Sample records for noradrenaline adrenaline dopamine

  1. Effects of propofol and sevoflurane on isolated human umbilical arteries pre-contracted with dopamine, adrenaline and noradrenaline.

    PubMed

    Gunduz, Ergun; Arun, Oguzhan; Bagci, Sengal Taylan; Oc, Bahar; Salman, Alper; Yilmaz, Setenay Arzu; Celik, Cetin; Duman, Ates

    2015-05-01

    To assess the effects of propofol and sevoflurane on the contraction elicited by dopamine, adrenaline and noradrenaline on isolated human umbilical arteries. Umbilical arteries were cut into endothelium-denuded spiral strips and suspended in organ baths containing Krebs-Henseleit solution bubbled with O2 +CO2 mixture. Control contraction to phenylephrine (10(-5)  M) was recorded. Response curves were obtained to 10(-5)  M dopamine, 10(-5)  M adrenaline or 10(-5)  M noradrenaline. Afterwards, either cumulative propofol (10(-6)  M, 10(-5)  M and 10(-4)  M) or cumulative sevoflurane (1.2%, 2.4% and 3.6%) was added to the organ bath, and the responses were recorded. Responses are expressed percentage of phenylephrine-induced contraction (mean ± standard deviation) (P < 0.05 = significance). Propofol and sevoflurane elicited concentration-dependent relaxations in strips pre-contracted with dopamine, adrenaline and noradrenaline (P < 0.05). Highest (10(-4)  M) concentration of propofol caused significantly higher relaxation compared with the highest (3.6%) concentration of sevoflurane in the contraction elicited by dopamine. High (10(-5)  M) and highest concentrations of propofol caused significantly higher relaxation compared with the high (2.4%) and highest concentrations of sevoflurane on the contraction elicited by adrenaline. High and highest concentrations of sevoflurane caused significantly higher relaxation compared with the high and highest concentrations of propofol on the contraction elicited by noradrenaline. Dopamine, adrenaline and noradrenaline elicit contractions in human umbilical arteries, and noradrenaline causes the highest contraction. Both propofol and sevoflurane inhibit these contractions in a dose-dependent manner. Propofol caused greater relaxation in the contractions elicited by dopamine and adrenaline while sevoflurane caused greater relaxation in the contraction elicited by noradrenaline. © 2014 The Authors

  2. Rotational Spectra of Adrenaline and Noradrenaline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortijo, V.; López, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.

    2009-06-01

    The emergence of Laser Ablation Molecular Beam Fourier Transform Microwave (LA-MB-FTMW) spectroscopy has rendered accessible the gas-phase study of solid biomolecules with high melting points. Among the biomolecules to benefit from this technique, neurotransmitters have received special attention due to the lack of experimental information and their biological relevance. As a continuation of the we present the study of adrenaline and noradrenaline. The comparison between the experimental rotational and ^{14}N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants and those calculated ab initio provide a definitive test for molecular structures and confirm unambiguously the identification of four conformers of adrenaline and three conformers of noradrenaline. Their relative population in the jet has been evaluated by relative intensity measurements of selected rotational transitions. The most abundant conformer in both neurotransmitters present an extended AG configuration with a O-H\\cdotsN hydrogen bond in the side chain. J.L. Alonso, M.E. Sanz, J.C. López and V. Cortijo, J. Am. Chem. Soc. (in press), 2009

  3. The effects of adrenaline, noradrenaline and isoprenaline on inhibitory α- and β-adrenoceptors in the longitudinal muscle of the guinea-pig ileum

    PubMed Central

    Kosterlitz, H. W.; Lydon, R. J.; Watt, A. J.

    1970-01-01

    1. Two preparations, a segment of the ileum and the myenteric plexuslongitudinal muscle preparation, have been used for an analysis of the inhibitory effects of adrenaline, noradrenaline and isoprenaline on the contractor responses of the longitudinal muscle to acetylcholine or to electrical, coaxial or field, stimulation. 2. Since the inhibitory effects of adrenaline, noradrenaline and isoprenaline on the acetylcholine-induced contractions were not affected by phenoxybenzamine but were antagonized by propranolol, it is concluded that β-adrenoceptors are present on the muscle cells. 3. The responses to electrical stimulation were suppressed by adrenaline or noradrenaline but only partly inhibited by isoprenaline. Propranolol antagonized the effect of isoprenaline and, to some extent, that of noradrenaline, but scarcely affected the action of adrenaline. Phenoxybenzamine, on the other hand, antagonized most of the effect of adrenaline and, to some extent, that of noradrenaline; it usually potentiated the effect of isoprenaline. 4. The output of acetylcholine evoked by electrical stimulation was diminished by adrenaline or noradrenaline but was not affected by isoprenaline. The depressant effect on acetylcholine release was antagonized by phenoxybenzamine but not affected by propranolol; therefore these effects of adrenaline and noradrenaline are mediated by α-adrenoceptors. 5. It may be assumed that α-adrenoceptors in situ are stimulated mainly by circulating adrenaline and possibly noradrenaline and thus cause a prejunctional inhibition at the nerve-smooth muscle junction. PMID:5425280

  4. Free adrenaline and noradrenaline excretion related to occupational stress.

    PubMed Central

    Timio, M; Gentili, S; Pede, S

    1979-01-01

    Urinary levels of free adrenaline and noradrenaline were measured in two groups of healthy male industrial workers exposed to alternate four-day periods of working conditions with and without time stress, to test the hypothesis that the sympathetic nervous system is overactivated by occupational stress. Thirty confectionary workers alternated piece-work (payment by results) and work with a fixed daily wage while 30 metal workers alternated work on an assembly line with work off it. Under time stress urinary free adrenaline was 450 per cent and noradrenaline 230 per cent of the levels for similar work without time stress but involving equal oxygen consumption. These differences were statistically highly significant and they persisted on retesting after six months of alternating work regimens. They support the concept that occupational stress in industrial workers influences the adrenosympathetic system and they indicate a possible method for assessing the effects of high levels of sympathetic activity on the aetiology of ischaemic heart disease. PMID:508478

  5. Effect of natural sunlight on adrenaline and noradrenaline excretion in man.

    PubMed

    Tatár, P; Tureceková, A

    1987-08-01

    Sympathoadrenal activity was evaluated in 6 healthy subjects by excretory rate of adrenaline and noradrenaline in 6 hour samples of urine throughout three consecutive days. Subjects were exposed to natural sunlight for 4 hours on the second day of experiment, the first and third days served for control measurements. Sunbath caused erythema in all subjects and it had no impact adrenaline on excretion. However, significantly higher no radrenalineexcretion was present during 6 hours after exposition to sunshine when compared to control days.

  6. The relation between the effect of a subhypnotic dose of thiopental on claw pain threshold in rats and adrenalin, noradrenalin and dopamine levels.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Mehmet; Ahiskalioglu, Ali; Ince, Ilker; Celik, Mine; Dostbil, Aysenur; Kuyrukluyildiz, Ufuk; Altuner, Durdu; Kurt, Nezahat; Suleyman, Halis

    2015-01-01

    Thiopental sodium (TPS) needs to be applied together with adrenalin in order to establish its analgesic effect in general anesthesia. We aimed to investigate the effect of TPS on the claw pain threshold in rats and evaluated its relationship with endogenous adrenalin (ADR), noradrenalin (NDR), and dopamine (DOP) levels. Intact and adrenalectomized rats were used in the experiment. Intact animals were divided into the following groups: 15 mg/kg TPS (TS), 0.3 mg/kg ADR+15 mg/kg TPS (ATS) and 0.3 mg/kg ADR alone (ADR). Adrenalectomized animals were divided into the following groups: 15 mg/kg TPS (A-TS), 0.3 mg/kg ADR+15 mg/kg TPS (A-ATS) and 0.3 mg/kg ADR alone (A-ADR). Claw pain threshold and blood ADR, NDR, and DOP levels were measured. The TS group's claw pain threshold was found low. However, the claw pain thresholds of the ATS and ADR groups increased significantly. In the A-TS group, the pain threshold decreased compared with normal, and in the A-ATS and A-ADR groups, the pain threshold increased. TPS reduced the blood ADR levels in intact rats; however, no significant changes were observed in the NDR and DOP levels. #TPS provides hyperalgesia by reducing the production of ADR in rats. The present study shows that to achieve analgesic activity, TPS needs to be applied together with ADR.

  7. The relation between the effect of a subhypnotic dose of thiopental on claw pain threshold in rats and adrenalin, noradrenalin and dopamine levels

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Mehmet; Ahiskalioglu, Ali; Ince, Ilker; Celik, Mine; Dostbil, Aysenur; Kuyrukluyildiz, Ufuk; Altuner, Durdu; Kurt, Nezahat; Suleyman, Halis

    2015-01-01

    Thiopental sodium (TPS) needs to be applied together with adrenalin in order to establish its analgesic effect in general anesthesia. We aimed to investigate the effect of TPS on the claw pain threshold in rats and evaluated its relationship with endogenous adrenalin (ADR), noradrenalin (NDR), and dopamine (DOP) levels. Intact and adrenalectomized rats were used in the experiment. Intact animals were divided into the following groups: 15 mg/kg TPS (TS), 0.3 mg/kg ADR+15 mg/kg TPS (ATS) and 0.3 mg/kg ADR alone (ADR). Adrenalectomized animals were divided into the following groups: 15 mg/kg TPS (A-TS), 0.3 mg/kg ADR+15 mg/kg TPS (A-ATS) and 0.3 mg/kg ADR alone (A-ADR). Claw pain threshold and blood ADR, NDR, and DOP levels were measured. The TS group’s claw pain threshold was found low. However, the claw pain thresholds of the ATS and ADR groups increased significantly. In the A-TS group, the pain threshold decreased compared with normal, and in the A-ATS and A-ADR groups, the pain threshold increased. TPS reduced the blood ADR levels in intact rats; however, no significant changes were observed in the NDR and DOP levels. #TPS provides hyperalgesia by reducing the production of ADR in rats. The present study shows that to achieve analgesic activity, TPS needs to be applied together with ADR. PMID:26211784

  8. Determination of adrenaline, noradrenaline and corticosterone in rodent blood by ion pair reversed phase UHPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Bergh, Marianne Skov-Skov; Bogen, Inger Lise; Andersen, Jannike Mørch; Øiestad, Åse Marit Leere; Berg, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    A novel ion pair reversed phase ultra high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method for simultaneous determination of the stress hormones adrenaline, noradrenaline and corticosterone in rodent blood was developed and fully validated. Separations were performed on an Acquity HSS T3 column (2.1mm i.d.×100mm, 1.8μm) with gradient elution and a runtime of 5.5min. The retention of adrenaline and noradrenaline was substantially increased by employing the ion pair reagent heptafluorobutyric acid (HFBA). Ion pair reagents are usually added to the mobile phase only, but we demonstrate for the first time that including HFBA to the sample reconstitution solvent as well, has a major impact on the chromatography of these compounds. The stability of adrenaline and corticosterone in rodent blood was investigated using the surrogate analytes adrenaline-d 3 and corticosterone-d 8 . The applicability of the described method was demonstrated by measuring the concentration of stress hormones in rodent blood samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. RELATIVE ACTIONS OF QUATERNARY METHYL DERIVATIVES OF TYRAMINE, DOPAMINE AND NORADRENALINE.

    PubMed

    CUTHBERT, M F

    1964-08-01

    Tyramine methiodide and dopamine methobromide have greater pressor effect (three- to five-times) in the spinal cat than the parent amines. Noradrenaline methochloride has little pressor effect. Dopamine methobromide is about four times as potent as nicotine; tyramine methiodide is about equiactive to nicotine; and noradrenaline methochloride has only one-tenth the potency of nicotine. Their pressor effects are usually abolished by hexamethonium but in some experiments the effect of noradrenaline methochloride persisted and was then abolished by tolazoline. Injected intravenously into the cat anaesthetized with chloralose, each of the three quaternary derivatives contracts the nictitating membrane; dopamine methobromide is again the most active, having more than six times the potency of nicotine. When the contractions of the nictitating membrane are induced by continuous stimulation of the preganglionic fibres of the cervical sympathetic nerve, intravenous injection of the quaternary derivatives of tyramine and dopamine has a biphasic effect; there is a block on which a contraction of the membrane appears to be superimposed. Noradrenaline methochloride produces only a further contraction of the membrane. On the isolated rectus abdominis muscle preparation of the frog, dopamine methobromide is the most active in contracting the muscle, being about twelve times as active as nicotine; noradrenaline methochloride is weakest, having only one-hundredth the activity of nicotine. These effects are antagonized by hexamethonium. On the isolated phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparation of the rat, the quaternary derivatives of tyramine and dopamine each have neuromuscular blocking properties, 0.7- and 3-times respectively that of nicotine. Noradrenaline methochloride has no effect. In the sciatic nerve-tibialis preparation of the cat, the quaternary derivatives of tyramine and dopamine are approximately equipotent in producing neuromuscular paralysis, having about three times the

  10. Relative actions of quaternary methyl derivatives of tyramine, dopamine and noradrenaline

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbert, M. F.

    1964-01-01

    Tyramine methiodide and dopamine methobromide have greater pressor effect (three- to five-times) in the spinal cat than the parent amines. Noradrenaline methochloride has little pressor effect. Dopamine methobromide is about four times as potent as nicotine; tyramine methiodide is about equiactive to nicotine; and noradrenaline methochloride has only one-tenth the potency of nicotine. Their pressor effects are usually abolished by hexamethonium but in some experiments the effect of noradrenaline methochloride persisted and was then abolished by tolazoline. Injected intravenously into the cat anaesthetized with chloralose, each of the three quaternary derivatives contracts the nictitating membrane; dopamine methobromide is again the most active, having more than six times the potency of nicotine. When the contractions of the nictitating membrane are induced by continuous stimulation of the preganglionic fibres of the cervical sympathetic nerve, intravenous injection of the quaternary derivatives of tyramine and dopamine has a biphasic effect; there is a block on which a contraction of the membrane appears to be superimposed. Noradrenaline methochloride produces only a further contraction of the membrane. On the isolated rectus abdominis muscle preparation of the frog, dopamine methobromide is the most active in contracting the muscle, being about twelve times as active as nicotine; noradrenaline methochloride is weakest, having only one-hundredth the activity of nicotine. These effects are antagonized by hexamethonium. On the isolated phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparation of the rat, the quaternary derivatives of tyramine and dopamine each have neuromuscular blocking properties, 0.7- and 3-times respectively that of nicotine. Noradrenaline methochloride has no effect. In the sciatic nerve-tibialis preparation of the cat, the quaternary derivatives of tyramine and dopamine are approximately equipotent in producing neuromuscular paralysis, having about three times the

  11. The effect of adrenaline and noradrenaline on hormone secretion and blood flow from the thyroid vein in sheep with exteriorized thyroids.

    PubMed

    Falconer, I R

    1967-02-01

    1. Emotional stimulus to the sheep has previously been shown to cause increased thyroid hormone secretion; the influence of adrenaline and noradrenaline in this process has been investigated.2. Sheep bearing exteriorized thyroid glands on carotid artery-jugular vein loops were used. Thyroid vein blood was collected through a cannula in the jugular vein within the loop, and blood flow was measured by a plethysmographic technique.3. (131)I (50 muc) was injected intramuscularly (I.M.) into the sheep, and 4-7 days later the concentration of total and protein bound (131)I in thyroid vein blood was measured in samples taken every 10 min for 4 hr. Intracarotid injections of 1 mug, I.V. injections of 5 mug, or I.V. infusions at 10 mug/min for 10 min, of adrenaline or noradrenaline were administered 1.5 hr after commencement of sampling. Blood flow from the thyroid was measured in similar experiments.4. No significant changes in thyroid hormone secretion could be attributed to adrenaline or noradrenaline, and it was concluded that circulating catecholamines do not influence the release of thyroid hormone observed after brief emotional stimulus in the sheep.

  12. Long-Term Citalopram Treatment Alters the Stress Responses of the Cortical Dopamine and Noradrenaline Systems: the Role of Cortical 5-HT1A Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Fumi; Kishikawa, Yuki; Hanada, Yuuki; Yamada, Makiko; Kakuma, Tatsuyuki; Kawahara, Hiroshi; Nishi, Akinori

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cortical dopamine and noradrenaline are involved in the stress response. Citalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, has direct and indirect effects on the serotonergic system. Furthermore, long-term treatment with citalopram affects the dopamine and noradrenaline systems, which could contribute to the therapeutic action of antidepressants. Methods: The effects of long-term treatment with citalopram on the responses of the dopamine and noradrenaline systems in the rat prefrontal cortex to acute handling stress were evaluated using in vivo microdialysis. Results: Acute handling stress increased dopamine and noradrenaline levels in the prefrontal cortex. The dopamine and noradrenaline responses were suppressed by local infusion of a 5-HT1A receptor agonist, 7-(Dipropylamino)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydronaphthalen-1-ol;hydrobromide, into the prefrontal cortex. The dopamine response was abolished by long-term treatment with citalopram, and the abolished dopamine response was reversed by local infusion of a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, (Z)-but-2-enedioic acid;N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl]ethyl]-N-pyridin-2-ylcyclohexanecarboxamide into the prefrontal cortex. On the other hand, long-term treatment with citalopram reduced the basal noradrenaline levels (approximately 40% of the controls), but not the basal dopamine levels. The noradrenaline response was maintained despite the low basal noradrenaline levels. Signaling from the 5-HT1A receptors and α2-adrenoceptors was not involved in the decrease in the basal noradrenaline levels but partially affected the noradrenaline response. Conclusions: Chronic citalopram treatment differentially suppresses the dopamine and noradrenaline systems in the prefrontal cortex, and the dopamine stress response was preferentially controlled by upregulating 5-HT1A receptor signaling. Our findings provide insight into how antidepressants modulate the dopamine and noradrenaline systems to overcome acute stress. PMID

  13. Contrasting Roles of Dopamine and Noradrenaline in the Motivational Properties of Social Play Behavior in Rats.

    PubMed

    Achterberg, E J Marijke; van Kerkhof, Linda W M; Servadio, Michela; van Swieten, Maaike M H; Houwing, Danielle J; Aalderink, Mandy; Driel, Nina V; Trezza, Viviana; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J

    2016-02-01

    Social play behavior, abundant in the young of most mammalian species, is thought to be important for social and cognitive development. Social play is highly rewarding, and as such, the expression of social play depends on its pleasurable and motivational properties. Since the motivational properties of social play have only sporadically been investigated, we developed a setup in which rats responded for social play under a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement. Dopaminergic neurotransmission plays a key role in incentive motivational processes, and both dopamine and noradrenaline have been implicated in the modulation of social play behavior. Therefore, we investigated the role of dopamine and noradrenaline in the motivation for social play. Treatment with the psychostimulant drugs methylphenidate and cocaine increased responding for social play, but suppressed its expression during reinforced play periods. The dopamine reuptake inhibitor GBR-12909 increased responding for social play, but did not affect its expression, whereas the noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor atomoxetine decreased responding for social play as well as its expression. The effects of methylphenidate and cocaine on responding for social play, but not their play-suppressant effects, were blocked by pretreatment with the dopamine receptor antagonist α-flupenthixol. In contrast, pretreatment with the α2-adrenoceptor antagonist RX821002 prevented the play-suppressant effect of methylphenidate, but left its effect on responding for social play unaltered. In sum, the present study introduces a novel method to study the incentive motivational properties of social play behavior in rats. Using this paradigm, we demonstrate dissociable roles for dopamine and noradrenaline in social play behavior: dopamine stimulates the motivation for social play, whereas noradrenaline negatively modulates the motivation for social play behavior and its expression.

  14. Rotational Spectroscopy Unveils Eleven Conformers of Adrenaline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabezas, C.; Cortijo, V.; Mata, S.; Lopez, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.

    2013-06-01

    Recent improvements in our LA-MB-FTMW instrumentation have allowed the characterization of eleven and eight conformers for the neurotransmitters adrenaline and noradrenaline respectively. The observation of this rich conformational behavior is in accordance with the recent observation of seven conformers for dopamine and in sharp contrast with the conformational reduction proposed for catecholamines. C. Cabezas, I. Peña, J. C. López, J. L. Alonso J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2013, 4, 486. H. Mitsuda, M. Miyazaki, I. B. Nielsen, P. Carcabal,C. Dedonder, C. Jouvet, S. Ishiuchi, M. Fujii J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2010, 1, 1130.

  15. Phosphate-modified TiO2 nanoparticles for selective detection of dopamine, levodopa, adrenaline, and catechol based on fluorescence quenching.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsin-Pin; Cheng, Tian-Lu; Tseng, Wei-Lung

    2007-07-03

    For the first time, an aqueous solution, comprising 6-nm phosphate-modified titanium dioxide (P-TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) and fluorescein, has been used for sensing dopamine (DA), levodopa (L-DOPA), adrenaline, and catechol. The complexes obtained by means of chelation of surface Ti(IV) ions with an enediol group exhibit strong absorption at 428 nm; thus, they can be designed as efficient quenchers for fluorescein. The fluorescence of a fluorescein solution containing 1.4 mM P-TiO2 NPs at pH 8.0 decreases if the solution comprises DA, L-DOPA, adrenaline, and catechol, but not noradrenaline, ascorbic acid, and salicylic acid. We consider that P-TiO2 NPs have a number of advantages over bare TiO2 NPs, such as ease of preparation, high selectivity, and high stability. By measuring fluorescence quenching, the limits of detection at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 are calculated as 33.5, 81.8, 20.3, and 92.1 nM for DA, L-DOPA, adrenaline, and catechol, respectively. In contrast, UV-vis absorption reveals the relatively poor sensitivity of these compounds. We have validated the applicability of our method by means of analyses of DA in urine samples. High-performance liquid chromatography in combination with an electrochemical cell has been used to further confirm our results. We believe that this approach has great potential for diagnostic purposes.

  16. Contribution of beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors of human atrium and ventricle to the effects of noradrenaline and adrenaline as assessed with (-)-atenolol.

    PubMed Central

    Lemoine, H.; Schönell, H.; Kaumann, A. J.

    1988-01-01

    1. (-)-Atenolol was used as a tool to assess the function of beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors in human heart. Right atrial and left ventricular preparations from patients undergoing open heart surgery were set up to contract isometrically. Membrane particles were prepared for beta-adrenoceptor labelling with [3H]-(-)-bupranolol and adenylate cyclase assays. 2. The positive inotropic effects of (-)-noradrenaline were antagonized to a similar extent by (-)-atenolol in atrial and ventricular preparations. (-)-Atenolol consistently antagonized the effects of (-)-adrenaline to a lesser extent than those of (-)-noradrenaline in atrial preparations. In ventricular preparations (-)-atenolol antagonized the effects of low concentrations of (-)-adrenaline to a lesser extent than those of high concentrations. 3. pKB values (M) of (-)-atenolol, estimated with non-linear analysis from the blockade of the positive inotropic effects of the catecholamines, were 7.4 for beta 1-adrenoceptors and 6.0 for beta 2-adrenoceptors. 4. (-)-Atenolol inhibited the binding of [3H]-(-)-bupranolol to ventricular beta 1-adrenoceptors with a pKD (M) of 5.9 and to ventricular beta 2-adrenoceptors with a pKD of 4.6. 5. (-)-Atenolol inhibited the catecholamine-induced adenylate cyclase stimulation in the atrium and ventricle with pKB values of 5.8-6.4 for beta 1- and pKB values of 4.7-5.7 for beta 2-adrenoceptors. The binding and cyclase assays suggest a partial affinity loss for (-)-atenolol inherent to membrane preparations. 6. beta 1-Adrenoceptors mediate the maximum positive inotropic effects of (-)-noradrenaline in both the atrium and ventricle of man. beta 2-Adrenoceptors appear to be capable of mediating maximal positive inotropic effects of (-)-adrenaline in atrium. In contrast, ventricular beta 2-adrenoceptors mediated only submaximal effects of (-)-adrenaline. PMID:2851354

  17. Accumulation of radioactivity after repeated infusion of 3H-adrenaline and 3H-noradrenaline in the rat as a model animal.

    PubMed

    Lepschy, M; Filip, T; Palme, R G

    2014-10-01

    Besides enzymatic inactivation, catecholamines bind non-enzymatically and irreversible to proteins. The physiological impact of these catecholamine adducts is still unclear. We therefore collected basic data about the distribution of catecholamine adducts in the rat after repeated intravenous administration of (3)H-adrenaline and (3)H-noradrenaline. In all animals radioactivity in blood increased until the last injection on Day 7 and decreased then slowly close to background values (plasma) or remained higher (erythrocytes). In all sampled tissues radioactivity could be found, but only in hair high amounts remained present even after 3 weeks. Half-life of rat serum albumin loaded with (3)H-adrenaline or (3)H-noradrenaline was not altered. This study provides basic knowledge about the distribution of catecholamines or their adducts, but physiological effects could not be demonstrated. However, for the first time deposition and accumulation of catecholamines (adducts) in the hair could be proven, suggesting that hair might be used for evaluating long term stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The atypical antipsychotic quetiapine increases both noradrenaline and dopamine release in the rat prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Pira, Luigi; Mongeau, Raymond; Pani, Luca

    2004-11-03

    Quetiapine is a novel atypical antipsychotic drug with multi-receptorial affinity. Using in vivo microdialysis, we investigated if quetiapine modulates extracellular noradrenaline and dopamine in brain areas generally believed to be involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and in the action of antipsychotic drugs. Quetiapine (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg, i.p.) increased levels of noradrenaline in both the prefrontal cortex and the caudate nucleus, while it increased dopamine levels mainly in the prefrontal cortex. It is argued that the marked increase of dopaminergic transmission in the prefrontal cortex induced by quetiapine might be relevant to its therapeutical action.

  19. Raman, IR, UV-vis and EPR characterization of two copper dioxolene complexes derived from L-dopa and dopamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreto, Wagner J.; Barreto, Sônia R. G.; Ando, Rômulo A.; Santos, Paulo S.; DiMauro, Eduardo; Jorge, Thiago

    2008-12-01

    The anionic complexes [Cu(L 1-) 3] 1-, L - = dopasemiquinone or L-dopasemiquinone, were prepared and characterized. The complexes are stable in aqueous solution showing intense absorption bands at ca. 605 nm for Cu(II)-L-dopasemiquinone and at ca. 595 nm for Cu(II)-dopasemiquinone in the UV-vis spectra, that can be assigned to intraligand transitions. Noradrenaline and adrenaline, under the same reaction conditions, did not yield Cu-complexes, despite the bands in the UV region showing that noradrenaline and adrenaline were oxidized during the process. The complexes display a resonance Raman effect, and the most enhanced bands involve ring modes and particularly the νCC + νCO stretching mode at ca. 1384 cm -1. The free radical nature of the ligands and the oxidation state of the Cu(II) were confirmed by the EPR spectra that display absorptions assigned to organic radicals with g = 2.0005 and g = 2.0923, and for Cu(II) with g = 2.008 and g = 2.0897 for L-dopasemiquinone and dopasemiquinone, respectively. The possibility that dopamine and L-dopa can form stable and aqueous-soluble copper complexes at neutral pH, whereas noradrenaline and adrenaline cannot, may be important in understanding how Cu(II)-dopamine crosses the cellular membrane as proposed in the literature to explain the role of copper in Wilson disease.

  20. Analysis of microdialysate monoamines, including noradrenaline, dopamine and serotonin, using capillary ultra-high performance liquid chromatography and electrochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Ferry, Barbara; Gifu, Elena-Patricia; Sandu, Ioana; Denoroy, Luc; Parrot, Sandrine

    2014-03-01

    Electrochemical methods are very often used to detect catecholamine and indolamine neurotransmitters separated by conventional reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The present paper presents the development of a chromatographic method to detect monoamines present in low-volume brain dialysis samples using a capillary column filled with sub-2μm particles. Several parameters (repeatability, linearity, accuracy, limit of detection) for this new ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) method with electrochemical detection were examined after optimization of the analytical conditions. Noradrenaline, adrenaline, serotonin, dopamine and its metabolite 3-methoxytyramine were separated in 1μL of injected sample volume; they were detected above concentrations of 0.5-1nmol/L, with 2.1-9.5% accuracy and intra-assay repeatability equal to or less than 6%. The final method was applied to very low volume dialysates from rat brain containing monoamine traces. The study demonstrates that capillary UHPLC with electrochemical detection is suitable for monitoring dialysate monoamines collected at high sampling rate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Mucuna pruriens improves male fertility by its action on the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Kamla Kant; Mahdi, Abbas Ali; Ahmad, Mohammad Kaleem; Shankhwar, Satya Narain; Rajender, Singh; Jaiswar, Shyam Pyari

    2009-12-01

    To understand the mechanism of action of Mucuna pruriens in the treatment of male infertility. Prospective study. Departments of Biochemistry, Urology, and Obstetrics and Gynecology, C.S.M. Medical University, Lucknow, India. Seventy-five normal healthy fertile men (controls) and 75 men undergoing infertility screening. High-performance liquid chromatography assay for quantitation of dopa, adrenaline, and noradrenaline in seminal plasma and blood. Estimation by RIA of hormonal parameters in blood plasma, namely T, LH, FSH, and PRL. Before and after treatment, serum T, LH, FSH, PRL, dopamine, adrenaline, and noradrenaline in seminal and blood plasma were measured. Decreased sperm count and motility were seen in infertile subjects. Serum T and LH levels, as well as seminal plasma and blood levels of dopamine, adrenaline, and noradrenaline were also decreased in all groups of infertile men. This was accompanied by significantly increased serum FSH and PRL levels in oligozoospermic subjects. Treatment with M. pruriens significantly improved T, LH, dopamine, adrenaline, and noradrenaline levels in infertile men and reduced levels of FSH and PRL. Sperm count and motility were significantly recovered in infertile men after treatment. Treatment with M. pruriens regulates steroidogenesis and improves semen quality in infertile men.

  2. Clinical application of noradrenaline spillover methodology: delineation of regional human sympathetic nervous responses.

    PubMed

    Esler, M

    1993-11-01

    The proportionality which in general exists between rates of sympathetic nerve firing and the overflow of noradrenaline into the venous drainage of an organ provides the experimental justification for the use of measurements of noradrenaline in plasma as a biochemical measure of sympathetic nervous function. Static measurements of noradrenaline plasma concentration have several limitations. One is the confounding influence of noradrenaline plasma clearance on plasma concentration. Other drawbacks include the distortion arising from antecubital venous sampling (this represents but one venous drainage, that of the forearm), and the inability to detect regional differentiation of sympathetic responses. Clinical regional noradrenaline spillover measurements, performed with infusions of radiolabelled noradrenaline and sampling from centrally placed catheters, and derived from regional isotope dilution, overcome these deficiencies. The strength of the methodology is that sympathetic nervous function may be studied in the internal organs not accessible to nerve recording with microneurography. Examples of the regionalization of human sympathetic responses disclosed include the preferential activation of the cardiac sympathetic outflow with mental stress, cigarette smoking, aerobic exercise, cardiac failure, coronary insufficiency, essential hypertension and in ventricular arrhythmias, and the preferential stimulation or inhibition of the renal sympathetic nerves with low salt diets and mental stress, and with exercise training, respectively. By application of the same principles, regional release of the sympathetic cotransmitters neuropeptide Y and adrenaline can be studied in humans. Cotransmitter release, however, is detected only with some difficulty. In restricted circumstances we find evidence of regional cotransmitter release to plasma, such as the release of neuropeptide Y from the heart at the very high rates of sympathetic nerve firing occurring with aerobic

  3. Dopamine and noradrenaline efflux in the prefrontal cortex in the light and dark period: effects of novelty and handling and comparison to the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Feenstra, M G; Botterblom, M H; Mastenbroek, S

    2000-01-01

    We used on-line microdialysis measurements of dopamine and noradrenaline extracellular concentrations in the medial prefrontal cortex of awake, freely moving rats during the dark and the light period of the day to study whether (i) basal efflux would be higher in the active, dark period than in the inactive, light period; (ii) the activation induced by environmental stimuli would be dependent on these conditions. When determined one day after cannula placement, noradrenaline and dopamine levels were higher during the dark. Maximal relative increases induced by novelty and handling were 150% and 175-200%, respectively, and were very similar in the light and the dark, but the net increases were higher in the dark. Separate groups were tested one week after cannula placement to ensure recovery of possibly disturbed circadian rhythms. While basal levels in the dark were now approximately twice those in the light, the maximal relative and net increases after both novelty and handling were very similar. Basal levels of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens (one day after cannula placement) were not different in the light or dark, but were increased by novelty and handling to about 130% only in the light period, not in the dark. Thus, in the prefrontal cortex, dopamine strongly resembles noradrenaline, in that basal efflux was state dependent, whereas activation by stimuli was not. In the nucleus accumbens, basal dopamine efflux was not state dependent, but activation by stimuli was. These results suggest that there are differential effects of circadian phase on basal activity and responsiveness of the mesolimbic vs the mesocortical dopamine system.

  4. Noradrenaline and dopamine levels in acute cerveau isolé in the cat.

    PubMed

    Szikszay, M; Benedek, G; Obál, F; Obál, F

    1980-01-01

    Noradrenaline (NA) and dopamine (DA) levels were studied in the forebrain of acute immobilized cats and in cerveau isolé preparations. A gradual decrease in NA and DA was observed one and two hours after high mesencephalic transection, while the amount of NA increased in acute immobilized cats after the cessation of ether anaesthesia. These changes in NA level are consistent with the observations suggesting an inverse relationship between NA and cortical deactivation. The decrease of DA with an exaggeration of spindle activity and increased synchronizing effect of basal forebrain stimulation indicate that the spindle-increasing effect of DA suggested by several authors requires the contribution of the brain stem.

  5. [Features of noradrenaline stimulation of rat liver mitochondria respiration by ADP and calcium ions].

    PubMed

    Stefankiv, Iu S; Babskyĭ, A M; Shostakovska, Y V

    1995-01-01

    A single administration of a physiological dose of noradrenaline to animals. in contrast to adrenaline, stimulates the respiration of mitochondria not only under oxidation of FAD-dependent Krebbs cycle substrate of the succinase but also HAD-dependent substrate of alpha-ketoglutarate. In the both cases the phosphorylation rate increases, since the action of noradrenaline, separating the respiration and oxidative phosphorylation, was not found. Noradrenaline increases the capacity of mitochondria to more actively absorb calcium ions under oxidation of succinate than under that of alpha-ketoglutarate.

  6. The dopamine beta-hydroxylase inhibitor nepicastat increases dopamine release and potentiates psychostimulant-induced dopamine release in the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Devoto, Paola; Flore, Giovanna; Saba, Pierluigi; Bini, Valentina; Gessa, Gian Luigi

    2014-07-01

    The dopamine-beta-hydroxylase inhibitor nepicastat has been shown to reproduce disulfiram ability to suppress the reinstatement of cocaine seeking after extinction in rats. To clarify its mechanism of action, we examined the effect of nepicastat, given alone or in association with cocaine or amphetamine, on catecholamine release in the medial prefrontal cortex and the nucleus accumbens, two key regions involved in the reinforcing and motivational effects of cocaine and in the reinstatement of cocaine seeking. Nepicastat effect on catecholamines was evaluated by microdialysis in freely moving rats. Nepicastat reduced noradrenaline release both in the medial prefrontal cortex and in the nucleus accumbens, and increased dopamine release in the medial prefrontal cortex but not in the nucleus accumbens. Moreover, nepicastat markedly potentiated cocaine- and amphetamine-induced extracellular dopamine accumulation in the medial prefrontal cortex but not in the nucleus accumbens. Extracellular dopamine accumulation produced by nepicastat alone or by its combination with cocaine or amphetamine was suppressed by the α2 -adrenoceptor agonist clonidine. It is suggested that nepicastat, by suppressing noradrenaline synthesis and release, eliminated the α2 -adrenoceptor mediated inhibitory mechanism that constrains dopamine release and cocaine- and amphetamine-induced dopamine release from noradrenaline or dopamine terminals in the medial prefrontal cortex. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction Biology © 2012 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  7. A computational and spectroscopic study of the gas-phase conformers of adrenaline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çarçabal, P.; Snoek, L. C.; van Mourik, T.

    The conformational landscapes of the neurotransmitter l-adrenaline (l-epinephrine) and its diastereoisomer pseudo-adrenaline, isolated in the gas phase and un-protonated, have been investigated by using a combination of mass-selected ultraviolet and infrared holeburn spectroscopy, following laser desorption of the sample into a pulsed supersonic argon jet, and DFT and ab initio computation (at the B3LYP/6-31+G*, MP2/6-31+G* and MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ levels of theory). Both for adrenaline and its diastereoisomer, pseudo-adrenaline, one dominant molecular conformation, very similar to the one seen in noradrenaline, has been observed. It could be assigned to an extended side-chain structure (AG1a) stabilized by an OH → N intramolecular hydrogen bond. An intramolecular hydrogen bond is also formed between the neighbouring hydroxyl groups on the catechol ring. The presence of further conformers for both diastereoisomers could not be excluded, but overlapping electronic spectra and low ion signals prevented further assignments.

  8. Rilmenidine sympatholytic activity preserves mental stress, orthostatic sympathetic responses and adrenaline secretion.

    PubMed

    Esler, Murray; Lux, Alan; Jennings, Garry; Hastings, Jacqui; Socratous, Flora; Lambert, Gavin

    2004-08-01

    Heightened central sympathetic nervous outflow is common in essential hypertension, contributing to hypertension development and possibly also to complications. Acute sympathetic nervous activation is a proven trigger for adverse cardiovascular events. Accordingly, antihypertensive drugs inhibiting sympathetic outflow represent a theoretically attractive therapeutic option. To study the sympatholytic and blood pressure-lowering activity of the imidazoline binding agent rilmenidine at rest and during reflex sympathetic activation. We used a randomized, double-blind, 6-week cross-over study, with a 1-week placebo run-in period, two 2-week active treatment intervals (rilmenidine 1 mg twice daily or placebo) and intervening 1-week placebo washout. In 15 hypertensive patients, noradrenaline and adrenaline plasma kinetics and intra-arterial blood pressure measurements were performed at rest, after mental stress (difficult mental arithmetic) and during head-up tilting, at the end of the 2-week dosing periods. The noradrenaline spillover rate, indicative of whole body sympathetic activity, was reduced 35% by rilmenidine at rest (P < 0.01) and remained significantly lower during mental stress and tilting, although the increases in noradrenaline spillover with both stimuli were preserved. The effects on intra-arterial blood pressure ran in parallel, a fall in supine resting pressure, but no reduction in blood pressure rise during mental stress and a lack of fall in blood pressure with tilting. On placebo, adrenaline secretion was 0.88 +/- 0.15 nmol/min (mean +/- SE) at rest, increased by 0.42 +/- 0.23 nmol/min with mental stress (P = 0.019) and was unchanged with tilting. Rilmenidine left adrenaline secretion untouched under all conditions. The present study confirms a sympatholytic effect of rilmenidine during supine rest but preservation of sympathetic responses during mental stress and tilting, with the latter underlying a freedom from postural hypotension on the drug

  9. Reduced capacity of cardiac efferent sympathetic neurons to release noradrenaline and modify cardiac function in tachycardia-induced canine heart failure.

    PubMed

    Cardinal, R; Nadeau, R; Laurent, C; Boudreau, G; Armour, J A

    1996-09-01

    To investigate the capacity of efferent sympathetic neurons to modulate the failing heart, stellate ganglion stimulation was performed in dogs with biventricular heart failure induced by rapid ventricular pacing (240 beats/min) for 4-6 weeks. Less noradrenaline was released from cardiac myoneural junctions into coronary sinus blood in response to left stellate ganglion stimulation in anesthetized failing heart preparations (582 pg/mL, lower and upper 95% confidence intervals of 288 and 1174 pg/mL, n = 19) compared with healthy heart preparations (6391 pg/mL, 95% confidence intervals of 4180 and 9770 pg/mL, n = 14; p < 0.001). There was substantial adrenaline extraction by failing hearts (49 +/- 6%), although it was slightly lower than in healthy heart preparations (65 +/- 9%, p = 0.055). In contrast with healthy heart preparations, no net release of adrenaline occurred during stellate ganglion stimulation in any of the failing heart preparations, and ventricular tissue levels of adrenaline fell below the sensitivity limit of the HPLC technique. In failing heart preparations, maximal electrical stimulation of right or left stellate ganglia resulted in minimal augmentation of left ventricular intramyocardial (17%) and chamber (12%) systolic pressures. These indices were augmented by 145 and 97%, respectively, following exogenous noradrenaline administration. Thus, the cardiac efferent sympathetic neurons' reduced capacity to release noradrenaline and modify cardiac function can contribute to reduction of sympathetic support to the failing heart.

  10. Calorigenic effect of adrenaline in rats under conditions of restricted motor activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomaszewska, L.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.; Kozlowski, S.

    1980-01-01

    In previous studies, it was demonstrated that long term restricted motor activity in rats induces a decrease in body weight, an increase in release of adrenaline, and a decrease in the release of noradrenaline with the urine, as well as a reduction in activity of the thymus gland and level of thyroxin in the blood. At the same time, a decrease was found in the internal body temperature that was accompanied by an increase in the rate of metabolism in the state of rest. An investigation is presented which attempts to clarify whether the calorigenic effect of adrenaline under conditions of increased metabolism in the period of immobility is exposed to changes.

  11. Surplus dietary tryptophan reduces plasma cortisol and noradrenaline concentrations and enhances recovery after social stress in pigs.

    PubMed

    Koopmans, Sietse Jan; Ruis, Marko; Dekker, Ruud; van Diepen, Hans; Korte, Mechiel; Mroz, Zdzislaw

    2005-07-21

    Social stress occurs in intensive pig farming due to aggressive behavior. This stress may be reduced at elevated dietary levels of tryptophan (TRP). In this study, we compared the effects of high (13.2%) vs. normal (3.4%) dietary TRP to large neutral amino acid (LNAA) ratios on behavior and stress hormones in catheterized pigs ( approximately 50 kg BW), which were exposed to social stress by placing them twice into the territory of a dominant pig ( approximately 60 kg) for 15 min. Pre-stress plasma TRP concentrations were 156+/-15 vs. 53+/-6 micromol/l (p<0.01) in pigs on the high vs. normal TRP diets, respectively. Pre-stress plasma cortisol and noradrenaline concentrations were twofold (p<0.01) and 1.4-fold (p<0.05) lower but plasma adrenaline concentration was similar in pigs on the high vs. normal TRP diets, respectively. During the social confrontations, pigs on the high vs. normal TRP diets show a tendency towards reduced active avoidance behavior (3.2+/-1.1 vs. 6.7+/-1.2 min, p<0.1) but their physical activity (8.5+/-0.6 vs. 10.2+/-0.8 min) and aggressive attitude towards the dominant pig (11+/-3 vs. 7+/-2 times biting) were similar. Immediate (+5 min) post-stress plasma cortisol, noradrenaline and adrenaline responses were similar among dietary groups. After the social confrontations, the post-stress plasma cortisol, noradrenaline and adrenaline concentrations and/or curves (from +5 min to 2 h) were lower/steeper (p<0.05) in pigs on the high vs. normal TRP diets. In summary, surplus TRP in diets for pigs (1) does not significantly affect behavior when exposed to social stress, (2) reduces basal plasma cortisol and noradrenaline concentrations, (3) does not affect the immediate hormonal response to stress, and (4) reduces the long-term hormonal response to stress. In general, pigs receiving high dietary TRP were found to be less affected by stress.

  12. Current real-life use of vasopressors and inotropes in cardiogenic shock - adrenaline use is associated with excess organ injury and mortality.

    PubMed

    Tarvasmäki, Tuukka; Lassus, Johan; Varpula, Marjut; Sionis, Alessandro; Sund, Reijo; Køber, Lars; Spinar, Jindrich; Parissis, John; Banaszewski, Marek; Silva Cardoso, Jose; Carubelli, Valentina; Di Somma, Salvatore; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Harjola, Veli-Pekka

    2016-07-04

    Vasopressors and inotropes remain a cornerstone in stabilization of the severely impaired hemodynamics and cardiac output in cardiogenic shock (CS). The aim of this study was to analyze current real-life use of these medications, and their impact on outcome and on changes in cardiac and renal biomarkers over time in CS. The multinational CardShock study prospectively enrolled 219 patients with CS. The use of vasopressors and inotropes was analyzed in relation to the primary outcome, i.e., 90-day mortality, with propensity score methods in 216 patients with follow-up data available. Changes in cardiac and renal biomarkers over time until 96 hours from baseline were analyzed with linear mixed modeling. Patients were 67 (SD 12) years old, 26 % were women, and 28 % had been resuscitated from cardiac arrest prior to inclusion. On average, systolic blood pressure was 78 (14) and mean arterial pressure 57 (11) mmHg at detection of shock. 90-day mortality was 41 %. Vasopressors and/or inotropes were administered to 94 % of patients and initiated principally within the first 24 hours. Noradrenaline and adrenaline were given to 75 % and 21 % of patients, and 30 % received several vasopressors. In multivariable logistic regression, only adrenaline (21 %) was independently associated with increased 90-day mortality (OR 5.2, 95 % CI 1.88, 14.7, p = 0.002). The result was independent of prior cardiac arrest (39 % of patients treated with adrenaline), and the association remained in propensity-score-adjusted analysis among vasopressor-treated patients (OR 3.0, 95 % CI 1.3, 7.2, p = 0.013); this was further confirmed by propensity-score-matched analysis. Adrenaline was also associated, independent of prior cardiac arrest, with marked worsening of cardiac and renal biomarkers during the first days. Dobutamine and levosimendan were the most commonly used inotropes (49 % and 24 %). There were no differences in mortality, whether noradrenaline was combined

  13. An amplified chemiluminescence system based on Si-doped carbon dots for detection of catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Amjadi, Mohammad; Hallaj, Tooba; Manzoori, Jamshid L; Shahbazsaghir, Tahmineh

    2018-08-05

    We report on a chemiluminescence (CL) system based on simultaneous enhancing effect of Si-doped carbon dots (Si-CDs) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) on HCO 3 - -H 2 O 2 reaction . The possible CL mechanism is investigated and discussed. Excited-state Si-CDs was found to be the final emitting species, which are probably produced via electron and hole injection by oxy-radicals. The effect of several other heteroatom-doped CDs and undoped CDs was also investigated and compared with Si-CDs. Furthermore, it was found that catecholamines such as dopamine, adrenaline and noradrenaline remarkably diminish the CL intensity of Si-CD-HCO 3 - -H 2 O 2 -CTAB system. By taking advantage of this fact, a sensitive probe was designed for determination of dopamine, adrenaline and noradrenaline with a limit of detection of 0.07, 0.60 and 0.01 μM, respectively. The method was applied to the determination of catecholamines in human plasma samples. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Noradrenaline transporter blockade increases fronto-parietal functional connectivity relevant for working memory.

    PubMed

    Hernaus, Dennis; Casales Santa, Marta Ma; Offermann, Jan Stefan; Van Amelsvoort, Thérèse

    2017-04-01

    Experimental animal work has demonstrated that dopamine and noradrenaline play an essential role in modulating prefrontal cortex-mediated networks underlying working memory performance. Studies of functional connectivity have been instrumental in extending such notions to humans but, so far, have almost exclusively focussed on pharmacological agents with a predominant dopaminergic mechanism of action. Here, we investigate the effect of a single dose of atomoxetine 60mg, a noradrenaline transporter inhibitor, on working memory performance and associated functional connectivity during an n-back task in 19 healthy male volunteers. Atomoxetine increased functional connectivity between right anterior insula and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, precentral gyrus, posterior parietal cortex and precuneus during the high-working memory load condition of the n-back task. Increased atomoxetine-induced insula-dorsolateral prefrontal cortex functional connectivity during this condition correlated with decreased reaction time variability and was furthermore predicted by working memory capacity. These results show for the first time that noradrenaline transporter blockade-induced increases in cortical catecholamines accentuate fronto-parietal working memory-related network integrity. The observation of significant inter-subject variability in response to atomoxetine has implications for inverted-U frameworks of dopamine and noradrenaline function, which could be useful to predict drug effects in clinical disorders with variable treatment response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  15. High-dose catecholamine treatment decreases polymorphonuclear leukocyte phagocytic capacity and reactive oxygen production.

    PubMed Central

    Wenisch, C; Parschalk, B; Weiss, A; Zedwitz-Liebenstein, K; Hahsler, B; Wenisch, H; Georgopoulos, A; Graninger, W

    1996-01-01

    Flow cytometry was used to study phagocytic function (uptake of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled bacteria) and release of reactive oxygen products (dihydrorhodamine 123 converted to rhodamine 123) following phagocytosis by neutrophil granulocytes of heparinized whole blood treated with adrenaline, noradrenaline, dopamine, dobutamine, or orciprenaline. Reduced neutrophil phagocytosis and reactive oxygen production were seen at 12 micrograms of adrenaline per liter (72% each compared with control values); at 120 micrograms of noradrenaline (72% each), dobutamine (83 and 80%, respectively), and orciprenaline (81 and 80%, respectively) per liter; and at 100 micrograms of dopamine per liter (66 and 70%) (P < 0.05 for all). At these dosages, neutrophil chemotaxis was reduced to < 50% of control values for all catecholamines. Treatment with catecholamines at lower dosages had no significant effect on phagocytosis or generation of reactive oxygen products or chemotaxis. The phagocytic capacity of granulocytes was related to the generation of reactive oxygen products (r = 0.789; P < 0.05). The results demonstrate that catecholamines have a suppressive effect on the response of phagocytic cells to bacterial pathogens at high therapeutic levels in blood. PMID:8807207

  16. Detection of neurotransmitters by a light scattering technique based on seed-mediated growth of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Li; Dong, Shaojun

    2008-03-01

    A simple light scattering detection method for neurotransmitters has been developed, based on the growth of gold nanoparticles. Neurotransmitters (dopamine, L-dopa, noradrenaline and adrenaline) can effectively function as active reducing agents for generating gold nanoparticles, which result in enhanced light scattering signals. The strong light scattering of gold nanoparticles then allows the quantitative detection of the neurotransmitters simply by using a common spectrofluorometer. In particular, Au-nanoparticle seeds were added to facilitate the growth of nanoparticles, which was found to enhance the sensing performance greatly. Using this light scattering technique based on the seed-mediated growth of gold nanoparticles, detection limits of 4.4 × 10-7 M, 3.5 × 10-7 M, 4.1 × 10-7 M, and 7.7 × 10-7 M were achieved for dopamine, L-dopa, noradrenaline and adrenaline, respectively. The present strategy can be extended to detect other biologically important molecules in a very fast, simple and sensitive way, and may have potential applications in a wide range of fields.

  17. Flow dependence of forearm noradrenaline overflow, as assessed during mental stress and sodium nitroprusside infusion.

    PubMed

    Lindqvist, M; Melcher, A; Hjemdahl, P

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of blood flow on measurements of regional sympathetic nerve activity by radiotracer methodology ([3H]noradrenaline). Ten healthy men were studied under two conditions of elevated forearm blood flow: mental stress (Stroop colour word conflict test) and an intra-arterial infusion of sodium nitroprusside. Arterial blood pressure was measured invasively and forearm blood flow with strain-gauge plethysmography. Arterial and venous plasma adrenaline and noradrenaline were measured with high-performance liquid chromatography, and regional and total noradrenaline spillover were calculated. During mental stress, mean arterial pressure increased by 17%, heart rate by 16 beats/min, forearm blood flow by 117%, while forearm vascular resistance decreased by 44% (P < 0.001 for all). Sodium nitroprusside increased forearm blood flow dose-dependently, but elicited only minor effects on systemic haemodynamics. Mental stress increased arterial plasma noradrenaline by 52% (P < 0.001), and total body noradrenaline spillover by 75% (P < 0.001). During sodium nitroprusside infusion, arterial plasma noradrenaline increased only slightly and total body noradrenaline spillover was unaffected Forearm noradrenaline overflow increased from 5.4 +/- 0.9 to 16.9 +/- 2.6 pmol/min per I (P < 0.001) during mental stress and from 6.6 +/- 0.8 to 16.9 +/- 3.7 pmol/min per I (P < 0.001) during the second dose-step of sodium nitroprusside infusion. By intra-individual comparisons of forearm noradrenaline overflow increases during mental stress and during sodium nitroprusside infusion, with similar forearm blood flow increases, the flow dependence of forearm noradrenaline overflow was estimated. During mental stress, about 60% (median value, range 29-112%) of the increase in forearm noradrenaline overflow was attributed to the increase in forearm blood flow, whereas 40% was considered to reflect increased sympathetic nerve activity. There seems to be a considerable flow

  18. Effects of chronic administration of nicotine on storage and synthesis of noradrenaline in rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Bhagat, B.

    1970-01-01

    1. Chronic administration of nicotine (0·5 mg/kg, subcutaneously four times a day, 5 days a week, for 6 weeks) did not affect the growth rate and water intake in rats. In these animals food intake was normal for the first 5 weeks, but was significantly increased during the sixth week of treatment. 2. Nicotine administration increased the blood pressure of rats from 120 mm Hg to 151 mm Hg. 3. The concentrations of endogenous noradrenaline, dopamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine and acetylcholine in the brain remained unaltered. However, chronic treatment with nicotine increased the turnover rate of noradrenaline. Initial accumulation of 3H-noradrenaline was also significantly increased. 4. It is concluded from these studies that changes in the turnover of cerebral noradrenaline caused by chronic administration rather than changes in the concentration of noradrenaline may be an important factor in nicotine-induced behavioural changes. PMID:5413293

  19. Noradrenaline and dopamine neurons in the reward/effort trade-off: a direct electrophysiological comparison in behaving monkeys.

    PubMed

    Varazzani, Chiara; San-Galli, Aurore; Gilardeau, Sophie; Bouret, Sebastien

    2015-05-20

    Motivation determines multiple aspects of behavior, including action selection and energization of behavior. Several components of the underlying neural systems have been examined closely, but the specific role of the different neuromodulatory systems in motivation remains unclear. Here, we compare directly the activity of dopaminergic neurons from the substantia nigra pars compacta and noradrenergic neurons from the locus coeruleus in monkeys performing a task manipulating the reward/effort trade-off. Consistent with previous reports, dopaminergic neurons encoded the expected reward, but we found that they also anticipated the upcoming effort cost in connection with its negative influence on action selection. Conversely, the firing of noradrenergic neurons increased with both pupil dilation and effort production in relation to the energization of behavior. Therefore, this work underlines the contribution of dopamine to effort-based decision making and uncovers a specific role of noradrenaline in energizing behavior to face challenges. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/357866-12$15.00/0.

  20. Volume Transmission in Central Dopamine and Noradrenaline Neurons and Its Astroglial Targets.

    PubMed

    Fuxe, Kjell; Agnati, Luigi F; Marcoli, Manuela; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O

    2015-12-01

    Already in the 1960s the architecture and pharmacology of the brainstem dopamine (DA) and noradrenaline (NA) neurons with formation of vast numbers of DA and NA terminal plexa of the central nervous system (CNS) indicated that they may not only communicate via synaptic transmission. In the 1980s the theory of volume transmission (VT) was introduced as a major communication together with synaptic transmission in the CNS. VT is an extracellular and cerebrospinal fluid transmission of chemical signals like transmitters, modulators etc. moving along energy gradients making diffusion and flow of VT signals possible. VT interacts with synaptic transmission mainly through direct receptor-receptor interactions in synaptic and extrasynaptic heteroreceptor complexes and their signaling cascades. The DA and NA neurons are specialized for extrasynaptic VT at the soma-dendrtitic and terminal level. The catecholamines released target multiple DA and adrenergic subtypes on nerve cells, astroglia and microglia which are the major cell components of the trophic units building up the neural-glial networks of the CNS. DA and NA VT can modulate not only the strength of synaptic transmission but also the VT signaling of the astroglia and microglia of high relevance for neuron-glia interactions. The catecholamine VT targeting astroglia can modulate the fundamental functions of astroglia observed in neuroenergetics, in the Glymphatic system, in the central renin-angiotensin system and in the production of long-distance calcium waves. Also the astrocytic and microglial DA and adrenergic receptor subtypes mediating DA and NA VT can be significant drug targets in neurological and psychiatric disease.

  1. Noradrenaline Triggers GABAA Inhibition of Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis Neurons Projecting to the Ventral Tegmental Area

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Éric C.; Williams, John T.

    2014-01-01

    The lateral part of the ventral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (vlBNST) is a critical site for the antiaversive effects of noradrenergic drugs during opioid withdrawal. The objective of the present study is to identify the cellular action(s) of noradrenaline in the vlBNST after withdrawal from a 5 d treatment with morphine. The vlBNST is a heterogeneous cell group with multiple efferent projections. Therefore, neurons projecting to the midbrain were identified by retrograde transport of fluorescent microspheres injected in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Whole-cell voltage clamp recordings of these neurons and of those sharing physiological properties were done in brain slices. Noradrenaline activated α1-adrenergic receptors to increase GABAA-IPSC frequency. Noradrenaline produced a similar increase in GABAA-IPSCs during acute opioid withdrawal, but this increase resulted from activation of β-adrenergic receptors, adenylyl cyclase, and protein kinase A, as well as α1-adrenergic receptors. Given that neurons in the vlBNST send an excitatory projection to the VTA, noradrenaline may reduce excitatory drive to mesolimbic dopamine cells. This mechanism might contribute to the withdrawal-induced inhibition of dopamine neurons and explain how noradrenergic drugs microinjected into the vlBNST reduce aversive aspects of opioid withdrawal. PMID:15385602

  2. Longitudinal changes in serum catecholamines, dopamine, serotonin, ACTH and cortisol in pregnant Spanish mares.

    PubMed

    Marcilla, María; Muñoz, Ana; Satué, Katy

    2017-12-01

    Systemic physiological changes required for placental and fetal development during pregnancy are associated with an activation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) in women, but this fact has not been investigated in mares. Venous blood samples were taken monthly from 31 successful Spanish mares during the 11months of pregnancy. During the first 4months of pregnancy, adrenaline (AD), dopamine (DOPA) and ACTH increases, whereas 5-hydroxitryptamine (5-HT) decreased, and noradrenaline (NAD) and cortisol (CORT) did not change. Serum NAD increased at 8th month, 5-HT at 5th, 7th months, and DOPA increased progressively between the 5th and 8th months and CORT concentrations peak at 5th month. During the three last months of pregnancy, NAD, 5-TH and DOPA decreased, particularly at the 11th month. These results confirmed an activation of the SNS and the HPA axis in pregnant mares during successful pregnancies. The next step would be to elucidate whether these changes also appear in unsuccessful pregnancies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Activation of the mesocortical dopamine system by feeding: lack of a selective response to stress.

    PubMed

    Taber, M T; Fibiger, H C

    1997-03-01

    There is wide agreement that catecholamine systems in the prefrontal cortex are activated by stressful stimuli. To date, however, the extent to which other stimuli can increase the activity of these systems has received little attention. In the present study, the effects of tail pinch stress and feeding on dopamine and noradrenaline release in the prefrontal cortex of rats were examined using in vivo brain microdialysis. Both stimuli increased dopamine release, with peak effects reaching 212% above baseline for tail pinch and 165% above baseline for feeding. The effects of the two stimuli on peak dopamine release were not significantly different. Both stimuli also significantly increased noradrenaline release, with peak effects reaching 128% above baseline for tail pinch and 98% above baseline for feeding. The effects of the two stimuli on peak noradrenaline release were not significantly different. These results indicate that activation of catecholaminergic afferents to the prefrontal cortex is not specific to stress, but also occurs in response to non-stressors with positive motivational valence.

  4. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), its cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), other catecholamine-related enzymes, and their human genes in relation to the drug and gene therapies of Parkinson's disease (PD): historical overview and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Nagatsu, Toshiharu; Nagatsu, Ikuko

    2016-11-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), which was discovered at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in 1964, is a tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4)-requiring monooxygenase that catalyzes the first and rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of catecholamines (CAs), such as dopamine, noradrenaline, and adrenaline. Since deficiencies of dopamine and noradrenaline in the brain stem, caused by neurodegeneration of dopamine and noradrenaline neurons, are mainly related to non-motor and motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), we have studied human CA-synthesizing enzymes [TH; BH4-related enzymes, especially GTP-cyclohydrolase I (GCH1); aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC); dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH); and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT)] and their genes in relation to PD in postmortem brains from PD patients, patients with CA-related genetic diseases, mice with genetically engineered CA neurons, and animal models of PD. We purified all human CA-synthesizing enzymes, produced their antibodies for immunohistochemistry and immunoassay, and cloned all human genes, especially the human TH gene and the human gene for GCH1, which synthesizes BH4 as a cofactor of TH. This review discusses the historical overview of TH, BH4-, and other CA-related enzymes and their genes in relation to the pathophysiology of PD, the development of drugs, such as L-DOPA, and future prospects for drug and gene therapy for PD, especially the potential of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells.

  5. Dopamine, Noradrenaline and Differences in Sexual Behavior between Roman High and Low Avoidance Male Rats: A Microdialysis Study in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Fabrizio; Bratzu, Jessica; Piludu, Maria A; Corda, Maria G; Melis, Maria R; Giorgi, Osvaldo; Argiolas, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Roman High- (RHA) and Low-Avoidance (RLA) outbred rats, which differ for a respectively rapid vs. poor acquisition of the active avoidance response in the shuttle-box, display differences in sexual activity when put in the presence of a sexually receptive female rat. Indeed RHA rats show higher levels of sexual motivation and copulatory performance than RLA rats, which persist also after repeated sexual activity. These differences have been correlated to a higher tone of the mesolimbic dopaminergic system of RHA rats vs. RLA rats, revealed by the higher increase of dopamine found in the dialysate obtained from the nucleus accumbens of RHA than RLA rats during sexual activity. This work shows that extracellular dopamine and noradrenaline (NA) also, increase in the dialysate from the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of male RHA and RLA rats put in the presence of an inaccessible female rat and more markedly during direct sexual interaction. Such increases in dopamine (and its main metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, DOPAC) and NA were found in both sexually naïve and experienced animals, but they were higher: (i) in RHA than in RLA rats; and (ii) in sexually experienced RHA and RLA rats than in their naïve counterparts. Finally, the differences in dopamine and NA in the mPFC occurred concomitantly to those in sexual activity, as RHA rats displayed higher levels of sexual motivation and copulatory performance than RLA rats in both the sexually naïve and experienced conditions. These results suggest that a higher dopaminergic tone also occurs in the mPFC, together with an increased noradrenergic tone, which may be involved in the different copulatory patterns found in RHA and RLA rats, as suggested for the mesolimbic dopaminergic system.

  6. Dopamine, Noradrenaline and Differences in Sexual Behavior between Roman High and Low Avoidance Male Rats: A Microdialysis Study in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Sanna, Fabrizio; Bratzu, Jessica; Piludu, Maria A.; Corda, Maria G.; Melis, Maria R.; Giorgi, Osvaldo; Argiolas, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Roman High- (RHA) and Low-Avoidance (RLA) outbred rats, which differ for a respectively rapid vs. poor acquisition of the active avoidance response in the shuttle-box, display differences in sexual activity when put in the presence of a sexually receptive female rat. Indeed RHA rats show higher levels of sexual motivation and copulatory performance than RLA rats, which persist also after repeated sexual activity. These differences have been correlated to a higher tone of the mesolimbic dopaminergic system of RHA rats vs. RLA rats, revealed by the higher increase of dopamine found in the dialysate obtained from the nucleus accumbens of RHA than RLA rats during sexual activity. This work shows that extracellular dopamine and noradrenaline (NA) also, increase in the dialysate from the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of male RHA and RLA rats put in the presence of an inaccessible female rat and more markedly during direct sexual interaction. Such increases in dopamine (and its main metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, DOPAC) and NA were found in both sexually naïve and experienced animals, but they were higher: (i) in RHA than in RLA rats; and (ii) in sexually experienced RHA and RLA rats than in their naïve counterparts. Finally, the differences in dopamine and NA in the mPFC occurred concomitantly to those in sexual activity, as RHA rats displayed higher levels of sexual motivation and copulatory performance than RLA rats in both the sexually naïve and experienced conditions. These results suggest that a higher dopaminergic tone also occurs in the mPFC, together with an increased noradrenergic tone, which may be involved in the different copulatory patterns found in RHA and RLA rats, as suggested for the mesolimbic dopaminergic system. PMID:28638325

  7. Extinction memory is facilitated by methylphenidate and regulated by dopamine and noradrenaline receptors.

    PubMed

    Furini, Cristiane R G; Behling, Jonny A K; Zinn, Carolina G; Zanini, Mara Lise; Assis Brasil, Eduardo; Pereira, Luiza Doro; Izquierdo, Ivan; de Carvalho Myskiw, Jociane

    2017-05-30

    Extinction is defined as the learned inhibition of retrieval and is the mainstay of exposure therapy, which is widely used to treat drug addiction, phobias and fear disorders. The psychostimulant, methylphenidate (MPH) is known to increase extracellular levels of noradrenaline and dopamine by blocking their reuptake and studies have demonstrated that MPH can modulate hippocampal physiology and/or functions including long-term potentiation (LTP), learning and memory. However, the influence of MPH on fear extinction memory has been insufficiently studied. Here we investigate the effect of MPH infused into the CA1 region of the hippocampus on extinction memory in animals normally incapable of showing contextual fear conditioning (CFC) extinction because of weak training, and the possible mechanisms through which it acts during this process. For this, male Wistar rats with infusion cannulae stereotaxically implanted in the CA1 region were submitted to a weak extinction protocol in a CFC apparatus. Animals that received intra-CA1 infusion of MPH (12.5μg/side) 20min before the extinction training (Ext Tr) expressed less freezing behavior than Veh-treated animals during both Ext Tr and extinction retention Test (Ext Test). Additionally, the administration of MPH+Timolol (1μg/side) or MPH+SCH23390 (1.5μg/side) intra-CA1 20min before the Ext Tr blocked the enhancing effect of the MPH on extinction learning. These results suggest that MPH in the CA1 region of the hippocampus is able to induce the consolidation of extinction memory and this process occurs through both β-adrenergic and D1/D5 dopaminergic receptors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. [Noradrenaline and the enzymes of its synthesis and breakdown in the rat hypothalamus after a flight on the Kosmos-936 biosatellite].

    PubMed

    Torda, T; Kvetnansky, R; Tigranian, R A; Chulman, J; Genin, A M

    1981-01-01

    In the hypothalamus of the weightless and centrifuged rats flown for 18.5 days on board the biosatellite Cosmos-936 the noradrenaline concentration and activity of the enzymes involved in the catecholamine synthesis and degradation were measured. It was found that under the space flight influence the noradrenaline concentration and tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine-beta-hydroxylase and monoamine oxidase activities remained unaltered. These findings indicate that a prolonged exposure to weightlessness was not a stressogenic agent that could activate the adrenergic system in the rat hypothalamus.

  9. Changes in plasma levels of adrenaline, noradrenaline, glucose, lactate and CO2 in the green turtle, Chelonia mydas, during peak period of nesting.

    PubMed

    Alkindi, A Y A; Al-Habsi, A A; Mahmoud, I Y

    2008-02-01

    Plasma concentrations of stress hormones [adrenaline (ADR), noradrenaline (NR)], lactate, glucose and CO2 were monitored during peak nesting period (May-October) at different phases of nesting in the green turtle, Chelonia mydas. These include, emergence from sea, excavating body and nest chambers, oviposition, covering and camouflaging the nest and then returning to sea. Turtles that completed all phases of nesting including oviposition before returning to sea were considered "successful" turtles, while those that completed all phases but failed to lay their eggs were "unsuccessful". Blood samples were taken from the cervical sinus within 5min of capture to avoid stress due to handling. The turtles were usually sampled for blood between 20:00 and 1:00h of nesting time to ensure uniformity in the sampling. Plasma ADR and NR values were highly significant (P<0.001) in successful turtles over emergence, excavating and unsuccessful turtles. Plasma glucose levels remained stable throughout the nesting phases while lactate levels were significantly higher in successful turtles over the other phases (P<0.05) which signifies anaerobic metabolism during nesting. Plasma CO2 values were negatively correlated with ADR and NR (r=-0.258, P=0.03; r=-0.304, P=0.010), respectively. Hematocrit was significantly higher in successful phase (P<0.05) compared to other phases, and this may signify a higher degree of stress in successful turtles. Body temperature were significantly lower (P<0.005) in the excavating phase compared to the other three phases. Overall, body temperatures were lower than sand temperatures around the nest, which may indicate a behavioral thermoregulation used by the turtles during nesting. This information will be of value to the ongoing conservation program at Ras Al-Hadd Reserve in the Sultanate of Oman.

  10. Analysis of Glutamate, GABA, Noradrenaline, Dopamine, Serotonin, and Metabolites Using Microbore UHPLC with Electrochemical Detection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The applicability of microbore ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) with electrochemical detection for offline analysis of a number of well-known neurotransmitters in less than 10 μL microdialysis fractions is described. Two methods are presented for the analysis of monoamine or amino acid neurotransmitters, using the same UHPLC instrument. Speed of analysis of noradrenaline (NA), dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT), and the metabolites homovanillic acid (HVA), 5-hydroxyindole aceticacid (5-HIAA), and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) was predominated by the retention behavior of NA, the nonideal behavior of matrix components, and the loss in signal of 5-HT. This method was optimized to meet the requirements for detection sensitivity and minimizing the size of collected fractions, which determines temporal resolution in microdialysis. The amino acid neurotransmitters glutamate (Glu) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) were analyzed after an automated derivatization procedure. Under optimized conditions, Glu was resolved from a number of early eluting system peaks, while the total runtime was decreased to 15 min by a 4-fold increase of the flow rate under UHPLC conditions. The detection limit for Glu and GABA was 10 nmol/L (15 fmol in 1.5 μL); the monoamine neurotransmitters had a detection limit between 32 and 83 pmol/L (0.16–0.42 fmol in 5 μL) in standard solutions. Using UHPLC, the analysis times varied from 15 min to less than 2 min depending on the complexity of the samples and the substances to be analyzed. PMID:23642417

  11. Effect of some blocking drugs on the pressor response to physostigmine in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Gokhale, S. D.; Gulati, O. D.; Joshi, N. Y.

    1963-01-01

    Bretylium and guanethidine blocked the pressor effect of physostigmine and potentiated the responses to adrenaline and noradrenaline on the blood pressure of the rat. Morphine and atropine in small doses blocked the pressor effect of physostigmine without interfering with the actions of adrenaline and noradrenaline. Chlorpromazine in small doses (0.5 to 2.5 mg/kg) blocked the pressor effect of physostigmine and potentiated the responses to noradrenaline whilst those to adrenaline remained unaltered. 3,6-Di(3-diethylaminopropoxy)pyridazine di(methiodide) (Win 4981) blocked the pressor effect of physostigmine and, in its early stages, this block was partially reversed by choline chloride. N-Diethylaminoethyl-N-isopentyl-N'N'-diisopropylurea (P-286), in a dose that reduced the effect of dimethylphenylpiperazinium, had no effect on the pressor response to physostigmine or on the responses to adrenaline and noradrenaline. Hexamethonium, even in large doses (100 mg/kg), only blocked partially the effect of physostigmine while mecamylamine produced a complete block; the responses to adrenaline and noradrenaline were potentiated in both instances. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:14081658

  12. The balance between the pro-inflammatory effect of plasma noradrenaline and the anti-inflammatory effect of neuronal noradrenaline determines the peripheral effects of noradrenaline.

    PubMed

    Crotty, T P

    2015-11-01

    Experiments on canine lateral saphenous vein segments have shown that noradrenaline causes potent, flow dependent effects, at a threshold concentration comparable to that of plasma noradrenaline, when it stimulates a segment by diffusion from its microcirculation (vasa vasorum). The effects it causes contrast with those neuronal noradrenaline causes in vivo and that, in the light of the principle that all information is transmitted in patterns that need contrast to be detected - star patterns need darkness, sound patterns, quietness - has generated the hypothesis that plasma noradrenaline provides the obligatory contrast tissues need to detect and respond to the regulatory information encrypted in the diffusion pattern of neuronal noradrenaline. Based on the implications of that hypothesis, the controlled variable of the peripheral noradrenergic system is believed to be the maintenance of a set point balance between the contrasting effects of plasma and neuronal noradrenaline on a tissue. The hypothalamic sympathetic centres are believed to monitor that balance through the level of afferent sympathetic traffic they receive from a tissue and to correct any deviation it detects in the balance by adjusting the level of efferent sympathetic input it projects to the tissue. The failure of the centres to maintain the correct balance is believed to be responsible for inflammatory and genetic disorders. When the failure causes the balance to be polarised in favour of the effect of plasma noradrenaline that is believed to cause inflammatory diseases like dilator cardiac failure, renal hypertension, varicose veins and aneurysms; when it causes it to be polarised in favour of the effect of neuronal noradrenaline that is believed to cause genetic diseases like hypertrophic cardiopathy, pulmonary hypertension and stenoses and when, in pregnancy, a factor causes the polarity to favour plasma noradrenaline in all the maternal tissues except the uterus and conceptus, where it

  13. Sexual side effects of serotonergic antidepressants: mediated by inhibition of serotonin on central dopamine release?

    PubMed

    Bijlsma, Elisabeth Y; Chan, Johnny S W; Olivier, Berend; Veening, Jan G; Millan, Mark J; Waldinger, Marcel D; Oosting, Ronald S

    2014-06-01

    Antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction adversely affects the quality of life of antidepressant users and reduces compliance with treatment. Animal models provide an instructive approach for examining potential sexual side effects of novel drugs. This review discusses the stability and reproducibility of our standardized test procedure that assesses the acute, subchronic and chronic effects of psychoactive compounds in a 30 minute mating test. In addition, we present an overview of the effects of several different (putative) antidepressants on male rat sexual behavior, as tested in our standardized test procedure. By comparing the effects of these mechanistically distinct antidepressants (paroxetine, venlafaxine, bupropion, buspirone, DOV 216,303 and S32006), this review discusses the putative mechanism underlying sexual side effects of antidepressants and their normalization. This review shows that sexual behavior is mainly inhibited by antidepressants that increase serotonin neurotransmission via blockade of serotonin transporters, while those that mainly increase the levels of dopamine and noradrenaline are devoid of sexual side effects. Those sexual disturbances cannot be normalized by simultaneously increasing noradrenaline neurotransmission, but are normalized by increasing both noradrenaline and dopamine neurotransmission. Therefore, it is hypothesized that the sexual side effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors may be mediated by their inhibitory effects on dopamine signaling in sex brain circuits. Clinical development of novel antidepressants should therefore focus on compounds that simultaneously increase both serotonin and dopamine signaling. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. XAFS of human tyrosine hydroxylase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, W.; Haavik, J.; Winkler, H.; Trautwein, A. X.; Nolting, H.-F.

    1995-02-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) catalyses the rate-limiting step (hydroxylation of tyrosine to form dihydroxyphenylalanine) in the biosynthetic pathway leading to the catecholamines dopamine, noradrenaline and adrenaline. The human enzyme (hTH) is present in four isoforms, generated by splicing of pre-mRNA. The purified apoenzyme (metal free) binds stoichiometric amounts of iron. The incorporation of Fe(II) results in a rapid and up to 40-fold increase of activity [1]. Besides the coordination of the metal centers in native enzyme we studied the purported inhibition of TH by its immediate products. So we analysed Fe-hTH isoform 1 native as well as oxidized with dopamine and Co-hTH isoform 2.

  15. The metabolic and renal effects of adrenaline and milrinone in patients with myocardial dysfunction after coronary artery bypass grafting

    PubMed Central

    Heringlake, Matthias; Wernerus, Marit; Grünefeld, Julia; Klaus, Stephan; Heinze, Hermann; Bechtel, Matthias; Bahlmann, Ludger; Poeling, Jochen; Schön, Julika

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Myocardial dysfunction necessitating inotropic support is a typical complication after on-pump cardiac surgery. This prospective, randomized pilot study analyzes the metabolic and renal effects of the inotropes adrenaline and milrinone in patients needing inotropic support after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Methods During an 18-month period, 251 patients were screened for low cardiac output upon intensive care unit (ICU) admission after elective, isolated CABG surgery. Patients presenting with a cardiac index (CI) of less than 2.2 liters/minute per square meter upon ICU admission – despite adequate mean arterial (titrated with noradrenaline or sodium nitroprusside) and filling pressures – were randomly assigned to 14-hour treatment with adrenaline (n = 7) or milrinone (n = 11) to achieve a CI of greater than 3.0 liters/minute per square meter. Twenty patients not needing inotropes served as controls. Hemodynamics, plasma lactate, pyruvate, glucose, acid-base status, insulin requirements, the urinary excretion of alpha-1-microglobuline, and creatinine clearance were determined during the treatment period, and cystatin-C levels were determined up to 48 hours after surgery (follow-up period). Results After two to four hours after ICU admission, the target CI was achieved in both intervention groups and maintained during the observation period. Plasma lactate, pyruvate, the lactate/pyruvate ratio, plasma glucose, and insulin doses were higher (p < 0.05) in the adrenaline-treated patients than during milrinone or control conditions. The urinary excretion of alpha-1-microglobuline was higher in the adrenaline than in the control group 6 to 14 hours after admission (p < 0.05). No between-group differences were observed in creatinine clearance, whereas plasma cystatin-C levels were significantly higher in the adrenaline than in the milrinone or the control group after 48 hours (p < 0.05). Conclusion This suggests that the use of adrenaline for

  16. Binding assessment of two arachidonic-based synthetic derivatives of adrenalin with β-lactoglobulin: Molecular modeling and chemometrics approach.

