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Sample records for nootropic drug noopept

  1. [The original nootropic and neuroprotective drug noopept potentiates the anticonvulsant activity of valproate in mice].

    PubMed

    Kravchenko, E V; Ponteleeva, I V; Trofimov, S S; Lapa, V I; Ostrovskaia, R U; Voronina, T A

    2009-01-01

    The influence of the original dipeptide drug noopept, known to possess nootrope, neuroprotector, and anxiolytic properties, on the anticonvulsant activity of the antiepileptic drug valproate has been studied on the model of corazole-induced convulsions in mice. Neither a single administration of noopept (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) nor its repeated introduction in 10 or 35 days enhanced the convulsant effect of corazole, which is evidence that noopept alone does not possess anticonvulsant properties. Prolonged (five weeks) preliminary administration of noopept enhanced the anticonvulsant activity of valproate. This result justifies the joint chronic administration of noopept in combination with valproate in order to potentiate the anticonvulsant effect of the latter drug. In addition, the administration of noopept favorably influences the cognitive functions and suppresses the development of neurodegenerative processes. PMID:20095393

  2. Neuroprotective and nootropic drug noopept rescues α-synuclein amyloid cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xueen; Gharibyan, Anna L; Öhman, Anders; Liu, Yonggang; Olofsson, Anders; Morozova-Roche, Ludmilla A

    2011-12-16

    Parkinson's disease is a common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by α-synuclein (α-Syn)-containing Lewy body formation and selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. We have demonstrated the modulating effect of noopept, a novel proline-containing dipeptide drug with nootropic and neuroprotective properties, on α-Syn oligomerization and fibrillation by using thioflavin T fluorescence, far-UV CD, and atomic force microscopy techniques. Noopept does not bind to a sterically specific site in the α-Syn molecule as revealed by heteronuclear two-dimensional NMR analysis, but due to hydrophobic interactions with toxic amyloid oligomers, it prompts their rapid sequestration into larger fibrillar amyloid aggregates. Consequently, this process rescues the cytotoxic effect of amyloid oligomers on neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells as demonstrated by using cell viability assays and fluorescent staining of apoptotic and necrotic cells and by assessing the level of intracellular oxidative stress. The mitigating effect of noopept against amyloid oligomeric cytotoxicity may offer additional benefits to the already well-established therapeutic functions of this new pharmaceutical. PMID:21986202

  3. [The original novel nootropic and neuroprotective agent noopept].

    PubMed

    Ostrovskaia, R U; Gudasheva, T A; Voronina, T A; Seredenin, S B

    2002-01-01

    The paper describes pharmacological properties of the new nootropic drug noopept created using an original approach based on the imitation of a nonpeptide nootrope structure by means of the short-peptide design. In particular, the structure of pyracetam was designed using dipeptide nootropes. Experimental investigations of noopept (N-phenylacetyl-L-polyglycine ethyl ester) showed that the new drug exceeds pyracetam both with respect to the effective dose level (1000 times lower for noopept than for pyracetam) and in the spectrum of mnemotropic activity. In contrast to pyracetam facilitating only the early stages of the memory process, noopept positively influences the memory consolidation and retrieval steps as well. The new drug produces an additional selective anxiolytic action. The pronounced neuroprotective effect of noopept was demonstrated both in vivo (in cases of various forms of brain ischemia) and in vitro (on various neuronal models). The drug action is based on the antioxidant effect, the antiinflammatory action, and the ability to inhibit the neurotoxicity of excess calcium and glutamate, and to improve the blood rheology. It was established for the first time that the activity of noopept is retained both upon parenteral introduction and upon peroral administration, which is a principal advantage of this proline-containing dipeptide over other, more complex peptides. This property provided a basis for the development of a medicinal form of noopept for peroral usage. At present, noopept tablets (noopept 5 and 10 mg) are under clinical assessment as a means of treating cognitive deficiency of cerebrovascular and post-traumatic origin. PMID:12596521

  4. Original nootropic drug noopept prevents memory deficit in rats with muscarinic and nicotinic receptor blockade.

    PubMed

    Radionova, K S; Belnik, A P; Ostrovskaya, R U

    2008-07-01

    Antiamnesic activity of Noopept was studied on the original three-way model of conditioned passive avoidance response, which allows studying spatial component of memory. Cholinoceptor antagonists of both types (scopolamine and mecamylamine) decreased entry latency and reduced the probability for selection of the safe compartment. Noopept abolished the antiamnesic effect of cholinoceptor antagonists and improved spatial preference. PMID:19145351

  5. Nootropic dipeptide noopept enhances inhibitory synaptic transmission in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Povarov, I S; Kondratenko, R V; Derevyagin, V I; Ostrovskaya, R U; Skrebitskii, V G

    2015-01-01

    Application of nootropic agent Noopept on hippocampal slices from Wistar rats enhanced the inhibitory component of total current induced by stimulation of Shaffer collaterals in CA1 pyramidal neurons, but did not affect the excitatory component. A direct correlation between the increase in the amplitude of inhibitory current and agent concentration was found. The substance did not affect the release of inhibitory transmitters from terminals in the pyramidal neurons, which indicated changes in GABAergic interneurons.

  6. Nootropic dipeptide noopept enhances inhibitory synaptic transmission in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Povarov, I S; Kondratenko, R V; Derevyagin, V I; Ostrovskaya, R U; Skrebitskii, V G

    2015-01-01

    Application of nootropic agent Noopept on hippocampal slices from Wistar rats enhanced the inhibitory component of total current induced by stimulation of Shaffer collaterals in CA1 pyramidal neurons, but did not affect the excitatory component. A direct correlation between the increase in the amplitude of inhibitory current and agent concentration was found. The substance did not affect the release of inhibitory transmitters from terminals in the pyramidal neurons, which indicated changes in GABAergic interneurons. PMID:25573367

  7. Novel nootropic dipeptide Noopept increases inhibitory synaptic transmission in CA1 pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Kondratenko, Rodion V; Derevyagin, Vladimir I; Skrebitsky, Vladimir G

    2010-05-31

    Effects of newly synthesized nootropic and anxiolytic dipeptide Noopept on inhibitory synaptic transmission in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells were investigated using patch-clamp technique in whole-cell configuration. Bath application of Noopept (1 microM) significantly increased the frequency of spike-dependant spontaneous IPSCs whereas spike-independent mIPSCs remained unchanged. It was suggested that Noopept mediates its effect due to the activation of inhibitory interneurons terminating on CA1 pyramidal cells. Results of current clamp recording of inhibitory interneurons residing in stratum radiatum confirmed this suggestion. PMID:20382202

  8. [Effect of the novel dipeptide nootropic agent noopept and its metabolite cyclo-L-prolylglycine on the transcallosal evoked potential in the rat brain].

    PubMed

    Molodavkin, G M; Borlikova, G G; Voronina, T A; Gudasheva, T A; Ostrovskaia, R U; Tushmalova, N A; Seredenin, S B

    2002-01-01

    The effect of new nootropic dipeptides--noopept (N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine, GVS-111) and its metabolite (cyclo-L-prolylglycine)--and a standard nootrope piracetam on the transcallosal evoked potential (TEP) in rat brain was studied. In the dose range from 150 to 300 mg/kg, piracetam increased the TEP amplitude, which exhibited a maximum after 1.5-2 h and then gradually decreased. Both noopept and cyclo-L-prolylglycine also increased the TEP amplitude, which attained a plateau and retained this level over the entire observation time (above 3.5 h). All the nootropes studied increased both components of the evoked potential. Piracetam and cyclo-L-prolylglycine led to an approximately equal increase in both waves, while noopept induced a somewhat greater increase in the negative TEP wave amplitude. It is suggested that the positive effect of noopept and cyclo-L-prolylglycine upon the interhemispheric signal transfer (indicated by the improved transcallosal response) can be considered as a potential neurophysiological basis for a positive drug influence on the behavioral level. PMID:12109288

  9. [Anti-inflammatory properties of noopept (dipeptide nootropic agent GVS-111)].

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, L P; Miramedova, M G; Alekseeva, S V; Gudasheva, T A; Ostrovskaia, R U; Seredenin, S B

    2002-01-01

    It is established that single intravenous (0.5 and 5 mg/kg, p.o.) or single peroral (10, 50, 100 mg/kg) and prolonged peroral (5 mg/kg, over 10 days) administration of noopept produces a dose-dependent inhibition of the model inflammatory response to concanavaline A in CBA mice. Intravenously injected (5 mg/kg) noopept suppressed the acute nonimmune carrageenan-induced foot inflammation in rats by 62.2% within 3 h. The most pronounced antiinflammatory effect of dipeptide was observed on the model of adjuvant arthritis in rats, where the drug administered over 25 days in a daily dose of 0.5 mg/kg (i.m.) or 5 mg/kg (p.o.) significantly reduced the chronic immune inflammation (on the 12th day, by 94.0 and 74.1%, respectively). The in vitro experiments with neutrophilic leukocytes of F1(CBA.C57BL/6) mice treated with noopept in a single dose of 5 mg/kg (i.v.) showed a 5- to 6-fold suppression of the hemiluminescence stimulated by opsoinized zymosan or phorbolmyristate acetate. It is suggested that the antiinflammatory activity of noopept is probably related to its antioxidant properties. PMID:12109295

  10. Efficiency of noopept in streptozotocin-induced diabetes in rats.

    PubMed

    Ostrovskaya, R U; Ozerova, I V; Gudascheva, T A; Kapitsa, I G; Ivanova, E A; Voronina, T A; Seredenin, S B

    2013-01-01

    We studied the effects of new nootropic and neuroprotective drug Noopept (N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine ethyl ester) in various dosage regimens on the dynamics of glycemia, body weight, and pain sensitivity in rats receiving diabetogenic toxin streptozotocin. In experimental diabetic rats, Noopept alleviated glycemia and weight loss and normalized enhanced pain sensitivity. The normalizing effect of Noopept was most pronounced when it was administered as a preventive agent prior to injection of the toxin. Both preventive and therapeutic administration of Noopept (delayed injections included) significantly weakened the examined metabolic effects of diabetogenic toxin. Possible mechanisms of the antidiabetic action of Noopept are analyzed. PMID:23484194

  11. [Platelet hyperreactivity and antiaggregatory properties of nootropic drugs under conditions of alloxan-induced diabetes in rats].

    PubMed

    Zhiliuk, V I; Levykh, A É; Mamchur, V I

    2012-01-01

    The effects of nootropic drugs (noopept, pentoxifylline, piracetam, pramiracetam, Ginkgo biloba extract, entrop, cerebrocurin and citicoline) on platelet aggregation in rats with experimental diabetes have been studied. It is established that all these drugs exhibit an inhibitory action of various degrees against platelet hyperreactivity under conditions of chronic hyperglycemia. The maximum universality of the antiaggregatory action is characteristic of pramiracetam, entrop and Ginkgo biloba extract. PMID:22702111

  12. [Studying specific effects of nootropic drugs on glutamate receptors in the rat brain].

    PubMed

    Firstova, Iu Iu; Vasil'eva, E V; Kovalev, G I

    2011-01-01

    The influence of nootropic drugs of different groups (piracetam, phenotropil, nooglutil, noopept, semax, meclofenoxate, pantocalcine, and dimebon) on the binding of the corresponding ligands to AMPA, NMDA, and mGlu receptors of rat brain has been studied by the method of radio-ligand binding in vitro. It is established that nooglutil exhibits pharmacologically significant competition with a selective agonist of AMPA receptors ([G-3H]Ro 48-8587) for the receptor binding sites (with IC50 = 6.4 +/- 0.2 microM), while the competition of noopept for these receptor binding sites was lower by an order of magnitude (IC50 = 80 +/- 5.6 microM). The heptapeptide drug semax was moderately competitive with [G-3H]LY 354740 for mGlu receptor sites (IC50 = 33 +/- 2.4 microM). Dimebon moderately influenced the specific binding of the ligand of NMDA receptor channel ([G-3H]MK-801) at IC50 = 59 +/- 3.6 microM. Nootropic drugs of the pyrrolidone group (piracetam, phenotropil) as well as meclofenoxate, pantocalcine (pantogam) in a broad rage of concentrations (10(-4)-10(-10) M) did not affect the binding of the corresponding ligands to glutamate receptors (IC50 100 pM). Thus, the direct neurochemical investigation was used for the first time to qualitatively characterize the specific binding sites for nooglutil and (to a lower extent) noopept on AMPA receptors, for semax on metabotropic glutamate receptors, and for dimebon on the channel region of NMDA receptors. The results are indicative of a selective action of some nootropes on the glutamate family. PMID:21476267

  13. [Effects of nootropic drugs on behavior of BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice in the exploratory cross-maze test].

    PubMed

    Vasil'eva, E V; Salimov, R M; Kovalev, G I

    2012-01-01

    Exploratory behavior, locomotor activity, and anxiety in inbred mice of C57BL/6 and BALB/c strains subchronically treated with placebo or various types of nootropic (cognition enhancing) drugs (piracetam, phenotropil, noopept, semax, pantogam, nooglutil) have been evaluated using the exploratory cross-maze test. It was found that BALB/c mice in comparison to C57BL/6 mice are characterized by greater anxiety and lower efficiency of exploratory behavior in the previously unfamiliar environment. All tested drugs clearly improved the exploratory behavior in BALB/c mice only. In BALB/c mice, piracetam, phenotropil, noopept, and semax also reduced anxiety, while phenotropil additionally increased locomotor activity. Thus, the nootropic drugs displayed clear positive modulation of spontaneous orientation in the mice strain with initially low exploratory efficiency (BALB/c) in the cross-maze test. Some drugs (pantogam, nooglutil) exhibited only nootropic properties, while the other drugs exhibited both nootropic effects on the exploratory activity and produced modulation of the anxiety level (piracetam, fenotropil, noopept, semax) and locomotor activity (fenotropil). PMID:23025044

  14. [Preclinical study of noopept toxicity].

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, L P; Smol'nikova, N M; Alekseeva, S V; Nemova, E P; Sorokina, A V; Miramedova, M G; Kurapova, S P; Sidorina, E I; Kulakova, A V; Daugel'-Dauge, N O

    2002-01-01

    Within the framework of a preclinical investigation, the new nootrope drug noopept (N-phenyl-acetyl-L-propyl-glycine ethylate) was tested for chronic toxicity upon peroral administration in a dose of 10 or 100 mg/kg over 6 months in both male and female rabbits. The results of observations showed that noopept administered in this dose range induced no irreversible pathologic changes in the organs and systems studied and exhibited no allergenic, immunotoxic, and mutagen activity. The drug affected neither the generative function nor the antenatal or postnatal progeny development. Noopept produced a dose-dependent suppression of inflammation reaction to concanavalin A and stimulated the cellular and humoral immune response in mice. PMID:12025790

  15. Dipeptide preparation Noopept prevents scopolamine-induced deficit of spatial memory in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Belnik, A P; Ostrovskaya, R U; Poletaeva, I I

    2007-04-01

    The effect of original nootropic preparation Noopept on learning and long-term memory was studied with BALB/c mice. Scopolamine (1 mg/kg) impaired long-term memory trace, while Noopept (0.5 mg/kg) had no significant effect. Noopept completely prevented the development of cognitive disorders induced by scopolamine (blockade of muscarinic cholinergic receptors). Our results confirmed the presence of choline-positive effect in dipeptide piracetam analogue Noopept on retrieval of learned skill of finding a submerged platform (spatial memory). We conclude that the effectiveness of this drug should be evaluated in patients with Alzheimer's disease. PMID:18214292

  16. The nootropic and neuroprotective proline-containing dipeptide noopept restores spatial memory and increases immunoreactivity to amyloid in an Alzheimer's disease model.

    PubMed

    Ostrovskaya, Rita U; Gruden, Marina A; Bobkova, Natalya A; Sewell, Robert D E; Gudasheva, Tatyana A; Samokhin, Alexander N; Seredinin, Sergey B; Noppe, Wim; Sherstnev, Vladimir V; Morozova-Roche, Ludmilla A

    2007-08-01

    The effects of the novel proline-containing nootropic and neuroprotective dipeptide, noopept (GVS-111, N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine ethyl ester) were investigated in NMRI mice following olfactory bulbectomy. We have shown previously that these animals developed Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like behaviour, morphology and biochemistry including impairment of spatial memory, regional neuronal degeneration and elevated Abeta peptide brain levels. In the current investigation, spatial memory was assessed using the Morris water maze and serum antibodies to in vitro morphologically characterized amyloid structures of both Abeta((25-35)) peptide and equine lysozyme, as well as to neurotrophic glial factor S100b, were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Noopept (administered at a dose of 0.01 mg/kg for a period of 21 days and during a further 5 days training) restored spatial memory and increased serum antibody levels to oligomers of Abeta((25-35)) peptide but not to equine lysozyme amyloid or S100b protein in bulbectomized animals. The positive immunotropic effect of noopept to Abeta((25-35)) peptide prefibrillar aggregates was more marked in sham-operated compared to the bulbectomized subjects which were characterized by an overall suppression of immunoreactivity. Enhancement of the immune response to Abeta((25-35)) peptide prefibrils caused by noopept may attenuate the neurotoxic consequences of amyloid fibrillization and also be associated with an improvement in spatial memory in bulbectomized mice. These actions of noopept, combined with its previously reported neuroprotective and cholinomimetic properties, suggests that this dipeptide may well be useful for improving cognitive deficits induced by neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:17092975

  17. [Behavior of mice from different strains: modifications produced by noopept].

    PubMed

    Bel'nik, A P; Ostrovskaia, R U; Poletaeva, I I

    2007-01-01

    Genotype-dependent behavioral effects were demonstrated in BALB/c, C57BL/6J [Russian character: see text] DBA/2J mice after injections of nootropic drug Noopept. In an elevated plus maze, drug administration induced an increase in the number of enterings into bright arms in BALB/c mice, whereas the opposite effect was observed in C57BL/6J. After the Noopept administration, animals from all the three strains increased the number of active avoidance reactions in stress-inducing slip-funnel test. A significant intensification of exploration behavior was observed in a closed plus-maze in BALB/c and C57BL/6J. The Noopept affected weakly or had no effect on the behavior of DBA/2J mice. PMID:18064900

  18. [Comparative neurophysiological study of the nootropic drugs piracetam and centrophenoxine].

    PubMed

    Krapivin, S V; Voronina, T A

    1987-01-01

    Effects of nootropic drugs on transcallosal evoked potential (TEP) and EEG spectra of the animal brain cortex and hippocamp were studied. It was found that piracetam and centrophenoxine exert similar effects on the amplitude of the primary TEP components, produce its increase and also a rise and stabilization of the predominant peak in distribution of EEG power spectrum that corresponds to the improvement of theta rhythm organization. The drugs exert different effects on the secondary positive TEP component; centrophenoxine induces a change in non-basic rhythm of EEG in rats. Based on the results obtained, the authors consider possible neurophysiological mechanisms of the nootropic effect and make a comparative analysis of the actions of the drugs.

  19. Noopept stimulates the expression of NGF and BDNF in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ostrovskaya, R U; Gudasheva, T A; Zaplina, A P; Vahitova, Ju V; Salimgareeva, M H; Jamidanov, R S; Seredenin, S B

    2008-09-01

    We studied the effect of original dipeptide preparation Noopept (N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine ethyl ester, GVS-111) with nootropic and neuroprotective properties on the expression of mRNA for neurotropic factors NGF and BDNF in rat hippocampus. Expression of NGF and BDNF mRNA in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus was studied by Northern blot analysis. Taking into account the fact that pharmacological activity of Noopept is realized after both acute and chronic treatment, we studied the effect of single and long-term treatment (28 days) with this drug. Expression of the studied neurotropic factors in the cerebral cortex was below the control after single administration of Noopept, while chronic administration caused a slight increase in BDNF expression. In the hippocampus, expression of mRNA for both neurotrophins increased after acute administration of Noopept. Chronic treatment with Noopept was not followed by the development of tolerance, but even potentiated the neurotrophic effect. These changes probably play a role in neuronal restoration. We showed that the nootropic drug increases expression of neurotrophic factors in the hippocampus. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that neurotrophin synthesis in the hippocampus determines cognitive function, particularly in consolidation and delayed memory retrieval. Published data show that neurotrophic factor deficiency in the hippocampus is observed not only in advanced Alzheimer's disease, but also at the stage of mild cognitive impairment (pre-disease state). In light of this our findings suggest that Noopept holds much promise to prevent the development of Alzheimer's disease in patients with mild cognitive impairment. Moreover, therapeutic effectiveness of Noopept should be evaluated at the initial stage of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:19240853

  20. [Effects of noopept and cortexin on the behavior of matured rats treated with corticoliberin or 70-kDa heat shock proteins in early ontogeny].

    PubMed

    Shabanov, P D; Lebedev, A A; Stetsenko, V P; Lavrov, N V; Sablina, G V; Gudasheva, T A; Ostrovaskaia, R U

    2007-01-01

    Young Wistar rats aged 4 days were injected intraperitoneally with corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH), which is an agent activating the stress system, or 70-kDa heat shock proteins (HSP-70)--intracellular shaperons, possessing antistress properties. In grown adult rats aged 90-100 days, the effects of nootropic drugs noopept and cortexin (1 mg/kg, i.p.) were assessed. The activation of stress or antistress systems with CRH or HSP-70 significantly altered the drug action. The effects were different in males and females and depended on animal gender. The spectrum of pharmacological activity of noopept and cortexin changed: noopept demonstrated preferable psychoactivating and antiaggressive effects, whereas cortexin showed mild anxiolytic and antidepressant activity. It is suggested that the behavioral effects of nootropes depend on the conditions of the stress system formation in early ontogeny. PMID:17402584

  1. Noopept normalizes parameters of the incretin system in rats with experimental diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ostrovskaya, R U; Zolotov, N N; Ozerova, I V; Ivanova, E A; Kapitsa, I G; Taraban, K V; Michunskaya, A M; Voronina, T A; Gudasheva, T A; Seredenin, S B

    2014-07-01

    Experiments on adult Wistar rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes showed that antihyperglycemic activity of an original nootropic and neuroprotective drug Noopept (N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine ethyl ester) is more pronounced under conditions of oral application than after intraperitoneal injection. These data provided a basis for studying the effect of Noopept on major indexes of the incretin system. Streptozotocin was shown to decrease the concentrations of incretin GLP-1 and insulin in the blood. Noopept had a normalizing effect on these parameters. This influence of Noopept was not related to the inhibition of a major enzyme metabolizing incretins (dipeptidyl peptidase IV). A reference drug sitagliptin also increased the contents of incretins and insulin, which was associated with the inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase IV. It is known that GLP-1 increases NGF expression in the insular system. Our results suggest that the increase in incretin activity contributes to the antiapoptotic effect of Noopept on pancreatic β cells. The mechanism for an increase in blood GLP-1 level after oral application of Noopept requires further investigations. PMID:25065315

  2. Cognitive enhancers (nootropics). Part 2: drugs interacting with enzymes.

    PubMed

    Froestl, Wolfgang; Muhs, Andreas; Pfeifer, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive enhancers (nootropics) are drugs to treat cognition deficits in patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, stroke, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or aging. Cognition refers to a capacity for information processing, applying knowledge, and changing preferences. It involves memory, attention, executive functions, perception, language, and psychomotor functions. The term nootropics was coined in 1972 when memory enhancing properties of piracetam were observed in clinical trials. In the meantime, hundreds of drugs have been evaluated in clinical trials or in preclinical experiments. To classify the compounds, a concept is proposed assigning drugs to 19 categories according to their mechanism(s) of action, in particular drugs interacting with receptors, enzymes, ion channels, nerve growth factors, re-uptake transporters, antioxidants, metal chelators, and disease modifying drugs meaning small molecules, vaccines, and monoclonal antibodies interacting with amyloid-β and tau. For drugs whose mechanism of action is not known, they are either classified according to structure, e.g., peptides, or their origin, e.g., natural products. This review covers the evolution of research in this field over the last 25 years.

  3. Cognitive enhancers (nootropics). Part 1: drugs interacting with receptors.

    PubMed

    Froestl, Wolfgang; Muhs, Andreas; Pfeifer, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive enhancers (nootropics) are drugs to treat cognition deficits in patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, stroke, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or aging. Cognition refers to a capacity for information processing, applying knowledge, and changing preferences. It involves memory, attention, executive functions, perception, language, and psychomotor functions. The term nootropics was coined in 1972 when memory enhancing properties of piracetam were observed in clinical trials. In the meantime, hundreds of drugs have been evaluated in clinical trials or in preclinical experiments. To classify the compounds, a concept is proposed assigning drugs to 18 categories according to their mechanism(s) of action, in particular drugs interacting with receptors, enzymes, ion channels, nerve growth factors, re-uptake transporters, antioxidants, metal chelators, and disease-modifying drugs meaning small molecules, vaccines, and monoclonal antibodies interacting with amyloid-β and tau. For drugs, whose mechanism of action is not known, they are either classified according to structure, e.g., peptides, or their origin, e.g., natural products. The review covers the evolution of research in this field over the last 25 years.

  4. [Clinical and electroencephalographic characteristic of noopept in patients with mild cognitive impairment of posttraumatic and vascular origin].

    PubMed

    Bochkarev, V K; Teleshova, E S; Siuniakov, S A; Davydova, D V; Neznamov, G G

    2008-01-01

    An effect of a new nootropic drug noopept on the dynamics of main EEG rhythms and narrow-band spectral EEG characteristics in patients with cerebral asthenic and cognitive disturbances caused by traumas or vascular brain diseases has been studied. Noopept caused the EEG changes characteristic of the action of nootropics: the increase of alpha- and beta-rhythms power and reduction of delta-rhythms power. The reaction of alpha-rhythm was provided mostly by the dynamics of its low and medium frequencies (6,7-10,2 Hz), the changes of beta-rhythm were augmented in frontal and attenuated in occipital areas. The analysis of frequency and spatial structure of EEG changes reveals that noopept exerts a nonspecific activation and anxyolytic effect. The differences in EEG changes depending on the brain pathology were found. The EEG indices of nootropic effect of the drug were most obvious in cerebral vascular diseases. The EEG changes in posttraumatic brain lesion were less typical.

  5. [Clinical and electroencephalographic characteristic of noopept in patients with mild cognitive impairment of posttraumatic and vascular origin].

    PubMed

    Bochkarev, V K; Teleshova, E S; Siuniakov, S A; Davydova, D V; Neznamov, G G

    2008-01-01

    An effect of a new nootropic drug noopept on the dynamics of main EEG rhythms and narrow-band spectral EEG characteristics in patients with cerebral asthenic and cognitive disturbances caused by traumas or vascular brain diseases has been studied. Noopept caused the EEG changes characteristic of the action of nootropics: the increase of alpha- and beta-rhythms power and reduction of delta-rhythms power. The reaction of alpha-rhythm was provided mostly by the dynamics of its low and medium frequencies (6,7-10,2 Hz), the changes of beta-rhythm were augmented in frontal and attenuated in occipital areas. The analysis of frequency and spatial structure of EEG changes reveals that noopept exerts a nonspecific activation and anxyolytic effect. The differences in EEG changes depending on the brain pathology were found. The EEG indices of nootropic effect of the drug were most obvious in cerebral vascular diseases. The EEG changes in posttraumatic brain lesion were less typical. PMID:19008801

  6. Effectiveness of nootropic drugs with cholinergic activity in treatment of cognitive deficit: a review.

    PubMed

    Colucci, Luisa; Bosco, Massimiliano; Rosario Ziello, Antonio; Rea, Raffaele; Amenta, Francesco; Fasanaro, Angiola Maria

    2012-01-01

    Nootropics represent probably the first "smart drugs" used for the treatment of cognitive deficits. The aim of this paper is to verify, by a systematic analysis of the literature, the effectiveness of nootropics in this indication. The analysis was limited to nootropics with cholinergic activity, in view of the role played by acetylcholine in learning and memory. Acetylcholine was the first neurotransmitter identified in the history of neuroscience and is the main neurotransmitter of the peripheral, autonomic, and enteric nervous systems. We conducted a systematic review of the literature for the 5-year period 2006-2011. From the data reported in the literature, it emerges that nootropics may be an effective alternative for strengthening and enhancing cognitive performance in patients with a range of pathologies. Although nootropics, and specifically the cholinergic precursors, already have a long history behind them, according to recent renewal of interest, they still seem to have a significant therapeutic role. Drugs with regulatory indications for symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer's disease, such as cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine, often have transient effects in dementia disorders. Nootropics with a cholinergic profile and documented clinical effectiveness in combination with cognate drugs such as cholinesterase inhibitors or alone in patients who are not suitable for these inhibitors should be taken into account and evaluated further.

  7. Effectiveness of nootropic drugs with cholinergic activity in treatment of cognitive deficit: a review

    PubMed Central

    Colucci, Luisa; Bosco, Massimiliano; Ziello, Antonio Rosario; Rea, Raffaele; Amenta, Francesco; Fasanaro, Angiola Maria

    2012-01-01

    Nootropics represent probably the first “smart drugs” used for the treatment of cognitive deficits. The aim of this paper is to verify, by a systematic analysis of the literature, the effectiveness of nootropics in this indication. The analysis was limited to nootropics with cholinergic activity, in view of the role played by acetylcholine in learning and memory. Acetylcholine was the first neurotransmitter identified in the history of neuroscience and is the main neurotransmitter of the peripheral, autonomic, and enteric nervous systems. We conducted a systematic review of the literature for the 5-year period 2006–2011. From the data reported in the literature, it emerges that nootropics may be an effective alternative for strengthening and enhancing cognitive performance in patients with a range of pathologies. Although nootropics, and specifically the cholinergic precursors, already have a long history behind them, according to recent renewal of interest, they still seem to have a significant therapeutic role. Drugs with regulatory indications for symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, such as cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine, often have transient effects in dementia disorders. Nootropics with a cholinergic profile and documented clinical effectiveness in combination with cognate drugs such as cholinesterase inhibitors or alone in patients who are not suitable for these inhibitors should be taken into account and evaluated further. PMID:27186129

  8. [Effect of the novel nootropic and neuroprotective dipeptide noopept on the streptozotocin-induced model of sporadic Alzheimer disease in rats].

    PubMed

    Ostrovskaia, R U; Tsaplina, A P; Vakhitova, Iu V; Salimgareeva, M Kh; Iamidanov, R S

    2010-01-01

    Streptozotocin-intracerebroventricularly treated rats are proposed as an experimental model of sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD). Diabetogenic toxin streptozotocin (STZ) administered in both cerebral ventricles in a dose of 3 mg/kg decreases the expression of NGF and BDNF mainly in the hippocampus and increases the content of malonic dialdehyde (MDA)--a product of lipid peroxidation--in the brain tissues. These metabolic changes are accompanied by a pronounced cognitive deficiency, which is manifested by long-term memory deterioration in the passive avoidance test. These manifestations of pathology are not accompanied by hyperglycemia in the case of intraventricular STZ administration, in contrast to the systemic (in particular, intraperitoneal) route of introduction that causes a pronounced increase in the blood glucose level. These results are consistent with the existing notions that (i) STZ administered intraventricularly provokes a complex of changes imitating the sporadic AD and (ii) this disease can be considered as a manifestation of type-III diabetes. The new original cognition enhancing and neuroprotective dipeptide noopept decreases the aforementioned metabolic changes and the accompanying long-term deterioration of the memory. Previously, this systemically active dipeptide was shown to be capable of increasing expression of NGF and BDNF in the hippocampus, stimulating the antibody production to beta-amyloid, inhibiting the lipid peroxidation, activating the endogenous antioxidant systems, and decreasing the rate of glutamate release (cholinopositive effect). Taken together, these data indicate that noopept can be considered as a multipotent substance acting upon several important pathogenic chainsof the sporadic AD. PMID:20184279

  9. [Interspecies differences of noopept pharmacokinetics].

    PubMed

    Boĭko, S S; Korotkov, S A; Zherdev, V P; Gudasheva, T A; Ostrovskaia, R U; Voronina, T A

    2004-01-01

    Significant interspecific differences in the pharmacokinetics of noopept are manifested by a decrease in the drug elimination rate on the passage from rats to rabbits and humans. Very intensive metabolism of noopept was observed upon intravenous administration in rats. In these animals, presystemic elimination mechanisms lead to the formation of a specific metabolite representing a product of drug biotransformation hydroxylated at the phenyl ring. In rabbits, unchanged noopept circulates in the blood for a longer time upon both intravenous and peroral introduction, biotransformation proceeds at a much slower rate, and no metabolites analogous to that found in rats are detected. The noopept pharmacokinetics in humans differs from that in animals by still slower elimination and considerable individual variability. No drug metabolites are found in the human blood plasma, probably because of a relatively small dose and low concentration. PMID:15079908

  10. ["Fast" and "slow" components of psychotropic activity of the drugs with nootropic effects].

    PubMed

    Neznamov, G G; Siuniakov, S A; Davydova, I A; Teleshova, E S

    2000-01-01

    A clinical-pharmacological study was carried out to evaluate correlation of "fast" (nonspecific) and "slow" (specific) components of the action of the drugs with nootropic properties (piracetam, mexidol, tanacan) and to estimate their contribution to achieving therapeutic efficacy. The study was performed during 28 days using standard quantitative assay techniques in 79 patients with "Organic emotional-liable (asthenic) disorders" (F06.6, ICD-10). It was found that "fast" component of the psychotropic action of the drugs tested was presented by stimulating and anxiolytic effects, while a "slow" one--by specific nootropic activity. All these effects were fully independent with no correlation found, and this could, probably, be attributed to different mechanisms of their realization. It is shown that nootropic activity of piracetam was most significant in its therapeutic effect; and anxiolytic effect was most important for mexidol action. Meanwhile, stimulating and anxiolytic activities as well as positive influence on long-term memory were main components of tanacan effect. The results obtained show an important role of both specific and nonspecific ("fast") effects in realization of therapeutic action of the drugs with nootropic effects in patients with cognitive-mnestic and neurosis-like disorders.

  11. Establishing Natural Nootropics: Recent Molecular Enhancement Influenced by Natural Nootropic.

    PubMed

    Suliman, Noor Azuin; Mat Taib, Che Norma; Mohd Moklas, Mohamad Aris; Adenan, Mohd Ilham; Hidayat Baharuldin, Mohamad Taufik; Basir, Rusliza

    2016-01-01

    Nootropics or smart drugs are well-known compounds or supplements that enhance the cognitive performance. They work by increasing the mental function such as memory, creativity, motivation, and attention. Recent researches were focused on establishing a new potential nootropic derived from synthetic and natural products. The influence of nootropic in the brain has been studied widely. The nootropic affects the brain performances through number of mechanisms or pathways, for example, dopaminergic pathway. Previous researches have reported the influence of nootropics on treating memory disorders, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases. Those disorders are observed to impair the same pathways of the nootropics. Thus, recent established nootropics are designed sensitively and effectively towards the pathways. Natural nootropics such as Ginkgo biloba have been widely studied to support the beneficial effects of the compounds. Present review is concentrated on the main pathways, namely, dopaminergic and cholinergic system, and the involvement of amyloid precursor protein and secondary messenger in improving the cognitive performance.

  12. Establishing Natural Nootropics: Recent Molecular Enhancement Influenced by Natural Nootropic

    PubMed Central

    Adenan, Mohd Ilham; Hidayat Baharuldin, Mohamad Taufik

    2016-01-01

    Nootropics or smart drugs are well-known compounds or supplements that enhance the cognitive performance. They work by increasing the mental function such as memory, creativity, motivation, and attention. Recent researches were focused on establishing a new potential nootropic derived from synthetic and natural products. The influence of nootropic in the brain has been studied widely. The nootropic affects the brain performances through number of mechanisms or pathways, for example, dopaminergic pathway. Previous researches have reported the influence of nootropics on treating memory disorders, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases. Those disorders are observed to impair the same pathways of the nootropics. Thus, recent established nootropics are designed sensitively and effectively towards the pathways. Natural nootropics such as Ginkgo biloba have been widely studied to support the beneficial effects of the compounds. Present review is concentrated on the main pathways, namely, dopaminergic and cholinergic system, and the involvement of amyloid precursor protein and secondary messenger in improving the cognitive performance.

  13. [Comparative study of the long-term behavioral effects of noopept and piracetam in adult male rats and female rats in postnatal period].

    PubMed

    Voronina, T A; Guzevatykh, L S; Trofimov, S S

    2005-01-01

    Adult male and female rats were treated with the peptide nootrope drug noopept (daily dose, 0.1 mg/kg) and piracetam (200 mg/kg). In the period from 8th to 20th day, both drugs (cognitive enhancers) suppressed the horizontal and vertical activity and the anxiety in test animals as compared to the control group treated with 0.9 % aqueous NaCl solution. Early postnatal injections of the nootropes influenced neither the morphology development nor the behavior of adult female rats in the plus maze, extrapolational escape, passive avoidance, and pain sensitivity threshold tests. Animals in the "intact" group (having received neither drugs not physiological solution, that is, developing in a poor sensor environment), showed less pronounced habituation in the open field test as compared to the control and drug treated groups. PMID:15934357

  14. Neuroprotective effect of novel cognitive enhancer noopept on AD-related cellular model involves the attenuation of apoptosis and tau hyperphosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Noopept (N-phenyl-acetyl-L-prolylglycine ethyl ester) was constructed as a dipeptide analog of the standard cognition enhancer, piracetam. Our previous experiments have demonstrated the cognition restoring effect of noopept in several animal models of Alzheimer disease (AD). Noopept was also shown to prevent ionic disbalance, excitotoxicity, free radicals and pro-inflammatory cytokines accumulation, and neurotrophine deficit typical for different kinds of brain damages, including AD. In this study, we investigated the neuroprotective action of noopept on cellular model of AD, Aβ25–35-induced toxicity in PC12 cells and revealed the underlying mechanisms. Results The neuroprotective effect of noopept (added to the medium at 10 μM concentration, 72 hours before Аβ25–35) was studied on Аβ25–35-induced injury (5 μM for 24 h) in PC12 cells. The ability of drug to protect the impairments of cell viability, calcium homeostasis, ROS level, mitochondrial function, tau phosphorylation and neurite outgrowth caused by Аβ25–35 were evaluated. Following the exposure of PC12 cells to Аβ25–35 an increase of the level of ROS, intracellular calcium, and tau phosphorylation at Ser396 were observed; these changes were accompanied by a decrease in cell viability and an increase of apoptosis. Noopept treatment before the amyloid-beta exposure improved PC12 cells viability, reduced the number of early and late apoptotic cells, the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species and calcium and enhanced the mitochondrial membrane potential. In addition, pretreatment of PC12 cell with noopept significantly attenuated tau hyperphosphorylation at Ser396 and ameliorated the alterations of neurite outgrowth evoked by Аβ25–35. Conclusions Taken together, these data provide evidence that novel cognitive enhancer noopept protects PC12 cell against deleterious actions of Aβ through inhibiting the oxidative damage and calcium overload as well as suppressing

  15. Cognitive enhancers (Nootropics). Part 1: drugs interacting with receptors. Update 2014.

    PubMed

    Froestl, Wolfgang; Muhs, Andreas; Pfeifer, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Scientists working in the fields of Alzheimer's disease and, in particular, cognitive enhancers are very productive. The review "Cognitive enhancers (nootropics): drugs interacting with receptors" was accepted for publication in July 2012. Since then, new targets for the potential treatment of Alzheimer's disease were identified. This update describes drugs interacting with 42 receptors versus 32 receptors in the first paper. Some compounds progressed in their development, while many others were discontinued. The present review covers the evolution of research in this field through March 2014.

  16. Noopept efficiency in experimental Alzheimer disease (cognitive deficiency caused by beta-amyloid25-35 injection into Meynert basal nuclei of rats).

    PubMed

    Ostrovskaya, R U; Belnik, A P; Storozheva, Z I

    2008-07-01

    Experiments on adult Wistar rats showed that injection of beta-amyloid25-35 (2 microg) into Meynert basal nuclei caused long-term memory deficiency which was detected 24 days after this injection by the memory trace retrieval in conditioned passive avoidance reflex (CPAR). The effects of noopept, an original nootropic and neuroprotective dipeptide, on the severity of this cognitive deficiency were studied. Preventive (for 7 days before the injury) intraperitoneal injections of noopept in a dose of 0.5 mg/kg completely prevented mnestic disorders under conditions of this model. Noopept exhibited a significant normalizing effect, if the treatment was started 15 days after the injury, when neurodegenerative changes in the basal nuclei, cortex, and hippocampus were still acutely pronounced. The mechanisms of this effect of the drug are studied, including, in addition to the choline-positive effect, its multicomponent neuroprotective effect and stimulation of production of antibodies to beta-amyloid25-35. Noopept efficiency in many models of Alzheimer disease, its high bioavailability and low toxicity suggest this dipeptide for further studies as a potential agent for the treatment of this condition (initial and moderate phases). PMID:19145356

  17. [On the mechanism of noopept action: decrease in activity of stress-induced kinases and increase in expression of neutrophines].

    PubMed

    Ostrovskaia, R U; Vakhitova, Iu V; Salimgareeva, M Kh; Iamidanov, R S; Sadovnikov, S V; Kapitsa, I G; Seredenin, S B

    2010-12-01

    The influence of noopept (N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine ethyl ester, GVS-111)--a drug combining the nootrope and neuroprotector properties--on the activity of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and the level of NGF and BDNF gene and protein expression in the frontal cortex, hippocampus, and hypothalamus has been studied in rats. Under conditions of chronic administration (28 days, 0.5 mg/day, i.p.), noopept decreased the activity of stress-induced kinases (SAPK/JNK 46/54 and pERK1/2) in rat hippocampus and increases the level of mRNA of the BDNF gene in both hypothalamus and hippocampus. The content of BDNF protein in the hypothalamus was also somewhat increased. In the context of notions about the activation of stress-induced kinases, as an important factor of amyloidogenesis and tau-protein deposition in brain tissue, and the role of deficiency of the neurotrophic factors in the development of neurodegenerative processes, the observed decrease in the activity of stress-activated MAPKs and increased expression of BDNF as a result of noopept administration suggest thatthis drug hasaspecific activity withrespect to some pathogenetic mechanisms involved in the Alzheimer disease. PMID:21395007

  18. Varsity Medical Ethics Debate 2015: should nootropic drugs be available under prescription on the NHS?

    PubMed

    Thorley, Emma; Kang, Isaac; D'Costa, Stephanie; Vlazaki, Myrto; Ayeko, Olaoluwa; Arbe-Barnes, Edward H; Swerner, Casey B

    2016-01-01

    The 2015 Varsity Medical Ethics debate convened upon the motion: "This house believes nootropic drugs should be available under prescription". This annual debate between students from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, now in its seventh year, provided the starting point for arguments on the subject. The present article brings together and extends many of the arguments put forward during the debate. We explore the current usage of nootropic drugs, their safety and whether it would be beneficial to individuals and society as a whole for them to be available under prescription. The Varsity Medical Debate was first held in 2008 with the aim of allowing students to engage in discussion about ethics and policy within healthcare. The event is held annually and it is hoped that this will allow future leaders to voice a perspective on the arguments behind topics that will feature heavily in future healthcare and science policy. This year the Oxford University Medical Society at the Oxford Union hosted the debate. PMID:27624701

  19. Nootropic drugs have different effects on kindling-induced learning deficits in rats.

    PubMed

    Becker, A; Grecksch, G

    1995-09-01

    Kindling represents an accepted model of human epileptogenesis. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that kindled rats show a diminished learning performance in an active avoidance task. In our study we administered different nootropic drugs to kindled rats to test their effects on learning a two-way active avoidance task in the shuttle-box. Kindling was induced by repeated intraperitoneal injections of 45 mg kg-1 pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) once every 48 h. The substances vinpocetine (0.1 and 1.0 mg kg-1), methylglucamin orotate (225 and 450 mg kg-1), piracetam (100 mg kg-1), and meclofenoxate (100 mg kg-1) were administered during kindling development and after kindling completion prior to each session in the learning experiment. The nootropic drugs had little if any effect on severity of seizures. Concerning their effect on learning the substances each acted in a specific manner. Methylglucamin orotate enhanced the learning deficit induced by kindling. Meclofenoxate injected prior to the kindling stimulation was ineffective, whereas administration prior to the learning test improved the learning performance effectively. A complementary action was shown in experiments with vinpocetine. Only piracetam prevented the occurrence of kindling-induced learning deficits regardless the administration schedule.

  20. Cognitive enhancers (nootropics). Part 3: drugs interacting with targets other than receptors or enzymes. disease-modifying drugs.

    PubMed

    Froestl, Wolfgang; Pfeifer, Andrea; Muhs, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive enhancers (nootropics) are drugs to treat cognition deficits in patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, stroke, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or aging. Cognition refers to a capacity for information processing, applying knowledge, and changing preferences. It involves memory, attention, executive functions, perception, language, and psychomotor functions. The term nootropics was coined in 1972 when memory enhancing properties of piracetam were observed in clinical trials. In the meantime, hundreds of drugs have been evaluated in clinical trials or in preclinical experiments. To classify the compounds, a concept is proposed assigning drugs to 19 categories according to their mechanism(s) of action, in particular drugs interacting with receptors, enzymes, ion channels, nerve growth factors, re-uptake transporters, antioxidants, metal chelators, and disease modifying drugs, meaning small molecules, vaccines, and monoclonal antibodies interacting with amyloid-β and tau. For drugs, whose mechanism of action is not known, they are either classified according to structure, e.g., peptides, or their origin, e.g., natural products. The review covers the evolution of research in this field over the last 25 years.

  1. [Noopept improves the spatial memory and stimulates prefibrillar beta-amyloid(25-35) antibody production in mice].

    PubMed

    Bobkova, N V; Gruden', M A; Samokhin, A N; Medvinskaia, N I; Morozova-Roch, L; Uudasheva, T A; Ostrovskaia, R U; Seredinin, S B

    2005-01-01

    The effects of the novel proline-containing nootropic and neuroprotective dipeptide noopept (GVS-111, N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine ethyl ester) were studied on NMRI mice upon olfactory bulbectomy, which had been previously shown to imitate the main morphological and biochemical signs of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The spatial memory was assessed using the Morris (water maze) test; the immunological status was characterized by ELISA with antibodies to prefibrillar beta-amyloid(25-35), S100b protein, and protofilaments of equine lysozyme, which are the molecular factors involved in the pathogenesis of AD. The control (sham-operated) animals during the Morris test preferred a sector where the safety platform was placed during the learning session. Bulbectomized animals treated with saline failed to recognize this sector, while bulbectomized animals treated with noopept (0.01 mg/kg for 21 days) restored this predominance, thus demonstrating the improvement of the spatial memory. These animals also demonstrated an increase in the level of antibodies to beta-amyloid(25-35)--the effect, which was more pronounced in the sham-operated than in bulbectomized mice. The latter demonstrated a profound decrease of immunological reactivity in a large number of tests. Noopept, stimulating the production of antibodies to beta-amyloid(25-35), can attenuate the well-known neurotoxic effects of beta-amyloid. The obtained data on the mnemotropic and immunostimulant effects noopept are indicative of good prospects for the clinical usage of this drug in the therapy of patients with neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:16277202

  2. Immunopharmacological properties of noopept.

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, L P; Shipaeva, E V; Alekseeva, S V; Pronin, A V; Durnev, A D; Gudasheva, T A; Ostrovskaja, R U; Seredenin, S B

    2007-07-01

    Noopept, a peptide analog of piracetam, enhanced phagocytic activity of mouse peritoneal macrophages, stimulated humoral and cellular immune response to various antigens, and markedly increased spontaneous proliferative activity of splenocytes. In animals with secondary immune deficiency caused by cyclophosphamide, noopept exhibited immunocorrector properties. PMID:18256750

  3. Early postnatal effects of noopept and piracetam on declarative and procedural memory of adult male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Trofimov, S S; Voronina, T A; Guzevatykh, L S

    2005-06-01

    We studied the effect of a new nootropic dipeptide Noopept and reference nootropic preparation piracetam injected subcutaneously on days 8-20 of life on learning of alternative feeding response in a 6-arm-maze in male and female rats. Early postnatal administration of Noopept disturbed the dynamics of learning by parameters of declarative and procedural memory. Piracetam impaired learning by parameters of procedural, but not declarative memory (only in males). Both preparations decreased the ratio of successfully learned males (but not females). The observed effects were not associated with changes in locomotor activity. PMID:16224581

  4. [Genotype-dependent mice behavior in cognitive tasks. Effect of noopept].

