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Sample records for nontoxigenic variants isolated

  1. Molecular analyses of Vibrio cholerae O1 clinical strains, including new nontoxigenic variants isolated in Mexico during the Cholera epidemic years between 1991 and 2000.

    PubMed

    Lizárraga-Partida, Marcial Leonardo; Quilici, Marie-Laure

    2009-05-01

    We studied the evolution of Vibrio cholerae O1 during the 1991 to 2000 cholera epidemic in Mexico by biochemical, serological, and molecular characterization of strains collected during this period. Strains were divided into toxigenic and nontoxigenic groups according to the presence or absence of genes encoding cholera toxin. As previously reported, we characterized two populations among toxigenic strains, which were present from the first year of the epidemic. BglI rRNA analysis revealed that these strains had ribotype profiles, denoted M5 and M6 in our study, that were identical to those previously designated Koblavi B5 or Popovic 5 and Popovic 6a or Tamayo B21a, respectively. Ribotype M5 was isolated between 1991 and 1993. This ribotype had a low level of genetic variation as detected by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Ribotype M6 persisted from 1991 to 2000. However, PFGE profiles suggested that two epidemiologically unrelated strains coexisted within this single ribotype from 1995 until the end of the epidemic. We identified three new BglI ribotypes, Mx1, Mx2, and Mx3, from nontoxigenic V. cholerae O1 strains isolated between 1998 and 2000; one of them grouped strains positive for the toxin-coregulated pilus island. They differed from nontoxigenic clones isolated in Latin America and on the U.S. Gulf Coast and are probably autochthonous Mexican V. cholerae O1 variants. Most of these new variants were isolated from states surrounding the Gulf of Mexico, where the highest incidence of cholera in the country was recorded. Thus, the Mexican Gulf Coast, like the U.S. Gulf Coast, may act as an environmental reservoir of V. cholerae O1.

  2. Isolation of nontoxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1 from a human wound infection.

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, J M; McFarland, L M; Bradford, H B; Caraway, C T

    1983-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae serotype O1 organisms that do not produce cholera toxin and, in fact, lack the genetic material encoding the enterotoxin have recently been detected in coastal regions of the United States. Although these organisms have been assumed to be nonpathogenic, they have been considered a potential reservoir of toxigenic V. cholerae. In 1979, nontoxigenic V. cholerae O1 was isolated from a leg wound of an accident victim residing in New Orleans. The only known risk factors of the patient, besides his debilitated condition, were alcoholism and the consumption of raw oysters before recognition of his wound infection. Coincident with the identification of the isolate from the leg wound, an identical nontoxigenic V. cholerae O1 isolate was cultured from the sewage system serving the residence of this patient. Nontoxigenic V. cholerae O1 seems to be capable of multiplying in human tissue and may produce extraintestinal infection. This indigenous inhabitant of temperate coastal regions may not be avirulent and may be of public health significance. PMID:6863510

  3. Differentiation of toxigenic from nontoxigenic isolates of Pasteurella multocida by PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, S; Someno, S; Yagihashi, T

    1994-01-01

    A PCR assay was developed for the differentiation of toxigenic Pasteurella multocida subsp. multocida strains, the major etiologic agent for progressive atrophic rhinitis in pigs, from nontoxigenic strains. The PCR targeted a toxA gene encoding a 143-kDa dermonecrotic toxin that is considered to be the central etiologic factor in progressive atrophic rhinitis. toxA fragments were amplified from toxigenic P. multocida isolates but not from nontoxigenic isolates or other bacteria isolated from pigs. The sensitivity of the reaction was as low as 10 pg of chromosomal DNA from a toxigenic strain. The results obtained by PCR of the DNAs of 187 field isolates of P. multocida were consistent with those obtained by the guinea pig skin test and Western blot (immunoblot) analysis. Restriction fragment analysis of the PCR-amplified fragments from 67 field isolates and comparison of the DNA sequences of fragments from capsular serotype A and D strains suggest that the PCR-amplified region, which is considered to encode the major immunologic determinants of the toxin, would be the same among P. multocida strains. The PCR that we describe should be useful for the diagnosis and the etiologic survey of progressive atrophic rhinitis. Images PMID:8027302

  4. Microbiological changes and diversity in autochthonous non-toxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae isolated in France.

    PubMed

    Farfour, E; Badell, E; Dinu, S; Guillot, S; Guiso, N

    2013-10-01

    Autochtonous toxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae have disappeared in mainland France, but non-toxigenic C. diphtheriae are still circulating. Using phenotypic and molecular tools, we retrospectively characterized 103 non-toxigenic C. diphtheriae collected in mainland France and highlight several changes. The proportion of C. diphtheriae belfanti increased between 1977 and 2011 and it is the most frequent biotype recovered in recent years. Resistance to ciprofloxacin has increased and most isolates with decreased sensitivity belong to the belfanti biotype. Using multilocus sequence typing, we demonstrate that French isolates are distributed in a large number of sequence types and identify three distinct lineages. C. diphtheriae mitis and gravis form lineage I while C. diphtheriae belfanti forms lineages II and III. Almost all isolates of lineage II are part of a unique clonal complex or are very close to it. Most French isolates have a dtxR sequence homologous to that of toxigenic isolates, suggesting that if lyzogenised by a corynephage, they can express diphtheria toxin.

  5. Isolation of culturable mycobiota from agricultural soils and determination of tolerance to glyphosate of nontoxigenic Aspergillus section Flavi strains.

    PubMed

    Carranza, Cecilia S; Barberis, Carla L; Chiacchiera, Stella M; Dalcero, Ana María; Magnoli, Carina E

    2016-01-01

    Glyphosate-based herbicides are extensively used in Argentina's agricultural system to control undesirable weeds. This study was conducted to evaluate the culturable mycobiota [colony forming units (CFU) g(-1) and frequency of fungal genera or species] from an agricultural field exposed to pesticides. In addition, we evaluated the tolerance of A. oryzae and nontoxigenic A. flavus strains to high concentrations (100 to 500 mM - 17,000 to 84,500 ppm) of a glyphosate commercial formulation. The analysis of the mycobiota showed that the frequency of the main fungal genera varied according to the analyzed sampling period. Aspergillus spp. or Aspergillus section Flavi strains were isolated from 20 to 100% of the soil samples. Sterilia spp. were also observed throughout the sampling (50 to 100%). Aspergillus section Flavi tolerance assays showed that all of the tested strains were able to develop at the highest glyphosate concentration tested regardless of the water availability conditions. In general, significant reductions in growth rates were observed with increasing concentrations of the herbicide. However, a complete inhibition of fungal growth was not observed with the concentrations assayed. This study contributes to the knowledge of culturable mycobiota from agricultural soils exposed to pesticides and provides evidence on the effective growth ability of A. oryzae and nontoxigenic A. flavus strains exposed to high glyphosate concentrations in vitro.

  6. Culture-negative prosthetic valve endocarditis with concomitant septicemia due to a nontoxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae biotype gravis isolate in a patient with multiple risk factors.

    PubMed

    Clinton, Lani Kai; Bankowski, Matthew J; Shimasaki, Teppei; Sae-Ow, Wichit; Whelen, A Christian; O'Connor, Norman; Kim, Wesley; Young, Royden

    2013-11-01

    A 54-year-old female with a prosthetic mitral valve presented with a 3-day history of dizziness, subjective fever, and chills. Blood cultures were positive for a pleomorphic Gram-positive rod. Initial phenotypic testing could only support the identification of a Corynebacterium species. Nucleic acid sequencing (16S rRNA) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) were conclusive for Corynebacterium diphtheriae. Definitive phenotypic testing classified the strain as nontoxigenic C. diphtheriae biotype Gravis.

  7. Osteosynthesis-associated bone infection caused by a nonproteolytic, nontoxigenic Clostridium botulinum-like strain.

    PubMed

    Carlier, Jean-Philippe; K'ouas, Guylène; Lozniewski, Alain; Sirveaux, François; Cailloux, Philippe; Mory, Francine

    2004-01-01

    A nonproteolytic, nontoxigenic Clostridium botulinum strain identified by conventional and molecular techniques as type B-, E-, or F-like (BEF-like) was isolated from a human postsurgical wound. All previous reports of such strains have been from environmental sources. Since toxin production is the main taxonomic denominator for C. botulinum, a new name is needed for nonproteolytic, nontoxigenic BEF-like clinical isolates.

  8. Characterization of colony morphology variants isolated from Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed

    Kirisits, Mary Jo; Prost, Lynne; Starkey, Melissa; Parsek, Matthew R

    2005-08-01

    In this study, we report the isolation of small, rough, strongly cohesive colony morphology variants from aging Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms. Similar to many of the P. aeruginosa colony morphology variants previously described in the literature, these variants autoaggregate in liquid culture and hyperadhere to solid surfaces. They also exhibit increased hydrophobicity and reduced motility compared to the wild-type parent strain. Despite the similarities in appearance of our colony morphology variant isolates on solid medium, the isolates showed a range of responses in various phenotypic assays. These variants form biofilms with significant three-dimensional structure and more biomass than the wild-type parent. To further explore the nature of the variants, their transcriptional profiles were evaluated. The variants generally showed increased expression of the psl and pel loci, which have been previously implicated in the adherence of P. aeruginosa to solid surfaces. When a mutation in the psl locus was introduced into a colony morphology variant, the colony morphology was only partially affected, but hyperadherence and autoaggregation were lost. Finally, similar colony morphology variants were found in isolates from cystic fibrosis patients. These variants displayed many of the same characteristics as the laboratory variants, suggesting a link between laboratory and cystic fibrosis biofilms.

  9. Nontoxigenic Vibrio cholerae non-O1/O139 isolate from a case of human gastroenteritis in the U.S. Gulf Coast.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Nur A; Rezayat, Talayeh; Blatz, Peter J; Choi, Seon Young; Griffitt, Kimberly J; Rashed, Shah M; Huq, Anwar; Conger, Nicholas G; Colwell, Rita R; Grimes, D Jay

    2015-01-01

    An occurrence of Vibrio cholerae non-O1/O139 gastroenteritis in the U.S. Gulf Coast is reported here. Genomic analysis revealed that the isolate lacked known virulence factors associated with the clinical outcome of a V. cholerae infection but did contain putative genomic islands and other accessory virulence factors. Many of these factors are widespread among environmental strains of V. cholerae, suggesting that there might be additional virulence factors in non-O1/O139 V. cholerae yet to be determined. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the isolate belonged to a phyletic lineage of environmental V. cholerae isolates associated with sporadic cases of gastroenteritis in the Western Hemisphere, suggesting a need to monitor non-O1/O139 V. cholerae in the interest of public health.

  10. Toxigenic Corynebacterium ulcerans in human and non-toxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae in cat.

    PubMed

    Detemmerman, L; Rousseaux, D; Efstratiou, A; Schirvel, C; Emmerechts, K; Wybo, I; Soetens, O; Piérard, D

    2013-10-01

    Corynebacterium diphtheriae and Corynebacterium ulcerans are rarely isolated from clinical samples in Belgium. A case of toxigenic C. ulcerans in a woman is described, which confirms that this pathogen is still present. During investigation of the patient's cats, only a non-toxigenic toxin-bearing C. diphtheriae strain was detected.

  11. Nontoxigenic tox-bearing Corynebacterium ulcerans Infection among Game Animals, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Kutzer, Peter; Peters, Martin; Sing, Andreas; Contzen, Matthias; Rau, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Corynebacterium ulcerans may cause diphtheria in humans and caseous lymphadenitis in animals. We isolated nontoxigenic tox-bearing C. ulcerans from 13 game animals in Germany. Our results indicate a role for game animals as reservoirs for zoonotic C. ulcerans. PMID:24572455

  12. Inhibition of adhesion of Clostridium difficile to human intestinal cells after treatment with serum and intestinal fluid isolated from mice immunized with nontoxigenic C. difficile membrane fraction.

    PubMed

    Senoh, Mitsutoshi; Iwaki, Masaaki; Yamamoto, Akihiko; Kato, Haru; Fukuda, Tadashi; Shibayama, Keigo

    2015-04-01

    Diarrhea and pseudomembrane colitis caused by Clostridium difficile infection is a global health concern because of the high recurrence rate after standard antibiotic therapy. Vaccination presents a powerful countermeasure against disease recurrence. In this study, mice vaccinated with the nontoxigenic C. difficile membrane fraction generated a marked immune response to the antigen, as demonstrated by the serum IgG and intestinal fluid IgA levels. Significantly, pretreatment with harvested IgG- and IgA-containing fluids was sufficient to prevent in vitro adhesion of C. difficile to human Caco-2 intestinal cells. These results highlight the potential of nontoxigenic C. difficile membrane fraction as a vaccine candidate for C. difficile infection.

  13. A Case of Necrotizing Epiglottitis Due to Nontoxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

    PubMed

    Lake, Jessica A; Ehrhardt, Matthew J; Suchi, Mariko; Chun, Robert H; Willoughby, Rodney E

    2015-07-01

    Diphtheria is a rare cause of infection in highly vaccinated populations and may not be recognized by modern clinicians. Infections by nontoxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae are emerging. We report the first case of necrotizing epiglottitis secondary to nontoxigenic C diphtheriae. A fully vaccinated child developed fever, poor oral intake, and sore throat and was found to have necrotizing epiglottitis. Necrotizing epiglottitis predominantly occurs in the immunocompromised host. Laboratory evaluation revealed pancytopenia, and bone marrow biopsy was diagnostic for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Clinicians should be aware of aggressive infections that identify immunocompromised patients. This case highlights the features of a reemerging pathogen, C diphtheriae.

  14. Isolation and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibody Charge Variants by Free Flow Isoelectric Focusing.

    PubMed

    Hosken, Brian D; Li, Charlene; Mullappally, Berny; Co, Carl; Zhang, Boyan

    2016-06-07

    Capillary isoelectric focusing (cIEF) is widely used in the biopharmaceutical industry to measure the charge distribution of therapeutic proteins. The implementation of this technology has created a new challenge. Capillary volumes are on the order of hundreds of nanoliters and cannot be scaled up for the preparative collection of charge variants. This makes it difficult to identify the charge variants in a cIEF electropherogram. Therefore, preparative IEF methods are needed to fractionate charge variants for characterization. We used free-flow electrophoresis (FFE) to isolate monoclonal antibody charge variants observed in a cIEF electropherogram. The same antibody was also fractionated using the Rotofor and Offgel instruments for comparison. A strategy for purifying the fractionated charge variants and downstream characterization is described. Acidic and basic variants were identified and related back to the analytical cIEF charge profile. This study establishes free-flow isoelectric focusing as a valuable tool for characterizing therapeutic proteins.

  15. Amphibian cells in culture. II. Isolation of drug-resistant variants and an asparagine-independent variant.

    PubMed

    Chinchar, G D; Sinclair, J H

    1978-09-01

    With L-15 as the base medium, drug-resistant variants were isolated from two amphibian tissue culture strains: the Xenopus laevis A8 diploid cell line and the ICR 2A cell line of Rana pipiens. Four different classes of variants were obtained: (1) A8 cells resistant to chloramphenicol, an inhibitor of mitochondrial protein synthesis; (2) A8 cells resistant to ouabain, an inhibitor of the Na+/K+-activated ATPase of the plasma membrane;(3) ICR 2A cells resistant to low (20 microgram/ml) and high (300 microgram/ml) levels of bromodeoxyuridine (BUdR), a thymidine analog which interferes with the pyrimidine salvage pathway; and (4) ICR 2A cells resistant to 2,6-diaminopurine (DAP), an adenine analog which interferes with the purine salvage pathway. Unlike the other variants, isolation of BUdR resistant cells is a 2-step process. Resistance to low levels of BUdR is phenotypically expressed by a reduction in thymidine transport activities while resistance to high levels of this compound is evidenced by greatly reduced levels of thymidine kinase activity. DAP-resistant cells, which are characterized by reduced levels of adenine phosphoribosyl transferase (APRT) activity, do not die in AAT (adenine, aminopterin, thymidine) selection medium. This suggests that these cells utilize adenine efficiently. With MEM as the base medium, an asparagine independent clone was isolated from the ICR 2A cell line. When compared with the wild type, this variant exhibited a slightly reduced growth rate in the presence or absence of asparagine.

  16. Novel VIM metallo-beta-lactamase variant, VIM-24, from a Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate from Colombia.

    PubMed

    Montealegre, Maria Camila; Correa, Adriana; Briceño, David F; Rosas, Natalia C; De La Cadena, Elsa; Ruiz, Sory J; Mojica, Maria F; Camargo, Ruben Dario; Zuluaga, Ivan; Marin, Adriana; Quinn, John P; Villegas, Maria Virginia

    2011-05-01

    We report the emergence of a novel VIM variant (VIM-24) in a Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate in Colombia. The isolate displays MICs for carbapenems below the resistance breakpoints, posing a real challenge for its detection. The blaVIM-24 gene was located within a class 1 integron carried on a large plasmid. Further studies are needed to clarify its epidemiological and clinical impact.

  17. Emergence of simian virus 40 variants during serial passage of plaque isolates.

    PubMed

    Norkin, L C; Tirrell, S M

    1982-05-01

    Three serial passage series of simian virus 40 (SV40) in CV-1 cells were initiated by infection directly from the same wild-type plaque isolate, three series were initiated by infection with another plaque isolate, and two series were initiated with each of two other plaque isolates. Aberrant SV40 genomes were not detected in any of the passage series until after the fifty undiluted passage, and each series generated a different array of variant genomes. The results show that the variants were not present in the original plaque isolates but, instead, were randomly generated during subsequent high-input multiplicity passages. Although many of the aberrant viral genomes in each passage series contained reiterations of the SV40 origin of replication and some also contained host cell sequences, there was no indication that SV40 is predisposed toward generating any particular variant.

  18. Streptokinase variants from Streptococcus pyogenes isolates display altered plasminogen activation characteristics - implications for pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cook, Simon M; Skora, Amanda; Gillen, Christine M; Walker, Mark J; McArthur, Jason D

    2012-12-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus, GAS) secretes streptokinase, a potent plasminogen activating protein. Among GAS isolates, streptokinase gene sequences (ska) are polymorphic and can be grouped into two distinct sequence clusters (termed cluster type-1 and cluster type-2) with cluster type-2 being further divided into sub-clusters type-2a and type-2b. In this study, far-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that purified streptokinase variants of each type displayed similar secondary structure. Type-2b streptokinase variants could not generate an active site in Glu-plasminogen through non-proteolytic mechanisms while all other variants had this capability. Furthermore, when compared with other streptokinase variants, type-2b variants displayed a 29- to 35-fold reduction in affinity for Glu-plasminogen. All SK variants could activate Glu-plasminogen when an activator complex was preformed with plasmin; however, type-2b and type-1 complexes were inhibited by α(2) -antiplasmin. Exchanging ska(type-2a) in the M1T1 GAS strain 5448 with ska(type-2b) caused a reduction in virulence while exchanging ska(type-2a) with ska(type-1) into 5448 produced an increase in virulence when using a mouse model of invasive disease. These findings suggest that streptokinase variants produced by GAS isolates utilize distinct plasminogen activation pathways, which directly affects the pathogenesis of this organism.

  19. Unique surface gene variants of hepatitis B virus isolated from patients in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Baclig, Michael O; Alvarez, May R; Gopez-Cervantes, Juliet; Natividad, Filipinas F

    2014-02-01

    Point mutations and multiple variants across the "a" determinant can destroy the antigenicity and immunogenicity of hepatitis B virus (HBV) leading to false negative assay and vaccine escape. In this study, the presence of surface gene variants of HBV was investigated among patients clinically diagnosed with chronic hepatitis B and positive for HBV DNA from 2002 to 2009. Sequence analysis of the surface gene of HBV showed that 23 (43%) of the 53 isolates had variations. Out of the 23 isolates, 15 (65%) exhibited single or multiple substitutions, which resulted to specific amino acid changes. The remaining 8 (35%) isolates had silent mutations. The amino acid substitution M133T which was associated with failure of HBsAg detection was found in one isolate (7%, 1/15), while the amino acid substitution D144A which was associated with vaccine escape was observed in one isolate (7%, 1/15). No G145R mutation was observed. Of the 15 isolates with identified single or multiple substitutions, 6 (40%) were found to have unique sequences which caused changes in the hydrophobicity profile in the protein. Unique sequence variants at amino acid positions M103I, L109P, S117R, F134I, and S136L found in this study have not yet been reported. These data should be taken into account when developing next generation HBV assays to detect both common and unique variants, and when new HBV vaccines will be designed.

  20. Emergence and molecular characterisation of non-toxigenic tox gene-bearing Corynebacterium diphtheriae biovar mitis in the United Kingdom, 2003-2012.

    PubMed

    Zakikhany, K; Neal, S; Efstratiou, A

    2014-06-05

    Non-toxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae have become increasingly recognised as emerging pathogens across Europe causing severe invasive disease. A subset of non-toxigenic C. diphtheriae are ‘non-toxigenic tox gene-bearing’ (NTTB) strains; these strains are genotypically toxpositive, but do not express the protein. The circulation of NTTB strains was first observed during the 1990s upsurge of diphtheria in Eastern Europe but has not been reported in other European countries. Circulation of NTTB strains could be considered an increased risk for diphtheria and other related diseases, given their possible role as a tox gene reservoir with the theoretical risk of re-emerging toxin expression. Here we report the characterisation of 108 non-toxigenic C. diphtheriae biovar mitis isolates submitted to the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Reference Centre for Diphtheria at Public Health England, London, between 2003 and 2012, in order to determine the presence of NTTB strains. Using molecular methods, five NTTB isolates were identified; four human isolates (MLST type 212) and one isolate from a companion cat (MLST type 40). The emergence of these strains could indicate continuation of the circulation of potentially toxigenic strains and appropriate laboratory diagnostic methods should be used for detection. Given the complacency that currently exists in Europe awareness with regards to diphtheria diagnostics must be enhanced.

  1. Novel VIM Metallo-β-Lactamase Variant, VIM-24, from a Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolate from Colombia▿

    PubMed Central

    Montealegre, Maria Camila; Correa, Adriana; Briceño, David F.; Rosas, Natalia C.; De La Cadena, Elsa; Ruiz, Sory J.; Mojica, Maria F.; Camargo, Ruben Dario; Zuluaga, Ivan; Marin, Adriana; Quinn, John P.; Villegas, Maria Virginia

    2011-01-01

    We report the emergence of a novel VIM variant (VIM-24) in a Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate in Colombia. The isolate displays MICs for carbapenems below the resistance breakpoints, posing a real challenge for its detection. The blaVIM-24 gene was located within a class 1 integron carried on a large plasmid. Further studies are needed to clarify its epidemiological and clinical impact. PMID:21282438

  2. Fibrinogen binds to nontoxigenic and toxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae strains.

    PubMed

    Sabbadini, Priscila Soares; Genovez, Marcia Rocha Novais; Silva, Cecília Ferreira da; Adelino, Thelma Lúcia Novaes; Santos, Cintia Silva dos; Pereira, Gabriela Andrade; Nagao, Prescilla Emy; Dias, Alexandre Alves de Souza de Oliveira; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luiza; Hirata Júnior, Raphael

    2010-08-01

    The production of fibrinous exudates may play an important role in determining the outcome of bacterial infection. Although pseudomembrane formation is a characteristic feature of diphtheria, little is known about the fibrinogen (Fbn)-binding properties of Corynebacterium diphtheriae strains and the influence of the gene that codes for diphtheria toxin (tox gene) in this process. In this study we demonstrated the ability of C. diphtheriae strains to bind to Fbn and to convert Fbn to fibrin. Bacterial interaction with rabbit plasma was evaluated by both slide and tube tests. Interaction of microorganisms with human Fbn was evaluated by both enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated (FITC) Fbn binding assays. Nontoxigenic and toxigenic strains formed bacterial aggregates in the presence of plasma in the slide tests. The ability to convert Fbn to a loose web of fibrin in the plasma solution in the tube tests appeared to be a common characteristic of the species, including strains that do not carry the tox gene. Fbn binding to C. diphtheriae strains occurred at varying intensities, as demonstrated by the FITC-Fbn and ELISA binding assays. Our data suggest that the capacity to bind to Fbn and to convert Fbn to fibrin may play a role in pseudomembrane formation and act as virulence determinants of both nontoxigenic and toxigenic strains.

  3. Isolation and Characterization of Brewer's Yeast Variants with Improved Fermentation Performance under High-Gravity Conditions▿

    PubMed Central

    Blieck, Lies; Toye, Geert; Dumortier, Françoise; Verstrepen, Kevin J.; Delvaux, Freddy R.; Thevelein, Johan M.; Van Dijck, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    To save energy, space, and time, today's breweries make use of high-gravity brewing in which concentrated medium (wort) is fermented, resulting in a product with higher ethanol content. After fermentation, the product is diluted to obtain beer with the desired alcohol content. While economically desirable, the use of wort with an even higher sugar concentration is limited by the inability of brewer's yeast (Saccharomyces pastorianus) to efficiently ferment such concentrated medium. Here, we describe a successful strategy to obtain yeast variants with significantly improved fermentation capacity under high-gravity conditions. We isolated better-performing variants of the industrial lager strain CMBS33 by subjecting a pool of UV-induced variants to consecutive rounds of fermentation in very-high-gravity wort (>22° Plato). Two variants (GT336 and GT344) showing faster fermentation rates and/or more-complete attenuation as well as improved viability under high ethanol conditions were identified. The variants displayed the same advantages in a pilot-scale stirred fermenter under high-gravity conditions at 11°C. Microarray analysis identified several genes whose altered expression may be responsible for the superior performance of the variants. The role of some of these candidate genes was confirmed by genetic transformation. Our study shows that proper selection conditions allow the isolation of variants of commercial brewer's yeast with superior fermentation characteristics. Moreover, it is the first study to identify genes that affect fermentation performance under high-gravity conditions. The results are of interest to the beer and bioethanol industries, where the use of more-concentrated medium is economically advantageous. PMID:17158628

  4. Isolation and characterization of brewer's yeast variants with improved fermentation performance under high-gravity conditions.

    PubMed

    Blieck, Lies; Toye, Geert; Dumortier, Françoise; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Delvaux, Freddy R; Thevelein, Johan M; Van Dijck, Patrick

    2007-02-01

    To save energy, space, and time, today's breweries make use of high-gravity brewing in which concentrated medium (wort) is fermented, resulting in a product with higher ethanol content. After fermentation, the product is diluted to obtain beer with the desired alcohol content. While economically desirable, the use of wort with an even higher sugar concentration is limited by the inability of brewer's yeast (Saccharomyces pastorianus) to efficiently ferment such concentrated medium. Here, we describe a successful strategy to obtain yeast variants with significantly improved fermentation capacity under high-gravity conditions. We isolated better-performing variants of the industrial lager strain CMBS33 by subjecting a pool of UV-induced variants to consecutive rounds of fermentation in very-high-gravity wort (>22 degrees Plato). Two variants (GT336 and GT344) showing faster fermentation rates and/or more-complete attenuation as well as improved viability under high ethanol conditions were identified. The variants displayed the same advantages in a pilot-scale stirred fermenter under high-gravity conditions at 11 degrees C. Microarray analysis identified several genes whose altered expression may be responsible for the superior performance of the variants. The role of some of these candidate genes was confirmed by genetic transformation. Our study shows that proper selection conditions allow the isolation of variants of commercial brewer's yeast with superior fermentation characteristics. Moreover, it is the first study to identify genes that affect fermentation performance under high-gravity conditions. The results are of interest to the beer and bioethanol industries, where the use of more-concentrated medium is economically advantageous.

  5. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies recognize antigenic variants among isolates of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winton, J.R.; Arakawa, C.N.; Lannan, C.N.; Fryer, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    eutralizing monoclonal antibodies were developed against strains of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) from steelhead trout Salmo gairdneri in the Deschutes River of Oregon, chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in the Sacramento River of California, and rainbow trout Salmo gairdneri reared in the Hagerman Valley of Idaho, USA. These antibodies were tested for neutralization of 12 IHNV isolates obtained from salmonids in Japan, Alaska, Washington, Oregon, California, and Idaho. The antibodies recognized antigenic variants among the isolates and could be used to separate the viruses into 4 groups. The members of each group tended to be related by geographic area rather than by source host species, virulence, or date of isolation.

  6. Classification and nomenclature system for Human Alphapapillomavirus variants: general features, nucleotide landmarks and assignment of HPV6 and HPV11 isolates to variant lineages

    PubMed Central

    Burk, R. D.; Chen, Z.; Harari, A.; Smith, B. C.; Kocjan, B. J.; Maver, P. J.; Poljak, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Papillomaviruses constitute a family of viruses that can be classified into genera, species and types based on their viral genome heterogeneity. Currently circulating infectious human Alphapapillomaviruses (alpha-PVs) constitute a set of viral genomes that have evolved from archaic times and display features of host co-speciation. Viral variants are more recently evolved genomes that require a standardized classification and nomenclature. Objectives To describe a system for the classification and nomenclature of HPV viral variants and provide landmarks for the numbering of nucleotide positions. Methods The complete 8 kb genomes of the alpha-9 species group and HPV6 and 11 types, collected from isolates throughout the world were obtained from published reports and GenBank. Complete genomes for each HPV type were aligned using the E1 start codon and sequence divergence was calculated by global and pairwise alignments using the MUSCLE program. Phylogenetic trees were constructed from the aligned sequences using a maximum likelihood method (RAxML). Results Pairwise comparisons of nucleotide differences between complete genomes of each type from alpha-9 HPV isolates (HPV16, 31, 33, 35, 52, 58 and 67) revealed a trimodal distribution. Maximum heterogeneity for variants within a type varied from 0.6%-2.3%. Nucleotide differences of approximately 1.0%-10.0% and 0.5%-1.0% of the complete genomes were used to define variant lineages and sublineages, respectively. Analysis of 43 HPV6 complete genomes indicated the presence of 2 variant lineages, whereas 32 HPV11 isolates were highly similar and clustered into 2 sublineages. A table was constructed of the human alpha-PV landmark nucleotide sequences for future reference and alignments. Conclusions A proposed nomenclature system for viral variants and coordination of nucleotide positions will facilitate the comparison of variants across geographic regions and amongst different populations. In addition, this system

  7. Homozygous loss-of-function variants in European cosmopolitan and isolate populations.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Vera B; Svinti, Victoria; Prendergast, James G; Chau, You-Ying; Campbell, Archie; Patarcic, Inga; Barroso, Inês; Joshi, Peter K; Hastie, Nicholas D; Miljkovic, Ana; Taylor, Martin S; Enroth, Stefan; Memari, Yasin; Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Wright, Alan F; Gyllensten, Ulf; Durbin, Richard; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Polašek, Ozren; Johansson, Åsa; Sauer, Sascha; Porteous, David J; Fraser, Ross M; Drake, Camilla; Vitart, Veronique; Hayward, Caroline; Semple, Colin A; Wilson, James F

    2015-10-01

    Homozygous loss of function (HLOF) variants provide a valuable window on gene function in humans, as well as an inventory of the human genes that are not essential for survival and reproduction. All humans carry at least a few HLOF variants, but the exact number of inactivated genes that can be tolerated is currently unknown—as are the phenotypic effects of losing function for most human genes. Here, we make use of 1432 whole exome sequences from five European populations to expand the catalogue of known human HLOF mutations; after stringent filtering of variants in our dataset, we identify a total of 173 HLOF mutations, 76 (44%) of which have not been observed previously. We find that population isolates are particularly well suited to surveys of novel HLOF genes because individuals in such populations carry extensive runs of homozygosity, which we show are enriched for novel, rare HLOF variants. Further, we make use of extensive phenotypic data to show that most HLOFs, ascertained in population-based samples, appear to have little detectable effect on the phenotype. On the contrary, we document several genes directly implicated in disease that seem to tolerate HLOF variants. Overall HLOF genes are enriched for olfactory receptor function and are expressed in testes more often than expected, consistent with reduced purifying selection and incipient pseudogenisation.

  8. Homozygous loss-of-function variants in European cosmopolitan and isolate populations

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Vera B.; Svinti, Victoria; Prendergast, James G.; Chau, You-Ying; Campbell, Archie; Patarcic, Inga; Barroso, Inês; Joshi, Peter K.; Hastie, Nicholas D.; Miljkovic, Ana; Taylor, Martin S.; Enroth, Stefan; Memari, Yasin; Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Wright, Alan F.; Gyllensten, Ulf; Durbin, Richard; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Polašek, Ozren; Johansson, Åsa; Sauer, Sascha; Porteous, David J.; Fraser, Ross M.; Drake, Camilla; Vitart, Veronique; Hayward, Caroline; Semple, Colin A.; Wilson, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Homozygous loss of function (HLOF) variants provide a valuable window on gene function in humans, as well as an inventory of the human genes that are not essential for survival and reproduction. All humans carry at least a few HLOF variants, but the exact number of inactivated genes that can be tolerated is currently unknown—as are the phenotypic effects of losing function for most human genes. Here, we make use of 1432 whole exome sequences from five European populations to expand the catalogue of known human HLOF mutations; after stringent filtering of variants in our dataset, we identify a total of 173 HLOF mutations, 76 (44%) of which have not been observed previously. We find that population isolates are particularly well suited to surveys of novel HLOF genes because individuals in such populations carry extensive runs of homozygosity, which we show are enriched for novel, rare HLOF variants. Further, we make use of extensive phenotypic data to show that most HLOFs, ascertained in population-based samples, appear to have little detectable effect on the phenotype. On the contrary, we document several genes directly implicated in disease that seem to tolerate HLOF variants. Overall HLOF genes are enriched for olfactory receptor function and are expressed in testes more often than expected, consistent with reduced purifying selection and incipient pseudogenisation. PMID:26173456

  9. Late-onset prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by nontoxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

    PubMed

    El-Hazmi, Malak M

    2015-08-29

    In developed countries, Corynebacterium diphtheriae infection is rare due to efficient immunization programs. However, cases of nontoxigenic strains of C. diphtheriae infections, including endocarditis, have been reported recently. Although the incidence remains low, these infections are associated with high morbidity and mortality. This report describes the first and atypical case of bacteremia and endocarditis caused by nontoxigenic C. diphtheriae var. gravis after introduction of immunization in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA).

  10. Whole-exome identifies RXRG and TH germline variants in familial isolated prolactinoma.

    PubMed

    Melo, Flavia M; Couto, Patrícia P; Bale, Allen E; Bastos-Rodrigues, Luciana; Passos, Flavia M; Lisboa, Raony G C; Ng, Jessica M Y; Curran, Tom; Dias, Eduardo P; Friedman, Eitan; De Marco, Luiz

    2016-06-01

    Familial isolated pituitary adenoma (FIPA) is a rare genetic disorder. In a subset of FIPA families AIP germline mutations have been reported, but in most FIPA cases the exact genetic defect remains unknown. The present study aimed to determine the genetic basis of FIPA in a Brazilian family. Three siblings presented with isolated prolactin genes. Further mutation screening was performed using whole-exome sequencing and all likely causative mutations were validated by Sanger sequencing. In silico analysis and secreting pituitary adenoma diagnosed through clinical, biochemical and imaging testing. Sanger sequencing was used to genotype candidate prolactinoma-mutated additional predictive algorithms were applied to prioritize likely pathogenic variants. No mutations in the coding and flanking intronic regions in the MEN1, AIP and PRLR genes were detected. Whole-exome sequencing of three affected siblings revealed novel, predicted damaging, heterozygous variants in three different genes: RXRG, REXO4 and TH. In conclusion, the RXRG and TH possibly pathogenic variants may be associated with isolated prolactinoma in the studied family. The possible contribution of these genes to additional FIPA families should be explored.

  11. A truncating PET100 variant causing fatal infantile lactic acidosis and isolated cytochrome c oxidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Oláhová, Monika; Haack, Tobias B; Alston, Charlotte L; Houghton, Jessica Ac; He, Langping; Morris, Andrew Am; Brown, Garry K; McFarland, Robert; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia Ma; Lightowlers, Robert N; Prokisch, Holger; Taylor, Robert W

    2015-07-01

    Isolated mitochondrial complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) deficiency is an important cause of mitochondrial disease in children and adults. It is genetically heterogeneous, given that both mtDNA-encoded and nuclear-encoded gene products contribute to structural components and assembly factors. Pathogenic variants within these proteins are associated with clinical variability ranging from isolated organ involvement to multisystem disease presentations. Defects in more than 10 complex IV assembly factors have been described including a recent Lebanese founder mutation in PET100 in patients presenting with Leigh syndrome. We report the clinical and molecular investigation of a patient with a fatal, neonatal-onset isolated complex IV deficiency associated with multiorgan involvement born to consanguineous, first-cousin British Asian parents. Exome sequencing revealed a homozygous truncating variant (c.142C>T, p.(Gln48*)) in the PET100 gene that results in a complete loss of enzyme activity and assembly of the holocomplex. Our report confirms PET100 mutation as an important cause of isolated complex IV deficiency outside of the Lebanese population, extending the phenotypic spectrum associated with abnormalities within this gene.

  12. Isolation of protein-tyrosine phosphatase-like member-a variant from cementum.

    PubMed

    Valdés De Hoyos, A; Hoz-Rodríguez, L; Arzate, H; Narayanan, A S

    2012-02-01

    Cementum has been shown to contain unique polypeptides that participate in cell recruitment and differentiation during cementum formation. We report the isolation of a cDNA variant for protein-tyrosine phosphatase-like (proline instead of catalytic arginine) member-a (PTPLA) from cementum. A cementifying fibroma-derived λ-ZAP expression library was screened by panning with a monoclonal antibody to cementum attachment protein (CAP), and 1435 bp cDNA (gb AC093525.3) was isolated. This cDNA encodes a 140-amino-acid polypeptide, and its N-terminal 125 amino acids are identical to those of PTPLA. This isoform, designated as PTPLA-CAP, results from a read-through of the PTPLA exon 2 splice donor site, truncating after the second putative transmembrane domain. It contains 15 amino acids encoded within the intron between PTPLA exons 2 and 3, which replace the active site for PTPLA phosphatase activity. The recombinant protein, rhPTPLA-CAP, has Mr 19 kDa and cross-reacts with anti-CAP antibody. Anti-rhPTPLA-CAP antibody immunostained cementum cells, cementum, heart, and liver. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that PTPLA was expressed in all periodontal cells; however, PTPLA-CAP expression was limited to cementum cells. The rhPTPLA-CAP promoted gingival fibroblast attachment. We conclude that PTPLA-CAP is a splice variant of PTPLA, and that, in the periodontium, cementum and cementum cells express this variant.

  13. Charge Variants of an Avastin Biosimilar Isolation, Characterization, In Vitro Properties and Pharmacokinetics in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wan-Hui; Tao, Wen-Jie; Liu, Li-Li; Shen, Zhen-Duo

    2016-01-01

    The similarity between a proposed biosimilar product and the reference product can be affected by many factors. This study is designed to examine whether any subtle difference in the distribution of the charge variants of an Avastin biosimilar can affect its in vitro potency and in vivo PK. Here, the acidic, basic and main peak fractions of a biosimilar product were isolated using high-performance cation-exchange chromatography and were subjected to various studies to compare their in vitro properties and in vivo PK profile. A serial of analytical methods, including size exclusion chromatography (SEC), imaged capillary isoelectric focusing (icIEF) capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and cation-exchange chromatography (CEX-HPLC) were also used to characterize the isolated charge variants. The kinetics constant was measured using a Biacore X100 system. The study indicates the biosimilar product has a high similarity with avastin in physicochemical properties. The potency in vitro and PK profile in rat of charge variants and biosimilar product are consistent with avastin. PMID:26987122

  14. Charge Variants of an Avastin Biosimilar Isolation, Characterization, In Vitro Properties and Pharmacokinetics in Rat.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan-Yan; Wang, Ning; Liu, Wan-Hui; Tao, Wen-Jie; Liu, Li-Li; Shen, Zhen-Duo

    2016-01-01

    The similarity between a proposed biosimilar product and the reference product can be affected by many factors. This study is designed to examine whether any subtle difference in the distribution of the charge variants of an Avastin biosimilar can affect its in vitro potency and in vivo PK. Here, the acidic, basic and main peak fractions of a biosimilar product were isolated using high-performance cation-exchange chromatography and were subjected to various studies to compare their in vitro properties and in vivo PK profile. A serial of analytical methods, including size exclusion chromatography (SEC), imaged capillary isoelectric focusing (icIEF) capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and cation-exchange chromatography (CEX-HPLC) were also used to characterize the isolated charge variants. The kinetics constant was measured using a Biacore X100 system. The study indicates the biosimilar product has a high similarity with avastin in physicochemical properties. The potency in vitro and PK profile in rat of charge variants and biosimilar product are consistent with avastin.

  15. Isolation of Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase-like Member-a Variant from Cementum

    PubMed Central

    Valdés De Hoyos, A.; Hoz-Rodríguez, L.; Arzate, H.; Narayanan, A.S.

    2012-01-01

    Cementum has been shown to contain unique polypeptides that participate in cell recruitment and differentiation during cementum formation. We report the isolation of a cDNA variant for protein-tyrosine phosphatase-like (proline instead of catalytic arginine) member-a (PTPLA) from cementum. A cementifying fibroma-derived λ-ZAP expression library was screened by panning with a monoclonal antibody to cementum attachment protein (CAP), and 1435 bp cDNA (gb AC093525.3) was isolated. This cDNA encodes a 140-amino-acid polypeptide, and its N-terminal 125 amino acids are identical to those of PTPLA. This isoform, designated as PTPLA-CAP, results from a read-through of the PTPLA exon 2 splice donor site, truncating after the second putative transmembrane domain. It contains 15 amino acids encoded within the intron between PTPLA exons 2 and 3, which replace the active site for PTPLA phosphatase activity. The recombinant protein, rhPTPLA-CAP, has Mr 19 kDa and cross-reacts with anti-CAP antibody. Anti-rhPTPLA-CAP antibody immunostained cementum cells, cementum, heart, and liver. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that PTPLA was expressed in all periodontal cells; however, PTPLA-CAP expression was limited to cementum cells. The rhPTPLA-CAP promoted gingival fibroblast attachment. We conclude that PTPLA-CAP is a splice variant of PTPLA, and that, in the periodontium, cementum and cementum cells express this variant. PMID:22067203

  16. Identification and functional characterization of NODAL rare variants in heterotaxy and isolated cardiovascular malformations

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, Bhagyalaxmi; Casey, Brett; Li, Hua; Ho-Dawson, Trang; Smith, Liana; Fernbach, Susan D.; Molinari, Laura; Niesh, Stephen R.; Jefferies, John Lynn; Craigen, William J.; Towbin, Jeffrey A.; Belmont, John W.; Ware, Stephanie M.

    2009-01-01

    NODAL and its signaling pathway are known to play a key role in specification and patterning of vertebrate embryos. Mutations in several genes encoding components of the NODAL signaling pathway have previously been implicated in the pathogenesis of human left–right (LR) patterning defects. Therefore, NODAL, a member of TGF-β superfamily of developmental regulators, is a strong candidate to be functionally involved in congenital LR axis patterning defects or heterotaxy. Here we have investigated whether variants in NODAL are present in patients with heterotaxy and/or isolated cardiovascular malformations (CVM) thought to be caused by abnormal heart tube looping. Analysis of a large cohort of cases (n = 269) affected with either classic heterotaxy or looping CVM revealed four different missense variants, one in-frame insertion/deletion and two conserved splice site variants in 14 unrelated subjects (14/269, 5.2%). Although similar with regard to other associated defects, individuals with the NODAL mutations had a significantly higher occurrence of pulmonary valve atresia (P = 0.001) compared with cases without a detectable NODAL mutation. Functional analyses demonstrate that the missense variant forms of NODAL exhibit significant impairment of signaling as measured by decreased Cripto (TDGF-1) co-receptor-mediated activation of artificial reporters. Expression of these NODAL proteins also led to reduced induction of Smad2 phosphorylation and impaired Smad2 nuclear import. Taken together, these results support a role for mutations and rare deleterious variants in NODAL as a cause for sporadic human LR patterning defects. PMID:19064609

  17. Staphylococcus aureus Isolates Encode Variant Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B Proteins That Are Diverse in Superantigenicity and Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, Petra L.; Greenwood, Seth D.; Nookala, Suba; Kotb, Malak; Kranz, David M.; Schlievert, Patrick M.

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus produces superantigens (SAgs) that bind and cross-link T cells and APCs, leading to activation and proliferation of immune cells. SAgs bind to variable regions of the β-chains of T cell receptors (Vβ-TCRs), and each SAg binds a unique subset of Vβ-TCRs. This binding leads to massive cytokine production and can result in toxic shock syndrome (TSS). The most abundantly produced staphylococcal SAgs and the most common causes of staphylococcal TSS are TSS toxin-1 (TSST-1), and staphylococcal enterotoxins B and C (SEB and SEC, respectively). There are several characterized variants of humans SECs, designated SEC1-4, but only one variant of SEB has been described. Sequencing the seb genes from over 20 S. aureus isolates show there are at least five different alleles of seb, encoding forms of SEB with predicted amino acid substitutions outside of the predicted immune-cell binding regions of the SAgs. Examination of purified, variant SEBs indicates that these amino acid substitutions cause differences in proliferation of rabbit splenocytes in vitro. Additionally, the SEBs varied in lethality in a rabbit model of TSS. The SEBs were diverse in their abilities to cause proliferation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and differed in their activation of subsets of T cells. A soluble, high-affinity Vβ-TCR, designed to neutralize the previously characterized variant of SEB (SEB1), was able to neutralize the variant SEBs, indicating that this high-affinity peptide may be useful in treating a variety of SEB-mediated illnesses. PMID:22815951

  18. Variants of the obligate methanotroph isolate 761M capable of growth on glucose in the absence of methane

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, S.J.; Hanson, R.S.

    1984-10-01

    Isolate 761M is an unusual type I methanotroph that possess a complete tricarboxylic acid cycle. Variants of this methanotroph that were capable of growth with methanol (isolate 761AR) or glucose (isolate 761H) have been isolated. Cultures of isolate 761H grown with glucose and casein hydrolysate as the sole carbon and energy sources retained the ability to grow on methane, contained methane monooxygenase and 3-hexulose phosphate synthase, and possessed intracytoplasmic membranes similar to those found in thin sections of isolate 761M grown on methane. Methane monooxygenase was also present in cultures of isolate 761AR grown on methanol and casein hydrolysate. 18 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  19. Isolation and characterization of novel RECK tumor suppressor gene splice variants

    PubMed Central

    Trombetta-Lima, Marina; Winnischofer, Sheila Maria Brochado; Demasi, Marcos Angelo Almeida; Filho, Renato Astorino; Carreira, Ana Claudia Oliveira; Wei, Beiyang; de Assis Ribas, Thais; Konig, Michelle Silberspitz; Bowman-Colin, Christian; Oba-Shinjo, Sueli Mieko; Marie, Suely Kazue Nagahashi; Stetler-Stevenson, William; Sogayar, Mari Cleide

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common and lethal of the central nervous system glial-derived tumors. RECK suppresses tumor invasion by negatively regulating at least three members of the matrix metalloproteinase family: MMP-9, MMP-2, and MT1-MMP. A positive correlation has been observed between the abundance of RECK expression in tumor samples and a more favorable prognosis for patients with several types of tumors. In the present study, novel alternatively spliced variants of the RECK gene: RECK-B and RECK-I were isolated by RT-PCR and sequenced. The expression levels and profiles of these alternative RECK transcripts, as well as canonical RECK were determined in tissue samples of malignant astrocytomas of different grades and in a normal tissue RNA panel by qRT-PCR. Our results show that higher canonical RECK expression, accompanied by a higher canonical to alternative transcript expression ratio, positively correlates with higher overall survival rate after chemotherapeutic treatment of GBM patients. U87MG and T98G cells over-expressing the RECK-B alternative variant display higher anchorage-independent clonal growth and do not display modulation of, respectively, MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression. Our findings suggest that RECK transcript variants might have opposite roles in GBM biology and the ratio of their expression levels may be informative for the prognostic outcome of GBM patients. PMID:26431549

  20. Identification and characterization of rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus genetic variants isolated in Korea.

    PubMed

    OEM, Jae-Ku; LEE, Kwang-Nyeong; ROH, In Soon; LEE, Kyoung-Ki; KIM, Seong-Hee; KIM, Hye-Ryoung; PARK, Choi-Kyu; JOO, Yi-Seok

    2009-11-01

    Nine isolates of rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) were used for the genetic characterization of RHDV strains collected from rabbits in Korea between 2006 and 2008. A phylogenetic analysis of the complete VP60 region was performed and the sequences were divided mainly into two groups. The one group consisted of original RHDV and the other contained antigenic variant strain known as RHDVa strains. Most of the Korean isolates clustered with Chinese RHDV strains and belonged to the RHDVa subtype. A comparison of the amino acid sequences among RHDVa strains and original RHDV strains revealed significant substitutions of two amino acids in the A region, two in the B region, two in the F region, and nine amino acids in the E region. Taken together, the recent RHDVa strains have gradually replaced the original RHDV and are the predominant strains in Korea.

  1. Distribution of allelic variants of the chromosomal gene bla OXA-114-like in Achromobacter xylosoxidans clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Traglia, German Matías; Almuzara, Marisa; Merkier, Andrea Karina; Papalia, Mariana; Galanternik, Laura; Radice, Marcela; Vay, Carlos; Centrón, Daniela; Ramírez, María Soledad

    2013-11-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans is increasingly being documented in cystic fibrosis patients. The bla(OXA-114) gene has been recognized as a naturally occurring chromosomal gene, exhibiting different allelic variants. In the population under study, the bla(OXA-114)-like gene was found in 19/19 non-epidemiological-related clinical isolates of A. xylosoxidans with ten different alleles including 1 novel OXA-114 variant.

  2. Verotoxins in Bovine and Meat Verotoxin-Producing Escherichia coli Isolates: Type, Number of Variants, and Relationship to Cytotoxicity▿

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Alejandra; Lucchesi, Paula M. A.; Parma, Alberto E.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we determined vt subtypes and evaluated verotoxicity in basal as well as induced conditions of verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC) strains isolated from cattle and meat products. Most (87%) of the 186 isolates carried a vt2 gene. Moreover, the vt2 subtype, which is associated with serious disease, was present in 42% of our VTEC collection. The other vt subtypes detected were vt1, vt1d, vt2vha, vt2vhb, vt2O118, vt2d (mucus activatable), and vt2g. A total of 41 (22%) of the isolates possessed more than one vt subtype in its genome, and among them the most frequent combination was vt1/vt2, but we also observed multiple combinations among vt2 subtypes. Differences in verotoxicity titers were found among a selection of 54 isolates. Among isolates with a single vt2 variant, those carrying the vt2 subtype had high titers under both uninduced and induced conditions. However, the highest increase in cytotoxicity under mitomycin C treatment was detected among the strains carrying vt2vha or vt2hb variants. Notably, the isolates carrying the vt1 subtype showed a lesser increase than that of most of the vt2-positive VTEC strains. Furthermore, the presence of more than one vt gene variant in the same isolate was not reflected in higher titers, and generally the titers were lower than those for strains with only one gene variant. The main observation was that both basal and induced cytotoxic effects seemed to be associated with the type and number of vt variants more than with the serotype or origin of the isolate. PMID:21037301

  3. Region of Difference 4 in Alpine Mycobacterium caprae Isolates Indicates Three Variants

    PubMed Central

    Prodinger, Wolfgang M.; Blum, Helmut; Krebs, Stefan; Gellert, Susanne; Müller, Matthias; Neuendorf, Erdmute; Sedlmaier, Florian; Büttner, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    The lack of complete genome sequence information for Mycobacterium caprae complicates a robust differentiation of M. caprae and Mycobacterium bovis. In this study, the presence or absence of M. caprae-specific single nucleotide polymorphisms in lepA and gyrB genes was assessed. The region of difference 4 (RD4) was analyzed for the identification and characterization of M. caprae. Molecular characteristics were evaluated in 12 recent M. caprae isolates from livestock and wildlife collected over a 3-year period in Bavaria, Germany. Conventional PCR strategies, sequence analysis of PCR fragments, and data from a next-generation sequencing approach together with variable-number tandem-repeat genotyping were utilized. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the lepA and gyrB genes indicating the presence of M. caprae were detected in all the isolates. At least three different RD4 variants were found for Alpine M. caprae isolates. The results demonstrate that the RD4 region is rather heterogeneous in M. caprae genomes. As assumed by others, the presence of RD4 is critical for PCR-based differentiation of M. caprae from M. bovis, but in addition, the observed variability of RD4 allows the identification of M. caprae genotypes and may be indicative of a geographical-type appearance. PMID:23408688

  4. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Regional Variants (Brachial Amyotrophic Diplegia, Leg Amyotrophic Diplegia, and Isolated Bulbar Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis).

    PubMed

    Jawdat, Omar; Statland, Jeffrey M; Barohn, Richard J; Katz, Jonathan S; Dimachkie, Mazen M

    2015-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a rapidly progressive, invariably fatal disease, involves mixed upper and lower motor neurons in different spinal cord regions. Patients with bulbar onset progress more rapidly than patients with limb onset or with a lower motor neuron presentation. Recent descriptions of regional variants suggest some patients have ALS isolated to a single spinal region for many years, including brachial amyotrophic diplegia, leg amyotrophic diplegia, and isolated bulbar palsy. Clearer definitions of regional variants will have implications for prognosis, understanding the pathophysiology of ALS, identifying genetic factors related to slower disease progression, and future planning of clinical trials.

  5. Identification and Characterization of Porcine Kobuvirus Variant Isolated from Suckling Piglet in Gansu Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Shengtao; Sun, Heting; Ying, Ying; Gao, Xiaolong; Wang, Zheng; Yu, Yicong; Li, Yuanguo; Wang, Tiecheng; Yu, Zhijun; Yang, Songtao; Zhao, Yongkun; Qin, Chuan; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2013-01-01

    Kobuviruses comprise three species, the Aichivirus A, Aichivirus B, and Aichivirus C (porcine kobuvirus). Porcine kobuvirus is endemic to pig farms and is not restricted geographically but, rather, is distributed worldwide. The complete genomic sequences of four porcine kobuvirus strains isolated during a diarrhea outbreak in piglets in the Gansu province of China were determined. Two of these strains exhibited variations relative to the traditional strains. The potential 3C/3D cleavage sites of the variant strains were Q/C, which differed from the Q/S in the traditional porcine kobuvirus genome. A 90-nucleotide deletion in the 2B protein and a single nucleotide insertion in the 3′UTR were found in the variant strains. The VP1 regions of all four porcine kobuviruses in our study were highly variable (81%–86%). Ten common amino acid mutations were found specifically at certain positions within the VP1 region. Significant recombination sites were identified using SimPlot scans of whole genome sequences. Porcine kobuviruses were also detected in pig serum, indicating that the virus can escape the gastrointestinal tract and travel to the circulatory system. These findings suggest that mutations and recombination events may have contributed to the high level of genetic diversity of porcine kobuviruses and serve as a driving force in its evolution. PMID:24145960

  6. Pathogenic mitochondrial mt-tRNAAla variants are uniquely associated with isolated myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Diana; Schubert, Kathrin; Joshi, Pushpa R; Hardy, Steven A; Tuppen, Helen A L; Baty, Karen; Blakely, Emma L; Bamberg, Christian; Zierz, Stephan; Deschauer, Marcus; Taylor, Robert W

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations are associated with a wide range of clinical phenotypes, often involving multiple organ systems. We report two patients with isolated myopathy owing to novel mt-tRNAAla variants. Muscle biopsy revealed extensive histopathological findings including cytochrome c oxidase (COX)-deficient fibres. Pyrosequencing confirmed mtDNA heteroplasmy for both mutations (m.5631G>A and m.5610G>A) whilst single-muscle fibre segregation studies (revealing statistically significant higher mutation loads in COX-deficient fibres than in COX-positive fibres), hierarchical mutation segregation within patient tissues and decreased steady-state mt-tRNAAla levels all provide compelling evidence of pathogenicity. Interestingly, both patients showed very high-mutation levels in all tissues, inferring that the threshold for impairment of oxidative phosphorylation, as evidenced by COX deficiency, appears to be extremely high for these mt-tRNAAla variants. Previously described mt-tRNAAla mutations are also associated with a pure myopathic phenotype and demonstrate very high mtDNA heteroplasmy thresholds, inferring at least some genotype:phenotype correlation for mutations within this particular mt-tRNA gene. PMID:25873012

  7. Pathogenic mitochondrial mt-tRNA(Ala) variants are uniquely associated with isolated myopathy.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Diana; Schubert, Kathrin; Joshi, Pushpa R; Hardy, Steven A; Tuppen, Helen A L; Baty, Karen; Blakely, Emma L; Bamberg, Christian; Zierz, Stephan; Deschauer, Marcus; Taylor, Robert W

    2015-12-01

    Pathogenic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations are associated with a wide range of clinical phenotypes, often involving multiple organ systems. We report two patients with isolated myopathy owing to novel mt-tRNA(Ala) variants. Muscle biopsy revealed extensive histopathological findings including cytochrome c oxidase (COX)-deficient fibres. Pyrosequencing confirmed mtDNA heteroplasmy for both mutations (m.5631G>A and m.5610G>A) whilst single-muscle fibre segregation studies (revealing statistically significant higher mutation loads in COX-deficient fibres than in COX-positive fibres), hierarchical mutation segregation within patient tissues and decreased steady-state mt-tRNA(Ala) levels all provide compelling evidence of pathogenicity. Interestingly, both patients showed very high-mutation levels in all tissues, inferring that the threshold for impairment of oxidative phosphorylation, as evidenced by COX deficiency, appears to be extremely high for these mt-tRNA(Ala) variants. Previously described mt-tRNA(Ala) mutations are also associated with a pure myopathic phenotype and demonstrate very high mtDNA heteroplasmy thresholds, inferring at least some genotype:phenotype correlation for mutations within this particular mt-tRNA gene.

  8. Nontoxigenic highly pathogenic clone of Corynebacterium diphtheriae, Poland, 2004-2012.

    PubMed

    Zasada, Aleksandra A

    2013-11-01

    Twenty-five cases of nontoxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae infection were recorded in Poland during 2004-2012, of which 18 were invasive. Alcoholism, homelessness, hepatic cirrhosis, and dental caries were predisposing factors for infection. However, for 17% of cases, no concomitant diseases or predisposing factors were found.

  9. Bloodstream infection caused by nontoxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae in an immunocompromised host in the United States.

    PubMed

    Wojewoda, Christina M; Koval, Christine E; Wilson, Deborah A; Chakos, Mary H; Harrington, Susan M

    2012-06-01

    Corynebacterium species are well-known causes of catheter-related bloodstream infections. Toxigenic strains of Corynebacterium diphtheriae cause respiratory diphtheria. We report a bloodstream infection caused by a nontoxigenic strain of C. diphtheriae and discuss the epidemiology, possible sources of the infection, and the implications of rapid species identification of corynebacteria.

  10. Genomic analysis of a nontoxigenic, invasive Corynebacterium diphtheriae strain from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Encinas, Fernando; Marin, Michel A; Ramos, Juliana N; Vieira, Verônica V; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luiza; Vicente, Ana Carolina P

    2015-09-01

    We report the complete genome sequence and analysis of an invasive Corynebacterium diphtheriae strain that caused endocarditis in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. It was selected for sequencing on the basis of the current relevance of nontoxigenic strains for public health. The genomic information was explored in the context of diversity, plasticity and genetic relatedness with other contemporary strains.

  11. Campylobacter hyointestinalis Isolated from Pigs Produces Multiple Variants of Biologically Active Cytolethal Distending Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Kamei, Kazumasa; Hatanaka, Noritoshi; Asakura, Masahiro; Somroop, Srinuan; Samosornsuk, Worada; Hinenoya, Atsushi; Misawa, Naoaki; Nakagawa, Shinsaku

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter hyointestinalis isolated from swine with proliferative enteritis often is considered to be pathogenic. While the precise virulence mechanisms of this species remain unclear, we have recently identified a cytolethal distending toxin (cdt) gene cluster in C. hyointestinalis isolated from a patient with diarrhea (W. Samosornsuk et al., J Med Microbiol, 27 July 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1099/jmm.0.000145). However, the sequences of the cdt genes in C. hyointestinalis were found to be significantly different and the gene products are immunologically distinct from those of other Campylobacter species. In this study, we demonstrate the presence of a second variant of the cdt gene cluster in C. hyointestinalis, designated cdt-II, while the former is named cdt-I. Sequencing of the cdt-II gene cluster and deduced amino acid sequences revealed that homologies between the subunits CdtA, CdtB, and CdtC of ChCDT-I and ChCDT-II are 25.0, 56.0, and 24.8%, respectively. Furthermore, the CdtB subunit of ChCDT-II was found to be immunologically unrelated to that of ChCDT-I by Ouchterlony double gel diffusion test. Recombinant ChCDT-II also induced cell distention and death of HeLa cells by blocking the cell cycle at G2/M phase. Interestingly, the cdt-II genes were detected in all 23 animal isolates and in 1 human isolate of C. hyointestinalis, and 21 of these strains carried both cdt-I and cdt-II gene clusters. Altogether, our results indicate that ChCDT-II is an important virulence factor of C. hyointestinalis in animals. PMID:26283337

  12. LasR Variant Cystic Fibrosis Isolates Reveal an Adaptable Quorum-Sensing Hierarchy in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Feltner, John B; Wolter, Daniel J; Pope, Christopher E; Groleau, Marie-Christine; Smalley, Nicole E; Greenberg, E Peter; Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Burns, Jane; Déziel, Eric; Hoffman, Lucas R; Dandekar, Ajai A

    2016-10-04

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections cause significant morbidity in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Over years to decades, P. aeruginosa adapts genetically as it establishes chronic lung infections. Nonsynonymous mutations in lasR, the quorum-sensing (QS) master regulator, are common in CF. In laboratory strains of P. aeruginosa, LasR activates transcription of dozens of genes, including that for another QS regulator, RhlR. Despite the frequency with which lasR coding variants have been reported to occur in P. aeruginosa CF isolates, little is known about their consequences for QS. We sequenced lasR from 2,583 P. aeruginosa CF isolates. The lasR sequences of 580 isolates (22%) coded for polypeptides that differed from the conserved LasR polypeptides of well-studied laboratory strains. This collection included 173 unique lasR coding variants, 116 of which were either missense or nonsense mutations. We studied 31 of these variants. About one-sixth of the variant LasR proteins were functional, including 3 with nonsense mutations, and in some LasR-null isolates, genes that are LasR dependent in laboratory strains were nonetheless expressed. Furthermore, about half of the LasR-null isolates retained RhlR activity. Therefore, in some CF isolates the QS hierarchy is altered such that RhlR quorum sensing is independent of LasR regulation. Our analysis challenges the view that QS-silent P. aeruginosa is selected during the course of a chronic CF lung infection. Rather, some lasR sequence variants retain functionality, and many employ an alternate QS strategy involving RhlR.

  13. LasR Variant Cystic Fibrosis Isolates Reveal an Adaptable Quorum-Sensing Hierarchy in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Feltner, John B.; Wolter, Daniel J.; Pope, Christopher E.; Groleau, Marie-Christine; Smalley, Nicole E.; Greenberg, E. Peter; Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Burns, Jane; Hoffman, Lucas R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections cause significant morbidity in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Over years to decades, P. aeruginosa adapts genetically as it establishes chronic lung infections. Nonsynonymous mutations in lasR, the quorum-sensing (QS) master regulator, are common in CF. In laboratory strains of P. aeruginosa, LasR activates transcription of dozens of genes, including that for another QS regulator, RhlR. Despite the frequency with which lasR coding variants have been reported to occur in P. aeruginosa CF isolates, little is known about their consequences for QS. We sequenced lasR from 2,583 P. aeruginosa CF isolates. The lasR sequences of 580 isolates (22%) coded for polypeptides that differed from the conserved LasR polypeptides of well-studied laboratory strains. This collection included 173 unique lasR coding variants, 116 of which were either missense or nonsense mutations. We studied 31 of these variants. About one-sixth of the variant LasR proteins were functional, including 3 with nonsense mutations, and in some LasR-null isolates, genes that are LasR dependent in laboratory strains were nonetheless expressed. Furthermore, about half of the LasR-null isolates retained RhlR activity. Therefore, in some CF isolates the QS hierarchy is altered such that RhlR quorum sensing is independent of LasR regulation. Our analysis challenges the view that QS-silent P. aeruginosa is selected during the course of a chronic CF lung infection. Rather, some lasR sequence variants retain functionality, and many employ an alternate QS strategy involving RhlR. PMID:27703072

  14. A new variant of rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus G2-like strain isolated in China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bo; Fan, Zhiyu; Wang, Fang; Song, Yanhua; Wei, Houjun; Liu, Xing; Qiu, Rulong; Xu, Weizhong; Yuan, Wanzhe; Xue, Jiabin

    2016-04-02

    To investigate the genetic variability and evolution of rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) strains in China, VP60 gene sequences of eight new isolates collected from farms with RHD occurrences in China between 2009 and 2014 were analyzed, and compared with the reference sequence of the vaccine strain WF/China/2007. We conducted a comprehensive analysis of the Chinese RHDV strains, including hemagglutination tests, western blot and immunosassays of capsid proteins, and phylogenetic analysis, and identified a new distinct antigenic variant. Specifically, strain HB/2014 collected in North China was identified as a non-hemagglutinating strain, and belongs to the original RHDV (G1-G5) group. The other seven isolates were classified in genogroup G6 (RHDVa), which was widely distributed across China before 2014, and was thought to replace the earlier groups. Antigenic characterization of the VP60 genes revealed a large degree of nucleotide sequence divergence between HB/2014 and the other Chinese strains. However, the current vaccine showed complete cross-protection against HB/2014 challenge in inoculated rabbits. Collectively, these data provide new tools and insight for further understanding the molecular evolution of RHDV in China.

  15. A novel SHV-type beta-lactamase variant (SHV-89) in clinical isolates in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia-Bin; Cheng, Jun; Wang, Qian; Chen, Yan; Ye, Ying; Zhang, Xue-Jun

    2009-05-01

    Two clinical strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) and one isolate of Escherichia coli (E. coli) were collected from two large general hospitals in China. Conjugation experiment, susceptibility testing, isoelectric focusing, PCR, and sequencing techniques as well as clone, expression, purification and kinetics were carried out to describe the characterization of the novel SHV-tpye enzyme. The analysis of plasmid profiling and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of the novel enzyme were performed to investigate epidemiology. These isolates had CTX-M-14 and SHV-89 beta-lactamases. SHV-89 beta-lactamase of pI 7.6 is a novel variant with two substitutions compared with the sequence of SHV-1: Leu35Gln and Met129Val. Its gene also had two silent mutations at positions 369 and 774, respectively. The results of substrate profiles and MIC determinations showed the activity of the novel enzyme was insufficient for the enzyme to count as an extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL). The substrates of the enzyme were also characterized. Furthermore, the three novel SHV enzyme-producing strains were epidemiologically unrelated. The emergence of a novel SHV-type beta-lactamase is rarely described in other areas. This study illustrates the importance of molecular survelliance in tracking SHV-producing strains in large teaching hospitals and emphasizes the need for epidemiological monitoring.

  16. Non-toxigenic environmental Vibrio cholerae O1 strain from Haiti provides evidence of pre-pandemic cholera in Hispaniola

    PubMed Central

    Azarian, Taj; Ali, Afsar; Johnson, Judith A.; Jubair, Mohammad; Cella, Eleonora; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Nolan, David J.; Farmerie, William; Rashid, Mohammad H.; Sinha-Ray, Shrestha; Alam, Meer T.; Morris, J. Glenn; Salemi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is ubiquitous in aquatic environments, with environmental toxigenic V. cholerae O1 strains serving as a source for recurrent cholera epidemics and pandemic disease. However, a number of questions remain about long-term survival and evolution of V. cholerae strains within these aquatic environmental reservoirs. Through monitoring of the Haitian aquatic environment following the 2010 cholera epidemic, we isolated two novel non-toxigenic (ctxA/B-negative) Vibrio cholerae O1. These two isolates underwent whole-genome sequencing and were investigated through comparative genomics and Bayesian coalescent analysis. These isolates cluster in the evolutionary tree with strains responsible for clinical cholera, possessing genomic components of 6th and 7th pandemic lineages, and diverge from “modern” cholera strains around 1548 C.E. [95% HPD: 1532–1555]. Vibrio Pathogenicity Island (VPI)-1 was present; however, SXT/R391-family ICE and VPI-2 were absent. Rugose phenotype conversion and vibriophage resistance evidenced adaption for persistence in aquatic environments. The identification of V. cholerae O1 strains in the Haitian environment, which predate the first reported cholera pandemic in 1817, broadens our understanding of the history of pandemics. It also raises the possibility that these and similar environmental strains could acquire virulence genes from the 2010 Haitian epidemic clone, including the cholera toxin producing CTXϕ. PMID:27786291

  17. Non-toxigenic environmental Vibrio cholerae O1 strain from Haiti provides evidence of pre-pandemic cholera in Hispaniola.

    PubMed

    Azarian, Taj; Ali, Afsar; Johnson, Judith A; Jubair, Mohammad; Cella, Eleonora; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Nolan, David J; Farmerie, William; Rashid, Mohammad H; Sinha-Ray, Shrestha; Alam, Meer T; Morris, J Glenn; Salemi, Marco

    2016-10-27

    Vibrio cholerae is ubiquitous in aquatic environments, with environmental toxigenic V. cholerae O1 strains serving as a source for recurrent cholera epidemics and pandemic disease. However, a number of questions remain about long-term survival and evolution of V. cholerae strains within these aquatic environmental reservoirs. Through monitoring of the Haitian aquatic environment following the 2010 cholera epidemic, we isolated two novel non-toxigenic (ctxA/B-negative) Vibrio cholerae O1. These two isolates underwent whole-genome sequencing and were investigated through comparative genomics and Bayesian coalescent analysis. These isolates cluster in the evolutionary tree with strains responsible for clinical cholera, possessing genomic components of 6(th) and 7(th) pandemic lineages, and diverge from "modern" cholera strains around 1548 C.E. [95% HPD: 1532-1555]. Vibrio Pathogenicity Island (VPI)-1 was present; however, SXT/R391-family ICE and VPI-2 were absent. Rugose phenotype conversion and vibriophage resistance evidenced adaption for persistence in aquatic environments. The identification of V. cholerae O1 strains in the Haitian environment, which predate the first reported cholera pandemic in 1817, broadens our understanding of the history of pandemics. It also raises the possibility that these and similar environmental strains could acquire virulence genes from the 2010 Haitian epidemic clone, including the cholera toxin producing CTXϕ.

  18. Genetic Variants in Isolated Ebstein Anomaly Implicated in Myocardial Development Pathways.

    PubMed

    Sicko, Robert J; Browne, Marilyn L; Rigler, Shannon L; Druschel, Charlotte M; Liu, Gang; Fan, Ruzong; Romitti, Paul A; Caggana, Michele; Kay, Denise M; Brody, Lawrence C; Mills, James L

    2016-01-01

    Ebstein anomaly (EA) is a rare heart defect in which the tricuspid valve is malformed and displaced. The tricuspid valve abnormalities can lead to backflow of blood from the right ventricle to the right atrium, preventing proper circulation of blood to the lungs. Although the etiology of EA is largely unresolved, increased prevalence of EA in those with a family history of congenital heart disease suggests EA has a genetic component. Copy number variants (CNVs) are a major source of genetic variation and have been implicated in a range of congenital heart defect phenotypes. We performed a systematic, genome-wide search for CNVs in 47 isolated EA cases using genotyping microarrays. In addition, we used a custom HaloPlex panel to sequence three known EA genes and 47 candidate EA genes. We identified 35 candidate CNVs in 24 (51%) EA cases. Rare sequence variants in genes associated with cardiomyopathy were identified in 11 (23%) EA cases. Two CNVs near the transcriptional repressor HEY1, a member of the NOTCH signaling pathway, were identified in three unrelated cases. All other candidate CNVs were each identified in a single case. At least 11 of 35 candidate CNVs include genes involved in myocardial development or function, including multiple genes in the BMP signaling pathway. We identified enrichment of gene sets involved in histone modification and cardiomyocyte differentiation, supporting the involvement of the developing myocardium in the etiology of EA. Gene set enrichment analysis also identified ribosomal RNA processing, a potentially novel pathway of altered cardiac development in EA. Our results suggest an altered myocardial program may contribute to abnormal tricuspid valve development in EA. Future studies should investigate abnormal differentiation of cardiomyocytes as a potential etiological factor in EA.

  19. Molecular characterization of "inconsistent" variants of Salmonella Typhimurium isolated in Italy.

    PubMed

    Barco, Lisa; Longo, Alessandra; Lettini, Antonia Anna; Cortini, Enzo; Saccardin, Cristina; Minorello, Claudio; Olsen, John Elmerdahl; Ricci, Antonia

    2014-06-01

    Salmonella 4,[5],12:i:- is a variant of Salmonella Typhimurium, which lacks the expression of phase-2 flagellar antigen, generally associated with the deletion of the fljB gene. Additional mechanisms involving the fljAB operon ( fljA, fljB, and hin genes) lead to the lack of expression of phase-2 flagellar antigens also in Salmonella strains harboring the fljB gene. For 20 S. 4,[5],12:i:- strains, defined as "inconsistent" Salmonella Typhimurium variants since they had phenotypically behaved as monophasic, even though the fljB gene was conserved, the fljAB operon was characterized in order to explain the ineffective expression of the phase-2 flagellar antigen. The monophasic phenotype for a first group of strains (9) was likely due to the absence of the hin gene, leading to the inhibited switch between the expression of phase-1 and phase-2 flagellar genes. For a second group of strains (5), the monophasic phenotype could be attributed to nonconservative point mutations identified in fljA and hin genes, which could hamper the proper expression of invertase gene and the fljA, acting as repressor of the phase-1 flagellar gene. Finally, for a last group of inconsistent strains (6), a plausible reason for their monophasic phenotype was not found, since the genes involved in the expression of phase-2 flagellar antigen were fully conserved. Moreover, the collection of inconsistent Salmonella Typhimurium isolates investigated were characterized by distinct molecular profiles, as demonstrated by multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis, and phenotype variability, as demonstrated by phage-typing. This study highlights the usefulness of investigating the entire fljAB operon when a definitive identification of the monophasic or biphasic status of Salmonella Typhimurium strains is needed (for instance, in the context of epidemiological investigations aimed to identify the relatedness among strains).