    PubMed

    Gholami, S; Bordbar, A K; Akvan, N; Parastar, H; Fani, N; Gretskaya, N M; Bezuglov, V V; Haertlé, T

    2015-12-01

    A computational approach to predict the main binding modes of two adrenalin derivatives, arachidonoyl adrenalin (AA-AD) and arachidonoyl noradrenalin (AA-NOR) with the β-lactoglubuline (BLG) as a nano-milk protein carrier is presented and assessed by comparison to the UV-Vis absorption spectroscopic data using chemometric analysis. Analysis of the spectral data matrices by using the multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) algorithm led to the pure concentration calculation and spectral profiles resolution of the chemical constituents and the apparent equilibrium constants computation. The negative values of entropy and enthalpy changes for both compound indicated the essential role of hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions as main driving forces in stabilizing protein-ligand complex. Computational studies predicted that both derivatives are situated in the calyx pose and remained in that pose during the whole time of simulation with no any significant protein structural changes which pointed that the BLG could be considered as a suitable carrier for these catecholamine compounds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of adrenaline and of spontaneous labour on the secretion and absorption of lung liquid in the fetal lamb.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, M J; Olver, R E; Ramsden, C A; Strang, L B; Walters, D V

    1983-01-01

    In the chronically catheterized fetal lamb, intravenous infusion of adrenaline at 0.5 microgram/min produced slowing of the secretion of lung liquid or its absorption, an effect which increased exponentially with advancing gestation. Between 120 and 130 days, the characteristic response was slowing of secretion, whereas after 130 days it was absorption. Stimulus-response curves, relating secretion or absorption rate to plasma adrenaline concentration, were obtained by infusing adrenaline into the fetus intravenously at rates between 0.1 and 1.0 microgram/min (0.55-5.5 nmol/min). These curves allowed estimation of the minimum concentration of adrenaline required to inhibit secretion [( Ai]) and this was found to decrease from 0.43 ng/ml. (2.35 nM) at 132-4 days' gestation to 0.029 ng/ml. (0.16 nM) at gestations above 140 days. During spontaneous labour there was a slowing of lung liquid secretion in the early stages followed by absorption during the last 50-150 min. The mean concentration of adrenaline in plasma increased from 0.087 ng/ml. (0.48 nM) in early labour to 6.86 ng/ml. (37.5 nM) in the last 50 min and to 7.17 ng/ml. (39.2 nM) in the early post-natal period. Mean noradrenaline levels at the same times were 1.71 ng/ml. (10.1 nM), 12.14 ng/ml. (71.8 nM) and 9.10 ng/ml. (53.9 nM). The relationship between the plasma adrenaline concentration and the rate of absorption during labour was similar to that found when adrenaline was infused at various rates into the non-labouring fetus of comparable gestational age. The upper airway of the fetus was shown to be capable of acting as a one-way valve allowing outflow but not inflow of liquid. Thus withdrawal of liquid at 5-20 ml./hr from the fetal trachea below the larynx caused closure of the upper airway and this result was obtained both when the recurrent laryngeal nerves were intact and when they were divided. PMID:6655575

  18. Measurement of endogenous noradrenaline release in the rat cerebral cortex in vivo by transcortical dialysis: effects of drugs affecting noradrenergic transmission.

    PubMed

    L'Heureux, R; Dennis, T; Curet, O; Scatton, B

    1986-06-01

    The release of endogenous noradrenaline was measured in the cerebral cortex of the halothane-anesthetized rat by using the technique of brain dialysis coupled to a radioenzymatic assay. A thin dialysis tube was inserted transversally in the cerebral cortex (transcortical dialysis) and perfused with Ringer medium (2 microliter min-1). Under basal conditions, the cortical output of noradrenaline was stable over a period of at least 6 h and amounted to 8.7 pg/20 min (not corrected for recovery). Histological control of the perfused area revealed very little damage and normal morphology in the vicinity of the dialysis tube. Omission of calcium from the perfusion medium caused a marked drop in cortical noradrenaline output. Bilateral electrical stimulation (for 10 min) of the ascending noradrenergic pathways in the medial forebrain bundle caused a frequency-dependent increase in cortical noradrenaline output over the range 5-20 Hz. Stimulation at a higher frequency (50 Hz) resulted in a levelling off of the increase in cortical noradrenaline release. Systemic administration of the dopamine-beta-hydroxylase inhibitor bis-(4-methyl-1-homopiperazinylthiocarbonyl) disulfide (FLA 63) (25 mg/kg i.p.) markedly reduced, whereas injection of the monoamine oxidase inhibitor pargyline (75 mg/kg i.p.) resulted in a progressive increase in, cortical noradrenaline output. d-Amphetamine (2 mg/kg i.p.) provoked a sharp increase in cortical noradrenaline release (+450% over basal values within 40 min). Desmethylimipramine (10 mg/kg i.p.) produced a twofold increase of cortical noradrenaline release. Finally, idazoxan (20 mg/kg i.p.) and clonidine (0.3 mg/kg i.p.), respectively, increased and decreased the release of noradrenaline from the cerebral cortex.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Adrenaline, terlipressin, and corticoids versus adrenaline in the treatment of experimental pediatric asphyxial cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    González, Rafael; Urbano, Javier; Botrán, Marta; López, Jorge; Solana, Maria J; García, Ana; Fernández, Sarah; López-Herce, Jesús

    2014-07-01

    To analyze if treatment with adrenaline (epinephrine) plus terlipressin plus corticoids achieves higher return of spontaneous circulation than adrenaline in an experimental infant animal model of asphyxial cardiac arrest. Prospective randomized animal study. Experimental department in a University Hospital. Forty-nine piglets were studied. Cardiac arrest was induced by at least 10 minutes of removal of mechanical ventilation and was followed by manual external chest compressions and mechanical ventilation. After 3 minutes of resuscitation, piglets that did not achieve return of spontaneous circulation were randomized to two groups: adrenaline 0.02 mg kg every 3 minutes (20 animals) and adrenaline 0.02 mg kg every 3 minutes plus terlipressin 20 μg kg every 6 minutes plus hydrocortisone 30 mg kg one dose (22 animals). Resuscitation was discontinued when return of spontaneous circulation was achieved or after 24 minutes. Return of spontaneous circulation was achieved in 14 piglets (28.5%), 14.2% with only cardiac massage and ventilation. Return of spontaneous circulation was achieved in 25% of piglets treated with adrenaline and in 9.1% of those treated with adrenaline plus terlipressin plus hydrocortisone (p = 0.167). Return of spontaneous circulation was achieved in 45.4% of animals with pulseless electric activity, 20% with asystole, and 0% with ventricular fibrillation (p = 0.037). Shorter duration of cardiac arrest, higher mean blood pressure and EtCO2 and lower PaCO2 before resuscitation, and higher mean blood pressure during resuscitation were associated with higher return of spontaneous circulation. Treatment with adrenaline plus terlipressin plus corticoids does not achieve higher return of spontaneous circulation than that with adrenaline in an infant animal model of asphyxial cardiac arrest.

  20. Evaluation of the clonidine suppression test in the diagnosis of phaeochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    McHenry, C M; Hunter, S J; McCormick, M T; Russell, C F; Smye, M G; Atkinson, A B

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study is to review the experience of the clonidine suppression test in a regional endocrine centre and to compare the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity using various previous published criteria. The design used is retrospective study. The subjects include 56 patients in whom clonidine suppression tests had been performed from 1995 to 2000: 15 with phaeochromocytoma and 41 patients in whom the diagnosis was excluded using a combination of biochemical testing, abdominal computed tomography scanning and clinical follow-up. Plasma catecholamines were measured by high pressure liquid chromatography on basal samples and at hourly intervals for 3 h after the administration of clonidine 300 μg orally and the following diagnostic criteria were applied: plasma noradrenaline+adrenaline>2.96 nmol l(-1) at 3 h post-clonidine or a baseline plasma adrenaline plus noradrenaline>11.82 nmol l(-1); plasma noradrenaline>2.96 nmol l(-1) at 3 h post-clonidine and plasma noradrenaline>2.96 nmol l(-1) and <50% fall in noradrenaline at 3 h post-clonidine. The results obtained is that mean plasma noradrenaline plus adrenaline fell across the test in 40/41 patients in the non-phaeochromocytoma patients and was lowest at 3 h (basal 2.28 ± 0.14 vs 1.36 ± 0.11 nmol l(-1), P<0.001). In the phaeochromocytoma group, clonidine had a variable effect on adrenaline plus noradrenaline levels with increases in 7/15. Using an abnormal result as a 3 h level of noradrenaline plus adrenaline>2.96 mmol l(-1) gave a sensitivity of 93% and specificity of 95%. When a 3 h noradrenaline>2.96 mmol l(-1) was used, sensitivity was 87% and specificity 95%. Using the former criteria, noradrenaline plus adrenaline>2.96 mmol l(-1), 1/15 in the phaeochromocytoma group had a normal result after clonidine suppression testing. Two of 41 in the non-phaeochromocytoma group had a false-positive result. Under carefully controlled conditions, the clonidine suppression test is well tolerated, safe and

  1. The peripheral action of hexamethonium and of pentolinium

    PubMed Central

    Mantegazza, P.; Tyler, Christine; Zaimis, Eleanor

    1958-01-01

    The influence of hexamethonium and pentolinium on the responses of certain peripheral effector cells to adrenaline, noradrenaline or postganglionic stimulation was studied in the cat. The actions of adrenaline and noradrenaline on the blood vessels of a limb and of adrenaline and postganglionic stimulation on the nictitating membrane were increased after the administration of hexamethonium and pentolinium. This effect was considered to be due to sensitization of the peripheral effector cells. The possible significance of these findings is discussed. PMID:13618555

  2. Arterial stress hormones during scuba diving with different breathing gases.

    PubMed

    Weist, Frank; Strobel, Günther; Hölzl, Mathias; Böning, Dieter

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether the conditions during scuba diving without exercise (e.g., submersion, restricted breathing) stimulate the activities of the sympathoadrenergic system and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. This might facilitate panic reactions in dangerous situations. Fifteen experienced rescue divers participated in three experiments with two submersions each in a diving tower where ambient pressure could be varied. During submersion (duration = 15 min), they were breathing either pure oxygen (ambient pressure = 1.1 bar) or air (1.1 and 5.3 bar) or Heliox21 (21% O(2) and 79% He, 1.1 and 5.3 bar). The subjects stayed upright immediately below the water surface holding one hand with a cannulated radial artery out in the air. Noradrenaline, adrenaline, and dopamine concentrations in arterial blood and heart rate (HR) variability as indicators of sympathoadrenergic activity and cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone concentrations as strain indicators were measured. [Noradrenaline] and [adrenaline] (initial values (mean ± SE) = 1616 ± 93 and 426 ± 38 pmol·L(-1)) decreased significantly by up to 30% and 50%, respectively, after 11 min of submersion, independent of pressure and inspired gas. HR variability showed roughly corresponding changes and also indications for parasympathetic stimulation, but artifacts by interference among HR monitors reduced the number of usable measurements. The other hormone concentrations did not change significantly. There was no increase of stress hormone concentrations in experienced subjects. The reduction of [noradrenaline] and [adrenaline] during scuba diving seems to be a reaction to orthostatic relief caused by external hydrostatic pressure on peripheral vasculature. The activity of the vegetative nervous system might be estimated from HR variability if interference among pulse watches can be avoided.

  3. Hemodynamic changes by drug interaction of adrenaline with chlorpromazine.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Hitoshi; Yabuki, Akiko; Ishii-Maruhama, Minako; Tomoyasu, Yumiko; Maeda, Shigeru; Miyawaki, Takuya

    2014-01-01

    Adrenaline (epinephrine) is included in dental local anesthesia for the purpose of vasoconstriction. In Japan, adrenaline is contraindicated for use in patients receiving antipsychotic therapy, because the combination of adrenaline and an antipsychotic is considered to cause severe hypotension; however, there is insufficient evidence supporting this claim. The purpose of the present study was to clarify the changes in hemodynamics caused by drug interaction between adrenaline and an antipsychotic and to evaluate the safety of the combined use of adrenaline and an antipsychotic in an animal study. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital. A catheter was inserted into the femoral artery to measure blood pressure and pulse rate. Rats were pretreated by intraperitoneal injection of chlorpromazine or chlorpromazine and propranolol, and after 20 minutes, saline or 1 of 3 different doses of adrenaline was administered by intraperitoneal injection. Changes in the ratio of mean arterial blood pressure and pulse rate were measured after the injection of adrenaline. Significant hypotension and tachycardia were observed after the injection of adrenaline in the chlorpromazine-pretreated rats. These effects were in a dose-dependent manner, and 100 μg/kg adrenaline induced significant hemodynamic changes. Furthermore, in the chlorpromazine and propranolol-pretreated rats, modest hypertension was induced by adrenaline, but hypotension and tachycardia were not significantly shown. Hypotension was caused by a drug interaction between adrenaline and chlorpromazine through the activation of the β-adrenergic receptor and showed a dose-dependent effect. Low-dose adrenaline similar to what might be used in human dental treatment did not result in a significant homodynamic change.

  4. Acute treatment with doxorubicin induced neurochemical impairment of the function of dopamine system in rat brain structures.

    PubMed

    Antkiewicz-Michaluk, Lucyna; Krzemieniecki, Krzysztof; Romanska, Irena; Michaluk, Jerzy; Krygowska-Wajs, Anna

    2016-06-01

    The clinical studies have shown that chemotherapy may impair cognitive functions especially in the patients treated for breast cancer. It should be mention that only few studies have made use of animals to investigate the effects of chemotherapy on the brain function. Doxorubicin (Adriamycin) is an anthracycline antibiotic commonly used for chemotherapy of breast cancer. This study examined the effect of doxorubicin (1.5 and 3.0mg/kg ip) after acute administration on the levels of dopamine, noradrenaline, serotonin and their metabolites in the rat brain structures connected with cognition and psychiatric disorders. The data indicate that doxorubicin produced a significant and specific for the dopamine system inhibition of its activity in the investigated structures connected with the fall of dopamine concentration (decrease from 25 to 30% in the frontal cortex; from 30 to 60% in the hippocampus and about 20% of the control in the striatum, p<0.05) and its extraneuronal metabolite, 3-MT (from 35% in the frontal cortex to 60% in the hippocampus of the control level, p<0.01). However, doxorubicin did not affect others monoaminergic transmitters in the brain: noradrenaline and serotonin. Summing up, these data indicate that a single injection of doxorubicin produced a clear and significant inhibition of dopamine system activity in all investigated structures with the strongest effect in the hippocampus what may lead to the disturbances of the cognitive functions at the patients treated for cancer. Moreover, such treatment did not significantly affect others monoaminergic transmitters such as noradrenaline and serotonin. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  5. Hemodynamic Changes by Drug Interaction of Adrenaline With Chlorpromazine

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Hitoshi; Yabuki, Akiko; Ishii-Maruhama, Minako; Tomoyasu, Yumiko; Maeda, Shigeru; Miyawaki, Takuya

    2014-01-01

    Adrenaline (epinephrine) is included in dental local anesthesia for the purpose of vasoconstriction. In Japan, adrenaline is contraindicated for use in patients receiving antipsychotic therapy, because the combination of adrenaline and an antipsychotic is considered to cause severe hypotension; however, there is insufficient evidence supporting this claim. The purpose of the present study was to clarify the changes in hemodynamics caused by drug interaction between adrenaline and an antipsychotic and to evaluate the safety of the combined use of adrenaline and an antipsychotic in an animal study. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital. A catheter was inserted into the femoral artery to measure blood pressure and pulse rate. Rats were pretreated by intraperitoneal injection of chlorpromazine or chlorpromazine and propranolol, and after 20 minutes, saline or 1 of 3 different doses of adrenaline was administered by intraperitoneal injection. Changes in the ratio of mean arterial blood pressure and pulse rate were measured after the injection of adrenaline. Significant hypotension and tachycardia were observed after the injection of adrenaline in the chlorpromazine-pretreated rats. These effects were in a dose-dependent manner, and 100 μg/kg adrenaline induced significant hemodynamic changes. Furthermore, in the chlorpromazine and propranolol–pretreated rats, modest hypertension was induced by adrenaline, but hypotension and tachycardia were not significantly shown. Hypotension was caused by a drug interaction between adrenaline and chlorpromazine through the activation of the β-adrenergic receptor and showed a dose-dependent effect. Low-dose adrenaline similar to what might be used in human dental treatment did not result in a significant homodynamic change. PMID:25517550

  6. Adrenaline overdose in pediatric anaphylaxis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Liew, Pui Yi Lily; Craven, John Andrew

    2017-05-08

    Adrenaline is the standard treatment for anaphylaxis but appropriate administration remains challenging, and iatrogenic overdose is easily overlooked. Despite the established importance of pediatric blood pressure measurement, its use remains inconsistent in clinical practice. We report a case of adrenaline overdose in a 9-year-old white boy with anaphylaxis, where signs of adrenaline overdose were indistinguishable from progressive shock until blood pressure measurement was taken. The consequences of under-dosing adrenaline in anaphylaxis are well-recognized, but the converse is less so. Blood pressure measurement should be a routine part of pediatric assessment as it is key to differentiating adrenaline overdose from anaphylactic shock.

  7. A case of suicide by self-injection of adrenaline.

    PubMed

    Palmiere, Cristian; Bévalot, Fabien; Malicier, Daniel; Grouzmann, Eric; Fracasso, Tony; Fanton, Laurent

    2015-09-01

    Adrenaline (epinephrine) auto-injectors provide life-saving pre-hospital treatment for individuals experiencing anaphylaxis in a community setting. Errors in handling adrenaline auto-injectors, particularly by children and healthcare professionals, have been reported. Reports of adrenaline overdoses are limited in the medical literature. In most of these cases, accidental adrenaline administration results from medical error. Exogenous administration of catecholamine is responsible for cardiovascular and metabolic responses, which may cause supraventricular tachycardia, ventricular dysrhythmias and myocardial ischemia. The authors present a unique autopsy case involving a 34 year-old woman who intentionally self-injected adrenaline using an adrenaline auto-injector as part of a suicide plan. Catecholamines and metanephrines were measured in peripheral and cardiac blood as well as urine and vitreous humor. Based on the results of all postmortem investigations, the cause of death was determined to be cardiac dysrhythmia and cardiac arrest following adrenaline self-injection.

  8. Dopamine, Noradrenaline and Serotonin Receptor Densities in the Striatum of Hemiparkinsonian Rats following Botulinum Neurotoxin-A Injection.

    PubMed

    Mann, T; Zilles, K; Dikow, H; Hellfritsch, A; Cremer, M; Piel, M; Rösch, F; Hawlitschka, A; Schmitt, O; Wree, A

    2018-03-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by a degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) that causes a dopamine (DA) deficit in the caudate-putamen (CPu) accompanied by compensatory changes in other neurotransmitter systems. These changes result in severe motor and non-motor symptoms. To disclose the role of various receptor binding sites for DA, noradrenaline, and serotonin in the hemiparkinsonian (hemi-PD) rat model induced by unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) injection, the densities of D 1 , D 2 /D 3 , α 1 , α 2 , and 5HT 2A receptors were longitudinally visualized and measured in the CPu of hemi-PD rats by quantitative in vitro receptor autoradiography. We found a moderate increase in D 1 receptor density 3 weeks post lesion that decreased during longer survival times, a significant increase of D 2 /D 3 receptor density, and 50% reduction in 5HT 2A receptor density. α 1 receptor density remained unaltered in hemi-PD and α 2 receptors demonstrated a slight right-left difference increasing with post lesion survival. In a second step, the possible role of receptors on the known reduction of apomorphine-induced rotations in hemi-PD rats by intrastriatally injected Botulinum neurotoxin-A (BoNT-A) was analyzed by measuring the receptor densities after BoNT-A injection. The application of this neurotoxin reduced D 2 /D 3 receptor density, whereas the other receptors mainly remained unaltered. Our results provide novel data for an understanding of the postlesional plasticity of dopaminergic, noradrenergic and serotonergic receptors in the hemi-PD rat model. The results further suggest a therapeutic effect of BoNT-A on the impaired motor behavior of hemi-PD rats by reducing the interhemispheric imbalance in D 2 /D 3 receptor density. Copyright © 2018 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Stability of Adrenaline in Irrigating Solution for Intraocular Surgery.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Yuuka; Kimura, Yasuhiro; Taogoshi, Takanori; Matsuo, Hiroaki; Kihira, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Intraocular irrigating solution containing 1 µg/mL adrenaline is widely used during cataract surgery to maintain pupil dilation. Prepared intraocular irrigating solutions are recommended for use within 6 h. After the irrigating solution is admistered for dilution, the adrenaline may become oxidized, and this may result in a decrease in its biological activity. However, the stability of adrenaline in intraocular irrigating solution is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the stability of adrenaline in clinically used irrigating solutions of varying pH. Six hours after mixing, the adrenaline percentages remaining were 90.6%±3.7 (pH 7.2), 91.1%±2.2 (pH 7.5), and 65.2%±2.8 (pH 8.0) of the initial concentration. One hour after mixing, the percentages remaining were 97.6%±2.0 (pH 7.2), 97.4%±2.7 (pH 7.5), and 95.6%±3.3 (pH 8.0). The degradation was especially remarkable and time dependent in the solution at pH 8.0. These results indicate that the concentration of adrenaline is decreased after preparation. Moreover, we investigated the influence of sodium bisulfite on adrenaline stability in irrigating solution. The percentage adrenaline remaining at 6 h after mixing in irrigating solution (pH 8.0) containing sodium bisulfite at 0.5 µg/mL (concentration in irrigating solution) or at 500 µg/mL (concentration in the undiluted adrenaline preparation) were 57.5 and 97.3%, respectively. Therefore, the low concentration of sodium bisulfite in the irrigating solution may be a cause of the adrenaline loss. In conclusion, intraocular irrigation solution with adrenaline should be prepared just prior to its use in surgery.

  10. Neurotransmitters in the Gas Phase: La-Mb Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabezas, C.; Mata, S.; López, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.

    2011-06-01

    LA-MB-FTMW spectroscopy combines laser ablation with Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy in supersonic jets overcoming the problems of thermal decomposition associated with conventional heating methods. We present here the results on LA-MB-FTMW studies of some neurotransmitters. Six conformers of dopamine, four of adrenaline, five of noradrenaline and three conformers of serotonin have been characterized in the gas phase. The rotational and nuclear quadrupole coupling constants extracted from the analysis of the rotational spectrum are directly compared with those predicted by ab initio methods to achieve the conclusive identification of different conformers and the experimental characterization of the intramolecular forces at play which control conformational preferences.

  11. THE ALLEGED OCCURRENCE OF ADRENALIN IN THE MEALWORM

    PubMed Central

    Gregerman, Robert I.; Wald, George

    1952-01-01

    Wense has reported the isolation of crystalline adrenalin from larvae of the beetle Tenebrio molitor. An attempt to repeat his procedures failed to yield any evidence of adrenalin. Analysis of mealworm extracts by paper chromatography and colorimetric means also yielded no indication of adrenalin, though adrenalin added to mealworms can be detected by these procedures in amounts less than 1 mg. per 100 gm. Mealworm extracts reveal on the paper chromatogram the presence of two other orthodiphenols, neither of which appears to be dopa but which may be 3,4-dihydroxyphenyllactic acid and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, compounds recently isolated elsewhere from this organism. PMID:14898031

  12. Pathogenesis of chronic cluster headache and bouts: role of tryptamine, arginine metabolism and α1-agonists.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, G; Bussone, G; Di Fiore, P; Perini, F; Gucciardi, A; Bolner, A; Aguggia, M; Saracco, G; Galloni, E; Giordano, G; Leon, A

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the possible role of tryptamine in the pathogenesis of chronic cluster headache along with that of adrenaline and noradrenaline (α-agonists) together with arginine metabolism in the origin of cluster bouts. Plasma levels of tyramine, tryptamine, serotonin, 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid, noradrenalin, adrenalin and the markers of arginine metabolism such as arginine, homoarginine, citrulline, ADMA and NMMA, were measured in 23 chronic cluster headache patients (10 chronic cluster ab initio and 13 transformed from episodic cluster) and 28 control subjects. The plasma levels of tyramine, tryptamine, noradrenalin and adrenalin were found several times higher in chronic cluster headache patients compared to controls, whereas the plasma levels of arginine, homoarginine and citrulline were significantly lower. No differences were found in the plasma levels of serotonin, 5-hydroxyindolacetic, ADMA and NMMA between chronic cluster headache patients and control subjects. These results provide support for a role of tryptamine in the pathogenesis of chronic cluster headache and, in particular, in the duration of the cluster bouts. In addition, the low levels of the nitric oxide substrates together with the high levels of noradrenalin and adrenalin suggest an activation of endothelial TAAR1 receptors followed by the release of nitric oxide in the circulation that may constitute the final step of the physiopathology of cluster crisis.

  13. Impact of special aviation gymnastics instruments training on selected hormones in cadets' blood serum and plasma.

    PubMed

    Wochyński, Zbigniew; Sobiech, Krzysztof

    2017-06-19

    This study has aimed at investigating the impact of the Special Aviation Gymnastics Instruments (SAGI) training scheme on the blood serum cortisol, testosterone, insulin, and plasma adrenaline, noradrenaline, and dopamine in comparison with a control group. Fifty-five cadets, aged 20 years old, participated in the study. Cadets were divided into 2 groups: A (N = 41) - the SAGI-trained, and B (N = 14) - the control group. In both groups, blood was the examined material, sampled twice: before the training session (BT) and after the training session (AT), at the beginning (training session I), during (training session II), and after completion of the SAGI training session (training session III). Commercially available kits were used for assaying serum cortisol, testosterone, and insulin as well as plasma adrenaline, noradrenaline, and dopamine. Cadets' physical fitness was assessed by means of Aero-Synthetic Efficiency Tests. In group A, a significant decrease in serum cortisol (training session III) and insulin in three training sessions AT in comparison with the values BT was seen. A statistically significant increase in testosterone and catecholamines was noted in all 3 training sessions AT in comparison with the values BT. In group B, a statistically significant increase in cortisol (training session II), testosterone, and catecholamines was observed in all 3 training sessions AT vs. the values in training session BT. In group B, serum levels of all assayed hormones were higher in training session III than those in group A. In the examined group, the SAGI training produced fewer hormonal changes dependent on the intensity and exercise type and physical efficiency improvement than in the control group. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2017;30(4):655-664. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  14. Adrenaline in anaphylaxis treatment. Balancing benefits and harms.

    PubMed

    Cervellin, Gianfranco; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    Although anaphylaxis is a relatively common disorder, clinicians and scientists have debated on how to best define and manage this condition. The current recommendations are focused on the central role of adrenaline, but evidence in support of this therapeutic approach is modest, mainly for the lack of well-designed trials. Conversely, serious adverse effects are commonly reported following adrenaline use, especially when given intravenously. These include hypertension, ventricular arrhythmias, myocardial infarction, pulmonary edema. Anaphylaxis treatment, with special focus on adrenaline utilization, both in pre-hospital and in-hospital settings. Aim is to examine in depth the balance between benefits and harms of this important drug. Due to the lack of solid evidence supporting the use of adrenaline in patients with anaphylaxis, except in severe cases, the strength of recommendations should be readdressed, limiting administration to selected categories of patients. Caregivers should promptly act in pre-hospital setting, given the shortness of time and lack of technology. In the hospital setting, and more specifically in the ED, clinicians should consider the prompt use of adrenaline in severe anaphylaxis cases, but they should also be able to judiciously wait in the vast majority of milder anaphylactic reactions, which may resolve spontaneously.

  15. Adrenaline: insights into its metabolic roles in hypoglycaemia and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Korim, W S; Sabetghadam, A; Llewellyn‐Smith, I J

    2016-01-01

    Adrenaline is a hormone that has profound actions on the cardiovascular system and is also a mediator of the fight‐or‐flight response. Adrenaline is now increasingly recognized as an important metabolic hormone that helps mobilize energy stores in the form of glucose and free fatty acids in preparation for physical activity or for recovery from hypoglycaemia. Recovery from hypoglycaemia is termed counter‐regulation and involves the suppression of endogenous insulin secretion, activation of glucagon secretion from pancreatic α‐cells and activation of adrenaline secretion. Secretion of adrenaline is controlled by presympathetic neurons in the rostroventrolateral medulla, which are, in turn, under the control of central and/or peripheral glucose‐sensing neurons. Adrenaline is particularly important for counter‐regulation in individuals with type 1 (insulin‐dependent) diabetes because these patients do not produce endogenous insulin and also lose their ability to secrete glucagon soon after diagnosis. Type 1 diabetic patients are therefore critically dependent on adrenaline for restoration of normoglycaemia and attenuation or loss of this response in the hypoglycaemia unawareness condition can have serious, sometimes fatal, consequences. Understanding the neural control of hypoglycaemia‐induced adrenaline secretion is likely to identify new therapeutic targets for treating this potentially life‐threatening condition. PMID:26896587

  16. Adrenaline: insights into its metabolic roles in hypoglycaemia and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Verberne, A J M; Korim, W S; Sabetghadam, A; Llewellyn-Smith, I J

    2016-05-01

    Adrenaline is a hormone that has profound actions on the cardiovascular system and is also a mediator of the fight-or-flight response. Adrenaline is now increasingly recognized as an important metabolic hormone that helps mobilize energy stores in the form of glucose and free fatty acids in preparation for physical activity or for recovery from hypoglycaemia. Recovery from hypoglycaemia is termed counter-regulation and involves the suppression of endogenous insulin secretion, activation of glucagon secretion from pancreatic α-cells and activation of adrenaline secretion. Secretion of adrenaline is controlled by presympathetic neurons in the rostroventrolateral medulla, which are, in turn, under the control of central and/or peripheral glucose-sensing neurons. Adrenaline is particularly important for counter-regulation in individuals with type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes because these patients do not produce endogenous insulin and also lose their ability to secrete glucagon soon after diagnosis. Type 1 diabetic patients are therefore critically dependent on adrenaline for restoration of normoglycaemia and attenuation or loss of this response in the hypoglycaemia unawareness condition can have serious, sometimes fatal, consequences. Understanding the neural control of hypoglycaemia-induced adrenaline secretion is likely to identify new therapeutic targets for treating this potentially life-threatening condition. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  17. Nanomolar concentrations of adrenaline induce platelet adhesion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Andreas C; Whiss, Per A

    2013-01-01

    Adrenaline is a platelet activator having a resting plasma concentration of <1 nmol/l that increases to a few nmol/l during stress. However, most in vitro assays only detect effects of adrenaline in micromolar concentrations. This makes it difficult to estimate the relevance of in vitro data for the in vivo situation. The aim of this study was to investigate experimental conditions in vitro that could detect platelet effects of adrenaline in nanomolar concentrations. Platelet adhesion to albumin and collagen was evaluated with a static platelet adhesion assay. Our results show that 10 nmol/l adrenaline induced platelet adhesion to albumin in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) prepared at 140 × g, while 100 nmol/l was necessary in order to increase adhesion of platelets prepared at 220 × g. The mean platelet volume was increased after preparation at 140 × g, suggesting that large reactive platelets contributed to the increased adrenaline sensitivity. At optimal Mg(2+)-concentration, adhesion to collagen was increased by 10 nmol/l adrenaline irrespective of centrifugal force applied during PRP preparation. More specifically, we defined two populations where adhesion to collagen was increased by 10 nmol/l adrenaline either upon centrifugation at 140 × g but not 220 × g or vice versa. In some experiments, platelet adhesion to collagen was induced by 3 nmol/l adrenaline, which corresponds to concentrations achieved during stress in vivo. In summary, the static adhesion assay is able to detect platelet activating effects of adrenaline very close to physiological concentrations. This is rare for in vitro assays and motivates further research about adrenergic signalling in platelets.

  18. Safety of Adrenaline Use in Anaphylaxis: A Multicentre Register.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Victòria; Ferré-Ybarz, Laia; Guilarte, Mar; Moreno-Pérez, Nuria; Gómez-Galán, Catalina; Alcoceba-Borràs, Eva; Delavalle, Maria Belén; Garriga-Baraut, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    The use of intramuscular adrenaline to treat anaphylaxis is suboptimal, despite being the first-line treatment recommended by national and international anaphylaxis guidelines. Fear of potentially severe side effects may be one of the underlying factors. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence and severity of adverse side effects after the use of adrenaline in anaphylaxis, as well as potential risk factors. Observational study based on a multicenter online registry of cases of adrenaline administration for suspected anaphylaxis. 277 registered valid cases were included: 138 (51.49%) female, median age 29 years (12-47), and 6 children under 2 years with a median age of 9 months (1-21). Side effects occurred in 58 cases (21.64%), with tremors, palpitations, and anxiety being the most frequent. There was a significant association of developing side effects with older age, higher dose of adrenaline, or use of the intravenous route. Potentially severe adverse effects (high blood pressure, chest discomfort, or ECG alterations) occurred only in 8 cases (2.99%); in these cases, no differences were found according to age or adrenaline dose, but again, intravenous administration was associated with more severe adverse events. This study shows that side effects affect less than 1 in 5 patients who receive adrenaline for an anaphylactic reaction, and are usually mild and transient. Therefore, in an emergency situation such as anaphylaxis, restricting adrenaline administration due to potential adverse effects would, in general, not be justified. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. A photoaffinity ligand for dopamine D2 receptors: azidoclebopride.

    PubMed

    Niznik, H B; Guan, J H; Neumeyer, J L; Seeman, P

    1985-02-01

    In order to label D2 dopamine receptors selectively and covalently by means of a photosensitive compound, azidoclebopride was synthesized directly from clebopride. The dissociation constant (KD) of clebopride for the D2 dopamine receptor (canine brain striatum) was 1.5 nM, while that for azidoclebopride was 21 nM. The affinities of both clebopride and azidoclebopride were markedly reduced in the absence of sodium chloride. In the presence of ultraviolet light, azidoclebopride inactivated D2 dopamine receptors irreversibly, as indicated by the inability of the receptors to bind [3H]spiperone. Maximal photoinactivation of about 60% of the D2 dopamine receptors occurred at 1 microM azidoclebopride; 30% of the receptors were inactivated at 80 nM azidoclebopride (pseudo-IC50). Dopamine agonists selectively protected the D2 receptors from being inactivated by azidoclebopride, the order of potency being (-)-N-n-propylnorapomorphine greater than apomorphine greater than (+/-)-6,7-dihydroxy-2-aminotetralin greater than (+)-N-n-propylnorapomorphine greater than dopamine greater than noradrenaline greater than serotonin. Similarly, dopaminergic antagonists prevented the photoinactivation of D2 receptors by azidoclebopride with the following order of potency: spiperone greater than (+)-butaclamol greater than haloperidol greater than clebopride greater than (-)-sulpiride greater than (-)-butaclamol. The degree of D2 dopamine receptor photoinduced inactivation by azidoclebopride was not significantly affected by scavengers such as p-aminobenzoic acid and dithiothreitol. Furthermore, irradiation of striatal membranes with a concentration of azidoclebopride sufficient to inactivate dopamine D2 receptors by 60% did not significantly reduce dopamine D1, serotonin (S2), benzodiazepine, alpha 1- or beta-noradrenergic receptors. This study describes the use of a novel and selective photoaffinity ligand for brain dopamine D2 receptors. The molecule, in radiolabeled form, may aid in the

  20. A novel fluorescent biosensor for adrenaline detection and tyrosinase inhibitor screening.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ziping; Liu, Shasha

    2018-04-17

    In this work, a novel simple fluorescent biosensor for the highly sensitive and selective detection of adrenaline was established. Firstly, water-soluble CuInS 2 quantum dots (QDs) capped by L-Cys were synthesized via a hydrothermal synthesis method. Then, the positively charged adrenaline was assembled on the surface of CuInS 2 QDs due to the electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonding, which led to the formation of adrenaline-CuInS 2 QD (Adr-CuInS 2 QD) electrostatic complexes. Tyrosinase (TYR) can catalyze adrenaline to generate H 2 O 2 , and additionally oxidize the adrenaline to adrenaline quinone. Both the H 2 O 2 and the adrenaline quinone can quench the fluorescence of the CuInS 2 QDs through the electron transfer (ET) process. Thus, the determination of adrenaline could be facilely achieved by taking advantage of the fluorescence "turn off" feature of CuInS 2 QDs. Under the optimum conditions, the fluorescence quenching ratio I f /I f0 (I f and I f0 were the fluorescence intensity of Adr-CuInS 2 QDs in the presence and absence of TYR, respectively) was proportional to the logarithm of adrenaline concentration in the range of 1 × 10 -8 -1 × 10 -4  mol L -1 with the detection limit of 3.6 nmol L -1 . The feasibility of the proposed biosensor in real sample assay was also studied and satisfactory results were obtained. Significantly, the proposed fluorescent biosensor can also be utilized to screen TYR inhibitors. Graphical abstract Schematic illustration of the fluorescent biosensor for adrenaline detection (A) and tyrosinase inhibitor screening (B).

  1. Effects of adrenaline on rhythm transitions in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Neset, Andres; Nordseth, Trond; Kramer-Johansen, Jo; Wik, Lars; Olasveengen, Theresa M

    2013-11-01

    We wanted to study the effects of intravenous (i.v.) adrenaline (epinephrine) on rhythm transitions during cardiac arrest with initial or secondary ventricular fibrillation/tachycardia (VF/VT). Post hoc analysis of patients included in a randomised controlled trial of i.v. drugs in adult, non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients who were defibrillated and had a readable electrocardiography recording. Patients who received adrenaline were compared with patients who did not. Cardiac rhythms were annotated manually using the defibrillator data. Eight hundred and forty-nine patients were included in the randomised trial of which 223 were included in this analysis; 119 in the adrenaline group and 104 in the no-adrenaline group. The proportion of patients with one or more VF/VT episodes after temporary return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) was higher in the adrenaline than in the no-adrenaline group, 24% vs. 12%, P = 0.03. Most relapses from ROSC to VF/VT in the no-adrenaline group occurred during the first 20 min of resuscitation, whereas patients in the adrenaline group experienced such relapses even after 20 min. Fibrillations from asystole or pulseless electrical activity, shock resistant VF/VT and the number of rhythm transitions per patient was higher in the adrenalin group compared with the no-adrenalin group: 90% vs. 69%, P < 0.001; 46% vs. 33%, P = 0.006; median 8 (5,13) vs. 2 (1,5), P < 0.001, respectively. Patients who received adrenaline had more rhythm transitions from ROSC and non-shockable rhythms to VF/VT. © 2013 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Adrenaline inhibits osteogenesis via repressing miR-21 expression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Danying; Wang, Zuolin

    2017-01-01

    Sympathetic signaling is involved in bone homeostasis; however, the cellular and molecular mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, we found that the psychological stress mediator adrenaline inhibited osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived stem cells (hMSC) by reducing microRNA-21 (miR-21) expression. Briefly, adrenaline significantly inhibited the osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs, as observed with both Alizarin red staining and maker gene expression (RUNX2, OSX, OCN, and OPN). During this process, miR-21 was suppressed by adrenaline via inhibition of histone acetylation, as verified by H3K9Ac chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay. MiR-21 was confirmed to promote hMSC osteogenic differentiation, and overexpression of miR-21 reversed the impeditive effect of adrenaline on hMSC osteogenic differentiation. Our results demonstrate that down-regulation of miR-21 is responsible for the adrenaline-mediated inhibition of hMSC osteogenic differentiation. These findings indicate a regulation of bone metabolism by psychological stress and also provide a molecular basis for psychological stress-associated bone diseases. © 2016 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  3. Absorption characteristics of epidural levobupivacaine with adrenaline and clonidine in children.

    PubMed

    Chalkiadis, George A; Abdullah, Farah; Bjorksten, Andrew R; Clarke, Alexander; Cortinez, Luis I; Udayasiri, Sonal; Anderson, Brian J

    2013-01-01

    To determine if the addition of adrenaline, clonidine, or their combination altered the pharmacokinetic profile of levobupivacaine administered via the caudal epidural route in children. Children aged <18 years old scheduled to undergo sub-umbilical surgery were administered caudal levobupivacaine plain 2.5 mg · ml(-1) or with adjuvants adrenaline 5 mcg · ml(-1) or clonidine 2 mcg · ml(-1) or their combination. Covariate analysis included weight and postnatal age (PNA). Time-concentration profile analysis was undertaken using nonlinear mixed effects models. A one-compartment linear disposition model with first-order input and first-order elimination was used to describe the data. The effect of either clonidine or adrenaline on absorption was investigated using a scaling parameter (Fabs(CLON), Fabs(ADR)) applied to the absorption half-life (Tabs). There were 240 children (median weight 11.0, range 1.9-56.1 kg; median postnatal age 16.7, range 0.6-167.6 months). Absorption of levobupivacaine was faster when mixed with clonidine (Fabs(CLON) 0.60; 95%CI 0.44, 0.83) but slower when mixed with adrenaline (Fabs(ADR) 2.12; 95%CI 1.45, 3.08). The addition of adrenaline to levobupivacaine resulted in a bifid absorption pattern. While initial absorption was unchanged (Tabs 0.15 h 95%CI 0.12, 0.18 h), there was a late absorption peak characterized by a Tabs(LATE) 2.34 h (95%CI 1.44, 4.97 h). The additional use of clonidine with adrenaline had minimal effect on the bifid absorption profile observed with adrenaline alone. Neither clonidine nor adrenaline had any effect on clearance. The population parameter estimate for volume of distribution was 157 l 70 kg(-1). Clearance was 6.5 l · h(-1) 70 kg(-1) at 1-month PNA and increased with a maturation half-time of 1.6 months to reach 90% of the mature value (18.5 l · h(-1) 70 kg(-1)) by 5 months PNA. The addition of adrenaline decreases the rate of levobupivacaine systemic absorption, reducing peak concentration by half

  4. Current Challenges in Neonatal Resuscitation: What is the Role of Adrenaline?

    PubMed

    Antonucci, Roberto; Antonucci, Luca; Locci, Cristian; Porcella, Annalisa; Cuzzolin, Laura

    2018-06-19

    Adrenaline, also known as epinephrine, is a hormone, neurotransmitter, and medication. It is the best established drug in neonatal resuscitation, but only weak evidence supports current recommendations for its use. Furthermore, the available evidence is partly based on extrapolations from adult studies, and this introduces further uncertainty, especially when considering the unique physiological characteristics of newly born infants. The timing, dose, and route of administration of adrenaline are still debated, even though this medication has been used in neonatal resuscitation for a long time. According to the most recent Neonatal Resuscitation Guidelines from the American Heart Association, adrenaline use is indicated when the heart rate remains < 60 beats per minute despite the establishment of adequate ventilation with 100% oxygen and chest compressions. The aforementioned guidelines recommend intravenous administration (via an umbilical venous catheter) of adrenaline at a dose of 0.01-0.03 mg/kg (1:10,000 concentration). Endotracheal administration of a higher dose (0.05-0.1 mg/kg) may be considered while venous access is being obtained, even if supportive data for endotracheal adrenaline are lacking. The safety and efficacy of intraosseous administration of adrenaline remain to be investigated. This article reviews the evidence on the circulatory effects and tolerability of adrenaline in the newborn, discusses literature data on adrenaline use in neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and describes international recommendations and outcome data regarding the use of this medication during neonatal resuscitation.

  5. Variable effects of high-dose adrenaline relative to standard-dose adrenaline on resuscitation outcomes according to cardiac arrest duration.

    PubMed

    Jeung, Kyung Woon; Ryu, Hyun Ho; Song, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Byung Kook; Lee, Hyoung Youn; Heo, Tag; Min, Yong Il

    2011-07-01

    Adjustment of adrenaline (epinephrine) dosage according to cardiac arrest (CA) duration, rather than administering the same dose, may theoretically improve resuscitation outcomes. We evaluated variable effects of high-dose adrenaline (HDA) relative to standard-dose adrenaline (SDA) on resuscitation outcomes according to CA duration. Twenty-eight male domestic pigs were randomised to the following 4 groups according to the dosage of adrenaline (SDA 0.02 mg/kg vs. HDA 0.2mg/kg) and duration of CA before beginning cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR): 6 min SDA, 6 min HDA, 13 min SDA, or 13 min HDA. After the predetermined duration of untreated ventricular fibrillation, CPR was provided. All animals in the 6 min SDA, 6 min HDA, and 13 min HDA groups were successfully resuscitated, while only 4 of 7 pigs in the 13 min SDA group were successfully resuscitated (p=0.043). HDA groups showed higher right atrial pressure, more frequent ventricular ectopic beats, higher blood glucose, higher troponin-I, and more severe metabolic acidosis than SDA groups. Animals of 13 min groups showed more severe metabolic acidosis and higher troponin-I than animals of 6 min groups. All successfully resuscitated animals, except two animals in the 13 min HDA group, survived for 7 days (p=0.121). Neurologic deficit score was not affected by the dose of adrenaline. HDA showed benefit in achieving restoration of spontaneous circulation in 13 min CA, when compared with 6 min CA. However, this benefit did not translate into improved long-term survival or neurologic outcome. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Myocardial protection induced by fentanyl in pigs exposed to high-dose adrenaline.

    PubMed

    da Luz, Vinicius Fernando; Otsuki, Denise Aya; Gonzalez, Maria Margarita Castro; Negri, Elnara Marcia; Caldini, Elia Garcia; Damaceno-Rodrigues, Nilsa Regina; Malbouisson, Luiz Marcelo Sá; Viana, Bruno Gonçalves; Vane, Matheus Fachini; Carmona, Maria Jose Carvalho

    2015-10-01

    The use of high doses of adrenaline is common in critical patients, especially during cardiac arrest. During these situations, myocardial dysfunction can be a result of multiple factors, including adrenaline use. In addition, opioids have been shown to have anti-arrhythmic and anti-ischemic mechanisms that may confer cardiac protection. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of fentanyl on myocardial function in pigs exposed to high-dose adrenaline. After institutional ethics committee approval, 26 pigs were randomly allocated to receive either 20 μg/kg fentanyl (n = 10; fentanyl group) administered 5 min before five doses of adrenaline (20 μg/kg), equivalent-volume saline (n = 10; saline group) using the same adrenaline dosing protocol, or neither fentanyl nor adrenaline (n = 6; sham group). The fentanyl group showed lower levels of troponin at the end of the sixth hour compared with the saline group (1.91 ± 1.47 vs 5.44 ± 5.35 ng/mL, P = 0.019). Transmission electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry also showed less myocardial injury in the fentanyl group. The conclusion was reached that fentanyl attenuates myocardial injury caused by high-dose adrenaline without blunting the hemodynamic effect of adrenaline. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Using terlipressin in a pediatric patient with septic shock resistant to catecholamines

    PubMed Central

    Erdogan, Seher; Bosnak, Mehmet

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are important causes of morbidity and mortality in critically ill children. The goal of treatment is to ensure adequate mean arterial pressure to maintain organ perfusion. The growing number of instances of peripheral vascular hyporeactivity to catecholamines has necessitated the search for alternative vasopressors. A 14-year-old boy had septic shock, with a high cardiac index and low systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) measurements according to pulse contour analysis, despite treatment with dopamine, dobutamine, adrenaline, and noradrenaline infusions. A terlipressin (TP) 10 μg/kg intravenous bolus was administered, followed by a 1 μg/kg/minute continuous infusion. The response to TP treatment was assessed using pulse contour analysis. The mean arterial pressure and SVRI increased, and the cardiac index and heart rate decreased within 10 minutes after bolus administration of TP. Noradrenaline infusion could be reduced to 0.7 μg/kg/minute within 5 hours. The goal in presenting this case was to evaluate the vasoconstrictor effects of TP, a long-acting vasopressin analogue, in septic shock. PMID:29270582

  8. Using terlipressin in a pediatric patient with septic shock resistant to catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, Seher; Bosnak, Mehmet

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are important causes of morbidity and mortality in critically ill children. The goal of treatment is to ensure adequate mean arterial pressure to maintain organ perfusion. The growing number of instances of peripheral vascular hyporeactivity to catecholamines has necessitated the search for alternative vasopressors. A 14-year-old boy had septic shock, with a high cardiac index and low systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) measurements according to pulse contour analysis, despite treatment with dopamine, dobutamine, adrenaline, and noradrenaline infusions. A terlipressin (TP) 10 μg/kg intravenous bolus was administered, followed by a 1 μg/kg/minute continuous infusion. The response to TP treatment was assessed using pulse contour analysis. The mean arterial pressure and SVRI increased, and the cardiac index and heart rate decreased within 10 minutes after bolus administration of TP. Noradrenaline infusion could be reduced to 0.7 μg/kg/minute within 5 hours. The goal in presenting this case was to evaluate the vasoconstrictor effects of TP, a long-acting vasopressin analogue, in septic shock.

  9. Adrenaline with lidocaine for digital nerve blocks.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Hemanshu; Rath, Santosh; Kalaivani, Mani; Bhanderi, Neel

    2015-03-19

    Surgery on fingers is a common procedure in emergency and day care surgery. Adrenaline combined with lidocaine can prolong digital nerve block and provide a bloodless operating field. Extended postoperative pain relief can reduce the need for analgesics and can facilitate hand rehabilitation. Conventionally, adrenaline is avoided at anatomical sites with end arteries such as digits, penis and pinna because of concerns about arterial spasm, ischaemia and gangrene distal to the site of drug infiltration. To assess the safety and efficacy of use of adrenaline (any dilution) combined with lidocaine (any dilution) for digital nerve blocks (fingers and toes). We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Issue 11, 2014), MEDLINE via Ovid SP (1966 to 18 November 2014) and EMBASE via Ovid SP (1980 to 18 November 2014). We also searched specific websites, such as www.indmed.nic.in; www.cochrane-sadcct.org; and www.Clinicaltrials.gov. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared the use of adrenaline with lidocaine and plain lidocaine in patients undergoing surgery on digits (fingers and toes). Our primary outcomes were duration of anaesthesia, adverse outcomes such as ischaemia distal to the injection site and cost analysis. Our secondary outcomes were duration of postoperative pain relief and reduced bleeding during surgery. We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Two review authors independently extracted details of trial methodology and outcome data from reports of all trials considered eligible for inclusion. We performed all analyses on an intention-to-treat basis. We used a fixed-effect model when no evidence of significant heterogeneity between studies was found and a random-effects model when heterogeneity was likely. We included four RCTs with 167 participants. Risk of bias of the included studies was high, as none of them reported method of randomization, allocation concealment

  10. Experimental cardiac arrest treatment with adrenaline, vasopressin, or placebo.

    PubMed

    Palácio, Manoel Ângelo Gomes; Paiva, Edison Ferreira de; Azevedo, Luciano Cesar Pontes de; Timerman, Ari

    2013-12-01

    The effect of vasoconstrictors in prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has not been fully clarified. To evaluate adrenaline and vasopressin pressure effect, and observe the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). A prospective, randomized, blinded, and placebo-controlled study. After seven minutes of untreated ventricular fibrillation, pigs received two minutes cycles of CPR. Defibrillation was attempted (4 J/kg) once at 9 minutes, and after every cycle if a shockable rhythm was present, after what CPR was immediately resumed. At 9 minutes and every five minutes intervals, 0.02 mg/kg (n = 12 pigs) adrenaline, or 0.4 U/kg (n = 12) vasopressin, or 0.2 mL/kg (n = 8) 0.9% saline solution was administered. CPR continued for 30 minutes or until the ROSC. Coronary perfusion pressure increased to about 20 mmHg in the three groups. Following vasoconstrictors doses, pressure level reached 35 mmHg versus 15 mmHg with placebo (p < 0.001). Vasopressin effect remained at 15-20 mmHg after three doses versus zero with adrenaline or placebo. ROSC rate differed (p = 0.031) among adrenaline (10/12), vasopressin (6/12), and placebo (2/8). Time-to-ROSC did not differ (16 minutes), nor the number of doses previously received (one or two). There was no difference between vasoconstrictors, but against placebo, only adrenaline significantly increased the ROSC rate (p = 0.019). The vasoconstrictors initial pressure effect was equivalent and vasopressin maintained a late effect at prolonged resuscitation. Nevertheless, when compared with placebo, only adrenaline significantly increased the ROSC rate.

  11. Experimental Cardiac Arrest Treatment with Adrenaline, Vasopressin, or Placebo

    PubMed Central

    Palácio, Manoel Ângelo Gomes; de Paiva, Edison Ferreira; de Azevedo, Luciano Cesar Pontes; Timerman, Ari

    2013-01-01

    Background The effect of vasoconstrictors in prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has not been fully clarified. Objectives To evaluate adrenaline and vasopressin pressure effect, and observe the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Methods A prospective, randomized, blinded, and placebo-controlled study. After seven minutes of untreated ventricular fibrillation, pigs received two minutes cycles of CPR. Defibrillation was attempted (4 J/kg) once at 9 minutes, and after every cycle if a shockable rhythm was present, after what CPR was immediately resumed. At 9 minutes and every five minutes intervals, 0.02 mg/kg (n = 12 pigs) adrenaline, or 0.4 U/kg (n = 12) vasopressin, or 0.2 mL/kg (n = 8) 0.9% saline solution was administered. CPR continued for 30 minutes or until the ROSC. Results Coronary perfusion pressure increased to about 20 mmHg in the three groups. Following vasoconstrictors doses, pressure level reached 35 mmHg versus 15 mmHg with placebo (p < 0.001). Vasopressin effect remained at 15-20 mmHg after three doses versus zero with adrenaline or placebo. ROSC rate differed (p = 0.031) among adrenaline (10/12), vasopressin (6/12), and placebo (2/8). Time-to-ROSC did not differ (16 minutes), nor the number of doses previously received (one or two). There was no difference between vasoconstrictors, but against placebo, only adrenaline significantly increased the ROSC rate (p = 0.019). Conclusion The vasoconstrictors initial pressure effect was equivalent and vasopressin maintained a late effect at prolonged resuscitation. Nevertheless, when compared with placebo, only adrenaline significantly increased the ROSC rate. PMID:24173134

  12. [THREE CASES OF ACCIDENTAL AUTO-INJECTION OF ADRENALINE].

    PubMed

    Yanagida, Noriyuki; Iikura, Katsuhito; Ogura, Kiyotake; Wang, Ling-jen; Asaumi, Tomoyuki; Sato, Sakura; Ebisawa, Motohiro

    2015-12-01

    Reports on accidental auto-injection of adrenaline are few. We encountered three cases of accidental injection of adrenaline. In this study, we have examined and reported the clinical courses and symptoms of our cases. CASE 1 involved a female physician in her 50s who had attended an explanatory meeting on auto-injection of adrenaline. She mistook EpiPen® to be the EpiPen trainer and accidentally injected herself with 0.3 mg EpiPen®. Her systolic/diastolic pressure peaked at 7 min to reach 144/78 mmHg and decreased to 120/77 mmHg at 14 min. Except for palpitation after 7 min, the only subjective symptom was local pain at the injection site. CASE 2 was noted in a 6-year-old boy. He accidentally pierced his right forefinger with 0.15 mg EpiPen®, and after 20 min, his right forefinger was swollen. The swelling improved 80 min after the accidental injection. CASE 3 was noted in a 4-year-old girl. She accidentally injected herself with 0.15 mg EpiPen®. Her systolic/diastolic pressure peaked at 23 min to reach 123/70 mmHg and decreased to 96/86 mmHg at 28 min. Severe adverse effects of accidental auto-injection of adrenaline were not observed in these three cases. Our findings suggest that while handling adrenaline auto-injectors, we should keep in mind the possibility of accidental injection.

  13. Forced swimming stress does not affect monoamine levels and neurodegeneration in rats.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Ghulam; Naqvi, Sabira; Mehmood, Shahab; Kabir, Nurul; Dar, Ahsana

    2011-10-01

    The current study was aimed to investigate the correlations between immobility time in the forced swimming test (FST, a behavioral indicator of stress level) and hippocampal monoamine levels (markers of depression), plasma adrenalin level (a peripheral marker of stress) as well as fluoro-jade C staining (a marker of neurodegeneration). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to acute, sub-chronic (7 d) or chronic (14 d) FSTs and immobility time was recorded. Levels of noradrenalin, serotonin and dopamine in the hippocampus, and adrenalin level in the plasma were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Brain sections from rats after chronic forced swimming or rotenone treatment (3 mg/kg subcutaneously for 4 d) were stained with fluoro-jade C. The rats subjected to swimming stress (acute, sub-chronic and chronic) showed long immobility times [(214 +/- 5), (220 +/- 4) and (231 +/- 7) s, respectively], indicating that the animals were under stress. However, the rats did not exhibit significant declines in hippocampal monoamine levels, and the plasma adrenalin level was not significantly increased compared to that in unstressed rats. The rats that underwent chronic swimming stress did not manifest fluoro-jade C staining in brain sections, while degenerating neurons were evident after rotenone treatment. The immobility time in the FST does not correlate with markers of depression (monoamine levels) and internal stress (adrenalin levels and neurodegeneration), hence this parameter may not be a true indicator of stress level.

  14. [Comparative study on the effect of antiatherosclerotic diet enriched with polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids of plant and animal origin on the level of natural antibodies against catecholamines in patients with cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Pogozheva, A V; Rozanova, I A; Miagkova, M A; Sorokovoĭ, K V; Panchenko, O N; Trubacheva, Zh N

    1998-01-01

    The levels of natural antibodies against catecholamines in 138 patients with cardiovascular diseases was studied and the comparative analysis of influence of antiatherosclerotic diets with different origin of PUFA omega-3 on dynamic of these parameters was made. For the first time discovered universal action of diets with PUFA omega-3 vegetable and animal origin on parameters of humoral immunity: in case of primary excess of norm of the contents of natural antibodies to adrenaline, noradrenaline and dopamine as a result of treatment these parameters were reduced or did not change; and at is primary a low their level--parameters increased in most cases. The greatest immunocorrection effect was rendered by diet, enriched PUFA omega-3 of freshwater fishes fat.

  15. An inhibitory role for noradrenaline in the mouse vas deferens

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, D.A.; Marshall, I.; Nasmyth, P.A.

    1977-01-01

    1 Noradrenaline (0.1-3.0 μM) inhibited the twitch responses to single pulse field stimulation of the isolated vas deferens of the mouse. The higher concentrations of noradrenaline (ca. 0.3-3.0 μM) were required to make the tissue contract. 2 Phentolamine (10 μM) abolished the contractor response to higher concentrations of noradrenaline and antagonized the inhibitory effect of lower concentrations on the twitch response. 3 Propranolol (10 μM) potentiated both the contractor and the inhibitory effect of noradrenaline on the twitch response. 4 Isoprenaline (0.1-3.0 μM) and salbutamol (1.0-3.0 μM) both inhibited the twitch response. Their effects were antagonized by propranolol (10 μM), but not by practolol (10 μM). 5 The effects of uptake1 and uptake2 blocking agents were determined. Cocaine (10 μM) reduced the size of the twitch response in 2 out of 4 experiments. Imipramine (0.18 μM) also reduced the size of the twitch, as did oestradiol (3.7 μM) and a combination of cocaine and oestradiol. 6 Contractor responses to exogenous noradrenaline showed tachyphylaxis, but when this was not very marked, the response could be shown to be potentiated by uptake blocking agents. 7 The inhibitory effect of noradrenaline on the twitch response was greatly potentiated by cocaine (10 μM) and much less so by oestradiol (3.7 μM). 8 It is concluded that the transmitter responsible for the twitch response is either an unknown substance released from the sympathetic neurone, or noradrenaline acting upon a receptor with none of the characteristics of known α- or β-adrenoceptors. In either case, noradrenaline can inhibit the output, probably by stimulation of presynaptic α-adrenoceptors. PMID:202361

  16. Steady state plasma [3H]-noradrenaline kinetics in quadriplegic chronic spinal cord injury patients.

    PubMed

    Krum, H; Brown, D J; Rowe, P R; Louis, W J; Howes, L G

    1990-08-01

    1. Steady state plasma noradrenaline kinetics were measured in eight male quadriplegic patients and in eight age and sex matched controls. 2. Plasma noradrenaline levels were significantly lower in quadriplegic patients compared to controls. Noradrenaline spillover rate was markedly reduced in quadriplegics compared to controls while noradrenaline clearance was similar in both groups. 3. Noradrenaline kinetics in quadriplegic patients differ from peripheral autonomic neuropathy patients where reductions in both the spillover and clearance of noradrenaline are present.

  17. Leptin inhibits and ghrelin augments hypothalamic noradrenaline release after stress.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Akio; Okada, Nobukazu; Rokkaku, Kumiko; Honda, Kazufumi; Ishibashi, Shun; Onaka, Tatsushi

    2008-09-01

    Metabolic conditions affect hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal responses to stressful stimuli. Here we examined effects of food deprivation, leptin and ghrelin upon noradrenaline release in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) concentrations after stressful stimuli. Food deprivation augmented both noradrenaline release in the PVN and the increase in plasma ACTH concentration following electrical footshocks (FSs). An intracerebroventricular injection of leptin attenuated the increases in hypothalamic noradrenaline release and plasma ACTH concentrations after FSs, while ghrelin augmented these responses. These data suggest that leptin inhibits and ghrelin facilitates neuroendocrine stress responses via noradrenaline release and indicate that a decrease in leptin and an increase in ghrelin release after food deprivation might contribute to augmentation of stress-induced ACTH release in a fasting state.

  18. Photoaffinity labelling of MSH receptors on Anolis melanophores: effects of catecholamines, calcium and forskolin.

    PubMed

    Eberle, A N; Girard, J

    1985-01-01

    Photoaffinity labelling of MSH receptors on Anolis melanophores was used as a tool for studying the effects of catecholamines, calcium and forskolin on hormone-receptor interaction and receptor-adenylate cyclase coupling. Covalent attachment of photoreactive alpha-MSH to its receptor was suppressed in calcium-free buffer but was hardly influenced by catecholamines or forskolin. The longlasting signal generated by the covalent MSH-receptor complex was readily and reversibly abolished by adrenaline, noradrenaline, dopamine or clonidine or by the absence of calcium. The suppression of pigment dispersion by catecholamines was blocked by the simultaneous presence of yohimbine but not prazosin, indicating that the catecholamines antagonize the alpha-MSH signal by inhibitory action on the adenylate cyclase system through an alpha-2 receptor. Forskolin, which stimulates melanophores by direct action on the catalytic unit of the adenylate cyclase and at about the same speed as alpha-MSH, produced a slower and weaker response in the presence of noradrenaline. If MSH receptors were covalently labelled and then exposed to noradrenaline, the characteristics of the forskolin-induced response were identical to those of unlabelled cells that had not been exposed to noradrenaline. This may point to a partial restoration of receptor-adenylate cyclase coupling by forskolin. The results show that the longlasting stimulation of Anolis melanophores by photoaffinity labelling proceeds via a permanently stimulated adenylate-cyclase system whose coupling to the receptor depends on calcium and is abolished by alpha-2 receptor agonists. Calcium is also essential for hormone-receptor binding.

  19. Noradrenaline induces CX3CL1 production and release by neurons.

    PubMed

    Madrigal, José L M; Caso, Javier R; García-Bueno, Borja; Gutiérrez, Irene L; Leza, Juan C

    2017-03-01

    CX3CL1 is a chemokine for which neurons constitute its primary source within the brain. Besides acting as a chemokine, CX3CL1 regulates multiple processes and is known to inhibit microglial activation. Because of this, CX3CL1 is considered as a messenger used by neurons to communicate with microglia. Similarly, the neurotransmitter noradrenaline reduces microglial activation and production of neurotoxic agents. Based on this, the regulation of neuronal CX3CXL1 by noradrenaline was analyzed. In primary cortical neurons, noradrenaline induced the accumulation of CX3CL1 protein and mRNA. Noradrenaline also increased CX3CL1 in its soluble form despite the inhibition of the activity and synthesis of ADAM10 and ADAM17, the main proteases known to cleave CX3CL1 from the neuronal membrane. Noradrenaline-treated neurons displayed a higher degree of dendritic arborization and a characteristic accumulation of CX3CL1 in the dendritic bifurcation zones. The soluble CX3CL1 produced by neurons after noradrenaline treatment, reduced the accumulation of nitrites in microglia. These findings indicate that NA anti-inflammatory actions are mediated by neuronal CX3CL1. In addition, CX3CL1 seems to be involved in the development of neuronal processes stimulated by noradrenaline. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Administration of the adrenaline auto-injector at the nursery/kindergarten/school in Western Japan.

    PubMed

    Korematsu, Seigo; Fujitaka, Michiko; Ogata, Mika; Zaitsu, Masafumi; Motomura, Chikako; Kuzume, Kazuyo; Toku, Yuchiro; Ikeda, Masanori; Odajima, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    In view of the increasing prevalence of food allergies, there has been an associated increase in frequency of situations requiring an emergency response for anaphylaxis at the home, childcare facilities and educational institutions. To clarify the situation of adrenaline auto-injector administration in nursery/kindergarten/school, we carried out a questionnaire survey on pediatric physicians in Western Japan. In 2015, self-reported questionnaires were mailed to 421 physicians who are members of the West Japan Research Society Pediatric Clinical Allergy and Shikoku Research Society Pediatric Clinical Allergy. The response rate was 44% (185 physicians) where 160 physicians had a prescription registration for the adrenaline auto-injector. In the past year, 1,330 patients were prescribed the adrenaline auto-injector where 83 patients (6% of the prescribed patients) actually administered the adrenaline auto-injector, of which 14 patients (17% of the administered patients) self-administered the adrenaline auto-injector. "Guardians" at the nursery/kindergarten and elementary school were found to have administered the adrenaline auto-injector the most. Among 117 adrenaline auto-injector prescription-registered physicians, 79% had experienced nonadministration of adrenaline auto-injector at nursery/kindergarten/school when anaphylaxis has occurred. The most frequent reason cited for not administering the adrenaline auto-injector was "hesitation about the timing of administration." If the adrenaline auto-injector was administered after the guardian arrived at the nursery/kindergarten/school, it may lead to delayed treatment of anaphylaxis in which symptoms develop in minutes. Education and cooperation among physicians and nursery/kindergarten/school staff will reduce the number of children suffering unfortunate outcomes due to anaphylaxis.

  1. Inhibition of noradrenaline release by lysergic acid diethylamide

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, J.

    1973-01-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) inhibits the release of labelled noradrenaline from the guinea-pig vas deferens during intramural nerve stimulation and causes a corresponding reduction in the contractions of the smooth muscle. These effects of LSD are most prominent at low stimulus frequencies and they are prevented by treatment with phentolamine. It is concluded that LSD inhibits noradrenaline release by interacting with presynaptic α-adrenoceptors. PMID:4788042

  2. [Anaphylaxis needing adrenaline administration during anesthesia: a 7-year single-institution study].

    PubMed

    Kayashima, Kenji; Sozen, Reiko

    2013-10-01

    Adrenaline is the key treatment for acute anaphylaxis; however, it is difficult to use it appropriately in terms of dosage and timing. If used incorrectly, adrenaline can cause cardiac infarction, stroke, recurrence and other problems. We collected data of suspected anaphylaxis from records in our anesthesia department between April 2005 and March 2012. All cases where the skin of patients turned red and blood pressure decreased continuously were included. We analyzed the usage of adrenaline in these cases. Six (0.034%) suspected anaphylaxis cases were analyzed from a total of 27,597 anesthesia cases. Adrenaline was administered subcutaneously in 2 cases, intravenously in 3 cases, and with and infused in 1 case. In the 4 cases with intravenous administration, the median dose was 0.52 (range : 0.02-1.6) mg. Following decreased and unstable blood pressure, adrenaline was initiated after a median of 12.5 (5-25) min, and blood pressure returned to normal after 20 (5-95) min. Patients were extubated 19 (4-24) hours after observation of anomalous blood pressure. No aftereffects or recurrences were observed. Adrenaline was administered appropriately in terms of dosage, but timing should have been earlies in 3 of 6 cases.

  3. The influence of occupational heat exposure on cognitive performance and blood level of stress hormones: a field study report.

    PubMed

    Mazlomi, Adel; Golbabaei, Farideh; Farhang Dehghan, Somayeh; Abbasinia, Marzieh; Mahmoud Khani, Somayeh; Ansari, Mohammad; Hosseini, Mostafa

    2017-09-01

    This article aimed to investigate the effect of heat stress on cognitive performance and the blood concentration of stress hormones among workers of a foundry plant. Seventy workers within the exposed (35 people) and unexposed (35 people) groups were studied. The wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) index was measured for heat stress assessment. The cognitive performance tests were conducted using the Stroop color word test (SCWT) before and during working hours. For the assessment of the serum level of cortisol and the plasma level of adrenaline and noradrenaline, blood samples were taken during working hours from both groups. Only for SCWT III was there a significant relationship between heat stress and test duration, error rate and reaction time. The laboratory test results revealed significantly higher concentrations of cortisol, adrenaline and noradrenaline in the exposed subjects than in the unexposed group. There existed a positive correlation between cortisol, adrenaline, noradrenaline and WBGT index and also test duration and reaction time of SCWT III, and number of errors of SCWT I, SCWT II and SCWT III during work. Heat stress can lead to an increase in the blood level of stress hormones, resulting in cognitive performance impairment.

  4. [Physicians' knowledge with regard to the timing of adrenaline administration for anaphylaxis in Japan].

    PubMed

    Imai, Takanori; Sugizaki, Chizuko; Ebisawa, Motohiro

    2013-11-01

    Adrenaline administration is a top priority treatment for severe anaphylaxis. A survey with regard to the timing of adrenaline administration for anaphylaxis was conducted among physicians in Japan. The survey was conducted using a questionnaire among physicians who had contributed to a nationwide survey for acute food allergy monitoring in 2011. The questionnaire comprised questions asking physicians whether they possessed registrations as an adrenaline self-injector (ASJ), and timing of adrenaline administration for anaphylaxis. Symptoms of anaphylaxis were categorized into shock or respiratory, gastrointestinal, cutaneous, or laryngeal symptoms. A total of 674 replies were obtained from physicians, and 547 physicians were reported to be registered as ASJs. With regard to time, when patients injected themselves with adrenaline, it resulted in laryngeal (78.4%) and circulatory symptoms (64.4%), whereas when physicians administered adrenaline in patients, it resulted in circulatory (74.8%) and laryngeal symptoms (70.0%). Japanese physicians did not necessarily understand the timing of adrenaline administration. Therefore, it is important to provide appropriate education to these physicians with regard to anaphylaxis and ASJ.

  5. Recurrent spontaneous hypoglycaemia causes loss of neurogenic and neuroglycopaenic signs in infants with congenital hyperinsulinism.

    PubMed

    Christesen, Henrik T; Brusgaard, Klaus; Hussain, Khalid

    2012-04-01

    Hypoglycaemia-associated autonomic failure (HAAF) with impaired neurogenic and neuroglycopaenic responses occurs in adults following recent, repeated hypoglycaemia. We aimed to evaluate whether HAAF also occurs in patients with infant-onset congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI). A controlled fast was performed in (i) seven CHI infants with initial symptomatic hypoglycaemia and three recent episodes of spontaneous recurrent hypoglycaemia each lasting <5 min and in (ii) seven infants with idiopathic ketotic hypoglycaemia for control. At the time of hypoglycaemia (blood glucose <3 mmol/l or clinical signs), blood was drawn for serum insulin, cortisol, glucagon, adrenalin and nor-adrenalin. Signs of hypoglycaemia were documented. In CHI patients, the ABCC8 and KCNJ11 genes were analysed by denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) and/or direct bidirectional sequencing. Two CHI patients had a paternal ABCC8 mutation, five had no mutations. When repeated hypoglycaemia was provoked, all CHI patients exhibited a complete loss of clinical signs of hypoglycaemia, along with a global blunting of the counter-regulatory hormones cortisol, glucagon, growth hormone, adrenalin and nor-adrenalin responses (median values 256 nmol/l, 23 pmol/l, 5·6 mU/l, 390 pmol/l and 2·9 nmol/l, respectively), irrespective of mutational status. In the controls, hypoglycaemia was always clinically overt with normal counter-regulatory cortisol, glucagon, adrenalin and nor-adrenalin responses (530 nmol/l, 60, 920 pmol/l and 4·0 nmol/l, respectively). Recurrent hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia even of short duration blunts the autonomic, neuroglycopaenic and glucose counter-regulatory hormonal responses in patients with infant-onset CHI resulting in clinically silent hypoglycaemia. Tight, or continuous, glucose monitoring is therefore recommended, especially in conservatively treated patients. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Evaluation of immune and stress status in harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena): can hormones and mRNA expression levels serve as indicators to assess stress?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The harbour porpoise is exposed to increasing pressure caused by anthropogenic activities in its marine environment. Numerous offshore wind farms are planned or under construction in the North and Baltic Seas, which will increase underwater noise during both construction and operation. A better understanding of how anthropogenic impacts affect the behaviour, health, endocrinology, immunology and physiology of the animals is thus needed. The present study compares levels of stress hormones and mRNA expression of cytokines and acute-phase proteins in blood samples of harbour porpoises exposed to different levels of stress during handling, in rehabilitation or permanent human care. Free-ranging harbour porpoises, incidentally caught in pound nets in Denmark, were compared to harbour porpoises in rehabilitation at SOS Dolfijn in Harderwijk, the Netherlands, and individuals permanently kept in human care in the Dolfinarium Harderwijk and Fjord & Belt Kerteminde, Denmark. Blood samples were investigated for catecholamines, adrenaline, noradrenaline and dopamine, as well as for adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol, metanephrine and normetanephrine. mRNA expression levels of relevant cell mediators (cytokines IL-10 and TNFα, acute-phase proteins haptoglobin and C-reactive protein and the heat shock protein HSP70) were measured using real-time PCR. Results Biomarker expression levels varied between free-ranging animals and porpoises in human care. Hormone and cytokine ranges showed correlations to each other and to the health status of investigated harbour porpoises. Hormone concentrations were higher in free-ranging harbour porpoises than in animals in human care. Adrenaline can be used as a parameter for the initial reaction to acute stress situations; noradrenaline, dopamine, ACTH and cortisol are more likely indicators for the following minutes of acute stress. There is evidence for different correlations between production of normetanephrine

  7. Adrenaline in cardiac arrest: Prefilled syringes are faster.

    PubMed

    Helm, Claire; Gillett, Mark

    2015-08-01

    Standard ampoules and prefilled syringes of adrenaline are widely available in Australasian EDs for use in cardiac arrest. We hypothesise that prefilled syringes can be administered more rapidly and accurately when compared with the two available standard ampoules. This is a triple arm superiority study comparing the time to i.v. administration and accuracy of dosing of three currently available preparations of adrenaline. In their standard packaging, prefilled syringes were on average more than 12 s faster to administer than the 1 mL 1:1000 ampoules and more than 16 s faster than the 10 mL 1:10,000 ampoules (P < 0.01 in both comparisons). With packaging removed, the time to administration was equal for the 1 mL (1:1000) ampoule and the prefilled syringe. Accuracy of dosing was excellent with both the 10 mL (1:10 000) ampoules and prefilled syringes. The 1 mL (1:1000) ampoules delivered a small number of markedly inaccurate doses, but these did not reach statistical significance. The speed of administration of adrenaline utilising a Minijet (CSL Limited, Parkville, Victoria, Australia) is faster than using adrenaline in glass ampoules presented in their plastic packaging. Removing the plastic packaging from the 1 mL (1 mg) ampoule might result in more rapid administration similar to the Minijet. Resuscitation personnel requiring rapid access to adrenaline should consider storing it as either Minijets or ampoules devoid of packaging. These results might be extrapolatable to other clinical scenarios, including pre-hospital and anaesthesia, where other drugs are required for rapid use. © 2015 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  8. Subcutaneous adrenaline versus terbutaline in the treatment of acute severe asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Spiteri, M A; Millar, A B; Pavia, D; Clarke, S W

    1988-01-01

    Subcutaneous adrenaline and terbutaline have been compared in a double blind study of 20 patients with acute severe asthma presenting to an accident and emergency department. Ten patients received adrenaline 0.5 mg (0.5 ml) and 10 terbutaline 0.5 mg (0.5 ml) subcutaneously. Further treatment with nebulised salbutamol (5 mg), hydrocortisone (200 mg), and aminophylline (0.9 mg/kg/hour) was started 15 minutes later. All patients reported a reduction in chest tightness within three minutes of receiving both adrenaline and terbutaline and reported no adverse effects. Mean baseline values of peak expiratory flow (PEF) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) did not differ significantly between the adrenaline group (130 1 min-1 and 0.83 l) and the terbutaline group (111 1 min-1 and 0.63 l). After administration of adrenaline PEF had increased by 21% and FEV1 by 40% five minutes after the injection, and by 35% and 64% at 15 minutes. Terbutaline caused a 23% increase in PEF and a 37% increase in FEV1 at five minutes, and a 40% and 58% increase at 15 minutes. There was no significant difference in PEF, FEV1, heart rate, blood pressure, or pulsus paradoxus between the two groups at any time. Continuous electrocardiographic recording showed no abnormalities in either group. Thus in this study subcutaneous adrenaline (0.5 mg) and terbutaline (0.5 mg) produced effective rapid bronchodilatation without serious side effects. PMID:3281307

  9. Increase in serum noradrenaline concentration by short dives with bradycardia in Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin Tursiops aduncus.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Miwa; Tomoshige, Mika; Ito, Miki; Koga, Sotaro; Yanagisawa, Makio; Bungo, Takashi; Makiguchi, Yuya

    2017-07-01

    In cetaceans, diving behavior immediately induces a change in blood circulation to favor flow to the brain and heart; this is achieved by intense vasoconstriction of the blood vessels that serve other organs. This blood circulation response is allied to a decrease in heart rate in order to optimize oxygen usage during diving. Vasoconstrictors are present in all mammals and stimulate the contraction of the smooth muscle in the walls of blood vessels. The most important of these vasoconstrictors are the hormones adrenaline (A), noradrenaline (NA), and angiotensin II (ANG II). At present, the contribution of these hormones to vasoconstriction during diving in cetaceans is unclear. To elucidate their possible roles, changes in serum levels of A, NA and ANG II were monitored together with heart rate in the Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin Tursiops aduncus during 90 and 180s dives. Both brief diving periods induced an increase in serum NA concentration and a decrease in heart rate; however, no changes were detected in serum levels of A or ANG II. These data indicate that NA may play a role in diving-induced vasoconstriction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Evidence on Adrenaline Use in Resuscitation and Its Relevance to Newborn Infants: A Non-Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Merlin; Solevåg, Anne Lee; OʼReilly, Megan; Aziz, Khalid; Cheung, Po-Yin; Schmölzer, Georg M

    2017-01-01

    Guidelines for newborn resuscitation state that if the heart rate does not increase despite adequate ventilation and chest compressions, adrenaline administration should be considered. However, controversy exists around the safety and effectiveness of adrenaline in newborn resuscitation. The aim of this review was to summarise a selection of the current knowledge about adrenaline during resuscitation and evaluate its relevance to newborn infants. A search in PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar until September 1, 2015, using search terms including adrenaline/epinephrine, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, death, severe brain injury, necrotizing enterocolitis, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, and adrenaline versus vasopressin/placebo. Adult data indicate that adrenaline improves the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) but not survival to hospital discharge. Newborn animal studies reported that adrenaline might be needed to achieve ROSC. Intravenous administration (10-30 μg/kg) is recommended; however, if there is no intravenous access, a higher endotracheal dose (50-100 μg/kg) is needed. The safety and effectiveness of intraosseous adrenaline remain undetermined. Early and frequent dosing does not seem to be beneficial. In fact, negative hemodynamic effects have been observed, especially with doses ≥30 μg/kg intravenously. Little is known about adrenaline in birth asphyxia and in preterm infants, but observations indicate that hemodynamics and neurological outcomes may be impaired by adrenaline administration in these conditions. However, a causal relationship between adrenaline administration and outcomes cannot be established from the few available retrospective studies. Alternative vasoconstrictors have been investigated, but the evidence is scarce. More research is needed on the benefits and risks of adrenaline in asphyxia-induced bradycardia or cardiac arrest during perinatal transition. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Experimental and theoretical evaluation on the microenvironmental effect of dimethyl sulfoxide on adrenaline in acid aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhang-Yu; Liu, Tao; Guo, Dao-Jun; Liu, Yong-Jun; Liu, Cheng-Bu

    2010-12-01

    The microenvironmental effect of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) on adrenaline was studied by several approaches including the cyclic voltammetry (CV) of adrenaline at a platinum electrode in acid aqueous solution, the chemical shift of 1H nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1H NMR) of adrenaline, and the change of diffusion coefficient of adrenaline. The experimental results demonstrated that DMSO has significant microenvironmental effect on adrenaline, which was confirmed by the density functional theory (DFT) study on the hydrogen bond (H-bond) complexes of adrenaline with water and DMSO.