    PubMed

    Bel'nik, A P; Ostrovskaia, R U; Poletaeva, I I

    2007-01-01

    The interstrain differences in performance of C57BL/6J, BALB/c and DBA/2J male mice in two cognitive tasks were found. Mice C57BL/6J showed good learning ability and preservation of memory traces tested 10 days after performance in a simplified version of Morris water maze. Mice BALB/c learned the task but, virtually, no long-term memory traces were revealed, whereas DBA/2J demonstrated poor learning. The effect of nootropic drug Noopept (GVS-111, N-phenil-acetyl-L-prolylglycin ethyl ether) was shown to be genotype-dependent. Its administration (0.5 mg/kg i.p., 15 min before learning) improved the long-term memory in Morris test in BALB/c mice but failed to produce any improvement in C57BL/6J. The ability of mice for extrapolation of the direction of stimulus movement differently changed after Noopept injections: the proportion of correct task solutions increased in C57BL/6J and BALB/c mice, whereas the performance of DBA/2J did not change. PMID:18592707

  5. [Noopept in the treatment of mild cognitive impairment in patients with stroke].

    PubMed

    Amelin, A V; Iliukhina, A Iu; Shmonin, A A

    2011-01-01

    Noopept is a neuroprotector and nootropics. Literature data revealed the treatment effect of noopept on mild cognitive impairment in patients with discirculatory encephalopathy. The present open prospective study included 60 patients with stroke treated with noopept during 12 months. Cognitive functions were assessed before and after treatment using neuropsychological tests. An analysis of MMSE scores and lateral and categorical associations revealed the significant improvement of cognitive functions after 2 months in patients of the main group compared to the controls. The global assessment of efficacy revealed the mild improvement in the main group while no changes were found in the control group. The results have demonstrated that noopept, used in dose 20 mg daily during 2 months, improves cognitive functions in stroke patients and has a high level of safety. PMID:22500312

  6. Establishing Natural Nootropics: Recent Molecular Enhancement Influenced by Natural Nootropic

    PubMed Central

    Adenan, Mohd Ilham; Hidayat Baharuldin, Mohamad Taufik

    2016-01-01

    Nootropics or smart drugs are well-known compounds or supplements that enhance the cognitive performance. They work by increasing the mental function such as memory, creativity, motivation, and attention. Recent researches were focused on establishing a new potential nootropic derived from synthetic and natural products. The influence of nootropic in the brain has been studied widely. The nootropic affects the brain performances through number of mechanisms or pathways, for example, dopaminergic pathway. Previous researches have reported the influence of nootropics on treating memory disorders, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases. Those disorders are observed to impair the same pathways of the nootropics. Thus, recent established nootropics are designed sensitively and effectively towards the pathways. Natural nootropics such as Ginkgo biloba have been widely studied to support the beneficial effects of the compounds. Present review is concentrated on the main pathways, namely, dopaminergic and cholinergic system, and the involvement of amyloid precursor protein and secondary messenger in improving the cognitive performance. PMID:27656235

  7. Establishing Natural Nootropics: Recent Molecular Enhancement Influenced by Natural Nootropic.

    PubMed

    Suliman, Noor Azuin; Mat Taib, Che Norma; Mohd Moklas, Mohamad Aris; Adenan, Mohd Ilham; Hidayat Baharuldin, Mohamad Taufik; Basir, Rusliza

    2016-01-01

    Nootropics or smart drugs are well-known compounds or supplements that enhance the cognitive performance. They work by increasing the mental function such as memory, creativity, motivation, and attention. Recent researches were focused on establishing a new potential nootropic derived from synthetic and natural products. The influence of nootropic in the brain has been studied widely. The nootropic affects the brain performances through number of mechanisms or pathways, for example, dopaminergic pathway. Previous researches have reported the influence of nootropics on treating memory disorders, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases. Those disorders are observed to impair the same pathways of the nootropics. Thus, recent established nootropics are designed sensitively and effectively towards the pathways. Natural nootropics such as Ginkgo biloba have been widely studied to support the beneficial effects of the compounds. Present review is concentrated on the main pathways, namely, dopaminergic and cholinergic system, and the involvement of amyloid precursor protein and secondary messenger in improving the cognitive performance. PMID:27656235

  8. Cannabis-induced impairment of learning and memory: effect of different nootropic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Salam, Omar M.E.; Salem, Neveen A.; El-Sayed El-Shamarka, Marwa; Al-Said Ahmed, Noha; Seid Hussein, Jihan; El-Khyat, Zakaria A.

    2013-01-01

    Cannabis sativa preparations are the most commonly used illicit drugs worldwide. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of Cannabis sativa extract in the working memory version of the Morris water maze (MWM; Morris, 1984[43]) test and determine the effect of standard memory enhancing drugs. Cannabis sativa was given at doses of 5, 10 or 20 mg/kg (expressed as Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol) alone or co-administered with donepezil (1 mg/kg), piracetam (150 mg/ kg), vinpocetine (1.5 mg/kg) or ginkgo biloba (25 mg/kg) once daily subcutaneously (s.c.) for one month. Mice were examined three times weekly for their ability to locate a submerged platform. Mice were euthanized 30 days after starting cannabis injection when biochemical assays were carried out. Malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), nitric oxide, glucose and brain monoamines were determined. Cannabis resulted in a significant increase in the time taken to locate the platform and enhanced the memory impairment produced by scopolamine. This effect of cannabis decreased by memory enhancing drugs with piracetam resulting in the most-shorter latency compared with the cannabis. Biochemically, cannabis altered the oxidative status of the brain with decreased MDA, increased GSH, but decreased nitric oxide and glucose. In cannabis-treated rats, the level of GSH in brain was increased after vinpocetine and donepezil and was markedly elevated after Ginkgo biloba. Piracetam restored the decrease in glucose and nitric oxide by cannabis. Cannabis caused dose-dependent increases of brain serotonin, noradrenaline and dopamine. After cannabis treatment, noradrenaline is restored to its normal value by donepezil, vinpocetine or Ginkgo biloba, but increased by piracetam. The level of dopamine was significantly reduced by piracetam, vinpocetine or Ginkgo biloba. These data indicate that cannabis administration is associated with impaired memory performance which is likely to involve decreased brain glucose

  9. The Nootropic Concept and Dyslexia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilsher, Colin R.

    1986-01-01

    Studies with Nootropic psychoactive drugs (such as Piracetam) suggest that Piracetam lacks significant side effects; promotes memory and learning; and improves the reading ability of dyslexics, possibly by directly affecting the left-brain hemisphere. Results are contrasted with studies showing the lack of effectiveness of intensive teaching.…

  10. [Comparative efficiency of nootropic drugs in complex treatment of patients with remote consequences of closed craniocereberal trauma].

    PubMed

    Hliebova, O S; Tkachenko, O V

    2008-01-01

    Main data of the research were data obtained after a complex treatment of 120 persons with late consequences of closed craniocereberal trauma (CCRCT). The treatment included administration of one of nootropic agents (noophen, aminolon or entropil), magnesium sulfate, group B vitamins. All patients have passed a complex examination: specially developed questionnaire, anamnesis gathering, neurologic status, neuropsychological status with the use of multiple-aspect scales and questionnaires, examination of fundus of eye, rheoencephalography, echoencephalography, brain MRT. Results of a complex examination proved positive effect of the use of nootropic agents, in particular noophen, entropil and aminolon in complex treatment of late consequences of closed craniocereberal trauma. For optimisation of the use of nootropic agents in the treatment of late consequences of closed craniocereberal trauma it is recommended to consider features of influence of nootropic agents on certain clinical aspects of the disease.

  11. Effects of nootropics on the EEG in conscious rats and their modification by glutamatergic inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Vorobyov, Vasily; Kaptsov, Vladimir; Kovalev, Georgy; Sengpiel, Frank

    2011-05-30

    To study the effects of acute and repeated injections of nootropics and to learn how glutamate receptors might be involved in their mediation, the frequency spectra of cortical and hippocampal electroencephalogram (EEG) were analyzed in non-narcotized rats subcutaneously injected repeatedly with Piracetam (400mg/kg) or its analogue, Noopept (0.2mg/kg), after intracerebroventricular infusions of saline (5 μl) or the antagonists of NMDA and quisqualate/AMPA receptors: CPP (0.1 nmol) and GDEE (1 μmol), respectively. Piracetam increased alpha/beta1 EEG activity in the left frontal cortex, and alpha activity in both the right cortex and hippocampus, with a 10-min latency and 40-min duration. Noopept increased alpha/beta1 activity, with 30-min latency and 40-min duration in all brain areas. CPP pretreatment eliminated Piracetam EEG effects; reduced Noopept effects in the cortex and completely suppressed them in the hippocampus. After four injections of Piracetam, EEG effects were very small in the cortex, and completely lacking in the hippocampus, while GDEE pretreatment partially recovered them. The effect of Noopept in the alpha/beta1 ranges was replaced by increased beta2 activity after the eighth injection, while no effects were observed after the ninth one. GDEE pretreatment restored the effect of Noopept in the beta2 frequency range. These results demonstrate similarities in EEG effects and their mediatory mechanisms for Piracetam and its much more effective analogue, Noopept. Activation of NMDA receptors is involved in the effects of a single injection of the nootropics, whereas activation of quisqualate/AMPA receptors is associated with the decrease in their efficacy after repeated use. PMID:21414388

  12. Performance enhancement at the cost of potential brain plasticity: neural ramifications of nootropic drugs in the healthy developing brain

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Kimberly R.; Gao, Wen-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive enhancement is perhaps one of the most intriguing and controversial topics in neuroscience today. Currently, the main classes of drugs used as potential cognitive enhancers include psychostimulants (methylphenidate (MPH), amphetamine), but wakefulness-promoting agents (modafinil) and glutamate activators (ampakine) are also frequently used. Pharmacologically, substances that enhance the components of the memory/learning circuits—dopamine, glutamate (neuronal excitation), and/or norepinephrine—stand to improve brain function in healthy individuals beyond their baseline functioning. In particular, non-medical use of prescription stimulants such as MPH and illicit use of psychostimulants for cognitive enhancement have seen a recent rise among teens and young adults in schools and college campuses. However, this enhancement likely comes with a neuronal, as well as ethical, cost. Altering glutamate function via the use of psychostimulants may impair behavioral flexibility, leading to the development and/or potentiation of addictive behaviors. Furthermore, dopamine and norepinephrine do not display linear effects; instead, their modulation of cognitive and neuronal function maps on an inverted-U curve. Healthy individuals run the risk of pushing themselves beyond optimal levels into hyperdopaminergic and hypernoradrenergic states, thus vitiating the very behaviors they are striving to improve. Finally, recent studies have begun to highlight potential damaging effects of stimulant exposure in healthy juveniles. This review explains how the main classes of cognitive enhancing drugs affect the learning and memory circuits, and highlights the potential risks and concerns in healthy individuals, particularly juveniles and adolescents. We emphasize the performance enhancement at the potential cost of brain plasticity that is associated with the neural ramifications of nootropic drugs in the healthy developing brain. PMID:24860437

  13. [Prevention of neuro- and cardiotoxic side effects of tuberculosis chemotherapy with noopept].

    PubMed

    Mordyk, A V; Lysov, A V; Kondria, A V; Gol'dzon, M A; Khlebova, N V

    2009-01-01

    The study evaluated clinical efficiency of noopept used to prevent adverse side effects of antituberculous agents. It included 60 patients with newly diagnosed respiratory tuberculosis. Those in group 1 (n = 30) received 10 mg of noopept twice daily during the first month. The treatment promoted functional normalization of vegetative nervous system and antioxidative systems, reduced manifestations of anxiety, decreased frequency of adverse neuro- and cardiotoxic responses to antituberculous drugs. PMID:19565831

  14. [Design of the novel dipeptide neuropsychotropic drug preparations].

    PubMed

    Gudasheva, T A; Skoldinov, A P

    2003-01-01

    The paper considers a new strategy in the field of neuropsychotropic dipeptide drug design, the main points being as follows: (i) determination of the structural elements of dipeptides, such as fragments of amino acid side radicals and peptide bonds, in nonpeptide drugs; (ii) design of peptide analogs topologically close to the drug; (iii) synthesis and activity testing of these analogs; (iv) determination of the corresponding endogenous neuropeptide among the known neuropeptides or identification of the new neuropeptides in the brain of experimental animals. Using this approach, new pyroglutamyl- and prolyl-containing dipeptides were obtained based on the structure of the well-known classical nootropic drug piracetam. The new drugs exhibit nootropic activity in doses 100-10,000 times lower than those of piracetam. The structure of most active pyroglutamyl dipeptide pGlu-Asn-NH2 coincides with that of the N-end fragment of the endogenous memory peptide AVP(4-9). Noopept (N-phenylacetylprolylglycine ethyl ester), patented in Russia and USA as a new nootropic drug, is currently under stage 2 of successful clinical trials. The main metabolite of noopept, cyclo-Pro-Gly, is identical to the endogenous dipeptide designed in this work and is most close analog of piracetam with respect to pharmacological activity. The universal character of the proposed strategy is demonstrated by the design of active dipeptide analogs of an atypical neuroleptic drug sulpiride. As a result, a potential dipeptide neuroleptic dilept was obtained, which has been patented in Russia and now passes broad preclinical trials. PMID:12962042

  15. Cognitive enhancers (nootropics). Part 2: drugs interacting with enzymes. Update 2014.

    PubMed

    Froestl, Wolfgang; Muhs, Andreas; Pfeifer, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Scientists working in the field of Alzheimer's disease and, in particular, cognitive enhancers are very productive. The review on Drugs interacting with Enzymes was accepted in August 2012. However, this field is very dynamic. New potential targets for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease were identified. This update describes drugs interacting with 60 enzymes versus 43 enzymes in the first paper. Some compounds progressed in their development, while many others were discontinued. The present review covers the evolution of research in this field through April 2014.

  16. Cognitive enhancers (nootropics). Part 2: drugs interacting with enzymes. Update 2014.

    PubMed

    Froestl, Wolfgang; Muhs, Andreas; Pfeifer, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Scientists working in the field of Alzheimer's disease and, in particular, cognitive enhancers are very productive. The review on Drugs interacting with Enzymes was accepted in August 2012. However, this field is very dynamic. New potential targets for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease were identified. This update describes drugs interacting with 60 enzymes versus 43 enzymes in the first paper. Some compounds progressed in their development, while many others were discontinued. The present review covers the evolution of research in this field through April 2014. PMID:24903780

  17. Screening and personalizing nootropic drugs and cognitive modulator regimens in silico.

    PubMed

    Jellen, Leslie C; Aliper, Alexander; Buzdin, Anton; Zhavoronkov, Alex

    2015-01-01

    The go-to cognitive enhancers of today are those that are widely available rather than optimal for the user, including drugs typically prescribed for treatment of ADHD (e.g., methylphenidate) and sleep disturbances such as narcolepsy (modafinil). While highly effective in their intended therapeutic role, performance gains in healthy populations are modest at best and profoundly inconsistent across subgroups and individuals. We propose a method for in silico screening of possible novel cognitive enhancers followed by high-throughput in vivo and in vitro validation. The proposed method uses gene expression data to evaluate the the collection of activated or suppressed signaling pathways in tissues or neurons of the cognitively enhanced brain. An algorithm maps expression data onto signaling pathways and quantifies their individual activation strength. The collective pathways and their activation form what we term the signaling pathway cloud, a biological fingerprint of cognitive enhancement (or any other condition of interest). Drugs can then be screened and ranked based on their ability to minimize, mimic, or exaggerate pathway activation or suppression within that cloud. Using this approach, one may predict the efficacy of many drugs that may enhance various aspects of cognition before costly preclinical studies and clinical trials are undertaken. PMID:25705179

  18. Screening and personalizing nootropic drugs and cognitive modulator regimens in silico

    PubMed Central

    Jellen, Leslie C.; Aliper, Alexander; Buzdin, Anton; Zhavoronkov, Alex

    2015-01-01

    The go-to cognitive enhancers of today are those that are widely available rather than optimal for the user, including drugs typically prescribed for treatment of ADHD (e.g., methylphenidate) and sleep disturbances such as narcolepsy (modafinil). While highly effective in their intended therapeutic role, performance gains in healthy populations are modest at best and profoundly inconsistent across subgroups and individuals. We propose a method for in silico screening of possible novel cognitive enhancers followed by high-throughput in vivo and in vitro validation. The proposed method uses gene expression data to evaluate the the collection of activated or suppressed signaling pathways in tissues or neurons of the cognitively enhanced brain. An algorithm maps expression data onto signaling pathways and quantifies their individual activation strength. The collective pathways and their activation form what we term the signaling pathway cloud, a biological fingerprint of cognitive enhancement (or any other condition of interest). Drugs can then be screened and ranked based on their ability to minimize, mimic, or exaggerate pathway activation or suppression within that cloud. Using this approach, one may predict the efficacy of many drugs that may enhance various aspects of cognition before costly preclinical studies and clinical trials are undertaken. PMID:25705179

  19. Novel nootropic drug sunifiram enhances hippocampal synaptic efficacy via glycine-binding site of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Shigeki; Tanaka, Tomoya; Narahashi, Toshio; Fukunaga, Kohji

    2013-10-01

    Sunifiram is a novel pyrrolidone nootropic drug structurally related to piracetam, which was developed for neurodegenerative disorder like Alzheimer's disease. Sunifiram is known to enhance cognitive function in some behavioral experiments such as Morris water maze task. To address question whether sunifiram affects N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent synaptic function in the hippocampal CA1 region, we assessed the effects of sunifiram on NMDAR-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP) by electrophysiology and on phosphorylation of synaptic proteins by immunoblotting analysis. In mouse hippocampal slices, sunifiram at 10-100 nM significantly enhanced LTP in a bell-shaped dose-response relationship which peaked at 10 nM. The enhancement of LTP by sunifiram treatment was inhibited by 7-chloro-kynurenic acid (7-ClKN), an antagonist for glycine-binding site of NMDAR, but not by ifenprodil, an inhibitor for polyamine site of NMDAR. The enhancement of LTP by sunifilam was associated with an increase in phosphorylation of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisozazole-4-propionate receptor (AMPAR) through activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and an increase in phosphorylation of NMDAR through activation of protein kinase Cα (PKCα). Sunifiram treatments at 1-1000 nM increased the slope of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) in a dose-dependent manner. The enhancement was associated with an increase in phosphorylation of AMPAR receptor through activation of CaMKII. Interestingly, under the basal condition, sunifiram treatments increased PKCα (Ser-657) and Src family (Tyr-416) activities with the same bell-shaped dose-response curve as that of LTP peaking at 10 nM. The increase in phosphorylation of PKCα (Ser-657) and Src (Tyr-416) induced by sunifiram was inhibited by 7-ClKN treatment. The LTP enhancement by sunifiram was significantly inhibited by PP2, a Src family inhibitor. Finally, when pretreated with a high

  20. Influence of ring size on the cognition-enhancing activity of DM235 and MN19, two potent nootropic drugs.

    PubMed

    Guandalini, L; Martini, E; Di Cesare Mannelli, L; Dei, S; Manetti, D; Scapecchi, S; Teodori, E; Ghelardini, C; Romanelli, M N

    2012-03-01

    A series of analogs of DM235 and MN19, characterized by rings with different size, have been prepared and evaluated for their nootropic activity in the mouse passive-avoidance test. It was found that the optimal ring size for the analogs of DM235, showing endocyclic both amidic groups, is 6 or 7 atoms. For the compounds structurally related to MN19, carrying an exocyclic amide group, the piperidine ring is the moiety which gives the most interesting compounds.

  1. [Electrophysiological correlates of efficacy of nootropic drugs in the treatment of consequences of traumatic brain injury in adolescents].

    PubMed

    Iznak, E V; Iznak, A F; Pankratova, E A; Zavadenko, N N; Guzilova, L S; Guzilova, Iu I

    2010-01-01

    To assess objectively a dynamics of brain functional state, EEG spectral power and peak latency of the P300 component of cognitive auditory evoked potentials have been analyzed in adolescents during the course of nootropic therapy of residual asthenic consequences of traumatic brain injury (ICD-10 F07.2). The study included 76 adolescents, aged 12-18 years, who have undergone severe closed head trauma with brain commotion 1/2--5 years ago. Patients have been divided into 3 groups treated during one month with cerebrolysin, piracetam or magne-B6, respectively. After the end of the nootropic therapy, 77% of patients treated with cerebrolysin as well as 50% of patients treated with piracetam and magne-B6 have demonstrated the positive dynamics of their brain functional state that manifested itself in the appearance of occipital EEG alpha rhythm or in the increase of its spectral power; in the normalization of alpha rhythm frequency; in the decrease in the spectral power of slow wave (theta and delta) EEG activity, in the amount (up to the disappearance) of paroxysmal EEG activity, in the EEG response to hyperventilation and in the shortening of the P300 peak latency. Such positive changes of neurophysiological parameters have been associated with the improvement of clinical conditions of patients and correlated significantly with the dynamics of psychometric scores of attention and memory.

  2. [Strategy for the development of dipeptide drugs].

    PubMed

    Gudasheva, T A

    2011-01-01

    The author describes an original approach to the development of dipeptide drugs based on the concept of the leading role of the beta-bend in the interaction of biologically active endogenous peptides with their receptors. The approach called "peptide-based drug design" includes both developments from the structure of a known psychotropic agent toward its topological peptide analog and developments from the active dipeptide site of a neuropeptide toward its mimetic. This strategy has been worked out at the V.V. Zakusov Research Institute of Pharmacology for 25 years. Results of investigations that discovered endogenous peptide prototypes of the known non-peptidic drugs (piracetam and sulpiride) are presented. They provided a basis for the creation of highly active non-toxic oral dipeptide preparations, such as nootrop Noopept, potential anti psychotic Dilept, and potential selective anxiolytic GB-115. PMID:21899085

  3. Cognitive enhancers (Nootropics). Part 3: drugs interacting with targets other than receptors or enzymes. Disease-modifying drugs. Update 2014.

    PubMed

    Froestl, Wolfgang; Pfeifer, Andrea; Muhs, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Scientists working in the field of Alzheimer's disease and, in particular, cognitive enhancers, are very productive. The review "Drugs interacting with Targets other than Receptors or Enzymes. Disease-modifying Drugs" was accepted in October 2012. In the last 20 months, new targets for the potential treatment of Alzheimer's disease were identified. Enormous progress was realized in the pharmacological characterization of natural products with cognitive enhancing properties. This review covers the evolution of research in this field through May 2014.

  4. [The antiamnestic effect of nootropic substances in rats].

    PubMed

    Iasnetsov, Vik V; Krylova, I N

    2013-01-01

    It has been established in experiments in rats that some nootropic substances (oxyracetam, aniracetam, nooglutil, mexidol, new 3-hydroxypyridine derivative SK-170, piracetam and noopept) produce marked antiamnestic effect on various models of amnesia (induced by microwave irradiation, acute hypoxia, and motion sickness). At the same time, meclophenoxate exhibited antiamnestic effect in the first and second models of amnesia, while 9-aminoacridine derivative HTOS-404 was only effective in the model of amnesia caused by microwave irradiation. The antiamnestic effect of nooglutil and SK-170 was caused to a significant degree by activation of non-NMDA receptors of excitatory amino acids (generally AMPA receptors), while the effect of mexidol was related to GABA(A) receptors.

  5. [The antiamnestic effect of nootropic substances in rats].

    PubMed

    Iasnetsov, Vik V; Krylova, I N

    2013-01-01

    It has been established in experiments in rats that some nootropic substances (oxyracetam, aniracetam, nooglutil, mexidol, new 3-hydroxypyridine derivative SK-170, piracetam and noopept) produce marked antiamnestic effect on various models of amnesia (induced by microwave irradiation, acute hypoxia, and motion sickness). At the same time, meclophenoxate exhibited antiamnestic effect in the first and second models of amnesia, while 9-aminoacridine derivative HTOS-404 was only effective in the model of amnesia caused by microwave irradiation. The antiamnestic effect of nooglutil and SK-170 was caused to a significant degree by activation of non-NMDA receptors of excitatory amino acids (generally AMPA receptors), while the effect of mexidol was related to GABA(A) receptors. PMID:24555225

  6. Proline-containing dipeptide GVS-111 retains nootropic activity after oral administration.

    PubMed

    Ostrovskaya, R U; Mirsoev, T K; Romanova, G A; Gudasheva, T A; Kravchenko, E V; Trofimov, C C; Voronina, T A; Seredenin, S B

    2001-10-01

    Experiments on rats trained passive avoidance task showed that N-phenyl-acetyl-L-prolyl-glycyl ethyl ester, peptide analog of piracetam (GVS-111, Noopept) after oral administration retained antiamnesic activity previously observed after its parenteral administration. Effective doses were 0.5-10 mg/kg. Experiments on a specially-developed model of active avoidance (massive one-session learning schedule) showed that GVS-111 stimulated one-session learning after single administration, while after repeated administration it increased the number of successful learners among those animals who failed after initial training. In this respect, GVS-111 principally differs from its main metabolite cycloprolylglycine and standard nootropic piracetam. PMID:11782792

  7. Studies of long-term noopept and afobazol treatment in rats with learned helplessness neurosis.

    PubMed

    Uyanaev, A A; Fisenko, V P

    2006-08-01

    Long-lasting effects of new Russian psychotropic drugs Noopept and Afobazol on active avoidance conditioning and formation of learned helplessness neurosis were studied on an original experimental model in rats. Noopept eliminated the manifestations of learned helplessness after long-term (21-day) treatment by increasing the percent of trained animals. Afobazol was low effective in preventing manifestations of learned helplessness, but if used for a long time, it reduced the incidence of learned helplessness development by increasing the percent of untrained animals. PMID:17369939

  8. [The role of non-NMDA glutamate receptors in the EEG effects of chronic administration of noopept GVS-111 in awake rats].

    PubMed

    Kovalev, G I; Vorob'ev, V V

    2002-01-01

    Participation of the non-NMDA glutamate receptor subtype in the formation of the EEG frequency spectrum was studied in wakeful rats upon a long-term (10 x 0.2 mg/kg, s.c.) administration of the nootropic dipeptide GVS-111 (noopept or N-phenylacetyl-L-prolyglycine ethylate). The EEGs were measured with electrodes implanted into somatosensor cortex regions, hippocampus, and a cannula in the lateral ventricle. The acute reactions (characteristic of nootropes) in the alpha and beta ranges of EEG exhibited inversion after the 6th injection of noopept and almost completely vanished after the 9th injection. Preliminary introduction of the non-NMDA antagonist GDEE (glutamic acid diethyl ester) in a dose of 1 mumole into the lateral ventricle restored the EEG pattern observed upon the 6th dose of GVS-111. The role of glutamate receptors in the course of a prolonged administration of nootropes, as well as the possible mechanisms accounting for a difference in the action of GVS-111 and piracetam are discussed. PMID:12596524

  9. Genotype-dependent characteristics of behavior in mice in cognitive tests. The effects of Noopept.

    PubMed

    Bel'nik, A P; Ostrovskaya, R U; Poletaeva, I I

    2009-01-01

    Male C57BL/6J, BALB/c, and DBA/2J mice showed differences in their abilities to perform two cognitive tests. C57BL/6J mice had good learning ability and memory trace retention (at 10 days) in a simplified Morris maze, while BALB/c mice had low levels of memory trace retention and DBA/2J mice had low learning ability in this test. I.p. administration of the nootropic agent Noopept (GVS-111, N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine ethyl ester) at a dose of 0.5 mg/kg 15 min before the start of the test induced significant improvements in long-term memory in this test in BALB/c mice but no further improvement in C57BL/6J mice, and had no effect in DBA/2J mice. On testing the ability to extrapolate the direction of movement of a stimulus, administration of Noopept increased the proportion of correct responses in C57BL/6J and BALB/c mice, but had no effect in DBA/2J mice. PMID:19089630

  10. [An experimental study of the anti-inflammatory action of noopept and its effect on the level of cytokines].

    PubMed

    Alekseeva, S V; Kovalenko, L P; Tallerova, A V; Gudasheva, T A; Durnev, A D

    2012-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory effects of noopept (dipeptide analog of piracetam) upon a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration at doses of 1, 5, and 10 mg/kg in comparison to the reference drug diclofenac (10 mg/kg, i.p.) have been studied on a model of acute exudative inflammation induced by carrageenan in outbred rats and concanavalin A (Con A) in CBA mice. The level of cytokines was studied on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) model (single administration, 100 mg/kg, i.p.) with 5-day administration of noopept at a dose of 5 mg/kg (i.p., before endotoxin injection) in C57BL/6 mice. The administration of noopept led to a significant suppression of the inflammatory response to both carrageenan and Con A. The administration of Con A caused a 16-fold increase in the level of IL-6 interleukin in the blood serum of mice as compared to control. Noopept (5 mg/kg) reduced the level of IL-6 by a factor of 1.8 in the inflammatory response to Con A. The administration of LPS led to pronounced increase in the levels ofpro-inflammatory IL-6 and TNF-alpha in the blood serum of test mice as compared to intact animals. The course administration of noopept (5 mg/kg) significantly decreased the level of IL-6 and reduced by half the level of TNF-alpha. PMID:23156084

  11. Novel nootropic drug sunifiram improves cognitive deficits via CaM kinase II and protein kinase C activation in olfactory bulbectomized mice.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Shigeki; Tanaka, Tomoya; Tagashira, Hideaki; Narahashi, Toshio; Fukunaga, Kohji

    2013-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) shows degeneration of the cholinergic system in the medial septum, thereby eliciting down-regulation of the olfactory function in patients. We have previously reported that olfactory bulbectomized (OBX) mice show hippocampus-dependent memory impairment as assessed by memory-related behavioral tasks and hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). In the present study, we focused whether novel pyrrolidone nootropic drug sunifiram improves both memory impairment and depression observed in OBX mice. OBX mice were administered once a day for 7-12 days with sunifiram (0.01-1.0mg/kg p.o.) from 10 days after operation with or without gavestinel (10mg/kg i.p.), which is glycine-binding site inhibitor of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). The spatial reference memory assessed by Y-maze and short-term memory assessed by novel object recognition task were significantly improved by sunifiram treatment in OBX mice. Sunifiram also restored hippocampal LTP injured in OBX mice without treatment with gavestinel. By contrast, sunifiram treatment did not ameliorate the depressive behaviors assessed by tail suspension task in OBX mice. Notably, sunifiram treatment restored CaMKIIα (Thr-286) autophosphorylation and GluR1 (Ser-831) phosphorylation in the hippocampal CA1 region from OBX mice to the levels of control mice. Likewise, sunifiram treatment improved PKCα (Ser-657) autophosphorylation and NR1 (Ser-896) phosphorylation to the control levels. Stimulation of CaMKII and PKC autophosphorylation by sunifiram was significantly inhibited by pre-treatment with gavestinel. However, sunifiram treatment did not affect the phosphorylation of CaMKIV (Thr-196) and ERK. Taken together, sunifiram ameliorates OBX-induced deficits of memory-related behaviors and impaired LTP in the hippocampal CA1 region via stimulation of glycine-binding site of NMDAR.

  12. [The dynamics of behavioral and neuroreceptor effects after acute and long-term noopept administration in C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice].

    PubMed

    Kovalev, G I; Kondrakhin, E A; Salimov, R M; Neznamov, G G

    2014-01-01

    The effect of acute, 7-fold and 14-fold noopept (1 mg/kg/day) administration on the dynamics of anxiolitic and nootropic behavioral effects in cross-maze, as well as their correlations with NMDA- and BDZ-receptor density was studied in inbred mice strains, differing in exploratory and emotional status--C57BL/6 and BALB/c. The dipeptide failed to affect the anxiety and exploration activity in C57BL/6 mice at each of 3 steps of experimental session. In this strain the B(max) values of [3H]-MK-801 and [3H]-Flunitrazepam binding changed only after single administration. In respect to BALB/c mice noopept induced both the anxiolitic and nootropic effects reaching their maximum on 7th day. In BALB/c strain the dynamics of hippocampal NMDA-receptor binding corresponds to the dynamics of exploratory efficacy whereas the dynamics of BDZ-receptors in prefrontal cortex was reciprocally to dynamics of anxiety level. PMID:25739185

  13. Comparative activity of proline-containing dipeptide noopept and inhibitor of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 sitagliptin in a rat model of developing diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ostrovskaya, R U; Ozerova, I V; Gudascheva, T A; Kapitsa, I G; Ivanova, E A; Voronina, T A; Seredenin, S B

    2014-01-01

    Developing diabetes was modeled on adult male Wistar rats by repeated intraperitoneal injections of streptozotocin in a subdiabetogenic dose of 30 mg/kg for 3 days. Proline-containing dipeptide drug Noopept or a standard diabetic drug dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor sitagliptin was administered per os in a dose of 5 mg/kg before each injection of the toxin and then for 16 days after streptozotocin course. In active control group, spontaneously increase glucose level and reduced tolerance to glucose load (1000 mg/kg intraperitoneally) were observed on the next day after the third administration of toxin. Basal glucose level decreased by day 16, but glucose tolerance remained impaired. Noopept normalized the basal blood glucose level and tolerance to glucose load on the next day after administration of streptozotocin. The effect of Noopept persisted to the end of the experiment. At early terms of the experiment, sitagliptin was somewhat superior to Noopept by the effect on baseline glucose level, but was inferior by the influence on glucose tolerance.. By the end of the experiment, Noopept significantly (by 2 times) surpassed sitagliptin by its effect on glucose tolerance. PMID:24771372

  14. PASS assisted prediction and pharmacological evaluation of novel nicotinic analogs for nootropic activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Navneet; Ishar, Mohan Pal Singh; Gajbhiye, Asmita; Goel, Rajesh Kumar

    2011-07-15

    The aim of present study is to predict the probable nootropic activity of novel nicotine analogues with the help of computer program, PASS (prediction of activity spectra for substances) and evaluate the same. Two compounds from differently substituted pyridines were selected for synthesis and evaluation of nootropic activity based on their high probable activity (Pa) value predicted by PASS computer program. Evaluation of nootropic activity of compounds after acute and chronic treatment was done with transfer latency (TL) and step down latency (SDL) methods which showed significant nootropic activity. The effect on scopolamine induced amnesia was also observed along with their acetylcholine esterase inhibitory activity which also showed positive results which strengthened their efficacy as nootropic agents through involvement of cholinergic system. This nootropic effect was similar to the effect of nicotine and donepezil used as standard drugs. Muscle coordination and locomotor activity along with their addiction liability, safety and tolerability studies were also evaluated. These studies showed that these compounds are well tolerable and safe over a wide range of doses tested along with the absence of withdrawal effect which is present in nicotine due to its addiction liability. The study showed that these compounds are true nicotine analogs with desirable efficacy and safety profile for their use as effective nootropic agents.

  15. The nootropic concept and dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Wilsher, C R

    1986-01-01

    A review is presented of controlled studies using intensive teaching intervention to improve dyslexics' reading ability. The results of eight controlled studies reveal only one showing the superiority of teaching. Taking this as a background, the work on Nootropics is reviewed. Both animal and clinical work with Piracetam (the first of the Nootropics) seems to indicate that this medication lacks significant or serious side effects and appears to promote memory and learning. Many double-blind studies of Piracetam have now been conducted on dyslexic children. These studies suggest that Piracetam improves the reading ability of dyslexics. In addition electrophysiological studies support the notion that Piracetam may be "left hemisphere active." Such encouraging trends will doubtless lead to further research in this interesting area.

  16. [Neuroprotective activity of the proline-containing dipeptide noopept on the model of brain ischemia induced by the middle cerebral artery occlusion].

    PubMed

    Gavrilova, S A; Us, K S; Ostrovskaia, R U; Koshelev, V B

    2006-01-01

    The influence of noopept (N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine ethyl ester, GVS-111) on the extent of ischemic cortical stroke was investigated in experiments on white mongrel male rats with ischemia induced by a combination of the middle cerebral artery occlusion with ipsilateral common carotid artery ligation. Animals were treated with noopept (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) according to the following schedule: 15 min and 2, 24, and 48 h after the occlusion. Test rats were decapitated 72 h after occlusion, brains were extracted and frozen, and thin brain slices were stained with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride. The slices were scanned and processed using Auc 1 computer program, which estimates the percentage of damaged area relative to that of the whole ipsilateral hemisphere. The conditions of coagulation the distal segment of middle cerebral artery were selected, which caused necrosis localized in the fronto-parietal and dorso-lateral regions of the brain cortex without any damage of subcortical structures. The extent of the brain damage in control group (treated by saline) was 18.6%, while that in the group treated with noopept was 12.2%, thus demonstrating a decrease in the infarction area by 34.5% (p < 05). The data on noopept efficacy on the model of the extensive ischemic injury of brain cortex show that this drug has good prospects for use in the neuroprotective treatment of stroke. PMID:16995431

  17. Dipeptide Piracetam Analogue Noopept Improves Viability of Hippocampal HT-22 Neurons in the Glutamate Toxicity Model.

    PubMed

    Antipova, T A; Nikolaev, S V; Ostrovskaya, P U; Gudasheva, T A; Seredenin, S B

    2016-05-01

    Effect of noopept (N-phenylacetyl-prolylglycine ethyl ester) on viability of neurons exposed to neurotoxic action of glutamic acid (5 mM) was studied in vitro in immortalized mouse hippocampal HT-22 neurons. Noopept added to the medium before or after glutamic acid improved neuronal survival in a concentration range of 10-11-10-5 M. Comparison of the effective noopept concentrations determined in previous studies on cultured cortical and cerebellar neurons showed that hippocampal neurons are more sensitive to the protective effect of noopept. PMID:27265136

  18. [Nootropics and antioxidants in the complex therapy of symptomatic posttraumatic epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Savenkov, A A; Badalian, O L; Avakian, G N

    2013-01-01

    To study the possibility of application of nootropics and antioxidants in the complex antiepileptic therapy, we examined 75 patients with symptomatic focal posttraumatic epilepsy. A statistically significant reduction in the number of epileptic seizures, improvement of cognitive function and quality of life of the patients as well as a decrease in the severity of depression and epileptic changes in the EEG were identified. The potentiation of antiepileptic activity of basic drugs, normalization of brain's electrical activity and reduction in EEG epileptiform activity, in particular coherent indicators of slow-wave activity, were noted after treatment with the antioxidant mexidol. A trend towards the improvement of neuropsychological performance and quality of life was observed. There was a lack of seizure aggravation typical of many nootropic drugs. Thus, phenotropil and mexidol can be recommended for complex treatment of symptomatic posttraumatic epilepsy.

  19. Effect of noopept and afobazole on the development of neurosis of learned helplessness in rats.

    PubMed

    Uyanaev, A A; Fisenko, V P; Khitrov, N K

    2003-08-01

    We studied the effects of new psychotropic preparations noopept and afobazole on acquisition of the conditioned active avoidance response and development of neurosis of learned helplessness in rats. Noopept in doses of 0.05-0.10 mg/kg accelerated acquisition of conditioned active avoidance response and reduced the incidence of learned helplessness in rats. Afobazole in a dose of 5 mg/kg produced an opposite effect, which is probably related to high selective anxiolytic activity of this preparation. PMID:14631499

  20. [Hypoxia and memory. Specific features of nootropic agents effects and their use].

    PubMed

    Voronina, T A

    2000-01-01

    Hypoxia and hypoxic adaptation are powerful factors of controlling memory and behavior processes. Acute hypoxia exerts a differential impact on different deficits of mnestic and cognitive functions. Instrumental reflexes of active and passive avoidance, negative learning, behavior with a change in the stereotype of learning are more greatly damaged. Memory with spatial and visual differentiation and their rearrangement change to a lesser extent and conditional reflexes are not deranged. In this contract, altitude hypoxic adaptation enhances information fixation and increases the degree and duration of retention of temporary relations. Nootropic agents with an antihypoxic action exert a marked effect on hypoxia-induced cognitive and memory disorders and the magnitude of this effect depends on the ration of proper nootropic to antihypoxic components in the spectrum of the drugs' pharmacological activity. The agents that combine a prevailing antiamnestic effect and a marked and moderate antihypoxic action (mexidole, nooglutil, pyracetam, beglymin, etc.) are most effective in eliminating different hypoxia-induced cognitive and memory disorders, nootropic drugs that have a pronounced antiamnestic activity (centrophenoxine, etc.) and no antihypoxic component also restore the main types of mnestic disorders after hypoxia, but to a lesser extent.

  1. Molecular Mechanism Underlying the Action of Substituted Pro-Gly Dipeptide Noopept

    PubMed Central

    Vakhitova, Y. V.; Sadovnikov, S. V.; Borisevich, S. S.; Ostrovskaya, R. U.; A.Gudasheva, T.; Seredenin, S. B.

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed in order to reveal the effect of Noopept (ethyl ester of N-phenylacetyl-Lprolylglycine, GVS-111) on the DNA-binding activity of transcriptional factors (TF) in HEK293 cells transiently transfected with luciferase reporter constructs containing sequences for CREB, NFAT, NF-κB, p53, STAT1, GAS, VDR, HSF1, and HIF-1. Noopept (10 μM) was shown to increase the DNA-binding activity of HIF-1 only, while lacking the ability to affect that of CREB, NFAT, NF-κB, p53, STAT1, GAS, VDR, and HSF1. Noopept provoked an additional increase in the DNA-binding activity of HIF-1 when applied in conditions of CoCl2-induced HIF- 1 stabilization. The degree of this HIF-positive effect of Noopept was shown to be concentration-dependent. Piracetam (1 mM) failed to affect significantly any of the TF under study. The results of molecular docking showed that Noopept (L-isomer), as well as its metabolite, L-isomer of N-phenyl-acetylprolyl, unlike its pharmacologically ineffective D-isomer, is able to bind to the active site of prolyl hydroxylase 2. Taking into account the important role of the genes activated by HIF-1 in the formation of an adaptive response to hypoxia, data on the ability of Noopept to provoke a selective increase in the DNA-binding activity of HIF-1 explain the wide spectrum of neurochemical and pharmacological effects of Noopept revealed before. The obtained data allow one to propose the HIF-positive effect as the primary mechanism of the activity of this Pro-Gly-containing dipeptide. PMID:27099787

  2. Molecular Mechanism Underlying the Action of Substituted Pro-Gly Dipeptide Noopept.

    PubMed

    Vakhitova, Y V; Sadovnikov, S V; Borisevich, S S; Ostrovskaya, R U; A Gudasheva, T; Seredenin, S B

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed in order to reveal the effect of Noopept (ethyl ester of N-phenylacetyl-Lprolylglycine, GVS-111) on the DNA-binding activity of transcriptional factors (TF) in HEK293 cells transiently transfected with luciferase reporter constructs containing sequences for CREB, NFAT, NF-κB, p53, STAT1, GAS, VDR, HSF1, and HIF-1. Noopept (10 μM) was shown to increase the DNA-binding activity of HIF-1 only, while lacking the ability to affect that of CREB, NFAT, NF-κB, p53, STAT1, GAS, VDR, and HSF1. Noopept provoked an additional increase in the DNA-binding activity of HIF-1 when applied in conditions of CoCl2-induced HIF- 1 stabilization. The degree of this HIF-positive effect of Noopept was shown to be concentration-dependent. Piracetam (1 mM) failed to affect significantly any of the TF under study. The results of molecular docking showed that Noopept (L-isomer), as well as its metabolite, L-isomer of N-phenyl-acetylprolyl, unlike its pharmacologically ineffective D-isomer, is able to bind to the active site of prolyl hydroxylase 2. Taking into account the important role of the genes activated by HIF-1 in the formation of an adaptive response to hypoxia, data on the ability of Noopept to provoke a selective increase in the DNA-binding activity of HIF-1 explain the wide spectrum of neurochemical and pharmacological effects of Noopept revealed before. The obtained data allow one to propose the HIF-positive effect as the primary mechanism of the activity of this Pro-Gly-containing dipeptide. PMID:27099787

  3. Nootropic herbs (Medhya Rasayana) in Ayurveda: An update

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Reena; Girish, K. J.; Kumar, Abhimanyu

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive deficits that present with many of neuropsychiatric conditions and/or alone as developmental deficit demand use of nootropics to boost cognitive abilities. Recently there is a tremendous urge to explore medicinal plants globally for improving cognitive function owing to their less adverse effects. Ayurveda provides a list of herbs known for nootropic activity as well as their multi-dimensional utility in various conditions. Present paper is a review to update knowledge on pharmacological properties, major chemical constituents, therapeutic actions, preclinical studies, safety and possible mode of action of the selected herbs from ayurvedic pharmacopoeia. Concurrently, it opens up for further research and standardization on nootropic herbs PMID:23055641

  4. Smart drugs: Implications of student use.

    PubMed

    Canterbury, R J; Lloyd, E

    1994-03-01

    The use of Smart Drugs to enhance intelligence, improve memory and maximize cognitive functioning in healthy individuals has attracted the attention of the popular press. This paper discusses the implication of the nonmedical college student use of "nootropic" Smart Drugs, a class of pharmaceuticals legally available in other countries to treat diseases associated with mental decline or dysfunction. Nootropic drug use is compared to steroid use in a student population. In a survey of college students, 5% of the males reported casual use of a drug to increase their intelligence, enhance their memory and make them smarter: 2.5% of these students probably used a nootropic drug.

  5. Impairment of learning and memory after photothrombosis of the prefrontal cortex in rat brain: effects of Noopept.

    PubMed

    Romanova, G A; Shakova, F M; Gudasheva, T A; Ostrovskaya, R U

    2002-12-01

    Experiments were performed on rats trained conditioned passive avoidance response. Acquisition and retention of memory traces were impaired after photothrombosis of the prefrontal cortex. The acyl-prolyl-containing dipeptide Noopept facilitated retention and retrieval of a conditioned passive avoidance response, normalized learning capacity in animals with ischemic damage to the cerebral cortex, and promoted finish training in rats with hereditary learning deficit. These results show that Noopept improves all three stages of memory. It should be emphasized that the effect of Noopept was most pronounced in animals with impaired mnesic function. PMID:12660828

  6. Unifi nootropics from the lab to the web: a story of academic (and industrial) shortcomings.

    PubMed

    Gualtieri, Fulvio

    2016-01-01

    This paper is a review of the work of my former academic group of research in the past 15 years, in the field of cognition enhancers (also called nootropics) that identified two very potent molecules: Unifiram and Sunifiram that for a variety of reasons were not protected by a patent. Some 12 years after their disclosure (2000) I casually found that on the web, there were dozens of sites offering Unifiram and Sunifiram as drugs that improve cognition in healthy individuals even if only few preclinical studies were done and their long-term toxicity was unknown.

