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Sample records for normal breast epithelia

  1. Expression profile of undifferentiated cell transcription factor 1 in normal and cancerous human epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Mouallif, Mustapha; Albert, Adelin; Zeddou, Mustapha; Ennaji, My Mustapha; Delvenne, Philippe; Guenin, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Undifferentiated cell Transcription Factor 1 (UTF1) is a chromatin-bound protein involved in stem cell differentiation. It was initially reported to be restricted to stem cells or germinal tissues. However, recent work suggests that UTF1 is also expressed in somatic cells and that its expression may increase during carcinogenesis. To further clarify the expression profile of UTF1, we evaluated UTF1 expression levels immunohistochemically in eight normal human epithelia (from breast, prostate, endometrium, bladder, colon, oesophagus, lung and kidney) and their corresponding tumours as well as in several epithelial cell lines. We showed UTF1 staining in normal and tumour epithelial tissues, but with varying intensities according to the tissue location. In vitro analyses also revealed that UTF1 is expressed in somatic epithelial cell lines even in the absence of Oct4A and Sox2, its two main known regulators. The comparison of UTF1 levels in normal and tumoral tissues revealed significant overexpression in endometrial and prostatic adenocarcinomas, whereas lower intensity of the staining was observed in renal and colic tumours, suggesting a potential tissue-specific function of UTF1. Altogether, these results highlight a potential dual role for UTF1, acting either as an oncogene or as a tumour suppressor depending on the tissue. These findings also question its role as a specific marker for stem cells. PMID:24738751

  2. Arsenic-induced cancer cell phenotype in human breast epithelia is estrogen receptor-independent but involves aromatase activation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yuanyuan; Tokar, Erik J.; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating data suggest arsenic may be an endocrine disruptor, and tentatively linked to breast cancer by some studies. Therefore, we tested the effects of chronic inorganic arsenic exposure on the normal, estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast epithelial cell line, MCF-10A. Cells were chronically exposed to a low-level arsenite (500 nM) for up to 24 weeks. Markers of cancer cell phenotype and expression of critical genes relevant to breast cancer or stem cells (SCs) were examined. After 24 weeks, chronic arsenic-exposed breast epithelial (CABE) cells showed increases in secreted MMP activity, colony formation, invasion and proliferation rate, indicating an acquired cancer cell phenotype. These CABE cells presented with basal-like breast cancer characteristics, including ER-α, HER-2 and progesterone receptor negativity, and overexpression of K5 and p63. Putative CD44+/CD24−/low breast SCs were increased to 80% over control in CABE cells. CABE cells also formed multilayer cell mounds, indicative of loss of contact inhibition. These mounds showed high levels of K5 and p63 indicating the potential presence of CSCs. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition occurred during arsenic exposure.. Overexpression of aromatase, a key rate-limiting enzyme in estrogen synthesis, occurred with arsenic starting early on in exposure. Levels of 17β-estradiol increased in CABE cells and their conditioned medium. The aromatase inhibitor, letrozole abolished arsenic-induced increases of 17β-estradiol production, and reversed cancer cell phenotype. Thus, chronic arsenic exposure drive human breast epithelia into a cancer cell phenotype with an apparent overabundance of putative CSCs. Arsenic appears to transform breast epithelia through overexpression of aromatase, thereby activating oncogenic processes independent of ER. PMID:24068038

  3. Expression of keratins in normal, immortalized and malignant oral epithelia in organotypic culture.

    PubMed

    Hansson, A; Bloor, B K; Haig, Y; Morgan, P R; Ekstrand, J; Grafström, R C

    2001-07-01

    Keratins have been extensively studied in tissues and cultured keratinocytes but limited information is available on epithelia reconstructed in vitro. The aim of this study was to examine keratin expression in organotypic epithelia with normal (NOK), immortalized (SVpgC2a) and malignant (SqCC/Y1) human buccal cells. Organotypic epithelia were derived from 10 days of culture at the air-liquid interface of collagen gels containing human oral fibroblasts using a standardized serum-free medium. Sections were stained immunohistochemically with selected mono-specific antibodies to a range of keratins. Organotypic epithelia showed sharp differences in keratin expression and distribution. K4/K13, K1/K10, K6/K16 were variably expressed in NOK and SqCC/Y1 but were not detected in SVpgC2a. K5 was expressed in all organotypic epithelia but K14 was absent in SVpgC2a. K7 and K8 showed variable expression while K18 was expressed uniformly in all epithelia. K19 was expressed consistently in NOK and K20 was distributed heterogeneously in SVpgC2a. Overall, organotypic cultures of normal keratinocytes express many of the same keratins as buccal mucosa. Further, the loss of keratins in SVpgC2a and their retention in SqCC/Y1 have several features in common with the respective keratin profile of oral epithelial dysplasia and well-differentiated oral squamous cell carcinoma. Although qualitative and quantitative differences exist compared to keratin expression in vivo, these cell lines in organotypic culture may serve in studies of the multi-step progression of oral cancer.

  4. Electron-microscopic observations of the gravity receptor epithelia of normal and spinner juvenile Octopus maya.

    PubMed

    Fermin, C D; Colmers, W F; Igarashi, M

    1985-01-01

    Light and electron microscopy of the gravity receptor epithelia (maculae) of statocysts of normal and "spinner" juvenile Octopus maya showed differences between the structures of the hair cells, supporting cells, and afferent neurons of these cephalopods. The maculae of spinner animals were approximately 30% smaller in their surface area and had 40% fewer hair cells. Moreover, the average distance between randomly-chosen hair bundles in scanning electron micrographs of maculae of normal animals was significantly greater (4.33 +/- 6.47 microns) than those of maculae of spinner animals (3.38 +/- 4.90 microns; P less than 0.0001). The sectional area of the supporting cell's microvilli in spinner maculae was larger (0.16 +/- 0.18 microns) than those of normal (0.10 +/- 0.10 micron; P less than 0.0001) O. maya. The morphological differences observed between certain structural components of the maculae of normal and spinner O. maya may be related to the absence and/or malformation of the neuroepithelial suprastructures in spinners. This may have direct or indirect effects to their inability to orient to gravity with these organs. PMID:2861903

  5. Toxicity of aged gasoline exhaust particles to normal and diseased airway epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Künzi, Lisa; Krapf, Manuel; Daher, Nancy; Dommen, Josef; Jeannet, Natalie; Schneider, Sarah; Platt, Stephen; Slowik, Jay G.; Baumlin, Nathalie; Salathe, Matthias; Prévôt, André S. H.; Kalberer, Markus; Strähl, Christof; Dümbgen, Lutz; Sioutas, Constantinos; Baltensperger, Urs; Geiser, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) pollution is a leading cause of premature death, particularly in those with pre-existing lung disease. A causative link between particle properties and adverse health effects remains unestablished mainly due to complex and variable physico-chemical PM parameters. Controlled laboratory experiments are required. Generating atmospherically realistic aerosols and performing cell-exposure studies at relevant particle-doses are challenging. Here we examine gasoline-exhaust particle toxicity from a Euro-5 passenger car in a uniquely realistic exposure scenario, combining a smog chamber simulating atmospheric ageing, an aerosol enrichment system varying particle number concentration independent of particle chemistry, and an aerosol deposition chamber physiologically delivering particles on air-liquid interface (ALI) cultures reproducing normal and susceptible health status. Gasoline-exhaust is an important PM source with largely unknown health effects. We investigated acute responses of fully-differentiated normal, distressed (antibiotics-treated) normal, and cystic fibrosis human bronchial epithelia (HBE), and a proliferating, single-cell type bronchial epithelial cell-line (BEAS-2B). We show that a single, short-term exposure to realistic doses of atmospherically-aged gasoline-exhaust particles impairs epithelial key-defence mechanisms, rendering it more vulnerable to subsequent hazards. We establish dose-response curves at realistic particle-concentration levels. Significant differences between cell models suggest the use of fully-differentiated HBE is most appropriate in future toxicity studies. PMID:26119831

  6. Toxicity of aged gasoline exhaust particles to normal and diseased airway epithelia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Künzi, Lisa; Krapf, Manuel; Daher, Nancy; Dommen, Josef; Jeannet, Natalie; Schneider, Sarah; Platt, Stephen; Slowik, Jay G.; Baumlin, Nathalie; Salathe, Matthias; Prévôt, André S. H.; Kalberer, Markus; Strähl, Christof; Dümbgen, Lutz; Sioutas, Constantinos; Baltensperger, Urs; Geiser, Marianne

    2015-06-01

    Particulate matter (PM) pollution is a leading cause of premature death, particularly in those with pre-existing lung disease. A causative link between particle properties and adverse health effects remains unestablished mainly due to complex and variable physico-chemical PM parameters. Controlled laboratory experiments are required. Generating atmospherically realistic aerosols and performing cell-exposure studies at relevant particle-doses are challenging. Here we examine gasoline-exhaust particle toxicity from a Euro-5 passenger car in a uniquely realistic exposure scenario, combining a smog chamber simulating atmospheric ageing, an aerosol enrichment system varying particle number concentration independent of particle chemistry, and an aerosol deposition chamber physiologically delivering particles on air-liquid interface (ALI) cultures reproducing normal and susceptible health status. Gasoline-exhaust is an important PM source with largely unknown health effects. We investigated acute responses of fully-differentiated normal, distressed (antibiotics-treated) normal, and cystic fibrosis human bronchial epithelia (HBE), and a proliferating, single-cell type bronchial epithelial cell-line (BEAS-2B). We show that a single, short-term exposure to realistic doses of atmospherically-aged gasoline-exhaust particles impairs epithelial key-defence mechanisms, rendering it more vulnerable to subsequent hazards. We establish dose-response curves at realistic particle-concentration levels. Significant differences between cell models suggest the use of fully-differentiated HBE is most appropriate in future toxicity studies.

  7. Toxicity of aged gasoline exhaust particles to normal and diseased airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Künzi, Lisa; Krapf, Manuel; Daher, Nancy; Dommen, Josef; Jeannet, Natalie; Schneider, Sarah; Platt, Stephen; Slowik, Jay G; Baumlin, Nathalie; Salathe, Matthias; Prévôt, André S H; Kalberer, Markus; Strähl, Christof; Dümbgen, Lutz; Sioutas, Constantinos; Baltensperger, Urs; Geiser, Marianne

    2015-06-29

    Particulate matter (PM) pollution is a leading cause of premature death, particularly in those with pre-existing lung disease. A causative link between particle properties and adverse health effects remains unestablished mainly due to complex and variable physico-chemical PM parameters. Controlled laboratory experiments are required. Generating atmospherically realistic aerosols and performing cell-exposure studies at relevant particle-doses are challenging. Here we examine gasoline-exhaust particle toxicity from a Euro-5 passenger car in a uniquely realistic exposure scenario, combining a smog chamber simulating atmospheric ageing, an aerosol enrichment system varying particle number concentration independent of particle chemistry, and an aerosol deposition chamber physiologically delivering particles on air-liquid interface (ALI) cultures reproducing normal and susceptible health status. Gasoline-exhaust is an important PM source with largely unknown health effects. We investigated acute responses of fully-differentiated normal, distressed (antibiotics-treated) normal, and cystic fibrosis human bronchial epithelia (HBE), and a proliferating, single-cell type bronchial epithelial cell-line (BEAS-2B). We show that a single, short-term exposure to realistic doses of atmospherically-aged gasoline-exhaust particles impairs epithelial key-defence mechanisms, rendering it more vulnerable to subsequent hazards. We establish dose-response curves at realistic particle-concentration levels. Significant differences between cell models suggest the use of fully-differentiated HBE is most appropriate in future toxicity studies.

  8. Toxicity of aged gasoline exhaust particles to normal and diseased airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Künzi, Lisa; Krapf, Manuel; Daher, Nancy; Dommen, Josef; Jeannet, Natalie; Schneider, Sarah; Platt, Stephen; Slowik, Jay G; Baumlin, Nathalie; Salathe, Matthias; Prévôt, André S H; Kalberer, Markus; Strähl, Christof; Dümbgen, Lutz; Sioutas, Constantinos; Baltensperger, Urs; Geiser, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) pollution is a leading cause of premature death, particularly in those with pre-existing lung disease. A causative link between particle properties and adverse health effects remains unestablished mainly due to complex and variable physico-chemical PM parameters. Controlled laboratory experiments are required. Generating atmospherically realistic aerosols and performing cell-exposure studies at relevant particle-doses are challenging. Here we examine gasoline-exhaust particle toxicity from a Euro-5 passenger car in a uniquely realistic exposure scenario, combining a smog chamber simulating atmospheric ageing, an aerosol enrichment system varying particle number concentration independent of particle chemistry, and an aerosol deposition chamber physiologically delivering particles on air-liquid interface (ALI) cultures reproducing normal and susceptible health status. Gasoline-exhaust is an important PM source with largely unknown health effects. We investigated acute responses of fully-differentiated normal, distressed (antibiotics-treated) normal, and cystic fibrosis human bronchial epithelia (HBE), and a proliferating, single-cell type bronchial epithelial cell-line (BEAS-2B). We show that a single, short-term exposure to realistic doses of atmospherically-aged gasoline-exhaust particles impairs epithelial key-defence mechanisms, rendering it more vulnerable to subsequent hazards. We establish dose-response curves at realistic particle-concentration levels. Significant differences between cell models suggest the use of fully-differentiated HBE is most appropriate in future toxicity studies. PMID:26119831

  9. Inverse Relationship between 15-Lipoxygenase-2 and PPAR-γ Gene Expression in Normal Epithelia Compared with Tumor Epithelia1

    PubMed Central

    Subbarayan, Vemparala; Xu, Xiao-Chun; Kim, Jeri; Yang, Peiying; Hoque, Ashraful; Sabichi, Anita L; Llansa, Norma; Mendoza, Gabriella; Logothetis, Christopher J; Newman, Robert A; Lippman, Scott M; Menter, David G

    2005-01-01

    Abstract 15-Lipoxygenase-2 (15-LOX-2) synthesizes 15-S-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-S-HETE), an endogenous ligand for the nuclear receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ). Several studies have described an inverse relationship between 15-LOX-2 and PPAR-γ expression in normal versus tumor samples. To systematically determine if this is a ubiquitous phenomenon, we used a variety of epithelial and nonepithelial cells and some tissues to further evaluate the extent of this inverse relationship. The levels of mRNA or protein were measured by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction or Western gray level intensity, whereas distribution was determined by in situ hybridization or immunofluorescence. 15-S-HETE was measured by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Normal epithelial cells/samples generally expressed high levels of 15-LOX-2 along with the enzyme product 15-S-HETE, but both levels were reduced in cancer cells/samples. In contrast, most cancer cells expressed high levels of PPAR-γ mRNA and protein, which were absent from normal epithelial cells. Overall, the inverse relationship between these two genes was primarily restricted to epithelial samples. Forced expression of PPAR-γ reduced 15-LOX-2 protein levels in normal cells, whereas forced expression of 15-LOX-2 in tumor cells suppressed PPAR-γ protein levels. These results suggest that feedback mechanisms may contribute to the loss of 15-LOX-2 pathway components, which coincide with an increase in PPAR-γ in many epithelial cancers. PMID:15799828

  10. Uniform expression of alcohol dehydrogenase 3 in epithelia regenerated with cultured normal, immortalised and malignant human oral keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, J J; Hansson, A; Nilsson, J A; Höög, J O; Grafström, R C

    2001-01-01

    The human oral epithelium is a target for damage from the inhalation of formaldehyde. However, most experimental studies on this chemical have relied on laboratory animals that are obligatory nose breathers, including rats and mice. Therefore, in vitro model systems that mimic the structure of the human oral epithelium and which retain normal tissue-specific metabolic competence are desirable. Based on the established role of alcohol dehydrogenase 3 (ADH3), also known as glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase, as the primary enzyme catalysing the detoxification of formaldehyde, the aim of this study was to investigate the expression of ADH3 in organotypic epithelia regenerated with normal (NOK), immortalised (SVpgC2a) and malignant (SqCC/Y1) human oral keratinocytes. Organotypic epithelia, usually consisting of 5-10 cell layers, were produced at the air-liquid interface of collagen gels containing human oral fibroblasts, after culture for 10 days in a standardised serum-free medium. Immunochemical staining demonstrated uniform expression of ADH3 in these organotypic epithelia, as well as in the epithelial cells of oral tissue. The specificity of the ADH3 antiserum was ascertained from the complete neutralisation of the immunochemical reaction with purified ADH3 protein. Assessment of the staining intensities indicated that the expression levels were similar among the regenerated epithelia. Furthermore, the regenerated epithelia showed similar ADH3 expression to the epithelium in oral tissue. Therefore, a tissue-like expression pattern for ADH3 can be generated from the culture of various oral keratinocyte lines in an organotypic state. Similar expression levels among the various cell lines indicate the preservation of ADH3 during malignant transformation, and therefore that NOK, SVpgC2a and SqCC/Y1 represent functional models for in vitro studies of formaldehyde metabolism in human oral mucosa.

  11. The xenobiotic transporter, MRP2, in epithelia from insects, sharks, and the human breast: implications for health and disease.

    PubMed

    Karnaky, Karl John; Hazen-Martin, Debra; Miller, David S

    2003-11-01

    A large number of mechanisms, including special excretory transporters, have evolved to help organisms excrete deleterious xenobiotics and endogenous molecules. We have examined the xenobiotic transport function of a putative multidrug resistance associated protein, MRP2, in three different epithelia: the insect renal (Malpighian) tubules, the secretory tubule of the shark rectal gland, and in ductules of the human breast. In the case of the insect and shark, transporter activity occurs in epithelia capable of great fluid transport. In the case of the insect Malpighian tubule, understanding the underlying mechanisms of this transporter may help with efforts to control populations of disease-carrying agriculturally important insects. In striking contrast, ductule architecture in nonlactating human breast ductules is that of an epithelium with a closed lumen. Immunocytochemical studies show that MRP2 is localized in the apical region of the ductule epithelial cells. In this unique case, MRP2 substrates transported into the lumen could possibly be concentrated. Transport substrates of MRP2 include carcinogens as well as antioxidants and other salutary molecules. Thus, in the breast ductule, MRP2 may play a significant role in breast epithelial cell health and cancer carcinogenesis.

  12. Immortalised breast epithelia survive prolonged DNA replication stress and return to cycle from a senescent-like state

    PubMed Central

    Maya-Mendoza, A; Merchut-Maya, J M; Bartkova, J; Bartek, J; Streuli, C H; Jackson, D A

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian cells have mechanisms to counteract the effects of metabolic and exogenous stresses, many of that would be mutagenic if ignored. Damage arising during DNA replication is a major source of mutagenesis. The extent of damage dictates whether cells undergo transient cell cycle arrest and damage repair, senescence or apoptosis. Existing dogma defines these alternative fates as distinct choices. Here we show that immortalised breast epithelial cells are able to survive prolonged S phase arrest and subsequently re-enter cycle after many days of being in an arrested, senescence-like state. Prolonged cell cycle inhibition in fibroblasts induced DNA damage response and cell death. However, in immortalised breast epithelia, efficient S phase arrest minimised chromosome damage and protected sufficient chromatin-bound replication licensing complexes to allow cell cycle re-entry. We propose that our observation could have implications for the design of drug therapies for breast cancer. PMID:25058425

  13. NHE-RF, a Merlin-Interacting Protein, Is Primarily Expressed in Luminal Epithelia, Proliferative Endometrium, and Estrogen Receptor-Positive Breast Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O.; Wiederhold, Thorsten; Nielsen, G. Petur; James, Marianne; Pinney-Michalowski, Denise; Roy, Jennifer E.; Cohen, Wendy A.; Ramesh, Vijaya; Louis, David N.

    2001-01-01

    NHE-RF, a regulatory cofactor for NHE (Na+-H+ exchanger) type 3, interacts with ion transporters and receptors through its PDZ domains and with the MERM proteins (merlin, ezrin, radixin and moesin) via its carboxyl terminus. Thus, NHE-RF may act as a multifunctional adaptor protein and play a role in the assembly of signal transduction complexes, linking ion channels and receptors to the actin cytoskeleton. NHE-RF expression is up-regulated in response to estrogen in estrogen receptor-positive breast carcinoma cell lines, suggesting that it may be involved in estrogen signaling. To further understand NHE-RF function and its possible role in estrogen signaling, we analyzed NHE-RF expression in normal human tissues, including cycling endometrium, and in breast carcinomas, tissues in which estrogen plays an important role in regulating cell growth and proliferation. NHE-RF is expressed in many epithelia, especially in cells specialized in ion transport or absorption, and is often localized to apical (luminal) membranes. NHE-RF expression varies markedly in proliferative versus secretory endometrium, with high expression in proliferative (estrogen-stimulated) endometrium. Furthermore, estrogen receptor status and NHE-RF expression correlate closely in breast carcinoma specimens. These findings support a role for NHE-RF in estrogen signaling. PMID:11141479

  14. Soluble mediators, not cilia, determine airway surface liquid volume in normal and cystic fibrosis superficial airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Tarran, Robert; Trout, Laura; Donaldson, Scott H; Boucher, Richard C

    2006-05-01

    A key aspect of the lung's innate defense system is the ability of the superficial epithelium to regulate airway surface liquid (ASL) volume to maintain a 7-mum periciliary liquid layer (PCL), which is required for cilia to beat and produce mucus flow. The mechanisms whereby airway epithelia regulate ASL height to >or=7 microm are poorly understood. Using bumetanide as an inhibitor of Cl- secretion, and nystatin as an activator of Na+ absorption, we found that a coordinated "blending" of both Cl- secretion and Na+ absorption must occur to effect ASL volume homeostasis. We then investigated how ASL volume status is regulated by the underlying epithelia. Cilia were not critical to this process as (a) ASL volume was normal in cultures from patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia with immotile cilia, and (b) in normal cultures that had not yet undergone ciliogenesis. However, we found that maneuvers that mimic deposition of excess ASL onto the proximal airways, which occurs during mucociliary clearance and after glandular secretion, acutely stimulated Na+ absorption, suggesting that volume regulation was sensitive to changes in concentrations of soluble mediators in the ASL rather than alterations in ciliary beating. To investigate this hypothesis further, we added potential "soluble mediators" to the ASL. ASL volume regulation was sensitive to a channel-activating protein (CAP; trypsin) and a CAP inhibitor (aprotinin), which regulated Na+ absorption via changes in epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) activity in both normal and cystic fibrosis cultures. ATP was also found to acutely regulate ASL volume by inducing secretion in normal and cystic fibrosis (CF) cultures, while its metabolite adenosine (ADO) evoked secretion in normal cultures but stimulated absorption in CF cultures. Interestingly, the amount of ASL/Cl- secretion elicited by ATP/ADO was influenced by the level of CAP-induced Na+ absorption, suggesting that there are important interactions between the soluble

  15. Cytonemes are required for the establishment of a normal Hedgehog morphogen gradient in Drosophila epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Seijo, Irene; Andrés, Germán; Rodríguez-Navas, Carmen; González-Méndez, Laura; Guerrero, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Summary Hedgehog (Hh) signalling is important in development, stem cell biology and disease. In a variety of tissues, Hh acts as a morphogen to regulate growth and cell fate specification. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain morphogen movement, one of which is transport via filopodia-like protrusions called cytonemes. Here, we analyse the mechanism underlying Hh movement in the wing disc and the abdominal epidermis of Drosophila. We show that, in both epithelia, cells generate cytonemes in regions of Hh signalling. These protrusions are actin-based and span several cell diameters. Various Hh signalling components localise to cytonemes, as well as to punctate structures that move along cytonemes and are probably exovesicles. Using in vivo imaging, we show that cytonemes are dynamic structures and that Hh gradient establishment correlates with cytoneme formation in space and time. Indeed, mutant conditions that affect cytoneme formation reduce both cytoneme length and Hh gradient length. Our results suggest that cytoneme-mediated Hh transport is the mechanistic basis for Hh gradient formation. PMID:24121526

  16. Cell Budding from Normal Appearing Epithelia: A Predictor of Colorectal Cancer Metastasis?

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bin; Mason, Jeffrey; Jewett, Anahid; Qian, Jun; Ding, Yijiang; Cho, William CS; Zhang, Xichen; Man, Yan-gao

    2013-01-01

    Background: Colorectal carcinogenesis is believed to be a multi-stage process that originates with a localized adenoma, which linearly progresses to an intra-mucosal carcinoma, to an invasive lesion, and finally to metastatic cancer. This progression model is supported by tissue culture and animal model studies, but it is difficult to reconcile with several well-established observations, principally among these are that up to 25% of early stage (Stage I/II), node-negative colorectal cancer (CRC) develop distant metastasis, and that circulating CRC cells are undetectable in peripheral blood samples of up to 50% of patients with confirmed metastasis, but more than 30% of patients with no detectable metastasis exhibit such cells. The mechanism responsible for this diverse behavior is unknown, and there are no effective means to identify patients with pending, or who are at high risk for, developing metastatic CRC. Novel findings: Our previous studies of human breast and prostate cancer have shown that cancer invasion arises from the convergence of a tissue injury, the innate immune response to that injury, and the presence of tumor stem cells within tumor capsules at the site of the injury. Focal degeneration of a capsule due to age or disease attracts lymphocyte infiltration that degrades the degenerating capsules resulting in the formation of a focal disruption in the capsule, which selectively favors proliferating or “budding” of the underlying tumor stem cells. Our recent studies suggest that lymphocyte infiltration also triggers metastasis by disrupting the intercellular junctions and surface adhesion molecules within the proliferating cell buds causing their dissociation. Then, lymphocytes and tumor cells are conjoined through membrane fusion to form tumor-lymphocyte chimeras (TLCs) that allows the tumor stem cell to avail itself of the lymphocyte's natural ability to migrate and breach cell barriers in order to intravasate and to travel to distant organs

  17. Regulation of Chloride Channels by Protein Kinase C in Normal and Cystic Fibrosis Airway Epithelia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; McCann, John D.; Anderson, Matthew P.; Clancy, John P.; Liedtke, Carole M.; Nairn, Angus C.; Greengard, Paul; Welsh, Michael J.

    1989-06-01

    Apical membrane chloride channels control chloride secretion by airway epithelial cells. Defective regulation of these channels is a prominent characteristic of cystic fibrosis. In normal intact cells, activation of protein kinase C (PKC) by phorbol ester either stimulated or inhibited chloride secretion, depending on the physiological status of the cell. In cell-free membrane patches, PKC also had a dual effect: at a high calcium concentration, PKC inactivated chloride channels; at a low calcium concentration, PKC activated chloride channels. In cystic fibrosis cells, PKC-dependent channel inactivation was normal, but activation was defective. Thus it appears that PKC phosphorylates and regulates two different sites on the channel or on an associated membrane protein, one of which is defective in cystic fibrosis.

  18. The expanding significance of keratin intermediate filaments in normal and diseased epithelia.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoou; Hobbs, Ryan P; Coulombe, Pierre A

    2013-02-01

    Intermediate filaments are assembled from a diverse group of evolutionary conserved proteins and are specified in a tissue-dependent, cell type-dependent, and context-dependent fashion in the body. Genetic mutations in intermediate filament proteins account for a large number of diseases, ranging from skin fragility conditions to cardiomyopathies and premature aging. Keratins, the epithelial-specific intermediate filaments, are now recognized as multi-faceted effectors in their native context. In this review, we emphasize the recent progress made in defining the role of keratins towards the regulation of cytoarchitecture, cell growth and proliferation, apoptosis, and cell motility during embryonic development, in normal adult tissues, and in select diseases such as cancer.

  19. Methylation of p16(INK4a) promoters occurs in vivo in histologically normal human mammary epithelia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Charles R.; Nuovo, Gerard J.; Esteller, Manel; Chew, Karen; Baylin, Stephen B.; Herman, James G.; Tlsty, Thea D.

    2003-01-01

    Cultures of human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs) contain a subpopulation of variant cells with the capacity to propagate beyond an in vitro proliferation barrier. These variant HMECs, which contain hypermethylated and silenced p16(INK4a) (p16) promoters, eventually accumulate multiple chromosomal changes, many of which are similar to those detected in premalignant and malignant lesions of breast cancer. To determine the origin of these variant HMECs in culture, we used Luria-Delbruck fluctuation analysis and found that variant HMECs exist within the population before the proliferation barrier, thereby raising the possibility that variant HMECs exist in vivo before cultivation. To test this hypothesis, we examined mammary tissue from normal women for evidence of p16 promoter hypermethylation. Here we show that epithelial cells with methylation of p16 promoter sequences occur in focal patches of histologically normal mammary tissue of a substantial fraction of healthy, cancer-free women.

  20. Genomic Changes in Normal Breast Tissue in Women at Normal Risk or at High Risk for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Danforth, David N.