  12. Noradrenergic Genotype Predicts Lapses in Sustained Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Ciara M.; Bellgrove, Mark A.; Gill, Michael; Robertson, Ian H.

    2009-01-01

    Sustained attention is modulated by the neurotransmitter noradrenaline. The balance of dopamine and noradrenaline in the cortex is controlled by the DBH gene. The principal variant in this gene is a C/T change at position-1021, and the T allele at this locus is hypothesised to result in a slower rate of dopamine to noradrenaline conversion than…

  13. Adrenaline (epinephrine) for the treatment of anaphylaxis with and without shock.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Aziz; Shehata, Yasser A; Brown, Simon Ga; Simons, F Estelle R

    2008-10-08

    Anaphylaxis is a serious hypersensitivity reaction that is rapid in onset and may cause death. Adrenaline is recommended as the initial treatment of choice for anaphylaxis. To assess the benefits and harms of adrenaline (epinephrine) in the treatment of anaphylaxis. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2007, Issue 1), MEDLINE (1966 to March 2007), EMBASE (1966 to March 2007), CINAHL (1982 to March 2007), BIOSIS (to March 2007), ISI Web of Knowledge (to March 2007) and LILACS (to March 2007). We also searched websites listing ongoing trials: http://clinicaltrials.gov/, http://www.controlledtrials.com and http://www.actr.org.au/; and contacted pharmaceutical companies and international experts in anaphylaxis in an attempt to locate unpublished material. Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials comparing adrenaline with no intervention, placebo or other adrenergic agonists were eligible for inclusion. Two authors independently assessed articles for inclusion. We found no studies that satisfied the inclusion criteria. Based on this review, we are unable to make any new recommendations on the use of adrenaline for the treatment of anaphylaxis. Although there is a need for randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials of high methodological quality in order to define the true extent of benefits from the administration of adrenaline in anaphylaxis, such trials are unlikely to be performed in individuals with anaphylaxis. Indeed, they might be unethical because prompt treatment with adrenaline is deemed to be critically important for survival in anaphylaxis. Also, such studies would be difficult to conduct because anaphylactic episodes usually occur without warning, often in a non-medical setting, and differ in severity both among individuals and from one episode to another in the same individual. Consequently, obtaining baseline measurements and frequent timed measurements might be difficult

  14. Rapid transcapillary exchange and unidirectional neuronal uptake of noradrenaline in the perfused rabbit heart.

    PubMed Central

    Mann, G E; Yudilevich, D L

    1984-01-01

    Capillary permeability and cellular uptake of noradrenaline by the isolated artificially perfused rabbit heart was measured using rapid (less than 30 s) single-circulation tracer-dilution techniques. In a single coronary circulation capillary extractions of L-[14C]noradrenaline and D-[3H]mannitol (extracellular reference) relative to an intravascular marker, 125I-labelled albumin, were similar and above 60%. The 'apparent' volume of distribution for tracer noradrenaline was 2.5-fold larger than that measured for D-mannitol (0.32 ml g-1) suggesting cellular uptake of the amine. Unidirectional noradrenaline uptake was estimated by directly comparing coronary sinus dilution profiles of L-[3H]noradrenaline and D-[14C]mannitol. Michaelis-Menten saturation kinetics based on a single-entry system were determined (Km = 2.8 +/- 1.5 microM, Vmax = 2.1 +/- 0.5 nmol min-1 g-1, n = 4) by perfusing hearts with varying concentrations of L-noradrenaline (1-10 microM). Various known inhibitors of noradrenaline uptake were investigated to determine whether uptake was mediated by neuronal (uptake1) and/or extraneuronal (uptake2) mechanisms. Desipramine (5 microM), imipramine (5 microM) and metaraminol (2 microM) resulted in a 66-94% inhibition of noradrenaline influx. In comparison, the steroids, 17 beta-oestradiol (1 microM) and corticosterone (10 microM), and the noradrenaline metabolite normetanephrine (5 microM) caused virtually no inhibitory effects. The beta-adrenergic antagonist propranolol (5 microM) was also relatively ineffective. These results together with the kinetic constants estimated suggest that the rapid noradrenaline uptake reflects transport into adrenergic neurones lying in the coronary interstitium. The high resolution of this paired-tracer dilution technique has permitted a 'non-invasive' study of neuronal uptake mechanisms and its application may be of clinical value. PMID:6425496

  15. Amperozide, a putative anti-psychotic drug: Uptake inhibition and release of dopamine in vitro in the rat brain

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Eriksson, E.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of amperozide (a diphenylbutylpiperazinecarboxamide derivative) on the uptake and release of {sup 3}H-dopamine in vitro were investigated. Amperozide inhibited the amphetamine-stimulated release of dopamine from perfused rat striatal tissue in a dose-dependent manner. With 1 and 10 {mu}m amperozide there was significant inhibition of the amphetamine-stimulated release of dopamine, to 44 and 36 % of control. In contrast, 10 {mu}M amperozide significantly strengthened the electrically stimulated release of dopamine from perfused striatal slices. Amperozide 1-10 {mu}M had no significant effect on the potassium-stimulated release of dopamine, 10 {mu}M amperozide also slightly increased the basal release of {sup 3}H-dopaminemore » from perfused striatal tissue. These effects on various types of release are similar to those reported for uptake inhibitors. The uptake of dopamine in striatal tissue was inhibited by amperozide with IC{sub 50} values of 18 {mu}M for uptake in chopped tissue and 1.0 {mu}M for uptake in synaptosomes. Amperozide also inhibited the uptake of serotonin in synaptosomes from frontal cortex, IC{sub 50} = 0.32 {mu}M and the uptake of noradrenaline in cortical synaptosomes, IC{sub 50} = 0.78 {mu}M.« less

  16. Interaction between lidocaine hydrochloride (with and without adrenaline) and various irrigants: A nuclear magnetic resonance analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vidhya, Nirmal; Karthikeyan, Balasubramanian Saravana; Velmurugan, Natanasabapathy; Abarajithan, Mohan; Nithyanandan, Sivasankaran

    2014-01-01

    Background: Interaction between local anesthetic solution, lidocaine hydrochloride (with and without adrenaline), and root canal irrigants such as sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA), and chlorhexidine (CHX) has not been studied earlier. Hence, the purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the chemical interaction between 2% lidocaine hydrochloride (with and without adrenaline) and commonly used root canal irrigants, NaOCl, EDTA, and CHX. Materials and Methods: Samples were divided into eight experimental groups: Group I-Lidocaine hydrochloride (with adrenaline)/3% NaOCl, Group II-Lidocaine hydrochloride (with adrenaline)/17% EDTA, Group III- Lidocaine hydrochloride (with adrenaline)/2% CHX, Group IV-Lidocaine hydrochloride (without adrenaline)/3% NaOCl, Group V-Lidocaine hydrochloride (without adrenaline)/17% EDTA, Group VI-Lidocaine hydrochloride (without adrenaline)/2% CHX, and two control groups: Group VII-Lidocaine hydrochloride (with adrenaline)/deionized water and Group VIII-Lidocaine hydrochloride (without adrenaline)/deionized water. The respective solutions of various groups were mixed in equal proportions (1 ml each) and observed for precipitate formation. Chemical composition of the formed precipitate was then analysed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and confirmed with diazotation test. Results: In groups I and IV, a white precipitate was observed in all the samples on mixing the respective solutions, which showed a color change to reddish brown after 15 minutes. This precipitate was then analysed by NMR spectroscopy and was observed to be 2,6-xylidine, a reported toxic compound. The experimental groups II, III, V, and VI and control groups VII and VIII showed no precipitate formation in any of the respective samples, until 2 hours. Conclusion: Interaction between lidocaine hydrochloride (with and without adrenaline) and NaOCl showed precipitate formation containing 2,6-xylidine, a toxic compound

  17. Dynamic effects of adrenaline (epinephrine) in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with initial pulseless electrical activity (PEA).

    PubMed

    Nordseth, Trond; Olasveengen, Theresa Mariero; Kvaløy, Jan Terje; Wik, Lars; Steen, Petter Andreas; Skogvoll, Eirik

    2012-08-01

    In cardiac arrest, pulseless electrical activity (PEA) is a challenging clinical syndrome. In a randomized study comparing intravenous (i.v.) access and drugs versus no i.v. access or drugs during advanced life support (ALS), adrenaline (epinephrine) improved return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) in patients with PEA. Originating from this study, we investigated the time-dependent effects of adrenaline on clinical state transitions in patients with initial PEA, using a non-parametric multi-state statistical model. Patients with available defibrillator recordings were included, of whom 101 received adrenaline and 73 did not. There were significantly more state transitions in the adrenaline group than in the no-adrenaline group (rate ratio = 1.6, p<0.001). Adrenaline markedly increased the rate of transition from PEA to ROSC during ALS and slowed the rate of being declared dead; e.g. by 20 min 20% of patients in the adrenaline group had been declared dead and 25% had obtained ROSC, whereas 50% in the no-adrenaline group have been declared dead and 15% had obtained ROSC. The differential effect of adrenaline could be seen after approx. 10 min of ALS for most transitions. For both groups the probability of deteriorating from PEA to asystole was highest during the first 15 min. Adrenaline increased the rate of transition from PEA to ventricular fibrillation or -tachycardia (VF/VT), and from ROSC to VF/VT. Adrenaline has notable clinical effects during ALS in patients with initial PEA. The drug extends the time window for ROSC to develop, but also renders the patient more unstable. Further research should investigate the optimal dose, timing and mode of adrenaline administration during ALS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of catecholamines on rat myocardial metabolism. I. Influence of catecholamines on energy-rich nucleotides and phosphorylated fraction contents.

    PubMed

    Merouze, P; Gaudemer, Y

    1975-01-01

    1. The influence of catecholamines (adrenaline and noradrenaline) on energy metabolism of the rat myocardium has been studied by incubating slices of this tissue with these hormones and by following the levels of the different phosphorylated fractions and adenylic nucleotides. 2. Similar effects are obtained with both hormones, adrenaline being more effective. 3. Catecholamines decrease significantly the total amount of phosphate while Pi content increases during the first 10 minutes of incubation; labile and residual phosphate contents increase at the beginning of incubation and decrease to the initial values afterwards. 4. ATP and ADP levels decrease significantly with both hormones; however, the effect of noradrenalin on the ATP level needs a longer time of incubation. The ATP/ADP ratios decrease after 5 minutes incubation and the total adenylic nucleotide content is severely decreased (35 per cent with adrenalin, after 20 minutes incubation). 5. Similar results have been obtained with other tissues; these results can explain the decrease of aerobic metabolism we observed under the same conditions.

  19. Anaphylaxis: lack of hospital doctors' knowledge of adrenaline (epinephrine) administration in adults could endanger patients' safety.

    PubMed

    Droste, J; Narayan, N

    2012-06-01

    Adrenaline (epinephrine) is the first line drug to be given in anaphylaxis and can save patients' lives. Conversely, incorrect administration of adrenaline in anaphylaxis has caused patients serious harm, including death. We compared the survey results of doctors' knowledge of adrenaline administration in adults of two District General Hospitals Trusts in England and found, that from 284 Hospital Doctors, 14.4% (n = 41) would administer adrenaline as recommended by published anaphylaxis guidelines. This survey comparison shows that a significant number of hospital doctors, regardless of seniority and specialty, have an educational deficit regarding correct administration of adrenaline (epinephrine) administration in adults with anaphylaxis. Multilevel strategies to educate doctors and prevent patient harm are needed. We propose a mnemonic for remembering the recommended treatment for anaphylaxis in the adult: "A Thigh 500" forAdrenaline into the antero-lateral thigh, 500 micrograms.

  20. [Prevention of ventricular fibrillation with the aid of protopine in animal experiments].

    PubMed

    Burtsev, V N; Dormidontov, E N; Saliaev, V N

    1978-04-01

    The anti-arrhythmic activity of protopin, quinidine and novocainamide infused intravenously as a preventive and relieving measure was studied in acute experiments on rats with calcium chloride and aconitic arrhythmia. In myocardial fibrillation induced by calcium chloride the contents in the rat heart of adrenalin, noradrenaline, dopa and dopamine were studied by spectrofluorimetry before and after the use of protopin. It was established that in the size of its minimum effective doses which arrest or prevent calcium chloride and aconitic arrhythmias in rats protopin is two to three times more potent than quinidine and novocainamide. The mechanism of the anti-arrhythmic effect of protopin in calcium chloride and aconitic arrhythmias is complex and is due to the suppression of the foci of heterotopic stimulation, decrease in excitability of the myocardial cells and normalization of the catecholamine content in the myocardium.

  1. The value of adrenaline in the induction of supraventricular tachycardia in the electrophysiological laboratory.

    PubMed

    Cismaru, Gabriel; Rosu, Radu; Muresan, Lucian; Puiu, Mihai; Andronache, Marius; Hengan, Erika; Ispas, Daniel; Gusetu, Gabriel; Pop, Dana; Mircea, Petru Adrian; Zdrenghea, Dumitru

    2014-11-01

    The most commonly used drug for the facilitation of supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) induction in the electrophysiological (EP) laboratory is isoprenaline. Despite isoprenaline's apparent indispensability, availability has been problematic in some European countries. Alternative sympatomimethic drugs such as adrenaline have therefore been tried. However, no studies have determined the sensitivity and specificity of adrenaline for the induction of SVT. The objective of this study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of adrenaline for the induction of SVT. Between February 2010 and July 2013, 336 patients underwent an EP study for prior documented SVT. In 66 patients, adrenaline was infused because tachycardia was not induced under basal conditions. This group was compared with 30 control subjects with no history of SVT. Programmed atrial stimulation was carried out during baseline state and repeated after an infusion of adrenaline (dose ranging from 0.05 mcg/kgc to 0.3 mcg/kgc). The endpoint was the induction of SVT. Among 66 patients with a history of SVT but no induction under basal conditions, adrenaline facilitated induction in 54 patients (82%, P < 0.001). Among the 30 control subjects, SVT was not induced in any patient (0%) after infusion. Adrenaline was generally well tolerated, except for two patients (3.0%), where it had to be discontinued due to headache and high blood pressure or lumbar pain. Adrenaline infusion has a high sensitivity (82%) and specificity (100%) for the induction of SVT in patients with prior documented SVT. Therefore, it could serve as an acceptable alternative to isoprenaline, when the latter is not available. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Effect of hexamethonium on the vascular response to noradrenaline in man

    PubMed Central

    Hodge, R. L.; Whelan, R. F.

    1962-01-01

    Intra-arterial infusion of hexamethonium into the brachial artery had no potentiating effect on the constrictor response of the vessels of the forearm or hand to noradrenaline given by the same route. The response of the hand vessels to intravenous infusion of noradrenaline was enhanced after intra-arterial hexamethonium, but this was attributed to entry of the blocking agent into the general circulation resulting in blockade of baroreceptor reflexes since the potentiation was seen to an equal degree on both sides. It is concluded that if increased sensitivity to noradrenaline plays a part in the phenomenon of tolerance to hexamethonium this must be a slowly developing effect. PMID:13907950

  3. [Involvement of carbonate/bicarbonate ions in the superoxide-generating reaction of adrenaline autoxidation].

    PubMed

    Sirota, T V

    2015-01-01

    An important role of carbonate/bicarbonate ions has been recognized in the superoxide generating reaction of adrenaline autooxidation in an alkaline buffer (a model of quinoid adrenaline oxidation in the body). It is suggested that these ions are directly involved not only in formation of superoxide anion radical (О(2)(-)) but also other radicals derived from the carbonate/bicarbonate buffer. Using various buffers it was shown that the rate of accumulation of adrenochrome, the end product of adrenaline oxidation, and the rate of О(2)(-)· formation depend on concentration of carbonate/bicarbonate ions in the buffer and that these ions significantly accelerate adrenaline autooxidation thus demonstrating prooxidant properties. The detectable amount of diformazan, the product of nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) reduction, was significantly higher than the amount of adrenochrome formed; taking into consideration the literature data on О(2)(-)· detection by NBT it is suggested that adrenaline autooxidation is accompanied by one-electron reduction not only of oxygen dissolved in the buffer and responsible for superoxide formation but possible carbon dioxide also dissolved in the buffer as well as carbonate/bicarbonate buffer components leading to formation of corresponding radicals. The plots of the dependence of the inhibition of adrenochrome and diformazan formation on the superoxide dismutase concentration have shown that not only superoxide radicals are formed during adrenaline autooxidation. Since carbonate/bicarbonate ions are known to be universally present in the living nature, their involvement in free radical processes proceeding in the organism is discussed.

  4. [Necrosis in fingers and toes following local anaesthesia with adrenaline--an urban legend?].

    PubMed

    Finsen, Vilhjalmur

    2013-09-17

    It is often maintained that a local anaesthetic (usually lidocaine) with adrenaline must not be used in fingers and toes because it may cause necrosis due to vascular spasm in end arteries. This review article is an attempt to find evidence to support this warning. Relevant literature was found by means of searches in PubMed limited downwards to 1946 and in EMBASE from 1980 to 2012, and in reference lists. Five review articles on finger necrosis following local anaesthesia concluded that lidocaine with adrenaline does not entail a risk of ischaemic injury. One article found 48 reported cases of finger necrosis in the period 1880 to 2000. Most were from the first half of the 1900s, and none involved lidocaine. Gangrene of part of the finger tip has subsequently been described in one patient with Raynaud's syndrome. No cases of necrosis have been described in a large number of reported accidents in which EpiPen injections contained the same quantity of adrenaline as is found in 60 ml lidocaine with adrenaline. Over a quarter of a million reports have been made of operations on feet, hands, fingers and toes anaesthetised with lidocaine with adrenaline without resulting necrosis. There are no grounds for the warning against using lidocaine with adrenaline in fingers and toes. This anaesthetic offers considerable practical advantages. Care should be taken with infected fingers or fingers with poor circulation.

  5. Noradrenaline treatment of rats stimulates H2O2 generation in liver mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Swaroop, A; Patole, M S; Puranam, R S; Ramasarma, T

    1983-01-01

    Treatment of rats with noradrenaline stimulated H2O2 generation in liver mitochondria using succinate, choline or glycerol 1-phosphate as substrate. The dehydrogenase activity with either succinate or choline as substrate showed no change, whereas that with glycerol 1-phosphate increased. The effect was obtained with noradrenaline, but not with dihydroxyphenylserine. Phenoxybenzamine and yohimbine, but not propranolol, prevented the response to noradrenaline treatment. Phenylephrine could stimulate H2O2 generation, whereas isoprenaline had only a marginal effect. Theophylline treatment slightly decreased the generation of H2O2 in liver mitochondria, but treatment with pargyline, Ro4-1284 and dibutyryl cyclic AMP had little effect. These studies showed that noradrenaline might possibly be acting through the alpha 2-adrenergic system. PMID:6312963

  6. Peripheral markers of serotonergic and noradrenergic function in post-pubertal, caucasian males with autistic disorder.

    PubMed

    Croonenberghs, J; Delmeire, L; Verkerk, R; Lin, A H; Meskal, A; Neels, H; Van der Planken, M; Scharpe, S; Deboutte, D; Pison, G; Maes, M

    2000-03-01

    Some studies have suggested that disorders in the peripheral and central metabolism of serotonin (5-HT) and noradrenaline may play a role in the pathophysiology of autistic disorder. This study examines serotonergic and noradrenergic markers in a study group of 13 male, post-pubertal, caucasian autistic patients (age 12-18 y; I.Q. > 55) and 13 matched volunteers. [3H]-paroxetine binding Kd values were significantly higher in patients with autism than in healthy volunteers. Plasma concentrations of tryptophan, the precursor of 5-HT, were significantly lower in autistic patients than in healthy volunteers. There were no significant differences between autistic and normal children in the serum concentrations of 5-HT, or the 24-hr urinary excretion of 5-hydroxy-indoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), adrenaline, noradrenaline, and dopamine. There were no significant differences in [3H]-rauwolscine binding Bmax or Kd values, or in the serum concentrations of tyrosine, the precursor of noradrenaline, between both study groups. There were highly significant positive correlations between age and 24-hr urinary excretion of 5-HIAA and serum tryptophan. The results suggest that: 1) serotonergic disturbances, such as defects in the 5-HT transporter system and lowered plasma tryptophan, may play a role in the pathophysiology of autism; 2) autism is not associated with alterations in the noradrenergic system; and 3) the metabolism of serotonin in humans undergoes significant changes between the ages of 12 and 18 years.

  7. Adrenaline stimulates the proliferation and migration of mesenchymal stem cells towards the LPS-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaodan; Wang, Zhiming; Qian, Mengjia; Wang, Lingyan; Bai, Chunxue; Wang, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) could modulate inflammation in experimental lung injury. On the other hand, adrenergic receptor agonists could increase DNA synthesis of stem cells. Therefore, we investigated the therapeutic role of adrenaline-stimulated BMSCs on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lung injury. BMSCs were cultured with adrenergic receptor agonists or antagonists. Suspensions of lung cells or sliced lung tissue from animals with or without LPS-induced injury were co-cultured with BMSCs. LPS-stimulated alveolar macrophages were co-cultured with BMSCs (with adrenaline stimulation or not) in Transwell for 6 hrs. A preliminary animal experiment was conducted to validate the findings in ex vivo study. We found that adrenaline at 10 μM enhanced proliferation of BMSCs through both α- and β-adrenergic receptors. Adrenaline promoted the migration of BMSCs towards LPS-injured lung cells or lung tissue. Adrenaline-stimulated BMSCs decreased the inflammation of LPS-stimulated macrophages, probably through the expression and secretion of several paracrine factors. Adrenaline reduced the extent of injury in LPS-injured rats. Our data indicate that adrenaline-stimulated BMSCs might contribute to the prevention from acute lung injury through the activation of adrenergic receptors, promotion of proliferation and migration towards injured lung, and modulation of inflammation. PMID:24684532

  8. Desensitization by noradrenaline of responses to stimulation of pre- and postsynaptic adrenoceptors

    PubMed Central

    Ball, N.; Danks, J.L.; Dorudi, S.; Nasmyth, P.A.

    1982-01-01

    1 The effect of exposing isolated preparations of rat aortic strip, rat atria and mouse vas deferens to perfusions of Krebs solution containing various concentrations of noradrenaline on their sensitivity to the drug has been determined. 2 The responses evoked by stimulation of postsynaptic adrenoceptors in all the tissues and presynaptic α-adrenoceptors in the mouse vas deferens were diminished by the perfusion of noradrenaline through the organ bath for 30 min. 3 The concentration of noradrenaline required to produce desensitization was higher in the mouse vas deferens than in the other tissues and more was required to desensitize the chronotropic responses than the inotropic responses in rat isolated atria. 4 The inclusion of cocaine (10-5 M) in the bathing solution to block uptake1 increased the sensitivity of most tissues to noradrenaline. With the possible exception of the response to stimulation of presynaptic receptors in the mouse vas deferens, desensitization was somewhat increased in its presence. 5 When uptake2 was blocked by oestradiol (10-5 M), it was not possible to desensitize the contractor responses of the aortic strip and vas deferens to exogenous noradrenaline, nor the inotropic response of the atria to the drug. However, oestradiol failed to block the desensitization of chronotropic responses and responses to stimulation of presynaptic receptors in the vas deferens. 6 Blockade of monoamine oxidase (MAO) with iproniazid (7.2 × 10-4 M) or with pargyline (5 × 10-4 M) did not affect the desensitization process in the aortic strip. 7 Blockade of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) with U-0521 (5.3 × 10-5 M) greatly increased desensitization in the aortic strip and desensitization of inotropic responses in the atria. It had no effect on desensitization of chronotropic responses. Its effect on responses in the mouse vas deferens was not determined. 8 The perfusion of methoxamine at concentrations about 1000 times higher than those of noradrenaline

  9. Evaluation of cytogenetic and DNA damage in human lymphocytes treated with adrenaline in vitro.

    PubMed

    Djelić, Ninoslav; Radaković, Milena; Spremo-Potparević, Biljana; Zivković, Lada; Bajić, Vladan; Stevanović, Jevrosima; Stanimirović, Zoran

    2015-02-01

    Catechol groups can be involved in redox cycling accompanied by generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which may lead to oxidative damage of cellular macromolecules including DNA. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate possible genotoxic effects of a natural catecholamine adrenaline in cultured human lymphocytes using cytogenetic (sister chromatid exchange and micronuclei) and the single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay. In cytogenetic tests, six experimental concentrations of adrenaline were used in a range from 0.01-500 μM. There were no indications of genotoxic effects of adrenaline in sister chromatid exchange and micronucleus tests. However, at four highest concentrations of adrenaline (5 μM, 50 μM, 150 μM and 300 μM) we observed a decreased mitotic index and cell-cycle delay. In addition, in the Comet assay we used adrenaline in a range from 0.0005-500 μM, at two treatment times: 15 min or 60 min. In contrast to cytogenetic analysis, there was a dose-dependent increase of DNA damage detected in the Comet assay. These effects were significantly reduced by concomitant treatment with quercetin or catalase. Therefore, the obtained results indicate that adrenaline may exhibit genotoxic effects in cultured human lymphocytes, most likely due to production of reactive oxygen species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Adrenaline potentiates PI 3-kinase in platelets stimulated with thrombin and SFRLLN: role of secreted ADP.

    PubMed

    Selheim, F; Frøyset, A K; Strand, I; Vassbotn, F S; Holmsen, H

    2000-11-17

    Adrenaline significantly potentiated late thrombin- and SFRLLN-induced PtdIns(3,4)P(2) production. Furthermore, the potentiating effect of adrenaline on thrombin-induced PtdIns(3, 4)P(2) production was independent on secreted ADP, whereas, the effect of adrenaline on SFRLLN-induced PtdIns(3,4)P(2) production was completely dependent of secreted ADP. However, the ADP-dependent accumulation of PtdIns(3,4)P(2) was not required for irreversible platelet aggregation induced by SFRLLN in the presence of adrenaline. It is concluded that adrenaline can replace secreted ADP to potentiate PtdIns(3,4)P(2) production in thrombin-stimulated but not in SFRLLN-stimulated platelets, thus demonstrating a qualitative difference between platelet stimulation by thrombin and the thrombin receptor activating peptide SFRLLN.

  11. α₂-Adrenoceptors activate noradrenaline-mediated glycogen turnover in chick astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Dana S; Catus, Stephanie L; Merlin, Jon; Summers, Roger J; Gibbs, Marie E

    2011-06-01

    In the brain, glycogen is primarily stored in astrocytes where it is regulated by several hormones/neurotransmitters, including noradrenaline that controls glycogen breakdown (in the short term) and synthesis. Here, we have examined the adrenoceptor (AR) subtype that mediates the glycogenic effect of noradrenaline in chick primary astrocytes by the measurement of glycogen turnover (total (14) C incorporation of glucose into glycogen) following noradrenergic activation. Noradrenaline and insulin increased glycogen turnover in a concentration-dependent manner. The effect of noradrenaline was mimicked by stimulation of α(2) -ARs (and to a lesser degree by β(3) -ARs), but not by stimulation of α(1) -, β(1) -, or β(2) -ARs, and occurred only in astrocytes and not neurons. In chick astrocytes, studies using RT-PCR and radioligand binding showed that α(2A) - and α(2C) -AR mRNA and protein were present. α(2) -AR- or insulin-mediated glycogen turnover was inhibited by phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase inhibitors, and both insulin and clonidine caused phosphorylation of Akt and glycogen synthase kinase-3 in chick astrocytes. α(2) -AR but not insulin-mediated glycogen turnover was inhibited by pertussis toxin pre-treatment indicating involvement of Gi/o proteins. These results show that the increase in glycogen turnover caused by noradrenaline is because of activation of α(2) -ARs that increase glycogen turnover in astrocytes utilizing a Gi/o-PI3K pathway. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2011 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  12. Management of cardiac arrest caused by coronary artery spasm: epinephrine/adrenaline versus nitrates.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Gabor; Corre, Olivier; Gueret, Gildas; Nguyen Ba, Vinh; Gilard, Martine; Boschat, Jaques; Arvieux, Charles Chistian

    2009-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation guidelines imply the use of epinephrine/adrenaline during cardiopulmonary arrest. However, in cardiac arrest situations resulting from coronary artery spasm (CAS), the use of epinephrine/adrenaline could be deleterious. A 49-year-old patient underwent an emergency coronarography with an attempt to stent the coronary arteries. Radiologic imaging revealed a positive methylergonovine maleate (Methergine, Novartis Pharmaceuticals, East Hanover, NJ) test, with subocclusive CAS in several coronary vessels leading to electromechanical dissociation. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed, and intracoronary boluses of isosorbide dinitrate were given to treat CAS. Epinephrine/adrenaline was not administered during resuscitation. Spontaneous circulation was obtained after cardioversion for ventricular fibrillation, and the patient progressively regained consciousness. Resuscitation guidelines do not specify the use of trinitrate derivatives in cardiac arrest situations caused by CAS. The pros and cons of the use of nitrates and epinephrine/adrenaline during cardiac arrest caused by CAS are analyzed in this case report.

  13. The time dependent association of adrenaline administration and survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Ewy, Gordon A; Bobrow, Bentley J; Chikani, Vatsal; Sanders, Arthur B; Otto, Charles W; Spaite, Daniel W; Kern, Karl B

    2015-11-01

    Recommended for decades, the therapeutic value of adrenaline (epinephrine) in the resuscitation of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is controversial. To investigate the possible time-dependent outcomes associated with adrenaline administration by Emergency Medical Services personnel (EMS). A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from a near statewide cardiac resuscitation database between 1 January 2005 and 30 November 2013. Multivariable logistic regression was used to analyze the effect of the time interval between EMS dispatch and the initial dose of adrenaline on survival. The primary endpoints were survival to hospital discharge and favourable neurologic outcome. Data from 3469 patients with witnessed OHCA were analyzed. Their mean age was 66.3 years and 69% were male. An initially shockable rhythm was present in 41.8% of patients. Based on a multivariable logistic regression model with initial adrenaline administration time interval (AATI) from EMS dispatch as the covariate, survival was greatest when adrenaline was administered very early but decreased rapidly with increasing (AATI); odds ratio 0.94 (95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.92-0.97). The AATI had no significant effect on good neurological outcome (OR=0.96, 95% CI=0.90-1.02). In patients with OHCA, survival to hospital discharge was greater in those treated early with adrenaline by EMS especially in the subset of patients with a shockable rhythm. However survival rapidly decreased with increasing adrenaline administration time intervals (AATI). Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of adrenaline injection and bipolar electrocoagulation for the arrest of peptic ulcer bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Lin, H; Tseng, G; Perng, C; Lee, F; Chang, F; Lee, S

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Peptic ulcers with active bleeding or a non-bleeding visible vessel require aggressive endoscopic treatment. 
AIMS—To determine whether endoscopic adrenaline injection alone or contact probe therapy following injection is a suitable treatment for peptic ulcer bleeding. 
METHODS—A total of 96 patients with active bleeding or non-bleeding visible vessels received adrenaline alone, bipolar electrocoagulation alone, or combined treatment (n=32 in each group). 
RESULTS—Initial haemostasis was not achieved in one patient in the adrenaline group, two in the gold probe group, and two in the injection gold probe group (p>0.1). Rebleeding episodes were fewer in the injection gold probe group (2/30, 6.7%) than in the gold probe group (9/30, 30%, p=0.04) and in the adrenaline group (11/31, 35.5%, p=0.01). Treatment failure (other therapy required) was rarer in the injection gold probe group (4/32, 12.5%) than in the adrenaline group (12/32, 37.5%, p=0.04). The volume of blood transfused after entry of the study was less in the injection gold probe group (mean 491 ml) than in the adrenaline group (1548ml, p<0.0001) and the gold probe group (1105 ml, p<0.01). Duration of hospital stay, numbers of patients requiring urgent surgery, and death rate were not statistically different among the three groups. 
CONCLUSIONS—For patients with peptic ulcer bleeding, combined adrenaline injection and gold probe treatment offers an advantage in preventing rebleeding and decreasing the need for blood transfusion. 

 Keywords: gold probe; haemostasis; injectional therapy; rebleeding; shock; peptic ulcer PMID:10205211

  15. Outcome when adrenaline (epinephrine) was actually given vs. not given - post hoc analysis of a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Olasveengen, Theresa M; Wik, Lars; Sunde, Kjetil; Steen, Petter A

    2012-03-01

    IV line insertion and drugs did not affect long-term survival in an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) randomized clinical trial (RCT). In a previous large registry study adrenaline was negatively associated with survival from OHCA. The present post hoc analysis on the RCT data compares outcomes for patients actually receiving adrenaline to those not receiving adrenaline. Patients from a RCT performed May 2003 to April 2008 were included. Three patients from the original intention-to-treat analysis were excluded due to insufficient documentation of adrenaline administration. Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and clinical outcomes were compared. Clinical characteristics were similar and CPR quality comparable and within guideline recommendations for 367 patients receiving adrenaline and 481 patients not receiving adrenaline. Odds ratio (OR) for being admitted to hospital, being discharged from hospital and surviving with favourable neurological outcome for the adrenaline vs. no-adrenaline group was 2.5 (CI 1.9, 3.4), 0.5 (CI 0.3, 0.8) and 0.4 (CI 0.2, 0.7), respectively. Ventricular fibrillation, response interval, witnessed arrest, gender, age and endotracheal intubation were confounders in multivariate logistic regression analysis. OR for survival for adrenaline vs. no-adrenaline adjusted for confounders was 0.52 (95% CI: 0.29, 0.92). Receiving adrenaline was associated with improved short-term survival, but decreased survival to hospital discharge and survival with favourable neurological outcome after OHCA. This post hoc survival analysis is in contrast to the previous intention-to-treat analysis of the same data, but agrees with previous non-randomized registry data. This shows limitations of non-randomized or non-intention-to-treat analyses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Basal cardiomyopathy develops in rabbits with ventricular tachyarrhythmias induced by a single injection of adrenaline.

    PubMed

    Ashida, Terunao; Takato, Tetsuya; Matsuzaki, Gen; Seko, Yoshinori; Fujii, Jun; Kawai, Sachio

    2014-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that basal cardiomyopathy develops in rabbits with ventricular tachyarrhythmias that have been induced by electrical stimulation of the cervical vagus. This study investigated whether similar basal cardiomyopathy would develop in rabbits with ventricular tachyarrhythmias induced by a single injection of adrenaline. Adrenaline was intravenously infused for 10-360 seconds in anesthetized rabbits. Colloidal carbon was injected after adrenaline infusion. Wall movement velocity of the left ventricular base was assessed by tissue Doppler echocardiography. Animals were killed either 1 week or 3-4 weeks later. Pathological lesions were identified by deposits of carbon particles. Animals were divided into two groups according to the infused dose of adrenaline. The small-dose group (group S, n = 15) received 1-10 μg and the large-dose group (group L, n = 23) received 15-60 μg of adrenaline. Adrenaline infusion induced premature ventricular contractions followed by monomorphic ventricular tachycardias in 22 of 23 animals in group L, but in only 1 of 15 animals in group S. Wall movement velocity of the left ventricular base decreased just after adrenaline infusion, remained low after 1 week, and recovered to near-baseline levels after 3-4 weeks in group L. Unique cardiac lesions identified by deposits of carbon particles were frequently observed on the left ventricular basal portion, almost always associated with the mitral valve and papillary muscles, but were never observed in the apical area. Lesions involving all areas of the left ventricular basal portion were observed in 22 of 23 animals in group L, but in only 2 of 15 animals in group S. Basal cardiomyopathy developed in rabbits with ventricular tachycardias induced by a single injection of adrenaline.

  17. Effects of progesterone on cardiovascular responses to amines and to sympathetic stimulation in the pithed rat

    PubMed Central

    Fozard, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    1. Blood pressure and heart rate responses to adrenaline, noradrenaline, tyramine, 5-hydroxytryptamine and stimulation of the spinal sympathetic outflow were measured in pithed rats pretreated either with progesterone (20 mg/kg daily for 14 days) or the vehicle solution of ethyl oleate. 2. Pretreatment with progesterone increased the durations but not the magnitudes of the blood pressure and heart rate responses to adrenaline and that phase of the response to sympathetic stimulation attributable to amine release from the adrenal medulla. 3. Responses to noradrenaline, tyramine, 5-hydroxytryptamine and that phase of the response to sympathetic stimulation associated with amine release from the sympathetic nerves were not significantly different in the two groups. 4. Pyrogallol (5 mg/kg) increased the duration but not the magnitude of responses to adrenaline, noradrenaline and sympathetic stimulation in both experimental groups. The increases in duration were consistently less in animals pretreated with progesterone than in controls. 5. Pretreatment with progesterone did not affect the total amount of radioactivity nor the proportion of catechol to non-catechol metabolites excreted in the urine during a period of 7·25 h following an intraperitoneal injection of (±) isoprenaline-7-3H. 6. It is concluded that the effects of progesterone may result from a localized decrease in catechol O-methyl transferase activity within the cardiovascular system. PMID:5280141

  18. The effects of catecholamines and adrenoceptor blocking drugs on the canine peripheral lymph flow.

    PubMed Central

    De Micheli, P; Glässer, A H

    1975-01-01

    Blood flow through the femoral artery, lymph flow in a lymphatic vessel in the femoral triangle and metatarsal distal venous pressure were measured simultaneously in a canine moving hind limb. 2. Low intra-arterial doses of adrenaline and noradrenaline increased lymph flow even in the presence of marked arterial vasoconstriction. In contrast, isoprenaline increased arterial blood flow without affecting lymph flow rate. 3. Phenoxybenzamine, dihydroergotoxine, and nicergoline did not inhibit the lymphatic flow increase induced by adrenaline at doses active on arterial or venous vascular alpha-adrenoceptors. 4. Propranolol given intra-arterially into animals pretreated with alpha-adrenoceptor blocking agents restored the vasoconstrictor effect of adrenaline (reversal of adrenaline reversal). PMID:238702

  19. Recovery of Ventriculo-Atrial Conduction after Adrenaline in Patients Implanted with Pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Cismaru, Gabriel; Gusetu, Gabriel; Muresan, Lucian; Rosu, Radu; Andronache, Marius; Matuz, Roxana; Puiu, Mihai; Mester, Petru; Miclaus, Maria; Pop, Dana; Mircea, Petru Adrian; Zdrenghea, Dumitru

    2015-07-01

    Ventriculo-atrial (VA) conduction can have negative consequences for patients with implanted pacemakers and defibrillators. There is concern whether impaired VA conduction could recover during stressful situations. Although the influence of isoproterenol and atropine are well established, the effect of adrenaline has not been studied systematically. The objective of this study was to determine if adrenaline can facilitate recovery of VA conduction in patients implanted with pacemakers. A prospective study was conducted on 61 consecutive patients during a 4-month period (April-July 2014). The presence of VA conduction was assessed during the pacemaker implantation procedure. In case of an impaired VA conduction, adrenaline infusio was used as a stress surrogate to test conduction recovery. The indications for pacemaker implantation were: sinus node dysfunction in 18 patients, atrioventricular (AV) block in 40 patients, binodal dysfunction (sinus node+ AV node) in two patients and other (carotid sinus syndrome) in one patient. In the basal state, 15/61 (24.6%) presented spontaneous VA conduction and 46/61 (75.4%) had no VA conduction. After administration of adrenaline, there was VA conduction recovery in 5/46 (10.9%) patients. Adrenaline infusion produced recovery of VA conduction in 10.9% of patients with absent VA conduction in a basal state. Recovery of VA conduction during physiological or pathological stresses could be responsible for the pacemaker syndrome, PMT episodes, or certain implantable cardiac defibrillator detection issues. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Adrenaline stimulates the proliferation and migration of mesenchymal stem cells towards the LPS-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaodan; Wang, Zhiming; Qian, Mengjia; Wang, Lingyan; Bai, Chunxue; Wang, Xiangdong

    2014-08-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) could modulate inflammation in experimental lung injury. On the other hand, adrenergic receptor agonists could increase DNA synthesis of stem cells. Therefore, we investigated the therapeutic role of adrenaline-stimulated BMSCs on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lung injury. BMSCs were cultured with adrenergic receptor agonists or antagonists. Suspensions of lung cells or sliced lung tissue from animals with or without LPS-induced injury were co-cultured with BMSCs. LPS-stimulated alveolar macrophages were co-cultured with BMSCs (with adrenaline stimulation or not) in Transwell for 6 hrs. A preliminary animal experiment was conducted to validate the findings in ex vivo study. We found that adrenaline at 10 μM enhanced proliferation of BMSCs through both α- and β-adrenergic receptors. Adrenaline promoted the migration of BMSCs towards LPS-injured lung cells or lung tissue. Adrenaline-stimulated BMSCs decreased the inflammation of LPS-stimulated macrophages, probably through the expression and secretion of several paracrine factors. Adrenaline reduced the extent of injury in LPS-injured rats. Our data indicate that adrenaline-stimulated BMSCs might contribute to the prevention from acute lung injury through the activation of adrenergic receptors, promotion of proliferation and migration towards injured lung, and modulation of inflammation. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  1. Synergism between thrombin and adrenaline (epinephrine) in human platelets. Marked potentiation of inositol phospholipid metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Steen, V M; Tysnes, O B; Holmsen, H

    1988-01-01

    We have studied synergism between adrenaline (epinephrine) and low concentrations of thrombin in gel-filtered human platelets prelabelled with [32P]Pi. Suspensions of platelets, which did not contain added fibrinogen, were incubated at 37 degrees C to measure changes in the levels of 32P-labelled phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PIP) and phosphatidate (PA), aggregation and dense-granule secretion after stimulation. Adrenaline alone (3.5-4.0 microM) did not cause a change in any parameter (phosphoinositide metabolism, aggregation and dense-granule secretion), but markedly enhanced the thrombin-induced responses over a narrow range of thrombin concentrations (0.03-0.08 units/ml). The thrombin-induced hydrolysis of inositol phospholipids by phospholipase C, which was measured as the formation of [32P]PA, was potentiated by adrenaline, as was the increase in the levels of [32P]PIP2 and [32P]PIP. The presence of adrenaline caused a shift to the left for the thrombin-induced changes in the phosphoinositide metabolism, without affecting the maximal levels of 32P-labelled compounds obtained. A similar shift by adrenaline in the dose-response relationship was previously demonstrated for thrombin-induced aggregation and dense-granule secretion. Also, the narrow range of concentrations of thrombin over which adrenaline potentiates thrombin-induced platelet responses is the same for changes in phosphoinositide metabolism and physiological responses (aggregation and dense-granule secretion). Our observations clearly indicate that adrenaline directly or indirectly influences thrombin-induced changes in phosphoinositide metabolism. PMID:2845924

  2. Cross-functioning between the extraneuronal monoamine transporter and multidrug resistance protein 1 in the uptake of adrenaline and export of 5-(glutathion-S-yl)adrenaline in rat cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Costa, Vera Marisa; Ferreira, Lusa Maria; Branco, Paula Srio; Carvalho, Flix; Bastos, Maria Lourdes; Carvalho, Rui Albuquerque; Carvalho, Mrcia; Remio, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    Isolated heart cells are highly susceptible to the toxicity of catecholamine oxidation products, namely, to catecholamine-glutathione adducts. Although cellular uptake and/or efflux of these products may constitute a crucial step, the knowledge about the involvement of transporters is still very scarce. This work aimed to contribute to the characterization of membrane transport mechanisms, namely, extraneuronal monoamine transporter (EMT), the multidrug resistant protein 1 (MRP1), and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in freshly isolated cardiomyocytes from adult rats. These transporters may be accountable for uptake and/or efflux of adrenaline and an adrenaline oxidation product, 5-(glutathion-S-yl)adrenaline, in cardiomyocyte suspensions. Our results showed that 5-(glutathion-S-yl)adrenaline efflux was mediated by MRP1. Additionally, we demonstrated that the adduct formation occurs within the cardiomyocytes, since EMT inhibition reduced the intracellular adduct levels. The classical uptake2 transport in rat myocardial cells was inhibited by the typical EMT inhibitor, corticosterone, and surprisingly was also inhibited by low concentrations of another drug, a well-known P-gp inhibitor, GF120918. The P-gp activity was absent in the cells since P-gp-mediated efflux of quinidine was not blocked by GF120918. In conclusion, this work showed that freshly isolated cardiomyocytes from adult rats constitute a good model for the study of catecholamines and catecholamines metabolites membrane transport. The cardiomyocytes maintain EMT and MRP1 fully active, and these transporters contribute to the formation and efflux of 5-(glutathion-S-yl)adrenaline. In the present experimental conditions, P-gp activity is absent in the isolated cardiomyocytes.

  3. Integrative function of adrenaline receptors for glucagon-like peptide-1 exocytosis in enteroendocrine L cell line GLUTag.

    PubMed

    Harada, Kazuki; Kitaguchi, Tetsuya; Tsuboi, Takashi

    2015-05-15

    Adrenaline reacts with three types of adrenergic receptors, α1, α2 and β-adrenergic receptors (ARs), inducing many physiological events including exocytosis. Although adrenaline has been shown to induce glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion from intestinal L cells, the precise molecular mechanism by which adrenaline regulates GLP-1 secretion remains unknown. Here we show by live cell imaging that all types of adrenergic receptors are stimulated by adrenaline in enteroendocrine L cell line GLUTag cells and are involved in GLP-1 exocytosis. We performed RT-PCR analysis and found that α1B-, α2A-, α2B-, and β1-ARs were expressed in GLUTag cells. Application of adrenaline induced a significant increase of intracellular Ca(2+) and cAMP concentration ([Ca(2+)]i and [cAMP]i, respectively), and GLP-1 exocytosis in GLUTag cells. Blockade of α1-AR inhibited adrenaline-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase and exocytosis but not [cAMP]i increase, while blockade of β1-AR inhibited adrenaline-induced [cAMP]i increase and exocytosis but not [Ca(2+)]i increase. Furthermore, overexpression of α2A-AR suppressed the adrenaline-induced [cAMP]i increase and exocytosis. These results suggest that the fine-turning of GLP-1 secretion from enteroendocrine L cells is established by the balance between α1-, α2-, and β-ARs activation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Role of external and internal calcium on heterocarrier-mediated transmitter release.

    PubMed

    Fassio, A; Bonanno, G; Fontana, G; Usai, C; Marchi, M; Raiteri, M

    1996-04-01

    Release-regulating heterocarriers exist on brain nerve endings. We have investigated in this study the mechanisms involved in the neurotransmitter release evoked by GABA heterocarrier activation. GABA increased the basal release of [3H]acetylcholine and [3H]noradrenaline from rat hippocampal synaptosomes and of [3H]dopamine from striatal synaptosomes. These GABA effects, insensitive to GABA receptor antagonists, were prevented by inhibiting GABA uptake but not by blocking noradrenaline, choline, or dopamine transport. Lack of extracellular Ca2+ or addition of tetrodotoxin selectively abolished the GABA-evoked release of [3H]noradrenaline, leaving unaffected that of [3H]acetylcholine or [3H]dopamine. 1,2-Bis(2-aminophenoxyl)-ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA-AM) or vesamicol attenuated the release of [3H]acetylcholine elicited by GABA. Reserpine, but not BAPTA-AM, prevented the effect of GABA on [3H] dopamine release. Autoreceptor activation inhibited the GABA-evoked release of [3H]noradrenaline but not that of [3H]acetylcholine or [3H]dopamine. It is concluded that (a) the release of [3H]noradrenaline consequent to activation of GABA heterocarriers sited on noradrenergic terminals meets the criteria of a conventional exocytotic process, (b) the extracellular [Ca2+]-independent releases of [3H]acetylcholine and [3H]dopamine appear to occur from vesicles possibly through involvement of intraterminal Ca2+, and (c) autoreceptor activation only affects heterocarrier-mediated vesicular release linked to entry of extracellular Ca2+.

  5. Autonomic regulation of mucociliary transport rate in the oesophagus of the frog, Rana temporaria.

    PubMed Central

    Morley, J; Sanjar, S

    1984-01-01

    Transport of lead particles along the mucosal surface of the frog oesophagus has been measured by direct observation with the aid of video recording. Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve increased the rate of particle transport. This acceleration was suppressed by atropine or by hexamethonium. Acetylcholine and other parasympathomimetic agents accelerated particle transport rate. Such acceleration was abolished by atropine. Nicotine increased the rate of particle transport and this effect was suppressed by hexamethonium or by atropine. Atropine did not significantly alter basal particle transport rate. Neither basal particle transport rate nor the response to vagal nerve stimulation were affected by eserine. Adrenaline, noradrenaline or isoprenaline did not affect basal particle transport rate. Adrenaline or noradrenaline were without effect on the increased particle transport rate due to electrical stimulation of the vagus. PMID:6332901

  6. Effect of adrenaline on survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: A randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Ian G; Finn, Judith C; Jelinek, George A; Oxer, Harry F; Thompson, Peter L

    2011-09-01

    There is little evidence from clinical trials that the use of adrenaline (epinephrine) in treating cardiac arrest improves survival, despite adrenaline being considered standard of care for many decades. The aim of our study was to determine the effect of adrenaline on patient survival to hospital discharge in out of hospital cardiac arrest. We conducted a double blind randomised placebo-controlled trial of adrenaline in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Identical study vials containing either adrenaline 1:1000 or placebo (sodium chloride 0.9%) were prepared. Patients were randomly allocated to receive 1 ml aliquots of the trial drug according to current advanced life support guidelines. Outcomes assessed included survival to hospital discharge (primary outcome), pre-hospital return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and neurological outcome (Cerebral Performance Category Score - CPC). A total of 4103 cardiac arrests were screened during the study period of which 601 underwent randomisation. Documentation was available for a total of 534 patients: 262 in the placebo group and 272 in the adrenaline group. Groups were well matched for baseline characteristics including age, gender and receiving bystander CPR. ROSC occurred in 22 (8.4%) of patients receiving placebo and 64 (23.5%) who received adrenaline (OR=3.4; 95% CI 2.0-5.6). Survival to hospital discharge occurred in 5 (1.9%) and 11 (4.0%) patients receiving placebo or adrenaline respectively (OR=2.2; 95% CI 0.7-6.3). All but two patients (both in the adrenaline group) had a CPC score of 1-2. Patients receiving adrenaline during cardiac arrest had no statistically significant improvement in the primary outcome of survival to hospital discharge although there was a significantly improved likelihood of achieving ROSC. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Simultaneous measurements of cardiac noradrenaline spillover and sympathetic outflow to skeletal muscle in humans.

    PubMed

    Wallin, B G; Esler, M; Dorward, P; Eisenhofer, G; Ferrier, C; Westerman, R; Jennings, G

    1992-01-01

    1. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSA) was recorded in the peroneal nerve at the knee by microneurography in ten healthy subjects and determinations were made simultaneously of intra-arterial blood pressure, and whole-body and cardiac noradrenaline spillover to plasma. Measurements were made at rest, during isometric handgrip at 30% of maximum power and during stress induced by forced mental arithmetic. 2. At rest there were significant positive correlations between spontaneous MSA (expressed as number of sympathetic bursts min-1) and both spillover of noradrenaline from the heart and concentration of noradrenaline in coronary sinus venous plasma. 3. Both isometric handgrip and mental arithmetic led to sustained increases of blood pressure, heart rate and MSA. Plasma concentrations of noradrenaline and spillover of noradrenaline (total body and cardiac) increased. In general the effects were more pronounced during handgrip than during stress. 4. When comparing effects during handgrip and stress the ratio between the fractional increases of MSA and cardiac noradrenaline spillover were significantly greater during handgrip. 5. The data suggest (a) that there are proportional interindividual differences in the strength of resting sympathetic activity to heart and skeletal muscle which are determined by a common mechanism and (b) that handgrip and mental stress are associated with differences in balance between sympathetic outflows to heart and skeletal muscle.

  8. Adrenaline is a critical mediator of acute exercise-induced AMP-activated protein kinase activation in adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Ho-Jin; Hirshman, Michael F.; He, Huamei; Li, Yangfeng; Manabe, Yasuko; Balschi, James A.; Goodyear, Laurie J.

    2007-01-01

    Exercise increases AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase) activity in human and rat adipocytes, but the underlying molecular mechanisms and functional consequences of this activation are not known. Since adrenaline (epinephrine) concentrations increase with exercise, in the present study we hypothesized that adrenaline activates AMPK in adipocytes. We show that a single bout of exercise increases AMPKα1 and α2 activities and ACC (acetyl-CoA carboxylase) Ser79 phosphorylation in rat adipocytes. Similarly to exercise, adrenaline treatment in vivo increased AMPK activities and ACC phosphorylation. Pre-treatment of rats with the β-blocker propranolol fully blocked exercise-induced AMPK activation. Increased AMPK activity with exercise and adrenaline treatment in vivo was accompanied by an increased AMP/ATP ratio. Adrenaline incubation of isolated adipocytes also increased the AMP/ATP ratio and AMPK activities, an effect blocked by propranolol. Adrenaline incubation increased lipolysis in isolated adipocytes, and Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, attenuated this effect. Finally, a potential role for AMPK in the decreased adiposity associated with chronic exercise was suggested by marked increases in AMPKα1 and α2 activities in adipocytes from rats trained for 6 weeks. In conclusion, both acute and chronic exercise are significant regulators of AMPK activity in rat adipocytes. Our findings suggest that adrenaline plays a critical role in exercise-stimulated AMPKα1 and α2 activities in adipocytes, and that AMPK can function in the regulation of lipolysis. PMID:17253964

  9. Using adrenaline during neonatal resuscitation may have an impact on serum cardiac troponin-T levels.

    PubMed

    Helmer, Caroline; Skranes, Janne H; Liestøl, Knut; Fugelseth, Drude

    2015-09-01

    It has been suggested that serum cardiac troponin-T (cTnT) can predict the severity of neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. We evaluated whether cTnT was better correlated with adrenaline during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) than with the severity of the insult itself, based on the Apgar scores. Serum cTnT was analysed in 47 asphyxiated newborn infants treated with hypothermia. Blood samples and resuscitation data were collected from medical records, and multiple linear regressions were used to evaluate the effect of the treatment and the Apgar scores on cTnT levels. The infants were divided into three groups: the no CPR group (n = 29) just received stimulation and ventilation, the CPR minus adrenaline group (n = 9) received cardiac compression and ventilation and the CPR plus adrenaline group (n = 9) received complete CPR, including adrenaline. In the univariate analysis, the five and ten-minute Apgar scores were significantly lower in the CPR plus adrenaline group and the cTnT was significantly higher. Multiple regression analysis showed significantly higher cTnT values in the CPR plus adrenaline group, but no significant relationship between cTnT and the Apgar scores. Although cTnT correlated with the severity of the insult in neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy, the levels may have been affected by adrenaline administered during CPR. ©2015 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Adrenaline (epinephrine) microcrystal sublingual tablet formulation: enhanced absorption in a preclinical model.

    PubMed

    Rawas-Qalaji, Mutasem; Rachid, Ousama; Mendez, Belacryst A; Losada, Annette; Simons, F Estelle R; Simons, Keith J

    2015-01-01

    For anaphylaxis treatment in community settings, adrenaline (epinephrine) administration using an auto-injector in the thigh is universally recommended. Despite this, many people at risk of anaphylaxis in community settings do not carry their prescribed auto-injectors consistently and hesitate to use them when anaphylaxis occurs.The objective of this research was to study the effect of a substantial reduction in adrenaline (Epi) particle size to a few micrometres (Epi microcrystals (Epi-MC)) on enhancing adrenaline dissolution and increasing the rate and extent of sublingual absorption from a previously developed rapidly disintegrating sublingual tablet (RDST) formulation in a validated preclinical model. The in-vivo absorption of Epi-MC 20 mg RDSTs and Epi 40 mg RDSTs was evaluated in rabbits. Epi 0.3 mg intramuscular (IM) injection in the thigh and placebo RDSTs were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. Epimean (standard deviation) area under the plasma concentration vs time curves up to 60 min and Cmax from Epi-MC 20 mg and Epi 40 mg RDSTs did not differ significantly (P > 0.05) from Epi 0.3 mg IM injection. After adrenaline, regardless of route of administration, pharmacokinetic parameters were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than after placebo RDSTs administration (reflecting endogenous adrenaline levels). Epi-MC RDSTs facilitated a twofold increase in Epi absorption and a 50% reduction in the sublingual dose. This novel sublingual tablet formulation is potentially useful for the first-aid treatment of anaphylaxis in community settings. © 2014 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  11. Comparing Adrenaline with Tranexamic Acid to Control Acute Endobronchial Bleeding: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Fekri, Mitra Samareh; Hashemi-Bajgani, Seyed Mehdy; Shafahi, Ahmad; Zarshenas, Rozita

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hemoptysis occurs due to either pulmonary diseases or bronchoscopy interventions. The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of the endobronchial instillation of adrenaline with that of tranexamic acid. Methods: Fifty patients were randomly selected as 2 double-blinded sample groups (n=25). In these patients, bleeding could not be controlled with cold saline lavage during bronchoscopy and they, therefore, required prescription of another medicine. Adrenaline (1 mg) in one group and tranexamic acid (500 mg) in the other group were diluted in 20 mL of normal saline and instilled through the bronchoscope. This technique was repeated 3 times at 90-second intervals, if necessary. In the case of persistent bleeding, 90 seconds after the last dose, a second medicine was given for bleeding control. Observation of clot through the bronchoscope meant that the bleeding had stopped. The efficacy of tranexamic acid and adrenaline was evaluated and then compared using the Mann–Whitney test. Results: The time of bleeding control had no significant difference between tranexamic acid and adrenaline (P=0.908). Another analysis was done to evaluate bleeding control with a second medicine; the results showed that 1 (4%) patient in the tranexamic acid and 8 (32%) in the adrenaline group needed the second medicine and there was no significant difference between the 2 groups (P=0.609). Conclusion: Our results suggested that tranexamic acid by endobronchial instillation was as efficient as adrenaline in controlling hemoptysis and required less frequent use of a second medicine. Trial Registration Number: IRCT2014120220188 PMID:28360438

  12. Comparing Adrenaline with Tranexamic Acid to Control Acute Endobronchial Bleeding: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Fekri, Mitra Samareh; Hashemi-Bajgani, Seyed Mehdy; Shafahi, Ahmad; Zarshenas, Rozita

    2017-03-01

    Hemoptysis occurs due to either pulmonary diseases or bronchoscopy interventions. The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of the endobronchial instillation of adrenaline with that of tranexamic acid. Fifty patients were randomly selected as 2 double-blinded sample groups (n=25). In these patients, bleeding could not be controlled with cold saline lavage during bronchoscopy and they, therefore, required prescription of another medicine. Adrenaline (1 mg) in one group and tranexamic acid (500 mg) in the other group were diluted in 20 mL of normal saline and instilled through the bronchoscope. This technique was repeated 3 times at 90-second intervals, if necessary. In the case of persistent bleeding, 90 seconds after the last dose, a second medicine was given for bleeding control. Observation of clot through the bronchoscope meant that the bleeding had stopped. The efficacy of tranexamic acid and adrenaline was evaluated and then compared using the Mann-Whitney test. The time of bleeding control had no significant difference between tranexamic acid and adrenaline (P=0.908). Another analysis was done to evaluate bleeding control with a second medicine; the results showed that 1 (4%) patient in the tranexamic acid and 8 (32%) in the adrenaline group needed the second medicine and there was no significant difference between the 2 groups (P=0.609). Our results suggested that tranexamic acid by endobronchial instillation was as efficient as adrenaline in controlling hemoptysis and required less frequent use of a second medicine. Trial Registration Number: IRCT2014120220188.

  13. Correlations between plasma noradrenaline concentrations, antioxidants, and neutrophil counts after submaximal resistance exercise in men

    PubMed Central

    Ramel, A; Wagner, K; Elmadfa, I

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate noradrenaline concentrations, neutrophil counts, plasma antioxidants, and lipid oxidation products before and after acute resistance exercise. Methods: 17 male participants undertook a submaximal resistance exercise circuit (10 exercises; 75% of the one repetition maximum; mean (SD) exercise time, 18.6 (1.1) minutes). Blood samples were taken before and immediately after exercise and analysed for plasma antioxidants, noradrenaline, neutrophils, and lipid oxidation products. Wilcoxon's signed-rank test and Pearson's correlation coefficient were used for calculations. Results: Neutrophils, noradrenaline, fat soluble antioxidants, and lipid oxidation products increased after exercise. Noradrenaline concentrations were associated with higher antioxidant concentrations. Neutrophils were related to higher concentrations of conjugated dienes. Conclusions: Submaximal resistance exercise increases plasma antioxidants. This might reflect enhanced antioxidant defence in response to the oxidative stress of exercise, though this is not efficient for inhibiting lipid oxidation. The correlation between noradrenaline concentrations and plasma antioxidants suggests a modulating role of the stress hormone. Neutrophils are a possible source of oxidative stress after resistance exercise. PMID:15388566

  14. Single-unit muscle sympathetic nervous activity and its relation to cardiac noradrenaline spillover

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Elisabeth A; Schlaich, Markus P; Dawood, Tye; Sari, Carolina; Chopra, Reena; Barton, David A; Kaye, David M; Elam, Mikael; Esler, Murray D; Lambert, Gavin W

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Recent work using single-unit sympathetic nerve recording techniques has demonstrated aberrations in the firing pattern of sympathetic nerves in a variety of patient groups. We sought to examine whether nerve firing pattern is associated with increased noradrenaline release. Using single-unit muscle sympathetic nerve recording techniques coupled with direct cardiac catheterisation and noradrenaline isotope dilution methodology we examined the relationship between single-unit firing patterns and cardiac and whole body noradrenaline spillover to plasma. Participants comprised patients with hypertension (n = 6), depression (n = 7) and panic disorder (n = 9) who were drawn from our ongoing studies. The patient groups examined did not differ in their single-unit muscle sympathetic nerve firing characteristics nor in the rate of spillover of noradrenaline to plasma from the heart. The median incidence of multiple spikes per beat was 9%. Patients were stratified according to the firing pattern: low level of incidence (less than 9% incidence of multiple spikes per beat) and high level of incidence (greater than 9% incidence of multiple spikes per beat). High incidence of multiple spikes within a cardiac cycle was associated with higher firing rates (P < 0.0001) and increased probability of firing (P < 0.0001). Whole body noradrenaline spillover to plasma and (multi-unit) muscle sympathetic nerve activity in subjects with low incidence of multiple spikes was not different to that of those with high incidence of multiple spikes. In those with high incidence of multiple spikes there occurred a parallel activation of the sympathetic outflow to the heart, with cardiac noradrenaline spillover to plasma being two times that of subjects with low nerve firing rates (11.0 ± 1.5 vs. 22.0 ± 4.5 ng min−1, P < 0.05). This study indicates that multiple within-burst firing and increased single-unit firing rates of the sympathetic outflow to the skeletal muscle vasculature is

  15. Effects of plasma adrenaline on hormone-sensitive lipase at rest and during moderate exercise in human skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Matthew J; Stellingwerff, Trent; Heigenhauser, George J F; Spriet, Lawrence L

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the effect of increased plasma adrenaline on hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) activity and extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 phosphorylation during exercise. Seven untrained men rested for 20 min and exercised for 10 min at 60 % peak pulmonary oxygen uptake on three occasions: with adrenaline infusion throughout rest and exercise (ADR), with no adrenaline infusion (CON) and with adrenaline infusion commencing after 3 min of exercise (EX+ADR). Muscle samples were obtained at rest before (Pre, −20 min) and after (0 min) infusion, and at 3 and 10 min of cycling. Exogenous adrenaline infusion increased (P < 0.05) plasma adrenaline at rest during ADR, which resulted in greater HSL activity (Pre, 2.14 ± 0.10 mmol min−1 (kg dry matter (dm))−1; 0 min, 2.74 ± 0.20 mmol min−1 (kg dm)−1). Subsequent exercise had no effect on HSL activity. During exercise in CON, HSL activity was increased (P < 0.05) above rest at 3 min but was not increased further by 10 min. The infusion of exogenous adrenaline at 3 min of exercise in EX+ADR resulted in a marked elevation in plasma adrenaline levels (3 min, 0.57 ± 0.12 nM; 10 min, 10.08 ± 0.84 nM) and increased HSL activity by 25 %. HSL activity at 10 min was greater (P < 0.05) in EX+ADR compared with CON. There were no changes between trials in the plasma concentrations of insulin and free fatty acids (FFA) and the muscle contents of free AMP, all putative regulators of HSL activity. ERK1/2 phosphorylation increased at 3 min in CON and EX+ADR. Because HSL activity did not increase during exercise when adrenaline was infused prior to exercise (ADR) and because HSL activity increased when adrenaline was infused during exercise (EX+ADR), we conclude that (1) high adrenaline levels can stimulate HSL activity regardless of the metabolic milieu and (2) large increases in adrenaline during exercise, independent of changes in other putative regulators, are able to further stimulate the contraction-induced increase

  16. Co-release of noradrenaline and dopamine in the cerebral cortex elicited by single train and repeated train stimulation of the locus coeruleus

    PubMed Central

    Devoto, Paola; Flore, Giovanna; Saba, Pierluigi; Fà, Mauro; Gessa, Gian Luigi

    2005-01-01

    Background Previous studies by our group suggest that extracellular dopamine (DA) and noradrenaline (NA) may be co-released from noradrenergic nerve terminals in the cerebral cortex. We recently demonstrated that the concomitant release of DA and NA could be elicited in the cerebral cortex by electrical stimulation of the locus coeruleus (LC). This study analyses the effect of both single train and repeated electrical stimulation of LC on NA and DA release in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), occipital cortex (Occ), and caudate nucleus. To rule out possible stressful effects of electrical stimulation, experiments were performed on chloral hydrate anaesthetised rats. Results Twenty min electrical stimulation of the LC, with burst type pattern of pulses, increased NA and DA both in the mPFC and in the Occ. NA in both cortices and DA in the mPFC returned to baseline within 20 min after the end of the stimulation period, while DA in the Occ reached a maximum increase during 20 min post-stimulation and remained higher than baseline values at 220 min post-stimulation. Local perfusion with tetrodotoxin (TTX, 10 μM) markedly reduced baseline NA and DA in the mPFC and Occ and totally suppressed the effect of electrical stimulation in both areas. A sequence of five 20 min stimulations at 20 min intervals were delivered to the LC. Each stimulus increased NA to the same extent and duration as the first stimulus, whereas DA remained elevated at the time next stimulus was delivered, so that baseline DA progressively increased in the mPFC and Occ to reach about 130 and 200% the initial level, respectively. In the presence of the NA transport (NAT) blocker desipramine (DMI, 100 μM), multiple LC stimulation still increased extracellular NA and DA levels. Electrical stimulation of the LC increased NA levels in the homolateral caudate nucleus, but failed to modify DA level. Conclusion The results confirm and extend that LC stimulation induces a concomitant release of DA and NA

  17. Importance of beta 2-adrenoceptor stimulation in the suppression of intradermal antigen challenge by adrenaline.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, J B; Pixley, F J; Dollery, C T

    1989-01-01

    1. Seven atopic subjects received two injections of antigen and one of saline intradermally in the back on each of 4 separate days. They were pretreated with four different drug combinations: (a) adrenaline 0.3 mg subcutaneously over the deltoid muscle (b) subcutaneous adrenaline preceded by 5 mg of the specific beta 2-adrenoceptor antagonist ICI 118,551 orally (c) 8 mg of salbutamol orally (d) placebo. Tablets were given 2 h before and subcutaneous injections 15 min before the intradermal injections of saline and antigen. 2. The median flare response to intradermal low dose antigen and high dose antigen after pretreatment with adrenaline was 4% and 49% of the response seen following pretreatment with placebo (P less than 0.001). When adrenaline was preceded by ICI-118,551, the corresponding median flare responses were 2% and 44% (P less than 0.001) of the placebo response. The flare response after pretreatment with salbutamol was not significantly different from placebo. 3. Adrenaline suppressed the median weal response to the higher dose of antigen to 52% of the response after pretreatment with placebo (P less than 0.05). This suppression by adrenaline was blocked by pretreatment with ICI 118,551. The median weal response after the highest dose of antigen was suppressed by salbutamol to 66% of the response seen after placebo, although this was not significant even when a further three subjects were studied with either salbutamol or placebo.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2565729

  18. Identifying binding modes of two synthetic derivatives of adrenalin to the α2C-adrenoceptor by using molecular modeling; insights into the α2C-adrenoceptor activation.

    PubMed

    Gholami, Samira; Bordbar, A Khalegh; Lohrasebi, Amir

    2017-04-01

    Although, α2C adrenergic receptor (AR) mediates a number of physiological functions in vivo and has great therapeutic potential, the absence of its crystal structure is a major difficulty in the activation mechanism studies and drug design endeavors. Here, a homology model of α2C AR has been presented by means of multiple sequence alignment. The used templates were the latest crystal structures of the other ARs (Protein Data Bank IDs: 2R4R, 2RH1, 4GPO, 3P0G, 4BVN and 4LDO) that have 38.4% identity with the query. We then conducted docking simulations to understand and analyze the binding of noradrenaline (NOR), and its derivatives, namely arachidonoyl adrenalin (AA-AD) and arachidonoyl noradrenalin (AA-NOR) to the receptor. The existence of H-bonds between the ligands and SER218 residue implies the same binding site of derivatives with respect to the NOR. AA-AD and AA-NOR bind to the receptor with the larger binding affinities. The presence of salt bridge between ARG149 and GLU377 in the free receptor, obtained from molecular dynamics studies proved that the receptor still is in its basal state before binding process take places. The activation process is characterized by increasing in the RMSD values of the backbone receptor in the bound state, increasing the RMSF of the transmembrane involved in the activation process and the disappearance of the ARG149-GLU377 salt bridge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Neural injury after use of vasopressin and adrenaline during porcine cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Halvorsen, Peter; Sharma, Hari Shanker; Basu, Samar

    2015-01-01

    Background Our aim was to investigate cerebral and cardiac tissue injury subsequent to use of vasopressin and adrenaline in combination compared with vasopressin alone during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Methods In a randomized, prospective, laboratory animal study 28 anesthetized piglets were subject to a 12-min untreated cardiac arrest and subsequent CPR. After 1 min of CPR, 10 of the piglets received 0.4 U/kg of arg8-vasopressin (V group), and 10 piglets received 0.4 U/kg of arg8-vasopressin, 1 min later followed by 20 µg/kg body weight of adrenaline, and another 1 min later continuous administration (10 µg/kg/min) of adrenaline (VA group). After 8 min of CPR, the piglets were defibrillated and monitored for another 3 h. Then they were killed and the brain immediately removed pending histological analysis. Results During CPR, the VA group had higher mean blood pressure and cerebral cortical blood flow (CCBF) but similar coronary perfusion pressure. After restoration of spontaneous circulation there was no difference in the pressure variables, but CCBF tended to be (36% ± 16%) higher in the V group. Neuronal injury and signs of a disrupted blood–brain barrier (BBB) were greater, 20% ± 4% and 21% ± 4%, respectively, in the VA group. In a background study of repeated single doses of adrenaline every third minute after 5 min arrest but otherwise the same protocol, histological measurements showed even worse neural injury and disruption of the BBB. Conclusion Combined use of vasopressin and adrenaline caused greater signs of cerebral and cardiac injury than use of vasopressin alone during experimental cardiopulmonary resuscitation. PMID:25645317

  20. Neural injury after use of vasopressin and adrenaline during porcine cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Halvorsen, Peter; Sharma, Hari Shanker; Basu, Samar; Wiklund, Lars

    2015-03-01

    Our aim was to investigate cerebral and cardiac tissue injury subsequent to use of vasopressin and adrenaline in combination compared with vasopressin alone during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). In a randomized, prospective, laboratory animal study 28 anesthetized piglets were subject to a 12-min untreated cardiac arrest and subsequent CPR. After 1 min of CPR, 10 of the piglets received 0.4 U/kg of arg(8)-vasopressin (V group), and 10 piglets received 0.4 U/kg of arg(8)-vasopressin, 1 min later followed by 20 µg/kg body weight of adrenaline, and another 1 min later continuous administration (10 µg/kg/min) of adrenaline (VA group). After 8 min of CPR, the piglets were defibrillated and monitored for another 3 h. Then they were killed and the brain immediately removed pending histological analysis. During CPR, the VA group had higher mean blood pressure and cerebral cortical blood flow (CCBF) but similar coronary perfusion pressure. After restoration of spontaneous circulation there was no difference in the pressure variables, but CCBF tended to be (36% ± 16%) higher in the V group. Neuronal injury and signs of a disrupted blood-brain barrier (BBB) were greater, 20% ± 4% and 21% ± 4%, respectively, in the VA group. In a background study of repeated single doses of adrenaline every third minute after 5 min arrest but otherwise the same protocol, histological measurements showed even worse neural injury and disruption of the BBB. Combined use of vasopressin and adrenaline caused greater signs of cerebral and cardiac injury than use of vasopressin alone during experimental cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  1. Adrenaline administration promotes the efficiency of granulocyte colony stimulating factor-mediated hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell mobilization in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chong; Cao, Jiang; Song, Xuguang; Zeng, Lingyu; Li, Zhenyu; Li, Yong; Xu, Kailin

    2013-01-01

    A high dose of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is widely used to mobilize hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC), but G-CSF is relatively inefficient and may cause adverse effects. Recently, adrenaline has been found to play important roles in HSPC mobilization. In this study, we explored whether adrenaline combined with G-CSF could induce HSPC mobilization in a mouse model. Mice were treated with adrenaline and either a high or low dose of G-CSF alone or in combination. Peripheral blood HSPC counts were evaluated by flow cytometry. Levels of bone marrow SDF-1 were measured by ELISA, the transcription of CXCR4 and SDF-1 was measured by real-time RT-PCR, and CXCR4 protein was detected by Western blot. Our results showed that adrenaline alone fails to mobilize HSPCs into the peripheral blood; however, when G-CSF and adrenaline are combined, the WBC counts and percentages of HSPCs are significantly higher compared to those in mice that received G-CSF alone. The combined use of adrenaline and G-CSF not only accelerated HSPC mobilization, but also enabled the efficient mobilization of HSPCs into the peripheral blood at lower doses of G-CSF. Adrenaline/G-CSF treatment also extensively downregulated levels of SDF-1 and CXCR4 in mouse bone marrow. These results demonstrated that adrenaline combined with G-CSF can induce HSPC mobilization by down-regulating the CXCR4/SDF-1 axis, indicating that the use of adrenaline may enable the use of reduced dosages or durations of G-CSF treatment, minimizing G-CSF-associated complications.