  7. [The nootropic and anxiolytic properties of different doses of piracetam].

    PubMed

    Voronina, T A; Molodavkin, G M; Borlikova, G G; Ostrovskaia, R U; Tushmalova, N A; Naznamov, G G

    2000-01-01

    The effect of piracetam at various doses on the behavioral and electrophysiological characteristics was studied, including the development of passive and active avoidance conditional reflexes in rats, their behavior in conflict situations, and the transcallosal evoked response (TER) in rabbit brain. In the dose range from 50 to 300 mg/kg, piracetam improved the avoidance performance of both types and produced a dose-dependent increase in the TER amplitude, but did not affect the behavior of rats in conflict situations. As the drug dose was increased to 400-1000 mg/kg, the positive learning influence disappeared (sometimes the effect was even negative) and the TER increase changed to decrease. In contrast, the conflict situation tests revealed pronounced anxiolytic activity of piracetam at elevated doses. Thus, the nootropic and anxiolytic effects of piracetam (and, probably, of the other tranquilizers as well) do not coexist and are significantly shifted relative to one another on the dose scale, being probably realized via different mechanisms.

  8. Evaluation of anticonvulsant and nootropic effect of ondansetron in mice.

    PubMed

    Jain, S; Agarwal, N B; Mediratta, P K; Sharma, K K

    2012-09-01

    The role of serotonin receptors have been implicated in various types of experimentally induced seizures. Ondansetron is a highly selective 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 (5-HT(3)) receptor antagonist used as antiemetic agent for chemotherapy-, and radiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. The present study was carried out to examine the effect of ondansetron on electroshock, pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures and cognitive functions in mice. Ondansetron was administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) at doses of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg (single dose) to observe its effect on the increasing current electroshock seizure (ICES) test and PTZ-induced seizure test. In addition, a chronic study (21 days) was also performed to assess the effects of ondansetron on electroshock-induced convulsions and cognitive functions. The effect on cognition was assessed by elevated plus maze and passive avoidance paradigms. Phenytoin (25 mg/kg, i.p.) was used as a standard anticonvulsant drug and piracetam (200 mg/kg) was administered as a standard nootropic drug. The results were compared with an acute study, wherein it was found that the administration of ondansetron (1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg) significantly raised the seizure-threshold current as compared to control group in the ICES test. Similar results were observed after chronic administration of ondansetron. In PTZ test, ondansetron in all the three tested doses failed to show protective effect against PTZ-induced seizure test. Administration of ondansetron for 21 days significantly decreased the transfer latency (TL) and prolonged the step-down latency (SDL). The results of present study suggest the anticonvulsant and memory-enhancing effect of ondansetron in mice.

  9. [Effect of natural nootropic and adaptogen preparations on the cortex bioelectrical activity in rats].

    PubMed

    Suslov, N I; Churin, A A; Skurikhin, E G; Provalova, N V; Stal'bovskiĭ, A O; Litvinenko, V I; Dygaĭ, A M

    2002-01-01

    The influence of new nootrope and adaptogen preparations representing dry extracts from Scutellaria baicalensis (Georgi), Bergenia crassifolia (Fritsch), and velvet antlers of Siberian deer (Cervus elaphus sibiricus) on the bioelectric activity (cortex Fourier spectral EEG power) under conflict situation and conditioned reflex development was studied in rats. In both tests, the drugs produced similar changes in the EEG activity: (i) increase in the partial contribution of delta-activity and general spectral power, (ii) depression in the alpha and beta 1-rhythm power, (iii) depression of theta-activity in some cases. The EEG activity changes depended on the initial state and were closely connected with the behavior of the test animals. The drug administration led to normalization of the alpha and beta 1 activity correlated with the improved behavioral characteristics. At the same time, the delta activity was virtually not affected and lost the correlation with behavior.

  10. Noopept reduces the postischemic functional and metabolic disorders in the brain of rats with different sensitivity to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Zarubina, I V; Shabanov, P D

    2009-03-01

    Chronic cerebral ischemia was induced by ligation of both common carotid arteries in Wistar rats, divided by sensitivity to hypoxia into highly sensitive and low-sensitive. Noopept (peptide preparation), injected (0.5 mg/kg) during 7 days after occlusion of the carotid arteries, reduced the neurological disorders in rats with high and low sensitivity to hypoxia and improved their survival during the postischemic period. Noopept normalized behavior disordered by cerebral ischemia (according to the open field and elevated plus maze tests), prevented accumulation of LPO products and inhibition of antioxidant systems in the brain of rats with high and low sensitivity to hypoxia. Hence, noopept exhibited a neuroprotective effect in cerebral ischemia. PMID:19529857

  11. Nootropic candidates inhibit head-twitches induced by mescaline in mice.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Ohno, M; Yatsugi, S; Fujikawa, Y; Ueki, S

    1992-07-01

    The effects of various nootropic candidates on mescaline-induced head-twitches were studied in mice. The number of head-twitches induced by mescaline (100 mg/kg, s.c.) was significantly reduced by idebenone (32 and 100 mg/kg, i.p.), minaprine (0.32-10 mg/kg, p.o.) and nebracetam (100 mg/kg, p.o.). Cholinesterase inhibitors such as tetrahydroaminoacridine (1 and 10 mg/kg, p.o.), NIK-247 (10 and 18 mg/kg, p.o.) and physostigmine (0.32 mg/kg, i.p.) also suppressed the head-twitch response to mescaline. These results suggest that the direct or indirect cholinergic-activating effects of these drugs may be involved in inhibiting mescaline-induced head-twitches.

  12. Nootropic Effects of Filipendula Vulgaris Moench Water Extract Fractions.

    PubMed

    Shilova, I V; Suslov, N I; Amelchenko, V P

    2015-07-01

    Nootropic activity of water extract fractions from aerial parts of Filipendula vulgaris Moench was demonstrated on the models of hermetic volume hypoxia, conditioned passive avoidance response, open field test, and forced swimming with a load. The fractions stimulated hypoxic resistance, normalized orientation and exploratory behavior, improved conditioned response reproduction during testing after hypoxic injury, and increased exercise tolerance. Fractionation of the extract led to dissociation of the effect components, which suggests that individual constituents have specific characteristics. Ethylacetate fraction exhibited most pronounced nootropic activity and was superior to plant extract by some characteristics. The detected effects seemed to be caused by modulation of the hippocampus activity the under the effects of phenol and triterpene compounds. PMID:26210209

  13. Nootropic Effects of Filipendula Vulgaris Moench Water Extract Fractions.

    PubMed

    Shilova, I V; Suslov, N I; Amelchenko, V P

    2015-07-01

    Nootropic activity of water extract fractions from aerial parts of Filipendula vulgaris Moench was demonstrated on the models of hermetic volume hypoxia, conditioned passive avoidance response, open field test, and forced swimming with a load. The fractions stimulated hypoxic resistance, normalized orientation and exploratory behavior, improved conditioned response reproduction during testing after hypoxic injury, and increased exercise tolerance. Fractionation of the extract led to dissociation of the effect components, which suggests that individual constituents have specific characteristics. Ethylacetate fraction exhibited most pronounced nootropic activity and was superior to plant extract by some characteristics. The detected effects seemed to be caused by modulation of the hippocampus activity the under the effects of phenol and triterpene compounds.

  14. Chromatographic Behaviour Predicts the Ability of Potential Nootropics to Permeate the Blood-Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Farsa, Oldřich

    2013-01-01

    The log BB parameter is the logarithm of the ratio of a compound’s equilibrium concentrations in the brain tissue versus the blood plasma. This parameter is a useful descriptor in assessing the ability of a compound to permeate the blood-brain barrier. The aim of this study was to develop a Hansch-type linear regression QSAR model that correlates the parameter log BB and the retention time of drugs and other organic compounds on a reversed-phase HPLC containing an embedded amide moiety. The retention time was expressed by the capacity factor log k′. The second aim was to estimate the brain’s absorption of 2-(azacycloalkyl)acetamidophenoxyacetic acids, which are analogues of piracetam, nefiracetam, and meclofenoxate. Notably, these acids may be novel nootropics. Two simple regression models that relate log BB and log k′ were developed from an assay performed using a reversed-phase HPLC that contained an embedded amide moiety. Both the quadratic and linear models yielded statistical parameters comparable to previously published models of log BB dependence on various structural characteristics. The models predict that four members of the substituted phenoxyacetic acid series have a strong chance of permeating the barrier and being absorbed in the brain. The results of this study show that a reversed-phase HPLC system containing an embedded amide moiety is a functional in vitro surrogate of the blood-brain barrier. These results suggest that racetam-type nootropic drugs containing a carboxylic moiety could be more poorly absorbed than analogues devoid of the carboxyl group, especially if the compounds penetrate the barrier by a simple diffusion mechanism. PMID:23641330

  15. [Meteoadaptogenic properties of peptide drugs in healthy volunteers].

    PubMed

    Shabanov, P D; Ganapol'skiĭ, V P; Aleksandrov, P V

    2007-01-01

    The meteoadaptogenic properties of a series of drugs with peptide (cortexin, noopept, dilept) and nonpeptide (vinpotropil) structure were investigated in a climate thermobarocomplex (Tabay, Japan) on a group of healthy volunteers aged 20-24. All the studied drugs produced a meteoadaptogenic action, the extent of which depended on the environmental test conditions (overcooling, overheating, hypobaric hypoxia). Vinpotropil, optimizing a physiological component of the functional state, can be recommended as a meteoadaptogen for both cold and hot climate as well as for hypobaric hypoxia, where it improved the psychological component of the functional state. Cortexin is qualified as an adaptogen and actoprotector only for hypobaric hypoxia conditions (uplands). Noopept, affecting positively a psychological component of the functional state, can be used for rapid adaptation to both cold and hot climate. In the hot climate, noopept also enhanced the physical work capacity. Dilept mostly elevated the psychological component of the functional state and can be considered as a psychomotor enhancer and adaptogen. Therefore, all the drugs studied (vinpotropil, cortexin, noopept and dilept) can be recommended as the agents producing activation, support and recovery of the physical and psychological efficiency under rapidly changing environment conditions. PMID:18318195

  16. Molecular docking, spectroscopic studies and quantum calculations on nootropic drug.

    PubMed

    Uma Maheswari, J; Muthu, S; Sundius, Tom

    2014-04-01

    A systematic vibrational spectroscopic assignment and analysis of piracetam [(2-oxo-1-pyrrolidineacetamide)] have been carried out using FT-IR and FT-Raman spectral data. The vibrational analysis was aided by an electronic structure calculation based on the hybrid density functional method B3LYP using a 6-311G++(d,p) basis set. Molecular equilibrium geometries, electronic energies, IR and Raman intensities, and harmonic vibrational frequencies have been computed. The assignments are based on the experimental IR and Raman spectra, and a complete assignment of the observed spectra has been proposed. The UV-visible spectrum of the compound was recorded and the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies and the maximum absorption wavelengths λmax were determined by the time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) method. The geometrical parameters, vibrational frequencies and absorption wavelengths were compared with the experimental data. The complete vibrational assignments are performed on the basis of the potential energy distributions (PED) of the vibrational modes in terms of natural internal coordinates. The simulated FT-IR, FT-Raman, and UV spectra of the title compound have been constructed. Molecular docking studies have been carried out in the active site of piracetam by using Argus Lab. In addition, the potential energy surface, HOMO and LUMO energies, first-order hyperpolarizability and the molecular electrostatic potential have been computed.

  17. [The influence of piracetam on behavior and brain receptors in C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice: nootropic and anxiolytic effects].

    PubMed

    Kovalev, G I; Kondrakhin, E A; Salimov, R M; Neznamov, G G

    2013-01-01

    The influence of acute and long-term piracetam administration on the dynamics of rapid (non-specific, anxiolytic) and slow (specific, nootropic) behavioral drug effects, as well as on their interrelation with NMDA- and BDZ-receptors was studied in inbred mice strains differing in cognitive and emotional status--C57BL/6 and BALB/c. The BALB/c strain contained 17% less [3H]-flunitrazepam binding sites in frontal cortex and 22% less [3H]-MK801 binding sites in hippocampus as compared to those in C57BL/6 mice. Based on these data, BALB/c strain was used as a model of psychopathology, combining increased anxiety and cognitive deficit. Under the action of single, 7-fold, and 14-fold piracetam i.p. injections (200 mg/kg body weight, daily), a fast increase in NMDA-receptor density and slow escalation of the specific nootropic effect was observed in BALB/c mice. Non-specific anxiolytic effects in these mice increased for the first 1 - 7 days without any changes in BDZ-binding and then decreased to initial values accompanied by decrement of brain receptor concentration. Thus, in BALB/c mice, a slowly manifested specific nootropic action of piracetam develops, following an increase in NMDA receptor density, whereas the non-specific anxiolytic effect precedes the fast-paced changes in BDZ-binding site density.

  18. Nootropic effect of meadowsweet (Filipendula vulgaris) extracts.

    PubMed

    Shilova, I V; Suslov, N I

    2015-03-01

    The effects of the extracts of the aboveground parts of Filipendula vulgaris Moench on the behavior and memory of mice after hypoxic injury and their physical performance in the open-field test were studied using the models of hypoxia in a sealed volume, conditioned passive avoidance response (CPAR), and forced swimming with a load. The extracts improved animal resistance to hypoxia, normalized orientation and exploration activities, promoted CPAR retention after hypoxic injury, and increased physical performance. Aqueous extract of meadowsweet had the most pronounced effect that corresponded to the effect of the reference drug piracetam. These effects were probably caused by modulation of hippocampal activity. PMID:25778665

  19. Nootropic effect of meadowsweet (Filipendula vulgaris) extracts.

    PubMed

    Shilova, I V; Suslov, N I

    2015-03-01

    The effects of the extracts of the aboveground parts of Filipendula vulgaris Moench on the behavior and memory of mice after hypoxic injury and their physical performance in the open-field test were studied using the models of hypoxia in a sealed volume, conditioned passive avoidance response (CPAR), and forced swimming with a load. The extracts improved animal resistance to hypoxia, normalized orientation and exploration activities, promoted CPAR retention after hypoxic injury, and increased physical performance. Aqueous extract of meadowsweet had the most pronounced effect that corresponded to the effect of the reference drug piracetam. These effects were probably caused by modulation of hippocampal activity.

  20. [Role of functional state of neuronal mitochondria of cerebral cortex in mechanisms of nootropic activity of neuroprotectors in rats with alloxan hyperglycemia].

    PubMed

    Zhiliuk, V I; Mamchur, V I; Pavlov, S V

    2015-01-01

    The influence of citicoline, phenylpiracetam, pentoxifylline and N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine on cognitive processes and functional state of mitochondria in the neocortex of alloxan-diabetic rats has been studied. The drug effects on cognitive processes were assessed using passive avoidance tests in the dark-light camera. Latent period and the number of animals with amnesia skill on 6th and 20th days of drug administration were recorded. Functional status of mitochondria was assessed by mitochondrial pore opening and mitochondrial transmembrane potential (Y) on 20th day. It has been established that course administration of phenylpiracetam, citicoline and to a lesser extent N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine, but not pentoxifylline, improves the processes of learning and storing conditional skill. At the same time, the nootropic activity of studied drugs was comparable to their effect on the functional state of mitochondria in neocortical neurons in rats with chronic hyperglycemia. According to mitoprotective activity (prevention of opening of mitochondrial cyclosporin-A-sensitive pores and restoration of mitochondrial transmembrane potential), the maximum potential was observed for citicoline and phenylpiracetam, and the minimum--for pentoxifylline. The results point out the importance of mitoprotective properties in nootropic effects of studied drugs.

  1. [Role of functional state of neuronal mitochondria of cerebral cortex in mechanisms of nootropic activity of neuroprotectors in rats with alloxan hyperglycemia].

    PubMed

    Zhiliuk, V I; Mamchur, V I; Pavlov, S V

    2015-01-01

    The influence of citicoline, phenylpiracetam, pentoxifylline and N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine on cognitive processes and functional state of mitochondria in the neocortex of alloxan-diabetic rats has been studied. The drug effects on cognitive processes were assessed using passive avoidance tests in the dark-light camera. Latent period and the number of animals with amnesia skill on 6th and 20th days of drug administration were recorded. Functional status of mitochondria was assessed by mitochondrial pore opening and mitochondrial transmembrane potential (Y) on 20th day. It has been established that course administration of phenylpiracetam, citicoline and to a lesser extent N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine, but not pentoxifylline, improves the processes of learning and storing conditional skill. At the same time, the nootropic activity of studied drugs was comparable to their effect on the functional state of mitochondria in neocortical neurons in rats with chronic hyperglycemia. According to mitoprotective activity (prevention of opening of mitochondrial cyclosporin-A-sensitive pores and restoration of mitochondrial transmembrane potential), the maximum potential was observed for citicoline and phenylpiracetam, and the minimum--for pentoxifylline. The results point out the importance of mitoprotective properties in nootropic effects of studied drugs. PMID:25898541

  2. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of Thai traditional nootropic remedy and its herbal ingredients.

    PubMed

    Tappayuthpijarn, Pimolvan; Itharat, Arunporn; Makchuchit, Sunita

    2011-12-01

    The incidence of Alzheimer disease (AD) is increasing every year in accordance with the increasing of elderly population and could pose significant health problems in the future. The use of medicinal plants as an alternative prevention or even for a possible treatment of the AD is, therefore, becoming an interesting research issue. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are well-known drugs commonly used in the treatment of AD. The aim of the present study was to screen for AChE inhibitory activity of the Thai traditional nootropic recipe and its herbal ingredients. The results showed that ethanolic extracts of four out of twenty-five herbs i.e. Stephania pierrei Diels. Kaempfera parviflora Wall. ex Baker, Stephania venosa (Blume) Spreng, Piper nigrum L at 0.1 mg/mL showed % AChE inhibition of 89, 64, 59, 50; the IC50 were 6, 21, 29, 30 microg/mL respectively. The other herbs as well as combination of the whole recipe had no synergistic inhibitory effect on AChE activity. However some plants revealed antioxidant activity. More research should have be performed on this local wisdom remedy to verify the uses in scientific term. PMID:22619927

  3. Preparation of Silica Nanoparticles Loaded with Nootropics and Their In Vivo Permeation through Blood-Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Zaruba, Kamil; Kunes, Martin; Ulbrich, Pavel; Brezaniova, Ingrid; Triska, Jan; Suchy, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier prevents the passage of many drugs that target the central nervous system. This paper presents the preparation and characterization of silica-based nanocarriers loaded with piracetam, pentoxifylline, and pyridoxine (drugs from the class of nootropics), which are designed to enhance the permeation of the drugs from the circulatory system through the blood-brain barrier. Their permeation was compared with non-nanoparticle drug substances (bulk materials) by means of an in vivo model of rat brain perfusion. The size and morphology of the nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. The content of the drug substances in silica-based nanocarriers was analysed by elemental analysis and UV spectrometry. Microscopic analysis of visualized silica nanocarriers in the perfused brain tissue was performed. The concentration of the drug substances in the tissue was determined by means of UHPLC-DAD/HRMS LTQ Orbitrap XL. It was found that the drug substances in silica-based nanocarriers permeated through the blood brain barrier to the brain tissue, whereas bulk materials were not detected in the brain. PMID:26075264

  4. Preparation of silica nanoparticles loaded with nootropics and their in vivo permeation through blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Jampilek, Josef; Zaruba, Kamil; Oravec, Michal; Kunes, Martin; Babula, Petr; Ulbrich, Pavel; Brezaniova, Ingrid; Opatrilova, Radka; Triska, Jan; Suchy, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier prevents the passage of many drugs that target the central nervous system. This paper presents the preparation and characterization of silica-based nanocarriers loaded with piracetam, pentoxifylline, and pyridoxine (drugs from the class of nootropics), which are designed to enhance the permeation of the drugs from the circulatory system through the blood-brain barrier. Their permeation was compared with non-nanoparticle drug substances (bulk materials) by means of an in vivo model of rat brain perfusion. The size and morphology of the nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. The content of the drug substances in silica-based nanocarriers was analysed by elemental analysis and UV spectrometry. Microscopic analysis of visualized silica nanocarriers in the perfused brain tissue was performed. The concentration of the drug substances in the tissue was determined by means of UHPLC-DAD/HRMS LTQ Orbitrap XL. It was found that the drug substances in silica-based nanocarriers permeated through the blood brain barrier to the brain tissue, whereas bulk materials were not detected in the brain. PMID:26075264

  5. Preparation of silica nanoparticles loaded with nootropics and their in vivo permeation through blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Jampilek, Josef; Zaruba, Kamil; Oravec, Michal; Kunes, Martin; Babula, Petr; Ulbrich, Pavel; Brezaniova, Ingrid; Opatrilova, Radka; Triska, Jan; Suchy, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier prevents the passage of many drugs that target the central nervous system. This paper presents the preparation and characterization of silica-based nanocarriers loaded with piracetam, pentoxifylline, and pyridoxine (drugs from the class of nootropics), which are designed to enhance the permeation of the drugs from the circulatory system through the blood-brain barrier. Their permeation was compared with non-nanoparticle drug substances (bulk materials) by means of an in vivo model of rat brain perfusion. The size and morphology of the nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. The content of the drug substances in silica-based nanocarriers was analysed by elemental analysis and UV spectrometry. Microscopic analysis of visualized silica nanocarriers in the perfused brain tissue was performed. The concentration of the drug substances in the tissue was determined by means of UHPLC-DAD/HRMS LTQ Orbitrap XL. It was found that the drug substances in silica-based nanocarriers permeated through the blood brain barrier to the brain tissue, whereas bulk materials were not detected in the brain.

  6. Cyclopropyl glycine and proline-containing preparation noopept evoke two types of membrane potential responses in synaptoneurosomes.

    PubMed

    Lutsenko, V K; Vukolova, M N; Gudasheva, T A

    2003-06-01

    Proline, cyclo(Pro-Gly), and acyl-prolyl-containing dipeptide GVS-111 decreased synaptoneurosome membrane potential in a Ca2+-free medium. The efficiency of these preparations decreased in the following order: GVS>cyclo(Pro-Gly)>proline. Depolarization responses induced by endogenous nootropic agent cyclo(Pro-Gly) was dose-dependent and saturable; the threshold concentration of cyclo(Pro-Gly) was 10(-9) M. In a Ca2+-containing medium GVS and cyclo(Pro-Gly) induced both hyperpolarizing and depolarizing membrane responses of synaptoneurosomes. Possible mechanisms underlying changes in the membrane potential of synaptoneurosomes induced by nootropic agents are discussed. It was interesting whether modulation of electrogenesis can improve memory and potentiate the neuroprotective effect of the test nootropic agents. PMID:12937673

  7. Smart drugs for cognitive enhancement: ethical and pragmatic considerations in the era of cosmetic neurology.

    PubMed

    Cakic, V

    2009-10-01

    Reports in the popular press suggest that smart drugs or "nootropics" such as methylphenidate, modafinil and piracetam are increasingly being used by the healthy to augment cognitive ability. Although current nootropics offer only modest improvements in cognitive performance, it appears likely that more effective compounds will be developed in the future and that their off-label use will increase. One sphere in which the use of these drugs may be commonplace is by healthy students within academia. This article reviews the ethical and pragmatic implications of nootropic use in academia by drawing parallels with issues relevant to the drugs in sport debate. It is often argued that performance-enhancing drugs should be prohibited because they create an uneven playing field. However, this appears dubious given that "unfair" advantages are already ubiquitous and generally tolerated by society. There are concerns that widespread use will indirectly coerce non-users also to employ nootropics in order to remain competitive. However, to restrict the autonomy of all people for fear that it may influence the actions of some is untenable. The use of potentially harmful drugs for the purposes of enhancement rather than treatment is often seen as unjustified, and libertarian approaches generally champion the rights of the individual in deciding if these risks are acceptable. Finally, whether the prohibition of nootropics can be effectively enforced is doubtful. As nootropics use becomes widespread among students in the future, discussion of this issue will become more pressing in the years to come. PMID:19793941

  8. [Nootropic and analgesic effects of Semax following different routes of administration].

    PubMed

    Manchenko, D M; Glazova, N Iu; Levitskaia, N G; Andreeva, L A; Kamenskiĭ, A A; Miasoedov, N F

    2010-10-01

    Heptapeptide Semax (MEHFPGP) is the fragment of ACTH(4-10) analogue with prolonged neurotropic activity. The aim of the present work was to study the Semax effects on learning capability and pain sensitivity in white rats following intraperitoneal and intranasal administration in different doses. Semax nootropic effects were studied in the test of acquisition of passive avoidance task. Pain sensitivity was estimated in Randall-Selitto paw-withdrawal test. It was shown that Semax exerts nootropic and analgesic activities following intraperitoneal administration. Analysis of dependence of these effects on dose resulted in different dose-response curves. Following intranasal administration, Semax was more potent in learning improvement compared to intraperitoneal administration. The peptide failed to affect the animal pain sensitivity following intranasal administration as opposed to intraperitoneal administration. The data obtained suggest different mechanisms and brain structures involved in realization of the nootropic and analgesic effects of Semax.

  9. Neuropharmacological Review of the Nootropic Herb Bacopa monnieri

    PubMed Central

    Borowski, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This review synthesizes behavioral research with neuromolecular mechanisms putatively involved with the low-toxicity cognitive enhancing action of Bacopa monnieri (BM), a medicinal Ayurvedic herb. BM is traditionally used for various ailments, but is best known as a neural tonic and memory enhancer. Numerous animal and in vitro studies have been conducted, with many evidencing potential medicinal properties. Several randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials have substantiated BM's nootropic utility in humans. There is also evidence for potential attenuation of dementia, Parkinson's disease, and epilepsy. Current evidence suggests BM acts via the following mechanisms—anti-oxidant neuroprotection (via redox and enzyme induction), acetylcholinesterase inhibition and/or choline acetyltransferase activation, β-amyloid reduction, increased cerebral blood flow, and neurotransmitter modulation (acetylcholine [ACh], 5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT], dopamine [DA]). BM appears to exhibit low toxicity in model organisms and humans; however, long-term studies of toxicity in humans have yet to be conducted. This review will integrate molecular neuroscience with behavioral research. PMID:23772955

  10. Neuropharmacological review of the nootropic herb Bacopa monnieri.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Sebastian; Borowski, Thomas

    2013-08-01

    This review synthesizes behavioral research with neuromolecular mechanisms putatively involved with the low-toxicity cognitive enhancing action of Bacopa monnieri (BM), a medicinal Ayurvedic herb. BM is traditionally used for various ailments, but is best known as a neural tonic and memory enhancer. Numerous animal and in vitro studies have been conducted, with many evidencing potential medicinal properties. Several randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials have substantiated BM's nootropic utility in humans. There is also evidence for potential attenuation of dementia, Parkinson's disease, and epilepsy. Current evidence suggests BM acts via the following mechanisms-anti-oxidant neuroprotection (via redox and enzyme induction), acetylcholinesterase inhibition and/or choline acetyltransferase activation, β-amyloid reduction, increased cerebral blood flow, and neurotransmitter modulation (acetylcholine [ACh], 5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT], dopamine [DA]). BM appears to exhibit low toxicity in model organisms and humans; however, long-term studies of toxicity in humans have yet to be conducted. This review will integrate molecular neuroscience with behavioral research.

  11. Anxiolytic and nootropic activity of Vetiveria zizanioides roots in mice

    PubMed Central

    Nirwane, Abhijit M.; Gupta, Purnima V.; Shet, Jitesh H.; Patil, Sandeep B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Vetiveria zizanioides (VZ) (family: Poaceae), an aromatic plant commonly known as “Vetiver” has been used for various ailments. Concerning the various ailments being listed as the traditional uses of VZ, no mention about anxiety and memory was found. Objective: The present study examined the anxiolytic and memory enhancing activity of ethanolic extract of V. zizanioides (EEVZ) dried roots in mice. Materials and Methods: Activity of EEVZ was assessed using models of anxiety (elevated plus-maze [EPM], light/dark test, hole board test, marble-burying test) and learning and memory (EPM, passive shock avoidance paradigm). Results: EEVZ at doses of 100, 200, and 300 mg/kg b.w. illustrated significant anxiolytic activity indicated by increase in time spent and number of entries in open arm, time spent in lightened area, number of head poking and number marble buried when compared to that of diazepam (1 mg/kg b.w.), a reference standard. The same treatment showed a significant decrease in transfer latency to reach open arm, shock-free zone, and number of mistakes when compared to that of scopolamine (0.3 mg/kg b.w.). EEVZ in all the doses (100, 200, and 300 mg/kg b.w.) significantly decreased mortality in sodium nitrite (250 mg/kg b.w.) induced hypoxia and also significantly increases contraction induced by acetylcholine on rat ileum preparation. Conclusion: The result emanated in the present investigation revealed EEVZ possesses significant anxiolytic and nootropic activity by possibly interplaying with neurotransmitters implicated in anxiety and learning and memory. PMID:26604550

  12. Nootropic potential of Ashwagandha leaves: Beyond traditional root extracts.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Renu; Konar, Arpita; Kaul, Sunil C

    2016-05-01

    Rapidly increasing aging population and environmental stressors are the two main global concerns of the modern society. These have brought in light rapidly increasing incidence of a variety of pathological conditions including brain tumors, neurodegenerative & neuropsychiatric disorders, and new challenges for their treatment. The overlapping symptoms, complex etiology and lack of full understanding of the brain structure and function to-date further complicate these tasks. On the other hand, several herbal reagents with a long history of their use have been asserted to possess neurodifferentiation, neuroregenerative and neuroprotective potentials, and hence been recommended as supplement to enhance and maintain brain health and function. Although they have been claimed to function by holistic approach resulting in maintaining body homeostasis and brain health, there are not enough laboratory studies in support to these and mechanism(s) of such beneficial activities remain largely undefined. One such herb is Ashwagandha, also called "Queen of Ayurveda" for its popular use in Indian traditional home medicine because of its extensive benefits including anticancer, anti-stress and remedial potential for aging and neurodegenerative pathologies. However, active principles and underlying mechanism(s) of action remain largely unknown. Here we provide a review on the effects of Ashwagandha extracts and active principles, and underlying molecular mechanism(s) for brain pathologies. We highlight our findings on the nootropic potential of Ashwagandha leaves. The effects of Ashwagandha leaf extracts are multidimensional ranging from differentiation of neuroblastoma and glioma cells, reversal of Alzheimer and Parkinson's pathologies, protection against environmental neurotoxins and enhancement of memory.

  13. [Experience in the application of pramistar, a new nootropic preparation, in the treatment of memory disorders in patients with cerebrovascular pathology].

    PubMed

    Dziak, L A; Golik, V A; Miziakina, E V

    2003-12-01

    Morbidity rise of cerebrovascular pathology is followed by remarkable cognitive decline. Chronic cerebral blood insufficiency and stroke consequences compose a group of the diseases which lead to different types of memory deterioration, consecutive memory decline and as a result to professional and social dysadaptation. The morphological basis of the problem consists in progressive structural cerebral deficit with forming a new adaptive system. The activity of this system is often not effective due to a lack of mediator supply. We have investigated the effects of monotherapy by a new nootropic drug--pramiracetam (Pramistar) on neuropsychological symptoms of memory deterioration in patients with chronic cerebrovascular insufficiency and stroke consequences in basilar and carotid vascular basin. The data obtained suggest statistically significant heterogeneous influence of the medicine on intensity of the evaluated symptoms.

  14. The use of a scopolamine model to study the potential nootropic effects of aniracetam and piracetam in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Wesnes, K; Anand, R; Simpson, P; Christmas, L

    1990-01-01

    In this study 26 healthy volunteers received scopolamine 0.7 mg subcutaneously on seven occasions at least a week apart. Cognitive efficiency was measured with a test battery before and 60 min following scopolamine on each occasion. Following this, over the seven occasions, a range of oral and intravenous dose regimens were administered including aniracetam 2 mg intravenously, 100 mg intravenously, 200 mg intravenously, 1500 mg per os and piracetam 2400 mg per os. On each session the test battery was then performed again at 120 and 200 min following scopolamine. The seven treatments were administered double- blind and the order was counterbalanced between volunteers over visits using a Latin Square design. At 60 min, scopolamine produced marked and significant decrements in all of the measures of memory and information processing. Aniracetam 1500 mg was able to sig nificantly antagonize decrements on both memory and information processing tasks. The other active treatments also produced significant effects, but for two these were equal to, and for two slightly above, the number which may have occurred by chance, and thus were questionable. Overall, the findings demonstrate that aniracetam 1500 mg can antagonize cognitive decrements produced by cholinergic blockade in healthy volunteers, and suggest that the drug possesses nootropic properties.

  15. The Novel Dipeptide Translocator Protein Ligand, Referred to As GD-23, Exerts Anxiolytic and Nootropic Activities.

    PubMed

    Povarnina, P Yu; Yarkov, S A; Gudasheva, T A; Yarkova, M A; Seredenin, S B

    2015-01-01

    The translocator protein (TSPO) promotes the translocation of cholesterol to the inner mitochondrial membrane and mediates steroid formation. In this study, we first report on a biological evaluation of the dipeptide GD-23 (N-carbobenzoxy-L tryptophanyl-L isoleucine amide), a structural analogue of Alpidem, the principal TSPO ligand. We show that GD-23 in a dose range of 0.05 to 0.5 mg/kg (i.p.) exhibits anxiolytic activity in the elevated plus maze test and nootropic activity in the object recognition test in scopolamine-induced amnesia in rodents. It was shown that GD-23 did not affect spontaneous locomotor activity, holding promise as a nonsedative anxiolytic agent. The anxiolytic and nootropic activities of GD-23 were abrogated by the TSPO specific ligand PK11195, which thus suggests a role for TSPO in mediating the pharmacological activity of GD-23. PMID:26483966

  16. Antidepressant, psychostimulant, and nootropic effects of major and trace element composition.

    PubMed

    Afanasieva, O G; Suslov, N I; Shilova, I V

    2013-06-01

    The antidepressant, psychostimulant, and nootropic effects of a composition of major and trace elements including KCl, RbNO3, magnesium sulfate, and zinc sulfate were studied on the models of behavioural despair (Porsolt test) and conditioned passive avoidance test. The preparation was found to shorten the immobilization time in the Porsolt test and promote retention of the conditioned passive avoidance. The most pronounced psychostimulant effect of the substance was observed at a dose of 4.68 mg/kg and the most pronounced antidepressant effect was found at a dose of 18.72 mg/kg. Maximum nootropic activity of the preparation was found at a dose of 93.6 mg/kg.

  17. Selective suppression of the slow-inactivating potassium currents by nootropics in molluscan neurons.

    PubMed

    Bukanova, Julia V; Solntseva, Elena I; Skrebitsky, Vladimir G

    2002-09-01

    The role of the voltage-gated K+ channels in the effect of some nootropics was investigated. Earlier, the multiple effect of high concentrations of two nootropics, piracetam and its peptide analogue GVS-111 [Seredenin et al. (1995), US Patent No. 5,439,930], on Ca2+ and K+ currents of molluscan neurons was shown [Solntseva et al. (1997), General Pharmacology 29, 85-89]. In the present work, we describe the selective effect of low concentrations of these nootropics as well as vinpocetine on certain types of K+ current. The experiments were performed on isolated neurons of the land snail Helix pomatia using a two-microelectrode voltage-clamp method. The inward voltage-gated Ca2+ current (ICa) and three subtypes of the outward voltage-gated K+ current were recorded: Ca2+-dependent K+ current (IK(Ca)), delayed rectifying current (IKD), and fast-inactivating K+ current (IA). It has been found that I Ca was not changed in the presence of 30 microM vinpocetine, 100 microM piracetam or 10 nM GVS-111, while slow-inactivating, TEA-sensitive IK(Ca) and IKD were inhibited (IK(Ca) more strongly than IKD). In contrast, the fast-inactivating, 4-AP-sensitive K+ current (IA) was not diminished by low concentrations of piracetam and GVS-111, while vinpocetine even augmented it. A possible role of slow-inactivating subtypes of the K+ channels in the development of different forms of dementia is discussed.

  18. Selective suppression of the slow-inactivating potassium currents by nootropics in molluscan neurons.

    PubMed

    Bukanova, Julia V; Solntseva, Elena I; Skrebitsky, Vladimir G

    2002-09-01

    The role of the voltage-gated K+ channels in the effect of some nootropics was investigated. Earlier, the multiple effect of high concentrations of two nootropics, piracetam and its peptide analogue GVS-111 [Seredenin et al. (1995), US Patent No. 5,439,930], on Ca2+ and K+ currents of molluscan neurons was shown [Solntseva et al. (1997), General Pharmacology 29, 85-89]. In the present work, we describe the selective effect of low concentrations of these nootropics as well as vinpocetine on certain types of K+ current. The experiments were performed on isolated neurons of the land snail Helix pomatia using a two-microelectrode voltage-clamp method. The inward voltage-gated Ca2+ current (ICa) and three subtypes of the outward voltage-gated K+ current were recorded: Ca2+-dependent K+ current (IK(Ca)), delayed rectifying current (IKD), and fast-inactivating K+ current (IA). It has been found that I Ca was not changed in the presence of 30 microM vinpocetine, 100 microM piracetam or 10 nM GVS-111, while slow-inactivating, TEA-sensitive IK(Ca) and IKD were inhibited (IK(Ca) more strongly than IKD). In contrast, the fast-inactivating, 4-AP-sensitive K+ current (IA) was not diminished by low concentrations of piracetam and GVS-111, while vinpocetine even augmented it. A possible role of slow-inactivating subtypes of the K+ channels in the development of different forms of dementia is discussed. PMID:12366875

  19. [Effect of nootropic agents on impulse activity of cerebral cortex neurons].

    PubMed

    Iasnetsov, V V; Pravdivtsev, V A; Krylova, I N; Kozlov, S B; Provornova, N A; Ivanov, Iu V; Iasnetsov, V V

    2001-01-01

    The effect of nootropes (semax, mexidol, and GVS-111) on the activity of individual neurons in various cerebral cortex regions was studied by microelectrode and microionophoresis techniques in cats immobilized by myorelaxants. It was established that the inhibiting effect of mexidol upon neurons in more than half of cases is prevented or significantly decreased by the GABA antagonists bicuculline and picrotoxin. The inhibiting effect of semax and GVS-111 upon neurons in more than half of cases is related to stimulation of the M-choline and NMDA receptors, respectively. PMID:11871233

  20. Pharmacokinetics of new nootropic acylprolyldipeptide and its penetration across the blood-brain barrier after oral administration.

    PubMed

    Boiko, S S; Ostrovskaya, R U; Zherdev, V P; Korotkov, S A; Gudasheva, T A; Voronina, T A; Seredenin, S B

    2000-04-01

    Pharmacokinetics of GVS-111, a new acylprolyldipeptide with nootropic properties and its penetration across the blood-brain barrier were studied in rats using HPLC. It was found that the dipeptide is absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract, enters the circulation, and penetrates through the blood-brain barrier in an unmodified state. PMID:10977920

  1. [The effect of the new nootropic dipeptide GVS-111 in different functional disorders of the escape reaction].

    PubMed

    Inozemtsev, A N; Trofimov, S S; Borlikova, G G; Firova, F A; Pragina, L L; Gudasheva, T A; Ostrovskaia, R U; Tushmalova, N A; Voronina, T A

    1998-01-01

    The authors studied the effect of a new nootropic agent with anxiolytic properties GVS-111 (ethyl ether N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine) on formation of the avoidance reaction (AR) in rats and its functional disorders which were induced by two methods. In one case the stereotype of the relations between the stimulus, reaction and its consequence which developed during the experiment were urgently disturbed: the change of the animal to the other half of the chamber in response to a conditioned stimulus did not lead to its cutting off and prevention of the electropain stimulation for three successive combinations (AR error). In another case the spatial stereotype of the experiment was altered by changing the place of the opening through which the animal avoided the stimulus (spatial remodeling). Intraperitoneal injection of GVS-111 (0.1 mg/kg/day) improved the learning, but the effect differed from experiment to experiment. Along with this, the dipeptide prevented AR disturbance during the error and quickened restoration of the habit in spatial remodeling. It was shown earlier that AR disorders during an error are prevented by anxiolytics and nootropic agents but during spatial remodeling only by nootropic agents. It may be assumed that the positive effect of GSV-111 on AR in functional disorders is due to its nootropic effect. PMID:9690067

  2. Nootropic (medhya) effect of Bhāvita Śaṇkhapuṣpī tablets: A clinical appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Hetal; Sharma, Rohit; Vyas, Hitesh; Vyas, Mahesh; Prajapati, P. K.; Dwivedi, Rambabu

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nootropic (medhya) potential of śaṅkhapuṣpī (Convolvulus pluricaulis Choisy.) is reported in Ayurvedic literature and modern studies are now validating the same. In spite of plentiful preclinical researches already carried out during the past decades, only meager clinical efforts exploring its nootropic activity have been reported. Present clinical study is an attempt to evaluate the nootropic effect of Śaṅkhapuṣpī tablets. Aims and Objective: To evaluate the nootropic effect of śaṅkhapuṣpī tablets prepared by three Bhāvanā (levigation) of its cūrṇa (powder) with its own Svarasa (fresh juice). Materials and Methods: Thirty volunteers between the age 16 and 25 years participated in this single group pre-post study. Weschler's memory scale was adopted to collect data before (pre) and after (post) intervention period (2 months). Paired t-test was used for analyzing the data. Results: In auditory immediate test and delayed test, 41.03% and 48% improvement was found which statistically highly significant (<0.001). In visual immediate and delayed test 32.5% and 44.87% improvement was found respectively, which shows highly significant result (<0.001). Conclusion: Results reveal that śaṅkhapuṣpī tablet shown highly significant results in improving memory, especially in long term memory loss in younger age group. PMID:25861147

  3. Evaluation of nootropic and neuroprotective effects of low dose aspirin in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arijit; Dhumal, V. R.; Tilak, A. V.; Das, Nina; Singh, Amarinder; Bondekar, Abhijit A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the nootropic and neuroprotective effects of aspirin in Sprague Dawley rats. Materials and Methods: Retention of conditioned avoidance response (CAR) and central 5-HT-mediated behavior (lithium-induced head twitches) were assessed using repeated electroconvulsive shock (ECS) in rats. Rats were divided into eight groups: control (pretreated with distilled water), scopolamine (0.5 mg/kg i.p.), ECS (150 V, 50 Hz sinusoidal with intensity of 210 mA for 0.5 s) pretreated, aspirin (6.75 mg/kg orally) pretreated, combined scopolamine and aspirin pretreated, ondansetron (0.36 mg/kg orally) pretreated, combined ECS and ondansetron pretreated and combined ECS and aspirin pretreated groups. Data was analyzed by the chi-square test and ANOVA. Results: Findings show that administration of single ECS daily for consecutive 8 days results in enhancement of 5-HT-mediated behavior (lithium-induced head twitches) and in disruption of the retention of CAR. Aspirin and ondansetron administration significantly increased the retention of conditioned avoidance response compared to control. Ondansetron and aspirin significantly prevented ECS-induced attenuation of the retention of conditioned avoidance response also. On the other hand, ondansetron and aspirin significantly retarded the ECS-induced enhancement of 5-HT-mediated behavior. Conclusion: Inhibition of the serotonergic transmission by aspirin is responsible for its nootropic and neuroprotective actions. PMID:21701638

  4. The Combination of Antidepressant Duloxetine with Piracetam in Mice does not Produce Enhancement of Nootropic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Pravin Popatrao; Sarkar, Amrita; Patel, Sonam; Savai, Jay

    2014-01-01

    There is a strong association between depression and memory impairment. The present study aims to assess the nootropic activity of duloxetine and piracetam combination. Male Swiss Albino mice were divided randomly into 4 groups. Treatment of normal saline (10 ml/kg), duloxetine (10 mg/kg), piracetam (100 mg/kg), and duloxetine (5 mg/kg) plus piracetam (50 mg/kg) were given through intra-peritoneal route to group I-IV, respectively. Transfer latency in elevated plus maze (EPM) and time spent in target quadrant in Morris water maze (MWM) were recorded. Estimation of brain monoamines in hippocampus, cerebral cortex, and whole brain were done using HPLC with fluorescence detector. Piracetam treated group showed significant decrease in transfer latency in EPM and increase in time spent in target quadrant recorded in MWM. Combination treated group failed to produce statistically significant nootropic effect in both EPM and MWM. Combination treated group failed to increase brain monoamine levels when compared against duloxetine and piracetam treated groups, separately. But there was exception of significant increase in norepinephrine levels in hippocampi when compared against duloxetine treated group. Results indicate no cognitive benefits with piracetam plus duloxetine combination. These findings can be further probed with the aim of understanding the interaction between duloxetine and piracetam as a future endeavor. PMID:25258569

  5. Are CB1 Receptor Antagonists Nootropic or Cognitive Impairing Agents?

    PubMed Central

    Varvel, Stephen A.; Wise, Laura E.; Lichtman, Aron H.

    2010-01-01

    For more than a decade, a considerable amount of research has examined the effects of rimonabant (SR 141716) and other CB1 receptor antagonists in both in vivo and in vitro models of learning and memory. In addition to its utility in determining whether the effects of drugs are mediated though a CB1 receptor mechanism of action, these antagonists are useful in providing insight into the physiological function of the endogenous cannabinoid system. Several groups have reported that CB1 receptor antagonists enhance memory duration in a variety of spatial and operant paradigms, but not in all paradigms. Conversely, disruption of CB1 receptor signaling also impairs extinction learning in which the animal actively suppresses a learned response when reinforcement has been withheld. These extinction deficits occur in aversively motivated tasks, such as in fear conditioning or escape behavior in the Morris water maze task, but not in appetitively motivated tasks. Similarly, in electrophysiological models, CB1 receptor antagonists elicit a variety of effects, including enhancement of long-term potentiation (LTP), while disrupting long-term depression (LTD) and interfering with transient forms of plasticity, including depolarization-induced suppression of inhibition (DSI) and depolarization-induced suppression of excitation (DSE). The collective results of the in vivo and in vitro studies employing CB1 receptor antagonists, demonstrate that these receptors play integral roles in different components of cognitive processing. Functionally, pharmacological blockade of CB1 receptors may strengthen memory duration, but interferes with extinction of learned behaviors that are associated with traumatic or aversive memories. PMID:20539824

  6. Nootropic efficacy of Satvavajaya Chikitsa and Ayurvedic drug therapy: A comparative clinical exposition

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Hetal; Sharma, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Ayurveda is known for philosophical basis, and its approach to psychological ailments is quite different from conventional system of management. Satvavajaya Chikitsa (Ayurvedic psychotherapy) is a nonpharmacological approach aimed at control of mind and restraining it from unwholesome Artha (objects) or stressors. Withdrawal of the mind from unwholesome objects is known as Sattvavajaya Chikitsa or it is a treatment by Self Control. Charaka defines it as a mind controlling therapy in which a stress has been laid on restraining of mind from unwholesome objects. Thus, it includes all the methods of Manonigraha and Astanga Yoga (Yogic techniques) too. Indian philosophy portrays Astanga Yoga as a primary tool to control mind; hence it can be used as Satvavajaya Chikitsa. Aims and Objectives: To evaluate efficacy of Satvavajaya Chikitsa and Aushadhiya Medhya Chikitsa for improving Smriti in young healthy volunteers. Materials and Methods: Totally, 102 physically healthy volunteers between age group 16 and 25 years were divided into two groups. In Group A, Satvavajaya Chikitsa was adopted in form of Yogic procedures such as Asana, Pranayama, Chanting etc., with counseling and placebo. Group B was Shankhapushpi tablets made with whole part of Shankhpushpi plant was used as standard control. The Weschler's memory scale (WMS) was adopted to collect data before and after intervention period of 2 months. Paired and Unpaired t-test were used for analysis the data in Sigmastat Software. Results: Group A (Satvavajaya + placebo) with counseling showed statistically highly significant result (P < 0.001) in verbal retention for similar pair, verbal retention for dissimilar pair and visual immediate tests; while Group B (Shankhapushpi tablets) showed significant result (P < 0.01) in auditory delayed, visual delayed, auditory recognition and visual recognition tests. Conclusion: Satvavajaya Chikitsa shows better results in immediate recollection in terms of short-term memory; while Shankhapushpi found much better in long-term memory enhancement on various tests of WMS. PMID:26170589

  7. Substituted piperazines as nootropic agents: 2- or 3-phenyl derivatives structurally related to the cognition-enhancer DM235.