    2016-01-01

    Sporadic breast cancer develops through the accumulation of molecular abnormalities in normal breast tissue, resulting from exposure to estrogens and other carcinogens beginning at adolescence and continuing throughout life. These molecular changes may take a variety of forms, including numerical and structural chromosomal abnormalities, epigenetic changes, and gene expression alterations. To characterize these abnormalities, a review of the literature has been conducted to define the molecular changes in each of the above major genomic categories in normal breast tissue considered to be either at normal risk or at high risk for sporadic breast cancer. This review indicates that normal risk breast tissues (such as reduction mammoplasty) contain evidence of early breast carcinogenesis including loss of heterozygosity, DNA methylation of tumor suppressor and other genes, and telomere shortening. In normal tissues at high risk for breast cancer (such as normal breast tissue adjacent to breast cancer or the contralateral breast), these changes persist, and are increased and accompanied by aneuploidy, increased genomic instability, a wide range of gene expression differences, development of large cancerized fields, and increased proliferation. These changes are consistent with early and long-standing exposure to carcinogens, especially estrogens. A model for the breast carcinogenic pathway in normal risk and high-risk breast tissues is proposed. These findings should clarify our understanding of breast carcinogenesis in normal breast tissue and promote development of improved methods for risk assessment and breast cancer prevention in women. PMID:27559297

  1. Genomic Changes in Normal Breast Tissue in Women at Normal Risk or at High Risk for Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Danforth, David N

    2016-01-01

    Sporadic breast cancer develops through the accumulation of molecular abnormalities in normal breast tissue, resulting from exposure to estrogens and other carcinogens beginning at adolescence and continuing throughout life. These molecular changes may take a variety of forms, including numerical and structural chromosomal abnormalities, epigenetic changes, and gene expression alterations. To characterize these abnormalities, a review of the literature has been conducted to define the molecular changes in each of the above major genomic categories in normal breast tissue considered to be either at normal risk or at high risk for sporadic breast cancer. This review indicates that normal risk breast tissues (such as reduction mammoplasty) contain evidence of early breast carcinogenesis including loss of heterozygosity, DNA methylation of tumor suppressor and other genes, and telomere shortening. In normal tissues at high risk for breast cancer (such as normal breast tissue adjacent to breast cancer or the contralateral breast), these changes persist, and are increased and accompanied by aneuploidy, increased genomic instability, a wide range of gene expression differences, development of large cancerized fields, and increased proliferation. These changes are consistent with early and long-standing exposure to carcinogens, especially estrogens. A model for the breast carcinogenic pathway in normal risk and high-risk breast tissues is proposed. These findings should clarify our understanding of breast carcinogenesis in normal breast tissue and promote development of improved methods for risk assessment and breast cancer prevention in women. PMID:27559297

  2. Lipoxin A4 Stimulates Calcium-Activated Chloride Currents and Increases Airway Surface Liquid Height in Normal and Cystic Fibrosis Airway Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Alawi, Mazen; Costello, Richard W.; McNally, Paul; Chiron, Raphaël; Harvey, Brian J.; Urbach, Valérie

    2012-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease characterised by a deficit in epithelial Cl− secretion which in the lung leads to airway dehydration and a reduced Airway Surface Liquid (ASL) height. The endogenous lipoxin LXA4 is a member of the newly identified eicosanoids playing a key role in ending the inflammatory process. Levels of LXA4 are reported to be decreased in the airways of patients with CF. We have previously shown that in normal human bronchial epithelial cells, LXA4 produced a rapid and transient increase in intracellular Ca2+. We have investigated, the effect of LXA4 on Cl− secretion and the functional consequences on ASL generation in bronchial epithelial cells obtained from CF and non-CF patient biopsies and in bronchial epithelial cell lines. We found that LXA4 stimulated a rapid intracellular Ca2+ increase in all of the different CF bronchial epithelial cells tested. In non-CF and CF bronchial epithelia, LXA4 stimulated whole-cell Cl− currents which were inhibited by NPPB (calcium-activated Cl− channel inhibitor), BAPTA-AM (chelator of intracellular Ca2+) but not by CFTRinh-172 (CFTR inhibitor). We found, using confocal imaging, that LXA4 increased the ASL height in non-CF and in CF airway bronchial epithelia. The LXA4 effect on ASL height was sensitive to bumetanide, an inhibitor of transepithelial Cl− secretion. The LXA4 stimulation of intracellular Ca2+, whole-cell Cl− currents, conductances and ASL height were inhibited by Boc-2, a specific antagonist of the ALX/FPR2 receptor. Our results provide, for the first time, evidence for a novel role of LXA4 in the stimulation of intracellular Ca2+ signalling leading to Ca2+-activated Cl− secretion and enhanced ASL height in non-CF and CF bronchial epithelia. PMID:22662206

  3. Expression and function of the protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor J (PTPRJ) in normal mammary epithelial cells and breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Smart, Chanel E; Askarian Amiri, Marjan E; Wronski, Ania; Dinger, Marcel E; Crawford, Joanna; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A; Vargas, Ana Cristina; Reid, Lynne; Simpson, Peter T; Song, Sarah; Wiesner, Christiane; French, Juliet D; Dave, Richa K; da Silva, Leonard; Purdon, Amy; Andrew, Megan; Mattick, John S; Lakhani, Sunil R; Brown, Melissa A; Kellie, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor J, PTPRJ, is a tumor suppressor gene that has been implicated in a range of cancers, including breast cancer, yet little is known about its role in normal breast physiology or in mammary gland tumorigenesis. In this paper we show that PTPRJ mRNA is expressed in normal breast tissue and reduced in corresponding tumors. Meta-analysis revealed that the gene encoding PTPRJ is frequently lost in breast tumors and that low expression of the transcript associated with poorer overall survival at 20 years. Immunohistochemistry of PTPRJ protein in normal human breast tissue revealed a distinctive apical localisation in the luminal cells of alveoli and ducts. Qualitative analysis of a cohort of invasive ductal carcinomas revealed retention of normal apical PTPRJ localization where tubule formation was maintained but that tumors mostly exhibited diffuse cytoplasmic staining, indicating that dysregulation of localisation associated with loss of tissue architecture in tumorigenesis. The murine ortholog, Ptprj, exhibited a similar localisation in normal mammary gland, and was differentially regulated throughout lactational development, and in an in vitro model of mammary epithelial differentiation. Furthermore, ectopic expression of human PTPRJ in HC11 murine mammary epithelial cells inhibited dome formation. These data indicate that PTPRJ may regulate differentiation of normal mammary epithelia and that dysregulation of protein localisation may be associated with tumorigenesis.

  4. Molecular Portrait of the Normal Human Breast Tissue and Its Influence on Breast Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Margan, Madalin Marius; Jitariu, Andreea Adriana; Nica, Cristian; Raica, Marius

    2016-01-01

    Normal human breast tissue consists of epithelial and nonepithelial cells with different molecular profiles and differentiation grades. This molecular heterogeneity is known to yield abnormal clones that may contribute to the development of breast carcinomas. Stem cells that are found in developing and mature breast tissue are either positive or negative for cytokeratin 19 depending on their subtype. These cells are able to generate carcinogenesis along with mature cells. However, scientific data remains controversial regarding the monoclonal or polyclonal origin of breast carcinomas. The majority of breast carcinomas originate from epithelial cells that normally express BRCA1. The consecutive loss of the BRCA1 gene leads to various abnormalities in epithelial cells. Normal breast epithelial cells also express hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) 1α and HIF-2α that are associated with a high metastatic rate and a poor prognosis for malignant lesions. The nuclear expression of estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) in normal human breast tissue is maintained in malignant tissue as well. Several controversies regarding the ability of ER and PR status to predict breast cancer outcome remain. Both ER and PR act as modulators of cell activity in normal human breast tissue. Ki-67 positivity is strongly correlated with tumor grade although its specific role in applied therapy requires further studies. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) oncoprotein is less expressed in normal human breast specimens but is highly expressed in certain malignant lesions of the breast. Unlike HER2, epidermal growth factor receptor expression is similar in both normal and malignant tissues. Molecular heterogeneity is not only found in breast carcinomas but also in normal breast tissue. Therefore, the molecular mapping of normal human breast tissue might represent a key research area to fully elucidate the mechanisms of breast carcinogenesis. PMID:27382385

  5. Molecular Portrait of the Normal Human Breast Tissue and Its Influence on Breast Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Margan, Madalin Marius; Jitariu, Andreea Adriana; Cimpean, Anca Maria; Nica, Cristian; Raica, Marius

    2016-06-01

    Normal human breast tissue consists of epithelial and nonepithelial cells with different molecular profiles and differentiation grades. This molecular heterogeneity is known to yield abnormal clones that may contribute to the development of breast carcinomas. Stem cells that are found in developing and mature breast tissue are either positive or negative for cytokeratin 19 depending on their subtype. These cells are able to generate carcinogenesis along with mature cells. However, scientific data remains controversial regarding the monoclonal or polyclonal origin of breast carcinomas. The majority of breast carcinomas originate from epithelial cells that normally express BRCA1. The consecutive loss of the BRCA1 gene leads to various abnormalities in epithelial cells. Normal breast epithelial cells also express hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) 1α and HIF-2α that are associated with a high metastatic rate and a poor prognosis for malignant lesions. The nuclear expression of estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) in normal human breast tissue is maintained in malignant tissue as well. Several controversies regarding the ability of ER and PR status to predict breast cancer outcome remain. Both ER and PR act as modulators of cell activity in normal human breast tissue. Ki-67 positivity is strongly correlated with tumor grade although its specific role in applied therapy requires further studies. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) oncoprotein is less expressed in normal human breast specimens but is highly expressed in certain malignant lesions of the breast. Unlike HER2, epidermal growth factor receptor expression is similar in both normal and malignant tissues. Molecular heterogeneity is not only found in breast carcinomas but also in normal breast tissue. Therefore, the molecular mapping of normal human breast tissue might represent a key research area to fully elucidate the mechanisms of breast carcinogenesis. PMID:27382385

  6. Intracellular pH and its relationship to regulation of ion transport in normal and cystic fibrosis human nasal epithelia.

    PubMed

    Willumsen, N J; Boucher, R C

    1992-09-01

    1. Intracellular pH (pHi) of cultured human airway epithelial cells from normal and cystic fibrosis (CF) subjects were measured with double-barrelled pH-sensitive liquid exchanger microelectrodes. The cells, which were grown to confluence on a permeable collagen matrix support, were mounted in a modified miniature Ussing chamber. All studies were conducted under open circuit conditions. Values are given as means +/- S.E.M. and n refers to the number of preparations. 2. Normal preparations (n = 15) were characterized by a transepithelial potential difference (Vt) of -18 +/- 2 mV, an apical membrane potential (Va) of -19 +/- 2 mV, a basolateral membrane potential (Vb) of -37 +/- 2 mV, a transepithelial resistance (Rt) of 253 +/- 15 omega cm2, a fractional apical membrane resistance (fRa) of 0.40 +/- 0.04 and an equivalent short circuit current (Ieq) of -73 +/- 7 microA cm-2. 3. CF preparations (n = 13) were characterized by a Vt of -46 +/- 7 mV, a Va of 3 +/- 5 mV, a Vb of -43 +/- 3 mV, Rt of 373 +/- 47 omega cm2, fRa of 0.44 +/- 0.04 and an Ieq of -130 +/- 16 microA cm-2. All parameters except Vb and fRa were significantly different (P < 0.025) from those of normal preparations. 4. Despite large differences in electrochemical driving force for proton flow across the apical cell membranes between normal and CF preparations (-4 +/- 3 mV and 20 +/- 7 mV, respectively), pHi was similar (7.15 +/- 0.02 and 7.11 +/- 0.05, respectively). The driving force across the basolateral membrane was similar in normal and CF preparations (22 +/- 3 and 26 +/- 3 mV, respectively). 5. Intracellular alkalinization achieved by removal of CO2 from the luminal Ringer solution or by luminal ammonium prepulse led to stimulation of Ieq in both normal (from -58 to -70 microA cm-2, n = 4; P < 0.05) and CF (from -144 to -163 microA cm-2, n = 4; P < 0.005) preparations. The increase in Ieq was associated with a reduction of Rt, increase in fRa, and hyperpolarization of Vb. All changes in

  7. Survivin expression in breast lobular carcinoma: correlations with normal breast tissue and clinicomorphological parameters.

    PubMed

    Adamkov, Marian; Výbohová, Desanka; Horáček, Jaroslav; Kovalská, Mária; Furjelová, Martina

    2013-06-01

    The antiapoptotic protein survivin is rarely expressed in normal adult differentiated tissues, but it is often detected in their malignant counterparts. Immunohistochemically, we evaluated survivin expression in 19 cases of normal breast tissue and 64 cases of lobular breast carcinoma. The intensity of staining, percentage of labeled cells and subcellular location of survivin were assessed. We analyzed the quantitative differences of survivin expression between normal breast tissue and carcinomas. We also correlated survivin expression pattern in carcinomas with clinicomorphological parameters such as age of patients, grade, stage and size of primary tumor, lymph node metastasis, vascular invasion as well as estrogen and progesterone status. Survivin was detected in 10/19 cases of normal breast tissue (52.6%) and in 55/64 cases of lobular breast carcinoma (86%). The statistical analysis confirmed significant correlations between the assessed parameters in normal breast and lobular carcinoma. Furthermore, the expression of estrogen correlated significantly with the subcellular localization and intensity of survivin in carcinoma. However, no significant correlation was shown with regard to other clinicomorphological parameters. Our results suggest that survivin may be a valuable diagnostic marker, as well as a new independent prognostic parameter, in lobular breast carcinoma. Finally, our data support the hypothesis that lobular and ductal breast carcinomas seem to be different clinicomorphological entities.

  8. Stem cells in normal mammary gland and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jie; Yin, Xin; Ma, Tao; Lu, Jun

    2010-04-01

    The mammary gland is a structurally dynamic organ that undergoes dramatic alterations with age, menstrual cycle, and reproductive status. Mammary gland stem cells, the minor cell population within the mature organ, are thought to have multiple functions in regulating mammary gland development, tissue maintenance, major growth, and structural remodeling. In addition, accumulative evidence suggests that breast cancers are initiated and maintained by a subpopulation of tumor cells with stem cell features (called cancer stem cells). A variety of methods have been developed to identify and characterize mammary stem cells, and several signal transduction pathways have been identified to be essential for the self-renewal and differentiation of mammary gland stem cells. Understanding the origin of breast cancer stem cells, their relationship to breast cancer development, and the differences between normal and cancer stem cells may lead to novel approaches to breast cancer diagnosis, prevention, and treatment.

  9. The normal breast epithelium of women with breast cancer displays an aberrant response to estradiol.

    PubMed

    Khan, S A; Sachdeva, A; Naim, S; Meguid, M M; Marx, W; Simon, H; Halverson, J D; Numann, P J

    1999-10-01

    Breast epithelial response to estradiol may play an important role in breast cancer etiology. We have examined the relationship between serum estradiol and progesterone levels and normal breast epithelial expression of estrogen receptor (ER) alpha, progesterone receptor (PgR), and epithelial proliferation (as reflected by the Ki-67 labeling index) in 121 women (50 newly diagnosed breast cancer cases and 71 benign breast disease controls). Simultaneous samples of grossly normal breast tissue and venous blood were obtained from women undergoing breast surgery. Serum estradiol and progesterone levels were measured by radioimmunoassay; breast epithelial ER, PgR, and Ki-67 expression was measured by immunohistochemistry. Linear regression, controlled for patient age and ductal and lobular composition of the tissue, showed that the breast epithelium of control women displayed an inverse correlation between serum estradiol and ER-alpha, which was not seen in case women (P for the difference in regression slopes = 0.001). PgR expression displayed a significant positive correlation with serum estradiol in cases, but not in controls. Epithelial proliferation had no relationship to either estradiol or progesterone in both cases and controls but showed an inverse relationship with ER in controls and a direct relationship in cases (P for the difference in regression slopes = 0.066). These results suggest a dysregulation of hormonal response in the normal breast epithelium of high-risk women, with lack of regulation of ER by estradiol, increased estrogen responsiveness as reflected by PgR expression, and a dissociation of ER expression and proliferative response.

  10. Differentiating cancerous from normal breast tissue by redox imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, He N.; Tchou, Julia; Feng, Min; Zhao, Huaqing; Li, Lin Z.

    2015-02-01

    Abnormal metabolism can be a hallmark of cancer occurring early before detectable histological changes and may serve as an early detection biomarker. The current gold standard to establish breast cancer (BC) diagnosis is histological examination of biopsy. Previously we have found that pre-cancer and cancer tissues in animal models displayed abnormal mitochondrial redox state. Our technique of quantitatively measuring the mitochondrial redox state has the potential to be implemented as an early detection tool for cancer and may provide prognostic value. We therefore in this present study, investigated the feasibility of quantifying the redox state of tumor samples from 16 BC patients. Tumor tissue aliquots were collected from both normal and cancerous tissue from the affected cancer-bearing breasts of 16 female patients (5 TNBC, 9 ER+, 2 ER+/Her2+) shortly after surgical resection. All specimens were snap-frozen with liquid nitrogen on site and scanned later with the Chance redox scanner, i.e., the 3D cryogenic NADH/oxidized flavoprotein (Fp) fluorescence imager. Our preliminary results showed that both NADH and Fp (including FAD, i.e., flavin adenine dinucleotide) signals in the cancerous tissues roughly tripled to quadrupled those in the normal tissues (p<0.05) and the redox ratio Fp/(NADH+Fp) was about 27% higher in the cancerous tissues than in the normal ones (p<0.05). Our findings suggest that the redox state could differentiate between cancer and non-cancer breast tissues in human patients and this novel redox scanning procedure may assist in tissue diagnosis in freshly procured biopsy samples prior to tissue fixation. We are in the process of evaluating the prognostic value of the redox imaging indices for BC.

  11. Analysis of CUL-5 expression in breast epithelial cells, breast cancer cell lines, normal tissues and tumor tissues

    PubMed Central

    Fay, Michael J; Longo, Kenneth A; Karathanasis, George A; Shope, David M; Mandernach, Craig J; Leong, Jason R; Hicks, Alfred; Pherson, Kenneth; Husain, Amyna

    2003-01-01

    Background The chromosomal location of CUL-5 (11q 22-23) is associated with LOH in breast cancer, suggesting that CUL-5 may be a tumor suppressor. The purpose of this research was to determine if there is differential expression of CUL-5 in breast epithelial cells versus breast cancer cell lines, and normal human tissues versus human tumors. The expression of CUL-5 in breast epithelial cells (HMEC, MCF-10A), and breast cancer cells (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231) was examined using RT-PCR, Northern blot analysis, and Western blot analysis. The expression of mRNA for other CUL family members (CUL-1, -2, -3, -4A, and -4B) in these cells was evaluated by RT-PCR. A normal human tissue expression array and a cancer profiling array were used to examine CUL-5 expression in normal human tissues and matched normal tissues versus tumor tissues, respectively. Results CUL-5 is expressed at the mRNA and protein levels by breast epithelial cells (HMEC, MCF-10A) and breast cancer cells (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231). These cells also express mRNA for other CUL family members. The normal human tissue expression array revealed that CUL-5 is widely expressed. The cancer profiling array revealed that 82% (41/50) of the breast cancers demonstrated a decrease in CUL-5 expression versus the matched normal tissue. For the 50 cases of matched breast tissue there was a statistically significant ~2.2 fold decreased expression of CUL-5 in tumor tissue versus normal tissue (P < 0.0001). Conclusions The data demonstrate no apparent decrease in CUL-5 expression in the breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231) versus the breast epithelial cells (HMEC, MCF-10A). The decrease in CUL-5 expression in breast tumor tissue versus matched normal tissue supports the hypothesis that decreased expression of CUL-5 may play a role in breast tumorigenesis. PMID:14641918

  12. Insulin-like growth factor receptor-1 (IGF-1R) expression in normal breast, proliferative breast lesions, and breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Rohit; Beriwal, Sushil; McManus, Kim; Dabbs, David J

    2011-05-01

    Insulin-like growth factor receptor 1 (IGF-1R) is a receptor protein tyrosine kinase that is activated by ligand (IGF-1) binding and promotes mitogenic, metastatic, and antiapoptotic phenotypes of breast cancer. There is a dearth of studies analyzing IGF-1R expression by immunohistochemistry in breast carcinoma. This biomarker analysis will be important for pharmacologic interventions that target the IGF system. IGF-1R expression pattern was first analyzed in normal breast tissue and a variety of breast lesions (71 diagnoses from 35 patients), followed by analysis in 191 consecutive invasive breast carcinomas. Furthermore, 86 carcinomas treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy were also analyzed. The carcinomas were classified using immunohistochemical surrogate (to molecular classes) markers-estrogen receptors (ER), progesterone receptors, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. IGF-1R is expressed at moderate level in normal breast tissue which was considered as normal expression. Overexpression and lower expression were defined as higher than normal or lower than normal expression, respectively. Among the benign and noninvasive breast lesions, IGF-1R expression was slightly increased in lesions that are hormonally driven (such as atypical ductal hyperplasia and columnar cells changes) whereas it was significantly reduced in ER-negative lesions (such as apocrine metaplasia). Similarly, in 191 consecutive breast carcinomas, IGF-1R overexpression was predominantly seen in ER-positive+ tumors. The tumor group that consistently showed reduced expression was the ERBB2 group (ER negative/progesterone receptors negative/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive). The expression was somewhat heterogeneous in the triple-negative group. IGF-1R expression was not predictive of pathologic complete response or tumor volume reduction in ER-negative tumors, but reduced IGF-1R was associated with pathologic complete response and significant tumor volume reduction in

  13. Armc8 expression was elevated during atypia-to-carcinoma progression and associated with cancer development of breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chuifeng; Zhao, Yang; Mao, Xiaoyun; Miao, Yuan; Lin, Xuyong; Jiang, Guiyang; Zhang, Xiupeng; Han, Qiang; Luan, Lan; Wang, Enhua

    2014-11-01

    Armadillo repeat-containing protein 8 (Armc8) is a key factor to regulate cell membrane adhesion complex through promoting α-catenin degradation. However, its expression and function in human malignant tumors are largely unknown. Here, we present our study investigating Armc8 expression in tumor and non-tumor breast tissues including 45 normal epithelia, 53 lesions of hyperplasia with or without dysplasia, 22 benign tumors, and 92 carcinomas including 28 carcinomas in situ and 64 infiltrating carcinomas using immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blotting study. Armc8 expression was detected mainly in the cytoplasm with occasional membrane immunostaining. The positive rate of Armc8 expression in normal breast epithelia (8.9%, four out of 45) was very low. No significant difference was found between Armc8 expression in usual ductal hyperplasia (UDH) (11.1%, two out of 18), benign breast tumors including intraductal papilloma (10.0%, one out of 10) and fibroadenoma (8.3%, one out of 12), and normal breast epithelia (p>0.05). Elevated expression of Armc8 was found in breast epithelia with dysplasia (24.0%, six out of 25) compared to that in normal breast epithelia, UDH, and benign breast tumors (p<0.05). Armc8 expression in breast carcinoma including breast carcinoma in situ (10/28, 35.7%), infiltrating ductal carcinoma (60.7%, 34/56), and infiltrating lobular carcinoma (50.0%, 4/8) was higher than that in normal breast epithelia, UDH, benign breast tumors, and breast epithelia with dysplasia (p<0.05). The highest expression of Armc8 was found in infiltrating breast carcinoma (59.4%, 38/64) compared to all the other breast tissues. Higher Armc8 expression was found to be linked to lymph node metastasis and advanced tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stages (III+IV) in infiltrating breast carcinoma (p<0.05). We further confirmed Armc8 expression in breast epithelial cell line MCF10A and breast carcinoma cell lines including MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, and ZR751 using Western

  14. Epithelia migration: A spatiotemporal interplay between contraction and adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Boris; Pinto, Inês Mendes

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial tissues represent 60% of the cells that form the human body and where more than 90% of all cancers derived. Epithelia transformation and migration involve altered cell contractile mechanics powered by an actomyosin-based cytoskeleton and influenced by cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. A balance between contractile and adhesive forces regulates a large number of cellular and tissue properties crucial for epithelia migration and tumorigenesis. In this review, the forces driving normal epithelia transformation into highly motile and invasive cells and tissues will be discussed. PMID:26176587

  15. GPER mediates estrogen-induced signaling and proliferations in human breast epithelial cells, and normal and malignant breast

    PubMed Central

    Scaling, Allison L.

    2014-01-01

    17β-estradiol (estrogen), through receptor binding and activation, is required for mammary gland development. Estrogen stimulates epithelial proliferation in the mammary gland, promoting ductal elongation and morphogenesis. In addition to a developmental role, estrogen promotes proliferation in tumorigenic settings, particularly breast cancer. The proliferative effects of estrogen in the normal breast and breast tumors are attributed to estrogen receptor α. Although in vitro studies have demonstrated that the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER, previously called GPR30) can modulate proliferation in breast cancer cells both positively and negatively depending on cellular context, its role in proliferation in the intact normal or malignant breast remains unclear. Estrogen-induced GPER-dependent proliferation was assessed in the immortalized non-tumorigenic human breast epithelial cell line, MCF10A, and an ex vivo organ culture model employing human breast tissue from reduction mammoplasty or tumor resections. Stimulation by estrogen and the GPER-selective agonist G-1 increased the mitotic index in MCF10A cells and proportion of cells in the cell cycle in human breast and breast cancer explants, suggesting increased proliferation. Inhibition of candidate signaling pathways that may link GPER activation to proliferation revealed a dependence on Src, epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation by heparin-bound EGF and subsequent ERK phosphorylation. Proliferation was not dependent on matrix metalloproteinase cleavage of membrane bound pro-HB-EGF. The contribution of GPER to estrogen-induced proliferation in MCF10A cells and breast tissue was confirmed by the ability of GPER-selective antagonist G36 to abrogate estrogen- and G-1-induced proliferation, and the ability of siRNA knockdown of GPER to reduce estrogen- and G-1-induced proliferation in MCF10A cells. This is the first study to demonstrate GPER-dependent proliferation in primary normal and malignant

  16. GPER mediates estrogen-induced signaling and proliferation in human breast epithelial cells and normal and malignant breast.

    PubMed

    Scaling, Allison L; Prossnitz, Eric R; Hathaway, Helen J

    2014-06-01

    17β-Estradiol (estrogen), through receptor binding and activation, is required for mammary gland development. Estrogen stimulates epithelial proliferation in the mammary gland, promoting ductal elongation and morphogenesis. In addition to a developmental role, estrogen promotes proliferation in tumorigenic settings, particularly breast cancer. The proliferative effects of estrogen in the normal breast and breast tumors are attributed to estrogen receptor α. Although in vitro studies have demonstrated that the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER, previously called GPR30) can modulate proliferation in breast cancer cells both positively and negatively depending on cellular context, its role in proliferation in the intact normal or malignant breast remains unclear. Estrogen-induced GPER-dependent proliferation was assessed in the immortalized nontumorigenic human breast epithelial cell line, MCF10A, and an ex vivo organ culture model employing human breast tissue from reduction mammoplasty or tumor resections. Stimulation by estrogen and the GPER-selective agonist G-1 increased the mitotic index in MCF10A cells and proportion of cells in the cell cycle in human breast and breast cancer explants, suggesting increased proliferation. Inhibition of candidate signaling pathways that may link GPER activation to proliferation revealed a dependence on Src, epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation by heparin-bound EGF and subsequent ERK phosphorylation. Proliferation was not dependent on matrix metalloproteinase cleavage of membrane-bound pro-HB-EGF. The contribution of GPER to estrogen-induced proliferation in MCF10A cells and breast tissue was confirmed by the ability of GPER-selective antagonist G36 to abrogate estrogen- and G-1-induced proliferation, and the ability of siRNA knockdown of GPER to reduce estrogen- and G-1-induced proliferation in MCF10A cells. This is the first study to demonstrate GPER-dependent proliferation in primary normal and malignant

  17. The normal breast microenvironment of premenopausal women differentially influences the behavior of breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Breast cancer studies frequently focus on the role of the tumor microenvironment in the promotion of cancer; however, the influence of the normal breast microenvironment on cancer cells remains relatively unknown. To investigate the role of the normal breast microenvironment on breast cancer cell tumorigenicity, we examined whether extracellular matrix molecules (ECM) derived from premenopausal African-American (AA) or Caucasian-American (CAU) breast tissue would affect the tumorigenicity of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. We chose these two populations because of the well documented predisposition of AA women to develop aggressive, highly metastatic breast cancer compared to CAU women. Methods The effects of primary breast fibroblasts on tumorigenicity were analyzed via real-time PCR arrays and mouse xenograft models. Whole breast ECM was isolated, analyzed via zymography, and its effects on breast cancer cell aggressiveness were tested in vitro via soft agar and invasion assays, and in vivo via xenograft models. Breast ECM and hormone metabolites were analyzed via mass spectrometry. Results Mouse mammary glands humanized with premenopausal CAU fibroblasts and injected with primary breast cancer cells developed significantly larger tumors compared to AA humanized glands. Examination of 164 ECM molecules and cytokines from CAU-derived fibroblasts demonstrated a differentially regulated set of ECM proteins and increased cytokine expression. Whole breast ECM was isolated; invasion and soft agar assays demonstrated that estrogen receptor (ER)-, progesterone receptor (PR)/PR- cells were significantly more aggressive when in contact with AA ECM, as were ER+/PR+ cells with CAU ECM. Using zymography, protease activity was comparatively upregulated in CAU ECM. In xenograft models, CAU ECM significantly increased the tumorigenicity of ER+/PR+ cells and enhanced metastases. Mass spectrometry analysis of ECM proteins showed that only 1,759 of approximately 8

  18. Nuclear nano-morphology markers of histologically normal cells detect the "field effect" of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bista, Rajan K; Wang, Pin; Bhargava, Rohit; Uttam, Shikhar; Hartman, Douglas J; Brand, Randall E; Liu, Yang

    2012-08-01

    Accurate detection of breast malignancy from histologically normal cells ("field effect") has significant clinical implications in a broad base of breast cancer management, such as high-risk lesion management, personalized risk assessment, breast tumor recurrence, and tumor margin management. More accurate and clinically applicable tools to detect markers characteristic of breast cancer "field effect" that are able to guide the clinical management are urgently needed. We have recently developed a novel optical microscope, spatial-domain low-coherence quantitative phase microscopy, which extracts the nanoscale structural characteristics of cell nuclei (i.e., nuclear nano-morphology markers), using standard histology slides. In this proof-of-concept study, we present the use of these highly sensitive nuclear nano-morphology markers to identify breast malignancy from histologically normal cells. We investigated the nano-morphology markers from 154 patients with a broad spectrum of breast pathology entities, including normal breast tissue, non-proliferative benign lesions, proliferative lesions (without and with atypia), "malignant-adjacent" normal tissue, and invasive carcinoma. Our results show that the nuclear nano-morphology markers of "malignant-adjacent" normal tissue can detect the presence of invasive breast carcinoma with high accuracy and do not reflect normal aging. Further, we found that a progressive change in nuclear nano-morphology markers that parallel breast cancer risk, suggesting its potential use for risk stratification. These novel nano-morphology markers that detect breast cancerous changes from nanoscale structural characteristics of histologically normal cells could potentially benefit the diagnosis, risk assessment, prognosis, prevention, and treatment of breast cancer.

