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Sample records for normal ankle joint

  1. Analysis of the Effects of Normal Walking on Ankle Joint Contact Characteristics After Acute Inversion Ankle Sprain.

    PubMed

    Bae, Ji Yong; Park, Kyung Soon; Seon, Jong Keun; Jeon, Insu

    2015-12-01

    To show the causal relationship between normal walking after various lateral ankle ligament (LAL) injuries caused by acute inversion ankle sprains and alterations in ankle joint contact characteristics, finite element simulations of normal walking were carried out using an intact ankle joint model and LAL injury models. A walking experiment using a volunteer with a normal ankle joint was performed to obtain the boundary conditions for the simulations and to support the appropriateness of the simulation results. Contact pressure and strain on the talus articular cartilage and anteroposterior and mediolateral translations of the talus were calculated. Ankles with ruptured anterior talofibular ligaments (ATFLs) had a higher likelihood of experiencing increased ankle joint contact pressures, strains and translations than ATFL-deficient ankles. In particular, ankles with ruptured ATFL + calcaneofibular ligaments and all ruptured ankles had a similar likelihood as the ATFL-ruptured ankles. The push off stance phase was the most likely situation for increased ankle joint contact pressures, strains and translations in LAL-injured ankles.

  2. Total ankle joint replacement.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    Ankle arthritis results in a stiff and painful ankle and can be a major cause of disability. For people with end-stage ankle arthritis, arthrodesis (ankle fusion) is effective at reducing pain in the shorter term, but results in a fixed joint, and over time the loss of mobility places stress on other joints in the foot that may lead to arthritis, pain and dysfunction. Another option is to perform a total ankle joint replacement, with the aim of giving the patient a mobile and pain-free ankle. In this article we review the efficacy of this procedure, including how it compares to ankle arthrodesis, and consider the indications and complications.

  3. The Effect of Cryotherapy on the Normal Ankle Joint Position Sense

    PubMed Central

    khanmohammadi, Roya; Someh, Marjan; Ghafarinejad, Farahnaze

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether a fifteen-minute water immersion treatment affects the normal ankle joint position sense (JPS) at the middle range of dorsiflexion and plantar flexion actively and passively. Methods Thirty healthy female volunteers aged between 18 and 30 years were treated by a 15-minute cryotherapy (6 ± 1°C). The subject's skin temperature over antromedial aspect of dominant ankle was measured by the Mayomed device before, immediate and 15 minutes after water immersion. Ankle JPS was tested trough the pedal goniometer at 3 stages similar to the skin temperature. ANOVA (α = 0.05) was performed on each of variables using SPSS 19.0 software. Results Skin temperature was seen to decrease after water immersion but subjects did not return to pre-test skin temperature after 15 minutes (P<0.001). The research found no significant difference in JPS at middle range of dorsiflexion and plantar flexion actively and passively before and after cryotherapy. Conclusion These findings suggest that 15-minute water immersion at 6°C dose not significantly alter the middle range of plantar flexion/ dorsiflexion JPS at the ankle and is not deleterious to JPS. PMID:22375224

  4. Arthroscopic Capsular Release of the Ankle Joint.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-12-01

    Adhesive capsulitis of the ankle is also known as frozen ankle and results in marked fibrosis and contracture of the ankle capsule. Arthroscopic capsular release is indicated for symptomatic frozen ankle that is resistant to conservative treatment. It is contraindicated for ankle stiffness due to degenerative joint disease, intra-articular malunion, or adhesion of the extensors of the ankle. The procedure consists of endoscopic posterior ankle capsulectomy and arthroscopic anterior ankle capsulotomy. It has the advantages of being minimally invasive surgery and allowing early postoperative vigorous mobilization of the ankle joint.

  5. Osteoligamentous injuries of the medial ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Lötscher, P; Lang, T H; Zwicky, L; Hintermann, B; Knupp, M

    2015-12-01

    Injuries of the ankle joint have a high incidence in daily life and sports, thus, playing an important socioeconomic role. Therefore, proper diagnosis and adequate treatment are mandatory. While most of the ligament injuries around the ankle joint are treated conservatively, great controversy exists on how to treat deltoid ligament injuries in ankle fractures. Missed injuries and inadequate treatment of the medial ankle lead to inferior outcome with instability, progressive deformity, and ankle joint osteoarthritis.

  6. Stresses in the ankle joint and total ankle replacement design.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Rahul; Siddique, M S

    2011-06-01

    The ankle is a highly congruent joint with a surface area of 11-13 cm(2). Total ankle replacements have been attempted since the early 1970s and design has continually evolved as the early designs were a failure. This was because the stresses involved and the mutiaxial motion of the ankle has not been understood until recently. It has been shown that the talus slides as well as rolls during the ankle arc of motion from plantarflexion to dorsiflexion. Furthermore, the articular surfaces and the calcaneofibular and tibiocalcaneal ligaments have been shown to form a four bar linkage dictating ankle motion. A new design ankle replacement has been suggested recently which allows multiaxial motion at the ankle while maintaining congruency throughout the arc of motion. The early results of this ankle replacement have been encouraging without any reported failures due to mechanical loosening.

  7. Biomechanics of the ankle joint and clinical outcomes of total ankle replacement.

    PubMed

    Michael, Junitha M; Golshani, Ashkahn; Gargac, Shawn; Goswami, Tarun

    2008-10-01

    Until the 1970s ankle arthrodesis was considered to be the "gold-standard" to treat arthritis. But the low fusion rate of ankle arthrodeses along with the inability to achieve normal range of motion led to the growing interest in the development of total ankle replacements. Though the short-term outcomes were good, their long-term outcomes were not as promising. To date, most models do not exactly mimic the anatomical functionality of a natural ankle joint. Therefore, research is being conducted worldwide to either enhance the existing models or develop new models while understanding the intricacies of the joint more precisely. This paper reviews the anatomical and biomechanical aspects of the ankle joint. Also, the evolution and comparison of clinical outcomes of various total ankle replacements are presented.

  8. [Arthroscopic therapy of ankle joint impingement syndrome after operation of ankle joint fracture dislocation].

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhibin; Mi, Kun; Wei, Renzhi; Liu, Wu; Wang, Bin

    2011-07-01

    To study the operative procedure and the effectiveness of arthroscopic therapy for ankle joint impingement syndrome after operation of ankle joint fracture dislocation. Between March 2008 and April 2010, 38 patients with ankle joint impingement syndrome after operation of ankle joint fracture dislocation were treated. Among them, there were 28 males and 10 females with an average age of 28 years (range, 18 to 42 years). The time from internal fixation to admission was 12-16 months (mean, 13.8 months). There were pressing pain in anterolateral and anterior ankle. The dorsal extension ranged from -20 to -5 degrees (mean, -10.6 degrees), and the palmar flexion was 30-40 degrees (mean, 35.5 degrees). The total score was 48.32 +/- 9.24 and the pain score was 7.26 +/- 1.22 before operation according to American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle and hindfoot score system. The X-ray films showed osteophyte formation in anterior tibia and talus; MRI showed cartilage injury in 22 cases. Arthroscopic intervention included removing osteophytes, debriding fabric scars and synovial membrane tissues, and removing osteochondral fragments. Arthroscopic microfracture technique was used in 22 patients with cartilage injury. All incisions healed primarily. Thirty-eight cases were followed up 10-26 months (mean, 16 months). At last follow-up, 26 patients had normal range of motion (ROM); the dorsal extension was 15-25 degrees (mean, 19.6 degrees) and the palmar flexion was 35-45 degrees (mean, 40.7 degrees). Eight patients had mild limited ROM; the dorsal extension was 5-15 degrees (mean, 7.2 degrees) and the palmar flexion was 35-45 degrees (mean, 39.5 degrees). Four patients had mild limited ROM and pain in posterior portion of the ankle after a long walking (3-4 hours); the dorsal extension was 0-5 degrees (mean, 2.6 degrees) and the palmar flexion was 35-40 degrees (mean, 37.5 degrees). The total score was 89.45 +/- 9.55 and the pain score was 1.42 +/- 1.26 after

  9. Relationship between viscosity of the ankle joint complex and functional ankle instability for inversion ankle sprain patients.

    PubMed

    Lin, Che-Yu; Kang, Jiunn-Horng; Wang, Chung-Li; Shau, Yio-Wha

    2015-03-01

    Measurement of viscosity of the ankle joint complex is a novel method to assess mechanical ankle instability. In order to further investigate the clinical significance of the method, this study intended to investigate the relationship between ankle viscosity and severity of functional ankle instability. Cross-sectional study. 15 participants with unilateral inversion ankle sprain and 15 controls were recruited. Their ankles were further classified into stable and unstable ankles. Ankle viscosity was measured by an instrumental anterior drawer test. Severity of functional ankle instability was measured by the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool. Unstable ankles were compared with stable ankles. Injured ankles were compared with uninjured ankles of both groups. The spearman's rank correlation coefficient was applied to determine the relationship between ankle viscosity and severity of functional ankle instability in unstable ankles. There was a moderate relationship between ankle viscosity and severity of functional ankle instability (r=-0.64, p<0.0001). Unstable ankles exhibited significantly lower viscosity (p<0.005) and more severe functional ankle instability (p<0.0001) than stable ankles. Injured ankles exhibited significantly lower viscosity and more severe functional ankle instability than uninjured ankles (p<0.0001). There was a moderate relationship between ankle viscosity and severity of functional ankle instability. This finding suggested that, severity of functional ankle instability may be partially attributed to mechanical insufficiencies such as the degenerative changes in ankle viscosity following the inversion ankle sprain. In clinical application, measurement of ankle viscosity could be a useful tool to evaluate severity of chronic ankle instability. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Chronic diseases of the ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Rand, T; Trattnig, S; Breitenseher, M; Kreuzer, S; Wagesreither, S; Imhof, H

    1999-01-01

    The etiology of chronic diseases of the ankle joint comprises a wide spectrum including chronic inflammatory processes and chronic degenerative, tumorous and neuropathic processes, as well as some specific syndromes based on chronic changes of the ankle joint. Of the inflammatory processes, chronic juvenile arthritis (JVC) is the most common disease. However, also Reiter disease, psoriasis or chronic monoarthritid diseases such as gout, as well as granulomatous diseases (tuberculosis, sarcoidosis) and fungal infections, may affect the ankle joint in a chronic course. Chronic degenerative changes are usually secondary due to abnormal positioning of the joint constituents or repetitive trauma. Neuropathic changes, as frequently seen in the course of diabetes, present with massive osseous destruction and malposition of the articular constituents. Chronic osseous as well as cartilaginous and synovial changes are seen in hemophilic patients. Chronic traumatic changes are represented by pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS), and chondromatosis, both with a predilection for the ankle joint. Due to the possibilities of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diagnosis of chronic ankle changes includes chronic ligamentous, tendinous and soft tissue changes. With the use of MRI, specific syndromes can be defined which particularly affect the ankle joint in a chronic way, such as the os trigonum syndrome, the anterolateral impingement syndrome and the sinus tarsi syndrome. Nevertheless, plain film radiographs are still the basic element of any investigation. MRI, however, can be potentially used as a second investigation, saving an unnecessary cascade of investigations with ultrasound and CT. The latter investigations are used only with very specific indications, for instance CT for subtle bone structures and sonography for a limited investigation of tendons or evaluation of fluid. Particularly due to the possibilities of MRI and the development of special gradient-echo imaging

  11. Does ice immersion influence ankle joint position sense?

    PubMed

    Hopper, D; Whittington, D; Davies, J; Chartier, J D

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether a fifteen minute ice immersion treatment influenced the normal ankle joint position sense at 40% and 80% range of inversion and to establish the length of treatment effect through monitoring the rewarming process. Forty nine healthy volunteers between the ages of 17 and 28 were tested. Subjects were screened to exclude those with a history of ankle injuries. The subject's skin temperature over antero-lateral aspect of the ankle was measured using a thermocouple device during the fifteen minutes ice intervention and thirty minutes post-intervention. Testing of ankle joint position sense using the pedal goniometer was performed before and after a clinical application of ice immersion. The testing required the subject to actively reposition their ankle at 40% and 80% of their total range of inversion. The majority of subjects experienced numbness of the foot and ankle by the fifth or sixth minute during ice immersion. One minute after immersion skin temperatures averaged 15 degrees C + 1.7 degrees C. Skin temperature was seen to rise relatively rapidly for the first ten minutes and then slowed considerably. Subjects had not returned to the pre-test skin temperatures by thirty minutes. A significant difference in ankle joint position sense (p < 0.0499) following fifteen minutes of ice immersion was found. However, the magnitude of this difference (0.5 degree) would not be deemed significant in clinical practice. The research found no significant difference in joint position sense between 40% and 80% of the range of inversion both before and after cryotherapy. These findings suggest that the clinical application of cryotherapy is not deleterious to joint position sense and assuming normal joint integrity patients may resume exercise without increased risk of injury.

  12. [Lateral instability of the upper ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Harrasser, N; Eichelberg, K; Pohlig, F; Waizy, H; Toepfer, A; von Eisenhart-Rothe, R

    2016-11-01

    Because of their frequency, ankle sprains are of major clinical and economic importance. The simple sprain with uneventful healing has to be distinguished from the potentially complicated sprain which is at risk of transition to chronic ankle instability. Conservative treatment is indicated for the acute, simple ankle sprain without accompanying injuries and also in cases of chronic instability. If conservative treatment fails, good results can be achieved by anatomic ligament reconstruction of the lateral ankle ligaments. Arthroscopic techniques offer the advantage of joint inspection and addressing intra-articular pathologies in combination with ligament repair. Accompanying pathologies must be adequately addressed during ligament repair to avoid persistent ankle discomfort. If syndesmotic insufficiency and tibiofibular instability are suspected, the objective should be early diagnosis with MRI and surgical repair.

  13. [Ankle joint arthritis--etiology, diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Uri, Ofir; Haim, Amir

    2008-11-01

    Ankle joint arthritis causes functional limitation and affects the quality of life many patients. It follows traumatic injuries, inflammatory joint arthritis, primary osteoarthritis, hemochromatosis and infections. Understanding the unique anatomy and biomechanics of the ankle is important for diagnosis and treatment of ankle joint pathology. The treatment of ankle joint arthritis has advanced considerably in recent years and it is still a surgical challenge. Total ankle replacement seems to be a promising form of treatment, even though current data does not demonstrate advantages over ankle joint arthrodesis.

  14. Ankle and knee biomechanics during normal walking following ankle plantarflexor fatigue.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Michael A; Hatfield, Gillian L

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the immediate effects of unilateral ankle plantarflexor fatigue on bilateral knee and ankle biomechanics during gait. Lower leg kinematics, kinetics, and muscle activation were assessed before and after an ankle plantarflexor fatiguing protocol in 31 healthy individuals. Fatigue (defined as >10% reduction in maximal isometric ankle plantarflexor torque production and a downward shift in the median power frequency of both heads of the gastrocnemius muscle of the fatigued limb) was achieved in 18 individuals, and only their data were used for analysis purposes. Compared to pre-fatigue walking trials, medial gastrocnemius activity was significantly reduced in the study (fatigued) limb. Other main changes following fatigue included significantly more knee flexion during loading, and an associated larger external knee flexion moment in the study limb. At the ankle joint, participants exhibited significantly less peak plantarflexion (occurring at toe-off) with fatigue. No significant differences were observed in the contralateral (non-fatigued) limb. Findings from this study indicate that fatigue of the ankle plantarflexor muscle does not produce widespread changes in gait biomechanics, suggesting that small to moderate changes in maximal ankle plantarflexor force production capacity (either an increase or decrease) will not have a substantial impact on normal lower limb functioning during gait. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Transverse plane motion at the ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Nester, Christopher J; Findlow, Andrew F; Bowker, Peter; Bowden, Peter D

    2003-02-01

    The ankle is often considered to have little or no capacity to move in the transverse plane. This is clear in the persistent concept that it is the role of the subtalar joint to accommodate the transverse plane motion of the leg while the foot remains in a fixed transverse plane position on the floor. We present data from noninvasive in vivo study of the ankle subtalar complex during standing internal and external rotation of the leg and study of the ankle subtalar complex during walking. These data reinforce the results of cadaver study and invasive in vivo study of the ankle/subtalar complex. We suggest that the ankle is capable of considerable movement in the transverse plane (generally greater than 15 degrees) and that its role in the mechanism that allows the foot to remain in a fixed transverse plane position on the floor while the leg rotates in the transverse plane, is not simply the transfer of the transverse plane moment to the subtalar joint, but is accommodation of some of the necessary movement.

  16. Osteochondral Allografts in the Ankle Joint

    PubMed Central

    Vannini, Francesca; Buda, Roberto; Ruffilli, Alberto; Cavallo, Marco; Giannini, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this systematic review is to report about the clinical use of partial and total fresh osteochondral allograft in the ankle joint. The state of the art of allografts with regard to basic science, procurement and storage methods, immunogenicity, generally accepted indications and contraindications, and the rationale of the allografting procedure have been described. Methods: All studies published in PubMed from 2000 to January 2012 addressing fresh osteochondral allograft procedures in the ankle joint were identified, including those that fulfilled the following criteria: (a) level I-IV evidence addressing the areas of interest outlined above; (b) measures of functional, clinical, or imaging outcome; and (c) outcome related to ankle cartilage lesions or ankle arthritis treated by allografts. Results: The analysis showed a progressively increasing number of articles from 2000. The number of selected articles was 14; 9 of those focused on limited dimension allografts (plugs, partial) and 5 on bipolar fresh osteochondral allografts. The evaluation of evidence level showed 14 case series and no randomized studies. Conclusions: Fresh osteochondral allografts are now a versatile and suitable option for the treatment of different degrees of osteochondral disease in the ankle joint and may even be used as total joint replacement. Fresh osteochondral allografts used for total joint replacement are still experimental and might be considered as a salvage procedure in otherwise unsolvable situations. A proper selection of the patients is therefore a key point. Moreover, the patients should be adequately informed about the possible risks, benefits, and alternatives to the allograft procedure. PMID:26069666

  17. Effects of ankle joint cooling on peroneal short latency response.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, J Ty; Hunter, Iain; McLoda, Todd

    2006-01-01

    While cryotherapy has direct physiological effects on contractile tissues, the extent to which joint cooling affects the neuromuscular system is not well understood. The purpose of the study was to detect changes in ankle dynamic restraint (peroneal short latency response and muscle activity amplitude) during inversion perturbation following ankle joint cryotherapy. A 2x3 factorial design was used to compare reaction time and EMG amplitude data of treatment conditions (cryotherapy and control) across time (pre-treatment, post-treatment, and 30 min post-treatment). Thirteen healthy volunteers (age 23 ± 4 yrs, ht 1.76 ± 0.09 m, mass 78.8 ± 16.6 kg), with no history of lower extremity joint injury participated in this study. Surface EMG was collected from the peroneus longus (PL) of the dominant leg during an ankle inversion perturbation triggered while walking. Subjects walked the length of a 6.1 m runway 30 times. A trap door mechanism, inducing inversion perturbation, was released at heel contact during six randomly selected trials for each leg. Following baseline measurements, a 1.5 L bag of crushed ice was applied to the lateral ankle of subjects in the treatment group with an elastic wrap. A bag similar in weight and consistency was applied to the lateral ankle of subjects in the control group. A repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare treatment conditions across time (p < 0.05). Maximum inversion range of motion was 28.4 ± 1.8° for all subjects. No overall condition by time difference was detected (p > 0.05) for PL reaction time. Average RMS EMG, normalized to an isometric reference position, increased in the cryotherapy group at the 30 min post-treatment interval relative to the control group (p < 0.05). Joint cooling does not result in deficiencies in reaction time or immediate muscle activation following inversion perturbation compared to a control. Key PointsJoint cooling is used as a treatment intervention prior to activity. Whether ankle cooling

  18. Ankle and hip postural strategies defined by joint torques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runge, C. F.; Shupert, C. L.; Horak, F. B.; Zajac, F. E.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have identified two discrete strategies for the control of posture in the sagittal plane based on EMG activations, body kinematics, and ground reaction forces. The ankle strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a single-segment-inverted pendulum and was elicited on flat support surfaces. In contrast, the hip strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a double-segment inverted pendulum divided at the hip and was elicited on short or compliant support surfaces. However, biomechanical optimization models have suggested that hip strategy should be observed in response to fast translations on a flat surface also, provided the feet are constrained to remain in contact with the floor and the knee is constrained to remain straight. The purpose of this study was to examine the experimental evidence for hip strategy in postural responses to backward translations of a flat support surface and to determine whether analyses of joint torques would provide evidence for two separate postural strategies. Normal subjects standing on a flat support surface were translated backward with a range of velocities from fast (55 cm/s) to slow (5 cm/s). EMG activations and joint kinematics showed pattern changes consistent with previous experimental descriptions of mixed hip and ankle strategy with increasing platform velocity. Joint torque analyses revealed the addition of a hip flexor torque to the ankle plantarflexor torque during fast translations. This finding indicates the addition of hip strategy to ankle strategy to produce a continuum of postural responses. Hip torque without accompanying ankle torque (pure hip strategy) was not observed. Although postural control strategies have previously been defined by how the body moves, we conclude that joint torques, which indicate how body movements are produced, are useful in defining postural control strategies. These results also illustrate how the biomechanics of the body can transform discrete control

  19. Ankle and hip postural strategies defined by joint torques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runge, C. F.; Shupert, C. L.; Horak, F. B.; Zajac, F. E.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have identified two discrete strategies for the control of posture in the sagittal plane based on EMG activations, body kinematics, and ground reaction forces. The ankle strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a single-segment-inverted pendulum and was elicited on flat support surfaces. In contrast, the hip strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a double-segment inverted pendulum divided at the hip and was elicited on short or compliant support surfaces. However, biomechanical optimization models have suggested that hip strategy should be observed in response to fast translations on a flat surface also, provided the feet are constrained to remain in contact with the floor and the knee is constrained to remain straight. The purpose of this study was to examine the experimental evidence for hip strategy in postural responses to backward translations of a flat support surface and to determine whether analyses of joint torques would provide evidence for two separate postural strategies. Normal subjects standing on a flat support surface were translated backward with a range of velocities from fast (55 cm/s) to slow (5 cm/s). EMG activations and joint kinematics showed pattern changes consistent with previous experimental descriptions of mixed hip and ankle strategy with increasing platform velocity. Joint torque analyses revealed the addition of a hip flexor torque to the ankle plantarflexor torque during fast translations. This finding indicates the addition of hip strategy to ankle strategy to produce a continuum of postural responses. Hip torque without accompanying ankle torque (pure hip strategy) was not observed. Although postural control strategies have previously been defined by how the body moves, we conclude that joint torques, which indicate how body movements are produced, are useful in defining postural control strategies. These results also illustrate how the biomechanics of the body can transform discrete control

  20. Joint mobilization acutely improves landing kinematics in chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Delahunt, Eamonn; Cusack, Kim; Wilson, Laura; Doherty, Cailbhe

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the acute effect of ankle joint mobilizations akin to those performed in everyday clinical practice on sagittal plane ankle joint kinematics during a single-leg drop landing in participants with chronic ankle instability (CAI). Fifteen participants with self-reported CAI (defined as <24 on the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool) performed three single-leg drop landings under two different conditions: 1) premobilization and, 2) immediately, postmobilization. The mobilizations performed included Mulligan talocrural joint dorsiflexion mobilization with movement, Mulligan inferior tibiofibular joint mobilization, and Maitland anteroposterior talocrural joint mobilization. Three CODA cx1 units (Charnwood Dynamics Ltd., Leicestershire, UK) were used to provide information on ankle joint sagittal plane angular displacement. The dependent variable under investigation was the angle of ankle joint plantarflexion at the point of initial contact during the drop landing. There was a statistically significant acute decrease in the angle of ankle joint plantarflexion from premobilization (34.89° ± 4.18°) to postmobilization (31.90° ± 5.89°), t(14) = 2.62, P < 0.05 (two-tailed). The mean decrease in the angle of ankle joint plantarflexion as a result of the ankle joint mobilization was 2.98° with a 95% confidence interval ranging from 0.54 to 5.43. The eta squared statistic (0.32) indicated a large effect size. These results indicate that mobilization acted to acutely reduce the angle of ankle joint plantarflexion at initial contact during a single-leg drop landing. Mobilization applied to participants with CAI has a mechanical effect on the ankle joint, thus facilitating a more favorable positioning of the ankle joint when landing from a jump.

  1. Bone alterations are associated with ankle osteoarthritis joint pain

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yukio; Uchiyama, Shigeharu; Kamimura, Mikio; Komatsu, Masatoshi; Ikegami, Shota; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    The etiology of ankle osteoarthritis (OA) is largely unknown. We analyzed 24 ankle OA of 21 patients diagnosed by plain radiographs using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ankle joint pain disappeared in 22 out of 24 joints by conservative treatment. MRI bone signal changes in and around the ankle joints were observed in 22 of 24 joints. Bone signal changes along the joint line were seen in 10 of 11 joints as a Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grade of II to IV. Such signal changes were witnessed in only 4 of 13 joints with KL grade 0 or I. In the talocrural joint, bone alterations occurred in both tibia and talus bones through the joint line in cases of KL grade III or IV, while focal bone alterations were present in the talus only in KL grade I or II cases. Sixteen of 24 joints exhibited intraosseous bone signal changes, which tended to correspond to joint pain of any ankle OA stage. Our results suggest that bone alterations around the ankle joint might be one of the etiologies of OA and associated with ankle joint pain. PMID:26776564

  2. [Ankle joint prosthesis for bone defects].

    PubMed

    Lampert, C

    2011-11-01

    Large defects of the talus, i.e. due to tumors, large areas of osteolysis in total ankle replacement (TAR) and posttraumatic talus body necrosis are difficult to manage. The gold standard in these circumstances is still tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis with all the negative aspects of a completely rigid hindfoot. We started 10 years ago to replace the talus by a custom-made, all cobalt-chrome implant (laser sintering). The first patient with a giant cell tumor did very well but the following patients showed all subsidence of the metal talus into the tibia due to missing bony edges. Therefore, we constructed a custom-made talus (mirrored from the healthy side) and combined it with a well functioning total ankle prosthesis (Hintegra). So far we have implanted this custom-made implant into 3 patients: the first had a chondrosarcoma of the talus (1 year follow-up), the second had massive osteolysis/necrosis of unknown origin (6 months follow-up) and the third massive osteolysis following a correct TAR (2 months follow-up). The results are very encouraging as all of the patients are practically pain free and have a good range of movement (ROM): D-P flexion 15°-0-20° but less motion in the lower ankle joint: ROM P-S 5°-0-5°. No subsidence was detected in the tibia or the calcaneus. The custom-made talus combined with the Hintegra total ankle replacement will probably be an interesting alternative to a tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis in selected cases with massive defects of the talus.

  3. [Advances on biomechanics and kinematics of sprain of ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong; Wang, Gang

    2015-04-01

    Ankle sprains are orthopedic clinical common disease, accounting for joint ligament sprain of the first place. If treatment is not timely or appropriate, the joint pain and instability maybe develop, and even bone arthritis maybe develop. The mechanism of injury of ankle joint, anatomical basis has been fully study at present, and the diagnostic problem is very clear. Along with the development of science and technology, biological modeling and three-dimensional finite element, three-dimensional motion capture system,digital technology study, electromyographic signal study were used for the basic research of sprain of ankle. Biomechanical and kinematic study of ankle sprain has received adequate attention, combined with the mechanism research of ankle sprain,and to explore the the biomechanics and kinematics research progress of the sprain of ankle joint.

  4. Biomechanical changes at the ankle joint after stroke.

    PubMed Central

    Thilmann, A F; Fellows, S J; Ross, H F

    1991-01-01

    The resistance of the relaxed ankle to slow displacement over the joint movement range was measured on both sides of a group of hemiparetic stroke patients, in whom spasticity had been established for at least one year and who showed no clinical signs of contractures. The ankle joints of the age-matched normal subjects were flexible over most of the movement range, showing dramatically increasing stiffness only when the foot was dorsiflexed beyond 70 degrees, with a neutral range between 90-100 degrees, and a less dramatic increase in stiffness during plantarflexion. Hemiparetic patients showed identical curves to the normal subjects on the "healthy" side, ipsilateral to the causative cerebral lesion, but were significantly stiffer in dorsiflexion on the contralateral side, without change in the minimum stiffness range or during plantarflexion. Therefore significant changes in passive biomechanical properties occur at the affected ankle of hemiparetic subjects, predominantly as the result of a loss of compliance in the Achilles tendon, although an increase in the passive stiffness of the triceps surae may also occur. The contribution of these changes to the locomotor disability of hemiparetic patients is discussed. PMID:2019838

  5. Test-Retest Reliability of Sudden Ankle Inversion Measurements in Subjects With Healthy Ankle Joints

    PubMed Central

    Eechaute, Christophe; Vaes, Peter; Duquet, William; Van Gheluwe, Bart

    2007-01-01

    Context: Sudden ankle inversion tests have been used to investigate whether the onset of peroneal muscle activity is delayed in patients with chronically unstable ankle joints. Before interpreting test results of latency times in patients with chronic ankle instability and healthy subjects, the reliability of these measures must be first demonstrated. Objective: To investigate the test-retest reliability of variables measured during a sudden ankle inversion movement in standing subjects with healthy ankle joints. Design: Validation study. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: 15 subjects with healthy ankle joints (30 ankles). Intervention(s): Subjects stood on an ankle inversion platform with both feet tightly fixed to independently moveable trapdoors. An unexpected sudden ankle inversion of 50° was imposed. Main Outcome Measure(s): We measured latency and motor response times and electromechanical delay of the peroneus longus muscle, along with the time and angular position of the first and second decelerating moments, the mean and maximum inversion speed, and the total inversion time. Correlation coefficients and standard error of measurements were calculated. Results: Intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.17 for the electromechanical delay of the peroneus longus muscle (standard error of measurement = 2.7 milliseconds) to 0.89 for the maximum inversion speed (standard error of measurement = 34.8 milliseconds). Conclusions: The reliability of the latency and motor response times of the peroneus longus muscle, the time of the first and second decelerating moments, and the mean and maximum inversion speed was acceptable in subjects with healthy ankle joints and supports the investigation of the reliability of these measures in subjects with chronic ankle instability. The lower reliability of the electromechanical delay of the peroneus longus muscle and the angular positions of both decelerating moments calls the use of these

  6. In Vivo Talocrural Joint Contact Mechanics With Functional Ankle Instability.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takumi; Suzuki, Eiichi; Yamazaki, Naohito; Suzukawa, Makoto; Akaike, Atsushi; Shimizu, Kuniaki; Gamada, Kazuyoshi

    2015-12-01

    Functional ankle instability (FAI) may involve abnormal kinematics and contact mechanics during ankle internal rotation. Understanding of these abnormalities is important to prevent secondary problems in patients with FAI. However, there are no in vivo studies that have investigated talocrural joint contact mechanics during weightbearing ankle internal rotation. The objective of this study to determine talocrural contact mechanics during weightbearing ankle internal rotation in patients with FAI. Twelve male subjects with unilateral FAI (age range, 18-26 years) were enrolled. Computed tomography and fluoroscopic imaging of both lower extremities were obtained during weightbearing passive ankle joint complex rotation. Three-dimensional bone models created from the computed tomographic images were matched to the fluoroscopic images to compute 6 degrees of freedom for talocrural joint kinematics. The closest contact area in the talocrural joint in ankle neutral rotation and maximum internal rotation during either dorsiflexion or plantar flexion was determined using geometric bone models and talocrural joint kinematics data. The closest contact area in the talus shifted anteromedially during ankle dorsiflexion-internal rotation, whereas it shifted posteromedially during ankle plantar flexion-internal rotation. The closest contact area in FAI joints was significantly more medial than that in healthy joints during maximum ankle internal rotation and was associated with excessive talocrural internal rotation or inversion. This study demonstrated abnormal talocrural kinematics and contact mechanics in FAI subjects. Such abnormal kinematics may contribute to abnormal contact mechanics and may increase cartilage stress in FAI joints. Therapeutic, Level IV: cross-sectional case-control study. © 2015 The Author(s).

  7. Compensatory strategies during walking in response to excessive muscle co-contraction at the ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruoli; Gutierrez-Farewik, Elena M

    2014-03-01

    Excessive co-contraction causes inefficient or abnormal movement in several neuromuscular pathologies. How synergistic muscles spanning the ankle, knee and hip adapt to co-contraction of ankle muscles is not well understood. This study aimed to identify the compensation strategies required to retain normal walking with excessive antagonistic ankle muscle co-contraction. Muscle-actuated simulations of normal walking were performed to quantify compensatory mechanisms of ankle and knee muscles during stance in the presence of normal, medium and high levels of co-contraction of antagonistic pairs gastrocnemius+tibialis anterior and soleus+tibialis anterior. The study showed that if co-contraction increases, the synergistic ankle muscles can compensate; with gastrocmemius+tibialis anterior co-contraction, the soleus will increase its contribution to ankle plantarflexion acceleration. At the knee, however, almost all muscles spanning the knee and hip are involved in compensation. We also found that ankle and knee muscles alone can provide sufficient compensation at the ankle joint, but hip muscles must be involved to generate sufficient knee moment. Our findings imply that subjects with a rather high level of dorsiflexor+plantarflexor co-contraction can still perform normal walking. This also suggests that capacity of other lower limb muscles to compensate is important to retain normal walking in co-contracted persons. The compensatory mechanisms can be useful in clinical interpretation of motion analyses, when secondary muscle co-contraction or other deficits may present simultaneously in subjects with motion disorders.

  8. Effects of deep brain stimulation and medication on strength, bradykinesia, and electromyographic patterns of the ankle joint in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Vaillancourt, David E; Prodoehl, Janey; Sturman, Molly M; Bakay, Roy A E; Metman, Leo Verhagen; Corcos, Daniel M

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the control of movement in 12 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) after they received surgically implanted high-frequency stimulating electrodes in the subthalamic nucleus (STN). The experiment studied ankle strength, movement velocity, and the associated electromyographic patterns in PD patients, six of whom had tremor at the ankle. The patients were studied off treatment, ON STN deep brain stimulation (DBS), on medication, and on medication plus STN DBS. Twelve matched control subjects were also examined. Medication alone and STN DBS alone increased patients' ankle strength, ankle velocity, agonist muscle burst amplitude, and agonist burst duration, while reducing the number of agonist bursts during movement. These findings were similar for PD patients with and without tremor. The combination of medication plus STN DBS normalized maximal strength at the ankle joint, but ankle movement velocity and electromyographic patterns were not normalized. The findings are the first to demonstrate that STN DBS and medication increase strength and movement velocity at the ankle joint.

  9. Movement discrimination after intra‐articular local anaesthetic of the ankle joint

    PubMed Central

    Down, Stuart; Waddington, Gordon; Adams, Roger; Thomson, Malcolm

    2007-01-01

    Background The effect on clinical safety of dampening articular mechanoreceptor feedback at the ankle is unknown. Injection of the ankle joint for pain control may result in such dampening. Athletes receiving intra‐articular local anaesthetic may therefore be at increased risk of sustaining ankle injuries, which are a common reason for missed sporting participation. Objective To determine the effect of intra‐articular local anaesthetic on movement discrimination at the ankle joint. Design Prospective, randomised, double‐blinded, placebo‐controlled, cross‐over trial. Setting Australian Institute of Sport Medical Centre, Canberra, Australia. Patients Twenty two healthy subjects (44 ankles) aged 18–26 were recruited for the three visits of the study. Interventions Subjects were tested for their initial movement discrimination scores using the active movement extent discrimination apparatus (AMEDA). They then received ultrasound‐guided intra‐articular injections of local anaesthetic (2% lignocaine hydrochloride) or normal saline, on two separate later occasions, before further AMEDA assessment. Main outcome measures Change in movement discrimination scores after intra‐articular injection of local anaesthetic or saline. Results Movement discrimination scores were not significantly different from control ankles after injection of either local anaesthetic or saline into the ankle joint. Conclusions The intra‐articular injection of neither 2 ml lignocaine nor an equivalent amount of normal saline resulted in significant effects on movement discrimination at the ankle joint. These results suggest that injections of local anaesthetic into the ankle joint are unlikely to significantly affect proprioception and thereby increase injury risk. PMID:17341587

  10. Treatment of anterolateral impingements of the ankle joint by arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Al-Husseiny Moustafa

    2007-09-01

    Impingement syndromes of the ankle joint are among the most common intraarticular ankle lesions. Soft tissue impingement lesions of the ankle usually occur as a result of synovial, or capsular irritation secondary to traumatic injuries, usually ankle sprains, leading to chronic ankle pain. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate arthroscopic debridement of an anterolateral soft tissue impingement of the ankle. During the period between October 2000 and February 2004, 23 patients with residual complaints after an ankle sprain were diagnosed as anterolateral impingement of the ankle, and were treated by arthroscopic debridement. At a minimum of 6 months follow up, patients were asked to complete an American orthopaedic foot and ankle society (AOFAS) ankle and hind foot score. The average follow-up was 25 months (range 12-38). The average pre-operative patient assessed AOFAS score was 34 (range 4-57). At the end of follow-up the mean AOFAS score was 89 (range 60-100). In terms of patient satisfaction 22 patients said they would accept the same arthroscopic procedure again for the same complaints. At the end of follow-up, 7 patients had excellent results, and 14 patients had good results while two patients had fair results. We believe that arthroscopic debridement of the anterolateral impingement soft tissues are a good, and effective method of treatment.

  11. Neuropathic midfoot deformity: associations with ankle and subtalar joint motion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Neuropathic deformities impair foot and ankle joint mobility, often leading to abnormal stresses and impact forces. The purpose of our study was to determine differences in radiographic measures of hind foot alignment and ankle joint and subtalar joint motion in participants with and without neuropathic midfoot deformities and to determine the relationships between radiographic measures of hind foot alignment to ankle and subtalar joint motion in participants with and without neuropathic midfoot deformities. Methods Sixty participants were studied in three groups. Forty participants had diabetes mellitus (DM) and peripheral neuropathy (PN) with 20 participants having neuropathic midfoot deformity due to Charcot neuroarthropathy (CN), while 20 participants did not have deformity. Participants with diabetes and neuropathy with and without deformity were compared to 20 young control participants without DM, PN or deformity. Talar declination and calcaneal inclination angles were assessed on lateral view weight bearing radiograph. Ankle dorsiflexion, plantar flexion and subtalar inversion and eversion were assessed by goniometry. Results Talar declination angle averaged 34±9, 26±4 and 23±3 degrees in participants with deformity, without deformity and young control participants, respectively (p< 0.010). Calcaneal inclination angle averaged 11±10, 18±9 and 21±4 degrees, respectively (p< 0.010). Ankle plantar flexion motion averaged 23±11, 38±10 and 47±7 degrees (p<0.010). The association between talar declination and calcaneal inclination angles with ankle plantar flexion range of motion is strongest in participants with neuropathic midfoot deformity. Participants with talonavicular and calcaneocuboid dislocations result in the most severe restrictions in ankle joint plantar flexion and subtalar joint inversion motions. Conclusions An increasing talar declination angle and decreasing calcaneal inclination angle is associated with decreases in ankle

  12. Neuropathic midfoot deformity: associations with ankle and subtalar joint motion.

    PubMed

    Sinacore, David R; Gutekunst, David J; Hastings, Mary K; Strube, Michael J; Bohnert, Kathryn L; Prior, Fred W; Johnson, Jeffrey E

    2013-03-25

    Neuropathic deformities impair foot and ankle joint mobility, often leading to abnormal stresses and impact forces. The purpose of our study was to determine differences in radiographic measures of hind foot alignment and ankle joint and subtalar joint motion in participants with and without neuropathic midfoot deformities and to determine the relationships between radiographic measures of hind foot alignment to ankle and subtalar joint motion in participants with and without neuropathic midfoot deformities. Sixty participants were studied in three groups. Forty participants had diabetes mellitus (DM) and peripheral neuropathy (PN) with 20 participants having neuropathic midfoot deformity due to Charcot neuroarthropathy (CN), while 20 participants did not have deformity. Participants with diabetes and neuropathy with and without deformity were compared to 20 young control participants without DM, PN or deformity. Talar declination and calcaneal inclination angles were assessed on lateral view weight bearing radiograph. Ankle dorsiflexion, plantar flexion and subtalar inversion and eversion were assessed by goniometry. Talar declination angle averaged 34±9, 26±4 and 23±3 degrees in participants with deformity, without deformity and young control participants, respectively (p< 0.010). Calcaneal inclination angle averaged 11±10, 18±9 and 21±4 degrees, respectively (p< 0.010). Ankle plantar flexion motion averaged 23±11, 38±10 and 47±7 degrees (p<0.010). The association between talar declination and calcaneal inclination angles with ankle plantar flexion range of motion is strongest in participants with neuropathic midfoot deformity. Participants with talonavicular and calcaneocuboid dislocations result in the most severe restrictions in ankle joint plantar flexion and subtalar joint inversion motions. An increasing talar declination angle and decreasing calcaneal inclination angle is associated with decreases in ankle joint plantar flexion motion in

  13. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an ankle...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an ankle...

  15. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an ankle...

  16. Dynamic high-resolution US of ankle and midfoot ligaments: normal anatomic structure and imaging technique.

    PubMed

    Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Orlandi, Davide; Lacelli, Francesca; Serafini, Giovanni; Silvestri, Enzo

    2015-01-01

    The ankle is the most frequently injured major joint in the body, and ankle sprains are frequently encountered in individuals playing football, basketball, and other team sports, in addition to occurring in the general population. Imaging plays a crucial role in the evaluation of ankle ligaments. Magnetic resonance imaging has been proven to provide excellent evaluation of ligaments around the ankle, with the ability to show associated intraarticular abnormalities, joint effusion, and bone marrow edema. Ultrasonography (US) performed with high-resolution broadband linear-array probes has become increasingly important in the assessment of ligaments around the ankle because it is low cost, fast, readily available, and free of ionizing radiation. US can provide a detailed depiction of normal anatomic structures and is effective for evaluating ligament integrity. In addition, US allows the performance of dynamic maneuvers, which may contribute to increased visibility of normal ligaments and improved detection of tears. In this article, the authors describe the US techniques for evaluation of the ankle and midfoot ligaments and include a brief review of the literature related to their basic anatomic structures and US of these structures. Short video clips showing dynamic maneuvers and dynamic real-time US of ankle and midfoot structures and their principal pathologic patterns are included as supplemental material. Use of a standardized imaging technique may help reduce the intrinsic operator dependence of US. Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  17. In vitro measurement of intraarticular pressure in the ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Suckel, Andreas; Muller, Otto; Wachter, Nikolaus; Kluba, Torsten

    2010-05-01

    Ankle joint affections and injuries are common problems in sports traumatology and in the daily routine of arthroscopic surgeons. However, there is little knowledge regarding intraarticular loads. Pressures on the ankle were determined in a dynamic model on 8 cadaver specimens, applying forces to tendons of the foot over the stance phase under vertical loading. A characteristic course of loading in the tibiotalar joint with a rapid increase upon heel contact was observed. It increased gradually to reach a maximum after 70% of the stance phase, during the push-off phase. The major torque in the ankle joint is located anterolaterally. A dynamic loading curve of the ankle joint can be demonstrated. These observations explain phenomena such as the appearance of osteophytes on the anterior tibia in the case of ankle osteoarthritis and the relatively low incidence of posterior tibial edge fragments in the case of trimalleolar ankle fracture. Furthermore, the medial side of the talus is less loaded compared to the lateral side, which appears relevant to the treatment of osteochondrosis dissecans.

  18. Finite element stress analysis of some ankle joint prostheses.

    PubMed

    Falsig, J; Hvid, I; Jensen, N C

    1986-05-01

    A three-dimensional finite element stress analysis was employed to calculate stresses in a distal tibia modelled with three simple total ankle joint replacement tibial components. The bone was modelled as a composite structure consisting of cortical and trabecular bone in which the trabecular bone was either homogeneous with a constant modulus of elasticity or heterogenous with experimentally determined heterogeneity. The results were sensitive to variations in trabecular bone material property distributions, with lower stresses being calculated in the heterogeneous model. An anterolateral application of load, which proved the least favourable, was used in comparing the prosthetic variants. Normal and shear stresses at the trabecular bone-cement interface and supporting trabecular bone were slightly reduced by addition of metal backing to the polyethylene articular surface, and a further reduction to very low values was obtained by addition of a long intramedullary peg bypassing stresses to the cortical bone.

  19. [Revision arthroplasty of the ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Hintermann, B; Barg, A; Knupp, M

    2011-11-01

    In the last 20 years total ankle replacement has become a viable alternative to arthrodesis for end-stage osteoarthritis of the ankle. Numerous ankle prosthesis designs have appeared on the market in the past and attracted by the encouraging intermediate results reported in the literature, many surgeons have started to perform this procedure. With increased availability on the market the indications for total ankle replacement have also increased in recent years. In particular, total ankle replacement may now be considered even in younger patients. Therefore, despite progress in total ankle arthroplasty the number of failures may increase. Up to now, arthrodesis was considered to be the gold standard for salvage of failed ankle prostheses. Because of extensive bone loss on the talar side, in most instances tibiocalcaneal fusion is the only reliable solution. An alternative to such extended hindfoot fusions would be revision arthroplasty. To date, however, there are no reported results of revision arthroplasty for salvage of a failed ankle replacement.Based on our experience prosthetic components with a flat undersurface are most likely to be able to find solid support on remaining bone stock. The first 83 cases (79 patients, 46 males, 33 females, average age 58.9 years, range 30.6-80.7 years) with a average follow-up of 5.4 years (range 2-11 years) showed excellent to good results in 69 cases (83%), a satisfactory result in 12 cases (15%) and a fair result in 2 cases (2%) and 47 patients (56%) were pain free. Primary loosening was noted in three cases and of these two cases were successfully revised by another total ankle replacement and in one case with arthrodesis. Another case with hematogenous infection was also revised by arthrodesis. At the last follow-up control two components were considered to be loose and the overall loosening rate was thus 6%.This series has proven that revision arthroplasty can be a promising option for patients with failed total

  20. Supramalleolar osteotomies for degenerative joint disease of the ankle joint: indication, technique and results.

    PubMed

    Barg, Alexej; Pagenstert, Geert I; Horisberger, Monika; Paul, Jochen; Gloyer, Marcel; Henninger, Heath B; Valderrabano, Victor

    2013-09-01

    Patients with varus or valgus hindfoot deformities usually present with asymmetric ankle osteoarthritis. In-vitro biomechanical studies have shown that varus or valgus hindfoot deformity may lead to altered load distribution in the tibiotalar joint which may result in medial (varus) or lateral (valgus) tibiotalar joint degeneration in the short or medium term. The treatment of asymmetric ankle osteoarthritis remains challenging, because more than half of the tibiotalar joint surface is usually preserved. Therefore, joint-sacrificing procedures like total ankle replacement or ankle arthrodesis may not be the most appropriate treatment options. The shortand midterm results following realignment surgery, are very promising with substantial pain relief and functional improvement observed post-operatively. In this review article we describe the indications, surgical techniques, and results from of realignment surgery of the ankle joint in the current literature.

  1. Dynamic Postural-Stability Deficits After Cryotherapy to the Ankle Joint.

    PubMed

    Fullam, Karl; Caulfield, Brian; Coughlan, Garrett F; McGroarty, Mark; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2015-09-01

    Decreased postural stability is a primary risk factor for lower limb musculoskeletal injuries. During athletic competitions, cryotherapy may be applied during short breaks in play or during half-time; however, its effects on postural stability remain unclear. To investigate the acute effects of a 15-minute ankle-joint cryotherapy application on dynamic postural stability. Controlled laboratory study. University biomechanics laboratory. A total of 29 elite-level collegiate male field-sport athletes (age = 20.8 ± 1.12 years, height = 1.80 ± 0.06 m, mass = 81.89 ± 8.59 kg) participated. Participants were tested on the anterior (ANT), posterolateral (PL), and posteromedial (PM) reach directions of the Star Excursion Balance Test before and after a 15-minute ankle-joint cryotherapy application. Normalized reach distances; sagittal-plane kinematics of the hip, knee, and ankle joints; and associated mean velocity of the center-of-pressure path during performance of the ANT, PL, and PM reach directions of the Star Excursion Balance Test. We observed a decrease in reach-distance scores for the ANT, PL, and PM reach directions from precryotherapy to postcryotherapy (P < .05). No differences were observed in hip-, knee-, or ankle-joint sagittal-plane kinematics (P > .05). We noted a decrease in mean velocity of the center-of-pressure path from precryotherapy to postcryotherapy (P < .05) in all reach directions. Dynamic postural stability was adversely affected immediately after cryotherapy to the ankle joint.

  2. The association between physical characteristics of the ankle joint and the mobility performance in elderly people with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ng, Thomas Ka-Wai; Lo, Sing-Kai; Cheing, Gladys Lai-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies showed that older adults with diabetes have a worse mobility performance as compared with those without diabetes. Studies also demonstrated that older adults with diabetes have weakened ankle muscle strength, reduced joint range in ankle dorsiflexion and worsened ankle joint proprioception as compared with control population. The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between the physical characteristics of the ankle joint and the mobility performance in older adults with type 2 diabetes. Older adults with type 2 diabetes (n=85) were recruited, and Timed Up and Go test (TUG) for mobility assessment was performed. Active ankle joint repositioning test was used for assessing the ankle joint proprioception sense; peak torque of ankle dorsiflexors and plantar flexors were tested by using a Cybex Norm dynamometer, and weight-bearing lunge test (WBLT) was used for assessing the stiffness of ankle dorsiflexion. Our results showed that age, body mass index (BMI), normalized peak torque of plantar flexors and dorsiflexors, active ankle joint repositioning test errors and the WBLT distance were significantly correlated with the TUG (all p<0.001). These ankle characteristics, together with the demographic data of the subjects, contributed 59.9% of the variance in the TUG by multiple regression analysis. Body mass, ankle plantar flexors strength and ankle joint proprioception are important factors contributing to the physical mobility of the older adults with type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Design of a simple, lightweight, passive-elastic ankle exoskeleton supporting ankle joint stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seyoung; Son, Youngsu; Choi, Sangkyu; Ham, Sangyong; Park, Cheolhoon

    2015-09-01

    In this study, a passive-elastic ankle exoskeleton (PEAX) with a one-way clutch mechanism was developed and then pilot-tested with vertical jumping to determine whether the PEAX is sufficiently lightweight and comfortable to be used in further biomechanical studies. The PEAX was designed to supplement the function of the Achilles tendon and ligaments as they passively support the ankle torque with their inherent stiffness. The main frame of the PEAX consists of upper and lower parts connected to each other by tension springs (N = 3) and lubricated hinge joints. The upper part has an offset angle of 5° with respect to the vertical line when the springs are in their resting state. Each spring has a slack length of 8 cm and connects the upper part to the tailrod of the lower part in the neutral position. The tailrod freely rotates with low friction but has a limited range of motion due to the stop pin working as a one-way clutch. Because of the one-way clutch system, the tension springs store the elastic energy only due to an ankle dorsiflexion when triggered by the stop pin. This clutch mechanism also has the advantage of preventing any inconvenience during ankle plantarflexion because it does not limit the ankle joint motion during the plantarflexion phase. In pilot jumping tests, all of the subjects reported that the PEAX was comfortable for jumping due to its lightweight (approximately 1 kg) and compact (firmly integrated with shoes) design, and subjects were able to nearly reach their maximum vertical jump heights while wearing the PEAX. During the countermovement jump, elastic energy was stored during dorsiflexion by spring extension and released during plantarflexion by spring restoration, indicating that the passive spring torque (i.e., supportive torque) generated by the ankle exoskeleton partially supported the ankle joint torque throughout the process.

  4. Effects of the application of ankle functional rehabilitation exercise on the ankle joint functional movement screen and isokinetic muscular function in patients with chronic ankle sprain

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Sung-Bum; Park, Gi Duck

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to investigate the effects of ankle functional rehabilitation exercise on ankle joint functional movement screen results and isokinetic muscular function in patients with chronic ankle sprain patients. [Subjects and Methods] In this study, 16 patients with chronic ankle sprain were randomized to an ankle functional rehabilitation exercise group (n=8) and a control group (n=8). The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise centered on a proprioceptive sense exercise program, which was applied 12 times for 2 weeks. To verify changes after the application, ankle joint functional movement screen scores and isokinetic muscular function were measured and analyzed. [Results] The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise group showed significant improvements in all items of the ankle joint functional movement screen and in isokinetic muscular function after the exercise, whereas the control group showed no difference after the application. [Conclusion] The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise program can be effectively applied in patients with chronic ankle sprain for the improvement of ankle joint functional movement screen score and isokinetic muscular function. PMID:28265157

  5. Effects of the application of ankle functional rehabilitation exercise on the ankle joint functional movement screen and isokinetic muscular function in patients with chronic ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Ju, Sung-Bum; Park, Gi Duck

    2017-02-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to investigate the effects of ankle functional rehabilitation exercise on ankle joint functional movement screen results and isokinetic muscular function in patients with chronic ankle sprain patients. [Subjects and Methods] In this study, 16 patients with chronic ankle sprain were randomized to an ankle functional rehabilitation exercise group (n=8) and a control group (n=8). The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise centered on a proprioceptive sense exercise program, which was applied 12 times for 2 weeks. To verify changes after the application, ankle joint functional movement screen scores and isokinetic muscular function were measured and analyzed. [Results] The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise group showed significant improvements in all items of the ankle joint functional movement screen and in isokinetic muscular function after the exercise, whereas the control group showed no difference after the application. [Conclusion] The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise program can be effectively applied in patients with chronic ankle sprain for the improvement of ankle joint functional movement screen score and isokinetic muscular function.

  6. Reliability of metatarsophalangeal and ankle joint torque measurements by an innovative device.

    PubMed

    Man, Hok-Sum; Leung, Aaron Kam-Lun; Cheung, Jason Tak-Man; Sterzing, Thorsten

    2016-07-01

    The toe flexor muscles maintain body balance during standing and provide push-off force during walking, running, and jumping. Additionally, they are important contributing structures to maintain normal foot function. Thus, weakness of these muscles may cause poor balance, inefficient locomotion and foot deformities. The quantification of metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) stiffness is valuable as it is considered as a confounding factor in toe flexor muscles function. MPJ and ankle joint stiffness measurement is still largely depended on manual skills as current devices do not have good control on alignment, angular joint speed and displacement during measurement. Therefore, this study introduces an innovative dynamometer and protocol procedures for MPJ and ankle Joint torque measurement with precise and reliable foot alignment, angular joint speed and displacement control. Within-day and between-day test-retest experiments on MPJ and ankle joint torque measurement were conducted on ten and nine healthy male subjects respectively. The mean peak torques of MPJ and ankle joint of between-day and within-day measurement were 1.50±0.38Nm/deg and 1.19±0.34Nm/deg. The corresponding torques of the ankle joint were 8.24±2.20Nm/deg and 7.90±3.18Nm/deg respectively. Intraclass-correlation coefficients (ICC) of averaged peak torque of both joints of between-day and within-day test-retest experiments were ranging from 0.91 to 0.96, indicating the innovative device is systematic and reliable for the measurements and can be used for multiple scientific and clinical purposes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Arthroscopy for anterolateral soft tissue impingement of the ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Koczy, Bogdan; Pyda, Michał; Stołtny, Tomasz; Mielnik, Michał; Pajak, Jan; Hermanson, Jacek; Pasek, Jarosław; Widuchowski, Jerzy

    2009-01-01

    Anterolateral soft tissue impingement of the ankle joint is a common consequence of ankle sprain due to excessive supination and adduction of the foot, injuries to the tibiofibular syndesmosis and lateral malleolus fractures. Twenty-two arthroscopic procedures to treat anterolateral soft tissue impingement of the ankle joint were performed at the Independent Public Regional Hospital of Trauma Surgery in Piekary Slaskie between 2006 and 2007. The study group included male patients at the mean age of 34 (17 to 55) years. Medical histories revealed ankle sprain in 13 patients, lateral malleolus fracture in 7, and isolated tibiofibular syndesmotic disruption in 2. The mean time from the injury to the arthroscopic treatment was 5 years (range 2 to 8 years). All patients that underwent arthroscopy were evaluated according to the AOFAS score at baseline (before surgery), and at 3 and 12 months after the treatment. The procedure consisted in the removal of hypertrophic, inflamed and scarred soft tissue from the lateral recess. The mean preoperative AOFAS score was 75.4 points. Post-operatively, the AOFAS functional scores increased to 90.6 and 92 points in the third and twelfth month after the procedure respectively. One patient showed temporary neurapraxia of the dorsal intermediate nerve and the ramus cutaneus branch of the superficial peroneal nerve. These results show that arthroscopic treatment of anterolateral soft tissue impingement of the ankle joint produces satisfactory early outcomes.

  8. Engineering considerations in the design of an ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Kempson, G E; Freeman, M A; Tuke, M A

    1975-05-01

    A prothesis has been designed to replace the articulating surfaces of the human ankle joint. The prothesis is in two parts, each forming a segment of a right circular cylinder with a single axis of rotation. The concave tibial component is manufactured from ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene and the talar component is manufactured from medical grade stainless steel. It is likely, however, that the talar component will be commercially manufactured from cobalt chrome alloy (Vitallium or Vinertia). The two components are secured to the cancellous bone by polymethylmethacrylate bone cement and laboratory tests have indicated that the bond should be strong enough to withstand the loads encountered at the ankle joint in vivo. The tests have also shown that the stability and strength of the ankle are not seriously reduced by implantation of the prosthesis. Laboratory wear tests and clinical experience over the last two years encourage optimism over the long term performance of the prothesis.

  9. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. 888.3110 Section 888.3110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3120 - Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented... metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer non... December 26, 1996 for any ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis that was in...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3120 - Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented... metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer non... December 26, 1996 for any ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis that was...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  15. 21 CFR 888.3120 - Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented... metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer non... December 26, 1996 for any ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis that was in...

  16. 21 CFR 888.3120 - Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented... metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer non... December 26, 1996 for any ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis that was in...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3120 - Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented... metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer non... December 26, 1996 for any ankle joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis that was in...

  18. [Treatment of lateral ankle joint instability. Open or arthroscopic?].

    PubMed

    Galla, M

    2016-02-01

    Chronic ankle joint instability often necessitates operative treatment. Operative treatment methods are classified into non-anatomical tenodesis, anatomical reconstruction and direct repair. In addition to open approaches, arthroscopic techniques are increasingly becoming established. This article describes the various operative treatment procedures, their advantages and disadvantages and in particular the arthroscopic feasibility.

  19. [The reorientational rearthrodesis of the upper ankle joint following failed arthrodesis].

    PubMed

    Zwipp, H; Grass, R; Rammelt, S

    2005-12-01

    There are three important principles for the correction of nonunion and/or malunion of the ankle joint: (1) reorientation back to anatomic shape and to the normal biomechanical axis of the ankle and foot; (2) respect for the biology of bone by resecting all sclerotic bone and/or transplantation of autogenous bone graft; and (3) achievement of optimal biomechanical stability by using the four-screw technique, a limited-contact dynamic-compression plate or a blade plate. CT scanning is the most reliable method for detecting nonunion of the ankle joint after arthrodesis. According to Saltzman, in order to understand the pathology of malunions and nonunions and to plan their correction, weight-bearing anteroposterior radiographs with a 20 degrees internal rotation of the feet, precise lateral views, and rear views of both sides are highly recommended.

  20. Effect of ankle proprioceptive exercise on static and dynamic balance in normal adults

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Min-Sik; Lee, Yun-Seob

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study was conducted to investigate whether ankle proprioceptive exercise affects static and dynamic balance in normal adults. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-eight normal adults were recruited to measure their static and dynamic balancing before and after the proprioceptive exercise. A subject stood with bare feet on the round supporting platform of the device for measuring balance, and the investigator entered the age and the height of the subjects and set his/her feet on the central point of the monitor screen. Training of ankle proprioceptive sense for the movements of plantar-flexion and dorsiflexion was performed. In the training of joint position sense in plantar-flexion and dorsiflexion, the plantar-flexion and the dorsiflexion were set as 15°, respectively. [Results] The static balancing did not show significant differences in average, while the dynamic balancing showed significant differences. [Conclusion] Ankle proprioceptive exercise can affect dynamic balance. PMID:28265149

  1. [Lateral ligament injuries of the ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Walther, M; Kriegelstein, S; Altenberger, S; Volkering, C; Röser, A; Wölfel, R

    2013-09-01

    Lateral ligament injuries are the most common sports injury and have a high incidence even in non-sportive activities. Although lateral ligament injuries are very common there is still a controversial debate on the best management. The diagnosis is based on clinical examination and X-ray images help to rule out fractures. Further imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used to diagnose associated injuries. According to the recommendations of the various scientific societies the primary therapy of lateral ligament injuries is conservative. Chronic ankle instability develops in 10-20 % of patients and the instability can be a result of sensomotoric deficits or insufficient healing of the lateral ligament complex. If the patient does not respond to an intensive rehabilitation program an operative reconstruction of the lateral ligaments has to be considered. Most of the procedures currently performed are anatomical reconstructions due to better long-term results compared to tenodesis procedures.

  2. [Arthrodesis versus total joint replacement of the ankle].

    PubMed

    Mittlmeier, T

    2013-06-01

    In general, for the treatment of end-stage osteoarthritis of the ankle joint arthrodesis is considered to be the gold standard based on its versatility and eligibility for numerous indications. Nowadays, total ankle arthroplasty represents a viable alternative to ankle arthrodesis taking into account distinct premises as both procedures provide a calculable reduction of the preoperative pain level and a comparable functional gain. Furthermore, current 10-year-survival rates of total ankle replacement are reported to range between 76 % and 89 %. Revision rates of up to 10 % for both techniques have been reported with manifest differences within the respective spectrum of complications. Due to the fact that more than two thirds of patients suffer from post-traumatic osteoarthritis with a relatively low average of age concomitant malalignment, soft tissue damage or instability may frequently occur. A restoration of anatomic axes and an adequate centering of the talus under the tibia appear to be crucial for the outcome as well as an adequate soft tissue balancing, in particular in total ankle replacement. Thus, the selection of the correct indication and the right choice of treatment on the basis of complete preoperative diagnostics considering necessary additive surgical measures are of paramount importance for the final outcome.

  3. Long-term neuromuscular training and ankle joint position sense.

    PubMed

    Kynsburg, A; Pánics, G; Halasi, T

    2010-06-01

    Preventive effect of proprioceptive training is proven by decreasing injury incidence, but its proprioceptive mechanism is not. Major hypothesis: the training has a positive long-term effect on ankle joint position sense in athletes of a high-risk sport (handball). Ten elite-level female handball-players represented the intervention group (training-group), 10 healthy athletes of other sports formed the control-group. Proprioceptive training was incorporated into the regular training regimen of the training-group. Ankle joint position sense function was measured with the "slope-box" test, first described by Robbins et al. Testing was performed one day before the intervention and 20 months later. Mean absolute estimate errors were processed for statistical analysis. Proprioceptive sensory function improved regarding all four directions with a high significance (p<0.0001; avg. mean estimate error improvement: 1.77 degrees). This was also highly significant (p< or =0.0002) in each single directions, with avg. mean estimate error improvement between 1.59 degrees (posterior) and 2.03 degrees (anterior). Mean absolute estimate errors at follow-up (2.24 degrees +/-0.88 degrees) were significantly lower than in uninjured controls (3.29 degrees +/-1.15 degrees) (p<0.0001). Long-term neuromuscular training has improved ankle joint position sense function in the investigated athletes. This joint position sense improvement can be one of the explanations for injury rate reduction effect of neuromuscular training.

  4. Medial joint space widening of the ankle in displaced Tillaux and Triplane fractures in children.

    PubMed

    Gourineni, Prasad; Gupta, Asheesh

    2011-10-01

    Tillaux and Triplane fractures occur in children predominantly from external rotation mechanism. We hypothesized that in displaced fractures, the talus would shift laterally along with the distal fibula and the distal tibial epiphyseal fragment increasing the medial joint space. Consecutive cases evaluated retrospectively. Level I and Level II centers. Twenty-two skeletally immature patients with 14 displaced Triplane fractures and eight displaced Tillaux fractures were evaluated for medial joint space widening. Measurement of fracture displacement and medial joint space widening before and after intervention. Thirteen Triplane and six Tillaux fractures (86%) showed medial space widening of 1 to 9 mm and equal to the amount of fracture displacement. Reduction of the fracture reduced the medial space to normal. There were no known complications. Medial space widening of the ankle may be a sign of ankle fracture displacement. Anatomic reduction of the fracture reduces the medial space and may improve the results in Tillaux and Triplane fractures.

  5. Modified Broström Procedure for Chronic Ankle Instability With Generalized Joint Hypermobility.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bingzhe; Kim, Yong Tae; Kim, Jung Uk; Shin, Jung Hoon; Park, Yong Wook; Kim, Hyong Nyun

    2016-04-01

    Chronic ankle instability with generalized joint hypermobility (GJH) is considered a contraindication for the modified Broström procedure. The most widely accepted definition of GJH is a Beighton score of ≥4 on a 9-point scale. However, it is not clear whether this criterion can be applied to determine the GJH that would lead to a poor outcome after a modified Broström procedure. Some of the previous studies that report unfavorable outcomes do not specify the tests or cutoff scores used to determine the GJH, and, in fact, some of the patients with GJH in these studies had good outcomes. The modified Broström procedure results in satisfactory outcomes in patients who have chronic ankle instability with GJH if the contralateral uninjured ankle shows a normal varus talar tilt and anterior talar translation during stress tests. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Modified Broström procedure was performed in 32 patients with chronic ankle instability with GJH if the contralateral uninjured ankle showed a normal varus talar tilt and anterior talar translation on stress tests. The mean patient age at surgery was 21.7 years, and the mean follow-up duration was 27.4 months. The Karlsson-Peterson ankle score significantly improved from a mean ± SD of 63.6 ± 7.1 preoperatively to 90.4 ± 6.7 at the final postoperative follow-up (P < .001). Sixteen patients were very satisfied with the results, 10 patients were satisfied, 3 patients rated their satisfaction as fair, and 1 patient was dissatisfied with the results. Nine patients sustained ankle sprains after the surgery, 6 of which were mild sprains. Although 3 of these 9 patients had a mechanically unstable ankle on stress radiographs, they were satisfied with the postoperative results. None of the patients required a reoperation. GJH was not a contraindication for the modified Broström procedure if the contralateral uninjured ankle showed a normal varus talar tilt and a normal anterior talar translation on stress

  6. Biomechanics of the natural, arthritic, and replaced human ankle joint

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The human ankle joint complex plays a fundamental role in gait and other activities of daily living. At the same time, it is a very complicated anatomical system but the large literature of experimental and modelling studies has not fully described the coupled joint motion, position and orientation of the joint axis of rotation, stress and strain in the ligaments and their role in guiding and stabilizing joint motion, conformity and congruence of the articular surfaces, patterns of contact at the articular surfaces, patterns of rolling and sliding at the joint surfaces, and muscle lever arm lengths. The present review article addresses these issues as described in the literature, reporting the most recent relevant findings. PMID:24499639

  7. Dynamic Postural-Stability Deficits After Cryotherapy to the Ankle Joint

    PubMed Central

    Fullam, Karl; Caulfield, Brian; Coughlan, Garrett F.; McGroarty, Mark; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2015-01-01

    Context  Decreased postural stability is a primary risk factor for lower limb musculoskeletal injuries. During athletic competitions, cryotherapy may be applied during short breaks in play or during half-time; however, its effects on postural stability remain unclear. Objective  To investigate the acute effects of a 15-minute ankle-joint cryotherapy application on dynamic postural stability. Design  Controlled laboratory study. Setting  University biomechanics laboratory. Patients or Other Participants  A total of 29 elite-level collegiate male field-sport athletes (age = 20.8 ± 1.12 years, height = 1.80 ± 0.06 m, mass = 81.89 ± 8.59 kg) participated. Intervention(s)  Participants were tested on the anterior (ANT), posterolateral (PL), and posteromedial (PM) reach directions of the Star Excursion Balance Test before and after a 15-minute ankle-joint cryotherapy application. Main Outcome Measure(s)  Normalized reach distances; sagittal-plane kinematics of the hip, knee, and ankle joints; and associated mean velocity of the center-of-pressure path during performance of the ANT, PL, and PM reach directions of the Star Excursion Balance Test. Results  We observed a decrease in reach-distance scores for the ANT, PL, and PM reach directions from precryotherapy to postcryotherapy (P < .05). No differences were observed in hip-, knee-, or ankle-joint sagittal-plane kinematics (P > .05). We noted a decrease in mean velocity of the center-of-pressure path from precryotherapy to postcryotherapy (P < .05) in all reach directions. Conclusions  Dynamic postural stability was adversely affected immediately after cryotherapy to the ankle joint. PMID:26285088

  8. A novel ultrasound technique for detection of osteochondral defects in the ankle joint: a parametric and feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Sarkalkan, Nazli; Loeve, Arjo J; van Dongen, Koen W A; Tuijthof, Gabrielle J M; Zadpoor, Amir A

    2014-12-24

    (Osteo)chondral defects (OCDs) in the ankle are currently diagnosed with modalities that are not convenient to use in long-term follow-ups. Ultrasound (US) imaging, which is a cost-effective and non-invasive alternative, has limited ability to discriminate OCDs. We aim to develop a new diagnostic technique based on US wave propagation through the ankle joint. The presence of OCDs is identified when a US signal deviates from a reference signal associated with the healthy joint. The feasibility of the proposed technique is studied using experimentally-validated 2D finite-difference time-domain models of the ankle joint. The normalized maximum cross correlation of experiments and simulation was 0.97. Effects of variables relevant to the ankle joint, US transducers and OCDs were evaluated. Variations in joint space width and transducer orientation made noticeable alterations to the reference signal: normalized root mean square error ranged from 6.29% to 65.25% and from 19.59% to 8064.2%, respectively. The results suggest that the new technique could be used for detection of OCDs, if the effects of other parameters (i.e., parameters related to the ankle joint and US transducers) can be reduced.