  20. Isolation of chicken alpha ENaC splice variants from a cochlear cDNA library.

    PubMed

    Killick, R; Richardson, G

    1997-01-03

    Three splice variants of the alpha subunit of the amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (alpha ENaC) have been isolated from a chicken cochlear cDNA library. A PCR product, generated from the cochlear library using degenerate primers to regions of homology between the rat alpha ENaC and the degenerin Mec-4, was used as a probe. The three splice variant cDNAs with sizes of 2321, 3399 and 3845 bp correspond to transcripts of 2.5, 3.5 and 3.9 kb as detected by Northern blot analysis. The 3399 bp clone differs from the 2321 clone solely by the addition of 1079 bases in the 3'-non-coding region. Both these cDNAs code for an identical predicted protein of 637 amino acids which has 68% similarity to the rat alpha ENaC, and is probably the chicken homologue of alpha ENaC. The third cDNA of 3845 bp is similar to the 3399 bp clone but includes two exons within the open reading frame. The first of these exons introduces a premature stop codon resulting in a truncated predicted protein of 434 amino acids. Northern blot analysis shows expression of the 2.5 and 3.5 kb transcripts in cochlea and colon, the 2.5 kb transcript in cartilage, whilst the 3.9 kb transcript is only detected in cochlea. No expression is detected in brain, liver, and heart nor, most notably, in lung or kidney.

  1. Genetic Variants in Isolated Ebstein Anomaly Implicated in Myocardial Development Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Druschel, Charlotte M.; Fan, Ruzong; Caggana, Michele; Brody, Lawrence C.; Mills, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Ebstein anomaly (EA) is a rare heart defect in which the tricuspid valve is malformed and displaced. The tricuspid valve abnormalities can lead to backflow of blood from the right ventricle to the right atrium, preventing proper circulation of blood to the lungs. Although the etiology of EA is largely unresolved, increased prevalence of EA in those with a family history of congenital heart disease suggests EA has a genetic component. Copy number variants (CNVs) are a major source of genetic variation and have been implicated in a range of congenital heart defect phenotypes. We performed a systematic, genome-wide search for CNVs in 47 isolated EA cases using genotyping microarrays. In addition, we used a custom HaloPlex panel to sequence three known EA genes and 47 candidate EA genes. We identified 35 candidate CNVs in 24 (51%) EA cases. Rare sequence variants in genes associated with cardiomyopathy were identified in 11 (23%) EA cases. Two CNVs near the transcriptional repressor HEY1, a member of the NOTCH signaling pathway, were identified in three unrelated cases. All other candidate CNVs were each identified in a single case. At least 11 of 35 candidate CNVs include genes involved in myocardial development or function, including multiple genes in the BMP signaling pathway. We identified enrichment of gene sets involved in histone modification and cardiomyocyte differentiation, supporting the involvement of the developing myocardium in the etiology of EA. Gene set enrichment analysis also identified ribosomal RNA processing, a potentially novel pathway of altered cardiac development in EA. Our results suggest an altered myocardial program may contribute to abnormal tricuspid valve development in EA. Future studies should investigate abnormal differentiation of cardiomyocytes as a potential etiological factor in EA. PMID:27788187

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa variants isolated from patients with cystic fibrosis are killed by a bactericidal protein from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Siefferman, C M; Regelmann, W E; Gray, B H

    1991-01-01

    The susceptibility of paired mucoid and nonmucoid variants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from 13 patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) to killing by a 55,000-Da bactericidal protein (BP55) from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes was studied. Mucoid and nonmucoid variants were equally sensitive to killing by BP55 at both pH 5.6 and pH 7.2. Eleven of the isolates were resistant to the bactericidal activity of 10% normal human serum but were as sensitive as the serum-sensitive isolates to BP55. Similarly, the 15 isolates with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) containing O-polysaccharide side chains (smooth LPS) were as sensitive to BP55 as those isolates with rough LPS.P. aeruginosa isolates from patients in poor clinical condition were more likely to have LPS of the smooth type and to be resistant to killing by 10% human serum than the isolates from patients in good clinical condition. We have concluded that the susceptibility of the P. aeruginosa isolates from patients with CF to killing by BP55 does not correlate with mucoid or nonmucoid variations, with the presence or absence of smooth LPS, or with the sensitivity or resistance to killing by normal human serum. Images PMID:1903774

  3. Exome Sequencing in an Admixed Isolated Population Indicates NFXL1 Variants Confer a Risk for Specific Language Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Pía; Nudel, Ron; Hoischen, Alexander; Fernández, María Angélica; Simpson, Nuala H.; Gilissen, Christian; Reader, Rose H.; Jara, Lillian; Echeverry, Maria Magdalena; Francks, Clyde; Baird, Gillian; Conti-Ramsden, Gina; O’Hare, Anne; Bolton, Patrick F.; Hennessy, Elizabeth R.; Palomino, Hernán; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Veltman, Joris A.; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; De Barbieri, Zulema

    2015-01-01

    Children affected by Specific Language Impairment (SLI) fail to acquire age appropriate language skills despite adequate intelligence and opportunity. SLI is highly heritable, but the understanding of underlying genetic mechanisms has proved challenging. In this study, we use molecular genetic techniques to investigate an admixed isolated founder population from the Robinson Crusoe Island (Chile), who are affected by a high incidence of SLI, increasing the power to discover contributory genetic factors. We utilize exome sequencing in selected individuals from this population to identify eight coding variants that are of putative significance. We then apply association analyses across the wider population to highlight a single rare coding variant (rs144169475, Minor Allele Frequency of 4.1% in admixed South American populations) in the NFXL1 gene that confers a nonsynonymous change (N150K) and is significantly associated with language impairment in the Robinson Crusoe population (p = 2.04 × 10–4, 8 variants tested). Subsequent sequencing of NFXL1 in 117 UK SLI cases identified four individuals with heterozygous variants predicted to be of functional consequence. We conclude that coding variants within NFXL1 confer an increased risk of SLI within a complex genetic model. PMID:25781923

  4. Exome sequencing in an admixed isolated population indicates NFXL1 variants confer a risk for specific language impairment.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Pía; Nudel, Ron; Hoischen, Alexander; Fernández, María Angélica; Simpson, Nuala H; Gilissen, Christian; Reader, Rose H; Jara, Lillian; Echeverry, María Magdalena; Echeverry, Maria Magdalena; Francks, Clyde; Baird, Gillian; Conti-Ramsden, Gina; O'Hare, Anne; Bolton, Patrick F; Hennessy, Elizabeth R; Palomino, Hernán; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Veltman, Joris A; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; De Barbieri, Zulema; Fisher, Simon E; Newbury, Dianne F

    2015-03-01

    Children affected by Specific Language Impairment (SLI) fail to acquire age appropriate language skills despite adequate intelligence and opportunity. SLI is highly heritable, but the understanding of underlying genetic mechanisms has proved challenging. In this study, we use molecular genetic techniques to investigate an admixed isolated founder population from the Robinson Crusoe Island (Chile), who are affected by a high incidence of SLI, increasing the power to discover contributory genetic factors. We utilize exome sequencing in selected individuals from this population to identify eight coding variants that are of putative significance. We then apply association analyses across the wider population to highlight a single rare coding variant (rs144169475, Minor Allele Frequency of 4.1% in admixed South American populations) in the NFXL1 gene that confers a nonsynonymous change (N150K) and is significantly associated with language impairment in the Robinson Crusoe population (p = 2.04 × 10-4, 8 variants tested). Subsequent sequencing of NFXL1 in 117 UK SLI cases identified four individuals with heterozygous variants predicted to be of functional consequence. We conclude that coding variants within NFXL1 confer an increased risk of SLI within a complex genetic model.

  5. Genetic Variants Modulating CRIPTO Serum Levels Identified by Genome-Wide Association Study in Cilento Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Ruggiero, Daniela; Nappo, Stefania; Nutile, Teresa; Sorice, Rossella; Talotta, Francesco; Giorgio, Emilia; Bellenguez, Celine; Leutenegger, Anne-Louise; Liguori, Giovanna L.; Ciullo, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Cripto, the founding member of the EGF-CFC genes, plays an essential role in embryo development and is involved in cancer progression. Cripto is a GPI-anchored protein that can interact with various components of multiple signaling pathways, such as TGF-β, Wnt and MAPK, driving different processes, among them epithelial-mesenchymal transition, cell proliferation, and stem cell renewal. Cripto protein can also be cleaved and released outside the cell in a soluble and still active form. Cripto is not significantly expressed in adult somatic tissues and its re-expression has been observed associated to pathological conditions, mainly cancer. Accordingly, CRIPTO has been detected at very low levels in the plasma of healthy volunteers, whereas its levels are significantly higher in patients with breast, colon or glioblastoma tumors. These data suggest that CRIPTO levels in human plasma or serum may have clinical significance. However, very little is known about the variability of serum levels of CRIPTO at a population level and the genetic contribution underlying this variability remains unknown. Here, we report the first genome-wide association study of CRIPTO serum levels in isolated populations (n = 1,054) from Cilento area in South Italy. The most associated SNPs (p-value<5*10-8) were all located on chromosome 3p22.1-3p21.3, in the CRIPTO gene region. Overall six CRIPTO associated loci were replicated in an independent sample (n = 535). Pathway analysis identified a main network including two other genes, besides CRIPTO, in the associated regions, involved in cell movement and proliferation. The replicated loci explain more than 87% of the CRIPTO variance, with 85% explained by the most associated SNP. Moreover, the functional analysis of the main associated locus identified a causal variant in the 5’UTR of CRIPTO gene which is able to strongly modulate CRIPTO expression through an AP-1-mediate transcriptional regulation. PMID:25629528

  6. A novel small acid soluble protein variant is important for spore resistance of most Clostridium perfringens food poisoning isolates.

    PubMed

    Li, Jihong; McClane, Bruce A

    2008-05-02

    Clostridium perfringens is a major cause of food poisoning (FP) in developed countries. C. perfringens isolates usually induce the gastrointestinal symptoms of this FP by producing an enterotoxin that is encoded by a chromosomal (cpe) gene. Those typical FP strains also produce spores that are extremely resistant to food preservation approaches such as heating and chemical preservatives. This resistance favors their survival and subsequent germination in improperly cooked, prepared, or stored foods. The current study identified a novel alpha/beta-type small acid soluble protein, now named Ssp4, and showed that sporulating cultures of FP isolates producing resistant spores consistently express a variant Ssp4 with an Asp substitution at residue 36. In contrast, Gly was detected at Ssp4 residue 36 in C. perfringens strains producing sensitive spores. Studies with isogenic mutants and complementing strains demonstrated the importance of the Asp 36 Ssp4 variant for the exceptional heat and sodium nitrite resistance of spores made by most FP strains carrying a chromosomal cpe gene. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and DNA binding studies showed that Ssp4 variants with an Asp at residue 36 bind more efficiently and tightly to DNA than do Ssp4 variants with Gly at residue 36. Besides suggesting one possible mechanistic explanation for the highly resistant spore phenotype of most FP strains carrying a chromosomal cpe gene, these findings may facilitate eventual development of targeted strategies to increase killing of the resistant spores in foods. They also provide the first indication that SASP variants can be important contributors to intra-species (and perhaps inter-species) variations in bacterial spore resistance phenotypes. Finally, Ssp4 may contribute to spore resistance properties throughout the genus Clostridium since ssp4 genes also exist in the genomes of other clostridial species.

  7. Identification of interleukin-26 in the dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius): Evidence of alternative splicing and isolation of novel splice variants.

    PubMed

    Premraj, Avinash; Nautiyal, Binita; Aleyas, Abi G; Rasool, Thaha Jamal

    2015-10-01

    Interleukin-26 (IL-26) is a member of the IL-10 family of cytokines. Though conserved across vertebrates, the IL-26 gene is functionally inactivated in a few mammals like rat, mouse and horse. We report here the identification, isolation and cloning of the cDNA of IL-26 from the dromedary camel. The camel cDNA contains a 516 bp open reading frame encoding a 171 amino acid precursor protein, including a 21 amino acid signal peptide. Sequence analysis revealed high similarity with other mammalian IL-26 homologs and the conservation of IL-10 cytokine family domain structure including key amino acid residues. We also report the identification and cloning of four novel transcript variants produced by alternative splicing at the Exon 3-Exon 4 regions of the gene. Three of the alternative splice variants had premature termination codons and are predicted to code for truncated proteins. The transcript variant 4 (Tv4) having an insertion of an extra 120 bp nucleotides in the ORF was predicted to encode a full length protein product with 40 extra amino acid residues. The mRNA transcripts of all the variants were identified in lymph node, where as fewer variants were observed in other tissues like blood, liver and kidney. The expression of Tv2 and Tv3 were found to be up regulated in mitogen induced camel peripheral blood mononuclear cells. IL-26-Tv2 expression was also induced in camel fibroblast cells infected with Camel pox virus in-vitro. The identification of the transcript variants of IL-26 from the dromedary camel is the first report of alternative splicing for IL-26 in a species in which the gene has not been inactivated.

  8. Phytophthora infestans isolates lacking class I ipiO variants are virulent on Rpi-blb1 potato.

    PubMed

    Champouret, Nicolas; Bouwmeester, Klaas; Rietman, Hendrik; van der Lee, Theo; Maliepaard, Chris; Heupink, Anika; van de Vondervoort, Peter J I; Jacobsen, Evert; Visser, Richard G F; van der Vossen, Edwin A G; Govers, Francine; Vleeshouwers, Vivianne G A A

    2009-12-01

    A strategy to control the devastating late blight disease is providing potato cultivars with genes that are effective in resistance to a broad spectrum of Phytophthora infestans isolates. Thus far, most late blight resistance (R) genes that were introgressed in potato were quickly defeated. In contrast, the Rpi-blb1 gene originating from Solanum bulbocastanum has performed as an exclusive broad-spectrum R gene for many years. Recently, the RXLR effector family ipiO was identified to contain Avr-blb1. Monitoring the genetic diversity of the ipiO family in a large set of isolates of P. infestans and related species resulted in 16 ipiO variants in three distinct classes. Class I and class II but not class III ipiO variants induce cell death when coinfiltrated with Rpi-blb1 in Nicotiana benthamiana. Class I is highly diverse and is represented in all analyzed P. infestans isolates except two Mexican P. infestans isolates, and these were found virulent on Rpi-blb1 plants. In its C-terminal domain, IPI-O contains a W motif that is essential for triggering Rpi-blb1-mediated cell death and is under positive selection. This study shows that profiling the variation of Avr-blb1 within a P. infestans population is instrumental for predicting the effectiveness of Rpi-blb1-mediated resistance in potato.

  9. Complete genome sequence of two rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus variant b isolates detected on the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Dalton, K P; Abrantes, J; Lopes, A M; Nicieza, I; Álvarez, Á L; Esteves, P J; Parra, F

    2015-03-01

    We report the complete genome sequences of two isolates (RHDV-N11 and CBVal16) of variant rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDVb). Isolate N11 was detected in young domestic animals during a rabbit hemorrhagic disease (RHD) outbreak that occurred in 2011 on a rabbit farm in Navarra, Spain, while CBVal16 was isolated from a wild rabbit found dead in Valpaços, Northern Portugal, a year later. The viral sequences reported show 84.8-85.1 % and 78.3-78.5 % identity to RHDVAst/89 and RCV-A1 MIC-07, representative members of the pathogenic genogroup 1 RHDV and apathogenic rabbit calicivirus, respectively. In comparison with other RHDV isolates belonging to the previously known genogroups 1-6, RHDVb shows marked phenotypic differences, as it causes disease preferentially in young rabbits under 40 days of age and shows modified red blood cell agglutination profiles as well as antigenic differences that allow this variant to escape protection by the currently available vaccines.

  10. Isolation and characterization of alternatively spliced variants of the mouse sigma1 receptor gene, Sigmar1

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Ling; Pasternak, David A.; Xu, Jin; Xu, Mingming; Lu, Zhigang; Pasternak, Gavril W.

    2017-01-01

    The sigma1 receptor acts as a chaperone at the endoplasmic reticulum, associates with multiple proteins in various cellular systems, and involves in a number of diseases, such as addiction, pain, cancer and psychiatric disorders. The sigma1 receptor is encoded by the single copy SIGMAR1 gene. The current study identifies five alternatively spliced variants of the mouse sigma1 receptor gene using a polymerase chain reaction cloning approach. All the splice variants are generated by exon skipping or alternative 3’ or 5’ splicing, producing the truncated sigma1 receptor. Similar alternative splicing has been observed in the human SIGMAR1 gene based on the molecular cloning or genome sequence prediction, suggesting conservation of alternative splicing of SIGMAR1 gene. Using quantitative polymerase chain reactions, we demonstrate differential expression of several splice variants in mouse tissues and brain regions. When expressed in HEK293 cells, all the splice variants fail to bind sigma ligands, implicating that each truncated region in these splice variants is important for ligand binding. However, co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) study in HEK293 cells co-transfected with tagged constructs reveals that all the splice variants maintain their ability to physically associate with a mu opioid receptor (mMOR-1), providing useful information to correlate the motifs/sequences necessary for their physical association. Furthermore, a competition Co-IP study showed that all the variants can disrupt in a dose-dependent manner the dimerization of the original sigma1 receptor with mMOR-1, suggesting a potential dominant negative function and providing significant insights into their function. PMID:28350844

  11. New cfiA variant and novel insertion sequence elements in carbapenem-resistant Bacteroides fragilis isolates from Korea.

    PubMed

    Roh, Kyoung Ho; Kim, Sinyoung; Kim, Chang-Ki; Yum, Jong Hwa; Kim, Myung Sook; Yong, Dongeun; Jeong, Seok Hoon; Lee, Kyungwon; Kim, June Myung; Chong, Yunsop

    2010-04-01

    Of 276 nonduplicate Bacteroides fragilis clinical isolates recovered from 1997 to 2004, 3 were resistant to carbapenem. cepA and cfiA alleles were detected by polymerase chain reaction in 240 (87.0%) and 11 (4.0%) of the isolates, respectively. Insertion sequence (IS) elements were found only in the 3 carbapenem-resistant B. fragilis isolates, which produced metallo-beta-lactamase at a level detectable by UV spectrophotometry. Sequence analysis showed 1 new cfiA variant, cfiA(11), and 2 novel IS elements. The cfiA(11) gene revealed 5 amino acid substitutions compared to cfiA, with 97.6% amino acid identity. The transposase, terminal inverted repeat sequence, and target site duplication sequence of the 2 novel IS elements were unique. This study reconfirmed the correlation between ISs and carbapenem resistance in B. fragilis.

  12. Characterisation of non-toxigenic Clostridium spp. strains, to use as surrogates for non-proteolytic Clostridium botulinum in chilled food challenge testing.

    PubMed

    Parker, M D; Barrett, P I; Shepherd, J; Price, L J; Bull, S D

    2015-01-01

    Under many of the conditions studied, a two-strain cocktail of non-toxigenic Clostridium spp. was found to be suitable as a surrogate for non-proteolytic Clostridium botulinum, and has the potential for use in chilled food challenge tests measuring growth. Non-toxigenic surrogates could also be used in thermal process screening studies.

  13. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of pseudorabies virus variants isolated from Guangdong province of southern China during 2013–2014

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jindai; Zeng, Xiduo; Zhang, Guanqun; Wu, Qiwen; Niu, Jianqiang; Sun, Baoli; Xie, Qingmei

    2016-01-01

    Outbreaks of pseudorabies (PR) have occurred in southern China since late 2011, resulting in significant economic impacts on the swine industry. To identify the cause of PR outbreaks, especially among vaccinated pigs, 11 pseudorabies virus (PRV) field strains were isolated from Guangdong province during 2013–2014. Their major viral genes (gE, TK, gI, PK, gD, 11K, and 28K) were analyzed in this study. Insertions or deletions were observed in gD, gE, gI and PK genes compared with other PRV isolates from all over the world. Furthermore, sequence alignment showed that insertions in gD and gE were unique molecular characteristics of the new prevalent PRV strains in China. Phylogenetic analysis showed that our isolates were clustered in an independent branch together with other strains isolated from China in recent years, and that they showed a closer genetic relationship with earlier isolates from Asia. Our results suggest that these isolates are novel PRV variants with unique molecular signatures. PMID:26726029

  14. Antagonistic lactic acid bacteria isolated from goat milk and identification of a novel nisin variant Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The raw goat milk microbiota is considered a good source of novel bacteriocinogenic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains that can be exploited as an alternative for use as biopreservatives in foods. The constant demand for such alternative tools justifies studies that investigate the antimicrobial potential of such strains. Results The obtained data identified a predominance of Lactococcus and Enterococcus strains in raw goat milk microbiota with antimicrobial activity against Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 7644. Enzymatic assays confirmed the bacteriocinogenic nature of the antimicrobial substances produced by the isolated strains, and PCR reactions detected a variety of bacteriocin-related genes in their genomes. Rep-PCR identified broad genetic variability among the Enterococcus isolates, and close relations between the Lactococcus strains. The sequencing of PCR products from nis-positive Lactococcus allowed the identification of a predicted nisin variant not previously described and possessing a wide inhibitory spectrum. Conclusions Raw goat milk was confirmed as a good source of novel bacteriocinogenic LAB strains, having identified Lactococcus isolates possessing variations in their genomes that suggest the production of a nisin variant not yet described and with potential for use as biopreservatives in food due to its broad spectrum of action. PMID:24521354

  15. New variant of Vibrio cholerae O1 from clinical isolates in Amazonia.

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, A; Andrade, J R; Vicente, A C; Salles, C A

    1995-01-01

    A survey of pathogenic Vibrio cholerae O1 strains from the north of Brazil by using arbitrarily primed PCR fingerprints revealed a group of strains with similar fingerprint patterns that are distinct from those of the current El Tor epidemic strain. These strains have been analyzed by in vivo and in vitro techniques and the group has been denominated the Amazonian variant of V. cholerae O1. PMID:7535309

  16. Isolation of a variant Porphyromonas sp. from polymicrobial infections in central bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps).

    PubMed

    Bemis, David A; Greenacre, Cheryl B; Bryant, Mary Jean; Jones, Rebekah D; Kania, Stephen A

    2011-01-01

    Isolates of gram-negative anaerobic bacteria from reptiles have only occasionally been identified to the genus and species level in the veterinary medical literature. In particular, reports identifying Porphyromonas spp. from infections in reptiles are scarce. The present report describes unique Porphyromonas isolates obtained from necrosuppurative infections in central bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps). The isolates grew in the presence of oxygen, were strongly hemolytic, and did not produce detectable black, iron porphyrin pigment. Biochemical identification kit numeric biocodes gave high but unreliable probabilities (>99.9%) for identification as Porphyromonas gingivalis. Partial 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences of the isolates were identical to each other and shared 91% identity with those of Porphyromonas gulae. The isolates may represent a new reptile-associated Porphyromonas species.

  17. Existence of variant strains Fowlpox virus integrated with Reticuloendotheliosis virus in its genome in field isolates in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Mzula, Alexanda; Masola, Selemani N; Kasanga, Christopher J; Wambura, Philemon N

    2014-06-01

    Fowlpox virus (FPV) is one example of poultry viruses which undergoes recombination with Reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV). Trepidation had been raised, and it was well established on augmented pathogenicity of the FPV upon integration of the full intact REV. In this study, we therefore intended at assessing the integration of REV into FPV genome of the field isolates obtained in samples collected from different regions of Tanzania. DNA extraction of 85 samples (scabs) was performed, and FPV-specific PCR was done by the amplification of the highly conserved P4b gene. Evaluation of FPV-REV recombination was done to FPV-specific PCR positively identified samples by amplifying the env gene and REV long terminal repeats (5' LTR). A 578-bp PCR product was amplified from 43 samples. We are reporting for the first time in Tanzania the existence of variant stains of FPV integrated with REV in its genome as 65 % of FPV identified isolates were having full intact REV integration, 21 % had partial FPV-REV env gene integration and 5 % had partial 5' LTR integration. Despite of the fact that FPV-REV integrated stains prevailed, FPV-REV-free isolates (9 %) also existed. In view of the fact that full intact REV integration is connected with increased pathogenicity of FPV, its existence in the FPV genome of most field isolates could have played a role in increased endemic, sporadic and recurring outbreaks in selected areas in Tanzania.

  18. Sensitive and specific detection of phaseolotoxigenic and nontoxigenic strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola by TaqMan real-time PCR using site-specific recombinase gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Cho, Min Seok; Jeon, Yong Ho; Kang, Man Jung; Ahn, Hong Il; Baek, Hyung-Jin; Na, Young Wang; Choi, Yu Mi; Kim, Tae San; Park, Dong Suk

    2010-09-20

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola, the causative agent of halo blight, is the most important bacterial pathogen of bean. Both nontoxigenic (Tox(-)) and toxigenic (Tox+) strains of this pathogen cause halo blight in beans. However, nontoxigenic strains cannot be detected by currently available molecular and serological tools. In this study, a TaqMan probe and primer set were designed based on the phage integrase family site-specific recombinase of P. s. pv. phaseolicola 1448A because it is known that most site-specific recombinases are structurally and functionally diverse. The specificity of the probe and primers was evaluated using purified DNA from 29 isolates of 3 different pathovars of P. syringae. The probe and primer set were able to detect Tox(-) and Tox+ isolates of P. s. pv. Phaseolicola, but no other phytopathogenic bacteria. The assay was also able to detect at least 5 genome equivalents of cloned amplified target DNA, using purified DNA, or 7 colony forming unit (CFU) per reaction when using calibrated cell suspensions. Thus, the TaqMan real-time PCR-based method can be used for the rapid detection of both types of P. s. pv. Phaseolicola, and will potentially simplify and facilitate the diagnosis and monitoring of this pathogen, and guide plant disease management.

  19. Triclosan-Induced Aminoglycoside-Tolerant Listeria monocytogenes Isolates Can Appear as Small-Colony Variants

    PubMed Central

    Kastbjerg, Vicky G.; Hein-Kristensen, Line

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of the human food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to sublethal concentrations of triclosan can cause resistance to several aminoglycosides. Aminoglycoside-resistant isolates exhibit two colony morphologies: normal-size and pinpoint colonies. The purposes of the present study were to characterize the small colonies of L. monocytogenes and to determine if specific genetic changes could explain the triclosan-induced aminoglycoside resistance in both pinpoint and normal-size isolates. Isolates from the pinpoint colonies grew poorly under aerated conditions, but growth was restored by addition of antibiotics. Pinpoint isolates had decreased hemolytic activity under stagnant conditions and a changed spectrum of carbohydrate utilization compared to the wild type and isolates from normal-size colonies. Genome sequence comparison revealed that all seven pinpoint isolates had a mutation in a heme gene, and addition of heme caused the pinpoint isolates to revert to normal colony size. Triclosan-induced gentamicin-resistant isolates had mutations in several different genes, and it cannot be directly concluded how the different mutations caused gentamicin resistance. However, since many of the mutations affected proteins involved in respiration, it seems likely that the mutations affected the active transport of the antibiotic and thereby caused resistance by decreasing the amount of aminoglycoside that enters the bacterial cell. Our study emphasizes that triclosan likely has more targets than just fabI and that exposure to triclosan can cause resistance to antibiotics that enters the cell via active transport. Further studies are needed to elucidate if L. monocytogenes pinpoint isolates could have any clinical impact, e.g., in persistent infections. PMID:24637686

  20. Mitochondrial DNA Variant in COX1 Subunit Significantly Alters Energy Metabolism of Geographically Divergent Wild Isolates in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Dingley, Stephen D.; Polyak, Erzsebet; Ostrovsky, Julian; Srinivasan, Satish; Lee, Icksoo; Rosenfeld, Amy B.; Tsukikawa, Mai; Xiao, Rui; Selak, Mary A.; Coon, Joshua J.; Hebert, Alexander S.; Grimsrud, Paul A.; Kwon, Young Joon; Pagliarini, David J.; Gai, Xiaowu; Schurr, Theodore G.; Hüttemann, Maik; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Falk, Marni J.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence variation can influence the penetrance of complex diseases and climatic adaptation. While studies in geographically defined human populations suggest that mtDNA mutations become fixed when they have conferred metabolic capabilities optimally suited for a specific environment, it has been challenging to definitively assign adaptive functions to specific mtDNA sequence variants in mammals. We investigated whether mtDNA genome variation functionally influences Caenorhabditis elegans wild isolates of distinct mtDNA lineages and geographic origins. We found that, relative to N2 (England) wild-type nematodes, CB4856 wild isolates from a warmer native climate (Hawaii) had a unique p.A12S amino acid substitution in the mtDNA-encoded COX1 core catalytic subunit of mitochondrial complex IV (CIV). Relative to N2, CB4856 worms grown at 20 °C had significantly increased CIV enzyme activity, mitochondrial matrix oxidant burden, and sensitivity to oxidative stress but had significantly reduced lifespan and mitochondrial membrane potential. Interestingly, mitochondrial membrane potential was significantly increased in CB4856 grown at its native temperature of 25 °C. A transmitochondrial cybrid worm strain, chpIR (M, CB4856 > N2), was bred as homoplasmic for the CB4856 mtDNA genome in the N2 nuclear background. The cybrid strain also displayed significantly increased CIV activity, demonstrating that this difference results from the mtDNA-encoded p.A12S variant. However, chpIR (M, CB4856 > N2) worms had significantly reduced median and maximal lifespan relative to CB4856, which may relate to their nuclear– mtDNA genome mismatch. Overall, these data suggest that C. elegans wild isolates of varying geographic origins may adapt to environmental challenges through mtDNA variation to modulate critical aspects of mitochondrial energy metabolism. PMID:24534730

  1. Glycosylation of chicken haptoglobin: isolation and characterization of three molecular variants and studies of their distribution in hen plasma before and after turpentine-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Delers, F; Strecker, G; Engler, R

    1988-03-01

    Chicken haptoglobin (Hp), a hemoglobin-binding protein isolated from chicken plasma, is composed of three molecular variants that react differently with concanavalin A (ConA). These glycosylation variants of chicken Hp have been isolated by affinity chromatography using Sepharose-bound ConA. They differ in their molecular weight, as determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. Analysis of the glycopeptides obtained after pronase digestion of these variants yielded two types of structures: one, reactive with ConA, corresponded to a biantennary N-linked carbohydrate unit and one, unreactive with ConA, corresponded to a triantennary unit. The strongly ConA-reactive Hp variant bears only two biantennary units and the nonreactive Hp variant bears only two triantennary units; the weakly reactive Hp variant bears equal amounts of both units. The distribution of Hp glycosylation variant does not show any significant difference when obtained from the plasma of laying hens before and after turpentine-induced inflammation.

  2. Characterization of H5N1 Influenza Virus Variants with Hemagglutinin Mutations Isolated from Patients

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Yasuha; Daidoji, Tomo; Kawashita, Norihito; Ibrahim, Madiha S.; El-Gendy, Emad El-Din M.; Hiramatsu, Hiroaki; Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko; Takagi, Tatsuya; Murata, Takeomi; Takahashi, Kazuo; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Nakaya, Takaaki; Suzuki, Yasuo; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A change in viral hemagglutinin (HA) receptor binding specificity from α2,3- to α2,6-linked sialic acid is necessary for highly pathogenic avian influenza (AI) virus subtype H5N1 to become pandemic. However, details of the human-adaptive change in the H5N1 virus remain unknown. Our database search of H5N1 clade 2.2.1 viruses circulating in Egypt identified multiple HA mutations that had been selected in infected patients. Using reverse genetics, we found that increases in both human receptor specificity and the HA pH threshold for membrane fusion were necessary to facilitate replication of the virus variants in human airway epithelia. Furthermore, variants with enhanced replication in human cells had decreased HA stability, apparently to compensate for the changes in viral receptor specificity and membrane fusion activity. Our findings showed that H5N1 viruses could rapidly adapt to growth in the human airway microenvironment by altering their HA properties in infected patients and provided new insights into the human-adaptive mechanisms of AI viruses. PMID:25852160

  3. Identification of a Latin American-specific BabA adhesin variant through whole genome sequencing of Helicobacter pylori patient isolates from Nicaragua

    DOE PAGES

    Thorell, Kaisa; Hosseini, Shaghayegh; Palacios Gonzales, Reyna Victoria Palacios; ...

    2016-02-29

    In this study, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is one of the most common bacterial infections in humans and this infection can lead to gastric ulcers and gastric cancer. H. pylori is one of the most genetically variable human pathogens and the ability of the bacterium to bind to the host epithelium as well as the presence of different virulence factors and genetic variants within these genes have been associated with disease severity. Nicaragua has particularly high gastric cancer incidence and we therefore studied Nicaraguan clinical H. pylori isolates for factors that could contribute to cancer risk. The complete genomes ofmore » fifty-two Nicaraguan H. pylorii isolates were sequenced and assembled de novo, and phylogenetic and virulence factor analyses were performed. The Nicaraguan isolates showed phylogenetic relationship with West African isolates in whole-genome sequence comparisons and with Western and urban South-and Central American isolates using MLSA (Multi-locus sequence analysis). A majority, 77 % of the isolates carried the cancer-associated virulence gene cagA and also the s1/i1/m1 vacuolating cytotoxin, vacA allele combination, which is linked to increased severity of disease. Specifically, we also found that Nicaraguan isolates have a blood group-binding adhesin (BabA) variant highly similar to previously reported BabA sequences from Latin America, including from isolates belonging to other phylogenetic groups. These BabA sequences were found to be under positive selection at several amino acid positions that differed from the global collection of isolates. In conclusion, the discovery of a Latin American BabA variant, independent of overall phylogenetic background, suggests hitherto unknown host or environmental factors within the Latin American population giving H. pylori isolates carrying this adhesin variant a selective advantage, which could affect pathogenesis and risk for sequelae through specific adherence properties.« less

  4. Identification of a Latin American-specific BabA adhesin variant through whole genome sequencing of Helicobacter pylori patient isolates from Nicaragua

    SciTech Connect

    Thorell, Kaisa; Hosseini, Shaghayegh; Palacios Gonzales, Reyna Victoria Palacios; Chaotham, Chatchai; Graham, David Y.; Paszat, Lawrence; Rabeneck, Linda; Lundin, Samuel B.; Nookaew, Intawat; Sjoling, Asa

    2016-02-29

    In this study, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is one of the most common bacterial infections in humans and this infection can lead to gastric ulcers and gastric cancer. H. pylori is one of the most genetically variable human pathogens and the ability of the bacterium to bind to the host epithelium as well as the presence of different virulence factors and genetic variants within these genes have been associated with disease severity. Nicaragua has particularly high gastric cancer incidence and we therefore studied Nicaraguan clinical H. pylori isolates for factors that could contribute to cancer risk. The complete genomes of fifty-two Nicaraguan H. pylorii isolates were sequenced and assembled de novo, and phylogenetic and virulence factor analyses were performed. The Nicaraguan isolates showed phylogenetic relationship with West African isolates in whole-genome sequence comparisons and with Western and urban South-and Central American isolates using MLSA (Multi-locus sequence analysis). A majority, 77 % of the isolates carried the cancer-associated virulence gene cagA and also the s1/i1/m1 vacuolating cytotoxin, vacA allele combination, which is linked to increased severity of disease. Specifically, we also found that Nicaraguan isolates have a blood group-binding adhesin (BabA) variant highly similar to previously reported BabA sequences from Latin America, including from isolates belonging to other phylogenetic groups. These BabA sequences were found to be under positive selection at several amino acid positions that differed from the global collection of isolates. In conclusion, the discovery of a Latin American BabA variant, independent of overall phylogenetic background, suggests hitherto unknown host or environmental factors within the Latin American population giving H. pylori isolates carrying this adhesin variant a selective advantage, which could affect pathogenesis and risk for sequelae through specific adherence

  5. Isolation of novel variants of infectious bursal disease virus from different outbreaks in Northeast India.

    PubMed

    Morla, Sudhir; Deka, Pankaj; Kumar, Sachin

    2016-04-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is a highly infectious disease of young chicken that predominantly affects the immune system. In the present study, we are reporting first comprehensive study of IBDV outbreaks from the Northeastern part of India. Northeast India shares a porous border with four different countries; and as a rule any outbreak in the neighboring countries substantially affects the poultry population in the adjoining states. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the VP2 gene of the IBDV isolates from the Northeastern part of India suggested the extreme virulent nature of the virus. The virulent marker amino acids (A222, I242, Q253, I256 and S299) in the hypervariable region of the Northeastern isolates were found identical with the reported very virulent strains of IBDV. A unique insertion of I/L294V was recorded in all the isolates of the Northeastern India. The study will be useful in understanding the circulating pathotypes of IBDV in India.

  6. The Characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus Small Colony Variant Isolated from Chronic Mastitis at a Dairy Farm in Yunnan Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Li-li; Zou, Feng-cai; Yan, Yu-lin; Wang, Qi-hui; Shi, Yong-qiang; Qu, Wei-jie

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major causative agent leading to bovine mastitis and has specific phonotypical characteristics including small colony, slow growth, and decreased hemolysis, therefore named as the small colony variants (SCVs). Out of 30 tested samples of the chronic S. aureus cases, one strain of SCVs (S. aureus SCV22) was isolated along with its parental strains (S. aureus11). S. aureus SCV22 showed a slow growth rate when it is compared with the parental strain. However, their resistant patterns were similar. Meanwhile, S. aureus SCV22 depicted the lower rate of apoptosis in bovine mammary epithelial cells. These findings of the present study presented the unique characteristics of S. aureus SCV22 for the first time in Yunnan province, which provided a prophase foundation for further study about the pathogenesis of S. aureus SCVs in chronic mastitis. PMID:27066529

  7. Isolation and Characterization of a Slowly Milk-Coagulating Variant of Lactobacillus helveticus Deficient in Purine Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hebert, Elvira M.; De Giori, Graciela S.; Raya, Raul R.

    2001-01-01

    A slowly milk-coagulating variant (Fmc−) of Lactobacillus helveticus CRL 1062, designated S1, was isolated and characterized. Strain S1 possessed all the known essential components required to utilize casein as a nitrogen source, which include functional proteinase and peptidase activities as well as functional amino acid, di- and tripeptide, and oligopeptide transport systems. The amino acid requirements of strain S1 were similar to those of the parental strain. However, on a purine-free, chemically defined medium, the growth rate of the Fmc− strain was threefold lower than that of the wild-type strain. L. helveticus S1 was found to be defective in IMP dehydrogenase activity and therefore was deficient in the ability to synthesize XMP and GMP. This conclusion was further supported by the observation that the addition of guanine or xanthine to milk, a substrate poor in purine compounds, restored the Fmc+ phenotype of L. helveticus S1. PMID:11282642

  8. Construction of Nontoxigenic Mutants of Nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum NCTC 11219 by Insertional Mutagenesis and Gene Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Clauwers, Charlien; Vanoirbeek, Kristof; Delbrassinne, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Group II nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum (gIICb) strains are an important concern for the safety of minimally processed ready-to-eat foods, because they can grow and produce botulinum neurotoxin during refrigerated storage. The principles of control of gIICb by conventional food processing and preservation methods have been well investigated and translated into guidelines for the food industry; in contrast, the effectiveness of emerging processing and preservation techniques has been poorly documented. The reason is that experimental studies with C. botulinum are cumbersome because of biosafety and biosecurity concerns. In the present work, we report the construction of two nontoxigenic derivatives of the type E gIICb strain NCTC 11219. In the first strain, the botulinum toxin gene (bont/E) was insertionally inactivated with a retargeted intron using the ClosTron system. In the second strain, bont/E was exchanged for an erythromycin resistance gene using a new gene replacement strategy that makes use of pyrE as a bidirectional selection marker. Growth under optimal and stressed conditions, sporulation efficiency, and spore heat resistance of the mutants were unaltered, except for small differences in spore heat resistance at 70°C and in growth at 2.3% NaCl. The mutants described in this work provide a safe alternative for basic research as well as for food challenge and process validation studies with gIICb. In addition, this work expands the clostridial genetic toolbox with a new gene replacement method that can be applied to replace any gene in gIICb and other clostridia. IMPORTANCE The nontoxigenic mutants described in this work provide a safe alternative for basic research as well as for food challenge and process validation studies with psychrotrophic Clostridium botulinum. In addition, this work expands the clostridial genetic toolbox with a new gene replacement method that can be applied to replace any gene in clostridia. PMID:26994073

  9. Novel TTV variants isolated in an epidemic of hepatitis of unknown etiology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhihua; Luo, Kangxian; Zheng, Ruidan; Hu, Jing; He, Haitang

    2002-05-01

    TT virus (TTV) is a recently discovered single-stranded DNA virus that has been reported to be associated with elevated transminase levels in the patients with posttransfusion hepatitis of unknown etiology. TTV prevalence is very high in the common population and its pathogenicity remains unclear. In this study, we performed an epidemiological study to investigate the infection rate of TTV and its role in an epidemic of unknown-etiology hepatitis. Moreover, two TTV isolates named L01 and L02 were cloned from the serum of a patient with unknown-etiology hepatitis. Eighty-one subjects were included in the study and were divided into two groups: 18 in the case group and 63 in the control group. TTVDNA was detected by nested PCR from sera samples. The infection rates of TTV in case and control groups were 33.3 and 38.9%, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups. Homology analysis showed that L01 had a very poor homology with other TTV isolates and L02, and L02 was 75.5% identical to JA10. The result does not support TTV as a causative agent in this epidemic. The genetic divergence between L01 and other TTV isolates beyond genotype, so it represents a new genotype of TTV.

  10. Isolation and characterization of novel variants of BBI coding genes from the legume Lathyrus sativus.

    PubMed

    De Paola, Domenico; Blanco, Emanuela; Pierri, Ciro Leonardo; Sonnante, Gabriella

    2012-08-01

    A pool of twelve cDNA sequences coding for Bowman-Birk inhibitors (BBIs) was identified in the legume grass pea (Lathyrus sativus L.). The corresponding amino acid sequences showed a canonical first anti-trypsin domain, predicted according to the identity of the determinant residue P(1). A more variable second binding loop was observed allowing to identify three groups based on the identity of residue P(1): two groups (Ls_BBI_1 and Ls_BBI_2) carried a second reactive site specific for chymotrypsin, while a third group (Ls_BBI_3) was predicted to inhibit elastase. A fourth variant carrying an Asp in the P(1) position of the second reactive site was identified only from genomic DNA. A phylogenetic tree constructed using grass pea BBIs with their homologs from other legume species revealed grouping based on taxonomy and on specificity of the reactive sites. Five BBI sequences, representing five different second reactive sites, were heterologously expressed in the yeast Pichia pastoris. The recombinant proteins demonstrated to be active against trypsin, while three of them were also active against chymotrypsin, and one against human leukocyte elastase. Comparative modeling and protein docking were used to further investigate interactions between two grass pea BBI isoforms and their target proteases. Thus two reliable 3D models have been proposed, representing two potential ternary complexes, each constituted of an inhibitor and its target enzymes.

  11. New TEM variant (TEM-92) produced by Proteus mirabilis and Providencia stuartii isolates.

    PubMed

    de Champs, C; Monne, C; Bonnet, R; Sougakoff, W; Sirot, D; Chanal, C; Sirot, J

    2001-04-01

    The sequences of the bla(TEM) genes encoding TEM-92 in Proteus mirabilis and Providencia stuartii isolates were determined and were found to be identical. Except for positions 218 (Lys-6) and 512 (Lys-104), the nucleotide sequence of bla(TEM-92) was identical to that of bla(TEM-20), including the sequence of the promoter region harboring a 135-bp deletion combined with a G-162-->T substitution. The deduced amino acid sequence of TEM-92 differed from that of TEM-52 by the presence of a substitution (Gln-6-->Lys) in the peptide signal.

  12. Distribution of Gifsy-3 and of Variants of ST64B and Gifsy-1 Prophages amongst Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Isolates: Evidence that Combinations of Prophages Promote Clonality

    PubMed Central

    Hiley, Lester; Fang, Ning-Xia; Micalizzi, Gino R.; Bates, John

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella isolates harbour a range of resident prophages which can influence their virulence and ability to compete and survive in their environment. Phage gene profiling of a range of phage types of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) indicates a significant level of correlation of phage gene profile with phage type as well as correlation with genotypes determined by a combination of multi-locus variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR) typing and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) typing. Variation in phage gene profiles appears to be partly linked to differences in composition of variants of known prophages. We therefore conducted a study of the distribution of variants of ST64B and Gifsy-1 prophages and coincidently the presence of Gifsy-3 prophage in a range of S. Typhimurium phage types and genotypes. We have discovered two variants of the DT104 variant of ST64B and at least two new variants of Gifsy-1 as well as variants of related phage genes. While there is definite correlation between phage type and the prophage profile based on ST64B and Gifsy-1 variants we find stronger correlation between the VNTR/CRISPR genotype and prophage profile. Further differentiation of some genotypes is obtained by addition of the distribution of Gifsy-3 and a sequence variant of the substituted SB26 gene from the DT104 variant of ST64B. To explain the correlation between genotype and prophage profile we propose that suites of resident prophages promote clonality possibly through superinfection exclusion systems. PMID:24475087

  13. Subtilase cytotoxin-encoding subAB2 variants in verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli strains isolated from goats and sheep.

    PubMed

    Orden, José A; Domínguez-Bernal, Gustavo; de la Fuente, Ricardo; Carrión, Javier

    2016-04-01

    Subtilase cytotoxin (SubAB) is a cytotoxin which might contribute to the virulence of verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC) strains in humans. Three variants of SubAB encoding genes have been described (subAB1, subAB2-1, and subAB2-2) and it has been suggested that the strains positive for two variants of subAB may be more pathogenic for humans. In this study, 188 subAB2-positive VTEC strains isolated from goats and sheep were investigated for the presence of the subAB2-1 and subAB2-2 variants by PCR. Eighty-one of the 132 (61.4%) caprine strains and 36 of the 56 (64.3%) ovine strains possessed the subAB2-1 variant and all ovine and caprine strains, except one, were positive for the subAB2-2 variant. The results of this study show for first time that the subAB2-1 and subAB2-2 variants are found in caprine subAB2-positive VTEC strains and confirm that both subAB2 variants are detected in ovine subAB2-positive VTEC strains. Since no significant difference in the presence of both subAB2 variants was found among strains belonging to serotypes associated with severe illness in humans and strains not belonging to these serotypes, the occurrence of two subAB2 variants seems not to be associated with a higher risk of severe disease in humans.

  14. Use of a genetic isolate to identify rare disease variants: C7 on 5p associated with MS

    PubMed Central

    Kallio, Suvi P.; Jakkula, Eveliina; Purcell, Shaun; Suvela, Minna; Koivisto, Keijo; Tienari, Pentti J.; Elovaara, Irina; Pirttilä, Tuula; Reunanen, Mauri; Bronnikov, Denis; Viander, Markku; Meri, Seppo; Hillert, Jan; Lundmark, Frida; Harbo, Hanne F.; Lorentzen, Åslaug R.; De Jager, Philip L.; Daly, Mark J.; Hafler, David A.; Palotie, Aarno; Peltonen, Leena; Saarela, Janna

    2009-01-01

    Large case–control genome-wide association studies primarily expose common variants contributing to disease pathogenesis with modest effects. Thus, alternative strategies are needed to tackle rare, possibly more penetrant alleles. One strategy is to use special populations with a founder effect and isolation, resulting in allelic enrichment. For multiple sclerosis such a unique setting is reported in Southern Ostrobothnia in Finland, where the prevalence and familial occurrence of multiple sclerosis (MS) are exceptionally high. Here, we have studied one of the best replicated MS loci, 5p, and monitored for haplotypes shared among 72 regional MS cases, the majority of which are genealogically distantly related. The haplotype analysis over the 45 Mb region, covering the linkage peak identified in Finnish MS families, revealed only modest association at IL7R (P = 0.04), recently implicated in MS, whereas most significant association was found with one haplotype covering the C7-FLJ40243 locus (P = 0.0001), 5.1 Mb centromeric of IL7R. The finding was validated in an independent sample from the isolate and resulted in an odds ratio of 2.73 (P = 0.000003) in the combined data set. The identified relatively rare risk haplotype contains C7 (complement component 7), an important player of the innate immune system. Suggestive association with alleles of the region was seen also in more heterogeneous populations. Interestingly, also the complement activity correlated with the identified risk haplotype. These results suggest that the MS predisposing locus on 5p is more complex than assumed and exemplify power of population isolates in the identification of rare disease alleles. PMID:19221116

  15. Molecular characterization of two Pepino mosaic virus variants from imported tomato seed reveals high levels of sequence identity between Chilean and US isolates.

    PubMed

    Ling, Kai-Shu

    2007-01-01

    Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV), a member of the genus Potexvirus, was first described in South America on pepino (Solanum muricatum A.). Only in recent years, it was reported to infect greenhouse-grown tomatoes. Genome nucleotide sequences from several European isolates showed extensive sequence identity (>99%). Recent genome nucleotide sequences from two US isolates (US1 and US2) however showed much greater sequence divergence from that of the European PepMV isolates. My interest in characterizing virus isolates from South America was due to an active commercial tomato seed production in Chile. Through genome sequence comparison and phylogenetic analyses, we may be able to understand the source of virus infection and control this devastating disease from further spreading into new tomato growing regions of the world. Complete genome nucleotide sequences from two PepMV variants (designated as Ch1 and Ch2) were determined from a virus isolate obtained from a commercial tomato seed lot produced in Chile. Using RT-PCR-based genome walking strategy, complete genome sequences from these two variants were determined. Excluding poly (A) tails, the genomes of PepMV Ch1 and Ch2 were 6414 and 6412 nucleotides (nt), respectively. Pairwise comparisons of PepMV Ch1 and Ch2 genomes with other PepMV isolates showed that the highest nucleotide sequence identity was with two US isolates, 98.7% between PepMV Ch1 and US1, and 90.7% between Ch2 and US2. Similar to PepMV US1 and US2, the two Chilean variants were the most divergent from one another (78% nt identity). These two Chilean PepMV variants also shared only 78-86% nucleotide sequence identity to that of five European isolates. The high level of nucleotide sequence identity between Chilean and US isolates suggests a common origin. Phylogenetic analyses with various gene products generated three distinct sequence clusters (or strains): US1 and Ch1 in the first group, US2 and Ch2 in the second, and the European tomato isolates in

  16. Isolation of two physiologically induced variant strains of Bacillus stearothermophilus NRS 2004/3a and characterization of their S-layer lattices.

    PubMed Central

    Sára, M; Pum, D; Küpcü, S; Messner, P; Sleytr, U B

    1994-01-01

    During growth of Bacillus stearothermophilus NRS 2004/3a in continuous culture on complex medium, the chemical properties of the S-layer glycoprotein and the characteristic oblique lattice were maintained only if glucose was used as the sole carbon source. With increased aeration, amino acids were also metabolized, accompanied by liberation of ammonium and by changes in the S-layer protein. Depending on the stage of fermentation at which oxygen limitation was relieved, two different variants, one with a more delicate oblique S-layer lattice (variant 3a/V1) and one with a square S-layer lattice (variant 3a/V2), were isolated. During the switch from the wild-type strain to a variant or from variant 3a/V2 to variant 3a/V1, monolayers of two types of S-layer lattices could be demonstrated on the surfaces of single cells. S-layer proteins from variants had different molecular sizes and a significantly lower carbohydrate content than S-layer proteins from the wild-type strain did. Although the S-layer lattices from the wild-type and variant strains showed quite different protein mass distributions in two- and three-dimensional reconstructions, neither the amino acid composition nor the pore size, as determined by permeability studies, was significantly changed. Peptide mapping and N-terminal sequencing results strongly indicated that the three S-layer proteins are encoded by different genes and are not derived from a universal precursor form. Images PMID:8300538

  17. A major EBNA1 variant from Asian EBV isolates shows enhanced transcriptional activity compared to prototype B95.8.

    PubMed

    Do, Nguyen-Van; Ingemar, Ernberg; Phi, Phan-Thi Phi; Jenny, Almqvist; Chinh, Tran-Thi; Zeng, Yixin; Hu, Lifu

    2008-03-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) has an instrumental role in maintaining EBV latent infection by controlling EBV episome replication and regulating viral transcription. It is a ubiquitously expressed protein during latent viral infection and in EBV-associated tumors. The EBNA1 C-terminus interacts functionally with the Qp and Cp that control viral gene expression in latency I/II and III, respectively. EBNA1 has been classified into five subtypes due to sequence variation in the DNA-interacting C-terminus. By DNA sequence analysis of its C-terminus, we detected a main sub-variant (V-val-v1) of EBNA1 with valine located in both positions 487 and 528 from matched samples including NPC biopsies and peripheral blood taken from Vietnamese (9), Chinese (12) NPC patients and healthy donors (5). In the FR-region of oriP from nine NPC biopsies from Vietnam we also frequently found substitutions, deletions and variable numbers of repeats. Using a luciferase reporter system, EBNA1 and FR both derived from Asian isolates induced higher transcriptional activity than those from B95-8 virus.

  18. Metallo-β-Lactamases in Clinical Pseudomonas Isolates in Taiwan and Identification of VIM-3, a Novel Variant of the VIM-2 Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jing-Jou; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Ko, Wen-Chien; Luh, Kwen-Tay; Tsai, Shu-Huei; Wu, Hsiu-Mei; Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    2001-01-01

    A total of 209 clinical isolates of Pseudomonas (193 Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 10 P. putida, 4 P. stutzeri, and 2 P. fluorescens isolates) with reduced susceptibilities to imipenem and/or ceftazidime were subjected to PCR assays with primers specific for blaIMP-1, blaIMP-2, blaVIM-1, and blaVIM-2 and sequence analysis to identify the metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) prevalent among these organisms in Taiwan; and 21 isolates gave positive results. Five isolates including two P. putida and three P. stutzeri isolates were found to carry blaIMP-1, and six isolates including five P. putida and one P. stutzeri isolates harbored blaVIM-2. The remaining 10 isolates were P. aeruginosa, and all were found to carry a novel variant of blaVIM-2, designated blaVIM-3. There are only two nucleotide differences between blaVIM-2 and blaVIM-3, leading to two amino acid alterations. Our findings indicate that VIM-2 and its variant have become the most prevalent metalloenzymes in Pseudomonas in Taiwan. Southern hybridization with the blaVIM-2-, blaVIM-3-, and blaIMP-1 -specific probes revealed that only two VIM-2-producing P. putida isolates appeared to carry the MBL gene on plasmids. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed that six VIM-3-producing P. aeruginosa isolates and two IMP-1-producing P. stutzeri isolates were genetically related, suggesting that the spread of these MBL genes in Taiwan could be due to clonal dissemination as well as genetic exchange between different clones. PMID:11451678

  19. Variants of Coconut cadang-cadang viroid isolated from an African oil palm (Elaies guineensis Jacq.) in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Vadamalai, G; Hanold, D; Rezaian, M A; Randles, J W

    2006-07-01

    Variants of Coconut cadang-cadang viroid have been identified in a plantation oil palm growing in Malaysia. Three size classes are described, comprising 297, 293, and 270 nt. Compared with the 296-nt form of coconut cadang-cadang viroid (CCCVd), all variants substituted C31 --> U in the pathogenicity domain and A175 --> C in the right-hand terminus. Other mutations and deletions accounted for the different sizes. These are the first sequences reported for variants of Coconut cadang-cadang viroid in a species other than coconut palm, and this is the first evidence that variants closely related to CCCVd occur outside the Philippines.

  20. Prothymosin α Variants Isolated From CD8+ T Cells and Cervicovaginal Fluid Suppress HIV-1 Replication Through Type I Interferon Induction

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Avelino; Yen, Benjamin; Gusella, Gabriele Luca; Thomas, Albert G.; Mullen, Michael P.; Aberg, Judith; Chen, Xintong; Hoshida, Yujin; van Bakel, Harm; Schadt, Eric; Basler, Christopher F.; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Mosoian, Arevik

    2015-01-01

    Soluble factors from CD8+ T cells and cervicovaginal mucosa of women are recognized as important in controlling human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection and transmission. Previously, we have shown the strong anti-HIV-1 activity of prothymosin α (ProTα) derived from CD8+ T cells. ProTα is a small acidic protein with wide cell distribution, to which several functions have been ascribed, depending on its intracellular or extracellular localization. To date, activities of ProTα have been attributed to a single protein known as isoform 2. Here we report the isolation and identification of 2 new ProTα variants from CD8+ T cells and cervicovaginal lavage with potent anti-HIV-1 activity. The first is a splice variant of the ProTα gene, known as isoform CRA_b, and the second is the product of a ProTα gene, thus far classified as a pseudogene 7. Native or recombinant ProTα variants potently restrict HIV-1 replication in macrophages through the induction of type I interferon. The baseline expression of interferon-responsive genes in primary human cervical tissues positively correlate with high levels of intracellular ProTα, and the knockdown of ProTα variants by small interfering RNA leads to downregulation of interferon target genes. Overall, these findings suggest that ProTα variants are innate immune mediators involved in immune surveillance. PMID:25404520

  1. Prothymosin α variants isolated from CD8+ T cells and cervicovaginal fluid suppress HIV-1 replication through type I interferon induction.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Avelino; Yen, Benjamin; Gusella, Gabriele Luca; Thomas, Albert G; Mullen, Michael P; Aberg, Judith; Chen, Xintong; Hoshida, Yujin; van Bakel, Harm; Schadt, Eric; Basler, Christopher F; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Mosoian, Arevik

    2015-05-01

    Soluble factors from CD8(+) T cells and cervicovaginal mucosa of women are recognized as important in controlling human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection and transmission. Previously, we have shown the strong anti-HIV-1 activity of prothymosin α (ProTα) derived from CD8(+) T cells. ProTα is a small acidic protein with wide cell distribution, to which several functions have been ascribed, depending on its intracellular or extracellular localization. To date, activities of ProTα have been attributed to a single protein known as isoform 2. Here we report the isolation and identification of 2 new ProTα variants from CD8(+) T cells and cervicovaginal lavage with potent anti-HIV-1 activity. The first is a splice variant of the ProTα gene, known as isoform CRA_b, and the second is the product of a ProTα gene, thus far classified as a pseudogene 7. Native or recombinant ProTα variants potently restrict HIV-1 replication in macrophages through the induction of type I interferon. The baseline expression of interferon-responsive genes in primary human cervical tissues positively correlate with high levels of intracellular ProTα, and the knockdown of ProTα variants by small interfering RNA leads to downregulation of interferon target genes. Overall, these findings suggest that ProTα variants are innate immune mediators involved in immune surveillance.

  2. Isolation and characterization of new exon 11-associated N-terminal splice variants of the human mu opioid receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Xu, Mingming; Hurd, Yasmin L; Pasternak, Gavril W; Pan, Ying-Xian

    2009-02-01

    Alternative splicing of the mu opioid receptor genes to create multiple mu receptor subtypes has been demonstrated in animals and humans. Previously, we identified a number of C-terminal variants in mice, rats and human, followed by several N-terminal variants associated with a new upstream exon in mice (exon 11). Behavioral studies in exon 11 knockout mice suggest an important role for the exon 11 variants in the analgesic actions of heroin and morphine-6beta-glucuronide, but not morphine or methadone. We now have identified a homologous human exon 11 and three similar human exon 11-associated variants, suggesting conservation of exon 11 and its associated variants across species. hMOR-1i has an additional 93 amino acids at the tip of the N-terminus but is otherwise identical to hMOR-1. When expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, the additional 93 amino acids in hMOR-1i had little effect on opioid binding, but significantly altered agonist-induced G-protein activation. hMOR-1G1 and hMOR-1G2 predicted six transmembrane domain variants, similar to those seen in mice. The regional expression of these exon 11-associated variants, as determined by RT-PCR, varied markedly, implying region-specific alternative splicing. The presence of exon 11-associated variants in humans raises questions regarding their potential role in heroin and morphine-6beta-glucuronide actions in people as they do in mice.

  3. A Novel erm(44) Gene Variant from a Human Staphylococcus saprophyticus Isolate Confers Resistance to Macrolides and Lincosamides but Not Streptogramins.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Christian; Hu, Yanmin; Coates, Anthony; Perreten, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    A novel erm(44) gene variant, erm(44)v, has been identified by whole-genome sequencing in a Staphylococcus saprophyticus isolate from the skin of a healthy person. It has the particularity to confer resistance to macrolides and lincosamides but not to streptogramin B when expressed in S. aureus The erm(44)v gene resides on a 19,400-bp genomic island which contains phage-associated proteins and is integrated into the chromosome of S. saprophyticus.

  4. Detection of a cfr(B) Variant in German Enterococcus faecium Clinical Isolates and the Impact on Linezolid Resistance in Enterococcus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Fleige, Carola; Klare, Ingo; Fiedler, Stefan; Mischnik, Alexander; Mutters, Nico T.; Dingle, Kate E.; Werner, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The National Reference Centre for Staphylococci and Enterococci in Germany has received an increasing number of clinical linezolid-resistant E. faecium isolates in recent years. Five isolates harbored a cfr(B) variant gene locus the product of which is capable of conferring linezolid resistance. The cfr(B)-like methyltransferase gene was also detected in Clostridium difficile. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined for cfr(B)-positive and linezolid-resistant E. faecium isolates and two isogenic C. difficile strains. All strains were subjected to whole genome sequencing and analyzed with respect to mutations in the 23S rDNA, rplC, rplD and rplV genes and integration sites of the cfr(B) variant locus. To evaluate methyltransferase function, the cfr(B) variant of Enterococcus and Clostridium was expressed in both E. coli and Enterococcus spp. Ribosomal target site mutations were detected in E. faecium strains but absent in clostridia. Sequencing revealed 99.9% identity between cfr(B) of Enterococcus and cfr of Clostridium. The methyltransferase gene is encoded by transposon Tn6218 which was present in C. difficile Ox3196, truncated in some E. faecium and absent in C. difficile Ox3206. The latter finding explains the lack of linezolid and chloramphenicol resistance in C. difficile Ox3206 and demonstrates for the first time a direct correlation of elevated linezolid MICs in C. difficile upon cfr acquisition. Tn6218 insertion sites revealed novel target loci for integration, both within the bacterial chromosome and as an integral part of plasmids. Importantly, the very first plasmid-association of a cfr(B) variant was observed. Although we failed to measure cfr(B)-mediated resistance in transformed laboratory strains the occurrence of the multidrug resistance gene cfr on putatively highly mobile and/or extrachromosomal DNA in clinical isolates is worrisome with respect to dissemination of antibiotic resistances. PMID:27893790

  5. Restoration of Ca2+ influx and degranulation capacity of variant RBL-2H3 cells upon implantation of isolated cromolyn binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Mazurek, N.; Bashkin, P.; Loyter, A.; Pecht, I.

    1983-01-01

    Recently, variants of the rat basophilic leukemia cells (RBL-2H3), deficient in their binding capacity for the antiallergic drug cromolyn but displaying unimpaired ability to bind IgE, were selected and cloned [Mazurek, N., Bashkin, P., Petrank, A. & Pecht, I. (1983) Nature (London) 303, 528-530]. Although the histamine content and the number of IgE receptors in these variants are similar to those of the parental cells, they cannot be stimulated immunologically to allow Ca2+ influx and to degranulate. In contrast, the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 causes these variants to degranulate, indicating that the mechanism distal to the Ca2+ gating is intact in the variants. The cromolyn binding protein (CBP), present in the membranes of RBL-2H3 cells, has recently been isolated by affinity chromatography under nondenaturing conditions. In the current study we have used Sendaivirus envelopes as fusogenic carriers to implant the purified CBP into the membrane of variant basophils that were defective in it. This fusion leads to the restoration of Ca2+ uptake and degranulation capacity of the variants after IgE-mediated stimulation. These restored activities seem to show a sigmoidal dependence on the amount of incorporated CBP. Saturation values comparable to those of the parental line are reached when the level of implanted CBP approaches its density on the latter line. The restored capacity is due to the implanted CBP, because the reinstated immunological response can be blocked by the inhibitory drug cromolyn and by monoclonal antibodies specific to CBP, both shown to prevent Ca2+ uptake and degranulation in mast cells and parental RBL-2H3 cells. These results point out that CBP plays an important role in the Ca2+ gating process resulting in degranulation. Images PMID:6577465

  6. Dissemination of clinical isolates of Klebsiella oxytoca harboring CMY-31, VIM-1, and a New OXY-2-type variant in the community.

    PubMed

    Tsakris, Athanassios; Poulou, Aggeliki; Markou, Fani; Pitiriga, Vassiliki; Piperaki, Evangelia-Theophano; Kristo, Ioulia; Pournaras, Spyros

    2011-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the epidemiological link of multidrug-resistant Klebsiella oxytoca isolates causing community-onset infections among patients attending our outpatient department and to investigate the underlying resistance mechanisms. The isolates were tested by agar dilution MICs, phenotypic carbapenemase testing, enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-PCR, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). PCR assays and nucleotide sequencing were employed for the identification of bla gene types and the mapping of the integron-containing metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) gene. During the study period (January 2005 to April 2007), nine broad-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant K. oxytoca clinical isolates were prospectively collected from separate outpatients with urinary tract infections. In all cases, the patients had been hospitalized or exposed to health care facilities during the preceding year. Molecular typing revealed that all isolates belonged to the same K. oxytoca clonal type, which contained five PFGE subtypes. A novel chromosomal OXY-2 β-lactamase type variant (OXY-2-9) was detected in all isolates, but no mutations in the promoter region justifying bla(OXY) gene overproduction were detected. In addition, all isolates harbored the plasmidic CMY-31 (LAT-4) AmpC cephalosporinase, while three of them harbored VIM-1 MBL in a class 1 integron structure. This is the first study to present the dissemination in the community of multidrug-resistant K. oxytoca isolates causing extrahospital infections.

  7. Dissemination of Clinical Isolates of Klebsiella oxytoca Harboring CMY-31, VIM-1, and a New OXY-2-Type Variant in the Community ▿

    PubMed Central

    Tsakris, Athanassios; Poulou, Aggeliki; Markou, Fani; Pitiriga, Vassiliki; Piperaki, Evangelia-Theophano; Kristo, Ioulia; Pournaras, Spyros

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the epidemiological link of multidrug-resistant Klebsiella oxytoca isolates causing community-onset infections among patients attending our outpatient department and to investigate the underlying resistance mechanisms. The isolates were tested by agar dilution MICs, phenotypic carbapenemase testing, enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-PCR, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). PCR assays and nucleotide sequencing were employed for the identification of bla gene types and the mapping of the integron-containing metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) gene. During the study period (January 2005 to April 2007), nine broad-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant K. oxytoca clinical isolates were prospectively collected from separate outpatients with urinary tract infections. In all cases, the patients had been hospitalized or exposed to health care facilities during the preceding year. Molecular typing revealed that all isolates belonged to the same K. oxytoca clonal type, which contained five PFGE subtypes. A novel chromosomal OXY-2 β-lactamase type variant (OXY-2-9) was detected in all isolates, but no mutations in the promoter region justifying blaOXY gene overproduction were detected. In addition, all isolates harbored the plasmidic CMY-31 (LAT-4) AmpC cephalosporinase, while three of them harbored VIM-1 MBL in a class 1 integron structure. This is the first study to present the dissemination in the community of multidrug-resistant K. oxytoca isolates causing extrahospital infections. PMID:21555768

  8. Prevalence and genetic diversity of arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME) in clinical isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci: identification of ACME type I variants in Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Mayumi; Urushibara, Noriko; Kawaguchiya, Mitsuyo; Ghosh, Souvik; Shinagawa, Masaaki; Watanabe, Naoki; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2013-12-01

    Arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME), a genomic island consisting of the arc and/or opp3 gene clusters found in staphylococcal species, is related to increased bacterial adaptability to hosts. Staphylococcus epidermidis is considered a major ACME reservoir; however, prevalence and genetic diversity of ACME in coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) have not yet been well characterized for clinical isolates in Japan. A total of 271 clinical isolates of CNS in a Japanese hospital were investigated for the presence and genotype of ACME and SCCmec. The prevalence of ACME-arcA was significantly higher (p<0.001) in S. epidermidis (45.8%) than in other CNS species (3.7%). ACME in S. epidermidis isolates (n=87) were differentiated into type I (n=33), variant forms of type I (ΔI, n=26) newly identified in this study, type II (n=6), and type ΔII (n=19). ACME-type ΔI, which were further classified into three subtypes, lacked some genetic components between the arc and opp3 clusters in archetypal type I, whereas the arc and opp3 clusters were intact. The arc cluster exhibited high sequence identity (95.8-100%) to that of type I ACME; in contrast, the opp3 cluster was highly diverse, and showed relatively lower identities (94.8-98.7%) to the identical regions in type I ACME. Twenty-one isolates of ΔI ACME-carrying S. epidermidis possessed SCCmec IVa and belonged to ST5 (clonal complex 2). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that isolates harboring ACME ΔI in this study clustered with previously reported S. epidermidis strains with other lineges, suggesting that S. epidermidis originally had some genetic variations in the opp3 cluster. In summary, ACME type ΔI, a truncated variant of ACME-I, was first identified in S. epidermidis, and revealed to be prevalent in ST5 MRSE clinical isolates with SCCmec IVa.

  9. Enrichment of rare variants in population isolates: single AICDA mutation responsible for hyper-IgM syndrome type 2 in Finland

    PubMed Central

    Trotta, Luca; Hautala, Timo; Hämäläinen, Sari; Syrjänen, Jaana; Viskari, Hanna; Almusa, Henrikki; Lepisto, Maija; Kaustio, Meri; Porkka, Kimmo; Palotie, Aarno; Seppänen, Mikko; Saarela, Janna

    2016-01-01

    Antibody class-switch recombination and somatic hypermutation critically depend on the function of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). Rare variants in its gene AICDA have been reported to cause autosomal recessive AID deficiency (autosomal recessive hyper-IgM syndrome type 2 (HIGM2)). Exome sequencing of a multicase Finnish family with an HIGM2 phenotype identified a rare, homozygous, variant (c.416T>C, p.(Met139Thr)) in the AICDA gene, found to be significantly enriched in the Finnish population compared with other populations of European origin (38.56-fold, P<0.001). The population history of Finland, characterized by a restricted number of founders, isolation and several population bottlenecks, has caused enrichment of certain rare disease-causing variants and losses of others, as part of a phenomenon called the Finnish Disease Heritage. Accordingly, rare founder mutations cause the majority of observed Finnish cases in these mostly autosomal recessive disorders that consequently are more frequent in Finland than elsewhere. Screening of all currently known Finnish patients with an HIGM2 phenotype showed them to be homozygous for p.(Met139Thr). All the Finnish p.(Met139Thr) carriers with available data on their geographic descent originated from the eastern and northeastern parts of Finland. They were observed to share more of their genome identity by descent (IBD) than Finns in general (P<0.001), and they all carried a 207.5-kb ancestral haplotype containing the variant. In conclusion, the identified p.(Met139Thr) variant is significantly enriched in Finns and explains all thus far found AID deficiencies in Finland. PMID:27142677

  10. Characterization of Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor biotype variant clinical isolates from Bangladesh and Haiti, including a molecular genetic analysis of virulence genes.

    PubMed

    Son, Mike S; Megli, Christina J; Kovacikova, Gabriela; Qadri, Firdausi; Taylor, Ronald K

    2011-11-01

    Vibrio cholerae serogroup O1, the causative agent of the diarrheal disease cholera, is divided into two biotypes: classical and El Tor. Both biotypes produce the major virulence factors toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP) and cholera toxin (CT). Although possessing genotypic and phenotypic differences, El Tor biotype strains displaying classical biotype traits have been reported and subsequently were dubbed El Tor variants. Of particular interest are reports of El Tor variants that produce various levels of CT, including levels typical of classical biotype strains. Here, we report the characterization of 10 clinical isolates from the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh, and a representative strain from the 2010 Haiti cholera outbreak. We observed that all 11 strains produced increased CT (2- to 10-fold) compared to that of wild-type El Tor strains under in vitro inducing conditions, but they possessed various TcpA and ToxT expression profiles. Particularly, El Tor variant MQ1795, which produced the highest level of CT and very high levels of TcpA and ToxT, demonstrated hypervirulence compared to the virulence of El Tor wild-type strains in the infant mouse cholera model. Additional genotypic and phenotypic tests were conducted to characterize the variants, including an assessment of biotype-distinguishing characteristics. Notably, the sequencing of ctxB in some El Tor variants revealed two copies of classical ctxB, one per chromosome, contrary to previous reports that located ctxAB only on the large chromosome of El Tor biotype strains.

  11. A PCR for dtxR gene: application to diagnosis of non-toxigenic and toxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Fabricia P; Matias, Gisele A M; Pereira, Gabriela A; Camello, Thereza C F; Alves, Gabriela B; Rosa, Ana C P; Hirata, Raphael; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana L

    2008-06-01

    The significant rise in the percentage of adults susceptible to diphtheria and the emergence of non-toxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae strains as the causative agent of endocarditis and other systemic infections emphasize the need for alternative laboratory diagnostic procedures. In this study, for the first time, the value of a species-specific PCR assay that targets the dtxR gene is documented as a procedure for differentiating C. diphtheriae from Corynebacterium-like colonies. The results of the PCR-dtxR were all positive for 91 C. diphtheriae (54 non-toxigenic and 37 toxigenic) strains. PCR-dtxR completely correlated with the standard biochemical and commercial identification for all C. diphtheriae strains tested. Conversely, the PCR-dtxR results were negative in 100% of the 111 non-diphtherial Gram-positive rod strains obtained during identification procedures in a hospital laboratory. Thus, the PCR-dtxR assay emerged as viable, cost-effective screening method for C. diphtheriae laboratory identification.

  12. Over-expression of major colonization factors of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, alone or together, on non-toxigenic E. coli bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tobias, Joshua; Holmgren, Jan; Hellman, Maria; Nygren, Erik; Lebens, Michael; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2010-10-08

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of diarrheal disease and deaths among children in developing countries and the major cause of traveller's diarrhea. Since surface protein colonization factors (CFs) of ETEC are important for pathogenicity and immune protection is mainly mediated by locally produced IgA antibodies in the gut, much effort has focused on the development of an oral CF-based vaccine. We have recently described the development of recombinant strains over-expressing CFA/I; the most prevalent CF among human clinical ETEC isolates. Here, non-toxigenic recombinant E. coli strains over-expressing Coli surface antigen 2 (CS2), CS4, CS5, and CS6, either alone, or each in combination with CFA/I were constructed by cloning the genes required for expression and assembly of each CF into expression vectors harboring a strong promoter. Immunological assays showed that recombinant strains expressing single CFs produced those in significantly larger amounts than did corresponding naturally high producing reference strains. Recombinant strains co-expressing CFA/I together with another CF also expressed significantly larger amounts of both CFs compared with the corresponding references strains. Further, when tested in mice, oral immunization with formalin-killed recombinant bacteria co-expressing one such double-expression CF pair, CFA/I+CS2, induced specific serum IgG+IgM and fecal IgA antibody responses against both CFs exceeding the responses induced by immunizations with natural reference strains expressing CFA/I and CS2, respectively. We conclude that the described type of recombinant bacteria over-expressing major CFs of ETEC, alone or in combination, may be useful as candidate strains for use in an oral whole-cell CF-ETEC vaccine.