  2. Stimulants and growth in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Negrao, Bianca Lee; Viljoen, Margaretha

    2011-07-01

    Initial suggestions that suppression of growth may be an intrinsic characteristic of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have now largely been disproven. Although controversy persists regarding the possible negative effect of adrenergic stimulants on growth in children with ADHD, the consensus that appears to be reached in the scientific literature is that stimulant usage may cause a manageable attenuation of growth in these children. Since it is known that stimulants increase the amount of dopamine and noradrenaline in the synapse, this writing suggests that these increases in dopamine and noradrenaline are responsible for the growth attenuation in these children. It appears that increased amounts of dopamine and noradrenaline have the ability to inhibit the secretion of growth hormone and growth-related hormones such as prolactin, thyroid hormones, sex hormones and insulin. Therefore, it would be reasonable to suggest that the increases in dopamine and noradrenaline caused by stimulant usage can disrupt the homeostasis of both growth hormone and growth-related hormones, generating the potential for the suppression of growth. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of Initial Response of Nebulized Salbutamol and Adrenaline in Infants and young Children Admitted with Acute Bronchiolitis.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, S; Thapa, P; Rao, K S; Bk, G

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute bronchiolitis is common cause of hospitalization in infants and young children. There are widespread variations in the diagnosis and management. Despite the use of bronchodilators for decades, there is lack of consensus for the benefit of one above another. Objective To compare initial response of nebulized adrenaline and salbutamol. Method Children aged two months to two years admitted with acute bronchiolitis in the department of Paediatrics of Manipal teaching hospital, Pokhara, Nepal, from 1st March 2014 to 28th February 2015 were enrolled. Patients fulfilling inclusion criteria received either adrenaline or salbutamol nebulization. Data were collected in a predesigned proforma. Respiratory distress assessment instrument (RDAI) scores were considered primary outcome measure and respiratory rate at 48 hours, duration of hospital stay, requirement of supplemental oxygen and intravenous fluid were considered secondary outcome measure. Result A total of 40 patients were enrolled in each study group. Mean RDAI scores at admission was in 9.75 with (CI- 9.01, 10.49) in adrenaline and 9.77 (CI- 9.05, 10.50) in salbutamol group. There was gradual decline in mean RDAI scores in both the groups over 48 hours to 4.15 (CI- 3.57,4.73) and 4.13 (CI- 3.69,4.56) in adrenaline and salbutamol group respectively. Hospital stay was 5.32 days in adrenaline and 5.68 days in salbutamol group. Patients nebulized with adrenaline required oxygen for 33.30 hours compared with 36.45 hours in salbutamol. Intravenous fluid duration was also less in adrenaline group compared to salbutamol group (33.15 vs 37.80 hours). Conclusion Patients of acute bronchiolitis nebulized with either salbutamol or adrenaline experienced similar decline in RDAI scores in the first 48 hours. Duration of supplementary oxygen and intravenous fluid was less in adrenaline group compared with salbutamol group.

  4. Adhesion of human platelets to albumin is synergistically increased by lysophosphatidic acid and adrenaline in a donor-dependent fashion.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Andreas C; Whiss, Per A; Nilsson, Ulrika K

    2006-07-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and adrenaline are weak platelet activators considered important for thrombus formation, and were previously shown to synergistically increase platelet aggregation. Here we investigate synergistic activation by LPA and adrenaline when measuring platelet adhesion. Platelet-rich plasma from healthy blood donors together with adrenaline and/or LPA were added to protein-coated microplates. Platelets were allowed to adhere and the amount of adhesion detected enzymatically. The LPA and adrenaline combination induced a synergistic increase of platelet adhesion to a normally non-adhesive albumin surface. The degree of synergy varied markedly between individuals; these variations could not be explained by age, gender, blood type or different amounts of platelets, oxidized low-density lipoprotein, insulin or glucose in plasma. There was a trend indicating increased synergistic effect for platelets sensitive to adrenaline stimulation. The synergistic effect was blocked by the alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine and inhibited by the ADP scavenger system creatine phosphate/creatine phosphokinase and antibodies against alphaIIbbeta3. Furthermore, platelets adhering to albumin after adrenaline and LPA treatment expressed P-selectin. In conclusion, LPA and adrenaline act synergistically to increase alphaIIbbeta3-mediated platelet adhesion to albumin, dependent on alpha2-adrenoceptor signalling and platelet secretion. We also confirm that synergistic platelet activation achieved with LPA and adrenaline is highly donor dependent.

  5. THE EFFECT OF PAINTING THE PANCREAS WITH ADRENALIN UPON HYPERGLYCEMIA AND GLYCOSURIA

    PubMed Central

    Kleiner, Israel S.; Meltzer, S. J.

    1918-01-01

    After Blum's discovery of the production of glycosuria by the subcutaneous injection of adrenal extract, Herter has the merit of having found that injection of adrenalin into the peritoneal cavity also produces glycosuria; this is an undeniable fact. Concerning Herter's claim that intraperitoneal injection gives a higher degree of glycosuria than subcutaneous or intravenous injection, we offer no comment since we have made no observations on the glycosuric effect of subcutaneous injection of adrenalin, while we have made only three experiments by intraperitoneal injection. The most we can predicate on the basis of the present experiments is that intraperitoneal injection of adrenalin produces a somewhat higher degree of glycosuria than could be anticipated. However, in an earlier study carried out several years ago we arrived at the conception that the more slowly adrenalin was absorbed from the tissues into the circulation, the greater was its glycosuric effect; hence an intramuscular injection, which in its effect is nearly equal to that of an intravenous injection, induced a glycosuria definitely smaller than that set up by a similar dose administered subcutaneously. Unless the absorption from the peritoneal cavity is shown to be different from the absorption from subcutaneous injections, there could be no reason to assume that the glycosuric effect of intraperitoneal injection is much greater than that of subcutaneous injection. We might add that our former experiments do not support Herter's view that subcutaneous injection of adrenalin yields only slight degrees of glycosuria, because it is largely oxidized before entering the circulation. A difference exists in the effects upon blood pressure and upon sugar production, depending upon the mode of administration of adrenalin. With regard to the sugar production, a subcutaneous injection has a definitely greater effect than an intravenous injection; with regard to the blood pressure effect, however, the

  6. THE EFFECT OF PAINTING THE PANCREAS WITH ADRENALIN UPON HYPERGLYCEMIA AND GLYCOSURIA.

    PubMed

    Kleiner, I S; Meltzer, S J

    1918-06-01

    After Blum's discovery of the production of glycosuria by the subcutaneous injection of adrenal extract, Herter has the merit of having found that injection of adrenalin into the peritoneal cavity also produces glycosuria; this is an undeniable fact. Concerning Herter's claim that intraperitoneal injection gives a higher degree of glycosuria than subcutaneous or intravenous injection, we offer no comment since we have made no observations on the glycosuric effect of subcutaneous injection of adrenalin, while we have made only three experiments by intraperitoneal injection. The most we can predicate on the basis of the present experiments is that intraperitoneal injection of adrenalin produces a somewhat higher degree of glycosuria than could be anticipated. However, in an earlier study carried out several years ago we arrived at the conception that the more slowly adrenalin was absorbed from the tissues into the circulation, the greater was its glycosuric effect; hence an intramuscular injection, which in its effect is nearly equal to that of an intravenous injection, induced a glycosuria definitely smaller than that set up by a similar dose administered subcutaneously. Unless the absorption from the peritoneal cavity is shown to be different from the absorption from subcutaneous injections, there could be no reason to assume that the glycosuric effect of intraperitoneal injection is much greater than that of subcutaneous injection. We might add that our former experiments do not support Herter's view that subcutaneous injection of adrenalin yields only slight degrees of glycosuria, because it is largely oxidized before entering the circulation. A difference exists in the effects upon blood pressure and upon sugar production, depending upon the mode of administration of adrenalin. With regard to the sugar production, a subcutaneous injection has a definitely greater effect than an intravenous injection; with regard to the blood pressure effect, however, the

  7. [Urinary excretion of catecholamines in obese subjects and in diabetics (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Giorgino, R; Nardelli, G M; Scardapane, R

    1976-03-01

    95 obese subjects, 40 diabetics and 22 normal controls were investigated. The weight of all obese subjects was at least 20% higher than the ideal weight. Catecholamine excretion was determined a few days after hospitalization to minimize the influence of environmental changes. Spectrofluorimetric estimation of adrenaline and noradrenaline in the urine was carried out according to the method of von Euler and Lihajko. Statistical analysis of the results showed a significant increase in both adrenaline and noradrenaline excretion in the group of obeses subjects compared with the diabetics. The increased catecholamine excretion may represent the response of the adrenal medulla to the stress of the disease. Such an increase may be responsible for perpheral insulin resistence and hence acts as a diabetogenic factor. The results obtained emphasize the influence of catecholamines on insulin responsiveness, possibly constituting a major contribution to the diabetic state.

  8. Role of catecholamines and nitric oxide on pigment displacement of the chromatophores of freshwater snakehead teleost fish, Channa punctatus.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Saikat P; Jadhao, Arun G; Palande, Nikhil V

    2014-04-01

    We are reporting for the first time that the catecholamines (adrenaline and noradrenaline) inhibit the effect of nitric oxide (NO) on melanosome dispersion in freshly isolated scales of the freshwater snakehead fish, Channa punctatus. We studied the effect of NO and catecholamines on the pigment displacement by observing the changes in the melanophore index. The scales when treated with solution containing NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) showed dispersion of melanosomes, whereas NO synthase blocker N-omega-Nitro-L-arginine suppresses this action of SNP. Treatment with adrenaline and noradrenaline on the isolated scales caused aggregation of melanosomes. Scales treated with solution containing catecholamines and SNP resulted in aggregation of melanosomes suggesting that catecholamines mask the effect of SNP. These results suggest that the catecholamines are inhibiting the effect of NO and causing the aggregation of the melanosomes may be via surface receptors.

  9. Adrenaline auto-injectors for the treatment of anaphylaxis with and without cardiovascular collapse in the community.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Aziz; Simons, F Estelle R; Barbour, Victoria; Worth, Allison

    2012-08-15

    Anaphylaxis is a serious hypersensitivity reaction that is rapid in onset and may cause death. Adrenaline (epinephrine) auto-injectors are recommended as the initial, potentially life-saving treatment of choice for anaphylaxis in the community, but they are not universally available and have limitations in their use. To assess the effectiveness of adrenaline (epinephrine) auto-injectors in relieving respiratory, cardiovascular, and other symptoms during episodes of anaphylaxis that occur in the community. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 1), MEDLINE (Ovid SP) (1950 to January 2012), EMBASE (Ovid SP) (1980 to January 2012 ), CINAHL (EBSCO host) (1982 to January 2012 ), AMED (EBSCO host) (1985 to January 2012 ), LILACS, (BIREME) (1980 to January 2012 ), ISI Web of Science (1950 to January 2012 ). We adapted our search terms for other databases. We also searched websites listing on-going trials: the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, the UK Clinical Research Network Study Portfolio, and the meta Register of Controlled Trials; and contacted pharmaceutical companies who manufacture adrenaline auto-injectors in an attempt to locate unpublished material. Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials comparing auto-injector administration of adrenaline with any control including no intervention, placebo, or other adrenergic agonists were eligible for inclusion. Two authors independently assessed articles for inclusion. None of the 1328 studies that were identified satisfied the inclusion criteria. Based on this review, we cannot make any new recommendations on the effectiveness of adrenaline auto-injectors for the treatment of anaphylaxis. Although randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials of high methodological quality are necessary to define the true extent of benefits from the administration of adrenaline in anaphylaxis via an auto

  10. Pharmacokinetics of Lidocaine Hydrochloride Administered with or without Adrenaline for the Paravertebral Brachial Plexus Block in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Choquette, Amélie; Troncy, Eric; Guillot, Martin; Varin, France; Del Castillo, Jérôme R E

    2017-01-01

    Adrenaline is known to prolong the duration of local anesthesia but its effects on the pharmacokinetic processes of local anesthetic drugs are not fully understood. Our objective was to develop a compartmental model for quantification of adrenaline's impact on the pharmacokinetics of perineurally-injected lidocaine in the dog. Dogs were subjected to paravertebral brachial plexus block using lidocaine alone or adrenalinated lidocaine. Data was collected through a prospective, randomised, blinded crossover protocol performed over three periods. Blood samples were collected during 180 minutes following block execution. Compartmental pharmacokinetic models were developed and their goodness-of-fit were compared. The lowering effects of adrenaline on the absorption of lidocaine were statistically determined with one-sided tests. A one-compartment disposition model with two successive zero-order absorption processes best fitted our experimental data. Adrenaline decreased the peak plasma lidocaine concentration by approximately 60% (P < 0.001), decreased this local anesthetic's fast and slow zero-order absorption rates respectively by 50% and 90% (P = 0.046, and P < 0.001), which respective durations were prolonged by 90% and 1300% (P < 0.020 and P < 0.001). Lidocaine demonstrated a previously unreported atypical absorption profile following its paravertebral injection in dogs. Adrenaline decreased the absorption rate of lidocaine and prolonged the duration of its absorption.

  11. Patients' ability to treat anaphylaxis using adrenaline autoinjectors: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Umasunthar, T; Procktor, A; Hodes, M; Smith, J G; Gore, C; Cox, H E; Marrs, T; Hanna, H; Phillips, K; Pinto, C; Turner, P J; Warner, J O; Boyle, R J

    2015-07-01

    Previous work has shown patients commonly misuse adrenaline autoinjectors (AAI). It is unclear whether this is due to inadequate training, or poor device design. We undertook a prospective randomized controlled trial to evaluate ability to administer adrenaline using different AAI devices. We allocated mothers of food-allergic children prescribed an AAI for the first time to Anapen or EpiPen using a computer-generated randomization list, with optimal training according to manufacturer's instructions. After one year, participants were randomly allocated a new device (EpiPen, Anapen, new EpiPen, JEXT or Auvi-Q), without device-specific training. We assessed ability to deliver adrenaline using their AAI in a simulated anaphylaxis scenario six weeks and one year after initial training, and following device switch. Primary outcome was successful adrenaline administration at six weeks, assessed by an independent expert. Secondary outcomes were success at one year, success after switching device, and adverse events. We randomized 158 participants. At six weeks, 30 of 71 (42%) participants allocated to Anapen and 31 of 73 (43%) participants allocated to EpiPen were successful - RR 1.00 (95% CI 0.68-1.46). Success rates at one year were also similar, but digital injection was more common at one year with EpiPen (8/59, 14%) than Anapen (0/51, 0%, P = 0.007). When switched to a new device without specific training, success rates were higher with Auvi-Q (26/28, 93%) than other devices (39/80, 49%; P < 0.001). AAI device design is a major determinant of successful adrenaline administration. Success rates were low with several devices, but were high using the audio-prompt device Auvi-Q. © 2015 The Authors Allergy Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The influences of adrenaline dosing frequency and dosage on outcomes of adult in-hospital cardiac arrest: A retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chih-Hung; Huang, Chien-Hua; Chang, Wei-Tien; Tsai, Min-Shan; Yu, Ping-Hsun; Wu, Yen-Wen; Hung, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Wen-Jone

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the influence of dosing frequency and dosage of adrenaline on outcomes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We conducted a retrospective observational study in a single medical centre and included adult patients who had suffered an in-hospital cardiac arrest between 2006 and 2012. We used multivariable logistic regression analysis to evaluate the associations between independent variables and outcomes. Adrenaline average dosing frequency was calculated as the total dosage of adrenaline administered during CPR divided by the duration of CPR. Body weight (BW) was analysed as an interaction term to investigate the effect of adrenaline dosage on outcomes. Favourable neurological outcome was defined as a score of 1 or 2 on the Cerebral Performance Category scale at hospital discharge. We included 896 patients in the analysis. After adjusting for multiple confounding factors, including CPR duration, the results indicated that higher adrenaline dosing frequency was associated with lower rates of survival (odds ratio (OR): 0.05, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.01-0.23) and favourable neurological outcome at hospital discharge (OR: 0.02, 95% CI: 0.002-0.16). A significant interaction was noted between total adrenaline dosage and BW, which indicated that, with the same adrenaline dosage, the outcomes for patients with BW≥82.5kg would be worse than those for patients with lower BW. Higher adrenaline average dosing frequency may be associated with worse outcomes after CPR. Besides, according to current recommendations, patients with BW above 82.5kg may not receive adequate dose of adrenaline. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Emergency due to allergy: the therapy--adrenaline for physicians and patients].

    PubMed

    Fricker, M; Helbling, A

    2005-06-01

    Emergency due to allergy may proceed within minutes to life-threatening respiratory and circulatory problems. Therefore, after diagnosis prompt and correct therapy might be vital. Because of its effect on alpha-, beta1-, and beta2-receptors, adrenaline is the treatment of choice in emergency due to allergy. For fear of cardiovascular side effects, often adrenaline is withheld even in case of anaphylaxis. If given properly such as an intramuscular injection the danger of undesirable side effects, however, is small. After a systemic, allergic reaction each patient needs to be equipped with rescue medications. If an adrenaline-containing device is prescribed--nowadays with EpiPen and the metered-dose inhaler Primatene Mist 2 systems are available--, the patient must get a correct instruction in its use. In case of a severe allergic reaction, antihistamines and corticosteroids are given in second line. Following any systemic allergy, an allergological work-up should be required. Only through exact diagnosis and profound patient's education, recurrences can be avoided, and in some cases, specific immunotherapy is indicated.

  14. Deletion of muscarinic type 1 acetylcholine receptors alters splenic lymphocyte functions and splenic noradrenaline concentration.

    PubMed

    Hainke, Susanne; Wildmann, Johannes; Del Rey, Adriana

    2015-11-01

    The existence of interactions between the immune and the sympathetic nervous systems is well established. Noradrenaline can promote or inhibit the immune response, and conversely, the immune response itself can affect noradrenaline concentration in lymphoid organs, such as the spleen. It is also well known that acetylcholine released by pre-ganglionic neurons can modulate noradrenaline release by the postsynaptic neuron. The spleen does not receive cholinergic innervation, but it has been reported that lymphocytes themselves can produce acetylcholine, and express acetylcholine receptors and acetylcholinesterase. We found that the spleen of not overtly immunized mice in which muscarinic type 1 acetylcholine receptors have been knocked out (M1KO) has higher noradrenaline concentrations than that of the wildtype mice, without comparable alterations in the heart, in parallel to a decreased number of IgG-producing B cells. Splenic lymphocytes from M1KO mice displayed increased in vitro-induced cytotoxicity, and this was observed only when CD4(+) T cells were present. In contrast, heterozygous acetylcholinesterase (AChE+/-) mice, had no alterations in splenic noradrenaline concentration, but the in vitro proliferation of AChE+/- CD4(+) T cells was increased. It is theoretically conceivable that reciprocal effects between neuronally and non-neuronally derived acetylcholine and noradrenaline might contribute to the results reported. Our results emphasize the need to consider the balance between the effects of these mediators for the final immunoregulatory outcome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Night-rest urinary catecholamine excretion in relation to aspects of free time, work and background data in a teacher group.

    PubMed

    Kinnunen, U; Vihko, V

    1991-01-01

    Free time, work and background data were related to night-rest catecholamine excretion rates in a teacher group (n = 137) during an autumn term. The explained interindividual variance increased slightly towards the end of the term. Adrenaline excretion was predicted better than noradrenaline, notedly by coffee consumption, amount of physical activity, and subjective stress feelings which explained 16% of the variance in adrenaline excretion during night rest. However, the results indicated that the differences in catecholamine excretion during night rest remained mostly unpredictable.

  16. [The Effectiveness of Epidural Droperidol for Prophylaxis of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting: A Comparative Study of Droperidol and Adrenaline].

    PubMed

    Toyonaga, Shinya; Shinozuka, Norihiro; Dobashi, Tamae; Iiyori, Nao; Sudo, Tomoko

    2016-05-01

    Intravenous droperidol has strong evidence for antiemetic efficacy in high risk patients for prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV). However it is not clear whether continuous epidural administration of doroperidol prevent PONV. It has been reported that epidural adrenaline decreases PONV; therefore we prospectively compared the effectiveness of epidural droperidol and adrenaline for prophylaxis of PONV. Eighty-six patients were scheduled for abdominal gynecological surgery under general-epidural anesthesia in the study. Patients were randomly assigned to droperidol group or adrenaline group. We investigated the incidences of PONV, the frequency of using the antiemetics. There was no statistical difference between the groups. The incidences of PONV were 27.9% (doropeidol group) and 58.1% (adrenaline group), respectively (P = 0.0046). The frequency of the anti-emetics use were 18.6% and 41.9%, respectively (P = 0.0189). There was one patient who needed cancellation of continuous epidural administration for vomiting in adrenaline group, but no patient in doropeidol group. The results suggest that epidural droperidol effectively decreases PONV in high risk patients. However epidural adrenaline might be ineffective.

  17. Repeated cycles of electrical stimulation decrease vasoconstriction and axon-reflex vasodilation to noradrenaline in the human forearm

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Peter D

    2007-01-01

    What is already known about this subject Repeated cycles of electrical stimulation inhibit cutaneous vasoconstriction to noradrenaline, but the mechanism is unknown. Investigating this is important because peripheral electrical stimulation is useful for pain modulation and appears to assist cutaneous wound healing. What this study adds Intermittent, brief electrical stimulation of the forearm over a 10-day period inhibited vasoconstriction and axon-reflex vasodilation to noradrenaline, but did not affect vasoconstriction to vasopressin or axon-reflex vasodilation to histamine. Thus, electrical stimulation may evoke a specific reduction in responsiveness to noradrenaline. Aim To investigate whether desensitization to the vasomotor effects of noradrenaline is a specific effect of electrical stimulation. Methods Three sites on the forearm of 10 healthy volunteers were stimulated with 0.2 mA direct current for 2 min twice daily for 10 days. Noradrenaline and histamine were then displaced from ring-shaped iontophoresis chambers into two of the pretreated sites and two untreated sites on the contralateral forearm. Axon-reflex vasodilation was measured from the centre of the ring described by the iontophoresis chamber with a laser Doppler flowmeter. One or two days later, noradrenaline and vasopressin were introduced into pretreated and untreated sites by iontophoresis, and vasoconstriction at sites of administration was measured in the heated forearm. Results The pretreatment blocked vasoconstriction to noradrenaline [median increase in flow 1%, interquartile range (IR) −41 to 52%; median decrease at the untreated site 53%, IR. −70 to −10%; P < 0.05], but did not block vasoconstriction to vasopressin (median decrease 42% at the untreated site and 45% at the pretreated site). Axon-reflex vasodilation to noradrenaline was diminished at the pretreated site (median increase in flow 33%, IR 2–321%; untreated site 247%, IR 31–1087%; P < 0.05). However, axon

  18. Catecholaminergic System of Invertebrates: Comparative and Evolutionary Aspects in Comparison With the Octopaminergic System.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Valentina P; Accordi, Fiorenza; Chimenti, Claudio; Civinini, Annalena; Crivellato, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    In this review we examined the catecholaminergic system of invertebrates, starting from protists and getting to chordates. Different techniques used by numerous researchers revealed, in most examined phyla, the presence of catecholamines dopamine, noradrenaline, and adrenaline or of the enzymes involved in their synthesis. The catecholamines are generally linked to the nervous system and they can act as neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, and hormones; moreover they play a very important role as regards the response to a large number of stress situations. Nevertheless, in some invertebrate phyla belonging to Protostoma, the monoamine octopamine is the main biogenic amine. The presence of catecholamines in some protists suggests a role as intracellular or interorganismal signaling molecules and an ancient origin of their synthetic pathways. The catecholamines appear also involved in the regulation of bioluminescence and in the control of larval development and metamorphosis in some marine invertebrate phyla. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison of the efficacy of two combined therapies for peptic ulcer bleeding: adrenaline injection plus haemoclipping versus adrenaline injection followed by bipolar electrocoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Świdnicka-Siergiejko, Agnieszka; Wróblewski, Eugeniusz; Baniukiewicz, Andrzej; Dąbrowski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Peptic ulcer remains the most frequent cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Treatment of bleeding with simultaneous combination of two endoscopic techniques has proved to be more efficient than monotherapy. None of the published comparative studies of various contact coagulation modalities have confirmed the superiority of one of these techniques over the others. Aim To compare the therapeutic outcomes of the use of a device enabling both injection of adrenaline solution and bipolar electrocoagulation (A + BE) to those of combined adrenaline injection with mechanical therapy (haemostatic clips) (A + HC) in the treatment of peptic ulcer bleeding. Material and methods Fifty-two subjects with bleeding ulcers were assigned to the A + BE group, and 55 patients were treated with A + HC. Results Overall, treatment failed in 20 patients (20/107, 18.7%): in 10 individuals from the A + BE group (10/52; 18.2%) and in 10 individuals from the A + HC group (10/55; 19.2%) (p > 0.05). Primary haemostasis was not obtained in 7 patients (6.5%): in 4 patients in the A + BE group and in 3 patients in the A + HC group (p > 0.05). Ten individuals (9.3%) experienced recurrent bleeding during hospitalisation: 4 patients from the A + BE group and 6 patients from the A + HC group (p > 0.05). Finally, in 96.3% of the patients (n = 103) the endoscopic treatment proved efficient with regards to obtaining haemostasis during hospitalisation. Surgical intervention was required in 4 individuals (3.7%): 2 patients in the A + BE group and 2 patients treated with A + HC (p > 0.05). Three patients (2.8%) – all from the A + HC group – died during hospitalisation. No significant intergroup differences were documented with regards to the mean number of transfused blood units and the mean length of hospital stay. Conclusions The efficacy of combined endoscopic treatment of ulcer bleeding with a probe enabling simultaneous bipolar electrocoagulation and adrenaline injection seems

  20. Lead intoxication induces noradrenaline depletion, motor nonmotor disabilities, and changes in the firing pattern of subthalamic nucleus neurons.

    PubMed

    Sabbar, M; Delaville, C; De Deurwaerdère, P; Benazzouz, A; Lakhdar-Ghazal, N

    2012-05-17

    Lead intoxication has been suggested as a high risk factor for the development of Parkinson disease. However, its impact on motor and nonmotor functions and the mechanism by which it can be involved in the disease are still unclear. In the present study, we studied the effects of lead intoxication on the following: (1) locomotor activity using an open field actimeter and motor coordination using the rotarod test, (2) anxiety behavior using the elevated plus maze, (3) "depression-like" behavior using sucrose preference test, and (4) subthalamic nucleus (STN) neuronal activity using extracellular single unit recordings. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated once a day with lead acetate or sodium acetate (20 mg/kg/d i.p.) during 3 weeks. The tissue content of monoamines was used to determine alteration of these systems at the end of experiments. Results show that lead significantly reduced exploratory activity, locomotor activity and the time spent on the rotarod bar. Furthermore, lead induced anxiety but not "depressive-like" behavior. The electrophysiological results show that lead altered the discharge pattern of STN neurons with an increase in the number of bursting and irregular cells without affecting the firing rate. Moreover, lead intoxication resulted in a decrease of tissue noradrenaline content without any change in the levels of dopamine and serotonin. Together, these results show for the first time that lead intoxication resulted in motor and nonmotor behavioral changes paralleled by noradrenaline depletion and changes in the firing activity of STN neurons, providing evidence consistent with the induction of atypical parkinsonian-like deficits. Copyright © 2012 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Noradrenaline inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 6 production in human whole blood.

    PubMed Central

    van der Poll, T; Jansen, J; Endert, E; Sauerwein, H P; van Deventer, S J

    1994-01-01

    Sepsis and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) trigger the systemic release of both cytokines and catecholamines. Cytokines are known to be capable of eliciting a stress hormone response in vivo. The present study sought insight into the effect of noradrenaline on LPS-induced release of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) in human whole blood. Whole blood was incubated with LPS for 4 h at 37 degrees C in the presence and absence of noradrenaline and/or specific alpha and beta antagonists and agonists. Noradrenaline caused a dose-dependent inhibition of LPS-induced TNF and IL-6 production. This effect could be completely prevented by addition of the specific beta 1, antagonist metoprolol, while it was not affected by the alpha antagonist phentolamine. Specific beta-adrenergic stimulation by isoprenaline mimicked the inhibiting effect of noradrenaline on LPS-evoked cytokine production, whereas alpha-adrenergic stimulation by phenylephrine had no effect. Fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis demonstrated that beta-adrenergic stimulation had no effect on LPS binding to and internalization into mononuclear cells or on the expression of CD14, the major receptor for LPS on mononuclear cells. In acute sepsis, enhanced release of noradrenaline may be part of a negative feedback mechanism meant to inhibit ongoing TNF and IL-6 production. PMID:8168970

  2. Could the survival and outcome benefit of adrenaline also be dependent upon the presence of gasping upon arrival of emergency rescuers?

    PubMed

    Rottenberg, Eric M

    2014-09-01

    A recent systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials of adrenaline use during resuscitation of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest found no benefit of adrenaline in survival to discharge or neurological outcomes. It did, however, find an advantage of standard dose adrenaline (SDA) over placebo and high dose adrenaline over SDA in overall survival to admission and return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), which was also consistent with previous reviews. As a result, the question that remains is "Why is there no difference in the rate of survival to discharge when there are increased rates of ROSC and survival to admission in patients who receive adrenaline?" It was suggested that the lack of efficacy and effectiveness of adrenaline may be confounded by the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) during cardiac arrest, which has been demonstrated in animal models. CPR quality was not measured or reported in the included randomized controlled trials. However, the survival and outcome benefit of adrenaline may also depend upon the presence of witnessed gasping and/or gasping upon arrival of emergency rescuers, which is a critical factor not accounted for in the analyses of the cited animal studies that allowed gasping but showed the survival and neurological outcome benefits of adrenaline use. Moreover, without the aid of gasping, very few rescuers can provide high-quality CPR. Also, age and the absence of gasping observed by bystanders and/or upon arrival of emergency- rescuers may be important factors in the determination of whether vasopressin instead of adrenaline should be used first. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. How fast monoamine oxidases decompose adrenaline? Kinetics of isoenzymes A and B evaluated by empirical valence bond simulation.

    PubMed

    Oanca, Gabriel; Stare, Jernej; Mavri, Janez

    2017-12-01

    This work scrutinizes kinetics of decomposition of adrenaline catalyzed by monoamine oxidase (MAO) A and B enzymes, a process controlling the levels of adrenaline in the central nervous system and other tissues. Experimental kinetic data for MAO A and B catalyzed decomposition of adrenaline are reported only in the form of the maximum reaction rate. Therefore, we estimated the experimental free energy barriers form the kinetic data of closely related systems using regression method, as was done in our previous study. By using multiscale simulation on the Empirical Valence Bond (EVB) level, we studied the chemical reactivity of the MAO A catalyzed decomposition of adrenaline and we obtained a value of activation free energy of 17.3 ± 0.4 kcal/mol. The corresponding value for MAO B is 15.7 ± 0.7 kcal/mol. Both values are in good agreement with the estimated experimental barriers of 16.6 and 16.0 kcal/mol for MAO A and MAO B, respectively. The fact that we reproduced the kinetic data and preferential catalytic effect of MAO B over MAO A gives additional support to the validity of the proposed hydride transfer mechanism. Furthermore, we demonstrate that adrenaline is preferably involved in the reaction in a neutral rather than in a protonated form due to considerably higher barriers computed for the protonated adrenaline substrate. The results are discussed in the context of chemical mechanism of MAO enzymes and possible applications of multiscale simulation to rationalize the effects of MAO activity on adrenaline level. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. When should we perform a repeat training on adrenaline auto-injector use for physician trainees?

    PubMed

    Topal, E; Bakirtas, A; Yilmaz, O; Karagol, I H E; Arga, M; Demirsoy, M S; Turktas, I

    2014-01-01

    Studies demonstrate that both doctors and patients may use adrenaline auto-injector improperly and the usage skills are improved by training. In this study, we aimed to determine the appropriate frequency of training to maintain skills for adrenaline auto-injector use. We invited all interns of 2011-2012 training period. At baseline, all participants were given theoretical and practical training on adrenaline auto-injector use. The participants were randomly assigned into two groups. We asked those in group 1 to demonstrate the use of adrenaline auto-injector trainer in the third month and those in group 2 in the sixth month. One hundred and sixty interns were enrolled. Compared with the beginning score, demonstration of skills at all the steps and total scores did not change for the group tested in the third month (p=0.265 and p=0.888, respectively). However; for the group examined in the sixth month; the demonstration of skills for proper use of the auto-injector at all steps and the mean time to administer adrenaline decreased (p=0.018 and p<0.001, respectively). Besides, the group which was tested in the third month was better than the group which was tested in the sixth month in terms of demonstrating all steps (p=0.014), the total score (p=0.019), mean time of change to administer adrenaline (p<0.001) and presumptive self-injection into thumb (p=0.029). Auto-injector usage skills of physician trainees decrease after the sixth month and are better in those who had skill reinforcement at 3 months, suggesting continued education and skill reinforcement may be useful. Copyright © 2013 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Haemodynamic effects of adrenaline (epinephrine) depend on chest compression quality during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in pigs.

    PubMed

    Pytte, Morten; Kramer-Johansen, Jo; Eilevstjønn, Joar; Eriksen, Morten; Strømme, Taevje A; Godang, Kristin; Wik, Lars; Steen, Petter Andreas; Sunde, Kjetil

    2006-12-01

    Adrenaline (epinephrine) is used during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) based on animal experiments without supportive clinical data. Clinically CPR was reported recently to have much poorer quality than expected from international guidelines and what is generally done in laboratory experiments. We have studied the haemodynamic effects of adrenaline during CPR with good laboratory quality and with quality simulating clinical findings and the feasibility of monitoring these effects through VF waveform analysis. After 4 min of cardiac arrest, followed by 4 min of basic life support, 14 pigs were randomised to ClinicalCPR (intermittent manual chest compressions, compression-to-ventilation ratio 15:2, compression depth 30-38 mm) or LabCPR (continuous mechanical chest compressions, 12 ventilations/min, compression depth 45 mm). Adrenaline 0.02 mg/kg was administered 30 s thereafter. Plasma adrenaline concentration peaked earlier with LabCPR than with ClinicalCPR, median (range), 90 (30, 150) versus 150 (90, 270) s (p = 0.007), respectively. Coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) and cortical cerebral blood flow (CCBF) increased and femoral blood flow (FBF) decreased after adrenaline during LabCPR (mean differences (95% CI) CPP 17 (6, 29) mmHg (p = 0.01), FBF -5.0 (-8.8, -1.2) ml min(-1) (p = 0.02) and median difference CCBF 12% of baseline (p = 0.04)). There were no significant effects during ClinicalCPR (mean differences (95% CI) CPP 4.7 (-3.2, 13) mmHg (p = 0.2), FBF -0.2 (-4.6, 4.2) ml min(-1)(p = 0.9) and CCBF 3.6 (-1.8, 9.0)% of baseline (p = 0.15)). Slope VF waveform analysis reflected changes in CPP. Adrenaline improved haemodynamics during laboratory quality CPR in pigs, but not with quality simulating clinically reported CPR performance.

  6. Effects of AT1 receptor antagonism on kainate-induced seizures and concomitant changes in hippocampal extracellular noradrenaline, serotonin, and dopamine levels in Wistar-Kyoto and spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Tchekalarova, Jana; Loyens, Ellen; Smolders, Ilse

    2015-05-01

    In the management of epilepsy, AT1 receptor antagonists have been suggested as an additional treatment strategy. A hyperactive brain angiotensin (Ang) II system and upregulated AT1 receptors are implicated in the cerebrovascular alterations in a genetic form of hypertension. Uncontrolled hypertension could also, in turn, be a risk factor for a seizure threshold decrease and development of epileptogenesis. The present study aimed to assess the effects of the selective AT1 receptor antagonist ZD7155 on kainic acid (KA)-induced status epilepticus (SE) development and accompanying changes in the hippocampal extracellular (EC) neurotransmitter levels of noradrenaline (NAD), serotonin (5-HT), and dopamine (DA) in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and their parent strain Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, since monoamines are well-known neurotransmitters involved in mechanisms of both epilepsy and hypertension. Status epilepticus was evoked in freely moving rats by a repetitive intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of KA in subconvulsant doses. In the treatment group, ZD7155 (5mg/kg i.p.) was coadministered with the first KA injection. Spontaneously hypertensive rats exhibited higher susceptibility to SE than WKY rats, but the AT1 receptor antagonist did not alter the development of SE in SHRs or in WKY rats. In vivo microdialysis demonstrated significant KA-induced increases of the hippocampal NAD and DA levels in SHRs and of NAD, 5-HT, and DA in WKY rats. Although SHRs developed more severe seizures while receiving a lower dose of KA compared to WKY rats, AT1 receptor antagonism completely prevented all KA-induced increases of hippocampal monoamine levels in both rat strains without affecting seizure development per se. These results suggest a lack of direct relationship between KA-induced seizure susceptibility and adaptive changes of hippocampal NAD, 5-HT, and DA levels in the effects of ZD7155 in WKY rats and SHRs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Physiologic implications of inter-hormonal interference in fish: lessons from the interaction of adrenaline with cortisol and thyroid hormones in climbing perch (Anabas testudineus Bloch).

    PubMed

    George, Nimta; Peter, Valsa S; Peter, M C Subhash

    2013-01-15

    Adrenaline and cortisol, the major stress hormones, are known for its direct control on stress response in fish. Likewise, as an important stress modifier hormone, thyroid hormone has also been implicated in stress response of fish. We tested whether the hypothesis on the phenomenon of inter-hormonal interference, a process that explains the hormonal interactions, operates in fish particularly between adrenaline, cortisol and thyroid hormones. To achieve this goal, indices of acid-base, osmotic and metabolic regulations were quantified after adrenaline challenge in propranolol pre-treated air-breathing fish (Anabas testudineus). Short-term adrenaline (10 ng g(-1)) injection for 30 min produced a rise in plasma cortisol without affecting plasma T(3) and T(4). On the contrary, blocking of adrenaline action with a non-selective blocker, propranolol (25 ng g(-1)) for 90 min reduced plasma cortisol along with plasma T(4) and that indicate a possible interference of these hormones in the absence of adrenaline challenge. Similarly, a reduction in plasma T(3) was found after adrenaline challenge in propranolol pre-treated fish and that suggests a functional synergistic interference of adrenaline with T(3). Adrenaline challenge in these fish, however, failed to abolish this propranolol effect. The remarkable systemic hypercapnia and acidosis by propranolol pre-treatment were reversed by adrenaline challenge, pointing to a direct action of adrenaline on acid-base indices probably by a mechanism which may not require β-adrenergic receptor systems. Interestingly, the prominent adrenaline-induced hyperglycemia, hyperlactemia and hyperuremea were not altered by propranolol treatment. Similarly, adrenaline challenge promoted and propranolol reduced the osmotic competencies of the gills, kidneys and liver of this fish as evident in the sodium and proton pump activities. The modified physiologic actions of adrenaline and its modified interaction with THs and cortisol in blocked

  8. Electrochemical behavior of adrenaline at the carbon atom wire modified electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Kuan-Hong; Liu, Jia-Mei; Wei, Ri-Bing; Chen, Shao-Peng

    2006-09-01

    Electrochemical behavior of adrenaline at an electrode modified by carbon atom wires (CAWs), a new material, was investigated by cyclic voltammetry combined with UV-vis spectrometry, and forced convection method. As to the electrochemical response of redox of adrenaline/adrenalinequinone couple in 0.50 M H 2SO 4, at a nitric acid treated CAW modified electrode, the anodic and cathodic peak potentials Epa and Epc shifted by 87 mV negatively and 139 mV in the positive direction, respectively, and standard heterogeneous rate constant k0 increased by 16 times compared to the corresponding bare electrode, indicating the extraordinary activity of CAWs in electrocatalysis for the process.

  9. Catecholamine excretion rates in relation to life-styles in the male population of Otmoor, Oxfordshire.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, V; Jenner, D A; Palmer, C D; Harrison, G A

    1981-01-01

    The paper gives the results of the number of analyses of aspects of life-style and dietary patterns of members of the Otmoor population, in relation to their catecholamine excretion rates. The data reported here are restricted to males. Feelings of boredom were associated with low adrenaline excretion rates. Reported physical tiredness was associated with low adrenaline levels, while mental tiredness seems to be related to high adrenaline levels. People who regarded themselves as having a competitive personality, as being faced by a large number of life challenges, as having to meet self-set deadlines, as choosing to focus on more than one task at the same time, or as being under time pressure had high rates. Cigarette smoking and coffee consumption were related to high adrenaline excretion rates. Taken together these variables can explain 16-20% of variance in adrenaline excretion. Smoking and coffee consumption are of primary importance. The results of similar analyses of noradrenaline are reported.

  10. [Standardization and regulation of the rate of the superoxide-generating adrenaline autoxidation reaction used for evaluation of pro/antioxidant properties of various materials].

    PubMed

    Sirota, T V

    2016-11-01

    The superoxide-generating reaction of adrenaline autoxidation is widely used for determination of the activity of superoxide dismutase and pro/antioxidant properties of various materials. There are two variants of the spectrophotometric registration of the products of this reaction. The first is based on registration of adrenochrome, as adrenaline autooxidation product at 347 nm; the second employs nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) and registration of diformazan, a product of NBT reduction at 560 nm. In the present work, recommendations for the standardization of the reaction rate in both variants have been proposed. The main approach consists in the use of the pharmaceutical form of 0.1% adrenaline hydrochloride solution. Although each of two adrenaline preparations available in the Russian market has some features in kinetic behavior of its autooxidation; they are applicable in the superoxide generating system based on adrenaline autooxidation. Performing measurements at 560 nm, the reaction rate can be regulated by lowering the concentration of added adrenaline, whereas during spectrophotometric registration at 347 nm, this cannot be done. These features of adrenaline autoxidation may be due to the fact that the intrinsic multistage process of the conversion of adrenaline to adrenochrome, which is recorded at 347 nm, is coupled with the transition of electrons from adrenaline and intermediate products of its oxidation to oxygen, carbon dioxide, and carbonate bicarbonate ions, which is detected in the presence of added NBT.

  11. Adrenaline in anaphylaxis treatment and self-administration: experience from an inner city emergency department.

    PubMed

    Mostmans, Y; Grosber, M; Blykers, M; Mols, P; Naeije, N; Gutermuth, J

    2017-03-01

    Anaphylaxis is a life-threatening emergency of which reliable epidemiological data are lacking. This study aimed to analyze how quickly patients presenting with anaphylaxis were treated in emergency and whether treatment followed the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) guidelines. Patient data were collected between April 2009 and April 2013. Emergency doctors completed a questionnaire for adult patients presenting at the emergency department (ED) of the St. Pierre hospital in Brussels with anaphylaxis. Inclusion criteria were based on the Sampson criteria of anaphylaxis. Data were analyzed using a Microsoft Excel database. About 0.04% (100/230878) of all emergency visits in adults presented with anaphylaxis. 64% of patients received their first medical help later than 30 min after symptom onset. 67% of patients received adrenaline, 85% oral antihistamines, and 89% received IV glucocorticosteroids. 46/100 patients were discharged directly from the ED, of which 87% received further medical prescriptions for self-administration: 67% corticosteroids, 83% antihistamines, and 9% intramuscular adrenaline. 74% were instructed to consult an allergologist for adequate diagnosis. 54/100 patients were hospitalized. The majority of patients were treated according to the EAACI guidelines for management of anaphylaxis, but only a minority received the recommended adrenaline auto-injector for self-administration at discharge. Because the majority of patients received medical help later than 30 min after symptom onset, adrenaline auto-injector prescription is a necessity. The low rate of doctors prescribing adrenaline auto-injectors in the ED setting underlines the need to train doctors of various backgrounds in prevention and treatment of anaphylaxis and the close collaboration with allergologists. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Management of airway obstruction with nebulised adrenaline resulting in takotsubo cardiomyopathy: case report.

    PubMed

    Keshtkar, F; Dale, O T; Bennett, W O; Hall, C E

    2016-09-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy has been associated with the use of catecholamines; however, its development after the use of nebulised adrenaline for the management of acute airway obstruction has not previously been described. A 66-year-old man with squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx, with tumour-node-metastasis staging of T3N2cM0, confirmed by biopsy and computed tomography, presented to the emergency department with acute airway obstruction. He was treated twice with nebulised adrenaline and intravenous dexamethasone. After a period of 24 hours, cardiac rhythm changes were noted on telemetry. A 12-lead electrocardiogram showed widespread T-wave inversion and QT prolongation suggestive of an acute coronary syndrome. Coronary angiography demonstrated no coronary artery disease, but left ventricular angiography showed marked apical ballooning and apical wall akinesia consistent with a diagnosis of takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy can mimic true ischaemic heart disease and the diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion in patients managed with nebulised adrenaline.

  13. (/sup 3/H)adrenaline release from hypothalamic synaptosomes and its modulation by clonidine: effects of chronic antidepressant drug regimens

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    McWilliam, J.R.; Campbell, I.C.

    1987-07-13

    (/sup 3/H)Adrenaline ((/sup 3/H)ADR, 40nM) was accumulated by rat hypothalamic synaptosomes (P/sub 2/) more rapidly and in significantly greater amounts than by similar preparations from cerebral cortex. There was no significant difference between these two tissues in the rate or amount of (/sup 3/H)noradrenaline ((/sup 3/H)NA, 40nM) accumulation. Talusupram (10..mu..M), maximally inhibited the uptake of (/sup 3/H)ADR into hypothalamic synaptosomes by 60%. Nomifensine further inhibited uptake by 14%. From these observations it was concluded that some (/sup 3/H)ADR was accumulated into non adrenergic neuronal terminals. The effects of desipramine (DMI, 10mg/kg/day and clorgyline (1mg/kg/day) administration for 28 days on K/supmore » +/-evoked release of (/sup 3/H)ADR was investigated using superfused hypothalamic synaptosomes. After both chronic antidepressant drug regimens, total (/sup 3/H)ADR release (spontaneous + evoked) was significantly reduced. Evoked release of (numberH)ADR (by KCl, 16mM) was significantly reduced after the DMI but not the clorgyline regimens. Presynaptic ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenoceptor function in the hypothalamus was assessed during superfusion by measuring the reduction in /sup +/-evoked release of (/sup 3/H)ADR caused by clonidine (1/sup +/M). 30 references, 3 figures, 1 table.« less

  14. Identification of the dopamine autoreceptor in the guinea-pig retina as D2 receptor using novel subtype-selective antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Bernd; Schlicker, Eberhard; Sokoloff, Pierre; Stark, Holger

    2001-01-01

    Dopamine release in the retina is subject to modulation via autoreceptors, which belong to the D2 receptor family (encompassing the D2, D3 and D4 receptors). The aim of the present study was to determine the receptor subtype (D2 vs D3) involved in the inhibition of dopamine release in guinea-pig retinal discs, using established (haloperidol, (S)-nafadotride) and novel dopamine receptor antagonists (ST-148, ST-198). hD2L and hD3 receptors were expressed in CHO cells and the pKi values determined in binding studies with [125I]-iodosulpride were: haloperidol 9.22 vs 8.54; ST-148 7.85 vs 6.60; (S)-nafadotride 8.52 vs 9.51; ST-198 6.14 vs 7.92. The electrically evoked tritium overflow from retinal discs preincubated with [3H]-noradrenaline (which represents quasi-physiological dopamine release) was inhibited by the dopamine receptor agonists B-HT 920 (talipexole) and quinpirole (maximally by 82 and 71%; pEC50 5.80 and 5.83). The concentration-response curves of these agonists were shifted to the right by haloperidol (apparent pA2 8.69 and 8.23) and ST-148 (7.52 and 7.66). (S)-Nafadotride 0.01 μM and ST-198 0.32 μM did not affect the concentration-response curve of B-HT 920. The dopamine autoreceptor in the guinea-pig retina can be classified as a D2 receptor. ST-148 and ST-198 show an improved selectivity for D2 and D3 receptors when compared to haloperidol and (S)-nafadotride, respectively. PMID:11498509

  15. Pharmacological characterization of a fluorescent uptake assay for the noradrenaline transporter.

    PubMed

    Haunsø, Anders; Buchanan, Dawn

    2007-04-01

    The noradrenaline transporter (NET) is a Na(+)/Cl(-) dependent monoamine transporter that mediates rapid clearance of noradrenaline from the synaptic cleft, thereby terminating neuronal signaling. NET is an important target for drug development and is known to be modulated by many psychoactive compounds, including psychostimulants and antidepressants. Here, the authors describe the development and pharmacological characterization of a nonhomogeneous fluorescent NET uptake assay using the compound 4-(4-dimethylaminostyryl)-N-methylpyridinium (ASP(+)). Data presented show that the pharmacology of both the classic radiolabeled (3)H-noradrenaline- and ASP(+)-based uptake assays are comparable, with an excellent correlation between potency obtained for known modulators of NET (r = 0.95, p < 0.0001). Furthermore, the fluorescent uptake assay is highly reproducible and has sufficiently large Z' values to be amenable for high-throughput screening (HTS). The advantage of this assay is compatibility with both 96- and 384-well formats and lack of radioactivity usage. Thus, the authors conclude that the assay is an inexpensive, viable approach for the identification and pharmacological profiling of small-molecule modulators of the monoamine transporter NET and may be amenable for HTS.

  16. Tyramine-induced noradrenaline release from rat brain slices: prevention by (-)-deprenyl.

    PubMed Central

    Glover, V.; Pycock, C. J.; Sandler, M.

    1983-01-01

    Clorgyline (1 and 10 microM) and (+)-deprenyl (10 microM) both significantly potentiated the tyramine (100 microM)-induced release of [3H]-noradrenaline from rat cerebral cortex slices. (-)-Deprenyl (50 microM) significantly reduced it, while lower concentrations had no effect on noradrenaline release. However, in combination, 1 microM (-)-deprenyl blocked the release-facilitating action of 1 microM clorgyline, and 10 microM (-)-deprenyl that of 10 microM (+)-deprenyl. Low concentrations of (+)- and (-)-deprenyl (1 and 10 microM), both selectively inhibited phenylethylamine oxidation by monoamine oxidase B. Higher concentrations of (-)-deprenyl (20 and 50 microM) also inhibited 5-hydroxytryptamine oxidation by monoamine oxidase A. Clorgyline (1 and 10 microM) inhibited both enzymes. Thus, the effects of these drugs on noradrenaline-release cannot be explained solely in terms of irreversible inhibition of monoamine oxidase A and B, and other possible mechanisms are discussed. If the brain-slice model faithfully mirrors the sequence of events manifesting peripherally as the tyramine hypertensive response ('cheese effect'), then it is possible that low doses of (-)-deprenyl, administered with antidepressant monoamine oxidase inhibitors, can prevent this adverse reaction. PMID:6418254

  17. Effect of adrenaline on the response of erythrocyte 2,3-diphosphoglycerate in rabbits in vivo.

    PubMed

    Odje, O E; Ramsey, J M

    1996-06-01

    1. A 6 hr time-course response of erythrocyte 2,3-diphosphoglycerate was studied in rabbits following adrenaline administration. 2. Eight female New Zealand white rabbits weighing about 3.6 Kg each were injected intra-peritoneally with a total of 0.97 mg/kg of adrenaline (0.56 mg/kg at time 0 min and 0.41 mg/kg at time 0.5 hr), and the venous level of red blood cell (RBC) 2,3-DPG was monitored at 0 hr, 1 hr, 3 hr, and 6 hr, respectively. As controls, the level of 2,3-DPG was also monitored in these rabbits weeks prior to the experiment. 3. A significant (p < 0.05) rise in the mean level of 2.3-DPG (mumol.ml-1 RBC) was reached 3 hr after the initial injection of adrenaline, and the level returned to the preexposure level by the end of 6 hr. 4. It is speculated that adrenaline may be one of the contributors that increases the level of 2,3-DPG during the resting period following exhaustive exercise because this catecholamine has been reported to increase following this type of hypoxia.

  18. Haemostatic effects of adrenaline-lidocaine subcutaneous infiltration at donor sites.

    PubMed

    Gacto, P; Miralles, F; Pereyra, J J; Perez, A; Martínez, E

    2009-05-01

    This study sought methods in burn surgery to reduce postoperative pain and blood loss at donor sites. A prospective, randomised, controlled, blinded trial included 56 people undergoing burn surgery, divided into two groups. Both groups received subcutaneous infiltration at donor sites, with either 1:500,000 adrenaline solution containing added lidocaine or with 0.45% normal saline (controls). Outcome measurements included amount of intraoperative bleeding, need for electrocautery, days the hydrocolloid dressing remained on donor sites, percentage of re-epithelialised skin at donor sites 1 week after surgery and viability of skin grafts. Results indicated that subcutaneous adrenaline-lidocaine infiltration at donor sites reduced intraoperative bleeding, decreased postoperative pain, shortened the duration of surgery and general anaesthesia and accelerated re-epithelialisation at the donor site. The overall graft take in both groups was similar.

  19. Adrenaline for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest resuscitation: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Lin, Steve; Callaway, Clifton W; Shah, Prakesh S; Wagner, Justin D; Beyene, Joseph; Ziegler, Carolyn P; Morrison, Laurie J

    2014-06-01

    The evidence for adrenaline in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) resuscitation is inconclusive. We systematically reviewed the efficacy of adrenaline for adult OHCA. We searched in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library from inception to July 2013 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating standard dose adrenaline (SDA) to placebo, high dose adrenaline (HDA), or vasopressin (alone or combination) in adult OHCA patients. Meta-analyses were performed using random effects modeling. Subgroup analyses were performed stratified by cardiac rhythm and by number of drug doses. The primary outcome was survival to discharge and the secondary outcomes were return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), survival to admission, and neurological outcome. Fourteen RCTs (n=12,246) met inclusion criteria: one compared SDA to placebo (n=534), six compared SDA to HDA (n=6174), six compared SDA to an adrenaline/vasopressin combination (n=5202), and one compared SDA to vasopressin alone (n=336). There was no survival to discharge or neurological outcome differences in any comparison group, including subgroup analyses. SDA showed improved ROSC (RR 2.80, 95%CI 1.78-4.41, p<0.001) and survival to admission (RR 1.95, 95%CI 1.34-2.84, p<0.001) compared to placebo. SDA showed decreased ROSC (RR 0.85, 95%CI 0.75-0.97, p=0.02; I(2)=48%) and survival to admission (RR 0.87, 95%CI 0.76-1.00, p=0.049; I(2)=34%) compared to HDA. There were no differences in outcomes between SDA and vasopressin alone or in combination with adrenaline. There was no benefit of adrenaline in survival to discharge or neurological outcomes. There were improved rates of survival to admission and ROSC with SDA over placebo and HDA over SDA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The nature of catecholamine-containing neurons in the enteric nervous system in relationship with organogenesis, normal human anatomy and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Natale, G; Ryskalin, L; Busceti, C L; Biagioni, F; Fornai, F

    2017-09-01

    reports are available on the anatomy and physiology of enteric dopamine neurons. Remarkably, this review limits the presence of enteric noradrenaline (and adrenaline) only within extrinsic sympathetic nerve terminals. This is based on careful morphological studies showing that the only catecholamine-containing neurons within ENS would be dopaminergic. This means that enteric pathology of catecholamine neurons should be conceived as axon pathology for noradrenaline neurons and whole cell pathology for dopamine neurons which would be the sole catecholamine cell within intrinsic circuitries affecting gut motility and secretions.The gastrointestinal tract is provided with extrinsic and intrinsic innervation. The extrinsic innervation includes the classic vagal parasympathetic and sympathetic components, with afferent sensitive and efferent secretomotor fibers. The intrinsic innervations is represented by the enteric nervous system (ENS), which is recognized as a complex neural network  controlling a variety of cell populations, including smooth muscle cells, mucosal secretory cells, endocrine cells, microvasculature, immune and inflammatory cells. This is finalized to regulate gastrointestinal secretion, absorption and motility. In particular, this network is organized in several plexuses each one providing quite autonomous control of gastrointestinal functions (hence the definition of "second brain"). The similarity between ENS and CNS is further substantiated by the presence of local sensitive pseudounipolar ganglionic neurons with both peripheral and central branching which terminate in the enteric wall. A large variety of neurons and neurotransmitters takes part in the ENS. However, the nature of these neurons and their role in the regulation of gastrointestinal functions is debatable. In particular, the available literature reporting the specific nature of catecholamine-containing neurons provides conflicting evidence. This is critical both for understanding the

  1. Effects of pressure on the skin exerted by clothing on responses of urinary catecholamines and cortisol, heart rate and nocturnal urinary melatonin in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Yuki; Kioka, Etsuko; Tokura, Hiromi

    2002-09-01

    The study investigated how the pressure exerted on the skin by clothing worn while working in the daytime affected the urinary excretion of adrenaline, noradrenaline and cortisol, heart rate, and also melatonin secretion at night. Nine young women (experiment I) and seven young women (experiment II) participated. Participants wore either a 100% cotton jacket (tight clothes, TC) or a 100% cotton T-shirt (loose clothes, LC). Loose-fitting, 100% cotton tank tops and panties were worn as underwear in both the TC and the LC groups. The main results can be summarized as follows: (1) urinary excretion of adrenaline, noradrenaline and cortisol was facilitated, and the amounts of urinary excretion were significantly higher when TC were worn. Heart rate was significantly higher in the TC group; (2) nocturnal urinary melatonin excretion was significantly greater in the TC group. These results are discussed in terms of an enhancement of diurnal sympathetic nervous system activity caused by pressure on the skin produced by tight clothing.

  2. Modulation of sibutramine-induced increases in extracellular noradrenaline concentration in rat frontal cortex and hypothalamus by α2-adrenoceptors

    PubMed Central

    Wortley, K E; Heal, D J; Stanford, S C

    1999-01-01

    The effects of sibutramine (0.25–10 mg kg−1 i.p.) on extracellular noradrenaline concentration in the frontal cortex and hypothalamus of freely-moving rats were investigated using microdialysis. The role of presynaptic α2-adrenoceptors in modulating the effects of sibutramine in these brain areas was also determined.Sibutramine induced an increase in extracellular noradrenaline concentration, the magnitude of which paralleled dose, in both brain areas. In the cortex, this increase was gradual and sustained, whereas in the hypothalamus it was more rapid and of shorter duration.In both the cortex and hypothalamus, pretreatment of rats with the α2-adrenoceptor antagonist RX821002 (3 mg kg−1 i.p.) potentiated increases in the accumulation of extracellular noradrenaline induced by sibutramine (10 mg kg−1 i.p.), by 7 and 10 fold respectively. RX821002 also reduced the latency of sibutramine to reach its maximum effect in the cortex, but not in the hypothalamus.Infusion of RX821002 (1 μM) via the probe increased the accumulation of extracellular noradrenaline induced by sibutramine (10 mg kg−1 i.p.) in both brain areas. In the hypothalamus, the effects of RX821002 on the accumulation of noradrenaline induced by sibutramine were 2 fold greater than those in the cortex.These findings support evidence that sibutramine inhibits the reuptake of noradrenaline in vivo, but that the accumulation of extracellular noradrenaline is limited by noradrenergic activation of presynaptic α2-adrenoceptors. Furthermore, the data suggest that terminal α2-adrenoceptors in the hypothalamus exert a greater inhibitory effect over the control of extracellular noradrenaline accumulation than do those in the cortex. PMID:10516646

  3. PDE3, but not PDE4, reduces β1- and β2-adrenoceptor-mediated inotropic and lusitropic effects in failing ventricle from metoprolol-treated patients

    PubMed Central

    Molenaar, Peter; Christ, Torsten; Hussain, Rizwan I; Engel, Andreas; Berk, Emanuel; Gillette, Katherine T; Chen, Lu; Galindo-Tovar, Alejandro; Krobert, Kurt A; Ravens, Ursula; Levy, Finn Olav; Kaumann, Alberto J

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose PDE3 and/or PDE4 control ventricular effects of catecholamines in several species but their relative effects in failing human ventricle are unknown. We investigated whether the PDE3-selective inhibitor cilostamide (0.3–1 μM) or PDE4 inhibitor rolipram (1–10 μM) modified the positive inotropic and lusitropic effects of catecholamines in human failing myocardium. Experimental Approach Right and left ventricular trabeculae from freshly explanted hearts of 5 non-β-blocker-treated and 15 metoprolol-treated patients with terminal heart failure were paced to contract at 1 Hz. The effects of (-)-noradrenaline, mediated through β1 adrenoceptors (β2 adrenoceptors blocked with ICI118551), and (-)-adrenaline, mediated through β2 adrenoceptors (β1 adrenoceptors blocked with CGP20712A), were assessed in the absence and presence of PDE inhibitors. Catecholamine potencies were estimated from –logEC50s. Key Results Cilostamide did not significantly potentiate the inotropic effects of the catecholamines in non-β-blocker-treated patients. Cilostamide caused greater potentiation (P = 0.037) of the positive inotropic effects of (-)-adrenaline (0.78 ± 0.12 log units) than (-)-noradrenaline (0.47 ± 0.12 log units) in metoprolol-treated patients. Lusitropic effects of the catecholamines were also potentiated by cilostamide. Rolipram did not affect the inotropic and lusitropic potencies of (-)-noradrenaline or (-)-adrenaline on right and left ventricular trabeculae from metoprolol-treated patients. Conclusions and Implications Metoprolol induces a control by PDE3 of ventricular effects mediated through both β1 and β2 adrenoceptors, thereby further reducing sympathetic cardiostimulation in patients with terminal heart failure. Concurrent therapy with a PDE3 blocker and metoprolol could conceivably facilitate cardiostimulation evoked by adrenaline through β2 adrenoceptors. PDE4 does not appear to reduce inotropic and lusitropic effects of

  4. Atrial natriuretic peptide regulation of noradrenaline release in the anterior hypothalamic area of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed Central

    Peng, N; Oparil, S; Meng, Q C; Wyss, J M

    1996-01-01

    In spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), high NaCl diets increase arterial pressure and sympathetic nervous system activity by decreasing noradrenaline release in the anterior hypothalamic area (AHA), thereby reducing the activation of sympathoinhibitory neurons in AHA. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) can inhibit the release of noradrenaline, and ANP concentration is elevated in the AHA of SHR. The present study tests the hypothesis that in SHR, local ANP inhibits noradrenaline release from nerve terminals in AHA. Male SHR fed a basal or high NaCl diet for 2 wk and normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY) fed a basal NaCl diet were studied. In SHR on the basal diet, microperfusion of exogenous ANP into the AHA elicited a dose-related decrease in the concentration of the major noradrenaline metabolite 3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-phenylglycol (MOPEG) in the AHA; this effect was attenuated in the other two groups. In a subsequent study, the ANP-C (clearance) receptor agonist c-ANP was microperfused into the AHA to increase extracellular concentration of endogenous ANP in AHA. c-ANP reduced AHA MOPEG concentration in SHR on the basal NaCl diet but not in the other two groups. These data support the hypothesis that local ANP inhibits noradrenaline release in the AHA and thereby contributes to NaCl-sensitive hypertension in SHR. PMID:8903325

  5. Pharmacological identification of β-adrenoceptor subtypes mediating isoprenaline-induced relaxation of guinea pig colonic longitudinal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Chino, Daisuke; Sone, Tomoyo; Yamazaki, Kumi; Tsuruoka, Yuri; Yamagishi, Risa; Shiina, Shunsuke; Obara, Keisuke; Yamaki, Fumiko; Higai, Koji; Tanaka, Yoshio

    2018-01-01

    Object We aimed to identify the β-adrenoceptor (β-AR) subtypes involved in isoprenaline-induced relaxation of guinea pig colonic longitudinal smooth muscle using pharmacological and biochemical approaches. Methods Longitudinal smooth muscle was prepared from the male guinea pig ascending colon and contracted with histamine prior to comparing the relaxant responses to three catecholamines (isoprenaline, adrenaline, and noradrenaline). The inhibitory effects of subtype-selective β-AR antagonists on isoprenaline-induced relaxation were then investigated. Results The relaxant potencies of the catecholamines were ranked as: isoprenaline > noradrenalineadrenaline, whereas the rank order was isoprenaline > noradrenaline > adrenaline in the presence of propranolol (a non-selective β-AR antagonist; 3 × 10 -7 M). Atenolol (a selective β 1 -AR antagonist; 3 × 10 -7 -10 -6  M) acted as a competitive antagonist of isoprenaline-induced relaxation, and the pA 2 value was calculated to be 6.49 (95% confidence interval: 6.34-6.83). The relaxation to isoprenaline was not affected by ICI-118,551 (a selective β 2 -AR antagonist) at 10 -9 -10 -8  M, but was competitively antagonized by 10 -7 -3 × 10 -7  M, with a pA 2 value of 7.41 (95% confidence interval: 7.18-8.02). In the presence of propranolol (3 × 10 -7 M), the relaxant effect of isoprenaline was competitively antagonized by bupranolol (a non-selective β-AR antagonist), with a pA 2 value of 5.90 (95% confidence interval: 5.73-6.35). Conclusion These findings indicated that the β-AR subtypes involved in isoprenaline-induced relaxation of colonic longitudinal guinea pig muscles are β 1 -AR and β 3 -AR.

  6. The effects of noradrenaline and adenosine 5'-triphosphate on polyphosphoinositide and phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis in arterial smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Nally, J. E.; Muir, T. C.; Guild, S. B.

    1992-01-01

    1. The effects of noradrenaline and alpha,beta,methylene adenosine 5'-triphosphate (alpha,beta,methylene ATP) on polyphosphoinositide metabolism, phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis and contraction in rabbit saphenous arteries were investigated. The effect of noradrenaline upon polyphosphoinositide metabolism was also investigated in the rat tail artery. 2. Noradrenaline (10(-7)-10(-4) M) evoked a concentration-dependent increase in total inositol phosphate accumulation in the rat tail but not in the rabbit saphenous artery. Propranolol (3 x 10(-6) M) did not alter this result in the rabbit saphenous artery. In addition, alpha,beta,methylene ATP (10(-6) M) significantly increased total inositol phosphate accumulation in the rabbit saphenous artery, while potassium chloride (8 x 10(-2) M) was ineffective. 3. Phorbol 1,2-myristate 1,3-acetate (3 x 10(-8) M) enhanced noradrenaline (10(-2)-10(-4) M)-evoked contractions in rabbit saphenous artery. The contractile responses to potassium chloride (1- 16 x 10(-2) M) in tissues treated with 6-hydroxydopamine (5 x 10(-4) M), in vitro, were unaffected by these concentrations of the phorbol ester. 4. Noradrenaline (10(-6)-10(-4) M) evoked a concentration-dependent increase in the levels of choline and choline phosphate, but not in those of glycerophosphocholine, in the rabbit saphenous artery. Choline levels increased significantly over the first 15-30 s then declined to control levels within 2 min of addition of noradrenaline (10(-5) M). A smaller initial rise in choline phosphate levels (15-30 s) was followed by a larger secondary rise at 2-4 min.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1327389

  7. Contractility and supersensitivity to adrenaline in dystrophic muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Takamori, M

    1975-01-01

    In the adductor pollicis muscle of patients with limb-girdle and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophies and possible carriers of Duchenne type muscular dystrophy, abnormal active state properties were found at the time when there was no alteration of needle electromyography and evoked muscle action potentials. Adrenaline induced a marked reduction of incomplete tetanus via beta receptors without change in neuromuscular transmission. PMID:1151415

  8. Adrenaline promotes cell proliferation and increases chemoresistance in colon cancer HT29 cells through induction of miR-155

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Pu, Jun; Bai, Danna; Yang, Xia

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adrenaline increases colon cancer cell proliferation and its resistance to cisplatin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adrenaline activates NF{kappa}B in a dose dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NF{kappa}B-miR-155 pathway contributes to cell proliferation and resistance to cisplatin. -- Abstract: Recently, catecholamines have been described as being involved in the regulation of cancer genesis and progression. Here, we reported that adrenaline increased the cell proliferation and decreased the cisplatin induced apoptosis in HT29 cells. Further study found that adrenaline increased miR-155 expression in an NF{kappa}B dependent manner. HT29 cells overexpressing miR-155 had a higher cell growth rate and more resistance to cisplatin induced apoptosis. Inmore » contrast, HT29 cells overexpressing miR-155 inhibitor displayed decreased cell proliferation and sensitivity to cisplatin induced cell death. In summary, our study here revealed that adrenaline-NF{kappa}B-miR-155 pathway at least partially contributes to the psychological stress induced proliferation and chemoresistance in HT29 cells, shedding light on increasing the therapeutic strategies of cancer chemotherapy.« less

  9. Effect of premedication with subcutaneous adrenaline on the pharmacokinetics and immunogenicity of equine whole IgG antivenom in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Herrera, María; Sánchez, Melvin; Machado, Anderson; Ramírez, Nils; Vargas, Mariángela; Villalta, Mauren; Sánchez, Andrés; Segura, Álvaro; Gómez, Aarón; Solano, Gabriela; Gutiérrez, José María; León, Guillermo

    2017-06-01

    Subcutaneous administration of a low dose of adrenaline is used to prevent the early adverse reactions (EARs) induced by snake antivenoms. We used a rabbit model to study the effect of premedication with adrenaline on the potential of antivenoms to exert therapeutic effects and to induce late adverse reactions. We found that premedication with adrenaline did not change the heart rate or blood pressure of normal rabbits, but reduced the rise in temperature in rabbits previously sensitized with antivenom. Pharmacokinetic studies suggest that premedication with adrenaline does not affect the ability of the antivenom to exert the initial control of envenomation nor the susceptibility of rabbits to develop recurrence of antigenemia and envenomation. Our results also indicate that it is unlikely that premedication with adrenaline decreases the incidence of late reactions induced by the antivenom administration, although it reduces the extent of early reactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. How far from correct is the use of adrenaline auto-injectors? A survey in Italian patients.

    PubMed

    Ridolo, Erminia; Montagni, Marcello; Bonzano, Laura; Savi, Eleonora; Peveri, Silvia; Costantino, Maria Teresa; Crivellaro, Mariangiola; Manzotti, Giuseppina; Lombardi, Carlo; Caminati, Marco; Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Senna, Gianenrico

    2015-12-01

    Self-administered adrenaline through an auto-injector is the main out-of-hospital treatment for anaphylaxis, and patients should be trained to promptly and correctly use the device. The aim of the study was to verify the proper use of the device and the correct drug administration, and to identify possible misuse by patients. In seven Italian Allergy clinics, patients who were previously provided with self-injectable adrenaline were recruited at the follow-up visit required for the renewal of their prescription. All patients completed a questionnaire covering details of their allergic reactions, and knowledge of the device. The correct use was verified by the physician using a trainer with a four-step examination. 242 patients were included; 46 patients (18 %) did not always carry the auto-injector, and 35 patients (14 %) reported situations in which they were doubtful about whether to use adrenaline. Only 39 % of patients properly managed the device, while some patients (6 %) failed in all four steps. The majority of patients considered it appropriate to use adrenaline at the onset of respiratory symptoms (56 %). The factor most closely related to proper use of the device was the education of the patient (p = 0.03), while age and the time from first prescription did not affect the ability to properly use the auto-injector. Even though accurate training is conducted, many patients are still unable to properly use the adrenaline auto-injector in case of anaphylaxis. Allergists should review the instructions provided to the patients every time a renewal of the auto-injector is prescribed.

  11. Nature of the stimulation of biogenesis of cholesterol in the liver by noradrenaline.

    PubMed Central

    George, R; Ramasarma, T

    1977-01-01

    1. Administration of noradrenaline increased the incorporation of [1-14C]acetate into hepatic sterols and the activity of liver microsomal 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase. 2. The stimulation was observed at short time-intervals with a maximum at 4h and was progressive with increasing concentrations of noradrenaline. 3. Protein synthesis de novo was a necessary factor for the effect. 4. The stimulatory effect was not mediated through the adrenergic receptors, but appears to involve a direct action of the hormone within the hepatocyte. PMID:68775

  12. A real-life study on acquired skills from using an adrenaline autoinjector.

    PubMed

    Topal, Erdem; Bakirtas, Arzu; Yilmaz, Ozlem; Ertoy, Ilbilge Hacer; Arga, Mustafa; Demirsoy, Mehmet Sadik; Turktas, Ipek

    2013-01-01

    Training programs performed by allergists have increased the ability of patients' recognition and management of anaphylaxis. We aim to investigate the permanence of effect of an anaphylaxis training program and to determine the factors affecting it beyond training given by allergists. Children and/or their caregivers who had been prescribed an adrenaline autoinjector at least 1 year before were invited to take part in the study. The knowledge about anaphylaxis was assessed using a questionnaire and the skills were practically tested. Sixty-four (50 caregivers/14 children >12 years of age) of 80 patients who accepted the invitation were included in the study. Fifty-nine patients obtained the autoinjector after initial prescription. Among them, 42 (71%) still had the device at the time of the study. The most common reason for not having the autoinjector was no longer feeling it was necessary (54.6%). Of the cases, 39.4% were competent in autoinjector use. There was a significant relation between adrenaline autoinjector competency and regular allergy visits (p = 0.010), believing that it is necessary (p = 0.04), having an adrenaline autoinjector (p = 0.003), and previous history of severe anaphylaxis (p = 0.010). Autoinjector competency score decreased as time elapsed from the last visit (rho = -0.382; p = 0.002) and the first instruction (rho = -0.317; p = 0.01). Regular visits (p = 0.009) and history of severe anaphylaxis (p = 0.007) were found as independent factors having an effect on adrenaline autoinjector competency. Training of patients/caregivers by allergists does not guarantee the permanence of acquired skills on anaphylaxis in the long run. Regular follow-up visits should be fostered. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Non-quantal release of acetylcholine in rat atrial myocardium is inhibited by noradrenaline.

    PubMed

    Borodinova, Anastasia A; Abramochkin, Denis V; Sukhova, Galina S

    2013-12-01

    In the mammalian myocardium, ACh, which is the main neurotransmitter of cardiac parasympathetic postganglionic fibres, can be released via both quantal (vesicular) and non-quantal (non-vesicular) mechanisms of secretion. Non-quantal release is continuous and independent of vagus activity and exocytosis of ACh-containing vesicles. During the incubation of myocardium in the presence of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors, non-quantal ACh release leads to accumulation of ACh in the myocardium and cholinergic effects, which are proportional to the intensity of non-quantal secretion. The aim of the present study was to reveal whether non-quantal release of ACh can be modulated by another major cardioregulator, noradrenaline, or whether it represents uncontrolled leakage of ACh from cholinergic fibres. Cholinergic changes of electrical activity induced by the AChE inhibitor paraoxon (5 × 10(-6) M) in isolated rat right atrial preparations were determined by means of a standard microlectrode technique and used as a measure of the intensity of non-quantal release. Noradrenaline (10(-7) and 10(-6) M) substantially suppressed, but did not abolish, effects of paraoxon via stimulation of α-adrenoceptors, because all experiments were conducted in the presence of the β-blocker propranolol (5 × 10(-6) M). A blocker of ganglionic transmission, hexamethonium bromide (10(-4) M), failed to alter the inhibitory effect of noradrenaline, indicating that only non-quantal ACh release is suppressed by this neurotransmitter. The effects of noradrenaline could be reduced by the α2-antagonist yohimbine (10(-6) M). However, both the α1-agonist phenylephrine (10(-6) M) and the α2-agonist clonidine (10(-6) M) significantly inhibited the cholinergic effects of paraoxon, indicating the possible involvement of both α-adrenoceptor subtypes in mediation of the adrenergic inhibition of non-quantal ACh release. Thus, cardiac non-quantal ACh release can be negatively regulated by

  14. The effects of C-type natriuretic peptide on catecholamine release in the pacific spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias).

    PubMed

    Montpetit, C J; McKendry, J; Perry, S F

    2001-08-01

    The interaction between homologous C-type natriuretic peptide (dfCNP) and catecholamine release in cardiovascular control was assessed in the marine dogfish (Squalus acanthias). This was accomplished by evaluation of the dynamics of the dfCNP-elicited secretion of catecholamines in situ and in vivo. With an in situ saline-perfused postcardinal sinus preparation, it was demonstrated that perfusion with saline containing dfCNP (10(-9) mol x L(-1)) did not affect the secretion of either noradrenaline or adrenaline. However, the presence of dfCNP in the perfusate significantly enhanced carbachol-evoked secretion of noradrenaline. In vivo, intravascular injection of dfCNP (10(-9) mol x kg(-1)) caused a biphasic pressor-depressor response consisting of a brief increase in caudal artery blood pressure (P(CA)) followed by a prolonged reduction in P(CA). Furthermore, although systemic resistance initially increased, it was subsequently maintained at baseline values in the face of persistent decreases in both P(CA) and cardiac output. Bolus injection of dfCNP elicited significant increases in plasma noradrenaline levels that peaked within 10 min; plasma adrenaline levels were unaffected. The release of noradrenaline elicited by dfCNP was unaffected by prior blockade of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) (with the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor lisinopril) or by pretreatment with the nicotinic receptor blocker hexamethonium. The delayed decrease in P(CA) was not observed in the hexamethonium-treated fish. Prior blockade of beta-adrenoreceptors (with sotalol) or alpha-adrenoreceptors (with prazosin) either significantly reduced (sotalol) or abolished (prazosin) the increase in plasma noradrenaline levels after dfCNP injection. The results of this investigation demonstrate that the elevation of plasma noradrenaline levels observed in vivo following dfCNP injection is not caused by a direct effect of dfCNP on catecholamine secretion from axillary body chromaffin cells

  15. Role of adrenal hormones in the synthesis of noradrenaline in cardiac sympathetic neurones

    PubMed Central

    Bhagat, B.