  19. Gradual telomere shortening and increasing chromosomal instability among PanIN grades and normal ductal epithelia with and without cancer in the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yoko; Ishiwata, Toshiyuki; Izumiyama-Shimomura, Naotaka; Hamayasu, Hideki; Fujiwara, Mutsunori; Tomita, Ken-Ichiro; Hiraishi, Naoki; Nakamura, Ken-Ichi; Ishikawa, Naoshi; Aida, Junko; Takubo, Kaiyo; Arai, Tomio

    2015-01-01

    A large body of evidence supports a key role for telomere dysfunction in carcinogenesis due to the induction of chromosomal instability. To study telomere shortening in precancerous pancreatic lesions, we measured telomere lengths using quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization in the normal pancreatic duct epithelium, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (PanINs), and cancers. The materials employed included surgically resected pancreatic specimens without cancer (n = 33) and with invasive ductal carcinoma (n = 36), as well as control autopsy cases (n = 150). In comparison with normal ducts, telomere length was decreased in PanIN-1, -2 and -3 and cancer. Furthermore, telomeres were shorter in cancer than in PanIN-1 and -2. Telomere length in cancer was not associated with histological type, lesion location, or cancer stage. PanINs with or without cancer showed similar telomere lengths. The incidences of atypical mitosis and anaphase bridges, which are morphological characteristics of chromosomal instability, were negatively correlated with telomere length. The telomeres in normal duct epithelium became shorter with aging, and those in PanINs or cancers were shorter than in age-matched controls, suggesting that telomere shortening occurs even when histological changes are absent. Our data strongly suggest that telomere shortening occurs in the early stages of pancreatic carcinogenesis and progresses with precancerous development. Telomere shortening and chromosomal instability in the duct epithelium might be associated with carcinogenesis of the pancreas. Determination of telomere length in pancreatic ductal lesions may be valuable for accurate detection and risk assessment of pancreatic cancer.

  20. Gradual Telomere Shortening and Increasing Chromosomal Instability among PanIN Grades and Normal Ductal Epithelia with and without Cancer in the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Yoko; Ishiwata, Toshiyuki; Izumiyama-Shimomura, Naotaka; Hamayasu, Hideki; Fujiwara, Mutsunori; Tomita, Ken-ichiro; Hiraishi, Naoki; Nakamura, Ken-ichi; Ishikawa, Naoshi; Aida, Junko; Takubo, Kaiyo; Arai, Tomio

    2015-01-01

    A large body of evidence supports a key role for telomere dysfunction in carcinogenesis due to the induction of chromosomal instability. To study telomere shortening in precancerous pancreatic lesions, we measured telomere lengths using quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization in the normal pancreatic duct epithelium, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (PanINs), and cancers. The materials employed included surgically resected pancreatic specimens without cancer (n = 33) and with invasive ductal carcinoma (n = 36), as well as control autopsy cases (n = 150). In comparison with normal ducts, telomere length was decreased in PanIN-1, −2 and −3 and cancer. Furthermore, telomeres were shorter in cancer than in PanIN-1 and −2. Telomere length in cancer was not associated with histological type, lesion location, or cancer stage. PanINs with or without cancer showed similar telomere lengths. The incidences of atypical mitosis and anaphase bridges, which are morphological characteristics of chromosomal instability, were negatively correlated with telomere length. The telomeres in normal duct epithelium became shorter with aging, and those in PanINs or cancers were shorter than in age-matched controls, suggesting that telomere shortening occurs even when histological changes are absent. Our data strongly suggest that telomere shortening occurs in the early stages of pancreatic carcinogenesis and progresses with precancerous development. Telomere shortening and chromosomal instability in the duct epithelium might be associated with carcinogenesis of the pancreas. Determination of telomere length in pancreatic ductal lesions may be valuable for accurate detection and risk assessment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:25658358

  1. Differentiating fibroadenoma and ductal carcinoma in situ from normal breast tissue by multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Yuting; Wu, Yan; Lian, Yuane; Fu, Fangmeng; Wang, Chuan; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-09-01

    Fibroadenoma (FA) is the most common benign tumor of the female breast and several studies have reported that women with it have increased risk of breast cancer. While the ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a very early form of breast cancer. Thus, early detections of FA and DCIS are critical for improving breast tumor outcome and survival. In this paper, we use multiphoton microscopy (MPM) to obtain the high-contrast images of fresh, unfixed, unstained human breast specimens (normal breast tissue, FA and DCIS). Our results show that MPM has the ability to identify the characteristics of FA and DCIS including changes of duct architecture and collagen morphology. These results are consistent with the histological results. With the advancement of MPM, the technique has potential ability to serve as a real-time noninvasive imaging tool for early detection of breast tumor.

  2. The 8th international symposium on the breast: Using next-generation science to understand the normal breast and the development of breast cancer- conference report.

    PubMed

    Gomberawalla, Ameer; Love, Susan

    2015-12-01

    Dr. Susan Love Research Foundation is committed to performing and advancing research that will lead to the discovery of what causes cancer to develop in the human breast. As part of this effort, the Foundation hosted the 8th International Symposium on the Breast in Santa Monica, Calif., Feb. 19 to Feb. 21, 2015. More than 120 forward-thinking clinical researchers, epidemiologists, pathologists, basic scientists, translational investigators, and breast cancer advocates from six countries attended this year's conference, "Using Next Generation Science to Understand the Normal Breast and the Development of Cancer." The highlights from this year's symposium are summarized in this report.

  3. Leptin and Adiponectin Modulate the Self-renewal of Normal Human Breast Epithelial Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Esper, Raymond M; Dame, Michael; McClintock, Shannon; Holt, Peter R; Dannenberg, Andrew J; Wicha, Max S; Brenner, Dean E

    2015-12-01

    Multiple mechanisms are likely to account for the link between obesity and increased risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. Two adipokines, leptin and adiponectin, are of particular interest due to their opposing biologic functions and associations with breast cancer risk. In the current study, we investigated the effects of leptin and adiponectin on normal breast epithelial stem cells. Levels of leptin in human adipose explant-derived conditioned media positively correlated with the size of the normal breast stem cell pool. In contrast, an inverse relationship was found for adiponectin. Moreover, a strong linear relationship was observed between the leptin/adiponectin ratio in adipose conditioned media and breast stem cell self-renewal. Consistent with these findings, exogenous leptin stimulated whereas adiponectin suppressed breast stem cell self-renewal. In addition to local in-breast effects, circulating factors, including leptin and adiponectin, may contribute to the link between obesity and breast cancer. Increased levels of leptin and reduced amounts of adiponectin were found in serum from obese compared with age-matched lean postmenopausal women. Interestingly, serum from obese women increased stem cell self-renewal by 30% compared with only 7% for lean control serum. Taken together, these data suggest a plausible explanation for the obesity-driven increase in postmenopausal breast cancer risk. Leptin and adiponectin may function as both endocrine and paracrine/juxtacrine factors to modulate the size of the normal stem cell pool. Interventions that disrupt this axis and thereby normalize breast stem cell self-renewal could reduce the risk of breast cancer.

  4. Lysyl oxidase-like 2 promotes migration in noninvasive breast cancer cells but not in normal breast epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hollosi, Peter; Yakushiji, Jana K; Fong, Keith S K; Csiszar, Katalin; Fong, Sheri F T

    2009-07-15

    A growing number of studies indicate the importance of the lysyl oxidase family in the promotion of epithelial neoplasms towards their more aggressive forms. However, the role of individual family members in carcinoma progression has yet to be ascertained. In this study, we analyzed LOXL2 expression in malignantly transformed MCF-7 and normal MCF-10A mammary epithelial cell line clones stably transduced with LOXL2 in vitro, and in normal and cancerous breast tissue samples in vivo. We found LOXL2 to be catalytically active in both MCF-7 and MCF-10 clones. LOXL2 overexpression promoted a more mesenchymal morphology in both cell types, but LOXL2-induced increase in migratory ability could only be established in MCF-7 clones. We demonstrated altered localization of the LOXL2 protein in breast cancer tissue compared to normal mammary tissue, and altered localization and processing of LOXL2 protein in breast cancer cell lines compared to normal cell lines, which may allow LOXL2 to interact with different intra and extracellular components during tumor progression. Results support the role of LOXL2 in selectively promoting a metastatic phenotype in breast tumor cells. Additional data suggest epigenetic molecular mechanisms in tumor specific regulation of LOXL2 expression that could be explored as a molecular target in the prevention of breast cancer progression.

  5. p53 alteration in morphologically normal/benign breast tissue in patients with triple-negative high-grade breast carcinomas: breast p53 signature?

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi; Stolla, Moritz; Ring, Brian Z; Yang, Qi; Laughlin, Todd S; Rothberg, Paul G; Skinner, Kristin; Hicks, David G

    2016-09-01

    p53 alterations have been identified in approximately 23% of breast carcinomas, particularly in hormone receptor-negative high-grade carcinomas. It is considered to be an early event in breast carcinogenesis. Nevertheless, the putative precursor lesion of high-grade breast carcinoma remains elusive. Breast excision specimens from 93 triple-negative high-grade invasive ductal carcinomas, 48 estrogen receptor (ER)-positive/progesterone receptor-positive/Her2-negative non-high-grade invasive ductal carcinomas, and 50 mammoplasty breasts were selected. At least 2 tissue blocks with tumor and adjacent benign tissue were sectioned and subjected to immunohistochemistry staining for p53. TP53 gene sequencing was performed on select tumors. Further immunohistochemistry staining for ER and Ki-67 was performed on consecutive sections of tissue with p53-positive normal/benign cells. Of the 93 high-grade carcinomas, 51 (55%) were positive for p53 alteration, whereas only 3 (6.25%) of the 48 non-high-grade carcinomas were p53 altered. Focal p53 positivity in adjacent normal/benign breast tissue was identified in 19 cases, and 18 of them also had p53 alteration in their carcinomas. Only 1 case had focal p53 staining in normal/benign tissue, but the tumor was negative for p53 alteration. No p53 staining positivity was identified in the mammoplasty specimens. The p53-stained normal/benign cells were ER negative and did not show an increase in the Ki-67 labeling index. These findings indicate that the p53 staining positivity in normal/benign breast tissue is not a random event. It could be considered as the "p53 signature" in breast and serve as an indicator for future potential risk of p53-positive high-grade breast carcinoma.

  6. Trace elemental correlation study in malignant and normal breast tissue by PIXE technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, G. J. Naga; Sarita, P.; Kumar, M. Ravi; Murty, G. A. V. Ramana; Reddy, B. Seetharami; Lakshminarayana, S.; Vijayan, V.; Lakshmi, P. V. B. Rama; Gavarasana, Satyanarayana; Reddy, S. Bhuloka

    2006-06-01

    Particle induced X-ray emission technique was used to study the variations in trace elemental concentrations between normal and malignant human breast tissue specimens and to understand the effects of altered homeostasis of these elements in the etiology of breast cancer. A 3 MeV proton beam was used to excite the biological samples of normal and malignant breast tissues. The elements Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb and Sr were identified and their relative concentrations were estimated. Almost all the elements were found to be elevated (p < 0.05, Wilcoxon signed-ranks test) in the cancerous tissues when compared with normal tissues. The excess levels of trace elements observed in the cancerous breast tissues could either be a cause or a consequence of breast cancer. Regarding their role in the initiation or promotion of breast cancer, one possible interpretation is that the elevated levels of Cu, Fe and Cr could have led to the formation of free radicals or other reactive oxygen species (ROS) that adversely affect DNA thereby causing breast cancer, which is mainly attributed to genetic abnormalities. Moreover, since Cu and Fe are required for angiogenesis, elevated concentrations of these elements are likely to promote breast cancer by increasing the blood supply for tumor growth. On the other hand elevated concentrations of elements in breast cancer tissues might also be a consequence of the cancer. This can be understood in terms of the biochemical and histological differences between normal and cancerous breast tissues. Tumors, characterized by unregulated multiplication of cells, need an ever-increasing supply of essential nutrients including trace elements. This probably results in an increased vascularity of malignant tissues, which in turn leads to enhancement of elemental concentrations in tumors.

  7. Identification of the boundary between normal breast tissue and invasive ductal carcinoma during breast-conserving surgery using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Tongxin; Nie, Yuting; Lian, Yuane; Wu, Yan; Fu, Fangmeng; Wang, Chuan; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-11-01

    Breast-conserving surgery has become an important way of surgical treatment for breast cancer worldwide nowadays. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has the ability to noninvasively visualize tissue architectures at the cellular level using intrinsic fluorescent molecules in biological tissues without the need for fluorescent dye. In this study, MPM is used to image the microstructures of terminal duct lobular unit (TDLU), invasive ductal carcinoma and the boundary region between normal and cancerous breast tissues. Our study demonstrates that MPM has the ability to not only reveal the morphological changes of the cuboidal epithelium, basement membrane and interlobular stroma but also identify the boundary between normal breast tissue and invasive ductal carcinoma, which correspond well to the Hematoxylin and Eosin (H and E) images. Predictably, MPM can monitor surgical margins in real time and provide considerable accuracy for resection of breast cancerous tissues intraoperatively. With the development of miniature, real-time MPM imaging technology, MPM should have great application prospects during breast-conserving surgery.

  8. Taxonomy of breast cancer based on normal cell phenotype predicts outcome

    PubMed Central

    Santagata, Sandro; Thakkar, Ankita; Ergonul, Ayse; Wang, Bin; Woo, Terri; Hu, Rong; Harrell, J. Chuck; McNamara, George; Schwede, Matthew; Culhane, Aedin C.; Kindelberger, David; Rodig, Scott; Richardson, Andrea; Schnitt, Stuart J.; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Ince, Tan A.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate classification is essential for understanding the pathophysiology of a disease and can inform therapeutic choices. For hematopoietic malignancies, a classification scheme based on the phenotypic similarity between tumor cells and normal cells has been successfully used to define tumor subtypes; however, use of normal cell types as a reference by which to classify solid tumors has not been widely emulated, in part due to more limited understanding of epithelial cell differentiation compared with hematopoiesis. To provide a better definition of the subtypes of epithelial cells comprising the breast epithelium, we performed a systematic analysis of a large set of breast epithelial markers in more than 15,000 normal breast cells, which identified 11 differentiation states for normal luminal cells. We then applied information from this analysis to classify human breast tumors based on normal cell types into 4 major subtypes, HR0–HR3, which were differentiated by vitamin D, androgen, and estrogen hormone receptor (HR) expression. Examination of 3,157 human breast tumors revealed that these HR subtypes were distinct from the current classification scheme, which is based on estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Patient outcomes were best when tumors expressed all 3 hormone receptors (subtype HR3) and worst when they expressed none of the receptors (subtype HR0). Together, these data provide an ontological classification scheme associated with patient survival differences and provides actionable insights for treating breast tumors. PMID:24463450

  9. Aluminum concentrations in central and peripheral areas of malignant breast lesions do not differ from those in normal breast tissues

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aluminum is used in a wide range of applications and is a potential environmental hazard. The known genotoxic effects of aluminum might play a role in the development of breast cancer. However, the data currently available on the subject are not sufficient to establish a causal relationship between aluminum exposure and the augmented risk of developing breast cancer. To achieve maximum sensitivity and specificity in the determination of aluminum levels, we have developed a detection protocol using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The objective of the present study was to compare the aluminum levels in the central and peripheral areas of breast carcinomas with those in the adjacent normal breast tissues, and to identify patient and/or tumor characteristics associated with these aluminum levels. Methods A total of 176 patients with breast cancer were included in the study. Samples from the central and peripheral areas of their tumors were obtained, as well as from the surrounding normal breast tissue. Aluminum quantification was performed using GFAAS. Results The average (mean ± SD) aluminum concentrations were as follows: central area, 1.88 ± 3.60 mg/kg; peripheral area, 2.10 ± 5.67 mg/kg; and normal area, 1.68 ± 11.1 mg/kg. Overall and two-by-two comparisons of the aluminum concentrations in these areas indicated no significant differences. We detected a positive relationship between aluminum levels in the peripheral areas of the tumors, age and menopausal status of the patients (P = .02). Conclusions Using a sensitive quantification technique we detected similar aluminum concentrations in the central and peripheral regions of breast tumors, and in normal tissues. In addition, we did not detect significant differences in aluminum concentrations as related to the location of the breast tumor within the breast, or to other relevant tumor features such as stage, size and steroid receptor status. The next

  10. Cellular growth and survival are mediated by beta 1 integrins in normal human breast epithelium but not in breast carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Howlett, Anthony R; Bailey, Nina; Damsky, Caroline; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    1994-11-28

    We previously established a rapid three-dimensional assay for discrimination of normal and malignant human breast epithelial cells using a laminin-rich reconstituted basement membrane. In this assay, normal epithelial cells differentiate into well-organized acinar structures whereas tumor cells fail to recapitulate this process and produce large, disordered colonies. The data suggest that breast acinar morphogenesis and differentiation is regulated by cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions and that these interactions are altered in malignancy. Here, we investigated the role of ECM receptors (integrins) in these processes and report on the expression and function of potential laminin receptors in normal and tumorigenic breast epithelial cells. Immmunocytochemical analysis showed that normal and carcinoma cells in a three-dimensional substratum express profiles of integrins similar to normal and malignant breast tissues in situ. Normal cells express {alpha}1, {alpha}2, {alpha}3, {alpha}6, {beta}1 and {beta}4 integrin subunits, whereas breast carcinoma cells show variable losses, disordered expression, or down regulation of these subunits. Function-blocking experiments using inhibitory antiintegrin subunit antibodies showed a >5-fold inhibition of the formation of acinar structures by normal cells in the presence of either anti-{beta}1 or anti-{alpha}3 antibodies, whereas anti-{alpha}2 or -{alpha}6 had little or no effect. In experiments where collagen type I gels were used instead of basement membrane, acinar morphogenesis was blocked by anti-{beta}1 and -{alpha}2 antibodies but not by anti-{alpha}3. These data suggest a specificity of integrin utilization dependent on the ECM ligands encountered by the cell. The interruption of normal acinar morphogenesis by anti-integrin antibodies was associated with an inhibition of cell growth and induction of apoptosis. Function-blocking antibodies had no inhibitory effect on the rate of tumor cell growth, survival or

  11. Expression of c-kit protein in cancer vs. normal breast tissue

    PubMed Central

    Jazayeri, Seyed Nematollah; Nateghi, Jamal

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study There are at least four main signal transduction pathways within human cells which are activated by interaction of an extracellular ligand with its corresponding receptors. One of them is activation of protein kinase. Actually, any of these proteins at any level of the signaling cascade in a human cell can undergo mutation and cause irregular cellular proliferation and finally result in cancer. C-kit is alternatively called stem cell factor receptor (SCFR) or CD117. It appears that lack of c-kit expression accompanies progression of some tumors, e.g. lung, breast, GIST. The aim of this study was to evaluate C-kit protein expression level within cancer cases. Material and methods Sixty specimens of breast cancer and 60 non-cancerous breast tissue specimens were evaluated by IHC for C-kit presentation. We used positive GIST slides as controls. Epi-info ver 6.04 (CDC, WHO) was used for analysis. Results C-kit was negative in all breast cancer specimens. C-kit was negative in 47 (78%) of 60 non-cancerous breast tissue specimens, but was positive in 13 (22%) of them (p < 0.0001). Conclusions There is a reduction in C-kit expression with malignant transformation of breast epithelium. C-kit is believed to play a role in breast carcinogenesis. However, we should follow patients with normal or benign breast tissue to indicate any correlation between C-kit presentation and breast cancer development. PMID:23788899

  12. Detection of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity in normal and neoplastic human breast epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, J.W.; Malan-Shibley, L.B.; Janss, D.H.

    1980-01-28

    Studies were conducted to determine whether normal and/or neoplastic (MCF-7) human breast epithelial cells contain the microsomal aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) which catalyses the conversion of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) to carcinogenic intermediates. Low constitutive levels of AHH activity were found in homogenates of both normal human breast epithelial and MCF-7 cells. The addition of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) to the culture medium of either cell type significantly increased AHH activity. Peak induction of hydroxylase activity occurred following the in vitro addition of 10 ..mu..M DMBA. A time course of DMBA-induced AHH activity in both normal human breast epithelium and MCF-7 cells revealed maximal induction 16 hr after 10 ..mu..M DMBA was added to the culture medium. Benzo(a)pyrene (BP), 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA) and benz(a)anthracene (BA) also induced AHH activity in normal and MCF-7 cells. For example, the addition of 10 ..mu..M BP to the culture medium of either normal human breast epithelial or MCF-7 cells for 16 hr increased AHH activity 13.8 and 65.3-fold, respectively. For all PAH, the magnitude of AHH induction was substantially greater in MCF-7 than normal breast epithelial cells. Finally, ..cap alpha..-naphthoflavone inhibited BA-induced AHH activity in MCF-7 cells. The study demonstrates the presence of a PAH-inducible AHH enzyme(s) in normal human breast epithelial cells grown in primary culture and in the human breast tumor cell line, MCF-7.

  13. Estimation of stress relaxation time for normal and abnormal breast phantoms using optical technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udayakumar, K.; Sujatha, N.

    2015-03-01

    Many of the early occurring micro-anomalies in breast may transform into a deadliest cancer tumor in future. Probability of curing early occurring abnormalities in breast is more if rightly identified. Even in mammogram, considered as a golden standard technique for breast imaging, it is hard to pick up early occurring changes in the breast tissue due to the difference in mechanical behavior of the normal and abnormal tissue when subjected to compression prior to x-ray or laser exposure. In this paper, an attempt has been made to estimate the stress relaxation time of normal and abnormal breast mimicking phantom using laser speckle image correlation. Phantoms mimicking normal breast is prepared and subjected to precise mechanical compression. The phantom is illuminated by a Helium Neon laser and by using a CCD camera, a sequence of strained phantom speckle images are captured and correlated by the image mean intensity value at specific time intervals. From the relation between mean intensity versus time, tissue stress relaxation time is quantified. Experiments were repeated for phantoms with increased stiffness mimicking abnormal tissue for similar ranges of applied loading. Results shows that phantom with more stiffness representing abnormal tissue shows uniform relaxation for varying load of the selected range, whereas phantom with less stiffness representing normal tissue shows irregular behavior for varying loadings in the given range.

  14. Next-generation transcriptome sequencing of the premenopausal breast epithelium using specimens from a normal human breast tissue bank

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Our efforts to prevent and treat breast cancer are significantly impeded by a lack of knowledge of the biology and developmental genetics of the normal mammary gland. In order to provide the specimens that will facilitate such an understanding, The Susan G. Komen for the Cure Tissue Bank at the IU Simon Cancer Center (KTB) was established. The KTB is, to our knowledge, the only biorepository in the world prospectively established to collect normal, healthy breast tissue from volunteer donors. As a first initiative toward a molecular understanding of the biology and developmental genetics of the normal mammary gland, the effect of the menstrual cycle and hormonal contraceptives on DNA expression in the normal breast epithelium was examined. Methods Using normal breast tissue from 20 premenopausal donors to KTB, the changes in the mRNA of the normal breast epithelium as a function of phase of the menstrual cycle and hormonal contraception were assayed using next-generation whole transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq). Results In total, 255 genes representing 1.4% of all genes were deemed to have statistically significant differential expression between the two phases of the menstrual cycle. The overwhelming majority (221; 87%) of the genes have higher expression during the luteal phase. These data provide important insights into the processes occurring during each phase of the menstrual cycle. There was only a single gene significantly differentially expressed when comparing the epithelium of women using hormonal contraception to those in the luteal phase. Conclusions We have taken advantage of a unique research resource, the KTB, to complete the first-ever next-generation transcriptome sequencing of the epithelial compartment of 20 normal human breast specimens. This work has produced a comprehensive catalog of the differences in the expression of protein-coding genes as a function of the phase of the menstrual cycle. These data constitute the beginning of

  15. Estrogen Receptor-Positive Proliferating Cells in the Normal and Precancerous Breast

    PubMed Central

    Shoker, Balvinder S.; Jarvis, Christine; Clarke, Robert B.; Anderson, Elizabeth; Hewlett, Joanne; Davies, Michael P. A.; Sibson, D. Ross; Sloane, John P.

    1999-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that epithelial cell expression of the estrogen receptor (ER) and that of the proliferation-associated marker Ki-67 are almost mutually exclusive in the normal premenopausal human breast but that coexpression frequently occurs in estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancers. This coexpression may indicate disordered expression of ER in the cell cycle or failure to suppress division of ER+ cells and could be important in neoplastic transformation. The purpose of this study was to determine whether in situ proliferations known to be associated with different levels of risk for developing breast cancer contain these coexpressing cells and, if so, the stage at which they occur. We found that ER+ proliferating cells were rare in premenopausal lobules but increased with age in the normal breast. There was no difference in nonlesional tissue between cancerous and noncancerous breasts. The percentage of dual-expressing cells was significantly increased, however, in all of the in situ proliferations and correlated positively with the level of risk of developing breast cancer. We suggest that development of at least some human breast cancers is associated with increasing failure to down-regulate ER as cells enter the cycle or to suppress division of ER+ cells. The mechanism may involve the loss of a tumor suppresser gene. PMID:10595909

  16. Combined thermal and elastic modeling of the normal and tumorous breast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Li; Zhan, Wang; Loew, Murray

    2008-03-01

    The abnormal thermogram has been shown to be a reliable indicator of a high risk of breast cancer, but an open question is how to quantify the complex relationships between the breast thermal behaviors and the underlying physiological/pathological conditions. Previous thermal modeling techniques generally did not utilize the breast geometry determined by the gravity-induced elastic deformations arising from various body postures. In this paper, a 3-D finite-element method is developed for combined modeling of the thermal and elastic properties of the breast, including the mechanical nonlinearity associated with large deformations. The effects of the thermal and elastic properties of the breast tissues are investigated quantitatively. For the normal breast in a standing/sitting up posture, the gravity-induced deformation alone is found to be able to cause an asymmetric temperature distribution even though all the thermal/elastic properties are symmetrical, and this temperature asymmetry increases for softer and more compressible breast tissues. For a tumorous breast, we found that the surface-temperature alterations generally can be recognizable for superficial tumors at depths less than 20 mm. Tumor size plays a less important role than the tumor depth in determining the tumor-induced temperature difference. This result may imply that a higher thermal sensitivity is critical for a breast thermogram system when deeper tumors are present, even if the tumor is relatively large. We expect this new method to provide a stronger foundation for, and greater specificity and precision in, thermographic diagnosis and treatment of breast tumors.

  17. Expression of microRNA-370 in human breast cancer compare with normal samples

    PubMed Central

    Mollainezhad, Halimeh; Eskandari, Nahid; Pourazar, Abbasali; Salehi, Mansoor; Andalib, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is the second leading cause of deaths from cancer in the woman. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous noncoding RNAs that are known critical player in carcinogenesis. The role of miR-370 in malignancies remains controversial because of its levels varying in different cancers according to its targets while the role of miR-370 in breast cancer has not been addressed so far. The aim of this study was to identify the expression pattern of miR-370 in human breast cancer tissue compared to adjacent healthy tissue. Materials and Methods: Twenty-two fresh frozen tissues (normal and malignant) from patients with breast cancer were examined for miR-370 by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction method at 2013. Results: We observed up-regulation (six-fold higher) of miR-370 in breast cancer tissue compared with normal adjacent tissue. Tumor samples in stage III, invasive ductal type, larger tumor size, human epidermal growth-factor receptor 2+, estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor−, P53 − status showed significantly increased expression in miR-370. Conclusion: Together, miR-370 may acts as an onco-miRNA, and it may have a novel role in breast cancer. Detection of miR-370 and its targets could be helpful as a diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic target. PMID:27563639

  18. Sarcoglycans in the normal and pathological breast tissue of humans: an immunohistochemical and molecular study.

    PubMed

    Arco, Alba; Favaloro, Angelo; Gioffrè, Mara; Santoro, Giuseppe; Speciale, Francesco; Vermiglio, Giovanna; Cutroneo, Giuseppina

    2012-01-01

    The sarcoglycan complex, consisting of α-, β-, γ-, δ- and ε-sarcoglycans, is a multimember transmembrane system providing a mechanosignaling connection from the cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix. Whereas the expression of α- and γ-sarcoglycan is restricted to striated muscle, other sarcoglycans are widely expressed. Although many studies have investigated sarcoglycans in all muscle types, insufficient data are available on the distribution of the sarcoglycan complex in nonmuscle tissue. On this basis, we used immunohistochemical and RT-PCR techniques to study preliminarily the sarcoglycans in normal glandular breast tissue (which has never been studied in the literature on these proteins) to verify the effective wider distribution of this complex. Moreover, to understand the role of sarcoglycans, we also tested samples obtained from patients affected by fibrocystic mastopathy and breast fibroadenoma. Our data showed, for the first time, that all sarcoglycans are always detectable in all normal samples both in epithelial and myoepithelial cells; in pathological breast tissue, all sarcoglycans appeared severely reduced. These data demonstrated that all sarcoglycans, not only β-, δ-, and ε-sarcoglycans, have a wider distribution, implying a new unknown role for these proteins. Moreover, in breast diseases, sarcoglycans containing cadherin domain homologs could provoke a loss of strong adhesion between epithelial cells, permitting and facilitating the degeneration of these benign breast tumors into malignant tumors. Consequently, sarcoglycans could play an important and intriguing role in many breast diseases and in particular in tumor progression from benign to malignant.