    PubMed

    Guandalini, Luca; Martino, Maria Vittoria; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Bartolucci, Gianluca; Melani, Fabrizio; Malik, Ruchi; Dei, Silvia; Floriddia, Elisa; Manetti, Dina; Orlandi, Francesca; Teodori, Elisabetta; Ghelardini, Carla; Romanelli, Maria Novella

    2015-04-15

    A series of 2-phenyl- or 3-phenyl piperazines, structurally related to DM235 and DM232, two potent nootropic agents, have been prepared and tested in the mouse passive-avoidance test, to assess their ability to revert scopolamine-induced amnesia. Although the newly synthesized molecules were less potent than the parent compounds, some useful information has been obtained from structure-activity relationships. A small but significant enantioselectivity has been found for the most potent compound 5a.

  8. Nootropic, neuroprotective and neurotrophic effects of phloretin in scopolamine induced amnesia in mice.

    PubMed

    Ghumatkar, Priya J; Patil, Sachin P; Jain, Pankaj D; Tambe, Rufi M; Sathaye, Sadhana

    2015-08-01

    Phloretin (PHL), a dihydrochalcone flavonoid usually present in the roots and leaves of apple tree. In vitro study on GT1-7 immortalized hypothalamic neurons exposed to amyloid beta (25-35), demonstrated that PHL significantly influenced membrane fluidity and potential. PHL also significantly decreased excitotoxicity by restoring the calcium homeostasis in the same. Thus, PHL proves to be a promising therapeutic moiety which should be further screened in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the nootropic, neuroprotective and neurotrophic roles of PHL in the subacute scopolamine induced amnesia in mice. In this study, mice were pretreated with PHL 2.5mg/kg, 5mg/kg, 10mg/kg and Donepezil (DON) 1mg/kg intraperitoneally (i.p) for 14days. The last 7days of treatment regimen included daily injection of SCP 1.5mg/kg to induce cognitive deficits. Mice were subjected to behavioral analysis. Biochemical estimation of the brain homogenates for acetylcholinesterase and oxidative stress biomarkers were conducted. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis for the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was carried out particularly in the hippocampus. PHL was found to significantly improve the performance of mice in Morris water maze test (P<0.001) and significantly decreased the acetylcholinesterase activity (P<0.001) at all doses compared to SCP treated mice. Also, PHL significantly elevated the activity of antioxidant enzymes viz. superoxide dismutase, catalase, reduced glutathione levels (P<0.001) and decreased malonaldehyde levels (P<0.001) in comparison with the SCP group. Immunohistochemistry revealed that PHL treatment dose dependently improved BDNF levels in the hippocampus which were found to be significantly depleted (P<0.001) in the SCP group. Additionally, PHL (10mg/kg) significantly enhanced the spatial memory formation (P<0.05) and neurotrophicity (P<0.001) compared to DON (1mg/kg). The aforementioned research

  9. Nootropic, neuroprotective and neurotrophic effects of phloretin in scopolamine induced amnesia in mice.

    PubMed

    Ghumatkar, Priya J; Patil, Sachin P; Jain, Pankaj D; Tambe, Rufi M; Sathaye, Sadhana

    2015-08-01

    Phloretin (PHL), a dihydrochalcone flavonoid usually present in the roots and leaves of apple tree. In vitro study on GT1-7 immortalized hypothalamic neurons exposed to amyloid beta (25-35), demonstrated that PHL significantly influenced membrane fluidity and potential. PHL also significantly decreased excitotoxicity by restoring the calcium homeostasis in the same. Thus, PHL proves to be a promising therapeutic moiety which should be further screened in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the nootropic, neuroprotective and neurotrophic roles of PHL in the subacute scopolamine induced amnesia in mice. In this study, mice were pretreated with PHL 2.5mg/kg, 5mg/kg, 10mg/kg and Donepezil (DON) 1mg/kg intraperitoneally (i.p) for 14days. The last 7days of treatment regimen included daily injection of SCP 1.5mg/kg to induce cognitive deficits. Mice were subjected to behavioral analysis. Biochemical estimation of the brain homogenates for acetylcholinesterase and oxidative stress biomarkers were conducted. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis for the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was carried out particularly in the hippocampus. PHL was found to significantly improve the performance of mice in Morris water maze test (P<0.001) and significantly decreased the acetylcholinesterase activity (P<0.001) at all doses compared to SCP treated mice. Also, PHL significantly elevated the activity of antioxidant enzymes viz. superoxide dismutase, catalase, reduced glutathione levels (P<0.001) and decreased malonaldehyde levels (P<0.001) in comparison with the SCP group. Immunohistochemistry revealed that PHL treatment dose dependently improved BDNF levels in the hippocampus which were found to be significantly depleted (P<0.001) in the SCP group. Additionally, PHL (10mg/kg) significantly enhanced the spatial memory formation (P<0.05) and neurotrophicity (P<0.001) compared to DON (1mg/kg). The aforementioned research

  10. Meta-analysis: the efficacy of nootropic agent Cerebrolysin in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wei, Z-H; He, Q-B; Wang, H; Su, B-H; Chen, H-Z

    2007-01-01

    To determine the therapeutic effect of nootropic agent Cerebrolysin on patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD), we searched the Cochrane Library, Medline, PubMed, and Chinese Biomedical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System for Compact Disc (CBMDISC), and communicated with EBEWE Pharmaceutical Ltd, for randomized trials comparing Cerebrolysin with placebo in AD. Available data on clinical global impression, cognitive performance and activities of daily living were extracted from 6 randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trials and combined with standard meta-analysis methods. An infusion with Cerebrolysin for 4 weeks (30 ml Cerebrolysin daily on five consecutive days of each week) led to a significant improvement of the clinical global impression. Compared with placebo, log(OR) was 1.1799, and 95% confident interval was 0.7463-1.6135 (P < 0.05), indicating that Cerebrolysin could significantly improve the clinical global impression in patients with mild to moderate AD. However, more convincing evidences are needed for the efficacy of Cerebrolysin on the cognitive performance and activities of daily living.

  11. A natural and broad spectrum nootropic substance for treatment of SDAT--the Ginkgo biloba extract.

    PubMed

    Fünfgeld, E W

    1989-01-01

    The efficacy of the Ginkgo biloba extract was not only found clinically or in standardised ratings but also documented by objective data, obtained by a computerized EEG method, the DYNAMIC BRAIN MAPPING and BRAIN FUNCTION MONITORING SYSTEM (Dr. T. Itil, New York). A one year open trial comprise 25 parkinson patients with additional signs of SDAT. Data from 3 selected cases were given: The short time efficacy of the substance after the infusion and the long-term result after the oral medication. The maps showed less slower and more faster waves. Without any side effects the Ginkgo biloba extract seems to be a substance with a broad spectrum of influence. Our therapeutic findings in parkinsonian patients with SDAT and the data taken from healthy elderly volunteers revealed that the computerized EEG method may have another big advantage: It seems that the so-called anteriorisation of the Theta waves can be taken as a preclinical sign of an incipient change in brain metabolism. As a consequence--it might be that these changes are reversible by an adequate nootropic treatment. Further studies and treatment experiences must confirm these preliminary findings. PMID:2602410

  12. [Dipeptide nootropic agent GVS-111 prevents accumulation of the lipid peroxidation products during immobilization].

    PubMed

    Lysenko, A V; Uskova, N I; Ostrovskaia, R U; Gudasheva, T A; Voronina, T A

    1997-01-01

    Immobilization of rats in a narrow plastic chamber for 24 h caused a sharp increase in the level of diene conjugates and the content of schiff bases in the synaptosomes of the brain cortex as well as accumulation of extraerythrocytic hemoglobin in blood serum. The dipeptide nootropic agent GVS-111 (ethyl ether of phenylacetylprolylglycine), when administered 15 and particularly 60 min before immobilization reduced the accumulation of these products of lipid peroxidation in the brain and blood. GVS-111 demonstrated these signs of its antioxidant effect after a single i.p. injection in doses of 0.12 and 0.5 mg/kg. Pyracetam produced a similar effect on the listed parameters in injection in a dose of 300 mg/kg for three successive days. The protective effect of the new pyracetam dipeptide analog GVS-111 in relation to activation of free-radical processes induced by immobilization is additional proof of the antistress action of this dipeptide. PMID:9483398

  13. [The pharmacokinetics of the dipeptide analog of piracetam with nootropic activity GVS-111 and of its basic metabolites].

    PubMed

    Boĭko, S S; Zherdev, V P; Dvorianinov, A A; Gudasheva, T A; Ostrovskaia, R U; Voronina, T A; Rozantsev, G G; Seredenin, S B

    1997-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of a new nootropic dipeptide analog of piracetam-N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine (GWS-111) and its main metabolites were studied in rats by means of high performance liquid chromatography and gas-liquid chromatography. The compound under study showed a greater resistance to an enzymatic effect than natural neuropeptides. In addition to an unchanged compound three of its metabolites were found in the blood plasma of the rats. One of them, cyclo-Pro-Gly was an active metabolite of GWS-111. PMID:9206571

  14. Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Hunter, Ed.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This document contains the third volume of "Today's Delinquent," an annual publication of the National Center for Juvenile Justice. This volume deals with the issue of drugs and includes articles by leading authorities in delinquency and substance abuse who share their views on causes and cures for the drug problem among youth in this country.…

  15. The Effects of Anti-Dementia and Nootropic Treatments on the Mortality of Patients with Dementia: A Population-Based Cohort Study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chen-Yi; Hu, Hsiao-Yun; Chow, Lok-Hi; Chou, Yiing-Jenq; Huang, Nicole; Wang, Pei-Ning; Li, Chung-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Background Few studies have examined the contribution of treatment on the mortality of dementia based on a population-based study. Objective To investigate the effects of anti-dementia and nootropic treatments on the mortality of dementia using a population-based cohort study. Methods 12,193 incident dementia patients were found from 2000 to 2010. Their data were compared with 12,193 age- and sex-matched non-dementia controls that were randomly selected from the same database. Dementia was classified into vascular (VaD) and degenerative dementia. Mortality incidence and hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated. Results The median survival time was 3.39 years (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.88–3.79) for VaD without medication, 6.62 years (95% CI: 6.24–7.21) for VaD with nootropics, 3.01 years (95% CI: 2.85–3.21) for degenerative dementia without medication, 8.11 years (95% CI: 6.30–8.55) for degenerative dementia with anti-dementia medication, 6.00 years (95% CI: 5.73–6.17) for degenerative dementia with nootropics, and 9.03 years (95% CI: 8.02–9.87) for degenerative dementia with both anti-dementia and nootropic medications. Compared to the non-dementia group, the HRs among individuals with degenerative dementia were 2.69 (95% CI: 2.55–2.83) without medication, 1.46 (95% CI: 1.39–1.54) with nootropics, 1.05 (95% CI: 0.82–1.34) with anti-dementia medication, and 0.92 (95% CI: 0.80–1.05) with both nootropic and anti-dementia medications. VaD with nootropics had a lower mortality (HR: 1.25, 95% CI: 1.15–1.37) than VaD without medication (HR: 2.46, 95% CI: 2.22–2.72). Conclusion Pharmacological treatments have beneficial effects for patients with dementia in prolonging their survival. PMID:26098910

  16. [The EAA-ergic modulation of the brain dopaminergic system as a basis for creating new nootropic agents with stress-protective activity].

    PubMed

    Petrov, V I; Grigor'ev, I A

    1998-01-01

    The paper provides theoretical evidence for and practical confirmation of the possible use of three lipophilic derivatives of N-acetyl-aspartic acid (EAA-AKF-94; AKF-92-10, and PIR-87-6-0). These compounds were shown to display pronounced nootropic activity to correct behavioral, memory, and cognitive disorders in rats exposed to emotional stress. Evidence is provided for the fact that modulation of monoaminergic brain activity mediated by heterosynaptic activation of EAA receptors.

  17. [Evolution of the neuroprotection concept].

    PubMed

    Ostrovskaia, R U

    2003-01-01

    Although the modern concept of neuroprotection has been formulated quite recently, the basis of this approach was laid about four decades ago when Zakusov initiated the study of mechanisms involved in the neuroprotector action of GABA shunt metabolites (in particular, alpha-hydroxybutyric acid and succinic semialdehyde) during hypoxia. It was suggested to consider these agents as a system of endogenous neuroprotectors. The interest of Zakusov in endogenous regulators (including oligopeptides) had stimulated research in this direction and gave impact to the investigations of A. P. Skoldinov and T. A. Gudasheva initiated in the early 1980s. Proceeding from the original concept of the possibility of imitation of the action of neurotropic agents by their structural-conformational oligopeptide analogs, a number of biologically active stable dipeptides were obtained, based on pyroglutamate and proline, and high specific bioaccessibility of these dipeptides for the brain was established. Our investigations showed that these compounds not only possess nootropic activity (in a dose 1000 times lower than that of piracetam), but produce a pronounced neuroprotector action as well. Most thoroughly studied in this respect were substituted acyl-prolyl dipeptides, in particular, the drug noopept exhibiting a combined neuroprotector effect both in vitro and in vivo. Noopept decreases the extent of necrotic damage caused by photoinduced thrombosis of cortical blood vessels. It was established that the neuroprotector effect of noopept is related to its action upon the well-known "triad", whereby the drug reduces neurotoxic effects of excess extracellular calcium, glutamate, and free radicals. Two additional components of the neuroprotector action of noopept are related to the antiinflammatory and antithrombotic activity. The prospects of using direct and indirect action upon neurotrophin system for neuroprotection purposes are considered. Taking into account common secondary

  18. Neuroprotective and nootropic activity of Clitorea ternatea Linn.(Fabaceae) leaves on diabetes induced cognitive decline in experimental animals

    PubMed Central

    Talpate, Karuna A.; Bhosale, Uma A.; Zambare, Mandar R.; Somani, Rahul S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Ethanol extract of Clitorea ternatea (EECT) was evaluated in diabetes-induced cognitive decline rat model for its nootropic and neuroprotective activity. Materials and Methods: Effect on spatial working memory, spatial reference memory and spatial working-reference memory was evaluated by Y maze, Morris water maze and Radial arm maze respectively. Neuroprotective effects of EECT was studied by assaying acetylcholinesterase, lipid peroxide, superoxide dismutase (SOD), total nitric oxide (NO), catalase (CAT) and glutathione (GSH) levels in the brain of diabetic rats. Results: The EECT (200 and 400 mg/kg) was found to cause significant increase in spatial working memory (P < 0.05), spatial reference memory (P < 0.001) and spatial working-reference (P < 0.001) in retention trials on Y maze, Morris water maze and Radial arm maze respectively. Whereas significant decrease in acetylcholinesterase activity (P < 0.05), lipid peroxide (P < 0.001), total NO (P < 0.001) and significant increase in SOD, CAT and GSH levels was observed in animals treated with EECT (200 and 400 mg/kg) compared to diabetic control group. Conclusions: The present data indicates that Clitorea ternatea tenders protection against diabetes induced cognitive decline and merits the need for further studies to elucidate its mode of action. PMID:24459404

  19. [Asthenic syndrome in clinical course of acute period of brain concussion during complex treatment using nootropic agents].

    PubMed

    Tkachov, A V

    2008-01-01

    The comparative analysis of a complex examination of 108 persons aged from 16 till 60 years in acute period of closed craniocerebral injury (CCCT) has been done. Every participants have been divided into 2 groups depending on a nootrop medication they receive in a complex treatment. A control group consisted of 30 practically healthy people. Objective examination by means of tests was done on the 1-st, 10-th that 30-th day of treatment. Patients of 1-st (37 persons) group received piracetam in complex treatment and patients of the 2-nd group (71 persons) pramistar. Patients of the first group received a base treatment (analgetics, tranquilizers, vitamins of group B, magnesium sulfate, diuretic preparations) as well as piracetam at dosage 0.2, two tablets three times per day. The Patients of the 2-nd group received a base treatment as well as pramistar at dosage 0.6, one tablet 2 times per day. Specially developed multiaspects scales and questionnaires, MRT of the brain and EEG have been used for objectification of patient, complaints. During a complex clinico-neuropsychological examination it was found that all cases of concussion of the brain are accompanied by those or other asthenic disorders.

  20. Effect of the combination of the benzodiazepine tranquilizer medazepam and the nootropic agent meclofenoxate on the activity of rat brain muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Popova, J S; Petkov, V D

    1990-01-01

    1. The effect of 7-day treatment with the benzodiazepine tranquilizer medazepam (5 mg/kg), the nootropic agent meclofenoxate (100 mg/kg) and their combination in the same doses on the binding activity of muscarinic receptors in four rat brain structures (cerebral cortex, striatum, hippocampus and hypothalamus) were studied using the antagonist [3H]-1-quinuclidinyl benzylate [( 3H]-QNB) as radio-ligand. 2. Medazepam treatment caused significant decrease of muscarinic receptor binding affinity (Kd) and of the receptor binding capacity (Bmax) in the brain structures studied. The number of muscarinic binding sites was unsignificantly decreased only in the hippocampus. 3. Meclofenoxate treatment caused an increase of muscarinic receptor affinity and a decrease of the binding capacity in the cerebral cortex and hypothalamus and an increase of the binding affinity in the striatum and hippocampus. 4. The combination of medazepam and meclofenoxate caused no significant changes of both muscarinic receptor characteristics in the hippocampus and of the receptor affinity in the striatum and hypothalamus in comparison with control rats. The Bmax values were decreased in the cerebral cortex, striatum and hypothalamus when compared with control animals. The differences observed were slighter than those determined after the comparison of medazepam treated rats with control rats. 5. The results obtained afford an opportunity to suggest that the nootropic agent meclofenoxate acts to moderate the effect of the benzodiazepine tranquilizer medazepam on the activity of rat brain muscarinic receptors.

  1. X-ray and 1H-NMR spectroscopic studies of the structures and conformations of the new nootropic agents RU-35929, RU-47010 and RU-35965

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, Maria E.; Bandoli, Giuliano; Casellato, Umberto; Pappalardo, Giuseppe C.; Toja, Emilio

    1990-10-01

    The crystal and molecular structures of the nootropics (±)1-benzenesulphonyl-2-oxo-5-ethoxypyrrolidine ( 1), (±)1-(3-pyridinylsulphonyl)-2-oxo-5-ethoxypyrrolidine ( 2) and (±)1-benzenesulphonyl-2-oxo-5-isopropyloxypyrrolidine ( 3) have been determined by X-ray analysis. The solution conformation of 1, 2 and 3 has been investigated by 1H NMR spectroscopy. In the solid state, the main feature consists of the similar structural parameters and conformations, with the exception of the conformation adopted by the 5-ethoxy moiety which changes on passing from 1 to 2. The solid state overall enveloped conformation of the 2-pyrrolidinone ring for the three nootropics is found to be retained in solution on the basis of NMR evidence. Comparison between calculated and experimental coupling constant values shows that one of the two possible puckered opposite conformational isomers (half-chair shapes) occurs in solution. The relative pharmacological potencies of 1, 2 and 3 cannot therefore be interpreted in terms of the different conformation features presently detectable by available experimental methods.

  2. Approaches to Measuring the Effects of Wake-Promoting Drugs: A Focus on Cognitive Function

    PubMed Central

    Edgar, Christopher J.; Pace-Schott, Edward F.; Wesnes, Keith A.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives In clinical drug development, wakefulness and wake-promotion maybe assessed by a large number of scales and questionnaires. Objective assessment of wakefulness is most commonly made using sleep latency/maintenance of wakefulness tests, polysomnography and/or behavioral measures. The purpose of the present review is to highlight the degree of overlap in the assessment of wakefulness and cognition, with consideration of assessment techniques and the underlying neurobiology of both concepts. Design Reviews of four key areas were conducted: commonly used techniques in the assessment of wakefulness; neurobiology of sleep/wake and cognition; targets of wake promoting and/or cognition enhancing drugs; and ongoing clinical trials investigating wake promoting effects. Results There is clear overlap between the assessment of wakefulness and cognition. There are common techniques which may be used to assess both concepts; aspects of the neurobiology of both concepts may be closely related; and wake promoting drugs may have nootropic properties (and vice-versa). Clinical trials of wake promoting drugs often, though not routinely, assess aspects of cognition. Conclusions Routine and broad assessment of cognition in the development of wake promoting drugs may reveal important nootropic effects, which are not secondary to alertness/wakefulness, whilst existing cognitive enhancers may have under explored or unknown wake promoting properties. PMID:19565524

  3. [The role of synaptic transmission in memory and neurodegeneration processes and effects of neurotropic preparations].

    PubMed

    Voronina, T A

    2003-01-01

    Academician Zakusov, in his book Pharmacology of Central Synapses (Moscow, 1973), emphasized the central role of synaptic processes in regulation of various forms of behavior, memory, and psychotropic drug action. The paper considers most promising directions in the search for substances possessing nootropic and neuroprotector properties, many of which were developed at the Institute of Pharmacology based on the notion about synaptic processes. These investigations led to the creation of well-known drugs such as mexidole, noopept, nooglutyl, beglimin, etc. Special attention is devoted to the implementation and modern development of the ideas of Academician Zakusov. Recent data are presented on the role of neuropeptides, neurotrophins, and intracellular signaling mechanisms in synaptic plasticity, memory processes, and development of neurodegenerative states. PMID:12962041

  4. [A method for reproducing amnesia in mice by the complex extremal exposure].

    PubMed

    Iasnetsov, V V; Provornova, N A

    2003-01-01

    It is suggested to reproduce a retrograde amnesia in mice by means of a complex extremal action: emaciating swim in cold water with simultaneous wheel rotation. It was found that nootropes such as pyracetam, mexidol, semax, nooglutil, acephen, and noopept fully or completely prevent from the amnesia development. PMID:12924240

  5. Evidence for centrophenoxine as a protective drug in aluminium induced behavioral and biochemical alteration in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Nehru, Bimla; Bhalla, Punita; Garg, Aarti

    2006-10-01

    Potential use of various nootropic drugs have been a burning area of research on account of various physical and chemical insult in brain under different toxicological conditions. One of the nootropic drug centrophenoxine, also known as an anti-aging drug has been exploited in the present experiment under aluminium toxic conditions. Aluminium was administered by oral gavage at a dose level of 100 mg/Kg x b x wt/day for a period of six weeks. To elucidate the region specific response, study was carried out in two different regions of brain namely cerebrum and cerebellum. Following aluminium exposure, a significant decrease in the activities of enzymes namely Hexokinase, Lactate dehydrogenase, Succinate dehydrogenase, Mg(2+) dependent ATPase was observed in both the regions. Moreover, the activity of acetylcholinesterase was also reported to be significantly decreased. Post-treatment with centrophenoxine was able to restore the altered enzyme activities and the effect was observed in both the regions of brain although the activity of lactate dehydrogenase and acetylcholinesterase did not register significant increase in the cerebellum region. Further, centrophenoxine was able to improve the altered short-term memory and cognitive performance resulted from aluminium exposure. From the present study, it can be concluded that centrophenoxine has a potential and can be exploited in other toxicological conditions also.

  6. Phytochemical Analysis, Antioxidant, Antistress, and Nootropic Activities of Aqueous and Methanolic Seed Extracts of Ladies Finger (Abelmoschus esculentus L.) in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Doreddula, Sathish Kumar; Bonam, Srinivasa Reddy; Gaddam, Durga Prasad; Desu, Brahma Srinivasa Rao; Ramarao, Nadendla; Pandy, Vijayapandi

    2014-01-01

    Abelmoschus esculentus L. (ladies finger, okra) is a well-known tropical vegetable, widely planted from Africa to Asia and from South Europe to America. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro antioxidant capacity and in vivo protective effect of the aqueous and methanolic seed extracts of Abelmoschus esculentus against scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment using passive avoidance task and acute restraining stress-induced behavioural and biochemical changes using elevated plus maze (EPM) and forced swimming test (FST) in mice. Our results demonstrated that the pretreatment of mice with aqueous and methanolic seed extracts of Abelmoschus esculentus (200 mg/kg, p.o.) for seven days significantly (P < 0.01) attenuated scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment in the passive avoidance test. In addition, these extracts significantly reduced the blood glucose, corticosterone, cholesterol, and triglyceride levels elevated by acute restraint stress and also significantly increased the time spent in open arm in EPM and decreased the immobility time in FST. It has also been revealed that these extracts showed a significant antioxidant activity and no signs of toxicity or death up to a dose of 2000 mg/kg, p.o. These results suggest that the seed extracts of Abelmoschus esculentus L. possess antioxidant, antistress, and nootropic activities which promisingly support the medicinal values of ladies finger as a vegetable. PMID:25401145

  7. Phytochemical analysis, antioxidant, antistress, and nootropic activities of aqueous and methanolic seed extracts of ladies finger (Abelmoschus esculentus L.) in mice.

    PubMed

    Doreddula, Sathish Kumar; Bonam, Srinivasa Reddy; Gaddam, Durga Prasad; Desu, Brahma Srinivasa Rao; Ramarao, Nadendla; Pandy, Vijayapandi

    2014-01-01

    Abelmoschus esculentus L. (ladies finger, okra) is a well-known tropical vegetable, widely planted from Africa to Asia and from South Europe to America. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro antioxidant capacity and in vivo protective effect of the aqueous and methanolic seed extracts of Abelmoschus esculentus against scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment using passive avoidance task and acute restraining stress-induced behavioural and biochemical changes using elevated plus maze (EPM) and forced swimming test (FST) in mice. Our results demonstrated that the pretreatment of mice with aqueous and methanolic seed extracts of Abelmoschus esculentus (200 mg/kg, p.o.) for seven days significantly (P < 0.01) attenuated scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment in the passive avoidance test. In addition, these extracts significantly reduced the blood glucose, corticosterone, cholesterol, and triglyceride levels elevated by acute restraint stress and also significantly increased the time spent in open arm in EPM and decreased the immobility time in FST. It has also been revealed that these extracts showed a significant antioxidant activity and no signs of toxicity or death up to a dose of 2000 mg/kg, p.o. These results suggest that the seed extracts of Abelmoschus esculentus L. possess antioxidant, antistress, and nootropic activities which promisingly support the medicinal values of ladies finger as a vegetable.

  8. Phytochemical analysis, antioxidant, antistress, and nootropic activities of aqueous and methanolic seed extracts of ladies finger (Abelmoschus esculentus L.) in mice.

    PubMed

    Doreddula, Sathish Kumar; Bonam, Srinivasa Reddy; Gaddam, Durga Prasad; Desu, Brahma Srinivasa Rao; Ramarao, Nadendla; Pandy, Vijayapandi

    2014-01-01

    Abelmoschus esculentus L. (ladies finger, okra) is a well-known tropical vegetable, widely planted from Africa to Asia and from South Europe to America. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro antioxidant capacity and in vivo protective effect of the aqueous and methanolic seed extracts of Abelmoschus esculentus against scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment using passive avoidance task and acute restraining stress-induced behavioural and biochemical changes using elevated plus maze (EPM) and forced swimming test (FST) in mice. Our results demonstrated that the pretreatment of mice with aqueous and methanolic seed extracts of Abelmoschus esculentus (200 mg/kg, p.o.) for seven days significantly (P < 0.01) attenuated scopolamine-induced cognitive impairment in the passive avoidance test. In addition, these extracts significantly reduced the blood glucose, corticosterone, cholesterol, and triglyceride levels elevated by acute restraint stress and also significantly increased the time spent in open arm in EPM and decreased the immobility time in FST. It has also been revealed that these extracts showed a significant antioxidant activity and no signs of toxicity or death up to a dose of 2000 mg/kg, p.o. These results suggest that the seed extracts of Abelmoschus esculentus L. possess antioxidant, antistress, and nootropic activities which promisingly support the medicinal values of ladies finger as a vegetable. PMID:25401145

  9. Comparative study of the neuroprotective and nootropic activities of the carboxylate and amide forms of the HLDF-6 peptide in animal models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bogachouk, Anna P; Storozheva, Zinaida I; Solovjeva, Olga A; Sherstnev, Vyacheslav V; Zolotarev, Yury A; Azev, Vyacheslav N; Rodionov, Igor L; Surina, Elena A; Lipkin, Valery M

    2016-01-01

    A comparative study of the neuroprotective and nootropic activities of two pharmaceutical substances, the HLDF-6 peptide (HLDF-6-OH) and its amide form (HLDF-6-NH2), was conducted. The study was performed in male rats using two models of a neurodegenerative disorder. Cognitive deficit in rats was induced by injection of the beta-amyloid fragment 25-35 (βA 25-35) into the giant-cell nucleus basalis of Meynert or by coinjection of βA 25-35 and ibotenic acid into the hippocampus. To evaluate cognitive functions in animals, three tests were used: the novel object recognition test, the conditioned passive avoidance task and the Morris maze. Comparative analysis of the data demonstrated that the neuroprotective activity of HLDF-6-NH2, evaluated by improvement of cognitive functions in animals, surpassed that of the native HLDF-6-OH peptide. The greater cognitive/ behavioral effects can be attributed to improved kinetic properties of the amide form of the peptide, such as the character of biodegradation and the half-life time. The effects of HLDF-6-NH2 are comparable to, or exceed, those of the reference compounds. Importantly, HLDF-6-NH2 exerts its effects at much lower doses than the reference compounds.

  10. New lifestyle drugs and somatoform disorders in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Harth, W; Seikowski, K; Hermes, B; Gieler, U

    2008-02-01

    An increasing number of healthy individuals make use of 'lifestyle' drugs, such as nootropics, psychopharmaca, hormones and eco-drugs. In this respect, the fact that many people try to improve their outer appearance, solve their 'cosmetic problems', influence their rate of hair growth and altogether delay, halt or even reverse the natural ageing process has become a relevant matter for the practising dermatologist. Lifestyle drugs in dermatology are taken in an attempt to increase personal life quality by means of attaining a certain, psychosocially defined beauty ideal. They are not taken to manage a medically identifiable, well-defined disease. Often, patients suffering from somatoform disorders, such as hypochondriac disorders, body dysmorphic disorders, somatization disorders or persistent somatoform pain disorders, may spontaneously ask physicians, in particular dermatologists and plastic surgeons, to prescribe them lifestyle drugs. Typically, patients repeatedly present with alleged 'physical symptoms' that turn out to be subjective complaints without any underlying identifiable medical disease. The use of lifestyle drugs without any proper medical indication may lead to a chronification of the emotional disorders that had ultimately been the cause of the patients' request for such drugs. Such disorders may need to be treated promptly with psychotherapy and/or appropriate psychopharmacotherapy, and the choice of the treatment requires an accurate differential diagnostic approach.

  11. [Experimental techniques for developing new drugs acting on dementia (4)--Aged rats].

    PubMed

    Egashira, T

    1994-08-01

    We have devised a method for the procurement and breeding of aged rats used for aiding in the development of drugs for disease, involving Alzheimer's disease and cerebrovascular dementia. The changes in choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), muscarinic receptor binding (mAChR) and Na(+)-dependent high affinity choline uptake (HACU) are generally consistent with age-dependent declines in cholinergic neurotransmission, although these decreases may include differences in strain/species, sex, tissue sampling and assay procedures. So, the choice of time points during the life cycle selected for comparison between young and aged rats is particularly important when using laboratory animals. These observations support the utility of the senescent rat model in studying aging and development of nootropic drugs.

  12. [Peptidergic modulation of the hippocampus synaptic activity].

    PubMed

    Skrebitskiĭ, V G; Kondratenko, R V; Povarov, I S; Dereviagin, V I

    2011-11-01

    Effects of two newly synthesized nootropic and anxiolytic dipeptides: Noopept and Selank on inhibitory synaptic transmission in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells were investigated using patch-clamp technique in whole-cell configuration. Bath application of Noopept (1 microM) or Selank (2 microM) significantly increased the frequency of spike-dependent spontaneous m1PSCs, whereas spike-independent mlPSCs remained unchanged. It was suggested that both peptides mediated their effect sue to activation of inhibitory interneurons terminating on CA1 pyramidal cells. Results of current clamp recording of inhibitory interneurons residing in stratum radiatum confirmed this suggestion, at least for Noonent. PMID:22390072

  13. Club Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rohypnol, ketamine, as well as MDMA (ecstasy) and methamphetamine ( Drug Facts: Club Drugs , National Institute on Drug ... Club Drugs , National Institute on Drug Abuse, 2010). Methamphetamine is a powerfully addictive stimulant associated with serious ...

  14. Drug allergies

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction - drug (medication); Drug hypersensitivity; Medication hypersensitivity ... A drug allergy involves an immune response in the body that produces an allergic reaction to a medicine. The ...

  15. Drug Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... over-the-counter drug. The FDA evaluates the safety of a drug by looking at Side effects ... clinical trials The FDA also monitors a drug's safety after approval. For you, drug safety means buying ...

  16. Drug Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment Drug Resistance (Last updated 3/1/2016; last reviewed 3/1/2016) Key Points As HIV multiplies in the ... the risk of drug resistance. What is HIV drug resistance? Once a person becomes infected with HIV, ...

  17. Smart drugs and synthetic androgens for cognitive and physical enhancement: revolving doors of cosmetic neurology.

    PubMed

    Frati, Paola; Kyriakou, Chrystalla; Del Rio, Alessandro; Marinelli, Enrico; Vergallo, Gianluca Montanari; Zaami, Simona; Busardò, Francesco P

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive enhancement can be defined as the use of drugs and/or other means with the aim to improve the cognitive functions of healthy subjects in particular memory, attention, creativity and intelligence in the absence of any medical indication. Currently, it represents one of the most debated topics in the neuroscience community. Human beings always wanted to use substances to improve their cognitive functions, from the use of hallucinogens in ancient civilizations in an attempt to allow them to better communicate with their gods, to the widespread use of caffeine under various forms (energy drinks, tablets, etc.), to the more recent development of drugs such as stimulants and glutamate activators. In the last ten years, increasing attention has been given to the use of cognitive enhancers, but up to now there is still only a limited amount of information concerning the use, effect and functioning of cognitive enhancement in daily life on healthy subjects. The first aim of this paper was to review current trends in the misuse of smart drugs (also known as Nootropics) presently available on the market focusing in detail on methylphenidate, trying to evaluate the potential risk in healthy individuals, especially teenagers and young adults. Moreover, the authors have explored the issue of cognitive enhancement compared to the use of Anabolic Androgenic Steroids (AAS) in sports. Finally, a brief overview of the ethical considerations surrounding human enhancement has been examined.

  18. Smart Drugs and Synthetic Androgens for Cognitive and Physical Enhancement: Revolving Doors of Cosmetic Neurology

    PubMed Central

    Frati, Paola; Kyriakou, Chrystalla; Del Rio, Alessandro; Marinelli, Enrico; Vergallo, Gianluca Montanari; Zaami, Simona; Busardò, Francesco P.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive enhancement can be defined as the use of drugs and/or other means with the aim to improve the cognitive functions of healthy subjects in particular memory, attention, creativity and intelligence in the absence of any medical indication. Currently, it represents one of the most debated topics in the neuroscience community. Human beings always wanted to use substances to improve their cognitive functions, from the use of hallucinogens in ancient civilizations in an attempt to allow them to better communicate with their gods, to the widespread use of caffeine under various forms (energy drinks, tablets, etc.), to the more recent development of drugs such as stimulants and glutamate activators. In the last ten years, increasing attention has been given to the use of cognitive enhancers, but up to now there is still only a limited amount of information concerning the use, effect and functioning of cognitive enhancement in daily life on healthy subjects. The first aim of this paper was to review current trends in the misuse of smart drugs (also known as Nootropics) presently available on the market focusing in detail on methylphenidate, trying to evaluate the potential risk in healthy individuals, especially teenagers and young adults. Moreover, the authors have explored the issue of cognitive enhancement compared to the use of Anabolic Androgenic Steroids (AAS) in sports. Finally, a brief overview of the ethical considerations surrounding human enhancement has been examined. PMID:26074739

  19. Smart drugs and synthetic androgens for cognitive and physical enhancement: revolving doors of cosmetic neurology.

    PubMed

    Frati, Paola; Kyriakou, Chrystalla; Del Rio, Alessandro; Marinelli, Enrico; Vergallo, Gianluca Montanari; Zaami, Simona; Busardò, Francesco P

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive enhancement can be defined as the use of drugs and/or other means with the aim to improve the cognitive functions of healthy subjects in particular memory, attention, creativity and intelligence in the absence of any medical indication. Currently, it represents one of the most debated topics in the neuroscience community. Human beings always wanted to use substances to improve their cognitive functions, from the use of hallucinogens in ancient civilizations in an attempt to allow them to better communicate with their gods, to the widespread use of caffeine under various forms (energy drinks, tablets, etc.), to the more recent development of drugs such as stimulants and glutamate activators. In the last ten years, increasing attention has been given to the use of cognitive enhancers, but up to now there is still only a limited amount of information concerning the use, effect and functioning of cognitive enhancement in daily life on healthy subjects. The first aim of this paper was to review current trends in the misuse of smart drugs (also known as Nootropics) presently available on the market focusing in detail on methylphenidate, trying to evaluate the potential risk in healthy individuals, especially teenagers and young adults. Moreover, the authors have explored the issue of cognitive enhancement compared to the use of Anabolic Androgenic Steroids (AAS) in sports. Finally, a brief overview of the ethical considerations surrounding human enhancement has been examined. PMID:26074739

  20. Drug Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... as drugged driving, violence, stress, and child abuse. Drug abuse can lead to homelessness, crime, and missed work or problems with keeping a job. It harms unborn babies and destroys families. There are different types of treatment for drug abuse. But the best is to prevent drug ...

  1. Controlled drugs.

    PubMed

    2016-05-18

    Essential facts Controlled drugs are defined and governed by the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 and associated regulations. Examples of controlled drugs include morphine, pethidine and methadone. Since 2012, appropriately qualified nurses and midwives can prescribe controlled drugs for medical conditions within their competence. There are some exceptions when treating addiction. PMID:27191427

  2. Drug Debacle.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Medicaid's Vendor Drug Program is under examination by the Texas Legislature. TMA's Physicians Medicaid Congress is seizing the opportunity to call for an administrative overhaul of a drug benefit physicians describe as unnecessarily complicated and confusing. PMID:27441421

  3. Drug Debacle.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2016-07-01

    Medicaid's Vendor Drug Program is under examination by the Texas Legislature. TMA's Physicians Medicaid Congress is seizing the opportunity to call for an administrative overhaul of a drug benefit physicians describe as unnecessarily complicated and confusing.

  4. Drugged Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infographics » Drugged Driving Drugged Driving Email Facebook Twitter Text Description of Infographic Top Right Figure : In 2009, ... crash than those who don't smoke. Bottom Text: Develop Social Strategies Offer to be a designated ...

  5. Drug Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leviton, Harvey S.

    1975-01-01

    This article attempts to assemble pertinent information about the drug problem, particularily marihuana. It also focuses on the need for an educational program for drug control with the public schools as the main arena. (Author/HMV)

  6. Generic Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... drugs. There are a few other differences— like color, shape, size, or taste—but they do not ... different . Brand-name drugs are often advertised by color and shape. Remember the ads for the “purple ...

  7. Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tong Logan, Angela; Silverman, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    One of the most clinically significant complications related to the use of pharmacotherapy is the potential for drug-drug or drug-disease interactions. The gastrointestinal system plays a large role in the pharmacokinetic profile of most medications, and many medications utilized in gastroenterology have clinically significant drug interactions. This review will discuss the impact of alterations of intestinal pH, interactions mediated by phase I hepatic metabolism enzymes and P-glycoprotein, the impact of liver disease on drug metabolism, and interactions seen with commonly utilized gastrointestinal medications. PMID:22933873

  8. Traditional Chinese Nootropic Medicine Radix Polygalae and Its Active Constituent Onjisaponin B Reduce β-Amyloid Production and Improve Cognitive Impairments.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaohang; Cui, Jin; Yu, Yang; Li, Wei; Hou, Yujun; Wang, Xin; Qin, Dapeng; Zhao, Cun; Yao, Xinsheng; Zhao, Jian; Pei, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Decline of cognitive function is the hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD), regardless of the pathological mechanism. Traditional Chinese medicine has been used to combat cognitive impairments and has been shown to improve learning and memory. Radix Polygalae (RAPO) is a typical and widely used herbal medicine. In this study, we aimed to follow the β-amyloid (Aβ) reduction activity to identify active constituent(s) of RAPO. We found that Onjisaponin B of RAPO functioned as RAPO to suppress Aβ production without direct inhibition of β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) and γ-secretase activities. Our mechanistic study showed that Onjisaponin B promoted the degradation of amyloid precursor protein (APP). Further, oral administration of Onjisaponin B ameliorated Aβ pathology and behavioral defects in APP/PS1 mice. Taken together, our results indicate that Onjisaponin B is effective against AD, providing a new therapeutic agent for further drug discovery.

  9. Traditional Chinese Nootropic Medicine Radix Polygalae and Its Active Constituent Onjisaponin B Reduce β-Amyloid Production and Improve Cognitive Impairments

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaohang; Cui, Jin; Yu, Yang; Li, Wei; Hou, Yujun; Wang, Xin; Qin, Dapeng; Zhao, Cun; Yao, Xinsheng; Zhao, Jian; Pei, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Decline of cognitive function is the hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), regardless of the pathological mechanism. Traditional Chinese medicine has been used to combat cognitive impairments and has been shown to improve learning and memory. Radix Polygalae (RAPO) is a typical and widely used herbal medicine. In this study, we aimed to follow the β-amyloid (Aβ) reduction activity to identify active constituent(s) of RAPO. We found that Onjisaponin B of RAPO functioned as RAPO to suppress Aβ production without direct inhibition of β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) and γ-secretase activities. Our mechanistic study showed that Onjisaponin B promoted the degradation of amyloid precursor protein (APP). Further, oral administration of Onjisaponin B ameliorated Aβ pathology and behavioral defects in APP/PS1 mice. Taken together, our results indicate that Onjisaponin B is effective against AD, providing a new therapeutic agent for further drug discovery. PMID:26954017

  10. COPD - control drugs

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - control drugs; Bronchodilators - COPD - control drugs; Beta agonist inhaler - COPD - control drugs; Anticholinergic inhaler - COPD - control drugs; Long-acting inhaler - COPD - control drugs; ...

  11. Drug Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    NBOD2, a program developed at Goddard Space Flight Center to solve equations of motion coupled N-body systems is used by E.I. DuPont de Nemours & Co. to model potential drugs as a series of elements. The program analyses the vibrational and static motions of independent components in drugs. Information generated from this process is used to design specific drugs to interact with enzymes in designated ways.

  12. [Drug dependence and psychotropic drugs].

    PubMed

    Giraud, M J; Lemonnier, E; Bigot, T

    1994-11-01

    Although the utility of psychotropic drugs has been well demonstrated, caution must still be exercised in their use. Among their potential risks, drug dependency must be kept in mind. This risk is well accepted with regard to benzodiazepines, and it appeared useful to study the potential risk for antidepressants, neuroleptics and thymoregulatory agents. Whatever the drug, the predominant factor appears to be psychological dependency. Prevention of drug dependency is most often achieved by informing the patient, limiting the length of use of the drug, making regular reevaluation of symptoms and of drug indication, and frequently be establishing a "treatment contract". The importance of the patient-physician relationship in the prescription of such treatment must be underlined. PMID:7984941

  13. Drug Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sardana, Raj K.

    This autoinstructional lesson deals with the study of such drugs as marijuana and LSD, with emphasis on drug abuse. It is suggested that it can be used in science classes at the middle level of school. No prerequisites are suggested. The teacher's guide lists the behavioral objectives, the equipment needed to complete the experience and suggests…

  14. Antineoplastic Drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadée, Wolfgang; El Sayed, Yousry Mahmoud

    The limited scope of therapeutic drug-level monitoring in cancer chemotherapy results from the often complex biochemical mechanisms that contribute to antineoplastic activity and obscure the relationships among drug serum levels and therapeutic benefits. Moreover, new agents for cancer chemotherapy are being introduced at a more rapid rate than for the treatment of other diseases, although the successful application of therapeutic drug-level monitoring may require several years of intensive study of the significance of serum drug levels. However, drug level monitoring can be of considerable value during phase I clinical trials of new antineoplastic agents in order to assess drug metabolism, bioavailability, and intersubject variability; these are important parameters in the interpretation of clinical studies, but have no immediate benefit to the patient. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) probably represents the most versatile and easily adaptable analytical technique for drug metabolite screening (1). HPLC may therefore now be the method of choice during phase I clinical trials of antineoplastic drugs. For example, within a single week we developed an HPLC assay—using a C18 reverse-phase column, UV detection, and direct serum injection after protein precipitation—for the new radiosensitizer, misonidazole (2).

  15. Prolongevity medicine: Antagonic-Stress drug in distress, geriatrics, and related diseases. II. Clinical review--2003.

    PubMed

    Riga, S; Riga, D; Schneider, F

    2004-06-01

    Distress and senescence, their reciprocal aggravating-quickening connections, and their related pathologies have a large worldwide impact on healthcare systems in this new millennium. For this reason, Antagonic-Stress (AS)--an advanced integrative therapy, with specific synergistic composition, and patented internationally--represents a significant strategy in health, aging, and longevity. Clinical research with AS proves the drug's efficacy in the management of distress (neurotic, stress-related, and affective disorders; behavioral syndromes associated with physiological disturbances and physical factors; mental and behavioral disorders due to psychoactive substance uses) and psychogeriatrics [organic, including symptomatic, mental disorders (OMD)]. Specific multiaxial psychopathological instruments and psychometric tests in multiple assessments used for gerontopsychiatry demonstrated strong improvements after AS administration in early-moderate stages of Alzheimer or vascular dementia, as well as in other OMD. In addition, comparative clinical studies evinced the superiority of AS (synergistic multitherapy) versus monotherapy [meclofenoxate (MF), piracetam (PA), pyritinol (PT), and nicergoline (NE), respectively]. These comparative clinical trials agreed closely with comparative preclinical research and confirmed AS synergistic homeostatic, adaptogenic, antioxidative, cerebrovascular, neurometabolic, and nootropic actions. Also, the AS protective actions against oxidative stress recommend this orthomolecular therapy in stress, aging, and free radical pathology. PMID:15247054

  16. Street Drugs and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... drugs that are abused How can street drugs harm your pregnancy? Using street drugs can cause problems ... drugs that are abused How can street drugs harm your pregnancy? Using street drugs can cause problems ...