  13. Holotoxin Activity of Botulinum Neurotoxin Subtype A4 Originating from a Nontoxigenic Clostridium botulinum Expression System.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Marite; Tepp, William H; Whitemarsh, Regina C M; Pellett, Sabine; Johnson, Eric A

    2014-12-01

    Clostridium botulinum subtype A4 neurotoxin (BoNT/A4) is naturally expressed in the dual-toxin-producing C. botulinum strain 657Ba at 100× lower titers than BoNT/B. In this study, we describe purification of recombinant BoNT/A4 (rBoNT/A4) expressed in a nonsporulating and nontoxigenic C. botulinum expression host strain. The rBoNT/A4 copurified with nontoxic toxin complex components provided in trans by the expression host and was proteolytically cleaved to the active dichain form. Activity of the recombinant BoNT/A4 in mice and in human neuronal cells was about 1,000-fold lower than that of BoNT/A1, and the recombinant BoNT/A4 was effectively neutralized by botulism heptavalent antitoxin. A previous report using recombinant truncated BoNT/A4 light chain (LC) expressed in Escherichia coli has indicated reduced stability and activity of BoNT/A4 LC compared to BoNT/A1 LC, which was surmounted by introduction of a single-amino-acid substitution, I264R. In order to determine whether this mutation would also affect the holotoxin activity of BoNT/A4, a recombinant full-length BoNT/A4 carrying this mutation as well as a second mutation predicted to increase solubility (L260F) was produced in the clostridial expression system. Comparative analyses of the in vitro, cellular, and in vivo activities of rBoNT/A4 and rBoNT/A4-L260F I264R showed 1,000-fold-lower activity than BoNT/A1 in both the mutated and nonmutated BoNT/A4. This indicates that these mutations do not alter the activity of BoNT/A4 holotoxin. In summary, a recombinant BoNT from a dual-toxin-producing strain was expressed and purified in an endogenous clostridial expression system, allowing analysis of this toxin.

  14. NDM-12, a Novel New Delhi Metallo-β-Lactamase Variant from a Carbapenem-Resistant Escherichia coli Clinical Isolate in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Tada, Tatsuya; Shrestha, Basudha; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Shimada, Kayo; Ohara, Hiroshi; Pokhrel, Bharat M.

    2014-01-01

    A novel New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase variant, NDM-12, was identified in a carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli clinical isolate obtained from a urine sample from a patient in Nepal. NDM-12 differed from NDM-1 by two amino acid substitutions (M154L and G222D). The enzymatic activities of NDM-12 against β-lactams were similar to those of NDM-1, although NDM-12 showed lower kcat/Km ratios for all β-lactams tested except doripenem. The blaNDM-12 gene was located in a plasmid of 160 kb. PMID:25092693

  15. Detection and Characterization of VIM-31, a New Variant of VIM-2 with Tyr224His and His252Arg Mutations, in a Clinical Isolate of Enterobacter cloacae

    PubMed Central

    Bebrone, Carine; Huang, Te-Din; Bouchahrouf, Warda; DeGheldre, Yves; Deplano, Ariane; Hoffmann, Kurt; Glupczynski, Youri

    2012-01-01

    We report the first description of the metallo-β-lactamase VIM-31, a new variant of VIM-2 with Tyr224His and His252Arg mutations, in Enterobacter cloacae 11236, which was isolated from blood specimens of a patient with colonic adenocarcinoma in Belgium. blaVIM-31 was found on a class 1 integron located on a self-transferable but not typeable 42-kb plasmid. Compared to values published elsewhere for VIM-2, the purified VIM-31 enzyme showed weaker catalytic efficiency against all the tested beta-lactam agents (except for ertapenem), resulting from lower kcat (except for ertapenem) and higher Km values for VIM-31. PMID:22391550

  16. Presence of pap-, sfa-, and afa-related sequences in necrotoxigenic Escherichia coli isolates from cattle: evidence for new variants of the AFA family.

    PubMed

    Mainil, J G; Jacquemin, E; Hérault, F; Oswald, E

    1997-07-01

    Necrotoxigenic Escherichia coli (NTEC) are associated with intestinal and extraintestinal diseases in animals and human beings and produce Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor 1 (CNF1) or 2 (CNF2). Fourty-three NTEC1, 42 NTEC2, and 32 CNF-negative isolates from cattle were tested by colony DNA hybridization, by plasmid DNA hybridization and by PCR assays for the presence of DNA sequences homologous to the operons coding for fimbrial (PAP/PRS, SFA/FIC, and F17) and afimbrial (AFA/Dr) adhesins of extraintestinal E. coli. Most NTEC1 isolates hybridized with the PAP probes and either the SFA probe (37%) or the AFA probes (49%). Most NTEC2 isolates, in contrast, hybridized with the F17 probe (45%), the AFA probes (19%), or the F17 and AFA probes (22%). A probe-positive plasmid was identified in each of the 19 NTEC2 isolates studied. They all hybridized with the CNF2 toxin probe (Vir plasmids) and most of them with the F17 (6 plasmids) or AFA (7 plasmids) probes. PCR amplification was obtained with 6 of the 11 NTEC isolates tested for the papGII/prsG genes; with all 5 NTEC isolates tested for the sfa and related operons; but with none of the 18 NTEC isolates tested for the afa and related operons. pap-, sfa-, and afa-related sequences are thus present in NTEC isolates from cattle in addition to f17-related operons and may code for adhesins corresponding to specific colonization factors. f17- and afa-related sequences can be located on the Vir plasmids along with the cnf2 gene. Existence of new variants of the AFA/Dr family is evident from the negative results of this family-specific PCR assay.

  17. Foodborne Salmonellosis in Italy: Characterization of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium and Monophasic Variant 4,[5],12:i- Isolated from Salami and Human Patients.

    PubMed

    Andreoli, Giuseppina; Merla, Cristina; Valle, Claudia Dalla; Corpus, Francesco; Morganti, Marina; D'incau, Mario; Colmegna, Silvia; Marone, Piero; Fabbi, Massimo; Barco, Lisa; Carra, Elena

    2017-04-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (STm) and its monophasic variant 4,[5],12:i:- (VMSTm) have been responsible for an increased number of foodborne infections in humans in Europe in recent years. The aim of this study was to investigate the origin of three foodborne salmonellosis outbreaks that occurred in Pavia Province (Lombardy region, northern Italy) in 2010. Phenotypic and genetic characteristics of the STm and VMSTm isolates from patients and from food that were recovered in the framework of the three outbreaks were evaluated through serotyping, phage typing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). Salami from three artisan producers, which had all purchased meat from the same slaughterhouse, was the food source of infection in outbreak I. STm isolates were recovered from salami and patients with symptoms of gastroenteritis. These isolates had the same PFGE type and the same rare MLVA profile (3-18-9-NA-211). The same molecular profiles were found in an STm isolate from a salami, which likely was the source of another family outbreak (II). A VMSTm strain with common phenotypic and molecular profiles was isolated from three hospitalized patients and identified as the cause of another putative outbreak (III). During the following 3 years (2011 through 2013), 360 salami produced in Pavia Province were monitored for the presence of S. enterica . In 2011, no STm and VMSTm isolates were recovered from 159 salami tested. During 2012 and 2013, 13.9% of 201 tested salami harbored S. enterica , and half of the isolates were VMSTm, mainly in salami from those artisan producers involved in the previous outbreaks. These isolates were genetically variable, especially in terms of MLVA profiles. The data collected suggest that from 2012, VMSTm has replaced STm in the environments of the salami producers monitored in this study, and these data confirm the dominance of

  18. Characterization of a variant of human T-lymphotropic virus type I isolated from a healthy member of a remote, recently contacted group in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed Central

    Yanagihara, R; Nerurkar, V R; Garruto, R M; Miller, M A; Leon-Monzon, M E; Jenkins, C L; Sanders, R C; Liberski, P P; Alpers, M P; Gajdusek, D C

    1991-01-01

    We report the characterization of a variant of human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) isolated from an interleukin 2-dependent, CD8+ T-cell line derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of a healthy member of a remote, recently contacted hunter-horticulturalist group (Hagahai) in Madang province of Papua New Guinea. Antigenic characterization of this variant, designated PNG-1, by immunofluorescence, indicated no expression of gag-encoded proteins p19 and p24 (even after incubation with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine), using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against HTLV-I gag gene products. Virus-specific proteins of 15, 19, 46, 53, and 61/68 kDa were demonstrated by Western blot analysis, using sera from patients with serologically and/or virologically confirmed HTLV-I myeloneuropathy, sera from HTLV-I-infected rabbits, and antibodies prepared against the C terminus of the major envelope glycoprotein gp46. Restriction endonuclease maps of PNG-1 proviral DNA differed from that of a prototype strain of HTLV-I (MT-2), but, as verified by polymerase chain reaction, PNG-1 was definitely HTLV-I, not HTLV-II. Nucleotide sequencing and further molecular genetic studies of this variant may provide insights into the origin and evolution of HTLV-I. Images PMID:1996344

  19. Molecular characterization and expression of buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) DEAD-box family VASA gene and mRNA transcript variants isolated from testis tissue.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Ramakant; Singh, Karn Pratap; Bahuguna, Vivek; Rameshbabu, K; Singh, Manoj Kumar; Manik, Radhey Shyam; Palta, Prabhat; Singla, Suresh Kumar; Chauhan, Manmohan Singh

    2015-11-01

    VASA is a member of the DEAD-box protein family that plays an indispensable role in mammalian spermatogenesis, particularly during meiosis. In the present study, we isolated, sequenced, and characterized VASA gene in buffalo testis. Here, we demonstrated that VASA mRNA is expressed as multiple isoforms and uses four alternative transcriptional start sites (TSSs) and four different polyadenylation sites. The TSSs identified by 5'-RNA ligase-mediated rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RLM-5'-RACE) were positioned at 48, 53, 85, and 88 nucleotides upstream relative to the translation initiation codon. 3'-RACE experiment revealed the presence of tandem polyadenylation signals, which lead to the expression of at least four different 3'-untranslated regions (209, 233, 239 and 605 nucleotides). The full-length coding region of VASA was 2190 bp, which encodes a 729 amino acid (aa) protein containing nine consensus regions of the DEAD box protein family. VASA variants are highly expressed in testis of adult buffalo. We found five variants, one full length VASA (729 aa) and four splice variants VASA 2, 4, 5, 6 (683, 685, 679, 703 aa). The expression level of VASA 1 was significantly higher than rest of all (P < 0.05) except VASA 6. The relative ratio for VASA 1:2:4:5:6 was 100:1.0:1.6:0.9:48.

  20. New approach to the management of Clostridium difficile infection: colonisation with non-toxigenic C. difficile during daily ampicillin or ceftriaxone administration.

    PubMed

    Merrigan, Michelle M; Sambol, Susan P; Johnson, Stuart; Gerding, Dale N

    2009-03-01

    Non-toxigenic strains of Clostridium difficile are highly effective in preventing toxigenic C. difficile infection in hamsters when given following a single dose of an antimicrobial agent. The goal of this study was to determine the ability of non-toxigenic C. difficile to colonise hamsters during administration of an antibiotic to which the organisms are resistant - ceftriaxone - and an antibiotic to which they are susceptible - ampicillin - and to determine if non-toxigenic colonisation is protective against toxigenic strain challenge. Groups of four or five hamsters were administered daily ceftriaxone 60 mg/kg/d intraperitoneally or ampicillin 60 mg/kg/d orally for 5 days. Three non-toxigenic strains of C. difficile, M3, M23, and T7 (MICs 96-128 mg/L) were each given orally at a dose of 1 x 10(6) spores to groups of five animals 3h after the first dose of ceftriaxone. All animals were colonised successfully by day 3 of the study and when challenged with 1 x 10(6) spores of toxigenic strain J9 (MIC >256 mg/L) on day 3 all animals survived, whereas the control animal given ceftriaxone, but not non-toxigenic C. difficile, died within 48h of challenge. When groups of four hamsters were given ampicillin, administration of non-toxigenic strain M3 (MIC 2 mg/L) or toxigenic strain J9 (MIC 0.75 mg/L) at 1 x 10(6) spores did not result in any colonisation or infection of the animals until day 8, 3 days after the last ampicillin dose. A protection study was designed by giving M3 spores to groups of five animals daily for 5 days beginning on day 1, 3, or 5 of ampicillin. Toxigenic challenge was given with J9 spores on day 3 of each M3 regimen. M3 colonised all animals by day 8 and none became infected with J9. Colonisation by non-toxigenic C. difficile is an effective prevention strategy during antibiotic administration of ceftriaxone or ampicillin, but multiple-day administration is required for ampicillin and colonisation does not occur until several days after the drug

  1. Identification of Two Novel Mycobacterium avium Allelic Variants in Pig and Human Isolates from Brazil by PCR-Restriction Enzyme Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Leão, Sylvia Cardoso; Briones, Marcelo R. S.; Sircili, Marcelo Palma; Balian, Simone Carvalho; Mores, Nelson; Ferreira-Neto, José Soares

    1999-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is composed of environmental mycobacteria found widely in soil, water, and aerosols that can cause disease in animals and humans, especially disseminated infections in AIDS patients. MAC consists of two closely related species, M. avium and M. intracellulare, and may also include other, less-defined groups. The precise differentiation of MAC species is a fundamental step in epidemiological studies and for the evaluation of possible reservoirs for MAC infection in humans and animals. In this study, which included 111 pig and 26 clinical MAC isolates, two novel allelic M. avium PCR-restriction enzyme analysis (PRA) variants were identified, differing from the M. avium PRA prototype in the HaeIII digestion pattern. Mutations in HaeIII sites were confirmed by DNA sequencing. Identification of these isolates as M. avium was confirmed by PCR with DT1-DT6 and IS1245 primers, nucleic acid hybridization with the AccuProbe system, 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing, and biochemical tests. The characterization of M. avium PRA variants can be useful in the elucidation of factors involved in mycobacterial virulence and routes of infection and also has diagnostic significance, since they can be misidentified as M. simiae II and M. kansasii I if the PRA method is used in the clinical laboratory for identification of mycobacteria. PMID:10405407

  2. Highly divergent molecular variants of human T-lymphotropic virus type I from isolated populations in Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands.

    PubMed Central

    Gessian, A; Yanagihara, R; Franchini, G; Garruto, R M; Jenkins, C L; Ajdukiewicz, A B; Gallo, R C; Gajdusek, D C

    1991-01-01

    To determine the molecular genetic relationship between Melanesian strains of human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) and cosmopolitan prototype HTLV-I, we amplified by PCR, then cloned, and sequenced a 522-base-pair region of the HTLV-I env gene in DNA extracted from uncultured (fresh) and cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from six seropositive Melanesian Papua New Guineans and Solomon Islanders, including a Solomon Islander with HTLV-I myeloneuropathy. Unlike isolates of HTLV-I from Japan, the West Indies, the Americas, and Africa, which share greater than or equal to 97% sequence homology, the Melanesian strains of HTLV-I were only 91.8%-92.5% identical with a prototype Japanese HTLV-IATK-1. The nucleotide sequence of proviral DNA from the Solomon Islander with HTLV-I myeloneuropathy also diverged markedly from that of HTLV-I isolated from Japanese patients with HTLV-I-associated myelopathy and from Jamaican patients with tropical spastic paraparesis, suggesting that these variant viruses are capable of causing disease. The HTLV-I variants from Papua New Guineans, in turn, differed by nearly 4% from the Melanesian variants from Solomon Islanders, indicating the existence of another HTLV-I quasi-species. By contrast, HTLV-I strains from two residents of Bellona Island, a Polynesian Outlier within the Solomon Islands, were closely related to cosmopolitan prototype HTLV-I (greater than or equal to 97% sequence identity), suggesting recent introduction, possibly during this century. These findings are consistent with a proto-Melanesian HTLV-I strain of archaic presence, which evolved independently of contemporary cosmopolitan strains, and pose new questions about the origin and global dissemination of HTLV-I. Images PMID:1881912

  3. Clostridium botulinum Group II Isolate Phylogenomic Profiling Using Whole-Genome Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    Weedmark, K. A.; Mabon, P.; Hayden, K. L.; Lambert, D.; Van Domselaar, G.; Austin, J. W.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum group II isolates (n = 163) from different geographic regions, outbreaks, and neurotoxin types and subtypes were characterized in silico using whole-genome sequence data. Two clusters representing a variety of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) types and subtypes were identified by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and core single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. While one cluster included BoNT/B4/F6/E9 and nontoxigenic members, the other comprised a wide variety of different BoNT/E subtype isolates and a nontoxigenic strain. In silico MLST and core SNP methods were consistent in terms of clade-level isolate classification; however, core SNP analysis showed higher resolution capability. Furthermore, core SNP analysis correctly distinguished isolates by outbreak and location. This study illustrated the utility of next-generation sequence-based typing approaches for isolate characterization and source attribution and identified discrete SNP loci and MLST alleles for isolate comparison. PMID:26116673

  4. Clostridium botulinum Group II Isolate Phylogenomic Profiling Using Whole-Genome Sequence Data.

    PubMed

    Weedmark, K A; Mabon, P; Hayden, K L; Lambert, D; Van Domselaar, G; Austin, J W; Corbett, C R

    2015-09-01

    Clostridium botulinum group II isolates (n = 163) from different geographic regions, outbreaks, and neurotoxin types and subtypes were characterized in silico using whole-genome sequence data. Two clusters representing a variety of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) types and subtypes were identified by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and core single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. While one cluster included BoNT/B4/F6/E9 and nontoxigenic members, the other comprised a wide variety of different BoNT/E subtype isolates and a nontoxigenic strain. In silico MLST and core SNP methods were consistent in terms of clade-level isolate classification; however, core SNP analysis showed higher resolution capability. Furthermore, core SNP analysis correctly distinguished isolates by outbreak and location. This study illustrated the utility of next-generation sequence-based typing approaches for isolate characterization and source attribution and identified discrete SNP loci and MLST alleles for isolate comparison.

  5. Acquisition of Tn6018-3' CS regions increases colistin MICs against Acinetobacter baumannii isolates harboring new variants of AbaRs.

    PubMed

    Savari, Mohammad; Ekrami, Alireza; Shoja, Saeed; Bahador, Abbas

    2017-02-25

    Colistin is the last hope to treat extensively drug resistance (XDR) Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) infections, but resistance to colistin is currently reported in clinical centers all over the world. Here, we studied two colistin-resistant A. baumannii isolates with a difference in minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) that were isolated from a single burn patient during treatment in the hospitalization period. The international clonal (IC) lineage, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and multiple loci variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) typing were used to characterize the relatedness of A. baumannii isolates. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and PmrAB system analysis by PCR sequencing, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), and real-time PCR were performed to determine the intactness and probable modifications of the LPS as the main resistance mechanisms to colistin. A combination of PCR, sequencing, and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was used for A. baumannii resistance islands (AbaR) mapping as resistance-determinant reservoirs. Two isolates were identical at all MLST and VNTR marker loci that indicated the isolates were the same strain. In comparison to colistin-heteroresistant A. baumannii strain TEH267 (MIC = 1.5 mg/L), colistin-resistant A. baumannii strain TEH273 (MIC ≥256 mg/L) acquired two genomic regions including Tn6018-topA sequence and topA sequence-3' CS in its AbaR structure containing ispA and cadA genes which, it would appear, could be associated with eightfold increase in colistin MIC. Both isolates had new variants of AbaR-like structures which could be derivatives of the typical AbaR3. According to the results of this study, AbaRs could be associated with an increase in MIC to colistin.

  6. A novel fexA variant from a canine Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolate that does not confer florfenicol resistance.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Sanz, Elena; Kadlec, Kristina; Feßler, Andrea T; Zarazaga, Myriam; Torres, Carmen; Schwarz, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    Transposon Tn558 integrated in the chromosomal radC gene was detected for the first time in Staphylococus pseudintermedius. It carried a novel fexA variant (fexAv) that confers only chloramphenicol resistance. The exporter FexAv exhibited two amino acid substitutions, Gly33Ala and Ala37Val, both of which seem to be important for substrate recognition. Site-directed mutagenesis that reverted the mutated base pairs to those present in the original fexA gene restored the chloramphenicol-plus-florfenicol resistance phenotype.

  7. A Novel FexA Variant from a Canine Staphylococcus pseudintermedius Isolate That Does Not Confer Florfenicol Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Sanz, Elena; Kadlec, Kristina; Feßler, Andrea T.; Zarazaga, Myriam; Schwarz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Transposon Tn558 integrated in the chromosomal radC gene was detected for the first time in Staphylococus pseudintermedius. It carried a novel fexA variant (fexAv) that confers only chloramphenicol resistance. The exporter FexAv exhibited two amino acid substitutions, Gly33Ala and Ala37Val, both of which seem to be important for substrate recognition. Site-directed mutagenesis that reverted the mutated base pairs to those present in the original fexA gene restored the chloramphenicol-plus-florfenicol resistance phenotype. PMID:23979755

  8. A novel triplex quantitative PCR strategy for quantification of toxigenic and nontoxigenic Vibrio cholerae in aquatic environments.

    PubMed

    Bliem, Rupert; Schauer, Sonja; Plicka, Helga; Obwaller, Adelheid; Sommer, Regina; Steinrigl, Adolf; Alam, Munirul; Reischer, Georg H; Farnleitner, Andreas H; Kirschner, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a severe human pathogen and a frequent member of aquatic ecosystems. Quantification of V. cholerae in environmental water samples is therefore fundamental for ecological studies and health risk assessment. Beside time-consuming cultivation techniques, quantitative PCR (qPCR) has the potential to provide reliable quantitative data and offers the opportunity to quantify multiple targets simultaneously. A novel triplex qPCR strategy was developed in order to simultaneously quantify toxigenic and nontoxigenic V. cholerae in environmental water samples. To obtain quality-controlled PCR results, an internal amplification control was included. The qPCR assay was specific, highly sensitive, and quantitative across the tested 5-log dynamic range down to a method detection limit of 5 copies per reaction. Repeatability and reproducibility were high for all three tested target genes. For environmental application, global DNA recovery (GR) rates were assessed for drinking water, river water, and water from different lakes. GR rates ranged from 1.6% to 76.4% and were dependent on the environmental background. Uncorrected and GR-corrected V. cholerae abundances were determined in two lakes with extremely high turbidity. Uncorrected abundances ranged from 4.6×10(2) to 2.3×10(4) cell equivalents liter(-1), whereas GR-corrected abundances ranged from 4.7×10(3) to 1.6×10(6) cell equivalents liter(-1). GR-corrected qPCR results were in good agreement with an independent cell-based direct detection method but were up to 1.6 log higher than cultivation-based abundances. We recommend the newly developed triplex qPCR strategy as a powerful tool to simultaneously quantify toxigenic and nontoxigenic V. cholerae in various aquatic environments for ecological studies as well as for risk assessment programs.

  9. An Atypical Clostridium Strain Related to the Clostridium botulinum Group III Strain Isolated from a Human Blood Culture

    PubMed Central

    Ruimy, Raymond; Bouchier, Christiane; Faucher, Nathalie; Mazuet, Christelle; Popoff, Michel R.

    2014-01-01

    A nontoxigenic strain isolated from a fatal human case of bacterial sepsis was identified as a Clostridium strain from Clostridium botulinum group III, based on the phenotypic characters and 16S rRNA gene sequence, and was found to be related to the mosaic C. botulinum D/C strain according to a multilocus sequence analysis of 5 housekeeping genes. PMID:24088855

  10. An atypical Clostridium strain related to the Clostridium botulinum group III strain isolated from a human blood culture.

    PubMed

    Bouvet, Philippe; Ruimy, Raymond; Bouchier, Christiane; Faucher, Nathalie; Mazuet, Christelle; Popoff, Michel R

    2014-01-01

    A nontoxigenic strain isolated from a fatal human case of bacterial sepsis was identified as a Clostridium strain from Clostridium botulinum group III, based on the phenotypic characters and 16S rRNA gene sequence, and was found to be related to the mosaic C. botulinum D/C strain according to a multilocus sequence analysis of 5 housekeeping genes.

  11. Evidence for association between structural variants in lissencephaly-related genes and executive deficits in schizophrenia or bipolar patients from a Spanish isolate population.

    PubMed

    Tabarés-Seisdedos, Rafael; Mata, Ignacio; Escámez, Teresa; Vieta, Eduard; López-Ilundain, Jose M; Salazar, Jose; Selva, Gabriel; Balanzá, Vicente; Rubio, Cristina; Martínez-Arán, Anabel; Valdés-Sánchez, Lourdes; Geijo-Barrientos, Emilio; Martínez, Salvador

    2008-12-01

    There is evidence for an association between structural variants in genes for lissencephaly, which are involved in neuronal migration, and prefrontal cognitive deficits in schizophrenia and bipolar patients. On the basis of these intriguing findings, we analyzed 16 markers located in the lissencephaly critical region (LCR in chromosome 17p13.3) in 124 schizophrenic, 56 bipolar, and 141 healthy individuals. All recruits were from a Spanish population isolate of Basque origin that is characterized by low genetic heterogeneity. In addition, we examined whether structural genomic variations in the LCR were associated with executive cognition. Twenty-three patients (12.8%), but none of the controls, showed structural variants (deletions and insertions) in either of two markers related with lissencephaly (D17S1566 on tumor suppressor gene TP53: tumor protein p53 and D17S22 on SMG6 gene: Smg-6 homolog, nonsense mediated mRNA decay factor- Caenorhabditis elegans). These patients performed significantly worse in the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test-Categories in comparison with patients without such variations in lissencephaly-related genes. The presence of structural variants was related to completed categories, and accounted for 10.7% of the variance (P=0.001). Finally, logistic regression showed that poor Wisconsin Card Sorting Test-Categories performance was the only predictor of belonging to the positive LCR variations group. These new findings provide further evidence for the association between some lissencephaly-related genes and both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, and influence on frontal executive functioning.

  12. MLVA Subtyping of Genovar E Chlamydia trachomatis Individualizes the Swedish Variant and Anorectal Isolates from Men who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Peuchant, Olivia; Le Roy, Chloé; Herrmann, Björn; Clerc, Maithé; Bébéar, Cécile; de Barbeyrac, Bertille

    2012-01-01

    This study describes a new multilocus variable number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) typing system for the discrimination of Chlamydia trachomatis genovar D to K isolates or specimens. We focused our MLVA scheme on genovar E which predominates in most populations worldwide. This system does not require culture and therefore can be performed directly on DNA extracted from positive clinical specimens. Our method was based on GeneScan analysis of five VNTR loci labelled with fluorescent dyes by multiplex PCR and capillary electrophoresis. This MLVA, called MLVA-5, was applied to a collection of 220 genovar E and 94 non-E genovar C. trachomatis isolates and specimens obtained from 251 patients and resulted in 38 MLVA-5 types. The genetic stability of the MLVA-5 scheme was assessed for results obtained both in vitro by serial passage culturing and in vivo using concomitant and sequential isolates and specimens. All anorectal genovar E isolates from men who have sex with men exhibited the same MLVA-5 type, suggesting clonal spread. In the same way, we confirmed the clonal origin of the Swedish new variant of C. trachomatis. The MLVA-5 assay was compared to three other molecular typing methods, ompA gene sequencing, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and a previous MLVA method called MLVA-3, on 43 genovar E isolates. The discriminatory index was 0.913 for MLVA-5, 0.860 for MLST and 0.622 for MLVA-3. Among all of these genotyping methods, MLVA-5 displayed the highest discriminatory power and does not require a time-consuming sequencing step. The results indicate that MLVA-5 enables high-resolution molecular epidemiological characterisation of C. trachomatis genovars D to K infections directly from specimens. PMID:22363667

  13. Novel plasmid and its variant harboring both a bla(NDM-1) gene and type IV secretion system in clinical isolates of Acinetobacter lwoffii.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hongyan; Hu, Yongfei; Pan, Yuanlong; Liang, Hui; Wang, Haiyan; Wang, Xiumei; Hao, Qinfang; Yang, Xiaoli; Yang, Xi; Xiao, Xue; Luan, Chunguang; Yang, Yi; Cui, Yujun; Yang, Ruifu; Gao, George F; Song, Yajun; Zhu, Baoli

    2012-04-01

    The spread of the bla(NDM-1) gene is gaining worldwide attentions. This gene is usually carried by large plasmids and has been discovered in diverse bacteria since it was originally found in Klebsiella pneumoniae. Here we report the complete sequences of a bla(NDM-1)-bearing plasmid, pNDM-BJ01, and its variant, pNDM-BJ02, isolated from clinical Acinetobacter lwoffii strains. The plasmid pNDM-BJ01 is 47.3 kb in size and cannot be classified into any known plasmid incompatibility group, thus representing a novel plasmid with an unknown maintenance mechanism. This plasmid contains both a bla(NDM-1) gene and a type IV secretion system (T4SS) gene cluster. The T4SS is assigned to the P-type T4SS group, which usually encode a short, rigid pilus, and the bla(NDM-1) gene is located within a composite transposon flanked by two insertion elements of ISAba125. Plasmid pNDM-BJ02 is nearly identical to pNDM-BJ01 except that one copy of the ISAba125 element is missing, and it is therefore regarded as a variant of pNDM-BJ01. Sequence alignment indicated that this bla(NDM-1)-containing composite transposon, which can also be captured by other mobile elements, was probably a product of multiple recombination events and can move as a whole by transposition.

  14. Multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Monophasic Variant 4,12:i:- Isolated from Asymptomatic Wildlife in a Catalonian Wildlife Rehabilitation Center, Spain.

    PubMed

    Molina-López, Rafael A; Vidal, Anna; Obón, Elena; Martín, Marga; Darwich, Laila

    2015-07-01

    Wildlife can act as long-term asymptomatic reservoirs for zoonotic bacteria, such as Salmonella. The prevalence and antimicrobial-susceptibility profiles of Salmonella spp. were assessed in 263 cases in wildlife from 22 animal orders from a wildlife rehabilitation center in Catalonia (NE Spain), September 2013-May 2014. Eleven of 263 tested animals were positive for Salmonella spp., representing an overall prevalence of 4.2%. Prevalences by taxonomic categories were 2% in mammals, 4.7% in birds, and 4.5% in reptiles. By species, one each of European hedgehog (Erinaceus europeus; from a sample of n = 26), Eurasian Eagle Owl (Bubo bubo; n = 2), Barn Owl (Tyto alba; n = 3), Tawny Owl (Strix aluco; n = 20), Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus; n = 1), Griffon Vulture (Gyps fulvus; n = 1), and Hoopoe (Upupa epops; n = 2), and two each Common Kestrels (Falco tinnunculus; n = 16) and pond sliders (Trachemys scripta; n = 25) were positive for Salmonella. By serotyping, seven of eleven isolates were classified as S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium, and five of seven belonged to the monophasic variant 4,12:i:-. All the monophasic variants were isolated from birds (4/5 in raptors) and showed a multidrug-resistance (MDR) profile to at least ampicillin, streptomycin, sulfonamide, and tetracycline (R-type ASSuT), and up to 12 antibiotics. The large proportion of S. Typhimurium monophasic MDR strains detected in wildlife never treated with antibiotics, especially in raptors, adds more complexity to the epidemiologic control of one of the most frequent serovars involved in human and livestock infection.

  15. Isolation of a hop-sensitive variant of Lactobacillus lindneri and identification of genetic markers for beer spoilage ability of lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Koji; Iijima, Kazumaru; Ozaki, Kazutaka; Yamashita, Hiroshi

    2005-09-01

    We have isolated a hop-sensitive variant of the beer spoilage bacterium Lactobacillus lindneri DSM 20692. The variant lost a plasmid carrying two contiguous open reading frames (ORF s) designated horB(L) and horC(L) that encode a putative regulator and multidrug transporter presumably belonging to the resistance-nodulation-cell division superfamily. The loss of hop resistance ability occurred with the loss of resistance to other drugs, including ethidium bromide, novobiocin, and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide. PCR and Southern blot analysis using 51 beer spoilage strains of various species of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) revealed that 49 strains possessed homologs of horB and horC. No false-positive results have been observed for nonspoilage LAB or frequently encountered brewery isolates. These features are superior to those of horA and ORF 5, previously reported genetic markers for determining the beer spoilage ability of LAB. It was further shown that the combined use of horB/horC and horA is able to detect all 51 beer spoilage strains examined in this study. Furthermore sequence comparison of horB and horC homologs identified in four different beer spoilage species indicates these homologs are 96.6 to 99.5% identical, which is not typical of distinct species. The wide and exclusive distribution of horB and horC homologs among beer spoilage LAB and their sequence identities suggest that the hop resistance ability of beer spoilage LAB has been acquired through horizontal gene transfer. These insights provide a foundation for applying trans-species genetic markers to differentiating beer spoilage LAB including previously unencountered species.

  16. Isolation of a Hop-Sensitive Variant of Lactobacillus lindneri and Identification of Genetic Markers for Beer Spoilage Ability of Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Koji; Iijima, Kazumaru; Ozaki, Kazutaka; Yamashita, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    We have isolated a hop-sensitive variant of the beer spoilage bacterium Lactobacillus lindneri DSM 20692. The variant lost a plasmid carrying two contiguous open reading frames (ORF s) designated horBL and horCL that encode a putative regulator and multidrug transporter presumably belonging to the resistance-nodulation-cell division superfamily. The loss of hop resistance ability occurred with the loss of resistance to other drugs, including ethidium bromide, novobiocin, and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide. PCR and Southern blot analysis using 51 beer spoilage strains of various species of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) revealed that 49 strains possessed homologs of horB and horC. No false-positive results have been observed for nonspoilage LAB or frequently encountered brewery isolates. These features are superior to those of horA and ORF 5, previously reported genetic markers for determining the beer spoilage ability of LAB. It was further shown that the combined use of horB/horC and horA is able to detect all 51 beer spoilage strains examined in this study. Furthermore sequence comparison of horB and horC homologs identified in four different beer spoilage species indicates these homologs are 96.6 to 99.5% identical, which is not typical of distinct species. The wide and exclusive distribution of horB and horC homologs among beer spoilage LAB and their sequence identities suggest that the hop resistance ability of beer spoilage LAB has been acquired through horizontal gene transfer. These insights provide a foundation for applying trans-species genetic markers to differentiating beer spoilage LAB including previously unencountered species. PMID:16151091

  17. DHAD variants and methods of screening

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Kristen J.; Ye, Rick W.

    2017-02-28

    Methods of screening for dihydroxy-acid dehydratase (DHAD) variants that display increased DHAD activity are disclosed, along with DHAD variants identified by these methods. Such enzymes can result in increased production of compounds from DHAD requiring biosynthetic pathways. Also disclosed are isolated nucleic acids encoding the DHAD variants, recombinant host cells comprising the isolated nucleic acid molecules, and methods of producing butanol.

  18. Full genome sequence analysis of a wild, non-MLV-related type 2 Hungarian PRRSV variant isolated in Europe.

    PubMed

    Balka, Gyula; Wang, Xiong; Olasz, Ferenc; Bálint, Ádám; Kiss, István; Bányai, Krisztián; Rusvai, Miklós; Stadejek, Tomasz; Marthaler, Douglas; Murtaugh, Michael P; Zádori, Zoltán

    2015-03-16

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a widespread pathogen of pigs causing significant economic losses to the swine industry. The expanding diversity of PRRSV strains makes the diagnosis, control and eradication of the disease more and more difficult. In the present study, the authors report the full genome sequencing of a type 2 PRRSV strain isolated from piglet carcasses in Hungary. Next generation sequencing was used to determine the complete genome sequence of the isolate (PRRSV-2/Hungary/102/2012). Recombination analysis performed with the available full-length genome sequences showed no evidence of such event with other known PRRSV. Unique deletions and an insertion were found in the nsp2 region of PRRSV-2/Hungary/102/2012 when it was compared to the highly virulent VR2332 and JXA-1 prototype strains. The majority of amino acid alterations in GP4 and GP5 of the virus were in the known antigenic regions suggesting an important role for immunological pressure in PRRSV-2/Hungary/102/2012 evolution. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that it belongs to lineage 1 or 2 of type 2 PRRSV. Considering the lack of related PRRSV in Europe, except for a partial sequence from Slovakia, the ancestor of PRRSV-2/Hungary/102/2012 was most probably transported from North-America. It is the first documented type 2 PRRSV isolated in Europe that is not related to the Ingelvac MLV.

  19. Neonatal, urogenital isolates of biotype 4 nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae express a variant P6 outer membrane protein molecule.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, T F; Kirkham, C; Sikkema, D J

    1992-01-01

    The P6 outer membrane protein is a highly conserved molecule which is present on the surface of all strains of Haemophilus influenzae. Sixty strains of nontypeable H. influenzae which caused invasive disease or colonized the female urogenital tract were studied with monoclonal antibodies 7F3 and 4G4, which recognize different surface-exposed epitopes on the P6 molecule. All 60 strains expressed the epitope recognized by 4G4, whereas 47 of 60 strains expressed the epitope recognized by antibody 7F3. The 7F3-nonreactive strains were all biotype 4 and were recovered from the blood of neonates or postpartum women or from the female urogenital tract. The P6 genes from two 7F3-nonreactive strains were cloned, and the nucleotide sequences were determined. Analysis of amino acid sequences, immunoassays with synthetic peptides, and site-directed mutation of the P6 gene indicate that the epitope recognized by antibody 7F3 is conformational and that the sequence Asp-Ile-Thr is critical in maintaining the conformation of the epitope. We conclude that the unusually virulent clone family of biotype 4 strains of nontypeable H. influenzae express a variant P6 molecule which has an alteration in a highly conserved surface-exposed epitope. Images PMID:1373403

  20. Stone Lakes virus (family Togaviridae, genus Alphavirus), a variant of Fort Morgan virus isolated from swallow bugs (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) west of the Continental Divide.

    PubMed

    Brault, Aaron C; Armijos, M Veronica; Wheeler, Sarah; Wright, Stan; Fang, Ying; Langevin, Stanley; Reisen, William K

    2009-09-01

    Multiple isolates of an alphaviruses within the western equine encephalomyelitis-serocomplex that were related closely to Ft. Morgan and its variant Buggy Creek virus were made from swallow bugs, Oeciacus vicarius Horvath (Hemiptera: Cimicidae), collected from cliff swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) nests at the Stone Lakes National Wildlife Refuge, Sacramento County, CA, during the summers of 2005 and 2006. This virus (hereafter Stone Lakes virus, family Togaviridae, genus Alphavirus, STLV) was the first record of this viral group west of the Continental Divide. STLV replicated well in Vero and other vertebrate cell cultures but failed to replicate in C6/36 cells or infect Culex tarsalis Coquillett mosquitoes. STLV failed to produce elevated viremias in adult chickens or house sparrows and was weakly immunogenic. In addition, STLV was not isolated from cliff swallow nestlings nor was antibody detected in adults collected at mist nets. We suggest that STL and related swallow bug viruses may be primarily infections of cimicids that are maintained and amplified either by vertical or nonviremic transmission and that cliff swallows may primarily be important as a bloodmeal source for the bugs rather than as an amplification host for the viruses.

  1. Draft Genome Sequences of Vibrio cholerae O1 ElTor Strains 2011EL-301 and P-18785, Isolated in Russia

    PubMed Central

    Vodop’ianov, Sergey O.; Markelov, Mikhail L.; Dedkov, Vladimir G.; Kermanov, Anton V.; Kruglikov, Vladimir D.; Vodop’ianov, Alexey S.; Pisanov, Ruslan V.; Mazrukho, Alexey B.; Shipulin, German A.

    2013-01-01

    We report the draft whole-genome sequences of two Vibrio cholerae O1 strains, the environmental toxigenic strain 2011EL-301 and the clinical nontoxigenic strain P-18785, both isolated in Russia. Some basic data comparing the two against the GenBank repository are provided. PMID:23969060

  2. Rough and smooth morphotypes isolated from Lactobacillus farciminis CNCM I-3699 are two closely-related variants.

    PubMed

    Tareb, Raouf; Bernardeau, Marion; Horvath, Philippe; Vernoux, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-16

    This study focused on a pleomorphic strain Lactobacillus farciminis CNCM I-3699 known as probiotic for animal applications. On plating, this strain was characterized by the presence of rough and smooth morphotypes depending on experimental conditions. Dominant smooth (S) form, bright white, having smooth edges with moist, ropy, and creamy along with rough (R) form, pale white, having irregular edges and a dry and granular aspect were always obtained from the parent strain under aerobic culture conditions. In anaerobic conditions, only S form growth was observed. Biochemical dosage of capsular exopolysaccharides showed a significant difference between S and R forms (p<0.01), in agreement with a ropy or non ropy phenotype for the S or R form, respectively. These differences were confirmed by transmission electronic microscopy. The auto-aggregation profile revealed major differences in cultural behaviors. The R morphotype presented a highly auto-aggregative ability contrary to the S morphotype. However, biochemical and molecular analyses revealed that R and S morphotypes: 1) shared the same sugar fermentation pattern; 2) belonged to L. farciminis species using 16S rDNA sequencing; 3) had identical PFGE patterns using NotI and ApaI endonucleases; and 4) had identical CRISPR loci but different from those of other L. farciminis strains. Furthermore, the novelty and uniqueness of CRISPR spacer sequences in CNCM I-3699 provides a genetic support for the development of a molecular tracking tool for CNCM I-3699 and its variants. In conclusion, L. farciminis CNCM I-3699 is a pleomorphic strain giving reproducibly rise to two phenotypically distinct morphotypes R and S. This phenomenon may explain survival and growth abilities in in vitro fluctuating aerobic-anaerobic conditions along with modulation of exopolysaccharide synthesis and autoaggregation profile.

  3. Presence of new mecA and mph(C) variants conferring antibiotic resistance in Staphylococcus spp. isolated from the skin of horses before and after clinic admission.

    PubMed

    Schnellmann, Christina; Gerber, Vinzenz; Rossano, Alexandra; Jaquier, Valentine; Panchaud, Yann; Doherr, Marcus G; Thomann, Andreas; Straub, Reto; Perreten, Vincent

    2006-12-01

    Because of the frequency of multiple antibiotic resistance, Staphylococcus species often represent a challenge in incisional infections of horses undergoing colic surgery. To investigate the evolution of antibiotic resistance patterns before and after preventative peri- and postoperative penicillin treatment, staphylococci were isolated from skin and wound samples at different times during hospitalization. Most staphylococci were normal skin commensals and belonged to the common coagulase-negative group. In some cases they turned out to be opportunistic pathogens present in wound infections. MICs were determined for 12 antibiotics, and antibiotic resistance genes were detected by microarray. At hospital admission, horses harbored staphylococci that were susceptible to antibiotics or resistant to one group of drugs, mainly due to the presence of new variants of the methicillin and macrolide resistance genes mecA and mph(C), respectively. After 3 days, the percentage of Staphylococcus isolates displaying antibiotic resistance, as well as the number of resistance genes per isolate, increased moderately in hospitalized horses without surgery or penicillin treatment but dramatically in hospitalized horses after colic surgery as well as penicillin treatment. Staphylococcus species displaying multiple resistance were found to harbor mainly genes conferring resistance to beta-lactams (mecA and blaZ), aminoglycosides [str and aac(6')-Ie-aph(2')-Ia], and trimethoprim [dfr(A) and dfr(D)]. Additional genes conferring resistance to macrolides [mph(C), erm(C), and erm(B)], tetracycline [tet(K) and tet(M)], chloramphenicol [cat(pC221) and cat(pC223)], and streptothricin (sat4) appeared in several strains. Hospitalization and preventive penicillin use were shown to act as selection agents for multidrug-resistant commensal staphylococcal flora.

  4. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (CDKN1B) gene variants in AIP mutation-negative familial isolated pituitary adenoma kindreds.

    PubMed

    Tichomirowa, Maria A; Lee, Misu; Barlier, Anne; Daly, Adrian F; Marinoni, Ilaria; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Naves, Luciana A; Rodien, Patrice; Rohmer, Vincent; Faucz, Fabio Rueda; Caron, Philippe; Estour, Bruno; Lecomte, Pierre; Borson-Chazot, Françoise; Penfornis, Alfred; Yaneva, Maria; Guitelman, Mirtha; Castermans, Emily; Verhaege, Catherine; Wémeau, Jean-Louis; Tabarin, Antoine; Fajardo Montañana, Carmen; Delemer, Brigitte; Kerlan, Veronique; Sadoul, Jean-Louis; Cortet Rudelli, Christine; Archambeaud, Françoise; Zacharieva, Sabine; Theodoropoulou, Marily; Brue, Thierry; Enjalbert, Alain; Bours, Vincent; Pellegata, Natalia S; Beckers, Albert

    2012-06-01

    Familial isolated pituitary adenoma (FIPA) occurs in families and is unrelated to multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and Carney complex. Mutations in AIP account only for 15-25% of FIPA families. CDKN1B mutations cause MEN4 in which affected patients can suffer from pituitary adenomas. With this study, we wanted to assess whether mutations in CDKN1B occur among a large cohort of AIP mutation-negative FIPA kindreds. Eighty-eight AIP mutation-negative FIPA families were studied and 124 affected subjects underwent sequencing of CDKN1B. Functional analysis of putative CDKN1B mutations was performed using in silico and in vitro approaches. Germline CDKN1B analysis revealed two nucleotide changes: c.286A>C (p.K96Q) and c.356T>C (p.I119T). In vitro, the K96Q change decreased p27 affinity for Grb2 but did not segregate with pituitary adenoma in the FIPA kindred. The I119T substitution occurred in a female patient with acromegaly. p27(I119T) shows an abnormal migration pattern by SDS-PAGE. Three variants (p.S56T, p.T142T, and c.605+36C>T) are likely nonpathogenic because In vitro effects were not seen. In conclusion, two patients had germline sequence changes in CDKN1B, which led to functional alterations in the encoded p27 proteins in vitro. Such rare CDKN1B variants may contribute to the development of pituitary adenomas, but their low incidence and lack of clear segregation with affected patients make CDKN1B sequencing unlikely to be of use in routine genetic investigation of FIPA kindreds. However, further characterization of the role of CDKN1B in pituitary tumorigenesis in these and other cases could help clarify the clinicopathological profile of MEN4.

  5. Exudative epidermitis of piglets caused by non-toxigenic Staphylococcus sciuri.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lixin; He, Kongwang; Ni, Yanxiu; Yu, Zhengyu; Mao, Aihua

    2017-02-01

    Infections with strains of Staphylococcus sciuri are a potential threat to animal and public health, and a cause for considerable concern. We isolated and identified S. sciuri as a pathogen from an acute outbreak of exudative epidermitis in piglets for further genetic identification using experimental infections. The results of this study showed that S. sciuri strain NJ1306 reproduced exudative epidermitis in experimentally infected 5-day-old piglets. The isolated bacteria also caused sudden death in BALB/c mice following intraperitoneal injection with 5×10(8) CFU of the isolate. The data indicated that strain NJ1306 of S. sciuri was pathogenic to piglets and mice, and the study provided the first known report of clinical lung lesions and endocarditis in piglets due to S. sciuri.

  6. Continuing evolution of canine parvovirus in China: Isolation of novel variants with an Ala5Gly mutation in the VP2 protein.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianke; Lin, Peng; Zhao, Hang; Cheng, Yuening; Jiang, Zhong; Zhu, Hongwei; Wu, Hua; Cheng, Shipeng

    2016-03-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) type 2c is a new antigenic variant of CPV-2. Since the year 2000 it has spread to several countries, causing severe hemorrhagic enteritis in dogs. In 2014 and 2015, 58 fecal samples were collected from dogs in Beijing with suspected CPV infection. Regardless of the vaccination status of the dogs, 43 samples were found positive for CPV according to PCR results; i.e., 18, 7, and 18 respectively belonged to antigenic types new CPV-2a, new CPV-2b, and CPV-2c. A phylogenetic tree based on their VP2 gene sequences indicated that the Chinese CPV-2c strains form a separate cluster. In addition to synonymous mutations, the CPV-2c strains also contain a unique coding mutation in VP2 that leads to glycine at residue 5, instead of the highly conserved alanine at this position in all other CPV-2c strains sequenced to date. Using F81 cells, several novel isolates of CPV-2c, each with the Ala5Gly mutation, were obtained. One of these was used to infect experimentally beagle dogs, which subsequently developed the typical clinical symptoms of CPV infection. Hence, it appears that CPV-2c is still evolving in China, a finding that warrants continuous surveying and the eventual adaptation of current vaccines.

  7. Cellulase variants

    DOEpatents

    Blazej, Robert; Toriello, Nicholas; Emrich, Charles; Cohen, Richard N.; Koppel, Nitzan

    2015-07-14

    This invention provides novel variant cellulolytic enzymes having improved activity and/or stability. In certain embodiments the variant cellulotyic enzymes comprise a glycoside hydrolase with or comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to one or more of residues F64, A226, and/or E246 in Thermobifida fusca Cel9A enzyme. In certain embodiments the glycoside hydrolase is a variant of a family 9 glycoside hydrolase. In certain embodiments the glycoside hydrolase is a variant of a theme B family 9 glycoside hydrolase.

  8. Variant surface glycoproteins from Venezuelan trypanosome isolates are recognized by sera from animals infected with either Trypanosoma evansi or Trypanosoma vivax.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Rocío; Izquier, Adriana; Uzcanga, Graciela L; Perrone, Trina; Acosta-Serrano, Alvaro; Carrasquel, Liomary; Arias, Laura P; Escalona, José L; Cardozo, Vanessa; Bubis, José

    2015-01-15

    Salivarian trypanosomes sequentially express only one variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) on their cell surface from a large repertoire of VSG genes. Seven cryopreserved animal trypanosome isolates known as TeAp-ElFrio01, TEVA1 (or TeAp-N/D1), TeGu-N/D1, TeAp-Mantecal01, TeGu-TerecayTrino, TeGu-Terecay03 and TeGu-Terecay323, which had been isolated from different hosts identified in several geographical areas of Venezuela were expanded using adult albino rats. Soluble forms of predominant VSGs expressed during the early infection stages were purified and corresponded to concanavalin A-binding proteins with molecular masses of 48-67 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electropohoresis, and pI values between 6.1 and 7.5. The biochemical characterization of all purified soluble VSGs revealed that they were dimers in their native form and represented different gene products. Sequencing of some of these proteins yielded peptides homologous to VSGs from Trypanosoma (Trypanozoon) brucei and Trypanosoma (Trypanozoon) evansi and established that they most likely are mosaics generated by homologous recombination. Western blot analysis showed that all purified VSGs were cross-reacting antigens that were recognized by sera from animals infected with either T. evansi or Trypanosoma (Dutonella) vivax. The VSG glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol cross-reacting determinant epitope was only partially responsible for the cross-reactivity of the purified proteins, and antibodies appeared to recognize cross-reacting conformational epitopes from the various soluble VSGs. ELISA experiments were performed using infected bovine sera collected from cattle in a Venezuelan trypanosome-endemic area. In particular, soluble VSGs from two trypanosome isolates, TeGu-N/D1 and TeGu-TeracayTrino, were recognized by 93.38% and 73.55% of naturally T. vivax-infected bovine sera, respectively. However, approximately 70% of the sera samples did not recognize all seven purified proteins. Hence, the

  9. Variant surface glycoproteins from Venezuelan trypanosome isolates are recognized by sera from animals infected with either Trypanosoma evansi or Trypanosoma vivax

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, Rocío; Izquier, Adriana; Uzcanga, Graciela L.; Perrone, Trina; Acosta-Serrano, Alvaro; Carrasquel, Liomary; Arias, Laura P.; Escalona, José L.; Cardozo, Vanessa; Bubis, José

    2015-01-01

    Salivarian trypanosomes sequentially express only one variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) on their cell surface from a large repertoire of VSG genes. Seven cryopreserved animal trypanosome isolates known as TeAp-ElFrio01, TEVA1 (or TeAp-N/D1), TeGu-N/D1, TeAp-Mantecal01, TeGu-TerecayTrino, TeGu-Terecay03 and TeGu-Terecay323, which had been isolated from different hosts identified in several geographical areas of Venezuela were expanded using adult albino rats. Soluble forms of predominant VSGs expressed during the early infection stages were purified and corresponded to concanavalin A-binding proteins with molecular masses of 48–67 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electropohoresis, and pI values between 6.1 and 7.5. The biochemical characterization of all purified soluble VSGs revealed that they were dimers in their native form and represented different gene products. Sequencing of some of these proteins yielded peptides homologous to VSGs from Trypanosoma (Trypanozoon) brucei and Trypanosoma (Trypanozoon) evansi and established that they most likely are mosaics generated by homologous recombination. Western blot analysis showed that all purified VSGs were cross-reacting antigens that were recognized by sera from animals infected with either T. evansi or Trypanosoma (Dutonella) vivax. The VSG glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol cross-reacting determinant epitope was only partially responsible for the cross-reactivity of the purified proteins, and antibodies appeared to recognize cross-reacting conformational epitopes from the various soluble VSGs. ELISA experiments were performed using infected bovine sera collected from cattle in a Venezuelan trypanosome-endemic area. In particular, soluble VSGs from two trypanosome isolates, TeGu-N/D1 and TeGu-TeracayTrino, were recognized by 93.38% and 73.55% of naturally T. vivax-infected bovine sera, respectively. However, approximately 70% of the sera samples did not recognize all seven purified proteins. Hence

  10. Identification and Quantification of a Toxigenic and Non-Toxigenic Aspergillus flavus Strain in Contaminated Maize Using Quantitative Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Mylroie, J. Erik; Ozkan, Seval; Shivaji, Renuka; Windham, Gary L.; Alpe, Michael N.; Williams, W. Paul

    2016-01-01

    Aflatoxins, which are produced by Aspergillus flavus, are toxic to humans, livestock, and pets. The value of maize (Zea mays) grain is markedly reduced when contaminated with aflatoxin. Plant resistance and biological control using non-toxin producing strains are considered effective strategies for reducing aflatoxin accumulation in maize grain. Distinguishing between the toxin and non-toxin producing strains is important in determining the effectiveness of bio-control strategies and understanding inter-strain interactions. Using polymorphisms found in the fungal rRNA intergenic spacer region (IGS) between a toxigenic strain of A. flavus (NRRL 3357) and the non-toxigenic strain used in the biological control agent Afla-Guard® (NRRL 21882), we developed a set of primers that allows for the identification and quantification of the two strains using quantitative PCR. This primer set has been used to screen maize grain that was inoculated with the two strains individually and co-inoculated with both strains, and it has been shown to be effective in both the identification and quantification of both strains. Screening of co-inoculated ears from multiple resistant and susceptible genotypic crosses revealed no significant differences in fungal biomass accumulation of either strain in the field tests from 2010 and 2011 when compared across the means of all genotypes. Only one genotype/year combination showed significant differences in strain accumulation. Aflatoxin accumulation analysis showed that, as expected, genotypes inoculated with the toxigenic strain accumulated more aflatoxin than when co-inoculated with both strains or inoculated with only the non-toxigenic strain. Furthermore, accumulation of toxigenic fungal mass was significantly correlated with aflatoxin accumulation while non-toxigenic fungal accumulation was not. This primer set will allow researchers to better determine how the two fungal strains compete on the maize ear and investigate the interaction

  11. Comparative genome analysis of non-toxigenic non-O1 versus toxigenic O1 Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Munmun; Kakarla, Prathusha; Kumar, Sanath; Gonzalez, Esmeralda; Floyd, Jared T.; Inupakutika, Madhuri; Devireddy, Amith Reddy; Tirrell, Selena R.; Bruns, Merissa; He, Guixin; Lindquist, Ingrid E.; Sundararajan, Anitha; Schilkey, Faye D.; Mudge, Joann; Varela, Manuel F.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic strains of Vibrio cholerae are responsible for endemic and pandemic outbreaks of the disease cholera. The complete toxigenic mechanisms underlying virulence in Vibrio strains are poorly understood. The hypothesis of this work was that virulent versus non-virulent strains of V. cholerae harbor distinctive genomic elements that encode virulence. The purpose of this study was to elucidate genomic differences between the O1 serotypes and non-O1 V. cholerae PS15, a non-toxigenic strain, in order to identify novel genes potentially responsible for virulence. In this study, we compared the whole genome of the non-O1 PS15 strain to the whole genomes of toxigenic serotypes at the phylogenetic level, and found that the PS15 genome was distantly related to those of toxigenic V. cholerae. Thus we focused on a detailed gene comparison between PS15 and the distantly related O1 V. cholerae N16961. Based on sequence alignment we tentatively assigned chromosome numbers 1 and 2 to elements within the genome of non-O1 V. cholerae PS15. Further, we found that PS15 and O1 V. cholerae N16961 shared 98% identity and 766 genes, but of the genes present in N16961 that were missing in the non-O1 V. cholerae PS15 genome, 56 were predicted to encode not only for virulence–related genes (colonization, antimicrobial resistance, and regulation of persister cells) but also genes involved in the metabolic biosynthesis of lipids, nucleosides and sulfur compounds. Additionally, we found 113 genes unique to PS15 that were predicted to encode other properties related to virulence, disease, defense, membrane transport, and DNA metabolism. Here, we identified distinctive and novel genomic elements between O1 and non-O1 V. cholerae genomes as potential virulence factors and, thus, targets for future therapeutics. Modulation of such novel targets may eventually enhance eradication efforts of endemic and pandemic disease cholera in afflicted nations. PMID:25722857

  12. Antiviral Susceptibility of Variant Influenza A(H3N2)v Viruses Isolated in the United States from 2011 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Sleeman, K.; Mishin, V. P.; Guo, Z.; Garten, R. J.; Balish, A.; Fry, A. M.; Villanueva, J.; Stevens, J.

    2014-01-01

    Since 2011, outbreaks caused by influenza A(H3N2) variant [A(H3N2)v] viruses have become a public health concern in the United States. The A(H3N2)v viruses share the A(H1N1)pdm09 M gene containing the marker of M2 blocker resistance, S31N, but do not contain any known molecular markers associated with resistance to neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors (NAIs). Using a fluorescent NA inhibition (NI) assay, the susceptibilities of recovered A(H3N2)v viruses (n = 168) to FDA-approved (oseltamivir and zanamivir) and other (peramivir, laninamivir, and A-315675) NAIs were assessed. All A(H3N2)v viruses tested, with the exception of a single virus strain, A/Ohio/88/2012, isolated from an untreated patient, were susceptible to the NAIs tested. The A/Ohio/88/2012 virus contained two rare substitutions, S245N and S247P, in the NA and demonstrated reduced inhibition by oseltamivir (31-fold) and zanamivir (66-fold) in the NI assay. Using recombinant NA (recNA) proteins, S247P was shown to be responsible for the observed altered NAI susceptibility, in addition to an approximately 60% reduction in NA enzymatic activity. The S247P substitution has not been previously reported as a molecular marker of reduced susceptibility to the NAIs. Using cell culture assays, the investigational antiviral drugs nitazoxanide, favipiravir, and fludase were shown to inhibit the replication of A(H3N2)v viruses, including the virus with the S247P substitution in the NA. This report demonstrates the importance of continuous monitoring of susceptibility of zoonotic influenza viruses to available and investigational antiviral drugs. PMID:24449767

  13. Genome-wide association analysis on five isolated populations identifies variants of the HLA-DOA gene associated with white wine liking

    PubMed Central

    Pirastu, Nicola; Kooyman, Maarten; Traglia, Michela; Robino, Antonietta; Willems, Sara M; Pistis, Giorgio; Amin, Najaf; Sala, Cinzia; Karssen, Lennart C; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Toniolo, Daniela; Gasparini, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Wine is the most popular alcoholic beverage around the world and because of its importance in society has been widely studied. Understanding what drives its flavor has been a quest for decades but much is still unknown and will be determined at least in part by individual taste preferences. Recently studies in the genetics of taste have uncovered the role of different genes in the determination of food preferences giving new insight on its physiology. In this context we have performed a genome-wide association study on red and white wine liking using three isolated populations collected in Italy, and replicated our results on two additional populations coming from the Netherland and Central Asia for a total of 3885 samples. We have found a significant association (P=2.1 × 10−8) between white wine liking and rs9276975:C>T a polymorphism in the HLA-DOA gene encoding a non-canonical MHC II molecule, which regulates other MHC II molecules. The same association was also found with red wine liking (P=8.3 × 10−6). Sex-separated analysis have also revealed that the effect of HLA-DOA is twice as large in women as compared to men suggesting an interaction between this polymorphism and gender. Our results are one of the first examples of genome-wide association between liking of a commonly consumed food and gene variants. Moreover, our results suggest a role of the MHC system in the determination of food preferences opening new insight in this field in general. PMID:25758996

  14. Genome-wide association analysis on five isolated populations identifies variants of the HLA-DOA gene associated with white wine liking.

    PubMed

    Pirastu, Nicola; Kooyman, Maarten; Traglia, Michela; Robino, Antonietta; Willems, Sara M; Pistis, Giorgio; Amin, Najaf; Sala, Cinzia; Karssen, Lennart C; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Toniolo, Daniela; Gasparini, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    Wine is the most popular alcoholic beverage around the world and because of its importance in society has been widely studied. Understanding what drives its flavor has been a quest for decades but much is still unknown and will be determined at least in part by individual taste preferences. Recently studies in the genetics of taste have uncovered the role of different genes in the determination of food preferences giving new insight on its physiology. In this context we have performed a genome-wide association study on red and white wine liking using three isolated populations collected in Italy, and replicated our results on two additional populations coming from the Netherland and Central Asia for a total of 3885 samples. We have found a significant association (P=2.1 × 10(-8)) between white wine liking and rs9276975:C>T a polymorphism in the HLA-DOA gene encoding a non-canonical MHC II molecule, which regulates other MHC II molecules. The same association was also found with red wine liking (P=8.3 × 10(-6)). Sex-separated analysis have also revealed that the effect of HLA-DOA is twice as large in women as compared to men suggesting an interaction between this polymorphism and gender. Our results are one of the first examples of genome-wide association between liking of a commonly consumed food and gene variants. Moreover, our results suggest a role of the MHC system in the determination of food preferences opening new insight in this field in general.

  15. Detection of ST772 Panton-Valentine leukocidin-positive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (Bengal Bay clone) and ST22 S. aureus isolates with a genetic variant of elastin binding protein in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Pokhrel, R.H.; Aung, M.S.; Thapa, B.; Chaudhary, R.; Mishra, S.K.; Kawaguchiya, M.; Urushibara, N.; Kobayashi, N.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic characteristics were analysed for recent clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant and -susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and MSSA respectively) in Kathmandu, Nepal. MRSA isolates harbouring Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) genes were classified into ST1, ST22 and ST88 with SCCmec-IV and ST772 with SCCmec-V (Bengal Bay clone), while PVL-positive MSSA into ST22, ST30 and ST772. ST22 isolates (PVL-positive MRSA and MSSA, PVL-negative MRSA) possessed a variant of elastin binding protein gene (ebpS) with an internal deletion of 180 bp, which was similar to that reported for ST121 S. aureus previously outside Nepal. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the ebpS variant in ST22 might have occurred independently of ST121 strains. This is the first report of ST772 PVL-positive MRSA in Nepal and detection of the deletion variant of ebpS in ST22 S. aureus. PMID:27014464

  16. Draft Genome Sequences of Five Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Isolates Harboring the New and Recently Described Subtilase Cytotoxin Allelic Variant subAB2-3

    PubMed Central

    Tasara, Taurai; Fierz, Lisa; Schmidt, Herbert

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We present here the draft genome sequences of five Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains which tested positive in a primary subAB screening. Assembly and annotation of the draft genomes revealed that all strains harbored the recently described allelic variant subAB2-3. Based on the sequence data, primers were designed to identify and differentiate this variant. PMID:28232433

  17. Comparative studies on the pathogenicity and tissue distribution of three virulence variants of classical swine fever virus, two field isolates and one vaccine strain, with special regard to immunohistochemical investigations

    PubMed Central

    Belák, Katinka; Koenen, Frank; Vanderhallen, Hans; Mittelholzer, Christian; Feliziani, Francesco; De Mia, Gian Mario; Belák, Sándor

    2008-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to compare the tissue distribution and pathogenicity of three virulence variants of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) and to investigate the applicability of various conventional diagnostic procedures. Methods 64 pigs were divided into three groups and infected with the highly virulent isolate ISS/60, the moderately virulent isolate Wingene'93 and the live attenuated vaccine strain Riems, respectively. Clinical signs, gross and histopathological changes were compared in relation to time elapsed post infection. Virus spread in various organs was followed by virus isolation, by immunohistochemistry, applying monoclonal antibodies in a two-step method and by in situ hybridisation using a digoxigenin-labelled riboprobe. Results The tissue distribution data are discussed in details, analyzing the results of the various diagnostic approaches. The comparative studies revealed remarkable differences in the onset of clinical signs as well as in the development of the macro- and microscopical changes, and in the tissue distribution of CSFV in the three experimental groups. Conclusion The present study demonstrates that in the case of highly and moderately virulent virus variants the virulence does not affect the pattern of the viral spread, however, it influences the outcome, the duration and the intensity of the disease. Immunohistochemistry has the advantage to allow the rapid detection and localisation of the virus, especially in cases of early infection, when clinical signs are still absent. Compared to virus isolation, the advantage of this method is that no cell culture facilities are required. Thus, immunohistochemistry provides simple and sensitive tools for the prompt detection of newly emerging variants of CSFV, including the viruses of very mild virulence. PMID:18775072

  18. Isolation of Clostridium botulinum type G from Swiss soil specimens by using sequential steps in an identification scheme.

    PubMed Central

    Sonnabend, W F; Sonnabend, U P; Krech, T

    1987-01-01

    After Clostridium botulinum type G organisms and toxin were identified in necropsy specimens in cases of unexplained death in adults and infants (O. Sonnabend, W. Sonnabend, R. Heinzle, T. Sigrist, R Dirnhofer, and U. Krech, J. Infect. Dis. 143:22-27, 1981), extensive research to detect C. botulinum type G in soil samples from Switzerland was done. A total of 41 specimens from virgin soil and from cultivated land were examined for the presence of C. botulinum type G and other toxin types. Because of the lack of the lipase marker in type G, the detection of C. botulinum type G was based on the demonstration of type G organisms in enrichment cultures by a type G-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect both the type G toxin and antigen; enrichment cultures in which type G toxin or antigen was identified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were then tested by a type G-specific gel immunodiffusion agar procedure. This method not only isolated strains of type G but also strains of Clostridium subterminale, a nontoxigenic variant of C. botulinum type G. As a consequence of the observed cross-reactions caused by strains of C. subterminale within this test system, all isolates of type G had to be definitively confirmed by mouse bioassay. The sequential steps of these methods seem to be very useful for detecting C. botulinum type G organisms. C. botulinum type G strains were isolated in five soil samples from different locations in close association with cultivated land.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:3116935

  19. Occurrence of efflux mechanism and cephalosporinase variant in a population of Enterobacter aerogenes and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamases.

    PubMed

    Tran, Que-Tien; Dupont, Myrielle; Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Chevalier, Jacqueline; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Sotto, Albert; Davin-Regli, Anne

    2009-04-01

    We investigated the occurrence of multidrug resistance in 44 Enterobacter aerogenes and Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolates. Efflux was involved in resistance in E. aerogenes isolates more frequently than in K. pneumoniae isolates (100 versus 38% of isolates) and was associated with the expression of phenylalanine arginine beta-naphthylamide-susceptible active efflux. AcrA-TolC overproduction in E. aerogenes isolates was noted. An analysis of four E. aerogenes isolates for which cefepime MICs were high revealed no modification in porin expression but a new specific mutation in the AmpC beta-lactamase.

  20. Association analysis of bitter receptor genes in five isolated populations identifies a significant correlation between TAS2R43 variants and coffee liking.

    PubMed

    Pirastu, Nicola; Kooyman, Maarten; Traglia, Michela; Robino, Antonietta; Willems, Sara M; Pistis, Giorgio; d'Adamo, Pio; Amin, Najaf; d'Eustacchio, Angela; Navarini, Luciano; Sala, Cinzia; Karssen, Lennart C; van Duijn, Cornelia; Toniolo, Daniela; Gasparini, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Coffee, one of the most popular beverages in the world, contains many different physiologically active compounds with a potential impact on people's health. Despite the recent attention given to the genetic basis of its consumption, very little has been done in understanding genes influencing coffee preference among different individuals. Given its markedly bitter taste, we decided to verify if bitter receptor genes (TAS2Rs) variants affect coffee liking. In this light, 4066 people from different parts of Europe and Central Asia filled in a field questionnaire on coffee liking. They have been consequently recruited and included in the study. Eighty-eight SNPs covering the 25 TAS2R genes were selected from the available imputed ones and used to run association analysis for coffee liking. A significant association was detected with three SNP: one synonymous and two functional variants (W35S and H212R) on the TAS2R43 gene. Both variants have been shown to greatly reduce in vitro protein activity. Surprisingly the wild type allele, which corresponds to the functional form of the protein, is associated to higher liking of coffee. Since the hTAS2R43 receptor is sensible to caffeine, we verified if the detected variants produced differences in caffeine bitter perception on a subsample of people coming from the FVG cohort. We found a significant association between differences in caffeine perception and the H212R variant but not with the W35S, which suggests that the effect of the TAS2R43 gene on coffee liking is mediated by caffeine and in particular by the H212R variant. No other significant association was found with other TAS2R genes. In conclusion, the present study opens new perspectives in the understanding of coffee liking. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of the TAS2R43 gene in coffee hedonics and to identify which other genes and pathways are involved in its genetics.

  1. Efflux-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance in the multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolate PA7: identification of a novel MexS variant involved in upregulation of the mexEF-oprN multidrug efflux operon

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Yuji; Tomida, Junko; Kawamura, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa has become a serious problem in medical settings. P. aeruginosa clinical isolate PA7 is resistant to fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and most β-lactams but not imipenem. In this study, enhanced efflux-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance of PA7 was shown to reflect increased expression of two resistance nodulation cell division (RND) -type multidrug efflux operons, mexEF-oprN and mexXY-oprA. Such a clinical isolate has rarely been reported because MexEF-OprN-overproducing mutants often increase susceptibility to aminoglycosides apparently owing to impairment of the MexXY system. A mutant of PA7 lacking three RND-type multidrug efflux operons (mexAB-oprM, mexEF-oprN, and mexXY-oprA) was susceptible to all anti-pseudomonas agents we tested, supporting an idea that these RND-type multidrug efflux transporters are molecular targets to overcome multidrug resistance in P. aeruginosa. mexEF-oprN-upregulation in P. aeruginosa PA7 was shown due to a MexS variant harboring the Valine-155 amino acid residue. This is the first genetic evidence shown that a MexS variant causes mexEF-oprN-upregulation in P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. PMID:25653649

  2. Group B streptococcal opacity variants.

    PubMed Central

    Pincus, S H; Cole, R L; Wessels, M R; Corwin, M D; Kamanga-Sollo, E; Hayes, S F; Cieplak, W; Swanson, J

    1992-01-01

    Colony opacity variants were detected for type III group B streptococci (GBS). Transparent colonies predominate in the parent GBS, with occasional colonies having opaque portions. Two stable opaque variants (1.1 and 1.5) were compared with three transparent clones (1.2, 1.3, and 1.4). All grew well on blood agar and on GC medium, but variant 1.1 failed to grow on Todd-Hewitt medium. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that colony opacity correlated with bacterial aggregation status, with opaque variants forming longer and more organized chains. Opaque-transparent switches were observed in both directions for most variants, with transparent to opaque noted most frequently, but 1.5 did not switch at all. Switching of the opacity phenotype was observed both in vitro and in neonatal mice. Relationships between colony opacity and several cell surface phenomena were explored. (i) Opaque variant 1.1 had two surface proteins (46 and 75 kDa) that were either unique or greatly overexpressed. (ii) Variant 1.1 was deficient in type III polysaccharide, while 1.5 lacked group B antigen. Diminished capsular polysaccharide of variant 1.1 was reflected in reduced negative electrophoretic mobility and in increased buoyant density. (iii) Transparent variant colonies growing closest to a penicillin disk were opaque, but colonial variants did not differ in their sensitivity to penicillin. These data indicate that GBS can exist in both opaque and transparent forms, with opaque appearance occurring by multiple routes. Opaque variants grow poorly on Todd-Hewitt medium generally used for isolation of GBS, so any possible relationships between opacity variation and pathogenesis of GBS infection are unknown. Images PMID:1592825

  3. Association Analysis of Bitter Receptor Genes in Five Isolated Populations Identifies a Significant Correlation between TAS2R43 Variants and Coffee Liking

    PubMed Central

    Pirastu, Nicola; Kooyman, Maarten; Traglia, Michela; Robino, Antonietta; Willems, Sara M.; Pistis, Giorgio; d’Adamo, Pio; Amin, Najaf; d’Eustacchio, Angela; Navarini, Luciano; Sala, Cinzia; Karssen, Lennart C.; van Duijn, Cornelia; Toniolo, Daniela; Gasparini, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Coffee, one of the most popular beverages in the world, contains many different physiologically active compounds with a potential impact on people’s health. Despite the recent attention given to the genetic basis of its consumption, very little has been done in understanding genes influencing coffee preference among different individuals. Given its markedly bitter taste, we decided to verify if bitter receptor genes (TAS2Rs) variants affect coffee liking. In this light, 4066 people from different parts of Europe and Central Asia filled in a field questionnaire on coffee liking. They have been consequently recruited and included in the study. Eighty-eight SNPs covering the 25 TAS2R genes were selected from the available imputed ones and used to run association analysis for coffee liking. A significant association was detected with three SNP: one synonymous and two functional variants (W35S and H212R) on the TAS2R43 gene. Both variants have been shown to greatly reduce in vitro protein activity. Surprisingly the wild type allele, which corresponds to the functional form of the protein, is associated to higher liking of coffee. Since the hTAS2R43 receptor is sensible to caffeine, we verified if the detected variants produced differences in caffeine bitter perception on a subsample of people coming from the FVG cohort. We found a significant association between differences in caffeine perception and the H212R variant but not with the W35S, which suggests that the effect of the TAS2R43 gene on coffee liking is mediated by caffeine and in particular by the H212R variant. No other significant association was found with other TAS2R genes. In conclusion, the present study opens new perspectives in the understanding of coffee liking. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of the TAS2R43 gene in coffee hedonics and to identify which other genes and pathways are involved in its genetics. PMID:24647340

  4. Isolation of Clostridium difficile from dogs with digestive disorders, including stable metronidazole-resistant strains.

