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Sample records for nonsynonymous single nucleotide

  1. [Phenotype predictions of the pathogenic nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in deafness-causing gene COCH].

    PubMed

    Xuli, Qian; Xin, Cao

    2015-07-01

    The COCH (Coagulation factor C homology) gene, located in human chromosome 14q12-q13, is the first gene identified to cause vestibular dysfunction. COCH encodes cochlin, which contains an N-terminal LCCL (Limulus factor C, cochlin, and late gestation lung protein Lgl1) domain and a C-temimal vWFA (Von Willebrand factor type A) domain. Recently, functional research of COCH mutations and cochlin have come under the spotlight in the field of hereditary deafness. Approximately 16 mutations in COCH have been confirmed to date, among which 13 non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) are the most common form of genetic variations. Nonetheless, there is poor knowledge on the relationship between the genotype and the phenotype of the other nsSNPs in COCH. Here we analyzed deleterious nsSNPs from all SNPs in the COCH gene in the vWFA domain based on different computational methods and identified eight potential pathogenic nsSNPs (I176T, R180Q, G265E, V269L, I368N, I372T, R416C and Y424D) after combining literatures with 3D structures. Meanwhile, the protein structures of six reported pathogenic nsSNPs (P51S, G87W, I109N, I109T, W117R and F121S) in the LCCL domain have been constructed, and we identified aberrant structural changes in loops and chains. The prediction of pathogenic mutations for COCH nsSNPs will provide a blueprint for screening pathogenic mutations, and it will be beneficial to the functional research of COCH and cochlin in this field.

  2. Proteome-wide analysis of nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variations in active sites of human proteins.

    PubMed

    Dingerdissen, Hayley; Motwani, Mona; Karagiannis, Konstantinos; Simonyan, Vahan; Mazumder, Raja

    2013-03-01

    An enzyme's active site is essential to normal protein activity such that any disruptions at this site may lead to dysfunction and disease. Nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variations (nsSNVs), which alter the amino acid sequence, are one type of disruption that can alter the active site. When this occurs, it is assumed that enzyme activity will vary because of the criticality of the site to normal protein function. We integrate nsSNV data and active site annotations from curated resources to identify all active-site-impacting nsSNVs in the human genome and search for all pathways observed to be associated with this data set to assess the likely consequences. We find that there are 934 unique nsSNVs that occur at the active sites of 559 proteins. Analysis of the nsSNV data shows an over-representation of arginine and an under-representation of cysteine, phenylalanine and tyrosine when comparing the list of nsSNV-impacted active site residues with the list of all possible proteomic active site residues, implying a potential bias for or against variation of these residues at the active site. Clustering analysis shows an abundance of hydrolases and transferases. Pathway and functional analysis shows several pathways over- or under-represented in the data set, with the most significantly affected pathways involved in carbohydrate metabolism. We provide a table of 32 variation-substrate/product pairs that can be used in targeted metabolomics experiments to assay the effects of specific variations. In addition, we report the significant prevalence of aspartic acid to histidine variation in eight proteins associated with nine diseases including glycogen storage diseases, lacrimo-auriculo-dento-digital syndrome, Parkinson's disease and several cancers.

  3. In silico Evaluation of Nonsynonymous Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in the ADIPOQ Gene Associated with Diabetes, Obesity, and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Narayana Swamy, A; Valasala, Harika; Kamma, Sreenivasulu

    2015-01-01

    Background: The human ADIPOQ gene encodes adiponectin protein hormone, which is involved in regulating glucose levels as well as fatty acid breakdown. It is exclusively produced by adipose tissue and abundantly present in the circulation, with concentration of around 0.01% of total serum proteins, with important effect on metabolism. Methods: Most deleterious nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in the coding region of the ADIPOQ gene were investigated using SNP databases, and detected nonsynonymous variants were analyzed in silico from the standpoint of relevant protein function and stability by using SIFT, PolyPhen-2, PROVEAN and MUpro, I-Mutant2.0 tools, respectively. Result: A total of 58 nonsynonymous SNPs consisting of 55 missense variations, 3 nonsense variations were found in the ADIPOQ gene. Next, 14 of the 55 missense variants were predicted to be damaging or deleterious by three different software programs (PolyPhen-2, SIFT, and PROVEAN), and 38 of them were predicted to be less stable (I-Mutant 2.0 and MUpro software). Totally, 10 variants out of 55 missense variants were predicted to be both deleterious and reduce protein stability. Additionally, 3 nonsense variants were predicted to produce a truncated ADIPOQ protein. RMSD and total energy were calculated for 4 nsSNPs out of 10 nsSNPs which were both deleterious and showed a decrease in protein stability. Conclusion: rs144526209 has high root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) and lower total energy value compared to the native modeled structure. It was concluded that this nsSNP, potentially functional and polymorphic in the ADIPOQ gene, might be associated with diabetes, obesity, and inflammation. PMID:26306152

  4. Construction and assessment of individualized proteogenomic databases for large-scale analysis of nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants.

    PubMed

    Krug, Karsten; Popic, Sasa; Carpy, Alejandro; Taumer, Christoph; Macek, Boris

    2014-12-01

    Next-generation sequencing projects focusing on genomes and transcriptomes identify millions of single nucleotide variants (SNVs), many of which result in single amino acid substitutions. These nonsynonymous (ns) SNVs are typically not incorporated into protein sequence databases used to identify MS/MS data. Here, we perform a comparative analysis of the assembly of nsSNV-containing proteogenomic databases. We use a comprehensive transcriptome and proteome dataset of HeLa cells from the literature to derive and to incorporate SNVs into databases applicable to proteomics search engines, and to assess their performance in the identification of nsSNVs. We assemble the databases by (1) translation of SNV-containing transcripts into all possible reading frames, (2) translation of predicted reading frame, (3) prediction of nsSNVs and subsequent incorporation into canonical protein sequences. We show substantial differences between generated databases in terms of represented nsSNVs and theoretical search space, affecting sensitivity and specificity of database search. We query the databases with >2.2M high-resolution MS/MS spectra using MaxQuant software and identify 451 variant peptides, containing 401 nsSNVs. We conclude that prediction of reading frame and, if applicable, SNV effect result in comprehensive yet compact databases necessary to retain sensitivity in large-scale analysis of nsSNVs called from transcriptomics data. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Prioritization Of Nonsynonymous Single Nucleotide Variants For Exome Sequencing Studies Via Integrative Learning On Multiple Genomic Data

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mengmeng; Wu, Jiaxin; Chen, Ting; Jiang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    The rapid advancement of next generation sequencing technology has greatly accelerated the progress for understanding human inherited diseases via such innovations as exome sequencing. Nevertheless, the identification of causative variants from sequencing data remains a great challenge. Traditional statistical genetics approaches such as linkage analysis and association studies have limited power in analyzing exome sequencing data, while relying on simply filtration strategies and predicted functional implications of mutations to pinpoint pathogenic variants are prone to produce false positives. To overcome these limitations, we herein propose a supervised learning approach, termed snvForest, to prioritize candidate nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants for a specific type of disease by integrating 11 functional scores at the variant level and 8 association scores at the gene level. We conduct a series of large-scale in silico validation experiments, demonstrating the effectiveness of snvForest across 2,511 diseases of different inheritance styles and the superiority of our approach over two state-of-the-art methods. We further apply snvForest to three real exome sequencing data sets of epileptic encephalophathies and intellectual disability to show the ability of our approach to identify causative de novo mutations for these complex diseases. The online service and standalone software of snvForest are found at http://bioinfo.au.tsinghua.edu.cn/jianglab/snvforest. PMID:26459872

  6. Prioritization Of Nonsynonymous Single Nucleotide Variants For Exome Sequencing Studies Via Integrative Learning On Multiple Genomic Data.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mengmeng; Wu, Jiaxin; Chen, Ting; Jiang, Rui

    2015-10-13

    The rapid advancement of next generation sequencing technology has greatly accelerated the progress for understanding human inherited diseases via such innovations as exome sequencing. Nevertheless, the identification of causative variants from sequencing data remains a great challenge. Traditional statistical genetics approaches such as linkage analysis and association studies have limited power in analyzing exome sequencing data, while relying on simply filtration strategies and predicted functional implications of mutations to pinpoint pathogenic variants are prone to produce false positives. To overcome these limitations, we herein propose a supervised learning approach, termed snvForest, to prioritize candidate nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants for a specific type of disease by integrating 11 functional scores at the variant level and 8 association scores at the gene level. We conduct a series of large-scale in silico validation experiments, demonstrating the effectiveness of snvForest across 2,511 diseases of different inheritance styles and the superiority of our approach over two state-of-the-art methods. We further apply snvForest to three real exome sequencing data sets of epileptic encephalophathies and intellectual disability to show the ability of our approach to identify causative de novo mutations for these complex diseases. The online service and standalone software of snvForest are found at http://bioinfo.au.tsinghua.edu.cn/jianglab/snvforest.

  7. Prediction of the damage-associated non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in the human MC1R gene.

    PubMed

    Hepp, Diego; Gonçalves, Gislene Lopes; de Freitas, Thales Renato Ochotorena

    2015-01-01

    The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) is involved in the control of melanogenesis. Polymorphisms in this gene have been associated with variation in skin and hair color and with elevated risk for the development of melanoma. Here we used 11 computational tools based on different approaches to predict the damage-associated non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) in the coding region of the human MC1R gene. Among the 92 nsSNPs arranged according to the predictions 62% were classified as damaging in more than five tools. The classification was significantly correlated with the scores of two consensus programs. Alleles associated with the red hair color (RHC) phenotype and with the risk of melanoma were examined. The R variants D84E, R142H, R151C, I155T, R160W and D294H were classified as damaging by the majority of the tools while the r variants V60L, V92M and R163Q have been predicted as neutral in most of the programs The combination of the prediction tools results in 14 nsSNPs indicated as the most damaging mutations in MC1R (L48P, R67W, H70Y, P72L, S83P, R151H, S172I, L206P, T242I, G255R, P256S, C273Y, C289R and R306H); C273Y showed to be highly damaging in SIFT, Polyphen-2, MutPred, PANTHER and PROVEAN scores. The computational analysis proved capable of identifying the potentially damaging nsSNPs in MC1R, which are candidates for further laboratory studies of the functional and pharmacological significance of the alterations in the receptor and the phenotypic outcomes.

  8. Cellular signalling of non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms of the human μ-opioid receptor (OPRM1)

    PubMed Central

    Knapman, Alisa; Connor, Mark

    2015-01-01

    There is significant variability in individual responses to opioid drugs, which is likely to have a significant genetic component. A number of non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the coding regions of the μ-opioid receptor gene (OPRM1) have been postulated to contribute to this variability. Although many studies have investigated the clinical influences of these μ-opioid receptor variants, the outcomes are reported in the context of thousands of other genes and environmental factors, and we are no closer to being able to predict individual response to opioids based on genotype. Investigation of how μ-opioid receptor SNPs affect their expression, coupling to second messengers, desensitization and regulation is necessary to understand how subtle changes in receptor structure can impact individual responses to opioids. To date, the few functional studies that have investigated the consequences of SNPs on the signalling profile of the μ-opioid receptor in vitro have shown that the common N40D variant has altered functional responses to some opioids, while other, rarer, variants display altered signalling or agonist-dependent regulation. Here, we review the data available on the effects of μ-opioid receptor polymorphisms on receptor function, expression and regulation in vitro, and discuss the limitations of the studies to date. Whether or not μ-opioid receptor SNPs contribute to individual variability in opioid responses remains an open question, in large part because we have relatively little good data about how the amino acid changes affect μ-opioid receptor function. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24527749

  9. A non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphism associated with multiple sclerosis risk affects the EVI5 interactome

    PubMed Central

    Didonna, Alessandro; Isobe, Noriko; Caillier, Stacy J.; Li, Kathy H.; Burlingame, Alma L.; Hauser, Stephen L.; Baranzini, Sergio E.; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A.; Oksenberg, Jorge R.

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent progress in the characterization of genetic loci associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) risk, the ubiquitous linkage disequilibrium operating across the genome has stalled efforts to distinguish causative variants from proxy single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Here, we have identified through fine mapping and meta-analysis EVI5 as the most plausible disease risk gene within the 1p22.1 locus. We further show that an exonic SNP associated with risk induces changes in superficial hydrophobicity patterns of the coiled-coil domain of EVI5, which, in turns, affects the EVI5 interactome. Immunoprecipitation of wild-type and mutated EVI5 followed by mass spectrometry generated a roster of disease-specific interactors functionally linked to lipid metabolism. Among the exclusive binding partners of the risk variant, we describe the novel interaction with sphingosine 1-phosphate lyase (SGPL1)—a key enzyme for the creation of the sphingosine-1 phosphate gradient, which is relevant to the pathogenic process and therapeutic management of MS. PMID:26433934

  10. Impacts of Nonsynonymous Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms of Adiponectin Receptor 1 Gene on Corresponding Protein Stability: A Computational Approach

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Md. Abu; Solayman, Md.; Paul, Sudip; Saha, Moumoni; Khalil, Md. Ibrahim; Gan, Siew Hua

    2016-01-01

    Despite the reported association of adiponectin receptor 1 (ADIPOR1) gene mutations with vulnerability to several human metabolic diseases, there is lack of computational analysis on the functional and structural impacts of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the human ADIPOR1 at protein level. Therefore, sequence- and structure-based computational tools were employed in this study to functionally and structurally characterize the coding nsSNPs of ADIPOR1 gene listed in the dbSNP database. Our in silico analysis by SIFT, nsSNPAnalyzer, PolyPhen-2, Fathmm, I-Mutant 2.0, SNPs&GO, PhD-SNP, PANTHER, and SNPeffect tools identified the nsSNPs with distorting functional impacts, namely, rs765425383 (A348G), rs752071352 (H341Y), rs759555652 (R324L), rs200326086 (L224F), and rs766267373 (L143P) from 74 nsSNPs of ADIPOR1 gene. Finally the aforementioned five deleterious nsSNPs were introduced using Swiss-PDB Viewer package within the X-ray crystal structure of ADIPOR1 protein, and changes in free energy for these mutations were computed. Although increased free energy was observed for all the mutants, the nsSNP H341Y caused the highest energy increase amongst all. RMSD and TM scores predicted that mutants were structurally similar to wild type protein. Our analyses suggested that the aforementioned variants especially H341Y could directly or indirectly destabilize the amino acid interactions and hydrogen bonding networks of ADIPOR1. PMID:27294143

  11. Effects of individually silenced N-glycosylation sites and non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms on the fusogenic function of human syncytin-2

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Lina; Wang, Huiying; Lu, Xiaoyin; Wang, Rui; Zheng, Ru; Li, Yue; Yang, Xiaokui; Jia, Wen-Tong; Zhao, Yangyu; Wang, Yongqing; Wang, Haibin; Wang, Yan-Ling; Zhu, Cheng; Lin, Hai-Yan; Wang, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The placental syncytiotrophoblast, which is formed by the fusion of cytotrophoblast cells, is indispensable for the establishment and maintenance of normal pregnancy. The human endogenous retrovirus envelope glycoprotein syncytin-2 is the most important player in mediating trophoblast cell-cell fusion as a fusogen. We constructed expression plasmids of wild-type and 21 single-amino-acid substitution mutants of syncytin-2, including 10 N-glycosylation sites individually silenced by mutagenizing N to Q, 1 naturally occurring single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) N118S that introduced an N-glycosylation site, and another 10 non-synonymous SNPs located within important functional domains. We observed that syncytin-2 was highly fusogenic and that the mutants had different capacities in merging 293T cells. Of the 21 mutants, N133Q, N312Q, N443Q, C46R (in the CXXC motif) and R417H (in the heptad repeat region and immunosuppressive domain) lost their fusogenicity, whereas N332Q, N118S, T367M (in the fusion peptide), V483I (in the transmembrane domain) and T522M (in the cytoplasmic domain) enhanced the fusogenic activity. We also proved that N133, N146, N177, N220, N241, N247, N312, N332 and N443 were all glycosylated in 293T cells. A co-immunoprecipitation assay showed compromised interaction between mutants N443Q, C46R, T367M, R417H and the receptor MFSD2A, whereas N118S was associated with more receptors. We also sequenced the coding sequence of syncytin-2 in 125 severe pre-eclamptic patients and 272 normal pregnant Chinese women. Surprisingly, only 1 non-synonymous SNP T522M was found and the frequencies of heterozygous carriers were not significantly different. Taken together, our results suggest that N-glycans at residues 133, 312, 332 and 443 of syncytin-2 are required for optimal fusion induction, and that SNPs C46R, N118S, T367M, R417H, V483I and T522M can alter the fusogenic function of syncytin-2. PMID:26853155

  12. Effects of individually silenced N-glycosylation sites and non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms on the fusogenic function of human syncytin-2.

    PubMed

    Cui, Lina; Wang, Huiying; Lu, Xiaoyin; Wang, Rui; Zheng, Ru; Li, Yue; Yang, Xiaokui; Jia, Wen-Tong; Zhao, Yangyu; Wang, Yongqing; Wang, Haibin; Wang, Yan-Ling; Zhu, Cheng; Lin, Hai-Yan; Wang, Hongmei

    2016-03-03

    The placental syncytiotrophoblast, which is formed by the fusion of cytotrophoblast cells, is indispensable for the establishment and maintenance of normal pregnancy. The human endogenous retrovirus envelope glycoprotein syncytin-2 is the most important player in mediating trophoblast cell-cell fusion as a fusogen. We constructed expression plasmids of wild-type and 21 single-amino-acid substitution mutants of syncytin-2, including 10 N-glycosylation sites individually silenced by mutagenizing N to Q, 1 naturally occurring single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) N118S that introduced an N-glycosylation site, and another 10 non-synonymous SNPs located within important functional domains. We observed that syncytin-2 was highly fusogenic and that the mutants had different capacities in merging 293T cells. Of the 21 mutants, N133Q, N312Q, N443Q, C46R (in the CXXC motif) and R417H (in the heptad repeat region and immunosuppressive domain) lost their fusogenicity, whereas N332Q, N118S, T367M (in the fusion peptide), V483I (in the transmembrane domain) and T522M (in the cytoplasmic domain) enhanced the fusogenic activity. We also proved that N133, N146, N177, N220, N241, N247, N312, N332 and N443 were all glycosylated in 293T cells. A co-immunoprecipitation assay showed compromised interaction between mutants N443Q, C46R, T367M, R417H and the receptor MFSD2A, whereas N118S was associated with more receptors. We also sequenced the coding sequence of syncytin-2 in 125 severe pre-eclamptic patients and 272 normal pregnant Chinese women. Surprisingly, only 1 non-synonymous SNP T522M was found and the frequencies of heterozygous carriers were not significantly different. Taken together, our results suggest that N-glycans at residues 133, 312, 332 and 443 of syncytin-2 are required for optimal fusion induction, and that SNPs C46R, N118S, T367M, R417H, V483I and T522M can alter the fusogenic function of syncytin-2.

  13. Non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in the watermelon eIF4E gene are closely associated with resistance to zucchini yellow mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Ling, Kai-Shu; Harris, Karen R; Meyer, Jenelle D F; Levi, Amnon; Guner, Nihat; Wehner, Todd C; Bendahmane, Abdelhafid; Havey, Michael J

    2009-12-01

    Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) is one of the most economically important potyviruses infecting cucurbit crops worldwide. Using a candidate gene approach, we cloned and sequenced eIF4E and eIF(iso)4E gene segments in watermelon. Analysis of the nucleotide sequences between the ZYMV-resistant watermelon plant introduction PI 595203 (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus) and the ZYMV-susceptible watermelon cultivar 'New Hampshire Midget' ('NHM') showed the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Initial analysis of the identified SNPs in association studies indicated that SNPs in the eIF4E, but not eIF(iso)4E, were closely associated to the phenotype of ZYMV-resistance in 70 F(2) and 114 BC(1R) progenies. Subsequently, we focused our efforts in obtaining the entire genomic sequence of watermelon eIF4E. Three SNPs were identified between PI 595203 and NHM. One of the SNPs (A241C) was in exon 1 and the other two SNPs (C309A and T554G) were in the first intron of the gene. SNP241 which resulted in an amino acid substitution (proline to threonine) was shown to be located in the critical cap recognition and binding area, similar to that of several plant species resistance to potyviruses. Analysis of a cleaved amplified polymorphism sequence (CAPS) marker derived from this SNP in F(2) and BC(1R) populations demonstrated a cosegregation between the CAPS-2 marker and their ZYMV resistance or susceptibility phenotype. When we investigated whether such SNP mutation in the eIF4E was also conserved in several other PIs of C. lanatus var. citroides, we identified a different SNP (A171G) resulting in another amino acid substitution (D71G) from four ZYMV-resistant C. lanatus var. citroides (PI 244018, PI 482261, PI 482299, and PI 482322). Additional CAPS markers were also identified. Availability of all these CAPS markers will enable marker-aided breeding of watermelon for ZYMV resistance.

  14. Non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in the watermelon eIF4E gene are closely associated with resistance to Zucchini yellow mosaic virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) is one of the most economically important potyviruses infecting cucurbit crops worldwide. Using a candidate gene approach, we cloned and sequenced eIF4E and eIF(iso)4E gene segments in watermelon. Analysis of the nucleotide sequences between the ZYMV-resistant wa...

  15. Large-scale mass spectrometric detection of variant peptides resulting from non-synonymous nucleotide differences

    PubMed Central

    Sheynkman, Gloria M.; Shortreed, Michael R.; Frey, Brian L.; Scalf, Mark; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2013-01-01

    Each individual carries thousands of non-synonymous single nucleotide variants (nsSNVs) in their genome, each corresponding to a single amino acid polymorphism (SAP) in the encoded proteins. It is important to be able to directly detect and quantify these variations at the protein level in order to study post-transcriptional regulation, differential allelic expression, and other important biological processes. However, such variant peptides are not generally detected in standard proteomic analyses, due to their absence from the generic databases that are employed for mass spectrometry searching. Here, we extend previous work that demonstrated the use of customized SAP databases constructed from sample-matched RNA-Seq data. We collected deep coverage RNA-Seq data from the Jurkat cell line, compiled the set of nsSNVs that are expressed, used this information to construct a customized SAP database, and searched it against deep coverage shotgun MS data obtained from the same sample. This approach enabled detection of 421 SAP peptides mapping to 395 nsSNVs. We compared these peptides to peptides identified from a large generic search database containing all known nsSNVs (dbSNP) and found that more than 70% of the SAP peptides from this dbSNP-derived search were not supported by the RNA-Seq data, and thus are likely false positives. Next, we increased the SAP coverage from the RNA-Seq derived database by utilizing multiple protease digestions, thereby increasing variant detection to 695 SAP peptides mapping to 504 nsSNV sites. These detected SAP peptides corresponded to moderate to high abundance transcripts (30+ transcripts per million, TPM). The SAP peptides included 192 allelic pairs; the relative expression levels of the two alleles were evaluated for 51 of those pairs, and found to be comparable in all cases. PMID:24175627

  16. A non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphism in the gene encoding Toll-like Receptor 3 (TLR3) is associated with sero-negative rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in a Danish population.

    PubMed

    Laska, Magdalena J; Hansen, Bettina; Troldborg, Anne; Lorenzen, Tove; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian; Junker, Peter; Nexø, Bjørn A; Lindegaard, Hanne M

    2014-10-10

    It has been suggested that polymorphisms in Toll-like Receptors (TLRs) are associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), but the implicated alleles have differed between studies. The aim of this investigation was to explore whether polymorphisms of TLR genes are associated with RA in a predominantly Caucasian population from Denmark using a case-control approach. DNA samples (3 university hospital outpatient clinics) were obtained from patients with RA (n = 704) and healthy controls (n = 639) in a Danish population. TLR single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected based on the previously reported associations with chronic autoimmune diseases. Genotyping for the TLR SNPs was performed using Sequenom Multiplex technology.We identified one SNP in TLR3, [(rs3775291, P = 0.02, OR (95% CI) 1.31 (1.1087-1.5493)] significantly associated with the whole RA cohort. Subgroup analysis according to IgM rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-cyclic citrinullated peptide (CCP) status suggested a significant association of sero-negative RA with the rs3775291 A allele and disease activity in this subset. These observations on a RA population of Danish ancestry suggest that variations in the TLR3 locus may be implicated in the pathogenesis of sero-negative RA. Since this TLR3 SNP has previously been associated with systemic lupus erythematous (SLE), the present findings support the notion that TLR3 genetic variants may represent a common risk factor in different chronic inflammatory conditions, including RA and SLE.

  17. Association of Novel Nonsynonymous Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in ampD with Cephalosporin Resistance and Phylogenetic Variations in ampC, ampR, ompF, and ompC in Enterobacter cloacae Isolates That Are Highly Resistant to Carbapenems.

    PubMed

    Babouee Flury, Baharak; Ellington, Matthew J; Hopkins, Katie L; Turton, Jane F; Doumith, Michel; Loy, Richard; Staves, Peter; Hinic, Vladimira; Frei, Reno; Woodford, Neil

    2016-04-01

    InEnterobacter cloacae, the genetic lesions associated with derepression of the AmpC β-lactamase include diverse single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and/or indels in theampDandampRgenes and SNPs inampC, while diverse SNPs in the promoter region or SNPs/indels within the coding sequence of outer membrane proteins have been described to alter porin production leading to carbapenem resistance. We sought to define the underlying mechanisms conferring cephalosporin and carbapenem resistance in a collection ofE. cloacaeisolates with unusually high carbapenem resistance and no known carbapenemase and, in contrast to many previous studies, considered the SNPs we detected in relation to the multilocus sequence type (MLST)-based phylogeny of our collection. Whole-genome sequencing was applied on the most resistant isolates to seek novel carbapenemases, expression ofampCwas measured by reverse transcriptase PCR, and porin translation was detected by SDS-PAGE. SNPs occurring inampC,ampR,ompF, andompCgenes (and their promoter regions) were mostly phylogenetic variations, relating to the isolates' sequence types, whereas nonsynonymous SNPs inampDwere associated with derepression of AmpC and cephalosporin resistance. The additional loss of porins resulted in high-level carbapenem resistance, underlining the clinical importance of chromosomal mutations among carbapenem-resistantE. cloacae.

  18. Association of Novel Nonsynonymous Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in ampD with Cephalosporin Resistance and Phylogenetic Variations in ampC, ampR, ompF, and ompC in Enterobacter cloacae Isolates That Are Highly Resistant to Carbapenems

    PubMed Central

    Ellington, Matthew J.; Hopkins, Katie L.; Turton, Jane F.; Doumith, Michel; Loy, Richard; Staves, Peter; Hinic, Vladimira; Frei, Reno; Woodford, Neil

    2016-01-01

    In Enterobacter cloacae, the genetic lesions associated with derepression of the AmpC β-lactamase include diverse single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and/or indels in the ampD and ampR genes and SNPs in ampC, while diverse SNPs in the promoter region or SNPs/indels within the coding sequence of outer membrane proteins have been described to alter porin production leading to carbapenem resistance. We sought to define the underlying mechanisms conferring cephalosporin and carbapenem resistance in a collection of E. cloacae isolates with unusually high carbapenem resistance and no known carbapenemase and, in contrast to many previous studies, considered the SNPs we detected in relation to the multilocus sequence type (MLST)-based phylogeny of our collection. Whole-genome sequencing was applied on the most resistant isolates to seek novel carbapenemases, expression of ampC was measured by reverse transcriptase PCR, and porin translation was detected by SDS-PAGE. SNPs occurring in ampC, ampR, ompF, and ompC genes (and their promoter regions) were mostly phylogenetic variations, relating to the isolates' sequence types, whereas nonsynonymous SNPs in ampD were associated with derepression of AmpC and cephalosporin resistance. The additional loss of porins resulted in high-level carbapenem resistance, underlining the clinical importance of chromosomal mutations among carbapenem-resistant E. cloacae. PMID:26856839

  19. The Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Michael

    2003-01-01

    I want to discuss both the Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Consortium and the Human Genome Project. I am afraid most of my presentation will be thin on law and possibly too high on rhetoric. Having been engaged in a personal and direct way with these issues as a trained scientist, I find it quite difficult to be always as objective as I ought to be.

  20. The Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Michael

    2003-01-01

    I want to discuss both the Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Consortium and the Human Genome Project. I am afraid most of my presentation will be thin on law and possibly too high on rhetoric. Having been engaged in a personal and direct way with these issues as a trained scientist, I find it quite difficult to be always as objective as I ought to be.

  1. Inter-individual variation in nucleotide excision repair pathway is modulated by non-synonymous polymorphisms in ERCC4 and MBD4 genes.

    PubMed

    Allione, Alessandra; Guarrera, Simonetta; Russo, Alessia; Ricceri, Fulvio; Purohit, Rituraj; Pagnani, Andrea; Rosa, Fabio; Polidoro, Silvia; Voglino, Floriana; Matullo, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Inter-individual differences in DNA repair capacity (DRC) may lead to genome instability and, consequently, modulate individual cancer risk. Among the different DNA repair pathways, nucleotide excision repair (NER) is one of the most versatile, as it can eliminate a wide range of helix-distorting DNA lesions caused by ultraviolet light irradiation and chemical mutagens. We performed a genotype-phenotype correlation study in 122 healthy subjects in order to assess if any associations exist between phenotypic profiles of NER and DNA repair gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Individuals were genotyped for 768 SNPs with a custom Illumina Golden Gate Assay, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of the same subjects were tested for a NER comet assay to measure DRC after challenging cells by benzo(a)pyrene diolepoxide (BPDE). We observed a large inter-individual variability of NER capacity, with women showing a statistically significant lower DRC (mean ± SD: 6.68 ± 4.76; p = 0.004) than men (mean ± SD: 8.89 ± 5.20). Moreover, DRC was significantly lower in individuals carrying a variant allele for the ERCC4 rs1800124 non-synonymous SNP (nsSNP) (p = 0.006) and significantly higher in subjects with the variant allele of MBD4 rs2005618 SNP (p = 0.008), in linkage disequilibrium (r(2) = 0.908) with rs10342 nsSNP. Traditional in silico docking approaches on protein-DNA and protein-protein interaction showed that Gly875 variant in ERCC4 (rs1800124) decreases the DNA-protein interaction and that Ser273 and Thr273 variants in MBD4 (rs10342) indicate complete loss of protein-DNA interactions. Our results showed that NER inter-individual capacity can be modulated by cross-talk activity involving nsSNPs in ERCC4 and MBD4 genes, and they suggested to better investigate SNP effect on cancer risk and response to chemo- and radiotherapies.

  2. Identifying single nucleotides by tunnelling current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Taniguchi, Masateru; Yokota, Kazumichi; Kawai, Tomoji

    2010-04-01

    A major goal in medical research is to develop a DNA sequencing technique that is capable of reading an entire human genome at low cost. Recently, it was proposed that DNA sequencing could be performed by measuring the electron transport properties of the individual nucleotides in a DNA molecule. Here, we report electrical detection of single nucleotides using two configurable nanoelectrodes and show that electron transport through single nucleotides occurs by tunnelling. We also demonstrate statistical identification of the nucleotides based on their electrical conductivity, thereby providing an experimental basis for a DNA sequencing technology based on measurements of electron transport.

  3. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Liang, Yuting; Li, Hong; Li, Haibo; He, Quanze; Xue, Ying; Shen, Cong; Zhang, Chunhua; Xiang, Jingjing; Ding, Jie; Qiao, Longwei; Zheng, Qiping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Osteoarthritis (OA) is a complex disorder characterized by degenerative articular cartilage and is largely attributed to genetic risk factors. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are common DNA variants that have shown promising and efficiency, compared with positional cloning, to map candidate genes of complex diseases, including OA. In this study, we aim to provide an overview of multiple SNPs from a number of genes that have recently been linked to OA susceptibility. We also performed a comprehensive meta-analysis to evaluate the association of SNP rs7639618 of double von Willebrand factor A domains (DVWA) gene with OA susceptibility. A systematic search of studies on the association of SNPs with susceptibility to OA was conducted in PubMed and Google scholar. Studies subjected to meta-analysis include human and case-control studies that met the Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium model and provide sufficient data to calculate an odds ratio (OR). A total of 9500 OA cases and 9365 controls in 7 case-control studies relating to SNP rs7639618 were included in this study and the ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Over 50 SNPs from different genes have been shown to be associated with either hip (23), or knee (20), or both (13) OA. The ORs of these SNPs for OA and the subtypes are not consistent. As to SNP rs7639618 of DVWA, increased knee OA risk was observed in all genetic models analyzed. Specifically, people from Asian with G-allele showed significantly increased risk of knee OA (A versus G: OR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.13–1.46; AA versus GG: OR = 1.60, 95% CI 1.25–2.05; GA versus GG: OR = 1.31, 95% CI 1.18–1.44; AA versus GA+GG: OR = 1.34, 95% CI 1.12–1.61; AA+GA versus GG: OR = 1.40, 95% CI 1.19–1.64), but not in Caucasians or with hip OA. Our results suggest that multiple SNPs play different roles in the pathogenesis of OA and its subtypes; SNP rs7639618 of DVWA gene is associated with a significantly increased

  4. Small Effective Population Sizes and Rare Nonsynonymous Variants in Potyviruses

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Austin L.

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of nucleotide sequence polymorphism in complete genomes of 12 species of potyviruses (single-stranded, positive-sense RNA viruses, family Potyviridae) revealed evidence that long-term effective population sizes of these viruses are on the order of 104. Comparison of nucleotide diversity in non-coding regions and at synonymous and nonsynonymous sites in coding regions showed that purifying selection has acted to eliminate numerous deleterious mutations both at nonsynonymous sites and in non-coding regions. The ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous polymorphic sites increased as a function of the number of genomes sampled, whereas mean gene diversity at nonsynonymous polymorphic sites decreased with increasing sample size at a substantially faster rate than does mean gene diversity at synonymous polymorphic sites. Very similar relationships were observed both in available genomic sequences of 12 potyvirus species and in subsets created by randomly sampling from among 98 TuMV genomes. Taken together, these observations imply that a greater proportion of nonsynonymous than of synonymous variants are relatively rare as the result of ongoing purifying selection, and thus many nonsynonymous variants are unlikely to be discovered without extensive sampling. PMID:19695658

  5. Analysis of VH gene diversity in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss): both nonsynonymous and synonymous nucleotide changes are more frequent in CDRs than in FRs.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, T; Andersson, E

    1997-01-01

    Forty-six immunoglobulin VH gene sequences of rainbow trout were compiled to analyze the extent of variations and the frequency of nucleotide changes in CDRs and FRs. The results show that the frequency of nonsynonymous (amino acid replacing) changes (Ka) are on average 4.9 times higher in complementarity determining regions (CDRs) than in FRs, thus contributing more diversity in CDRs. Unexpectedly, however, the frequency of synonymous (silent) changes (Ks) show the same tendency: it was 5.3 times higher in CDRs than in framework regions (FRs). The distribution of Ks/Ka ratios of each comparison shows no segregation between CDRs and FRs. The same analysis applied to five germline VH genes of Heterodontus francisci shows the same result as was found with the rainbow trout. In contrast, the results from mouse data show that, while the CDR/FR ratio for Ka is much higher (7.4), the CDR/FR ratio for Ks is only slightly higher (1.8). The distribution of Ks/Ka ratios in mouse indicates clear segregation between CDRs and FRs. This suggests that CDR germline diversity is largely generated by gene conversion in VHs of lower vertebrates such as rainbow trout or shark. This mechanism might be advantageous to lower vertebrates in generating V gene diversity faster than other mechanisms such as point mutation and selection.

  6. [Identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms in centenarians].

    PubMed

    Gambini, Juan; Gimeno-Mallench, Lucía; Inglés, Marta; Olaso, Gloria; Abdelaziz, Kheira Mohamed; Avellana, Juan Antonio; Belenguer, Ángel; Cruz, Raquel; Mas-Bargues, Cristina; Borras, Consuelo; Viña, José

    2016-01-01

    Longevity is determined by genetic and external factors, such as nutritional, environmental, social, etc. Nevertheless, when living conditions are optimal, longevity is determined by genetic variations between individuals. In a same population, with relative genotypic homogeneity, subtle changes in the DNA sequence affecting a single nucleotide can be observed. These changes, called single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) are present in 1-5% of the population. A total of 92 subjects were recruited, including 28 centenarians and 64 controls, in order to find SNP that maybe implicated in the extreme longevity, as in the centenarians. Blood samples were collected to isolate and amplify the DNA in order to perform the analysis of SPN by Axiom™ Genotyping of Affymetrix technology. Statistical analyses were performed using the Plink program and libraries SNPassoc and skatMeta. Our results show 12 mutations with a p<.001, where 5 of these (DACH1, LOC91948, BTB16, NFIL3 y HDAC4) have regulatory functions of the expressions of others genes. Therefore, these results suggest that the genetic variation between centenarians and controls occurs in five genes that are involved in the regulation of gene expression to adapt to environmental changes better than controls. Copyright © 2015 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Collective judgment predicts disease-associated single nucleotide variants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent years the number of human genetic variants deposited into the publicly available databases has been increasing exponentially. The latest version of dbSNP, for example, contains ~50 million validated Single Nucleotide Variants (SNVs). SNVs make up most of human variation and are often the primary causes of disease. The non-synonymous SNVs (nsSNVs) result in single amino acid substitutions and may affect protein function, often causing disease. Although several methods for the detection of nsSNV effects have already been developed, the consistent increase in annotated data is offering the opportunity to improve prediction accuracy. Results Here we present a new approach for the detection of disease-associated nsSNVs (Meta-SNP) that integrates four existing methods: PANTHER, PhD-SNP, SIFT and SNAP. We first tested the accuracy of each method using a dataset of 35,766 disease-annotated mutations from 8,667 proteins extracted from the SwissVar database. The four methods reached overall accuracies of 64%-76% with a Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.38-0.53. We then used the outputs of these methods to develop a machine learning based approach that discriminates between disease-associated and polymorphic variants (Meta-SNP). In testing, the combined method reached 79% overall accuracy and 0.59 MCC, ~3% higher accuracy and ~0.05 higher correlation with respect to the best-performing method. Moreover, for the hardest-to-define subset of nsSNVs, i.e. variants for which half of the predictors disagreed with the other half, Meta-SNP attained 8% higher accuracy than the best predictor. Conclusions Here we find that the Meta-SNP algorithm achieves better performance than the best single predictor. This result suggests that the methods used for the prediction of variant-disease associations are orthogonal, encoding different biologically relevant relationships. Careful combination of predictions from various resources is therefore a good strategy

  8. Single nucleotide polymorphisms and suicidal behaviour.

    PubMed

    Pregelj, Peter

    2012-09-01

    The World Health Organization estimates that almost one million deaths each year are attributable to suicide, and suicide attempt is close to 10 times more common than suicide completion. Suicidal behaviour has multiple causes that are broadly divided into proximal stressors or triggers and predisposition such as genetic. It is also known that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) occur throughout a human DNA influencing the structure, quantity and the function of proteins and other molecules. Abnormalities of the serotonergic system were observed in suicide victims. Beside 5-HT1A and other serotonin receptors most studied are the serotonin transporter 5' functional promoter variant, and monoamine oxidase A and the tryptophan-hydroxylase 1 and 2 (TPH) polymorphisms. It seems that especially genes regulating serotoninergic system and neuronal systems involved in stress response are associated with suicidal behaviour. Most genetic studies on suicidal behaviour have considered a small set of functional polymorphisms relevant mostly to monoaminergic neurotransmission. However, genes involved in regulation of other factors such as brain-derived neurotropic factor seems to be even more relevant for further research.

  9. A new single nucleotide polymorphism in the ryanodine gene of chicken skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Droval, A A; Binneck, E; Marin, S R R; Paião, F G; Oba, A; Nepomuceno, A L; Shimokomaki, M

    2012-04-03

    Some genes affect meat quality in chickens. We looked for polymorphisms in the Gallus gallus α-RyR gene (homologous to RyR 1) that could be associated with PSE (pale, soft and exudative) meat. Because RyR genes are over 100,000 bp long and code for proteins with about 5000 amino acids, primers were designed to amplify a fragment of hotspot region 2, a region with a high density of mutations in other species. Total blood DNA was extracted from 50 birds, 25 that had PSE meat and 25 normal chickens. The DNA samples were amplified by PCR, cloned, sequenced, and used to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The amplified fragment of α-RyR was 604 nucleotides in length; 181 nucleotides were similar to two exons from a hypothetical turkey cDNA sequence for α-RyR. A non-synonymous nucleotide substitution (G/A) was identified in at least one of the three sequenced clones obtained from nine animals, six PSE (HAL+) birds and three normal (HAL-) birds; they were heterozygous for this mutation. This SNP causes a change from Val to Met in the α-RYR protein. Since the frequencies of this SNP were not significantly different in the PSE versus normal chickens, it appears that this mutation (in heterozygosity) does not alter the structure or function of the muscle protein, making it an inappropriate candidate as a genetic marker for PSE meat.

  10. CHASM and SNVBox: toolkit for detecting biologically important single nucleotide mutations in cancer.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wing Chung; Kim, Dewey; Carter, Hannah; Diekhans, Mark; Ryan, Michael C; Karchin, Rachel

    2011-08-01

    Thousands of cancer exomes are currently being sequenced, yielding millions of non-synonymous single nucleotide variants (SNVs) of possible relevance to disease etiology. Here, we provide a software toolkit to prioritize SNVs based on their predicted contribution to tumorigenesis. It includes a database of precomputed, predictive features covering all positions in the annotated human exome and can be used either stand-alone or as part of a larger variant discovery pipeline. MySQL database, source code and binaries freely available for academic/government use at http://wiki.chasmsoftware.org, Source in Python and C++. Requires 32 or 64-bit Linux system (tested on Fedora Core 8,10,11 and Ubuntu 10), 2.5*≤ Python <3.0*, MySQL server >5.0, 60 GB available hard disk space (50 MB for software and data files, 40 GB for MySQL database dump when uncompressed), 2 GB of RAM.

  11. Single-nucleotide polymorphism discovery by targeted DNA photocleavage.

    PubMed

    Hart, Jonathan R; Johnson, Martin D; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2004-09-28

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms are the largest source of genetic variation in humans. We report a method for the discovery of single-nucleotide polymorphisms within genomic DNA. Pooled genomic samples are amplified, denatured, and annealed to generate mismatches at polymorphic DNA sites. Upon photoactivation, these DNA mismatches are then cleaved site-specifically by using a small molecular probe, a bulky metallointercalator, Rhchrysi or Rhphzi. Fluorescent labeling of the cleaved products and separation by capillary electrophoresis permits rapid identification with single-base resolution of the single-nucleotide polymorphism site. This method is remarkably sensitive and minor allele frequencies as low as 5% can be readily detected.

  12. Time-resolved FRET for single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreoni, Alessandra; Nardo, Luca; Bondani, Maria

    2009-05-01

    By tens-of-picosecond resolved fluorescence detection (TCSPC, time-correlated single-photon counting) we study Förster resonance energy transfer between a donor and a black-hole-quencher acceptor bound at the 5'- and 3'-positions of a synthetic DNA oligonucleotide. This dual labelled oligonucleotide is annealed with either the complementary sequence or with sequences that mimic single-nucleotide polymorphic gene sequences: they differ in one nucleotide at positions near either the ends or the center of the oligonucleotide. We find donor fluorescence decay times whose values are definitely distinct and discuss the feasibility of single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping by this method.

  13. Single strand conformation polymorphism is a sensitive method for screening nucleotide variations in Mycosphaerella graminicola.

    PubMed

    Siah, A; Tisserant, B; El Chartouni, L; Deweer, C; Roisin-Fichter, C; Sanssené, J; Durand, R; Reignault, Ph; Halama, P

    2010-01-01

    Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism (SSCP) and sequencing were performed in order to assess molecular polymorphism of mating type sequences in the heterothallic ascomycete Mycosphaerella graminicola, the causal agent of Septoria tritici blotch of wheat. The screening was undertaken on mat1-1 and mat1-2 partial sequences of 341 and 657 bp, respectively, amplified with multiplex PCR from 510 French single-conidial strains plus the two reference isolates IPO323 and IPO94269 from The Netherlands. After restriction with Taq1 in order to reduce the fragment sizes, all digested amplicons were subjected to SSCP. Sequencing was then performed when a SSCP pattern deviates from the most frequently occurring profile. Among the assessed strains, 228 ones plus IPO323 were MAT1-1 and 282 ones plus IPO94269 were MAT1-2. Among the MAT1-1 strains, only a single one exhibited a SSCP profile distinct to the other MAT1-1 strains, whereas 10 MAT1-2 strains (among which 2 and 4 with same profiles, respectively) showed a SSCP profile differing to the other MAT1-2 strains. Sequencing revealed that all polymorphisms observed on SSCP gels were single nucleotide variations and all strains displaying the same SSCP profiles showed identical nucleotide sequences. Among the seven disclosed nucleotide variations, only two were non-synonymous and both were non-conservative. This study reports a high sensitivity of SSCP allowing detection of single point mutations in M. graminicola, shows a conservation of mating type idiomorphs in the fungus at both sequence and population scales, but also suggests a difference in polymorphism level between the two mating type sequences.

  14. HPLC purification of RNA aptamers up to 59 nucleotides with single-nucleotide resolution.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhen; Lin, Chi-Yen; Jaremko, William; Niu, Li

    2015-01-01

    An RNA sample is usually heterogeneous. RNA heterogeneity refers to difference in length or size (i.e., number of nucleotides [nt]), sequence, or alternative but coexisting conformations. Separation and purification of RNA is generally required for investigating the structure and function of RNA, such as RNA catalysis and RNA structure determination by nuclear magnetic resonance or crystallography. Separation and purification of RNA is also required for using RNAs as functional probes and therapeutics as well as building blocks for RNA nanoparticles. Previously established protocols are limited in separating RNAs longer than 25 nt by single-nucleotide resolution. When the length of RNAs becomes longer, single-nucleotide separation of RNAs becomes more challenging. Here we describe protocols, by the use of ion-pair, reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), to extend our ability to separate regular RNAs up to 59 nt with single-nucleotide resolution. For chemically modified RNAs at 2' positions on the ribose, we can resolve RNAs of similar sizes even with a 26 Da difference. This is much less than 320 Da, an average single-nucleotide molecular weight difference.

  15. Compositions and methods for detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, Hsin-Chih; Werner, James; Martinez, Jennifer S.

    2016-11-22

    Described herein are nucleic acid based probes and methods for discriminating and detecting single nucleotide variants in nucleic acid molecules (e.g., DNA). The methods include use of a pair of probes can be used to detect and identify polymorphisms, for example single nucleotide polymorphism in DNA. The pair of probes emit a different fluorescent wavelength of light depending on the association and alignment of the probes when hybridized to a target nucleic acid molecule. Each pair of probes is capable of discriminating at least two different nucleic acid molecules that differ by at least a single nucleotide difference. The methods can probes can be used, for example, for detection of DNA polymorphisms that are indicative of a particular disease or condition.

  16. Human brain harbors single nucleotide somatic variations in functionally relevant genes possibly mediated by oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anchal; Pandey, Rajesh; Rehman, Rakhshinda; Mehani, Bharati; Varma, Binuja; Desiraju, Bapu K.; Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Agrawal, Anurag; Mukhopadhyay, Arijit

    2017-01-01

    Somatic variation in DNA can cause cells to deviate from the preordained genomic path in both disease and healthy conditions. Here, using exome sequencing of paired tissue samples, we show that the normal human brain harbors somatic single base variations measuring up to 0.48% of the total variations. Interestingly, about 64% of these somatic variations in the brain are expected to lead to non-synonymous changes, and as much as 87% of these represent G:C>T:A transversion events. Further, the transversion events in the brain were mostly found in the frontal cortex, whereas the corpus callosum from the same individuals harbors the reference genotype. We found a significantly higher amount of 8-OHdG (oxidative stress marker) in the frontal cortex compared to the corpus callosum of the same subjects (p<0.01), correlating with the higher G:C>T:A transversions in the cortex. We found significant enrichment for axon guidance and related pathways for genes harbouring somatic variations. This could represent either a directed selection of genetic variations in these pathways or increased susceptibility of some loci towards oxidative stress. This study highlights that oxidative stress possibly influence single nucleotide somatic variations in normal human brain. PMID:28149503

  17. Human brain harbors single nucleotide somatic variations in functionally relevant genes possibly mediated by oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anchal; Ansari, Asgar Hussain; Kumari, Renu; Pandey, Rajesh; Rehman, Rakhshinda; Mehani, Bharati; Varma, Binuja; Desiraju, Bapu K; Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Agrawal, Anurag; Mukhopadhyay, Arijit

    2016-01-01

    Somatic variation in DNA can cause cells to deviate from the preordained genomic path in both disease and healthy conditions. Here, using exome sequencing of paired tissue samples, we show that the normal human brain harbors somatic single base variations measuring up to 0.48% of the total variations. Interestingly, about 64% of these somatic variations in the brain are expected to lead to non-synonymous changes, and as much as 87% of these represent G:C>T:A transversion events. Further, the transversion events in the brain were mostly found in the frontal cortex, whereas the corpus callosum from the same individuals harbors the reference genotype. We found a significantly higher amount of 8-OHdG (oxidative stress marker) in the frontal cortex compared to the corpus callosum of the same subjects (p<0.01), correlating with the higher G:C>T:A transversions in the cortex. We found significant enrichment for axon guidance and related pathways for genes harbouring somatic variations. This could represent either a directed selection of genetic variations in these pathways or increased susceptibility of some loci towards oxidative stress. This study highlights that oxidative stress possibly influence single nucleotide somatic variations in normal human brain.

  18. Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism of PPARγ, a Protein at the Crossroads of Physiological and Pathological Processes.

    PubMed

    Petrosino, Maria; Lori, Laura; Pasquo, Alessandra; Lori, Clorinda; Consalvi, Valerio; Minicozzi, Velia; Morante, Silvia; Laghezza, Antonio; Giorgi, Alessandra; Capelli, Davide; Chiaraluce, Roberta

    2017-02-10

    Genome polymorphisms are responsible for phenotypic differences between humans and for individual susceptibility to genetic diseases and therapeutic responses. Non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) lead to protein variants with a change in the amino acid sequence that may affect the structure and/or function of the protein and may be utilized as efficient structural and functional markers of association to complex diseases. This study is focused on nsSNP variants of the ligand binding domain of PPARγ a nuclear receptor in the superfamily of ligand inducible transcription factors that play an important role in regulating lipid metabolism and in several processes ranging from cellular differentiation and development to carcinogenesis. Here we selected nine nsSNPs variants of the PPARγ ligand binding domain, V290M, R357A, R397C, F360L, P467L, Q286P, R288H, E324K, and E460K, expressed in cancer tissues and/or associated with partial lipodystrophy and insulin resistance. The effects of a single amino acid change on the thermodynamic stability of PPARγ, its spectral properties, and molecular dynamics have been investigated. The nsSNPs PPARγ variants show alteration of dynamics and tertiary contacts that impair the correct reciprocal positioning of helices 3 and 12, crucially important for PPARγ functioning.

  19. Impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms in HBB gene causing haemoglobinopathies: in silico analysis.

    PubMed

    George Priya Doss, C; Rao, Sethumadhavan

    2009-04-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are being intensively studied to understand the biological basis of complex traits and diseases. Deleterious mutations of the human beta-globin gene (HBB) are responsible for beta-thalassaemia and other haemoglobinopathies, which are the most common genetic diseases of blood. Single amino acid substitutions in the globin chain are the commonest forms of haemoglobinopathy. Although many haemoglobinopathies present similar structural abnormal points, their functions sometimes are different. Here, using computational methods, we analysed the genetic variations that can alter the expression and function of the HBB gene. We applied an evolutionary perspective to screen the SNPs using a sequence homology-based SIFT tool, which suggested that 210 (90%) non-synonymous (ns)SNPs were found to be deleterious. The structure-based approach PolyPhen server suggested that 134 (57%) nsSNPS may disrupt protein function and structure. The PupaSuite tool predicted the phenotypic effect of SNPs on the structure and function of the affected protein. Structure analysis was carried out with the major mutation that occurred in the native protein coded by the HBB gene in HbC, HbD, HbE and HbS. The amino acid residues in the native and mutant modelled protein were further analysed for solvent accessibility, and secondary structure to check the stability of the proteins. The functional analysis presented here may be a good model for further research.

  20. Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism of PPARγ, a Protein at the Crossroads of Physiological and Pathological Processes

    PubMed Central

    Petrosino, Maria; Lori, Laura; Pasquo, Alessandra; Lori, Clorinda; Consalvi, Valerio; Minicozzi, Velia; Morante, Silvia; Laghezza, Antonio; Giorgi, Alessandra; Capelli, Davide; Chiaraluce, Roberta

    2017-01-01

    Genome polymorphisms are responsible for phenotypic differences between humans and for individual susceptibility to genetic diseases and therapeutic responses. Non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) lead to protein variants with a change in the amino acid sequence that may affect the structure and/or function of the protein and may be utilized as efficient structural and functional markers of association to complex diseases. This study is focused on nsSNP variants of the ligand binding domain of PPARγ a nuclear receptor in the superfamily of ligand inducible transcription factors that play an important role in regulating lipid metabolism and in several processes ranging from cellular differentiation and development to carcinogenesis. Here we selected nine nsSNPs variants of the PPARγ ligand binding domain, V290M, R357A, R397C, F360L, P467L, Q286P, R288H, E324K, and E460K, expressed in cancer tissues and/or associated with partial lipodystrophy and insulin resistance. The effects of a single amino acid change on the thermodynamic stability of PPARγ, its spectral properties, and molecular dynamics have been investigated. The nsSNPs PPARγ variants show alteration of dynamics and tertiary contacts that impair the correct reciprocal positioning of helices 3 and 12, crucially important for PPARγ functioning. PMID:28208577

  1. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Predict Symptom Severity of Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiao, Yun; Chen, Rong; Ke, Xiaoyan; Cheng, Lu; Chu, Kangkang; Lu, Zuhong; Herskovits, Edward H.

    2012-01-01

    Autism is widely believed to be a heterogeneous disorder; diagnosis is currently based solely on clinical criteria, although genetic, as well as environmental, influences are thought to be prominent factors in the etiology of most forms of autism. Our goal is to determine whether a predictive model based on single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)…

  2. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Predict Symptom Severity of Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiao, Yun; Chen, Rong; Ke, Xiaoyan; Cheng, Lu; Chu, Kangkang; Lu, Zuhong; Herskovits, Edward H.

    2012-01-01

    Autism is widely believed to be a heterogeneous disorder; diagnosis is currently based solely on clinical criteria, although genetic, as well as environmental, influences are thought to be prominent factors in the etiology of most forms of autism. Our goal is to determine whether a predictive model based on single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)…

  3. Discovery, Validation and Characterization of 1039 Cattle Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We identified approximately 13000 putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by comparison of repeat-masked BAC-end sequences from the cattle RPCI-42 BAC library with whole-genome shotgun contigs of cattle genome assembly Btau 1.0. Genotyping of a subset of these SNPs was performed on a panel ...

  4. A Laboratory Exercise for Genotyping Two Human Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernando, James; Carlson, Bradley; LeBard, Timothy; McCarthy, Michael; Umali, Finianne; Ashton, Bryce; Rose, Ferrill F., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    The dramatic decrease in the cost of sequencing a human genome is leading to an era in which a wide range of students will benefit from having an understanding of human genetic variation. Since over 90% of sequence variation between humans is in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), a laboratory exercise has been devised in order to…

  5. Prospects for inferring pairwise relationships with single nucleotide polymorphisms

    Treesearch

    Jeffery C. Glaubitz; O. Eugene, Jr. Rhodes; J. Andrew DeWoody

    2003-01-01

    An extraordinarily large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are now available in humans as well as in other model organisms. Technological advancements may soon make it feasible to assay hundreds of SNPs in virtually any organism of interest. One potential application of SNPs is the determination of pairwise genetic relationships in populations without...

  6. A Laboratory Exercise for Genotyping Two Human Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernando, James; Carlson, Bradley; LeBard, Timothy; McCarthy, Michael; Umali, Finianne; Ashton, Bryce; Rose, Ferrill F., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    The dramatic decrease in the cost of sequencing a human genome is leading to an era in which a wide range of students will benefit from having an understanding of human genetic variation. Since over 90% of sequence variation between humans is in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), a laboratory exercise has been devised in order to…

  7. Identification and characterization of functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Axin 1 gene: a molecular dynamics approach.

    PubMed

    Khan, Imran; Ansari, Irfan A; Singh, Pratichi; Dass, J Febin Prabhu; Khan, Fahad

    2017-08-02

    Wnt signaling pathway has been reported to play crucial role in intestinal crypt formation and deregulation of this pathway is responsible for colorectal cancer initiation and progression. Axin 1, a scaffold protein, play pivotal role in the regulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and has been found to be mutated in several cancers; primarily in colon cancer. Considering its crucial role, a structural and functional analysis of missense mutations in Axin 1 gene was performed in this study. Initially, one hundred non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in the coding regions of Axin 1 gene were selected for in silico analysis. Six variants (G820S, G856S, E830K, L811V, L847V, and R767C) were predicted to be deleterious by combinatorial prediction. Further investigation of structural attributes confirmed two highly deleterious single nucleotide polymorphisms (G820S and G856S). Molecular dynamics simulation demonstrated variation in different structural attributes between native and two highly deleterious Axin 1 mutant models. Finally, docking analysis showed variation in binding affinity of mutant Axin 1 proteins with two destruction complex members, GSK3β and adenomatous polyposis. The results collectively showed the deleterious effect of the above predicted single nucleotide polymorphisms on the Axin 1 protein structure and could prove to be an adjunct in the disease genotype-phenotype correlation studies.

  8. Alteration of Antiviral Signalling by Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) of Mitochondrial Antiviral Signalling Protein (MAVS)

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Fei; Matsumiya, Tomoh; Hayakari, Ryo; Yoshida, Hidemi; Kawaguchi, Shogo; Takahashi, Ippei; Nakaji, Shigeyuki; Imaizumi, Tadaatsu

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variation is associated with diseases. As a type of genetic variation occurring with certain regularity and frequency, the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is attracting more and more attention because of its great value for research and real-life application. Mitochondrial antiviral signalling protein (MAVS) acts as a common adaptor molecule for retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs), which can recognize foreign RNA, including viral RNA, leading to the induction of type I interferons (IFNs). Therefore, MAVS is thought to be a crucial molecule in antiviral innate immunity. We speculated that genetic variation of MAVS may result in susceptibility to infectious diseases. To assess the risk of viral infection based on MAVS variation, we tested the effects of twelve non-synonymous MAVS coding-region SNPs from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database that result in amino acid substitutions. We found that five of these SNPs exhibited functional alterations. Additionally, four resulted in an inhibitory immune response, and one had the opposite effect. In total, 1,032 human genomic samples obtained from a mass examination were genotyped at these five SNPs. However, no homozygous or heterozygous variation was detected. We hypothesized that these five SNPs are not present in the Japanese population and that such MAVS variations may result in serious immune diseases. PMID:26954674

  9. Neuropeptide VGF Promotes Maturation of Hippocampal Dendrites That Is Reduced by Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Behnke, Joseph; Cheedalla, Aneesha; Bhatt, Vatsal; Bhat, Maysa; Teng, Shavonne; Palmieri, Alicia; Windon, Charles Christian; Thakker-Varia, Smita; Alder, Janet

    2017-01-01

    The neuropeptide VGF (non-acronymic) is induced by brain-derived neurotrophic factor and promotes hippocampal neurogenesis, as well as synaptic activity. However, morphological changes induced by VGF have not been elucidated. Developing hippocampal neurons were exposed to VGF through bath application or virus-mediated expression in vitro. VGF-derived peptide, TLQP-62, enhanced dendritic branching, and outgrowth. Furthermore, VGF increased dendritic spine density and the proportion of immature spines. Spine formation was associated with increased synaptic protein expression and co-localization of pre- and postsynaptic markers. Three non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected in human VGF gene. Transfection of N2a cells with plasmids containing these SNPs revealed no relative change in protein expression levels and normal protein size, except for a truncated protein from the premature stop codon, E525X. All three SNPs resulted in a lower proportion of N2a cells bearing neurites relative to wild-type VGF. Furthermore, all three mutations reduced the total length of dendrites in developing hippocampal neurons. Taken together, our results suggest VGF enhances dendritic maturation and that these effects can be altered by common mutations in the VGF gene. The findings may have implications for people suffering from psychiatric disease or other conditions who may have altered VGF levels. PMID:28287464

  10. Effect of TREM-1 blockade and single nucleotide variants in experimental renal injury and kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tammaro, A.; Kers, J.; Emal, D.; Stroo, I.; Teske, G. J. D.; Butter, L. M.; Claessen, N.; Damman, J.; Derive, M.; Navis, G.; Florquin, S.; Leemans, J. C.; Dessing, M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Renal ischemia reperfusion (IR)-injury induces activation of innate immune response which sustains renal injury and contributes to the development of delayed graft function (DGF). Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1) is a pro-inflammatory evolutionary conserved pattern recognition receptor expressed on a variety of innate immune cells. TREM-1 expression increases following acute and chronic renal injury. However, the function of TREM-1 in renal IR is still unclear. Here, we investigated expression and function of TREM-1 in a murine model of renal IR using different TREM-1 inhibitors: LP17, LR12 and TREM-1 fusion protein. In a human study, we analyzed the association of non-synonymous single nucleotide variants in the TREM1 gene in a cohort comprising 1263 matching donors and recipients with post-transplant outcomes, including DGF. Our findings demonstrated that, following murine IR, renal TREM-1 expression increased due to the influx of Trem1 mRNA expressing cells detected by in situ hybridization. However, TREM-1 interventions by means of LP17, LR12 and TREM-1 fusion protein did not ameliorate IR-induced injury. In the human renal transplant cohort, donor and recipient TREM1 gene variant p.Thr25Ser was not associated with DGF, nor with biopsy-proven rejection or death-censored graft failure. We conclude that TREM-1 does not play a major role during experimental renal IR and after kidney transplantation. PMID:27928159

  11. A Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism of Human Neuropeptide S Gene Originated from Europe Shows Decreased Bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Aaron J. W.

    2013-01-01

    Using accumulating SNP (Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism) data, we performed a genome-wide search for polypeptide hormone ligands showing changes in the mature regions to elucidate genotype/phenotype diversity among various human populations. Neuropeptide S (NPS), a brain peptide hormone highly conserved in vertebrates, has diverse physiological effects on anxiety, fear, hyperactivity, food intake, and sleeping time through its cognate receptor-NPSR. Here, we report a SNP rs4751440 (L6-NPS) causing non-synonymous substitution on the 6th position (V to L) of the NPS mature peptide region. L6-NPS has a higher allele frequency in Europeans than other populations and probably originated from European ancestors ∼25,000 yrs ago based on haplotype analysis and Approximate Bayesian Computation. Functional analyses indicate that L6-NPS exhibits a significant lower bioactivity than the wild type NPS, with ∼20-fold higher EC50 values in the stimulation of NPSR. Additional evolutionary and mutagenesis studies further demonstrate the importance of the valine residue in the 6th position for NPS functions. Given the known physiological roles of NPS receptor in inflammatory bowel diseases, asthma pathogenesis, macrophage immune responses, and brain functions, our study provides the basis to elucidate NPS evolution and signaling diversity among human populations. PMID:24386135

  12. Mutational evolution in a lobular breast tumour profiled at single nucleotide resolution.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sohrab P; Morin, Ryan D; Khattra, Jaswinder; Prentice, Leah; Pugh, Trevor; Burleigh, Angela; Delaney, Allen; Gelmon, Karen; Guliany, Ryan; Senz, Janine; Steidl, Christian; Holt, Robert A; Jones, Steven; Sun, Mark; Leung, Gillian; Moore, Richard; Severson, Tesa; Taylor, Greg A; Teschendorff, Andrew E; Tse, Kane; Turashvili, Gulisa; Varhol, Richard; Warren, René L; Watson, Peter; Zhao, Yongjun; Caldas, Carlos; Huntsman, David; Hirst, Martin; Marra, Marco A; Aparicio, Samuel

    2009-10-08

    Recent advances in next generation sequencing have made it possible to precisely characterize all somatic coding mutations that occur during the development and progression of individual cancers. Here we used these approaches to sequence the genomes (>43-fold coverage) and transcriptomes of an oestrogen-receptor-alpha-positive metastatic lobular breast cancer at depth. We found 32 somatic non-synonymous coding mutations present in the metastasis, and measured the frequency of these somatic mutations in DNA from the primary tumour of the same patient, which arose 9 years earlier. Five of the 32 mutations (in ABCB11, HAUS3, SLC24A4, SNX4 and PALB2) were prevalent in the DNA of the primary tumour removed at diagnosis 9 years earlier, six (in KIF1C, USP28, MYH8, MORC1, KIAA1468 and RNASEH2A) were present at lower frequencies (1-13%), 19 were not detected in the primary tumour, and two were undetermined. The combined analysis of genome and transcriptome data revealed two new RNA-editing events that recode the amino acid sequence of SRP9 and COG3. Taken together, our data show that single nucleotide mutational heterogeneity can be a property of low or intermediate grade primary breast cancers and that significant evolution can occur with disease progression.

  13. Development of 101 novel EST-derived single nucleotide polymorphism markers for Zhikong scallop ( Chlamys farreri)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiqin; Bao, Zhenmin; Li, Ling; Wang, Xiaojian; Wang, Shi; Hu, Xiaoli

    2013-09-01

    Zhikong scallop ( Chlamys farreri) is an important maricultured species in China. Many researches on this species, such as population genetics and QTL fine-mapping, need a large number of molecular markers. In this study, based on the expressed sequence tags (EST), a total of 300 putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected and validated using high resolution melting (HRM) technology with unlabeled probe. Of them, 101 (33.7%) were found to be polymorphic in 48 individuals from 4 populations. Further evaluation with 48 individuals from Qingdao population showed that all the polymorphic loci had two alleles with the minor allele frequency ranged from 0.046 to 0.500. The observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.000 to 0.925 and from 0.089 to 0.505, respectively. Fifteen loci deviated significantly from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and significant linkage disequilibrate was detected in one pair of markers. BLASTx gave significant hits for 72 of the 101 polymorphic SNP-containing ESTs. Thirty four polymorphic SNP loci were predicted to be non-synonymous substitutions as they caused either the change of codons (33 SNPs) or pretermination of translation (1 SNP). The markers developed can be used for the population studies and genetic improvement on Zhikong scallop.

  14. An evaluation of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the human aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene.

    PubMed

    Rowlands, J Craig; Urban, Jonathan D; Wikoff, Daniele Staskal; Budinsky, Robert A

    2011-01-01

    The human aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a protein for which there is little evidence of polymorphic variability of functional consequence. It has been hypothesized that potential variability in dioxin sensitivity may be due to polymorphisms in AHR-associated proteins, such as the human AHR-interacting protein (AIP). There are limited data on AIP single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with potential functional consequences. We sequenced 103 human DNA samples within the open reading frames of the AIP locus using samples from six ethnic populations to further characterize AIP SNPs. Eight exonic SNPs were identified at the AIP locus, including three novel SNPs: T48T, L212L, and V302V. Combined with prior reports, there are now a total of 14 exonic SNPs that have been identified within AIP. Of these, six are non-synonymous and are therefore of potential functional importance, though only two of these (Q228K and A276V) were detected in the current study. The functional consequences of Q228K and A276V are unknown, although functional evidence from AIP SNPs associated with congenital pituitary tumors suggests that such amino acid changes are likely to have no effect or to decrease, rather than increase, sensitivity to dioxins. To date, no non-synonymous SNPs have been detected in the AHR-binding region of AIP.

  15. Single nucleotide polymorphism analysis using different colored dye dimer probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmé, Nicole; Friedrich, Achim; Denapaite, Dalia; Hakenbeck, Regine; Knemeyer, Jens-Peter

    2006-09-01

    Fluorescence quenching by dye dimer formation has been utilized to develop hairpin-structured DNA probes for the detection of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the penicillin target gene pbp2x, which is implicated in the penicillin resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae. We designed two specific DNA probes for the identification of the pbp2x genes from a penicillin susceptible strain R6 and a resistant strain Streptococcus mitis 661 using green-fluorescent tetramethylrhodamine (TMR) and red-fluorescent DY-636, respectively. Hybridization of each of the probes to its respective target DNA sequence opened the DNA hairpin probes, consequently breaking the nonfluorescent dye dimers into fluorescent species. This hybridization of the target with the hairpin probe achieved single nucleotide specific detection at nanomolar concentrations via increased fluorescence.

  16. Proteome-wide analysis of single-nucleotide variations in the N-glycosylation sequon of human genes.

    PubMed

    Mazumder, Raja; Morampudi, Krishna Sudeep; Motwani, Mona; Vasudevan, Sona; Goldman, Radoslav

    2012-01-01

    N-linked glycosylation is one of the most frequent post-translational modifications of proteins with a profound impact on their biological function. Besides other functions, N-linked glycosylation assists in protein folding, determines protein orientation at the cell surface, or protects proteins from proteases. The N-linked glycans attach to asparagines in the sequence context Asn-X-Ser/Thr, where X is any amino acid except proline. Any variation (e.g. non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism or mutation) that abolishes the N-glycosylation sequence motif will lead to the loss of a glycosylation site. On the other hand, variations causing a substitution that creates a new N-glycosylation sequence motif can result in the gain of glycosylation. Although the general importance of glycosylation is well known and acknowledged, the effect of variation on the actual glycoproteome of an organism is still mostly unknown. In this study, we focus on a comprehensive analysis of non-synonymous single nucleotide variations (nsSNV) that lead to either loss or gain of the N-glycosylation motif. We find that 1091 proteins have modified N-glycosylation sequons due to nsSNVs in the genome. Based on analysis of proteins that have a solved 3D structure at the site of variation, we find that 48% of the variations that lead to changes in glycosylation sites occur at the loop and bend regions of the proteins. Pathway and function enrichment analysis show that a significant number of proteins that gained or lost the glycosylation motif are involved in kinase activity, immune response, and blood coagulation. A structure-function analysis of a blood coagulation protein, antithrombin III and a protease, cathepsin D, showcases how a comprehensive study followed by structural analysis can help better understand the functional impact of the nsSNVs.

  17. Electrochemical Quantification of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Using Nanoparticle Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

    2007-08-29

    We report a new approach for electrochemical quantification of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using nanoparticle probes. The principle is based on DNA polymerase I (klenow fragment)-induced coupling of the nucleotide-modified nanoparticle probe to the mutant sites of duplex DNA under the Watson-Crick base pairing rule. After liquid hybridization events occurred among biotinylated DNA probes, mutant DNA, and complementary DNA, the resulting duplex DNA helixes were captured to the surface of magnetic beads through a biotin-avidin affinity reaction and magnetic separation. A cadmium phosphate-loaded apoferritin nanoparticle probe, which is modified with nucleotides and is complementary to the mutant site, is coupled to the mutant sites of the formed duplex DNA in the presence of DNA polymerase. Subsequent electrochemical stripping analysis of the cadmium component of coupled nanoparticle probes provides a means to quantify the concentration of mutant DNA. The method is sensitive enough to detect 21.5 attomol mutant DNA, which will enable the quantitative analysis of nucleic acid without polymerase chain reaction pre-amplification. The approach was challenged with constructed samples containing mutant and complementary DNA. The results indicated that it was possible to accurately determine SNPs with frequencies as low 0.01. The proposed approach has a great potential for realizing an accurate, sensitive, rapid, and low-cost method of SNP detection.

  18. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Linkage Disequilibrium in Sunflower

    PubMed Central

    Kolkman, Judith M.; Berry, Simon T.; Leon, Alberto J.; Slabaugh, Mary B.; Tang, Shunxue; Gao, Wenxiang; Shintani, David K.; Burke, John M.; Knapp, Steven J.

    2007-01-01

    Genetic diversity in modern sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) cultivars (elite oilseed inbred lines) has been shaped by domestication and breeding bottlenecks and wild and exotic allele introgression−the former narrowing and the latter broadening genetic diversity. To assess single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies, nucleotide diversity, and linkage disequilibrium (LD) in modern cultivars, alleles were resequenced from 81 genic loci distributed throughout the sunflower genome. DNA polymorphisms were abundant; 1078 SNPs (1/45.7 bp) and 178 insertions-deletions (INDELs) (1/277.0 bp) were identified in 49.4 kbp of DNA/genotype. SNPs were twofold more frequent in noncoding (1/32.1 bp) than coding (1/62.8 bp) sequences. Nucleotide diversity was only slightly lower in inbred lines (θ = 0.0094) than wild populations (θ = 0.0128). Mean haplotype diversity was 0.74. When extraploted across the genome (∼3500 Mbp), sunflower was predicted to harbor at least 76.4 million common SNPs among modern cultivar alleles. LD decayed more slowly in inbred lines than wild populations (mean LD declined to 0.32 by 5.5 kbp in the former, the maximum physical distance surveyed), a difference attributed to domestication and breeding bottlenecks. SNP frequencies and LD decay are sufficient in modern sunflower cultivars for very high-density genetic mapping and high-resolution association mapping. PMID:17660563

  19. Single nucleotide polymorphisms and linkage disequilibrium in sunflower.

    PubMed

    Kolkman, Judith M; Berry, Simon T; Leon, Alberto J; Slabaugh, Mary B; Tang, Shunxue; Gao, Wenxiang; Shintani, David K; Burke, John M; Knapp, Steven J

    2007-09-01

    Genetic diversity in modern sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) cultivars (elite oilseed inbred lines) has been shaped by domestication and breeding bottlenecks and wild and exotic allele introgression(-)the former narrowing and the latter broadening genetic diversity. To assess single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies, nucleotide diversity, and linkage disequilibrium (LD) in modern cultivars, alleles were resequenced from 81 genic loci distributed throughout the sunflower genome. DNA polymorphisms were abundant; 1078 SNPs (1/45.7 bp) and 178 insertions-deletions (INDELs) (1/277.0 bp) were identified in 49.4 kbp of DNA/genotype. SNPs were twofold more frequent in noncoding (1/32.1 bp) than coding (1/62.8 bp) sequences. Nucleotide diversity was only slightly lower in inbred lines ( = 0.0094) than wild populations ( = 0.0128). Mean haplotype diversity was 0.74. When extraploted across the genome ( approximately 3500 Mbp), sunflower was predicted to harbor at least 76.4 million common SNPs among modern cultivar alleles. LD decayed more slowly in inbred lines than wild populations (mean LD declined to 0.32 by 5.5 kbp in the former, the maximum physical distance surveyed), a difference attributed to domestication and breeding bottlenecks. SNP frequencies and LD decay are sufficient in modern sunflower cultivars for very high-density genetic mapping and high-resolution association mapping.

  20. Identification of single nucleotides in MoS2 nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jiandong; Liu, Ke; Bulushev, Roman D.; Khlybov, Sergey; Dumcenco, Dumitru; Kis, Andras; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2015-12-01

    The size of the sensing region in solid-state nanopores is determined by the size of the pore and the thickness of the pore membrane, so ultrathin membranes such as graphene and single-layer molybdenum disulphide could potentially offer the necessary spatial resolution for nanopore DNA sequencing. However, the fast translocation speeds (3,000-50,000 nt ms-1) of DNA molecules moving across such membranes limit their usability. Here, we show that a viscosity gradient system based on room-temperature ionic liquids can be used to control the dynamics of DNA translocation through MoS2 nanopores. The approach can be used to statistically detect all four types of nucleotide, which are identified according to current signatures recorded during their transient residence in the narrow orifice of the atomically thin MoS2 nanopore. Our technique, which exploits the high viscosity of room-temperature ionic liquids, provides optimal single nucleotide translocation speeds for DNA sequencing, while maintaining a signal-to-noise ratio higher than 10.