  9. Normal Foot and Ankle Radiographic Angles, Measurements, and Reference Points.

    PubMed

    Lamm, Bradley M; Stasko, Paul A; Gesheff, Martin G; Bhave, Anil

    2016-01-01

    The limb deformity-based principles originate from a standard set of lower extremity radiographic angles and reference points. Objective radiographic measures are the building blocks for surgical planning. Critical preoperative planning and intraoperative and postoperative evaluation of radiographs are essential for proper deformity planning and correction of all foot and ankle cases. A total of 33 angles and reference points were measured on 24 healthy feet. The radiographic measurements were performed on standard weightbearing anteroposterior, lateral, and axial views of the right foot. A total of 4 measurements were made from the axial view, 12 from the lateral view, and 17 from the anteroposterior view. All angles were measured by both senior authors twice, independent of each other. The radiographic angles and measurements presented in the present study demonstrate a comprehensive and useful set of standard angles, measures, and reference points that can be used in clinical and perioperative evaluation of the foot and ankle. The standard radiographic measures presented in the present study provide the foundation for understanding the osseous foot and ankle position in a normal population. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The axis of rotation of the ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, A; Svensson, O K; Németh, G; Selvik, G

    1989-01-01

    The axis of the talo-crural joint was analysed by roentgen stereophotogrammetry in eight healthy volunteers. Examinations were performed at 10 degrees increments of flexion and pronation/supination of the foot as well as medial and lateral rotation of the leg. Results indicate that the talo-crural joint axis changes continuously throughout the range of movement. In dorsiflexion it tended to be oblique downward and laterally. In rotation of the leg, the axis took varying inclinations between horizontal and vertical. All axes in each subject lay close to the midpoint of a line between the tips of the malleoli. Our study indicates that the talo-crural joint axis may alter considerably during the arc of motion and differ significantly between individuals. This prompts caution in the use of hinge axes in orthoses and prostheses for the ankle.

  11. [Arthroscopy-guided fracture management. Ankle joint and calcaneus].

    PubMed

    Schoepp, C; Rixen, D

    2013-04-01

    Arthroscopic fracture management of the ankle and calcaneus requires a differentiated approach. The aim is to minimize surgical soft tissue damage and to visualize anatomical fracture reduction arthroscopically. Moreover, additional cartilage damage can be detected and treated. The arthroscopic approach is limited by deep impressions of the joint surface needing cancellous bone grafting, by multiple fracture lines on the articular side and by high-grade soft tissue damage. An alternative to the minimally invasive arthroscopic approach is open arthroscopic reduction in conventional osteosynthesis. This facilitates correct assessment of surgical reduction of complex calcaneal fractures, otherwise remaining non-anatomical reduction might not be fluoroscopically detected during surgery.

  12. Normal Variation of Talar Tilt of the Ankle in Children

    PubMed Central

    St-Jacques, Robert; Laurin, Carroll A.

    1965-01-01

    Sixty normal children were examined clinically and radiologically, using a special apparatus with a goniometer and a tensometer to standardize stress tests when applying valgus and varus forces to the ankle. It was noted that the clinical movement of inversion is not entirely due to a subtalar movement; indeed a talar tilt appears to be physiological. The range of normal in these patients, age range 6 to 15 years, was 0 to 27° with an average talar tilt of 7°. The talar tilt is not necessarily the same in both ankles of any one individual and it is never noted in eversion. The talar tilt is more marked in younger children in the position of equinus. When interpreting radiographs of recently injured ankles, it is wise to recall that a talar tilt need not be the result of trauma and that it may be physiological and yet unequal on both sides. ImagesFig. 1Figs. 2a and bFig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 7 PMID:5828942

  13. Can Chronic Ankle Instability be Prevented? Rethinking Management of Lateral Ankle Sprains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denegar, Craig R.; Miller, Sayers J., III

    2002-01-01

    Investigates whether chronic ankle instability can be prevented, discussing: the relationship between mechanical and functional instability; normal ankle mechanics, sequelae to lateral ankle sprains, and abnormal ankle mechanics; and tissue healing, joint dysfunction, and acute lateral ankle sprain management. The paper describes a treatment model…

  14. Can Chronic Ankle Instability be Prevented? Rethinking Management of Lateral Ankle Sprains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denegar, Craig R.; Miller, Sayers J., III

    2002-01-01

    Investigates whether chronic ankle instability can be prevented, discussing: the relationship between mechanical and functional instability; normal ankle mechanics, sequelae to lateral ankle sprains, and abnormal ankle mechanics; and tissue healing, joint dysfunction, and acute lateral ankle sprain management. The paper describes a treatment model…

  15. The joints of the evolving foot. Part I. The ankle joint.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, O J

    1980-01-01

    Evidence is presented to suggest that the eutherian ankle joint has been derived from a meniscus-containing joint such as that found in extant arboreal marsupials. Probable morphological derivatives of this meniscus are identifiable in the Eutheria. The form and function of the joint are described in sub-human Primates and the adaptations which characterize the joint in bipedal man are noted. These morphological findings permit some speculation about the palaeocology of the earliest mammals with particular reference to the emergence of the order Primates. PMID:7410197

  16. Use of circular external fixation for combined subtalar joint fusion and ankle distraction.

    PubMed

    Zgonis, Thomas; Stapleton, John J; Roukis, Thomas S

    2008-10-01

    The authors discuss a novel technique not previously published that incorporates a subtalar joint arthrodesis with an ankle joint arthrodiastasis as an alternative to a tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis. Young and active patients who experience refractory pain and stiffness to the rearfoot and ankle secondary to combined severe subtalar and ankle arthrosis are suitable candidates for this surgical procedure. This new approach is based on sound principles in the treatment of severe arthrosis affecting the ankle and subtalar joint. The authors are currently prospectively reviewing their surgical experience with this procedure and believe that it provides an alternative option for the patient, with potentially promising long-term results.

  17. Reconstruction of the form and function of lateral malleolus and ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Kiyokawa, Kensuke; Tanaka, Shinsuke; Kiduka, Yuichiro; Inoue, Yojiro; Yamauchi, Toshihiko; Tai, Yoshiaki

    2005-08-01

    Soft-tissue reconstruction alone cannot obtain normal ankle function in patients with large defects in the area of the lateral malleolus. The authors report a functional reconstructive method for the lateral malleolus, utilized in a male patient whose osteosarcoma in the fibula was resected with surrounding soft tissue. In order to reconstruct the lateral malleolus, the remaining half of the fibula at the knee was removed, and the fibular head was fixed with the tibia at the ankle joint. Ligaments were reconstructed with tendon grafts. Skin and soft-tissue defects were reconstructed with a combined composite flap comprised of a latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap and a serratus anterior muscle flap. Dead space around the bone graft was filled with the serratus anterior muscle flap that was divided into two portions. The surface was covered with the latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap. The patient regained almost normal function of the ankle joint. This technique would be a useful functional reconstructive method for patients with large defects in the area of the lateral malleolus.

  18. The effect of external ankle support on knee and ankle joint movement and loading in netball players.

    PubMed

    Vanwanseele, Benedicte; Stuelcken, Max; Greene, Andrew; Smith, Richard

    2014-09-01

    External ankle support has been successfully used to prevent ankle sprains. However, some recent studies have indicated that reducing ankle range of motion can place larger loads on the knee. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of external ankle support (braces and high-top shoes) on the ankle and knee joint loading during a netball specific landing task. A repeated measure design. High performance netball players with no previously diagnosed severe ankle or knee injury (n=11) were recruited from NSW Institute of Sport netball programme. The kinematic and kinetic data were collected simultaneously using a 3-D Motion Analysis System and one Kistler force plate to measure ground reaction forces. Players performed a single leg landing whilst receiving a pass while wearing a standard netball shoe, the same shoe with a lace-up brace and a high-top shoe. Only the brace condition significantly reduced the ankle range of motion in the frontal plane (in/eversion) by 3.95 ± 3.74 degrees compared to the standard condition. No changes were found for the knee joint loading in the brace condition. The high-top shoes acted to increase the peak knee internal rotation moment by 15%. Both the brace and high-top conditions brought about increases in the peak ankle plantar flexion moment during the landing phase. Lace-up braces can be used by netball players to restrict ankle range of motion during a single leg landing while receiving a pass without increasing the load on the knee joint. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Four Weeks of Balance Training does not Affect Ankle Joint Stiffness in Subjects with Unilateral Chronic Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Tarang Kumar; Wauneka, Clayton N.; Liu, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Background Balance training has been shown to be effective in preventing ankle sprain recurrences in subjects with chronic ankle instability (CAI) but the biomechanical pathways underlying the clinical outcomes are still unknown. This study was conducted to determine if a 4-week balance training intervention can alter the mechanical characteristics in ankles with CAI. Methods Twenty-two recreationally active subjects with unilateral CAI were randomized to either a control (n = 11, 35.1 ± 9.3 years) or intervention (n = 11, 33.5 ± 6.6 years) group. Subjects in the intervention group were trained on the affected limb with static and dynamic components using a Biodex balance stability system for 4-weeks. The ankle joint stiffness and neutral zone in inversion and eversion directions on the involved and uninvolved limbs was measured at baseline and post-intervention using a dynamometer. Results At baseline, the mean values of the inversion stiffness (0.69 ± 0.37 Nm/degree) in the involved ankle was significantly lower (p < 0.011, 95% CI [0.563, 0.544]) than that of uninvolved contralateral ankle (0.99 ± 0.41 Nm/degree). With the available sample size, the eversion stiffness, inversion neutral zone, and eversion neutral zone were not found to be significantly different between the involved and uninvolved contralateral ankles. The 4-week balance training intervention failed to show any significant effect on the passive ankle stiffness and neutral zones in inversion and eversion. Conclusion Decreased inversion stiffness in the involved chronic unstable ankle was found that of uninvolved contralateral ankle. The 4-week balance training program intervention was ineffective in altering the mechanical characteristics of ankles with CAI. Level of evidence Randomized controlled clinical trial; Level of evidence, 1. PMID:27642647

  20. In vivo kinematics of the talocrural and subtalar joints during weightbearing ankle rotation in chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takumi; Saka, Masayuki; Suzuki, Eiichi; Yamazaki, Naohito; Suzukawa, Makoto; Akaike, Atsushi; Shimizu, Kuniaki; Gamada, Kazuyoshi

    2014-02-01

    Chronic ankle instability (CAI) results in abnormal ankle kinematics, but there exists limited quantitative data characterizing these alterations. This study was undertaken to investigate kinematic alterations of the talocrural and subtalar joints in CAI. A total of 14 male patients with unilateral CAI (mean age = 21.1 ± 2.5 years) were enrolled. Computed tomography and fluoroscopic imaging of both lower extremities during weightbearing passive ankle joint complex (AJC) rotation were obtained. Three-dimensional bone models created from the computed tomography images were matched with the fluoroscopic images to compute the 6 degrees-of-freedom talocrural, subtalar, and AJC kinematics. In 20° plantarflexion, ankles with CAI demonstrated significantly increased anterior translation of the talocrural joint during AJC internal rotation from 5° to 7° and significantly decreased talocrural internal rotation within an AJC arc of motion from -1° to 5°. CAI joints demonstrated significantly increased internal rotation of the subtalar joint within an AJC arc of motion from -1° to 3°. In CAI, altered subtalar internal rotation occurs with increased talocrural anterior translation and reduced talocrural internal rotation during weightbearing ankle internal rotation in plantarflexion. These results suggest that altered subtalar mechanics may contribute to CAI symptoms.

  1. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... cemented prosthesis. 888.3100 Section 888.3100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... cemented prosthesis. 888.3100 Section 888.3100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... cemented prosthesis. 888.3100 Section 888.3100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  4. Comparative study on isokinetic capacity of knee and ankle joints by functional injury

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Kyoungkyu; Seo, Byoung-Do; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To collect basic data for exercise programs designed to enhance functional knee and ankle joint stability based on isokinetic measurement and muscle strength evaluations in normal and impaired functional states. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four subjects were randomly assigned to the athlete group and the control group (n = 12 each). Data were collected of isokinetic knee extensor and flexor strength at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec and ankle plantar and dorsiflexor strength at 30°/sec and 120°/sec. [Results] Significant intergroup differences were observed in peak torque of the right extensors at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec and the right flexors at 240°/sec. Significant differences were observed in peak torque/body weight in the right extensors at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec and in the right flexors at 180°/sec and 240°/sec. Significant peak torque differences were noted in the left ankle joint dorsiflexor at 30°/sec and 120°/sec, right plantar flexor at 120°/sec, left plantar flexor at 30°/sec, left dorsiflexor at 30°/sec and 120°/sec, and right dorsiflexor at 120°/sec. [Conclusion] Isokinetic evaluation stimulates muscle contraction at motion-dependent speeds and may contribute to the development of intervention programs to improve knee and ankle joint function and correct lower-extremity instability. PMID:26957768

  5. Comparative study on isokinetic capacity of knee and ankle joints by functional injury.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Kyoungkyu; Seo, Byoung-Do; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To collect basic data for exercise programs designed to enhance functional knee and ankle joint stability based on isokinetic measurement and muscle strength evaluations in normal and impaired functional states. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four subjects were randomly assigned to the athlete group and the control group (n = 12 each). Data were collected of isokinetic knee extensor and flexor strength at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec and ankle plantar and dorsiflexor strength at 30°/sec and 120°/sec. [Results] Significant intergroup differences were observed in peak torque of the right extensors at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec and the right flexors at 240°/sec. Significant differences were observed in peak torque/body weight in the right extensors at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec and in the right flexors at 180°/sec and 240°/sec. Significant peak torque differences were noted in the left ankle joint dorsiflexor at 30°/sec and 120°/sec, right plantar flexor at 120°/sec, left plantar flexor at 30°/sec, left dorsiflexor at 30°/sec and 120°/sec, and right dorsiflexor at 120°/sec. [Conclusion] Isokinetic evaluation stimulates muscle contraction at motion-dependent speeds and may contribute to the development of intervention programs to improve knee and ankle joint function and correct lower-extremity instability.

  6. Effects of Kinesio taping on joint position sense of the ankle

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyun-Do; Kim, Min-Young; Choi, Jung-Eun; Lim, Ga-Hee; Jung, Seong-In; Park, So-Hyun; Cheon, Song-Hee; Lee, Hae-Yong

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of Kinesio taping on the joint position sense of the ankle. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 26 nomal adults who had experienced ankle sprain. Kinesio taping was applied over the ankle medial ligament and ankle lateral ligament with eight pattern reinforcement taping. Joint position sense was measured using isokinetic equipment (Biodex System 4 pro dynamometer, Biodex Medical systems Inc., USA) during dorsiflexion/plantarflexion and inversion/eversion, before and after taping. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 21.0 for Windows. [Results] Joint position sense after Kinesio taping was improved in the dorsiflexion and inversion positions. [Conclusion] According to the results of this study, Kinesio taping of the ankle is effective for the prevention of ankle sprain. PMID:27190446

  7. Effects of fatigue due to contraction of evertor muscles on the ankle joint position sense in male soccer players.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Farshid; Roozdar, Arash

    2010-04-01

    The high incidence of ankle sprains that occur later in matches suggests that fatigue may contribute to altered neuromuscular control of the ankle. Moreover, deficits in ankle joint position sense (JPS) were seen in patients with a history of recurrent ankle sprains. It has been hypothesized that ankle sprains may be related to altered ankle JPS as a consequence of fatigue. To evaluate if fatiguing contractions of evertor muscles alter the ankle JPS. Controlled laboratory study. Thirty-six soccer players (age, 24.7 +/- 1.3 years; height, 183.7 +/- 8.2 cm; weight, 78.9 +/- 7.9 kg) were recruited. Subjects were asked to recognize 2 positions (15 degrees of inversion and maximal active inversion minus 5 degrees ) for 2 conditions: normal and fatigue. Muscular fatigue was induced in evertor muscles of the dominant leg by using isometric contractions. The average of the absolute and variable errors of 3 trials were recorded for both fatigue and nonfatigue conditions. A matched control group of 36 soccer players (age, 23.9 +/- 0.9 years; height, 181.2 +/- 6.9 cm; weight, 77.8 +/- 6.5 kg) was asked to recognize the same positions, before a soccer match and after 45 minutes of playing, and their same scores were recorded. Finally, results of the 2 groups were compared. There was significant decrease in subjects' ability to recognize passive and active repositioning of their ankle after a fatigue protocol (P <.001). Passive and active JPS were reduced after playing (P <.001). There was no significant difference between 2 groups in the results of JPS before and after the intervention (P > .1). The acuity of the ankle JPS is reduced subsequent to a fatigue protocol and after a soccer match. Evaluation of athletes' ankle JPS before returning to physical activity may prevent further injuries.

  8. Ratio of Range of Motion of the Ankle and Surrounding Joints After Total Ankle Replacement: A Radiographic Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Dekker, Travis J; Hamid, Kamran S; Easley, Mark E; DeOrio, James K; Nunley, James A; Adams, Samuel B

    2017-04-05

    This study attempted to identify where motion occurs after total ankle replacement, the difference in range-of-motion contributions between fixed-bearing and mobile-bearing total ankle replacements, and the contribution of abnormal peritalar motion. We hypothesized that sagittal plane radiographic assessment would demonstrate that actual ankle motion through the prosthesis is less than the total arc of ankle motion that may be observed clinically secondary to contributions from adjacent joints. Patients underwent routine standardized weight-bearing maximum dorsiflexion and plantar flexion sagittal radiographs. Sagittal plane ankle and foot measurements were performed on each dorsiflexion and plantar flexion radiograph to determine the total arc of ankle motion, actual ankle motion through the prosthesis, motion through the subtalar and talonavicular joints, and midfoot motion. Motion radiographs were routinely made at 1 year postoperatively and at the time of the most recent follow-up. A minimum follow-up of 2 years was required of all patients. There were 197 patients who met the inclusion criteria (75 INBONE, 52 Salto Talaris, and 70 STAR prostheses). The mean time to the latest radiographs (and standard deviation) was 42.9 ± 18.8 months. The mean actual ankle motion through the prosthesis was 25.9° ± 12.2°, which was significantly less (p < 0.001) than the mean total motion arc of 37.6° ± 12.0°. The motion of the ankle accounted for 68% of total range of motion, and motion of the peritalar joints accounted for 32%. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) among the 3 prostheses or when comparing fixed and mobile-bearing designs for both ranges of motion. This study demonstrates that actual ankle motion after total ankle replacement is approximately 12° less than the total arc of motion that might be observed clinically because of increased midfoot and subtalar motion. Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of

  9. Differences in type II collagen turnover of osteoarthritic human knee and ankle joints.

    PubMed

    Aurich, Matthias; Hofmann, Gunther O; Rolauffs, Bernd

    2017-05-01

    We analysed hyaline cartilage of human knee and ankle joints for collagen and proteoglycan turnover in order to find differences in the metabolism and biochemical content of the extracellular matrix that could explain the higher prevalence of osteoarthritis (OA) in the knee joint, compared to the ankle joint. Cartilage tissue from ankle and knee joints of OA patients were assessed for total collagen and proteoglycan content. For turnover, the aggrecan 846-epitope (CS 846), the type II collagen C-propeptide (CP2) and the collagenase-generated intrahelical cleavage neoepitope (C2C) were quantified. Molecular analyses showed that type II collagen turnover (CP2 and C2C) was significantly elevated in the ankle, whereas aggrecan turnover (CS 846), total proteoglycan and total collagen were comparable between both joints. Analysis of the inter-relationships in the components of cartilage matrix turnover showed a significant positive correlation of C2C vs CP2. The data suggest an increased type II collagen turnover in ankle vs knee OA cartilage but a comparable aggrecan turnover and comparable contents of type II collagen and proteoglycan. These findings point towards a focused attempt in advanced OA cartilage to structurally repair the collagen network that was more pronounced in the ankle joint and may explain in part the higher prevalence of OA in the knee as compared to the ankle joint.

  10. Soluble Flt-1 improves the repair of ankle joint injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jing; Xie, Bing; Xiang, Liangbi; Zhao, Yong; Zhou, Dapeng

    2016-01-01

    The ankle injuries create great pain to a great number of patients worldwide. Past studies have focused on the development of practical treatments to relieve pain and improve recovery, but the molecular mechanisms underlying the ankle injuries, especially the local inflammation in the damaged ankle joint, have been rarely studied. Moreover, although reduction of production and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines may reduce the pain and promote the recovery, a practical approach is currently lacking. Here, we detected significantly higher levels of placental growth factor (PLGF) and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the joint fluid from the patients of acute ankle joint injury (AAJI). Interestingly, the levels of PLGF and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the joint fluid strongly correlated. In order to examine whether PLGF may regulate the production and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the injured joint, we used a rat carrageenan-induced ankle injury model for AAJI in humans. We injected soluble Flt-1 (sFlt-1) into the articular cavity of the injured ankle joint to block PLGF signaling and found that injection of sFlt-1 significantly improved the rat behavior in activity wheels test, which appeared to result from reduced secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines in the ankle joint. Thus, our study suggests that blocking PLGF signaling may be a novel therapeutic approach for treating AAJI in humans. PMID:27904694

  11. The effects of a semi-rigid ankle brace on a simulated isolated subtalar joint instability.

    PubMed

    Choisne, Julie; Hoch, Matthew C; Bawab, Sebastian; Alexander, Ian; Ringleb, Stacie I

    2013-12-01

    Subtalar joint instability is hypothesized to occur after injuries to the calcaneofibular ligament (CFL) in isolation or in combination with the cervical and the talocalcaneal interosseous ligaments. A common treatment for hindfoot instability is the application of an ankle brace. However, the ability of an ankle brace to promote subtalar joint stability is not well established. We assessed the kinematics of the subtalar joint, ankle, and hindfoot in the presence of isolated subtalar instability, investigated the effect of bracing in a CFL deficient foot and with a total rupture of the intrinsic ligaments, and evaluated how maximum inversion range of motion is affected by the position of the ankle in the sagittal plane. Kinematics from nine cadaveric feet were collected with the foot placed in neutral, dorsiflexion, and plantar flexion. Motion was applied with and without a brace on an intact foot and after sequentially sectioning the CFL and the intrinsic ligaments. Isolated CFL sectioning increased ankle joint inversion, while sectioning the CFL and intrinsic ligaments affected subtalar joint stability. The brace limited inversion at the subtalar and ankle joints. Additionally, examining the foot in dorsiflexion reduced ankle and subtalar joint motion.

  12. Effects of wearing ankle weight on knee joint repositioning sense in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sooyoung; Jung, Daeun; Han, Jintae; Jung, Jaemin

    2016-09-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of different ankle weights on knee joint repositioning sense in elderly individuals. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-one subjects were divided for assessment as follows: young (20-30 years, n=10) and elderly (60-70 years, n=11). Knee joint repositioning error was measured by asking the subjects to reposition the target angle of their knee joints while wearing different ankle weights (0%, 0.5%, 1%, and 1.5%) in an open kinetic chain. The Hawk Digital System (60 Hz; Motion Analysis, Santa Rosa, CA, USA) was used to measure knee joint repositioning error. Differences in knee joint repositioning error between the young and elderly groups according to ankle weight load were examined by using two-way mixed repeated-measures analysis of variance. [Results] The knee joint repositioning error was lower with than without ankle weights in both groups. The error value was lowest with the 1.0% weight, though not significantly. Knee joint repositioning error was significantly higher in the elderly under all the ankle weight conditions. [Conclusion] Knee joint repositioning sense can be improved in elderly individuals by wearing proper ankle weights. However, weights that are too heavy might disturb knee joint positioning sense.

  13. Effects of wearing ankle weight on knee joint repositioning sense in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sooyoung; Jung, Daeun; Han, Jintae; Jung, Jaemin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of different ankle weights on knee joint repositioning sense in elderly individuals. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-one subjects were divided for assessment as follows: young (20–30 years, n=10) and elderly (60–70 years, n=11). Knee joint repositioning error was measured by asking the subjects to reposition the target angle of their knee joints while wearing different ankle weights (0%, 0.5%, 1%, and 1.5%) in an open kinetic chain. The Hawk Digital System (60 Hz; Motion Analysis, Santa Rosa, CA, USA) was used to measure knee joint repositioning error. Differences in knee joint repositioning error between the young and elderly groups according to ankle weight load were examined by using two-way mixed repeated-measures analysis of variance. [Results] The knee joint repositioning error was lower with than without ankle weights in both groups. The error value was lowest with the 1.0% weight, though not significantly. Knee joint repositioning error was significantly higher in the elderly under all the ankle weight conditions. [Conclusion] Knee joint repositioning sense can be improved in elderly individuals by wearing proper ankle weights. However, weights that are too heavy might disturb knee joint positioning sense. PMID:27799664

  14. Effects of focal ankle joint cooling on unipedal static balance in individuals with and without chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Min; Hart, Joseph M; Saliba, Susan A; Hertel, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Application of cryotherapy over an injured joint has been shown to improve muscle function, yet it is unknown how ankle cryotherapy affects postural control. Our purpose was to determine the effects of a 20-min focal ankle joint cooling on unipedal static stance in individuals with and without chronic ankle instability (CAI). Fifteen young subjects with CAI (9 males, 6 females) and 15 healthy gender-matched controls participated. All subjects underwent two intervention sessions on different days in which they had a 1.5L plastic bag filled with either crushed ice (active treatment) or candy corn (sham) applied to the ankle. Unipedal stance with eyes closed for 10s were assessed with a forceplate before and after each intervention. Center of pressure (COP) data were used to compute 10 specific dependent measures including velocity, area, standard deviation (SD), and percent range of COP excursions, and mean and SD of time-to-boundary (TTB) minima in the anterior-posterior (AP) and mediolateral directions. For each measure a three-way (Group-Intervention-Time) repeated ANOVAs found no significant interactions and main effects involving intervention (all Ps > 0.05). There were group main effects found for mean velocity (F(1,28) = 6.46, P = .017), area (F(1,28) = 12.83, P = .001), and mean of TTB minima in the AP direction (F(1,28) = 5.19, P = .031) indicating that the CAI group demonstrated greater postural instability compared to the healthy group. Postural control of unipedal stance was not significantly altered following focal ankle joint cooling in groups both with and without CAI. Ankle joint cryotherapy was neither beneficial nor harmful to single leg balance.

  15. Ankle instability effects on joint position sense when stepping across the active movement extent discrimination apparatus.

    PubMed

    Witchalls, Jeremy; Waddington, Gordon; Blanch, Peter; Adams, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with and without functional ankle instability have been tested for deficits in lower limb proprioception with varied results. To determine whether a new protocol for testing participants' joint position sense during stepping is reliable and can detect differences between participants with unstable and stable ankles. Descriptive laboratory study. University clinical laboratory. Sample of convenience involving 21 young adult university students and staff. Ankle stability was categorized by score on the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool; 13 had functional ankle instability, 8 had healthy ankles. Test-retest of ankle joint position sense when stepping onto and across the Active Movement Extent Discrimination Apparatus twice, separated by an interim test, standing still on the apparatus and moving only 1 ankle into inversion. Difference in scores between groups with stable and unstable ankles and between test repeats. Participants with unstable ankles were worse at differentiating between inversion angles underfoot in both testing protocols. On repeated testing with the stepping protocol, performance of the group with unstable ankles was improved (Cohen d = 1.06, P = .006), whereas scores in the stable ankle group did not change in the second test (Cohen d = 0.04, P = .899). Despite this improvement, the unstable group remained worse at differentiating inversion angles on the stepping retest (Cohen d = 0.99, P = .020). The deficits on proprioceptive tests shown by individuals with functional ankle instability improved with repeated exposure to the test situation. The learning effect may be the result of systematic exposure to ankle-angle variation that led to movement-specific learning or increased confidence when stepping across the apparatus.

  16. Ankle Instability Effects on Joint Position Sense When Stepping Across the Active Movement Extent Discrimination Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Witchalls, Jeremy; Waddington, Gordon; Blanch, Peter; Adams, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Context Individuals with and without functional ankle instability have been tested for deficits in lower limb proprioception with varied results. Objective To determine whether a new protocol for testing participants' joint position sense during stepping is reliable and can detect differences between participants with unstable and stable ankles. Design Descriptive laboratory study. Setting University clinical laboratory. Patients or Other Participants Sample of convenience involving 21 young adult university students and staff. Ankle stability was categorized by score on the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool; 13 had functional ankle instability, 8 had healthy ankles. Intervention(s) Test-retest of ankle joint position sense when stepping onto and across the Active Movement Extent Discrimination Apparatus twice, separated by an interim test, standing still on the apparatus and moving only 1 ankle into inversion. Main Outcome Measure(s) Difference in scores between groups with stable and unstable ankles and between test repeats. Results Participants with unstable ankles were worse at differentiating between inversion angles underfoot in both testing protocols. On repeated testing with the stepping protocol, performance of the group with unstable ankles was improved (Cohen d = 1.06, P = .006), whereas scores in the stable ankle group did not change in the second test (Cohen d = 0.04, P = .899). Despite this improvement, the unstable group remained worse at differentiating inversion angles on the stepping retest (Cohen d = 0.99, P = .020). Conclusions The deficits on proprioceptive tests shown by individuals with functional ankle instability improved with repeated exposure to the test situation. The learning effect may be the result of systematic exposure to ankle-angle variation that led to movement-specific learning or increased confidence when stepping across the apparatus. PMID:23182010

  17. Measurement of the passive stiffness of ankle joint in 3 DOF using stewart platform type ankle foot device.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kenta; Yonezawa, Teru; Mizoguchi, Hiroshi; Takemura, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a method to measure the passive stiffness of an ankle joint in three degrees of freedom (DOF) under two motion speeds (1 Hz and 5 degree/s) using a developed Stewart platform-type device. The developed device can reproduce input motions of the foot in 6 DOF by controlling six pneumatic linear motion actuators. We used the device to measure the passive stiffness of an ankle joint undergoing three kinds of motion, namely dorsi-plantar flexion, inversion-eversion, and adduction-abduction. The measured values of the passive stiffness of the ankle joint in dorsiflexion that we obtained agreed well with that obtained in a previous study, indicating that the developed device is useful for measuring the passive stiffness of ankle joint. In addition, the developed device can be used to measure the stiffness in inversion-eversion and adduction-abduction motions as well, parameters that have never been measured. The results we obtained demonstrated certain interesting features as we varied both the direction and pace of motion (e.g., there were significant differences in the stiffness not only between adduction and abduction during the faster pace, but also between these and the other motions).

  18. Mechanical energy profiles of the combined ankle-foot system in normal gait: insights for prosthetic designs.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kota Z; Stanhope, Steven J

    2013-09-01

    Over the last half-century, the field of prosthetic engineering has continuously evolved with much attention being dedicated to restoring the mechanical energy properties of ankle joint musculatures during gait. However, the contributions of 'distal foot structures' (e.g., foot muscles, plantar soft tissue) have been overlooked. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to quantify the total mechanical energy profiles (e.g., power, work, and work-ratio) of the natural ankle-foot system (NAFS) by combining the contributions of the ankle joint and all distal foot structures during stance in level-ground steady state walking across various speeds (0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0 statures/s). The results from eleven healthy subjects walking barefoot indicated ankle joint and distal foot structures generally performed opposing roles: the ankle joint performed net positive work that systematically increased its energy generation with faster walking speeds, while the distal foot performed net negative work that systematically increased its energy absorption with faster walking speeds. Accounting for these simultaneous effects, the combined ankle-foot system exhibited increased work-ratios with faster walking. Most notably, the work-ratio was not significantly greater than 1.0 during the normal walking speed of 0.8 statures/s. Therefore, a prosthetic design that strategically exploits passive-dynamic properties (e.g., elastic energy storage and return) has the potential to replicate the mechanical energy profiles of the NAFS during level-ground steady-state walking. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Validity of an ankle joint motion and position sense measurement system and its application in healthy subjects and patients with ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chueh-Ho; Chiang, Shang-Lin; Lu, Liang-Hsuan; Wei, Shun-Hwa; Sung, Wen-Hsu

    2016-07-01

    Ankle motion and proprioception in multiple axis movements are crucial for daily activities. However, few studies have developed and used a multiple axis system for measuring ankle motion and proprioception. This study was designed to validate a novel ankle haptic interface system that measures the ankle range of motion (ROM) and joint position sense in multiple plane movements, investigating the proprioception deficits during joint position sense tasks for patients with ankle instability. Eleven healthy adults (mean ± standard deviation; age, 24.7 ± 1.9 years) and thirteen patients with ankle instability were recruited in this study. All subjects were asked to perform tests to evaluate the validity of the ankle ROM measurements and underwent tests for validating the joint position sense measurements conducted during multiple axis movements of the ankle joint. Pearson correlation was used for validating the angular position measurements obtained using the developed system; the independent t test was used to investigate the differences in joint position sense task performance for people with or without ankle instability. The ROM measurements of the device were linearly correlated with the criterion standards (r = 0.99). The ankle instability and healthy groups were significantly different in direction, absolute, and variable errors of plantar flexion, dorsiflexion, inversion, and eversion (p < 0.05). The results demonstrate that the novel ankle joint motion and position sense measurement system is valid and can be used for measuring the ankle ROM and joint position sense in multiple planes and indicate proprioception deficits for people with ankle instability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Numerical simulation of strain-adaptive bone remodelling in the ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Bouguecha, Anas; Weigel, Nelly; Behrens, Bernd-Arno; Stukenborg-Colsman, Christina; Waizy, Hazibullah

    2011-07-05

    The use of artificial endoprostheses has become a routine procedure for knee and hip joints while ankle arthritis has traditionally been treated by means of arthrodesis. Due to its advantages, the implantation of endoprostheses is constantly increasing. While finite element analyses (FEA) of strain-adaptive bone remodelling have been carried out for the hip joint in previous studies, to our knowledge there are no investigations that have considered remodelling processes of the ankle joint. In order to evaluate and optimise new generation implants of the ankle joint, as well as to gain additional knowledge regarding the biomechanics, strain-adaptive bone remodelling has been calculated separately for the tibia and the talus after providing them with an implant. FE models of the bone-implant assembly for both the tibia and the talus have been developed. Bone characteristics such as the density distribution have been applied corresponding to CT scans. A force of 5,200 N, which corresponds to the compression force during normal walking of a person with a weight of 100 kg according to Stauffer et al., has been used in the simulation. The bone adaptation law, previously developed by our research team, has been used for the calculation of the remodelling processes. A total bone mass loss of 2% in the tibia and 13% in the talus was calculated. The greater decline of density in the talus is due to its smaller size compared to the relatively large implant dimensions causing remodelling processes in the whole bone tissue. In the tibia, bone remodelling processes are only calculated in areas adjacent to the implant. Thus, a smaller bone mass loss than in the talus can be expected. There is a high agreement between the simulation results in the distal tibia and the literature regarding. In this study, strain-adaptive bone remodelling processes are simulated using the FE method. The results contribute to a better understanding of the biomechanical behaviour of the ankle joint

  1. Posterior ankle impingement syndrome caused by malunion of joint depressed type calcaneal fracture.

    PubMed

    Lui, T H

    2008-07-01

    Late complications after calcaneal fracture usually resulted in lateral heel pain. Malunion of joint depressed type calcaneal fracture can result in posterior ankle impingement pain. This is caused by the posterior calcaneal bone spike formed just behind the posterior calcaneal facet. We describe a technique to resect the offending posterior calcaneal bone spike to relieve the posterior ankle impingement pain.

  2. Arthrodesis of the ankle and subtalar joints in patients with haemophilic arthropathy.

    PubMed

    Tsailas, P G; Wiedel, J D

    2010-09-01

    There have been only a few studies in the literature that reported on the outcome of ankle arthrodesis in patients with haemophilia; furthermore, the number of patients was usually low and the operative technique has not been uniform. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of surgery in haemophilic arthropathy of the ankle and subtalar joints, using internal fixation. From 1983 to 2006, 20 fusions were performed in 13 patients with advanced haemophilic arthropathy of the ankle and subtalar joints. There were 11 ankle fusions, one isolated subtalar fusion and eight combined ankle and subtalar fusions. Three of the latter had a subtalar fusion at a second operation. The mean age at operation was 38.7 years and the mean followup was 9.4 years. In the majority of the cases, the ankle fusion was achieved by two crossing screws. For the subtalar fusion, either staples were used or the tibiotalar screws were extended to the calcaneus. Arthrodesis of the ankle was successful in all but one patient, in whose case the procedure was revised and eventually his condition was progressed to fusion. There was also one case of painless non-union of the subtalar joint which was not revised. There was no recurrent bleeding, and no deep infection. Arthrodesis with cross screw fixation is an effective method for fusion of the ankle and subtalar joints in patients with haemophilia.

  3. The Effects of Sex, Joint Angle, and the Gastrocnemius Muscle on Passive Ankle Joint Complex Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    DeMont, Richard G.; Ryu, Keeho; Lephart, Scott M.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effects of sex, joint angle, and the gastrocnemius muscle on passive ankle joint complex stiffness (JCS). Design and Setting: A repeated-measures design was employed using sex as a between-subjects factor and joint angle and inclusion of the gastrocnemius muscle as within-subject factors. All testing was conducted in a neuromuscular research laboratory. Subjects: Twelve female and 12 male healthy, physically active subjects between the ages of 18 and 30 years volunteered for participation in this study. The dominant leg was used for testing. No subjects had a history of lower extremity musculoskeletal injury or circulatory or neurologic disorders. Measurements: We determined passive ankle JCS by measuring resistance to passive dorsiflexion (5°·s−1) from 23° plantar flexion (PF) to 13° dorsiflexion (DF). Angular position and torque data were collected from a dynamometer under 2 conditions designed to include or reduce the contribution of the gastrocnemius muscle. Separate fourth-order polynomial equations relating angular position and torque were constructed for each trial. Stiffness values (Nm·degree−1) were calculated at 10° PF, neutral (NE), and 10° DF using the slope of the line at each respective position. Results: Significant condition-by-position and sex-by-position interactions and significant main effects for sex, position, and condition were revealed by a 3-way (sex-by-position, condition-by-position) analysis of variance. Post hoc analyses of the condition-by-position interaction revealed significantly higher stiffness values under the knee-straight condition compared with the knee-bent condition at both ankle NE and 10° DF. Within each condition, stiffness values at each position were significantly higher as the ankle moved into DF. Post hoc analysis of the sex-by-position interaction revealed significantly higher stiffness values at 10° DF in the male subjects. Post hoc analysis of the position main effect revealed

  4. Effect of ankle braces on lower extremity joint energetics in single-leg landings.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Jacob K; McCaw, Steven T; Laudner, Kevin G; Smith, Peter J; Stafford, Lindsay N

    2012-06-01

    Ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries in competitive and recreational athletics. Studies have shown that the use of prophylactic ankle braces effectively reduces the frequency of ankle sprains in athletes. However, although it is generally accepted that the ankle braces are effective at reducing frontal plane motion, some researchers report that the design of the brace may also reduce ankle sagittal plane motion. The purpose of this study was to quantify lower extremity joint contributions to energy absorption during single-legged drop landings in three ankle brace conditions (no brace, boot brace, and hinged brace). Eleven physically active females experienced in landing and free of lower extremity injury (age = 22.3 ± 1.7 yr, height = 1.66 ± 0.04 m, mass = 58.43 ± 5.83 kg) performed 10 single-leg drop landings in three conditions (one unbraced, two braced) from a 0.33-m height. Measurements taken were hip, knee, and ankle joint impulse; hip, knee, ankle, and total work; and hip, knee, and ankle joint relative work. Total energy absorption remained consistent across the braced conditions (P = 0.057). Wearing the boot brace reduced relative ankle work (P = 0.04, Cohen d = 0.43) but did not change relative knee (P = 0.08, Cohen d = 0.32) or hip (P = 0.14, Cohen d = 0.20) work compared with the no-brace condition. In an ankle-braced condition, ankle, knee, and hip energetics may be altered depending on the design of the brace.

  5. The contribution of quasi-joint stiffness of the ankle joint to gait in patients with hemiparesis.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Yusuke; Muraki, Takayuki; Kuramatsu, Yuko; Furusawa, Yoshihito; Izumi, Shin-Ichi

    2012-06-01

    The role of ankle joint stiffness during gait in patients with hemiparesis has not been clarified. The purpose of this study was to determine the contribution of quasi-joint stiffness of the ankle joint to spatiotemporal and kinetic parameters regarding gait in patients with hemiparesis due to brain tumor or stroke and healthy individuals. Spatiotemporal and kinetic parameters regarding gait in twelve patients with hemiparesis due to brain tumor or stroke and nine healthy individuals were measured with a 3-dimensional motion analysis system. Quasi-joint stiffness was calculated from the slope of the linear regression of the moment-angle curve of the ankle joint during the second rocker. There was no significant difference in quasi-joint stiffness among both sides of patients and the right side of controls. Quasi-joint stiffness on the paretic side of patients with hemiparesis positively correlated with maximal ankle power (r=0.73, P<0.01) and gait speed (r=0.66, P<0.05). In contrast, quasi-joint stiffness in controls negatively correlated with maximal ankle power (r=-0.73, P<0.05) and gait speed (r=-0.76, P<0.05). Our findings suggested that ankle power during gait might be generated by increasing quasi-joint stiffness in patients with hemiparesis. In contrast, healthy individuals might decrease quasi-joint stiffness to avoid deceleration of forward tilt of the tibia. Our findings might be useful for selecting treatment for increased ankle stiffness due to contracture and spasticity in patients with hemiparesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Unusual exostosis formation of the subtalar joint following an inversion ankle injury.

    PubMed

    Cisco, R W; Shaffer, M; Kuchler, L

    1993-01-01

    Exostosis formation following trauma isnot uncommon to the joints of the foot and ankle. The etiology and treatment of these boney lesions is well-documented in the literature. The following is a report of an unusual exostosis of the subtalar joint following inversion ankle injury. This case is unusual in respect to the formation of an adventitious articulation, the size of the lesion, and the pathology.

  7. Modeling and stress analyses of a normal foot-ankle and a prosthetic foot-ankle complex.

    PubMed

    Ozen, Mustafa; Sayman, Onur; Havitcioglu, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Total ankle replacement (TAR) is a relatively new concept and is becoming more popular for treatment of ankle arthritis and fractures. Because of the high costs and difficulties of experimental studies, the developments of TAR prostheses are progressing very slowly. For this reason, the medical imaging techniques such as CT, and MR have become more and more useful. The finite element method (FEM) is a widely used technique to estimate the mechanical behaviors of materials and structures in engineering applications. FEM has also been increasingly applied to biomechanical analyses of human bones, tissues and organs, thanks to the development of both the computing capabilities and the medical imaging techniques. 3-D finite element models of the human foot and ankle from reconstruction of MR and CT images have been investigated by some authors. In this study, data of geometries (used in modeling) of a normal and a prosthetic foot and ankle were obtained from a 3D reconstruction of CT images. The segmentation software, MIMICS was used to generate the 3D images of the bony structures, soft tissues and components of prosthesis of normal and prosthetic ankle-foot complex. Except the spaces between the adjacent surface of the phalanges fused, metatarsals, cuneiforms, cuboid, navicular, talus and calcaneus bones, soft tissues and components of prosthesis were independently developed to form foot and ankle complex. SOLIDWORKS program was used to form the boundary surfaces of all model components and then the solid models were obtained from these boundary surfaces. Finite element analyses software, ABAQUS was used to perform the numerical stress analyses of these models for balanced standing position. Plantar pressure and von Mises stress distributions of the normal and prosthetic ankles were compared with each other. There was a peak pressure increase at the 4th metatarsal, first metatarsal and talus bones and a decrease at the intermediate cuneiform and calcaneus bones, in

  8. Acute influence of restricted ankle dorsiflexion angle on knee joint mechanics during gait.

    PubMed

    Ota, S; Ueda, M; Aimoto, K; Suzuki, Y; Sigward, S M

    2014-06-01

    Restrictions in range of ankle dorsiflexion (DF) motion can persist following ankle injuries. Ankle DF is necessary during terminal stance of gait, and its restricted range may affect knee joint kinematics and kinetics. The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute influence of varied levels of restricted ankle DF on knee joint sagittal and frontal plane kinematics and kinetics during gait. Thirty healthy volunteers walked with a custom-designed ankle brace that restricted ankle DF. Kinematics and kinetics were collected using a 7-camera motion analysis system and two force plates. Ankle dorsiflexion was restricted in 10-degree increments, allowing for four conditions: Free, light (LR), moderate (MR) and severe restriction (SR). Knee angles and moments were measured during terminal stance. Real peak ankle DF for Free, LR, MR, and SR were 13.7±4.8°, 11.6±5.0°, 7.5±5.3°, and 4.2±7.2°, respectively. Peak knee extension angles under the same conditions were -6.7±6.7°, -5.4±6.4°, -2.5±7.5°, and 0.6±7.8°, respectively, and the peak knee varus moment was 0.48±0.17 Nm/kg, 0.47±0.17 Nm/kg, 0.53±0.20 Nm/kg, and 0.57±0.20 Nm/kg. The knee varus moment was significantly increased from MR condition with an 8-degree restriction in ankle DF. Knee joint kinematics and kinetics in the sagittal and frontal planes were affected by reduced ankle DF during terminal stance of gait. Differences were observed with restriction in ankle DF range of approximately 8°. level III. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Dynamics of the ankle joint analyzed through moment-angle loops during human walking: gender and age effects.

    PubMed

    Crenna, Paolo; Frigo, Carlo

    2011-12-01

    Aim of this study was to provide a non-invasive assessment of the dynamic properties of the ankle joint during human locomotion, with specific focus on the effects of gender and age. Accordingly, flexion-extension angles and moments, obtained through gait analysis, were used to generate moment-angle loops at the ankle joint in 120 healthy subjects walking at a same normalized speed. Four reproducible types of loops were identified: Typical Loops, Narrow, Large and Yielding loops. No significant changes in the slopes of the main loop phases were observed as a function of gender and age, with the exception of a relative increase in the slope of the descending phase in elderly males compared to adult females. As for the ergometric parameters, the peak ankle moment, work produced and net work along the cycle were slightly, but significantly affected, with progressively decrease in the following order: Adult Males, Adult Females, Elderly Males and Elderly Females. The evidence that only few of the quantitative aspects of moment-angle loops were affected suggests that the control strategy which regulates the biomechanical properties of the ankle joint during walking is rather robust and qualitatively consistent across genders and age. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Prospective Computed Tomographic Analysis of Osteochondral Lesions of the Ankle Joint Associated With Ankle Fractures.

    PubMed

    Nosewicz, Tomasz L; Beerekamp, M Suzan H; De Muinck Keizer, Robert-Jan O; Schepers, Tim; Maas, Mario; Niek van Dijk, C; Goslings, J Carel

    2016-08-01

    Osteochondral lesions (OCLs) associated with ankle fracture correlate with unfavorable outcome. The goals of this study were to detect OCLs following ankle fracture, to associate fracture type to OCLs and to investigate whether OCLs affect clinical outcome. 100 ankle fractures requiring operative treatment were prospectively included (46 men, 54 women; mean age 44 ± 14 years, range 20-77). All ankle fractures (conventional radiography; 71 Weber B, 22 Weber C, 1 Weber A, 4 isolated medial malleolus and 2 isolated posterior malleolus fractures) were treated by open reduction and internal fixation. Multidetector computed tomography (CT) was performed postoperatively. For each OCL, the location, size, and Loomer OCL classification (CT modified Berndt and Harty classification) were determined. The subjective Foot and Ankle Outcome Scoring (FAOS) was used for clinical outcome at 1 year. OCLs were found in 10/100 ankle fractures (10.0%). All OCLs were solitary talar lesions. Four OCLs were located posteromedial, 4 posterolateral, 1 anterolateral, and 1 anteromedial. There were 2 type I OCLs (subchondral compression), 6 type II OCLs (partial, nondisplaced fracture) and 2 type IV OCLs (displaced fracture). Mean OCL size (largest diameter) was 4.4 ± 1.7 mm (range, 1.7 mm to 6.2 mm). Chi-square analysis showed no significant association between ankle fracture type and occurrence of OCLs. OCLs did occur only in Lauge-Hansen stage III/IV ankle fractures. There were no significant differences in FAOS outcome between patients with or without OCLs. Ten percent of investigated ankle fractures had associated OCLs on CT. Although no significant association between fracture type and OCL was found, OCLs only occurred in Lauge-Hansen stage III/IV ankle fractures. With the numbers available, OCLs did not significantly affect clinical outcome at 1 year according to FAOS. Level IV, observational study. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Footwear affects the gearing at the ankle and knee joints during running.

    PubMed

    Braunstein, Bjoern; Arampatzis, Adamantios; Eysel, Peer; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter

    2010-08-10

    The objective of the study was to investigate the adjustment of running mechanics by wearing five different types of running shoes on tartan compared to barefoot running on grass focusing on the gearing at the ankle and knee joints. The gear ratio, defined as the ratio of the moment arm of the ground reaction force (GRF) to the moment arm of the counteracting muscle tendon unit, is considered to be an indicator of joint loading and mechanical efficiency. Lower extremity kinematics and kinetics of 14 healthy volunteers were quantified three dimensionally and compared between running in shoes on tartan and barefoot on grass. Results showed no differences for the gear ratios and resultant joint moments for the ankle and knee joints across the five different shoes, but showed that wearing running shoes affects the gearing at the ankle and knee joints due to changes in the moment arm of the GRF. During barefoot running the ankle joint showed a higher gear ratio in early stance and a lower ratio in the late stance, while the gear ratio at the knee joint was lower during midstance compared to shod running. Because the moment arms of the counteracting muscle tendon units did not change, the determinants of the gear ratios were the moment arms of the GRF's. The results imply higher mechanical stress in shod running for the knee joint structures during midstance but also indicate an improved mechanical advantage in force generation for the ankle extensors during the push-off phase.

  12. Lower-limb multi-joint stiffness of knee and ankle.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sang Hoon; Ren, Yupeng; Xu, Dali; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2014-01-01

    Lower-limb multi-joint (knee and ankle) stiffness may play an important role in functional activities such as walking, and may be significantly altered post stroke. Thus, determination of lower-limb multi joint stiffness matrix is important for better understanding of gait and of pathological changes post stroke. In this study, using novel dynamics decomposition, the knee and ankle joint stiffness matrix including cross-coupled stiffness terms between the two joints were determined and reported ever first. The determined stiffness matrix may be useful for gait studies, and can be served as a baseline for studying pathophysiological changes post stroke.

  13. Design and simulation of a cable-pulley-based transmission for artificial ankle joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huaxin; Ceccarelli, Marco; Huang, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a mechanical transmission based on cable pulley is proposed for human-like actuation in the artificial ankle joints of human-scale. The anatomy articular characteristics of the human ankle is discussed for proper biomimetic inspiration in designing an accurate, efficient, and robust motion control of artificial ankle joint devices. The design procedure is presented through the inclusion of conceptual considerations and design details for an interactive solution of the transmission system. A mechanical design is elaborated for the ankle joint angular with pitch motion. A multi-body dynamic simulation model is elaborated accordingly and evaluated numerically in the ADAMS environment. Results of the numerical simulations are discussed to evaluate the dynamic performance of the proposed design solution and to investigate the feasibility of the proposed design in future applications for humanoid robots.

  14. The effect of strapping on the motor performance of the ankle and wrist joints.

    PubMed

    Kauranen, K; Siira, P; Vanharanta, H

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of strapping on different components of motor performance of wrist and ankle joints. The subjects were 14 healthy volunteers (12 females, two males), aged 21-33 years, with no known previous injuries of the ankle and wrist joints. The measurements were made with the HPM/BEP system and Isokinetic Lido Active Multi-joint system. First, the subjects performed the test without strapping and then, on the following day, with strapped right wrist and ankle joints. The strapping of the wrist increased the simple reaction time by 9%, choice reaction time by 9% and decreased the wrist tapping speed by 21%. Wrist strength decreased in flexion (180 degrees/s) by 14% and ulnar deviation (180 degrees/s) by 8%. The strapping of the ankle increased the simple reaction time by 12%, choice reaction time by 9% and decreased foot tapping speed by 14%. Ankle strength in plantar flexion decreased in 60 degrees/s by 22% and 180 degrees/s by 14% and in inversion in 60 degrees/s by 28% and 180 degrees/s by 15%. These results suggest the strapping of ankle and wrist joints reduces motor performance in the above-mentioned directions as measured by the following parameters: simple reaction time, choice reaction time, tapping speed, and muscle strength.

  15. Relevance of adjacent joint imaging in the evaluation of ankle fractures.

    PubMed

    Antoci, Valentin; Patel, Shaun P; Weaver, Michael J; Kwon, John Y

    2016-10-01

    Routinely obtaining adjacent joint radiographs when evaluating patients with ankle fractures may be of limited clinical utility and an unnecessary burden, particularly in the absence of clinical suspicion for concomitant injuries. One thousand, three hundred and seventy patients who sustained ankle fractures over a 5-year period presenting to two level 1 trauma centers were identified. Medical records were retrospectively reviewed for demographics, physical examination findings, and radiographic information. Analyses included descriptive statistics along with sensitivity and predictive value calculations for the presence of adjacent joint fracture. Adjacent joint imaging (n=1045 radiographs) of either the knee or foot was obtained in 873 patients (63.7%). Of those, 75/761 patients (9.9%) demonstrated additional fractures proximal to the ankle joint, most commonly of the proximal fibula. Twenty-two of 284 (7.7%) demonstrated additional fractures distal to the ankle joint, most commonly of the metatarsals. Tenderness to palpation demonstrated sensitivities of 0.92 and 0.77 and positive predictive values of 0.94 and 0.89 for the presence of proximal and distal fractures, respectively. Additionally, 19/22 (86.4%) of patients sustaining foot fractures had their injury detectable on initial ankle X-rays. Overall, only 5.5% (75/1370) of patients sustained fractures proximal to the ankle and only 0.2% (3/1370) of patients had additional foot fractures not evident on initial ankle X-rays. The addition of adjacent joint imaging for the evaluation of patients sustaining ankle fractures is low yield. As such, patient history, physical examination, and clinical suspicion should direct the need for additional X-rays. Level IV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. In vivo kinematics of the talocrural and subtalar joints with functional ankle instability during weight-bearing ankle internal rotation: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takumi; No, Yumi; Yoneta, Kei; Sadakiyo, Masashi; Gamada, Kazuyoshi

    2013-06-01

    Functional ankle instability (FAI) may involve abnormal kinematics. However, reliable quantitative data for kinematics of FAI have not been reported. The objective of this study was to determine if the abnormal kinematics exist in the talocrural and subtalar joints in patients with FAI. Five male subjects with unilateral FAI (a mean age of 33.4 ± 13.2 years) were enrolled. All subjects were examined with stress radiography and found to have no mechanical ankle instability (MAI). Lateral radiography at weight-bearing ankle internal rotation of 0° and 20° was taken with the ankle at 30° dorsiflexion and 30° plantar flexion. Patients underwent computed tomography scan at 1.0 mm slice pitch spanning distal one third of the lower leg and the distal end of the calcaneus. Three-dimensional (3D) kinematics of the talocrural and subtalar joints as well as the ankle joint complex (AJC) were determined using a 3D-to-2D registration technique using a 3D-to-2D registration technique with 3D bone models and plain radiography. FAI joints in ankle dorsiflexion demonstrated significantly greater subtalar internal rotation from 0° to 20° internal rotation. No statistical differences in plantar flexion were detected in talocrural, subtalar or ankle joint complex kinematics between the FAI and contralateral healthy joints. During ankle internal rotation in dorsiflexion, FAI joints demonstrated greater subtalar internal rotation. The FAI joints without mechanical instability presented abnormal kinematics. This suggests that abnormal kinematics of the FAI joints may contribute to chronic instability. FAI joints may involve unrecognized abnormal subtalar kinematics during internal rotation in ankle dorsiflexion which may contribute to chronic instability and frequent feelings of instability.

  17. Online estimation algorithm for a biaxial ankle kinematic model with configuration dependent joint axes.

    PubMed

    Tsoi, Y H; Xie, S Q

    2011-02-01

    The kinematics of the human ankle is commonly modeled as a biaxial hinge joint model. However, significant variations in axis orientations have been found between different individuals and also between different foot configurations. For ankle rehabilitation robots, information regarding the ankle kinematic parameters can be used to estimate the ankle and subtalar joint displacements. This can in turn be used as auxiliary variables in adaptive control schemes to allow modification of the robot stiffness and damping parameters to reduce the forces applied at stiffer foot configurations. Due to the large variations observed in the ankle kinematic parameters, an online identification algorithm is required to provide estimates of the model parameters. An online parameter estimation routine based on the recursive least-squares (RLS) algorithm was therefore developed in this research. An extension of the conventional biaxial ankle kinematic model, which allows variation in axis orientations with different foot configurations had also been developed and utilized in the estimation algorithm. Simulation results showed that use of the extended model in the online algorithm is effective in capturing the foot orientation of a biaxial ankle model with variable joint axis orientations. Experimental results had also shown that a modified RLS algorithm that penalizes a deviation of model parameters from their nominal values can be used to obtain more realistic parameter estimates while maintaining a level of estimation accuracy comparable to that of the conventional RLS routine.

  18. Changes in ankle joint motion after Supramalleolar osteotomy: a cadaveric model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak Jun; Yeo, Eui Dong; Rhyu, Im Joo; Lee, Soon-Hyuck; Lee, Yeon Soo; Lee, Young Koo

    2017-09-09

    Malalignment of the ankle joint has been found after trauma, by neurological disorders, genetic predisposition and other unidentified factors, and results in asymmetrical joint loading. For a medial open wedge supramalleolar osteotomy(SMO), there are some debates as to whether concurrent fibular osteotomy should be performed. We assessed the changes in motion of ankle joint and plantar pressure after supramalleolar osteotomy without fibular osteotomy. Ten lower leg specimens below the knee were prepared from fresh-frozen human cadavers. They were harvested from five males (10 ankles)whose average age was 70 years. We assessed the motion of ankle joint as well as plantar pressure for SS(supra-syndesmotic) SMO and IS(intra-syndesmotic) SMO. After the osteotomy, each specimen was subjected to axial compression from 20 N preload to 350 N representing half-body weight. For the measurement of the motion of ankle joint, the changes in gap and point, angles in ankle joint were measured. The plantar pressure were also recorded using TekScan sensors. The changes in the various gap, point, and angles movements on SS-SMO and IS-SMO showed no statistically significant differences between the two groups. Regarding the shift of plantar center of force (COF) were noted in the anterolateral direction, but not statistically significant. SS-SMO and IS-SMO with intact fibula showed similar biomechanical effect on the ankle joint. We propose that IS-SMO should be considered carefully for the treatment of osteoarthrosis when fibular osteotomy is not performed because lateral cortex fracture was less likely using the intrasyndesmosis plane because of soft tissue support.

  19. Supramalleolar osteotomy for realignment of the ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Noman A; Herzenberg, John E; Lamm, Bradley M

    2012-10-01

    Ankle replacement systems have not been as reliable as hip replacements in providing long-term relief of pain, increased motion, and return to full activity. Supramalleolar Osteotomy is an extraarticular procedure that realigns the mechanical axis, thereby restoring ankle function. The literature discussing knee arthritis has shown that realignment osteotomies of the tibia improve function and prolong total knee replacement surgery. The success of the procedure is predicated on understanding the patient's clinical and radiographic presentation and proper preoperative assessment and planning.

  20. The effect of changing plantarflexion resistive moment of an articulated ankle-foot orthosis on ankle and knee joint angles and moments while walking in patients post stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Toshiki; Singer, Madeline L.; Orendurff, Michael S.; Gao, Fan; Daly, Wayne K.; Foreman, K. Bo

    2015-01-01

    Background The adjustment of plantarflexion resistive moment of an articulated ankle-foot orthosis is considered important in patients post stroke, but the evidence is still limited. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of changing the plantarflexion resistive moment of an articulated ankle-foot orthosis on ankle and knee joint angles and moments in patients post stroke. Methods Gait analysis was performed on 10 subjects post stroke under four different plantarflexion resistive moment conditions using a newly designed articulated ankle-foot orthosis. Data were recorded using a Bertec split-belt instrumented treadmill in a 3-dimensional motion analysis laboratory. Findings The ankle and knee sagittal joint angles and moments were significantly affected by the amount of plantarflexion resistive moment of the ankle-foot orthosis. Increasing the plantarflexion resistive moment of the ankle-foot orthosis induced significant decreases both in the peak ankle plantarflexion angle (P<0.01) and the peak knee extension angle (P<0.05). Also, the increase induced significant increases in the internal dorsiflexion moment of the ankle joint (P<0.01) and significantly decreased the internal flexion moment of the knee joint (P<0.01). Interpretation These results suggest an important link between the kinematic/kinetic parameters of the lower-limb joints and the plantarflexion resistive moment of an articulated ankle-foot orthosis. A future study should be performed to clarify their relationship further so that the practitioners may be able to use these parameters as objective data to determine an optimal plantarflexion resistive moment of an articulated ankle-foot orthosis for improved orthotic care in individual patients. PMID:26149007

  1. Active AFO with ankle joint brake friction control using force observer.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Nobuyuki

    2012-01-01

    Optimum friction control of the ankle joint brake is essential for realizing a stable gait when wearing an active ankle foot orthosis (AFO). An optimum friction control system using a force observer is designed and simulated. The brake friction is controlled in proportion to the observed human force of the lower limb without using force sensors. The simulated results show that the force observer performs well. The force-controlled orthosis is robust and practical because it uses no force sensors.

  2. Biomechanical gender differences of the ankle joint during simulated half-squat parachute landing.

    PubMed

    Niu, Wenxin; Wang, Yang; He, Yan; Fan, Yubo; Zhao, Qinping

    2010-08-01

    A search of the literature did not reveal known gender differences in biomechanics during parachute landing. Eight male and eight female healthy adults participated in this experiment. Each individual jumped from platforms with three different heights (low: 0.32 m; medium: 0.52 m; and high: 0.72 m) and landed on flat ground in a standard half-squat parachute landing technique. The ground reaction force (GRF) normalized to bodyweight (BW), ankle joint kinematics, and the surface electromyogram (EMG) signals of the tibialis anterior (TA) and lateral gastrocnemius (LG) were measured. Two-way ANOVA was used to analyze the effects of the dropping height and gender factors. The anterior-posterior GRF (men 1.01 BW; women 0.79 BW), rate of loading (men 260 BW x s(-1); women 127 BW x s(-1)), and absolute EMG amplitude of TA (pre-landing: men 219 microv; women 129 microv; post-landing: men 573 microv; women 288 microv) in the men's group were significantly higher than in the women's group, whereas peak angular velocity of dorsiflexion in the women's group (1627 degrees x s(-1)) was significantly higher than in the men's (1188 degrees x s(-1)). Women are prone to transform the kinetic energy to the ankle motion, whereas men are more likely to transform it to friction. The co-contraction of the ankle flexor and extensor differs between genders. These factors may be associated with the higher incidence of parachute injuries among women reported by some authors.

  3. Ankle distraction arthroplasty combined with joint resurfacing for management of an osteochondral defect of the talus and concomitant osteoarthritis: a case report.

    PubMed

    D'Angelantonio, Albert M; Schick, Faith A

    2013-01-01

    There are many treatment options for patients with ankle osteochondral defects and subsequent osteoarthritis. Although ankle arthrodesis remains the gold standard to definitive treatment of this condition, its permanent sequelae demands an alternative. In this article we discuss a case report from a 61-year-old woman with a history of a previous ankle sprain resulting in an osteochondral defect that progressed to develop ankle osteoarthritis. After multiple attempts at conservative management, the patient underwent placement of an articulating external ring fixator for arthrodiastasis, as well as ankle joint resurfacing using allograft. The fixator was kept in place for a total of 12 weeks, with the patient performing range-of-motion exercises throughout the treatment course. We feel that this treatment presents as a promising treatment alternative based on the success demonstrated by this patient's 6-month follow-up. The patient has reported a decease in ankle joint pain, increased range of motion, and a return to normal daily activity without limitation. Copyright © 2013 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Ankle Joint Angle and Lower Leg Musculotendinous Unit Responses to Cryotherapy.

    PubMed

    Akehi, Kazuma; Long, Blaine C; Warren, Aric J; Goad, Carla L

    2016-09-01

    Akehi, K, Long, BC, Warren, AJ, and Goad, CL. Ankle joint angle and lower leg musculotendinous unit responses to cryotherapy. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2482-2492, 2016-The use of cold application has been debated for its influence on joint range of motion (ROM) and stiffness. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a 30-minute ice bag application to the plantarflexor muscles or ankle influences passive ankle dorsiflexion ROM and lower leg musculotendinous stiffness (MTS). Thirty-five recreationally active college-aged individuals with no history of lower leg injury 6 months before data collection volunteered. On each testing day, we measured maximum passive ankle dorsiflexion ROM (°) and plantarflexor torque (N·m) on an isokinetic dynamometer to calculate the passive plantarflexor MTS (N·m per degree) at 4 joint angles before, during, and after a treatment. Surface electromyography amplitudes (μV), and skin surface and ambient air temperature (°C) were also measured. Subjects received an ice bag to the posterior lower leg, ankle joint, or nothing for 30 minutes in different days. Ice bag application to the lower leg and ankle did not influence passive ROM (F(12,396) = 0.67, p = 0.78). Passive torque increased after ice bag application to the lower leg (F(12,396) = 2.21, p = 0.011). Passive MTS at the initial joint angle increased after ice bag application to the lower leg (F(12,396) = 2.14, p = 0.014) but not at the other joint angles (p > 0.05). Surface electromyography amplitudes for gastrocnemius and soleus muscles increased after ice application to the lower leg (F(2,66) = 5.61, p = 0.006; F(12,396) = 3.60, p < 0.001). Ice bag application to the lower leg and ankle joint does not alter passive dorsiflexion ROM but increases passive ankle plantarflexor torque in addition to passive ankle plantarflexor MTS at the initial joint angle.