    PubMed

    Orden, Cristina; Blanco, Jose L; Álvarez-Pérez, Sergio; Garcia-Sancho, Mercedes; Rodriguez-Franco, Fernando; Sainz, Angel; Villaescusa, Alejandra; Harmanus, Celine; Kuijper, Ed; Garcia, Marta E

    2017-02-01

    The prevalence of Clostridium difficile in 107 dogs with diverse digestive disorders attended in a Spanish veterinary teaching hospital was assessed. The microorganism was isolated from 13 dogs (12.1%) of different disease groups. Isolates belonged to PCR ribotypes 078, 106, 154 and 430 (all of them toxigenic) and 110 (non-toxigenic), and were resistant to several antimicrobial drugs. Notably, seven isolates obtained from different dogs displayed stable resistance to metronidazole. The results of this study provide further evidence that dogs can act as a reservoir of C. difficile strains of epidemic ribotypes with resistance to multiple antibiotics.

  5. Prevalence of Met-203 type spaA variant in Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae isolates and the efficacy of swine erysipelas vaccines in Japan.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Mariko; Yamamoto, Kinya; Ochiai, Mariko; Yamamoto, Tsukasa; Hirano, Fumiya; Imamura, Saiki; Nagai, Hidetaka; Ohishi, Kouji; Horiuchi, Noriyuki; Kijima, Mayumi

    2014-03-01

    Since 2009, erysipelas infection among pigs in Japan has been increasing. This study investigated the prevalence, and characteristics of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae isolates in Japan from 2008 to 2010 and assessed the efficacy of current commercial erysipelas vaccines. Based on polymorphisms in a 432-bp hypervariable region in the surface protective antigen A (spaA) gene, 34 isolates were classified into three groups: (i) Group 1 with methionine at position 203 (Met-203) and isoleucine at position 257 (Ile-257) (18 isolates of serotype 1a and one untypable isolate). (ii) Group 2 with Ile-257 (12 isolates of serotypes 1a, 1b, 2, 10 and 11), and (iii) Group 3 with alanine at position 195 (Ala-195) and Ile-257 (three isolates of serotype 1a). Isolates with Met-203 were highly pathogenic in mice and pigs, causing death in the pig and LD50 values of 0.45-1.45 CFU per mouse. One live and three inactivated commercial E. rhusiopathiae vaccines were evaluated for efficacy against a Met-203 isolate. Almost all mice and pigs that received vaccine survived, while non-vaccinated controls all died within 5 days of the challenge. This indicates that swine erysipelas vaccines might be still effective in protecting animals against the recently prevalent Met-203 isolates in Japan.

  6. Highly Divergent Clostridium difficile Strains Isolated from the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Janezic, Sandra; Potocnik, Mojca; Zidaric, Valerija; Rupnik, Maja

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is one of the most important human and animal pathogens. However, the bacterium is ubiquitous and can be isolated from various sources. Here we report the prevalence and characterization of C. difficile in less studied environmental samples, puddle water (n = 104) and soil (n = 79). C. difficile was detected in 14.4% of puddle water and in 36.7% of soil samples. Environmental strains displayed antimicrobial resistance patterns comparable to already published data of human and animal isolates. A total of 480 isolates were grouped into 34 different PCR ribotypes. More than half of these (52.9%; 18 of 34) were already described in humans or animals. However, 14 PCR ribotypes were new in our PCR ribotype library and all but one were non-toxigenic. The multilocus sequence analysis of these new PCR ribotypes revealed that non-toxigenic environmental isolates are phylogenetically distinct and belong to three highly divergent clades, two of which have not been described before. Our data suggest that environment is a potential reservoir of genetically diverse population of C. difficile. PMID:27880843

  7. In vitro selection of meropenem resistance among ceftazidime-avibactam resistant, meropenem susceptible Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates with variant KPC-3 carbapenemases.

    PubMed

    Shields, Ryan K; Nguyen, M Hong; Press, Ellen G; Chen, Liang; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Clancy, Cornelius J

    2017-02-27

    Ceftazidime-avibactam resistance is mediated by blaKPC-3 mutations, which restore carbapenem susceptibility. We subjected blaKPC-3 mutant (n=5) and wild-type (n=2) K. pneumoniae isolates to serial meropenem passage. Meropenem MICs against all isolates increased. Ompk36 porin mutations evolved in 5 isolates, including those with wild-type blaKPC-3 In different passage lineages, blaKPC-3 mutations reverted to wild-type, were replaced by new mutations, or were retained. Carbapenem treatment of ceftazidime-avibactam resistant K. pneumoniae infections may select for carbapenem resistance.

  8. Chromosome-Based blaOXA-48-Like Variants in Shewanella Species Isolates from Food-Producing Animals, Fish, and the Aquatic Environment.

    PubMed

    Ceccarelli, Daniela; van Essen-Zandbergen, Alieda; Veldman, Kees T; Tafro, Nedzib; Haenen, Olga; Mevius, Dik J

    2017-02-01

    Carbapenems are considered last-resort antibiotics in health care. Increasing reports of carbapenemase-producing bacteria in food-producing animals and in the environment indicate the importance of this phenomenon in public health. Surveillance for carbapenemase genes and carbapenemase-producing bacteria in Dutch food-producing animals, environmental freshwater, and imported ornamental fish revealed several chromosome-based blaOXA-48-like variants in Shewanella spp., including two new alleles, blaOXA-514 and blaOXA-515 Carbapenemase genes were not associated with mobile genetic elements or Enterobacteriaceae.

  9. Vibrio cholerae Serogroup O139: Isolation from Cholera Patients and Asymptomatic Household Family Members in Bangladesh between 2013 and 2014

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Fahima; Mather, Alison E.; Begum, Yasmin Ara; Asaduzzaman, Muhammad; Baby, Nabilah; Sharmin, Salma; Biswas, Rajib; Ikhtear Uddin, Muhammad; LaRocque, Regina C.; Harris, Jason B.; Calderwood, Stephen B.; Ryan, Edward T.; Clemens, John D.; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Qadri, Firdausi

    2015-01-01

    Background Cholera is endemic in Bangladesh, with outbreaks reported annually. Currently, the majority of epidemic cholera reported globally is El Tor biotype Vibrio cholerae isolates of the serogroup O1. However, in Bangladesh, outbreaks attributed to V. cholerae serogroup O139 isolates, which fall within the same phylogenetic lineage as the O1 serogroup isolates, were seen between 1992 and 1993 and in 2002 to 2005. Since then, V. cholerae serogroup O139 has only been sporadically isolated in Bangladesh and is now rarely isolated elsewhere. Methods Here, we present case histories of four cholera patients infected with V. cholerae serogroup O139 in 2013 and 2014 in Bangladesh. We comprehensively typed these isolates using conventional approaches, as well as by whole genome sequencing. Phenotypic typing and PCR confirmed all four isolates belonging to the O139 serogroup. Findings Whole genome sequencing revealed that three of the isolates were phylogenetically closely related to previously sequenced El Tor biotype, pandemic 7, toxigenic V. cholerae O139 isolates originating from Bangladesh and elsewhere. The fourth isolate was a non-toxigenic V. cholerae that, by conventional approaches, typed as O139 serogroup but was genetically divergent from previously sequenced pandemic 7 V. cholerae lineages belonging to the O139 or O1 serogroups. Conclusion These results suggest that previously observed lineages of V. cholerae O139 persist in Bangladesh and can cause clinical disease and that a novel disease-causing non-toxigenic O139 isolate also occurs. PMID:26562418

  10. Frequency of VanA, VanB and VanH variants amongst vancomycin-resistant enterococci isolated from patients in central region of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Rezvani, Jaafar; Nasr, Reza; T. Shamsabadi, Fatemeh; Akbari Eidgahi, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the VRE frequency and the rate of each gene in isolated enterococci from patients with intestinal infection in the central region of Iran. Background: Enterococci infections are a public health growing concern due to the glycopeptide antibiotics resistance especially vancomycin. Genes, vanA, B, and H contribute to the influence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). Patients and methods: This study was conducted from January to July 2014 in Shahrood university hospital. Enterococci isolation and its antibacterial susceptibility were performed by culturing in Aesculin Azide agar and Kirby-Bauer method, respectively. Vancomycin-resistant genes were screened through conventional PCR, and subsequently sequenced. Results: Among 265 specimens, 100 isolates revealed enterococci, in which E. faecalis (91%) and E. faecium (9%). The isolated enterococci were resistant to vancomycin (6%) and chloramphenicol (21%), whereas their large proportions (94% to 100%) were multi-drug resistant. All VRE isolates belonged to E. faecalis, conversely, the E. faecium were susceptible to the same antibiotic. Both vanA and vanH genes were identified in all VRE isolates, although, no vanB gene was indicated. Homology analysis of sequenced amplicons verified the full length compatibility to the worldwide reported genes. Conclusion: The present study revealed VR E. faecalis in gastroenteritis patients and resistance factor for vanA and vanH genes are coordinated. Since enterococci isolates were all multidrug resistance, increase in VR E. faecalis vanA / vanH in this area could be expected. PMID:27895857

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Variant Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Strain CH/HNZZ47/2016 Isolated from Suckling Piglets in China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinsheng; Zhang, Qiaoling; Fang, Yuzhen; Zhou, Peng; Lu, Yanzhen; Xiao, Shuai; Dong, Zhaoliang

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) could cause an acute and highly contagious enteric disease in swine. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of PEDV strain CH/HNZZ47/2016 isolated from suckling piglets with mild diarrhea in Henan Province, China. It will help understand the molecular and evolutionary characteristics of PEDV in China. PMID:28254990

  12. Two-dimensional cartography of equine beta-casein variants achieved by isolation of phosphorylation isoforms and control of the deamidation phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Matéos, A; Girardet, J-M; Mollé, D; Dary, A; Miclo, L; Gaillard, J-L

    2009-06-01

    Because of variable degrees of phosphorylation, alternative splicing, and probable instability resulting from nonenzymatic deamidation, equine beta-casein presents a complex pattern by 2-dimensional electrophoresis that needs clarification. beta-Casein prepared from Haflinger mare's milk by hydrophobic interaction chromatography was fractionated by ion-exchange chromatography according to the degree of phosphorylation. Isoforms were identified by mass spectrometry; they corresponded to the full-length protein having 3 to 7 phosphate groups and to the splicing variant involving exon 5 and containing 4 to 7 phosphate groups. Investigations of nonenzymatic deamidation showed that beta-casein did not deamidate spontaneously in stored milk and during the different steps of chromatography, but deamidation could occur when 2-dimensional electrophoresis was performed, increasing the beta-casein pattern complexity. This phenomenon was strongly minimized when the first dimension step was carried out at 10 degrees C instead of at room temperature. Finally, spot attribution on 2-dimensional pattern of beta-casein was achieved by mixing each phosphorylation isoform in its native state with the whole beta-casein fraction.

  13. Selection during cefepime treatment of a new cephalosporinase variant with extended-spectrum resistance to cefepime in an Enterobacter aerogenes clinical isolate.

    PubMed

    Barnaud, G; Benzerara, Y; Gravisse, J; Raskine, L; Sanson-Le Pors, M J; Labia, R; Arlet, G

    2004-03-01

    Enterobacter aerogenes resistant to cefepime (MIC, 32 microg/ml) was isolated from a patient treated with cefepime for an infection caused by a strain of E. aerogenes overproducing its AmpC beta-lactamase (MIC of cefepime, 0.5 microg/ml). The AmpC beta-lactamase of the resistant strain had an L-293-P amino acid substitution and a high k(cat)/K(m) ratio for cefepime. Both of these modifications were necessary for resistance to cefepime.

  14. Characterization of Tn5801.Sag, a variant of Staphylococcus aureus Tn916 family transposon Tn5801 that is widespread in clinical isolates of Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Mingoia, Marina; Morici, Eleonora; Tili, Emily; Giovanetti, Eleonora; Montanari, Maria Pia; Varaldo, Pietro E

    2013-09-01

    Tn5801, originally detected in Staphylococcus aureus Mu50, is a Tn916 family element in which a unique int gene (int5801) replaces the int and xis genes in Tn916 (int916 and xis916). Among 62 tet(M)-positive tetracycline-resistant Streptococcus agalactiae isolates, 43 harbored Tn916, whereas 19 harbored a Tn5801-like element (Tn5801.Sag, ∼20.6 kb). Tn5801.Sag was characterized (PCR mapping, partial sequencing, and chromosomal integration) and compared to other Tn5801-like elements. Similar to Tn5801 from S. aureus Mu50, tested in parallel, Tn5801.Sag was unable to undergo circularization and conjugal transfer.

  15. Protection conferred by live infectious bronchitis vaccine viruses against variant Middle East IS/885/00-like and IS/1494/06-like isolates in commercial broiler chicks

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Faez; Forrester, Anne; Baylis, Matthew; Lemiere, Stephane; Ganapathy, Kannan

    2015-01-01

    The ability of the infectious bronchitis H120 (a Massachusetts strain) and CR88 (a 793B strain) live attenuated vaccine viruses to protect from two Middle East infectious bronchitis virus isolates, IS/885/00-like (IS/885) and IS/1494/06-like (IS/1494) in broiler chicks was investigated. Day-old chicks were separated into three groups, (I) vaccinated with H120 at day-old followed by CR88 at 14 days-old, (II) vaccinated with H120 and CR88 simultaneously at day-old and again with CR88 at 14 days-old, (III) control unvaccinated. At 30 days-old, each of the groups was challenged with virulent IS/885 or IS/1494. Protection was evaluated based on the clinical signs, tracheal and kidney gross lesions and tracheal ciliostasis. Results showed that administering combined live H120 and CR88 vaccines simultaneously at day-old followed by CR88 vaccine at 14 days-old gave more than 80 per cent tracheal ciliary protection from both of the Middle East isolates. In addition, this programme conferred 100 per cent protection from clinical signs and tracheal or kidney lesions. The other vaccination programme, H120 at day-old followed by CR88 at 14 days-old, the tracheal ciliary protection conferred were 60 per cent and 80 per cent from IS/885/00-like and IS/1494/06-like, respectively. PMID:26392909

  16. Nontoxigenic Clostridium difficile protects hamsters against challenge with historic and epidemic strains of toxigenic BI/NAP1/027 C. difficile.

    PubMed

    Nagaro, Kristin J; Phillips, S Tyler; Cheknis, Adam K; Sambol, Susan P; Zukowski, Walter E; Johnson, Stuart; Gerding, Dale N

    2013-11-01

    Nontoxigenic Clostridium difficile (NTCD) has been shown to prevent fatal C. difficile infection in the hamster model when hamsters are challenged with standard toxigenic C. difficile strains. The purpose of this study was to determine if NTCD can prevent C. difficile infection in the hamster model when hamsters are challenged with restriction endonuclease analysis group BI C. difficile strains. Groups of 10 hamsters were given oral clindamycin, followed on day 2 by 10(6) CFU of spores of NTCD strain M3 or T7, and were challenged on day 5 with 100 CFU of spores of BI1 or BI6. To conserve animals, results for control hamsters challenged with BI1 or BI6 from the present study and controls from previous identical experiments were combined for statistical comparisons. NTCD strains M3 and T7 achieved 100% colonization and were 100% protective against challenge with BI1 (P ≤ 0.001). M3 colonized 9/10 hamsters and protected against BI6 challenge in the colonized hamsters (P = 0.0003). T7 colonized 10/10 hamsters, but following BI6 challenge, cocolonization occurred in 5 hamsters, 4 of which died, for protection of 6/10 animals (P = 0.02). NTCD colonization provides protection against challenge with toxigenic BI group strains. M3 is more effective than T7 in preventing C. difficile infection caused by the BI6 epidemic strain. Prevention of C. difficile infection caused by the epidemic BI6 strain may be more challenging than that of infections caused by historic BI1 and non-BI C. difficile strains.

  17. Characterization of a cluster of oncogenic mutations in E6 of a human papillomavirus 83 variant isolated from a high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion.

    PubMed

    Cannavo, Isabelle; Benchetrit, Maxime; Loubatier, Céline; Michel, Gregory; Lemichez, Emmanuel; Giordanengo, Valérie

    2011-10-01

    We previously isolated human papillomavirus 83 (HPV83m) from a cervical smear. Sequence analysis of E6 and E7 proteins highlighted five mutations located in the second putative zinc-finger region of E6 (E6m), an important domain for protein-protein or protein-DNA interactions. Here, we show that E6m of HPV83m can trigger human primary cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth properties, similarly to E6 of HPV16, a high-risk HPV (HR-HPV). Interestingly, we demonstrate that, in contrast to E6 of HPV16, E6m corrupts neither p53 stability nor telomerase activity, but acts as a specific modulator of the transcriptional machinery. By studying E6m reversion mutants, we confirmed the importance of the second zinc-finger domain in triggering the observed upregulation of cell growth and of the transcriptional machinery. Reversion of these mutations in E6m (to yield strain E6r) fully abolished the oncogenic potential of E6m, transforming the phenotype of E6 from a high-risk to a low-risk phenotype. Importantly, our data define the importance of a cluster of mutations in the second zinc finger of E6m in increasing the oncogenic potential of HPV83.

  18. Characterization of Microbulbifer strain CMC-5, a new biochemical variant of Microbulbifer elongatus type strain DSM6810T isolated from decomposing seaweeds.

    PubMed

    Jonnadula, RaviChand; Verma, Pankaj; Shouche, Yogesh S; Ghadi, Sanjeev C

    2009-12-01

    A Gram-negative, rod-shaped, non-spore forming, non-motile and moderate halophilic bacteria designated as strain CMC-5 was isolated from decomposing seaweeds by enrichment culture. The growth of strain CMC-5 was assessed in synthetic seawater-based medium containing polysaccharide. The bacterium degraded and utilized agar, alginate, carrageenan, xylan, carboxymethyl cellulose and chitin. The strain was characterized using a polyphasic approach for taxonomic identification. Cellular fatty acid analysis showed the presence of iso-C(15:0) as major fatty acid and significant amounts of iso-C(17:1x9c) and C(18:1x7c). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequence indicated that strain CMC-5 is phylogenetically related to Microbulbifer genus and 99% similar to type strain Microbulbifer elongatus DSM6810T. However in contrast to Microbulbifer elongatus DSM6810T, strain CMC-5 is non-motile, utilizes glucose, galactose, inositol and xylan, does not utilize fructose and succinate nor does it produce H2S. Further growth of bacterial strain CMC-5 was observed when inoculated in seawater-based medium containing sterile pieces of Gracilaria corticata thalli. The bacterial growth was associated with release of reducing sugar in the broth suggesting its role in carbon recycling of polysaccharides from seaweeds in marine ecosystem.

  19. A Genetic Variant of Hepatitis B Virus Divergent from Known Human and Ape Genotypes Isolated from a Japanese Patient and Provisionally Assigned to New Genotype J▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Tatematsu, Kanako; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Kurbanov, Fuat; Sugauchi, Fuminaka; Mano, Shuhei; Maeshiro, Tatsuji; Nakayoshi, Tomokuni; Wakuta, Moriaki; Miyakawa, Yuzo; Mizokami, Masashi

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) of a novel genotype (J) was recovered from an 88-year-old Japanese patient with hepatocellular carcinoma who had a history of residing in Borneo during the World War II. It was divergent from eight human (A to H) and four ape (chimpanzee, gorilla, gibbon, and orangutan) HBV genotypes, as well as from a recently proposed ninth human genotype I, by 9.9 to 16.5% of the entire genomic sequence and did not have evidence of recombination with any of the nine human genotypes and four nonhuman genotypes. Based on a comparison of the entire nucleotide sequence against 1,440 HBV isolates reported, HBV/J was nearest to the gibbon and orangutan genotypes (mean divergences of 10.9 and 10.7%, respectively). Based on a comparison of four open reading frames, HBV/J was closer to gibbon/orangutan genotypes than to human genotypes in the P and large S genes and closest to Australian aboriginal strains (HBV/C4) and orangutan-derived strains in the S gene, whereas it was closer to human than ape genotypes in the C gene. HBV/J shared a deletion of 33 nucleotides at the start of preS1 region with C4 and gibbon genotypes, had an S-gene sequence similar to that of C4, and expressed the ayw subtype. Efficient infection, replication, and antigen expression by HBV/J were experimentally established in two chimeric mice with the liver repopulated for human hepatocytes. The HBV DNA sequence recovered from infected mice was identical to that in the inoculum. Since HBV/J is positioned phylogenetically in between human and ape genotypes, it may help to trace the origin of HBV and merits further epidemiological surveys. PMID:19640977

  20. Characterization of the amantadine-resistant H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza variants isolated from quails in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Dong, Guoying; Luo, Jing; Zhou, Kai; Wu, Bin; Peng, Chao; Ji, Guangju; He, Hongxuan

    2014-10-01

    Highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza viruses have spread in poultry and wild birds in Asia, Europe, and Africa since 2003. To evaluate the role of quails in the evolution of influenza A virus, we characterized three H5N1 viruses isolated from quails (QA viruses) in southern China. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that three QA viruses derived from the A/goose/Guangdong/1/96-like lineage and most closely related to HA clade 4 A/chicken/Hong Kong/31.4/02-like viruses. Molecular analysis suggested that QA viruses and clade 4 H5N1 viruses carried consistent residue signatures, such as the characteristic M2 Ser31Asn amantadine-resistance mutation, implying a common origin of these viruses. As revealed by viral pathogenicity tests, these QA viruses could replicate in intranasally infected mice, but were not lethal to them, showing low pathogenicity in mammals. However, they killed all intravenously inoculated chickens, showing high pathogenicity in poultry. Results from amantadine sensitivity tests of wild-type QA viruses and their reverse genetic viruses demonstrated that all QA viruses were resistant to amantadine, and the M2 Ser31Asn mutation was determined as the most likely cause of the increased amantadine-resistance of H5N1 QA viruses. Our study confirmed experimentally that the amino acid at residue 31 in the M2 protein plays a major role in determining the amantadine-resistance phenotype of H5N1 influenza viruses. Our findings provide further evidence that quails may play important roles in the evolution of influenza A viruses, which raises concerns over possible transmissions of H5N1 viruses among poultry, wild birds, and humans.

  1. A genetic variant of hepatitis B virus divergent from known human and ape genotypes isolated from a Japanese patient and provisionally assigned to new genotype J.

    PubMed

    Tatematsu, Kanako; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Kurbanov, Fuat; Sugauchi, Fuminaka; Mano, Shuhei; Maeshiro, Tatsuji; Nakayoshi, Tomokuni; Wakuta, Moriaki; Miyakawa, Yuzo; Mizokami, Masashi

    2009-10-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) of a novel genotype (J) was recovered from an 88-year-old Japanese patient with hepatocellular carcinoma who had a history of residing in Borneo during the World War II. It was divergent from eight human (A to H) and four ape (chimpanzee, gorilla, gibbon, and orangutan) HBV genotypes, as well as from a recently proposed ninth human genotype I, by 9.9 to 16.5% of the entire genomic sequence and did not have evidence of recombination with any of the nine human genotypes and four nonhuman genotypes. Based on a comparison of the entire nucleotide sequence against 1,440 HBV isolates reported, HBV/J was nearest to the gibbon and orangutan genotypes (mean divergences of 10.9 and 10.7%, respectively). Based on a comparison of four open reading frames, HBV/J was closer to gibbon/orangutan genotypes than to human genotypes in the P and large S genes and closest to Australian aboriginal strains (HBV/C4) and orangutan-derived strains in the S gene, whereas it was closer to human than ape genotypes in the C gene. HBV/J shared a deletion of 33 nucleotides at the start of preS1 region with C4 and gibbon genotypes, had an S-gene sequence similar to that of C4, and expressed the ayw subtype. Efficient infection, replication, and antigen expression by HBV/J were experimentally established in two chimeric mice with the liver repopulated for human hepatocytes. The HBV DNA sequence recovered from infected mice was identical to that in the inoculum. Since HBV/J is positioned phylogenetically in between human and ape genotypes, it may help to trace the origin of HBV and merits further epidemiological surveys.

  2. Molecular evolution of VP3, VP1, 3C(pro) and 3D(pol) coding regions in coxsackievirus group A type 24 variant isolates from acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis in 2011 in Okinawa, Japan.

    PubMed

    Nidaira, Minoru; Kuba, Yumani; Saitoh, Mika; Taira, Katsuya; Maeshiro, Noriyuki; Mahoe, Yoko; Kyan, Hisako; Takara, Taketoshi; Okano, Sho; Kudaka, Jun; Yoshida, Hiromu; Oishi, Kazunori; Kimura, Hirokazu

    2014-04-01

    A large acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) outbreak occurred in 2011 in Okinawa Prefecture in Japan. Ten strains of coxsackievirus group A type 24 variant (CA24v) were isolated from patients with AHC and full sequence analysis of the VP3, VP1, 3C(pro) and 3D(pol) coding regions performed. To assess time-scale evolution, phylogenetic analysis was performed using the Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo method. In addition, similarity plots were constructed and pairwise distance (p-distance) and positive pressure analyses performed. A phylogenetic tree based on the VP1 coding region showed that the present strains belong to genotype 4 (G4). In addition, the present strains could have divided in about 2010 from the same lineages detected in other countries such as China, India and Australia. The mean rates of molecular evolution of four coding regions were estimated at about 6.15 to 7.86 × 10(-3) substitutions/site/year. Similarity plot analyses suggested that nucleotide similarities between the present strains and a prototype strain (EH24/70 strain) were 0.77-0.94. The p-distance of the present strains was relatively short (<0.01). Only one positive selected site (L25H) was identified in the VP1 protein. These findings suggest that the present CA24v strains causing AHC are genetically related to other AHC strains with rapid evolution and emerged in around 2010.

  3. Efficacy of commercial produce sanitizers against nontoxigenic Escherichia coli O157:H7 during processing of iceberg lettuce in a pilot-scale leafy green processing line.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Gordon R; Buchholz, Annemarie L; Ryser, Elliot T

    2013-11-01

    Chemical sanitizers are routinely used during commercial flume washing of fresh-cut leafy greens to minimize cross-contamination from the water. This study assessed the efficacy of five commercial sanitizer treatments against Escherichia coli O157:H7 on iceberg lettuce, in wash water, and on equipment during simulated commercial production in a pilot-scale processing line. Iceberg lettuce (5.4 kg) was inoculated to contain 10(6) CFU/g of a four-strain cocktail of nontoxigenic, green fluorescent protein-labeled, ampicillin-resistant E. coli O157:H7 and processed after 1 h of draining at ~22 °C. Lettuce was shredded using a commercial slicer, step-conveyed to a flume tank, washed for 90 s using six different treatments (water alone, 50 ppm of peroxyacetic acid, 50 ppm of mixed peracid, or 50 ppm of available chlorine either alone or acidified to pH 6.5 with citric acid [CA] or T-128), and then dried using a shaker table and centrifugal dryer. Various product (25-g) and water (50-ml) samples collected during processing along with equipment surface samples (100 cm(2)) from the flume tank, shaker table, and centrifugal dryer were homogenized in neutralizing buffer and plated on tryptic soy agar. During and after iceberg lettuce processing, none of the sanitizers were significantly more effective (P ≤ 0.05) than water alone at reducing E. coli O157:H7 populations on lettuce, with reductions ranging from 0.75 to 1.4 log CFU/g. Regardless of the sanitizer treatment used, the centrifugal dryer surfaces yielded E. coli O157:H7 populations of 3.49 to 4.98 log CFU/100 cm(2). Chlorine, chlorine plus CA, and chlorine plus T-128 were generally more effective (P ≤ 0.05) than the other treatments, with reductions of 3.79, 5.47, and 5.37 log CFU/ml after 90 s of processing, respectively. This indicates that chlorine-based sanitizers will likely prevent wash water containing low organic loads from becoming a vehicle for cross-contamination.

  4. Novel variant of tickborne encephalitis virus, Russia.

    PubMed

    Ternovoi, Vladimir A; Protopopova, Elena V; Chausov, Eugene V; Novikov, Dmitry V; Leonova, Galina N; Netesov, Sergey V; Loktev, Valery B

    2007-10-01

    We isolated a novel strain of tickborne encephalitis virus (TBEV), Glubinnoe/2004, from a patient with a fatal case in Russia. We sequenced the strain, whose landmark features included 57 amino acid substitutions and 5 modified cleavage sites. Phylogenetically, Glubinnoe/2004 is a novel variant that belongs to the Eastern type of TBEV.

  5. Charge variants in IgG1

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Sirj; Hutchinson, Ryan; Kwong, Zephania W; Yang, Jihong; Wang, Xiangdan; Yao, Zhenling; Sreedhara, Alavattam; Cano, Tony; Tesar, Devin; Nijem, Ihsan; Allison, David E; Wong, Pin Yee; Kao, Yung-Hsiang; Quan, Cynthia; Joshi, Amita; Harris, Reed J; Motchnik, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Antibody charge variants have gained considerable attention in the biotechnology industry due to their potential influence on stability and biological activity. Subtle differences in the relative proportions of charge variants are often observed during routine biomanufacture or process changes and pose a challenge to demonstrating product comparability. To gain further insights into the impact on biological activity and pharmacokinetics (PK) of monoclonal antibody (mAb) charge heterogeneity, we isolated the major charge forms of a recombinant humanized IgG1 and compared their in vitro properties and in vivo PK. The mAb starting material had a pI range of 8.7–9.1 and was composed of about 20% acidic variants, 12% basic variants and 68% main peak. Cation exchange displacement chromatography was used to isolate the acidic, basic and main peak fractions for animal studies. Detailed analyses were performed on the isolated fractions to identify specific chemical modification contributing to the charge differences and were also characterized for purity and in vitro potency prior to being administered either subcutaneously (SC) or intravenously (IV) in rats. All isolated materials had similar potency and rat FcRn binding relative to the starting material. Following IV or SC administration (10 mg/kg) in rats, no difference in serum PK was observed, indicating that physiochemical modifications and pI differences among charge variants were not sufficient to result in PK changes. Thus, these results provided meaningful information for the comparative evaluation of charge-related heterogeneity of mAbs and suggested that charge variants of IgGs do not affect the in vitro potency, FcRn binding affinity or the PK properties in rats. PMID:20818176

  6. Histone Variants and Epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Henikoff, Steven; Smith, M. Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    Histones package and compact DNA by assembling into nucleosome core particles. Most histones are synthesized at S phase for rapid deposition behind replication forks. In addition, the replacement of histones deposited during S phase by variants that can be deposited independently of replication provide the most fundamental level of chromatin differentiation. Alternative mechanisms for depositing different variants can potentially establish and maintain epigenetic states. Variants have also evolved crucial roles in chromosome segregation, transcriptional regulation, DNA repair, and other processes. Investigations into the evolution, structure, and metabolism of histone variants provide a foundation for understanding the participation of chromatin in important cellular processes and in epigenetic memory. PMID:25561719

  7. In Vitro Activities of Cephalosporins and Quinolones against Escherichia coli Strains Isolated from Diarrheic Dairy Calves

    PubMed Central

    Orden, José Antonio; Ruiz-Santa-Quiteria, José Antonio; García, Silvia; Cid, Dolores; de la Fuente, Ricardo

    1999-01-01

    The in vitro activities of several cephalosporins and quinolones against 195 strains of Escherichia coli isolated from dairy calves affected by neonatal diarrhea were determined. One hundred thirty-seven of these strains produced one or more potential virulence factors (F5, F41, F17, cytotoxic necrotizing factor, verotoxin, and the eae gene), but the remaining 58 strains did not produce any of these factors. From 11 to 18% of the E. coli strains were resistant to cephalothin, nalidixic acid, enoxacin, and enrofloxacin. However, cefuroxime, cefotaxime, and cefquinome were highly effective against the E. coli isolates tested. Some significant differences (P < 0.05) in resistance to quinolones between the strains producing potential virulence factors and nonfimbriated, nontoxigenic, eae-negative strains were found. Thus, eae-positive, necrotoxigenic, and verotoxigenic (except for nalidixic acid) E. coli strains were significantly more sensitive to nalidixic acid, enoxacin, and enrofloxacin than nonfimbriated, nontoxigenic, eae-negative strains. Moreover, eae-positive strains were significantly more sensitive to enoxacin and enrofloxacin than F5-positive strains. Thus, the results of this study suggest that the bovine E. coli strains that produce some potential virulence factors are more sensitive to quinolones than those that do not express these factors. PMID:10049259

  8. Pathogenic properties of a Corynebacterium diphtheriae strain isolated from a case of osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Peixoto, Renata Stavracakis; Hacker, Elena; Antunes, Camila Azevedo; Weerasekera, Dulanthi; Dias, Alexandre Alves de Souza de Oliveira; Martins, Carlos Alberto; Hirata, Raphael; Santos, Kátia Regina Netto Dos; Burkovski, Andreas; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luíza

    2016-11-01

    Corynebacterium diphtheriae is typically recognized as a colonizer of the upper respiratory tract (respiratory diphtheria) and the skin (cutaneous diphtheria). However, different strains of Corynebacteriumdiphtheriae can also cause invasive infections. In this study, the characterization of a non-toxigenic Corynebacteriumdiphtheriae strain (designated BR-INCA5015) isolated from osteomyelitis in the frontal bone of a patient with adenoid cystic carcinoma was performed. Pathogenic properties of the strain BR-INCA5015 were tested in a Caenorhabditis elegans survival assay showing strong colonization and killing by this strain. Survival rates of 3.8±2.7 %, 33.6±7.3 % and 0 % were observed for strains ATCC 27010T, ATCC 27012 and BR-INCA5015, respectively, at day 7. BR-INCA5015 was able to colonize epithelial cells, showing elevated capacity to adhere to and survive within HeLa cells compared to other Corynebacteriumdiphtheriae isolates. Intracellular survival in macrophages (THP-1 and RAW 264.7) was significantly higher compared to control strains ATCC 27010T (non-toxigenic) and ATCC 27012 (toxigenic). Furthermore, the ability of BR-INCA5015 to induce osteomyelitis was confirmed by in vivo assay using Swiss Webster mice.

  9. Mucopolysaccharidosis: A New Variant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Primrose, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    Described is a possibly new variant of mucopolysaccharidosis characterized by progressive mental and motor deficiency, bone abnormalities, a generalized skin lesion, and abnormal mucopolysaccharides in the urine as seen in a 20-year-old female. (DB)

  10. Immunogenic variants obtained by mutagenesis of mouse mastocytoma P815. V. H-2 associativity of variant-specific antigens.

    PubMed

    Van Snick, J; Maryanski, J; Van Pel, A; Parmiani, G; Boon, T

    1982-11-01

    By in vitro mutagenesis of mastocytoma P815, it is possible to obtain tumor cell variants that are rejected by syngeneic mice (tum-). Most of these variants carry new individual antigens and stimulate a specific cytolytic T cell (CTL) response in mixed leukocyte tumor cell culture (MLTC). The H-2 associativity of this response was examined for six different variants by measuring the inhibition of cell-mediated cytolysis by antibodies directed against products of the K or the D end of the H-2d complex. The lysis was either not inhibited (variants P91 and P116) or inhibited selectively by anti-Kd (variants P21, P32 and P198) or anti-Dd antibodies (variant P35). All these tum- variants expressed Kd and Dd antigens as measured by absorption of H-2 alloantisera. Long-term CTL clones can be obtained that are specific for individual tum- antigens. The pattern of H-2 associativity obtained with MLTC-derived CTL against four tum- variants was verified with CTL clones directed against the specific antigens of these variants. Concordant results were observed in all cases. In addition to CTL clones specific for tum- antigens, it is possible to isolate clones against a P815 tumor-associated antigen found on all P815 tum- variants. For these clones no clear associativity with either Kd or Dd products was found.

  11. Sporadic isolates of Escherichia coli O157.H7 investigated by pyrolysis mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, R.; Sisson, P. R.; Jenkins, D. R.; Ward, A. C.; Lightfoot, N. F.; O'Brien, S. J.

    1995-01-01

    Thirty-six encoded isolates of Escherichia coli. 32 of which were of serotype O157, were examined by pyrolysis mass spectrometry (PyMS). Thirty-one of the serotype O157 isolates possessed the flagellar antigen H7 and produced Verocytotoxin (VT), the other isolate serotyped as H45 and was non-toxigenic. Eighteen of the VT-producing E. coli (VTEC) isolates were from sporadic disease in residents of the Northern Region. Standard principal component (PC) and canonical variate (CV) analysis of the data distinguished only the four non-O157 isolates from the remainder which were indistinguishable by this approach. A similarity matrix based on differences between individual CV means distinguished a further ten isolates. The matrix correctly clustered 2 pairs of isolates from siblings and 4 isolates from an affected family. A further 5 clusters of 3 or more isolates and 6 pairs of isolates were defined. These groupings proved to be homogenous for toxin phenotype but occasionally entrained isolates of dissimilar phage type. However, in general, PyMS-derived clustering of apparently sporadic isolates accorded with geographical locations as determined by postcode. PyMS, which is a quick and high volume capacity phenotypic technique, may be a useful addition to existing methods in the investigation of the epidemiology of sporadic VTEC disease. PMID:7781731

  12. Genotyping Clostridium botulinum toxinotype A isolates from patients using amplified rDNA restriction analysis.

    PubMed

    Pourshafie, M; Vahdani, P; Popoff, M

    2005-10-01

    In this study, the application of amplified rDNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) for characterizing Clostridium botulinum toxinotype A strains isolated from individuals with botulism was evaluated. Ten restriction enzymes were tested for their suitability in ARDRA as a typing method and HhaI was selected for the best outcome. Analysis of HhaI restriction profiles of the amplified products divided C. botulinum isolates into three clusters. Non-toxigenic Clostridium sporogenes strains showed an ARDRA restriction pattern that was distinct from those observed for C. botulinum. The successful use of ARDRA for subdivision of C. botulinum in this study confirmed that this technique is a powerful method for typing of C. botulinum toxinotype A clonal diversity. In addition, it is rapid, sensitive and simple.

  13. MCR-1.3: a new MCR variant carried by an IncP plasmid in a colistin-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolated from a healthy individual.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xin; Hu, Yongfei; Luo, Ming; Zhou, Haijian; Wang, Xiaoxun; Du, Yu; Li, Zhenpeng; Xu, Jialiang; Zhu, Baoli; Xu, Xuebin; Kan, Biao

    2017-03-06

    In this study, we reported a novel mcr-1 gene variant, named mcr-1.3, carried by an IncP plasmid in a colistin-resistant Salmonella Typhimurium from a healthy person. Compared with mcr-1, the mcr-1.3 gene contained two SNPs; one of them resulted in an arginine to histidine variation (Arg536->His). The plasmid carrying mcr-1.3 gene was designated pMCR1.3_P053, and was highly similar to a recently discovered mcr-1-bearing plasmid found in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

  14. Searching for missing heritability: Designing rare variant association studies

    PubMed Central

    Zuk, Or; Schaffner, Stephen F.; Samocha, Kaitlin; Do, Ron; Hechter, Eliana; Kathiresan, Sekar; Daly, Mark J.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Sunyaev, Shamil R.; Lander, Eric S.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic studies have revealed thousands of loci predisposing to hundreds of human diseases and traits, revealing important biological pathways and defining novel therapeutic hypotheses. However, the genes discovered to date typically explain less than half of the apparent heritability. Because efforts have largely focused on common genetic variants, one hypothesis is that much of the missing heritability is due to rare genetic variants. Studies of common variants are typically referred to as genomewide association studies, whereas studies of rare variants are often simply called sequencing studies. Because they are actually closely related, we use the terms common variant association study (CVAS) and rare variant association study (RVAS). In this paper, we outline the similarities and differences between RVAS and CVAS and describe a conceptual framework for the design of RVAS. We apply the framework to address key questions about the sample sizes needed to detect association, the relative merits of testing disruptive alleles vs. missense alleles, frequency thresholds for filtering alleles, the value of predictors of the functional impact of missense alleles, the potential utility of isolated populations, the value of gene-set analysis, and the utility of de novo mutations. The optimal design depends critically on the selection coefficient against deleterious alleles and thus varies across genes. The analysis shows that common variant and rare variant studies require similarly large sample collections. In particular, a well-powered RVAS should involve discovery sets with at least 25,000 cases, together with a substantial replication set. PMID:24443550

  15. Variants of Uncertainty

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-15

    Variants of Uncertainty Daniel Kahneman University of British Columbia Amos Tversky Stanford University DTI-C &%E-IECTE ~JUNO 1i 19 8 1j May 15, 1981... Dennett , 1979) in which different parts have ac- cess to different data, assign then different weights and hold different views of the situation...2robable and t..h1 provable. Oxford- Claredor Press, 1977. Dennett , D.C. Brainstorms. Hassocks: Harvester, 1979. Donchin, E., Ritter, W. & McCallum, W.C

  16. Variants of glycoside hydrolases

    DOEpatents

    Teter, Sarah; Ward, Connie; Cherry, Joel; Jones, Aubrey; Harris, Paul; Yi, Jung

    2013-02-26

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent glycoside hydrolase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 21, 94, 157, 205, 206, 247, 337, 350, 373, 383, 438, 455, 467, and 486 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, and optionally further comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2 a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, wherein the variants have glycoside hydrolase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant glycoside hydrolases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  17. Variants of glycoside hydrolases

    DOEpatents

    Teter, Sarah; Ward, Connie; Cherry, Joel; Jones, Aubrey; Harris, Paul; Yi, Jung

    2011-04-26

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent glycoside hydrolase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 21, 94, 157, 205, 206, 247, 337, 350, 373, 383, 438, 455, 467, and 486 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, and optionally further comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2 a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, wherein the variants have glycoside hydrolase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant glycoside hydrolases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  18. Variants of Aspergillus alutaceus var. alutaceus (formerly Aspergillus ochraceus) with altered ochratoxin a production

    SciTech Connect

    Chelack, W.S.; Borsa, J.; Szekely, J.G. ); Marquardt, R.R.; Frohlich, A.A. )

    1991-09-01

    The present studies, using Asperigillus alutaceus var. alutaceus Berkeley et Curtis (formerly A. ochraceus Wilhelm) NRRL 3174 along with three other wild-type strains, were undertaken in an attempt to understand the effects of irradiation and other treatments on mycotoxin production in grain. Bedford barley was inoculated with spores of NRRL 3174, gamma irradiated, and incubated at 28C and 25% moisture. After 10 days of incubation, two colony types, ocher (parental) and yellow (variant), were isolated from the grain. Further culturing of the yellow variant resulted in the spontaneous appearance of a white variant that exhibited greatly enhanced fluorescence under UV light. In subsequent work, we have also isolated variants producing a soluble red pigment. In addition, in model experiments involving irradiation (1 kGy) of pure cultures, induction frequencies ranging between 2 and 4% (survival basis) were observed for the yellow and red variants. Inoculation of these variants into wheat and incubation for 14 days at 28C and 32% moisture resulted in ochratoxin A production in the relative amounts of 0.09:1:4.6:9.3 for the red, ocher (parental), yellow, and white variants, respectively. Additional characteristics of these isolates are described. Confirmation that the white high-ochratoxin-A-producing variants were derived from the parental strain was demonstrated by obtaining revertant sectors in monoclonal cultures of the variants.

  19. Genetic Assessment of African Swine Fever Isolates Involved in Outbreaks in the Democratic Republic of Congo between 2005 and 2012 Reveals Co-Circulation of p72 Genotypes I, IX and XIV, Including 19 Variants

    PubMed Central

    Mulumba–Mfumu, Leopold K.; Achenbach, Jenna E.; Mauldin, Matthew R.; Dixon, Linda K.; Tshilenge, Curé Georges; Thiry, Etienne; Moreno, Noelia; Blanco, Esther; Saegerman, Claude; Lamien, Charles E.; Diallo, Adama

    2017-01-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is a devastating disease of domestic pigs. It is a socioeconomically important disease, initially described from Kenya, but subsequently reported in most Sub-Saharan countries. ASF spread to Europe, South America and the Caribbean through multiple introductions which were initially eradicated—except for Sardinia—followed by re‑introduction into Europe in 2007. In this study of ASF within the Democratic Republic of the Congo, 62 domestic pig samples, collected between 2005–2012, were examined for viral DNA and sequencing at multiple loci: C-terminus of the B646L gene (p72 protein), central hypervariable region (CVR) of the B602L gene, and the E183L gene (p54 protein). Phylogenetic analyses identified three circulating genotypes: I (64.5% of samples), IX (32.3%), and XIV (3.2%). This is the first evidence of genotypes IX and XIV within this country. Examination of the CVR revealed high levels of intra-genotypic variation, with 19 identified variants. PMID:28218698

  20. Genetic Assessment of African Swine Fever Isolates Involved in Outbreaks in the Democratic Republic of Congo between 2005 and 2012 Reveals Co-Circulation of p72 Genotypes I, IX and XIV, Including 19 Variants.

    PubMed

    Mulumba-Mfumu, Leopold K; Achenbach, Jenna E; Mauldin, Matthew R; Dixon, Linda K; Tshilenge, Curé Georges; Thiry, Etienne; Moreno, Noelia; Blanco, Esther; Saegerman, Claude; Lamien, Charles E; Diallo, Adama

    2017-02-18

    African swine fever (ASF) is a devastating disease of domestic pigs. It is a socioeconomically important disease, initially described from Kenya, but subsequently reported in most Sub-Saharan countries. ASF spread to Europe, South America and the Caribbean through multiple introductions which were initially eradicated-except for Sardinia-followed by re‑introduction into Europe in 2007. In this study of ASF within the Democratic Republic of the Congo, 62 domestic pig samples, collected between 2005-2012, were examined for viral DNA and sequencing at multiple loci: C-terminus of the B646L gene (p72 protein), central hypervariable region (CVR) of the B602L gene, and the E183L gene (p54 protein). Phylogenetic analyses identified three circulating genotypes: I (64.5% of samples), IX (32.3%), and XIV (3.2%). This is the first evidence of genotypes IX and XIV within this country. Examination of the CVR revealed high levels of intra-genotypic variation, with 19 identified variants.

  1. Charge variant analysis of proposed biosimilar to Trastuzumab.

    PubMed

    Dakshinamurthy, Pravinkumar; Mukunda, Pavithra; Prasad Kodaganti, Bhargav; Shenoy, Bharath Ravindra; Natarajan, Bairavabalakumar; Maliwalave, Amol; Halan, Vivek; Murugesan, Sathyabalan; Maity, Sunit

    2017-03-01

    Trastuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody (mAb) employed for the treatment of HER2 Positive Breast Cancer. A HER2 overexpressing tumor cell binds to Trastuzumab and attracts immune cells which lead to induction of Antibody Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity (ADCC) by binding to Fc receptors (CD16a or FcγRIIIa) on an effector cell, such as natural killer (NK) cells. The most commonly expressed receptor on NK cell is CD16a which binds to the Fc portion of Trastuzumab. The ligand-independent HER2-HER3 dimerization is the most potent stimulator of downstream pathways for regulation of cell growth and survival. An attempt has been made in this study to understand the impact of charge heterogeneity on the binding kinetics and potency of the monoclonal antibody. Trastuzumab has a pI range of 8.7-8.9 and is composed of mixture of acidic and basic variants beside the main peak. Ion exchange chromatography was used to isolate the acidic, basic, and main peak fractions from in-house proposed biosimilar to Trastuzumab and their activities were compared to the Innovator Trastuzumab Herclon(®). Data from the mass analysis confirmed the potential modifications in both acidic and basic variant. Binding activity studies performed using Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) revealed that acidic variants had lesser binding to HER2 in comparison to the basic variants. Both acidic and basic variant showed no significant changes in their binding to soluble CD16a receptors. In vitro assay studies using a breast cancer cell line (BT-474) confirmed the binding potency of acidic variant to be lesser than basic variant, along with reduced anti-proliferative activity for the acidic variant of Trastuzumab. Overall, these data has provided meaningful insights to the impact of antibody charge variants on in vitro potency and CD16 binding affinity of trastuzumab.

  2. Variants of windmill nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kwang-Dong; Shin, Hae Kyung; Kim, Ji-Soo; Kim, Sung-Hee; Choi, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Hyo-Jung; Zee, David S

    2016-07-01

    Windmill nystagmus is characterized by a clock-like rotation of the beating direction of a jerk nystagmus suggesting separate horizontal and vertical oscillators, usually 90° out of phase. We report oculographic characteristics in three patients with variants of windmill nystagmus in whom the common denominator was profound visual loss due to retinal diseases. Two patients showed a clock-like pattern, while in the third, the nystagmus was largely diagonal (in phase or 180° out of phase) but also periodically changed direction by 180°. We hypothesize that windmill nystagmus is a unique manifestation of "eye movements of the blind." It emerges when the central structures, including the cerebellum, that normally keep eye movements calibrated and gaze steady can no longer perform their task, because they are deprived of the retinal image motion that signals a need for adaptive recalibration.

  3. Election 2016: Voting on Variants.

    PubMed

    Cho, Raymond J; Collisson, Eric A

    2016-07-01

    Genome sequencing studies increasingly identify variants of unknown significance in provocative genes. Kim and colleagues present a system with which to functionally annotate such variants in a high-throughput, biologically relevant series of assays. Cancer Discov; 6(7); 694-6. ©2016 AACRSee related article by Kim et al., p. 714.

  4. Identification of Aspergillus flavus isolates as potential biocontrol agents of aflatoxin contamination in crops.

    PubMed

    Rosada, L J; Sant'anna, J R; Franco, C C S; Esquissato, G N M; Santos, P A S R; Yajima, J P R S; Ferreira, F D; Machinski, M; Corrêa, B; Castro-Prado, M A A

    2013-06-01

    Aspergillus flavus, a haploid organism found worldwide in a variety of crops, including maize, cottonseed, almond, pistachio, and peanut, causes substantial and recurrent worldwide economic liabilities. This filamentous fungus produces aflatoxins (AFLs) B1 and B2, which are among the most carcinogenic compounds from nature, acutely hepatotoxic and immunosuppressive. Recent efforts to reduce AFL contamination in crops have focused on the use of nonaflatoxigenic A. flavus strains as biological control agents. Such agents are applied to soil to competitively exclude native AFL strains from crops and thereby reduce AFL contamination. Because the possibility of genetic recombination in A. flavus could influence the stability of biocontrol strains with the production of novel AFL phenotypes, this article assesses the diversity of vegetative compatibility reactions in isolates of A. flavus to identify heterokaryon self-incompatible (HSI) strains among nonaflatoxigenic isolates, which would be used as biological controls of AFL contamination in crops. Nitrate nonutilizing (nit) mutants were recovered from 25 A. flavus isolates, and based on vegetative complementation between nit mutants and on the microscopic examination of the number of hyphal fusions, five nonaflatoxigenic (6, 7, 9 to 11) and two nontoxigenic (8 and 12) isolates of A. flavus were phenotypically characterized as HSI. Because the number of hyphal fusions is reduced in HSI strains, impairing both heterokaryon formation and the genetic exchanges with aflatoxigenic strains, the HSI isolates characterized here, especially isolates 8 and 12, are potential agents for reducing AFL contamination in crops.

  5. Genetic variability of Aspergillus flavus isolates from a Mississippi corn field.

    PubMed

    Solorzano, Cesar D; Abbas, Hamed K; Zablotowicz, Robert M; Chang, Perng-Kuang; Jones, Walker A

    2014-01-01

    A nontoxigenic Aspergillus flavus strain, K49, is currently being tested as a biological control agent in corn fields in the Mississippi Delta. However, little is known about the overall genetic diversity of A. flavus from year to year in corn fields and specifically in Mississippi. Our objective was to assess the genetic variability of A. flavus isolates from different seasons, inoculum sources, and years, from a no-till corn field. Of the 175 A. flavus isolates examined, 74 and 97 had the typical norB-cypA type I (1.5 kb) and type II (1.0 kb) deletion patterns, respectively. Variability in the sequence of the omtA gene of the majority of the field isolates (n = 118) was compared to strain K49. High levels of haplotypic diversity (24 omtA haplotypes; Hd = 0.61 ± 0.04) were found. Among the 24 haplotypes, two were predominant, H1 (n = 71), which consists of mostly toxigenic isolates, and H49 (n = 18), which consists of mostly atoxigenic isolates including K49. Toxigenic isolates were prevalent (60%) in this natural population. Nonetheless, about 15% of the population likely shared the same ancestral origin with K49. This study provides valuable information on the diversity of A. flavus. This knowledge can be further used to develop additional biological control strains.

  6. Microbiological and molecular characterization of Corynebacterium diphtheriae isolated in Algeria between 1992 and 2015.

    PubMed

    Benamrouche, N; Hasnaoui, S; Badell, E; Guettou, B; Lazri, M; Guiso, N; Rahal, K

    2016-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to undertake the microbiological and molecular characterization of Corynebacterium diphtheriae isolates collected in Algeria during epidemic and post-epidemic periods between 1992 and 2015. Microbiological characterization includes the determination of biotype and toxigenicity status using phenotypic and genotypic methods. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the E-test method. Molecular characterization was performed by multi-locus sequence typing. In total, there were 157 cases of C. diphtheriae isolates, 127 in patients with respiratory diphtheria and 30 with ozena. Isolates with a mitis biotype were predominant (122 out of 157; 77.7%) followed by belfanti (28 out of 157; 17.8%) and gravis biotype (seven out of 157; 4.5%). Toxigenic isolates were predominant in the period 1992-2006 (74 out of 134) whereas in the period 2007-2015, only non-toxigenic isolates circulated (23 out of 23). All 157 isolates were susceptible to erythromycin, gentamicin, vancomycin and cotrimoxazole. Reduced susceptibility to penicillin G, cefotaxime, tetracycline and chloramphenicol was detected in 90 (57.3%), 88 (56.1%), 112 (71.3%) and 90 (57.3%) isolates, respectively. Multi-locus sequence typing analysis indicates that sequence type 116 (ST-116) was the most frequent, with 65 out of 100 isolates analysed, in particular during the epidemic period 1992-1999 (57 out of 65 isolates). In the post-epidemic period, 2000-2015, 13 different sequence types were isolated. All belfanti isolates (ten out of 100 isolates) belonged to closely related sequence types grouped in a phylogenetically distinct eBurst group and were collected exclusively in ozena cases. In conclusion, the epidemic period was associated with ST-116 while the post-epidemic period was characterized by more diversity. Belfanti isolates are grouped in a phylogenetically distinct clonal complex.

  7. Cellobiohydrolase variants and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Wogulis, Mark

    2013-09-24

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent cellobiohydrolase II. The present invention also relates to polynucleotides encoding the variants; nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides; and methods of using the variants.

  8. Cellobiohydrolase variants and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Wogulis, Mark

    2014-10-14

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent cellobiohydrolase II. The present invention also relates to polynucleotides encoding the variants; nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides; and methods of using the variants.

  9. Cellobiohydrolase variants and polynucleotides encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Wogulis, Mark

    2014-09-09

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent cellobiohydrolase. The present invention also relates to polynucleotides encoding the cellobiohydrolase variants; nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides; and methods of using the cellobiohydrolase variants.

  10. Rare Copy Number Variants

    PubMed Central

    Grozeva, Detelina; Kirov, George; Ivanov, Dobril; Jones, Ian R.; Jones, Lisa; Green, Elaine K.; St Clair, David M.; Young, Allan H.; Ferrier, Nicol; Farmer, Anne E.; McGuffin, Peter; Holmans, Peter A.; Owen, Michael J.; O’Donovan, Michael C.; Craddock, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Context Recent studies suggest that copy number variation in the human genome is extensive and may play an important role in susceptibility to disease, including neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. The possible involvement of copy number variants (CNVs) in bipolar disorder has received little attention to date. Objectives To determine whether large (>100 000 base pairs) and rare (found in <1% of the population) CNVs are associated with susceptibility to bipolar disorder and to compare with findings in schizophrenia. Design A genome-wide survey of large, rare CNVs in a case-control sample using a high-density microarray. Setting The Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. Participants There were 1697 cases of bipolar disorder and 2806 nonpsychiatric controls. All participants were white UK residents. Main Outcome Measures Overall load of CNVs and presence of rare CNVs. Results The burden of CNVs in bipolar disorder was not increased compared with controls and was significantly less than in schizophrenia cases. The CNVs previously implicated in the etiology of schizophrenia were not more common in cases with bipolar disorder. Conclusions Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder differ with respect to CNV burden in general and association with specific CNVs in particular. Our data are consistent with the possibility that possession of large, rare deletions may modify the phenotype in those at risk of psychosis: those possessing such events are more likely to be diagnosed as having schizophrenia, and those without them are more likely to be diagnosed as having bipolar disorder. PMID:20368508

  11. Heteromorphic variants of chromosome 9

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Heterochromatic variants of pericentromere of chromosome 9 are reported and discussed since decades concerning their detailed structure and clinical meaning. However, detailed studies are scarce. Thus, here we provide the largest ever done molecular cytogenetic research based on >300 chromosome 9 heteromorphism carriers. Results In this study, 334 carriers of heterochromatic variants of chromosome 9 were included, being 192 patients from Western Europe and the remainder from Easter-European origin. A 3-color-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probe-set directed against for 9p12 to 9q13~21.1 (9het-mix) and 8 different locus-specific probes were applied for their characterization. The 9het-mix enables the characterization of 21 of the yet known 24 chromosome 9 heteromorphic patterns. In this study, 17 different variants were detected including five yet unreported; the most frequent were pericentric inversions (49.4%) followed by 9qh-variants (23.9%), variants of 9ph (11.4%), cenh (8.2%), and dicentric- (3.8%) and duplication-variants (3.3%). For reasons of simplicity, a new short nomenclature for the yet reported 24 heteromorphic patterns of chromosome 9 is suggested. Six breakpoints involved in four of the 24 variants could be narrowed down using locus-specific probes. Conclusions Based on this largest study ever done in carriers of chromosome 9 heteromorphisms, three of the 24 detailed variants were more frequently observed in Western than in Eastern Europe. Besides, there is no clear evidence that infertility is linked to any of the 24 chromosome 9 heteromorphic variants. PMID:23547710

  12. Variants of beta-glucosidases

    SciTech Connect

    Fidantsef, Ana; Lamsa, Michael; Gorre-Clancy, Brian

    2014-10-07

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent beta-glucosidase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 703 of amino acids 1 to 842 of SEQ ID NO: 2 or corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 705 of amino acids 1 to 844 of SEQ ID NO: 70, wherein the variant has beta-glucosidase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant beta-glucosidases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  13. Variants of beta-glucosidase

    SciTech Connect

    Fidantsef, Ana; Lamsa, Michael; Gorre-Clancy, Brian

    2015-07-14

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent beta-glucosidase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 703 of amino acids 1 to 842 of SEQ ID NO: 2 or corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 705 of amino acids 1 to 844 of SEQ ID NO: 70, wherein the variant has beta-glucosidase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant beta-glucosidases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  14. Variants of beta-glucosidase

    DOEpatents

    Fidantsef, Ana; Lamsa, Michael; Gorre-Clancy, Brian

    2009-12-29

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent beta-glucosidase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 703 of amino acids 1 to 842 of SEQ ID NO: 2 or corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 705 of amino acids 1 to 844 of SEQ ID NO: 70, wherein the variant has beta-glucosidase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant beta-glucosidases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  15. Variants of beta-glucosidases

    DOEpatents

    Fidantsef, Ana; Lamsa, Michael; Clancy, Brian Gorre

    2008-08-19

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent beta-glucosidase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 703 of amino acids 1 to 842 of SEQ ID NO: 2 or corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 705 of amino acids 1 to 844 of SEQ ID NO: 70, wherein the variant has beta-glucosidase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant beta-glucosidases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  16. [Differences in virulence genes in Vibrio cholerae eltor strains isolated from different sources in Turkmenistan territory].

    PubMed

    Smirnova, N I; Kostromitina, E A; Cheldyshova, N B; Kutyrev, V V

    2002-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detected the presence of various genes associated with virulence in genome of strains V. cholerae eltor isolated in Turkmenistan territory during epidemic and epidemic-free perios. It was found that a complete set of virulence genes (ctxA+, tcpA+ and toxR+) contained strains isolated from patients, carriers and environment only in cholera epidemics. Strains isolated from the environment in the period free of epidemics did not contain ctxA and tcpA in 78.2% of cases, but 5.2% of the strains carried a complete set of virulence genes. There were also nontoxigenic strains containing genes tcpA and toxR. Such strains were isolated from the environment (16.6%) and vibrion carriers (42.9%). Isolated were also strains V.cholerae eltor carrying bacteriophage CTX phi with incomplete set of virulence genes and having genotype ctxA-, ace+ and zot+. Almost all the strains ctxA-, tcpA+ carry attRS1-site in genome. This shows that such strains may transform into toxigenic as a result of infection with bacteriophage CTX phi.

  17. Human AZU-1 gene, variants thereof and expressed gene products

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Huei-Mei; Bissell, Mina

    2004-06-22

    A human AZU-1 gene, mutants, variants and fragments thereof. Protein products encoded by the AZU-1 gene and homologs encoded by the variants of AZU-1 gene acting as tumor suppressors or markers of malignancy progression and tumorigenicity reversion. Identification, isolation and characterization of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes localized to a tumor suppressive locus at chromosome 10q26, highly expressed in nonmalignant and premalignant cells derived from a human breast tumor progression model. A recombinant full length protein sequences encoded by the AZU-1 gene and nucleotide sequences of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes and variant and fragments thereof. Monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies specific to AZU-1, AZU-2 encoded protein and to AZU-1, or AZU-2 encoded protein homologs.

  18. Developing a DNA variant database.

    PubMed

    Fung, David C Y

    2008-01-01

    Disease- and locus-specific variant databases have been a valuable resource to clinical and research geneticists. With the recent rapid developments in technologies, the number of DNA variants detected in a typical molecular genetics laboratory easily exceeds 1,000. To keep track of the growing inventory of DNA variants, many laboratories employ information technology to store the data as well as distributing the data and its associated information to clinicians and researchers via the Web. While it is a valuable resource, the hosting of a web-accessible database requires collaboration between bioinformaticians and biologists and careful planning to ensure its usability and availability. In this chapter, a series of tutorials on building a local DNA variant database out of a sample dataset will be provided. However, this tutorial will not include programming details on building a web interface and on constructing the web application necessary for web hosting. Instead, an introduction to the two commonly used methods for hosting web-accessible variant databases will be described. Apart from the tutorials, this chapter will also consider the resources and planning required for making a variant database project successful.

  19. Phenotypic and metabolic profiling of colony morphology variants evolved from Pseudomonas fluorescens biofilms.

    PubMed

    Workentine, Matthew L; Harrison, Joe J; Weljie, Aalim M; Tran, Vy A; Stenroos, Pernilla U; Tremaroli, Valentina; Vogel, Hans J; Ceri, Howard; Turner, Raymond J

    2010-06-01

    Colony morphology variants isolated from natural and laboratory-grown biofilms represent subpopulations of biofilm cells that may be important for multiple aspects of the sessile lifestyle, from surface colonization to stress resistance. There are many genetic and environmental factors that determine the frequency at which colony morphology variants are recovered from biofilms. One of these factors involves an increased selection for variants in biofilms of Pseudomonas species bearing inactivating mutations in the global activator of cyanide biosynthesis/regulator of secondary metabolism (gac/rsm) signal transduction pathway. Here we characterize two distinct colony morphology variants isolated from biofilms of Pseudomonas fluorescens missing the gacS sensor kinase. These variants produced more biofilm cell mass, and in one case, this was likely due to overproduction of the exopolysaccharide cellulose. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolomics revealed distinct metabolic changes for each of the two phenotypic variants, and these changes involved amino acids and metabolites produced through glutathione biochemistry. Some of these metabolites are hypothesized to play a role in redox and metal homeostasis, and corresponding to this, we show that biofilm populations grown from each of these variants had a different ability to survive when exposed to toxic doses of metal ions. These data suggest that colony morphology variants that evolve during growth of P. fluorescens as a biofilm may have distinct metabolic capacities that contribute to their individual abilities to withstand environmental stress.

  20. Characterization of a Mycobacterium intracellulare Variant Strain by Molecular Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Menendez, M. C.; Palenque, E.; Navarro, M. C.; Nuñez, M. C.; Rebollo, M. J.; Garcia, M. J.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a Mycobacterium intracellulare variant strain causing an unusual infection. Several isolates obtained from an immunocompromised patient were identified as members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) by the commercial AccuProbe system and biochemical standard identification. Further molecular approaches were undertaken for a more accurate characterization of the bacteria. Up to seven different genomic sequences were analyzed, ranging from conserved mycobacterial genes such as 16S ribosomal DNA to MAC-specific genes such as mig (macrophage-induced gene). The results obtained identify the isolates as a variant of M. intracellulare, an example of the internal variability described for members of the MAC, particularly within that species. The application of other molecular approaches is recommended for more accurate identification of bacteria described as MAC members. PMID:11724827

  1. New diphtheria toxin repressor types depicted in a Romanian collection of Corynebacterium diphtheriae isolates.

    PubMed

    Dinu, Sorin; Damian, Maria; Badell, Edgar; Dragomirescu, Cristiana Cerasella; Guiso, Nicole

    2014-10-01

    Corynebacterium diphtheriae is the etiological agent of diphtheria, a potential fatal disease caused by a corynephage toxin. The expression of this diphtheria toxin is controlled via an iron-dependent repressor with various functions (DtxR). Some mutations in the dtxR gene are associated with diminished activity or even with total loss of DtxR function. We conducted a molecular study to characterize the dtxR alleles harbored by 34 isolates of C. diphtheriae recovered from Romanian patients between 1961 and 2007. Three of the seven alleles identified in this study have not previously been described. Two new DtxR types were identified, one of which has an unusual polypeptide length. All the new DtxR types were found in toxigenic isolates, suggesting that they effectively regulate the expression of diphtheria toxin. Furthermore, one of the new DtxR identified was also found in a non-toxigenic isolate, making it a potential source of toxigenic isolates after lysogenic conversion.

  2. Are isolated wetlands isolated?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Loren M.; Euliss, Ned H.; Haukos, David A.

    2011-01-01

    While federal regulations during the past 10 years have treated isolated wetlands as unconnected to aquatic resources protected by the Clean Water Act, they provide critical ecosystem services to society that extend well beyond their wetland boundaries. The authors offer well-documented examples from the scientific literature on some of the ecosystem services provided by isolated wetlands to society and other ecosystems.

  3. Molecular Epidemiology of Hepatitis B Virus Variants in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Grethe, Stefanie; Heckel, Jens-Ove; Rietschel, Wolfram; Hufert, Frank T.

    2000-01-01

    We characterized hepatitis B virus (HBV) isolates from sera of 21 hepatitis B virus surface antigen-positive apes, members of the families Pongidae and Hylobatidae (19 gibbon spp., 1 chimpanzee, and 1 gorilla). Sera originate from German, French, Thai, and Vietnamese primate-keeping institutions. To estimate the phylogenetic relationships, we sequenced two genomic regions, one located within the pre-S1/pre-S2 region and one including parts of the polymerase and the X protein open reading frames. By comparison with published human and ape HBV isolates, the sequences could be classified into six genomic groups. Four of these represented new genomic groups of gibbon HBV variants. The gorilla HBV isolate was distantly related to the chimpanzee isolate described previously. To confirm these findings, the complete HBV genome from representatives of each genomic group was sequenced. The HBV isolates from gibbons living in different regions of Thailand and Vietnam could be classified into four different phylogenetically distinct genomic groups. The same genomic groups were found in animals from European zoos. Therefore, the HBV infections of these apes might have been introduced into European primate-keeping facilities by direct import of already infected animals from different regions in Thailand. Taken together, our data suggest that HBV infections are indigenous in the different apes. One event involving transmission between human and nonhuman primates in the Old World of a common ancestor of human HBV genotypes A to E and the ape HBV variants might have occurred. PMID:10799618

  4. Acute small fiber neuropathy following Mycoplasma infection: a rare variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    PubMed

    Makonahalli, Rohitha; Seneviratne, Janaka; Seneviratne, Udaya

    2014-06-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is a well-described condition involving the peripheral nervous system. The most well-known form of this disease is acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. Among the different variants of GBS described in the literature, the sensory variant is scantily recognized. There has been a recent attempt to classify the sensory variants of the GBS and bring more objectivity to this diagnostic paradigm. We report a rare sensory variant of GBS presenting with isolated small nerve fiber involvement peripherally in the limbs and associated facial nerve palsy in a patient who had clinical and serological evidence of a preceding Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. The symptoms resolved gradually with intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. This case adds to the growing literature of the rare form of acute small fiber neuropathy and GBS variants.

  5. Connected speech production in three variants of primary progressive aphasia.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Stephen M; Henry, Maya L; Besbris, Max; Ogar, Jennifer M; Dronkers, Nina F; Jarrold, William; Miller, Bruce L; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa

    2010-07-01

    Primary progressive aphasia is a clinical syndrome defined by progressive deficits isolated to speech and/or language, and can be classified into non-fluent, semantic and logopenic variants based on motor speech, linguistic and cognitive features. The connected speech of patients with primary progressive aphasia has often been dichotomized simply as 'fluent' or 'non-fluent', however fluency is a multidimensional construct that encompasses features such as speech rate, phrase length, articulatory agility and syntactic structure, which are not always impacted in parallel. In this study, our first objective was to improve the characterization of connected speech production in each variant of primary progressive aphasia, by quantifying speech output along a number of motor speech and linguistic dimensions simultaneously. Secondly, we aimed to determine the neuroanatomical correlates of changes along these different dimensions. We recorded, transcribed and analysed speech samples for 50 patients with primary progressive aphasia, along with neurodegenerative and normal control groups. Patients were scanned with magnetic resonance imaging, and voxel-based morphometry was used to identify regions where atrophy correlated significantly with motor speech and linguistic features. Speech samples in patients with the non-fluent variant were characterized by slow rate, distortions, syntactic errors and reduced complexity. In contrast, patients with the semantic variant exhibited normal rate and very few speech or syntactic errors, but showed increased proportions of closed class words, pronouns and verbs, and higher frequency nouns, reflecting lexical retrieval deficits. In patients with the logopenic variant, speech rate (a common proxy for fluency) was intermediate between the other two variants, but distortions and syntactic errors were less common than in the non-fluent variant, while lexical access was less impaired than in the semantic variant. Reduced speech rate was

  6. [Isolation and characterization of Escherichia coli O157 in bovine meat products and cattle in the province of Tucuman].

    PubMed

    Jure, María A; Condorí, Marina S; Pérez Terrazzino, Gabriela; Catalán, Mariana G; López Campo, Alejandro; Zolezzi, Gisella; Chinen, Isabel; Rivas, Marta; Castillo, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157 is an emergent pathogen associated with diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Meat products constitute an important transmission source of this microorganism. The aims of this study were to characterize E. coli O157 isolated from cattle and meat products collected from abattoirs and retail stores, to establish the clonal relatedness among regional isolates and to compare them with those in the national database. Between 2004 and 2013, 169 minced meat, 35 sausage and 216 carcass samples were analyzed. Thirteen E. coli O157 isolates were identified; 6 of which were O157:H7 and characterized as stx2c(vh-a)/eae/ehxA (n = 5) and stx2/eae/ehxA (n = 1). The 7 remaining isolates were non-toxigenic E. coli strains, and serotyped as O157:NT (n = 4), O157:NM (n = 1), O157:ND (n = 1) and O157:H16 (n = 1). The strains yielded different XbaI-PFGE patterns. Compared to the E. coli O157 isolates in the National Database, none of these patterns have been previously detected in strains of different origin in Argentina.

  7. Recurring defective variants of simian virus 40 containing monkey DNA segments.

    PubMed Central

    Papamatheakis, J; Lee, T N; Thayer, R E; Singer, M F

    1981-01-01

    Four independently and newly isolated defective variants of simian virus 40 have been characterized. All four are very similar, if not identical, to two previously and independently isolated variants (Wakamiya et al., J. Biol. Chem. 254:3584-3591, 1979; J. Papamatheakis, E. Kuff, E. Winocour, and M. F. Singer, J. Biol. Chem. 255:8919-8927, 1980). The documented similarities include restriction endonuclease maps and the presence of the same monkey DNA segments covalently linked to simian virus 40 DNA sequences. Each of the newly described variants was first detected upon serial passaging of wild-type simian virus 40 at a high multiplicity of infection at 33 degrees C as recently described (M. F. Singer and R. E. Thayer, J. Virol. 35:141-149, 1980). A variety of experiments support the idea that the various isolates were independent and do not reflect inadvertent cross-contamination. Two of the new isolates arose during passage of wild-type strain 777 virus in BSC-1 cells, one during passage of strain 776 in BSC-1 cells, and one during passage of strain 776 in primary African green monkey kidney cells. The two variants obtained after passage of strain 776 were shown to contain a particular recognition site for restriction endonuclease MboII within their simian virus 40 DNA segments, as do the two previous isolates. This site is not present in wild-type strain 776 DNA but is shown here to be present in wild-type strain 777 DNA. The surprising recurrence of closely related variants and particularly the unexpected presence of the endo R.MboII site in variants derived from passaging strain 776 suggest that these variants may arise by mechanisms other than recombination between the initial infecting viral genome and the host DNA. Images PMID:6260983

  8. Variant (Swine Origin) Influenza Viruses in Humans

    MedlinePlus

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Newsletters Variant Influenza Viruses: Background and CDC Risk Assessment and Reporting Language: ... Background CDC Assessment Reporting Background On Variant Influenza Viruses Swine flu viruses do not normally infect humans. ...

  9. Effect of mutation mechanisms on variant composition and distribution in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiou

    2017-01-01

    Genetic diversity is maintained by continuing generation and removal of variants. While examining over 800,000 DNA variants in wild isolates of Caenorhabditis elegans, we made a discovery that the proportions of variant types are not constant across the C. elegans genome. The variant proportion is defined as the fraction of a specific variant type (e.g. single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) or indel) within a broader set of variants (e.g. all variants or all non-SNPs). The proportions of most variant types show a correlation with the recombination rate. These correlations can be explained as a result of a concerted action of two mutation mechanisms, which we named Morgan and Sanger mechanisms. The two proposed mechanisms act according to the distinct components of the recombination rate, specifically the genetic and physical distance. Regression analysis was used to explore the characteristics and contributions of the two mutation mechanisms. According to our model, ~20–40% of all mutations in C. elegans wild populations are derived from programmed meiotic double strand breaks, which precede chromosomal crossovers and thus may be the point of origin for the Morgan mechanism. A substantial part of the known correlation between the recombination rate and variant distribution appears to be caused by the mutations generated by the Morgan mechanism. Mathematically integrating the mutation model with background selection model gives a more complete depiction of how the variant landscape is shaped in C. elegans. Similar analysis should be possible in other species by examining the correlation between the recombination rate and variant landscape within the context of our mutation model. PMID:28135268

  10. Characterization of Nosema ceranae Genetic Variants from Different Geographic Origins.

    PubMed

    Branchiccela, B; Arredondo, D; Higes, M; Invernizzi, C; Martín-Hernández, R; Tomasco, I; Zunino, P; Antúnez, K

    2017-05-01

    In recent years, large-scale colony losses of honey bees (Apis mellifera) have been reported and the infection with the microsporidia Nosema ceranae has been involved. However, the effect of N. ceranae at the colony level and its role in colony losses vary in different geographic areas. This difference may be related to the presence of multiple N. ceranae genetic variants resulting in different biological consequences. In this study, we analyzed the genetic diversity of 75 N. ceranae samples obtained from 13 countries and Hawaii through inter-sequence single repetition (ISSR) and evaluated if two of these genetic variants triggered different immune responses when infecting Apis mellifera iberiensis. The genetic diversity analysis showed that 41% of the samples had the same DNA amplification pattern, including samples from most European countries except Spain, while the remaining samples showed high variability. Infection assays were performed to analyze the infection levels and the immune response of bees infected with N. ceranae from Spain and Uruguay. The infected bees presented similar infection levels, and both isolates downregulated the expression of abaecin, confirming the ability of the microsporidia to depress the immune response. Only N. ceranae from Uruguay downregulated the expression level of imd compared to control bees. On the other hand, both genetic variants triggered different expression levels of lysozyme. As imd and lysozyme play important roles in the response to pathogens, these results could reflect differences in the biological consequences of N. ceranae variants in A. mellifera infection.