  1. Identification of single nucleotides in MoS2 nanopores.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jiandong; Liu, Ke; Bulushev, Roman D; Khlybov, Sergey; Dumcenco, Dumitru; Kis, Andras; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2015-12-01

    The size of the sensing region in solid-state nanopores is determined by the size of the pore and the thickness of the pore membrane, so ultrathin membranes such as graphene and single-layer molybdenum disulphide could potentially offer the necessary spatial resolution for nanopore DNA sequencing. However, the fast translocation speeds (3,000-50,000 nt ms(-1)) of DNA molecules moving across such membranes limit their usability. Here, we show that a viscosity gradient system based on room-temperature ionic liquids can be used to control the dynamics of DNA translocation through MoS2 nanopores. The approach can be used to statistically detect all four types of nucleotide, which are identified according to current signatures recorded during their transient residence in the narrow orifice of the atomically thin MoS2 nanopore. Our technique, which exploits the high viscosity of room-temperature ionic liquids, provides optimal single nucleotide translocation speeds for DNA sequencing, while maintaining a signal-to-noise ratio higher than 10.

  2. Thoroughbred Horse Single Nucleotide Polymorphism and Expression Database: HSDB

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joon-Ho; Lee, Taeheon; Lee, Hak-Kyo; Cho, Byung-Wook; Shin, Dong-Hyun; Do, Kyoung-Tag; Sung, Samsun; Kwak, Woori; Kim, Hyeon Jeong; Kim, Heebal; Cho, Seoae; Park, Kyung-Do

    2014-01-01

    Genetics is important for breeding and selection of horses but there is a lack of well-established horse-related browsers or databases. In order to better understand horses, more variants and other integrated information are needed. Thus, we construct a horse genomic variants database including expression and other information. Horse Single Nucleotide Polymorphism and Expression Database (HSDB) (http://snugenome2.snu.ac.kr/HSDB) provides the number of unexplored genomic variants still remaining to be identified in the horse genome including rare variants by using population genome sequences of eighteen horses and RNA-seq of four horses. The identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were confirmed by comparing them with SNP chip data and variants of RNA-seq, which showed a concordance level of 99.02% and 96.6%, respectively. Moreover, the database provides the genomic variants with their corresponding transcriptional profiles from the same individuals to help understand the functional aspects of these variants. The database will contribute to genetic improvement and breeding strategies of Thoroughbreds. PMID:25178365

  3. A single natural nucleotide mutation alters bacterial pathogen host tropism.

    PubMed

    Viana, David; Comos, María; McAdam, Paul R; Ward, Melissa J; Selva, Laura; Guinane, Caitriona M; González-Muñoz, Beatriz M; Tristan, Anne; Foster, Simon J; Fitzgerald, J Ross; Penadés, José R

    2015-04-01

    The capacity of microbial pathogens to alter their host tropism leading to epidemics in distinct host species populations is a global public and veterinary health concern. To investigate the molecular basis of a bacterial host-switching event in a tractable host species, we traced the evolutionary trajectory of the common rabbit clone of Staphylococcus aureus. We report that it evolved through a likely human-to-rabbit host jump over 40 years ago and that only a single naturally occurring nucleotide mutation was required and sufficient to convert a human-specific S. aureus strain into one that could infect rabbits. Related mutations were identified at the same locus in other rabbit strains of distinct clonal origin, consistent with convergent evolution. This first report of a single mutation that was sufficient to alter the host tropism of a microorganism during its evolution highlights the capacity of some pathogens to readily expand into new host species populations.

  4. Nonrandom Distribution of miRNAs Genes and Single Nucleotide Variants in Keratoconus Loci

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Dorota M.; Gajecka, Marzena

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous studies, the causes of both development and progression of keratoconus remain elusive. Previous studies of this disorder focused mainly on one or two genetic factors only. However, in the analysis of such complex diseases all potential factors should be taken into consideration. The purpose of this study was a comprehensive analysis of known keratoconus loci to uncover genetic factors involved in this disease causation in the general population, which could be omitted in the original studies. In this investigation genomic data available in various databases and experimental own data were assessed. The lists of single nucleotide variants and miRNA genes localized in reported keratoconus loci were obtained from Ensembl and miRBase, respectively. The potential impact of nonsynonymous amino acid substitutions on protein structure and function was assessed with PolyPhen-2 and SIFT. For selected protein genes the ranking was made to choose those most promising for keratoconus development. Ranking results were based on topological features in the protein-protein interaction network. High specificity for the populations in which the causative sequence variants have been identified was found. In addition, the possibility of links between previously analyzed keratoconus loci was confirmed including miRNA-gene interactions. Identified number of genes associated with oxidative stress and inflammatory agents corroborated the hypothesis of their effect on the disease etiology. Distribution of the numerous sequences variants within both exons and mature miRNA which forces you to search for a broader look at the determinants of keratoconus. Our findings highlight the complexity of the keratoconus genetics. PMID:26176855

  5. Shifting Paradigm of Association Studies: Value of Rare Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Gorlov, Ivan P.; Gorlova, Olga Y.; Sunyaev, Shamil R.; Spitz, Margaret R.; Amos, Christopher I.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Currently, single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with minor allele frequency (MAF) of >5% are preferentially used in case-control association studies of common human diseases. Recent technological developments enable inexpensive and accurate genotyping of a large number of SNPs in thousands of cases and controls, which can provide adequate statistical power to analyze SNPs with MAF <5%. Our purpose was to determine whether evaluating rare SNPs in case-control association studies could help identify causal SNPs for common diseases. We suggest that slightly deleterious SNPs (sdSNPs) subjected to weak purifying selection are major players in genetic control of susceptibility to common diseases. We compared the distribution of MAFs of synonymous SNPs with that of nonsynonymous SNPs (1) predicted to be benign, (2) predicted to be possibly damaging, and (3) predicted to be probably damaging by PolyPhen. Our sources of data were the International HapMap Project, ENCODE, and the SeattleSNPs project. We found that the MAF distribution of possibly and probably damaging SNPs was shifted toward rare SNPs compared with the MAF distribution of benign and synonymous SNPs that are not likely to be functional. We also found an inverse relationship between MAF and the proportion of nsSNPs predicted to be protein disturbing. On the basis of this relationship, we estimated the joint probability that a SNP is functional and would be detected as significant in a case-control study. Our analysis suggests that including rare SNPs in genotyping platforms will advance identification of causal SNPs in case-control association studies, particularly as sample sizes increase. PMID:18179889

  6. Nonrandom Distribution of miRNAs Genes and Single Nucleotide Variants in Keratoconus Loci.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Dorota M; Gajecka, Marzena

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous studies, the causes of both development and progression of keratoconus remain elusive. Previous studies of this disorder focused mainly on one or two genetic factors only. However, in the analysis of such complex diseases all potential factors should be taken into consideration. The purpose of this study was a comprehensive analysis of known keratoconus loci to uncover genetic factors involved in this disease causation in the general population, which could be omitted in the original studies. In this investigation genomic data available in various databases and experimental own data were assessed. The lists of single nucleotide variants and miRNA genes localized in reported keratoconus loci were obtained from Ensembl and miRBase, respectively. The potential impact of nonsynonymous amino acid substitutions on protein structure and function was assessed with PolyPhen-2 and SIFT. For selected protein genes the ranking was made to choose those most promising for keratoconus development. Ranking results were based on topological features in the protein-protein interaction network. High specificity for the populations in which the causative sequence variants have been identified was found. In addition, the possibility of links between previously analyzed keratoconus loci was confirmed including miRNA-gene interactions. Identified number of genes associated with oxidative stress and inflammatory agents corroborated the hypothesis of their effect on the disease etiology. Distribution of the numerous sequences variants within both exons and mature miRNA which forces you to search for a broader look at the determinants of keratoconus. Our findings highlight the complexity of the keratoconus genetics.

  7. Postzygotic single-nucleotide mosaicisms in whole-genome sequences of clinically unremarkable individuals

    PubMed Central

    Huang, August Y; Xu, Xiaojing; Ye, Adam Y; Wu, Qixi; Yan, Linlin; Zhao, Boxun; Yang, Xiaoxu; He, Yao; Wang, Sheng; Zhang, Zheng; Gu, Bowen; Zhao, Han-Qing; Wang, Meng; Gao, Hua; Gao, Ge; Zhang, Zhichao; Yang, Xiaoling; Wu, Xiru; Zhang, Yuehua; Wei, Liping

    2014-01-01

    Postzygotic single-nucleotide mutations (pSNMs) have been studied in cancer and a few other overgrowth human disorders at whole-genome scale and found to play critical roles. However, in clinically unremarkable individuals, pSNMs have never been identified at whole-genome scale largely due to technical difficulties and lack of matched control tissue samples, and thus the genome-wide characteristics of pSNMs remain unknown. We developed a new Bayesian-based mosaic genotyper and a series of effective error filters, using which we were able to identify 17 SNM sites from ∼80× whole-genome sequencing of peripheral blood DNAs from three clinically unremarkable adults. The pSNMs were thoroughly validated using pyrosequencing, Sanger sequencing of individual cloned fragments, and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. The mutant allele fraction ranged from 5%-31%. We found that C→T and C→A were the predominant types of postzygotic mutations, similar to the somatic mutation profile in tumor tissues. Simulation data showed that the overall mutation rate was an order of magnitude lower than that in cancer. We detected varied allele fractions of the pSNMs among multiple samples obtained from the same individuals, including blood, saliva, hair follicle, buccal mucosa, urine, and semen samples, indicating that pSNMs could affect multiple sources of somatic cells as well as germ cells. Two of the adults have children who were diagnosed with Dravet syndrome. We identified two non-synonymous pSNMs in SCN1A, a causal gene for Dravet syndrome, from these two unrelated adults and found that the mutant alleles were transmitted to their children, highlighting the clinical importance of detecting pSNMs in genetic counseling. PMID:25312340

  8. Single nucleotide polymorphism analysis of Korean native chickens using next generation sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dong-Won; Oh, Jae-Don; Jin, Shil; Song, Ki-Duk; Park, Hee-Bok; Heo, Kang-Nyeong; Shin, Younhee; Jung, Myunghee; Park, Junhyung; Jo, Cheorun; Lee, Hak-Kyo; Lee, Jun-Heon

    2015-02-01

    There are five native chicken lines in Korea, which are mainly classified by plumage colors (black, white, red, yellow, gray). These five lines are very important genetic resources in the Korean poultry industry. Based on a next generation sequencing technology, whole genome sequence and reference assemblies were performed using Gallus_gallus_4.0 (NCBI) with whole genome sequences from these lines to identify common and novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We obtained 36,660,731,136 ± 1,257,159,120 bp of raw sequence and average 26.6-fold of 25-29 billion reference assembly sequences representing 97.288 % coverage. Also, 4,006,068 ± 97,534 SNPs were observed from 29 autosomes and the Z chromosome and, of these, 752,309 SNPs are the common SNPs across lines. Among the identified SNPs, the number of novel- and known-location assigned SNPs was 1,047,951 ± 14,956 and 2,948,648 ± 81,414, respectively. The number of unassigned known SNPs was 1,181 ± 150 and unassigned novel SNPs was 8,238 ± 1,019. Synonymous SNPs, non-synonymous SNPs, and SNPs having character changes were 26,266 ± 1,456, 11,467 ± 604, 8,180 ± 458, respectively. Overall, 443,048 ± 26,389 SNPs in each bird were identified by comparing with dbSNP in NCBI. The presently obtained genome sequence and SNP information in Korean native chickens have wide applications for further genome studies such as genetic diversity studies to detect causative mutations for economic and disease related traits.

  9. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the MATP gene are associated with normal human pigmentation variation.

    PubMed

    Graf, Justin; Hodgson, Richard; van Daal, Angela

    2005-03-01

    Human physical pigmentation is determined by the type and amount of melanin and the process of pigmentation production probably involves more than 100 genes. A failure to synthesize melanin results in oculocutaneous albinism (OCA). A recently identified form of OCA results from mutations in the Membrane Associated Transporter Protein (MATP) gene. The role of MATP in human pigmentation is not clear. We investigated the role of two nonpathogenic nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the MATP gene to determine if they are associated with normal human skin, hair, and eye color variation. A total of 608 individuals from four different population groups (456 Caucasians, 31 Asians, 70 African-Americans, and 51 Australian Aborigines) were genotyped for c.814G>A (p.Glu272Lys) and c.1122C>G (p.Phe374Leu). Results indicate that the allele frequencies of both polymorphisms are significantly different between population groups. The two alleles, 374Leu and 272Lys, are significantly associated with dark hair, skin, and eye color in Caucasians. The odds ratios (ORs) of the LeuLeu genotype for black hair and olive skin are 25.63 and 28.65, respectively, and for the LysLys genotype are 43.23 and 8.27, respectively. The OR for eye color is lower at 3.48 for the LeuLeu and 6.57 for LysLys genotypes. This is the first report of this highly significant association of MATP polymorphisms with normal human pigmentation variation.

  10. Y-Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Diversity in Chinese Indigenous Horse.

    PubMed

    Han, Haoyuan; Zhang, Qin; Gao, Kexin; Yue, Xiangpeng; Zhang, Tao; Dang, Ruihua; Lan, Xianyong; Chen, Hong; Lei, Chuzhao

    2015-08-01

    In contrast to high genetic diversity of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), equine Y chromosome shows extremely low variability, implying limited patrilines in the domesticated horse. In this study, we applied direct sequencing and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) methods to investigate the polymorphisms of 33 Y chromosome specific loci in 304 Chinese indigenous horses from 13 breeds. Consequently, two Y-single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (Y-45701/997 and Y-50869) and one Y-indel (Y-45288) were identified. Of those, the Y-50869 (T>A) revealed the highest variation frequency (24.67%), whereas it was only 3.29% and 1.97% in Y-45288 (T/-) and Y-45701/997 (G>T) locus, respectively. These three mutations accounted for 27.96% of the total samples and identified five Y-SNP haplotypes, demonstrating genetic diversity of Y chromosome in Chinese horses. In addition, all the five Y-SNP haplotypes were shared by different breeds. Among 13 horse breeds analyzed, Balikun horse displayed the highest nucleotide diversity (π = 5.6×10(-4)) and haplotype diversity (h = 0.527), while Ningqiang horse showed the lowest nucleotide diversity (π = 0.00000) and haplotype diversity (h = 0.000). The results also revealed that Chinese horses had a different polymorphic pattern of Y chromosome from European and American horses. In conclusion, Chinese horses revealed genetic diversity of Y chromosome, however more efforts should be made to better understand the domestication and paternal origin of Chinese indigenous horses.

  11. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in nucleotide excision repair genes, cancer treatment, and head and neck cancer survival

    PubMed Central

    Wyss, Annah B.; Weissler, Mark C.; Avery, Christy L.; Herring, Amy H.; Bensen, Jeannette T.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Funkhouser, William K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Head and neck cancers (HNC) are commonly treated with radiation and platinum-based chemotherapy, which produce bulky DNA adducts to eradicate cancerous cells. Because nucleotide excision repair (NER) enzymes remove adducts, variants in NER genes may be associated with survival among HNC cases both independently and jointly with treatment. Methods Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate race-stratified (White, African American) hazard ratios (HRs) and 95 % confidence intervals for overall (OS) and disease-specific (DS) survival based on treatment (combinations of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy) and 84 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 15 NER genes among 1,227 HNC cases from the Carolina Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Study. Results None of the NER variants evaluated were associated with survival at a Bonferroni-corrected alpha of 0.0006. However, rs3136038 [OS HR = 0.79 (0.65, 0.97), DS HR = 0.69 (0.51, 0.93)] and rs3136130 [OS HR = 0.78 (0.64, 0.96), DS HR = 0.68 (0.50, 0.92)] of ERCC4 and rs50871 [OS HR = 0.80 (0.64, 1.00), DS HR = 0.67 (0.48, 0.92)] of ERCC2 among Whites, and rs2607755 [OS HR = 0.62 (0.45, 0.86), DS HR = 0.51 (0.30, 0.86)] of XPC among African Americans were suggestively associated with survival at an uncorrected alpha of 0.05. Three SNP-treatment joint effects showed possible departures from additivity among Whites. Conclusions Our study, a large and extensive evaluation of SNPs in NER genes and HNC survival, identified mostly null associations, though a few variants were suggestively associated with survival and potentially interacted additively with treatment. PMID:24487794

  12. Single Nucleotide Variations in CLCN6 Identified in Patients with Benign Partial Epilepsies in Infancy and/or Febrile Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Shimojima, Keiko; Sangu, Noriko; Komoike, Yuta; Ishii, Atsushi; Abe, Shinpei; Yamashita, Shintaro; Imai, Katsumi; Kubota, Tetsuo; Fukasawa, Tatsuya; Okanishi, Tohru; Enoki, Hideo; Tanabe, Takuya; Saito, Akira; Furukawa, Toru; Shimizu, Toshiaki; Milligan, Carol J.; Petrou, Steven; Heron, Sarah E.; Dibbens, Leanne M.; Hirose, Shinichi; Okumura, Akihisa

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide alterations in the gene encoding proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2) have been identified in most patients with benign partial epilepsies in infancy (BPEI)/benign familial infantile epilepsy (BFIE). However, not all patients harbor these PRRT2 mutations, indicating the involvement of genes other than PRRT2. In this study, we performed whole exome sequencing analysis for a large family affected with PRRT2-unrelated BPEI. We identified a non-synonymous single nucleotide variation (SNV) in the voltage-sensitive chloride channel 6 gene (CLCN6). A cohort study of 48 BPEI patients without PRRT2 mutations revealed a different CLCN6 SNV in a patient, his sibling and his father who had a history of febrile seizures (FS) but not BPEI. Another study of 48 patients with FS identified an additional SNV in CLCN6. Chloride channels (CLCs) are involved in a multitude of physiologic processes and some members of the CLC family have been linked to inherited diseases. However, a phenotypic correlation has not been confirmed for CLCN6. Although we could not detect significant biological effects linked to the identified CLCN6 SNVs, further studies should investigate potential CLCN6 variants that may underlie the genetic susceptibility to convulsive disorders. PMID:25794116

  13. HLA-C locus allelic dropout in Sanger sequence-based typing due to intronic single nucleotide polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Christopher; Kashi, Zahra Mehdizadeh; Martin, Russell; Woodruff, Gillian; Dinauer, David; Agostini, Tina

    2014-12-01

    We report a novel HLA-C allele that was identified during routine HLA typing using sequence-based methods. The patient was initially typed as a C*06:02, 06:04 with two nucleotide mismatches in exon 3, (C to T and T to G changes) which would have resulted in a non-synonymous mutation of a leucine residue being replaced with tryptophan. Further resolution of the patient's type by using sequence-specific primers (SSP) revealed that the companion allele to C*06:02 was a novel C*17:01. Confirmation of the existence of the new allele was performed across multiple platforms: Sanger sequencing, SSP, and Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) on the original sample and allele-specific clones for the entire HLA-C locus. The investigation revealed a single nucleotide mismatch within the Sanger sequencing primer binding site in intron 3. The mutation caused the initial C*17 dropout in exons 2 and 3. Further analysis of the Sanger and NGS data revealed that the C*17 had two additional unique positions in introns 2 and 7. The companion C*06:02 allele also possessed a novel position at intron 3. On August 31, 2013, the WHO nomenclature committee officially named the novel C*17:01 allele sequence as C*17:01:01:03 and the novel C*06:02 allele sequence as C*06:02:01:03.

  14. Evaluation of single-nucleotide polymorphism imputation using random forests

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have helped to reveal genetic mechanisms of complex diseases. Although commonly used genotyping technology enables us to determine up to a million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), causative variants are typically not genotyped directly. A favored approach to increase the power of genome-wide association studies is to impute the untyped SNPs using more complete genotype data of a reference population. Random forests (RF) provides an internal method for replacing missing genotypes. A forest of classification trees is used to determine similarities of probands regarding their genotypes. These proximities are then used to impute genotypes of untyped SNPs. We evaluated this approach using genotype data of the Framingham Heart Study provided as Problem 2 for Genetic Analysis Workshop 16 and the Caucasian HapMap samples as reference population. Our results indicate that RFs are faster but less accurate than alternative approaches for imputing untyped SNPs. PMID:20018059

  15. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in type 2 diabetes among Hispanic adults.

    PubMed

    Watson, Amanda L; Hu, Jie; Chiu, Norman H L

    2015-05-01

    In this pilot study, we explore the genetic variation that may relate to type 2 diabetes (T2D) among Hispanic adults. The genotypes of 36 Hispanic adults were analyzed by using the Cardio-Metabochip. The goal is to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated to T2D among Hispanic adults. A total of 26 SNPs were identified to be associated with T2D among Hispanic adults. None of these SNPs have been reported for T2D. By using the principle components analysis to analyze the genotype of 26 SNPs in 36 samples, the samples obtained from diabetic patients could be distinguished from the control samples. The findings support genetic involvement in T2D among Hispanic adults.

  16. ENGINES: exploring single nucleotide variation in entire human genomes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Next generation ultra-sequencing technologies are starting to produce extensive quantities of data from entire human genome or exome sequences, and therefore new software is needed to present and analyse this vast amount of information. The 1000 Genomes project has recently released raw data for 629 complete genomes representing several human populations through their Phase I interim analysis and, although there are certain public tools available that allow exploration of these genomes, to date there is no tool that permits comprehensive population analysis of the variation catalogued by such data. Description We have developed a genetic variant site explorer able to retrieve data for Single Nucleotide Variation (SNVs), population by population, from entire genomes without compromising future scalability and agility. ENGINES (ENtire Genome INterface for Exploring SNVs) uses data from the 1000 Genomes Phase I to demonstrate its capacity to handle large amounts of genetic variation (>7.3 billion genotypes and 28 million SNVs), as well as deriving summary statistics of interest for medical and population genetics applications. The whole dataset is pre-processed and summarized into a data mart accessible through a web interface. The query system allows the combination and comparison of each available population sample, while searching by rs-number list, chromosome region, or genes of interest. Frequency and FST filters are available to further refine queries, while results can be visually compared with other large-scale Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) repositories such as HapMap or Perlegen. Conclusions ENGINES is capable of accessing large-scale variation data repositories in a fast and comprehensive manner. It allows quick browsing of whole genome variation, while providing statistical information for each variant site such as allele frequency, heterozygosity or FST values for genetic differentiation. Access to the data mart generating scripts and to

  17. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of myostatin gene in Chinese domestic horses.

    PubMed

    Li, Ran; Liu, Dong-Hua; Cao, Chun-Na; Wang, Shao-Qiang; Dang, Rui-Hua; Lan, Xian-Yong; Chen, Hong; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Wu-Jun; Lei, Chu-Zhao

    2014-03-15

    The myostatin gene (MSTN) is a genetic determinant of skeletal muscle growth. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in MSTN are of importance due to their strong associations with horse racing performances. In this study, we screened the SNPs in MSTN gene in 514 horses from 15 Chinese horse breeds. Six SNPs (g.26T>C, g.156T>C, g.587A>G, g.598C>T, g.1485C>T, g.2115A>G) in MSTN gene were detected by sequencing and genotyped using PCR-RFLP method. The g.587A>G and g.598C>T residing in the 5'UTR region were novel SNPs identified by this study. The g.2115A>G which have previously been associated with racing performances were present in Chinese horse breeds, providing valuable genetic information for evaluating the potential racing performances in Chinese domestic breeds. The six SNPs together defined thirteen haplotypes, demonstrating abundant haplotype diversities in Chinese horses. Most of the haplotypes were shared among different breeds with no haplotype restricted to a specific region or a single horse breed. AMOVA analysis indicated that most of the genetic variance was attributable to differences among individuals without any significant contribution by the four geographical groups. This study will provide fundamental and instrumental genetic information for evaluating the potential racing performances of Chinese horse breeds.

  18. Electrophoretic Transport of Single DNA Nucleotides through Nanoslits: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Xia, Kai; Novak, Brian R; Weerakoon-Ratnayake, Kumuditha M; Soper, Steven A; Nikitopoulos, Dimitris E; Moldovan, Dorel

    2015-09-03

    There is potential for flight time based DNA sequencing involving disassembly into individual nucleotides which would pass through a nanochannel with two or more detectors. We performed molecular dynamics simulations of electrophoretic motion of single DNA nucleotides through 3 nm wide hydrophobic slits with both smooth and rough walls. The electric field (E) varied from 0.0 to 0.6 V/nm. The nucleotides adsorb and desorb from walls multiple times during their transit through the slit. The nucleotide-wall interactions differed due to nucleotide hydrophobicities and wall roughness which determined duration and frequency of nucleotide adsorptions and their velocities while adsorbed. Transient association of nucleotides with one, two, or three sodium ions occurred, but the mean association numbers (ANs) were weak functions of nucleotide type. Nucleotide-wall interactions contributed more to separation of nucleotide flight time distributions than ion association and thus indicate that nucleotide-wall interactions play a defining role in successfully discriminating between nucleotides on the basis of their flight times through nanochannels/slits. With smooth walls, smaller nucleotides moved faster, but with rough walls larger nucleotides moved faster due to fewer favorable wall adsorption sites. This indicates that roughness, or surface patterning, might be exploited to achieve better time-of-flight based discrimination between nucleotides.

  19. Computational Analysis of Damaging Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Their Structural and Functional Impact on the Insulin Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Mahmud, Zabed; Malik, Syeda Umme Fahmida; Ahmed, Jahed

    2016-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with complex disorders can create, destroy, or modify protein coding sites. Single amino acid substitutions in the insulin receptor (INSR) are the most common forms of genetic variations that account for various diseases like Donohue syndrome or Leprechaunism, Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome, and type A insulin resistance. We analyzed the deleterious nonsynonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) in INSR gene based on different computational methods. Analysis of INSR was initiated with PROVEAN followed by PolyPhen and I-Mutant servers to investigate the effects of 57 nsSNPs retrieved from database of SNP (dbSNP). A total of 18 mutations that were found to exert damaging effects on the INSR protein structure and function were chosen for further analysis. Among these mutations, our computational analysis suggested that 13 nsSNPs decreased protein stability and might have resulted in loss of function. Therefore, the probability of their involvement in disease predisposition increases. In the lack of adequate prior reports on the possible deleterious effects of nsSNPs, we have systematically analyzed and characterized the functional variants in coding region that can alter the expression and function of INSR gene. In silico characterization of nsSNPs affecting INSR gene function can aid in better understanding of genetic differences in disease susceptibility. PMID:27840822

  20. Single QTL mapping and nucleotide-level resolution of a physiologic trait in wine Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Marullo, Philippe; Aigle, Michel; Bely, Marina; Masneuf-Pomarède, Isabelle; Durrens, Pascal; Dubourdieu, Denis; Yvert, Gaël

    2007-09-01

    Natural Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains exhibit very large genotypic and phenotypic diversity. However, the link between phenotype variation and genetic determinism is still difficult to identify, especially in wild populations. Using genome hybridization on DNA microarrays, it is now possible to identify single-feature polymorphisms among divergent yeast strains. This tool offers the possibility of applying quantitative genetics to wild yeast strains. In this instance, we studied the genetic basis for variations in acetic acid production using progeny derived from two strains from grape must isolates. The trait was quantified during alcoholic fermentation of the two strains and 108 segregants derived from their crossing. A genetic map of 2212 markers was generated using oligonucleotide microarrays, and a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) was mapped with high significance. Further investigations showed that this QTL was due to a nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphism that targeted the catalytic core of asparaginase type I (ASP1) and abolished its activity. This QTL was only effective when asparagine was used as a major nitrogen source. Our results link nitrogen assimilation and CO(2) production rate to acetic acid production, as well as, on a broader scale, illustrating the specific problem of quantitative genetics when working with nonlaboratory microorganisms.

  1. Effectiveness of single-nucleotide polymorphisms to investigate cattle rustling.

    PubMed

    Fernández, María E; Rogberg-Muñoz, Andrés; Lirón, Juan P; Goszczynski, Daniel E; Ripoli, María V; Carino, Mónica H; Peral-García, Pilar; Giovambattista, Guillermo

    2014-11-01

    Short tandem repeats (STR)s have been the eligible markers for forensic animal genetics, despite single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP)s became acceptable. The technology, the type, and amount of markers could limit the investigation in degraded forensic samples. The performance of a 32-SNP panel genotyped through OpenArrays(TM) (real-time PCR based) was evaluated to resolve cattle-specific forensic cases. DNA from different biological sources was used, including samples from an alleged instance of cattle rustling. SNPs and STRs performance and repeatability were compared. SNP call rate was variable among sample type (average = 80.18%), while forensic samples showed the lowest value (70.94%). The repeatability obtained (98.7%) supports the used technology. SNPs had better call rates than STRs in 12 of 20 casework samples, while forensic index values were similar for both panels. In conclusion, the 32-SNPs used are as informative as the standard bovine STR battery and hence are suitable to resolve cattle rustling investigations.

  2. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Markers for Genetic Mapping in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Hoskins, Roger A.; Phan, Alexander C.; Naeemuddin, Mohammed; Mapa, Felipa A.; Ruddy, David A.; Ryan, Jessica J.; Young, Lynn M.; Wells, Trent; Kopczynski, Casey; Ellis, Michael C.

    2001-01-01

    For nearly a century, genetic analysis in Drosophila melanogaster has been a powerful tool for analyzing gene function, yet Drosophila lacks the molecular genetic mapping tools that recently have revolutionized human, mouse, and plant genetics. Here, we describe the systematic characterization of a dense set of molecular markers in Drosophila by using a sequence tagged site-based physical map of the genome. We identify 474 biallelic markers in standard laboratory strains of Drosophila that span the genome. Most of these markers are single nucleotide polymorphisms and sequences for these variants are provided in an accessible format. The average density of the new markers is one per 225 kb on the autosomes and one per megabase on the X chromosome. We include in this survey a set of P-element strains that provide additional use for high-resolution mapping. We show one application of the new markers in a simple set of crosses to map a mutation in the hedgehog gene to an interval of <1 Mb. This new map resource significantly increases the efficiency and resolution of recombination mapping and will be of immediate value to the Drosophila research community. PMID:11381036

  3. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Clustering in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Charlon, Thomas; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Carmona, F. David; Di Cara, Alessandro; Wojcik, Jérôme; Voloshynovskiy, Sviatoslav

    2016-01-01

    Systemic Autoimmune Diseases, a group of chronic inflammatory conditions, have variable symptoms and difficult diagnosis. In order to reclassify them based on genetic markers rather than clinical criteria, we performed clustering of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms. However naive approaches tend to group patients primarily by their geographic origin. To reduce this “ancestry signal”, we developed SNPClust, a method to select large sources of ancestry-independent genetic variations from all variations detected by Principal Component Analysis. Applied to a Systemic Lupus Erythematosus case control dataset, SNPClust successfully reduced the ancestry signal. Results were compared with association studies between the cases and controls without or with reference population stratification correction methods. SNPClust amplified the disease discriminating signal and the ratio of significant associations outside the HLA locus was greater compared to population stratification correction methods. SNPClust will enable the use of ancestry-independent genetic information in the reclassification of Systemic Autoimmune Diseases. SNPClust is available as an R package and demonstrated on the public Human Genome Diversity Project dataset at https://github.com/ThomasChln/snpclust. PMID:27490238

  4. Single nucleotide polymorphism markers for genetic mapping in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskins, Roger A.; Phan, Alexander C.; Naeemuddin, Mohammed; Mapa, Felipa A.; Ruddy, David A.; Ryan, Jessica J.; Young, Lynn M.; Wells, Trent; Kopczynski, Casey; Ellis, Michael C.

    2001-04-16

    For nearly a century, genetic analysis in Drosophila melanogaster has been a powerful tool for analyzing gene function, yet Drosophila lacks the molecular genetic mapping tools that have recently revolutionized human, mouse and plant genetics. Here, we describe the systematic characterization of a dense set of molecular markers in Drosophila using an STS-based physical map of the genome. We identify 474 biallelic markers in standard laboratory strains of Drosophila that the genome. The majority of these markers are single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and sequences for these variants are provided in an accessible format. The average density of the new markers is 1 marker per 225 kb on the autosomes and 1 marker per 1 Mb on the X chromosome. We include in this survey a set of P-element strains that provide additional utility for high-resolution mapping. We demonstrate one application of the new markers in a simple set of crosses to map a mutation in the hedgehog gene to an interval of <1 Mb. This new map resource significantly increases the efficiency and resolution of recombination mapping and will be of immediate value to the Drosophila research community.

  5. ADH single nucleotide polymorphism associations with alcohol metabolism in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Birley, Andrew J.; James, Michael R.; Dickson, Peter A.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Heath, Andrew C.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Whitfield, John B.

    2009-01-01

    We have previously found that variation in alcohol metabolism in Europeans is linked to the chromosome 4q region containing the ADH gene family. We have now typed 103 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across this region to test for allelic associations with variation in blood and breath alcohol concentrations after an alcohol challenge. In vivo alcohol metabolism was modelled with three parameters that identified the absorption and rise of alcohol concentration following ingestion, and the rate of elimination. Alleles of ADH7 SNPs were associated with the early stages of alcohol metabolism, with additional effects in the ADH1A, ADH1B and ADH4 regions. Rate of elimination was associated with SNPs in the intragenic region between ADH7 and ADH1C, and across ADH1C and ADH1B. SNPs affecting alcohol metabolism did not correspond to those reported to affect alcohol dependence or alcohol-related disease. The combined SNP associations with early- and late-stage metabolism only account for approximately 20% of the total genetic variance linked to the ADH region, and most of the variance for in vivo alcohol metabolism linked to this region is yet to be explained. PMID:19193628

  6. High-Throughput Genotyping with Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Ranade, Koustubh; Chang, Mau-Song; Ting, Chih-Tai; Pei, Dee; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Olivier, Michael; Pesich, Robert; Hebert, Joan; Chen, Yii-Der I.; Dzau, Victor J.; Curb, David; Olshen, Richard; Risch, Neil; Cox, David R.; Botstein, David

    2001-01-01

    To make large-scale association studies a reality, automated high-throughput methods for genotyping with single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are needed. We describe PCR conditions that permit the use of the TaqMan or 5′ nuclease allelic discrimination assay for typing large numbers of individuals with any SNP and computational methods that allow genotypes to be assigned automatically. To demonstrate the utility of these methods, we typed >1600 individuals for a G-to-T transversion that results in a glutamate-to-aspartate substitution at position 298 in the endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene, and a G/C polymorphism (newly identified in our laboratory) in intron 8 of the 11–β hydroxylase gene. The genotyping method is accurate—we estimate an error rate of fewer than 1 in 2000 genotypes, rapid—with five 96-well PCR machines, one fluorescent reader, and no automated pipetting, over one thousand genotypes can be generated by one person in one day, and flexible—a new SNP can be tested for association in less than one week. Indeed, large-scale genotyping has been accomplished for 23 other SNPs in 13 different genes using this method. In addition, we identified three “pseudo-SNPs” (WIAF1161, WIAF2566, and WIAF335) that are probably a result of duplication. PMID:11435409

  7. Single nucleotide polymorphisms and haplotypes in Native American populations.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Judith R; Friedlaender, Françoise; Pakstis, Andrew J; Furtado, Manohar; Fang, Rixun; Wang, Xudong; Nievergelt, Caroline M; Kidd, Kenneth K

    2011-12-01

    Autosomal DNA polymorphisms can provide new information and understanding of both the origins of and relationships among modern Native American populations. At the same time that autosomal markers can be highly informative, they are also susceptible to ascertainment biases in the selection of the markers to use. Identifying markers that can be used for ancestry inference among Native American populations can be considered separate from identifying markers to further the quest for history. In the current study, we are using data on nine Native American populations to compare the results based on a large haplotype-based dataset with relatively small independent sets of single nucleotide polymorphisms. We are interested in what types of limited datasets an individual laboratory might be able to collect are best for addressing two different questions of interest. First, how well can we differentiate the Native American populations and/or infer ancestry by assigning an individual to her population(s) of origin? Second, how well can we infer the historical/evolutionary relationships among Native American populations and their Eurasian origins? We conclude that only a large comprehensive dataset involving multiple autosomal markers on multiple populations will be able to answer both questions; different small sets of markers are able to answer only one or the other of these questions. Using our largest dataset, we see a general increasing distance from Old World populations from North to South in the New World except for an unexplained close relationship between our Maya and Quechua samples. 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Single nucleotide polymorphism identification in candidate gene systems of obesity.

    PubMed

    Irizarry, K; Hu, G; Wong, M L; Licinio, J; Lee, C J

    2001-01-01

    We have constructed a large panel of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) identified in 68 candidate genes for obesity. Our panel combines novel SNP identification methods based on EST data, with public SNP data from largescale genomic sequencing, to produce a total of 218 SNPs in the coding regions of obesity candidate genes, 178 SNPs in untranslated regions, and over 1000 intronic SNPs. These include new non-conservative amino acid changes in thyroid receptor beta, esterase D, acid phosphatase 1. Our data show evidence of negative selection among these polymorphisms implying functional impacts of the non-conservative mutations. Comparison of overlap between SNPs identified independently from EST data vs genomic sequencing indicate that together they may constitute about one half of the actual total number of amino acid polymorphisms in these genes that are common in the human population (defined here as a population allele frequency above 5%). We have analyzed our polymorphism panel to construct a database of detailed information about their location in the gene structure and effect on protein coding, available on the web at http://www.bioinformat ics.ucla.edu/snp/obesity. We believe this panel can serve as a valuable new resource for genetic and pharmacogenomic studies of the causes of obesity.

  9. Genetic diversity of Eurycoma longifolia inferred from single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Osman, Asiah; Jordan, Barbara; Lessard, Philip A; Muhammad, Norwati; Haron, M Rosli; Riffin, Norifiza Mat; Sinskey, Anthony J; Rha, ChoKyun; Housman, David E

    2003-03-01

    Eurycoma longifolia Jack. is a treelet that grows in the forests of Southeast Asia and is widely used throughout the region because of its reported medicinal properties. Widespread harvesting of wild-grown trees has led to rapid thinning of natural populations, causing a potential decrease in genetic diversity among E. longifolia. Suitable genetic markers would be very useful for propagation and breeding programs to support conservation of this species, although no such markers currently exist. To meet this need, we have applied a genome complexity reduction strategy to identify a series of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the genomes of several E. longifolia accessions. We have found that the occurrence of these SNPs reflects the geographic origins of individual plants and can distinguish different natural populations. This work demonstrates the rapid development of molecular genetic markers in species for which little or no genomic sequence information is available. The SNP markers that we have developed in this study will also be useful for identifying genetic fingerprints that correlate with other properties of E. longifolia, such as high regenerability or the appearance of bioactive metabolites.

  10. Recombination detection in Aspergillus fumigatus through single nucleotide polymorphisms typing.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Joana; Amorim, António; Araujo, Ricardo

    2015-12-01

    The first evidence of sexual reproduction in Aspergillus fumigatus was reported in 2009. Nevertheless, it remains difficult to understand how A. fumigatus is able to reproduce through this mode in its natural environment and how frequently this occurs. The aim of this study was to analyse single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a set of environmental and clinical isolates of A. fumigatus to detect signatures of recombination. A group of closely related Portuguese A. fumigatus isolates was characterized by mating type and the genetic diversity of the intergenic regions, microsatellites and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) genes. A group of 19 SNPs, organized in nine association groups and inherited in blocks, was identified and compared. Several variations on the association panel were detected on reference isolates of A. fumigatus AF293 and A1163, the sequence types available at MLST database and six clinical and environmental Portuguese isolates. About one to four haplotype disruptions were observed per isolate. Considering clinical and environmental isolates, sexual reproduction seems to occur more frequently than previously admitted in A. fumigatus. In this study, a practical SNP approach is proposed for detection of recombination events in larger collections of A. fumigatus. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Preterm birth and single nucleotide polymorphisms in cytokine genes

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qin; Sun, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Preterm birth (PTB) is an important issue in neonates because of its complications as well as high morbidity and mortality. The prevalence of PTB is approximately 12-13% in USA and 5-9% in many other developed countries. China represents 7.8% (approximately one million) of 14.9 million babies born prematurely annually worldwide. The rate of PTB is still increasing. Both genetic susceptibility and environmental factors are the major causes of PTB. Inflammation is regarded as an enabling characteristic factor of PTB. The aim of this review is to summarize the current literatures to illustrate the role of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of cytokine genes in PTB. These polymorphisms are different among different geographic regions and different races, thus different populations may have different risk factors of PTB. SNPs affect the ability to metabolize poisonous substances and determine inflammation susceptibility, which in turn has an influence on reproduction-related risks and on delivery outcomes after exposure to environmental toxicants and pathogenic organisms. PMID:26835330

  12. Deblur Rapidly Resolves Single-Nucleotide Community Sequence Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Amir, Amnon; McDonald, Daniel; Navas-Molina, Jose A.; Kopylova, Evguenia; Morton, James T.; Zech Xu, Zhenjiang; Kightley, Eric P.; Thompson, Luke R.; Hyde, Embriette R.; Gonzalez, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT High-throughput sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA gene amplicons has facilitated understanding of complex microbial communities, but the inherent noise in PCR and DNA sequencing limits differentiation of closely related bacteria. Although many scientific questions can be addressed with broad taxonomic profiles, clinical, food safety, and some ecological applications require higher specificity. Here we introduce a novel sub-operational-taxonomic-unit (sOTU) approach, Deblur, that uses error profiles to obtain putative error-free sequences from Illumina MiSeq and HiSeq sequencing platforms. Deblur substantially reduces computational demands relative to similar sOTU methods and does so with similar or better sensitivity and specificity. Using simulations, mock mixtures, and real data sets, we detected closely related bacterial sequences with single nucleotide differences while removing false positives and maintaining stability in detection, suggesting that Deblur is limited only by read length and diversity within the amplicon sequences. Because Deblur operates on a per-sample level, it scales to modern data sets and meta-analyses. To highlight Deblur’s ability to integrate data sets, we include an interactive exploration of its application to multiple distinct sequencing rounds of the American Gut Project. Deblur is open source under the Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD) license, easily installable, and downloadable from https://github.com/biocore/deblur. IMPORTANCE Deblur provides a rapid and sensitive means to assess ecological patterns driven by differentiation of closely related taxa. This algorithm provides a solution to the problem of identifying real ecological differences between taxa whose amplicons differ by a single base pair, is applicable in an automated fashion to large-scale sequencing data sets, and can integrate sequencing runs collected over time. PMID:28289731

  13. Differential single nucleotide polymorphism-based analysis of an outbreak caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Manhattan reveals epidemiological details missed by standard pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Scaltriti, Erika; Sassera, Davide; Comandatore, Francesco; Morganti, Marina; Mandalari, Carmen; Gaiarsa, Stefano; Bandi, Claudio; Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Bolzoni, Luca; Casadei, Gabriele; Pongolini, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    We retrospectively analyzed a rare Salmonella enterica serovar Manhattan outbreak that occurred in Italy in 2009 to evaluate the potential of new genomic tools based on differential single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis in comparison with the gold standard genotyping method, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. A total of 39 isolates were analyzed from patients (n=15) and food, feed, animal, and environmental sources (n=24), resulting in five different pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiles. Isolates epidemiologically related to the outbreak clustered within the same pulsotype, SXB_BS.0003, without any further differentiation. Thirty-three isolates were considered for genomic analysis based on different sets of SNPs, core, synonymous, nonsynonymous, as well as SNPs in different codon positions, by Bayesian and maximum likelihood algorithms. Trees generated from core and nonsynonymous SNPs, as well as SNPs at the second and first plus second codon positions detailed four distinct groups of isolates within the outbreak pulsotype, discriminating outbreak-related isolates of human and food origins. Conversely, the trees derived from synonymous and third-codon-position SNPs clustered food and human isolates together, indicating that all outbreak-related isolates constituted a single clone, which was in line with the epidemiological evidence. Further experiments are in place to extend this approach within our regional enteropathogen surveillance system. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Differential Single Nucleotide Polymorphism-Based Analysis of an Outbreak Caused by Salmonella enterica Serovar Manhattan Reveals Epidemiological Details Missed by Standard Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Scaltriti, Erika; Sassera, Davide; Comandatore, Francesco; Morganti, Marina; Mandalari, Carmen; Gaiarsa, Stefano; Bandi, Claudio; Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Bolzoni, Luca; Casadei, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed a rare Salmonella enterica serovar Manhattan outbreak that occurred in Italy in 2009 to evaluate the potential of new genomic tools based on differential single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis in comparison with the gold standard genotyping method, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. A total of 39 isolates were analyzed from patients (n = 15) and food, feed, animal, and environmental sources (n = 24), resulting in five different pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiles. Isolates epidemiologically related to the outbreak clustered within the same pulsotype, SXB_BS.0003, without any further differentiation. Thirty-three isolates were considered for genomic analysis based on different sets of SNPs, core, synonymous, nonsynonymous, as well as SNPs in different codon positions, by Bayesian and maximum likelihood algorithms. Trees generated from core and nonsynonymous SNPs, as well as SNPs at the second and first plus second codon positions detailed four distinct groups of isolates within the outbreak pulsotype, discriminating outbreak-related isolates of human and food origins. Conversely, the trees derived from synonymous and third-codon-position SNPs clustered food and human isolates together, indicating that all outbreak-related isolates constituted a single clone, which was in line with the epidemiological evidence. Further experiments are in place to extend this approach within our regional enteropathogen surveillance system. PMID:25653407

  15. Association of prediabetes-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms with microalbuminuria.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jong Wook; Moon, Shinje; Jang, Eun Jung; Lee, Chang Hwa; Park, Joon-Sung

    2017-01-01

    Increased glycemic exposure, even below the diagnostic criteria for diabetes mellitus, is crucial in the pathogenesis of diabetic microvascular complications represented by microalbuminuria. Nonetheless, there is limited evidence regarding which single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with prediabetes and whether genetic predisposition to prediabetes is related to microalbuminuria, especially in the general population. Our objective was to answer these questions. We conducted a genomewide association study (GWAS) separately on two population-based cohorts, Ansung and Ansan, in the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study (KoGES). The initial GWAS was carried out on the Ansung cohort, followed by a replication study on the Ansan cohort. A total of 5682 native Korean participants without a significant medical illness were classified into either control group (n = 3153) or prediabetic group (n = 2529). In the GWAS, we identified two susceptibility loci associated with prediabetes, one at 17p15.3-p15.1 in the GCK gene and another at 7p15.1 in YKT6. When variations in GCK and YKT6 were used as a model of prediabetes, this genetically determined prediabetes increased microalbuminuria. Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed that fasting glucose concentration in plasma and SNP rs2908289 in GCK were associated with microalbuminuria, and adjustment for age, gender, smoking history, systolic blood pressure, waist circumference, and serum triglyceride levels did not attenuate this association. Our results suggest that prediabetes and the associated SNPs may predispose to microalbuminuria before the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. Further studies are needed to explore the details of the physiological and molecular mechanisms underlying this genetic association.

  16. Association of prediabetes-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms with microalbuminuria

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jong Wook; Moon, Shinje; Jang, Eun Jung; Lee, Chang Hwa; Park, Joon-Sung

    2017-01-01

    Increased glycemic exposure, even below the diagnostic criteria for diabetes mellitus, is crucial in the pathogenesis of diabetic microvascular complications represented by microalbuminuria. Nonetheless, there is limited evidence regarding which single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with prediabetes and whether genetic predisposition to prediabetes is related to microalbuminuria, especially in the general population. Our objective was to answer these questions. We conducted a genomewide association study (GWAS) separately on two population-based cohorts, Ansung and Ansan, in the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study (KoGES). The initial GWAS was carried out on the Ansung cohort, followed by a replication study on the Ansan cohort. A total of 5682 native Korean participants without a significant medical illness were classified into either control group (n = 3153) or prediabetic group (n = 2529). In the GWAS, we identified two susceptibility loci associated with prediabetes, one at 17p15.3-p15.1 in the GCK gene and another at 7p15.1 in YKT6. When variations in GCK and YKT6 were used as a model of prediabetes, this genetically determined prediabetes increased microalbuminuria. Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed that fasting glucose concentration in plasma and SNP rs2908289 in GCK were associated with microalbuminuria, and adjustment for age, gender, smoking history, systolic blood pressure, waist circumference, and serum triglyceride levels did not attenuate this association. Our results suggest that prediabetes and the associated SNPs may predispose to microalbuminuria before the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. Further studies are needed to explore the details of the physiological and molecular mechanisms underlying this genetic association. PMID:28158221

  17. Genomic and single nucleotide polymorphism analysis of infectious bronchitis coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Abolnik, Celia

    2015-06-01

    Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) is a Gammacoronavirus that causes a highly contagious respiratory disease in chickens. A QX-like strain was analysed by high-throughput Illumina sequencing and genetic variation across the entire viral genome was explored at the sub-consensus level by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. Thirteen open reading frames (ORFs) in the order 5'-UTR-1a-1ab-S-3a-3b-E-M-4b-4c-5a-5b-N-6b-3'UTR were predicted. The relative frequencies of missense: silent SNPs were calculated to obtain a comparative measure of variability in specific genes. The most variable ORFs in descending order were E, 3b, 5'UTR, N, 1a, S, 1ab, M, 4c, 5a, 6b. The E and 3b protein products play key roles in coronavirus virulence, and RNA folding demonstrated that the mutations in the 5'UTR did not alter the predicted secondary structure. The frequency of SNPs in the Spike (S) protein ORF of 0.67% was below the genomic average of 0.76%. Only three SNPS were identified in the S1 subunit, none of which were located in hypervariable region (HVR) 1 or HVR2. The S2 subunit was considerably more variable containing 87% of the polymorphisms detected across the entire S protein. The S2 subunit also contained a previously unreported multi-A insertion site and a stretch of four consecutive mutated amino acids, which mapped to the stalk region of the spike protein. Template-based protein structure modelling produced the first theoretical model of the IBV spike monomer. Given the lack of diversity observed at the sub-consensus level, the tenet that the HVRs in the S1 subunit are very tolerant of amino acid changes produced by genetic drift is questioned. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Distribution bias analysis of germline and somatic single-nucleotide variations that impact protein functional site and neighboring amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yang; Yan, Cheng; Hu, Yu; Fan, Yu; Pan, Qing; Wan, Quan; Torcivia-Rodriguez, John; Mazumder, Raja

    2017-01-01

    Single nucleotide variations (SNVs) can result in loss or gain of protein functional sites. We analyzed the effects of SNVs on enzyme active sites, ligand binding sites, and various types of post translational modification (PTM) sites. We found that, for most types of protein functional sites, the SNV pattern differs between germline and somatic mutations as well as between synonymous and non-synonymous mutations. From a total of 51,138 protein functional site affecting SNVs (pfsSNVs), a pan-cancer analysis revealed 142 somatic pfsSNVs in five or more cancer types. By leveraging patient information for somatic pfsSNVs, we identified 17 loss of functional site SNVs and 60 gain of functional site SNVs which are significantly enriched in patients with specific cancer types. Of the key pfsSNVs identified in our analysis above, we highlight 132 key pfsSNVs within 17 genes that are found in well-established cancer associated gene lists. For illustrating how key pfsSNVs can be prioritized further, we provide a use case where we performed survival analysis showing that a loss of phosphorylation site pfsSNV at position 105 in MEF2A is significantly associated with decreased pancreatic cancer patient survival rate. These 132 pfsSNVs can be used in developing genetic testing pipelines. PMID:28176830

  19. Systematic Dissection of Coding Exons at Single Nucleotide Resolution Supports an Additional Role in Cell-Specific Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mee J.; Findlay, Gregory M.; Martin, Beth; Zhao, Jingjing; Bell, Robert J. A.; Smith, Robin P.; Ku, Angel A.; Shendure, Jay; Ahituv, Nadav

    2014-01-01

    In addition to their protein coding function, exons can also serve as transcriptional enhancers. Mutations in these exonic-enhancers (eExons) could alter both protein function and transcription. However, the functional consequence of eExon mutations is not well known. Here, using massively parallel reporter assays, we dissect the enhancer activity of three liver eExons (SORL1 exon 17, TRAF3IP2 exon 2, PPARG exon 6) at single nucleotide resolution in the mouse liver. We find that both synonymous and non-synonymous mutations have similar effects on enhancer activity and many of the deleterious mutation clusters overlap known liver-associated transcription factor binding sites. Carrying a similar massively parallel reporter assay in HeLa cells with these three eExons found differences in their mutation profiles compared to the liver, suggesting that enhancers could have distinct operating profiles in different tissues. Our results demonstrate that eExon mutations could lead to multiple phenotypes by disrupting both the protein sequence and enhancer activity and that enhancers can have distinct mutation profiles in different cell types. PMID:25340400

  20. Strain-Specific Genotyping of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis by Using Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms, Insertions, and Deletions▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Briczinski, Elizabeth P.; Loquasto, Joseph R.; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Dudley, Edward G.; Roberts, Anastasia M.; Roberts, Robert F.

    2009-01-01

    Several probiotic strains of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis are widely supplemented into food products and dietary supplements due to their documented health benefits and ability to survive within the mammalian gastrointestinal tract and acidified dairy products. The strain specificity of these characteristics demands techniques with high discriminatory power to differentiate among strains. However, to date, molecular approaches, such as pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR, have been ineffective at achieving strain separation due to the monomorphic nature of this subspecies. Previously, sequencing and comparison of two B. animalis subsp. lactis genomes (DSMZ 10140 and Bl-04) confirmed this high level of sequence similarity, identifying only 47 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and four insertions and/or deletions (INDELs) between them. In this study, we hypothesized that a sequence-based typing method targeting these loci would permit greater discrimination between strains than previously attempted methods. Sequencing 50 of these loci in 24 strains of B. animalis subsp. lactis revealed that a combination of nine SNPs/INDELs could be used to differentiate strains into 14 distinct genotypic groups. In addition, the presence of a nonsynonymous SNP within the gene encoding a putative glucose uptake protein was found to correlate with the ability of certain strains to transport glucose and to grow rapidly in a medium containing glucose as the sole carbon source. The method reported here can be used in clinical, regulatory, and commercial applications requiring identification of B. animalis subsp. lactis at the strain level. PMID:19801460

  1. A survey of genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms through genome resequencing in the Périgord black truffle (Tuber melanosporum Vittad.).

    PubMed

    Payen, Thibaut; Murat, Claude; Gigant, Anaïs; Morin, Emmanuelle; De Mita, Stéphane; Martin, Francis

    2015-09-01

    The Périgord black truffle (Tuber melanosporum Vittad.), considered a gastronomic delicacy worldwide, is an ectomycorrhizal filamentous fungus that is ecologically important in Mediterranean French, Italian and Spanish woodlands. In this study, we developed a novel resource of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for T. melanosporum using Illumina high-throughput resequencing. The genome from six T. melanosporum geographical accessions was sequenced to a depth of approximately 20×. These geographical accessions were selected from different populations within the northern and southern regions of the geographical species distribution. Approximately 80% of the reads for each of the six resequenced geographical accessions mapped against the reference T. melanosporum genome assembly, estimating the core genome size of this organism to be approximately 110 Mbp. A total of 442 326 SNPs corresponding to 3540 SNPs/Mbps were identified as being included in all seven genomes. The SNPs occurred more frequently in repeated sequences (85%), although 4501 SNPs were also identified in the coding regions of 2587 genes. Using the ratio of nonsynonymous mutations per nonsynonymous site (pN) to synonymous mutations per synonymous site (pS) and Tajima's D index scanning the whole genome, we were able to identify genomic regions and genes potentially subjected to positive or purifying selection. The SNPs identified represent a valuable resource for future population genetics and genomics studies.

  2. Non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes for immunoregulatory galectins: association of galectin-8 (F19Y) occurrence with autoimmune diseases in a Caucasian population.

    PubMed

    Pál, Zsuzsanna; Antal, Péter; Srivastava, Sanjeev Kumar; Hullám, Gábor; Semsei, Agnes F; Gál, János; Svébis, Mihály; Soós, Györgyi; Szalai, Csaba; André, Sabine; Gordeeva, Elena; Nagy, György; Kaltner, Herbert; Bovin, Nicolai V; Molnár, Mária Judit; Falus, András; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Buzás, Edit Irén

    2012-10-01

    Galectins are potent immune regulators, with galectin-8 acting as a pro-apoptotic effector on synovial fluid cells and thymocytes and stimulator on T-cells. To set a proof-of-principle example for risk assessment in autoimmunity, and for a mutation affecting physiological galectin sensor functions, a polymorphism in the coding region of the galectin-8 gene (rs2737713; F19Y) was studied for its association with two autoimmune disorders, i.e. rheumatoid arthritis and myasthenia gravis. A case-control analysis and a related quantitative trait-association study were performed to investigate the association of this polymorphism in patients (myasthenia gravis 149, rheumatoid arthritis 214 and 134 as primary and repetitive cohorts, respectively) and 365 ethnically matched (Caucasian) healthy controls. Distribution was also investigated in patients grouped according to their antibody status and age at disease onset. Comparative testing for lectin activity was carried out in ELISA/ELLA-based binding tests with both wild-type and F19Y mutant galectin-8 from peripheral blood mononuclear cell lysates of healthy individuals with different genotypes as well as with recombinant wild-type and F19Y mutant galectin-8 proteins. A strong association was found for rheumatoid arthritis, and a mild one with myasthenia gravis. Furthermore, the presence of the sequence deviation also correlated with age at disease onset in the case of rheumatoid arthritis. The F19Y substitution did not appear to affect carbohydrate binding in solid-phase assays markedly. This is the first report of an association between a galectin-based polymorphism leading to a mutant protein and autoimmune diseases, with evidence for antagonistic pleiotropy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of pattern recognition receptors and chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Sahingur, S E; Xia, X-J; Gunsolley, J; Schenkein, H A; Genco, R J; De Nardin, E

    2011-04-01

    Periodontitis is a multifactorial disease influenced partly by genetics. Activation of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) can lead to the up-regulation of inflammatory pathways, resulting in periodontal tissue destruction. Hence, functional polymorphisms located in PRRs can explain differences in host susceptibility to periodontitis. This study investigated single nucleotide polymorphisms of PRRs including toll-like receptor (TLR)2 (G2408A), TLR4 (A896G), TLR9 (T1486C), TLR9 (T1237C) and CD14 (C260T) in patients with chronic periodontitis and in periodontally healthy subjects. One-hundred and fourteen patients with chronic periodontitis and 77 periodontally healthy subjects were genotyped using TaqMan® allelic discrimination assays. Fisher's exact test and chi-square analyses were performed to compare genotype and allele frequencies. The frequency of subjects with the CC genotype of CD14 (C260T) (24.6% in the chronic periodontitis group vs. 13% in the periodontally healthy group) and those expressing the T allele of CD14 (C260T) (CT and TT) (75.4% in the chronic periodontitis group vs. 87% in the periodontally healthy group) was statistically different among groups (p = 0.04). Homozygocity for the C allele of the CD14 (C260T) polymorphism (CC) was associated with a two--fold increased susceptibility to periodontitis (p = 0.04; odds ratio, 2.49; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-6.26). Individuals with the CC genotype of TLR9 (T1486C) (14.9% in the chronic periodontitis group vs. 28.6% in the periodontally healthy group) and those expressing the T allele of TLR9 (T1486C) (CT and TT) (85.1% in the chronic periodontitis group vs. 71.4% in the periodontally healthy group) were also significantly differently distributed between groups without adjustment (p = 0.03). Further analysis of nonsmokers revealed a significant difference in the distribution of genotypes between groups for TLR9 (T1486C; p = 0.017) and CD14 (C260T; p = 0.03), polymorphisms again without adjustment

  4. The application and performance of single nucleotide polymorphism markers for population genetic analyses of Lepidoptera

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are nucleotide substitution mutations that tend to be at high densities within eukaryotic genomes. The development of assays that detect allelic variation at SNP loci is attractive for genome mapping, population genetics, and phylogeographic applications. A p...

  5. Quantum Point Contact Single-Nucleotide Conductance for DNA and RNA Sequence Identification.

    PubMed

    Afsari, Sepideh; Korshoj, Lee E; Abel, Gary R; Khan, Sajida; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2017-10-06

    Several nanoscale electronic methods have been proposed for high-throughput single-molecule nucleic acid sequence identification. While many studies display a large ensemble of measurements as "electronic fingerprints" with some promise for distinguishing the DNA and RNA nucleobases (adenine, guanine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil), important metrics such as accuracy and confidence of base calling fall well below the current genomic methods. Issues such as unreliable metal-molecule junction formation, variation of nucleotide conformations, insufficient differences between the molecular orbitals responsible for single-nucleotide conduction, and lack of rigorous base calling algorithms lead to overlapping nanoelectronic measurements and poor nucleotide discrimination, especially at low coverage on single molecules. Here, we demonstrate a technique for reproducible conductance measurements on conformation-constrained single nucleotides and an advanced algorithmic approach for distinguishing the nucleobases. Our quantum point contact single-nucleotide conductance sequencing (QPICS) method uses combed and electrostatically bound single DNA and RNA nucleotides on a self-assembled monolayer of cysteamine molecules. We demonstrate that by varying the applied bias and pH conditions, molecular conductance can be switched ON and OFF, leading to reversible nucleotide perturbation for electronic recognition (NPER). We utilize NPER as a method to achieve >99.7% accuracy for DNA and RNA base calling at low molecular coverage (∼12×) using unbiased single measurements on DNA/RNA nucleotides, which represents a significant advance compared to existing sequencing methods. These results demonstrate the potential for utilizing simple surface modifications and existing biochemical moieties in individual nucleobases for a reliable, direct, single-molecule, nanoelectronic DNA and RNA nucleotide identification method for sequencing.

  6. A three-single-nucleotide polymorphism haplotype in intron 1 of OCA2 explains most human eye-color variation.

    PubMed

    Duffy, David L; Montgomery, Grant W; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Zhen Zhen; Le, Lien; James, Michael R; Hayward, Nicholas K; Martin, Nicholas G; Sturm, Richard A

    2007-02-01

    We have previously shown that a quantitative-trait locus linked to the OCA2 region of 15q accounts for 74% of variation in human eye color. We conducted additional genotyping to clarify the role of the OCA2 locus in the inheritance of eye color and other pigmentary traits associated with skin-cancer risk in white populations. Fifty-eight synonymous and nonsynonymous exonic single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and tagging SNPs were typed in a collection of 3,839 adolescent twins, their siblings, and their parents. The highest association for blue/nonblue eye color was found with three OCA2 SNPs: rs7495174 T/C, rs6497268 G/T, and rs11855019 T/C (P values of 1.02x10(-61), 1.57x10(-96), and 4.45x10(-54), respectively) in intron 1. These three SNPs are in one major haplotype block, with TGT representing 78.4% of alleles. The TGT/TGT diplotype found in 62.2% of samples was the major genotype seen to modify eye color, with a frequency of 0.905 in blue or green compared with only 0.095 in brown eye color. This genotype was also at highest frequency in subjects with light brown hair and was more frequent in fair and medium skin types, consistent with the TGT haplotype acting as a recessive modifier of lighter pigmentary phenotypes. Homozygotes for rs11855019 C/C were predominantly without freckles and had lower mole counts. The minor population impact of the nonsynonymous coding-region polymorphisms Arg305Trp and Arg419Gln associated with nonblue eyes and the tight linkage of the major TGT haplotype within the intron 1 of OCA2 with blue eye color and lighter hair and skin tones suggest that differences within the 5' proximal regulatory control region of the OCA2 gene alter expression or messenger RNA-transcript levels and may be responsible for these associations.

  7. Electrical detection and quantification of single and mixed DNA nucleotides in suspension

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Mahmoud Al; Panicker, Neena G.; Rizvi, Tahir A.; Mustafa, Farah

    2016-01-01

    High speed sequential identification of the building blocks of DNA, (deoxyribonucleotides or nucleotides for short) without labeling or processing in long reads of DNA is the need of the hour. This can be accomplished through exploiting their unique electrical properties. In this study, the four different types of nucleotides that constitute a DNA molecule were suspended in a buffer followed by performing several types of electrical measurements. These electrical parameters were then used to quantify the suspended DNA nucleotides. Thus, we present a purely electrical counting scheme based on the semiconductor theory that allows one to determine the number of nucleotides in a solution by measuring their capacitance-voltage dependency. The nucleotide count was observed to be similar to the multiplication of the corresponding dopant concentration and debye volume after de-embedding the buffer contribution. The presented approach allows for a fast and label-free quantification of single and mixed nucleotides in a solution. PMID:27677329

  8. Electrical detection and quantification of single and mixed DNA nucleotides in suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Mahmoud Al; Panicker, Neena G.; Rizvi, Tahir A.; Mustafa, Farah

    2016-09-01

    High speed sequential identification of the building blocks of DNA, (deoxyribonucleotides or nucleotides for short) without labeling or processing in long reads of DNA is the need of the hour. This can be accomplished through exploiting their unique electrical properties. In this study, the four different types of nucleotides that constitute a DNA molecule were suspended in a buffer followed by performing several types of electrical measurements. These electrical parameters were then used to quantify the suspended DNA nucleotides. Thus, we present a purely electrical counting scheme based on the semiconductor theory that allows one to determine the number of nucleotides in a solution by measuring their capacitance-voltage dependency. The nucleotide count was observed to be similar to the multiplication of the corresponding dopant concentration and debye volume after de-embedding the buffer contribution. The presented approach allows for a fast and label-free quantification of single and mixed nucleotides in a solution.

  9. Hypermutable non-synonymous sites are under stronger negative selection.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Steffen; Gerasimova, Anna; Kondrashov, Fyodor A; Adzhubei, Ivan A; Adzuhbei, Ivan A; Kondrashov, Alexey S; Sunyaev, Shamil

    2008-11-01

    Mutation rate varies greatly between nucleotide sites of the human genome and depends both on the global genomic location and the local sequence context of a site. In particular, CpG context elevates the mutation rate by an order of magnitude. Mutations also vary widely in their effect on the molecular function, phenotype, and fitness. Independence of the probability of occurrence of a new mutation's effect has been a fundamental premise in genetics. However, highly mutable contexts may be preserved by negative selection at important sites but destroyed by mutation at sites under no selection. Thus, there may be a positive correlation between the rate of mutations at a nucleotide site and the magnitude of their effect on fitness. We studied the impact of CpG context on the rate of human-chimpanzee divergence and on intrahuman nucleotide diversity at non-synonymous coding sites. We compared nucleotides that occupy identical positions within codons of identical amino acids and only differ by being within versus outside CpG context. Nucleotides within CpG context are under a stronger negative selection, as revealed by their lower, proportionally to the mutation rate, rate of evolution and nucleotide diversity. In particular, the probability of fixation of a non-synonymous transition at a CpG site is two times lower than at a CpG site. Thus, sites with different mutation rates are not necessarily selectively equivalent. This suggests that the mutation rate may complement sequence conservation as a characteristic predictive of functional importance of nucleotide sites.

  10. Hypermutable Non-Synonymous Sites Are under Stronger Negative Selection

    PubMed Central

    Kondrashov, Fyodor A.; Adzuhbei, Ivan A.; Kondrashov, Alexey S.; Sunyaev, Shamil

    2008-01-01

    Mutation rate varies greatly between nucleotide sites of the human genome and depends both on the global genomic location and the local sequence context of a site. In particular, CpG context elevates the mutation rate by an order of magnitude. Mutations also vary widely in their effect on the molecular function, phenotype, and fitness. Independence of the probability of occurrence of a new mutation's effect has been a fundamental premise in genetics. However, highly mutable contexts may be preserved by negative selection at important sites but destroyed by mutation at sites under no selection. Thus, there may be a positive correlation between the rate of mutations at a nucleotide site and the magnitude of their effect on fitness. We studied the impact of CpG context on the rate of human–chimpanzee divergence and on intrahuman nucleotide diversity at non-synonymous coding sites. We compared nucleotides that occupy identical positions within codons of identical amino acids and only differ by being within versus outside CpG context. Nucleotides within CpG context are under a stronger negative selection, as revealed by their lower, proportionally to the mutation rate, rate of evolution and nucleotide diversity. In particular, the probability of fixation of a non-synonymous transition at a CpG site is two times lower than at a CpG site. Thus, sites with different mutation rates are not necessarily selectively equivalent. This suggests that the mutation rate may complement sequence conservation as a characteristic predictive of functional importance of nucleotide sites. PMID:19043566

  11. Kinetic properties of a single nucleotide binding site on chloroplast coupling factor 1 (CF1).

    PubMed

    Günther, S; Huchzermeyer, B

    1998-12-01

    The kinetics of nucleotide binding to spinach chloroplast coupling factor CF1 in a fully inhibited state were investigated by stopped-flow experiments using the fluorescent trinitrophenyl analogue (NO2)3Ph-ADP. The CF1 was in a state in which two of the three binding sites on the beta subunits were irreversibly blocked with ADP, Mg2+ and fluoroaluminate, while the three binding sites on the alpha subunits were occupied by nucleotides [Garin, J., Vincon, M., Gagnon, J. & Vignais, P. V. (1994) Biochemistry 33, 3772-3777)]. Thus, it was possible to characterise a single nucleotide-binding site without superimposed nucleotide exchange or binding to an additional site. (NO2)3Ph-ADP binding to the remaining site on the third beta subunit was characterised by a high dissociation rate of 15 s(-1), leading to a very low affinity (dissociation constant higher than 150 microM). Subsequent to isolation, CF1 preparations contained two endogenously bound nucleotides. Pre-loading with ATP yielded CF1 with five tightly bound nucleotides and one free nucleotide-binding site on a beta subunit. Pre-loading with ADP, however, resulted in a CF1 preparation containing four tightly bound nucleotides and two free nucleotide binding sites. One of the two free binding sites was located on a beta subunit, while the other was probably located on an alpha subunit.

  12. Potential Association Between Frequent Nonsynonymous Variant of NPPA and Cardioembolic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-Hyun; Jang, Bo-Hyung; Go, Ho Yeon; Park, Sunju; Shin, Yong-Cheol; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2012-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP, also known as NPPA) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP, also known as NPPB) have been determined as genetic factors for several diseases, including stroke and myocardial infarction, in human and rat models. To investigate the potential association between polymorphisms of the NPPA gene and stroke in a Korean population, nine single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of NPPA and NPPB genes were genotyped in a total of 941 Korean subjects, including 674 stroke patients (109 hemorrhagic and 565 ischemic) and 267 unaffected controls. Genotype comparisons of the targeted alleles revealed that there were no significant associations between stroke patients and control subjects, or among hemorrhagic, ischemic, and control groups. However, in logistic analysis for Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) classification of ischemic stroke, nonsynonymous rs5065 (STOP152Arg) and rs5067 in 3′UTR of NPPA, which were in complete linkage disequilibrium, showed significant associations with cardioembolic stroke. These two SNPs showed higher frequencies in cardioembolic stroke patients than those in controls and ischemic patients with small-vessel occlusion (p=0.002, adjusted p=0.02). It was also found that NPPA rs5065C allele in all of the Korean subjects existed as heterozygous compared with Caucasian and African populations. Although further replications in larger cardioembolic stroke subjects are required, our preliminary findings suggest that the nonsynonymous rs5065C of the NPPA gene, which could produce a new or dysfunctional transcript, is possibly associated with cardioembolism. PMID:22400494

  13. Structure-function relationships in human d-aspartate oxidase: characterisation of variants corresponding to known single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Katane, Masumi; Kanazawa, Ryo; Kobayashi, Risa; Oishi, Megumi; Nakayama, Kazuki; Saitoh, Yasuaki; Miyamoto, Tetsuya; Sekine, Masae; Homma, Hiroshi

    2017-09-01

    d-Aspartate oxidase (DDO) is a degradative enzyme that is stereospecific for the acidic amino acid d-aspartate, an endogenous agonist of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. Dysregulation of NMDA receptor-mediated neurotransmission has been implicated in the onset of various neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia and in chronic pain. Thus, appropriate regulation of the amount of d-aspartate is believed to be important for maintaining proper neural activity in the nervous system. Herein, the effects of the non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) R216Q and S308N on several properties of human DDO were examined. Analysis of the purified recombinant enzyme showed that the R216Q and S308N substitutions reduce enzyme activity towards acidic d-amino acids, decrease the binding affinity for the coenzyme flavin adenine dinucleotide and decrease the temperature stability. Consistent with these findings, further experiments using cultured mammalian cells revealed elevated d-aspartate in cultures of R216Q and S308N cells compared with cells expressing wild-type DDO. Furthermore, accumulation of several amino acids other than d-aspartate also differed between these cultures. Thus, expression of DDO genes carrying the R216Q or S308N SNP substitutions may increase the d-aspartate content in humans and alter homeostasis of several other amino acids. This work may aid in understanding the correlation between DDO activity and the risk of onset of NMDA receptor-related diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Molecular Evolutionary Analysis of ABCB5: The Ancestral Gene Is a Full Transporter with Potentially Deleterious Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    McGee, Kate; Lancaster, Germaine; Gold, Bert; Dean, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background ABCB5 is a member of the ABC protein superfamily, which includes the transporters ABCB1, ABCC1 and ABCG2 responsible for causing drug resistance in cancer patients and also several other transporters that have been linked to human disease. The ABCB5 full transporter (ABCB5.ts) is expressed in human testis and its functional significance is presently unknown. Another variant of this transporter, ABCB5 beta posses a “half-transporter-like” structure and is expressed in melanoma stem cells, normal melanocytes, and other types of pigment cells. ABCB5 beta has important clinical implications, as it may be involved with multidrug resistance in melanoma stem cells, allowing these stem cells to survive chemotherapeutic regimes. Methodology/Principal Findings We constructed and examined in detail topological structures of the human ABCB5 protein and determined in-silico the cSNPs (coding single nucleotide polymorphisms) that may affect its function. Evolutionary analysis of ABCB5 indicated that ABCB5, ABCB1, ABCB4, and ABCB11 share a common ancestor, which began duplicating early in the evolutionary history of chordates. This suggests that ABCB5 has evolved as a full transporter throughout its evolutionary history. Conclusions/Significance From our in-silco analysis of cSNPs we found that a large number of non-synonymous cSNPs map to important functional regions of the protein suggesting that these SNPs if present in human populations may play a role in diseases associated with ABCB5. From phylogenetic analyses, we have shown that ABCB5 evolved as a full transporter throughout its evolutionary history with an absence of any major shifts in selection between the various lineages suggesting that the function of ABCB5 has been maintained during mammalian evolution. This finding would suggest that ABCB5 beta may have evolved to play a specific role in human pigment cells and/or melanoma cells where it is predominantly expressed. PMID:21298007

  15. A robust method for detecting single-nucleotide changes as polymorphic markers by PCR.

    PubMed

    Michaels, S D; Amasino, R M

    1998-05-01

    Numerous techniques in plant molecular genetic analysis, such as mapping and positional cloning techniques, rely on the availability of molecular markers that can differentiate between alleles at a particular locus. PCR-based cleaved amplified polymorphic sequences (CAPS) markers have been widely used as a means of rapidly and reliably detecting a single-base change that creates a unique restriction site in one of a pair of alleles. However, the majority of single-nucleotide changes do not create such sites and thus cannot be used to create CAPS markers. In this paper, a modification of the CAPS technique that allows detection of most single-nucleotide changes by utilizing mismatched PCR primers is described. The mismatches in the PCR primers, in combination with the single-nucleotide change, create a unique restriction site in one of the alleles.