  19. From The Cover: Reconstruction of functionally normal and malignant human breast tissues in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuperwasser, Charlotte; Chavarria, Tony; Wu, Min; Magrane, Greg; Gray, Joe W.; Carey, Loucinda; Richardson, Andrea; Weinberg, Robert A.

    2004-04-01

    The study of normal breast epithelial morphogenesis and carcinogenesis in vivo has largely used rodent models. Efforts at studying mammary morphogenesis and cancer with xenotransplanted human epithelial cells have failed to recapitulate the full extent of development seen in the human breast. We have developed an orthotopic xenograft model in which both the stromal and epithelial components of the reconstructed mammary gland are of human origin. Genetic modification of human stromal cells before the implantation of ostensibly normal human mammary epithelial cells resulted in the outgrowth of benign and malignant lesions. This experimental model allows for studies of human epithelial morphogenesis and differentiation in vivo and underscores the critical role of heterotypic interactions in human breast development and carcinogenesis.

  20. Variability of glutathione S-transferase isoenzyme patterns in matched normal and cancer human breast tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, M K; Engqvist-Goldstein, A; Montali, J A; Wheatley, J B; Schmidt, D E; Kauvar, L M

    1994-01-01

    The determination of GST levels in blood has been proposed to a marker of tumour burden in general, whereas level of the P1 isoenzyme has been identified as a prognostic factor for breast-cancer patients receiving no adjuvant chemotherapy. Particular glutathione S-transferase (GST) isoenzymes differ in their substrate specificity, however, and their presence or absence might therefore account for the resistance of tumours to particular chemotherapeutic drugs, as already established for cultured cell lines. Determination of the GST isoenzyme profile of a cancer tissue could have prognostic value in the selection of treatment if the levels of expression/activity show a degree of variation comparable with that exhibited by actual patient responses. Using reversed-phase h.p.l.c. to quantify affinity-isolated GSTs, we have analysed full isoenzyme profiles in the first large sample of matched normal and cancer human tissues (18 breast-cancer patients). In no patients did the tumour tissues express any isoenzymes that were not found in normal breast tissue. In addition to the GSTs, another enzyme, identified as enoyl-CoA isomerase, was regularly found in breast tissue cytosol following elution from a hexyl-glutathione affinity column. In most cases, the average level of GST was substantially elevated in the cancer tissues above the levels in normal breast tissue from the same patient. Furthermore, the relative levels of the isoenzymes were substantially more variable in the cancer samples than in the normal breast tissue, providing a plausible mechanism for the well established variable response to treatment. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:7818489

  1. Unraveling the microenvironmental influences on the normal mammary gland and induction and progression of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Weigelt, Britta; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-06-26

    The normal mammary gland and invasive breast cancer are both complex 'organs' composed of multiple cell types as well as extracellular matrix (ECM) in three-dimensional (3D) space. Conventionally, both normal and malignant breast cells are studied in vitro as two-dimensional (2D) monolayers of epithelial cells, which results in the loss of structure and tissue function. Many laboratories are now investigating regulation of signaling function in normal mammary gland using 3D cultures. However, it is important also to assay malignant breast cells ex vivo in a physiologically relevant environment to more closely mimic tumor architecture, signal transduction regulation and tumor behavior in vivo. Here we present the potential of these 3D models for drug testing, target validation and guidance of patient selection for clinical trials. We argue also that in order to get full insight into the biology of the normal and malignant breast, and to create in vivo-like models for therapeutic approaches in humans, we need to continue to create more complex heterotypic models to approach the full context the cells encounter in the human body.

  2. [Trace and anxiety of nursing mothers with insufficient and normal breast feeding indicators].

    PubMed

    Aragaki, Ilva Marico Mizumoto; Silva, Isília Aparecida; dos Santos, Jair Lício Ferreira

    2006-09-01

    The objective of this study was to identify and compare the trace and the anxiety state on the 10th day postpartum and the anxiety state on the 30th day postpartum of primiparous and multiparous nursing mothers who present insufficient breast feeding indicators and nursing mothers with normal breast feeding, in order to verify the possible relationships between the anxiety state of the nursing mothers in those two moments with the insufficient breast feeding indicators presented. This is an exploratory and descriptive study, whose data has been gotten from 168 nursing mothers and their children by means of interviews in nursing consultations in the 10th and 30th day postpartum. The results obtained showed that primiparous and multiparous with insufficient breast feeding and primiparous with normal lactation presented higher anxiety state trace than the anxiety state on the 10th and 30th day postpartum. There was remission of the maternal signals of anxiety with the passing of time, which may be caused by the correction of the breast feeding technique and support to the nursing mothers.

  3. Signaling pathways regulating aromatase and cyclooxygenases in normal and malignant breast cells.

    PubMed

    Richards, Jeanette A; Petrel, Trevor A; Brueggemeier, Robert W

    2002-02-01

    Aromatase (estrogen synthase) is the cytochrome P450 enzyme complex that converts C(19) androgens to C(18) estrogens. Aromatase activity has been demonstrated in breast tissue in vitro, and expression of aromatase is highest in or near breast tumor sites. Thus, local regulation of aromatase by both endogenous factors as well as exogenous medicinal agents will influence the levels of estrogen available for breast cancer growth. The prostaglandin PGE(2) increases intracellular cAMP levels and stimulates estrogen biosynthesis, and our recent studies have shown a strong linear association between CYP19 expression and the sum of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in breast cancer specimens. Knowledge of the signaling pathways that regulate the expression and enzyme activity of aromatase and cyclooxygenases (COXs) in stromal and epithelial breast cells will aid in understanding the interrelationships of these two enzyme systems and potentially identify novel targets for regulation. The effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta), and tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate (TPA) on aromatase and COXs were studied in primary cultures of normal human adipose stromal cells and in cell cultures of normal immortalized human breast epithelial cells MCF-10F, estrogen-responsive human breast cancer cells MCF-7, and estrogen-unresponsive human breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231. Levels of the constitutive COX isozyme, COX-1, were not altered by the various treatments in the cell systems studied. In breast adenocarcinoma cells, EGF and TGFbeta did not alter COX-2 levels at 24h, while TPA induced COX-2 levels by 75% in MDA-MB-231 cells. EGF and TPA in MCF-7 cells significantly increased aromatase activity while TGFbeta did not. In contrast to MCF-7 cells, TGFbeta and TPA significantly increased activity in MDA-MB-231 cells, while only a modest increase with EGF was observed. Untreated normal adipose stromal cells exhibited

  4. PMC42, a breast progenitor cancer cell line, has normal-like mRNA and microRNA transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Git, Anna; Spiteri, Inmaculada; Blenkiron, Cherie; Dunning, Mark J; Pole, Jessica CM; Chin, Suet-Feung; Wang, Yanzhong; Smith, James; Livesey, Frederick J; Caldas, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    Introduction The use of cultured cell lines as model systems for normal tissue is limited by the molecular alterations accompanying the immortalisation process, including changes in the mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) repertoire. Therefore, identification of cell lines with normal-like expression profiles is of paramount importance in studies of normal gene regulation. Methods The mRNA and miRNA expression profiles of several breast cell lines of cancerous or normal origin were measured using printed slide arrays, Luminex bead arrays, and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results We demonstrate that the mRNA expression profiles of two breast cell lines are similar to that of normal breast tissue: HB4a, immortalised normal breast epithelium, and PMC42, a breast cancer cell line that retains progenitor pluripotency allowing in-culture differentiation to both secretory and myoepithelial fates. In contrast, only PMC42 exhibits a normal-like miRNA expression profile. We identified a group of miRNAs that are highly expressed in normal breast tissue and PMC42 but are lost in all other cancerous and normal-origin breast cell lines and observed a similar loss in immortalised lymphoblastoid cell lines compared with healthy uncultured B cells. Moreover, like tumour suppressor genes, these miRNAs are lost in a variety of tumours. We show that the mechanism leading to the loss of these miRNAs in breast cancer cell lines has genomic, transcriptional, and post-transcriptional components. Conclusion We propose that, despite its neoplastic origin, PMC42 is an excellent molecular model for normal breast epithelium, providing a unique tool to study breast differentiation and the function of key miRNAs that are typically lost in cancer. PMID:18588681

  5. Expression of ecto-5'-nucleotidase (CD73) in normal mammary gland and in breast carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, K. H.; Thompson, L. F.; Kaufmann, M.; Möller, P.

    1991-01-01

    Ecto-5'-nucleotidase (ecto-5'-NT) is a phosphatidylinositol anchored membrane structure recently defined as the lymphocyte differentiation antigen CD73. Using CD73 (1E9.28.1) monoclonal antibody, normal mammary gland and breast carcinoma were immunohistochemically investigated for ecto-5'-NT expression. In normal breast epithelium, CD73 was differentially expressed in lobular, ductal and myoepithelial cells and was most frequently detected in the myoepithelial compartment. The glandular stroma contained fibrocytes, a subset of which was also CD73-positive. Among 102 unselected breast carcinoma primary lesions, only 9 contained CD73-positive tumour cells, whereas in 95 cases, stromal fibroblasts and fibrocytes showed variable degrees of CD73 expression. The extent of stromal CD73 expression correlated positively with the estrogen receptor (ER) status of the tumour (P less than 0.038). We conclude that ecto-5'-NT-expression reflects a still unknown state of activity of normal breast epithelium which is lost in the majority of carcinomas derived therefrom. It may also be indicative of some functional activity of stromal fibroblasts which is significantly enhanced in ER-positive carcinomas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1989648

  6. Breast Cancer Heterogeneity Examined by High-Sensitivity Quantification of PIK3CA, KRAS, HRAS, and BRAF Mutations in Normal Breast and Ductal Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Myers, Meagan B; Banda, Malathi; McKim, Karen L; Wang, Yiying; Powell, Michael J; Parsons, Barbara L

    2016-04-01

    Mutant cancer subpopulations have the potential to derail durable patient responses to molecularly targeted cancer therapeutics, yet the prevalence and size of such subpopulations are largely unexplored. We employed the sensitive and quantitative Allele-specific Competitive Blocker PCR approach to characterize mutant cancer subpopulations in ductal carcinomas (DCs), examining five specific hotspot point mutations (PIK3CA H1047R, KRAS G12D, KRAS G12V, HRAS G12D, and BRAF V600E). As an approach to aid interpretation of the DC results, the mutations were also quantified in normal breast tissue. Overall, the mutations were prevalent in normal breast and DCs, with 9/9 DCs having measureable levels of at least three of the five mutations. HRAS G12D was significantly increased in DCs as compared to normal breast. The most frequent point mutation reported in DC by DNA sequencing, PIK3CA H1047R, was detected in all normal breast tissue and DC samples and was present at remarkably high levels (mutant fractions of 1.1 × 10(-3) to 4.6 × 10(-2)) in 4/10 normal breast samples. In normal breast tissue samples, PIK3CA mutation levels were positively correlated with age. However, the PIK3CA H1047R mutant fraction distributions for normal breast tissues and DCs were similar. The results suggest PIK3CA H1047R mutant cells have a selective advantage in breast, contribute to breast cancer susceptibility, and drive tumor progression during breast carcinogenesis, even when present as only a subpopulation of tumor cells. PMID:27108388

  7. Pleomorphic adenoma of the breast should be excised with a cuff of normal tissue.

    PubMed

    John, Biku J; Griffiths, Carl; Ebbs, Steven R

    2007-01-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma is a benign tumor found rarely in the breast but commonly in the salivary gland. Unlike the salivary gland variant management guidelines are poorly defined in the breast. We describe the first case of pleomorphic adenoma of the breast that has recurred for the second time following previous surgical excisions, and review the available literature. Due to the risk of recurrence and malignant transformation, we recommend complete excision of the lesion with a cuff of normal tissue, as is the practice in the salivary gland. Clinicians should be aware of the condition, as preoperative diagnosis will facilitate adequate surgery. Patients should be informed about the risk of recurrence. We recommend follow-up for at least a period of 5 years with yearly clinical examinations.

  8. Comparison of gene regulatory networks of benign and malignant breast cancer samples with normal samples.

    PubMed

    Chen, D B; Yang, H J

    2014-11-11

    The aim of this study was to explain the pathogenesis and deterioration process of breast cancer. Breast cancer expression profile data GSE27567 was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database, and breast cancer-related genes were extracted from databases, including Cancer-Resource and Online Mendelian Inheritance In Man (OMIM). Next, h17 transcription factor data were obtained from the University of California, Santa Cruz. Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery (DAVID)-enrichment analysis was applied and gene-regulatory networks were constructed by double-two-way t-tests in 3 states, including normal, benign, and malignant. Furthermore, network topological properties were compared between 2 states, and breast cancer-related bub genes were ranked according to their different degrees between each of the two states. A total of 2380 breast cancer-related genes and 215 transcription factors were screened by exploring databases; the genes were mainly enriched in their functions, such as cell apoptosis and proliferation, and pathways, such as p53 signaling and apoptosis, which were related with carcinogenesis. In addition, gene-regulatory networks in the 3 conditions were constructed. By comparing their network topological properties, we found that there is a larger transition of differences between malignant and benign breast cancer. Moreover, 8 hub genes (YBX1, ZFP36, YY1, XRCC5, XRCC4, ZFHX3, ZMAT3, and XPC) were identified in the top 10 genes ranked by different degrees. Through comparative analysis of gene-regulation networks, we identified the link between related genes and the pathogenesis of breast cancer. However, further experiments are needed to confirm our results.

  9. Prolyl-isomerase Pin1 controls normal and cancer stem cells of the breast

    PubMed Central

    Rustighi, Alessandra; Zannini, Alessandro; Tiberi, Luca; Sommaggio, Roberta; Piazza, Silvano; Sorrentino, Giovanni; Nuzzo, Simona; Tuscano, Antonella; Eterno, Vincenzo; Benvenuti, Federica; Santarpia, Libero; Aifantis, Iannis; Rosato, Antonio; Bicciato, Silvio; Zambelli, Alberto; Del Sal, Giannino

    2014-01-01

    Mammary epithelial stem cells are fundamental to maintain tissue integrity. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are implicated in both treatment resistance and disease relapse, and the molecular bases of their malignant properties are still poorly understood. Here we show that both normal stem cells and CSCs of the breast are controlled by the prolyl-isomerase Pin1. Mechanistically, following interaction with Pin1, Notch1 and Notch4, key regulators of cell fate, escape from proteasomal degradation by their major ubiquitin-ligase Fbxw7α. Functionally, we show that Fbxw7α acts as an essential negative regulator of breast CSCs' expansion by restraining Notch activity, but the establishment of a Notch/Pin1 active circuitry opposes this effect, thus promoting breast CSCs self-renewal, tumor growth and metastasis in vivo. In human breast cancers, despite Fbxw7α expression, high levels of Pin1 sustain Notch signaling, which correlates with poor prognosis. Suppression of Pin1 holds promise in reverting aggressive phenotypes, through CSC exhaustion as well as recovered drug sensitivity carrying relevant implications for therapy of breast cancers. PMID:24357640

  10. In vivo quantitative imaging of normal and cancerous breast tissue using broadband diffuse optical tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia; Jiang, Shudong; Li, Zhongze; diFlorio-Alexander, Roberta M.; Barth, Richard J.; Kaufman, Peter A.; Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: A NIR tomography system that combines frequency domain (FD) and continuous wave (CW) measurements was used to image normal and malignant breast tissues. Methods: FD acquisitions were confined to wavelengths less than 850 nm because of detector limitations, whereas light from longer wavelengths (up to 948 nm) was measured in CW mode with CCD-coupled spectrometer detection. The two data sets were combined and processed in a single spectrally constrained reconstruction to map concentrations of hemoglobin, water, and lipid, as well as scattering parameters in the breast. Results: Chromophore concentrations were imaged in the breasts of nine asymptomatic volunteers to evaluate their intrasubject and intersubject variability. Normal subject data showed physiologically expected trends. Images from three cancer patients indicate that the added CW data is critical to recovering the expected increases in water and decreases in lipid content within malignancies. Contrasts of 1.5 to twofold in hemoglobin and water values were found in cancers. Conclusions:In vivo breast imaging with instrumentation that combines FD and CW NIR data acquisition in a single spectral reconstruction produces more accurate hemoglobin, water, and lipid results relative to FD data alone. PMID:20831079

  11. Propagation of oestrogen receptor-positive and oestrogen-responsive normal human breast cells in culture

    PubMed Central

    Fridriksdottir, Agla J.; Kim, Jiyoung; Villadsen, René; Klitgaard, Marie Christine; Hopkinson, Branden M.; Petersen, Ole William; Rønnov-Jessen, Lone

    2015-01-01

    Investigating the susceptibility of oestrogen receptor-positive (ERpos) normal human breast epithelial cells (HBECs) for clinical purposes or basic research awaits a proficient cell-based assay. Here we set out to identify markers for isolating ERpos cells and to expand what appear to be post-mitotic primary cells into exponentially growing cultures. We report a robust technique for isolating ERpos HBECs from reduction mammoplasties by FACS using two cell surface markers, CD166 and CD117, and an intracellular cytokeratin marker, Ks20.8, for further tracking single cells in culture. We show that ERpos HBECs are released from growth restraint by small molecule inhibitors of TGFβ signalling, and that growth is augmented further in response to oestrogen. Importantly, ER signalling is functionally active in ERpos cells in extended culture. These findings open a new avenue of experimentation with normal ERpos HBECs and provide a basis for understanding the evolution of human breast cancer. PMID:26564780

  12. Ultrasonic differentiation of normal versus malignant breast epithelial cells in monolayer cultures

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Timothy E.; Goodrich, Jeffrey B.; Ambrose, Brady J.; Patel, Hemang; Kwon, Soonjo; Pearson, Lee H.

    2010-01-01

    Normal and malignant mammary epithelial cells were studied using laboratory measurements, wavelet analysis, and numerical simulations of monolayer cell cultures to determine whether microscopic breast cancer can be detected in vitro with high-frequency ultrasound. Pulse-echo waveforms were acquired by immersing a broadband, unfocused 50-MHz transducer in the growth media of cell culture well plates and collecting the first reflection from the well bottoms. The simulations included a multilayer pulse-reflection model and a model of two-dimensional arrays of spherical cells and nuclei. The results show that normal and malignant cells produce time-domain signals and spectral features that are significantly different. PMID:21110531

  13. Biophysical model of ion transport across human respiratory epithelia allows quantification of ion permeabilities.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Guilherme J M; Boucher, Richard C; Elston, Timothy C

    2013-02-01

    Lung health and normal mucus clearance depend on adequate hydration of airway surfaces. Because transepithelial osmotic gradients drive water flows, sufficient hydration of the airway surface liquid depends on a balance between ion secretion and absorption by respiratory epithelia. In vitro experiments using cultures of primary human nasal epithelia and human bronchial epithelia have established many of the biophysical processes involved in airway surface liquid homeostasis. Most experimental studies, however, have focused on the apical membrane, despite the fact that ion transport across respiratory epithelia involves both cellular and paracellular pathways. In fact, the ion permeabilities of the basolateral membrane and paracellular pathway remain largely unknown. Here we use a biophysical model for water and ion transport to quantify ion permeabilities of all pathways (apical, basolateral, paracellular) in human nasal epithelia cultures using experimental (Ussing Chamber and microelectrode) data reported in the literature. We derive analytical formulas for the steady-state short-circuit current and membrane potential, which are for polarized epithelia the equivalent of the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz equation for single isolated cells. These relations allow parameter estimation to be performed efficiently. By providing a method to quantify all the ion permeabilities of respiratory epithelia, the model may aid us in understanding the physiology that regulates normal airway surface hydration.

  14. Classification of breast masses and normal tissues in digital tomosynthesis mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jun; Chan, Heang-Ping; Zhang, Yiheng; Sahiner, Berkman; Zhou, Chuan; Ge, Jun; Wu, Yi-Ta; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.

    2008-03-01

    Digital tomosynthesis mammography (DTM) can provide quasi-3D structural information of the breast by reconstructing the breast volume from projection views (PV) acquired in a limited angular range. Our purpose is to design an effective classifier to distinguish breast masses from normal tissues in DTMs. A data set of 100 DTM cases collected with a GE first generation prototype DTM system at the Massachusetts General Hospital was used. We reconstructed the DTMs using a simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART). Mass candidates were identified by 3D gradient field analysis. Three approaches to distinguish breast masses from normal tissues were evaluated. In the 3D approach, we extracted morphological and run-length statistics texture features from DTM slices as input to a linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier. In the 2D approach, the raw input PVs were first preprocessed with a Laplacian pyramid multi-resolution enhancement scheme. A mass candidate was then forward-projected to the preprocessed PVs in order to determine the corresponding regions of interest (ROIs). Spatial gray-level dependence (SGLD) texture features were extracted from each ROI and averaged over 11 PVs. An LDA classifier was designed to distinguish the masses from normal tissues. In the combined approach, the LDA scores from the 3D and 2D approaches were averaged to generate a mass likelihood score for each candidate. The A z values were 0.87+/-0.02, 0.86+/-0.02, and 0.91+/-0.02 for the 3D, 2D, and combined approaches, respectively. The difference between the A z values of the 3D and 2D approaches did not achieve statistical significance. The performance of the combined approach was significantly (p<0.05) better than either the 3D or 2D approach alone. The combined classifier will be useful for false-positive reduction in computerized mass detection in DTM.

  15. Role of microRNA221 in regulating normal mammary epithelial hierarchy and breast cancer stem-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Su-Hyung; Bai, Shoumin; He, Zhen; Malik, Fayaz; Xu, Jiahui; Zhou, Lei; Chen, Weilong; Martin-Trevino, Rachel; Wu, Xiaojian; Lan, Ping; Yi, Yongju; Ginestier, Christophe; Ibarra, Ingrid; Shang, Li; McDermott, Sean; Luther, Tahra; Clouthier, Shawn G.; Wicha, Max S.; Liu, Suling

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that lineage specific subpopulations and stem-like cells exist in normal and malignant breast tissues. Epigenetic mechanisms maintaining this hierarchical homeostasis remain to be investigated. In this study, we found the level of microRNA221 (miR-221) was higher in stem-like and myoepithelial cells than in luminal cells isolated from normal and malignant breast tissue. In normal breast cells, over-expression of miR-221 generated more myoepithelial cells whereas knock-down of miR-221 increased luminal cells. Over-expression of miR-221 stimulated stem-like cells in luminal type of cancer and the miR-221 level was correlated with clinical outcome in breast cancer patients. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) was induced by overexpression of miR-221 in normal and breast cancer cells. The EMT related gene ATXN1 was found to be a miR-221 target gene regulating breast cell hierarchy. In conclusion, we propose that miR-221 contributes to lineage homeostasis of normal and malignant breast epithelium. PMID:25686829

  16. Loss of Fibulin-2 Expression Is Associated with Breast Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Chun-Hui; Smith, David J.; West, William W.; Hollingsworth, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    Fibulin-2, an extracellular matrix protein expressed by normal epithelia, was found to be down-regulated in several breast cancer cell lines. Fibulin-2 protein expression was also decreased in breast cancer tissue samples as evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Reintroduction of Fibulin-2 into breast cancer cell lines that do not express Fibulin-2 reduced cancer cell motility and invasion in vitro but had no effect on cell growth and adhesion properties. Together with evidence that Fibulin-2 contributes to wound healing and inhibits smooth muscle cell migration, our findings suggest that loss of Fibulin-2 expression may facilitate migration and invasion in breast cancer. PMID:17456760

  17. Photoacoustic spectroscopy based investigatory approach to discriminate breast cancer from normal: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priya, Mallika; Rao, Bola Sadashiva Satish; Chandra, Subhash; Ray, Satadru; Mathew, Stanley; Datta, Anirbit; Nayak, Subramanya G.; Mahato, Krishna Kishore

    2016-02-01

    In spite of many efforts for early detection of breast cancer, there is still lack of technology for immediate implementation. In the present study, the potential photoacoustic spectroscopy was evaluated in discriminating breast cancer from normal, involving blood serum samples seeking early detection. Three photoacoustic spectra in time domain were recorded from each of 20 normal and 20 malignant samples at 281nm pulsed laser excitations and a total of 120 spectra were generated. The time domain spectra were then Fast Fourier Transformed into frequency domain and 116.5625 - 206.875 kHz region was selected for further analysis using a combinational approach of wavelet, PCA and logistic regression. Initially, wavelet analysis was performed on the FFT data and seven features (mean, median, area under the curve, variance, standard deviation, skewness and kurtosis) from each were extracted. PCA was then performed on the feature matrix (7x120) for discriminating malignant samples from the normal by plotting a decision boundary using logistic regression analysis. The unsupervised mode of classification used in the present study yielded specificity and sensitivity values of 100% in each respectively with a ROC - AUC value of 1. The results obtained have clearly demonstrated the capability of photoacoustic spectroscopy in discriminating cancer from the normal, suggesting its possible clinical implications.

  18. Influence of menstrual cycle, parity and oral contraceptive use on steroid hormone receptors in normal breast.

    PubMed Central

    Battersby, S.; Robertson, B. J.; Anderson, T. J.; King, R. J.; McPherson, K.

    1992-01-01

    Steroid receptor was assessed immunohistochemically in 158 samples of normal breast for variation through the menstrual cycle. Patterns and intensity of reaction were used in a semi-quantitative scoring system to examine the influence of cycle phase, cycle type, parity and age. The changes in oestrogen receptor for natural cycle and oral contraceptive (OC) cycles indicated down-regulation by progestins. Progesterone receptor did not vary significantly in natural cycles, but increased steadily through OC cycles. This study provides strong evidence that both oestrogen and progesterone influence breast epithelium, but dissimilarities from the endometrium are apparent. The interval since pregnancy had a significant negative effect on frequency and score of oestrogen receptor and score of progesterone receptor. Multivariate analysis established the phase of cycle and OC use as independent significant influences on oestrogen receptor. The interval since pregnancy was an independent significant factor for both oestrogen and progesterone receptor presence. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1562470

  19. Differential expression of WISP-1 and WISP-2 genes in normal and transformed human breast cell lines.

    PubMed

    Saxena, N; Banerjee, S; Sengupta, K; Zoubine, M N; Banerjee, S K

    2001-12-01

    The transcriptional alterations of specific gene(s) are actively associated with the development of different cancers including breast. The preceding studies of different laboratories documented at least 40 genes that may contribute directly to the genesis of cancer. Using differential display, RT-PCR and DNA sequencing analyses in normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) and various breast tumor cell lines including MCF-7, ZR-75, T-47D and SKBR2, we demonstrated that WISP-1 and WISP-2 genes are differentially transcribed in these cells. WISP-2 mRNA transcription was identified in all 4 tumor derived cell lines, but the mRNA expression was undetected or minimally detected in normal breast epithelial cells. WISP-1 mRNA expression was identified in normal and transformed cell lines. However, the level of expression was higher in different breast tumor cell lines as compared to HMEC. The mRNA expression profiles of WISP genes in normal breast epithelial cells and breast tumor derived cell lines indicated a strong possibility of the involvement of WISP-signaling in the development of human breast tumors, and can be utilized as genetic markers of this disease.

  20. Analysis of differential protein expression in normal and neoplastic human breast epithelial cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.; Chubb, C.; Huberman, E.; Giometti, C.S.

    1997-07-01

    High resolution two dimensional get electrophoresis (2DE) and database analysis was used to establish protein expression patterns for cultured normal human mammary epithelial cells and thirteen breast cancer cell lines. The Human Breast Epithelial Cell database contains the 2DE protein patterns, including relative protein abundances, for each cell line, plus a composite pattern that contains all the common and specifically expressed proteins from all the cell lines. Significant differences in protein expression, both qualitative and quantitative, were observed not only between normal cells and tumor cells, but also among the tumor cell lines. Eight percent of the consistently detected proteins were found in significantly (P < 0.001) variable levels among the cell lines. Using a combination of immunostaining, comigration with purified protein, subcellular fractionation, and amino-terminal protein sequencing, we identified a subset of the differentially expressed proteins. These identified proteins include the cytoskeletal proteins actin, tubulin, vimentin, and cytokeratins. The cell lines can be classified into four distinct groups based on their intermediate filament protein profile. We also identified heat shock proteins; hsp27, hsp60, and hsp70 varied in abundance and in some cases in the relative phosphorylation levels among the cell lines. Finally, we identified IMP dehydrogenase in each of the cell lines, and found the levels of this enzyme in the tumor cell lines elevated 2- to 20-fold relative to the levels in normal cells.

  1. Immunohistochemical distribution of type IV collagenase in normal, benign, and malignant breast tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Monteagudo, C.; Merino, M. J.; San-Juan, J.; Liotta, L. A.; Stetler-Stevenson, W. G.