  11. Cognition and Anatomy in Three Variants of Primary Progressive Aphasia

    PubMed Central

    Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa; Dronkers, Nina F.; Rankin, Katherine P.; Ogar, Jennifer M.; Phengrasamy, La; Rosen, Howard J.; Johnson, Julene K.; Weiner, Michael W.; Miller, Bruce L.

    2008-01-01

    We performed a comprehensive cognitive, neuroimaging, and genetic study of 31 patients with primary progressive aphasia (PPA), a decline in language functions that remains isolated for at least 2 years. Detailed speech and language evaluation was used to identify three different clinical variants: nonfluent progressive aphasia (NFPA; n = 11), semantic dementia (SD; n = 10), and a third variant termed logopenic progressive aphasia (LPA; n = 10). Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) on MRIs showed that, when all 31 PPA patients were analyzed together, the left perisylvian region and the anterior temporal lobes were atrophied. However, when each clinical variant was considered separately, distinctive patterns emerged: (1) NFPA, characterized by apraxia of speech and deficits in processing complex syntax, was associated with left inferior frontal and insular atrophy; (2) SD, characterized by fluent speech and semantic memory deficits, was associated with anterior temporal damage; and (3) LPA, characterized by slow speech and impaired syntactic comprehension and naming, showed atrophy in the left posterior temporal cortex and inferior parietal lobule. Apolipoprotein E ε4 haplotype frequency was 20% in NFPA, 0% in SD, and 67% in LPA. Cognitive, genetic, and anatomical features indicate that different PPA clinical variants may correspond to different underlying pathological processes. PMID:14991811

  12. Evaluation of Perceived Threat Differences Posed by Filovirus Variants

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Jens H.; Dodd, Lori E.; Wahl-Jensen, Victoria; Radoshitzky, Sheli R.; Bavari, Sina

    2011-01-01

    In the United States, filoviruses (ebolaviruses and marburgviruses) are listed as National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Category A Priority Pathogens, Select Agents, and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Category A Bioterrorism Agents. In recent months, U.S. biodefense professionals and policy experts have initiated discussions on how to optimize filovirus research in regard to medical countermeasure (ie, diagnostics, antiviral, and vaccine) development. Standardized procedures and reagents could accelerate the independent verification of research results across government agencies and establish baselines for the development of animal models acceptable to regulatory entities, such as the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), while being fiscally responsible. At the root of standardization lies the question of which filovirus strains, variants, or isolates ought to be the prototypes for product development, evaluation, and validation. Here we discuss a rationale for their selection. We conclude that, based on currently available data, filovirus biodefense research ought to focus on the classical taxonomic filovirus prototypes: Marburg virus Musoke in the case of marburgviruses and Ebola virus Mayinga in the case of Zaire ebolaviruses. Arguments have been made in various committees in favor of other variants, such as Marburg virus Angola, Ci67 or Popp, or Ebola virus Kikwit, but these rationales seem to be largely based on anecdotal or unpublished and unverified data, or they may reflect a lack of awareness of important facts about the variants' isolation history and genomic properties. PMID:22070137

  13. Variant Humicola grisea CBH1.1

    DOEpatents

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Larenas, Edmund

    2011-08-16

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  14. Variant Humicola grisea CBH1.1

    DOEpatents

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Larenas, Edmund

    2011-05-31

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  15. Variant Humicola grisea CBH1.1

    DOEpatents

    Goedegebuur, Frits [Vlaardingen, NL; Gualfetti, Peter [San Francisco, CA; Mitchinson, Colin [Half Moon Bay, CA; Larenas, Edmund [Moss Beach, CA

    2012-08-07

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  16. Variant Humicola grisea CBH1.1

    DOEpatents

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Larenas, Edmund

    2008-12-02

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  17. Cultural variant interaction in teaching and transmission.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Marshall

    2015-01-01

    Focus on the way in which cultural variants affect other variants' probabilities of transmission in modeling and empirical work can enrich Kline's conceptualization of teaching. For example, the problem of communicating complex cumulative culture is an adaptive problem; teaching methods that manage transmission so that acquisition of some cultural variants increases the probability of acquiring others, provide a partial solution.

  18. Variant humicola grisea CBH1.1

    DOEpatents

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Edmund, Larenas

    2014-09-09

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  19. Variant Humicola grisea CBH1.1

    DOEpatents

    Goedegeburr, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Larenas, Edmund

    2013-02-19

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  20. Variant Humicola grisea CBH1.1

    DOEpatents

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Larenas, Edmund

    2014-03-18

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  1. Displacement of the anterior leaflet of the tricuspid valve: Rare variant of Ebstein's anomaly.

    PubMed

    Tsujii, Nobuyuki; Kurosaki, Kenichi; Yasuda, Kenji; Mizuno, Masanori; Sakaguchi, Heima; Hoashi, Takaya; Ichikawa, Hajime; Shiraishi, Isao

    2016-08-01

    In Ebstein's anomaly, the points of attachment, or hinges, of the septal and mural leaflets in the right ventricle are displaced away from the atrioventricular junction. In contrast, the junctional hinge of the anterior leaflet usually retains a normal position. Here, we report a case of giant right atrial aneurysm due to isolated displacement of the anterior leaflet of the tricuspid valve in an infant, a rare variant of Ebstein's anomaly. Enlargement of the right atrium, which was initially diagnosed during the fetal period, progressively and markedly dilated after birth and was successfully treated with surgical resection. Isolated displacement of the anterior leaflet should be recognized as a variant of Ebstein's anomaly.

  2. Clinicopathologic Variants of Mycosis Fungoides.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-González, H; Molina-Ruiz, A M; Requena, L

    2017-04-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is the most common primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. The clinical course of the disease is typically characterized by progression from a nonspecific phase of erythematous macules to the appearance of plaques and ultimately, in some patients, tumors. However, numerous clinical and histopathologic variants of MF with specific therapeutic and prognostic implications have been described in recent decades. Clarification of the differential diagnosis can be frustrated by the wide range of clinical manifestations and histopathologic patterns of cutaneous infiltration, particularly in the early phases of the disease. In this paper, we review the main clinical, histopathologic, and immunohistochemical characteristics of the variants of MF described in the literature in order to facilitate early diagnosis of the disease.

  3. Oncotator: cancer variant annotation tool.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Alex H; Lichtenstein, Lee; Gupta, Manaswi; Lawrence, Michael S; Pugh, Trevor J; Saksena, Gordon; Meyerson, Matthew; Getz, Gad

    2015-04-01

    Oncotator is a tool for annotating genomic point mutations and short nucleotide insertions/deletions (indels) with variant- and gene-centric information relevant to cancer researchers. This information is drawn from 14 different publicly available resources that have been pooled and indexed, and we provide an extensible framework to add additional data sources. Annotations linked to variants range from basic information, such as gene names and functional classification (e.g. missense), to cancer-specific data from resources such as the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC), the Cancer Gene Census, and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). For local use, Oncotator is freely available as a python module hosted on Github (https://github.com/broadinstitute/oncotator). Furthermore, Oncotator is also available as a web service and web application at http://www.broadinstitute.org/oncotator/.

  4. A variant of Brugada syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Switzer, Maryna Popp; Agunanne, Enoch; Abbas, Aamer

    2017-01-01

    Brugada syndrome is an inherited disorder that can present with syncope, cardiac arrest, or sudden cardiac death. Multiple genetic mutations have been described that cause this disease. We present a 56-year-old man who sustained an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, was resuscitated, and was found to have typical features of the Brugada criteria on the electrocardiogram. Genetic testing was positive for a heterozygous mutation in the sodium voltage-gated channel alpha subunit 5 (SCN5A) gene with a p. Leu227Pro (L227P) variant located on exon 6. To our knowledge, this is the first described case with this variant causing malignant arrhythmia with a cardiac arrest. PMID:28127136

  5. A variant of Brugada syndrome.

    PubMed

    Switzer, Maryna Popp; Teleb, Mohamed; Agunanne, Enoch; Abbas, Aamer

    2017-01-01

    Brugada syndrome is an inherited disorder that can present with syncope, cardiac arrest, or sudden cardiac death. Multiple genetic mutations have been described that cause this disease. We present a 56-year-old man who sustained an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, was resuscitated, and was found to have typical features of the Brugada criteria on the electrocardiogram. Genetic testing was positive for a heterozygous mutation in the sodium voltage-gated channel alpha subunit 5 (SCN5A) gene with a p. Leu227Pro (L227P) variant located on exon 6. To our knowledge, this is the first described case with this variant causing malignant arrhythmia with a cardiac arrest.

  6. Evolution of mouse hepatitis virus: detection and characterization of spike deletion variants during persistent infection.

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, C L; Baker, S C; Nathan, M J; Fleming, J O

    1997-01-01

    High-frequency RNA recombination has been proposed as an important mechanism for generating viral deletion variants of murine coronavirus. Indeed, a number of variants with deletions in the spike glycoprotein have been isolated from persistently infected animals. However, the significance of generating and potentially accumulating deletion variants in the persisting viral RNA population is unclear. To study this issue, we evaluated the evolution of spike variants by examining the population of spike RNA sequences detected in the brains and spinal cords of mice inoculated with coronavirus and sacrificed at 4, 42, or 100 days postinoculation. We focused on the S1 hypervariable region since previous investigators had shown that this region is subject to recombination and deletion. RNA isolated from the brains or spinal cords of infected mice was rescued by reverse transcription-PCR, and the amplified products were cloned and used in differential colony hybridizations to identify individual isolates with deletions. We found that 11 of 20 persistently infected mice harbored spike deletion variants (SDVs), indicating that deletions are common but not required for persistent infection. To determine if a specific type of SDV accumulated during persistence, we sequenced 106 of the deletion isolates. We identified 23 distinct patterns of SDVs, including 5 double-deletion variants. Furthermore, we found that each mouse harbored distinct variants in its central nervous system (CNS), suggesting that SDVs are generated during viral replication in the CNS. Interestingly, mice with the most severe and persisting neurological disease harbored the most prevalent and diverse quasispecies of SDVs. Overall, these findings illustrate the complexity of the population of persisting viral RNAs which may contribute to chronic disease. PMID:9060655

  7. Molecular basis of organ-specific selection of viral variants during chronic infection.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, R; Hahn, C S; Somasundaram, T; Villarete, L; Matloubian, M; Strauss, J H

    1991-01-01

    Viral variants of different phenotypes are present in the central nervous system (CNS) and lymphoid tissues of carrier mice infected at birth with the Armstrong strain of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. The CNS isolates are similar to the parental virus and cause acute infections in adult mice, whereas the lymphoid isolates cause chronic infections associated with suppressed T-cell responses. In this study, we provide a molecular basis for this organ-specific selection and identify a single amino acid change in the viral glycoprotein that correlates with the tissue specific selection and the persistent and immunosuppressive phenotype of the variants. This phenylalanine (F)-to-leucine (L) change at position 260 of the viral glycoprotein was seen in the vast majority (43 of 47) of the lymphoid isolates, and variants with L at this residue were selected in spleens of persistently infected mice. In striking contrast, isolates with the parental sequence (F at residue 260) predominated (48 of 59 isolates) in the CNS of the same carrier mice. Complete nucleotide sequence analysis of the major structural genes of several independently derived (from different mice) spleen isolates showed that these variants were greater than 99.8% identical to the parental virus. In fact, the only common change among these spleen isolates was the F----L mutation at residue 260 of the glycoprotein. These results show that an RNA virus can exhibit minimal genetic drift during chronic infection in its natural host, and yet a single or few mutations can result in the organ-specific selection of variants that are markedly different from the parental virus. Images PMID:2072451

  8. Variant Calling From Next Generation Sequence Data.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Nancy F

    2016-01-01

    The use of next generation nucleotide sequencing to discover and genotype small sequence variants has led to numerous insights into the molecular causes of various diseases. This chapter describes the use of freely available software to align next generation sequencing reads to a reference and then to use the resulting alignments to call, annotate, view, and filter small sequence variants. The suggested variant calling workflow includes read alignment with novoalign, the removal of polymerase chain reaction duplicate sequences with samtools or bamUtils, and the detection of variants with Freebayes or bam2mpg software. ANNOVAR is then used to annotate the predicted variants using gene models, population frequencies, and predicted mutation severity, producing variant files which can be viewed and filtered with the variant display tool VarSifter.

  9. Re-sequencing expands our understanding of the phenotypic impact of variants at GWAS loci.

    PubMed

    Service, Susan K; Teslovich, Tanya M; Fuchsberger, Christian; Ramensky, Vasily; Yajnik, Pranav; Koboldt, Daniel C; Larson, David E; Zhang, Qunyuan; Lin, Ling; Welch, Ryan; Ding, Li; McLellan, Michael D; O'Laughlin, Michele; Fronick, Catrina; Fulton, Lucinda L; Magrini, Vincent; Swift, Amy; Elliott, Paul; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kaakinen, Marika; McCarthy, Mark I; Peltonen, Leena; Pouta, Anneli; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Collins, Francis S; Narisu, Narisu; Stringham, Heather M; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Ripatti, Samuli; Fulton, Robert S; Sabatti, Chiara; Wilson, Richard K; Boehnke, Michael; Freimer, Nelson B

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified >500 common variants associated with quantitative metabolic traits, but in aggregate such variants explain at most 20-30% of the heritable component of population variation in these traits. To further investigate the impact of genotypic variation on metabolic traits, we conducted re-sequencing studies in >6,000 members of a Finnish population cohort (The Northern Finland Birth Cohort of 1966 [NFBC]) and a type 2 diabetes case-control sample (The Finland-United States Investigation of NIDDM Genetics [FUSION] study). By sequencing the coding sequence and 5' and 3' untranslated regions of 78 genes at 17 GWAS loci associated with one or more of six metabolic traits (serum levels of fasting HDL-C, LDL-C, total cholesterol, triglycerides, plasma glucose, and insulin), and conducting both single-variant and gene-level association tests, we obtained a more complete understanding of phenotype-genotype associations at eight of these loci. At all eight of these loci, the identification of new associations provides significant evidence for multiple genetic signals to one or more phenotypes, and at two loci, in the genes ABCA1 and CETP, we found significant gene-level evidence of association to non-synonymous variants with MAF<1%. Additionally, two potentially deleterious variants that demonstrated significant associations (rs138726309, a missense variant in G6PC2, and rs28933094, a missense variant in LIPC) were considerably more common in these Finnish samples than in European reference populations, supporting our prior hypothesis that deleterious variants could attain high frequencies in this isolated population, likely due to the effects of population bottlenecks. Our results highlight the value of large, well-phenotyped samples for rare-variant association analysis, and the challenge of evaluating the phenotypic impact of such variants.

  10. Characterization of a Variant of vga(A) Conferring Resistance to Streptogramin A and Related Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Haroche, Julien; Allignet, Jeanine; Buchrieser, Carmen; El Solh, Névine

    2000-01-01

    A variant of the vga(A) gene (1,575 bp), encoding an ATP-binding cassette protein conferring resistance to streptogramin A and related antibiotics, was cloned from the chromosome of a Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolate and sequenced. The sequence of the variant was similar to that of the vga(A) gene (83.2% identity). However, the G+C content of the variant (35.6%) was higher than that of vga(A) (29%) and there was no cross hybridization between vga(A) and the variant at high stringency (≥60°C), the highest temperature at which a signal was detected being 55°C. Unlike previous reports for vga(A) and vga(B), the variant of vga(A) may be present in multiple copies in the genome. These copies are chromosomal in some isolates and both chromosomal and plasmid-borne in others. Nucleotide sequences hybridizing at 65°C with the vga(A) variant were found in all the staphylococcal strains harboring plasmids carrying both vga(B) and vat(B), which also encode resistance to streptogramin A. PMID:10952567

  11. Analysis of human papillomavirus 16 variants and risk for cervical cancer in Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Hang, Dong; Yin, Yin; Han, Jing; Jiang, Jie; Ma, Hongxqia; Xie, Shuanghua; Feng, Xiaoshuang; Zhang, Kai; Hu, Zhibin; Shen, Hongbing; Clifford, Gary M; Dai, Min; Li, Ni

    2016-01-15

    HPV16 is the most carcinogenic HPV type, but only a minority of HPV16 infections progress to cancer. Intratype genetic variants of HPV16 have been suggested to confer differential carcinogenicity. To investigate risk implications of HPV16 variants among Chinese women, a case-control study was conducted with 298 cervical cancer patients and 85 controls (all HPV16-positive). HPV16 isolates were predominantly of the A variant lineage, and variants of A4 (previously named "Asian") sublineage were common. A4/Asian variants were significantly associated with increased risk of cervical cancer compared to A1-3 (OR=1.72, 95% CI=1.04-2.85). Furthermore, a meta-analysis including 703 cases and 323 controls from East Asia confirmed the association (OR=2.82, 95% CI=1.44-5.52). In conclusion, A4 variants appear to predict higher risk of cervical cancer among HPV16-positive women, which may provide clues to the genetic basis of differences in the carcinogenicity of HPV16 variants.

  12. Recent emergence of new variants of Yersinia pestis in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Guiyoule, A; Rasoamanana, B; Buchrieser, C; Michel, P; Chanteau, S; Carniel, E

    1997-11-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, has been responsible for at least three pandemics. During the last pandemic, which started in Hong Kong in 1894, the microorganism colonized new, previously unscathed geographical areas where it has become well established. The aim of this longitudinal study was to investigate the genetic stability of Y. pestis strains introduced into a new environment just under a century ago and to follow the epidemiology of any new genetic variant detected. In the present study, 187 strains of Y. pestis isolated between 1939 and 1996 from different regions of Madagascar and responsible mainly for human cases of bubonic and pneumonic plague were studied. Our principal genotyping method was rRNA gene profiling (ribotyping), which has previously been shown to be an effective scheme for typing Y. pestis strains of different geographical origins. We report that all studied Y. pestis strains isolated in Madagascar before 1982 were of classical ribotype B, the ribotype attributed to the Y. pestis clone that spread around the world during the third pandemic. In 1982, 1983, and 1994, strains with new ribotypes, designated R, Q, and T, respectively, were isolated on the high-plateau region of the island. Analysis of other genotypic traits such as the NotI genomic restriction profiles and the EcoRV plasmid restriction profiles revealed that the new variants could also be distinguished by specific genomic and/or plasmid profiles. A follow-up of these new variants indicated that strains of ribotypes Q and R have become well established in their ecosystem and have a tendency to spread to new geographical areas and supplant the original classical strain.

  13. Genetic characterization of Vibrio cholerae isolates from Argentina by V. cholerae repeated sequences-polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Nancy Claudia; Pichel, Mariana; Orman, Betina; Binsztein, Norma; Roy, Paul H; Centrón, Daniela

    2005-11-01

    We have developed a novel typing method based on Vibrio cholerae repeat sequences (VCR) using primers directed out of the VCR sequences. To evaluate the VCR-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) as a typing system, 2 categories, efficacy and efficiency, were analyzed in 69 strains of human and environmental V. cholerae O1 toxigenic and nontoxigenic, and non-O1 strains isolated since 1992-2000 from Argentina. The discriminatory power (0.91), stability (0.95), reproducibility (1), typeability (1), rapidity, accessibility, as well ease of use, indicated that the VCR-PCR method provides an alternative useful tool for molecular epidemiology of V. cholerae. The VCR-PCR of V. cholerae isolates showed 29 patterns, of which pattern 1 represented 68% of the V. cholerae O1 isolates, supporting the hypothesis that a clone with epidemic behavior was responsible for the epidemic in Latin America. These results showed a good correlation and a better epidemiologic analysis when the results were compared in parallel with repetitive extragenic palindromic sequences-PCR. In conclusion, VCR-PCR showed excellent performance as a typing method for cholera surveillance programs.

  14. Histone variants: emerging players in cancer biology

    PubMed Central

    Vardabasso, Chiara; Hasson, Dan; Ratnakumar, Kajan; Chung, Chi-Yeh; Duarte, Luis F.

    2014-01-01

    Histone variants are key players in shaping chromatin structure, and, thus, in regulating fundamental cellular processes such as chromosome segregation and gene expression. Emerging evidence points towards a role for histone variants in contributing to tumor progression, and, recently, the first cancer-associated mutation in a histone variant-encoding gene was reported. In addition, genetic alterations of the histone chaperones that specifically regulate chromatin incorporation of histone variants are rapidly being uncovered in numerous cancers. Collectively, these findings implicate histone variants as potential drivers of cancer initiation and/or progression, and, therefore, targeting histone deposition or the chromatin remodeling machinery may be of therapeutic value. Here, we review the mammalian histone variants of the H2A and H3 families in their respective cellular functions, and their involvement in tumor biology. PMID:23652611

  15. Pilus gene pool variation and the virulence of Corynebacterium diphtheriae clinical isolates during infection of a nematode.

    PubMed

    Broadway, Melissa M; Rogers, Elizabeth A; Chang, Chungyu; Huang, I-Hsiu; Dwivedi, Prabhat; Yildirim, Suleyman; Schmitt, Michael P; Das, Asis; Ton-That, Hung

    2013-08-01

    Toxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae strains cause diphtheria in humans. The toxigenic C. diphtheriae isolate NCTC13129 produces three distinct heterotrimeric pili that contain SpaA, SpaD, and SpaH, making up the shaft structure. The SpaA pili are known to mediate bacterial adherence to pharyngeal epithelial cells. However, to date little is known about the expression of different pili in various clinical isolates and their importance in bacterial pathogenesis. Here, we characterized a large collection of C. diphtheriae clinical isolates for their pilin gene pool by PCR and for the expression of the respective pilins by immunoblotting with antibodies against Spa pilins. Consistent with the role of a virulence factor, the SpaA-type pili were found to be prevalent among the isolates, and most significantly, corynebacterial adherence to pharyngeal epithelial cells was strictly correlated with isolates that were positive for the SpaA pili. By comparison, the isolates were heterogeneous for the presence of SpaD- and SpaH-type pili. Importantly, using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model host for infection, we show here that strain NCTC13129 rapidly killed the nematodes, the phenotype similar to isolates that were positive for toxin and all pilus types. In contrast, isogenic mutants of NCTC13129 lacking SpaA-type pili or devoid of toxin and SpaA pili exhibited delayed killing of nematodes with similar kinetics. Consistently, nontoxigenic or toxigenic isolates that lack one, two, or all three pilus types were also attenuated in virulence. This work signifies the important role of pili in corynebacterial pathogenesis and provides a simple host model to identify additional virulence factors.

  16. Structure, tissue distribution and estrogen regulation of splice variants of the sea bream estrogen receptor α gene.

    PubMed

    Pinto, P I S; Teodósio, R; Socorro, S; Power, D M; Canário, A V M

    2012-07-15

    Estrogen actions are mainly mediated by specific nuclear estrogen receptors (ERs), for which different genes and a diversity of transcript variants have been identified, mainly in mammals. In this study, we investigated the presence of ER splice variants in the teleost fish gilthead sea bream (Sparus auratus), by comparison with the genomic organization of the related species Takifugu rubripes. Two exon2-deleted ERα transcript variants were isolated from liver cDNA of estradiol-treated fish. The ΔE2 variant lacks ERα exon 2, generating a premature termination codon and a putative C-terminal truncated receptor, while the ΔE2,3* variant contains an in-frame deletion of exon 2 and part of exon 3 and codes for a putative ERα protein variant lacking most of the DNA-binding domain. Both variants were expressed at very low levels in several female and male sea bream tissues, and their expression was highly inducible in liver by estradiol-17β treatment with a strong positive correlation with the typical wild-type (wt) ERα response in this tissue. These findings identify novel estrogen responsive splice variants of fish ERα, and provide the basis for future studies to investigate possible modulation of wt-ER actions by splice variants.

  17. A rigorous approach for selection of optimal variant sets for carrier screening with demonstration of clinical utility

    PubMed Central

    Perreault-Micale, Cynthia; Davie, Jocelyn; Breton, Benjamin; Hallam, Stephanie; Greger, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    Carrier screening for certain diseases is recommended by major medical and Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) societies. Most carrier screening panels test only for common, ethnic-specific variants. However, with formerly isolated ethnic groups becoming increasingly intermixed, this approach is becoming inadequate. Our objective was to develop a rigorous process to curate all variants, for relevant genes, into a database and then apply stringent clinical validity classification criteria to each in order to retain only those with clear evidence for pathogenicity. The resulting variant set, in conjunction with next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS), then affords the capability for an ethnically diverse, comprehensive, highly specific carrier-screening assay. The clinical utility of our approach was demonstrated by screening a pan-ethnic population of 22,864 individuals for Bloom syndrome carrier status using a BLM variant panel comprised of 50 pathogenic variants. In addition to carriers of the common AJ founder variant, we identified 57 carriers of other pathogenic BLM variants. All variants reported had previously been curated and their clinical validity documented, or were of a type that met our stringent, preassigned validity criteria. Thus, it was possible to confidently report an increased number of Bloom’s syndrome carriers compared to traditional, ethnicity-based screening, while not reducing the specificity of the screening due to reporting variants of unknown clinical significance. PMID:26247052

  18. Small colony variant of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius ST71 presenting as a sticky phenotype.

    PubMed

    Savini, Vincenzo; Carretto, Edoardo; Polilli, Ennio; Marrollo, Roberta; Santarone, Stella; Fazii, Paolo; D'Antonio, Domenico; Rossano, Alexandra; Perreten, Vincent

    2014-04-01

    We first observed the phenomenon of small colony variants (SCVs) in a Staphylococcus pseudintermedius sequence type 71 (ST71) strain, isolated from a non-pet owner. Although we found that small-sized colonies share main features with Staphylococcus aureus SCVs, they nevertheless show a novel, particular, and sticky phenotype, whose expression was extremely stable, even after subcultivation.

  19. Outbreak of cholera caused by Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor variant strain in Bihar, India.

    PubMed

    Koley, Hemanta; Ray, Nivedita; Chowdhury, Goutam; Barman, Soumik; Mitra, Soma; Ramamurthy, T; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K; Sarkar, B L; Katyal, Rakesh; Das, Pradeep; Panda, Samiran; Ghosh, Subrata

    2014-01-01

    An outbreak of cholera struck Bihar, an Indian state, in August 2008 following a massive flood. Here we report the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of Vibrio cholerae strains isolated from patients with diarrhea. Rectal swabs were obtained from patients with diarrhea who were admitted to medical camps or the hospital, and the strains were biochemically and serologically characterized. V. cholerae was isolated from 21 (65.6%) of 32 rectal swabs. Serological studies revealed that all the 21 isolates belonged to V. cholerae O1 Ogawa. Mismatch amplification mutation assay (MAMA)-PCR showed that the isolates belonged to El Tor variant group, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) proved that these isolates were of a different lineage than the conventional El Tor variant strains. These isolates were resistant to several drugs, including ampicillin, streptomycin, tetracycline, nalidixic acid, and furazolidone. The uniqueness of the current report arises from the fact that records of cholera in Bihar are availiable for the early 1960s but not for the next 4 decades. Moreover, the present study is the first to report a cholera outbreak in Bihar that was caused by an El Tor variant strain.

  20. Attenuated virulence of pleconaril-resistant coxsackievirus B3 variants.

    PubMed

    Groarke, J M; Pevear, D C

    1999-06-01

    Pleconaril (VP 63843) is a novel orally bioavailable small molecule with broad antipicornavirus (enterovirus and rhinovirus) activity. Ten independently derived pleconaril-resistant variants of coxsackievirus B3 were isolated from cell culture. The molecular basis of drug resistance and the biologic properties of the drug-resistant viruses were investigated. RNA sequence analysis revealed amino acid changes in the drug-binding pocket of the resistant variants. Thermal stability studies showed the drug-resistant viruses to be significantly less stable than wild type virus. When evaluated in a murine model in which wild type virus infection is 100% lethal, the drug-resistant viruses showed attenuated virulence with both reduced mortality and delayed time to death. Virus titers in heart and spleen were dramatically lower in drug-resistant virus-infected mice than in wild type virus-infected animals. The study results indicate that pleconaril-resistant virus variants are attenuated and significantly less virulent than drug-sensitive wild type virus.

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa induces pigment production and enhances virulence in a white phenotypic variant of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Antonic, Vlado; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Zhang, Binxue; Izadjoo, Mina J; Alavi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Staphyloxanthin is a virulence factor which protects Staphylococcus aureus in stress conditions. We isolated two pigment variants of S. aureus and one strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a single wound infection. S. aureus variants displayed white and yellow colony phenotypes. The sequence of the operons for staphyloxanthin synthesis indicated that coding and promoter regions were identical between the two pigment variants. Quorum sensing controls pigment synthesis in some bacteria. It is also shown that P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing molecules affect S. aureus transcription. We explored whether the co-infecting P. aeruginosa can affect pigment production in the white S. aureus variant. In co-culture experiments between the white variants and a selected number of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, only P. aeruginosa induced pigment production in the white variant. Gene expression analysis of the white variant did not indicate upregulation of the crtM and other genes known to be involved in pigment production (sigB, sarA, farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase gene [FPP-synthase], hfq). In contrast, transcription of the catalase gene was significantly upregulated after co-culture. P. aeruginosa-induced pigment synthesis and catalase upregulation correlated with increased resistance to polymyxin B, hydrogen peroxide, and the intracellular environment of macrophages. Our data indicate the presence of silent but functional staphyloxanthin synthesis machinery in a white phenotypic variant of S. aureus which is activated by a co-infecting P. aeruginosa via inter-species communication. Another S. aureus virulence factor, catalase is also induced by this co-infecting bacterium. The resulting phenotypic changes are directly correlated with resistance of the white variant to stressful conditions. PMID:24232573

  2. Distribution and Medical Impact of Loss-of-Function Variants in the Finnish Founder Population

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Elaine T.; Würtz, Peter; Havulinna, Aki S.; Palta, Priit; Tukiainen, Taru; Rehnström, Karola; Esko, Tõnu; Mägi, Reedik; Inouye, Michael; Lappalainen, Tuuli; Chan, Yingleong; Salem, Rany M.; Lek, Monkol; Flannick, Jason; Sim, Xueling; Manning, Alisa; Ladenvall, Claes; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Hämäläinen, Eija; Aalto, Kristiina; Maksimow, Mikael; Salmi, Marko; Blankenberg, Stefan; Ardissino, Diego; Shah, Svati; Horne, Benjamin; McPherson, Ruth; Hovingh, Gerald K.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Watkins, Hugh; Goel, Anuj; Farrall, Martin; Girelli, Domenico; Reiner, Alex P.; Stitziel, Nathan O.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Gabriel, Stacey; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Laakso, Markku; Groop, Leif; Kaprio, Jaakko; Perola, Markus; McCarthy, Mark I.; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David M.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Metspalu, Andres; Freimer, Nelson B.; Zeller, Tanja; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Koskinen, Seppo; Raitakari, Olli; Durbin, Richard; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Salomaa, Veikko; Ripatti, Samuli

    2014-01-01

    Exome sequencing studies in complex diseases are challenged by the allelic heterogeneity, large number and modest effect sizes of associated variants on disease risk and the presence of large numbers of neutral variants, even in phenotypically relevant genes. Isolated populations with recent bottlenecks offer advantages for studying rare variants in complex diseases as they have deleterious variants that are present at higher frequencies as well as a substantial reduction in rare neutral variation. To explore the potential of the Finnish founder population for studying low-frequency (0.5–5%) variants in complex diseases, we compared exome sequence data on 3,000 Finns to the same number of non-Finnish Europeans and discovered that, despite having fewer variable sites overall, the average Finn has more low-frequency loss-of-function variants and complete gene knockouts. We then used several well-characterized Finnish population cohorts to study the phenotypic effects of 83 enriched loss-of-function variants across 60 phenotypes in 36,262 Finns. Using a deep set of quantitative traits collected on these cohorts, we show 5 associations (p<5×10−8) including splice variants in LPA that lowered plasma lipoprotein(a) levels (P = 1.5×10−117). Through accessing the national medical records of these participants, we evaluate the LPA finding via Mendelian randomization and confirm that these splice variants confer protection from cardiovascular disease (OR = 0.84, P = 3×10−4), demonstrating for the first time the correlation between very low levels of LPA in humans with potential therapeutic implications for cardiovascular diseases. More generally, this study articulates substantial advantages for studying the role of rare variation in complex phenotypes in founder populations like the Finns and by combining a unique population genetic history with data from large population cohorts and centralized research access to National Health Registers. PMID

  3. Distribution and medical impact of loss-of-function variants in the Finnish founder population.

    PubMed

    Lim, Elaine T; Würtz, Peter; Havulinna, Aki S; Palta, Priit; Tukiainen, Taru; Rehnström, Karola; Esko, Tõnu; Mägi, Reedik; Inouye, Michael; Lappalainen, Tuuli; Chan, Yingleong; Salem, Rany M; Lek, Monkol; Flannick, Jason; Sim, Xueling; Manning, Alisa; Ladenvall, Claes; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Hämäläinen, Eija; Aalto, Kristiina; Maksimow, Mikael; Salmi, Marko; Blankenberg, Stefan; Ardissino, Diego; Shah, Svati; Horne, Benjamin; McPherson, Ruth; Hovingh, Gerald K; Reilly, Muredach P; Watkins, Hugh; Goel, Anuj; Farrall, Martin; Girelli, Domenico; Reiner, Alex P; Stitziel, Nathan O; Kathiresan, Sekar; Gabriel, Stacey; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Lehtimäki, Terho; Laakso, Markku; Groop, Leif; Kaprio, Jaakko; Perola, Markus; McCarthy, Mark I; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David M; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Metspalu, Andres; Freimer, Nelson B; Zeller, Tanja; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Koskinen, Seppo; Raitakari, Olli; Durbin, Richard; MacArthur, Daniel G; Salomaa, Veikko; Ripatti, Samuli; Daly, Mark J; Palotie, Aarno

    2014-07-01

    Exome sequencing studies in complex diseases are challenged by the allelic heterogeneity, large number and modest effect sizes of associated variants on disease risk and the presence of large numbers of neutral variants, even in phenotypically relevant genes. Isolated populations with recent bottlenecks offer advantages for studying rare variants in complex diseases as they have deleterious variants that are present at higher frequencies as well as a substantial reduction in rare neutral variation. To explore the potential of the Finnish founder population for studying low-frequency (0.5-5%) variants in complex diseases, we compared exome sequence data on 3,000 Finns to the same number of non-Finnish Europeans and discovered that, despite having fewer variable sites overall, the average Finn has more low-frequency loss-of-function variants and complete gene knockouts. We then used several well-characterized Finnish population cohorts to study the phenotypic effects of 83 enriched loss-of-function variants across 60 phenotypes in 36,262 Finns. Using a deep set of quantitative traits collected on these cohorts, we show 5 associations (p<5×10⁻⁸) including splice variants in LPA that lowered plasma lipoprotein(a) levels (P = 1.5×10⁻¹¹⁷). Through accessing the national medical records of these participants, we evaluate the LPA finding via Mendelian randomization and confirm that these splice variants confer protection from cardiovascular disease (OR = 0.84, P = 3×10⁻⁴), demonstrating for the first time the correlation between very low levels of LPA in humans with potential therapeutic implications for cardiovascular diseases. More generally, this study articulates substantial advantages for studying the role of rare variation in complex phenotypes in founder populations like the Finns and by combining a unique population genetic history with data from large population cohorts and centralized research access to National Health Registers.

  4. Characterization of a novel variant of Mycobacterium chimaera.

    PubMed

    van Ingen, J; Hoefsloot, W; Buijtels, P C A M; Tortoli, E; Supply, P; Dekhuijzen, P N R; Boeree, M J; van Soolingen, D

    2012-09-01

    In this study, nonchromogenic mycobacteria were isolated from pulmonary samples of three patients in the Netherlands. All isolates had identical, unique 16S rRNA gene and 16S-23S ITS sequences, which were closely related to those of Mycobacterium chimaera and Mycobacterium marseillense. The biochemical features of the isolates differed slightly from those of M. chimaera, suggesting that the isolates may represent a possible separate species within the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). However, the cell-wall mycolic acid pattern, analysed by HPLC, and the partial sequences of the hsp65 and rpoB genes were identical to those of M. chimaera. We concluded that the isolates represent a novel variant of M. chimaera. The results of this analysis have led us to question the currently used methods of species definition for members of the genus Mycobacterium, which are based largely on 16S rRNA or rpoB gene sequencing. Definitions based on a single genetic target are likely to be insufficient. Genetic divergence, especially in the MAC, yields strains that cannot be confidently assigned to a specific species based on the analysis of a single genetic target.

  5. [Normokalemic variant of paroxysmal myoplegia].

    PubMed

    Il'ina, N A; Aver'ianov, Iu N; Antipova, R I; Sokolina, N A; Maksimenko, I M

    1977-01-01

    For the first time in Soviet literature the authors describe a family where patients from 2 generations suffered from normokalemic periodical paralysis. The patients had undergone several examinations which confirmed this diagnosis. This report confirms the existence of a normopotassemic variant of periodical paralysis. The authors demonstrate the absence of a direct relation between the development of myoplegic attacks in these patients and disorders of the electrolyte balance. The histological studies of the muscular biopsy during the attacks detected a vacuolization of muscular fiberes. Histochemical studies of some metabolities of the carbohydrate metabolism did not detect any significant changes. The achieved results point only to an increase of the glyconeogenesis process and aerobie glycolisis.¿

  6. Turner syndrome and its variants.

    PubMed

    Bharath, R; Unnikrishnan, A G; Thampy, M V; Anilkumar, Alka; Nisha, B; Praveen, V P; Nair, Vasantha; Jayakumar, R V; Kumar, Harish

    2010-02-01

    Case records of female patients with karyotype proven turner syndrome were analyzed. 11 patients had classic Turner karyotype (Group 1) and 13 patients had karyotype suggestive of one of the variants of Turner syndrome (Group 2). There was a median difference of 3 years between the age of presentation and the age of diagnosis in Group 2. Out of the thirteen patients in Group 2, 4 had no clinical stigmata of Turner Syndrome; the rest (n=9) had one or more of the typical clinical stigmata of Turner Syndrome. One patient with a complex mosaic karyotype also had an intracranial medulloblastoma. One patient in each group had coarctation of the aorta. 5 patients in Group 1 and 3 patients in Group 2 had primary hypothyroidism and received levothyroxine. The median Thyroid Stimulating Hormone levels were significantly higher among patients in group 1 than in group 2.

  7. Primary pleural liposarcoma, pleomorphic variant.

    PubMed

    Carrillo B, Jorge Alberto; Navarrete, Constanza; López Arias, María Alejandra; Peláez, Mauricio

    2014-09-01

    Primary pleural liposarcoma (PPL) is a rare tumor derived from primitive mesenchymal tissue. We report a case of a 49-year-old female patient complaining of thoracic pain and dyspnea for 3 months. The chest X-ray showed a left basal opacity of lobulated contours and the thoracic computer tomography (CT) scan revealed a left pleural collection/mass, of 18 HU density and passive pulmonary atelectasis. The patient was taken to surgery and the cytologic examination of the gelatinous mass found in the procedure confirmed the diagnosis of a pleomorphic variant of pleural liposarcoma. We emphasise in the importance of careful inspection of the origin of the tumor in the diagnostic images to allow accurate diagnosis.

  8. Engineering of temperature- and light-switchable Cas9 variants

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Florian; Fonfara, Ines; Bouazza, Boris; Schumacher, Charlotte Helene; Bratovič, Majda; Charpentier, Emmanuelle; Möglich, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Sensory photoreceptors have enabled non-invasive and spatiotemporal control of numerous biological processes. Photoreceptor engineering has expanded the repertoire beyond natural receptors, but to date no generally applicable strategy exists towards constructing light-regulated protein actuators of arbitrary function. We hence explored whether the homodimeric Rhodobacter sphaeroides light-oxygen-voltage (LOV) domain (RsLOV) that dissociates upon blue-light exposure can confer light sensitivity onto effector proteins, via a mechanism of light-induced functional site release. We chose the RNA-guided programmable DNA endonuclease Cas9 as proof-of-principle effector, and constructed a comprehensive library of RsLOV inserted throughout the Cas9 protein. Screening with a high-throughput assay based on transcriptional repression in Escherichia coli yielded paRC9, a moderately light-activatable variant. As domain insertion can lead to protein destabilization, we also screened the library for temperature-sensitive variants and isolated tsRC9, a variant with robust activity at 29°C but negligible activity at 37°C. Biochemical assays confirmed temperature-dependent DNA cleavage and binding for tsRC9, but indicated that the light sensitivity of paRC9 is specific to the cellular setting. Using tsRC9, the first temperature-sensitive Cas9 variant, we demonstrate temperature-dependent transcriptional control over ectopic and endogenous genetic loci. Taken together, RsLOV can confer light sensitivity onto an unrelated effector; unexpectedly, the same LOV domain can also impart strong temperature sensitivity. PMID:27744350

  9. Congenital pancreatic anomalies, variants, and conditions.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Lauren F

    2012-05-01

    Understanding pancreatic development and the congenital anomalies and variants that result from alterations in normal development allows for better recognition of these anomalies at diagnostic imaging. This article reviews normal pancreatic embryology and anatomy, and the appearance of the more common developmental anomalies and ductal variants, with emphasis on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Common mimics of masses are also covered.

  10. Beta-glucosidase I variants with improved properties

    SciTech Connect

    Bott, Richard R.; Kaper, Thijs; Kelemen, Bradley; Goedegebuur, Frits; Hommes, Ronaldus Wilhelmus; Kralj, Slavko; Kruithof, Paulien; Nikolaev, Igor; Van Der Kley, Wilhelmus Antonious Hendricus; Van Lieshout, Johannes Franciscus Thomas; Van Stigt Thans, Sander

    2016-09-20

    The present disclosure is generally directed to enzymes and in particular beta-glucosidase variants. Also described are nucleic acids encoding beta-glucosidase variants, compositions comprising beta-glucosidase variants, methods of using beta-glucosidase variants, and methods of identifying additional useful beta-glucosidase variants.

  11. Visualizing the geography of genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Joseph H; Novembre, John

    2016-10-14

    One of the key characteristics of any genetic variant is its geographic distribution. The geographic distribution can shed light on where an allele first arose, what populations it has spread to, and in turn on how migration, genetic drift, and natural selection have acted. The geographic distribution of a genetic variant can also be of great utility for medical/clinical geneticists and collectively many genetic variants can reveal population structure. Here we develop an interactive visualization tool for rapidly displaying the geographic distribution of genetic variants. Through a REST API and dynamic front-end, the Geography of Genetic Variants (GGV) browser (http://popgen.uchicago.edu/ggv/) provides maps of allele frequencies in populations distributed across the globe.

  12. Phenotypic and Enzymatic Comparative Analysis of the KPC Variants, KPC-2 and Its Recently Discovered Variant KPC-15

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yijun

    2014-01-01

    Sixteen different variants (KPC-2 to KPC-17) in the KPC family have been reported, and most current studies are focusing on KPC-2 and KPC-3. The KPC-15 variant, which isolated from Klebsiella pneumoniae in a Chinese hospital, was a recently discovered KPC enzyme. To compare the characteristics of KPC-15 and KPC-2, the variants were determined by susceptibility testing, PCR amplification and sequencing, and study of kinetic parameters. The strain harboring the KPC-15 showed resistance to 18 conventional antimicrobial agents, especially to cabapenem antibiotics, and the strain involving the KPC-2 also indicated resistance to cabapenem antibiotics, but both strains were susceptible to polymyxin B and colistin. The conjugation experiments showed that the changes of MIC values to the antibiotics were due to the transferred plasmids. The differences of amino acids were characterised at sites of 119 leucine and 146 lysine with KPC-15 and KPC-2. The minimum evolution tree indicated the KPC alleles evolution, and showed that the KPC-15 appeared to be homogenous with KPC-4 closely. Steady-state kinetic parameters showed the catalytic efficiency of KPC-15 was higher than that of KPC-2 for all tested antibiotics in this study. The catalytic efficiency of KPC-15 caused resistance to β-lactam antibiotics was higher than that of KPC-2. Meanwhile, an evolutionary transformation changed KPC from an efficient carbapenemase to its variants (KPC-15) with better ceftazidimase catalytic efficiency, and the old antibiotics polymyxin B and colistin might play a role in the therapy for multi-resistant strains. PMID:25360633

  13. Association of Copy Number Variants With Specific Ultrasonographically Detected Fetal Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Jennifer C; Platt, Lawrence D; Rebarber, Andrei; Zachary, Julia; Grobman, William A; Wapner, Ronald J

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association of other-than-common benign copy number variants with specific fetal abnormalities detected by ultrasonogram. Methods Fetuses with structural anomalies were compared to fetuses without detected abnormalities for the frequency of other-than-common benign copy number variants. This is a secondary analysis from the previously published National Institute of Child Health and Human Development microarray trial. Ultrasound reports were reviewed and details of structural anomalies were entered into a nonhierarchical web-based database. The frequency of other-than-common benign copy number variants (ie, either pathogenic or variants of uncertain significance) not detected by karyotype was calculated for each anomaly in isolation and in the presence of other anomalies and compared to the frequency in fetuses without detected abnormalities. Results Of 1,082 fetuses with anomalies detected on ultrasound, 752 had a normal karyotype. Other-than-common benign copy number variants were present in 61 (8.1%) of these euploid fetuses. Fetuses with anomalies in more than one system had a 13.0% frequency of other-than-common benign copy number variants, which was significantly higher (p<0.001) than the frequency (3.6%) in fetuses without anomalies (n = 1966). Specific organ systems in which isolated anomalies were nominally significantly associated with other-than-common benign copy number variants were the renal (p= 0.036) and cardiac systems (p=0.012) but did not meet the adjustment for multiple comparisons. Conclusions When a fetal anomaly is detected on ultrasonogram, chromosomal microarray offers additional information over karyotype, the degree of which depends on the organ system involved. PMID:24901266

  14. Variability in alternanthera mosaic virus isolates from different hosts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have determined the complete genome sequences of Alternanthera mosaic virus phlox isolate PA (AltMV-PA) and four infectious clone variants derived from AltMV-SP, as well as partial sequences of other isolates from various types of phlox, and from portulaca, nandina, and cineraria. Phylogenetic co...

  15. Genetic diversity among isolates of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our knowledge of genetic variation at the nucleotide sequence level of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV; Baculoviridae: Alphabaculovirus) derives from complete genome sequences of the C6 clonal isolate of AcMNPV and the R1 and CL3 clonal isolates of AcMNPV variants Rachip...

  16. Characterization of blaOXA-143 variants in Acinetobacter baumannii and Acinetobacter pittii.

    PubMed

    Zander, Esther; Bonnin, Rémy A; Seifert, Harald; Higgins, Paul G

    2014-05-01

    The acquired carbapenem-hydrolyzing oxacillinase (OXA) OXA-143 has thus far been detected only in Acinetobacter baumannii isolates from Brazil. The aim of this study was to characterize three OXA-143 variants: OXA-231 and OXA-253 from carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii isolates and OXA-255 in a carbapenem-susceptible Acinetobacter pittii isolate originating from Brazil, Honduras, and the United States, respectively. The 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) technique identified the same transcription initiation site for all blaOXA-143-like genes and revealed differences in the putative promoter regions. However, all cloned OXA-143 variants conferred carbapenem resistance on A. baumannii ATCC 17978 and OXA-255 conferred carbapenem resistance on A. pittii SH024, which was correlated with blaOXA-255 gene expression. This is the first description of OXA-143-like outside A. baumannii. Detection of OXA-143-like in the United States and Honduras indicates its dissemination through the American continent.

  17. Volatile organic compounds emitted by filamentous fungi isolated from flooded homes after Hurricane Sandy show toxicity in a Drosophila bioassay.

    PubMed

    Zhao, G; Yin, G; Inamdar, A A; Luo, J; Zhang, N; Yang, I; Buckley, B; Bennett, J W

    2016-10-17

    Superstorm Sandy provided an opportunity to study filamentous fungi (molds) associated with winter storm damage. We collected 36 morphologically distinct fungal isolates from flooded buildings. By combining traditional morphological and cultural characters with an analysis of ITS sequences (the fungal DNA barcode), we identified 24 fungal species that belong to eight genera: Penicillium (11 species), Fusarium (four species), Aspergillus (three species), Trichoderma (two species), and one species each of Metarhizium, Mucor, Pestalotiopsis, and Umbelopsis. Then, we used a Drosophila larval assay to assess possible toxicity of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by these molds. When cultured in a shared atmosphere with growing cultures of molds isolated after Hurricane Sandy, larval toxicity ranged from 15 to 80%. VOCs from Aspergillus niger 129B were the most toxic yielding 80% mortality to Drosophila after 12 days. The VOCs from Trichoderma longibrachiatum 117, Mucor racemosus 138a, and Metarhizium anisopliae 124 were relatively non-toxigenic. A preliminary analysis of VOCs was conducted using solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry from two of the most toxic, two of the least toxic, and two species of intermediate toxicity. The more toxic molds produced higher concentrations of 1-octen-3-ol, 3-octanone, 3-octanol, 2-octen-1-ol, and 2-nonanone; while the less toxic molds produced more 3-methyl-1-butanol and 2-methyl-1-propanol, or an overall lower amount of volatiles. Our data support the hypothesis that at certain concentrations, some VOCs emitted by indoor molds are toxigenic.

  18. Detection of toxins A/B and isolation of Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens from dogs in Minas Gerais, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Rodrigo Otávio Silveira; Santos, Renata Lara Resende; Pires, Prhiscylla Sadanã; Pereira, Luiz Carlos; Pereira, Silvia Trindade; Duarte, Marina Carvalho; de Assis, Ronnie Antunes; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to detect C. difficile A/B toxins and to isolate strains of C. perfringens and C. difficile from diarrheic and non-diarrheic dogs in Brazil. Stool samples were collected from 57 dogs, 35 of which were apparently healthy, and 22 of which were diarrheic. C. difficile A/B toxins were detected by ELISA, and C. perfringens and C. difficile were identified by multiplex PCR. C. difficile A/B toxins were detected in 21 samples (36.8%). Of these, 16 (76.2%) were from diarrheic dogs, and five (23.8%) were from non-diarrheic dogs. Twelve C. difficile strains (21.1%) were isolated, of which ten were A+B+ and two were A−B−. All non-toxigenic strains were isolated from non-diarrheic animals. The binary toxin gene cdtB was found in one strain, which was A+B+ and was derived from a non-diarrheic dog. C. perfringens strains were isolated from 40 samples (70.2%). Of these, 18 (45%) were from the diarrheic group, and 22 (55%) belonged to the non-diarrheic group. All isolates were classified as C. perfringens type A and there was an association between the detection of the cpe gene and the presence of diarrhea. Interestingly, ten strains (25%) were positive for the presence of the cpb2 gene. The high rate of detection of the A/B toxins in non-diarrheic dogs suggests the occurrence of subclinical disease in dogs or carriage of its toxins without disease. More studies are needed to elucidate the epidemiology of C. difficile and C. perfringens in dogs and to better our understanding of C. difficile as a zoonotic agent. This is the first study to report the binary toxin gene in C. difficile strains isolated from dogs in Brazil. PMID:24159295

  19. Chemokine gene variants in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Dasdemir, Selcuk; Kucukali, Cem Ismail; Bireller, Elif Sinem; Tuzun, Erdem; Cakmakoglu, Bedia

    2016-08-01

    Background Chemokines are known to play a major role in driving inflammation and immune responses in several neuroinflammatory diseases, including multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Inflammation has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Aim We aimed to investigate a potential link between chemokines and schizophrenia and analyze the role of MCP-1-A2518G, SDF-1-3'A, CCR5-delta32, CCR5-A55029G, CXCR4-C138T and CCR2-V64I gene polymorphisms in the Turkish population. Methods Genotyping was conducted by PCR-RFLP based on 140 patients and 123 unrelated healthy controls to show the relation between chemokine gene variants and schizophrenia risk. Results Frequencies of CCR5-A55029G A genotypes and CCR5-A55029G AG genotypes were found higher in patients than the controls and even also CCR2-V64I WT: CCR5-A55029G A and CCR2-V64I 64I: CCR5-A55029G A haplotypes significantly associated according to Bonferroni correction. However, no significant association was found for any of the other polymorphisms with the risk of schizophrenia. Conclusions Our findings suggest that CCR5-A55029G polymorphisms and CCR2-V64I WT: CCR5-A55029G A and CCR2-V64I 64I: CCR5-A55029G A haplotypes might have association with schizophrenia pathogenesis.

  20. Prioritizing Rare Variants with Conditional Likelihood Ratios

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weili; Dobbins, Sara; Tomlinson, Ian; Houlston, Richard; Pal, Deb K.; Strug, Lisa J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Prioritizing individual rare variants within associated genes or regions often consists of an ad hoc combination of statistical and biological considerations. From the statistical perspective, rare variants are often ranked using Fisher’s exact p values, which can lead to different rankings of the same set of variants depending on whether 1- or 2-sided p values are used. Results We propose a likelihood ratio-based measure, maxLRc, for the statistical component of ranking rare variants under a case-control study design that avoids the hypothesis-testing paradigm. We prove analytically that the maxLRc is always well-defined, even when the data has zero cell counts in the 2×2 disease-variant table. Via simulation, we show that the maxLRc outperforms Fisher’s exact p values in most practical scenarios considered. Using next-generation sequence data from 27 rolandic epilepsy cases and 200 controls in a region previously shown to be linked to and associated with rolandic epilepsy, we demonstrate that rankings assigned by the maxLRc and exact p values can differ substantially. Conclusion The maxLRc provides reliable statistical prioritization of rare variants using only the observed data, avoiding the need to specify parameters associated with hypothesis testing that can result in ranking discrepancies across p value procedures; and it is applicable to common variant prioritization. PMID:25659987

  1. The distribution of plasmids determining citrate utilization in citrate-positive variants of Escherichia coli from humans, domestic animals, feral birds and environments.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, N; Sato, G

    1979-10-01

    Sixty-seven isolates of citrate-positive variants of Escherichia coli were isolated from human, domestic animal, feral bird and environmental sources. With the exception of citrate utilization, all isolates were identified as typical E. coli by their biochemical reactions. The transmission of the ability to utilize citrate on Simmons' citrate agar was demonstrated in 53 (79.1%) out of the 67 citrate-positive E. coli variants obtained from various sources. Drug resistance determinants and citrate utilizing character were co-transmitted into E. coli K-12 by conjugation among citrate-positive E. coli isolates carrying R plasmids except for that isolated from horses. The other characters (haemolysin or colicin production, raffinose or sucrose fermentation) were not transmitted together with the citrate utilizing character. These facts suggested that the structural gene responsible for citrate utilizing ability in citrate-positive variants of E. coli was located on a conjugative plasmid.

  2. Molecular variation of hop mosaic virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Poke, Fiona S; Crowle, Damian R; Whittock, Simon P; Wilson, Calum R

    2010-10-01

    Hop mosaic virus (HpMV), a member of the genus Carlavirus, is importance to hop production worldwide. We identified variation in nucleic and amino acid sequences among 23 HpMV isolates from Australia, the USA, the Czech Republic, South Africa and Japan using a 1,455-bp fragment covering the 3' end of the virus genome including ORFs 4, 5 and 6. Three clusters of two or more isolates were identified in phylogenies of the total nucleotide sequence and the coat protein (ORF5) amino acid sequence. Two of these clusters combined in analyses of ORF4 and ORF6 amino acid sequences. Isolates from within and outside of Australia were found in each cluster, indicating that sequence variation was not associated with geographic source. Monitoring of HpMV variants in the field and evaluation of the impact of variants on vector association, rate of spread, and hop yield and quality can now be undertaken.

  3. Ultrasonographic imaging of papillary thyroid carcinoma variants

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is routinely used to evaluate thyroid nodules. The US features of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), the most common thyroid malignancy, include hypoechogenicity, spiculated/microlobulated margins, microcalcifications, and a nonparallel orientation. However, many PTC variants have been identified, some of which differ from the classic type of PTC in terms of biological behavior and clinical outcomes. This review describes the US features and clinical implications of the variants of PTC. With the introduction of active surveillance replacing immediate biopsy or surgical treatment of indolent, small PTCs, an understanding of the US characteristics of PTC variants will facilitate the individualized management of patients with PTC. PMID:28222584

  4. A Novel Binary Mixture of Helicoverpa armigera Single Nucleopolyhedrovirus Genotypic Variants Has Improved Insecticidal Characteristics for Control of Cotton Bollworms

    PubMed Central

    Arrizubieta, Maite; Simón, Oihane; Williams, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    The genotypic diversity of two Spanish isolates of Helicoverpa armigera single nucleopolyhedrovirus (HearSNPV) was evaluated with the aim of identifying mixtures of genotypes with improved insecticidal characteristics for control of the cotton bollworm. Two genotypic variants, HearSP1A and HearSP1B, were cloned in vitro from the most pathogenic wild-type isolate of the Iberian Peninsula, HearSNPV-SP1 (HearSP1-wt). Similarly, six genotypic variants (HearLB1 to -6) were obtained by endpoint dilution from larvae collected from cotton crops in southern Spain that died from virus disease during laboratory rearing. Variants differed significantly in their insecticidal properties, pathogenicity, speed of kill, and occlusion body (OB) production (OBs/larva). HearSP1B was ∼3-fold more pathogenic than HearSP1-wt and the other variants. HearLB1, HearLB2, HeaLB5, and HearLB6 were the fastest-killing variants. Moreover, although highly virulent, HearLB1, HearLB4, and HearLB5 produced more OBs/larva than did the other variants. The co-occluded HearSP1B:LB6 mixture at a 1:1 proportion was 1.7- to 2.8-fold more pathogenic than any single variant and other mixtures tested and also killed larvae as fast as the most virulent genotypes. Serial passage resulted in modified proportions of the component variants of the HearSP1B:LB6 co-occluded mixture, suggesting that transmissibility could be further improved by this process. We conclude that the improved insecticidal phenotype of the HearSP1B:LB6 co-occluded mixture underlines the utility of the genotypic variant dissection and reassociation approach for the development of effective virus-based insecticides. PMID:25841011

  5. A Novel Binary Mixture of Helicoverpa armigera Single Nucleopolyhedrovirus Genotypic Variants Has Improved Insecticidal Characteristics for Control of Cotton Bollworms.

    PubMed

    Arrizubieta, Maite; Simón, Oihane; Williams, Trevor; Caballero, Primitivo

    2015-06-15

    The genotypic diversity of two Spanish isolates of Helicoverpa armigera single nucleopolyhedrovirus (HearSNPV) was evaluated with the aim of identifying mixtures of genotypes with improved insecticidal characteristics for control of the cotton bollworm. Two genotypic variants, HearSP1A and HearSP1B, were cloned in vitro from the most pathogenic wild-type isolate of the Iberian Peninsula, HearSNPV-SP1 (HearSP1-wt). Similarly, six genotypic variants (HearLB1 to -6) were obtained by endpoint dilution from larvae collected from cotton crops in southern Spain that died from virus disease during laboratory rearing. Variants differed significantly in their insecticidal properties, pathogenicity, speed of kill, and occlusion body (OB) production (OBs/larva). HearSP1B was ∼3-fold more pathogenic than HearSP1-wt and the other variants. HearLB1, HearLB2, HeaLB5, and HearLB6 were the fastest-killing variants. Moreover, although highly virulent, HearLB1, HearLB4, and HearLB5 produced more OBs/larva than did the other variants. The co-occluded HearSP1B:LB6 mixture at a 1:1 proportion was 1.7- to 2.8-fold more pathogenic than any single variant and other mixtures tested and also killed larvae as fast as the most virulent genotypes. Serial passage resulted in modified proportions of the component variants of the HearSP1B:LB6 co-occluded mixture, suggesting that transmissibility could be further improved by this process. We conclude that the improved insecticidal phenotype of the HearSP1B:LB6 co-occluded mixture underlines the utility of the genotypic variant dissection and reassociation approach for the development of effective virus-based insecticides.

  6. Tissue-specific splice variants of HARE/Stabilin-2 are expressed in bone marrow, lymph node, and spleen.

    PubMed

    Hare, Amanda K; Harris, Edward N

    2015-01-02

    The hyaluronan receptor for endocytosis (HARE), or Stabilin-2, is the mammalian endocytic clearance receptor for HA, heparin, advanced glycation end-products, acetylated and oxidized low-density lipoproteins and collagen N-terminal propeptides. This large 2551 amino acid receptor is encoded by a gene that covers over 180 kbp on human chromosome 12 and is predicted to be composed of 69 exons. Due to the expression profile of this gene and the number of exons it contains, we hypothesized that splice variants of stab2 are encoded in these tissues. In addition, a correlation between alternative splice variants and cancer progression has been shown in other HA receptors such as RHAMM and CD42. In this study, two methods were utilized in identifying and/or isolating the HARE splice variants. The first method used primer sets to amplify the 190-HARE encoding region that could contain splice junctions; therefore, they were purified from agarose gels and sequenced. Five splice variants were detected in that manner. In the second approach, the entire open reading frame of HARE was amplified. This allowed four splice variants with extensive exon splicing to be isolated. After the splice variants were sequenced, three were cloned into a mammalian expression vector. Next, stable cell lines expressing the variants were created in order to determine stable protein expression. In this study, the splice variants were found to be tissue specific in most cases. This suggests that tissue specific regulatory splicing mechanisms may lead to differences in functionality between the splice variants.

  7. PRNP genetic variability and molecular typing of natural goat scrapie isolates in a high number of infected flocks.

    PubMed

    Fragkiadaki, Eirini G; Vaccari, Gabriele; Ekateriniadou, Loukia V; Agrimi, Umberto; Giadinis, Nektarios D; Chiappini, Barbara; Esposito, Elena; Conte, Michela; Nonno, Romolo

    2011-09-30

    One hundred and four scrapie positive and 77 negative goats from 34 Greek mixed flocks were analysed by prion protein gene sequencing and 17 caprine scrapie isolates from 11 flocks were submitted to molecular isolate typing. For the first time, the protective S146 variant was reported in Greece, while the protective K222 variant was detected in negative but also in five scrapie positive goats from heavily infected flocks. By immunoblotting six isolates, including two goat flockmates carrying the K222 variant, showed molecular features slightly different from all other Greek and Italian isolates co-analysed, possibly suggesting the presence of different scrapie strains in Greece.

  8. Carriage and acquisition rates of Clostridium difficile in hospitalized horses, including molecular characterization, multilocus sequence typing and antimicrobial susceptibility of bacterial isolates.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, C; Taminiau, B; Brévers, B; Avesani, V; Van Broeck, J; Leroux, A A; Amory, H; Delmée, M; Daube, G

    2014-08-06

    Clostridium difficile has been identified as a significant agent of diarrhoea and enterocolitis in both foals and adult horses. Hospitalization, antibiotic therapy or changes in diet may contribute to the development of C. difficile infection. Horses admitted to a care unit are therefore at greater risk of being colonized. The aim of this study was to investigate the carriage of C. difficile in hospitalized horses and the possible influence of some risk factors in colonization. During a seven-month period, faecal samples and data relating the clinical history of horses admitted to a veterinary teaching hospital were collected. C. difficile isolates were characterized through toxin profiles, cytotoxicity activity, PCR-ribotyping, antimicrobial resistance and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Ten isolates were obtained with a total of seven different PCR-ribotypes, including PCR-ribotype 014. Five of them were identified as toxinogenic. A high resistance to gentamicin, clindamycin and ceftiofur was found. MLST revealed four different sequencing types (ST), which included ST11, ST26, ST2 and ST15, and phylogenetic analysis showed that most of the isolates clustered in the same lineage. Clinical history suggests that horses frequently harbour toxigenic and non-toxigenic C. difficile and that in most cases they are colonized regardless of the reason for hospitalization; the development of diarrhoea is more unusual.

  9. Monoclonal antibody characterization of rabies virus strains isolated in the River Plate Basin.

    PubMed

    Delpietro, H A; Gury-Dhomen, F; Larghi, O P; Mena-Segura, C; Abramo, L

    1997-10-01

    In this study, 91 strains isolated in the River Plate Basin, South America, were examined from the epidemiological standpoint and with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to the nucleocapsid of rabies virus. Such strains reacted to MAbs in accordance with nine different patterns (antigenic variants). Rabies virus was isolated from 49 cattle, 21 dogs, 11 non-haematophagous bats, four vampire bats, two foxes, two horses, one buffalo, and one human. Five of the variants had not been described previously. It was also found that two cases of rabies in wild foxes (Cerdocyon thous) which had attacked persons in the Province of Chaco, Argentina, had been caused by variants from dog and vampire bat, while two cases in frugivorous bats (Artibeus lituratus) from Argentina and Brazil, had been infected by vampire bat variants. In addition, symptoms shown by cattle infected with strains which reacted as originating in canine vectors, differed from those observed in bovines from which the variants isolated corresponded to vampire bats.

  10. Histone variants in plant transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Danhua; Berger, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    Chromatin based organization of eukaryotic genome plays a profound role in regulating gene transcription. Nucleosomes form the basic subunits of chromatin by packaging DNA with histone proteins, impeding the access of DNA to transcription factors and RNA polymerases. Exchange of histone variants in nucleosomes alters the properties of nucleosomes and thus modulates DNA exposure during transcriptional regulation. Growing evidence indicates the important function of histone variants in programming transcription during developmental transitions and stress response. Here we review how histone variants and their deposition machineries regulate the nucleosome stability and dynamics, and discuss the link between histone variants and transcriptional regulation in plants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Gene Regulatory Mechanisms and Networks, edited by Dr. Erich Grotewold and Dr. Nathan Springer.

  11. Genetic variants of ghrelin in metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Ukkola, Olavi

    2011-11-01

    An increasing understanding of the role of genes in the development of obesity may reveal genetic variants that, in combination with conventional risk factors, may help to predict an individual's risk for developing metabolic disorders. Accumulating evidence indicates that ghrelin plays a role in regulating food intake and energy homeostasis and it is a reasonable candidate gene for obesity-related co-morbidities. In cross-sectional studies low total ghrelin concentrations and some genetic polymorphisms of ghrelin have been associated with obesity-associated diseases. The present review highlights many of the important problems in association studies of genetic variants and complex diseases. It is known that population-specific differences in reported associations exist. We therefore conclude that more studies on variants of ghrelin gene are needed to perform in different populations to get deeper understanding on the relationship of ghrelin gene and its variants to obesity.

  12. Gonococcal pilin variants in experimental gonorrhea.

    PubMed

    Swanson, J; Robbins, K; Barrera, O; Corwin, D; Boslego, J; Ciak, J; Blake, M; Koomey, J M

    1987-05-01

    When pilus+ Gc were introduced into a male subject's urethra, they gave rise to pilus+ variants whose pilin mRNAs differed from that of input Gc. The differences stemmed from the Gc genome's single complete pilin gene having undergone gene conversion by different partial pilin genes' sequences and by different length stretches of a single partial pilin gene. In some instances, the variant's pilin mRNA appeared to reflect two independent gene-conversion events that used sequences from two different partial pilin genes. The resulting variants' pilins exhibited antigenic differences compared with the pilin polypeptide of input Gc; these differences were discernible by immunoblotting with mAbs. Amino acid and antigenic changes occurred in a segment of the variants' pilin polypeptides that previously was thought to be conserved or constant in sequence.

  13. Swine Influenza/Variant Influenza Viruses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Past Newsletters Information on Swine Influenza/Variant Influenza Virus Language: English Español Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... disease of pigs caused by type A influenza viruses that regularly cause outbreaks of influenza in pigs. ...

  14. A rare hemoglobin variant, Hb Belliard

    PubMed Central

    Benavides, Raul

    2017-01-01

    There are many documented variants of hemoglobin; however, other than a limited number (such as sickle cell disease), very few are known to have any clinical significance. As advances in detection and identification continue through gel electrophoresis, capillary electrophoresis, and DNA sequencing, more rare variants are identified. Without case reporting, the significance of these variants will remain unknown or continue to be thought of as insignificant. Here we report a rare hemoglobin variant, Hb Belliard, which was detected in a 68-year-old Indian immigrant to the United States. He presented with elevated hemoglobin and was found to have a unique peak on capillary electrophoresis. The specimen was sent for sequencing and was subsequently found to have Hb Belliard. Currently, Hb Belliard is thought to be insignificant.

  15. FTO variant associated with malformation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rohena, Luis; Lawson, Michelle; Guzman, Edwin; Ganapathi, Mythily; Cho, Megan T; Haverfield, Eden; Anyane-Yeboa, Kwame

    2016-04-01

    Common FTO variants are associated with obesity. However, it has recently been shown that homozygous FTO c.947G>A variant, which predicts p.R316Q, and c.956C>T, which predicts p.S319F, are associated with a malformation syndrome inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. We present a similar homozygous FTO c.965G>A variant that predicts p.R322Q, associated with a lethal malformation syndrome in a consanguineous Yemeni family. Functional studies showed that the p.R316Q, p.S219F, and p.R322Q variants render the FTO protein inactive. We further expand on the phenotype of homozygous FTO loss-of-function mutations to include eye abnormalities, gingival overgrowth, craniosynostosis, and cutaneous photosensitivity.

  16. Pseudoangiomatous xanthelasmoid mastocytosis: two case reports showing the hypervascularity of this rare variant of cutaneous mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Kolivras, Athanassios; André, Josette; Thompson, Curtis; Sass, Ursula; Fraitag, Sylvie

    2016-04-01

    Xanthelasmoid mastocytosis or xanthelasmoidea is a rare clinical variant of cutaneous mastocytosis characterized by a yellow hue of the clinical lesions, which are often misdiagnosed as juvenile xanthogranuloma. We present two pediatric cases of xanthelasmoid mastocytosis presenting as isolated mastocytomas, which are notable histopathologically for their hypervascularity. This pseudoangiomatous variant of cutaneous mastocytosis is important for pathologists to have knowledge of, so that a diagnosis of a vascular tumor is not rendered accidentally. The yellow hue has previously been explained by the usual deep and solid dermal mast cell infiltrate. In the two presented cases, however, the mast cell infiltrate was sparse, and the yellow color cannot be related to infiltrate density. We believe that the hypervascularity is at least one factor in the production of clinical xanthelasmoid appearance, and we propose the term 'pseudoangiomatous xanthelasmoid mastocytosis' to properly describe this rare variant of cutaneous mastocytosis.

  17. Identification of a Chicken Anemia Virus Variant-Related Gyrovirus in Stray Cats in China, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuanjia; Ji, Jun; Chen, Feng; Sun, Baoli; Xue, Chunyi; Ma, Jingyun; Bi, Yingzuo; Xie, Qingmei

    2014-01-01

    The chicken anemia virus (CAV), is a known member of the genus Gyrovirus and was first isolated from chickens in Japan in 1979. Some reports have also demonstrated that CAV can be identified in human stool specimens. In this study, a variant of CAV was detected using PCR with CAV-based primers in fecal samples of stray cats. The genome of CAV variant was sequenced and the results suggest that it could be a recombinant viral strain from parental CAV strains JQ690762 and AF311900. Recombination is an important evolutionary mechanism that contributes to genetic diversification. These findings indicate that CAV variant might have originated from CAV-infected chickens. The epidemiology and pathogenesis of this novel virus remains to be elucidated. This study underscores the importance of CAV surveillance and it presents the first evidence suggesting the possibility of CAV homologous recombination in cat. PMID:24689034

  18. Induction of L-phase variants of Nocardia caviae within intact murine lungs.

    PubMed Central

    Beaman, B L

    1980-01-01

    The data presented show that cells of Nocardia caviae 112 were converted to cell wall-deficient microbial variants within the intact murine lung after intranasal administration. At the time that these L-phase variants were recovered in large numbers from the lung, there was a correspondingly enhanced inflammation leading to alveolar consolidation and animal death. During the peak of this response (at 1 week after infection), normal nocardial cells were neither isolated from nor seen within the lung. It is suggested that the conversion of these normal nocardial cells to their L-phase variant leads to this extensive pulmonary damage. Furthermore, the L-phase organisms appear to play an active role in this pathological effect since introduction of similar amounts of killed nocardial cells into the lungs of the mice failed to produce a similar response. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7399704

  19. Bisalbuminemia. A new molecular variant, albumin Vancouver.

    PubMed

    Frohlich, J; Kozier, J; Campbell, D J; Curnow, J V; Tárnoky, A L

    1978-11-01

    Of 18 members of a Fiji Indian family investigated, eight of the 12 males and two of the six females had an electrophoretically slow-type bisalbuminemia (alloalbuminemia). The albumin was characterized by the hiterto unique ratio of the two bands (Al A 35%: variant 65%), and by dye-binding studies and electrophoretic mobility in different media. The data suggest that this is a new variant, which we propose to call albumin Vancouver (Al Va).

  20. Rare variant association test with multiple phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Selyeong; Won, Sungho; Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Yongkang; Kim, Bong-Jo; Park, Taesung

    2017-04-01

    Although genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have now discovered thousands of genetic variants associated with common traits, such variants cannot explain the large degree of "missing heritability," likely due to rare variants. The advent of next generation sequencing technology has allowed rare variant detection and association with common traits, often by investigating specific genomic regions for rare variant effects on a trait. Although multiple correlated phenotypes are often concurrently observed in GWAS, most studies analyze only single phenotypes, which may lessen statistical power. To increase power, multivariate analyses, which consider correlations between multiple phenotypes, can be used. However, few existing multivariant analyses can identify rare variants for assessing multiple phenotypes. Here, we propose Multivariate Association Analysis using Score Statistics (MAAUSS), to identify rare variants associated with multiple phenotypes, based on the widely used sequence kernel association test (SKAT) for a single phenotype. We applied MAAUSS to whole exome sequencing (WES) data from a Korean population of 1,058 subjects to discover genes associated with multiple traits of liver function. We then assessed validation of those genes by a replication study, using an independent dataset of 3,445 individuals. Notably, we detected the gene ZNF620 among five significant genes. We then performed a simulation study to compare MAAUSS's performance with existing methods. Overall, MAAUSS successfully conserved type 1 error rates and in many cases had a higher power than the existing methods. This study illustrates a feasible and straightforward approach for identifying rare variants correlated with multiple phenotypes, with likely relevance to missing heritability.