  5. Subtalar Joint Position During Gastrocnemius Stretching and Ankle Dorsiflexion Range of Motion

    PubMed Central

    Johanson, Marie; Baer, Jennifer; Hovermale, Holley; Phouthavong, Phouvy

    2008-01-01

    Context: Gastrocnemius stretching exercises often are prescribed as part of the treatment program for patients with overuse injuries associated with limited ankle dorsiflexion. However, little is known about how the position of the subtalar joint during gastrocnemius stretching affects ankle dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM). Objective: To determine the effect of subtalar joint position during gastrocnemius stretching on ankle dorsiflexion ROM. Design: This study was a 3-way mixed-model design. The 3 factors were subtalar joint position (supinated, pronated), lower extremity (experimental, control), and time (pretest, posttest). Lower extremity and time were the repeated measures. Setting: University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Thirty-three healthy volunteers (29 women, 4 men). Intervention(s): Participants performed a gastrocnemius stretching exercise 2 times daily for 3 weeks with the subtalar joint of the randomly assigned experimental side (dominant or nondominant) in the randomly assigned position (supination or pronation). The contralateral lower extremity served as the control. Main Outcome Measure(s): Before and after the 3-week gastrocnemius stretching program, we used goniometers to measure ankle dorsiflexion ROM in weight-bearing and non–weight-bearing positions with the subtalar joint positioned in anatomic 0°. Results: Ankle dorsiflexion ROM measured in weight-bearing and non–weight-bearing positions increased after the gastrocnemius stretching program (P  =  .034 and .003, respectively), but the increase in ROM did not differ based on subtalar joint position (P  =  .775 and .831, respectively). Conclusions: Subtalar joint position did not appear to influence gains in ankle dorsiflexion ROM after a gastrocnemius stretching program in healthy volunteers. PMID:18345342

  6. Muscle, reflex and central components in the control of the ankle joint in healthy and spastic man.

    PubMed

    Sinkjaer, T

    1997-01-01

    In understanding the control of the ankle joint during different motor tasks, we have to investigate at least three components, namely the influence of i) the passive and intrinsic properties of the intact and active muscle system around the joint (termed the non-reflex component), ii) the mechanical importance of the stretch reflex in the stretched and unloaded muscles, and iii) the supraspinal control of the stretch reflex. This thesis is dealing with the importance of the three components in healthy and spastic persons during sitting, standing, and walking. The results are based on stretch reflex and H-reflex measurements from the ankle extensor muscles. During stretch reflex experiments the foot was mounted to a platform (portable during walking) from which the ankle joint torque and the position were measured. To elicit a stretch reflex, the ankle joint was rotated by a strong motor connected to the platform. The mechanical importance of the stretch reflex was investigated by measuring the changes in joint torque. Electrically, the stretch reflex was recorded as the compound muscle action potential through bipolar surface EMG electrodes placed over the soleus muscle. During H-reflex experiments, the tibial nerve was stimulated at the popliteal fossa and the H-reflex recorded over the soleus muscle as during stretch reflex experiments. To investigate how the contractile properties of a muscle in humans depend on the history of activation, we investigated the intrinsic stiffness of the ankle extensors in healthy subjects. At matched background contraction in sitting subjects, a prolonged contraction increased the intrinsic muscle stiffness by 49%. Muscle yielding has been considered especially important for understanding the reflex compensation. We found a general lack of muscle yield and a mechanically important non-reflex stiffness of the ankle extensors showing that non-reflex stiffness is a prominent factor in normal movements of the ankle joint. In both

  7. Peri-talar re-alignment osteotomy for joint preservation in asymmetrical ankle osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Young; Lee, Woochun

    2017-01-01

    Various types of re-alignment surgery are used to preserve the ankle joint in cases of intermediate ankle arthritis with partial joint space narrowing. The short-term and mid-term results after re-alignment surgery are promising, with substantial post-operative pain relief and functional improvement that is reflected by high rates of patient satisfaction. In this context, re-alignment surgery can preserve the joint and reduce the pathological load that acts on the affected area. Good clinical and radiological outcomes can be achieved in asymmetrical ankle osteoarthritis by understanding the specific deformities and appropriate indications for different surgical techniques. Cite this article: EFORT Open Rev 2017;2:324-331. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.2.160021 PMID:28828181

  8. Identification of the contribution of the ankle and hip joints to multi-segmental balance control

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human stance involves multiple segments, including the legs and trunk, and requires coordinated actions of both. A novel method was developed that reliably estimates the contribution of the left and right leg (i.e., the ankle and hip joints) to the balance control of individual subjects. Methods The method was evaluated using simulations of a double-inverted pendulum model and the applicability was demonstrated with an experiment with seven healthy and one Parkinsonian participant. Model simulations indicated that two perturbations are required to reliably estimate the dynamics of a double-inverted pendulum balance control system. In the experiment, two multisine perturbation signals were applied simultaneously. The balance control system dynamic behaviour of the participants was estimated by Frequency Response Functions (FRFs), which relate ankle and hip joint angles to joint torques, using a multivariate closed-loop system identification technique. Results In the model simulations, the FRFs were reliably estimated, also in the presence of realistic levels of noise. In the experiment, the participants responded consistently to the perturbations, indicated by low noise-to-signal ratios of the ankle angle (0.24), hip angle (0.28), ankle torque (0.07), and hip torque (0.33). The developed method could detect that the Parkinson patient controlled his balance asymmetrically, that is, the right ankle and hip joints produced more corrective torque. Conclusion The method allows for a reliable estimate of the multisegmental feedback mechanism that stabilizes stance, of individual participants and of separate legs. PMID:23433148

  9. [Measurement of the isometric dorsiflexion and plantar flexion force in the ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Göpfert, Beat; Valderrabano, Victor; Hintermann, Beat; Wirz, Dieter

    2005-09-01

    This article describes an easy to use test equipment for measuring the isometric force in the ankle joints in dorsiflexion and plantar flexion. The combination of the test equipment for measuring the voluntary maximal isometric muscle force in the ankle joint, the surface electromyograms and the motion analysis of the measured leg allow an objective comparison of the strength of the muscular force between the left and right leg. It might be also used as a control setup during rehabilitation after surgical treatment or injuries.

  10. Reciprocal angular acceleration of the ankle and hip joints during quiet standing in humans.

    PubMed

    Aramaki, Y; Nozaki, D; Masani, K; Sato, T; Nakazawa, K; Yano, H

    2001-02-01

    Human quiet standing is often modeled as a single inverted pendulum rotating around the ankle joint, under the assumption that movement around the hip joint is quite small. However, several recent studies have shown that movement around the hip joint can play a significant role in the efficient maintenance of the center of body mass (COM) above the support area. The aim of this study was to investigate how coordination between the hip and ankle joints is controlled during human quiet standing. Subjects stood quietly for 30 s with their eyes either opened (EO) or closed (EC), and we measured subtle angular displacements around the ankle (thetaa) and hip (thetah) joints using three highly sensitive CCD laser displacement sensors. Reliable data were obtained for both angular displacement and angular velocity (the first derivative of the angular displacement). Further, measurement error was not predominant, even among the angular acceleration data, which were obtained by taking the second derivative of the angular displacement. The angular displacement, velocity, and acceleration of the hip were found to be significantly greater (P<0.001) than those of the ankle, confirming that hip-joint motion cannot be ignored, even during quiet standing. We also found that a consistent reciprocal relationship exists between the angular accelerations of the hip and ankle joints, namely positive or negative angular acceleration of ankle joint is compensated for by oppositely directed angular acceleration of the hip joint. Principal component analysis revealed that this relationship can be expressed as: thetah=gammathetaa with gamma=-3.15+/-1.24 and gamma=-3.12+/-1.46 (mean +/-SD) for EO and EC, respectively, where theta is the angular acceleration. There was no significant difference in the values of y for EO and EC, and these values were in agreement with the theoretical value calculated assuming the acceleration of COM was zero. On the other hand, such a consistent relationship was

  11. Relative Changes in Ankle and Hip Control during Bilateral Joint Movements in Persons with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Matthew C.; Hyngstrom, Allison S.; Ng, Alexander V.; Schmit, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to quantify hip and ankle impairments contributing to movement dysfunction in multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods Volitional phasing of bilateral hip and ankle torques was assessed using a load-cell-instrumented servomotor drive system in 10 participants with MS and 10 age-matched healthy participants. The hips and ankles were separately bilaterally oscillated 180° out of phase (40° range of motion) at a frequency of 0.75 Hz while the other joints were held stationary. Participants were instructed to assist in the same direction as the robot-imposed movement. The hip and ankle torques were measured and work was calculated for each movement. Results Total negative work at the ankle was significantly different between groups (p=0.040). The participants with MS produced larger negative work during hip flexion (p=0.042) and ankle flexion (p=0.037). Negative work at the hip was significantly correlated with the Berg Balance Scores and Timed 25 Feet Walk Test, and trends demonstrated increasing negative work with increasing clinical impairment in MS. Conclusions These results suggest an increased importance of the hip in functional balance and gait in MS. Significance Rehabilitation strategies targeting ankle recovery or compensation using the hip might improve movement function in MS. PMID:24315810

  12. Relative changes in ankle and hip control during bilateral joint movements in persons with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chua, Matthew C; Hyngstrom, Allison S; Ng, Alexander V; Schmit, Brian D

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify hip and ankle impairments contributing to movement dysfunction in multiple sclerosis (MS). Volitional phasing of bilateral hip and ankle torques was assessed using a load-cell-instrumented servomotor drive system in ten participants with MS and 10 age-matched healthy participants. The hips and ankles were separately bilaterally oscillated 180° out of phase (40° range of motion) at a frequency of 0.75 Hz while the other joints were held stationary. Participants were instructed to assist in the same direction as the robot-imposed movement. The hip and ankle torques were measured and work was calculated for each movement. Total negative work at the ankle was significantly different between groups (p=0.040). The participants with MS produced larger negative work during hip flexion (p=0.042) and ankle flexion (p=0.037). Negative work at the hip was significantly correlated with the Berg Balance Scores and Timed 25 Feet Walk Test, and trends demonstrated increasing negative work with increasing clinical impairment in MS. These results suggest an increased importance of the hip in functional balance and gait in MS. Rehabilitation strategies targeting ankle recovery or compensation using the hip might improve movement function in MS. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Ankle rehabilitation device with two degrees of freedom and compliant joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racu (Cazacu, C.-M.; Doroftei, I.

    2015-11-01

    We propose a rehabilitation device that we intend to be low cost and easy to manufacture. The system will ensure functionality but also have a small dimensions and low mass, considering the physiological dimensions of the foot and lower leg. To avoid injure of the ankle joint, this device is equipped with a compliant joint between the motor and mechanical transmission. The torque of this joint is intended to be adjustable, according to the degree of ankle joint damage. To choose the material and the dimensions of this compliant joint, in this paper we perform the first stress simulation. The minimum torque is calculated, while the maximum torque is given by the preliminary chosen actuator.

  14. Proprioceptive impairments associated with knee osteoarthritis are not generalized to the ankle and elbow joints.

    PubMed

    Shanahan, Camille J; Wrigley, Tim V; Farrell, Michael J; Bennell, Kim L; Hodges, Paul W

    2015-06-01

    The mechanisms for proprioceptive changes associated with knee osteoarthritis (OA) remain elusive. Observations of proprioceptive changes in both affected knees and other joints imply more generalized mechanisms for proprioceptive impairment. However, evidence for a generalized effect remains controversial. This study examined whether joint repositioning proprioceptive deficits are localized to the diseased joint (knee) or generalized across other joints (elbow and ankle) in people with knee OA. Thirty individuals with right knee OA (17 female, 66±7 [mean±SD] years) of moderate/severe radiographic disease severity and 30 healthy asymptomatic controls of comparable age (17 female, 65±8years) performed active joint repositioning tests of the knee, ankle and elbow in randomised order in supine. Participants with knee OA had a larger relative error for joint repositioning of the knee than the controls (OA: 2.7±2.1°, control: 1.6±1.7°, p=.03). Relative error did not differ between groups for the ankle (OA: 2.2±2.5°, control: 1.9±1.3°, p=.50) or elbow (OA: 2.5±3.3°, control: 2.9±2.8°, p=.58). These results are consistent with a mechanism for proprioceptive change that is localized to the knee joint. This could be mediated by problems with mechanoreceptors, processing/relay of somatosensory input to higher centers, or joint-specific interference with cognitive processes by pain.

  15. Normal hip, knee and ankle range of motion in the Turkish population.

    PubMed

    Hallaçeli, Hasan; Uruç, Vedat; Uysal, Halil Hakan; Ozden, Raif; Hallaçeli, Ciğdem; Soyuer, Ferhan; Ince Parpucu, Tuba; Yengil, Erhan; Cavlak, Uğur

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain the effect of gender and cultural habits on hip, knee and ankle range of motion (ROM) and to determine the differences between the ROM of right and left side symmetric joints of the lower extremities. The study included 987 (513 males and 474 females) healthy volunteers. Individuals with a history of illness, prior surgery or trauma involving any joint of either lower extremity were excluded from the study. The terminology and techniques of measurements used were those suggested by the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. Left side passive hip flexion and active internal rotation was higher than the right side. Passive flexion of the hip joint was higher in male subjects and internal and external rotation was higher in female subjects. In the knee joint, passive extension was higher in males. Plantarflexion and inversion of the ankle joint were higher in male subjects and dorsiflexion and eversion were higher in female subjects. The differences were considered insignificant in clinical terms as all were less than 3 degrees. There is no clinically significantly difference between right and left side hip, knee and ankle joints ROM. Gender and cultural habits do not appear to have clinically significantly effects on lower extremity joint ROM.

  16. The effect of lateral ankle sprain on dorsiflexion range of motion, posterior talar glide, and joint laxity.

    PubMed

    Denegar, Craig R; Hertel, Jay; Fonseca, Jose

    2002-04-01

    Retrospective study. Assess range of motion, posterior talar glide, and residual joint laxity following ankle sprain in a population of athletes who have returned to unrestricted activity. Lateral ankle sprains occur frequently in athletic populations and the reinjury rate may be as high as 80%. In an effort to better understand risk factors for reinjury, the sequelae to injury in a sample of college athletes were assessed. Twelve athletes with a history of lateral ankle sprain within the last 6 months and who had returned to sport participation were tested. Only athletes who reported never injuring the contralateral ankle were included. The injured and uninjured ankles of subjects were compared for measures of joint laxity, ankle dorsiflexion range of motion, and posterior talar glide. Friedman's test of rank order was used to analyze the laxity measures and a MANOVA was used to assess the dorsiflexion and posterior talar glide measures. Laxity was significantly greater at the talocrural and subtalar joints of the injured ankles. There were no significant differences in any of the ankle dorsiflexion measurements between injured and uninjured ankles, but posterior talar glide was significantly reduced in injured ankles as compared to uninjured ankles. In our sample of subjects, residual ligamentous laxity was commonly found following lateral ankle sprain. Dorsiflexion range of motion was restored in the population studied despite evidence of restricted posterior glide of the talocrural joint. Although restoration of physiological range of motion was achieved, residual joint dysfunction persisted. Further research is warranted to elucidate the role of altered arthrokinematics after lateral ankle sprain.

  17. A 4-week neuromuscular training program and gait patterns at the ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Coughlan, Garrett; Caulfield, Brian

    2007-01-01

    Previous research into the rehabilitation of ankle sprains has primarily focused on outcome measures that do not replicate functional activities, thus making it difficult to extrapolate the results relative to the weight-bearing conditions under which most ankle sprains occur. To measure the effects of a training program on gait during walking and running in an active athletic population. Matched-pairs, controlled trial. University motion analysis laboratory. Ten subjects from an athletic population (7 healthy, 3 with functional ankle instability: age = 25.8 +/- 3.9 years, height = 177.6 +/- 6.1 cm, mass = 66.8 +/- 7.4 kg) and 10 controls matched for age, sex, activity, and ankle instability (7 healthy, 3 with functional ankle instability: age = 27.4 +/- 5.8 years, height = 178.7 +/- 10.8 cm, mass = 71.6 +/- 10.0 kg). A 4-week neuromuscular training program undertaken by the treatment group. We measured ankle position and velocity in the frontal (x) and sagittal (y) planes in all subjects during treadmill walking and running for the periods 100 milliseconds before heel strike, at heel strike, and 100 milliseconds after heel strike. A 4-week neuromuscular training program resulted in no significant changes in ankle position or velocity during treadmill walking and running. The mechanisms by which neuromuscular training improves function in normal subjects and those with functional ankle instability do not appear to result in measurable changes in gait kinematics. Our findings raise issues regarding methods of ankle sprain rehabilitation and the measurement of their effectiveness in improving functional activities. Further research in a larger population with functional ankle instability is necessary.

  18. A 4-Week Neuromuscular Training Program and Gait Patterns at the Ankle Joint

    PubMed Central

    Coughlan, Garrett; Caulfield, Brian

    2007-01-01

    Context: Previous research into the rehabilitation of ankle sprains has primarily focused on outcome measures that do not replicate functional activities, thus making it difficult to extrapolate the results relative to the weight-bearing conditions under which most ankle sprains occur. Objective: To measure the effects of a training program on gait during walking and running in an active athletic population. Design: Matched-pairs, controlled trial. Setting: University motion analysis laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Ten subjects from an athletic population (7 healthy, 3 with functional ankle instability: age = 25.8 ± 3.9 years, height = 177.6 ± 6.1 cm, mass = 66.8 ± 7.4 kg) and 10 controls matched for age, sex, activity, and ankle instability (7 healthy, 3 with functional ankle instability: age = 27.4 ± 5.8 years, height = 178.7 ± 10.8 cm, mass = 71.6 ± 10.0 kg). Intervention(s): A 4-week neuromuscular training program undertaken by the treatment group. Main Outcome Measure(s): We measured ankle position and velocity in the frontal (x) and sagittal (y) planes in all subjects during treadmill walking and running for the periods 100 milliseconds before heel strike, at heel strike, and 100 milliseconds after heel strike. Results: A 4-week neuromuscular training program resulted in no significant changes in ankle position or velocity during treadmill walking and running. Conclusions: The mechanisms by which neuromuscular training improves function in normal subjects and those with functional ankle instability do not appear to result in measurable changes in gait kinematics. Our findings raise issues regarding methods of ankle sprain rehabilitation and the measurement of their effectiveness in improving functional activities. Further research in a larger population with functional ankle instability is necessary. PMID:17597944

  19. Effects of joint mobilization on chronic ankle instability: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Díaz, David; Lomas Vega, Rafael; Osuna-Pérez, Maria Catalina; Hita-Contreras, Fidel; Martínez-Amat, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of joint mobilization, in which movement is applied to the ankle's dorsiflexion range of motion, on dynamic postural control and on the self-reported instability of patients with chronic ankle instability (CAI). A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial with repeated measures and a follow-up period. Ninety patients with a history of recurrent ankle sprain, self-reported instability, and a limited dorsiflexion range of motion, were randomly assigned to either the intervention group (Joint Mobilizations, 3 weeks, two sessions per week) the placebo group (Sham Mobilizations, same duration as joint mobilization) or the control group, with a 6 months follow-up. Dorsiflexion Range of Motion (DFROM), Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) and CAI Tool (CAIT) were outcome measures. A separate 3 × 4 mixed model analysis of variance was performed to examine the effect of treatment conditions and time, and intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis was applied to evaluate the effect of the independent variable. The application of joint mobilization resulted in better scores of DFROM, CAIT, and SEBTs in the intervention group when compared with the placebo or the control groups (p < 0.001). The effect sizes of group-by-time interaction, measured with eta-squared, oscillated between 0.954 for DFROM and 0.288 for SEBT posteromedial distance. In within-group analysis, the manipulation group showed an improvement at 6 months follow-up in CAIT [mean = 5.23, CI 95% (4.63-5.84)], DFROM [mean = 6.77, CI 95% (6.45-7.08)], anterior SEBT [mean = 7.35, CI 95% (6.59-8.12)], posteromedial SEBT [mean = 3.32, CI 95% (0.95-5.69)], and posterolateral SEBT [mean = 2.55, CI 95% (2.20-2.89)]. Joint mobilization techniques applied to subjects suffering from CAI were able to improve ankle DFROM, postural control, and self-reported instability. These results suggest that joint mobilization could be applied to patients with recurrent ankle sprain to

  20. Subchondral bone remodeling is related to clinical improvement after joint distraction in the treatment of ankle osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Intema, F.; Thomas, T.P.; Anderson, D.D.; Elkins, J.M.; Brown, T.D.; Amendola, A.; Lafeber, F.P.J.G.; Saltzman, C.L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective In osteoarthritis (OA), subchondral bone changes alter the joint’s mechanical environment and potentially influence progression of cartilage degeneration. Joint distraction as a treatment for OA has been shown to provide pain relief and functional improvement through mechanisms that are not well understood. This study evaluated whether subchondral bone remodeling was associated with clinical improvement in OA patients treated with joint distraction. Method Twenty-six patients with advanced post-traumatic ankle OA were treated with joint distraction for three months using an Ilizarov frame in a referral center. Primary outcome measure was bone density change analyzed on CT scans. Longitudinal, manually segmented CT datasets for a given patient were brought into a common spatial alignment. Changes in bone density (Hounsfield Units (HU), relative to baseline) were calculated at the weight-bearing region, extending subchondrally to a depth of 8 mm. Clinical outcome was assessed using the ankle OA scale. Results Baseline scans demonstrated subchondral sclerosis with local cysts. At one and two years of follow-up, an overall decrease in bone density (−23% and −21%, respectively) was observed. Interestingly, density in originally low-density (cystic) areas increased. Joint distraction resulted in a decrease in pain (from 60 to 35, scale of 100) and functional deficit (from 67 to 36). Improvements in clinical outcomes were best correlated with disappearance of low-density (cystic) areas (r=0.69). Conclusions Treatment of advanced post-traumatic ankle OA with three months of joint distraction resulted in bone density normalization that was associated with clinical improvement. PMID:21324372

  1. Effects of immobilization and remobilization on the ankle joint in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, R.I.; Coradini, J.G.; Silva, L.I.; Bertolini, G.R.F.; Brancalhão, R.M.C.; Ribeiro, L.F.C.

    2014-01-01

    A sprained ankle is a common musculoskeletal sports injury and it is often treated by immobilization of the joint. Despite the beneficial effects of this therapeutic measure, the high prevalence of residual symptoms affects the quality of life, and remobilization of the joint can reverse this situation. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of immobilization and remobilization on the ankle joint of Wistar rats. Eighteen male rats had their right hindlimb immobilized for 15 days, and were divided into the following groups: G1, immobilized; G2, remobilized freely for 14 days; and G3, remobilized by swimming and jumping in water for 14 days, performed on alternate days, with progression of time and a series of exercises. The contralateral limb was the control. After the experimental period, the ankle joints were processed for microscopic analysis. Histomorphometry did not show any significant differences between the control and immobilized/remobilized groups and members, in terms of number of chondrocytes and thickness of the articular cartilage of the tibia and talus. Morphological analysis of animals from G1 showed significant degenerative lesions in the talus, such as exposure of the subchondral bone, flocculation, and cracks between the anterior and mid-regions of the articular cartilage and the synovial membrane. Remobilization by therapeutic exercise in water led to recovery in the articular cartilage and synovial membrane of the ankle joint when compared with free remobilization, and it was shown to be an effective therapeutic measure in the recovery of the ankle joint. PMID:25140815

  2. [Ultrasound in complex of radiological studies in diagnosis of ankle joint medial aspect pathologies].

    PubMed

    Gurgenidze, T; Mizandari, M

    2011-10-01

    The aim of the research is to study sonosemiotics of ankle joint pathology by means of ultrasound in order to optimize the diagnostic process and improve the treatment. 130 patients (age ranges from 5 to 70 years) underwent the radiological study of ankle joint medial aspect. Pathology types: degenerative-dystrophic diseases - 39 (30%), inflammatory pathology - 21 (16.2%), traumatic injuries - 20 (15.2%), vascular pathologies - 26 (20%), neurogenic problems -7 (5.4%), soft tissue neoplasms - 5 (3.8%), congenital anomalies - 7 (5.4%) and vertebral pathology - 5 (4.0%). The diagnostic studies include: a) Ultrasound, performed on digital ultrasound system using high frequency (7.5-12.0 MHz) linear probe with Doppler capability (all patients); b) X-Ray filming in antero-posterior and lateral projections (6 patients- 4.5%); c) MRI - T1 and T2 weighted images in saggital and transverse planes 10 patients (10.0%) and d) CT - 2 patients (1.5%); To 2 (1.5%) patient biopsy has been performed. This study showed that ultrasound was successful in ankle joint medial aspect pathology diagnosis in 108 cases (84.0%); It was ineffective in osseous pathology definition. In final diagnosis of impingment syndrom MRI was required in 4 (3.6%) cases. It is concluded that ultrasound should be used as a Gold Standard in diagnosis of localized pain and swelling in the ankle joint.

  3. The Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement and the ideal biomechanical requirements of ankle replacements.

    PubMed

    Robati, Shibby; Salih, Alan; Ghosh, Koushik; Vinayakam, Parthiban

    2016-03-01

    The complex anatomy of the articular bone surfaces, ligaments, tendon attachments and muscles makes the ankle joint difficult to replicate in prosthetic replacements. Ever since the early 1970s, which saw the dawn of the first total ankle replacements, there have been numerous other attempts at replicating the joint, often with poor clinical outcomes. The anatomy of the ankle is discussed, followed by evidence of the normal ankle biomechanics and the ideal requirements of an ankle replacement. We focus on the Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement and evaluate whether these requirements have been met.

  4. The Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement and the ideal biomechanical requirements of ankle replacements

    PubMed Central

    Robati, Shibby; Salih, Alan; Ghosh, Koushik; Vinayakam, Parthiban

    2016-01-01

    The complex anatomy of the articular bone surfaces, ligaments, tendon attachments and muscles makes the ankle joint difficult to replicate in prosthetic replacements. Ever since the early 1970s, which saw the dawn of the first total ankle replacements, there have been numerous other attempts at replicating the joint, often with poor clinical outcomes. The anatomy of the ankle is discussed, followed by evidence of the normal ankle biomechanics and the ideal requirements of an ankle replacement. We focus on the Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement and evaluate whether these requirements have been met. PMID:26955224

  5. Ankle, knee, and hip joint contribution to body support during gait

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Tsutomu; Ueda, Yasuhisa; Kamijo, Fumiko

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Support moment was defined as the sum of ankle plantar flexion, knee and hip extension moments. There are some mechanical relationships among the 3 joints. If these relationships were understood, it might be possible to determine which joint should be strengthened to improve gait. The aims of this study were to examine the mutual relationship among kinetic variables of the 3 joints during different phases. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-five healthy subjects volunteered for this study. They were asked to walk on a platform at a self-selected speed. Correlation coefficients between support moment and vertical ground reaction force were calculated for each subject. Pearson correlation analysis was performed among the 3 joint moments and between each joint moment and vertical ground reaction force. [Results] Knee and hip extension moments showed negative correlation throughout the stance. Ankle moment had a positive with hip but a negative correlation with knee moment except in the initial contact and pre-swing. Hip moment in the initial contact, knee moment in the loading response, and ankle moment from the terminal stance to pre-swing had a high correlation with vertical ground reaction force. [Conclusion] The results may indicate which joint should be strengthened to improve gait pattern. PMID:27821945

  6. A three-dimensional ankle kinetostatic model to simulate loaded and unloaded joint motion.

    PubMed

    Forlani, Margherita; Sancisi, Nicola; Parenti-Castelli, Vincenzo

    2015-06-01

    A kinetostatic model able to replicate both the natural unloaded motion of the tibiotalar (or ankle) joint and the joint behavior under external loads is presented. The model is developed as the second step of a sequential procedure, which allows the definition of a kinetostatic model as a generalization of a kinematic model of the joint defined at the first step. Specifically, this kinematic model taken as the starting point of the definition procedure is a parallel spatial mechanism which replicates the ankle unloaded motion. It features two rigid bodies (representing the tibia-fibula and the talus-calcaneus complexes) interconnected by five rigid binary links, that mimic three articular contacts and two nearly isometric fibers (IFs) of the tibiocalcaneal ligament (TiCaL) and calcaneofibular ligament (CaFiL). In the kinetostatic model, the five links are considered as compliant; moreover, further elastic structures are added to represent all the main ankle passive structures of the joint. Thanks to this definition procedure, the kinetostatic model still replicates the ankle unloaded motion with the same accuracy as the kinematic model. In addition, the model can replicate the behavior of the joint when external loads are applied. Finally, the structures that guide these motions are consistent with the anatomical evidence. The parameters of the model are identified for two specimens from both subject-specific and published data. Loads are then applied to the model in order to simulate two common clinical tests. The model-predicted ankle motion shows good agreement with results from the literature.

  7. Upper ankle joint space detection on low contrast intraoperative fluoroscopic C-arm projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Sarina; Schnetzke, Marc; Brehler, Michael; Swartman, Benedict; Vetter, Sven; Franke, Jochen; Grützner, Paul A.; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Nolden, Marco

    2017-03-01

    Intraoperative mobile C-arm fluoroscopy is widely used for interventional verification in trauma surgery, high flexibility combined with low cost being the main advantages of the method. However, the lack of global device-to- patient orientation is challenging, when comparing the acquired data to other intrapatient datasets. In upper ankle joint fracture reduction accompanied with an unstable syndesmosis, a comparison to the unfractured contralateral site is helpful for verification of the reduction result. To reduce dose and operation time, our approach aims at the comparison of single projections of the unfractured ankle with volumetric images of the reduced fracture. For precise assessment, a pre-alignment of both datasets is a crucial step. We propose a contour extraction pipeline to estimate the joint space location for a prealignment of fluoroscopic C-arm projections containing the upper ankle joint. A quadtree-based hierarchical variance comparison extracts potential feature points and a Hough transform is applied to identify bone shaft lines together with the tibiotalar joint space. By using this information we can define the coarse orientation of the projections independent from the ankle pose during acquisition in order to align those images to the volume of the fractured ankle. The proposed method was evaluated on thirteen cadaveric datasets consisting of 100 projections each with manually adjusted image planes by three trauma surgeons. The results show that the method can be used to detect the joint space orientation. The correlation between angle deviation and anatomical projection direction gives valuable input on the acquisition direction for future clinical experiments.

  8. Interventions for increasing ankle joint dorsiflexion: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ankle joint equinus, or restricted dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM), has been linked to a range of pathologies of relevance to clinical practitioners. This systematic review and meta-analysis investigated the effects of conservative interventions on ankle joint ROM in healthy individuals and athletic populations. Methods Keyword searches of Embase, Medline, Cochrane and CINAHL databases were performed with the final search being run in August 2013. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they assessed the effect of a non-surgical intervention on ankle joint dorsiflexion in healthy populations. Studies were quality rated using a standard quality assessment scale. Standardised mean differences (SMDs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated and results were pooled where study methods were homogenous. Results Twenty-three studies met eligibility criteria, with a total of 734 study participants. Results suggest that there is some evidence to support the efficacy of static stretching alone (SMDs: range 0.70 to 1.69) and static stretching in combination with ultrasound (SMDs: range 0.91 to 0.95), diathermy (SMD 1.12), diathermy and ice (SMD 1.16), heel raise exercises (SMDs: range 0.70 to 0.77), superficial moist heat (SMDs: range 0.65 to 0.84) and warm up (SMD 0.87) in improving ankle joint dorsiflexion ROM. Conclusions Some evidence exists to support the efficacy of stretching alone and stretching in combination with other therapies in increasing ankle joint ROM in healthy individuals. There is a paucity of quality evidence to support the efficacy of other non-surgical interventions, thus further research in this area is warranted. PMID:24225348

  9. Borderline ankle-brachial index is associated with increased prevalence of micro- and macrovascular complications in type 2 diabetes: A cross-sectional analysis of 12,772 patients from the Joint Asia Diabetes Evaluation Program.

    PubMed

    Yan, Bryan P; Zhang, Yuying; Kong, Alice P S; Luk, Andrea O Y; Ozaki, Risa; Yeung, Roseanne; Tong, Peter C Y; Chan, Wing Ban; Tsang, Chiu-Chi; Lau, Kam-Piu; Cheung, Yu; Wolthers, Troels; Lyubomirsky, Greg; So, Wing-Yee; Ma, Ronald C W; Chow, Francis C C; Chan, Juliana C N

    2015-09-01

    Borderline ankle-brachial index is increasingly recognised as a marker of cardiovascular risk. We evaluated the impact of borderline ankle-brachial index in 12,772 Chinese type 2 diabetes patients from the Joint Asia Diabetes Evaluation Program between 2007 and 2012. Cardiovascular risk factors, complications and health-related quality of life were compared between patients with normal ankle-brachial index (1.0-1.4), borderline ankle-brachial index (0.90-0.99) and peripheral arterial disease (ankle-brachial index < 0.9). The prevalence of peripheral arterial disease and borderline ankle-brachial index was 4.6% and 9.6%, respectively. Borderline ankle-brachial index patients were older, more likely to be smokers and hypertensive, had longer duration of diabetes, poorer kidney function and poorer health-related quality of life than patients with normal ankle-brachial index. After adjustment for traditional cardiovascular risk factors, borderline ankle-brachial index was an independent predictor of diabetes-related micro- and macrovascular complications including retinopathy (odd ratios: 1.19 (95% confidence interval: 1.04-1.37)), macroalbuminuria (1.31 (1.10-1.56)), chronic kidney disease (1.22 (1.00-1.50)) and stroke (1.31 (1.05-1.64)). These findings suggest that patients with diabetes and borderline ankle-brachial index are at increased cardiovascular risk and may benefit from more intensive management. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Ankle replacement - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... ankle replacement. Your surgeon removed and reshaped damaged bones, and put in an artificial ankle joint. You received pain medicine and were shown how to treat swelling around your new ankle joint.

  11. Retrospective analysis of the rate and interval to union for joint arthrodesis of the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Mirmiran, Roya; Wilde, Brandon; Nielsen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Arthrodesis is a common procedure indicated for surgical treatment of end-stage degenerative joint disease of the foot and ankle. Many published studies have reviewed the union rate, focusing on specific technique or fixation. However, studies reporting on the average period required to achieve fusion, irrespective of the type of fixation or surgical method used, have been lacking. We report on the union rate and interval to fusion in patients who had undergone primary arthrodesis of various joints of the foot and ankle. A retrospective review of the medical records of 135 patients was performed. The specific joints studied were ankle, and the subtalar, triple, first tarsometatarsal, first metatarsophalangeal, and hallux interphalangeal joints. Our results showed that the average interval for complete fusion was significantly less for the joints in the forefoot, with the subtalar joint, ankle, and triple arthrodesis requiring a longer period to achieve complete fusion. The nonunion rate was also greater when the fusion involved the joints of the rearfoot. Our results have refuted the idea that 6 weeks is the minimum period required to achieve fusion in the foot and ankle. The results of our study support the need for additional education of the patients and surgeons that the interval required for recovery after foot and ankle fusion depends on the location and surface area that has been fused. Copyright © 2014 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Open Dislocation of the High Ankle Joint After Fibular Graft Harvesting.

    PubMed

    Anđelković, Slađana Z; Vučković, Čedo Đ; Palibrk, Tomislav D; Milutinović, Suzana M; Bumbaširević, Marko Ž

    2015-01-01

    The free microvascular fibula and soft tissue transfer has become a widely used method for reconstruction of different regions. Donor site morbidity for free fibula microvascular flaps has generally been reported to be low, or at least acceptable. We describe the case of a patient who underwent vascularized free fibula graft harvest for mandibular reconstruction. After 21 months, he had sustained an open dislocation of the left high ankle joint during recreational sports activity. We did not found such case in the published data. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Estimation of Time-Varying, Intrinsic and Reflex Dynamic Joint Stiffness during Movement. Application to the Ankle Joint

    PubMed Central

    Guarín, Diego L.; Kearney, Robert E.

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic joint stiffness determines the relation between joint position and torque, and plays a vital role in the control of posture and movement. Dynamic joint stiffness can be quantified during quasi-stationary conditions using disturbance experiments, where small position perturbations are applied to the joint and the torque response is recorded. Dynamic joint stiffness is composed of intrinsic and reflex mechanisms that act and change together, so that nonlinear, mathematical models and specialized system identification techniques are necessary to estimate their relative contributions to overall joint stiffness. Quasi-stationary experiments have demonstrated that dynamic joint stiffness is heavily modulated by joint position and voluntary torque. Consequently, during movement, when joint position and torque change rapidly, dynamic joint stiffness will be Time-Varying (TV). This paper introduces a new method to quantify the TV intrinsic and reflex components of dynamic joint stiffness during movement. The algorithm combines ensemble and deterministic approaches for estimation of TV systems; and uses a TV, parallel-cascade, nonlinear system identification technique to separate overall dynamic joint stiffness into intrinsic and reflex components from position and torque records. Simulation studies of a stiffness model, whose parameters varied with time as is expected during walking, demonstrated that the new algorithm accurately tracked the changes in dynamic joint stiffness using as little as 40 gait cycles. The method was also used to estimate the intrinsic and reflex dynamic ankle stiffness from an experiment with a healthy subject during which ankle movements were imposed while the subject maintained a constant muscle contraction. The method identified TV stiffness model parameters that predicted the measured torque very well, accounting for more than 95% of its variance. Moreover, both intrinsic and reflex dynamic stiffness were heavily modulated through the

  14. Factors affecting the range of motion of the ankle and first metatarsophalangeal joints in patients undergoing hemodialysis who walk daily

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Nobumasa; Shoji, Morio; Kitagawa, Takashi; Terada, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Increased plantar pressure during walking is a risk factor for foot ulcers because of reduced range of motion at the ankle and first metatarsophalangeal joints. However, the range of motion in patients undergoing hemodialysis has not yet been determined. A cross-sectional study was performed to investigate the factors affecting the range of motion of the ankle and first metatarsophalangeal joints in patients undergoing hemodialysis who walk daily. [Subjects and Methods] Seventy feet of 35 patients receiving hemodialysis therapy were examined. Measurements included the passive range of motion of plantar flexion and dorsiflexion of the ankle joint, and flexion and extension of the first metatarsophalangeal joint. [Results] Hemodialysis duration was not associated with ankle and first metatarsophalangeal joint range of motion in patients undergoing hemodialysis. Diabetes duration was significantly associated with limited ankle joint mobility. Finally, blood hemoglobin levels, body mass index, and age were associated with first metatarsophalangeal joint range of motion. [Conclusion] The present study identified age, diabetes, and decreased physical activity, but not hemodialysis duration, to be risk factors for limited joint mobility of the ankle and first metatarsophalangeal joints in patients undergoing hemodialysis. PMID:27313371

  15. Factors affecting the range of motion of the ankle and first metatarsophalangeal joints in patients undergoing hemodialysis who walk daily.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Nobumasa; Shoji, Morio; Kitagawa, Takashi; Terada, Shigeru

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] Increased plantar pressure during walking is a risk factor for foot ulcers because of reduced range of motion at the ankle and first metatarsophalangeal joints. However, the range of motion in patients undergoing hemodialysis has not yet been determined. A cross-sectional study was performed to investigate the factors affecting the range of motion of the ankle and first metatarsophalangeal joints in patients undergoing hemodialysis who walk daily. [Subjects and Methods] Seventy feet of 35 patients receiving hemodialysis therapy were examined. Measurements included the passive range of motion of plantar flexion and dorsiflexion of the ankle joint, and flexion and extension of the first metatarsophalangeal joint. [Results] Hemodialysis duration was not associated with ankle and first metatarsophalangeal joint range of motion in patients undergoing hemodialysis. Diabetes duration was significantly associated with limited ankle joint mobility. Finally, blood hemoglobin levels, body mass index, and age were associated with first metatarsophalangeal joint range of motion. [Conclusion] The present study identified age, diabetes, and decreased physical activity, but not hemodialysis duration, to be risk factors for limited joint mobility of the ankle and first metatarsophalangeal joints in patients undergoing hemodialysis.

  16. Estimation of ankle joint angle from peroneal and tibial electroneurograms based on muscle spindle model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chou-Ching K; Ju, Ming-Shaung; Chan, Ching-Chao

    2010-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to develop a new method of estimating the angle of the passively stretched ankle joint, based on structural muscle spindle models of the tibial and peroneal electroneurograms (ENG). Passive ramp-and-hold and alternating stretches of the ankle joint were performed in a rabbit. Simultaneously, two cuff electrodes were used to record the ENGs of peroneal and tibial nerves. Based on the two ENGs and the joint angle trajectory, two muscle spindle models were constructed and their inverse models were integrated to compute angle estimates. The model parameters were optimized. The performance of our approach was compared with those of the adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system and artificial neural network model. The results revealed that our model had a better performance of estimating the ankle joint angle in large-range movements and smaller tracking errors. This study provides a new estimation algorithm to extract the joint angle from the information conveyed in a nerve.

  17. The effects of ankle bracing on motion of the knee and the hip joint during trunk rotation tasks.

    PubMed

    Santos, Marcio J; McIntire, Kevin; Foecking, Joseph; Liu, Wen

    2004-11-01

    The use of prophylactic ankle braces is common during athletic activities since the ankle is one of the most commonly injured joints. Past studies have focused on the effects of ankle braces on ankle movement restriction, preventing injuries, proprioception, balance and athletic performance. However, the influence of ankle restriction on other joints has not been studied. The constraint of ankle movement may lead to an increased loading on the knee joint, which could be a potential risk of knee injuries during athletic activities. The primary goal of the current study was to determine quantitatively the effect of an ankle brace on the knee axial rotation during two different trunk turning tasks. Ten healthy subjects performed trunk turning movements while standing on one leg: turning sideways to catch a ball and turning sideways to touch a target with the shoulder. The tasks were performed with and without an ankle brace worn on the supporting leg. The trunk axial rotation in reference to the floor and three dimensional joint angular motions of the ankle, knee and hip were determined. The use of an ankle brace resulted in reduced trunk axial rotation during the ball catching tasks, and increased knee axial rotation during the target touching tasks. The results of this study showed that the effect of the ankle brace on the knee axial rotation depended on the context of the tasks performed. Under situations that required forceful trunk turning movement while standing on a single leg, the ankle braces may cause an increase in the knee axial rotation indicating higher risk of knee injury.

  18. Relation between ankle joint dynamics and patellar tendinopathy in elite volleyball players.

    PubMed

    Richards, David P; Ajemian, Stanley V; Wiley, J Preston; Brunet, Jacques A; Zernicke, Ronald F

    2002-09-01

    Ankle joint complex dynamics developed during volleyball spike jumps take-offs and landings were quantified to assess potential relations between these joint dynamics and patellar tendinopathy. Three-dimensional kinematic data provided information about movements of the lower limbs, while the kinetic data permitted analysis of ground reaction forces as players took-off and landed from full-speed spike jumps. Simulated volleyball court with net in a biomechanics research laboratory. 10 members of the Canadian Men's National Volleyball Team. From history and physical examination, 3 of the 10 players had patellar tendon pain associated with activity and were diagnosed with patellar tendinopathy at the time of the study. Investigators were blinded about the injury status of the players. None. Three-dimensional kinematics and joint moments of the ankle, knee, and hip joints. Our analysis revealed that maximal external tibial rotation occurred at or near maximal dorsiflexion while maximal internal tibial rotation coincided with maximal plantarflexion. The plantarflexion moment was 3 to 10 times greater than all the other moments measured, with the maximal plantarflexor moment being calculated at 0.4 BWm (360 Nm). In blinded logistic regression analyses, we found one of the dynamics variables (inversion moment during the landing of the spike jump) was a significant predictor of patellar tendinopathy. Coupling the results of the current analysis of ankle joint complex dynamics with previously reported results of knee joint dynamics related to patellar tendinopathy suggests that a cluster of variables linked to patellar tendinopathy includes: high ankle inversion-eversion moments, high external tibial rotation and plantarflexion moments, large vertical ground reaction forces, and high rate of knee extensor moment development.

  19. Three-dimensional morphological characteristics measurement of ankle joint based on computed tomography image post-processing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-Xi; Lu, Xiao-Ling; Bi, Gang; Yu, Xiao; Hao, Yi-Li; Zhang, Kun; Zou, Li-Ling; Mei, Jiong; Yu, Guang-Rong

    2011-12-01

    As precise positioning of ankle radiography is not possible, quantitative measurement of all syndesmotic parameters on repeated ankle X-ray films may be of little value. The purpose of this study was to provide a set of scientific and objective evaluation criteria for assessing the quality of ankle fracture reduction accurately and reliably by an intelligent combining three-dimensional (3-D) computed tomography (CT) measurement model. From June 2008 to March 2011, all the thin-slice CT images of 100 cases (50 males and 50 females) with normal ankle joint scanned by 16-slice spiral CT were collected. Two-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D images of ankle joints were generated by using multiple planar reconstruction (MPR) and surface shaded display (SSD) respectively. The relevant parameters about bone structures and their relationship were measured and analyzed based on 3-D topological narrow division technique and 3-D measurement techniques combining essential elements of point, line and surface. In this study, the mean distance from lateral malleolus tip to talocrural articular surface, the tip of medial malleolus anterior colliculus to talocrural articular surface and lateral malleolus tip to the tip of medial malleolus anterior colliculus were (22.83 ± 1.12) mm, (12.84 ± 1.09) mm, and (61.18 ± 2.03) mm respectively in male group, and (20.16 ± 1.00) mm, (10.30 ± 1.05) mm and (53.00 ± 1.40) mm respectively in female group. The above three parameters were correlated with gender, height and weight (P < 0.05). However, the mean perpendicular distance from lateral malleolus tip to the plane through the tip of medial malleolus anterior colliculus, the talocrural angle, later clear space, medial clear space, and the superior clear space were (9.93 ± 0.29) mm, (10.01 ± 0.38)°, (1.94 ± 0.16) mm, (2.78 ± 0.19) mm, and (3.14 ± 0.15) mm respectively in 100 cases, were not significance correlated with gender, height and weight (P > 0.05). This study could provide a certain

  20. [Conventional X-Rays of Ankle Joint Fractures in Older Patients are Not Always Predictive].

    PubMed

    Jubel, A; Faymonville, C; Andermahr, J; Boxberg, S; Schiffer, G

    2017-02-01

    Background: Ankle fractures are extremely common in the elderly, with an incidence of up to 39 fractures per 100,000 persons per year. We found a discrepancy between intraoperative findings and preoperative X-ray findings. It was suggested that many relevant lesions of the ankle joint in the elderly cannot be detected with plain X-rays. Methods: Complete data sets and preoperative X-rays of 84 patients aged above 60 years with ankle fractures were analysed retrospectively. There were 59 women and 25 men, with a mean age of 69.9 years. Operation reports and preoperative X-rays were analysed with respect to four relevant lesions: multifragmentary fracture pattern of the lateral malleolus, involvement of the medial malleolus, posterior malleolar fractures and bony avulsion of anterior syndesmosis. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, accuracy and prevalence were calculated. Results: The prevalence of specific ankle lesions in the analyzed cohort was 24 % for the multifragmentary fracture pattern of the lateral malleolus, 38 % for fractures of the medial malleolus, 25 % for posterior malleolar fractures and 22.6 % for bony avulsions of the anterior syndesmosis. Multifragmentary fracture patterns of the lateral malleolus (sensitivity 0 %) and bony avulsions of the anterior syndesmosis (sensitivity 5 %) could not be detected in plain X-rays of the ankle joint at all. Fractures of the medial malleolus and involvement of the dorsal tibial facet were detected with a sensitivity of 96.8 % and 76.2 %, respectively, and specificity of 100 % in both cases. Conclusions: This study confirms that complex fracture patterns, such as multifragmentary involvement of the lateral malleolus, additional fracture of the medial malleolus, involvement of the dorsal tibial facet or bony avulsion of the anterior syndesmosis are common in ankle fractures of the elderly. Therefore, CT scans should be routinely considered for primary

  1. The correlation of the morphological changes of ankle point and ankle joint function after surgery on the Ruedi-Allgouer type III Pilon fracture: A case series study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yifei; Cai, Leyi; Lu, Xiaolang; Yu, Yang; Hong, Jianjun

    2017-08-01

    To analyze the relationship between imaging findings and postoperative curative effect by measuring the morphology of the ankle mortise in patients with the Ruedi-Allgouer type III Pilon fractures. Forty-seven patients with Ruedi-Allgouer type III Pilon fractures who underwent surgical treatment from January 2011 to January 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. At the last follow-up, x-rays of the affected ankle and the healthy side were measured. According to the Kitaoka score of ankle joint function at the last follow-up. All patients were followed up for 18-24 months (mean 21 months). This study demonstrated that compared with the healthy side, the index of the width, depth, and coronal/sagittal angles of the ankle mortise were significantly different (P < 0.05) in the 47 patients except for the index of height (P > 0.05). According to the Kitaoka score, the difference between the affected and the healthy sides of each index of the ankle mortise was compared between the 3 groups. That is, the intraoperative treatment of the width and depth of the ankle mortise as well as the coronal and sagittal angles of the ankle mortise were significantly correlated with the postoperative curative effect. The intraoperative treatment of ankle mortise width, depth, and ankle coronal/sagittal angle in patients with severe Pilon fractures has a significant impact on postoperative efficacy. In order to prevent the occurrence of traumatic arthritis, the anatomical morphology of the ankle should be restored as much as possible in the course of surgery. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Intra-articular sodium hyaluronate injections in the osteoarthritic ankle joint: effects, safety and dose dependency.

    PubMed

    Witteveen, Angelique G H; Sierevelt, Inger N; Blankevoort, Leendert; Kerkhoffs, Gino M M J; van Dijk, C Niek

    2010-12-01

    To determine the efficacy, safety and dose dependency of intra-articular Orthovisc(®) hyaluronic acid injections in the ankle. A prospective single blinded study in patients with symptomatic ankle-osteoarthritis. Patients were randomly allocated to 1, 2, 3 ml, or 3 weekly injections of 1 ml (3 × 1 ml). Primary outcome was 'pain during walking' at 15 weeks measured on a 100mm VAS. Twenty-six patients (ITT) participated. The 3 × 1 ml dose group showed statistically significant decreases at week 7 for 'pain during walking' and 'pain at rest' (p=0.046). At week 15 decreases were significant for 'pain at rest' (p=0.046). There was no significant decrease of VAS-scores in any of the single dose groups. Seven patients experienced temporary local swelling and increased pain in the injected ankle. Orthovisc(®) viscosupplementation in the ankle joint is effective and well tolerated. The 3 × 1 ml dose regimen shows the best results. Copyright © 2009 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Redistribution of Mechanical Work at the Knee and Ankle Joints During Fast Running in Minimalist Shoes.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Joel T; Buckley, Jonathan D; Tsiros, Margarita D; Brown, Nicholas A T; Thewlis, Dominic

    2016-10-01

    Minimalist shoes have been suggested as a way to alter running biomechanics to improve running performance and reduce injuries. However, to date, researchers have only considered the effect of minimalist shoes at slow running speeds. To determine if runners change foot-strike pattern and alter the distribution of mechanical work at the knee and ankle joints when running at a fast speed in minimalist shoes compared with conventional running shoes. Crossover study. Research laboratory. Twenty-six trained runners (age = 30.0 ± 7.9 years [age range, 18-40 years], height = 1.79 ± 0.06 m, mass = 75.3 ± 8.2 kg, weekly training distance = 27 ± 15 km) who ran with a habitual rearfoot foot-strike pattern and had no experience running in minimalist shoes. Participants completed overground running trials at 18 km/h in minimalist and conventional shoes. Sagittal-plane kinematics and joint work at the knee and ankle joints were computed using 3-dimensional kinematic and ground reaction force data. Foot-strike pattern was classified as rearfoot, midfoot, or forefoot strike based on strike index and ankle angle at initial contact. We observed no difference in foot-strike classification between shoes (χ(2)1 = 2.29, P = .13). Ankle angle at initial contact was less (2.46° versus 7.43°; t25 = 3.34, P = .003) and strike index was greater (35.97% versus 29.04%; t25 = 2.38, P = .03) when running in minimalist shoes compared with conventional shoes. We observed greater negative (52.87 J versus 42.46 J; t24 = 2.29, P = .03) and positive work (68.91 J versus 59.08 J; t24 = 2.65, P = .01) at the ankle but less negative (59.01 J versus 67.02 J; t24 = 2.25, P = .03) and positive work (40.37 J versus 47.09 J; t24 = 2.11, P = .046) at the knee with minimalist shoes compared with conventional shoes. Running in minimalist shoes at a fast speed caused a redistribution of work from the knee to the ankle joint. This finding suggests that runners changing from conventional to minimalist shoes

  4. Redistribution of Mechanical Work at the Knee and Ankle Joints During Fast Running in Minimalist Shoes

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Joel T.; Buckley, Jonathan D.; Tsiros, Margarita D.; Brown, Nicholas A. T.; Thewlis, Dominic

    2016-01-01

    Context: Minimalist shoes have been suggested as a way to alter running biomechanics to improve running performance and reduce injuries. However, to date, researchers have only considered the effect of minimalist shoes at slow running speeds. Objective: To determine if runners change foot-strike pattern and alter the distribution of mechanical work at the knee and ankle joints when running at a fast speed in minimalist shoes compared with conventional running shoes. Design: Crossover study. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty-six trained runners (age = 30.0 ± 7.9 years [age range, 18−40 years], height = 1.79 ± 0.06 m, mass = 75.3 ± 8.2 kg, weekly training distance = 27 ± 15 km) who ran with a habitual rearfoot foot-strike pattern and had no experience running in minimalist shoes. Intervention(s): Participants completed overground running trials at 18 km/h in minimalist and conventional shoes. Main Outcome Measure(s): Sagittal-plane kinematics and joint work at the knee and ankle joints were computed using 3-dimensional kinematic and ground reaction force data. Foot-strike pattern was classified as rearfoot, midfoot, or forefoot strike based on strike index and ankle angle at initial contact. Results: We observed no difference in foot-strike classification between shoes (χ21 = 2.29, P = .13). Ankle angle at initial contact was less (2.46° versus 7.43°; t25 = 3.34, P = .003) and strike index was greater (35.97% versus 29.04%; t25 = 2.38, P = .03) when running in minimalist shoes compared with conventional shoes. We observed greater negative (52.87 J versus 42.46 J; t24 = 2.29, P = .03) and positive work (68.91 J versus 59.08 J; t24 = 2.65, P = .01) at the ankle but less negative (59.01 J versus 67.02 J; t24 = 2.25, P = .03) and positive work (40.37 J versus 47.09 J; t24 = 2.11, P = .046) at the knee with minimalist shoes compared with conventional shoes. Conclusions: Running in minimalist shoes at a fast speed caused a

  5. Association with isokinetic ankle strength measurements and normal clinical muscle testing in sciatica patients.

    PubMed

    Ustun, N; Erol, O; Ozcakar, L; Ceceli, E; Ciner, O Akar; Yorgancioglu, Z R

    2013-01-01

    Sensitive muscle strength tests are needed to measure muscle strength in the diagnosis and management of sciatica patients. The aim of this study was to assess the isokinetic muscle strength in sciatica patients' and control subjects' ankles that exhibited normal ankle muscle strength when measured clinically. Forty-six patients with L5 and/or S1 nerve compression, and whose age, sex, weight, and height matched 36 healthy volunteers, were recruited to the study. Heel-walking, toe-walking, and manual muscle testing were used to perform ankle dorsiflexion and plantar flexion strengths in clinical examination. Patients with normal ankle dorsiflexion and plantar flexion strengths assessed by manual muscle testing and heel-and toe-walking tests were included in the study. Bilateral isokinetic (concentric/concentric) ankle plantar-flexion-dorsiflexion measurements of the patients and controls were performed within the protocol of 30°/sec (5 repetitions). Peak torque and peak torque/body weight were obtained for each ankle motion of the involved limb at 30°/s speed. L5 and/or S1 nerve compression was evident in 46 patients (76 injured limbs). Mean disease duration was two years. The plantar flexion muscle strength of the patients was found to be lower than that of the controls (p=0.036). The dorsiflexion muscle strength of the patients was found to be the same as that of the controls (p=0.211). Isokinetic testing is superior to clinical muscle testing when evaluating ankle plantar flexion torque in sciatica patients. Therefore, isokinetic muscle testing may be helpful when deciding whether to place a patient into a focused rehabilitation program.

  6. Effects of changing speed on knee and ankle joint load during walking and running.

    PubMed

    de David, Ana Cristina; Carpes, Felipe Pivetta; Stefanyshyn, Darren

    2015-01-01

    Joint moments can be used as an indicator of joint loading and have potential application for sports performance and injury prevention. The effects of changing walking and running speeds on joint moments for the different planes of motion still are debatable. Here, we compared knee and ankle moments during walking and running at different speeds. Data were collected from 11 recreational male runners to determine knee and ankle joint moments during different conditions. Conditions include walking at a comfortable speed (self-selected pacing), fast walking (fastest speed possible), slow running (speed corresponding to 30% slower than running) and running (at 4 m · s(-1) ± 10%). A different joint moment pattern was observed between walking and running. We observed a general increase in joint load for sagittal and frontal planes as speed increased, while the effects of speed were not clear in the transverse plane moments. Although differences tend to be more pronounced when gait changed from walking to running, the peak moments, in general, increased when speed increased from comfortable walking to fast walking and from slow running to running mainly in the sagittal and frontal planes. Knee flexion moment was higher in walking than in running due to larger knee extension. Results suggest caution when recommending walking over running in an attempt to reduce knee joint loading. The different effects of speed increments during walking and running should be considered with regard to the prevention of injuries and for rehabilitation purposes.

  7. Changes in joint position sense after conservatively treated chronic lateral ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Kynsburg, A; Halasi, T; Tállay, A; Berkes, I

    2006-12-01

    Improvement of ankle proprioception through physiotherapy (a.k.a. proprioceptive training) is a widely accepted conservative treatment modality of chronic functional lateral ankle instability. Clinical studies provided controversial data on its proprioceptive effect. Aim of this study was to gain evidence on the efficacy of proprioceptive training on ankle joint position sense. Ten patients (five males and five females, aged 23.3+/-5.4 years) were treated conservatively for chronic lateral ankle instability with a special training programme over 6 weeks. For the assessment of joint position sense we used the slope-box test, first applied and described by Robbins et al. (Br J Sports Med 29:242-247, 1995). The test was performed before the start and after the end of the training programme, measuring joint position sense on 11 different slope amplitudes in four directions (anterior, posterior, lateral and medial) in random order each on both ankles. Comparisons were made between pre- and post-training results as well as versus a control-group of ten healthy athletes. Overall the proprioceptive sensory function of the studied group has improved, but this improvement was not significant in all directions. Only two patients have shown significant improvement of joint position sense in all directions (mean estimate error improvement: 2.47 degrees ), while conservative treatment was partially successful in five others (mean estimate error improvement: 0.73 degrees ). The follow-up results of these seven patients were comparable with the values measured in the control-group. Three patients did not show any improvements (mean estimate error improvement: -0.55 degrees ) (overall difference between improving and non-improving patients: P<0.0001). Mean absolute estimate error profiles of the seven improving patients became similar to the profiles of healthy athletes, while these changes could not be observed in the case of the three non-improving participants. Proprioceptive

  8. Joint loads in marsupial ankles reflect habitual bipedalism versus quadrupedalism.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Kristian J; Jashashvili, Tea; Houghton, Kimberley; Westaway, Michael C; Patel, Biren A

    2013-01-01

    Joint surfaces of limb bones are loaded in compression by reaction forces generated from body weight and musculotendon complexes bridging them. In general, joints of eutherian mammals have regions of high radiodensity subchondral bone that are better at resisting compressive forces than low radiodensity subchondral bone. Identifying similar form-function relationships between subchondral radiodensity distribution and joint load distribution within the marsupial postcranium, in addition to providing a richer understanding of marsupial functional morphology, can serve as a phylogenetic control in evaluating analogous relationships within eutherian mammals. Where commonalities are established across phylogenetic borders, unifying principles in mammalian physiology, morphology, and behavior can be identified. Here, we assess subchondral radiodensity patterns in distal tibiae of several marsupial taxa characterized by different habitual activities (e.g., locomotion). Computed tomography scanning, maximum intensity projection maps, and pixel counting were used to quantify radiodensity in 41 distal tibiae of bipedal (5 species), arboreal quadrupedal (4 species), and terrestrial quadrupedal (5 species) marsupials. Bipeds (Macropus and Wallabia) exhibit more expansive areas of high radiodensity in the distal tibia than arboreal (Dendrolagus, Phascolarctos, and Trichosurus) or terrestrial quadrupeds (Sarcophilus, Thylacinus, Lasiorhinus, and Vombatus), which may reflect the former carrying body weight only through the hind limbs. Arboreal quadrupeds exhibit smallest areas of high radiodensity, though they differ non-significantly from terrestrial quadrupeds. This could indicate slightly more compliant gaits by arboreal quadrupeds compared to terrestrial quadrupeds. The observed radiodensity patterns in marsupial tibiae, though their statistical differences disappear when controlling for phylogeny, corroborate previously documented patterns in primates and xenarthrans

  9. Joint Loads in Marsupial Ankles Reflect Habitual Bipedalism versus Quadrupedalism

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Kristian J.; Jashashvili, Tea; Houghton, Kimberley; Westaway, Michael C.; Patel, Biren A.

    2013-01-01

    Joint surfaces of limb bones are loaded in compression by reaction forces generated from body weight and musculotendon complexes bridging them. In general, joints of eutherian mammals have regions of high radiodensity subchondral bone that are better at resisting compressive forces than low radiodensity subchondral bone. Identifying similar form-function relationships between subchondral radiodensity distribution and joint load distribution within the marsupial postcranium, in addition to providing a richer understanding of marsupial functional morphology, can serve as a phylogenetic control in evaluating analogous relationships within eutherian mammals. Where commonalities are established across phylogenetic borders, unifying principles in mammalian physiology, morphology, and behavior can be identified. Here, we assess subchondral radiodensity patterns in distal tibiae of several marsupial taxa characterized by different habitual activities (e.g., locomotion). Computed tomography scanning, maximum intensity projection maps, and pixel counting were used to quantify radiodensity in 41 distal tibiae of bipedal (5 species), arboreal quadrupedal (4 species), and terrestrial quadrupedal (5 species) marsupials. Bipeds (Macropus and Wallabia) exhibit more expansive areas of high radiodensity in the distal tibia than arboreal (Dendrolagus, Phascolarctos, and Trichosurus) or terrestrial quadrupeds (Sarcophilus, Thylacinus, Lasiorhinus, and Vombatus), which may reflect the former carrying body weight only through the hind limbs. Arboreal quadrupeds exhibit smallest areas of high radiodensity, though they differ non-significantly from terrestrial quadrupeds. This could indicate slightly more compliant gaits by arboreal quadrupeds compared to terrestrial quadrupeds. The observed radiodensity patterns in marsupial tibiae, though their statistical differences disappear when controlling for phylogeny, corroborate previously documented patterns in primates and xenarthrans

  10. Chondrolysis of the Ankle Joint following Ankle Arthroscopy and Microfracture of the Osteochondral Lesion of the Talar Dome

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2013-01-01

    Chondrolysis of the ankle is a very rare condition. We report a case of chondrolysis of the ankle following ankle arthroscopy and microfracture of the osteochondral lesion of the talar dome. The patient's symptoms were relieved after articulated distraction arthroplasty. PMID:24369518

  11. Modeling and simulating the neuromuscular mechanisms regulating ankle and knee joint stiffness during human locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Maculan, Marco; Pizzolato, Claudio; Reggiani, Monica; Farina, Dario

    2015-01-01

    This work presents an electrophysiologically and dynamically consistent musculoskeletal model to predict stiffness in the human ankle and knee joints as derived from the joints constituent biological tissues (i.e., the spanning musculotendon units). The modeling method we propose uses electromyography (EMG) recordings from 13 muscle groups to drive forward dynamic simulations of the human leg in five healthy subjects during overground walking and running. The EMG-driven musculoskeletal model estimates musculotendon and resulting joint stiffness that is consistent with experimental EMG data as well as with the experimental joint moments. This provides a framework that allows for the first time observing 1) the elastic interplay between the knee and ankle joints, 2) the individual muscle contribution to joint stiffness, and 3) the underlying co-contraction strategies. It provides a theoretical description of how stiffness modulates as a function of muscle activation, fiber contraction, and interacting tendon dynamics. Furthermore, it describes how this differs from currently available stiffness definitions, including quasi-stiffness and short-range stiffness. This work offers a theoretical and computational basis for describing and investigating the neuromuscular mechanisms underlying human locomotion. PMID:26245321

  12. Does ankle joint power reflect type of muscle action of soleus and gastrocnemius during walking in cats and humans?

    PubMed

    Cronin, Neil J; Prilutsky, Boris I; Lichtwark, Glen A; Maas, Huub

    2013-04-26

    The main objective of this paper is to highlight the difficulties of identifying shortening and lengthening contractions based on analysis of power produced by resultant joint moments. For that purpose, we present net ankle joint powers and muscle fascicle/muscle-tendon unit (MTU) velocities for medial gastrocnemius (MG) and soleus (SO) muscles during walking in species of different size (humans and cats). For the cat, patterns of ankle joint power and MTU velocity of MG and SO during stance were similar: negative power (ankle moment×angular velocity<0), indicating absorption of mechanical energy, was associated with MTU lengthening, and positive power (generation of mechanical energy) was found during MTU shortening. This was also found for the general fascicle velocity pattern in SO. In contrast, substantial differences between ankle joint power and fascicle velocity patterns were observed for MG muscle. In humans, like cats, the patterns of ankle joint power and MTU velocity of SO and MG were similar. Unlike the cat, there were substantial differences between patterns of fascicle velocity and ankle joint power during stance in both muscles. These results indicate that during walking, only a small fraction of mechanical work of the ankle moment is either generated or absorbed by the muscle fascicles, thus confirming the contribution of in-series elastic structures and/or energy transfer via two-joint muscles. We conclude that ankle joint negative power does not necessarily indicate eccentric action of muscle fibers and that positive power cannot be exclusively attributed to muscle concentric action, especially in humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Gait training reduces ankle joint stiffness and facilitates heel strike in children with Cerebral Palsy.

    PubMed

    Willerslev-Olsen, Maria; Lorentzen, Jakob; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2014-01-01

    Foot drop and toe walking are frequent concerns in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Increased stiffness of the ankle joint muscles may contribute to these problems. Does four weeks of daily home based treadmill training with incline reduce ankle joint stiffness and facilitate heel strike in children with CP? Seventeen children with CP (4-14 years) were recruited. Muscle stiffness and gait ability were measured twice before and twice after training with an interval of one month. Passive and reflex-mediated stiffness were measured by a dynamometer which applied stretches below and above reflex threshold. Gait kinematics were recorded by 3-D video-analysis during treadmill walking. Foot pressure was measured by force-sensitive foot soles during treadmill and over-ground walking. Children with increased passive stiffness showed a significant reduction in stiffness following training (P = 0.01). Toe lift in the swing phase (P = 0.014) and heel impact (P = 0.003) increased significantly following the training during both treadmill and over-ground walking. Daily intensive gait training may influence the elastic properties of ankle joint muscles and facilitate toe lift and heel strike in children with CP. Intensive gait training may be beneficial in preventing contractures and maintain gait ability in children with CP.

  14. Safety profile of sural nerve in posterolateral approach to the ankle joint: MRI study.

    PubMed

    Ellapparadja, Pregash; Husami, Yaya; McLeod, Ian

    2014-05-01

    The posterolateral approach to ankle joint is well suited for ORIF of posterior malleolar fractures. There are no major neurovascular structures endangering this approach other than the sural nerve. The sural nerve is often used as an autologous peripheral nerve graft and provides sensation to the lateral aspect of the foot. The aim of this paper is to measure the precise distance of the sural nerve from surrounding soft tissue structures so as to enable safe placement of skin incision in posterolateral approach. This is a retrospective image review study involving 64 MRI scans. All measurements were made from Axial T1 slices. The key findings of the paper is the safety window for the sural nerve from the lateral border of tendoachilles (TA) is 7 mm, 1.3 cm and 2 cm at 3 cm above ankle joint, at the ankle joint and at the distal tip of fibula respectively. Our study demonstrates the close relationship of the nerve in relation to TA and fibula in terms of exact measurements. The safety margins established in this study should enable the surgeon in preventing endangerment of the sural nerve encountered in this approach.

  15. Identification of ankle joint stiffness during passive movements--a subspace linear parameter varying approach.

    PubMed

    Tehrani, Ehsan Sobhani; Jalaleddini, Kian; Kearney, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a novel method for the identification of time-varying ankle joint dynamic stiffness during large passive movements. The method estimates a linear parameter varying parallel-cascade (LPV-PC) model of joint stiffness consisting of two pathways: (a) an LPV impulse response function (IRF) for intrinsic mechanics and (b) an LPV Hammerstein cascade with time-varying static nonlinearity and a time-invariant linear dynamics for the reflex pathway. A subspace identification technique is used to estimate a statespace representation of the reflex stiffness dynamics. Then, an orthogonal projection decouples intrinsic from reflex response and subsequently identifies an LPV-IRF model of intrinsic stiffness. Finally, an LPV model of the reflex static nonlinearity is estimated using an iterative, separable least squares method. The LPV method was validated using experimental data from two healthy subjects where the ankle was moved passively by an actuator through its range of motion first without and then with perturbations. The identification results demonstrated that (a) the dynamic response of the intrinsic pathway changes systematically with joint position; and (b) the static nonlinearity of the reflex pathway resembles a half-wave rectifier whose threshold decreases and gain increases as ankle is moved to dorsiflexed position.

  16. Effects of plyometric training on passive stiffness of gastrocnemii and the musculo-articular complex of the ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Fouré, A; Nordez, A; Guette, M; Cornu, C

    2009-12-01

    This study aimed to determine simultaneously the effects of plyometric training on the passive stiffness of the ankle joint musculo-articular complex, the gastrocnemii muscle-tendon complex (MTC) and the Achilles tendon in order to assess possible local adaptations of elastic properties. Seventeen subjects were divided into a trained (TG) group and a control (CG) group. They were tested before and after 8 weeks of a plyometric training period. The ankle joint range of motion (RoM), the global musculo-articular passive stiffness of the ankle joint, the maximal passive stiffness of gastrocnemii and the stiffness of the Achilles tendon during isometric plantar flexion were determined. A significant increase in the jump performances of TG relative to CG was found (squat jumps: +17.6%, P=0.008; reactive jumps: +19.8%, P=0.001). No significant effect of plyometric training was observed in the ankle joint RoM, musculo-articular passive stiffness of the ankle joint or Achilles tendon stiffness (P>0.05). In contrast, the maximal passive stiffness of gastrocnemii of TG increased after plyometric training relative to CG (+33.3%, P=0.001). Thus, a specific adaptation of the gastrocnemii MTC occurred after plyometric training, without affecting the global passive musculo-articular stiffness of the ankle joint.

  17. One-degree-of-freedom spherical model for the passive motion of the human ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Sancisi, Nicola; Baldisserri, Benedetta; Parenti-Castelli, Vincenzo; Belvedere, Claudio; Leardini, Alberto

    2014-04-01

    Mathematical modelling of mobility at the human ankle joint is essential for prosthetics and orthotic design. The scope of this study is to show that the ankle joint passive motion can be represented by a one-degree-of-freedom spherical motion. Moreover, this motion is modelled by a one-degree-of-freedom spherical parallel mechanism model, and the optimal pivot-point position is determined. Passive motion and anatomical data were taken from in vitro experiments in nine lower limb specimens. For each of these, a spherical mechanism, including the tibiofibular and talocalcaneal segments connected by a spherical pair and by the calcaneofibular and tibiocalcaneal ligament links, was defined from the corresponding experimental kinematics and geometry. An iterative procedure was used to optimize the geometry of the model, able to predict original experimental motion. The results of the simulations showed a good replication of the original natural motion, despite the numerous model assumptions and simplifications, with mean differences between experiments and predictions smaller than 1.3 mm (average 0.33 mm) for the three joint position components and smaller than 0.7° (average 0.32°) for the two out-of-sagittal plane rotations, once plotted versus the full flexion arc. The relevant pivot-point position after model optimization was found within the tibial mortise, but not exactly in a central location. The present combined experimental and modelling analysis of passive motion at the human ankle joint shows that a one degree-of-freedom spherical mechanism predicts well what is observed in real joints, although its computational complexity is comparable to the standard hinge joint model.