    1969-01-01

    1. Adrenalectomy or adrenal demedullation affected neither the levels of endogenous catecholamines in the rat heart nor the accumulation of 3H-noradrenaline 1 hr after its intravenous administration. 2. Twenty-four hours after intravenous administration of labelled amine, however, its retention was markedly reduced in the heart of adrenalectomized or demedullated rats. Ganglionic blockade prevented this reduction. 3. Rate calculations from the decline of catecholamine levels after blockade of synthesis with α-methyl-tyrosine showed that cardiac synthesis of noradrenaline increased about four-fold after demedullation and about three-fold after adrenalectomy. This increase in synthesis may compensate for the loss of circulating catecholamines. 4. There was no change in catechol-o-methyl-transferase activity, but monoamine oxidase activity was increased in the homogenates of the heart of adrenalectomized and demedullated rats. The increase in the cardiac monoamine oxidase activity was markedly greater in the adrenalectomized rats than in the demedullated rats. 5. It is suggested that adrenal cortex insufficiency may modulate the rate of synthesis of noradrenaline and monoamine oxidase activity in cardiac sympathetic neurones. PMID:5360339

  16. Association of MAOA gene functional promoter polymorphism with CSF dopamine turnover and atypical depression.

    PubMed

    Aklillu, Eleni; Karlsson, Sara; Zachrisson, Olof O; Ozdemir, Vural; Agren, Hans

    2009-04-01

    Monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) is a key mitochondrial enzyme that metabolizes biogenic amine neurotransmitters such as dopamine and serotonin. Individuals with atypical depression (AD) are particularly responsive to treatment with MAO inhibitors (MAOIs). Biomarker tests are essential for prompt diagnosis of AD, and to identify those with an altered brain neurotransmitter metabolism who may selectively respond to MAOI therapy. In a sample of 118 Scandinavian patients with treatment-resistant depression who are naive to MAOI therapy, we investigated the associations between a common MAOA functional promoter polymorphism (MAOA-uVNTR), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neurotransmitter metabolites, and AD susceptibility. The metabolites for dopamine (homovanillic acid, HVA), serotonin (5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid) and noradrenaline (3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol) were measured in the CSF. AD was associated with the female sex and a higher HVA in CSF (P=0.008). The carriers of the MAOA-uVNTR short allele were significantly overrepresented among women with AD (P=0.005; odds ratio=4.76; 95% confidence interval=1.5-13.1; statistical power=80.0%). Moreover, the MAOA-uVNTR genotype significantly influenced the HVA concentration (P=0.01) and showed a strong trend in relation to 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid concentration (P=0.057) in women. The mediational statistical analyses showed the CSF-HVA concentration as a key driver of the relationship between MAOA-uVNTR genotype and AD. The association of the MAOA-uVNTR with both susceptibility to AD and dopamine metabolite (HVA) concentration lends further biological plausibility for high MAO-A enzyme activity as a mechanistic factor for genetic predisposition to AD through altered dopamine turnover. Our observations provide new evidence on the in-vivo functional significance of the MAOA-uVNTR short allele as a high activity variant.

  17. Raynaud's phenomenon: peripheral catecholamine concentration and effect of sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, S L; Christensen, N J; Olsen, N; Lassen, N A

    1980-01-01

    The reaction to body and finger cooling was recorded in seven patients with relapse of primary Raynaud's phenomenon after sufficiently performed bilateral upper thoracic sympathectomy and for comparison in eight young women with primary Raynaud's phenomenon as well as in seven normal women. The forearm venous concentration of noradrenaline was lower and adrenaline concentration higher in the sympathectomized patients than in the other groups (p less than 0,05). Noradrenaline showed a significant increase during body cooling in normals and primary Raynaud's (p less than 0,05). There was no significant correlation between the vasoconstrictor response to cooling of a finger and the noradrenaline concentration probably due to the fact that skin vasoconstriction impeded release of noradrenaline from the skin. The relapse of Raynaud's phenomenon after surgically sufficient sympathectomy could not be treated by reserpine or alfa-adrenergic receptor blockers in two patients in whom this was tried.

  18. Adrenaline promotes epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition via HuR-TGFβ regulatory axis in pancreatic cancer cells and the implication in cancer prognosis.

    PubMed

    Pu, Jun; Zhang, Xiaorui; Luo, Huiwen; Xu, Lijuan; Lu, Xiaozhao; Lu, Jianguo

    2017-11-25

    Psychological stress has recently been described as a risk factor in the development of pancreatic cancer. Here, we reported that increased neurotransmitter adrenaline was associated with the poor survival in pancreatic cancer patients. Moreover, in the cell model study, we found adrenaline promoted pancreatic cell PANC-1 migration in a dose dependent manner. Block of the β2-adrenoreceptor with ICI118,551, significantly reduced cell migration. Further study found that adrenaline induced a cytoplasmic translocation of RNA binding protein HuR, which in turn activated TGFβ, as shown by the SBE luciferase assay and phosphorylation of Smad2/3. Either HuR knockdown or TGFβ inhibition reduced cell migration induced by adrenaline. Taken together, our study here revealed that adrenaline-HuR-TGFβ regulatory axis at least partially contributes to the psychological stress induced metastasis in PANC-1 cells, shedding light on therapeutic targeting psychological stress in improving the prognosis of pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Should adrenaline be used in patients with hemodynamically stable anaphylaxis? Incident case control study nested within a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Ko, Byuk Sung; Kim, Ji Yeon; Seo, Dong-Woo; Kim, Won Young; Lee, Jae Ho; Sheikh, Aziz; Bates, David W

    2016-02-03

    Although adrenaline (epinephrine) is a cornerstone of initial anaphylaxis treatment, it is not often used. We sought to assess whether use of adrenaline in hemodynamically stable patients with anaphylaxis could prevent the development of hypotension. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 761 adult patients with anaphylaxis presenting to the emergency department (ED) of a tertiary care hospital over a 10-year period. We divided the patients into two groups according to the occurrence of hypotension and compared demographic characteristics, clinical features, treatments and outcomes. Of the 340 patients with anaphylaxis who were normotensive at first presentation, 40 patients experienced hypotension during their ED stay. The ED stay of the hypotension group was significantly longer than that of patients who did not experience hypotension (496 min vs 253 min, P = 0.000). Adrenaline use in hemodynamically stable anaphylaxis patient was independently associated with a lower risk of developing in-hospital occurrence of hypotension: OR, 0.254 [95% CI, 0.091-0.706]. Adrenaline use in hemodynamically stable anaphylaxis patients was associated with a reduced risk of developing in-hospital occurrence of hypotension. Adverse events induced by adrenaline were rare when the intramuscular route was used.

  20. The costo-uterine muscle of the rat contains a homogeneous population of beta-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, M. L.; Pennefather, J. N.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of two selective beta-adrenoceptor antagonists on the inhibitory responses to some sympathomimetic amines of electrically-stimulated preparations of costo-uterine muscle, taken from virgin rats, have been examined quantitatively. pA2 values for the antagonist, atenolol (beta 1-selective) and ICI 118,551 (beta 2-selective) were obtained using as agonists, fenoterol (beta 2-selective agonist) and noradrenaline (alpha- and beta-adrenoceptor agonist, beta 1-selective); and in addition, with ICI 118,551 only, isoprenaline (beta-agonist, non-selective) and adrenaline (alpha- and beta-adrenoceptor agonist, beta 2-selective). Catecholamine uptake mechanisms and alpha-adrenoceptors were not blocked in any of these experiments. Atenolol competitively antagonized the effects of fenoterol and noradrenaline to a similar extent, the pA2 values being 5.4 and 5.7, respectively. ICI 118,551 competitively antagonized the effects of fenoterol, isoprenaline, adrenaline and noradrenaline to a similar extent; pA2 values ranged from 8.7 with noradrenaline to 9.1 with isoprenaline. These results extend our previous observations which indicated that the adrenoceptors mediating inhibition of electrically-evoked contractions of costo-uterine muscle of the virgin rat are homogeneous and of the beta 2-subtype. The potency of the beta 1-selective agonist RO 363 in producing inhibition of electrically-evoked contractions of this tissue was also examined. RO 363 was 200 times less potent than isoprenaline but was a full agonist. This indicates that there is efficient coupling between beta 2-adrenoceptor activation and tissue response in this non-innervated preparation. PMID:2858239

  1. A randomised, double-blind, multi-centre trial comparing vasopressin and adrenaline in patients with cardiac arrest presenting to or in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Ong, Marcus Eng Hock; Tiah, Ling; Leong, Benjamin Sieu-Hon; Tan, Elaine Ching Ching; Ong, Victor Yeok Kein; Tan, Elizabeth Ai Theng; Poh, Bee Yen; Pek, Pin Pin; Chen, Yuming

    2012-08-01

    To compare vasopressin and adrenaline in the treatment of patients with cardiac arrest presenting to or in the Emergency Department (ED). A randomised, double-blind, multi-centre, parallel-design clinical trial in four adult hospitals. Eligible cardiac arrest patients (confirmed by the absence of pulse, unresponsiveness and apnea) aged >16 (aged>21 for one hospital) were randomly assigned to intravenous adrenaline (1mg) or vasopressin (40 IU) at ED. Patients with traumatic cardiac arrest or contraindication for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) were excluded. Patients received additional open label doses of adrenaline as per current guidelines. Primary outcome was survival to hospital discharge (defined as participant discharged alive or survival to 30 days post-arrest). The study recruited 727 participants (adrenaline = 353; vasopressin = 374). Baseline characteristics of the two groups were comparable. Eight participants (2.3%) from adrenaline and 11 (2.9%) from vasopressin group survived to hospital discharge with no significant difference between groups (p = 0.27, RR = 1.72, 95% CI = 0.65-4.51). After adjustment for race, medical history, bystander CPR and prior adrenaline given, more participants survived to hospital admission with vasopressin (22.2%) than with adrenaline (16.7%) (p = 0.05, RR = 1.43, 95% CI = 1.02-2.04). Sub-group analysis suggested improved outcomes for vasopressin in participants with prolonged arrest times. Combination of vasopressin and adrenaline did not improve long term survival but seemed to improve survival to admission in patients with prolonged cardiac arrest. Further studies on the effect of vasopressin combined with therapeutic hypothermia on patients with prolonged cardiac arrest are needed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cardiac Responses to Thermal, Physical, and Emotional Stress

    PubMed Central

    Taggart, Peter; Parkinson, Peter; Carruthers, Malcolm

    1972-01-01

    We have studied the effect of a short period of exposure to the intense heat of a sauna bath on the electrocardiogram and plasma catecholamine, free fatty acid, and triglyceride concentrations in 17 subjects with apparently normal hearts and 18 persons with coronary heart disease. Similar observations were made on 11 of the 17 normal subjects and on 7 of the persons with coronary heart disease in response to exercise. Exposure to heat was associated with an increase in plasma adrenaline with no change in noradrenaline, free fatty acid, or triglyceride concentrations. Exercise was associated with the expected increase in both plasma noradrenaline and adrenaline concentrations. A heart rate up to 180 beats/min was observed in response to both heat and exercise. Apart from the ST-T changes inherent to sinus tachycardia, ST-T segment abnormalities were frequent in response to heat in both the subjects with normal and abnormal hearts, but little change occurred in the ST-T configuration when the subjects were exercised to produce comparable heart rates. Ectopic beats, sometimes numerous and multifocal, were observed in some subjects of both groups in response to heat, but not to exercise. It seems likely that the net unbalanced adrenaline component of the increased plasma catecholamine concentrations (which is also seen in certain emotional stress situations) is predominantly responsible for ischaemic-like manifestations of the electrocardiogram in susceptible subjects. The observations provide further validation for previously reported studies that it is the increased plasma noradrenaline in response to emotional stress that is associated with the release of free fatty acids and ultimate hypertriglyceridaemia, of probable importance in the aetiology of atheroma. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6 PMID:4114377

  3. Beta-blockers influence the short-term and long-term prognostic information of natriuretic peptides and catecholamines in chronic heart failure independent from specific agents.

    PubMed

    Frankenstein, Lutz; Nelles, Manfred; Slavutsky, Maxim; Schellberg, Dieter; Doesch, Andreas; Katus, Hugo; Remppis, Andrew; Zugck, Christian

    2007-10-01

    In chronic heart failure (CHF), the physiologic effects of natriuretic peptides and catecholamines are interdependent. Furthermore, reports state an agent-dependent effect of individual beta-blockers on biomarkers. Data on the short-term and long-term predictive power comparing these biomarkers as well as accounting for the influence of beta-blocker treatment both on the marker or the resultant prognostic information are scarce. We included 513 consecutive patients with systolic CHF, measured atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), N-terminal prohormone brain natriuretic peptide (NTproBNP), noradrenaline, and adrenaline, and monitored them for 90 +/- 25 months. Death or the combination of death and cardiac transplantation at 1 year, 5 years, and overall follow-up were considered end points. Compared with patients not taking beta-blockers, patients taking beta-blockers had significantly lower levels of catecholamines but not natriuretic peptides. Only for adrenaline was the amount of this effect related to the specific beta-blocker chosen. Receiver operating characteristic curves demonstrated superior prognostic accuracy for NTproBNP both at the 1- and 5-year follow-up compared with ANP, noradrenaline, and adrenaline. In multivariate analysis including established risk markers (New York Heart Association functional class, left ventricular ejection fraction, peak oxygen uptake, and 6-minute walk test), of all neurohumoral parameters, only NTproBNP remained an independent predictor for both end points. Long-term beta-blocker therapy is associated with decreased levels of plasma catecholamines but not natriuretic peptides. This effect is independent from the actual beta-blocker chosen for natriuretic peptides and noradrenaline. In multivariate analysis, both for short-term and long-term prediction of mortality or the combined end point of death and cardiac transplantation, only NTproBNP remained independent from established clinical risk markers.

  4. Infiltration with lidocaine and adrenaline instead of normal saline does not improve the septoplasty procedure.

    PubMed

    Gungor, Volkan; Baklaci, Deniz; Kum, Rauf Oguzhan; Yilmaz, Yavuz Fuat; Ozcan, Muge; Unal, Adnan

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether infiltration of local anesthetics with adrenaline improved septoplasty procedure when compared to normal saline. Eight-two patients undergoing septoplasty were randomized into two groups. In group 1, septal mucoperichondrium was infiltrated with lidocaine with adrenaline, and normal saline was used in group 2. Presence of intra-operative septal mucosal injuries, the amount of bleeding, arterial blood pressure, operation time as well as the quality of the surgical field and the convenience of finding the correct surgical plane as determined by the surgeon using a 5-point scale were compared between two groups. There were no significant differences for the amount of blood loss, mean arterial pressure, operation time, or scores for convenience of finding the correct surgical plane between the two groups. There was no significant difference for intra-operative simple (P = 0.631) and total (simple+severe) (P = 0.649) septal mucoperichondrial injuries between groups 1 and 2, either. However, severe mucoperichondrial injury rate was higher in the patients infiltrated with lidocaine and adrenaline (P = 0.026), and the quality of the surgical field was worse in the patients injected with normal saline (P = 0.0179). Infiltration of septal mucoperichondrium with lidocaine and adrenaline instead of normal saline was not advantageous in terms of objective parameters tested, including bleeding amount and duration of surgery as well as the of the total mucosal injury rate in septoplasty procedure.

  5. EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES ON THE PROTECTIVE EFFECT OF SEVERAL PHARMACOLOGICAL AGENTS AGAINST X-IRRADIATION (in Japanese)

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Shakudo, Y.

    The protective effects of several pharmacological agents against lethal radiation effects were tested in mice. Noradrenaline, phenylephrine, naphazoline, tetrahydrozoline, and methoxamine markedly reduced radiation mortality when injected 5 min before exposure. Adrenaline and phenylethylamine had little protective effect, while ephedrine had no effect. Cocain was moderately effective, while caffein had little effect. (C.H.)

  6. Should adrenaline be used in patients with hemodynamically stable anaphylaxis? Incident case control study nested within a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Byuk Sung; Kim, Ji Yeon; Seo, Dong-Woo; Kim, Won Young; Lee, Jae Ho; Sheikh, Aziz; Bates, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Although adrenaline (epinephrine) is a cornerstone of initial anaphylaxis treatment, it is not often used. We sought to assess whether use of adrenaline in hemodynamically stable patients with anaphylaxis could prevent the development of hypotension. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 761 adult patients with anaphylaxis presenting to the emergency department (ED) of a tertiary care hospital over a 10-year period. We divided the patients into two groups according to the occurrence of hypotension and compared demographic characteristics, clinical features, treatments and outcomes. Of the 340 patients with anaphylaxis who were normotensive at first presentation, 40 patients experienced hypotension during their ED stay. The ED stay of the hypotension group was significantly longer than that of patients who did not experience hypotension (496 min vs 253 min, P = 0.000). Adrenaline use in hemodynamically stable anaphylaxis patient was independently associated with a lower risk of developing in-hospital occurrence of hypotension: OR, 0.254 [95% CI, 0.091–0.706]. Adrenaline use in hemodynamically stable anaphylaxis patients was associated with a reduced risk of developing in-hospital occurrence of hypotension. Adverse events induced by adrenaline were rare when the intramuscular route was used. PMID:26837822

  7. Amphetamine Paradoxically Augments Exocytotic Dopamine Release and Phasic Dopamine Signals

    PubMed Central

    Daberkow, DP; Brown, HD; Bunner, KD; Kraniotis, SA; Doellman, MA; Ragozzino, ME; Garris, PA; Roitman, MF

    2013-01-01

    Drugs of abuse hijack brain reward circuitry during the addiction process by augmenting action potential-dependent phasic dopamine release events associated with learning and goal-directed behavior. One prominent exception to this notion would appear to be amphetamine (AMPH) and related analogs, which are proposed instead to disrupt normal patterns of dopamine neurotransmission by depleting vesicular stores and promoting non-exocytotic dopamine efflux via reverse transport. This mechanism of AMPH action, though, is inconsistent with its therapeutic effects and addictive properties - which are thought to be reliant on phasic dopamine signaling. Here we used fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in freely moving rats to interrogate principal neurochemical responses to AMPH in the striatum and relate these changes to behavior. First, we showed that AMPH dose-dependently enhanced evoked dopamine responses to phasic-like current pulse trains for up to two hours. Modeling the data revealed that AMPH inhibited dopamine uptake but also unexpectedly potentiated vesicular dopamine release. Second, we found that AMPH increased the amplitude, duration and frequency of spontaneous dopamine transients, the naturally occurring, non-electrically evoked, phasic increases in extracellular dopamine. Finally, using an operant sucrose reward paradigm, we showed that low-dose AMPH augmented dopamine transients elicited by sucrose-predictive cues. However, operant behavior failed at high-dose AMPH, which was due to phasic dopamine hyperactivity and the decoupling of dopamine transients from the reward predictive cue. These findings identify up-regulation of exocytotic dopamine release as a key AMPH action in behaving animals and support a unified mechanism of abused drugs to activate phasic dopamine signaling. PMID:23303926

  8. Action of a NO donor on the excitation–contraction pathway activated by noradrenaline in rat superior mesenteric artery

    PubMed Central

    Ghisdal, Philippe; Gomez, Jean-Pierre; Morel, Nicole

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the actions of NO donors in ratsuperior mesenteric artery stimulated with noradrenaline by studying their effects on isometric tension, membrane potential (Vm), cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]cyt) and accumulation of inositol phosphates. In unstimulated arteries, SNAP (S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine, 10 μm) hyperpolarised Vm by 3.0 ± 0.5 mV (n = 9). In KCl-stimulated arteries, SNAP relaxed contraction without changing Vm and [Ca2+]cyt. In noradrenaline-stimulated arteries, SNAP relaxed tension, repolarised Vm and decreased [Ca2+]cyt with the same potency. Responses to SNAP were unaffected by the following K+ channel blockers: glibenclamide, 4-aminopyridine, apamin and charybdotoxin, and by increasing the KCl concentration to 25 mM. In SNAP-pretreated arteries, the production of inositol phosphates and the contraction stimulated by noradrenaline were inhibited similarly. The guanylate cyclase inhibitor ODQ abolished the increase in cyclic GMP content evoked by SNAP and inhibited the effects of SNAP on contraction, Vm and accumulation of inositol phosphates in noradrenaline-stimulated artery. These results indicate that, in rat superior mesenteric arteries activated by noradrenaline, inhibition of production of inositol phosphates is responsible for the effects of the NO donor SNAP on membrane potential, [Ca2+]cyt and contraction through a cyclic GMP-dependent mechanism. PMID:10618154

  9. Purinoceptor modulation of noradrenaline release in rat tail artery: tonic modulation mediated by inhibitory P2Y- and facilitatory A2A-purinoceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, J.; Queiroz, G.

    1996-01-01

    1. The effects of analogues of adenosine and ATP on noradrenaline release elicited by electrical stimulation (5 Hz, 2700 pulses) were studied in superfused preparations of rat tail artery. The effects of purinoceptor antagonists, of adenosine deaminase and of adenosine uptake blockade were also examined. Noradrenaline was measured by h.p.l.c. electrochemical detection. 2. The A1-adenosine receptor agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA; 0.1-100 nM) reduced, whereas the A2A-receptor agonist 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS 21680; 3-30 nM) increased evoked noradrenaline overflow. These effects were antagonized by the A1-adenosine receptor antagonist, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX; 20 nM) and the A2-adenosine receptor antagonist, 3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine (DMPX; 100 nM), respectively. The P2Y-purinoceptor agonist, 2-methylthio-ATP (1-100 microM) reduced noradrenaline overflow, an effect prevented by the P2-purinoceptor antagonist, cibacron blue 3GA (100 microM) and suramin (100 microM). 3. Adenosine deaminase (2 u ml-1), DMPX (100 nM) and inhibition of adenosine uptake with S-(p-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine (NBTI; 50 nM) decreased evoked noradrenaline overflow. DPCPX alone did not change noradrenaline overflow but prevented the inhibition caused by NBTI. The P2Y-purinoceptor antagonist, cibacron blue 3GA (100 microM) increased evoked noradrenaline overflow as did suramin, a non-selective P2-antagonist. 4. It is concluded that, in rat tail artery, inhibitory (A1 and P2Y) and facilitatory (A2A) purinoceptors are present and modulate noradrenaline release evoked by electrical stimulation. Endogenous purines tonically modulate noradrenaline release through activation of inhibitory P2Y and facilitatory A2A purinoceptors, whereas a tonic activation of inhibitory A1 purinoceptors seems to be prevented by adenosine uptake. PMID:8825357

  10. Antidepressants differentially affect striatal amphetamine-stimulated dopamine and serotonin release in rats with high and low novelty-oriented behaviour.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Aet; Kõiv, Kadri; Raudkivi, Karita; Harro, Jaanus

    2016-11-01

    In the studies of depression pathogenesis and antidepressant action, the monoaminergic hypothesis of depression has mainly focused on the serotonergic and noradrenergic mechanisms. However, dopaminergic neurotransmission is also linked to both depressive symptomatology as well as antidepressant effects. We have previously shown that persistent inter-individual differences in the rat behavioural activity in novel environments is associated with differences in the striatal extracellular levels of dopamine and serotonin, depressive-like behaviour and the expression of several depression-related genes. The aim of the current study was to investigate the relative potency of the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine, the selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor fluoxetine, and the selective noradrenaline re-uptake inhibitor reboxetine (all drugs administered in the dose of 10mg/kg, i.p.) to enhance amphetamine-stimulated dopamine and serotonin release in the striatum using in vivo microdialysis in awake, freely-moving rats, categorized into high explorers (HE) and low explorers (LE) based on their spontaneous novelty-oriented behaviour. The basal extracellular dopamine and serotonin concentration in the striatum did not differ between the LE- and HE-rats. None of the antidepressants alone were able to modify baseline striatal dopamine levels, but the amphetamine-stimulated dopamine release was significantly higher in the HE-rats after acute and chronic imipramine (but not fluoxetine or reboxetine). Acute imipramine and fluoxetine, but not reboxetine, increased both the basal and amphetamine-stimulated levels of serotonin in the striatum. Again, the HE-rats had higher amphetamine-stimulated serotonin release after fluoxetine administration. These findings suggest that rats with depressive-like phenotype are less sensitive to the neurochemical effects of antidepressants in the striatum. These results may have relevance in understanding the neurobiological bases for inter

  11. Potentiation by adrenaline of human platelet activation and the inhibition by the alpha-adrenergic antagonist nicergoline of platelet adhesion, secretion and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Lanza, F; Cazenave, J P; Beretz, A; Sutter-Bay, A; Kretz, J G; Kieny, R

    1986-08-01

    Adrenaline (1 to 10 microM) can induce the aggregation of human platelets suspended in citrated plasma but does not induce the aggregation of washed human platelets at doses as high as 1 mM, although these platelets respond normally to ADP, PAF-acether, collagen, arachidonic acid, thrombin, the endoperoxide analog U-46619 and the Ca2+ ionophore A23187. Adrenaline (0.5 microM) potentiates the aggregation and secretion induced by all the previous agonists in citrated platelet-rich plasma (cPRP) or in washed platelets. The activation by adrenaline of human platelets is mediated by alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, as demonstrated by inhibition with a series of adrenergic antagonists. The alpha-adrenergic antagonist nicergoline inhibits the activation of human platelets by adrenaline in the following situations: nicergoline inhibits the aggregation and secretion caused by adrenaline in cPRP (IC50 0.22 microM and 0.28 microM respectively); nicergoline inhibits the aggregation and secretion induced by the combination of adrenaline and each aggregating agent listed above in cPRP (IC50 ranging from 0.1 to 2.5 microM) or in washed platelets (IC50 ranging from 0.1 to 0.8 microM); nicergoline inhibits the binding of 3H-yohimbine to washed human platelets (IC50 0.26 microM); the intravenous administration of nicergoline (0.5 mg/kg per day) to patients inhibits significantly the ex vivo response of their platelets to adrenaline in cPRP. High concentrations of nicergoline also inhibit the aggregation and secretion induced by the aggregating agents listed above in cPRP (IC50 range 108 to 670 microM) and in washed platelets (IC50 range 27 to 140 microM) and the adhesion of platelets to collagen-coated surfaces. This latter effect is not mediated through blockade of alpha-adrenoceptors. A possible role of adrenaline in platelet activation in vivo could justify the use of nicergoline (Sermion), an alpha-adrenergic antagonist in combination therapy to prevent arterial thrombosis.

  12. Effect of adrenaline and alpha-agonists on net rate of liquid absorption from the pleural space of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Zocchi, L; Raffaini, A; Agostoni, E

    1997-05-01

    Indirect evidence supporting a solute-coupled liquid absorption from the pleural space of rabbits has recently been provided; moreover, the beta 2-adrenoceptor agonist terbutaline has been found to increase this absorption. In this study the effect of adrenaline and alpha-adrenoceptor agonists on net rate of liquid absorption (Jnet) from albumin Ringer hydrothoraces of various sizes has been determined in anaesthetized rabbits. In hydrothoraces with adrenaline (5 x 10(-6) M) the relationship between Jnet and volume of liquid injected was displaced upwards by 0.09 ml h-1 relative to that in control hydrothoraces (P < 0.01). This displacement did not occur with lower adrenaline concentrations or after pretreatment with the beta-blocker propranolol. Hence, this increase in Jnet is mediated by stimulation of beta-receptors. It seems to be caused by an increase in solute-coupled liquid absorption, since beta-agonists inhibit lymphatic activity while, at relatively high concentrations, they may increase active transport. Conversely, the strong stimulation of lymphatic alpha-receptors that should occur with adrenaline after beta-blockade may fail to increase lymphatic drainage, because it has been shown that the increase in contraction frequency of lymphatics may be balanced by the decrease in their stroke volume. Arterial blood pressure during the hydrothoraces with adrenaline was unchanged. In hydrothoraces with the alpha 2-agonist clonidine (5 x 10(-6) M; a less potent agent than adrenaline) the slope of the relationship between Jnet and volume injected increased by 26% (P < 0.01), while its origin did not change. This increase in slope did not occur with a lower clonidine concentration or after pretreatment with the alpha-blocker phentolamine. Hence, it is caused by stimulation of alpha 2-receptors, which probably lead to an increase in lymphatic drainage related to liquid load. In hydrothoraces with the alpha 1-agonist phenylephrine (5 x 10(-6) or 10(-7) M) Jnet was

  13. Prejunctional angiotensin receptors involved in the facilitation of noradrenaline release in mouse tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cox, S L; Trendelenburg, A U; Starke, K

    1999-01-01

    The effect of angiotensin II, angiotensin III, angiotensin IV and angiotensin-(1–7) on the electrically induced release of noradrenaline was studied in preparations of mouse atria, spleen, hippocampus, occipito-parietal cortex and hypothalamus preincubated with [3H]-noradrenaline. The prejunctional angiotensin receptor type was investigated using the non-selective receptor antagonist saralasin (AT1/AT2) and the AT1 and AT2 selective receptor antagonists losartan and PD 123319, respectively. In atrial and splenic preparations, angiotensin II (0.01 nM–0.1 μM) and angiotensin III (0.01 and 0.1 nM–1 μM) increased the stimulation-induced overflow of tritium in a concentration-dependent manner. Angiotensin IV, only at high concentrations (1 and 10 μM), enhanced tritium overflow in the atria, while angiotensin-(1–7) (0.1 nM–10 μM) was without effect in both preparations. In preparations of hippocampus, occipito-parietal cortex and hypothalamus, none of the angiotensin peptides altered the evoked overflow of tritium. In atrial and splenic preparations, saralasin (0.1 μM) and losartan (0.1 and 1 μM), but not PD 123319 (0.1 μM), shifted the concentration-response curves of angiotensin II and angiotensin III to the right. In conclusion, in mouse atria and spleen, angiotensin II and angiotensin III facilitate the action potential induced release of noradrenaline via a prejunctional AT1 receptor. Only high concentrations of angiotensin IV are effective in the atria and angiotensin-(1–7) is without effect in both preparations. In mouse brain areas, angiotensin II, angiotensin III, angiotensin IV and angiotensin-(1–7) do not modulate the release of noradrenaline. PMID:10455273

  14. Efficacy of buprenorphine added to 2% lignocaine plus adrenaline 1:80,000 in providing postoperative analgesia after lower third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, N; Sharma, P; Chhabra, S; Gupta, N

    2016-12-01

    A number of trials have examined the peripheral analgesic effect of opioids, known to have an anti-nociceptive effect at the central and/or spinal cord level. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of buprenorphine added to 2% lignocaine with adrenaline 1:80,000 in providing postoperative analgesia after lower third molar surgery. Sixty patients were randomized to three groups: group A received lignocaine 2% with adrenaline 1:80,000 for inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB), along with intramuscular (IM) injection of 1ml saline; group B received buprenorphine mixed with lignocaine 2% with adrenaline 1:80,000 for IANB (0.01mg buprenorphine/ml lignocaine with adrenaline), along with 1ml saline IM; group C received lignocaine 2% with adrenaline 1:80,000 for IANB, along with 0.03mg buprenorphine IM. Mean postoperative pain scores (visual analogue scale; when the patient first felt pain) were 6.0 for group A, 1.0 for group B, and 4.4 for group C. The mean duration of postoperative analgesia was 3.5h in groups A and C and 12h in group B. The mean number of postoperative analgesics consumed was 5.8 in groups A and C and 3.9 in group B. The addition of buprenorphine (0.03mg) to 2% lignocaine with adrenaline 1:80,000 significantly reduced the severity of postoperative pain and prolonged the duration of analgesia, thereby decreasing the need for postoperative analgesics. Copyright © 2016 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Sustained Liver Glucose Release in Response to Adrenaline Can Improve Hypoglycaemic Episodes in Rats under Food Restriction Subjected to Acute Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Babata, Lucas K. R.; Pedrosa, Maria M. D.; Garcia, Rosângela F.; Peicher, Márcia V.; de Godoi, Vilma Aparecida Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Background. As the liver is important for blood glucose regulation, this study aimed at relating liver glucose release stimulated by glucagon and adrenaline to in vivo episodes of hypoglycaemia. Methods. The blood glucose profile during an episode of insulin-induced hypoglycaemia in exercised and nonexercised male Wistar control (GC) and food-restricted (GR, 50%) rats and liver glucose release stimulated by glucagon and adrenaline were investigated. Results. In the GR, the hypoglycaemic episodes showed severe decreases in blood glucose, persistent hypoglycaemia, and less complete glycaemic recovery. An exercise session prior to the episode of hypoglycaemia raised the basal blood glucose, reduced the magnitude of the hypoglycaemia, and improved the recovery of blood glucose. In fed animals of both groups, liver glucose release was activated by glucagon and adrenaline. In fasted GR rats, liver glycogenolysis activated by glucagon was impaired, despite a significant basal glycogenolysis, while an adrenaline-stimulated liver glucose release was recorded. Conclusions. The lack of liver response to glucagon in the GR rats could be partially responsible for the more severe episodes of hypoglycaemia observed in vivo in nonexercised animals. The preserved liver response to adrenaline can partially account for the less severe hypoglycaemia in the food-restricted animals after acute exercise. PMID:24719616

  16. Paring down on Descartes: a review of brain noradrenaline and sympathetic nervous function.

    PubMed

    Lambert, G W

    2001-12-01

    1. The conceptual framework of mind-body interaction can be traced back to the seminal observations of the French philosopher and mathematician René Descartes (1596-1650). Descartes succeeded in eliminating the soul's apparent physiological role and established the brain as the body's control centre. 2. While the pivotal role played by the central nervous system (CNS) in the maintenance of physiological and psychological health has long been recognized, the development of methods designed for the direct examination of human CNS processes has only recently come to fruition. 3. There exists a substantial body of evidence derived from clinical and experimental studies indicating that CNS monoaminergic cell groups, in particular those using noradrenaline as their neurotransmitter, participate in the excitatory regulation of the sympathetic nervous system and the development and maintenance of the hypertensive state. 4. In essential hypertension, particularly in younger patients, there occurs an activation of sympathetic nervous outflows to the kidneys, heart and skeletal muscle. The existence of a correlation between subcortical brain noradrenaline turnover and total body noradrenaline spillover to plasma, resting blood pressure and heart rate provides further support for the observation that elevated subcortical noradrenergic activity subserves a sympathoexcitatory role in the regulation of sympathetic preganglionic neurons of the thorocolumbar cord.

  17. Increased Cyclooxygenase-2-Derived Prostanoids Contributes to the Hyperreactivity to Noradrenaline in Mesenteric Resistance Arteries from Offspring of Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Rocha, Juliana; Duarte, Gloria P.; Xavier, Fabiano E.

    2012-01-01

    This study analyzed the effect of in utero exposure to maternal diabetes on contraction to noradrenaline in mesenteric resistance arteries (MRA) from adult offspring, focusing on the role of cyclooxygenase (COX)-derived prostanoids. Diabetes in the maternal rat was induced by a single injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg body weight) on day 7 of pregnancy. Contraction to noradrenaline was analyzed in isolated MRA from offspring of diabetic (O-DR) and non-diabetic (O-CR) rats at 3, 6 and 12 months of age. Release of thromboxane A2 (TxA2) and prostaglandins E2 (PGE2) and F2α (PGF2α), was measured by specific enzyme immunoassay kits. O-DR developed hypertension from 6 months of age compared with O-CR. Arteries from O-DR were hyperactive to noradrenaline only at 6 and 12 months of age. Endothelial removal abolished this hyperreactivity to noradrenaline between O-CR and O-DR. Preincubation with either the COX-1/2 (indomethacin) or COX-2 inhibitor (NS-398) decreased noradrenaline contraction only in 6- and 12-month-old O-DR, while it remained unmodified by COX-1 inhibitor SC-560. In vessels from 6-month-old O-DR, a similar reduction in the contraction to noradrenaline produced by NS-398 was observed when TP and EP receptors were blocked (SQ29548+AH6809). In 12-month-old O-DR, this effect was only achieved when TP, EP and FP were blocked (SQ29548+AH6809+AL8810). Noradrenaline-stimulated TxB2 and PGE2 release was higher in 6- and 12-month-old O-DR, whereas PGF2α was increased only in 12-month-old O-DR. Our results demonstrated that in utero exposure to maternal hyperglycaemia in rats increases the participation of COX-2-derived prostanoids on contraction to noradrenaline, which might help to explain the greater response to this agonist in MRA from 6- and 12-month-old offspring. As increased contractile response in resistance vessels may contribute to hypertension, our results suggest a role for these COX-2-derived prostanoids in elevating vascular resistance and blood

  18. Comparison of changes in the extracellular concentration of noradrenaline in rat frontal cortex induced by sibutramine or d-amphetamine: modulation by α2-adrenoceptors

    PubMed Central

    Wortley, K E; Hughes, Z A; Heal, D J; Stanford, S C

    1999-01-01

    The effects of sibutramine (0.25–10 mg kg−1, i.p.) on extracellular noradrenaline concentration in the frontal cortex of halothane-anaesthetized rats were compared with those of d-amphetamine (1–3 mg kg−1, i.p.) using in vivo microdialysis. The role of presynaptic α2-adrenoceptors in modulating the effects of these drugs on extracellular noradrenaline concentration were also investigated by pretreating rats with the selective α2-adrenoceptor antagonist, RX821002.Sibutramine induced a gradual and sustained increase in extracellular noradrenaline concentration. The dose-response relationship was described by a bell-shaped curve with a maximum effect at 0.5 mg kg−1. In contrast, d-amphetamine induced a rapid increase in extracellular noradrenaline concentration, the magnitude of which paralleled drug dose.Pretreatment with the α2-adrenoceptor antagonist, RX821002 (dose 3 mg kg−1, i.p.) increased by 5 fold the accumulation of extracellular noradrenaline caused by sibutramine (10 mg kg−1) and reduced the latency of sibutramine to reach its maximum effect from 144–56 min.RX821002-pretreatment increased by only 2.5 fold the increase in extracellular noradrenaline concentration caused by d-amphetamine alone (10 mg kg−1) and had no effect on the latency to reach maximum.These findings support evidence that sibutramine acts as a noradrenaline uptake inhibitor in vivo and that the effects of this drug are blunted by indirect activation of presynaptic α2-adreno-ceptors. In contrast, the rapid increase in extracellular noradrenaline concentration induced by d-amphetamine is consistent with this being mainly due to an increase in Ca2+-independent release of noradrenaline. PMID:10482917

  19. Catecholamines - urine

    MedlinePlus

    Dopamine - urine test; Epinephrine - urine test; Adrenalin - urine test; Urine metanephrine; Normetanephrine; Norepinephrine - urine test; Urine catecholamines; VMA; HVA; Metanephrine; Homovanillic ...

  20. Comparison of haemodynamic responses following different concentrations of adrenaline with and without lignocaine for surgical field infiltration during cleft lip and cleft palate surgery in children.

    PubMed

    Muthukumar, Marimuthu; Arya, Virendra K; Mathew, Preety J; Sharma, Ramesh K

    2012-01-01

    Surgical field infiltration with adrenaline is common practice for quality surgical field during cleft lip and palate repair in children. Intravascular absorption of adrenaline infiltration often leads to adverse haemodynamic responses. In this prospective, double-blinded, randomised study the haemodynamic effects, quality of surgical field and postoperative analgesia following surgical field infiltration with different concentrations of adrenaline with and without lignocaine were compared in 100 American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I children aged six months to seven years undergoing cleft lip/palate surgery. A standard anaesthesia protocol was used and they were randomised into four groups based on solution for infiltration: adrenaline 1:400,000 (group A), adrenaline 1:200,000 (group B), lignocaine + adrenaline 1:400,000 (group C) and lignocaine + adrenaline 1:200,000 (group D). Statistically significant tachycardia and hypertension occurred only in group B as compared to other groups (P <0.001). The peak changes in heart rate and mean arterial pressure following infiltration occurred at 4.3 ± 2.4, 3.8 ± 1.5, 5.7 ± 3.2 and 5.9 ± 4.9 minutes in groups A, B, C and D respectively. Surgical field was comparable among all groups. Postoperative pain scores and rescue analgesic requirements were lesser in the groups where lignocaine was added to the infiltrating solution (P <0.05). We found that 1:400000 or 1:200000 adrenaline with lignocaine 0.5 to 0.7% is most suitable for infiltration in terms of stable haemodynamics, quality of surgical field and good postoperative analgesia in children.

  1. Time to achieve target mean arterial pressure during resuscitation from experimental anaphylactic shock in an animal model. A comparison of adrenaline alone or in combination with different volume expanders.

    PubMed

    Tajima, K; Zheng, F; Collange, O; Barthel, G; Thornton, S N; Longrois, D; Levy, B; Audibert, G; Malinovsky, J M; Mertes, P M

    2013-11-01

    Anaphylactic shock is a rare, but potentially lethal complication, combining life-threatening circulatory failure and massive fluid shifts. Treatment guidelines rely on adrenaline and volume expansion by intravenous fluids, but there is no solid evidence for the choice of one specific type of fluid over another. Our purpose was to compare the time to achieve target mean arterial pressure upon resuscitation using adrenaline alone versus adrenaline with different resuscitation fluids in an animal model and to compare the tissue oxygen pressures (PtiO2) with the various strategies. Twenty-five ovalbumin-sensitised Brown Norway rats were allocated to five groups after anaphylactic shock induction: vehicle (CON), adrenaline alone (AD), or adrenaline with isotonic saline (AD+IS), hydroxyethyl starch (AD+HES) or hypertonic saline (AD+HS). Time to reach a target mean arterial pressure value of 75 mmHg, cardiac output, skeletal muscle PtiO2, lactate/pyruvate ratio and cumulative doses of adrenaline were recorded. Non-treated rats died within 15 minutes. The target mean arterial pressure value was reached faster with AD+HES (median: 10 minutes, range: 7.5 to 12.5 minutes) and AD+IS (median: 17.5 minutes, range: 5 to 25 minutes) versus adrenaline alone (median: 25 minutes, range: 20-30 minutes). There were also reduced adrenaline requirements in these groups. The skeletal muscle PtiO2 was restored only in the AD+HES group. Although direct extrapolation to humans should be made with caution, our results support the combined use of adrenaline and volume expansion for resuscitation from anaphylactic shock. When used with adrenaline the most effective fluid was hydroxyethyl starch, whereas hypertonic saline was the least effective.

  2. TISSUE HYPOXIA AS A MECHANISM OF THE ANTI-RADIO PROTECTION EFFECT OF ADRENALIN, HEROIN AND MORPHINE (in Russian)

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Konstantinova, M.M.; Graevskii, E.J.

    1960-07-21

    The protective mechanism of adrenalin heroin, and - morphine on white mice 12 to 18 weeks old, and weighing 18 to 23 g was analyzed in order to determine the protection action of neurotropical substances in relation to their ability to reduce oxygen in tissues. Parallel studies were made of the time factor influence. The results indicate that the investigated substances are capable of reducing the level of oxygen in tissue, and particularly in the spleen. The reduction and restoration of the oxygen content correspond in general to the reduction and increase of mortality. Data confirm that the protective effectsmore » of adrenalin, heroin, and morphine are the result of their ability to produce hypoxia in radiosensitive organs. The hypoxia is induced by the adrenalin pressure effect and by morphine and heroin depression of respiratory centers. (R.V.J.)« less

  3. Psychostimulants affect dopamine transmission through both dopamine transporter-dependent and independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    dela Peña, Ike; Gevorkiana, Ruzanna; Shi, Wei-Xing

    2015-01-01

    The precise mechanisms by which cocaine and amphetamine-like psychostimulants exert their reinforcing effects are not yet fully defined. It is widely believed, however, that these drugs produce their effects by enhancing dopamine neurotransmission in the brain, especially in limbic areas such as the nucleus accumbens, by inducing dopamine transporter-mediated reverse transport and/or blocking dopamine reuptake though the dopamine transporter. Here, we present the evidence that aside from dopamine transporter, non-dopamine transporter-mediated mechanisms also participate in psychostimulant-induced dopamine release and contribute to the behavioral effects of these drugs, such as locomotor activation and reward. Accordingly, psychostimulants could increase norepinephrine release in the prefrontal cortex, the latter then alters the firing pattern of dopamine neurons resulting in changes in action potential-dependent dopamine release. These alterations would further affect the temporal pattern of dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens, thereby modifying information processing in that area. Hence, a synaptic input to a nucleus accumbens neuron may be enhanced or inhibited by dopamine depending on its temporal relationship to dopamine release. Specific temporal patterns of dopamine release may also be required for certain forms of synaptic plasticity in the nucleus accumbens. Together, these effects induced by psychostimulants, mediated through a non-dopamine transporter-mediated mechanism involving norepinephrine and the prefrontal cortex, may also contribute importantly to the reinforcing properties of these drugs. PMID:26209364

  4. [Biogenic amines in the epiphysis and hypothalamus under normal conditions and following ovariectomy].

    PubMed

    Grishchenko, V I; Koliada, L D; Demidenko, D I

    1977-01-01

    Melatonin content in the epiphysis, serotonin, noradrenaline, dopamine-in the hypothalamus, gonadotropins--in the hypophysis of rats was studied under normal conditions and following ovariectomy; regularly of the estral cycle phases was studied as well. Two series of experiments were conducted on 120 rats with regular estral cycles. The animals were divided into groups according to the estral cycle phase. Melatonin concentration in the epiphysis, serotonin, noradrenaline, dopamine--in the hypothalamus was subject to variations coinciding with the estral cycle phases. Serotonin, noradrenaline, and dopamine content decreased in the hypophysis of ovariectomized rats in comparison with control; melatonin content rose in the epiphysis. There was no complete extinction of the estral cycle in the course of investigation (20 days). The action of castration on the sexual cycle depended on the phase at which the rats were subjected to ovariectomy. A reverse relationship existed between the melatonin content in the epiphysis and serotonin content in the hypothalamus, this serving as one of the important factors in the regulation of the sexual function.

  5. Potentiometric and NMR complexation studies of phenylboronic acid PBA and its aminophosphonate analog with selected catecholamines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptak, Tomasz; Młynarz, Piotr; Dobosz, Agnieszka; Rydzewska, Agata; Prokopowicz, Monika

    2013-05-01

    Boronic acids are a class of intensively explored compounds, which according to their specific properties have been intensively explored in last decades. Among them phenylboronic acids and their derivatives are most frequently examined as receptors for diverse carbohydrates. In turn, there is a large gap in basic research concerning complexation of catecholamines by these compounds. Therefore, we decided to undertake studies on interaction of chosen catecholamines, namely: noradrenaline (norephinephrine), dopamine, L-DOPA, DOPA-P (phosphonic analog of L-DOPA) and catechol, with simple phenyl boronic acid PBA by means of potentiometry and NMR spectroscopy. For comparison, the binding properties of recently synthesized phenylboronic receptor 1 bearing aminophosphonate function in meta-position were investigated and showed promising ability to bind catecholamines. The protonation and stability constants of PBA and receptor 1 complexes were examined by potentiometry. The obtained results demonstrated that PBA binds the catecholamines with the following affinity order: noradrenalinedopamine ≈ L-DOPA > catechol > DOPA-P, while its modified analog 1 reveals slightly different preferences: dopamine > noradrenaline > catechol > L-DOPA > DOPA-P.

  6. Myometrial responses in situ to nicergoline, acebutolol, phentolamine and noradrenaline of the rat in proestrus.

    PubMed

    Acritopoulou-Fourcroy, S; Clabaut, M; Schrub, J C

    1984-12-15

    The effects of two adrenoceptor antagonists, nicergoline (alpha 1) and acebutolol (beta 1), on the contraction of myometrium in the proestrous rat were compared to those of noradrenaline and phentolamine. The spontaneous myometrial contractions of Wistar rats on the day of proestrus were recorded isometrically and the data were analysed using Wilcoxon non-parametric statistics. All drugs were administered i.v. and the doses are expressed as microgram/kg body weight. Noradrenaline (1200 micrograms/kg per h) induced a 32.5% reduction (P less than 0.001) of the uterine contraction amplitude. Nicergoline did not alter uterine motility significantly when administered alone at doses ranging from 400 to 1600 micrograms/kg. However, successive injections of nicergoline in the same range given during noradrenaline infusion at 600 micrograms/kg per h potentiated the relaxing action of the latter (38%, P less than 0.01). Phentolamine (120 micrograms/kg) reduced myometrial activity by 25% (P less than 0.05). This inhibitory response rose to 65% (P less than 0.001) when the dose of phentolamine was increased to 960 micrograms/kg. When a single injection of nicergoline (400 micrograms/kg) was followed by the administration of increasing doses of acebutolol (120, 1200, 2400 micrograms/kg) the slight inhibitory effect on uterine motility observed after administration of each of the two agents separately became more pronounced (P less than 0.05). It appears from these results that combining noradrenaline with nicergoline and nicergoline with acebutolol leads to potentiation of their relaxing effects. Furthermore the results confirm that nicergoline is a partial alpha-blocker.

  7. [The effect of prolonged treatment of hypertensive rats with antihypertensive drugs of various actions on the arterial tension and noradrenaline level in the myocardium, brain and aortal].

    PubMed

    Kiriakov, A; Khlebarova, M; Staneva-stoicheva, D; Panova, I

    1975-01-01

    The authors examined the changes in arterial blood pressure and the content of Noradrenaline in the myocardium, brain and aorta of rats with hypertension due to nephrectomy and treatment with desoxycorticosterone and NaCl, and after a chronic 6-month treatment of hypertension with various antihypertensive means. The most significant reduction of noradrenaline in the three of the examined tissues was found in rats, which received dic. sulfyram (100 mg/kg per os). Clondine (10 mkg/kg, per os) manifested the strongest hypotensive effect and lowered the level of noradrenaline in the myocardium, while it was raised in the aorta. Reserpine (10 mkg/kg, s. c) induced a clear reduction of Noradrenaline content in the brain, but an increase in the other two tissues. Insignificant hypotensive effect was observed in animals, treated with guanetidine (0.5 mg/kg, per os), which did not affect substantially noradrenaline in the examined organs. The increase of noradrenaline level was established in the three of the organs of animals, treated with alpha-methyl-DOFA (25 mg/kg, per os). Furosemide (1 mg/kg, s.c.) induced a statistically significant elevation of noradrenaline in the aorta, but was noneffective to noradrenaline in the myocardium and brain.

  8. Roles of Octopamine and Dopamine Neurons for Mediating Appetitive and Aversive Signals in Pavlovian Conditioning in Crickets

    PubMed Central

    Mizunami, Makoto; Matsumoto, Yukihisa

    2017-01-01

    Revealing neural systems that mediate appetite and aversive signals in associative learning is critical for understanding the brain mechanisms controlling adaptive behavior in animals. In mammals, it has been shown that some classes of dopamine neurons in the midbrain mediate prediction error signals that govern the learning process, whereas other classes of dopamine neurons control execution of learned actions. In this review, based on the results of our studies on Pavlovian conditioning in the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus and by referring to the findings in honey bees and fruit-flies, we argue that comparable aminergic systems exist in the insect brain. We found that administrations of octopamine (the invertebrate counterpart of noradrenaline) and dopamine receptor antagonists impair conditioning to associate an olfactory or visual conditioned stimulus (CS) with water or sodium chloride solution (appetitive or aversive unconditioned stimulus, US), respectively, suggesting that specific octopamine and dopamine neurons mediate appetitive and aversive signals, respectively, in conditioning in crickets. These findings differ from findings in fruit-flies. In fruit-flies, appetitive and aversive signals are mediated by different dopamine neuron subsets, suggesting diversity in neurotransmitters mediating appetitive signals in insects. We also found evidences of “blocking” and “auto-blocking” phenomena, which suggested that the prediction error, the discrepancy between actual US and predicted US, governs the conditioning in crickets and that octopamine neurons mediate prediction error signals for appetitive US. Our studies also showed that activations of octopamine and dopamine neurons are needed for the execution of an appetitive conditioned response (CR) and an aversive CR, respectively, and we, thus, proposed that these neurons mediate US prediction signals that drive appetitive and aversive CRs. Our findings suggest that the basic principles of functioning of

  9. Roles of Octopamine and Dopamine Neurons for Mediating Appetitive and Aversive Signals in Pavlovian Conditioning in Crickets.

    PubMed

    Mizunami, Makoto; Matsumoto, Yukihisa

    2017-01-01

    Revealing neural systems that mediate appetite and aversive signals in associative learning is critical for understanding the brain mechanisms controlling adaptive behavior in animals. In mammals, it has been shown that some classes of dopamine neurons in the midbrain mediate prediction error signals that govern the learning process, whereas other classes of dopamine neurons control execution of learned actions. In this review, based on the results of our studies on Pavlovian conditioning in the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus and by referring to the findings in honey bees and fruit-flies, we argue that comparable aminergic systems exist in the insect brain. We found that administrations of octopamine (the invertebrate counterpart of noradrenaline) and dopamine receptor antagonists impair conditioning to associate an olfactory or visual conditioned stimulus (CS) with water or sodium chloride solution (appetitive or aversive unconditioned stimulus, US), respectively, suggesting that specific octopamine and dopamine neurons mediate appetitive and aversive signals, respectively, in conditioning in crickets. These findings differ from findings in fruit-flies. In fruit-flies, appetitive and aversive signals are mediated by different dopamine neuron subsets, suggesting diversity in neurotransmitters mediating appetitive signals in insects. We also found evidences of "blocking" and "auto-blocking" phenomena, which suggested that the prediction error, the discrepancy between actual US and predicted US, governs the conditioning in crickets and that octopamine neurons mediate prediction error signals for appetitive US. Our studies also showed that activations of octopamine and dopamine neurons are needed for the execution of an appetitive conditioned response (CR) and an aversive CR, respectively, and we, thus, proposed that these neurons mediate US prediction signals that drive appetitive and aversive CRs. Our findings suggest that the basic principles of functioning of

  10. Pre-hospital Assessment of the Role of Adrenaline: Measuring the Effectiveness of Drug administration In Cardiac arrest (PARAMEDIC-2): Trial protocol.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Gavin D; Quinn, Tom; Deakin, Charles D; Nolan, Jerry P; Lall, Ranjit; Slowther, Anne-Marie; Cooke, Matthew; Lamb, Sarah E; Petrou, Stavros; Achana, Felix; Finn, Judith; Jacobs, Ian G; Carson, Andrew; Smyth, Mike; Han, Kyee; Byers, Sonia; Rees, Nigel; Whitfield, Richard; Moore, Fionna; Fothergill, Rachael; Stallard, Nigel; Long, John; Hennings, Susie; Horton, Jessica; Kaye, Charlotte; Gates, Simon

    2016-11-01

    Despite its use since the 1960s, the safety or effectiveness of adrenaline as a treatment for cardiac arrest has never been comprehensively evaluated in a clinical trial. Although most studies have found that adrenaline increases the chance of return of spontaneous circulation for short periods, many studies found harmful effects on the brain and raise concern that adrenaline may reduce overall survival and/or good neurological outcome. The PARAMEDIC-2 trial seeks to determine if adrenaline is safe and effective in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. This is a pragmatic, individually randomised, double blind, controlled trial with a parallel economic evaluation. Participants will be eligible if they are in cardiac arrest in the out-of-hospital environment and advanced life support is initiated. Exclusions are cardiac arrest as a result of anaphylaxis or life threatening asthma, and patient known or appearing to be under 16 or pregnant. 8000 participants treated by 5 UK ambulance services will be randomised between December 2014 and August 2017 to adrenaline (intervention) or placebo (control) through opening pre-randomised drug packs. Clinical outcomes are survival to 30 days (primary outcome), hospital discharge, 3, 6 and 12 months, health related quality of life, and neurological and cognitive outcomes (secondary outcomes). Trial registration (ISRCTN73485024). Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Selective inhibition of dopamine-beta-hydroxylase enhances dopamine release from noradrenergic terminals in the medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Devoto, Paola; Flore, Giovanna; Saba, Pierluigi; Frau, Roberto; Gessa, Gian L

    2015-10-01

    Disulfiram has been claimed to be useful in cocaine addiction therapy, its efficacy being attributed to dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DBH) inhibition. Our previous results indicate that disulfiram and the selective DBH inhibitor nepicastat increase extracellular dopamine (DA) in the rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), and markedly potentiated cocaine-induced increase. Concomitantly, in rats with cocaine self-administration history, cocaine-seeking behavior induced by drug priming was prevented, probably through overstimulation of D1 receptors due to the DA increase. The present research was aimed at studying the neurochemical mechanisms originating the enhanced DA release. Noradrenergic system ablation was attained by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of the neurotoxin anti-DBH-saporin (aDBH-sap). DA, noradrenaline (NA), and DOPAC were assessed by HPLC after ex vivo tissue extraction or in vivo microdialysis. Control and denervated rats were subjected to microdialysis in the mPFC and caudate nucleus to evaluate the effect of nepicastat-cocaine combination on extracellular DA levels and their regulation by α2-adrenoceptors. Fifteen days after neurotoxin or its vehicle administration, tissue and extracellular NA were reduced to less than 2% the control value, while extracellular DA was increased by approximately 100%. In control rats, nepicastat given alone and in combination with cocaine increased extracellular DA by about 250% and 1100%, respectively. In denervated rats, nepicastat slightly affected extracellular DA, while in combination with cocaine increased extracellular DA by 250%. No differences were found in the caudate nucleus. Clonidine almost totally reversed the extracellular DA elevation produced by nepicastat-cocaine combination, while it was ineffective in denervated rats. This research shows that the increase of extracellular DA produced by nepicastat alone or in combination with cocaine was prevented by noradrenergic denervation. The

  12. Adrenaline Stimulates Glucagon Secretion by Tpc2-Dependent Ca2+ Mobilization From Acidic Stores in Pancreatic α-Cells.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Alexander; Zhang, Quan; Salehi, Albert; Willems, Mara; Knudsen, Jakob G; Ringgaard, Anna K; Chapman, Caroline E; Gonzalez-Alvarez, Alejandro; Surdo, Nicoletta C; Zaccolo, Manuela; Basco, Davide; Johnson, Paul R V; Ramracheya, Reshma; Rutter, Guy A; Galione, Antony; Rorsman, Patrik; Tarasov, Andrei I

    2018-06-01

    Adrenaline is a powerful stimulus of glucagon secretion. It acts by activation of β-adrenergic receptors, but the downstream mechanisms have only been partially elucidated. Here, we have examined the effects of adrenaline in mouse and human α-cells by a combination of electrophysiology, imaging of Ca 2+ and PKA activity, and hormone release measurements. We found that stimulation of glucagon secretion correlated with a PKA- and EPAC2-dependent (inhibited by PKI and ESI-05, respectively) elevation of [Ca 2+ ] i in α-cells, which occurred without stimulation of electrical activity and persisted in the absence of extracellular Ca 2+ but was sensitive to ryanodine, bafilomycin, and thapsigargin. Adrenaline also increased [Ca 2+ ] i in α-cells in human islets. Genetic or pharmacological inhibition of the Tpc2 channel (that mediates Ca 2+ release from acidic intracellular stores) abolished the stimulatory effect of adrenaline on glucagon secretion and reduced the elevation of [Ca 2+ ] i Furthermore, in Tpc2-deficient islets, ryanodine exerted no additive inhibitory effect. These data suggest that β-adrenergic stimulation of glucagon secretion is controlled by a hierarchy of [Ca 2+ ] i signaling in the α-cell that is initiated by cAMP-induced Tpc2-dependent Ca 2+ release from the acidic stores and further amplified by Ca 2+ -induced Ca 2+ release from the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum. © 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.

  13. Physiologic effect of repeated adrenaline (epinephrine) doses during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the cath lab setting: A randomised porcine study.

    PubMed

    Hardig, Bjarne Madsen; Götberg, Michael; Rundgren, Malin; Götberg, Matthias; Zughaft, David; Kopotic, Robert; Wagner, Henrik

    2016-04-01

    This porcine study was designed to explore the effects of repetitive intravenous adrenaline doses on physiologic parameters during CPR. Thirty-six adult pigs were randomised to four injections of: adrenaline 0.02 mg(kgdose)(-1), adrenaline 0.03 mg(kgdose)(-1) or saline control. The effect on systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure (CePP), end tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2), arterial oxygen saturation via pulse oximetry (SpO2), cerebral tissue oximetry (SctO2), were analysed immediately prior to each injection and at peak arterial systolic pressure and arterial blood gases were analysed at baseline and after 15 min. In the group given 0.02 mg(kgdose)(-1), there were increases in all arterial blood pressures at all 4 pressure peaks but CePP only increased significantly after peak 1. A decrease in ETCO2 following peak 1 and 2 was observed. SctO2 and SpO2 were lowered following injection 2 and beyond. In the group given a 0.03 mg(kgdose)(-1), all ABP's increased at the first 4 pressure peaks but CePP only following 3 pressure peaks. Lower ETCO2, SctO2 and SpO2 were seen at peak 1 and beyond. In the two adrenaline groups, pH and Base Excess were lower and lactate levels higher compared to baseline as well as compared to the control. Repetitive intravenous adrenaline doses increased ABP's and to some extent also CePP, but significantly decreased organ and brain perfusion. The institutional protocol number: Malmö/Lund Committee for Animal Experiment Ethics, approval reference number: M 192-10. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Protective effect of dry olive leaf extract in adrenaline induced DNA damage evaluated using in vitro comet assay with human peripheral leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Cabarkapa, Andrea; Zivković, Lada; Zukovec, Dijana; Djelić, Ninoslav; Bajić, Vladan; Dekanski, Dragana; Spremo-Potparević, Biljana

    2014-04-01

    Excessive release of stress hormone adrenaline is accompanied by generation of reactive oxygen species which may cause disruption of DNA integrity leading to cancer and age-related disorders. Phenolic-rich plant product dry olive leaf extract (DOLE) is known to modulate effects of various oxidants in human cells. The aim was to evaluate the effect of commercial DOLE against adrenaline induced DNA damage in human leukocytes by using comet assay. Peripheral blood leukocytes from 6 healthy subjects were treated in vitro with three final concentrations of DOLE (0.125, 0.5, and 1mg/mL) for 30 min at 37°C under two different protocols, pretreatment and post-treatment. Protective effect of DOLE was assessed from its ability to attenuate formation of DNA lesions induced by adrenaline. Compared to cells exposed only to adrenaline, DOLE displayed significant reduction (P<0.001) of DNA damage at all three concentrations and under both experimental protocols. Pearson correlation analysis revealed a significant positive association between DOLE concentration and leukocytes DNA damage (P<0.05). Antigenotoxic effect of the extract was more pronounced at smaller concentrations. Post-treatment with 0.125 mg/mL DOLE was the most effective against adrenaline genotoxicity. Results indicate genoprotective and antioxidant properties in dry olive leaf extract, strongly supporting further explorations of its underlying mechanisms of action. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of demedullation on freezing injury in hind limbs of rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhingra, Shashi; Bhatia, B.; Chhina, G. S.; Singh, Baldev

    1987-09-01

    Freezing incidence and tissue loss on exposure of hind limbs of female Wistar rats to freezing mixture was reduced by demedullation 6 days prior to cold exposure (p<0.01 and p<0.001 respectively); demedullation 1 h after freezing injury had no effect on tissue loss. Noradrenaline (1 mg/kg i.p.) 5 min before exposure increased the freezing incidence in intact (p<0.05) as well as in demedullated rats (p<0.01), with no effect on tissue loss. Adrenaline (500 mg/kg i.p.) had no effect on either. A sustained fall in plasma adrenaline after demedullation leading to reduced reactivity of the blood vessels to some vasoactive agents is postulated.

  16. Noradrenaline, oxymetazoline and phorbol myristate acetate induce distinct functional actions and phosphorylation patterns of α1A-adrenergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Alcántara-Hernández, Rocío; Hernández-Méndez, Aurelio; Romero-Ávila, M Teresa; Alfonzo-Méndez, Marco A; Pupo, André S; García-Sáinz, J Adolfo

    2017-12-01

    In LNCaP cells that stably express α 1A -adrenergic receptors, oxymetazoline increased intracellular calcium and receptor phosphorylation, however, this agonist was a weak partial agonist, as compared to noradrenaline, for calcium signaling. Interestingly, oxymetazoline-induced receptor internalization and desensitization displayed greater effects than those induced by noradrenaline. Phorbol myristate acetate induced modest receptor internalization and minimal desensitization. α 1A -Adrenergic receptor interaction with β-arrestins (colocalization/coimmunoprecipitation) was induced by noradrenaline and oxymetazoline and, to a lesser extent, by phorbol myristate acetate. Oxymetazoline was more potent and effective than noradrenaline in inducing ERK 1/2 phosphorylation. Mass spectrometric analysis of immunopurified α 1A -adrenergic receptors from cells treated with adrenergic agonists and the phorbol ester clearly showed that phosphorylated residues were present both at the third intracellular loop and at the carboxyl tail. Distinct phosphorylation patterns were observed under the different conditions. The phosphorylated residues were: a) Baseline and all treatments: T233; b) noradrenaline: S220, S227, S229, S246, S250, S389; c) oxymetazoline: S227, S246, S381, T384, S389; and d) phorbol myristate acetate: S246, S250, S258, S351, S352, S401, S402, S407, T411, S413, T451. Our novel data, describing the α 1A -AR phosphorylation sites, suggest that the observed different phosphorylation patterns may participate in defining adrenoceptor localization and action, under the different conditions examined. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. [The mechanism of change in speed of agglutination of human erythrocytes under the influence of adrenaline].

    PubMed

    Volodchenko, A I; Tsirkin, V I; Kostiaev, A A

    2014-01-01

    In the study of red blood cells of 80 men found that adrenaline (10(-10) - 10(-6) g/mL) and phenylephrine (10-(10) - 10(-6) g/mL) dose-dependently increase the speed of agglutination of red blood cells, according to the decrease in agglutination of the start time and ginipral (10(-10) - 10(-7) g/mL), on the contrary, decreases it. The effect of adrenaline and phenylephrine is blocked by nicergoline (10(-6) g/mL), increased obzidan (10(-6) g/mL) and does not change under the action ofyohimbine (10(-6) g/mL) and atenolol (10(-6) g/mL). These data indicate that the speed of agglutination increases with activation alpha1-adrenergic receptor (AR) and decreases in the activation of beta2-AR, while the activation of alpha2- and beta1-AR does not affect it. Trifluoperazine (10(-6) g/mL) as the calmodulin antagonist, barium chloride (10(-6) g/mL) as a blocked of Ca(2+)-dependent K(+)-channels and indomethacine (10(-6) g/mL) as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase and phospholipase A2 inhibit the ability of adrenaline to increases the speed of agglutination of red blood cells. This suggests that the effect of adrenaline caused an increase in erythrocyte entry of Ca2+, activation of calmodulin, cyclooxygenase, phospholipase A2 and the release of K+ from red blood cell through the Ca(2+)-dependent K+ channels, which is regarded as a manifestation of eryptosis. Indirectly, this means that more efficient activation of alpha1-AR and beta2-AR, respectively, increases or, conversely, decreases the rate of eryptosis.

  18. Divergent effects of adrenaline in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes obtained from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Prajapati, Chandra

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common inherited cardiac disease that affects the heart muscle with diverse clinical outcomes. HCM can cause sudden cardiac death (SCD) during or immediately after mild to rigorous physical activity in young patients. However, the mechanism causing SCD as a result of exercise remains unknown, but exercise-induced ventricular arrhythmias are thought to be responsible for this fatal consequence. To understand the disease mechanism behind HCM in a better way, we generated patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs) from HCM patients carrying either the MYBPC3-Gln1061X or TPM1-Asp175Asn mutation. We extensively investigated the effects of low to high concentrations of adrenaline on action potential characteristics, and the occurrence of arrhythmias in the presence of various concentrations of adrenaline and in wash-out condition. We classified and quantified different types of arrhythmias observed in hiPSC-CMs, and found that the occurrence of arrhythmias was dependent on concentrations of adrenaline and positions of mutations in genes causing HCM. In addition, we observed ventricular tachycardia types of arrhythmias in hiPSC-CMs carrying the TPM1-Asp175Asn mutation. We additionally examined the antiarrhythmic potency of bisoprolol in HCM-specific hiPSC-CMs. However, bisoprolol could not reduce the occurrence of arrhythmias during administration or during the wash-out condition of adrenaline in HCM-specific hiPSC-CMs. Our study demonstrates hiPSC-CMs as a promising tool for studying HCM. The experimental design used in this study could be suitable and beneficial for studying other components and drugs related to cardiac disease in general. PMID:29361520

  19. Oestrogen supplementation attenuates responses to psychological stress in elderly men rendered hypogonadal after treatment for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Komesaroff, Paul A; Fullerton, Meryl; Esler, Murray D; Jennings, Garry; Sudhir, Krishnankutty

    2002-06-01

    We have shown previously that oestrogens attenuate cardiovascular and hormonal responses to stress in perimenopausal women. The cardiovascular role of oestrogens in men is uncertain, despite preliminary evidence that endogenous oestrogens produced by aromatization of androgenic precursors are of physiological importance; hypogonadal men have very low levels of circulating oestrogen. We therefore studied the haemodynamic and hormonal responses to a standardized laboratory mental stress test in 12 men (mean age 68.9 +/- 2.6 SEM years) rendered hypogonadal as a result of treatment for prostatic cancer, before and after 8 weeks of oestrogen supplementation (oestradiol valerate 1 mg daily, n = 7) or placebo (n = 5). The stress was administered as a standard mental arithmetic test of 10 minutes' duration. Blood pressure, cortisol and ACTH were measured at baseline, and following 5 minutes and 10 minutes of stress, and ACTH again at 25 minutes on both days. Noradrenaline and adrenaline responses to mental stress, as well as changes in total body and forearm spillover of noradrenaline and noradrenaline clearance, were also measured. Oestrogen supplementation was well tolerated, with minimal adverse effects. Mean oestradiol levels increased from < 30 pmol/l to 308 +/- 65 pmol/l after oestrogen treatment. Oestradiol significantly attenuated the mental stress-induced increase in both systolic and diastolic blood pressures. Oestradiol also attenuated mental stress-induced increases in ACTH, cortisol and adrenaline, but did not influence either total body or forearm spillover of noradrenaline. Responses to stress were unchanged after administration of placebo. We conclude that oestrogen supplementation in men rendered hypogonadal as a result of treatment for prostate cancer is well tolerated and significantly attenuates blood pressure and hormonal responses to psychological stress. These findings suggest the need for further studies to examine a possible clinical role for

  20. Neonatal exposure to estradiol valerate increases dopamine content in nigrostriatal pathway during adulthood in the rat.

    PubMed

    Cruz, G; Riquelme, R; Espinosa, P; Jara, P; Dagnino-Subiabre, A; Renard, G M; Sotomayor-Zárate, R

    2014-05-01

    Research in programming has focused in the study of stimuli that affect sensitive periods of development such as prenatal and neonatal stage. We previously showed that exposure to estradiol valerate to female rats during the first 12 h of life increased catecholamine content in ventromedial-arcuatus hypothalamus of the adult rat. However, changes in others dopaminergic circuits have not been studied. The purpose of this work was to determine the neurotransmitters changes induced by neonatal estradiol valerate (0.1 mg/50 μl s. c. per rat) administration on nigrostriatal pathway of adult female rats. Sesame oil (50 μl s. c. per rat) was administered in a control parallel group. EV-1 adult rats presented effective markers of long-term estrogenization as decreased serum levels of progesterone and a reduction in the size of estrogen-sensitive organs. In the brain, neonatal estradiol valerate administration led to a significant increase in dopamine content in striatum, substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area. With respect to the contents of dopamine metabolites, only 3-methoxytyramine content increased in substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area. In addition, the content of noradrenaline increased only in striatum. Interestingly, estrogenized rats lacked locomotor activity induced by acute dose of amphetamine (1 mg/kg i. p.). Altogether, these results show that neonatal exposure to estradiol valerate permanently modified the content of monoamine neurotransmitters in nigrostriatal pathway and amphetamine-induced locomotor activity of adult female rats. This might imply that estrogenized rats could have changes in the expression of key proteins in dopaminergic regulation, as tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Proposed use of adrenaline (epinephrine) in anaphylaxis and related conditions: a study of senior house officers starting accident and emergency posts

    PubMed Central

    Gompels, L; Bethune, C; Johnston, S; Gompels, M

    2002-01-01

    Senior house officers (SHOs) (n=78) at the start of their accident and emergency (A&E) post were given an anonymous five case history questionnaire, containing one case of true anaphylaxis, and asked to complete the medication they would prescribe. In the case of anaphylaxis, 100% would administer adrenaline (epinephrine) but 55% would do so by the incorrect route. In the remaining cases, 10%–56% would be prepared to administer adrenaline inappropriately. Only 5% were able to indicate the correct route and dose of adrenaline according to Resuscitation Council guidelines (UK). This has implications for training as the survey took place before the start of the A&E posting. Anaphylaxis is over-diagnosed and poorly treated despite Resuscitation Council guidelines. PMID:12151658

  2. The Gly16 Allele of the G16R Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in the β2-Adrenergic Receptor Gene Augments the Glycemic Response to Adrenaline in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Rokamp, Kim Z.; Staalsø, Jonatan M.; Zaar, Morten; Rasmussen, Peter; Petersen, Lonnie G.; Nielsen, Rikke V.; Secher, Niels H.; Olsen, Niels V.; Nielsen, Henning B.

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral non-oxidative carbohydrate consumption may be driven by a β2-adrenergic mechanism. This study tested whether the 46G > A (G16R) single nucleotide polymorphism of the β2-adrenergic receptor gene (ADRB2) influences the metabolic and cerebrovascular responses to administration of adrenaline. Forty healthy Caucasian men were included from a group of genotyped individuals. Cardio- and cerebrovascular variables at baseline and during a 60-min adrenaline infusion (0.06 μg kg−1 min−1) were measured by Model flow, near-infrared spectroscopy and transcranial Doppler sonography. Blood samples were obtained from an artery and a retrograde catheter in the right internal jugular vein. The ADRB2 G16R variation had no effect on baseline arterial glucose, but during adrenaline infusion plasma glucose was up to 1.2 mM (CI95: 0.36–2.1, P < 0.026) higher in the Gly16 homozygotes compared with Arg16 homozygotes. The extrapolated steady-state levels of plasma glucose was 1.9 mM (CI95: 1.0 –2.9, PNLME < 0.0026) higher in the Gly16 homozygotes compared with Arg16 homozygotes. There was no change in the cerebral oxygen glucose index and the oxygen carbohydrate index during adrenaline infusion and the two indexes were not affected by G16R polymorphism. No difference between genotype groups was found in cardiac output at baseline or during adrenaline infusion. The metabolic response of glucose during adrenergic stimulation with adrenaline is associated to the G16R polymorphism of ADRB2, although without effect on cerebral metabolism. The differences in adrenaline-induced blood glucose increase between genotypes suggest an elevated β2-adrenergic response in the Gly16 homozygotes with increased adrenaline-induced glycolysis compared to Arg16 homozygotes. PMID:28928674

  3. Effect of noni (Morinda citrifolia Linn.) fruit and its bioactive principles scopoletin and rutin on rat vas deferens contractility: an ex vivo study.

    PubMed

    Pandy, Vijayapandi; Narasingam, Megala; Kunasegaran, Thubasni; Murugan, Dharmani Devi; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effect of methanolic extract of Morinda citrifolia Linn. (MMC) and its bioactive principles, scopoletin and rutin, on dopamine- and noradrenaline-evoked contractility in isolated rat vas deferens preparations. MMC (1-40 mg/mL), scopoletin (1-200 μg/mL), and rutin hydrate (0.6-312.6 μg/mL) dose-dependently inhibited the contractility evoked by submaximal concentrations of both dopamine and noradrenaline, respectively. Haloperidol and prazosin, reference dopamine D2, and α 1-adrenoceptors antagonists significantly reversed the dopamine- and noradrenaline-induced contractions, respectively, in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, MMC per se at higher doses (60-100 mg/mL) showed dose-dependent contractile response in rat vas deferens which was partially inhibited by high doses of haloperidol but not by prazosin. These results demonstrated the biphasic effects of MMC on dopaminergic system; that is, antidopaminergic effect at lower concentrations (<40 mg/mL) and dopaminergic agonistic effect at higher concentrations (>60 mg/mL). However, similar contractile response at high doses of scopoletin (0.5-5 mg/mL) and rutin hydrate (0.5-5 mg/mL) per se was not observed. Therefore, it can be concluded that the bioactive principles of MMC, scopoletin, and rutin might be responsible for the antidopaminergic and antiadrenergic activities of MMC.