  17. Prescription Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... body, especially in brain areas involved in the perception of pain and pleasure. Prescription stimulants , such as ... of drug that causes changes in your mood, perceptions, and behavior can affect judgment and willingness to ...

  18. Antiretroviral drugs.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik

    2010-10-01

    In October 2010, it will be exactly 25 years ago that the first antiretroviral drug, AZT (zidovudine, 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine), was described. It was the first of 25 antiretroviral drugs that in the past 25 years have been formally licensed for clinical use. These antiretroviral drugs fall into seven categories [nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NtRTIs), non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), protease inhibitors (PIs), fusion inhibitors (FIs), co-receptor inhibitors (CRIs) and integrase inhibitors (INIs). The INIs (i.e. raltegravir) represent the most recent advance in the search for effective and selective anti-HIV agents. Combination of several anti-HIV drugs [often referred to as highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)] has drastically altered AIDS from an almost uniformly fatal disease to a chronic manageable one.

  19. Drug Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... or diabetes. But medicines can also cause unwanted reactions. One problem is interactions, which may occur between ... more serious. Drug allergies are another type of reaction. They can be mild or life-threatening. Skin ...

  20. Club Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content En español Researchers Medical & Health Professionals Patients & ... Cold Medicines Steroids (Anabolic) Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Synthetic Cathinones (Bath Salts) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs ...

  1. Drugged Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Charts Emerging Trends and Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine ... distance, and decrease coordination. Drivers who have used cocaine or methamphetamine can be aggressive and reckless when ...

  2. Drug Interactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... not be taken at the same time as antacids. WHAT CAUSES THE MOST INTERACTIONS WITH HIV MEDICATIONS? ... azole” Some antibiotics (names end in “mycin”) The antacid cimetidine (Tagamet) Some drugs that prevent convulsions, including ...

  3. Club Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... also known as Ecstasy XTC, X, E, Adam, Molly, Hug Beans, and Love Drug Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), also known as G, Liquid Ecstasy, and Soap Ketamine, also known as Special K, K, Vitamin K, and Jet Rohypnol, also known ...

  4. Drug allergy

    PubMed Central

    Warrington, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Allergic drug reactions occur when a drug, usually a low molecular weight molecule, has the ability to stimulate an immune response. This can be done in one of two ways. The first is by binding covalently to a self-protein, to produce a haptenated molecule that can be processed and presented to the adaptive immune system to induce an immune response. Sometimes the drug itself cannot do this but a reactive breakdown product of the drug is able to bind covalently to the requisite self-protein or peptide. The second way in which drugs can stimulate an immune response is by binding non-covalently to antigen presenting or antigen recognition molecules such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) or the T cell receptor. This is known as the p-I or pharmacological interaction hypothesis. The drug binding in this situation is reversible and stimulation of the response may occur on first exposure, not requiring previous sensitization. There is probably a dependence on the presence of certain MHC alleles and T cell receptor structures for this type of reaction to occur. PMID:22922763

  5. Drug misuse.

    PubMed Central

    Waller, T.

    1992-01-01

    1. Assessment by history and examination should include: a history of all drugs taken during each day for the previous 7 days (including alcohol), length of drug use and route (including the sharing of needles or syringes), the possibility of pregnancy if female, previous psychiatric history and treatment of drug misuse, social factors (including employment, family, friends, involvement in prostitution, legal problems), medical problems, including evidence of hepatitis, injection abscesses and other infections, suicide attempts, and weight loss. 2. Notification to the Chief Medical Officer of the Drug Branch of the Home Office is a legal obligation. 3. Investigations include: liver function tests (LFTs), hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), hepatitis B surface antibody (HBsAb), hepatitis C antibody, full blood count (FBC), and urine for drug screening. Consider HIV testing if at risk but it is usually better arranged at a later stage. 4. Prescribing may be considered for a variety of drugs but objectives will differ according to drug type and individual. 5. In the case of opioid users, prescribing may be useful to stabilize their lives and to promote attendance for professional help. It may reduce high risk behaviour for contracting and spreading HIV. 6. If medication is given to opioid users, methadone mixture 1 mg/ml given once a day is the prescription of choice. Dispensing should be on a daily basis and the blue prescription form FP10 (MDA) allows the chemist to dispense daily for up to 14 days. A maximum ceiling of 100 mg methadone/day should not be exceeded. The initial dose will depend on the amount of opioid consumed in the previous week.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1345155

  6. Drug watch.

    PubMed

    Whitson, S

    1999-01-01

    Recent developments on new anti-HIV agents and drugs for opportunistic infections are highlighted. Information is provided on the infusion inhibitor T-20; DuPont's second generation non-nukes, DPC 961 and DPC 963; Papirine (PEN203) for the human papilloma virus; Sporanox for treating fungal infections; and the antiretroviral protein, lysozyme. In addition, information is given on a plant found in the Bolivian rainforest that may contain compounds to prevent HIV infection by blocking the enzyme, integrase. Other promising new drugs addressed at the 6th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections are listed in a table. Contact information for US clinical trials is provided.

  7. Drug Allergy.

    PubMed

    Waheed, Abdul; Hill, Tiffany; Dhawan, Nidhi

    2016-09-01

    An adverse drug reaction relates to an undesired response to administration of a drug. Type A reactions are common and are predictable to administration, dose response, or interaction with other medications. Type B reactions are uncommon with occurrences that are not predictable. Appropriate diagnosis, classification, and entry into the chart are important to avoid future problems. The diagnosis is made with careful history, physical examination, and possibly allergy testing. It is recommended that help from allergy immunology specialists should be sought where necessary and that routine prescription of Epi pen should be given to patients with multiple allergy syndromes. PMID:27545730

  8. [Ureter drugs].

    PubMed

    Raynal, G; Bellan, J; Saint, F; Tillou, X; Petit, J

    2008-03-01

    Many improvements have been made recently in the field of the ureteral smooth muscle pharmacology. After a brief summary on physiological basis, we review what is known about effects on ureter of different drugs class. In a second part, we review clinical applications for renal colic analgesia, calculi expulsive medical therapy, ESWL adjuvant treatment and preoperative treatment before retrograde access. There are now sufficient data on NSAID and alpha-blockers. beta-agonists, especially for beta3 selective ones, and topical drugs before retrograde access are interesting and should be further evaluated.

  9. Antineoplastic Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Sara; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on antineoplastic drugs is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then…

  10. Therapeutic drug monitoring: antiarrhythmic drugs.

    PubMed

    Campbell, T J; Williams, K M

    2001-01-01

    Antiarrhythmic agents are traditionally classified according to Vaughan Williams into four classes of action. Class I antiarrhythmic agents include most of the drugs traditionally thought of as antiarrhythmics, and have as a common action, blockade of the fast-inward sodium channel on myocardium. These agents have a very significant toxicity, and while they are being used less, therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) does significantly increase the safety with which they can be administered. Class II agents are antisympathetic drugs, particularly the b-adrenoceptor blockers. These are generally safe agents which do not normally require TDM. Class III antiarrhythmic agents include sotalol and amiodarone. TDM can be useful in the case of amiodarone to monitor compliance and toxicity but is generally of little value for sotalol. Class IV antiarrhythmic drugs are the calcium channel blockers verapamil and diltiazem. These are normally monitored by haemodynamic effects, rather than using TDM. Other agents which do not fall neatly into the Vaughan Williams classification include digoxin and perhexiline. TDM is very useful for monitoring the administration (and particularly the safety) of both of these agents.

  11. Therapeutic drug monitoring: antiarrhythmic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, T J; Williams, K M

    2001-01-01

    Antiarrhythmic agents are traditionally classified according to Vaughan Williams into four classes of action. Class I antiarrhythmic agents include most of the drugs traditionally thought of as antiarrhythmics, and have as a common action, blockade of the fast-inward sodium channel on myocardium. These agents have a very significant toxicity, and while they are being used less, therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) does significantly increase the safety with which they can be administered. Class II agents are antisympathetic drugs, particularly the b-adrenoceptor blockers. These are generally safe agents which do not normally require TDM. Class III antiarrhythmic agents include sotalol and amiodarone. TDM can be useful in the case of amiodarone to monitor compliance and toxicity but is generally of little value for sotalol. Class IV antiarrhythmic drugs are the calcium channel blockers verapamil and diltiazem. These are normally monitored by haemodynamic effects, rather than using TDM. Other agents which do not fall neatly into the Vaughan Williams classification include digoxin and perhexiline. TDM is very useful for monitoring the administration (and particularly the safety) of both of these agents. PMID:11564050

  12. Drug watch.

    PubMed

    Whitson, S

    1999-01-01

    Current research findings and treatment issues related to a number of drugs are briefly outlined. Topics include T-20, a reformulation of ddI, PMPA, chicoric acid, Omniferon (alpha leukoferon), and Mepron. Also discussed is a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor called calanolide A, which is synthesized from a tree native to Malaysian rain forests. An update is provided on Panretin, a gel which is used to treat KS lesions. Contact information is provided.

  13. Drug Rash (Unclassified Drug Eruption) in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Drug Eruption, Unclassified (Pediatric) A parent's guide to condition ... lesions coming together into larger lesions typical of drug rashes (eruptions). Overview A drug eruption, also known ...

  14. Asthma - control drugs

    MedlinePlus

    Asthma - inhaled corticosteroids; Asthma - long-acting beta-agonists; Asthma - leukotriene modifiers; Asthma - cromolyn; Bronchial asthma-control drugs; Wheezing - control drugs; Reactive airway disease - control drugs

  15. Antiplatelet Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Hirsh, Jack; Spencer, Frederick A.; Baglin, Trevor P.; Weitz, Jeffrey I.

    2012-01-01

    The article describes the mechanisms of action, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of aspirin, dipyridamole, cilostazol, the thienopyridines, and the glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonists. The relationships among dose, efficacy, and safety are discussed along with a mechanistic overview of results of randomized clinical trials. The article does not provide specific management recommendations but highlights important practical aspects of antiplatelet therapy, including optimal dosing, the variable balance between benefits and risks when antiplatelet therapies are used alone or in combination with other antiplatelet drugs in different clinical settings, and the implications of persistently high platelet reactivity despite such treatment. PMID:22315278

  16. Drugs Approved for Neuroblastoma

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for neuroblastoma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  17. Drugs Approved for Retinoblastoma

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for retinoblastoma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  18. Drugs Approved for Leukemia

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the FDA for use in leukemia. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  19. Drug Plan Coverage Rules

    MedlinePlus

    ... works with other insurance Find health & drug plans Drug plan coverage rules Note Call your Medicare drug ... shingles vaccine) when medically necessary to prevent illness. Drugs you get in hospital outpatient settings In most ...

  20. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Therapeutic Drug Monitoring Share this page: Was this page ... Monitored Drugs | Common Questions | Related Pages What is therapeutic drug monitoring? Therapeutic drug monitoring is the measurement ...

  1. [Drug poisoning].

    PubMed

    Gainza, I; Nogué, S; Martínez Velasco, C; Hoffman, R S; Burillo-Putze, G; Dueñas, A; Gómez, J; Pinillos, M A

    2003-01-01

    A review is made of acute poisoning by opiates and its treatment in the emergency services, bearing in mind the progressive decline in the number of cases presented with the arrival of new forms of their administration, as well as the presence of new addictive drugs that have resulted in a shift in consumption habits. Reference is also made to the way in which the different types of existing substances originated, with the aim of achieving a better understanding of their use and in order to administer the most suitable treatment when poisoning occurs. Cocaine poisoning is discussed, with reference to its clinical picture, diagnosis and treatment. The consumption of illegal drugs in our country has undergone a notable change in recent years, with heroin being relegated and the incorporation of cocaine, amphetamine derivatives such as "ecstasy" (MDMA), "liquid ecstasy" (GHB) and, to a lesser extent, ketamine. A review is made of cannabis and its derivates, from the history of its consumption and the preparations employed to the effects produced in the different bodily systems. A brief explanation is also given of its metabolites and its principal mechanisms of action. Finally, we comment on the effects of LSD and hallucinogenic mushrooms.

  2. Drugs and the Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health (DHHS), Bethesda, MD.

    This booklet explores various aspects of drug addiction, with a special focus on drugs' effects on the brain. A brief introduction presents information on the rampant use of drugs in society and elaborates the distinction between drug abuse and drug addiction. Next, a detailed analysis of the brain and its functions is given. Drugs target the more…

  3. Clinically significant drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Ament, P W; Bertolino, J G; Liszewski, J L

    2000-03-15

    A large number of drugs are introduced every year, and new interactions between medications are increasingly reported. Consequently, it is no longer practical for physicians to rely on memory alone to avoid potential drug interactions. Multiple drug regimens carry the risk of adverse interactions. Precipitant drugs modify the object drug's absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion or actual clinical effect. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics and, in particular, rifampin are common precipitant drugs prescribed in primary care practice. Drugs with a narrow therapeutic range or low therapeutic index are more likely to be the objects for serious drug interactions. Object drugs in common use include warfarin, fluoroquinolones, antiepileptic drugs, oral contraceptives, cisapride and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors. Many other drugs, act as precipitants or objects, and a number of drugs act as both. Regularly updated manuals of drug interactions and CD-ROM-formatted programs are useful office references. PMID:10750880

  4. Personality, Drug Preference, Drug Use, and Drug Availability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Marc; Boyer, Bret; Kumar, V. K.; Prout, Maurice

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between drug preference, drug use, drug availability, and personality among individuals (n = 100) in treatment for substance abuse in an effort to replicate the results of an earlier study (Feldman, Kumar, Angelini, Pekala, & Porter, 2007) designed to test prediction derived from Eysenck's (1957, 1967)…

  5. 99 Films on Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, David O., Ed.

    This catalog describes and evaluates 16-millimeter films about various aspects of drug use. Among the subjects covered by the 99 films are the composition and effects of different drugs, reasons why people use drugs, life in the drug culture, the problem of law enforcement, and various means of dealing with drug users. Each film is synopsized. Two…

  6. [Ilicit drugs frequently used by drug addicts].

    PubMed

    Cirriez, J P

    2015-03-01

    Drugs stimulate the brain causing mental and physical effects. The effects of drugs can be stimulating, narcotic or mind-altering. This article briefly discusses some commonly used illicit drugs, namely heroin, cocaine, cannabis, ecstasy, amphetamines, LSD, psilocybin mushrooms and poppers. PMID:26571792

  7. Attitudes towards drug legalization among drug users.

    PubMed

    Trevino, Roberto A; Richard, Alan J

    2002-01-01

    Research shows that support for legalization of drugs varies significantly among different sociodemographic and political groups. Yet there is little research examining the degree of support for legalization of drugs among drug users. This paper examines how frequency and type of drug use affect the support for legalization of drugs after adjusting for the effects of political affiliation and sociodemographic characteristics. A sample of 188 drug users and non-drug users were asked whether they would support the legalization of marijuana, cocaine, and heroin. Respondents reported their use of marijuana, crack, cocaine, heroin, speedball, and/or methamphetamines during the previous 30 days. Support for legalization of drugs was analyzed by estimating three separate logistic regressions. The results showed that the support for the legalization of drugs depended on the definition of "drug user" and the type of drug. In general, however, the results showed that marijuana users were more likely to support legalizing marijuana, but they were less likely to support the legalization of cocaine and heroin. On the other hand, users of crack, cocaine, heroin, speedball, and/or methamphetamines were more likely to support legalizing all drugs including cocaine and heroin.

  8. Drug Use by Students of Drug Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linder, Ronald; And Others

    1973-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the significance of differences in the use of certain psychoactive drugs among students who enrolled for an elective drug abuse course and students not enrolled, or who have not previously taken a drug abuse course. (Author)

  9. Discontinued drugs in 2008: cardiovascular drugs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu-Song; Xiang, Bing-Ren

    2009-07-01

    This perspective is part of an annual series of papers discussing drugs dropped from clinical development in the previous year. Specifically, this paper focuses on the 16 cardiovascular drugs discontinued in 2008. Information for this perspective was derived from a search of the Pharmaprojects database for drugs discontinued after reaching Phase I-III clinical trials. PMID:19548849

  10. Access to Investigational Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... drug if the supply is limited and the demand is high. Are all investigational drugs available through ... be limited in part by drug supply, patient demand, or other factors. What is NCI’s role in ...

  11. Drug Development Process

    MedlinePlus

    ... Approvals The Drug Development Process The Drug Development Process Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... public. More Information More in The Drug Development Process Step 1: Discovery and Development Step 2: Preclinical ...

  12. Drugs Approved for Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Leukemia This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... not listed here. Drugs Approved for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) Abitrexate (Methotrexate) Arranon (Nelarabine) Asparaginase Erwinia chrysanthemi ...

  13. Drug Retention Times

    SciTech Connect

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user.

  14. Drug Retention Times

    SciTech Connect

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user

  15. Drug-induced hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Toxic hepatitis ... to get liver damage. Some drugs can cause hepatitis with small doses, even if the liver breakdown ... liver. Many different drugs can cause drug-induced hepatitis. Painkillers and fever reducers that contain acetaminophen are ...

  16. ORAL ADVERSE DRUG REACTIONS TO CARDIOVASCULAR DRUGS.

    PubMed

    Torpet, Lis Andersen; Kragelund, Camilla; Reibel, Jesper; Nauntofte, Birgitte

    2004-01-01

    A great many cardiovascular drugs (CVDs) have the potential to induce adverse reactions in the mouth. The prevalence of such reactions is not known, however, since many are asymptomatic and therefore are believed to go unreported. As more drugs are marketed and the population includes an increasing number of elderly, the number of drug prescriptions is also expected to increase. Accordingly, it can be predicted that the occurrence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs), including the oral ones (ODRs), will continue to increase. ODRs affect the oral mucous membrane, saliva production, and taste. The pathogenesis of these reactions, especially the mucosal ones, is largely unknown and appears to involve complex interactions among the drug in question, other medications, the patient's underlying disease, genetics, and life-style factors. Along this line, there is a growing interest in the association between pharmacogenetic polymorphism and ADRs. Research focusing on polymorphism of the cytochrome P450 system (CYPs) has become increasingly important and has highlighted the intra- and inter-individual responses to drug exposure. This system has recently been suggested to be an underlying candidate regarding the pathogenesis of ADRs in the oral mucous membrane. This review focuses on those CVDs reported to induce ODRs. In addition, it will provide data on specific drugs or drug classes, and outline and discuss recent research on possible mechanisms linking ADRs to drug metabolism patterns. Abbreviations used will be as follows: ACEI, ACE inhibitor; ADR, adverse drug reaction; ANA, antinuclear antigen; ARB, angiotensin II receptor blocker; BAB, beta-adrenergic blocker; CCB, calcium-channel blocker; CDR, cutaneous drug reaction; CVD, cardiovascular drug; CYP, cytochrome P450 enzyme; EM, erythema multiforme; FDE, fixed drug eruption; I, inhibitor of CYP isoform activity; HMG-CoA, hydroxymethyl-glutaryl coenzyme A; NAT, N-acetyltransferase; ODR, oral drug reaction; RDM, reactive

  17. [Drug-induced dementia].

    PubMed

    Kojima, Taro; Akishita, Masahiro

    2016-03-01

    Many drugs have been reported to induce not only delirium but also cognitive impairment. Some types of drugs are reported to induce dementia, and prolonged hypotension or hypoglycemia induced by overuse of antihypertensive drugs or oral antidiabetic drugs could result in dementia. Recently, taking multiple drugs with anticholinergic activity are reported to cause cognitive decline and anticholinergic burden should be avoided especially in patients with dementia. Drug-induced dementia can be prevented by avoiding polypharmacy and adhering to the saying 'start low and go slow' . Early diagnosis of drug-induced dementia and withdrawal of the offending drug is essential to improve cognitive function. PMID:27025096

  18. Nanoencapsulation for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Avnesh; Singla, Rubbel; Guliani, Anika; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Nanoencapsulation of drug/small molecules in nanocarriers (NCs) is a very promising approach for development of nanomedicine. Modern drug encapsulation methods allow efficient loading of drug molecules inside the NCs thereby reducing systemic toxicity associated with drugs. Targeting of NCs can enhance the accumulation of nanonencapsulated drug at the diseased site. This article focussed on the synthesis methods, drug loading, drug release mechanism and cellular response of nanoencapsulated drugs on liposomes, micelles, carbon nanotubes, dendrimers, and magnetic NCs. Also the uses of these various NCs have been highlighted in the field of nanotechnology. PMID:26417260

  19. Nuclear Receptors in Drug Metabolism, Drug Response and Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Chandra; Zuniga, Baltazar; Song, Chung Seog; Jiang, Shoulei; Cropper, Jodie; Park, Sulgi; Chatterjee, Bandana

    2016-01-01

    Orally delivered small-molecule therapeutics are metabolized in the liver and intestine by phase I and phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs), and transport proteins coordinate drug influx (phase 0) and drug/drug-metabolite efflux (phase III). Genes involved in drug metabolism and disposition are induced by xenobiotic-activated nuclear receptors (NRs), i.e. PXR (pregnane X receptor) and CAR (constitutive androstane receptor), and by the 1α, 25-dihydroxy vitamin D3-activated vitamin D receptor (VDR), due to transactivation of xenobiotic-response elements (XREs) present in phase 0-III genes. Additional NRs, like HNF4-α, FXR, LXR-α play important roles in drug metabolism in certain settings, such as in relation to cholesterol and bile acid metabolism. The phase I enzymes CYP3A4/A5, CYP2D6, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP1A2, CYP2C8, CYP2A6, CYP2J2, and CYP2E1 metabolize >90% of all prescription drugs, and phase II conjugation of hydrophilic functional groups (with/without phase I modification) facilitates drug clearance. The conjugation step is mediated by broad-specificity transferases like UGTs, SULTs, GSTs. This review delves into our current understanding of PXR/CAR/VDR-mediated regulation of DME and transporter expression, as well as effects of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and epigenome (specified by promoter methylation, histone modification, microRNAs, long non coding RNAs) on the expression of PXR/CAR/VDR and phase 0-III mediators, and their impacts on variable drug response. Therapeutic agents that target epigenetic regulation and the molecular basis and consequences (overdosing, underdosing, or beneficial outcome) of drug-drug/drug-food/drug-herb interactions are also discussed. Precision medicine requires understanding of a drug’s impact on DME and transporter activity and their NR-regulated expression in order to achieve optimal drug efficacy without adverse drug reactions. In future drug screening, new tools such as humanized mouse models and

  20. Drug treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Effects on caregiver burden and patient quality of life.

    PubMed

    Hollister, L; Gruber, N

    1996-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a devastating illness that will become more common as the population ages. Although clinical diagnosis of the illness is not certain without histological examination of the brain, and misdiagnosis may occur, broad working criteria to help diagnose the likely presence of Alzheimer's disease are available. Thoughtful clinical evaluation improves diagnostic accuracy, and appropriately diagnosed patients are critical for involvement in research into new antidementia agents. Essential to the discovery of new drugs is careful measurement of illness response. A variety of scales--some aimed at patients, others at their caregivers, and yet others for clinicians--assess Alzheimer's disease severity, progression, symptom response, and quality of life. Of note, patient response is not the only measurement of treatment benefit today. Growing interest is also being placed on tracking the possible amelioration of caregiver 'burden'. This burden refers to the psychological, physical, and material costs of providing care for an Alzheimer's patient over long periods of time. A number of scales and questionnaires have been developed and are occasionally used. Many drugs have been tried in Alzheimer's disease, but very few have produced any benefit, and this is often modest. Ergoloid mesylates, initially thought to be effective, are now considered of little value. The cholinomimetic drugs, especially the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor tacrine, have provided a very modest benefit, slowing the progression of the illness for a number of months. No cognitive improvement has been noted with the various nootropic agents such as piracetam. Early studies with levacecarnine (acetyl-L-carnitine), a substance that facilitates the use of fatty acids, memantidine, the dimethyl derivative of amantidine, and the calcium channel blocker nimodipine, have shown some promise, but require larger, more rigorous studies. As mentioned above, documenting effects in individual patients

  1. Fighting the Drug War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    The Journal of State Government, 1990

    1990-01-01

    All nine articles in this periodical issue focus on the theme of the war against illegal drug use, approaching the topic from a variety of perspectives. The articles are: "The Drug War: Meeting the Challenge" (Stanley E. Morris); "Ways to Fight Drug Abuse" (Bruce A. Feldman); "Treatment Key to Fighting Drugs" (Stan Lundine); "Patience and…

  2. What Are Drugs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Police and Peace Officers Association.

    This guide for parents presents, in Laotian and English, information about drugs, drug use and abuse, and treatment for drug use. Most of the information is presented in question and answer form to give parents the information they need to answer their children's questions and help prevent drug use. The following sections are included: (1)…

  3. Drugs and Young People

    MedlinePlus

    Drug abuse is a serious public health problem. It affects almost every community and family in some way. Drug abuse in children and teenagers may pose a ... of young people may be more susceptible to drug abuse and addiction than adult brains. Abused drugs ...

  4. Drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and novel cardiovascular drugs.

    PubMed

    Pelliccia, Francesco; Rollini, Fabiana; Marazzi, Giuseppe; Greco, Cesare; Gaudio, Carlo; Angiolillo, Dominick J

    2015-10-15

    The combination of aspirin and the thienopyridine clopidogrel is a cornerstone in the prevention of atherothrombotic events. These two agents act in concert to ameliorate the prothrombotic processes stimulated by plaque rupture and vessel injury complicating cardiovascular disease. Guidelines recommend the use of clopidogrel in patients with acute coronary syndromes and in those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention, and the drug remains the most utilized P2Y12 receptor inhibitor despite the fact that newer antiplatelet agents are now available. In recent years, numerous studies have shown inconsistency in the efficacy of clopidogrel to prevent atherothrombotic events. Studies of platelet function testing have shown variability in the response to clopidogrel. One of the major reason for this phenomenon lies in the interaction between clopidogrel and other drugs that may affect clopidogrel absorption, metabolism, and ultimately its antiplatelet action. Importantly, these drug-drug interactions have prognostic implications, since patients with high on-treatment platelet reactivity associated with reduced clopidogrel metabolism have an increased risk of ischemia. Previous systematic reviews have focused on drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and specific pharmacologic classes, such as proton pump inhibitors, calcium channel blockers, and statins. However, more recent pieces of scientific evidence show that clopidogrel may also interact with newer drugs that are now available for the treatment of cardiovascular patients. Accordingly, the aim of this review is to highlight and discuss recent data on drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and third-generation proton pump inhibitors, pantoprazole and lansoprazole, statins, pitavastatin, and antianginal drug, ranolazine. PMID:26341013

  5. Nanotransporters for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Lühmann, Tessa; Meinel, Lorenz

    2016-06-01

    Soluble nanotransporters for drugs can be profiled for targeted delivery particularly to maximize the efficacy of highly potent drugs while minimizing off target effects. This article outlines on the use of biological carrier molecules with a focus on albumin, various drug linkers for site specific release of the drug payload from the nanotransporter and strategies to combine these in various ways to meet different drug delivery demands particularly the optimization of the payload per nanotransporter.

  6. Food-Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bushra, Rabia; Aslam, Nousheen; Khan, Arshad Yar

    2011-01-01

    The effect of drug on a person may be different than expected because that drug interacts with another drug the person is taking (drug-drug interaction), food, beverages, dietary supplements the person is consuming (drug-nutrient/food interaction) or another disease the person has (drug-disease interaction). A drug interaction is a situation in which a substance affects the activity of a drug, i.e. the effects are increased or decreased, or they produce a new effect that neither produces on its own. These interactions may occur out of accidental misuse or due to lack of knowledge about the active ingredients involved in the relevant substances. Regarding food-drug interactions physicians and pharmacists recognize that some foods and drugs, when taken simultaneously, can alter the body's ability to utilize a particular food or drug, or cause serious side effects. Clinically significant drug interactions, which pose potential harm to the patient, may result from changes in pharmaceutical, pharmacokinetic, or pharmacodynamic properties. Some may be taken advantage of, to the benefit of patients, but more commonly drug interactions result in adverse drug events. Therefore it is advisable for patients to follow the physician and doctors instructions to obtain maximum benefits with least food-drug interactions. The literature survey was conducted by extracting data from different review and original articles on general or specific drug interactions with food. This review gives information about various interactions between different foods and drugs and will help physicians and pharmacists prescribe drugs cautiously with only suitable food supplement to get maximum benefit for the patient. PMID:22043389

  7. Herb-drug, food-drug, nutrient-drug, and drug-drug interactions: mechanisms involved and their medical implications.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Janina Maria

    2002-06-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and iatrogenic diseases have been identified as significant factors responsible for patient morbidity and mortality. Significant studies on drug metabolism in humans have been published during the last few years, offering a deeper comprehension of the mechanisms underlying adverse drug reactions and interactions. More understanding of these mechanisms, and of recent advances in laboratory technology, can help to evaluate potential drug interactions when drugs are prescribed concurrently. Increasing knowledge of interindividual variation in drug breakdown capacity and recent findings concerning the influence of environment, diet, nutrients, and herbal products can be used to reduce ADRs and iatrogenic diseases. Reviewed data suggest that drug treatment should be increasingly custom tailored to suit the individual patient and that appropriately co-prescribed diet and herbal remedies, could increase drug efficacy and lessen drug toxicity. This review focuses mainly on recently published research material. The cytochrome p450 enzymes, their role in metabolism, and their mechanisms of action are reviewed, and their role in drug-drug interactions are discussed. Drug-food and drug-herb interactions have garnered attention. Interdisciplinary communication among medical herbalists, medical doctors, and dietetic experts needs to be improved and encouraged. Internet resources for obtaining current information regarding drug-drug, drug-herb, and drug-nutrient interactions are provided. PMID:12165187

  8. Do drug offences matter?

    PubMed

    Gordon, A M

    1978-07-15

    Drug offences in addicts are often thought to indicate little more than continued dependency. In a four-year follow-up study of 60 men attending a drug clinic a history of repeated convictions for drug offences was found to be strongly related to patterns of delinquency. The following variables were associated with a history of repeated drug offences: a higher conviction rate for "non-drug" offences; younger age at first conviction; conviction preceding drug use; convictions for offences of sex and violence; longer prison sentences; and regular narcotic use and continued dependency at follow-up. Receiving a clinic prescription was not associated with a lower incidence of drug offences. Repeated drug offences identified a subgroup of drug users who were characterised by extensive sociopathic behaviour. Such offences should not be dismissed as an unavoidable, unimportant part of addiction. PMID:678840

  9. Drugs and drug administration in extreme environments.

    PubMed

    Küpper, Thomas E A H; Schraut, Bettina; Rieke, Burkhard; Hemmerling, Arnica-Verena; Schöffl, Volker; Steffgen, Juergen

    2006-01-01

    Emergency medicine must often cope with harsh climates far below freezing point or high temperatures, and sometimes, an alternative to the normal route of drug administration is necessary. Most of this information is not yet published. Therefore, we summarized the information about these topics for most drugs used in medical emergencies by combining literature research with extensive personal communications with the heads of the drug safety departments of the companies producing these drugs. Most drugs can be used after temperature stress of limited duration. Nevertheless, we recommend replacing them at least once per year or after extreme heat. Knowledge about drugs used in extreme environments will be of increasing importance for medical personnel because in an increasingly mobile society, more and more people, and especially elderly -often with individual medical risks-travel to extreme regions such as tropical or arctic regions or to high altitude, and some of them need medical care during these activities. Because of this increasing need to use drugs in harsh climates (tourism, expeditions, peace corps, military, etc) the actual International Congress of Harmonization recommendations should be added with stability tests at +50 degrees C, freezing and oscillating temperatures, and UV exposure to simulate the storage of the drugs at "outdoor conditions." PMID:16412107

  10. Discontinued drugs in 2010: cardiovascular drugs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong-ping; Zhang, Xu-song; Xiang, Bing-ren

    2011-10-01

    This perspective is a paper discussing drugs dropped from clinical development in the previous years. Specifically, this paper focuses on 16 cardiovascular drugs discontinued in 2010 after reaching Phase I - III clinical trials. Information for this perspective is mainly derived from a search of Pharmaprojects. PMID:21870899

  11. Adverse drug reactions in veterinary patients associated with drug transporters.

    PubMed

    Mealey, Katrina L

    2013-09-01

    For many drugs used in veterinary practice, plasma and tissue concentrations are highly dependent on the activity of drug transporters. This article describes how functional changes in drug transporters, whether mediated by genetic variability or drug-drug interactions, affect drug disposition and, ultimately, drug safety and efficacy in veterinary patients. A greater understanding of species, breed, and individual (genetic) differences in drug transporter function, as well as drug-drug interactions involving drug transporters, will result in improved strategies for drug design and will enable veterinarians to incorporate individualized medicine in their practices.

  12. Adverse drug reactions in veterinary patients associated with drug transporters.

    PubMed

    Mealey, Katrina L

    2013-09-01

    For many drugs used in veterinary practice, plasma and tissue concentrations are highly dependent on the activity of drug transporters. This article describes how functional changes in drug transporters, whether mediated by genetic variability or drug-drug interactions, affect drug disposition and, ultimately, drug safety and efficacy in veterinary patients. A greater understanding of species, breed, and individual (genetic) differences in drug transporter function, as well as drug-drug interactions involving drug transporters, will result in improved strategies for drug design and will enable veterinarians to incorporate individualized medicine in their practices. PMID:23890239

  13. Students and Drug Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todays Educ, 1969

    1969-01-01

    Introduction to "Students and Drug Abuse, prepared by the Public Information Branch and Center for Studies of Narcotic and Drug Abuse, National Institute of Mental Health, in cooperation with the staff of Today's Education.

  14. Antidiarrheal drug overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... class of drugs that includes morphine and other narcotics. Use of prescription opioids for nonmedical reasons is ... tracing) Intravenous fluids (given through a vein) Laxative Narcotic-counteracting drug (antagonist), approximately every 30 minutes Tube ...

  15. What Are Narcotic Drugs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todays Educ, 1969

    1969-01-01

    Part of "Students and Drug Abuse, prepared by the Public Information Branch and Center for Studies of Narcotic and Drug Abuse, National Institute of Mental Health, in cooperation with the staff of Today's Education.

  16. The Drug Education Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, John C., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Examines the problems of alcoholism, smoking and drug addiction and their influence on students. Suggests that intermediate and secondary schools can assist in alcohol and tobacco (the two legal drugs) programs through improved educational methods. (Author/RK)

  17. Therapeutic drug levels

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003430.htm Therapeutic drug levels To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Therapeutic drug levels are lab tests to look for the presence ...

  18. Alcoholism, Alcohol, and Drugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Emanuel; Lieber, Charles S.

    1971-01-01

    Describes research on synergistic effects of alcohol and other drugs, particularly barbiturates. Proposes biochemical mechanisms to explain alcoholics' tolerance of other drugs when sober, and increased sensitivity when drunk. (AL)

  19. Drug discovery in academia.

    PubMed

    Shamas-Din, Aisha; Schimmer, Aaron D

    2015-08-01

    Participation of academic centers in aspects of drug discovery and development beyond target identification and clinical trials is rapidly increasing. Yet many academic drug discovery projects continue to stall at the level of chemical probes, and they infrequently progress to drugs suitable for clinical trials. This gap poses a major hurdle for academic groups engaged in drug discovery. A number of approaches have been pursued to overcome this gap, including stopping at the production of high-quality chemical probes, establishing the resources in-house to advance select projects toward clinical trials, partnering with not-for-profit groups to bring the necessary resources and expertise to develop probes into drugs, and drug repurposing, whereby known drugs are advanced into clinical trials for new indications. In this review, we consider the role of academia in anticancer drug discovery and development, as well as the strategies used by academic groups to overcome barriers in this process.

  20. Animal Drug Safety FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... the top How do you determine if a veterinary drug is safe to market? As mandated by the ... to the top How does CVM remove unsafe veterinary drugs from the market? See Withdrawal of New Animal ...

  1. Drug Interaction and Pharmacist

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, JA

    2010-01-01

    The topic of drug–drug interactions has received a great deal of recent attention from the regulatory, scientific, and health care communities worldwide. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics and, in particular, rifampin are common precipitant drugs prescribed in primary care practice. Drugs with a narrow therapeutic range or low therapeutic index are more likely to be the objects for serious drug interactions. Object drugs in common use include warfarin, fluoroquinolones, antiepileptic drugs, oral contraceptives, cisapride, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors. The pharmacist, along with the prescriber has a duty to ensure that patients are aware of the risk of side effects and a suitable course of action should they occur. With their detailed knowledge of medicine, pharmacists have the ability to relate unexpected symptoms experienced by patients to possible adverse effects of their drug therapy. PMID:21042495

  2. Prescription Drug Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... what the doctor prescribed, it is called prescription drug abuse. It could be Taking a medicine that ... purpose, such as getting high Abusing some prescription drugs can lead to addiction. These include narcotic painkillers, ...

  3. Treating Prescription Drug Addiction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trends and Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Prescription ... View all ​Research Reports Opioids: The Prescription Drug & Heroin Overdose Epidemic (HHS website) NIDA Home Site Map ...

  4. Black Youths and Illegal Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, Janice; Pearson, Patricia G.

    2002-01-01

    Examines the effect of drugs on black youths, discussing different types of drug involvement, reasons for drug involvement, extent and nature of involvement, drugs and crime, drugs and health issues, drug control strategies, and prevention. Policy implications include prioritizing drug prevention among black youths, providing alternatives to drug…

  5. Contemporary drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Giannini, A J; Price, W A; Giannini, M C

    1986-03-01

    The physician needs to know the signs, symptoms and recommended treatments of drug overdoses. Overdose of hallucinogens usually does not require drug therapy. Overdose of amphetamines ("uppers") may be complicated by the presence of PCP, a dissociative substance. It is important for the physician to be familiar with the street terminology for contemporary drugs of abuse and to be aware of how users obtain these drugs.

  6. Polypharmacology in a single drug: multitarget drugs.

    PubMed

    Bolognesi, M L

    2013-01-01

    Polypharmacology offers a model for the way drug discovery must evolve to develop therapies most suited to treating currently incurable diseases. It is driven by a worldwide demand for safer, more effective, and affordable medicines against the most complex diseases, and by the failures of modern drug discovery to provide these. Polypharmacology can involve combinations and/or multitarget drugs (MTD). Although not mutually exclusive, my premise is that MTDs have inherent advantages over combinations. This review article focuses on MTDs from a medicinal chemistry perspective. I will explore their use in current clinical practice, their likely application in the future, and the challenges to be overcome to achieve this goal.

  7. Drug Enforcement Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Justice, Washington, DC.

    This fact sheet contains information relating to drug abuse and abusers; drug traffic legislation; law enforcement; and descriptions of commonly used narcotics, stimulants, depressants, and hallucinogens. Also included is a short but explicit listing of audiovisual aids, an annotated bibliography, and drug identification pictures. The booklet…

  8. Educating against Drug Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    This book is a compilation of drug education and drug abuse prevention materials collected by United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) along with example of activities carried out by various countries. It opens with four introductory papers by separate authors: (1) "Prevention of Drug Dependence: A Utopian Dream?"…

  9. Other Drugs of Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... can make you pass out. It's called a "date rape" drug because someone can secretly put it in your ... you without your permission. Rohypnol (roofies) is a date rape pill and can ... about these drugs . Bath Salts are drugs made with chemicals like ...

  10. Strategies against Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metzler, Birgit

    1996-01-01

    The main private organization in Germany dedicated to combatting drug addition--the DHS and the Federal Health Information Agency (BzGA) jointly estimate the number of persons addicted to "illegal" drugs in Germany at around 200,000. Yet, people may grow up immune to drug addiction if they acquire a stable basis for self-confidence and…

  11. Keeping Youth Drug Free.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Center for Substance Abuse Prevention.

    This guide is designed to help caregivers prevent children from getting involved in drugs. It details six key prevention principles, including actions caregivers can take that can help their child make healthy choices. Each section includes language to use with children, activities to do, information about drugs, statistics about youth drug use,…

  12. Drugs and the Coach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Kenneth S., Ed.

    This volume is based on the premise that professional preparation for coaching should include viable experiences in drug education, with particular reference to coping with drug-related problems. The first section provides general information on the purposes and effects of drugs, controls, and concepts of doping. The second section deals with four…

  13. Drugs of Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, Donald E., Ed.

    This Drug Enforcement Administration publication delivers clear, scientific information about drugs in a factual, straightforward way, combined with precise photographs shot to scale. The publication is intended to serve as an A to Z guide for drug history, effects, and identification information. Chapters are included on the Controlled Substances…

  14. Drug companies, UNAIDS make drugs available.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    The United Nations AIDS (UNAIDS) initiative is working with several drug companies and four countries on a pilot program to build a health infrastructure that provides affordable drugs to insure that combination therapies are used appropriately. The countries involved in the program are Uganda, Chile, Vietnam and Cote d'Ivoire, and the drug companies are Glaxo Wellcome, Hoffmann-La Roche, and Virco NV. Each country agreed to form national HIV/AIDS drug advisory boards, and non-profit companies will act as clearinghouses. Financing will come from the pharmaceutical companies, local health ministries, and a $1 million grant from UNAIDS. The program will be evaluated in terms of improvements to overall health care delivery, number of people treated, the impact on emergency care, and the rate of illness and death.

  15. Drug Rash (Unclassified Drug Eruption) in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... microscope by a specially trained physician (dermatopathologist). In addition, your doctor may want to perform blood work to look for signs of an allergic reaction. The best treatment for a drug rash is ...

  16. Drug abuse and addiction.

    PubMed

    Nessa, A; Latif, S A; Siddiqui, N I; Hussain, M A; Hossain, M A

    2008-07-01

    Among the social and medical ills of the twentieth century, substance abuse ranks as on one of the most devastating and costly. The drug problem today is a major global concern including Bangladesh. Almost all addictive drugs over stimulate the reward system of the brain, flooding it with the neurotransmitter dopamine. That produces euphoria and that heightened pleasure can be so compelling that the brain wants that feeling back again and again. However repetitive exposure induces widespread adaptive changes in the brain. As a consequence drug use may become compulsive. An estimated 4.7% of the global population aged 15 to 64 or 184 million people, consume illicit drug annually. Heroin use alone is responsible for the epidemic number of new cases of HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis and drug addicted infant born each year. Department of narcotic control (DNC) in Bangladesh reported in June 2008 that about 5 million drug addicts in the country & addicts spend at least 17 (Seventeen) billion on drugs per year. Among these drug addicts, 91% are young and adolescents population. Heroin is the most widely abused drugs in Bangladesh. For geographical reason like India, Pakistan and Myanmar; Bangladesh is also an important transit root for internationally trafficking of illicit drug. Drug abuse is responsible for decreased job productivity and attendance increased health care costs, and escalations of domestic violence and violent crimes. Drug addiction is a preventable disease. Through scientific advances we now know much more about how exactly drugs work in the brain, and we also know that drug addiction can be successfully treated to help people stop abusing drugs and resume their productive lives. Most countries have legislation designed to criminalize some drugs. To decrease the prevalence of this problem in our setting; increase awareness, promoting additional research on abused and addictive drugs, and exact implementation of existing laws are strongly recommended. We should

  17. Drug discovery in jeopardy

    PubMed Central

    Cuatrecasas, Pedro

    2006-01-01

    Despite striking advances in the biomedical sciences, the flow of new drugs has slowed to a trickle, impairing therapeutic advances as well as the commercial success of drug companies. Reduced productivity in the drug industry is caused mainly by corporate policies that discourage innovation. This is compounded by various consequences of mega-mergers, the obsession for blockbuster drugs, the shift of control of research from scientists to marketers, the need for fast sales growth, and the discontinuation of development compounds for nontechnical reasons. Lessons from the past indicate that these problems can be overcome, and herein, new and improved directions for drug discovery are suggested. PMID:17080187

  18. Drug Facts Chat Day: NIH Experts Answer Students' Drug Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Drug Facts Chat Day: NIH Experts Answer Students' Drug Questions Past Issues / ... Drug Abuse during their first Drug Facts Chat Day. Photo courtesy of NIDA The questions poured in… ...

  19. Drug Interactions and Antiretroviral Drug Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Foy, Matthew; Sperati, C. John; Lucas, Gregory M.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the improved longevity afforded by combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), HIV-infected individuals are developing several non-AIDS related comorbid conditions. Consequently, medical management of the HIV-infected population is increasingly complex, with a growing list of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs). This article reviews some of the most relevant and emerging potential interactions between antiretroviral medications and other agents. The most common DDIs are those involving protease inhibitors or non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors which alter the cytochrome P450 enzyme system and/or drug transporters such as p-glycoprotein. Of note are the new agents for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection. These new classes of drugs and others drugs which are increasingly used in this patient population represent a significant challenge with regard to achieving the goals of effective HIV suppression and minimization of drug-related toxicities. Awareness of DDIs and a multidisciplinary approach are imperative in reaching these goals. PMID:24950731

  20. Drugs Approved for Wilms Tumor

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Wilms tumor and other childhood kidney cancers. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  1. Drugs Approved for Kaposi Sarcoma

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Kaposi sarcoma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  2. Drugs Approved for Malignant Mesothelioma

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for malignant mesothelioma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  3. How to Read Drug Labels

    MedlinePlus

    ... and alternative medicine Healthy Aging How to read drug labels Printer-friendly version How to Read Drug ... read drug labels How to read a prescription drug label View a text version of this picture. ...

  4. COPD - quick-relief drugs

    MedlinePlus

    COPD - quick-relief drugs; Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - control drugs; Chronic obstructive airways disease - quick-relief drugs; Chronic obstructive lung disease - quick-relief drugs; Chronic bronchitis - quick-relief ...

  5. Drugs Approved for Skin Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for skin cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  6. Drugs Approved for Vaginal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to prevent vaginal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  7. DEA Multimedia Drug Library: Marijuana

    MedlinePlus

    ... OPERATIONS Diversion Control Programs Most Wanted Fugitives Training Intelligence Submit a Tip DRUG INFO Drug Fact Sheets ... Operations Diversion Control Programs Most Wanted Fugitives Training Intelligence Submit a Tip Drug Info Drug Fact Sheets ...

  8. Drugs Approved for Penile Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for penile cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  9. Drugs Approved for Vulvar Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for vulvar cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  10. Drugs Approved for Liver Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for liver cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  11. Drugs Approved for Bone Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for bone cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  12. Drugs Approved for Esophageal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for esophageal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  13. Drugs Approved for Endometrial Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for endometrial cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  14. Drug-induced hyperkalemia.

    PubMed

    Ben Salem, Chaker; Badreddine, Atef; Fathallah, Neila; Slim, Raoudha; Hmouda, Houssem

    2014-09-01

    Hyperkalemia is a common clinical condition that can be defined as a serum potassium concentration exceeding 5.0 mmol/L. Drug-induced hyperkalemia is the most important cause of increased potassium levels in everyday clinical practice. Drug-induced hyperkalemia may be asymptomatic. However, it may be dramatic and life threatening, posing diagnostic and management problems. A wide range of drugs can cause hyperkalemia by a variety of mechanisms. Drugs can interfere with potassium homoeostasis either by promoting transcellular potassium shift or by impairing renal potassium excretion. Drugs may also increase potassium supply. The reduction in renal potassium excretion due to inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system represents the most important mechanism by which drugs are known to cause hyperkalemia. Medications that alter transmembrane potassium movement include amino acids, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, suxamethonium, and mannitol. Drugs that impair renal potassium excretion are mainly represented by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-II receptor blockers, direct renin inhibitors, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, calcineurin inhibitors, heparin and derivatives, aldosterone antagonists, potassium-sparing diuretics, trimethoprim, and pentamidine. Potassium-containing agents represent another group of medications causing hyperkalemia. Increased awareness of drugs that can induce hyperkalemia, and monitoring and prevention are key elements for reducing the number of hospital admissions, morbidity, and mortality related to drug-induced hyperkalemia.