  18. Inverse Dynamics Model for the Ankle Joint with Applications in Tibia Malleolus Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budescu, E.; Merticaru, E.; Chirazi, M.

    The paper presents a biomechanical model of the ankle joint, in order to determine the force and the torque of reaction into the articulation, through inverse dynamic analysis, in various stages of the gait. Thus, knowing the acceleration of the foot and the reaction force between foot and ground during the gait, determined by experimental measurement, there was calculated, for five different positions of the foot, the joint reaction forces, on the basis of dynamic balance equations. The values numerically determined were compared with the admissible forces appearing in the technical systems of osteosynthesis of tibia malleolus fracture, in order to emphasize the motion restrictions during bone healing.

  19. A Long-Term Study of the Effect of Subtalar Arthrodesis on the Ankle and Hindfoot Joints.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chonglin; Xu, Xiangyang; Zhu, Yuan; Liu, Jinhao; Wei, Baofu

    2016-01-01

    Subtalar arthrodesis is a common therapy for subtalar joint disorders. In this article, we evaluate the effect of subtalar arthrodesis on the ankle and hindfoot joints. Fifty patients (33 men and 17 women) underwent subtalar arthrodesis between January 1, 1996, and August 31, 2011. The 36-item Short-Form Health Survey and American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle hindfoot scores were used for clinical evaluation. Radiographic analysis included assessment of degenerative changes and ankle and hindfoot joint function in the frontal and sagittal planes. Thirty-seven patients (27 men and 10 women; mean age, 42.6 years) were followed up for an average of 9.2 years (range, 2-17 years). The mean ± SD 36-item Short-Form Health Survey score improved from 30.21 ± 7.19 before surgery to 78.50 ± 12.23, and the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle hindfoot score increased from 50.32 ± 12.39 to 73.14 ± 15.44. Degenerative changes in the talonavicular, calcaneocuboid, metatarsocuboid, and ankle joints occurred. The talar-vertical angle was positively related to the tibial-plantar minimal angle (affected side: r = 0.56; P < .01; healthy side: r = 0.46; P < .01). The difference in hindfoot height is positively related to the difference in tibial-plantar minimal angle (r = 0.54; P < .01). Subtalar arthrodesis is effective treatment for subtalar joint disease but could induce joint degeneration and ankle joint motion limitation related to talar declination and hindfoot height.

  20. A weightbearing technique for the measurement of ankle joint dorsiflexion with the knee extended is reliable.

    PubMed

    Munteanu, Shannon E; Strawhorn, Andrea B; Landorf, Karl B; Bird, Adam R; Murley, George S

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of ankle joint dorsiflexion is routinely undertaken by clinicians who manage lower limb musculoskeletal pathology. This study aimed to determine the reliability of a technique to measure ankle joint dorsiflexion in a weightbearing position with the knee extended. Four raters with varying clinical experience measured ankle joint dorsiflexion in a weightbearing position with the knee extended on 30 asymptomatic participants. Measurements occurred on two occasions, 1 week apart using (i) a digital inclinometer and (ii) a clear acrylic plate apparatus. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and 95% limits of agreement (LOAs) were calculated. Intra-rater reliability of the experienced raters was high for both the digital inclinometer (average ICC=0.88, average 95% LOA=-6.6 degrees to 4.8 degrees ) and the clear acrylic plate apparatus (average ICC=0.89, average 95% LOA=-7.2 degrees to 4.3 degrees ). Intra-rater reliability of the inexperienced rater was good to high for both the digital inclinometer (ICC=0.77, 95% LOA=-9.1 degrees to 8.3 degrees ) and the clear acrylic plate apparatus (ICC=0.89, 95% LOA=-8.1 degrees to 4.6 degrees ). Inter-rater reliability was high for both the digital inclinometer (ICC=0.95, 95% LOA=-5.7 degrees to 5.7 degrees ) and the clear acrylic plate apparatus (ICC=0.97, 95% LOA=-4.7 degrees to 4.7 degrees ). Measurements of ankle dorsiflexion in a weightbearing position with the knee extended can be performed reliably by experienced and inexperienced raters. However, the reliability of this measurement technique needs to be interpreted in the context of the purpose for which the measurement is intended.

  1. Inter-individual similarities and variations in muscle forces acting on the ankle joint during gait.

    PubMed

    Błażkiewicz, Michalina; Wiszomirska, Ida; Kaczmarczyk, Katarzyna; Naemi, Roozbeh; Wit, Andrzej

    2017-07-29

    Muscle forces acting over the ankle joint play an important role in the forward progression of the body during gait. Yet despite the importance of ankle muscle forces, direct in-vivo measurements are neither possible nor practical. This makes musculoskeletal simulation useful as an indirect technique to quantify the muscle forces at work during locomotion. The purpose of this study was to: 1) identify the maximum peaks of individual ankle muscle forces during gait; 2) investigate the order over which the muscles are sorted based on their maximum peak force. Three-dimensional kinematics and ground reaction forces were measured during the gait of 10 healthy subjects, and the data so obtained were input into the musculoskeletal model distributed with the OpenSim software. In all 10 individuals we observed that the soleus muscle generated the greatest strength both in dynamic (1856.1N) and isometric (3549N) conditions, followed by the gastrocnemius in dynamic conditions (1232.5N). For all other muscles, however, the sequence looks different across subjects, so the k-means clustering method was used to obtain one main order over which the muscles' peak-forces are sorted. The results indicate a common theme, with some variations in the maximum peaks of ankle muscle force across subjects. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Consideration of equilibrium equations at the hip joint alongside those at the knee and ankle joints has mixed effects on knee joint response during gait.

    PubMed

    Adouni, M; Shirazi-Adl, A

    2013-02-01

    Accurate estimation of muscle forces during daily activities such as walking is critical for a reliable evaluation of loads on the knee joint. To evaluate knee joint muscle forces, the importance of the inclusion of the hip joint alongside the knee and ankle joints when treating the equilibrium equations remains yet unknown. An iterative kinematics-driven finite element model of the knee joint that accounts for the synergy between passive structures and active musculature is employed. The knee joint muscle forces and biomechanical response are predicted and compared with our earlier results that did not account for moment equilibrium equations at the hip joint. This study indicates that inclusion of the hip joint in the optimization along the knee and ankle joints only slightly (<10%) influences total forces in quadriceps, lateral hamstrings and medial hamstrings. As a consequence, even smaller differences are found in predicted ligament forces, contact forces/areas, and cartilage stresses/strains during the stance phase of gait. The distribution of total forces between the uni- and bi-articular muscle components in quadriceps and in lateral hamstrings; however, substantially alter at different stance phases.

  3. Clinical benefits of joint mobilisation on ankle sprains: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Weerasekara, Ishanka; Osmotherly, Peter; Snodgrass, Suzanne; Marquez, Jodie; de Zoete, Rutger; Rivett, Darren A

    2017-09-04

    To assess the clinical benefits of joint mobilisation on ankle sprains. MEDLINE, MEDLINE In Process, Embase, AMED, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Cochrane library, PEDro, Scopus, SPORTDiscus and Dissertations and Thesis were searched from inception to June, 2017. Studies investigating humans with a grade I or II lateral or medial sprains of the ankle in any pathological state from acute to chronic, who had been treated with joint mobilisation were considered for inclusion. Any conservative intervention was considered as a comparator. Commonly reported clinical outcomes were considered such as ankle range of movement, pain, and function. After screening of 1530 abstracts, 56 studies were selected for full text screening, and 23 were eligible for inclusion. Eleven studies on chronic sprains reported sufficient data for meta-analysis. Data were extracted using the participants, interventions, comparison, outcomes and study design approach. Clinically relevant outcomes (dorsiflexion range, proprioception, balance, function, pain threshold, pain intensity) were assessed at immediate, short term and long term follow-up points. Methodological quality was assessed independently by two reviewers and most studies were found to be of moderate quality, with no studies rated as poor. Meta-analysis revealed significant immediate benefits of joint mobilisation compared to comparators on improving postero-medial dynamic balance (p=0.0004), but not for improving dorsiflexion range (p= 0.16), static balance (p = 0.96) or pain intensity (p= 0.45). Joint mobilisation was beneficial in the short term for improving weight-bearing dorsiflexion range (p= 0.003) compared to a control. Joint mobilisation appears to be beneficial for improving dynamic balance immediately after application and dorsiflexion range in the short term. Long term benefits have not been adequately investigated. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Functional ankle instability as a risk factor for osteoarthritis: using T2-mapping to analyze early cartilage degeneration in the ankle joint of young athletes.

    PubMed

    Golditz, T; Steib, S; Pfeifer, K; Uder, M; Gelse, K; Janka, R; Hennig, F F; Welsch, G H

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate, using T2-mapping, the impact of functional instability in the ankle joint on the development of early cartilage damage. Ethical approval for this study was provided. Thirty-six volunteers from the university sports program were divided into three groups according to their ankle status: functional ankle instability (FAI, initial ankle sprain with residual instability); ankle sprain Copers (initial sprain, without residual instability); and controls (without a history of ankle injuries). Quantitative T2-mapping magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed at the beginning ('early-unloading') and at the end ('late-unloading') of the MR-examination, with a mean time span of 27 min. Zonal region-of-interest T2-mapping was performed on the talar and tibial cartilage in the deep and superficial layers. The inter-group comparisons of T2-values were analyzed using paired and unpaired t-tests. Statistical analysis of variance was performed. T2-values showed significant to highly significant differences in 11 of 12 regions throughout the groups. In early-unloading, the FAI-group showed a significant increase in quantitative T2-values in the medial, talar regions (P = 0.008, P = 0.027), whereas the Coper-group showed this enhancement in the central-lateral regions (P = 0.05). Especially the comparison of early-loading to late-unloading values revealed significantly decreasing T2-values over time laterally and significantly increasing T2-values medially in the FAI-group, which were not present in the Coper- or control-group. Functional instability causes unbalanced loading in the ankle joint, resulting in cartilage alterations as assessed by quantitative T2-mapping. This approach can visualize and localize early cartilage abnormalities, possibly enabling specific treatment options to prevent osteoarthritis in young athletes. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Operative treatment and curative effects of the deltoid ligament injuries of the ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Cong, Pei-Jun; Liu, Bai-Hong; Wang, Ji-Ping; Qiao, Yong-Ping

    2009-12-01

    To explore the operative methods and curative effects of the deltoid ligament injuries. From 2002 to 2008, all 61 patients with ankle fractures complicated with deltoid ligament injuries were treated with open reduction and firm internal fixation. Among the patients, 39 patients were male and 22 patients were female, ranging in age from 14 to 71 years, with an average of 41 years. During the operation, the deltoid ligament was reconstructed to restore the medial and lateral stability of ankle joint. All the patients were followed up ranged from 5 to 30 months, with an average of 17 months. Fifty-nine patients had incision healed at the first stage; 2 patients had superficial infections at lateral malleolus, and healed at the 3rd week after changing dressings. The incisions at the internal medial malleolus were all healed at the first stage. According to Qi evaluation criteria, 35 patients got an excellent result, 13 good and 13 fair. The deltoid ligament should be treated properly in the treatment of ankle joint fractures when open reduction and firm internal fixation were emphasized.

  6. The Effects of a Lateral Wedge Insole on Knee and Ankle Joints During Slope Walking.

    PubMed

    Uto, Yuki; Maeda, Tetsuo; Kiyama, Ryoji; Kawada, Masayuki; Tokunaga, Ken; Ohwatashi, Akihiko; Fukudome, Kiyohiro; Ohshige, Tadasu; Yoshimoto, Yoichi; Yone, Kazunori

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether a lateral wedge insole reduces the external knee adduction moment during slope walking. Twenty young, healthy subjects participated in this study. Subjects walked up and down a slope using 2 different insoles: a control flat insole and a 7° lateral wedge insole. A three-dimensional motion analysis system and force plate were used to examine the knee adduction moment, the ankle valgus moment, and the moment arm of the ground reaction force to the knee joint center in the frontal plane. The lateral wedge insole significantly decreased the moment arm of the ground reaction force, resulting in a reduction of the knee adduction moment during slope walking, similar to level walking. The reduction ratio of knee adduction moment by the lateral wedge insole during the early stance of up-slope walking was larger than that of level walking. Conversely, the lateral wedge insole increased the ankle valgus moment during slope walking, especially during the early stance phase of up-slope walking. Clinicians should examine the utilization of a lateral wedge insole for knee osteoarthritis patients who perform inclined walking during daily activity, in consideration of the load on the ankle joint.

  7. A surgical protocol of ankle arthrodesis with combined Ilizarov's distraction-compression osteogenesis and locked nailing for osteomyelitis around the ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuan-Mu; Su, Alvin W; Chiu, Fang-Yao; Chen, Tain-Hsiung

    2010-09-01

    Managing refractory osteomyelitis around the ankle joint has been challenging. Destruction of both the ankle and the subtalar joints was common in cases of open fracture. For those who already had multiple surgeries, it would be tough to salvage the limb. Our goal was to set up a staged surgical protocol aiming in treating the aforementioned clinical issue. Twelve male patients underwent our protocol since year 2000. All patients presented refractory osteomyelitis, ankle and subtalar joint destruction, and poor soft tissue condition. All cases had internal fixation for open fractures followed by multiple debridement surgery before. The mean age was 50.8 years (range, 37-71 years), and the median follow-up time was 61 months (range, 48-96 months). The surgical protocol consisted of radical debridement, distraction osteogenesis for segmental bone transport, and tibia lengthening to avoid leg length discrepancy followed by intramedullary nailing for tibio-talo-calcaneal arthrodesis. The external fixation period averaged 24.7 weeks (range, 12-36 weeks). The mean duration to solid union of the arthrodesis and the bridging callus was 18.3 weeks (range, 16-20 weeks). Mild surgical site infection occurred in four cases but all subsided after removal of the nail and oral antibiotics use. At latest follow-up, all patients were infection free and could walk with plantigrade feet. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society hindfoot score rising from 21.5 points (range 20-24 points) preoperatively to 65.5 points (range, 60-72). This study has shown our staged surgical protocol may be effective in solving complicated osteomyelitis around the ankle, although salvaging the limb with successful ankle arthrodesis and minimized limb length inequality, yet improving the patients' ambulation level.

  8. Tibialis anterior response to sudden ankle displacements in normal and Parkinsonian subjects.

    PubMed

    Chan, C W; Kearney, R E; Jones, G M

    1979-09-14

    It is well known that in Parkinsonian subjects with akinesia, reaction times are increased but reflex latencies remain normal. We have attempted to use this knowledge to distinguish between 'reflex' and 'voluntary' components of the electromyographic (EMG) response to ankle displacement. The EMG and torque responses of tibialis anterior (TA) to randomly applied servo-controlled plantar-flexing displacements of the ankle with and without the subject's intentional opposition were examined in 9 Parkinsonian and 9 age-matched normal humans. To obtain a measure of akinesia, the response latency to a visual stimulus was subsequently measured in the same subjects. Three principal findings emerged. (1) The intermediate latency EMG component (PSR) of the response evoked by ankle displacement with the subject instructed to relax was more regularly evoked and of lower threshold in Parkinsonians than in normals. This finding corresponds to the enlarged M2 component in upper limb muscles. However, the facilitation of PSR was not found to be associated with an increase in torque. In fact, the patients did not exhibit more stiffness than normals under our experimental conditions. (2) Mean latency estimate of the PSR was indistinguishable between Parkinsonians and normals. This finding puts the PSR in the nature of a reflex. Indeed, in accordance with reflex behaviour which is proportional to input characteristics, its area increased linearly with increase in the magnitude of displacement velocity. (3) In contrast, the 'late' EMG response (FSR) evoked by opposing sudden ankle displacement exhibited a significantly longer latency in 6 out of 8 Parkinsonians than normals. In the same patients, the EMG response latency to a visual signal was similarly increased. The delay of FSR in akinesia patients thus argued against its being a stereotyped reflex. The result is discussed with reference to the recent finding that preprogrammed responses are delayed in Parkinsonians.

  9. Influence of external ankle support on lower extremity joint mechanics during drop landings.

    PubMed

    Cordova, Mitchell L; Takahashi, Yosuke; Kress, Gregory M; Brucker, Jody B; Finch, Alfred E

    2010-05-01

    To investigate the effects of external ankle support (EAS) on lower extremity joint mechanics and vertical ground-reaction forces (VGRF) during drop landings. A 1 x 3 repeated-measures, crossover design. Biomechanics research laboratory. 13 male recreationally active basketball players (age 22.3 +/- 2.2 y, height 177.5 +/- 7.5 cm, mass 72.2 +/- 11.4 kg) free from lower extremity pathology for the 12 mo before the study. Subjects performed a 1-legged drop landing from a standardized height under 3 different ankle-support conditions. Hip, knee, and ankle angular displacement along with specific temporal (TGRFz1, TGRFz2; s) and spatial (GRFz1, GRFz2; body-weight units [BW]) characteristics of the VGRF vector were measured during a drop landing. The tape condition (1.08 +/- 0.09 BW) demonstrated less GRFz1 than the control (1.28 +/- 0.16 BW) and semirigid conditions (1.28 +/- 0.21 BW; P < .0001), and GRFz2 was unaffected. For TGRFz1, no-support displayed slower time (0.017 +/- 0.004 s) than the semirigid (0.014 +/- 0.001 s) and tape conditions (0.014 +/- 0.002 s; P < .05). For TGRFz2, no-support displayed slower time (0.054 +/- 0.006 s) than the semirigid (0.050 +/- 0.006 s) and tape conditions (0.045 +/- 0.004 s; P < .05). Semirigid bracing was slower than the tape condition, as well (P < .05). Ankle-joint displacement was less in the tape (34.6 degrees +/- 7.7 degrees) and semirigid (36.8 degrees +/- 9.3 degrees) conditions than in no-support (45.7 degrees +/- 7.3 degrees; P < .05). Knee-joint displacement was larger in the no-support (45.1 degrees +/- 9.0 degrees) than in the semirigid (42.6 degrees +/- 6.8 degrees; P < .05) condition. Tape support (43.8 degrees +/- 8.7 degrees) did not differ from the semirigid condition (P > .05). Hip angular displacement was not affected by EAS (F(2,24) = 1.47, P = .25). EAS reduces ankle- and knee-joint displacement, which appear to influence the spatial and temporal characteristics of GRFz1 during drop landings.

  10. Ankle replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... is surgery to replace the damaged bone and cartilage in the ankle joint. Artificial joint parts (prosthetics) ... Your surgeon will remove the damaged bone and cartilage. Your surgeon will replace the damaged part of: ...

  11. Concomitant Contracture of the Knee and Ankle Joint After Gastrocnemius Muscle Rupture: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Dong Jin; Kim, Joon Mee; Kim, Bom Soo

    Injury of the medial head of the gastrocnemius, also called "tennis leg," is known to heal uneventfully in most cases with compression and immobilization therapy. Failure to heal or long-term complications, including ongoing pain and pes equinus, have been documented in only a limited number of case reports. To the best of our knowledge, a severe concomitant contracture of the knee and ankle joint as a consequence of a maltreated gastrocnemius muscle rupture has not been previously reported in English-language reports. The purpose of the present study was to report a serious complication of neglected tennis leg with a review of the published data. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Misalignment of total ankle components can induce high joint contact pressures.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, N; Walti, M; Favre, P; Snedeker, J G

    2010-05-01

    A major cause of the limited longevity of total ankle replacements is premature polyethylene component wear, which can be induced by high joint contact pressures. We implemented a computational model to parametrically explore the hypothesis that intercomponent positioning deviating from the manufacturer's recommendations can result in pressure distributions that may predispose to wear of the polyethylene insert. We also investigated the hypothesis that a modern mobile-bearing design may be able to better compensate for imposed misalignments compared with an early two-component design. Two finite element models of total ankle replacement prostheses were built to quantify peak and average contact pressures on the polyethylene insert surfaces. Models were validated by biomechanical testing of the two implant designs with use of pressure-sensitive film. The validated models were configured to replicate three potential misalignments with the most version of the tibial component, version of the talar component, and relative component rotation of the two-component design. The misalignments were simulated with use of the computer model with physiologically relevant boundary loads. With use of the manufacturer's guidelines for positioning of the two-component design, the predicted average joint contact pressures exceeded the yield stress of polyethylene (18 to 20 MPa). Pressure magnitudes increased as implant alignment was systematically deviated from this reference position. The three-component design showed lower-magnitude contact pressures in the standard position (<10 MPa) and was generally less sensitive to misalignment. Both implant systems were sensitive to version misalignment. In the tested implants, a highly congruent mobile-bearing total ankle replacement design yields more evenly distributed and lower-magnitude joint contact pressures than a less congruent design. Although the mobile-bearing implant reduced susceptibility to aberrant joint contact

  13. [Effects of acupuncture-moxibustion intervention on proprioception in athletes with lateral collateral ligament injury of ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Tang, Wen-Jiang; Jiang, Chui-Gang; Chen, Li-Rong; Pang, Yong; Li, Jie; Huang, Yun

    2013-08-01

    To compare the efficacy differences between acupuncture-moxibustion and physiotherapy interventions in improving proprioception of athletes with lateral collateral ligament injury of the ankle joint. Thirty patients with injured lateral collateral ligament of ankle joint were randomly divided into acupuncture group (n = 15) and physiotherapy group (n = 15). Patients of the acupuncture group were treated by acupuncture and moxibustion stimulation of Qiuxu (GB40), Kunlun (BL 60), Shenmai (BL 62), Jiexi (ST 41), and Ashi-points, etc., and those of the physiotherapy group treated with TDP irradiation of the regional lateral malleolus. The treatment of the two groups was conducted once the other day, 3 times each week, continuously for 8 weeks. Before and after the treatment, the ankle-joint's active and passive repositioning error angles were measured by using a joint angle ruler. The average error angle values of active and passive reposition tests of the injured ankle-joint were 4.98 +/- 1.11 and 4.78 +/- 1.3 before the treatment, and 3.67 +/- 0.58 and 3.51 +/- 0.64 after the treatment, respectively in the acupuncture group, being reduced significantly after the treatment (both P < 0.01). No significant changes of the average error angle values of both active and passive reposition tests of the ankle-joint were found after the treatment in the physiotherapy group (P > 0.05). Comparison between two groups showed that the average error angle, average active and passive reposition angles of the injured ankle in the acupuncture group were evidently lower than those in the physiotherapy group (P < 0.01). Acupuncture and moxibustion can effectively improve the proprioception of the injured lateral collateral ligament of the ankle joint in athletes, which is superior to conventional physiotherapy in the therapeutic effect.

  14. The Colorado Haemophilia Paediatric Joint Physical Examination Scale: normal values and interrater reliability.

    PubMed

    Hacker, M R; Funk, S M; Manco-Johnson, M J

    2007-01-01

    Persons with haemophilia often experience their first joint haemorrhage in early childhood. Recurrent bleeding into a joint may lead to significant morbidity, specifically haemophilic arthropathy. Early identification of the onset and progression of joint damage is critical to preserving joint structure and function. Physical examination is the most feasible approach to monitor joint health. Our group developed the Colorado Haemophilia Paediatric Joint Physical Examination Scale to identify earlier signs of joint degeneration and incorporate developmentally appropriate tasks for assessing joint function in young children. This study's objectives were to establish normal ranges for this scale and assess interrater reliability. The ankles, knees and elbows of 72 healthy boys aged 1 through 7 years were evaluated by a physical therapist to establish normal ranges. Exactly 10 boys in each age category from 2 to 7 years were evaluated by a second physical therapist to determine interrater reliability. The original scale was modified to account for the finding that mild angulation in the weight-bearing joints is developmentally normal. The interrater reliability of the scale ranged from fair to good, underscoring the need for physical therapists to have specific training in the orthopaedic assessment of very young children and the measurement error inherent in the goniometer. Modifications to axial alignment scoring will allow the scale to distinguish healthy joints from those suffering frequent haemarthroses.

  15. Changes in joint position sense after surgically treated chronic lateral ankle instability

    PubMed Central

    Halasi, T; Kynsburg, A; Tallay, A; Berkes, I

    2005-01-01

    Background: A search of the literature shows that the effect of surgery on ankle proprioception has been hardly investigated. Objective: To examine the effect of anatomical reconstruction of the anterolateral capsuloligamentous complex on ankle joint position sense. Methods: A prospective study using the "slope box" test. Ten consecutive patients were included in the study, and 10 healthy athletes represented the control group. Results: Similar test-retest reliability rates (overall reliability 0.92; p = 0.0013) were obtained to those of the original designers of the method. There were no significant differences with respect to side dominance (p = 0.9216). Investigation of the characteristics of mean absolute estimate errors showed that the controls tested became error prone in the range of slope altitudes 7.5–25° in every direction, compared with the range 0–5° (range of p values 0.00003–0.00072). The results of the intervention group showed that, for the two main directions of interest (anterior and lateral), preoperative differences in mean absolute estimate errors between injured (anterior 3.91 (2.81)°; lateral 4.06 (2.85)°) and healthy (anterior 2.94 (2.21)°, lateral 3.19 (2.64)°) sides (anterior, p = 0.0124; lateral, p = 0.0250) had disappeared (postoperative differences: anterior, p = 0.6906; lateral, p = 0.4491). The afflicted ankle had improved significantly after surgery in both important directions (anterior, p<0.0001; lateral, p = 0.0023). Conclusions: The study shows that differences in joint position sense between healthy and injured ankles disappeared as the result of surgery. Preoperative data show that proprioceptive malfunction is a cause of functional instability. If treatment is by means of surgery, the retensioning of the original anterolateral structures is inevitable, even if other grafting or surgical techniques are used. PMID:16244190

  16. Adaptations to long-term strength training of ankle joint muscles in old age.

    PubMed

    Simoneau, Emilie; Martin, Alain; Van Hoecke, Jacques

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study was to enquire whether older adults, who continue plantar-flexion (PF) strength training for an additional 6-month period, would achieve further improvements in neuromuscular performance, in the ankle PFs, and in the antagonist dorsi-flexors (DFs). Twenty-three healthy older volunteers (mean age 77.4 +/- 3.7 years) took part in this investigation and 12 of them followed a 1-year strength-training program. Both neural and muscular factors were examined during isometric maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torques in ankle PF and DF pre-training, post 6 and post 12 months. The main finding was that 6 months of additional strength training of the PFs, beyond 6 months, allowed further improvements in neuromuscular performance at the ankle joint in older adults. Indeed, during the first 6 months of progressive resistance training, there was an increase in the PF MVC torque of 11.1 +/- 19.9 N m, and then of 11.1 +/- 17.9 N m in the last 6-month period. However, it was only after 1 year that there was an improvement in the evoked contraction at rest in PF (+ 8%). The strength training of the agonist PF muscles appeared to have an impact on the maximal resultant torque in DF. However, it appeared that this gain was first due to modifications occurring in the trained PFs muscles, then, it seemed that the motor drive of the DFs per se was altered. In conclusion, long-term strength training of the PFs resulted in continued improvements in neuromuscular performance at the ankle joint in older adults, beyond the initial 6 months.

  17. Effects of balance training on post-sprained ankle joint instability.

    PubMed

    Faizullin, I; Faizullina, E

    2015-01-01

    Ankle sprain is a medical condition when ankle ligaments are totally or partially torn. The primary cause of ankle sprain is sharp movements like turning or rolling the foot [1]. The ankle sprain needs to be treated right after the trauma, because if not treated it could lead to decreased stability of the ankle joint and lead to chronic ankle instability, which is characterized by increased risk of the ankle sprain [2] . We suppose that rehabilitation after the ankle sprain could significantly increase the performance of sportsmen. To investigate effects of balance exercise training on instable ankle due to the previous ankle sprain injury. In addition, the secondary aim of this systematic review was to find the effectiveness of different balance training exercises on instable ankle in order to find better opportunities for rehabilitation of sportsmen. The studies were selected from PubMed and Scopus using the library of the Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (further-UB FAU), we used full texts, and only texts in English were included in this review. The literature search was conducted at the end of December 2014. Texts included randomised controlled trials, which were published in the last 5 years (2009-2014). The literature was included in this review only if it was published in English and if the randomised controlled trial was conducted in the study and if the full text was available from UB FAU. The articles, which were found only in PubMed search, were excluded during Scopus search.PubMed search.First MeSH term was "Balance training for the ankle sprain" and 44 articles were found in PubMed. Then 29 articles were filtered by title and excluded from the study. Remaining 15 articles were assessed reading their abstracts, 6 of them were excluded and only 4 articles were left. The second MeSH term was "Balance training for ankle injury". Four additional articles were found by initial search. Two of them were filtered by the title and 2 were

  18. The effect of the ankle joint angle in the level of soleus Ia afferent presynaptic inhibition.

    PubMed

    Patikas, D A; Kotzamanidis, C; Robertson, C T; Koceja, D M

    2004-12-01

    The factors that are responsible for the relationship between motoneuron excitability and muscle length may have both mechanical and/or neurophysiologic origins. The aim of the study was to investigate the changes in the level of presynaptic inhibition, as measured with a soleus H-reflex conditioning protocol, and muscle length. Ten healthy volunteers were measured at three different ankle angles: 30 degrees plantar flexion, neutral position (0 degrees) and 15 degrees dorsiflexion. At each position the soleus H-reflex and the maximum M-wave were measured while the limb was relaxed. The H-reflex was conditioned by a stimulation of the common peroneal nerve, 100 ms prior to the tibial nerve stimulation. The results revealed that the level of presynaptic inhibition was higher at the neutral position in comparison to the dorsiflexed or plantarflexed positions. Additionally, the HMAX/MMAX ratio was significantly decreased when the joint position was set at dorsiflexion. Further, there was a significant correlation, independent of ankle joint angle, between presynaptic inhibition levels and the HMAX/MMAX ratio. The above findings support the concept that peripheral feedback from passive, static modifications in the joint angle and consequently in muscle length, can modify the input/output threshold of the motoneurons on a presynaptic level.

  19. Differentiation between non-neural and neural contributors to ankle joint stiffness in cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Spastic paresis in cerebral palsy (CP) is characterized by increased joint stiffness that may be of neural origin, i.e. improper muscle activation caused by e.g. hyperreflexia or non-neural origin, i.e. altered tissue viscoelastic properties (clinically: “spasticity” vs. “contracture”). Differentiation between these components is hard to achieve by common manual tests. We applied an assessment instrument to obtain quantitative measures of neural and non-neural contributions to ankle joint stiffness in CP. Methods Twenty-three adolescents with CP and eleven healthy subjects were seated with their foot fixated to an electrically powered single axis footplate. Passive ramp-and-hold rotations were applied over full ankle range of motion (RoM) at low and high velocities. Subject specific tissue stiffness, viscosity and reflexive torque were estimated from ankle angle, torque and triceps surae EMG activity using a neuromuscular model. Results In CP, triceps surae reflexive torque was on average 5.7 times larger (p = .002) and tissue stiffness 2.1 times larger (p = .018) compared to controls. High tissue stiffness was associated with reduced RoM (p < .001). Ratio between neural and non-neural contributors varied substantially within adolescents with CP. Significant associations of SPAT (spasticity test) score with both tissue stiffness and reflexive torque show agreement with clinical phenotype. Conclusions Using an instrumented and model based approach, increased joint stiffness in CP could be mainly attributed to higher reflexive torque compared to control subjects. Ratios between contributors varied substantially within adolescents with CP. Quantitative differentiation of neural and non-neural stiffness contributors in CP allows for assessment of individual patient characteristics and tailoring of therapy. PMID:23880287

  20. Endurance of the ankle joint plantar flexor muscles in athletes with medial tibial stress syndrome: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Madeley, Luke T; Munteanu, Shannon E; Bonanno, Daniel R

    2007-12-01

    Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) is a common overuse leg injury seen in athletes and can be recalcitrant to management. This cross-sectional study aimed to determine if there are differences in the isotonic endurance of the ankle joint plantar flexor muscles in athletes with MTSS compared to athletes without MTSS. The isotonic endurance of the ankle joint plantar flexors was measured in 30 participants diagnosed with MTSS, and 30 reference participants that were matched to MTSS participants on the basis of age (+/-5 years), gender, BMI (+/-5%) and type of sporting activity. The number of heel-rise repetitions of the participants in each group was compared for differences. There were no significant differences between participants with and without MTSS for age (p=0.34), height (p=0.40) or BMI (p=0.27). The mean number of heel-rise repetitions performed by participants in the MTSS group was significantly less than the reference group (mean 23, S.D. 5.6, versus mean 33, S.D. 8.6; p<0.001). These results suggest that athletes with MTSS have endurance deficits of the ankle joint plantar flexor muscles. Rehabilitation of athletes with MTSS should comprise training designed to enhance endurance of the lower limb musculature, including the ankle joint plantar flexors. It is not known whether a lack of endurance of the ankle joint plantar flexor muscles is the cause or effect of MTSS.

  1. Can Chronic Ankle Instability Be Prevented? Rethinking Management of Lateral Ankle Sprains

    PubMed Central

    Denegar, Craig R.; Miller, Sayers J.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To pose the question, “Can chronic ankle instability be prevented?” The evaluation and treatment of chronic ankle instability is a significant challenge in athletic health care. The condition affects large numbers of athletes and is associated with reinjury and impaired performance. The management of acute injuries varies widely but in athletic training has traditionally focused on initial symptom management and rapid return to activity. A review of practice strategies and philosophies suggests that a more detailed evaluation of all joints affected by the injury, correction of hypomobility, and protection of healing structures may lead to a more optimal long-term outcome. Background: Sprains to the lateral ankle are common in athletes, and the reinjury rate is high. These injuries are often perceived as being isolated to the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments. It is, however, becoming apparent that a lateral ankle sprain can injure other tissues and result in joint dysfunction throughout the ankle complex. Description: We begin by addressing the relationship between mechanical and functional instability. We then discuss normal ankle mechanics, sequelae to lateral ankle sprains, and abnormal ankle mechanics. Finally, tissue healing, joint dysfunction, and the management of acute lateral ankle sprain are reviewed, with an emphasis on restoring normal mechanics of the ankle-joint complex. A treatment model based on assessment of joint function, treatment of hypomobile segments, and protection of healing tissues at hypermobile segments is described. PMID:12937564

  2. [Repair and reconstruction for severe fracture and dislocation of ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Yin, Qingwei; Jiang, Yi; Xiao, Lianping; Li, Xiaodong; Fu, Jiaxin; Tian, Yonggang; Han, Liqiang; Liu, Zhi

    2008-06-01

    To summarize the technique and effect of the therapy for severe fracture and dislocation of ankle joint by operation. From March 2003 to February 2006, 76 cases were treated with primary open restoration and internal fixation for dislocated ankle joint fracture, with 47 males and 29 females, with the average age of 36.4 years (ranging from 18 years to 65 years). According to AO criterion, these fresh fractures were classified into 13 cases for type C3-1, 45 cases for type C3-2 and 18 cases for type C3-3. Based on the Gustilo-Anderson standard, 23 open fractures were classified into 17 cases for type II and 6 cases for type III A. The operation was delayed from 1 hours to 24 hours after the injury. All incisions healed at the first stage except 4 cases which delayed union because of simple infection by revision with ointment. A total of 72 cases were followed up, with the average time of 18.5 months (from 12 months to 35 months). The time of bone union was from 12 weeks to 24 weeks. The screws of fixation for lower tibia-fibula joint were found to be ruptured in 2 cases when further consultation was performed in the 16th and 20th week after the operation, respectively, and were broken within 1 year after the operation. These screws were taken out 12 weeks postoperative in 28 cases, while the whole internal fixations of the rest cases were taken out 1 year after the operation. The postoperative function of malleolus extended from 21.7 degrees to 26.8 degrees and flection from 38.5 degrees to 44.7 degrees. Assessed by the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Clinical Rating Scales, 23 cases were excellent, 36 good, 13 fair, and the choiceness rate reached 81.94%. These procedures, together with reduction by twist after hospital, open and internal fixation in time, and parenchyma managed with internal fixation, are important to attain satisfactory effect for the treatment of severe fracture and dislocation of ankle joint.

  3. Anatomical variations of the anterior talofibular ligament of the human ankle joint

    PubMed Central

    MILNER, C. E.; SOAMES, R. W.

    1997-01-01

    Compared with other joints, the ligaments of the ankle have not been studied in great detail; consequently relatively little literature exists. The positions of the 3 major bands of the lateral collateral ligament are well known and documented (Schafer et al. 1915; Sarrafian, 1983; McMinn, 1994; Palastanga et al. 1994; Williams et al. 1995). The detailed anatomy of the ligaments is, however, relatively complex with variations of the major bands and several minor additional bands being reported (Sarrafian, 1993; Burks & Morgan, 1994; Rosenberg et al. 1995). PMID:9419003

  4. [Arthrographic diagnosis of rupture of the anterior syndesmosis of the upper ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Wrazidlo, W; Karl, E L; Koch, K

    1988-05-01

    We describe 114 cases based on 2020 arthrographies of the ankle joint for diagnosing fresh tears of the tibio-fibula syndesmosis without bone lesions. Comparison of the arthrographical diagnosis with the intra-operative diagnosis showed good agreement. Diagnosis of the isolated tear of the tibio-fibular syndesmosis revealed a sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 67%. The technical procedure and the isolated tear of the tibiofibular syndesmosis in combination with other capsuleligament lesions are presented, using typical x-ray images as examples.

  5. IINCIDENCE OF ANKLE SPRAINS IN SOCCER PLAYERS WITH JOINT HYPERMOBILITY SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Rodrigo Barreiros; Bertolini, Fabricio Melo; Vieira, Tallys Campos; Aguiar, Rodrigo Manso; Pinheiro, Guilherme Baldez; Lasmar, Rodrigo Campos Pace

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Eighty-three soccer players aged between 14 and 19 years, in the basic category of a professional soccer club in the city of Belo Horizonte, were followed up during the 2009 season. Methods: A prospective observational cohort study was conducted, in which these soccer players were divided randomly into two groups. The first consisted of individuals with joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS), totaling 22 players, and the second was a control group with 61 players without this syndrome, determined through a physical examinati. Results: Both groups were studied with regard to incidence of ankle sprains. At the end of this period, the data were compiled and statistical analysis was performed. A total of 43 cases of ankle injury due to sprains were recorded, of which nine episodes were in players with JHS, thus making p = 0.106. The significance level was 5%. Conclusion: We were able to conclude that in our study there was insufficient evidence to assert that there is an association with increased incidence of ankle sprains among patients with JHS. PMID:27047888

  6. Pilot studies suggesting new applications of NiTi in dynamic orthoses for the ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Pittaccio, Simone; Viscuso, Stefano; Beretta, Elena; Turconi, Anna Carla; Strazzer, Sandra

    2010-09-01

    NiTi is a metal alloy with unconventional functional characteristics: Shape memory and pseudoelasticity. Its use in the field of rehabilitation is very innovative. This work presents applications in lower limb orthotics. Three different devices were assembled and tested: An equinus gait dynamic splint, a compliant ankle positioning brace, and a dual-mode haptic/active exerciser for the dorsiflexors. Results are derived from technical and preclinical trials. The gait splint improves several walking parameters even better than a traditional flexible ankle-foot orthoses (AFO). In particular, it supports mid-stance and propulsion biomechanics and affects physiological activation of tibialis anterior during swing much less than posterior leaf AFO. The haptic/active exerciser, able to provide dorsiflexion through a suitable articular range, could be controlled on the basis of minimal surface electromyographic (sEMG) signals, suggesting its use as an aid for early active workouts as soon as patients start to recover voluntary control of tibialis anterior. Further evidence must be sought in future to confirm for the ankle joint the promising results obtained in repositioning applications in prior upper limb studies. The work done so far on the tested prototypes is encouraging: Material characteristics and dimensioning will be optimized so that customized NiTi devices can be prescribed to best meet individual patients' requirements.

  7. Vibrotactile stimulation of fast-adapting cutaneous afferents from the foot modulates proprioception at the ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Mildren, Robyn L; Bent, Leah R

    2016-04-15

    It has previously been shown that cutaneous sensory input from across a broad region of skin can influence proprioception at joints of the hand. The present experiment tested whether cutaneous input from different skin regions across the foot can influence proprioception at the ankle joint. The ability to passively match ankle joint position (17° and 7° plantar flexion and 7° dorsiflexion) was measured while cutaneous vibration was applied to the sole (heel, distal metatarsals) or dorsum of the target foot. Vibration was applied at two different frequencies to preferentially activate Meissner's corpuscles (45 Hz, 80 μm) or Pacinian corpuscles (255 Hz, 10 μm) at amplitudes ∼3 dB above mean perceptual thresholds. Results indicated that cutaneous input from all skin regions across the foot could influence joint-matching error and variability, although the strongest effects were observed with heel vibration. Furthermore, the influence of cutaneous input from each region was modulated by joint angle; in general, vibration had a limited effect on matching in dorsiflexion compared with matching in plantar flexion. Unlike previous results in the upper limb, we found no evidence that Pacinian input exerted a stronger influence on proprioception compared with Meissner input. Findings from this study suggest that fast-adapting cutaneous input from the foot modulates proprioception at the ankle joint in a passive joint-matching task. These results indicate that there is interplay between tactile and proprioceptive signals originating from the foot and ankle.

  8. Vibrotactile stimulation of fast-adapting cutaneous afferents from the foot modulates proprioception at the ankle joint

    PubMed Central

    Bent, Leah R.

    2016-01-01

    It has previously been shown that cutaneous sensory input from across a broad region of skin can influence proprioception at joints of the hand. The present experiment tested whether cutaneous input from different skin regions across the foot can influence proprioception at the ankle joint. The ability to passively match ankle joint position (17° and 7° plantar flexion and 7° dorsiflexion) was measured while cutaneous vibration was applied to the sole (heel, distal metatarsals) or dorsum of the target foot. Vibration was applied at two different frequencies to preferentially activate Meissner's corpuscles (45 Hz, 80 μm) or Pacinian corpuscles (255 Hz, 10 μm) at amplitudes ∼3 dB above mean perceptual thresholds. Results indicated that cutaneous input from all skin regions across the foot could influence joint-matching error and variability, although the strongest effects were observed with heel vibration. Furthermore, the influence of cutaneous input from each region was modulated by joint angle; in general, vibration had a limited effect on matching in dorsiflexion compared with matching in plantar flexion. Unlike previous results in the upper limb, we found no evidence that Pacinian input exerted a stronger influence on proprioception compared with Meissner input. Findings from this study suggest that fast-adapting cutaneous input from the foot modulates proprioception at the ankle joint in a passive joint-matching task. These results indicate that there is interplay between tactile and proprioceptive signals originating from the foot and ankle. PMID:26823342

  9. [Case control study of fractures-dislocations of ankle joint with conservative and operative treatment].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Song-Tu; Lin, Yi-Rong; Chen, Lian-Yuan

    2010-10-01

    To compare the clinical efficacy of grade III, IV supination-eversion fractures-dislocations of ankle joint between manipulative treatment and operative treatment. From September 2007 to December 2008, the clinical data of 60 patients with grade III, IV supination-eversion fractures-dislocations of ankle joint were retrospectively analyzed. There were 32 males and 28 females, ranging in age from 18 to 70 years with an average age of 38.17 years. All patients were respectively treated with manipulative treatment (conservative group, 30 cases) and operative treatment (operative group, 30 cases). The joint function was compared with Mazur standard; the reduction and shifting of fractures were observed with X-ray; the hospitalization day and the therapeutic cost were compared between two groups. All patients were followed up with an average of 15.27 months (ranged, 6 to 25 months). In conservative group, 16 cases got excellent result in joint function, 10 good, 3 fair, 1 poor; in operative group, 20 cases got excellent result, 8 good, 2 fair, 0 poor. In conservative group in the X-ray showed 25 cases obtained excellent and good reduction, 4 fair, 1 poor; and in operative group in the X-ray showed 28 cases obtained excellent and good reduction, 2 fair, 0 poor. There was no significant difference at the joint function and X-ray film after treatment between two groups (P > 0.05). The hospital day was respectively (7.87 +/- 3.34), (17.37 +/- 4.64) d in conservative group and operative group; and the therapeutic cost was respectively (2 506.67 +/- 649.10), (11 473.33 +/- 1 564.90) yuan. There was significant difference at hospital day and therapeutic cost between two groups (P < 0.05). Conservative treatment and operative treatment can both reach a very good result in treating grade III, IV supination-eversion fractures and dislocations of ankle joint. However, conservative treatment has advantage of high safety factor, low therapeutic cost, can reduce medical costs for

  10. Preventive lateral ligament tester (PLLT): a novel method to evaluate mechanical properties of lateral ankle joint ligaments in the intact ankle.

    PubMed

    Best, Raymond; Böhle, Caroline; Mauch, Frieder; Brüggemann, Peter G

    2016-04-01

    To construct and evaluate an ankle arthrometer that registers inversion joint deflection at standardized inversion loads and that, moreover, allows conclusions about the mechanical strain of intact ankle joint ligaments at these loads. Twelve healthy ankles and 12 lower limb cadaver specimens were tested in a self-developed measuring device monitoring passive ankle inversion movement (Inv-ROM) at standardized application of inversion loads of 5, 10 and 15 N. To adjust in vivo and in vitro conditions, the muscular inactivity of the evertor muscles was assured by EMG in vivo. Preliminary, test-retest and trial-to-trial reliabilities were tested in vivo. To detect lateral ligament strain, the cadaveric calcaneofibular ligament was instrumented with a buckle transducer. After post-test harvesting of the ligament with its bony attachments, previously obtained resistance strain gauge results were then transferred to tensile loads, mounting the specimens with their buckle transducers into a hydraulic material testing machine. ICC reliability considering the Inv-ROM and torsional stiffness varied between 0.80 and 0.90. Inv-ROM ranged from 15.3° (±7.3°) at 5 N to 28.3° (±7.6) at 15 N. The different tests revealed a CFL tensile load of 31.9 (±14.0) N at 5 N, 51.0 (±15.8) at 10 N and 75.4 (±21.3) N at 15 N inversion load. A highly reliable arthrometer was constructed allowing not only the accurate detection of passive joint deflections at standardized inversion loads but also reveals some objective conclusions of the intact CFL properties in correlation with the individual inversion deflections. The detection of individual joint deflections at predefined loads in correlation with the knowledge of tensile ligament loads in the future could enable more individual preventive measures, e.g., in high-level athletes.

  11. [Arthroscopic treatment of chondral lesions of the ankle joint. Evidence-based therapy].

    PubMed

    Thomas, M; Jordan, M; Hamborg-Petersen, E

    2016-02-01

    Ankle sprains are the most relevant injuries of the lower extremities and can lead to damage to ligaments and osteochondral lesions. Up to 50 % of patients with a sprained ankle later develop a lesion of the cartilage in the ankle joint or an osteochondral lesion of the talus. This can lead to osteoarthritis of the injured ankle joint. Spontaneous healing is possible in all age groups in cases of a bone bruise in the subchondral bone but in isolated chondral injuries is only useful in pediatric patients. In many cases chondral and osteochondral injuries lead to increasing demarcation of the affected area and can result in progressive degeneration of the joint if not recognized in time. There also exist a certain number of osteochondral changes of the articular surface of the talus without any history of relevant trauma, which are collectively grouped under the term osteochondrosis dissecans. Perfusion disorders are discussed as one of many possible causes of these alterations. Nowadays, chondral and osteochondral defects can be treated earlier due to detection using very sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) techniques. The use of conservative treatment only has a chance of healing in pediatric patients. Conservative measures for adults should only be considered as adjuvant treatment to surgery.Based on a comprehensive analysis of the current literature, this article gives an overview and critical analysis of the current concepts for treatment of chondral and osteochondral injuries and lesions of the talus. With arthroscopic therapy curettage and microfracture of talar lesions are the predominant approaches or retrograde drilling of the defect is another option when the chondral coating is retained. Implantation of autologous chondral cells or homologous juvenile cartilage tissue is also possible with arthroscopic techniques. Osteochondral fractures (flake fracture) are usually performed as a mini-open procedure supported by

  12. Physiological coxa varus-genu valgus influences internal knee and ankle joint moments in females during crossover cutting.

    PubMed

    Nyland, J A; Caborn, D N M

    2004-07-01

    This study evaluated the ankle and knee electromyographic, kinematic, and kinetic differences of 20 nonimpaired females with either neutral (group 1) or coxa varus-genu valgus (group 2) alignment during crossover cutting stance phase. Two-way mixed model ANOVA (group, session) assessed mean differences ( p<0.05) and correlation analysis further delineated relationships. During impact absorption, group 2 displayed earlier peak horizontal braking (anterior-posterior) ground reaction force timing, decreased and earlier peak internal knee extension moments (eccentric function), and earlier peak internal ankle dorsiflexion moment timing (eccentric function). During the pivot phase, group 2 displayed later and eccentrically-biased peak ankle plantar flexion moments, increased peak internal knee flexion moments (eccentric function), and later peak knee internal rotation timing. Correlation analysis revealed that during impact absorption, subjects with coxa varus-genu valgus alignment (group 2) displayed a stronger relationship between knee internal rotation velocity and peak internal ankle dorsiflexion moment onset timing ( r= -0.64 vs r = -0.26) and between peak horizontal braking ground reaction forces and peak internal ankle dorsiflexion moment onset timing ( r= 0.61 vs r= 0.24). During the pivot phase these subjects displayed a stronger relationship between peak horizontal braking ground reaction forces and peak internal ankle plantar flexion moment onset timing ( r= -0.63 vs r= -0.09) and between peak horizontal braking forces and peak internal ankle plantar flexion moments ( r= -0.72 vs r= -0.26). Group differences suggest that subjects with coxa varus-genu valgus frontal-plane alignment have an increased dependence on both ankle dorsiflexor and plantar flexor muscle group function during crossover cutting. Greater dependence on ankle muscle group function during the performance of a task that requires considerable 3D dynamic knee joint control suggests a greater

  13. A randomized controlled trial of a passive accessory joint mobilization on acute ankle inversion sprains.

    PubMed

    Green, T; Refshauge, K; Crosbie, J; Adams, R

    2001-04-01

    Passive joint mobilization is commonly used by physical therapists as an intervention for acute ankle inversion sprains. A randomized controlled trial with blinded assessors was conducted to investigate the effect of a specific joint mobilization, the anteroposterior glide on the talus, on increasing pain-free dorsiflexion and 3 gait variables: stride speed (gait speed), step length, and single support time. Forty-one subjects with acute ankle inversion sprains (<72 hours) and no other injury to the lower limb entered the trial. Subjects were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatment groups. The control group received a protocol of rest, ice, compression, and elevation (RICE). The experimental group received the anteroposterior mobilization, using a force that avoided incurring any increase in pain, in addition to the RICE protocol. Subjects in both groups were treated every second day for a maximum of 2 weeks or until the discharge criteria were met, and all subjects were given a home program of continued RICE application. Outcomes were measured before and after each treatment. The results showed that the experimental group required fewer treatment sessions than the control group to achieve full pain-free dorsiflexion. The experimental group had greater improvement in range of movement before and after each of the first 3 treatment sessions. The experimental group also had greater increases in stride speed during the first and third treatment sessions. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION Addition of a talocrural mobilization to the RICE protocol in the management of ankle inversion injuries necessitated fewer treatments to achieve pain-free dorsiflexion and to improve stride speed more than RICE alone. Improvement in step length symmetry and single support time was similar in both groups.

  14. A cadaveric study showing the anatomical variations in the branches of the dorsalis pedis artery at the level of the ankle joint and its clinical implication in ankle arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Parikh, S; Dawe, E; Lee, C; Whitehead-Clarke, T; Smith, C; Bendall, S

    2016-09-23

    Introduction Pseudoaneurysm formation following ankle arthroscopy is a rare but potentially catastrophic complication. The placement of anterior ankle portals carries inherent risk to the superficial and deep peroneal nerves, as well as to the dorsalis pedis artery. Anatomical variations in the dorsalis pedis and the presence of branches at the joint line may increase the risk of vascular injury and pseudoaneurysm formation during arthroscopy. There is limited anatomical evidence available regarding the branches of the dorsalis pedis artery, which occur at the point at which they cross the ankle joint. Objectives The objective of the study was to describe the frequency and direction of branches of the dorsalis pedis crossing the ankle joint. Materials and Methods Nineteen cadaveric feet were carefully dissected to explore the course of the dorsalis pedis artery, noting in particular the branching pattern at the joint line. Results Eleven of the nineteen feet had a branch of the dorsalis pedis artery that crossed the level of the ankle joint. Out of these, six were lateral, four medial and one bilateral. Eight of the eleven specimens had one branch at, or just before, the level of the joint. Two specimens had two branches and one had three branches crossing the ankle, which were all in the same direction, crossing laterally to the main trunk of the dorsalis pedis. Conclusions Our study demonstrated high rates of branching of the dorsalis pedis artery at the level of the ankle joint. The role of these branches in pseudoaneurysm formation during anterior hindfoot surgery remains unclear.

  15. Design of a stiffness-adjustable ankle-foot orthosis and its effect on ankle joint kinematics in patients with stroke.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Toshiki; Leung, Aaron K L; Akazawa, Yasushi; Hutchins, Stephen W

    2011-04-01

    Ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs) are commonly prescribed to improve gait. The stiffness of an AFO is central for successful prescription; however, the recommended level of stiffness is currently based on the experience of clinicians. Therefore, the aim of this study was to design an experimental AFO (EAFO) whose stiffness was adjustable using commercially available oil-damper joints, and to demonstrate its potential capability in investigating the effects of altering AFO stiffness on gait. The influence of the EAFO stiffness on ankle joint kinematics in sagittal plane was evaluated in 10 patients with stroke by altering the stiffness of its oil-damper- type orthotic ankle joints using the four levels pre-set and defined by the manufacturer in dorsi- and plantarflexion directions independently. The mean peak plantarflexion angle was reduced by 105%, showing a change from 8.18 (3.14) degrees of plantarflexion to 0.38 (4.17) degrees of dorsiflexion, whilst the mean peak dorsiflexion angle was reduced by 44%, showing a change from 11.46 (5.57) degrees of dorsiflexion to 6.47 (5.23) degrees of dorsiflexion by altering the EAFO stiffness. The EAFO would therefore serve as a convenient tool when investigating the influence of AFO stiffness on gait in both clinical and research settings. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Motion control of the ankle joint with a multiple contact nerve cuff electrode: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun-Joo; Durand, Dominique M

    2014-08-01

    The flat interface nerve electrode (FINE) has demonstrated significant capability for fascicular and subfascicular stimulation selectivity. However, due to the inherent complexity of the neuromuscular skeletal systems and nerve-electrode interface, a trajectory tracking motion control algorithm of musculoskeletal systems for functional electrical stimulation using a multiple contact nerve cuff electrode such as FINE has not yet been developed. In our previous study, a control system was developed for multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) musculoskeletal systems with little prior knowledge of the system. In this study, more realistic computational ankle/subtalar joint model including a finite element model of the sciatic nerve was developed. The control system was tested to control the motion of ankle/subtalar joint angles by modulating the pulse amplitude of each contact of a FINE placed on the sciatic nerve. The simulation results showed that the control strategy based on the separation of steady state and dynamic properties of the system resulted in small output tracking errors for different reference trajectories such as sinusoidal and filtered random signals. The proposed control method also demonstrated robustness against external disturbances and system parameter variations such as muscle fatigue. These simulation results under various circumstances indicate that it is possible to take advantage of multiple contact nerve electrodes with spatial selectivity for the control of limb motion by peripheral nerve stimulation even with limited individual muscle selectivity. This technology could be useful to restore neural function in patients with paralysis.

  17. Joint sparing treatments in early ankle osteoarthritis: current procedures and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Castagnini, Francesco; Pellegrini, Camilla; Perazzo, Luca; Vannini, Francesca; Buda, Roberto

    2016-12-01

    Ankle osteoarthritis (AOA) is a severe pathology, mostly affecting a post-traumatic young population. Arthroscopic debridement, arthrodiastasis, osteotomy are the current joint sparing procedures, but, in the available studies, controversial results were achieved, with better outcomes in case of limited degeneration. Only osteotomy in case of malalignment is universally accepted as a joint sparing procedure in case of partial AOA. Recently, the biological mechanism of osteoarthritis has been intensively studied: it is a whole joint pathology, affecting cartilage, bone and synovial membrane. In particular, the first stage is characterized by a reversible catabolic activity with a state of chondropenia. Thus, biological procedures for early AOA were proposed in order to delay or to avoid end stage procedures. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may be a good solution to prevent or reverse degeneration, due to their immunomodulatory features (able to control the catabolic joint environment) and their regenerative osteochondral capabilities (able to treat the chondral defects). In fact, MSCs may regulate the cytokine cascade and the metalloproteinases release, restoring the osteochondral tissue as well. After interesting reports of mesenchymal stem cells seeded on scaffold and applied to cartilage defects in non-degenerated joints, bone marrow derived cells transplantation appears to be a promising technique in order to control the degenerative pathway and restore the osteochondral defects.

  18. [The Significance of Early Reposition in Patients with Visible Malposition of the Upper Ankle Joint].

    PubMed

    Wohlrath, B; Schweigkofler, U; Barzen, S; Heinz, S M; Schmidt-Horlohé, K; Hoffmann, R

    2016-12-01

    Background: Protracted dislocation of the upper ankle joint can lead to substantial damage to the surrounding soft tissue, possibly followed by local complications and longer hospitalisation. Although reposition is usually easy to conduct, it is commonly recommended that this should only be performed by an experienced specialist, as long as there is no neurovascular restriction. There are however no exact data or studies on this problem. The aim of the present study is to examine whether early reposition is of benefit for subsequent treatment. Methods: Retrospective study of all patients in a supra-regional trauma centre during the period from January 2009 to July 2015, with either prehospital reposition of the ankle joint because of visible malposition or documented visible malposition on arrival at hospital. Patients with relevant concomitant injuries elsewhere were excluded. Data on the duration of dislocation were matched with diagnostic findings at the time of hospital admission, the kind of primary care, local complications and the time of hospitalisation, using linear regression analysis and ANOVA calculations. Results: Of a total of 391 patients with a dislocation or a fracture dislocation of the ankle joint within this period, 132 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. These patients were divided into 5 groups on the basis of the time of dislocation. Time to reposition was less than one hour for 39 patients, between one and two hours for 29 patients, between two and six hours for 41 patients, between six and 24 hours for 13 patients and more than 24 hours for 10 patients, all with a visible dislocation. The results on admission showed a significant increase in skin bruises and tension bullae with increasing time of dislocation. A longer time of dislocation was associated with more two stage surgical procedures with external fixators and a decreasing number of single stage procedures. While there was immediate definitive treatment of 79.5 % of the patients in

  19. Subtalar joint arthrodesis, ankle arthrodiastasis, and talar dome resurfacing with the use of a collagen-glycosaminoglycan monolayer.

    PubMed

    Ramanujam, Crystal L; Sagray, Bryan; Zgonis, Thomas

    2010-04-01

    Intraarticular fractures of the calcaneus are a common injury to the hindfoot leading to posttraumatic arthrosis of the subtalar joint. Operative treatment with reduction and internal fixation at the time of initial presentation and once the soft tissue envelope is deemed suitable has become the standard of care for the surgical management of calcaneal fractures. However, numerous complications have been associated with calcaneal fractures, most notably subtalar joint arthrosis and calcaneal malunion. The authors describe a method of a delayed subtalar joint arthrodesis, ankle joint arthrodiastasis, and talar resurfacing with positive results for the management of painful posttraumatic concomitant arthrosis of the subtalar and ankle joints. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Effect of Backpack Load Carriage on the Kinetics and Kinematics of Ankle and Knee Joints During Uphill Walking.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinkyu; Yoon, Yong-Jin; Shin, Choongsoo S

    2017-05-22

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of load carriage on the kinematics and kinetics of the ankle and knee joints during uphill walking, including joint work, range of motion (ROM), and stance time. Fourteen males walked at a self-selected speed on an uphill (15°) slope wearing military boots and carrying a rifle in hand without a backpack (control condition) and with a backpack. The results showed that the stance time significantly decreased with backpack carriage (p<.05). The mediolateral impulse significantly increased with backpack carriage (p<.05). In the ankle joints, the inversion-eversion, and dorsi-plantar flexion ROM in the ankle joints increased with backpack carriage (p<.05). The greater dorsi-plantar flexion ROM with backpack carriage suggested one strategy for obtaining high plantar flexor power during uphill walking. The result of the increased mediolateral impulse and inversion-eversion ROM in the ankle joints indicated an increase in body instability caused by an elevated center of mass with backpack carriage during uphill walking. The decreased stance time indicated that an increase in walking speed could be a compensatory mechanism for reducing the instability of the body during uphill walking while carrying a heavy backpack.

  1. Anatomical predisposition of the ankle joint for lateral sprain or lateral malleolar fracture evaluated by radiographic measurements.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung Min; Chung, Chin Youb; Sung, Ki Hyuk; Lee, SeungYeol; Kim, Tae Gyun; Choi, Young; Jung, Ki Jin; Kim, Yeon Ho; Koo, Seung Bum; Park, Moon Seok

    2015-01-01

    Injury mechanism and the amount of force are important factors determining whether a fracture or sprain occurs at the time of an ankle inversion injury. However, the anatomical differences between the ankle fracture and sprain have not been investigated sufficiently. This study was performed to investigate whether an anatomical predisposition of the ankle joint results in a lateral malleolar fracture or lateral ankle sprain. Two groups of consecutive patients, one with lateral malleolar fracture (274 patients, mean age 49.0 years) and the other with lateral ankle sprain (400 patients, mean age 38.4 years), were evaluated. Ankle radiographs were examined for 7 measures: distal tibial articular surface (DTAS) angle, bimalleolar tilt (BT), medial malleolar relative length (MMRL), lateral malleolar relative length (LMRL), medial malleolar slip angle (MMSA), anterior inclination of tibia (AI), and fibular position (FP). After an interobserver reliability test, the radiographic measurements were compared between the 2 groups. Linear regression analysis was performed to correct for age and sex effects between the groups. The fracture group and the sprain group showed significant differences in BT (P = .001), MMSA (P < .001), AI (P = .023), and FP (P < .001). In multiple regression analysis, after adjusting for age and sex effects, fracture and sprain groups showed a significant difference in BT (P = .001), MMRL (P < .001), MMSA (P < .001), and FP (P < .001). The lateral malleolar fracture group tended to show more bony constraint than that of the lateral ankle sprain group. Further 3-dimensional assessment of the bony structure and subsequent biomechanical studies are needed to elucidate the mechanism of injury according to the various types of ankle fractures and ankle sprain. Level III, retrospective comparative study. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Biomechanical evaluation of a prototype foot/ankle prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Quesada, P M; Pitkin, M; Colvin, J

    2000-03-01

    In this paper, we report on our pilot evaluation of a prototype foot/ankle prosthesis. This prototype has been designed and fabricated with the intention of providing decreased ankle joint stiffness during the middle portion of the stance phase of gait, and increased (i.e., more normal) knee range of motion during stance. Our evaluation involved fitting the existing prototype foot/ankle prosthesis, as well as a traditional solid ankle cushioned heel (SACH) foot, to an otherwise healthy volunteer with a below-knee (BK) amputation. We measured this individual's lower extremity joint kinematics and kinetics during walking using a video motion analysis system and force platform. These measurements permitted direct comparison of prosthetic ankle joint stiffness and involved side knee joint motion, as well as prosthetic ankle joint moment and power.

  3. Control of torque direction by spinal pathways at the cat ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Nichols, T R; Lawrence, J H; Bonasera, S J

    1993-01-01

    To study the biomechanics of the calcaneal tendon's complex insertion onto the calcaneus, we measured torque-time trajectories exerted by the triceps surae and tibialis anterior muscles in eight unanesthetized decerebrate cats using a multi-axis force-moment sensor placed at the ankle joint. The ankle was constrained to an angle of 110 degrees plantarflexion. Muscles were activated using crossed-extension (XER), flexion (FWR), and caudal cutaneous sural nerve (SNR) reflexes. Torque contributions of other muscles activated by these reflexes were eliminated by denervation or tenotomy. In two animals, miniature pressure transducers were implanted among tendon fibers from the lateral gastrocnemius (LG) muscle that insert straight into the calcaneus or among tendon fibers from the medial gastrocnemius (MG) that cross over and insert on the lateral aspect of calcaneus. Reflexively evoked torques had the following directions: FWR, dorsiflexion and adduction; SNR, plantarflexion and abduction; and XER, plantarflexion and modest abduction or adduction. The proportion of abduction torque to plantarflexion torque was always greater for SNR than XER; this difference was about 50% of the magnitude of abduction torque generated by tetanic stimulation of the peronei. During SNR, pressures were higher in regions of the calcaneal tendon originating from MG than regions originating from LG. Similarly, pressures within the MG portion of the calcaneal tendon were higher during SNR than during XER, although these two reflexes produced matched ankle plantarflexion forces. Selective tenotomies and electromyographic recordings further demonstrated that MG generated most of the torque in response to SNR, while soleus, LG, and MG all generated torques in response to XER.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. [Computer-assisted surgery (CAS)-guided correction arthrodesis of the ankle and subtalar joint with retrograde nail fixation].

    PubMed

    Richter, M

    2011-04-01

    Restoration of a stable and plantigrade foot in deformities of the ankle and/or hindfoot and concomitant degenerative changes at the ankle and subtalar joint. Deformities of the ankle and/or hindfoot and concomitant degenerative changes at the ankle and subtalar joint. Active local infection or relevant arterial insufficiency. Prone position and posterolateral approach to ankle and subtalar joint. Placement of dynamic reference bases (DRB) in the tibia and through a stab incision in the talus or calcaneus. Two-dimensional (2D) image acquisition for navigation. Definition of axes of the tibia, calcaneus, and hindfoot, and of extent of correction. Exposition of ankle and subtalar joint and removal of remaining cartilage. Computer-assisted surgery (CAS)-guided correction and transfixation of the corrected position with 2.5 mm K-wires. Three-dimensional (3D) image acquisition for analysis of the accuracy of the correction and planning of the drilling for the retrograde nail. CAS-guided drilling insertion of the nail. Insertion of locking screws in the calcaneus, talus and tibia. 3D image acquisition for analysis of the accuracy of the correction implant position. Partial weight bearing (15 kg) in an orthosis (Vacuped) for 6 weeks, followed by full weight bearing in a stable standard shoe. From 1 September 2006 to 31 August 2008, 14 correction arthrodeses were performed. The accuracy was assessed by intraoperative 3D imaging. All achieved angles/translations were within a maximum deviation of 2°/mm when compared to the planned correction. Complications that were associated with CAS were not observed. In all 14 cases completing follow-up, timely fusion was registered.

  5. Therapeutic Experience on Stance Control Knee-Ankle-Foot Orthosis With Electromagnetically Controlled Knee Joint System in Poliomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Hwan; Ji, Sang-Goo; Jung, Kang-Jae

    2016-01-01

    A 54-year-old man with poliomyelitis had been using a conventional, passive knee-ankle-foot orthosis (KAFO) with a drop ring lock knee joint for about 40 years. A stance control KAFO (SCKAFO) with an electromagnetically controlled (E-MAG) knee joint system was prescribed. To correct his gait pattern, he also underwent rehabilitation therapy, which included muscle re-education, neuromuscular electrical stimulation, strengthening exercises for the lower extremities, and balance training twice a week for about 4 months. Both before and after rehabilitation, we conducted a gait analysis and assessed the physiological cost index in energy expended during walking in a locked-knee state and while he wore a SCKAFO with E-MAG. When compared with the pre-rehabilitation data, the velocity, step length, stride length, and knee kinematic data were improved after rehabilitation. Although the SCKAFO with E-MAG system facilitated the control of knee motion during ambulation, appropriate rehabilitative therapy was also needed to achieve a normal gait pattern. PMID:27152288

  6. Therapeutic Experience on Stance Control Knee-Ankle-Foot Orthosis With Electromagnetically Controlled Knee Joint System in Poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Hwan; Ji, Sang-Goo; Jung, Kang-Jae; Kim, Jae-Hyung

    2016-04-01

    A 54-year-old man with poliomyelitis had been using a conventional, passive knee-ankle-foot orthosis (KAFO) with a drop ring lock knee joint for about 40 years. A stance control KAFO (SCKAFO) with an electromagnetically controlled (E-MAG) knee joint system was prescribed. To correct his gait pattern, he also underwent rehabilitation therapy, which included muscle re-education, neuromuscular electrical stimulation, strengthening exercises for the lower extremities, and balance training twice a week for about 4 months. Both before and after rehabilitation, we conducted a gait analysis and assessed the physiological cost index in energy expended during walking in a locked-knee state and while he wore a SCKAFO with E-MAG. When compared with the pre-rehabilitation data, the velocity, step length, stride length, and knee kinematic data were improved after rehabilitation. Although the SCKAFO with E-MAG system facilitated the control of knee motion during ambulation, appropriate rehabilitative therapy was also needed to achieve a normal gait pattern.