    1990-01-01

    Production of type IV collagenase by tumor cells has been linked to their metastatic potential in several experimental models. A possible role for this enzyme in basement membrane type IV collagen turnover has also been suggested. Two recently developed affinity-purified, monospecific antibodies directed against the amino terminus (H1), or an internal active site domain (metal binding region [MBR]) of human type IV collagenase, were employed in the avidin-biotin-immunoperoxidase technique in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded breast tissue samples from 55 patients. Intense cytoplasmic immunostaining of myoepithelial cells was found in normal and hyperplastic tissue, and discontinuous staining was noted in intraductal carcinomas. Luminal epithelial cells were negative or weakly positive in large- or medium-sized ducts but reacted frequently in normal terminal ducts and hyperplastic lesions. Epithelial cells in intraductal carcinomas exhibited immunoreactivity in 20 of 23 cases. Invasive carcinomas were positive in 36 of 40 cases, and metastatic cells in lymph nodes stained in 10 of 12 cases. These results support a role for type IV collagenase in the basement membrane remodeling of normal breast. Our findings suggest that myoepithelial cells play a pivotal role in this enzymatic activity. The high percentage of positive cells in invasive carcinomas and the strong immunoreactivity of lymph node metastases support the role of the enzyme in tumor invasion and metastasis and suggest that tumor cells are the essential source of the enzyme in these processes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2156430

  2. CDDO-Me Protects Normal Lung and Breast Epithelial Cells but Not Cancer Cells from Radiation

    PubMed Central

    El-Ashmawy, Mariam; Delgado, Oliver; Cardentey, Agnelio; Wright, Woodring E.; Shay, Jerry W.

    2014-01-01

    Although radiation therapy is commonly used for treatment for many human diseases including cancer, ionizing radiation produces reactive oxygen species that can damage both cancer and healthy cells. Synthetic triterpenoids, including CDDO-Me, act as anti-inflammatory and antioxidant modulators primarily by inducing the transcription factor Nrf2 to activate downstream genes containing antioxidant response elements (AREs). In the present series of experiments, we determined if CDDO-Me can be used as a radioprotector in normal non-cancerous human lung and breast epithelial cells, in comparison to lung and breast cancer cell lines. A panel of normal non-cancerous, partially cancer progressed, and cancer cell lines from both lung and breast tissue was exposed to gamma radiation with and without pre-treatment with CDDO-Me. CDDO-Me was an effective radioprotector when given ∼18 hours before radiation in epithelial cells (average dose modifying factor (DMF) = 1.3), and Nrf2 function was necessary for CDDO-Me to exert these radioprotective effects. CDDO-Me did not protect cancer lines tested from radiation-induced cytotoxicity, nor did it protect experimentally transformed human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) with progressive oncogenic manipulations. CDDO-Me also protected human lymphocytes against radiation-induced DNA damage. A therapeutic window exists in which CDDO-Me protects normal cells from radiation by activating the Nrf2 pathway, but does not protect experimentally transformed or cancer cell lines. This suggests that use of this oral available, non-toxic class of drug can protect non-cancerous healthy cells during radiotherapy, resulting in better outcomes and less toxicity for patients. PMID:25536195

  3. CDDO-Me protects normal lung and breast epithelial cells but not cancer cells from radiation.

    PubMed

    El-Ashmawy, Mariam; Delgado, Oliver; Cardentey, Agnelio; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W

    2014-01-01

    Although radiation therapy is commonly used for treatment for many human diseases including cancer, ionizing radiation produces reactive oxygen species that can damage both cancer and healthy cells. Synthetic triterpenoids, including CDDO-Me, act as anti-inflammatory and antioxidant modulators primarily by inducing the transcription factor Nrf2 to activate downstream genes containing antioxidant response elements (AREs). In the present series of experiments, we determined if CDDO-Me can be used as a radioprotector in normal non-cancerous human lung and breast epithelial cells, in comparison to lung and breast cancer cell lines. A panel of normal non-cancerous, partially cancer progressed, and cancer cell lines from both lung and breast tissue was exposed to gamma radiation with and without pre-treatment with CDDO-Me. CDDO-Me was an effective radioprotector when given ∼18 hours before radiation in epithelial cells (average dose modifying factor (DMF) = 1.3), and Nrf2 function was necessary for CDDO-Me to exert these radioprotective effects. CDDO-Me did not protect cancer lines tested from radiation-induced cytotoxicity, nor did it protect experimentally transformed human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) with progressive oncogenic manipulations. CDDO-Me also protected human lymphocytes against radiation-induced DNA damage. A therapeutic window exists in which CDDO-Me protects normal cells from radiation by activating the Nrf2 pathway, but does not protect experimentally transformed or cancer cell lines. This suggests that use of this oral available, non-toxic class of drug can protect non-cancerous healthy cells during radiotherapy, resulting in better outcomes and less toxicity for patients.

  4. TFF3 is a normal breast epithelial protein and is associated with differentiated phenotype in early breast cancer but predisposes to invasion and metastasis in advanced disease.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ahmed R H; Griffiths, Andrew B; Tilby, Michael T; Westley, Bruce R; May, Felicity E B

    2012-03-01

    The trefoil protein TFF3 stimulates invasion and angiogenesis in vitro. To determine whether it has a role in breast tumor metastasis and angiogenesis, its levels were measured by immunohistochemistry in breast tissue with a specific monoclonal antibody raised against human TFF3. TFF3 is expressed in normal breast lobules and ducts, at higher levels in areas of fibrocystic change and papillomas, in all benign breast disease lesions, and in 89% of in situ and in 83% of invasive carcinomas. In well-differentiated tumor cells, TFF3 is concentrated at the luminal edge, whereas in poorly differentiated cells polarity is inverted and expression is directed toward the stroma. Expression was high in well-differentiated tumors and was associated significantly with low histological grade and with estrogen and progesterone receptor expression, accordant with induction of TFF3 mRNA by estrogen in breast cancer cells. Paradoxically, TFF3 expression was associated with muscle, neural, and lymphovascular invasion and the presence and number of involved lymph nodes, and it was an independent predictive marker of lymphovascular invasion and lymph node involvement. Consistent with an angiogenic function, TFF3 expression correlated strongly with microvessel density evaluated with CD31 and CD34. In conclusion, TFF3 is expressed in both the normal and diseased breast. Although associated with features of good prognosis, its profile of expression in invasive cancer is consistent with a role in breast tumor progression and tumor cell dissemination.

  5. Chloride and potassium channels in cystic fibrosis airway epithelia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Michael J.; Liedtke, Carole M.

    1986-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis, the most common lethal genetic disease in Caucasians, is characterized by a decreased permeability in sweat gland duct and airway epithelia. In sweat duct epithelium, a decreased Cl- permeability accounts for the abnormally increased salt content of sweat1. In airway epithelia a decreased Cl- permeability, and possibly increased sodium absorption, may account for the abnormal respiratory tract fluid2,3. The Cl- impermeability has been localized to the apical membrane of cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells4. The finding that hormonally regulated Cl- channels make the apical membrane Cl- permeable in normal airway epithelial cells5 suggested abnormal Cl- channel function in cystic fibrosis. Here we report that excised, cell-free patches of membrane from cystic fibrosis epithelial cells contain Cl- channels that have the same conductive properties as Cl- channels from normal cells. However, Cl- channels from cystic fibrosis cells did not open when they were attached to the cell. These findings suggest defective regulation of Cl- channels in cystic fibrosis epithelia; to begin to address this issue, we performed two studies. First, we found that isoprenaline, which stimulates Cl- secretion, increases cellular levels of cyclic AMP in a similar manner in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis epithelial cells. Second, we show that adrenergic agonists open calcium-activated potassium channels, indirectly suggesting that calcium-dependent stimulus-response coupling is intact in cystic fibrosis. These data suggest defective regulation of Cl- channels at a site distal to cAMP accumulation.

  6. Proapoptotic CD95L levels in normal human serum and sera of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Olimón-Andalón, Vicente; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Ratkovich-González, Sarah; Uribe-López, Aida; Mariscal-Ramírez, Ignacio; Delgadillo-Cristerna, Raúl; Ortiz-Lazareno, Pablo; Hernández-Flores, Georgina; de Celis, Ruth; Bravo-Cuellar, Alejandro; Jave-Suárez, Luis F

    2015-05-01

    The CD95 pathway is a critical apoptotic pathway used by immune cells to avoid cancer development. CD95 ligand (CD95L) is found in several forms, as a cell membrane-associated form, a soluble metalloprotease-cleaved form, and a soluble but membrane-bound CD95L released on cell-derived exosomes. In this study, we used a cell-based assay to evaluate the activity of proapoptotic CD95L in sera from healthy individuals and breast cancer patients. We confirmed that our cell-based assay using Jurkat cells was sensitive to the presence of proapoptotic CD95L in serum, and apoptosis induction by mechanisms other than CD95 was discriminated using apoptosis-resistant Jurkat subclones. Our results indicated a proapoptotic potential of normal serum that involved CD95L. Sera from breast cancer patients exhibited significantly decreased apoptosis induction, due to increased CD95 receptor levels compared with healthy women. Apoptotic potential tended to decrease as the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System grade increased, and we observed restoration of proapoptotic potential after tumor removal. The CD95L in serum responsible for apoptotic induction was associated with high-molecular-weight particles, perhaps with exosomes. The sera of healthy individuals generally contain a proapoptotic environment, and this property is mainly maintained by the presence of CD95L. Furthermore, measurement of CD95L-mediated apoptosis induction by sera could be a useful parameter to be evaluated during cancer development and therapeutic response.

  7. The role of the basal stem cell of the human breast in normal development and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Jose; Russo, Irma H.

    2011-01-01

    MCF-10F a spontaneously immortalized ERα negative human breast epithelial cell line derived from breast tissues containing Lobules type 1, is able to form normal ductal structures in a tridimensional collagen matrix system. MCF-10F cells that are Estrogen-transformed [trMCF cells] progressively express phenotypes of in vitro cell transformation, including colony formation in agar methocel, and loss of the ductulogenic capacity. Further selection of these trMCF cells for invasiveness in a Matrigel invasion system identified cells [bcMCF] that formed tumors in severe combined immunodeficient [SCID] mice. The cell lines derived from those tumors [caMCF] were poorly differentiated ERα, PR and ERBB2 negative adenocarcinomas. These characteristics are similar to the human basal cell-like carcinomas. This in vitro in vivo model demonstrates the importance of the basal cell type as a stem cell that reconstitute the branching pattern of the breast and that is also target of a carcinogenic insult leading to transformation and cancer. PMID:21901623

  8. Breast Cancer Stem Cells Transition between Epithelial and Mesenchymal States Reflective of their Normal Counterparts

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Suling; Cong, Yang; Wang, Dong; Sun, Yu; Deng, Lu; Liu, Yajing; Martin-Trevino, Rachel; Shang, Li; McDermott, Sean P.; Landis, Melissa D.; Hong, Suhyung; Adams, April; D’Angelo, Rosemarie; Ginestier, Christophe; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Clouthier, Shawn G.; Birnbaum, Daniel; Wong, Stephen T.; Zhan, Ming; Chang, Jenny C.; Wicha, Max S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Previous studies have suggested that breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) mediate metastasis, are resistant to radiation and chemotherapy, and contribute to relapse. Although several BCSC markers have been described, it is unclear whether these markers identify the same or independent BCSCs. Here, we show that BCSCs exist in distinct mesenchymal-like (epithelial-mesenchymal transition [EMT]) and epithelial-like (mesenchymal-epithelial transition [MET]) states. Mesenchymal-like BCSCs characterized as CD24−CD44+ are primarily quiescent and localized at the tumor invasive front, whereas epithelial-like BCSCs express aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), are proliferative, and are located more centrally. The gene-expression profiles of mesenchymal-like and epithelial-like BCSCs are remarkably similar across different molecular subtypes of breast cancer, and resemble those of distinct basal and luminal stem cells found in the normal breast. We propose that the plasticity of BCSCs that allows them to transition between EMT- and MET-like states endows these cells with the capacity for tissue invasion, dissemination, and growth at metastatic sites. PMID:24511467

  9. DNA replication licensing and cell cycle kinetics of normal and neoplastic breast

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, A; Loddo, M; Fanshawe, T; Prevost, A T; Sainsbury, R; Williams, G H; Stoeber, K

    2005-01-01

    Mcm2–7 (MCM) proteins are part of the origin licensing machinery that regulates initiation of DNA replication. Geminin is a licensing repressor and prevents reinitiation of DNA replication during S–G2–M phase by blocking reloading of Mcm2–7 at replication origins. Here, we have analysed these replication licensing factors (RLFs) to determine whether the pathway becomes deregulated during mammary carcinogenesis, and have assessed their potential value as prognostic markers. Protein expression profiles were generated for Ki67, Mcm2, geminin, HER-2, ER and PR in a series of reduction mammoplasty (n=18) and breast cancer specimens (n=120), and compared to clinicopathological parameters. A large proportion of epithelial cells of the terminal duct lobular unit reside in a primed ‘replication licensed' but not proliferating state. This state is characterised by Mcm2 expression and absence of Ki67 and the S/G2/M marker geminin. In breast cancers, increasing tumour grade is associated with increased Ki67, Mcm2 and geminin expression. The Mcm2/Ki67 ratio decreases through the grades, indicating a shift from a predominantly licensed state to an actively proliferating state. This shift is associated with an increase in the geminin/Ki67 ratio, signifying a shortening of G1 phase in breast cancer cells. Ki67, Mcm2 and the Mcm2/Ki67 ratio are statistically significantly associated with the Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI), but geminin and the geminin/Ki67 ratio are not. Ki67, Mcm2 and Mcm2/Ki67 are highly correlated with one another, with Mcm2 being the single most important predictor of NPI score (P<0.001). However, only 12% of variation in NPI is explained by Mcm2, as the labelling index for this marker is approaching 100% for many of the high-grade tumours. The origin licensing phenotypes of normal breast and breast cancers therefore relate to their cellular differentiation status, and high-level MCM expression in more poorly differentiated tumours severely

  10. The biology of progesterone receptor in the normal mammary gland and in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Obr, Alison E; Edwards, Dean P

    2012-06-24

    This paper reviews work on progesterone and the progesterone receptor (PR) in the mouse mammary gland that has been used extensively as an experimental model. Studies have led to the concept that progesterone controls proliferation and morphogenesis of the luminal epithelium in a tightly orchestrated manner at distinct stages of development by paracrine signaling pathways, including receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) as a major paracrine factor. Progesterone also drives expansion of stem cells by paracrine signals to generate progenitors required for alveologenesis. During mid-to-late pregnancy, progesterone has another role to suppress secretory activation until parturition mediated in part by crosstalk between PR and prolactin/Stat5 signaling to inhibit induction of milk protein gene expression, and by inhibiting tight junction closure. In models of hormone-dependent mouse mammary tumors, the progesterone/PR signaling axis enhances pre-neoplastic progression by a switch from a paracrine to an autocrine mode of proliferation and dysregulation of the RANKL signaling pathway. Limited experiments with normal human breast show that progesterone/PR signaling also stimulates epithelial cell proliferation by a paracrine mechanism; however, the signaling pathways and whether RANKL is a major mediator remains unknown. Work with human breast cancer cell lines, patient tumor samples and clinical studies indicates that progesterone is a risk factor for breast cancer and that alteration in progesterone/PR signaling pathways contributes to early stage human breast cancer progression. However, loss of PR expression in primary tumors is associated with a less differentiated more invasive phenotype and worse prognosis, suggesting that PR may limit later stages of tumor progression.

  11. PTK6/BRK is expressed in the normal mammary gland and activated at the plasma membrane in breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Peng, Maoyu; Emmadi, Rajyasree; Wang, Zebin; Wiley, Elizabeth L; Gann, Peter H; Khan, Seema A; Banerji, Nilanjana; McDonald, William; Asztalos, Szilard; Pham, Thao N D; Tonetti, Debra A; Tyner, Angela L

    2014-08-15

    Protein Tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6/BRK) is overexpressed in the majority of human breast tumors and breast tumor cell lines. It is also expressed in normal epithelial linings of the gastrointestinal tract, skin, and prostate. To date, expression of PTK6 has not been extensively examined in the normal human mammary gland. We detected PTK6 mRNA and protein expression in the immortalized normal MCF-10A human mammary gland epithelial cell line, and examined PTK6 expression and activation in a normal human breast tissue microarray, as well as in human breast tumors. Phosphorylation of tyrosine residue 342 in the PTK6 activation loop corresponds with its activation. Similar to findings in the prostate, we detect nuclear and cytoplasmic PTK6 in normal mammary gland epithelial cells, but no phosphorylation of tyrosine residue 342. However, in human breast tumors, striking PTK6 expression and phosphorylation of tyrosine 342 is observed at the plasma membrane. PTK6 is expressed in the normal human mammary gland, but does not appear to be active and may have kinase-independent functions that are distinct from its cancer promoting activities at the membrane. Understanding consequences of PTK6 activation at the plasma membrane may have implications for developing novel targeted therapies against this kinase.

  12. Nucleotide release by airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Lazarowski, Eduardo R; Sesma, Juliana I; Seminario, Lucia; Esther, Charles R; Kreda, Silvia M

    2011-01-01

    The purinergic events regulating the airways' innate defenses are initiated by the release of purines from the epithelium, which occurs constitutively and is enhanced by chemical or mechanical stimulation. While the external triggers have been reviewed exhaustively, this chapter focuses on current knowledge of the receptors and signaling cascades mediating nucleotide release. The list of secreted purines now includes ATP, ADP, AMP and nucleotide sugars, and involves at least three distinct mechanisms reflecting the complexity of airway epithelia. First, the constitutive mechanism involves ATP translocation to the ER/Golgi complex as energy source for protein folding, and fusion of Golgi-derived vesicles with the plasma membrane. Second, goblet cells package ATP with mucins into granules, which are discharged in response to P2Y(2)R activation and Ca(2+)-dependent signaling pathways. Finally, non-mucous cells support a regulated mechanism of ATP release involving protease activated receptor (PAR)-elicited G(12/13) activation, leading to the RhoGEF-mediated exchange of GDP for GTP on RhoA, and cytoskeleton rearrangement. Together, these pathways provide fine tuning of epithelial responses regulated by purinergic signaling events. PMID:21560042

  13. Fingerprinting Breast Cancer vs. Normal Mammary Cells by Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jingjing; Sinues, Pablo Martinez-Lozano; Hollmén, Maija; Li, Xue; Detmar, Michael; Zenobi, Renato

    2014-06-01

    There is increasing interest in the development of noninvasive diagnostic methods for early cancer detection, to improve the survival rate and quality of life of cancer patients. Identification of volatile metabolic compounds may provide an approach for noninvasive early diagnosis of malignant diseases. Here we analyzed the volatile metabolic signature of human breast cancer cell lines versus normal human mammary cells. Volatile compounds in the headspace of conditioned culture medium were directly fingerprinted by secondary electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. The mass spectra were subsequently treated statistically to identify discriminating features between normal vs. cancerous cell types. We were able to classify different samples by using feature selection followed by principal component analysis (PCA). Additionally, high-resolution mass spectrometry allowed us to propose their chemical structures for some of the most discriminating molecules. We conclude that cancerous cells can release a characteristic odor whose constituents may be used as disease markers.

  14. Surface modification of microparticles causes differential uptake responses in normal and tumoral human breast epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patiño, Tania; Soriano, Jorge; Barrios, Lleonard; Ibáñez, Elena; Nogués, Carme

    2015-06-01

    The use of micro- and nanodevices as multifunctional systems for biomedical applications has experienced an exponential growth during the past decades. Although a large number of studies have focused on the design and fabrication of new micro- and nanosystems capable of developing multiple functions, a deeper understanding of their interaction with cells is required. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of different microparticle surfaces on their interaction with normal and tumoral human breast epithelial cell lines. For this, AlexaFluor488 IgG functionalized polystyrene microparticles (3 μm) were coated with Polyethyleneimine (PEI) at two different molecular weights, 25 and 750 kDa. The effect of microparticle surface properties on cytotoxicity, cellular uptake and endocytic pathways were assessed for both normal and tumoral cell lines. Results showed a differential response between the two cell lines regarding uptake efficiency and mechanisms of endocytosis, highlighting the potential role of microparticle surface tunning for specific cell targeting.

  15. Functional Roles of Bestrophins in Ocular Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Marmorstein, Alan D.; Cross, Harold E.; Peachey, Neal S.

    2009-01-01

    There are four members of the bestrophin family of proteins in the human genome, of which two are known to be expressed in the eye. The gene BEST1 (formerly VMD2) which encodes the protein bestrophin-1 (Best1) was first identified in 1998. Mutations in this gene have now been associated with four clinically distinguishable human eye diseases, collectively referred to as “bestrophinopathies”. Over the last decade, laboratories have sought to understand how Best1 mutations could result in eye diseases that range in presentation from macular degeneration to nanophthalmos. The majority of our knowledge comes from studies that have sought to understand how Best1 mutations or dysfunction could induce the classical symptoms of the most common of these diseases: Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (BVMD). BVMD is a dominant trait that is characterized electrophysiologically by a diminished electrooculogram light peak with a normal clinical electroretinogram. This together with the localization of Best1 to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) basolateral plasma membrane and data from heterologous expression studies, have led to the proposal that Best1 generates the light peak, and that bestrophins are a family of Ca2+ activated Cl- channels (CaCCs). However, data from Best1 knock-out and knock-in mice, coupled with the recent discovery of a recessive bestrophinopathy suggest that Best1 does not generate the light peak. Recently Best2 was found to be expressed in non-pigmented epithelia in the ciliary body. However, aqueous dynamics in Best2 knock-out mice do not support a role for Best2 as a Cl- channel. Thus, the purported CaCC function of the bestrophins and how loss of this function relates to clinical disease needs to be reassessed. In this article, we examine data obtained from tissue-type and animal models and discuss the current state of bestrophin research, what roles Best1 and Best2 may play in ocular epithelia and ocular electrophysiology, and how perturbation

  16. Measurement of pressure-displacement kinetics of hemoglobin in normal breast tissue with near-infrared spectral imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Shudong; Pogue, Brian W.; Laughney, Ashley M.; Kogel, Christine A.; Paulsen, Keith D

    2009-04-01

    Applying localized external displacement to the breast surface can change the interstitial fluid pressure such that regional transient microvascular changes occur in oxygenation and vascular volume. Imaging these dynamic responses over time, while different pressures are applied, could provide selective temporal contrast for cancer relative to the surrounding normal breast. In order to investigate this possibility in normal breast tissue, a near-infrared spectral tomography system was developed that can simultaneously acquire data at three wavelengths with a 15 s time resolution per scan. The system was tested first with heterogeneous blood phantoms. Changes in regional blood concentrations were found to be linearly related to recovered mean hemoglobin concentration (HbT) values (R{sup 2}=0.9). In a series of volunteer breast imaging exams, data from 17 asymptomatic subjects were acquired under increasing and decreasing breast compression. Calculations show that a 10 mm displacement applied to the breast results in surface pressures in the range of 0-55 kPa depending on breast density. The recovered human data indicate that HbT was reduced under compression and the normalized change was significantly correlated to the applied pressure with a p value of 0.005. The maximum HbT decreases in breast tissue were associated with body mass index (BMI), which is a surrogate indicator of breast density. No statistically valid correlations were found between the applied pressure and the changes in tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) or water percentage (H2O) across the range of BMI values studied.

  17. Adipocyte differentiation influences the proliferation and migration of normal and tumoral breast epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Creydt, Virginia Pistone; Sacca, Paula Alejandra; Tesone, Amelia Julieta; Vidal, Luciano; Calvo, Juan Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Stromal tissue regulates the development and differentiation of breast epithelial cells, with adipocytes being the main stromal cell type. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of adipocyte differentiation on proliferation and migration, as well as to assess the activity of heparanase and metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), in normal (NMuMG) and tumoral (LM3) murine breast epithelial cells. NMuMG and LM3 cells were grown on irradiated 3T3-L1 cells (stromal support, SS) at various degrees of differentiation [preadipocytes (preA), poorly differentiated adipocytes (pDA) and mature adipocytes (MA)] and/or were incubated in the presence of conditioned medium (CM) derived from each of these three types of differentiated cells. Cells grown on a plastic support or in fresh medium served as the controls. Cell proliferation was measured with a commercial colorimetric kit, and the motility of the epithelial cells was evaluated by means of a wound-healing assay. Heparanase activity was assessed by quantifying heparin degradation, and the expression of MMP-9 was determined using Western blotting. The results indicate that cell proliferation was increased after 24 and 48 h in the NMuMG and LM3 cells grown on preA, pDA and MA SS. In the NMuMG cells cultured on SS in the presence of all three types of CM, proliferation was enhanced. LM3 cell migration was increased in the presence of all three types of CM and in cells grown on preA SS. Heparanase activity was increased in the NMuMG cells incubated with all three types of CM, and in the LM3 cells incubated with the CM from pDA and MA. Both the NMuMG and LM3 cell lines presented basal expression of MMP-9; however, a significant increase in MMP-9 expression was observed in the LM3 cells incubated with each of the three types of CM. In conclusion, adipocyte differentiation influences normal and tumoral breast epithelial cell proliferation and migration. Heparanase and MMP-9 appear to be involved in this regulation. The

  18. Quantitative changes of collagen in human normal breast tissue and invasive ductal carcinoma using nonlinear optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiqiang; Wu, Yan; Lian, Yuane; Fu, Fangmeng; Wang, Chuan; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-11-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) imaging of collagen plays a key role in noninvasive diagnosis of human tissue. During the experiment, we observed an interesting phenomenon which two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) signal of collagen in human invasive ductal carcinoma of breast tissue becomes much weaker than the normal breast tissue, but the second harmonic generation (SHG) signal of collagen does not get an obvious change . In order to explain the phenomena,this paper emphasizes on the intensity of TPEF and SHG signal from collagen in human invasive ductal carcinoma of breast tissues and normal breast tissue. Further, we respectively obtain the intensity spectral information from collagen in the above two tissues with all parameter unaltered. Our quantitative results show that the intensity of TPEF from collagen in human invasive ductal carcinoma of breast tissue is much lower than the intensity of TPEF from collagen in normal breast tissue. According to the theoretic analysis, it was concluded that the intensity of TPEF declined due to the reduction of the quantum yield when the collagen was intruded by cancer cells. However, the invasion of cancer cells has no effect on decisive factor of SHG. Our theoretical analysis brings more detailed information about intensity of SHG and TPEF from collagen in the above two tissues.

  19. Simulation of Dose to Surrounding Normal Structures in Tangential Breast Radiotherapy Due to Setup Error

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhakar, Ramachandran Rath, Goura K.; Julka, Pramod K.; Ganesh, Tharmar; Haresh, K.P.; Joshi, Rakesh C.; Senthamizhchelvan, S.; Thulkar, Sanjay; Pant, G.S.

    2008-04-01

    Setup error plays a significant role in the final treatment outcome in radiotherapy. The effect of setup error on the planning target volume (PTV) and surrounding critical structures has been studied and the maximum allowed tolerance in setup error with minimal complications to the surrounding critical structure and acceptable tumor control probability is determined. Twelve patients were selected for this study after breast conservation surgery, wherein 8 patients were right-sided and 4 were left-sided breast. Tangential fields were placed on the 3-dimensional-computed tomography (3D-CT) dataset by isocentric technique and the dose to the PTV, ipsilateral lung (IL), contralateral lung (CLL), contralateral breast (CLB), heart, and liver were then computed from dose-volume histograms (DVHs). The planning isocenter was shifted for 3 and 10 mm in all 3 directions (X, Y, Z) to simulate the setup error encountered during treatment. Dosimetric studies were performed for each patient for PTV according to ICRU 50 guidelines: mean doses to PTV, IL, CLL, heart, CLB, liver, and percentage of lung volume that received a dose of 20 Gy or more (V20); percentage of heart volume that received a dose of 30 Gy or more (V30); and volume of liver that received a dose of 50 Gy or more (V50) were calculated for all of the above-mentioned isocenter shifts and compared to the results with zero isocenter shift. Simulation of different isocenter shifts in all 3 directions showed that the isocentric shifts along the posterior direction had a very significant effect on the dose to the heart, IL, CLL, and CLB, which was followed by the lateral direction. The setup error in isocenter should be strictly kept below 3 mm. The study shows that isocenter verification in the case of tangential fields should be performed to reduce future complications to adjacent normal tissues.

  20. Simulation of dose to surrounding normal structures in tangential breast radiotherapy due to setup error.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Ramachandran; Rath, Goura K; Julka, Pramod K; Ganesh, Tharmar; Haresh, K P; Joshi, Rakesh C; Senthamizhchelvan, S; Thulkar, Sanjay; Pant, G S

    2008-01-01

    Setup error plays a significant role in the final treatment outcome in radiotherapy. The effect of setup error on the planning target volume (PTV) and surrounding critical structures has been studied and the maximum allowed tolerance in setup error with minimal complications to the surrounding critical structure and acceptable tumor control probability is determined. Twelve patients were selected for this study after breast conservation surgery, wherein 8 patients were right-sided and 4 were left-sided breast. Tangential fields were placed on the 3-dimensional-computed tomography (3D-CT) dataset by isocentric technique and the dose to the PTV, ipsilateral lung (IL), contralateral lung (CLL), contralateral breast (CLB), heart, and liver were then computed from dose-volume histograms (DVHs). The planning isocenter was shifted for 3 and 10 mm in all 3 directions (X, Y, Z) to simulate the setup error encountered during treatment. Dosimetric studies were performed for each patient for PTV according to ICRU 50 guidelines: mean doses to PTV, IL, CLL, heart, CLB, liver, and percentage of lung volume that received a dose of 20 Gy or more (V20); percentage of heart volume that received a dose of 30 Gy or more (V30); and volume of liver that received a dose of 50 Gy or more (V50) were calculated for all of the above-mentioned isocenter shifts and compared to the results with zero isocenter shift. Simulation of different isocenter shifts in all 3 directions showed that the isocentric shifts along the posterior direction had a very significant effect on the dose to the heart, IL, CLL, and CLB, which was followed by the lateral direction. The setup error in isocenter should be strictly kept below 3 mm. The study shows that isocenter verification in the case of tangential fields should be performed to reduce future complications to adjacent normal tissues. PMID:18262128

  1. The myoepithelial cell: its role in normal mammary glands and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sopel, M

    2010-02-01

    Mammary gland epithelium is composed of an inner layer of secretory cells (luminal) and an outer layer of myoepithelial cells (MEC) bordering the basal lamina which separates the epithelial layer from the extracellular matrix. Mature MECs morphologically resemble smooth muscle cells; however, they exhibit features typical for epithelial cells, such as the presence of specific cytokeratin filaments. During lactation, secretory cells synthesize milk components, which are collected in alveoli and duct lumen, and transported to the nipple as a result of MEC contraction. Although the induction of MEC contraction results from oxytocin action, also other, still unknown auto/paracrine mechanisms participate in the regulation of this process. As well as milk ejection, MECs are involved in mammary gland morphogenesis in all developmental stages, modulating proliferation and differentiation of luminal cells. They take part in the formation of extracellular matrix, synthesizing its components and secreting proteinases and their inhibitors. In addition, MECs are regarded as natural cancer suppressors, stabilizing the normal structure of the mammary gland, they secrete suppressor proteins (e.g. maspin) limiting cancer growth, invasiveness, and neoangiogenesis. The majority of malignant breast cancers are derived from luminal cells, whereas neoplasms of MEC origin are the most seldom and usually benign form of breast tumours. MECs are markedly resistant to malignant transformation and they are able to suppress the transformation of neighboring luminal cells. Therefore, a deeper insight into the role of MECs in the physiology and pathology of mammary glands would allow a better understanding of cancerogenesis mechanisms and possible application of specific MEC markers in the diagnosis and therapy of breast cancer.