  16. Single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays and unexpected consanguinity: considerations for clinicians when returning results to families.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Fernanda; Tabor, Holly K; Chow, Penny M; Conta, Jessie H; Feldman, Kenneth W; Tsuchiya, Karen D; Beck, Anita E

    2015-05-01

    The broad use of single-nucleotide polymorphism microarrays has increased identification of unexpected consanguinity. Therefore, guidelines to address reporting of consanguinity have been published for clinical laboratories. Because no such guidelines for clinicians exist, we describe a case and present recommendations for clinicians to disclose unexpected consanguinity to families. In a boy with multiple endocrine abnormalities and structural birth defects, single-nucleotide polymorphism array analysis revealed ~23% autosomal homozygosity suggestive of a first-degree parental relationship. We assembled an interdisciplinary health-care team, planned the most appropriate way to discuss results of the single-nucleotide polymorphism array with the adult mother, including the possibility of multiple autosomal recessive disorders in her child, and finally met with her as a team. From these discussions, we developed four major considerations for clinicians returning results of unexpected consanguinity, all guided by the child's best interests: (i) ethical and legal obligations for reporting possible abuse, (ii) preservation of the clinical relationship, (iii) attention to justice and psychosocial challenges, and (iv) utilization of the single-nucleotide polymorphism array results to guide further testing. As single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays become a common clinical diagnostic tool, clinicians can use this framework to return results of unexpected consanguinity to families in a supportive and productive manner.

  17. Quantitative genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphism by single-molecule multi-color fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Koh, Hye Ran; Han, Kyu Young; Jung, Jiwon; Kim, Seong Keun

    2011-10-07

    We developed a new single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping method based on single-molecule multi-color fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). We demonstrated that this new method uses less than 1 fmol of sample and is also highly quantitative with a detection level of 1% or lower in the minor allele fraction. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  18. Insertion kinetics of small nucleotides through single walled carbon nanotube.

    PubMed

    Clavier, A; Kraszewski, S; Ramseyer, C; Picaud, F

    2013-03-10

    We report molecular dynamic simulations showing that a DNA molecule constituted by five unique bases can be spontaneously inserted into single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) in normal conditions (P, T and water environment) depending on the tube radius value. The van der Waals and electrostatic interactions play a central role for the rapid insertion process. Our study shows also that the Guanine molecule inserts the fastest compared to thymine, adenine and cytosine bases, respectively. The differences of insertion time could be exploited for applications concerning for example DNA sequencing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms in the human nescient helix-loop-helix 2 (NHLH2) gene reduce mRNA stability and DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Al Rayyan, Numan; Wankhade, Umesh D; Bush, Korie; Good, Deborah J

    2013-01-01

    Nescient helix-loop-helix-2 (NHLH2) is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, which has been implicated, using mouse knockouts, in adult body weight regulation and fertility. A scan of the known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the NHLH2 gene revealed one in the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR), which lies within an AUUUA RNA stability motif. A second SNP is nonsynonymous within the coding region of NHLH2, and was found in a genome-wide association study for obesity. Both of these SNPs were examined for their effect on NLHL2 by creating mouse mimics and examining mRNA stability, and protein function in mouse hypothalamic cell lines. The 3'UTR SNP causes increased instability and, when the SNP-containing Nhlh2 3'UTR is attached to luciferase mRNA, reduced protein levels in cells. The nonsynonymous SNP at position 83 in the protein changes an alanine residue, conserved in NHLH2 orthologs through the Drosophila sp. to a proline residue. This change affects migration of the protein on an SDS-PAGE gel, and appears to alter secondary structure of the protein, as predicted using in silico methods. These results provide functional information on two rare human SNPs in the NHLH2 gene. One of these has been linked to human obese phenotypes, while the other is present in a relatively high proportion of individuals. Given their effects on NHLH2 protein levels, both SNPs deserve further analysis in whether they are causative and/or additive for human body weight and fertility phenotypes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of single nucleotide polymorphism markers for the green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas).

    PubMed

    Roden, Suzanne E; Dutton, Peter H; Morin, Phillip A

    2009-05-01

    We present data on 29 new single nucleotide polymorphism assays for the green sea turtle, Chelonia mydas. DNA extracts from 39 green turtles were used for two methods of single nucleotide polymorphism discovery. The first approach employed an amplified fragment length polymorphism technique. The second technique screened a microsatellite library. Allele-specific amplification assays were developed for high-throughput single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping and tested on two Pacific C. mydas nesting populations. Observed heterozygosities ranged from 0 to 0.95 for a Hawaiian population and from 0 to 0.85 for a Galapagos population. Each of the populations had one locus out of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, SSCM2b and SSCM5 for Hawaii and Galapagos, respectively. No loci showed significant genotypic linkage disequilibrium across an expanded set of four Pacific nesting populations. However, two loci, SSCM4 and SSCM10b showed linkage disequilibrium across three populations indicating possible association.

  1. The Label-Free Unambiguous Detection and Symbolic Display of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms on DNA Origami

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Hari K. K.; Chakraborty, Banani; Sha, Ruojie; Seeman, Nadrian C.

    2011-01-01

    Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most common genetic variation in the human genome. Kinetic methods based on branch migration have proved successful for detecting SNPs because a mispair inhibits the progress of branch migration in the direction of the mispair. We have combined the effectiveness of kinetic methods with AFM of DNA origami patterns to produce a direct visual readout of the target nucleotide contained in the probe sequence. The origami contains graphical representations of the four nucleotide alphabetic characters, A, T, G and C, and the symbol containing the test nucleotide identity vanishes in the presence of the probe. The system also works with pairs of probes, corresponding to heterozygous diploid genomes. PMID:21235216

  2. Contrasting patterns of synonymous and nonsynonymous sequence evolution in asexual and sexual freshwater snail lineages.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Steven G; Howard, R Stephen

    2007-11-01

    In asexual lineages, both synonymous and nonsynonymous sequence polymorphism may be reduced due to severe founder effects when asexual lineages originate. However, mildly deleterious (nonsynonymous) mutations may accumulate after asexual lineages are formed, because the efficiency of purifying selection is reduced even in the nonrecombining mitochondrial genome. Here we examine patterns of synonymous and nonsynonymous mitochondrial sequence polymorphism in asexual and sexual lineages of the freshwater snail Campeloma. Using clade-specific estimates, we found that synonymous sequence polymorphism was significantly reduced by 75% in asexuals relative to sexuals, whereas nonsynonymous sequence polymorphism did not differ significantly between sexuals and asexuals. Two asexual clades had high negative values for Tajima's D statistic. Coalescent simulations confirmed that various bottleneck scenarios can account for this result. We also used branch-specific estimates of the ratio of amino acid to silent substitutions, K(a)/K(s). Our study revealed that K(a)/K(s) ratios are six times higher in terminal branches of independent asexual lineages compared to sexuals. Coalescent-based reconstruction of gene networks for all sexual and asexual clades indicated that nonsynonymous mutations occurred at a higher frequency in recently derived asexual haplotypes. These findings suggest that patterns of synonymous and nonsynonymous nucleotide polymorphism in asexual snail lineages may be shaped by both severe founder effect and relaxed purifying selection.

  3. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Nucleotide Excision Repair Genes, Cigarette Smoking, and the Risk of Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wyss, Annah B.; Herring, Amy H.; Avery, Christy L.; Weissler, Mark C.; Bensen, Jeannette T.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Funkhouser, William K.; Olshan, Andrew F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoking is associated with increased head and neck cancer (HNC) risk. Tobacco-related carcinogens are known to cause bulky DNA adducts. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) genes encode enzymes that remove adducts and may be independently associated with HNC, as well as modifiers of the association between smoking and HNC. Methods Using population-based case-control data from the Carolina Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Study (1,227 cases, 1,325 controls), race-stratified (white, African American) conventional and hierarchical logistic regression models were utilized to estimate odds ratios (OR) with 95% intervals (I) for the independent and joint effects of cigarette smoking and 84 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 15 NER genes on HNC risk. Results The odds of HNC were elevated among ever cigarette smokers, and increased with smoking duration and frequency. Among whites, rs4150403 on ERCC3 was associated with increased HNC odds (AA+AG vs. GG, OR=1.28, 95% I=1.01,1.61). Among African Americans, rs4253132 on ERCC6 was associated with decreased HNC odds (CC+CT vs. TT, OR=0.62, 95% I=0.45,0.86). Interactions between ever cigarette smoking and three SNPs (rs4253132 on ERCC6, rs2291120 on DDB2, and rs744154 on ERCC4) suggested possible departures from additivity among whites. Conclusions We did not find associations between some previously studied NER variants and HNC. We did identify new associations between two SNPs and HNC and three suggestive cigarette-SNP interactions to consider in future studies. Impact We conducted one of the most comprehensive evaluations of NER variants, identifying a few SNPs from biologically plausible candidate genes associated with HNC and possibly interacting with cigarette smoking. PMID:23720401

  4. Development of single-nucleotide polymorphism markers for Bromus tectorum (Poaceae) from a partially sequenced transcriptome

    Treesearch

    Keith R. Merrill; Craig E. Coleman; Susan E. Meyer; Elizabeth A. Leger; Katherine A. Collins

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Bromus tectorum (Poaceae) is an annual grass species that is invasive in many areas of the world but most especially in the U.S. Intermountain West. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers were developed for use in investigating the geospatial and ecological diversity of B. tectorum in the Intermountain West to better understand the...

  5. Short communication: Relationship of call rate and accuracy of single nucleotide polymorphism genotypes in dairy cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Call rate has been used as a measure of quality on both a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and animal basis since SNP genotypes were first used in genomic evaluation of dairy cattle. The genotyping laboratories perform initial quality control screening and genotypes that fail are usually exclude...

  6. Development of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Markers for Use in Commercial Maize (Zea Mays L.) Germplasm

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The development of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in maize offer the opportunity to utilize DNA markers in many new areas of population genetics, gene discovery, plant breeding, and germplasm identification. However, the steps from sequencing and SNP discovery to SNP marker design and ...

  7. Subtyping of Salmonella enterica subspecies I using single nucleotide polymorphisms in adenylate cyclase (cyaA)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Methods to rapidly identify serotypes of Salmonella enterica subspecies I are of vital importance for protecting the safety of food. To supplement the serotyping method dkgB-linked intergenic sequence ribotyping (ISR), single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were characterized within adenylate cyclas...

  8. Identification of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Markers in the Laccase Gene of Shiitake Mushrooms (Lentinula edodes)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Hwan; Ka, Kang-Hyeon; Kang, Ji Hyoun; Kim, Sangil; Lee, Jung Won; Jeon, Bong-Kyun; Yun, Jung-Kuk

    2015-01-01

    We identified single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in the laccase gene to establish a line-diagnostic system for shiitake mushrooms. A total of 89 fungal isolates representing four lines, including Korean registered, Korean wild type, Chinese, and Japanese lines, were analyzed. The results suggest that SNP markers in the laccase gene can be useful for line typing in shiitake mushrooms. PMID:25892919

  9. Verification of genetic identity of introduced cacao germplasm in Ghana using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Accurate identification of individual genotypes is important for cacao (Theobroma cacao L.) breeding, germplasm conservation and seed propagation. The development of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in cacao offers an effective way to use a high-throughput genotyping system for cacao gen...

  10. Increasing the number of single nucleotide polymorphisms used in genomic evaluation of dairy cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    GeneSeek designed a new version of the GeneSeek Genomic Profiler HD BeadChip for Dairy Cattle, which had >77,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). A set of >140,000 SNPs was selected that included all SNPs on the existing GeneSeek chip, all SNPs used in U.S. national genomic evaluations, SNPs ...

  11. Association of a single nucleotide polymorphism of calpain 1 gene with meat tenderness of the yak

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The association of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of calpain 1 (CAPN1) gene with shear force of 2.54 cm steaks from M. longissimus dorsi from Gannan yaks (Bos grunniens, n = 181) was studied. The experimental design was a repeated measures with the main unit in a completely randomized design...

  12. A lateral flow biosensor for detection of single nucleotide polymorphism by circular strand displacement reaction.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhuo; Lie, Puchang; Fang, Zhiyuan; Yu, Luxin; Chen, Junhua; Liu, Jie; Ge, Chenchen; Zhou, Xuemeng; Zeng, Lingwen

    2012-09-04

    A lateral flow biosensor for detection of single nucleotide polymorphism based on circular strand displacement reaction (CSDPR) has been developed. Taking advantage of high fidelity of T4 DNA ligase, signal amplification by CSDPR, and the optical properties of gold nanoparticles, this assay has reached a detection limit of 0.01 fM.

  13. Lineage and genogroup-defining single nucleotide polymorphisms of Escherichia coli 0157:H7

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 is a zoonotic human pathogen for which cattle are an important reservoir host. Using both previously published and new sequencing data, a 48-locus single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) based typing panel was developed that redundantly identified eleven genogroups that span ...

  14. A novel technique for detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms by analyzing consumed allele-specific primers.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, G; Umetsu, K; Yuasa, I; Sato, M; Sakabe, M; Naito, E; Yamanouchi, H; Suzuki, T

    2001-02-01

    We present a simple and rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based technique, termed consumed allele-specific primer analysis (CASPA), as a new strategy for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. The method involves the use of labeled allele-specific primers, differing in length, with several noncomplementary nucleotides added in the 5'-terminal region. After PCR amplification, the amounts of the remaining primers not incorporated into the PCR products are determined. Thus, nucleotide substitutions are identified by measuring the consumption of primers. In this study, the CASPA method was successfully applied to ABO genotyping. In the present method, the allele-specific primer only anneals with the target polymorphic site on the DNA, so it is not necessary to analyze the PCR products. Therefore, this method is only little affected by modification of the PCR products. The CASPA method is expected to be a useful tool for typing of SNPs.

  15. Heated oligonucleotide ligation assay (HOLA): an affordable single nucleotide polymorphism assay.

    PubMed

    Black, W C; Gorrochotegui-Escalante, N; Duteau, N M

    2006-03-01

    Most single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection requires expensive equipment and reagents. The oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA) is an inexpensive SNP assay that detects ligation between a biotinylated "allele-specific detector" and a 3' fluorescein-labeled "reporter" oligonucleotide. No ligation occurs unless the 3' detector nucleotide is complementary to the SNP nucleotide. The original OLA used chemical denaturation and neutralization. Heated OLA (HOLA) instead uses a thermal stable ligase and cycles of denaturing and hybridization for ligation and SNP detection. The cost per genotype is approximately US$1.25 with two-allele SNPs or approximately US$1.75 with three-allele SNPs. We illustrate the development of HOLA for SNP detection in the Early Trypsin and Abundant Trypsin loci in the mosquito Aedes aegypti (L.) and at the a-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase locus in the mosquito Anopheles gambiae s.s.

  16. OmpF, a nucleotide-sensing nanoprobe, computational evaluation of single channel activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdolvahab, R. H.; Mobasheri, H.; Nikouee, A.; Ejtehadi, M. R.

    2016-09-01

    The results of highthroughput practical single channel experiments should be formulated and validated by signal analysis approaches to increase the recognition precision of translocating molecules. For this purpose, the activities of the single nano-pore forming protein, OmpF, in the presence of nucleotides were recorded in real time by the voltage clamp technique and used as a means for nucleotide recognition. The results were analyzed based on the permutation entropy of current Time Series (TS), fractality, autocorrelation, structure function, spectral density, and peak fraction to recognize each nucleotide, based on its signature effect on the conductance, gating frequency and voltage sensitivity of channel at different concentrations and membrane potentials. The amplitude and frequency of ion current fluctuation increased in the presence of Adenine more than Cytosine and Thymine in milli-molar (0.5 mM) concentrations. The variance of the current TS at various applied voltages showed a non-monotonic trend whose initial increasing slope in the presence of Thymine changed to a decreasing one in the second phase and was different from that of Adenine and Cytosine; e.g., by increasing the voltage from 40 to 140 mV in the 0.5 mM concentration of Adenine or Cytosine, the variance decreased by one third while for the case of Thymine it was doubled. Moreover, according to the structure function of TS, the fractality of current TS differed as a function of varying membrane potentials (pd) and nucleotide concentrations. Accordingly, the calculated permutation entropy of the TS, validated the biophysical approach defined for the recognition of different nucleotides at various concentrations, pd's and polarities. Thus, the promising outcomes of the combined experimental and theoretical methodologies presented here can be implemented as a complementary means in pore-based nucleotide recognition approaches.

  17. Disparities in allele frequencies and population differentiation for 101 disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms between Puerto Ricans and non-Hispanic whites

    PubMed Central

    Mattei, Josiemer; Parnell, Laurence D; Lai, Chao-Qiang; Garcia-Bailo, Bibiana; Adiconis, Xian; Shen, Jian; Arnett, Donna; Demissie, Serkalem; Tucker, Katherine L; Ordovas, Jose M

    2009-01-01

    Background Variations in gene allele frequencies can contribute to differences in the prevalence of some common complex diseases among populations. Natural selection modulates the balance in allele frequencies across populations. Population differentiation (FST) can evidence environmental selection pressures. Such genetic information is limited in Puerto Ricans, the second largest Hispanic ethnic group in the US, and a group with high prevalence of chronic disease. We determined allele frequencies and population differentiation for 101 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 30 genes involved in major metabolic and disease-relevant pathways in Puerto Ricans (n = 969, ages 45–75 years) and compared them to similarly aged non-Hispanic whites (NHW) (n = 597). Results Minor allele frequency (MAF) distributions for 45.5% of the SNPs assessed in Puerto Ricans were significantly different from those of NHW. Puerto Ricans carried risk alleles in higher frequency and protective alleles in lower frequency than NHW. Patterns of population differentiation showed that Puerto Ricans had SNPs with exceptional FST values in intronic, non-synonymous and promoter regions. NHW had exceptional FST values in intronic and promoter region SNPs only. Conclusion These observations may serve to explain and broaden studies on the impact of gene polymorphisms on chronic diseases affecting Puerto Ricans. PMID:19682384

  18. Transcriptome-Wide Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) for Abalone (Haliotis midae): Validation and Application Using GoldenGate Medium-Throughput Genotyping Assays

    PubMed Central

    Bester-Van Der Merwe, Aletta; Blaauw, Sonja; Plessis, Jana Du; Roodt-Wilding, Rouvay

    2013-01-01

    Haliotis midae is one of the most valuable commercial abalone species in the world, but is highly vulnerable, due to exploitation, habitat destruction and predation. In order to preserve wild and cultured stocks, genetic management and improvement of the species has become crucial. Fundamental to this is the availability and employment of molecular markers, such as microsatellites and single nucleotide (SNPs). Transcriptome sequences generated through sequencing-by-synthesis technology were utilized for the in vitro and in silico identification of 505 putative SNPs from a total of 316 selected contigs. A subset of 234 SNPs were further validated and characterized in wild and cultured abalone using two Illumina GoldenGate genotyping assays. Combined with VeraCode technology, this genotyping platform yielded a 65%–69% conversion rate (percentage polymorphic markers) with a global genotyping success rate of 76%–85% and provided a viable means for validating SNP markers in a non-model species. The utility of 31 of the validated SNPs in population structure analysis was confirmed, while a large number of SNPs (174) were shown to be informative and are, thus, good candidates for linkage map construction. The non-synonymous SNPs (50) located in coding regions of genes that showed similarities with known proteins will also be useful for genetic applications, such as the marker-assisted selection of genes of relevance to abalone aquaculture. PMID:24065109

  19. Development and Validation of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) Markers from Two Transcriptome 454-Runs of Turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) Using High-Throughput Genotyping.

    PubMed

    Vera, Manuel; Alvarez-Dios, Jose-Antonio; Fernandez, Carlos; Bouza, Carmen; Vilas, Roman; Martinez, Paulino

    2013-03-12

    The turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) is a commercially valuable flatfish and one of the most promising aquaculture species in Europe. Two transcriptome 454-pyrosequencing runs were used in order to detect Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes related to immune response and gonad differentiation. A total of 866 true SNPs were detected in 140 different contigs representing 262,093 bp as a whole. Only one true SNP was analyzed in each contig. One hundred and thirteen SNPs out of the 140 analyzed were feasible (genotyped), while Ш were polymorphic in a wild population. Transition/transversion ratio (1.354) was similar to that observed in other fish studies. Unbiased gene diversity (He) estimates ranged from 0.060 to 0.510 (mean = 0.351), minimum allele frequency (MAF) from 0.030 to 0.500 (mean = 0.259) and all loci were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium after Bonferroni correction. A large number of SNPs (49) were located in the coding region, 33 representing synonymous and 16 non-synonymous changes. Most SNP-containing genes were related to immune response and gonad differentiation processes, and could be candidates for functional changes leading to phenotypic changes. These markers will be useful for population screening to look for adaptive variation in wild and domestic turbot.

  20. Development and Validation of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) Markers from Two Transcriptome 454-Runs of Turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) Using High-Throughput Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Vera, Manuel; Alvarez-Dios, Jose-Antonio; Fernandez, Carlos; Bouza, Carmen; Vilas, Roman; Martinez, Paulino

    2013-01-01

    The turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) is a commercially valuable flatfish and one of the most promising aquaculture species in Europe. Two transcriptome 454-pyrosequencing runs were used in order to detect Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes related to immune response and gonad differentiation. A total of 866 true SNPs were detected in 140 different contigs representing 262,093 bp as a whole. Only one true SNP was analyzed in each contig. One hundred and thirteen SNPs out of the 140 analyzed were feasible (genotyped), while III were polymorphic in a wild population. Transition/transversion ratio (1.354) was similar to that observed in other fish studies. Unbiased gene diversity (He) estimates ranged from 0.060 to 0.510 (mean = 0.351), minimum allele frequency (MAF) from 0.030 to 0.500 (mean = 0.259) and all loci were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium after Bonferroni correction. A large number of SNPs (49) were located in the coding region, 33 representing synonymous and 16 non-synonymous changes. Most SNP-containing genes were related to immune response and gonad differentiation processes, and could be candidates for functional changes leading to phenotypic changes. These markers will be useful for population screening to look for adaptive variation in wild and domestic turbot. PMID:23481633

  1. PEG-Labeled Nucleotides and Nanopore Detection for Single Molecule DNA Sequencing by Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shiv; Tao, Chuanjuan; Chien, Minchen; Hellner, Brittney; Balijepalli, Arvind; Robertson, Joseph W. F.; Li, Zengmin; Russo, James J.; Reiner, Joseph E.; Kasianowicz, John J.; Ju, Jingyue

    2012-01-01

    We describe a novel single molecule nanopore-based sequencing by synthesis (Nano-SBS) strategy that can accurately distinguish four bases by detecting 4 different sized tags released from 5′-phosphate-modified nucleotides. The basic principle is as follows. As each nucleotide is incorporated into the growing DNA strand during the polymerase reaction, its tag is released and enters a nanopore in release order. This produces a unique ionic current blockade signature due to the tag's distinct chemical structure, thereby determining DNA sequence electronically at single molecule level with single base resolution. As proof of principle, we attached four different length PEG-coumarin tags to the terminal phosphate of 2′-deoxyguanosine-5′-tetraphosphate. We demonstrate efficient, accurate incorporation of the nucleotide analogs during the polymerase reaction, and excellent discrimination among the four tags based on nanopore ionic currents. This approach coupled with polymerase attached to the nanopores in an array format should yield a single-molecule electronic Nano-SBS platform. PMID:23002425

  2. PEG-labeled nucleotides and nanopore detection for single molecule DNA sequencing by synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shiv; Tao, Chuanjuan; Chien, Minchen; Hellner, Brittney; Balijepalli, Arvind; Robertson, Joseph W F; Li, Zengmin; Russo, James J; Reiner, Joseph E; Kasianowicz, John J; Ju, Jingyue

    2012-01-01

    We describe a novel single molecule nanopore-based sequencing by synthesis (Nano-SBS) strategy that can accurately distinguish four bases by detecting 4 different sized tags released from 5'-phosphate-modified nucleotides. The basic principle is as follows. As each nucleotide is incorporated into the growing DNA strand during the polymerase reaction, its tag is released and enters a nanopore in release order. This produces a unique ionic current blockade signature due to the tag's distinct chemical structure, thereby determining DNA sequence electronically at single molecule level with single base resolution. As proof of principle, we attached four different length PEG-coumarin tags to the terminal phosphate of 2'-deoxyguanosine-5'-tetraphosphate. We demonstrate efficient, accurate incorporation of the nucleotide analogs during the polymerase reaction, and excellent discrimination among the four tags based on nanopore ionic currents. This approach coupled with polymerase attached to the nanopores in an array format should yield a single-molecule electronic Nano-SBS platform.

  3. Associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms in multiple candidate genes and body weight in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    El-Sabrout, Karim; Aggag, Sarah A.

    2017-01-01

    Aim: In this study, we examined parts of six growth genes (growth hormone [GH], melanocortin 4 receptor [MC4R], growth hormone receptor [GHR], phosphorglycerate mutase [PGAM], myostatin [MSTN], and fibroblast growth factor [FGF]) as specific primers for two rabbit lines (V-line, Alexandria) using nucleotide sequence analysis, to investigate association between detecting single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of these genes and body weight (BW) at market. Materials and Methods: Each line kits were grouped into high and low weight rabbits to identify DNA markers useful for association studies with high BW. DNA from blood samples of each group was extracted to amplify the six growth genes. SNP technique was used to study the associate polymorphism in the six growth genes and marketing BW (at 63 days) in the two rabbit lines. The purified polymerase chain reaction products were sequenced in those had the highest and lowest BW in each line. Results: Alignment of sequence data from each group revealed the following SNPs: At nucleotide 23 (A-C) and nucleotide 35 (T-G) in MC4R gene (sense mutation) of Alexandria and V-line high BW. Furthermore, we detected the following SNPs variation between the two lines: A SNP (T-C) at nucleotide 27 was identified by MC4R gene (sense mutation) and another one (A-C) at nucleotide 14 was identified by GHR gene (nonsense mutation) of Alexandria line. The results of individual BW at market (63 days) indicated that Alexandria rabbits had significantly higher BW compared with V-line rabbits. MC4R polymorphism showed significant association with high BW in rabbits. Conclusion: The results of polymorphism demonstrate the possibility to detect an association between BW in rabbits and the efficiency of the used primers to predict through the genetic specificity using the SNP of MC4R. PMID:28246458

  4. Microfluidic linear hydrogel array for multiplexed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yun Kyung; Kim, Jungkyu; Mathies, Richard A

    2015-03-17

    A PDMS-based microfluidic linear hydrogel array is developed for multiplexed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection. A sequence of three-dimensional (3D) hydrogel plugs containing the desired DNA probes is prepared by UV polymerization within a PDMS microchannel system. The fluorescently labeled target DNA is then electrophoresed through the sequence of hydrogel plugs for hybridization. Continued electrophoresis provides an electrophoretic wash that removes nonspecific binders. The capture gel array is imaged after washing at various temperatures (temperature gradient electrophoresis) to further distinguish perfect matches from mismatches. The ability of this microdevice to perform multiplex SNP genotyping is demonstrated by analyzing a mixture of model E. coli bacterial targets. This microfluidic hydrogel array is ∼1000 times more sensitive than planar microarrays due to the 3D gel capture, the hybridization time is much shorter due to electrophoretic control of the transport properties, and the stringent wash with temperature gradient electrophoresis enables analysis of single nucleotide mismatches with high specificity.

  5. Robust embryo identification using first polar body single nucleotide polymorphism microarray-based DNA fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Treff, Nathan R; Su, Jing; Kasabwala, Natasha; Tao, Xin; Miller, Kathleen A; Scott, Richard T

    2010-05-01

    This study sought to validate a novel, minimally invasive system for embryo tracking by single nucleotide polymorphism microarray-based DNA fingerprinting of the first polar body. First polar body-based assignments of which embryos implanted and were delivered after multiple ET were 100% consistent with previously validated embryo DNA fingerprinting-based assignments. Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Non-nearest-neighbor dependence of stability for group III RNA single nucleotide bulge loops.

    PubMed

    Kent, Jessica L; McCann, Michael D; Phillips, Daniel; Panaro, Brandon L; Lim, Geoffrey F S; Serra, Martin J

    2014-06-01

    Thirty-five RNA duplexes containing single nucleotide bulge loops were optically melted and the thermodynamic parameters for each duplex determined. The bulge loops were of the group III variety, where the bulged nucleotide is either a AG/U or CU/G, leading to ambiguity to the exact position and identity of the bulge. All possible group III bulge loops with Watson-Crick nearest-neighbors were examined. The data were used to develop a model to predict the free energy of an RNA duplex containing a group III single nucleotide bulge loop. The destabilization of the duplex by the group III bulge could be modeled so that the bulge nucleotide leads to the formation of the Watson-Crick base pair rather than the wobble base pair. The destabilization of an RNA duplex caused by the insertion of a group III bulge is primarily dependent upon non-nearest-neighbor interactions and was shown to be dependent upon the stability of second least stable stem of the duplex. In-line structure probing of group III bulge loops embedded in a hairpin indicated that the bulged nucleotide is the one positioned further from the hairpin loop irrespective of whether the resulting stem formed a Watson-Crick or wobble base pair. Fourteen RNA hairpins containing group III bulge loops, either 3' or 5' of the hairpin loop, were optically melted and the thermodynamic parameters determined. The model developed to predict the influence of group III bulge loops on the stability of duplex formation was extended to predict the influence of bulge loops on hairpin stability. © 2014 Kent et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  7. Single-nucleotide patch base excision repair of uracil in DNA by mitochondrial protein extracts.

    PubMed

    Stierum, R H; Dianov, G L; Bohr, V A

    1999-09-15

    Mammalian mitochondria contain several 16.5 kb circular DNAs (mtDNA) encoding electron transport chain proteins. Reactive oxygen species formed as byproducts from oxidative phosphorylation in these organelles can cause oxidative deamination of cytosine and lead to uracil in mtDNA. Upon mtDNA replication, these lesions, if unrepaired, can lead to mutations. Until recently, it was thought that there was no DNA repair in mitochondria, but lately there is evidence that some lesions are efficiently repaired in these organelles. In the study of nuclear DNA repair, the in vitro repair measurements in cell extracts have provided major insights into the mechanisms. The use of whole-cell extract based DNA repair methods has revealed that mammalian nuclear base excision repair (BER) diverges into two pathways: the single-nucleotide replacement and long patch repair mechanisms. Similar in vitro methods have not been available for the study of mitochondrial BER. We have established an in vitro DNA repair system supported by rat liver mitochondrial protein extract and DNA substrates containing a single uracil opposite to a guanine. Using this approach, we examined the repair pathways and the identity of the DNA polymerase involved in mitochondrial BER (mtBER). Employing restriction analysis of in vitro repaired DNA to map the repair patch size, we demonstrate that only one nucleotide is incorporated during the repair process. Thus, in contrast to BER in the nucleus, mtBER of uracil in DNA is solely accomplished by single-nucleotide replacement.

  8. Single-molecule comparison of DNA Pol I activity with native and analog nucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gul, Osman; Olsen, Tivoli; Choi, Yongki; Corso, Brad; Weiss, Gregory; Collins, Philip

    2014-03-01

    DNA polymerases are critical enzymes for DNA replication, and because of their complex catalytic cycle they are excellent targets for investigation by single-molecule experimental techniques. Recently, we studied the Klenow fragment (KF) of DNA polymerase I using a label-free, electronic technique involving single KF molecules attached to carbon nanotube transistors. The electronic technique allowed long-duration monitoring of a single KF molecule while processing thousands of template strands. Processivity of up to 42 nucleotide bases was directly observed, and statistical analysis of the recordings determined key kinetic parameters for the enzyme's open and closed conformations. Subsequently, we have used the same technique to compare the incorporation of canonical nucleotides like dATP to analogs like 1-thio-2'-dATP. The analog had almost no affect on duration of the closed conformation, during which the nucleotide is incorporated. On the other hand, the analog increased the rate-limiting duration of the open conformation by almost 40%. We propose that the thiolated analog interferes with KF's recognition and binding, two key steps that determine its ensemble turnover rate.

  9. The discrepancy among single nucleotide variants detected by DNA and RNA high throughput sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan; Zhao, Shilin; Sheng, Quanhu; Samuels, David C; Shyr, Yu

    2017-10-03

    High throughput sequencing technology enables the both the human genome and transcriptome to be screened at the single nucleotide resolution. Tools have been developed to infer single nucleotide variants (SNVs) from both DNA and RNA sequencing data. To evaluate how much difference can be expected between DNA and RNA sequencing data, and among tissue sources, we designed a study to examine the single nucleotide difference among five sources of high throughput sequencing data generated from the same individual, including exome sequencing from blood, tumor and adjacent normal tissue, and RNAseq from tumor and adjacent normal tissue. Through careful quality control and analysis of the SNVs, we found little difference between DNA-DNA pairs (1%-2%). However, between DNA-RNA pairs, SNV differences ranged anywhere from 10% to 20%. Only a small portion of these differences can be explained by RNA editing. Instead, the majority of the DNA-RNA differences should be attributed to technical errors from sequencing and post-processing of RNAseq data. Our analysis results suggest that SNV detection using RNAseq is subject to high false positive rates.

  10. Nanoparticle-Based Discrimination of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism in Long DNA Sequences.

    PubMed

    Sanromán-Iglesias, María; Lawrie, Charles H; Liz-Marzán, Luis M; Grzelczak, Marek

    2017-04-19

    Circulating DNA (ctDNA) and specifically the detection cancer-associated mutations in liquid biopsies promises to revolutionize cancer detection. The main difficulty however is that the length of typical ctDNA fragments (∼150 bases) can form secondary structures potentially obscuring the mutated fragment from detection. We show that an assay based on gold nanoparticles (65 nm) stabilized with DNA (Au@DNA) can discriminate single nucleotide polymorphism in clinically relevant ssDNA sequences (70-140 bases). The preincubation step was crucial to this process, allowing sequential bridging of Au@DNA, so that single base mutation can be discriminated, down to 100 pM concentration.

  11. An Approach to Elucidate NBS1 Function in DNA Repair Using Frequent Nonsynonymous Polymorphism in Wild Medaka (Oryzias latipes) Populations.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Kento; Kobayashi, Junya; Katsumura, Takafumi; Urushihara, Yusuke; Hida, Kyohei; Watanabe-Asaka, Tomomi; Oota, Hiroki; Oda, Shoji; Mitani, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Nbs1 is one of the genes responsible for Nijmegen breakage syndrome, which is marked with high radiosensitivity. In human NBS1 (hNBS1), Q185E polymorphism is known as the factor to cancer risks, although its DSB repair defect has not been addressed. Here we investigated the genetic variations in medaka (Oryzias latipes) wild populations, and found 40 nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in medaka nbs1 (olnbs1) gene within 5 inbred strains. A mutation to histidine in Q170 residue in olNbs1, which corresponds to Q185 residue of hNBS1, was widely distributed in the closed colonies derived from the eastern Korean population of medaka. Overexpression of H170 type olNbs1 in medaka cultured cell lines resulted in the increased accumulation of olNbs1 at laser-induced DSB sites. Autophosphorylation of DNA-dependent protein kinase at T2609 was suppressed after the γ-ray irradiation, which was followed by prolonged formation of γ-H2AX foci and delayed DSB repair. These findings suggested that the nonsynonymous SNP (Q170H) in olnbs1, which induced DSB repair defects, is specifically distributed in the eastern Korean population of medaka. Furthermore, examination using the variation within wild populations might provide a novel method to characterize a driving force to spread the disease risk alleles.

  12. An Approach to Elucidate NBS1 Function in DNA Repair Using Frequent Nonsynonymous Polymorphism in Wild Medaka (Oryzias latipes) Populations

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Kento; Kobayashi, Junya; Katsumura, Takafumi; Urushihara, Yusuke; Hida, Kyohei; Watanabe-Asaka, Tomomi; Oota, Hiroki; Oda, Shoji

    2017-01-01

    Nbs1 is one of the genes responsible for Nijmegen breakage syndrome, which is marked with high radiosensitivity. In human NBS1 (hNBS1), Q185E polymorphism is known as the factor to cancer risks, although its DSB repair defect has not been addressed. Here we investigated the genetic variations in medaka (Oryzias latipes) wild populations, and found 40 nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in medaka nbs1 (olnbs1) gene within 5 inbred strains. A mutation to histidine in Q170 residue in olNbs1, which corresponds to Q185 residue of hNBS1, was widely distributed in the closed colonies derived from the eastern Korean population of medaka. Overexpression of H170 type olNbs1 in medaka cultured cell lines resulted in the increased accumulation of olNbs1 at laser-induced DSB sites. Autophosphorylation of DNA-dependent protein kinase at T2609 was suppressed after the γ-ray irradiation, which was followed by prolonged formation of γ-H2AX foci and delayed DSB repair. These findings suggested that the nonsynonymous SNP (Q170H) in olnbs1, which induced DSB repair defects, is specifically distributed in the eastern Korean population of medaka. Furthermore, examination using the variation within wild populations might provide a novel method to characterize a driving force to spread the disease risk alleles. PMID:28107384

  13. Large-scale characterization of public database SNPs causing non-synonymous changes in three ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Ireland, James; Carlton, Victoria E H; Falkowski, Matthew; Moorhead, Martin; Tran, Karen; Useche, Francisco; Hardenbol, Paul; Erbilgin, Ayca; Fitzgerald, Ron; Willis, Thomas D; Faham, Malek

    2006-03-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that lead to non-synonymous changes in proteins may have functional effects and be subject to selection. Hence they are of particular interest in the study of genetic diseases. We have genotyped approximately 28,000 such SNPs in three ethnic populations (the HapMap plates) and ten primate species and analyzed these data for evidence of selection. We find SNPs predicted by PolyPhen to be damaging, have lower allele frequencies, and are particularly likely to be population-specific. We have also grouped SNPs by molecular function or biological process of the associated genes and find evidence that selection may be acting in concert on classes of genes.

  14. A genetic variation map for chicken with 2.8 million single nucleotide polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, G K; Hillier, L; Brandstrom, M; Croojmans, R; Ovcharenko, I; Gordon, L; Stubbs, L; Lucas, S; Glavina, T; Kaiser, P; Gunnarsson, U; Webber, C; Overton, I

    2005-02-20

    We describe a genetic variation map for the chicken genome containing 2.8 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), based on a comparison of the sequences of 3 domestic chickens (broiler, layer, Silkie) to their wild ancestor Red Jungle Fowl (RJF). Subsequent experiments indicate that at least 90% are true SNPs, and at least 70% are common SNPs that segregate in many domestic breeds. Mean nucleotide diversity is about 5 SNP/kb for almost every possible comparison between RJF and domestic lines, between two different domestic lines, and within domestic lines--contrary to the idea that domestic animals are highly inbred relative to their wild ancestors. In fact, most of the SNPs originated prior to domestication, and there is little to no evidence of selective sweeps for adaptive alleles on length scales of greater than 100 kb.

  15. High-throughput profiling of influenza A virus hemagglutinin gene at single-nucleotide resolution

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Nicholas C.; Young, Arthur P.; Al-Mawsawi, Laith Q.; Olson, C. Anders; Feng, Jun; Qi, Hangfei; Chen, Shu-Hwa; Lu, I.-Hsuan; Lin, Chung-Yen; Chin, Robert G.; Luan, Harding H.; Nguyen, Nguyen; Nelson, Stanley F.; Li, Xinmin; Wu, Ting-Ting; Sun, Ren

    2014-01-01

    Genetic research on influenza virus biology has been informed in large part by nucleotide variants present in seasonal or pandemic samples, or individual mutants generated in the laboratory, leaving a substantial part of the genome uncharacterized. Here, we have developed a single-nucleotide resolution genetic approach to interrogate the fitness effect of point mutations in 98% of the amino acid positions in the influenza A virus hemagglutinin (HA) gene. Our HA fitness map provides a reference to identify indispensable regions to aid in drug and vaccine design as targeting these regions will increase the genetic barrier for the emergence of escape mutations. This study offers a new platform for studying genome dynamics, structure-function relationships, virus-host interactions, and can further rational drug and vaccine design. Our approach can also be applied to any virus that can be genetically manipulated. PMID:24820965

  16. Direct observation of the interaction of single fluorescent nucleotide analogue molecules with DNA polymerase I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jing Yong; Yamane, Yuji; Yamauchi, Masayo; Nakatsuka, Hiroki; Ishikawa, Mitsuru

    2000-04-01

    The interaction of a fluorescent nucleotide analogue, 2'- (or-3')- O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl) adenosine 5'-triphosphate (TNP-ATP), with the Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I (Pol I) was visualized at a single-molecule level. Upon excitation, individual enzyme-TNP-ATP complexes resulted in bright fluorescent spots owing to the increase of the fluorescence quantum yield of TNP-ATP when it bound to the enzyme molecule, whereas unbound TNP-ATP molecules were not visible in the single molecule detection. Thus, we directly investigated the individual interactions of TNP-ATP with the enzyme using single-molecule fluorescence imaging and time-resolved spectroscopy of single enzyme-TNP-ATP complexes without prior separation of the unbound probe molecules.

  17. Genome-wide divergence and linkage disequilibrium analyses for Capsicum baccatum revealed by genome-anchored single nucleotide polymorphisms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Principal component analysis (PCA) with 36,621 polymorphic genome-anchored single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified collectively for Capsicum annuum and Capsicum baccatum was used to show the distribution of these 2 important incompatible cultivated pepper species. Estimated mean nucleotide...

  18. Human histamine N-methyltransferase pharmacogenetics: gene resequencing, promoter characterization, and functional studies of a common 5'-flanking region single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP).

    PubMed

    Wang, Liewei; Thomae, Bianca; Eckloff, Bruce; Wieben, Eric; Weinshilboum, Richard

    2002-08-15

    Histamine N-methyltransferase (HNMT) catalyzes one of two major metabolic pathways for histamine. The levels of HNMT activity and immunoreactive protein in human tissues are regulated primarily by inheritance. Previous studies of HNMT identified two common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), including a functionally significant nonsynonymous coding SNP (cSNP), (C314T, Thr105Ile), but that polymorphism did not explain all of the phenotypic variation. In the present study, a genotype-to-phenotype strategy was used to search for additional genetic factors that might contribute to the regulation of human HNMT activity. Specifically, we began by resequencing the human HNMT gene using 90 ethnically anonymous DNA samples from the Coriell Cell Repository and identified a total of eight SNPs, including the two that had been reported previously. No new nonsynonymous cSNPs were observed, but three of the six novel SNPs were located in the 5'-flanking region (5'-FR) of the gene-including a third common polymorphism with a frequency of 0.367 (36.7%). That observation directed our attention to possible genetic effects on HNMT transcription. As a first step in testing that possibility, we created and studied a series of reporter gene constructs for the initial 1kb of the HNMT 5'-FR. The core promoter and possible regulatory regions were identified and verified by electrophoresis mobility shift assays. We then studied the possible functional implications of the new common HNMT 5'-FR SNP. However, on the basis of reporter gene studies, that SNP appeared to have little effect on transcription. Phenotype-genotype correlation analysis performed with 112 human kidney biopsy samples that had been phenotyped for their level of HNMT activity confirmed that the common 5'-FR SNP was not associated with the level of HNMT activity in vivo. In summary, this series of experiments resulted in the identification of several novel HNMT polymorphisms, identification of the HNMT core promoter

  19. Designing siRNA That Distinguish between Genes That Differ by a Single Nucleotide

    PubMed Central

    Kennington, Lori; Moore, Jessica T; Schelter, Janell; Burchard, Julja; Linsley, Peter S; Aronin, Neil; Xu, Zuoshang; Zamore, Phillip D

    2006-01-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), the guides that direct RNA interference (RNAi), provide a powerful tool to reduce the expression of a single gene in human cells. Ideally, dominant, gain-of-function human diseases could be treated using siRNAs that specifically silence the mutant disease allele, while leaving expression of the wild-type allele unperturbed. Previous reports suggest that siRNAs can be designed with single nucleotide specificity, but no rational basis for the design of siRNAs with single nucleotide discrimination has been proposed. We systematically identified siRNAs that discriminate between the wild-type and mutant alleles of two disease genes: the human Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene, which contributes to the progression of hereditary amyotrophic lateral sclerosis through the gain of a toxic property, and the huntingtin (HTT) gene, which causes Huntington disease when its CAG-repeat region expands beyond approximately 35 repeats. Using cell-free RNAi reactions in Drosophila embryo lysate and reporter assays and microarray analysis of off-target effects in cultured human cells, we identified positions within an siRNA that are most sensitive to mismatches. We also show that purine:purine mismatches imbue an siRNA with greater discriminatory power than other types of base mismatches. siRNAs in which either a G:U wobble or a mismatch is located in the “seed” sequence, the specialized siRNA guide region responsible for target binding, displayed lower levels of selectivity than those in which the mismatch was located 3′ to the seed; this region of an siRNA is critical for target cleavage but not siRNA binding. Our data suggest that siRNAs can be designed to discriminate between the wild-type and mutant alleles of many genes that differ by just a single nucleotide. PMID:16965178

  20. Different applications of polymerases with and without proofreading activity in single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia; Li, Kai; Liao, Duanfang; Pardinas, Jose R; Chen, Linling; Zhang, Xu

    2003-08-01

    With the completion of the human genome project, single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have become the focus of intense study in biomedical research. Polymerase-mediated primer extension has been employed in a variety of SNP assays. However, these SNP assays using polymerase without proofreading function are compromised by their low reliability. Using a newly developed short amplicon harboring restriction enzyme site, EcoR-I, we were able to compare the single-base discrimination abilities of polymerases with and without proofreading function in primer extension in a broad range of annealing temperatures. Thermodynamic analysis demonstrated a striking single-nucleotide discrimination ability of polymerases with proofreading function. Using unmodified 3'-end allele-specific primers, only template-dependent products were generated by polymerase with proofreading activity. This powerful single-base discrimination ability of exo(+) polymerases was further evaluated in primer extension using three types of 3' terminally modified allele-specific primers. As compared with the poor fidelity in primer extension of polymerases lacking 3' exonuclease activity, this study provides convincing evidence that the use of proofreading polymerases in combination with 3'-end modified allele-specific primers can be a powerful new strategy for the development of SNP assays.

  1. Transient suppression of MLH1 allows effective single-nucleotide substitution by single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Dekker, Marleen; de Vries, Sandra; Aarts, Marieke; Dekker, Robert; Brouwers, Conny; Wiebenga, Oliver; de Wind, Niels; Cantelli, Erika; Tonelli, Roberto; Te Riele, Hein

    2011-10-01

    Short synthetic single-stranded oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ssODNs) can be used to introduce subtle modifications into the genome of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We have previously shown that effective application of ssODN-mediated gene targeting in ESC requires (transient) suppression of DNA mismatch repair (MMR). However, whereas transient down-regulation of the mismatch recognition protein MSH2 allowed substitution of 3 or 4 nucleotides, 1 or 2 nucleotide substitutions were still suppressed. We now demonstrate that single- or dinucleotide substitution can effectively be achieved by transient down-regulation of the downstream MMR protein MLH1. By exploiting highly specific real-time PCR, we demonstrate the feasibility of substituting a single basepair in a non-selectable gene. However, disabling the MMR machinery may lead to inadvertent mutations. To obtain insight into the mutation rate associated with transient MMR suppression, we have compared the impact of transient and constitutive MMR deficiency on the repair of frameshift intermediates at mono- and dinucleotide repeats. Repair at these repeats relied on the substrate specificity and functional redundancy of the MSH2/MSH6 and MSH2/MSH3 MMR complexes. MLH1 knockdown increased the level of spontaneous mutagenesis, but modified ESCs remained germ line competent. Thus, transient MLH1 suppression provides a valuable extension of the MSH2 knockdown strategy, allowing rapid generation of mice carrying single basepair alterations in their genome.

  2. Dissection of the angle of single fluorophore attached to the nucleotide in corkscrewing microtubules.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Shoko; Ito, Yuko; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori; Adachi, Kengo; Yajima, Junichiro; Nishizaka, Takayuki

    2017-04-08

    Direct dissection of the angles of single fluorophores under an optical microscope has been a challenging approach to study the dynamics of proteins in an aqueous solution. For angle quantifications of single substrates, however, there was only one report (Nishizaka et al., 2014) because of difficulties of construction of experimental systems with active proteins working at the single-molecule level. We here show precise estimation of orientation of single fluorescent nucleotides bound to single tubulins that comprise microtubule. When single-headed kinesins immobilized on a glass surface drive the sliding of microtubules, microtubules show corkscrewing with regular pitches (Yajima et al., 2005 & 2008). We found, by using a three-dimensional tracking microscope, that S8A mutant kinesin also showed precise corkscrewing with a 330-nm pitch, which is 13% longer than that of the wild type. The assay with the mutant was combined with a defocused imaging technique to visualize the rotational behavior of fluorescent nucleotide bound to corkscrewing microtubule. Notably, the defocused pattern of single TAMRA-GTP periodically changed, precisely correlating to its precession movement. The time course of the change in the fluorophore angle projected to the xy-plane enabled to estimate both the fluorophore orientation against microtubule axis and the precision of angle-determination of analyses system. The orientation showed main distribution with peaks at∼40°, 50° and 60°. To identify their molecular conformations, the rigorous docking simulations were performed using an atomic-level structure modeled by fitting x-ray crystal structures to the cryo-electron microscopy map. Among isomers, 2'-O-EDA-GDP labeled with 5- or 6-TAMRA were mainly specified as possible candidates as a substrate, which suggested the hydrolysis of TAMRA-GTP by tubulins.

  3. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the upstream regulatory region alter the expression of myostatin.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Chen, Songyu; Zhang, Ran; Lin, Yushuang

    2013-06-01

    The expression of the gene encoding myostatin (MSTN), the product of which is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth and development in mammals, is regulated by many cis-regulatory elements, including enhancer box (E-box) motifs. While E-box motif mutants of MSTN exhibit altered expression of myostatin in many animal models, the phenotypes of these mutations in chicken are not investigated. In this study, we cloned and sequenced the full encoded DNA sequence of MSTN gene and its upstream promoter region in Wenshang Luhua chicken breed. After analysis of the sequence, 13 E-box motifs were identified in the MSTN promoter region, which were denoted by E1 to E13 according to their positions in the region. Although many single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were revealed in the MSTN promoter region, only two SNPs were in the E-boxes, i.e., the first nucleotide of the E3 and the fifth nucleotide of E4. The effects of these two polymorphisms on the expression of MSTN gene were explored both with MSTN-GFP reporter constructs in vitro and real-time PCR in vivo. The results suggested that the E-boxes in the chicken MSTN promoter region are involved in the regulation of myostatin expression and the polymorphisms in E3 and E4 altered the expression of myostatin.

  4. Determination of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms by Real-time Pyrophosphate DNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Alderborn, Anders; Kristofferson, Anna; Hammerling, Ulf

    2000-01-01

    The characterization of naturally occurring variations in the human genome has evoked an immense interest during recent years. Variations known as biallelic Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) have become increasingly popular markers in molecular genetics because of their wide application both in evolutionary relationship studies and in the identification of susceptibility to common diseases. We have addressed the issue of SNP genotype determination by investigating variations within the Renin–Angiotensin–Aldosterone System (RAAS) using pyrosequencing, a real-time pyrophosphate detection technology. The method is based on indirect luminometric quantification of the pyrophosphate that is released as a result of nucleotide incorporation onto an amplified template. The technical platform employed comprises a highly automated sequencing instrument that allows the analysis of 96 samples within 10 to 20 minutes. In addition to each studied polymorphic position, 5–10 downstream bases were sequenced for acquisition of reference signals. Evaluation of pyrogram data was accomplished by comparison of peak heights, which are proportional to the number of incorporated nucleotides. Analysis of the pyrograms that resulted from alternate allelic configurations for each addressed SNP revealed a highly discriminating pattern. Homozygous samples produced clear-cut single base peaks in the expected position, whereas heterozygous counterparts were characterized by distinct half-height peaks representing both allelic positions. Whenever any of the allelic bases of an SNP formed a homopolymer with adjacent bases, the nonallelic signal was added to those of the SNP. This feature did not, however, influence SNP readability. Furthermore, the multibase reading capacity of the described system provides extensive flexibility in regard to the positioning of sequencing primers and allows the determination of several closely located SNPs in a single run. PMID:10958643

  5. Single nucleotide polymorphisms as susceptibility, prognostic, and therapeutic markers of nonsmall cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zienolddiny, Shanbeh; Skaug, Vidar

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is a major public health problem throughout the world. Among the most frequent cancer types (prostate, breast, colorectal, stomach, lung), lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Among the two major subtypes of small cell lung cancer and nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC), 85% of tumors belong to the NSCLC histological types. Small cell lung cancer is associated with the shortest survival time. Although tobacco smoking has been recognized as the major risk factor for lung cancer, there is a great interindividual and interethnic difference in risk of developing lung cancer given exposure to similar environmental and lifestyle factors. This may indicate that in addition to chemical and environmental factors, genetic variations in the genome may contribute to risk modification. A common type of genetic variation in the genome, known as single nucleotide polymorphism, has been found to be associated with susceptibility to lung cancer. Interestingly, many of these polymorphisms are found in the genes that regulate major pathways of carcinogen metabolism (cytochrome P450 genes), detoxification (glutathione S-transferases), adduct removal (DNA repair genes), cell growth/apoptosis (TP53/MDM2), the immune system (cytokines/chemokines), and membrane receptors (nicotinic acetylcholine and dopaminergic receptors). Some of these polymorphisms have been shown to alter the level of mRNA, and protein structure and function. In addition to being susceptibility markers, several of these polymorphisms are emerging to be important for response to chemotherapy/radiotherapy and survival of patients. Therefore, it is hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms will be valuable genetic markers in individual-based prognosis and therapy in future. Here we will review some of the most important single nucleotide polymorphisms in the metabolic pathways that may modulate susceptibility, prognosis, and therapy in NSCLC. PMID:28210120

  6. Developing Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) markers from transcriptome sequences for the identification of longan (Dimocarpus longan) germplasm

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour.) is an important tropical fruit tree crop. Accurate varietal identification is essential for germplasm management and breeding. Using longan transcriptome sequences from public databases, we developed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers; validated 60 SNPs in...

  7. Genome-wide association study of fertility traits in dairy cattle using high-density single nucleotide polymorphism marker panels

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Unfavorable genetic correlations between production and fertility traits are well documented. Genetic selection for fertility traits is slow, however, due to low heritabilities. Identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) involved in reproduction could improve reliability of genomic esti...

  8. Effect of ageing and single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with the risk of aggressive prostate cancer in a New Zealand population.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Venkatesh; Naidu, Vijay; Karunasinghe, Nishi; Kao, Chi Hsiu-Juei; Pallati, Radha; Jabed, Anower; Marlow, Gareth; Kallingappa, Prasanna; Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2017-09-26

    Prostate cancer is one of the most significant male health concerns worldwide, and various researchers carrying out molecular diagnostics have indicated that genetic interactions with biological and behavioral factors play an important role in the overall risk and prognosis of this disease. Single nucleotide polymorphisms are increasingly becoming strong biomarker candidates to identify the susceptibility of individuals to prostate cancer. We carried out risk association of different stages of prostate cancer to a number of single nucleotide polymorphisms to identify the susceptible alleles in a New Zealand population and checked the interaction with environmental factors as well. We identified a number of single nucleotide polymorphisms to have associations specifically to the risk of prostate cancer and aggressiveness of the disease, and also certain single nucleotide polymorphisms to be vulnerable to the reported behavioral factors. We have addressed "special" environmental conditions prevalent in New Zealand, which can be used as a model for a bigger worldwide study.

  9. Single nucleotide variations in cultured cancer cells: Effect of mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Panyutin, Igor G; Panyutin, Irina V; Powell-Castilla, Ian; Felix, Laura; Neumann, Ronald D

    2017-10-01

    We assessed single nucleotide variations (SNVs) between individual cells in two cancer cell lines; DU145, from brain metastasis of prostate tumor with deficient mismatch repair; and HT1080, a fibrosarcoma cell line. Clones of individual cells were isolated, and sequenced using Ion Ampliseq comprehensive cancer panel that covered the exomes of 409 oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Five clones of DU145 and four clones of HT1080 cells were analyzed. We found from 7 to 12 unique SNVs between DU145 clones, while HT1080 clones showed no more than one unique SNV. We then sub-cloned individual cells from some of these isolated clones of DU145 and HT1080 cells. The sub-clones were expanded from a single cell to approximately one million cells after about 20 cell divisions. The sub-clones of DU145 cells had from one to four new unique SNVs within the sequenced regions. No unique SNVs were found between sub-clones of HT1080 cells. Our data demonstrate that the extent of genetic variation at the single nucleotide level in cultured cancer cells is significantly affected by the status of the DNA mismatch repair system. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) mitochondrial DNA derived from restriction site haplotype information.

    PubMed

    Garvin, M R; Saitoh, K; Churikov, D Y; Brykov, V A; Gharrett, A J

    2010-07-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are useful genetic markers for the management and conservation of commercially important species such as salmon. Informative markers can be derived from data obtained for other purposes. We used restriction endonuclease data from earlier work to identify potentially useful restriction sites in chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta). With the aid of a newly generated complete mitochondrial DNA sequence (accession number AP010773), we identified the SNP responsible for each restriction site variant, designed rapid genotyping assays, and surveyed the SNPs in more than 400 individuals. The restriction site analysis and the SNP genotyping assays were almost perfectly concordant. Some reasons for the non-concordance were identified and discussed.

  11. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms of the PRDM9 (MEISETZ) gene in patients with nonobstructive azoospermia.

    PubMed

    Irie, Shinji; Tsujimura, Akira; Miyagawa, Yasushi; Ueda, Tomohiro; Matsuoka, Yasuhiro; Matsui, Yasuhisa; Okuyama, Akihiko; Nishimune, Yoshitake; Tanaka, Hiromitsu

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the possible association between variations in the PRDM9 (MEISETZ) gene and impaired spermatogenesis in humans, we screened for mutations in the human PRDM9 gene using DNA from 217 sterile male patients and 162 proven fertile male volunteers. Two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 17353G>T (Gly433Val) and 18109C>G (Thr685Arg), were identified, as well as an intronic SNP, 15549G>T. These SNPs were identified in the heterozygous state in separate patients who demonstrated azoospermia. Neither variant was identified in fertile subjects. Our results suggest that mutations in PRDM9 may cause idiopathic infertility in human males.

  12. Six diagnostic single nucleotide polymorphism markers for detecting introgression between cutthroat and rainbow trouts.

    PubMed

    Finger, Amanda J; Stephens, Molly R; Clipperton, Neil W; May, Bernie

    2009-05-01

    Ten primer pairs were screened to develop single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) TaqMan assays that will distinguish California golden trout and some rainbow trouts (Oncorhynchus mykiss sspp., O. m. aguabonita) from the Paiute and Lahontan cutthroat trouts (Oncorhynchus clarkii seleniris, O. c. henshawi). From these 10 primer pairs, one mitochondrial and five nuclear fixed SNP differences were discovered and developed into TaqMan assays. These six assays will be useful for characterizing and monitoring hybridization between these groups. Additional Oncorhynchus clarkii sspp. and Oncorhynchus mykiss sspp. were assayed to determine if these assays are useful in closely related species.

  13. A suite of twelve single nucleotide polymorphism markers for detecting introgression between cutthroat and rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Harwood, Andrew S; Phillips, Ruth B

    2011-03-01

    A suite of 12 subspecies and species-specific single nucleotide polymorphism (species-specific SNP) markers was developed to distinguish rainbow trout (RT) Oncorhynchus mykiss from the four major subspecies of cutthroat trout: westslope cutthroat trout (WCT) Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi, Yellowstone cutthroat trout (YCT) Oncorhynchus clarki bouvieri, coastal cutthroat trout (CCT) Oncorhynchus clarki clarki, Lahontan cutthroat trout (LCT) Oncorhynchus clarki henshawi, and their hybrids. Several of the markers were linked to help strengthen hybrid determinations, and sex-specific species-specific SNP assays were also developed.

  14. Predicting responses to sunitinib using single nucleotide polymorphisms: Progress and recommendations for future trials.

    PubMed

    Ganapathi, Ram N; Bukowski, Ronald M

    2011-12-30

    Targeted therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors has led to a substantial improvement in the standard of care for patients with advanced or metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Because the mechanism of action, metabolism and transport of tyrosine kinase inhibitors can affect outcome and toxicity, several investigators have pursued the identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes associated with these actions. We discuss SNPs associated with outcome and toxicity following sunitinib therapy and provide recommendations for future trials to facilitate the use of SNPs in personalized therapy for this disease.

  15. Prioritizing single-nucleotide polymorphisms and variants associated with clinical mastitis.

    PubMed

    Suravajhala, Prashanth; Benso, Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technology has provided resources to easily explore and identify candidate single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and variants. However, there remains a challenge in identifying and inferring the causal SNPs from sequence data. A problem with different methods that predict the effect of mutations is that they produce false positives. In this hypothesis, we provide an overview of methods known for identifying causal variants and discuss the challenges, fallacies, and prospects in discerning candidate SNPs. We then propose a three-point classification strategy, which could be an additional annotation method in identifying causalities.

  16. A Brownian-ratchet DNA pump with applications to single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, J. S.; Deem, M. W.; Hammond, R. W.; Henck, S. A.; Simpson, J. W.; Rothberg, J. M.

    2002-08-01

    We have fabricated a micron-scale device capable of transporting DNA oligomers using Brownian ratchets. The ratchet potential is generated by applying a voltage difference to interdigitated electrodes. Cycling between the charged state and a discharged, free-diffusion state rectifies the Brownian motion of charged particles. The observed macroscopic transport properties agree with the transport rate predicted from microscopic parameters including the DNA diffusivity, the dimensions of the ratchet potential, and the cycling time. Applications to human genetics, primarily genotyping of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), are discussed.

  17. Multicolor fluorescence detection for single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping using a filter-less fluorescence detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Keita; Nakazawa, Hirokazu; Misawa, Nobuo; Ishida, Makoto; Sawada, Kazuaki

    2013-06-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis that is commonly performed using fluorescence is important in drug development and pathology research. In this study, to facilitate the analysis, multicolor fluorescence detection for SNP genotyping using a filter-less fluorescence detector (FFD) was investigated. FFDs do not require any optical filters for multicolor fluorescence detection. From the experimental results, FFD could identify 0 μM, 1 μM, and 10 μM solutions of Texas Red and fluorescein isothiocyanate. Moreover, a mixture of Texas Red and 6-FAM could be detected in the SNP genotyping simulation. Therefore, a small and low-cost SNP genotyping system is feasible.

  18. DNA sequencing by a single molecule detection of labeled nucleotides sequentially cleaved from a single strand of DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, P.M.; Schecker, J.A.; Wilkerson, C.W.; Hammond, M.L.; Ambrose, W.P.; Jett, J.H.; Martin, J.C.; Marrone, B.L.; Keller, R.A. ); Haces, A.; Shih, P.J.; Harding, J.D. )

    1993-01-01

    We are developing a laser-based technique for the rapid sequencing of large DNA fragments (several kb in size) at a rate of 100 to 1000 bases per second. Our approach relies on fluorescent labeling of the bases in a single fragment of DNA, attachment of this labeled DNA fragment to a support, movement of the supported DNA into a flowing sample stream, sequential cleavage of the end nucleotide from the DNA fragment with an exonuclease, and detection of the individual fluorescently labeled bases by laser-induced fluorescence.

  19. DNA sequencing by a single molecule detection of labeled nucleotides sequentially cleaved from a single strand of DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, P.M.; Schecker, J.A.; Wilkerson, C.W.; Hammond, M.L.; Ambrose, W.P.; Jett, J.H.; Martin, J.C.; Marrone, B.L.; Keller, R.A.; Haces, A.; Shih, P.J.; Harding, J.D.

    1993-02-01

    We are developing a laser-based technique for the rapid sequencing of large DNA fragments (several kb in size) at a rate of 100 to 1000 bases per second. Our approach relies on fluorescent labeling of the bases in a single fragment of DNA, attachment of this labeled DNA fragment to a support, movement of the supported DNA into a flowing sample stream, sequential cleavage of the end nucleotide from the DNA fragment with an exonuclease, and detection of the individual fluorescently labeled bases by laser-induced fluorescence.

  20. Implications of single nucleotide polymorphisms in CD44 exon 2 for risk of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Juhua; Nagarkatti, Prakash S; Zhong, Yin; Zhang, Jiajia; Nagarkatti, Mitzi

    2011-09-01

    CD44 is a cell-surface glycoprotein involved in many cellular functions including lymphocyte activation, recirculation and homing, hematopoiesis and tumor metastasis, suggesting that CD44 may play an important role in breast cancer development. In this study, we examined whether CD44 exon 2 polymorphisms are associated with increased susceptibility to breast cancer. Direct nucleotide sequencing analysis showed that multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms were present in the CD44 exon 2 coding region in female patients with breast cancer. There was no significant difference in the frequency of any one single nucleotide polymorphism in the CD44 exon 2 coding region between patients with breast cancer and normal donors. However, CD44 polymorphisms in the CD44 exon 2 coding region were identified in approximately 40% of patients with breast cancer, which was significantly higher than in normal donors (odds ratio, 9.34; 95% confidence interval = 2.58-33.82; P < 0.0001). The Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test analysis showed that the patients with the CD44 polymorphisms in CD44 exon 2 coding sequence had breast cancer at earlier ages, 49 ± 3 versus 62 ± 2 years (P < 0.0005), and larger tumor burdens (4.9 ± 1.22 vs. 1.6 ± 0.15 mm, P < 0.01) at the time of diagnosis. Interestingly, African-American female patients having the CD44 polymorphisms in CD44 exon 2 coding sequence were diagnosed with breast cancer at very young age (41 ± 2 years). Our results show that CD44 exon 2 polymorphisms are associated with breast cancer development, and such analysis may be effectively used in the evaluation of risk, prediction of cancer, prevention, diagnosis, and epidemiological studies of breast cancer.

  1. Computational Analysis of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Associated with Altered Drug Responsiveness in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Valerio; Federico, Antonio; Pollastro, Carla; Ziviello, Carmela; Cataldi, Simona; Formisano, Pietro; Ciccodicola, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is one of the most frequent mortality causes in western countries, with rapidly increasing prevalence. Anti-diabetic drugs are the first therapeutic approach, although many patients develop drug resistance. Most drug responsiveness variability can be explained by genetic causes. Inter-individual variability is principally due to single nucleotide polymorphisms, and differential drug responsiveness has been correlated to alteration in genes involved in drug metabolism (CYP2C9) or insulin signaling (IRS1, ABCC8, KCNJ11 and PPARG). However, most genome-wide association studies did not provide clues about the contribution of DNA variations to impaired drug responsiveness. Thus, characterizing T2D drug responsiveness variants is needed to guide clinicians toward tailored therapeutic approaches. Here, we extensively investigated polymorphisms associated with altered drug response in T2D, predicting their effects in silico. Combining different computational approaches, we focused on the expression pattern of genes correlated to drug resistance and inferred evolutionary conservation of polymorphic residues, computationally predicting the biochemical properties of polymorphic proteins. Using RNA-Sequencing followed by targeted validation, we identified and experimentally confirmed that two nucleotide variations in the CAPN10 gene—currently annotated as intronic—fall within two new transcripts in this locus. Additionally, we found that a Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP), currently reported as intergenic, maps to the intron of a new transcript, harboring CAPN10 and GPR35 genes, which undergoes non-sense mediated decay. Finally, we analyzed variants that fall into non-coding regulatory regions of yet underestimated functional significance, predicting that some of them can potentially affect gene expression and/or post-transcriptional regulation of mRNAs affecting the splicing. PMID:27347941

  2. Computational Analysis of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Associated with Altered Drug Responsiveness in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Costa, Valerio; Federico, Antonio; Pollastro, Carla; Ziviello, Carmela; Cataldi, Simona; Formisano, Pietro; Ciccodicola, Alfredo

    2016-06-25

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is one of the most frequent mortality causes in western countries, with rapidly increasing prevalence. Anti-diabetic drugs are the first therapeutic approach, although many patients develop drug resistance. Most drug responsiveness variability can be explained by genetic causes. Inter-individual variability is principally due to single nucleotide polymorphisms, and differential drug responsiveness has been correlated to alteration in genes involved in drug metabolism (CYP2C9) or insulin signaling (IRS1, ABCC8, KCNJ11 and PPARG). However, most genome-wide association studies did not provide clues about the contribution of DNA variations to impaired drug responsiveness. Thus, characterizing T2D drug responsiveness variants is needed to guide clinicians toward tailored therapeutic approaches. Here, we extensively investigated polymorphisms associated with altered drug response in T2D, predicting their effects in silico. Combining different computational approaches, we focused on the expression pattern of genes correlated to drug resistance and inferred evolutionary conservation of polymorphic residues, computationally predicting the biochemical properties of polymorphic proteins. Using RNA-Sequencing followed by targeted validation, we identified and experimentally confirmed that two nucleotide variations in the CAPN10 gene-currently annotated as intronic-fall within two new transcripts in this locus. Additionally, we found that a Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP), currently reported as intergenic, maps to the intron of a new transcript, harboring CAPN10 and GPR35 genes, which undergoes non-sense mediated decay. Finally, we analyzed variants that fall into non-coding regulatory regions of yet underestimated functional significance, predicting that some of them can potentially affect gene expression and/or post-transcriptional regulation of mRNAs affecting the splicing.

  3. Naked-eye fingerprinting of single nucleotide polymorphisms on psoriasis patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentini, Paola; Marsella, Alessandra; Tarantino, Paolo; Mauro, Salvatore; Baglietto, Silvia; Congedo, Maurizio; Paolo Pompa, Pier

    2016-05-01

    We report a low-cost test, based on gold nanoparticles, for the colorimetric (naked-eye) fingerprinting of a panel of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), relevant for the personalized therapy of psoriasis. Such pharmacogenomic tests are not routinely performed on psoriasis patients, due to the high cost of standard technologies. We demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity of our colorimetric test by validating it on a cohort of 30 patients, through a double-blind comparison with two state-of-the-art instrumental techniques, namely reverse dot blotting and sequencing, finding 100% agreement. This test offers high parallelization capabilities and can be easily generalized to other SNPs of clinical relevance, finding broad utility in diagnostics and pharmacogenomics.We report a low-cost test, based on gold nanoparticles, for the colorimetric (naked-eye) fingerprinting of a panel of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), relevant for the personalized therapy of psoriasis. Such pharmacogenomic tests are not routinely performed on psoriasis patients, due to the high cost of standard technologies. We demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity of our colorimetric test by validating it on a cohort of 30 patients, through a double-blind comparison with two state-of-the-art instrumental techniques, namely reverse dot blotting and sequencing, finding 100% agreement. This test offers high parallelization capabilities and can be easily generalized to other SNPs of clinical relevance, finding broad utility in diagnostics and pharmacogenomics. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02200f

  4. DNA detection and single nucleotide mutation identification using SERS for molecular diagnostics and global health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Hoan T.; Gandra, Naveen; Fales, Andrew M.; Taylor, Steve M.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2017-02-01

    Nucleic acid-based molecular diagnostics at the point-of-care (POC) and in resource-limited settings is still a challenge. We present a sensitive yet simple DNA detection method with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) identification capability. The detection scheme involves sandwich hybridization of magnetic beads conjugated with capture probes, target sequences, and ultrabright surface-enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) nanorattles conjugated with reporter probes. Upon hybridization, the sandwich probes are concentrated at the detection focus controlled by a magnetic system for SERS measurements. The ultrabright SERS nanorattles, consisting of a core and a shell with resonance Raman reporters loaded in the gap space between the core and the shell, serve as SERS tags for ultrasensitive signal detection. Specific DNA sequences of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and dengue virus 1 (DENV1) were used as the model marker system. Detection limit of approximately 100 attomoles was achieved. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discrimination of wild type malaria DNA and mutant malaria DNA, which confers resistance to artemisinin drugs, was also demonstrated. The results demonstrate the molecular diagnostic potential of the nanorattle-based method to both detect and genotype infectious pathogens. The method's simplicity makes it a suitable candidate for molecular diagnosis at the POC and in resource-limited settings.

  5. Gallium plasmonic nanoparticles for label-free DNA and single nucleotide polymorphism sensing.

    PubMed

    Marín, Antonio García; García-Mendiola, Tania; Bernabeu, Cristina Navio; Hernández, María Jesús; Piqueras, Juan; Pau, Jose Luis; Pariente, Félix; Lorenzo, Encarnación

    2016-05-05

    A label-free DNA and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sensing method is described. It is based on the use of the pseudodielectric function of gallium plasmonic nanoparticles (GaNPs) deposited on Si (100) substrates under reversal of the polarization handedness condition. Under this condition, the pseudodielectric function is extremely sensitive to changes in the surrounding medium of the nanoparticle surface providing an excellent sensing platform competitive to conventional surface plasmon resonance. DNA sensing has been carried out by immobilizing a thiolated capture probe sequence from Helicobacter pylori onto GaNP/Si substrates; complementary target sequences of Helicobacter pylori can be quantified over the range of 10 pM to 3.0 nM with a detection limit of 6.0 pM and a linear correlation coefficient of R(2) = 0.990. The selectivity of the device allows the detection of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in a specific sequence of Helicobacter pylori, without the need for a hybridization suppressor in solution such as formamide. Furthermore, it also allows the detection of this sequence in the presence of other pathogens, such as Escherichia coli in the sample. The broad applicability of the system was demonstrated by the detection of a specific gene mutation directly associated with cystic fibrosis in large genomic DNA isolated from blood cells.

  6. Single Nucleotide Variants in the Protein C Pathway and Mortality in Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ocak, Gürbey; Drechsler, Christiane; Vossen, Carla Y.; Vos, Hans L.; Rosendaal, Frits R.; Reitsma, Pieter H.; Hoffmann, Michael M.; März, Winfried; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Krediet, Raymond T.; Boeschoten, Elisabeth W.; Dekker, Friedo W.; Wanner, Christoph; Verduijn, Marion

    2014-01-01

    Background The protein C pathway plays an important role in the maintenance of endothelial barrier function and in the inflammatory and coagulant processes that are characteristic of patients on dialysis. We investigated whether common single nucleotide variants (SNV) in genes encoding protein C pathway components were associated with all-cause 5 years mortality risk in dialysis patients. Methods Single nucleotides variants in the factor V gene (F5 rs6025; factor V Leiden), the thrombomodulin gene (THBD rs1042580), the protein C gene (PROC rs1799808 and 1799809) and the endothelial protein C receptor gene (PROCR rs867186, rs2069951, and rs2069952) were genotyped in 1070 dialysis patients from the NEtherlands COoperative Study on the Adequacy of Dialysis (NECOSAD) cohort) and in 1243 dialysis patients from the German 4D cohort. Results Factor V Leiden was associated with a 1.5-fold (95% CI 1.1–1.9) increased 5-year all-cause mortality risk and carriers of the AG/GG genotypes of the PROC rs1799809 had a 1.2-fold (95% CI 1.0–1.4) increased 5-year all-cause mortality risk. The other SNVs in THBD, PROC, and PROCR were not associated with 5-years mortality. Conclusion Our study suggests that factor V Leiden and PROC rs1799809 contributes to an increased mortality risk in dialysis patients. PMID:24816905

  7. Modified tetra-primer ARMS PCR as a single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping tool.

    PubMed

    Mesrian Tanha, Hamzeh; Mojtabavi Naeini, Marjan; Rahgozar, Soheila; Rasa, Seyed Mohammad Mahdi; Vallian, Sadeq

    2015-03-01

    Genotyping of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) has been applied in various genetic contexts. Tetra-primer amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is reported as a prominent assay for SNP genotyping. However, there were published data that may question the reliability of this method on some occasions, in addition to a laborious and time-consuming procedure of the optimization step. In the current study, a new SNP genotyping method named modified tetra-primer ARMS (MTPA) PCR was developed based on tetra-primer ARMS PCR. The modified method has two improvements in its instruction, including equalization of outer primer and inner primer strength by additional mismatch in outer primers, and consideration of equal annealing temperature of specific fragments more than melting temperature of primers. Advantageously, a new computer software was provided for designing primers based on novel concepts. The usual tetra-primer ARMS PCR has a laborious process for optimization. In nonoptimal PCR programs, identification of the accurate genotype was found to be very difficult. However, in MTPA PCR, equalization of the amplicons and primer strength leads to increasing specificity and convenience of genotyping, which was validated by sequencing. In the MTPA PCR technique, a new mismatch at -2 positions of outer primers and equal annealing temperature improve the genotyping procedure. Together, the introduced method could be suggested as a powerful tool for genotyping single-nucleotide mutations and polymorphisms.