  4. Adrenaline release evokes hyperpnoea and an increase in ventilatory CO2 sensitivity during hypoglycaemia: a role for the carotid body

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Emma L.; Ray, Clare J.; Holmes, Andrew P.; Pye, Richard L.; Wyatt, Christopher N.; Kumar, Prem

    2016-01-01

    Key points Hypoglycaemia is counteracted by release of hormones and an increase in ventilation and CO2 sensitivity to restore blood glucose levels and prevent a fall in blood pH.The full counter‐regulatory response and an appropriate increase in ventilation is dependent on carotid body stimulation.We show that the hypoglycaemia‐induced increase in ventilation and CO2 sensitivity is abolished by preventing adrenaline release or blocking its receptors.Physiological levels of adrenaline mimicked the effect of hypoglycaemia on ventilation and CO2 sensitivity.These results suggest that adrenaline, rather than low glucose, is an adequate stimulus for the carotid body‐mediated changes in ventilation and CO2 sensitivity during hypoglycaemia to prevent a serious acidosis in poorly controlled diabetes. Abstract Hypoglycaemia in vivo induces a counter‐regulatory response that involves the release of hormones to restore blood glucose levels. Concomitantly, hypoglycaemia evokes a carotid body‐mediated hyperpnoea that maintains arterial CO2 levels and prevents respiratory acidosis in the face of increased metabolism. It is unclear whether the carotid body is directly stimulated by low glucose or by a counter‐regulatory hormone such as adrenaline. Minute ventilation was recorded during infusion of insulin‐induced hypoglycaemia (8–17 mIU kg−1 min−1) in Alfaxan‐anaesthetised male Wistar rats. Hypoglycaemia significantly augmented minute ventilation (123 ± 4 to 143 ± 7 ml min−1) and CO2 sensitivity (3.3 ± 0.3 to 4.4 ± 0.4 ml min−1 mmHg−1). These effects were abolished by either β‐adrenoreceptor blockade with propranolol or adrenalectomy. In this hypermetabolic, hypoglycaemic state, propranolol stimulated a rise in P aC O2, suggestive of a ventilation–metabolism mismatch. Infusion of adrenaline (1 μg kg−1 min−1) increased minute ventilation (145 ± 4 to 173 ± 5 ml min−1) without altering P aC O2 or pH and enhanced

  5. Adrenaline release evokes hyperpnoea and an increase in ventilatory CO2 sensitivity during hypoglycaemia: a role for the carotid body.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Emma L; Ray, Clare J; Holmes, Andrew P; Pye, Richard L; Wyatt, Christopher N; Coney, Andrew M; Kumar, Prem

    2016-08-01

    Hypoglycaemia is counteracted by release of hormones and an increase in ventilation and CO2 sensitivity to restore blood glucose levels and prevent a fall in blood pH. The full counter-regulatory response and an appropriate increase in ventilation is dependent on carotid body stimulation. We show that the hypoglycaemia-induced increase in ventilation and CO2 sensitivity is abolished by preventing adrenaline release or blocking its receptors. Physiological levels of adrenaline mimicked the effect of hypoglycaemia on ventilation and CO2 sensitivity. These results suggest that adrenaline, rather than low glucose, is an adequate stimulus for the carotid body-mediated changes in ventilation and CO2 sensitivity during hypoglycaemia to prevent a serious acidosis in poorly controlled diabetes. Hypoglycaemia in vivo induces a counter-regulatory response that involves the release of hormones to restore blood glucose levels. Concomitantly, hypoglycaemia evokes a carotid body-mediated hyperpnoea that maintains arterial CO2 levels and prevents respiratory acidosis in the face of increased metabolism. It is unclear whether the carotid body is directly stimulated by low glucose or by a counter-regulatory hormone such as adrenaline. Minute ventilation was recorded during infusion of insulin-induced hypoglycaemia (8-17 mIU kg(-1)  min(-1) ) in Alfaxan-anaesthetised male Wistar rats. Hypoglycaemia significantly augmented minute ventilation (123 ± 4 to 143 ± 7 ml min(-1) ) and CO2 sensitivity (3.3 ± 0.3 to 4.4 ± 0.4 ml min(-1)  mmHg(-1) ). These effects were abolished by either β-adrenoreceptor blockade with propranolol or adrenalectomy. In this hypermetabolic, hypoglycaemic state, propranolol stimulated a rise in P aC O2, suggestive of a ventilation-metabolism mismatch. Infusion of adrenaline (1 μg kg(-1)  min(-1) ) increased minute ventilation (145 ± 4 to 173 ± 5 ml min(-1) ) without altering P aC O2 or pH and enhanced ventilatory CO2 sensitivity (3

  6. Reduced Tissue Levels of Noradrenaline Are Associated with Behavioral Phenotypes of the TgCRND8 Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Beverly M; Yang, Jimao; Hajderi, Enid; Brown, Mary E; Michalski, Bernadeta; McLaurin, JoAnne; Fahnestock, Margaret; Mount, Howard T J

    2012-01-01

    Noradrenergic cell loss is well documented in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have measured the tissue levels of catecholamines in an amyloid precursor protein-transgenic ‘TgCRND8' mouse model of AD and found reductions in noradrenaline (NA) within hippocampus, temporoparietal and frontal cortices, and cerebellum. An age-related increase in cortical NA levels was observed in non-Tg controls, but not in TgCRND8 mice. In contrast, NA levels declined with aging in the TgCRND8 hippocampus. Dopamine levels were unaffected. Reductions in the tissue content of NA were found to coincide with altered expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA and to precede the onset of object memory impairment and behavioral despair. To test whether these phenotypes might be associated with diminished NA, we treated mice with dexefaroxan, an antagonist of presynaptic inhibitory α2-adrenoceptors on noradrenergic and cholinergic terminals. Mice 12 weeks of age were infused systemically for 28 days with dexefaroxan or rivastigmine, a cholinesterase inhibitor. Both dexefaroxan and rivastigmine improved TgCRND8 behavioral phenotypes and increased BDNF mRNA expression without affecting amyloid-β peptide levels. Our results highlight the importance of noradrenergic depletion in AD-like phenotypes of TgCRND8 mice. PMID:22491352

  7. ELECTROCARDIOGRAPHIC CHANGES IN RABBITS SUBJECTED TO THE CHRONIC ACTION OF RADIOACTIVE ZINC DURING INTRAVENOUS ADMINISTRATION OF ADRENALINE AND INHALATION OF AMMONIA (in Russian)

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Ovakimov, V.G.; Bibikhin, L.N.; Saitanov, A.O.

    1963-09-01

    The employment of pharmacological loadings (administration of adrenaline and inhalation of ammonia) in rabbits subjected to the chronic action of radioactive zinc (1 and 10 mu C/kg) disclosed changes in the sensitivity of adrenoreactive systems of the myocardium (in adrenaline test) and an altered intensity and duration of reflex bradycardia (in ammonia test). (auth)

  8. DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Akatsuchi, Y.

    Mice were x irradiated by whole-body single doses of 700 r (lethal dose). The administration of phenylephrine chloride, naphazoline, tetrahydrozoline chloride, and noradrenaline gave considerable protection against the lethal effect, when an optimal dose of each agent was given. Cocaine chloride, histamine chloride, or adrenaline chloride gave moderate protection. No protective effect was seen after the administration of ephedrine chloride or diphenhydramine. (Abstr. Japan Med., 2, No. 1, Jan. 1962)

  9. [The catecholamine content of the hypothalamus during the modelling of the ulcer process in the gastroduodenal area].

    PubMed

    Iemel'ianenko, I V; Sultanova, I D; Voronych, N M

    1995-01-01

    The content of catecholamines in rat hypothalamus in experimental ulcer process in gastroduodenal region has been studied in experiments on rats. It was determined that under these conditions the content of hypothalamus adrenalin increases and the content of noradrenalin decreases. The level of dofamin and DOFA in this brain structure changes in phases. The mentioned shifts depended on the duration and character of the pathological process in the gastroduodenal region.

  10. Protective Effects of Morus alba Leaves Extract on Ocular Functions of Pups from Diabetic and Hypercholesterolemic Mother Rats

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayyad, H.I.H.; El-Sherbiny, M.A.; Sobh, M.A.; Abou-El-Naga, A.M.; Ibrahim, M.A.N.; Mousa, S.A.

    2011-01-01

    Phytotherapy is frequently considered to be less toxic and free from side effects than synthetic drugs. Hence, the present study was designed to investigate the protective use of crude water extract of Morus alba leaves on ocular functions including cataractogenesis, biochemical diabetic and hypercholesterolemic markers, retinal neurotransmitters and retinopathy of rat pups maternally subjected to either diabetes and/or hypercholesterolemia. Application of crude water extract of Morus alba resulted in amelioration of the alterations of maternal serum glucose, LDL, HDL, total cholesterol and creatine phosphokinase activity as well as retinal neurotransmitters including acetylcholine (ACE), adrenaline (AD), nor-adrenaline (NAD), serotonin (5-HT), histamine (HS), dopamine (DA) and gamma amino butyric acid (GABA). The retina of pups of either diabetic and/or hypercholesterolemia mothers exhibited massive alterations of retinal neurotransmitters. The alterations of retinal neurotransmitters were correlated with the observed pathological alterations of retinal pigmented epithelium, photoreceptor inner segment and ganglion cells and increased incidence of DNA fragmentation and apoptosis cell death. However, protection with Morus alba extract led to amelioration of the pathological alterations of retinal neurons and estimated neurotransmitters. Furthermore, a striking incidence of cataract was detected in pups of either diabetic and/or hypercholesterolemic mothers. Highest cataractogenesis was observed in pups of combined -treated groups. Our data indicate that experimental maternal diabetes alone or in combination with hypercholesterolemia led to alteration in the ocular structures of their pups, with an increasing incidence of cataract and retinopathy, and the effects of the extract might be attributed to the hypoglycaemic, antihypercholesterolemic and anti-oxidative potential of flavonoids, the major components of the plant extract. PMID:21697998

  11. Protective effects of Morus alba leaves extract on ocular functions of pups from diabetic and hypercholesterolemic mother rats.

    PubMed

    El-Sayyad, H I H; El-Sherbiny, M A; Sobh, M A; Abou-El-Naga, A M; Ibrahim, M A N; Mousa, S A

    2011-01-01

    Phytotherapy is frequently considered to be less toxic and free from side effects than synthetic drugs. Hence, the present study was designed to investigate the protective use of crude water extract of Morus alba leaves on ocular functions including cataractogenesis, biochemical diabetic and hypercholesterolemic markers, retinal neurotransmitters and retinopathy of rat pups maternally subjected to either diabetes and/or hypercholesterolemia. Application of crude water extract of Morus alba resulted in amelioration of the alterations of maternal serum glucose, LDL, HDL, total cholesterol and creatine phosphokinase activity as well as retinal neurotransmitters including acetylcholine (ACE), adrenaline (AD), nor-adrenaline (NAD), serotonin (5-HT), histamine (HS), dopamine (DA) and gamma amino butyric acid (GABA). The retina of pups of either diabetic and/or hypercholesterolemia mothers exhibited massive alterations of retinal neurotransmitters. The alterations of retinal neurotransmitters were correlated with the observed pathological alterations of retinal pigmented epithelium, photoreceptor inner segment and ganglion cells and increased incidence of DNA fragmentation and apoptosis cell death. However, protection with Morus alba extract led to amelioration of the pathological alterations of retinal neurons and estimated neurotransmitters. Furthermore, a striking incidence of cataract was detected in pups of either diabetic and/or hypercholesterolemic mothers. Highest cataractogenesis was observed in pups of combined -treated groups. Our data indicate that experimental maternal diabetes alone or in combination with hypercholesterolemia led to alteration in the ocular structures of their pups, with an increasing incidence of cataract and retinopathy, and the effects of the extract might be attributed to the hypoglycaemic, antihypercholesterolemic and anti-oxidative potential of flavonoids, the major components of the plant extract.

  12. Occupational EMF exposure from radar at X and Ku frequency band and plasma catecholamine levels.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sarika; Kapoor, Neeru

    2015-09-01

    Workers in certain occupations such as the military may be exposed to technical radiofrequency radiation exposure above current limits, which may pose a health risk. The present investigation intended to find the effect of chronic electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure from radar on plasma catecholamines in the military workforce. In the study, 166 male personnel selected randomly were categorized into three groups: control (n = 68), exposure group-I (X-band, 8-12 GHz, n = 40), and exposure group-II (Ku-band, 12.5-18 GHz, n = 58). The three clusters were further divided into two groups according to their years of service (YOS) (up to 9 years and ≥10 years) to study the effect of years of radar exposure. Enzyme immunoassay was employed to assess catecholamine concentrations. EMF levels were recorded at different occupational distances from radar. Significant adrenaline diminution was registered in exposure group-II with no significant difference in exposure group-I when both groups were weighed against control. Nor-adrenaline and dopamine levels did not vary significantly in both exposure groups when compared to controls. Exposure in terms of YOS also did not yield any significant alteration in any of the catecholamines and in any of the exposure groups when compared with their respective control groups. The shift from baseline catecholamine values due to stress has immense significance for health and well-being. Their continual alteration may prove harmful in due course. Suitable follow-up studies are needed to further strengthen these preliminary observations and for now, exposures should be limited as much as possible with essential safeguards. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Human muscle sympathetic nerve activity and plasma noradrenaline kinetics in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ertl, Andrew C.; Diedrich, Andre; Biaggioni, Italo; Levine, Benjamin D.; Robertson, Rose Marie; Cox, James F.; Zuckerman, Julie H.; Pawelczyk, James A.; Ray, Chester A.; Buckey, Jay C Jr; hide

    2002-01-01

    Astronauts returning from space have reduced red blood cell masses, hypovolaemia and orthostatic intolerance, marked by greater cardio-acceleration during standing than before spaceflight, and in some, orthostatic hypotension and presyncope. Adaptation of the sympathetic nervous system occurring during spaceflight may be responsible for these postflight alterations. We tested the hypotheses that exposure to microgravity reduces sympathetic neural outflow and impairs sympathetic neural responses to orthostatic stress. We measured heart rate, photoplethysmographic finger arterial pressure, peroneal nerve muscle sympathetic activity and plasma noradrenaline spillover and clearance, in male astronauts before, during (flight day 12 or 13) and after the 16 day Neurolab space shuttle mission. Measurements were made during supine rest and orthostatic stress, as simulated on Earth and in space by 7 min periods of 15 and 30 mmHg lower body suction. Mean (+/- S.E.M.) heart rates before lower body suction were similar pre-flight and in flight. Heart rate responses to -30 mmHg were greater in flight (from 56 +/- 4 to 72 +/- 4 beats min(-1)) than pre-flight (from 56 +/- 4 at rest to 62 +/- 4 beats min(-1), P < 0.05). Noradrenaline spillover and clearance were increased from pre-flight levels during baseline periods and during lower body suction, both in flight (n = 3) and on post-flight days 1 or 2 (n = 5, P < 0.05). In-flight baseline sympathetic nerve activity was increased above pre-flight levels (by 10-33 %) in the same three subjects in whom noradrenaline spillover and clearance were increased. The sympathetic response to 30 mmHg lower body suction was at pre-flight levels or higher in each subject (35 pre-flight vs. 40 bursts min(-1) in flight). No astronaut experienced presyncope during lower body suction in space (or during upright tilt following the Neurolab mission). We conclude that in space, baseline sympathetic neural outflow is increased moderately and sympathetic

  14. Infusion of noradrenaline through the proximal line of a migrated central venous catheter.

    PubMed

    Freer, M; Noble, S

    2012-08-01

    A 41-year-old, obese, patient was admitted to Accident and Emergency with a history of leg cellulitis. A central line was inserted. Documented aspiration of blood from all lines, central venous pressure trace obtained and correct position noted on the chest X-ray (CXR). The patient became increasingly septic despite antibiotic therapy. He was subsequently commenced on a noradrenaline infusion; however, the blood pressure was unresponsive. On admission to the intensive care unit (ICU), it was noted he had an area of white skin over the right clavicle. The infusions were stopped and a CXR confirmed proximal migration of the line. The central line was re-sited and his noradrenaline recommenced with an improvement in his blood pressure. Acute renal failure developed which required haemofiltration for 24 hours. The condition improved and the patient was discharged from ICU. It took several weeks for his renal function to return to normal, but he was discharged home with no permanent damage.

  15. The modulatory effects of noradrenaline on vagal control of heart rate in the dogfish, Squalus acanthias.

    PubMed

    Agnisola, Claudio; Randall, David J; Taylor, Edwin W

    2003-01-01

    The possible interactions between inhibitory vagal control of the heart and circulating levels of catecholamines in dogfish (Squalus acanthias) were studied using an in situ preparation of the heart, which retained intact its innervation from centrally cut vagus nerves. The response to peripheral vagal stimulation typically consisted of an initial cardiac arrest, followed by an escape beat, leading to renewed beating at a mean heart rate lower than the prestimulation rate (partial recovery). Cessation of vagal stimulation led to a transient increase in heart rate, above the prestimulation rate. This whole response was completely abolished by 10(-4) M atropine (a muscarinic cholinergic antagonist). The degree of vagal inhibition was evaluated in terms of both the initial, maximal cardiac interval and the mean heart rate during partial recovery, both expressed as a percentage of the prestimulation heart rate. The mean prestimulation heart rate of this preparation (36+/-4 beats min(-1)) was not affected by noradrenaline but was significantly reduced by 10(-4) M nadolol (a beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist), suggesting the existence of a resting adrenergic tone arising from endogenous catecholamines. The degree of vagal inhibition of heart rate varied with the rate of stimulation and was increased by the presence of 10(-8) M noradrenaline (the normal in vivo level in routinely active fish), while 10(-7) M noradrenaline (the in vivo level measured in disturbed or deeply hypoxic fish) reduced the cardiac response to vagal stimulation. In the presence of 10(-7) M noradrenaline, 10(-4) M nadolol further reduced the vagal response, while 10(-4) M nadolol + 10(-4) M phentolamine had no effect, indicating a complex interaction between adrenoreceptors, possibly involving presynaptic modulation of vagal inhibition.

  16. Intra-articular administration of lidocaine plus adrenaline in dogs: Pharmacokinetic profile and evaluation of toxicity in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Di Salvo, A; Chiaradia, E; della Rocca, G; Mancini, F; Galarini, R; Giusepponi, D; De Monte, V; Cagnardi, P; Marenzoni, M L; Bufalari, A

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety of intra-articular (IA) lidocaine plus adrenaline for improving peri-operative analgesia in anaesthetized dogs undergoing arthroscopy of the elbow. A solution of lidocaine (L) 1.98% plus adrenaline 1:100.000 was administered via the IA route and its safety evaluated in terms of cardio-, neuro-, and chondro-toxicity. No bradycardia or hypotension was recorded from induction to the last observational time point. Signs of toxicity of the nervous system could have been masked by the general anaesthesia but lidocaine concentrations detected in the blood were lower than those thought to be capable of producing toxicity. The assessment of in vitro chondrotoxicity showed a dose- and time-dependent effect of lidocaine on the viability of articular cells. Adrenaline appeared to reduce the chondrotoxicity of 1% lidocaine, following an exposure of up to 30 min. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Lack of CB1 receptors increases noradrenaline release in vas deferens without affecting atrial noradrenaline release or cortical acetylcholine release

    PubMed Central

    Schlicker, Eberhard; Redmer, Agnes; Werner, André; Kathmann, Markus

    2003-01-01

    We studied whether cannabinoid CB1 receptor gene disruption (to yield CB1−/− mice) affects the electrically evoked tritium overflow from vas deferens and atrial pieces preincubated with [3H]-noradrenaline (NA) (‘noradrenaline release') and from cerebral cortex slices preincubated with [3H]-choline (‘acetylcholine release'). NA release was higher by 37% in vas deferens from CB1−/− mice than in vas deferens from CB1+/+ mice. The cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 inhibited, and the CB1 receptor inverse agonist/antagonist SR 141716, increased NA release in vas deferens from CB1+/+ mice without affecting it in vas deferens from CB1−/− mice. Atrial NA release did not differ between CB1+/+ and CB1−/− mice nor did WIN 55,212-2 affect NA release in either strain. Cortical acetylcholine (Ach) release did not differ between CB1+/+ and CB1−/− mice. WIN 55,212-2 inhibited, but SR 141716 did not affect, Ach release in the cortex from CB1+/+ mice. Both drugs did not alter Ach release in the cortex from CB1−/− mice. Tritium content did not differ between CB1+/+ and CB1−/− mice in any preparation. In conclusion, the increase in NA release associated with CB1 receptor deficiency in the vas deferens, which cannot be ascribed to an alteration of tritium content of the preparations, suggests an endogenous tone at the CB1 receptors of CB1+/+ mice in this tissue. Furthermore, the effect of WIN 55,212-2 on NA release in the vas deferens and on cortical Ach release involves CB1 receptors, whereas the involvement of non-CB1–non-CB2 receptors can be excluded. PMID:12970076

  18. Muscarinic inhibition of [3H]-noradrenaline release on rabbit iris in vitro: effects of stimulation conditions on intrinsic activity of methacholine and pilocarpine.

    PubMed Central

    Bognar, I. T.; Pallas, S.; Fuder, H.; Muscholl, E.

    1988-01-01

    1. Rabbit isolated irides were loaded with [3H]-noradrenaline and superfused with Tyrode solution. The inhibition by the muscarinic agonists (+/-)-methacholine and pilocarpine of the [3H]-noradrenaline overflow into the superfusate evoked by field stimulation (pulses of 1 ms duration, 75 mA) was measured as an index of activation of presynaptic muscarinic receptors. 2. The fractional rate of release per pulse during the first stimulation period (S1) was low with 360 pulses at 3 Hz, intermediate with 360 pulses at 10 Hz and high with 1200 pulses at 10 Hz. Upon repetitive stimulation (7 periods at 20 min intervals), the fractional rates of release per pulse during S7 no longer differed, suggesting a 'long-term' regulation of [3H]-noradrenaline release depending on the stimulation conditions. 3. The evoked [3H]-noradrenaline overflow was depressed by (+/-)-methacholine in a concentration-dependent manner. The EC50 ranged from 0.29 to 0.42 microM. Methacholine nearly abolished the transmitter release evoked at 3 Hz but reduced that induced at 10 Hz by only 50%. Under the latter condition the methacholine concentration-inhibition curve was bell-shaped and no muscarinic inhibition was observed in the presence of methacholine 30 microM. After washout of methacholine the evoked [3H]-noradrenaline release was temporarily enhanced. 4. Atropine 0.1 microM enhanced the [3H]-noradrenaline overflow (evoked by stimulation with 360 or 1200 pulses at 10 Hz), probably antagonizing a presynaptic inhibition by endogenous acetylcholine. The inhibition by methacholine was competitively antagonized by atropine 0.1 microM (apparent -log KB = 8.5-9.0). 5. Depending on the concentration, pilocarpine reduced the [3H]-noradrenaline overflow evoked by 360 pulses at 3 Hz up to 63%. However, at 10 Hz stimulation frequency the compound was inactive as an agonist but competitively antagonized the presynaptic inhibition induced by methacholine. The KB under the latter condition (0.95 microM) was

  19. Serum concentrations of thyroid and adrenal hormones and TSH in men after repeated 1 h-stays in a cold room.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, I; Hassi, J; Leppäluoto, J

    2001-11-01

    We exposed six healthy men to 1-h cold air (10 degrees C) daily for 11 days and measured adrenal and thyroid hormones and TSH in serum before and after the cold air exposure on days 0, 5 and 10. We observed that on days 0, 5 and 10 the resting levels and the levels after the cold exposure in serum adrenaline, thyroid hormones and TSH did not significantly change, whereas the serum noradrenaline levels showed a significant 2.2-2.5-fold increase in response to the cold air exposures. The increases were similar indicating that the subjects did not show signs of habituation in their noradrenaline responses. Therefore the 1-h cold air exposure is not sufficiently intensive to reduce the cold-induced sympathetic response.

  20. What are the 'ideal' features of an adrenaline (epinephrine) auto-injector in the treatment of anaphylaxis?

    PubMed

    Frew, A J

    2011-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is a systemic allergic reaction that often involves respiratory symptoms and cardiovascular collapse, which are potentially life-threatening if not treated promptly with intramuscular adrenaline. Owing to the unpredictable nature of anaphylaxis and accidental exposure to allergens (such as peanuts and shellfish), patients should be prescribed intramuscular adrenaline auto-injectors and carry these with them at all times. Patients also need to be able to use their auto-injectors correctly while under high stress, when an anaphylactic attack occurs. Despite this, an alarming number of patients fail to carry their auto-injectors and many patients, carers of children with known anaphylaxis and healthcare professionals do not know how to use the device correctly, despite having had training. Currently available auto-injector devices have various limitations that may impede their use in the management of anaphylaxis. There is also a lack of validated assessment criteria and regulatory requirements for new devices. This review describes the different delivery systems used in currently available auto-injectors and discusses the key barriers to the use of adrenaline auto-injectors, with the goal of identifying the 'ideal' features/characteristics of such devices in the emergency treatment of anaphylaxis that will ensure ease of use, portability and accurate delivery of a life-saving drug. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Identifying the factors and root causes associated with the unintentional usage of an adrenaline auto-injector in Japanese children and their caregivers.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kemal; Nakagawa, Tomoko; Sugiura, Shiro; Ebisawa, Motohiro; Ito, Komei

    2018-03-05

    The unintentional usage of adrenaline auto-injectors may cause injury to caregivers or patients. To prevent such incidents, we assessed the causative factors of these incidents. The Anaphylaxis Working Group of the Japanese Society of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology requested that society members register cases in which adrenaline auto-injectors were unintentionally used. One hundred cases were reported from June 2015 to March 2016. We identified the root causes of 70 child and 25 adult cases, separately. The incidents occurred with repeated prescriptions as well as the first prescription. Three cases resulted in a failure to administer an adrenaline auto-injector to children with anaphylaxis. Four caregivers used it with improper application (epilepsy or enteritis). Among the child cases, the median age at the time of the incident was 5.5 years (range, 2-14 years). Five children injected the adrenaline auto-injector on their own body trunk. Twenty children were not the allergic patients themselves. Improper management protocol of the device and the child's development were concomitantly involved in most of the cases. A variety of human behaviors were identified as the root causes in the adult cases. At least 34 cases were associated with mix-ups between the actual and training device. Health workers should provide sufficient education regarding safety use of adrenaline auto-injector for caregivers tailored to their experience levels at both first and repeated prescriptions. Such education must cover anticipatory behavior based on normal child development. Devices should also be further improved to prevent such incidents. Copyright © 2018 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The effect of working on-call on stress physiology and sleep: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hall, Sarah J; Ferguson, Sally A; Turner, Anne I; Robertson, Samuel J; Vincent, Grace E; Aisbett, Brad

    2017-06-01

    On-call work is becoming an increasingly common work pattern, yet the human impacts of this type of work are not well established. Given the likelihood of calls to occur outside regular work hours, it is important to consider the potential impact of working on-call on stress physiology and sleep. The aims of this review were to collate and evaluate evidence on the effects of working on-call from home on stress physiology and sleep. A systematic search of Ebsco Host, Embase, Web of Science, Scopus and ScienceDirect was conducted. Search terms included: on-call, on call, standby, sleep, cortisol, heart rate, adrenaline, noradrenaline, nor-adrenaline, epinephrine, norepinephrine, nor-epinephrine, salivary alpha amylase and alpha amylase. Eight studies met the inclusion criteria, with only one study investigating the effect of working on-call from home on stress physiology. All eight studies investigated the effect of working on-call from home on sleep. Working on-call from home appears to adversely affect sleep quantity, and in most cases, sleep quality. However, studies did not differentiate between night's on-call from home with and without calls. Data examining the effect of working on-call from home on stress physiology were not sufficient to draw meaningful conclusions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Pathogen espionage: multiple bacterial adrenergic sensors eavesdrop on host communication systems.

    PubMed

    Karavolos, Michail H; Winzer, Klaus; Williams, Paul; Khan, C M Anjam

    2013-02-01

    The interactions between bacterial pathogens and their eukaryotic hosts are vital in determining the outcome of infections. Bacterial pathogens employ molecular sensors to detect and facilitate adaptation to changes in their niche. The sensing of these extracellular signals enables the pathogen to navigate within mammalian hosts. Intercellular bacterial communication is facilitated by the production and sensing of autoinducer (AI) molecules via quorum sensing. More recently, AI-3 and the host neuroendocrine (NE) hormones adrenaline and noradrenaline were reported to display cross-talk for the activation of the same signalling pathways. Remarkably, there is increasing evidence to suggest that enteric bacteria sense and respond to the host NE stress hormones adrenaline and noradrenaline to modulate virulence. These responses can be inhibited by α and β-adrenergic receptor antagonists implying a bacterial receptor-based sensing and signalling cascade. In Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella, QseC has been proposed as the adrenergic receptor. Strikingly, there is an increasing body of evidence that not all the bacterial adrenergic responses require signalling through QseC. Here we provide additional hypotheses to reconcile these observations implicating the existence of alternative adrenergic receptors including BasS, QseE and CpxA and their associated signalling cascades with major roles in interkingdom communication. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Neuroendocrine response to film-induced sexual arousal in men and women.

    PubMed

    Exton, N G; Truong, T C; Exton, M S; Wingenfeld, S A; Leygraf, N; Saller, B; Hartmann, U; Schedlowski, M

    2000-02-01

    The psychoneuroendocrine responses to sexual arousal have not been clearly established in humans. However, we have demonstrated previously that masturbation-induced orgasm stimulates cardiovascular activity and induces increases in catecholamines and prolactin in blood of both males and females. We presently investigated the role of orgasm in producing these effects. Therefore, in this study parallel analysis of prolactin, adrenaline, noradrenaline, and cortisol concentrations, together with cardiovascular variables of systolic/diastolic blood pressure and heart rate were undertaken during film-induced sexual arousal in nine healthy adult men and nine healthy adult women. Blood was drawn continuously via an indwelling cannula and connected tubing system passed through a mini-pump. In parallel, the cardiovascular parameters were recorded continuously via a computerised finger-cuff sensor. Subjective sexual arousal increased significantly in both men and women during the erotic film, with sexual arousal eliciting an increase in blood pressure in both males and females, and plasma noradrenaline in females only. In contrast, adrenaline, cortisol and prolactin levels were unaffected by sexual arousal. These data further consolidate the role of sympathetic activation in sexual arousal processes. Furthermore, they demonstrate that increases in plasma prolactin during sexual stimulation are orgasm-dependent, suggesting that prolactin may regulate a negative-feedback sexual-satiation mechanism.

  5. Stress at birth: plasma noradrenaline concentrations of women in labour and in cord blood.

    PubMed

    Messow-Zahn, K; Sarafoff, M; Riegel, K P

    1978-03-15

    Radioenzymatically measured plasma noradrenaline concentrations, present at birth in umbilical veins of 19 healthy, 17 acutely asphyxiated, and 9 chronically distressed newborn infants were found to be elevated above maternal values proportional to the degree of distress and to plasma H ion concentrations.

  6. Neurochemical evidence that cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) 55-102 peptide modulates the dopaminergic reward system by decreasing the dopamine release in the mouse nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Rakovska, Angelina; Baranyi, Maria; Windisch, Katalin; Petkova-Kirova, Polina; Gagov, Hristo; Kalfin, Reni

    2017-09-01

    levels of DOPET. At the same concentration, 0.1μM, CART (55-102) peptide did not have any effect on the release of noradrenaline. In the presence of CART (55-102) peptide, 0.1μM, the effect of cocaine, 30μM, on the basal dopamine release was inhibited and the effect on the basal DOPAC release substantially increased. To our knowledge, our findings are the first to show direct neurochemical evidence that CART (55-102) peptide plays a neuromodulatory role on the dopaminergic reward system by decreasing dopamine in the mouse nucleus accumbens and by attenuating cocaine-induced effects on dopamine release. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Embryonic lethality in mice lacking mismatch-specific thymine DNA glycosylase is partially prevented by DOPS, a precursor of noradrenaline.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yusuke; Ono, Tetsuya; Takeda, Naoki; Nohmi, Takehiko; Seki, Masayuki; Enomoto, Takemi; Noda, Tetsuo; Uehara, Yoshihiko

    2012-01-01

    Thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) is involved in the repair of G:T and G:U mismatches caused by hydrolytic deamination of 5-methylcytosine and cytosine, respectively. Recent studies have shown that TDG not only has G-T/U glycosylase activities but also acts in the maintaining proper epigenetic status. In order to investigate the function of TDG in vivo, mice lacking Tdg, Tdg (-/-), were generated. Tdg mutant mice died in utero by 11.5 days post coitum (dpc), although there were no significant differences in the spontaneous mutant frequencies between wild type and Tdg (-/-) embryos. On the other hand, the levels of noradrenaline in 10.5 dpc whole embryos, which is necessary for normal embryogenesis, were dramatically reduced in Tdg (-/-) embryos. Consequently, we tested the effect of D, L-threo-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylserine (DOPS), a synthetic precursor of noradrenaline, on the survival of the Tdg (-/-) embryos. DOPS was given to pregnant Tdg (+/-) mice from 6.5 dpc through drinking water. Most of the Tdg (-/-) embryos were alive at 11.5 dpc, and they were partially rescued up to 14.5 dpc by the administration of DOPS. In contrast, the administration of L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) had marginal effects on Tdg (-/-) embryonic lethality. No embryo was alive without DOPS beyond 11.5 dpc, suggesting that the lethality in (-/-) embryos is partially due to the reduction of noradrenaline. These results suggest that embryonic lethality in Tdg (-/-) embryos is due, in part, to the reduction of noradrenaline levels.

  8. Epinephrine (adrenaline) in anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Simons, F Estelle R; Simons, Keith J

    2010-01-01

    Epinephrine (adrenaline) is universally recommended as the initial drug of choice for the treatment of anaphylaxis. No other medication has similar life-saving pharmacologic effects in multiple organ systems, including prevention and relief of both upper and lower airway obstruction, and of shock. Failure to inject epinephrine promptly contributes to anaphylaxis fatalities. It is most effective when given immediately after the onset of anaphylaxis symptoms. The initial recommended adult dose is 0.3-0.5 mg, injected intramuscularly in the anterolateral aspect of the mid-thigh. Injected by other routes, epinephrine appears to have a less satisfactory therapeutic window; for example, onset of action is potentially delayed when it is injected subcutaneously, and risk of adverse effects potentially increases when it is injected intravenously. The possibility of randomized, controlled trials of epinephrine in anaphylaxis should be considered. For ethical reasons, these trials will not be placebo-controlled. They might involve comparison of one epinephrine dose versus another, or one route of epinephrine administration versus another. For first-aid treatment of people with anaphylaxis in the community, novel epinephrine formulations are being developed. These include epinephrine autoinjectors that are safer and easier to use, and epinephrine formulations that can be administered through non-invasive routes. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Effect of Noni (Morinda citrifolia Linn.) Fruit and Its Bioactive Principles Scopoletin and Rutin on Rat Vas Deferens Contractility: An Ex Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Narasingam, Megala; Murugan, Dharmani Devi; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effect of methanolic extract of Morinda citrifolia Linn. (MMC) and its bioactive principles, scopoletin and rutin, on dopamine- and noradrenaline-evoked contractility in isolated rat vas deferens preparations. MMC (1–40 mg/mL), scopoletin (1–200 μg/mL), and rutin hydrate (0.6–312.6 μg/mL) dose-dependently inhibited the contractility evoked by submaximal concentrations of both dopamine and noradrenaline, respectively. Haloperidol and prazosin, reference dopamine D2, and α 1-adrenoceptors antagonists significantly reversed the dopamine- and noradrenaline-induced contractions, respectively, in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, MMC per se at higher doses (60–100 mg/mL) showed dose-dependent contractile response in rat vas deferens which was partially inhibited by high doses of haloperidol but not by prazosin. These results demonstrated the biphasic effects of MMC on dopaminergic system; that is, antidopaminergic effect at lower concentrations (<40 mg/mL) and dopaminergic agonistic effect at higher concentrations (>60 mg/mL). However, similar contractile response at high doses of scopoletin (0.5–5 mg/mL) and rutin hydrate (0.5–5 mg/mL) per se was not observed. Therefore, it can be concluded that the bioactive principles of MMC, scopoletin, and rutin might be responsible for the antidopaminergic and antiadrenergic activities of MMC. PMID:25045753

  10. Noradrenaline induces peripheral antinociception by endogenous opioid release.

    PubMed

    Romero, Thiago Roberto Lima; Soares Santos, Raquel Rodrigues; Castor, Marina Gomes Miranda E; Petrocchi, Júlia Alvarenga; Guzzo, Luciana Souza; Klein, Andre; Duarte, Igor Dimitri Gama

    2018-02-23

    The aim of this study was to investigate this involvement in not inflammatory model of pain and which opioid receptor subtype mediates noradrenaline-induced peripheral antinociception. NA is involved in the intrinsic control of pain-inducing pro-nociceptive effects in the primary afferent nociceptors. However, inflammation can induce various plastic changes in the central and peripheral noradrenergic system that, upon interaction with the immune system, may contribute, in part, to peripheral antinociception. Hyperalgesia was induced by intraplantar injection of prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 , 2 μg) into the plantar surface of the right hind paw and the paw pressure test to evaluated the hyperalgesia was used. Noradrenaline (NA) was administered locally into right hind paw of Wistar rat (160-200 g) alone and after either agents, α 2 -adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine, α 1 -adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin, β-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol, μ-opioid antagonist clocinnamox, δ-opioid antagonist naltrindole and κ-opioid antagonist nor-binaltorfimina. In addition, the enkephalinase inhibitor bestatin was administered prior to NA low dose. Intraplantar injection of NA induced peripheral antinociception against hyperalgesia induced by PGE 2 . This effect was reversed, in dose dependent manner, by intraplantar injection of yohimbine, prazosin, propranolol, clocinnamox and naltrindole. However, injection of nor-binaltorfimina did not alter antinociception of NA after PGE 2 hyperalgesia. Bestatin intensified the antinociceptive effects of low-dose of NA. Besides the α 2 -adrenoceptor, the present data provide evidence that, in absence of inflammation, NA activating α 1 and β-adrenoceptor induce endogenous opioid release to produce peripheral antinociceptive effect by μ and δ opioid receptors. Copyright © 2018 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of Modafinil on Dopamine and Dopamine Transporters in the Male Human Brain: Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Volkow, Nora D.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Alexoff, David; Zhu, Wei; Telang, Frank; Wang, Gene-Jack; Jayne, Millard; Hooker, Jacob M.; Wong, Christopher; Hubbard, Barbara; Carter, Pauline; Warner, Donald; King, Payton; Shea, Colleen; Xu, Youwen; Muench, Lisa; Apelskog-Torres, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Context Modafinil, a wake-promoting drug used to treat narcolepsy, is increasingly being used as a cognitive enhancer. Although initially launched as distinct from stimulants that increase extracellular dopamine by targeting dopamine transporters, recent preclinical studies suggest otherwise. Objective To measure the acute effects of modafinil at doses used therapeutically (200 mg and 400 mg given orally) on extracellular dopamine and on dopamine transporters in the male human brain. Design, Setting, and Participants Positron emission tomography with [11C]raclopride (D2/D3 radioligand sensitive to changes in endogenous dopamine) and [11C]cocaine (dopamine transporter radioligand) was used to measure the effects of modafinil on extracellular dopamine and on dopamine transporters in 10 healthy male participants. The study took place over an 8-month period (2007–2008) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Main Outcome Measures Primary outcomes were changes in dopamine D2/D3 receptor and dopamine transporter availability (measured by changes in binding potential) after modafinil when compared with after placebo. Results Modafinil decreased mean (SD) [11C]raclopride binding potential in caudate (6.1% [6.5%]; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5% to 10.8%; P=.02), putamen (6.7% [4.9%]; 95% CI, 3.2% to 10.3%; P=.002), and nucleus accumbens (19.4% [20%]; 95% CI, 5% to 35%; P=.02), reflecting increases in extracellular dopamine. Modafinil also decreased [11C]cocaine binding potential in caudate (53.8% [13.8%]; 95% CI, 43.9% to 63.6%; P<.001), putamen (47.2% [11.4%]; 95% CI, 39.1% to 55.4%; P<.001), and nucleus accumbens (39.3% [10%]; 95% CI, 30% to 49%; P=.001), reflecting occupancy of dopamine transporters. Conclusions In this pilot study, modafinil blocked dopamine transporters and increased dopamine in the human brain (including the nucleus accumbens). Because drugs that increase dopamine in the nucleus accumbens have the potential for abuse, and considering the increasing

  12. Experimente ueber den Einflusse von Metaboliten und Antimetaboliten am Modell von Trichomonas Vaginalis. VIII. Mitteilung: Experiments mit Hormonen (Experiments on the Influence of Metabolites and Antimetabolites on the Model of Trichomonas Vaginalis. VIII. Communication: Experiments with Hormones),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    experiments were performed on 7 trichomonas vaginalis strains. The test cultures with serotonin, oestron, testosteron and methyltestosteron grew at...The present study has been concerned with the influence of some hormones upon trichomonas growth. The following substances were used for our...ml onward. Adrenalin and noradrenalin have generally inhibiting action (from 0.80 mg/ml onward) upon trichomonas growth. The antihormone 3.5-dijodtyrosin does rarely influence the growth of trichomonas . (Author)

  13. Virus Type and Genomic Load in Acute Bronchiolitis: Severity and Treatment Response With Inhaled Adrenaline.

    PubMed

    Skjerven, Håvard O; Megremis, Spyridon; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G; Mowinckel, Petter; Carlsen, Kai-Håkon; Lødrup Carlsen, Karin C

    2016-03-15

    Acute bronchiolitis frequently causes infant hospitalization. Studies on different viruses or viral genomic load and disease severity or treatment effect have had conflicting results. We aimed to investigate whether the presence or concentration of individual or multiple viruses were associated with disease severity in acute bronchiolitis and to evaluate whether detected viruses modified the response to inhaled racemic adrenaline. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from 363 infants with acute bronchiolitis in a randomized, controlled trial that compared inhaled racemic adrenaline versus saline. Virus genome was identified and quantified by polymerase chain reaction analyses. Severity was assessed on the basis of the length of stay and the use of supportive care. Respiratory syncytial virus (83%) and human rhinovirus (34%) were most commonly detected. Seven other viruses were present in 8%-15% of the patients. Two or more viruses (maximum, 7) were detected in 61% of the infants. Virus type or coinfection was not associated with disease severity. A high genomic load of respiratory syncytial virus was associated with a longer length of stay and with an increased frequency of oxygen and ventilatory support use. Treatment effect of inhaled adrenaline was not modified by virus type, load or coinfection. In infants hospitalized with acute bronchiolitis, disease severity was not associated with specific viruses or the total number of viruses detected. A high RSV genomic load was associated with more-severe disease. NCT00817466 and EudraCT 2009-012667-34. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Developmental vitamin D deficiency alters multiple neurotransmitter systems in the neonatal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Kesby, James P; Turner, Karly M; Alexander, Suzanne; Eyles, Darryl W; McGrath, John J; Burne, Thomas H J

    2017-11-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that developmental vitamin D (DVD) deficiency is a risk factor for neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia. DVD deficiency in rats is associated with altered brain structure and adult behaviours indicating alterations in dopamine and glutamate signalling. Developmental alterations in dopamine neurotransmission have also been observed in DVD-deficient rats but a comprehensive assessment of brain neurochemistry has not been undertaken. Thus, the current study determined the regional concentrations of dopamine, noradrenaline, serotonin, glutamine, glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and associated metabolites, in DVD-deficient neonates. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a vitamin D deficient diet or control diet six weeks prior to mating until birth and housed under UVB-free lighting conditions. Neurotransmitter concentration was assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography on post-mortem neonatal brain tissue. Ubiquitous reductions in the levels of glutamine (12-24%) were observed in DVD-deficient neonates compared with control neonates. Similarly, in multiple brain regions DVD-deficient neonates had increased levels of noradrenaline and serine compared with control neonates. In contrast, increased levels of dopamine and decreased levels of serotonin in DVD-deficient neonates were limited to striatal subregions compared with controls. Our results confirm that DVD deficiency leads to changes in multiple neurotransmitter systems in the neonate brain. Importantly, this regionally-based assessment in DVD-deficient neonates identified both widespread neurotransmitter changes (glutamine/noradrenaline) and regionally selective neurotransmitter changes (dopamine/serotonin). Thus, vitamin D may have both general and local actions depending on the neurotransmitter system being investigated. Taken together, these data suggest that DVD deficiency alters neurotransmitter systems relevant to schizophrenia in the developing rat

  15. Low-Dose Adrenaline, Promethazine, and Hydrocortisone in the Prevention of Acute Adverse Reactions to Antivenom following Snakebite: A Randomised, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    de Silva, H. Asita; Pathmeswaran, Arunasalam; Ranasinha, Channa D.; Jayamanne, Shaluka; Samarakoon, Senarath B.; Hittharage, Ariyasena; Kalupahana, Ranjith; Ratnatilaka, G. Asoka; Uluwatthage, Wimalasiri; Aronson, Jeffrey K.; Armitage, Jane M.; Lalloo, David G.; de Silva, H. Janaka

    2011-01-01

    Background Envenoming from snakebites is most effectively treated by antivenom. However, the antivenom available in South Asian countries commonly causes acute allergic reactions, anaphylactic reactions being particularly serious. We investigated whether adrenaline, promethazine, and hydrocortisone prevent such reactions in secondary referral hospitals in Sri Lanka by conducting a randomised, double-blind placebo-controlled trial. Methods and Findings In total, 1,007 patients were randomized, using a 2×2×2 factorial design, in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of adrenaline (0.25 ml of a 1∶1,000 solution subcutaneously), promethazine (25 mg intravenously), and hydrocortisone (200 mg intravenously), each alone and in all possible combinations. The interventions, or matching placebo, were given immediately before infusion of antivenom. Patients were monitored for mild, moderate, or severe adverse reactions for at least 96 h. The prespecified primary end point was the effect of the interventions on the incidence of severe reactions up to and including 48 h after antivenom administration. In total, 752 (75%) patients had acute reactions to antivenom: 9% mild, 48% moderate, and 43% severe; 89% of the reactions occurred within 1 h; and 40% of all patients were given rescue medication (adrenaline, promethazine, and hydrocortisone) during the first hour. Compared with placebo, adrenaline significantly reduced severe reactions to antivenom by 43% (95% CI 25–67) at 1 h and by 38% (95% CI 26–49) up to and including 48 h after antivenom administration; hydrocortisone and promethazine did not. Adding hydrocortisone negated the benefit of adrenaline. Conclusions Pretreatment with low-dose adrenaline was safe and reduced the risk of acute severe reactions to snake antivenom. This may be of particular importance in countries where adverse reactions to antivenom are common, although the need to improve the quality of available antivenom cannot be overemphasized

  16. Statewide prevalence of school children at risk of anaphylaxis and rate of adrenaline autoinjector activation in Victorian government schools, Australia.

    PubMed

    Loke, Paxton; Koplin, Jennifer; Beck, Cara; Field, Michael; Dharmage, Shyamali C; Tang, Mimi L K; Allen, Katrina J

    2016-08-01

    The prevalence of school students at risk of anaphylaxis in Victoria is unknown and has not been previously studied. Similarly, rates of adrenaline autoinjector usage in the school environment have yet to be determined given increasing prescription rates. We sought to determine time trends in prevalence of school children at risk of anaphylaxis across all year levels and the annual usage rate of adrenaline autoinjectors in the school setting relative to the number of students at risk of anaphylaxis. Statewide surveys from more than 1,500 government schools including more than 550,000 students were used and prevalence rates (%) with 95% CIs were calculated. The overall prevalence of students at risk of anaphylaxis has increased 41% from 0.98% (95% CI, 0.95-1.01) in 2009 to 1.38% (95% CI, 1.35-1.41) in 2014. There was a significant drop in reporting of anaphylaxis risk with transition from the final year of primary school to the first year of secondary school, suggesting a change in parental reporting of anaphylaxis risk among secondary school students. The number of adrenaline autoinjectors activated per 1000 students at risk of anaphylaxis ranged from 6 to 8 per year, with consistently higher activation use in secondary school students than in primary school students. Statewide prevalence of anaphylaxis risk has increased in children attending Victorian government schools. However, adrenaline autoinjector activation has remained fairly stable despite known increase in the rates of prescription. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Human muscle sympathetic nerve activity and plasma noradrenaline kinetics in space

    PubMed Central

    Ertl, Andrew C; Diedrich, André; Biaggioni, Italo; Levine, Benjamin D; Robertson, Rose Marie; Cox, James F; Zuckerman, Julie H; Pawelczyk, James A; Ray, Chester A; Buckey, Jay C; Lane, Lynda D; Shiavi, Richard; Gaffney, F Andrew; Costa, Fernando; Holt, Carol; Blomqvist, C Gunnar; Eckberg, Dwain L; Baisch, Friedhelm J; Robertson, David

    2002-01-01

    Astronauts returning from space have reduced red blood cell masses, hypovolaemia and orthostatic intolerance, marked by greater cardio–acceleration during standing than before spaceflight, and in some, orthostatic hypotension and presyncope. Adaptation of the sympathetic nervous system occurring during spaceflight may be responsible for these postflight alterations. We tested the hypotheses that exposure to microgravity reduces sympathetic neural outflow and impairs sympathetic neural responses to orthostatic stress. We measured heart rate, photoplethysmographic finger arterial pressure, peroneal nerve muscle sympathetic activity and plasma noradrenaline spillover and clearance, in male astronauts before, during (flight day 12 or 13) and after the 16 day Neurolab space shuttle mission. Measurements were made during supine rest and orthostatic stress, as simulated on Earth and in space by 7 min periods of 15 and 30 mmHg lower body suction. Mean (± s.e.m.) heart rates before lower body suction were similar pre–flight and in flight. Heart rate responses to −30 mmHg were greater in flight (from 56 ± 4 to 72 ± 4 beats min−1) than pre–flight (from 56 ± 4 at rest to 62 ± 4 beats min−1, P < 0.05). Noradrenaline spillover and clearance were increased from pre–flight levels during baseline periods and during lower body suction, both in flight (n = 3) and on post–flight days 1 or 2 (n = 5, P < 0.05). In–flight baseline sympathetic nerve activity was increased above pre–flight levels (by 10–33 %) in the same three subjects in whom noradrenaline spillover and clearance were increased. The sympathetic response to 30 mmHg lower body suction was at pre–flight levels or higher in each subject (35 pre–flight vs. 40 bursts min−1 in flight). No astronaut experienced presyncope during lower body suction in space (or during upright tilt following the Neurolab mission). We conclude that in space, baseline sympathetic neural outflow is increased moderately

  18. Dynamics of change of lipid and monoamine metabolisms and the blood coagulation system during experimental atherosclerosis caused by restriction of movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gvishiani, G. S.; Kobakhidze, N. G.

    1980-01-01

    Shifts in lipid, catecholamine, and blood coagulation systems following various periods (1, 2, 3, and 4 months) of experimentally induced atherosclerosis were studied. The same indices were studied in the tissues of the myocardium, liver, and brain stem-reticular formation after decapitation of the animals at the end of the experiment. Periodic motion restriction caused an increase in blood beta-lipoproteins in the rabbits at the beginning of the experiment. An increase in general cholesterol content and a decrease in the lecithincholesterol index were established at the end of the experiment. Myocardial beta-lipoprotein and brain stem reticular formation general cholesterol contents were elevated; catecholamine content was increased at the end of the experiment. In the initial months, free adrenaline basically increased, while in later months blood adrenaline decreased and blood noradrenaline increased.

  19. Combined treatment with MAO-A inhibitor and MAO-B inhibitor increases extracellular noradrenaline levels more than MAO-A inhibitor alone through increases in beta-phenylethylamine.

    PubMed

    Kitaichi, Yuji; Inoue, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Shin; Boku, Shuken; Izumi, Takeshi; Koyama, Tsukasa

    2010-07-10

    Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAO inhibitors) have been widely used as antidepressants. However, it remains unclear whether a difference exists between non-selective MAO inhibitors and selective MAO-A inhibitors in terms of their antidepressant effects. Using in vivo microdialysis methods, we measured extracellular noradrenaline and serotonin levels following administration of Ro 41-1049, a reversible MAO-A inhibitor and/or lazabemide, a reversible MAO-B inhibitor in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of rats. We examined the effect of local infusion of beta-phenylethylamine to the mPFC of rats on extracellular noradrenaline and serotonin levels. Furthermore, the concentrations of beta-phenylethylamine in the tissue of the mPFC after combined treatment with Ro 41-1049 and lazabemide were measured. The Ro 41-1049 alone and the combined treatment significantly increased extracellular noradrenaline levels compared with vehicle and lazabemide alone. Furthermore, the combined treatment increased noradrenaline levels significantly more than Ro 41-1049 alone did. The Ro 41-1049 alone and the combined treatment significantly increased extracellular serotonin levels compared with vehicle and lazabemide alone, but no difference in serotonin levels was found between the combined treatment group and the Ro 41-1049 group. Local infusion of low-dose beta-phenylethylamine increased extracellular noradrenaline levels, but not that of serotonin. Only the combined treatment significantly increased beta-phenylethylamine levels in tissues of the mPFC. Our results suggest that the combined treatment with a MAO-A inhibitor and a MAO-B inhibitor strengthens antidepressant effects because the combined treatment increases extracellular noradrenaline levels more than a MAO-A inhibitor alone through increases in beta-phenylethylamine. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Orbitofrontal Dopamine Depletion Upregulates Caudate Dopamine and Alters Behavior via Changes in Reinforcement Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Cardinal, R. N.; Rygula, R.; Hong, Y. T.; Fryer, T. D.; Sawiak, S. J.; Ferrari, V.; Cockcroft, G.; Aigbirhio, F. I.; Robbins, T. W.; Roberts, A. C.

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with upregulation of dopamine (DA) release in the caudate nucleus. The caudate has dense connections with the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) via the frontostriatal loops, and both areas exhibit pathophysiological change in schizophrenia. Despite evidence that abnormalities in dopaminergic neurotransmission and prefrontal cortex function co-occur in schizophrenia, the influence of OFC DA on caudate DA and reinforcement processing is poorly understood. To test the hypothesis that OFC dopaminergic dysfunction disrupts caudate dopamine function, we selectively depleted dopamine from the OFC of marmoset monkeys and measured striatal extracellular dopamine levels (using microdialysis) and dopamine D2/D3 receptor binding (using positron emission tomography), while modeling reinforcement-related behavior in a discrimination learning paradigm. OFC dopamine depletion caused an increase in tonic dopamine levels in the caudate nucleus and a corresponding reduction in D2/D3 receptor binding. Computational modeling of behavior showed that the lesion increased response exploration, reducing the tendency to persist with a recently chosen response side. This effect is akin to increased response switching previously seen in schizophrenia and was correlated with striatal but not OFC D2/D3 receptor binding. These results demonstrate that OFC dopamine depletion is sufficient to induce striatal hyperdopaminergia and changes in reinforcement learning relevant to schizophrenia. PMID:24872570

  1. Adrenaline injection plus argon plasma coagulation versus adrenaline injection plus hemoclips for treating high-risk bleeding peptic ulcers: A prospective, randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Taghavi, Seyed Alireza; Soleimani, Seyed Mohammad; Hosseini-Asl, Seyed Mohammad Kazem; Eshraghian, Ahad; Eghbali, Hajar; Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Ahmadpour, Bita; Saberifiroozi, Mehdi

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: Several combination endoscopic therapies are currently in use. The present study aimed to compare argon plasma coagulation (APC) + adrenaline injection (AI) with hemoclips + AI for the treatment of high-risk bleeding peptic ulcers. METHODS: In a prospective randomized trial, 172 patients with major stigmata of peptic ulcer bleeding were randomly assigned to receive APC + AI (n=89) or hemoclips + AI (n=83). In the event of rebleeding, the initial modality was used again. Patients in whom treatment or retreatment was unsuccessful underwent emergency surgery. The primary end point of rebleeding rate and secondary end points of initial and definitive hemostasis need for surgery and mortality were compared between the two groups. RESULTS: The two groups were similar in all background variables. Definitive hemostasis was achieved in 85 of 89 (95.5%) of the APC + AI and 82 of 83 (98.8%) of the hemoclips + AI group (P=0.206). The mean volume of adrenaline injected in the two groups was equal (20.7 mL; P=0.996). There was no significant difference in terms of initial hemostasis (96.6% versus 98.8%; P=0.337), rate of rebleeding (11.2% versus 4.8%; P=0.124), need for surgery (4.5% versus 1.2%; P=0.266) and mortality (2.2% versus 1.2%; P=0.526). When compared for the combined end point of mortality plus rebleeding and the need for surgery, there was an advantage for the hemoclip group (6% versus 15.7%, P=0.042). CONCLUSION: Hemoclips + AI has no superiority over APC + AI in treating patients with high-risk bleeding peptic ulcers. Hemoclips + AI may be superior when a combination of all negative outcomes is considered. PMID:19826646

  2. Dynamic nigrostriatal dopamine biases action selection

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Christopher D.; Li, Hao; Geddes, Claire E.; Jin, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Summary Dopamine is thought to play a critical role in reinforcement learning and goal-directed behavior, but its function in action selection remains largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that nigrostriatal dopamine biases ongoing action selection. When mice were trained to dynamically switch the action selected at different time points, changes in firing rate of nigrostriatal dopamine neurons, as well as dopamine signaling in the dorsal striatum, were found to be associated with action selection. This dopamine profile is specific to behavioral choice, scalable with interval duration, and doesn’t reflect reward prediction error, timing, or value as single factors alone. Genetic deletion of NMDA receptors on dopamine or striatal neurons, or optogenetic manipulation of dopamine concentration, alters dopamine signaling and biases action selection. These results unveil a crucial role of nigrostriatal dopamine in integrating diverse information for regulating upcoming actions and have important implications for neurological disorders including Parkinson’s disease and substance dependence. PMID:28285820

  3. Dynamic Nigrostriatal Dopamine Biases Action Selection.

    PubMed

    Howard, Christopher D; Li, Hao; Geddes, Claire E; Jin, Xin

    2017-03-22

    Dopamine is thought to play a critical role in reinforcement learning and goal-directed behavior, but its function in action selection remains largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that nigrostriatal dopamine biases ongoing action selection. When mice were trained to dynamically switch the action selected at different time points, changes in firing rate of nigrostriatal dopamine neurons, as well as dopamine signaling in the dorsal striatum, were found to be associated with action selection. This dopamine profile is specific to behavioral choice, scalable with interval duration, and doesn't reflect reward prediction error, timing, or value as single factors alone. Genetic deletion of NMDA receptors on dopamine or striatal neurons or optogenetic manipulation of dopamine concentration alters dopamine signaling and biases action selection. These results unveil a crucial role of nigrostriatal dopamine in integrating diverse information for regulating upcoming actions, and they have important implications for neurological disorders, including Parkinson's disease and substance dependence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Immunohistochemistry of catecholamines in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal system with special regard to fatal hypothermia and hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takaki; Yoshida, Chiemi; Michiue, Tomomi; Perdekamp, Markus Grosse; Pollak, Stefan; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2010-05-01

    Catecholamines are involved in various stress responses. Previous studies have suggested applicability of the postmortem blood levels to investigations of physical stress responses or toxic/hyperthermic neuronal dysfunction during death process. The present study investigated cellular immunopositivity for adrenaline (Adr), noradrenaline (Nad) and dopamine (DA) in the hypothalamus, adenohypophysis and adrenal medulla with special regard to fatal hypothermia (cold exposure) and hyperthermia (heat stroke) to examine forensic pathological significance. Medicolegal autopsy cases (n=290, within 3 days postmortem) were examined. The proportions of catecholamine (Adr, Nad and DA)-positive cells (% positivity) in each tissue were quantitatively estimated using immunostaining. Hyperthermia cases (n=12) showed a lower neuronal DA-immunopositivity in the hypothalamus than hypothermia cases (n=20), while Nad- and DA-immunopositivities in the adrenal medulla were higher for hyperthermia than for hypothermia. Rates of Nad-immunopositivity in the adrenal medulla were very low for hypothermia. No such difference between hypothermia and hyperthermia was seen in the adenohypophysis. In hypothermia cases, cellular Nad-immunopositivity in the adrenal medulla correlated with the Nad level in cerebrospinal fluid (r=0.591, p<0.01). These observations suggest a characteristic immunohistochemical pattern of systemic stress response to fatal hypothermia and hyperthermia, involving the hypothalamus and adrenal medulla. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Progression and recovery of Parkinsonism in a chronic progressive MPTP-induction model in the marmoset without persistent molecular and cellular damage.

    PubMed

    Franke, S K; van Kesteren, R E; Wubben, J A M; Hofman, S; Paliukhovich, I; van der Schors, R C; van Nierop, P; Smit, A B; Philippens, I H C H M

    2016-01-15

    Chronic exposure to low-dose 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) in marmoset monkeys was used to model the prodromal stage of Parkinson's disease (PD), and to investigate mechanisms underlying disease progression and recovery. Marmosets were subcutaneously injected with MPTP for a period of 12weeks, 0.5mg/kg once per week, and clinical signs of Parkinsonism, motor- and non-motor behaviors were recorded before, during and after exposure. In addition, postmortem immunohistochemistry and proteomics analysis were performed. MPTP-induced parkinsonian clinical symptoms increased in severity during exposure, and recovered after MPTP administration was ended. Postmortem analyses, after the recovery period, revealed no alteration of the number and sizes of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive dopamine (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra. Also levels of TH in putamen and caudate nucleus were unaltered, no differences were observed in DA, serotonin or nor-adrenalin levels in the caudate nucleus, and proteomics analysis revealed no global changes in protein expression in these brain areas between treatment groups. Our findings indicate that parkinsonian symptoms can occur without detectable damage at the cellular or molecular level. Moreover, we show that parkinsonian symptoms may be reversible when diagnosed and treated early. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG) attenuates the hemodynamics stimulated by caffeine through decrease of catecholamines release.

    PubMed

    Han, Jin-Yi; Moon, Yong-Jin; Han, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Woo, Jae-Hoon; Yoo, Hwan-Soo; Hong, Jin Tae; Ahn, Hee-Yul; Hong, Jong-Myeon; Oh, Ki-Wan

    2016-09-01

    A human study of the effects on hemodynamics of caffeine and epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG) was performed. Caffeine tablets (200 mg) were orally administered to healthy males aged between 25 and 35 years 30 min after oral administration of EGCG tablets (100 and 200 mg). The increase in BP induced by caffeine was inhibited when co-administrated with EGCG. We found that caffeine slightly decreased heart rate (HR) in the volunteers. Although EGCG enhanced HR reduction, the effect was not significant. In addition, caffeine increased blood catecholamine levels, but EGCG inhibited the increase in noradrenaline, adrenaline and dopamine levels induced by caffeine. Whether EGCG decreases the elevated HR and systolic perfusion pressure, and ventricular contractility induced by adrenergic agonists in the isolated rat heart was investigated. The modified Krebs-Henseleit solution was perfused through a Langendorff apparatus to the isolated hearts of rats. HR, systolic perfusion pressure, and developed maximal rates of contraction (+dP/dtmax) and relaxation (-dP/dtmax) were increased by epinephrine (EP) and isoproterenol (IP). In contrast, EGCG decreased the elevated HR, systolic perfusion pressure, and left ventricular ±dp/dtmax induced by EP and/or IP. In conclusion, EGCG could attenuate the hemodynamics stimulated by caffeine through decreasing catecholamine release.

  7. Effects of transportation during the hot season, breed and electrical stimulation on histochemical and meat quality characteristics of goat longissimus muscle.

    PubMed

    Kadim, Isam T; Mahgoub, Osman; Al-Marzooqi, Waleed; Khalaf, Samera; Al-Sinawi, Shadia S H; Al-Amri, Issa

    2010-06-01

    The effects of transportation and electrical stimulation (90 V) on physiological, histochemical and meat quality characteristics of two breeds of Omani goats were assessed. Twenty 1-year-old male goats from each breed (Batina and Dhofari) were divided into two groups: 3 h transported during the hot season (42 degrees C day time temperature) and non-transported. Animals were blood-sampled before loading and prior to slaughter. Electrical stimulation was applied 20 min postmortem to 50% randomly selected carcasses of both breeds. Temperature and pH decline of the Longissimus was monitored. Ultimate pH, shear force, sarcomere length, myofibrillar fragmentation index, expressed juice, cooking loss and colour were measured from samples of Longissimus dorsi muscles. Electrical stimulation and transportation had a significant effect on most biochemical and meat quality characteristics of Longissimus dorsi. The transported goats had higher plasma cortisol (P < 0.01), adrenaline, nor-adrenaline and dopamine concentrations (P < 0.05) than non-transported goats. Electrical stimulation resulted in a significantly (P < 0.05) more rapid muscle pH fall during the first 12 h after slaughter. Muscles from electrically-stimulated carcasses had significantly (P < 0.05) longer sarcomeres, lower shear force value, a lighter colour (higher L* value), higher expressed juice and myofibrillar fragmentation index than those from non-stimulated ones. Meat from transported goats had significantly higher pH, expressed juice and shear force, but contained significantly lower sarcomere length and L* values than non-transported goats. The proportion of the myosin ATPase staining did not change as a function of stimulation, transportation or breed. These results indicated that subjecting goats to transportation for 3 h under high ambient temperatures can generate major physiological and muscle metabolism responses. Electrical stimulation improved quality characteristics of meat from both groups

  8. Dopamine receptors – IUPHAR Review 13

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Jean-Martin; Espinoza, Stefano; Gainetdinov, Raul R

    2015-01-01

    The variety of physiological functions controlled by dopamine in the brain and periphery is mediated by the D1, D2, D3, D4 and D5 dopamine GPCRs. Drugs acting on dopamine receptors are significant tools for the management of several neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression and Parkinson's disease. Recent investigations of dopamine receptor signalling have shown that dopamine receptors, apart from their canonical action on cAMP-mediated signalling, can regulate a myriad of cellular responses to fine-tune the expression of dopamine-associated behaviours and functions. Such signalling mechanisms may involve alternate G protein coupling or non-G protein mechanisms involving ion channels, receptor tyrosine kinases or proteins such as β-arrestins that are classically involved in GPCR desensitization. Another level of complexity is the growing appreciation of the physiological roles played by dopamine receptor heteromers. Applications of new in vivo techniques have significantly furthered the understanding of the physiological functions played by dopamine receptors. Here we provide an update of the current knowledge regarding the complex biology, signalling, physiology and pharmacology of dopamine receptors. PMID:25671228

  9. Dopamine, reward learning, and active inference.

    PubMed

    FitzGerald, Thomas H B; Dolan, Raymond J; Friston, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Temporal difference learning models propose phasic dopamine signaling encodes reward prediction errors that drive learning. This is supported by studies where optogenetic stimulation of dopamine neurons can stand in lieu of actual reward. Nevertheless, a large body of data also shows that dopamine is not necessary for learning, and that dopamine depletion primarily affects task performance. We offer a resolution to this paradox based on an hypothesis that dopamine encodes the precision of beliefs about alternative actions, and thus controls the outcome-sensitivity of behavior. We extend an active inference scheme for solving Markov decision processes to include learning, and show that simulated dopamine dynamics strongly resemble those actually observed during instrumental conditioning. Furthermore, simulated dopamine depletion impairs performance but spares learning, while simulated excitation of dopamine neurons drives reward learning, through aberrant inference about outcome states. Our formal approach provides a novel and parsimonious reconciliation of apparently divergent experimental findings.

  10. [Influence of hydrocortisone and adrenaline against the background of mu- and delta-opiate receptors blockade on local immune response in mice].

    PubMed

    Geĭn, S V; Chizhova, E G; Tendriakova, S P

    2006-07-01

    In the induced phase of the immune response, the immunosuppressive effects of hydrocortisone and adrenaline were enhanced under mu- and delta-opiate receptor blockade. No changes were observed in the effects of hydrocortisone and adrenaline under mu- and delta-opiate receptor blockade in effector phase. In the induced phase of the immune response, selective agonists of mu- and delta-opiate receptors DAGO and DADLE enhanced antibody response, delayed-type hypersensitivity, and reduced the number of cells in the regional lymph node. Thus, our data suggest an equal role of mu- and delta-opiate receptors in regulation of expressiveness of local immune response.

  11. Dopamine, reward learning, and active inference

    PubMed Central

    FitzGerald, Thomas H. B.; Dolan, Raymond J.; Friston, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Temporal difference learning models propose phasic dopamine signaling encodes reward prediction errors that drive learning. This is supported by studies where optogenetic stimulation of dopamine neurons can stand in lieu of actual reward. Nevertheless, a large body of data also shows that dopamine is not necessary for learning, and that dopamine depletion primarily affects task performance. We offer a resolution to this paradox based on an hypothesis that dopamine encodes the precision of beliefs about alternative actions, and thus controls the outcome-sensitivity of behavior. We extend an active inference scheme for solving Markov decision processes to include learning, and show that simulated dopamine dynamics strongly resemble those actually observed during instrumental conditioning. Furthermore, simulated dopamine depletion impairs performance but spares learning, while simulated excitation of dopamine neurons drives reward learning, through aberrant inference about outcome states. Our formal approach provides a novel and parsimonious reconciliation of apparently divergent experimental findings. PMID:26581305

  12. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme insertion/deletion polymorphism and adrenergic response to exercise in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Jalil, Jorge E; Córdova, Samuel; Ocaranza, Marí a; Schumacher, Erwin; Braun, Sandra; Chamorro, Gastón; Fardella, Carlos; Lavandero, Sergio

    2002-08-01

    The insertion/deletion ACE polymorphism (ACE I/D) regulates different levels of circulating and tissue ACE activities, which may induce diverse adrenergic responses to physiological stimuli. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the ACE I/D polymorphism on the adrenergic response to isotonic exercise in middle-aged hypertensive patients. Submaximal exercise (on a treadmill, using the Naughton protocol at 75% of maximal heart rate) was performed in 34 patients homozygous for the ACE I/D polymorphism (ACE II and ACE DD) with untreated essential hypertension (II = 19, DD = 15). Plasma venous adrenaline and noradrenaline were measured at rest and at submaximal exercise. Plasma ACE activity was significantly higher in the hypertensive patients carrying the ACE DD genotype compared with the ACE II group. Left atrium size, as well as LV dimensions, mass, and function, were similar in both groups. Total exercise time, baseline and 75% maximal heart rate (MHR) and blood pressure were similar in both groups. Baseline plasma adrenaline and noradrenaline levels were similar in both groups and increased significantly (p<0.05) by ca. 300% at submaximal exercise without differences between groups. The presence of the D allele on the ACE gene in middle-aged hypertensive patients determines higher circulating ACE activity but not increased sympathetic activity in response to submaximal exercise.

  13. Stereospecificity of mushroom tyrosinase immobilized on a chiral and a nonchiral support.

    PubMed

    Marín-Zamora, María Elisa; Rojas-Melgarejo, Francisco; García-Canovas, Francisco; García-Ruiz, Pedro Antonio

    2007-05-30

    Mushroom tyrosinase was immobilized from an extract onto glass beads covered with the cross-linked totally cinnamoylated derivates of d-sorbitol (sorbitol cinnamate) and glycerine (glycerine cinnamate). The enzyme was immobilized onto the support by direct adsorption, and the quantity of immobilized tyrosinase was higher for sorbitol cinnamate, the support with the higher number of esterified hydroxyls per unit of monosacharide, than for glycerine cinnamate. The results obtained from the stereospecificity study of the monophenolase and diphenolase activity of immobilized mushroom tyrosinase are reported. The enantiomers L-tyrosine, DL-tyrosine, D-tyrosine, L-dopa, DL-dopa, D-dopa, L-alpha-methyldopa, DL-alpha-methyldopa, L-isoprenaline, DL-isoprenaline, L-adrenaline, DL-adrenaline, L-noradrenaline, and D-noradrenaline were assayed with tyrosinase immobilized on a chiral support (sorbitol cinnamate), whereas L-tyrosine, DL-tyrosine, D-tyrosine, L-dopa, DL-dopa, D-dopa, L-alpha-methyldopa, and DL-alpha-methyldopa were assayed with tyrosinase immobilized on a nonchiral support (glycerine cinnamate). The same Vmax(app) values for each series of enantiomers were obtained. However, the Km(app) values were different, the l isomers showing lower values than the dl isomers, whereas the highest Km(app) value was obtained with d isomers. No difference was observed in the stereospecificity of tyrosinase immobilized on a chiral (sorbitol cinnamate) or nonchiral (glycerine cinnamate) support.

  14. Effects of nicergoline on the cardiovascular system of dogs and rats.

    PubMed

    Huchet, A M; Mouillé, P; Chelly, J; Lucet, B; Doursout, M F; Lechat, P; Schmitt, H

    1981-01-01

    In pentobarbitalized closed-chest dogs, nicergoline (10--100 microgram/kg, i.v.) reduced blood pressure, heart rate, and splanchnic nerve activity. Intracisternal administration of nicergoline (3 microgram/kg) only reduced splanchnic nerve activity. In open-chest dogs, nicergoline reduced blood pressure, cardiac output, and total peripheral resistance but did not change heart rate. In pithed rats treated with a beta-adrenoceptor-blocking agent, nicergoline reduced the pressor responses to noradrenaline and adrenaline. Nicergoline slightly attenuated the pressor responses of dogs to noradrenaline and tyramine and, in addition, reversed the hypertension induced by adrenaline and dimethylphenylpiperazinium. Nicergoline (100 microgram/kg) increased the tachycardia induced in dogs by stimulation of the right cardiovascular nerve and prevented the inhibitory effect of clonidine on this response. However, nicergoline only partially antagonized the effect of clonidine once it was fully established. Nicergoline did not antagonize the hypotensive and bradycardic effects of clonidine when they were established. Nicergoline did not affect the vagally mediated bradycardia evoked by carotid nerve stimulation in beta-adrenoceptor-blocked dogs. The compound did not change blood pressure in Cl spinal cord transected dogs. In conclusion, nicergoline appears to decrease blood pressure by blocking alpha-adrenoceptors and, at least at some doses, by a central inhibition of the sympathetic tone. Nicergoline appears to be a preferential alpha 1-adrenoceptor-blocking agent.

  15. Spinal mechanism of micturition reflex inhibition by naftopidil in rats.

    PubMed

    Sugaya, Kimio; Nishijima, Saori; Kadekawa, Katsumi; Ashitomi, Katsuhiro; Ueda, Tomoyuki; Yamamoto, Hideyuki

    2014-10-29

    We investigated the spinal mechanism through which naftopidil inhibits the micturition reflex by comparing the effects of noradrenaline and naftopidil in rats. The following were investigated: the influence of oral naftopidil on plasma monoamine and amino acid levels, the distribution of oral 14C-naftopidil, the effects of intravenous (IV) or intrathecal (IT) injection of noradrenaline or naftopidil on isovolumetric bladder contractions, amino acid levels in the lumbosacral spinal cord after IT noradrenaline or naftopidil, and the effects of IT naftopidil and strychnine and/or bicuculline on isovolumetric bladder contractions. Oral naftopidil decreased the plasma adrenaline level, while it increased the serotonin and glycine levels. After oral administration, 14C-naftopidil was detected in the spinal cord and cerebrum, as well as in plasma and the prostate gland. When the bladder volume was below the threshold for isovolumetric reflex contractions, IV (0.1mg) or IT (0.1μg) noradrenaline evoked bladder contractions, but IV (1mg) or IT (0.01-1μg) naftopidil did not. When the bladder volume was above the threshold for isovolumetric reflex contractions, IV or IT noradrenaline transiently abolished bladder contractions. IT noradrenaline decreased the levels of glycine and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the lumbosacral cord, while IT naftopidil increased the GABA level. IT strychnine and/or bicuculline blocked the inhibitory effect of IT naftopidil on bladder contractions. Naftopidil inhibits the micturition reflex by blocking α1 receptors, as well as by the activation of serotonergic, glycinergic, and GABAergic neurons in the central nervous system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Dopamine Gene Profiling to Predict Impulse Control and Effects of Dopamine Agonist Ropinirole.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Hayley J; Stinear, Cathy M; Ren, April; Coxon, James P; Kao, Justin; Macdonald, Lorraine; Snow, Barry; Cramer, Steven C; Byblow, Winston D

    2016-07-01

    Dopamine agonists can impair inhibitory control and cause impulse control disorders for those with Parkinson disease (PD), although mechanistically this is not well understood. In this study, we hypothesized that the extent of such drug effects on impulse control is related to specific dopamine gene polymorphisms. This double-blind, placebo-controlled study aimed to examine the effect of single doses of 0.5 and 1.0 mg of the dopamine agonist ropinirole on impulse control in healthy adults of typical age for PD onset. Impulse control was measured by stop signal RT on a response inhibition task and by an index of impulsive decision-making on the Balloon Analogue Risk Task. A dopamine genetic risk score quantified basal dopamine neurotransmission from the influence of five genes: catechol-O-methyltransferase, dopamine transporter, and those encoding receptors D1, D2, and D3. With placebo, impulse control was better for the high versus low genetic risk score groups. Ropinirole modulated impulse control in a manner dependent on genetic risk score. For the lower score group, both doses improved response inhibition (decreased stop signal RT) whereas the lower dose reduced impulsiveness in decision-making. Conversely, the higher score group showed a trend for worsened response inhibition on the lower dose whereas both doses increased impulsiveness in decision-making. The implications of the present findings are that genotyping can be used to predict impulse control and whether it will improve or worsen with the administration of dopamine agonists.

  17. Prefrontal and Striatal Glutamate Differently Relate to Striatal Dopamine: Potential Regulatory Mechanisms of Striatal Presynaptic Dopamine Function?

    PubMed

    Gleich, Tobias; Deserno, Lorenz; Lorenz, Robert Christian; Boehme, Rebecca; Pankow, Anne; Buchert, Ralph; Kühn, Simone; Heinz, Andreas; Schlagenhauf, Florian; Gallinat, Jürgen

    2015-07-01

    Theoretical and animal work has proposed that prefrontal cortex (PFC) glutamate inhibits dopaminergic inputs to the ventral striatum (VS) indirectly, whereas direct VS glutamatergic afferents have been suggested to enhance dopaminergic inputs to the VS. In the present study, we aimed to investigate relationships of glutamate and dopamine measures in prefrontostriatal circuitries of healthy humans. We hypothesized that PFC and VS glutamate, as well as their balance, are differently associated with VS dopamine. Glutamate concentrations in the left lateral PFC and left striatum were assessed using 3-Tesla proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Striatal presynaptic dopamine synthesis capacity was measured by fluorine-18-l-dihydroxyphenylalanine (F-18-FDOPA) positron emission tomography. First, a negative relationship was observed between glutamate concentrations in lateral PFC and VS dopamine synthesis capacity (n = 28). Second, a positive relationship was revealed between striatal glutamate and VS dopamine synthesis capacity (n = 26). Additionally, the intraindividual difference between PFC and striatal glutamate concentrations correlated negatively with VS dopamine synthesis capacity (n = 24). The present results indicate an involvement of a balance in PFC and striatal glutamate in the regulation of VS dopamine synthesis capacity. This notion points toward a potential mechanism how VS presynaptic dopamine levels are kept in a fine-tuned range. A disruption of this mechanism may account for alterations in striatal dopamine turnover as observed in mental diseases (e.g., in schizophrenia). The present work demonstrates complementary relationships between prefrontal and striatal glutamate and ventral striatal presynaptic dopamine using human imaging measures: a negative correlation between prefrontal glutamate and presynaptic dopamine and a positive relationship between striatal glutamate and presynaptic dopamine are revealed. The results may reflect a regulatory role

  18. Presence and function of dopamine transporter (DAT) in stallion sperm: dopamine modulates sperm motility and acrosomal integrity.