  7. Kinesio-Taping Application and Corticospinal Excitability at the Ankle Joint

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Francois; Karam, Siobhan

    2015-01-01

    Context Physiotherapists and athletic trainers often use Kinesio Taping (KT) to prevent and treat musculoskeletal injuries in athletes, yet evidence about its effects on neuromuscular performance is conflicting. Objective To investigate the influence of a KT application directed at the ankle joint on measures of corticospinal excitability with transcranial magnetic stimulation. Design Controlled laboratory study. Setting Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants Twelve healthy young women (age = 23.1 ± 1.9 years; range, 19–26 years). Intervention(s) Participants were tested under no-tape and KT conditions according to a random sequence order. The KT was applied to the skin overlying the dorsiflexor and plantar-flexor muscles of the ankle. Main Outcome Measure(s) We assessed changes in the amplitude of motor-evoked potentials elicited at rest and during movement and changes in the silent period and background muscle activity during movement. Results Taping conditions had no effect on motor-evoked potential amplitude at rest or during movement or on the silent-period duration and background muscle activity. Conclusions Our results concur with other recent reports, showing KT applications have little influence at the neuromuscular level. Alterations in sensory feedback ascribed to elastic taping are likely insufficient to modulate corticospinal excitability in a functionally meaningful manner. PMID:26090708

  8. Increased delivery stride length places greater loads on the ankle joint in elite male cricket fast bowlers.

    PubMed

    Spratford, Wayne; Hicks, Amy

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect stride length has on ankle biomechanics of the leading leg with reference to the potential risk of injury in cricket fast bowlers. Ankle joint kinematic and kinetic data were collected from 51 male fast bowlers during the stance phase of the final delivery stride. The bowling cohort comprised national under-19, first class and international-level athletes. Bowlers were placed into either Short, Average or Long groups based on final stride length, allowing statistical differences to be measured. A multivariate analysis of variance with a Bonferroni post-hoc correction (α = 0.05) revealed significant differences between peak plantarflexion angles (Short-Long P = 0.005, Average and Long P = 0.04) and negative joint work (Average-Long P = 0.026). This study highlighted that during fast bowling the ankle joint of the leading leg experiences high forces under wide ranges of movement. As stride length increases, greater amounts of negative work and plantarflexion are experienced. These increases place greater loads on the ankle joint and move the foot into positions that make it more susceptible to injuries such as posterior impingement syndrome.

  9. Inverted Pendulum Standing Apparatus for Investigating Closed-Loop Control of Ankle Joint Muscle Contractions during Functional Electrical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Tan, John F; Masani, Kei; Vette, Albert H; Zariffa, José; Robinson, Mark; Lynch, Cheryl; Popovic, Milos R

    2014-01-01

    The restoration of arm-free standing in individuals with paraplegia can be facilitated via functional electrical stimulation (FES). In developing adequate control strategies for FES systems, it remains challenging to test the performance of a particular control scheme on human subjects. In this study, we propose a testing platform for developing effective control strategies for a closed-loop FES system for standing. The Inverted Pendulum Standing Apparatus (IPSA) is a mechanical inverted pendulum, whose angular position is determined by the subject's ankle joint angle as controlled by the FES system while having the subject's body fixed in a standing frame. This approach provides a setup that is safe, prevents falling, and enables a research and design team to rigorously test various closed-loop controlled FES systems applied to the ankle joints. To demonstrate the feasibility of using the IPSA, we conducted a case series that employed the device for studying FES closed-loop controllers for regulating ankle joint kinematics during standing. The utilized FES system stimulated, in able-bodied volunteers, the plantarflexors as they prevent toppling during standing. Four different conditions were compared, and we were able to show unique performance of each condition using the IPSA. We concluded that the IPSA is a useful tool for developing and testing closed-loop controlled FES systems for regulating ankle joint position during standing.

  10. Inverted Pendulum Standing Apparatus for Investigating Closed-Loop Control of Ankle Joint Muscle Contractions during Functional Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Tan, John F.; Masani, Kei; Vette, Albert H.; Zariffa, José; Robinson, Mark; Lynch, Cheryl; Popovic, Milos R.

    2014-01-01

    The restoration of arm-free standing in individuals with paraplegia can be facilitated via functional electrical stimulation (FES). In developing adequate control strategies for FES systems, it remains challenging to test the performance of a particular control scheme on human subjects. In this study, we propose a testing platform for developing effective control strategies for a closed-loop FES system for standing. The Inverted Pendulum Standing Apparatus (IPSA) is a mechanical inverted pendulum, whose angular position is determined by the subject's ankle joint angle as controlled by the FES system while having the subject's body fixed in a standing frame. This approach provides a setup that is safe, prevents falling, and enables a research and design team to rigorously test various closed-loop controlled FES systems applied to the ankle joints. To demonstrate the feasibility of using the IPSA, we conducted a case series that employed the device for studying FES closed-loop controllers for regulating ankle joint kinematics during standing. The utilized FES system stimulated, in able-bodied volunteers, the plantarflexors as they prevent toppling during standing. Four different conditions were compared, and we were able to show unique performance of each condition using the IPSA. We concluded that the IPSA is a useful tool for developing and testing closed-loop controlled FES systems for regulating ankle joint position during standing. PMID:27350992

  11. Relationship of medial gastrocnemius relative fascicle excursion and ankle joint power and work performance during gait in typically developing children

    PubMed Central

    Martín Lorenzo, Teresa; Albi Rodríguez, Gustavo; Rocon, Eduardo; Martínez Caballero, Ignacio; Lerma Lara, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Muscle fascicles lengthen in response to chronic passive stretch through in-series sarcomere addition in order to maintain an optimum sarcomere length. In turn, the muscles’ force generating capacity, maximum excursion, and contraction velocity is enhanced. Thus, longer fascicles suggest a greater capacity to develop joint power and work. However, static fascicle length measurements may not be taking sarcomere length differences into account. Thus, we considered relative fascicle excursions through passive ankle dorsiflexion may better correlate with the capacity to generate joint power and work than fascicle length. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine if medial gastrocnemius relative fascicle excursions correlate with ankle joint power and work generation during gait in typically developing children. A sample of typically developing children (n = 10) were recruited for this study and data analysis was carried out on 20 legs. Medial gastrocnemius relative fascicle excursion from resting joint angle to maximum dorsiflexion was estimated from trigonometric relations of medial gastrocnemius pennation angle and thickness obtained from B-mode real-time ultrasonography. Furthermore, a three-dimensional motion capture system was used to obtain ankle joint work and power during the stance phase of gait. Significant correlations were found between relative fascicle excursion and peak power absorption (–) r(14) = −0.61, P = .012 accounting for 31% variability, positive work r(18) = 0.56, P = .021 accounting for 31% variability, and late stance positive work r(15) = 0.51, P = .037 accounting for 26% variability. The large unexplained variance may be attributed to mechanics of neighboring structures (e.g., soleus or Achilles tendon mechanics) and proximal joint kinetics which may also contribute to ankle joint power and work performance, and were not taken into account. Further studies are encouraged to provide

  12. Sagittal Subtalar and Talocrural Joint Assessment During Ambulation with Controlled Ankle Movement (CAM) Boots.

    PubMed

    McHenry, Benjamin D; Exten, Emily L; Cross, Janelle A; Kruger, Karen M; Law, Brian; Fritz, Jessica M; Harris, Gerald

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of the current study was to determine sagittal plane talocrural and subtalar kinematic differences between barefoot and controlled ankle movement (CAM) boot walking. This study used fluoroscopic images to determine talar motion relative to tibia and calcaneal motion relative to talus. Fourteen male subjects (mean age 24.1 ± 3.5 years) screened for normal gait were tested. A fluoroscopy unit was used to collect images at 200 Hz during stance. Sagittal motion of the talocrural and subtalar joints were analyzed barefoot and within short and tall CAM boots. Barefoot talocrural mean maximum plantar and dorsiflexion were 9.2 ± 5.4 degrees and -7.5 ± 7.4 degrees, respectively; short CAM boot mean maximum plantar and dorsiflexion were 3.2 ± 4.0 degrees and -4.8 ± 10.2 degrees, respectively; and tall CAM boot mean maximum plantar and dorsiflexion were -0.2 ± 3.5 degrees and -2.4 ± 5.1 degrees, respectively. Talocrural mean range of motion (ROM) decreased from barefoot (16.7 ± 5.1 degrees) to short CAM boot (8.0 ± 4.9 degrees) to tall CAM boot (2.2 ± 2.5 degrees). Subtalar mean maximum plantarflexion angles were 5.3 ± 5.6 degrees for barefoot walking, 4.1 ± 5.9 degrees for short CAM boot walking, and 3.0 ± 4.7 degrees for tall CAM boot walking. Mean minimum subtalar plantarflexion angles were 0.7 ± 3.2 degrees for barefoot walking, 0.7 ± 2.9 degrees for short CAM boot walking, and 0.1 ± 4.8 degrees for tall CAM boot walking. Subtalar mean ROM decreased from barefoot (4.6 ± 3.9 degrees) to short CAM boot (3.4 ± 3.8 degrees) to tall CAM boot (2.9 ± 2.6 degrees). Tall and short CAM boot intervention was shown to limit both talocrural and subtalar motion in the sagittal plane during ambulation. The greatest reductions were seen with the tall CAM boot, which limited talocrural motion by 86.8% and subtalar motion by 37.0% compared to barefoot. Short CAM boot intervention reduced talocrural motion by 52.1% and subtalar motion by 26.1% compared to

  13. Long-term follow-up of mobile-bearing total ankle replacement in patients with inflammatory joint disease.

    PubMed

    Kraal, T; van der Heide, H J L; van Poppel, B J; Fiocco, M; Nelissen, R G H H; Doets, H C

    2013-12-01

    Little is known about the long-term outcome of mobile-bearing total ankle replacement (TAR) in the treatment of end-stage arthritis of the ankle, and in particular for patients with inflammatory joint disease. The aim of this study was to assess the minimum ten-year outcome of TAR in this group of patients. We prospectively followed 76 patients (93 TARs) who underwent surgery between 1988 and 1999. No patients were lost to follow-up. At latest follow-up at a mean of 14.8 years (10.7 to 22.8), 30 patients (39 TARs) had died and the original TAR remained in situ in 28 patients (31 TARs). The cumulative incidence of failure at 15 years was 20% (95% confidence interval (CI) 11 to 28). The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot score of the surviving patients at latest follow-up was 80.4 (95% CI 72 to 88). In total, 21 patients (23 TARs) underwent subsequent surgery: three implant exchanges, three bearing exchanges and 17 arthrodeses. Neither design of TAR described in this study, the LCS and the Buechel-Pappas, remains currently available. However, based both on this study and on other reports, we believe that TAR using current mobile-bearing designs for patients with end-stage arthritis of the ankle due to inflammatory joint disease remains justified.

  14. A Patient-Specific Foot Model for the Estimate of Ankle Joint Forces in Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Prinold, Joe A I; Mazzà, Claudia; Di Marco, Roberto; Hannah, Iain; Malattia, Clara; Magni-Manzoni, Silvia; Petrarca, Maurizio; Ronchetti, Anna B; Tanturri de Horatio, Laura; van Dijkhuizen, E H Pieter; Wesarg, Stefan; Viceconti, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the leading cause of childhood disability from a musculoskeletal disorder. It generally affects large joints such as the knee and the ankle, often causing structural damage. Different factors contribute to the damage onset, including altered joint loading and other mechanical factors, associated with pain and inflammation. The prediction of patients' joint loading can hence be a valuable tool in understanding the disease mechanisms involved in structural damage progression. A number of lower-limb musculoskeletal models have been proposed to analyse the hip and knee joints, but juvenile models of the foot are still lacking. This paper presents a modelling pipeline that allows the creation of juvenile patient-specific models starting from lower limb kinematics and foot and ankle MRI data. This pipeline has been applied to data from three children with JIA and the importance of patient-specific parameters and modelling assumptions has been tested in a sensitivity analysis focused on the variation of the joint reaction forces. This analysis highlighted the criticality of patient-specific definition of the ankle joint axes and location of the Achilles tendon insertions. Patient-specific detection of the Tibialis Anterior, Tibialis Posterior, and Peroneus Longus origins and insertions were also shown to be important.

  15. Using a discrete preisach model for hysteresis in ankle joint passive moment.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ching-Chao; Lin, Chou-Ching K; Ju, Ming-Shaung

    2014-04-01

    The steady-state passive joint moment was considered as a nonlinear elasticity in the past. However, we found that it was path dependent and the estimation error could be large if the commonly used path-independent functions were adopted. The aim of this study was to develop a model to describe the movement history-dependent passive moment in the steady state. The steady-state passive ankle moments of the rabbit were measured by a series of ramp-and-hold angle changes (stairway angle trajectory). A customized discrete Preisach model was constructed and a commonly adopted double-exponential function was also implemented. Two sets of data with different angle paths (major loop and inward loop trajectories) were acquired for model validation. The performance of the two models was compared. The results showed that the proposed model could accurately estimate the steady-state passive moment for both sets of validation data. The estimated error of the proposed model was approximately 50% smaller than that of the double-exponential function approach. It is expected that this new approach, by reducing the error of estimating passive joint moment, may contribute to the active control of joint moments.

  16. Joint kinetic response during unexpectedly reduced plantar flexor torque provided by a robotic ankle exoskeleton during walking

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Pei-Chun; Lewis, Cara L.; Ferris, Daniel P.

    2010-01-01

    During human walking, plantar flexor activation in late stance helps to generate a stable and economical gait pattern. Because plantar flexor activation is highly mediated by proprioceptive feedback, the nervous system must modulate reflex pathways to meet the mechanical requirements of gait. The purpose of this study was to quantify ankle joint mechanical output of the plantar flexor stretch reflex response during a novel unexpected gait perturbation. We used a robotic ankle exoskeleton to mechanically amplify the ankle torque output resulting from soleus muscle activation. We recorded lower-body kinematics, ground reaction forces, and electromyography during steady-state walking and during randomly perturbed steps when the exoskeleton assistance was unexpectedly turned off. We also measured soleus Hoffmann- (H-) reflexes at late stance during the two conditions. Subjects reacted to the unexpectedly decreased exoskeleton assistance by greatly increasing soleus muscle activity about 60 milliseconds after ankle angle deviated from the control condition (p<0.001). There were large differences in ankle kinematic and electromyography patterns for the perturbed and control steps, but the total ankle moment was almost identical for the two conditions (p=0.13). The ratio of soleus H-reflex amplitude to background electromyography was not significantly different between the two conditions (p=0.4). This is the first study to show that the nervous system chooses reflex responses during human walking such that invariant ankle joint moment patterns are maintained during perturbations. Our findings are particularly useful for the development of neuromusculoskeletal computer simulations of human walking that need to adjust reflex gains appropriately for biomechanical analyses. PMID:20171638

  17. Bone shape difference between control and osteochondral defect groups of the ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Tümer, N; Blankevoort, L; van de Giessen, M; Terra, M P; de Jong, P A; Weinans, H; Tuijthof, G J M; Zadpoor, A A

    2016-12-01

    The etiology of osteochondral defects (OCDs), for which the ankle (talocrural) joint is one of the common sites, is not yet fully understood. In this study, we hypothesized that bone shape plays a role in development of OCDs. Therefore, we quantitatively compared the morphology of the talus and the distal tibia between an OCD group and a control group. The shape variations of the talus and distal tibia were described separately by constructing two statistical shape models (SSMs) based on the segmentation of the bones from ankle computed tomography (CT) scans obtained from control (i.e., 35 CT scans) and OCD (i.e., 37 CT scans) groups. The first five modes of shape variation for the SSM corresponding to each bone were statistically compared between control and OCD groups using an analysis of variance (ANOVA) corrected with the Bonferroni for multiple comparisons. The first five modes of variation in the SSMs respectively represented 49% and 40% of the total variance of talus and tibia. Less than 5% of the variance per mode was described by the higher modes. Mode 5 of the talus (P = 0.004) primarily describing changes in the vertical neck angle and Mode 1 of the tibia (P < 0.0001) representing variations at the medial malleolus, showed statistically significant difference between the control and OCD groups. Shape differences exist between control and OCD groups. This indicates that a geometry modulated biomechanical behavior of the talocrural joint may be a risk factor for OCD. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Mechanics of the ankle and subtalar joints revealed through a 3D quasi-static stress MRI technique.

    PubMed

    Siegler, S; Udupa, J K; Ringleb, S I; Imhauser, C W; Hirsch, B E; Odhner, D; Saha, P K; Okereke, E; Roach, N

    2005-03-01

    A technique to study the three-dimensional (3D) mechanical characteristics of the ankle and of the subtalar joints in vivo and in vitro is described. The technique uses an MR scanner compatible 3D positioning and loading linkage to load the hindfoot with precise loads while the foot is being scanned. 3D image processing algorithms are used to derive from the acquired MR images bone morphology, hindfoot architecture, and joint kinematics. The technique was employed to study these properties both in vitro and in vivo. The ankle and subtler joint motion and the changes in architecture produced in response to an inversion load and an anterior drawer load were evaluated. The technique was shown to provide reliable measures of bone morphology. The left-to-right variations in bone morphology were less than 5%. The left-to-right variations in unloaded hindfoot architecture parameters were less than 10%, and these properties were only slightly affected by inversion and anterior drawer loads. Inversion and anterior drawer loads produced motion both at the ankle and at the subtalar joint. In addition, high degree of coupling, primarily of internal rotation with inversion, was observed both at the ankle and at the subtalar joint. The in vitro motion produced in response to inversion and anterior drawer load was greater than the in vivo motion. Finally, external motion, measured directly across the ankle complex, produced in response to load was much greater than the bone movements measured through the 3D stress MRI technique indicating the significant effect of soft tissue and skin interference.

  19. [Surgery of ipsilateral Hawkins Ⅲ talus neck and ankle joint fractures via internal and lateral approaches with Herbert screws].

    PubMed

    Zhang, P; Dong, Q R; Wang, Z Y; Chen, B; Wan, J H; Wang, L

    2016-11-08

    Objective: To explore the manual operation skills of operative treatment of ipsilateral Hawkins Ⅲ talus neck and ankle joint fractures via internal and lateral approaches with Herbert screws, and to study the clinical results. Method: From Jan 2009 to Dec 2014, the clinical data of 13 patients with ipsilateral Hawkins Ⅲ talus neck and ankle joint fractres via internal and lateral approaches with Herbert screws were retrospectively analyzed in our department.There were 10 males and 3 female, ranging in age from 20 to 60 years with an average age of 31.5 years.The fractures occurred on the right side in 9 patients and on the left side in 4 patients.Three cases had the complication of medial malleolar fracture.Ten cases had the complication of medial and lateral malleolar fracture. Totally 11 cases were made calcaneal skeletal traction, and all the were made CT with three-dimensional image reconstruction.Two cases were treated with emergency operation.Eleven cases were treated with selective operation.The operation time was 5 hours-10 days after injury. The functional results were evaluated by American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS). Result: The average duration of follow-up was 22.6 months (range, 14-65 months). There was skin necrosis in one cases, no incision infection, malunion and nonunion of the fractures and loss of reduction. At final follow-up, AOFAS ankle score was 75.2 (range, 42 to 93), higher than preoperative 39.2 (range, 23 to 60), the difference was statistically significant (P=0.023). The result was excellent in 4 cases, good in 5 cases, fair in 3 cases and 1 cases in poor, and the overall excellent or good rate was 69.2%. Avascular necrosis occurred in 3 cases (23.1%, 3/13). Traumatic arthritis was found in 5 cases (38.5%, 5/13), involved tibial astragaloid joint in 2 cases, involved subtalar joint in 1 case, involved tibial astragaloid joint and subtalar joint in 2 cases. Conclusion: The effect of surgical treatment for ipsilateral

  20. Effect of an ankle-foot orthosis on knee joint mechanics: a novel conservative treatment for knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Fantini Pagani, Cynthia H; Willwacher, Steffen; Benker, Rita; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter

    2014-12-01

    Several conservative treatments for medial knee osteoarthritis such as knee orthosis and laterally wedged insoles have been shown to reduce the load in the medial knee compartment. However, those treatments also present limitations such as patient compliance and inconsistent results regarding the treatment success. To analyze the effect of an ankle-foot orthosis on the knee adduction moment and knee joint alignment in the frontal plane in subjects with knee varus alignment. Controlled laboratory study, repeated measurements. In total, 14 healthy subjects with knee varus alignment were analyzed in five different conditions: without orthotic, with laterally wedged insoles, and with an ankle-foot orthosis in three different adjustments. Three-dimensional kinetic and kinematic data were collected during gait analysis. Significant decreases in knee adduction moment, knee lever arm, and joint alignment in the frontal plane were observed with the ankle-foot orthosis in all three different adjustments. No significant differences could be found in any parameter while using the laterally wedged insoles. The ankle-foot orthosis was effective in reducing the knee adduction moment. The decreases in this parameter seem to be achieved by changing the knee joint alignment and thereby reducing the knee lever arm in the frontal plane. This study presents a novel approach for reducing the load in the medial knee compartment, which could be developed as a new treatment option for patients with medial knee osteoarthritis. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2013.

  1. Immediate combined effect of gastrocnemius stretching and sustained talocrural joint mobilization in individuals with limited ankle dorsiflexion: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Hyeok; Oh, Jae-Seop; Kwon, Oh-Yun; Weon, Jong-Hyuk; An, Duk-Hyun; Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2015-12-01

    Although gastrocnemius stretching and talocrural joint mobilization have been suggested as effective interventions to address limited ankle dorsiflexion passive range of motion (DF PROM), the effects of a combination of the two interventions have not been identified. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of gastrocnemius stretching combined with joint mobilization and gastrocnemius stretching alone. A randomized controlled trial. In total, 24 individuals with limited ankle DF PROM were randomized to undergo gastrocnemius stretching combined with joint mobilization (12 feet in 12 individuals) or gastrocnemius stretching alone (12 feet in 12 individuals) for 5 min. Ankle kinematics during gait (time to heel-off and ankle DF before heel-off), ankle DF PROM, posterior talar glide, and displacement of the myotendinous junction (MTJ) of the gastrocnemius were assessed before and after the interventions. The groups were compared using two-way repeated measures analysis of variance. Greater increases in the time to heel-off and ankle DF before heel-off during gait and posterior talar glide were observed in the stretching combined with joint mobilization group versus the stretching alone group. Ankle DF PROM and displacement of the MTJ of the gastrocnemius were increased significantly after the interventions in both groups, with no significant difference between them. These findings suggest that gastrocnemius stretching with joint mobilization needs to be considered to improve ankle kinematics during gait. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of rigid and dynamic ankle-foot orthoses on normal gait.

    PubMed

    Guillebastre, Bastien; Calmels, Paul; Rougier, Patrice

    2009-01-01

    As shown through posturographic data, wearing an ankle-foot orthosis (AFO) causes a backward shift in healthy subjects of the mean position of the center of pressure under the limb wearing it, and difficulty in controlling these displacements. This study evaluated whether this particular positioning influenced gait independent of a neurological disorder. Two AFO models, with different mechanical concepts (a rigid-AFO (R-AFO) and dynamic-AFO (D-AFO)), were worn by 11 healthy subjects required to walk on a 12-m electronic mat. Velocity, step time and step length were assessed for each of the five conditions where subjects walked barefoot, and wearing R-AFO or D-AFO (without and with slight and greater stiffness at the elastic band). Spatial and temporal characteristics of each support were also analyzed. Although wearing R-AFO disturbed velocity, step length and time with an asymmetry between sides, wearing the D-AFO only affected a support characteristic (midline length: length between the pivot points of the two dimensional sensor structure of heel and toe area). No effect was seen when modifying the stiffness of the D-AFO model. Even though the posturographic data might partly explain this behavior, wearing an orthosis caused different effects on normal gait parameters. These features should be useful when prescribing an ankle-foot orthosis by differentiating what alterations are due to the orthosis and which are due to the gait disorder.

  3. Antagonist mechanical contribution to resultant maximal torque at the ankle joint in young and older men.

    PubMed

    Simoneau, Emilie M; Billot, Maxime; Martin, Alain; Van Hoecke, Jacques

    2009-04-01

    A recorded muscular torque at one joint is a resultant torque corresponding to the participation of both agonist and antagonist muscles. This study aimed to examine the effect of aging on the mechanical contributions of both plantar- and dorsi-flexors to the resultant maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torques exerted at the ankle joint, in dorsi-flexion (DF) and plantar-flexion (PF). The estimation of isometric agonist and antagonist torques by means of an EMG biofeedback technique was made with nine young (mean age 24 years) and nine older (mean age 80 years) men. While there was a non-significant age-related decline in the measured resultant DF MVC torque (-15%; p=0.06), there was a clear decrease in the estimated agonist MVC torque exerted by the dorsi-flexors (-39%; p=0.001). The DF-to-PF resultant MVC torque ratio was significantly lower in young than in older men (0.25 vs. 0.31; p=0.006), whereas the DF-to-PF agonist MVC torque ratio was no longer different between the two populations (0.38 vs. 0.35; p>0.05). Thus, agonist MVC torques in PF and DF would be similarly affected by aging, which could not be deduced when only resultant torques were examined.

  4. [Arthrodesis and endoprostheses of the ankle joint: indications, techniques and pitfalls].

    PubMed

    Wirth, S H; Klammer, G; Espinosa, N

    2013-09-01

    If adequate conservative measures for the treatment of end-stage ankle osteoarthritis have failed, surgery may be taken into consideration. After exorbitant failure rates in the beginning of total ankle replacement, nowadays this kind of treatment has regained lot of interest and has become a viable alternative to ankle fusion. The correct indication and a precise explanation of the surgical procedure, outcomes and potential complications provide a solid base for future success.Currently, there is no doubt that total ankle replacement has become an important player in the treatment of symptomatic and debilitating end-stage ankle arthritis. With increasing number of patients who undergo total ankle replacement the experience with this kind of procedure increases too. As a consequence several surgeons have started to stretch indications favoring total ankle replacement. However, it must be mentioned here, despite progress in terms of improved anatomical and biomechanical understanding of the hindfoot and improved surgical techniques and instruments, total ankle replacement and ankle fusion remain challenging and difficult procedures. We provide a review article including an overview of the relevant techniques. This article should serve as rough guide for surgeons and help in decision-making regarding total ankle replacement and ankle fusion.

  5. Value of ultrasonography for detecting chronic injury of the lateral ligaments of the ankle joint compared with ultrasonography findings

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Y; Cai, Y

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of chronic lateral ankle ligament injury. Methods: A total of 120 ankles in 120 patients with a clinical suspicion of chronic ankle ligament injury were examined by ultrasonography by using a 5- to 17-MHz linear array transducer before surgery. The results of ultrasonography were compared with the operative findings. Results: There were 18 sprains and 24 partial and 52 complete tears of the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL); 26 sprains, 27 partial and 12 complete tears of the calcaneofibular ligament (CFL); and 1 complete tear of the posterior talofibular ligament (PTFL) at arthroscopy and operation. Compared with operative findings, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of ultrasonography were 98.9%, 96.2% and 84.2%, respectively, for injury of the ATFL and 93.8%, 90.9% and 83.3%, respectively, for injury of the CFL. The PTFL tear was identified by ultrasonography. The accuracy of identification between acute-on-chronic and subacute–chronic patients did not differ. The accuracies of diagnosing three grades of ATFL injuries were almost the same as those of diagnosing CFL injuries. Conclusion: Ultrasonography provides useful information for the evaluation of patients presenting with chronic pain after ankle sprain. Advances in knowledge: Intraoperative findings are the reference standard. We demonstrated that ultrasonography was highly sensitive and specific in detecting chronic lateral ligments injury of the ankle joint. PMID:24352708

  6. Radiographic Evaluation of Ankle Joint Stability After Calcaneofibular Ligament Elevation During Open Reduction and Internal Fixation of Calcaneus Fracture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chien-Shun; Tzeng, Yun-Hsuan; Lin, Chun-Cheng; Huang, Ching-Kuei; Chang, Ming-Chau; Chiang, Chao-Ching

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the influence of sectioning the calcaneofibular ligament (CFL) during an extensile lateral approach during open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) of calcaneal fractures on ankle joint stability. Forty-two patients with calcaneal fractures that received ORIF were included. Talar tilt stress and anterior drawer radiographs were performed on the operative and contralateral ankles 6 months postoperatively. The average degree of talar tilt on stress radiographs was 3.4 degrees (range, 0-12 degrees) on the operative side and 3.2 degrees (range, 0-14 degrees) on the contralateral side. The mean anterior drawer on stress radiographs of the CFL incised ankle was 6.1 mm (range, 2.4-11.8 mm) and on the contralateral ankle was 5.7 mm (range, 2.6-8.6 mm). There was no statistically significant difference of talar tilt and anterior drawer between the CFL incised side and the contralateral side (P = .658 and .302, respectively). The results suggest that sectioning of the CFL without any repair during ORIF of a calcaneal fracture does not have a negative effect on stability of the ankle. Repair of the CFL is, thus, probably not necessary following extended lateral approach for ORIF of calcaneal fractures. Level II, comparative study. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. Ankle-joint mobility and standing squat posture in elite junior cross-country skiers. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Conradsson, D; Fridén, C; Nilsson-Wikmar, L; Ang, B O

    2010-06-01

    Skating technique in cross-country skiing is a complex multi-joint movement with kinematics comparable to those of the standing squat exercise where any restricted joint mobility in the lower extremity-chain may change the movement pattern. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the effect of ankle mobility on trunk posture during squat exercise in cross-country skiers. Seven elite junior cross-country skiers (age range 17-19 years) performed two different standing squats, one with hands on hips and one with arms extended above the head. The squats were recorded on video and analyzed in selected positions: 90 degrees and maximal knee flexion. Segment angles for shank and trunk were calculated from anatomical references relative to vertical/horizontal orientation in space. Recordings from passive ankle dorsiflexion were correlated with 1) trunk flexion, and 2) angle index (trunk flexion relative to shank angle). Reduced ankle dorsiflexion was moderately associated with increased trunk flexion with hands on hips (r=-0.51 to -0.57), and arms above head (r=-0.61 to -0.64). Further, reduced dorsiflexion was also moderately associated with decreased angle index with hands on hip (r=0.60 to 0.67) but highly associated with decreased angle index with arms above head (r=0.75 to 0.76). The results imply that reduced ankle dorsal mobility is related to decreased angle index as well as increased trunk flexion during squat exercise, thus indicating the relevance of good ankle joint mobility for appropriate upper-body posture during squat exercise.

  8. Phenotypic plasticity of climbing-related traits in the ankle joint of great apes and rainforest hunter-gatherers.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Vivek V; Kraft, Thomas S; Desilva, Jeremy M; Dominy, Nathaniel J

    2013-01-01

    The "negrito" and African "pygmy" phenotypes are predominately exhibited by hunter-gatherers living in rainforest habitats. Foraging within such habitats is associated with a unique set of locomotor behaviors, most notably habitual vertical climbing during the pursuit of honey, fruit, and game. When performed frequently, this behavior is expected to correlate with developmentally plastic skeletal morphologies that respond to mechanical loading. Using six measurements in the distal tibia and talus that discriminate nonhuman primates by vertical climbing frequency, we tested the prediction that intraspecific variation in this behavior is reflected in the morphology of the ankle joint of habitually climbing human populations. First, to explore the plasticity of climbing-linked morphologies, we made comparisons between chimpanzees, gorillas, and orangutans from wild and captive settings. The analysis revealed significant differences in two climbing-linked traits (anterior expansion of the articular surface of the distal tibia and increased degree of talar wedging), indicating that these traits are sensitive to climbing behavior. However, our analyses did not reveal any signatures of climbing behavior in the ankles of habitually climbing hunter-gatherers. These results suggest that the detection of fine-grained differences in human locomotor behaviors at the ankle joint, particularly those associated with arboreality, may be obscured by the functional demands of terrestrial bipedalism. Accordingly, it may be difficult to use population-level characteristics of ankle morphology to make inferences about the climbing behavior of hominins in the fossil record, even when facultative arborealism is associated with key fitness benefits.

  9. Movement within foot and ankle joint in children with spastic cerebral palsy: a 3-dimensional ultrasound analysis of medial gastrocnemius length with correction for effects of foot deformation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In spastic cerebral palsy (SCP), a limited range of motion of the foot (ROM), limits gait and other activities. Assessment of this limitation of ROM and knowledge of active mechanisms is of crucial importance for clinical treatment. Methods For a comparison between spastic cerebral palsy (SCP) children and typically developing children (TD), medial gastrocnemius muscle-tendon complex length was assessed using 3-D ultrasound imaging techniques, while exerting externally standardized moments via a hand-held dynamometer. Exemplary X-ray imaging of ankle and foot was used to confirm possible TD-SCP differences in foot deformation. Results SCP and TD did not differ in normalized level of excitation (EMG) of muscles studied. For given moments exerted in SCP, foot plate angles were all more towards plantar flexion than in TD. However, foot plate angle proved to be an invalid estimator of talocrural joint angle, since at equal foot plate angles, GM muscle-tendon complex was shorter in SCP (corresponding to an equivalent of 1 cm). A substantial difference remained even after normalizing for individual differences in tibia length. X-ray imaging of ankle and foot of one SCP child and two typically developed adults, confirmed that in SCP that of total footplate angle changes (0-4 Nm: 15°), the contribution of foot deformation to changes in foot plate angle (8) were as big as the contribution of dorsal flexion at the talocrural joint (7°). In typically developed individuals there were relatively smaller contributions (10 -11%) by foot deformation to changes in foot plate angle, indicating that the contribution of talocrural angle changes was most important. Using a new estimate for position at the talocrural joint (the difference between GM muscle–tendon complex length and tibia length, GM relative length) removed this effect, thus allowing more fair comparison of SCP and TD data. On the basis of analysis of foot plate angle and GM relative length as a function

  10. The effects of ankle joint strategy exercises with and without visual feedback on the dynamic balance of stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Si-Nae; Choi, Jung-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effects of visual feedback training on the balance of stroke patients performing ankle joint strategy exercises. [Subjects and Methods] In this study, 26 stroke patients were randomly and equally assigned to a visual feedback group (VFG) and a visual disuse group (VDG). They performed ankle joint strategy exercises for 30 minutes, three times per week for six weeks. The patients’ balance ability was measured before and after the exercises to compare the effects of visual feedback. To assess balance ability, the limits of stability (LOS) and the distance the center of pressure (CoP) moved were measured using a BT4 portable force platform. The Berg balance scale (BBS) and the timed up and go (TUG) test were also used to assess balance before and after the exercises. [Results] Changes in LOS were significant in the anterior, posterior, left, and right directions in each group, and the interactions between the two groups were significant in the posterior, left, and right directions. The changes in TUG and BBS results between pre-test and the post-test were statistically significant in the two groups, and also between the groups. [Conclusion] Visual feedback training had a positive effect on balance when ankle joint strategy exercises were performed by stroke patients to improve balance. PMID:26355721

  11. Joint Stability Characteristics of the Ankle Complex in Female Athletes With Histories of Lateral Ankle Sprain, Part II: Clinical Experience Using Arthrometric Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Kovaleski, John E.; Heitman, Robert J.; Gurchiek, Larry R.; Hollis, J. M.; Liu, Wei; IV, Albert W. Pearsall

    2014-01-01

    Context: This is part II of a 2-part series discussing stability characteristics of the ankle complex. In part I, we used a cadaver model to examine the effects of sectioning the lateral ankle ligaments on anterior and inversion motion and stiffness of the ankle complex. In part II, we wanted to build on and apply these findings to the clinical assessment of ankle-complex motion and stiffness in a group of athletes with a history of unilateral ankle sprain. Objective: To examine ankle-complex motion and stiffness in a group of athletes with reported history of lateral ankle sprain. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty-five female college athletes (age = 19.4 ± 1.4 years, height = 170.2 ± 7.4 cm, mass = 67.3 ± 10.0 kg) with histories of unilateral ankle sprain. Intervention(s): All ankles underwent loading with an ankle arthrometer. Ankles were tested bilaterally. Main Outcome Measure(s): The dependent variables were anterior displacement, anterior end-range stiffness, inversion rotation, and inversion end-range stiffness. Results: Anterior displacement of the ankle complex did not differ between the uninjured and sprained ankles (P = .37), whereas ankle-complex rotation was greater for the sprained ankles (P = .03). The sprained ankles had less anterior and inversion end-range stiffness than the uninjured ankles (P < .01). Conclusions: Changes in ankle-complex laxity and end-range stiffness were detected in ankles with histories of sprain. These results indicate the presence of altered mechanical characteristics in the soft tissues of the sprained ankles. PMID:24568223

  12. Effect of isotonic and isokinetic exercise on muscle activity and balance of the ankle joint

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Kyoung; Yoo, Kyung-Tae

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to examine how the balance of lower limbs and the muscle activities of the tibialis anterior (TA), the medial gastrocnemius (GCM), and the peroneus longus (PL) are influenced by isotonic and isokinetic exercise of the ankle joint. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were healthy adults (n=20), and they were divided into two groups (isotonic=10, isokinetic=10). [Methods] Isotonic group performed 3 sets of 10 contractions at 50% of MVIC and Isokinetic group performed 3 sets of 60°/sec. Muscle activity was measured by EMG and balance was measured by one-leg standing test. [Results] For muscle activity, a main effect of group was found in the non-dominant TA, and the dominant TA, GCM and PL. For balance, a main effect of time was found in both groups for the sway area measured support was provided by the non-dominant side. [Conclusion] In terms of muscle activity, the two groups showed a significant difference, and the isokinetic group showed higher muscle activities. In terms of balance, there was a significant difference between the pre-test and the post-test. The results of this study may help in the selection of exercises for physical therapy, because they show that muscle activity and balance vary according to the type of exercise. PMID:25729181

  13. Effect of isotonic and isokinetic exercise on muscle activity and balance of the ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Kyoung; Yoo, Kyung-Tae

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to examine how the balance of lower limbs and the muscle activities of the tibialis anterior (TA), the medial gastrocnemius (GCM), and the peroneus longus (PL) are influenced by isotonic and isokinetic exercise of the ankle joint. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were healthy adults (n=20), and they were divided into two groups (isotonic=10, isokinetic=10). [Methods] Isotonic group performed 3 sets of 10 contractions at 50% of MVIC and Isokinetic group performed 3 sets of 60°/sec. Muscle activity was measured by EMG and balance was measured by one-leg standing test. [Results] For muscle activity, a main effect of group was found in the non-dominant TA, and the dominant TA, GCM and PL. For balance, a main effect of time was found in both groups for the sway area measured support was provided by the non-dominant side. [Conclusion] In terms of muscle activity, the two groups showed a significant difference, and the isokinetic group showed higher muscle activities. In terms of balance, there was a significant difference between the pre-test and the post-test. The results of this study may help in the selection of exercises for physical therapy, because they show that muscle activity and balance vary according to the type of exercise.

  14. Association Between Years of Experience and Ankle Joint Disorder in Male Student Basketball Players Based on Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Yaeko

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The goal of the study was to survey ankle joint disorder in male senior high school and college student basketball players based on the results of an ultrasonographic medical check-up of the ankle joint. Materials and Methods The subjects were 17 senior high school student and 19 college student basketball players. Ultrasonography, evaluation of ATFL injury, and examination of the talocrural joint region were performed. The subjects were grouped based on the presence or absence of old ATFL injury, and subjects with ATFL injury were classified by the injured region: fibular insertion site, parenchyma, and talar insertion site. The talocrural joint region was evaluated based on the areas of the lateral margin, central region, and medial margin, and sites with an irregular bone contour and osteophyte were counted individually. The questionnaire asked about the patients’ history of ankle injuries. Results A questionnaire survey revealed that 70–79% of all subjects had experienced a sprain at least once and 21–29% had frequently sprained the left or right foot 10 or more times in the past. On ultrasonography, there was no significant difference in ligament injury or injured site between the senior high school and college students, but the number of osteochondral findings in the talocrural joint region was significantly higher in the college students. In addition, the number of injured sites significantly increased in those with 10 or more years of playing experience. Conclusion These results suggest that disorder of the talocrural joint region progresses with an increase in years of experience in student basketball players who do not take specific preventive measures against this injury. PMID:28603784

  15. Association Between Years of Experience and Ankle Joint Disorder in Male Student Basketball Players Based on Ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Yaeko

    2017-04-01

    The goal of the study was to survey ankle joint disorder in male senior high school and college student basketball players based on the results of an ultrasonographic medical check-up of the ankle joint. The subjects were 17 senior high school student and 19 college student basketball players. Ultrasonography, evaluation of ATFL injury, and examination of the talocrural joint region were performed. The subjects were grouped based on the presence or absence of old ATFL injury, and subjects with ATFL injury were classified by the injured region: fibular insertion site, parenchyma, and talar insertion site. The talocrural joint region was evaluated based on the areas of the lateral margin, central region, and medial margin, and sites with an irregular bone contour and osteophyte were counted individually. The questionnaire asked about the patients' history of ankle injuries. A questionnaire survey revealed that 70-79% of all subjects had experienced a sprain at least once and 21-29% had frequently sprained the left or right foot 10 or more times in the past. On ultrasonography, there was no significant difference in ligament injury or injured site between the senior high school and college students, but the number of osteochondral findings in the talocrural joint region was significantly higher in the college students. In addition, the number of injured sites significantly increased in those with 10 or more years of playing experience. These results suggest that disorder of the talocrural joint region progresses with an increase in years of experience in student basketball players who do not take specific preventive measures against this injury.

  16. Influence of footwear and equipment on stride length and range of motion of ankle, knee and hip joint.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Christoph; Lindner, Tobias; Woitge, Sandra; Schulz, Katharina; Finze, Susanne; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Footwear and equipment worn by military personnel is of importance for them to be able to meet the physical demands specific to their profession daily activities. The aim of the present study was to investigate by means of gait analysis how army-provided footwear and equipment influence the range of motion of hip, knee and ankle joints as well as stride length. Thirty-two soldiers were subjected to gait analysis on a treadmill by way of video recordings and goniometric measurements. The stride length increased when military shoes are worn. We found no influence on stride length in connection to increased loading. The weight of the shoes represents the decisive factor. Neither shoes nor equipment changed the range of motion of the knee joint. Weight of equipment affected range of motion of the hip joint. The range of motion of the upper and lower ankle joints was mainly influenced by the properties of the shoes. Military footwear and weight of equipment influence stride length and range of motion of joints of the lower extremities in a specific way. Shape of material is the decisive factor.

  17. [Intramedullary locked fixation and compression nail (IP-XS-Nail): treatment of ankle joint fractures].

    PubMed

    Gehr, Jonas; Friedl, Wilhelm

    2006-06-01

    Reconstruction of the anatomy of the ankle joint while protecting the soft tissue, and osteosynthesis to maintain stability for function and weight bearing. Distal fractures of the fibula, bimalleolar fractures, and isolated fractures of the medial malleolus. Very small (< 5 mm) distal fragments (if fixation of the fragments is not possible using a small XXS nail) and very narrow (< 2.5 mm) medullary cavity (conversion to plate fixation). With displaced fibula fractures, open reduction should be performed with fracture retention using wide-armed reduction forceps, insertion of a central guide wire into the medullary cavity, use of a cannulated drill bit, introduction of the nail using an aiming arm and locked fixation with threaded wire. After checking the position using X-ray, the wire should be shortened using the bolt cutters. POSTOPERATIVE MANAGEMENT (Depending on the Weber classification): Full weight bearing for all isolated distal fractures of the fibula (Weber types A and B) and isolated fractures of the medial malleolus. For distal fractures of the fibula (Weber types A and B) with additional fracture of the medial malleolus or involvement of the medial ligament partial weight bearing of 20 kp for 4 weeks, followed by full weight bearing. For all Weber C fractures and/or additional Volkmann fracture only 10 kp of partial weight bearing with a rocker-sole orthosis should be allowed for 6 weeks followed by full weight bearing. No weight bearing for 6 weeks until the screws are removed is only recommended, if positioning screws have been used for Weber C fractures. In the period from 05/2000 to 01/2002, 194 ankle fractures were treated with the IP-XS-Nail((R)). Follow-up examinations were conducted on 162 patients with an average age of 51.2 years after an average of 15 months. 62 Weber B fractures (38.3%) and 45 Weber C fractures (27.7%) were evaluated. There were bimalleolar fractures in 55 cases (34.0%). According to the Olerud Score (clinical and

  18. Neural Excitability and Joint Laxity in Chronic Ankle Instability, Coper, and Control Groups.

    PubMed

    Bowker, Samantha; Terada, Masafumi; Thomas, Abbey C; Pietrosimone, Brian G; Hiller, Claire E; Gribble, Phillip A

    2016-04-01

    Neuromuscular and mechanical deficiencies are commonly studied in participants with chronic ankle instability (CAI). Few investigators have attempted to comprehensively consider sensorimotor and mechanical differences among people with CAI, copers who did not present with prolonged dysfunctions after an initial ankle sprain, and a healthy control group. To determine if differences exist in spinal reflex excitability and ankle laxity among participants with CAI, copers, and healthy controls. Case-control study. Research laboratory. Thirty-seven participants with CAI, 30 participants categorized as copers, and 26 healthy control participants. We assessed spinal reflex excitability of the soleus using the Hoffmann reflex protocol. Participants' ankle laxity was measured with an instrumented ankle arthrometer. The maximum Hoffmann reflex : maximal muscle response ratio was calculated. Ankle laxity was measured as the total displacement in the anterior-posterior directions (mm) and total rotation in the inversion and eversion directions (°). Spinal reflex excitability was diminished in participants with CAI compared with copers and control participants (P = .01). No differences were observed among any of the groups for ankle laxity. Changes in the spinal reflex excitability of the soleus that likely affect ankle stability were seen only in the CAI group, yet no mechanical differences were noted across the groups. These findings support the importance of finding effective ways to increase spinal reflex excitability for the purpose of treating neural excitability dysfunction in patients with CAI.

  19. Clinical results of resection arthrodesis by triangular external fixation for posttraumatic arthrosis of the ankle joint in 89 cases.

    PubMed

    Kiene, J; Schulz, Arndt P; Hillbricht, S; Jürgens, Ch; Paech, A

    2009-01-28

    The methods for ankle arthrodesis differ significantly, probably a sign that no method is clearly superior to others. In the last ten years there is a clear favour toward internal fixation. We retrospectively evaluate the technique and evaluate the clinical long term results of external fixation in a triangular frame. From 1994 to 2001 a consecutive series of 95 patients with end stage arthritis of the ankle joint were treated. Retrospectively the case notes were evaluated regarding trauma history, medical complaints, further injuries and illnesses, walking and pain status and occupational issues and the clinical examination before arthrodesis. Mean age at the index procedure was 45.4 years (18-82), 67 patients were male (70.5%). Via a bilateral approach the malleoli and the joint surfaces were resected. An AO fixator was applied with two Steinmann-nails inserted with approximately 8 cm distance in the distal tibia, one in the neck of the talus and one in the dorsal calcaneus. The fixator was removed after approximately 12 weeks. Follow up examination at mean 4.4 years included a standardised questionnaire and a clinical examination including the criteria of the AOFAS-Score and radiographs. Due to different complications, 8 (8.9%) further surgical procedures were necessary including 1 below knee amputation. In 4 patients a non-union of the ankle arthrodesis developed (4.5%). The mean AOFAS score improved from 20.8 to 69.3 points. Non-union rates and clinical results of arthrodesis by triangular external fixation of the ankle joint do not differ to internal fixation methods. The complication rate and the reduced patient comfort reserve this method mainly for infected arthritis and complicated soft tissue situations.

  20. An EMG-Controlled SMA Device for the Rehabilitation of the Ankle Joint in Post-Acute Stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittaccio, S.; Viscuso, S.

    2011-07-01

    The capacity of flexing one's ankle is an indispensible segment of gait re-learning, as imbalance, wrong compensatory use of other joints and risk of falling may depend on the so-called drop-foot. The rehabilitation of ankle dorsiflexion may be achieved through active exercising of the relevant musculature (especially tibialis anterior, TA). This can be troublesome for patients affected by weakness and flaccid paresis. Thus, as needs evolve during patient's improvements, a therapeutic device should be able to guide and sustain gradual recovery by providing commensurate aid. This includes exploiting even initial attempts at voluntary motion and turns those into effective workout. An active orthosis powered by two rotary actuators containing NiTi wire was designed to obtain ankle dorsiflexion. A computer routine that analyzes the electromyographic (sEMG) signal from TA muscle is used to control the orthosis and trigger its activation. The software also provides instructions and feed-back for the patient. Tests on the orthosis proved that it can produce strokes up to 36° against resisting torques exceeding 180 Ncm. Three healthy subjects were able to control the orthosis by modulating their TA sEMG activity. The movement produced in the preliminary tests is interesting for lower limb rehabilitation, and will be further improved by optimizing body-orthosis interface. It is hoped that this device will enhance early rehabilitation and recovery of ankle mobility in stroke patients.

  1. ANKLE JOINT CONTROL DURING SINGLE-LEGGED BALANCE USING COMMON BALANCE TRAINING DEVICES – IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION STRATEGIES

    PubMed Central

    Strøm, Mark; Thorborg, Kristian; Bandholm, Thomas; Tang, Lars; Zebis, Mette; Nielsen, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background A lateral ankle sprain is the most prevalent musculoskeletal injury in sports. Exercises that aim to improve balance are a standard part of the ankle rehabilitation process. In an optimal progression model for ankle rehabilitation and prevention of future ankle sprains, it is important to characterize different balance exercises based on level of difficulty and sensori-motor training stimulus. Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate frontal-plane ankle kinematics and associated peroneal muscle activity during single-legged balance on stable surface (floor) and three commonly used balance devices (Airex®, BOSU® Ball and wobble board). Design Descriptive exploratory laboratory study. Methods Nineteen healthy subjects performed single-legged balance with eyes open on an Airex® mat, BOSU® Ball, wobble board, and floor (reference condition). Ankle kinematics were measured using reflective markers and 3-dimensional recordings and expressed as inversion-eversion range of motion variability, peak velocity of inversion and number of inversion-eversion direction changes. Peroneus longus EMG activity was averaged and normalized to maximal activity during maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), and in addition amplitude probability distribution function (APDF) between 90 and 10% was calculated as a measure of muscle activation variability. Results Balancing on BOSU® Ball and wobble board generally resulted in increased ankle kinematic and muscle activity variables, compared to the other surfaces. BOSU® Ball was the most challenging in terms of inversion-eversion variability while wobble board was associated with a higher number of inversion-eversion direction changes. No differences in average muscle activation level were found between these two surfaces, but the BOSU® Ball did show a more variable activation pattern in terms of APDF. Conclusion The results showed large kinematic variability among different balance training devices and

  2. The Effect of Velocity of Joint Mobilization on Corticospinal Excitability in Individuals With a History of Ankle Sprain.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Beth E; Piraino, Andrew; Lee, Ya-Yun; Smith, Jo Armour; Johnson, Sean; Davenport, Todd E; Kulig, Kornelia

    2016-07-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Background Joint mobilization and manipulation decrease pain and improve patient function. Yet, the processes underlying these changes are not well understood. Measures of corticospinal excitability provide insight into potential mechanisms mediated by the central nervous system. Objectives To investigate the differential effects of joint mobilization and manipulation at the talocrural joint on corticospinal excitability in individuals with resolved symptoms following ankle sprain. Methods Twenty-seven participants with a history of ankle sprain were randomly assigned to the control, joint mobilization, or thrust manipulation group. The motor-evoked potential (MEP) and cortical silent period (CSP) of the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius were obtained with transcranial magnetic stimulation at rest and during active contraction of the tibialis anterior. The slopes of MEP/CSP input/output curves and the maximal MEP/CSP values were calculated to indicate corticospinal excitability. Behavioral measures, including ankle dorsiflexion and dynamic balance, were evaluated. Results A repeated-measures analysis of variance of the MEP slope showed a significant group-by-time interaction for the tibialis anterior at rest (P = .002) and during active contraction (P = .042). After intervention, the thrust manipulation group had an increase in corticospinal excitability, while the corticospinal excitability decreased in the mobilization group. The thrust manipulation group, but not other groups, also demonstrated a significant increase in the maximal MEP amplitude of the tibialis anterior after intervention. Conclusion The findings suggest that joint manipulation and mobilization have different effects on corticospinal excitability. The increased corticospinal excitability following thrust manipulation may provide a window for physical therapists to optimize muscle recruitment and subsequently movement. The trial was registered at

  3. Total Ankle Replacement Survival Rates Based on Kaplan-Meier Survival Analysis of National Joint Registry Data.

    PubMed

    Bartel, Annette F P; Roukis, Thomas S

    2015-10-01

    National joint registry data provides unique information about primary total ankle replacement (TAR) survival. We sought to recreate survival curves among published national joint registry data sets using the Kaplan-Meier estimator. Overall, 5152 primary and 591 TAR revisions were included over a 2- to 13-year period with prosthesis survival for all national joint registries of 0.94 at 2-years, 0.87 at 5-years and 0.81 at 10-years. National joint registry datasets should strive for completion of data presentation including revision definitions, modes and time of failure, and patients lost to follow-up or death for complete accuracy of the Kaplan-Meier estimator.

  4. Effects of ankle joint mobilization with movement and weight-bearing exercise on knee strength, ankle range of motion, and gait velocity in patients with stroke: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    An, Chang-Man; Won, Jong-Im

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of ankle joint mobilization with movement on knee strength, ankle range of motion, and gait velocity, compared with weight-bearing exercise in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty subjects with chronic stroke were divided into three groups: MWM (n = 12), WBE (n = 8), and control (n = 10). All groups attended physical therapy sessions 3 times a week for 5 weeks. Subjects in the MWM group performed mobilization with movement exercises, whilst participants in the WBE group performed weight-bearing exercises. Knee peak torque, ankle range of motion, and spatiotemporal gait parameters were evaluated before and after the interventions. [Results] Knee extensor peak torque increased significantly in both MWM and WBE groups. However, only the MWM group showed significant improvement in passive and active ankle range of motion and gait velocity, among the three groups. [Conclusion] Ankle joint mobilization with movement intervention is more effective than simple weight-bearing intervention in improving gait speed in stroke patients with limited ankle motion.

  5. Is intramedullary nailing applicable for distal tibial fractures with ankle joint extension?

    PubMed

    Beytemür, Ozan; Albay, Cem; Adanır, Oktay; Yüksel, Serdar; Güleç, Mehmet Akif

    2016-12-01

    This study aims to evaluate the functional and radiographic results and treatment complications of AO/OTA (Arbeitsgemeinschaft fur Osteosynthesefragen/Orthopaedic Trauma Association) type 43C1 and C2 fractures treated with intramedullary nailing. We retrospectively evaluated 35 AO/OTA type 43C1 and C2 patients (26 males, 9 females; mean age 39.8±16.9 years; range 19 to 82 years) treated with intramedullary nailing. Two interfragmentary screws out of nail were applied in 10 patients (29%), while one interfragmentary screw out of nail was applied in 17 patients (49%). Intramedullary nailing was applied in eight patients (23%) without external screws. Fracture union, union time, alignment problems, and complications were evaluated. Clinical evaluation of patients was conducted using the Olerud and Molander score and by measuring the ankle joint range of motion. Union was achieved in all 35 patients. Mean union time was 16.5±2.8 weeks (range 12 to 24 weeks) and mean Olerud and Molander score was 88±8.24. Varus deformity was detected in one patient, valgus deformity was detected in two patients, and rotation deformity was detected in one patient. Superficial infection was detected in three patients (9%). Deep infection was not detected in any patient. Intramedullary nailing is not contraindicated for simple intra-articular distal tibial fractures. In these fractures, intramedullary nailing performed in accordance with its technique, with an additional percutaneous screw if necessary, is a successful treatment option with high fracture union rates, high functional results, and low complication rates.

  6. Manual therapy in joint and nerve structures combined with exercises in the treatment of recurrent ankle sprains: A randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Plaza-Manzano, Gustavo; Vergara-Vila, Marta; Val-Otero, Sandra; Rivera-Prieto, Cristina; Pecos-Martin, Daniel; Gallego-Izquierdo, Tomás; Ferragut-Garcías, Alejandro; Romero-Franco, Natalia

    2016-12-01

    Recurrent ankle sprains often involve residual symptoms for which subjects often perform proprioceptive or/and strengthening exercises. However, the effectiveness of mobilization to influence important nerve structures due to its anatomical distribution like tibial and peroneal nerves is unclear. To analyze the effects of proprioceptive/strengthening exercises versus the same exercises and manual therapy including mobilizations to influence joint and nerve structures in the management of recurrent ankle sprains. A randomized single-blind controlled clinical trial. Fifty-six patients with recurrent ankle sprains and regular sports practice were randomly assigned to experimental or control group. The control group performed 4 weeks of proprioceptive/strengthening exercises; the experimental group performed 4 weeks of the same exercises combined with manual therapy (mobilizations to influence joint and nerve structures). Pain, self-reported functional ankle instability, pressure pain threshold (PPT), ankle muscle strength, and active range of motion (ROM) were evaluated in the ankle joint before, just after and one month after the interventions. The within-group differences revealed improvements in all of the variables in both groups throughout the time. Between-group differences revealed that the experimental group exhibited lower pain levels and self-reported functional ankle instability and higher PPT, ankle muscle strength and ROM values compared to the control group immediately after the interventions and one month later. A protocol involving proprioceptive and strengthening exercises and manual therapy (mobilizations to influence joint and nerve structures) resulted in greater improvements in pain, self-reported functional joint stability, strength and ROM compared to exercises alone. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Military Exercises, Knee and Ankle Joint Position Sense, and Injury in Male Conscripts: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Farshid; Azma, Kamran; Naseh, Iman; Emadifard, Reza; Etemadi, Yasaman

    2013-01-01

    Context: The high incidence of lower limb injuries associated with physical exercises in military conscripts suggests that fatigue may be a risk factor for injuries. Researchers have hypothesized that lower limb injuries may be related to altered ankle and knee joint position sense (JPS) due to fatigue. Objective: To evaluate if military exercises could alter JPS and to examine the possible relation of JPS to future lower extremity injuries in military service. Design: Cohort study. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 50 male conscripts (age = 21.4 ± 2.3 years, height = 174.5 ± 6.4 cm, mass = 73.1 ± 6.3 kg) from a unique military base were recruited randomly. Main Outcome Measure(s): Participants performed 8 weeks of physical activities at the beginning of a military course. In the first part of the study, we instructed participants to recognize predetermined positions before and after military exercises so we could examine the effects of military exercise on JPS. The averages of the absolute error and the variable error of 3 trials were recorded. We collected data on the frequency of lower extremity injuries over 8 weeks. Next, the participants were divided into 2 groups: injured and uninjured. Separate 2 × 2 × 2 (group-by-time-by-joint) mixed-model analyses of variance were used to determine main effects and interactions of these factors for each JPS measure. In the second part of the study, we examined whether the effects of fatigue on JPS were related to the development of injury during an 8-week training program. We calculated Hedges effect sizes for JPS changes postexercise in each group and compared change scores between groups. Results: We found group-by-time interactions for all JPS variables (F range = 2.86–4.05, P < .01). All participants showed increases in JPS errors postexercise (P < .01), but the injured group had greater changes for all the variables (P < .01). Conclusions: Military conscripts who sustained lower

  8. [Arthrodesis (with/without correction) of the ankle and subtalar joint: A3 nail fixation with triple bending and mechanical navigation].

    PubMed

    Richter, M

    2014-08-01

    Restoration of a stable and plantigrade foot in deformities of the ankle and/or hindfoot and concomitant degenerative changes at the ankle and subtalar joints. Deformities at the ankle and/or hindfoot and concomitant degenerative changes at the ankle and subtalar joint. Failed (corrective) arthrodesis of the ankle and subtalar joints. Fused ankle and degeneration of the subtalar joint. Failed total ankle replacement with insufficient substance of talar body and/or degeneration of subtalar joint. Massive hindfoot instability. Active local infection or relevant vascular insufficiency, possible preservation of the ankle or subtalar joint (relative contraindication). Prone position and posterolateral approach to ankle and subtalar joints (alternative supine position/anterior approach; lateral position/lateral approach). Exposition of ankle and subtalar joints and removal of remaining cartilage. Optional corrective osteotomies and/or bone grafting. Correction and optional fixation of the corrected position with 2.0 mm K-wires. Mechanically navigated insertion of a retrograde guide wire in projection of the tibial axis and insertion of a second guide wire through the entry point of the nail lateral and dorsal to the tibial axis. Reaming and insertion of the A3 nail with a distal double bend; one posterior and one lateral, and a proximal bend corresponding to a slight recurvatum. Insertion of locking screws into the calcaneus, talus and tibia (twice with optional static or dynamic locking). Optional compression between calcaneus and talus, and between tibia and talus. Insertion of a drainage and layer-wise closure. For the first 6 weeks 15 kg partial weight bearing in an orthosis, followed by full weight bearing in a stable standard shoe. In October 2010 (n = 2) and from 15 October 2011 to 13 April 2012 (n = 26) 28 arthrodeses (with/without correction) with A3 fixation were performed. In all cases, exact nail placement was achieved. Thirteen cases completed

  9. Normal Anatomy and Compression Areas of Nerves of the Foot and Ankle: US and MR Imaging with Anatomic Correlation.

    PubMed

    De Maeseneer, Michel; Madani, Hardi; Lenchik, Leon; Kalume Brigido, Monica; Shahabpour, Maryam; Marcelis, Stefaan; de Mey, Johan; Scafoglieri, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    The anatomy of the nerves of the foot and ankle is complex, and familiarity with the normal anatomy and course of these nerves as well as common anatomic variants is essential for correct identification at imaging. Ultrasonography (US) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging allow visualization of these nerves and may facilitate diagnosis of various compression syndromes, such as "jogger's heel," Baxter neuropathy, and Morton neuroma. It may be difficult to distinguish the nerves from adjacent vasculature at MR imaging, and US can help in differentiation. The authors review the normal anatomy and common variants of the nerves of the foot and ankle, with use of dissected specimens and correlative US and MR imaging findings. In addition, the authors illustrate proper probe positioning, which is essential for visualizing the nerves at US. The authors' discussion focuses on the superficial and deep peroneal, sural, saphenous, tibial, medial and lateral plantar, medial and inferior calcaneal, common digital, and medial proper plantar digital nerves.

  10. Neural Excitability and Joint Laxity in Chronic Ankle Instability, Coper, and Control Groups

    PubMed Central

    Bowker, Samantha; Terada, Masafumi; Thomas, Abbey C.; Pietrosimone, Brian G.; Hiller, Claire E.; Gribble, Phillip A.

    2016-01-01

    Context:  Neuromuscular and mechanical deficiencies are commonly studied in participants with chronic ankle instability (CAI). Few investigators have attempted to comprehensively consider sensorimotor and mechanical differences among people with CAI, copers who did not present with prolonged dysfunctions after an initial ankle sprain, and a healthy control group. Objective:  To determine if differences exist in spinal reflex excitability and ankle laxity among participants with CAI, copers, and healthy controls. Design:  Case-control study. Setting:  Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants:  Thirty-seven participants with CAI, 30 participants categorized as copers, and 26 healthy control participants. Main Outcome Measure(s):  We assessed spinal reflex excitability of the soleus using the Hoffmann reflex protocol. Participants' ankle laxity was measured with an instrumented ankle arthrometer. The maximum Hoffmann reflex : maximal muscle response ratio was calculated. Ankle laxity was measured as the total displacement in the anterior-posterior directions (mm) and total rotation in the inversion and eversion directions (°). Results:  Spinal reflex excitability was diminished in participants with CAI compared with copers and control participants (P = .01). No differences were observed among any of the groups for ankle laxity. Conclusion:  Changes in the spinal reflex excitability of the soleus that likely affect ankle stability were seen only in the CAI group, yet no mechanical differences were noted across the groups. These findings support the importance of finding effective ways to increase spinal reflex excitability for the purpose of treating neural excitability dysfunction in patients with CAI. PMID:27065189

  11. Assessment of ankle and hindfoot stability and joint pressures using a human cadaveric model of a large lateral talar process excision: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Sands, Andrew; White, Charles; Blankstein, Michael; Zderic, Ivan; Wahl, Dieter; Ernst, Manuela; Windolf, Markus; Hagen, Jennifer E; Richards, R Geoff; Stoffel, Karl; Gueorguiev, Boyko

    2015-03-01

    Lateral talar process fragment excision may be followed by hindfoot instability and altered biomechanics. There is controversy regarding the ideal fragment size for internal fixation versus excision and a concern that excision of a large fragment may lead to significant instability. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of a simulated large lateral talar process excision on ankle and subtalar joint stability.A custom-made seesaw rig was designed to apply inversion/eversion stress loading on 7 fresh-frozen human cadaveric lower legs and investigate them in pre-excision, 5 cm and 10 cm lateral talar process fragment excision states. Anteroposterior radiographs were taken to assess ankle and subtalar joint tilt and calculate angular change from neutral hindfoot alignment to 10-kg forced inversion/eversion. Ankle joint pressures and contact areas were measured under 30-kg axial load in neutral hindfoot alignment.In comparison to the pre-excision state, no significantly different mediolateral angular change was observed in the subtalar joint after 5 and 10 cm lateral talar process fragment excision in inversion and eversion. With respect to the ankle joint, 10-cm fragment excision produced significantly bigger inversion tibiotalar tilt compared with the pre-excision state, P = .04. No significant change of the ankle joint pressure and contact area was detected after 5 and 10-cm excision in comparison with the pre-excison state.An excision of up to 10 cm of the lateral talar process does not cause a significant instability at the level of the subtalar joint but might be a destabilizing factor at the ankle joint under inversion stress. The latter could be related to extensive soft tissue dissection required for resection.

  12. Talar neck fracture with talar head dislocation and intact ankle and subtalar joints--a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Veerappa, Lokesh A; Gopalkrishna, Chetan

    2010-03-01

    A rare case of talar neck fracture with intact ankle and subtalar joint is presented. The talar head fragment is dislocated dorsally with the fractured surface of the head facing plantarward. Only two such cases were reported in the literature. The mechanism of injury described in the yesteryears for talar neck fractures does not explain this variety of injury. A possible mechanism of injury has been described. This rare fracture has been successfully treated without any complications after a follow-up of 2 and 1/2 years. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Elevated Knee Joint Kinetics and Reduced Ankle Kinetics Are Present During Jogging and Hopping After Achilles Tendon Ruptures.

    PubMed

    Willy, Richard W; Brorsson, Annelie; Powell, Hayley C; Willson, John D; Tranberg, Roy; Grävare Silbernagel, Karin

    2017-04-01

    Deficits in plantarflexor function are common after an Achilles tendon rupture. These deficits may result in an altered distribution of joint loads during lower extremity tasks. We hypothesized that, regardless of treatment, the Achilles tendon-ruptured limb would exhibit deficits in ankle kinematics and joint power while exhibiting elevated knee joint power and patellofemoral joint loads during walking, jogging, and hopping. We further hypothesized that this loading pattern would be most evident during jogging and hopping. Controlled laboratory study. Thirty-four participants (17 participants treated surgically, 17 treated nonsurgically) were tested at a mean 6.1 ± 2.0 years after an Achilles tendon rupture. Lower extremity kinematics and kinetics were assessed while participants completed walking, jogging, and single-legged hopping trials. Patellofemoral joint stress was calculated via a musculoskeletal model. Data were analyzed via mixed-model repeated analyses of variance (α = .05) and the limb symmetry index (LSI). No differences ( P ≥ .05) were found between the surgical and nonsurgical groups. In both groups, large side-to-side deficits in the plantarflexion angle at toeoff (LSI: 53.5%-73.9%) were noted during walking, jogging, and hopping in the involved limb. Side-to-side deficits in the angular velocity were only present during jogging (LSI: 93.5%) and hopping (LSI: 92.5%). This pattern was accompanied by large deficits in eccentric (LSI: 80.8%-94.7%) and concentric (LSI: 82.2%-84.7%) ankle joint powers in the involved limb during all tasks. Interestingly, only jogging and hopping demonstrated greater knee joint loads when compared with the uninvolved limb. Concentric knee power was greater during jogging (LSI: 117.2%) and hopping (LSI: 115.9%) compared with the uninvolved limb. Similarly, peak patellofemoral joint stress was greater in the involved limb during jogging (LSI: 107.5%) and hopping (LSI: 107.1%), while only hopping had a greater loading

  14. Is balance impaired by recurrent sprained ankle?

    PubMed Central

    Isakov, E; Mizrahi, J

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate uninjured and recurrent sprained ankles during single leg standing, both with and without visual input, and the contribution of related proprioceptive feedback in this event. METHODS: A force measuring system was used for monitoring reaction forces in the anteroposterior and mediolateral directions during single leg standing. Differences between selected variables obtained in the uninjured and sprained ankles were analysed using two way analysis of variance. RESULTS: Foot-ground reaction forces in both anteroposterior and mediolateral directions were the same in normal and sprained ankles of each subject while standing with either open or closed eyes. However, standing with closed eyes, irrespective of the ankle status, always produced significantly higher reaction forces than those obtained with open eyes (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The amount of postural sway during single leg standing is similar in the chronically sprained and the uninjured ankle joint. Images p66-a PMID:9132216

  15. Triceps surae muscle-tendon unit length changes as a function of ankle joint angles and contraction levels: the effect of foot arch deformation.