  1. Variant profiling of evolving prokaryotic populations

    PubMed Central

    Zojer, Markus; Schuster, Lisa N.; Schulz, Frederik; Pfundner, Alexander; Horn, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Genomic heterogeneity of bacterial species is observed and studied in experimental evolution experiments and clinical diagnostics, and occurs as micro-diversity of natural habitats. The challenge for genome research is to accurately capture this heterogeneity with the currently used short sequencing reads. Recent advances in NGS technologies improved the speed and coverage and thus allowed for deep sequencing of bacterial populations. This facilitates the quantitative assessment of genomic heterogeneity, including low frequency alleles or haplotypes. However, false positive variant predictions due to sequencing errors and mapping artifacts of short reads need to be prevented. We therefore created VarCap, a workflow for the reliable prediction of different types of variants even at low frequencies. In order to predict SNPs, InDels and structural variations, we evaluated the sensitivity and accuracy of different software tools using synthetic read data. The results suggested that the best sensitivity could be reached by a union of different tools, however at the price of increased false positives. We identified possible reasons for false predictions and used this knowledge to improve the accuracy by post-filtering the predicted variants according to properties such as frequency, coverage, genomic environment/localization and co-localization with other variants. We observed that best precision was achieved by using an intersection of at least two tools per variant. This resulted in the reliable prediction of variants above a minimum relative abundance of 2%. VarCap is designed for being routinely used within experimental evolution experiments or for clinical diagnostics. The detected variants are reported as frequencies within a VCF file and as a graphical overview of the distribution of the different variant/allele/haplotype frequencies. The source code of VarCap is available at https://github.com/ma2o/VarCap. In order to provide this workflow to a broad community

  2. Laryngeal Dysplasia, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, and Variants.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Lester D R

    2017-03-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a malignant epithelial tumor showing evidence of squamous differentiation. It is the most common malignancy of the larynx, with several variants (verrucous, exophytic or papillary, spindle-cell, basaloid, acantholytic, adenosquamous) recognized, with well-established precursor lesions. Dysplasia is now separated into only low-grade and high-grade categories. Each SCC variant has unique cytomorphologic features and histologic differential diagnoses that are important to consider, as management and outcomes are different.

  3. Variant profiling of evolving prokaryotic populations.

    PubMed

    Zojer, Markus; Schuster, Lisa N; Schulz, Frederik; Pfundner, Alexander; Horn, Matthias; Rattei, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Genomic heterogeneity of bacterial species is observed and studied in experimental evolution experiments and clinical diagnostics, and occurs as micro-diversity of natural habitats. The challenge for genome research is to accurately capture this heterogeneity with the currently used short sequencing reads. Recent advances in NGS technologies improved the speed and coverage and thus allowed for deep sequencing of bacterial populations. This facilitates the quantitative assessment of genomic heterogeneity, including low frequency alleles or haplotypes. However, false positive variant predictions due to sequencing errors and mapping artifacts of short reads need to be prevented. We therefore created VarCap, a workflow for the reliable prediction of different types of variants even at low frequencies. In order to predict SNPs, InDels and structural variations, we evaluated the sensitivity and accuracy of different software tools using synthetic read data. The results suggested that the best sensitivity could be reached by a union of different tools, however at the price of increased false positives. We identified possible reasons for false predictions and used this knowledge to improve the accuracy by post-filtering the predicted variants according to properties such as frequency, coverage, genomic environment/localization and co-localization with other variants. We observed that best precision was achieved by using an intersection of at least two tools per variant. This resulted in the reliable prediction of variants above a minimum relative abundance of 2%. VarCap is designed for being routinely used within experimental evolution experiments or for clinical diagnostics. The detected variants are reported as frequencies within a VCF file and as a graphical overview of the distribution of the different variant/allele/haplotype frequencies. The source code of VarCap is available at https://github.com/ma2o/VarCap. In order to provide this workflow to a broad community

  4. Histone variants: key players of chromatin.

    PubMed

    Biterge, Burcu; Schneider, Robert

    2014-06-01

    Histones are fundamental structural components of chromatin. Eukaryotic DNA is wound around an octamer of the core histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4. Binding of linker histone H1 promotes higher order chromatin organization. In addition to their structural role, histones impact chromatin function and dynamics by, e.g., post-translational histone modifications or the presence of specific histone variants. Histone variants exhibit differential expression timings (DNA replication-independent) and mRNA characteristics compared to canonical histones. Replacement of canonical histones with histone variants can affect nucleosome stability and help to create functionally distinct chromatin domains. In line with this, several histone variants have been implicated in the regulation of cellular processes such as DNA repair and transcriptional activity. In this review, we focus on recent progress in the study of core histone variants H2A.X, H2A.Z, macroH2A, H3.3, and CENP-A, as well as linker histone H1 variants, their functions and their links to development and disease.

  5. Discovery of rare variants for complex phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Kosmicki, Jack A; Churchhouse, Claire L; Rivas, Manuel A; Neale, Benjamin M

    2016-06-01

    With the rise of sequencing technologies, it is now feasible to assess the role rare variants play in the genetic contribution to complex trait variation. While some of the earlier targeted sequencing studies successfully identified rare variants of large effect, unbiased gene discovery using exome sequencing has experienced limited success for complex traits. Nevertheless, rare variant association studies have demonstrated that rare variants do contribute to phenotypic variability, but sample sizes will likely have to be even larger than those of common variant association studies to be powered for the detection of genes and loci. Large-scale sequencing efforts of tens of thousands of individuals, such as the UK10K Project and aggregation efforts such as the Exome Aggregation Consortium, have made great strides in advancing our knowledge of the landscape of rare variation, but there remain many considerations when studying rare variation in the context of complex traits. We discuss these considerations in this review, presenting a broad range of topics at a high level as an introduction to rare variant analysis in complex traits including the issues of power, study design, sample ascertainment, de novo variation, and statistical testing approaches. Ultimately, as sequencing costs continue to decline, larger sequencing studies will yield clearer insights into the biological consequence of rare mutations and may reveal which genes play a role in the etiology of complex traits.

  6. Exon skipping creates novel splice variants of DMC1 gene in ruminants.

    PubMed

    Ahlawat, S; Chopra, M; Jaiswal, L; Sharma, R; Arora, R; Brahma, B; Lal, S V; De, S

    2016-04-01

    Disrupted meiotic cDNA1 (DMC1) recombinase plays a pivotal role in homology search and strand exchange reactions during meiotic homologous recombination. In the present study, full length coding sequence of DMC1 gene was sequence characterized for the first time from four ruminant species (cattle, buffalo, sheep and goat) and phylogenetic relationship of ruminant DMC1 with other eukaryotes was analyzed. DMC1 gene encodes a putative protein of 340 amino acids in cattle, sheep and buffalo and 341 amino acids in goat. A high degree of evolutionary conservation at both nucleotide and amino acid level was observed for the four ruminant orthologs. In cattle and sheep, novel alternatively spliced mRNAs with skipping of exons 7 and 8 (Transcript variant 1, TV1) were isolated in addition to the full length (FL) transcript. Novel transcript variants with partial skipping of exon 7 and complete skipping of exon 8 (Transcript variant 2, TV2) were found in sheep and goat. The presence of these variants was validated by amplifying cDNA isolated from testis tissue of ruminants using two oligonucleotides flanking the deleted region. To accurately estimate their relative proportions, real-time PCR was performed using primers specific for each variant. Expression level of DMC1-FL was significantly higher than that of TV1 in cattle and TV2 in goat (P < 0.05). Relative ratio for expression of DMC1-FL: TV1: TV2 in sheep was 6.78: 1.43: 1. In-silico analysis revealed presence of splice variants of DMC1 gene across other mammalian species underpinning the role of alternative splicing in functional innovation.

  7. Sequence diversity of wheat mosaic virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Lucy R

    2016-02-02

    Wheat mosaic virus (WMoV), transmitted by eriophyid wheat curl mites (Aceria tosichella) is the causal agent of High Plains disease in wheat and maize. WMoV and other members of the genus Emaravirus evaded thorough molecular characterization for many years due to the experimental challenges of mite transmission and manipulating multisegmented negative sense RNA genomes. Recently, the complete genome sequence of a Nebraska isolate of WMoV revealed eight segments, plus a variant sequence of the nucleocapsid protein-encoding segment. Here, near-complete and partial consensus sequences of five more WMoV isolates are reported and compared to the Nebraska isolate: an Ohio maize isolate (GG1), a Kansas barley isolate (KS7), and three Ohio wheat isolates (H1, K1, W1). Results show two distinct groups of WMoV isolates: Ohio wheat isolate RNA segments had 84% or lower nucleotide sequence identity to the NE isolate, whereas GG1 and KS7 had 98% or higher nucleotide sequence identity to the NE isolate. Knowledge of the sequence variability of WMoV isolates is a step toward understanding virus biology, and potentially explaining observed biological variation.

  8. Alternative Technical Summary Report: Electrometallurgical Treatment Variant

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, L.W.

    1995-11-30

    Immobilization is the fixation of the surplus fissile materials in an acceptable matrix such as glass or ceramics to create an environmentally benign form for disposal in a repository. In addition to the traditional characteristics required of an immobilization form to achieve isolation of the fissile material from the biosphere over geologic times, the immobilization form for the Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP) must also possess the property that it is inherently as unattractive and inaccessible as the fissile material from commercial spent fuel. This latter requirement is similar to the wording of the ''spent fuel standard'' invoked in the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study on plutonium disposition. High-level wastes (HLW) or separated cesium ({sup 137}Cs), can be added with the fissile material into the waste form to create a radiation field that increases the proliferation resistance and decreases reuse by the host nation in the following ways: (1) Plutonium will be diluted with elements that must be removed by extensive chemical processing to return it to weapons-usable purity; (2) The immobilized plutonium canisters will contain approximately 2 tonnes (2000 kg; 2.2 tons) of mass, thereby forcing the use of heavy equipment to move the canisters; (3) A gamma radiation barrier will be added to the immobilized plutonium canisters; the present concept is to add a radiation barrier that is greater than 1 Gy (100 rad) per hour at 1 m (3 ft) 30 years after fabrication; (4) These canisters will then be sealed in casks and emplaced into drifts in a federal repository where they will be monitored for 100 years before the repository is sealed. This immobilization process is shown conceptually in Figure 1. In the electrometallurgical treatment (ET) variant, plutonium-rich residues are shipped to existing Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) facilities where the plutonium is converted to plutonium chloride, dissolved in a molten salt solution, sorbed

  9. Genetic analysis of a transcriptional activation pathway by using hepatoma cell variants.

    PubMed Central

    Bulla, G A; Fournier, R E

    1994-01-01

    A hierarchy of liver-enriched transcription factors plays an important role in activating expression of many hepatic genes. In particular, hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF-4) is a major activator of the gene encoding HNF-1, and HNF-1 itself activates expression of more than 20 liver genes. To dissect this activation pathway genetically, we prepared somatic cell variants that were deficient in expression of the liver-specific alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1AT) gene, which requires both HNF-1 and HNF-4 for high-level gene activity. This was accomplished in two steps. First, hepatoma transfectants that stably expressed two selectable markers under alpha 1AT promoter control were prepared; second, variant sublines that could no longer express either transgene were isolated by direct selection. In this report, we demonstrate that the variants contain defects in the HNF-4/HNF-1 activation pathway. These defects functioned in trans, as expression of many liver genes was affected, but the variant phenotypes were recessive to wild type in somatic cell hybrids. Three different variant classes could be discriminated by their phenotypic responses to ectopic expression of either HNF-4 or HNF-1. Two variant clones appeared specifically deficient in HNF-4 expression, as transfection with an HNF-4 expression cassette fully restored their hepatic phenotypes. Another line activated HNF-1 in response to forced HNF-4 expression, but activation of downstream genes failed to occur. One clone was unresponsive to either HNF-1 or HNF-4. Using the variants, we demonstrate further that the chromosomal genes encoding alpha 1AT, aldolase B, and alpha-fibrinogen display strict requirements for HNF-1 activation in vivo, while other liver genes were unaffected by the presence or absence of HNF-1 or HNF-4. We also provide evidence for the existence of an autoregulatory loop in which HNF-1 regulates its own expression through activation of HNF-4. Images PMID:7935424

  10. Emergence of an Outbreak-Associated Clostridium difficile Variant with Increased Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Quesada-Gómez, Carlos; López-Ureña, Diana; Acuña-Amador, Luis; Villalobos-Zúñiga, Manuel; Du, Tim; Freire, Rosemayre; Guzmán-Verri, Caterina; Gamboa-Coronado, María del Mar; Lawley, Trevor D.; Moreno, Edgardo; Mulvey, Michael R.; Brito, Gerly Anne de Castro; Rodríguez-Cavallini, Evelyn; Rodríguez, César

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of Clostridium difficile infections has increased due to the emergence of epidemic variants from diverse genetic lineages. Here we describe the emergence of a novel variant during an outbreak in a Costa Rican hospital that was associated with severe clinical presentations. This C. difficile variant elicited higher white blood cell counts and caused disease in younger patients than did other strains isolated during the outbreak. Furthermore, it had a recurrence rate, a 30-day attributable disease rate, and disease severity as great as those of the epidemic strain NAP1. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis genotyping indicated that the outbreak strains belong to a previously undescribed variant, designated NAPCR1. Whole-genome sequencing and ribotyping indicated that the NAPCR1 variant belongs to C. difficile ribotype 012 and sequence type 54, as does the reference strain 630. NAPCR1 strains are resistant to fluoroquinolones due to a mutation in gyrA, and they possess an 18-bp deletion in tcdC that is characteristic of the epidemic, evolutionarily distinct, C. difficile NAP1 variant. NAPCR1 genomes contain 10% more predicted genes than strain 630, most of which are of hypothetical function and are present on phages and other mobile genetic elements. The increased virulence of NAPCR1 was confirmed by mortality rates in the hamster model and strong inflammatory responses induced by bacteria-free supernatants in the murine ligated loop model. However, NAPCR1 strains do not synthesize toxin A and toxin B at levels comparable to those in NAP1 strains. Our results suggest that the pathogenic potential of this emerging C. difficile variant is due to the acquisition of hypothetical functions associated with laterally acquired DNA. PMID:25653402

  11. A divergent variant of Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 3 is present in California

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Grapevine leafroll-associated viruses are a problem for grape production globally. Symptoms are caused by a number of distinct viral species. During a survey of Napa Valley vineyards (California, USA), we found evidence of a new variant of Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 3 (GLRaV-3). We isolated its genome from a symptomatic greenhouse-raised plant and fully sequenced it. Findings In a maximum likelihood analysis of representative GLRaV-3 gene sequences, the isolate grouped most closely with a recently sequenced variant from South Africa and a partial sequence from New Zealand. These highly divergent GLRaV-3 variants have predicted proteins that are more than 10% divergent from other GLRaV-3 variants, and appear to be missing an open reading frame for the p6 protein. Conclusions This divergent GLRaV-3 phylogroup is already present in grape-growing regions worldwide and is capable of causing symptoms of leafroll disease without the p6 protein. PMID:23062082

  12. Hereditary renal amyloidosis with a novel variant fibrinogen.

    PubMed Central

    Uemichi, T; Liepnieks, J J; Benson, M D

    1994-01-01

    Two families with hereditary renal amyloidosis were found to have a novel mutation in the fibrinogen A alpha chain gene. This form of amyloidosis is an autosomal dominant condition characterized by proteinuria, hypertension, and subsequent azotemia. DNAs of patients with amyloidosis were screened for a polymorphism in fibrinogen A alpha chain gene by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis, and affected individuals from two kindreds were found to have a mutation. Both of these kindreds are American of Irish descent presenting with non-neuropathic, nephropathic amyloidosis in the fifth to the seventh decade of life. DNA sequencing showed a point mutation in the fibrinogen A alpha chain gene that is responsible for substitution of valine for glutamic acid at position 526. By restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, 7 affected individuals and 14 asymptomatic individuals in these two kindreds were positive for the fibrinogen A alpha chain Val 526 gene. Fibrinogen was isolated from plasma of a heterozygous gene carrier and shown to contain approximately 50% variant fibrinogen. Discovery of this new mutation confirms the association between fibrinogen A alpha chain variant and hereditary renal amyloidosis and establishes a new biochemical subtype of amyloidosis. Images PMID:8113408

  13. Super Spy variants implicate flexibility in chaperone action

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Shu; Wang, Lili; Petrotchenko, Evgeniy V; Makepeace, Karl AT; Horowitz, Scott; Yang, Jianyi; Zhang, Yang; Borchers, Christoph H; Bardwell, James CA

    2014-01-01

    Experimental study of the role of disorder in protein function is challenging. It has been proposed that proteins utilize disordered regions in the adaptive recognition of their various binding partners. However apart from a few exceptions, defining the importance of disorder in promiscuous binding interactions has proven to be difficult. In this paper, we have utilized a genetic selection that links protein stability to antibiotic resistance to isolate variants of the newly discovered chaperone Spy that show an up to 7 fold improved chaperone activity against a variety of substrates. These “Super Spy” variants show tighter binding to client proteins and are generally more unstable than is wild type Spy and show increases in apparent flexibility. We establish a good relationship between the degree of their instability and the improvement they show in their chaperone activity. Our results provide evidence for the importance of disorder and flexibility in chaperone function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01584.001 PMID:24497545

  14. Identification of carriers of a variant plasma prealbumin (transthyretin) associated with familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy type I.

    PubMed Central

    Benson, M D; Dwulet, F E

    1985-01-01

    A method is described for detecting carriers of a variant plasma prealbumin that is associated with familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP) type I. It is based on the finding of an extra methionine in the variant prealbumin, at position 30 from the amino terminals. Since normal prealbumin has only one methionine (position 13), treatment with cyanogen bromide (CNBr), which cleaves only at methionines, results in two peptides. CNBr treatment of the variant prealbumin gives three peptides. The extra can then be detected in two ways: by HPLC using a reverse phase C18 column, and by sequential Edman degradation. Each method can detect as little as 1% variant prealbumin in isolated plasma prealbumin, and therefore, can identify carriers of the gene for the variant protein. Since FAP type I usually is not manifest until after the childbearing years, this method to identify carriers of the gene offers a new approach for genetic counseling of families with this disease. To date, kindreds with hereditary amyloidosis that could benefit from these studies include those with FAP type I of Swedish, Japanese, and Portuguese origins. PMID:2981253

  15. Clinical variants of Guillain-Barre syndrome: some aspects of differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Dididze, M N

    2009-01-01

    Acute Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy--Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) affects spinal roots, peripheral and cranial nerves. Various clinical variants of GBS have been described. Isolated cranial nerve involvement without prominent signs of GBS is considered as rare variant of this disease. The aim of the study was to identify clinical characteristics of various forms of GBS particularly in rare variants of the disease. 57 patients with GBS were evaluated based on clinical and electrophysiological data. The following forms of GBS were revealed: 27 had acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, 9--acute motor axonal neuropathy, 12--acute motor and sensory axonal neuropathy, 5--Fisher syndrome and 3--facial diplegia (rare clinical variant). 50 patients were graded 3 or more according to Hughes functional grading scale. Seasonal preponderance was found in spring (March-May) and autumn (September-November). 23 patients received IVIG and 34 were treated by plasma exchange within two weeks after onset. Follow up study revealed: 46 recovered satisfactory, 8 were persistently disabled, 3 died during admission to hospital. Guillain-Barre syndrome showed seasonal distribution and high frequency of axonal forms. Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy was more effective than plasma exchange. Poor outcomes were likely due to severe condition (required mechanical ventilation) and axonal forms. It is crucial to timely identify rare variants of GBS which recover with appropriate treatment.

  16. Cooperation between distinct viral variants promotes growth of H3N2 influenza in cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Katherine S; Hooper, Kathryn A; Ollodart, Anja R; Dingens, Adam S; Bloom, Jesse D

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses rapidly diversify into quasispecies of related genotypes. This genetic diversity has long been known to facilitate adaptation, but recent studies have suggested that cooperation between variants might also increase population fitness. Here, we demonstrate strong cooperation between two H3N2 influenza variants that differ by a single mutation at residue 151 in neuraminidase, which normally mediates viral exit from host cells. Residue 151 is often annotated as an ambiguous amino acid in sequenced isolates, indicating mixed viral populations. We show that mixed populations grow better than either variant alone in cell culture. Pure populations of either variant generate the other through mutation and then stably maintain a mix of the two genotypes. We suggest that cooperation arises because mixed populations combine one variant’s proficiency at cell entry with the other’s proficiency at cell exit. Our work demonstrates a specific cooperative interaction between defined variants in a viral quasispecies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13974.001 PMID:26978794

  17. Interference between variants of peach latent mosaic viroid reveals novel features of its fitness landscape: implications for detection.

    PubMed

    Serra, Pedro; Bertolini, Edson; Martínez, M Carmen; Cambra, Mariano; Flores, Ricardo

    2017-02-17

    Natural populations of peach latent mosaic viroid (PLMVd) are complex mixtures of variants. During routine testing, TaqMan rtRT-PCR and RNA gel-blot hybridization produced discordant results with some PLMVd isolates. Analysis of the corresponding populations showed that they were exclusively composed of variants (of class II) with a structural domain different from that of the reference and many other variants (of class I) targeted by the TaqMan rtRT-PCR probe. Bioassays in peach revealed that a representative PLMVd variant of class II replicated without symptoms, generated a progeny with low nucleotide diversity, and, intriguingly, outcompeted a representative symptomatic variant of class I when co-inoculated in equimolecular amounts. A number of informative positions associated with the higher fitness of variants of class II have been identified, and novel sets of primers and probes for universal or specific TaqMan rtRT-PCR detection of PLMVd variants have been designed and tested.

  18. Interference between variants of peach latent mosaic viroid reveals novel features of its fitness landscape: implications for detection

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Pedro; Bertolini, Edson; Martínez, M. Carmen; Cambra, Mariano; Flores, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    Natural populations of peach latent mosaic viroid (PLMVd) are complex mixtures of variants. During routine testing, TaqMan rtRT-PCR and RNA gel-blot hybridization produced discordant results with some PLMVd isolates. Analysis of the corresponding populations showed that they were exclusively composed of variants (of class II) with a structural domain different from that of the reference and many other variants (of class I) targeted by the TaqMan rtRT-PCR probe. Bioassays in peach revealed that a representative PLMVd variant of class II replicated without symptoms, generated a progeny with low nucleotide diversity, and, intriguingly, outcompeted a representative symptomatic variant of class I when co-inoculated in equimolecular amounts. A number of informative positions associated with the higher fitness of variants of class II have been identified, and novel sets of primers and probes for universal or specific TaqMan rtRT-PCR detection of PLMVd variants have been designed and tested. PMID:28211491

  19. Taxonomic Characterization, Evaluation of Toxigenicity, and Saccharification Capability of Aspergillus Section Flavi Isolates from Korean Traditional Wheat-Based Fermentation Starter Nuruk

    PubMed Central

    Bal, Jyotiranjan; Yun, Suk-Hyun; Chun, Jeesun; Kim, Beom-Tae

    2016-01-01

    The most economically important species used in a wide range of fermentation industries throughout Asia belong to Aspergillus section Flavi, which are morphologically and phylogenetically indistinguishable, with a few being toxigenic and therefore a major concern. They are frequently isolated from Korean fermentation starters, such as nuruk and meju. The growing popularity of traditional Korean alcoholic beverages has led to a demand for their quality enhancement, therefore requiring selection of efficient non-toxigenic strains to assist effective fermentation. This study was performed to classify the most efficient strains of Aspergillus section Flavi isolated from various types of traditional wheat nuruk, based on a polyphasic approach involving molecular and biochemical evaluation. A total of 69 strains were isolated based on colony morphology and identified as Aspergillus oryzae/flavus based on internal transcribed spacer and calmodulin gene sequencing. Interestingly, none were toxigenic based on PCR amplification of intergenic regions of the aflatoxin cluster genes norB-cypA and the absence of aflatoxin in the culture supernatants by thin-layer chromatography analysis. Saccharification capability of the isolates, assessed through α-amylase and glucoamylase activities, revealed that two isolates, TNA24 and TNA15, showed the highest levels of activity. Although the degrees of variation in α-amylase and glucoamylase activities among the isolates were higher, there were only slight differences in acid protease activity among the isolates with two, TNA28 and TNA36, showing the highest activities. Furthermore, statistical analyses showed that α-amylase activity was positively correlated with glucoamylase activity (p < 0.001), and therefore screening for either was sufficient to predict the saccharifying capacity of the Aspergillus strain. PMID:27790066

  20. Unusual growth variants of Avibacterium paragallinarum.

    PubMed

    Blackall, P J; Christensen, H; Bisgaard, M

    2011-07-01

    Two isolates of haemophilic bacteria originally isolated in the 1980s from chickens were re-examined. The addition of a 10% sterile filtrate from an overnight culture of Staphylococcus epidermidis allowed growth of both isolates in solid and liquid media that were otherwise not capable of supporting the growth of these isolates. Using the modified media, genotypic and serotypic studies were performed, which confirmed both isolates to be Avibacterium paragallinarum, with one isolate being serovar A and the other serovar C. The unusual growth requirements of these two isolates reinforces the need for careful interpretation by diagnostic laboratories examining chickens showing signs of upper respiratory tract disease.

  1. In vivo emergence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli variants lacking genes for K99 fimbriae and heat-stable enterotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Mainil, J G; Sadowski, P L; Tarsio, M; Moon, H W

    1987-01-01

    Neonatal pigs were inoculated with porcine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli 431, which carries genes for K99 fimbriae and STaP enterotoxin. Colonies of strain 431 were recovered from feces of pigs for up to 17 days after inoculation and tested for hybridization with gene probes for K99 and STaP. Variants of strain 431 that did not hybridize with the probes were considered to have lost the genes. Variants were recovered from 10 of 13 suckling pigs that survived the infection. Only 0.4% of the isolates recovered during the first 2 days after inoculation were variants. Of the isolates recovered 3 to 5 days after inoculation, 20 to 36% were variants. Variant colonies were detected more frequently among pigs in some litters than in others. The litter with the highest number of variant-shedding pigs had the dam with the highest titer of K99 antibody in her colostrum. Variants also occurred in colostrum-deprived, artificially reared pigs. However, the number of variants detected was lower and they occurred later in the course of the infection in colostrum-deprived pigs than in suckling pigs. More variants were detected and they were detected earlier in colostrum-deprived pigs fed anti-K99 monoclonal antibody than in controls fed anti-K88 monoclonal antibody. Loss of STaP appeared to be secondary to loss of K99 in that some variants lacked only K99 (K99- STaP+) and some lacked both genes (K99- STaP-), but none was of the K99+ STaP- type. Our results confirmed reports of gene loss from enterotoxigenic E. coli during infection. They are consistent with the hypothesis that variants emerge under in vivo selection pressure of K99 antibody and with the speculation that gene loss may be an important component of protection in vaccinated populations. However, the emergence of variants did not appear to play a major role in the recovery of individual pigs from clinical disease. PMID:2890584

  2. Identifying the source of unknown microcystin genes and predicting microcystin variants by comparing genes within uncultured cyanobacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Allender, Christopher J; LeCleir, Gary R; Rinta-Kanto, Johanna M; Small, Randall L; Satchwell, Michael F; Boyer, Gregory L; Wilhelm, Steven W

    2009-06-01

    While multiple phylogenetic markers have been used in the culture-independent study of microcystin-producing cyanobacteria, in only a few instances have multiple markers been studied within individual cells, and in all cases these studies have been conducted with cultured isolates. Here, we isolate and evaluate large DNA fragments (>6 kb) encompassing two genes involved in microcystin biosynthesis (mcyA2 and mcyB1) and use them to identify the source of gene fragments found in water samples. Further investigation of these gene loci from individual cyanobacterial cells allowed for improved analysis of the genetic diversity within microcystin producers as well as a method to predict microcystin variants for individuals. These efforts have also identified the source of the novel mcyA genotype previously termed Microcystis-like that is pervasive in the Laurentian Great Lakes and they predict the microcystin variant(s) that it produces.

  3. FTO Obesity Risk Variants Are Linked to Adipocyte IRX3 Expression and BMI of Children - Relevance of FTO Variants to Defend Body Weight in Lean Children?

    PubMed Central

    Landgraf, Kathrin; Scholz, Markus; Kovacs, Peter; Kiess, Wieland; Körner, Antje

    2016-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies have identified variants within the FTO (fat mass and obesity associated) locus as the strongest predictors of obesity amongst all obesity-associated gene loci. Recent evidence suggests that variants in FTO directly affect human adipocyte function through targeting IRX3 and IRX5 and thermogenesis regulation. Aim We addressed the relevance of this proposed FTO-IRX pathway in adipose tissue (AT) of children. Results Expression of IRX3 was higher in adipocytes compared to SVF. We found increased adipocyte-specific expression of IRX3 and IRX5 with the presence of the FTO risk haplotype in lean children, whereas it was unaffected by risk variants in obese peers. We further show that IRX3 expression was elevated in isolated adipocytes and AT of lean compared to obese children, particularly in UCP1-negative adipocytes, and inversely correlated with BMI SDS. Independent of BMI, IRX3 expression in adipocytes was significantly related to adipocyte hypertrophy, and subsequent associations with AT inflammation and HOMA-IR in the children. Conclusion One interpretation of our observation of FTO risk variants linked to IRX3 expression and adipocyte size restricted to lean children, along with the decreased IRX3 expression in obese compared to lean peers, may reflect a defense mechanism for protecting body-weight, which is pertinent for lean children. PMID:27560134

  4. Frequency of thermostability variants: estimation of total rare variant frequency in human populations

    SciTech Connect

    Mohrenweiser, H.W.; Neel, J.V.

    1981-09-01

    Eight erythrocyte enzymes were examine for thermostability in an unselected sample of 100 newborn infants. Three thermolabile variants, one each of lactate dehydrogenase, glucosephosphate isomerase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, were identified, none of which was detectable as a variant by standard electrophoretic techniques. All were inherited. This frequency of 3.8 heritable thermostability variants per 1000 determinations is to be compared with a frequency of electrophoretically detectable variants of 1.1 per 1000 determinations, a frequency of 2.4 enzyme-deficiency variants per 1000 determinations, and a frequency of individuals with rare enzyme deficiency or electrophoretic or thermostability (or both) variants at these loci is 8.4 per 1000 determinations. A similar distribution and frequency is seen when the comparison is limited to the seven loci studied by all techniques. it is clear that not all of the electrophoretic and thermostability variants present in the population are detected by the techniques used in this study. Accordingly, it is estimated that the true frequency of carriers of a rare variant for each of these enzyme-coding loci averages greater than 10/1000. Some implications of these frequencies for human disease are discussed.

  5. New insight into the biosynthesis of flavanolignans in the white-flowered variant of Silybum marianum.

    PubMed

    Nyiredy, Sz; Samu, Zs; Szücs, Z; Gulácsi, K; Kurtán, T; Antus, S

    2008-02-01

    It has been demonstrated that besides the known flavanolignan constituents of the white-flowered variant of Silybum marianum, (-)-silandrin A (3a) and (-)-isosilandrin A (4a); their trans-benzodioxane diastereomers, (-)-silandrin B (3b) and (-)-isosilandrin B (4b), are also produced by the plant. Moreover, the isolation of their cis-benzodioxane diastereomers, (-)-isocisilandrin (5) and cisilandrin (6), confirm that the previously proposed biosynthetic pathway involving a nonselective O-beta coupling is correct.

  6. VariantAnnotation: a Bioconductor package for exploration and annotation of genetic variants

    PubMed Central

    Obenchain, Valerie; Lawrence, Michael; Carey, Vincent; Gogarten, Stephanie; Shannon, Paul; Morgan, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Summary: VariantAnnotation is an R / Bioconductor package for the exploration and annotation of genetic variants. Capabilities exist for reading, writing and filtering variant call format (VCF) files. VariantAnnotation allows ready access to additional R / Bioconductor facilities for advanced statistical analysis, data transformation, visualization and integration with diverse genomic resources. Availability and implementation: This package is implemented in R and available for download at the Bioconductor Web site (http://bioconductor.org/packages/2.13/bioc/html/VariantAnnotation.html). The package contains extensive help pages for individual functions and a ‘vignette’ outlining typical work flows; it is made available under the open source ‘Artistic-2.0’ license. Version 1.9.38 was used in this article. Contact: vobencha@fhcrc.org PMID:24681907

  7. Genomic and Phenotypic Analyses Reveal the Emergence of an Atypical Salmonella enterica Serovar Senftenberg Variant in China

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaolu; Li, Yinghui; Ansari, Hifzur R.; Hill-Cawthorne, Grant A.; Ho, Y. S.; Naeem, Raeece; Pickard, Derek; Klena, John D.; Xu, Xuebing; Pain, Arnab

    2016-01-01

    Human infections with Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Senftenberg are often associated with exposure to poultry flocks, farm environments, or contaminated food. The recent emergence of multidrug-resistant isolates has raised public health concerns. In this study, comparative genomics and phenotypic analysis were used to characterize 14 Salmonella Senftenberg clinical isolates recovered from multiple outbreaks in Shenzhen and Shanghai, China, between 2002 and 2011. Single-nucleotide polymorphism analyses identified two phylogenetically distinct clades of S. Senftenberg, designated SC1 and SC2, harboring variations in Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) and SPI-2 and exhibiting distinct biochemical and phenotypic signatures. Although the two variants shared the same serotype, the SC2 isolates of sequence type 14 (ST14) harbored intact SPI-1 and -2 and hence were characterized by possessing efficient invasion capabilities. In contrast, the SC1 isolates had structural deletion patterns in both SPI-1 and -2 that correlated with an impaired capacity to invade cultured human cells and also the year of their isolation. These atypical SC1 isolates also lacked the capacity to produce hydrogen sulfide. These findings highlight the emergence of atypical Salmonella Senftenberg variants in China and provide genetic validation that variants lacking SPI-1 and regions of SPI-2, which leads to impaired invasion capacity, can still cause clinical disease. These data have identified an emerging public health concern and highlight the need to strengthen surveillance to detect the prevalence and transmission of nontyphoidal Salmonella species. PMID:27225410

  8. Genetic tracking of the raccoon variant of rabies virus in eastern North America.

    PubMed

    Szanto, Annamaria G; Nadin-Davis, Susan A; Rosatte, Richard C; White, Bradley N

    2011-06-01

    To gain insight into the incursion of the raccoon variant of rabies into the raccoon population in three Canadian provinces, a collection of 192 isolates of the raccoon rabies virus (RRV) strain was acquired from across its North American range and was genetically characterized. A 516-nucleotide segment of the non-coding region between the G and L protein open reading frames, corresponding to the most variable region of the rabies virus genome, was sequenced. This analysis identified 119 different sequences, and phylogenetic analysis of the dataset supports the documented history of RRV spread. Three distinct geographically restricted RRV lineages were identified. Lineage 1 was found in Florida, Alabama and Georgia and appears to form the ancestral lineage of the raccoon variant of rabies. Lineage 2, represented by just two isolates, was found only in Florida, while the third lineage appears broadly distributed throughout the rest of the eastern United States and eastern Canada. In New York State, two distinct spatially segregated variants were identified; the one occupying the western and northern portions of the state was responsible for an incursion of raccoon rabies into the Canadian province of Ontario. Isolates from New Brunswick and Quebec form distinct, separate clusters, consistent with their independent origins from neighboring areas of the United States. The data are consistent with localized northward incursion into these three separate areas with no evidence of east-west viral movement between the three Canadian provinces.

  9. Novel Human Butyrylcholinesterase Variants: Toward Organophosphonate Detoxication

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Human butyrylcholinesterase (hBChE) is currently being developed as a detoxication enzyme for stoichiometric binding and/or catalytic hydrolysis of organophosphates. Herein, we describe the use of a molecular evolution method to develop novel hBChE variants with increased resistance to stereochemically defined nerve agent model compounds of soman, sarin, and cyclosarin. Novel hBChE variants (Y332S, D340H, and Y332S/D340H) were identified with an increased resistance to nerve agent model compounds that retained robust intrinsic catalytic efficiency. Molecular dynamics simulations of these variants revealed insights into the mechanism by which these structural changes conferred nerve agent model compound resistance. PMID:24902043

  10. A phonetic explanation of pronunciation variant effects.

    PubMed

    Sumner, Meghan

    2013-07-01

    Effects of word-level phonetic variation on the recognition of words with different pronunciation variants (e.g., center produced with/(out) [t]) are investigated via the semantic- and pseudoword-priming paradigms. A bias favoring clearly articulated words with canonical variants ([nt]) is found. By reducing the bias, words with different variants show robust and equivalent lexical activation. The equivalence of different word forms highlights a snag for frequency-based theories of lexical access: How are words and word productions with vastly different frequencies recognized equally well by listeners? A process-based account is proposed, suggesting that careful speech induces bottom-up processing and casual speech induces top-down processing.

  11. In silico comparative characterization of pharmacogenomic missense variants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Missense pharmacogenomic (PGx) variants refer to amino acid substitutions that potentially affect the pharmacokinetic (PK) or pharmacodynamic (PD) response to drug therapies. The PGx variants, as compared to disease-associated variants, have not been investigated as deeply. The ability to computationally predict future PGx variants is desirable; however, it is not clear what data sets should be used or what features are beneficial to this end. Hence we carried out a comparative characterization of PGx variants with annotated neutral and disease variants from UniProt, to test the predictive power of sequence conservation and structural information in discriminating these three groups. Results 126 PGx variants of high quality from PharmGKB were selected and two data sets were created: one set contained 416 variants with structural and sequence information, and, the other set contained 1,265 variants with sequence information only. In terms of sequence conservation, PGx variants are more conserved than neutral variants and much less conserved than disease variants. A weighted random forest was used to strike a more balanced classification for PGx variants. Generally structural features are helpful in discriminating PGx variant from the other two groups, but still classification of PGx from neutral polymorphisms is much less effective than between disease and neutral variants. Conclusions We found that PGx variants are much more similar to neutral variants than to disease variants in the feature space consisting of residue conservation, neighboring residue conservation, number of neighbors, and protein solvent accessibility. Such similarity poses great difficulty in the classification of PGx variants and polymorphisms. PMID:25057096

  12. Efficacy of commercial canarypox vaccine for protecting Hawai'i 'Amakihi from field isolates of Avipoxvirus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Atkinson, Carter T.; Wiegand, Kimberly C.; Triglia, Dennis; Jarvi, Susan I.

    2010-01-01

    At least three variants of avian pox virus are present in Hawai‘i - Fowlpox from domestic poultry and a group of genetically distinct viruses that cluster within two clades (Pox Variant 1 and Pox Variant 2) that are most similar to Canarypox based on DNA sequence of the virus 4b core protein gene. We tested whether Hawai‘i ‘Amakihi can be protected from wild virus isolates with an attenuated live Canarypox vaccine that is closely related to isolates that cluster within clade 1 (Pox Variant 1) based on sequence of the attenuated Canarypox virus 4b core protein. Thirty-one (31) Hawai`i ‘Amakihi (Hemignathus virens) with no prior physical evidence of pox infection were collected on Mauna Kea from xeric, high elevation habitats with low pox prevalence and randomly divided into two groups. One group of 16 was vaccinated with Poximmune C® while the other group received a sham vaccination with virus diluent. Four of 15 (27%) vaccinated birds developed potentially life-threatening disseminated lesions or lesions of unusually long duration, while one bird never developed a vaccine-associated lesion or "take". After vaccine-associated lesions healed, vaccinated birds were randomly divided into three groups of five and challenged with either a wild isolate of Fowlpox, a Hawai`i `Amakihi isolate of a Canarypox-like virus from clade 1 (Pox Variant 1) or a Hawai`i `Amakihi isolate of a Canarypox-like virus from clade 2 (Pox Variant 2). Similarly, three random groups of five unvaccinated ‘Amakihi were challenged with the same virus isolates. Vaccinated and unvaccinated ‘Amakihi challenged with Fowlpox had transient infections with no clinical signs of infection. Mortality in vaccinated ‘Amakihi that were challenged with Pox Variant 1 and Pox Variant 2 ranged from 0% (0/5) for Pox Variant 1 to 60% (3/5) for Pox Variant 2. Mortality in unvaccinated ‘Amakihi ranged from 40% (2/5) for Pox Variant 1 to 100% (5/5) for Pox Variant 2. While the vaccine provided some

  13. Genetic Association Analysis Reveals Differences in the Contribution of NOD2 Variants to the Clinical Phenotypes of Orofacial Granulomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Mentzer, Alexander; Nayee, Shalini; Omar, Yasmin; Hullah, Esther; Taylor, Kirstin; Goel, Rishi; Bye, Hannah; Shembesh, Tarik; Elliott, Timothy R.; Campbell, Helen; Patel, Pritash; Nolan, Anita; Mansfield, John; Challacombe, Stephen; Escudier, Michael; Mathew, Christopher G.; Sanderson, Jeremy D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Orofacial granulomatosis (OFG) is a rare, inflammatory disorder of the mouth, in which some patients also have intestinal Crohn's disease (CD). The etiology remains largely unknown, although there is a high prevalence of atopy, and oral granulomas are also seen in other immune disorders particularly CD and sarcoidosis. We investigated whether genetic variants associated with an increased risk of CD, sarcoidosis, or atopy were also associated with susceptibility to OFG. Methods: Patients were stratified clinically as isolated oral manifestations (OFG only) or concurrent intestinal CD (OFG+CD). We genotyped 201 patients and 1023 healthy controls for risk variants in NOD2, IRGM, IL23R, ATG16L1 (CD), BTNL2 (sarcoidosis), and FLG (atopy). The coding regions of the NOD2 gene were screened for rare, potentially pathogenic variants in OFG. Results: A combined analysis of 3 CD-risk variants in NOD2 showed no association with any OFG subgroup. NOD2 p.L1007insC was associated with OFG+CD (P = 0.023) and IL23R p.R381Q with all OFG (P = 0.031). The sarcoidosis risk variant rs2076530 in BTNL2 was associated with all OFG (P = 0.013). We identified 7 rare missense NOD2 alleles in 8 individuals with OFG, 4 OFG-only patients and 4 patients with OFG+CD. There was a significant enrichment of NOD2 variants in the OFG+CD group compared to the OFG-only group (P = 0.008, common variants; P = 0.04, all common and rare variants). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that genetic variants in NOD2 are only associated with OFG in patients with concurrent intestinal disease. A genome-wide association scan is needed to fully define the genetic architecture of OFG. PMID:27306066

  14. Heat sensitivity in a bentgrass variant. Failure to accumulate a chloroplast heat shock protein isoform implicated in heat tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongfang; Luthe, Dawn S

    2003-09-01

    Two variants of creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera cv palustris), developed using tissue culture, have been used to determine the roles of chloroplast-localized small heat shock proteins (CP-sHSPs) in heat tolerance. Results from previous research indicate that the heat-tolerant variant expressed two additional CP-sHSP isoforms not expressed in the heat-sensitive variant, that accumulation of the additional CP-sHSP isoforms was genetically linked to thermotolerance, and that the presence of the additional isoforms in the heat-tolerant variant provided greater protection to photosystem II during heat stress. To determine the basis of the differential expression, we isolated the genes encoding the CP-sHSPs from both variants and characterized their structure and expression. Two genes, ApHsp26.2 and ApHsp26.7a, were isolated from the heat-tolerant variant, and three genes, ApHsp26.2m, ApHsp26.8, and ApHsp26.7b, were isolated from the heat-sensitive variant. The sequence of ApHsp26.2m from the heat-sensitive variant was identical to ApHsp26.2, except for a point mutation that generated a premature stop codon. Therefore, the protein product of ApHsp26.2m did not accumulate in the heat-sensitive line. Mass spectrometry analysis confirmed that ApHsp26.2 encoded for the CP-sHSP isoforms unique to the heat-tolerant variant. An identical mutation was detected in one of the three parental lines used to develop the creeping bentgrass variants. This suggests that ApHsp26.2m was inherited from this parent and did not arise from a mutation that occurred during tissue culture. The presence of two isoforms encoded by the same gene might be due to differential processing of the N-terminal amino acids during or after import into the chloroplast.

  15. Characterization of Micrococcaceae Isolated from Clinical Sources

    PubMed Central

    Person, Donald A.; Yu, Pauline K. W.; Washington, John A.

    1969-01-01

    The characterization of 556 Micrococcaceae isolates from various clinical sources has been presented. The incidence of coagulase-negative mannitol-positive staphylococci was 3.2% and that of coagulase-positive mannitol-negative staphylococci was 1.6%. There appears to be insufficient justification for the routine reporting of staphylococcal variants from a general bacteriology laboratory, and biotyping should be reserved for special circumstances. PMID:5803634

  16. Identification of STRA6 and SKI sequence variants in patients with anophthalmia/microphthalmia

    PubMed Central

    White, Tristan; Lu, Tianyi; Metlapally, Ravikanth; Katowitz, James; Kherani, Femida; Wang, Tian-Yuan; Tran-Viet, Khanh-Nhat

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Anophthalmia and microphthalmia (A/M) are rare congenital ocular malformations presenting with the absence of eye components or small eyes with or without structural abnormalities. A/M can be isolated or syndromic. The stimulated by retinoic acid gene 6 (STRA6) and Sloan-Kettering viral oncogene homolog (SKI) genes are involved in vitamin A metabolism, and are implicated with A/M developmental abnormalities in human and animal studies. Vitamin A metabolism is vital to normal eye development and growth. This study explores the association of these genes in a cohort of subjects with A/M. Methods STRA6 and SKI were screened for sequence variants by direct sequencing of genomic DNA samples from 18 affected subjects with A/M. The DNA samples of 4 external, unrelated controls were initially screened. Eighty-nine additional unrelated controls were screened to confirm that any sequence variants found in the affected subject DNA samples were related to the phenotype. Coding regions, intron-exon boundaries, and untranslated regions were sequenced by standard techniques. Derived DNA sequences were compared to known reference sequences from public genomic databases. Results For STRA6, a novel coding non-synonymous sequence variant was found in one subject, resulting in an amino acid change from glycine to glutamic acid in residue 217. One novel nonsense sequence variant found in the same subject changed the STRA6 amino acid residue 592 from cytosine to thymine resulting in a premature stop codon. For SKI, a known coding non-synonymous sequence variant (rs28384811) was found in 3 subject DNA samples and 11/89 control DNA samples. Four novel coding-synonymous sequence variants were observed in SKI. Conclusions The STRA6 sequence variants reported in this study could play a role in the pathogenesis of A/M by structural changes to the STRA6 protein. We can attribute 4% A/M incidence in this cohort to these sequence variants. Although no SKI sequence variants were found in

  17. Postnatally-transmitted HIV-1 Envelope variants have similar neutralization-sensitivity and function to that of nontransmitted breast milk variants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Breastfeeding is a leading cause of infant HIV-1 infection in the developing world, yet only a minority of infants exposed to HIV-1 via breastfeeding become infected. As a genetic bottleneck severely restricts the number of postnatally-transmitted variants, genetic or phenotypic properties of the virus Envelope (Env) could be important for the establishment of infant infection. We examined the efficiency of virologic functions required for initiation of infection in the gastrointestinal tract and the neutralization sensitivity of HIV-1 Env variants isolated from milk of three postnatally-transmitting mothers (n=13 viruses), five clinically-matched nontransmitting mothers (n=16 viruses), and seven postnatally-infected infants (n = 7 postnatally-transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses). Results There was no difference in the efficiency of epithelial cell interactions between Env virus variants from the breast milk of transmitting and nontransmitting mothers. Moreover, there was similar efficiency of DC-mediated trans-infection, CCR5-usage, target cell fusion, and infectivity between HIV-1 Env-pseudoviruses from nontransmitting mothers and postnatal T/F viruses. Milk Env-pseudoviruses were generally sensitive to neutralization by autologous maternal plasma and resistant to breast milk neutralization. Infant T/F Env-pseudoviruses were equally sensitive to neutralization by broadly-neutralizing monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies as compared to nontransmitted breast milk Env variants. Conclusion Postnatally-T/F Env variants do not appear to possess a superior ability to interact with and cross a mucosal barrier or an exceptional resistance to neutralization that define their capability to initiate infection across the infant gastrointestinal tract in the setting of preexisting maternal antibodies. PMID:23305422

  18. The current state of clinical interpretation of sequence variants.

    PubMed

    Hoskinson, Derick C; Dubuc, Adrian M; Mason-Suares, Heather

    2017-01-31

    Accurate and consistent variant classification is required for Precision Medicine. But clinical variant classification remains in its infancy. While recent guidelines put forth jointly by the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) and Association of Molecular Pathology (AMP) for the classification of Mendelian variants has advanced the field, the degree of subjectivity allowed by these guidelines can still lead to inconsistent classification across clinical molecular genetic laboratories. In addition, there are currently no such guidelines for somatic cancer variants, only published institutional practices. Additional variant classification guidelines, including disease- or gene-specific criteria, along with inter-laboratory data sharing is critical for accurate and consistent variant interpretation.

  19. Neuroendocrine factors distinguish juvenile psychopathy variants.

    PubMed

    Kimonis, Eva R; Goulter, Natalie; Hawes, David J; Wilbur, Rhonda R; Groer, Maureen W

    2017-03-01

    The characteristic pattern of emotional hypo-reactivity observed in primary psychopathy is not evident in secondary psychopathy, which is thought to originate from childhood adversity and co-occurring anxiety. The main aim of this study was to test whether salivary afternoon cortisol, Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), and cortisol-to-DHEA concentrations, which at high levels indicate risk for chronic stress and poor mental health, distinguished secondary from primary variants of callous-unemotional (CU) traits-the affective component of psychopathy. This aim was achieved by first identifying psychopathy variants using latent profile analysis of CU, anxiety, and aggression scores among 232 incarcerated adolescent boys (M age = 16.75). Based on a subset with neuroendocrine data (n = 201), aggressive secondary CU variants had lower afternoon DHEA concentrations and higher cortisol-to-DHEA ratios and comorbid psychopathology compared with all other groups. In contrast, two primary CU variants (aggressive and non-aggressive types) emerged with profiles characterized by low to average psychopathology and high DHEA levels. Findings contribute to a growing literature base suggesting that biomarkers may distinguish youth on separable developmental pathways to psychopathy.

  20. Variant Spellings in Modern American Dictionaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emery, Donald W.

    A record of how present-day desk dictionaries are recognizing the existence of variant or secondary spellings for many common English words, this reference list can be used by teachers of English and authors of spelling lists. Originally published in 1958, this revised edition uses two dictionaries not in existence then and the revised editions of…

  1. Truncated variants of apolipoprotein B cause hypobetalipoproteinaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, D R; Knott, T J; Pease, R J; Powell, L M; Wallis, S C; Robertson, S; Pullinger, C R; Milne, R W; Marcel, Y L; Humphries, S E

    1988-01-01

    Familial hypobetalipoproteinaemia is a rare autosomal dominant disorder in which levels of apo-B-containing plasma lipoproteins are approximately half-normal in heterozygotes and virtually absent in homozygotes. Here we describe mutations of the apo-B gene that cause two different truncated variants of apo-B in unrelated individuals with hypobetalipoproteinaemia. One variant, apo-B(His1795----Met-Trp-Leu-Val-Thr-Term) is predicted to be 1799 amino acids long and arises from deletion of a single nucleotide (G) from leucine codon 1794. This protein was found at low levels in very low density and low density lipoprotein fractions in the blood. The second, shorter variant, apo-B(Arg1306----Term), is caused by mutation of a CpG dinucleotide in arginine codon 1306 converting it to a stop codon and predicting a protein of 1305 residues. The product of this allele could not be detected in the circulation. The differences in size and behaviour of these two variants compared to apo-B100 or apo-B48 point to domains that may be important for the assembly, secretion or stability of apo-B-containing lipoproteins. Images PMID:2843815

  2. Guillain-Barré Syndrome and Variants

    PubMed Central

    Barohn, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is characterized by rapidly evolving ascending weakness, mild sensory loss and hypo- or areflexia, progressing to a nadir over up to four weeks. Cerebrospinal fluid evaluation demonstrates albuminocytologic dissociation in 90% of cases. Acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP) was the first to be recognized over a century ago and is the most common form of GBS. In AIDP, the immune attack is directed at peripheral nerve myelin with secondary by-stander axon loss. Axonal motor and sensorimotor variants have been described in the last 3 decades and are mediated by molecular mimicry targeting peripheral nerve motor axons. Besides the Miller-Fisher syndrome (MFS) and descending weakness, other rare phenotypic variants have been recently described with pure sensory variant, restricted autonomic manifestations and the pharyngeal-cervical-brachial pattern. It is important to recognize GBS and its variants due to the availability of equally effective therapies in the form of plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulins. PMID:23642721

  3. Truncated variants of apolipoprotein B cause hypobetalipoproteinaemia

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, D.R.; Knott, T.J.; Pease, R.J.; Powell, L.M.; Wallis, S.C.; Robertson, S.; Pullinger, C.R.; Lloyd, K.; Miller, N.E.; Muller, D.; Scott, J. ); Humphries, S.E.; Talmud, P.J. ); Milne, R.W.; Marcel, Y.L. )

    1988-09-12

    Familial hypobetalipoproteinaemia is a rare autosomal dominant disorder in which levels of apo-B-containing plasma lipoproteins are approximately half-normal in heterozygotes and virtually absent in homozygotes. Here the authors describe mutations of the apo-B gene that cause two different truncated variants of apo-B in unrelated individuals with hypobetalipoproteinaemia. One variant is predicted to be 1,799 amino acids long and arises from deletion of a single nucleotide (G) from leucine codon 1,794. This protein was found at low levels in very low density and low density lipoprotein fractions in the blood. The second, shorter variant is caused by mutation of a CpG dinucleotide in arginine codon 1,306 converting it to a stop codon and predicting a protein of 1,305 residues. The differences in size and behavior of these two variants compared to apo-B100 or apo-B48 point to domains that may be important for the assembly, secretion or stability of apo-B-containing lipoproteins.

  4. Regional Phonological Variants in Louisiana Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubrecht, August Weston

    Based on tape recorded conversations of 28 informants in 18 Louisiana communities, this study investigated regional phonological variants in Louisiana speech. On the basis of settlement history and previous dialect studies, four regions are defined: northern Louisiana, the Florida Parishes, French Louisiana, and New Orleans. The informants are all…

  5. New genetic variants associated with prostate cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have newly identified 23 common genetic variants -- one-letter changes in DNA known as single-nucleotide polymorphisms or SNPs -- that are associated with risk of prostate cancer. These results come from an analysis of more than 10 million SNP

  6. Cellobiohydrolase I gene and improved variants

    DOEpatents

    Adney, William S.; Decker, Stephen R.; Mc Carter, Suzanne; Baker, John O.; Nieves, Raphael; Himmel, Michael E.; Vinzant, Todd B.

    2008-05-20

    The disclosure provides a method for preparing an active exoglucanase in a heterologous host of eukaryotic origin. The method includes mutagenesis to reduce glycosylation of the exoglucanase when expressed in a heterologous host. It is further disclosed a method to produce variant cellobiohydrolase that is stable at high temperature through mutagenesis.

  7. Progress in methods for rare variant association.

    PubMed

    Santorico, Stephanie A; Hendricks, Audrey E

    2016-02-03

    Empirical studies and evolutionary theory support a role for rare variants in the etiology of complex traits. Given this motivation and increasing affordability of whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing, methods for rare variant association have been an active area of research for the past decade. Here, we provide a survey of the current literature and developments from the Genetics Analysis Workshop 19 (GAW19) Collapsing Rare Variants working group. In particular, we present the generalized linear regression framework and associated score statistic for the 2 major types of methods: burden and variance components methods. We further show that by simply modifying weights within these frameworks we arrive at many of the popular existing methods, for example, the cohort allelic sums test and sequence kernel association test. Meta-analysis techniques are also described. Next, we describe the 6 contributions from the GAW19 Collapsing Rare Variants working group. These included development of new methods, such as a retrospective likelihood for family data, a method using genomic structure to compare cases and controls, a haplotype-based meta-analysis, and a permutation-based method for combining different statistical tests. In addition, one contribution compared a mega-analysis of family-based and population-based data to meta-analysis. Finally, the power of existing family-based methods for binary traits was compared. We conclude with suggestions for open research questions.

  8. Gene variants as risk factors for gastroschisis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei; Schultz, Kathleen; Tom, Lauren; Lin, Bin; Carmichael, Suzan L.; Lammer, Edward J.; Shaw, Gary M.

    2016-01-01

    In a population‐based case‐control study in California of 228 infants, we investigated 75 genetic variants in 20 genes and risk of gastroschisis with regard to maternal age, race/ethnicity, vitamin use, and smoking exposure. We hypothesized that genes related to vascular compromise may interact with environmental factors to affect the risk of gastroschisis. Haplotypes were constructed for 75 gene variants using the HaploView program. Risk for gastroschisis associated with each gene variant was calculated for both the homozygotes and the heterozygotes, with the homozygous wildtypes as the referent. Risks were estimated as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) by logistic regression. We found 11 gene variants with increased risk and four variants with decreased risk of gastroschisis for heterozygous (ORh) or homozygous variants (ORv) genotypes. These included NOS3 (rs1036145) ORh = 0.4 (95% CI: 0.2–0.7); NOS3 (rs10277237) ORv = 2.7 (95% CI: 1.3–6.0); ADD1 (rs12503220) ORh = 2.9 (95% CI: 1.6–5.4), GNB3 (rs5443) ORh = 0.2 (95% CI: 0.1–0.5), ORv = 0.4 (95% CI: 0.2–0.9); ICAM1 (rs281428) ORv = 6.9 (95% CI: 2.1–22.9), ICAM1 (rs3093030) ORv = 2.6 (95% CI: 1.2–5.6); ICAM4 (rs281438) ORv = 4.9 (95% CI: 1.4–16.6), ICAM5 (rs281417) ORh = 2.1 (95% CI: 1.1–4.1), ORv = 4.8 (95% CI: 1.7–13.6); ICAM5 (rs281440) ORh = 23.7 (95% CI: 5.5–102.5), ORv = 20.6 (95% CI: 3.4–124.3); ICAM5 (rs2075741) ORv = 2.2 (95% CI: 1.1–4.4); NAT1 ORv = 0.3 (95% CI: 0.1–0.9). There were additional associations between several gene variants and gastroschisis among women aged 20–24 and among mothers with and without vitamin use. NOS3, ADD1, ICAM1, ICAM4, and ICAM5 warrant further investigation in additional populations and with the interaction of additional environmental exposures. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27616475

  9. Mouse p63 variants and chondrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Junxia; Lu, Yaojuan; Qiao, Longwei; Ran, Deyuan; Li, Na; Cao, Hong; Gao, Yan; Zheng, Qiping

    2013-01-01

    As a critical member of the p53 family of transcription factors, p63 has been implicated a role in development than in tumor formation, because p63 is seldom mutated in human cancers, while p63 null mice exhibit severe developmental abnormalities without increasing cancer susceptibility. Notably, besides the major epithelial and cardiac defect, p63 deficient mice show severe limb and craniofacial abnormalities. In addition, humans with p63 mutations also show severe limb and digit defects, suggesting a putative role of p63 in skeletal development. There are eight p63 variants which encode for the TAp63 and ΔNp63 isoforms by alternative promoters. How these isoforms function during skeletal development is currently largely unknown. Our recent transgenic studies suggest a role of TAP63α, but not ΔNP63α, during embryonic long bone development. However, the moderate skeletal phenotypes in the TAP63α transgenic mice suggest requirement of additional p63 isoform(s) for the limb defects in p63 null mice. Here, we report analysis of mouse p63 variants in MCT and ATDC5 cells, two cell models undergo hypertrophic differentiation and mimic the process of endochondral bone formation upon growth arrest or induction. We detected increased level of p63 variants in hypertrophic MCT cells by regular RT-PCR analysis. Further analysis by qRT-PCR, we detected significantly upregulated level of γ variant (p<0.05), but not α or β variant (p>0.05), in hypertrophic MCT cells than in proliferative MCT cells. Moreover, we detected upregulated TAP63γ in ATDC5 cells undergoing hypertrophic differentiation. Our results suggest that TAp63γ plays a positive role during endochondral bone formation. PMID:24294373

  10. Dynamic Bayesian Testing of Sets of Variants in Complex Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Ghosh, Soumitra; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2014-01-01

    Rare genetic variants have recently been studied for genome-wide associations with human complex diseases. Existing rare variant methods are based on the hypothesis-testing framework that predefined variant sets need to be tested separately. The power of those methods is contingent upon accurate selection of variants for testing, and frequently, common variants are left out for separate testing. In this article, we present a novel Bayesian method for simultaneous testing of all genome-wide variants across the whole frequency range. The method allows for much more flexible grouping of variants and dynamically combines them for joint testing. The method accounts for correlation among variant sets, such that only direct associations with the disease are reported, whereas indirect associations due to linkage disequilibrium are not. Consequently, the method can obtain much improved power and flexibility and simultaneously pinpoint multiple disease variants with high resolution. Additional covariates of categorical, discrete, and continuous values can also be added. We compared our method with seven existing categories of approaches for rare variant mapping. We demonstrate that our method achieves similar power to the best methods available to date when testing very rare variants in small SNP sets. When moderately rare or common variants are included, or when testing a large collection of variants, however, our method significantly outperforms all existing methods evaluated in this study. We further demonstrate the power and the usage of our method in a whole-genome resequencing study of type 1 diabetes. PMID:25217050

  11. Evidence for differences in the binding of drugs to the two main genetic variants of human alpha 1-acid glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Herve, F; Gomas, E; Duche, J C; Tillement, J P

    1993-01-01

    1. Human alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AAG), a plasma transport protein, has three main genetic variants. F1. S and A. Native commercial AAG (a mixture of almost equal proportions of these three variants) has been separated by chromatography into variants which correspond to the proteins of the two genes which code for AAG in humans: the A variant and a mixture of the F1 and S variants (60% F1 and 40% S). Their binding properties towards imipramine, warfarin and mifepristone were studied by equilibrium dialysis. 2. The F1S variant mixture strongly bound warfarin and mifepristone with an affinity of 1.89 and 2.06 x 10(6) l mol-1, respectively, but had a low affinity for imipramine. Conversely, the A variant strongly bound imipramine with an affinity of 0.98 x 10(6) l mol-1. The low degree of binding of warfarin and mifepristone to the A variant sample was explained by the presence of protein contaminants in this sample. These results indicate specific drug transport roles for each variant, with respect to its separate genetic origin. 3. Control binding experiments performed with (unfractionated) commercial AAG and with AAG isolated from individuals with either the F1/A or S/A phenotypes, agreed with these findings. The results for the binding of warfarin and mifepristone by the AAG samples were similar to those obtained with the F1S mixture: the mean high-affinity association constant of the AAG samples for each drug was of the same order as that of the F1S mixture: the decrease in the number of binding sites of the AAG samples, as compared with the F1S mixture, was explained by the smaller proportion of variants F1 and/or S in these samples. Conversely, results of the imipramine binding study with the AAG samples concurred with those for the binding of this basic drug by the A variant, with respect to the proportion of the A variant in these samples. Images Figure 1 PMID:9114911

  12. Evidence for differences in the binding of drugs to the two main genetic variants of human alpha 1-acid glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Herve, F; Gomas, E; Duche, J C; Tillement, J P

    1993-09-01

    1. Human alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AAG), a plasma transport protein, has three main genetic variants. F1. S and A. Native commercial AAG (a mixture of almost equal proportions of these three variants) has been separated by chromatography into variants which correspond to the proteins of the two genes which code for AAG in humans: the A variant and a mixture of the F1 and S variants (60% F1 and 40% S). Their binding properties towards imipramine, warfarin and mifepristone were studied by equilibrium dialysis. 2. The F1S variant mixture strongly bound warfarin and mifepristone with an affinity of 1.89 and 2.06 x 10(6) l mol-1, respectively, but had a low affinity for imipramine. Conversely, the A variant strongly bound imipramine with an affinity of 0.98 x 10(6) l mol-1. The low degree of binding of warfarin and mifepristone to the A variant sample was explained by the presence of protein contaminants in this sample. These results indicate specific drug transport roles for each variant, with respect to its separate genetic origin. 3. Control binding experiments performed with (unfractionated) commercial AAG and with AAG isolated from individuals with either the F1/A or S/A phenotypes, agreed with these findings. The results for the binding of warfarin and mifepristone by the AAG samples were similar to those obtained with the F1S mixture: the mean high-affinity association constant of the AAG samples for each drug was of the same order as that of the F1S mixture: the decrease in the number of binding sites of the AAG samples, as compared with the F1S mixture, was explained by the smaller proportion of variants F1 and/or S in these samples. Conversely, results of the imipramine binding study with the AAG samples concurred with those for the binding of this basic drug by the A variant, with respect to the proportion of the A variant in these samples.

  13. STEPWISE INTRATYPE TRANSFORMATION OF PNEUMOCOCCUS FROM R TO S BY WAY OF A VARIANT INTERMEDIATE IN CAPSULAR POLYSACCHARIDE PRODUCTION

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, Colin M.; Krauss, Marjorie R.

    1947-01-01

    1. A variant intermediate between the classical R and S forms has been isolated by selective procedures from a rough strain of pneumococcus originally derived from Type II S. 2. The intermediate variant D39/Int53 is avirulent for mice, forms rough colonies, and does not possess a demonstrable capsule. However, it synthesizes SSSII which is immunologically indistinguishable from that produced by fully encapsulated pneumococcus Type II, though in much smaller amount. The polysaccharide is present as a surface component and as it exists in the cell is highly antigenic for rabbits. 3. An extract of the intermediate variant causes the transformation in vitro of an R strain into a variant resembling the intermediate in SSSII production but without any apparent alteration in the colonial characteristics of the R variant. 4. The intermediate variant is convertible in vivo, into a fully encapsulated strain of pneumococcus Type II. Transformation of the intermediate to a heterologous type of pneumococcus (Type III) was unsuccessful. 5. A method is described for the preparation of transforming extracts of pneumococci utilizing the massive growth of the organisms obtained in the presence of a large concentration of glucose. PMID:19871689

  14. Naturally Occurring Surface Antigen Variants of Hepatitis B Virus in Tunisian Patients.

    PubMed

    Chaouch, Houda; Taffon, Stefania; Villano, Umbertina; Equestre, Michele; Bruni, Roberto; Belhadj, Manel; Hannachi, Naila; Aouni, Mahjoub; Letaief, Amel; Ciccaglione, Anna Rita

    2016-01-01

    In Tunisia, the prevalence of naturally occurring surface (S) gene variants of hepatitis B virus (HBV) has not been determined. In the present study, the prevalence of these variants was examined in terms of the clinical and viral state in a series of 99 Tunisian patients with HBV infection. The S genes were amplified and directly sequenced. Genotype D was predominant (98%), 40.4% isolates belonged to subgenotypes D7 and 1 to subgenotype D2. The most common subtype was ayw2 (95.9%). In total, 60.6% of the studied strains harbored S mutations. Several novel mutation patterns were detected. Interestingly, the presence of S mutations was significantly correlated with the D7 subgenotype, low HBV DNA and advancing age (≥35 years), and tended to be higher in liver cirrhosis than in chronic infection. The global prevalence of the major hydrophilic region variants was 12.1%, with substitution S143L/T as the most frequent (4%). Only 33.9% of S substitutions produced amino acid changes in the polymerase gene. In conclusion, a high prevalence of naturally occurring HBsAg variants was observed among Tunisian HBV carriers. Natural viral variability in a geographical region and duration of infection are among the major factors associated with the occurrence of S mutations.

  15. Association of human papillomavirus type 16 and its genetic variants with cervical lesion in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Su; Shin, Sue; Kim, Eui-Chong; Kim, Ji Eun; Kim, Yong Beom; Oh, Sohee; Roh, Eun Youn; Yoon, Jong Hyun

    2016-11-01

    Persistent human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) is the major risk factor for cervical cancer. HPV16 intratypic variants differ in their geographical distribution and oncogenic potential. This study aimed to analyze the distribution of HPV16 variants and their association with cervical lesion histopathology in Korean women. In total, 133 HPV16-positive cervical samples from women admitted to Seoul National University Boramae Hospital were analyzed by sequencing E6, E7, and L1 genes and the long control region (LCR), and the variant distribution according to cervical lesion grade was determined. Isolates were grouped into a phylogenetic lineage, and A1-3, A4, C, and D sublineages were detected in 54.1, 37.8, 0.7, and 7.4% of samples, respectively. The most commonly observed LCR variations were 7521G>A (91.5%), 7730A>C (59.6%), and 7842G>A (59.6%). Furthermore, A4 or D sublineage-positive women had a higher risk for cervical cancer than women who were positive for A1-3. Among HPV phylogenetic clusters, A1-3 was the predominant sublineage, and within A1-3, the 350G polymorphism was highly frequent. These results differed from those of previous studies in Korea and other Asian countries. The findings suggest that cervical neoplasia incidence in HPV16-infected patients could be affected by the distribution of HPV16 variants in the population.

  16. Human papillomavirus type 6 and 11 genetic variants found in 71 oral and anogenital epithelial samples from Australia.

    PubMed

    Danielewski, Jennifer A; Garland, Suzanne M; McCloskey, Jenny; Hillman, Richard J; Tabrizi, Sepehr N

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variation of 49 human papillomavirus (HPV) 6 and 22 HPV11 isolates from recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) (n = 17), genital warts (n = 43), anal cancer (n = 6) and cervical neoplasia cells (n = 5), was determined by sequencing the long control region (LCR) and the E6 and E7 genes. Comparative analysis of genetic variability was examined to determine whether different disease states resulting from HPV6 or HPV11 infection cluster into distinct variant groups. Sequence variation analysis of HPV6 revealed that isolates cluster into variants within previously described HPV6 lineages, with the majority (65%) clustering to HPV6 sublineage B1 across the three genomic regions examined. Overall 72 HPV6 and 25 HPV11 single nucleotide variations, insertions and deletions were observed within samples examined. In addition, missense alterations were observed in the E6/E7 genes for 6 HPV6 and 5 HPV11 variants. No nucleotide variations were identified in any isolates at the four E2 binding sites for HPV6 or HPV11, nor were any isolates found to be identical to the HPV6 lineage A or HPV11 sublineage A1 reference genomes. Overall, a high degree of sequence conservation was observed between isolates across each of the regions investigated for both HPV6 and HPV11. Genetic variants identified a slight association with HPV6 and anogenital lesions (p = 0.04). This study provides important information on the genetic diversity of circulating HPV 6 and HPV11 variants within the Australian population and supports the observation that the majority of HPV6 isolates cluster to the HPV6 sublineage B1 with anogenital lesions demonstrating an association with this sublineage (p = 0.02). Comparative analysis of Australian isolates for both HPV6 and HPV11 to those from other geographical regions based on the LCR revealed a high degree of sequence similarity throughout the world, confirming previous observations that there are no geographically specific variants for these HPV types.

  17. Chlamydial Variants Differ in Ability To Ascend the Genital Tract in the Guinea Pig Model of Chlamydial Genital Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yeruva, Laxmi; Bowlin, Anne K.; Spencer, Nicole; Maurelli, Anthony T.

    2015-01-01

    An important question in the study of chlamydial genital tract disease is why some women develop severe upper tract disease while others have mild or even “silent” infections with or without pathology. Animal studies suggest that the pathological outcome of an infection is dependent upon both the composition of the infecting chlamydial population and the genotype of the host, along with host physiological effects, such as the cyclical production of reproductive hormones and even the size of the infecting inoculum or the number of repeated infections. In this study, we compared two variants of Chlamydia caviae, contrasting in virulence, with respect to their abilities to ascend the guinea pig genital tract. We then determined the effect of combining the two variants on the course of infection and on the bacterial loads of the two variants in the genital tract. Although the variants individually had similar infection kinetics in the cervix, SP6, the virulent variant, could be isolated from the oviducts more often and in greater numbers than the attenuated variant, AZ2. SP6 also elicited higher levels of interleukin 8 (IL-8) in the lower genital tract and increased leukocyte infiltration in the cervix and uterus compared to AZ2. When the two variants were combined in a mixed infection, SP6 outcompeted AZ2 in the lower genital tract; however, AZ2 was able to ascend the genital tract as readily as SP6. These data suggest that the ability of SP6 to elicit an inflammatory response in the lower genital tract facilitates the spread of both variants to the oviducts. PMID:26015484

  18. Human papillomavirus 16 non-European variants are preferentially associated with high-grade cervical lesions.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Luciana Bueno; Chen, Zigui; Muqui, Elaine Freire; Boldrini, Neide Aparecida Tosato; Miranda, Angélica Espinosa; Spano, Liliana Cruz; Burk, Robert D

    2014-01-01

    HPV16 accounts for 50-70% of cervical cancer cases worldwide. Characterization of HPV16 variants previously indicated that they differ in risks for viral persistence, progression to cervical precancer and malignant cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the association of severity of disease with HPV16 variants identified in specimens (n = 281) obtained from a Cervical Pathology and Colposcopy outpatient clinic in the University Hospital of Espírito Santo State, Southeastern Brazil, from April 2010 to November 2011. All cytologic and histologic diagnoses were determined prior to definitive treatment. The DNA was isolated using QIAamp DNA Mini Kit and HPV was detected by amplification with PGMY09/11 primers and positive samples were genotyped by RFLP analyses and reverse line blot. The genomes of the HPV16 positive samples were sequenced, from which variant lineages were determined. Chi2 statistics was performed to test the association of HPV16 variants between case and control groups. The prevalence of HR-HPV types in variants. Classification of disease into CIN3+ vs. variants with an increased risk of CIN3+ is consistent with an HPV16 genetically determined enhanced oncogenicity. The prevalence of genetic variants of HPV16 is distributed across different geographical areas and with recent population admixture, only empiric data will provide information on the highest risk HPV16 variants within a given population.