  8. Association of the DIO2 gene single nucleotide polymorphisms with recurrent depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Gałecka, Elżbieta; Talarowska, Monika; Orzechowska, Agata; Górski, Paweł; Bieńkiewicz, Małgorzata; Szemraj, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    Genetic factors may play a role in the etiology of depressive disorder. The type 2 iodothyronine deiodinase gene (DIO2) encoding the enzyme catalyzing the conversion of T4 to T3 is suggested to play a role in the recurrent depressive disorder (rDD). The current study investigates whether a specific single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the DIO2 gene, Thr92Ala (T/C); rs 225014 or ORFa-Gly3Asp (C/T); rs 12885300, correlate with the risk for recurrent depression. Genotypes for these two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were determined in 179 patients meeting the ICD-10 criteria for rDD group and in 152 healthy individuals (control group) using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based method. The specific variant of the DIO2 gene, namely the CC genotype of the Thr92Ala polymorphism, was more frequently found in healthy subjects than in patients with depression, what suggests that it could potentially serve as a marker of a lower risk for recurrent depressive disorder. The distribution of four haplotypes was also significantly different between the two study groups with the TC (Thr-Gly) haplotype more frequently detected in patients with depression. In conclusion, data generated from this study suggest for the first time that DIO2 gene may play a role in the etiology of the disease, and thus should be further investigated.

  9. Loss and Gain of Human Acidic Mammalian Chitinase Activity by Nonsynonymous SNPs

    PubMed Central

    Okawa, Kazuaki; Ohno, Misa; Kashimura, Akinori; Kimura, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Yuki; Sakaguchi, Masayoshi; Sugahara, Yasusato; Kamaya, Minori; Kino, Yoshihiro; Bauer, Peter O.; Oyama, Fumitaka

    2016-01-01

    Acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase) is implicated in asthma, allergic inflammation, and food processing. Little is known about genetic and evolutional regulation of chitinolytic activity of AMCase. Here, we relate human AMCase polymorphisms to the mouse AMCase, and show that the highly active variants encoded by nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) are consistent with the mouse AMCase sequence. The chitinolytic activity of the recombinant human AMCase was significantly lower than that of the mouse counterpart. By creating mouse-human chimeric AMCase protein we found that the presence of the N-terminal region of human AMCase containing conserved active site residues reduced the enzymatic activity of the molecule. We were able to significantly increase the activity of human AMCase by amino acid substitutions encoded by nsSNPs (N45, D47, and R61) with those conserved in the mouse homologue (D45, N47, and M61). For abolition of the mouse AMCase activity, introduction of M61R mutation was sufficient. M61 is conserved in most of primates other than human and orangutan as well as in other mammals. Orangutan has I61 substitution, which also markedly reduced the activity of the mouse AMCase, indicating that the M61 is a crucial residue for the chitinolytic activity. Altogether, our data suggest that human AMCase has lost its chitinolytic activity by integration of nsSNPs during evolution and that the enzyme can be reactivated by introducing amino acids conserved in the mouse counterpart. PMID:27702777

  10. Profiling deleterious non-synonymous SNPs of smoker's gene CYP1A1.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, A Sai; Khan, Imran; Farhan, Md; Thiagarajan, Padma

    2013-01-01

    CYP1A1 gene belongs to the cytochrome P450 family and is known better as smokers' gene due to its hyperactivation as a consequence of long term smoking. The expression of CYP1A1 induces polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon production in the lungs, which when over expressed, is known to cause smoking related diseases, such as cardiovascular pathologies, cancer, and diabetes. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the simplest form of genetic variations that occur at a higher frequency, and are denoted as synonymous and non-synonymous SNPs on the basis of their effects on the amino acids. This study adopts a systematic in silico approach to predict the deleterious SNPs that are associated with disease conditions. It is inferred that four SNPs are highly deleterious, among which the SNP with rs17861094 is commonly predicted to be harmful by all tools. Hydrophobic (isoleucine) to hydrophilic (serine) amino acid variation was observed in the candidate gene. Hence, this investigation aims to characterize a candidate gene from 159 SNPs of CYP1A1.

  11. VarMod: modelling the functional effects of non-synonymous variants.

    PubMed

    Pappalardo, Morena; Wass, Mark N

    2014-07-01

    Unravelling the genotype-phenotype relationship in humans remains a challenging task in genomics studies. Recent advances in sequencing technologies mean there are now thousands of sequenced human genomes, revealing millions of single nucleotide variants (SNVs). For non-synonymous SNVs present in proteins the difficulties of the problem lie in first identifying those nsSNVs that result in a functional change in the protein among the many non-functional variants and in turn linking this functional change to phenotype. Here we present VarMod (Variant Modeller) a method that utilises both protein sequence and structural features to predict nsSNVs that alter protein function. VarMod develops recent observations that functional nsSNVs are enriched at protein-protein interfaces and protein-ligand binding sites and uses these characteristics to make predictions. In benchmarking on a set of nearly 3000 nsSNVs VarMod performance is comparable to an existing state of the art method. The VarMod web server provides extensive resources to investigate the sequence and structural features associated with the predictions including visualisation of protein models and complexes via an interactive JSmol molecular viewer. VarMod is available for use at http://www.wasslab.org/varmod.

  12. Genome-wide patterns of recombination, linkage disequilibrium and nucleotide diversity from pooled resequencing and single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping unlock the evolutionary history of Eucalyptus grandis.

    PubMed

    Silva-Junior, Orzenil B; Grattapaglia, Dario

    2015-11-01

    We used high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data and whole-genome pooled resequencing to examine the landscape of population recombination (ρ) and nucleotide diversity (ϴw ), assess the extent of linkage disequilibrium (r(2) ) and build the highest density linkage maps for Eucalyptus. At the genome-wide level, linkage disequilibrium (LD) decayed within c. 4-6 kb, slower than previously reported from candidate gene studies, but showing considerable variation from absence to complete LD up to 50 kb. A sharp decrease in the estimate of ρ was seen when going from short to genome-wide inter-SNP distances, highlighting the dependence of this parameter on the scale of observation adopted. Recombination was correlated with nucleotide diversity, gene density and distance from the centromere, with hotspots of recombination enriched for genes involved in chemical reactions and pathways of the normal metabolic processes. The high nucleotide diversity (ϴw = 0.022) of E. grandis revealed that mutation is more important than recombination in shaping its genomic diversity (ρ/ϴw = 0.645). Chromosome-wide ancestral recombination graphs allowed us to date the split of E. grandis (1.7-4.8 million yr ago) and identify a scenario for the recent demographic history of the species. Our results have considerable practical importance to Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS), while indicating bright prospects for genomic prediction of complex phenotypes in eucalypt breeding. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  13. Study of single-nucleotide polymorphisms by means of electrical conductance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hihath, Joshua; Xu, Bingqian; Zhang, Peiming; Tao, Nongjian

    2005-11-01

    Understanding the complexities of DNA has been a hallmark of science for over a half century, and one of the important topics in DNA research is recognizing the occurrence of mutations in the base-stack. In this article, we present a study of SNPs by direct-contact electrical measurements to a single DNA duplex. We have used short, 11- and 12-bp dsDNA to investigate the change in conductance that occurs if a single base pair, a single base, or two separate bases in the stack are modified. All measurements are carried out in aqueous solution with the DNA chemically bound to the electrodes. These measurements demonstrate that the presence of a single base pair mismatch can be identified by the conductance of the molecule and can cause a change in the conductance of dsDNA by as much as an order of magnitude, depending on the specific details of the double helix and the single nucleotide polymorphism. molecular electronics | scanning tunneling microscope break junction

  14. Single nucleotide variants and InDels identified from whole-genome re-sequencing of Guzerat, Gyr, Girolando and Holstein cattle breeds.

    PubMed

    Stafuzza, Nedenia Bonvino; Zerlotini, Adhemar; Lobo, Francisco Pereira; Yamagishi, Michel Eduardo Beleza; Chud, Tatiane Cristina Seleguim; Caetano, Alexandre Rodrigues; Munari, Danísio Prado; Garrick, Dorian J; Machado, Marco Antonio; Martins, Marta Fonseca; Carvalho, Maria Raquel; Cole, John Bruce; Barbosa da Silva, Marcos Vinicius Gualberto

    2017-01-01

    Whole-genome re-sequencing, alignment and annotation analyses were undertaken for 12 sires representing four important cattle breeds in Brazil: Guzerat (multi-purpose), Gyr, Girolando and Holstein (dairy production). A total of approximately 4.3 billion reads from an Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencer generated for each animal 10.7 to 16.4-fold genome coverage. A total of 27,441,279 single nucleotide variations (SNVs) and 3,828,041 insertions/deletions (InDels) were detected in the samples, of which 2,557,670 SNVs and 883,219 InDels were novel. The submission of these genetic variants to the dbSNP database significantly increased the number of known variants, particularly for the indicine genome. The concordance rate between genotypes obtained using the Bovine HD BeadChip array and the same variants identified by sequencing was about 99.05%. The annotation of variants identified numerous non-synonymous SNVs and frameshift InDels which could affect phenotypic variation. Functional enrichment analysis was performed and revealed that variants in the olfactory transduction pathway was over represented in all four cattle breeds, while the ECM-receptor interaction pathway was over represented in Girolando and Guzerat breeds, the ABC transporters pathway was over represented only in Holstein breed, and the metabolic pathways was over represented only in Gyr breed. The genetic variants discovered here provide a rich resource to help identify potential genomic markers and their associated molecular mechanisms that impact economically important traits for Gyr, Girolando, Guzerat and Holstein breeding programs.

  15. Structure-PPi: a module for the annotation of cancer-related single-nucleotide variants at protein–protein interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez, Miguel; Valencia, Alfonso; Pons, Tirso

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: The interpretation of cancer-related single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) considering the protein features they affect, such as known functional sites, protein–protein interfaces, or relation with already annotated mutations, might complement the annotation of genetic variants in the analysis of NGS data. Current tools that annotate mutations fall short on several aspects, including the ability to use protein structure information or the interpretation of mutations in protein complexes. Results: We present the Structure–PPi system for the comprehensive analysis of coding SNVs based on 3D protein structures of protein complexes. The 3D repository used, Interactome3D, includes experimental and modeled structures for proteins and protein–protein complexes. Structure–PPi annotates SNVs with features extracted from UniProt, InterPro, APPRIS, dbNSFP and COSMIC databases. We illustrate the usefulness of Structure–PPi with the interpretation of 1 027 122 non-synonymous SNVs from COSMIC and the 1000G Project that provides a collection of ∼172 700 SNVs mapped onto the protein 3D structure of 8726 human proteins (43.2% of the 20 214 SwissProt-curated proteins in UniProtKB release 2014_06) and protein–protein interfaces with potential functional implications. Availability and implementation: Structure–PPi, along with a user manual and examples, isavailable at http://structureppi.bioinfo.cnio.es/Structure, the code for local installations at https://github.com/Rbbt-Workflows Contact: tpons@cnio.es Supplementary Information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25765346

  16. In silico Analysis Revealed High-risk Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Human Pentraxin-3 Gene and their Impact on Innate Immune Response against Microbial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Raman; Shankar, Jata

    2016-01-01

    Pentraxin-3 (PTX-3) protein is an evolutionary conserved protein that acts as a soluble pattern-recognition receptor for pathogens and plays important role in innate immune response. It recognizes various pathogens by interacting with extracellular moieties such as glactomannan of conidia (Aspergillus fumigatus), lipopolysaccharide of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumonia and Salmonella typhimurium. Thus, PTX-3 protein helps to clear these pathogens by activating downstream innate immune process. In this study, computational methods were used to analyze various non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) in PTX-3 gene. Three different databases were used to retrieve SNP data sets followed by seven different in silico algorithms to screen nsSNPs in PTX-3 gene. Sequence homology based approach was used to identify nsSNPs. Conservation profile of PTX-3 protein amino acid residues were predicted by ConSurf web server. In total, 10 high-risk nsSNPs were identified in pentraxin-domain of PTX-3 gene. Out of these 10 high-risk nsSNPs, 4 were present in the conserved structural and functional residues of the pentraxin-domain, hence, selected for structural analyses. The results showed alteration in the putative structure of pentraxin-domain. Prediction of protein–protein interactions analysis showed association of PTX-3 protein with C1q component of complement pathway. Different functional and structural residues along with various putative phosphorylation sites and evolutionary relationship were also predicted for PTX-3 protein. This is the first extensive computational analyses of pentraxin protein family with nsSNPs and will serve as a valuable resource for future population based studies. PMID:26941719

  17. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the P2X7 receptor gene are associated with post-menopausal bone loss and vertebral fractures

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, Niklas R; Husted, Lise B; Skarratt, Kristen K; Stokes, Leanne; Tofteng, Charlotte L; Kvist, Torben; Jensen, Jens-Erik B; Eiken, Pia; Brixen, Kim; Fuller, Stephen; Clifton-Bligh, Rory; Gartland, Alison; Schwarz, Peter; Langdahl, Bente L; Wiley, James S

    2012-01-01

    The purinergic P2X7 receptor has a major role in the regulation of osteoblast and osteoclast activity and changes in receptor function may therefore affect bone mass in vivo. The aim of this study was to determine the association of non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the P2RX7 gene to bone mass and fracture incidence in post-menopausal women. A total of 1694 women (aged 45–58) participating in the Danish Osteoporosis Prevention Study were genotyped for 12 functional P2X7 receptor variants. Bone mineral density was determined at baseline and after 10 years. In addition, vertebral fracture incidence was documented at 10 years. We found that the rate of bone loss was clearly associated with the Arg307Gln amino acid substitution such that individuals heterozygous for this polymorphism had a 40% increased rate of bone loss. Furthermore, individuals carrying the Ile568Asn variant allele had increased bone loss. In contrast, the Gln460Arg polymorphism was associated with protection against bone loss. The Ala348Thr polymorphism was associated with a lower vertebral fracture incidence 10 years after menopause. Finally, we developed a risk model, which integrated P2RX7 genotypes. Using this model, we found a clear association between the low-risk (high-P2X7 function) alleles and low rate of bone loss. Conversely, high-risk (reduced P2X7 function) alleles were associated with a high rate of bone loss. In conclusion, an association was demonstrated between variants that reduce P2X7 receptor function and increased rate of bone loss. These data support that the P2X7 receptor is important in regulation of bone mass. PMID:22274585

  18. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the P2X7 receptor gene are associated with post-menopausal bone loss and vertebral fractures.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Niklas R; Husted, Lise B; Skarratt, Kristen K; Stokes, Leanne; Tofteng, Charlotte L; Kvist, Torben; Jensen, Jens-Erik B; Eiken, Pia; Brixen, Kim; Fuller, Stephen; Clifton-Bligh, Rory; Gartland, Alison; Schwarz, Peter; Langdahl, Bente L; Wiley, James S

    2012-06-01

    The purinergic P2X7 receptor has a major role in the regulation of osteoblast and osteoclast activity and changes in receptor function may therefore affect bone mass in vivo. The aim of this study was to determine the association of non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the P2RX7 gene to bone mass and fracture incidence in post-menopausal women. A total of 1694 women (aged 45-58) participating in the Danish Osteoporosis Prevention Study were genotyped for 12 functional P2X7 receptor variants. Bone mineral density was determined at baseline and after 10 years. In addition, vertebral fracture incidence was documented at 10 years. We found that the rate of bone loss was clearly associated with the Arg307Gln amino acid substitution such that individuals heterozygous for this polymorphism had a 40% increased rate of bone loss. Furthermore, individuals carrying the Ile568Asn variant allele had increased bone loss. In contrast, the Gln460Arg polymorphism was associated with protection against bone loss. The Ala348Thr polymorphism was associated with a lower vertebral fracture incidence 10 years after menopause. Finally, we developed a risk model, which integrated P2RX7 genotypes. Using this model, we found a clear association between the low-risk (high-P2X7 function) alleles and low rate of bone loss. Conversely, high-risk (reduced P2X7 function) alleles were associated with a high rate of bone loss. In conclusion, an association was demonstrated between variants that reduce P2X7 receptor function and increased rate of bone loss. These data support that the P2X7 receptor is important in regulation of bone mass.

  19. High-throughput genotyping of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in ace-1 gene of mosquitoes using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yun; Tan, Feng; Yan, Shuai-Guo; Wu, Guo-Xing; Qiao, Chuan-Ling; Zhang, Wen-Xue; Cui, Feng

    2013-04-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) plays a vital role in the nervous system of insects and other animal species and serves as the target for many chemical agents such as organophosphate and carbamate insecticides. The mosquito, Culex pipiens complex, a vector of human disease, has evolved to be resistant to insecticides by a limited number of amino acid substitutions in AChE1, which is encoded by the ace-1 gene. The aims of this study are to identify single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sites in the ace-1 gene of the C. pipiens complex and explore an economical high-throughput method to differentiate the genotypes of these sites in mosquitoes collected in the field. We identified 22 SNP sites in exon regions of the ace-1 gene. Four of them led to non-synonymous mutations, that is, Y163C, G247S, C677S and T682A. We used matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization - time-of-flight mass spectrometry for genotyping at these four sites and another site F416V, which was relevant to insecticide resistance, in 150 mosquitoes collected from 15 field populations. We were able to synchronize analysis of the five SNP sites in each well of a 384-well plate for each individual mosquito, thus decreasing the cost to one-fifth of the routine analysis. Heterozygous genotypes at Y163C and G247S sites were observed in one mosquito. The possible influence of the five SNP sites on the activity or function of the enzyme is discussed based on the predicted tertiary structure of the enzyme.

  20. Single nucleotide variants and InDels identified from whole-genome re-sequencing of Guzerat, Gyr, Girolando and Holstein cattle breeds

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Francisco Pereira; Yamagishi, Michel Eduardo Beleza; Chud, Tatiane Cristina Seleguim; Caetano, Alexandre Rodrigues; Munari, Danísio Prado; Garrick, Dorian J.; Machado, Marco Antonio; Martins, Marta Fonseca; Carvalho, Maria Raquel; Cole, John Bruce; Barbosa da Silva, Marcos Vinicius Gualberto

    2017-01-01

    Whole-genome re-sequencing, alignment and annotation analyses were undertaken for 12 sires representing four important cattle breeds in Brazil: Guzerat (multi-purpose), Gyr, Girolando and Holstein (dairy production). A total of approximately 4.3 billion reads from an Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencer generated for each animal 10.7 to 16.4-fold genome coverage. A total of 27,441,279 single nucleotide variations (SNVs) and 3,828,041 insertions/deletions (InDels) were detected in the samples, of which 2,557,670 SNVs and 883,219 InDels were novel. The submission of these genetic variants to the dbSNP database significantly increased the number of known variants, particularly for the indicine genome. The concordance rate between genotypes obtained using the Bovine HD BeadChip array and the same variants identified by sequencing was about 99.05%. The annotation of variants identified numerous non-synonymous SNVs and frameshift InDels which could affect phenotypic variation. Functional enrichment analysis was performed and revealed that variants in the olfactory transduction pathway was over represented in all four cattle breeds, while the ECM-receptor interaction pathway was over represented in Girolando and Guzerat breeds, the ABC transporters pathway was over represented only in Holstein breed, and the metabolic pathways was over represented only in Gyr breed. The genetic variants discovered here provide a rich resource to help identify potential genomic markers and their associated molecular mechanisms that impact economically important traits for Gyr, Girolando, Guzerat and Holstein breeding programs. PMID:28323836

  1. Novel Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms of the Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I Gene and Their Associations with Growth Traits in Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio L.)

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiu; Yu, Xiaomu; Tong, Jingou

    2014-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) plays an important role in the growth and development of vertebrates. To study polymorphisms of IGF-I, we screened a total of 4555 bp of genomic sequences in four exons and partial introns for the discovery of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in common carp (Cyprinus carpio). Three SNPs (g.3759T>G, g.7627T>A and g.7722T>C) in intron 2 and a nonsynonymous SNP (g.7892C>T) in exon 3 were identified in a pilot population including random parents and their progenies. 289 progenies were further genotyped for studying possible associations between genotypes or combined genotypes and growth traits. The results showed that the locus g.7627T>A was significantly associated with body weight and body length, and fish with genotype AA had a mean body weight 5.9% higher than those with genotype TT. No significant associations were observed between genotypes of other loci and growth traits. However, when both g.7627T>A and g.7722T>C were considered, the combined genotype TT/TT was extremely associated with the lowest values of body length and body weight and the highest K value in comparison with other diplotypes (p < 0.01). These results suggest that genotype AA at g.7627T>A and its combined genotypes with alleles from another locus have positive effects on growth traits, which would be a candidate molecular marker for further studies in marker-assisted selection in common carp. PMID:25486058

  2. Associations between novel single nucleotide polymorphisms in the Bos taurus growth hormone gene and performance traits in Holstein-Friesian dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Mullen, M P; Berry, D P; Howard, D J; Diskin, M G; Lynch, C O; Berkowicz, E W; Magee, D A; MacHugh, D E; Waters, S M

    2010-12-01

    Growth hormone, produced in the anterior pituitary gland, stimulates the release of insulin-like growth factor-I from the liver and is of critical importance in the control of nutrient utilization and partitioning for lactogenesis, fertility, growth, and development in cattle. The aim of this study was to discover novel polymorphisms in the bovine growth hormone gene (GH1) and to quantify their association with performance using estimates of genetic merit on 848 Holstein-Friesian AI (artificial insemination) dairy sires. Associations with previously reported polymorphisms in the bovine GH1 gene were also undertaken. A total of 38 novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were identified across a panel of 22 beef and dairy cattle by sequence analysis of the 5' promoter, intronic, exonic, and 3' regulatory regions, encompassing approximately 7 kb of the GH1 gene. Following multiple regression analysis on all SNP, associations were identified between 11 SNP (2 novel and 9 previously identified) and milk fat and protein yield, milk composition, somatic cell score, survival, body condition score, and body size. The G allele of a previously identified SNP in exon 5 at position 2141 of the GH1 sequence, resulting in a nonsynonymous substitution, was associated with decreased milk protein yield. The C allele of a novel SNP, GH32, was associated with inferior carcass conformation. In addition, the T allele of a previously characterized SNP, GH35, was associated with decreased survival. Both GH24 (novel) and GH35 were independently associated with somatic cell count, and 3 SNP, GH21, 2291, and GH35, were independently associated with body depth. Furthermore, 2 SNP, GH24 and GH63, were independently associated with carcass fat. Results of this study further demonstrate the multifaceted influences of GH1 on milk production, fertility, and growth-related traits in cattle.

  3. Unraveling the complexity of the interactions of DNA nucleotides with gold by single molecule force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bano, Fouzia; Sluysmans, Damien; Wislez, Arnaud; Duwez, Anne-Sophie

    2015-11-01

    Addressing the effect of different environmental factors on the adsorption of DNA to solid supports is critical for the development of robust miniaturized devices for applications ranging from biosensors to next generation molecular technology. Most of the time, thiol-based chemistry is used to anchor DNA on gold - a substrate commonly used in nanotechnology - and little is known about the direct interaction between DNA and gold. So far there have been no systematic studies on the direct adsorption behavior of the deoxyribonucleotides (i.e., a nitrogenous base, a deoxyribose sugar, and a phosphate group) and on the factors that govern the DNA-gold bond strength. Here, using single molecule force spectroscopy, we investigated the interaction of the four individual nucleotides, adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine, with gold. Experiments were performed in three salinity conditions and two surface dwell times to reveal the factors that influence nucleotide-Au bond strength. Force data show that, at physiological ionic strength, adenine-Au interactions are stronger, asymmetrical and independent of surface dwell time as compared to cytosine-Au and guanine-Au interactions. We suggest that in these conditions only adenine is able to chemisorb on gold. A decrease of the ionic strength significantly increases the bond strength for all nucleotides. We show that moderate ionic strength along with longer surface dwell period suggest weak chemisorption also for cytosine and guanine.Addressing the effect of different environmental factors on the adsorption of DNA to solid supports is critical for the development of robust miniaturized devices for applications ranging from biosensors to next generation molecular technology. Most of the time, thiol-based chemistry is used to anchor DNA on gold - a substrate commonly used in nanotechnology - and little is known about the direct interaction between DNA and gold. So far there have been no systematic studies on the direct

  4. SLC30A8 nonsynonymous variant is associated with recovery following exercise and skeletal muscle size and strength.

    PubMed

    Sprouse, Courtney; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Orkunoglu-Suer, E Funda; Lipof, Jason S; Moeckel-Cole, Stephanie; Patel, Ronak R; Adham, Kasra; Larkin, Justin S; Hubal, Monica J; Kearns, Amy K; Clarkson, Priscilla M; Thompson, Paul D; Angelopoulos, Theodore J; Gordon, Paul M; Moyna, Niall M; Pescatello, Linda S; Visich, Paul S; Zoeller, Robert F; Hoffman, Eric P; Tosi, Laura L; Devaney, Joseph M

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified thousands of variants that are associated with numerous phenotypes. One such variant, rs13266634, a nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphism in the solute carrier family 30 (zinc transporter) member eight gene, is associated with a 53% increase in the risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D). We hypothesized that individuals with the protective allele against T2D would show a positive response to short-term and long-term resistance exercise. Two cohorts of young adults-the Eccentric Muscle Damage (EMD; n = 156) cohort and the Functional Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Associated with Muscle Size and Strength Study (FAMuSS; n = 874)-were tested for association of the rs13266634 variant with measures of skeletal muscle response to resistance exercise. Our results were sexually dimorphic in both cohorts. Men in the EMD study with two copies of the protective allele showed less post-exercise bout strength loss, less soreness, and lower creatine kinase values. In addition, men in the FAMuSS, homozygous for the protective allele, showed higher pre-exercise strength and larger arm skeletal muscle volume, but did not show a significant difference in skeletal muscle hypertrophy or strength with resistance training.

  5. Analysis of Association Between MGMT and p53 Gene Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Laryngeal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yayun; Jia, Chuanliang; Jiang, Aihua; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Yunqiang; Liu, Feifei; Yang, Linlin; Sun, Yan; Lv, Runli; Song, Xicheng

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the p53 and O(6)-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT)5' upstream sequence gene promoter regions for single nucleotide polymorphisms and explore the p53 gene 5' upstream sequence consisting of two haplotypes to provide a genetic marker for the incidence of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. We included 96 cases of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma and 102 controls. We used SNaPshot micro-sequencing analysis of the MGMT promoter region for four single nucleotide polymorphisms and p53 gene 5' upstream sequence loci (rs1625649, rs2287499, rs2287498, rs228749) genotypes. We calculated and compared two groups for genotypic and allelic frequencies, applied HaploView4.2 for computing rs2287499, rs2287498, rs228749 values and haplotype frequencies and tested control loci and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. All the experimental data were statistically evaluated using SPSS17.0. The Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis with p<0.05 indicating statistical significance. 5'Upstream single nucleotide polymorphisms rs1625649, rs2287499, rs2287498, rs228749 of p53 were polymorphic in both patient and control groups. There was no statistical significance in frequency distributions for the four loci genotypes when comparing patients and healthy controls (Chi-square values were 4.47, 0.98, 1.67, 4.68, respectively; p>0.05). However, allelic frequencies of the MGMT promoter region locus rs1625649 between patients and healthy control groups were statistically significantly different (chi-square value of 5.77; p<0.05). Differences between allelic frequencies for the p53 gene 5' upstream sequence loci rs2287499, rs2287498 and rs228749 between patients and the healthy control group were not statistically significant (Chi-square values were 1.11,1.56,3.36; p>0.05). Nor were those for the two haplotypes of rs2287499, rs2287498 and rs228749 between patients and the healthy control group were not statistically significant (Chi-square value 1.46, p>0.05). MGMT gene

  6. Ewing's sarcoma: analysis of single nucleotide polymorphism in the EWS gene.

    PubMed

    Silva, Deborah S B S; Sawitzki, Fernanda R; De Toni, Elisa C; Graebin, Pietra; Picanco, Juliane B; Abujamra, Ana Lucia; de Farias, Caroline B; Roesler, Rafael; Brunetto, Algemir L; Alho, Clarice S

    2012-11-10

    We aimed to investigate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the EWS gene breaking region in order to analyze Ewing's sarcoma susceptibility. The SNPs were investigated in a healthy subject population and in Ewing's sarcoma patients from Southern Brazil. Genotyping was performed by TaqMan® assay for allelic discrimination using Real-Time PCR. The analysis of incidence of SNPs or different SNP-arrangements revealed a higher presence of homozygote TT-rs4820804 in Ewing's sarcoma patients (p=0.02; Chi Square Test). About 300 bp from the rs4820804 SNP lies a palindromic hexamer (5'-GCTAGC-3') and three nucleotides (GTC), which were previously identified to be in close vicinity of the breakpoint junction in both EWS and FLI1 genes. This DNA segment surrounding the rs4820804 SNP is likely to indicate a breakpoint region. If the T-rs4820804 allele predisposes a DNA fragment to breakage, homozygotes (TT-rs4820804) would have double the chance of having a chromosome break, increasing the chances for a translocation to occur. In conclusion, the TT-rs4820804 EWS genotype can be associated with Ewing's sarcoma and the SNP rs4820804 can be a candidate marker to understand Ewing's sarcoma susceptibility.

  7. A single nucleotide polymorphism assay for the identification of unisexual Ambystoma salamanders.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, Katherine R; Lisle Gibbs, H

    2012-03-01

    Unisexual (all female) salamanders in the genus Ambystoma are animals of variable ploidy (2N-5N) that reproduce via a unique system of 'leaky' gynogenesis. As a result, these salamanders have a diverse array of nuclear genome combinations from up to five sexual species: the blue-spotted (A. laterale), Jefferson (A. jeffersonianum), smallmouth (A. texanum), tiger (A. tigrinum) and streamside (A. barbouri) salamanders. Identifying the genome complement, or biotype, is a critical first step in addressing a broad range of ecological and evolutionary questions about these salamanders. Previous work relied upon genome-related differences in allele size distributions for specific microsatellite loci, but overlap in these distributions among different genomes makes definitive identification and ploidy determination in unisexuals difficult or impossible. Here, we develop the first single nucleotide polymorphism assay for the identification of unisexual biotypes, based on species-specific nucleotide polymorphisms in noncoding DNA loci. Tests with simulated and natural unisexual DNA samples show that this method can accurately identify genome complement and estimate ploidy, making this a valuable tool for assessing the genome composition of unisexual samples.

  8. Single-nucleotide resolution mapping of m6A and m6Am throughout the transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Linder, Bastian; Grozhik, Anya V.; Olarerin-George, Anthony O.; Meydan, Cem; Mason, Christopher E.; Jaffrey, Samie R.

    2015-01-01

    N6-methyladenosine (m6A) is the most abundant modified base in eukaryotic mRNA and has been linked to diverse effects on mRNA fate. Current m6A mapping approaches localize m6A residues to 100–200 nt-long regions of transcripts. The precise position of m6A in mRNAs cannot be identified on a transcriptome-wide level because there are no chemical methods to distinguish between m6A and adenosine. Here we show that anti-m6A antibodies can induce specific mutational signatures at m6A residues after ultraviolet light-induced antibody-RNA crosslinking and reverse transcription. We find these antibodies similarly induce mutational signatures at N6,2′-O-dimethyladenosine (m6Am), a nucleotide found at the first encoded position of certain mRNAs. Using these mutational signatures, we map m6A and m6Am at single-nucleotide resolution in human and mouse mRNA and identify snoRNAs as a novel class of m6A-containing ncRNAs. PMID:26121403

  9. Whole-genome single-nucleotide-polymorphism analysis for discrimination of Clostridium botulinum group I strains.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Escalona, Narjol; Timme, Ruth; Raphael, Brian H; Zink, Donald; Sharma, Shashi K

    2014-04-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a genetically diverse Gram-positive bacterium producing extremely potent neurotoxins (botulinum neurotoxins A through G [BoNT/A-G]). The complete genome sequences of three strains harboring only the BoNT/A1 nucleotide sequence are publicly available. Although these strains contain a toxin cluster (HA(+) OrfX(-)) associated with hemagglutinin genes, little is known about the genomes of subtype A1 strains (termed HA(-) OrfX(+)) that lack hemagglutinin genes in the toxin gene cluster. We sequenced the genomes of three BoNT/A1-producing C. botulinum strains: two strains with the HA(+) OrfX(-) cluster (69A and 32A) and one strain with the HA(-) OrfX(+) cluster (CDC297). Whole-genome phylogenic single-nucleotide-polymorphism (SNP) analysis of these strains along with other publicly available C. botulinum group I strains revealed five distinct lineages. Strains 69A and 32A clustered with the C. botulinum type A1 Hall group, and strain CDC297 clustered with the C. botulinum type Ba4 strain 657. This study reports the use of whole-genome SNP sequence analysis for discrimination of C. botulinum group I strains and demonstrates the utility of this analysis in quickly differentiating C. botulinum strains harboring identical toxin gene subtypes. This analysis further supports previous work showing that strains CDC297 and 657 likely evolved from a common ancestor and independently acquired separate BoNT/A1 toxin gene clusters at distinct genomic locations.

  10. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the multidrug resistance 1 gene in Korean epileptics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Ok; Kim, Myeong Kyu; Woo, Young Jong; Lee, Min Cheol; Kim, Jin Hee; Park, Ki Won; Kim, Eun Young; Roh, Young Il; Kim, Chan Jong

    2006-01-01

    P-glycoprotein 170 encoded by the multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene exports various antiepileptic drugs out of the CNS, which leads to multidrug resistance. This study was performed to elucidate the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the MDR1 gene and drug resistance in Koreans with epilepsy. Three SNPs at nucleotide position 1236 in exon 12, 2677 in exon 21 and 3435 in exon 26 of the MDR1 gene were genotyped in 207 Korean epileptics. Subjects were classified according to whether they had drug-resistant (RS group; N=99) or drug-responsive epilepsy (RP group; N=108). The frequencies of genotype and haplotype were compared between the RS and RP groups. The frequencies of genotype and haplotype in the RS group were not statistically different from those in the RP group. In Korean epileptics, there was no significant relationship between three known SNPs in MDR1 and drug resistance. And there was no association of MDR1 haplotype based on above three sites with pharmacoresistance.

  11. Multi-locus genotyping of bottom fermenting yeasts by single nucleotide polymorphisms indicative of brewing characteristics.

    PubMed

    Ikushima, Shigehito; Tateishi, Yoshiyuki; Kanai, Keiko; Shimada, Emiko; Tanaka, Misa; Ishiguro, Tatsuji; Mizutani, Satoru; Kobayashi, Osamu

    2012-04-01

    Yeast plays a capital role in brewing fermentation and has a direct impact on flavor and aroma. For the evaluation of competent brewing strains during quality control or development of novel strains it is standard practice to perform fermentation tests, which are costly and time-consuming. Here, we have categorized DNA markers which enable to distinguish and to screen brewing strains more efficiently than ever before. Sequence analysis at 289 loci in the genomes of six bottom fermenting Saccharomyces pastorianus strains revealed that 30 loci contained single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). By determining the nucleotide sequences at the SNP-loci in 26 other S. pastorianus strains and 20 strains of the top fermenting yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, almost all these strains could be discriminated solely on the basis of the SNPs. By comparing the fermentative phenotypes of these strains we found that some DNA markers showed a strong association with brewing characteristics, such as the production of ethyl acetate and hydrogen sulphide (H2S). Therefore, the DNA markers we identified will facilitate quality control and the efficient development of brewing yeast strains.

  12. Assessment of the Geographic Origins of Pinewood Nematode Isolates via Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in Effector Genes

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Joana; Simões, Maria José; Gomes, Paula; Barroso, Cristina; Pinho, Diogo; Conceição, Luci; Fonseca, Luís; Abrantes, Isabel; Pinheiro, Miguel; Egas, Conceição

    2013-01-01

    The pinewood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, is native to North America but it only causes damaging pine wilt disease in those regions of the world where it has been introduced. The accurate detection of the species and its dispersal routes are thus essential to define effective control measures. The main goals of this study were to analyse the genetic diversity among B. xylophilus isolates from different geographic locations and identify single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) markers for geographic origin, through a comparative transcriptomic approach. The transcriptomes of seven B. xylophilus isolates, from Continental Portugal (4), China (1), Japan (1) and USA (1), were sequenced in the next generation platform Roche 454. Analysis of effector gene transcripts revealed inter-isolate nucleotide diversity that was validated by Sanger sequencing in the genomic DNA of the seven isolates and eight additional isolates from different geographic locations: Madeira Island (2), China (1), USA (1), Japan (2) and South Korea (2). The analysis identified 136 polymorphic positions in 10 effector transcripts. Pairwise comparison of the 136 SNPs through Neighbor-Joining and the Maximum Likelihood methods and 5-mer frequency analysis with the alignment-independent bilinear multivariate modelling approach correlated the SNPs with the isolates geographic origin. Furthermore, the SNP analysis indicated a closer proximity of the Portuguese isolates to the Korean and Chinese isolates than to the Japanese or American isolates. Each geographic cluster carried exclusive alleles that can be used as SNP markers for B. xylophilus isolate identification. PMID:24391785

  13. Subtyping of Salmonella enterica Subspecies I Using Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Adenylate Cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Abdo, Zaid; Byers, Sara Overstreet; Kriebel, Patrick; Rothrock, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Methods to rapidly identify serotypes of Salmonella enterica subspecies I are of vital importance for protecting the safety of food. To supplement the serotyping method dkgB-linked intergenic sequence ribotyping (ISR), single-nucleotide polymorphisms were characterized within adenylate cyclase (cyaA). The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database had 378 cyaA sequences from S. enterica subspecies I, which included 42 unique DNA sequences and 19 different amino acid sequences. Five representative isolates, namely serotypes Typhimurium, Kentucky, Enteritidis phage type PT4, and two variants of Enteritidis phage type PT13a, were differentiated within a microsphere-based fluidics system in cyaA by allele-specific primer extension. Validation against 25 poultry-related environmental Salmonella isolates representing 11 serotypes yielded a ∼89% success rate at identifying the serotype of the isolate, and a different region could be targeted to achieve 100%. When coupled with ISR, all serotypes were differentiated. Phage lineages of serotype Enteritidis 13a and 4 were identified, and a biofilm-forming strain of PT13a was differentiated from a smooth phenotype within phage type. Comparative ranking of mutation indices to genes such as the tRNA transferases, the diguanylate cyclases, and genes used for multilocus sequence typing indicated that cyaA is an appropriate gene for assessing epidemiological trends of Salmonella because of its relative stability in nucleotide composition. PMID:27035032

  14. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of nucleotide excision repair and homologous recombination repair pathways and their role in the risk of osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Guojun; Wang, Min; Chen, Weida; Shi, Wei; Yin, Jiapeng; Gang, Wang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the influence of polymorphisms in nucleotide excision repair (NER) and homologous recombination repair (HRR) pathways on the development of osteosarcoma patients. Methods: Genotypes of ERCC1 rs11615 and rs3212986, ERCC2 rs1799793 and rs13181, NBN rs709816 and rs1805794, RAD51 rs1801320, rs1801321 and rs12593359, and XRCC3 rs861539 were conducted by Polymerase Chain Reaction Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay. Results: Total 148 osteosarcoma patients and 296 control subjects were collected from Taizhou First People’s Hospital. Conditional logistic regression analyses found that individuals carrying with GA+AA genotype of ERCC2 rs1799793 and GC+CC genotype of NBN rs1805794 were significantly associated with increased risk of osteosarcoma, and the ORs(95%CI) were 1.58(1.03-2.41) and 2.66(1.73-4.08), respectively. We found that GA+AA genotype of ERCC2 rs1799793 or GC+CC genotype of NBN rs1805794 were associated with an increased risk of osteosarcoma in females, with ORs(95%CI) of 2.42(1.20-4.87) and 2.01(1.07-4.23), respectively. Conclusion: Our results suggest that ERCC2 rs1799793 and NBN rs1805794 polymorphisms were associated with an increased risk for osteosarcoma, which suggests that NER and HRR pathways modulate the risk of developing osteosarcoma. PMID:26101473

  15. Genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms related to attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Tortajada-Genaro, Luis A; Mena, Salvador; Niñoles, Regina; Puigmule, Marta; Viladevall, Laia; Maquieira, Ángel

    2016-03-01

    Pharmacological treatment of several diseases, such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), presents marked variability in efficiency and its adverse effects. The genotyping of specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) can support the prediction of responses to drugs and the genetic risk of presenting comorbidities associated with ADHD. This study presents two rapid and affordable microarray-based strategies to discriminate three clinically important SNPs in genes ADRA2A, SL6CA2, and OPRM1 (rs1800544, rs5569, and rs1799971, respectively). These approaches are allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization (ASO) and a combination of allele-specific amplification (ASA) and solid-phase hybridization. Buccal swab and blood samples taken from ADHD patients and controls were analyzed by ASO, ASA, and a gold-reference method. The results indicated that ASA is superior in genotyping capability and analytical performance.

  16. PupaSuite: finding functional single nucleotide polymorphisms for large-scale genotyping purposes

    PubMed Central

    Conde, Lucía; Vaquerizas, Juan M.; Dopazo, Hernán; Arbiza, Leonardo; Reumers, Joke; Rousseau, Frederic; Schymkowitz, Joost; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a web tool, PupaSuite, for the selection of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with potential phenotypic effect, specifically oriented to help in the design of large-scale genotyping projects. PupaSuite uses a collection of data on SNPs from heterogeneous sources and a large number of pre-calculated predictions to offer a flexible and intuitive interface for selecting an optimal set of SNPs. It improves the functionality of PupaSNP and PupasView programs and implements new facilities such as the analysis of user's data to derive haplotypes with functional information. A new estimator of putative effect of polymorphisms has been included that uses evolutionary information. Also SNPeffect database predictions have been included. The PupaSuite web interface is accessible through and through . PMID:16845085

  17. Developing single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers from transcriptome sequences for identification of longan (Dimocarpus longan) germplasm

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Boyi; Tan, Hua-Wei; Fang, Wanping; Meinhardt, Lyndel W; Mischke, Sue; Matsumoto, Tracie; Zhang, Dapeng

    2015-01-01

    Longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour.) is an important tropical fruit tree crop. Accurate varietal identification is essential for germplasm management and breeding. Using longan transcriptome sequences from public databases, we developed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers; validated 60 SNPs in 50 longan germplasm accessions, including cultivated varieties and wild germplasm; and designated 25 SNP markers that unambiguously identified all tested longan varieties with high statistical rigor (P<0.0001). Multiple trees from the same clone were verified and off-type trees were identified. Diversity analysis revealed genetic relationships among analyzed accessions. Cultivated varieties differed significantly from wild populations (Fst=0.300; P<0.001), demonstrating untapped genetic diversity for germplasm conservation and utilization. Within cultivated varieties, apparent differences between varieties from China and those from Thailand and Hawaii indicated geographic patterns of genetic differentiation. These SNP markers provide a powerful tool to manage longan genetic resources and breeding, with accurate and efficient genotype identification. PMID:26504559

  18. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of Toll-like receptors and susceptibility to infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Skevaki, C; Pararas, M; Kostelidou, K; Tsakris, A; Routsias, J G

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are the best-studied family of pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs), whose task is to rapidly recognize evolutionarily conserved structures on the invading microorganisms. Through binding to these patterns, TLRs trigger a number of proinflammatory and anti-microbial responses, playing a key role in the first line of defence against the pathogens also promoting adaptive immunity responses. Growing amounts of data suggest that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on the various human TLR proteins are associated with altered susceptibility to infection. This review summarizes the role of TLRs in innate immunity, their ligands and signalling and focuses on the TLR SNPs which have been linked to infectious disease susceptibility. PMID:25560985

  19. Plasmonics nanoprobes: detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the breast cancer BRCA1 gene.

    PubMed

    Wabuyele, Musundi B; Yan, Fei; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2010-09-01

    This paper describes the application of plasmonics-based nanoprobes that combine the modulation of the plasmonics effect to change the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of a Raman label and the specificity of a DNA hairpin loop sequence to recognize and discriminate a variety of molecular target sequences. Hybridization with target DNA opens the hairpin and physically separates the Raman label from the metal nanoparticle thus reducing the plasmonics effect and quenching the SERS signal of the label. We have successfully demonstrated the specificity and selectivity of the nanoprobes in the detection of a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the breast cancer BRCA1 gene in a homogenous solution at room temperature. In addition, the potential application of plasmonics nanoprobes for quantitative DNA diagnostic testing is discussed.

  20. Large-scale detection and application of expressed sequence tag single nucleotide polymorphisms in Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Zhou, D; Wang, S; Yang, L

    2015-07-14

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are widespread in the Nicotiana genome. Using an alignment and variation detection method, we developed 20,607,973 SNPs, based on the expressed sequence tag sequences of 10 Nicotiana species. The replacement rate was much higher than the transversion rate in the SNPs, and SNPs widely exist in the Nicotiana. In vitro verification indicated that all of the SNPs were high quality and accurate. Evolutionary relationships between 15 varieties were investigated by polymerase chain reaction with a special primer; the specific 302 locus of these sequence results clearly indicated the origin of Zhongyan 100. A database of Nicotiana SNPs (NSNP) was developed to store and search for SNPs in Nicotiana. NSNP is a tool for researchers to develop SNP markers of sequence data.

  1. Gallium plasmonic nanoparticles for label-free DNA and single nucleotide polymorphism sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marín, Antonio García; García-Mendiola, Tania; Bernabeu, Cristina Navio; Hernández, María Jesús; Piqueras, Juan; Pau, Jose Luis; Pariente, Félix; Lorenzo, Encarnación

    2016-05-01

    A label-free DNA and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sensing method is described. It is based on the use of the pseudodielectric function of gallium plasmonic nanoparticles (GaNPs) deposited on Si (100) substrates under reversal of the polarization handedness condition. Under this condition, the pseudodielectric function is extremely sensitive to changes in the surrounding medium of the nanoparticle surface providing an excellent sensing platform competitive to conventional surface plasmon resonance. DNA sensing has been carried out by immobilizing a thiolated capture probe sequence from Helicobacter pylori onto GaNP/Si substrates; complementary target sequences of Helicobacter pylori can be quantified over the range of 10 pM to 3.0 nM with a detection limit of 6.0 pM and a linear correlation coefficient of R2 = 0.990. The selectivity of the device allows the detection of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in a specific sequence of Helicobacter pylori, without the need for a hybridization suppressor in solution such as formamide. Furthermore, it also allows the detection of this sequence in the presence of other pathogens, such as Escherichia coli in the sample. The broad applicability of the system was demonstrated by the detection of a specific gene mutation directly associated with cystic fibrosis in large genomic DNA isolated from blood cells.A label-free DNA and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sensing method is described. It is based on the use of the pseudodielectric function of gallium plasmonic nanoparticles (GaNPs) deposited on Si (100) substrates under reversal of the polarization handedness condition. Under this condition, the pseudodielectric function is extremely sensitive to changes in the surrounding medium of the nanoparticle surface providing an excellent sensing platform competitive to conventional surface plasmon resonance. DNA sensing has been carried out by immobilizing a thiolated capture probe sequence from Helicobacter pylori

  2. DivStat: A User-Friendly Tool for Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Analysis of Genomic Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Inês; Moleirinho, Ana; Oliveira, Gonçalo N. P.; Amorim, António

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments have led to an enormous increase of publicly available large genomic data, including complete genomes. The 1000 Genomes Project was a major contributor, releasing the results of sequencing a large number of individual genomes, and allowing for a myriad of large scale studies on human genetic variation. However, the tools currently available are insufficient when the goal concerns some analyses of data sets encompassing more than hundreds of base pairs and when considering haplotype sequences of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Here, we present a new and potent tool to deal with large data sets allowing the computation of a variety of summary statistics of population genetic data, increasing the speed of data analysis. PMID:25756185

  3. DNA Methylation Analysis of ChIP Products at Single Nucleotide Resolution by Pyrosequencing®.

    PubMed

    Moison, Céline; Assemat, Fanny; Daunay, Antoine; Arimondo, Paola B; Tost, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Interaction and co-occurrence of protein and DNA-based epigenetic modifications have become a topic of interest for many fundamental and biomedical questions. We describe within this chapter a protocol that combines two techniques in order to determine the methylation status of the DNA specifically associated with a protein of interest. First, DNA that directly interacts with the selected protein (such as a specific histone modification, a transcription factor, or any other DNA-associated protein) is purified by standard chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Second, the level of DNA methylation of this immunoprecipitated DNA is measured by bisulfite conversion and Pyrosequencing, a quantitative sequencing-by-synthesis method. This procedure allows determining the methylation status of genomic DNA associated to a specific protein at single nucleotide resolution.

  4. No association of single nucleotide polymorphisms in one-carbon metabolism genes with prostate cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Victoria L; Rodriguez, Carmen; Sun, Juzhong; Talbot, Jeffrey T; Thun, Michael J; Calle, Eugenia E

    2008-12-01

    One-carbon metabolism mediates the interconversion of folates for the synthesis of precursors used in DNA synthesis, repair, and methylation. Inadequate folate nutrition or compromised metabolism can disrupt these processes and facilitate carcinogenesis. In this study, we investigated associations of 39 candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 9 one-carbon metabolism genes with risk of prostate cancer using 1,144 cases and 1,144 controls from the Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort. None of these SNPs were significantly associated with prostate cancer risk, either overall or in cases with advanced prostate cancer. Thus, our findings do not support the hypothesis that common genetic variation in one-carbon metabolism genes influences prostate cancer risk.

  5. Quantifying the utility of single nucleotide polymorphisms to guide colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Mark A; Makalic, Enes; Dowty, James G; Schmidt, Daniel F; Dite, Gillian S; MacInnis, Robert J; Ait Ouakrim, Driss; Clendenning, Mark; Flander, Louisa B; Stanesby, Oliver K; Hopper, John L; Win, Aung K; Buchanan, Daniel D

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) can be used to identify people who should be screened for colorectal cancer. Methods: We simulated one million people with and without colorectal cancer based on published SNP allele frequencies and strengths of colorectal cancer association. We estimated 5-year risks of colorectal cancer by number of risk alleles. Results: We identified 45 SNPs with an average 1.14-fold increase colorectal cancer risk per allele (range: 1.05–1.53). The colorectal cancer risk for people in the highest quintile of risk alleles was 1.81-times that for the average person. Conclusion: We have quantified the extent to which known susceptibility SNPs can stratify the population into clinically useful colorectal cancer risk categories. PMID:26846999

  6. Single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae isolates from pigs affected with chronic erysipelas in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shiraiwa, Kazumasa; Ogawa, Yohsuke; Nishikawa, Sayaka; Kusumoto, Masahiro; Eguchi, Masahiro; Shimoji, Yoshihiro

    2017-04-05

    Over the past decades, Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae strains displaying similar phenotypic and genetic profiles of the attenuated, acriflavine-resistant E. rhusiopathiae Koganei 65-0.15 strain (serovar 1a) have been frequently isolated from pigs affected with chronic erysipelas in Japan. In this study, using the conventional PCR assay that was designed to detect strain-specific single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sites found in the genome of the vaccine strain, we analyzed E. rhusiopathiae isolates from pigs with chronic disease in farms where the Koganei vaccine was used. Out of a total of 155 isolates, 101 isolates (65.2%) were determined to be the vaccine strain by SNP-based PCR. Among the 101 PCR-positive isolates, four isolates were found to be sensitive to acriflavine.

  7. Accurate zygote-specific discrimination of single-nucleotide polymorphisms using microfluidic electrochemical DNA melting curves.

    PubMed

    Yang, Allen H J; Hsieh, Kuangwen; Patterson, Adriana S; Ferguson, B Scott; Eisenstein, Michael; Plaxco, Kevin W; Soh, H Tom

    2014-03-17

    We report the first electrochemical system for the detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that can accurately discriminate homozygous and heterozygous genotypes using microfluidics technology. To achieve this, our system performs real-time melting-curve analysis of surface-immobilized hybridization probes. As an example, we used our sensor to analyze two SNPs in the apolipoprotein E (ApoE) gene, where homozygous and heterozygous mutations greatly affect the risk of late-onset Alzheimer's disease. Using probes specific for each SNP, we simultaneously acquired melting curves for probe-target duplexes at two different loci and thereby accurately distinguish all six possible ApoE allele combinations. Since the design of our device and probes can be readily adapted for targeting other loci, we believe that our method offers a modular platform for the diagnosis of SNP-based diseases and personalized medicine. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Single nucleotide polymorphisms and inherited risk of chronic lymphocytic leukemia among African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Coombs, Catherine C.; Rassenti, Laura Z.; Falchi, Lorenzo; Slager, Susan L.; Strom, Sara S.; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Weinberg, J. Brice; Kipps, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is significantly lower in African Americans than whites, but overall survival is inferior. The biologic basis for these observations remains unexplored. We hypothesized that germline genetic predispositions differ between African Americans and whites with CLL and yield inferior clinical outcomes among African Americans. We examined a discovery cohort of 42 African American CLL patients ascertained at Duke University and found that the risk allele frequency of most single nucleotide polymorphisms known to confer risk of development for CLL is significantly lower among African Americans than whites. We then confirmed our results in a distinct cohort of 68 African American patients ascertained by the CLL Research Consortium. These results provide the first evidence supporting differential genetic risk for CLL between African Americans compared with whites. A fuller understanding of differential genetic risk may improve prognostication and therapeutic decision making for all CLL patients. PMID:22745306

  9. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Genotyping and Distribution of Coxiella burnetii Strains from Field Samples in Belgium

    PubMed Central

    Dal Pozzo, Fabiana; Renaville, Bénédicte; Martinelle, Ludovic; Renaville, Robert; Thys, Christine; Smeets, François; Kirschvink, Nathalie; Grégoire, Fabien; Delooz, Laurent; Czaplicki, Guy

    2015-01-01

    The genotypic characterization of Coxiella burnetii provides useful information about the strains circulating at the farm, region, or country level and may be used to identify the source of infection for animals and humans. The aim of the present study was to investigate the strains of C. burnetii circulating in caprine and bovine Belgian farms using a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) technique. Direct genotyping was applied to different samples (bulk tank milk, individual milk, vaginal swab, fetal product, and air sample). Besides the well-known SNP genotypes, unreported ones were found in bovine and caprine samples, increasing the variability of the strains found in the two species in Belgium. Moreover, multiple genotypes were detected contemporarily in caprine farms at different years of sampling and by using different samples. Interestingly, certain SNP genotypes were detected in both bovine and caprine samples, raising the question of interspecies transmission of the pathogen. PMID:26475104

  10. Mapsnp: An R Package to Plot a Genomic Map for Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hongbao; Jin, Chunhui; Cheng, Zaohuo; Wang, Guoqiang; Shugart, Yin Yao

    2015-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is one of the most common sources of genetic variations of the genome. Currently, SNPs are a main target for most genetic association studies. Visualizing genomic coordinates of SNPs, including their physical location relative to their host gene, and the structure of the relevant transcripts, may provide intuitive supplements to the understanding of their functions. Nevertheless, to date, no such easy-to-use programming tools exist. Therefore, we developed an R package, “mapsnp”, to plot genomic map for a panel of SNPs within a genome region of interest, including the relative chromosome location and the transcripts in the region. mapsnp is a simple and flexible software package which can be used to visualize a genomic map for SNPs, integrating a chromosome ideogram, genomic coordinates, SNP locations and SNP labels. PMID:25853637

  11. Single nucleotide polymorphisms from Theobroma cacao expressed sequence tags associated with witches' broom disease in cacao.

    PubMed

    Lima, L S; Gramacho, K P; Carels, N; Novais, R; Gaiotto, F A; Lopes, U V; Gesteira, A S; Zaidan, H A; Cascardo, J C M; Pires, J L; Micheli, F

    2009-07-14

    In order to increase the efficiency of cacao tree resistance to witches' broom disease, which is caused by Moniliophthora perniciosa (Tricholomataceae), we looked for molecular markers that could help in the selection of resistant cacao genotypes. Among the different markers useful for developing marker-assisted selection, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) constitute the most common type of sequence difference between alleles and can be easily detected by in silico analysis from expressed sequence tag libraries. We report the first detection and analysis of SNPs from cacao-M. perniciosa interaction expressed sequence tags, using bioinformatics. Selection based on analysis of these SNPs should be useful for developing cacao varieties resistant to this devastating disease.

  12. Whole-genome linkage analysis in mapping alcoholism genes using single-nucleotide polymorphisms and microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuang; Huang, Song; Liu, Nianjun; Chen, Liang; Oh, Cheongeun; Zhao, Hongyu

    2005-12-30

    There is currently a great interest in using single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genetic linkage and association studies because of the abundance of SNPs as well as the availability of high-throughput genotyping technologies. In this study, we compared the performance of whole-genome scans using SNPs with microsatellites on 143 pedigrees from the Collaborative Studies on Genetics of Alcoholism provided by Genetic Analysis Workshop 14. A total of 315 microsatellites and 10,081 SNPs from Affymetrix on 22 autosomal chromosomes were used in our analyses. We found that the results from the two scans had good overall concordance. One region on chromosome 2 and two regions on chromosome 7 showed significant linkage signals (i.e., NPL >or= 2) for alcoholism from both the SNP and microsatellite scans. The different results observed between the two scans may be explained by the difference observed in information content between the SNPs and the microsatellites.

  13. Identification of a Novel Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in Porcine Beta-Defensin-1 Gene.

    PubMed

    Pruthviraj, D R; Usha, A P; Venkatachalapathy, R T

    2016-03-01

    Porcine beta-defensin-1 (PBD-1) gene plays an important role in the innate immunity of pigs. The peptide encoded by this gene is an antimicrobial peptide that has direct activity against a wide range of microbes. This peptide is involved in the co-creation of an antimicrobial barrier in the oral cavity of pigs. The objective of the present study was to detect polymorphisms, if any, in exon-1 and exon-2 regions of PBD-1 gene in Large White Yorkshire (LWY) and native Ankamali pigs of Kerala, India. Blood samples were collected from 100 pigs and genomic DNA was isolated using phenol chloroform method. The quantity of DNA was assessed in a spectrophotometer and quality by gel electrophoresis. Exon-1 and exon-2 regions of PBD-1 gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the products were subjected to single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. Subsequent silver staining of the polyacrylamide gels revealed three unique SSCP banding patterns in each of the two exons. The presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was confirmed by nucleotide sequencing of the PCR products. A novel SNP was found in the 5'-UTR region of exon-1 and a SNP was detected in the mature peptide coding region of exon-2. In exon-1, the pooled population frequencies of GG, GT, and TT genotypes were 0.67, 0.30, and 0.03, respectively. GG genotype was predominant in both the breeds whereas TT genotype was not detected in LWY breed. Similarly, in exon-2, the pooled population frequencies of AA, AG, and GG genotypes were 0.50, 0.27, and 0.23, respectively. AA genotype was predominant in LWY pigs whereas GG genotype was predominant in native pigs. These results suggest that there exists a considerable genetic variation at PBD-1 locus and further association studies may help in development of a PCR based genotyping test to select pigs with better immunity.

  14. Comprehensive Identification of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Associated with Beta-lactam Resistance within Pneumococcal Mosaic Genes

    PubMed Central

    Chewapreecha, Claire; Marttinen, Pekka; Croucher, Nicholas J.; Salter, Susannah J.; Harris, Simon R.; Mather, Alison E.; Hanage, William P.; Goldblatt, David; Nosten, Francois H.; Turner, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Traditional genetic association studies are very difficult in bacteria, as the generally limited recombination leads to large linked haplotype blocks, confounding the identification of causative variants. Beta-lactam antibiotic resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae arises readily as the bacteria can quickly incorporate DNA fragments encompassing variants that make the transformed strains resistant. However, the causative mutations themselves are embedded within larger recombined blocks, and previous studies have only analysed a limited number of isolates, leading to the description of “mosaic genes” as being responsible for resistance. By comparing a large number of genomes of beta-lactam susceptible and non-susceptible strains, the high frequency of recombination should break up these haplotype blocks and allow the use of genetic association approaches to identify individual causative variants. Here, we performed a genome-wide association study to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and indels that could confer beta-lactam non-susceptibility using 3,085 Thai and 616 USA pneumococcal isolates as independent datasets for the variant discovery. The large sample sizes allowed us to narrow the source of beta-lactam non-susceptibility from long recombinant fragments down to much smaller loci comprised of discrete or linked SNPs. While some loci appear to be universal resistance determinants, contributing equally to non-susceptibility for at least two classes of beta-lactam antibiotics, some play a larger role in resistance to particular antibiotics. All of the identified loci have a highly non-uniform distribution in the populations. They are enriched not only in vaccine-targeted, but also non-vaccine-targeted lineages, which may raise clinical concerns. Identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms underlying resistance will be essential for future use of genome sequencing to predict antibiotic sensitivity in clinical microbiology. PMID:25101644

  15. Comprehensive identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with beta-lactam resistance within pneumococcal mosaic genes.

    PubMed

    Chewapreecha, Claire; Marttinen, Pekka; Croucher, Nicholas J; Salter, Susannah J; Harris, Simon R; Mather, Alison E; Hanage, William P; Goldblatt, David; Nosten, Francois H; Turner, Claudia; Turner, Paul; Bentley, Stephen D; Parkhill, Julian

    2014-08-01

    Traditional genetic association studies are very difficult in bacteria, as the generally limited recombination leads to large linked haplotype blocks, confounding the identification of causative variants. Beta-lactam antibiotic resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae arises readily as the bacteria can quickly incorporate DNA fragments encompassing variants that make the transformed strains resistant. However, the causative mutations themselves are embedded within larger recombined blocks, and previous studies have only analysed a limited number of isolates, leading to the description of "mosaic genes" as being responsible for resistance. By comparing a large number of genomes of beta-lactam susceptible and non-susceptible strains, the high frequency of recombination should break up these haplotype blocks and allow the use of genetic association approaches to identify individual causative variants. Here, we performed a genome-wide association study to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and indels that could confer beta-lactam non-susceptibility using 3,085 Thai and 616 USA pneumococcal isolates as independent datasets for the variant discovery. The large sample sizes allowed us to narrow the source of beta-lactam non-susceptibility from long recombinant fragments down to much smaller loci comprised of discrete or linked SNPs. While some loci appear to be universal resistance determinants, contributing equally to non-susceptibility for at least two classes of beta-lactam antibiotics, some play a larger role in resistance to particular antibiotics. All of the identified loci have a highly non-uniform distribution in the populations. They are enriched not only in vaccine-targeted, but also non-vaccine-targeted lineages, which may raise clinical concerns. Identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms underlying resistance will be essential for future use of genome sequencing to predict antibiotic sensitivity in clinical microbiology.

  16. Single Nucleotide Variants Associated With Polygenic Hypercholesterolemia in Families Diagnosed Clinically With Familial Hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Lamiquiz-Moneo, Itziar; Pérez-Ruiz, María Rosario; Jarauta, Estíbaliz; Tejedor, María Teresa; Bea, Ana M; Mateo-Gallego, Rocío; Pérez-Calahorra, Sofía; Baila-Rueda, Lucía; Marco-Benedí, Victoria; de Castro-Orós, Isabel; Cenarro, Ana; Civeira, Fernando

    2017-09-14

    Approximately 20% to 40% of clinically defined familial hypercholesterolemia cases do not show a causative mutation in candidate genes, and some of them may have a polygenic origin. A cholesterol gene risk score for the diagnosis of polygenic hypercholesterolemia has been demonstrated to be valuable to differentiate polygenic and monogenic hypercholesterolemia. The aim of this study was to determine the contribution to low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) of the single nucleotide variants associated with polygenic hypercholesterolemia in probands with genetic hypercholesterolemia without mutations in candidate genes (nonfamilial hypercholesterolemia genetic hypercholesterolemia) and the genetic score in cascade screening in their family members. We recruited 49 nonfamilial hypercholesterolemia genetic hypercholesterolemia families (294 participants) and calculated cholesterol gene scores, derived from single nucleotide variants in SORT1, APOB, ABCG8, APOE and LDLR and lipoprotein(a) plasma concentration. Risk alleles in SORT1, ABCG8, APOE, and LDLR showed a statistically significantly higher frequency in blood relatives than in the 1000 Genomes Project. However, there were no differences between affected and nonaffected members. The contribution of the cholesterol gene score to LDL-C was significantly higher in affected than in nonaffected participants (P = .048). The percentage of the LDL-C variation explained by the score was 3.1%, and this percentage increased to 6.9% in those families with the highest genetic score in the proband. Nonfamilial hypercholesterolemia genetic hypercholesterolemia families concentrate risk alleles for high LDL-C. Their contribution varies greatly among families, indicating the complexity and heterogeneity of these forms of hypercholesterolemias. The gene score explains a small percentage of LDL-C, which limits its use in diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All

  17. High-resolution genomic copy number profiling of glioblastoma multiforme by single nucleotide polymorphism DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Yin, Dong; Ogawa, Seishi; Kawamata, Norihiko; Tunici, Patrizia; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Eoli, Marica; Ruckert, Christian; Huynh, Thien; Liu, Gentao; Kato, Motohiro; Sanada, Masashi; Jauch, Anna; Dugas, Martin; Black, Keith L; Koeffler, H Phillip

    2009-05-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an extremely malignant brain tumor. To identify new genomic alterations in GBM, genomic DNA of tumor tissue/explants from 55 individuals and 6 GBM cell lines were examined using single nucleotide polymorphism DNA microarray (SNP-Chip). Further gene expression analysis relied on an additional 56 GBM samples. SNP-Chip results were validated using several techniques, including quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), nucleotide sequencing, and a combination of Q-PCR and detection of microsatellite markers for loss of heterozygosity with normal copy number [acquired uniparental disomy (AUPD)]. Whole genomic DNA copy number in each GBM sample was profiled by SNP-Chip. Several signaling pathways were frequently abnormal. Either the p16(INK4A)/p15(INK4B)-CDK4/6-pRb or p14(ARF)-MDM2/4-p53 pathways were abnormal in 89% (49 of 55) of cases. Simultaneous abnormalities of both pathways occurred in 84% (46 of 55) samples. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway was altered in 71% (39 of 55) GBMs either by deletion of PTEN or amplification of epidermal growth factor receptor and/or vascular endothelial growth factor receptor/platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha. Deletion of chromosome 6q26-27 often occurred (16 of 55 samples). The minimum common deleted region included PARK2, PACRG, QKI, and PDE10A genes. Further reverse transcription Q-PCR studies showed that PARK2 expression was decreased in another collection of GBMs at a frequency of 61% (34 of 56) of samples. The 1p36.23 region was deleted in 35% (19 of 55) of samples. Notably, three samples had homozygous deletion encompassing this site. Also, a novel internal deletion of a putative tumor suppressor gene, LRP1B, was discovered causing an aberrant protein. AUPDs occurred in 58% (32 of 55) of the GBM samples and five of six GBM cell lines. A common AUPD was found at chromosome 17p13.3-12 (included p53 gene) in 13 of 61 samples and cell lines. Single-strand conformational polymorphism and nucleotide

  18. Generation of DNA single-strand displacement by compromised nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Godon, Camille; Mourgues, Sophie; Nonnekens, Julie; Mourcet, Amandine; Coin, Fréderic; Vermeulen, Wim; Mari, Pierre-Olivier; Giglia-Mari, Giuseppina

    2012-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a precisely coordinated process essential to avoid DNA damage-induced cellular malfunction and mutagenesis. Here, we investigate the mechanistic details and effects of the NER machinery when it is compromised by a pathologically significant mutation in a subunit of the repair/transcription factor TFIIH, namely XPD. In contrast to previous studies, we find that no single- or double-strand DNA breaks are produced at early time points after UV irradiation of cells bearing a specific XPD mutation, despite the presence of a clear histone H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX) signal in the UV-exposed areas. We show that the observed γH2AX signal can be explained by the presence of longer single-strand gaps possibly generated by strand displacement. Our in vivo measurements also indicate a strongly reduced TFIIH-XPG binding that could promote single-strand displacement at the site of UV lesions. This finding not only highlights the crucial role of XPG's interactions with TFIIH for proper NER, but also sheds new light on how a faulty DNA repair process can induce extreme genomic instability in human patients. PMID:22863773

  19. Kelvin probe force microscopy of DNA-capped nanoparticles for single-nucleotide polymorphism detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyungbeen; Lee, Sang Won; Lee, Gyudo; Lee, Wonseok; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Hwang, Kyo Seon; Yang, Jaemoon; Lee, Sang Woo; Yoon, Dae Sung

    2016-07-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) is a robust toolkit for profiling the surface potential (SP) of biomolecular interactions between DNAs and/or proteins at the single molecule level. However, it has often suffered from background noise and low throughput due to instrumental or environmental constraints, which is regarded as limiting KPFM applications for detection of minute changes in the molecular structures such as single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Here, we show KPFM imaging of DNA-capped nanoparticles (DCNP) that enables SNP detection of the BRCA1 gene owing to sterically well-adjusted DNA-DNA interactions that take place within the confined spaces of DCNP. The average SP values of DCNP interacting with BRCA1 SNP were found to be lower than the DCNP reacting with normal (non-mutant) BRCA1 gene. We also demonstrate that SP characteristics of DCNP with different substrates (e.g., Au, Si, SiO2, and Fe) provide us with a chance to attenuate or augment the SP signal of DCNP without additional enhancement of instrumentation capabilities.Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) is a robust toolkit for profiling the surface potential (SP) of biomolecular interactions between DNAs and/or proteins at the single molecule level. However, it has often suffered from background noise and low throughput due to instrumental or environmental constraints, which is regarded as limiting KPFM applications for detection of minute changes in the molecular structures such as single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Here, we show KPFM imaging of DNA-capped nanoparticles (DCNP) that enables SNP detection of the BRCA1 gene owing to sterically well-adjusted DNA-DNA interactions that take place within the confined spaces of DCNP. The average SP values of DCNP interacting with BRCA1 SNP were found to be lower than the DCNP reacting with normal (non-mutant) BRCA1 gene. We also demonstrate that SP characteristics of DCNP with different substrates (e.g., Au, Si, SiO2, and Fe) provide us with a

  20. Performance of single nucleotide polymorphisms versus haplotypes for genome-wide association analysis in barley.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Aaron J; Hamblin, Martha T; Jannink, Jean-Luc

    2010-11-22

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) may benefit from utilizing haplotype information for making marker-phenotype associations. Several rationales for grouping single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) into haplotype blocks exist, but any advantage may depend on such factors as genetic architecture of traits, patterns of linkage disequilibrium in the study population, and marker density. The objective of this study was to explore the utility of haplotypes for GWAS in barley (Hordeum vulgare) to offer a first detailed look at this approach for identifying agronomically important genes in crops. To accomplish this, we used genotype and phenotype data from the Barley Coordinated Agricultural Project and constructed haplotypes using three different methods. Marker-trait associations were tested by the efficient mixed-model association algorithm (EMMA). When QTL were simulated using single SNPs dropped from the marker dataset, a simple sliding window performed as well or better than single SNPs or the more sophisticated methods of blocking SNPs into haplotypes. Moreover, the haplotype analyses performed better 1) when QTL were simulated as polymorphisms that arose subsequent to marker variants, and 2) in analysis of empirical heading date data. These results demonstrate that the information content of haplotypes is dependent on the particular mutational and recombinational history of the QTL and nearby markers. Analysis of the empirical data also confirmed our intuition that the distribution of QTL alleles in nature is often unlike the distribution of marker variants, and hence utilizing haplotype information could capture associations that would elude single SNPs. We recommend routine use of both single SNP and haplotype markers for GWAS to take advantage of the full information content of the genotype data.

  1. Detection and quantitation of single nucleotide polymorphisms, DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    DOEpatents

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    DNA mutation binding proteins alone and as chimeric proteins with nucleases are used with solid supports to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms. The solid supports may be flow cytometry beads, DNA chips, glass slides or DNA dips sticks. DNA molecules are coupled to solid supports to form DNA-support complexes. Labeled DNA is used with unlabeled DNA mutation binding proteins such at TthMutS to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by binding which gives an increase in signal. Unlabeled DNA is utilized with labeled chimeras to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by nuclease activity of the chimera which gives a decrease in signal.

  2. Fluorescent detection of single nucleotide polymorphism utilizing a hairpin DNA containing a nucleotide base analog pyrrolo-deoxycytidine as a fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongge; Wang, Minjuan; Gao, Qiang; Qi, Honglan; Zhang, Chengxiao

    2011-05-15

    A novel fluorescent method for the detection of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was developed using a hairpin DNA containing nucleotide base analog pyrrolo-deoxycytidine (P-dC) as a fluorescent probe. This fluorescent probe was designed by incorporating a fluorescent P-dC into a stem of the hairpin DNA, whose sequence of the loop moiety complemented the target single strand DNA (ss-DNA). In the absence of the target ss-DNA, the fluorescent probe stays a closed configuration in which the P-dC is located in the double strand stem of the fluorescent probe, such that there is weak fluorescence, attributed to a more efficient stacking and collisional quenching of neighboring bases. In the presence of target ss-DNA, upon hybridizing the ss-DNA to the loop moiety, a stem-loop of the fluorescent probe is opened and the P-dC is located in the ss-DNA, thus resulting in strong fluorescence. The effective discrimination of the SNP, including single base mismatch ss-DNA (A, T, G) and double mismatch DNA (C, C), against perfect complementary ss-DNA was achieved by increased fluorescence intensity, and verified by thermal denaturation and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Relative fluorescence intensity had a linear relationship with the concentration of perfect complementary ss-DNA and ranged from 50 nM to 3.0 μM. The linear regression equation was F/F(0)=2.73 C (μM)+1.14 (R=0.9961) and the detection limit of perfect complementary ss-DNA was 16 nM (S/N=3). This study demonstrates that a hairpin DNA containing nucleotide base analog P-dC is a promising fluorescent probe for the effective discrimination of SNP and for highly sensitive detection of perfect complementary DNA.

  3. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the D-loop region of mitochondrial DNA is associated with colorectal cancer outcome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cuiju; Zhao, Shengnan; Du, Yanming; Guo, Zhanjun

    2016-11-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the displacement loop (D-Loop) of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been identified for their association with the risk and outcome in many cancers. We have identified risk associated D-loop SNPs for colorectal cancer previously, in the present study, we evaluate their prognostic value for postoperative survival of colorectal cancer (CRC). The minor haplotype of nucleotides 16290T and frequent haplotype of nucleotide 16298T in the hypervariable segment 1 (HV1) region of the D-loop were identified for their association with high survival rate of CRC. After adjusted with COX proportional hazard model, the nucleotide site of 16290 was identified as independent predictor for CRC (RR, 0.379; 95% CI, 0.171-0.839; p = 0.017). In conclusion, SNPs in the mtDNA D-Loop were found to be valuable markers for colorectal cancer outcome evaluation.