    PubMed

    Iwanuma, Soichiro; Akagi, Ryota; Hashizume, Satoru; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Yanai, Toshimasa; Kawakami, Yasuo

    2011-09-23

    The purpose of this study was to clarify how foot deformation affects the relationship between triceps surae muscle-tendon unit (MTU) length and ankle joint angle. For six women and six men a series of sagittal magnetic resonance (MR) images of the right foot were taken, and changes in MTU length (the displacement of the calcaneal tuberosity), foot arch angle, and ankle joint angle were measured. In the passive session, each subject's ankle joint was secured at 10° dorsiflexed position, neutral position (NP), and 10° and 20° plantar flexed positions while MR images were acquired. In the active session, each subject was requested to perform submaximal isometric plantar flexions (30%, 60%, and 80% of voluntary maximum) at NP. The changes in MTU length in each trial were estimated by two different formulae reported previously. The changes of the measured MTU length as a function of ankle joint angles observed in all trials of the active session were significantly (p<0.05) larger than corresponding values in the passive session and by the estimation formulae. In the passive session, MTU length changes were significantly smaller than the estimated values when the ankle was plantar flexed. The foot arch angle increased as the contraction level increased from rest (117 ± 4°) to 80% (125 ± 3°), and decreased as the ankle was positioned further into plantar flexion in the passive session (115 ± 3°). These results indicate that foot deformation profoundly affects the triceps surae MTU length-ankle joint angle relationship during plantar flexion.

  16. Age and gender differences in the control of vertical ground reaction force by the hip, knee and ankle joints.

    PubMed

    Toda, Haruki; Nagano, Akinori; Luo, Zhiwei

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the relationships between joint moment and the control of the vertical ground reaction force during walking in the elderly and young male and female individuals. [Subjects and Methods] Forty elderly people, 65 years old or older (20 males and 20 females), and 40 young people, 20 to 29 years old (20 males and 20 females), participated in this study. Joint moment and vertical ground reaction force during walking were obtained using a 3D motion analysis system and force plates. Stepwise linear regression analysis determined the joint moments that predict the amplitude of the vertical ground reaction force. [Results] Knee extension moment was related to the vertical ground reaction force in the young males and females. On the other hand, in the elderly females, hip, ankle, and knee joint moments were related to the first peak and second peak forces, and the minimum value of vertical ground reaction force, respectively. [Conclusion] Our results suggest that the young males and females make use of the knee joint moment to control of the vertical ground reaction force. There were differences between the elderly and the young females with regard to the joints used for the control of the vertical ground reaction force.

  17. Normal sacroiliac joint: a CT study of asymptomatic patients

    SciTech Connect

    Vogler, J.B. III; Brown, W.H.; Helms, C.A.; Genant, H.K.

    1984-05-01

    The sacroiliac (SI) joints of 45 asymptomatic subjects were prospectively studied to define better the normal appearance of SI joints on CT scans and therby attach appropriate significance to CT signs of sacroiliitis. Joint space narrowing, subchondral sclerosis, erosions, ankylosis, osteophytes, subchondral cysts, and symmetry were evaluted. The results indicate that the SI joints demonstrate symmetry in patients under the age of 30 (100% of subjects in this age group). Those CT findings of sacroiliitis that occurred infrequently in the asymptomatic population, and hence may represent good indicators of sacroiliac disease, include increased sacral subchondral sclerosis in subjects under the age of 40 (11%), bilateral or unilateral uniform joint space of less than 2 mm (2% or 0%, respectively), erosions (2%), and intraarticular ankylosis (0%).

  18. Foot and Ankle Function at Maturity After Ilizarov Treatment for Atrophic-Type Congenital Pseudarthrosis of the Tibia: A Comprehensive Outcome Comparison with Normal Controls.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sang Gyo; Lee, Dong Yeon; Kim, Yeon Soo; Yoo, Won Joon; Cho, Tae-Joon; Choi, In Ho

    2016-03-16

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical outcomes and the biomechanical function of the foot and ankle at skeletal maturity of patients treated for atrophic-type congenital pseudarthrosis of the tibia (CPT) compared with healthy young adult controls. Twenty-four patients (mean age of 19.1 years) who had undergone Ilizarov treatment for unilateral atrophic-type CPT were compared with twenty-four controls (mean age of 19.6 years). All participants were evaluated using validated outcome questionnaires, radiographs, physical examination, instrumented motion analysis including a multisegmental foot model, and pedobarographic measurement. Within the CPT group, the mean score of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot scale was 89.9 (range, 76 to 100), and the mean score of the Oxford Ankle Foot Questionnaire (OAFQ) was 42.8 (range, 15 to 60). Motion analysis and pedobarographic measurement showed differences in biomechanical function of the foot and ankle on the side affected by CPT: a slower walking speed due to the short stride length; decreased dorsiflexion in hallux motion; increased hindfoot pronation in the presence of forefoot supination; diminished ankle push-off power; delayed time to heel-rise; and decreased forefoot pressure relative to hindfoot pressure. However, sagittal motion of the hindfoot and forefoot on the affected side was relatively well preserved. Subgroup analysis demonstrated no significant differences in terms of clinical outcome scores and most biomechanical parameters between the tibiofibular synostosis group and the intact-fibula group. Children with atrophic-type CPT can obtain satisfactory foot and ankle function at maturity after successful Ilizarov treatment. Early stabilization of the ankle mortise by fibular stabilization and preservation of ankle mobility during and after treatment is thought to be crucial to maintaining function of the ankle in patients with CPT. Therapeutic Level III. See

  19. Effects of muscle strength asymmetry between left and right on isokinetic strength of the knee and ankle joints depending on athletic performance level

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Kyoungkyu; Chun, Sungyung; Seo, Byoungdo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to collect basic data on the effect of asymmetry on the muscle strength of the left and right knee and ankle joints of soccer players at varying athletic performance levels, to guide the development of improved exercise programs. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-nine soccer players at three athletic performance levels participated: 15 professional, 16 amateur, and 18 college. Knee extensor and flexor strength were measured at 60°/sec and 180°/sec, and ankle plantar flexor and dorsiflexor strength were measured at 30°/sec and at 120°/sec. Variables were analyzed by one-way ANOVA. [Results] College soccer players showed greater muscle strength at 60°/sec and 180°/sec in the knee extension muscles of both the right and the left sides, lower muscle strength at 30°/sec and 120°/sec in the dorsiflexor of the right ankle, and similar levels of asymmetry between left and right. The maximum muscle strength on the same side significantly differed in the right ankle joint, with asymmetry between left and right at 30°/sec and 120°/sec. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that muscle strength asymmetry in the ankle joint may lead to counterbalancing muscle strengthening of the knee joint to maintain the center of body mass. PMID:27190469

  20. Arthroscopic Ankle Arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Byron

    2016-10-01

    Arthroscopic ankle arthrodesis is a cost-effective option for many patients with posttraumatic arthritis of the ankle joint. Rehabilitation is generally quicker than conventional open techniques, and rates of fusion are comparable or better than traditional open techniques. Unless the arthroscopic surgeon has considerable experience, the best results are seen in patients with very little deformity in the ankle joint. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Posttraumatic severe infection of the ankle joint - long term results of the treatment with resection arthrodesis in 133 cases.

    PubMed

    Kienast, Benjamin; Kiene, J; Gille, J; Thietje, R; Gerlach, U; Schulz, A P

    2010-02-26

    Although there is a clear trend toward internal fixation for ankle arthrodesis, there is general consensus that external fixation is required for cases of posttraumatic infection. We retrospectively evaluated the technique and clinical long term results of external fixation in a triangular frame for cases of posttraumatic infection of the ankle. From 1993 to 2006 a consecutive series of 155 patients with an infection of the ankle was included in our study. 133 cases of the advanced "Gächter" stage III and IV were treated with arthrodesis. We treated the patients with a two step treatment plan. After radical debridement and sequestrectomy the malleoli and the joint surfaces were resected. An AO fixator was applied with two Steinmann-nails inserted in the tibia and in the calcaneus and the gap was temporary filled with gentamicin beads as the first step. In the second step we performed an autologous bone graft after a period of four weeks. The case notes were evaluated regarding trauma history, medical complaints, further injuries and illnesses, walking and pain status and occupational issues. Mean age at the index procedure was 49.7 years (18-82), 104 patients were male (67.1%). Follow up examination after mean 4.5 years included a standardised questionnaire and a clinical examination including the criteria of the AOFAS-Score and radiographs. 92.7% of the cases lead to a stable arthrodesis. In 5 patients the arthrodesis was found partly-stable. In six patients (4,5%) the infection was not controllable during the treatment process. These patients had to be treated with a below knee amputation. The mean AOFAS score at follow up was 63.7 (53-92). Overall there is a high degree of remaining disability. The complication rate and the reduced patient comfort reserve this method mainly for infection. Joint salvage is possible in the majority of cases with an earlier stage I and II infection.

  2. Combined total ankle replacement and modified bridle tendon transfer for end-stage ankle joint arthrosis with paralytic dropfoot: report of an unusual case.

    PubMed

    Bibbo, Christopher; Baronofsky, Hyim J; Jaffe, Leland

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, total ankle replacement has become a reasonable option for many patients with end-stage ankle arthrosis. In order to be successful, total ankle replacement requires a relatively balanced alignment of the foot in relation to the leg. Such alignment is traditionally achieved surgically by means of stabilization of the hindfoot in conjunction with relocation osteotomy of the calcaneus and/or tibia. In this report, we describe the unconventional combination of total ankle replacement in an adult patient with concomitant paralysis that was addressed by means of tendon transfer.

  3. An intrinsic mechanism to stabilize posture--joint-angle-dependent moment arms of the feline ankle muscles.

    PubMed

    Young, R P; Scott, S H; Loeb, G E

    1992-10-12

    The neuromuscular system can use sensory feedback to regulate motion, but these feedback loops involve relatively long delays (50-100 ms) and may produce undesirable oscillations. However, stabilizing changes in muscle force can also be provided intrinsically (i.e. without feedback) by 2 properties of the muscle itself, its force-length and force-velocity relationships. We have discovered another intrinsically stabilizing mechanism in the musculoskeletal architecture of the cat ankle joint. Many of its muscles have their predominant moment arms about the adduction/abduction axis, with smaller moment arms for inversion/eversion and about the principal axis of motion, dorsiflexion/extension. The magnitudes of the moment arms in ab/adduction and in/eversion depend strongly on joint angle, increasing for positions away from neutral that lengthen the muscles. Thus, co-activation of agonist-antagonist pairs, known to occur in these muscles, would provide immediate stabilizing changes in torque when the ankle is perturbed away from neutral position.

  4. Inferring Muscle-Tendon Unit Power from Ankle Joint Power during the Push-Off Phase of Human Walking: Insights from a Multiarticular EMG-Driven Model

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Inverse dynamics joint kinetics are often used to infer contributions from underlying groups of muscle-tendon units (MTUs). However, such interpretations are confounded by multiarticular (multi-joint) musculature, which can cause inverse dynamics to over- or under-estimate net MTU power. Misestimation of MTU power could lead to incorrect scientific conclusions, or to empirical estimates that misguide musculoskeletal simulations, assistive device designs, or clinical interventions. The objective of this study was to investigate the degree to which ankle joint power overestimates net plantarflexor MTU power during the Push-off phase of walking, due to the behavior of the flexor digitorum and hallucis longus (FDHL)–multiarticular MTUs crossing the ankle and metatarsophalangeal (toe) joints. Methods We performed a gait analysis study on six healthy participants, recording ground reaction forces, kinematics, and electromyography (EMG). Empirical data were input into an EMG-driven musculoskeletal model to estimate ankle power. This model enabled us to parse contributions from mono- and multi-articular MTUs, and required only one scaling and one time delay factor for each subject and speed, which were solved for based on empirical data. Net plantarflexing MTU power was computed by the model and quantitatively compared to inverse dynamics ankle power. Results The EMG-driven model was able to reproduce inverse dynamics ankle power across a range of gait speeds (R2 ≥ 0.97), while also providing MTU-specific power estimates. We found that FDHL dynamics caused ankle power to slightly overestimate net plantarflexor MTU power, but only by ~2–7%. Conclusions During Push-off, FDHL MTU dynamics do not substantially confound the inference of net plantarflexor MTU power from inverse dynamics ankle power. However, other methodological limitations may cause inverse dynamics to overestimate net MTU power; for instance, due to rigid-body foot assumptions. Moving

  5. Shoe collar height effect on athletic performance, ankle joint kinematics and kinetics during unanticipated maximum-effort side-cutting performance.

    PubMed

    Lam, Gilbert Wing Kai; Park, Eun Jung; Lee, Ki-Kwang; Cheung, Jason Tak-Man

    2015-01-01

    Side-step cutting manoeuvres comprise the coordination between planting and non-planting legs. Increased shoe collar height is expected to influence ankle biomechanics of both legs and possibly respective cutting performance. This study examined the shoe collar height effect on kinematics and kinetics of planting and non-planting legs during an unanticipated side-step cutting. Fifteen university basketball players performed maximum-effort side-step cutting to the left 45° direction or a straight ahead run in response to a random light signal. Seven successful cutting trials were collected for each condition. Athletic performance, ground reaction force, ankle kinematics and kinetics of both legs were analysed using paired t-tests. Results indicated that high-collar shoes resulted in less ankle inversion and external rotation during initial contact for the planting leg. The high-collar shoes also exhibited a smaller ankle range of motion in the sagittal and transverse planes for both legs, respectively. However, no collar effect was found for ankle moments and performance indicators including cutting performance time, ground contact time, propulsion ground reaction forces and impulses. These findings indicated that high-collar shoes altered ankle positioning and restricted ankle joint freedom movements in both legs, while no negative effect was found for athletic cutting performance.

  6. Ankle Cheilectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... your primary doctor. Treatments of the Ankle Achilles Tendinosis Surgery Achilles Tendon Rupture Surgery Ankle Arthrodesis Ankle ... for Osteochondral Lesions of the Talus Insertional Achilles Tendinosis Surgery Lateral Ankle Ligament Reconstruction Lateral Ankle Stabilization ...

  7. Outcomes of temporomandibular joint arthroscopy in patients with painful but otherwise normal joints.

    PubMed

    Dimitroulis, George

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this retrospective clinical study was to assess the clinical outcomes of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthroscopy in patients who presented with category 1 normal joints. The null hypothesis being tested was that patients with normal joints do not respond to TMJ arthroscopy. The clinical records of 116 patients who had undergone TMJ arthroscopy by the author from 2010 to 2013 were retrieved and individually analysed for inclusion in this retrospective, cohort clinical study. The inclusion criteria used to select patients for this study were those who had arthroscopically proven category 1 normal joints, free of intra-articular pathology. Of the 14 patients who were found to have normal joints, only 10 could be contacted for a follow-up survey. Despite the fact that all patients were informed that no joint pathology was found, six out of the 10 patients reported improvement in their temporomandibular disorder (TMD) symptoms that lasted for more than 6 months following TMJ arthroscopy. The results of this investigation indicate that we can reject the null hypothesis, and that patients with normal TMJs do indeed respond to TMJ arthroscopy. What this limited study has highlighted is the pervasive effects of the placebo that all surgeons need to keep in mind when formulating treatment plans for patients with TMD.

  8. Treadmill training with an incline reduces ankle joint stiffness and improves active range of movement during gait in adults with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Lorentzen, Jakob; Kirk, Henrik; Fernandez-Lago, Helena; Frisk, Rasmus; Scharff Nielsen, Nanna; Jorsal, Martin; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2017-05-01

    We investigated if 30 min of daily treadmill training with an incline for 6 weeks would reduce ankle joint stiffness and improve active range of movement in adults with cerebral palsy (CP). The study was designed as a randomized controlled clinical trial including 32 adults with CP (GMFCS 1-3) aged 38.1 SD 12 years. The training group (n = 16) performed uphill treadmill training at home daily for 30 min for 6 weeks in addition to their usual activities. Passive and reflex mediated stiffness and range of motion (ROM) of the ankle joint, kinematic and functional measures of gait were obtained before and after the intervention/control period. Intervention subjects trained 31.4 SD 10.1 days for 29.0 SD 2.3 min (total) 15.2 h. Passive ankle joint stiffness was reduced (F = 5.1; p = 0.031), maximal gait speed increased (F = 42.8, p < 0.001), amplitude of toe lift prior to heel strike increased (F = 5.3, p < 0.03) and ankle angle at heel strike was decreased (F = 12.5; p < 0.001) significant in the training group as compared to controls. Daily treadmill training with an incline for 6 weeks reduces ankle joint stiffness and increases active ROM during gait in adults with CP. Intensive gait training may thus be beneficial in preventing and reducing contractures and help to maintain functional gait ability in adults with CP. Implications for rehabilitation Uphill gait training is an effective way to reduce ankle joint stiffness in adult with contractures. 6 weeks of daily uphill gait training improves functional gait parameters such as gait speed and dorsal flexion during gait in adults with cerebral palsy.

  9. Surgical Reconstruction with the Remnant Ligament Improves Joint Position Sense as well as Functional Ankle Instability: A 1-Year Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Iwao, Kamizato; Masataka, Deie; Kohei, Fukuhara

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Chronic functional instability—characterized by repeated ankle inversion sprains and a subjective sensation of instability—is one of the most common residual disabilities after an inversion sprain. However, whether surgical reconstruction improves sensorimotor control has not been reported to date. The purpose of this study was to assess functional improvement of chronic ankle instability after surgical reconstruction using the remnant ligament. Materials and Methods. We performed 10 cases in the intervention group and 20 healthy individuals as the control group. Before and after surgical reconstruction, we evaluated joint position sense and functional ankle instability by means of a questionnaire. Results and Discussion. There was a statistically significant difference between the control and intervention groups before surgical reconstruction. Three months after surgery in the intervention group, the joint position sense was significantly different from those found preoperatively. Before surgery, the mean score of functional ankle instability in the intervention group was almost twice as low. Three months after surgery, however, the score significantly increased. The results showed that surgical reconstruction using the remnant ligament was effective not only for improving mechanical retensioning but also for ameliorating joint position sense and functional ankle instability. PMID:25401146

  10. Immediate effects of manipulation of the talocrural joint on stabilometry and baropodometry in patients with ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    López-Rodríguez, Sandra; Fernández de-Las-Peñas, César; Alburquerque-Sendín, Francisco; Rodríguez-Blanco, Cleofás; Palomeque-del-Cerro, Luis

    2007-01-01

    This study assessed the immediate effects of talocrural joint manipulation on stabilometric and baropodometric outcomes in patients with grade II ankle sprain. Fifty-two field hockey players (35 men and 17 women) between 18 and 40 years old (mean = 22.5 years, SD = 3.6 years) were included in this study. A simple blind, intrapatient, placebo-controlled, and repeated-measures study was carried out. All the patients underwent a baropodometric study performed with a Foot Work force platform (4 times; pre-post placebo group and pre-post intervention group). The sample was subjected to two techniques of manipulative treatment: (a) talocrural joint manipulation and (b) posterior gliding manipulation over the talus. In a second instance, placebo manipulation was applied. Unilateral analysis of variance and multivariate analysis of variance were used for statistical analysis. The results in the intervention group revealed significant differences in the percentage of posterior load on the foot (P = .015) and the percentage of bilateral anterior load (P = .02) before and after the manipulation. The placebo group did not show any change in any of the variables except for area (P = .045). Intergroup comparison revealed statistically significant differences in the increase in percentage of posterior load on the manipulated foot, percentage of bilateral posterior load, percentage of anterior load on the manipulated foot, and percentage of bilateral anterior load (with the exception of the total load on the foot). The application of caudal talocrural joint manipulation, as compared with placebo manipulation, in athletic patients with grade II ankle sprain redistributed the load supports at the level of the foot.

  11. Expedited Patient-Specific Assessment of Contact Stress Exposure in the Ankle Joint Following Definitive Articular Fracture Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Andrew M.; Anderson, Donald D.

    2015-01-01

    Acute injury severity, altered joint kinematics, and joint incongruity are three important mechanical factors linked to post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). Finite element analysis (FEA) was previously used to assess the influence of increased contact stress due to joint incongruity on PTOA development. While promising agreement with PTOA development was seen, the inherent complexities of contact FEA limited the numbers of subjects that could be analyzed. Discrete element analysis (DEA) is a simplified methodology for contact stress computation, which idealizes contact surfaces as a bed of independent linear springs. In this study, DEA was explored as an expedited alternative to FEA contact stress exposure computation. DEA was compared to FEA using results from a previously completed validation study of two cadaveric human ankles, as well as a previous study of post-operative contact stress exposure in 11 patients with tibial plafond fracture. DEA-computed maximum contact stresses were within 19% of those experimentally measured, with 90% of the contact area having computed contact stress values within 1 MPa of those measured. In the 11 fractured ankles, maximum contact stress and contact area differences between DEA and FEA were 0.85±0.64 MPa and 22.5±11.5 mm2. As a predictive measure for PTOA development, both DEA and FEA had 100% concordance with presence of OA (KL grade ≥ 2) and >95% concordance with KL grade at 2 years. These results support DEA as a reasonable alternative to FEA for computing contact stress exposures following surgical reduction of a tibial plafond fracture. PMID:26105660

  12. Expedited patient-specific assessment of contact stress exposure in the ankle joint following definitive articular fracture reduction.

    PubMed

    Kern, Andrew M; Anderson, Donald D

    2015-09-18

    Acute injury severity, altered joint kinematics, and joint incongruity are three important mechanical factors linked to post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). Finite element analysis (FEA) was previously used to assess the influence of increased contact stress due to joint incongruity on PTOA development. While promising agreement with PTOA development was seen, the inherent complexities of contact FEA limited the numbers of subjects that could be analyzed. Discrete element analysis (DEA) is a simplified methodology for contact stress computation, which idealizes contact surfaces as a bed of independent linear springs. In this study, DEA was explored as an expedited alternative to FEA contact stress exposure computation. DEA was compared to FEA using results from a previously completed validation study of two cadaveric human ankles, as well as a previous study of post-operative contact stress exposure in 11 patients with tibial plafond fracture. DEA-computed maximum contact stresses were within 19% of those experimentally measured, with 90% of the contact area having computed contact stress values within 1MPa of those measured. In the 11 fractured ankles, maximum contact stress and contact area differences between DEA and FEA were 0.85 ± 0.64 MPa and 22.5 ± 11.5mm(2). As a predictive measure for PTOA development, both DEA and FEA had 100% concordance with presence of OA (KL grade ≥ 2) and >95% concordance with KL grade at 2 years. These results support DEA as a reasonable alternative to FEA for computing contact stress exposures following surgical reduction of a tibial plafond fracture. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Measurements of normal joint angles by goniometry in calves.

    PubMed

    Sengöz Şirin, O; Timuçin Celik, M; Ozmen, A; Avki, S

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish normal reference values of the forelimb and hindlimb joint angles in normal Holstein calves. Thirty clinically normal Holstein calves that were free of any detectable musculoskeletal abnormalities were included in the study. A standard transparent plastic goniometer was used to measure maximum flexion, maximum extension, and range-of-motion of the shoulder, elbow, carpal, hip, stifle, and tarsal joints. The goniometric measurements were done on awake calves that were positioned in lateral recumbency. The goniometric values were measured and recorded by two independent investigators. As a result of the study it was concluded that goniometric values obtained from awake calves in lateral recumbency were found to be highly consistent and accurate between investigators (p <0.05). The data of this study acquired objective and useful information on the normal forelimb and hindlimb joint angles in normal Holstein calves. Further studies can be done to predict detailed goniometric values from different diseases and compare them.

  14. Foot sole and ankle muscle inputs contribute jointly to human erect posture regulation

    PubMed Central

    Kavounoudias, Anne; Roll, Régine; Roll, Jean-Pierre

    2001-01-01

    In order to assess the relative contribution and the interactions of the plantar cutaneous and muscle proprioceptive feedback in controlling human erect posture, single or combined vibratory stimuli were applied to the forefoot areas and to the tendons of the tibialis anterior muscles of nine standing subjects using various vibration frequency patterns (ranging from 20 to 80 Hz). The variations in the centre of foot pressure, ankle angle and the EMG activities of the soleus and tibialis anterior muscles of each subject were recorded and analysed. Separate stimulation of the plantar forefoot zones or the tibialis anterior muscles always resulted in whole-body tilts oppositely directed backwards and forwards, respectively, the amplitude of which was proportional to the vibration frequency. EMG activity of ankle muscles also varied according to the direction of the postural responses. However, the same vibration frequency did not elicit equivalent postural responses: in the low frequency range, tactile stimulation induced stronger postural effects than proprioceptive stimulation, and the converse was the case for the higher frequency range. Under sensory conflict conditions, i.e. foot sole-flexor ankle muscle co-stimulation, the direction of the body tilts also varied according to the difference and the absolute levels of the vibration frequencies. In all cases, the resulting postural shifts always corresponded to the theoretical sum of the isolated effects observed upon vibrating each of these two sensory channels. We proposed that tactile and proprioceptive information from the foot soles and flexor ankle muscles might be co-processed following a vector addition mode to subserve the maintenance of erect stance in a complementary way. PMID:11313452

  15. Current concepts: tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications in the ankle joint

    PubMed Central

    Correia, S. I.; Pereira, H.; Silva-Correia, J.; Van Dijk, C. N.; Espregueira-Mendes, J.; Oliveira, J. M.; Reis, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) has caused a revolution in present and future trends of medicine and surgery. In different tissues, advanced TERM approaches bring new therapeutic possibilities in general population as well as in young patients and high-level athletes, improving restoration of biological functions and rehabilitation. The mainstream components required to obtain a functional regeneration of tissues may include biodegradable scaffolds, drugs or growth factors and different cell types (either autologous or heterologous) that can be cultured in bioreactor systems (in vitro) prior to implantation into the patient. Particularly in the ankle, which is subject to many different injuries (e.g. acute, chronic, traumatic and degenerative), there is still no definitive and feasible answer to ‘conventional’ methods. This review aims to provide current concepts of TERM applications to ankle injuries under preclinical and/or clinical research applied to skin, tendon, bone and cartilage problems. A particular attention has been given to biomaterial design and scaffold processing with potential use in osteochondral ankle lesions. PMID:24352667

  16. Design of a Robotic Ankle Joint for a Microspine-Based Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thatte, Nitish

    2011-01-01

    Successful robotic exploration of near-Earth asteroids necessitates a method of securely anchoring to the surface of these bodies without gravitational assistance. Microspine grip- per arrays that can grasp rock faces are a potential solution to this problem. A key component of a future microspine-based rover will be the ankle used to attach each microspine gripper to the robot. The ankle's purpose is twofold: 1) to allow the gripper to conform to the rock so a higher percentage of microspines attach to the surface, and 2) to neutralize torques that may dislodge the grippers from the wall. Parts were developed using computer aided design and manufactured using a variety of methods including selective laser sintering, CNC milling, and traditional manual machining techniques. Upon completion of the final prototype, the gripper and ankle system was tested to demonstrate robotic engagement and disengagement of the gripper and to determine load bearing ability. The immediate application of this project is to out t the Lemur IIb robot so it can climb and hang from rock walls.

  17. Current concepts: tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications in the ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Correia, S I; Pereira, H; Silva-Correia, J; Van Dijk, C N; Espregueira-Mendes, J; Oliveira, J M; Reis, R L

    2014-03-06

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) has caused a revolution in present and future trends of medicine and surgery. In different tissues, advanced TERM approaches bring new therapeutic possibilities in general population as well as in young patients and high-level athletes, improving restoration of biological functions and rehabilitation. The mainstream components required to obtain a functional regeneration of tissues may include biodegradable scaffolds, drugs or growth factors and different cell types (either autologous or heterologous) that can be cultured in bioreactor systems (in vitro) prior to implantation into the patient. Particularly in the ankle, which is subject to many different injuries (e.g. acute, chronic, traumatic and degenerative), there is still no definitive and feasible answer to 'conventional' methods. This review aims to provide current concepts of TERM applications to ankle injuries under preclinical and/or clinical research applied to skin, tendon, bone and cartilage problems. A particular attention has been given to biomaterial design and scaffold processing with potential use in osteochondral ankle lesions.

  18. Design of a Robotic Ankle Joint for a Microspine-Based Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thatte, Nitish

    2011-01-01

    Successful robotic exploration of near-Earth asteroids necessitates a method of securely anchoring to the surface of these bodies without gravitational assistance. Microspine grip- per arrays that can grasp rock faces are a potential solution to this problem. A key component of a future microspine-based rover will be the ankle used to attach each microspine gripper to the robot. The ankle's purpose is twofold: 1) to allow the gripper to conform to the rock so a higher percentage of microspines attach to the surface, and 2) to neutralize torques that may dislodge the grippers from the wall. Parts were developed using computer aided design and manufactured using a variety of methods including selective laser sintering, CNC milling, and traditional manual machining techniques. Upon completion of the final prototype, the gripper and ankle system was tested to demonstrate robotic engagement and disengagement of the gripper and to determine load bearing ability. The immediate application of this project is to out t the Lemur IIb robot so it can climb and hang from rock walls.

  19. Closed medial total subtalar joint dislocation without ankle fracture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Azarkane, Mohamed; Boussakri, Hassan; Alayyoubi, Abdelghani; Bachiri, Mohamed; Elibrahimi, Abdelhalim; Elmrini, Abdelemejid

    2014-09-20

    Total subtalar dislocation without fracture of the ankle is a rare clinical entity; it is usually due to a traumatic high-energy mechanism. Standard treatment is successful closed reduction under general anesthesia followed by non-weight bearing and ankle immobilization with a below-knee cast for 6 weeks. We present the case of a 30-year-old Moroccan woman who was involved in a road traffic accident. She subsequently received a radiological assessment that objectified a total subtalar dislocation without fracture of her ankle. She was immediately admitted to the operating theater where an immediate reduction was performed under sedation, and immobilization in a plaster boot was adopted for 8 weeks. The management of this traumatic lesion is discussed in the light of the literature. Medial subtalar dislocation is a rare dislocation and is not commonly seen as a sports injury because it requires transfer of a large amount of kinetic energy. The weaker talocalcaneal and talonavicular ligaments often bear the brunt of the energy and are more commonly disrupted, compared to the relatively stronger calcaneonavicular ligament. Urgent reduction is important, and closed reduction under general anesthesia is usually successful, often facilitated by keeping the knee in flexion to relax the gastrocnemius muscle. Long-term sequelae include talar avascular necrosis and osteochondral fracture, as well as chronic instability and pain.

  20. Examining Ankle-Joint Laxity Using 2 Knee Positions and With Simulated Muscle Guarding

    PubMed Central

    Hanlon, Shawn; Caccese, Jaclyn; Knight, Christopher A.; Swanik, Charles “Buz”; Kaminski, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    Context:  Several factors affect the reliability of the anterior drawer and talar tilt tests, including the individual clinician's experience and skill, ankle and knee positioning, and muscle guarding. Objectives:  To compare gastrocnemius activity during the measurement of ankle-complex motion at different knee positions, and secondarily, to compare ankle-complex motion during a simulated trial of muscle guarding. Design:  Cross-sectional study. Setting:  Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants:  Thirty-three participants aged 20.2 ± 1.7 years were tested. Intervention(s):  The ankle was loaded under 2 test conditions (relaxed, simulated muscle guarding) at 2 knee positions (0°, 90° of flexion) while gastrocnemius electromyography (EMG) activity was recorded. Main Outcome Measure(s):  Anterior displacement (mm), inversion-eversion motion (°), and peak EMG amplitude values of the gastrocnemius (μV). Results:  Anterior displacement did not differ between the positions of 0° and 90° of knee flexion (P = .193). Inversion-eversion motion was greater at 0° of knee flexion compared with 90° (P < .001). Additionally, peak EMG amplitude of the gastrocnemius was not different between 0° and 90° of knee flexion during anterior displacement (P = .101). As expected, the simulated muscle-guarding trial reduced anterior displacement compared with the relaxed condition (0° of knee flexion, P = .008; 90° of knee flexion, P = .016) and reduced inversion-eversion motion (0° of knee flexion, P = .03; 90° of knee flexion, P < .001). Conclusions:  In a relaxed state, the gastrocnemius muscle did not appear to affect anterior ankle laxity at the 2 most common knee positions for anterior drawer testing; however, talar tilt testing may be best performed with the knee in 0° of knee flexion. Finally, our outcomes from the simulated muscle-guarding condition suggest that clinicians should use caution and be aware of reduced perceived laxity when

  1. Clinical experience with a new hip-knee-ankle-foot orthotic system using a medial single hip joint for paraplegic standing and walking.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, E; Suzuki, T; Sonoda, S; Fujitani, J; Tomita, Y; Chino, N

    1996-01-01

    The Walkabout is a new hip-knee-ankle-foot orthotic (HKAFO) system with a medial single hip joint (MSH-KAFO) invented by S. McKay in 1992. Compared with other HKAFO systems, the hip joint part is compact and removable, so it has distinguishable, real merits: ease in donning and doffing the device, compatibility with a wheelchair, and cosmesis. We clinically tested five patients, paraplegic because of spinal cord injury, using the MSH-KAFO system. All were males, aged 26-36 yr old. Their functional levels were L-1 (2 cases), T-10 (2 cases), and T-5 (1 case). All patients could stand stably without crutches and walk in parallel bars immediately the first time they wore the braces. After a few hours of crutch-walking exercises, all could walk independently with Lofstrand crutches. Their walking velocities ranged from 10 to 37.5 (mean, 19.9) m/min at the follow-up points (mean, 7.1 mo). With four cases, we measured oxygen uptake for predictions of energy consumption. At comfortable walking, predicted energy consumptions were from 1.31 to 3.89 (mean, 2.75) METs. Compared with the data in literature, these seemed to be at the same level with normal walking and lower than the KAFOs walking level. Our results suggest that MSH-KAFO is a very convenient standing and walking device for paraplegics and is compatible with wheelchair use.

  2. Understanding the effect of touchdown distance and ankle joint kinematics on sprint acceleration performance through computer simulation.

    PubMed

    Bezodis, Neil Edward; Trewartha, Grant; Salo, Aki Ilkka Tapio

    2015-06-01

    This study determined the effects of simulated technique manipulations on early acceleration performance. A planar seven-segment angle-driven model was developed and quantitatively evaluated based on the agreement of its output to empirical data from an international-level male sprinter (100 m personal best = 10.28 s). The model was then applied to independently assess the effects of manipulating touchdown distance (horizontal distance between the foot and centre of mass) and range of ankle joint dorsiflexion during early stance on horizontal external power production during stance. The model matched the empirical data with a mean difference of 5.2%. When the foot was placed progressively further forward at touchdown, horizontal power production continually reduced. When the foot was placed further back, power production initially increased (a peak increase of 0.7% occurred at 0.02 m further back) but decreased as the foot continued to touchdown further back. When the range of dorsiflexion during early stance was reduced, exponential increases in performance were observed. Increasing negative touchdown distance directs the ground reaction force more horizontally; however, a limit to the associated performance benefit exists. Reducing dorsiflexion, which required achievable increases in the peak ankle plantar flexor moment, appears potentially beneficial for improving early acceleration performance.

  3. Reverse lateral supramalleolar adipofascial flap and skin grafting for one-stage soft tissue reconstruction of foot and ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Hoon; Chung, Duke-Whan

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this report is to present the clinical result and efficacy of reverse lateral supramalleolar adipofascial flap and skin grafting for one stage soft tissue reconstruction of the foot and ankle joints. Reconstruction using a reverse lateral supramalleolar adipofascial flap and skin grafting was performed in eight cases between January 2005 and March 2009. All the subjects were male with a mean age of 53 years. The mean follow-up period was 20 months. The reasons for soft tissue defects were diabetic foot, infected bursitis, open injuries of the foot, and chronic osteomyelitis. The mean size of the flaps was 3.5 (3-4) × 4.5 (4-6) cm. The flaps were elevated in the form of an adipofascial flap and split-thickness skin grafting was performed over the flaps and adjoining raw areas. Flaps survived in all cases. The implantation of the split-thickness skin graft over the flap was also successful in all cases. Neither partial necrosis in the adipofascial flap nor venous congestion was observed. At the last follow-up, there were no limited motions in the ankle and the toe. No cases complained of inconveniences in ambulation or had difficulties in selecting footwear. In cases that require a flap for the exposed bone or tendon of the foot with a small-sized defect, reverse lateral supramalleolar adipofascial flap and skin grafting is considered a useful method as it lowers the morbidity rate of the donor site and reconstructs soft tissues.

  4. Effects of Ankle Arthrodesis on Biomechanical Performance of the Entire Foot

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Li, Zengyong; Wong, Duo Wai-Chi; Zhang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background/Methodology Ankle arthrodesis is one popular surgical treatment for ankle arthritis, chronic instability, and degenerative deformity. However, complications such as foot pain, joint arthritis, and bone fracture may cause patients to suffer other problems. Understanding the internal biomechanics of the foot is critical for assessing the effectiveness of ankle arthrodesis and provides a baseline for the surgical plan. This study aimed to understand the biomechanical effects of ankle arthrodesis on the entire foot and ankle using finite element analyses. A three-dimensional finite element model of the foot and ankle, involving 28 bones, 103 ligaments, the plantar fascia, major muscle groups, and encapsulated soft tissue, was developed and validated. The biomechanical performances of a normal foot and a foot with ankle arthrodesis were compared at three gait instants, first-peak, mid-stance, and second-peak. Principal Findings/Conclusions Changes in plantar pressure distribution, joint contact pressure and forces, von Mises stress on bone and foot deformation were predicted. Compared with those in the normal foot, the peak plantar pressure was increased and the center of pressure moved anteriorly in the foot with ankle arthrodesis. The talonavicular joint and joints of the first to third rays in the hind- and mid-foot bore the majority of the loading and sustained substantially increased loading after ankle arthrodesis. An average contact pressure of 2.14 MPa was predicted at the talonavicular joint after surgery and the maximum variation was shown to be 80% in joints of the first ray. The contact force and pressure of the subtalar joint decreased after surgery, indicating that arthritis at this joint was not necessarily a consequence of ankle arthrodesis but rather a progression of pre-existing degenerative changes. Von Mises stress in the second and third metatarsal bones at the second-peak instant increased to 52 MPa and 34 MPa, respectively, after

  5. Relationship of medial gastrocnemius relative fascicle excursion and ankle joint power and work performance during gait in typically developing children: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Martín Lorenzo, Teresa; Albi Rodríguez, Gustavo; Rocon, Eduardo; Martínez Caballero, Ignacio; Lerma Lara, Sergio

    2017-07-01

    Muscle fascicles lengthen in response to chronic passive stretch through in-series sarcomere addition in order to maintain an optimum sarcomere length. In turn, the muscles' force generating capacity, maximum excursion, and contraction velocity is enhanced. Thus, longer fascicles suggest a greater capacity to develop joint power and work. However, static fascicle length measurements may not be taking sarcomere length differences into account. Thus, we considered relative fascicle excursions through passive ankle dorsiflexion may better correlate with the capacity to generate joint power and work than fascicle length. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine if medial gastrocnemius relative fascicle excursions correlate with ankle joint power and work generation during gait in typically developing children. A sample of typically developing children (n = 10) were recruited for this study and data analysis was carried out on 20 legs. Medial gastrocnemius relative fascicle excursion from resting joint angle to maximum dorsiflexion was estimated from trigonometric relations of medial gastrocnemius pennation angle and thickness obtained from B-mode real-time ultrasonography. Furthermore, a three-dimensional motion capture system was used to obtain ankle joint work and power during the stance phase of gait. Significant correlations were found between relative fascicle excursion and peak power absorption (-) r(14) = -0.61, P = .012 accounting for 31% variability, positive work r(18) = 0.56, P = .021 accounting for 31% variability, and late stance positive work r(15) = 0.51, P = .037 accounting for 26% variability. The large unexplained variance may be attributed to mechanics of neighboring structures (e.g., soleus or Achilles tendon mechanics) and proximal joint kinetics which may also contribute to ankle joint power and work performance, and were not taken into account. Further studies are encouraged to provide greater insight

  6. The immediate effect of triceps surae myofascial trigger point therapy on restricted active ankle joint dorsiflexion in recreational runners: a crossover randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Grieve, Rob; Cranston, Amy; Henderson, Andrew; John, Rachel; Malone, George; Mayall, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the immediate effect on restricted active ankle joint dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM), after a single intervention of myofascial trigger point (MTrP) therapy on latent triceps surae MTrPs in recreational runners. A crossover randomised controlled trial. Twenty-two recreational runners (11 men and 11 women; mean age 24.57; ±8.7 years) with a restricted active ankle joint dorsiflexion and presence of latent MTrPs. Participants were screened for a restriction in active ankle dorsiflexion in either knee flexion (soleus) or knee extension (gastrocnemius) and the presence of latent MTrPs. Participants were randomly allocated a week apart to both the intervention (combined pressure release and 10 s passive stretch) and the control condition. A clinically meaningful (large effect size) and statistically significant increase in ankle ROM in the intervention compared to the control group was achieved, for the soleus (p = 0.004) and the gastrocnemius (p = 0.026). Apart from the statistical significance (p < 0.05), these results are clinically relevant due to the immediate increase in ankle dorsiflexion. These results must be viewed in caution due to the carry-over effect in the RCT crossover design and the combined MTrP therapy approach. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparisons of knee and ankle joint angles and ground reaction force according to functional differences during single-leg drop landing

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kewwan; Jeon, Kyoungkyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine potential predictors of functional instability of the knee and ankle joints during single-leg drop landing based on the prior history of injury. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 24 collegiate soccer players without pain or dysfunction. To compare the differences between the stable and unstable sides during single-leg drop landing, 8 motion analysis cameras and a force plate were used. The Cortex 4 software was used for a biomechanical analysis of 3 events. An independent t-test was used for statistical comparison between both sides; p<0.05 indicated significance. [Results] The knee joint movements showed gradual flexion in the sagittal plane. The unstable-side ankle joint showed plantar flexion of approximately 2° relative to the stable side. In the coronal plane, the unstable-side knee joint differed from the stable side in its tendency for valgus movement. The unstable-side ankle joint showed contrasting movement compared with the stable side, and the difference was significant. Regarding the vertical ground reaction force, the stable side showed maximum knee flexion that was approximately 0.1 BW lower than that of the unstable side. [Conclusion] Increasing the flexion angle of the knee joint can help prevent injury during landing. PMID:27190444

  8. External knee joint design based on normal motion.

    PubMed

    Walker, P S; Kurosawa, H; Rovick, J S; Zimmerman, R A

    1985-01-01

    There are several advantages to accurate reproduction of knee motion in an external joint assembly such as a knee brace: reduction of pistoning forces, better ligament protection, kinematic compatability. The geometry and kinematics of the normal human knee were studied and the results applied to external joint design. Geometrically, the posterior portions of the femoral condyles were found to be spherical in shape. These spherical surfaces are projected in sagittal plane radiographs as circles with center points coincident with those of the spheres. A line connecting these centers defines an axis system and enables three-dimensional orientation of the femur on the tibia to be determined using sagittal-plane radiographs. Knee kinematics was determined as a function of flexion angle for 14 fresh cadavers and 8 volunteers. Results were in the form of eulerian rotations and displacements. The data were normalized to the size of the average knee and the results from the 22 trials were averaged. The most obvious motion was internal rotation of the tibia with flexion; however, varus rotation and posterior translation of the origin were also evident. An external joint system was then designed to mimic "average" knee motion during flexion. The joints have been incorporated into a knee brace, and clinical evaluation has begun. Other applications include cast bracing and hinge distraction.

  9. Bilateral Arthrodesis of the Ankle Joint: Self-Reported Outcomes in 35 Patients From the Swedish Ankle Registry.

    PubMed

    Henricson, Anders; Kamrad, Ilka; Rosengren, Björn; Carlsson, Åke

    Bilateral ankle arthrodesis is seldom performed, and results concerning the outcome and satisfaction can only sparsely be found in published studies. We analyzed the data from 35 patients who had undergone bilateral ankle arthrodesis in the Swedish Ankle Registry using patient-reported generic and region-specific outcome measures. Of 36 talocrural arthrodeses and 34 tibio-talar-calcaneal arthrodeses, 6 ankles (9%) had undergone repeat arthrodesis because of nonunion. After a mean follow-up period of 47 ± 5 (range 12 to 194) months, the mean scores were as follows: self-reported foot and ankle score, 33 ± 10 (range 4 to 48); the EuroQol Group's EQ-5D(™) score, 0.67 ± 0.28 (range -0.11 to 1), the EuroQol Group's visual analog scale score, 70 ± 19 (range 20 to 95), 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) physical domain, 39 ± 11 (range 16 to 58); and SF-36 mental domain, 54 ± 14 (range 17 to 71). Patients with rheumatoid arthritis seemed to have similar self-reported foot and ankle scores but possibly lower EQ-5D(™) and SF-36 scores. Those with talocrural arthrodeses scored higher than did those with tibio-talar-calcaneal arthrodeses on the EQ5D(™) and SF-36 questionnaires (p = .03 and p = .04). In 64 of 70 ankles (91%), the patients were satisfied or very satisfied with the outcome. In conclusion, we consider bilateral ankle arthrodesis to be a reasonable treatment for symptomatic hindfoot arthritis, with high postoperative mid-term satisfaction and satisfactory scores on the patient-reported generic and region-specific outcome measures, when no other treatment option is available.

  10. Simulated radiographic bone and joint modeling from 3D ankle MRI: feasibility and comparison with radiographs and 2D MRI.

    PubMed

    Nordeck, Shaun M; Koerper, Conrad E; Adler, Aaron; Malhotra, Vidur; Xi, Yin; Liu, George T; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to simulate radiographs from isotropic 3D MRI data, compare relationship of angle and joint space measurements on simulated radiographs with corresponding 2D MRIs and real radiographs (XR), and compare measurement times among the three modalities. Twenty-four consecutive ankles were included, eight males and 16 females, with a mean age of 46 years. Segmented joint models simulating radiographs were created from 3D MRI data sets. Three readers independently performed blinded angle and joint space measurements on the models, corresponding 2D MRIs, and XRs at two time points. Linear mixed models and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was ascertained, with p values less than 0.05 considered significant. Simulated radiograph models were successfully created in all cases. Good agreement (ICC > 0.65) was noted among all readers across all modalities and among most measurements. Absolute measurement values differed between modalities. Measurement time was significantly greater (p < 0.05) on 2D versus simulated radiographs for most measurements and on XR versus simulated radiographs (p < 0.05) for nearly half the measurements. Simulated radiographs can be successfully generated from 3D MRI data; however, measurements differ. Good inter-reader and moderate-to-good intra-reader reliability was observed and measurements obtained on simulated radiograph models took significantly less time compared to measurements with 2D and generally less time than XR.

  11. A Review of 399 Total Ankle Replacements: Analysis of Ipsilateral Subtalar Joint Arthrodesis and Associated Talar Component Subsidence.

    PubMed

    Prissel, Mark A; Hyer, Christopher F; Berlet, Gregory C

    Total ankle replacement (TAR) is an accepted treatment for end-stage ankle arthritis. When concurrent subtalar joint pathologic features exist, ipsilateral subtalar joint arthrodesis (STJA) can be performed either simultaneous with TAR or as a staged procedure. Limited data exist on the effect of talar component subsidence and prosthesis survivorship. The present study purpose was to evaluate the effect of STJA on talar component subsidence after primary TAR and its effect on TAR survivorship. All patients, a minimum of 18 years old, from a single institution with modern-generation TAR and 1-year minimum follow-up data available were evaluated. The study group included patients who had also undergone STJA, and the control group (no STJA) was matched 1:1 by age, gender, and prosthesis. The initial postoperative weightbearing and most recent weightbearing radiographs were compared for talar component subsidence. We reviewed 399 primary TARs from 2004 to 2012. A total of 33 patients with ipsilateral STJA met the inclusion criteria and had an appropriate control group match. In the study group, 8 patients required a return to the operating room for 4 revisions and 4 reoperations at a median follow-up point of 24.3 months. Of the controls, 9 patients required a return to the operating room, with 4 revisions and 5 reoperations at a median follow-up point of 38.4 months. No statistically significant radiographic differences were found between the 2 groups. Primary TAR and ipsilateral STJA were infrequently required (41 of 399; 10.3%). TAR did not result in decreased survivorship when performed with ipsilateral STJA at an early follow-up point. Further study is warranted to determine any differences among previous, simultaneous, and subsequent STJA with ipsilateral TAR, and a matched longitudinal analysis is needed to determine longer term survivorship.

  12. [Case-control study on bone setting manipulation for the treatment of over degree II supination-eversion fractures of ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Qi, Yue-Feng; Chen, Fa-Lin; Bao, Shu-Ren; Li, Cheng-Huan; Zhao, Xing-Wei; Liu, Shi-Ming; Chen, Wen-Xue; Li, Ye; Wang, Peng

    2012-08-01

    To explore therapeutic effects of bone setting manipulation for the treatment of over degree II supination-eversion fractures of ankle,and analyze manipulative reduction mechanism. From 2005 to 2008, 95 patients with over degree II supination-eversion fractures of ankle were treated respectively by manipulation and operation. There were 43 cases [11 males and 32 females with an average age of (44.95 +/- 12.65) years] in manipulation group, and 2 cases were degree II, 11 cases were degree III, and 30 cases were degree IV. There were 52 cases [21 males and 31 females with an average age of (39.96 +/- 13.28) years] in operative group,and 6 cases were degree II, 18 cases were degree III, and 28 cases were degree IV. Bone setting manipulation and hard splint external fixation were applied to manipulative group. Operative reduction internal fixation was performed in operative group. X-ray was used to evaluate reduction of fracture before and after treatment, 2 months after treatment. Ankle joint function was evaluated according to Olerud-Molander scoring system after 6 months treatment. All patients were followed up with good reduction. Three cases occurred wound complication in operative group, but not in manipulative group. In manipulation group, 19 cases got excellent results, 20 cases good and 4 cases fair; while in operative group, 30 cases got excellent results, 20 cases good and 2 cases poor. There were no significant differences in fracture reduction and ankle joint function recovery between two groups (P > 0.05). Efficacy of operative treatment was better than that of manipulative treatment at degree IV fracture (P < 0.05). Bone setting manipulation is a good method for treating supination-eversion ankle joint fractures, which has advantages of simple and safe operation, reliable efficacy. For ankle join fracture at degree IV, manipulative reduction should be adopted earlier, and operative treatment also necessary

  13. Subtalar Joint Arthrodesis for Elective and Posttraumatic Foot and Ankle Deformities.

    PubMed

    DiDomenico, Lawrence A; Butto, Danielle N

    2017-07-01

    Subtalar joint arthrodesis is a procedure used in posttraumatic arthritis, osteoarthritis, tarsal coalition management, posterior tibial tendon dysfunction, and inflammatory arthropathies, and can be used in deformity correction. The goals of the procedure are to eliminate pain, improve function, restore stability, and realign the hind foot. The procedure has high patient satisfaction with low complications while preserving motion in adjacent tarsal joints. Joint preparation is important and time should be spent preparing the joint for successful arthrodesis and the fixation construct needs to be done well and effectively to provide a solid Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO) construct for good results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Sodium Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Ankle Joint in Cadaver Specimens, Volunteers, and Patients After Different Cartilage Repair Techniques at 7 T

    PubMed Central

    Zbýň, Štefan; Brix, Martin O.; Juras, Vladimir; Domayer, Stephan E.; Walzer, Sonja M.; Mlynarik, Vladimir; Apprich, Sebastian; Buckenmaier, Kai; Windhager, Reinhard; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The goal of cartilage repair techniques such as microfracture (MFX) or matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) is to produce repair tissue (RT) with sufficient glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content. Sodium magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers a direct and noninvasive evaluation of the GAG content in native cartilage and RT. In the femoral cartilage, this method was able to distinguish between RTs produced by MFX and MACT having different GAG contents. However, it needs to be clarified whether sodium MRI can be useful for evaluating RT in thin ankle cartilage. Thus, the aims of this 7-T study were (1) to validate our sodium MRI protocol in cadaver ankle samples, (2) to evaluate the sodium corrected signal intensities (cSI) in cartilage of volunteers, (3) and to compare sodium values in RT between patients after MFX and MACT treatment. Materials and Methods Five human cadaver ankle samples as well as ankles of 9 asymptomatic volunteers, 6 MFX patients and 6 MACT patients were measured in this 7-T study. Sodium values from the ankle samples were compared with histochemically evaluated GAG content. In the volunteers, sodium cSI values were calculated in the cartilages of ankle and subtalar joint. In the patients, sodium cSI in RT and reference cartilage were measured, morphological appearance of RT was evaluated using the magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) scoring system, and clinical outcome before and after surgery was assessed using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score and Modified Cincinnati Knee Scale. All regions of interest were defined on morphological images and subsequently transferred to the corresponding sodium images. Analysis of variance, t tests, and Pearson correlation coefficients were evaluated. Results In the patients, significantly lower sodium cSI values were found in RT than in reference cartilage for the MFX (P = 0.007) and MACT patients (P = 0.008). Sodium cSI and

  15. Sodium magnetic resonance imaging of ankle joint in cadaver specimens, volunteers, and patients after different cartilage repair techniques at 7 T: initial results.

    PubMed

    Zbýň, Štefan; Brix, Martin O; Juras, Vladimir; Domayer, Stephan E; Walzer, Sonja M; Mlynarik, Vladimir; Apprich, Sebastian; Buckenmaier, Kai; Windhager, Reinhard; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2015-04-01

    The goal of cartilage repair techniques such as microfracture (MFX) or matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) is to produce repair tissue (RT) with sufficient glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content. Sodium magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers a direct and noninvasive evaluation of the GAG content in native cartilage and RT. In the femoral cartilage, this method was able to distinguish between RTs produced by MFX and MACT having different GAG contents. However, it needs to be clarified whether sodium MRI can be useful for evaluating RT in thin ankle cartilage. Thus, the aims of this 7-T study were (1) to validate our sodium MRI protocol in cadaver ankle samples, (2) to evaluate the sodium corrected signal intensities (cSI) in cartilage of volunteers, (3) and to compare sodium values in RT between patients after MFX and MACT treatment. Five human cadaver ankle samples as well as ankles of 9 asymptomatic volunteers, 6 MFX patients and 6 MACT patients were measured in this 7-T study. Sodium values from the ankle samples were compared with histochemically evaluated GAG content. In the volunteers, sodium cSI values were calculated in the cartilages of ankle and subtalar joint. In the patients, sodium cSI in RT and reference cartilage were measured, morphological appearance of RT was evaluated using the magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) scoring system, and clinical outcome before and after surgery was assessed using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score and Modified Cincinnati Knee Scale. All regions of interest were defined on morphological images and subsequently transferred to the corresponding sodium images. Analysis of variance, t tests, and Pearson correlation coefficients were evaluated. In the patients, significantly lower sodium cSI values were found in RT than in reference cartilage for the MFX (P = 0.007) and MACT patients (P = 0.008). Sodium cSI and MOCART scores in RT did not differ between

  16. Ankle joint proprioception and passive mechanical properties of the calf muscles after an Achilles tendon rupture: a comparison with matched controls.

    PubMed

    Bressel, Eadric; Larsen, Brian T; McNair, Peter J; Cronin, John

    2004-03-01

    To examine if ankle joint proprioception, passive stiffness, and torque relaxation responses of the involved and uninvolved limbs of persons with a previous history of an Achilles tendon rupture were different from matched controls. Quasi-experimental mixed design. The influence of an Achilles tendon rupture on the proprioceptive and kinetic performance of the involved and uninvolved ankle is not known. Twenty persons (mean age, 44.8 years) with a unilateral rupture and 20 matched controls (mean age, 44.2 years) volunteered. Proprioception was tested with a position-matching protocol from which absolute errors were quantified. A dynamometer was used to measure ankle joint angle and passive torque from which stiffness and torque relaxation were calculated. Proprioception absolute errors for the involved and uninvolved limbs of the experimental group were 27% and 31% greater respectively, than values for the control group. Torque relaxation values were greater in the involved limb versus the uninvolved limb or the control group (P=0.003-0.04). In conclusion, participants with a previous history of an Achilles tendon rupture display proprioception deficits in both limbs and greater torque relaxation in the involved limb in comparison to matched controls. Bilateral deficits in ankle joint proprioception, as reported in this study, suggest the uninvolved limb may not serve as an effective control and because proprioception deficits influence some functional tests, Achilles tendon rupture patients may benefit from proprioception training.

  17. Ankle arthroscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... ankle - arthroscopy; Surgery - ankle - arthroscopic References Cerrato R, Campbell J, Triche R. Ankle arthroscopy. In: Miller MD, ... and ankle. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; ...

  18. Summary of Human Ankle Mechanical Impedance During Walking.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunglae; Rouse, Elliott J; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2016-01-01

    The human ankle joint plays a critical role during walking and understanding the biomechanical factors that govern ankle behavior and provides fundamental insight into normal and pathologically altered gait. Previous researchers have comprehensively studied ankle joint kinetics and kinematics during many biomechanical tasks, including locomotion; however, only recently have researchers been able to quantify how the mechanical impedance of the ankle varies during walking. The mechanical impedance describes the dynamic relationship between the joint position and the joint torque during perturbation, and is often represented in terms of stiffness, damping, and inertia. The purpose of this short communication is to unify the results of the first two studies measuring ankle mechanical impedance in the sagittal plane during walking, where each study investigated differing regions of the gait cycle. Rouse et al. measured ankle impedance from late loading response to terminal stance, where Lee et al. quantified ankle impedance from pre-swing to early loading response. While stiffness component of impedance increases significantly as the stance phase of walking progressed, the change in damping during the gait cycle is much less than the changes observed in stiffness. In addition, both stiffness and damping remained low during the swing phase of walking. Future work will focus on quantifying impedance during the "push off" region of stance phase, as well as measurement of these properties in the coronal plane.

  19. Summary of Human Ankle Mechanical Impedance During Walking

    PubMed Central

    Rouse, Elliott J.; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2016-01-01

    The human ankle joint plays a critical role during walking and understanding the biomechanical factors that govern ankle behavior and provides fundamental insight into normal and pathologically altered gait. Previous researchers have comprehensively studied ankle joint kinetics and kinematics during many biomechanical tasks, including locomotion; however, only recently have researchers been able to quantify how the mechanical impedance of the ankle varies during walking. The mechanical impedance describes the dynamic relationship between the joint position and the joint torque during perturbation, and is often represented in terms of stiffness, damping, and inertia. The purpose of this short communication is to unify the results of the first two studies measuring ankle mechanical impedance in the sagittal plane during walking, where each study investigated differing regions of the gait cycle. Rouse et al. measured ankle impedance from late loading response to terminal stance, where Lee et al. quantified ankle impedance from pre-swing to early loading response. While stiffness component of impedance increases significantly as the stance phase of walking progressed, the change in damping during the gait cycle is much less than the changes observed in stiffness. In addition, both stiffness and damping remained low during the swing phase of walking. Future work will focus on quantifying impedance during the “push off” region of stance phase, as well as measurement of these properties in the coronal plane. PMID:27766187

  20. An open 8-channel parallel transmission coil for static and dynamic 7T MRI of the knee and ankle joints at multiple postures.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jin; Weber, Ewald; Destruel, Aurelien; O'Brien, Kieran; Henin, Bassem; Engstrom, Craig; Crozier, Stuart

    2017-06-22

    We present the initial in vivo imaging results of an open architecture eight-channel parallel transmission (pTx) transceive radiofrequency (RF) coil array that was designed and constructed for static and dynamic 7T MRI of the knee and ankle joints. The pTx coil has a U-shaped dual-row configuration (200 mm overall length longitudinally) that allows static and dynamic imaging of the knee and ankle joints at various postures and during active movements. This coil structure, in combination with B1 shimming, allows flexible configuration of B1 transmit profiles, with good homogeneity over 120-mm regions of interest. This coil enabled high-resolution gradient echo (e.g., 3D dual-echo steady state [DESS] and 3D multiecho data image combination [MEDIC]) and turbo spin echo (TSE) imaging (e.g., with proton density weighting [PDw], PDw with fat saturation, and T1 and T2 weightings) with local RF energy absorption rates well below regulatory limits. High-resolution 2D and 3D image series (e.g., 0.3 mm in-plane resolution for TSE, 0.47 mm isotropic for DESS and MEDIC) were obtained from the knee and ankle joints with excellent tissue contrast. Dynamic imaging during continuous knee and ankle flexion-extension cycles were successfully acquired. The new open pTx coil array provides versatility for high-quality static and dynamic MRI of the knee and ankle joints at 7T. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  1. Effect of treadmill walking with ankle stretching orthosis on ankle flexibility and gait

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young-ki; Kim, Si-hyun; Jeon, In-cheol; Ahn, Sun-hee; Kwon, Oh-yun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the kinematics of the ankle in the lunge to estabilish effectiveness of an ankle stretching orthosis (ASO) on the ankle dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM) of individuals with limited dorsiflexion ROM. [Subjects and Methods] Forty ankles with decreased dorsiflexion ROM of 20 participants were evaluated in this study. After wearing the ASO, participants walked on a treadmill for 15 minutes. Participants walked on the treadmill at a self-selected comfortable speed. Ankle dorsiflexion ROM, maximum dorsiflexion ROM before heel-off, and time to heel-off during the stance phase of gait were measured before and after 15 minutes of treadmill walking with the ASO. The differences in all variables between before and after treadmill walking with ASO were analyzed using the paired t-test. [Results] Ankle active and passive ROM, and dorsiflexion ROM during lunge increased significantly after treadmill walking with ASO. Treadmill walking with the ASO significantly increased the angle of maximal dorsiflexion before heel-off and time to heel-off during the stance phase. [Conclusion] The results of this study show that treadmill walking with the ASO effectively improved ankle flexibility and restored the normal gait pattern of the ankle joint by increasing dorsiflexion ROM, maximal angle of dorsiflexion, and time to heel-off in the stance phase. PMID:25995601

  2. Topography of human ankle joint: focused on posterior tibial artery and tibial nerve

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Deog-Im; Kim, Yi-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Most of foot pain occurs by the entrapment of the tibial nerve and its branches. Some studies have reported the location of the tibial nerve; however, textbooks and researches have not described the posterior tibial artery and the relationship between the tibal nerve and the posterior tibial artery in detail. The purpose of this study was to analyze the location of neurovascular structures and bifurcations of the nerve and artery in the ankle region based on the anatomical landmarks. Ninety feet of embalmed human cadavers were examined. All measurements were evaluated based on a reference line. Neurovascular structures were classified based on the relationship between the tibial nerve and the posterior tibial artery. The bifurcation of arteries and nerves were expressed by X- and Y-coordinates. Based on the reference line, 9 measurements were examined. The most common type I (55.6%), was the posterior tibial artery located medial to the tibial nerve. Neurovascular structures were located less than 50% of the distance between M and C from M at the reference line. The bifurcation of the posterior tibial artery was 41% in X-coordinate, -38% in Y-coordinate, and that of the tibial nerve was 48%, and -10%, respectively. Thirteen measurements and classification showed statistically significant differences between both sexes (P<0.05). It is determined the average position of neurovascular structures in the human ankle region and recorded the differences between the sexes and amongst the populations. These results would be helpful for the diagnosis and treatment of foot pain. PMID:26140224

  3. The senses of active and passive forces at the human ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Savage, G; Allen, T J; Proske, U

    2015-07-01

    The traditional view of the neural basis for the sense of muscle force is that it is generated at least in part within the brain. Recently it has been proposed that force sensations do not arise entirely centrally and that there is a contribution from peripheral receptors within the contracting muscle. Evidence comes from experiments on thumb flexor and elbow flexor muscles. Here we have studied the sense of force in plantar flexor muscles of the human ankle, looking for further evidence for such a mechanism. The active angle-torque curve was measured for muscles of both legs, and for each muscle, ankle angles were identified on the ascending and descending limbs of the curve where active forces were similar. In a plantar flexion force matching task, subjects were asked to match the force in one foot, generated on the ascending limb of the curve, with force in the other foot, generated on the descending limb. It was hypothesised that despite active forces being similar, the sensation generated in the more stretched muscle should be greater because of the contribution from its peripheral stretch receptors, leading to an overestimation of the force in the stretched muscle. It was found that provided that the comparison was between active forces, there was no difference in the forces generated by the two legs, supporting the central hypothesis for the sense of force. When total forces were matched, including a component of passive force due to muscle stretch, subjects seemed to ignore the passive component. Yet subjects had an acute sense of passive force, provided that the muscles remained relaxed. It was concluded that subjects had two senses, a sense of active force, generated centrally, and a sense of passive force, or perhaps muscle stretch, generated within the muscle itself.

  4. Failure of normal development of central drive to ankle dorsiflexors relates to gait deficits in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Tue Hvass; Farmer, Simon F; Kliim-Due, Mette; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2013-02-01

    Neurophysiological markers of the central control of gait in children with cerebral palsy (CP) are used to assess developmental response to therapy. We measured the central common drive to a leg muscle in children with CP. We recorded electromyograms (EMGs) from the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of 40 children with hemiplegic CP and 42 typically developing age-matched controls during static dorsiflexion of the ankle and during the swing phase of treadmill walking. The common drive to TA motoneurons was identified through time- and frequency-domain cross-correlation methods. In control subjects, the common drive consists of frequencies between 1 and 60 Hz with peaks at beta (15-25 Hz) and gamma (30-45 Hz) frequencies known to be caused by activity within sensorimotor cortex networks: this drive to motoneurons strengthens during childhood. Similar to this drive in control subjects, this drive to the least affected TA in the CP children tended to strengthen with age, although compared with that in the control subjects, it was slightly weaker. For CP subjects of all ages, the most affected TA muscle common drive was markedly reduced compared with that of their least affected muscle as well as that of controls. These differences between the least and most affected TA muscles were unrelated to differences in the magnitude of EMG in the two muscles but positively correlated with ankle dorsiflexion velocity and joint angle during gait. Time- and frequency-domain analysis of ongoing EMG recruited during behaviorally relevant lower limb tasks provides a noninvasive and important measure of the central drive to motoneurons in subjects with CP.

  5. Inferior joint space arthrography of normal temporomandibular joints: Reassessment of diagnostic criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, P.A.; Tu, H.K.; Sleder, P.R.; Lydiatt, D.D.; Laney, T.J.

    1986-06-01

    Inferior joint space arthrograms of the temporomandibular joints of 31 healthy volunteers (62 joints) were obtained to determine normal arthrographic findings. The superior margin of the anterior recess was smooth and flat in 68% of the joints and concave in 32% with the subjects' mouths closed. The concavity was the result of the anterior ridge of the meniscus impinging on the contrast material. The concave impression could be distinguished easily from an anteriorly displaced meniscus on videotaped studies, which demonstrated a smooth transition of contrast material from the anterior to the posterior recess during opening of a subject's mouth. With the mouth open, the anterior recess decreased in size, appearing as a small, crescent-shaped collection of contrast material anterior to the head of the condyle in 52 joints (84%); it remained large in ten joints (16%) at maximal mouth opening. The configuration of the posterior recess was identical to that described previously; however, with the subjects' mouths closed, it was larger than the anterior recess, contrary to most previously reported results.

  6. Total ankle replacement. Design evolution and results.

    PubMed

    van den Heuvel, Alexander; Van Bouwel, Saskia; Dereymaeker, Greta

    2010-04-01

    The ankle joint has unique anatomical, biomechanical and cartilaginous structural characteristics that allow the joint to withstand the very high mechanical stresses and strains over years. Any minor changes to any of these features predispose the joint to osteoarthritis. Total ankle replacement (TAR) is evolving as an alternative to ankle arthrodesis for the treatment of end-stage ankle osteoarthritis. Initial implant designs from the early 1970s had unacceptably high failure and complication rates. As a result many orthopaedic surgeons have restricted the use of TAR in favour of ankle arthrodesis. Long term follow-up studies following ankle arthrodesis show risks of developing adjacent joint osteoarthritis. Therefore research towards a successful ankle replacement continues. Newer designs and longer-term outcome studies have renewed the interest in ankle joint replacement. We present an overview of the evolution, results and current concepts of total ankle replacement.