  19. Distribution of Bartonella henselae variants in patients, reservoir hosts and vectors in Spain.

    PubMed

    Gil, Horacio; Escudero, Raquel; Pons, Inmaculada; Rodríguez-Vargas, Manuela; García-Esteban, Coral; Rodríguez-Moreno, Isabel; García-Amil, Cristina; Lobo, Bruno; Valcárcel, Félix; Pérez, Azucena; Jiménez, Santos; Jado, Isabel; Juste, Ramón; Segura, Ferrán; Anda, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the diversity of B. henselae circulating in patients, reservoir hosts and vectors in Spain. In total, we have fully characterized 53 clinical samples from 46 patients, as well as 78 B. henselae isolates obtained from 35 cats from La Rioja and Catalonia (northeastern Spain), four positive cat blood samples from which no isolates were obtained, and three positive fleas by Multiple Locus Sequence Typing and Multiple Locus Variable Number Tandem Repeats Analysis. This study represents the largest series of human cases characterized with these methods, with 10 different sequence types and 41 MLVA profiles. Two of the sequence types and 35 of the profiles were not described previously. Most of the B. henselae variants belonged to ST5. Also, we have identified a common profile (72) which is well distributed in Spain and was found to persist over time. Indeed, this profile seems to be the origin from which most of the variants identified in this study have been generated. In addition, ST5, ST6 and ST9 were found associated with felines, whereas ST1, ST5 and ST8 were the most frequent sequence types found infecting humans. Interestingly, some of the feline associated variants never found on patients were located in a separate clade, which could represent a group of strains less pathogenic for humans.

  20. Distribution of Bartonella henselae Variants in Patients, Reservoir Hosts and Vectors in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Horacio; Escudero, Raquel; Pons, Inmaculada; Rodríguez-Vargas, Manuela; García-Esteban, Coral; Rodríguez-Moreno, Isabel; García-Amil, Cristina; Lobo, Bruno; Valcárcel, Félix; Pérez, Azucena; Jiménez, Santos; Jado, Isabel; Juste, Ramón; Segura, Ferrán; Anda, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the diversity of B. henselae circulating in patients, reservoir hosts and vectors in Spain. In total, we have fully characterized 53 clinical samples from 46 patients, as well as 78 B. henselae isolates obtained from 35 cats from La Rioja and Catalonia (northeastern Spain), four positive cat blood samples from which no isolates were obtained, and three positive fleas by Multiple Locus Sequence Typing and Multiple Locus Variable Number Tandem Repeats Analysis. This study represents the largest series of human cases characterized with these methods, with 10 different sequence types and 41 MLVA profiles. Two of the sequence types and 35 of the profiles were not described previously. Most of the B. henselae variants belonged to ST5. Also, we have identified a common profile (72) which is well distributed in Spain and was found to persist over time. Indeed, this profile seems to be the origin from which most of the variants identified in this study have been generated. In addition, ST5, ST6 and ST9 were found associated with felines, whereas ST1, ST5 and ST8 were the most frequent sequence types found infecting humans. Interestingly, some of the feline associated variants never found on patients were located in a separate clade, which could represent a group of strains less pathogenic for humans. PMID:23874563

  1. Strategies to choose from millions of imputed sequence variants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Millions of sequence variants are known, but subsets are needed for routine genomic predictions or to include on genotyping arrays. Variant selection and imputation strategies were tested using 26 984 simulated reference bulls, of which 1 000 had 30 million sequence variants, 773 had 600 000 markers...

  2. Discussing and managing hematologic germ line variants.

    PubMed

    Kohlmann, Wendy; Schiffman, Joshua D

    2016-12-02

    With the introduction of genomic technologies, more hereditary cancer syndromes with hematologic malignancies are being described. Up to 10% of hematologic malignancies in children and adults may be the result of an underlying inherited genetic risk. Managing these patients with hereditary hematologic malignancies, including familial leukemia, remains a clinical challenge because there is little information about these relatively rare disorders. This article covers some of the issues related to the diagnosis and interpretation of variants associated with hereditary hematologic malignancies, including the importance of an accurate family history in interpreting genetic variants associated with disease. The challenges of screening other family members and offering the most appropriate early malignancy detection is also discussed. We now have a good opportunity to better define hereditary cancer syndromes with associated hematologic malignancies and contribute to clinically effective guidelines.

  3. Discussing and managing hematologic germ line variants.

    PubMed

    Kohlmann, Wendy; Schiffman, Joshua D

    2016-11-24

    With the introduction of genomic technologies, more hereditary cancer syndromes with hematologic malignancies are being described. Up to 10% of hematologic malignancies in children and adults may be the result of an underlying inherited genetic risk. Managing these patients with hereditary hematologic malignancies, including familial leukemia, remains a clinical challenge because there is little information about these relatively rare disorders. This article covers some of the issues related to the diagnosis and interpretation of variants associated with hereditary hematologic malignancies, including the importance of an accurate family history in interpreting genetic variants associated with disease. The challenges of screening other family members and offering the most appropriate early malignancy detection is also discussed. We now have a good opportunity to better define hereditary cancer syndromes with associated hematologic malignancies and contribute to clinically effective guidelines.

  4. The Saccharomyces Genome Database Variant Viewer

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, Travis K.; Hitz, Benjamin C.; Engel, Stacia R.; Song, Giltae; Balakrishnan, Rama; Binkley, Gail; Costanzo, Maria C.; Dalusag, Kyla S.; Demeter, Janos; Hellerstedt, Sage T.; Karra, Kalpana; Nash, Robert S.; Paskov, Kelley M.; Skrzypek, Marek S.; Weng, Shuai; Wong, Edith D.; Cherry, J. Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD; http://www.yeastgenome.org) is the authoritative community resource for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae reference genome sequence and its annotation. In recent years, we have moved toward increased representation of sequence variation and allelic differences within S. cerevisiae. The publication of numerous additional genomes has motivated the creation of new tools for their annotation and analysis. Here we present the Variant Viewer: a dynamic open-source web application for the visualization of genomic and proteomic differences. Multiple sequence alignments have been constructed across high quality genome sequences from 11 different S. cerevisiae strains and stored in the SGD. The alignments and summaries are encoded in JSON and used to create a two-tiered dynamic view of the budding yeast pan-genome, available at http://www.yeastgenome.org/variant-viewer. PMID:26578556

  5. Wham: Identifying Structural Variants of Biological Consequence.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Zev N; Osborne, Edward J; Cone, Kelsey R; Kennedy, Brett J; Domyan, Eric T; Shapiro, Michael D; Elde, Nels C; Yandell, Mark

    2015-12-01

    Existing methods for identifying structural variants (SVs) from short read datasets are inaccurate. This complicates disease-gene identification and efforts to understand the consequences of genetic variation. In response, we have created Wham (Whole-genome Alignment Metrics) to provide a single, integrated framework for both structural variant calling and association testing, thereby bypassing many of the difficulties that currently frustrate attempts to employ SVs in association testing. Here we describe Wham, benchmark it against three other widely used SV identification tools-Lumpy, Delly and SoftSearch-and demonstrate Wham's ability to identify and associate SVs with phenotypes using data from humans, domestic pigeons, and vaccinia virus. Wham and all associated software are covered under the MIT License and can be freely downloaded from github (https://github.com/zeeev/wham), with documentation on a wiki (http://zeeev.github.io/wham/). For community support please post questions to https://www.biostars.org/.

  6. Wham: Identifying Structural Variants of Biological Consequence

    PubMed Central

    Kronenberg, Zev N.; Osborne, Edward J.; Cone, Kelsey R.; Kennedy, Brett J.; Domyan, Eric T.; Shapiro, Michael D.; Elde, Nels C.; Yandell, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Existing methods for identifying structural variants (SVs) from short read datasets are inaccurate. This complicates disease-gene identification and efforts to understand the consequences of genetic variation. In response, we have created Wham (Whole-genome Alignment Metrics) to provide a single, integrated framework for both structural variant calling and association testing, thereby bypassing many of the difficulties that currently frustrate attempts to employ SVs in association testing. Here we describe Wham, benchmark it against three other widely used SV identification tools–Lumpy, Delly and SoftSearch–and demonstrate Wham’s ability to identify and associate SVs with phenotypes using data from humans, domestic pigeons, and vaccinia virus. Wham and all associated software are covered under the MIT License and can be freely downloaded from github (https://github.com/zeeev/wham), with documentation on a wiki (http://zeeev.github.io/wham/). For community support please post questions to https://www.biostars.org/. PMID:26625158

  7. MRI anatomical variants of mammillary bodies.

    PubMed

    Tagliamonte, Micaela; Sestieri, Carlo; Romani, Gian Luca; Gallucci, Massimo; Caulo, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The mammillary bodies (MBs) are classically defined as a pair of small round structures located on the undersurface of the diencephalon. The systematic observation of MR brain images of patients with neurological diseases, but also of healthy subjects enrolled in research protocols, reveals, however, a greater anatomical variability. The aim of the present study was to define the spectrum of such variability using spatial normalized 3D TFE T1-weighted MR images in a group of 151 healthy right-handed young subjects (78 females, age range 16-39 years). The MBs were identified on reformatted coronal and axial images and classified according to morphological, positional and numerical criteria. On the basis of coronal images, MBs were first divided into symmetrical (86.1 %) and asymmetrical (13.9 %), depending on their respective height. Symmetrical MBs were further subdivided into three variants [type A (2.7 %), B (76.2 %), C (7.3 %)] according to the depth of the intermammillary sulcus. Two morphological variants were defined on axial images, depending on whether the MBs were circular (63.6 %) or elliptic (36.4 %). This latter group was further divided in two subgroups, depending on whether the MBs were parallel (21.9 %) or convergent (14.6 %). Finally, two subjects (1.3 %) presented a supernumeral MB. The transverse size of the third ventricle was greater in the type A compared to the type B and C groups. Gender did not significantly affect the frequency of MBs variants, except for the three symmetrical subgroups in which the variants A and C were more frequent in males than in females. These findings suggest the presence of an anatomical variability of the MBs, in contrast to their classical definition. Therefore, atypical presentation of MBs can be the expression of this variability rather than a marker of neurological disorders (i.e. cerebral malformation, mesial temporal sclerosis, Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome).

  8. Sex steroids and variants of gender identity.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F L

    2013-09-01

    This article summarizes for the practicing endocrinologist the current literature on the psychobiology of the development of gender identity and its variants in individuals with disorders of sex development (DSD) or with non-DSD transgenderism. Gender reassignment remains the treatment of choice for strong and persistent gender dysphoria in both categories, but more research is needed on the short-term and long-term effects of puberty-suppressing medications and cross-sex hormones on brain and behavior.

  9. Variant congenital dyserythropoietic anaemia with ringed sideroblasts.

    PubMed

    Brien, W F; Mant, M J; Etches, W S

    1985-01-01

    A family is described with mild anaemia characterized by marked dyserythropoiesis and by prominent ringed sideroblasts. Inheritance is autosomal recessive. Other features include marked microcytosis, poikilocytosis, mild haemolysis, slightly increased haemoglobin A2, bone marrow erythroid hyperplasia and non-specific structural abnormalities of erythroid precursors on electron microscopy. This appears to be a previously unreported type of hereditary anaemia with both dyserythropoiesis and ringed sideroblasts. We propose the designation 'variant congenital dyserythropoietic anaemia with ringed sideroblasts'.

  10. Keratoameloblastoma, a very rare variant of ameloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Ketabi, Mohammad Ali; Dehghani, Nima; Sadeghi, Hasan Mirmohammad; Shams, Mohammad Ghasem; Mohajerani, Hasan; Azarsina, Mohadese; Azizi, Arshia

    2013-11-01

    The keratoameloblastoma is a rare histologic variant of ameloblastoma. Fewer than 15 cases of keratoameloblastoma have been documented in the literature. We report a new case of keratoameloblastoma in a 21-year-old female patient with a unilocular radiolucent lesion between the roots of the right mandibular incisors. We describe the clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic features of this lesion along with a review on the characteristics of previous cases. We also discuss about classification and management of this lesion.

  11. Molecular Characterization of Attenuated Junin Virus Variants.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-14

    No. DAMD17-89-Z-9024 Area de Quimica Biologica y Biologia Molecular Facultad de Ciencias Exactas Universidad Nacional de La Plata Calles 47 y 115, 1900...MONITORING ORGANIZATION Area de Quimica Biologica (If applicable) y Biologia Molecular I 6c. ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIPCode) 7b. ADDRESS (City, State...AD-A260 128 AD____ MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF ATTENUATED JUNIN VIRUS VARIANTS FINAL REPORT VICTOR ROMANOWSKI PABLO D. GHIRINGHELLI CESAR G

  12. dbVar structural variant cluster set for data analysis and variant comparison

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Lon; Hsu, Jeffrey; Tri, Le Quang Minh; Willi, Michaela; Mansour, Tamer; Kai, Yan; Garner, John; Lopez, John; Busby, Ben

    2017-01-01

    dbVar houses over 3 million submitted structural variants (SSV) from 120 human studies including copy number variations (CNV), insertions, deletions, inversions, translocations, and complex chromosomal rearrangements. Users can submit multiple SSVs to dbVAR  that are presumably identical, but were ascertained by different platforms and samples,  to calculate whether the variant is rare or common in the population and allow for cross validation. However, because SSV genomic location reporting can vary – including fuzzy locations where the start and/or end points are not precisely known – analysis, comparison, annotation, and reporting of SSVs across studies can be difficult. This project was initiated by the Structural Variant Comparison Group for the purpose of generating a non-redundant set of genomic regions defined by counts of concordance for all human SSVs placed on RefSeq assembly GRCh38 (RefSeq accession GCF_000001405.26). We intend that the availability of these regions, called structural variant clusters (SVCs), will facilitate the analysis, annotation, and exchange of SV data and allow for simplified display in genomic sequence viewers for improved variant interpretation. Sets of SVCs were generated by variant type for each of the 120 studies as well as for a combined set across all studies. Starting from 3.64 million SSVs, 2.5 million and 3.4 million non-redundant SVCs with count >=1 were generated by variant type for each study and across all studies, respectively. In addition, we have developed utilities for annotating, searching, and filtering SVC data in GVF format for computing summary statistics, exporting data for genomic viewers, and annotating the SVC using external data sources. PMID:28357035

  13. Fine-Mapping of Common Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Tumor Risk Identified Potential Functional Variants

    PubMed Central

    Gala, Manish; Abecasis, Goncalo; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Caan, Bette J.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Casey, Graham; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Conti, David V.; Curtis, Keith R.; Duggan, David; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W.; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hayes, Richard B.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Küry, Sébastien; Le Marchand, Loic; Leal, Suzanne M.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Potter, John D.; Schoen, Robert E.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L.; Hsu, Li; Chan, Andrew T.; White, Emily; Berndt, Sonja I.; Peters, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified many common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with colorectal cancer risk. These SNPs may tag correlated variants with biological importance. Fine-mapping around GWAS loci can facilitate detection of functional candidates and additional independent risk variants. We analyzed 11,900 cases and 14,311 controls in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium and the Colon Cancer Family Registry. To fine-map genomic regions containing all known common risk variants, we imputed high-density genetic data from the 1000 Genomes Project. We tested single-variant associations with colorectal tumor risk for all variants spanning genomic regions 250-kb upstream or downstream of 31 GWAS-identified SNPs (index SNPs). We queried the University of California, Santa Cruz Genome Browser to examine evidence for biological function. Index SNPs did not show the strongest association signals with colorectal tumor risk in their respective genomic regions. Bioinformatics analysis of SNPs showing smaller P-values in each region revealed 21 functional candidates in 12 loci (5q31.1, 8q24, 11q13.4, 11q23, 12p13.32, 12q24.21, 14q22.2, 15q13, 18q21, 19q13.1, 20p12.3, and 20q13.33). We did not observe evidence of additional independent association signals in GWAS-identified regions. Our results support the utility of integrating data from comprehensive fine-mapping with expanding publicly available genomic databases to help clarify GWAS associations and identify functional candidates that warrant more onerous laboratory follow-up. Such efforts may aid the eventual discovery of disease-causing variant(s). PMID:27379672

  14. Characterization of the Two Intra-Individual Sequence Variants in the 18S rRNA Gene in the Plant Parasitic Nematode, Rotylenchulus reniformis

    PubMed Central

    Nyaku, Seloame T.; Sripathi, Venkateswara R.; Kantety, Ramesh V.; Gu, Yong Q.; Lawrence, Kathy; Sharma, Govind C.

    2013-01-01

    The 18S rRNA gene is fundamental to cellular and organismal protein synthesis and because of its stable persistence through generations it is also used in phylogenetic analysis among taxa. Sequence variation in this gene within a single species is rare, but it has been observed in few metazoan organisms. More frequently it has mostly been reported in the non-transcribed spacer region. Here, we have identified two sequence variants within the near full coding region of 18S rRNA gene from a single reniform nematode (RN) Rotylenchulus reniformis labeled as reniform nematode variant 1 (RN_VAR1) and variant 2 (RN_VAR2). All sequences from three of the four isolates had both RN variants in their sequences; however, isolate 13B had only RN variant 2 sequence. Specific variable base sites (96 or 5.5%) were found within the 18S rRNA gene that can clearly distinguish the two 18S rDNA variants of RN, in 11 (25.0%) and 33 (75.0%) of the 44 RN clones, for RN_VAR1 and RN_VAR2, respectively. Neighbor-joining trees show that the RN_VAR1 is very similar to the previously existing R. reniformis sequence in GenBank, while the RN_VAR2 sequence is more divergent. This is the first report of the identification of two major variants of the 18S rRNA gene in the same single RN, and documents the specific base variation between the two variants, and hypothesizes on simultaneous co-existence of these two variants for this gene. PMID:23593343

  15. Association of genetic variants with diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Saliha; Raza, Syed Tasleem; Mahdi, Farzana

    2014-12-15

    Diabetic nephropathy accounts for the most serious microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus. It is suggested that the prevalence of diabetic nephropathy will continue to increase in future posing a major challenge to the healthcare system resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. It occurs as a result of interaction between both genetic and environmental factors in individuals with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Genetic susceptibility has been proposed as an important factor for the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy, and various research efforts are being executed worldwide to identify the susceptibility gene for diabetic nephropathy. Numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms have been found in various genes giving rise to various gene variants which have been found to play a major role in genetic susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy. The risk of developing diabetic nephropathy is increased several times by inheriting risk alleles at susceptibility loci of various genes like ACE, IL, TNF-α, COL4A1, eNOS, SOD2, APOE, GLUT, etc. The identification of these genetic variants at a biomarker level could thus, allow the detection of those individuals at high risk for diabetic nephropathy which could thus help in the treatment, diagnosis and early prevention of the disease. The present review discusses about the various gene variants found till date to be associated with diabetic nephropathy.

  16. Warty Carcinoma Penis: An Uncommon Variant

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arnab; Shrestha, Santosh; Ghartimagar, Dilasma; Narasimhan, Raghavan; Talwar, OP

    2017-01-01

    Penile carcinoma frequency varies widely in different parts of the world and comprises 1–10% of all the malignancies in males. Majority of the cases of penile carcinoma are squamous cell carcinoma of penis comprising 60% to 70% of all cases. Warty carcinoma of penis is an unusual neoplasm and a variant of penile squamous cell carcinoma comprising 5%–10% of all the variants. The other histological variants include basaloid, verrucous, papillary, sarcomatous, mixed, and adenosquamous carcinoma. The various histological entities with an exophytic papillary lesions including warty carcinoma are together referred to as the “verruciform” group of neoplasms. The warty carcinoma has to be differentiated from these lesions and is typically distinguished by histological features of hyperkeratosis, arborescent papillomatosis, acanthosis, and prominent koilocytosis with nuclear pleomorphism. We present a case of 65-year-old male with growth measuring 6 × 4 cm in the penis who underwent total penectomy and was diagnosed as warty carcinoma penis. PMID:28154768

  17. Spatially variant periodic structures in electromagnetics

    PubMed Central

    Rumpf, Raymond C.; Pazos, Javier J.; Digaum, Jennefir L.; Kuebler, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Spatial transforms are a popular technique for designing periodic structures that are macroscopically inhomogeneous. The structures are often required to be anisotropic, provide a magnetic response, and to have extreme values for the constitutive parameters in Maxwell's equations. Metamaterials and photonic crystals are capable of providing these, although sometimes only approximately. The problem still remains about how to generate the geometry of the final lattice when it is functionally graded, or spatially varied. This paper describes a simple numerical technique to spatially vary any periodic structure while minimizing deformations to the unit cells that would weaken or destroy the electromagnetic properties. New developments in this algorithm are disclosed that increase efficiency, improve the quality of the lattices and provide the ability to design aplanatic metasurfaces. The ability to spatially vary a lattice in this manner enables new design paradigms that are not possible using spatial transforms, three of which are discussed here. First, spatially variant self-collimating photonic crystals are shown to flow unguided waves around very tight bends using ordinary materials with low refractive index. Second, multi-mode waveguides in spatially variant band gap materials are shown to guide waves around bends without mixing power between the modes. Third, spatially variant anisotropic materials are shown to sculpt the near-field around electric components. This can be used to improve electromagnetic compatibility between components in close proximity. PMID:26217058

  18. UCSC Data Integrator and Variant Annotation Integrator

    PubMed Central

    Hinrichs, Angie S.; Raney, Brian J.; Speir, Matthew L.; Rhead, Brooke; Casper, Jonathan; Karolchik, Donna; Kuhn, Robert M.; Rosenbloom, Kate R.; Zweig, Ann S.; Haussler, David; Kent, W. James

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Two new tools on the UCSC Genome Browser web site provide improved ways of combining information from multiple datasets, optionally including the user's own custom track data and/or data from track hubs. The Data Integrator combines columns from multiple data tracks, showing all items from the first track along with overlapping items from the other tracks. The Variant Annotation Integrator is tailored to adding functional annotations to variant calls; it offers a more restricted set of underlying data tracks but adds predictions of each variant's consequences for any overlapping or nearby gene transcript. When available, it optionally adds additional annotations including effect prediction scores from dbNSFP for missense mutations, ENCODE regulatory summary tracks and conservation scores. Availability and implementation: The web tools are freely available at http://genome.ucsc.edu/ and the underlying database is available for download at http://hgdownload.cse.ucsc.edu/. The software (written in C and Javascript) is available from https://genome-store.ucsc.edu/ and is freely available for academic and non-profit usage; commercial users must obtain a license. Contact: angie@soe.ucsc.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26740527

  19. Primary Aldosteronism and ARMC5 Variants

    PubMed Central

    Zilbermint, Mihail; Xekouki, Paraskevi; Faucz, Fabio R.; Berthon, Annabel; Gkourogianni, Alexandra; Schernthaner-Reiter, Marie Helene; Batsis, Maria; Sinaii, Ninet; Quezado, Martha M.; Merino, Maria; Hodes, Aaron; Abraham, Smita B.; Libé, Rossella; Assié, Guillaume; Espiard, Stéphanie; Drougat, Ludivine; Ragazzon, Bruno; Davis, Adam; Gebreab, Samson Y.; Neff, Ryan; Kebebew, Electron; Bertherat, Jérôme; Lodish, Maya B.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Primary aldosteronism is one of the leading causes of secondary hypertension, causing significant morbidity and mortality. A number of genetic defects have recently been identified in primary aldosteronism, whereas we identified mutations in ARMC5, a tumor-suppressor gene, in cortisol-producing primary macronodular adrenal hyperplasia. Objective: We investigated a cohort of 56 patients who were referred to the National Institutes of Health for evaluation of primary aldosteronism for ARMC5 defects. Methods: Patients underwent step-wise diagnosis, with measurement of serum aldosterone and plasma renin activity followed by imaging, saline suppression and/or oral salt loading tests, plus adrenal venous sampling. Cortisol secretion was also evaluated; unilateral or bilateral adrenalectomy was performed, if indicated. DNA, protein, and transfection studies in H295R cells were conducted by standard methods. Results: We identified 12 germline ARMC5 genetic alterations in 20 unrelated and two related individuals in our cohort (39.3%). ARMC5 sequence changes in 6 patients (10.7%) were predicted to be damaging by in silico analysis. All affected patients carrying a variant predicted to be damaging were African Americans (P = .0023). Conclusions: Germline ARMC5 variants may be associated with primary aldosteronism. Additional cohorts of patients with primary aldosteronism and metabolic syndrome, particularly African Americans, should be screened for ARMC5 sequence variants because these may underlie part of the known increased predisposition of African Americans to low renin hypertension. PMID:25822102

  20. Novel RNA variants in colorectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Alagaratnam, Sharmini; Zhao, Sen; Nome, Torfinn; Løvf, Marthe; Bakken, Anne C.; Hektoen, Merete; Sveen, Anita; Lothe, Ragnhild A.; Skotheim, Rolf I.

    2015-01-01

    With an annual estimated incidence of 1.4 million, and a five-year survival rate of 60%, colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major clinical burden. To identify novel RNA variants in CRC, we analyzed exon-level microarray expression data from a cohort of 202 CRCs. We nominated 25 genes with increased expression of their 3′ parts in at least one cancer sample each. To efficiently investigate underlying transcript structures, we developed an approach using rapid amplification of cDNA ends followed by high throughput sequencing (RACE-seq). RACE products from the targeted genes in 23 CRC samples were pooled together and sequenced. We identified VWA2-TCF7L2, DHX35-BPIFA2 and CASZ1-MASP2 as private fusion events, and novel transcript structures for 17 of the 23 other candidate genes. The high-throughput approach facilitated identification of CRC specific RNA variants. These include a recurrent read-through fusion transcript between KLK8 and KLK7, and a splice variant of S100A2. Both of these were overrepresented in CRC tissue and cell lines from external RNA-seq datasets. PMID:26474385

  1. Orosomucoid-1 Expression in Ameloblastoma Variants

    PubMed Central

    García-Muñoz, Alejandro; Bologna-Molina, Ronell; A. Rodríguez, Mario; Liceága-Reyes, Rodrigo; Farfán-Morales, Jose Eduardo; Aranda-Romo, Saray; Molina-Frechero, Nelly; González-González, Rogelio

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors constitute a group of heterogeneous lesions of benign and malignant neoplasms with variable aggressiveness. Ameloblastomas are a group of benign but locally invasive neoplasms that occur in the jaws and are derived from epithelial elements of the tooth-forming apparatus. We previously described orosomucoid-1 protein expression in odontogenic myxomas. However, whether orosomucoid-1 is expressed in other odontogenic tumors remains unknown. Since orosomucoid-1 belongs to a group of acute-phase proteins and has many functions in health and disease, we identified and analyzed orosomucoid-1 expression in ameloblastoma variants and ameloblastic carcinoma using western blot and immunohistochemical techniques. Thirty cases of ameloblastoma were analyzed for orsomucoid-1; five specimens were fresh for western blot study (four benign ameloblastomas and one ameloblastic carcinoma), and 25 cases of benign ameloblastoma for immunohistochemical assays. Orosomucoid-1 was widely expressed in each tumor variant analyzed in this study, and differential orosomucoid-1 expression was observed between benign and malignant tumor. Orosomucoid-1 may play an important role in the behavior of ameloblastomas and influence the biology and development of the variants of this tumor. PMID:27386438

  2. Random Plant Viral Variants Attain Temporal Advantages During Systemic Infections and in Turn Resist other Variants of the Same Virus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Guo, Jiangbo; Zhang, Xiuchun; Meulia, Tea; Paul, Pierce; Madden, Laurence V.; Li, Dawei; Qu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Infection of plants with viruses containing multiple variants frequently leads to dominance by a few random variants in the systemically infected leaves (SLs), for which a plausible explanation is lacking. We show here that SL dominance by a given viral variant is adequately explained by its fortuitous lead in systemic spread, coupled with its resistance to superinfection by other variants. We analyzed the fate of a multi-variant turnip crinkle virus (TCV) population in Arabidopsis and N. benthamiana plants. Both wild-type and RNA silencing-defective plants displayed a similar pattern of random dominance by a few variant genotypes, thus discounting a prominent role for RNA silencing. When introduced to plants sequentially as two subpopulations, a twelve-hour head-start was sufficient for the first set to dominate. Finally, SLs of TCV-infected plants became highly resistant to secondary invasions of another TCV variant. We propose that random distribution of variant foci on inoculated leaves allows different variants to lead systemic movement in different plants. The leading variants then colonize large areas of SLs, and resist the superinfection of lagging variants in the same areas. In conclusion, superinfection resistance is the primary driver of random enrichment of viral variants in systemically infected plants. PMID:26481091

  3. Divergent Evolution of the repFII Replicon of IncF Plasmids Carrying Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor cnf2, Cytolethal Distending Toxin cdtIII, and f17Ae Fimbrial Variant Genes in Type 2 Necrotoxigenic Escherichia coli Isolates from Calves

    PubMed Central

    Bihannic, Morgan; Haenni, Marisa; Oswald, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Among the pathovars of Escherichia coli in cattle, necrotoxigenic E. coli (NTEC) is defined by the production of cytotoxic necrotizing factors (CNFs). In particular, type 2 NTEC (NTEC2) strains are frequent in diarrheic and septicemic calves and usually coproduce CNF type 2 (CNF2), cytolethal distending toxin type III (CDTIII), and fimbrial adhesins of the F17 family, whose genetic determinants have frequently been reported on the same Vir-like plasmid. In this study, we investigated the genetic environment of the cnf2, f17Ae, and cdtIII genes in a collection of fecal E. coli isolates recovered from 484 French and 58 Iranian calves. In particular, we highlighted the spread of cnf2, f17Ae, and cdtIII on similar 150-kb IncF plasmids harboring the newly assigned repFII replicon allele F74 in NTEC2 isolates. Interestingly, this 150-kb IncF plasmid differed from the 140-kb IncF plasmid harboring the newly assigned repFII replicon allele F75 and carrying cnf2 alone. These results suggest two divergent lineages of cnf2-carrying IncF plasmids depending on the presence of the f17Ae and cdtIII genes. This partition was observed in E. coli strains of unrelated backgrounds, suggesting two different evolutionary paths of cnf2-carrying IncF plasmids rather than divergent evolutions of NTEC2 clones. The driving forces for such divergent evolutions are not known, and further studies are required to clarify the selection of plasmid subtypes spreading virulence determinants in E. coli, in particular, plasmids of the IncF family. PMID:26546422

  4. A Rare Clinical Variant of Oromandibular Limb Hypogenesis Syndrome Type I B

    PubMed Central

    Godhane, Alkesh; Kalaskar, Ashita; Demble, Swati

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aglossia is a rare congenital malformation that often occurs as an isolated disorder or is observed in association with other congenital deformities, particularly limb defects. We present a unique case of a 7-year-old girl with aglossia, hypodactyli, rudimentary ears, retrognathic and V-shaped mandible. Her parental history revealed intrauterine exposure of medicines. The patient had problems in difficulty in eating, speech, taste sensation and hearing. The present case does not fit into Hall’s classification of oromandibular limb hypogenesis syndrome (OLHS) which best describes hypoglossia and limb deformities. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to document the rare variant of OLHS which can be included in Hall’s classification. How to cite this article: Kalaskar RR, Godhane A, Kalaskar A, Demble S. A Rare Clinical Variant of Oromandibular Limb Hypogenesis Syndrome Type I B. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(1):78-81. PMID:27274161

  5. Clear cell variant of squamous cell carcinoma of skin: A report of a case.

    PubMed

    Lawal, Ahmed Oluwatoyin; Adisa, Akinyele Olumuyiwa; Olajide, Mofoluwaso A; Olusanya, Adeola Adenike

    2013-01-01

    Clear cell squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a rare variant of SCC of skin in which ultraviolet radiation has been suggested as possible etiology. This case is that of a 62-year-old male concrete block maker/bricklayer who presented with a 6 months history of a non-healing ulcer on the left side of his face. Histology showed features of malignant epithelial neoplasm composed of islands of large oval to polyhedral malignant squamous cells with eosinophilic to amphophilic cytoplasm and vesicular nuclei and there were areas showing clear cell differentiation and isolated areas of keratin pearl formation. The lesion was also negative for periodic acid schiff, mucicarmine, and alcian blue stains but was strongly positive for AE1/AE3 (immuno-stain). This case showed an aggressive and bizarre clinical presentation but more report of cases are needed to have a better characterization of the clinical presentation and prognosis of this variant of SCC.

  6. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Intra-Host Populations Are Characterized by Numerous High Frequency Variants

    PubMed Central

    Borucki, Monica K.; Lao, Victoria; Hwang, Mona; Gardner, Shea; Adney, Danielle; Munster, Vincent; Bowen, Richard; Allen, Jonathan E.

    2016-01-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is an emerging human pathogen related to SARS virus. In vitro studies indicate this virus may have a broad host range suggesting an increased pandemic potential. Genetic and epidemiological evidence indicate camels serve as a reservoir for MERS virus but the mechanism of cross species transmission is unclear and many questions remain regarding the susceptibility of humans to infection. Deep sequencing data was obtained from the nasal samples of three camels that had been experimentally infected with a human MERS-CoV isolate. A majority of the genome was covered and average coverage was greater than 12,000x depth. Although only 5 mutations were detected in the consensus sequences, 473 intrahost single nucleotide variants were identified. Many of these variants were present at high frequencies and could potentially influence viral phenotype and the sensitivity of detection assays that target these regions for primer or probe binding. PMID:26790002

  7. Genetic characterization of MHC class II DQB exon 2 variants in gayal (Bos frontalis).

    PubMed

    Sun, Yongke; Xi, Dongmei; Li, Guozhi; Hao, Tiantian; Chen, Yuhan; Yang, Yuai

    2014-09-03

    In the present study, exon 2 of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II DQB gene from 39 gayals (Bos frontalis) was isolated, characterized and compared with previously reported patterns for other bovidae. It was revealed by sequence analyses that there are 36 DQB exon 2 variants among 39 gayals. These variants exhibited a high degree of nucleotide and amino acid substitutions with most amino acid variations occurring at positions forming the peptide-binding sites (PBS). The DQB loci were analysed for patterns of synonymous (dS) and non-synonymous (dN) substitution. The gayals were observed to be under strong balancing selection in the DQB exon 2 PBS (dN = 0.094, P = 0.001). It appears that this variability among gayals could confer the ability to mount immune responses to a wide variety of peptides or pathogens.

  8. Genetic characterization of MHC class II DQB exon 2 variants in gayal (Bos frontalis)

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yongke; Xi, Dongmei; Li, Guozhi; Hao, Tiantian; Chen, Yuhan; Yang, Yuai

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, exon 2 of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II DQB gene from 39 gayals (Bos frontalis) was isolated, characterized and compared with previously reported patterns for other bovidae. It was revealed by sequence analyses that there are 36 DQB exon 2 variants among 39 gayals. These variants exhibited a high degree of nucleotide and amino acid substitutions with most amino acid variations occurring at positions forming the peptide-binding sites (PBS). The DQB loci were analysed for patterns of synonymous (d S) and non-synonymous (d N) substitution. The gayals were observed to be under strong balancing selection in the DQB exon 2 PBS (d N = 0.094, P = 0.001). It appears that this variability among gayals could confer the ability to mount immune responses to a wide variety of peptides or pathogens. PMID:26019566

  9. Hemoglobin Brigham (α2Aβ2100 Pro→Leu). HEMOGLOBIN VARIANT ASSOCIATED WITH FAMILIAL ERYTHROCYTOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Lokich, Jacob J.; Moloney, William C.; Bunn, H. Franklin; Bruckheimer, Sally M.; Ranney, Helen M.

    1973-01-01

    Erythrocytosis associated with the presence of a hemoglobin with increased oxygen affinity has been reported for 10 hemoglobin variants, most of which demonstrate altered electrophoretic mobility. Several members of a family were found to have erythrocytosis, and both the whole blood and the hemoglobin exhibited increased oxygen affinity. Phosphate-free hemoglobin solutions had a normal Bohr effect and reactivity to 2,3-diphosphoglycerate. The electrophoretic properties of the hemoglobin were normal, but on peptide mapping of a tryptic digest of the isolated β-chains, a normal βT11 peptide and an abnormal βT11 with greater Rf were seen. Analysis of the abnormal peptide showed the substitution of leucine for the normal proline at β100 (helical residue G2). The hemoglobin variant, designated Hb Brigham, serves to emphasize the necessity for detailed evaluation of the structure and function of hemoglobin in familial erythrocytosis even with electrophoretically “normal” hemoglobin. PMID:4719677

  10. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Intra-Host Populations Are Characterized by Numerous High Frequency Variants

    SciTech Connect

    Borucki, Monica K.; Lao, Victoria; Hwang, Mona; Gardner, Shea; Adney, Danielle; Munster, Vincent; Bowen, Richard; Allen, Jonathan E.

    2016-01-20

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is an emerging human pathogen related to SARS virus. In vitro studies indicate this virus may have a broad host range suggesting an increased pandemic potential. Genetic and epidemiological evidence indicate camels serve as a reservoir for MERS virus but the mechanism of cross species transmission is unclear and many questions remain regarding the susceptibility of humans to infection. Deep sequencing data was obtained from the nasal samples of three camels that had been experimentally infected with a human MERS-CoV isolate. A majority of the genome was covered and average coverage was greater than 12,000x depth. Although only 5 mutations were detected in the consensus sequences, 473 intrahost single nucleotide variants were identified. Lastly, many of these variants were present at high frequencies and could potentially influence viral phenotype and the sensitivity of detection assays that target these regions for primer or probe binding.

  11. Phylogenetic relationship of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae isolated in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Mohd-Zain, Zaini; Kamsani, Nurul H; Ahmad, Norazah; Clarke, Stuart C

    2015-12-01

    The epidemiology of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) remains poorly understood. We therefore sought to determine the genetic relationship of 25 NTHi isolated from various states in Malaysia using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The majority of isolates were obtained from sputum. There were 24 novel sequence types (STs). Eight isolates were single-locus variants, the remainder being singletons. Clustering was not based on clinical site of isolation or geographical origin. Despite the limited number of isolates examined in this study, we demonstrate that NTHi isolates in Malaysia are diverse and warrant further investigation.

  12. Rich annotation of DNA sequencing variants by leveraging the Ensembl Variant Effect Predictor with plugins.

    PubMed

    Yourshaw, Michael; Taylor, S Paige; Rao, Aliz R; Martín, Martín G; Nelson, Stanley F

    2015-03-01

    High-throughput DNA sequencing has become a mainstay for the discovery of genomic variants that may cause disease or affect phenotype. A next-generation sequencing pipeline typically identifies thousands of variants in each sample. A particular challenge is the annotation of each variant in a way that is useful to downstream consumers of the data, such as clinical sequencing centers or researchers. These users may require that all data storage and analysis remain on secure local servers to protect patient confidentiality or intellectual property, may have unique and changing needs to draw on a variety of annotation data sets and may prefer not to rely on closed-source applications beyond their control. Here we describe scalable methods for using the plugin capability of the Ensembl Variant Effect Predictor to enrich its basic set of variant annotations with additional data on genes, function, conservation, expression, diseases, pathways and protein structure, and describe an extensible framework for easily adding additional custom data sets.

  13. DNA variant databases: current state and future directions.

    PubMed

    Plazzer, John-Paul; Macrae, Finlay

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter we aim to provide an overview of DNA variant databases, commonly known as Locus-Specific Databases (LSDBs), or Gene-Disease Specific Databases (GDSDBs), but the term variant database will be used for simplicity. We restrict this overview to germ-line variants, particularly as related to Mendelian diseases, which are diseases caused by a variant in a single gene. Common difficulties associated with variant databases and some proposed solutions are reviewed. Finally, systems where technical solutions have been implemented are discussed. This work will be useful for anyone wishing to establish their own variant database, or to learn about the global picture of variant databases, and the technical challenges to be overcome.

  14. A phylogenetic reconstruction of the epidemiological history of canine rabies virus variants in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Gareth J; Páez, Andrés; Bóshell, Jorge; Rupprecht, Charles E

    2004-03-01

    Historically, canine rabies in Colombia has been caused by two geographically distinct canine variants of rabies virus (RV) which between 1992 and 2002 accounted for approximately 95% of Colombian rabies cases. Genetic variant 1 (GV1) has been isolated up until 1997 in the Central Region and the Department of Arauca, and is now considered extinct through a successful vaccination program. Genetic variant 2 (GV2) has been isolated from the northern Caribbean Region and continues to circulate at present. Here we have analyzed two sets of sequence data based upon either a 147 nucleotide region of the glycoprotein (G) gene or a 258 nucleotide region that combines a fragment of the non-coding intergenic region and a fragment of the polymerase gene. Using both maximum likelihood (ML) and Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods we have estimated the time of the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of the two variants to be between 1983 and 1988. Reconstructions of the population history suggest that GV2 has been circulating in Colombia since the 1960s and that GV1 evolved as a separate lineage from GV2. Estimations of the effective population size at present show the GV2 outbreak to be approximately 20 times greater than that of GV1. Demographic reconstructions were unable to detect a decrease in population size concurrent with the elimination of GV1. We find a raised rate of nucleotide substitution for GV1 gene sequences when compared to that of GV2, although all estimates have wide confidence limits. We demonstrate that phylogenetic reconstructions and sequence analysis can be used to support incidence data from the field in the assessment of RV epidemiology.

  15. Alphavirus mutator variants present host-specific defects and attenuation in mammalian and insect models.

    PubMed

    Rozen-Gagnon, Kathryn; Stapleford, Kenneth A; Mongelli, Vanesa; Blanc, Hervé; Failloux, Anna-Bella; Saleh, Maria-Carla; Vignuzzi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Arboviruses cycle through both vertebrates and invertebrates, which requires them to adapt to disparate hosts while maintaining genetic integrity during genome replication. To study the genetic mechanisms and determinants of these processes, we use chikungunya virus (CHIKV), a re-emerging human pathogen transmitted by the Aedes mosquito. We previously isolated a high fidelity (or antimutator) polymerase variant, C483Y, which had decreased fitness in both mammalian and mosquito hosts, suggesting this residue may be a key molecular determinant. To further investigate effects of position 483 on RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase (RdRp) fidelity, we substituted every amino acid at this position. We isolated novel mutators with decreased replication fidelity and higher mutation frequencies, allowing us to examine the fitness of error-prone arbovirus variants. Although CHIKV mutators displayed no major replication defects in mammalian cell culture, they had reduced specific infectivity and were attenuated in vivo. Unexpectedly, mutator phenotypes were suppressed in mosquito cells and the variants exhibited significant defects in RNA synthesis. Consequently, these replication defects resulted in strong selection for reversion during infection of mosquitoes. Since residue 483 is conserved among alphaviruses, we examined the analogous mutations in Sindbis virus (SINV), which also reduced polymerase fidelity and generated replication defects in mosquito cells. However, replication defects were mosquito cell-specific and were not observed in Drosophila S2 cells, allowing us to evaluate the potential attenuation of mutators in insect models where pressure for reversion was absent. Indeed, the SINV mutator variant was attenuated in fruit flies. These findings confirm that residue 483 is a determinant regulating alphavirus polymerase fidelity and demonstrate proof of principle that arboviruses can be attenuated in mammalian and insect hosts by reducing fidelity.

  16. Whole-exome sequencing in an isolated population from the Dalmatian island of Vis

    PubMed Central

    Jeroncic, Ana; Memari, Yasin; Ritchie, Graham RS; Hendricks, Audrey E; Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Matchan, Angela; Vitart, Veronique; Hayward, Caroline; Kolcic, Ivana; Glodzik, Dominik; Wright, Alan F; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Durbin, Richard; Polašek, Ozren; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Boraska Perica, Vesna

    2016-01-01

    We have whole-exome sequenced 176 individuals from the isolated population of the island of Vis in Croatia in order to describe exonic variation architecture. We found 290 577 single nucleotide variants (SNVs), 65% of which are singletons, low frequency or rare variants. A total of 25 430 (9%) SNVs are novel, previously not catalogued in NHLBI GO Exome Sequencing Project, UK10K-Generation Scotland, 1000Genomes Project, ExAC or NCBI Reference Assembly dbSNP. The majority of these variants (76%) are singletons. Comparable to data obtained from UK10K-Generation Scotland that were sequenced and analysed using the same protocols, we detected an enrichment of potentially damaging variants (non-synonymous and loss-of-function) in the low frequency and common variant categories. On average 115 (range 93–140) genotypes with loss-of-function variants, 23 (15–34) of which were homozygous, were identified per person. The landscape of loss-of-function variants across an exome revealed that variants mainly accumulated in genes on the xenobiotic-related pathways, of which majority coded for enzymes. The frequency of loss-of-function variants was additionally increased in Vis runs of homozygosity regions where variants mainly affected signalling pathways. This work confirms the isolate status of Vis population by means of whole-exome sequence and reveals the pattern of loss-of-function mutations, which resembles the trails of adaptive evolution that were found in other species. By cataloguing the exomic variants and describing the allelic structure of the Vis population, this study will serve as a valuable resource for future genetic studies of human diseases, population genetics and evolution in this population. PMID:27049301

  17. Whole-exome sequencing in an isolated population from the Dalmatian island of Vis.

    PubMed

    Jeroncic, Ana; Memari, Yasin; Ritchie, Graham Rs; Hendricks, Audrey E; Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Matchan, Angela; Vitart, Veronique; Hayward, Caroline; Kolcic, Ivana; Glodzik, Dominik; Wright, Alan F; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Durbin, Richard; Polašek, Ozren; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Boraska Perica, Vesna

    2016-10-01

    We have whole-exome sequenced 176 individuals from the isolated population of the island of Vis in Croatia in order to describe exonic variation architecture. We found 290 577 single nucleotide variants (SNVs), 65% of which are singletons, low frequency or rare variants. A total of 25 430 (9%) SNVs are novel, previously not catalogued in NHLBI GO Exome Sequencing Project, UK10K-Generation Scotland, 1000Genomes Project, ExAC or NCBI Reference Assembly dbSNP. The majority of these variants (76%) are singletons. Comparable to data obtained from UK10K-Generation Scotland that were sequenced and analysed using the same protocols, we detected an enrichment of potentially damaging variants (non-synonymous and loss-of-function) in the low frequency and common variant categories. On average 115 (range 93-140) genotypes with loss-of-function variants, 23 (15-34) of which were homozygous, were identified per person. The landscape of loss-of-function variants across an exome revealed that variants mainly accumulated in genes on the xenobiotic-related pathways, of which majority coded for enzymes. The frequency of loss-of-function variants was additionally increased in Vis runs of homozygosity regions where variants mainly affected signalling pathways. This work confirms the isolate status of Vis population by means of whole-exome sequence and reveals the pattern of loss-of-function mutations, which resembles the trails of adaptive evolution that were found in other species. By cataloguing the exomic variants and describing the allelic structure of the Vis population, this study will serve as a valuable resource for future genetic studies of human diseases, population genetics and evolution in this population.

  18. Runx3-regulated expression of two Ntrk3 transcript variants in dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Ogihara, Yuuki; Masuda, Tomoyuki; Ozaki, Shigeru; Yoshikawa, Masaaki; Shiga, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    Somatosensation is divided into proprioception and cutaneous sensation. Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons project their fibers toward peripheral targets including muscles and skin, and centrally to the spinal cord. Proprioceptive DRG neurons transmit information from muscle spindles and Golgi tendon organs to the spinal cord. We previously showed that Runt-related transcription factor 3 (Runx3) is expressed in these neurons and their projections to the ventral spinal cord and muscle spindles are lost in Runx3-deficient (Runx3(-/-) ) mouse embryos. Although Runx3 is likely to contribute to the fate decision and projection of proprioceptive DRG neurons, the precise roles for Runx3 in these phenomena are unknown. To identify genes regulated by Runx3 in embryonic DRGs, we performed microarray analyses using cDNAs isolated from wild-type and Runx3(-/-) DRGs of embryonic day (E) 12.5 and selected two transcript variants of the tyrosine kinase receptor C (TrkC) gene. These variants, Ntrk3 variant 1 (Ntrk3-v1) and variant 2 (Ntrk3-v2), encode full-length and truncated receptors of neurotrophin-3, respectively. Using double in situ hybridization, we found that most of Ntrk3-v1 mRNA expression in E14.5 DRGs depended on Runx3 but that more than half of Ntrk3-v2 mRNA one were expressed in a Runx3-independent manner. Furthermore, our data revealed that the rate of Ntrk3-v1 and Ntrk3-v2 colocalization in DRGs changed from E14.5 to E18.5. Together, our data suggest that Runx3 may play a crucial role in the development of DRGs by regulating the expression of Ntrk3 variants and that DRG neurons expressing Ntrk3-v1 but not Ntrk3-v2 may differentiate into proprioceptive ones.

  19. Efficacy of a commercial canarypox vaccine for protecting Hawai'i 'Amakihi from field isolates of avipoxvirus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Atkinson, Carter T.; Wiegand, Kimberly C.; Triglia, Dennis; Jarvi, Susan I.

    2010-01-01

    At least three variants of avian pox virus are present in Hawai’i - Fowlpox from domestic poultry and a group of genetically distinct viruses that cluster within two clades (Pox Variant 1 and Pox Variant 2) that are most similar to Canarypox based on DNA sequence of the virus 4b core protein gene. We tested whether Hawai’i ‘Amakihi can be protected from wild virus isolates with an attenuated live Canarypox vaccine that is closely related to isolates that cluster within clade 1 (Pox Variant 1) based on sequence of the attenuated Canarypox virus 4b core protein. Thirty-one (31) Hawai`i ‘Amakihi (Hemignathus virens) with no prior physical evidence of pox infection were collected on Mauna Kea from xeric, high elevation habitats with low pox prevalence and randomly divided into two groups. One group of 16 was vaccinated with Poximmune C® while the other group received a sham vaccination with virus diluent. Four of 15 (27%) vaccinated birds developed potentially life-threatening disseminated lesions or lesions of unusually long duration, while one bird never developed a vaccine-associated lesion or “take”. After vaccine-associated lesions healed, vaccinated birds were randomly divided into three groups of five and challenged with either a wild isolate of Fowlpox, a Hawai`i `Amakihi isolate of a Canarypox-like virus from clade 1 (Pox Variant 1) or a Hawai`i `Amakihi isolate of a Canarypox-like virus from clade 2 (Pox Variant 2). Similarly, three random groups of five unvaccinated ‘Amakihi were challenged with the same virus isolates. Vaccinated and unvaccinated ‘Amakihi challenged with Fowlpox had transient infections with no clinical signs of infection. Mortality in vaccinated ‘Amakihi that were challenged with Pox Variant 1 and Pox Variant 2 ranged from 0% (0/5) for Pox Variant 1 to 60% (3/5) for Pox Variant 2. Mortality in unvaccinated ‘Amakihi ranged from 40% (2/5) for Pox Variant 1 to 100% (5/5) for Pox Variant 2. While the vaccine provided some

  20. Fractionation of the genetic variants of human alpha 1-acid glycoprotein in the native form by chromatography on an immobilized copper(II) affinity adsorbent. Heterogeneity of the separate variants by isoelectrofocusing and by concanavalin A affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hervé, F; Gomas, E; Duché, J C; Tillement, J P

    1993-05-19

    Fractionation of the three main genetic variants (F1, S and A) of human alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AAG), in their native (sialylated) form, by chromatography on immobilized copper(II) affinity adsorbent was investigated. This chromatographic method had been previously developed to fractionate the desialylated protein variants. For that purpose, the three main AAG phenotypes samples (F1S/A, F1/A and S/A), which had been previously isolated from individual human plasma samples, and an AAG sample from commercial source (a mixture of the phenotypes) were used in the native form. Affinity chromatography of these different samples on an iminodiacetate Sepharose-copper(II) gel at pH 7 resolved two protein peaks, irrespective of the origin of the native AAG sample used. The unbound peak 1 was found to consist of the F1, the S or both variants, depending on the phenotype of the AAG sample used in the chromatography. The bound peak 2 was found to consist of the A variant in a pure form. The fractionation results obtained with native AAG were found to be the same as those originally yielded by the desialylated protein. However, comparison of the interactions of native and desialylated AAG with immobilized copper(II) ions, using an affinity chromatographic method and a non-chromatographic equilibrium binding technique, respectively, showed that desialylation increased the non-specific interactions of the protein with immobilized copper(II) ions. The AAG variants were not fractionated when affinity chromatography was performed using immobilized zinc, nickel or cobalt(II) ions, instead of copper. After purification of each variant in the sialylated form (F1, S and A), their respective heterogeneity was studied by analytical isoelectrofocusing with carrier ampholytes in the pH range 2.5-4.5. In addition, the lectin-binding behaviour of the separate sialylated AAG variants was investigated by affinity chromatography on immobilized concanavalin A.

  1. Oligomeric α-synuclein and β-amyloid variants as potential biomarkers for Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases.

    PubMed

    Williams, Stephanie M; Schulz, Philip; Sierks, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Oligomeric forms of α-synuclein and β-amyloid are toxic protein variants that are thought to contribute to the onset and progression of Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD), respectively. The detection of toxic variants in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood has great promise for facilitating early and accurate diagnoses of these devastating diseases. Two hurdles that have impeded the use of these protein variants as biomarkers are the availability of reagents that can bind the different variants and a sensitive assay to detect their very low concentrations. We previously isolated antibody-based reagents that selectively bind two different oligomeric variants of α-synuclein and two of β-amyloid, and developed a phage-based capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with subfemtomolar sensitivity to quantify their presence. Here, we used these reagents to show that these oligomeric α-synuclein variants are preferentially present in PD brain tissue, CSF and serum, and that the oligomeric β-amyloid variants are preferentially present in AD brain tissue, CSF, and serum. Some AD samples also had α-synuclein pathology and some PD samples also had β-amyloid pathology, and, very intriguingly, these PD cases also had a history of dementia. Detection of different oligomeric α-synuclein and β-amyloid species is an effective method for identifying tissue, CSF and sera from PD and AD samples, respectively, and samples that also contained early stages of other protein pathologies, indicating their potential value as blood-based biomarkers for neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Genetic Variants Associated with Circulating Parathyroid Hormone.

    PubMed

    Robinson-Cohen, Cassianne; Lutsey, Pamela L; Kleber, Marcus E; Nielson, Carrie M; Mitchell, Braxton D; Bis, Joshua C; Eny, Karen M; Portas, Laura; Eriksson, Joel; Lorentzon, Mattias; Koller, Daniel L; Milaneschi, Yuri; Teumer, Alexander; Pilz, Stefan; Nethander, Maria; Selvin, Elizabeth; Tang, Weihong; Weng, Lu-Chen; Wong, Hoi Suen; Lai, Dongbing; Peacock, Munro; Hannemann, Anke; Völker, Uwe; Homuth, Georg; Nauk, Matthias; Murgia, Federico; Pattee, Jack W; Orwoll, Eric; Zmuda, Joseph M; Riancho, Jose Antonio; Wolf, Myles; Williams, Frances; Penninx, Brenda; Econs, Michael J; Ryan, Kathleen A; Ohlsson, Claes; Paterson, Andrew D; Psaty, Bruce M; Siscovick, David S; Rotter, Jerome I; Pirastu, Mario; Streeten, Elizabeth; März, Winfried; Fox, Caroline; Coresh, Josef; Wallaschofski, Henri; Pankow, James S; de Boer, Ian H; Kestenbaum, Bryan

    2016-12-07

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is a primary calcium regulatory hormone. Elevated serum PTH concentrations in primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism have been associated with bone disease, hypertension, and in some studies, cardiovascular mortality. Genetic causes of variation in circulating PTH concentrations are incompletely understood. We performed a genome-wide association study of serum PTH concentrations among 29,155 participants of European ancestry from 13 cohort studies (n=22,653 and n=6502 in discovery and replication analyses, respectively). We evaluated the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with natural log-transformed PTH concentration adjusted for age, sex, season, study site, and principal components of ancestry. We discovered associations of SNPs from five independent regions with serum PTH concentration, including the strongest association with rs6127099 upstream of CYP24A1 (P=4.2 × 10(-53)), a gene that encodes the primary catabolic enzyme for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and 25-dihydroxyvitamin D. Each additional copy of the minor allele at this SNP associated with 7% higher serum PTH concentration. The other SNPs associated with serum PTH concentration included rs4074995 within RGS14 (P=6.6 × 10(-17)), rs219779 adjacent to CLDN14 (P=3.5 × 10(-16)), rs4443100 near RTDR1 (P=8.7 × 10(-9)), and rs73186030 near CASR (P=4.8 × 10(-8)). Of these five SNPs, rs6127099, rs4074995, and rs219779 replicated. Thus, common genetic variants located near genes involved in vitamin D metabolism and calcium and renal phosphate transport associated with differences in circulating PTH concentrations. Future studies could identify the causal variants at these loci, and the clinical and functional relevance of these variants should be pursued.

  3. Phylogenetically related, clinically different: human papillomaviruses 6 and 11 variants distribution in genital warts and in laryngeal papillomatosis.

    PubMed

    Godínez, J M; Nicolás-Párraga, S; Pimenoff, V N; Mengual-Chuliá, B; Muñoz, N; Bosch, F X; Sánchez, G I; McCloskey, J; Bravo, I G

    2014-06-01

    Genital warts (GWs) and laryngeal papillomatosis (LP) are two usually benign pathologies related to infection with human papillomaviruses (HPVs), mainly HPV6 and HPV11. The aim of this work was to describe the genetic diversity of HPV6 and HPV11 isolates found in GWs and LPs, and to analyse the differential involvement of viral variants in either lesion. A total of 231 samples diagnosed as GWs (n = 198) or LP (n = 33) and caused by HPV6 or HPV11 monoinfections were analysed. The phylogenetic relationships of the retrieved viral sequences were explored. We have identified the long control region and the intergenic E2-L2 region as the two most variable regions in both HPV6 and HPV11 genomes. We have generated new HPV6 (n = 166) or HPV11 (n = 65) partial sequences from GWs and LPs lesions spanning both regions and studied them in the context of all available sequences of both types (final n = 412). Our results show a significant (p <0.01) differential presence of HPV6 variants among both pathologies, with HPV6 B variants being preferentially found in GW versus LP samples. No differential involvement of HPV11 variants was observed. Our findings suggest that different HPV6 variants may either show differential tropism or have different potential to induce lesions in different epithelia.

  4. Detecting Novel Genetic Variants Associated with Isoniazid-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Maurice K. L.; Ong, Danny C. T.; Tongyoo, Pumipat; Wong, Sin-Yew; Lee, Ann S. G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Isoniazid (INH) is a highly effective antibiotic central for the treatment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). INH-resistant MTB clinical isolates are frequently mutated in the katG gene and the inhA promoter region, but 10 to 37% of INH-resistant clinical isolates have no detectable alterations in currently known gene targets associated with INH-resistance. We aimed to identify novel genes associated with INH-resistance in these latter isolates. Methodology/Principal Findings INH-resistant clinical isolates of MTB were pre-screened for mutations in the katG, inhA, kasA and ndh genes and the regulatory regions of inhA and ahpC. Twelve INH-resistant isolates with no mutations, and 17 INH-susceptible MTB isolates were subjected to whole genome sequencing. Phylogenetically related variants and synonymous mutations were excluded and further analysis revealed mutations in 60 genes and 4 intergenic regions associated with INH-resistance. Sanger sequencing verification of 45 genes confirmed that mutations in 40 genes were observed only in INH-resistant isolates and not in INH-susceptible isolates. The ratios of non-synonymous to synonymous mutations (dN/dS ratio) for the INH-resistance associated mutations identified in this study were 1.234 for INH-resistant and 0.654 for INH-susceptible isolates, strongly suggesting that these mutations are indeed associated with INH-resistance. Conclusion The discovery of novel targets associated with INH-resistance described in this study may potentially be important for the development of improved molecular detection strategies. PMID:25025225

  5. Mutation Update: The Spectra of Nebulin Variants and Associated Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Kiiski, Kirsi; Sandaradura, Sarah A.; Laporte, Jocelyn; Repo, Pauliina; Frey, Jennifer A.; Donner, Kati; Marttila, Minttu; Saunders, Carol; Barth, Peter G.; den Dunnen, Johan T.; Beggs, Alan H.; Clarke, Nigel F.; North, Kathryn N.; Laing, Nigel G.; Romero, Norma B.; Winder, Thomas L.; Pelin, Katarina; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina

    2015-01-01

    A mutation update on the nebulin gene (NEB) is necessary because of recent developments in analysis methodology, the identification of increasing numbers and novel types of variants, and a widening in the spectrum of clinical and histological phenotypes associated with this gigantic, 183 exons containing gene. Recessive pathogenic variants in NEB are the major cause of nemaline myopathy (NM), one of the most common congenital myopathies. Moreover, pathogenic NEB variants have been identified in core-rod myopathy and in distal myopathies. In this update, we present the disease-causing variants in NEB in 159 families, 143 families with NM, and 16 families with NM-related myopathies. Eighty-eight families are presented here for the first time. We summarize 86 previously published and 126 unpublished variants identified in NEB. Furthermore, we have analyzed the NEB variants deposited in the Exome Variant Server (http://evs.gs.washington.edu/EVS/), identifying that pathogenic variants are a minor fraction of all coding variants (~7%). This indicates that nebulin tolerates substantial changes in its amino acid sequence, providing an explanation as to why variants in such a large gene result in relatively rare disorders. Lastly, we discuss the difficulties of drawing reliable genotype–phenotype correlations in NEB-associated disease. PMID:25205138

  6. Non-coding genetic variants in human disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Lupski, James R

    2015-10-15

    Genetic variants, including single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) and copy number variants (CNVs), in the non-coding regions of the human genome can play an important role in human traits and complex diseases. Most of the genome-wide association study (GWAS) signals map to non-coding regions and potentially point to non-coding variants, whereas their functional interpretation is challenging. In this review, we discuss the human non-coding variants and their contributions to human diseases in the following four parts. (i) Functional annotations of non-coding SNPs mapped by GWAS: we discuss recent progress revealing some of the molecular mechanisms for GWAS signals affecting gene function. (ii) Technical progress in interpretation of non-coding variants: we briefly describe some of the technologies for functional annotations of non-coding variants, including the methods for genome-wide mapping of chromatin interaction, computational tools for functional predictions and the new genome editing technologies useful for dissecting potential functional consequences of non-coding variants. (iii) Non-coding CNVs in human diseases: we review our emerging understanding the role of non-coding CNVs in human disease. (iv) Compound inheritance of large genomic deletions and non-coding variants: compound inheritance at a locus consisting of coding variants plus non-coding ones is described.

  7. Non-coding genetic variants in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Lupski, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variants, including single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) and copy number variants (CNVs), in the non-coding regions of the human genome can play an important role in human traits and complex diseases. Most of the genome-wide association study (GWAS) signals map to non-coding regions and potentially point to non-coding variants, whereas their functional interpretation is challenging. In this review, we discuss the human non-coding variants and their contributions to human diseases in the following four parts. (i) Functional annotations of non-coding SNPs mapped by GWAS: we discuss recent progress revealing some of the molecular mechanisms for GWAS signals affecting gene function. (ii) Technical progress in interpretation of non-coding variants: we briefly describe some of the technologies for functional annotations of non-coding variants, including the methods for genome-wide mapping of chromatin interaction, computational tools for functional predictions and the new genome editing technologies useful for dissecting potential functional consequences of non-coding variants. (iii) Non-coding CNVs in human diseases: we review our emerging understanding the role of non-coding CNVs in human disease. (iv) Compound inheritance of large genomic deletions and non-coding variants: compound inheritance at a locus consisting of coding variants plus non-coding ones is described. PMID:26152199

  8. Identification of strain harboring both aac(6')-Ib and aac(6')-Ib-cr variant simultaneously in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun-Tae; Jang, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Chul; Kim, Hyogyeong; Lee, Kyoung-Ryul; Park, Kyung Sun; Lee, Hee-Joo; Kim, Young-Jin

    2011-04-01

    The aac(6')-Ib gene is the most prevalent gene that encodes aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes and confers resistance to tobramycin, kanamycin, and amikacin. The aac(6')-Ib-cr variant gene can induce resistance against aminoglycoside and fluoroquinolone simultaneously. Two main methods, sequence analysis and the restriction enzyme method, can detect the aac(6')-Ib-cr variant in clinical strains. We collected the 85 strains that were believed to be aac(6')-Ib positive from clinical isolates. Among them, 38 strains were the wild-type; the remaining 47 strains were the aac(6')-Ib-cr variant. Of these 47 strains, 19 simultaneously harbored aac(6')-Ib and aac(6')-Ib-cr. Our study aims to report the characteristics of the 19 strains that simultaneously harbored both genes. This study is the first investigation published in Korea of strains that included both aac(6')-Ib and aac(6')-Ib-cr variant.

  9. Specific genetic variants of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans correlate with disease and health in a regional population of families with localized juvenile periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    DiRienzo, J M; Slots, J; Sixou, M; Sol, M A; Harmon, R; McKay, T L

    1994-01-01

    A geographically homogeneous population of 83 subjects, from 21 families with localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP), and 35 healthy control subjects was monitored, over a 5-year period, for the presence of the periodontal pathogen Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis was used to monitor the distribution of genetic variants of this bacterium in LJP-susceptible subjects that converted from a healthy to a diseased periodontal status. A. actinomycetemcomitans was cultured from 57% of the LJP family members accessioned into the study. Nine of 36 LJP-susceptible subjects, in seven families, developed signs of periodontal destruction. All but one of these conversion subjects harbored A. actinomycetemcomitans. Bacterial variants representative of a single RFLP group (II) showed the strongest correlation with conversion (P < 0.002). Six of nine conversion subjects were infected with A. actinomycetemcomitans from this group. RFLP group II variants also prevailed in 8 of 22 probands but were absent in the 35 healthy control subjects. In contrast to the selective distribution of group II variants is diseased individuals, variants belonging to RFLP groups XIII and XIV were found exclusively in the control subjects. Thus, the use of RFLP to type clinical isolates of A. actinomycetemcomitans has resulted in the identification of genetic variants that predominate in LJP and health. These results indicate that studies concerned with the pathogenicity of this bacterium in LJP should be focused on the group II variants. PMID:7913695

  10. [Necrobiosis lipoidica. Variants on a theme].

    PubMed

    Geissler, E; Laaff, H; Technau, K; Bruckner-Tuderman, L; Nashan, D

    2011-08-01

    A 69-year-old patient presented with different skin lesions all of which belonged to group of necrobiosis lipoidica. The initial histologic diagnosis was actinic granuloma O'Brien. A subsequent biopsy was interpreted as granulomatous necrobiosis lipoidica. The history of these necrobiotic variants is reviewed and exemplarily depicted with this case. Necrobiosis lipoidica is part of the spectrum of granulomatous skin disorders. Although its etiology is unclear, an association with diabetes mellitus is often discussed. Multiple therapeutic options exist, but standardized guidelines for treatment are missing.

  11. Pitfalls and variants in pediatric chest imaging.

    PubMed

    García Asensio, D; Fernández Martín, M

    2016-05-01

    Most pitfalls in the interpretation of pediatric chest imaging are closely related with the technique used and the characteristics of pediatric patients. To obtain a quality image that will enable the correct diagnosis, it is very important to use an appropriate technique. It is important to know how technical factors influence the image and to be aware of the possible artifacts that can result from poor patient cooperation. Moreover, radiologists need to be familiar with the normal anatomy in children, with the classic radiologic findings, and with the anatomic and developmental variants to avoid misinterpreting normal findings as pathological.

  12. Infection of chickens with antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella enterica Typhimurium DT193 and monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium-like variants: an emerging risk to the poultry industry?

    PubMed

    Parsons, B N; Crayford, G; Humphrey, T J; Wigley, P

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella enterica poses a particular risk to public health, and in particular isolates belonging to clonal lineages such as Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 cause epidemics across species including poultry. In recent years, antimicrobial-resistant S. Typhimurium DT193 and specifically the monophasic S. Typhimurium-like variants of this phage type, serotypes 4,12:i:- and 4,5,12:i:-, have become an increasing risk to public health in Europe and the USA and now account for nearly one-half of human S. Typhimurium infections in the UK. Unlike S. Typhimurium that possesses two forms of flagella which can vary between phase 1 and phase 2 during infection, monophasic variants possess only phase 1 flagella. These monophasic antimicrobial-resistant variants have become a major problem in pig production but human cases have also been associated with poultry consumption and have been found in UK flocks through surveillance schemes since 2010. In this study we determined the ability of antimicrobial-resistant DT193 serotype 4,12:i:- and 4,5,12:i:- isolates from pigs to infect chickens. All isolates were found to colonize the caeca and liver. All but one isolate of serotype 4,5,12:i:- also infected the spleen. Levels of infection and pathology were comparable with those found with the virulent S. Typhimurium isolate 4/74. These findings indicate that both S. Typhimurium DT193 and monophasic variants of this phage type usually associated with pigs are capable of colonizing the chicken. This shows that both S. Typhimurium DT193 and monophasic variants represent a significant and potential emerging threat to poultry production from "spill-over" of these isolates from the pig industry or other sources.

  13. IN-VITRO SCREENING OF CISSUS QUADRANGULARIS L. VARIANT II AGAINST HELICOBACTER PYLORI

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Anoop; Jegadeesan, M.; Gowrishankar, R.

    2003-01-01

    Cissus quadrangularis L. variant II belonging to the family Vitaceae was screened for its activity Hellcobacter pylori (Hp) human isolates. Flowering and vegetative period samples were analyzed. Aqueous (hot and cold) and solvent extracts (acetone, chloroform and methanol) were screened. Among them chloroform was observed to recover bioactive principles with low MIC and MLC. MIC and MLC was 40 μg/ml for flowering period. Whereas for vegetative period MIC was 40 μg/ml and MLC was 40 μg/ml respectively. Extracts from samples collected during flowering period were better than that of vegetative period. The results confirm the traditional use of the plant in PUD. PMID:22557114

  14. Recombinational joints in a simian virus 40 variant generated in a persistent infection.

    PubMed

    Norkin, L C; Piatak, M

    1982-12-01

    SP1, a viable simian virus 40 (SV40) variant isolated from a persistent infection of rhesus monkey kidney cells, contains sequence rearrangements in the untranslated region of the SV40 genome which are transcribed into late mRNA leader sequences and in the region which encodes the large T antigen. Nucleotide sequences about the recombinational junctions in SP1 were determined. The sequence data show that in most instances there was not extensive homology between recombining sequences. The recombinant sequences are discussed with respect to the mechanisms by which they might have been generated.

  15. Canonical and variant histones of protozoan parasites.

    PubMed

    Dalmasso, Maria Carolina; Sullivan, William Joseph; Angel, Sergio Oscar

    2011-06-01

    Protozoan parasites have tremendously diverse lifestyles that require adaptation to a remarkable assortment of different environmental conditions. In order to complete their life cycles, protozoan parasites rely on fine-tuning gene expression. In general, protozoa use novel regulatory elements, transcription factors, and epigenetic mechanisms to regulate their transcriptomes. One of the most surprising findings includes the nature of their histones--these primitive eukaryotes lack some histones yet harbor novel histone variants of unknown function. In this review, we describe the histone components of different protozoan parasites based on literature and database searching. We summarize the key discoveries regarding histones and histone variants and their impact on chromatin regulation in protozoan parasites. In addition, we list histone genes IDs, sequences, and genomic localization of several protozoan parasites and Microsporidia histones, obtained from a thorough search of genome databases. We then compare these findings with those observed in higher eukaryotes, allowing us to highlight some novel aspects of epigenetic regulation in protists and to propose questions to be addressed in the upcoming years.

  16. Schizophrenia copy number variants and associative learning.

    PubMed

    Clifton, N E; Pocklington, A J; Scholz, B; Rees, E; Walters, J T R; Kirov, G; O'Donovan, M C; Owen, M J; Wilkinson, L S; Thomas, K L; Hall, J

    2017-02-01

    Large-scale genomic studies have made major progress in identifying genetic risk variants for schizophrenia. A key finding from these studies is that there is an increased burden of genomic copy number variants (CNVs) in schizophrenia cases compared with controls. The mechanism through which these CNVs confer risk for the symptoms of schizophrenia, however, remains unclear. One possibility is that schizophrenia risk CNVs impact basic associative learning processes, abnormalities of which have long been associated with the disorder. To investigate whether genes in schizophrenia CNVs impact on specific phases of associative learning we combined human genetics with experimental gene expression studies in animals. In a sample of 11 917 schizophrenia cases and 16 416 controls, we investigated whether CNVs from patients with schizophrenia are enriched for genes expressed during the consolidation, retrieval or extinction of associative memories. We show that CNVs from cases are enriched for genes expressed during fear extinction in the hippocampus, but not genes expressed following consolidation or retrieval. These results suggest that CNVs act to impair inhibitory learning in schizophrenia, potentially contributing to the development of core symptoms of the disorder.

  17. COMT gene locus: new functional variants

    PubMed Central

    Meloto, Carolina B.; Segall, Samantha K.; Smith, Shad; Parisien, Marc; Shabalina, Svetlana A.; Rizzatti-Barbosa, Célia M.; Gauthier, Josée; Tsao, Douglas; Convertino, Marino; Piltonen, Marjo H.; Slade, Gary Dmitri; Fillingim, Roger B.; Greenspan, Joel D.; Ohrbach, Richard; Knott, Charles; Maixner, William; Zaykin, Dmitri; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.; Reenilä, Ilkka; Männistö, Pekka T.; Diatchenko, Luda

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) metabolizes catecholaminergic neurotransmitters. Numerous studies have linked COMT to pivotal brain functions such as mood, cognition, response to stress, and pain. Both nociception and risk of clinical pain have been associated with COMT genetic variants, and this association was shown to be mediated through adrenergic pathways. Here, we show that association studies between COMT polymorphic markers and pain phenotypes in 2 independent cohorts identified a functional marker, rs165774, situated in the 3′ untranslated region of a newfound splice variant, (a)-COMT. Sequence comparisons showed that the (a)-COMT transcript is highly conserved in primates, and deep sequencing data demonstrated that (a)-COMT is expressed across several human tissues, including the brain. In silico analyses showed that the (a)-COMT enzyme features a distinct C-terminus structure, capable of stabilizing substrates in its active site. In vitro experiments demonstrated not only that (a)-COMT is catalytically active but also that it displays unique substrate specificity, exhibiting enzymatic activity with dopamine but not epinephrine. They also established that the pain-protective A allele of rs165774 coincides with lower COMT activity, suggesting contribution to decreased pain sensitivity through increased dopaminergic rather than decreased adrenergic tone, characteristic of reference isoforms. Our results provide evidence for an essential role of the (a)-COMT isoform in nociceptive signaling and suggest that genetic variations in (a)-COMT isoforms may contribute to individual variability in pain phenotypes. PMID:26207649

  18. COMT gene locus: new functional variants.

    PubMed

    Meloto, Carolina B; Segall, Samantha K; Smith, Shad; Parisien, Marc; Shabalina, Svetlana A; Rizzatti-Barbosa, Célia M; Gauthier, Josée; Tsao, Douglas; Convertino, Marino; Piltonen, Marjo H; Slade, Gary Dmitri; Fillingim, Roger B; Greenspan, Joel D; Ohrbach, Richard; Knott, Charles; Maixner, William; Zaykin, Dmitri; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Reenilä, Ilkka; Männistö, Pekka T; Diatchenko, Luda

    2015-10-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) metabolizes catecholaminergic neurotransmitters. Numerous studies have linked COMT to pivotal brain functions such as mood, cognition, response to stress, and pain. Both nociception and risk of clinical pain have been associated with COMT genetic variants, and this association was shown to be mediated through adrenergic pathways. Here, we show that association studies between COMT polymorphic markers and pain phenotypes in 2 independent cohorts identified a functional marker, rs165774, situated in the 3' untranslated region of a newfound splice variant, (a)-COMT. Sequence comparisons showed that the (a)-COMT transcript is highly conserved in primates, and deep sequencing data demonstrated that (a)-COMT is expressed across several human tissues, including the brain. In silico analyses showed that the (a)-COMT enzyme features a distinct C-terminus structure, capable of stabilizing substrates in its active site. In vitro experiments demonstrated not only that (a)-COMT is catalytically active but also that it displays unique substrate specificity, exhibiting enzymatic activity with dopamine but not epinephrine. They also established that the pain-protective A allele of rs165774 coincides with lower COMT activity, suggesting contribution to decreased pain sensitivity through increased dopaminergic rather than decreased adrenergic tone, characteristic of reference isoforms. Our results provide evidence for an essential role of the (a)-COMT isoform in nociceptive signaling and suggest that genetic variations in (a)-COMT isoforms may contribute to individual variability in pain phenotypes.