    PubMed

    Urra, Javier A; Villaroel-Espíndola, Franz; Covarrubias, Alejandra A; Rodríguez-Gil, Joan Enric; Ramírez-Reveco, Alfredo; Concha, Ilona I

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine is a catecholamine with multiple physiological functions, playing a key role in nervous system; however its participation in reproductive processes and sperm physiology is controversial. High dopamine concentrations have been reported in different portions of the feminine and masculine reproductive tract, although the role fulfilled by this catecholamine in reproductive physiology is as yet unknown. We have previously shown that dopamine type 2 receptor is functional in boar sperm, suggesting that dopamine acts as a physiological modulator of sperm viability, capacitation and motility. In the present study, using immunodetection methods, we revealed the presence of several proteins important for the dopamine uptake and signalling in mammalian sperm, specifically monoamine transporters as dopamine (DAT), serotonin (SERT) and norepinephrine (NET) transporters in equine sperm. We also demonstrated for the first time in equine sperm a functional dopamine transporter using 4-[4-(Dimethylamino)styryl]-N-methylpyridinium iodide (ASP(+)), as substrate. In addition, we also showed that dopamine (1 mM) treatment in vitro, does not affect sperm viability but decreases total and progressive sperm motility. This effect is reversed by blocking the dopamine transporter with the selective inhibitor vanoxerine (GBR12909) and non-selective inhibitors of dopamine reuptake such as nomifensine and bupropion. The effect of dopamine in sperm physiology was evaluated and we demonstrated that acrosome integrity and thyrosine phosphorylation in equine sperm is significantly reduced at high concentrations of this catecholamine. In summary, our results revealed the presence of monoamine transporter DAT, NET and SERT in equine sperm, and that the dopamine uptake by DAT can regulate sperm function, specifically acrosomal integrity and sperm motility.

  19. Presence and Function of Dopamine Transporter (DAT) in Stallion Sperm: Dopamine Modulates Sperm Motility and Acrosomal Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Covarrubias, Alejandra A.; Rodríguez-Gil, Joan Enric; Ramírez-Reveco, Alfredo; Concha, Ilona I.

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine is a catecholamine with multiple physiological functions, playing a key role in nervous system; however its participation in reproductive processes and sperm physiology is controversial. High dopamine concentrations have been reported in different portions of the feminine and masculine reproductive tract, although the role fulfilled by this catecholamine in reproductive physiology is as yet unknown. We have previously shown that dopamine type 2 receptor is functional in boar sperm, suggesting that dopamine acts as a physiological modulator of sperm viability, capacitation and motility. In the present study, using immunodetection methods, we revealed the presence of several proteins important for the dopamine uptake and signalling in mammalian sperm, specifically monoamine transporters as dopamine (DAT), serotonin (SERT) and norepinephrine (NET) transporters in equine sperm. We also demonstrated for the first time in equine sperm a functional dopamine transporter using 4-[4-(Dimethylamino)styryl]-N-methylpyridinium iodide (ASP+), as substrate. In addition, we also showed that dopamine (1 mM) treatment in vitro, does not affect sperm viability but decreases total and progressive sperm motility. This effect is reversed by blocking the dopamine transporter with the selective inhibitor vanoxerine (GBR12909) and non-selective inhibitors of dopamine reuptake such as nomifensine and bupropion. The effect of dopamine in sperm physiology was evaluated and we demonstrated that acrosome integrity and thyrosine phosphorylation in equine sperm is significantly reduced at high concentrations of this catecholamine. In summary, our results revealed the presence of monoamine transporter DAT, NET and SERT in equine sperm, and that the dopamine uptake by DAT can regulate sperm function, specifically acrosomal integrity and sperm motility. PMID:25402186

  20. Effects of thyroidal, gonadal and adrenal hormones on tissue respiration of streaked frog, Rana limnocharis, at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Gupta, B B; Chakrabarty, P

    1990-01-01

    In vivo and in vitro effects of thyroidal, gonadal and adrenal hormones were studied on the rate of liver and skeletal muscle respiration in both the sexes of R. limnocharis during active and inactive phases of the annual activity cycle. Triiodothyronine (L-T3) and thyroxine (L-T4) did not stimulate tissue (liver and muscle) respiration in any of the experiments irrespective of season, sex and temperature. Testosterone, estradiol and corticosterone stimulated O2 uptake significantly irrespective of season, sex and temperature. Adrenaline and nor-adrenaline also stimulated tissue respiration significantly during the winter month. Since the ambient temperature was low even during the active phase (max. temperature 21 degrees C), it seems that the frog might have developed tissue sensitivity for gonadal and adrenal hormones at low temperatures when thyroid hormones are calorigenically ineffective.

  1. Brexpiprazole: A Partial Dopamine Agonist for the Treatment of Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ekinci, Asli; Ekinci, Okan

    2018-01-31

    Schizophrenia is a chronic and debilitating mental disorder that affects the patient's and their family's life. The disease remains a complicated disorder that is challenging to treat, despite there being a large antipsychotic armamentarium. Brexpiprazole acts both as a partial agonist at the serotonin 5-HT1A and dopamine D2 receptors and as an antagonist at the serotonin 5- HT2A and noradrenaline alpha1B and alpha2C receptors, all with similar potency. This balanced receptor profile may produce promising antipsychotic effects on positive, negative and cognitive symptoms in schizophrenia with minimal adverse effects. This review summarizes the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetic profile of brexpiprazole and the clinical trial information pertaining to its effectiveness and safety and tolerability, discusses its best clinical use, and compares its clinical profile to those of other widely used antipsychotic agents. Brexpiprazole demonstrated significant clinical efficacy and had good safety and tolerability in well-designed trials with patients with schizophrenia. This agent may be a useful treatment alternative. However, it will be valuable to consider a long-term observational study that includes an active comparator, especially other second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs), to further evaluate the efficacy and safety of brexpiprazole in the treatment of schizophrenia. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Olfactory discrimination deficits in mice lacking the dopamine transporter or the D2 dopamine receptor.

    PubMed

    Tillerson, Jennifer L; Caudle, W Michael; Parent, Jack M; Gong, C; Schallert, Timothy; Miller, Gary W

    2006-09-15

    Previous pharmacological studies have implicated dopamine as a modulator of olfactory bulb processing. Several disorders characterized by altered dopamine homeostasis in olfaction-related brain regions display olfactory deficits. To further characterize the role of dopamine in olfactory processing, we subjected dopamine transporter knockout mice (DAT -/-) and dopamine receptor 2 knockout mice (D2 -/-) to a battery of olfactory tests. In addition to behavioral characterization, several neurochemical markers of olfactory bulb integrity and function were examined. DAT -/- mice displayed an olfactory discrimination deficit, but did not differ detectably from DAT wildtype (DAT +/+) mice in odor habituation, olfactory sensitivity, or odor recognition memory. Neurochemically, DAT -/- mice have decreased D2 receptor staining in the periglomerular layer of the olfactory bulb and increased tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity compared to DAT +/+ controls. D2 -/- mice exhibited the same olfactory deficit as the DAT -/- mice, further supporting the role of dopamine at the D2 synapse in olfactory discrimination processing. The findings presented in this paper reinforce the functional significance of dopamine and more specifically the D2 receptor in olfactory discrimination and may help explain the behavioral phenotype in the DAT and D2 knockout mice.

  3. Model-based predictions for dopamine.

    PubMed

    Langdon, Angela J; Sharpe, Melissa J; Schoenbaum, Geoffrey; Niv, Yael

    2018-04-01

    Phasic dopamine responses are thought to encode a prediction-error signal consistent with model-free reinforcement learning theories. However, a number of recent findings highlight the influence of model-based computations on dopamine responses, and suggest that dopamine prediction errors reflect more dimensions of an expected outcome than scalar reward value. Here, we review a selection of these recent results and discuss the implications and complications of model-based predictions for computational theories of dopamine and learning. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Influence of laser radiation on some integrative indications of sympathetic-adrenal system activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pronchenkova, G. F.; Chesnokova, N. P.

    2002-07-01

    One of the goals of this experimental research is elucidation of the influence of laser radiation on the functional state of the sympathetic-adrenal system of a microorganism, which to a large extent defines the intensity of an inflammatory reaction development, and in particular regeneration and repair process in the zone of post traumatic influence of infectious and non-infectious pathogen factors. We have also studied the alteration of adrenaline and noradrenaline content in the wound itself in the dynamics of regeneration.

  5. Effect of space flights on plasma hormone levels in man and in experimental animal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macho, L.; Kvetňanský, R.; Vigaš, M.; Németh, S.; Popova, I.; Tigranian, R. A.; Noskov, V. B.; Serova, L.; Grigoriev, I. A.

    An important increase of plasma hormone levels like insulin, TSH and aldosterone was observed in human subjects after space flights, however in the changes of plasma content of ACTH, cortisol, adrenaline and noradrenaline the individual variations were observed in relation to number and duration of space flight. For evaluation of the effects of these changes in plasma hormone levels on metabolic processes also the experiments with small animals subjected to space flights on a board of biosatellite of Cosmos series were running. An elevation of plasma levels of corticosterone, adrenaline, noradrenaline and insulin was found in rats after the space flights of duration from 7 to 20 days. It was demonstrated, that the increase of corticosterone in plasma is followed by the activation of enzymes involved in the aminoacid metabolism in rat liver (tyrosine aminotransferase, tryptophanpyrolase, alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase). After a short recovery period (2 to 6 days) the plasma corticosterone concentration and also the activity of liver enzymes returned to control levels. The exposition of animals to stress stimuli during this recovery period showed higher response of corticosterone levels in flight rats as compared to intact controls. The increase of plasma catecholamine levels was not followed by elevation of lipolysis in adipose tissue. This is due to lower response of adipose tissue to catecholamine because a decrease of the stimulation of lipolysis by noradrenaline was observed in animals after space flight. The increase of insulin was not followed by adequate decrease of glucose concentration suggesting a disturbances in glucose utilization similarly as in cosmonauts after a long-term space flight. These results showed that changes in plasma hormone levels, observed after space flight, affected the regulation of metabolic processes in tissues.

  6. Congestion of mastoid mucosa and influence on middle ear pressure - Effect of retroauricular injection of adrenaline.

    PubMed

    Fooken Jensen, Pernille Vita; Gaihede, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Micro-CT scanning of temporal bones has revealed numerous retroauricular microchannels, which connect the outer bone surface directly to the underlying mastoid air cells. Their structure and dimensions have suggested a separate vascular supply to the mastoid mucosa, which may play a role in middle ear (ME) pressure regulation. This role may be accomplished by changes in the mucosa congestion resulting in volumetric changes, which ultimately affect the pressure of the enclosed ME gas pocket (Boyle's law). Further, such mucosa congestion may be susceptible to α-adrenergic stimulation similar to the mucosa of the nose. The purpose of our study was to investigate these hypotheses by recording the ME pressure in response to adrenergic stimulation administered by retroauricular injections at the surface of the microchannels. In a group of 20 healthy adults we measured the ME pressure by tympanometry initially in the sitting position, and then in the supine position over a 5 min period with 30 s intervals. In each subject, the study included 1) a control reference experiment with no intervention, 2) a control experiment with subcutaneously retroauricular injection of 1 ml isotonic NaCl solution, and 3) a test experiment with subcutaneously retroauricular injection of 1 ml NaCl-adrenaline solution. In both control experiments the ME pressure displayed an immediate increase in response to changing body position; this pressure increase remained stable for the entire period up to five minutes. In the test experiments the ME pressure also showed an initial pressure increase, but it was followed by a distinct significant pressure decrease with a maximum after 90 s. The test group was injected with both a 5 and 10% adrenaline solution, but the responses appeared similar for the two concentrations. Subcutaneous retroauricular injection of adrenaline caused a significant pressure decrease in ME pressure compared with control ears. This may be explained by the microchannels

  7. Mesolimbic Dopamine Signals the Value of Work

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Arif A.; Pettibone, Jeffrey R.; Mabrouk, Omar S.; Hetrick, Vaughn L.; Schmidt, Robert; Vander Weele, Caitlin M.; Kennedy, Robert T.; Aragona, Brandon J.; Berke, Joshua D.

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine cell firing can encode errors in reward prediction, providing a learning signal to guide future behavior. Yet dopamine is also a key modulator of motivation, invigorating current behavior. Existing theories propose that fast (“phasic”) dopamine fluctuations support learning, while much slower (“tonic”) dopamine changes are involved in motivation. We examined dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens across multiple time scales, using complementary microdialysis and voltammetric methods during adaptive decision-making. We first show that minute-by-minute dopamine levels covary with reward rate and motivational vigor. We then show that second-by-second dopamine release encodes an estimate of temporally-discounted future reward (a value function). We demonstrate that changing dopamine immediately alters willingness to work, and reinforces preceding action choices by encoding temporal-difference reward prediction errors. Our results indicate that dopamine conveys a single, rapidly-evolving decision variable, the available reward for investment of effort, that is employed for both learning and motivational functions. PMID:26595651

  8. Stress hormone epinephrine (adrenaline) and norepinephrine (noradrenaline) effects on the anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Boyanova, Lyudmila

    2017-04-01

    Microbial endocrinology is a relatively new research area that already encompasses the anaerobes. Stress hormones, epinephrine and norepinephrine, can affect the growth of anaerobic bacteria such as Fusobacterium nucleatum, Prevotella spp., Porhyromonas spp., Tanerella forsythia and Propionibacterium acnes and can increase virulence gene expression, iron acquisition and many virulence factors of some anaerobic species such as Clostridium perfringens, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Brachyspira pilosicoli. Epinephrine and norepinephrine effects can lead to a growth increase or decrease, or no effect on the growth of the anaerobes. The effects are species-specific and perhaps strain-specific. Discrepancies in the results of some studies can be due to the different methods and media used, catecholamine concentrations, measurement techniques and the low number of strains tested. Biological effects of the stress hormones on the anaerobes may range from halitosis and a worsening of periodontal diseases to tissue damages and atherosclerotic plaque ruptures. Optimizations of the research methods and a detailed assessment of the catecholamine effects in conditions mimicking those in affected organs and tissues, as well as the effects on the quorum sensing and virulence of the anaerobes and the full spectrum of biological consequences of the effects are interesting topics for further evaluation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Cross-hemispheric dopamine projections have functional significance

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Megan E.; Mikhailova, Maria A.; Bass, Caroline E.; Takmakov, Pavel; Gainetdinov, Raul R.; Budygin, Evgeny A.; Wightman, R. Mark

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine signaling occurs on a subsecond timescale, and its dysregulation is implicated in pathologies ranging from drug addiction to Parkinson’s disease. Anatomic evidence suggests that some dopamine neurons have cross-hemispheric projections, but the significance of these projections is unknown. Here we report unprecedented interhemispheric communication in the midbrain dopamine system of awake and anesthetized rats. In the anesthetized rats, optogenetic and electrical stimulation of dopamine cells elicited physiologically relevant dopamine release in the contralateral striatum. Contralateral release differed between the dorsal and ventral striatum owing to differential regulation by D2-like receptors. In the freely moving animals, simultaneous bilateral measurements revealed that dopamine release synchronizes between hemispheres and intact, contralateral projections can release dopamine in the midbrain of 6-hydroxydopamine–lesioned rats. These experiments are the first, to our knowledge, to show cross-hemispheric synchronicity in dopamine signaling and support a functional role for contralateral projections. In addition, our data reveal that psychostimulants, such as amphetamine, promote the coupling of dopamine transients between hemispheres. PMID:27298371

  10. Olfactory Perceptual Learning Requires Action of Noradrenaline in the Olfactory Bulb: Comparison with Olfactory Associative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinera, Jennifer; Kermen, Florence; Sacquet, Joëlle; Didier, Anne; Mandairon, Nathalie; Richard, Marion

    2015-01-01

    Noradrenaline contributes to olfactory-guided behaviors but its role in olfactory learning during adulthood is poorly documented. We investigated its implication in olfactory associative and perceptual learning using local infusion of mixed a1-ß adrenergic receptor antagonist (labetalol) in the adult mouse olfactory bulb. We reported that…

  11. Effects of Ketamine and Ketamine Metabolites on Evoked Striatal Dopamine Release, Dopamine Receptors, and Monoamine Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Can, Adem; Zanos, Panos; Moaddel, Ruin; Kang, Hye Jin; Dossou, Katinia S. S.; Wainer, Irving W.; Cheer, Joseph F.; Frost, Douglas O.; Huang, Xi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Following administration at subanesthetic doses, (R,S)-ketamine (ketamine) induces rapid and robust relief from symptoms of depression in treatment-refractory depressed patients. Previous studies suggest that ketamine’s antidepressant properties involve enhancement of dopamine (DA) neurotransmission. Ketamine is rapidly metabolized to (2S,6S)- and (2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine (HNK), which have antidepressant actions independent of N-methyl-d-aspartate glutamate receptor inhibition. These antidepressant actions of (2S,6S;2R,6R)-HNK, or other metabolites, as well as ketamine’s side effects, including abuse potential, may be related to direct effects on components of the dopaminergic (DAergic) system. Here, brain and blood distribution/clearance and pharmacodynamic analyses at DA receptors (D1–D5) and the DA, norepinephrine, and serotonin transporters were assessed for ketamine and its major metabolites (norketamine, dehydronorketamine, and HNKs). Additionally, we measured electrically evoked mesolimbic DA release and decay using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry following acute administration of subanesthetic doses of ketamine (2, 10, and 50 mg/kg, i.p.). Following ketamine injection, ketamine, norketamine, and multiple hydroxynorketamines were detected in the plasma and brain of mice. Dehydronorketamine was detectable in plasma, but concentrations were below detectable limits in the brain. Ketamine did not alter the magnitude or kinetics of evoked DA release in the nucleus accumbens in anesthetized mice. Neither ketamine’s enantiomers nor its metabolites had affinity for DA receptors or the DA, noradrenaline, and serotonin transporters (up to 10 μM). These results suggest that neither the side effects nor antidepressant actions of ketamine or ketamine metabolites are associated with direct effects on mesolimbic DAergic neurotransmission. Previously observed in vivo changes in DAergic neurotransmission following ketamine administration are likely indirect. PMID

  12. Retigabine diminishes the effects of acetylcholine, adrenaline and adrenergic agonists on the spontaneous activity of guinea pig smooth muscle strips in vitro.

    PubMed

    Apostolova, Elisaveta; Zagorchev, Plamen; Kokova, Vesela; Peychev, Lyudmil

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of retigabine on the smooth muscle response to acetylcholine, adrenaline, α-and β-adrenoceptor agonists. We studied the change in the spontaneous smooth muscle contraction of guinea pig gastric corpus strips before and after 20-min treatment with 2μM retigabine. We also evaluated the effect of retigabine on the smooth muscle response to 10μM acetylcholine, 1 and 10μM adrenaline, 1μM methoxamine, 0.1μM p-iodoclonidine and 10μM isoproterenol. We observed a significant reduction in the effects of all studied mediators and agonists when they were added to organ baths in the presence of retigabine. Retigabine diminished the effect of acetylcholine on the spontaneous smooth muscle activity. The effect was fully antagonized by XE-991 (Kv7 channel blocker), which supports our hypothesis about the role of KCNQ channels in the registered changes. The increase in the contraction force after adding of 1μM adrenaline, methoxamine, and 0.1μM p-iodoclonidine was also significantly smaller in presence of retigabine. However, comparing the effect of 10μM adrenaline on the contractility before and after treatment with retigabine, we observed increased contractility when retigabine was present in the organ baths. A possible explanation for the observed diminished effects of mediators and receptor agonists is that the effect of retigabine on smooth muscle contractility is complex. The membrane hyperpolarization, the interaction between Kv7 channels and adrenoceptors, and the influence on signaling pathways may contribute to the summary smooth muscle response. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The neurobiology of social play and its rewarding value in rats

    PubMed Central

    Vanderschuren, Louk J.M.J.; Achterberg, E.J. Marijke; Trezza, Viviana

    2016-01-01

    In the young of many mammalian species, including humans, a vigorous and highly rewarding social activity is abundantly expressed, known as social play behaviour. Social play is thought to be important for the development of social, cognitive and emotional processes and their neural underpinnings, and it is disrupted in pediatric psychiatric disorders. Here, we summarize recent progress in our understanding of the brain mechanisms of social play behaviour, with a focus on its rewarding properties. Opioid, endocannabinoid, dopamine and noradrenaline systems play a prominent role in the modulation of social play. Of these, dopamine is particularly important for the motivational properties of social play. The nucleus accumbens has been identified as a key site for opioid and dopamine modulation of social play. Endocannabinoid influences on social play rely on the basolateral amygdala, whereas noradrenaline modulates social play through the basolateral amygdala, habenula and prefrontal cortex. In sum, social play behaviour is the result of coordinated activity in a network of corticolimbic structures, and its monoamine, opioid and endocannabinoid innervation. PMID:27587003

  14. The Longevity of Hippocampus-Dependent Memory Is Orchestrated by the Locus Coeruleus-Noradrenergic System

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The locus coeruleus is connected to the dorsal hippocampus via strong fiber projections. It becomes activated after arousal and novelty, whereupon noradrenaline is released in the hippocampus. Noradrenaline from the locus coeruleus is involved in modulating the encoding, consolidation, retrieval, and reversal of hippocampus-based memory. Memory storage can be modified by the activation of the locus coeruleus and subsequent facilitation of hippocampal long-term plasticity in the forms of long-term depression and long-term potentiation. Recent evidence indicates that noradrenaline and dopamine are coreleased in the hippocampus from locus coeruleus terminals, thus fostering neuromodulation of long-term synaptic plasticity and memory. Noradrenaline is an inductor of epigenetic modifications regulating transcriptional control of synaptic long-term plasticity to gate the endurance of memory storage. In conclusion, locus coeruleus activation primes the persistence of hippocampus-based long-term memory. PMID:28695015

  15. Interaction between adrenaline and dibenzo-18-crown-6: Electrochemical, nuclear magnetic resonance, and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhang-Yu; Liu, Tao; Wang, Xue-Liang

    2014-12-01

    The interaction between adrenaline (Ad) and dibenzo-18-crown-6 (DB18C6) was studied by cyclic voltammetry, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and the theoretical calculations, respectively. The results show that DB18C6 will affect the electron transfer properties of Ad. DB18C6 can form stable supramolecular complexes with Ad through ion-dipole and hydrogen bond interactions.

  16. Computational Systems Analysis of Dopamine Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Zhen; Miller, Gary W.; Voit, Eberhard O.

    2008-01-01

    A prominent feature of Parkinson's disease (PD) is the loss of dopamine in the striatum, and many therapeutic interventions for the disease are aimed at restoring dopamine signaling. Dopamine signaling includes the synthesis, storage, release, and recycling of dopamine in the presynaptic terminal and activation of pre- and post-synaptic receptors and various downstream signaling cascades. As an aid that might facilitate our understanding of dopamine dynamics in the pathogenesis and treatment in PD, we have begun to merge currently available information and expert knowledge regarding presynaptic dopamine homeostasis into a computational model, following the guidelines of biochemical systems theory. After subjecting our model to mathematical diagnosis and analysis, we made direct comparisons between model predictions and experimental observations and found that the model exhibited a high degree of predictive capacity with respect to genetic and pharmacological changes in gene expression or function. Our results suggest potential approaches to restoring the dopamine imbalance and the associated generation of oxidative stress. While the proposed model of dopamine metabolism is preliminary, future extensions and refinements may eventually serve as an in silico platform for prescreening potential therapeutics, identifying immediate side effects, screening for biomarkers, and assessing the impact of risk factors of the disease. PMID:18568086

  17. Dopamine-Secreting Paraganglioma in the Retroperitoneum.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yusuke; Kimura, Noriko; Yoshimoto, Takanobu; Sekiguchi, Yoshihiro; Tomoishi, Junzo; Kasahara, Ichiro; Hara, Yoshihito; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2017-03-01

    Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas, which exclusively produce dopamine, are very rare. Herein, we report for the first time a Japanese case of an exclusively dopamine-producing paraganglioma accompanied by detailed immunohistochemical analyses. A 70-year-old Japanese woman was referred to our hospital for functional examination of her left retroperitoneal mass. Her adrenal functions were normal, except for excessive dopamine secretion. After the tumorectomy, her dopamine level normalized. The histopathological diagnosis of the tumor was paraganglioma; this was confirmed by positive immunostaining of chromogranin A (CgA), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH), and succinate dehydrogenase gene subunit B (SDHB). However, the immunostaining of CgA in the tumor cells showed peculiar dot-like staining located corresponding to Golgi complex in the perinuclear area, rather than the diffuse cytoplasmic staining usually observed in epinephrine- or norepinephrine-producing functional pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas. The immunohistochemical results suggested that the tumor cells had sparse neuroendocrine granules in the cytoplasm, resulting in inhibition of catecholamine synthesis from dopamine to norepinephrine in neurosecretory granules. This may be the mechanism responsible for exclusive dopamine secretion in the present case.

  18. The effects on increasing cardiac output with adrenaline or isoprenaline on arterial haemoglobin oxygen saturation and shunt during one-lung ventilation.

    PubMed

    Russell, W J; James, M F

    2000-12-01

    Theoretically, if the cardiac output were increased in the presence of a given intrapulmonary shunt, the arterial haemoglobin oxygen saturation (SaO2) should improve as the venous oxygen extraction per ml of blood decreases. To test this hypothesis, eight pigs were subjected to one-lung ventilation and adrenaline and isoprenaline infusions used to increase the cardiac output. The mixed venous oxygen, shunt fraction and oxygen consumption were measured. With both adrenaline and isoprenaline, although there was a small rise in mixed venous oxygen content, there was a fall in SaO2. With adrenaline, the mean shunt rose from 48% to 65%, the mean oxygen consumption rose from 126 ml/min to 134 ml/min and the mean SaO2 fell from 86.9% to 82.5%. With isoprenaline, the mean shunt rose from 45% to 59%, the mean oxygen consumption rose from 121 ml/min to 137 ml/min and the mean SaO2 fell from 89.5% to 84.7%. It is concluded that potential improvement in SaO2, which might occur from a catecholamine-induced increase in mixed venous oxygen content during one-lung ventilation, is more than offset by increased shunting and oxygen consumption which reduce SaO2.

  19. Estradiol, dopamine and motivation.

    PubMed

    Yoest, Katie E; Cummings, Jennifer A; Becker, Jill B

    2014-01-01

    The gonadal hormone estradiol modulates mesolimbic dopamine systems in the female rat. This modulatory effect is thought to be responsible for the observed effects of estradiol on motivated behaviors. Dopamine acting in the nucleus accumbens is thought to be important for the attribution of incentive motivational properties to cues that predict reward delivery, while dopamine in the striatum is associated with the expression of repetitive or stereotyped behaviors. Elevated concentrations of estradiol are associated with increased motivation for sex or cues associated with access to a mate, while simultaneously attenuating motivation for food. This shift in motivational salience is important for adaptive choice behavior in the natural environment. Additionally, estradiol's adaptive effects on motivation can be maladaptive when increasing motivation for non-natural reinforcers, such as drugs of abuse. Here we discuss the effect of estradiol on mesotelencephalic dopamine transmission and subsequent effects on motivated behaviors.

  20. Monoamines and sexual function in rats bred for increased catatonic reactivity.

    PubMed

    Klochkov, D V; Alekhina, T A; Kuznetsova, E G; Barykina, N N

    2009-07-01

    Body weight, ovary and uterus weight, the nature of estral cycles, and hypothalamus dopamine and noradrenaline levels and plasma testosterone levels were studied in female GC rats, bred for increased catatonic reactivity, at different stages of the estral cycle (estrus, proestrus). The outbred Wistar strain served as controls. On the background of decreased body weight, GC females showed impairments to the morphological cyclical changes in the ovaries and uterus, with a reduction in ovary weight in diestrus (p < 0.01) and a smaller estrogen-dependent increase in uterus weight in estrus as compared with Wistar females. On the background of decreases in dopamine and noradrenaline contents in the hypothalamus, GC rats showed higher levels of these monoamines in estrus and lower levels in diestrus. Plasma testosterone levels in female GC rats were higher in diestrus than in estrus and in Wistar rats.

  1. Comparison of chiral electrophoretic separation methods for phenethylamines and application on impurity analysis.

    PubMed

    Borst, Claudia; Holzgrabe, Ulrike

    2010-12-15

    A chiral microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography method has been developed for the separation of the enantiomers of the phenethylamines ephedrine, N-methylephedrine, norephedrine, pseudoephedrine, adrenaline (epinephrine), 2-amino-1-phenylethanol, diethylnorephedrine, and 2-(dibutylamino)-1-phenyl-1-propanol, respectively. The separations were achieved using an oil-in-water microemulsion consisting of the oil-component ethyl acetate, the surfactant sodium dodecylsulfate, the cosurfactant 1-butanol, the organic modifier propan-2-ol and 20mM phosphate buffer pH 2.5 as aqueous phase. For enantioseparation sulfated beta-cyclodextrin was added. The method was compared to an already described CZE method, which made use of heptakis(2,3-di-O-diacetyl-6-O-sulfo)-beta-cyclodextrin (HDAS) as chiral selector. Additionally, the developed method was successfully applied to the related substances analysis of noradrenaline, adrenaline, dipivefrine, ephedrine and pseudoephedrine monographed in the European Pharmacopoeia 6. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of consecutive cooling and immobilization on catecholamine metabolism in rat tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matlina, E. S.; Waysman, S. M.; Zaydner, I. G.; Kogan, B. M.; Nozdracheva, L. V.

    1979-01-01

    The combined effect of two stressor stimuli--cooling and immobilization--acting successively on the sympathetic-adrenaline system was studied experimentally in rats that were cooled for 8 hours at 7 C on the first day and immobilized for 6 hours on the next day. The biochemical and histochemical methods used and the experimental technique involved are described in detail. The following conclusions were formulated: (1) the successive action of cooling and immobilization results in a stronger decrease in the adrenaline and noradrenaline content in the adrenal gland than that which could be due to a simple summation of the cooling and immobilization effects; (2) successive cooling and immobilization are followed by activation of catecholamine synthesis in the adrenal gland; and (3) 1-DOPA administration (45 mg/kg 3 times in 2 days) intraabdominally activated catecholamine synthesis in the adrenal glands in both the control and test animals.

  3. Recovery of dopamine transporters with methamphetamine detoxification is not linked to changes in dopamine release

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Volkow, Nora D.; Wang, Gene-Jack; Smith, Lisa

    Metamphetamine’s widepread abuse and concerns that it may increase Parkinson’s disease led us to assess if the reported loss of dopamine transporters (DAT) in methamphetamine abusers (MA) reflected damage to dopamine neurons. Using PET with [ 11C]cocaine to measure DAT, and with [ 11C]raclopride to measure dopamine release (assessed as changes in specific binding of [ 11C]raclopride between placebo and methylphenidate), which was used as marker of dopamine neuronal function, we show that MA (n=16), tested during early detoxification, had lower DAT (20-30%) but overall normal DA release in striatum (except for a small decrease in left putamen), when comparedmore » to controls (n=15). In controls, DAT were positively correlated with DA release (higher DAT associated with larger DA increases), consistent with DAT serving as markers of DA terminals. In contrast, MA showed a trend for a negative correlation (p=0.07) (higher DAT associated with lower DA increases), consistent with reduced DA re-uptake following DAT downregulation. MA who remained abstinent nine-months later (n=9) showed significant increases in DAT (20%) but methylphenidate-induced dopamine increases did not change. In contrast, in controls, DAT did not change when retested 9 months later but methylphenidate-induced dopamine increases in ventral striatum were reduced (p=0.05). Baseline D2/D3 receptors in caudate were lower in MA than in controls and did not change with detoxification, nor did they change in the controls upon retest. The loss of DAT in the MA, which was not associated with a concomitant reduction in dopamine release as would have been expected if DAT loss reflected DA terminal degneration; as well as the recovery of DAT after protracted detoxification, which was not associated with increased dopamine release as would have been expected if DAT increases reflected terminal regeneration, indicate that the loss of DAT in these MA does not reflect degeneration of dopamine terminals.« less

  4. Recovery of dopamine transporters with methamphetamine detoxification is not linked to changes in dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Volkow, Nora D; Wang, Gene-Jack; Smith, Lisa; Fowler, Joanna S; Telang, Frank; Logan, Jean; Tomasi, Dardo

    2015-11-01

    Methamphetamine's widepread abuse and concerns that it might increase Parkinson's disease led us to assess if the reported loss of dopamine transporters (DAT) in methamphetamine abusers (MA) reflected damage to dopamine neurons. Using PET with [(11)C]cocaine to measure DAT, and with [(11)C]raclopride to measure dopamine release (assessed as changes in specific binding of [(11)C]raclopride between placebo and methylphenidate), which was used as a marker of dopamine neuronal function, we show that MA (n=16), tested during early detoxification, had lower DAT (20-30%) but overall normal DA release in striatum (except for a small decrease in left putamen), when compared to controls (n=15). In controls, DAT were positively correlated with DA release (higher DAT associated with larger DA increases), consistent with DAT serving as markers of DA terminals. In contrast, MA showed a trend for a negative correlation (p=0.07) (higher DAT associated with lower DA increases), consistent with reduced DA re-uptake following DAT downregulation. MA who remained abstinent nine-months later (n=9) showed significant increases in DAT (20%) but methylphenidate-induced dopamine increases did not change. In contrast, in controls, DAT did not change when retested 9 months later but methylphenidate-induced dopamine increases in ventral striatum were reduced (p=0.05). Baseline D2/D3 receptors in caudate were lower in MA than in controls and did not change with detoxification, nor did they change in the controls upon retest. The loss of DAT in the MA, which was not associated with a concomitant reduction in dopamine release as would have been expected if DAT loss reflected DA terminal degneration; as well as the recovery of DAT after protracted detoxification, which was not associated with increased dopamine release as would have been expected if DAT increases reflected terminal regeneration, indicate that the loss of DAT in these MA does not reflect degeneration of dopamine terminals

  5. Recovery of dopamine transporters with methamphetamine detoxification is not linked to changes in dopamine release

    DOE PAGES

    Volkow, Nora D.; Wang, Gene-Jack; Smith, Lisa; ...

    2015-07-21

    Metamphetamine’s widepread abuse and concerns that it may increase Parkinson’s disease led us to assess if the reported loss of dopamine transporters (DAT) in methamphetamine abusers (MA) reflected damage to dopamine neurons. Using PET with [ 11C]cocaine to measure DAT, and with [ 11C]raclopride to measure dopamine release (assessed as changes in specific binding of [ 11C]raclopride between placebo and methylphenidate), which was used as marker of dopamine neuronal function, we show that MA (n=16), tested during early detoxification, had lower DAT (20-30%) but overall normal DA release in striatum (except for a small decrease in left putamen), when comparedmore » to controls (n=15). In controls, DAT were positively correlated with DA release (higher DAT associated with larger DA increases), consistent with DAT serving as markers of DA terminals. In contrast, MA showed a trend for a negative correlation (p=0.07) (higher DAT associated with lower DA increases), consistent with reduced DA re-uptake following DAT downregulation. MA who remained abstinent nine-months later (n=9) showed significant increases in DAT (20%) but methylphenidate-induced dopamine increases did not change. In contrast, in controls, DAT did not change when retested 9 months later but methylphenidate-induced dopamine increases in ventral striatum were reduced (p=0.05). Baseline D2/D3 receptors in caudate were lower in MA than in controls and did not change with detoxification, nor did they change in the controls upon retest. The loss of DAT in the MA, which was not associated with a concomitant reduction in dopamine release as would have been expected if DAT loss reflected DA terminal degneration; as well as the recovery of DAT after protracted detoxification, which was not associated with increased dopamine release as would have been expected if DAT increases reflected terminal regeneration, indicate that the loss of DAT in these MA does not reflect degeneration of dopamine terminals.« less

  6. Empirical Valence Bond Simulations of the Hydride-Transfer Step in the Monoamine Oxidase A Catalyzed Metabolism of Noradrenaline.

    PubMed

    Poberžnik, Matic; Purg, Miha; Repič, Matej; Mavri, Janez; Vianello, Robert

    2016-11-10

    Monoamine oxidases (MAOs) A and B are flavoenzymes responsible for the metabolism of biogenic amines, such as dopamine, serotonin, and noradrenaline (NA), which is why they have been extensively implicated in the etiology and course of various neurodegenerative disorders and, accordingly, used as primary pharmacological targets to treat these debilitating cognitive diseases. The precise chemical mechanism through which MAOs regulate the amine concentration, which is vital for the development of novel inhibitors, is still not unambiguously determined in the literature. In this work, we present atomistic empirical valence bond simulations of the rate-limiting step of the MAO-A-catalyzed NA (norepinephrine) degradation, involving hydride transfer from the substrate α-methylene group to the flavin moiety of the flavin adenine dinucleotide prosthetic group, employing the full dimensionality and thermal fluctuations of the hydrated enzyme, with extensive configurational sampling. We show that MAO-A lowers the free energy of activation by 14.3 kcal mol -1 relative to that of the same reaction in aqueous solution, whereas the calculated activation free energy of ΔG ‡ = 20.3 ± 1.6 kcal mol -1 is found to be in reasonable agreement with the correlated experimental value of 16.5 kcal mol -1 . The results presented here strongly support the fact that both MAO-A and MAO-B isoforms function by the same hydride-transfer mechanism. We also considered a few point mutations of the "aromatic cage" tyrosine residue (Tyr444Phe, Tyr444Leu, Tyr444Trp, Tyr444His, and Tyr444Glu), and the calculated changes in the reaction barriers are in agreement with the experimental values, thus providing further support to the proposed mechanism.

  7. α2A- and α2C-Adrenoceptors as Potential Targets for Dopamine and Dopamine Receptor Ligands.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Soto, Marta; Casadó-Anguera, Verònica; Yano, Hideaki; Bender, Brian Joseph; Cai, Ning-Sheng; Moreno, Estefanía; Canela, Enric I; Cortés, Antoni; Meiler, Jens; Casadó, Vicent; Ferré, Sergi

    2018-03-18

    The poor norepinephrine innervation and high density of Gi/o-coupled α 2A - and α 2C -adrenoceptors in the striatum and the dense striatal dopamine innervation have prompted the possibility that dopamine could be an effective adrenoceptor ligand. Nevertheless, the reported adrenoceptor agonistic properties of dopamine are still inconclusive. In this study, we analyzed the binding of norepinephrine, dopamine, and several compounds reported as selective dopamine D 2 -like receptor ligands, such as the D 3 receptor agonist 7-OH-PIPAT and the D 4 receptor agonist RO-105824, to α 2 -adrenoceptors in cortical and striatal tissue, which express α 2A -adrenoceptors and both α 2A - and α 2C -adrenoceptors, respectively. The affinity of dopamine for α 2 -adrenoceptors was found to be similar to that for D 1 -like and D 2 -like receptors. Moreover, the exogenous dopamine receptor ligands also showed high affinity for α 2A - and α 2C -adrenoceptors. Their ability to activate Gi/o proteins through α 2A - and α 2C -adrenoceptors was also analyzed in transfected cells with bioluminescent resonance energy transfer techniques. The relative ligand potencies and efficacies were dependent on the Gi/o protein subtype. Furthermore, dopamine binding to α 2 -adrenoceptors was functional, inducing changes in dynamic mass redistribution, adenylyl cyclase activity, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Binding events were further studied with computer modeling of ligand docking. Docking of dopamine at α 2A - and α 2C -adrenoceptors was nearly identical to its binding to the crystallized D 3 receptor. Therefore, we provide conclusive evidence that α 2A - and α 2C -adrenoceptors are functional receptors for norepinephrine, dopamine, and other previously assumed selective D 2 -like receptor ligands, which calls for revisiting previous studies with those ligands.

  8. Striatal dopamine D1 and D2 receptors: widespread influences on methamphetamine-induced dopamine and serotonin neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Gross, Noah B; Duncker, Patrick C; Marshall, John F

    2011-11-01

    Methamphetamine (mAMPH) is an addictive psychostimulant drug that releases monoamines through nonexocytotic mechanisms. In animals, binge mAMPH dosing regimens deplete markers for monoamine nerve terminals, for example, dopamine and serotonin transporters (DAT and SERT), in striatum and cerebral cortex. Although the precise mechanism of mAMPH-induced damage to monoaminergic nerve terminals is uncertain, both dopamine D1 and D2 receptors are known to be important. Systemic administration of dopamine D1 or D2 receptor antagonists to rodents prevents mAMPH-induced damage to striatal dopamine nerve terminals. Because these studies employed systemic antagonist administration, the specific brain regions involved remain to be elucidated. The present study examined the contribution of dopamine D1 and D2 receptors in striatum to mAMPH-induced DAT and SERT neurotoxicities. In this experiment, either the dopamine D1 antagonist, SCH23390, or the dopamine D2 receptor antagonist, sulpiride, was intrastriatally infused during a binge mAMPH regimen. Striatal DAT and cortical, hippocampal, and amygdalar SERT were assessed as markers of mAMPH-induced neurotoxicity 1 week following binge mAMPH administration. Blockade of striatal dopamine D1 or D2 receptors during an otherwise neurotoxic binge mAMPH regimen produced widespread protection against mAMPH-induced striatal DAT loss and cortical, hippocampal, and amygdalar SERT loss. This study demonstrates that (1) dopamine D1 and D2 receptors in striatum, like nigral D1 receptors, are needed for mAMPH-induced striatal DAT reductions, (2) these same receptors are needed for mAMPH-induced SERT loss, and (3) these widespread influences of striatal dopamine receptor antagonists are likely attributable to circuits connecting basal ganglia to thalamus and cortex. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Comparison of hemodynamic response to adrenaline infiltration in children undergoing cleft palate repair during general anesthesia with sevoflurane and isoflurane.

    PubMed

    Gunnam, Poojita Reddy; Durga, Padmaja; Gurajala, Indira; Kaluvala, Prasad Rao; Veerabathula, Prardhana; Ramachandran, Gopinath

    2016-01-01

    Systemic absorption of adrenaline often used for infiltration during cleft palate surgery leads to adverse hemodynamic responses. These hemodynamic responses may be attenuated by the volatile anesthetics. This study aims to compare the hemodynamic responses to adrenaline infiltration during isoflurane (ISO) and sevoflurane (SEVO) anesthesia. Sixty children aged between 9 months and 48 months, weighing between 8 kg and 20 kg, undergoing primary repair of cleft palate were randomly allocated into two groups: Group ISO - anesthesia maintained with ISO (2 minimum alveolar concentrations [MAC]) and nitrous oxide 50% and group SEVO - maintained on SEVO (2 MAC) and nitrous oxide 50%. Surgical site was infiltrated with 1 ml/kg of 1:200,000 solution of adrenaline with 0.5% lignocaine. Heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) were noted at the end of infiltration and every 1 min for 5 min following infiltration. The percentage change of hemodynamic responses from baseline, following infiltration were compared between the two groups. There was no significant change in HR from baseline, and the response was comparable between the agents at all times. The blood pressure (BP) increased from baseline in both the groups but the increase was greater in SEVO than ISO group at 2 and 3 min after infiltration. The maximum change in HR from baseline (group ISO median 10.9% [interquartile range (IQR) 4.5-23.0] vs. group SEVO 26.5% [11.9-44.6]) was comparable in both the groups (P = 0.169). The maximum change in SBP was significantly greater in group SEVO than group ISO (42.8% [IQR 20.0-60.9] vs. 26.0 [11.3-44.5], P = 0.04). The incidence of significant change (>20%) of SBP, DBP, and MAP from baseline was significantly greater in group SEVO after infiltration and 1 min and 2 min after infiltration. There were no arrhythmias in any of the groups. Isoflurane results in greater attenuation of rise in BP during

  10. Coupling to protein kinases A and C of adenosine A2B receptors involved in the facilitation of noradrenaline release in the prostatic portion of rat vas deferens.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Glória; Quintas, Clara; Talaia, Carlos; Gonçalves, Jorge

    2004-08-01

    In the prostatic portion of rat vas deferens, the non-selective adenosine receptor agonist NECA (0.1-30 microM), but not the A(2A) agonist CGS 21680 (0.001-10 microM), caused a facilitation of electrically evoked noradrenaline release (up to 43 +/- 4%), when inhibitory adenosine A(1) receptors were blocked. NECA-elicited facilitation of noradrenaline release was prevented by the A(2B) receptor-antagonist MRS 1754, enhanced by preventing cyclic-AMP degradation with rolipram, abolished by the protein kinase A inhibitors H-89, KT 5720 and cyclic-AMPS-Rp and attenuated by the protein kinase C inhibitors Ro 32-0432 and calphostin C. The adenosine uptake inhibitor NBTI also elicited a facilitation of noradrenaline release; an effect that was abolished by adenosine deaminase and attenuated by MRS 1754, by inhibitors of the extracellular nucleotide metabolism and by blockade of alpha(1)-adrenoceptors and P2X receptors with prazosin and NF023, respectively. It was concluded that adenosine A(2B) receptors are involved in a facilitation of noradrenaline release in the prostatic portion of rat vas deferens that can be activated by adenosine formed by extracellular catabolism of nucleotides. The receptors seem to be coupled to the adenylyl cyclase-protein kinase A pathway but activation of the protein kinase C by protein kinase A, may also contribute to the adenosine A(2B) receptor-mediated facilitation of noradrenaline release.

  11. Infantile parkinsonism-dystonia: a dopamine "transportopathy".

    PubMed

    Blackstone, Craig

    2009-06-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) retrieves the neurotransmitter dopamine from the synaptic cleft at dopaminergic synapses. Variations in solute carrier family 6A, member 3 (SLC6A3/DAT1), the human gene encoding DAT, have been implicated in attention deficit hyperactivity and bipolar disorders, and DAT is a prominent site of action for drugs such as amphetamines and cocaine. In this issue of the JCI, Kurian et al. report that an autosomal recessive infantile parkinsonism-dystonia is caused by loss-of-function mutations in DAT that impair dopamine reuptake (see the related article beginning on page 1595). Though this might be predicted to result in dopamine excess in the synaptic cleft, it likely also causes depletion of presynaptic dopamine stores and possibly downregulation of postsynaptic dopamine receptor function, resulting in impairments in dopaminergic neurotransmission consistent with the clinical presentation. This is the first report of a genetic alteration in DAT function underlying a parkinsonian disorder.

  12. Update on epinephrine (adrenaline) for pediatric emergencies.

    PubMed

    Walker, David M

    2009-06-01

    Epinephrine (adrenaline) is a medication widely used in the pediatric emergency department. This article reviews the most recent evidence and recommendations behind the many applications of epinephrine as they apply to the care of children in emergency departments. Recent publications address epinephrine's role in the treatment of anaphylaxis, croup, asthma, bronchiolitis and as an adjunct to local anesthesia. Additionally, authors discuss epinephrine autoinjectors and the various routes of epinephrine administration. Epinephrine is the recommended first-line treatment for anaphylaxis and moderate-to-severe croup. Its role in asthma and bronchiolitis is less clear. Traditional beta2-agonists are seen as first-line therapies for moderate bronchiolitis and asthma exacerbations. Epinephrine may have a role for subsets of patients with both of these illnesses. The preferred route for parenteral treatment is intramuscular. Epinephrine is well tolerated as an adjunct to local anesthesia when used in digital blocks in digits with normal perfusion. Although autoinjectors allow faster access to epinephrine for anaphylaxis, there are many issues surrounding their use and indications.

  13. Evaluation of pre-hospital administration of adrenaline (epinephrine) by emergency medical services for patients with out of hospital cardiac arrest in Japan: controlled propensity matched retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Shinji; Tomio, Jun; Takahashi, Hideto; Ichikawa, Masao; Nishida, Masamichi; Morimura, Naoto; Sakamoto, Tetsuya

    2013-12-10

    To evaluate the effectiveness of pre-hospital adrenaline (epinephrine) administered by emergency medical services to patients with out of hospital cardiac arrest. Controlled propensity matched retrospective cohort study, in which pairs of patients with or without (control) adrenaline were created with a sequential risk set matching based on time dependent propensity score. Japan's nationwide registry database of patients with out of hospital cardiac arrest registered between January 2007 and December 2010. Among patients aged 15-94 with out of hospital cardiac arrest witnessed by a bystander, we created 1990 pairs of patients with and without adrenaline with an initial rhythm of ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VF/VT) and 9058 pairs among those with non-VF/VT. Overall and neurologically intact survival at one month or at discharge, whichever was earlier. After propensity matching, pre-hospital administration of adrenaline by emergency medical services was associated with a higher proportion of overall survival (17.0% v 13.4%; unadjusted odds ratio 1.34, 95% confidence interval 1.12 to 1.60) but not with neurologically intact survival (6.6% v 6.6%; 1.01, 0.78 to 1.30) among those with VF/VT; and higher proportions of overall survival (4.0% v 2.4%; odds ratio 1.72, 1.45 to 2.04) and neurologically intact survival (0.7% v 0.4%; 1.57, 1.04 to 2.37) among those with non-VF/VT. Pre-hospital administration of adrenaline by emergency medical services improves the long term outcome in patients with out of hospital cardiac arrest, although the absolute increase of neurologically intact survival was minimal.

  14. Distribution and types of adrenoceptors in the guinea-pig ileum: the action of α-and β-adrenoceptor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, V.

    1981-01-01

    1 Segments of guinea-pig ileum and the myenteric plexus-longitudinal smooth muscle preparation were used for a study of the actions of adrenaline, noradrenaline, isoprenaline, ephedrine and phenylephrine on the responses of coaxially stimulated ileum at different distances from the ileocaecal valve. 2 The responses of the ileum to electrical stimulation were suppressed by adrenaline, nonadrenaline and ephedrine, while phenylephrine and isoprenaline inhibited them only partially. 3 The twitch inhibition elicited by these adrenoceptor agonists was the same at all distances from the ileocaecal valve. There was no significant difference between their cumulative and non-cumulative concentration-response curves. 4 Smooth muscle relaxation was induced only by isoprenaline and contraction only by phenylephrine at all distances from the ileocaecal junction. Adrenaline and noradrenaline evoked smooth muscle contraction in the terminal (0 to 20 cm), a concentration-dependent, biphasic response in the intermediate part (21 to 50 cm) and a relaxation in the proximal ileum (> 50 cm from the ilecocaecal valve). Ephedrine did not change significantly the smooth muscle tension in the terminal and the intermediate segments and induced smooth muscle relaxation in the proximal ones. 5 Ouabain and a potassium-free solution did not appear to influence the prejunctional action of noradrenaline nor the amplitude of smooth muscle relaxation in the proximal ileum, whereas the concentration-contractor response curves were significantly depressed and shifted to the right by ouabain and in a potassium-free solution. 6 The brief initial (phasic) contraction induced by acetylcholine was not influenced during the sustained increase or decrease in tension induced by catecholamines. On the contrary, the stimulatory catecholamine actions disappeared or were changed to smooth muscle relaxation by acetylcholine pretreatment. Potassium chloride pretreatment did not change the character of the

  15. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrene sulfonate)/dopamine-coated electrodes for dopamine delivery.

    PubMed

    Sui, L; Song, X J; Ren, J; Cai, W J; Ju, L H; Wang, Y; Wang, L Y; Chen, M

    2014-06-01

    Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) doped with poly(styrene sulfonate) (PSS) has a variety of chemical and biomedical applications. The application of PEDOT/PSS polymers in drug delivery has attracted attention. However, whether conducting polymers of PEDOT/PSS could be used for dopamine delivery has not clear. In the present study, the PEDOT/PSS coatings incorporated with dopamine were fabricated on 0.5 mm diameter platinum electrodes, electrochemical properties, and dopamine delivery capacities of these electrodes were evaluated in vitro and in vivo through implanting these electrodes into brain striatum area. The findings demonstrated that the PEDOT/PSS/dopamine coatings on platinum electrodes could reduce electrodes impedances, increase charge storage capacities, and release significant levels of dopamine upon electrical stimulation of these electrodes. These results indicated that polymers of PEDOT/PSS/dopamine could be used for dopamine delivery, implicating potential application of PEDOT/PSS/dopamine-coated implantable electrodes in the treatment of some diseases associated with dopamine deficits, such as, electrodes for the treatment of Parkinson's disease during deep brain stimulation. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Enhanced dopamine D2 autoreceptor function in the adult prefrontal cortex contributes to dopamine hypoactivity following adolescent social stress.

    PubMed

    Weber, Matthew A; Graack, Eric T; Scholl, Jamie L; Renner, Kenneth J; Forster, Gina L; Watt, Michael J

    2018-06-14

    Adult psychiatric disorders characterized by cognitive deficits reliant on prefrontal cortex (PFC) dopamine are promoted by teenage bullying. Similarly, male Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to social defeat in mid-adolescence (P35-39) show impaired working memory in adulthood (P56-70), along with decreased medial PFC (mPFC) dopamine activity that results in part from increased dopamine transporter-mediated clearance. Here, we determined if dopamine synthesis and D2 autoreceptor-mediated inhibition of dopamine release in the adult mPFC are also enhanced by adolescent defeat to contribute to later dopamine hypofunction. Control and previously defeated rats did not differ in either DOPA accumulation following amino acid decarboxylase inhibition (NSD-1015 100 mg/kg ip.) or total/phosphorylated tyrosine hydroxylase protein expression, suggesting dopamine synthesis in the adult mPFC is not altered by adolescent defeat. However, exposure to adolescent defeat caused greater decreases in extracellular dopamine release (measured using in vivo chronoamperometry) in the adult mPFC upon local infusion of the D2 receptor agonist quinpirole (3 nM), implying greater D2 autoreceptor function. Equally enhanced D2 autoreceptor-mediated inhibition of dopamine release is seen in the adolescent (P40 or P49) mPFC, which declines in control rats by adulthood. However, this developmental decrease in autoreceptor function is absent following adolescent defeat, suggesting retention of an adolescent-like phenotype into adulthood. Current and previous findings indicate adolescent defeat decreases extracellular dopamine availability in the adult mPFC via both enhanced inhibition of dopamine release and increased dopamine clearance, which may be viable targets for improving treatment of cognitive deficits seen in neuropsychiatric disorders promoted by adolescent stress. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Site(s) and ionic basis of α-autoinhibition and facilitation of [3H]noradrenaline secretion in guinea-pig vas deferens

    PubMed Central

    Alberts, P.; Bartfai, T.; Stjärne, L.

    1981-01-01

    1. Mechanisms controlling the secretion of [3H]noradrenaline from the noradrenergic nerves of guinea-pig isolated vas deferens, prelabelled by incubation with [3H]noradrenaline, were studied using (a) different modes of (extramural or transmural) electrical nerve stimulation (a total of 300 shocks of varying strength, and a duration of 2 msec) at 1-30 Hz, or (b) depolarizing concentrations of K+ (60-110 mm). 2. The fractional rise in efflux of 3H-labelled material (Δt) was used to measure the secretion of [3H]noradrenaline. 3. The dependence of [3H]noradrenaline secretion on the external Ca2+ concentration (1-8 mm) was essentially hyperbolic. Double reciprocal plot analysis (1/Δt vs. 1/Ca2+) of the data yields that blockade of α-autoinhibition (phentolamine 1 μm) does not increase the maximal secretory velocity, but does enhance the apparent affinity of the secretory mechanism for external Ca2+. Exogenous noradrenaline has (qualitatively) opposite effects. The interaction between α-autoinhibition and external Ca2+ thus shows a `competitive' pattern, indicating that restriction of the utilization of external Ca2+ is a major mechanism in α-autoinhibition of noradrenaline secretion, in this system. 4. Phenoxybenzamine (10 μm) and phentolamine (1 μm) increased the secretion of [3H]noradrenaline evoked by depolarization with K+ much less than that caused by electrical nerve stimulation (frequencies up to 10 Hz). Exogenous noradrenaline (1-5 μm) depressed the secretion evoked by both modes of stimulation. The results indicate that α-autoinhibition of [3H]noradrenaline secretion is mainly operative when the secretory stimulus requires conduction of nerve impulses between varicosities. 5. The frequency dependence of [3H]noradrenaline secretion was hyperbolic, both in the presence and in the absence of α-autoinhibition; at each frequency the secretion (Δt per shock) increased with the Ca2+ concentration in the medium (0·6-8 mm). Double reciprocal plot analysis

  18. Adrenergic receptor-mediated modulation of striatal firing patterns.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Hiroyuki; Kohno, Yu; Arake, Masashi; Tamura, Risa; Yukawa, Suguru; Sato, Yoshiaki; Morimoto, Yuji; Nishida, Yasuhiro; Yawo, Hiromu

    2016-11-01

    Although noradrenaline and adrenaline are some of the most important neurotransmitters in the central nervous system, the effects of noradrenergic/adrenergic modulation on the striatum have not been determined. In order to explore the effects of adrenergic receptor (AR) agonists on the striatal firing patterns, we used optogenetic methods which can induce continuous firings. We employed transgenic rats expressing channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) in neurons. The medium spiny neuron showed a slow rising depolarization during the 1-s long optogenetic striatal photostimulation and a residual potential with 8.6-s half-life decay after the photostimulation. As a result of the residual potential, five repetitive 1-sec long photostimulations with 20-s onset intervals cumulatively increased the number of spikes. This 'firing increment', possibly relating to the timing control function of the striatum, was used to evaluate the AR modulation. The β-AR agonist isoproterenol decreased the firing increment between the 1st and 5th stimulation cycles, while the α 1 -AR agonist phenylephrine enhanced the firing increment. Isoproterenol and adrenaline increased the early phase (0-0.5s of the photostimulation) firing response. This adrenergic modulation was inhibited by the β-antagonist propranolol. Conversely, phenylephrine and noradrenaline reduced the early phase response. β-ARs and α 1 -ARs work in opposition controlling the striatal firing initiation and the firing increment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Combined treatment with atorvastatin and imipenem improves survival and vascular functions in mouse model of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Soumen; Kannan, Kandasamy; Pule Addison, M; Darzi, Sazad A; Singh, Vishakha; Singh, Thakur Uttam; Thangamalai, Ramasamy; Dash, Jeevan Ranjan; Parida, Subhashree; Debroy, Biplab; Paul, Avishek; Mishra, Santosh Kumar

    2015-08-01

    We have recently reported that pre-treatment, but not the post-treatment with atorvastatin showed survival benefit and improved hemodynamic functions in cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model of sepsis in mice. Here we examined whether combined treatment with atorvastatin and imipenem after onset of sepsis can prolong survival and improve vascular functions. At 6 and 18h after sepsis induction, treatment with atorvastatin plus imipenem, atorvastatin or imipenem alone or placebo was initiated. Ex vivo experiments were done on mouse aorta to examine the vascular reactivity to nor-adrenaline and acetylcholine and mRNA expressions of α1D AR, GRK2 and eNOS. Atorvastatin plus imipenem extended the survival time to 56.00±4.62h from 20.00±1.66h observed in CLP mice. The survival time with atorvastatin or imipenem alone was 20.50±1.89h and 27.00±4.09h, respectively. The combined treatment reversed the hyporeactivity to nor-adrenaline through preservation of α1D AR mRNA/protein expression and reversal of α1D AR desensitization mediated by GRK2/Gβγ pathway. The treatment also restored endothelium-dependent relaxation to ACh through restoration of aortic eNOS mRNA expression and NO availability. In conclusion, combined treatment with atorvastatin and imipenem exhibited survival benefit and improved vascular functions in septic mice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Spectrophotometric investigation on the kinetics of oxidation of adrenaline by dioxygen of μ-dioxytetrakis(histidinato)-dicobalt(II) complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiquee, M. Z. A.; Siddiqui, Masoom R.; Ali, Mohd. Sajid; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A.

    The cobalt(II)histidine complex binds molecular oxygen reversibly to form an oxygen adduct complex, μ-dioxytetrakis-(histidinato)dicobalt(II). The molecular oxygen can be released from the oxygenated complex by heating it or by passing N2, He or Ar gas through its solution. μ-Dioxytetrakis-(histidinato)dicobalt(II) complex oxidizes adrenaline into leucoadrenochrome at 25 °C while at higher temperature (>40 °C) adrenochrome with λmax at 490 nm is formed. The rate of formation of leucoadrenochrome was found to be independent of [bis(histidinato)cobalt(II)]. The rate of reaction for the formation of leucoadrenochrome and adrenochrome increased with the increase in [adrenaline] at its lower concentration but become independent at higher concentration. Similarly, the rate of formation of both leucoadrenochrome and adrenochrome was linearly dependent upon [NaOH]. The values of activation parameters i.e. ΔEa, ΔH‡ and ΔS‡ for the formation of leucoadrenochrome are reported.

  1. Dopamine-imprinted monolithic column for capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Aşır, Süleyman; Sarı, Duygu; Derazshamshir, Ali; Yılmaz, Fatma; Şarkaya, Koray; Denizli, Adil

    2017-11-01

    A dopamine-imprinted monolithic column was prepared and used in capillary electrochromatography as stationary phase for the first time. Dopamine was selectively separated from aqueous solution containing the competitor molecule norepinephrine, which is similar in size and shape to the template molecule. Morphology of the dopamine-imprinted column was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The influence of the organic solvent content of mobile phase, applied pressure and pH of the mobile phase on the recognition of dopamine by the imprinted monolithic column has been evaluated, and the imprinting effect in the dopamine-imprinted monolithic polymer was verified. Developed dopamine-imprinted monolithic column resulted in excellent separation of dopamine from structurally related competitor molecule, norepinephrine. Separation was achieved in a short period of 10 min, with the electrophoretic mobility of 5.81 × 10 -5  m 2 V -1 s -1 at pH 5.0 and 500 mbar pressure. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. [Changes in the monoamine content in different parts of hypothalamus depending on the stages of the estrous cycle].

    PubMed

    Babichev, V N; Adamskaia, E I

    1976-01-01

    Fluorimetric determination of monoamines in various regions of the hypothalamus and at different stages of the estral cycle in rats showed that the serotonin, noradrenaline, and particularly dophamine content changed both in the course of the cycle and at different time (10, 15 and 18 hours) of the same stage of the cycle. Dophamine concentration in the arcuate area--the centre of the tonic activity--reached its maximum at 18 hours of the diestrus-2 (D2) and fell to the minimum at 10 hours of the proestrus (P). Noradrenaline level in the preoptic area increased at 18 hours of the D2 and fell at 10 hours of the P. It is supposed that in the hypothalamic regulation of the estral cycle at least two monoamines (dopamine and noradrenaline) took part; the trigger role belongs to noradrenaline of the preoptic area (the cyclic centre).

  3. Genetic variants of dopamine D2 receptor impact heterodimerization with dopamine D1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Błasiak, Ewa; Łukasiewicz, Sylwia; Szafran-Pilch, Kinga; Dziedzicka-Wasylewska, Marta

    2017-04-01

    The human dopamine D2 receptor gene has three polymorphic variants that alter its amino acid sequence: alanine substitution by valine in position 96 (V96A), proline substitution by serine in position 310 (P310S) and serine substitution by cysteine in position 311 (S311C). Their functional role has never been the object of extensive studies, even though there is some evidence that their occurrence correlates with schizophrenia. The HEK293 cell line was transfected with dopamine D1 and D2 receptors (or genetic variants of the D2 receptor), coupled to fluorescent proteins which allowed us to measure the extent of dimerization of these receptors, using a highly advanced biophysical approach (FLIM-FRET). Additionally, Fluoro-4 AM was used to examine changes in the level of calcium release after ligand stimulation of cells expressing different combinations of dopamine receptors. Using FLIM-FRET experiments we have shown that in HEK 293 expressing dopamine receptors, polymorphic mutations in the D2 receptor play a role in dimmer formation with the dopamine D1 receptor. The association level of dopamine receptors is affected by ligand administration, with variable effects depending on polymorphic variant of the D2 dopamine receptor. We have found that the level of heteromer formation is reflected by calcium ion release after ligand stimulation and have observed variations of this effect dependent on the polymorphic variant and the ligand. The data presented in this paper support the hypothesis on the role of calcium signaling regulated by the D1-D2 heteromer which may be of relevance for schizophrenia etiology. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  4. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for determination of panel of neurotransmitters in cerebrospinal fluid from the rat model for tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Kovac, Andrej; Somikova, Zuzana; Zilka, Norbert; Novak, Michal

    2014-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is still being recognized today as an unmet medical need. Currently, there is no cure and early preclinical diagnostic assay available for AD. Therefore much attention is now being directed at the development of novel methods for quantitative determination of AD biomarkers in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Here, we describe the liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for determination of 5-hydroxytryptamine (SER), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), homovanilic acid (HVA), noradrenaline (NADR), adrenaline (ADR), dopamine (DA), glutamic acid (Glu), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and histamine (HIS) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from the rat model for human tauopathy. The benzoyl chloride was used as pre-column derivatization reagents. Neurotransmitters and metabolites were analysed on ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) on C18 column in combination with tandem mass spectrometry. The method is simple, highly sensitive and showed excellent linearity with regression coefficients higher than 0.99. The accuracy was in a range of 93-113% for all analytes. The inter-day precision (n=5 days), expressed as %RSD, was in a range 2-10% for all analytes. Using this method we detected significant changes of CSF levels of two important neurotransmitters/metabolites, ADR and 5-HIAA, which correlates with progression of neurodegeneration in our animal model. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Central α- and β-adrenoceptors modifying arterial blood pressure and heart rate in conscious cats

    PubMed Central

    Day, M.D.; Roach, A.G.

    1974-01-01

    1 In conscious unrestrained cats noradrenaline, α-methylnoradrenaline and clonidine, infused into the lateral cerebral ventricles (i.c.v.) caused dose-related falls in blood pressure and heart rate; both effects were abolished after i.c.v. phentolamine. 2 In 12 out of 20 cats, i.c.v. isoprenaline and salbutamol when given caused dose-related pressor responses and tachycardias. These effects were abolished after i.c.v. β-adrenoceptor blocking drugs but were unaffected by α-adrenoceptor blocking agents. 3 In 5 out of 20 cats, i.c.v. isoprenaline regularly produced dose-related falls in blood pressure with associated tachycardias; both effects were abolished after i.c.v. β-adrenoceptor blocking agents. 4 Intracerebroventricular dopamine produced cardiovascular responses which were qualitatively similar to those produced by i.c.v. isoprenaline. 5 Intracerebroventricular adrenaline produced complex responses in untreated animals but typical α-effects were obtained after prior i.c.v. treatment with a β-adrenoceptor blocking agent and typical β-effects after i.c.v. pretreatment with an α-adrenoceptor blocking agent. 6 The cardiovascular changes produced by i.c.v. β-adrenoceptor agonists were abolished after systemic administration of hexamethonium or bethanidine. 7 The results are discussed in the light of the mode of action of β-adrenoceptor stimulants and β-adrenoceptor blocking agents in the treatment of hypertension. PMID:4451747

  6. Endocrine response to fasting in the overwintering captive raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides).

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Petteri; Saarela, Seppo; Pyykönen, Teija; Asikainen, Juha; Mononen, Jaakko; Mustonen, Anne-Mari

    2004-12-01

    The raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides) is an omnivorous canid utilizing the passive wintering strategy in the boreal climate. Farmed raccoon dogs (n=12) were randomly assigned into two study groups on 26 November 2003. Between 3 December 2003 and 27 January 2004, half of the animals were fasted for 8 weeks and plasma weight-regulatory hormone concentrations determined on 26 November and 30 December 2003 and on 27 January 2004. The plasma peptide YY, ghrelin, and growth hormone (GH) concentrations increased due to food deprivation, while the T4 and Acrp30 concentrations decreased. Furthermore, the plasma GH concentrations were higher in the fasted raccoon dogs than in the fed animals, which had higher plasma insulin, glucagon, and T4 concentrations. However, fasting had no effect on the plasma leptin concentrations. The results confirm previous findings with unchanged leptin levels in fasting carnivores. Increased GH levels probably contribute to increased lipolysis and mobilization of fat stores. Ghrelin can also enhance lipolysis by increasing the GH levels. The decreased levels of T4 may reduce the metabolic rate. The plasma dopamine concentrations decreased due to fasting unlike observed previously in rats. Together with the unaffected adrenaline, noradrenaline, and cortisol concentrations, this suggests that food deprivation in winter does not cause stress to the raccoon dog but is an integral part of its natural life history.

  7. Reduced maximal oxygen consumption and overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines in athletes.

    PubMed

    Vaisberg, Mauro; de Mello, Marco Tulio; Seelaender, Marília Cerqueira Leite; dos Santos, Ronaldo Vagner Thomatieli; Costa Rosa, Luis Fernando Bicudo Pereira

    2007-01-01

    It was the aim of this study to evaluate whether chronic pain in athletes is related to performance, measured by the maximum oxygen consumption and production of hormones and cytokines. Fifty-five athletes with a mean age of 31.9 +/- 4.2 years engaged in regular competition and showing no symptoms of acute inflammation, particularly fever, were studied. They were divided into 2 subgroups according to the occurrence of pain. Plasma concentrations of adrenaline, noradrenaline, cortisol, prolactin, growth hormone and dopamine were measured by radioimmunoassay, and the production of the cytokines interleukin (IL)-1, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interferon-alpha and prostaglandin E(2) by whole-blood culture. Maximal oxygen consumption was determined during an incremental treadmill test. There was no change in the concentration of stress hormones, but the athletes with chronic pain showed a reduction in maximum oxygen consumption (22%) and total consumption at the anaerobic threshold (25%), as well as increased cytokine production. Increases of 2.7-, 8.1-, 1.7- and 3.7-fold were observed for IL-1, IL-2, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-alpha, respectively. Our data show that athletes with chronic pain have enhanced production of proinflammatory cytokines and lipid mediators and reduced performance in the ergospirometric test. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. [Dopamine receptor signaling regulates human osteoclastogenesis].

    PubMed

    Hanami, Kentaro; Nakano, Kazuhisa; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2013-01-01

    Although the central nervous system and the neurotransmitters are known to control not only the immune system but also the homeostasis of bone mass, their pathological relevance to bone disorders remains unclear. Osteoclasts in the synovium of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) play an important role in bone destruction. It is known that increased sympathetic nervous activity increases both differentiation and function of osteoclasts, which leads to bone loss. Dopamine, a major neurotransmitter, transmits signals via five different seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors termed D1 to D5. We previously reported that dopamine plays an important role in IL-6-IL-17 axis and subsequent joint destruction in RA. The major source of dopamine in the synovial tissue of RA was dendritic cells (DCs) that stored and secreted dopamine. Dopamine released by DCs bounded to D1-like dopamine receptors on T cells and induced activation of cAMP and differentiation to Th17 cells via IL-6 production We here overview the interplay among the immune system, bone metabolism and neurologic system shedding light upon dopaminergic signals upon osteoclastogenesis.

  9. Dopamine, Affordance and Active Inference

    PubMed Central

    Friston, Karl J.; Shiner, Tamara; FitzGerald, Thomas; Galea, Joseph M.; Adams, Rick; Brown, Harriet; Dolan, Raymond J.; Moran, Rosalyn; Stephan, Klaas Enno; Bestmann, Sven

    2012-01-01

    The role of dopamine in behaviour and decision-making is often cast in terms of reinforcement learning and optimal decision theory. Here, we present an alternative view that frames the physiology of dopamine in terms of Bayes-optimal behaviour. In this account, dopamine controls the precision or salience of (external or internal) cues that engender action. In other words, dopamine balances bottom-up sensory information and top-down prior beliefs when making hierarchical inferences (predictions) about cues that have affordance. In this paper, we focus on the consequences of changing tonic levels of dopamine firing using simulations of cued sequential movements. Crucially, the predictions driving movements are based upon a hierarchical generative model that infers the context in which movements are made. This means that we can confuse agents by changing the context (order) in which cues are presented. These simulations provide a (Bayes-optimal) model of contextual uncertainty and set switching that can be quantified in terms of behavioural and electrophysiological responses. Furthermore, one can simulate dopaminergic lesions (by changing the precision of prediction errors) to produce pathological behaviours that are reminiscent of those seen in neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. We use these simulations to demonstrate how a single functional role for dopamine at the synaptic level can manifest in different ways at the behavioural level. PMID:22241972

  10. PRESYNAPTIC DOPAMINE MODULATION BY STIMULANT SELF ADMINISTRATION

    PubMed Central

    España, Rodrigo A.; Jones, Sara R.

    2013-01-01

    The mesolimbic dopamine system is an essential participant in the initiation and modulation of various forms of goal-directed behavior, including drug reinforcement and addiction processes. Dopamine neurotransmission is increased by acute administration of all drugs of abuse, including the stimulants cocaine and amphetamine. Chronic exposure to these drugs via voluntary self-administration provides a model of stimulant abuse that is useful in evaluating potential behavioral and neurochemical adaptations that occur during addiction. This review describes commonly used methodologies to measure dopamine and baseline parameters of presynaptic dopamine regulation, including exocytotic release and reuptake through the dopamine transporter in the nucleus accumbens core, as well as dramatic adaptations in dopamine neurotransmission and drug sensitivity that occur with acute non-contingent and chronic, contingent self-administration of cocaine and amphetamine. PMID:23277050

  11. Ventral tegmental ionotropic glutamate receptor stimulation of nucleus accumbens tonic dopamine efflux blunts hindbrain-evoked phasic neurotransmission: implications for dopamine dysregulation disorders.

    PubMed

    Tye, S J; Miller, A D; Blaha, C D

    2013-11-12

    Activation of glutamate receptors within the ventral tegmental area (VTA) stimulates extrasynaptic (basal) dopamine release in terminal regions, including the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Hindbrain inputs from the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT) are critical for elicitation of phasic VTA dopamine cell activity and consequent transient dopamine release. This study investigated the role of VTA ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) stimulation on both basal and LDT electrical stimulation-evoked dopamine efflux in the NAc using in vivo chronoamperometry and fixed potential amperometry in combination with stearate-graphite paste and carbon fiber electrodes, respectively. Intra-VTA infusion of the iGluR agonists (±)-α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA; 1 μg/μl) or N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA; 2 μg/μl) enhanced basal NAc dopamine efflux. This iGluR-mediated potentiation of basal dopamine efflux was paralleled by an attenuation of LDT-evoked transient NAc dopamine efflux, suggesting that excitation of basal activity effectively inhibited the capacity of hindbrain afferents to elicit transient dopamine efflux. In line with this, post-NMDA infusion of the dopamine D2 autoreceptor (D2R) agonist quinpirole (1 μg/μl; intra-VTA) partially recovered NMDA-mediated attenuation of LDT-evoked NAc dopamine, while concurrently attenuating NMDA-mediated potentiation of basal dopamine efflux. Post-NMDA infusion of quinpirole (1 μg/μl) alone attenuated basal and LDT-evoked dopamine efflux. Taken together, these data reveal that hyperstimulation of basal dopamine transmission can stunt hindbrain burst-like stimulation-evoked dopamine efflux. Inhibitory autoreceptor mechanisms within the VTA help to partially recover the magnitude of phasic dopamine efflux, highlighting the importance of both iGluRs and D2 autoreceptors in maintaining the functional balance of tonic and phasic dopamine neurotransmission. Dysregulation of this balance may have important

  12. Cholinergic Interneurons Underlie Spontaneous Dopamine Release in Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The release of dopamine from terminals in the NAc is regulated by a number of factors, including voltage-gated ion channels, D2-autoreceptors, and nAChRs. Cholinergic interneurons (CINs) drive dopamine release through activation of nAChRs on dopamine terminals. Using cyclic voltammetry in mouse brain slices, nAChR-dependent spontaneous dopamine transients and the mechanisms underlying the origin were examined in the NAc. Spontaneous events were infrequent (0.3 per minute), but the rate and amplitude were increased after blocking Kv channels with 4-aminopyridine. Although the firing frequency of CINs was increased by blocking glutamate reuptake with TBOA and the Sk blocker apamin, only 4-aminopyridine increased the frequency of dopamine transients. In contrast, inhibition of CIN firing with the μ/δ selective opioid [Met5]enkephalin (1 μm) decreased spontaneous dopamine transients. Cocaine increased the rate and amplitude of dopamine transients, suggesting that the activity of the dopamine transporter limits the detection of these events. In the presence of cocaine, the rate of spontaneous dopamine transients was further increased after blocking D2-autoreceptors. Blockade of muscarinic receptors had no effect on evoked dopamine release, suggesting that feedback inhibition of acetylcholine release was not involved. Thus, although spontaneous dopamine transients are reliant on nAChRs, the frequency was not strictly governed by the activity of CINs. The increase in frequency of spontaneous dopamine transients induced by cocaine was not due to an increase in cholinergic tone and is likely a product of an increase in detection resulting from decreased dopamine reuptake. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The actions of dopamine in the NAc are thought to be responsible for endogenous reward and the reinforcing properties of drugs of abuse, such as psychostimulants. The present work examines the mechanisms underlying nAChR-induced spontaneous dopamine release. This study

  13. Chicks incubated in hypomagnetic field need more exogenous noradrenaline for memory consolidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Ying; Wang, Qian; Xu, Mu-Ling; Jiang, Jin-Chang; Li, Bing

    2009-07-01

    The geomagnetic field (GMF) is one of the essential characteristics of the terrestrial environment but does not apply in outer space. The elimination of GMF may interfere with the normal activities of life in many aspects. Previous behavioral experiments have found that long-term memory is impaired in chicks incubated in a near-zero magnetic environment (i.e. hypomagnetic field or HMF). The present study was designed to evaluate the possible involvement of noradrenergic change in the functional abnormality observed before. A HMF space was produced by nullifying the natural GMF with three pairs of Helmholtz coils. The one-trial passive avoidance learning paradigm was performed on day-old chicks incubated in either the HMF space or the natural GMF. Exogenous noradrenaline was administered by intracerebral injections and the effect on memory consolidation was compared between the two categories of subjects. In the behavioral paradigm, the HMF chicks had a higher elimination rate than the GMF chicks and displayed a significant reduction in overall responsiveness. The administration of moderate doses (0.1-0.5 nmol/hemisphere) of noradrenaline led to fairly good memory retention in GMF chicks but had little effect on HMF chicks. However, long-term memory of HMF chicks could be elevated to the normal level by much higher doses (1.0-1.75 nmol/hem) of the drug. These results suggest that prolonged exposure to HMF may induce disorders in the noradrenergic system in the brain and indicate a potentiality of counteracting the ill-effect of GMF deprivation with appropriate pharmacological manipulation.