  4. Mining of haplotype-based expressed sequence tag single nucleotide polymorphisms in citrus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunxian; Gmitter, Fred G

    2013-11-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), the most abundant variations in a genome, have been widely used in various studies. Detection and characterization of citrus haplotype-based expressed sequence tag (EST) SNPs will greatly facilitate further utilization of these gene-based resources. In this paper, haplotype-based SNPs were mined out of publicly available citrus expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from different citrus cultivars (genotypes) individually and collectively for comparison. There were a total of 567,297 ESTs belonging to 27 cultivars in varying numbers and consequentially yielding different numbers of haplotype-based quality SNPs. Sweet orange (SO) had the most (213,830) ESTs, generating 11,182 quality SNPs in 3,327 out of 4,228 usable contigs. Summed from all the individually mining results, a total of 25,417 quality SNPs were discovered - 15,010 (59.1%) were transitions (AG and CT), 9,114 (35.9%) were transversions (AC, GT, CG, and AT), and 1,293 (5.0%) were insertion/deletions (indels). A vast majority of SNP-containing contigs consisted of only 2 haplotypes, as expected, but the percentages of 2 haplotype contigs varied widely in these citrus cultivars. BLAST of the 25,417 25-mer SNP oligos to the Clementine reference genome scaffolds revealed 2,947 SNPs had "no hits found", 19,943 had 1 unique hit / alignment, 1,571 had one hit and 2+ alignments per hit, and 956 had 2+ hits and 1+ alignment per hit. Of the total 24,293 scaffold hits, 23,955 (98.6%) were on the main scaffolds 1 to 9, and only 338 were on 87 minor scaffolds. Most alignments had 100% (25/25) or 96% (24/25) nucleotide identities, accounting for 93% of all the alignments. Considering almost all the nucleotide discrepancies in the 24/25 alignments were at the SNP sites, it served well as in silico validation of these SNPs, in addition to and consistent with the rate (81%) validated by sequencing and SNaPshot assay. High-quality EST-SNPs from different citrus genotypes were detected, and

  5. Mining of haplotype-based expressed sequence tag single nucleotide polymorphisms in citrus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), the most abundant variations in a genome, have been widely used in various studies. Detection and characterization of citrus haplotype-based expressed sequence tag (EST) SNPs will greatly facilitate further utilization of these gene-based resources. Results In this paper, haplotype-based SNPs were mined out of publicly available citrus expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from different citrus cultivars (genotypes) individually and collectively for comparison. There were a total of 567,297 ESTs belonging to 27 cultivars in varying numbers and consequentially yielding different numbers of haplotype-based quality SNPs. Sweet orange (SO) had the most (213,830) ESTs, generating 11,182 quality SNPs in 3,327 out of 4,228 usable contigs. Summed from all the individually mining results, a total of 25,417 quality SNPs were discovered – 15,010 (59.1%) were transitions (AG and CT), 9,114 (35.9%) were transversions (AC, GT, CG, and AT), and 1,293 (5.0%) were insertion/deletions (indels). A vast majority of SNP-containing contigs consisted of only 2 haplotypes, as expected, but the percentages of 2 haplotype contigs varied widely in these citrus cultivars. BLAST of the 25,417 25-mer SNP oligos to the Clementine reference genome scaffolds revealed 2,947 SNPs had “no hits found”, 19,943 had 1 unique hit / alignment, 1,571 had one hit and 2+ alignments per hit, and 956 had 2+ hits and 1+ alignment per hit. Of the total 24,293 scaffold hits, 23,955 (98.6%) were on the main scaffolds 1 to 9, and only 338 were on 87 minor scaffolds. Most alignments had 100% (25/25) or 96% (24/25) nucleotide identities, accounting for 93% of all the alignments. Considering almost all the nucleotide discrepancies in the 24/25 alignments were at the SNP sites, it served well as in silico validation of these SNPs, in addition to and consistent with the rate (81%) validated by sequencing and SNaPshot assay. Conclusions High-quality EST-SNPs from different

  6. On-chip detection of a single nucleotide polymorphism without polymerase amplification

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jinhee; Tan, Matthew; Sudheendra, Lakshmana; Weiss, Robert H.; Kennedy, Ian M.

    2014-01-01

    A nanoparticle-assembled photonic crystal (PC) array was used to detect single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). The assay platform with PC nanostructure enhanced the fluorescent signal from nanoparticle-hybridized DNA complexes due to phase matching of excitation and emission. Nanoparticles coupled with probe DNA were trapped into nanowells in an array by using an electrophoretic particle entrapment system. The PC/DNA assay platform was able to identify a 1 base pair (bp) difference in synthesized nucleotide sequences that mimicked the mutation seen in a feline model of human autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (PKD) with a sensitivity of 0.9 fg/mL (50 aM)-sensitivity, which corresponds to 30 oligos/array. The reliability of the PC/DNA assay platform to detect SNP in a real sample was demonstrated by using genomic DNA (gDNA) extracted from the urine and blood of two PKD− wild type and three PKD positive cats. The standard curves for PKD positive (PKD+) and negative (PKD−) DNA were created using two feline-urine samples. An additional three urine samples were analyzed in a similar fashion and showed satisfactory agreement with the standard curve, confirming the presence of the mutation in affected urine. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.005 ng/mL which corresponds to 6 fg per array for gDNA in urine and blood. The PC system demonstrated the ability to detect a number of genome equivalents for the PKD SNP that was very similar to the results reported with real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The favorable comparison with quantitative PCR suggests that the PC technology may find application well beyond the detection of the PKD SNP, into areas where a simple, cheap and portable nucleic acid analysis is desirable. PMID:25580203

  7. Developing single nucleotide polymorphism markers for the identification of pineapple (Ananas comosus) germplasm

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lin; Matsumoto, Tracie; Tan, Hua-Wei; Meinhardt, Lyndel W; Mischke, Sue; Wang, Boyi; Zhang, Dapeng

    2015-01-01

    Pineapple (Ananas comosus [L.] Merr.) is the third most important tropical fruit in the world after banana and mango. As a crop with vegetative propagation, genetic redundancy is a major challenge for efficient genebank management and in breeding. Using expressed sequence tag and nucleotide sequences from public databases, we developed 213 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers and validated 96 SNPs by genotyping the United States Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service pineapple germplasm collection, maintained in Hilo, Hawaii. The validation resulted in designation of a set of 57 polymorphic SNP markers that revealed a high rate of duplicates in this pineapple collection. Twenty-four groups of duplicates were detected, encompassing 130 of the total 170 A cosmos accessions. The results show that somatic mutation has been the main source of intra-cultivar variations in pineapple. Multivariate clustering and a model-based population stratification suggest that the modern pineapple cultivars are comprised of progenies that are derived from different wild Ananas botanical varieties. Parentage analysis further revealed that both A. comosus var. bracteatus and A. comosus var. ananassoides are likely progenitors of pineapple cultivars. However, the traditional classification of cultivated pineapple into horticultural groups (e.g. ‘Cayenne’, ‘Spanish’, ‘Queen’) was not well supported by the present study. These SNP markers provide robust and universally comparable DNA fingerprints; thus, they can serve as an efficient genotyping tool to assist pineapple germplasm management, propagation of planting material, and pineapple cultivar protection. The high rate of genetic redundancy detected in this pineapple collection suggests the potential impact of applying this technology on other clonally propagated perennial crops. PMID:26640697

  8. On-chip detection of a single nucleotide polymorphism without polymerase amplification.

    PubMed

    Han, Jinhee; Tan, Matthew; Sudheendra, Lakshmana; Weiss, Robert H; Kennedy, Ian M

    2014-09-01

    A nanoparticle-assembled photonic crystal (PC) array was used to detect single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). The assay platform with PC nanostructure enhanced the fluorescent signal from nanoparticle-hybridized DNA complexes due to phase matching of excitation and emission. Nanoparticles coupled with probe DNA were trapped into nanowells in an array by using an electrophoretic particle entrapment system. The PC/DNA assay platform was able to identify a 1 base pair (bp) difference in synthesized nucleotide sequences that mimicked the mutation seen in a feline model of human autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (PKD) with a sensitivity of 0.9 fg/mL (50 aM)-sensitivity, which corresponds to 30 oligos/array. The reliability of the PC/DNA assay platform to detect SNP in a real sample was demonstrated by using genomic DNA (gDNA) extracted from the urine and blood of two PKD(-) wild type and three PKD positive cats. The standard curves for PKD positive (PKD(+)) and negative (PKD(-)) DNA were created using two feline-urine samples. An additional three urine samples were analyzed in a similar fashion and showed satisfactory agreement with the standard curve, confirming the presence of the mutation in affected urine. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.005 ng/mL which corresponds to 6 fg per array for gDNA in urine and blood. The PC system demonstrated the ability to detect a number of genome equivalents for the PKD SNP that was very similar to the results reported with real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The favorable comparison with quantitative PCR suggests that the PC technology may find application well beyond the detection of the PKD SNP, into areas where a simple, cheap and portable nucleic acid analysis is desirable.

  9. Developing single nucleotide polymorphism markers for the identification of pineapple (Ananas comosus) germplasm.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lin; Matsumoto, Tracie; Tan, Hua-Wei; Meinhardt, Lyndel W; Mischke, Sue; Wang, Boyi; Zhang, Dapeng

    2015-01-01

    Pineapple (Ananas comosus [L.] Merr.) is the third most important tropical fruit in the world after banana and mango. As a crop with vegetative propagation, genetic redundancy is a major challenge for efficient genebank management and in breeding. Using expressed sequence tag and nucleotide sequences from public databases, we developed 213 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers and validated 96 SNPs by genotyping the United States Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service pineapple germplasm collection, maintained in Hilo, Hawaii. The validation resulted in designation of a set of 57 polymorphic SNP markers that revealed a high rate of duplicates in this pineapple collection. Twenty-four groups of duplicates were detected, encompassing 130 of the total 170 A cosmos accessions. The results show that somatic mutation has been the main source of intra-cultivar variations in pineapple. Multivariate clustering and a model-based population stratification suggest that the modern pineapple cultivars are comprised of progenies that are derived from different wild Ananas botanical varieties. Parentage analysis further revealed that both A. comosus var. bracteatus and A. comosus var. ananassoides are likely progenitors of pineapple cultivars. However, the traditional classification of cultivated pineapple into horticultural groups (e.g. 'Cayenne', 'Spanish', 'Queen') was not well supported by the present study. These SNP markers provide robust and universally comparable DNA fingerprints; thus, they can serve as an efficient genotyping tool to assist pineapple germplasm management, propagation of planting material, and pineapple cultivar protection. The high rate of genetic redundancy detected in this pineapple collection suggests the potential impact of applying this technology on other clonally propagated perennial crops.

  10. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Array Genotyping is Equivalent to Metaphase Cytogenetics for Diagnosis of Turner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Siddharth; Guo, Dongchuan; Maslen, Cheryl L.; Silberbach, Michael; Investigators, GenTAC; Milewicz, Dianna; Bondy, Carolyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Turner syndrome (TS) is a developmental disorder caused by partial or complete monosomy for the X chromosome in 1:2500 females. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array genotyping can provide superior resolution in comparison to metaphase karyotype analysis to facilitate genotype-phenotype correlations. Methods We genotyped 187 TS patients with 733,000 SNP marker arrays. All cases met diagnostic criteria for TS based on karyotypes (60%) or characteristic physical features. SNP array results confirmed the diagnosis of TS in 100% of cases. Results We identified a single X chromosome (45,X) in 113 cases. In 58 additional cases (31%), other mosaic cell lines were present including isochromosomes (16%), rings (5%) and Xp deletions (8%). The remaining cases were mosaic for monosomy X and normal male or female cell lines. Array-based models of X chromosome structure were compatible with karyotypes in 104 of 116 comparable cases (90%). We found that SNP array data did not detect X;autosome translocations (3 cases), but did identify 2 derivative Y chromosomes and 13 large copy number variants that were not detected by karyotyping. Conclusions Our data is the first systematic comparison between the two methods and supports the utility of SNP array genotyping to address clinical and research questions in TS. PMID:23743550

  11. High Degree of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in California Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae) sensu lato

    PubMed Central

    LEE, YOOSOOK; SEIFERT, STEPHANIE N.; NIEMAN, CATELYN C.; McABEE, RORY D.; GOODELL, PARKER; FRYXELL, REBECCA TROUT; LANZARO, GREGORY C.; CORNEL, ANTHONY J.

    2013-01-01

    Resolution of systematic relationships among members of the Culex pipiens (L.) complex has important implications for public health as well as for studies on the evolution of sibling species. Currently held views contend that in California considerable genetic introgression occurs between Cx. pipiens and Cx. quinquefasciatus Say, and as such, these taxa behave as if they are a single species. Development of high throughput SNP genotyping tools for the analysis of Cx. pipiens complex population structure is therefore desirable. As a first step toward this goal, we sequenced 12 gene fragments from specimens collected in Marin and Fresno counties. On average, we found a higher single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) density than any other mosquito species reported thus far. Coding regions contained significantly higher GC content (median 54.7%) than noncoding regions (42.4%; Wilcoxon rank sum test, P = 5.29 × 10−5). Differences in SNP allele frequencies observed between mosquitoes from Marin and Fresno counties indicated significant genetic divergence and suggest that SNP markers will be useful for future detailed population genetic studies of this group. The high density of SNPs highlights the difficulty in identifying species within the complex and may be associated with the large degree of phenotypic variation observed in this group of mosquitoes. PMID:22493847

  12. Melting analysis on microbeads in rapid temperature-gradient inside microchannels for single nucleotide polymorphisms detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Kan-Chien; Ding, Shih-Torng; Lin, En-Chung; Wang, Lon Alex; Lu, Yen-Wen

    2014-11-01

    A continuous-flow microchip with a temperature gradient in microchannels was utilized to demonstrate spatial melting analysis on microbeads for clinical Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyping on animal genomic DNA. The chip had embedded heaters and thermometers, which created a rapid and yet stable temperature gradient between 60 °C and 85 °C in a short distance as the detection region. The microbeads, which served as mobile supports carrying the target DNA and fluorescent dye, were transported across the temperature gradient. As the surrounding temperature increased, the fluorescence signals of the microbeads decayed with this relationship being acquired as the melting curve. Fast DNA denaturation, as a result of the improved heat transfer and thermal stability due to scaling, was also confirmed. Further, each individual microbead could potentially bear different sequences and pass through the detection region, one by one, for a series of melting analysis, with multiplex, high-throughput capability being possible. A prototype was tested with target DNA samples in different genotypes (i.e., wild and mutant types) with a SNP location from Landrace sows. The melting temperatures were obtained and compared to the ones using a traditional tube-based approach. The results showed similar levels of SNP discrimination, validating our proposed technique for scanning homozygotes and heterozygotes to distinguish single base changes for disease research, drug development, medical diagnostics, agriculture, and animal production.

  13. Facile method for automated genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms by mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Sascha; Gelfand, David H.; Boussicault, Francis; Bauer, Keith; Reichert, Fred; Gut, Ivo G.

    2002-01-01

    In the future, analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) should become a powerful tool for many genetic applications in areas such as association studies, pharmacogenetics and traceability in the agro-alimentary sector. A number of technologies have been developed for high-throughput genotyping of SNPs. Here we present the simplified GOOD assay for SNP genotyping by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI). The simplified GOOD assay is a single-tube, purification-free, three-step procedure consisting of PCR, primer extension and phosphodiesterase II digestion followed by mass spectrometric analysis. Due to the application of charge-tag technology, no sample purification is required prior to the otherwise very impurity-sensitive MALDI analysis. The use of methylphosphonate containing primers and ddNTPs or α-S-ddNTPs together with a novel DNA polymerase derived from Thermotoga maritima for primer extension allow the fluent preparation of negatively charge-tagged, allele-specific products. A key feature of this polymerase is its preference for ddNTPs and α-S-ddNTPs over dNTPs. The simplified GOOD assay was run with automatic liquid handling at the lowest manageable volumes, automatic data acquisition and interpretation. We applied this novel procedure to genotyping SNPs of candidate genes for hypertension and cardiovascular disease. PMID:11861927

  14. A single natural nucleotide mutation alters bacterial pathogen host-tropism

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Melissa J.; Selva, Laura; Guinane, Caitriona M.; González-Muñoz, Beatriz M.; Tristan, Anne; Foster, Simon J; Fitzgerald, J. Ross; Penadés, José R.

    2015-01-01

    The capacity of microbial pathogens to alter their host-tropism leading to epidemics in distinct host-species populations is a global public and veterinary health concern. In order to investigate the molecular basis of a bacterial host-switching event in a tractable host-species, we traced the evolutionary trajectory of the common rabbit clone of Staphylococcus aureus. We report that it evolved through a likely human-to-rabbit host jump over 40 years ago, and that only a single natural nucleotide mutation was required and sufficient to convert a human-specific S. aureus strain into one which could infect rabbits. Related mutations were identified at the same locus in other rabbit strains of distinct clonal origin, consistent with convergent evolution. This first report of a single mutation that was sufficient to alter the host-tropism of a micro-organism during its evolution highlights the capacity of some pathogens to readily expand into novel host-species populations. PMID:25685890

  15. SNPnexus: a web database for functional annotation of newly discovered and public domain single nucleotide polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Chelala, Claude; Khan, Arshad; Lemoine, Nicholas R

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: Design a new computational tool allowing scientists to functionally annotate newly discovered and public domain single nucleotide polymorphisms in order to help in prioritizing targets in further disease studies and large-scale genotyping projects. Summary: SNPnexus database provides functional annotation for both novel and public SNPs. Possible effects on the transcriptome and proteome levels are characterized and reported from five major annotation systems providing the most extensive information on alternative splicing. Additional information on HapMap genotype and allele frequency, overlaps with potential regulatory elements or structural variations as well as related genetic diseases can be also retrieved. The SNPnexus database has a user-friendly web interface, providing single or batch query options using SNP identifiers from dbSNP as well as genomic location on clones, contigs or chromosomes. Therefore, SNPnexus is the only database currently providing a complete set of functional annotations of SNPs in public databases and newly detected from sequencing projects. Hence, we describe SNPnexus, provide details of the query options, the annotation categories as well as biological examples of use. Availability: The SNPnexus database is freely available at http://www.snp-nexus.org. Contact: claude.chelala@cancer.org.uk PMID:19098027

  16. Single-nucleotide polymorphism array genotyping is equivalent to metaphase cytogenetics for diagnosis of Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Siddharth; Guo, Dongchuan; Maslen, Cheryl L; Silberbach, Michael; Milewicz, Dianna; Bondy, Carolyn A

    2014-01-01

    Turner syndrome is a developmental disorder caused by partial or complete monosomy for the X chromosome in 1 in 2,500 females. We hypothesized that single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array genotyping could provide superior resolution in comparison to metaphase karyotype analysis to facilitate genotype-phenotype correlations. We genotyped 187 Turner syndrome patients with 733,000 SNP marker arrays. All cases met diagnostic criteria for Turner syndrome based on karyotypes (60%) or characteristic physical features. The SNP array results confirmed the diagnosis of Turner syndrome in 100% of cases. We identified a single X chromosome (45,X) in 113 cases. In 58 additional cases (31%), other mosaic cell lines were present, including isochromosomes (16%), rings (5%), and Xp deletions (8%). The remaining cases were mosaic for monosomy X and normal male or female cell lines. Array-based models of X chromosome structure were compatible with karyotypes in 104 of 116 comparable cases (90%). We found that the SNP array data did not detect X-autosome translocations (three cases) but did identify two derivative Y chromosomes and 13 large copy-number variants that were not detected by karyotyping. Our study is the first systematic comparison between the two methods and supports the utility of SNP array genotyping to address clinical and research questions in Turner syndrome.

  17. The distribution of fitness effects caused by single-nucleotide substitutions in an RNA virus

    PubMed Central

    Sanjuán, Rafael; Moya, Andrés; Elena, Santiago F.

    2004-01-01

    Little is known about the mutational fitness effects associated with single-nucleotide substitutions on RNA viral genomes. Here, we used site-directed mutagenesis to create 91 single mutant clones of vesicular stomatitis virus derived from a common ancestral cDNA and performed competition experiments to measure the relative fitness of each mutant. The distribution of nonlethal deleterious effects was highly skewed and had a long, flat tail. As expected, fitness effects depended on whether mutations were chosen at random or reproduced previously described ones. The effect of random deleterious mutations was well described by a log-normal distribution, with -19% reduction of average fitness; the effects distribution of preobserved deleterious mutations was better explained by a β model. The fit of both models was improved when combined with a uniform distribution. Up to 40% of random mutations were lethal. The proportion of beneficial mutations was unexpectedly high. Beneficial effects followed a γ distribution, with expected fitness increases of 1% for random mutations and 5% for preobserved mutations. PMID:15159545

  18. Melting analysis on microbeads in rapid temperature-gradient inside microchannels for single nucleotide polymorphisms detectiona)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kan-Chien; Ding, Shih-Torng; Lin, En-Chung; Wang, Lon (Alex); Lu, Yen-Wen

    2014-01-01

    A continuous-flow microchip with a temperature gradient in microchannels was utilized to demonstrate spatial melting analysis on microbeads for clinical Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyping on animal genomic DNA. The chip had embedded heaters and thermometers, which created a rapid and yet stable temperature gradient between 60 °C and 85 °C in a short distance as the detection region. The microbeads, which served as mobile supports carrying the target DNA and fluorescent dye, were transported across the temperature gradient. As the surrounding temperature increased, the fluorescence signals of the microbeads decayed with this relationship being acquired as the melting curve. Fast DNA denaturation, as a result of the improved heat transfer and thermal stability due to scaling, was also confirmed. Further, each individual microbead could potentially bear different sequences and pass through the detection region, one by one, for a series of melting analysis, with multiplex, high-throughput capability being possible. A prototype was tested with target DNA samples in different genotypes (i.e., wild and mutant types) with a SNP location from Landrace sows. The melting temperatures were obtained and compared to the ones using a traditional tube-based approach. The results showed similar levels of SNP discrimination, validating our proposed technique for scanning homozygotes and heterozygotes to distinguish single base changes for disease research, drug development, medical diagnostics, agriculture, and animal production. PMID:25553186

  19. KBG syndrome involving a single-nucleotide duplication in ANKRD11

    PubMed Central

    Kleyner, Robert; Malcolmson, Janet; Tegay, David; Ward, Kenneth; Maughan, Annette; Maughan, Glenn; Nelson, Lesa; Wang, Kai; Robison, Reid; Lyon, Gholson J.

    2016-01-01

    KBG syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant genetic condition characterized by neurological involvement and distinct facial, hand, and skeletal features. More than 70 cases have been reported; however, it is likely that KBG syndrome is underdiagnosed because of lack of comprehensive characterization of the heterogeneous phenotypic features. We describe the clinical manifestations in a male currently 13 years of age, who exhibited symptoms including epilepsy, severe developmental delay, distinct facial features, and hand anomalies, without a positive genetic diagnosis. Subsequent exome sequencing identified a novel de novo heterozygous single base pair duplication (c.6015dupA) in ANKRD11, which was validated by Sanger sequencing. This single-nucleotide duplication is predicted to lead to a premature stop codon and loss of function in ANKRD11, thereby implicating it as contributing to the proband's symptoms and yielding a molecular diagnosis of KBG syndrome. Before molecular diagnosis, this syndrome was not recognized in the proband, as several key features of the disorder were mild and were not recognized by clinicians, further supporting the concept of variable expressivity in many disorders. Although a diagnosis of cerebral folate deficiency has also been given, its significance for the proband's condition remains uncertain. PMID:27900361

  20. Single nucleotide polymorphism of FSHβ gene associated with reproductive traits in Japanese flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Feng; Wen, Haishen; Yu, Dahui; Li, Jifang; Shi, Bao; Chen, Caifang; Zhang, Jiaren; Jin, Guoxiong; Chen, Xiaoyan; Shi, Dan; Yang, Yanping

    2010-12-01

    Follicle stimulating hormone β (FSHβ) of Japanese flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus) plays a key role in the regulation of gonadal development. This study aimed to investigate molecular genetic characteristics of the FSHβ gene and elucidate the effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of FSHβ on reproductive traits in Japanese flounder. We used polymerase chain reaction single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and sequencing of the FSHβ gene in 60 individuals. We identified only an SNP (T/C) in the coding region of exon3 of FSHβ. The SNP (T/C) did not lead to amino acid changes at the position 340 bp of FSHβ gene. Statistical analysis showed that the SNP was significantly associated with testosterone (T) level and gonadosomatic index (GSI) ( P < 0.05). Individuals with genotype TC of the SNP had significantly higher serum T levels and GSI ( P < 0.05) than that of genotype CC. Therefore, FSHβ gene could be a useful molecular marker in selection for prominent reproductive trait in Japanese Flounder.

  1. Wireless electrochemiluminescence bipolar electrode array for visualized genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Khoshfetrat, Seyyed Mehdi; Ranjbari, Mitra; Shayan, Mohsen; Mehrgardi, Masoud A; Kiani, Abolfazl

    2015-08-18

    The development of simple, inexpensive, hand-held, user-friendly biosensor for high throughput and multiplexed genotyping of various single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a single run experiment by a nonspecialist user is the main challenge in the analysis of DNA. Visualizing the signal and possibility to monitor SNPs by a digital camera opens a new horizon for the routine applications. In the present manuscript, a novel wireless electrochemiluminescence (ECL) DNA array is introduced for the visualized genotyping of different SNPs on the basis of ECL of luminol/hydrogen peroxide system on a bipolar electrode (BPE) array platform. After modification of anodic poles of the array with the DNA probe and its hybridization with the targets, genotyping of various SNPs is carried out by exposing the array to different monobase modified luminol-platinum nanoparticles (M-L-PtNPs). Upon the hybridization of M-L-PtNPs to mismatch sites, the ECL of luminol is followed using a photomultiplier tube (PMT) or digital camera and the images are analyzed by ImageJ software. This biosensor can detect even thermodynamically stable SNP (G-T mismatches) in the range of 2-600 pM. Also, by combining the advantages of BPE and the high visual sensitivity of ECL, it could be easily expected to achieve sensitive screening of different SNPs. The present biosensor demonstrates the capability for the discrimination between PCR products of normal, heterozygous, and homozygous beta thalassemia genetic disorders.

  2. Detection of mandarin in orange juice by single-nucleotide polymorphism qPCR assay.

    PubMed

    Aldeguer, Miriam; López-Andreo, María; Gabaldón, José A; Puyet, Antonio

    2014-02-15

    A dual-probe real time PCR (qPCR) DNA-based analysis was devised for the identification of mandarin in orange juice. A single nucleotide polymorphism at the trnL-trnF intergenic region of the chloroplast chromosome was confirmed in nine orange (Citrus sinensis) and thirteen commercial varieties of mandarin, including Citrus reticulata and Citrus unshiu species and a mandarin × tangelo hybrid. Two short minor-groove binding fluorescent probes targeting the polymorphic sequence were used in the dual-probe qPCR, which allowed the detection of both species in single-tube reactions. The similarity of PCR efficiencies allowed a simple estimation of the ratio mandarin/orange in the juice samples, which correlated to the measured difference of threshold cycle values for both probes. The limit of detection of the assay was 5% of mandarin in orange juice, both when the juice was freshly prepared (not from concentrate) or reconstituted from concentrate, which would allow the detection of fraudulently added mandarin juice. The possible use of the dual-probe system for quantitative measurements was also tested on fruit juice mixtures. qPCR data obtained from samples containing equal amounts of mandarin and orange juice revealed that the mandarin target copy number was approximately 2.6-fold higher than in orange juice. The use of a matrix-adapted control as calibrator to compensate the resulting C(T) bias allowed accurate quantitative measurements to be obtained. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. KBG syndrome involving a single-nucleotide duplication in ANKRD11.

    PubMed

    Kleyner, Robert; Malcolmson, Janet; Tegay, David; Ward, Kenneth; Maughan, Annette; Maughan, Glenn; Nelson, Lesa; Wang, Kai; Robison, Reid; Lyon, Gholson J

    2016-11-01

    KBG syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant genetic condition characterized by neurological involvement and distinct facial, hand, and skeletal features. More than 70 cases have been reported; however, it is likely that KBG syndrome is underdiagnosed because of lack of comprehensive characterization of the heterogeneous phenotypic features. We describe the clinical manifestations in a male currently 13 years of age, who exhibited symptoms including epilepsy, severe developmental delay, distinct facial features, and hand anomalies, without a positive genetic diagnosis. Subsequent exome sequencing identified a novel de novo heterozygous single base pair duplication (c.6015dupA) in ANKRD11, which was validated by Sanger sequencing. This single-nucleotide duplication is predicted to lead to a premature stop codon and loss of function in ANKRD11, thereby implicating it as contributing to the proband's symptoms and yielding a molecular diagnosis of KBG syndrome. Before molecular diagnosis, this syndrome was not recognized in the proband, as several key features of the disorder were mild and were not recognized by clinicians, further supporting the concept of variable expressivity in many disorders. Although a diagnosis of cerebral folate deficiency has also been given, its significance for the proband's condition remains uncertain.

  4. Homogeneous Assays for Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism Typing Using AlphaScreen

    PubMed Central

    Beaudet, Lucille; Bédard, Julie; Breton, Billy; Mercuri, Roberto J.; Budarf, Marcia L.

    2001-01-01

    AlphaScreen technology allows the development of high-throughput homogeneous proximity assays. In these assays, signal is generated when 680 nm laser light irradiates a donor bead in close proximity to an acceptor bead. For the detection of nucleic acids, donor and acceptor beads are brought into proximity by two bridging probes that hybridize simultaneously to a common target and to the generic oligonucleotides attached covalently to the beads. This method allows the detection of as little as 10 amole of a single-stranded DNA target. The combination of AlphaScreen with allele-specific amplification (ASA) and allele-specific hybridization (ASH) has allowed the development of two homogenous single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping platforms. Both types of assay are very robust, routinely giving accurate genotyping results with < 2 ng of genomic DNA per genotype. An AlphaScreen validation study was performed for 12 SNPs by using ASA assays and seven SNPs by using ASH assays. More than 580 samples were genotyped with accuracy >99%. The two assays are remarkably simple, requiring no post-PCR manipulations. Genotyping has been performed successfully in 96- and 384-well formats with volumes as small as 2 μL, allowing a considerable reduction in the amount of reagents and genomic DNA necessary for genotyping. These results show that the AlphaScreen technology can be successfully adapted to high-throughput genotyping. PMID:11282975

  5. Novel biosensing methodologies for improving the detection of single nucleotide polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kai; Deng, Shaoli; Chen, Ming

    2015-04-15

    The growing volume of sequence data confirm more and more candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which are believed to reveal the genetic basis of individual susceptibility to disease and the diverse responses to treatment. There is therefore an urgent demand for developing the sensitive, rapid, easy-to-use, and cost-effective method to identify SNPs. During the last two decades, biosensing techniques have been developed by integrating the unique specificity of biological reactions and the high sensitivity of physical sensors, which provided significant advantages for the detection of SNPs. In this feature article, we focused attention on the strategies of SNP genotyping based on biosensors, including nucleic acid analogs, surface ligation reaction, single base extension, mismatch binding protein, molecular beacon, rolling circle amplification, and strand-displacement amplification. In addition, the perspectives on their advantages, current limitations, and future trends were also discussed. The biosensing technique would provide a promising alternative for the detection of SNPs, and pave the way for the diagnosis of genetic diseases and the design of appropriate treatments.

  6. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the ovine casein genes detected by polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Ceriotti, G; Chessa, S; Bolla, P; Budelli, E; Bianchi, L; Duranti, E; Caroli, A

    2004-08-01

    Casein genetic polymorphisms are important and well known due to their effects on quantitative traits and technological properties of milk. At the DNA level, polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) allows for the simultaneous typing of several alleles at casein loci, as well as the detection of unknown polymorphisms. Here we describe the usefulness of the PCR-SSCP technique for casein typing in sheep. In particular, three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) are described at CSN1S1, CSN2, and CSN3, all resulting in amino acid exchanges. At CSN1S1, a transition T-->C was found, resulting in the deduced amino acid exchange Ile186-->Thr186. A transition A-->G resulting in the deduced amino acid exchange Met183-->Val183 was identified at CSN2. The 2 SNP showed a rather high frequency (ranging from 0.12 to 0.26) in 3 Italian breeds (Sarda, Comisana, Sopravissana). Another transition C-->T (Ser104-->Leu104) was found at CSN3 in one heterozygous animal.

  7. Single nucleotide polymorphisms and haplotypes associated with feed efficiency in beef cattle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background General, breed- and diet-dependent associations between feed efficiency in beef cattle and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) or haplotypes were identified on a population of 1321 steers using a 50 K SNP panel. Genomic associations with traditional two-step indicators of feed efficiency – residual feed intake (RFI), residual average daily gain (RADG), and residual intake gain (RIG) – were compared to associations with two complementary one-step indicators of feed efficiency: efficiency of intake (EI) and efficiency of gain (EG). Associations uncovered in a training data set were evaluated on independent validation data set. A multi-SNP model was developed to predict feed efficiency. Functional analysis of genes harboring SNPs significantly associated with feed efficiency and network visualization aided in the interpretation of the results. Results For the five feed efficiency indicators, the numbers of general, breed-dependent, and diet-dependent associations with SNPs (P-value < 0.0001) were 31, 40, and 25, and with haplotypes were six, ten, and nine, respectively. Of these, 20 SNP and six haplotype associations overlapped between RFI and EI, and five SNP and one haplotype associations overlapped between RADG and EG. This result confirms the complementary value of the one and two-step indicators. The multi-SNP models included 89 SNPs and offered a precise prediction of the five feed efficiency indicators. The associations of 17 SNPs and 7 haplotypes with feed efficiency were confirmed on the validation data set. Nine clusters of Gene Ontology and KEGG pathway categories (mean P-value < 0.001) including, 9nucleotide binding; ion transport, phosphorous metabolic process, and the MAPK signaling pathway were overrepresented among the genes harboring the SNPs associated with feed efficiency. Conclusions The general SNP associations suggest that a single panel of genomic variants can be used regardless of breed and diet. The breed- and diet

  8. Statistical modeling for sensitive detection of low-frequency single nucleotide variants.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yangyang; Zhang, Pengyue; Xuei, Xiaoling; Nakshatri, Harikrishna; Edenberg, Howard J; Li, Lang; Liu, Yunlong

    2016-08-22

    Sensitive detection of low-frequency single nucleotide variants carries great significance in many applications. In cancer genetics research, tumor biopsies are a mixture of normal and tumor cells from various subpopulations due to tumor heterogeneity. Thus the frequencies of somatic variants from a subpopulation tend to be low. Liquid biopsies, which monitor circulating tumor DNA in blood to detect metastatic potential, also face the challenge of detecting low-frequency variants due to the small percentage of the circulating tumor DNA in blood. Moreover, in population genetics research, although pooled sequencing of a large number of individuals is cost-effective, pooling dilutes the signals of variants from any individual. Detection of low frequency variants is difficult and can be cofounded by sequencing artifacts. Existing methods are limited in sensitivity and mainly focus on frequencies around 2 % to 5 %; most fail to consider differential sequencing artifacts. We aimed to push down the frequency detection limit close to the position specific sequencing error rates by modeling the observed erroneous read counts with respect to genomic sequence contexts. 4 distributions suitable for count data modeling (using generalized linear models) were extensively characterized in terms of their goodness-of-fit as well as the performances on real sequencing data benchmarks, which were specifically designed for testing detection of low-frequency variants; two sequencing technologies with significantly different chemistry mechanisms were used to explore systematic errors. We found the zero-inflated negative binomial distribution generalized linear mode is superior to the other models tested, and the advantage is most evident at 0.5 % to 1 % range. This method is also generalizable to different sequencing technologies. Under standard sequencing protocols and depth given in the testing benchmarks, 95.3 % recall and 79.9 % precision for Ion Proton data, 95.6 % recall

  9. Genetic analysis of glucosinolate variability in broccoli florets using genome-anchored single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Brown, Allan F; Yousef, Gad G; Reid, Robert W; Chebrolu, Kranthi K; Thomas, Aswathy; Krueger, Christopher; Jeffery, Elizabeth; Jackson, Eric; Juvik, John A

    2015-07-01

    The identification of genetic factors influencing the accumulation of individual glucosinolates in broccoli florets provides novel insight into the regulation of glucosinolate levels in Brassica vegetables and will accelerate the development of vegetables with glucosinolate profiles tailored to promote human health. Quantitative trait loci analysis of glucosinolate (GSL) variability was conducted with a B. oleracea (broccoli) mapping population, saturated with single nucleotide polymorphism markers from a high-density array designed for rapeseed (Brassica napus). In 4 years of analysis, 14 QTLs were associated with the accumulation of aliphatic, indolic, or aromatic GSLs in floret tissue. The accumulation of 3-carbon aliphatic GSLs (2-propenyl and 3-methylsulfinylpropyl) was primarily associated with a single QTL on C05, but common regulation of 4-carbon aliphatic GSLs was not observed. A single locus on C09, associated with up to 40 % of the phenotypic variability of 2-hydroxy-3-butenyl GSL over multiple years, was not associated with the variability of precursor compounds. Similarly, QTLs on C02, C04, and C09 were associated with 4-methylsulfinylbutyl GSL concentration over multiple years but were not significantly associated with downstream compounds. Genome-specific SNP markers were used to identify candidate genes that co-localized to marker intervals and previously sequenced Brassica oleracea BAC clones containing known GSL genes (GSL-ALK, GSL-PRO, and GSL-ELONG) were aligned to the genomic sequence, providing support that at least three of our 14 QTLs likely correspond to previously identified GSL loci. The results demonstrate that previously identified loci do not fully explain GSL variation in broccoli. The identification of additional genetic factors influencing the accumulation of GSL in broccoli florets provides novel insight into the regulation of GSL levels in Brassicaceae and will accelerate development of vegetables with modified or enhanced GSL

  10. Empirically derived subgroups in rheumatoid arthritis: association with single-nucleotide polymorphisms on chromosome 6

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Marsha A; McAfee, Andrew T

    2007-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a disorder with important public health implications. It is possible that there are clinically distinctive subtypes of the disorder with different genetic etiologies. We used the data provided to the participants in the Genetic Analysis Workshop 15 to evaluate and describe clinically based subgroups and their genetic associations with single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on chromosome 6, which harbors the HLA region. Detailed two- and three-SNP haplotype analyses were conducted in the HLA region. We used demographic, clinical self-report, and biomarker data from the entire sample (n = 8477) to identify and characterize the subgroups. We did not use the RA diagnosis itself in the identification of the subgroups. Nuclear families (715 families, 1998 individuals) were used to examine the genetic association with the HLA region. We found five distinct subgroups in the data. The first comprised unaffected family members. Cluster 2 was a mix of affected and unaffected in which patients endorsed symptoms not corroborated by physicians. Clusters 3 through 5 represented a severity continuum in RA. Cluster 5 was characterized by early onset severe disease. Cluster 2 showed no association on chromosome 6. Clusters 3 through 5 showed association with 17 SNPs on chromosome 6. In the HLA region, Cluster 3 showed single-, two-, and three-SNP association with the centromeric side of the region in an area of linkage disequilibrium. Cluster 5 showed both single- and two-SNP association with the telomeric side of the region in a second area of linkage disequilibrium. It will be important to replicate the subgroup structure and the association findings in an independent sample. PMID:18466517

  11. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in uracil-processing genes, intake of one-carbon nutrients and breast cancer risk

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background/Objectives: The misincorporation of uracil into DNA leads to genomic instability. In a previous study, some of us identified four common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in uracil-processing genes (rs2029166 and rs7296239 in SMUG1, rs34259 in UNG and rs4775748 in DUT) that were asso...

  12. High-throughput single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping for breeding applications in rice using the BeadXpress platform

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Multiplexed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers have the potential to increase the speed and cost-effectiveness of genotyping, provided that an optimal SNP density is used for each application. To test the efficiency of multiplexed SNP genotyping for diversity, mapping and breeding applicat...

  13. A high-density simple sequence repeat and single nucleotide polymorphism genetic map of the tetraploid cotton genome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cotton genome complexity was investigated with a saturated molecular genetic map that combined several sets of microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSR) and the first major public set of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in cotton genomes (Gossypium spp.), and that was constructed ...

  14. Comparing genotyping-by-sequencing and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism chip genotyping in Quantitive Trait Loci mapping in wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Array- or chip-based single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers are widely used in genomic studies because of their abundance in a genome and cost less per data point compared to older marker technologies. Genotyping by sequencing (GBS), a relatively newer approach of genotyping, suggests equal or...

  15. Ultrahigh-density linkage map for cultivated cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) using a single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping array

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    With the low cost of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery, use of SNP markers for SNP array development is becoming more affordable. The SNP array is a very useful tool for high throughput genotyping and has a number of applications such as genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Since the...

  16. DNA replication timing and higher-order nuclear organization determine single-nucleotide substitution patterns in cancer genomes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin; De, Subhajyoti; Michor, Franziska

    2013-01-01

    Single-nucleotide substitutions are a defining characteristic of cancer genomes. Many single-nucleotide substitutions in cancer genomes arise because of errors in DNA replication, which is spatio-temporally stratified. Here we propose that DNA replication patterns help shape the mutational landscapes of normal and cancer genomes. Using data on five fully sequenced cancer types and two personal genomes, we determined that the frequency of intergenic single-nucleotide substitution is significantly higher in late DNA replication timing regions, even after controlling for a number of genomic features. Furthermore, some substitution signatures are more frequent in certain DNA replication timing zones. Finally, integrating data on higher-order nuclear organization, we found that genomic regions in close spatial proximity to late-replicating domains display similar mutation spectra as the late-replicating regions themselves. These data suggest that DNA replication timing together with higher-order genomic organization contribute to the patterns of single-nucleotide substitution in normal and cancer genomes.

  17. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in candidate genes associated with fertilizing ability of sperm and subsequent embryonic development in cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fertilization and development of the preimplantation embryo is under genetic control. The goal of the current study was to test 434 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for association with genetic variation in fertilization and early embryonic development. The approach was to produce embryos from...

  18. Characterization of polyploid wheat genomic diversity using a high-density 90 000 single nucleotide polymorphism array

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    High-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping chips are a powerful tool for studying genomic patterns of diversity, inferring ancestral relationships among individuals in populations and studying marker-trait associations in mapping experiments. We developed a genotyping array includ...

  19. Assessing the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms at the thyroglobulin gene with carcass traits in beef cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to assess the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the thyroglobulin gene, including a previously reported marker in current industry use, with marbling score in beef cattle. Three populations, designated GPE6, GPE7, and GPE8, were studied. The GPE6 pop...

  20. A ferrofluid-based homogeneous assay for highly sensitive and selective detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wei; Lim, Cai Le; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2013-09-21

    A simple and low-cost colorimetric assay utilizing ferrofluidic nanoparticulate probes (FNPs) and a ligase for single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping is described. Excellent sensitivity and selectivity were accomplished through the engagement of the FNPs and a ligase chain reaction.

  1. Imputation of single nucleotide polymorhpism genotypes of Hereford cattle: reference panel size, family relationship and population structure

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study is to investigate single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotypes imputation of Hereford cattle. Purebred Herefords were from two sources, Line 1 Hereford (N=240) and representatives of Industry Herefords (N=311). Using different reference panels of 62 and 494 males with 1...

  2. Discovery of single nucleotide polymorphisms in candidate genes associated with fertility and production traits in Holstein cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for specific genes involved in reproduction might improve reliability of genomic estimates for these low- heritability traits. Semen from 550 Holstein bulls of high (>= 1.7; n=288) or low (<= -2; n = 262) daughter pregnancy rate (DPR) was geno...

  3. Characterization of Single-Nucleotide-Polymorphism Markers for Plasmopara viticola, the Causal Agent of Grapevine Downy Mildew▿

    PubMed Central

    Delmotte, F.; Machefer, V.; Giresse, X.; Richard-Cervera, S.; Latorse, M. P.; Beffa, R.

    2011-01-01

    We report 34 new nuclear single-nucleotide-polymorphism (SNP) markers that have been developed from an expressed sequence tag library of Plasmopara viticola, the causal agent of grapevine downy mildew. This newly developed battery of markers will provide useful additional genetic tools for population genetic studies of this important agronomic species. PMID:21926208

  4. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in ABCG5 and ABCG8 are associated with changes in cholestrol metabolism during weight loss

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Objective: To examine whether changes in cholesterol lowering and metabolism after weight loss were affected by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ABCG5 and ABCG8 genes. Methods and Results: Thirty-five hypercholesterolemic women lost 11.7 +/- 2.5 kg (P<0.001). Cholesterol kinetics were ass...

  5. Effects of bovine cytochrome P450 single nucleotide polymorphism, forage type, and body condition on production traits in cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Relating single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) to cows with acceptable productivity could benefit cattle breeders especially in areas where tall fescue is the predominant forage. This study aimed to 1) identify SNPs in bovine cytochrome P450 3A28 (CYP3A28) and 2) determine associations between SNP g...

  6. A new single-nucleotide polymorphisms database for rainbow trout generated through whole genome resequencing of selected samples

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are highly abundant markers, which are broadly distributed in animal genomes. For rainbow trout, SNP discovery has been done through sequencing of restriction-site associated DNA (RAD) libraries, reduced representation libraries (RRL), RNA sequencing, and whole...

  7. Efficient Detection of Mediterranean β-Thalassemia Mutations by Multiplex Single-Nucleotide Primer Extension

    PubMed Central

    Atanasovska, Biljana; Bozhinovski, Georgi; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana; Chakalova, Lyubomira

    2012-01-01

    β-Thalassemias and abnormal hemoglobin variants are among the most common hereditary abnormalities in humans. Molecular characterization of the causative genetic variants is an essential part of the diagnostic process. In geographic areas with high hemoglobinopathy prevalence, such as the Mediterranean region, a limited number of genetic variants are responsible for the majority of hemoglobinopathy cases. Developing reliable, rapid and cost-effective mutation-specific molecular diagnostic assays targeting particular populations greatly facilitates routine hemoglobinopathy investigations. We developed a one-tube single-nucleotide primer extension assay for the detection of eight common Mediterranean β-thalassemia mutations: Codon 5 (-CT); CCT(Pro)->C–, Codon 6 (-A); GAG(Glu)->G-G, Codon 8 (-AA); AAG(Lys)->–G, IVS-I-1 (G->A), IVS-I-6 (T->C), IVS-I-110 (G->A), Codon 39 (C->T), and IVS-II-745 (C->G), as well as the hemoglobin S variant beta 6(A3) Glu>Val. We validated the new assay using previously genotyped samples obtaining 100% agreement between independent genotyping methods. Our approach, applicable in a range of Mediterranean countries, offers a combination of high accuracy and rapidity exploiting standard techniques and widely available equipment. It can be further adapted to particular populations by including/excluding assayed mutations. We facilitate future modifications by providing detailed information on assay design. PMID:23110203

  8. Tuberculosis risk-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms do not show association with leprosy in Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuan; Wang, Na; Yu, Yongxiang; Yu, Gongqi; Wang, Zhenzhen; Fu, Xi'an; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Furen

    2015-06-01

    Leprosy and tuberculosis (TB) are chronic granulomatous infectious diseases. As well as pathogen and environmental factors, host genetic factors make a substantial contribution to susceptibility to both diseases. More importantly, leprosy and TB also have pathogenic mechanisms and clinical features in common. In this study, the genetic association between leprosy and TB was investigated in a Chinese Han population. A genetic association study that included 46 TB susceptibility single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was performed, involving 1150 leprosy cases and 1150 controls from the Chinese Han population. The Sequenom MassARRAY system was used. No significant association was found between the 46 SNPs and leprosy. Therefore, according to the present study, there is no shared susceptibility locus between leprosy and TB in the Chinese Han population. Although leprosy and TB have a number of similar characteristics, no shared susceptibility loci were found in the Chinese Han population. Thus, this study demonstrated that the genetic basis of the pathogenesis of the two diseases may vary greatly. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Single-nucleotide polymorphism array karyotyping in clinical practice: where, when, and how?

    PubMed

    Sato-Otsubo, Aiko; Sanada, Masashi; Ogawa, Seishi

    2012-02-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphism array (SNP-A) karyotyping is a new technology that has enabled genome-wide detection of genetic lesions in human cancers, including hematopoietic neoplasms. Taking advantage of very large numbers of allele-specific probes synthesized on microarrays at high density, copy number alterations as well as allelic imbalances can be sensitively detected in a genome-wide manner at unprecedented resolutions. Most importantly, SNP-A karyotyping represents the only platform currently available for genome-scale detection of copy neutral loss of heterozygosity (CN-LOH) or uniparental disomy (UPD), which is widely observed in cancer genomes. Although not applicable to detection of balanced translocations, which are commonly found in hematopoietic malignancies, SNP-A karyotyping technology complements and even outperforms conventional metaphase karyotyping, potentially allowing for more accurate genetic diagnosis of hematopoietic neoplasms in clinical practice. Here, we review the current status of SNP-A karyotyping and its application to hematopoietic neoplasms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Association of ENAM gene single nucleotide polymorphisms with dental caries in Polish children.

    PubMed

    Gerreth, Karolina; Zaorska, Katarzyna; Zabel, Maciej; Borysewicz-Lewicka, Maria; Nowicki, Michal

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to prove the association between dental caries and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ENAM gene. The research was carried out in 96 children (48 with caries and 48 counterparts free of this disease), aged 20-42 months, with 11-20 erupted teeth. All children were from four day nurseries located in Poznan. The study included the dental examination to select individuals to the research and oral swab collection for molecular evaluation. Seven selected SNPs markers of the ENAM gene were genotyped, five using TaqMan probe assay (rs2609428, rs7671281, rs36064169, rs3796704, and rs12640848) and two by Sanger sequencing (rs144929717 and rs139228330). Statistically significant higher prevalence of the alternative G allele and the alternative GG homozygote in the control group in comparison with the caries group in SNP rs12640848 was observed, respectively, p = 0.0062 and 0.0010. Although the prevalence of the AG heterozygote was higher for the caries subjects in comparison with controls (OR = 2.9), and the result was statistically significant (p = 0.0010), the overall prevalence of the G allele for this SNP was significantly higher in control group (OR = 2.3; p = 0.0062). The study revealed the strong association between rs12640848 marker of ENAM gene and caries susceptibility in primary teeth in children from Poznan. The presence of SNPs in the ENAM gene may be important as suspected predictive factor of dental caries occurrence in children.

  11. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the bovine Histophilus somni genome; a comparison of new and old isolates.

    PubMed

    Madampage, Claudia Avis; Rawlyk, Neil; Crockford, Gordon; Van Donkersgoed, Joyce; Dorin, Craig; Potter, Andrew

    2015-07-01

    Histophilus somni, a causative agent of the bovine respiratory disease complex, can also cause a variety of systemic disorders, including bronchopneumonia, myocarditis, pericarditis, arthritis, pleuritis, and infectious thrombotic meningoencephalitis. The purpose of this study was to determine if currently circulating strains differ from those of the 1980s by identifying genomic changes. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and insertion and deletion (INDEL) sites were examined by whole-genome sequencing in 12 samples, 6 old and 6 new. The 31 028 SNP/INDELs recorded were compared against the reference genome sequence of the pathogenic H. somni strain 2336. The distribution of about 75% of these SNPs within a specified gene differed between old and new isolates and did not follow any particular pattern. The other 25% clustered into 2 groups containing the same SNPs in various genes: group I included 5 old isolates and 1 new isolate; group II included 5 new isolates and 1 old isolate. For putative virulence genes there were more SNPs in group I compared with strain 2336, itself an older isolate, than in group II. Although only 25% of all the SNPs formed 2 clusters, the results suggest some genetic difference in various genes between old and new strains.

  12. Single nucleotide polymorphisms and outcome risk in unrelated mismatched hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: an exploration study.

    PubMed

    Harkensee, Christian; Oka, Akira; Onizuka, Makoto; Middleton, Peter G; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Hirayasu, Kouyuki; Kashiwase, Koichi; Yabe, Toshio; Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Gennery, Andrew R; Ando, Kiyoshi; Morishima, Yasuo

    2012-06-28

    Genetic risk factors contribute to adverse outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Mismatching of the HLA complex most strongly determines outcomes, whereas non-HLA genetic polymorphisms are also having an impact. Although the majority of HSCTs are mismatched, only few studies have investigated the effects of non-HLA polymorphisms in the unrelated HSCT and HLA-mismatched setting. To understand these effects, we genotyped 41 previously studied single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 2 independent, large cohorts of HSCT donor-recipient pairs (n = 460 and 462 pairs) from a homogeneous genetic background. The study population was chosen to pragmatically represent a large clinically homogeneous group (acute leukemia), allowing all degrees of HLA matching. The TNF-1031 donor-recipient genotype mismatch association with acute GVHD grade 4 was the only consistent association identified. Analysis of a subgroup of higher HLA matching showed consistent associations of the recipient IL2-330 GT genotype with risk of chronic GVHD, and the donor CTLA4-CT60 GG genotype with protection from acute GVHD. These associations are strong candidates for prediction of risk in a clinical setting. This study shows that non-HLA gene polymorphisms are of relevance for predicting HSCT outcome, even for HLA mismatched transplants.

  13. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in candidate genes associated with gastrointestinal nematode infection in goats.

    PubMed

    Bressani, F A; Tizioto, P C; Giglioti, R; Meirelles, S L C; Coutinho, R; Benvenuti, C L; Malagó-Jr, W; Mudadu, M A; Vieira, L S; Zaros, L G; Carrilho, E; Regitano, L C A

    2014-10-20

    Cytokines are small cell-signaling proteins that play an important role in the immune system, participating in intracellular communication. Four candidate genes of the cytokine family (IL2, IL4, IL13, and IFNG) were selected to identify Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) that might be associated with resistance to gastrointestinal endoparasites in goats. A population of 229 goats, F2 offspring from an F1 intercross was produced by crossing pure Saanen goats, considered as susceptible to gastrointestinal endoparasites, with pure Anglo-Nubian goats, considered resistant. Blood was collected for DNA extraction and fecal samples were also collected for parasite egg count. Polymorphisms were prospected by sequencing animals with extreme phenotype for fecal egg count (FEC) distribution. The association between SNPs and phenotype was determined by using the Fisher exact test with correction for multiple tests. Three of the 10 SNPs were identified as significant (P ≤ 0.03). They were found in intron 1 of IL2 (ENSBTA00000020883), intron 3 of IL13 (ENSBTA00000015953) and exon 3 of IFNG (ENSBTA00000012529), suggesting an association between them and gastrointestinal endoparasite resistance. Further studies will help describe the effects of these markers accurately before implementing them in marker assisted selection. This study is the pioneer in describing such associations in goats.

  14. Quadruplex-single nucleotide polymorphisms (Quad-SNP) influence gene expression difference among individuals.

    PubMed

    Baral, Aradhita; Kumar, Pankaj; Halder, Rashi; Mani, Prithvi; Yadav, Vinod Kumar; Singh, Ankita; Das, Swapan K; Chowdhury, Shantanu

    2012-05-01

    Non-canonical guanine quadruplex structures are not only predominant but also conserved among bacterial and mammalian promoters. Moreover recent findings directly implicate quadruplex structures in transcription. These argue for an intrinsic role of the structural motif and thereby posit that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) that compromise the quadruplex architecture could influence function. To test this, we analysed SNPs within quadruplex motifs (Quad-SNP) and gene expression in 270 individuals across four populations (HapMap) representing more than 14,500 genotypes. Findings reveal significant association between quadruplex-SNPs and expression of the corresponding gene in individuals (P < 0.0001). Furthermore, analysis of Quad-SNPs obtained from population-scale sequencing of 1000 human genomes showed relative selection bias against alteration of the structural motif. To directly test the quadruplex-SNP-transcription connection, we constructed a reporter system using the RPS3 promoter-remarkable difference in promoter activity in the 'quadruplex-destabilized' versus 'quadruplex-intact' promoter was noticed. As a further test, we incorporated a quadruplex motif or its disrupted counterpart within a synthetic promoter reporter construct. The quadruplex motif, and not the disrupted-motif, enhanced transcription in human cell lines of different origin. Together, these findings build direct support for quadruplex-mediated transcription and suggest quadruplex-SNPs may play significant role in mechanistically understanding variations in gene expression among individuals.

  15. Association between OGG1 gene single nucleotide polymorphisms and risk of pancreatic cancer in Chinese.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chengli; Huang, Hui; Wang, Cheng; Kong, Yalin; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Hongyi

    2014-07-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase gene (OGG1) has potentially influenced the risk of pancreatic cancer. The objective of this study was to assess the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of OGG1 gene and risk of pancreatic cancer. A case-control study has been conducted in 370 pancreatic cancer patients and 395 healthy controls. Genotypes were determined using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism and DNA sequencing methods. The association analysis was evaluated by the unconditional logistic regression test. Our data suggested that the distributions of alleles and genotypes were statistically different between pancreatic cancer patients and healthy controls. The c.307G>C SNP was associated with the decreased risk of pancreatic cancer (C vs. G: OR 0.73, 95 % CI 0.59-0.91, P = 0.006). As for c.828A>G SNP, the significantly decreased risk of pancreatic cancer was detected (G vs. A: OR 0.74, 95 % CI 0.59-0.92, P = 0.006). The allele C of c.307G>C and allele G of c.828A>G SNPs might be associated with a protection from pancreatic cancer. Findings from this study indicate that OGG1 SNPs are associated with pancreatic cancer risk in Chinese Han population and could be useful molecular biomarkers for assessing the risk of pancreatic cancer.

  16. Association of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms with Atrial Fibrillation and the Outcome after Catheter Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yu-Feng; Wang, Hsueh-Hsiao; Yeh, Hung-I; Lee, Kun-Tai; Lin, Yenn-Jiang; Chang, Shih-Lin; Lo, Li-Wei; Tuan, Ta-Chuan; Li, Cheng-Hung; Chao, Tze-Fan; Chung, Fa-Po; Liao, Jo-Nan; Tang, Paul Wei Hua; Tsai, Wei-Chung; Chiou, Chuen-Wang; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2016-01-01

    Background The association of gene variants with atrial fibrillation (AF) type and the recurrence of AF after catheter ablation in Taiwan is still unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate the relationships between gene variants, AF type, and the recurrence of AF. Methods In our investigation, we examined 383 consecutive patients with AF (61.9 ± 14.0 years; 63% men); of these 383 patients, 189 underwent catheter ablation for drug-refractory AF. Thereafter, the single nucleotide polymorphisms rs2200733, and rs7193343 were genotyped using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results The rs7193343 variant was independently associated with non-paroxysmal AF (non-PAF). In the PAF group, the rs7193343 variant was independently associated with AF recurrence after catheter ablation. However, the rs2200733 variant was not associated with AF recurrence in this group. The combination of the rs7193343 and rs2200733 risk alleles was associated with a better predictive power in the PAF patients. In contrast, in the non-PAF group, the SNPs were not associated with recurrence. The rs7193343 and rs2200733 variants were not associated with different atrial voltage and activation times. Conclusions The rs7193343 variants were associated with AF recurrence after catheter ablation in PAF patients but not in non-PAF patients. The rs7193343 CC variant was independently associated with non-PAF. PMID:27713600

  17. RNA-Seq Reveals Differential Gene Expression in Staphylococcus aureus with Single-Nucleotide Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Osmundson, Joseph; Dewell, Scott; Darst, Seth A.

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a gram-positive cocci and an important human commensal bacteria and pathogen. S. aureus infections are increasingly difficult to treat because of the emergence of highly resistant MRSA (methicillin-resistant S. aureus) strains. Here we present a method to study differential gene expression in S. aureus using high-throughput RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq). We used RNA-seq to examine gene expression in S. aureus RN4220 cells containing an exogenously expressed transcription factor and between two S. aureus strains (RN4220 and NCTC8325-4). We investigated the sequence and gene expression differences between RN4220 and NCTC8325-4 and used the RNA-seq data to identify S. aureus promoters suitable for in vitro analysis. We used RNA-seq to describe, on a genome wide scale, genes positively and negatively regulated by the phage encoded transcription factor gp67. RNA-seq offers the ability to study differential gene expression with single-nucleotide resolution, and is a considerable improvement over the predominant genome-wide transcriptome technologies used in S. aureus. PMID:24116120

  18. The Role of Vitamin D Level and Related Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Crohn’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Andre Y. O. M.; Bishop, Karen S.; Han, Dug Yeo; Ellett, Stephanie; Jesuthasan, Amalini; Lam, Wen J.; Ferguson, Lynnette R.

    2013-01-01

    New Zealand has one of the highest rates of Crohn’s Disease (CD) in the world, and there is much speculation as to why this might be. A high risk of CD has been associated with deficient or insufficient levels of Vitamin D (Vit D), lifestyle as well as various genetic polymorphisms. In this study we sought to analyse the relevance of serum Vit D levels, lifestyle and genotype to CD status. Serum samples were analysed for 25-OH-Vitamin D levels. DNA was isolated from blood and cheek-swabs, and Sequenom and ImmunoChip techniques were used for genotyping. Serum Vit D levels were significantly lower in CD patients (mean = 49.5 mg/L) than those found in controls (mean = 58.9 mg/L, p = 4.74 × 10−6). A total of seven single nucleotide polymorphisms were examined for effects on serum Vit D levels, with adjustment for confounding variables. Two variants: rs731236[A] (VDR) and rs732594[A] (SCUBE3) showed a significant association with serum Vit D levels in CD patients. Four variants: rs7975232[A] (VDR), rs732594[A] (SCUBE3), and rs2980[T] and rs2981[A] (PHF-11) showed a significant association with serum Vit D levels in the control group. This study demonstrates a significant interaction between Vit D levels and CD susceptibility, as well as a significant association between Vit D levels and genotype. PMID:24084050

  19. MSProGene: integrative proteogenomics beyond six-frames and single nucleotide polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Zickmann, Franziska; Renard, Bernhard Y.

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Ongoing advances in high-throughput technologies have facilitated accurate proteomic measurements and provide a wealth of information on genomic and transcript level. In proteogenomics, this multi-omics data is combined to analyze unannotated organisms and to allow more accurate sample-specific predictions. Existing analysis methods still mainly depend on six-frame translations or reference protein databases that are extended by transcriptomic information or known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). However, six-frames introduce an artificial sixfold increase of the target database and SNP integration requires a suitable database summarizing results from previous experiments. We overcome these limitations by introducing MSProGene, a new method for integrative proteogenomic analysis based on customized RNA-Seq driven transcript databases. MSProGene is independent from existing reference databases or annotated SNPs and avoids large six-frame translated databases by constructing sample-specific transcripts. In addition, it creates a network combining RNA-Seq and peptide information that is optimized by a maximum-flow algorithm. It thereby also allows resolving the ambiguity of shared peptides for protein inference. We applied MSProGene on three datasets and show that it facilitates a database-independent reliable yet accurate prediction on gene and protein level and additionally identifies novel genes. Availability and implementation: MSProGene is written in Java and Python. It is open source and available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/msprogene/. Contact: renardb@rki.de PMID:26072472

  20. Influence of a critical single nucleotide polymorphism on nuclear receptor PXR-promoter function.

    PubMed

    Rana, Manjul; Coshic, Poonam; Goswami, Ravinder; Tyagi, Rakesh K

    2017-02-15

    The Pregnane and Xenobiotic Receptor (PXR; NR1I2) is a ligand-modulated transcription factor that belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily. It is expressed at higher levels primarily in liver and intestine as compared to the levels in several other organs. It is activated by a broad spectrum of xenobiotics and endobiotics. The primary function of PXR is to regulate the expression of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters and prevent the accumulation of toxic chemicals in the body, thereby maintaining body's homeostasis. In this study, we identified a C/T single nucleotide polymorphism at position -831 from the transcriptional start site of the PXR gene promoter and examined the functional significance of this variant using both the luciferase reporter gene assays and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). Transient transfection experiments showed that the T-allele was associated with significantly greater transcriptional activity than the C-allele of SNP rs3814055. These results indicate that the -831C/T polymorphism has a direct effect on transcriptional regulation of PXR gene. This allelic variation may be a potential genetic marker that can help identify individuals at higher risk for Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD).

  1. Frequency of M287T/AS3MT Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in an Iranian Population

    PubMed Central

    Farhid, Fatemeh; Nadali, Fatemeh; Chahardouli, Bahram; Mohammadi, Saeed; Rostami, Shahrbano; Alimoghaddam, Kamran; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir

    2017-01-01

    Background : To determine the frequency of the single nucleotide polymorphism M287T in exon 9 of the AS3MT gene in Iranian population and to assess the difference in allele frequencies with other ethnicities. Subjects and Methods : Genotyping analysis was performed on 150 healthy subjects using the PCR-RFLP assay. We used chi-square analysis to check the deviation from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium and compare of the observed genotype frequencies in various ethnic. The level of statistical significance was considered as p<0.05. Results : The homozygous CC, homozygous TT and heterozygous CT genotypes were observed in 2%, 80% and 18% of participated individuals. The SNP rs11191439 passed the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium chi-squared test with p-value>0.05 and had a minor allele frequency (MAF)>5%. Conclusion: Iranians are genetically very similar to Caucasian and African individuals and they are considerably different from other East Asians including Koreans, Chinese and Japanese individuals. Due to genetic polymorphisms can contribute to the variability in AS3MT activity; they may contribute to interindividual as well as intra-ethnic differences in response to the detoxification of arsenic. PMID:28286610

  2. Self-similar characteristics of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the rice genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang-Yong

    2016-11-01

    With single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data from the 3,000 rice genome project, we investigate the mutational characteristics of the rice genome from the perspective of statistical physics. From the frequency distributions of the space between adjacent SNPs, we present evidence that SNPs are not spaced randomly, but clustered across the genome. The clustering property is related to a long-range correlation in SNP locations, suggesting that a mutation occurring in a locus may affect other mutations far away along the sequence in a chromosome. In addition, the reliability of the existence of the long-range correlation is supported by the agreement between the results of two independent analysis methods. The highly-skewed and long-tailed distribution of SNP spaces is further characterized by a multi-fractal, showing that SNP spaces possess a rich structure of a statistical self-similarity. These results can be used for an optimal design of a microarray assay and a primer, as well as for genotyping quality control.

  3. Single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping in polyploid wheat with the Illumina GoldenGate assay.

    PubMed

    Akhunov, Eduard; Nicolet, Charles; Dvorak, Jan

    2009-08-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are indispensable in such applications as association mapping and construction of high-density genetic maps. These applications usually require genotyping of thousands of SNPs in a large number of individuals. Although a number of SNP genotyping assays are available, most of them are designed for SNP genotyping in diploid individuals. Here, we demonstrate that the Illumina GoldenGate assay could be used for SNP genotyping of homozygous tetraploid and hexaploid wheat lines. Genotyping reactions could be carried out directly on genomic DNA without the necessity of preliminary PCR amplification. A total of 53 tetraploid and 38 hexaploid homozygous wheat lines were genotyped at 96 SNP loci. The genotyping error rate estimated after removal of low-quality data was 0 and 1% for tetraploid and hexaploid wheat, respectively. Developed SNP genotyping assays were shown to be useful for genotyping wheat cultivars. This study demonstrated that the GoldenGate assay is a very efficient tool for high-throughput genotyping of polyploid wheat, opening new possibilities for the analysis of genetic variation in wheat and dissection of genetic basis of complex traits using association mapping approach.

  4. Expanded insecticide catabolic activity gained by a single nucleotide substitution in a bacterial carbamate hydrolase gene.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Başak; Ghequire, Maarten; Nguyen, Thi Phi Oanh; De Mot, René; Wattiez, Ruddy; Springael, Dirk

    2016-12-01

    Carbofuran-mineralizing strain Novosphingobium sp. KN65.2 produces the CfdJ enzyme that converts the N-methylcarbamate insecticide to carbofuran phenol. Purified CfdJ shows a remarkably low KM towards carbofuran. Together with the carbaryl hydrolase CehA of Rhizobium sp. strain AC100, CfdJ represents a new protein family with several uncharacterized bacterial members outside the proteobacteria. Although both enzymes differ by only four amino acids, CehA does not recognize carbofuran as a substrate whereas CfdJ also hydrolyzes carbaryl. None of the CfdJ amino acids that differ from CehA were shown to be silent regarding carbofuran hydrolytic activity but one particular amino acid substitution, i.e., L152 to F152, proved crucial. CfdJ is more efficient in degrading methylcarbamate pesticides with an aromatic side chain whereas CehA is more efficient in degrading the oxime carbamate nematicide oxamyl. The presence of common flanking sequences suggest that the cfdJ gene is located on a remnant of the mobile genetic element Tnceh carrying cehA. Our results suggest that these enzymes can be acquired through horizontal gene transfer and can evolve to degrade new carbamate substrates by limited amino acid substitutions. We demonstrate that a carbaryl hydrolase can gain the additional capacity to degrade carbofuran by a single nucleotide transversion. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Nano-enabled bioanalytical approaches to ultrasensitive detection of low abundance single nucleotide polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Lapitan Jr., Lorico D. S.; Guo, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) constitute the most common types of genetic variations in the human genome. A number of SNPs have been linked to the development of life threatening diseases including cancer, cardiovascular diseases and neurodegenerative diseases. The ability for ultrasensitive and accurate detection of low abundant disease-related SNPs in bodily fluids (e.g. blood, serum, etc.) holds a significant value in the development of non-invasive future biodiagnostic tools. Over the past two decades, nanomaterials have been utilized in a myriad of biosensing applications due to their ability of detecting extremely low quantities of biologically important biomarkers with high sensitivity and accuracy. Of particular interest is the application of such technologies in the detection of SNPs. The use of various nanomaterials, coupled with different powerful signal amplification strategies, has paved the way for a new generation of ultrasensitive SNP biodiagnostic assays. Over the past few years, several ultrasensitive SNP biosensors capable of detecting specific targets down to the ultra-low regimes (ca. aM and below) and therefore holding great promises for early clinical diagnosis of diseases have been developed. This mini review will highlight some of the most recent, significant advances in nanomaterial-based ultrasensitive SNP sensing technologies capable of detecting specific targets on the attomolar (10–18 M) regime or below. In particular, the design of novel, powerful signal amplification strategies that hold the key to the ultrasensitivity is highlighted. PMID:25785914

  6. Paclitaxel sensitivity in relation to ABCB1 expression, efflux and single nucleotide polymorphisms in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bo; Russell, Amanda; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiao Qing; Healey, Sue; Henderson, Michelle; Wong, Mark; Emmanuel, Catherine; Galletta, Laura; Johnatty, Sharon E; Bowtell, David; Haber, Michelle; Norris, Murray; Harnett, Paul; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Balleine, Rosemary L; deFazio, Anna

    2014-05-09

    ABCB1 (adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporter B1) mediates cellular elimination of many chemotherapeutic agents including paclitaxel, which is commonly used to treat ovarian cancer. A significant association between common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ABCB1 and progression-free survival has been reported in patients with ovarian cancer. Variable paclitaxel clearance due to genotype specific differences in ABCB1 activity in cancer cells and/or normal tissues may underlie the association. Using cell-based models, we evaluated the correlations between ABCB1 expression, polymorphisms, transporter activity and paclitaxel sensitivity in ovarian cancer (n = 10) and lymphoblastoid (n = 19) cell lines. Close associations between ABCB1 expression, transporter function and paclitaxel sensitivity were found in lymphoblastoid cell lines, although we could not demonstrate an association with common SNPs. In ovarian cancer cell lines, ABCB1 expression was low and the association between expression and function was lost. These results suggest that ABCB1 related survival difference in ovarian cancer patients is more likely to be due to differential whole body paclitaxel clearance mediated by normal cells rather than a direct effect on cancer cells.

  7. Genetic Diversity Revealed by Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Markers in a Worldwide Germplasm Collection of Durum Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jing; Sun, Daokun; Chen, Liang; You, Frank M.; Wang, Jirui; Peng, Yunliang; Nevo, Eviatar; Sun, Dongfa; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Peng, Junhua

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of genetic diversity and genetic structure in crops has important implications for plant breeding programs and the conservation of genetic resources. Newly developed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers are effective in detecting genetic diversity. In the present study, a worldwide durum wheat collection consisting of 150 accessions was used. Genetic diversity and genetic structure were investigated using 946 polymorphic SNP markers covering the whole genome of tetraploid wheat. Genetic structure was greatly impacted by multiple factors, such as environmental conditions, breeding methods reflected by release periods of varieties, and gene flows via human activities. A loss of genetic diversity was observed from landraces and old cultivars to the modern cultivars released during periods of the Early Green Revolution, but an increase in cultivars released during the Post Green Revolution. Furthermore, a comparative analysis of genetic diversity among the 10 mega ecogeographical regions indicated that South America, North America, and Europe possessed the richest genetic variability, while the Middle East showed moderate levels of genetic diversity. PMID:23538839

  8. How Oxytocin Receptor (OXTR) Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Act on Prosociality: The Mediation Role of Moral Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Siyuan; Wu, Nan; Su, Yanjie

    2017-01-01

    Prosociality is related to numerous positive outcomes, and mechanisms underlying individual differences in prosociality have been widely discussed. Recently, research has found converging evidence on the influence of the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) gene on prosociality. Meanwhile, moral reasoning, a key precursor for social behavior, has also been associated with variability in OXTR gene, thus the relationship between OXTR and prosociality is assumed to be mediated by moral evaluation. The current study examines the relationship in question, and includes gender as a potential moderator. Self-reported prosociality on Prosocial Tendencies Measure and evaluation on the moral acceptability of behaviors in stories from 790 Chinese adolescents (32.4% boys) were analyzed for the influence of their OXTR single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Results showed that SNP at site rs2254298 was indirectly associated with prosocial behaviors via moral evaluation of behaviors, and this effect was moderated by gender. Our findings suggest an indirect association between genetic variations in OXTR and prosociality through moral evaluation, indicating the potential pathway from genetic variability to prosociality through level of moral development. We also provide some evidence that the role of oxytocin system may to some extent depend on gender. These findings may promote our understanding of the genetic and biological roots of prosociality and morality. PMID:28377734

  9. Novel Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Markers for Low Dose Aspirin-Associated Small Bowel Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Shiotani, Akiko; Murao, Takahisa; Fujita, Yoshihiko; Fujimura, Yoshinori; Sakakibara, Takashi; Nishio, Kazuto; Haruma, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Background Aspirin-induced enteropathy is now increasingly being recognized although the pathogenesis of small intestinal damage induced by aspirin is not well understood and related risk factors have not been established. Aim To investigate pharmacogenomic profile of low dose aspirin (LDA)-induced small bowel bleeding. Methods Genome-wide analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was performed using the Affymetrix DMET™ Plus Premier Pack. Genotypes of candidate genes associated with small bowel bleeding were determined using TaqMan SNP Genotyping Assay kits and direct sequencing. Results In the validation study in overall 37 patients with small bowel bleeding and 400 controls, 4 of 27 identified SNPs: CYP4F11 (rs1060463) GG (p=0.003), CYP2D6 (rs28360521) GG (p=0.02), CYP24A1 (rs4809957) T allele (p=0.04), and GSTP1 (rs1695) G allele (p=0.04) were significantly more frequent in the small bowel bleeding group compared to the controls. After adjustment for significant factors, CYP2D6 (rs28360521) GG (OR 4.11, 95% CI. 1.62 -10.4) was associated with small bowel bleeding. Conclusions CYP4F11 and CYP2D6 SNPs may identify patients at increased risk for aspirin-induced small bowel bleeding. PMID:24367646

  10. Social cognition, face processing, and oxytocin receptor single nucleotide polymorphisms in typically developing children.