  7. The Effect of Ankle Joint Muscle Strengthening Training and Static Muscle Stretching Training on Stroke Patients’ C.O.P Sway Amplitude

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Ho; Yoon, Joo Soo; Lee, Jin Hwan

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study implement ankle joint dorsiflexion training for ankle muscle the weakness that impairs stroke patients’ gait performance, to examine the effect of the training on stroke patients’ plantar pressure and gait ability. [Subjects and Methods] In this study, 36 stroke patients diagnosed with stroke due to cerebral infarction or cerebral hemorrhage performed the training. Static muscle stretching was performed four times a week for 20 minutes at a time for 6 weeks by the training group. Ankle dorsiflexor training was performed four times a week, two sets per time in the case of females and three sets per time in the case of males for 6 weeks, by another group. Center of pressure sway amplitude was measured using the F-scan system during gait. All subjects were assessed with the same measurements at a pre-study examination and reassessed at eight weeks. Data were analyzed statistically using the paired t-test and one-way ANOVA. [Results] Among the between ankle dorsiflexor training group, static muscle stretching group, and control group, the difference before and after the training were proven to be statistically significant. [Conclusion] Compared to other training groups, the ankle muscle strength training group showed statistically significant increases of forward thrust at stroke patients’ toe-off which positively affected stroke patients’ ability to perform gait. PMID:24409032

  8. Altered Knee and Ankle Kinematics During Squatting in Those With Limited Weight-Bearing–Lunge Ankle-Dorsiflexion Range of Motion

    PubMed Central

    Dill, Karli E.; Begalle, Rebecca L.; Frank, Barnett S.; Zinder, Steven M.; Padua, Darin A.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Ankle-dorsiflexion (DF) range of motion (ROM) may influence movement variables that are known to affect anterior cruciate ligament loading, such as knee valgus and knee flexion. To our knowledge, researchers have not studied individuals with limited or normal ankle DF-ROM to investigate the relationship between those factors and the lower extremity movement patterns associated with anterior cruciate ligament injury. Objective: To determine, using 2 different measurement techniques, whether knee- and ankle-joint kinematics differ between participants with limited and normal ankle DF-ROM. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Sports medicine research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Forty physically active adults (20 with limited ankle DF-ROM, 20 with normal ankle DF-ROM). Main Outcome Measure(s): Ankle DF-ROM was assessed using 2 techniques: (1) nonweight-bearing ankle DF-ROM with the knee straight, and (2) weight-bearing lunge (WBL). Knee flexion, knee valgus-varus, knee internal-external rotation, and ankle DF displacements were assessed during the overhead-squat, single-legged squat, and jump-landing tasks. Separate 1-way analyses of variance were performed to determine whether differences in knee- and ankle-joint kinematics existed between the normal and limited groups for each assessment. Results: We observed no differences between the normal and limited groups when classifying groups based on nonweight-bearing passive-ankle DF-ROM. However, individuals with greater ankle DF-ROM during the WBL displayed greater knee-flexion and ankle-DF displacement and peak knee flexion during the overhead-squat and single-legged squat tasks. In addition, those individuals also demonstrated greater knee-varus displacement during the single-legged squat. Conclusions: Greater ankle DF-ROM assessed during the WBL was associated with greater knee-flexion and ankle-DF displacement during both squatting tasks as well as greater knee-varus displacement during

  9. Differences Regarding Branded HA in Italy, Part 2: Data from Clinical Studies on Knee, Hip, Shoulder, Ankle, Temporomandibular Joint, Vertebral Facets, and Carpometacarpal Joint

    PubMed Central

    Migliore, A.; Bizzi, E.; De Lucia, O.; Delle Sedie, A.; Tropea, S.; Bentivegna, M.; Mahmoud, A.; Foti, C.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The aim of the current study is to collect scientific data on all branded hyaluronic acid (HA) products in Italy that are in use for intra-articular (IA) injection in osteoarthritis (OA) compared with that reported in the leaflet. METHODS An extensive literature research was performed for all articles reporting data on the IA use of HA in OA. Selected studies were taken into consideration only if they are related to products based on HAs that are currently marketed in Italy with the specific joint indication for IA use in patients affected by OA. RESULTS Sixty-two HA products are marketed in Italy: 30 products are indicated for the knee but only 8 were proved with some efficacy; 9 products were effective for the hip but only 6 had hip indication; 7 products proved to be effective for the shoulder but only 3 had the indication; 5 products proved effective for the ankle but only one had the indication; 6 products were effective for the temporomandibular joint but only 2 had the indication; only 2 proved effective for vertebral facet joints but only 1 had the indication; and 5 products proved effective for the carpometacarpal joint but only 2 had the indication. CONCLUSIONS There are only a few products with some evidences, while the majority of products remain without proof. Clinicians and regulators should request postmarketing studies from pharmaceuticals to corroborate with that reported in the leaflet and to gather more data, allowing the clinicians to choose the adequate product for the patient. PMID:27279754

  10. Reference values for metacarpophalangeal joint stiffness in normals.

    PubMed Central

    Howe, A; Thompson, D; Wright, V

    1985-01-01

    A new form of microprocessor-controlled arthrograph is described which measures stiffness parameters of the metacarpophalangeal joints of the index, middle, and ring fingers of both hands. The apparatus is simple and quick to use and gives reproducible results. The arthrograph is used to determine the reference limits for stiffness at the middle finger of the right hand in 128 normal subjects. It is found that incorporating information on the subject's finger circumference allows a much improved precision to be achieved, but the precision is not further enhanced by including details of age and sex. Images PMID:4026407

  11. Management of ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, M W; Uhl, T L; Mattacola, C G; McCluskey, L C

    2001-01-01

    Without adequate care, acute ankle trauma can result in chronic joint instability. Use of a standardized protocol enhances the management of ankle sprains. In patients with grades I or II sprains, emphasis should be placed on accurate diagnosis, early use of RICE (rest, ice, compression and elevation), maintenance of range of motion and use of an ankle support. Sprains with complete ligament [corrected] tears (grade III) may require surgical intervention. Although early motion and mobility are recommended, ligamentous strength does not return until months after an ankle sprain.

  12. Current thoughts on ankle arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ritterman, Scott A; Fellars, Todd A; Digiovanni, Christopher W

    2013-03-01

    The ankle is the most commonly injured joint in athletic and work activities. In contrast, osteoarthritis of the ankle joint is relatively rare and is typically post-traumatic or inflammatory in nature. Common symptoms that prompt an orthopaedic consultation include pain, disability and altered gait mechanics. Non-operative management has been the mainstay for previously undiagnosed patients. For those with advanced disease, ankle fusion or total ankle replacement may be the only surgical options. Though some recent studies have shown patients' preference for a well functioning ankle replacement, significant long- term follow-up data is lacking.

  13. Bionic ankle-foot prosthesis normalizes walking gait for persons with leg amputation.

    PubMed

    Herr, Hugh M; Grabowski, Alena M

    2012-02-07

    Over time, leg prostheses have improved in design, but have been incapable of actively adapting to different walking velocities in a manner comparable to a biological limb. People with a leg amputation using such commercially available passive-elastic prostheses require significantly more metabolic energy to walk at the same velocities, prefer to walk slower and have abnormal biomechanics compared with non-amputees. A bionic prosthesis has been developed that emulates the function of a biological ankle during level-ground walking, specifically providing the net positive work required for a range of walking velocities. We compared metabolic energy costs, preferred velocities and biomechanical patterns of seven people with a unilateral transtibial amputation using the bionic prosthesis and using their own passive-elastic prosthesis to those of seven non-amputees during level-ground walking. Compared with using a passive-elastic prosthesis, using the bionic prosthesis decreased metabolic cost by 8 per cent, increased trailing prosthetic leg mechanical work by 57 per cent and decreased the leading biological leg mechanical work by 10 per cent, on average, across walking velocities of 0.75-1.75 m s(-1) and increased preferred walking velocity by 23 per cent. Using the bionic prosthesis resulted in metabolic energy costs, preferred walking velocities and biomechanical patterns that were not significantly different from people without an amputation.

  14. The Effect of Modified Brostrom-Gould Repair for Lateral Ankle Instability on In Vivo Tibiotalar Kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Wainright, William B; Spritzer, Charles E.; Lee, Jun Young; Easley, Mark E.; DeOrio, James K.; Nunley, James A.; DeFrate, Louis E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Lateral ankle instability leads to an increased risk of tibiotalar joint osteoarthritis. Previous studies have found abnormal tibiotalar joint motions with lateral ankle instability that may contribute to this increased incidence of osteoarthritis, including increased anterior translation and internal rotation of the talus under weight-bearing loading. Surgical repairs for lateral ankle instability have shown good clinical results, but the effects of repair on in vivo ankle motion are not well understood. Hypothesis The modified Broström-Gould lateral ligament reconstruction decreases anterior translation and internal rotation of the talus under in vivo weight-bearing loading conditions. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods Seven patients underwent modified Brostöm-Gould repair for unilateral lateral ankle instability. Ankle joint kinematics as a function of increasing body weight were studied with magnetic resonance imaging and biplanar fluoroscopy. Tibiotalar kinematics were measured in unstable ankles preoperatively and postoperatively at a mean follow-up of 12 months, as well as in the uninjured contralateral ankles of the same individuals. Results Surgical repair resulted in statistically significant decreases in anterior translation of the talus (0.9±0.3mm, p=0.018) at 100% bodyweight and internal rotation of the talus at 75% (2.6±0.8°, p=0.019) and 100% (2.7±0.8°, p=0.013) bodyweight compared to ankle kinematics measured before repair. No statistically significant differences were detected between repaired ankles and contralateral normal ankles. Conclusion The modified Broström-Gould repair improved the abnormal joint motion observed in patients with lateral ankle instability, decreasing anterior translation and internal rotation of the talus. Clinical Relevance Altered kinematics may contribute to the tibiotalar joint degeneration that occurs with chronic lateral ankle instability. The findings of the current study support

  15. The effects of powered ankle-foot orthoses on joint kinematics and muscle activation during walking in individuals with incomplete spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Sawicki, Gregory S; Domingo, Antoinette; Ferris, Daniel P

    2006-01-01

    Background Powered lower limb orthoses could reduce therapist labor during gait rehabilitation after neurological injury. However, it is not clear how patients respond to powered assistance during stepping. Patients might allow the orthoses to drive the movement pattern and reduce their muscle activation. The goal of this study was to test the effects of robotic assistance in subjects with incomplete spinal cord injury using pneumatically powered ankle-foot orthoses. Methods Five individuals with chronic incomplete spinal cord injury (ASIA C-D) participated in the study. Each subject was fitted with bilateral ankle-foot orthoses equipped with artificial pneumatic muscles to power ankle plantar flexion. Subjects walked on a treadmill with partial bodyweight support at four speeds (0.36, 0.54, 0.72 and 0.89 m/s) under three conditions: without wearing orthoses, wearing orthoses unpowered (passively), and wearing orthoses activated under pushbutton control by a physical therapist. Subjects also attempted a fourth condition wearing orthoses activated under pushbutton control by them. We measured joint angles, electromyography, and orthoses torque assistance. Results A therapist quickly learned to activate the artificial pneumatic muscles using the pushbuttons with the appropriate amplitude and timing. The powered orthoses provided ~50% of peak ankle torque. Ankle angle at stance push-off increased when subjects walked with powered orthoses versus when they walked with passive-orthoses (ANOVA, p < 0.05). Ankle muscle activation amplitudes were similar for powered and passive-orthoses conditions except for the soleus (~13% lower for powered condition; p < 0.05). Two of the five subjects were able to control the orthoses themselves using the pushbuttons. The other three subjects found it too difficult to coordinate pushbutton timing. Orthoses assistance and maximum ankle angle at push-off were smaller when the subject controlled the orthoses compared to when the therapist

  16. Preoperative gait characterization of patients with ankle arthrosis.

    PubMed

    Khazzam, Michael; Long, Jason T; Marks, Richard M; Harris, Gerald F

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the kinematic changes that occur about the foot and ankle during gait in patients with degenerative joint disease (DJD). By comparing a normal adult population with what was found in the DJD population we determined how the motion of theses groups differed, thereby characterizing how this pathology affects foot and ankle motion. A 15-camera Vicon Motion Analysis System was used in conjunction with weight bearing radiographs to obtain three-dimensional motion of the foot and ankle during ambulation. The study was comprised of 34 patients and 35 ankles diagnosed with DJD (19 men and 15 women) of the ankle and 25 patients with normal ankles (13 men and 12 women). Dynamic foot and ankle motion was analyzed using the four-segment Milwaukee Foot Model (MFM). The data from this model resulted in three-dimensional (3D) kinematic parameters in the sagittal, coronal, and transverse planes as well as spatial-temporal parameters. Patient health status was evaluated using the SF-36 Health Survey and American Orthopaedics Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) hindfoot scores. The DJD group showed significant differences (p<0.001) as compared to normals with prolonged stance time, shortened stride length, reduced cadence and a walking speed which was only 66.96% of normal. Overall, kinematic data in the DJD cohort showed significant differences (p<0.001) in all planes of motion for tibial, hindfoot and forefoot motion as compared to normals. The average preoperative AOFAS hindfoot score was 26. DJD of the ankle results in decreased range of motion during gait. This decreased range of motion may be related to several factors including bony deformity, muscle weakness, and attempts to decrease the pain associated with weight bearing. To date there has not been a study which describes the effect of this disease process on motion of the foot and ankle. These findings may prove to be useful in the pre-operative assessment of these patients.

  17. A high normal ankle-brachial index combined with a high pulse wave velocity is associated with cerebral microbleeds.

    PubMed

    Kinjo, Yoshino; Ishida, Akio; Kinjo, Kozen; Ohya, Yusuke

    2016-08-01

    Arterial stiffness is associated with the pathogenesis of cerebral microbleeds (CMBs). The ankle-brachial index (ABI) is used to predict arterial stiffness. We hypothesized that the increase in ABI with age occurs as a result of increasing arterial stiffness and wave reflection, and is thus associated with target organ damage. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between ABI, brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), and CMBs. We recruited 990 cardiovascular disease-free and stroke-free participants [median age 53 (24-86) years, 531 were woman] who underwent brain MRI, ABI, and baPWV at a health checkup. The prevalence of CMBs was 4%. Both ABI (1.14 vs. 1.10) and baPWV (17.29 vs. 14.68 m/s) were higher in participants with CMBs than those without. Cutoff values of ABI and baPWV for the presence of CMBs were 1.12 and 16.07 m/s, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that ABI at least 1.12 [odds ratio (OR) 2.57, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.30-5.37, P < 0.05] and baPWV at least 16.07 m/s (OR 2.08, 95% CI 1.02-4.38, P < 0.05) were independently associated with CMBs. Moreover, the combination of ABI at least 1.12 and baPWV at least 16.07 m/s was strongly associated with CMBs (OR 5.26, 95% CI 1.93-16.92, P < 0.05). A high normal ABI, combined with a high baPWV, was strongly associated with CMBs in a screened Japanese cohort, suggesting a novel use for ABI as a predictor for target organ damage.

  18. Understanding acute ankle ligamentous sprain injury in sports.

    PubMed

    Fong, Daniel Tp; Chan, Yue-Yan; Mok, Kam-Ming; Yung, Patrick Sh; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2009-07-30

    used as it results in joint stiffness, muscle atrophy and loss of proprioception. Traditional Chinese medicine such as herbs, massage and acupuncture were well applied in China in managing sports injuries, and was reported to be effective in relieving pain, reducing swelling and edema, and restoring normal ankle function. Finally, the best practice of sports medicine would be to prevent the injury. Different previous approaches, including designing prophylactice devices, introducing functional interventions, as well as change of games rules were highlighted. This paper allows the readers to catch up with the previous researches on ankle sprain injury, and facilitate the future research idea on sport-related ankle sprain injury.

  19. Understanding acute ankle ligamentous sprain injury in sports

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Daniel TP; Chan, Yue-Yan; Mok, Kam-Ming; Yung, Patrick SH; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2009-01-01

    be used as it results in joint stiffness, muscle atrophy and loss of proprioception. Traditional Chinese medicine such as herbs, massage and acupuncture were well applied in China in managing sports injuries, and was reported to be effective in relieving pain, reducing swelling and edema, and restoring normal ankle function. Finally, the best practice of sports medicine would be to prevent the injury. Different previous approaches, including designing prophylactice devices, introducing functional interventions, as well as change of games rules were highlighted. This paper allows the readers to catch up with the previous researches on ankle sprain injury, and facilitate the future research idea on sport-related ankle sprain injury. PMID:19640309

  20. The impact of simulated ankle plantarflexion contracture on the knee joint during stance phase of gait: a within-subject study.

    PubMed

    Leung, Joan; Smith, Richard; Harvey, Lisa Anne; Moseley, Anne M; Chapparo, Joseph

    2014-04-01

    Ankle plantarflexion contractures are common in adults with neurological disorders and known to cause secondary gait deviations. However, their impact on the knee joint is not fully understood. The aims of this study are to describe the effect of simulated plantarflexion contractures on knee biomechanics during the stance phase and on the spatiotemporal characteristics of gait. Mild (10-degree plantarflexion) and severe (20-degree plantarflexion) ankle contractures were simulated in thirteen able-bodied adults using an ankle-foot-orthosis. A no contracture condition was compared with two simulated contracture conditions. There was an increase in knee extension, sometimes resulting in hyperextension, throughout stance for the two contracture conditions compared to the no contracture condition (mean increase in knee extension ranged from 5° to 9°; 95% CI 0° to 17°). At the same time, there were reductions in extension moment and power generation at the knee. Simulated plantarflexion contractures also reduced gait velocity, bilateral step length and cadence. All these changes were more pronounced in the severe contracture condition than mild contracture condition. While the majority of participants adopted a foot-flat pattern on landing and exhibited an increase in knee extension during stance, two participants used a toe-walking pattern and exhibited an increase in knee flexion. Ankle plantarflexion contractures are associated with an increase in knee extension during stance phase. However, some people with simulated ankle contractures may walk with an increase in knee flexion instead. Ankle plantarflexion contractures also adversely affect gait velocity, step length and cadence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Ankle "sprains" during sport activities with normal radiographs: Incidence of associated bone and tendon injuries on MRI findings and its clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Yammine, Kaissar; Fathi, Yahia

    2011-12-01

    To evaluate, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the occurrence of bone and tendon injuries and their impact on clinical management in athletes with ankle trauma during sports activities having normal radiographs and referred to the orthopedic department as "ankle sprains". This was a prospective study of 54 patients. Clinical examination and MR imaging were done in order to have an accurate diagnosis and the incidence of those injuries. Nearly half of the patients were found to have no ligament injury on MRI. Isolated bone bruises and isolated tendon injuries may share the same clinical signs with ankle sprains. MRI-based clinical management has been adjusted for each case; beside the Grade 3 ligament injuries and the rare, but difficult to diagnose osteochondral lesions of the talus, partial weight bearing or short-immobilization were offered as treatment modalities for the rest of the patients avoiding unnecessary long-term treatments and rehabilitation exercises. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of Ankle Joint Contact Angle and Ground Contact Time on Depth Jump Performance.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Joshua H; Flanagan, Sean P

    2015-11-01

    Athletes often need to both jump high and get off the ground quickly, but getting off the ground quickly can decrease the vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) impulse, impeding jump height. Energy stored in the muscle-tendon complex during the stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) may mitigate the effects of short ground contact times (GCTs). To take advantage of the SSC, several coaches recommend "attacking" the ground with the foot in a dorsiflexed (DF) position at contact. However, the efficacy of this technique has not been tested. This investigation tested the hypotheses that shorter GCTs would lead to smaller vertical depth jump heights (VDJH), and that this difference could be mitigated by instructing the athletes to land in a DF as opposed to a plantar flexed (PF) foot position. Eighteen healthy junior college athletes performed depth jumps from a 45-cm box onto force platforms under instruction to achieve one of the 2 objectives (maximum jump height [hmax] or minimal GCT [tmin]), with one of the 2 foot conditions (DF or PF). These variations created 4 distinct jump conditions: DF-hmax, DF-tmin, PF-hmax, and PF-tmin. For all variables examined, there were no significant interactions. For all 4 conditions, the ankle was PF during landing, but the DF condition was 28.87% less PF than the PF condition. The tmin conditions had a 23.48% shorter GCT than hmax. There were no significant main effects for jump height. The peak impact force for tmin was 22.14% greater than hmax and 19.11% greater for DF compared with PF conditions. A shorter GCT did not necessitate a smaller jump height, and a less PF foot did not lead to improvements in jump height or contact time during a depth jump from a 45-cm box. The same jump height was attained in less PF and shorter GCT conditions by larger impact forces. To decrease contact time while maintaining jump height, athletes should be instructed to "get off the ground as fast as possible." This cue seems to be more important than foot

  3. Classic article: foot & ankle 1:15, 1980 traumatic dislocations of the first metatarsophalangeal joint.

    PubMed

    Jahss, Melvin H

    2006-06-01

    The mechanics, anatomy, and pathomechanics of traumatic dorsal dislocation of the first metatarsophalangeal joint are discussed. There are two basic types of dislocations. In Type I, dislocation of the hallux with the sesamoids occurs without disrupting the sesamoid mass. Such cases are usually irreducible on closed reduction, the metatarsal head being incarcerated by the conjoined tendons with their intact sesamoids. In Type II, there is either associated disruption of the intersesamoid ligament (Type IIA) or a transverse fracture of one of the sesamoids (Type IIB). In Type II, the sesamoid disruption usually permits closed reduction.

  4. Development of an Intelligent Stretching Device for Ankle Joints With Contracture/Spasticity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    7] T. G. Olmstead, H. W. Wevers, J. T. Bryant, and G. J. Gouw, "Effect of Muscular Activity on Valgus /Varus Laxity and Stiffness of the Knee ," J...Biomech., vol. 19, pp. 565-577, 1986. [8] L.-Q. Zhang and G. Wang, " Dynamic and Static Control of the Human Knee Joint in Abduction-Adduction," J...casting, dynamic splinting and traction, the continuous passive motion (CPM) device, and advanced robot-aided devices [3-6]. However, existing devices

  5. Modelling the Shear Behaviour of Rock Joints with Asperity Damage Under Constant Normal Stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indraratna, Buddhima; Thirukumaran, Sivanathan; Brown, E. T.; Zhu, Song-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The shear behaviour of a rough rock joint depends largely on the surface properties of the joint, as well as the boundary conditions applied across the joint interface. This paper proposes a new analytical model to describe the complete shear behaviour of rough joints under constant normal stiffness (CNS) boundary conditions by incorporating the effect of damage to asperities. In particular, the effects of initial normal stress levels and joint surface roughness on the shear behaviour of joints under CNS conditions were studied, and the analytical model was validated through experimental results. Finally, the practical application of the model to a jointed rock slope stability analysis is presented.

  6. [Injuries to the superior ankle joint from the viewpoint of accident surgery].

    PubMed

    Zwipp, H

    1991-12-01

    The treatment of bony, osteochondral, and ligamentous injuries of the tibio-talar joint requires precise preoperative planning by radiological investigation. This is essential to a correct understanding of the underlying pathology and will allow a proper classification of the injury, which is the basis of treatment. Conventional radiography using anteroposterior and lateral X-rays with comparative views of the noninjured side and, if necessary, rotated spot views and tomography are of high value especially in osteochondral fractures of the talus. Intraoperative control images in both planes after osteosynthesis are mandatory. For evaluation of the postoperative course and severity of arthrosis formation, the classification system of Bargon has proved its worth. In addition, tomography of the tibio-talar joint in two planes is useful especially in tibial pilon fractures, some malleolar fractures, and peripheral talar fractures. In talar fracture dislocations with concomitant compartment syndrome an emergency CT scan can be helpful to determine the optimal surgical approach. In these cases a 3-D reconstruction also might be of assistance. If there is evidence of partial or total talar necrosis, magnetic resonance imaging can be extremely helpful. However, in most cases implants considerably limit the validity of the image obtained. Ultrasonography offers a noninvasive, reproducible, and very inexpensive alternative and should be performed in cases of chondral-osteochondral talar rim avulsions and juvenile osteochondral ligament ruptures. It can also be used as a dynamic method for stress examination in fibular ligament ruptures and soft tissue injuries such as dislocation of the peroneal tendons. The use of Arthrography, stress tenography, and Arthro-CT scan nowadays has become extremely limited.

  7. Gender differences in hip and ankle joint kinematics on knee abduction during running.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Masanori; Ogawa, Haruna; Shimizu, Norifumi; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Yanai, Toshimasa; Kawakami, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    The knee is the most common site of running injuries, particularly prevalent in females. The purpose of this study was to clarify gender differences in the lower extremity kinematics during running, with a specific emphasis on the relationships between the distal and proximal factors and the knee joint kinematics. Eleven female and 11 male runners participated in this study. Three-dimensional marker positions were recorded with a motion analysis system while the subjects ran along a 25 m runway at a speed of 3.5 m/s. Kinematic variables were analyzed for the stance phase of the right leg. Female runners demonstrated significantly greater peak knee abduction (P<0.05), hip adduction (P<0.01) and internal rotation (P<0.05), whereas male runners demonstrated significantly greater peak rearfoot eversion (P<0.01). The knee abduction angles were positively correlated with hip adduction angles (r=0.49, P<0.05) and negatively correlated with rearfoot eversion (r= -0.69, P<0.001). There was no significant difference in normalised step width between genders (P>0.05). Smaller rearfoot eversion and greater hip adduction related closely to the greater knee abduction as the distal and proximal factors, respectively. These relationships are thought to be the compensatory joint motions in the frontal plane, because there was no significant difference in the normalised step width between females and males. The current results suggest that if the step width is identical, the subjects with greater knee abduction had smaller rearfoot eversion to compensate for greater hip adduction, which were more apparent in females. This explains greater knee abduction found in female runners, which can be linked to a high risk of knee injury.

  8. Rehabilitation of Syndesmotic (High) Ankle Sprains

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Glenn N.; Allen, Eric J.

    2010-01-01

    Context: High ankle sprains are common in athletes who play contact sports. Most high ankle sprains are treated nonsurgically with a rehabilitation program. Evidence Acquisition: All years of PUBMED, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, CINAHL PLUS, SPORTDiscuss, Google Scholar, and Web of Science were searched to August 2010, cross-referencing existing publications. Keywords included syndesmosis ankle sprain or high ankle sprain and the following terms: rehabilitation, treatment, cryotherapy, braces, orthosis, therapeutic modalities, joint mobilization, massage, pain, pain medications, TENS (ie, transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation), acupuncture, aquatic therapy, strength, neuromuscular training, perturbation training, and outcomes. Results: Level of evidence, 5. A 3-phase rehabilitation program is described. The acute phase is directed at protecting the joint while minimizing pain, inflammation, muscle weakness, and loss of motion. Most patients are treated with some form of immobilization and have weightbearing restrictions. A range of therapeutic modalities are used to minimize pain and inflammation. Gentle mobilization and resistance exercises are used to gain mobility and maintain muscle size and strength. The subacute phase is directed at normalizing range of motion, strength, and function in activities of daily living. Progressive mobilization and strengthening are hallmarks of this phase. Neuromuscular training is begun and becomes the central component of rehabilitation. The advanced training phase focuses on preparing the patient for return to sports participation. Perturbation of support surfaces, agility drills, plyometrics, and sport-specific training are central components of this phase. Conclusion: The rehabilitation guidelines discussed may assist clinicians in managing syndesmotic ankle sprains. PMID:23015976

  9. Impact of the difference in the plantar flexor strength of the ankle joint in the affected side among hemiplegic patients on the plantar pressure and walking asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    You, Young Youl; Chung, Sin Ho; Lee, Hyung Jin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was to examine the changes in the gait lines and plantar pressures in static and dynamic circumstances, according to the differences in the strengths of the plantar flexors in the ankle joints on the affected sides of hemiplegic patients, and to determine their impacts on walking symmetry. [Subjects and Methods] A total of thirty hospitalized stroke patients suffering from hemiplegia were selected in this study. The subjects had ankylosing patterns in the ankle joints of the affected sides. Fifteen of the patients had plantar flexor manual muscle testing scores between poor and fair, while fifteen of the patients had zero and trace. [Results] The contact pattern of the plantar surface with the ground is a reliable method for walking analysis, which is an important index for understanding the ankle mechanism and the relationship between the plantar surface and the ground. [Conclusion] The functional improvement of patients with stroke could be supported through a verification of the analysis methods of the therapy strategy and walking pattern. PMID:27942112

  10. Impact of the difference in the plantar flexor strength of the ankle joint in the affected side among hemiplegic patients on the plantar pressure and walking asymmetry.

    PubMed

    You, Young Youl; Chung, Sin Ho; Lee, Hyung Jin

    2016-11-01

    [Purpose] This study was to examine the changes in the gait lines and plantar pressures in static and dynamic circumstances, according to the differences in the strengths of the plantar flexors in the ankle joints on the affected sides of hemiplegic patients, and to determine their impacts on walking symmetry. [Subjects and Methods] A total of thirty hospitalized stroke patients suffering from hemiplegia were selected in this study. The subjects had ankylosing patterns in the ankle joints of the affected sides. Fifteen of the patients had plantar flexor manual muscle testing scores between poor and fair, while fifteen of the patients had zero and trace. [Results] The contact pattern of the plantar surface with the ground is a reliable method for walking analysis, which is an important index for understanding the ankle mechanism and the relationship between the plantar surface and the ground. [Conclusion] The functional improvement of patients with stroke could be supported through a verification of the analysis methods of the therapy strategy and walking pattern.

  11. [The effects of electro-acupuncture on the signaling pathway of TLR/MYD88 in ankle joint synovial tissue of acute gouty arthritis rats].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao-nan; Huang, Xue-kuan; Luo, Yan; Jiang, Juan; Wan, Lei; Wang, Ling

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the effects of electro-acupuncture ( EA) on the related protein expression of the signaling pathway of the toll-like receptor2 (TLR2)/myeloid differentiation factor (MYD) 88 in ankle joint synovial tissue of acute gouty arthritis (AGA) rats. Fifty male SD rats were randomly divided into 5 groups: normal group, SMD group, AGA model group, medication group and EA group, 10 rats in each group. SMD group established model by inducing SMD, other groups established AGA model by inducing monosodium urate, except the normal group. Two days before model was established, normal and SMD and AGA model groups were lavaged with normal saline (20 mL/kg), medication group was lavaged with colchicine solution (1 mg/kg), EA (1. 5-2 Hz, D.-D. wave, 9 V, 1-3 mA) was applied to"Sanyinjiao" (SP6),"Jiexi"(ST41) and "kunlun" (BL60) for 20 min, once daily, continuously for 9 days. Then the join sewlling index was observed periodically, the protein expression of TLR2 and MYD88 was determined by immunohistochemistry. Compared to the normal group, the join sewlling of the SMD group in test join increased significantly (P<0. 05) and the protein expression of TLR2 and MYD88 in synovial tissue has not statistically significant (P>0.05), the oin sewlling and protein expression of TLR2 and MYD88 in synovial tissue of model group increased significantly P<0. 05); The medication and EA group compared to the model group, the protein expression of TLR2 and MYD88 in synovial tissue decreased significantly (P <0. 05), the join sewlling in test join decreased significantly P<1. 05); There were not statistically significant between the EA group and the medication group (P>0.05). EA can alleviate the symptoms of AGA, which may be related to regulation of the protein expression Y TRI and MYD88 in the TLR/MYD88 signaling pathway.

  12. MRI of the ankle joint in healthy non-athletes and in marathon runners: image quality issues at 7.0 T compared to 1.5 T.

    PubMed

    Theysohn, J M; Kraff, O; Maderwald, S; Kokulinsky, P C; Ladd, M E; Barkhausen, J; Ladd, S C

    2013-02-01

    To present imaging characteristics of the ankle at 7.0 T and to investigate the appearance and image quality of presumed pathologies of ankles without physical strain as well as of ankles after a marathon run in comparison to 1.5 T. Appearance of presumed pathologic findings and image quality of TSE (PD, T2, and STIR) and GRE sequences (MEDIC, DESS, and/or CISS) at 7.0 T and 1.5 T MRI were compared by two senior radiologists in consensus in two healthy controls without strain and in six marathon runners after a full-length marathon (eight males, mean age 49.1 years). Overall, 7.0 T MRI allowed for higher resolution images for most of the sequences while requiring comparable acquisition times and achieving high contrast images mainly in gradient echo sequences. Bursal or presumed peritendineal fluid and/or edematous tissue, which were found in seven of eight subjects, could be best appreciated with 7.0 T MEDIC. Other findings with sharper delineation at 7.0 T included cartilage defects (best: CISS), osseous avulsions, and osteophytes (best: DESS). Nevertheless, 1.5 T STIR imaging enabled assessment of a tibiotalar bone edema-like lesion in two runners, which was barely visible at 7.0 T using STIR, but not with any other sequence at 7.0 T including MEDIC (with frequency selective fat suppression). 7.0 T showed larger image quality variations with challenges especially in the TSE sequences. Our initial results of ultra-high-field ankle joint imaging demonstrate the improved depiction of ankle anatomy, fluid depositions, and cartilage defects. However imaging of edema-like bone lesions remains challenging at ultra-high magnetic field strength, and TSE coverage in particular is limited by the specific absorption rate.

  13. [The Use of Pedobarographic Examination to Biomechanical Evaluation of Foot and Ankle Joint in Adult - Own Experience].

    PubMed

    Lorkowski, Jacek; Grzegorowska, Oliwia; Kotela, Ireneusz

    2015-01-01

    A non-invasive method, that can be used to describe the underfoot pressure distribution during stance and gait, is pedobarography. This examination helps to describe biomechanics of foot and ankle. It has been used to diagnose foot disorders, assess the disease progression, monitor the progress of rehabilitation and also evaluate the effectivness of undergone surgical treatment. In this article we describe chosen issues of pedobarographic examination in diagnostics and treatment of foot and ankle in adults. We base on our own experience (about 10 thousand examinations) and review of literature. In our opinion, pedobarography should be used in diagnostics and treatment of foot and ankle more often and widely than now.

  14. Posterior ankle impingement syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maquirriain, Javier

    2005-10-01

    Posterior ankle impingement syndrome is a clinical disorder characterized by posterior ankle pain that occurs in forced plantar flexion. The pain may be acute as a result of trauma or chronic from repetitive stress. Pathology of the os trigonum-talar process is the most common cause of this syndrome, but it also may result from flexor hallucis longus tenosynovitis, ankle osteochondritis, subtalar joint disease, and fracture. Patients usually report chronic or recurrent posterior ankle pain caused or exacerbated by forced plantar flexion or push-off maneuvers, such as may occur during dancing, kicking, or downhill running. Diagnosis of posterior ankle impingement syndrome is based primarily on clinical history and physical examination. Radiography, scintigraphy, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging depict associated bone and soft-tissue abnormalities. Symptoms typically improve with nonsurgical management, but surgery may be required in refractory cases.

  15. Lubrication of the human ankle joint in walking with the synovial fluid filtrated by the cartilage with the surface zone worn out: steady pure sliding motion.

    PubMed

    Hlavácek, M

    1999-10-01

    A mixture model of synovial fluid filtration by cartilage in the human ankle joint during walking is presented for steady sliding motion of the articular surfaces. In the paper the cartilage surface zone is assumed worn out. The same model has been recently applied to the squeeze-film problem for the human hip joint loaded by the body weight during standing (Hlavácek, Journal of Biomechanics 26, 1145-1150, 1151-1160, 1993; Hlavácek and Novák, Journal of Biomechanics 28, 1193-1198, 1199-1205, 1995). The linear biphasic model for cartilage (elastic porous matrix + ideal fluid) due to Prof. V. C. Mow and his co-workers and the biphasic model for synovial fluid (viscous fluid + ideal fluid), as used in the above-mentioned squeeze-film problem, are applied. For the physiologic parameters of the ankle joint during walking, a continuous synovial fluid film about 1 microm thick is maintained under steady entraining motion according to the classical model without the fluid transport across the articular surface. This is not the case in the filtration model with the cartilage surface zones worn out. On the contrary, this filtration model indicates that synovial fluid is intensively filtrated by such cartilage, so that no continuous fluid film is maintained and a synovial gel layer, about 10(-8) m thick, develops over the majority of the contact. Thus, if the cartilage surface zones are worn out, boundary lubrication should prevail in the ankle joint under steady sliding motion for the mean values of loading and the sliding velocity encountered in walking cycle.

  16. Adaptive sports ankle prosthetics. Interview by Sarah A. Curran.

    PubMed

    Lyle, David K

    2012-09-01

    Participating in sport at all levels is gaining a dedicated following and this is also apparent in individuals with an amputation. Currently, there is a wide variety of ankle prostheses available which attempt to provide function, control, and comfort, as well as good aesthetic appeal. Participation in sport, however, increases the demands placed upon ankle prostheses. This can compromise function and performance, and constrain the opportunities of participation in various outdoor and water sports. In acknowledging this limitation and the need to develop more versatile ankle prostheses, this article introduces the evolution of a prototype ankle prosthesis referred to as "Adaptive Sports Ankle." The ankle prosthesis, which is compatible with any foot pyramid adapter, offers the same range of motion as the normal human ankle joint and is made up of components that are chemical and corrosion resistant. These design features that are specifically created to accommodate below-the-knee amputees provide an ideal prosthesis for those wishing to lead an active lifestyle and participate in aquatic (i.e. swimming, surfing, and scuba diving), snowboarding, and equestrian activities. Although it is acknowledged that there is a need to establish research on the Adaptive Sports Ankle, its introduction to the market will enhance and expand opportunities of those individuals with a lower limb amputation to lead an active and healthy lifestyle.

  17. Gastrocnemius Stretching Program: More Effective in Increasing Ankle/Rear-Foot Dorsiflexion When Subtalar Joint Positioned in Pronation Than in Supination.

    PubMed

    Johanson, Marie A; Armstrong, Megan; Hopkins, Chris; Keen, Meghan L; Robinson, Michael; Stephenson, Scott

    2015-08-01

    Stretching exercises are commonly prescribed for patients and healthy individuals with limited extensibility of the gastrocnemius muscle. To determine if individuals demonstrate more dorsiflexion at the ankle/rear foot and less at the midfoot after a gastrocnemius-stretching program with the subtalar joint (STJ) positioned in supination compared with pronation. Randomized controlled trial. Biomechanical laboratory. 22 volunteers with current or recent history of lower-extremity cumulative trauma and gastrocnemius tightness (10 women and 4 men, mean age 28 y) randomly assigned to stretching groups with the STJ positioned in either pronation (n = 11) or supination (n = 11). 3-wk home gastrocnemius-stretching program using a template to place the subtalar joint in either a pronated or a supinated position. A 7-camera Vicon motion-analysis system measured ankle/ rear-foot dorsiflexion and midfoot dorsiflexion of all participants during stretching with the STJ positioned in both pronation and supination before and after the 3-wk gastrocnemius-stretching program. A 2-way mixed-model ANOVA revealed a significant interaction (P = .019). At posttest, the group who performed the 3-week stretching program with the STJ positioned in pronation demonstrated more increased ankle/rear-foot dorsiflexion when measured with the STJ in pronation than the group who performed the 3-wk stretching program with the STJ positioned in supination. No significant main effect of stretching group or interaction for dorsiflexion at the midfoot was detected (P = .755 and P = .820, respectively). After a 3-wk gastrocnemius-stretching program, when measuring dorsiflexion with the STJ positioned in supination, the participants who completed a 3-wk gastrocnemius stretching program with the STJ positioned in pronation showed more increased dorsiflexion at the ankle/rear foot than participants who completed the stretching program with the STJ positioned in supination.

  18. Is it possible to decrease skin temperature with ice packs under casts and bandages? A cross-sectional, randomized trial on normal and swollen ankles.

    PubMed

    Okcu, Guvenir; Yercan, H S

    2006-12-01

    There is a general belief that the presence of a cast or a bandage eliminates the lowering effects of skin temperature when local cold therapy applied on the surface of the cast or bandage. The purpose of this study is to determine the magnitude of temperature changes at the skin of the ankle after the application of frozen ice packs to the surface of various casts and bandages both in normal and swollen ankles. Thirty-two healthy subjects (Group A) and 12 patients with Grade III inversion type acute ankle sprain (Group B) were randomly divided into four groups. The sensor of the digital thermometer was secured to the ankle over the anterior talo-fibular ligament in every subject before placement of a bandage or cast. Robert Jones bandage, elastic support bandage, a below-knee plaster cast and synthetic below-knee cast were applied in groups 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively. Two frozen ice packs were placed around the cast or bandage at the level of sensor, and skin temperatures were recorded. The skin temperature under dressings and casts decreased significantly relative to the baseline temperatures with local cold therapy in all groups. The fall in the temperature with cryotherapy in group A showed a three-phase pattern of change between groups 1 and 2, groups 2 and 3 and groups 2 and 4 during the experiment. The fall in the skin temperature with ice packs differed significantly between groups 1 and 3, and also groups 1 and 4 from the beginning till the end of the experiment. There was no significant difference between groups 3 and 4 in terms of skin temperature fall with cryotherapy during the whole experiment. The results were similar in group B. A bandage or cast does not prevent measurable skin temperature lowering by frozen ice packs both in normal and swollen ankles.

  19. Gain modulation of the middle latency cutaneous reflex in patients with chronic joint instability after ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Futatsubashi, Genki; Sasada, Shusaku; Tazoe, Toshiki; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the neural alteration of reflex pathways arising from cutaneous afferents in patients with chronic ankle instability. Cutaneous reflexes were elicited by applying non-noxious electrical stimulation to the sural nerve of subjects with chronic ankle instability (n=17) and control subjects (n=17) while sitting. Electromyographic (EMG) signals were recorded from each ankle and thigh muscle. The middle latency response (MLR; latency: 70-120 ms) component was analyzed. In the peroneus longus (PL) and vastus lateralis (VL) muscles, linear regression analyses between the magnitude of the inhibitory MLR and background EMG activity showed that, compared to the uninjured side and the control subjects, the gain of the suppressive MLR was increased in the injured side. This was also confirmed by the pooled data for both groups. The degree of MLR alteration was significantly correlated to that of chronic ankle instability in the PL. The excitability of middle latency cutaneous reflexes in the PL and VL is modulated in subjects with chronic ankle instability. Cutaneous reflexes may be potential tools to investigate the pathological state of the neural system that controls the lower limbs in subjects with chronic ankle instability. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Ankle Arthroscopic Reconstruction of Lateral Ligaments (Ankle Anti-ROLL)

    PubMed Central

    Takao, Masato; Glazebrook, Mark; Stone, James; Guillo, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Ankle instability is a condition that often requires surgery to stabilize the ankle joint that will improve pain and function if nonoperative treatments fail. Ankle stabilization surgery may be performed as a repair in which the native existing anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both) is imbricated or reattached. Alternatively, when native ankle ligaments are insufficient for repair, a reconstruction of the ligaments may be performed in which an autologous or allograft tendon is used to reconstruct the anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both). Currently, ankle stabilization surgery is most commonly performed through an open incision, but arthroscopic ankle stabilization using repair techniques has been described and is being used more often. We present our technique for anatomic ankle arthroscopic reconstruction of the lateral ligaments (anti-ROLL) performed in an all–inside-out manner that is likely safe for patients and minimally invasive. PMID:26900560

  1. Ankle Arthroscopic Reconstruction of Lateral Ligaments (Ankle Anti-ROLL).

    PubMed

    Takao, Masato; Glazebrook, Mark; Stone, James; Guillo, Stéphane

    2015-10-01

    Ankle instability is a condition that often requires surgery to stabilize the ankle joint that will improve pain and function if nonoperative treatments fail. Ankle stabilization surgery may be performed as a repair in which the native existing anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both) is imbricated or reattached. Alternatively, when native ankle ligaments are insufficient for repair, a reconstruction of the ligaments may be performed in which an autologous or allograft tendon is used to reconstruct the anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both). Currently, ankle stabilization surgery is most commonly performed through an open incision, but arthroscopic ankle stabilization using repair techniques has been described and is being used more often. We present our technique for anatomic ankle arthroscopic reconstruction of the lateral ligaments (anti-ROLL) performed in an all-inside-out manner that is likely safe for patients and minimally invasive.

  2. A Robot-Driven Computational Model for Estimating Passive Ankle Torque With Subject-Specific Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingming; Meng, Wei; Davies, T Claire; Zhang, Yanxin; Xie, Sheng Q

    2016-04-01

    Robot-assisted ankle assessment could potentially be conducted using sensor-based and model-based methods. Existing ankle rehabilitation robots usually use torquemeters and multiaxis load cells for measuring joint dynamics. These measurements are accurate, but the contribution as a result of muscles and ligaments is not taken into account. Some computational ankle models have been developed to evaluate ligament strain and joint torque. These models do not include muscles and, thus, are not suitable for an overall ankle assessment in robot-assisted therapy. This study proposed a computational ankle model for use in robot-assisted therapy with three rotational degrees of freedom, 12 muscles, and seven ligaments. This model is driven by robotics, uses three independent position variables as inputs, and outputs an overall ankle assessment. Subject-specific adaptations by geometric and strength scaling were also made to allow for a universal model. This model was evaluated using published results and experimental data from 11 participants. Results show a high accuracy in the evaluation of ligament neutral length and passive joint torque. The subject-specific adaptation performance is high, with each normalized root-mean-square deviation value less than 10%. This model could be used for ankle assessment, especially in evaluating passive ankle torque, for a specific individual. The characteristic that is unique to this model is the use of three independent position variables that can be measured in real time as inputs, which makes it advantageous over other models when combined with robot-assisted therapy.

  3. "One-step" bone marrow-derived cells transplantation and joint debridement for osteochondral lesions of the talus in ankle osteoarthritis: clinical and radiological outcomes at 36 months.

    PubMed

    Buda, Roberto; Castagnini, Francesco; Cavallo, Marco; Ramponi, Laura; Vannini, Francesca; Giannini, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    Ankle osteoarthritis (OA) is a challenging pathology, often requiring surgical treatments. In young patients, joint sparing, biologic procedures would be desirable. Recently, a few reports have described the efficacy of bone marrow stem cells in OA. Considering the good outcomes of one-step bone marrow derived cells transplantation (BMDCT) for osteochondral lesions of the talus (OLT), we applied this procedure for OLT in concomitant ankle OA. 56 patients, with a mean age of 35.6 years (range 16–50), who suffered from OLT and ankle OA, were treated using BMDCT. All patients were clinically checked using AOFAS score, in the pre-operative setting until the final follow-up of 36 months. Weight-bearing radiographs and MRI evaluation using Mocart score were performed, preoperatively and postoperatively. The whole clinical outcome had a remarkable improvement at 12 months, a further amelioration at 24 months and a lowering trend at 36 months (77.8 ± 18.3). Early OA had better outcomes. 16 patients required another treatment and they were considered failures. Clinical outcome significantly correlates with OA degree, BMI, associate procedures. Radiographs were in line with clinical results. MRI evaluation showed signs of osteochondral repair. BMDCT showed encouraging clinical and radiological outcomes at short-term follow-up. This procedure should be applied in young and selected patients, excluding severe ankle degeneration, where the results are critical. Longer follow-ups and larger case series are needed to confirm these results and if this treatment could be effective in postponing end-stage procedures. IV.

  4. Reconstruction of the varus ankle from soft-tissue procedures with osteotomy through arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    LaClair, Susan Mosier

    2007-03-01

    Cavovarus foot and ankle reconstruction is done to preserve motion whenever possible, and to maintain or impart stability, realigning foot and ankle joints into as anatomic a position as possible to restore a more normal mechanical axis to the extremity, and redistribute joint pressure or load more evenly. In patients who have a flexible deformity based on the Coleman block test, this is accomplished through calcaneal and metatarsal osteotomies to preserve joint motion, even in the presence of osteoarthritis. In cases of rigid and nonreducible deformity, the rigid cavovarus foot and ankle are addressed using a modified triple arthrodesis, an ankle arthrodesis, a tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis, or pantalar arthrodesis. In most patients, bony procedures are combined with soft-tissue realignment procedures.

  5. Functional Anatomy, Pathomechanics, and Pathophysiology of Lateral Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    Hertel, Jay

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To describe the functional anatomy of the ankle complex as it relates to lateral ankle instability and to describe the pathomechanics and pathophysiology of acute lateral ankle sprains and chronic ankle instability. Data Sources: I searched MEDLINE (1985–2001) and CINAHL (1982–2001) using the key words ankle sprain and ankle instability. Data Synthesis: Lateral ankle sprains are among the most common injuries incurred during sports participation. The ankle functions as a complex with contributions from the talocrural, subtalar, and inferior tibiofibular joints. Each of these joints must be considered in the pathomechanics and pathophysiology of lateral ankle sprains and chronic ankle instability. Lateral ankle sprains typically occur when the rearfoot undergoes excessive supination on an externally rotated lower leg. Recurrent ankle sprain is extremely common; in fact, the most common predisposition to suffering a sprain is the history of having suffered a previous ankle sprain. Chronic ankle instability may be due to mechanical instability, functional instability, or most likely, a combination of these 2 phenomena. Mechanical instability may be due to specific insufficiencies such as pathologic laxity, arthrokinematic changes, synovial irritation, or degenerative changes. Functional instability is caused by insufficiencies in proprioception and neuromuscular control. Conclusions/Recommendations: Lateral ankle sprains are often inadequately treated, resulting in frequent recurrence of ankle sprains. Appreciation of the complex anatomy and mechanics of the ankle joint and the pathomechanics and pathophysiology related to acute and chronic ankle instability is integral to the process of effectively evaluating and treating ankle injuries. PMID:12937557

  6. Joint attention studies in normal and autistic children using NIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Ujwal; Hall, Michael; Gutierrez, Anibal; Messinger, Daniel; Rey, Gustavo; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2011-03-01

    Autism is a socio-communication brain development disorder. It is marked by degeneration in the ability to respond to joint attention skill task, from as early as 12 to 18 months of age. This trait is used to distinguish autistic from nonautistic. In this study Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is being applied for the first time to study the difference in activation and connectivity in the frontal cortex of typically developing (TD) and autistic children between 4-8 years of age in response to joint attention task. The optical measurements are acquired in real time from frontal cortex using Imagent (ISS Inc.) - a frequency domain based NIRS system in response to video clips which engenders a feeling of joint attention experience in the subjects. A block design consisting of 5 blocks of following sequence 30 sec joint attention clip (J), 30 sec non-joint attention clip (NJ) and 30 sec rest condition is used. Preliminary results from TD child shows difference in brain activation (in terms of oxy-hemoglobin, HbO) during joint attention interaction compared to the nonjoint interaction and rest. Similar activation study did not reveal significant differences in HbO across the stimuli in, unlike in an autistic child. Extensive studies are carried out to validate the initial observations from both brain activation as well as connectivity analysis. The result has significant implication for research in neural pathways associated with autism that can be mapped using NIRS.

  7. Ankle dorsiflexion postburn scar contractures: anatomy and reconstructive techniques.

    PubMed

    Grishkevich, Viktor M

    2012-09-01

    Postburn ankle scar contractures cause functional limitations of all lower extremities and create a serious cosmetic defect, not allowing patients to use normal foot wear, and, therefore, needing surgical reconstruction. The anatomic features of ankle dorsiflexion contractures and their treatment have been covered in the literature far less than other joint contractures, and their treatment is still a challenge for many surgeons. A common treatment method is incisional release of the contracture and defect resurfacing with skin graft. Rarely, distally based sural or free flaps and Ilizarov fixator are used. Anatomy of postburn ankle scar contractures in 55 patients was studied and contractures were surgically treated using a specific approach and technique. Follow-up results were observed from 6 months to 16 years. According to the anatomic features, dorsiflexion scar contractures were divided into three types: edge, medial, and total. Edge contractures were caused by burns and scars located on the lateral or medial ankle surface and were characterized by the presence of the fold along the anterior edge ankle; the skin of the anterior ankle surface was not injured. Medial contractures were caused by scars located on the anterior ankle surface and were characterized by the presence of the fold along the medial ankle line. Total contractures were caused by scars tightly surrounding the ankle. In fold's sheets of edge and medial contractures there is a trapeze-shaped surface deficit in length (cause of contracture) and a surface surplus in width which allows contracture release with local trapezoid flaps. For total contractures, wide scar excision and skin grafting were indicated. Three anatomic types of ankle dorsiflexion scar contractures were identified: edge, medial, and total. An anatomically justified technique for edge and medial contractures is trapeze-flap plasty; total contractures are effectively eliminated with scar excision and skin grafting. Copyright

  8. Ankle Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... or outside of your ankle or along the Achilles tendon, which connects the muscles in your lower ... home. Accessed Dec. 15, 2015. Draper TR. Non-Achilles ankle tendinopathy. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed ...

  9. Biomechanics of the ankle-foot system during stair ambulation: implications for design of advanced ankle-foot prostheses.

    PubMed

    Sinitski, Emily H; Hansen, Andrew H; Wilken, Jason M

    2012-02-02

    Unilateral lower limb prosthesis users display temporal, kinematic, and kinetic asymmetries between limbs while ascending and descending stairs. These asymmetries are due, in part, to the inability of current prosthetic devices to effectively mimic normal ankle function. The purpose of this study was to provide a comprehensive set of biomechanical data for able-bodied and unilateral transtibial amputee (TTA) ankle-foot systems for level-ground (LG), stair ascent (SA), and stair descent (SD), and to characterize deviations from normal performance associated with prosthesis use. Ankle joint kinematics, kinetics, torque-angle curves, and effective shapes were calculated for twelve able-bodied individuals and twelve individuals with TTA. The data from this study demonstrated the prosthetic limb can more effectively mimic the range of motion and power output of a normal ankle-foot during LG compared to SA and SD. There were larger differences between the prosthetic and able-bodied limbs during SA and SD, most evident in the torque-angle curves and effective shapes. These data can be used by persons designing ankle-foot prostheses and provide comparative data for assessment of future ankle-foot prosthesis designs.

  10. Lower Mitochondrial Energy Production of the Thigh Muscles in Patients With Low-Normal Ankle-Brachial Index.

    PubMed

    AlGhatrif, Majd; Zane, Ariel; Oberdier, Matt; Canepa, Marco; Studenski, Stephanie; Simonsick, Eleanor; Spencer, Richard G; Fishbein, Kenneth; Reiter, David; Lakatta, Edward G; McDermott, Mary M; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2017-08-30

    Lower muscle mitochondrial energy production may contribute to impaired walking endurance in patients with peripheral arterial disease. A borderline ankle-brachial index (ABI) of 0.91 to 1.10 is associated with poorer walking endurance compared with higher ABI. We hypothesized that in the absence of peripheral arterial disease, lower ABI is associated with lower mitochondrial energy production. We examined 363 men and women participating in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging with an ABI between 0.90 and 1.40. Muscle mitochondrial energy production was assessed by post-exercise phosphocreatine recovery rate constant (kPCr) measured by phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the left thigh. A lower post-exercise phosphocreatine recovery rate constant reflects decreased mitochondria energy production.The mean age of the participants was 71±12 years. A total of 18.4% had diabetes mellitus and 4% were current and 40% were former smokers. Compared with participants with an ABI of 1.11 to 1.40, those with an ABI of 0.90 to 1.10 had significantly lower post-exercise phosphocreatine recovery rate constant (19.3 versus 20.8 ms(-1), P=0.015). This difference remained significant after adjusting for age, sex, race, smoking status, diabetes mellitus, body mass index, and cholesterol levels (P=0.028). Similarly, post-exercise phosphocreatine recovery rate constant was linearly associated with ABI as a continuous variable, both in the ABI ranges of 0.90 to 1.40 (standardized coefficient=0.15, P=0.003) and 1.1 to 1.4 (standardized coefficient=0.12, P=0.0405). An ABI of 0.90 to 1.10 is associated with lower mitochondrial energy production compared with an ABI of 1.11 to 1.40. These data demonstrate adverse associations of lower ABI values with impaired mitochondrial activity even within the range of a clinically accepted definition of a normal ABI. Further study is needed to determine whether interventions in persons with ABIs of 0.90 to 1.10 can prevent subsequent

  11. The effect of damping in prosthetic ankle and knee joints on the biomechanical outcomes: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Safaeepour, Zahra; Eshraghi, Arezoo; Geil, Mark

    2017-08-01

    Given the growing number of variable-damping prosthetic knee and ankle components and broad number of potential biomechanical outcomes, a systematic review is needed to assess advantages of damped knee and ankle units over non-damped prostheses. This study provides an overview of the biomechanical outcomes associated with the use of prosthetic knees and ankles with damping mechanisms in individuals with lower limb amputation. Literature review. A systematic search was performed through PubMed, Science Direct, Web of Science, Cochrane, and Scopus databases from June 1994 to March 2016. The level of evidence of each article was assessed using a 13-element checklist for evaluating non-randomized controlled trials for quality assessment. Afterward, the studies were classified as A-level, B-level, or C-level based on total score and positive scores from certain key categories. In total, 22 papers remained for the quality assessment based on the inclusion criteria. In total, 15 studies scored sufficiently high quality scores to be classified. One article scored as A-level, eight as B-level, and six as C-level. In total, 10 studied knees and 5 examined ankles. Sample sizes ranged from 5 to 28 subjects. Available studies were evaluated in detail and biomechanical outcomes were extracted from the studies that met criteria. Results of this review indicate that study methodology and outcome measures were heterogeneous across reviewed papers. This could be an explanation for inconsistent findings of the reviewed studies. Only self-selected gait speed showed a consistent difference when dampers were applied to the leg. Thus, further research is required in this area. Clinical relevance This study provides an overview of evidence related to prosthetic knee and foot/ankle components with damping attachments. Research related to biomechanical outcomes is of great importance for researchers and practitioners in this area. The studies drew mixed conclusions, but walking speed was

  12. Long Term Effects of Orthoses Use on the Changes of Foot and Ankle Joint Motions of Spastic CP Children.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xue-Cheng; Embrey, David; Tassone, Channing; Zvara, Kim; Brandsma, Brenna; Lyon, Roger; Goodfriend, Karin; Tarima, Sergey; Thometz, John

    2017-08-31

    Orthoses are commonly prescribed to children with cerebral palsy (CP) in order to provide foot correction and to improve ambulatory function. Immediate effects of ankle foot orthosis (AFOs) have been investigated, but long term kinematic effects are lacking clinical evidence. To determine changes in pediatric patients with Cerebral Palsy's 3D ankle and foot segment motion between initial, and follow up visits (18 month average time differences) in both barefoot gait and gait with their ankle foot orthotic (AFO). We will also investigate intra visit changes between barefoot and AFO gait. A prospective cohort study. Children's Hospital of Wisconsin, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. Medical College of Wisconsin. A total of 23 children with CP, mean age 10.5 years (6.2 to 18.1) were clinically prescribed either a solid ankle foot orthotic (SAFO), hinged ankle foot orthotic (HAFO), or supramalleolar orthotic (SMO). Holes were cut in the study orthoses so that electromagnetic markers could be directly placed on the skin. A 6 foot segment model (6SF) was used. Kinematic and kinetic data was recorded for each patient's initial and follow up visit (18 month follow up average, 15 to 20 months range) RESULTS: For the SAFO group (gait with AFO), a significant decrease in dorsiflexion was found between the initial and third visit (p=.008). Furthermore, the SAFO group (barefoot gait), had an increased eversion at the midfoot for most of the gait cycle (p < .008). Sagittal forefoot ROM is reduced for all three groups between the barefoot and AFO groups. Use of AFOs long term either maintained or improved foot deformities or dysfunction. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Greyscale and power Doppler ultrasonographic evaluation of normal synovial joints: correlation with pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and angiogenic factors.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, Joanne; Kane, David

    2015-03-01

    US is a promising tool in evaluating RA synovitis, but abnormal US findings have been reported in small subsets of normal joints in healthy subjects. This study aimed to systematically assess greyscale US (GSUS) and power Doppler US (PDUS) findings in 40 peripheral joints-the 28-joint DAS (DAS28) set, ankles and MTP joints-in healthy subjects. A composite score of abnormal US findings in 40 joints was compared with serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. US of 60 standard views in 40 joints was performed in 30 healthy subjects (total 3600 images). GSUS and PDUS were scored semi-quantitatively (0-3). Serum samples were obtained at the time of US and analysed for IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, VEGF, TNF-α and IFN-γ using biochip array technology. GSUS abnormalities were more frequent than PDUS abnormalities [mean total GSUS score = 20.07 (range 6-45; maximum potential score = 180), mean total PDUS score = 4.8 (range 0-13)]. GSUS score increased with increasing age (Spearman's ρ = 0.383, P = 0.037). A PDUS signal >1 was observed only in the wrist (8%) and MTP1 (3%). GSUS scores did not correlate with any pro-inflammatory cytokine level. The total PDUS score correlated significantly with serum VEGF (r = 0.395, P = 0.046). PDUS signals >1 are rarely seen in normal synovial joints. GSUS synovitis, but not PDUS, may reflect age-related joint changes. PDUS correlated with VEGF, providing further evidence of a central role for VEGF in synovial neo-angiogenesis. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Therapeutic Interventions for Increasing Ankle Dorsiflexion After Ankle Sprain: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Terada, Masafumi; Pietrosimone, Brian G.; Gribble, Phillip A.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Clinicians perform therapeutic interventions, such as stretching, manual therapy, electrotherapy, ultrasound, and exercises, to increase ankle dorsiflexion. However, authors of previous studies have not determined which intervention or combination of interventions is most effective. Objective: To determine the magnitude of therapeutic intervention effects on and the most effective therapeutic interventions for restoring normal ankle dorsiflexion after ankle sprain. Data Sources: We performed a comprehensive literature search in Web of Science and EBSCO HOST from 1965 to May 29, 2011, with 19 search terms related to ankle sprain, dorsiflexion, and intervention and by cross-referencing pertinent articles. Study Selection: Eligible studies had to be written in English and include the means and standard deviations of both pretreatment and posttreatment in patients with acute, subacute, or chronic ankle sprains. Outcomes of interest included various joint mobilizations, stretching, local vibration, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, electrical stimulation, and mental-relaxation interventions. Data Extraction: We extracted data on dorsiflexion improvements among various therapeutic applications by calculating Cohen d effect sizes with associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and evaluated the methodologic quality using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale. Data Synthesis: In total, 9 studies (PEDro score = 5.22 ± 1.92) met the inclusion criteria. Static-stretching interventions with a home exercise program had the strongest effects on increasing dorsiflexion in patients 2 weeks after acute ankle sprains (Cohen d = 1.06; 95% CI = 0.12, 2.42). The range of effect sizes for movement with mobilization on ankle dorsiflexion among individuals with recurrent ankle sprains was small (Cohen d range = 0.14 to 0.39). Conclusions: Static-stretching intervention as a part of standardized care yielded the strongest effects on dorsiflexion after acute ankle sprains. The

  15. Relationship between activation of ankle muscles and quasi-joint stiffness in early and middle stances during gait in patients with hemiparesis.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Yusuke; Muraki, Takayuki; Tanaka, Naofumi; Izumi, Shin-Ichi

    2015-09-01

    It is unclear whether muscle contraction is necessary to increase quasi-joint stiffness (QJS) of the ankle joint during gait in patients with hemiparesis. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between QJS and muscle activation at the ankle joint in the stance phase during gait in patients with hemiparesis. Spatiotemporal and kinetic gait parameters and activation of the medial head of the gastrocnemius (MG), soleus (SOL), and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles were measured using a 3-dimensional motion analysis system and surface electromyography, in 21 patients with hemiparesis due to stroke and 10 healthy individuals. In the early stance, the QJS on the paretic side (PS) of patients was greater than that on the non-PS (p<0.05) and not significantly correlated with activation of the three muscles. In the middle stance, the QJS on the PS was lower than that on the non-PS (p<0.05) and that on the right side of controls (p<0.001), which was positively correlated with activation of the MG (r=0.51, p<0.05) and SOL (r=0.49, p<0.05). In the patients with hemiparesis, plantarflexor activation may not contribute to QJS in the early stance. On the other hand, QJS in the middle stance may be attributed to activation of the MG and SOL. Our findings suggest that activation of the MG and SOL in the middle stance on the PS may require to be enhanced to increase QJS during gait in patients with hemiparesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Arthroscopic Talar Dome Access Using a Standard Versus Wire-Based Traction Method for Ankle Joint Distraction.

    PubMed

    Barg, Alexej; Saltzman, Charles L; Beals, Timothy C; Bachus, Kent N; Blankenhorn, Brad D; Nickisch, Florian

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the accessibility of the talar dome through anterior and posterior portals for ankle arthroscopy with the standard noninvasive distraction versus wire-based longitudinal distraction using a tensioned wire placed transversely through the calcaneal tuberosity. Seven matched pairs of thigh-to-foot specimens underwent ankle arthroscopy with 1 of 2 methods of distraction: a standard noninvasive strapping technique or a calcaneal tuberosity wire-based technique. The order of the arthroscopic approach and use of a distraction method was randomly determined. The areas accessed from both 2-portal anterior and 2-portal posterior approaches were determined by using a molded translucent grid. The mean talar surface accessible by anterior ankle arthroscopy was comparable with noninvasive versus calcaneal wire distraction with 57.8% ± 17.2% (range, 32.9% to 75.7%) versus 61.5% ± 15.2% (range, 38.5% to 79.1%) of the talar dome, respectively (P = .590). The use of calcaneal wire distraction significantly improved posterior talar dome accessibility compared with noninvasive distraction, with 56.4% ± 20.0% (range, 14.4% to 78.0%) versus 39.8% ± 14.9% (range, 20.0% to 57.6%) of the talar dome, respectively (P = .031). Under the conditions studied, our cadaveric model showed equivalent talar dome access with 2-portal anterior arthroscopy of calcaneal wire-based distraction versus noninvasive strap distraction, but improved access for 2-portal posterior arthroscopy with calcaneal wire-based distraction versus noninvasive strap distraction. The posterior 40% of the talar dome is difficult to access via anterior ankle arthroscopy. Posterior calcaneal tuberosity wire-based longitudinal distraction improved arthroscopic access to the centro-posterior talar dome with a posterior arthroscopic approach. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Intraoperative assessment of the stability of the distal tibiofibular joint in supination-external rotation injuries of the ankle: sensitivity, specificity, and reliability of two clinical tests.

    PubMed

    Pakarinen, Harri; Flinkkilä, Tapio; Ohtonen, Pasi; Hyvönen, Pekka; Lakovaara, Martti; Leppilahti, Juhana; Ristiniemi, Jukka

    2011-11-16

    This study was designed to assess the sensitivity, specificity, and interobserver reliability of the hook test and the stress test for the intraoperative diagnosis of instability of the distal tibiofibular joint following fixation of ankle fractures resulting from supination-external rotation forces. We conducted a prospective study of 140 patients with an unstable unilateral ankle fracture resulting from a supination-external rotation mechanism (Lauge-Hansen SE). After internal fixation of the malleolar fracture, a hook test and an external rotation stress test under fluoroscopy were performed independently by the lead surgeon and assisting surgeon, followed by a standardized 7.5-Nm external rotation stress test of each ankle under fluoroscopy. A positive stress test result was defined as a side-to-side difference of >2 mm in the tibiotalar or the tibiofibular clear space on mortise radiographs. The sensitivity and specificity of each test were calculated with use of the standardized 7.5-Nm external rotation stress test as a reference. Twenty-four (17%) of the 140 patients had a positive standardized 7.5-Nm external rotation stress test after internal fixation of the malleolar fracture. The hook test had a sensitivity of 0.25 (95% confidence interval, 0.12 to 0.45) and a specificity of 0.98 (95% confidence interval, 0.94 to 1.0) for the detection of the same instabilities. The external rotation stress test had a sensitivity of 0.58 (95% confidence interval, 0.39 to 0.76) and a specificity of 0.96 (95% confidence interval, 0.90 to 0.98). Both tests had excellent interobserver reliability, with 99% agreement for the hook test and 98% for the stress test. Interobserver agreement for the hook test and the clinical stress test was excellent, but the sensitivity of these tests was insufficient to adequately detect instability of the syndesmosis intraoperatively.

  18. Objective roentgenologic measurements of the influence of ankle braces on pathologic joint mobility. A comparison of 9 braces.

    PubMed

    Vaes, P; Duquet, W; Handelberg, F; Casteleyn, P P; Van Tiggelen, R; Opdecam, P

    1998-06-01

    The stabilizing effect of external support (taping and nine different ankle braces) was tested in a total of 220 functionally unstable ankles. A standard surface EMG controlled stress Roentgen test protocol was used, measuring talar tilt (TT) without support and with tape bandage or brace. Different levels of TT restraining by external support could be identified. Tape bandage and two braces had a highly significant influence on the talar tilt. The mean TT without support was decreased by using from 13.4 degrees to 4.9 degrees, by using one brace to 4.8 degrees and by using another brace to 5.9 degrees. These two braces are effective for protection during functional treatment. A classification into three grades of effectiveness is proposed. It is concluded that the stabilizing influence offered by bandages and braces should be measured before using the external support as a treatment device for acute ankle sprain and as a reliable protection against sprain injuries in daily living and sports.