  14. Evaluation of pre-hospital administration of adrenaline (epinephrine) by emergency medical services for patients with out of hospital cardiac arrest in Japan: controlled propensity matched retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Tomio, Jun; Takahashi, Hideto; Ichikawa, Masao; Nishida, Masamichi; Morimura, Naoto; Sakamoto, Tetsuya

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness of pre-hospital adrenaline (epinephrine) administered by emergency medical services to patients with out of hospital cardiac arrest. Design Controlled propensity matched retrospective cohort study, in which pairs of patients with or without (control) adrenaline were created with a sequential risk set matching based on time dependent propensity score. Setting Japan’s nationwide registry database of patients with out of hospital cardiac arrest registered between January 2007 and December 2010. Participants Among patients aged 15-94 with out of hospital cardiac arrest witnessed by a bystander, we created 1990 pairs of patients with and without adrenaline with an initial rhythm of ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VF/VT) and 9058 pairs among those with non-VF/VT. Main outcome measures Overall and neurologically intact survival at one month or at discharge, whichever was earlier. Results After propensity matching, pre-hospital administration of adrenaline by emergency medical services was associated with a higher proportion of overall survival (17.0% v 13.4%; unadjusted odds ratio 1.34, 95% confidence interval 1.12 to 1.60) but not with neurologically intact survival (6.6% v 6.6%; 1.01, 0.78 to 1.30) among those with VF/VT; and higher proportions of overall survival (4.0% v 2.4%; odds ratio 1.72, 1.45 to 2.04) and neurologically intact survival (0.7% v 0.4%; 1.57, 1.04 to 2.37) among those with non-VF/VT. Conclusions Pre-hospital administration of adrenaline by emergency medical services improves the long term outcome in patients with out of hospital cardiac arrest, although the absolute increase of neurologically intact survival was minimal. PMID:24326886

  15. Insulin resistance impairs nigrostriatal dopamine function.

    PubMed

    Morris, J K; Bomhoff, G L; Gorres, B K; Davis, V A; Kim, J; Lee, P-P; Brooks, W M; Gerhardt, G A; Geiger, P C; Stanford, J A

    2011-09-01

    Clinical studies have indicated a link between Parkinson's disease (PD) and Type 2 Diabetes. Although preclinical studies have examined the effect of high-fat feeding on dopamine function in brain reward pathways, the effect of diet on neurotransmission in the nigrostriatal pathway, which is affected in PD and parkinsonism, is less clear. We hypothesized that a high-fat diet, which models early-stage Type 2 Diabetes, would disrupt nigrostriatal dopamine function in young adult Fischer 344 rats. Rats were fed a high fat diet (60% calories from fat) or a normal chow diet for 12 weeks. High fat-fed animals were insulin resistant compared to chow-fed controls. Potassium-evoked dopamine release and dopamine clearance were measured in the striatum using in vivo electrochemistry. Dopamine release was attenuated and dopamine clearance was diminished in the high-fat diet group compared to chow-fed rats. Magnetic resonance imaging indicated increased iron deposition in the substantia nigra of the high fat group. This finding was supported by alterations in the expression of several proteins involved in iron metabolism in the substantia nigra in this group compared to chow-fed animals. The diet-induced systemic and basal ganglia-specific changes may play a role in the observed impairment of nigrostriatal dopamine function. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Investigation of the mechanisms underlying the hypophagic effects of the 5-HT and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, sibutramine, in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Helen C; Bearham, M Clair; Hutchins, Lisa J; Mazurkiewicz, Sarah E; Needham, Andrew M; Heal, David J

    1997-01-01

    Sibutramine is a novel 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (serotonin- noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, SNRI) which is currently being developed as a treatment for obesity. Sibutramine has been shown to decrease food intake in the rat. In this study we have used a variety of monoamine receptor antagonists to examine the pharmacological mechanisms underlying sibutramine-induced hypophagia. Individually-housed male Sprague-Dawley rats were maintained on reversed phase lighting with free access to food and water. Drugs were administered at 09 h 00 min and food intake was monitored over the following 8 h dark period. Sibutramine (10 mg kg−1, p.o.) produced a significant decrease in food intake during the 8 h following drug administration. This hypophagic response was fully antagonized by the α1-adrenoceptor antagonist, prazosin (0.3 and 1 mg kg−1, i.p.), and partially antagonized by the β1-adrenoceptor antagonist, metoprolol (3 and 10 mg kg−1, i.p.) and the 5-HT receptor antagonists, metergoline (non-selective; 0.3 mg kg−1, i.p.); ritanserin (5-HT2A/2C; 0.1 and 0.5 mg kg−1, i.p.) and SB200646 (5-HT2B/2C; 20 and 40 mg kg−1, p.o.). By contrast, the α2-adrenoceptor antagonist, RX821002 (0.3 and 1 mg kg−1, i.p.) and the β2-adrenoceptor antagonist, ICI 118,551 (3 and 10 mg kg−1, i.p.) did not reduce the decrease in food intake induced by sibutramine. These results demonstrate that β1-adrenoceptors, 5-HT2A/2C-receptors and particularly α1-adrenoceptors, are involved in the effects of sibutramine on food intake and are consistent with the hypothesis that sibutramine-induced hypophagia is related to its ability to inhibit the reuptake of both noradrenaline and 5-HT, with the subsequent activation of a variety of noradrenaline and 5-HT receptor systems. PMID:9283694

  17. Dopamine and anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Södersten, P; Bergh, C; Leon, M; Zandian, M

    2016-01-01

    We have suggested that reduced food intake increases the risk for anorexia nervosa by engaging mesolimbic dopamine neurons, thereby initially rewarding dieting. Recent fMRI studies have confirmed that dopamine neurons are activated in anorexia nervosa, but it is not clear whether this response is due to the disorder or to its resulting nutritional deficit. When the body senses the shortage of nutrients, it rapidly shifts behavior toward foraging for food as a normal physiological response and the mesolimbic dopamine neurons may be involved in that process. On the other hand, the altered dopamine status of anorexics has been suggested to result from a brain abnormality that underlies their complex emotional disorder. We suggest that the outcomes of the treatments that emerge from that perspective remain poor because they target the mental symptoms that are actually the consequences of the food deprivation that accompanies anorexia. On the other hand, a method that normalizes the disordered eating behavior of anorexics results in much better physiological, behavioral, and emotional outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Catecholamines release mediators in the opossum oesophageal circular smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, E E; Jager, L P; Jury, J

    1987-01-01

    1. Effects of catecholamines applied exogenously to the circular smooth muscle layer of the body of the oesophagus of the opossum (Didelphis marsupialis) were studied, simultaneously measuring changes in the membrane potential, the membrane conductance and the contractility of the muscle, using the double sucrose-gap technique. 2. Superfusion of the smooth muscle with Krebs solution at 27 degrees C containing dopamine (10(-6)-10(-4) M) dose-dependently caused a hyperpolarization of the smooth muscle cells and an increased membrane resistance followed after gradual repolarization by oscillations of the membrane potential, often accompanied by muscle action potentials. During the hyperpolarization, the tendency for the membrane potential to sag during prolonged application of hyperpolarizing currents was reduced and the 'off' depolarization following such currents was increased. This muscle did not develop active tension prior to treatment; it therefore did not relax during the hyperpolarizations, but contracted following the depolarized phase of oscillations. 3. The non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic nerve-mediated inhibitory junction potential (i.j.p.) showed a small reduction in amplitude during superfusion with dopamine, explicable as a result of the drug-induced hyperpolarization. The 'off' response following the i.j.p., decreased transiently when the membrane potential was hyperpolarized to its maximum value. Then it increased to values larger than control as the membrane repolarized. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP, 10(-6) M) produced a similar response but hyperpolarizations were smaller. 4. Of the tested catecholamines, isoprenaline, phenylephrine, butylated hydroxytoluene-920 (BHT-920) and clonidine were ineffective whereas the potency order for other catecholamines was dopamine greater than noradrenaline greater than or equal to adrenaline greater than DOPA. The catecholamine-induced responses were not affected by alpha- or beta

  19. Methamphetamine Regulation of Firing Activity of Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Min; Sambo, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a substrate for the dopamine transporter that increases extracellular dopamine levels by competing with dopamine uptake and increasing reverse transport of dopamine via the transporter. METH has also been shown to alter the excitability of dopamine neurons. The mechanism of METH regulation of the intrinsic firing behaviors of dopamine neurons is less understood. Here we identified an unexpected and unique property of METH on the regulation of firing activity of mouse dopamine neurons. METH produced a transient augmentation of spontaneous spike activity of midbrain dopamine neurons that was followed by a progressive reduction of spontaneous spike activity. Inspection of action potential morphology revealed that METH increased the half-width and produced larger coefficients of variation of the interspike interval, suggesting that METH exposure affected the activity of voltage-dependent potassium channels in these neurons. Since METH has been shown to affect Ca2+ homeostasis, the unexpected findings that METH broadened the action potential and decreased the amplitude of afterhyperpolarization led us to ask whether METH alters the activity of Ca2+-activated potassium (BK) channels. First, we identified BK channels in dopamine neurons by their voltage dependence and their response to a BK channel blocker or opener. While METH suppressed the amplitude of BK channel-mediated unitary currents, the BK channel opener NS1619 attenuated the effects of METH on action potential broadening, afterhyperpolarization repression, and spontaneous spike activity reduction. Live-cell total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, electrophysiology, and biochemical analysis suggest METH exposure decreased the activity of BK channels by decreasing BK-α subunit levels at the plasma membrane. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Methamphetamine (METH) competes with dopamine uptake, increases dopamine efflux via the dopamine transporter, and affects the excitability of

  20. Dopamine D1 and D2 Receptor Immunoreactivities in the Arcuate-Median Eminence Complex and their Link to the Tubero-Infundibular Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Fernandez, W.; Borroto-Escuela, D.O.; Vargas-Barroso, V.; Narváez, M.; Di Palma, M.; Agnati, L.F.; Sahd, J. Larriva

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine D1 and D2 receptor immunohistochemistry and Golgi techniques were used to study the structure of the adult rat arcuate-median eminence complex, and determine the distribution of the dopamine D1 and D2 receptor immunoreactivities therein, particularly in relation to the tubero-infundibular dopamine neurons. Punctate dopamine D1 and D2 receptor immunoreactivities, likely located on nerve terminals, were enriched in the lateral palisade zone built up of nerve terminals, while the densities were low to modest in the medial palisade zone. A codistribution of dopamine D1 receptor or dopamine D2 receptor immunoreactive puncta with tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive nerve terminals was demonstrated in the external layer. Dopamine D1 receptor but not dopamine D2 receptor immnunoreactivites nerve cell bodies were found in the ventromedial part of the arcuate nucleus and in the lateral part of the internal layer of the median eminence forming a continuous cell mass presumably representing neuropeptide Y immunoreactive nerve cell bodies. The major arcuate dopamine/ tyrosine hydroxylase nerve cell group was found in the dorsomedial part. A large number of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive nerve cell bodies in this region demonstrated punctate dopamine D1 receptor immunoreactivity but only a few presented dopamine D2 receptor immunoreactivity which were mainly found in a substantial number of tyrosine hydroxylase cell bodies of the ventral periventricular hypothalamic nucleus, also belonging to the tuberoinfundibular dopamine neurons. Structural evidence for projections of the arcuate nerve cells into the median eminence was also obtained. Distal axons formed horizontal axons in the internal layer issuing a variable number of collaterals classified into single or multiple strands located in the external layer increasing our understanding of the dopamine nerve terminal networks in this region. Dopamine D1 and D2 receptors may therefore directly and differentially

  1. Dopamine D1 and D2 receptor immunoreactivities in the arcuate-median eminence complex and their link to the tubero-infundibular dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Romero-Fernandez, W; Borroto-Escuela, D O; Vargas-Barroso, V; Narváez, M; Di Palma, M; Agnati, L F; Larriva Sahd, J; Fuxe, K

    2014-07-18

    Dopamine D1 and D2 receptor immunohistochemistry and Golgi techniques were used to study the structure of the adult rat arcuate-median eminence complex, and determine the distribution of the dopamine D1 and D2 receptor immunoreactivities therein, particularly in relation to the tubero-infundibular dopamine neurons. Punctate dopamine D1 and D2 receptor immunoreactivities, likely located on nerve terminals, were enriched in the lateral palisade zone built up of nerve terminals, while the densities were low to modest in the medial palisade zone. A codistribution of dopamine D1 receptor or dopamine D2 receptor immunoreactive puncta with tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive nerve terminals was demonstrated in the external layer. Dopamine D1 receptor but not dopamine D2 receptor immnunoreactivites nerve cell bodies were found in the ventromedial part of the arcuate nucleus and in the lateral part of the internal layer of the median eminence forming a continuous cell mass presumably representing neuropeptide Y immunoreactive nerve cell bodies. The major arcuate dopamine/ tyrosine hydroxylase nerve cell group was found in the dorsomedial part. A large number of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive nerve cell bodies in this region demonstrated punctate dopamine D1 receptor immunoreactivity but only a few presented dopamine D2 receptor immunoreactivity which were mainly found in a substantial number of tyrosine hydroxylase cell bodies of the ventral periventricular hypothalamic nucleus, also belonging to the tubero-infundibular dopamine neurons. Structural evidence for projections of the arcuate nerve cells into the median eminence was also obtained. Distal axons formed horizontal axons in the internal layer issuing a variable number of collaterals classified into single or multiple strands located in the external layer increasing our understanding of the dopamine nerve terminal networks in this region.  Dopamine D1 and D2 receptors may therefore directly and differentially

  2. [Massive iatrogenic haemothorax treated by lidocaïne-adrenaline intercostal injection].

    PubMed

    Bazarbachi, T; Ghantous, W; Daher, M; Smayra, T; Riachy, M; Chelala, D; Tabet, G

    2009-11-01

    Massive haemothorax is a relatively rare complication of thoracocentesis or the placement of tube thoracostomy. It is principally caused by intercostal vessel injury. The therapeutic approach consists in pleural drainage and sometimes thoracotomy for haemostasis. We describe a frail 72 year old patient, who developed a massive haemothorax occurring after a tube thoracostomy placing, persisting despite second pleural drainage, and complicated by deep haemodynamic shock. He was considered to have a very high risk of mortality if surgery was undertaken. Haemorrhage was totally stopped after intercostal instillation of lidocaïne-adrenaline. This case report suggests a role for pleural vasoconstrictor injection as initial treatment in case of persistent pleural haemorrhage caused by intercostal vessel injury.

  3. Noradrenaline might enhance assertive human social behaviours: an investigation in a flatmate relationship.

    PubMed

    Tse, W S; Bond, A J

    2006-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the role of noradrenaline on the social behaviour of healthy volunteers when they were interacting with a familiar person, their flatmate. Interaction with the flatmate was explored in a cooperative game situation. Ten pairs of same-sex healthy volunteer flatmates aged 18-25 years were recruited for the experiment. All volunteers gave written informed consent and the study was approved by the institutional ethical committee. A randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial of reboxetine versus placebo was conducted. In each of the 10 pairs of volunteers, one (subject) volunteered to take the tablets and the other (flatmate) received no treatment. Reboxetine (4 mg/bd) and placebo were administered orally as identical capsules for 2 weeks. The subjects were randomly assigned to receive either reboxetine or placebo first and there was a two-week washout period following the first treatment. At baseline and the end of each treatment, they filled in the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Social Adapation Self-Evaluation Scale (SASS), and Aggression Questionnaire (AQ). Then, they were instructed to play the Tangrams game. This task elicits face-valid social behaviours such as cooperation, giving commands and unilateral grasps. Analysis of covariance showed that there was a statistical trend for reboxetine treatment to increase commands (p=0.055). This study presents preliminary evidence that two weeks' enhancement of noradrenaline transmission induced by reboxetine makes healthy volunteers more self-confident and assertive.

  4. Infantile parkinsonism-dystonia: a dopamine “transportopathy”

    PubMed Central

    Blackstone, Craig

    2009-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) retrieves the neurotransmitter dopamine from the synaptic cleft at dopaminergic synapses. Variations in solute carrier family 6A, member 3 (SLC6A3/DAT1), the human gene encoding DAT, have been implicated in attention deficit hyperactivity and bipolar disorders, and DAT is a prominent site of action for drugs such as amphetamines and cocaine. In this issue of the JCI, Kurian et al. report that an autosomal recessive infantile parkinsonism-dystonia is caused by loss-of-function mutations in DAT that impair dopamine reuptake (see the related article beginning on page 1595). Though this might be predicted to result in dopamine excess in the synaptic cleft, it likely also causes depletion of presynaptic dopamine stores and possibly downregulation of postsynaptic dopamine receptor function, resulting in impairments in dopaminergic neurotransmission consistent with the clinical presentation. This is the first report of a genetic alteration in DAT function underlying a parkinsonian disorder. PMID:19504720

  5. Single Molecule Imaging of Conformational Dynamics in Sodium-Coupled Transporters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, Daniel S.

    2013-01-01

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporter (NSS) proteins remove neurotransmitters released into the synapse through a transport process driven by the physiological sodium ion (Na[superscript +]) gradient. NSSs for dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin are targeted by the psychostimulants cocaine and amphetamines, as well as by antidepressants. The…

  6. Dopamine reward prediction error coding.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Wolfram

    2016-03-01

    Reward prediction errors consist of the differences between received and predicted rewards. They are crucial for basic forms of learning about rewards and make us strive for more rewards-an evolutionary beneficial trait. Most dopamine neurons in the midbrain of humans, monkeys, and rodents signal a reward prediction error; they are activated by more reward than predicted (positive prediction error), remain at baseline activity for fully predicted rewards, and show depressed activity with less reward than predicted (negative prediction error). The dopamine signal increases nonlinearly with reward value and codes formal economic utility. Drugs of addiction generate, hijack, and amplify the dopamine reward signal and induce exaggerated, uncontrolled dopamine effects on neuronal plasticity. The striatum, amygdala, and frontal cortex also show reward prediction error coding, but only in subpopulations of neurons. Thus, the important concept of reward prediction errors is implemented in neuronal hardware.

  7. Dopamine reward prediction error coding

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Reward prediction errors consist of the differences between received and predicted rewards. They are crucial for basic forms of learning about rewards and make us strive for more rewards—an evolutionary beneficial trait. Most dopamine neurons in the midbrain of humans, monkeys, and rodents signal a reward prediction error; they are activated by more reward than predicted (positive prediction error), remain at baseline activity for fully predicted rewards, and show depressed activity with less reward than predicted (negative prediction error). The dopamine signal increases nonlinearly with reward value and codes formal economic utility. Drugs of addiction generate, hijack, and amplify the dopamine reward signal and induce exaggerated, uncontrolled dopamine effects on neuronal plasticity. The striatum, amygdala, and frontal cortex also show reward prediction error coding, but only in subpopulations of neurons. Thus, the important concept of reward prediction errors is implemented in neuronal hardware. PMID:27069377

  8. Control of extracellular dopamine at dendrite and axon terminals

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Christopher P.; Gantz, Stephanie C.; Phillips, Paul E. M.; Williams, John T.

    2010-01-01

    Midbrain dopamine neurons release dopamine from both axons and dendrites. The mechanism underlying release at these different sites has been proposed to differ. This study used electrochemical and electrophysiological methods to compare the time course and calcium-dependence of somatodendritc dopamine release in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) to that of axonal dopamine release in the dorsal striatum. The amount of dopamine released in the striatum was ~20 fold greater than in cell body regions of the VTA or SNc. However the calcium dependence and time to peak of the dopamine transients were similar. These results illustrate an unexpected overall similarity in the mechanisms of dopamine release in the striatum and cell body regions. To examine how diffusion regulates the time course of dopamine following release, dextran was added to the extracellular solution to slow diffusion. In the VTA, dextran slowed the rate of rise and fall of the extracellular dopamine transient as measured by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) yet did not alter the kinetics of the dopamine dependent inhibitory post-synaptic current (IPSC). Dextran failed to significantly alter the time course of the rise and fall of the dopamine transient in the striatum suggesting a more influential role for reuptake in the striatum. The conclusion is that the time course of dopamine within the extracellular space of the VTA is dependent on both diffusion and reuptake, whereas the activation of D2-receptors on dopamine neurons is primarily limited by reuptake. PMID:20484639

  9. THE MYSTERIOUS MOTIVATIONAL FUNCTIONS OF MESOLIMBIC DOPAMINE

    PubMed Central

    Salamone, John D.; Correa, Mercè

    2012-01-01

    Summary Nucleus accumbens dopamine is known to play a role in motivational processes, and dysfunctions of mesolimbic dopamine may contribute to motivational symptoms of depression and other disorders, as well as features of substance abuse. Although it has become traditional to label dopamine neurons as “reward” neurons, this is an over-generalization, and it is important to distinguish between aspects of motivation that are differentially affected by dopaminergic manipulations. For example, accumbens dopamine does not mediate primary food motivation or appetite, but is involved in appetitive and aversive motivational processes including behavioral activation, exertion of effort, approach behavior, sustained task engagement, Pavlovian processes and instrumental learning. In this review, we discuss the complex roles of dopamine in behavioral functions related to motivation. PMID:23141060

  10. Comparison of Ropivacaine 0.75 % and Lignocaine 2 % with 1:200,000 Adrenaline in Dental Extractions: Single Blind Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Vishal; Kumar, Deval; Mowar, Apoorva; Bansal, Avi

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy, safety and clinical acceptability of the local anaesthetic agent ropivacaine 0.75 % in comparison with lignocaine 2 % with adrenaline 1:200,000 in minor oral surgical procedures. Forty-seven patients, who required bilateral extractions in a single arch, were included in this study. One hundred and sixty-six extractions were performed and all the patients were administered nerve blocks/infiltration. Pre and postoperative pulse, blood pressure, random blood sugar, electrocardiogram and partial oxygen pressure were recorded at specified time intervals. Pain score by visual analogue scale, onset of action and depth of anesthesia were also observed. Duration of anaesthesia was assessed by feeling of numbness and first sign of pain. Statistical analysis revealed insignificant difference between both the groups in terms of pulse, blood pressure, random blood sugar, and partial oxygen pressure. The depth of anesthesia was evaluated by pain, comfort during the procedure with visual analog scale and showed no significant difference between the two groups. The onset of action for maxillary infiltration was 33.29 ± 9.2 (ropivacaine), 32.12 ± 6.8 s (2 % lignocaine with adrenaline 1:200,000) and for pterygomandibular nerve block was 181.0 ± 87.5 (ropivacaine), 32.12 ± 6.8 s (2 % lignocaine with adrenaline 1:200,000). Duration of anesthesia when compared was 411.7 ± 66.11 min (ropivacaine) and 107.87 ± 16.54 (2 % lignocaine with adrenaline 1:200,000). On maxillary buccal vestibule infiltration it was also observed that in ropivacaine group there was no requirement of palatal infiltration suggestive of good diffusion property. Ropivacaine is a safe, clinically acceptable long acting local anaesthetic agent with added advantage of effective diffusion property. SDC/MISC/2013/239.

  11. Dopamine neurons in culture express VGLUT2 explaining their capacity to release glutamate at synapses in addition to dopamine.

    PubMed

    Dal Bo, Gregory; St-Gelais, Fannie; Danik, Marc; Williams, Sylvain; Cotton, Mathieu; Trudeau, Louis-Eric

    2004-03-01

    Dopamine neurons have been suggested to use glutamate as a cotransmitter. To identify the basis of such a phenotype, we have examined the expression of the three recently identified vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1-3) in postnatal rat dopamine neurons in culture. We found that the majority of isolated dopamine neurons express VGLUT2, but not VGLUT1 or 3. In comparison, serotonin neurons express only VGLUT3. Single-cell RT-PCR experiments confirmed the presence of VGLUT2 mRNA in dopamine neurons. Arguing for phenotypic heterogeneity among axon terminals, we find that only a proportion of terminals established by dopamine neurons are VGLUT2-positive. Taken together, our results provide a basis for the ability of dopamine neurons to release glutamate as a cotransmitter. A detailed analysis of the conditions under which DA neurons gain or loose a glutamatergic phenotype may provide novel insight into pathophysiological processes that underlie diseases such as schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease and drug dependence.

  12. Effect of methylprednisolone on bone mineral density in rats with ovariectomy-induced bone loss and suppressed endogenous adrenaline levels by metyrosine

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Mehmet; Isaoglu, Unal; Uslu, Turan; Yildirim, Kadir; Seven, Bedri; Akcay, Fatih; Hacimuftuoglu, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: In this study, effect of methylprednisolone on bone mineral density (BMD) was investigated in rats with overiectomy induced bone lose and suppressed endogenous adrenalin levels, and compared to alendronate. Materials and Methods: Severity of bone loss in the examined material (femur bones) was evaluated by BMD measurement. Results: The group with the highest BMD value was metyrosinemetyrosine + methylprednisolone combination (0.151 g/cm2), while that with the lowest BMD was methylprednisolone (0.123 g/cm2). Alendronate was effective only when used alone in ovariectomized rats (0.144 g/cm2), but not when used in combination with methylprednisolone (0.124 g/cm2). In the ovariectomized rat group which received only metyrosine, BMD value was statistically indifferent from ovariectomized control group. Conclusions: Methylprednisolone protected bone loss in rats with suppressed adrenaline levels because of metyrosinemetyrosine. PMID:24014908

  13. Modulation of motor behavior by dopamine and the D1-like dopamine receptor AmDOP2 in the honey bee

    PubMed Central

    Mustard, Julie A.; Pham, Priscilla M.; Smith, Brian H.

    2009-01-01

    Determining the specific molecular pathways through which dopamine affects behavior has been complicated by the presence of multiple dopamine receptor subtypes that couple to different second messenger pathways. The observation of freely moving adult bees in an arena was used to investigate the role of dopamine signaling in regulating the behavior of the honey bee. Dopamine or the dopamine receptor antagonist flupenthixol was injected into the hemolymph of worker honey bees. Significant differences between treated and control bees were seen for all behaviors (walking, stopped, upside down, grooming, flying and fanning), and behavioral shifts were dependent on drug dosage and time after injection. To examine the role of dopamine signaling through a specific dopamine receptor in the brain, RNA interference was used to reduce expression levels of a D1-like receptor, AmDOP2. Injection of Amdop2 dsRNA into the mushroom bodies reduced the levels of Amdop2 mRNA and produced significant changes in the amount of time honey bees spent performing specific behaviors with reductions in time spent walking offset by increases in grooming or time spent stopped. Taken together these results establish that dopamine plays an important role in regulating motor behavior of the honey bee. PMID:19945462

  14. Modulation of motor behavior by dopamine and the D1-like dopamine receptor AmDOP2 in the honey bee.

    PubMed

    Mustard, Julie A; Pham, Priscilla M; Smith, Brian H

    2010-04-01

    Determining the specific molecular pathways through which dopamine affects behavior has been complicated by the presence of multiple dopamine receptor subtypes that couple to different second messenger pathways. The observation of freely moving adult bees in an arena was used to investigate the role of dopamine signaling in regulating the behavior of the honey bee. Dopamine or the dopamine receptor antagonist flupenthixol was injected into the hemolymph of worker honey bees. Significant differences between treated and control bees were seen for all behaviors (walking, stopped, upside down, grooming, flying and fanning), and behavioral shifts were dependent on drug dosage and time after injection. To examine the role of dopamine signaling through a specific dopamine receptor in the brain, RNA interference was used to reduce expression levels of a D1-like receptor, AmDOP2. Injection of Amdop2 dsRNA into the mushroom bodies reduced the levels of Amdop2 mRNA and produced significant changes in the amount of time honey bees spent performing specific behaviors with reductions in time spent walking offset by increases in grooming or time spent stopped. Taken together these results establish that dopamine plays an important role in regulating motor behavior of the honey bee. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Rotigotine is a potent agonist at dopamine D1 receptors as well as at dopamine D2 and D3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Wood, Martyn; Dubois, Vanessa; Scheller, Dieter; Gillard, Michel

    2015-02-01

    Rotigotine acts as a dopamine receptor agonist with high affinity for the dopamine D2, D3, D4 and D5 receptors but with a low affinity for the dopamine D1 receptor. We have investigated this further in radioligand binding and functional studies and compared the profile of rotigotine with that of other drugs used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). The binding of rotigotine to human dopamine D1, D2, D3, D4 and D5 receptors was determined in radioligand binding studies using [(3)H]rotigotine and compared with that of standard antagonist radioligands. Functional interactions of rotigotine with human dopamine receptors was also determined. [(3)H]rotigotine can be used as an agonist radioligand to label all dopamine receptor subtypes and this can be important to derive agonist affinity estimates. Rotigotine maintains this high affinity in functional studies at all dopamine receptors especially D1, D2 and D3 receptors and, to a lesser extent, D4 and D5 receptors. Rotigotine, like apomorphine but unlike ropinirole and pramipexole, was a potent agonist at all dopamine receptors. Rotigotine is a high-potency agonist at human dopamine D1, D2 and D3 receptors with a lower potency at D4 and D5 receptors. These studies differentiate rotigotine from conventional dopamine D2 agonists, used in the treatment of PD, such as ropinirole and pramipexole which lack activity at the D1 and D5 receptors, but resembles that of apomorphine which has greater efficacy in PD than other dopamine agonists but has suboptimal pharmacokinetic properties. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  16. Rotigotine is a potent agonist at dopamine D1 receptors as well as at dopamine D2 and D3 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Martyn; Dubois, Vanessa; Scheller, Dieter; Gillard, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Rotigotine acts as a dopamine receptor agonist with high affinity for the dopamine D2, D3, D4 and D5 receptors but with a low affinity for the dopamine D1 receptor. We have investigated this further in radioligand binding and functional studies and compared the profile of rotigotine with that of other drugs used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). Experimental Approach The binding of rotigotine to human dopamine D1, D2, D3, D4 and D5 receptors was determined in radioligand binding studies using [3H]rotigotine and compared with that of standard antagonist radioligands. Functional interactions of rotigotine with human dopamine receptors was also determined. Key Results [3H]rotigotine can be used as an agonist radioligand to label all dopamine receptor subtypes and this can be important to derive agonist affinity estimates. Rotigotine maintains this high affinity in functional studies at all dopamine receptors especially D1, D2 and D3 receptors and, to a lesser extent, D4 and D5 receptors. Rotigotine, like apomorphine but unlike ropinirole and pramipexole, was a potent agonist at all dopamine receptors. Conclusions and Implications Rotigotine is a high-potency agonist at human dopamine D1, D2 and D3 receptors with a lower potency at D4 and D5 receptors. These studies differentiate rotigotine from conventional dopamine D2 agonists, used in the treatment of PD, such as ropinirole and pramipexole which lack activity at the D1 and D5 receptors, but resembles that of apomorphine which has greater efficacy in PD than other dopamine agonists but has suboptimal pharmacokinetic properties. PMID:25339241

  17. Tipepidine, a non-narcotic antitussive, exerts an antidepressant-like effect in the forced swimming test in adrenocorticotropic hormone-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Kawaura, Kazuaki; Ogata, Yukino; Honda, Sokichi; Soeda, Fumio; Shirasaki, Tetsuya; Takahama, Kazuo

    2016-04-01

    We investigated whether tipepidine exerts an antidepressant-like effect in the forced swimming test in adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-treated rats, which is known as a treatment-resistant depression model, and we studied the pharmacological mechanisms of the effects of tipepidine. Male Wistar rats (5-7 weeks old) were used in this study. Tipepidine (20 and 40 mg/kg, i.p.) decreased the immobility time in the forced swimming test in ACTH-treated rats. The anti-immobility effect of tipepidine was blocked by a catecholamine-depleting agent, alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine (300 mg/kg, s.c.), but not by a serotonin-depleting agent, p-chlorophenylalanine. The anti-immobility effect of tipepidine was also blocked by a dopamine D1 receptor antagonist, SCH23390 (0.02 mg/kg, s.c.) and an adrenaline α2 receptor antagonist, yohimbine (2 mg/kg, i.p.). In microdialysis technique, tipepidine (40 mg/kg, i.p.) increased the extracellular dopamine level of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in ACTH-treated rats. These results suggest that tipepidine exerts an antidepressant-like effect in the forced swimming test in ACTH-treated rats, and that the effect of tipepidine is mediated by the stimulation of dopamine D1 receptors and adrenaline α2 receptors. The results also suggest that an increase in the extracellular dopamine level in the NAc may be involved in the antidepressant-like effect of tipepidine in ACTH-treated rats. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (Snris) for fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Welsch, Patrick; Üçeyler, Nurcan; Klose, Petra; Walitt, Brian; Häuser, Winfried

    2018-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia is a clinically defined chronic condition of unknown etiology characterized by chronic widespread pain that often co-exists with sleep disturbances, cognitive dysfunction and fatigue. People with fibromyalgia often report high disability levels and poor quality of life. Drug therapy, for example, with serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), focuses on reducing key symptoms and improving quality of life. This review updates and extends the 2013 version of this systematic review. Objectives To assess the efficacy, tolerability and safety of serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) compared with placebo or other active drug(s) in the treatment of fibromyalgia in adults. Search methods For this update we searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, the US National Institutes of Health and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for published and ongoing trials and examined the reference lists of reviewed articles, to 8 August 2017. Selection criteria We selected randomized, controlled trials of any formulation of SNRIs against placebo or any other active treatment of fibromyalgia in adults. Data collection and analysis Three review authors independently extracted data, examined study quality, and assessed risk of bias. For efficacy, we calculated the number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) for pain relief of 50% or greater and of 30% or greater, patient's global impression to be much or very much improved, dropout rates due to lack of efficacy, and the standardized mean differences (SMD) for fatigue, sleep problems, health-related quality of life, mean pain intensity, depression, anxiety, disability, sexual function, cognitive disturbances and tenderness. For tolerability we calculated number needed to treat for an additional harmful outcome (NNTH) for withdrawals due to adverse events and for nausea, insomnia and somnolence as specific adverse events

  19. Refractory case of adrenergic urticaria successfully treated with clotiazepam.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Yukari; Gokita, Mari; Fukunaga, Atsushi; Nishigori, Chikako

    2015-06-01

    Adrenergic urticaria (AU) is a rare type of stress-induced physical urticaria characterized by widespread pruritic urticarial papules. Diagnosis can be made by i.d. injection of adrenaline or noradrenaline, which produces the characteristic rash. Although the lesions of AU typically respond to beta-blockers such as propranolol, the therapeutic options for AU are limited. Here, we report a case of AU that was resistant to beta-blockers and successfully treated with clotiazepam. The clinical picture of AU resembles that of cholinergic urticaria (CU), however, positive noradrenaline test and negative acetylcholine skin test were useful for the differential diagnosis of AU and CU. Although his symptoms were resistant to several therapeutic methods including olopatadine (H1 antagonist), lafutidine (H2 antagonist) and propranolol, the severity and frequency of his attacks and his subjective symptoms were reduced by oral clotiazepam, an anxiolytic benzodiazepine. Dermatologists should be aware that anxiolytic benzodiazepines may be a therapeutic option in AU. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  20. Biochemical diagnosis of phaeochromocytoma: two instructive case reports.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, M F; Reed, P; Weinkove, C; Moriarty, K J; Ralston, A J

    1993-01-01

    The biochemical features of two patients with phaeochromocytomas illustrate the inadvisability of depending on a single group of analytes for the diagnosis. The first case presented as a surgical emergency with retroperitoneal haemorrhage. Biochemical diagnosis was difficult since total 24 hour urinary free catecholamine excretion was within normal limits in two out of three samples, and only marginally raised in the third with an atypical preponderance of adrenaline. Plasma catecholamine concentrations were also normal. But urinary excretion of the catecholamine metabolites, metadrenaline and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy mandelic acid (HMMA), was consistently raised. In contrast, the second patient presenting with headache and labile hypertension showed normal metabolite excretion in the face of grossly increased free noradrenaline excretion and raised plasma noradrenaline concentrations. It is therefore recommend that, as well as urinary free catecholamines, one group of their main metabolites, the 3-methoxy amines (normetadrenaline and metadrenaline) or HMMA, should routinely be measured whenever a phaeochromocytoma is suspected. PMID:8463426

  1. Study the chemical composition and biological outcomes resulting from the interaction of the hormone adrenaline with heavy elements: Infrared, Raman, electronic, 1H NMR, XRD and SEM studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Omar B.; Mohamed, Mahmoud A.; Refat, Moamen S.

    2014-01-01

    Heavy metal adrenaline complexes formed from the reaction of adrenaline with Al3+, Zn2+, Sn2+, Sb3+, Pb2+and Bi3+ ions in methanolic solvent at 60 °C. The final reaction products have been isolated and characterization using elemental analyses (% of carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen), conductivity measurements, mid infrared, Raman laser, UV-Vis, 1H NMR spectra, X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Upon the spectroscopic, conductivity and elemental analyses, the stoichiometric reactions indicated that the data obtained refer to 1:2 (M:L) for Zn2+, Sn2+, Pb2+and Bi3+ complexes [Zn(Adr)2(Cl)2], [Sn(Adr)2]Cl2, [Pb(Adr)2](NO3)2 and [Bi(Adr)2(Cl)2]Cl, while the molar ratio 1:3 (M:L) for Al3+ and Sb3+ with formulas [Al(Adr)3](NO3)3 and [Sb(Adr)3]Cl3. The infrared and Raman laser spectra interpreted the mode of interactions which associated through the two phenolic groups of catechol moiety. The adrenaline chelates have been screened for their in vitro antibacterial activity against four bacteria, Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and two strains of fungus (Aspergillus flavus and Candida albicans). The metal chelates were shown to possess more antibacterial and antifungal activities than the free adrenaline chelate.

  2. Renal dopamine containing nerves. What is their functional significance?

    PubMed

    DiBona, G F

    1990-06-01

    Biochemical and morphological studies indicate that there are nerves within the kidney that contain dopamine and that various structures within the kidney contain dopamine receptors. However, the functional significance of these renal dopamine containing nerves in relation to renal dopamine receptors is unknown. The functional significance could be defined by demonstrating that an alteration in one or more renal functions occurring in response to reflex or electrical activation of efferent renal nerves is dependent on release of dopamine as the neurotransmitter from the renal nerve terminals acting on renal dopamine receptors. Thus, the hypothesis becomes: reflex or electrical activation of efferent renal nerves causes alterations in renal function (eg, renal blood flow, water and solute handling) that are inhibited by specific and selective dopamine receptor antagonists. As reviewed herein, the published experimental data do not support the hypothesis. Therefore, the view that alterations in one or more renal functions occurring in response to reflex or electrical activation of efferent renal nerves are dependent on release of dopamine as the neurotransmitter from the renal nerve terminals acting on renal dopamine receptors remains unproven.

  3. Blockade of the high-affinity noradrenaline transporter (NET) by the selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor escitalopram: an in vivo microdialysis study in mice

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hai T; Guiard, Bruno P; Bacq, Alexandre; David, Denis J; David, Indira; Quesseveur, Gaël; Gautron, Sophie; Sanchez, Connie; Gardier, Alain M

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Escitalopram, the S(+)-enantiomer of citalopram is the most selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor approved. Although all 5-HT selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) increase extracellular levels of 5-HT ([5-HT]ext). some also enhance, to a lesser extent, extracellular levels of noradrenaline ([NA]ext). However, the mechanisms by which SSRIs activate noradrenergic transmission in the brain remain to be determined. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH This study examined the effects of escitalopram, on both [5-HT]ext and [NA]ext in the frontal cortex (FCx) of freely moving wild-type (WT) and mutant mice lacking the 5-HT transporter (SERT−/−) by using intracerebral microdialysis. We explored the possibilities that escitalopram enhances [NA]ext, either by a direct mechanism involving the inhibition of the low- or high-affinity noradrenaline transporters, or by an indirect mechanism promoted by [5-HT]ext elevation. The forced swim test (FST) was used to investigate whether enhancing cortical [5-HT]ext and/or [NA]ext affected the antidepressant-like activity of escitalopram. KEY RESULTS In WT mice, a single systemic administration of escitalopram produced a significant increase in cortical [5-HT]ext and [NA]ext. As expected, escitalopram failed to increase cortical [5-HT]ext in SERT−/− mice, whereas its neurochemical effects on [NA]ext persisted in these mutants. In WT mice subjected to the FST, escitalopram increased swimming parameters without affecting climbing behaviour. Finally, escitalopram, at relevant concentrations, failed to inhibit cortical noradrenaline and 5-HT uptake mediated by low-affinity monoamine transporters. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These experiments suggest that escitalopram enhances, although moderately, cortical [NA]extin vivo by a direct mechanism involving the inhibition of the high-affinity noradrenaline transporter (NET). PMID:22233336

  4. Stimulus-Dependent Dopamine Release in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikstrom, Sverker; Soderlund, Goran

    2007-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is related to an attenuated and dysfunctional dopamine system. Normally, a high extracellular dopamine level yields a tonic dopaminergic input that down-regulates stimuli-evoked phasic dopamine responses through autoreceptors. Abnormally low tonic extracellular dopamine in ADHD up-regulates the…

  5. Oxytocin in corticosterone-induced chronic stress model: Focus on adrenal gland function.

    PubMed

    Stanić, Dušanka; Plećaš-Solarović, Bosiljka; Mirković, Duško; Jovanović, Predrag; Dronjak, Slađana; Marković, Bojan; Đorđević, Tea; Ignjatović, Svetlana; Pešić, Vesna

    2017-06-01

    Chronic stress conditions can lead to considerable and extensible changes in physiological and psychological performances, and in emergence of risk for various somatic diseases. On the other hand, the neuropeptide oxytocin is reported to increase the resistance of the organism to stress and modulate activity of autonomic nervous system. Chronic corticosterone administration is used as a rat model for a state observed in terms of chronic stress exposure, when negative feedback mechanism of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis activity is disrupted. In our study, we aimed to investigate whether chronic administration of oxytocin (10 IU/400μL/day for 14days, s.c.) influenced adrenal gland morphology and activity in adult male Wistar rats during long-term corticosterone administration via drinking water (100mg/L for 21days). We examined the influence of treatments on the levels of adrenal gland hormones, corticosterone, adrenaline and noradrenaline, as well as their response to an acute stress challenge evoked by 15-min forced swimming. In addition, the expression of two main monoamine transporters, the noradrenaline transporter (NAT) and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) in adrenal medulla was measured in the rats exposed to acute stress. Our results showed that oxytocin treatment prevented corticosterone-induced decrease in body weight gain, attenuated adrenal gland atrophy by increasing glandular weight, and the area of the zona fasciculate and reticularis. Chronic corticosterone intake blunted the response of all measured hormones to acute stress, whereas concomitant oxytocin treatment reversed adrenaline and noradrenaline response to acute stress. Furthermore, in adrenal medulla, oxytocin produced significant vasodilatation and stimulated expression of both catecholamine transporters detected both on mRNA and protein level. Our data suggest that oxytocin, by reducing atrophy of adrenal gland, and by increasing catecholamine storage capacity, may be

  6. The Control of Responsiveness in ADHD by Catecholamines: Evidence for Dopaminergic, Noradrenergic and Interactive Roles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oades, Robert D.; Sadile, Adolfo G.; Sagvolden, Terje; Viggiano, Davide; Zuddas, Alessandro; Devoto, Paola; Aase, Heidi; Johansen, Espen B.; Ruocco, Lucia A.; Russell, Vivienne A.

    2005-01-01

    We explore the neurobiological bases of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) from the viewpoint of the neurochemistry and psychopharmacology of the catecholamine-based behavioural systems. The contributions of dopamine (DA) and noradrenaline (NA) neurotransmission to the motor and cognitive symptoms of ADHD (e.g. hyperactivity, variable…

  7. Exposure to the Polybrominated Diphenyl Ether Mixture DE-71 Damages the Nigrostriatal Dopamine System: Role of Dopamine Handling in Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Bradner, Joshua M.; Suragh, Tiffany A.; Wilson, W. Wyatt; Lazo, Carlos R.; Stout, Kristen A.; Kim, Hye Mi; Wang, Min Z.; Walker, Douglas I.; Pennell, Kurt D.; Richardson, Jason R.; Miller, Gary W.; Caudle, W. Michael

    2013-01-01

    In the last several decades polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have replaced the previously banned polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in multiple flame retardant utilities. As epidemiological and laboratory studies have suggested PCBs as a risk factor for Parkinson’s disease (PD), the similarities between PBDEs and PCBs suggest that PBDEs have the potential to be neurotoxic to the dopamine system. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the neurotoxic effects of the PBDE mixture, DE-71, on the nigrostriatal dopamine system and address the role of altered dopamine handling in mediating this neurotoxicity. Using an in vitro model system we found DE-71 effectively caused cell death in a dopaminergic cell line as well as reducing the number of TH+ neurons isolated from VMAT2 WT and LO animals. Assessment of DE-71 neurotoxicity in vivo demonstrated significant deposition of PBDE congeners in the brains of mice, leading to reductions in striatal dopamine and dopamine handling, as well as reductions in the striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) and VMAT2. Additionally, DE-71 elicited a significant locomotor deficit in the VMAT2 WT and LO mice. However, no change was seen in TH expression in dopamine terminal or in the number of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). To date, these are the first data to demonstrate that exposure to PBDEs disrupts the nigrostriatal dopamine system. Given their similarities to PCBs, additional laboratory and epidemiological research should be considered to assess PBDEs as a potential risk factor for PD and other neurological disorders. PMID:23287494

  8. Pharmacological aspects of the combined use of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) and gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB): a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Uys, Joachim D K; Niesink, Raymond J M

    2005-07-01

    Epidemiological studies show that the use of club drugs is on the rise. Furthermore, the last few decades have seen a rise in patterns of polydrug use. One of the combinations frequently used is ecstasy (MDMA) with gammahydroxybutyrate (GHB). For effective prevention it is important to be aware of this phenomenon and of the pharmacology of these drugs. The effects of the combination extend to different neurotransmitter systems, including serotonin, dopamine and noradrenaline. Studies investigating the effects of combinations of psychoactive substances are limited. In this review we describe the subjective effects of the MDMA/GHB combination. Furthermore, we review the individual actions of MDMA on serotonin, dopamine and noradrenaline systems. In addition, actions of GHB on these systems are discussed as a possible pharmacological basis for the interaction of both drugs. It is postulated that GHB attenuates the unpleasant or dysphoric effects of MDMA by its effect on the central dopaminergic system.

  9. Evaluation and validation of a method for determining platelet catecholamine in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Feres, Marcia C; Cintra, Fatima D; Rizzi, Camila F; Mello-Fujita, Luciane; Lino de Souza, Altay A; Tufik, Sergio; Poyares, Dalva

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of plasma and urinary catecholamine are susceptible to confounding factors that influence the results, complicating the interpretation of sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity in the Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and arterial hypertension (HYP) conditions. In this study, we validated a test for platelet catecholamine and compared the catecholamine levels (adrenaline and noradrenaline) in urine, plasma and platelets in patients with OSA and HYP compared with controls. In the validation, 30 healthy, nonsmoking volunteers who were not currently undergoing treatment or medication were selected as the control group. One hundred fifty-four individuals (114 OSA, 40 non-OSA) were consecutively selected from the outpatient clinic of the Sleep Institute and underwent clinical, polysomnographic and laboratory evaluation, including the urinary, plasma and platelet levels of adrenaline (AD) and noradrenaline (NA). Patients were then allocated to groups according to the presence of OSA and/or hypertension. A logistic regression model, controlled for age and BMI, showed that urinary AD and urinary NA were risk factors in the OSA+HYP group and the HYP group; however, the model showed higher levels of platelet NA for OSA without HYP. After 1 year of CPAP (continuous upper airway pressure) treatment, patients (n = 9) presented lower levels of urinary NA (p = 0.04) and platelet NA (p = 0.05). Urinary NA and AD levels were significantly associated with the condition of hypertension with and without OSA, whereas platelet NA with OSA without comorbidity. These findings suggest that platelet catecholamine levels might reflect nocturnal sympathetic activation in OSA patients without hypertension.

  10. Anesthetic efficacy of the supplemental X-tip intraosseous injection using 4% articaine with 1:100,000 adrenaline in patients with irreversible pulpitis: An in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Bhuyan, Atool Chandra; Latha, Satheesh Sasidharan; Jain, Shefali; Kataki, Rubi

    2014-11-01

    Pain management remains the utmost important qualifying criteria in minimizing patient agony and establishing a strong dentist-patient rapport. Symptomatic irreversible pulpitis is a painful condition necessitating immediate attention and supplemental anesthetic techniques are often resorted to in addition to conventional inferior alveolar nerve block. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the anesthetic efficacy of X-tip intraosseous injection in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis, in mandibular posterior teeth, using 4% Articaine with 1:100,000 adrenaline as local anesthetic, when the conventional inferior alveolar nerve block proved ineffective. X-tip system was used to administer 1.7 ml of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 adrenaline in 30 patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis of mandibular posterior teeth with moderate to severe pain on endodontic access after administration of an inferior alveolar nerve block. The results of the study showed that 25 X-tip injections (83.33%) were successful and 5 X-tip injections (16.66%) were unsuccessful. When the inferior alveolar nerve block fails to provide adequate pulpal anesthesia, X-tip system using 4% articaine with 1:100,000 adrenaline was successful in achieving pulpal anesthesia in patients with irreversible pulpitis.

  11. The methods of optical physics as a mean of the objects’ molecular structure identification (on the base of the research of dophamine and adrenaline molecules)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkin, M. D.; Alykova, O. M.; Smirnov, V. V.; Stefanova, G. P.

    2017-01-01

    Structural and dynamic models of dopamine and adrenaline are proposed on the basis of ab initio quantum calculations of the geometric and electronic structure. The parameters of the adiabatic potential are determined, a vibrational states interpretation of the test compound is proposed in this work. The analysis of the molecules conformational structure of the substance is made. A method for calculating the shifts of vibrational excitation frequencies in 1,2,4-threesubstituted of benzole is presented. It is based on second order perturbation theory. A choice of method and basis for calculation of a fundamental vibrations frequencies and intensities of the bands in the IR and Raman spectra is justified. The technique for evaluation of anharmonicity with cubic and quartic force constants is described. The paper presents the results of numerical experiments, geometric parameters of molecules, such as the valence bond lengths and angles between them. We obtain the frequency of the vibrational states and values of their integrated intensities. The interpretation of vibration of conformers is given. The results are in good agreement with experimental values. Proposed frequency can be used to identify the compounds of the vibrational spectra of molecules. The calculation was performed quantum density functional method DFT/B3LYP. It is shown that this method can be used to modeling the geometrical parameters molecular and electronic structure of various substituted of benzole. It allows us to construct the structural-dynamic models of this class of compounds by numerical calculations.

  12. PET evaluation of the dopamine system of the human brain

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.S.; Gatley, S.

    1996-07-01

    Dopamine plays a pivotal role in the regulation and control of movement, motivation and cognition. It also is closely linked to reward, reinforcement and addiction. Abnormalities in brain dopamine are associated with many neurological and psychiatric disorders including Parkinson`s disease, schizophrenia and substance abuse. This close association between dopamine and neurological and psychiatric diseases and with substance abuse make it an important topic in research in the neurosciences and an important molecular target in drug development. PET enables the direct measurement of components of the dopamine system in the living human brain. It relies on radiotracers which label dopamine receptors,more » dopamine transporters, precursors of dopamine or compounds which have specificity for the enzymes which degrade dopamine. Additionally, by using tracers that provide information on regional brain metabolism or blood flow as well as neurochemically specific pharmacological interventions, PET can be used to assess the functional consequences of change in brain dopamine activity. PET dopamine measurements have been used to investigate the normal human brain and its involvement in psychiatric and neurological diseases. It has also been used in psychopharmacological research to investigate dopamine drugs used in the treatment of Parkinson`s disease and of schizophrenia as well as to investigate the effects of drugs of abuse on the dopamine system. Since various functional and neurochemical parameters can be studied in the same subject, PET enables investigation of the functional integrity of the dopamine system in the human brain and investigation of the interactions of dopamine with other neurotransmitters. This paper summarizes the different tracers and experimental strategies developed to evaluate the various elements of the dopamine system in the human brain with PET and their applications to clinical research. 254 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.« less

  13. Quantitative systems pharmacology analysis of drug combination and scaling to humans: the interaction between noradrenaline and vasopressin on vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Yin, Anyue; Yamada, Akihiro; Stam, Wiro B; van Hasselt, Johan G C; van der Graaf, Piet H

    2018-06-02

    Development of combination therapies has received significant interest in recent years. Previously a two-receptor one-transducer (2R-1T) model was proposed to characterize drug interactions with two receptors that lead to the same phenotypic response through a common transducer pathway. We applied, for the first time, the 2R-1T model to characterize the interaction of noradrenaline and arginine-vasopressin on vasoconstriction, and performed inter-species scaling to humans using this mechanism-based model. Contractile data was obtained from in vitro rat small mesenteric arteries after exposure to single or combined challenges of noradrenaline and arginine-vasopressin with or without pre-treatment with the irreversible α-adrenoceptor antagonist, phenoxybenzamine. Data was analysed using the 2R-1T model to characterize the observed exposure-response relationships and drug-drug interaction. The model was then scaled to humans by accounting for differences in receptor density. With receptor affinities set to literature values, the 2R-1T model satisfactorily characterized the interaction between noradrenaline and arginine-vasopressin in rat small mesenteric arteries (relative standard error ≤ 20%), as well as the effect of phenoxybenzamine. Furthermore, after scaling the model to human vascular tissue, the model also adequately predicted the interaction between both agents on human renal arteries. The 2R-1T model can be of relevance to quantitatively characterize the interaction between two drugs that interact via different receptors and a common transducer pathway. Its mechanistic properties are valuable for scaling the model across species. This approach is therefore of significant value to rationally optimize novel combination treatments. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Human dopamine receptor and its uses

    DOEpatents

    Civelli, Olivier; Van Tol, Hubert Henri-Marie

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward the isolation, characterization and pharmacological use of the human D4 dopamine receptor. The nucleotide sequence of the gene corresponding to this receptor and alleleic variant thereof are provided by the invention. The invention also includes recombinant eukaryotic expression constructs capable of expressing the human D4 dopamine receptor in cultures of transformed eukaryotic cells. The invention provides cultures of transformed eukaryotic cells which synthesize the human D4 dopamine receptor, and methods for characterizing novel psychotropic compounds using such cultures.

  15. Long-term studies of dopamine agonists.

    PubMed

    Hubble, Jean P

    2002-02-26

    Dopamine agonists have long been used as adjunctive therapy for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). In more recent years these drugs have also been proved safe and effective as initial therapy in lieu of levodopa in the treatment of PD. Long-term levodopa therapy is associated with motor complications, including fluctuating response patterns and dyskinesia. By initially introducing a dopamine agonist as symptomatic drug therapy, it may be possible to postpone the use of levodopa and delay or prevent the development of motor complications. Recently, four clinical trials have explored this hypothesis by comparing the long-term response and side effects of levodopa with dopamine agonist therapy. The drugs studied have included ropinirole, pramipexole, cabergoline, and pergolide. In each of these projects, the occurrence of motor complications, such as wearing off and dyskinesia, was significantly less in the subjects assigned to initiation of therapy with a dopamine agonist. The addition of levodopa could be postponed by many months or even several years. Therefore, these long-term studies of dopamine agonists support the initiation of a dopamine agonist instead of levodopa in an effort to postpone levodopa-related motor complications. This therapeutic approach may be particularly appropriate in PD patients with a long treatment horizon on the basis of age and general good health. The extension phase of the long-term study comparing pramipexole with levodopa is ongoing, and follow-up information may help to establish the value of this treatment strategy.

  16. Flipped Phenyl Ring Orientations of Dopamine Binding with Human and Drosophila Dopamine Transporters: Remarkable Role of Three Nonconserved Residues.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yaxia; Zhu, Jun; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2018-03-09

    Molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations were performed in the present study to examine the modes of dopamine binding with human and Drosophila dopamine transporters (hDAT and dDAT). The computational data revealed flipped binding orientations of dopamine in hDAT and dDAT due to the major differences in three key residues (S149, G153, and A423 of hDAT vs A117, D121, and S422 of dDAT) in the binding pocket. These three residues dictate the binding orientation of dopamine in the binding pocket, as the aromatic ring of dopamine tends to take an orientation with both the para- and meta-hydroxyl groups being close to polar residues and away from nonpolar residues of the protein. The flipped binding orientations of dopamine in hDAT and dDAT clearly demonstrate a generally valuable insight concerning how the species difference could drastically affect the protein-ligand binding modes, demonstrating that the species difference, which is a factor rarely considered in early drug design stage, must be accounted for throughout the ligand/drug design and discovery processes in general.

  17. Release of [3H-noradrenaline from the motor adrenergic nerves of the anococcygeus muscle by lysergic acid diethylamide, tyramine or nerve stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, J C; Olverman, H J

    1978-01-01

    1 A method is described for labelling the neuronal noradrenaline (NA) stores of rat anococcygeus with [3H]-NA and detecting subsequent release of 3H from the superfused tissue by nerve stimulation or drugs. 2 Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) or tyramine but not barium chloride or carbachol increased the efflux of 3H although each drug produced an equivalent contractile response. This confirms that LDS has an indirect sympathomimetic action. 3 LSD was found to produce a proportionately smaller reduction of the nerve-induced efflux of 3H than of the accompanying contractile response. 4 The inhibition of nerve-induced contractile responses by LSD was shown to be independent of the neuronal uptake of noradrenaline and any post-junctional inhibition demonstrated to be non-specific. PMID:728688

  18. Decreased prefrontal cortical dopamine transmission in alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Narendran, Rajesh; Mason, Neale Scott; Paris, Jennifer; Himes, Michael L; Douaihy, Antoine B; Frankle, W Gordon

    2014-08-01

    Basic studies have demonstrated that optimal levels of prefrontal cortical dopamine are critical to various executive functions such as working memory, attention, inhibitory control, and risk/reward decisions, all of which are impaired in addictive disorders such as alcoholism. Based on this and imaging studies of alcoholism that have demonstrated less dopamine in the striatum, the authors hypothesized decreased dopamine transmission in the prefrontal cortex in persons with alcohol dependence. To test this hypothesis, amphetamine and [11C]FLB 457 positron emission tomography were used to measure cortical dopamine transmission in 21 recently abstinent persons with alcohol dependence and 21 matched healthy comparison subjects. [11C]FLB 457 binding potential, specific compared to nondisplaceable uptake (BPND), was measured in subjects with kinetic analysis using the arterial input function both before and after 0.5 mg kg-1 of d-amphetamine. Amphetamine-induced displacement of [11C]FLB 457 binding potential (ΔBPND) was significantly smaller in the cortical regions in the alcohol-dependent group compared with the healthy comparison group. Cortical regions that demonstrated lower dopamine transmission in the alcohol-dependent group included the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, medial prefrontal cortex, orbital frontal cortex, temporal cortex, and medial temporal lobe. The results of this study, for the first time, unambiguously demonstrate decreased dopamine transmission in the cortex in alcoholism. Further research is necessary to understand the clinical relevance of decreased cortical dopamine as to whether it is related to impaired executive function, relapse, and outcome in alcoholism.

  19. Dopamine, T cells and multiple sclerosis (MS).

    PubMed

    Levite, Mia; Marino, Franca; Cosentino, Marco

    2017-05-01

    Dopamine is a key neurotransmitter that induces critical effects in the nervous system and in many peripheral organs, via 5 dopamine receptors (DRs): D1R-D5R. Dopamine also induces many direct and very potent effects on many DR-expressing immune cells, primarily T cells and dendritic cells. In this review, we focus only on dopamine receptors, effects and production in T cells. Dopamine by itself (at an optimal concentration of~0.1 nM) induces multiple function of resting normal human T cells, among them: T cell adhesion, chemotactic migration, homing, cytokine secretion and others. Interestingly, dopamine activates resting effector T cells (Teffs), but suppresses regulatory T cells (Tregs), and both effects lead eventually to Teff activation. Dopamine-induced effects on T cells are dynamic, context-sensitive and determined by the: T cell activation state, T cell type, DR type, and dopamine concentration. Dopamine itself, and also few dopaminergic molecules/ drugs that are in clinical use for cardiac, neurological and other non-immune indications, have direct effects on human T cells (summarized in this review). These dopaminergic drugs include: dopamine = intropin, L-DOPA, bromocriptine, pramipexole, pergolide, haloperidol, pimozide, and amantadine. Other dopaminergic drugs were not yet tested for their direct effects on T cells. Extensive evidence in multiple sclerosis (MS) and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) show dopaminergic dysregulations in T cells in these diseases: D1-like DRs are decreased in Teffs of MS patients, and dopamine does not affect these cells. In contrast, D1-like DRs are increased in Tregs of MS patients, possibly causing functional Treg impairment in MS. Treatment of MS patients with interferon β (IFN-β) increases D1-like DRs and decreases D2-like DRs in Teffs, decreases D1-like DRs in Tregs, and most important: restores responsiveness of patient's Teffs to dopamine. DR agonists and antagonists confer some benefits in

  20. Dopamine in motivational control: rewarding, aversive, and alerting

    PubMed Central

    Bromberg-Martin, Ethan S.; Matsumoto, Masayuki; Hikosaka, Okihide

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Midbrain dopamine neurons are well known for their strong responses to rewards and their critical role in positive motivation. It has become increasingly clear, however, that dopamine neurons also transmit signals related to salient but non-rewarding experiences such as aversive and alerting events. Here we review recent advances in understanding the reward and non-reward functions of dopamine. Based on this data, we propose that dopamine neurons come in multiple types that are connected with distinct brain networks and have distinct roles in motivational control. Some dopamine neurons encode motivational value, supporting brain networks for seeking, evaluation, and value learning. Others encode motivational salience, supporting brain networks for orienting, cognition, and general motivation. Both types of dopamine neurons are augmented by an alerting signal involved in rapid detection of potentially important sensory cues. We hypothesize that these dopaminergic pathways for value, salience, and alerting cooperate to support adaptive behavior. PMID:21144997

  1. Frequency-Dependent Modulation of Dopamine Release by Nicotine and Dopamine D1 Receptor Ligands: An In Vitro Fast Cyclic Voltammetry Study in Rat Striatum.

    PubMed

    Goutier, W; Lowry, J P; McCreary, A C; O'Connor, J J

    2016-05-01

    Nicotine is a highly addictive drug and exerts this effect partially through the modulation of dopamine release and increasing extracellular dopamine in regions such as the brain reward systems. Nicotine acts in these regions on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The effect of nicotine on the frequency dependent modulation of dopamine release is well established and the purpose of this study was to investigate whether dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) ligands have an influence on this. Using fast cyclic voltammetry and rat corticostriatal slices, we show that D1R ligands are able to modulate the effect of nicotine on dopamine release. Nicotine (500 nM) induced a decrease in dopamine efflux at low frequency (single pulse or five pulses at 10 Hz) and an increase at high frequency (100 Hz) electrical field stimulation. The D1R agonist SKF-38393, whilst having no effect on dopamine release on its own or on the effect of nicotine upon multiple pulse evoked dopamine release, did significantly prevent and reverse the effect of nicotine on single pulse dopamine release. Interestingly similar results were obtained with the D1R antagonist SCH-23390. In this study we have demonstrated that the modulation of dopamine release by nicotine can be altered by D1R ligands, but only when evoked by single pulse stimulation, and are likely working via cholinergic interneuron driven dopamine release.

  2. Dopamine D2 receptors photolabeled by iodo-azido-clebopride.

    PubMed

    Niznik, H B; Dumbrille-Ross, A; Guan, J H; Neumeyer, J L; Seeman, P

    1985-04-19

    Iodo-azido-clebopride, a photoaffinity compound for dopamine D2 receptors, had high affinity for canine brain striatal dopamine D2 receptors with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 14 nM. Irradiation of striatal homogenate with iodo-azido-clebopride irreversibly inactivated 50% of dopamine D2 receptors at 20 nM (as indicated by subsequent [3H]spiperone binding). Dopamine agonists and antagonists prevented this photo-inactivation with the appropriate rank-order of potency. Striatal dopamine D1, serotonin (S2), alpha 1- and beta-adrenoceptors were not significantly inactivated following irradiation with iodo-azido-clebopride. Thus, iodo-azido-clebopride is a selective photoaffinity probe for dopamine D2 receptors, the radiolabelled form of which may aid in the molecular characterization of these proteins.

  3. Atypical Dopamine Uptake Inhibitors that Provide Clues About Cocaine's Mechanism at the Dopamine Transporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauck Newman, Amy; Katz, Jonathan L.

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) has been a primary target for cocaine abuse/addiction medication discovery. However predicted addiction liability and limited clinical evaluation has provided a formidable challenge for development of these agents for human use. The unique and atypical pharmacological profile of the benztropine (BZT) class of dopamine uptake inhibitors, in preclinical models of cocaine effects and abuse, has encouraged further development of these agents. Moreover, in vivo studies have challenged the original DAT hypothesis and demonstrated that DAT occupancy and subsequent increases in dopamine produced by BZT analogues are significantly delayed and long lasting, as compared to cocaine. These important and distinctive elements are critical to the lack of abuse liability among BZT analogues, and improve their potential for development as treatments for cocaine abuse and possibly other neuropsychiatric disorders.

  4. ILLICIT DOPAMINE TRANSIENTS: RECONCILING ACTIONS OF ABUSED DRUGS

    PubMed Central

    Covey, Dan P.; Roitman, Mitchell F.; Garris, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Phasic increases in brain dopamine are required for cue-directed reward seeking. While compelling within the framework of appetitive behavior, the view that illicit drugs hijack reward circuits by hyper-activating these dopamine transients is inconsistent with established psychostimulant pharmacology. However, recent work reclassifying amphetamine (AMPH), cocaine, and other addictive dopamine-transporter inhibitors (DAT-Is) supports transient hyper-activation as a unifying hypothesis of abused drugs. We argue here that reclassification also identifies generating burst firing by dopamine neurons as a keystone action. Unlike natural rewards, which are processed by sensory systems, drugs act directly on the brain. Consequently, to mimic natural reward and exploit reward circuits, dopamine transients must be elicited de novo. Of available drug targets, only burst firing achieves this essential outcome. PMID:24656971

  5. Dopamine agonist withdrawal syndrome: implications for patient care.

    PubMed

    Nirenberg, Melissa J

    2013-08-01

    Dopamine agonists are effective treatments for a variety of indications, including Parkinson's disease and restless legs syndrome, but may have serious side effects, such as orthostatic hypotension, hallucinations, and impulse control disorders (including pathological gambling, compulsive eating, compulsive shopping/buying, and hypersexuality). The most effective way to alleviate these side effects is to taper or discontinue dopamine agonist therapy. A subset of patients who taper a dopamine agonist, however, develop dopamine agonist withdrawal syndrome (DAWS), which has been defined as a severe, stereotyped cluster of physical and psychological symptoms that correlate with dopamine agonist withdrawal in a dose-dependent manner, cause clinically significant distress or social/occupational dysfunction, are refractory to levodopa and other dopaminergic medications, and cannot be accounted for by other clinical factors. The symptoms of DAWS include anxiety, panic attacks, dysphoria, depression, agitation, irritability, suicidal ideation, fatigue, orthostatic hypotension, nausea, vomiting, diaphoresis, generalized pain, and drug cravings. The severity and prognosis of DAWS is highly variable. While some patients have transient symptoms and make a full recovery, others have a protracted withdrawal syndrome lasting for months to years, and therefore may be unwilling or unable to discontinue DA therapy. Impulse control disorders appear to be a major risk factor for DAWS, and are present in virtually all affected patients. Thus, patients who are unable to discontinue dopamine agonist therapy may experience chronic impulse control disorders. At the current time, there are no known effective treatments for DAWS. For this reason, providers are urged to use dopamine agonists judiciously, warn patients about the risks of DAWS prior to the initiation of dopamine agonist therapy, and follow patients closely for withdrawal symptoms during dopamine agonist taper.

  6. Systemic effects of low-dose dopamine during administration of cytarabine.

    PubMed

    Connelly, James; Benani, Dina J; Newman, Matthew; Burton, Bradley; Crow, Jessica; Levis, Mark

    2017-09-01

    Purpose Low-dose dopamine has been utilized to improve renal blood flow, urine output, and reduce drug-induced nephrotoxicity. The purpose of this study was to assess changes in renal function, cardiovascular adverse events, and neurologic toxicity in patients receiving cytarabine with or without low-dose dopamine. Methods A retrospective, single-center, cohort study of patients receiving cytarabine at 667 mg/m 2 /dose or greater, with or without dopamine at ≤5 mcg/kg/min. Cohorts were based upon initiation or absence of low-dose dopamine; cytarabine only, cytarabine + pre- and day of low-dose dopamine, and cytarabine + post-low-dose dopamine. Renal outcomes (urine output, serum creatinine, and creatinine clearance) were compared with baseline and between cohorts. Safety endpoints (arrhythmias, tachycardia, and neurotoxicity) were compared between cohorts based on low-dose dopamine exposure. Results There was no difference in urine output from baseline in all cohorts. Comparing cytarabine only and pre- and day of low-dose dopamine cohorts, there was no difference in urine output. In those receiving low-dose dopamine, there was no difference in serum creatinine and creatinine clearance from baseline. No arrhythmias were documented during the study period, and there was no difference in the incidence of tachycardia between groups (P = 0.66). Neurotoxicity was reported in three patients who were on low-dose dopamine. Conclusion Though variation existed in individual patients administered low-dose dopamine, the use of low-dose dopamine did not significantly impact renal function in this small sample at a single institution. In addition, low-dose dopamine did not negatively impact cardiovascular function.

  7. Dopamine induces soluble α-synuclein oligomers and nigrostriatal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mor, Danielle E.; Tsika, Elpida; Mazzulli, Joseph R.; Gould, Neal S.; Kim, Hanna; Daniels, Malcolm J.; Doshi, Shachee; Gupta, Preetika; Grossman, Jennifer L.; Tan, Victor X.; Kalb, Robert G.; Caldwell, Kim A.; Caldwell, Guy A.; Wolfe, John H.; Ischiropoulos, Harry

    2018-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is defined by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and formation of Lewy body inclusions containing aggregated α-synuclein. Efforts to explain dopamine neuron vulnerability are hindered by the lack of dopaminergic cell death in α-synuclein transgenic mice. To address this, we manipulated dopamine levels in addition to α-synuclein expression. Nigra-targeted expression of mutant tyrosine hydroxylase with enhanced catalytic activity increased dopamine without damaging neurons in non-transgenic mice. In contrast, raising dopamine in mice expressing human A53T mutant α-synuclein induced progressive nigrostriatal degeneration and reduced locomotion. Dopamine elevation in A53T mice increased levels of potentially toxic α-synuclein oligomers, resulting in conformationally and functionally modified species. Moreover, in genetically tractable C. elegans models expression of α-synuclein mutated at the site of interaction with dopamine prevented dopamine-induced toxicity. The data suggest a unique mechanism linking two cardinal features of Parkinson’s disease, dopaminergic cell death and α-synuclein aggregation. PMID:28920936

  8. Dopamine induces soluble α-synuclein oligomers and nigrostriatal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Mor, Danielle E; Tsika, Elpida; Mazzulli, Joseph R; Gould, Neal S; Kim, Hanna; Daniels, Malcolm J; Doshi, Shachee; Gupta, Preetika; Grossman, Jennifer L; Tan, Victor X; Kalb, Robert G; Caldwell, Kim A; Caldwell, Guy A; Wolfe, John H; Ischiropoulos, Harry

    2017-11-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is defined by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and the formation of Lewy body inclusions containing aggregated α-synuclein. Efforts to explain dopamine neuron vulnerability are hindered by the lack of dopaminergic cell death in α-synuclein transgenic mice. To address this, we manipulated both dopamine levels and α-synuclein expression. Nigrally targeted expression of mutant tyrosine hydroxylase with enhanced catalytic activity increased dopamine levels without damaging neurons in non-transgenic mice. In contrast, raising dopamine levels in mice expressing human A53T mutant α-synuclein induced progressive nigrostriatal degeneration and reduced locomotion. Dopamine elevation in A53T mice increased levels of potentially toxic α-synuclein oligomers, resulting in conformationally and functionally modified species. Moreover, in genetically tractable Caenorhabditis elegans models, expression of α-synuclein mutated at the site of interaction with dopamine prevented dopamine-induced toxicity. These data suggest that a unique mechanism links two cardinal features of PD: dopaminergic cell death and α-synuclein aggregation.

  9. Should unobstructed gasping be facilitated and confirmed before administering adrenaline, otherwise, give titrated vasopressin?

    PubMed

    Rottenberg, Eric M

    2015-02-01

    A recent commentary, "Resuscitation That's (Un)Shockable: Time to Get the Adrenaline Flowing", published in the New England Journal of Medicine Journal Watch called attention to a relatively recent study showing that a large and increasing percentage of patients with in-hospital cardiac arrests exhibit initial nonshockable rhythms (asystole or pulseless electrical activity [PEA]; 82% in 2009 vs 69% in 2000) and a most recent study that concluded that neurologically intact survival to hospital discharge after in-hospital cardiac arrest was significantly more likely after earlier epinephrine administration. It was found that delayed administration of epinephrine was associated significantly with lower chance for survival to hospital discharge, in stepwise fashion (12%, 10%, 8%, and 7% survival, respectively, for patients receiving their first epinephrine dose≤3, 4-6, 7-9, and >9 minutes after arrest). Although early use of epinephrine to manage patients with nonshockable rhythms lacks strong evidence to support efficacy, focus on time to epinephrine administration-in addition to high-quality chest compressions-might be the best early intervention. However, evidence may strongly support the recommendation that adrenaline needs to be used very early because without effective-depth cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with complete recoil, epinephrine may only be effective when gasping is present, which is a time-limited phenomenon. However, because very few rescuers can perform effective-depth chest compressions with complete recoil, gasping is critically necessary for adequate ventilation and generation of adequate coronary and cerebral perfusion. However, under acidemic conditions and high catecholamine levels and/or absence of gasping, vasopressin should be administered instead. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Layered reward signalling through octopamine and dopamine in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Burke, Christopher J; Huetteroth, Wolf; Owald, David; Perisse, Emmanuel; Krashes, Michael J; Das, Gaurav; Gohl, Daryl; Silies, Marion; Certel, Sarah; Waddell, Scott

    2012-12-20

    Dopamine is synonymous with reward and motivation in mammals. However, only recently has dopamine been linked to motivated behaviour and rewarding reinforcement in fruitflies. Instead, octopamine has historically been considered to be the signal for reward in insects. Here we show, using temporal control of neural function in Drosophila, that only short-term appetitive memory is reinforced by octopamine. Moreover, octopamine-dependent memory formation requires signalling through dopamine neurons. Part of the octopamine signal requires the α-adrenergic-like OAMB receptor in an identified subset of mushroom-body-targeted dopamine neurons. Octopamine triggers an increase in intracellular calcium in these dopamine neurons, and their direct activation can substitute for sugar to form appetitive memory, even in flies lacking octopamine. Analysis of the β-adrenergic-like OCTβ2R receptor reveals that octopamine-dependent reinforcement also requires an interaction with dopamine neurons that control appetitive motivation. These data indicate that sweet taste engages a distributed octopamine signal that reinforces memory through discrete subsets of mushroom-body-targeted dopamine neurons. In addition, they reconcile previous findings with octopamine and dopamine and suggest that reinforcement systems in flies are more similar to mammals than previously thought.

  11. Temporal Profiles Dissociate Regional Extracellular Ethanol versus Dopamine Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In vivo monitoring of dopamine via microdialysis has demonstrated that acute, systemic ethanol increases extracellular dopamine in regions innervated by dopaminergic neurons originating in the ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra. Simultaneous measurement of dialysate dopamine and ethanol allows comparison of the time courses of their extracellular concentrations. Early studies demonstrated dissociations between the time courses of brain ethanol concentrations and dopaminergic responses in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) elicited by acute ethanol administration. Both brain ethanol and extracellular dopamine levels peak during the first 5 min following systemic ethanol administration, but the dopamine response returns to baseline while brain ethanol concentrations remain elevated. Post hoc analyses examined ratios of the dopamine response (represented as a percent above baseline) to tissue concentrations of ethanol at different time points within the first 25–30 min in the prefrontal cortex, NAc core and shell, and dorsomedial striatum following a single intravenous infusion of ethanol (1 g/kg). The temporal patterns of these “response ratios” differed across brain regions, possibly due to regional differences in the mechanisms underlying the decline of the dopamine signal associated with acute intravenous ethanol administration and/or to the differential effects of acute ethanol on the properties of subpopulations of midbrain dopamine neurons. This Review draws on neurochemical, physiological, and molecular studies to summarize the effects of acute ethanol administration on dopamine activity in the prefrontal cortex and striatal regions, to explore the potential reasons for the regional differences observed in the decline of ethanol-induced dopamine signals, and to suggest directions for future research. PMID:25537116

  12. Dopamine dysregulation syndrome: implications for a dopamine hypothesis of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Berk, M; Dodd, S; Kauer-Sant'anna, M; Malhi, G S; Bourin, M; Kapczinski, F; Norman, T

    2007-01-01

    Rational therapeutic development in bipolar is hampered by a lack of pathophysiological model. However, there is a wealth of converging data on the r