    PubMed

    Slane, Mylissa M; Lusk, Laina G; Boomer, K B; Hare, Abby E; King, Margaret K; Evans, David W

    2014-07-01

    Recent research has provided evidence of a link between behavioral measures of social cognition (SC) and neural and genetic correlates. Differences in face processing and variations in the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) gene have been associated with SC deficits and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) traits. Much work has examined the qualitative differences between those with ASD and typically developing (TD) individuals, but very little has been done to quantify the natural variation in ASD-like traits in the typical population. The present study examines this variation in TD children using a multidimensional perspective involving behavior assessment, neural electroencephalogram (EEG) testing, and OXTR genotyping. Children completed a series of neurocognitive assessments, provided saliva samples for sequencing, and completed a face processing task while connected to an EEG. No clear pattern emerged for EEG covariates or genotypes for individual OXTR single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). However, SNPs rs2254298 and rs53576 consistently interacted such that the AG/GG allele combination of these SNPs was associated with poorer performance on neurocognitive measures. These results suggest that neither SNP in isolation is risk-conferring, but rather that the combination of rs2254298(A/G) and rs53576(G/G) confers a deleterious effect on SC across several neurocognitive measures.

  11. Association of Toll-Like Receptor 3 Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Al-Anazi, Mashael R.; Matou-Nasri, Sabine; Abdo, Ayman A.; Sanai, Faisal M.; Alkahtani, Saad; Alarifi, Saud; Alkahtane, Abdullah A.; Al-Yahya, Hamad; Ali, Daoud; Alessia, Mohammed S.; Alshahrani, Bushra; Al-Ahdal, Mohammed N.

    2017-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) plays a key role in innate immunity by recognizing pathogenic, double-stranded RNAs. Thus, activation of TLR3 is a major factor in antiviral defense and tumor eradication. Although downregulation of TLR3 gene expression has been mainly reported in patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), the influence of TLR3 genotype on the risk of HCV infection, HCV-related cirrhosis, and/or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains to be determined. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the TLR3 gene and their associations with HCV-related disease risk were investigated in a Saudi Arabian population in this study. Eight TLR3 SNPs were analyzed in 563 patients with HCV, which consisted of 437 patients with chronic HCV infections, 88 with HCV-induced liver cirrhosis, and 38 with HCC. A total of 599 healthy control subjects were recruited to the study. Among the eight TLR3 SNPs studied, the rs78726532 SNP was strongly associated with HCV infection when compared to that in healthy control subjects. The rs5743314 was also strongly associated with HCV-related liver disease progression (cirrhosis and HCC). In summary, these results indicate that distinct genetic variants of TLR3 SNPs are associated with HCV infection and HCV-mediated liver disease progression in the Saudi Arabian population. PMID:28127569

  12. Different Genotype of rs3130932 Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Between Gastric Cancer Patients and Normal Subjects.

    PubMed

    Shahhoseini, Zahra; Jeivad, Fereshteh; Ahangar, Nematollah; Abediankenari, Saeid

    2017-03-01

    Octamer binding transcription factor B gene (OCT4) is responsible for development and self-renewal maintenance of embryonic stem cells. The rs3130932 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) may play a role in tumor genesis. Because of high prevalence of gastric cancer in north of Iran, this study was investigated role of rs3130932 polymorphism and stomach cancer. Blood samples were collected from 100 informed gastric cancer patients and 100 age and sex-matched healthy individuals, and were genotyped for the presence of rs3130932G allele by ssp PCR. The mean age of participant (n = 200) was 67.83 ± 10.878 years. In genotyping and allelic analysis, TG genotype increased 66.147 times more likely to develop stomach cancer than the TT genotype, and disease risk increases 140.496 times more in GG genotype in comparison with TT genotype. This study clearly emphasis on different genetic profile in this population and show that the rs3130932G allele and odds of gastric cancer are related to each other in northern of Iran.

  13. A single nucleotide polymorphism of porcine MX2 gene provides antiviral activity against vesicular stomatitis virus.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Keisuke; Tungtrakoolsub, Pullop; Morozumi, Takeya; Uenishi, Hirohide; Kawahara, Manabu; Watanabe, Tomomasa

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to determine if single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in porcine MX2 gene affect its antiviral potential. MX proteins are known to suppress the multiplication of several viruses, including influenza virus and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). In domestic animals possessing highly polymorphic genome, our previous research indicated that a specific SNP in chicken Mx gene was responsible for its antiviral function. However, there still has been no information about SNPs in porcine MX2 gene. In this study, we first conducted polymorphism analysis in 17 pigs of MX2 gene derived from seven breeds. Consequently, a total of 30 SNPs, of which 11 were deduced to cause amino acid variations, were detected, suggesting that the porcine MX2 is very polymorphic. Next, we classified MX2 into eight alleles (A1-A8) and subsequently carried out infectious experiments with recombinant VSVΔG*-G to each allele. In A1-A5 and A8, position 514 amino acid (514 aa) of MX2 was glycine (Gly), which did not inhibit VSV multiplication, whereas in A6 and A7, 514 aa was arginine (Arg), which exhibited the antiviral ability against VSV. These results demonstrate that a SNP at 514 aa (Gly-Arg) of porcine MX2 plays a pivotal role in the antiviral activity as well as that at 631 aa of chicken Mx.

  14. Validation of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Associated with Carcass Traits in a Commercial Hanwoo Population

    PubMed Central

    Sudrajad, Pita; Sharma, Aditi; Dang, Chang Gwon; Kim, Jong Joo; Kim, Kwan Suk; Lee, Jun Heon; Kim, Sidong; Lee, Seung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Four carcass traits, namely carcass weight (CW), eye muscle area (EMA), back fat thickness (BF), and marbling score (MS), are the main price decision parameters used for purchasing Hanwoo beef. The development of DNA markers for these carcass traits for use in a beef management system could result in substantial profit for beef producers in Korea. The objective of this study was to validate the association of highly significant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified in a previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) with the four carcass traits in a commercial Hanwoo population. We genotyped 83 SNPs distributed across all 29 autosomes in 867 steers from a Korean Hanwoo feedlot. Six SNPs, namely ARS-BFGL-NGS-22774 (Chr4, Pos:4889229), ARS-BFGL-NGS-100046 (Chr6, Pos:61917424), ARS-BFGL-NGS-39006 (Chr27, Pos:38059196), ARS-BFGL-NGS-18790 (Chr10, Pos:26489109), ARS-BFGL-NGS-43879 (Chr9, Pos:39964297), and BTB-00775794 (Chr20, Pos:20476265), were found to be associated with CW, EMA, BF, and MS. The ARS-BFGL-NGS-22774, BTB-00775794, and ARS-BFGL-NGS-39006 markers accounted for 1.80%, 1.72%, and 1.35% (p<0.01), respectively, of the phenotypic variance in the commercial Hanwoo population. Many genes located in close proximity to the significant SNPs identified in this study were previously reported to have roles in carcass traits. The results of this study could be useful for marker-assisted selection programs. PMID:26954199

  15. A single nucleotide polymorphism in tetherin promotes retrovirus restriction in vivo.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Bradley S; Smith, Diana S; Li, Sam X; Guo, Kejun; Hasenkrug, Kim J; Santiago, Mario L

    2012-01-01

    Tetherin is a membrane protein of unusual topology expressed from rodents to humans that accumulates enveloped virus particles on the surface of infected cells. However, whether this 'tethering' activity promotes or restricts retroviral spread during acute retrovirus infection in vivo is controversial. We report here the identification of a single nucleotide polymorphism in the Tetherin gene of NZW/LacJ (NZW) mice that mutated the canonical ATG start site to GTG. Translation of NZW Tetherin from downstream ATGs deleted a conserved dual-tyrosine endosomal sorting motif, resulting in higher cell surface expression and more potent inhibition of Friend retrovirus release compared to C57BL/6 (B6) Tetherin in vitro. Analysis of (B6×NZW)F(1) hybrid mice revealed that increased Tetherin cell surface expression in NZW mice is a recessive trait in vivo. Using a classical genetic backcrossing approach, NZW Tetherin expression strongly correlated with decreased Friend retrovirus replication and pathogenesis. However, the protective effect of NZW Tetherin was not observed in the context of B6 Apobec3/Rfv3 resistance. These findings identify the first functional Tetherin polymorphism within a mammalian host, demonstrate that Tetherin cell surface expression is a key parameter for retroviral restriction, and suggest the existence of a restriction factor hierarchy to counteract pathogenic retrovirus infections in vivo.

  16. Use of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Array Technology to Improve the Identification of Chromosomal Lesions in Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Iacobucci, Ilaria; Lonetti, Annalisa; Papayannidis, Cristina; Martinelli, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Acute leukemias are characterized by recurring chromosomal and genetic abnormalities that disrupt normal development and drive aberrant cell proliferation and survival. Identification of these abnormalities plays important role in diagnosis, risk assessment and patient classification. Until the last decade methods to detect these aberrations have included genome wide approaches, such as conventional cytogenetics, but with a low sensitivity (5-10%), or gene candidate approaches, such as fluorescent in situ hybridization, having a greater sensitivity but being limited to only known regions of the genome. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) technology is a screening method that has revolutionized our way to find genetic alterations, enabling linkage and association studies between SNP genotype and disease as well as the identification of alterations in DNA content on a whole genome scale. The adoption of this approach for the study of lymphoid and myeloid leukemias contributed to the identification of novel genetic alterations, such as losses/gains/uniparental disomy not visible by cytogenetics and implicated in pathogenesis, improving risk assessment and patient classification and in some cases working as targets for tailored therapies. In this review, we reported recent advances obtained in the knowledge of the genomic complexity of chronic myeloid leukemia and acute leukemias thanks to the use of high-throughput technologies, such as SNP array. PMID:23941516

  17. Investigation of Rare Single-Nucleotide PCDH15 Variants in Schizophrenia and Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ishizuka, Kanako; Kimura, Hiroki; Wang, Chenyao; Xing, Jingrui; Kushima, Itaru; Arioka, Yuko; Oya-Ito, Tomoko; Uno, Yota; Okada, Takashi; Mori, Daisuke; Ozaki, Norio

    2016-01-01

    Both schizophrenia (SCZ) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are neuropsychiatric disorders with overlapping genetic etiology. Protocadherin 15 (PCDH15), which encodes a member of the cadherin super family that contributes to neural development and function, has been cited as a risk gene for neuropsychiatric disorders. Recently, rare variants of large effect have been paid attention to understand the etiopathology of these complex disorders. Thus, we evaluated the impacts of rare, single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) in PCDH15 on SCZ or ASD. First, we conducted coding exon-targeted resequencing of PCDH15 with next-generation sequencing technology in 562 Japanese patients (370 SCZ and 192 ASD) and detected 16 heterozygous SNVs. We then performed association analyses on 2,096 cases (1,714 SCZ and 382 ASD) and 1,917 controls with six novel variants of these 16 SNVs. Of these six variants, four (p.R219K, p.T281A, p.D642N, c.3010-1G>C) were ultra-rare variants (minor allele frequency < 0.0005) that may increase disease susceptibility. Finally, no statistically significant association between any of these rare, heterozygous PCDH15 point variants and SCZ or ASD was found. Our results suggest that a larger sample size of resequencing subjects is necessary to detect associations between rare PCDH15 variants and neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:27058588

  18. Single nucleotide polymorphism in transcriptional regulatory regions and expression of environmentally responsive genes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xuting; Tomso, Daniel J.; Liu Xuemei; Bell, Douglas A. . E-mail: BELL1@niehs.nih.gov

    2005-09-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human genome are DNA sequence variations that can alter an individual's response to environmental exposure. SNPs in gene coding regions can lead to changes in the biological properties of the encoded protein. In contrast, SNPs in non-coding gene regulatory regions may affect gene expression levels in an allele-specific manner, and these functional polymorphisms represent an important but relatively unexplored class of genetic variation. The main challenge in analyzing these SNPs is a lack of robust computational and experimental methods. Here, we first outline mechanisms by which genetic variation can impact gene regulation, and review recent findings in this area; then, we describe a methodology for bioinformatic discovery and functional analysis of regulatory SNPs in cis-regulatory regions using the assembled human genome sequence and databases on sequence polymorphism and gene expression. Our method integrates SNP and gene databases and uses a set of computer programs that allow us to: (1) select SNPs, from among the >9 million human SNPs in the NCBI dbSNP database, that are similar to cis-regulatory element (RE) consensus sequences; (2) map the selected dbSNP entries to the human genome assembly in order to identify polymorphic REs near gene start sites; (3) prioritize the candidate polymorphic RE containing genes by searching the existing genotype and gene expression data sets. The applicability of this system has been demonstrated through studies on p53 responsive elements and is being extended to additional pathways and environmentally responsive genes.

  19. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms: A Window into the Informatics of the Living Genome

    PubMed Central

    Dunston, Georgia M.; Mason, Tshela E.; Hercules, William; Lindesay, James

    2015-01-01

    Nested in the environment of the nucleus of the cell, the 23 sets of chromosomes that comprise the human genome function as one integrated whole system, orchestrating the expression of thousands of genes underlying the biological characteristics of the cell, individual and the species. The extraction of meaningful information from this complex data set depends crucially upon the lens through which the data are examined. We present a biophysical perspective on genomic information encoded in single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and introduce metrics for modeling information encoded in the genome. Information, like energy, is considered to be a conserved physical property of the universe. The information structured in SNPs describes the adaptation of a human population to a given environment. The maintained order measured by the information content is associated with entropies, energies, and other state variables for a dynamic system in homeostasis. “Genodynamics” characterizes the state variables for genomic populations that are stable under stochastic environmental stresses. The determination of allelic energies allows the parameterization of specific environmental influences upon individual alleles across populations. The environment drives population-based genome variation. From this vantage point, the genome is modeled as a complex, dynamic information system defined by patterns of SNP alleles and SNP haplotypes. PMID:25635233

  20. In silico prediction of splice-altering single nucleotide variants in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Jian, Xueqiu; Boerwinkle, Eric; Liu, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    In silico tools have been developed to predict variants that may have an impact on pre-mRNA splicing. The major limitation of the application of these tools to basic research and clinical practice is the difficulty in interpreting the output. Most tools only predict potential splice sites given a DNA sequence without measuring splicing signal changes caused by a variant. Another limitation is the lack of large-scale evaluation studies of these tools. We compared eight in silico tools on 2959 single nucleotide variants within splicing consensus regions (scSNVs) using receiver operating characteristic analysis. The Position Weight Matrix model and MaxEntScan outperformed other methods. Two ensemble learning methods, adaptive boosting and random forests, were used to construct models that take advantage of individual methods. Both models further improved prediction, with outputs of directly interpretable prediction scores. We applied our ensemble scores to scSNVs from the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer database. Analysis showed that predicted splice-altering scSNVs are enriched in recurrent scSNVs and known cancer genes. We pre-computed our ensemble scores for all potential scSNVs across the human genome, providing a whole genome level resource for identifying splice-altering scSNVs discovered from large-scale sequencing studies. PMID:25416802

  1. Analysis of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis in Korea: For Personalized Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Eun Su; Kim, Hak Sun; Sharma, Veushj; Park, Jin Oh; Lee, Hwan Mo; Moon, Sung Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The incidence of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) has rapidly increased, and with it, physician consultations and expenditures (about one and a half times) in the last 5 years. Recent etiological studies reveal that AIS is a complex genetic disorder that results from the interaction of multiple gene loci and the environment. For personalized treatment of AIS, a tool that can accurately measure the progression of Cobb's angle would be of great use. Gene analysis utilizing single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) has been developed as a diagnostic tool for use in Caucasians but not Koreans. Therefore, we attempted to reveal AIS-related genes and their relevance in Koreans, exploring the potential use of gene analysis as a diagnostic tool for personalized treatment of AIS therein. Materials and Methods A total of 68 Korean AIS and 35 age- and sex-matched, healthy adolescents were enrolled in this study and were examined for 10 candidate scoliosis gene SNPs. Results This study revealed that the SNPs of rs2449539 in lysosomal-associated transmembrane protein 4 beta (LAPTM4B) and rs5742612 in upstream and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) were associated with both susceptibility to and curve severity in AIS. The results suggested that both LAPTM4B and IGF1 genes were important in AIS predisposition and progression. Conclusion Thus, on the basis of this study, if more SNPs or candidate genes are studied in a larger population in Korea, personalized treatment of Korean AIS patients might become a possibility. PMID:23364988

  2. A novel, single nucleotide polymorphism-based assay to detect 22q11 deletions.

    PubMed

    Funke, Birgit H; Brown, Alison C; Ramoni, Marco F; Regan, Maura E; Baglieri, Chris; Finn, Christine T; Babcock, Melanie; Shprintzen, Robert J; Morrow, Bernice E; Kucherlapati, Raju

    2007-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome, DiGeorge syndrome, and conotruncal anomaly face syndrome, now collectively referred to as 22q11deletion syndrome (22q11DS) are caused by microdeletions on chromosome 22q11. The great majority ( approximately 90%) of these deletions are 3 Mb in size. The remaining deleted patients have nested break-points resulting in overlapping regions of hemizygosity. Diagnostic testing for the disorder is traditionally done by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using probes located in the proximal half of the region common to all deletions. We developed a novel, high-resolution single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping assay to detect 22q11 deletions. We validated this assay using DNA from 110 nondeleted controls and 77 patients with 22q11DS that had previously been tested by FISH. The assay was 100% sensitive (all deletions were correctly identified). Our assay was also able to detect a case of segmental uniparental disomy at 22q11 that was not detected by the FISH assay. We used Bayesian networks to identify a set of 17 SNPs that are sufficient to ascertain unambiguously the deletion status of 22q11DS patients. Our SNP based assay is a highly accurate, sensitive, and specific method for the diagnosis of 22q11 deletion syndrome.

  3. The development and characterization of a 57K single nucleotide polymorphism array for rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Palti, Y; Gao, G; Liu, S; Kent, M P; Lien, S; Miller, M R; Rexroad, C E; Moen, T

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we describe the development and characterization of the first high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping array for rainbow trout. The SNP array is publically available from a commercial vendor (Affymetrix). The SNP genotyping quality was high, and validation rate was close to 90%. This is comparable to other farm animals and is much higher than previous smaller scale SNP validation studies in rainbow trout. High quality and integrity of the genotypes are evident from sample reproducibility and from nearly 100% agreement in genotyping results from other methods. The array is very useful for rainbow trout aquaculture populations with more than 40 900 polymorphic markers per population. For wild populations that were confounded by a smaller sample size, the number of polymorphic markers was between 10 577 and 24 330. Comparison between genotypes from individual populations suggests good potential for identifying candidate markers for populations' traceability. Linkage analysis and mapping of the SNPs to the reference genome assembly provide strong evidence for a wide distribution throughout the genome with good representation in all 29 chromosomes. A total of 68% of the genome scaffolds and contigs were anchored through linkage analysis using the SNP array genotypes, including ~20% of the genome assembly that has not been previously anchored to chromosomes.

  4. Study of MICA alleles in 201 African Americans by multiplexed single nucleotide extension (MSNE) typing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanzheng; Han, Mei; Vorhaben, Robert; Giang, Chris; Lavingia, Bhavna; Stastny, Peter

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a method for major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA) genotyping using multiplexed single nucleotide extension (MSNE) and flow cytometric analysis of an array of fluorescent microspheres. This technique employs a polymerase chain reaction-derived target DNA containing all the polymorphic sites of MICA, synthetic complementary primers, biotinylated dideoxynucleotide triphosphate, fluorescent reporter molecules (streptavidin-phycoerythrin), and thermophilic DNA polymerase. Genomic DNA was amplified by MICA locus-specific primers and the MSNE reactions were carried out in the presence of 30 MSNE primers used to assay polymorphisms in exons 2, 3, and 4 of the MICA genes. Thirty-two previously typed cell lines were used as reference material. The MICA gene frequencies among 201 African-American unrelated donors were determined. Of 51 previously known alleles, 18 were observed in African-Americans, compared to 16 that were found in North American Caucasians and 9 in South American Indians, suggesting a more diversified allelic distribution in African-Americans. MICA*00201 and MICA*00801 were the two most frequent alleles in African-Americans. We observed a high degree of linkage disequilibrium between certain alleles of MICA and of human leukocyte antigen-B in the African-American population. The methodology described here offers a powerful new approach to DNA typing of the MICA alleles.

  5. Development of a cassava core collection based on single nucleotide polymorphism markers.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, E J; Ferreira, C F; Santos, V S; Oliveira, G A F

    2014-08-25

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers were used in the largest cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) germplasm collection from Brazil to develop core collections based on the maximization strategy. Subsets with 61, 64, 84, 128, 256, and 384 cassava accessions were selected and named PoHEU, MST64, PoRAN, MST128, MST256, and MST384, respectively. All the 798 alleles identified by 402 SNP markers in the entire collection were captured in all core collections. Only small alterations in the diversity parameters were observed for the different core collections compared with the complete collection. Because of the optimal adjustment of the validation parameters representative of the complete collection, the absence of genotypes with high genetic similarity and the maximization of the genetic distances between accessions of the PoHEU core collection, which contained 4.7% of the accessions of the complete collection, maximized the genetic conservation of this important cassava collection. Furthermore, the development of this core collection will allow concentrated efforts toward future characterization and agronomic evaluation of accessions to maximize the diversity and genetic gains in cassava breeding programs.

  6. Oxytocin Receptor (OXTR) Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Indirectly Predict Prosocial Behavior Through Perspective Taking and Empathic Concern.

    PubMed

    Christ, Christa C; Carlo, Gustavo; Stoltenberg, Scott F

    2016-04-01

    Engaging in prosocial behavior can provide positive outcomes for self and others. Prosocial tendencies contribute to the propensity to engage in prosocial behavior. The oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) has also been associated with prosocial tendencies and behaviors. There has been little research, however, investigating whether the relationship between OXTR and prosocial behaviors is mediated by prosocial tendencies. This relationship may also vary among different types of prosocial behavior. The current study examines the relationship between OXTR, gender, prosocial tendencies, and both altruistic and public prosocial behavior endorsement. Students at a midwestern university (N = 398; 89.2% Caucasian; Mage  = 20.76; 26.6% male) provided self-report measures of prosocial tendencies and behaviors and buccal cells for genotyping OXTR polymorphisms. Results indicated that OXTR single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2268498 genotype significantly predicted empathic concern, whereas gender moderated the association between several other OXTR SNPs and prosocial tendencies. Increased prosocial tendencies predicted increased altruistic prosocial behavior endorsement and decreased public prosocial behavior endorsement. Our findings suggest an association between genetic variation in OXTR and endorsement of prosocial behavior indirectly through prosocial tendencies, and that the pathway is dependent on the type of prosocial behavior and gender. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. A review of the associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms in taste receptors, eating behaviors, and health.

    PubMed

    Chamoun, Elie; Mutch, David M; Allen-Vercoe, Emma; Buchholz, Andrea C; Duncan, Alison M; Spriet, Lawrence L; Haines, Jess; Ma, David W L

    2016-05-31

    Food preferences and dietary habits are heavily influenced by taste perception. There is growing interest in characterizing taste preferences based on genetic variation. Genetic differences in the ability to perceive key tastes may impact eating behavior and nutritional intake. Therefore, increased understanding of taste biology and genetics may lead to new personalized strategies, which may prevent or influence the trajectory of chronic disease risk. Recent advances show that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CD36 fat taste receptor are linked to differences in fat perception, fat preference, and chronic-disease biomarkers. Genetic variation in the sweet taste receptor T1R2 has been shown to alter sweet taste preferences, eating behaviors, and risk of dental caries. Polymorphisms in the bitter taste receptor T2R38 have been shown to influence taste for brassica vegetables. Individuals that intensely taste the bitterness of brassica vegetables ("supertasters") may avoid vegetable consumption and compensate by increasing their consumption of sweet and fatty foods, which may increase risk for chronic disease. Emerging evidence also suggests that the role of genetics in taste perception may be more impactful in children due to the lack of cultural influence compared to adults. This review examines the current knowledge of SNPs in taste receptors associated with fat, sweet, bitter, umami, and salt taste modalities and their contributions to food preferences, and chronic disease. Overall, these SNPs demonstrate the potential to influence food preferences and consequently health.

  8. Analysis of the Association between MDM4 rs4245739 Single Nucleotide Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Pedram, Negar; Pouladi, Nasser; Feizi, Mohammad A Hosseinpour; Montazeri, Vahid; Sakhinia, Ebrahim; Estiar, Mehrdad A

    2016-07-01

    MDM4 is a negative regulator of the p53 tumor suppression pathway. Recent studies have revealed that the rs4245739 A>C polymorphism of MDM4 in the 3-untranslated region makes it a miR-191 target site which leads to lower MDM4 expression. This study is aimed to detect if rs4245739 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the MDM4 gene influences the breast cancer development in Iranian-Azeri women. Blood samples were taken from 260 healthy controls and 220 breast cancer women with ethnicity of Iranian-Azeri. Genotyping was done using Tetra-ARMS PCR. Alleles of MDM4 rs4245739 SNP had no significant different frequency between patients and controls (p > 0.05). Additionally, genotypes of MDM4 rs4245739 SNP did not increase or decrease breast cancer risk in patients when compared to healthy women. Also, there was no significant association between the alleles of MDM4 rs4245739 SNP and clinicopathological factors (p > 0.05). Considering the lack of association between MDM4 rs4245739 polymorphism and breast cancer, rs4245739 polymorphism of this gene seems to have no significant role in the pathophysiology of the disease.

  9. Automated detection system of single nucleotide polymorphisms using two kinds of functional magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongna; Li, Song; Wang, Zhifei; Li, Zhiyang; Deng, Yan; Wang, Hua; Shi, Zhiyang; He, Nongyue

    2008-11-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) comprise the most abundant source of genetic variation in the human genome wide codominant SNPs identification. Therefore, large-scale codominant SNPs identification, especially for those associated with complex diseases, has induced the need for completely high-throughput and automated SNP genotyping method. Herein, we present an automated detection system of SNPs based on two kinds of functional magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and dual-color hybridization. The amido-modified MNPs (NH 2-MNPs) modified with APTES were used for DNA extraction from whole blood directly by electrostatic reaction, and followed by PCR, was successfully performed. Furthermore, biotinylated PCR products were captured on the streptavidin-coated MNPs (SA-MNPs) and interrogated by hybridization with a pair of dual-color probes to determine SNP, then the genotype of each sample can be simultaneously identified by scanning the microarray printed with the denatured fluorescent probes. This system provided a rapid, sensitive and highly versatile automated procedure that will greatly facilitate the analysis of different known SNPs in human genome.

  10. Challenges in the association of human single nucleotide polymorphism mentions with unique database identifiers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Most information on genomic variations and their associations with phenotypes are covered exclusively in scientific publications rather than in structured databases. These texts commonly describe variations using natural language; database identifiers are seldom mentioned. This complicates the retrieval of variations, associated articles, as well as information extraction, e. g. the search for biological implications. To overcome these challenges, procedures to map textual mentions of variations to database identifiers need to be developed. Results This article describes a workflow for normalization of variation mentions, i.e. the association of them to unique database identifiers. Common pitfalls in the interpretation of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) mentions are highlighted and discussed. The developed normalization procedure achieves a precision of 98.1 % and a recall of 67.5% for unambiguous association of variation mentions with dbSNP identifiers on a text corpus based on 296 MEDLINE abstracts containing 527 mentions of SNPs. The annotated corpus is freely available at http://www.scai.fraunhofer.de/snp-normalization-corpus.html. Conclusions Comparable approaches usually focus on variations mentioned on the protein sequence and neglect problems for other SNP mentions. The results presented here indicate that normalizing SNPs described on DNA level is more difficult than the normalization of SNPs described on protein level. The challenges associated with normalization are exemplified with ambiguities and errors, which occur in this corpus. PMID:21992066

  11. Mining for single nucleotide polymorphisms and insertions / deletions in expressed sequence tag libraries of oil palm.

    PubMed

    Riju, Aykkal; Chandrasekar, Arumugam; Arunachalam, Vadivel

    2007-01-01

    The oil palm is a tropical oil bearing tree. Recently EST-derived SNPs and SSRs are a free by-product of the currently expanding EST (Expressed Sequence Tag) data bases. The development of high-throughput methods for the detection of SNPs (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism) and small indels (insertion / deletion) has led to a revolution in their use as molecular markers. Available (5452) Oil palm EST sequences were mined from dbEST of NCBI. CAP3 program was used to assemble EST sequences into contigs. Candidate SNPs and Indel polymorphisms were detected using the perl script auto_snip version 1.0 which has used 576 ESTs for detecting SNPs and Indel sites. We found 1180 SNP sites and 137 indel polymorphisms with frequency 1.36 SNPs / 100 bp. Among the six tissues from which the EST libraries had been generated, mesocarp had high frequency of 2.91 SNPs and indels per 100 bp whereas the zygotic embryos had lowest frequency of 0.15 per 100 bp. We also used the Shannon index to analyze the proportion of ten possible types of SNP/indels. ESTs from tissues of normal apex showed highest values of Shannon index (0.60) whereas abnormal apex had least value (0.02). The present report deals the use of Shannon index for comparing SNP/ indel frequencies mined from ESTlibraries and also confirm that the frequency of SNP occurrence in oil palm to use them as markers for genetic studies.

  12. Mining for single nucleotide polymorphisms and insertions/deletions in maize expressed sequence tag data.

    PubMed

    Batley, Jacqueline; Barker, Gary; O'Sullivan, Helen; Edwards, Keith J; Edwards, David

    2003-05-01

    We have developed a computer based method to identify candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and small insertions/deletions from expressed sequence tag data. Using a redundancy-based approach, valid SNPs are distinguished from erroneous sequence by their representation multiple times in an alignment of sequence reads. A second measure of validity was also calculated based on the cosegregation of the SNP pattern between multiple SNP loci in an alignment. The utility of this method was demonstrated by applying it to 102,551 maize (Zea mays) expressed sequence tag sequences. A total of 14,832 candidate polymorphisms were identified with an SNP redundancy score of two or greater. Segregation of these SNPs with haplotype indicates that candidate SNPs with high redundancy and cosegregation confidence scores are likely to represent true SNPs. This was confirmed by validation of 264 candidate SNPs from 27 loci, with a range of redundancy and cosegregation scores, in four inbred maize lines. The SNP transition/transversion ratio and insertion/deletion size frequencies correspond to those observed by direct sequencing methods of SNP discovery and suggest that the majority of predicted SNPs and insertion/deletions identified using this approach represent true genetic variation in maize.

  13. Differentiation of drug and non-drug Cannabis using a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay.

    PubMed

    Rotherham, D; Harbison, S A

    2011-04-15

    Cannabis sativa is both an illegal drug and a legitimate crop. The differentiation of illegal drug Cannabis from non-drug forms of Cannabis is relevant in the context of the growth of fibre and seed oil varieties of Cannabis for commercial purposes. This differentiation is currently determined based on the levels of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in adult plants. DNA based methods have the potential to assay Cannabis material unsuitable for analysis using conventional means including seeds, pollen and severely degraded material. The purpose of this research was to develop a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay for the differentiation of "drug" and "non-drug"Cannabis plants. An assay was developed based on four polymorphisms within a 399 bp fragment of the tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) synthase gene, utilising the snapshot multiplex kit. This SNP assay was tested on 94 Cannabis plants, which included 10 blind samples, and was able to differentiate between "drug" and "non-drug"Cannabis in all cases, while also differentiating between Cannabis and other species. Non-drug plants were found to be homozygous at the four sites assayed while drug Cannabis plants were either homozygous or heterozygous.

  14. The Regulated Secretory Pathway and Human Disease: Insights from Gene Variants and Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Jye; Salton, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    The regulated secretory pathway provides critical control of peptide, growth factor, and hormone release from neuroendocrine and endocrine cells, and neurons, maintaining physiological homeostasis. Propeptides and prohormones are packaged into dense core granules (DCGs), where they frequently undergo tissue-specific processing as the DCG matures. Proteins of the granin family are DCG components, and although their function is not fully understood, data suggest they are involved in DCG formation and regulated protein/peptide secretion, in addition to their role as precursors of bioactive peptides. Association of gene variation, including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), with neuropsychiatric, endocrine, and metabolic diseases, has implicated specific secreted proteins and peptides in disease pathogenesis. For example, a SNP at position 196 (G/A) of the human brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene dysregulates protein processing and secretion and leads to cognitive impairment. This suggests more generally that variants identified in genes encoding secreted growth factors, peptides, hormones, and proteins involved in DCG biogenesis, protein processing, and the secretory apparatus, could provide insight into the process of regulated secretion as well as disorders that result when it is impaired. PMID:23964269

  15. The regulated secretory pathway and human disease: insights from gene variants and single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Jye; Salton, Stephen R

    2013-01-01

    The regulated secretory pathway provides critical control of peptide, growth factor, and hormone release from neuroendocrine and endocrine cells, and neurons, maintaining physiological homeostasis. Propeptides and prohormones are packaged into dense core granules (DCGs), where they frequently undergo tissue-specific processing as the DCG matures. Proteins of the granin family are DCG components, and although their function is not fully understood, data suggest they are involved in DCG formation and regulated protein/peptide secretion, in addition to their role as precursors of bioactive peptides. Association of gene variation, including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), with neuropsychiatric, endocrine, and metabolic diseases, has implicated specific secreted proteins and peptides in disease pathogenesis. For example, a SNP at position 196 (G/A) of the human brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene dysregulates protein processing and secretion and leads to cognitive impairment. This suggests more generally that variants identified in genes encoding secreted growth factors, peptides, hormones, and proteins involved in DCG biogenesis, protein processing, and the secretory apparatus, could provide insight into the process of regulated secretion as well as disorders that result when it is impaired.

  16. A Single Nucleotide Deletion in Gibberellin20-oxidase1 Causes Alpine Dwarfism in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yonghai; Dong, Xinwei; Yu, Tianying; Shi, Xuan; Li, Zongyun; Yang, Weicai; Widmer, Alex; Karrenberg, Sophie

    2015-07-01

    Alpine dwarfism is widely observed in alpine plant populations and often considered a high-altitude adaptation, yet its molecular basis and ecological relevance remain unclear. In this study, we used map-based cloning and field transplant experiments to investigate dwarfism in natural Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) accessions collected from the Swiss Alps. A loss-of-function mutation due to a single nucleotide deletion in gibberellin20-oxidase1 (GA5) was identified as the cause of dwarfism in an alpine accession. The mutated allele, ga5-184, was found in two natural Arabidopsis populations collected from one geographic region at high altitude, but was different from all other reported ga5 null alleles, suggesting that this allele has evolved locally. In field transplant experiments, the dwarf accession with ga5-184 exhibited a fitness pattern consistent with adaptation to high altitude. Across a wider array of accessions from the Swiss Alps, plant height decreased with altitude of origin, but fitness patterns in the transplant experiments were variable and general altitudinal adaptation was not evident. In general, our study provides new insights into molecular basis and possible ecological roles of alpine dwarfism, and demonstrates the importance of the GA-signaling pathway for the generation of ecologically relevant variation in higher plants. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  17. A Single Nucleotide Deletion in Gibberellin20-oxidase1 Causes Alpine Dwarfism in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xinwei; Yu, Tianying; Shi, Xuan; Li, Zongyun; Yang, Weicai; Karrenberg, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Alpine dwarfism is widely observed in alpine plant populations and often considered a high-altitude adaptation, yet its molecular basis and ecological relevance remain unclear. In this study, we used map-based cloning and field transplant experiments to investigate dwarfism in natural Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) accessions collected from the Swiss Alps. A loss-of-function mutation due to a single nucleotide deletion in gibberellin20-oxidase1 (GA5) was identified as the cause of dwarfism in an alpine accession. The mutated allele, ga5-184, was found in two natural Arabidopsis populations collected from one geographic region at high altitude, but was different from all other reported ga5 null alleles, suggesting that this allele has evolved locally. In field transplant experiments, the dwarf accession with ga5-184 exhibited a fitness pattern consistent with adaptation to high altitude. Across a wider array of accessions from the Swiss Alps, plant height decreased with altitude of origin, but fitness patterns in the transplant experiments were variable and general altitudinal adaptation was not evident. In general, our study provides new insights into molecular basis and possible ecological roles of alpine dwarfism, and demonstrates the importance of the GA-signaling pathway for the generation of ecologically relevant variation in higher plants. PMID:25941313

  18. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the bovine Histophilus somni genome; a comparison of new and old isolates

    PubMed Central

    Madampage, Claudia Avis; Rawlyk, Neil; Crockford, Gordon; Van Donkersgoed, Joyce; Dorin, Craig; Potter, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Histophilus somni, a causative agent of the bovine respiratory disease complex, can also cause a variety of systemic disorders, including bronchopneumonia, myocarditis, pericarditis, arthritis, pleuritis, and infectious thrombotic meningoencephalitis. The purpose of this study was to determine if currently circulating strains differ from those of the 1980s by identifying genomic changes. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and insertion and deletion (INDEL) sites were examined by whole-genome sequencing in 12 samples, 6 old and 6 new. The 31 028 SNP/INDELs recorded were compared against the reference genome sequence of the pathogenic H. somni strain 2336. The distribution of about 75% of these SNPs within a specified gene differed between old and new isolates and did not follow any particular pattern. The other 25% clustered into 2 groups containing the same SNPs in various genes: group I included 5 old isolates and 1 new isolate; group II included 5 new isolates and 1 old isolate. For putative virulence genes there were more SNPs in group I compared with strain 2336, itself an older isolate, than in group II. Although only 25% of all the SNPs formed 2 clusters, the results suggest some genetic difference in various genes between old and new strains. PMID:26130851

  19. Identification, validation and survey of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associated with pungency in Capsicum spp.

    PubMed

    Garcés-Claver, Ana; Fellman, Shanna Moore; Gil-Ortega, Ramiro; Jahn, Molly; Arnedo-Andrés, María S

    2007-11-01

    A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associated with pungency was detected within an expressed sequence tag (EST) of 307 bp. This fragment was identified after expression analysis of the EST clone SB2-66 in placenta tissue of Capsicum fruits. Sequence alignments corresponding to this new fragment allowed us to identify an SNP between pungent and non-pungent accessions. Two methods were chosen for the development of the SNP marker linked to pungency: tetra-primer amplification refractory mutation system-PCR (tetra-primer ARMS-PCR) and cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence. Results showed that both methods were successful in distinguishing genotypes. Nevertheless, tetra-primer ARMS-PCR was chosen for SNP genotyping because it was more rapid, reliable and less cost-effective. The utility of this SNP marker for pungency was demonstrated by the ability to distinguish between 29 pungent and non-pungent cultivars of Capsicum annuum. In addition, the SNP was also associated with phenotypic pungent character in the tested genotypes of C. chinense, C. baccatum, C. frutescens, C. galapagoense, C. eximium, C. tovarii and C. cardenasi. This SNP marker is a faster, cheaper and more reproducible method for identifying pungent peppers than other techniques such as panel tasting, and allows rapid screening of the trait in early growth stages.

  20. Association of IL-13 single nucleotide polymorphisms in Iranian patients to multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Seyfizadeh, Narges; Kazemi, Tohid; Farhoudi, Mehdi; Aliparasti, Mohammad Reza; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Almasi, Shohreh; Babaloo, Zohreh

    2014-01-01

    MS is an autoimmune disease and interleukin 13 (IL-13) has been proposed to be an important neuroprotective mediator in MS. Because of plausible effect of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in expression level or biological activity of any cytokine, we sought to investigate association of IL-13 SNPs, C-1112T, A-1512C and G+2044A, with risk to MS. Sixty-eight RRMS patients and 110 healthy controls were involved in this study. After extraction of genomic DNA, frequency of genotypes and alleles were determined by PCR-RFLP and data were analyzed statistically. Results showed significant higher frequency of CC, CC, and AA genotypes and C, C, and A alleles of -1112CT, -1512AC and +2044GA SNPs respectively, in patients group. There was significant association between -1112C allele with onset age of MS. No significant association was seen between any of genotypes or alleles with expanded disability status scale (EDSS) of patients. Our findings showed significant association between three studied SNPs of IL-13 with susceptibility to MS in Iranian patients. More studies should be done on other IL-13 SNPs, and also polymorphisms of IL-13 receptor and other cytokines to determine the exact role of SNPs in protecting or predisposing of individuals for MS. PMID:25628961

  1. HIV-1 Promoter Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Are Associated with Clinical Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Rui; Moldover, Brian; Passic, Shendra; Aiamkitsumrit, Benjamas; Dampier, Will; Wojno, Adam; Kilareski, Evelyn; Blakey, Brandon; Ku, Tse-Sheun Jade; Shah, Sonia; Sullivan, Neil T.; Jacobson, Jeffrey M.; Wigdahl, Brian

    2016-01-01

    The large majority of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) markers of disease progression/severity previously identified have been associated with alterations in host genetic and immune responses, with few studies focused on viral genetic markers correlate with changes in disease severity. This study presents a cross-sectional/longitudinal study of HIV-1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) contained within the viral promoter or long terminal repeat (LTR) in patients within the Drexel Medicine CNS AIDS Research and Eradication Study (CARES) Cohort. HIV-1 LTR SNPs were found to associate with the classical clinical disease parameters CD4+ T-cell count and log viral load. They were found in both defined and undefined transcription factor binding sites of the LTR. A novel SNP identified at position 108 in a known COUP (chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter)/AP1 transcription factor binding site was significantly correlated with binding phenotypes that are potentially the underlying cause of the associated clinical outcome (increase in viral load and decrease in CD4+ T-cell count). PMID:27100290

  2. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Gene Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Predicts Cerebral Vasospasm following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Starke, Robert M.; Kim, Grace H.; Komotar, Ricardo J.; Hickman, Zachary L.; Black, Eric M.; Rosales, Maritza B.; Kellner, Christopher P.; Hahn, David K.; Otten, Marc L.; Edwards, John; Wang, Tao; Russo, James J.; Mayer, Stephan A.; Connolly, E. Sander

    2009-01-01

    Summary Vasospasm is a major cause of morbidity and mortality following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Studies have demonstrated a link between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene and the incidence of coronary spasm and aneurysms. Alterations in the eNOS T-786 SNP may lead to an increased risk of post-aSAH cerebral vasospasm. In this prospective clinical study, 77 aSAH patients provided genetic material and were followed for the occurrence of vasospasm. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, genotype was the only factor predictive of vasospasm. The odds ratio for symptomatic vasospasm in patients with one T allele was 3.3 (95% CI 1.1–10.0, p=0.034) and 10.9 for TT. Patients with angiographic spasm were 3.6 times more likely to have a T allele (95% CI 1.3–9.6, p=0.013, TT OR 12.6). Patients with severe vasospasm requiring endovascular therapy were more likely to have a T allele (OR 3.5, 95% CI 1.3–9.5, p=0.016, TT OR 12.0). Patients with the T allele of the eNOS gene are more likely have severe vasospasm. Presence of this genotype may allow the identification of individuals at high risk for post-aSAH vasospasm and lead to early treatment and improved outcome. PMID:18319732

  3. Dynamic regulation of the transcription initiation landscape at single nucleotide resolution during vertebrate embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nepal, Chirag; Hadzhiev, Yavor; Previti, Christopher; Haberle, Vanja; Li, Nan; Takahashi, Hazuki; Suzuki, Ana Maria M; Sheng, Ying; Abdelhamid, Rehab F; Anand, Santosh; Gehrig, Jochen; Akalin, Altuna; Kockx, Christel E M; van der Sloot, Antoine A J; van Ijcken, Wilfred F J; Armant, Olivier; Rastegar, Sepand; Watson, Craig; Strähle, Uwe; Stupka, Elia; Carninci, Piero; Lenhard, Boris; Müller, Ferenc

    2013-11-01

    Spatiotemporal control of gene expression is central to animal development. Core promoters represent a previously unanticipated regulatory level by interacting with cis-regulatory elements and transcription initiation in different physiological and developmental contexts. Here, we provide a first and comprehensive description of the core promoter repertoire and its dynamic use during the development of a vertebrate embryo. By using cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE), we mapped transcription initiation events at single nucleotide resolution across 12 stages of zebrafish development. These CAGE-based transcriptome maps reveal genome-wide rules of core promoter usage, structure, and dynamics, key to understanding the control of gene regulation during vertebrate ontogeny. They revealed the existence of multiple classes of pervasive intra- and intergenic post-transcriptionally processed RNA products and their developmental dynamics. Among these RNAs, we report splice donor site-associated intronic RNA (sRNA) to be specific to genes of the splicing machinery. For the identification of conserved features, we compared the zebrafish data sets to the first CAGE promoter map of Tetraodon and the existing human CAGE data. We show that a number of features, such as promoter type, newly discovered promoter properties such as a specialized purine-rich initiator motif, as well as sRNAs and the genes in which they are detected, are conserved in mammalian and Tetraodon CAGE-defined promoter maps. The zebrafish developmental promoterome represents a powerful resource for studying developmental gene regulation and revealing promoter features shared across vertebrates.

  4. Functional Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms in the BRCA1 Gene and Risk of Salivary Gland Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Li; Doan, Phi C.; Wei, Qingyi; Li, Guojun; Sturgis, Erich M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Polymorphic BRCA1 is a vital tumor suppressor gene within the DNA double-strand break repair pathways, but its association with salivary gland carcinoma (SGC) has yet to be investigated. Materials and Methods In a case-control study of 156 SGC patients and 511 controls, we used unconditional logistical regression analyses to investigate the association between SGC risk and seven common functional single-nucleotide polymorphisms (A1988G, A31875G, C33420T, A33921G, A34356G, T43893C and A55298G) in BRCA1. Results T43893C TC/CC genotype was associated with a reduction of SGC risk (adjusted odds ratio =0.55, 95% CI: 0.38–0.80, Bonferroni-adjusted p=0.011), which was more pronounced in women, non-Hispanic whites, and individuals with a family history of cancer in first-degree relatives. The interaction between T43893C and family history of cancer was significant (p=0.009). The GATGGCG and AACAACA haplotypes, both of which carry the T43893C minor allele, were also associated with reduced SGC risk. Conclusion Our results suggest that polymorphic BRCA1, particularly T43893C polymorphism, may protect against SGC. PMID:22503699

  5. Within-breed heterozygosity of canine single nucleotide polymorphisms identified by across-breed comparison.

    PubMed

    Brouillette, J A; Venta, P J

    2002-12-01

    Identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by DNA sequence comparison across breeds is a strategy for developing genetic markers that are useful for many breeds. However, the heterozygosity of SNPs identified in this way might be severely reduced within breeds by inbreeding or genetic drift in the small effective population size of a breed (population subdivision). The effect of inbreeding and population subdivision on heterozygosity of SNPs in dog breeds has never been investigated in a systematic way. We determined the genotypes of dogs from three divergent breeds for SNPs in four canine genes (ACTC, LMNA, SCGB, and TYMS) identified by across-breed DNA sequence comparison, and compared the genotype frequencies to those expected under Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE). Although population subdivision significantly skewed allele frequencies across breeds for two of the SNPs, the deviations of observed heterozygosities compared with those expected within breeds were minimal. These results indicate that across-breed DNA sequence comparison is a reasonable strategy for identifying SNPs that are useful within many canine breeds.

  6. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the CNTNAP2 gene in Brazilian patients with autistic spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, P P; Bossolani-Martins, A L; Rosan, D B A; Mattos, L C; Brandão-Mattos, C; Fett-Conte, A C

    2016-02-05

    The role of some genes and their single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) as genetic contributors of complex diseases is still a topic of much investigation. Research on genes related to autism susceptibility has been somewhat challenging, but also promising. Common genomic variants of CNTNAP2 have been associated with autism, and a range of autistic phenotypes such as impaired language function, abnormal social behavior, intellectual deficiency, epilepsy, and schizophrenia have been associated with this gene. Earlier findings have suggested that SNPs in the CNTNAP2 gene may be used as genetic markers for predisposition to autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We analyzed the SNPs (rs7794745 and rs2710102) in the CNTNAP2 gene of 210 individuals with idiopathic ASD and 200 non-autistic individuals by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The results revealed higher frequency distributions statistically significant (P = 0.034) of the homozygous SNP rs7794745 (presumed risk genotype) in ASD patients as compared with control subjects. The results also showed an association (OR = 1.802, 95%CI = 1.054-3.083, P = 0.042) between the same homozygous genotype and ASD, suggesting that it is a susceptibility factor for autism in this Brazilian population.

  7. Pairwise Kinship Analysis by the Index of Chromosome Sharing Using High-Density Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Chie; Manabe, Sho; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Kawai, Chihiro; Fujimoto, Shuntaro; Hamano, Yuya; Yamada, Ryo; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Tamaki, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    We developed a new approach for pairwise kinship analysis in forensic genetics based on chromosomal sharing between two individuals. Here, we defined "index of chromosome sharing" (ICS) calculated using 174,254 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) loci typed by SNP microarray and genetic length of the shared segments from the genotypes of two individuals. To investigate the expected ICS distributions from first- to fifth-degree relatives and unrelated pairs, we used computationally generated genotypes to consider the effect of linkage disequilibrium and recombination. The distributions were used for probabilistic evaluation of the pairwise kinship analysis, such as likelihood ratio (LR) or posterior probability, without allele frequencies and haplotype frequencies. Using our method, all actual sample pairs from volunteers showed significantly high LR values (i.e., ≥ 108); therefore, we can distinguish distant relationships (up to the fifth-degree) from unrelated pairs based on LR. Moreover, we can determine accurate degrees of kinship in up to third-degree relationships with a probability of > 80% using the criterion of posterior probability ≥ 0.90, even if the kinship of the pair is totally unpredictable. This approach greatly improves pairwise kinship analysis of distant relationships, specifically in cases involving identification of disaster victims or missing persons.

  8. Estrogen receptor alpha single nucleotide polymorphism as predictor of diabetes type 2 risk in hypogonadal men.

    PubMed

    Linnér, Carl; Svartberg, Johan; Giwercman, Aleksander; Giwercman, Yvonne Lundberg

    2013-06-01

    Estradiol (E2) is, apart from its role as a reproductive hormone, also important for cardiac function and bone maturation in both genders. It has also been shown to play a role in insulin production, energy expenditure and in inducing lipolysis. The aim of the study was to investigate if low circulating testosterone or E2 levels in combination with variants in the estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1) and estrogen receptor beta (ESR2) genes were of importance for the risk of type-2 diabetes. The single nucleotide polymorphisms rs2207396 and rs1256049, in ESR1 and ESR2, respectively, were analysed by allele specific PCR in 172 elderly men from the population-based Tromsø study. The results were adjusted for age. In individuals with low total (≤11 nmol/L) or free testosterone (≤0.18 nmol/L) being carriers of the variant A-allele in ESR1 was associated with 7.3 and 15.9 times, respectively, increased odds ratio of being diagnosed with diabetes mellitus type 2 (p = 0.025 and p = 0.018, respectively). Lower concentrations of E2 did not seem to increase the risk of being diagnosed with diabetes. In conclusion, in hypogonadal men, the rs2207396 variant in ESR1 predicts the risk of type 2 diabetes.

  9. Prediction of maize phenotype based on whole-genome single nucleotide polymorphisms using deep belief networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachmatia, H.; Kusuma, W. A.; Hasibuan, L. S.

    2017-05-01

    Selection in plant breeding could be more effective and more efficient if it is based on genomic data. Genomic selection (GS) is a new approach for plant-breeding selection that exploits genomic data through a mechanism called genomic prediction (GP). Most of GP models used linear methods that ignore effects of interaction among genes and effects of higher order nonlinearities. Deep belief network (DBN), one of the architectural in deep learning methods, is able to model data in high level of abstraction that involves nonlinearities effects of the data. This study implemented DBN for developing a GP model utilizing whole-genome Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) as data for training and testing. The case study was a set of traits in maize. The maize dataset was acquisitioned from CIMMYT’s (International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center) Global Maize program. Based on Pearson correlation, DBN is outperformed than other methods, kernel Hilbert space (RKHS) regression, Bayesian LASSO (BL), best linear unbiased predictor (BLUP), in case allegedly non-additive traits. DBN achieves correlation of 0.579 within -1 to 1 range.

  10. Single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis of GH, GHR, and IGF-1 genes in minipigs.

    PubMed

    Tian, Y G; Yue, M; Gu, Y; Gu, W W; Wang, Y J

    2014-09-01

    Tibetan (TB) and Bama (BM) miniature pigs are two popular pig breeds that are used as experimental animals in China due to their small body size. Here, we analyzed single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in gene fragments that are closely related to growth traits [growth hormone (GH), growth hormone receptor (GHR), and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1)] in these pig breeds and a large white (LW) control pig breed. On the basis of the analysis of 100 BMs, 108 TBs, and 50 LWs, the polymorphic distribution levels of GH, GHR, and IGF-1 were significantly different among these three pig breeds. According to correlation analyses between SNPs and five growth traits--body weight (BW), body length (BL), withers height (WH), chest circumference (CC), and abdomen circumference (AC)--three SNP loci in BMs and four SNP loci in TBs significantly affected growth traits. Three SNP sites in BMs and four SNP sites in TBs significantly affected growth traits. SNPs located in the GH gene fragment significantly affected BL and CC at locus 12 and BL at locus 45 in BMs, and also BW, WH, CC, and AC at locus 45 and WH and CC at locus 93 in TBs. One SNP at locus 85 in the BM GHR gene fragment significantly affected all growth traits. All indices were significantly reduced with a mixture of alleles at locus 85. These results provide more information regarding the genetic background of these minipig species and indicate useful selection markers for pig breeding programs.

  11. The Textile Plot: A New Linkage Disequilibrium Display of Multiple-Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Genotype Data

    PubMed Central

    Kumasaka, Natsuhiko; Nakamura, Yusuke; Kamatani, Naoyuki

    2010-01-01

    Linkage disequilibrium (LD) is a major concern in many genetic studies because of the markedly increased density of SNP (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism) genotype markers. This dramatic increase in the number of SNPs may cause problems in statistical analyses, such as by introducing multiple comparisons in hypothesis testing and colinearity in logistic regression models, because of the presence of complex LD structures. Inferences must be made about the underlying genetic variation through the LD structure before applying statistical models to the data. Therefore, we introduced the textile plot to provide a visualization of LD to improve the analysis of the genetic variation present in multiple-SNP genotype data. The plot can accentuate LD by displaying specific geometrical shapes, and allowing for the underlying haplotype structure to be inferred without any haplotype-phasing algorithms. Application of this technique to simulated and real data sets illustrated the potential usefulness of the textile plot as an aid to the interpretation of LD in multiple-SNP genotype data. The initial results of LD mapping and haplotype analyses of disease genes are encouraging, indicating that the textile plot may be useful in disease association studies. PMID:20436909

  12. A molecular beacon microarray based on a quantum dot label for detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qingsheng; Bai, Zhixiong; Liu, Yuqian; Sun, Qingjiang

    2016-03-15

    In this work, we report the application of streptavidin-coated quantum dot (strAV-QD) in molecular beacon (MB) microarray assays by using the strAV-QD to label the immobilized MB, avoiding target labeling and meanwhile obviating the use of amplification. The MBs are stem-loop structured oligodeoxynucleotides, modified with a thiol and a biotin at two terminals of the stem. With the strAV-QD labeling an "opened" MB rather than a "closed" MB via streptavidin-biotin reaction, a sensitive and specific detection of label-free target DNA sequence is demonstrated by the MB microarray, with a signal-to-background ratio of 8. The immobilized MBs can be perfectly regenerated, allowing the reuse of the microarray. The MB microarray also is able to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms, exhibiting genotype-dependent fluorescence signals. It is demonstrated that the MB microarray can perform as a 4-to-2 encoder, compressing the genotype information into two outputs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. [Association between single nucleotide polymorphisms of 5'-untranslated region of GPx4 gene and male infertility].

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-yuan; Zhang, Chang-jun; Si, Xiao-min; Yao, Yu-feng; Shi, Lei; Ke, Jin-kun; Yu, Liang; Shi, Li; Yang, Zhao-qin; Huang, Xiao-qin; Sun, Hao; Chu, Jia-you

    2011-06-01

    To study the association between the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (GPx4 or PHGPx) gene and oligo- or asthenozoospermic male infertility. The 5'-UTR region of the GPx4 gene was amplified from infertile men and controls using the polymerase chain reaction and was analyzed for polymorphisms by direct sequencing. A total of 9 SNPs were present in the cohort, however there were no significant differences in these 9 SNPs between the case and control groups. According to the results of linkage disequilibrium analysis and haplotype construction, one haplotype (rs757229-rs757230-rs4588110-rs3746165-rs3746166: C-G-G-T-A) was present only in the control men, and significant difference was detected(P< 0.01). The SNPs of 5'-UTR region of the GPx4 gene might not be associated with oligo- or asthenozoospermic male infertility. However, the haplotype (rs757229-rs757230-rs4588110- rs3746165-rs3746166: C-G-G-T-A) might be a protective haplotype.

  14. Single nucleotide polymorphism in the neuroplastin locus associates with cortical thickness and intellectual ability in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Desrivières, S; Lourdusamy, A; Tao, C; Toro, R; Jia, T; Loth, E; Medina, L M; Kepa, A; Fernandes, A; Ruggeri, B; Carvalho, F M; Cocks, G; Banaschewski, T; Barker, G J; Bokde, A L W; Büchel, C; Conrod, P J; Flor, H; Heinz, A; Gallinat, J; Garavan, H; Gowland, P; Brühl, R; Lawrence, C; Mann, K; Martinot, M L P; Nees, F; Lathrop, M; Poline, J-B; Rietschel, M; Thompson, P; Fauth-Bühler, M; Smolka, M N; Pausova, Z; Paus, T; Feng, J; Schumann, G

    2015-01-01

    Despite the recognition that cortical thickness is heritable and correlates with intellectual ability in children and adolescents, the genes contributing to individual differences in these traits remain unknown. We conducted a large-scale association study in 1583 adolescents to identify genes affecting cortical thickness. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; n=54 837) within genes whose expression changed between stages of growth and differentiation of a human neural stem cell line were selected for association analyses with average cortical thickness. We identified a variant, rs7171755, associating with thinner cortex in the left hemisphere (P=1.12 × 10−7), particularly in the frontal and temporal lobes. Localized effects of this SNP on cortical thickness differently affected verbal and nonverbal intellectual abilities. The rs7171755 polymorphism acted in cis to affect expression in the human brain of the synaptic cell adhesion glycoprotein-encoding gene NPTN. We also found that cortical thickness and NPTN expression were on average higher in the right hemisphere, suggesting that asymmetric NPTN expression may render the left hemisphere more sensitive to the effects of NPTN mutations, accounting for the lateralized effect of rs7171755 found in our study. Altogether, our findings support a potential role for regional synaptic dysfunctions in forms of intellectual deficits. PMID:24514566

  15. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus in a Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meijun; Zhang, Xuelong; Fang, Qingxiao; Wang, Tongtong; Li, Tingting; Qiao, Hong

    2017-01-01

    An Indian study recently observed three new loci: rs9552911 in the SGCG, rs1593304 near PLXNA4 and rs4858889 in SCAP associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in a south Asian population. The present study aimed to validate these findings in a Chinese population. We genotyped the above three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs9552911, rs1593304, and rs4858889, in a group of 1,972 Chinese individuals, comprising of 966 type 2 diabetic patients and 976 controls. Anthropometric variables and biochemical traits were measured in all the participants. The association analyses of genotype-disease and genotype-traits were estimated. The genotype frequency of rs9552911 differed statistically between the cases and controls (P=0.017). The difference was also evident between the cases and controls in non-obese participants (P=0.033). In addition, the SNP rs9552911 was associated with weight (P=0.033), total cholesterol (P=0.006) and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (P=0.007). The SNP rs1593304 was associated with β-cell function estimated by the homeostatic model assessment of β-cell function (P=0.041). However, there was no significant association between rs4858889 and T2DM. In conclusion, the results show that the SNP rs9552911 was associated with T2DM, possibly by affecting body mass index and lipid metabolism. The SNP rs1593304 may impair β-cell function. PMID:28123479

  16. The Effect of Multiple Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in the Folic Acid Pathway Genes on Homocysteine Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Shuang; Zhou, Yuanpeng; Wang, Huijun; Qian, Yanyan; Ma, Duan; Tian, Weidong; Persaud-Sharma, Vishwani; Yu, Chen; Ren, Yunyun; Zhou, Shufeng; Li, Xiaotian

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the joint effects of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of genes in the folic acid pathway on homocysteine (Hcy) metabolism. Methods. Four hundred women with normal pregnancies were enrolled in this study. SNPs were identified by MassARRAY. Serum folic acid and Hcy concentration were measured. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and support vector machine (SVM) regressions were used to analyze the joint effects of SNPs on the Hcy level. Results. SNPs of MTHFR (rs1801133 and rs3733965) were significantly associated with maternal serum Hcy level. In the different genotypes of MTHFR (rs1801133), SNPs of RFC1 (rs1051266), TCN2 (rs9606756), BHMT (rs3733890), and CBS (rs234713 and rs2851391) were linked with the Hcy level adjusted for folic acid concentration. The integrated SNPs scores were significantly associated with the residual Hcy concentration (RHC) (r = 0.247). The Hcy level was significantly higher in the group with high SNP scores than that in other groups with SNP scores of less than 0.2 (P = 0.000). Moreover, this difference was even more significant in moderate and high levels of folic acid. Conclusion. SNPs of genes in the folic acid pathway possibly affect the Hcy metabolism in the presence of moderate and high levels of folic acid. PMID:24524080

  17. The role of CGRP and CALCA T-692C single-nucleotide polymorphism in psoriasis vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ren; Li, Fang-Fang; Chen, Ming-Liang; Ya, Ming-Zhu; He, Hui-Lan; Li, Dai

    2015-02-01

    Calcitonin gene related protein (CGRP) is increased in both lesional and non-lesional psoriasis. The role of CGRP in the pathogenesis of psoriasis vulgaris is still not clear. We designed to determine the CGRP-I (or CALCA), II (or CALCB) gene expression and morbidity and CALCA T-692C single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and plasma samples were collected, and CGRP level and CGRP-I, II mRNA expression were measured in psoriasis patients and healthy controls. The CALCA T-692C genetic polymorphism in psoriasis and control subjects was also compared. A higher expression of CGRP-I, II mRNA in PBMCs in psoriasis patients. The plasma CGRP level in psoriasis patients was also higher than that in healthy subjects. SNP analysis showed carriers of the T-692C allele were over-represented in non-drinking Patients. The plasma CGRP level was higher in alcohol-drinking patients with TT genotype than that with TC genotype. The plasma CGRP level is increased in psoriasis patients and CALCA T-692C polymorphism TT genotype is a factor for the affectability in alcohol-drinking Psoriasis vulgaris patients.

  18. Human Aldo-Keto Reductases: Function, Gene Regulation, and Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Penning, Trevor M.; Drury, Jason E.

    2007-01-01

    Aldo-Keto Reductases (AKRs) are a superfamily of NAD(P)H linked oxidoreductases that are generally monomeric 34- 37 kDa proteins present in all phyla. The superfamily consists of 15 families, which contains 151 members (www.med.upenn.edu/akr). Thirteen human AKRs exist that use endogenous substrates (sugar and lipid aldehydes, prostaglandins, retinals and steroid hormones), and in many instances they regulate nuclear receptor signaling. Exogenous substrates include metabolites implicated in chemical carcinogenesis: NNK (4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon trans-dihydrodiols, and aflatoxin dialdehyde. Promoter analysis of the human genes identifies common elements involved in their regulation which include osmotic response elements, antioxidant response elements, xenobiotic response elements, AP-1 sites and steroid response elements. The human AKRs are highly polymorphic, and in some instances single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of high penetrance exist. This suggests that there will be inter-individual variation in endogenous and xenobiotic metabolism which in turn affect susceptibility to nuclear receptor signaling and chemical carcinogenesis. PMID:17537398

  19. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the need for a curated database.

    PubMed

    Stucki, David; Gagneux, Sebastien

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in DNA sequencing have led to the discovery of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). This genetic variation has changed our understanding of the differences and phylogenetic relationships between strains. Many of these mutations can serve as phylogenetic markers for strain classification, while others cause drug resistance. Moreover, SNPs can affect the bacterial phenotype in various ways, which may have an impact on the outcome of tuberculosis (TB) infection and disease. Despite the importance of SNPs for our understanding of the diversity of MTBC populations, the research community currently lacks a comprehensive, well-curated and user-friendly database dedicated to SNP data. First attempts to catalogue and annotate SNPs in MTBC have been made, but more work is needed. In this review, we discuss the biological and epidemiological relevance of SNPs in MTBC. We then review some of the analytical challenges involved in processing SNP data, and end with a list of features, which should be included in a new SNP database for MTBC.

  20. Associations of Two Obesity-Related Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms with Adiponectin in Chinese Children

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Liwang; Zhao, Xiaoyuan; Zhang, Meixian; Wu, Jianxin

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. Genome-wide association studies have found two obesity-related single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs17782313 near the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) gene and rs6265 near the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene, but the associations of both SNPs with other obesity-related traits are not fully described, especially in children. The aim of the present study is to investigate the associations between the SNPs and adiponectin that has a regulatory role in glucose and lipid metabolism. Methods. We examined the associations of the SNPs with adiponectin in Beijing Child and Adolescent Metabolic Syndrome (BCAMS) study. A total of 3503 children participated in the study. Results. The SNP rs6265 was significantly associated with adiponectin under an additive model (P = 0.02 and 0.024, resp.) after adjustment for age, gender, and BMI or obesity statuses. The SNP rs17782313 was significantly associated with low adiponectin under a recessive model. No statistical significance was found between the two SNPs and low adiponectin after correction for multiple testing. Conclusion. We demonstrate for the first time that the SNP rs17782313 near MC4R and the SNP rs6265 near BDNF are associated with adiponectin in Chinese children. These novel findings provide important evidence that adiponectin possibly mediates MC4R and BDNF involved in obesity. PMID:28396685

  1. Role of six single nucleotide polymorphisms, risk factors in coronary disease, in OLR1 alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Tejedor, J Ramón; Tilgner, Hagen; Iannone, Camilla; Guigó, Roderic; Valcárcel, Juan

    2015-06-01

    The OLR1 gene encodes the oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor (LOX-1), which is responsible for the cellular uptake of oxidized LDL (Ox-LDL), foam cell formation in atheroma plaques and atherosclerotic plaque rupture. Alternative splicing (AS) of OLR1 exon 5 generates two protein isoforms with antagonistic functions in Ox-LDL uptake. Previous work identified six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in linkage disequilibrium that influence the inclusion levels of OLR1 exon 5 and correlate with the risk of cardiovascular disease. Here we use minigenes to recapitulate the effects of two allelic series (Low- and High-Risk) on OLR1 AS and identify one SNP in intron 4 (rs3736234) as the main contributor to the differences in exon 5 inclusion, while the other SNPs in the allelic series attenuate the drastic effects of this key SNP. Bioinformatic, proteomic, mutational and functional high-throughput analyses allowed us to define regulatory sequence motifs and identify SR protein family members (SRSF1, SRSF2) and HMGA1 as factors involved in the regulation of OLR1 AS. Our results suggest that antagonism between SRSF1 and SRSF2/HMGA1, and differential recognition of their regulatory motifs depending on the identity of the rs3736234 polymorphism, influence OLR1 exon 5 inclusion and the efficiency of Ox-LDL uptake, with potential implications for atherosclerosis and coronary disease.

  2. Single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping on optical thin-film biosensor chips.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xiao-Bo; Reynolds, Robert; Kidd, Judith R; Kidd, Kenneth K; Jenison, Robert; Marlar, Richard A; Ward, David C

    2003-09-30

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) constitute the bulk of human genetic variation and provide excellent markers to identify genetic factors contributing to complex disease susceptibility. A rapid, sensitive, and inexpensive assay is important for large-scale SNP scoring. Here we report the development of a multiplex SNP detection system using silicon chips coated to create a thin-film optical biosensor. Allele-discriminating, aldehyde-labeled oligonucleotides are arrayed and covalently attached to a hydrazinederivatized chip surface. Target sequences (e.g., PCR amplicons) then are hybridized in the presence of a mixture of biotinylated detector probes, one for each SNP, and a thermostable DNA ligase. After a stringent wash (0.01 M NaOH), ligation of biotinylated detector probes to perfectly matched capture oligomers is visualized as a color change on the chip surface (gold to blue/purple) after brief incubations with an anti-biotin IgG-horseradish peroxidase conjugate and a precipitable horseradish peroxidase substrate. Testing of PCR fragments is completed in 30-40 min. Up to several hundred SNPs can be assayed on a 36-mm2 chip, and SNP scoring can be done by eye or with a simple digital-camera system. This assay is extremely robust, exhibits high sensitivity and specificity, and is format-flexible and economical. In studies of mutations associated with risk for venous thrombosis and genotyping/haplotyping of African-American samples, we document high-fidelity analysis with 0 misassignments in 500 assays performed in duplicate.

  3. rs621554 single nucleotide polymorphism of DLC1 is associated with breast cancer susceptibility and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xia; Gao, Sumei; Yang, Qifeng

    2016-05-01

    Deleted in liver cancer 1 (DLC1) on chromosome 8p22, is an important tumor suppressor gene originally identified to be deleted in hepatocellular carcinoma. It can regulate the structure of the actin cytoskeleton and inhibit cell proliferation, motility and angiogenesis, which predominantly depends on its homology to rat RhoGAP. There are many genetic variants in DLC1, which may influence its antitumor efficacy. The rs621554 (IVS19+108C>T) polymorphism is a synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) previously found to be associated with hepatocellular carcinoma. In the present study, 453 patients with breast cancer and 330 healthy females were analyzed using a cycling probe method. It was determined that the rs621554 polymorphism of DLC1 was associated with breast cancer susceptibility, with the CC and CT genotypes resulting in a higher risk of developing breast cancer. In regard to clinicopathological variables, it was demonstrated that the CT and CC genotype were associated with tumor size, lymph node metastasis and progesterone receptor status. Patients with the CT and CC genotype had shorter disease-free survival and overall survival rates compared with those with the TT genotype. Additionally, it was demonstrated that the rs621554 polymorphism was correlated with DLC1 expression at the mRNA level. These results suggested that the rs621554 polymorphism is associated with breast cancer susceptibility and prognosis, and may serve as a biomarker for breast cancer development and progression.

  4. Mining the transcriptomes of four commercially important shellfish species for single nucleotide polymorphisms within biomineralization genes.

    PubMed

    Vendrami, David L J; Shah, Abhijeet; Telesca, Luca; Hoffman, Joseph I

    2016-06-01

    Transcriptional profiling not only provides insights into patterns of gene expression, but also generates sequences that can be mined for molecular markers, which in turn can be used for population genetic studies. As part of a large-scale effort to better understand how commercially important European shellfish species may respond to ocean acidification, we therefore mined the transcriptomes of four species (the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, the blue mussel Mytilus edulis, the great scallop Pecten maximus and the blunt gaper Mya truncata) for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Illumina data for C. gigas, M. edulis and P. maximus and 454 data for M. truncata were interrogated using GATK and SWAP454 respectively to identify between 8267 and 47,159 high quality SNPs per species (total=121,053 SNPs residing within 34,716 different contigs). We then annotated the transcripts containing SNPs to reveal homology to diverse genes. Finally, as oceanic pH affects the ability of organisms to incorporate calcium carbonate, we honed in on genes implicated in the biomineralization process to identify a total of 1899 SNPs in 157 genes. These provide good candidates for biomarkers with which to study patterns of selection in natural or experimental populations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. In silico prediction of splice-altering single nucleotide variants in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Jian, Xueqiu; Boerwinkle, Eric; Liu, Xiaoming

    2014-12-16

    In silico tools have been developed to predict variants that may have an impact on pre-mRNA splicing. The major limitation of the application of these tools to basic research and clinical practice is the difficulty in interpreting the output. Most tools only predict potential splice sites given a DNA sequence without measuring splicing signal changes caused by a variant. Another limitation is the lack of large-scale evaluation studies of these tools. We compared eight in silico tools on 2959 single nucleotide variants within splicing consensus regions (scSNVs) using receiver operating characteristic analysis. The Position Weight Matrix model and MaxEntScan outperformed other methods. Two ensemble learning methods, adaptive boosting and random forests, were used to construct models that take advantage of individual methods. Both models further improved prediction, with outputs of directly interpretable prediction scores. We applied our ensemble scores to scSNVs from the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer database. Analysis showed that predicted splice-altering scSNVs are enriched in recurrent scSNVs and known cancer genes. We pre-computed our ensemble scores for all potential scSNVs across the human genome, providing a whole genome level resource for identifying splice-altering scSNVs discovered from large-scale sequencing studies.

  6. Single nucleotide polymorphisms to discriminate different classes of hybrid between wild Atlantic salmon and aquaculture escapees.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Victoria L; Erkinaro, Jaakko; Kent, Matthew P; Niemelä, Eero; Orell, Panu; Lien, Sigbjørn; Primmer, Craig R

    2016-09-01

    Many wild Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) populations are threatened by introgressive hybridization from domesticated fish that have escaped from aquaculture facilities. A detailed understanding of the hybridization dynamics between wild salmon and aquaculture escapees requires discrimination of different hybrid classes; however, markers currently available to discriminate the two types of parental genome have limited power to do this. Using a high-density Atlantic salmon single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, in combination with pooled-sample allelotyping and an Fst outlier approach, we identified 200 SNPs that differentiated an important Atlantic salmon stock from the escapees potentially hybridizing with it. By simulating multiple generations of wild-escapee hybridization, involving wild populations in two major phylogeographic lineages and a genetically diverse set of escapees, we showed that both the complete set of SNPs and smaller subsets could reliably assign individuals to different hybrid classes up to the third hybrid (F3) generation. This set of markers will be a useful tool for investigating the genetic interactions between native wild fish and aquaculture escapees in many Atlantic salmon populations.

  7. High-throughput chemiluminometric genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms of histamine, serotonin, and adrenergic receptor genes.

    PubMed

    Toubanaki, Dimitra K; Christopoulos, Theodore K; Ioannou, Penelope C; Flordellis, Christodoulos S

    2009-02-01

    Several pharmacogenetic studies are focused on the investigation of the relation between the efficacy of various antipsychotic agents (e.g., clozapine) and the genetic profile of the patient with an emphasis on genes that code for neurotransmitter receptors such as histamine, serotonin, and adrenergic receptors. We report a high-throughput method for genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the genes of histamine H2 receptor (HRH2), serotonin receptor (HTR2A1 and HTR2A2), and beta(3) adrenergic receptor (ADRB3). The method combines the high specificity of allele discrimination by oligonucleotide ligation reaction (OLR) and the superior sensitivity and simplicity of chemiluminometric detection in a microtiter well assay configuration. The genomic region that spans the locus of interest is first amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Subsequently, an oligonucleotide ligation reaction is performed using a biotinylated common probe and two allele-specific probes that are labeled at the 3' end with digoxigenin and fluorescein. The ligation products are immobilized in polystyrene wells via biotin-streptavidin interaction, and the hybrids are denatured. Detection is accomplished by the addition of alkaline phosphatase-conjugated anti-digoxigenin or anti-fluorescein antibodies in combination with a chemiluminogenic substrate. The ratio of the luminescence signals obtained from digoxigenin and fluorescein indicates the genotype of the sample. The method was applied successfully to the genotyping of 23 blood samples for all four SNPs. The results were in concordance with both PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and sequencing.