  15. Drug abuse and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Smith, C G; Asch, R H

    1987-09-01

    It is clear that a number of CNS agents, including drugs of abuse, can inhibit reproductive function. Figure 1 shows the chemical diversity of some of the drug groups that affect reproductive hormones. Their structural dissimilarity to the steroid hormones is also readily apparent in the figure. These chemically diverse drugs share an important pharmacologic property: they are highly potent neuroactive drugs, and they can disrupt hypothalamic-pituitary function. Although it is frequently difficult to distinguish between direct drug actions on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis and subsequent effects on gonadal hormones and sex accessory gland function, the distinction is an important one. Most neuroactive drugs produce only transient effects on the central nervous pathways necessary for normal gonadotropin secretion. The disruptive effects of these drugs are likely to be transient and completely reversible, and tolerance to the inhibitory drug effects may occur even with continued drug use. Under these circumstances, normal adults may experience only subtle changes in sexual function. However, individuals with compromised reproductive function may exhibit major problems. It is also likely that adolescents may be at substantial risk for reproductive damage from these neuroactive drugs since the endocrine events associated with puberty are dependent on the normal development of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis.

  16. Ocular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Gaudana, Ripal; Ananthula, Hari Krishna; Parenky, Ashwin; Mitra, Ashim K

    2010-09-01

    Ocular drug delivery has been a major challenge to pharmacologists and drug delivery scientists due to its unique anatomy and physiology. Static barriers (different layers of cornea, sclera, and retina including blood aqueous and blood-retinal barriers), dynamic barriers (choroidal and conjunctival blood flow, lymphatic clearance, and tear dilution), and efflux pumps in conjunction pose a significant challenge for delivery of a drug alone or in a dosage form, especially to the posterior segment. Identification of influx transporters on various ocular tissues and designing a transporter-targeted delivery of a parent drug has gathered momentum in recent years. Parallelly, colloidal dosage forms such as nanoparticles, nanomicelles, liposomes, and microemulsions have been widely explored to overcome various static and dynamic barriers. Novel drug delivery strategies such as bioadhesive gels and fibrin sealant-based approaches were developed to sustain drug levels at the target site. Designing noninvasive sustained drug delivery systems and exploring the feasibility of topical application to deliver drugs to the posterior segment may drastically improve drug delivery in the years to come. Current developments in the field of ophthalmic drug delivery promise a significant improvement in overcoming the challenges posed by various anterior and posterior segment diseases. PMID:20437123

  17. Ocular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Gaudana, Ripal; Ananthula, Hari Krishna; Parenky, Ashwin; Mitra, Ashim K

    2010-09-01

    Ocular drug delivery has been a major challenge to pharmacologists and drug delivery scientists due to its unique anatomy and physiology. Static barriers (different layers of cornea, sclera, and retina including blood aqueous and blood-retinal barriers), dynamic barriers (choroidal and conjunctival blood flow, lymphatic clearance, and tear dilution), and efflux pumps in conjunction pose a significant challenge for delivery of a drug alone or in a dosage form, especially to the posterior segment. Identification of influx transporters on various ocular tissues and designing a transporter-targeted delivery of a parent drug has gathered momentum in recent years. Parallelly, colloidal dosage forms such as nanoparticles, nanomicelles, liposomes, and microemulsions have been widely explored to overcome various static and dynamic barriers. Novel drug delivery strategies such as bioadhesive gels and fibrin sealant-based approaches were developed to sustain drug levels at the target site. Designing noninvasive sustained drug delivery systems and exploring the feasibility of topical application to deliver drugs to the posterior segment may drastically improve drug delivery in the years to come. Current developments in the field of ophthalmic drug delivery promise a significant improvement in overcoming the challenges posed by various anterior and posterior segment diseases.

  18. Opioid pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Overholser, Brian R; Foster, David R

    2011-09-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions (DDIs) involving opioid analgesics can be problematic. Opioids are widely used, have a narrow therapeutic index, and can be associated with severe toxicity. The purpose of this review is to describe pharmacokinetic DDIs associated with opioids frequently encountered in managed care settings (morphine, codeine, oxycodone, oxymorphone, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, fentanyl, tramadol, and methadone). An introduction to the pharmacokinetic basis of DDIs is provided, and potential DDIs associated with opioids are reviewed. Opioids metabolized by the drug metabolizing enzymes of the cytochrome P450 (CYP450) system (codeine, oxycodone, hydrocodone, fentanyl, tramadol, and methadone) are associated with numerous DDIs that can result in either a reduction in opioid effect or excess opioid effects. Conversely, opioids that are not metabolized by that system (morphine, oxymorphone, and hydromorphone) tend to be involved in fewer CYP450-associated pharmacokinetic DDIs.

  19. Informatics confronts drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Percha, Bethany; Altman, Russ B

    2013-03-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are an emerging threat to public health. Recent estimates indicate that DDIs cause nearly 74000 emergency room visits and 195000 hospitalizations each year in the USA. Current approaches to DDI discovery, which include Phase IV clinical trials and post-marketing surveillance, are insufficient for detecting many DDIs and do not alert the public to potentially dangerous DDIs before a drug enters the market. Recent work has applied state-of-the-art computational and statistical methods to the problem of DDIs. Here we review recent developments that encompass a range of informatics approaches in this domain, from the construction of databases for efficient searching of known DDIs to the prediction of novel DDIs based on data from electronic medical records, adverse event reports, scientific abstracts, and other sources. We also explore why DDIs are so difficult to detect and what the future holds for informatics-based approaches to DDI discovery. PMID:23414686

  20. Discontinued drugs in 2012: cardiovascular drugs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong-Ping; Jiang, Hong-Min; Xiang, Bing-Ren

    2013-11-01

    The continued high rate of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality has attracted wide concern and great attention of pharmaceutical industry. In order to reduce the attrition of cardiovascular drug R&D, it might be helpful recapitulating previous failures and identifying the potential factors to success. This perspective mainly analyses the 30 cardiovascular drugs dropped from clinical development in 2012. Reasons causing the termination of the cardiovascular drugs in the past 5 years are also tabulated and analysed. The analysis shows that the attrition is highest in Phase II trials and financial and strategic factors and lack of clinical efficacy are the principal reasons for these disappointments. To solve the four problems (The 'better than the Beatles' problem, the 'cautious regulator' problem, the 'throw money at it' tendency and the 'basic researchbrute force' bias) is recommended as the main measure to increase the number and quality of approvable products. PMID:23992034

  1. New Antithrombotic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Eikelboom, John W.; Samama, Meyer Michel

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on new antithrombotic drugs that are in or are entering phase 3 clinical testing. Development of these new agents was prompted by the limitations of existing antiplatelet, anticoagulant, or fibrinolytic drugs. Addressing these unmet needs, this article (1) outlines the rationale for development of new antithrombotic agents; (2) describes the new antiplatelet, anticoagulant, and fibrinolytic drugs; and (3) provides clinical perspectives on the opportunities and challenges faced by these novel agents. PMID:22315258

  2. [Safety nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs].

    PubMed

    Oscanoa-Espinoza, Teodoro Julio

    2015-01-01

    The choice of a specific medication belonging to a drug class is under the criteria of efficacy, safety, cost and suitability. NSAIDs currently constitute one of the most consumed drug in the world, so it is very important review of the safety aspects of this drug class. This review has the objective of analyze the safety of NSAIDs on 3 main criteria: gastrolesivity, cardiotoxicity and nephrotoxicity.

  3. Grapefruit and drug interactions.

    PubMed

    2012-12-01

    Since the late 1980s, grapefruit juice has been known to affect the metabolism of certain drugs. Several serious adverse effects involving drug interactions with grapefruit juice have been published in detail. The components of grapefruit juice vary considerably depending on the variety, maturity and origin of the fruit, local climatic conditions, and the manufacturing process. No single component accounts for all observed interactions. Other grapefruit products are also occasionally implicated, including preserves, lyophylised grapefruit juice, powdered whole grapefruit, grapefruit seed extract, and zest. Clinical reports of drug interactions with grapefruit juice are supported by pharmacokinetic studies, each usually involving about 10 healthy volunteers, in which the probable clinical consequences were extrapolated from the observed plasma concentrations. Grapefruit juice inhibits CYP3A4, the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme most often involved in drug metabolism. This increases plasma concentrations of the drugs concerned, creating a risk of overdose and dose-dependent adverse effects. Grapefruit juice also inhibits several other cytochrome P450 isoenzymes, but they are less frequently implicated in interactions with clinical consequences. Drugs interacting with grapefruit and inducing serious clinical consequences (confirmed or very probable) include: immunosuppressants, some statins, benzodiazepines, most calcium channel blockers, indinavir and carbamazepine. There are large inter-individual differences in enzyme efficiency. Along with the variable composition of grapefruit juice, this makes it difficult to predict the magnitude and clinical consequences of drug interactions with grapefruit juice in a given patient. There is increasing evidence that transporter proteins such as organic anion transporters and P-glycoprotein are involved in interactions between drugs and grapefruit juice. In practice, numerous drugs interact with grapefruit juice. Although only a few

  4. Grapefruit and drug interactions.

    PubMed

    2012-12-01

    Since the late 1980s, grapefruit juice has been known to affect the metabolism of certain drugs. Several serious adverse effects involving drug interactions with grapefruit juice have been published in detail. The components of grapefruit juice vary considerably depending on the variety, maturity and origin of the fruit, local climatic conditions, and the manufacturing process. No single component accounts for all observed interactions. Other grapefruit products are also occasionally implicated, including preserves, lyophylised grapefruit juice, powdered whole grapefruit, grapefruit seed extract, and zest. Clinical reports of drug interactions with grapefruit juice are supported by pharmacokinetic studies, each usually involving about 10 healthy volunteers, in which the probable clinical consequences were extrapolated from the observed plasma concentrations. Grapefruit juice inhibits CYP3A4, the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme most often involved in drug metabolism. This increases plasma concentrations of the drugs concerned, creating a risk of overdose and dose-dependent adverse effects. Grapefruit juice also inhibits several other cytochrome P450 isoenzymes, but they are less frequently implicated in interactions with clinical consequences. Drugs interacting with grapefruit and inducing serious clinical consequences (confirmed or very probable) include: immunosuppressants, some statins, benzodiazepines, most calcium channel blockers, indinavir and carbamazepine. There are large inter-individual differences in enzyme efficiency. Along with the variable composition of grapefruit juice, this makes it difficult to predict the magnitude and clinical consequences of drug interactions with grapefruit juice in a given patient. There is increasing evidence that transporter proteins such as organic anion transporters and P-glycoprotein are involved in interactions between drugs and grapefruit juice. In practice, numerous drugs interact with grapefruit juice. Although only a few

  5. Vaccines for Drug Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiaoyun; Orson, Frank M.; Kosten, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    Current medications for drug abuse have had only limited success. Anti-addiction vaccines to elicit antibodies that block the pharmacological effects of drugs have great potential for treating drug abuse. We review the status for two vaccines that are undergoing clinical trials (cocaine and nicotine) and two that are still in pre-clinical development (methamphetamine and heroin). We also outline the challenges and ethical concerns for anti-addiction vaccine development and their use as future therapeutics. PMID:22130115

  6. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance Antibiotic-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE) Multidrug-Resistant Neisseria ...

  7. Newer drugs for arthritis.

    PubMed

    McGillivray, D C

    1977-01-01

    The major area of new drug discoveries for the treatment of arthritis is in non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIA). Unfortunately, as yet no new and safe drug of major significance has appeared. Aspirin still ranks high beside the newcomers. Indomethacin, ibuprofen, naproxen, fenoprofen and tolmetin are described and their roles in therapy are discussed. A further group of older drugs receiving new application in the treatment of arthritis is presented. These include penicillamine and the immunosuppressive drugs. Gold and chloroquin are also discussed to put these agents in their proper perspective.

  8. [The importance of therapeutic drug monitoring for psychotropic drugs].

    PubMed

    Messer, Thomas; Schmauss, Max

    2006-05-15

    The goal of therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is the optimization of the psychiatric pharmacotherapy. Above all, TDM is absolutely indicated for the prevention of adverse drug effects or poisoning. TDM is well-established for therapies with antidepressants, antipsychotic drugs and mood stabilizers. For anti-dementia drugs, anxiolytic drugs, hypnotic drugs and medications for treating addiction, monitoring is currently applied to the interpretation of side effects, drug interactions and to forensic questions. PMID:20104722

  9. Recommunalizing Drug Offenders: The "Drug Peace" Agenda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arrigo, Bruce A.

    1997-01-01

    Examines the manner in which substance-using shelter tenants, many of them ex-offenders, who lived in an urban, single- room-occupancy neighborhood, engaged in the process of recommunalization. Identifies and describes eight developmental stages of recommunalization, and links recommunalization to proposals for solving the war on drugs. (RJM)

  10. Drugs and Drug Abuse: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook.

    For a relatively new field of research and interest, the bibliographic control of drug literature (indexing and recording for retrieval) is remarkable. Public and private agencies have taken the initiative in compiling catalogs, bibliographies and indexes which, although often duplicatory, nonetheless ensure access to the many aspects of the drug…

  11. Nanosize drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Biswajit

    2013-01-01

    Nanosize materials provide hopes, speculations and chances for an unprecedented change in drug delivery in near future. Nanotechnology is an emerging field to produce nanomaterials for drug delivery that can offer a new tool, opportunities and scope to provide more focused and fine-tuned treatment of diseases at a molecular level, enhancing the therapeutic potential of drugs so that they become less toxic and more effective. Nanodimensional drug delivery systems are of great scientific interest as they project their tremendous utility because of their capability of altering biodistribution of therapeutic agents so that they can concentrate more in the target tissues. Nanosize drug delivery systems generally focus on formulating bioactive molecules in biocompatible nanosystems such as nanocrystals, solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructure lipid carriers, lipid drug conjugates, nanoliposomes, dendrimers, nanoshells, emulsions, nanotubes, quantum dots etc. Extensively versatile molecules like synthetic chemicals to naturally occurring complex macromolecules such as nucleic acids and proteins could be dispensed in such formulations maintaining their stability and efficacy. Empty viral capsids are being tried to deliver drug as these uniformly sized bionanomaterials can be utilized to load drug to improve solubility, reduce toxicity and provide site specific targeting. Nanomedicines offer a wide scope for delivery of smart materials from tissue engineering to more recently artificial RBCs. Nanocomposites are the future hope for tailored and personalized medicines as well as for bone repairing and rectification of cartilage impairment. Nanosize drug delivery systems are addressing the challenges to overcome the delivery problems of wide ranges of drugs through their narrow submicron particle size range, easily manipulatable surface characteristics in achievement of versatile tissue targeting (includes active and passive drug targeting), controlled and sustained drug

  12. The Drug War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCrosta, Anthony

    1989-01-01

    The role of teachers in helping fight against drug abuse is discussed stressing the teacher's ability to see changes in the students and the potential for positive influence. A vital school role involves teaching life skills and wellness principles. Information on commonly abused drugs and their effects is presented. (SM)

  13. Drug and Substance Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Latest Research Getting More Help Related Topics Anxiety COPD Delirium Depression Pain Management Prevention Related News Older Adults Who Drink Alcohol at Risk for Drug Interactions Monday, November 23, 2015 Join our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Drug and Substance Abuse ...

  14. Dimensions of Drug Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Mark E.

    2011-01-01

    The high number, heterogeneity, and inadequate integration of drug information resources constitute barriers to many drug information usage scenarios. In the biomedical domain there is a rich legacy of knowledge representation in ontology-like structures that allows us to connect this problem both to the very mature field of library and…

  15. Drug effects on spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Amory, John K

    2007-10-01

    Many drugs can adversely affect spermatogenesis. These effects can occur either by directly inhibiting sperm or testicular function or indirectly by impairing the hypothalamic pituitary testicular axis. In this paper, we will review the drugs that are known to adversely impact spermatogenesis, and/or sperm function and detail what is known about the mechanisms through which these compounds impair fertility in men.

  16. Drugs and Personal Values.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blum, Richard H.

    Drug use and abuse have two major motivations: the medical or curative, and the religious or supplementary. The author discusses the expanding use of drugs for both purposes, suggesting a possible connection between increased medical use and confidence, and increased religious or pleasure use. He outlines many problems of definition and public…

  17. Enhancing Drug Court Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deschenes, Elizabeth Piper; Ireland, Connie; Kleinpeter, Christine B.

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluates the impact of enhanced drug court services in a large county in Southern California. These enhanced services, including specialty counseling groups, educational/employment resources, and increased Residential Treatment (RT) beds, were designed to increase program retention and successful completion (graduation) of drug court.…

  18. Automated drug identification system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campen, C. F., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    System speeds up analysis of blood and urine and is capable of identifying 100 commonly abused drugs. System includes computer that controls entire analytical process by ordering various steps in specific sequences. Computer processes data output and has readout of identified drugs.

  19. Drug Testing. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2007-01-01

    In 2002, the United States Supreme Court confirmed that in the school's role of in loco parentis, drug testing of students who were involved in athletics and extracurricular activities was constitutional. In a state of the union address, George W. Bush stated that drug testing in schools had been effective and was part of "our aggressive…

  20. Drugs, Alcohol & Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dye, Christina

    Expectant parents are introduced to the effects of a variety of drugs on the unborn baby. Material is divided into seven sections. Section 1 deals with the most frequently used recreational drugs, including alcohol, marijuana, narcotics, depressants, stimulants, inhalants, and hallucinogens. Sections 2 and 3 focus on the effects of prescription…

  1. Alternative drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Sutter, M E; Chenoweth, J; Albertson, T E

    2014-02-01

    The incidence of drug abuse with alternative agents is increasing. The term "alternative drugs of abuse" is a catch-all term for abused chemicals that do not fit into one of the classic categories of drugs of abuse. The most common age group abusing these agents range from 17 to 25 years old and are often associated with group settings. Due to their diverse pharmacological nature, legislative efforts to classify these chemicals as a schedule I drug have lagged behind the development of new alternative agents. The potential reason for abuse of these agents is their hallucinogenic, dissociative, stimulant, anti-muscarinic, or sedative properties. Some of these drugs are easily obtainable such as Datura stramonium (Jimson Weed) or Lophophora williamsii (Peyote) because they are natural plants indigenous to certain regions. The diverse pharmacology and clinical effects of these agents are so broad that they do not produce a universal constellation of signs and symptoms. Detailed physical exams are essential for identifying clues leading one to suspect an alternative drug of abuse. Testing for the presence of these agents is often limited, and even when available, the results do not return in a timely fashion. Intoxications from these agents pose unique challenges for health care providers. Physician knowledge of the physiological effects of these alternative agents and the local patterns of drug of abuse are important for the accurate diagnosis and optimal care of poisoned patients. This review summarizes the current knowledge of alternative drugs of abuse and highlights their clinical presentations. PMID:23636733

  2. Interoception and Drug Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Paulus, Martin P.; Stewart, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    The role of interoception and its neural basis with relevance to drug addiction is reviewed. Interoception consists of the receiving, processing, and integrating body-relevant signals with external stimuli to affect ongoing motivated behavior. The insular cortex is the central nervous system hub to process and integrate these signals. Interoception is an important component of several addiction relevant constructs including arousal, attention, stress, reward, and conditioning. Imaging studies with drug-addicted individuals show that the insular cortex is hypo-active during cognitive control processes but hyperactive during cue reactivity and drug-specific, reward-related processes. It is proposed that interoception contributes to drug addiction by incorporating an “embodied” experience of drug uses together with the individual’s predicted versus actual internal state to modulate approach or avoidance behavior, i.e. whether to take or not to take drugs. This opens the possibility of two types of interventions. First, one may be able to modulate the embodied experience by enhancing insula reactivity where necessary, e.g. when engaging in drug seeking behavior, or attenuating insula when exposed to drug-relevant cues. Second, one may be able to reduce the urge to act by increasing the frontal control network, i.e. inhibiting the urge to use by employing cognitive training. PMID:23855999

  3. Prescription Drug Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q&A School & Jobs Drugs & Alcohol Staying Safe Recipes En Español Making a Change – Your Personal Plan Hot Topics Meningitis Choosing Your Mood Prescription Drug Abuse Healthy School Lunch Planner How Can I ...

  4. Newer antithrombotic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Sikka, Pranav; Bindra, V. K.

    2010-01-01

    Thromboembolic disorders are one of the disorders for which we are still on the look out for a safe and efficient drug. Despite the widespread use of antithrombotic drugs for the prevention and treatment of arterial and venous thrombosis, thromboembolic diseases continue to be a major cause of death and disability worldwide. This shows our inefficiency in searching efficacious and safe antithrombotic drugs. We have reached the basic mechanism of thrombus formation and by interrupting various steps of this mechanism, we can prevent as well as treat thromboembolic disorders. In continuation of Aspirin, now, we are using Clopidogrel, Ticlopidine and GpIIb/IIIa inhibitors (Abciximab, Tirofiban and Eptifibatide). Warfarin is an old antithrombotic drug which is still being used; but due to various side effects and drug interactions, we are bound to use newer drugs. Newer antiplatelet drugs include Prasugrel, Ticagrelor and Cangrelor, whereas newer thrombin inhibitors are Ximelgatran and Dabigatran. Apixaban is also a newer entry in this category as factor Xa inhibitor. Idrabiotaparinux is an indirect inhibitor of Xa as it accelerates the activity of antithrombin. Moreover, researches and trials for better and safe drugs are ongoing. PMID:21572750

  5. PRESERVATION OF DRUGS

    PubMed Central

    Rao, R. Bhima; Natarajan, R.K.; Sarma, P.S. Nataraja; Purushothaman, K.K.

    1982-01-01

    In this article the factors likely to cause spoilage of the drugs of the Indian systems of medicine are reviewed. Methods for the prevention of spoilage are discussed. The results of a limited study carried out on the stability of a few selected drug preparations representing the main dosage forms are also presented PMID:22556951

  6. Implantable Drug Dispenser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, E. R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs such as insulin are injected as needed directly into bloodstream by compact implantable dispensing unit. Two vapor cavities produce opposing forces on drug-chamber diaphragm. Heaters in cavities allow control of direction and rate of motion of bellows. Dispensing capsule fitted with coil so batteries can be recharged by induction.

  7. Single compartment drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Cima, Michael J.; Lee, Heejin; Daniel, Karen; Tanenbaum, Laura M.; Mantzavinou, Aikaterini; Spencer, Kevin C.; Ong, Qunya; Sy, Jay C.; Santini, John; Schoellhammer, Carl M.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Langer, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Drug design is built on the concept that key molecular targets of disease are isolated in the diseased tissue. Systemic drug administration would be sufficient for targeting in such a case. It is, however, common for enzymes or receptors that are integral to disease to be structurally similar or identical to those that play important biological roles in normal tissues of the body. Additionally, systemic administration may not lead to local drug concentrations high enough to yield disease modification because of rapid systemic metabolism or lack of sufficient partitioning into the diseased tissue compartment. This review focuses on drug delivery methods that physically target drugs to individual compartments of the body. Compartments such as the bladder, peritoneum, brain, eye and skin are often sites of disease and can sometimes be viewed as “privileged,” since they intrinsically hinder partitioning of systemically administered agents. These compartments have become the focus of a wide array of procedures and devices for direct administration of drugs. We discuss the rationale behind single compartment drug delivery for each of these compartments, and give an overview of examples at different development stages, from the lab bench to phase III clinical trials to clinical practice. We approach single compartment drug delivery from both a translational and a technological perspective. PMID:24798478

  8. Drug Testing. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2005-01-01

    The Vernonia School District v. Acton Supreme Court decision in 1995, forever changed the landscape of the legality of drug testing in schools. This decision stated that students who were involved in athletic programs could be drug tested as long as the student's privacy was not invaded. According to some in the medical profession, there are two…

  9. Alternative drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Sutter, M E; Chenoweth, J; Albertson, T E

    2014-02-01

    The incidence of drug abuse with alternative agents is increasing. The term "alternative drugs of abuse" is a catch-all term for abused chemicals that do not fit into one of the classic categories of drugs of abuse. The most common age group abusing these agents range from 17 to 25 years old and are often associated with group settings. Due to their diverse pharmacological nature, legislative efforts to classify these chemicals as a schedule I drug have lagged behind the development of new alternative agents. The potential reason for abuse of these agents is their hallucinogenic, dissociative, stimulant, anti-muscarinic, or sedative properties. Some of these drugs are easily obtainable such as Datura stramonium (Jimson Weed) or Lophophora williamsii (Peyote) because they are natural plants indigenous to certain regions. The diverse pharmacology and clinical effects of these agents are so broad that they do not produce a universal constellation of signs and symptoms. Detailed physical exams are essential for identifying clues leading one to suspect an alternative drug of abuse. Testing for the presence of these agents is often limited, and even when available, the results do not return in a timely fashion. Intoxications from these agents pose unique challenges for health care providers. Physician knowledge of the physiological effects of these alternative agents and the local patterns of drug of abuse are important for the accurate diagnosis and optimal care of poisoned patients. This review summarizes the current knowledge of alternative drugs of abuse and highlights their clinical presentations.

  10. Drug-induced lupus.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Robert L

    2005-04-15

    Autoantibodies and, less commonly, systemic rheumatic symptoms are associated with treatment with numerous medications and other types of ingested compounds. Distinct syndromes can be distinguished, based on clinical and laboratory features, as well as exposure history. Drug-induced lupus has been reported as a side-effect of long-term therapy with over 40 medications. Its clinical and laboratory features are similar to systemic lupus erythematosus, except that patients fully recover after the offending medication is discontinued. This syndrome differs from typical drug hypersensitivity reactions in that drug-specific T-cells or antibodies are not involved in induction of autoimmunity, it usually requires many months to years of drug exposure, is drug dose-dependent and generally does not result in immune sensitization to the drug. Circumstantial evidence strongly suggests that oxidative metabolites of the parent compound trigger autoimmunity. Several mechanisms for induction of autoimmunity will be discussed, including bystander activation of autoreactive lymphocytes due to drug-specific immunity or to non-specific activation of lymphocytes, direct cytotoxicity with release of autoantigens and disruption of central T-cell tolerance. The latter hypothesis will be supported by a mouse model in which a reactive metabolite of procainamide introduced into the thymus results in lupus-like autoantibody induction. These findings, as well as evidence for thymic function in drug-induced lupus patients, support the concept that abnormalities during T-cell selection in the thymus initiate autoimmunity.

  11. Drugs and Addictions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, S. Mae; Miller, Eva

    The effects of drug abuse and dependence vary, depending on the type of drug, polydrug use, and characteristics of the user. The influence of genetic, neurochemical, neuropsyiological, sociocultural, and economic factors suggest that the etiology of substance abuse and dependence is multiply determined. Models explaining the causation of substance…

  12. Medicare Prescription Drug Coverage

    MedlinePlus

    ... people also have to pay an additional monthly cost. Private companies provide Medicare prescription drug coverage. You choose the drug plan you like best. Whether or not you should sign up depends on how good your current coverage is. You need to sign up as ...

  13. Ayurvedic drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Balachandran, Premalatha; Govindarajan, Rajgopal

    2007-12-01

    Ayurveda is a major traditional system of Indian medicine that is still being successfully used in many countries. Recapitulation and adaptation of the older science to modern drug discovery processes can bring renewed interest to the pharmaceutical world and offer unique therapeutic solutions for a wide range of human disorders. Eventhough time-tested evidences vouch immense therapeutic benefits for ayurvedic herbs and formulations, several important issues are required to be resolved for successful implementation of ayurvedic principles to present drug discovery methodologies. Additionally, clinical examination in the extent of efficacy, safety and drug interactions of newly developed ayurvedic drugs and formulations are required to be carefully evaluated. Ayurvedic experts suggest a reverse-pharmacology approach focusing on the potential targets for which ayurvedic herbs and herbal products could bring tremendous leads to ayurvedic drug discovery. Although several novel leads and drug molecules have already been discovered from ayurvedic medicinal herbs, further scientific explorations in this arena along with customization of present technologies to ayurvedic drug manufacturing principles would greatly facilitate a standardized ayurvedic drug discovery.

  14. Safety of obesity drugs.

    PubMed

    Greenway, Frank L; Caruso, Mary K

    2005-11-01

    The safety of obesity drugs has historically been poor. This and the stigmatisation of obesity in society ensured that a higher standard of safety for obesity drugs must be met. The authors review the safety disasters of obesity drugs that were withdrawn. The authors then review the safety of presently available drugs--benzphetamine, phendimetrazine, diethylpropion, phentermine, sibutramine and orlistat. The safety of rimonabant, a drug with a pending new drug application that has an independent effect on metabolic syndrome, is also reviewed. The authors compare the stage of obesity drug development to that of hypertension in the 1950s. As new and safer drugs with more downstream mechanisms are developed that have independent effects on the cardiovascular risks associated with obesity, third party reimbursement for obesity medicine is likely to improve. This may lead to obesity being treated like hypertension and other chronic diseases with long-term medication. With improved technological tools, the authors believe this process will be more rapid for obesity than it was for hypertension.

  15. Evaluation of enzyme inhibition kinetics in drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ang; Qin, Xuan; Tang, Yu; Liu, Mingyao; Wang, Xin

    2014-10-01

    Inhibition of CYP enzymes is thought to be the most common cause of drug-drug and/or herb-drug interactions. To characterize the inhibition of CYP enzymes activities by chemicals, enzyme inhibition kinetic experiments are usually carried out. The purpose of this letter is to call attention to evaluate the enzyme inhibition kinetics in drug-drug interactions.

  16. Pharmacogenetics of drug hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Elizabeth J; Mallal, Simon A

    2010-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions and severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions, such as Stevens–Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis, are examples of serious adverse drug reactions mediated through a combination of metabolic and immunological mechanisms that could traditionally not have been predicted based on the pharmacological characteristics of the drug alone. The discovery of new associations between these syndromes and specific HLA has created the promise that risk for these reactions could be predicted through pharmacogenetic screening, thereby avoiding serious morbidity and mortality associated with these types of drug reactions. Despite this, several hurdles exist in the translation of these associations into pharmacogenetic tests that could be routinely used in the clinical setting. HLA-B*5701 screening to prevent abacavir hypersensitivity syndrome is an example of a test now in widespread routine clinical use in the developed world. PMID:20602616

  17. Piracetam and piracetam-like drugs: from basic science to novel clinical applications to CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    Malykh, Andrei G; Sadaie, M Reza

    2010-02-12

    There is an increasing interest in nootropic drugs for the treatment of CNS disorders. Since the last meta-analysis of the clinical efficacy of piracetam, more information has accumulated. The primary objective of this systematic survey is to evaluate the clinical outcomes as well as the scientific literature relating to the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics, mechanism of action, dosing, toxicology and adverse effects of marketed and investigational drugs. The major focus of the literature search was on articles demonstrating evidence-based clinical investigations during the past 10 years for the following therapeutic categories of CNS disorders: (i) cognition/memory; (ii) epilepsy and seizure; (iii) neurodegenerative diseases; (iv) stroke/ischaemia; and (v) stress and anxiety. In this article, piracetam-like compounds are divided into three subgroups based on their chemical structures, known efficacy and intended clinical uses. Subgroup 1 drugs include piracetam, oxiracetam, aniracetam, pramiracetam and phenylpiracetam, which have been used in humans and some of which are available as dietary supplements. Of these, oxiracetam and aniracetam are no longer in clinical use. Pramiracetam reportedly improved cognitive deficits associated with traumatic brain injuries. Although piracetam exhibited no long-term benefits for the treatment of mild cognitive impairments, recent studies demonstrated its neuroprotective effect when used during coronary bypass surgery. It was also effective in the treatment of cognitive disorders of cerebrovascular and traumatic origins; however, its overall effect on lowering depression and anxiety was higher than improving memory. As add-on therapy, it appears to benefit individuals with myoclonus epilepsy and tardive dyskinesia. Phenylpiracetam is more potent than piracetam and is used for a wider range of indications. In combination with a vasodilator drug, piracetam appeared to have an additive beneficial effect on various

  18. Potential Drug - Drug Interactions among Medications Prescribed to Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Barna

    2014-01-01

    Context: Drug-drug interactions(DDIs) are significant but avoidable causes of iatrogenic morbidity and hospital admission. Aim: To detect potential drug-drug interactions among medications received by hypertensive patients. Materials and Methods: Patients of both sex and all adult age groups, who were attending medicine out -patient department (OPD) of a tertiary care teaching rural hospital since last six months and were being prescribed antihypertensive drug/s for essential hypertension, were selected for the study. Hypertensive patient with co-morbities diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart diseases, congestive heart failure, and chronic renal diseases were also included in the study. Potential drug drug interactions were checked with medscape drug interaction software. Results: With the help of medscape drug interaction software, 71.50% prescriptions were identified having atleast one drug-drug interaction. Total 918 DDIs were found in between 58 drug pairs. 55.23% DDIs were pharmacodynamic, 4.79% pharmacokinetic type of DDIs. 32.24% DDIs were found affecting serum potassium level. 95.42% DDIs were found significant type of DDIs. Drug drug interaction between atenolol & amlodipine was the most common DDI (136) followed by metoprolol and amlodine (88) in this study. Atenolol and amlodipine ( 25.92%) was the most common drugs to cause DDIs in our study. Conclusion: We detected a significant number of drug drug interaction in hypertensive patients. These interactions were between antihypertensive agents or between hypertensive and drug for co-morbid condition. PMID:25584241

  19. Drugs Approved for Multiple Myeloma

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for multiple myeloma and other plasma cell neoplasms. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  20. Drugs Approved for Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for myeloproliferative neoplasms. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  1. Drugs Approved for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Hodgkin lymphoma. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  2. Off-Label Drug Use

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your Local Offices Close + - Text Size Off-label Drug Use What is off-label drug use? In the United States new drugs are ... unapproved use of a drug. Is off-label drug use legal? The off-label use of FDA- ...

  3. Is the Drug Problem Soluble?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonas, Steven

    1989-01-01

    Concludes that the principle drug problems in the United States arise from the use of cigarette tobacco and alcoholic beverages. Identifies a drug culture as the persistent force in society that promotes drug use. Points out that the influence of the primary drug industries inhibit attempts to deal effectively with drug problems. (KO)

  4. Drugs, Society, and Human Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Oakley

    The varied aspects of drugs, their source, abuse, chemical composition, and physical, personal, and social effects are explored. Seven units cover the following areas: (1) an overview on drug use, a brief history of drugs and discussion of social implications; (2) the human nervous system and the actions of drugs; (3) "nondrug drugs" such as…

  5. Drugs Approved for Cervical Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for cervical cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  6. Drugs Approved for Testicular Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for testicular cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  7. The Great Drug Debate: II. Taking Drugs Seriously.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, John

    1988-01-01

    Argues that legalization is not the solution to drug-related problems. Proposes increased emphasis on the small retailers of drugs, and mandatory urinalysis for heroin, cocaine, and PCP for those arrested for typical drug-related crimes. (FMW)

  8. Irreversible enzyme inhibition kinetics and drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Mohutsky, Michael; Hall, Stephen D

    2014-01-01

    This chapter describes the types of irreversible inhibition of drug-metabolizing enzymes and the methods commonly employed to quantify the irreversible inhibition and subsequently predict the extent and time course of clinically important drug-drug interactions.

  9. Bioequivalence of generic drugs.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2015-09-01

    Generic drugs are bioequivalent to the original brand; this is a prerequisite for marketing approval. It is theoretically possible that one generic drug may overestimate the pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters of the original and another generic may underestimate these PK parameters; in consequence, these 2 generics may not be bioequivalent between themselves. The result could be loss of efficacy or development of drug-related adverse effects if these generics are interchanged in stable patients. In a recent study involving 292 indirect comparisons of generic formulations of 9 different drugs, mathematical modeling showed that in most cases (87.0% for maximum concentration, 90.1% for area under the curve, and 80.5% for both) generic drugs are bioequivalent to each other. These reassuring findings notwithstanding, prudence dictates that, in stable patients, generic drugs should be interchanged only if there is a good reason for it. This is because bioequivalent brands of drugs may differ in their excipient content, and this can result in variations in safety profiles. PMID:26455677

  10. Benzylpiperazine: "A messy drug".

    PubMed

    Katz, D P; Deruiter, J; Bhattacharya, D; Ahuja, M; Bhattacharya, S; Clark, C R; Suppiramaniam, V; Dhanasekaran, M

    2016-07-01

    Designer drugs are synthetic structural analogues/congeners of controlled substances with slightly modified chemical structures intended to mimic the pharmacological effects of known drugs of abuse so as to evade drug classification. Benzylpiperazine (BZP), a piperazine derivative, elevates synaptic dopamine and serotonin levels producing stimulatory and hallucinogenic effects, respectively, similar to the well-known drug of abuse, methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). Furthermore, BZP augments the release of norepinephrine by inhibiting presynaptic autoreceptors, therefore, BZP is a "messy drug" due to its multifaceted regulation of synaptic monoamine neurotransmitters. Initially, pharmaceutical companies used BZP as a therapeutic drug for the treatment of various disease states, but due to its contraindications and abuse potential it was withdrawn from the market. BZP imparts predominately sympathomimetic effects accompanied by serious cardiovascular implications. Addictive properties of BZP include behavioral sensitization, cross sensitization, conditioned place preference and repeated self-administration. Additional testing of piperazine derived drugs is needed due to a scarcity of toxicological data and widely abuse worldwide. PMID:27207154

  11. Anticancer drugs during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Shingo; Yamada, Manabu; Kasai, Yasuyo; Miyauchi, Akito; Andoh, Kazumichi

    2016-09-01

    Although cancer diagnoses during pregnancy are rare, they have been increasing with the rise in maternal age and are now a topic of international concern. In some cases, the administration of chemotherapy is unavoidable, though there is a relative paucity of evidence regarding the administration of anticancer drugs during pregnancy. As more cases have gradually accumulated and further research has been conducted, we are beginning to elucidate the appropriate timing for the administration of chemotherapy, the regimens that can be administered with relative safety, various drug options and the effects of these drugs on both the mother and fetus. However, new challenges have arisen, such as the effects of novel anticancer drugs and the desire to bear children during chemotherapy. In this review, we outline the effects of administering cytotoxic anticancer drugs and molecular targeted drugs to pregnant women on both the mother and fetus, as well as the issues regarding patients who desire to bear children while being treated with anticancer drugs. PMID:27284093

  12. Anti-Microtubule Drugs.

    PubMed

    Florian, Stefan; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    Small molecule drugs that target microtubules (MTs), many of them natural products, have long been important tools in the MT field. Indeed, tubulin (Tb) was discovered, in part, as the protein binding partner of colchicine. Several anti-MT drug classes also have important medical uses, notably colchicine, which is used to treat gout, familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), and pericarditis, and the vinca alkaloids and taxanes, which are used to treat cancer. Anti-MT drugs have in common that they bind specifically to Tb in the dimer, MT or some other form. However, their effects on polymerization dynamics and on the human body differ markedly. Here we briefly review the most-studied molecules, and comment on their uses in basic research and medicine. Our focus is on practical applications of different anti-MT drugs in the laboratory, and key points that users should be aware of when designing experiments. We also touch on interesting unsolved problems, particularly in the area of medical applications. In our opinion, the mechanism by which any MT drug cures or treats any disease is still unsolved, despite decades of research. Solving this problem for particular drug-disease combinations might open new uses for old drugs, or provide insights into novel routes for treatment. PMID:27193863

  13. Bioequivalence of generic drugs.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2015-09-01

    Generic drugs are bioequivalent to the original brand; this is a prerequisite for marketing approval. It is theoretically possible that one generic drug may overestimate the pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters of the original and another generic may underestimate these PK parameters; in consequence, these 2 generics may not be bioequivalent between themselves. The result could be loss of efficacy or development of drug-related adverse effects if these generics are interchanged in stable patients. In a recent study involving 292 indirect comparisons of generic formulations of 9 different drugs, mathematical modeling showed that in most cases (87.0% for maximum concentration, 90.1% for area under the curve, and 80.5% for both) generic drugs are bioequivalent to each other. These reassuring findings notwithstanding, prudence dictates that, in stable patients, generic drugs should be interchanged only if there is a good reason for it. This is because bioequivalent brands of drugs may differ in their excipient content, and this can result in variations in safety profiles.

  14. Teratogenic drugs and their drug interactions with hormonal contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Ahn, M R; Li, L; Shon, J; Bashaw, E D; Kim, M-J

    2016-09-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Guidance for Industry-Drug Interaction Studies, recommends that a potential human teratogen needs to be studied in vivo for effects on contraceptive steroids.(1) This article highlights the need to evaluate the drug-drug interactions (DDIs) between drugs with teratogenic potential and hormonal contraceptives (HCs) during drug development. It also addresses the FDA's effort of communicating DDI findings in product labels to mitigate the risk of unintended pregnancy. PMID:27090193

  15. [Pharmacopsychoses during drug addiction].

    PubMed

    Cottereau, M J; Lôo, H; Poirier, M F; Deniker, P

    1975-01-01

    Widespread use of certain drugs (amphetamines, L.S.D., hypnotics) in France, allowed us to observe more than 200 cases of acute or chronic psychoses among addicts. Sometimes these are transitory outburst but the occurrence of a delusional psychosis with long range evolution raises a difficult diagnosis problem in relation to functional psychoses. The emphasis should be put on respective roles of the drug and of a predisposed mental state. Circumstances of beginning, apparently direct relationship between drug taking and pathological symptoms, therapy efficiency, absence of earlier pathological traits (as in many of our patients) and relapse when intoxication starts again, are in favour of a pharmacological origin of the troubles.

  16. Lipidomics in drug development.

    PubMed

    Dehairs, Jonas; Derua, Rita; Rueda-Rincon, Natalia; Swinnen, Johannes V

    2015-06-01

    Numerous human pathologies, including common conditions such as obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer, inflammatory disease and neurodegeneration, involve changes in lipid metabolism. Likewise, a growing number of drugs are being developed that directly or indirectly affect lipid metabolic pathways. Instead of classical and cumbrous radiochemical analyses, lipid profiling by mass spectrometry (MS)-based lipidomics holds great potential as companion diagnostic in several steps along the drug development process. In this review we describe some typical lipidomics set-ups and illustrate how these technologies can be implemented in target discovery, compound screening, in vitro and in vivo preclinical testing, toxicity testing of drugs, and prediction and monitoring of response. PMID:26190681

  17. Prescription Drugs and Cold Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abuse » Prescription Drugs & Cold Medicines Prescription Drugs & Cold Medicines Email Facebook Twitter What is Prescription Drug Abuse: ... treatment of addiction. Read more Safe Disposal of Medicines Disposal of Unused Medicines: What You Should Know ( ...

  18. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for pancreatic cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  19. Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for bladder cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  20. Drugs Approved for Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Thyroid Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Thyroid Cancer Cabozantinib-S-Malate Caprelsa (Vandetanib) Cometriq (Cabozantinib-S-Malate) ...

  1. Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer Abiraterone Acetate Bicalutamide Cabazitaxel Casodex (Bicalutamide) Degarelix Docetaxel ...

  2. Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... are not listed here. Drugs Approved to Prevent Breast Cancer Evista (Raloxifene Hydrochloride) Keoxifene (Raloxifene Hydrochloride) Nolvadex (Tamoxifen ...

  3. Drugs Approved for Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Brain Tumors This page lists cancer drugs approved by ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Brain Tumors Afinitor (Everolimus) Afinitor Disperz (Everolimus) Avastin (Bevacizumab) ...

  4. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    MedlinePlus

    ... Children & Teens Search Connect with NIDA : Google Plus Facebook LinkedIn Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Menu Home Drugs ... HIV Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Email Facebook Twitter 2005 –Ongoing Behaviors associated with drug abuse ...

  5. Drugs Approved for Lung Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for lung cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  6. Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for breast cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  7. Drugs Approved for Bone Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Bone Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Bone Cancer Abitrexate (Methotrexate) Cosmegen (Dactinomycin) Dactinomycin Denosumab Doxorubicin Hydrochloride ...

  8. Drugs Approved for Myeloproliferative Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Myeloproliferative Neoplasms This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Adriamycin PFS (Doxorubicin Hydrochloride) Adriamycin RDF (Doxorubicin Hydrochloride) ...

  9. Analysis of Street Drugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Stuart H.; Bhatt, Sudhir

    1972-01-01

    A study of the content of street drugs available to a college campus and a community is presented. Emphasis is given to the adulterants and substitutions encountered in the illicit preparations. (Author)

  10. Metalloid compounds as drugs

    PubMed Central

    Sekhon, B. S.

    2013-01-01

    The six elements commonly known as metalloids are boron, silicon, germanium, arsenic, antimony, and tellurium. Metalloid containing compounds have been used as antiprotozoal drugs. Boron-based drugs, the benzoxaboroles have been exploited as potential treatments for neglected tropical diseases. Arsenic has been used as a medicinal agent and arsphenamine was the main drug used to treat syphilis. Arsenic trioxide has been approved for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. Pentavalent antimonials have been the recommended drug for visceral leishmaniasis and cutaneous leishmaniasis. Tellurium (IV) compounds may have important roles in thiol redox biological activity in the human body, and ammonium trichloro (dioxoethylene-O, O’-)tellurate (AS101) may be a promising agent for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. Organosilicon compounds have been shown to be effective in vitro multidrug-resistance reverting agents. PMID:24019824

  11. Drug testing programs.

    PubMed

    Willette, R E

    1986-01-01

    Many Federal agencies and private companies are conducting drug tests on job applicants and employees. Although the reasons for testing and the circumstances under which testing is conducted vary considerably, the main intent of these programs is to provide a drug-free environment for other employees and a safe service to the public. The programs that have been most successful usually include a clear communication to all employees and applicants as to the nature of the drug program and the consequences of detected drug use. Also, successful programs usually afford employees some type of assistance and a second chance. Finally, it is essential for successful programs to provide a reasonable and fair approach that includes procedures for due process, that is, a line of review and appeal. PMID:3127722

  12. Information for Consumers (Drugs)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Advertising: Questions to Ask Yourself Sample Prescription Drug Advertisements Give Us Feedback Resources for You Report a ... feeds Follow FDA on Twitter Follow FDA on Facebook View FDA videos on YouTube View FDA photos ...

  13. Neuropathy secondary to drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider). The following drugs may be used to control pain: Over-the-counter pain relievers may be helpful ... as morphine or fentanyl, may be needed to control severe pain. Whenever possible, avoid or reduce use of medicines ...

  14. Drug-induced infertility.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, J F; Davis, L J

    1984-02-01

    Primary infertility may result from the use of various drugs. This phenomenon may be the result of an effect on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis or a direct toxic effect on the gonads. Some of the drugs considered in this article demonstrate sex-related differences in their ability to cause infertility; there also may be age-related differences. The drugs described in this review, in regard to their association with the development of infertility, include various individual antineoplastic agents (cyclophosphamide, chlorambucil, busulphan, and methotrexate) and combinations of these chemotherapeutic drugs, glucocorticosteroids, hormonal steroids (diethylstilbestrol, medroxyprogesterone acetate, estrogen, and the constituents of oral contraceptives), antibiotics (sulfasalazine and co-trimoxazole), thyroid supplements, spironolactone, cimetidine, colchicine, marihuana, opiates, and neuroleptic agents.