  2. Signatures of post-zygotic structural genetic aberrations in the cells of histologically normal breast tissue that can predispose to sporadic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, Lars A.; Rasi, Chiara; Pekar, Gyula; Davies, Hanna; Piotrowski, Arkadiusz; Absher, Devin; Razzaghian, Hamid Reza; Ambicka, Aleksandra; Halaszka, Krzysztof; Przewoźnik, Marcin; Kruczak, Anna; Mandava, Geeta; Pasupulati, Saichand; Hacker, Julia; Prakash, K. Reddy; Dasari, Ravi Chandra; Lau, Joey; Penagos-Tafurt, Nelly; Olofsson, Helena M.; Hallberg, Gunilla; Skotnicki, Piotr; Mituś, Jerzy; Skokowski, Jaroslaw; Jankowski, Michal; Śrutek, Ewa; Zegarski, Wojciech; Tiensuu Janson, Eva; Ryś, Janusz; Tot, Tibor; Dumanski, Jan P.

    2015-01-01

    Sporadic breast cancer (SBC) is a common disease without robust means of early risk prediction in the population. We studied 282 females with SBC, focusing on copy number aberrations in cancer-free breast tissue (uninvolved margin, UM) outside the primary tumor (PT). In total, 1162 UMs (1–14 per breast) were studied. Comparative analysis between UM(s), PT(s), and blood/skin from the same patient as a control is the core of the study design. We identified 108 patients with at least one aberrant UM, representing 38.3% of cases. Gains in gene copy number were the principal type of mutations in microscopically normal breast cells, suggesting that oncogenic activation of genes via increased gene copy number is a predominant mechanism for initiation of SBC pathogenesis. The gain of ERBB2, with overexpression of HER2 protein, was the most common aberration in normal cells. Five additional growth factor receptor genes (EGFR, FGFR1, IGF1R, LIFR, and NGFR) also showed recurrent gains, and these were occasionally present in combination with the gain of ERBB2. All the aberrations found in the normal breast cells were previously described in cancer literature, suggesting their causative, driving role in pathogenesis of SBC. We demonstrate that analysis of normal cells from cancer patients leads to identification of signatures that may increase risk of SBC and our results could influence the choice of surgical intervention to remove all predisposing cells. Early detection of copy number gains suggesting a predisposition toward cancer development, long before detectable tumors are formed, is a key to the anticipated shift into a preventive paradigm of personalized medicine for breast cancer. PMID:26430163

  3. Signatures of post-zygotic structural genetic aberrations in the cells of histologically normal breast tissue that can predispose to sporadic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Lars A; Rasi, Chiara; Pekar, Gyula; Davies, Hanna; Piotrowski, Arkadiusz; Absher, Devin; Razzaghian, Hamid Reza; Ambicka, Aleksandra; Halaszka, Krzysztof; Przewoźnik, Marcin; Kruczak, Anna; Mandava, Geeta; Pasupulati, Saichand; Hacker, Julia; Prakash, K Reddy; Dasari, Ravi Chandra; Lau, Joey; Penagos-Tafurt, Nelly; Olofsson, Helena M; Hallberg, Gunilla; Skotnicki, Piotr; Mituś, Jerzy; Skokowski, Jaroslaw; Jankowski, Michal; Śrutek, Ewa; Zegarski, Wojciech; Tiensuu Janson, Eva; Ryś, Janusz; Tot, Tibor; Dumanski, Jan P

    2015-10-01

    Sporadic breast cancer (SBC) is a common disease without robust means of early risk prediction in the population. We studied 282 females with SBC, focusing on copy number aberrations in cancer-free breast tissue (uninvolved margin, UM) outside the primary tumor (PT). In total, 1162 UMs (1-14 per breast) were studied. Comparative analysis between UM(s), PT(s), and blood/skin from the same patient as a control is the core of the study design. We identified 108 patients with at least one aberrant UM, representing 38.3% of cases. Gains in gene copy number were the principal type of mutations in microscopically normal breast cells, suggesting that oncogenic activation of genes via increased gene copy number is a predominant mechanism for initiation of SBC pathogenesis. The gain of ERBB2, with overexpression of HER2 protein, was the most common aberration in normal cells. Five additional growth factor receptor genes (EGFR, FGFR1, IGF1R, LIFR, and NGFR) also showed recurrent gains, and these were occasionally present in combination with the gain of ERBB2. All the aberrations found in the normal breast cells were previously described in cancer literature, suggesting their causative, driving role in pathogenesis of SBC. We demonstrate that analysis of normal cells from cancer patients leads to identification of signatures that may increase risk of SBC and our results could influence the choice of surgical intervention to remove all predisposing cells. Early detection of copy number gains suggesting a predisposition toward cancer development, long before detectable tumors are formed, is a key to the anticipated shift into a preventive paradigm of personalized medicine for breast cancer.

  4. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy method to differentiate between normal and cancerous breast cells.

    PubMed

    Lane, Randy; See, Seong S

    2012-09-01

    Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) is used to find the structural differences between cancerous breast cells (MCF-7 line) and normal breast cells (MCF-12F line). Gold nanoparticles were prepared and the hydrodynamic diameter of the gold nanoparticles found to be 38.45 nm. The Gold nanoparticles were exposed to both MCF-7 and MCF-12F cells from lower to higher concentrations. Spectroscopic studies founds nanoparticles were within the cells, and increasing the nanoparticles concentration inside the cells also resulted in sharper IR peaks as a result of localized surface Plasmon resonance. Asymmetric and symmetric stretching and bending vibrations between phosphate, COO-, CH2 groups were found to give negative shifts in wavenumbers and a decrease in peak intensities when going from noncancerous to cancerous cells. Cellular proteins produced peak assignments at the 1542 and 1644 cm(-1) wavenumbers which were attributed to the amide I and amide II bands of the polypeptide bond of proteins. Significant changes were found in the peak intensities between the cell lines in the spectrum range from 2854-2956 cm(-1). Results show that the concentration range of gold nanoparticles used in this research showed no significant changes in cell viability in either cell line. Therefore, we believe ATR-FTIR and gold nanotechnology can be at the forefront of cancer diagnosis for some time to come.

  5. Pluripotency Genes and Their Functions in the Normal and Aberrant Breast and Brain.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Tracy; Twigger, Alecia-Jane; Kakulas, Foteini

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) attracted considerable interest with the successful isolation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) from the inner cell mass of murine, primate and human embryos. Whilst it was initially thought that the only PSCs were ESCs, in more recent years cells with similar properties have been isolated from organs of the adult, including the breast and brain. Adult PSCs in these organs have been suggested to be remnants of embryonic development that facilitate normal tissue homeostasis during repair and regeneration. They share certain characteristics with ESCs, such as an inherent capacity to self-renew and differentiate into cells of the three germ layers, properties that are regulated by master pluripotency transcription factors (TFs) OCT4 (octamer-binding transcription factor 4), SOX2 (sex determining region Y-box 2), and homeobox protein NANOG. Aberrant expression of these TFs can be oncogenic resulting in heterogeneous tumours fueled by cancer stem cells (CSC), which are resistant to conventional treatments and are associated with tumour recurrence post-treatment. Further to enriching our understanding of the role of pluripotency TFs in normal tissue function, research now aims to develop optimized isolation and propagation methods for normal adult PSCs and CSCs for the purposes of regenerative medicine, developmental biology, and disease modeling aimed at targeted personalised cancer therapies. PMID:26580604

  6. Pluripotency Genes and Their Functions in the Normal and Aberrant Breast and Brain.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Tracy; Twigger, Alecia-Jane; Kakulas, Foteini

    2015-11-13

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) attracted considerable interest with the successful isolation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) from the inner cell mass of murine, primate and human embryos. Whilst it was initially thought that the only PSCs were ESCs, in more recent years cells with similar properties have been isolated from organs of the adult, including the breast and brain. Adult PSCs in these organs have been suggested to be remnants of embryonic development that facilitate normal tissue homeostasis during repair and regeneration. They share certain characteristics with ESCs, such as an inherent capacity to self-renew and differentiate into cells of the three germ layers, properties that are regulated by master pluripotency transcription factors (TFs) OCT4 (octamer-binding transcription factor 4), SOX2 (sex determining region Y-box 2), and homeobox protein NANOG. Aberrant expression of these TFs can be oncogenic resulting in heterogeneous tumours fueled by cancer stem cells (CSC), which are resistant to conventional treatments and are associated with tumour recurrence post-treatment. Further to enriching our understanding of the role of pluripotency TFs in normal tissue function, research now aims to develop optimized isolation and propagation methods for normal adult PSCs and CSCs for the purposes of regenerative medicine, developmental biology, and disease modeling aimed at targeted personalised cancer therapies.

  7. Small breast lesion classification performance using the normalized axial-shear strain area feature.

    PubMed

    Thittai, Arun K; Yamal, Jose-Miguel; Ophir, Jonathan

    2013-03-01

    Breast cancers that are found and confirmed because they are causing symptoms tend to be larger and are more likely to have already spread to the lymph nodes and beyond. Thus, early detection and confirmation are of paramount importance. The normalized axial-shear strain area (NASSA) feature from the axial-shear strain elastogram (ASSE) has been shown to be a feature that can identify the boundary-bonding conditions that are indicative of the presence of cancer. Recently, we investigated and reported on the potential of the NASSA feature for breast lesion classification into fibroadenomas and cancers. In this article, we investigate the size distribution of the lesions that were part of the previous study and analyze classification performance specifically on small lesions (<10 mm diameter). A total of 33 biopsy-proven malignant tumors and 30 fibroadenomas were part of the study that involved three observers blinded to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS) ultrasound scores. The observers outlined the lesions on the sonograms and the lesion size (maximum circle-equivalent diameter in millimeters) was computed from this outline. The ASSE was automatically segmented and color-overlaid on the sonogram, and the NASSA feature from ASSE was computed semi-automatically. Receiver operating characteristic curves were then generated for the subset of cases involving small lesions. Box plots were produced for the two different lesion size groups, small and large, from a logistic regression classifier that was built previously. The results of our study show that approximately 38% and 22% of the fibroadenomas and cancers, respectively, were small. Furthermore, it was found that the NASSA feature resulted in a perfect classification of the small lesions, both in the training data and in the cross-validation. For lesions <10 mm the difference in fibroadenoma and cancer mean scores was 0.73 ± 0.13 (p < 0.001), whereas lesions >10 mm had a difference of 0.52 ± 0

  8. Elastic moduli of normal and pathological human breast tissues: an inversion-technique-based investigation of 169 samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samani, Abbas; Zubovits, Judit; Plewes, Donald

    2007-03-01

    Understanding and quantifying the mechanical properties of breast tissues has been a subject of interest for the past two decades. This has been motivated in part by interest in modelling soft tissue response for surgery planning and virtual-reality-based surgical training. Interpreting elastography images for diagnostic purposes also requires a sound understanding of normal and pathological tissue mechanical properties. Reliable data on tissue elastic properties are very limited and those which are available tend to be inconsistent, in part as a result of measurement methodology. We have developed specialized techniques to measure tissue elasticity of breast normal tissues and tumour specimens and applied them to 169 fresh ex vivo breast tissue samples including fat and fibroglandular tissue as well as a range of benign and malignant breast tumour types. Results show that, under small deformation conditions, the elastic modulus of normal breast fat and fibroglandular tissues are similar while fibroadenomas were approximately twice the stiffness. Fibrocystic disease and malignant tumours exhibited a 3-6-fold increased stiffness with high-grade invasive ductal carcinoma exhibiting up to a 13-fold increase in stiffness compared to fibrogalndular tissue. A statistical analysis showed that differences between the elastic modulus of the majority of those tissues were statistically significant. Implications for the specificity advantages of elastography are reviewed.

  9. A new normal?: Women's experiences of biographical disruption and liminality following treatment for early stage breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Trusson, Diane; Pilnick, Alison; Roy, Srila

    2016-02-01

    Increasing numbers of women are surviving breast cancer, but little is known about the long-term implications of having survived a life-threatening illness and living with embodied reminders of its potential to return. Twenty-four women aged between 42 and 80 (median = 51)who had been treated for early stage breast cancer in the UK between 6 months and 29 years previously, were recruited through local media and interviewed. Analysis of their narratives revealed challenges in the post-treatment period that were conceptualised as biographical disruption and liminality. Although no longer ill, an ongoing fear of recurrence combined with embodied changes prevented a return to 'normal' i.e. a pre-cancer state in terms of health status, identity and relationships. We argue that following the biographical disruption of breast cancer, a 'new normal' entails a continual renegotiation of identities, daily lives and futures as time passes and lives evolve. PMID:26802368

  10. Dynamic epithelia of the developing vertebrate face

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Chong Pyo; Crump, J. Gage

    2015-01-01

    A segmental series of endoderm-derived pouch and ectoderm-derived cleft epithelia act as signaling centers in the developing face. Their precise morphogenesis is therefore essential for proper patterning of the vertebrate head. Intercellular adhesion and polarity are highly dynamic within developing facial epithelial cells, with signaling from the adjacent mesenchyme controlling both epithelial character and directional migration. Endodermal and ectodermal epithelia fuse to form the primary mouth and gill slits, which involves basement membrane dissolution, cell intercalations, and apoptosis, as well as undergo further morphogenesis to generate the middle ear cavity and glands of the neck. Recent studies of facial epithelia are revealing both core programs of epithelial morphogenesis and insights into the coordinated assembly of the vertebrate head. PMID:25748249

  11. An "elite hacker": breast tumors exploit the normal microenvironment program to instruct their progression and biological diversity.

    PubMed

    Boudreau, Aaron; van't Veer, Laura J; Bissell, Mina J

    2012-01-01

    The year 2011 marked the 40 year anniversary of Richard Nixon signing the National Cancer Act, thus declaring the beginning of the "War on Cancer" in the United States. Whereas we have made tremendous progress toward understanding the genetics of tumors in the past four decades, and in developing enabling technology to dissect the molecular underpinnings of cancer at unprecedented resolution, it is only recently that the important role of the stromal microenvironment has been studied in detail. Cancer is a tissue-specific disease, and it is becoming clear that much of what we know about breast cancer progression parallels the biology of the normal breast differentiation, of which there is still much to learn. In particular, the normal breast and breast tumors share molecular, cellular, systemic and microenvironmental influences necessary for their progression. It is therefore enticing to consider a tumor to be a "rogue hacker"--one who exploits the weaknesses of a normal program for personal benefit. Understanding normal mammary gland biology and its "security vulnerabilities" may thus leave us better equipped to target breast cancer. In this review, we will provide a brief overview of the heterotypic cellular and molecular interactions within the microenvironment of the developing mammary gland that are necessary for functional differentiation, provide evidence suggesting that similar biology--albeit imbalanced and exaggerated--is observed in breast cancer progression particularly during the transition from carcinoma in situ to invasive disease. Lastly we will present evidence suggesting that the multigene signatures currently used to model cancer heterogeneity and clinical outcome largely reflect signaling from a heterogeneous microenvironment-a recurring theme that could potentially be exploited therapeutically. PMID:22863741

  12. Normalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuevas, Eduardo J.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses cornerstone of Montessori theory, normalization, which asserts that if a child is placed in an optimum prepared environment where inner impulses match external opportunities, the undeviated self emerges, a being totally in harmony with its surroundings. Makes distinctions regarding normalization, normalized, and normality, indicating how…

  13. Stem cell heterogeneity and plasticity in epithelia.

    PubMed

    Donati, Giacomo; Watt, Fiona M

    2015-05-01

    Epithelia cover the surfaces and line the cavities of the body. Recent studies have highlighted the existence of multiple stem cell compartments within individual epithelia that exhibit striking plasticity in response to tissue damage, transplantation, or tumor development. New knowledge about the composition of the epithelial niche and the transcription factor networks that maintain cell identity has provided new insights into the extrinsic and intrinsic regulation of stem cell behavior. In addition new in vitro tissue substitutes allow better integration of data from human and mouse models. PMID:25957902

  14. A differential role for CXCR4 in the regulation of normal versus malignant breast stem cell activity.

    PubMed

    Ablett, Matthew P; O'Brien, Ciara S; Sims, Andrew H; Farnie, Gillian; Clarke, Robert B

    2014-02-15

    C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) is known to regulate lung, pancreatic and prostate cancer stem cells. In breast cancer, CXCR4 signalling has been reported to be a mediator of metastasis, and is linked to poor prognosis. However its role in normal and malignant breast stem cell function has not been investigated. Anoikis resistant (AR) cells were collected from immortalised (MCF10A, 226L) and malignant (MCF7, T47D, SKBR3) breast cell lines and assessed for stem cell enrichment versus unsorted cells. AR cells had significantly higher mammosphere forming efficiency (MFE) than unsorted cells. The AR normal cells demonstrated increased formation of 3D structures in Matrigel compared to unsorted cells. In vivo, SKBR3 and T47D AR cells had 7- and 130-fold enrichments for tumour formationrespectively, compared with unsorted cells. AR cells contained significantly elevated CXCR4 transcript and protein levels compared to unsorted cells. Importantly, CXCR4 mRNA was higher in stem cell-enriched CD44+/CD24- patient-derived breast cancer cells compared to non-enriched cells. CXCR4 stimulation by its ligand SDF-1 reduced MFE of the normal breast cells lines but increased the MFE in T47D and patient-derived breast cancer cells. CXCR4 inhibition by AMD3100 increased stem cell activity but reduced the self-renewal capacity of the malignant breast cell line T47D. CXCR4+ FACS sorted MCF7 cells demonstrated a significantly increased MFE compared with CXCR4- cells. This significant increase in MFE was further demonstrated in CXCR4 over-expressing MCF7 cells which also had an increase in self-renewal compared to parental cells. A greater reduction in self-renewal following CXCR4 inhibition in the CXCR4 over-expressing cells compared with parental cells was also observed. Our data establish for the first time that CXCR4 signalling has contrasting effects on normal and malignant breast stem cell activity. Here, we demonstrate that CXCR4 signalling specifically regulates breast

  15. A differential role for CXCR4 in the regulation of normal versus malignant breast stem cell activity

    PubMed Central

    Ablett, Matthew P.; O'Brien, Ciara S.; Sims, Andrew H.; Farnie, Gillian; Clarke, Robert B.

    2014-01-01

    C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) is known to regulate lung, pancreatic and prostate cancer stem cells. In breast cancer, CXCR4 signalling has been reported to be a mediator of metastasis, and is linked to poor prognosis. However its role in normal and malignant breast stem cell function has not been investigated. Anoikis resistant (AR) cells were collected from immortalised (MCF10A, 226L) and malignant (MCF7, T47D, SKBR3) breast cell lines and assessed for stem cell enrichment versus unsorted cells. AR cells had significantly higher mammosphere forming efficiency (MFE) than unsorted cells. The AR normal cells demonstrated increased formation of 3D structures in Matrigel compared to unsorted cells. In vivo, SKBR3 and T47D AR cells had 7- and 130-fold enrichments for tumour formation respectively, compared with unsorted cells. AR cells contained significantly elevated CXCR4 transcript and protein levels compared to unsorted cells. Importantly, CXCR4 mRNA was higher in stem cell-enriched CD44+ /CD24− - patient-derived breast cancer cells compared to non-enriched cells. CXCR4 stimulation by its ligand SDF-1 reduced MFE of the normal breast cells lines but increased the MFE in T47D and patient-derived breast cancer cells. CXCR4 inhibition by AMD3100 increased stem cell activity but reduced the self-renewal capacity of the malignant breast cell line T47D. CXCR4 + FACS sorted MCF7 cells demonstrated a significantly increased MFE compared with CXCR4- cells. This significant increase in MFE was further demonstrated in CXCR4 over-expressing MCF7 cells which also had an increase in self-renewal compared to parental cells. A greater reduction in self-renewal following CXCR4 inhibition in the CXCR4 over-expressing cells compared with parental cells was also observed. Our data establish for the first time that CXCR4 signalling has contrasting effects on normal and malignant breast stem cell activity. Here, we demonstrate that CXCR4 signalling specifically regulates

  16. Loss of TGFβ Signaling Destabilizes Homeostasis and Promotes Squamous Cell Carcinomas in Stratified Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Guasch, Géraldine; Schober, Markus; Pasolli, H. Amalia; Conn, Emily Belmont; Polak, Lisa; Fuchs, Elaine

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Although TGFβ is a potent inhibitor of proliferation, epithelia lacking the essential receptor (TβRII) for TGFβ signaling display normal tissue homeostasis. By studying asymptomatic TβRII-deficient stratified epithelia, we show that tissue homeostasis is maintained by balancing hyperproliferation with elevated apoptosis. Moreover, rectal and genital epithelia, which are naturally proliferative, develop spontaneous squamous cell carcinomas with age when TβRII is absent. This progression is associated with a reduction in apoptosis and can be accelerated in phenotypically normal epidermis by oncogenic mutations in Ras. We show that TβRII deficiency leads to enhanced keratinocyte motility and integrin-FAK-Src signaling. Together, these mechanisms provide a molecular framework to account for many of the characteristics of TβRII-deficient invasive SQCCs. PMID:17936557

  17. Reliability of Quantitative Ultrasonic Assessment of Normal-Tissue Toxicity in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Emi J.; Chen Hao; Torres, Mylin; Andic, Fundagul; Liu Haoyang; Chen Zhengjia; Sun, Xiaoyan; Curran, Walter J.; Liu Tian

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: We have recently reported that ultrasound imaging, together with ultrasound tissue characterization (UTC), can provide quantitative assessment of radiation-induced normal-tissue toxicity. This study's purpose is to evaluate the reliability of our quantitative ultrasound technology in assessing acute and late normal-tissue toxicity in breast cancer radiotherapy. Method and Materials: Our ultrasound technique analyzes radiofrequency echo signals and provides quantitative measures of dermal, hypodermal, and glandular tissue toxicities. To facilitate easy clinical implementation, we further refined this technique by developing a semiautomatic ultrasound-based toxicity assessment tool (UBTAT). Seventy-two ultrasound studies of 26 patients (720 images) were analyzed. Images of 8 patients were evaluated for acute toxicity (<6 months postradiotherapy) and those of 18 patients were evaluated for late toxicity ({>=}6 months postradiotherapy). All patients were treated according to a standard radiotherapy protocol. To assess intraobserver reliability, one observer analyzed 720 images in UBTAT and then repeated the analysis 3 months later. To assess interobserver reliability, three observers (two radiation oncologists and one ultrasound expert) each analyzed 720 images in UBTAT. An intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to evaluate intra- and interobserver reliability. Ultrasound assessment and clinical evaluation were also compared. Results: Intraobserver ICC was 0.89 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.96 for glandular tissue toxicity. Interobserver ICC was 0.78 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.94 for glandular tissue toxicity. Statistical analysis found significant changes in dermal (p < 0.0001), hypodermal (p = 0.0027), and glandular tissue (p < 0.0001) assessments in the acute toxicity group. Ultrasound measurements correlated with clinical Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity scores of patients

  18. Fibroblast radiosensitivity versus acute and late normal skin responses in patients treated for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, W.A.; Wike, J.; Tucker, S.L.

    1995-07-30

    To determine if the radiosensitivity of normal human skin fibroblasts, measured in early passage cultures, is significantly correlated with the degree of acute or late normal skin damage in patients treated for breast cancer with radiotherapy. To test assay reproducibility, SF2 values derived from paired biopsies of the same patient (12 cases) were compared. A reasonably good correlation (p = 0.075) was obtained for SF2s determined by high dose-rate irradiations with immediated plating, but not for delayed plating or low dose-rate treatments. The median coefficient of variation in the replicate SF2s after high dose-rate treatment and immediate plating was 13%, suggesting that the poor correlation in paired SF2 values is due to the magnitude of the uncertainty in SF2 relative to the overall spread in SF2 values between patients (CV = 28%). Individual SF2 values and averaged values from patients with data from two biopsies were compared with the acute and late clinical reactions. A significant negative correlation was found between SF2 and relative clinical response, but only when averaged high dose-rate SF2 values and telangiectasia scores were compared. There was no significant correlation between average SF2 values and acute responses or between individual SF2 measurements and either the acute or late clinical response. The results of this study suggest that the degree of late telangiectasia is at least partially dependent upon the intrinsic cellular radiosensitivity of normal fibroblasts, but the relationship is not clear cut. Multiple replicate assays are necessary to obtain reliable estimates of fibroblast SF2 values using current techniques. 20 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Differential sensitivity of normal and malignant breast epithelial cells to genistein is partly mediated by p21(WAF1).

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, S; Neburi, M; Chinni, S R; Alhasan, S; Miller, F; Sarkar, F H

    2001-06-01

    Genistein, a soy metabolite, is a potential chemopreventive agent against various types of cancer. There are several studies documenting molecular alterations leading to cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells; however, no studies, to date, have shown the effect of genistein in isogenic normal and malignant breast epithelial cells. In this study, we investigated whether genistein shows any differential sensitivity to normal (MCF10A and MCF12A) and malignant (MCF10CA1a and MDA-MB-231) breast epithelial cells. We found that genistein causes a greater degree of G(2)-M arrest and induces apoptosis in malignant cell lines compared with normal breast epithelial cells. After genistein treatment, flow cytometric analysis revealed a hyperdiploid population in malignant cells that was not observed in normal cells. Cell cycle regulator p21(WAF1), which is known to be up-regulated by genistein treatment, was greatly induced at RNA and protein levels in normal cells, whereas its level was only slightly induced in malignant MDA-MB-231 cells and not detectable in malignant MCF10CA1a cells. Therefore, we investigated the causal role of p21(WAF1) in the differential sensitivity of genistein among these cell lines. We examined the effects of genistein on p21(WAF1) -/- and p21(WAF1) +/+ HCT116 cells, which were used as controls prior to studies on breast cancer cells. We found that there was a greater degree of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in p21(WAF1) -/- cells compared with p21(WAF1) +/+ HCT116 cells after genistein treatment. Flow cytometric analysis after genistein treatment showed a significant number of p21(WAF1) -/- cells in the hyperdiploid population, which are probably programmed to die through apoptotic processes. To further confirm the causal role of p21(WAF1) in genistein-mediated cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, we down-regulated p21(WAF1) by antisense p21(WAF1) cDNA transfection experiments. We found that both normal and malignant p

  20. Characterization of cell lines derived from breast cancers and normal mammary tissues for the study of the intrinsic molecular subtypes.

    PubMed

    Prat, Aleix; Karginova, Olga; Parker, Joel S; Fan, Cheng; He, Xiaping; Bixby, Lisa; Harrell, J Chuck; Roman, Erick; Adamo, Barbara; Troester, Melissa; Perou, Charles M

    2013-11-01

    Five molecular subtypes (luminal A, luminal B, HER2-enriched, basal-like, and claudin-low) with clinical implications exist in breast cancer. Here, we evaluated the molecular and phenotypic relationships of (1) a large in vitro panel of human breast cancer cell lines (BCCLs), human mammary fibroblasts (HMFs), and human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs); (2) in vivo breast tumors; (3) normal breast cell subpopulations; (4) human embryonic stem cells (hESCs); and (5) bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). First, by integrating genomic data of 337 breast tumor samples with 93 cell lines we were able to identify all the intrinsic tumor subtypes in the cell lines, except for luminal A. Secondly, we observed that the cell lines recapitulate the differentiation hierarchy detected in the normal mammary gland, with claudin-low BCCLs and HMFs cells showing a stromal phenotype, HMECs showing a mammary stem cell/bipotent progenitor phenotype, basal-like cells showing a luminal progenitor phenotype, and luminal B cell lines showing a mature luminal phenotype. Thirdly, we identified basal-like and highly migratory claudin-low subpopulations of cells within a subset of triple-negative BCCLs (SUM149PT, HCC1143, and HCC38). Interestingly, both subpopulations within SUM149PT were enriched for tumor-initiating cells, but the basal-like subpopulation grew tumors faster than the claudin-low subpopulation. Finally, claudin-low BCCLs resembled the phenotype of hMSCs, whereas hESCs cells showed an epithelial phenotype without basal or luminal differentiation. The results presented here help to improve our understanding of the wide range of breast cancer cell line models through the appropriate pairing of cell lines with relevant in vivo tumor and normal cell counterparts.