  8. A Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in Human APOBEC3C Enhances Restriction of Lentiviruses

    PubMed Central

    Wittkopp, Cristina J.; Adolph, Madison B.; Wu, Lily I.; Chelico, Linda; Emerman, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Humans express seven human APOBEC3 proteins, which can inhibit viruses and endogenous retroelements through cytidine deaminase activity. The seven paralogs differ in the potency of their antiviral effects, as well as in their antiviral targets. One APOBEC3, APOBEC3C, is exceptional as it has been found to only weakly block viruses and endogenous retroelements compared to other APOBEC3s. However, our positive selection analyses suggest that APOBEC3C has played a role in pathogen defense during primate evolution. Here, we describe a single nucleotide polymorphism in human APOBEC3C, a change from serine to isoleucine at position 188 (I188) that confers potent antiviral activity against HIV-1. The gain-of-function APOBEC3C SNP results in increased enzymatic activity and hypermutation of target sequences when tested in vitro, and correlates with increased dimerization of the protein. The I188 is widely distributed in human African populations, and is the ancestral primate allele, but is not found in chimpanzees or gorillas. Thus, while other hominids have lost activity of this antiviral gene, it has been maintained, or re-acquired, as a more active antiviral gene in a subset of humans. Taken together, our results suggest that APOBEC3C is in fact involved in protecting hosts from lentiviruses. PMID:27732658

  9. Bayesian pedigree inference with small numbers of single nucleotide polymorphisms via a factor-graph representation.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Eric C; Ng, Thomas C

    2016-02-01

    We develop a computational framework for addressing pedigree inference problems using small numbers (80-400) of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Our approach relaxes the assumptions, which are commonly made, that sampling is complete with respect to the pedigree and that there is no genotyping error. It relies on representing the inferred pedigree as a factor graph and invoking the Sum-Product algorithm to compute and store quantities that allow the joint probability of the data to be rapidly computed under a large class of rearrangements of the pedigree structure. This allows efficient MCMC sampling over the space of pedigrees, and, hence, Bayesian inference of pedigree structure. In this paper we restrict ourselves to inference of pedigrees without loops using SNPs assumed to be unlinked. We present the methodology in general for multigenerational inference, and we illustrate the method by applying it to the inference of full sibling groups in a large sample (n=1157) of Chinook salmon typed at 95 SNPs. The results show that our method provides a better point estimate and estimate of uncertainty than the currently best-available maximum-likelihood sibling reconstruction method. Extensions of this work to more complex scenarios are briefly discussed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Estimating single nucleotide polymorphism associations using pedigree data: applications to breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Barnes, D R; Barrowdale, D; Beesley, J; Chen, X; James, P A; Hopper, J L; Goldgar, D; Chenevix-Trench, G; Antoniou, A C; Mitchell, G

    2013-06-25

    Pedigrees with multiple genotyped family members have been underutilised in breast cancer (BC) genetic-association studies. We developed a pedigree-based analytical framework to characterise single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations with BC risk using data from 736 BC families ascertained through multiple affected individuals. On average, eight family members had been genotyped for 24 SNPs previously associated with BC. Breast cancer incidence was modelled on the basis of SNP effects and residual polygenic effects. Relative risk (RR) estimates were obtained by maximising the retrospective likelihood (RL) of observing the family genotypes conditional on all disease phenotypes. Models were extended to assess parent-of-origin effects (POEs). Thirteen SNPs were significantly associated with BC under the pedigree RL approach. This approach yielded estimates consistent with those from large population-based studies. Logistic regression models ignoring pedigree structure generally gave larger RRs and association P-values. SNP rs3817198 in LSP1, previously shown to exhibit POE, yielded maternal and paternal RR estimates that were similar to those previously reported (paternal RR=1.12 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.99-1.27), P=0.081, one-sided P=0.04; maternal RR=0.94 (95% CI: 0.84-1.06), P=0.33). No other SNP exhibited POE. Our pedigree-based methods provide a valuable and efficient tool for characterising genetic associations with BC risk or other diseases and can complement population-based studies.

  11. Potential impact of a single nucleotide polymorphism in the hyaluronan synthase 1 gene in Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Adamia, Sophia; Treon, Steven P; Reiman, Tony; Tournilhac, Olivier; McQuarrie, Carrie; Mant, Michael J; Belch, Andrew R; Pilarski, Linda M

    2005-03-01

    The hyaluronan synthase 1 (HAS1) gene encodes a plasma membrane protein that synthesizes hyaluronan, an extracellular matrix molecule. Previously, in patients with Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia (WM), we detected upregulation of HAS1 transcripts and identified aberrant splice variants of this gene. Aberrant splicing of HAS1 results from activation of cryptic splice sites. In turn, activation of cryptic donor and acceptor splice sites can be promoted by mutations occurring upstream of these sites and/or at the branch point of slicing. We measured the frequency of the HAS1 833A/G polymorphism (ie, single-nucleotide polymorphism; SNP) in patients with WM and healthy donors. Additionally, HAS1 gene expression was evaluated in the same group of patients. Our observations so far suggest that HAS1 833A/G SNPs contribute to aberrant splicing of this gene; this idea is supported by the fact that 833A/G SNP is located on an exonic splicing enhancer motif. Based on the results obtained thus far, we speculate that individuals with HAS1 833G/G genotype are predisposed toward aberrant HAS1 splicing and expression of HAS1 variants, resulting in an enhanced risk of developing WM. Study of a larger group of patients and healthy donors is needed to confirm these speculations and to evaluate the prognostic significance of these findings.

  12. Single nucleotide polymorphism and FMR1 CGG repeat instability in two Basque valleys.

    PubMed

    Barasoain, Maitane; Barrenetxea, Gorka; Ortiz-Lastra, Eduardo; González, Javier; Huerta, Iratxe; Télez, Mercedes; Ramírez, Juan Manuel; Domínguez, Amaia; Gurtubay, Paula; Criado, Begoña; Arrieta, Isabel

    2012-03-01

    Fragile X Syndrome (FXS, MIM 309550) is mainly due to the expansion of a CGG trinucleotide repeat sequence, found in the 5' untranslated region of the FMR1 gene. Some studies suggest that stable markers, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and the study of populations with genetic identity, could provide a distinct advance to investigate the origin of CGG repeat instability. In this study, seven SNPs (WEX28 rs17312728:G>T, WEX70 rs45631657:C>T, WEX1 rs10521868:A>C, ATL1 rs4949:A>G, FMRb rs25707:A>G, WEX17 rs12010481:C>T and WEX10 ss71651741:C>T) have been analyzed in two Basque valleys (Markina and Arratia). We examined the association between these SNPs and the CGG repeat size, the AGG interruption pattern and two microsatellite markers (FRAXAC1 and DXS548). The results suggest that in both valleys WEX28-T, WEX70-C, WEX1-C, ATL1-G, and WEX10-C are preferably associated with cis-acting sequences directly influencing instability. But comparison of the two valleys reveals also important differences with respect to: (1) frequency and structure of "susceptible" alleles and (2) association between "susceptible" alleles and STR and SNP haplotypes. These results may indicate that, in Arratia, SNP status does not identify a pool of susceptible alleles, as it does in Markina. In Arratia valley, the SNP haplotype association reveals also a potential new "protective" factor.

  13. Regulatory Single-Nucleotide Variant Predictor Increases Predictive Performance of Functional Regulatory Variants.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Thomas A; Mort, Matthew; Cooper, David N; Radivojac, Predrag; Kann, Maricel G; Mooney, Sean D

    2016-11-01

    In silico methods for detecting functionally relevant genetic variants are important for identifying genetic markers of human inherited disease. Much research has focused on protein-coding variants since coding regions have well-defined physicochemical and functional properties. However, many bioinformatics tools are not applicable to variants outside coding regions. Here, we increase the classification performance of our regulatory single-nucleotide variant predictor (RSVP) for variants that cause regulatory abnormalities from an AUC of 0.90-0.97 by incorporating genomic regions identified by the ENCODE project into RSVP. RSVP is comparable to a recently published tool, Genome-Wide Annotation of Variants (GWAVA); both RSVP and GWAVA perform better on regulatory variants than a traditional variant predictor, combined annotation-dependent depletion (CADD). However, our method outperforms GWAVA on variants located at similar distances to the transcription start site as the positive set (AUC: 0.96) as compared with GWAVA (AUC: 0.71). Much of this disparity is due to RSVP's incorporation of features pertaining to the nearest gene (expression, GO terms, etc.), which are not included in GWAVA. Our findings hold out the promise of a framework for the assessment of all functional regulatory variants, providing a means to predict which rare or de novo variants are of pathogenic significance. © 2016 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  14. Association of a single nucleotide polymorphism upstream of ICOS with Japanese autoimmune hepatitis type 1.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Takashi; Oka, Shomi; Furukawa, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Minoru; Komori, Atsumasa; Abiru, Seigo; Nagaoka, Shinya; Hashimoto, Satoru; Naganuma, Atsushi; Naeshiro, Noriaki; Yoshizawa, Kaname; Shimada, Masaaki; Nishimura, Hideo; Tomizawa, Minoru; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Makita, Fujio; Yamashita, Haruhiro; Ario, Keisuke; Yatsuhashi, Hiroshi; Tohma, Shigeto; Kawasaki, Aya; Ohira, Hiromasa; Tsuchiya, Naoyuki; Migita, Kiyoshi

    2017-04-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is an uncommon chronic autoimmune liver disease. Several studies reported the association of polymorphisms between CD28, CTLA4 and ICOS gene cluster in 2q33.2 with autoimmune or inflammatory diseases. The previous genome-wide association study on type 1 AIH in a European population has reported a risk G allele of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs4325730, in this region. Here, we conducted an association study of this SNP with type 1 AIH in a Japanese population, as a replication study.An association study of rs4325730 was conducted in 343 Japanese AIH patients and 315 controls.We found that rs4325730 is associated with AIH (P=0.0173, odds ratio (OR) 1.30, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05-1.62, under the allele model for G allele, P=0.0070, OR 1.62, 95% CI 1.14-2.31, under the dominant model for G allele). This SNP was strongly associated with definite AIH (P=0.0134, OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.07-1.74; under allele model for G, P=0.0035, OR 1.85, 95% CI 1.22-2.81, under dominant model for G).This is the first replication association study of rs4325730 upstream of ICOS with AIH in the Japanese population and rs4325730G is a risk allele.

  15. Single nucleotide polymorphism mapping and alignment of recombinant chromosome substitution lines in barley.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kazuhiro; Close, Timothy J; Bhat, Prasanna; Muñoz-Amatriaín, María; Muehlbauer, Gary J

    2011-05-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping is useful for assessing genetic variation in germplasm collections, genetic map development and detection of alien chromosome substitutions. In this study, a diversity analysis using 1,301 SNPs on a set of 37 barley accessions was conducted. This analysis showed a high polymorphism rate between the malting barley cultivar 'Haruna Nijo' and the food barley cultivar 'Akashinriki'. Haruna Nijo and Akashinriki are donors of the barley expressed sequence tag (EST) collections. A doubled haploid (DH) population derived from the cross between Haruna Nijo and Akashinriki was genotyped with 1,448 SNPs. Of these 1,448 SNPs, 734 were polymorphic and distributed on barley linkage groups (chromosomes) as follows: 1H (86), 2H (125), 3H (120), 4H (100), 5H (127), 6H (88) and 7H (88). By using cMAP, we integrated the SNP markers across high-density maps. The SNPs were also used to genotype 98 BC(3)F(4) recombinant chromosome substitution lines (RCSLs) developed from the same cross (Haruna Nijo/Akashinriki). These data were used to create graphical genotypes for each line and thus estimate the location, extent and total number of introgressions from Akashinriki in the Haruna Nijo background. The 35 selected RCSLs sample most of the Akashinriki food barley genome, with only a few missing segments. These resources bring new alleles into the malting barley gene pool from food barley.

  16. Validation of Suspected Somatic Single Nucleotide Variations in the Brain of Alzheimer's Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Ramos, Alberto; Picher, Angel J; García, Esther; Garrido, Patricia; Hernandez, Felix; Soriano, Eduardo; Avila, Jesús

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing techniques and genome-wide association study analyses have provided a huge amount of data, thereby enabling the identification of DNA variations and mutations related to disease pathogenesis. New techniques and software tools have been developed to improve the accuracy and reliability of this identification. Most of these tools have been designed to discover and validate single nucleotide variants (SNVs). However, in addition to germ-line mutations, human tissues bear genomic mosaicism, which implies that somatic events are present only in low percentages of cells within a given tissue, thereby hindering the validation of these variations using standard genetic tools. Here we propose a new method to validate some of these somatic mutations. We combine a recently developed software with a method that cuts DNA by using restriction enzymes at the sites of the variation. The non-cleaved molecules, which bear the SNV, can then be amplified and sequenced using Sanger's technique. This procedure, which allows the detection of alternative alleles present in as few as 10% of cells, could be of value for the identification and validation of low frequency somatic events in a variety of tissues and diseases.

  17. A STAT6 Intronic Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism is Associated with Clinical Malaria in Ghanaian Children

    PubMed Central

    Amoako-Sakyi, Daniel; Adukpo, Selorme; Kusi, Kwadwo A.; Dodoo, Daniel; Ofori, Michael F.; Adjei, George O.; Edoh, Dominic E.; Asmah, Richard H.; Brown, Charles; Adu, Bright; Obiri-Yeboah, Dorcas; Futagbi, Godfred; Abubakari, Sharif Buari; Troye-Blomberg, Marita; Akanmori, Bartholomew D.; Goka, Bamenla Q.; Arko-Mensah, John; Gyan, Ben A.

    2016-01-01

    Malaria pathogenesis may be influenced by IgE responses and cytokine cross-regulation. Several mutations in the IL-4/STAT6 signaling pathway can alter cytokine cross-regulation and IgE responses during a Plasmodium falciparum malarial infection. This study investigated the relationship between a STAT6 intronic single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs3024974), total IgE, cytokines, and malaria severity in 238 Ghanaian children aged between 0.5 and 13 years. Total IgE and cytokine levels were measured by ELISA, while genotyping was done by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). Compared with healthy controls, heterozygosity protected against clinical malaria: uncomplicated malaria (odds ratios [OR] = 0.13, P < 0.001), severe malarial anemia (OR = 0.18, P < 0.001), and cerebral malaria (OR = 0.39, P = 0.022). Levels of total IgE significantly differed among malaria phenotypes (P = 0.044) and rs3024974 genotypes (P = 0.037). Neither cytokine levels nor IL-6/IL-10 ratios were associated with malaria phenotypes or rs3024974 genotypes. This study suggests a role for rs3024974 in malaria pathogenesis and offers further insights into an IL-4/STAT6 pathway mutation in malaria pathogenesis. PMID:27279750

  18. [Analysis on single nucleotide polymorphisms of porcine myostatin gene in different breeds].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Y L; Li, N; Wu, C X; Du, L X

    2001-01-01

    By PCR-RFLPs and PCR-SSCP approach, three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of porcine myostatin gene (MSTN) were analyzed in different breeds including "doubled-muscled" Yorkshire, Yorkshire, Landrace, Hamshire, Duroc, Piteran, Erhualian, Min, Hubei White and some hybrids. The three SNPs were located in the 3' encoding region, 5' promoter region and intronl region respectively. For the SNP in the 3' encoding region, which was caused by C-->T transition, the mutation frequency was relatively low: no TT genotype was detected in 274 individuals of different breeds. For the SNP in the 5' promoter region, 560 pigs were investigated. The allele T dominates in the imported lean-type pig breeds such as Yorkshire, Landrace, Duroc, Hampshire, Piteran and hybrid, however, in Erhualian and Hubei White pigs, the allele A was in majority. Polymorphism showed the similar pattern for the SNP in intron 1 region. G was the dominant allele in Yorkshire, Landrace and their hybrids, while in Erhualian and Hubei White pigs the frequency of A was much higher. Obviously they were not in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium state. For Min and Yorshire x Erhualian pigs, they were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium state for the SNPs in the 5' promoter region and (or) intron 1 region. The frequency for the A alleles of SNPs in the 5' promoter region and intron 1 region was higher for "double-muscled" Yorkshire than for Yorkshire and linkage for these two mutation sites was also observed.

  19. Single nucleotide polymorphism in the neuroplastin locus associates with cortical thickness and intellectual ability in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Desrivières, S; Lourdusamy, A; Tao, C; Toro, R; Jia, T; Loth, E; Medina, L M; Kepa, A; Fernandes, A; Ruggeri, B; Carvalho, F M; Cocks, G; Banaschewski, T; Barker, G J; Bokde, A L W; Büchel, C; Conrod, P J; Flor, H; Heinz, A; Gallinat, J; Garavan, H; Gowland, P; Brühl, R; Lawrence, C; Mann, K; Martinot, M L P; Nees, F; Lathrop, M; Poline, J-B; Rietschel, M; Thompson, P; Fauth-Bühler, M; Smolka, M N; Pausova, Z; Paus, T; Feng, J; Schumann, G

    2015-02-01

    Despite the recognition that cortical thickness is heritable and correlates with intellectual ability in children and adolescents, the genes contributing to individual differences in these traits remain unknown. We conducted a large-scale association study in 1583 adolescents to identify genes affecting cortical thickness. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; n=54,837) within genes whose expression changed between stages of growth and differentiation of a human neural stem cell line were selected for association analyses with average cortical thickness. We identified a variant, rs7171755, associating with thinner cortex in the left hemisphere (P=1.12 × 10(-)(7)), particularly in the frontal and temporal lobes. Localized effects of this SNP on cortical thickness differently affected verbal and nonverbal intellectual abilities. The rs7171755 polymorphism acted in cis to affect expression in the human brain of the synaptic cell adhesion glycoprotein-encoding gene NPTN. We also found that cortical thickness and NPTN expression were on average higher in the right hemisphere, suggesting that asymmetric NPTN expression may render the left hemisphere more sensitive to the effects of NPTN mutations, accounting for the lateralized effect of rs7171755 found in our study. Altogether, our findings support a potential role for regional synaptic dysfunctions in forms of intellectual deficits.

  20. Development of a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay for genotyping of Pandora neoaphidis.

    PubMed

    Fournier, A; Widmer, F; Enkerli, J

    2010-01-01

    Pandora neoaphidis (Entomophthoromycotina, Entomophthorales) is one of the most important fungal pathogens of aphids with great potential as a biological control agent. Development of tools that allow high-resolution monitoring of P. neoaphidis in the environment is a prerequisite for the successful implementation of biological control strategies. In this study, a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay was developed. The assay targets 13 SNPs identified in 6 genomic regions including the largest subunit of nuclear RNA polymerase II (RPB1) gene, the second-largest subunit of nuclear RNA polymerase II (RPB2) gene, the β-tubulin (BTUB) gene, the elongation factor 1α-like (EFL) gene, the large subunit (LSU) rRNA gene, and the small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene together with the internal transcribed spacer (ITS). The assay allowed the discrimination of 15 different SNP profiles among 19 P. neoaphidis isolates and 4 P. neoaphidis-infected cadavers. Results showed that the assay is applicable to DNA extracted from infected aphids allowing genotyping of the fungus without cultivation. The SNP assay provides an efficient tool for investigation of population structures and dynamics of P. neoaphidis, as well as its persistence and epidemiology in agro-ecosystems. Furthermore, it constitutes a powerful approach for monitoring potential biological control strains of P. neoaphidis in the environment. Copyright © 2010 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the need for a curated database

    PubMed Central

    Stucki, David; Gagneux, Sebastien

    2013-01-01

    Summary Recent advances in DNA sequencing have lead to the discovery of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). This genetic variation has changed our understanding of the differences and phylogenetic relationships between strains. Many of these mutations can serve as phylogenetic markers for strain classification, while others cause drug resistance. Moreover, SNPs can affect the bacterial phenotype in various ways, which may have an impact on the outcome of tuberculosis (TB) infection and disease. Despite the importance of SNPs for our understanding of the diversity of MTBC populations, the research community is currently lacking a comprehensive, well-curated and user-friendly database dedicated to SNP data. First attempts to catalogue and annotate SNPs in MTBC have been made, but more work is needed. In this review, we discuss the biological and epidemiological relevance of SNPs in MTBC. We then review some of the analytical challenges involved in processing SNP data, and end with a list of features, which should be included in a new SNP database for MTBC. PMID:23266261

  2. Dynamic regulation of the transcription initiation landscape at single nucleotide resolution during vertebrate embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nepal, Chirag; Hadzhiev, Yavor; Previti, Christopher; Haberle, Vanja; Li, Nan; Takahashi, Hazuki; Suzuki, Ana Maria M.; Sheng, Ying; Abdelhamid, Rehab F.; Anand, Santosh; Gehrig, Jochen; Akalin, Altuna; Kockx, Christel E.M.; van der Sloot, Antoine A.J.; van IJcken, Wilfred F.J.; Armant, Olivier; Rastegar, Sepand; Watson, Craig; Strähle, Uwe; Stupka, Elia; Carninci, Piero; Lenhard, Boris; Müller, Ferenc

    2013-01-01

    Spatiotemporal control of gene expression is central to animal development. Core promoters represent a previously unanticipated regulatory level by interacting with cis-regulatory elements and transcription initiation in different physiological and developmental contexts. Here, we provide a first and comprehensive description of the core promoter repertoire and its dynamic use during the development of a vertebrate embryo. By using cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE), we mapped transcription initiation events at single nucleotide resolution across 12 stages of zebrafish development. These CAGE-based transcriptome maps reveal genome-wide rules of core promoter usage, structure, and dynamics, key to understanding the control of gene regulation during vertebrate ontogeny. They revealed the existence of multiple classes of pervasive intra- and intergenic post-transcriptionally processed RNA products and their developmental dynamics. Among these RNAs, we report splice donor site-associated intronic RNA (sRNA) to be specific to genes of the splicing machinery. For the identification of conserved features, we compared the zebrafish data sets to the first CAGE promoter map of Tetraodon and the existing human CAGE data. We show that a number of features, such as promoter type, newly discovered promoter properties such as a specialized purine-rich initiator motif, as well as sRNAs and the genes in which they are detected, are conserved in mammalian and Tetraodon CAGE-defined promoter maps. The zebrafish developmental promoterome represents a powerful resource for studying developmental gene regulation and revealing promoter features shared across vertebrates. PMID:24002785

  3. Are Myocardial Infarction–Associated Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms Associated With Ischemic Stroke?

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yu-Ching; Anderson, Christopher D.; Bione, Silvia; Keene, Keith; Maguire, Jane M.; Nalls, Michael; Rasheed, Asif; Zeginigg, Marion; Attia, John; Baker, Ross; Barlera, Simona; Biffi, Alessandro; Bookman, Ebony; Brott, Thomas G.; Brown, Robert D.; Fang Chen, PhD; Chen, Wei-Min; Ciusani, Emilio; Cole, John W.; Cortellini, Lynelle; Danesh, John; Doheny, Kimberly; Ferrucci, Luigi; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Frossard, Philippe; Furie, Karen L.; Golledge, Jonathan; Hankey, Graeme J.; Hernandez, Dena; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Jannes, Jim; Kamal, Ayeesha; Khan, Muhammad Saleem; Kittner, Steven J.; Koblar, Simon A.; Lewis, Martin; Lincz, Lisa; Lisa, Antonella; Matarin, Mar; Moscato, Pablo; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C.; Parati, Eugenio A.; Parolo, Silvia; Pugh, Elizabeth; Rost, Natalia S.; Schallert, Michael; Schmidt, Helena; Scott, Rodney J.; Sturm, Jonathan W.; Yadav, Sunaina; Zaidi, Moazzam; Boncoraglio, Giorgio B.; Levi, Christopher Royce; Meschia, James F.; Rosand, Jonathan; Sale, Michele; Saleheen, Danish; Schmidt, Reinhold; Sharma, Pankaj; Worrall, Bradford; Mitchell, Braxton D.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Ischemic stroke (IS) shares many common risk factors with coronary artery disease (CAD). We hypothesized that genetic variants associated with myocardial infarction (MI) or CAD may be similarly involved in the etiology of IS. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated whether single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 11 different loci recently associated with MI or CAD through genome-wide association studies were associated with IS. Methods Meta-analyses of the associations between the 11 MI-associated SNPs and IS were performed using 6865 cases and 11 395 control subjects recruited from 9 studies. SNPs were either genotyped directly or imputed; in a few cases a surrogate SNP in high linkage disequilibrium was chosen. Logistic regression was performed within each study to obtain study-specific βs and standard errors. Meta-analysis was conducted using an inverse variance weighted approach assuming a random effect model. Results Despite having power to detect odds ratio of 1.09–1.14 for overall IS and 1.20–1.32 for major stroke subtypes, none of the SNPs were significantly associated with overall IS and/or stroke subtypes after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Conclusions Our results suggest that the major common loci associated with MI risk do not have effects of similar magnitude on overall IS but do not preclude moderate associations restricted to specific IS subtypes. Disparate mechanisms may be critical in the development of acute ischemic coronary and cerebrovascular events. PMID:22363065

  4. Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms in NAGNAG Acceptors Are Highly Predictive for Variations of Alternative Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Hiller, Michael; Huse, Klaus; Szafranski, Karol; Jahn, Niels; Hampe, Jochen; Schreiber, Stefan; Backofen, Rolf; Platzer, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    Aberrant or modified splicing patterns of genes are causative for many human diseases. Therefore, the identification of genetic variations that cause changes in the splicing pattern of a gene is important. Elsewhere, we described the widespread occurrence of alternative splicing at NAGNAG acceptors. Here, we report a genomewide screen for single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that affect such tandem acceptors. From 121 SNPs identified, we extracted 64 SNPs that most likely affect alternative NAGNAG splicing. We demonstrate that the NAGNAG motif is necessary and sufficient for this type of alternative splicing. The evolutionarily young NAGNAG alleles, as determined by the comparison with the chimpanzee genome, exhibit the same biases toward intron phase 1 and single–amino acid insertion/deletions that were already observed for all human NAGNAG acceptors. Since 28% of the NAGNAG SNPs occur in known disease genes, they represent preferable candidates for a more-detailed functional analysis, especially since the splice relevance for some of the coding SNPs is overlooked. Against the background of a general lack of methods for identifying splice-relevant SNPs, the presented approach is highly effective in the prediction of polymorphisms that are causal for variations in alternative splicing. PMID:16400609

  5. Genotyping of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in DNA Isolated from Serum Using Sequenom MassARRAY Technology.

    PubMed

    Clendenen, Tess V; Rendleman, Justin; Ge, Wenzhen; Koenig, Karen L; Wirgin, Isaac; Currie, Diane; Shore, Roy E; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Large epidemiologic studies have the potential to make valuable contributions to the assessment of gene-environment interactions because they prospectively collected detailed exposure data. Some of these studies, however, have only serum or plasma samples as a low quantity source of DNA. We examined whether DNA isolated from serum can be used to reliably and accurately genotype single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using Sequenom multiplex SNP genotyping technology. We genotyped 81 SNPs using samples from 158 participants in the NYU Women's Health Study. Each participant had DNA from serum and at least one paired DNA sample isolated from a high quality source of DNA, i.e. clots and/or cell precipitates, for comparison. We observed that 60 of the 81 SNPs (74%) had high call frequencies (≥95%) using DNA from serum, only slightly lower than the 85% of SNPs with high call frequencies in DNA from clots or cell precipitates. Of the 57 SNPs with high call frequencies for serum, clot, and cell precipitate DNA, 54 (95%) had highly concordant (>98%) genotype calls across all three sample types. High purity was not a critical factor to successful genotyping. Our results suggest that this multiplex SNP genotyping method can be used reliably on DNA from serum in large-scale epidemiologic studies.

  6. A new single-nucleotide deletion of PMP22 in an HNPP family without recurrent palsies.

    PubMed

    Luigetti, Marco; Conte, Amelia; Madia, Francesca; Mereu, Maria Lucia; Zollino, Marcella; Marangi, Giuseppe; Pomponi, Maria Grazia; Liberatore, Giuseppe; Tonali, Pietro Altilio; Sabatelli, Mario

    2008-08-01

    In this study we describe four patients from the same kindred who were affected by an autosomal-dominantly inherited peripheral neuropathy. They presented an unusual combination of clinical, electrophysiological, and pathological findings in association with a new mutation of the PMP22 gene. Clinically, three patients had carpal tunnel syndrome symptoms and one patient had late-onset peroneal atrophy. Motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities were reduced without focal slowing at entrapment sites. Nerve biopsy disclosed diffuse hypomyelination with focal thickening of the myelin sheath in some fibers. Sequence analysis of the PMP22 gene showed a single-nucleotide deletion (227delG) in the affected patients. This mutation, which has not been reported previously, leads to an open reading frame shift and probably to a truncated and unstable PMP22 protein. We conclude that this novel 227delG mutation of PMP22 gives a mild form of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy with atypical clinical and electrophysiological findings.

  7. A single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping platform for the authentication of patient derived xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Kathryn; Toscan, Cara; Xie, Jinhan; Lee, Hyunjoo; Taylor, Renea A.; Lawrence, Mitchell G.; Risbridger, Gail P.; MacKenzie, Karen L.; Sutton, Rosemary; Lock, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Patient derived xenografts (PDXs) have become a vital, frequently used, component of anti-cancer drug development. PDXs can be serially passaged in vivo for years, and shared across laboratories. As a consequence, the potential for mis-identification and cross-contamination is possible, yet authentication of PDXs appears limited. We present a PDX Authentication System (PAS), by combining a commercially available OpenArray assay of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with in-house R studio programs, to validate PDXs established in individual mice from acute lymphoblastic leukemia biopsies. The PAS is sufficiently robust to identify contamination at levels as low as 3%, similar to the gold standard of short tandem repeat (STR) profiling. We have surveyed a panel of PDXs established from 73 individual leukemia patients, and found that the PAS provided sufficient discriminatory power to identify each xenograft. The identified SNP-discrepant PDXs demonstrated distinct gene expression profiles, indicating a risk of contamination for PDXs at high passage number. The PAS also allows for the authentication of tumor cells with complex karyotypes from solid tumors including prostate cancer and Ewing's sarcoma. This study highlights the demands of authenticating PDXs for cancer research, and evaluates a reliable authentication platform that utilizes a commercially available and cost-effective system. PMID:27528024

  8. Identification of single nucleotide polymorphism in protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 11 gene in Murrah bulls.

    PubMed

    Jain, Varsha; Patel, Brijesh; Umar, Farhat Paul; Ajithakumar, H M; Gurjar, Suraj K; Gupta, I D; Verma, Archana

    2017-02-01

    This study was conducted with the objective to identify single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 11 (PPP1R11) gene in Murrah bulls. Genomic DNA was isolated by phenol-chloroform extraction method from the frozen semen samples of 65 Murrah bulls maintained at Artificial Breeding Research Centre, ICAR-National Dairy Research Institute, Karnal. The quality and concentration of DNA was checked by spectrophotometer reading and agarose gel electrophoresis. The target region of PPP1R11 gene was amplified using four sets of primer designed based on Bos taurus reference sequence. The amplified products were sequenced and aligned using Clustal Omega for identification of SNPs. Animals were genotyped by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) using EcoNI restriction enzyme. The sequences in the NCBI accession number NW_005785016.1 for Bubalus bubalis were compared and aligned with the edited sequences of Murrah bulls with Clustal Omega software. A total of 10 SNPs were found, out of which 1 at 5'UTR, 3 at intron 1, and 6 at intron 2 region. PCR-RFLP using restriction enzyme EcoNI revealed only AA genotype indicating monomorphism in PPP1R11 gene of all Murrah animals included in the study. A total of 10 SNPs were found. PCR-RFLP revealed only AA genotype indicating monomorphism in PPP1R11 gene of all Murrah animals included in the study, due to which association analysis with conception rate was not feasible.

  9. Nonsynonymous substitution in abalone sperm fertilization genes exceeds substitution in introns and mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Metz, Edward C.; Robles-Sikisaka, Refugio; Vacquier, Victor D.

    1998-01-01

    Strong positive Darwinian selection acts on two sperm fertilization proteins, lysin and 18-kDa protein, from abalone (Haliotis). To understand the phylogenetic context for this dramatic molecular evolution, we obtained sequences of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (mtCOI), and genomic sequences of lysin, 18-kDa, and a G protein subunit. Based on mtDNA differentiation, four north Pacific abalone species diverged within the past 2 million years (Myr), and remaining north Pacific species diverged over a period of 4–20 Myr. Between-species nonsynonymous differences in lysin and 18-kDa exons exceed nucleotide differences in introns by 3.5- to 24-fold. Remarkably, in some comparisons nonsynonymous substitutions in lysin and 18-kDa genes exceed synonymous substitutions in mtCOI. Lysin and 18-kDa intron/exon segments were sequenced from multiple red abalone individuals collected over a 1,200-km range. Only two nucleotide changes and two sites of slippage variation were detected in a total of >29,000 nucleotides surveyed. However, polymorphism in mtCOI and a G protein intron was found in this species. This finding suggests that positive selection swept one lysin allele and one 18-kDa allele to fixation. Similarities between mtCOI and lysin gene trees indicate that rapid adaptive evolution of lysin has occurred consistently through the history of the group. Comparisons with mtCOI molecular clock calibrations suggest that nonsynonymous substitutions accumulate 2–50 times faster in lysin and 18-kDa genes than in rapidly evolving mammalian genes. PMID:9724763

  10. DNA Methylation Analysis of the Macrosatellite Repeat Associated with FSHD Muscular Dystrophy at Single Nucleotide Level

    PubMed Central

    Huichalaf, Claudia; Micheloni, Stefano; Ferri, Giulia; Caccia, Roberta; Gabellini, Davide

    2014-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is one of the most common inherited diseases of the skeletal muscle. It is characterized by asymmetric muscle weakness and variable penetrance. FSHD is linked to a reduction in copy number of the D4Z4 3.3 kb macrosatellite repeat, located in 4q35. This causes the epigenetic de-repression of FSHD candidate genes leading to disease. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanism responsible for silencing of FSHD candidate genes in healthy subjects is not fully understood. While a role for DNA methylation has been suggested, so far there is limited information regarding the methylation status of the 325 CpGs contained in each D4Z4 unit. Using a human/rodent monochromosomal hybrid cell line containing a single human chromosome 4, we performed an in depth analysis of DNA methylation for the majority of the CpGs inside D4Z4 at single nucleotide level. We found that D4Z4 is not uniformly methylated and that the level of DNA methylation does not correlate with the density of CpG dinucleotides. Moreover, in several D4Z4 regions characterized by near complete methylation, we found specific unmethylated CpGs. These elements are enriched in transcription factor binding sites that could be involved in muscle-specific D4Z4 activity. Our approach also detected differential methylation among different D4Z4 units, suggesting that the D4Z4 array is a mosaic of euchromatic and heterochromatic domains. Finally, we found that DNA methylation and histone de-acetylation are required to maintain FSHD candidate genes repressed. Taken together, our data underscore new players involved in the epigenetic regulation of the FSHD locus that could be targeted for therapeutic purposes. PMID:25545674

  11. SiNoPsis: Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms selection and promoter profiling.

    PubMed

    Boloc, Daniel; Rodríguez, Natalia; Gassó, Patricia; Abril, Josep F; Bernardo, Miquel; Lafuente, Amalia; Mas, Sergi

    2017-09-14

    The selection of a Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) using bibliographic methods can be a very time-consuming task. Moreover, a SNP selected in this way may not be easily visualized in its genomic context by a standard user hoping to correlate it with other valuable information. Here we propose a web form built on top of Circos that can assist SNP-centred screening, based on their location in the genome and the regulatory modules they can disrupt. Its use may allow researchers to prioritize SNPs in genotyping and disease studies. SiNoPsis is bundled as a web portal. It focuses on the different structures involved in the genomic expression of a gene, especially those found in the core promoter upstream region. These structures include transcription factor binding sites (for promoter and enhancer signals), histones, and promoter flanking regions. Additionally, the tool provides eQTL and linkage disequilibrium (LD) properties for a given SNP query, yielding further clues about other indirectly associated SNPs. Possible disruptions of the aforementioned structures affecting gene transcription are reported using multiple resource databases. SiNoPsis has a simple user-friendly interface, which allows single queries by gene symbol, genomic coordinates, Ensembl gene identifiers, RefSeq transcript identifiers and SNPs. It is the only portal providing useful SNP selection based on regulatory modules and LD with functional variants in both textual and graphic modes (by properly defining the arguments and parameters needed to run Circos). danielboloc@gmail.com. SiNoPsis is freely available at https://compgen.bio.ub.edu/SiNoPsis /.

  12. Rapid single nucleotide polymorphism detection for personalized medicine applications using planar waveguide fluorescence sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herron, James N.; Tolley, Samuel E.; Smith, Richard; Christensen, Douglas A.

    2006-02-01

    Personalized medicine is an emerging field in which clinical diagnostics information about a patient's genotype or phenotype is used to optimize his/her pharmacotherapy. This article evaluates whether planar waveguide fluorescent sensors are suitable for determining such information from patient testing in point-of-care (POC) settings. The model system was Long QT Syndrome, a congenital disease associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding for cardiac ion channels. Three different SNP assay formats were examined: DNA/DNA hybridization, DNA/PNA hybridization (PNA: "peptide nucleic acid"), and single base extension (SBEX). Although DNA/DNA hybridization produced a strong intensity-time response for both wildtype and SNP analytes in a 5-min assay at 32°C, their hybridization rates differed by only 32.7%, which was insufficient for clinical decision-making. Much better differentiation of the two rates was observed at 53°C, where the wildtype's hybridization rate was two-thirds of its maximum value, while that of the SNP was essentially zero. Such all-or-nothing resolution would be adequate for clinical decision-making; however, the elevated temperature and precise temperature control would be hard to achieve in a POC setting. Results from DNA/PNA hybridization studies were more promising. Nearly 20-fold discrimination between wildtype and SNP hybridization rates was observed in a 5-min assay at 30°C, although the low ionic strength conditions required necessitated a de-salting step between sample preparation and SNP detection. SBEX was the most promising of the three, determining the absolute identity of the suspected polymorphism in a 5-min assay at 40°C.

  13. Evaluation of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Typing with Invader on PCR Amplicons and Its Automation

    PubMed Central

    Mein, Charles A.; Barratt, Bryan J.; Dunn, Michael G.; Siegmund, Thorsten; Smith, Annabel N.; Esposito, Laura; Nutland, Sarah; Stevens, Helen E.; Wilson, Amanda J.; Phillips, Michael S.; Jarvis, Nancy; Law, Scott; de Arruda, Monika; Todd, John A.

    2000-01-01

    Large-scale pharmacogenetics and complex disease association studies will require typing of thousands of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in thousands of individuals. Such projects would benefit from a genotyping system with accuracy >99% and a failure rate <5% on a simple, reliable, and flexible platform. However, such a system is not yet available for routine laboratory use. We have evaluated a modification of the previously reported Invader SNP-typing chemistry for use in a genotyping laboratory and tested its automation. The Invader technology uses a Flap Endonuclease for allele discrimination and a universal fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) reporter system. Three hundred and eighty-four individuals were genotyped across a panel of 36 SNPs and one insertion/deletion polymorphism with Invader assays using PCR product as template, a total of 14,208 genotypes. An average failure rate of 2.3% was recorded, mostly associated with PCR failure, and the typing was 99.2% accurate when compared with genotypes generated with established techniques. An average signal-to-noise ratio (9:1) was obtained. The high degree of discrimination for single base changes, coupled with homogeneous format, has allowed us to deploy liquid handling robots in a 384-well microtitre plate format and an automated end-point capture of fluorescent signal. Simple semiautomated data interpretation allows the generation of ∼25,000 genotypes per person per week, which is 10-fold greater than gel-based SNP typing and microsatellite typing in our laboratory. Savings on labor costs are considerable. We conclude that Invader chemistry using PCR products as template represents a useful technology for typing large numbers of SNPs rapidly and efficiently. PMID:10720574

  14. Association of BRCA1 Functional Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms with Risk of Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Li; Doan, Phi C.; Wei, Qingyi; Liu, Yanhong; Li, Guojun

    2012-01-01

    Background Breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) is a vital DNA repair gene, and the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of this gene have been studied in diverse cancer types. In this study, we investigated the association between eight common BRCA1 functional SNPs and the risk of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). Methods This cancer center-based case–control study included 303 DTC cases and 511 controls. A polymerase chain reaction-based restriction fragment length polymorphism assay was performed for genotyping. Unconditional logistical regression analysis was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in single-SNP analysis and haplotype analysis. Results A decreased risk of DTC was found for the A1988G heterozygous AG genotype (adjusted OR=0.63, 95% CI: 0.45–0.87, Bonferroni-adjusted p-value=0.036). AATAATA and ATAA haplotypes that carry C33420T variant allele were associated with reduced papillary thyroid cancer risk (adjusted OR=0.52, 95% CI: 0.33–0.84; adjusted OR=0.62, 95% CI: 0.40–0.95, respectively). Also, having a combination of ≥3 favorable genotypes was associated with a DTC risk reduction (adjusted OR=0.69, 95% CI: 0.50–0.95). The A31875G AG/GG genotype was associated with a 69% reduced risk of multifocal primary tumor in DTC patients (adjusted OR=0.31, 95% CI: 0.12–0.81). Conclusion BRCA1 genetic polymorphisms may play a role in DTC risk, while the possible associations warrant confirmation in independent studies. PMID:22136207

  15. Exploring the efficacy of paternity and kinship testing based on single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Mo, Shao-Kang; Liu, Ya-Cheng; Wang, Sheng-qi; Bo, Xiao-Chen; Li, Zhen; Chen, Ying; Ni, Ming

    2016-05-01

    Short tandem repeats (STRs) are conventional genetic markers typically used for paternity and kinship testing. As supplementary markers of STRs, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have less discrimination power but broader applicability to degraded samples. The rapid improvement of next-generation sequencing (NGS) and multiplex amplification technologies also make it possible now to simultaneously identify dozens or even hundreds of SNP loci in a single pool. However, few studies have been endeavored to kinship testing based on SNP loci. In this study, we genotyped 90 autosomal human identity SNP loci with NGS, and investigated their testing efficacies based on the likelihood ratio model in eight pedigree scenarios involving paternity, half/full-sibling, uncle/nephew, and first-cousin relationships. We found that these SNPs might be sufficient to discriminate paternity and full-sibling, but impractical for more distant relatives such as uncle and cousin. Furthermore, we conducted an in silico study to obtain the theoretical tendency of how testing efficacy varied with increasing number of SNP loci. For each testing battery in a given pedigree scenario, we obtained distributions of logarithmic likelihood ratio for both simulated relatives and unrelated controls. The proportion of the overlapping area between the two distributions was defined as a false testing level (FTL) to evaluate the testing efficacy. We estimated that 85, 127, 491, and 1,858 putative SNP loci were required to discriminate paternity, full-sibling, half-sibling/uncle-nephew, and first-cousin (FTL, 0.1%), respectively. To test a half-sibling or nephew, an additional uncle relative could be included to decrease the required number of putative SNP loci to ∼320 (FTL, 0.1%). As a systematic computation of paternity and kinship testing based only on SNPs, our results could be informative for further studies and applications on paternity and kinship testing using SNP loci.

  16. Distribution of cytokine gene single nucleotide polymorphisms among a multi-ethnic Iranian population

    PubMed Central

    Kurdistani, Zana Karimi; Saberi, Samaneh; Talebkhan, Yeganeh; Oghalaie, Akbar; Esmaeili, Maryam; Mohajerani, Nazanin; Bababeik, Maryam; Hassanpour, Parisa; Barani, Shaghik; Farjaddoost, Ameneh; Ebrahimzadeh, Fatemeh; Trejaut, Jean; Mohammadi, Marjan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cytokine gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are widely used to study susceptibility to complex diseases and as a tool for anthropological studies. Materials and Methods: To investigate cytokine SNPs in an Iranian multi-ethnic population, we have investigated 10 interleukin (IL) SNPs (IL-1β (C-511T, T-31C), IL-2 (G-384T), IL-4 (C-590T), IL-6 (G-174C), IL-8 (T-251A), IL-10 (G-1082A, C-819T, C-592A) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) (G-308A) in 415 Iranian subjects comprising of 6 different ethnicities. Allelic and genotypic frequencies as well as Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) were calculated by PyPop software. Population genetic indices including observed heterozygosity (Ho), expected heterozygosity (He), fixation index (FIS), the effective number of alleles (Ne) and polymorphism information content (PIC) were derived using Popgene 32 software. Multidimensional scaling (MDS) was constructed using Reynold's genetic distance obtained from the frequencies of cytokine gene polymorphism. Results: Genotypic distributions were consistent with the HWE assumptions, except for 3 loci (IL-4-590, IL-8-251 and IL-10-819) in Fars and 4 loci (IL-4-590, IL-6-174, IL-10-1082 and TNF-α-308) in Turks. Pairwise assessment of allelic frequencies, detected differences at the IL-4-590 locus in Gilakis versus Kurds (P = 0.028) and Lurs (P = 0.022). Mazanis and Gilakis displayed the highest (Ho= 0.50 ± 0.24) and lowest (Ho= 0.34 ± 0.16) mean observed heterozygosity, respectively. Conclusions: MDS analysis of our study population, in comparison with others, revealed that Iranian ethnicities except Kurds and Mazanis were tightly located within a single cluster with closest genetic affinity to Europeans. PMID:26436076

  17. Methods to Increase the Sensitivity of High Resolution Melting Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Genotyping in Malaria.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Rachel; Hamilton, Elizabeth J; Durfee, Katelyn; Ndiaye, Daouda; Wirth, Dyann F; Hartl, Daniel L; Volkman, Sarah K

    2015-11-10

    Despite decades of eradication efforts, malaria remains a global burden. Recent renewed interest in regional elimination and global eradication has been accompanied by increased genomic information about Plasmodium parasite species responsible for malaria, including characteristics of geographical populations as well as variations associated with reduced susceptibility to anti-malarial drugs. One common genetic variation, single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), offers attractive targets for parasite genotyping. These markers are useful not only for tracking drug resistance markers but also for tracking parasite populations using markers not under drug or other selective pressures. SNP genotyping methods offer the ability to track drug resistance as well as to fingerprint individual parasites for population surveillance, particularly in response to malaria control efforts in regions nearing elimination status. While informative SNPs have been identified that are agnostic to specific genotyping technologies, high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis is particularly suited to field-based studies. Compared to standard fluorescent-probe based methods that require individual SNPs in a single labeled probe and offer at best 10% sensitivity to detect SNPs in samples that contain multiple genomes (polygenomic), HRM offers 2-5% sensitivity. Modifications to HRM, such as blocked probes and asymmetric primer concentrations as well as optimization of amplification annealing temperatures to bias PCR towards amplification of the minor allele, further increase the sensitivity of HRM. While the sensitivity improvement depends on the specific assay, we have increased detection sensitivities to less than 1% of the minor allele. In regions approaching malaria eradication, early detection of emerging or imported drug resistance is essential for prompt response. Similarly, the ability to detect polygenomic infections and differentiate imported parasite types from cryptic local reservoirs

  18. Real-time single-molecule electronic DNA sequencing by synthesis using polymer-tagged nucleotides on a nanopore array

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Carl W.; Kumar, Shiv; Porel, Mintu; Chien, Minchen; Bibillo, Arek; Stranges, P. Benjamin; Dorwart, Michael; Tao, Chuanjuan; Li, Zengmin; Guo, Wenjing; Shi, Shundi; Korenblum, Daniel; Trans, Andrew; Aguirre, Anne; Liu, Edward; Harada, Eric T.; Pollard, James; Bhat, Ashwini; Cech, Cynthia; Yang, Alexander; Arnold, Cleoma; Palla, Mirkó; Hovis, Jennifer; Chen, Roger; Morozova, Irina; Kalachikov, Sergey; Russo, James J.; Kasianowicz, John J.; Davis, Randy; Roever, Stefan; Church, George M.; Ju, Jingyue

    2016-01-01

    DNA sequencing by synthesis (SBS) offers a robust platform to decipher nucleic acid sequences. Recently, we reported a single-molecule nanopore-based SBS strategy that accurately distinguishes four bases by electronically detecting and differentiating four different polymer tags attached to the 5′-phosphate of the nucleotides during their incorporation into a growing DNA strand catalyzed by DNA polymerase. Further developing this approach, we report here the use of nucleotides tagged at the terminal phosphate with oligonucleotide-based polymers to perform nanopore SBS on an α-hemolysin nanopore array platform. We designed and synthesized several polymer-tagged nucleotides using tags that produce different electrical current blockade levels and verified they are active substrates for DNA polymerase. A highly processive DNA polymerase was conjugated to the nanopore, and the conjugates were complexed with primer/template DNA and inserted into lipid bilayers over individually addressable electrodes of the nanopore chip. When an incoming complementary-tagged nucleotide forms a tight ternary complex with the primer/template and polymerase, the tag enters the pore, and the current blockade level is measured. The levels displayed by the four nucleotides tagged with four different polymers captured in the nanopore in such ternary complexes were clearly distinguishable and sequence-specific, enabling continuous sequence determination during the polymerase reaction. Thus, real-time single-molecule electronic DNA sequencing data with single-base resolution were obtained. The use of these polymer-tagged nucleotides, combined with polymerase tethering to nanopores and multiplexed nanopore sensors, should lead to new high-throughput sequencing methods. PMID:27091962

  19. Real-time single-molecule electronic DNA sequencing by synthesis using polymer-tagged nucleotides on a nanopore array.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Carl W; Kumar, Shiv; Porel, Mintu; Chien, Minchen; Bibillo, Arek; Stranges, P Benjamin; Dorwart, Michael; Tao, Chuanjuan; Li, Zengmin; Guo, Wenjing; Shi, Shundi; Korenblum, Daniel; Trans, Andrew; Aguirre, Anne; Liu, Edward; Harada, Eric T; Pollard, James; Bhat, Ashwini; Cech, Cynthia; Yang, Alexander; Arnold, Cleoma; Palla, Mirkó; Hovis, Jennifer; Chen, Roger; Morozova, Irina; Kalachikov, Sergey; Russo, James J; Kasianowicz, John J; Davis, Randy; Roever, Stefan; Church, George M; Ju, Jingyue

    2016-05-10

    DNA sequencing by synthesis (SBS) offers a robust platform to decipher nucleic acid sequences. Recently, we reported a single-molecule nanopore-based SBS strategy that accurately distinguishes four bases by electronically detecting and differentiating four different polymer tags attached to the 5'-phosphate of the nucleotides during their incorporation into a growing DNA strand catalyzed by DNA polymerase. Further developing this approach, we report here the use of nucleotides tagged at the terminal phosphate with oligonucleotide-based polymers to perform nanopore SBS on an α-hemolysin nanopore array platform. We designed and synthesized several polymer-tagged nucleotides using tags that produce different electrical current blockade levels and verified they are active substrates for DNA polymerase. A highly processive DNA polymerase was conjugated to the nanopore, and the conjugates were complexed with primer/template DNA and inserted into lipid bilayers over individually addressable electrodes of the nanopore chip. When an incoming complementary-tagged nucleotide forms a tight ternary complex with the primer/template and polymerase, the tag enters the pore, and the current blockade level is measured. The levels displayed by the four nucleotides tagged with four different polymers captured in the nanopore in such ternary complexes were clearly distinguishable and sequence-specific, enabling continuous sequence determination during the polymerase reaction. Thus, real-time single-molecule electronic DNA sequencing data with single-base resolution were obtained. The use of these polymer-tagged nucleotides, combined with polymerase tethering to nanopores and multiplexed nanopore sensors, should lead to new high-throughput sequencing methods.

  20. Mango (Mangifera indica L.) germplasm diversity based on single nucleotide polymorphisms derived from the transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Amir; Rubinstein, Mor; Eshed, Ravit; Benita, Miri; Ish-Shalom, Mazal; Sharabi-Schwager, Michal; Rozen, Ada; Saada, David; Cohen, Yuval; Ophir, Ron

    2015-11-14

    Germplasm collections are an important source for plant breeding, especially in fruit trees which have a long duration of juvenile period. Thus, efforts have been made to study the diversity of fruit tree collections. Even though mango is an economically important crop, most of the studies on diversity in mango collections have been conducted with a small number of genetic markers. We describe a de novo transcriptome assembly from mango cultivar 'Keitt'. Variation discovery was performed using Illumina resequencing of 'Keitt' and 'Tommy Atkins' cultivars identified 332,016 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 1903 simple-sequence repeats (SSRs). Most of the SSRs (70.1%) were of trinucleotide with the preponderance of motif (GGA/AAG)n and only 23.5% were di-nucleotide SSRs with the mostly of (AT/AT)n motif. Further investigation of the diversity in the Israeli mango collection was performed based on a subset of 293 SNPs. Those markers have divided the Israeli mango collection into two major groups: one group included mostly mango accessions from Southeast Asia (Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia) and India and the other with mainly of Floridian and Israeli mango cultivars. The latter group was more polymorphic (FS=-0.1 on the average) and was more of an admixture than the former group. A slight population differentiation was detected (FST=0.03), suggesting that if the mango accessions of the western world apparently was originated from Southeast Asia, as has been previously suggested, the duration of cultivation was not long enough to develop a distinct genetic background. Whole-transcriptome reconstruction was used to significantly broaden the mango's genetic variation resources, i.e., SNPs and SSRs. The set of SNP markers described in this study is novel. A subset of SNPs was sampled to explore the Israeli mango collection and most of them were polymorphic in many mango accessions. Therefore, we believe that these SNPs will be valuable as they recapitulate and

  1. Highly Significant Association between Two Common Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in CORIN Gene and Preeclampsia in Caucasian Women

    PubMed Central

    de Prost, Dominique; Tsatsaris, Vassilis; Dreyfus, Michel; Treluyer, Jean-Marc; Mandelbrot, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a frequent medical complication during pregnancy. Corin, a serine protease which activates pro-atrial natriuretic peptide, has recently been shown to be involved in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. The aim of this study was to search for CORIN gene variations and their association to preeclampsia in Caucasian and African women. Our study population was composed of 571 pregnant women (295 with preeclampsia and 276 normotensive controls) matched for maternal and gestational age, and ethnic origin. The 22 exons of the CORIN gene were sequenced in a discovery sample (n = 260), where 31 single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified. In a replication sample (n = 311), 4 single nucleotide polymorphisms were tested. Two minor alleles (C for rs2271036 and G for rs2271037) were significantly associated to preeclampsia. Adjusted odds ratios [95% confidence interval] were 2.5 [1.2–3.8] (p = 0.007) and 2.3 [1.5–3.5] (p = 1.3×10−4), respectively. These associations were ethnic-specific, as only found in the Caucasian of subjects (odds ratio = 3.5 [1.8–6.6], p = 1.1×10−4; odds ratio = 3.1 [1.7–5.8], p = 2.1×10−4, for each single nucleotide polymorphism, respectively). The two single nucleotide polymorphisms are in almost perfect linkage disequilibrium (r2 = 0.93). No specific association was found with severe preeclampsia, early-onset preeclampsia nor fetal growth retardation. In conclusion, this is the first report of a highly significant association between these two single nucleotide polymorphisms in CORIN gene and preeclampsia. Our findings further support the probability of a critical role of corin in preeclamspia pathophysiology at the uteroplacental interface. PMID:25474356

  2. Highly significant association between two common single nucleotide polymorphisms in CORIN gene and preeclampsia in Caucasian women.

    PubMed

    Stepanian, Alain; Alcaïs, Alexandre; de Prost, Dominique; Tsatsaris, Vassilis; Dreyfus, Michel; Treluyer, Jean-Marc; Mandelbrot, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a frequent medical complication during pregnancy. Corin, a serine protease which activates pro-atrial natriuretic peptide, has recently been shown to be involved in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. The aim of this study was to search for CORIN gene variations and their association to preeclampsia in Caucasian and African women. Our study population was composed of 571 pregnant women (295 with preeclampsia and 276 normotensive controls) matched for maternal and gestational age, and ethnic origin. The 22 exons of the CORIN gene were sequenced in a discovery sample (n = 260), where 31 single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified. In a replication sample (n = 311), 4 single nucleotide polymorphisms were tested. Two minor alleles (C for rs2271036 and G for rs2271037) were significantly associated to preeclampsia. Adjusted odds ratios [95% confidence interval] were 2.5 [1.2-3.8] (p = 0.007) and 2.3 [1.5-3.5] (p = 1.3 × 10(-4)), respectively. These associations were ethnic-specific, as only found in the Caucasian of subjects (odds ratio = 3.5 [1.8-6.6], p = 1.1 × 10(-4); odds ratio = 3.1 [1.7-5.8], p = 2.1 × 10(-4), for each single nucleotide polymorphism, respectively). The two single nucleotide polymorphisms are in almost perfect linkage disequilibrium (r(2) = 0.93). No specific association was found with severe preeclampsia, early-onset preeclampsia nor fetal growth retardation. In conclusion, this is the first report of a highly significant association between these two single nucleotide polymorphisms in CORIN gene and preeclampsia. Our findings further support the probability of a critical role of corin in preeclamspia pathophysiology at the uteroplacental interface.

  3. IMHOTEP—a composite score integrating popular tools for predicting the functional consequences of non-synonymous sequence variants

    PubMed Central

    Knecht, Carolin; Mort, Matthew; Junge, Olaf; Cooper, David N.; Krawczak, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The in silico prediction of the functional consequences of mutations is an important goal of human pathogenetics. However, bioinformatic tools that classify mutations according to their functionality employ different algorithms so that predictions may vary markedly between tools. We therefore integrated nine popular prediction tools (PolyPhen-2, SNPs&GO, MutPred, SIFT, MutationTaster2, Mutation Assessor and FATHMM as well as conservation-based Grantham Score and PhyloP) into a single predictor. The optimal combination of these tools was selected by means of a wide range of statistical modeling techniques, drawing upon 10 029 disease-causing single nucleotide variants (SNVs) from Human Gene Mutation Database and 10 002 putatively ‘benign’ non-synonymous SNVs from UCSC. Predictive performance was found to be markedly improved by model-based integration, whilst maximum predictive capability was obtained with either random forest, decision tree or logistic regression analysis. A combination of PolyPhen-2, SNPs&GO, MutPred, MutationTaster2 and FATHMM was found to perform as well as all tools combined. Comparison of our approach with other integrative approaches such as Condel, CoVEC, CAROL, CADD, MetaSVM and MetaLR using an independent validation dataset, revealed the superiority of our newly proposed integrative approach. An online implementation of this approach, IMHOTEP (‘Integrating Molecular Heuristics and Other Tools for Effect Prediction’), is provided at http://www.uni-kiel.de/medinfo/cgi-bin/predictor/. PMID:28180317

  4. IMHOTEP-a composite score integrating popular tools for predicting the functional consequences of non-synonymous sequence variants.

    PubMed

    Knecht, Carolin; Mort, Matthew; Junge, Olaf; Cooper, David N; Krawczak, Michael; Caliebe, Amke

    2017-02-17

    The in silico prediction of the functional consequences of mutations is an important goal of human pathogenetics. However, bioinformatic tools that classify mutations according to their functionality employ different algorithms so that predictions may vary markedly between tools. We therefore integrated nine popular prediction tools (PolyPhen-2, SNPs&GO, MutPred, SIFT, MutationTaster2, Mutation Assessor and FATHMM as well as conservation-based Grantham Score and PhyloP) into a single predictor. The optimal combination of these tools was selected by means of a wide range of statistical modeling techniques, drawing upon 10 029 disease-causing single nucleotide variants (SNVs) from Human Gene Mutation Database and 10 002 putatively ‘benign’ non-synonymous SNVs from UCSC. Predictive performance was found to be markedly improved by model-based integration, whilst maximum predictive capability was obtained with either random forest, decision tree or logistic regression analysis. A combination of PolyPhen-2, SNPs&GO, MutPred, MutationTaster2 and FATHMM was found to perform as well as all tools combined. Comparison of our approach with other integrative approaches such as Condel, CoVEC, CAROL, CADD, MetaSVM and MetaLR using an independent validation dataset, revealed the superiority of our newly proposed integrative approach. An online implementation of this approach, IMHOTEP (‘Integrating Molecular Heuristics and Other Tools for Effect Prediction’), is provided at http://www.uni-kiel.de/medinfo/cgi-bin/predictor/.

  5. Assessing patterns of hybridization between North Atlantic eels using diagnostic single-nucleotide polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Pujolar, J M; Jacobsen, M W; Als, T D; Frydenberg, J; Magnussen, E; Jónsson, B; Jiang, X; Cheng, L; Bekkevold, D; Maes, G E; Bernatchez, L; Hansen, M M

    2014-06-01

    The two North Atlantic eel species, the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) and the American eel (Anguilla rostrata), spawn in partial sympatry in the Sargasso Sea, providing ample opportunity to interbreed. In this study, we used a RAD (Restriction site Associated DNA) sequencing approach to identify species-specific diagnostic single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and design a low-density array that combined with screening of a diagnostic mitochondrial DNA marker. Eels from Iceland (N=159) and from the neighboring Faroe Islands (N=29) were genotyped, along with 94 larvae (49 European and 45 American eel) collected in the Sargasso Sea. Our SNP survey showed that the majority of Icelandic eels are pure European eels but there is also an important contribution of individuals of admixed ancestry (10.7%). Although most of the hybrids were identified as F1 hybrids from European eel female × American eel male crosses, backcrosses were also detected, including a first-generation backcross (F1 hybrid × pure European eel) and three individuals identified as second-generation backcrosses originating from American eel × F1 hybrid backcrosses interbreeding with pure European eels. In comparison, no hybrids were observed in the Faroe Islands, the closest bodies of land to Iceland. It is possible that hybrids show an intermediate migratory behaviour between the two parental species that ultimately brings hybrid larvae to the shores of Iceland, situated roughly halfway between the Sargasso Sea and Europe. Only two hybrids were observed among Sargasso Sea larvae, both backcrosses, but no F1 hybrids, that points to temporal variation in the occurrence of hybridization.

  6. A single nucleotide polymorphism in APOA5 determines triglyceride levels in Hong Kong and Guangzhou Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chao Qiang; Liu, Bin; Cheung, Bernard MY; Lam, Tai Hing; Lin, Jie Ming; Li Jin, Ya; Yue, Xiao Jun; Ong, Kwok Leung; Tam, Sidney; Wong, Ka Sing; Tomlinson, Brian; Lam, Karen SL; Thomas, G Neil

    2010-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5) gene have been associated with hypertriglyceridaemia. We investigated which SNPs in the APOA5 gene were associated with triglyceride levels in two independent Chinese populations. In all, 1375 subjects in the Hong Kong Cardiovascular Risk Factor Prevalence Study were genotyped for five tagging SNPs chosen from HapMap. Replication was sought in 1996 subjects from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study. Among the five SNPs, rs662799 (-1131T>C) was strongly related to log-transformed triglyceride levels among Hong Kong subjects (β=0.192, P=2.6 × 10−13). Plasma triglyceride level was 36.1% higher in CC compared to TT genotype. This association was confirmed in Guangzhou subjects (β=0.159, P=1.3 × 10−12), and was significantly irrespective of sex, age group, obesity, metabolic syndrome, hypertension, diabetes, smoking and alcohol drinking. The odds ratios and 95% confidence interval for plasma triglycerides ≥1.7 mmol/l associated with TC and CC genotypes were, respectively, 1.81 (1.37–2.39) and 2.22 (1.44–3.43) in Hong Kong and 1.27 (1.05–1.54) and 1.97 (1.42–2.73) in Guangzhou. Haplotype analysis suggested the association was due to rs662799 only. The corroborative findings in two independent populations indicate that the APOA5-1131T>C polymorphism is an important and clinically relevant determinant of plasma triglyceride levels in the Chinese population. PMID:20571505

  7. Improved assay performance of single nucleotide polymorphism array over conventional karyotyping in analyzing products of conception.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shao-Bin; Xie, Ying-Jun; Chen, Zheng; Zhou, Yi; Wu, Jian-Zhu; Zhang, Zhi-Qiang; Shi, Shan-Shan; Chen, Bao-Jiang; Fang, Qun

    2015-07-01

    Conventional karyotyping has been a routine method to identify chromosome abnormalities in products of conception. However, this process is being transformed by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, which has advantages over karyotyping, including higher resolution and dispensing with cell culture. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the advantage of high-resolution SNP array in identifying genetic aberrations in products of conception. We consecutively collected 155 products of conception specimens, including 139 from first-trimester miscarriage and 16 from second-trimester miscarriage. SNP array was performed on these samples in parallel with G-banded karyotyping. The test success rate was 98.1% (152/155) using SNP array, which was higher than that using karyotyping (133/155, 85.8%). It yielded a 63.8% (97/152) abnormality rate, and the frequency of various chromosome abnormalities was in agreement with other previous studies. The results between array and karyotyping demonstrated a 94.0% (125/133) concordance. SNP array obtained additional aberrations in 3.8% (5/133) of those cases unidentified by karyotyping, which included three cases with whole-genome uniparental disomy, one with pathogenic copy number variation, and one with del(4)(q35.1q35.2) and dup(12)(q24.31q24.33). However, chromosome translocations presented in two cases and tetraploidy presented in one case were detected by karyotyping instead of array. Additionally, two out of three cases with mosaic trisomy were revealed by array but recognized as pure trisomy by karyotyping. This study demonstrated that SNP array had certain advantages over G-banded karyotyping, including a higher success rate, additional detection of copy number variations and uniparental disomy, and improved sensitivity to mosaicism. Therefore, it would be an alternative method to karyotyping in clinical genetic practice. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  8. Strain-specific single-nucleotide polymorphism assays for the Bacillus anthracis Ames strain.

    PubMed

    Van Ert, Matthew N; Easterday, W Ryan; Simonson, Tatum S; U'Ren, Jana M; Pearson, Talima; Kenefic, Leo J; Busch, Joseph D; Huynh, Lynn Y; Dukerich, Megan; Trim, Carla B; Beaudry, Jodi; Welty-Bernard, Amy; Read, Timothy; Fraser, Claire M; Ravel, Jacques; Keim, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Highly precise diagnostics and forensic assays can be developed through a combination of evolutionary analysis and the exhaustive examination of genomic sequences. In Bacillus anthracis, whole-genome sequencing efforts revealed ca. 3,500 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) among eight different strains and evolutionary analysis provides the identification of canonical SNPs. We have previously shown that SNPs are highly evolutionarily stable, and the clonal nature of B. anthracis makes them ideal signatures for subtyping this pathogen. Here we identified SNPs that define the lineage of B. anthracis that contains the Ames strain, the strain used in the 2001 bioterrorist attacks in the United States. Sequencing and real-time PCR were used to validate these SNPs across B. anthracis strains, including (i) 88 globally and genetically diverse isolates; (ii) isolates that were shown to be genetic relatives of the Ames strain by multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA); and (iii) several different lab stocks of the Ames strain, including a clinical isolate from the 2001 letter attack. Six SNPs were found to be highly specific for the Ames strain; four on the chromosome, one on the pX01 plasmid, and one on the pX02 plasmid. All six SNPs differentiated the B. anthracis Ames strain from the 88 unique B. anthracis strains, while five of the six separated Ames from its close genetic relatives. The use of these SNPs coupled with real-time PCR allows specific and sensitive (<100 fg of template DNA) identification of the Ames strain. This evolutionary and genomics-based approach provides an effective means for the discovery of strain-specific SNPs in B. anthracis.

  9. Single-nucleotide polymorphism associations in common with immune responses to measles and rubella vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Salk, Hannah M; Larrabee, Beth R; Pankratz, V Shane; Poland, Gregory A

    2014-11-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in candidate immune response genes were evaluated for associations with measles- and rubella-specific neutralizing antibodies, interferon (IFN)-γ, and interleukin (IL)-6 secretion in two separate association analyses in a cohort of healthy immunized subjects. We identified six SNP associations shared between the measles-specific and rubella-specific immune responses, specifically neutralizing antibody titers (DDX58), secreted IL-6 (IL10RB, IL12B), and secreted IFN-γ (IFNAR2, TLR4). An intronic SNP (rs669260) in the antiviral innate immune receptor gene, DDX58, was significantly associated with increased neutralizing antibody titers for both measles and rubella viral antigens post-MMR vaccination (p values 0.02 and 0.0002, respectively). Significant associations were also found between IL10RB (rs2284552; measles study p value 0.006, rubella study p value 0.00008) and IL12B (rs2546893; measles study p value 0.005, rubella study p value 0.03) gene polymorphisms and variations in both measles- and rubella virus-specific IL-6 responses. We also identified associations between individual SNPs in the IFNAR2 and TLR4 genes that were associated with IFN-γ secretion for both measles and rubella vaccine-specific immune responses. These results are the first to indicate that there are SNP associations in common across measles and rubella vaccine immune responses and that SNPs from multiple genes involved in innate and adaptive immune response regulation may contribute to the overall human antiviral response.

  10. Screening of a Brassica napus bacterial artificial chromosome library using highly parallel single nucleotide polymorphism assays

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Efficient screening of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries with polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based markers is feasible provided that a multidimensional pooling strategy is implemented. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) can be screened in multiplexed format, therefore this marker type lends itself particularly well for medium- to high-throughput applications. Combining the power of multiplex-PCR assays with a multidimensional pooling system may prove to be especially challenging in a polyploid genome. In polyploid genomes two classes of SNPs need to be distinguished, polymorphisms between accessions (intragenomic SNPs) and those differentiating between homoeologous genomes (intergenomic SNPs). We have assessed whether the highly parallel Illumina GoldenGate® Genotyping Assay is suitable for the screening of a BAC library of the polyploid Brassica napus genome. Results A multidimensional screening platform was developed for a Brassica napus BAC library which is composed of almost 83,000 clones. Intragenomic and intergenomic SNPs were included in Illumina’s GoldenGate® Genotyping Assay and both SNP classes were used successfully for screening of the multidimensional BAC pools of the Brassica napus library. An optimized scoring method is proposed which is especially valuable for SNP calling of intergenomic SNPs. Validation of the genotyping results by independent methods revealed a success of approximately 80% for the multiplex PCR-based screening regardless of whether intra- or intergenomic SNPs were evaluated. Conclusions Illumina’s GoldenGate® Genotyping Assay can be efficiently used for screening of multidimensional Brassica napus BAC pools. SNP calling was specifically tailored for the evaluation of BAC pool screening data. The developed scoring method can be implemented independently of plant reference samples. It is demonstrated that intergenomic SNPs represent a powerful tool for BAC library screening of a polyploid genome

  11. Correlation of Chitinase 3-Like 1 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms with Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wayne Shih-Wei; Lin, Hung-Yu; Yeh, Chao-Bin; Chen, Li-You; Chou, Ying-Erh; Yang, Shun-Fa; Liu, Yu-Fan

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second leading cause of cancer death in Taiwan. Multiple risk factors, such as chronic hepatitis B or C virus infection, carcinogen exposure, cirrhosis, and various single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), are considered to contribute to hepatocarcinogenesis. Chitinase-3-like protein 1 (CHI3L1), a biomarker implicated in inflammation and tissue remodeling, plays a promoting role in angiogenesis, antiapoptosis, and cell proliferation. This study investigated the role of CHI3L1 SNPs in HCC susceptibility and clinicopathology. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to analyze four SNPs of CHI3L1 in 343 patients with HCC and 686 cancer-free controls. We found associations with HCC susceptibility in CHI3L1 rs880633 polymorphism carriers with genotypes (TC+CC). We observed that HCC patients had lower frequencies of CHI3L1 rs6691378 polymorphisms with the variant genotype GA+AA than the wild-type carriers with distant metastasis and positive HBsAg did. In 200 HBsAg negative HCC patients, we observed that the CHI3L1 rs4950928 polymorphisms carriers with the variant genotype CG+GG had higher frequencies of vascular invasion. Finally, carriers of CHI3L1 rs6691378 and 10399805 polymorphisms with the variant genotypes GA+AA showed lower levels of alpha-fetoprotein in HCC laboratory status. In conclusion, our results indicate that patients with CHI3L1 rs880633 variant genotypes TC+CC are at a higher risk of HCC. CHI3L1 polymorphisms rs880633 or rs4950928 may be potential candidates for predicting poor HCC prognosis and clinical status.

  12. Involvement of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Predisposition to Head and Neck Cancer in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hadyan, Khaled S.; Al-Harbi, Najla M.; Al-Qahtani, Sara S.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Individuals differ in their inherited tendency to develop cancer. This has been suggested to be due to genetic variations between individuals. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most common form of genetic variations found in the human population. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between 10 SNPs in genes involved in cell cycle control and DNA repair (p21 C31A, p53 G72C, ATM G1853A, XRCC1 G399A, XRCC3 C241T, Ku80 A2790G, DNA Ligase IV C9T, DNA-PKcs A3434G, TGF-beta T10C, MDM2 promoter T309G) and the risk to develop head and neck cancer. Materials and Methods: A cohort of 407 individuals (156 cancer patients and 251 controls) was included. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood. SNPs were genotyped by direct sequencing. Results: Data showed significant allelic associations for p21 C31A (p=0.04; odds ratio [OR]=1.44; confidence interval [CI]: 1.02–2.03), Ku80 A2790G (p=0.04; OR=1.5; CI: 1.01–2.23), and MDM2 T309G (p=0.0003; OR=0.58; CI: 0.43–0.78) and head and neck cancer occurrence. Both cancer cases and controls were in Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium. Conclusion: SNPs can be associated with head and neck cancer in the Saudi population. The p21 C31A, Ku80 A2790G, and MDM2 T309G SNPs could be used as genetic biomarkers to screen individuals at high cancer risk. PMID:21877955

  13. Discovery and characterization of single nucleotide polymorphisms in Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha.

    PubMed

    Clemento, A J; Abadía-Cardoso, A; Starks, H A; Garza, J C

    2011-03-01

    Molecular population genetics of non-model organisms has been dominated by the use of microsatellite loci over the last two decades. The availability of extensive genomic resources for many species is contributing to a transition to the use of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for the study of many natural populations. Here we describe the discovery of a large number of SNPs in Chinook salmon, one of the world's most important fishery species, through large-scale Sanger sequencing of expressed sequence tag (EST) regions. More than 3 Mb of sequence was collected in a survey of variation in almost 132 kb of unique genic regions, from 225 separate ESTs, in a diverse ascertainment panel of 24 salmon. This survey yielded 117 TaqMan (5' nuclease) assays, almost all from separate ESTs, which were validated in population samples from five major stocks of salmon from the three largest basins on the Pacific coast of the contiguous United States: the Sacramento, Klamath and Columbia Rivers. The proportion of these loci that was variable in each of these stocks ranged from 86.3% to 90.6% and the mean minor allele frequency ranged from 0.194 to 0.236. There was substantial differentiation between populations with these markers, with a mean F(ST) estimate of 0.107, and values for individual loci ranging from 0 to 0.592. This substantial polymorphism and population-specific differentiation indicates that these markers will be broadly useful, including for both pedigree reconstruction and genetic stock identification applications. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. An in vitro diagnostic certified point of care single nucleotide test for IL28B polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Darragh; Mottez, Estelle; Ainsworth, Shaun; Buivan, Tan-Phuc; Baudin, Aurelie; Vray, Muriel; Reed, Ben; Fontanet, Arnaud; Rohel, Alexandra; Petrov-Sanchez, Ventzislava; Abel, Laurent; Theodorou, Ioannis; Miele, Gino; Pol, Stanislas; Albert, Matthew L

    2017-01-01

    Numerous genetic polymorphisms have been identified as associated with disease or treatment outcome, but the routine implementation of genotyping into actionable medical care remains limited. Point-of-care (PoC) technologies enable rapid and real-time treatment decisions, with great potential for extending molecular diagnostic approaches to settings with limited medical infrastructure (e.g., CLIA certified diagnostic laboratories). With respect to resource-limited settings, there is a need for simple devices to implement biomarker guided treatment strategies. One relevant example is chronic hepatitis C infection, for which several treatment options are now approved. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the IL-28B / IFNL3 locus have been well described to predict both spontaneous clearance and response to interferon based therapies. We utilized the Genedrive® platform to develop an assay for the SNP rs12979860 variants (CC, CT and TT). The assay utilizes a hybrid thermal engine, permitting rapid heating and cooling, enabling an amplification based assay with genetic variants reported using endpoint differential melting cure analysis in less than 60 minutes. We validated this assay using non-invasive buccal swab sampling in a prospective study of 246 chronic HCV patients, achieving 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity (95% exact CI: 98.8-100%)) in 50 minutes as compared to conventional lab based PCR testing. Our results provide proof of concept that precision medicine is feasible in resource-limited settings, offering the first CE-IVD (in vitro diagnostics) validated PoC SNP test. We propose that IL-28B genotyping may be useful for directing patients towards lower cost therapies, and rationing use of costly direct antivirals for use in those individuals showing genetic risk.