  15. Calculating drug doses.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    Numeracy and calculation are key skills for nurses. As nurses are directly accountable for ensuring medicines are prescribed, dispensed and administered safely, they must be able to understand and calculate drug doses. PMID:27615351

  16. Mucoadhesive drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Rahamatullah; Raj Singh, Thakur Raghu; Garland, Martin James; Woolfson, A David; Donnelly, Ryan F.

    2011-01-01

    Mucoadhesion is commonly defined as the adhesion between two materials, at least one of which is a mucosal surface. Over the past few decades, mucosal drug delivery has received a great deal of attention. Mucoadhesive dosage forms may be designed to enable prolonged retention at the site of application, providing a controlled rate of drug release for improved therapeutic outcome. Application of dosage forms to mucosal surfaces may be of benefit to drug molecules not amenable to the oral route, such as those that undergo acid degradation or extensive first-pass metabolism. The mucoadhesive ability of a dosage form is dependent upon a variety of factors, including the nature of the mucosal tissue and the physicochemical properties of the polymeric formulation. This review article aims to provide an overview of the various aspects of mucoadhesion, mucoadhesive materials, factors affecting mucoadhesion, evaluating methods, and finally various mucoadhesive drug delivery systems (buccal, nasal, ocular, gastro, vaginal, and rectal). PMID:21430958

  17. Teenagers and drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss of appetite (occurs with amphetamine, methamphetamine, or cocaine use) Increased appetite (with marijuana use) Unsteady gait ... drugs) Hyperactivity (as seen with uppers such as cocaine and methamphetamine) You also may notice changes in ...

  18. Drug use first aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... addiction is gradual. And some drugs (such as cocaine ) can cause addiction after only a few doses. ... Saunders; 2013:chap 150. Rao RB, Hoffman RS. Cocaine and other sympathomimetics. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, ...

  19. Vitiligo, drug induced (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... this person's face have resulted from drug-induced vitiligo. Loss of melanin, the primary skin pigment, occasionally ... is the case with this individual. The typical vitiligo lesion is flat (macular) and depigmented, but maintains ...

  20. The drug swindlers.

    PubMed

    Silverman, M; Lydecker, M; Lee, P R

    1990-01-01

    In a number of important developing nations--among them Indonesia, India, and Brazil--clinical pharmacologists and other drug experts are revealing mounting concern over the marketing of fraudulent drug products. These are shaped, colored, flavored, marked, and packaged to mimic the real product. They may contain the actual antibiotic or other drug indicated on the label, but so "cut" that the product provides only a small fraction of the labeled amount, or they may contain only useless flour or starch. At best, they are worthless. At the worst, they can kill. In most instances, it is believed that these "drugs" are produced and marketed by local or domestic fly-by-night groups and not by multinational pharmaceutical firms. Blame for these practices is placed on inadequate or unenforced laws, only trivial punishments, bribery and corruption, and the fact that generally "nobody inspects the inspectors."

  1. National Drug IQ Challenge

    MedlinePlus

    ... See 2016's Chat Day Transcript Drugs: SHATTER THE MYTHS Order Free Copies Now for Your NDAFW Event! ... dress are registered trademarks of HHS. SHATTER THE MYTHS is a trademark and service mark of HHS. ...

  2. The drug swindlers.

    PubMed

    Silverman, M; Lydecker, M; Lee, P R

    1990-01-01

    In a number of important developing nations--among them Indonesia, India, and Brazil--clinical pharmacologists and other drug experts are revealing mounting concern over the marketing of fraudulent drug products. These are shaped, colored, flavored, marked, and packaged to mimic the real product. They may contain the actual antibiotic or other drug indicated on the label, but so "cut" that the product provides only a small fraction of the labeled amount, or they may contain only useless flour or starch. At best, they are worthless. At the worst, they can kill. In most instances, it is believed that these "drugs" are produced and marketed by local or domestic fly-by-night groups and not by multinational pharmaceutical firms. Blame for these practices is placed on inadequate or unenforced laws, only trivial punishments, bribery and corruption, and the fact that generally "nobody inspects the inspectors." PMID:2265874

  3. Substance use - prescription drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... substance use; Oxycodone - substance use; Hydrocodone - substance use; Morphine - substance use; Fentanyl - substance use ... fluff, hydros, v-itamin, vic, vike, Watson-387. Morphine. Drugs include Avinza, Duramorph, Kadian, Ormorph, Roxanol. Street ...

  4. Inexpensive portable drug detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J.; Heimbuch, A. H.; Parker, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Inexpensive, easy-to-use, self-scanning, self-calibrating, portable unit automatically graphs fluorescence spectrum of drug sample. Device also measures rate of movement through chromatographic column for forensic and medical testing.

  5. Drugs in breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Hotham, Neil; Hotham, Elizabeth

    2015-10-01

    Most commonly used drugs are relatively safe for breastfed babies. The dose received via milk is generally small and much less than the known safe doses of the same drug given directly to neonates and infants. Drugs contraindicated during breastfeeding include anticancer drugs, lithium, oral retinoids, iodine, amiodarone and gold salts. An understanding of the principles underlying the transfer into breast milk is important, as is an awareness of the potential adverse effects on the infant. Discussion with the mother about the possibility of either negative product information or ill-informed advice from others will reduce the confusion and anxiety that may be generated. Good resources about medicines and breastfeeding are available and include state-based medicines information services. PMID:26648652

  6. Drug therapy smartens up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Christian

    2015-11-01

    The submission of the first 'smart pill' for market approval, combined with progress in the European nanomedicine landscape, illustrates the positive outlook for drug therapy and health monitoring, explains Christian Martin.

  7. Professional thieves and drugs.

    PubMed

    Inciardi, J A; Russe, B R

    1977-12-01

    The "professional thief" is a highly specialized predatory offender with a history that dates back to Elizabethan England. Although this type of criminal is generally associated with narcotic addiction, his drug-taking typically involved the use of heroin, morphine, and cocaine on an intermittent basis. However, trafficking in drugs was common to the "professional" underworld, and as a result this deviant fraternity had a notable impact on the impressment of a criminal model of drug use on twentieth century conceptions of the addict. The concept of "professional" theft is reviewed, the use of drugs by professional thieves is discussed, and the interaction between this underworld group and the early Federal Bureau of Narcotics is examined.

  8. Club Drug Use

    MedlinePlus

    ... MDMA ("ecstasy"), GHB ("liquid ecstasy"), flunitrazepam ("roofies") and ketamine ("special K"). They have many other slang names. ... also can become addicted if they use GHB, ketamine and flunitrazepam repeatedly. These drugs can cause severe ...

  9. Drug-induced diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    Diarrhea associated with medicines ... Nearly all medicines may cause diarrhea as a side effect. The drugs listed below, however, are more likely to cause diarrhea. Laxatives are meant to cause diarrhea. ...

  10. Drugs, Alcohol and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Combat Veterans & their Families Readjustment Counseling (Vet Centers) War Related Illness & Injury Study Center Homeless Veterans Returning ... follow these reminders: Never reuse or "share" syringes, water, or drug preparation equipment. Use only syringes obtained ...

  11. Oral Diabetes Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... could save hundreds of dollars a month by switching to generic metformin, a Consumer Reports Best Buy ... drugs because they are effective, generally safe, and cost less. Work with your doctor to choose the ...

  12. Bibliography [On Drugs].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Student Personnel Administrators, Detroit, MI.

    A bibliography of materials on drugs is presented. The book and paper back entries are annotated. Selected technical references are listed under these major findings: (1) dependency, (2) barbiturates, (3) amphetamines, and (4) general pharmacology. (PS)

  13. Clinical nutrition and drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Ekincioğlu, Aygin Bayraktar; Demirkan, Kutay

    2013-01-01

    A drug's plasma level, pharmacological effects or side effects, elimination, physicochemical properties or stability could be changed by interactions of drug-drug or drug-nutrition products in patients who receive enteral or parenteral nutritional support. As a result, patients might experience ineffective outcomes or unexpected effects of therapy (such as drug toxicity, embolism). Stability or incompatibility problems between parenteral nutrition admixtures and drugs might lead to alterations in expected therapeutic responses from drug and/or parenteral nutrition, occlusion in venous catheter or symptoms or mortality due to infusion of composed particles. Compatibilities between parenteral nutrition and drugs are not always guaranteed in clinical practice. Although the list of compatibility or incompatibilities of drugs are published for the use of clinicians in their practices, factors such as composition of parenteral nutrition admixture, drug concentration, contact time in catheter, temperature of the environment and exposure to light could change the status of compatibilities between drugs and nutrition admixtures. There could be substantial clinical changes occurring in the patient's nutritional status and pharmacological effects of drugs due to interactions between enteral nutrition and drugs. Drug toxicity and ineffective nutritional support might occur as a result of those predictable interactions. Although administration of drugs via feeding tube is a complex and problematic route for drug usage, it is possible to minimise the risk of tube occlusion, decreased effects of drug and drug toxicity by using an appropriate technique. Therefore, it is important to consider pharmacological dosage forms of drugs while administering drugs via a feeding tube. In conclusion, since the pharmacists are well-experienced and more knowledgeable professionals in drugs and drug usage compared to other healthcare providers, it is suggested that provision of information and

  14. Boston Collaborative Drug Surveillance Program

    Cancer.gov

    The Boston Collaborative Drug Surveillance Program started in 1966 and conducted epidemiologic research to quantify the potential adverse effects of prescription drugs, utilizing in-hospital monitoring.

  15. Drug-induced lupus erythematosus

    MedlinePlus

    ... that caused the condition. Treatment may include: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to treat arthritis and pleurisy Corticosteroid creams to treat skin rashes Antimalarial drugs (hydroxychloroquine) to ...

  16. New drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Rech, Megan A; Donahey, Elisabeth; Cappiello Dziedzic, Jacqueline M; Oh, Laura; Greenhalgh, Elizabeth

    2015-02-01

    Drug abuse is a common problem and growing concern in the United States, and over the past decade, novel or atypical drugs have emerged and have become increasingly popular. Recognition and treatment of new drugs of abuse pose many challenges for health care providers due to lack of quantitative reporting and routine surveillance, and the difficulty of detection in routine blood and urine analyses. Furthermore, street manufacturers are able to rapidly adapt and develop new synthetic isolates of older drugs as soon as law enforcement agencies render them illegal. In this article, we describe the clinical and adverse effects and purported pharmacology of several new classes of drugs of abuse including synthetic cannabinoids, synthetic cathinones, salvia, desomorphine, and kratom. Because many of these substances can have severe or life-threatening adverse effects, knowledge of general toxicology is key in recognizing acute intoxication and overdose; however, typical toxidromes (e.g., cholinergic, sympathomimetic, opioid, etc.) are not precipitated by many of these agents. Medical management of patients who abuse or overdose on these drugs largely consists of supportive care, although naloxone may be used as an antidote for desomorphine overdose. Symptoms of aggression and psychosis may be treated with sedation (benzodiazepines, propofol) and antipsychotics (haloperidol or atypical agents such as quetiapine or ziprasidone). Other facets of management to consider include treatment for withdrawal or addiction, nutrition support, and potential for transmission of infectious diseases. PMID:25471045

  17. Eosinophilic Drug Allergy.

    PubMed

    Kuruvilla, Merin; Khan, David A

    2016-04-01

    While peripheral or tissue eosinophilia may certainly characterize drug eruptions, this feature is hardly pathognomonic for a medication-induced etiology. While delayed drug hypersensitivity reactions with prominent eosinophilic recruitment have been typically classified as type IVb reactions, their pathophysiology is now known to be more complex. Eosinophilic drug reactions have a diversity of presentations and may be benign and self-limited to severe and life-threatening. The extent of clinical involvement is also heterogeneous, ranging from isolated peripheral eosinophilia or single organ involvement (most often the skin and lung) to systemic disease affecting multiple organs, classically exemplified by drug-reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS). The spectrum of implicated medications in the causation of DRESS is ever expanding, and multiple factors including drug metabolites, specific HLA alleles, herpes viruses, and immune system activation have been implicated in pathogenesis. Due to this complex interplay of various factors, diagnostic workup in terms of skin and laboratory testing has not been validated. Similarly, the lack of controlled trials limits treatment options. This review also describes other localized as well as systemic manifestations of eosinophilic disease induced by various medication classes, including their individual pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management. Given the multitude of clinical patterns associated with eosinophilic drug allergy, the diagnosis can be challenging. Considerable deficits in our knowledge of these presentations remain, but the potential for severe reactions should be borne in mind in order to facilitate diagnosis and institute appropriate management. PMID:26006718

  18. Safety of antiobesity drugs.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Bernard Man Yung; Cheung, Tommy Tsang; Samaranayake, Nithushi Rajitha

    2013-08-01

    Obesity is a major health problem worldwide. Although diet and physical activity are crucial in the management of obesity, the long-term success rate is low. Therefore antiobesity drugs are of great interest, especially when lifestyle modification has failed. As obesity is not an immediate life-threatening disease, these drugs are required to be safe. Antiobesity drugs that have been developed so far have limited efficacies and considerable adverse effects affecting tolerability and safety. Therefore, most antiobesity drugs have been withdrawn. Fenfluramine and dexfenfluramine were withdrawn because of the potential damage to heart valves. Sibutramine was associated with an increase in major adverse cardiovascular events in the Sibutramine Cardiovascular Outcomes (SCOUT) trial and it was withdrawn from the market in 2010. Rimonabant was withdrawn because of significant psychiatric adverse effects. Orlistat was approved in Europe and the United States for long-term treatment of obesity, but many patients cannot tolerate its gastrointestinal side effects. Phentermine and diethylpropion can only be used for less than 12 weeks because the long-term safety of these drugs is unknown. Ephedrine and caffeine are natural substances but the effects on weight reduction are modest. As a result there is a huge unmet need for effective and safe antiobesity drugs. Recently lorcaserin and topiramate plus phentermine have been approved for the treatment of obesity but long-term safety data are lacking. PMID:25114779

  19. Drug abuse in athletes

    PubMed Central

    Reardon, Claudia L; Creado, Shane

    2014-01-01

    Drug abuse occurs in all sports and at most levels of competition. Athletic life may lead to drug abuse for a number of reasons, including for performance enhancement, to self-treat otherwise untreated mental illness, and to deal with stressors, such as pressure to perform, injuries, physical pain, and retirement from sport. This review examines the history of doping in athletes, the effects of different classes of substances used for doping, side effects of doping, the role of anti-doping organizations, and treatment of affected athletes. Doping goes back to ancient times, prior to the development of organized sports. Performance-enhancing drugs have continued to evolve, with “advances” in doping strategies driven by improved drug testing detection methods and advances in scientific research that can lead to the discovery and use of substances that may later be banned. Many sports organizations have come to ban the use of performance-enhancing drugs and have very strict consequences for people caught using them. There is variable evidence for the performance-enhancing effects and side effects of the various substances that are used for doping. Drug abuse in athletes should be addressed with preventive measures, education, motivational interviewing, and, when indicated, pharmacologic interventions. PMID:25187752

  20. [Drug use in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    von Mandach, U

    2005-01-01

    Drug use in pregnancy is associated with a number of serious complications for mother and fetus. There are safe data on destructive effects of alcohol, cocain, marijuana and tobacco on pregnancy and neonatal outcome. Of importance is the fact that for many drugs similar effects on pregnancy could be observed: vasoconstriction of the placental vessels resulting in placental abruption, preterm labour (mother), spontaneous abortion, intrauterine growth retardation, low birth weight, preterm delivery and stillbirth (fetus). Symptoms of withdrawal and neurodevelopmental disorders are the most important problems of the neonate. However, only small data exist about the effects of recently popular party drugs like ecstasy or LSD. In addition, from most drugs, with exception of alcohol, safe information about the risk of congenital malformations doesn't exist. Nevertheless they may be a useful guide in the diagnostic of potential malformations by ultrasound. Most of pregnant women using drugs are poly-drug users and are often in reduced general condition. They need therefore the intensive care of the obstetrician in cooperation with other specialists (internal medicine, psychiatry).

  1. Miami Drug Court Gives Drug Defendants a Second Chance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Peter; Newlyn, Andrea K.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the Diversion and Drug Treatment program, known as "Drug Court," in Miami (Florida) in which nonviolent drug offenders have prosecution of their cases deferred while they participate in a court-ordered drug-rehabilitation program. Those who successfully complete the program have their cases dismissed. Whereas typical recidivism rates for…

  2. Delayed drug hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Pichler, Werner J

    2003-10-21

    Immune reactions to small molecular compounds, such as drugs, can cause a variety of diseases involving the skin, liver, kidney, and lungs. In many drug hypersensitivity reactions, drug-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells recognize drugs through their alphabeta T-cell receptors in an MHC-dependent way. Drugs stimulate T cells if they act as haptens and bind covalently to peptides or if they have structural features that allow them to interact with certain T-cell receptors directly. Immunohistochemical and functional studies of drug-reactive T cells in patients with distinct forms of exanthema reveal that distinct T-cell functions lead to different clinical phenotypes. In maculopapular exanthema, perforin-positive and granzyme B-positive CD4+ T cells kill activated keratinocytes, while a large number of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells in the epidermis is associated with formation of vesicles and bullae. Drug-specific T cells also orchestrate inflammatory skin reactions through the release of various cytokines (for example, interleukin-5, interferon) and chemokines (such as interleukin-8). Activation of T cells with a particular function seems to lead to a specific clinical picture (for example, bullous or pustular exanthema). Taken together, these data allow delayed hypersensitivity reactions (type IV) to be further subclassified into T-cell reactions, which through the release of certain cytokines and chemokines preferentially activate and recruit monocytes (type IVa), eosinophils (type IVb), or neutrophils (type IVd). Moreover, cytotoxic functions by either CD4+ or CD8+ T cells (type IVc) seem to participate in all type IV reactions.

  3. Role of Hepatic Drug Transporters in Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Houfu; Sahi, Jasminder

    2016-07-01

    Hepatic drug transporters can play an important role in pharmacokinetics and the disposition of therapeutic drugs and endogenous substances. Altered function of hepatic drug transporters due to drug-drug interactions (DDIs), genetic polymorphisms, and disease states can often result in a change in systemic and/or tissue exposure and subsequent pharmacological/toxicological effects of their substrates. Regulatory agencies including the US Food and Drug Administration, European Medicines Agency, and Japan Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency have issued guidance for industry on drug interaction studies, which contain comprehensive recommendations on in vitro and in vivo study tools and cutoff values to evaluate the DDI potential of new molecular entities mediated by hepatic drug transporters. In this report we summarize the latest regulatory and scientific progress of hepatic drug transporters in clinical DDIs, pharmacogenetics, drug-induced liver injury (DILI), as well as methods for predicting transporter-mediated pharmacokinetics and DDIs. PMID:27385168

  4. Recent New Drug Approvals. Part 1: Drugs with Pediatric Indications

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Chasity M.; Chhim, Rebecca F.; Christensen, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    This two-part review provides information about drugs that have been recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration and focuses on drugs approved with pediatric indications or approved in adults with active pediatric studies. Information was obtained from the product labeling and selected published studies. Part 1 reviews recently approved drugs with labeled pediatric indications, and Part 2 will review recent drug approvals in adults that have potential use in pediatrics and have active studies. PMID:23412997

  5. [Benefit assessment of drugs].

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Thomas; Vervölgyi, V; Wieseler, B

    2015-03-01

    In Germany, new drugs are subject to a benefit assessment at the time of their market access. This "early benefit assessment" is the method primarily used for the benefit assessment of pharmaceuticals in Germany. While for the authorization of a drug a positive risk-benefit ratio is sufficient, early benefit assessment examines whether the new drug has an added benefit compared with other therapies, and thus differs significantly from authorization. For the evaluation, the manufacturer is required to submit a dossier, which must contain all the relevant studies. Early benefit assessment is very transparent in international comparisons, because all the relevant data and the evaluation report will be published. The assessment is carried out with regard to the evidence-based standard of care (the "appropriate comparator"). If the new drug is found to have an additional benefit, the extent of this added benefit is assessed. In addition, groups of patients should be identified with the particular extent of the added benefit. Therefore, subgroup analyses have to be carried out frequently. Often, for new drugs, only registration studies are available. General requirements for such studies (e.g., placebo comparison, endpoints) and decisions regarding the approval process (e.g., dosage regimens) can affect the level of confidence of these studies in the benefit assessment. Joint scientific advice by regulatory authorities and HTA (health technology assessment) agencies are provided to solve this problem. However, this is not possible without additional expense for the pharmaceutical companies. PMID:25566842

  6. Drug hypersensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Rashmi; Timshina, Dependra K; Thappa, Devinder Mohan

    2011-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity syndrome (DHS) is an adverse drug reaction commonly associated with the aromatic antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), viz., phenytoin (PHT), carbamazepine (CBZ), phenobarbital (PB), lamotrigine, primidone, etc. It can also be caused by other drugs, such as sulfonamides, dapsone, minocycline, gold derivatives, cyclosporine, captopril, diltiazem, terbinafine, azathioprine and allopurinol. Diagnosis of DHS may be difficult because of the variety of clinical and laboratory abnormalities and manifestations and because the syndrome may mimic infectious, neoplastic or collagen vascular disorders. The risk for developing hypersensitivity within 60 days of the first or second prescription in new users of PHT or CBZ was estimated to be 2.3-4.5 per 10,000 and 1-4.1 per 10,000, respectively. The syndrome is defined by the fever, skin rash, lymphadenopathy and internal organ involvement within the first 2-8 weeks after initiation of therapy. Internal manifestations include, among others, agranulocytosis, hepatitis, nephritis and myositis. Insufficient detoxification may lead to cell death or contribute to the formation of antigen that triggers an immune reaction. Cross-reactivity among PHT, CBZ and PB is as high as 70%-80%. Management mainly includes immediate withdrawal of the culprit drug, symptomatic treatment and systemic steroids or immunoglobulins.

  7. Photomechanical drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doukas, Apostolos G.; Lee, Shun

    2000-05-01

    Photomechanical waves (PW) are generated by Q-switched or mode-locked lasers. Ablation is a reliable method for generating PWs with consistent characteristics. Depending on the laser wavelength and target material, PWs with different parameters can be generated which allows the investigation of PWs with cells and tissue. PWs have been shown to permeabilize the stratum corneum (SC) in vivo and facilitate the transport of drugs into the skin. Once a drug has diffused into the dermis it can enter the vasculature, thus producing a systemic effect. Fluorescence microscopy of biopsies show that 40-kDa molecules can be delivered to a depth of > 300 micrometers into the viable skin of rats. Many important drugs such as insulin, and erythropoietin are smaller or comparable in size, making the PWs attractive for transdermal drug delivery. There are three possible pathways through the SC: Transappendageal via hair follicles or other appendages, transcellular through the corneocytes, and intercellular via the extracellular matrix. The intracellular route appears to be the most likely pathway of drug delivery through the SC.

  8. Drug consumption among Polish centenarians.

    PubMed

    Rajska-Neumann, A; Mossakowska, M; Klich-Rączka, A; Życzkowska, J; Grześkowiak, E; Shieh, S; Wieczorowska-Tobis, K

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the quantitative and qualitative aspects of pharmacotherapy of Polish centenarians. The studied group consisted of 92 centenarians (mean age: 101.7±1.2 years, 77 females, mean age: 101.5±1.2; 15 males mean age: 102.2±1.2). Among the studied subjects, 18 individuals (19.6% of all subjects) did not use any drugs in his or her daily regimen. The mean number of drugs per person was 2.5±2.5 drugs (prescription drugs: 1.9±2.2 and non-prescription drugs: 0.5±0.8). Fifty-six centenarians (60.9% of all studied subjects) took concomitantly 0-3 drugs daily while 36 (39.1%) took more than 3 drugs daily. Within this group, 30 centenarians (32.6%) took 5 or more drugs concomitantly every day. The most commonly used groups of drugs were: gastrointestinal drugs (55 centenarians, 74.3% of all drug consumed), cardiovascular drugs (51 centenarians, 68.9%) and central nervous system drugs (N) (38 centenarians, 51.4%). In the studied group, 6 persons (8.1% of all drug consumers) were taking one potentially inappropriate drug based on the Beers criteria. To conclude, the mean number of drugs, the prevalence of polypharmacy, and the tendency for potential inappropriateness of treatment are lower among Polish centenarians comparing to the common elderly.

  9. National Drug Control Strategy. Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of National Drug Control Policy, Washington, DC.

    President Bush's new National Drug Control Strategy for 2003 focuses on three core priorities: stopping drug use before it starts; healing America's drug users; and disrupting the market. The 2003 strategy reports progress toward meeting the President's goals of reducing drug use by 10 percent over 2 years, and 25 percent over 5 years. With regard…

  10. Overview of Selected Drug Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Edgar H.; And Others

    This document begins with a brief overview of findings from national surveys conducted by the National Institute on Drug Abuse which show increasing drug use throughout the 1970s and a decreasing trend in drug use during the 1980s. In spite of this decline, drug use in the U.S. is described as still constituting a major public health problem that…

  11. Drug Use in American History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWilliams, John C.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses drug use in U.S. history. Argues that a "get-tough" approach did not work in the past and will not work in the future. Suggests that history can provide a scholarly assessment of drugs, foster understanding of drugs in contemporary society, and enable students to evaluate drug policies more objectively. (DK)

  12. Drug-Path: a database for drug-induced pathways.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hui; Qiu, Chengxiang; Cui, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    Some databases for drug-associated pathways have been built and are publicly available. However, the pathways curated in most of these databases are drug-action or drug-metabolism pathways. In recent years, high-throughput technologies such as microarray and RNA-sequencing have produced lots of drug-induced gene expression profiles. Interestingly, drug-induced gene expression profile frequently show distinct patterns, indicating that drugs normally induce the activation or repression of distinct pathways. Therefore, these pathways contribute to study the mechanisms of drugs and drug-repurposing. Here, we present Drug-Path, a database of drug-induced pathways, which was generated by KEGG pathway enrichment analysis for drug-induced upregulated genes and downregulated genes based on drug-induced gene expression datasets in Connectivity Map. Drug-Path provides user-friendly interfaces to retrieve, visualize and download the drug-induced pathway data in the database. In addition, the genes deregulated by a given drug are highlighted in the pathways. All data were organized using SQLite. The web site was implemented using Django, a Python web framework. Finally, we believe that this database will be useful for related researches.

  13. Drugs, the Internet and change.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    This article investigates the symbiotic relationship between drugs and the Internet, focusing (though not exclusively) on psychedelics. Programming on psychedelics in Silicon Valley from the 1960s to date is detailed, as are the twinned conceptualizations of drugs as a technology and technology as a drug. The correlation between drugs, the Internet, and consumerism is explored: the Internet is a medium through which "white," "grey" and "black" drug markets flourish. Thus, this article details the burgeoning online trades in pharmaceuticals, recreational, and "life-style" drugs that turn the Internet into a veritable candy store. Drug forums transmogrify into street corners, threatening the continued existence of the current system of global prohibition. However, it is arguably the use of the Web as an information source that may offer the greatest challenge to the incumbent paradigm, with experiential discourses offering alternatives to the hegemonic narrative, as the relationships between drugs, those who sell drugs and drug takers are reconfigured online. PMID:21615008

  14. Drug-Induced Hematologic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Mintzer, David M.; Billet, Shira N.; Chmielewski, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Drugs can induce almost the entire spectrum of hematologic disorders, affecting white cells, red cells, platelets, and the coagulation system. This paper aims to emphasize the broad range of drug-induced hematological syndromes and to highlight some of the newer drugs and syndromes. Methods. Medline literature on drug-induced hematologic syndromes was reviewed. Most reports and reviews focus on individual drugs or cytopenias. Results. Drug-induced syndromes include hemolytic anemias, methemoglobinemia, red cell aplasia, sideroblastic anemia, megaloblastic anemia, polycythemia, aplastic anemia, leukocytosis, neutropenia, eosinophilia, immune thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic syndromes, hypercoagulability, hypoprothrombinemia, circulating anticoagulants, myelodysplasia, and acute leukemia. Some of the classic drugs known to cause hematologic abnormalities have been replaced by newer drugs, including biologics, accompanied by their own syndromes and unintended side effects. Conclusions. Drugs can induce toxicities spanning many hematologic syndromes, mediated by a variety of mechanisms. Physicians need to be alert to the potential for iatrogenic drug-induced hematologic complications. PMID:19960059

  15. Drug Screening in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Bell, Susan Givens

    2016-01-01

    Gestational substance exposure continues to be a significant problem. Neonates may be exposed to various substances including illicit drugs, prescription drugs, and other legal substances that are best not used during pregnancy because of their potential deleterious effects as possible teratogens or their potential to create dependence and thus withdrawal in the neonate. Screening the newborn for gestational substance exposure is important for both acute care and early intervention to promote the best possible long-term outcomes. This column provides insight into what is known about the extent of substance use by pregnant women, an overview of neonatal biologic matrices for drug testing, and a discussion of the legal implications of neonatal substance screening. PMID:27636697

  16. Drug Resistance in Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Jaya; Sundar, Shyam

    2010-01-01

    The treatment options of leishmaniasis are limited and far from satisfactory. For more than 60 years, treatment of leishmaniasis has centered around pentavalent antimonials (Sbv). Widespread misuse has led to the emergence of Sbv resistance in the hyperendemic areas of North Bihar. Other antileishmanials could also face the same fate, especially in the anthroponotic cycle. The HIV/ visceral leishmaniasis (VL) coinfected patients are another potential source for the emergence of drug resistance. At present no molecular markers of resistance are available and the only reliable method for monitoring resistance of isolates is the technically demanding in vitro amastigote-macrophage model. As the armametrium of drugs for leishmaniasis is limited, it is important that effective monitoring of drug use and response should be done to prevent the spread of resistance. Regimens of simultaneous or sequential combinations should be seriously considered to limit the emergence of resistance. PMID:20606973

  17. Drug-induced pseudolupus.

    PubMed

    Grob, P J; Müller-Schoop, J W; Häcki, M A; Joller-Jemelka, H I

    1975-07-26

    Of fifteen patients with pseudolupus (a syndrome characterised by recurrent fever, myalgia, arthralgia, pleuritis, pulmonary infiltrates, pericarditis, myocarditis, and by mitochondrial antibodies in the absence of nuclear antibodies), all had been treated with "Venocuran", one of a great number of drugs used for venous diseases. This drug, available in twenty countries under various names, contains phenopyrazone, horse-chestnut extract, and cardiac glycosides extracted from various plants. Further studies revealed that up to 90% of long-term users of venocuran acquired mitochondrial antibodies. This was not true for patients with venous diseases being treated with other drugs. About 30% of long-term users of venocuran might experience prodronal symptoms, such as myalgia and arthralgia, while more than 10% could develop the full disease. PMID:49743

  18. Toxins and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Alan L

    2014-12-15

    Components from venoms have stimulated many drug discovery projects, with some notable successes. These are briefly reviewed, from captopril to ziconotide. However, there have been many more disappointments on the road from toxin discovery to approval of a new medicine. Drug discovery and development is an inherently risky business, and the main causes of failure during development programmes are outlined in order to highlight steps that might be taken to increase the chances of success with toxin-based drug discovery. These include having a clear focus on unmet therapeutic needs, concentrating on targets that are well-validated in terms of their relevance to the disease in question, making use of phenotypic screening rather than molecular-based assays, and working with development partners with the resources required for the long and expensive development process.

  19. [INFORMATION ON DRUGS].

    PubMed

    Foucher, Jean-pierre

    2015-03-01

    Drugs not being just a product like any other, prescribers, providers and patients must have access to the information relating the characteristics of such medicinal products. This information must be complete, objective and scientifically rigorous. It must be adapted to the use of the drug and be fully understandable. It should help in prescribing, expedite dispensing, and help the patient adhere to treatment. Thus, according to the recipient, the information will be different. It is the role of the pharmacist and the physician to use it for patient education. The information given must be objective. Medication guidelines published by HAS (Haute Autorité de Santé/National Health Agency) and Inserts given with the drugs should be considered the most reliable. Information can also be found in major scientific publication journals, in independent papers produced by groups of doctors and pharmacists, or in treatment guidelines. One must be very reserved about such information found on certain "Internet" sites. PMID:26606769

  20. Drugs, discrimination and disability.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Frances

    2009-12-01

    Whether addiction to prohibited drugs should be classified as a disability for the purposes of disability discrimination is a controversial question in Australia. The leading Australian case of Marsden v Human Rights Equal Opportunity Commission & Coffs Harbour & District Ex-Servicemen & Women's Memorial Club Ltd (HREOC, No H98/51, 30 August 1999); [2000] FCA 1619 concerned a disability discrimination complaint brought by Mr Marsden as a result of his treatment by the club. The case was brought as a public interest test case by the New South Wales Legal Aid Commission. Mr Marsden was on a methadone program at the time. The reasoning of the decision at the Federal Court opened the way for a finding that dependence on illegal drugs constituted a disability under disability discrimination legislation. The media reaction to the court's decision led to State and federal governments proposing legislation limiting legal protection from discrimination for people addicted to illegal drugs on the basis of their drug use. While the proposed federal legislation lapsed after objections from a coalition of medical, legal and other advocacy groups, the New South Wales legislation still provides that, in employment matters, it is not unlawful to discriminate against a person on the ground of disability if the disability relates to the person's addiction to a prohibited drug and the person is actually addicted to a prohibited drug at the time of the discrimination. The article details the sequence of events in the Marsden case, reflects on the role of public interest litigation in achieving social justice outcomes and suggests that Australia's recent ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities on 17 July 2008 should encourage legislators to review legislation which may have a discriminatory effect on people suffering from addictions. PMID:20169800

  1. Antiplatelet drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, I S; Coughtrie, M W H; MacDonald, T M; Wei, L

    2010-12-01

    Both laboratory studies in healthy volunteers and clinical studies have suggested adverse interactions between antiplatelet drugs and other commonly used medications. Interactions described include those between aspirin and ibuprofen, aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and the thienopyridine, clopidogrel, and drugs inhibiting CYP2C19, notably the proton pump inhibitors (PPI) omeprazole and esomeprazole. Other interactions between thienopyridines and CYP3A4/5 have also been reported for statins and calcium channel blockers. The ibuprofen/aspirin interaction is thought to be caused by ibuprofen blocking the access of aspirin to platelet cyclo-oxygenase. The thienopyridine interactions are caused by inhibition of microsomal enzymes that metabolize these pro-drugs to their active metabolites. We review the evidence for these interactions, assess their clinical importance and suggest strategies of how to deal with them in clinical practice. We conclude that ibuprofen is likely to interact with aspirin and reduce its anti-platelet action particularly in those patients who take ibuprofen chronically. This interaction is of greater relevance to those patients at high cardiovascular risk. A sensible strategy is to advise users of aspirin to avoid chronic ibuprofen or to ingest aspirin at least 2 h prior to ibuprofen. Clearly the use of NSAIDs that do not interact in this way is preferred. For the clopidogrel CYP2C19 and CYP3A4/5 interactions, there is good evidence that these interactions occur. However, there is less good evidence to support the clinical importance of these interactions. Again, a reasonable strategy is to avoid the chronic use of drugs that inhibit CYP2C19, notably PPIs, in subjects taking clopidogrel and use high dose H2 antagonists instead. Finally, anti-platelet agents probably interact with other drugs that affect platelet function such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and clinicians should probably judge

  2. Drug use as consumer behavior.

    PubMed

    Foxall, Gordon Robert; Sigurdsson, Valdimar

    2011-12-01

    Seeking integration of drug consumption research by a theory of memory function and emphasizing drug consumption rather than addiction, Müller & Schumann (M&S) treat drug self-administration as part of a general pattern of consumption. This insight is located within a more comprehensive framework for understanding drug use as consumer behavior that explicates the reinforcement contingencies associated with modes of drug consumption.

  3. Smart drugs: green shuttle or real drug?

    PubMed

    Cornara, L; Borghesi, B; Canali, C; Andrenacci, M; Basso, M; Federici, S; Labra, M

    2013-11-01

    We have combined morphological, molecular, and chemical techniques in order to identify the plant and chemical composition of some last-generation smart drugs, present on the market under the following names: Jungle Mistic Incense, B-52, Blendz, and Kratom 10x. Micromorphological analyses of botanical fragments allowed identification of epidermal cells, stomata, trichomes, starch, crystals, and pollen. DNA barcoding was carried out by the plastidial gene rbcL and the spacer trnH-psbA as universal markers. The combination of morphological and molecular data revealed a mixture of plants from different families, including aromatic species, viz., Lamiaceae and Turneraceae. GC-MS and LC-MS analyses on ethanol or methanol extracts showed the presence of synthetic cannabinoids, including JWH-250 in Jungle, JWH-122 in B-52, and JWH-073 and JWH-018 in Blendz. In Kratom 10x, only the indole alkaloid mitragynine was detected. All the identified synthetic cannabinoids, apart from mitragynine, are under the restriction of law in Italy (TU 309/90). Synthetic cannabinoid crystals were also identified by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, which also detected other foreign organic chemicals, probably preservatives or antimycotics. In Kratom only leaf fragments from Mitragyna speciosa, containing the alkaloid mitragynine, were found. In the remaining products, aromatic plant species have mainly the role of hiding synthetic cannabinoids, thus acting as a "green shuttle" rather than as real drugs. Such a multidisciplinary approach is proposed as a method for the identification of herbal blends of uncertain composition, which are widely marketed in "headshops" and on the Internet, and represent a serious hazard to public health. PMID:23842669

  4. Driving forces for drug loading in drug carriers.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Yang, Li

    2015-01-01

    The loading capacity of a drug carrier is determined essentially by intermolecular interactions between drugs and carrier materials. In this review, the process of drug loading is described in detail based on the differences in the driving force for drug incorporation, including hydrophobic interaction, electrostatic interaction, hydrogen bonding, Pi-Pi stacking and van der Waals force. Modifying drug-loading sites of carrier materials with interacting groups aiming at tailoring drug-carrier interactions is reviewed by highlighting its importance for improving in vitro properties such as the loading capacity, release behaviour and stability. Other factors affecting drug loading, methods employed to predict the encapsulation capacity and the techniques to verify intermolecular interactions are also discussed to inform the readers of all-sided information on drug-loading processes and theories. The drug carriers can be designed more reasonably with the better understanding of the nature and interacting mechanism of intermolecular interactions.

  5. [Mechanisms of drug metabolism--implications for drug interaction].

    PubMed

    Sitkiewicz, D

    2000-09-01

    Most drugs undergo biotransformation before excretion by renal, biliary or other routes. The main purpose of metabolism is to make the drug, which is usually lipophilic, more water soluble. Metabolic reactions, depending upon the end product formed, can be classified as functionalisation (phase I) or conjugation (Phase II) reactions. Phase I metabolic reactions include oxidation, reduction and hydrolysis; while phase II processes are glucuronidation, sulfation, methylation, acetylation and mercapture formation. Cytochrome P-450 isozymes play a central role in metabolism of great majority of xenobiotics, as well as some endogenous substances. Many drugs can inhibit, induce and alter relative amounts of different P-450 enzymes; therefore, possibilities of drug-drug interactions exist in that one drug can influence biodisposition of another with potential clinical implications. One drug can inhibit metabolism of another, leading to excessive accumulation and toxicity. Alternatively, one drug can stimulate or induce metabolism of another drug resulting in subtherapeutic plasma levels of the later.

  6. The metaphorical nature of drugs and drug taking.

    PubMed

    Montagne, M

    1988-01-01

    An inquiry into the role metaphor plays in personal and societal conceptions of drugs and drug taking reveals that drug metaphors and symbols are quite pervasive in individual thinking, social discourse, and the cultural media. They appear to influence beliefs and attitudes regarding drugs, the nature and meaning of drug experiences, and the reasons behind drug-taking behaviors. Some drug metaphors are common to different cultures and historical periods, while others are specific and exclusive to particular individuals and groups or drug-taking situations. These metaphors can carry positive as well as negative connotations. Further study is needed to delineate the metaphorical structuring of our thinking about drugs, and the process whereby these metaphors are generated and spread throughout society.

  7. Clustering drug-drug interaction networks with energy model layouts: community analysis and drug repurposing

    PubMed Central

    Udrescu, Lucreţia; Sbârcea, Laura; Topîrceanu, Alexandru; Iovanovici, Alexandru; Kurunczi, Ludovic; Bogdan, Paul; Udrescu, Mihai

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing drug-drug interactions may unravel previously unknown drug action patterns, leading to the development of new drug discovery tools. We present a new approach to analyzing drug-drug interaction networks, based on clustering and topological community detection techniques that are specific to complex network science. Our methodology uncovers functional drug categories along with the intricate relationships between them. Using modularity-based and energy-model layout community detection algorithms, we link the network clusters to 9 relevant pharmacological properties. Out of the 1141 drugs from the DrugBank 4.1 database, our extensive literature survey and cross-checking with other databases such as Drugs.com, RxList, and DrugBank 4.3 confirm the predicted properties for 85% of the drugs. As such, we argue that network analysis offers a high-level grasp on a wide area of pharmacological aspects, indicating possible unaccounted interactions and missing pharmacological properties that can lead to drug repositioning for the 15% drugs which seem to be inconsistent with the predicted property. Also, by using network centralities, we can rank drugs according to their interaction potential for both simple and complex multi-pathology therapies. Moreover, our clustering approach can be extended for applications such as analyzing drug-target interactions or phenotyping patients in personalized medicine applications. PMID:27599720

  8. Clustering drug-drug interaction networks with energy model layouts: community analysis and drug repurposing.

    PubMed

    Udrescu, Lucreţia; Sbârcea, Laura; Topîrceanu, Alexandru; Iovanovici, Alexandru; Kurunczi, Ludovic; Bogdan, Paul; Udrescu, Mihai

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing drug-drug interactions may unravel previously unknown drug action patterns, leading to the development of new drug discovery tools. We present a new approach to analyzing drug-drug interaction networks, based on clustering and topological community detection techniques that are specific to complex network science. Our methodology uncovers functional drug categories along with the intricate relationships between them. Using modularity-based and energy-model layout community detection algorithms, we link the network clusters to 9 relevant pharmacological properties. Out of the 1141 drugs from the DrugBank 4.1 database, our extensive literature survey and cross-checking with other databases such as Drugs.com, RxList, and DrugBank 4.3 confirm the predicted properties for 85% of the drugs. As such, we argue that network analysis offers a high-level grasp on a wide area of pharmacological aspects, indicating possible unaccounted interactions and missing pharmacological properties that can lead to drug repositioning for the 15% drugs which seem to be inconsistent with the predicted property. Also, by using network centralities, we can rank drugs according to their interaction potential for both simple and complex multi-pathology therapies. Moreover, our clustering approach can be extended for applications such as analyzing drug-target interactions or phenotyping patients in personalized medicine applications. PMID:27599720

  9. A statistical methodology for drug-drug interaction surveillance.

    PubMed

    Norén, G Niklas; Sundberg, Rolf; Bate, Andrew; Edwards, I Ralph

    2008-07-20

    Interaction between drug substances may yield excessive risk of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) when two drugs are taken in combination. Collections of individual case safety reports (ICSRs) related to suspected ADR incidents in clinical practice have proven to be very useful in post-marketing surveillance for pairwise drug--ADR associations, but have yet to reach their full potential for drug-drug interaction surveillance. In this paper, we implement and evaluate a shrinkage observed-to-expected ratio for exploratory analysis of suspected drug-drug interaction in ICSR data, based on comparison with an additive risk model. We argue that the limited success of previously proposed methods for drug-drug interaction detection based on ICSR data may be due to an underlying assumption that the absence of interaction is equivalent to having multiplicative risk factors. We provide empirical examples of established drug-drug interaction highlighted with our proposed approach that go undetected with logistic regression. A database wide screen for suspected drug-drug interaction in the entire WHO database is carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach. As always in the analysis of ICSRs, the clinical validity of hypotheses raised with the proposed method must be further reviewed and evaluated by subject matter experts. PMID:18344185

  10. The Drug Alternative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winn, Mitchell

    This book was written for educators and counselors, but its concepts are applicable to anyone who works with youth. It contains five chapters, the first of which emphasizes that building self-esteem is the best way to counter serious drug misuse. In chapter two, the kinds of pressures youngsters must cope with are discussed. In this chapter…

  11. Prevention and Drug Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Testa, Mark F.; Smith, Brenda

    2009-01-01

    Evidence linking alcohol and other drug abuse with child maltreatment, particularly neglect, is strong. But does substance abuse cause maltreatment? According to Mark Testa and Brenda Smith, such co-occurring risk factors as parental depression, social isolation, homelessness, or domestic violence may be more directly responsible than substance…

  12. Drug-mineral interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, L.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of drugs such as glucocorticoids and thyroid extract on calcium metabolism is unknown. However, several other medications affect the excretion and intestinal absorption of calcium. A controlled study was carried out to investigate these aspects. Urinary calcium was determined for 3 months during the long-term intake of the antituberculous drug isoniazid (INH) and of the antibiotic tetracycline. The effect of the diuretics furosemide and hydrochlorothiazide, of several aluminum-containing antacids, of thyroid extract and of corticosteroids was also studied. Metabolic balances of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and zinc were determined, as well as the intestinal absorption of calcium using Ca 47. Plasma levels, urinary and fecal excretions of Ca 47 were determined. All drugs tested increased urinary calcium except for the diuretic hydrochlorothiazide. Regarding the effect of corticosteroids: the intestinal absorption of calcium was unchanged after the short-term use and was very high after long-term use. The studies have shown that several commonly used drugs induce an increase in urinary calcium excretion which may contribute to calcium loss, if this increase persists for prolonged periods of time. Urinary excretions of phosphorus, magnesium and zinc increased in some of the studies.

  13. Drug Errors in Anaesthesiology

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rajnish Kumar; Katiyar, Sarika

    2009-01-01

    Summary Medication errors are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. The incidence of these drug errors during anaesthesia is not certain. They impose a considerable financial burden to health care systems apart from the patient losses. Common causes of these errors and their prevention is discussed. PMID:20640103

  14. "Reasonable" Drug Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling-Sendor, Benjamin

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in "Board of Education of Independent School District No. 92 of Pottawatomie County v. Earls," wherein the Court held that random drug testing of students taking part in extracurricular activities is constitutional. (PKP)

  15. Drugs Used in COPD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on drugs used in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first.…

  16. Drug development and manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, Benjamin P.; McCleskey, T. Mark; Burrell, Anthony K.

    2015-10-13

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry has been used for detecting binding events and measuring binding selectivities between chemicals and receptors. XRF may also be used for estimating the therapeutic index of a chemical, for estimating the binding selectivity of a chemical versus chemical analogs, for measuring post-translational modifications of proteins, and for drug manufacturing.