  19. An exoskeleton using controlled energy storage and release to aid ankle propulsion.

    PubMed

    Wiggin, M Bruce; Sawicki, Gregory S; Collins, Steven H

    2011-01-01

    Symmetric ankle propulsion is the cornerstone of efficient human walking. The ankle plantar flexors provide the majority of the mechanical work for the step-to-step transition and much of this work is delivered via elastic recoil from the Achilles' tendon - making it highly efficient. Even though the plantar flexors play a central role in propulsion, body-weight support and swing initiation during walking, very few assistive devices have focused on aiding ankle plantarflexion. Our goal was to develop a portable ankle exoskeleton taking inspiration from the passive elastic mechanisms at play in the human triceps surae-Achilles' tendon complex during walking. The challenge was to use parallel springs to provide ankle joint mechanical assistance during stance phase but allow free ankle rotation during swing phase. To do this we developed a novel `smart-clutch' that can engage and disengage a parallel spring based only on ankle kinematic state. The system is purely passive - containing no motors, electronics or external power supply. This `energy-neutral' ankle exoskeleton could be used to restore symmetry and reduce metabolic energy expenditure of walking in populations with weak ankle plantar flexors (e.g. stroke, spinal cord injury, normal aging). © 2011 IEEE

  20. Three-dimensional analysis of foot motion after uphill walking with mobilization with movement using tape applied to the talocrural joint in women with limited ankle dorsiflexion.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ji-yeon; Oh, Jae-seop; An, Duk-hyun

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies that investigated mobilization with movement (MWM) treatment assessed only improvements in passive range of motion (ROM). No information is currently available regarding the efficacy of modified MWM by application of tape. Therefore, we investigated the effect of uphill walking with modified MWM using tape applied to the talocrural joint (uphill walking with MWM taping) in women with limited ankle dorsiflexion. Twelve feet of 12 women with ankle dorsiflexion < 8 degrees were studied. Passive ROM measured using a goniometer was used to select participants. Participants walked on a level walkway under 3 conditions: before exercise, after uphill walking, and after uphill walking with MWM taping. The Oxford Foot Model using 3D motion analysis system was used to examine dynamic foot kinematics, and statistical significance was determined by 1-way repeated-measures analysis of variance. After uphill walking with MWM taping, peak hindfoot dorsiflexion relative to the tibia was significantly greater than that before exercise and after uphill walking. Furthermore, peak forefoot plantarflexion relative to the hindfoot, peak hindfoot plantarflexion relative to the tibia, and backward tilt of the tibia were greater than those before exercise. Uphill walking with MWM taping resulted in an immediate alteration in foot motion during walking, increasing hindfoot dorsiflexion in particular. Further studies are needed to investigate the long-term effects of uphill walking with MWM taping and its potential use in rehabilitation training. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Total ankle replacement - surgical treatment and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Prusinowska, Agnieszka; Krogulec, Zbigniew; Turski, Piotr; Przepiórski, Emil; Małdyk, Paweł; Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Functions of the ankle joint are closely connected with the gait and ability to maintain an upright position. Degenerative lesions of the joint directly contribute to postural disorders and greatly restrict propulsion of the foot, thus leading to abnormal gait. Development of total ankle replacement is connected with the use of the method as an efficient treatment of joint injuries and continuation of achievements in hip and knee surgery. The total ankle replacement technique was introduced as an alternative to arthrodesis, i.e. surgical fixation, which made it possible to preserve joint mobility and to improve gait. Total ankle replacement is indicated in post-traumatic degenerative joint disease and joint destruction secondary to rheumatoid arthritis. In this paper, total ankle replacement and various types of currently used endoprostheses are discussed. The authors also describe principles of early postoperative rehabilitation as well as rehabilitation in the outpatient setting.

  2. Thromboembolic complications after an ankle joint open fracture in a patient with a history of deep vein thrombosis in the lower limbs.

    PubMed

    Stankowski, Tomasz; Aboul-Hassan, Sleiman Sebastian; Stępiński, Piotr; Szymańska, Anna; Marczak, Jakub; Cichoń, Romuald

    2017-03-01

    A 55-year-old patient was admitted to the Department of Orthopedics due to an open fracture in the right ankle joint. On the seventh day of hospitalization the patient experienced a transient ischemic attack. During the next day, dyspnea, chest pain and a 'rider' type pulmonary embolism in the pulmonary trunk occluding both pulmonary arteries and its branches were diagnosed. The patient was transferred to the Department of Cardiac Surgery. He underwent pulmonary embolectomy for massive pulmonary, right and left atrial embolism, and left ventricular embolism. ASD II was closed during this procedure. Ultrasonography with Doppler was performed 6 days after the surgery and revealed deep vein thrombosis, so the patient was transferred to the Department of Vascular Surgery for temporary inferior vena cava filter placement at the time of orthopedic surgery. The next day after implantation of the filter, the lower limb was operated on, and 14 days after orthopedic surgery, the vena cava filter was removed.

  3. Apparatus to measure simultaneously 14 isometric leg joint moments. Part 1: Design and calibration of six-axis transducers for the forces and moments at the ankle.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, N N; Munih, M; Perkins, T A; Wood, D E

    1999-03-01

    An apparatus has been developed for making isometric measurements of the joint moments corresponding to the 14 degrees of freedom of the legs, in postures ranging between sitting and near full extension. The apparatus is called the multi-moment chair system (MMCS) and is described in the companion paper. This paper describes the most critical components of the MMCS, which are the six-axis transducers for measuring the force and moment components on the plantar-flexion axis of each ankle while the feet are laced into fixed shoes. The transducers are made of steel bars, on which strain gauges are mounted, joined by clamps. The design of the transducer and methods of calibration and error estimation are described. The RMS errors are less than 2 N for the forces and 1 Nm for the moments, but these may be correlated. A method for error reduction that compensates for the finite compliance of the transducer does not reduce the measured errors.

  4. Joint Hypermobility and Joint Range of Motion in Young Dancers.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Nili; Hershkovitz, Israel; Zeev, Aviva; Rothschild, Bruce; Siev-Ner, Itzhak

    2016-06-01

    Joint range of motion (ROM) refers to the extent of movement of the joint, recorded using standard goniometers. Joint hypermobility (JHM) is a condition in which most of the synovial joints move beyond the "normal" limits. Joint hypermobility is recognized as a feature of heritable disorders of the connective tissue and can be identified mostly by the Beighton scale. Data on the possible relationship between JHM and joint ROM are lacking in the literature. The main objective of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between JHM and joint ROM in the different lower-extremity joints in young dancers. Joint hypermobility and ROM were assessed among 240 female dancers, aged 8 to 16 years, and 226 nondancers of similar age. The prevalence of JHM is significantly higher among dancers compared with the control subjects (P < 0.001). Joints' ROM is higher among dancers with JHM compared with dancers without JHM (P < 0.05). This phenomenon, however, is age dependent; as in young dancers (aged 8-10 years), this pertains only to the ankle dorsiflexion ROM. In adolescent dancers (aged 11-13 years), this relationship has been observed in most joints: ankle/foot en pointe, ankle dorsiflexion, hip external rotation, hip abduction, and hip extension. In mature dancers (aged 14-16 years), dancers with JHM had greater ROM in ankle/foot en pointe, hip abduction, and knee flexion (P < 0.05). (1) Joint ROM and JHM are associated one with the other; (2) the relationship between joint ROM and JHM is age dependent; and (3) JHM is common among young nonprofessional dancers compared with control subjects. The main clinical implications of the current study are to try and reduce the risk of injuries among JHM dancers by developing proprioceptive trainings to improve the correct alignment of the hyperextended joints, to increase their muscle strength for better stabilization of the hypermobile joints, and to provide them additional balancing and stabilizing exercises for their

  5. Reliability of sagittal plane hip, knee, and ankle joint angles from a single frame of video data using the GAITRite camera system.

    PubMed

    Ross, Sandy A; Rice, Clinton; Von Behren, Kristyn; Meyer, April; Alexander, Rachel; Murfin, Scott

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish intra-rater, intra-session, and inter-rater, reliability of sagittal plane hip, knee, and ankle angles with and without reflective markers using the GAITRite walkway and single video camera between student physical therapists and an experienced physical therapist. This study included thirty-two healthy participants age 20-59, stratified by age and gender. Participants performed three successful walks with and without markers applied to anatomical landmarks. GAITRite software was used to digitize sagittal hip, knee, and ankle angles at two phases of gait: (1) initial contact; and (2) mid-stance. Intra-rater reliability was more consistent for the experienced physical therapist, regardless of joint or phase of gait. Intra-session reliability was variable, the experienced physical therapist showed moderate to high reliability (intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.50-0.89) and the student physical therapist showed very poor to high reliability (ICC = 0.07-0.85). Inter-rater reliability was highest during mid-stance at the knee with markers (ICC = 0.86) and lowest during mid-stance at the hip without markers (ICC = 0.25). Reliability of a single camera system, especially at the knee joint shows promise. Depending on the specific type of reliability, error can be attributed to the testers (e.g. lack of digitization practice and marker placement), participants (e.g. loose fitting clothing) and camera systems (e.g. frame rate and resolution). However, until the camera technology can be upgraded to a higher frame rate and resolution, and the software can be linked to the GAITRite walkway, the clinical utility for pre/post measures is limited.

  6. Ultrasound of the elbow: Examination techniques and US appearance of the normal and pathologic joint.

    PubMed

    Draghi, F; Danesino, G M; de Gautard, R; Bianchi, S

    2007-06-01

    Ultrasound studies are frequently requested for the work-up of patients with local elbow pain, which is generally caused by overuse syndromes, trauma, inflammatory diseases, or neuropathies. The technique used to examine this joint will vary to some extent depending on the precise location of the pain and other clinical findings. The aim of this article is to describe the standard technique used for elbow ultrasound, the normal anatomy of the joint, and the appearance on ultrasound of normal elbow anatomy and the alterations associated with some of the more common disorders affecting this joint.

  7. Normal and abnormal temporomandibular joints as demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kreipke, D L; Conces, D J; Sondhi, A; Lappas, J C; Augustyn, G T

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was performed on two normal volunteer subjects and two symptomatic subjects using a 0.15 T resistive magnet. A spin echo pulse sequence with a TE of 38 ms and a TR of 500 ms was employed. The TMJ meniscus is a low signal structure, and the bilaminar zone behind it is a relatively high signal structure. In normal closed mouths, the demarcation between meniscus and bilaminar zone is located at the vertex position above the mandibular condyle. When the condyle translates, the posterior portion of the meniscus bulges into the joint space. Dislocated meniscus can be identified by a gray mass anterior to the condylar head. The joint space is filled with the higher signal of the bilaminar zone. In non-reducible dislocations, the meniscus remains anterior to the condylar head with opening of the mouth. Reduced dislocations appear similar to normal joints in the open mouth.

  8. Posterior tibial nerve lesions in ankle arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cugat, Ramon; Ares, Oscar; Cuscó, Xavier; Garcia, Montserrat; Samitier, Gonzalo; Seijas, Roberto

    2008-05-01

    Ankle arthroscopy provides a minimally invasive approach to the diagnosis and treatment of certain ankle disorders. Neurological complications resulting from ankle arthroscopy have been well documented in orthopaedic and podiatric literature. Owing to the superficial location of the ankle joint and the abundance of overlying periarticular neurovascular structures, complications reported in ankle arthroscopy are greater than those reported for other joints. In particular, all reported neurovascular injuries following ankle arthroscopy have been the direct result of distractor pin or portal placement. The standard posteromedial portal has recognized risks because of the proximity of the posterior neurovascular structures. There can be considerable variability in the course of these portals and their proximity to the neurovascular structures. We found one report of intra-articular damage to the posterior tibial nerve as a result of ankle arthroscopy in the English-language literature and we report this paper as a second case described in the literature.

  9. Effect of a 4-week balance exercise with medio-lateral unstable sole on ankle joint functional ability.

    PubMed

    Nam, Su-Bin; Choi, Bo-Ram

    2017-07-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of 4-week of balance exercise with medio-lateral unstable sole on ankle muscle activation and functional ability. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty university students without current or past ankle injuries were assigned to either an experimental group or control group. The experimental group participated in a balance exercise program 3 times a week over 4 weeks, which consisted of one-leg stands and semi-squat exercises with medio-lateral unstable sole. The control group continued with their regular life activities without participation in the program. Electromyographic activities of peroneus longus and brevis muscles were recorded during stair descending immediately before and after the exercise program. Functional balance was tested with the Star Excursion Balance test immediately before and after the exercise program. Paired t-tests were used to assess statistical significance. [Results] Activation of peroneus longus and brevis and Star Excursion Balance Test scores in both groups did not show a significant difference between pre- and post-exercise. [Conclusion] A future study is suggested with increased level of medio-lateral perturbation during outcome measurements and exercises with addition of supervision in the exercise training and home program.

  10. Acute ankle sprain: an update.

    PubMed

    Ivins, Douglas

    2006-11-15

    Acute ankle injury, a common musculoskeletal injury, can cause ankle sprains. Some evidence suggests that previous injuries or limited joint flexibility may contribute to ankle sprains. The initial assessment of an acute ankle injury should include questions about the timing and mechanism of the injury. The Ottawa Ankle and Foot Rules provide clinical guidelines for excluding a fracture in adults and children and determining if radiography is indicated at the time of injury. Reexamination three to five days after injury, when pain and swelling have improved, may help with the diagnosis. Therapy for ankle sprains focuses on controlling pain and swelling. PRICE (Protection, Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation) is a well-established protocol for the treatment of ankle injury. There is some evidence that applying ice and using nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs improves healing and speeds recovery. Functional rehabilitation (e.g., motion restoration and strengthening exercises) is preferred over immobilization. Superiority of surgical repair versus functional rehabilitation for severe lateral ligament rupture is controversial. Treatment using semirigid supports is superior to using elastic bandages. Support devices provide some protection against future ankle sprains, particularly in persons with a history of recurrent sprains. Ankle disk or proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation exercise regimens also may be helpful, although the literature supporting this is limited.

  11. Quantitative analysis of human ankle characteristics at different gait phases and speeds for utilizing in ankle-foot prosthetic design

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ankle characteristics vary in terms of gait phase and speed change. This study aimed to quantify the components of ankle characteristics, including quasi-stiffness and work in different gait phases and at various speeds. Methods The kinetic and kinematic data of 20 healthy participants were collected during normal gait at four speeds. Stance moment-angle curves were divided into three sub-phases including controlled plantarflexion, controlled dorsiflexion and powered plantarflexion. The slope of the moment-angle curves was quantified as quasi-stiffness. The area under the curves was defined as work. Results The lowest quasi-stiffness was observed in the controlled plantarflexion. The fitted line to moment-angle curves showed R2 > 0.8 at controlled dorsiflexion and powered plantarflexion. Quasi-stiffness was significantly different at different speeds (P = 0.00). In the controlled dorsiflexion, the ankle absorbed energy; by comparison, energy was generated in the powered plantarflexion. A negative work value was recorded at slower speeds and a positive value was observed at faster speeds. Ankle peak powers were increased with walking speed (P = 0.00). Conclusions Our findings suggested that the quasi-stiffness and work of the ankle joint can be regulated at different phases and speeds. These findings may be clinically applicable in the design and development of ankle prosthetic devices that can naturally replicate human walking at various gait speeds. PMID:24568175

  12. Ankle mechanics during sidestep cutting implicates need for 2-degrees of freedom powered ankle-foot prostheses.

    PubMed

    Ficanha, Evandro M; Rastgaar, Mohammad; Kaufman, Kenton R

    2015-01-01

    The ankle joint of currently available powered prostheses is capable of controlling one degree of freedom (DOF), focusing on improved mobility in the sagittal plane. To increase agility, the requirements of turning in prosthesis design need to be considered. Ankle kinematics and kinetics were studied during sidestep cutting and straight walking. There were no significant differences between the ankle sagittal plane mechanics when comparing sidestep cutting and straight walking; however, significant differences were observed in ankle frontal plane mechanics. During straight walking, the inversion-eversion (IE) angles were smaller than with sidestep cutting. The ankle that initiated the sidestep cutting showed progressively increasing inversion from 2 to 13 degrees while the following contralateral step showed progressively decreasing inversion from 8 to -4 degrees during normal walking speed. The changes in IE kinematics were the most significant during sidestep cutting compared with straight walking. The IE moments of the step that initiated the sidestep cutting were always in eversion, acting as a braking moment opposing the inverting motion. This suggests that an ankle-foot prosthesis with active DOFs in the sagittal and frontal planes will increase the agility of gait for patients with limb loss.

  13. [Development of the normal infantile hip joints assessed by MRI].

    PubMed

    Wierusz-Kozłowska, M; Ziemiański, A; Kruczyński, J; Borkowski, W

    2000-01-01

    The paper provides an overview of the time of appearance of the secondary ossification centers and closure of the growth plates of the acetabulum and proximal epiphysis of the femur: the triradiate cartilage, the acetabular roof growth cartilage, the subcapital growth cartilage, the growth cartilage of the major trochanter, the growth cartilage of the minor trochanter. The study is based upon 62 MRI scans of healthy hips in 45 patients aged 3-21. The examined hips showed no pathologic traits--neither in the MRI scan nor in X-ray investigation. In Spin Echo and Turbo Spin Echo sequential imaging all obtained slices were used, on GRADIENT ECHO: FISP 3D, FLASH 2D, and FLASH 3D FAT SAT only chosen slices were included in the study. This way the following results were obtained: the ossification center of the major trochanter appears at the age of 3 in girls and at the age of 6 in boys, while the ossification center of the minor trochanter appears at the age of 6 in both sexes. The times of complete ossification of following growth cartilages were observed: for the triradiate cartilage ossification was observed at age 12-15 in girls and 15-16 in boys; for the cartilage of the acetabular roof ossification was noted at age 12-15 in girls and 15-18 in boys; ossification in the subcapital growth cartilage occurred at age 15-17 in girls and 16-18 in boys; the major trochanter growth cartilage ossifies at age 15-16 in girls and 16-18 in boys; for the minor trochanter ossification of the growth cartilage occurs at age 14-16 in girls and at age 16-18 in boys. The secondary ossification center of the pubic bone appears at age 9-11 in girls and 13-16 in boys and the secondary ossification center of the acetabular roof appears at age 13-17 in girls and boys. This study expand our knowledge on the development of the hip joint and facilitate the assessment of hip pathology.

  14. Long-term follow-up on 33 TPR ankle joint replacements in 26 patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Niels C; Linde, Frank

    2009-01-01

    There exist very few long-term follow-up studies, on total ankle replacement (TAR). In the present study a cohort of rheumatoid arthritic (RA) were followed for up to 23 years. Thirty-three TAR were performed in 26 RA patients from 1980 to 1993. Removal of the prostheses and radiolucency was considered endpoints. All patients were followed to prosthesis failure or until death of the patients or until January 2008. Two patients with 3 prostheses were still alive with their prosthesis in place. Eighteen patients with 23 prostheses had died with their prosthesis in place. Two patients had their ipsilateral leg amputated 12 and 14 years after operation of unrelated causes. Five prostheses in 4 patients had been removed. The 10 years prosthesis survival was 85%, when removal is the endpoint. The long-term survival of this first generation type of TAR adds some optimism to the development of TAR.

  15. Restraining forces in various designs of knee ankle orthoses: their placement and effect on the anatomical knee joint.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, J F; Warren, C G

    1976-09-01

    A biochemical evaluation was conducted on double upright knee ankle orthoses, which were instrumented with strain gauge transducers to determine the magnitudes of the restraining forces exerted on the leg. Measurements were made on six commonly used designs of orthoses worn by spinal cord injured persons ambulating with a swing-through gait. The measurements were used to determine distribution of forces on the limb as well as their effect on anatomical knee shear. Based on the experimental data, the following basic principles of optimal orthosis design were identified: The forces required to stabilize the knee should be minimized by applying the stabilizing force as close as possible to the knee center, and by maintaining the anatomical knee as straight as possible. When the major portion of the knee stabilizing force is applied below the knee, the shear on the anatomical knee structures is markedly reduced. Further, the stabilizing forces should be well distributed over tolerant areas.

  16. Foot and ankle problems in dancers.

    PubMed

    Kadel, Nancy

    2014-11-01

    The dancer's foot and ankle are subjected to high forces and unusual stresses in training and performance. Injuries are common in dancers, and the foot and ankle are particularly vulnerable. Ankle sprains, ankle impingement syndromes, flexor hallucis longus tendonitis, cuboid subluxation, stress fractures, midfoot injuries, heel pain, and first metatarsophalangeal joint problems including hallux valgus, hallux rigidus, and sesamoid injuries will be reviewed. This article will discuss these common foot and ankle problems in dancers and give typical clinical presentation and diagnostic and treatment recommendations.

  17. Parameters influencing complaints and joint function in patients with osteochondral lesions of the ankle-an investigation based on data from the German Cartilage Registry (KnorpelRegister DGOU).

    PubMed

    Körner, Daniel; Gueorguiev, Boyko; Niemeyer, Philipp; Bangert, Yannic; Zinser, Wolfgang; Aurich, Matthias; Walther, Markus; Becher, Christoph; Ateschrang, Atesch; Schröter, Steffen

    2017-03-01

    Patients with osteochondral lesions of the ankle represent a heterogeneous population with traumatic, posttraumatic and idiopathic forms of this pathology, where the etiology of the idiopathic form is principally unknown. The aim of this study was to classify the heterogeneous patient population according to the patients' complaints and joint function. Data from the German Cartilage Registry (KnorpelRegister DGOU) was analyzed for this purpose to investigate whether traumatic and posttraumatic lesions cause more complaints and loss of joint function than idiopathic lesions. Moreover, it was sought to determine if lesion localization, defective area, stage, patient age, gender, and body mass index (BMI) are related to patients' complaints and loss of joint function. A 117 patients with osteochondral lesions of the ankle were operated in 20 clinical centers in the period between October 2014 and January 2016. Data collection was performed by means of a web-based Remote Data Entry system at the time of surgery. Patients' complaints and joint function were assessed with online questionnaires using the German versions of the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM) and the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS), followed by statistical data evaluation. No significant difference was indicated between the groups with traumatic/posttraumatic lesions and idiopathic lesions with regard to most of the patients' complaints and joint function, excluding the category Life quality of the FAOS score, where patients with idiopathic lesions had a significantly better quality of life (p = 0.02). No significant association was detected between lesion localization, defective area, patient age, gender, and BMI on the one hand, and patients' complaints and joint function on the other. Similarly, no significant association was found between lesion stage according to the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) classification and patients' complaints and joint function. However, a

  18. Tibiofemoral angle and its relation to ankle sprain occurrence.

    PubMed

    Pefanis, Nikolaos; Karagounis, Panagiotis; Tsiganos, Georgios; Armenis, Elias; Baltopoulos, Panagiotis

    2009-12-01

    The lack of a normal joint orientation generates translational or shear forces across the joint. These forces can put abnormally high strain on the cartilage and the surrounding capsuloligamentous tissues. Ankle joint structure can affect or be affected by bony malformations of the surrounding areas, including the knee and hip. The aim of the current study is to examine the possible relationship between the tibiofemoral (TFA) angle and other factors (anthropometric characteristics, medical history, and age) on the occurrence of ankle sprains because its value provides useful information for the anatomical alignment of the lower extremity. The study sample consisted of 45 high-level athletes, evenly distributed among 3 sports (basketball, soccer, and volleyball). TFA measurements were made on radiographs. The study lasted 2 years. A logistic regression was used to determine the importance of each factor on the probability in question. A significance level of P = .1 was used. The factors contributing more to an ankle sprain were a previous injury of the same type followed by body mass index (BMI) and age. On the contrary, TFA was proven to be statistically nonsignificant. When the BMI variable was substituted with body inertia propensity, a derived variable, the TFA remained statistically nonsignificant. TFA magnitude does not seem to be a determinant factor that could increase the probability of spraining an ankle.

  19. The effect of a knee ankle foot orthosis incorporating an active knee mechanism on gait of a person with poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Arazpour, Mokhtar; Chitsazan, Ahmad; Bani, Monireh Ahmadi; Rouhi, Gholamreza; Ghomshe, Farhad Tabatabai; Hutchins, Stephen W

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this case study was to identify the effect of a powered stance control knee ankle foot orthosis on the kinematics and temporospatial parameters of walking by a person with poliomyelitis when compared to a knee ankle foot orthosis. A knee ankle foot orthosis was initially manufactured by incorporating drop lock knee joints and custom molded ankle foot orthoses and fitted to a person with poliomyelitis. The orthosis was then adapted by adding electrically activated powered knee joints to provide knee extension torque during stance and also flexion torque in swing phase. Lower limb kinematic and kinetic data plus data for temporospatial parameters were acquired from three test walks using each orthosis. Walking speed, step length, and vertical and horizontal displacement of the pelvis decreased when walking with the powered stance control knee ankle foot orthosis compared to the knee ankle foot orthosis. When using the powered stance control knee ankle foot orthosis, the knee flexion achieved during swing and also the overall pattern of walking more closely matched that of normal human walking. The reduced walking speed may have caused the smaller compensatory motions detected when the powered stance control knee ankle foot orthosis was used. The new powered SCKAFO facilitated controlled knee flexion and extension during ambulation for a volunteer poliomyelitis person.

  20. Revision of the aseptic and septic total ankle replacement.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Norman; Wirth, Stephan Hermann

    2013-04-01

    Total ankle replacement has become a popular treatment of symptomatic end-stage ankle osteoarthritis. Contemporary total ankle replacement systems provide more anatomic and biomechanically sound function. However, longevity is still limited and long-term results of modern total ankle replacement designs are not available. In the case of failure, conversion into arthrodesis has remained the treatment of choice but at the cost of hindfoot function and potential degeneration of the adjacent joints. Thus, revision total ankle replacement by exchange of the prosthetic components represents an attractive solution. This article focuses on revision total ankle replacement and conversion to ankle arthrodesis.

  1. Independent and Joint Effect of Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity and Blood Pressure Control on Incident Stroke in Hypertensive Adults.

    PubMed

    Song, Yun; Xu, Benjamin; Xu, Richard; Tung, Renee; Frank, Eric; Tromble, Wayne; Fu, Tong; Zhang, Weiyi; Yu, Tao; Zhang, Chunyan; Fan, Fangfang; Zhang, Yan; Li, Jianping; Bao, Huihui; Cheng, Xiaoshu; Qin, Xianhui; Tang, Genfu; Chen, Yundai; Yang, Tianlun; Sun, Ningling; Li, Xiaoying; Zhao, Lianyou; Hou, Fan Fan; Ge, Junbo; Dong, Qiang; Wang, Binyan; Xu, Xiping; Huo, Yong

    2016-07-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) has been shown to influence the effects of antihypertensive drugs in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Data are limited on whether PWV is an independent predictor of stroke above and beyond hypertension control. This longitudinal analysis examined the independent and joint effect of brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV) with hypertension control on the risk of first stroke. This report included 3310 hypertensive adults, a subset of the China Stroke Primary Prevention Trial (CSPPT) with baseline measurements for baPWV. During a median follow-up of 4.5 years, 111 participants developed first stroke. The risk of stroke was higher among participants with baPWV in the highest quartile than among those in the lower quartiles (6.3% versus 2.4%; hazard ratio, 1.66; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-2.60). Similarly, the participants with inadequate hypertension control had a higher risk of stroke than those with adequate control (5.1% versus 1.8%; hazard ratio, 2.32; 95% confidence interval, 1.49-3.61). When baPWV and hypertension control were examined jointly, participants in the highest baPWV quartile and with inadequate hypertension control had the highest risk of stroke compared with their counterparts (7.5% versus 1.3%; hazard ratio, 3.57; 95% confidence interval, 1.88-6.77). There was a significant and independent effect of high baPWV on stroke as shown among participants with adequate hypertension control (4.2% versus 1.3%; hazard ratio, 2.29, 95% confidence interval, 1.09-4.81). In summary, among hypertensive patients, baPWV and hypertension control were found to independently and jointly affect the risk of first stroke. Participants with high baPWV and inadequate hypertension control had the highest risk of stroke compared with other groups.

  2. Powered ankle-foot prosthesis for the improvement of amputee ambulation.

    PubMed

    Au, Samuel K; Herr, Hugh; Weber, Jeff; Martinez-Villalpando, Ernesto C

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the mechanical design, control scheme, and clinical evaluation of a novel, motorized ankle-foot prosthesis, called MIT Powered Ankle-Foot Prosthesis. Unlike a conventional passive-elastic ankle-foot prosthesis, this prosthesis can provide active mechanical power during the stance period of walking. The basic architecture of the prosthesis is a unidirectional spring, configured in parallel with a force-controllable actuator with series elasticity. With this architecture, the anklefoot prosthesis matches the size and weight of the human ankle, and is also capable of delivering high mechanical power and torque observed in normal human walking. We also propose a biomimetic control scheme that allows the prosthesis to mimic the normal human ankle behavior during walking. To evaluate the performance of the prosthesis, we measured the rate of oxygen consumption of three unilateral transtibial amputees walking at self-selected speeds to estimate the metabolic walking economy. We find that the powered prosthesis improves amputee metabolic economy from 7% to 20% compared to the conventional passive-elastic prostheses (Flex-Foot Ceterus and Freedom Innovations Sierra), even though the powered system is twofold heavier than the conventional devices. This result highlights the benefit of performing net positive work at the ankle joint to amputee ambulation and also suggests a new direction for further advancement of an ankle-foot prosthesis.

  3. Distribution and alteration of lymphatic vessels in knee joints of normal and osteoarthritic mice.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jixiang; Liang, Qianqian; Zuscik, Michael; Shen, Jie; Chen, Di; Xu, Hao; Wang, Yong-Jun; Chen, Yan; Wood, Ronald W; Li, Jia; Boyce, Brendan F; Xing, Lianping

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the distribution and alteration of lymphatic vessels and draining function in knee joints of normal and osteoarthritic mice. For the mouse models of osteoarthritis (OA), we used mice with meniscal-ligamentous injury or mice with conditional knockout of the gene for cartilage transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) type II receptor. The severity of cartilage loss and joint destruction was assessed histologically. Capillary and mature lymphatic vessels were identified and analyzed using double immunofluorescence staining and a whole-slide digital imaging system. Lymphatic drainage of knee joints was examined using near-infrared lymphatic imaging. Patient joint specimens obtained during total knee or hip arthroplasty were evaluated to verify the content validity of the mouse findings. Lymphatic vessels were distributed in soft tissues (mainly around the joint capsule, ligaments, fat pads, and muscles of normal knees). The number of lymphatic vessels, particularly the number of capillaries, was significantly increased in joints of mice with mild OA, while the number of mature lymphatic vessels was markedly decreased in joints of mice with severe OA. OA knees exhibited significantly decreased lymph clearance. The number of both capillary and mature lymphatic vessels was significantly decreased in the joints of patients with OA. The whole-slide digital imaging system is a powerful tool, enabling the identification and assessment of lymphatic microvasculature in the entire mouse knee. Lymphatic capillaries and mature vessels are present in various soft tissues around articular spaces. Abnormalities of lymphatic vessels and draining function, including significantly reduced numbers of mature vessels and impaired clearance, are present in OA joints. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  4. Distribution and Alteration of Lymphatic Vessels in Knee Joints of Normal and Osteoarthritic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jixiang; Liang, Qianqian; Zuscik, Michael; Shen, Jie; Chen, Di; Xu, Hao; Wang, Yong-Jun; Chen, Yan; Wood, Ronald W.; Li, Jia; Boyce, Brendan F.; Xing, Lianping

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the distribution and alteration of lymphatic vessels and draining function in knee joints of normal and osteoarthritic mice. Methods For the mouse models of osteoarthritis (OA), we used mice with meniscal-ligamentous injury or mice with conditional knockout of the gene for cartilage transforming growth factor β (TGF β) type II receptor. The severity of cartilage loss and joint destruction was assessed histologically. Capillary and mature lymphatic vessels were identified and analyzed using double immunofluorescence staining and a whole-slide digital imaging system. Lymphatic drainage of knee joints was examined using near-infrared lymphatic imaging. Patient joint specimens obtained during total knee or hip arthroplasty were evaluated to verify the content validity of the mouse findings. Results Lymphatic vessels were distributed in soft tissues (mainly around the joint capsule, ligaments, fat pads, and muscles of normal knees). The number of lymphatic vessels, particularly the number of capillaries, was significantly increased in joints of mice with mild OA, while the number of mature lymphatic vessels was markedly decreased in joints of mice with severe OA. OA knees exhibited significantly decreased lymph clearance. The number of both capillary and mature lymphatic vessels was significantly decreased in the joints of patients with OA. Conclusion The whole-slide digital imaging system is a powerful tool, enabling the identification and assessment of lymphatic microvasculature in the entire mouse knee. Lymphatic capillaries and mature vessels are present in various soft tissues around articular spaces. Abnormalities of lymphatic vessels and draining function, including significantly reduced numbers of mature vessels and impaired clearance, are present in OA joints. PMID:24574226

  5. Ankle Sprains

    MedlinePlus

    ... the sole of the foot is facing inwards, stretching and possibly damaging the ligaments on the outer ... sprains: Always warm up and use the recommended stretching techniques for your ankles before playing sports, exercising, ...

  6. Marked loss of sympathetic nerve fibers in chronic Charcot foot of diabetic origin compared to ankle joint osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Koeck, Franz-Xaver; Bobrik, Verena; Fassold, Alexander; Grifka, Joachim; Kessler, Sigurd; Straub, Rainer H

    2009-06-01

    The pathogenesis of Charcot foot is based on three disputed factors: (1) loss of neurotrophic influence, (2) microtraumatic lesions, and (3) neurovascular disturbances. These etiological causes were uncovered by clinicophysiological tests. However, no results of quantitative nerve density studies of sympathetic and sensory substance P-positive (SP+) nerve fibers are available. We studied the density of sympathetic and SP+ nerve fibers in three distinct areas of the tarsus. Fifteen patients with ankle osteoarthritis (OA) and 15 patients with diabetic Charcot foot were included. Patients with OA did not differ from those with Charcot foot in SP+ sensory nerve fiber density. However, at all three areas, the density of sympathetic nerve fibers was significantly lower in patients with Charcot foot compared to OA (p = 0.006). In addition, we found that the sympathetic nerve repellent factor semaphorin 3C was highly expressed in inflamed tissue in Charcot patients. In Charcot foot of diabetic origin a severe loss of sympathetic nerve fibers was observed. These findings in chronically inflamed Charcot foot lend support to the neurovascular theory in the late chronic phase, which probably depends on the inflammatory upregulation of nerve repellent factors.

  7. Ankle sprain - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... anatomy URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100209.htm Ankle sprain - Series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Go to slide 1 out of 4 Go to slide 2 ...

  8. Haemophilic arthropathy of the ankle treated by total ankle replacement: a case series.

    PubMed

    Barg, A; Elsner, A; Hefti, D; Hintermann, B

    2010-07-01

    The standard treatment for end-stage osteoarthritis of the ankle joint in haemophilic patients has been fusion of the ankle joint. Total ankle replacement is still controversial as a treatment option. The objective of this prospective study was to evaluate the mid-term outcome in patients treated with total ankle replacement using an unconstrained three-component ankle implant. Ten haemophilic ankles in eight patients (mean age: 43.2 years, range 26.7-57.5) treated with total ankle replacement were followed up for a minimum of 2.7 years (mean: 5.6, range 2.7-7.6). The outcome was measured with clinical and radiological evaluations. There were no intra- or peri-operative complications. The AOFAS-hindfoot-score increased from 38 (range 8-57) preoperatively to 81 (range 69-95) postoperatively. All patients were satisfied with the results. Four patients became pain free; in the whole patient cohort pain level decreased from 7.1 (range 4-9) preoperatively to 0.8 (range 0-3) postoperatively. All categories of SF-36 score showed significant improvements in quality of life. In one patient, open ankle arthrolysis was performed because of painful arthrofibrosis. For patients with haemophilic osteoarthritis of the ankle joint, total ankle replacement is a valuable alternative treatment to ankle fusion.

  9. Comparison of Children with Joint Angles in Spastic Diplegia with Those of Normal Children

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang Ju; Kim, Young Mi; Kim, Dong Dae

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare joint angles between normal children and those with spastic diplegia using three-dimensional gait analysis. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects were eight patients with spastic diplegia and eight normal children. Three-dimensional gait analysis was used for the survey. The measured gait variables were the joints of the lower extremity in the sagittal plane, frontal plane, and transverse planes and the maximum and minimum angles of their stance phase and swing phases. [Results] In the sagittal plane, the maximum angles of both the right and left pelvis and hip joint in the stance phase and swing phases were significantly greater for children with spastic diplegia than for normal children. In the stance phase of the right side of the hip joint, the maximum angles of the hip in the swing phase and the knee joint’s minimum angles in the stance phase differed significantly. In the transverse plane, there were a significant differences on the left side of the pelvis in the maximum angles in the swing and stance phases. There were also significant differences on the right side pelvis, in the maximum and minimum angles in the stance phase and minimum angles in the swing phase. [Conclusion] Children with spastic diplegia employ a different gait strategy and pattern from normal children. PMID:25276040

  10. The effects of prosthetic ankle dorsiflexion and energy return on below-knee amputee leg loading.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Jessica D; Klute, Glenn K; Neptune, Richard R

    2011-03-01

    Prosthetic devices are intended to return lower limb amputees to their pre-amputation functional status. However, prosthetic devices designed for unilateral below-knee amputees have yet to completely restore the biomechanical functions normally provided by the ankle muscles, leading to gait asymmetries and increased reliance on their intact leg. In an effort to improve amputee gait, energy storage and return feet have been developed that store mechanical energy in elastic structures in early to mid-stance and return it in late stance. However, little is known regarding how ankle compliance and the level of energy return influences walking mechanics. The purpose of this study was to identify the influence of prosthetic ankle dorsiflexion and energy storage and return on leg loading during steady-state walking. Compliant ankles with different stiffness levels were attached to a Seattle Lightfoot2 in different orientations (forward- and reverse-facing). The ankles decreased residual leg vertical ground reaction forces in late stance, increased residual leg propulsive ground reaction force impulses and increased residual leg knee joint extensor moments. The reverse-facing ankles increased residual leg vertical ground reaction forces in early stance, and the compliant forward-facing ankle increased residual leg braking impulses. In contrast to previous studies, increased energy storage and return from compliant ankles did not decrease hip joint powers or the intact leg vertical ground reaction forces. These results provide insight into the relationships between ankle dorsiflexion, energy storage and return, and leg loading, which may lead to more effective prosthetic devices to improve amputee gait. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Individual-specific muscle maximum force estimation using ultrasound for ankle joint torque prediction using an EMG-driven Hill-type model.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Liliam Fernandes; Menegaldo, Luciano Luporini

    2010-10-19

    EMG-driven models can be used to estimate muscle force in biomechanical systems. Collected and processed EMG readings are used as the input of a dynamic system, which is integrated numerically. This approach requires the definition of a reasonably large set of parameters. Some of these vary widely among subjects, and slight inaccuracies in such parameters can lead to large model output errors. One of these parameters is the maximum voluntary contraction force (F(om)). This paper proposes an approach to find F(om) by estimating muscle physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) using ultrasound (US), which is multiplied by a realistic value of maximum muscle specific tension. Ultrasound is used to measure muscle thickness, which allows for the determination of muscle volume through regression equations. Soleus, gastrocnemius medialis and gastrocnemius lateralis PCSAs are estimated using published volume proportions among leg muscles, which also requires measurements of muscle fiber length and pennation angle by US. F(om) obtained by this approach and from data widely cited in the literature was used to comparatively test a Hill-type EMG-driven model of the ankle joint. The model uses 3 EMGs (Soleus, gastrocnemius medialis and gastrocnemius lateralis) as inputs with joint torque as the output. The EMG signals were obtained in a series of experiments carried out with 8 adult male subjects, who performed an isometric contraction protocol consisting of 10s step contractions at 20% and 60% of the maximum voluntary contraction level. Isometric torque was simultaneously collected using a dynamometer. A statistically significant reduction in the root mean square error was observed when US-obtained F(om) was used, as compared to F(om) from the literature. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Efficacy of Prophylactic Ankle Support: An Experimental Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Cordova, Mitchell L.; Ingersoll, Christopher D.; Palmieri, Riann M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To provide a comprehensive review of the literature regarding the role of external ankle support on joint kinematics, joint kinetics, sensorimotor function, and functional performance. Data Sources: We searched MEDLINE and SPORT Discus databases from 1960–2001 for the key words ankle bracing, ankle support, ankle taping, and ankle prophylaxes. We also used personal libraries based on our own research to complement the existing literature. Data Synthesis: The effects of external ankle support have been studied on a plethora of dependent measures. Here, we specifically discuss the role of external ankle support on joint kinematics, joint kinetics, sensorimotor function, and functional performance and present a general consensus regarding the overall effects of these prophylactic devices. Conclusions/Recommendations: The effects of ankle support on joint kinematics during static joint assessment and on traditional functional-performance measures (ie, agility, sprint speed, vertical jump height) are well understood. However, the potential effects of ankle support on joint kinetics, joint kinematics during dynamic activity (eg, a cutting maneuver), and various sensorimotor measures are not well known. Future research investigating the role of external ankle bracing needs to focus on these areas. PMID:12937566

  13. A Study of Association of Ankle Brachial Index (ABI) and the Highly Sensitive C - Reactive Protein (hsCRP) in Type 2 Diabetic Patients and in Normal Subjects.

    PubMed

    K O, Thejaswini; M S, Roopakala; G, Dayananda; S P, Chandrakala; Kumar K M, Prasanna

    2013-01-01

    The Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI) objectively assesses the lower extremity arterial perfusion. A low ABI suggests atherosclerosis and Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD). PAD is more common in individuals with type2 Diabetes mellitus (Type2 DM). Inflammatory markers are found to be associated with Type2 DM. But the association of the inflammatory markers with the atherosclerotic burden remains poorly defined. To compare the ABI and the hsCRP in the Type 2 DM patients with those in the normal subjects and to study the association of serum hsCRP with ABI in the Type 2 DM patients and in normal subjects. The subjects were 40 Type2 DM and 40 age, sex and BMI matched normal subjects who were aged between 45-60 yrs. The subjects were assigned to two different groups, Group1- the Type2 DM patients and Group2- the healthy controls. The serum hsCRP levels were determined by the turbidimetry method (BIOSYSTEMS) and the ABI values were determined by using the traditional continuous wave (CW) Doppler of NICOLET VERSALAB. The data was analyzed by using the Student's t test (two tailed; independent) to find the significance of the study parameters between the two groups. Pearson's Correlation was used to find the correlation of serum hsCRP with the ABI in the two groups. The ABI showed a significantly low value (P=0.035*) and the serum hsCRP showed a trend towards a significant increase (p = 0.069+) in the type2diabetics as compared to those in the normals. There was a significant negative correlation between ABI and hsCRP in the Type 2 DM patients (r=-0.560, p<0.001**). However, such correlation was not observed in the normal subjects. As serum hsCRP is associated with ABI in the type2 DM patients, inflammation may play a role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  14. Symptomatic anterior subtalar arthrosis after ankle arthrodesis

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2014-01-01

    A 76-year-old man reported right lateral heel pain 11 years after ankle arthrodesis. Clinically, there was tenderness in the right sinus tarsi and over the junction point between the talonavicular and calcaneocuboid joints. Radiographs showed that the joint spaces of the posterior subtalar joint and the talonavicular joint were preserved although there were osteophytes at both joints. Arthroscopic findings showed degeneration of the anterior subtalar and talonavicular joints. The symptoms subsided after arthroscopic debridement. PMID:24825553

  15. Symptomatic anterior subtalar arthrosis after ankle arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2014-05-13

    A 76-year-old man reported right lateral heel pain 11 years after ankle arthrodesis. Clinically, there was tenderness in the right sinus tarsi and over the junction point between the talonavicular and calcaneocuboid joints. Radiographs showed that the joint spaces of the posterior subtalar joint and the talonavicular joint were preserved although there were osteophytes at both joints. Arthroscopic findings showed degeneration of the anterior subtalar and talonavicular joints. The symptoms subsided after arthroscopic debridement.

  16. From normal to fast walking: Impact of cadence and stride length on lower extremity joint moments.

    PubMed

    Ardestani, Marzieh M; Ferrigno, Christopher; Moazen, Mehran; Wimmer, Markus A

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to clarify the influence of various speeding strategies (i.e. adjustments of cadence and stride length) on external joint moments. This study investigated the gait of 52 healthy subjects who performed self-selected normal and fast speed walking trials in a motion analysis laboratory. Subjects were classified into three separate groups based on how they increased their speed from normal to fast walking: (i) subjects who increased their cadence, (ii) subjects who increased their stride length and (iii) subjects who simultaneously increased both stride length and cadence. Joint moments were calculated using inverse dynamics and then compared between normal and fast speed trials within and between three groups using spatial parameter mapping. Individuals who increased cadence, but not stride length, to walk faster did not experience a significant increase in the lower limb joint moments. Conversely, subjects who increased their stride length or both stride length and cadence, experienced a significant increase in all joint moments. Additionally, our findings revealed that increasing the stride length had a higher impact on joint moments in the sagittal plane than those in the frontal plane. However, both sagittal and frontal plane moments were still more responsive to the gait speed change than transverse plane moments. This study suggests that the role of speed in altering the joint moment patterns depends on the individual's speed-regulating strategy, i.e. an increase in cadence or stride length. Since the confounding effect of walking speed is a major consideration in human gait research, future studies may investigate whether stride length is the confounding variable of interest. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Long-term functional outcome after surgery of chronic ankle instability. A 5-year follow-up study of the modified Evans procedure.

    PubMed

    Kaikkonen, A; Lehtonen, H; Kannus, P; Järvinen, M

    1999-08-01

    Chronic ankle instability is a rather common consequence of poorly healed rupture of the lateral ligaments of the ankle. In some rare cases, instability symptoms can be caused by general laxity of the joints, but since these cases are normally bilateral, they can easily be distinguished from posttraumatic instability. This report presents the long-term (average follow-up 4.6 years) functional outcome after a modified Evans tenodesis of 48 patients. The follow-up examination consisted of a questionnaire evaluating the subjective assessment of the ankle, and clinical examination measuring ankle stability, range of motion and swelling, and atrophy of the calf muscles. Additionally, the functional recovery of the ankle was assessed by a standardized performance test protocol. According to the subjective assessment, 25 subjects (52%) considered the ankle fully recovered, or at least much better than before surgery. In the performance test, however, only 17 subjects (35%) achieved an excellent or good score. In the performance test protocol, two functional tests, walking down a staircase and balancing on a square beam, best demonstrated the impaired function of the injured ankle. The modified Evans procedure could restore the stability of the ankle to the preinjury level, although the ankle range of motion was significantly impaired, and swelling of the ankle and atrophy of the calf muscles were frequent findings at the follow-up. In conclusion, surgical treatment of chronic ankle instability by the Evans procedure restores the mechanical stability of the joint, but too frequently the function of the ankle does not return to the pre-injury level.

  18. Ankle arthrodesis. Long-term follow-up with gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Mazur, J M; Schwartz, E; Simon, S R

    1979-10-01

    A functional assessment of twelve patients after ankle arthrodesis for post-traumatic arthritis was carried out by means of an extensive clinical evaluation and gait analysis after an average follow-up of eight years. A weighted point system was developed to grade ankle function clinically. The data on gait analysis were examined to determine the effect of arthrodesis of the ankle on the over-all pattern of walking. Under conditions of normal daily living while wearing shoes, all patients functioned well after arthrodesis. The gait-analysis data obtained with the patients wearing shoes showed excellent gait characteristics, and the ankle motion that had been lost was compensated for by: (1) motion of the small joints of the ipsilateral foot; (2) altered motion of the ankle in the contralateral limb; and (3) appropriate footwear. While the patients were walking barefooted, some adverse effects of fusion of the ankle were evident. Velocity of gait was slowed and the length of stride was shortened in all twelve patients. One patient whose ankle had been fused in an equinus position had a back-knee deformity during stance phase, and another walked only on his toes when he was without shoes. The gait patterns of all patients were markedly improved when they were wearing shoes with appropriate heel heights.

  19. Prediction of gait outcome with the knee-ankle-foot orthosis with medial hip joint in patients with spinal cord injuries: a study using recursive partitioning analysis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Sonoda, S; Saitoh, E; Onogi, K; Fujino, H; Teranishi, T; Oyobe, T; Katoh, M; Ohtsuka, K

    2007-01-01

    Retrospective study of the degree of gait independence achieved by persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) using knee-ankle-foot orthosis with a medial single hip joint (MSH-KAFO). To examine the effects of the neurological level, degree of paresis, age, and inhibitory physical/other factors on the gait with a MSH-KAFO in patients with SCIs. Three university hospitals and two rehabilitation hospitals in Japan. The 45 patients (36 men, nine women) examined included 10 with injuries in the cervical cord between C6 and C8 (group C), 20 with injuries in the upper-middle thoracic cord between T4 and T10 (group UT), and 15 with injuries in the lower thoracic-lumbar cord between T12 and L1 (group TL). Mean age was 34.0 years (range 16-68 years). Of these patients, 13 used the Walkabout, four used the gear joint, and 28 used the Primewalk as the medial hip joint. Recursive partitioning, which predicted the final status of gait from the level, degree of paresis, age, and inhibitory factors, was performed, and a decision tree for gait was constructed. Inhibitory factors were spasticity, involuntary spasms or muscle contractions, pain, contracture, weakness of the upper extremities, and decreased motivation to perform gait exercise. The degree of gait independence was rated on the following five-point scale: outdoor independent gait (5 points), indoor independent gait (4 points), indoor supervised gait (3 points), indoor assisted gait (2 points), and gait within parallel bars (1 point). New branches were added to the decision tree for gait based on the clinical experience, thereby constructing a new decision tree. The coincident ratio between the value predicted on the basis of the decision tree of gait and the value actually observed was 53.3%. The coincident ratio between the value predicted on the basis of the modified decision tree of gait and the actually observed value was 68.9%. The results provide valuable information to medical teams that may assist prescription of

  20. Ankle Injuries and Ankle Strength, Flexibility, and Proprioception in College Basketball Players

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Kristen A.; Berg, Kris; Latin, Richard W.

    1997-01-01

    Objective: To determine if ankle muscular strength, flexibility and proprioception can predict ankle injury in college basketball players and to compare ankle injury rates in female and male players. Design and Setting: In this prospective, correlational study, subjects were tested at the start of the competitive season for ankle joint muscle strength, flexibility, and proprioception. The first ankle injury for each subject was recorded on an injury report form, and the data were analyzed to determine if any of these preseason measurements predicted future injury. The setting was a competitive 9-week season for four women's and four men's college basketball teams. Subjects: A convenience sample of 31 female and 11 male college basketball players. Measurements: Subjects were tested for ankle dorsiflexion range of motion, various measures of ankle proprioception, and isokinetic peak torque of ankle dorsiflexion-plantar flexion and eversion-inversion at 30°/sec and 180°/sec before the start of the conference basketball seasons. Data were analyzed using a series of multiple regression equations to determine the variance in ankle injury attributed to each variable. Results: Various measures of proprioception predicted left ankle injury in all subjects (p < .05), while ankle strength and flexibility measures failed to account for additional variance. There was no statistically significant difference in ankle injury rate between women and men. Conclusions: Ankle joint proprioceptive deficits can be used to predict ankle injury, but further research is needed to identify other sources of variance. In our study, ankle injury rate was similar in female and male college basketball players. PMID:16558453

  1. Modeling of Human Joint Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    Radial Lateral " epicondyle Olecranon Radius Ulna Figure 3. Lateral aspect of the right elbow joint. -17- Annular Ligament This strong band encircles... elbow joint, knee joint, human joints, shoulder joint, ankle joint, joint models, hip joint, ligaments. 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse side If...ligaments. -A rather extended discussion of the articulations and anatomical descriptions of the elbow , shoulder, hip, knee and ankle joints are

  2. Comparison of sensitivity coefficients for joint angle trajectory between normal and pathological gait.

    PubMed

    Błażkiewicz, Michalina; Wit, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Gait recordings exhibit intra-subject, inter-subject, within-trial and between-trial variability as well as data analysis methods. In medicine, comparison of different measuring method results or quantifying changes due to specific treatment is required. The aim of this study was to compare a group homogeneity with respect to dispersion around the reference curve and to compare waveforms of normal and pathological gait data based on joint angle curves. Data files were tracked using APAS system. Our own model of lower limb was used to calculate the trajectories of joint angles for 5 groups: healthy men, women, children, persons with drop foot and Trendelenburg's sign. Waveform parameterizations, RMS, IAE and correlation coefficients were used to compare joint angles with reference curve. The sample scores obtained in this work provide an important information about closeness in the shape of two curves. Using multiple techniques of data analysis will benefit and give more accurate information.

  3. Arthroscopic Management of Complications Following Total Ankle Replacement.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing; Roukis, Thomas S

    2015-10-01

    There is great potential of managing the complications of total ankle replacement arthroscopically and endoscopically, and these procedures can be summarized into 3 groups. Group 1 includes procedures of the ankle joint proper with close proximity to the articular components of the total ankle replacement. Group 2 includes procedures of the tibia and talus with close proximity to the nonarticular parts of the total ankle replacement. Group 3 includes procedures that are away from the total ankle replacement. However, these remain master arthroscopist procedures and should be performed by foot and ankle surgeons who perform them with regularity.

  4. Contributions of individual muscles to hip joint contact force in normal walking.

    PubMed

    Correa, Tomas A; Crossley, Kay M; Kim, Hyung J; Pandy, Marcus G

    2010-05-28

    The human hip joint withstands high contact forces during daily activity and is therefore susceptible to injury and structural deterioration over time. Knowledge of muscle-force contributions to hip joint loading may assist in the development of strategies to prevent and manage conditions such as osteoarthritis, femoro-acetabular impingement and fracture. The main aim of this study was to determine the contributions of individual muscles to hip contact force in normal walking. Muscle contributions to hip contact force were calculated based on a previously published dynamic optimization solution for normal walking, which provided the time histories of joint motion, ground reaction forces, and muscle forces during the stance and swing phases of gait. The force developed by each muscle plus its contribution to the ground reaction force were used to determine the muscle's contribution to hip contact force. Muscles were the major contributors to hip contact force, with gravitational and centrifugal forces combined contributing less than 5% of the total contact force. Four muscles that span the hip - gluteus medius, gluteus maximus, iliopsoas, and hamstrings - contributed most significantly to the three components of the hip contact force and hip contact impulse (integral of hip contact force over time). Three muscles that do not span the hip - vasti, soleus, and gastrocnemius - also contributed substantially to hip joint loading. These results provide additional insight into lower-limb muscle function during walking and may also be relevant to studies of cartilage degeneration and bone remodelling at the hip.

  5. Sprained Ankles

    MedlinePlus

    ... 18-21yrs. Healthy Living Healthy Living Healthy Living Nutrition Fitness Sports Oral Health Emotional Wellness Growing Healthy Sleep Safety & ... Head Neck & Nervous System Heart Infections Learning Disabilities Obesity Orthopedic Prevention ... Children > Health Issues > Conditions > Orthopedic > Sprained Ankles Health Issues ...

  6. Effects of Cyclic Loading on the Shear Behaviour of Infilled Rock Joints Under Constant Normal Stiffness Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaghorbanali, Ali; Nemcik, Jan; Aziz, Naj

    2014-07-01

    The variation of the shear strength of infilled rock joints under cyclic loading and constant normal stiffness conditions is studied. To simulate the joints, triangular asperities inclined at angles of 9.5° and 18.5° to the shear movement were cast using high-strength gypsum plaster and infilled with clayey sand. These joints were sheared cyclically under constant normal stiffness conditions. It was found that, for a particular normal stiffness, the shear strength is a function of the initial normal stress, initial asperity angle, joint surface friction angle, infill thickness, infill friction angle, loading direction and number of loading cycles. Based on the experimental results, a mathematical model is proposed to evaluate the shear strength of infilled rock joints in cyclic loading conditions. The proposed model takes into consideration different initial asperity angles, initial normal stresses and ratios of infill thickness to asperity height.

  7. Accuracy of Posterior Subtalar Joint Injection Without Fluoroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, Kevin L.; Campbell, John T.; Guyton, Gregory P.

    2008-01-01

    Injection into the posterior subtalar joint has not been validated for accuracy using radiographic end points. We asked whether needle placement into a normal posterior subtalar joint could be performed accurately and selectively by experienced surgeons without fluoroscopic guidance. Three fellowship-trained orthopaedic foot and ankle surgeons each injected the posterior subtalar joint of 20 cadaveric specimens using an anterolateral approach. Fluoroscopic images were obtained by an independent investigator and blinded. A separate fellowship-trained foot and ankle surgeon interpreted the images. Of 60 injections, 58 were accurate and two were extraarticular based on interpretation by an independent foot and ankle surgeon. Extravasation into the ankle occurred in 14 samples and into the peroneal sheath in two samples. Experienced surgeons can place intraarticular injections into a radiographically normal posterior subtalar joint without fluoroscopy with a high degree of accuracy. However, extravasation into the ankle or peroneal tendon sheath occurred in an unpredictable fashion, suggesting selectivity of injection placement is relatively limited without the use of fluoroscopy. Fluoroscopy may not be necessary for injections used solely for therapeutic purposes. However, if the injection is intended for diagnostic purposes or to assist in surgical decision-making or if the joint is abnormal, we recommend fluoroscopy to ensure the subtalar joint is the only anatomic structure impacted by the injection. PMID:18404293

  8. Identification and long-term observation of early joint damage by magnetic resonance imaging in clinically asymptomatic joints in patients with haemophilia A or B despite prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, M; Kurnik, K; Pfluger, T; Bidlingmaier, C

    2012-05-01

    Severe haemophilia is associated with recurrent joint bleeds, which can lead to haemophilic arthropathy. Subclinical joint bleeds have also been associated with joint damage detected using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We investigated the development of early changes in clinically asymptomatic joints using MRI in haemophilia A or B patients receiving prophylactic therapy. In this single-centre retrospective cohort study, patients with clinical evidence of joint damage in one ankle and one clinically asymptomatic ankle, in which we performed an MRI scan of both ankles in one session, were enrolled. MRI findings were graded using a 4-point scoring system (0 = normal findings and III = severe joint damage). Since 2000, 38 MRIs in 26 patients have been performed. Starting at a median age of 4 years, 23 patients received prophylaxis 2-3 times weekly. On-demand treatment was performed in three patients. Eight patients (31%) presented with an MRI score of 0, 12 (46%) had a score of I, four (15%) had a score of II, and two (8%) had a score of III in the clinically unaffected ankle. The six patients with MRI scores of II and III had started regular prophylaxis between the ages of 2 years and 15 years; none had developed an inhibitor or experienced a clinically evident bleed in the asymptomatic ankle. During our study, five of 26 patients had a worsening of MRI findings without experiencing a joint bleed. Early morphological changes in clinically asymptomatic ankles can be detected using MRI, despite adequate prophylaxis.

  9. Biomechanical comparison of frontal plane knee joint moment arms during normal and Tai Chi walking.

    PubMed

    Jagodinsky, Adam; Fox, John; Decoux, Brandi; Weimar, Wendi; Liu, Wei

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] Medial knee osteoarthritis, a degenerative joint disease, affects adults. The external knee adduction moment, a surrogate knee-loading measure, has clinical implications for knee osteoarthritis patients. Tai Chi is a promising intervention for pain alleviation in knee osteoarthritis; however, the characteristics of external knee adduction moment during Tai Chi have not been established. [Subjects and Methods] During normal and Tai Chi walking, a gait analysis was performed to compare the external knee adduction moment moment-arm characteristics and paired t-tests to compare moment-arm magnitudes. [Results] A significant difference was observed in the average lateral direction of moment-arm magnitude during Tai Chi walking (-0.0239 ± 0.011 m) compared to that during normal walking (-0.0057 ± 0.004 m). No significant difference was found between conditions in average medial direction of moment-arm magnitude (normal walking: 0.0143 ± 0.010 m; Tai Chi walking: 0.0098 ± 0.014 m). [Conclusion] Tai Chi walking produced a larger peak lateral moment-arm value than normal walking during the stance phase, whereas Tai Chi walking and normal walking peak medial moment-arm values were similar, suggesting that medial knee joint loading may be avoided during Tai Chi walking.

  10. A Study of Association of Ankle Brachial Index (ABI) and the Highly Sensitive C - Reactive Protein (hsCRP) in Type 2 Diabetic Patients and in Normal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    K.O., Thejaswini; M.S, Roopakala; G., Dayananda; S.P, Chandrakala; Kumar K.M., Prasanna

    2013-01-01

    Background: The Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI) objectively assesses the lower extremity arterial perfusion. A low ABI suggests atherosclerosis and Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD). PAD is more common in individuals with type2 Diabetes mellitus (Type2 DM). Inflammatory markers are found to be associated with Type2 DM. But the association of the inflammatory markers with the atherosclerotic burden remains poorly defined. Aims: To compare the ABI and the hsCRP in the Type 2 DM patients with those in the normal subjects and to study the association of serum hsCRP with ABI in the Type 2 DM patients and in normal subjects. Methods: The subjects were 40 Type2 DM and 40 age, sex and BMI matched normal subjects who were aged between 45-60 yrs. The subjects were assigned to two different groups, Group1- the Type2 DM patients and Group2- the healthy controls. The serum hsCRP levels were determined by the turbidimetry method (BIOSYSTEMS) and the ABI values were determined by using the traditional continuous wave (CW) Doppler of NICOLET VERSALAB. Statistical Analysis: The data was analyzed by using the Student’s t test (two tailed; independent) to find the significance of the study parameters between the two groups. Pearson’s Correlation was used to find the correlation of serum hsCRP with the ABI in the two groups. Results: The ABI showed a significantly low value (P=0.035*) and the serum hsCRP showed a trend towards a significant increase (p = 0.069+) in the type2diabetics as compared to those in the normals. There was a significant negative correlation between ABI and hsCRP in the Type 2 DM patients (r=-0.560, p<0.001**). However, such correlation was not observed in the normal subjects. Conclusion: As serum hsCRP is associated with ABI in the type2 DM patients, inflammation may play a role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. PMID:23450165

  11. Modeling the effect of preexisting joints on normal fault geometries using a brittle and cohesive material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettermann, M.; van Gent, H. W.; Urai, J. L.

    2012-04-01

    , stereo-photography at the final stage of deformation enabled the creation of 3D models to preserve basic geometric information. The models showed that at the surface the deformation localized always along preexisting joints, even when they strike at an angle to the basement-fault. In most cases faults intersect precisely at the maximum depth of the joints. With increasing fault-joint angle the deformation occurred distributed over several joints by forming stepovers with fractures oriented normal to the strike of the joints. No fractures were observed parallel to the basement fault. At low angles stepovers coincided with wedge-shaped structures between two joints that remain higher than the surrounding joint-fault intersection. The wide opening gap along the main fault allowed detailed observations of the fault planes at depth, which revealed (1) changing dips according to joint-fault angles, (2) slickenlines, (3) superimposed steepening fault-planes, causing sharp sawtooth-shaped structures. Comparison to a field analogue at Canyonlands National Park, Utah/USA showed similar structures and features such as vertical fault escarpments at the surface coinciding with joint-surfaces. In the field and in the models stepovers were observed as well as conjugate faulting and incremental fault-steepening.

  12. Hip joint contact forces in normal subjects and subjects with total hip prostheses: walking and stair and ramp negotiation.

    PubMed

    Stansfield, B W; Nicol, A C

    2002-02-01

    To calculate the hip joint contact force in normal subjects and subjects with total hip replacements. An observational study of age matched normal subjects and subjects with hip joint replacements. Hip joint contact forces have been calculated using musculo-skeletal models and measured in vivo using instrumented hip prostheses. There are few examples of studies performed on subjects in the 40-60 year age range. This study characterises the forces in both normal subjects and subjects with hip joint replacements for these 'young' subjects. Motion analysis and force plate data were used as input to a three-dimensional model of the leg. Five male and six female normal subjects and five male subjects with hip prostheses were studied. Each subject was observed walking and negotiating stairs and a ramp. Hip joint contact forces in both thigh and pelvic-based co-ordinate systems are presented. Subjects cadence, speed and stride length are given. In general subjects with hip replacements exhibited lower hip joint contact forces than age matched normal subjects. It is suggested that this was the results of the lower speeds, stride lengths and cadences adopted by the subjects with hip replacements. The characterisation of hip joint contact forces provides essential information for prosthetic joint design and testing. The comparison of hip joint contact forces in normal subjects with those in subjects with prosthetic joints provides evidence of, not only actual use of joints, but also of possible levels of force that might be applied to hip prostheses if subjects returned to normal use.

  13. Musculoskeletal ultrasonography delineates ankle symptoms in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Yukihiro; Tamura, Maasa; Kirino, Yohei; Sugiyama, Yumiko; Tsuchida, Naomi; Kunishita, Yosuke; Kishimoto, Daiga; Kamiyama, Reikou; Miura, Yasushi; Minegishi, Kaoru; Yoshimi, Ryusuke; Ueda, Atsuhisa; Nakajima, Hideaki

    2017-05-01

    To clarify the use of musculoskeletal ultrasonography (US) of ankle joints in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Consecutive RA patients with or without ankle symptoms participated in the study. The US, clinical examination (CE), and patients' visual analog scale for pain (pVAS) for ankles were assessed. Prevalence of tibiotalar joint synovitis and tenosynovitis were assessed by grayscale (GS) and power Doppler (PD) US using a semi-quantitative grading (0-3). The positive US and CE findings were defined as GS score ≥2 and/or PD score ≥1, and joint swelling and/or tenderness, respectively. Multivariate analysis with the generalized linear mixed model was performed by assigning ankle pVAS as a dependent variable. Among a total of 120 ankles from 60 RA patients, positive ankle US findings were found in 21 (35.0%) patients. The concordance rate of CE and US was moderate (kappa 0.57). Of the 88 CE negative ankles, US detected positive findings in 9 (10.2%) joints. Multivariate analysis revealed that ankle US, clinical disease activity index, and foot Health Assessment Questionnaire, but not CE, was independently associated with ankle pVAS. US examination is useful to illustrate RA ankle involvement, especially for patients who complain ankle pain but lack CE findings.

  14. Total ankle replacement – surgical treatment and rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Krogulec, Zbigniew; Turski, Piotr; Przepiórski, Emil; Małdyk, Paweł; Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Functions of the ankle joint are closely connected with the gait and ability to maintain an upright position. Degenerative lesions of the joint directly contribute to postural disorders and greatly restrict propulsion of the foot, thus leading to abnormal gait. Development of total ankle replacement is connected with the use of the method as an efficient treatment of joint injuries and continuation of achievements in hip and knee surgery. The total ankle replacement technique was introduced as an alternative to arthrodesis, i.e. surgical fixation, which made it possible to preserve joint mobility and to improve gait. Total ankle replacement is indicated in post-traumatic degenerative joint disease and joint destruction secondary to rheumatoid arthritis. In this paper, total ankle replacement and various types of currently used endoprostheses are discussed. The authors also describe principles of early postoperative rehabilitation as well as rehabilitation in the outpatient setting. PMID:27407223

  15. Elimination of tritium-labelled hyaluronic acid from normal and osteoarthritic rabbit knee joints.

    PubMed

    Lindenhayn, K; Heilmann, H H; Niederhausen, T; Walther, H U; Pohlenz, K

    1997-05-01

    The half-life of [3H]hyaluronic acid in rabbit knee joints was estimated using two methods: (i) by following the [3H]hyaluronan content of the synovial fluid after intra-articular injection and (ii) by following the 3H2O radioactivity of plasma after intra-articular injection of [3H]hyaluronan. For normal rabbits we obtained a half-life of 15.8 hours (method I) and 17.5 +/- 1.0 hours (mean +/- SEM, method II), respectively. The second method was used to estimate the kinetics of the hyaluronan elimination from normal, sham-operated, as well as from osteoarthritic rabbit knee joints (Colombo model of osteoarthritis). Four weeks after injury, during the developing phase of osteoarthritis, the half-life of hyaluronan rose significantly to 23.5 +/- 2.1 hours and returned to normal levels (17.4 +/- 2.7 hours) 12 weeks after the operation (osteoarthritis developed). At the stage of developed osteoarthritis, the clearance rates were considerably higher than in normal rabbits.

  16. The effects of a semi-rigid brace or taping on talocrural and subtalar kinematics in chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takumi; Saka, Masayuki; Suzuki, Eiichi; Yamazaki, Naohito; Suzukawa, Makoto; Akaike, Atsushi; Shimizu, Kuniaki; Gamada, Kazuyoshi

    2014-12-01

    A semi-rigid brace or taping is often used to prevent giving-ways in the joint with chronic ankle instability (CAI). However, it remains unknown whether the application of a semi-rigid brace or taping modifies abnormal kinematics in CAI joints. The objective of this study was to determine if the application of a semi-rigid brace or taping of the ankle normalizes abnormal weight-bearing kinematics in CAI joints during ankle internal rotation in plantar flexion. A total of 14 male patients with unilateral CAI (mean age 21.1 ± 2.5 years) were enrolled. Three-dimensional bone models created from the computed tomography images were matched to the fluoroscopic images to compute the 6 degrees-of-freedom talocrural, subtalar, and ankle joint complex (AJC) kinematics for the healthy and contralateral CAI joints, as well as for CAI joints with a brace or taping. Selected outcome measures were talocrural anterior translation, talocrural internal rotation, and subtalar internal rotation. There was no significant difference in talocrural anterior translation and internal rotation induced by applying either a semi-rigid brace or taping (P > .05). For subtalar internal rotation, there was a tendency toward restoration of normal kinematics in CAI joints after applying a semi-rigid brace or taping. However, the difference was not significant (P > .05). Application of a semi-rigid brace or taping had limited effects on the CAI joint during weight-bearing ankle internal rotation in plantar flexion. Further studies using a variety of testing conditions should be conducted in the future. Therapeutic, Level IV: Cross-Sectional Case Series. © 2014 The Author(s).

  17. Imaging of normal and pathologic joint synovium using nonlinear optical microscopy as a potential diagnostic tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Nivedan; Chabra, Sanjay; Mehdi, Sheherbano; Sweet, Paula; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Pool, Roy; Andrews,