  15. Incorporating Single-nucleotide Polymorphisms Into the Lyman Model to Improve Prediction of Radiation Pneumonitis

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Susan L.; Li Minghuan; Xu Ting; Gomez, Daniel; Yuan Xianglin; Yu Jinming; Liu Zhensheng; Yin Ming; Guan Xiaoxiang; Wang Lie; Wei Qingyi; Mohan, Radhe; Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy; Martel, Mary; Liao Zhongxing

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes associated with DNA repair, cell cycle, transforming growth factor-{beta}, tumor necrosis factor and receptor, folic acid metabolism, and angiogenesis can significantly improve the fit of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) normal-tissue complication probability (NTCP) model of radiation pneumonitis (RP) risk among patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Sixteen SNPs from 10 different genes (XRCC1, XRCC3, APEX1, MDM2, TGF{beta}, TNF{alpha}, TNFR, MTHFR, MTRR, and VEGF) were genotyped in 141 NSCLC patients treated with definitive radiation therapy, with or without chemotherapy. The LKB model was used to estimate the risk of severe (grade {>=}3) RP as a function of mean lung dose (MLD), with SNPs and patient smoking status incorporated into the model as dose-modifying factors. Multivariate analyses were performed by adding significant factors to the MLD model in a forward stepwise procedure, with significance assessed using the likelihood-ratio test. Bootstrap analyses were used to assess the reproducibility of results under variations in the data. Results: Five SNPs were selected for inclusion in the multivariate NTCP model based on MLD alone. SNPs associated with an increased risk of severe RP were in genes for TGF{beta}, VEGF, TNF{alpha}, XRCC1 and APEX1. With smoking status included in the multivariate model, the SNPs significantly associated with increased risk of RP were in genes for TGF{beta}, VEGF, and XRCC3. Bootstrap analyses selected a median of 4 SNPs per model fit, with the 6 genes listed above selected most often. Conclusions: This study provides evidence that SNPs can significantly improve the predictive ability of the Lyman MLD model. With a small number of SNPs, it was possible to distinguish cohorts with >50% risk vs <10% risk of RP when they were exposed to high MLDs.

  16. Prospecting for pig single nucleotide polymorphisms in the human genome: have we struck gold?

    PubMed

    Grapes, L; Rudd, S; Fernando, R L; Megy, K; Rocha, D; Rothschild, M F

    2006-06-01

    Gene-to-gene variation in the frequency of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) has been observed in humans, mice, rats, primates and pigs, but a relationship across species in this variation has not been described. Here, the frequency of porcine coding SNPs (cSNPs) identified by in silico methods, and the frequency of murine cSNPs, were compared with the frequency of human cSNPs across homologous genes. From 150,000 porcine expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences, a total of 452 SNP-containing sequence clusters were found, totalling 1394 putative SNPs. All the clustered porcine EST annotations and SNP data have been made publicly available at http://sputnik.btk.fi/project?name=swine. Human and murine cSNPs were identified from dbSNP and were characterized as either validated or total number of cSNPs (validated plus non-validated) for comparison purposes. The correlation between in silico pig cSNP and validated human cSNP densities was found to be 0.77 (p < 0.00001) for a set of 25 homologous genes, while a correlation of 0.48 (p < 0.0005) was found for a primarily random sample of 50 homologous human and mouse genes. This is the first evidence of conserved gene-to-gene variability in cSNP frequency across species and indicates that site-directed screening of porcine genes that are homologous to cSNP-rich human genes may rapidly advance cSNP discovery in pigs.

  17. Identification of single-nucleotide polymorphism markers associated with cortisol response to crowding in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sixin; Vallejo, Roger L; Gao, Guangtu; Palti, Yniv; Weber, Gregory M; Hernandez, Alvaro; Rexroad, Caird E

    2015-06-01

    Understanding stress responses is essential for improving animal welfare and increasing agriculture production efficiency. Previously, we reported microsatellite markers associated with quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting plasma cortisol response to crowding in rainbow trout. In this study, our main objectives were to identify single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers associated with cortisol response to crowding in rainbow trout using both GWAS (genome-wide association studies) and QTL mapping methods and to employ rapidly expanding genomic resources for rainbow trout toward the identification of candidate genes affecting this trait. A three-generation F2 mapping family (2008052) was genotyped using RAD-seq (restriction-site-associated DNA sequencing) to identify 4874 informative SNPs. GWAS identified 26 SNPs associated with cortisol response to crowding whereas QTL mapping revealed two significant QTL on chromosomes Omy8 and Omy12, respectively. Positional candidate genes were identified using marker sequences to search the draft genome assembly of rainbow trout. One of the genes in the QTL interval on Omy12 is a putative serine/threonine protein kinase gene that was differentially expressed in the liver in response to handling and confinement stress in our previous study. A homologue of this gene was differentially expressed in zebrafish embryos exposed to diclofenac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and an environmental toxicant. NSAIDs have been shown to affect the cortisol response in rainbow trout; therefore, this gene is a good candidate based on its physical position and expression. However, the reference genome resources currently available for rainbow trout require continued improvement as demonstrated by the unmapped SNPs and the putative assembly errors detected in this study.

  18. A deep catalog of autosomal single nucleotide variation in the pig.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Erica; Nevado, Bruno; Ramos-Onsins, Sebastián E; Pérez-Enciso, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive catalog of variability in a given species is useful for many important purposes, e.g., designing high density arrays or pinpointing potential mutations of economic or physiological interest. Here we provide a genomewide, worldwide catalog of single nucleotide variants by simultaneously analyzing the shotgun sequence of 128 pigs and five suid outgroups. Despite the high SNP missing rate of some individuals (up to 88%), we retrieved over 48 million high quality variants. Of them, we were able to assess the ancestral allele of more than 39M biallelic SNPs. We found SNPs in 21,455 out of the 25,322 annotated genes in pig assembly 10.2. The annotation showed that more than 40% of the variants were novel variants, not present in dbSNP. Surprisingly, we found a large variability in transition / transversion rate along the genome, which is very well explained (R2=0.79) primarily by genome differences in in CpG content and recombination rate. The number of SNPs per window also varied but was less dependent of known factors such as gene density, missing rate or recombination (R2=0.48). When we divided the samples in four groups, Asian wild boar (ASWB), Asian domestics (ASDM), European wild boar (EUWB) and European domestics (EUDM), we found a marked correlation in allele frequencies between domestics and wild boars within Asia and within Europe, but not across continents, due to the large evolutive distance between pigs of both continents (~1.2 MYA). In general, the porcine species showed a small percentage of SNPs exclusive of each population group. EUWB and EUDM were predicted to harbor a larger fraction of potentially deleterious mutations, according to the SIFT algorithm, than Asian samples, perhaps a result of background selection being less effective due to a lower effective population size in Europe.

  19. Molecular Epidemiology of Mycoplasma pneumoniae: Genotyping Using Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and SNaPshot Technology.

    PubMed

    Touati, A; Blouin, Y; Sirand-Pugnet, P; Renaudin, H; Oishi, T; Vergnaud, G; Bébéar, C; Pereyre, S

    2015-10-01

    Molecular typing of Mycoplasma pneumoniae is an important tool for identifying grouped cases and investigating outbreaks. In the present study, we developed a new genotyping method based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) selected from the whole-genome sequencing of eight M. pneumoniae strains, using the SNaPshot minisequencing assay. Eight SNPs, localized in housekeeping genes, predicted lipoproteins, and adhesin P1 genes were selected for genotyping. These SNPs were evaluated on 140 M. pneumoniae clinical isolates previously genotyped by multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA-5) and adhesin P1 typing. This method was also adapted for direct use with clinical samples and evaluated on 51 clinical specimens. The analysis of the clinical isolates using the SNP typing method showed nine distinct SNP types with a Hunter and Gaston diversity index (HGDI) of 0.836, which is higher than the HGDI of 0.583 retrieved for the MLVA-4 typing method, where the nonstable Mpn1 marker was removed. A strong correlation with the P1 adhesin gene typing results was observed. The congruence was poor between MLVA-5 and SNP typing, indicating distinct genotyping schemes. Combining the results increased the discriminatory power. This new typing method based on SNPs and the SNaPshot technology is a method for rapid M. pneumoniae typing directly from clinical specimens, which does not require any sequencing step. This method is based on stable markers and provides information distinct from but complementary to MLVA typing. The combined use of SNPs and MLVA typing provides powerful discrimination of strains. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Molecular Epidemiology of Mycoplasma pneumoniae: Genotyping Using Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and SNaPshot Technology

    PubMed Central

    Touati, A.; Blouin, Y.; Sirand-Pugnet, P.; Renaudin, H.; Oishi, T.; Vergnaud, G.; Bébéar, C.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular typing of Mycoplasma pneumoniae is an important tool for identifying grouped cases and investigating outbreaks. In the present study, we developed a new genotyping method based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) selected from the whole-genome sequencing of eight M. pneumoniae strains, using the SNaPshot minisequencing assay. Eight SNPs, localized in housekeeping genes, predicted lipoproteins, and adhesin P1 genes were selected for genotyping. These SNPs were evaluated on 140 M. pneumoniae clinical isolates previously genotyped by multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA-5) and adhesin P1 typing. This method was also adapted for direct use with clinical samples and evaluated on 51 clinical specimens. The analysis of the clinical isolates using the SNP typing method showed nine distinct SNP types with a Hunter and Gaston diversity index (HGDI) of 0.836, which is higher than the HGDI of 0.583 retrieved for the MLVA-4 typing method, where the nonstable Mpn1 marker was removed. A strong correlation with the P1 adhesin gene typing results was observed. The congruence was poor between MLVA-5 and SNP typing, indicating distinct genotyping schemes. Combining the results increased the discriminatory power. This new typing method based on SNPs and the SNaPshot technology is a method for rapid M. pneumoniae typing directly from clinical specimens, which does not require any sequencing step. This method is based on stable markers and provides information distinct from but complementary to MLVA typing. The combined use of SNPs and MLVA typing provides powerful discrimination of strains. PMID:26202117

  1. Association of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms of the Tau Gene With Late-Onset Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Eden R.; Scott, William K.; Nance, Martha A.; Watts, Ray L.; Hubble, Jean P.; Koller, William C.; Lyons, Kelly; Pahwa, Rajesh; Stern, Matthew B.; Colcher, Amy; Hiner, Bradley C.; Jankovic, Joseph; Ondo, William G.; Allen, Fred H.; Goetz, Christopher G.; Small, Gary W.; Masterman, Donna; Mastaglia, Frank; Laing, Nigel G.; Stajich, Jeffrey M.; Ribble, Robert C.; Booze, Michael W.; Rogala, Allison; Hauser, Michael A.; Zhang, Fengyu; Gibson, Rachel A.; Middleton, Lefkos T.; Roses, Allen D.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Scott, Burton L.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Vance, Jeffery M.

    2013-01-01

    Context The human tau gene, which promotes assembly of neuronal microtubules, has been associated with several rare neurologic diseases that clinically include parkinsonian features. We recently observed linkage in idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD) to a region on chromosome 17q21 that contains the tau gene. These factors make tau a good candidate for investigation as a susceptibility gene for idiopathic PD, the most common form of the disease. Objective To investigate whether the tau gene is involved in idiopathic PD. Design, Setting, and Participants Among a sample of 1056 individuals from 235 families selected from 13 clinical centers in the United States and Australia and from a family ascertainment core center, we tested 5 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the tau gene for association with PD, using family-based tests of association. Both affected (n = 426) and unaffected (n = 579) family members were included; 51 individuals had unclear PD status. Analyses were conducted to test individual SNPs and SNP haplotypes within the tau gene. Main Outcome Measure Family-based tests of association, calculated using asymptotic distributions. Results Analysis of association between the SNPs and PD yielded significant evidence of association for 3 of the 5 SNPs tested: SNP 3, P = .03; SNP 9i, P = .04; and SNP 11, P = .04. The 2 other SNPs did not show evidence of significant association (SNP 9ii, P = .11, and SNP 9iii, P = .87). Strong evidence of association was found with haplotype analysis, with a positive association with one haplotype (P = .009) and a negative association with another haplotype (P = .007). Substantial linkage disequilibrium (P<.001) was detected between 4 of the 5 SNPs (SNPs 3,9i, 9ii, and 11). Conclusions This integrated approach of genetic linkage and positional association analyses implicates tau as a susceptibility gene for idiopathic PD. PMID:11710889

  2. Fluorescence detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms using a universal molecular beacon.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yang-Wei; Ho, Hsin-Tsung; Huang, Chih-Ching; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2008-11-01

    We present a simple and novel assay-employing a universal molecular beacon (MB) in the presence of Hg(2+)-for the detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) based on Hg(2+)-DNA complexes inducing a conformational change in the MB. The MB (T(7)-MB) contains a 19-mer loop and a stem of a pair of seven thymidine (T) bases, a carboxyfluorescein (FAM) unit at the 5'-end, and a 4-([4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]azo)benzoic acid (DABCYL) unit at the 3'-end. Upon formation of Hg(2+)-T(7)-MB complexes through T-Hg(2+)-T bonding, the conformation of T(7)-MB changes from a random coil to a folded structure, leading to a decreased distance between the FAM and DABCYL units and, hence, increased efficiency of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the FAM and DABCYL units, resulting in decreased fluorescence intensity of the MB. In the presence of complementary DNA, double-stranded DNA complexes form (instead of the Hg(2+)-T(7)-MB complexes), with FRET between the FAM and DABCYL units occurring to a lesser extent than in the folded structure. Under the optimal conditions (20 nM T(7)-MB, 20 mM NaCl, 1.0 muM Hg(2+), 5.0 mM phosphate buffer solution, pH 7.4), the linear plot of the fluorescence intensity against the concentration of perfectly matched DNA was linear over the range 2-30 nM (R(2) = 0.991), with a limit of detection of 0.5 nM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. This new probe provides higher selectivity toward DNA than that exhibited by conventional MBs.

  3. Isothermal Diagnostic Assays for Monitoring Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Necator americanus Associated with Benzimidazole Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Rashwan, Nour; Bourguinat, Catherine; Keller, Kathy; Gunawardena, Nipul Kithsiri; de Silva, Nilanthi; Prichard, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Background Soil-transmitted helminths (STHs) are the most prevalent intestinal helminths of humans, and a major cause of morbidity in tropical and subtropical countries. The benzimidazole (BZ) drugs albendazole (ABZ) and mebendazole (MBZ) are used for treatment of human STH infections and this use is increasing dramatically with massive drug donations. Frequent and prolonged use of these drugs could lead to the emergence of anthelmintic resistance as has occurred in nematodes of livestock. Previous molecular assays for putative resistance mutations have been based mainly on PCR amplification and sequencing. However, these techniques are complicated and time consuming and not suitable for resource-constrained situations. A simple, rapid and sensitive genotyping method is required to monitor for possible developing resistance to BZ drugs. Methods To address this problem, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection assays were developed based on the Smart amplification method (SmartAmp2) to target codons 167, 198, and 200 in the β-tubulin isotype 1 gene for the hookworm Necator americanus. Findings Diagnostic assays were developed and applied to analyze hookworm samples by both SmartAmp2 and conventional sequencing methods and the results showed high concordance. Additionally, fecal samples spiked with N. americanus larvae were assessed and the results showed that the Aac polymerase used has high tolerance to inhibitors in fecal samples. Conclusion The N. americanus SmartAmp2 SNP detection assay is a new genotyping tool that is rapid, sensitive, highly specific and efficient with the potential to be used as a field tool for monitoring SNPs associated with BZ resistance. However, further validation on large numbers of field samples is required. PMID:27930648

  4. Associations between single-nucleotide polymorphisms of human exonuclease 1 and the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Shengkui; Qin, Ruoyun; Zhu, Xiaonian; Tan, Chao; Song, Jiale; Qin, Linyuan; Liu, Liu; Huang, Xiong; Li, Anhua; Qiu, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Human exonuclease 1 (hEXO1) is an important nuclease involved in mismatch repair system that contributes to maintain genomic stability and modulate DNA recombination. This study is aimed to explore the associations between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of hEXO1 and the hereditary susceptibility of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). SNPs rs1047840, rs1776148, rs3754093, rs4149867, rs4149963, and rs1776181 of hEXO1 were examined from a hospital-based case-control study including 1,196 cases (HCC patients) and 1,199 controls (non-HCC patients) in Guangxi, China. We found the rs3754093 AG genotype decreased the risk of HCC (OR=0.714, 95% CI: 0.539∼0.946). According to the results of stratification analysis, rs3754093 mutant genotype AG/GG decreased the risk of HCC with some HCC protective factors such as non-smoking, non-alcohol consumption and non-HCC family history, but also decreased the risk of HCC with HBV infection. Moreover, it was correlated to non-tumor metastasis and increased the survival of HCC patients. The results from gene-environment interaction assay indicated all hEXO1 SNPs interacted with smoking, alcohol consumption, HBV infection in pathogenesis of HCC. However, gene-gene interaction assay suggested the interaction between rs3754093 and other 5 SNPs were associated with reducing the HCC risk. These results suggest rs3754093 exhibits a protective activity to decrease the incidence risk of HCC in Guangxi, China. In addition, all SNPs in this study interacted with environment risk factors in pathogenesis of HCC. PMID:27894089

  5. Mechanisms of mosaicism, chimerism and uniparental disomy identified by single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis

    PubMed Central

    Conlin, Laura K.; Thiel, Brian D.; Bonnemann, Carsten G.; Medne, Livija; Ernst, Linda M.; Zackai, Elaine H.; Deardorff, Matthew A.; Krantz, Ian D.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Spinner, Nancy B.

    2010-01-01

    Mosaic aneuploidy and uniparental disomy (UPD) arise from mitotic or meiotic events. There are differences between these mechanisms in terms of (i) impact on embryonic development; (ii) co-occurrence of mosaic trisomy and UPD and (iii) potential recurrence risks. We used a genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array to study patients with chromosome aneuploidy mosaicism, UPD and one individual with XX/XY chimerism to gain insight into the developmental mechanism and timing of these events. Sixteen cases of mosaic aneuploidy originated mitotically, and these included four rare trisomies and all of the monosomies, consistent with the influence of selective factors. Five trisomies arose meiotically, and three of the five had UPD in the disomic cells, confirming increased risk for UPD in the case of meiotic non-disjunction. Evidence for the meiotic origin of aneuploidy and UPD was seen in the patterns of recombination visible during analysis with 1–3 crossovers per chromosome. The mechanisms of formation of the UPD included trisomy rescue, with and without concomitant trisomy, monosomy rescue, and mitotic formation of a mosaic segmental UPD. UPD was also identified in an XX/XY chimeric individual, with one cell line having complete maternal UPD consistent with a parthenogenetic origin. Utilization of SNP arrays allows simultaneous evaluation of genomic alterations and insights into aneuploidy and UPD mechanisms. Differentiation of mitotic and meiotic origins for aneuploidy and UPD supports existence of selective factors against full trisomy of some chromosomes in the early embryo and provides data for estimation of recurrence and disease mechanisms. PMID:20053666

  6. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms within Interferon Signaling Pathway Genes Are Associated with Colorectal Cancer Susceptibility and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shun; Pardini, Barbara; Cheng, Bowang; Naccarati, Alessio; Huhn, Stefanie; Vymetalkova, Veronika; Vodickova, Ludmila; Buchler, Thomas; Hemminki, Kari; Vodicka, Pavel; Försti, Asta

    2014-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) signaling has been suggested to play an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Our study aimed to examine potentially functional genetic variants in interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), IRF5, IRF7, type I and type II IFN and their receptor genes with respect to colorectal cancer (CRC) risk and clinical outcome. Altogether 74 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were covered by the 34 SNPs genotyped in a hospital-based case-control study of 1327 CRC cases and 758 healthy controls from the Czech Republic. We also analyzed these SNPs in relation to overall survival and event-free survival in a subgroup of 483 patients. Seven SNPs in IFNA1, IFNA13, IFNA21, IFNK, IFNAR1 and IFNGR1 were associated with CRC risk. After multiple testing correction, the associations with the SNPs rs2856968 (IFNAR1) and rs2234711 (IFNGR1) remained formally significant (P = 0.0015 and P<0.0001, respectively). Multivariable survival analyses showed that the SNP rs6475526 (IFNA7/IFNA14) was associated with overall survival of the patients (P = 0.041 and event-free survival among patients without distant metastasis at the time of diagnosis, P = 0.034). The hazard ratios (HRs) for rs6475526 remained statistically significant even after adjustment for age, gender, grade and stage (P = 0.029 and P = 0.036, respectively), suggesting that rs6475526 is an independent prognostic marker for CRC. Our data suggest that genetic variation in the IFN signaling pathway genes may play a role in the etiology and survival of CRC and further studies are warranted. PMID:25350395

  7. Single nucleotide polymorphisms within interferon signaling pathway genes are associated with colorectal cancer susceptibility and survival.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shun; Pardini, Barbara; Cheng, Bowang; Naccarati, Alessio; Huhn, Stefanie; Vymetalkova, Veronika; Vodickova, Ludmila; Buchler, Thomas; Hemminki, Kari; Vodicka, Pavel; Försti, Asta

    2014-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) signaling has been suggested to play an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Our study aimed to examine potentially functional genetic variants in interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), IRF5, IRF7, type I and type II IFN and their receptor genes with respect to colorectal cancer (CRC) risk and clinical outcome. Altogether 74 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were covered by the 34 SNPs genotyped in a hospital-based case-control study of 1327 CRC cases and 758 healthy controls from the Czech Republic. We also analyzed these SNPs in relation to overall survival and event-free survival in a subgroup of 483 patients. Seven SNPs in IFNA1, IFNA13, IFNA21, IFNK, IFNAR1 and IFNGR1 were associated with CRC risk. After multiple testing correction, the associations with the SNPs rs2856968 (IFNAR1) and rs2234711 (IFNGR1) remained formally significant (P = 0.0015 and P<0.0001, respectively). Multivariable survival analyses showed that the SNP rs6475526 (IFNA7/IFNA14) was associated with overall survival of the patients (P = 0.041 and event-free survival among patients without distant metastasis at the time of diagnosis, P = 0.034). The hazard ratios (HRs) for rs6475526 remained statistically significant even after adjustment for age, gender, grade and stage (P = 0.029 and P = 0.036, respectively), suggesting that rs6475526 is an independent prognostic marker for CRC. Our data suggest that genetic variation in the IFN signaling pathway genes may play a role in the etiology and survival of CRC and further studies are warranted.

  8. The cardiovascular implication of single nucleotide polymorphisms of chromosome 9p21 locus among Arab population

    PubMed Central

    El-Menyar, Ayman A.; Rizk, Nasser M.; Al-Qahtani, Awad; AlKindi, Fahad; Elyas, Ahmed; Farag, Fathi; Bakhsh, Fadheela Dad; Ebrahim, Samah; Ahmed, Emad; Al-khinji, Mooza; Al-Thani, Hassan; Suwaidi, Jassim Al

    2015-01-01

    Background: Based on several reports including genome-wide association studies, genetic variability has been linked with higher (nearly half) susceptibility toward coronary artery disease (CAD). We aimed to evaluate the association of chromosome 9p21 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs): rs2383207, rs10757278, and rs10757274 with the risk and severity of CAD among Arab population. Materials and Methods: A prospective observational case-control study was conducted between 2011 and 2012, in which 236 patients with CAD were recruited from the Heart Hospital in Qatar. Patients were categorized according to their coronary angiographic findings. Also, 152 healthy volunteers were studied to determine if SNPs are associated with risk of CAD. All subjects were genotyped for SNPs (rs2383207, rs2383206, rs10757274 and rs10757278) using allele-specific real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results: Patients with CAD had a mean age of 57 ± 10; of them 77% were males, 54% diabetics, and 25% had family history of CAD. All SNPs were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium except rs2383206, with call rate >97%. After adjusting for age, sex and body mass index, the carriers of GG genotype for rs2383207 have increased the risk of having CAD with odds ratio (OR) of 1.52 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01-2.961, P = 0.046). Also, rs2383207 contributed to CAD severity with adjusted OR 1.80 (95% CI = 1.04-3.12, P = 0.035) based on the dominant genetic model. The other SNPs (rs10757274 and rs10757278) showed no significant association with the risk of CAD or its severity. Conclusion: Among Arab population in Qatar, only G allele of rs2483207 SNP is significantly associated with risk of CAD and its severity. PMID:26109989

  9. A High Throughput Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Multiplex Assay for Parentage Assignment in New Zealand Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Shannon M.; Henry, Hannah M.; Dodds, Ken G.; Jowett, Timothy W. D.; Manley, Tim R.; Anderson, Rayna M.; McEwan, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate pedigree information is critical to animal breeding systems to ensure the highest rate of genetic gain and management of inbreeding. The abundance of available genomic data, together with development of high throughput genotyping platforms, means that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are now the DNA marker of choice for genomic selection studies. Furthermore the superior qualities of SNPs compared to microsatellite markers allows for standardization between laboratories; a property that is crucial for developing an international set of markers for traceability studies. The objective of this study was to develop a high throughput SNP assay for use in the New Zealand sheep industry that gives accurate pedigree assignment and will allow a reduction in breeder input over lambing. This required two phases of development- firstly, a method of extracting quality DNA from ear-punch tissue performed in a high throughput cost efficient manner and secondly a SNP assay that has the ability to assign paternity to progeny resulting from mob mating. A likelihood based approach to infer paternity was used where sires with the highest LOD score (log of the ratio of the likelihood given parentage to likelihood given non-parentage) are assigned. An 84 “parentage SNP panel” was developed that assigned, on average, 99% of progeny to a sire in a problem where there were 3,000 progeny from 120 mob mated sires that included numerous half sib sires. In only 6% of those cases was there another sire with at least a 0.02 probability of paternity. Furthermore dam information (either recorded, or by genotyping possible dams) was absent, highlighting the SNP test’s suitability for paternity testing. Utilization of this parentage SNP assay will allow implementation of progeny testing into large commercial farms where the improved accuracy of sire assignment and genetic evaluations will increase genetic gain in the sheep industry. PMID:24740141

  10. Single nucleotide polymorphism discovery from expressed sequence tags in the waterflea Daphnia magna

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Daphnia (Crustacea: Cladocera) plays a central role in standing aquatic ecosystems, has a well known ecology and is widely used in population studies and environmental risk assessments. Daphnia magna is, especially in Europe, intensively used to study stress responses of natural populations to pollutants, climate change, and antagonistic interactions with predators and parasites, which have all been demonstrated to induce micro-evolutionary and adaptive responses. Although its ecology and evolutionary biology is intensively studied, little is known on the functional genomics underpinning of phenotypic responses to environmental stressors. The aim of the present study was to find genes expressed in presence of environmental stressors, and target such genes for single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP) marker development. Results We developed three expressed sequence tag (EST) libraries using clonal lineages of D. magna exposed to ecological stressors, namely fish predation, parasite infection and pesticide exposure. We used these newly developed ESTs and other Daphnia ESTs retrieved from NCBI GeneBank to mine for SNP markers targeting synonymous as well as non synonymous genetic variation. We validate the developed SNPs in six natural populations of D. magna distributed at regional scale. Conclusions A large proportion (47%) of the produced ESTs are Daphnia lineage specific genes, which are potentially involved in responses to environmental stress rather than to general cellular functions and metabolic activities, or reflect the arthropod's aquatic lifestyle. The characterization of genes expressed under stress and the validation of their SNPs for population genetic study is important for identifying ecologically responsive genes in D. magna. PMID:21668940

  11. Contribution of protein Z gene single-nucleotide polymorphism to systemic lupus erythematosus in Egyptian patients.

    PubMed

    Yousry, Sherif M; Shahin, Rasha M H; El Refai, Rasha M

    2016-09-01

    Protein Z has been reported to exert an important role in inhibiting coagulation. Polymorphisms in the protein Z gene (PROZ) may affect protein Z levels and thus play a role in thrombosis. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and clinical significance of protein Z gene G79A polymorphism in Egyptian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We studied the distribution of the protein Z gene (rs17882561) (G79A) single-nucleotide polymorphism by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism in 100 Egyptian patients with SLE and 100 age, sex, and ethnically matched controls. There was no statistically significant difference in the distribution of the genotypes between SLE patients and the control group in our study (P = 0.103). But a statistically significant difference in the frequency of the alleles between SLE patients and controls was observed (P = 0.024). Also a significant association was detected between protein Z genotypes (and also A allele) and thrombosis, which is one of the manifestations of SLE (P = 0.004 and P = 0.001, respectively). Moreover, we observed a significant association between the protein Z AA and GA genotypes (and also A allele) and the presence of anticardiolipin antibodies (P = 0.016 and P = 0.004, respectively). The minor A allele of the G79A polymorphism in the protein Z gene might contribute to the genetic susceptibility of SLE in Egyptian patients. Also, an influence for this polymorphism on some of the disease manifestations has been elucidated, so protein Z G79A AG/AA may be a risk factor for thrombosis.

  12. Validation of single nucleotide polymorphisms in invasive aspergillosis following hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Cynthia E; Hohl, Tobias M; Fan, Wenhong; Storer, Barry E; Levine, David M; Zhao, Lu Ping; Martin, Paul J; Warren, Edus H; Boeckh, Michael; Hansen, John A

    2017-03-07

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Previous studies have reported an association between IA development and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), but many have not been replicated in a separate cohort. The presence of a positive serum galactomannan assay (SGM+) has also been associated with a worse prognosis in patients with IA, and genetic determinants in this subset of patients have not been systematically studied. The study cohort included 2,609 HCT recipients and their donor pairs: 483 with proven/probable IA (183 SGM+) and 2,126 with no IA by standard criteria. Of 25 SNPs previously published, we analyzed 20 in 14 genes that passed quality control. Samples were genotyped via microarray, and SNPs that could not be genotyped were imputed. The primary aim was to replicate SNPs associated with proven/probable IA at 2 years; secondary goals were to explore the associations using an endpoint of SGM+ IA or proven/probable using a different genetic model or time-to-IA (3 months vs. 2 years) compared to the original study. Two SNPs in two genes (PTX3, CLEC7a) were replicated. Thirteen SNPs in nine genes had an association at p≤0.05 using the secondary aims (PTX3, CLEC7a, CD209, CXCL10, TLR6, S100B, IFNG, PLG, TNFR1), with hazards ratios ranging from 1.2 to 3.29. Underlying genetic differences can influence development of IA following HCT. Identification of genetic predispositions to IA could have important implications in donor screening, risk stratification of recipients, monitoring, and prophylaxis.

  13. Functional Impact of 14 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Causing Missense Mutations of Human α7 Nicotinic Receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinhui; Du, Yingjie; Zhang, Jianliang; Xu, Xiaojun; Xue, Fenqin; Guo, Cong; Huang, Yao; Lukas, Ronald J; Chang, Yongchang

    2015-01-01

    The α7nicotinic receptor (nAChR) is a major subtype of the nAChRs in the central nervous system, and the receptor plays an important role in brain function. In the dbSNP database, there are 55 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that cause missense mutations of the human α7nAChR in the coding region. In this study, we tested the impact of 14 SNPs that cause missense mutations in the agonist binding site or the coupling region between binding site and channel gate on the receptor function. The wild type or mutant receptors were expressed or co-expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and the agonist-induced currents were tested using two-electrode voltage clamp. Our results demonstrated that 6 mutants were nonfunctional, 4 mutants had reduced current expression, and 1 mutants altered ACh and nicotine efficacy in the opposite direction, and one additional mutant had slightly reduced agonist sensitivity. Interestingly, the function of most of these nonfunctional mutants could be rescued by α7nAChR positive allosteric modulator PNU-120596 and agonist-PAM 4BP-TQS. Finally, when coexpressed with the wild type, the nonfunctional mutants could also influence the receptor function. These changes of the receptor properties by the mutations could potentially have an impact on the physiological function of the α7nAChR-mediated cholinergic synaptic transmission and anti-inflammatory effects in the human SNP carriers. Rescuing the nonfunctional mutants could provide a novel way to treat the related disorders.

  14. Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Markers of Oxidative Stress in Healthy Women

    PubMed Central

    Minlikeeva, Albina N.; Browne, Richard W.; Ochs-Balcom, Heather M.; Marian, Catalin; Shields, Peter G.; Trevisan, Maurizio; Krishnan, Shiva; Modali, Ramakrishna; Seddon, Michael; Lehman, Teresa; Freudenheim, Jo L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There is accumulating evidence that oxidative stress is an important contributor to carcinogenesis. We hypothesized that genetic variation in genes involved in maintaining antioxidant/oxidant balance would be associated with overall oxidative stress. Methods We examined associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in MnSOD, GSTP1, GSTM1, GPX1, GPX3, and CAT genes and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), a blood biomarker of oxidative damage, in healthy white women randomly selected from Western New York (n = 1402). We used general linear models to calculate age-adjusted geometric means of TBARS across the variants. We also examined the associations within strata of menopausal status. Results For MnSOD, being heterozygous was associated with lower geometric means of TBARS (less oxidative stress), 1.28 mg/dL, compared to homozygous T-allele or homozygous C-allele,1.35 mg/dL, and 1.31 mg/dL correspondingly (p for trend = 0.01). This difference remained among postmenopausal women, 1.40 mg/dL for TT, 1.32 mg/dL for TC, and 1.34mg/dL for CC (p for trend 0.015); it was attenuated among premenopausal women. SNPs in the other genes examined (GSTP1, GSTM1, GPX1, GPX3, and CAT) were not associated with TBARS. Conclusions Our findings suggest that genetic variation in MnSOD gene may be associated with oxidative status, particularly among postmenopausal women. PMID:27271305

  15. An in vitro diagnostic certified point of care single nucleotide test for IL28B polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Buivan, Tan-Phuc; Baudin, Aurelie; Vray, Muriel; Reed, Ben; Fontanet, Arnaud; Rohel, Alexandra; Petrov-Sanchez, Ventzislava; Abel, Laurent; Theodorou, Ioannis; Miele, Gino; Pol, Stanislas; Albert, Matthew L.

    2017-01-01

    Numerous genetic polymorphisms have been identified as associated with disease or treatment outcome, but the routine implementation of genotyping into actionable medical care remains limited. Point-of-care (PoC) technologies enable rapid and real-time treatment decisions, with great potential for extending molecular diagnostic approaches to settings with limited medical infrastructure (e.g., CLIA certified diagnostic laboratories). With respect to resource-limited settings, there is a need for simple devices to implement biomarker guided treatment strategies. One relevant example is chronic hepatitis C infection, for which several treatment options are now approved. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the IL-28B / IFNL3 locus have been well described to predict both spontaneous clearance and response to interferon based therapies. We utilized the Genedrive® platform to develop an assay for the SNP rs12979860 variants (CC, CT and TT). The assay utilizes a hybrid thermal engine, permitting rapid heating and cooling, enabling an amplification based assay with genetic variants reported using endpoint differential melting cure analysis in less than 60 minutes. We validated this assay using non-invasive buccal swab sampling in a prospective study of 246 chronic HCV patients, achieving 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity (95% exact CI: 98.8–100%)) in 50 minutes as compared to conventional lab based PCR testing. Our results provide proof of concept that precision medicine is feasible in resource-limited settings, offering the first CE-IVD (in vitro diagnostics) validated PoC SNP test. We propose that IL-28B genotyping may be useful for directing patients towards lower cost therapies, and rationing use of costly direct antivirals for use in those individuals showing genetic risk. PMID:28877177

  16. The role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and its single nucleotide polymorphisms in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Kotlęga, Dariusz; Peda, Barbara; Zembroń-Łacny, Agnieszka; Gołąb-Janowska, Monika; Nowacki, Przemysław

    2017-03-06

    Stroke is the main cause of motoric and neuropsychological disability in adults. Recent advances in research into the role of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor in neuroplasticity, neuroprotection and neurogenesis might provide important information for the development of new poststroke-rehabilitation strategies. It plays a role as a mediator in motor learning and rehabilitation after stroke. Concentrations of BDNF are lower in acute ischemic-stroke patients compared to controls. Lower levels of BDNF are correlated with an increased risk of stroke, worse functional outcomes and higher mortality. BDNF signalling is dependent on the genetic variation which could affect an individual's response to recovery after stroke. Several single nucleotide polymorphisms of the BDNF gene have been studied with regard to stroke patients, but most papers analyse the rs6265 which results in a change from valine to methionine in the precursor protein. Subsequently a reduction in BDNF activity is observed. There are studies indicating the role of this polymorphism in brain plasticity, functional and morphological changes in the brain. It may affect the risk of ischemic stroke, post-stroke outcomes and the efficacy of the rehabilitation process within physical exercise and transcranial magnetic stimulation. There is a consistent trend of Met alleles' being connected with worse outcomes and prognoses after stroke. However, there is no satisfactory data confirming the importance of Met allele in stroke epidemiology and the post-stroke rehabilitation process. We present the current data on the role of BDNF and polymorphisms of the BDNF gene in stroke patients, concentrating on human studies.

  17. Single nucleotide polymorphisms for assessing genetic diversity in castor bean (Ricinus communis)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Castor bean (Ricinus communis) is an agricultural crop and garden ornamental that is widely cultivated and has been introduced worldwide. Understanding population structure and the distribution of castor bean cultivars has been challenging because of limited genetic variability. We analyzed the population genetics of R. communis in a worldwide collection of plants from germplasm and from naturalized populations in Florida, U.S. To assess genetic diversity we conducted survey sequencing of the genomes of seven diverse cultivars and compared the data to a reference genome assembly of a widespread cultivar (Hale). We determined the population genetic structure of 676 samples using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 48 loci. Results Bayesian clustering indicated five main groups worldwide and a repeated pattern of mixed genotypes in most countries. High levels of population differentiation occurred between most populations but this structure was not geographically based. Most molecular variance occurred within populations (74%) followed by 22% among populations, and 4% among continents. Samples from naturalized populations in Florida indicated significant population structuring consistent with local demes. There was significant population differentiation for 56 of 78 comparisons in Florida (pairwise population ϕPT values, p < 0.01). Conclusion Low levels of genetic diversity and mixing of genotypes have led to minimal geographic structuring of castor bean populations worldwide. Relatively few lineages occur and these are widely distributed. Our approach of determining population genetic structure using SNPs from genome-wide comparisons constitutes a framework for high-throughput analyses of genetic diversity in plants, particularly in species with limited genetic diversity. PMID:20082707

  18. LMNA gene single nucleotide polymorphisms in dilated cardiomyopathy of Han children

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Li-Jian; Xiao, Ting-Ting; Huang, Min; Shen, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether LMNA gene mutation is associated with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in Chinese Han Race children. Methods: DNA was isolated from 78 patients with DCM and 100 healthy Chinese children who served as controls. 12 exons in the functional regions and the adjacent part of introns of the LMNA gene were amplified with polymerase chain reactions (PCR) and the PCR products were sequenced with DNA sequencer. We compared the DNA sequence with Blast software online PubMed website. The differences of allele and genotype between the groups were detected by χ2 test. Results: No disease-causing mutation in LMNA gene was found in all DCM patients. Three nonsense single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified. ① The first is c.1908C>T (H566H, rs4641) which was located at exon 10 of LMNA gene. It was found in 29 DCM cases and 15 control subjects. Compared to healthy controls, the frequency of TT and TC genotypes, and the C allele were significantly increased in DCM patients (P<0.05). ② The second was c.861C>T (A287A, rs5380) which was located at exon 5 of LMNA gene. It was found in 9 DCM cases and 2 control subjects. The frequency of TC genotype was significantly increased in DCM patients (P<0.05). ③ The third was c.1338C>T (D446D, rs5058) which located at exon 7 of LMNA gene. It was found in 8 DCM cases and 3 control subjects. The frequency of TC genotype was significantly increased in DCM patients (P<0.05). Conclusion: The SNP of LMNA gene may be associated with the susceptivity of DCM in Chinese Han children. PMID:26379929

  19. Common single nucleotide variants underlying drug addiction: more than a decade of research.

    PubMed

    Bühler, Kora-Mareen; Giné, Elena; Echeverry-Alzate, Victor; Calleja-Conde, Javier; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodriguez; López-Moreno, Jose Antonio

    2015-09-01

    Drug-related phenotypes are common complex and highly heritable traits. In the last few years, candidate gene (CGAS) and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a huge number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with drug use, abuse or dependence, mainly related to alcohol or nicotine. Nevertheless, few of these associations have been replicated in independent studies. The aim of this study was to provide a review of the SNPs that have been most significantly associated with alcohol-, nicotine-, cannabis- and cocaine-related phenotypes in humans between the years of 2000 and 2012. To this end, we selected CGAS, GWAS, family-based association and case-only studies published in peer-reviewed international scientific journals (using the PubMed/MEDLINE and Addiction GWAS Resource databases) in which a significant association was reported. A total of 371 studies fit the search criteria. We then filtered SNPs with at least one replication study and performed meta-analysis of the significance of the associations. SNPs in the alcohol metabolizing genes, in the cholinergic gene cluster CHRNA5-CHRNA3-CHRNB4, and in the DRD2 and ANNK1 genes, are, to date, the most replicated and significant gene variants associated with alcohol- and nicotine-related phenotypes. In the case of cannabis and cocaine, a far fewer number of studies and replications have been reported, indicating either a need for further investigation or that the genetics of cannabis/cocaine addiction are more elusive. This review brings a global state-of-the-art vision of the behavioral genetics of addiction and collaborates on formulation of new hypothesis to guide future work.

  20. Detection of nasopharyngeal carcinoma susceptibility with single nucleotide polymorphism analysis using next-generation sequencing technology

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mu-Yun; Huang, Shu-Jing; Yang, Fan; Qin, Xin-Tian; Liu, Dong; Ding, Ying; Yang, Shu; Wang, Xi-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a head and neck cancer with high incidence in South China and East Asia. To provide a theoretical basis for NPC risk screening and early prevention, we conducted a meta-analysis of relevant literature on the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP)s with NPC susceptibility. Further, expression of 15 candidate SNPs identified in the meta-analysis was evaluated in a cohort of NPC patients and healthy volunteers using next-generation sequencing technology. Among the 15 SNPs detected in the meta-analysis, miR-146a (rs2910164, C>G), HCG9 (rs3869062, A>G), HCG9 (rs16896923, T>C), MMP2 (rs243865, C>T), GABBR1 (rs2076483, T>C), and TP53 (rs1042522, C>G) were associated with decreased susceptibility to NPC, while GSTM1 (+/DEL), IL-10 (rs1800896, A>G), MDM2 (rs2279744, T>G), MDS1-EVI1 (rs6774494, G>A), XPC (rs2228000, C>T), HLA-F (rs3129055, T>C), SPLUNC1 (rs2752903, T>C; and rs750064, A>G), and GABBR1 (rs29232, G>A) were associated with increased susceptibility to NPC. In our case-control study, an association with increased risk for NPC was found for the AG vs AA genotype in HCG9 (rs3869062, A>G). In addition, heterozygous deletion of the GSTM1 allele was associated with increased susceptibility to NPC, while an SNP in GABBR1 (rs29232, G>A) was associated with decreased risk, and might thus have a protective role on NPC carcinogenesis. This work provides the first comprehensive assessment of SNP expression and its relationship to NPC risk. It suggests the need for well-designed, larger confirmatory studies to validate its findings. PMID:28881764

  1. Identifying Litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn.) Cultivars and Their Genetic Relationships Using Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Markers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Xiao, Zhidan; Bao, Xiuli; Yang, Xiaoyan; Fang, Jing; Xiang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Litchi is an important fruit tree in tropical and subtropical areas of the world. However, there is widespread confusion regarding litchi cultivar nomenclature and detailed information of genetic relationships among litchi germplasm is unclear. In the present study, the potential of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) for the identification of 96 representative litchi accessions and their genetic relationships in China was evaluated using 155 SNPs that were evenly spaced across litchi genome. Ninety SNPs with minor allele frequencies above 0.05 and a good genotyping success rate were used for further analysis. A relatively high level of genetic variation was observed among litchi accessions, as quantified by the expected heterozygosity (He = 0.305). The SNP based multilocus matching identified two synonymous groups, ‘Heiye’ and ‘Wuye’, and ‘Chengtuo’ and ‘Baitangli 1’. A subset of 14 SNPs was sufficient to distinguish all the non-redundant litchi genotypes, and these SNPs were proven to be highly stable by repeated analyses of a selected group of cultivars. Unweighted pair-group method of arithmetic averages (UPGMA) cluster analysis divided the litchi accessions analyzed into four main groups, which corresponded to the traits of extremely early-maturing, early-maturing, middle-maturing, and late-maturing, indicating that the fruit maturation period should be considered as the primary criterion for litchi taxonomy. Two subpopulations were detected among litchi accessions by STRUCTURE analysis, and accessions with extremely early- and late-maturing traits showed membership coefficients above 0.99 for Cluster 1 and Cluster 2, respectively. Accessions with early- and middle-maturing traits were identified as admixture forms with varying levels of membership shared between the two clusters, indicating their hybrid origin during litchi domestication. The results of this study will benefit litchi germplasm conservation programs and facilitate maximum

  2. Multiplex single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay for detection of soybean mosaic virus resistance genes in soybean.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ainong; Chen, Pengyin; Vierling, Richard; Zheng, Cuming; Li, Dexiao; Dong, Dekun; Shakiba, Ehsan; Cervantez, Innan

    2011-02-01

    Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) is one of the most destructive viral diseases in soybean (Glycine max). Three independent loci for SMV resistance have been identified in soybean germplasm. The use of genetic resistance is the most effective method of controlling this disease. Marker assisted selection (MAS) has become very important and useful in the effort of selecting genes for SMV resistance. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), because of its abundance and high-throughput potential, is a powerful tool in genome mapping, association studies, diversity analysis, and tagging of important genes in plant genomics. In this study, a 10 SNPs plus one insert/deletion (InDel) multiplex assay was developed for SMV resistance: two SNPs were developed from the candidate gene 3gG2 at Rsv1 locus, two SNPs selected from the clone N11PF linked to Rsv1, one 'BARC' SNP screened from soybean chromosome 13 [linkage group (LG) F] near Rsv1, two 'BARC' SNPs from probe A519 linked to Rsv3, one 'BARC' SNP from chromosome 14 (LG B2) near Rsv3, and two 'BARC' SNPs from chromosome 2 (LG D1b) near Rsv4, plus one InDel marker from expressed sequence tag (EST) AW307114 linked to Rsv4. This 11 SNP/InDel multiplex assay showed polymorphism among 47 diverse soybean germplasm, indicating this assay can be used to investigate the mode of inheritance in a SMV resistant soybean line carrying Rsv1, Rsv3, and/or Rsv4 through a segregating population with phenotypic data, and to select a specific gene or pyramid two or three genes for SMV resistance through MAS in soybean breeding program. The presence of two SMV resistance genes (Rsv1 and Rsv3) in J05 soybean was confirmed by the SNP assay.

  3. Identification of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Associated with Hyperproduction of Alpha-Toxin in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Junshu; Yan, Meiying; Doll, Katherine; Bey, Russell; Ji, Yinduo

    2011-01-01

    The virulence factor α-toxin (hla) is needed by Staphylococcus aureus in order to cause infections in both animals and humans. Although the complicated regulation of hla expression has been well studied in human S. aureus isolates, the mechanisms of of hla regulation in bovine S. aureus isolates remain undefined. In this study, we found that many bovine S. aureus isolates, including the RF122 strain, generate dramatic amounts of α-toxin in vitro compared with human clinical S. aureus isolates, including MRSA WCUH29 and MRSA USA300. To elucidate potential regulatory mechanisms, we analyzed the hla promoter regions and identified predominant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at positions −376, −483, and −484 from the start codon in α-toxin hyper-producing isolates. Using site-directed mutagenesis and hla promoter-gfp-luxABCDE dual reporter approaches, we demonstrated that the SNPs contribute to the differential control of hla expression among bovine and human S. aureus isolates. Using a DNA affinity assay, gel-shift assays and a null mutant, we identified and revealed that an hla positive regulator, SarZ, contributes to the involvement of the SNPs in mediating hla expression. In addition, we found that the bovine S. aureus isolate RF122 exhibits higher transcription levels of hla positive regulators, including agrA, saeR, arlR and sarZ, but a lower expression level of hla repressor rot compared to the human S. aureus isolate WCUH29. Our results indicate α-toxin hyperproduction in bovine S. aureus is a multifactorial process, influenced at both the genomic and transcriptional levels. Moreover, the identification of predominant SNPs in the hla promoter region may provide a novel method for genotyping the S. aureus isolates. PMID:21494631

  4. Candidate gene analysis using imputed genotypes: cell cycle single-nucleotide polymorphisms and ovarian cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Goode, Ellen L; Fridley, Brooke L; Vierkant, Robert A; Cunningham, Julie M; Phelan, Catherine M; Anderson, Stephanie; Rider, David N; White, Kristin L; Pankratz, V Shane; Song, Honglin; Hogdall, Estrid; Kjaer, Susanne K; Whittemore, Alice S; DiCioccio, Richard; Ramus, Susan J; Gayther, Simon A; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Pharaoh, Paul P D; Sellers, Thomas A

    2009-03-01

    Polymorphisms in genes critical to cell cycle control are outstanding candidates for association with ovarian cancer risk; numerous genes have been interrogated by multiple research groups using differing tagging single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sets. To maximize information gleaned from existing genotype data, we conducted a combined analysis of five independent studies of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer. Up to 2,120 cases and 3,382 controls were genotyped in the course of two collaborations at a variety of SNPs in 11 cell cycle genes (CDKN2C, CDKN1A, CCND3, CCND1, CCND2, CDKN1B, CDK2, CDK4, RB1, CDKN2D, and CCNE1) and one gene region (CDKN2A-CDKN2B). Because of the semi-overlapping nature of the 123 assayed tagging SNPs, we performed multiple imputation based on fastPHASE using data from White non-Hispanic study participants and participants in the international HapMap Consortium and National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences SNPs Program. Logistic regression assuming a log-additive model was done on combined and imputed data. We observed strengthened signals in imputation-based analyses at several SNPs, particularly CDKN2A-CDKN2B rs3731239; CCND1 rs602652, rs3212879, rs649392, and rs3212891; CDK2 rs2069391, rs2069414, and rs17528736; and CCNE1 rs3218036. These results exemplify the utility of imputation in candidate gene studies and lend evidence to a role of cell cycle genes in ovarian cancer etiology, suggest a reduced set of SNPs to target in additional cases and controls.

  5. Novel Single Nucleotide Polymorphism-Based Assay for Genotyping Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Goldstone, Robert J.; McLuckie, Joyce; Smith, David G. E.

    2015-01-01

    Typing of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis strains presents a challenge, since they are genetically monomorphic and traditional molecular techniques have limited discriminatory power. The recent advances and availability of whole-genome sequencing have extended possibilities for the characterization of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, and whole-genome sequencing can provide a phylogenetic context to facilitate global epidemiology studies. In this study, we developed a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay based on PCR and restriction enzyme digestion or sequencing of the amplified product. The SNP analysis was performed using genome sequence data from 133 Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis isolates with different genotypes from 8 different host species and 17 distinct geographic regions around the world. A total of 28,402 SNPs were identified among all of the isolates. The minimum number of SNPs required to distinguish between all of the 133 genomes was 93 and between only the type C isolates was 41. To reduce the number of SNPs and PCRs required, we adopted an approach based on sequential detection of SNPs and a decision tree. By the analysis of 14 SNPs Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis isolates can be characterized within 14 phylogenetic groups with a higher discriminatory power than mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit–variable number tandem repeat assay and other typing methods. Continuous updating of genome sequences is needed in order to better characterize new phylogenetic groups and SNP profiles. The novel SNP assay is a discriminative, simple, reproducible method and requires only basic laboratory equipment for the large-scale global typing of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis isolates. PMID:26677250

  6. A single nucleotide polymorphism in NEUROD1 is associated with production traits in Nelore beef cattle.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, P S N; Tizioto, P C; Malago, W; do Nascimento, M L; Cesar, A S M; Diniz, W J S; de Souza, M M; Lanna, D P D; Tullio, R R; Mourão, G B; de A Mudadu, M; Coutinho, L L; de A Regitano, L C

    2016-07-14

    Feed efficiency and carcass characteristics are late-measured traits. The detection of molecular markers associated with them can help breeding programs to select animals early in life, and to predict breeding values with high accuracy. The objective of this study was to identify polymorphisms in the functional and positional candidate gene NEUROD1 (neurogenic differentiation 1), and investigate their associations with production traits in reference families of Nelore cattle. A total of 585 steers were used, from 34 sires chosen to represent the variability of this breed. By sequencing 14 animals with extreme residual feed intake (RFI) values, seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in NEUROD1 were identified. The investigation of marker effects on the target traits RFI, backfat thickness (BFT), ribeye area (REA), average body weight (ABW), and metabolic body weight (MBW) was performed with a mixed model using the restricted maximum likelihood method. SNP1062, which changes cytosine for guanine, had no significant association with RFI or REA. However, we found an additive effect on ABW (P ≤ 0.05) and MBW (P ≤ 0.05), with an estimated allele substitution effect of -1.59 and -0.93 kg0.75, respectively. A dominant effect of this SNP for BFT was also found (P ≤ 0.010). Our results are the first that identify NEUROD1 as a candidate that affects BFT, ABW, and MBW. Once confirmed, the inclusion of this SNP in dense panels may improve the accuracy of genomic selection for these traits in Nelore beef cattle as this SNP is not currently represented on SNP chips.

  7. A Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in Catalase Is Strongly Associated with Ovarian Cancer Survival.

    PubMed

    Belotte, Jimmy; Fletcher, Nicole M; Saed, Mohammed G; Abusamaan, Mohammed S; Dyson, Gregory; Diamond, Michael P; Saed, Ghassan M

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the deadliest of all gynecologic cancers. Recent evidence demonstrates an association between enzymatic activity altering single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) with human cancer susceptibility. We sought to evaluate the association of SNPs in key oxidant and antioxidant enzymes with increased risk and survival in epithelial ovarian cancer. Individuals (n = 143) recruited were divided into controls, (n = 94): healthy volunteers, (n = 18), high-risk BRCA1/2 negative (n = 53), high-risk BRCA1/2 positive (n = 23) and ovarian cancer cases (n = 49). DNA was subjected to TaqMan SNP genotype analysis for selected oxidant and antioxidant enzymes. Of the seven selected SNP studied, no association with ovarian cancer risk (Pearson Chi-square) was found. However, a catalase SNP was identified as a predictor of ovarian cancer survival by the Cox regression model. The presence of this SNP was associated with a higher likelihood of death (hazard ratio (HR) of 3.68 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.149-11.836)) for ovarian cancer patients. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis demonstrated a significant median overall survival difference (108 versus 60 months, p<0.05) for those without the catalase SNP as compared to those with the SNP. Additionally, age at diagnosis greater than the median was found to be a significant predictor of death (HR of 2.78 (95% CI: 1.022-7.578)). This study indicates a strong association with the catalase SNP and survival of ovarian cancer patients, and thus may serve as a prognosticator.

  8. Assessing patterns of hybridization between North Atlantic eels using diagnostic single-nucleotide polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Pujolar, J M; Jacobsen, M W; Als, T D; Frydenberg, J; Magnussen, E; Jónsson, B; Jiang, X; Cheng, L; Bekkevold, D; Maes, G E; Bernatchez, L; Hansen, M M

    2014-01-01

    The two North Atlantic eel species, the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) and the American eel (Anguilla rostrata), spawn in partial sympatry in the Sargasso Sea, providing ample opportunity to interbreed. In this study, we used a RAD (Restriction site Associated DNA) sequencing approach to identify species-specific diagnostic single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and design a low-density array that combined with screening of a diagnostic mitochondrial DNA marker. Eels from Iceland (N=159) and from the neighboring Faroe Islands (N=29) were genotyped, along with 94 larvae (49 European and 45 American eel) collected in the Sargasso Sea. Our SNP survey showed that the majority of Icelandic eels are pure European eels but there is also an important contribution of individuals of admixed ancestry (10.7%). Although most of the hybrids were identified as F1 hybrids from European eel female × American eel male crosses, backcrosses were also detected, including a first-generation backcross (F1 hybrid × pure European eel) and three individuals identified as second-generation backcrosses originating from American eel × F1 hybrid backcrosses interbreeding with pure European eels. In comparison, no hybrids were observed in the Faroe Islands, the closest bodies of land to Iceland. It is possible that hybrids show an intermediate migratory behaviour between the two parental species that ultimately brings hybrid larvae to the shores of Iceland, situated roughly halfway between the Sargasso Sea and Europe. Only two hybrids were observed among Sargasso Sea larvae, both backcrosses, but no F1 hybrids, that points to temporal variation in the occurrence of hybridization. PMID:24424165

  9. KRAS and VEGF gene 3'-UTR single nucleotide polymorphisms predicted susceptibility in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Xiaorui; Li, Xin; Xia, Tian; Long, Hanan

    2017-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in tumor-related genes have been reported to play important roles in cancer development. Recent studies have shown that 3’-untranslated regions (UTR) polymorphisms are associated with the occurrence and prognosis of cancers. The aim of this study is to analyze the association between KRAS and VEGF gene 3’-UTR SNPs and genetic susceptibility to colorectal cancer (CRC). In this case-control study of 371 CRC cases and 246 healthy controls, we analyzed the association between one SNP (rs1137188G > A) in the KRAS gene and four SNPs (rs3025039C > T, rs3025040C > T, rs3025053G > A and rs10434A > G) in the VEGF gene and CRC susceptibility by the improved multiplex ligase detection reaction (iMLDR) method. We checked the selected SNPs’ minor allele frequency and its distribution in the frequency of Chinese people by Hap-map database and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, and used multivariate logistic regression models to estimate adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). We found that the rs3025039C variant genotype in the VEGF gene was associated with a significant protection for CRC (AOR = 0.693, 95% CI = 0.485–0.989; P = 0.043 for CC and CT+TT). Nevertheless, the difference was no longer significant after Bonferroni correction (Bonferroni-adjusted P = 0.172). In genetic polymorphisms analysis, we found that the KRAS rs1137188 variant AA genotype had higher portion of tumor size (≥ 5 cm) (P = 0.01; Bonferroni-adjusted P = 0.04), which suggested that the rs1137188 variant AA genotype may significantly be associated with increased progression of CRC. In conclusion, our study suggested that these five SNPs in the KRAS gene and the VEGF gene were not associated with CRC susceptibility in Han Chinese in Sichuan province. PMID:28328959

  10. Single nucleotide polymorphisms concordant with the horned/polled trait in Holsteins.

    PubMed

    Cargill, Edward J; Nissing, Nick J; Grosz, Michael D

    2008-12-08

    Cattle that naturally do not grow horns are referred to as polled, a trait inherited in a dominant Mendelian fashion. Previous studies have localized the polled mutation (which is unknown) to the proximal end of bovine chromosome 1 in a region approximately 3 Mb in size. While a polled genetic test, Tru-Polledtrade mark, is commercially available from MetaMorphix Inc., Holsteins are not a validated breed for this test. Approximately 160 kb were sequenced within the known polled region from 12 polled and 12 horned Holsteins. Analysis of the polymorphisms identified 13 novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are concordant with the horned/polled trait. Three of the 13 SNPs are located in gene coding or regulatory regions (e.g., the untranslated region, or UTR) where one is located in the 3'UTR of a gene and the other two are located in the 5'UTR and coding region (synonymous SNP) of another gene. The 3'UTR of genes have been shown to be targets of microRNAs regulating gene expression. In silico analysis indicates the 3'UTR SNP may disrupt a microRNA target site. These 13 novel SNPs concordant with the horned/polled trait in Holsteins represent a test panel for the breed and this is the first report to the authors' knowledge of SNPs within gene coding or regulatory regions concordant with the horned/polled trait in cattle. These SNPs will require further testing for verification and further study to determine if the 3'UTR SNP may have a functional effect on the polled trait in Holsteins.

  11. Single nucleotide polymorphism detection using gold nanoprobes and bio-microfluidic platform with embedded microlenses.

    PubMed

    Bernacka-Wojcik, Iwona; Águas, Hugo; Carlos, Fabio Ferreira; Lopes, Paulo; Wojcik, Pawel Jerzy; Costa, Mafalda Nascimento; Veigas, Bruno; Igreja, Rui; Fortunato, Elvira; Baptista, Pedro Viana; Martins, Rodrigo

    2015-06-01

    The use of microfluidics platforms combined with the optimal optical properties of gold nanoparticles has found plenty of application in molecular biosensing. This paper describes a bio-microfluidic platform coupled to a non-cross-linking colorimetric gold nanoprobe assay to detect a single nucleotide polymorphism associated with increased risk of obesity fat-mass and obesity-associated (FTO) rs9939609 (Carlos et al., 2014). The system enabled significant discrimination between positive and negative assays using a target DNA concentration of 5 ng/µL below the limit of detection of the conventionally used microplate reader (i.e., 15 ng/µL) with 10 times lower solution volume (i.e., 3 µL). A set of optimization of our previously reported bio-microfluidic platform (Bernacka-Wojcik et al., 2013) resulted in a 160% improvement of colorimetric analysis results. Incorporation of planar microlenses increased 6 times signal-to-loss ratio reaching the output optical fiber improving by 34% the colorimetric analysis of gold nanoparticles, while the implementation of an optoelectronic acquisition system yielded increased accuracy and reduced noise. The microfluidic chip was also integrated with a miniature fiber spectrometer to analyze the assays' colorimetric changes and also the LEDs transmission spectra when illuminating through various solutions. Furthermore, by coupling an optical microscope to a digital camera with a long exposure time (30 s), we could visualise the different scatter intensities of gold nanoparticles within channels following salt addition. These intensities correlate well to the expected difference in aggregation between FTO positive (none to small aggregates) and negative samples (large aggregates).

  12. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of metabolic syndrome-related genes in primary open angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Gang; Liu, Bin

    2010-01-01

    AIM To analyze single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of primary open angle glaucoma- and metabolic syndrome-related genes in primary open angle glaucoma (POAG), in order to elucidate the roles of metabolic syndrome as a risk factor in POAG progress. METHODS SNP genotypes and alleles of interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-6 receptor (IL-6R), dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2), beta-fibrinogen (FGB), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ2 (PPARG), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), E-selectin (E-Sel), apolipoprotein A-5 (APOA5), C-reactive protein (CRP), ectonueleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 1 (ENPP1), hepatic lipase (LIPC), adiponectin (ADIPOQ), paraoxonase 1 (PON1) and serine protease inhibitor E (SERPINE1) genes in POAG (n=37) and normal control (n=100) groups were measured with ABI Prism 7900HT Fluorescence Quantitative PCR and TaqMan SNP Genotyping fluorescence probe kit. RESULTS Genotypes and allele frequencies of IL-6R, IL-6, FGB, CRP, ENPP1, LIPC, ADIPOQ, PON1, and SERPINE1 in total POAG group were significantly different compared to the control group. CONCLUSION Metabolic syndrome as a risk factor for POAG may be associated with genotypes and allele frequencies of the related genes. The corresponding gene expression and function can affect POAG progress, including roles of SERPINE1 in extracellular matrix, ENPP1 in insulin inhibition, IL-6 in endogenous neuroprotection, IL-6, IL-6R and E-Sel in autoimmune response, LIPC and FGB in blood hyperviscosity syndrome, ADIPOQ in NOS/NO production, PON1 in vascular endothelial protection. PMID:22553514

  13. The Impact of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms on Human Aldehyde OxidaseS

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Tobias; Terao, Mineko; Garattini, Enrico; Teutloff, Christian; Alfaro, Joshua F.; Jones, Jeffrey P.; Leimkühler, Silke

    2012-01-01

    Aldehyde oxidase (AO) is a complex molybdo-flavoprotein that belongs to the xanthine oxidase family. AO is active as a homodimer, and each 150-kDa monomer binds two distinct [2Fe2S] clusters, FAD, and the molybdenum cofactor. AO has an important role in the metabolism of drugs based on its broad substrate specificity oxidizing aromatic aza-heterocycles, for example, N1-methylnicotinamide and N-methylphthalazinium, or aldehydes, such as benzaldehyde, retinal, and vanillin. Sequencing the 35 coding exons of the human AOX1 gene in a sample of 180 Italian individuals led to the identification of relatively frequent, synonymous, missense and nonsense single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Human aldehyde oxidase (hAOX1) was purified after heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein was obtained with a purity of 95% and a yield of 50 μg/l E. coli culture. Site-directed mutagenesis of the hAOX1 cDNA allowed the purification of protein variants bearing the amino acid changes R802C, R921H, N1135S, and H1297R, which correspond to some of the identified SNPs. The hAOX1 variants were purified and compared with the wild-type protein relative to activity, oligomerization state, and metal content. Our data show that the mutation of each amino acid residue has a variable impact on the ability of hAOX1 to metabolize selected substrates. Thus, the human population is characterized by the presence of functionally inactive hAOX1 allelic variants as well as variants encoding enzymes with different catalytic activities. Our results indicate that the presence of these allelic variants should be considered for the design of future drugs. PMID:22279051

  14. Novel Single Nucleotide Polymorphism-Based Assay for Genotyping Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Leão, Célia; Goldstone, Robert J; Bryant, Josephine; McLuckie, Joyce; Inácio, João; Smith, David G E; Stevenson, Karen

    2016-03-01

    Typing of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis strains presents a challenge, since they are genetically monomorphic and traditional molecular techniques have limited discriminatory power. The recent advances and availability of whole-genome sequencing have extended possibilities for the characterization of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, and whole-genome sequencing can provide a phylogenetic context to facilitate global epidemiology studies. In this study, we developed a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay based on PCR and restriction enzyme digestion or sequencing of the amplified product. The SNP analysis was performed using genome sequence data from 133 Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis isolates with different genotypes from 8 different host species and 17 distinct geographic regions around the world. A total of 28,402 SNPs were identified among all of the isolates. The minimum number of SNPs required to distinguish between all of the 133 genomes was 93 and between only the type C isolates was 41. To reduce the number of SNPs and PCRs required, we adopted an approach based on sequential detection of SNPs and a decision tree. By the analysis of 14 SNPs Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis isolates can be characterized within 14 phylogenetic groups with a higher discriminatory power than mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeat assay and other typing methods. Continuous updating of genome sequences is needed in order to better characterize new phylogenetic groups and SNP profiles. The novel SNP assay is a discriminative, simple, reproducible method and requires only basic laboratory equipment for the large-scale global typing of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis isolates. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms reveal population history and adaptive divergence in wild guppies.

    PubMed

    Willing, Eva-Maria; Bentzen, Paul; van Oosterhout, Cock; Hoffmann, Margarete; Cable, Joanne; Breden, Felix; Weigel, Detlef; Dreyer, Christine

    2010-03-01

    Adaptation of guppies (Poecilia reticulata) to contrasting upland and lowland habitats has been extensively studied with respect to behaviour, morphology and life history traits. Yet population history has not been studied at the whole-genome level. Although single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most abundant form of variation in many genomes and consequently very informative for a genome-wide picture of standing natural variation in populations, genome-wide SNP data are rarely available for wild vertebrates. Here we use genetically mapped SNP markers to comprehensively survey genetic variation within and among naturally occurring guppy populations from a wide geographic range in Trinidad and Venezuela. Results from three different clustering methods, Neighbor-net, principal component analysis (PCA) and Bayesian analysis show that the population substructure agrees with geographic separation and largely with previously hypothesized patterns of historical colonization. Within major drainages (Caroni, Oropouche and Northern), populations are genetically similar, but those in different geographic regions are highly divergent from one another, with some indications of ancient shared polymorphisms. Clear genomic signatures of a previous introduction experiment were seen, and we detected additional potential admixture events. Headwater populations were significantly less heterozygous than downstream populations. Pairwise F(ST) values revealed marked differences in allele frequencies among populations from different regions, and also among populations within the same region. F(ST) outlier methods indicated some regions of the genome as being under directional selection. Overall, this study demonstrates the power of a genome-wide SNP data set to inform for studies on natural variation, adaptation and evolution of wild populations.

  16. Polygenic Effects of Common Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms on Life Span: When Association Meets Causality

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Deqing; Arbeev, Konstantin G.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Recently we have shown that the human life span is influenced jointly by many common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), each with a small individual effect. Here we investigate further the polygenic influence on life span and discuss its possible biological mechanisms. First we identified six sets of prolongevity SNP alleles in the Framingham Heart Study 550K SNPs data, using six different statistical procedures (normal linear, Cox, and logistic regressions; generalized estimation equation; mixed model; gene frequency method). We then estimated joint effects of these SNPs on human survival. We found that alleles in each set show significant additive influence on life span. Twenty-seven SNPs comprised the overlapping set of SNPs that influenced life span, regardless of the statistical procedure. The majority of these SNPs (74%) were within genes, compared to 40% of SNPs in the original 550K set. We then performed a review of current literature on functions of genes closest to these 27 SNPs. The review showed that the respective genes are largely involved in aging, cancer, and brain disorders. We concluded that polygenic effects can explain a substantial portion of genetic influence on life span. Composition of the set of prolongevity alleles depends on the statistical procedure used for the allele selection. At the same time, there is a core set of longevity alleles that are selected with all statistical procedures. Functional relevance of respective genes to aging and major diseases supports causal relationships between the identified SNPs and life span. The fact that genes found in our and other genetic association studies of aging/longevity have similar functions indicates high chances of true positive associations for corresponding genetic variants. PMID:22533364

  17. Effective Detection of Human Leukocyte Antigen Risk Alleles in Celiac Disease Using Tag Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Monsuur, Alienke J.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Pinto, Dalila; Verduijn, Willem; Romanos, Jihane; Auricchio, Renata; Lopez, Ana; van Heel, David A.; Crusius, J. Bart A; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2008-01-01

    Background The HLA genes, located in the MHC region on chromosome 6p21.3, play an important role in many autoimmune disorders, such as celiac disease (CD), type 1 diabetes (T1D), rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis and others. Known HLA variants that confer risk to CD, for example, include DQA1*05/DQB1*02 (DQ2.5) and DQA1*03/DQB1*0302 (DQ8). To diagnose the majority of CD patients and to study disease susceptibility and progression, typing these strongly associated HLA risk factors is of utmost importance. However, current genotyping methods for HLA risk factors involve many reactions, and are complicated and expensive. We sought a simple experimental approach using tagging SNPs that predict the CD-associated HLA risk factors. Methodology Our tagging approach exploits linkage disequilibrium between single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) and the CD-associated HLA risk factors DQ2.5 and DQ8 that indicate direct risk, and DQA1*0201/DQB1*0202 (DQ2.2) and DQA1*0505/DQB1*0301 (DQ7) that attribute to the risk of DQ2.5 to CD. To evaluate the predictive power of this approach, we performed an empirical comparison of the predicted DQ types, based on these six tag SNPs, with those executed with current validated laboratory typing methods of the HLA-DQA1 and -DQB1 genes in three large cohorts. The results were validated in three European celiac populations. Conclusion Using this method, only six SNPs were needed to predict the risk types carried by >95% of CD patients. We determined that for this tagging approach the sensitivity was >0.991, specificity >0.996 and the predictive value >0.948. Our results show that this tag SNP method is very accurate and provides an excellent basis for population screening for CD. This method is broadly applicable in European populations. PMID:18509540

  18. Performance Metrics for Selecting Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Late-onset Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Ching; Hsiao, Chi-Jung; Jung, Chien-Cheng; Hu, Hui-Han; Chen, Jen-Hau; Lee, Wen-Chung; Chiou, Jeng-Min; Chen, Ta-Fu; Sun, Yu; Wen, Li-Li; Yip, Ping-Keung; Chu, Yi-Min; Chen, Chien-Jen; Yang, Hwai-I

    2016-11-02

    Previous genome-wide association studies using P-values to select single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have suffered from high false-positive and false-negative results. This case-control study recruited 713 late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) cases and controls aged ≥65 from three teaching hospitals in northern Taiwan from 2007 to 2010. Performance metrics were used to select SNPs in stage 1, which were then genotyped to another dataset (stage 2). Four SNPs (CPXM2 rs2362967, APOC1 rs4420638, ZNF521 rs7230380, and rs12965520) were identified for LOAD by both traditional P-values (without correcting for multiple tests) and performance metrics. After correction for multiple tests, no SNPs were identified by traditional P-values. Simultaneous testing of APOE e4 and APOC1 rs4420638 (the SNP with the best performance in the performance metrics) significantly improved the low sensitivity of APOE e4 from 0.50 to 0.78. A point-based genetic model including these 2 SNPs and important covariates was constructed. Compared with elders with low-risks score (0-6), elders belonging to moderate-risk (score = 7-11) and high-risk (score = 12-18) groups showed a significantly increased risk of LOAD (adjusted odds ratio = 7.80 and 46.93, respectively; Ptrend < 0.0001). Performance metrics allow for identification of markers with moderate effect and are useful for creating genetic tests with clinical and public health implications.

  19. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms and recovery from aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Sheila; Poloyac, Samuel; Hoffman, Leslie; Gallek, Matthew; Dianxu Ren; Balzer, Jeffrey; Kassam, Amin; Conley, Yvette

    2009-07-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a hemorrhagic stroke subtype with a poor recovery profile. Cerebral vasospasm (CV), a narrowing of the cerebral vasculature, significantly contributes to the poor recovery profile. Variation in the endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) gene has been implicated in CV and outcome after SAH. The purpose of this project was to explore the potential association between three eNOS tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and recovery from SAH. We included 195 participants with a diagnosis of SAH and DNA and 6-month outcome data available but without preexisting neurologic disease/deficit. Genotyping was performed using an ABI Prism 7000 Sequence Detection System and TaqMan assays. CV was verified by cerebral angiogram independently read by a neurosurgeon on 118 participants. Modified Rankin Scores (MRS) and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) scores were collected 6 months posthemorrhage. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and chi-square analysis as appropriate. The sample was primarily female (n=147; 75.4%) and White (n=178; 91.3%) with a mean age of 54.6 years. Of the participants with CV data, 56 (47.5%) developed CV within 14 days of SAH. None of the SNPs individually were associated with CV presence; however, a combination of the three variant SNPs was significantly associated with CV (p=.017). Only one SNP (rs1799983, variant allele) was associated with worse 6-month GOS scores (p<.001) and MRS (p<.001). These data indicate that the eNOS gene plays a role in the response to SAH, which may be explained by an influence on CV.

  20. Deciphering Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Evolutionary Trends in Isolates of the Cydia pomonella granulovirus

    PubMed Central

    Wennmann, Jörg T.; Radtke, Pit; Eberle, Karolin E.; Gueli Alletti, Gianpiero

    2017-01-01

    Six complete genome sequences of Cydia pomonella granulovirus (CpGV) isolates from Mexico (CpGV-M and CpGV-M1), England (CpGV-E2), Iran (CpGV-I07 and CpGV-I12), and Canada (CpGV-S) were aligned and analyzed for genetic diversity and evolutionary processes. The selected CpGV isolates represented recently identified phylogenetic lineages of CpGV, namely, the genome groups A to E. The genomes ranged from 120,816 bp to 124,269 bp. Several common differences between CpGV-M, -E2, -I07, -I12 and -S to CpGV-M1, the first sequenced and published CpGV isolate, were highlighted. Phylogenetic analysis based on the aligned genome seq