  17. NARCOTIC DRUG ADDICTION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    YAHRAES, HERBERT; AND OTHERS

    MUCH HAS BEEN LEARNED IN RECENT YEARS ABOUT THE NATURE OF DRUG ADDICTION, THE FACTORS WHICH LEAD A PERSON INTO ADDICTION, AND THE EFFECTIVE TREATMENT OF PERSONS WHO HAVE BECOME ADDICTED. THIS PAMPHLET SURVEYS THE NEW FINDINGS AND IS INTENDED PRIMARILY FOR (1) THOSE WHO IN THE COURSE OF THEIR PROFESSIONAL DUTIES COME IN CONTACT WITH ADDICTED…

  18. [Resistance to antituberculous drugs].

    PubMed

    Veziris, N; Cambau, E; Sougakoff, W; Robert, J; Jarlier, V

    2005-08-01

    Mycobacteria responsible for tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, M. africanum) are susceptible to a very small number of antibiotics. As soon as these drugs were used in humans all gave rise to the selection of resistant mycobacteria. Study of the mechanisms of acquired resistance, with the help of the genetics of mycobacteria, led to a more accurate understanding of the mode of action of antituberculous drugs. The antibiotics isoniazid, pyrazinamide, ethionamide and ethambutol are mycobacteria-specific because they inhibit the synthesis of mycolic acids, which are specific constituants of the bacterial wall. Mutations responsible for resistance to these drugs affect genes coding for activator enzymes (katg for isoniazid, pncA for pyrazinamide) or genes coding for their target (inhA for isoniazid/ethionamide, embB for ethambutol). With rifamycins, aminosides and quinolones, mechanisms of action and resistance are the same for mycobacteria as for non-mycobacterial organisms. No plasmid or resistance transposon has been described in M. tuberculosis. Currently a test for the quick detection of resistance to rifampicin is widely available but in the future DNA chips may allow the simultaneous detection of multiple resistances. Monitoring of antituberculous drugs shows that in France the prevalence of multiresistance ( resistance to both isoniazid and rifampicin) is 0.5%, primary resistance (before treatment) is 9%, and secondary resistance (after treatment) is 16%.

  19. Should Drugs Be Legalized?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambliss, William; Scorza, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    Presents two opposing viewpoints concerning the legalization of drugs. States that control efforts are not cost effective and suggests that legalization with efforts at education is a better course of action (W. Chambliss). The opposing argument contends that the cost in human suffering negates any savings in dollars gained through legalization…

  20. Prescription Drug Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Gloria J.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents current statistics on nonmedical use of both categories of prescription medications by high school and college students. The incidence of nonmedical use of prescription medications continues to increase among high school and college students. Two categories of drugs that are commonly used for reasons other than those for…

  1. Cognition-Enhancing Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Mehlman, Maxwell J

    2004-01-01

    New drugs that enhance cognition in cognitively healthy individuals present difficult public policy challenges. While their use is not inherently unethical, steps must be taken to ensure that they are safe, that they are widely available to promote equality of opportunity, and that individuals are free to decide whether or not to use them. PMID:15330974

  2. Drugs in Sport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mottram, David

    2012-01-01

    Drugs may be used by athletes for a number of reasons, including performance enhancement. The role of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is vital to ensure a winning performance has been achieved by fair means. Substances and methods that are included on the WADA Prohibited List are described. The procedures for testing banned substances are…

  3. Obesity drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Baretić, M

    2013-09-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease, and it requires chronic therapy. Hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases are leading causes of mortality in the modern world. All of them are strongly linked to obesity. While treating obesity, those conditions are also managed. Obese patients should always be treated through lifestyle interventions, though the results of such interventions are modest. Pharmacotherapy is a second step in the treatment of obesity, approved only when weight loss targets were not reached through lifestyle intervention. During the history of antiobesity drugs, many of them were withdrawn because of their side effects. Various guidelines recommend prescribing drug therapy for obesity through consideration of the potential benefits and limitations. Orlistat deactivates intestinal lipase and inhibits intestinal fat lipolysis. It is actually the only drug on the European market approved for the treatment of obesity. Orlistat therapy reduces weight to a modest extent, but it reduces the incidence of diabetes beyond the result achieved with lifestyle changes. Recently, some effective antiobesity drugs like sibutramine and rimonabant have been removed from the market due to their side effects. The new combination of topimarate and fentermine is approved in the US but not in Europe. The cost effectiveness of long-term pharmacotherapy of obesity is still an unresolved question. PMID:24126545

  4. Drug Education in Tune.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janowiak, John J.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses Vietnam-era folk musician John Prine's song "Sam Stone" as an example of heroin-related musical lyricism. Notes the potential use of this and other songs as a teaching method in drug education programs. Notes that many researchers believe heroin addiction is a disease of biological irregularity encoded in the genes fueled by abuse of the…

  5. Drug discovery today.

    PubMed

    Schwardt, Oliver; Kolb, Hartmuth; Ernst, Beat

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, tools for the development of new drugs have been dramatically improved. These include genomic and proteomic research, numerous biophysical methods, combinatorial chemistry and screening technologies. In addition, early ADMET studies are employed in order to significantly reduce the failure rate in the development of drug candidates. As a consequence, the lead finding, lead optimization and development process has gained marked enhancement in speed and efficiency. In parallel to this development, major pharma companies are increasingly outsourcing many components of drug discovery research to biotech companies. All these measures are designed to address the need for a faster time to market. New screening methodologies have contributed significantly to the efficiency of the drug discovery process. The conventional screening of single compounds or compound libraries has been dramatically accelerated by high throughput screening methods. In addition, in silico screening methods allow the evaluation of virtual compounds. A wide range of new lead finding and lead optimization opportunities result from novel screening methods by NMR, which are the topic of this review article.

  6. The 50 Drug Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chernick, Warren S.

    1977-01-01

    The "50 Drug Program" is an attempt by the faculty of the Department of Pharmacology at Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital, in association with other clinical departments, to provide structured guidance outside the realm of formal courses in the study of pharmacology and therapeutics throughout the entire four-year curriculum. (LBH)

  7. Antimalarial drug resistance: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Antony, Hiasindh Ashmi; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a major public health burden throughout the world. Resistance to the antimalarial drugs has increased the mortality and morbidity rate that is achieved so far through the malaria control program. Monitoring the drug resistance to the available antimalarial drugs helps to implement effective drug policy, through the in vivo efficacy studies, in vitro drug susceptibility tests and detection of molecular markers. It is important to understand the mechanism of the antimalarial drugs, as it is one of the key factors in the emergence and spread of drug resistance. This review summarizes the commonly used antimalarial drugs, their mechanism of action and the genetic markers validated so far for the detection of drug-resistant parasites. PMID:26998432

  8. Immunosuppressive drugs and fertility.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Clara; Rigot, Jean-Marc; Leroy, Maryse; Decanter, Christine; Le Mapihan, Kristell; Parent, Anne-Sophie; Le Guillou, Anne-Claire; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Dharancy, Sébastien; Noel, Christian; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppressive drugs are used in the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, as well as in transplantation. Frequently prescribed in young people, these treatments may have deleterious effects on fertility, pregnancy outcomes and the unborn child. This review aims to summarize the main gonadal side effects of immunosuppressants, to detail the effects on fertility and pregnancy of each class of drug, and to provide recommendations on the management of patients who are seen prior to starting or who are already receiving immunosuppressive treatment, allowing them in due course to bear children. The recommendations for use are established with a rather low level of proof, which needs to be taken into account in the patient management. Methotrexate, mycophenolate, and le- and teri-flunomide, cyclophosphamide, mitoxanthrone are contraindicated if pregnancy is desired due to their teratogenic effects, as well as gonadotoxic effects in the case of cyclophosphamide. Anti-TNF-alpha and mTOR-inhibitors are to be used cautiously if pregnancy is desired, since experience using these drugs is still relatively scarce. Azathioprine, glucocorticoids, mesalazine, anticalcineurins such as cyclosporine and tacrolimus, ß-interferon, glatiramer-acetate and chloroquine can be used during pregnancy, bearing in mind however that side effects may still occur. Experience is limited concerning natalizumab, fingolimod, dimethyl-fumarate and induction treatments. Conclusion: At the time of prescription, patients must be informed of the possible consequences of immunosuppressants on fertility and of the need for contraception. Pregnancy must be planned and the treatment modified if necessary in a pre-conception time period adapted to the half-life of the drug, imperatively in relation with the prescriber of the immunosuppressive drugs. PMID:26490561

  9. Immunosuppressive drugs and fertility.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Clara; Rigot, Jean-Marc; Leroy, Maryse; Decanter, Christine; Le Mapihan, Kristell; Parent, Anne-Sophie; Le Guillou, Anne-Claire; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Dharancy, Sébastien; Noel, Christian; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppressive drugs are used in the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, as well as in transplantation. Frequently prescribed in young people, these treatments may have deleterious effects on fertility, pregnancy outcomes and the unborn child. This review aims to summarize the main gonadal side effects of immunosuppressants, to detail the effects on fertility and pregnancy of each class of drug, and to provide recommendations on the management of patients who are seen prior to starting or who are already receiving immunosuppressive treatment, allowing them in due course to bear children. The recommendations for use are established with a rather low level of proof, which needs to be taken into account in the patient management. Methotrexate, mycophenolate, and le- and teri-flunomide, cyclophosphamide, mitoxanthrone are contraindicated if pregnancy is desired due to their teratogenic effects, as well as gonadotoxic effects in the case of cyclophosphamide. Anti-TNF-alpha and mTOR-inhibitors are to be used cautiously if pregnancy is desired, since experience using these drugs is still relatively scarce. Azathioprine, glucocorticoids, mesalazine, anticalcineurins such as cyclosporine and tacrolimus, ß-interferon, glatiramer-acetate and chloroquine can be used during pregnancy, bearing in mind however that side effects may still occur. Experience is limited concerning natalizumab, fingolimod, dimethyl-fumarate and induction treatments. Conclusion: At the time of prescription, patients must be informed of the possible consequences of immunosuppressants on fertility and of the need for contraception. Pregnancy must be planned and the treatment modified if necessary in a pre-conception time period adapted to the half-life of the drug, imperatively in relation with the prescriber of the immunosuppressive drugs.

  10. Drug approval and surveillance.

    PubMed

    Potts, M

    1980-01-01

    This article argues that current regulations governing the licensing of drugs, particularly in the U.S., need to be changed and replaced by a system of provisional or conditional licensing and increased postmarketing surveillance of drug use. In terms of research and development of new forms of contraception, this proposal would have great impact. It is believed that the U.S./Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requirements--animal experiments and Phase 1 and 2 clinical trials--not only put an unacceptable financial burden on any institution attempting to develop new contraceptives, but do not demonstrably contribute to the reduction of risks. The author questions whether even if oral contraceptives introduced prior to new U.S./FDA regulations had been subject to these current regulations that convincing evidence would have been found to alert anyone to the now-known rare adverse effects, such as risk of thromboembolism. It is pointed out that these sorts of rare risks were uncovered by continuous screening processes which are not now a part of the FDA drug regulation requirements. The author also questions the politics of "conpulsory safety," such as might be legislated for regulated car safety belt use. Citing a partnership already established between government and private industry in high-risk/low cost ventures in the aerospace industry, the author sees no reason why such a relationship could not evolve in the pharmaceutical industry. In Britain, proposals have been made to establish a fund to compensate patients adversely affected by drugs which pharmaceutical companies would reimburse if proved negligent; such a fund may work in the U.S. under new regulations which stress postmarketing surveillance.

  11. Drug Information in Space Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayuse, Tina M.

    2009-01-01

    Published drug information is widely available for terrestrial conditions. However, information on dosing, administration, drug interactions, stability, and side effects is scant as it relates to use in Space Medicine. Multinational crews on board the International Space Station present additional challenges for drug information because medication nomenclature, information available for the drug as well as the intended use for the drug is not standard across countries. This presentation will look at unique needs for drug information and how the information is managed in Space Medicine. A review was conducted of the drug information requests submitted to the Johnson Space Center Pharmacy by Space Medicine practitioners, astronaut crewmembers and researchers. The information requested was defined and cataloged. A list of references used was maintained. The wide range of information was identified. Due to the information needs for the medications in the on-board medical kits, the Drug Monograph Project was created. A standard method for answering specific drug information questions was generated and maintained by the Johnson Space Center Pharmacy. The Drug Monograph Project will be presented. Topic-centered requests, including multinational drug information, drug-induced adverse reactions, and medication events due to the environment will be highlighted. Information management of the drug information will be explained. Future considerations for drug information needs will be outlined.

  12. 77 FR 71802 - Guidance on Investigational New Drug Applications for Positron Emission Tomography Drugs...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance on Investigational New Drug Applications for... ``Investigational New Drug Applications for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Drugs.'' The guidance is intended to assist manufacturers of PET drugs in submitting investigational new drug applications (INDs)....

  13. 76 FR 13880 - Investigational New Drug Applications and Abbreviated New Drug Applications; Technical Amendment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 312 and 314 Investigational New Drug Applications and Abbreviated New Drug Applications; Technical Amendment AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration... amending its investigational new drug application (IND) regulations and abbreviated new drug...

  14. Drug Usage and Attitude Toward Drugs Among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Herbert J.; Keir, Richard G.

    1971-01-01

    Results of the data presented suggest that there is considerable experimentation among college students with illegal drugs, especially marijuana. Their attitudes toward other drugs still seems cautious. Marijuana, however, seems-to be accepted and generally positively evaluated. (Author)

  15. Scaffold Repurposing of Old Drugs Towards New Cancer Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haijun; Wu, Jianlei; Gao, Yu; Chen, Haiying; Zhou, Jia

    2016-01-01

    As commented by the Nobelist James Black that "The most fruitful basis of the discovery of a new drug is to start with an old drug", drug repurposing represents an attractive drug discovery strategy. Despite the success of several repurposed drugs on the market, the ultimate therapeutic potential of a large number of non-cancer drugs is hindered during their repositioning due to various issues including the limited efficacy and intellectual property. With the increasing knowledge about the pharmacological properties and newly identified targets, the scaffolds of the old drugs emerge as a great treasure-trove towards new cancer drug discovery. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in the development of novel small molecules for cancer therapy by scaffold repurposing with highlighted examples. The relevant strategies, advantages, challenges and future research directions associated with this approach are also discussed.

  16. 77 FR 65198 - Generic Drug User Fee-Abbreviated New Drug Application, Prior Approval Supplement, and Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Generic Drug User Fee--Abbreviated New Drug Application, Prior Approval Supplement, and Drug Master File Fee Rates for Fiscal Year 2013 AGENCY: Food and Drug... the Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA), Prior Approval Supplement (PAS), and Drug Master...

  17. Projecting future drug expenditures: 2011.

    PubMed

    Doloresco, Fred; Fominaya, Cory; Schumock, Glen T; Vermeulen, Lee C; Matusiak, Linda; Hunkler, Robert J; Shah, Nilay D; Hoffman, James M

    2011-05-15

    PURPOSE. Drug expenditure trends in 2009 and 2010, projected drug expenditures for 2011, and factors likely to influence drug expenditures are discussed. SUMMARY. Various factors are likely to influence drug expenditures in 2011, including drugs in development, the diffusion of new drugs, generic drugs, health care reform, and biosimilars. Two distinct patterns of drug expenditures continue to exist. The dominant trend over the past several years is substantial moderation in expenditure growth for widely used drugs, primarily due to the ongoing introduction of generic medications for high-cost, frequently used medications and the influence of the economic downturn. The second pattern is substantial increases in expenditures for specialized medications, particularly in the outpatient setting. The influence of health care reform, the economy, and the emergence of biosimilars will be important trends to follow over the next several years, but they are unlikely to have substantial impact on drug expenditures in 2011. From 2008 to 2009, total U.S. drug expenditures increased by 5.2%, with total spending rising from $284.8 billion to $299.5 billion. Growth in drug expenditures in clinics grew by 5.1% from 2008 to 2009. Hospital drug expenditures increased at the moderate rate of 2.8% from 2008 to 2009; through the first nine months of 2010, hospital drug expenditures increased by only 0.8% compared with the same period in 2009. CONCLUSION. For 2011, we project a 3-5% increase in drug expenditures in outpatient settings, a 4-6% increase in expenditures for clinic-administered drugs, and a 1-3% increase in hospital drug expenditures.

  18. Over-the-Counter Drugs: A Challenge for Drug Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serrone, David M.

    1973-01-01

    Drug education should be a complete program including information on the all too frequently overused group of self medicaments. Misuse of these drugs by self medication may, in many circumstances, lead to serious consequences. Knowledge of their use should be an effort of every drug education program. (Author)

  19. Federal Strategy for Drug Abuse and Drug Traffic Prevention 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strategy Council on Drug Abuse, Washington, DC.

    This represents an approach to the Nation's drug abuse problem and reflects the views of departments and agencies involved in the federal drug control and prevention effort, public interest groups and members of Congress. It describes a comprehensive strategy for federal activities relating to drug abuse prevention and control. Major topics…

  20. Federal Strategy for Drug Abuse and Drug Traffic Prevention 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strategy Council on Drug Abuse, Washington, DC.

    The Drug Abuse Office and Treatment Act of 1972 directed the development and promulgation of a comprehensive, coordinated long-term Federal strategy for all drug abuse prevention and drug traffic control functions conducted, sponsored, or supported by the Federal Government. This second annual report of the Strategy Council builds on the…

  1. Drug models of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Steeds, Hannah; Carhart-Harris, Robin L; Stone, James M

    2015-02-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex mental health disorder with positive, negative and cognitive symptom domains. Approximately one third of patients are resistant to currently available medication. New therapeutic targets and a better understanding of the basic biological processes that drive pathogenesis are needed in order to develop therapies that will improve quality of life for these patients. Several drugs that act on neurotransmitter systems in the brain have been suggested to model aspects of schizophrenia in animals and in man. In this paper, we selectively review findings from dopaminergic, glutamatergic, serotonergic, cannabinoid, GABA, cholinergic and kappa opioid pharmacological drug models to evaluate their similarity to schizophrenia. Understanding the interactions between these different neurotransmitter systems and their relationship with symptoms will be an important step towards building a coherent hypothesis for the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. PMID:25653831

  2. Drugs and sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Antonio; Scimeca, Giuseppe; Marino, Antonio G; Mento, Carmela; Micò, Umberto; Romeo, Vincenzo M; Pandolfo, Gianluca; Zoccali, Rocco; Muscatello, Maria R A

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the association between drugs and sexual behavior in a sample of polydrug substance abusers recruited from several Italian therapeutic communities; participants were 90 polydrug substance abusers (opiates, cocaine, amphetamine, inhalants, marijuana/sedatives or hallucinogens abusers) who were compared with 90 nonsubstance-abusing individuals. Sexual behavior was measured by the Italian version of the Sex and the Average Woman (or Man; SAWM), a questionnaire that assesses different kind of sexual attitudes. Results showed that drug-abusing individuals are particularly inclined to search for sexual intercourse and are open to different kinds of sexual experiences; however, they have difficulties in establishing committed and deep relationships with their partners, showing signs of inhibition, affective detachment or anger. Their sexual lives are also surrounded by negative emotions, disturbing thoughts and maladjusted behaviors. The importance of integrating sexual problems into therapeutic strategies is discussed. PMID:23457886

  3. [Drug therapy for cough].

    PubMed

    Koskela, Heikki; Naaranlahti, Toivo

    2016-01-01

    An efficient therapy for cough usually requires identification and treatment of the underlying disease, like asthma. However an underlying disease in cough is not found in all cases and conventional treatment of the underlying disease is ineffective against cough. Drug therapy options are available also for these situations. Honey or menthol can be tried for cough associated with respitatory infections, antihistamines for cough associated with allergic rhinitis, blockers of the leukotriene receptor or muscarinic receptor for asthma-associated cough and morphine for cough associated with a malignant disease. Menthol, blockers of the muscarinic receptor, or dextrometorphan can be tried for prolonged idiopathic cough. Codeine is not necessary in the treatment of cough. Refraining from drug treatment should always be considered. PMID:27089619

  4. Drug mechanisms in anxiety.

    PubMed

    Bourin, M; Hascoët, M

    2001-02-01

    The most common and successful therapyfor the majority of patients suffering from anxiety is treatment with benzodiazepines (BZDs). The problem of drug-induced dependency following treatment with these drugs may be avoided by developing more selective and specific BZD compounds, such as 2,3-substituted BZDs. Alternative approaches to the treatment of anxiety include the following: (i) antidepressants such as the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), which are active in treating most anxiety disorders, including GAD; (ii) metabotropic glutamate (mGluR2) receptor agonists, which negatively modulate glutamate neurotransmission, and CRF antagonists, which have been proposed to exhibit anxiolytic properties; (iii) 5-HT1A receptor agonists which have demonstrated anxiolytic effects in clinical studies, although preclinical studies have reported weak or variable effects; (iv) 5-HT moduline antagonists, as well as 5-HT2C receptor antagonists, which may have anxiolytic properties; and, finally, (v) other approaches which are under investigation, including CCK2 antagonists.

  5. Pharmacogenetics of analgesic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Giovanna; Gubbay, Anthony; Branford, Ruth; Sato, Hiroe

    2013-01-01

    Summary points • Individual variability in pain perception and differences in the efficacy of analgesic drugs are complex phenomena and are partly genetically predetermined. • Analgesics act in various ways on the peripheral and central pain pathways and are regarded as one of the most valuable but equally dangerous groups of medications. • While pharmacokinetic properties of drugs, metabolism in particular, have been scrutinised by genotype–phenotype correlation studies, the clinical significance of inherited variants in genes governing pharmacodynamics of analgesics remains largely unexplored (apart from the µ-opioid receptor). • Lack of replication of the findings from one study to another makes meaningful personalised analgesic regime still a distant future. • This narrative review will focus on findings related to pharmacogenetics of commonly used analgesic medications and highlight authors’ views on future clinical implications of pharmacogenetics in the context of pharmacological treatment of chronic pain. PMID:26516523

  6. [Drug therapy for cough].

    PubMed

    Koskela, Heikki; Naaranlahti, Toivo

    2016-01-01

    An efficient therapy for cough usually requires identification and treatment of the underlying disease, like asthma. However an underlying disease in cough is not found in all cases and conventional treatment of the underlying disease is ineffective against cough. Drug therapy options are available also for these situations. Honey or menthol can be tried for cough associated with respitatory infections, antihistamines for cough associated with allergic rhinitis, blockers of the leukotriene receptor or muscarinic receptor for asthma-associated cough and morphine for cough associated with a malignant disease. Menthol, blockers of the muscarinic receptor, or dextrometorphan can be tried for prolonged idiopathic cough. Codeine is not necessary in the treatment of cough. Refraining from drug treatment should always be considered.

  7. Drugging Membrane Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hang; Flynn, Aaron D.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of therapeutics target membrane proteins, accessible on the surface of cells, to alter cellular signaling. Cells use membrane proteins to transduce signals into cells, transport ions and molecules, bind the cell to a surface or substrate, and catalyze reactions. Newly devised technologies allow us to drug conventionally “undruggable” regions of membrane proteins, enabling modulation of protein–protein, protein–lipid, and protein–nucleic acid interactions. In this review, we survey the state of the art in high-throughput screening and rational design in drug discovery, and we evaluate the advances in biological understanding and technological capacity that will drive pharmacotherapy forward against unorthodox membrane protein targets. PMID:26863923

  8. Curiosities in drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Stephen C; Waring, Rosemary H; Smith, Robert L

    2014-07-01

    1. It is inevitable that during some xenobiotic biotransformation studies, a certain metabolite or degradation product arises of which the identity is uncertain, the route of formation is ambiguous, or it is just a plain mystery. 2. The following communication draws attention to three drugs reported in the literature, chlorphentermine, phenothiazine and aminopyrine, where after many years of investigation there still exists uncertainty over some of their metabolites. Noticeably, these three examples probably involve (potential) interaction of a nitrogen centre within the drug molecule. 3. It is hoped that the resurrection and assemblage of these data will offer interesting reading and that these examples may prove sufficiently intriguing to motivate further exploration and some resolution of these lingering concerns. PMID:24779638

  9. Transdermal drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Prausnitz, Mark R.; Langer, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery has made an important contribution to medical practice, but has yet to fully achieve its potential as an alternative to oral delivery and hypodermic injections. First-generation transdermal delivery systems have continued their steady increase in clinical use for delivery of small, lipophilic, low-dose drugs. Second-generation delivery systems using chemical enhancers, non-cavitational ultrasound and iontophoresis have also resulted in clinical products; the ability of iontophoresis to control delivery rates in real time provides added functionality. Third-generation delivery systems target their effects to skin’s barrier layer of stratum corneum using microneedles, thermal ablation, microdermabrasion, electroporation and cavitational ultrasound. Microneedles and thermal ablation are currently progressing through clinical trials for delivery of macromolecules and vaccines, such as insulin, parathyroid hormone and influenza vaccine. Using these novel second- and third-generation enhancement strategies, transdermal delivery is poised to significantly increase impact on medicine. PMID:18997767

  10. Drug models of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Steeds, Hannah; Carhart-Harris, Robin L.

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex mental health disorder with positive, negative and cognitive symptom domains. Approximately one third of patients are resistant to currently available medication. New therapeutic targets and a better understanding of the basic biological processes that drive pathogenesis are needed in order to develop therapies that will improve quality of life for these patients. Several drugs that act on neurotransmitter systems in the brain have been suggested to model aspects of schizophrenia in animals and in man. In this paper, we selectively review findings from dopaminergic, glutamatergic, serotonergic, cannabinoid, GABA, cholinergic and kappa opioid pharmacological drug models to evaluate their similarity to schizophrenia. Understanding the interactions between these different neurotransmitter systems and their relationship with symptoms will be an important step towards building a coherent hypothesis for the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. PMID:25653831

  11. Pharmacophores in Drug Research.

    PubMed

    Langer, Thierry

    2010-07-12

    The pharmacophore concept in modern drug research is highlighted and the most important use examples and success stories are reviewed. These include papers from method development as well as from application areas. As indicated by the number of publications available, the pharmacophore approach has proven to be extremely useful as interface between medicinal and computational chemistry, both in virtual screening and library design for efficient hit discovery, but also in the optimization of lead compounds to clinical candidates. Recent studies focus on the usage of parallel screening using pharmacophore models for bio-activity profiling and early stage risk assessment of potential side effects and toxicity due to interaction of drug candidates with anti-targets. PMID:27463325

  12. ISMP Adverse Drug Reactions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this feature is to heighten awareness of specific adverse drug reactions (ADRs), discuss methods of prevention, and promote reporting of ADRs to the US Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) MedWatch program (800-FDA-1088). If you have reported an interesting, preventable ADR to MedWatch, please consider sharing the account with our readers. Write to Dr. Mancano at ISMP, 200 Lakeside Drive, Suite 200, Horsham, PA 19044 (phone: 215-707-4936; e-mail: mmancano@temple.edu). Your report will be published anonymously unless otherwise requested. This feature is provided by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) in cooperation with the FDA’s MedWatch program and Temple University School of Pharmacy. ISMP is an FDA MedWatch partner. PMID:24421544

  13. Microdosing of protein drugs.

    PubMed

    Rowland, M

    2016-02-01

    Poor pharmacokinetics (PK) can seriously limit clinical utility. Knowing early whether a new compound is likely to have the desired PK profile at therapeutic doses is therefore important. One approach, microdosing, has shown high success with small molecular weight compounds, despite early skepticism. Vlaming et al. report the first, and successful, clinical application of a microdose of a humanized recombinant protein. But what is the likely success for this class of drugs more generally?

  14. [Pollinosis: drug treatments].

    PubMed

    Harf, R

    2013-06-01

    The medical treatment of allergic rhino-conjunctivitis involves different classes of drugs administered locally or by general route. They belong to three main classes, antihistamines, steroids and mast cell stabilizers. Since it is a relatively benign and also highly common disease, treatment options are limited by possible, even mild, side effects and by cost efficacy restriction. In the more severe forms of the condition, treatment efficacy remains unsatisfactory.

  15. The Drug Alternative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winn, Mitchell

    While this book is directed toward educators and counselors, its concepts are applicable to all who work with youth, including parents. What the author does is to look honestly at one fact--that a linkage exists between serious drug misuse and lack of self-esteem--and to turn this fact around to encourage the building of self-esteem from K-12 as…

  16. Drug abuse in Slovak Republic.

    PubMed

    Kresanek, Jaroslav; Plackova, Silvia; Caganova, Blazena; Klobusicka, Zora

    2005-01-01

    The drug abusing structure has dramatically changed since 1989. While in 1989 the sniffing of the fluid drugs represented 98% of the global drug abuse, the most abused drugs were: heroin, marijuana, cocaine, amphetamine and its derivatives. During last 10 years situation with drug abuse has changed. Currently the most abused drugs: cannabinoides, amphetamines. The plant drugs (Datura stramonium, hallucinogenic mushrooms Psilocybe semilanceata, nutmeg--the seed of Myristica fragrans) combined with the alcohol are popular among the young abusers. According to an analysis of the phone consultations in our Toxicological Information Centre (TIC) we found out, that the number of intoxications with the plant drugs has increased five times during the last year (comparing with the year 2000), because of their easy availability, low price and quick spreading of information.

  17. RAS - Screens & Assays - Drug Discovery

    Cancer.gov

    The RAS Drug Discovery group aims to develop assays that will reveal aspects of RAS biology upon which cancer cells depend. Successful assay formats are made available for high-throughput screening programs to yield potentially effective drug compounds.

  18. Drugs Approved for Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Lung Cancer This page lists cancer ... in lung cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Abitrexate ( ...

  19. Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer This page lists cancer ... in bladder cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer Atezolizumab Cisplatin Doxorubicin Hydrochloride ...

  20. Drugs Approved for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Hodgkin Lymphoma This page lists cancer ... in Hodgkin lymphoma that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Hodgkin Lymphoma Adcetris (Brentuximab Vedotin) Ambochlorin ( ...

  1. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer This page lists cancer ... in pancreatic cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer Abraxane (Paclitaxel Albumin-stabilized ...

  2. Drugs Approved for Testicular Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Testicular Cancer This page lists cancer ... in testicular cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Testicular Cancer Blenoxane (Bleomycin) Bleomycin Cisplatin ...

  3. Drugs Approved for Malignant Mesothelioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Malignant Mesothelioma This page lists cancer ... in malignant mesothelioma that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Malignant Mesothelioma Alimta (Pemetrexed Disodium) Pemetrexed ...

  4. Drugs Approved for Vulvar Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Vulvar Cancer This page lists cancer ... in vulvar cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved to Prevent Vulvar Cancer Gardasil (Recombinant HPV ...

  5. Drugs Approved for Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Cervical Cancer This page lists cancer ... in cervical cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved to Prevent Cervical Cancer Cervarix (Recombinant HPV ...

  6. Drugs Approved for Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Skin Cancer This page lists cancer ... in skin cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Basal Cell Carcinoma Aldara (Imiquimod) Efudex ( ...

  7. Comparing Osteoporosis Drugs: The Bisphosphonates

    MedlinePlus

    Drugs to Treat Low Bone Density Comparing Osteoporosis Drugs: The Bisphosphonates What is osteoporosis (low bone density)? Osteoporosis is a condition in which the body does not build enough new bone. ...

  8. Drugs in the Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Steven E.; Linder, Ronald L.

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine at what grade levels and to what extent upper elementary school students used selected psychoactive drugs, reasons for use, and availability of selected drugs within the school. (Author)

  9. Understanding Drug Use and Addiction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Charts Emerging Trends and Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine ... Drugs Anabolic Steroids Cigarettes and Other Tobacco Products Cocaine Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse Electronic Cigarettes (e- ...

  10. Advances in ophthalmic drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Peter W J; Khutoryanskiy, Vitaliy V

    2014-12-01

    Various strategies for ocular drug delivery are considered; from basic formulation techniques for improving availability of drugs; viscosity enhancers and mucoadhesives aid drug retention and penetration enhancers promote drug transport into the eye. The use of drug-loaded contact lenses and ocular inserts allows drugs to be better placed where they are needed for more direct delivery. Developments in ocular implants gives a means to overcome the physical barriers that traditionally prevented effective treatment. Implant technologies are under development allowing long-term drug delivery from a single procedure, these devices allow posterior chamber diseases to be effectively treated. Future developments could bring artificial corneas to eliminate the need for donor tissue and one-off implantable drug depots lasting the patient's lifetime.

  11. Would decriminalising drugs improve care?

    PubMed

    Riddell, Stephen

    The decriminalisation of illegal drugs is controversial. This article examines the debate in the UK, and argues that a change in the laws would help to remove stigma and consequently change health professionals' attitudes towards drug users and improve services.

  12. Medications and Drug Allergic Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drug Guide Conditions Dictionary Just for Kids Library School Tools Videos Virtual Allergist Education & Training Careers in ... reaction to a medication. These include: genetics, body chemistry, frequent drug exposure or the presence of an ...

  13. Drugs: What You Should Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... people on the hamster wheel of chasing a high just to feel better. Commonly abused drugs include: ... — or a friend — may be addicted to drugs, talk to your doctor , school counselor , or nurse. They can help you get ...

  14. Medical Consequences of Drug Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trends and Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Prescription ... Public Health What Can We Do About the Heroin Overdose Epidemic? NIDA's Publication Series Brain Power DrugFacts ...

  15. Trends in Prescription Drug Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trends and Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Prescription ... View all ​Research Reports Opioids: The Prescription Drug & Heroin Overdose Epidemic (HHS website) NIDA Home Site Map ...

  16. Drug interactions with quinolones.

    PubMed

    Davies, B I; Maesen, F P

    1989-01-01

    Numerous drug interactions with the new 4-quinolone antimicrobial agents have now been established. Many, but not all, quinolones are extensively metabolized and can have inhibitory effects on the liver cytochrome P450 enzyme system, leading to reduced metabolism and clearance of certain other drugs that are normally thus eliminated. Examples include the highly significant interaction between enoxacin and theophylline and the interaction between ciprofloxacin and theophylline, which may also be important clinically. The quinolone-caffeine interaction does not usually cause problems. Absorption of all quinolones from the stomach and small intestine is greatly reduced by antacids containing magnesium or aluminium salts, including sucralfate, probably as a result of the formation of nonabsorbable chelates. Cimetidine can reduce the clearance of pefloxacin (but not of ciprofloxacin) through its effects on liver metabolism, although newer H2-inhibitors appear not to have these effects. Probenecid reduces the renal elimination of some quinolones by inhibiting tubular secretion. New evidence is now coming to light of interactions between certain nonsteroid antiinflammatory drugs (e.g., fenbufen), quinolones, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors, producing increased cerebral excitation and, sometimes, epileptiform convulsions. PMID:2570456

  17. 21 CFR 201.105 - Veterinary drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Veterinary drugs. 201.105 Section 201.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Exemptions From Adequate Directions for Use § 201.105 Veterinary drugs. A drug subject to...

  18. 21 CFR 201.105 - Veterinary drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Veterinary drugs. 201.105 Section 201.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Exemptions From Adequate Directions for Use § 201.105 Veterinary drugs. A drug subject to...

  19. 21 CFR 201.105 - Veterinary drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Veterinary drugs. 201.105 Section 201.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Exemptions From Adequate Directions for Use § 201.105 Veterinary drugs. A drug subject to...

  20. 21 CFR 201.105 - Veterinary drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Veterinary drugs. 201.105 Section 201.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Exemptions From Adequate Directions for Use § 201.105 Veterinary drugs. A drug subject to...

  1. 21 CFR 201.105 - Veterinary drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Veterinary drugs. 201.105 Section 201.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Exemptions From Adequate Directions for Use § 201.105 Veterinary drugs. A drug subject to...

  2. Patients' perceptions of psychotropic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Helman, Cecil G.

    1981-01-01

    This pilot study examined patients' perceptions of, and attitudes towards, psychotropic drug-taking. Fifty chronic users of benzodiazepines in two Middlesex group practices were interviewed, and data were collected on their knowledge, experience and expectations of these drugs. The data suggest that psychotropic drug-taking has become an important part of many patients' self-image and of their social relationships, and that these factors should be taken into account when dealing with psychological dependence on psychotropic drugs. PMID:7265056

  3. Adverse ocular reactions to drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Spiteri, M. A.; James, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs acting on various parts of the body may also affect the eye insidiously. Increased awareness of such drug toxicity by the prescribing doctor should encourage him to consider effects on the cornea, lens, retina, optic nerve and elsewhere when checking the patient's progress. The following review concerns adverse ocular effects of systemic drug administration. PMID:6356101

  4. Drug Abuse in Southeast Asia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scorzelli, James F.

    This report examines the incidence of drug abuse and the methods of treatment and prevention of drug abuse used in Southeast Asia. Countries studied include Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, Indonesia, and the Philippines. Because of Malaysia's intensive effort to eliminate its drug abuse problem, emphasis is placed on this country's treatment and…

  5. Drug Testing in Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjorklun, Eugene C.; Gluckman, Ivan B., Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Public concern about use of drugs by young people in the United States remains high and efforts to counter drug abuse through education and intervention continue. While drug testing of athletes at the collegiate level is fairly common, legal restraints make testing less common at the secondary school level. After citing numerous statistics…

  6. Drug Advertising and the FDA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levesque, Cynthia

    With increases in consumer focused advertising for prescription drugs, the Federal Drug Administration has renewed efforts to protect the public from false advertising. In 1982, it charged that the press kits Eli Lilly and Company distributed to reporters on its new antiarthritis drug, Oraflex, misrepresented the product. It recommended that Lilly…

  7. The Biochemistry of Psychoactive Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abood, Leo G.

    The effect of psychochemicals on the higher central nervous system, and recent theories regarding drug addiction are discussed. The effect of drugs upon each individual is different. Many drugs have no effect on the brain because of a blood-brain barrier. However, alterations in the rate and character of one's metabolic pattern can lead to…

  8. National Drug Control Strategy, 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    The White House, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This report presents a summary of the Fiscal Year 2007 Budget for the National Drug Control Strategy within the three key priority areas; education and community action, treatment and intervention, and disruption in the illegal drug market. The first chapter, "Stopping Drug Use Before It Starts," outlines the Administration's work to prevent the…

  9. National Drug Control Strategy, 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of National Drug Control Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In May of 2010, President Obama released the Administration's inaugural "National Drug Control Strategy". Based on the premise that drug use and its consequences pose a threat not just to public safety, but also to public health, the 2010 "Strategy" represented the first comprehensive rebalancing of Federal drug control policy in the nearly 40…

  10. Drug Misuse in Older People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raffoul, Paul R.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Drug misuse of prescription and OTC drugs was studied among 67 older subjects to determine the frequency of misuse and relationship to various psychosocial, medical and pharmacological factors. Drug misuse was found among 43 percent of subjects with number of prescribing physicians and number of pharmacies directly related to misuse. (Author)

  11. Club Drugs. The DAWN Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Office of Applied Studies.

    This report was prepared in response to requests from the media, law enforcement, and community leaders for information about club drugs. By being able to utilize statistics from hospital emergency departments and by compiling statistics on drug-related deaths, the Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN) is able to alert parents, educators, and others…

  12. Drug Education: Is Ignorance Bliss?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zazzaro, Joanne

    1973-01-01

    Explains that drug education in schools has failed to work the way schoolmen expected, and may have cause more harm than good. Contends that just knowing about overdoses and chromosome damage hasn't convinced students to steer clear of drugs. Describes Boulder Valley Public Schools program for integrating drug information into broader mental…

  13. Aptamers as Both Drugs and Drug-Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Ashrafuzzaman, Md.

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers are short nucleic acid oligos. They may serve as both drugs and drug-carriers. Their use as diagnostic tools is also evident. They can be generated using various experimental, theoretical, and computational techniques. The systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment which uses iterative screening of nucleic acid libraries is a popular experimental technique. Theory inspired methodology entropy-based seed-and-grow strategy that designs aptamer templates to bind specifically to targets is another one. Aptamers are predicted to be highly useful in producing general drugs and theranostic drugs occasionally for certain diseases like cancer, Alzheimer's disease, and so on. They bind to various targets like lipids, nucleic acids, proteins, small organic compounds, and even entire organisms. Aptamers may also serve as drug-carriers or nanoparticles helping drugs to get released in specific target regions. Due to better target specific physical binding properties aptamers cause less off-target toxicity effects. Therefore, search for aptamer based drugs, drug-carriers, and even diagnostic tools is expanding fast. The biophysical properties in relation to the target specific binding phenomena of aptamers, energetics behind the aptamer transport of drugs, and the consequent biological implications will be discussed. This review will open up avenues leading to novel drug discovery and drug delivery. PMID:25295268

  14. Glutamatergic transmission in drug reward: implications for drug addiction

    PubMed Central

    D'Souza, Manoranjan S.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals addicted to drugs of abuse such as alcohol, nicotine, cocaine, and heroin are a significant burden on healthcare systems all over the world. The positive reinforcing (rewarding) effects of the above mentioned drugs play a major role in the initiation and maintenance of the drug-taking habit. Thus, understanding the neurochemical mechanisms underlying the reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse is critical to reducing the burden of drug addiction in society. Over the last two decades, there has been an increasing focus on the role of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate in drug addiction. In this review, pharmacological and genetic evidence supporting the role of glutamate in mediating the rewarding effects of the above described drugs of abuse will be discussed. Further, the review will discuss the role of glutamate transmission in two complex heterogeneous brain regions, namely the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and the ventral tegmental area (VTA), which mediate the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse. In addition, several medications approved by the Food and Drug Administration that act by blocking glutamate transmission will be discussed in the context of drug reward. Finally, this review will discuss future studies needed to address currently unanswered gaps in knowledge, which will further elucidate the role of glutamate in the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse. PMID:26594139

  15. Drug-drug plasma protein binding interactions of ivacaftor.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Elena K; Huang, Johnny X; Carbone, Vincenzo; Baker, Mark; Azad, Mohammad A K; Cooper, Matthew A; Li, Jian; Velkov, Tony

    2015-06-01

    Ivacaftor is a novel cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) potentiator that improves the pulmonary function for patients with CF bearing a G551D CFTR-protein mutation. Because ivacaftor is highly bound (>97%) to plasma proteins, there is the strong possibility that co-administered CF drugs may compete for the same plasma protein binding sites and impact the free drug concentration. This, in turn, could lead to drastic changes in the in vivo efficacy of ivacaftor and therapeutic outcomes. This biochemical study compares the binding affinity of ivacaftor and co-administered CF drugs for human serum albumin (HSA) and α1 -acid glycoprotein (AGP) using surface plasmon resonance and fluorimetric binding assays that measure the displacement of site-selective probes. Because of their ability to strongly compete for the ivacaftor binding sites on HSA and AGP, drug-drug interactions between ivacaftor are to be expected with ducosate, montelukast, ibuprofen, dicloxacillin, omeprazole, and loratadine. The significance of these plasma protein drug-drug interactions is also interpreted in terms of molecular docking simulations. This in vitro study provides valuable insights into the plasma protein drug-drug interactions of ivacaftor with co-administered CF drugs. The data may prove useful in future clinical trials for a staggered treatment that aims to maximize the effective free drug concentration and clinical efficacy of ivacaftor. PMID:25707701

  16. Drug abuse and illicit drug use in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed Central

    Canino, G; Anthony, J C; Freeman, D H; Shrout, P; Rubio-Stipec, M

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Based on an epidemiologic field survey of community households in Puerto Rico, this study estimates the frequency of illicit drug use and clinically defined drug abuse and/or dependence syndromes. Results are compared with those from surveys on the United States mainland. Suspected risk factors are studied as well, with a special focus on childhood misbehavior. METHODS. Trained lay interviewers administered a Spanish Diagnostic Interview Schedule to 912 respondents aged 17 to 68 years who were selected by multistage probability sampling of island households. RESULTS. An estimated 8.2% of the population had a history of illicit drug use and 1.2% qualified for a standardized lifetime diagnosis of drug abuse, dependence, or both. An estimated 18.4% of the male drug users and 7.7% of the female drug users met criteria for drug abuse and/or dependence. A history of drug use was related to the diagnoses of alcohol abuse and/or dependence and antisocial personality, but few persons who had used illicit drugs at least once in their lifetime reported a history of receiving treatment for alcohol, drug, or mental health problems. CONCLUSIONS. The data were consistent with a suspected association between level of childhood misbehavior and occurrence of illicit drug use, even after statistical control for potentially confounding variables. PMID:8427322

  17. Glutamatergic transmission in drug reward: implications for drug addiction.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Manoranjan S

    2015-01-01

    Individuals addicted to drugs of abuse such as alcohol, nicotine, cocaine, and heroin are a significant burden on healthcare systems all over the world. The positive reinforcing (rewarding) effects of the above mentioned drugs play a major role in the initiation and maintenance of the drug-taking habit. Thus, understanding the neurochemical mechanisms underlying the reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse is critical to reducing the burden of drug addiction in society. Over the last two decades, there has been an increasing focus on the role of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate in drug addiction. In this review, pharmacological and genetic evidence supporting the role of glutamate in mediating the rewarding effects of the above described drugs of abuse will be discussed. Further, the review will discuss the role of glutamate transmission in two complex heterogeneous brain regions, namely the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and the ventral tegmental area (VTA), which mediate the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse. In addition, several medications approved by the Food and Drug Administration that act by blocking glutamate transmission will be discussed in the context of drug reward. Finally, this review will discuss future studies needed to address currently unanswered gaps in knowledge, which will further elucidate the role of glutamate in the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse. PMID:26594139

  18. Glutamatergic transmission in drug reward: implications for drug addiction.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Manoranjan S

    2015-01-01

    Individuals addicted to drugs of abuse such as alcohol, nicotine, cocaine, and heroin are a significant burden on healthcare systems all over the world. The positive reinforcing (rewarding) effects of the above mentioned drugs play a major role in the initiation and maintenance of the drug-taking habit. Thus, understanding the neurochemical mechanisms underlying the reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse is critical to reducing the burden of drug addiction in society. Over the last two decades, there has been an increasing focus on the role of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate in drug addiction. In this review, pharmacological and genetic evidence supporting the role of glutamate in mediating the rewarding effects of the above described drugs of abuse will be discussed. Further, the review will discuss the role of glutamate transmission in two complex heterogeneous brain regions, namely the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and the ventral tegmental area (VTA), which mediate the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse. In addition, several medications approved by the Food and Drug Administration that act by blocking glutamate transmission will be discussed in the context of drug reward. Finally, this review will discuss future studies needed to address currently unanswered gaps in knowledge, which will further elucidate the role of glutamate in the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse.

  19. [Customizing dosage drugs what contribution in therapeutic drug monitoring?].

    PubMed

    Abdessadek, Mohammed; Magoul, Rabia; Amarti, Afaf; El Ouezzani, Seloua; Khabbal, Youssef

    2014-01-01

    Drug response is often variable from an individual to another: the same dose of drug administered to different patients could cause variable pharmacological effects in nature and intensity. Those effects are often the result of variability in drugs pharmacokinetics (absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination) which alter their bioavailability. In fact, two factors should be taken into account: the disease(s) from which the patient suffers, and the associated drugs, because many drug interactions may alter their pharmacokinetics causing consequently quite enough of different therapeutic effects. The choice of the assay of the drug subject in monitoring is crucial, it allows quantifying the in vivo dose of the drug and the quality of compliance thereof, the pharmacokinetic characteristics allows the clinician to adjust the dosage by different approaches so that plasma concentrations are included in the therapeutic range. Therapeutic monitoring aims to increase clinical efficacy and to minimize toxicity.

  20. Preventing and Recognizing Prescription Drug Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abuse » Preventing and recognizing prescription drug abuse Prescription Drug Abuse Email Facebook Twitter Preventing and recognizing prescription drug abuse To ensure proper medical care, patients should discuss ...