  1. Cholinergic nicotinic receptors in the vestibular epithelia.

    PubMed

    Thornhill, R A

    1991-10-01

    Receptor binding studies specific for nicotinic cholinergic receptors have been carried out on isolated vestibular epithelia of the frogs Rana catesbiana and Rana temporaria. Evidence is presented for the presence of nicotinic-like cholinergic receptors specifically associated with the sensory areas. PMID:1797345

  2. A large-scale study of the ultrawideband microwave dielectric properties of normal, benign and malignant breast tissues obtained from cancer surgeries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazebnik, Mariya; Popovic, Dijana; McCartney, Leah; Watkins, Cynthia B.; Lindstrom, Mary J.; Harter, Josephine; Sewall, Sarah; Ogilvie, Travis; Magliocco, Anthony; Breslin, Tara M.; Temple, Walley; Mew, Daphne; Booske, John H.; Okoniewski, Michal; Hagness, Susan C.

    2007-10-01

    The development of microwave breast cancer detection and treatment techniques has been driven by reports of substantial contrast in the dielectric properties of malignant and normal breast tissues. However, definitive knowledge of the dielectric properties of normal and diseased breast tissues at microwave frequencies has been limited by gaps and discrepancies across previously published studies. To address these issues, we conducted a large-scale study to experimentally determine the ultrawideband microwave dielectric properties of a variety of normal, malignant and benign breast tissues, measured from 0.5 to 20 GHz using a precision open-ended coaxial probe. Previously, we reported the dielectric properties of normal breast tissue samples obtained from reduction surgeries. Here, we report the dielectric properties of normal (adipose, glandular and fibroconnective), malignant (invasive and non-invasive ductal and lobular carcinomas) and benign (fibroadenomas and cysts) breast tissue samples obtained from cancer surgeries. We fit a one-pole Cole-Cole model to the complex permittivity data set of each characterized sample. Our analyses show that the contrast in the microwave-frequency dielectric properties between malignant and normal adipose-dominated tissues in the breast is considerable, as large as 10:1, while the contrast in the microwave-frequency dielectric properties between malignant and normal glandular/fibroconnective tissues in the breast is no more than about 10%.

  3. Expression of hemidesmosomes and component proteins is lost by invasive breast cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bergstraesser, L. M.; Srinivasan, G.; Jones, J. C.; Stahl, S.; Weitzman, S. A.

    1995-01-01

    Hemidesmosomes are multiprotein structures that attach basal cells of stratified epithelia to basement membranes. Although normal human breast epithelia are not stratified, we observed expression of electron-dense hemidesmosomes and hemidesmosome protein components by breast epithelial and myoepithelial cells at the basal lamina in vivo. Primary cultured normal human breast epithelial cells also contained hemidesmosomes and component proteins, and could be used as a model for hemidesmosome assembly and regulation. In these cultured cells, hemidesmosome proteins were expressed and localized basally in an unvaried temporal pattern, and electron-dense hemidesmosomes were not seen until the final protein was localized to the cell base. In addition, rate of localization was influenced by confluence, doubling time, and extracellular matrix. Invasive breast cancer cells did not express hemidesmosomes or most of the component proteins in vivo. In carcinoma in situ, cells away from the basement membrane lacked hemidesmosomes and hemidesmosome proteins, and cells at the basement membrane exhibited abnormalities of hemidesmosome protein expression. Primary human malignant breast cells in culture exhibited a mix of hemidesmosome phenotypes. These data suggest that hemidesmosomes may be important subcellular structures in determining the cytoarchitecture of the breast epithelium. Further, their downregulation may influence cytoarchitecture remodeling closely linked with cell cycle, motility, and extracellular matrix interactions; and their loss in carcinoma may be associated with loss of normal cytoarchitecture. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:7495306

  4. Non-normal Screening Mammography Results, Lumpectomies, and Breast Cancer Reported by California Women, 2001–2009

    PubMed Central

    Irvin, Veronica L.; Breen, Nancy; Meissner, Helen I.; Liu, Benmei; Kaplan, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although screening mammography may contribute to decreases in breast cancer mortality in a population, it may also increase the risk of false positives, anxiety, and unnecessary and costly medical procedures in individuals. We report trends in self-reported non-normal screening mammography results, lumpectomies, and breast cancer in a representative sample of California women. Methods Data were obtained from the 2001, 2005, and 2009 cross-sectional California Health Interview Surveys (CHIS) and weighted to the California population. CHIS employed a multistage sampling design to administer telephone surveys in 6 languages. Our study sample was restricted to women 40 years and older who reported a screening mammogram in the past 2 years. Sample sizes were 13,974 in 2001, 12,069 in 2005, and 15,552 in 2009. Women reporting non-normal results were asked whether they had an operation to remove the lump and, if so, whether the lump was confirmed as malignant. Findings Between 2001 and 2009, the percent of California women who reported having been diagnosed with breast cancer was relatively stable. For each of the three age groups studied, the percentage of non-normal mammography results increased and the percentages of lumpectomies decreased and, for every woman reporting a diagnosis of breast cancer, three women reported a lumpectomy that turned out not to be cancer. This ratio was greater for younger women and less for older women. Conclusions Despite relatively constant rates of breast cancer diagnosis from 2001 to 2009, the percentage of non-normal mammography results increased and lumpectomies declined. PMID:26070253

  5. Isotonic water transport in secretory epithelia.

    PubMed

    Swanson, C H

    1977-01-01

    The model proposed by Diamond and Bossert [1] for isotonic water transport has received wide acceptance in recent years. It assumes that the local driving force for water transport is a standing osmotic gradient produced in the lateral intercellular spaces of the epithelial cell layer by active solute transport. While this model is based on work done in absorptive epithelia where the closed to open direction of the lateral space and the direction of net transport are the same, it has been proposed that the lateral spaces could also serve as the site of the local osmotic gradients for water transport in secretory epithelia, where the closed to open direction of the lateral space and net transport are opposed, by actively transporting solute out of the space rather than into it. Operation in the backward direction, however, requires a lower than ambient hydrostatic pressure within the lateral space which would seem more likely to cause the space to collapse with loss of function. On the other hand, most secretory epithelia are characterized by transport into a restricted ductal system which is similar to the lateral intercellular space in the absorptive epithelia in that its closed to open direction is the same as that of net transport. In vitro micropuncture studies on the exocrine pancreas of the rabbit indicate the presence of a small but statistically significant increase in juice osmolality, 6 mOsm/kg H(2)O, at the site of electrolyte and water secretion in the smallest extralobular ducts with secretin stimulation which suggests that the ductal system in the secretory epithelia rather than the lateral intercellular space is the site of the local osmotic gradients responsible for isotonic water transport. PMID:331693

  6. Expression profiling of cancerous and normal breast tissues identifies microRNAs that are differentially expressed in serum from patients with (metastatic) breast cancer and healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a group of small noncoding RNAs involved in the regulation of gene expression. As such, they regulate a large number of cellular pathways, and deregulation or altered expression of miRNAs is associated with tumorigenesis. In the current study, we evaluated the feasibility and clinical utility of circulating miRNAs as biomarkers for the detection and staging of breast cancer. Methods miRNAs were extracted from a set of 84 tissue samples from patients with breast cancer and eight normal tissue samples obtained after breast-reductive surgery. After reverse transcription and preamplification, 768 miRNAs were profiled by using the TaqMan low-density arrays. After data normalization, unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis (UHCA) was used to investigate global differences in miRNA expression between cancerous and normal samples. With fold-change analysis, the most discriminating miRNAs between both tissue types were selected, and their expression was analyzed on serum samples from 20 healthy volunteers and 75 patients with breast cancer, including 16 patients with untreated metastatic breast cancer. miRNAs were extracted from 200 μl of serum, reverse transcribed, and analyzed in duplicate by using polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Results UHCA showed major differences in miRNA expression between tissue samples from patients with breast cancer and tissue samples from breast-reductive surgery (P < 0.0001). Generally, miRNA expression in cancerous samples tends to be repressed when compared with miRNA expression in healthy controls (P = 0.0685). The four most discriminating miRNAs by fold-change (miR-215, miR-299-5p, miR-411, and miR-452) were selected for further analysis on serum samples. All miRNAs at least tended to be differentially expressed between serum samples from patients with cancer and serum samples from healthy controls (miR-215, P = 0.094; miR-299-5P, P = 0.019; miR-411, P = 0.002; and miR-452, P = 0.092). For all

  7. ADAMTS-1 Is Found in the Nuclei of Normal and Tumoral Breast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Suély V.; Lima, Maíra A.; Cella, Nathalie; Jaeger, Ruy G.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins secreted in the extracellular matrix microenvironment (ECM) by tumor cells are involved in cell adhesion, motility, intercellular communication and invasion. The tumor microenvironment is expansively modified and remodeled by proteases, resulting in important changes in both cell-cell and cell-ECM interactions and in the generation of new signals from the cell surface. Metalloproteinases belonging to the ADAMTS (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin motifs) family have been implicated in tissue remodeling events observed in cancer development, growth and progression. Here we investigated the subcellular localization of ADAMTS-1 in normal-like (MCF10-A) and tumoral (MCF7 and MDA-MB-231) human breast cells. ADAMTS-1 is a secreted protease found in the extracellular matrix. However, in this study we show for the first time that ADAMTS-1 is also present in the nuclei and nucleoli of the three mammary cell lines studied here. Our findings indicate that ADAMTS-1 has proteolytic functions in the nucleus through its interaction with aggrecan substrate. PMID:27764205

  8. Associations between genetic variation in one-carbon metabolism and LINE-1 DNA methylation in histologically normal breast tissues

    PubMed Central

    Llanos, Adana A M; Marian, Catalin; Brasky, Theodore M; Dumitrescu, Ramona G; Liu, Zhenhua; Mason, Joel B; Makambi, Kepher H; Spear, Scott L; Kallakury, Bhaskar V S; Freudenheim, Jo L; Shields, Peter G

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide DNA hypomethylation is an early event in the carcinogenic process. Percent methylation of long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) is a biomarker of genome-wide methylation and is a potential biomarker for breast cancer. Understanding factors associated with percent LINE-1 DNA methylation in histologically normal tissues could provide insight into early stages of carcinogenesis. In a cross-sectional study of 121 healthy women with no prior history of cancer who underwent reduction mammoplasty, we examined associations between plasma and breast folate, genetic variation in one-carbon metabolism, and percent LINE-1 methylation using multivariable regression models (adjusting for race, oral contraceptive use, and alcohol use). Results are expressed as the ratio of LINE-1 methylation relative to that of the referent group, with the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI). We found no significant associations between plasma or breast folate and percent LINE-1 methylation. Variation in MTHFR, MTR, and MTRR were significantly associated with percent LINE-1 methylation. Variant allele carriers of MTHFR A1289C had 4% lower LINE-1 methylation (Ratio 0.96, 95% CI 0.93–0.98), while variant allele carriers of MTR A2756G (Ratio 1.03, 95% CI 1.01–1.06) and MTRR A66G (Ratio 1.03, 95% CI 1.01–1.06) had 3% higher LINE-1 methylation, compared to those carrying the more common genotypes of these SNPs. DNA methylation of LINE-1 elements in histologically normal breast tissues is influenced by polymorphisms in genes in the one-carbon metabolism pathway. Future studies are needed to investigate the sociodemographic, environmental and additional genetic determinants of DNA methylation in breast tissues and the impact on breast cancer susceptibility. PMID:26090795

  9. A comparison study of different excitation wavelengths to determine the relative content of key biomolecules in breast cancer and breast normal tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sordillo, Laura A.; Sordillo, Peter P.; Budansky, Yury; Pu, Yang; Alfano, R. R.

    2015-03-01

    Fluorescence profiles from breast cancer and breast normal tissue samples with excitation wavelengths at 280 nm and 340 nm were obtained using the conventional LS-50 Perkin-Elmer spectrometer. Fluorescence ratios from these tissue samples, demonstrated by emission peaks at 340 nm, 440 nm and 460 nm and likely representing tryptophan and NADH, show increased relative content of tryptophan in malignant samples. Double ratio (DR) techniques were used to measure the severity of disease. The single excitation double ratio (Single-DR) method utilizes the emission intensity peaks from the spectrum acquired using a single excitation of 280 nm; while the dual excitation double ratio (dual-DR) method utilizes the emission intensity peaks from the spectra acquired using an excitation of 280 nm and 340 nm. Single-DR and dual-DR from 13 patients with breast carcinoma were compared in terms of their efficiency to distinguish high from low/intermediate tumors. Similar results were found with both methods. Results suggest that dual excitation wavelengths may be as effective as single excitation wavelength in calculating the relative content of biomolecules in breast cancer tissue, as well as for the assessment of the malignant potential of these tumors.

  10. Reliability of quantitative ultrasonic assessment of normal-tissue toxicity in breast cancer radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Emi J.; Chen, Hao; Torres, Mylin; Andic, Fundagul; Liu, Hao-Yang; Chen, Zhengjia; Sun, Xiaoyan; Curran, Walter J; Liu, Tian

    2011-01-01

    Purpose We have recently reported that ultrasound imaging, together with ultrasound tissue characterization (UTC), can provide quantitative assessment of radiation-induced normal-tissue toxicity. This study’s purpose is to evaluate the reliability of our quantitative ultrasound technology in assessing acute and late normal-tissue toxicity in breast cancer radiotherapy. Method and Materials Our ultrasound technique analyzes radio-frequency echo signals and provides quantitative measures of dermal, hypodermal, and glandular-tissue toxicities. To facilitate easy clinical implementation, we further refined this technique by developing a semi-automatic ultrasound-based toxicity assessment tool (UBTAT). Seventy-two ultrasound studies of 26 patients (720 images) were analyzed. Images of 8 patients were evaluated for acute toxicity (<6 months post radiotherapy) and those of 18 patients were evaluated for late toxicity (≥6 months post radiotherapy). All patients were treated according to a standard radiotherapy protocol. To assess intra-observer reliability, one observer analyzed 720 images in UBTAT and then repeated the analysis 3 months later. To assess inter-observer reliability, three observers (two radiation oncologists and one ultrasound expert) each analyzed 720 images in UBTAT. An intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to evaluate intra- and inter-observer reliability. Ultrasound assessment and clinical evaluation were also compared. Results Intra-observer ICC was 0.89 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.96 for glandular-tissue toxicity. Inter-observer ICC was 0.78 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.94 for glandular-tissue toxicity. Statistical analysis found significant changes in dermal (p < 0.0001), hypodermal (p=0.0027), and glandular-tissue (p < 0.0001) assessments in the acute toxicity group. Ultrasound measurements correlated with clinical RTOG toxicity scores of patients in the late toxicity group

  11. Vitamin D and the mammary gland: a review on its role in normal development and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Nair; Paredes, Joana; Costa, José Luis; Ylstra, Bauke; Schmitt, Fernando

    2012-05-31

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease associated with diverse biological behaviours and clinical outcome. Although some molecular subgroups of breast cancer have a targeted therapy, the most aggressive tumours still lack a molecular target. Despite vitamin D being classically associated with the physiological role of calcium regulation and phosphate transport in bone metabolism, several studies have demonstrated a wide range of functions for this hormone, which are particularly important in the field of cancer. The mechanisms underlying the protective actions of vitamin D in cancer development are only sparsely understood, but evidence shows that vitamin D participates in cell growth regulation, apoptosis and cell differentiation. In addition, it has been implicated in the suppression of cancer cell invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis. Most of vitamin D biological actions are mediated by the vitamin D receptor and the synthesis and catabolism of this hormone are regulated by the enzymes CYP27B1 and CYP24A1. In the present review we highlight research data concerning the function of this hormone in the mammary gland, with a special focus on breast carcinogenesis. Hence, and although the available data are controversial, we consider not only updated information on the epidemiology of vitamin D in breast cancer and its potential value as a therapeutic agent or prophylactic (with an emphasis on molecular mechanisms and effectors of vitamin D action), but include data on its role in other stages of breast cancer progression as well. Accordingly, we review data on the influence of vitamin D in the development of normal breast and the expression of vitamin D-related proteins (VDR, CYP27B1 and CYP24A21) in benign mammary lesions and ductal carcinomas in situ.

  12. Use of high-throughput protein array for profiling of differentially expressed proteins in normal and malignant breast tissue.

    PubMed

    Hudelist, Gernot; Pacher-Zavisin, Margit; Singer, Christian F; Holper, Tina; Kubista, Ernst; Schreiber, Martin; Manavi, Mahmood; Bilban, Martin; Czerwenka, Klaus

    2004-08-01

    cDNA arrays provide a powerful tool to identify gene expression pattern that are potentially associated with tumor invasion and metastasis. However, genes work at the protein level and, since the transcriptional activity of a gene does not necessarily reflect cellular protein expression, the identification and quantification of proteins is essential for the understanding of molecular events leading to malignant transformation. We have therefore employed a high-throughput protein microarray system which contains 378 well-characterized monoclonal antibodies in order to compare the gene expression pattern of malignant and adjacent normal breast tissue in a patient with primary breast cancer. Using this technique, we have identified a number of proteins that show increased expression levels in malignant breast tissues such as casein kinase Ie, p53, annexin XI, CDC25C, eIF-4E and MAP kinase 7. The expression of other proteins, such as the multifunctional regulator 14-3-3e was found to be decreased in malignant breast tissue, whereas the majority of proteins remained unchanged when compared to the corresponding non-malignant samples. The protein expression pattern was confirmed by immunohistochemistry, in which antibodies against 8 representative proteins known to be involved in carcinogenesis were employed in paraffin-embedded normal and malignant tissue sections deriving from the same patient. In each case, the results obtained by IHC matched the data obtained by antibody microarray system. Taken together, we have described for the first time a tumor cell specificity protein expression pattern by use of a novel commercially available antibody microarray system. We have thus demonstrated the feasibility of high-throughput protein arrays in the proteomic analysis of human breast tissue. We hypothesize that the use of protein arrays will not only increase our understanding of the molecular events, but could prove useful in evaluating prognosis and in determining optimal

  13. Breast lump

    MedlinePlus

    Breast mass ... males and females of all ages have normal breast tissue. This tissue responds to hormone changes. Because of this, lumps can come and go. Breast lumps may appear at any age: Both male ...

  14. Effects of BRCA2 cis-regulation in normal breast and cancer risk amongst BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Cis-acting regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at specific loci may modulate penetrance of germline mutations at the same loci by introducing different levels of expression of the wild-type allele. We have previously reported that BRCA2 shows differential allelic expression and we hypothesize that the known variable penetrance of BRCA2 mutations might be associated with this mechanism. Methods We combined haplotype analysis and differential allelic expression of BRCA2 in breast tissue to identify expression haplotypes and candidate cis-regulatory variants. These candidate variants underwent selection based on in silico predictions for regulatory potential and disruption of transcription factor binding, and were functionally analyzed in vitro and in vivo in normal and breast cancer cell lines. SNPs tagging the expression haplotypes were correlated with the total expression of several genes in breast tissue measured by Taqman and microarray technologies. The effect of the expression haplotypes on breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers was investigated in 2,754 carriers. Results We identified common haplotypes associated with differences in the levels of BRCA2 expression in human breast cells. We characterized three cis-regulatory SNPs located at the promoter and two intronic regulatory elements which affect the binding of the transcription factors C/EBPα, HMGA1, D-binding protein (DBP) and ZF5. We showed that the expression haplotypes also correlated with changes in the expression of other genes in normal breast. Furthermore, there was suggestive evidence that the minor allele of SNP rs4942440, which is associated with higher BRCA2 expression, is also associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer (per-allele hazard ratio (HR) = 0.85, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.72 to 1.00, P-trend = 0.048). Conclusions Our work provides further insights into the role of cis-regulatory variation in the penetrance of disease-causing mutations

  15. Discrimination between normal breast tissue and tumor tissue using CdTe series detector developed for photon-counting mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Chizuru; Ihori, Akiko; Yamakawa, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Shuichiro; Okada, Masahiro; Kato, Misa; Nakajima, Ai; Kodera, Yoshie

    2016-03-01

    We propose a new mammography system using a cadmium telluride (CdTe) series photon-counting detector, having high absorption efficiency over a wide energy range. In a previous study, we showed that the use of high X-ray energy in digital mammography is useful from the viewpoint of exposure dose and image quality. In addition, the CdTe series detector can acquire X-ray spectrum information following transmission through a subject. This study focused on the tissue composition identified using spectral information obtained by a new photon-counting detector. Normal breast tissue consists entirely of adipose and glandular tissues. However, it is very difficult to find tumor tissue in the region of glandular tissue via a conventional mammogram, especially in dense breast because the attenuation coefficients of glandular tissue and tumor tissue are very close. As a fundamental examination, we considered a simulation phantom and showed the difference between normal breast tissue and tumor tissue of various thicknesses in a three-dimensional (3D) scatter plot. We were able to discriminate between both types of tissues. In addition, there was a tendency for the distribution to depend on the thickness of the tumor tissue. Thinner tumor tissues were shown to be closer in appearance to normal breast tissue. This study also demonstrated that the difference between these tissues could be made obvious by using a CdTe series detector. We believe that this differentiation is important, and therefore, expect this technology to be applied to new tumor detection systems in the future.

  16. Electromagnetic spectroscopy of normal breast tissue specimens obtained from reduction surgeries: comparison of optical and microwave properties.

    PubMed

    Lazebnik, Mariya; Zhu, Changfang; Palmer, Gregory M; Harter, Josephine; Sewall, Sarah; Ramanujam, Nirmala; Hagness, Susan C

    2008-10-01

    Techniques utilizing electromagnetic energy at microwave and optical frequencies have been shown to be promising for breast cancer detection and diagnosis. Since different biophysical mechanisms are exploited at these frequencies to discriminate between healthy and diseased tissue, combining these two modalities may result in a more powerful approach for breast cancer detection and diagnosis. Toward this end, we performed microwave dielectric spectroscopy and optical diffuse reflectance spectroscopy measurements at the same sites on freshly excised normal breast tissues obtained from reduction surgeries at the University of Wisconsin Hospital, using microwave and optical probes with very similar sensing volumes. We found that the microwave dielectric constant and effective conductivity are correlated with tissue composition across the entire measurement frequency range (|r| approximately 0.5-0.6, p<0.01) and that the optical absorption coefficient at 460 nm and optical scattering coefficient are correlated with tissue composition (|r| approximately 0.4-0.6, p<0.02). Finally, we found that the optical absorption coefficient at 460 nm is correlated with the microwave dielectric constant and effective conductivity (r=-0.55, p<0.01). Our results suggest that combining optical and microwave modalities for analyzing breast tissue samples may serve as a crosscheck and provide complementary information about tissue composition.

  17. Correction of electrode polarization contributions to the dielectric properties of normal and cancerous breast tissues at audio/radiofrequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoneman, M. R.; Kosempa, M.; Gregory, W. D.; Gregory, C. W.; Marx, J. J.; Mikkelson, W.; Tjoe, J.; Raicu, V.

    2007-11-01

    Spurious contributions from electrode polarization (EP) are a major nuisance in dielectric measurements of biological tissues and hamper accurate determination of tissue properties in the audio/radiofrequencies. Various electrode geometries and/or treatments have been employed traditionally to reduce EP contributions, although none succeeded to completely remove EP from measurements on tissues for all practical frequency ranges. A method of correction for contributions of EP to the dielectric properties of tissues is proposed. The method is based on modeling the electrode impedance with suitable functions and on the observation that certain parameters are only dependent on electrodes properties and can thus be determined separately. The method is tested on various samples with known properties, and its usefulness is demonstrated with samples of normal and cancerous human female breast tissue. It is observed that the dielectric properties of the tissues over the frequency range 40 Hz-100 MHz are significantly different among different types of breast tissue. This observation is used further to demonstrate that, by scanning the tip of the measuring dielectric probe (with modest spatial resolution) across a sample of excised breast tissue, significant variations in the electrical properties are detected at a position where a tumor is located. This study shows that dielectric spectroscopy has the potential to offer a viable alternative to the current methods for detection of breast cancer in vivo.

  18. Identification of novel breast cancer-associated transcripts by UniGene database mining and gene expression analysis in normal and malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Laversin, Stéphanie A-S; Phatak, Vinaya M; Powe, Des G; Li, Geng; Miles, Amanda K; Hughes, David C; Ball, Graham R; Ellis, Ian O; Gritzapis, Angelos D; Missitzis, Ioannis; McArdle, Stéphanie E B; Rees, Robert C

    2013-03-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous and complex disease. Although the use of tumor biomarkers has improved individualized breast cancer care, i.e., assessment of risk, diagnosis, prognosis, and prediction of treatment outcome, new markers are required to further improve patient clinical management. In the present study, a search for novel breast cancer-associated genes was performed by mining the UniGene database for expressed sequence tags (ESTs) originating from human normal breast, breast cancer tissue, or breast cancer cell lines. Two hundred and twenty-eight distinct breast-associated UniGene Clusters (BUC1-228) matched the search criteria. Four BUC ESTs (BUC6, BUC9, BUC10, and BUC11) were subsequently selected for extensive in silico database searches, and in vitro analyses through sequencing and RT-PCR based assays on well-characterized cell lines and tissues of normal and cancerous origin. BUC6, BUC9, BUC10, and BUC11 are clustered on 10p11.21-12.1 and showed no homology to any known RNAs. Overall, expression of the four BUC transcripts was high in normal breast and testis tissue, and in some breast cancers; in contrast, BUC was low in other normal tissues, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and other cancer cell lines. Results to-date suggest that BUC11 and BUC9 translate to protein and BUC11 cytoplasmic and nuclear protein expression was detected in a large cohort of breast cancer samples using immunohistochemistry. This study demonstrates the discovery and expression analysis of a tissue-restricted novel transcript set which is strongly expressed in breast tissue and their application as clinical cancer biomarkers clearly warrants further investigation.

  19. Immunohistochemical analysis of MUC5B apomucin expression in breast cancer and non-malignant breast tissues.

    PubMed

    Sóñora, Cecilia; Mazal, Daniel; Berois, Nora; Buisine, Marie-Pierre; Ubillos, Luis; Varangot, Mario; Barrios, Enrique; Carzoglio, Julio; Aubert, Jean-Pierre; Osinaga, Eduardo

    2006-03-01

    A deregulation of several MUC genes (MUC1, MUC2, MUC3, MUC5AC, and MUC6) was previously demonstrated in breast carcinomas. Considering that recently we found the "non-mammary" MUC5B mRNA in primary breast tumors (Berois et al. 2003), we undertook the present study to evaluate the expression profile of MUC5B protein product in breast tissues, using LUM5B-2 antisera raised against sequences within the non-glycosylated regions of this apomucin. Expression of MUC5B by breast cancer cells was confirmed by immunocytochemistry, in situ hybridization, and Western blot on MCF-7 cancer cells. Using an immunohistochemical procedure, MUC5B apomucin was detected in 34/42 (81%) primary breast tumors, in 13/14 (92.8%) samples of non-malignant breast diseases, in 8/19 (42.1%) samples of normal-appearing breast epithelia adjacent to cancer, and in 0/5 normal control breast samples. The staining pattern of MUC5B was very different when comparing breast cancer cells (cytoplasmic) and non-malignant breast cells (predominantly apical and in the secretory material). We analyzed MUC5B mRNA expression using RT-PCR in bone marrow aspirates from 22/42 patients with breast cancer to compare with MUC5B protein expression in the primary tumors. Good correlation was observed because the six MUC5B-positive bone marrow samples also displayed MUC5B expression in the tumor. Our results show, for the first time at the protein level, that MUC5B apomucin is upregulated in breast cancer. Its characterization could provide new insights about the glycobiology of breast cancer cells. PMID:16148312

  20. Ki-67 Expression in Sclerosing Adenosis and Adjacent Normal Breast Terminal Ductal Lobular Units: A Nested Case-Control Study from the Mayo Benign Breast Disease Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Nassar, Aziza; Hoskin, Tanya L.; Stallings-Mann, Melody L.; Degnim, Amy C.; Radisky, Derek C.; Frost, Marlene H.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Hartmann, Lynn C.; Visscher, Daniel W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Sclerosing adenosis (SA) increases risk for invasive breast cancer (BC) 2.1 times relative to that in the general population. Here, we sought to evaluate whether the proliferation marker Ki-67 stratifies risk among women with SA. Methods A nested case-control sample of patients with SA was obtained from the Mayo Clinic Benign Breast Disease Cohort. Ki-67 expression was evaluated in SA lesions and in the adjacent normal terminal duct lobular units (TDLU) in women who did (cases, n =133) or did not (controls, n =239) develop BC. Ki67 was scored by intensity and number of positively stained cells per one high-power field (magnification, ×40) (40×HPF) for both SA and normal TDLU. Associations of Ki-67 expression with case-control status were assessed using conditional logistic regression. Results Higher Ki-67 expression was significantly associated with case-control status in both SA (P=.03) and normal background TDLU (P=.006). For the SA lesion, >2 average positively stained cells/40×HPF showed an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 1.9 (95% CI, 1.1–3.4) compared to samples with an average of ≤2 positively stained cells. For background TDLU, lobules with >2 but ≤6 average positively stained cells showed an adjusted OR of 1.3 to 1.5, whereas those with an average of >6 positively stained cells had an OR of 2.4 (95% CI, 1.1–5.3) compared to those with an average of <2 positively stained cells. Conclusions Among women with SA, increased Ki-67 expression in either the SA lesion or the normal background TDLU carried an approximately 2-fold increased odds of subsequent BC as compared to lower Ki-67 expression. PMID:25863475

  1. Isotropic 3D Nuclear Morphometry of Normal, Fibrocystic and Malignant Breast Epithelial Cells Reveals New Structural Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Nandakumar, Vivek; Kelbauskas, Laimonas; Hernandez, Kathryn F.; Lintecum, Kelly M.; Senechal, Patti; Bussey, Kimberly J.; Davies, Paul C. W.; Johnson, Roger H.; Meldrum, Deirdre R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Grading schemes for breast cancer diagnosis are predominantly based on pathologists' qualitative assessment of altered nuclear structure from 2D brightfield microscopy images. However, cells are three-dimensional (3D) objects with features that are inherently 3D and thus poorly characterized in 2D. Our goal is to quantitatively characterize nuclear structure in 3D, assess its variation with malignancy, and investigate whether such variation correlates with standard nuclear grading criteria. Methodology We applied micro-optical computed tomographic imaging and automated 3D nuclear morphometry to quantify and compare morphological variations between human cell lines derived from normal, benign fibrocystic or malignant breast epithelium. To reproduce the appearance and contrast in clinical cytopathology images, we stained cells with hematoxylin and eosin and obtained 3D images of 150 individual stained cells of each cell type at sub-micron, isotropic resolution. Applying volumetric image analyses, we computed 42 3D morphological and textural descriptors of cellular and nuclear structure. Principal Findings We observed four distinct nuclear shape categories, the predominant being a mushroom cap shape. Cell and nuclear volumes increased from normal to fibrocystic to metastatic type, but there was little difference in the volume ratio of nucleus to cytoplasm (N/C ratio) between the lines. Abnormal cell nuclei had more nucleoli, markedly higher density and clumpier chromatin organization compared to normal. Nuclei of non-tumorigenic, fibrocystic cells exhibited larger textural variations than metastatic cell nuclei. At p<0.0025 by ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis tests, 90% of our computed descriptors statistically differentiated control from abnormal cell populations, but only 69% of these features statistically differentiated the fibrocystic from the metastatic cell populations. Conclusions Our results provide a new perspective on nuclear structure variations

  2. Growth hormone is secreted by normal breast epithelium upon progesterone stimulation and increases proliferation of stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Sara; Honeth, Gabriella; Ginestier, Christophe; Shinomiya, Ireneusz; Marlow, Rebecca; Buchupalli, Bharath; Gazinska, Patrycja; Brown, John; Catchpole, Steven; Liu, Suling; Barkan, Ariel; Wicha, Max; Purushotham, Anand; Burchell, Joy; Pinder, Sarah; Dontu, Gabriela

    2014-06-01

    Using in vitro and in vivo experimental systems and in situ analysis, we show that growth hormone (GH) is secreted locally by normal human mammary epithelial cells upon progesterone stimulation. GH increases proliferation of a subset of cells that express growth hormone receptor (GHR) and have functional properties of stem and early progenitor cells. In 72% of ductal carcinoma in situ lesions, an expansion of the cell population that expresses GHR was observed, suggesting that GH signaling may contribute to breast cancer development.