  19. Schizophrenia copy number variants and associative learning

    PubMed Central

    Clifton, N E; Pocklington, A J; Scholz, B; Rees, E; Walters, J T R; Kirov, G; O'Donovan, M C; Owen, M J; Wilkinson, L S; Thomas, K L; Hall, J

    2017-01-01

    Large-scale genomic studies have made major progress in identifying genetic risk variants for schizophrenia. A key finding from these studies is that there is an increased burden of genomic copy number variants (CNVs) in schizophrenia cases compared with controls. The mechanism through which these CNVs confer risk for the symptoms of schizophrenia, however, remains unclear. One possibility is that schizophrenia risk CNVs impact basic associative learning processes, abnormalities of which have long been associated with the disorder. To investigate whether genes in schizophrenia CNVs impact on specific phases of associative learning we combined human genetics with experimental gene expression studies in animals. In a sample of 11 917 schizophrenia cases and 16 416 controls, we investigated whether CNVs from patients with schizophrenia are enriched for genes expressed during the consolidation, retrieval or extinction of associative memories. We show that CNVs from cases are enriched for genes expressed during fear extinction in the hippocampus, but not genes expressed following consolidation or retrieval. These results suggest that CNVs act to impair inhibitory learning in schizophrenia, potentially contributing to the development of core symptoms of the disorder. PMID:27956746

  20. Variants in CUL4B are Associated with Cerebral Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T.; Nakagawa, Tadashi; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Haas, Stefan A.; Hu, Hao; Bienek, Melanie; Vissers, Lisenka E.L.M.; Gilissen, Christian; Tzschach, Andreas; Busche, Andreas; Müsebeck, Jörg; Rump, Patrick; Mathijssen, Inge B.; Avela, Kristiina; Somer, Mirja; Doagu, Fatma; Philips, Anju K.; Rauch, Anita; Baumer, Alessandra; Voesenek, Krysta; Poirier, Karine; Vigneron, Jacqueline; Amram, Daniel; Odent, Sylvie; Nawara, Magdalena; Obersztyn, Ewa; Lenart, Jacek; Charzewska, Agnieszka; Lebrun, Nicolas; Fischer, Ute; Nillesen, Willy M.; Yntema, Helger G.; Järvelä, Irma; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; de Vries, Bert B.A.; Brunner, Han G.; van Bokhoven, Hans; Raymond, F. Lucy; Willemsen, Michèl A.A.P.; Chelly, Jamel; Xiong, Yue; Barkovich, A. James; Kalscheuer, Vera M.; Kleefstra, Tjitske; de Brouwer, Arjan P.M.

    2015-01-01

    Variants in cullin 4B (CUL4B) are a known cause of syndromic X-linked intellectual disability. Here, we describe an additional 25 patients from 11 families with variants in CUL4B. We identified nine different novel variants in these families and confirmed the pathogenicity of all nontruncating variants. Neuroimaging data, available for 15 patients, showed the presence of cerebral malformations in ten patients. The cerebral anomalies comprised malformations of cortical development (MCD), ventriculomegaly, and diminished white matter volume. The phenotypic heterogeneity of the cerebral malformations might result from the involvement of CUL-4B in various cellular pathways essential for normal brain development. Accordingly, we show that CUL-4B interacts with WDR62, a protein in which variants were previously identified in patients with microcephaly and a wide range of MCD. This interaction might contribute to the development of cerebral malformations in patients with variants in CUL4B. PMID:25385192

  1. Variants in CUL4B are associated with cerebral malformations.

    PubMed

    Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T; Nakagawa, Tadashi; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Haas, Stefan A; Hu, Hao; Bienek, Melanie; Vissers, Lisenka E L M; Gilissen, Christian; Tzschach, Andreas; Busche, Andreas; Müsebeck, Jörg; Rump, Patrick; Mathijssen, Inge B; Avela, Kristiina; Somer, Mirja; Doagu, Fatma; Philips, Anju K; Rauch, Anita; Baumer, Alessandra; Voesenek, Krysta; Poirier, Karine; Vigneron, Jacqueline; Amram, Daniel; Odent, Sylvie; Nawara, Magdalena; Obersztyn, Ewa; Lenart, Jacek; Charzewska, Agnieszka; Lebrun, Nicolas; Fischer, Ute; Nillesen, Willy M; Yntema, Helger G; Järvelä, Irma; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; de Vries, Bert B A; Brunner, Han G; van Bokhoven, Hans; Raymond, F Lucy; Willemsen, Michèl A A P; Chelly, Jamel; Xiong, Yue; Barkovich, A James; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Kleefstra, Tjitske; de Brouwer, Arjan P M

    2015-01-01

    Variants in cullin 4B (CUL4B) are a known cause of syndromic X-linked intellectual disability. Here, we describe an additional 25 patients from 11 families with variants in CUL4B. We identified nine different novel variants in these families and confirmed the pathogenicity of all nontruncating variants. Neuroimaging data, available for 15 patients, showed the presence of cerebral malformations in ten patients. The cerebral anomalies comprised malformations of cortical development (MCD), ventriculomegaly, and diminished white matter volume. The phenotypic heterogeneity of the cerebral malformations might result from the involvement of CUL-4B in various cellular pathways essential for normal brain development. Accordingly, we show that CUL-4B interacts with WDR62, a protein in which variants were previously identified in patients with microcephaly and a wide range of MCD. This interaction might contribute to the development of cerebral malformations in patients with variants in CUL4B.

  2. Characterization of two different apricot latent virus variants associated with peach asteroid spot and peach sooty ringspot diseases.

    PubMed

    Gentit, P; Foissac, X; Svanella-Dumas, L; Peypelut, M; Candresse, T

    2001-08-01

    Peach asteroid spot (PAS) and peach sooty ringspot (PSRS) are two diseases of stone fruit trees of unknown aetiology. The use of a cRNA probe of the newly described Apricot latent virus (ApLV), a tentative member of the Foveavirus genus, indicated the presence of cross-hybridizing agents in PAS isolate LA2 and in PSRS isolates Caserta 12 and Clava J4. Analysis of dsRNA patterns revealed in each case the presence of a major dsRNA band of about 9.6 kbp. The purified dsRNAs were used to obtain cDNA clones for isolates LA2 and Caserta 12. Sequence analysis of a 1.1 kbp cDNA clone from isolate LA2 showed very high homology with the known ApLV sequence, indicating that this isolate represents a closely related variant of ApLV. Sequence analysis of a 3.06 kbp Caserta 12 cDNA clone representing the 3' region of the genome revealed a genomic organization similar to that reported for other members of the Foveavirus genus, including the triple gene block and a large, 43.6 kDa coat protein. Sequence comparison with the CP gene of ApLV, the only sequenced region so far for this virus, showed an overall homology of 78%. These results indicate that the foveavirus represented by the Caserta 12 isolate of PSRS disease may be regarded as a distant variant of ApLV. The present results indicate that the viral agents associated with peach asteroid spot and peach sooty ringspot diseases might be variants of the recently described ApLV.

  3. False-negative cerebrospinal fluid cryptococcal antigen test due to small-colony variants of Cryptococcus neoformans meningitis in a patient with cystopleural shunt.

    PubMed

    To, Kelvin K W; Cheng, Vincent C C; Tang, Bone S F; Fan, Yiu-Wah; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2006-01-01

    This is the first report of a small-colony variant Cryptococcus neoformans isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid of a patient with cystopleural shunt associated chronic meningitis. Cryptococcal antigen testing of the cerebrospinal fluid and the serum were both negative. The atypical morphology and the false-negative test may lead to delay of diagnosis and treatment.

  4. The distribution of serotype-specific plasmids among different subgroups of strains of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis: characterization of molecular variants by restriction enzyme fragmentation patterns.

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, S. C.; Benson, C. E.; Platt, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    Four hundred and thirty-four isolates of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis were studied. They were grouped into five subsets defined by either the collection criteria or the parameter which formed the basis for subsequent analysis. Seventy-seven per cent harboured the serotype-specific plasmid (SSP). In 55% of the isolates this was the sole plasmid. Molecular variation in the SSP was detected in 17 (5%) of the isolates on the basis of restriction enzyme fragmentation pattern (REFP) analysis using Pst I and Sma I. The SSP variants were further characterized using additional restriction enzymes chosen to optimize the information content and analysed using a coefficient of similarity. A variant SSP designated pOG690 showed greater resemblance to the SSP of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium than Enteritidis; 89% and 68% respectively for Pst I and 79% and 55% respectively for Sma I. In respect of the Pst I data pOG690 shared at least 55 kb of DNA with the Typhimurium SSP and 37 kb with the SSP of Enteritidis. This variant was associated with poultry (duck, goose, chicken) and all isolates belonged to phage type 9b. Other variants were associated with phage types 4, 6, 6a, 9a, 11, 15 and 24. The epidemiological implications of these results are discussed. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7867741

  5. Characterization of influenza virus variants with different sizes of the non-structural (NS) genes and their potential as live influenza vaccine in poultry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influenza virus isolate A/turkey/Oregon/71-delNS1 (H7N3) has a 10 nucleotide deletion in the coding region of the NS1 gene and as a result produces a truncated NS1 protein. From a stock of this virus, we found that several variants with different sizes of the NS genes exist. The number of varian...

  6. Database for Parkinson Disease Mutations and Rare Variants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    due to time or knowledge restrained to sift through scattered information. Current databases do not address actual contribution of variant to PD...variant discovery , the Parkinson Disease project focuses on identification of rare variants and their differential accumulation within a gene region...During her three year fellowship in Miami, she has extended her knowledge and acquired vast experience working with next generation sequencing

  7. Genomic variant representation in a Chlamydia population is dynamic and adaptive with dependence on in vitro and in vivo passage

    PubMed Central

    Jasper, Deana K.; Sigar, Ira M.; Schripsema, Justin H.; Sainvil, Carlyn K.; Smith, Christopher L.; Yeruva, Laxmi; Rank, Roger G.; Murthy, Ashlesh K.; Widder, Jared R.; Ramsey, Kyle H.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that Chlamydia muridarum has multiple genomic variants that concomitantly vary in their in vitro and in vivo phenotype. Herein, we used real-time polymerase chain reaction-based genotyping assays to query plaque-cloned isolates of C. muridarum for the frequency of eight selected polymorphisms. These strains had no history of passage in vivo since their original isolation from laboratory mice. There was significant variance in the frequency of two of the eight polymorphisms assessed with the remaining exhibiting a low rate of variance. To determine if any of these polymorphisms were more favorable for in vivo conditions, we blindly passaged non-clonal C. muridarum three times at 7-day intervals through the urogenital tract of mice. Seven of the eight polymorphisms varied in frequency following in vivo passage and four of these varied between C. muridarum strains. Selected isolates displayed variable growth rates and cytopathic effect in vitro. We conclude that multiple genotypic variants are present within the existing known C. muridarum strains and that the frequency of these variants changes upon introduction into the mouse host. These findings lend support to the concept that genotypic proportional representation in a chlamydial population is dynamic and adaptive. PMID:25673672

  8. Genomic variant representation in a Chlamydia population is dynamic and adaptive with dependence on in vitro and in vivo passage.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Deana K; Sigar, Ira M; Schripsema, Justin H; Sainvil, Carlyn K; Smith, Christopher L; Yeruva, Laxmi; Rank, Roger G; Murthy, Ashlesh K; Widder, Jared R; Ramsey, Kyle H

    2015-02-01

    We have previously shown that Chlamydia muridarum has multiple genomic variants that concomitantly vary in their in vitro and in vivo phenotype. Herein, we used real-time polymerase chain reaction-based genotyping assays to query plaque-cloned isolates of C. muridarum for the frequency of eight selected polymorphisms. These strains had no history of passage in vivo since their original isolation from laboratory mice. There was significant variance in the frequency of two of the eight polymorphisms assessed with the remaining exhibiting a low rate of variance. To determine if any of these polymorphisms were more favorable for in vivo conditions, we blindly passaged non-clonal C. muridarum three times at 7-day intervals through the urogenital tract of mice. Seven of the eight polymorphisms varied in frequency following in vivo passage and four of these varied between C. muridarum strains. Selected isolates displayed variable growth rates and cytopathic effect in vitro. We conclude that multiple genotypic variants are present within the existing known C. muridarum strains and that the frequency of these variants changes upon introduction into the mouse host. These findings lend support to the concept that genotypic proportional representation in a chlamydial population is dynamic and adaptive.

  9. MUS-2, a novel variant of the chromosome-encoded β-lactamase MUS-1, from Myroides odoratimimus

    PubMed Central

    Al-Bayssari, C.; Gupta, S. Kumar; Dabboussi, F.; Hamze, M.; Rolain, J.-M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular mechanism of carbapenem resistance of three imipenem-resistant isolates of Myroides odoratimimus recovered from two livestock farms of cows and pigeons by rectal swab in Lebanon in January 2014. Investigation of imipenem resistance of these isolates using the modified Hodge test, the EDTA test, the modified CarbaNP test and the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry Ultraflex assay showed a carbapenemase activity due to the presence of a chromosome-encoded β-lactamase MUS, verified by PCR. However amplification and sequencing of this chromosomal gene showed a novel variant of it designated MUS-2 by the curators of the Lahey database of β-lactamases (http://www.lahey.org/Studies/webt.asp). Cloning of the blaMUS-2 was performed, followed by protein expression in Escherichia coli TOP 10. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis clearly showed that the three isolates belonged to the same clone. This study reports a novel variant of the chromosome-encoded blaMUS-1 associated with carbapenem resistance in Myroides odoratimimus and shows that animals may represent a reservoir of bacteria harbouring several variants of resistance genes. PMID:26257915

  10. Estrogen Receptor Mutants/Variants in Human Breast Cancer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-12-01

    tumors. Cloning and sequencing of the larger RT-PCR products identified three different types: a complete duplication of exon 6 occurring in 7.5 % of...generation of the exon deleted ER variant mRNAs and the truncated clone 4 type ER variant mRNA5 is likely to occur via an alternative splicing...Task 5). These include the clone 4 ER truncated variant and variants deleted in exon 2, exon 3, exons 2-3, exon 5 or exon 7. The next question addressed

  11. Rare variant detection using family-based sequencing analysis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Gang; Fan, Yu; Palculict, Timothy B; Shen, Peidong; Ruteshouser, E Cristy; Chi, Aung-Kyaw; Davis, Ronald W; Huff, Vicki; Scharfe, Curt; Wang, Wenyi

    2013-03-05

    Next-generation sequencing is revolutionizing genomic analysis, but this analysis can be compromised by high rates of missing true variants. To develop a robust statistical method capable of identifying variants that would otherwise not be called, we conducted sequence data simulations and both whole-genome and targeted sequencing data analysis of 28 families. Our method (Family-Based Sequencing Program, FamSeq) integrates Mendelian transmission information and raw sequencing reads. Sequence analysis using FamSeq reduced the number of false negative variants by 14-33% as assessed by HapMap sample genotype confirmation. In a large family affected with Wilms tumor, 84% of variants uniquely identified by FamSeq were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. In children with early-onset neurodevelopmental disorders from 26 families, de novo variant calls in disease candidate genes were corrected by FamSeq as mendelian variants, and the number of uniquely identified variants in affected individuals increased proportionally as additional family members were included in the analysis. To gain insight into maximizing variant detection, we studied factors impacting actual improvements of family-based calling, including pedigree structure, allele frequency (common vs. rare variants), prior settings of minor allele frequency, sequence signal-to-noise ratio, and coverage depth (∼20× to >200×). These data will help guide the design, analysis, and interpretation of family-based sequencing studies to improve the ability to identify new disease-associated genes.

  12. Population structure of KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates from midwestern U.S. hospitals.

    PubMed

    Wright, Meredith S; Perez, Federico; Brinkac, Lauren; Jacobs, Michael R; Kaye, Keith; Cober, Eric; van Duin, David; Marshall, Steven H; Hujer, Andrea M; Rudin, Susan D; Hujer, Kristine M; Bonomo, Robert A; Adams, Mark D

    2014-08-01

    Genome sequencing of carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates from regional U.S. hospitals was used to characterize strain diversity and the bla(KPC) genetic context. A phylogeny based on core single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) supports a division of sequence type 258 (ST258) into two distinct groups. The primary differences between the groups are in the capsular polysaccharide locus (cps) and their plasmid contents. A strict association between clade and KPC variant was found. The bla(KPC) gene was found on variants of two plasmid backbones. This study indicates that highly similar K. pneumoniae subpopulations coexist within the same hospitals over time.

  13. Population Structure of KPC-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates from Midwestern U.S. Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Meredith S.; Perez, Federico; Brinkac, Lauren; Jacobs, Michael R.; Kaye, Keith; Cober, Eric; van Duin, David; Marshall, Steven H.; Hujer, Andrea M.; Rudin, Susan D.; Hujer, Kristine M.

    2014-01-01

    Genome sequencing of carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates from regional U.S. hospitals was used to characterize strain diversity and the blaKPC genetic context. A phylogeny based on core single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) supports a division of sequence type 258 (ST258) into two distinct groups. The primary differences between the groups are in the capsular polysaccharide locus (cps) and their plasmid contents. A strict association between clade and KPC variant was found. The blaKPC gene was found on variants of two plasmid backbones. This study indicates that highly similar K. pneumoniae subpopulations coexist within the same hospitals over time. PMID:24913165

  14. Siderophore Production by Cystic Fibrosis Isolates of Burkholderia cepacia

    PubMed Central

    Darling, Patricia; Chan, Maria; Cox, Andrew D.; Sokol, Pamela A.

    1998-01-01

    Sixty-one Burkholderia cepacia isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and four plant isolates were screened for production of the siderophores salicylic acid (SA), pyochelin, cepabactin, and ornibactins and fingerprinted by a PCR-based randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method. Of the 24 RAPD types determined, 22 (92%) were associated with isolates that produced SA, 21 (87%) were associated with isolates that produced ornibactins, 15 (60%) were associated with isolates that produced pyochelin, and 3 (12%) were associated with isolates that produced cepabactin. Of the 24 RAPD types plus 2 phenotypic variants of types 1 and 9, 3 were associated with isolates that produced all four siderophores, 8 were associated with isolates that produced three siderophores, 12 were associated with isolates that produced two siderophores, and 3 were associated with isolates that produced only one siderophore. These results suggest that the numbers and types of siderophores produced by CF isolates of B. cepacia correlate with RAPD type and that SA and ornibactins are the most prevalent siderophores produced. PMID:9453660

  15. Virulence of a variant of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis that exists in the yeast form at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Villar, L A; Restrepo, A

    1989-01-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (ATCC 60885) produces conidia that, when plated in enriched media and incubated at 21-25 degrees C, give rise to a yeast-form variant (YRT) (ATCC 46678). The virulence of this variant for BALB/c mice has been compared with that of the yeast and conidia produced by the parent isolate. Adult female mice were inoculated intravenously with 10(7) viable cells of YRT or yeast, or 5 x 10(5) viable conidia. Mice were weighed weekly, and three mice were sacrificed at 1, 2, 3, 4 and 8 weeks post-inoculation and their organs weighed and prepared for determination of viable counts (colony forming units; c.f.u.). Animals infected with yeast cells or with conidia exhibited little weight loss in comparison with that seen in the YRT-infected mice which began to lose weight 1 week post-challenge. Organ weights increased in the YRT group, while the changes in the remaining two groups were minor. The c.f.u. from these organs also increased in the YRT-infected mice, whereas the infection in the yeast-and conidia-infected mice was self-limiting. A proportion (16.6%) of the YRT-infected animals died during the observation period. Conversely, no deaths occurred in the remaining groups. These results indicate that the YRT variant possesses increased virulence.

  16. Functional characterization of Ih-channel splice variants from Apis mellifera.

    PubMed

    Gisselmann, Günter; Wetzel, Christian H; Warnstedt, Maike; Hatt, Hanns

    2004-09-24

    We isolated splice variants of the AMIH cDNA by means of polymerase chain reaction and homology screening. Splicing at one site generates at least four different channel transcripts (AMIH, AMIHL, AMIHM and AMIHT), which code for ion-channel proteins that vary in the interloop regions between the membrane-spanning domains S4 and S5. HEK293 cells in which the AMIHL splice variants were functionally expressed generated currents that were activated by hyperpolarizing voltage steps. Compared to AMIH, AMIHL cells showed pronounced differences in the voltage dependency of activation: the incorporation of 32 extra amino acids between S4 and S5 shifts the activation curve by +25 mV. Intracellular cAMP made the current-activation potential still less negative and accelerated the activation more effectively than it does in AMIH cells. In vertebrates, functional diversity of Ih-channels is generated by four different genes. In Apis mellifera, splice variants coded by the single gene AMIH could generate a similar diversity.

  17. Association Between a Functional Variant Downstream of TNFAIP3 and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Adrianto, Indra; Wen, Feng; Templeton, Amanda; Wiley, Graham; King, Jarrod B.; Lessard, Christopher J.; Bates, Jared S.; Hu, Yanqing; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Guthridge, Joel M.; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Bang, So-Young; Boackle, Susan A.; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Petri, Michelle A.; Gallant, Caroline; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Reveille, John D.; Vila, Luis M.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Edberg, Jeffrey C.; Freedman, Barry I.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Jacob, Chaim O.; James, Judith A.; Kamen, Diane L.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Martin, Javier; Merrill, Joan T.; Niewold, Timothy B.; Park, So-Yeon; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Scofield, R. Hal; Stevens, Anne M.; Tsao, Betty P.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Harley, John B.; Moser, Kathy L.; Webb, Carol F.; Humphrey, Mary Beth; Montgomery, Courtney Gray; Gaffney, Patrick M.

    2011-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE, OMIM 152700) is an autoimmune disease characterized by self-reactive antibodies resulting in systemic inflammation and organ failure. TNFAIP3, encoding the ubiquitin-modifying enzyme A20, is an established susceptibility locus for SLE. By fine mapping and genomic resequencing in ethnically diverse populations we fully characterized the TNFAIP3 risk haplotype and isolated a novel TT>A polymorphic dinucleotide associated with SLE in subjects of European (P = 1.58 × 10−8; odds ratio (OR) = 1.70) and Korean (P = 8.33 × 10−10; OR = 2.54) ancestry. This variant, located in a region of high conservation and regulatory potential, bound a nuclear protein complex comprised of NF-κB subunits with reduced avidity. Furthermore, compared with the non-risk haplotype, the haplotype carrying this variant resulted in reduced TNFAIP3 mRNA and A20 protein expression. These results establish this TT>A variant as the most likely functional polymorphism responsible for the association between TNFAIP3 and SLE. PMID:21336280

  18. RcsB contributes to the distinct stress fitness among Escherichia coli O157:H7 curli variants of the 1993 hamburger-associated outbreak strains.

    PubMed

    Carter, Michelle Q; Parker, Craig T; Louie, Jacqueline W; Huynh, Steven; Fagerquist, Clifton K; Mandrell, Robert E

    2012-11-01

    Curli are adhesive fimbriae of Enterobactericaeae and are involved in surface attachment, cell aggregation, and biofilm formation. We reported previously that curli-producing (C(+)) variants of E. coli O157:H7 (EcO157) were much more acid sensitive than their corresponding curli-deficient (C(-)) variants; however, this difference was not linked to the curli fimbriae per se. Here, we investigated the underlying molecular basis of this phenotypic divergence. We identified large deletions in the rcsB gene of C(+) variants isolated from the 1993 U.S. hamburger-associated outbreak strains. rcsB encodes the response regulator of the RcsCDB two-component signal transduction system, which regulates curli biogenesis negatively but acid resistance positively. Further comparison of stress fitness revealed that C(+) variants were also significantly more sensitive to heat shock but were resistant to osmotic stress and oxidative damage, similar to C(-) variants. Transcriptomics analysis uncovered a large number of differentially expressed genes between the curli variants, characterized by enhanced expression in C(+) variants of genes related to biofilm formation, virulence, catabolic activity, and nutrient uptake but marked decreases in transcription of genes related to various types of stress resistance. Supplying C(+) variants with a functional rcsB restored resistance to heat shock and acid challenge in cells but blocked curli production, confirming that inactivation of RcsB in C(+) variants was the basis of fitness segregation within the EcO157 population. This study provides an example of how genome instability of EcO157 promotes intrapopulation diversification, generating subpopulations carrying an array of distinct phenotypes that may confer the pathogen with survival advantages in diverse environments.

  19. Coagulase gene typing of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from cows with mastitis in southeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract A typing procedure based on polymorphism of the coagulase gene (coa) was used to discriminate Staphylococcus aureus isolated from Minas Gerais dairy cows with mastitis. Amplification of the gene from the 64 S. aureus isolates produced 27 different polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products; 60 isolates showed only 1 amplicon, and 4 showed 2 amplicons. The isolates were grouped into 49 types by analyzing the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the coa gene; the 10 most common types accounted for 39% of the isolates. The results demonstrate that many variants of the coa gene are present in the studied region, although only a few predominate. PMID:16479723

  20. Melanoma risk associated with MC1R gene variants in Latvia and the functional analysis of rare variants.

    PubMed

    Ozola, Aija; Azarjana, Kristīne; Doniņa, Simona; Proboka, Guna; Mandrika, Ilona; Petrovska, Ramona; Cēma, Ingrīda; Heisele, Olita; Eņģele, Ludmila; Streinerte, Baiba; Pjanova, Dace

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the association of melanocortin 1 receptor gene (MC1R) variants with melanoma risk in a Latvian population, the MC1R gene was sequenced in 200 melanoma patients and 200 control persons. A functional study of previously uncharacterized, rare MC1R variants was also performed. In total, 26 different MC1R variants, including two novel variants Val165Ile and Val188Ile, were detected. The highest risk of melanoma was associated with the Arg151Cys variant (odds ratio (OR) 4.47, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.19-9.14, P<0.001). A gene dosage effect was observed, with melanoma risk for carriers of two variants being twice (OR 3.98, 95% CI 2.15-7.38, P<0.001) that of carriers of one variant (OR 1.98, 95% CI 1.26-3.11, P=0.003). After stratification according to the pigmentation phenotype, the risk of melanoma remained in groups with otherwise protective phenotypes. Functional analyses of eight previously uncharacterized MC1R variants revealed that a subset of them is functionally relevant. Our results support the contribution of MC1R variants to a genetic predisposition to melanoma in Latvia.

  1. AA479 antiserum: new reagent for the serotype characterization of atypical variants of Shigella flexneri.

    PubMed

    van der Ploeg, Claudia A; Rogé, Ariel D; Bordagorria, Ximena L; de Urquiza, María T; Viñas, María R; Pichel, Mariana G; Bruno, Susana B

    2015-01-01

    Shigella flexneri is divided into 13 serotypes based on the combination of antigenic determinants present in the O-antigen. A new O-antigen modification with phosphoethanolamine has been identified. The presence of this antigenic determinant (called E1037) is recognized by monoclonal antibody MASF IV-1. Given the increasing incidence of these new variants and the difficulty in supplying the monoclonal antibody to our country, we produced a polyclonal antiserum (AA479) through immunization with a S. flexneri Xv strain. The antiserum specificity was assessed by slide agglutination against isolates from clinical cases and a culture collection representing all Shigella serotypes. The results obtained demonstrated a 100% correlation between AA479 absorbed antiserum and monoclonal antibody MASF IV-1. The availability of AA479 antiserum in every public hospital in Argentina will allow us to identify atypical S. flexneri isolates in order to strengthen Shigella surveillance in our country and to compare with global epidemiological data.

  2. Genetic characterization of an isolate of HIV type 1 AG recombinant form circulating in Siberia, Russia.

    PubMed

    Baryshev, P B; Bogachev, V V; Gashnikova, N M

    2012-12-01

    Before 2008, HIV-1 subtype A was the predominant genetic variant in the Novosibirsk oblast of Russia as well as in most parts of this country. However, a rapid spread of the recombinant HIV-1 02_AG form has been reported in Novosibirsk since 2009. We have analyzed the genome of the 10.RU.6637 isolate, a HIV-1 02_AG recombinant form, which represents a monophyletic cluster of the HIV-1 variants widespread in this region. Phylogenetic analysis has shown that the Siberian 10.RU.6637 isolate displays the highest sequence identity to the HIV-1 subtype AG forms circulating in Uzbekistan. However, recombination analysis of 10.RU.6637 has demonstrated that this isolate is a recombinant form between HIV-1 subtype A and CRF02_AG, differing in its genetic structure from both the CRF02_AG reference sequences and the Central Asian variants of HIV-1 02_AG.

  3. Variant terminology. [for aerospace information systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchan, Ronald L.

    1991-01-01

    A system called Variant Terminology Switching (VTS) is set forth that is intended to provide computer-assisted spellings for terms that have American and British versions. VTS is based on the use of brackets, parentheses, and other symbols in conjunction with letters that distinguish American and British spellings. The symbols are used in the systems as indicators of actions such as deleting, adding, and replacing letters as well as replacing entire words and concepts. The system is shown to be useful for the intended purpose and also for the recognition of misspellings and for the standardization of computerized input/output. The VTS system is of interest to the development of international retrieval systems for aerospace and other technical databases that enhance the use by the global scientific community.

  4. A look-ahead variant of TFQMR

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, R.W.; Nachtigal, N.M.

    1994-12-31

    Recently, Freund proposed a Krylov subspace iteration, the transpose-free quasi-minimal residual method (TFQMR), for solving general nonsingular non-Hermitian linear systems. The algorithm relies on a version of the squared Lanczos process to generate the basis vectors for the underlying Krylov subspace. It then constructs iterates defined by a quasi-minimization property, which leads to a smooth and nearly monotone convergence behavior. The authors investigate a variant of TFQMR that uses look-ahead to avoid some of the problems associated with breakdowns in the underlying squared Lanczos procedure. They also present some numerical examples that illustrate the properties of the new method, as compared to the original TFQMR algorithm.

  5. Multiplex real-time PCR assay for detection and classification of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase gene (bla KPC) variants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Mediavilla, José R; Endimiani, Andrea; Rosenthal, Marnie E; Zhao, Yanan; Bonomo, Robert A; Kreiswirth, Barry N

    2011-02-01

    Carbapenem resistance mediated by plasmid-borne Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemases (KPC) is an emerging problem of significant clinical importance in Gram-negative bacteria. Multiple KPC gene variants (bla(KPC)) have been reported, with KPC-2 (bla(KPC-2)) and KPC-3 (bla(KPC-3)) associated with epidemic outbreaks in New York City and various international settings. Here, we describe the development of a multiplex real-time PCR assay using molecular beacons (MB-PCR) for rapid and accurate identification of bla(KPC) variants. The assay consists of six molecular beacons and two oligonucleotide primer pairs, allowing for detection and classification of all currently described bla(KPC) variants (bla(KPC-2) to bla(KPC-11)). The MB-PCR detection limit was 5 to 40 DNA copies per reaction and 4 CFU per reaction using laboratory-prepared samples. The MB-PCR probes were highly specific for each bla(KPC) variant, and cross-reactivity was not observed using DNA isolated from several bacterial species. A total of 457 clinical Gram-negative isolates were successfully characterized by our MB-PCR assay, with bla(KPC-3) and bla(KPC-2) identified as the most common types in the New York/New Jersey metropolitan region. The MB-PCR assay described herein is rapid, sensitive, and specific and should be useful for understanding the ongoing evolution of carbapenem resistance in Gram-negative bacteria. As novel bla(KPC) variants continue to emerge, the MB-PCR assay can be modified in response to epidemiologic developments.

  6. A genome-wide survey of CD4+ lymphocyte regulatory genetic variants identifies novel asthma genes

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sunita; Zhou, Xiaobo; Thibault, Derek M.; Himes, Blanca E.; Liu, Andy; Szefler, Stanley J.; Strunk, Robert; Castro, Mario; Hansel, Nadia N.; Diette, Gregory B.; Vonakis, Becky M.; Adkinson, N. Franklin; Avila, Lydiana; Soto-Quiros, Manuel; Barraza-Villareal, Albino; Lemanske, Robert F.; Solway, Julian; Krishnan, Jerry; White, Steven R.; Cheadle, Chris; Berger, Alan E.; Fan, Jinshui; Boorgula, Meher Preethi; Nicolae, Dan; Gilliland, Frank; Barnes, Kathleen; London, Stephanie J.; Martinez, Fernando; Ober, Carole; Celedón, Juan C.; Carey, Vincent J.; Weiss, Scott T.; Raby, Benjamin A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies have yet to identify the majority of genetic variants involved in asthma. We hypothesized that expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) mapping can identify novel asthma genes by enabling prioritization of putative functional variants for association testing. Objective We evaluated 6,706 cis-acting expression-associated variants (eSNP) identified through a genome-wide eQTL survey of CD4+ lymphocytes for association with asthma. Methods eSNP were tested for association with asthma in 359 asthma cases and 846 controls from the Childhood Asthma Management Program, with verification using family-based testing. Significant associations were tested for replication in 579 parent-child trios with asthma from Costa Rica. Further functional validation was performed by Formaldehyde Assisted Isolation of Regulatory Elements (FAIRE)-qPCR and Chromatin-Immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-PCR in lung derived epithelial cell lines (Beas-2B and A549) and Jurkat cells, a leukemia cell line derived from T lymphocytes. Results Cis-acting eSNP demonstrated associations with asthma in both cohorts. We confirmed the previously-reported association of ORMDL3/GSDMB variants with asthma (combined p=2.9 × 108). Reproducible associations were also observed for eSNP in three additional genes: FADS2 (p=0.002), NAGA (p=0.0002), and F13A1 (p=0.0001). We subsequently demonstrated that FADS2 mRNA is increased in CD4+ lymphocytes in asthmatics, and that the associated eSNPs reside within DNA segments with histone modifications that denote open chromatin status and confer enhancer activity. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the utility of eQTL mapping in the identification of novel asthma genes, and provide evidence for the importance of FADS2, NAGA, and F13A1 in the pathogenesis of asthma. PMID:24934276

  7. Genetic divergence of Chikungunya virus plaque variants from the Comoros Island (2005).

    PubMed

    Wasonga, Caroline; Inoue, Shingo; Rumberia, Cecilia; Michuki, George; Kimotho, James; Ongus, Juliette R; Sang, Rosemary; Musila, Lillian

    2015-12-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) from a human sample collected during the 2005 Chikungunya outbreak in the Comoros Island, showed distinct and reproducible large (L2) and small (S7) plaques which were characterized in this study. The parent strain and plaque variants were analysed by in vitro growth kinetics in different cell lines and their genetic similarity assessed by whole genome sequencing, comparative sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis. In vitro growth kinetic assays showed similar growth patterns of both plaque variants in Vero cells but higher viral titres of S7 compared to L2 in C6/36 cells. Amino acids (AA) alignments of the CHIKV plaque variants and S27 African prototype strain, showed 30 AA changes in the non-structural proteins (nsP) and 22 AA changes in the structural proteins. Between L2 and S7, only two AAs differences were observed. A missense substitution (C642Y) of L2 in the nsP2, involving a conservative AA substitution and a nonsense substitution (R524X) of S7 in the nsP3, which has been shown to enhance O'nyong-nyong virus infectivity and dissemination in Anopheles mosquitoes. The phenotypic difference observed in plaque size could be attributed to one of these AA substitutions. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the parent strain and its variants clustered closely together with each other and with Indian Ocean CHIKV strains indicating circulation of isolates with close evolutionary relatedness in the same outbreak. These observations pave way for important functional studies to understand the significance of the identified genetic changes in virulence and viral transmission in mosquito and mammalian hosts.

  8. Isolated sleep paralysis

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep paralysis - isolated; Parasomnia - isolated sleep paralysis ... Episodes of isolated sleep paralysis last from a few seconds to 1 or 2 minutes. During these episodes the person is unable to move or ...

  9. Molecular typing of monophasic Salmonella 4,[5]:i:- strains isolated in Belgium (2008-2011).

    PubMed

    Boland, Cécile; Bertrand, Sophie; Mattheus, Wesley; Dierick, Katelijne; Wattiau, Pierre

    2014-01-31

    To assess the distribution of Salmonella 4,[5]:i:- subtypes in the Belgian food chain and compare it to the subtypes associated with human infections, a molecular assessment was initiated. Two hundred fifty-three Salmonella isolates serotyped as 4,[5]:i:- during the period 2008-2011 in Belgium and originating from animal productions, food or human clinical samples were analysed by a specific duplex PCR. One hundred ninety-four isolates (76.7%) fit the profile of a S. Typhimurium monophasic variant as defined by the European Food Safety Authority. The other isolates possessed but did not express the phase II flagellin gene (23.3%). Multiple Locus Variable Number of Tandem Repeats Analysis (MLVA) revealed many but closely related profiles in the fljB-negative S. Typhimurium monophasic variant isolates. Some MLVA types were associated with both human and animal isolates but no unique source of human contamination could be demonstrated.

  10. Re-ranking sequencing variants in the post-GWAS era for accurate causal variant identification.

    PubMed

    Faye, Laura L; Machiela, Mitchell J; Kraft, Peter; Bull, Shelley B; Sun, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Next generation sequencing has dramatically increased our ability to localize disease-causing variants by providing base-pair level information at costs increasingly feasible for the large sample sizes required to detect complex-trait associations. Yet, identification of causal variants within an established region of association remains a challenge. Counter-intuitively, certain factors that increase power to detect an associated region can decrease power to localize the causal variant. First, combining GWAS with imputation or low coverage sequencing to achieve the large sample sizes required for high power can have the unintended effect of producing differential genotyping error among SNPs. This tends to bias the relative evidence for association toward better genotyped SNPs. Second, re-use of GWAS data for fine-mapping exploits previous findings to ensure genome-wide significance in GWAS-associated regions. However, using GWAS findings to inform fine-mapping analysis can bias evidence away from the causal SNP toward the tag SNP and SNPs in high LD with the tag. Together these factors can reduce power to localize the causal SNP by more than half. Other strategies commonly employed to increase power to detect association, namely increasing sample size and using higher density genotyping arrays, can, in certain common scenarios, actually exacerbate these effects and further decrease power to localize causal variants. We develop a re-ranking procedure that accounts for these adverse effects and substantially improves the accuracy of causal SNP identification, often doubling the probability that the causal SNP is top-ranked. Application to the NCI BPC3 aggressive prostate cancer GWAS with imputation meta-analysis identified a new top SNP at 2 of 3 associated loci and several additional possible causal SNPs at these loci that may have otherwise been overlooked. This method is simple to implement using R scripts provided on the author's website.

  11. Selection of sequence variants to improve dairy cattle genomic predictions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic prediction reliabilities improved when adding selected sequence variants from run 5 of the 1,000 bull genomes project. High density (HD) imputed genotypes for 26,970 progeny tested Holstein bulls were combined with sequence variants for 444 Holstein animals. The first test included 481,904 c...

  12. Exploring the basis of [PIN(+)] variant differences in [PSI(+)] induction.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Jaya; Liebman, Susan W

    2013-09-09

    Certain soluble proteins can form amyloid-like prion aggregates. Indeed, the same protein can make different types of aggregates, called variants. Each variant is heritable because it attracts soluble homologous protein to join its aggregate, which is then broken into seeds (propagons) and transmitted to daughter cells. [PSI(+)] and [PIN(+)] are respectively prion forms of Sup35 and Rnq1. Curiously, [PIN(+)] enhances the de novo induction of [PSI(+)]. Different [PIN(+)] variants do this to dramatically different extents. Here, we investigate the mechanism underlying this effect. Consistent with a heterologous prion cross-seeding model, different [PIN(+)] variants preferentially promoted the appearance of different variants of [PSI(+)]. However, we did not detect this specificity in vitro. Also, [PIN(+)] variant cross-seeding efficiencies were not proportional to the level of Rnq1 coimmunocaptured with Sup35 or to the number of [PIN(+)] propagons characteristic for that variant. This leads us to propose that [PIN(+)] variants differ in the cross-seeding quality of their seeds, following the Sup35/[PIN(+)] binding step.

  13. denovo-db: a compendium of human de novo variants

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Tychele N.; Yi, Qian; Krumm, Niklas; Huddleston, John; Hoekzema, Kendra; F. Stessman, Holly A.; Doebley, Anna-Lisa; Bernier, Raphael A.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Eichler, Evan E.

    2017-01-01

    Whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing have facilitated the large-scale discovery of de novo variants in human disease. To date, most de novo discovery through next-generation sequencing focused on congenital heart disease and neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs). Currently, de novo variants are one of the most significant risk factors for NDDs with a substantial overlap of genes involved in more than one NDD. To facilitate better usage of published data, provide standardization of annotation, and improve accessibility, we created denovo-db (http://denovo-db.gs.washington.edu), a database for human de novo variants. As of July 2016, denovo-db contained 40 different studies and 32,991 de novo variants from 23,098 trios. Database features include basic variant information (chromosome location, change, type); detailed annotation at the transcript and protein levels; severity scores; frequency; validation status; and, most importantly, the phenotype of the individual with the variant. We included a feature on our browsable website to download any query result, including a downloadable file of the full database with additional variant details. denovo-db provides necessary information for researchers to compare their data to other individuals with the same phenotype and also to controls allowing for a better understanding of the biology of de novo variants and their contribution to disease. PMID:27907889

  14. Foodborne outbreak and nonmotile Salmonella enterica variant, France.

    PubMed

    Le Hello, Simon; Brisabois, Anne; Accou-Demartin, Marie; Josse, Adeline; Marault, Muriel; Francart, Sylvie; Da Silva, Nathalie Jourdan; Weill, François-Xavier

    2012-01-01

    We report a food-related outbreak of salmonellosis in humans caused by a nonmotile variant of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium in France in 2009. This nonmotile variant had been circulating in laying hens but was not considered as Typhimurium and consequently escaped European poultry flock regulations.

  15. CBH1 homologs and variant CBH1 cellulases

    DOEpatents

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Neefe, Paulien

    2008-11-18

    Disclosed are a number of homologs and variants of Hypocrea jecorina Cel7A (formerly Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I or CBH1), nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The homologs and variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted and/or deleted.

  16. CBH1 homologs and variant CBH1 cellulases

    DOEpatents

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Neefe, Paulien

    2011-05-31

    Disclosed are a number of homologs and variants of Hypocrea jecorina Cel7A (formerly Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I or CBH1), nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The homologs and variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted and/or deleted.

  17. Selecting sequence variants to improve genomic predictions for dairy cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Millions of genetic variants have been identified by population-scale sequencing projects, but subsets are needed for routine genomic predictions or to include on genotyping arrays. Methods of selecting sequence variants were compared using both simulated sequence genotypes and actual data from run ...

  18. Variant course of bilateral anterior cerebral artery in semilobar holoprosencephaly.

    PubMed

    Pendharkar, Hima; Venkateshappa, Bhaskar Madivala; Prasad, Chandrajit

    2015-12-01

    We report an unusual case of semilobar holoprosencephaly with variant course of bilateral anterior cerebral arteries (ACA) in a 1-year-old child. This is a very rare arterial variant, given that holoprosencephalic brains are usually associated with azygous ACAs.

  19. [Antigen profile of rabies virus isolated from different species of non-hematophagous bats in the region of Presidente Prudente, State of São Paulo].

    PubMed

    Albas, Avelino; Souza, Edson Aroldo Novaes de; Lourenço, Rúbia Anzolin; Favoretto, Silvana Regina; Sodré, Miriam Martos

    2009-01-01

    Using the monoclonal antibody technique, the Clinical and Molecular Virology Laboratory of the Institute of Biomedical Sciences of the University of São Paulo typed 18 rabies virus samples from non-hematophagous bats of several species from the region of Presidente Prudente, SP, Brazil. Among these samples, 15 (82.3%) were defined as variant 3 (compatible with samples isolated from Desmodus rotundus bats) and three (16.7%) as variant 4 (compatible with samples isolated from Tadarida brasiliensis bats).

  20. Small colony variants have a major role in stability and persistence of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms.

    PubMed

    Mirani, Zulfiqar Ali; Aziz, Mubashir; Khan, Seema Ismat

    2015-02-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the significance of small colony variants (SCVs) in biofilm life cycle of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA). All of these MRSA and MSSA isolates were recovered from different food commodities. Molecular typing showed that 21 MRSA isolates carry SCCmecA type IV and belong to agr type II. Out of 15 MSSA isolates, 7 were found to carry agr type II, 5 agr type I and 2 agr type III. All of the MRSA isolates studied adopted biofilm mode of growth after exposure to sublethal doses of oxacillin. MSSA isolates, on the other hand, were biofilm producers by nature, that is, without exposure to any stress. The biomass of the biofilm reaches its maximum thickness after 48 h of incubation at 35 °C. It was noticed that biofilm population consists of wild type and SCVs. Moreover, the number of SCVs increases with the age of biofilm. The SCVs of MRSA were unable to readopt biofilm mode of growth independently, irrespective of the presence or absence of oxacillin. The SCVs of MSSA, on the other hand, quickly revert to normal life just after a single subculture and show biofilm formation without any stress. Molecular studies showed a parallel reduction in the expression of the genes icaA, sigβ and sarA, and also in the extracellular matrix production in SCVs of MRSA. This might be due to oxacillin as it seems to be a stress factor responsible for induction of biofilm formation in MRSA isolates. Contrary to the wild type, SCVs are metabolically inactive and do not respond to oxacillin, which is only active against the growing cells. Therefore, stress-responsive genes, that is, sigβ and sarA, are not induced. Conversely, MSSA isolates are natural biofilm producers without induction through any known factors.

  1. Prioritisation of structural variant calls in cancer genomes

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Brad A.; Cingolani, Pablo; Hofmann, Oliver; Sidoruk, Aleksandr; Lai, Zhongwu; Zakharov, Gennadii; Rodichenko, Mikhail; Alperovich, Mikhail; Jenkins, David; Carr, T. Hedley; Stetson, Daniel; Dougherty, Brian; Barrett, J. Carl; Johnson, Justin H.

    2017-01-01

    Sensitivity of short read DNA-sequencing for gene fusion detection is improving, but is hampered by the significant amount of noise composed of uninteresting or false positive hits in the data. In this paper we describe a tiered prioritisation approach to extract high impact gene fusion events from existing structural variant calls. Using cell line and patient DNA sequence data we improve the annotation and interpretation of structural variant calls to best highlight likely cancer driving fusions. We also considerably improve on the automated visualisation of the high impact structural variants to highlight the effects of the variants on the resulting transcripts. The resulting framework greatly improves on readily detecting clinically actionable structural variants. PMID:28392986

  2. Detection of rare functional variants using group ISIS.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yue S; Hao, Ning; An, Lingling

    2011-11-29

    Genome-wide association studies have been firmly established in investigations of the associations between common genetic variants and complex traits or diseases. However, a large portion of complex traits and diseases cannot be explained well by common variants. Detecting rare functional variants becomes a trend and a necessity. Because rare variants have such a small minor allele frequency (e.g., <0.05), detecting functional rare variants is challenging. Group iterative sure independence screening (ISIS), a fast group selection tool, was developed to select important genes and the single-nucleotide polymorphisms within. The performance of the group ISIS and group penalization methods is compared for detecting important genes in the Genetic Analysis Workshop 17 data. The results suggest that the group ISIS is an efficient tool to discover genes and single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated to phenotypes.

  3. Temporal Variant Frontotemporal Dementia is Associated with Globular Glial Tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Clark, Camilla N; Lashley, Tammaryn; Mahoney, Colin J; Warren, Jason D; Revesz, Tamas; Rohrer, Jonathan D

    2015-06-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a clinically and pathologically heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorder associated with atrophy of the frontal and temporal lobes. Most patients with focal temporal lobe atrophy present with either the semantic dementia subtype of FTD or the behavioral variant subtype. For patients with temporal variant FTD, the most common cause found on post-mortem examination has been a TDP-43 (transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 kDa) proteinopathy, but tauopathies have also been described, including Pick's disease and mutations in the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) gene. We report the clinical and imaging features of 2 patients with temporal variant FTD associated with a rare frontotemporal lobar degeneration pathology known as globular glial tauopathy. The pathologic diagnosis of globular glial tauopathy should be considered in patients with temporal variant FTD, particularly those who have atypical semantic dementia or an atypical parkinsonian syndrome in association with the right temporal variant.

  4. Histological variants of urothelial carcinoma: diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic implications.

    PubMed

    Amin, Mahul B

    2009-06-01

    It is well established that invasive urothelial carcinoma, involving the urinary bladder and renal pelvis, has marked propensity for divergent differentiation. In recent years, several 'variant' morphologies have been described and most have been recognized in the 2004 World Health Organization Classification. These histological variants of urothelial carcinoma have clinical significance at various levels, including diagnostic, that is, awareness of the morphological variant is essential in order to avoid diagnostic misinterpretations; prognostic for patient risk stratification; and therapeutic, where a diagnostic assignment of a particular variant may be associated with the administration of a therapy distinctive from that used in conventional invasive urothelial carcinoma. The diagnoses of micropapillary urothelial carcinoma, small-cell carcinoma, lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma and sarcomatoid carcinoma are prime examples where treatment protocols may be different than the usual muscle-invasive bladder cancer. This review discusses the variants of urothelial carcinoma, outlining for each the diagnostic features, differential diagnostic considerations and the clinical significance.

  5. Genetic variants in Alzheimer disease - molecular and brain network approaches.

    PubMed

    Gaiteri, Chris; Mostafavi, Sara; Honey, Christopher J; De Jager, Philip L; Bennett, David A

    2016-07-01

    Genetic studies in late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) are aimed at identifying core disease mechanisms and providing potential biomarkers and drug candidates to improve clinical care of AD. However, owing to the complexity of LOAD, including pathological heterogeneity and disease polygenicity, extraction of actionable guidance from LOAD genetics has been challenging. Past attempts to summarize the effects of LOAD-associated genetic variants have used pathway analysis and collections of small-scale experiments to hypothesize functional convergence across several variants. In this Review, we discuss how the study of molecular, cellular and brain networks provides additional information on the effects of LOAD-associated genetic variants. We then discuss emerging combinations of these omic data sets into multiscale models, which provide a more comprehensive representation of the effects of LOAD-associated genetic variants at multiple biophysical scales. Furthermore, we highlight the clinical potential of mechanistically coupling genetic variants and disease phenotypes with multiscale brain models.

  6. Asian-variant intravascular large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Pasch, Whitney; Costales, Cristina; Siddiqi, Imran; Mohrbacher, Ann

    2017-01-01

    Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL) is a rare and deadly malignancy involving the growth of lymphoma cells within vessel lumina of all organ types. IVLBCL is further divided into the hemophagocytic Asian variant and a classical Western variant. Both variants are difficult to diagnose by imaging, and although diagnostic criteria have been developed to guide workup, histopathological examination remains imperative. Treatment of IVLBCL remains difficult given the high mortality of the disease, but rituximab has emerged as a promising therapeutic option when combined with various cytotoxic regimens. The two main variants of IVLBCL generally manifest in their respective Asian or Western populations, and crossover between ethnicities is rare. We present the second described case of Asian-variant IVLBCL in an African American individual.

  7. Variants of RhD--current testing and clinical consequences.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Geoff

    2013-05-01

    Anti-D (-RH1) of the Rh blood group system is clinically important as it causes haemolytic transfusion reactions and haemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. Although most people are either D+ or D-, there is a plethora of D variants, often categorized as either weak D or partial D. These two types are inadequately defined and the dichotomy is potentially misleading. DVI is the D variant most commonly associated with anti-D production and UK guidelines recommend that patients are tested with anti-D reagents that do not react with DVI. Weak D types 1, 2, and 3 are seldom, if ever, associated with alloanti-D production, so a policy recommendation would be to treat patients with those D variants as D+, to preserve D- stocks, whereas patients with all other D variants would be treated as D-. All donors with D variant red cells, including DVI, should be treated as D+.

  8. Revisiting the Heidenhain Variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: Evidence for Prion Type Variability Influencing Clinical Course and Laboratory Findings.

    PubMed

    Baiardi, Simone; Capellari, Sabina; Ladogana, Anna; Strumia, Silvia; Santangelo, Mario; Pocchiari, Maurizio; Parchi, Piero

    2016-01-01

    The Heidenhain variant defines a peculiar clinical presentation of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) characterized by isolated visual disturbances at disease onset and reflecting the early targeting of prions to the occipital cortex. Molecular and histopathological typing, thus far performed in 23 cases, has linked the Heidenhain variant to the MM1 sCJD type. To contribute a comprehensive characterization of cases with the Heidenhain variant, we reviewed a series of 370 definite sCJD cases. Eighteen patients (4.9%) fulfilled the selection criteria. Fourteen of them belonging to sCJD types MM1 or MM1+2C had a short duration of isolated visual symptoms and overall clinical disease, a high prevalence of periodic sharp-wave complexes in EEG, and a marked increase of cerebrospinal fluid proteins t-tau and 14-3-3 levels. In contrast, three cases of the MM 2C or MM 2+1C types showed a longer duration of isolated visual symptoms and overall clinical disease, non-specific EEG findings, and cerebrospinal fluid concentration below threshold for the diagnosis of "probable" CJD of both 14-3-3 and t-tau. However, a brain DWI-MRI disclosed an occipital cortical hyperintensity in the majority of examined cases of both groups. While confirming the strong linkage with the methionine genotype at the polymorphic codon 129 of the prion protein gene, our results definitely establish that the Heidenhain variant can also be associated with the MM 2C sCJD type in addition to the more common MM1 type. Likewise, our results highlight the significant differences in clinical evolution and laboratory findings between cases according to the dominant PrPSc type (type 1 versus type 2).

  9. Revisiting the Heidenhain Variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: Evidence for Prion Type Variability Influencing Clinical Course and Laboratory Findings

    PubMed Central

    Baiardi, Simone; Capellari, Sabina; Ladogana, Anna; Strumia, Silvia; Santangelo, Mario; Pocchiari, Maurizio; Parchi, Piero

    2015-01-01

    The Heidenhain variant defines a peculiar clinical presentation of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) characterized by isolated visual disturbances at disease onset and reflecting the early targeting of prions to the occipital cortex. Molecular and histopathological typing, thus far performed in 23 cases, has linked the Heidenhain variant to the MM1 sCJD type. To contribute a comprehensive characterization of cases with the Heidenhain variant, we reviewed a series of 370 definite sCJD cases. Eighteen patients (4.9%) fulfilled the selection criteria. Fourteen of them belonging to sCJD types MM1 or MM1+2C had a short duration of isolated visual symptoms and overall clinical disease, a high prevalence of periodic sharp-wave complexes in EEG, and a marked increase of cerebrospinal fluid proteins t-tau and 14-3-3 levels. In contrast, three cases of the MM 2C or MM 2+1C types showed a longer duration of isolated visual symptoms and overall clinical disease, non-specific EEG findings, and cerebrospinal fluid concentration below threshold for the diagnosis of “probable” CJD of both 14-3-3 and t-tau. However, a brain DWI-MRI disclosed an occipital cortical hyperintensity in the majority of examined cases of both groups. While confirming the strong linkage with the methionine genotype at the polymorphic codon 129 of the prion protein gene, our results definitely establish that the Heidenhain variant can also be associated with the MM 2C sCJD type in addition to the more common MM1 type. Likewise, our results highlight the significant differences in clinical evolution and laboratory findings between cases according to the dominant PrPSc type (type 1 versus type 2). PMID:26682685

  10. Comparison of mammalian and bacterial expression library screening to detect recombinant alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor variants with enhanced thrombin inhibitory capacity.

    PubMed

    Gierczak, Richard F; Bhakta, Varsha; Xie, Michael; Sheffield, William P

    2015-08-20

    Serpins are a widely distributed family of serine proteases. A key determinant of their specificity is the reactive centre loop (RCL), a surface motif of ∼20 amino acids in length. Expression libraries of variant serpins could be rapidly probed with proteases to develop novel inhibitors if optimal systems were available. The serpin variant alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor M358R (API M358R) inhibits the coagulation protease thrombin, but at sub-maximal rates compared to other serpins. Here we compared two approaches to isolate functional API variants from serpin expression libraries, using the same small library of API randomized at residue 358 (M358X): flow cytometry of transfected HEK 293 cells expressing membrane-displayed API; and a thrombin capture assay (TCA) performed on pools of bacterial lysates expressing soluble API. No enrichment for specific P1 residues was observed when the RCL codons of the 1% of sorted transfected 293 cells with the highest fluorescent thrombin-binding signals were subcloned and sequenced. In contrast, screening of 16 pools of bacterial API-expressing transformants led to the facile identification of API M358R and M358K as functional variants. Kinetic characterization showed that API M358R inhibited thrombin 17-fold more rapidly than API M358K. Reducing the incubation time with immobilized thrombin improved the sensitivity of TCA to detect supra-active API M358R variants and was used to screen a hypervariable library of API variants expressing 16 different amino acids at residues 352-357. The most active variant isolated, with TLSATP substituted for FLEAI, inhibited thrombin 2.9-fold more rapidly than API M358R. Our results indicate that flow cytometric approaches used in protein engineering of antibodies are not appropriate for serpins, and highlight the utility of the optimized TCA for serpin protein engineering.

  11. Differential expression of GATA-3 in urothelial carcinoma variants.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yu; Heitzman, Joseph; Kamat, Ashish M; Dinney, Colin P; Czerniak, Bogdan; Guo, Charles C

    2014-07-01

    GATA binding protein 3 (GATA-3) is a novel immunohistochemical marker for urothelial carcinoma (UC); however, few studies have investigated GATA-3's role as a marker for UC variants. We used immunohistochemistry to assess GATA-3 expression in different UC variants, including micropapillary (n = 46), sarcomatoid (n = 43), small cell carcinoma (n = 22), and plasmacytoid (n = 16) variants, and we also compared GATA-3 expression in conventional bladder UC (n = 103) to that in squamous cell carcinoma (n = 14). GATA-3 expression was present in 70% (72/103) of conventional bladder UCs and highly concordant between matched primary and metastatic UCs. The GATA-3 expression levels of the micropapillary variants (57%; 26/46) and plasmacytoid variants (44%; 7/16) were not significantly different from that of conventional UC. However, the GATA-3 expression levels of the sarcomatoid variants (16%; 7/43) and small cell carcinoma variants (5%; 1/22), which only weakly expressed the protein, were significantly lower than that of conventional UC (P < .001). Only 7% of squamous cell carcinomas (1/14) expressed GATA-3, and it was also significantly lower than that of conventional UC (P < .001). GATA-3 expression was not significantly associated with tumor stage or patients' clinical outcomes. In conclusion, GATA-3 expression differed among UC variants. GATA-3 is a useful marker for confirming the urothelial origin of micropapillary and plasmacytoid UC variants but not that of sarcomatoid or small cell carcinoma variants. GATA-3 can also be used in differentiating UC from squamous cell carcinoma.

  12. Association of low-frequency and rare coding-sequence variants with blood lipids and coronary heart disease in 56,000 whites and blacks.

    PubMed

    Peloso, Gina M; Auer, Paul L; Bis, Joshua C; Voorman, Arend; Morrison, Alanna C; Stitziel, Nathan O; Brody, Jennifer A; Khetarpal, Sumeet A; Crosby, Jacy R; Fornage, Myriam; Isaacs, Aaron; Jakobsdottir, Johanna; Feitosa, Mary F; Davies, Gail; Huffman, Jennifer E; Manichaikul, Ani; Davis, Brian; Lohman, Kurt; Joon, Aron Y; Smith, Albert V; Grove, Megan L; Zanoni, Paolo; Redon, Valeska; Demissie, Serkalem; Lawson, Kim; Peters, Ulrike; Carlson, Christopher; Jackson, Rebecca D; Ryckman, Kelli K; Mackey, Rachel H; Robinson, Jennifer G; Siscovick, David S; Schreiner, Pamela J; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C; Pankow, James S; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Harris, Tamara B; Taylor, Kent D; Stafford, Jeanette M; Reynolds, Lindsay M; Marioni, Riccardo E; Dehghan, Abbas; Franco, Oscar H; Patel, Aniruddh P; Lu, Yingchang; Hindy, George; Gottesman, Omri; Bottinger, Erwin P; Melander, Olle; Orho-Melander, Marju; Loos, Ruth J F; Duga, Stefano; Merlini, Piera Angelica; Farrall, Martin; Goel, Anuj; Asselta, Rosanna; Girelli, Domenico; Martinelli, Nicola; Shah, Svati H; Kraus, William E; Li, Mingyao; Rader, Daniel J; Reilly, Muredach P; McPherson, Ruth; Watkins, Hugh; Ardissino, Diego; Zhang, Qunyuan; Wang, Judy; Tsai, Michael Y; Taylor, Herman A; Correa, Adolfo; Griswold, Michael E; Lange, Leslie A; Starr, John M; Rudan, Igor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Launer, Lenore J; Ordovas, Jose M; Levy, Daniel; Chen, Y-D Ida; Reiner, Alexander P; Hayward, Caroline; Polasek, Ozren; Deary, Ian J; Borecki, Ingrid B; Liu, Yongmei; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Wilson, James G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Kooperberg, Charles; Rich, Stephen S; Psaty, Bruce M; Rotter, Jerome I; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Rice, Kenneth; Boerwinkle, Eric; Kathiresan, Sekar; Cupples, L Adrienne

    2014-02-06

    Low-frequency coding DNA sequence variants in the proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 gene (PCSK9) lower plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), protect against risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), and have prompted the development of a new class of therapeutics. It is uncertain whether the PCSK9 example represents a paradigm or an isolated exception. We used the "Exome Array" to genotype >200,000 low-frequency and rare coding sequence variants across the genome in 56,538 individuals (42,208 European ancestry [EA] and 14,330 African ancestry [AA]) and tested these variants for association with LDL-C, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides. Although we did not identify new genes associated with LDL-C, we did identify four low-frequency (frequencies between 0.1% and 2%) variants (ANGPTL8 rs145464906 [c.361C>T; p.Gln121*], PAFAH1B2 rs186808413 [c.482C>T; p.Ser161Leu], COL18A1 rs114139997 [c.331G>A; p.Gly111Arg], and PCSK7 rs142953140 [c.1511G>A; p.Arg504His]) with large effects on HDL-C and/or triglycerides. None of these four variants was associated with risk for CHD, suggesting that examples of low-frequency coding variants with robust effects on both lipids and CHD will be limited.

  13. Deleterious coding variants in multi-case families with non-syndromic cleft lip and/or palate phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Pengelly, Reuben J.; Arias, Liliana; Martínez, Julio; Upstill-Goddard, Rosanna; Seaby, Eleanor G.; Gibson, Jane; Ennis, Sarah; Collins, Andrew; Briceño, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Nonsyndromic Cleft Lip and/or Palate (NSCLP) is regarded as a multifactorial condition in which clefting is an isolated phenotype, distinguished from the largely monogenic, syndromic forms which include clefts among a spectrum of phenotypes. Nonsyndromic clefting has been shown to arise through complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. However, there is increasing evidence that the broad NSCLP classification may include a proportion of cases showing familial patterns of inheritance and contain highly penetrant deleterious variation in specific genes. Through exome sequencing of multi-case families ascertained in Bogota, Colombia, we identify 28 non-synonymous single nucleotide variants that are considered damaging by at least one predictive score. We discuss the functional impact of candidate variants identified. In one family we find a coding variant in the MSX1 gene which is predicted damaging by multiple scores. This variant is in exon 2, a highly conserved region of the gene. Previous sequencing has suggested that mutations in MSX1 may account for ~2% of NSCLP. Our analysis further supports evidence that a proportion of NSCLP cases arise through monogenic coding mutations, though further work is required to unravel the complex interplay of genetics and environment involved in facial clefting. PMID:27456059

  14. A novel homozygous variant in the dsp gene underlies the first case of non-syndromic form of alopecia.

    PubMed

    Jan, Abid; Basit, Sulman; Wakil, Salma M; Ramzan, Khushnooda; Ahmad, Wasim

    2015-11-01

    Autosomal recessive forms of hair loss (alopecia) disorders have previously been associated with variants in at least five different genes including hairless (HR), desmoglein-4 (DSG4), desmocollin-3 (DSC3), lipase-H (LIPH), and lysophosphatidic acid receptor 6 (LPAR6). Here, we report the first familial case of alopecia resulting from a novel homozygous variant in the DSP gene. Since previous reports indicated the presence of heart abnormalities in patients carrying variants in the DSP gene; therefore, the echocardiographic evaluations of all affected members were performed. The results clearly excluded the presence of any form of heart abnormality in patients of the present family. Human genome scan mapped a disease locus on chromosome 6p25.1-p23, harboring DSP gene. Sequence analysis identified a novel homozygous missense variant [c.1493C > T (p.Pro498Leu)] in the DSP gene as the underlying genetic cause of non-syndromic alopecia in the family. The transition alters the completely conserved Pro498 residue in the SH3 domain of plakin that contributes to the stability and rigidity of this subfamily of spectrin repeats (SRs) containing proteins. Our study strengthens the evidence that hereditary hair loss disorders are genetically heterogeneous and imply that isolated form of alopecia is allelic with cardiocutaneous syndromes.

  15. Cross-resistance analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 variants individually selected for resistance to five different protease inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Tisdale, M; Myers, R E; Maschera, B; Parry, N R; Oliver, N M; Blair, E D

    1995-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitor-resistant variants, isolated on passage of HIV-1HXB2 in MT-4 cells with five different protease inhibitors, have been examined for cross-resistance to five inhibitors. The protease inhibitors studied were Ro 31-8959, A-77003, XM323, L-735,524, and VX-478. Resistant variants with two to four mutations within their protease sequence and 9- to 40-fold-decreased susceptibility were selected for all five inhibitors within six to eight passes in cell culture. Passage of a zidovudine-resistant mutant in Ro 31-8959 generated a dual reverse transcriptase- and protease-resistant virus. Variants were cloned directly into a modified pHXB2-D infectious clone for cross-resistance analysis. Although the resistant variants selected possessed different combinations of protease mutations for each inhibitor, many showed cross-resistance to the other inhibitors, and one showed cross-resistance to all five inhibitors. Interestingly, some mutants showed increased susceptibility to some inhibitors. Further HIV passage studies in the combined presence of two protease inhibitors demonstrated that in vitro it was possible to delay significantly selection of mutations producing resistance to one or both inhibitors. These studies indicate that there may be some rationale for combining different protease inhibitors as well as protease and reverse transcriptase inhibitors in HIV combination therapy. PMID:7486905

  16. αIIbβ3 variants defined by next-generation sequencing: Predicting variants likely to cause Glanzmann thrombasthenia

    PubMed Central

    Buitrago, Lorena; Rendon, Augusto; Liang, Yupu; Simeoni, Ilenia; Negri, Ana; Filizola, Marta; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Coller, Barry S.; Alessi, Marie-Christine; Ballmaier, Matthias; Bariana, Tadbir; Bellissimo, Daniel; Bertoli, Marta; Bray, Paul; Bury, Loredana; Carrell, Robin; Cattaneo, Marco; Collins, Peter; French, Deborah; Favier, Remi; Freson, Kathleen; Furie, Bruce; Germeshausen, Manuela; Ghevaert, Cedric; Gomez, Keith; Goodeve, Anne; Gresele, Paolo; Guerrero, Jose; Hampshire, Dan J.; Hadinnapola, Charaka; Heemskerk, Johan; Henskens, Yvonne; Hill, Marian; Hogg, Nancy; Johnsen, Jill; Kahr, Walter; Kerr, Ron; Kunishima, Shinji; Laffan, Michael; Natwani, Amit; Neerman-Arbez, Marguerite; Nurden, Paquita; Nurden, Alan; Ormiston, Mark; Othman, Maha; Ouwehand, Willem; Perry, David; Vilk, Shoshana Ravel; Reitsma, Pieter; Rondina, Matthew; Simeoni, Ilenia; Smethurst, Peter; Stephens, Jonathan; Stevenson, William; Szkotak, Artur; Turro, Ernest; Van Geet, Christel; Vries, Minka; Ward, June; Waye, John; Westbury, Sarah; Whiteheart, Sidney; Wilcox, David; Zhang, Bi

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing is transforming our understanding of human genetic variation but assessing the functional impact of novel variants presents challenges. We analyzed missense variants in the integrin αIIbβ3 receptor subunit genes ITGA2B and ITGB3 identified by whole-exome or -genome sequencing in the ThromboGenomics project, comprising ∼32,000 alleles from 16,108 individuals. We analyzed the results in comparison with 111 missense variants in these genes previously reported as being associated with Glanzmann thrombasthenia (GT), 20 associated with alloimmune thrombocytopenia, and 5 associated with aniso/macrothrombocytopenia. We identified 114 novel missense variants in ITGA2B (affecting ∼11% of the amino acids) and 68 novel missense variants in ITGB3 (affecting ∼9% of the amino acids). Of the variants, 96% had minor allele frequencies (MAF) < 0.1%, indicating their rarity. Based on sequence conservation, MAF, and location on a complete model of αIIbβ3, we selected three novel variants that affect amino acids previously associated with GT for expression in HEK293 cells. αIIb P176H and β3 C547G severely reduced αIIbβ3 expression, whereas αIIb P943A partially reduced αIIbβ3 expression and had no effect on fibrinogen binding. We used receiver operating characteristic curves of combined annotation-dependent depletion, Polyphen 2-HDIV, and sorting intolerant from tolerant to estimate the percentage of novel variants likely to be deleterious. At optimal cut-off values, which had 69–98% sensitivity in detecting GT mutations, between 27% and 71% of the novel αIIb or β3 missense variants were predicted to be deleterious. Our data have implications for understanding the evolutionary pressure on αIIbβ3 and highlight the challenges in predicting the clinical significance of novel missense variants. PMID:25827233

  17. αIIbβ3 variants defined by next-generation sequencing: predicting variants likely to cause Glanzmann thrombasthenia.

    PubMed

    Buitrago, Lorena; Rendon, Augusto; Liang, Yupu; Simeoni, Ilenia; Negri, Ana; Filizola, Marta; Ouwehand, Willem H; Coller, Barry S

    2015-04-14

    Next-generation sequencing is transforming our understanding of human genetic variation but assessing the functional impact of novel variants presents challenges. We analyzed missense variants in the integrin αIIbβ3 receptor subunit genes ITGA2B and ITGB3 identified by whole-exome or -genome sequencing in the ThromboGenomics project, comprising ∼32,000 alleles from 16,108 individuals. We analyzed the results in comparison with 111 missense variants in these genes previously reported as being associated with Glanzmann thrombasthenia (GT), 20 associated with alloimmune thrombocytopenia, and 5 associated with aniso/macrothrombocytopenia. We identified 114 novel missense variants in ITGA2B (affecting ∼11% of the amino acids) and 68 novel missense variants in ITGB3 (affecting ∼9% of the amino acids). Of the variants, 96% had minor allele frequencies (MAF) < 0.1%, indicating their rarity. Based on sequence conservation, MAF, and location on a complete model of αIIbβ3, we selected three novel variants that affect amino acids previously associated with GT for expression in HEK293 cells. αIIb P176H and β3 C547G severely reduced αIIbβ3 expression, whereas αIIb P943A partially reduced αIIbβ3 expression and had no effect on fibrinogen binding. We used receiver operating characteristic curves of combined annotation-dependent depletion, Polyphen 2-HDIV, and sorting intolerant from tolerant to estimate the percentage of novel variants likely to be deleterious. At optimal cut-off values, which had 69-98% sensitivity in detecting GT mutations, between 27% and 71% of the novel αIIb or β3 missense variants were predicted to be deleterious. Our data have implications for understanding the evolutionary pressure on αIIbβ3 and highlight the challenges in predicting the clinical significance of novel missense variants.

  18. Characterization of macrolide efflux pump mef subclasses detected in clinical isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes isolated between 1999 and 2005.

    PubMed

    Blackman Northwood, J; Del Grosso, M; Cossins, L R; Coley, M D; Creti, R; Pantosti, A; Farrell, D J

    2009-05-01

    The macrolide efflux mechanism of resistance, mef, was characterized in community-acquired respiratory tract infections with Streptococcus pyogenes. Fifty-four (4.6%) M phenotype isolates were screen tested as negative for mef(A). Of these 54 isolates, 5 (0.4%), 27 (2.3%), and 1 (0.1%) were considered to be mef(I) positive, a novel mosaic variant of mef, or a novel subclass of mef, respectively. This study shows (i) the definitive presence of mef(E) in S. pyogenes and its global distribution, (ii) the presence of a mosaic variant of mef composed of mef(A) and mef(E), (iii) the previously undescribed presence of mef(I) in S. pyogenes, and (iv) the presence of a novel subclass of mef in S. pyogenes.

  19. Genetic variants linked to education predict longevity.

    PubMed

    Marioni, Riccardo E; Ritchie, Stuart J; Joshi, Peter K; Hagenaars, Saskia P; Okbay, Aysu; Fischer, Krista; Adams, Mark J; Hill, W David; Davies, Gail; Nagy, Reka; Amador, Carmen; Läll, Kristi; Metspalu, Andres; Liewald, David C; Campbell, Archie; Wilson, James F; Hayward, Caroline; Esko, Tõnu; Porteous, David J; Gale, Catharine R; Deary, Ian J

    2016-11-22

    Educational attainment is associated with many health outcomes, including longevity. It is also known to be substantially heritable. Here, we used data from three large genetic epidemiology cohort studies (Generation Scotland, n = ∼17,000; UK Bio