  3. Fluid Transport Phenomena in Ocular Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Candia, Oscar A.; Alvarez, Lawrence J.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses three largely unrecognized aspects related to fluid movement in ocular tissues; namely, a) the dynamic changes in water permeability observed in corneal and conjunctival epithelia under anisotonic conditions; b) the indications that the fluid transport rate exhibited by the ciliary epithelium is insufficient to explain aqueous humor production; and c) the evidence for fluid movement into and out of the lens during accommodation. We have studied each of these subjects in recent years and present an evaluation of our data within the context of the results of others who have also worked on electrolyte and fluid transport in ocular tissues. We propose that 1) the corneal and conjunctival epithelia, with apical aspects naturally exposed to variable tonicities, are capable of regulating their water permeabilities as part of the cell-volume regulatory process, 2) fluid may directly enter the anterior chamber of the eye across the anterior surface of the iris, thereby representing an additional entry pathway for aqueous humor production, and 3) changes in lens volume occur during accommodation, and such changes are best explained by a net influx and efflux of fluid. PMID:18289913

  4. Mechanics and Patterning in Metazoan Epithelia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, Kevin K.

    In this dissertation we consider the effect of mechanical interactions on cell biology and how this translates into tissue-level properties in metazoan epithelia. We delineate three model-based approaches with different phenomenological aims and compare applicable results to experimental data. We first consider cellular vertex model simulations, which are used to represent the mechanics of two-dimensional epithelial cell arrays. We outline the assumptions, parameters, and outputs. Then we review a number of systems in which these simulations have been used. The second approach is the Mechanical Inverse, which is a vertex model-based approach to inferring mechanical stresses from cell boundary labeled images of epithelial tissue. We develop this inference method from the assumption of mechanical equilibrium and dominant stresses in the tissue. We then apply this computational method to experimental images and validate the performance. In the final part we consider avian cochlea development in epithelia where lateral inhibition plays a role in cell differentiation—a process which involves cell division, differentiation, and rearrangement in a two-dimensional epithelial layer. We develop a mean-field mathematical description of this process. The results provide a description of the observed hair cell patterns in the cochlea.

  5. Epithelia, an evolutionary novelty of metazoans.

    PubMed

    Leys, Sally P; Riesgo, Ana

    2012-09-01

    At the point in animal evolution when cells began to adhere to each other they presumably initially functioned as colonies. The formation of an epithelium that enclosed and controlled an internal milieu would have been the first event to distinguish an individual animal from a colony. To better understand when the first epithelium arose and what its characteristics were, we evaluate the morphological, functional, and molecular characters of epithelia in sponges, considered here the extant representatives of the first metazoans. In particular, we show new claudin-like sequences from sponges align most closely with sequences from Drosophila that have a barrier function in septate junctions. We also show that type IV collagen, the main component of the basement membrane (BM), is present in calcareous sponges, and we confirm the presence of type IV-like collagen (spongin short chain collagen) in other sponges. Though in sponges as in other metazoans the epithelium has grades of specialization with varying complexity of junctions and the BM, the main character of a functional epithelium, the ability to seal and control the ionic composition of the internal milieu, is a property of even the simplest sponge epithelium, and therefore the first metazoans likely also had epithelia with these characteristics, which we consider a "true" epithelium.

  6. Developing Multivariable Normal Tissue Complication Probability Model to Predict the Incidence of Symptomatic Radiation Pneumonitis among Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Liyun; Ting, Hui-Min; Huang, Yu-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (SRP), which decreases quality of life (QoL), is the most common pulmonary complication in patients receiving breast irradiation. If it occurs, acute SRP usually develops 4–12 weeks after completion of radiotherapy and presents as a dry cough, dyspnea and low-grade fever. If the incidence of SRP is reduced, not only the QoL but also the compliance of breast cancer patients may be improved. Therefore, we investigated the incidence SRP in breast cancer patients after hybrid intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to find the risk factors, which may have important effects on the risk of radiation-induced complications. Methods In total, 93 patients with breast cancer were evaluated. The final endpoint for acute SRP was defined as those who had density changes together with symptoms, as measured using computed tomography. The risk factors for a multivariate normal tissue complication probability model of SRP were determined using the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) technique. Results Five risk factors were selected using LASSO: the percentage of the ipsilateral lung volume that received more than 20-Gy (IV20), energy, age, body mass index (BMI) and T stage. Positive associations were demonstrated among the incidence of SRP, IV20, and patient age. Energy, BMI and T stage showed a negative association with the incidence of SRP. Our analyses indicate that the risk of SPR following hybrid IMRT in elderly or low-BMI breast cancer patients is increased once the percentage of the ipsilateral lung volume receiving more than 20-Gy is controlled below a limitation. Conclusions We suggest to define a dose-volume percentage constraint of IV20< 37% (or AIV20< 310cc) for the irradiated ipsilateral lung in radiation therapy treatment planning to maintain the incidence of SPR below 20%, and pay attention to the sequelae especially in elderly or low-BMI breast cancer patients. (AIV20: the absolute ipsilateral lung

  7. Quantification of growth asymmetries in developing epithelia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittig, T.; Wartlick, O.; González-Gaitán, M.; Jülicher, F.

    2009-09-01

    Many developmental processes of multicellular organisms involve the patterning and growth of two-dimensional tissues, so called epithelia. We have quantified the growth of the wing imaginal disk, which is the precursor of the adult wing, of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. We find that growth follows a simple rule with exponentially decreasing area growth rate. Anisotropies of growth can be precisely determined by comparing experimental results to a continuum theory. Growth anisotropies are to good approximation constant in space and time. They are weak in wild-type wing disks but threefold increased in GFP-Dpp disks in which the morphogen Dpp is overexpressed. Our findings indicate that morphogens such as Dpp control tissue shape via oriented cell divisions that generate anisotropic growth. in here

  8. Swelling-activated Ca2+ entry via TRPV4 channel is defective in cystic fibrosis airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Arniges, Maite; Vázquez, Esther; Fernández-Fernández, José M; Valverde, Miguel A

    2004-12-24

    The vertebrate transient receptor potential cationic channel TRPV4 has been proposed as an osmo- and mechanosensor channel. Studies using knock-out animal models have further emphasized the relevance of the TRPV4 channel in the maintenance of the internal osmotic equilibrium and mechanosensation. However, at the cellular level, there is still one important question to answer: does the TRPV4 channel generate the Ca(2+) signal in those cells undergoing a Ca(2+)-dependent regulatory volume decrease (RVD) response? RVD in human airway epithelia requires the generation of a Ca(2+) signal to activate Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels. The RVD response is lost in airway epithelia affected with cystic fibrosis (CF), a disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator channel. We have previously shown that the defective RVD in CF epithelia is linked to the lack of swelling-dependent activation of Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels. In the present study, we show the expression of TRPV4 in normal human airway epithelia, where it functions as the Ca(2+) entry pathway that triggers the RVD response after hypotonic stress, as demonstrated by TRPV4 antisense experiments. However, cell swelling failed to trigger Ca(2+) entry via TRPV4 channels in CF airway epithelia, although the channel's response to a specific synthetic activator, 4 alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate, was maintained. Furthermore, RVD was recovered in CF airway epithelia treated with 4 alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate. Together, these results suggest that defective RVD in CF airway epithelia might be caused by the absence of a TRPV4-mediated Ca(2+) signal and the subsequent activation of Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels. PMID:15489228

  9. Analysis of cell surface carbohydrate expression patterns in normal and tumorigenic human breast cell lines using lectin arrays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Siyuan; Zheng, Ting; Shortreed, Michael R; Alexander, Caroline; Smith, Lloyd M

    2007-08-01

    Cell surface carbohydrates play important roles in a wide variety of biological processes including cell adhesion, fertilization, differentiation, development, and tumor cell metastasis. Lectins are proteins of nonimmune origin which recognize and bind to specific carbohydrate structural epitopes. We have recently described the development and use of lectin arrays as tools for the elucidation of the carbohydrate structures expressed on cell surfaces. In the present work this technology is employed for the characterization of differences in carbohydrate expression patterns on normal and tumorigenic human breast cell lines, as well as on sublines differing in their tendency to "home" to different tissues during metastasis. Significant differences were observed, including changes that correlate with metastatic potential as well as with tissue-specific homing of metastatic cells.

  10. Up-regulation of vitamin B1 homeostasis genes in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zastre, Jason A; Hanberry, Bradley S; Sweet, Rebecca L; McGinnis, A Cary; Venuti, Kristen R; Bartlett, Michael G; Govindarajan, Rajgopal

    2013-09-01

    An increased carbon flux and exploitation of metabolic pathways for the rapid generation of biosynthetic precursors is a common phenotype observed in breast cancer. To support this metabolic phenotype, cancer cells adaptively regulate the expression of glycolytic enzymes and nutrient transporters. However, activity of several enzymes involved in glucose metabolism requires an adequate supply of cofactors. In particular, vitamin B1 (thiamine) is utilized as an essential cofactor for metabolic enzymes that intersect at critical junctions within the glycolytic network. Intracellular availability of thiamine is facilitated by the activity of thiamine transporters and thiamine pyrophosphokinase-1 (TPK-1). Therefore, the objective of this study was to establish if the cellular determinants regulating thiamine homeostasis differ between breast cancer and normal breast epithelia. Employing cDNA arrays of breast cancer and normal breast epithelial tissues, SLC19A2, SLC25A19 and TPK-1 were found to be significantly up-regulated. Similarly, up-regulation was also observed in breast cancer cell lines compared to human mammary epithelial cells. Thiamine transport assays and quantitation of intracellular thiamine and thiamine pyrophosphate established a significantly greater extent of thiamine transport and free thiamine levels in breast cancer cell lines compared to human mammary epithelial cells. Overall, these findings demonstrate an adaptive response by breast cancer cells to increase cellular availability of thiamine.

  11. Targeted deletion of Atg5 reveals differential roles of autophagy in keratin K5-expressing epithelia

    SciTech Connect

    Sukseree, Supawadee; Rossiter, Heidemarie; Mildner, Michael; Pammer, Johannes; Buchberger, Maria; Gruber, Florian; Watanapokasin, Ramida; Tschachler, Erwin; Eckhart, Leopold

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We generated mice lacking Atg5 and autophagy in keratin K5-positive epithelia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Suppression of autophagy in thymic epithelium was not associated with signs of autoimmunity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Autophagy was required for normal terminal differentiation of preputial gland cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Autophagy-deficient cells of the preputial glands degraded nuclear DNA prematurely. -- Abstract: Autophagy contributes to the homeostasis of many tissues, yet its role in epithelia is incompletely understood. A recent report proposed that Atg5-dependent autophagy in thymic epithelial cells is essential for their function in the negative selection of self-reactive T-cells and, thus, for the suppression of tissue inflammation. Here we crossed mice carrying floxed alleles of the Atg5 gene with mice expressing the Cre recombinase under the control of the keratin K5 promoter to suppress autophagy in all K5-positive epithelia. The efficiency of autophagy abrogation was confirmed by immunoanalyses of LC3, which was converted to the autophagy-associated LC3-II form in normal but not Atg5-deficient cells, and of p62, which accumulated in Atg5-deficient cells. Mice carrying the epithelium-specific deletion of Atg5 showed normal weight gain, absence of tissue inflammation, and a normal morphology of the thymic epithelium. By contrast, autophagy-deficient epithelial cells of the preputial gland showed aberrant eosinophilic staining in histology and premature degradation of nuclear DNA during terminal differentiation. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that autophagy is dispensable for the suppression of autoimmunity by thymic epithelial cells but essential for normal differentiation of the preputial gland in mice.

  12. Ultrastructural aspects of otoliths and sensory epithelia of fish inner ear exposed to hypergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibsch, M.; Nindl, G.; Anken, R. H.; Körtje, K. H.; Rahmann, H.

    The present electron microscopical investigations were directed to the question, whether alterations in the gravitational force might induce structural changes in the morphology of otoliths or/and inner ear sensory epithelia of developing and adult swordtail fish (Xiphophorus helleri) that had been kept either under long-term moderate hypergravity (8 days; 3g) or under short-time extreme hypergravity (10 minutes up to 9g). The otoliths of adult and neonate swordtail fish were investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Macular epithelia of adult fish were examined both by SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The saccular otoliths (sagittae) of normally hatched adult fish revealed an enormous inter- (and even intra-; i.e. left vs. right) individual diversity in shape and size, whereas the otoliths of utricles (lapilli) and lagenae (asterisci) seemed to be more constant regarding morphological parameters. The structural diversity of juvenile otoliths was found to be less prominent as compared to the adults, differing from the latter regarding their peculiar crystalline morphology. Qualitative differences in the fine structure (SEM) of otoliths taken from adult and larval animals kept under 3g in comparison to 1g controls could not be observed. The SEM and TEM investigations of sensory epithelia also did not reveal any effects due to 3g stimulation. Even extreme hypergravity (more than 7g) for 10 minutes did not result in distinct pathological changes.

  13. Generation of inner ear sensory epithelia from pluripotent stem cells in 3D culture.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Karl R; Mikosz, Andrew M; Molosh, Andrei I; Patel, Dharmeshkumar; Hashino, Eri

    2013-08-01

    The inner ear contains sensory epithelia that detect head movements, gravity and sound. It is unclear how to develop these sensory epithelia from pluripotent stem cells, a process that will be critical for modelling inner ear disorders or developing cell-based therapies for profound hearing loss and balance disorders. So far, attempts to derive inner ear mechanosensitive hair cells and sensory neurons have resulted in inefficient or incomplete phenotypic conversion of stem cells into inner-ear-like cells. A key insight lacking from these previous studies is the importance of the non-neural and preplacodal ectoderm, two critical precursors during inner ear development. Here we report the stepwise differentiation of inner ear sensory epithelia from mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) in three-dimensional culture. We show that by recapitulating in vivo development with precise temporal control of signalling pathways, ESC aggregates transform sequentially into non-neural, preplacodal and otic-placode-like epithelia. Notably, in a self-organized process that mimics normal development, vesicles containing prosensory cells emerge from the presumptive otic placodes and give rise to hair cells bearing stereocilia bundles and a kinocilium. Moreover, these stem-cell-derived hair cells exhibit functional properties of native mechanosensitive hair cells and form specialized synapses with sensory neurons that have also arisen from ESCs in the culture. Finally, we demonstrate how these vesicles are structurally and biochemically comparable to developing vestibular end organs. Our data thus establish a new in vitro model of inner ear differentiation that can be used to gain deeper insight into inner ear development and disorder. PMID:23842490

  14. Assessment of quantitative and qualitative changes of proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans in normal breast tissue during the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Júnior, J A Dos Santos; de Lima, C R; Michelacci, Y M C da Silva; Nazário, A C Pinto

    2015-01-01

    The effect of sex hormones on extracellular matrix compounds, such as proteoglycans (PGs) and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), in mammary tissue remains poorly understood. The elucidation of extracellular matrix component functions could clarify pathophysiological conditions, such as cyclical mastalgia (breast pain). The authors examined the quantitative and qualitative changes of PGs and GAGs in normal breast tissue during the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. Twenty-eight eumenorrheic patients with benign breast nodules were divided into groups: Group A included 15 follicular patients and Group B included 13 luteal phase patients. Breast tissue adjacent to the nodules was biochemically analyzed to evaluate the types and concentrations of PGS and GAGs. The distribution of proteoglycans during the menstrual cycle was analyzed with immunofluorescence. PG concentrations were elevated (p < 0.01) during the luteal phase compared with the follicular phase, whereas the concentrations of GAGs did not differ significantly. Immunofluorescence revealed that decorin was mainly found in the intralobular stroma. PG concentrations were elevated during the luteal phase, likely due to the influence of sex hormones on macromolecular synthesis. The PG decorin was observed in normal breast tissue in the intralobular stroma. Although the concentration of GAGs, including dermatan and heparan sulfate, varied cyclically, the differences were not significant.

  15. Role of vascular density and normalization in response to neoadjuvant bevacizumab and chemotherapy in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Tolaney, Sara M; Boucher, Yves; Duda, Dan G; Martin, John D; Seano, Giorgio; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Barry, William T; Goel, Shom; Lahdenrata, Johanna; Isakoff, Steven J; Yeh, Eren D; Jain, Saloni R; Golshan, Mehra; Brock, Jane; Snuderl, Matija; Winer, Eric P; Krop, Ian E; Jain, Rakesh K

    2015-11-17

    Preoperative bevacizumab and chemotherapy may benefit a subset of breast cancer (BC) patients. To explore potential mechanisms of this benefit, we conducted a phase II study of neoadjuvant bevacizumab (single dose) followed by combined bevacizumab and adriamycin/cyclophosphamide/paclitaxel chemotherapy in HER2-negative BC. The regimen was well-tolerated and showed a higher rate of pathologic complete response (pCR) in triple-negative (TN)BC (11/21 patients or 52%, [95% confidence interval (CI): 30,74]) than in hormone receptor-positive (HR)BC [5/78 patients or 6% (95%CI: 2,14)]. Within the HRBCs, basal-like subtype was significantly associated with pCR (P = 0.007; Fisher exact test). We assessed interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) and tissue biopsies before and after bevacizumab monotherapy and circulating plasma biomarkers at baseline and before and after combination therapy. Bevacizumab alone lowered IFP, but to a smaller extent than previously observed in other tumor types. Pathologic response to therapy correlated with sVEGFR1 postbevacizumab alone in TNBC (Spearman correlation 0.610, P = 0.0033) and pretreatment microvascular density (MVD) in all patients (Spearman correlation 0.465, P = 0.0005). Moreover, increased pericyte-covered MVD, a marker of extent of vascular normalization, after bevacizumab monotherapy was associated with improved pathologic response to treatment, especially in patients with a high pretreatment MVD. These data suggest that bevacizumab prunes vessels while normalizing those remaining, and thus is beneficial only when sufficient numbers of vessels are initially present. This study implicates pretreatment MVD as a potential predictive biomarker of response to bevacizumab in BC and suggests that new therapies are needed to normalize vessels without pruning.

  16. Role of vascular density and normalization in response to neoadjuvant bevacizumab and chemotherapy in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Tolaney, Sara M.; Boucher, Yves; Duda, Dan G.; Martin, John D.; Seano, Giorgio; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Barry, William T.; Goel, Shom; Lahdenrata, Johanna; Isakoff, Steven J.; Yeh, Eren D.; Jain, Saloni R.; Golshan, Mehra; Brock, Jane; Snuderl, Matija; Winer, Eric P.; Krop, Ian E.; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2015-01-01

    Preoperative bevacizumab and chemotherapy may benefit a subset of breast cancer (BC) patients. To explore potential mechanisms of this benefit, we conducted a phase II study of neoadjuvant bevacizumab (single dose) followed by combined bevacizumab and adriamycin/cyclophosphamide/paclitaxel chemotherapy in HER2-negative BC. The regimen was well-tolerated and showed a higher rate of pathologic complete response (pCR) in triple-negative (TN)BC (11/21 patients or 52%, [95% confidence interval (CI): 30,74]) than in hormone receptor-positive (HR)BC [5/78 patients or 6% (95%CI: 2,14)]. Within the HRBCs, basal-like subtype was significantly associated with pCR (P = 0.007; Fisher exact test). We assessed interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) and tissue biopsies before and after bevacizumab monotherapy and circulating plasma biomarkers at baseline and before and after combination therapy. Bevacizumab alone lowered IFP, but to a smaller extent than previously observed in other tumor types. Pathologic response to therapy correlated with sVEGFR1 postbevacizumab alone in TNBC (Spearman correlation 0.610, P = 0.0033) and pretreatment microvascular density (MVD) in all patients (Spearman correlation 0.465, P = 0.0005). Moreover, increased pericyte-covered MVD, a marker of extent of vascular normalization, after bevacizumab monotherapy was associated with improved pathologic response to treatment, especially in patients with a high pretreatment MVD. These data suggest that bevacizumab prunes vessels while normalizing those remaining, and thus is beneficial only when sufficient numbers of vessels are initially present. This study implicates pretreatment MVD as a potential predictive biomarker of response to bevacizumab in BC and suggests that new therapies are needed to normalize vessels without pruning. PMID:26578779

  17. TU-F-12A-09: GLCM Texture Analysis for Normal-Tissue Toxicity: A Prospective Ultrasound Study of Acute Toxicity in Breast-Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, T; Yang, X; Curran, W; Torres, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the morphologic and structural integrity of the breast glands using sonographic textural analysis, and identify potential early imaging signatures for radiation toxicity following breast-cancer radiotherapy (RT). Methods: Thirty-eight patients receiving breast RT participated in a prospective ultrasound imaging study. Each participant received 3 ultrasound scans: 1 week before RT (baseline), and at 6-week and 3-month follow-ups. Patients were imaged with a 10-MHz ultrasound on the four quadrant of the breast. A second order statistical method of texture analysis, called gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM), was employed to assess RT-induced breast-tissue toxicity. The region of interest (ROI) was 28 mm × 10 mm in size at a 10 mm depth under the skin. Twenty GLCM sonographic features, ratios of the irradiated breast and the contralateral breast, were used to quantify breast-tissue toxicity. Clinical assessment of acute toxicity was conducted using the RTOG toxicity scheme. Results: Ninety-seven ultrasound studies (776 images) were analyzed; and 5 out of 20 sonographic features showed significant differences (p < 0.05) among the baseline scans, the acute toxicity grade 1 and 2 groups. These sonographic features quantified the degree of tissue damage through homogeneity, heterogeneity, randomness, and symmetry. Energy ratio value decreased from 108±0.05 (normal) to 0.99±0.05 (Grade 1) and 0.84±0.04 (Grade 2); Entropy ratio value increased from 1.01±0.01 to 1.02±0.01 and 1.04±0.01; Contrast ratio value increased from 1.03±0.03 to 1.07±0.06 and 1.21±0.09; Variance ratio value increased from 1.06±0.03 to 1.20±0.04 and 1.42±0.10; Cluster Prominence ratio value increased from 0.98±0.02 to 1.01±0.04 and 1.25±0.07. Conclusion: This work has demonstrated that the sonographic features may serve as imaging signatures to assess radiation-induced normal tissue damage. While these findings need to be validated in a larger cohort, they suggest

  18. Sclerotium rolfsii Lectin Induces Stronger Inhibition of Proliferation in Human Breast Cancer Cells than Normal Human Mammary Epithelial Cells by Induction of Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Savanur, Mohammed Azharuddin; Eligar, Sachin M.; Pujari, Radha; Chen, Chen; Mahajan, Pravin; Borges, Anita; Shastry, Padma; Ingle, Arvind.; Kalraiya, Rajiv D.; Swamy, Bale M.; Rhodes, Jonathan M.; Yu, Lu-Gang; Inamdar, Shashikala R.

    2014-01-01

    Sclerotium rolfsii lectin (SRL) isolated from the phytopathogenic fungus Sclerotium rolfsii has exquisite binding specificity towards O-linked, Thomsen-Freidenreich (Galβ1-3GalNAcα1-Ser/Thr, TF) associated glycans. This study investigated the influence of SRL on proliferation of human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and ZR-75), non-tumorigenic breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A) and normal mammary epithelial cells (HMECs). SRL caused marked, dose-dependent, inhibition of proliferation of MCF-7 and ZR-75 cells but only weak inhibition of proliferation of non-tumorigenic MCF-10A and HMEC cells. The inhibitory effect of SRL on cancer cell proliferation was shown to be a consequence of SRL cell surface binding and subsequent induction of cellular apoptosis, an effect that was largely prevented by the presence of inhibitors against caspases -3, -8, or -9. Lectin histochemistry using biotin-labelled SRL showed little binding of SRL to normal human breast tissue but intense binding to cancerous tissues. In conclusion, SRL inhibits the growth of human breast cancer cells via induction of cell apoptosis but has substantially less effect on normal epithelial cells. As a lectin that binds specifically to a cancer-associated glycan, has potential to be developed as an anti-cancer agent. PMID:25364905

  19. The organizing principle: microenvironmental influences in the normal and malignant breast

    SciTech Connect

    Bissell, Mina; Radisky, Derek C.; Rizki, Aylin; Weaver, Valerie M.; Petersen, Ole W.

    2002-08-20

    The current paradigm for cancer initiation and progression rests on the groundbreaking discoveries of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. This framework has revealed much about the role of genetic alterations in the underlying signaling pathways central to normal cellular function and to tumor progression. However, it is clear that single gene theories or even sequential acquisition of mutations underestimate the nature of the genetic and epigenetic changes in tumors, and do not account for the observation that many cancer susceptibility genes (e.g. BRCA1, APC) show a high degree of tissue specificity in their association with neoplastic transformation. Therefore, the cellular and tissue context itself must confer additional and crucial information necessary for mutated genes to exert their influence. A considerable body of evidence now shows that cell - cell and cell - extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions are essential organizing principles that help define the nature of the tissue context, and play a crucial role in regulating homeostasis and tissue specificity. How this context determines functional integrity, and how its loss can lead to malignancy, appears to have much to do with tissue structure and polarity.

  20. The cell-cell adhesion receptor Mel-CAM acts as a tumor suppressor in breast carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Shih, L. M.; Hsu, M. Y.; Palazzo, J. P.; Herlyn, M.

    1997-01-01

    Mel-CAM (MUC18 or CD146) is a cell adhesion molecule sharing sequence homology with members of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily. Mel-CAM was originally described as a marker associated with invasion and metastasis in melanoma. We determined here the distribution and biological significance of Mel-CAM in normal, benign proliferative, and neoplastic breast ductal epithelium. Using a Mel-CAM-specific monoclonal antibody, we, immunohistochemically demonstrate Mel-CAM expression in 14 of 14 (100%) normal breast epithelia and benign proliferative ductal epithelial lesions, whereas Mel-CAM expression can only be focally detected in 12 of 72 (17%) breast carcinomas. Solid-phase cell adhesion assay revealed that breast carcinoma cells in culture express the ligand for Mel-CAM. Transfection of Mel-CAM cDNA into breast carcinoma cells induces a more cohesive cell growth pattern and establishes smaller tumors in immunocompromised mice than mock transfectants. In conclusion, Mel-CAM is distributed throughout normal and benign proliferative mammary ductal epithelium, but it is frequently lost in carcinomas; it functions as a heterophilic cell-cell adhesion molecule in breast epithelium, and loss of Mel-CAM expression in breast carcinoma may be an important step for tumor progression. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 PMID:9284823

  1. Histological and immunohistochemical study of estrogen and progesterone receptors in normal human breast tissue in adult age groups vulnerable to malignancy.

    PubMed

    Goyal, R; Gupta, T; Gupta, R; Aggarwal, A; Sahni, D; Singh, G

    2016-09-01

    Analysis of receptor status has become standard procedure for assessing breast cancer patients. Estrogen causes epithelial proliferation in breast tissue via the estrogen receptor (ER). The progesterone receptor (PR) is also regulated by the estrogen gene. Analyzing ER and PR together gives information regarding the likely response of carcinoma patients to hormonal therapy. The aim of the present study was to record the expression patterns of ER and PR in normal mammary tissue in different age groups to provide reference data to facilitate histological diagnosis. Breast tissues from the upper outer quadrant of each side of 27 adult female cadavers were examined after H & E staining. ER and PR were identified and examined by immunohistochemistry. The percentage area occupied by parenchyma relative to stromal tissue was calculated in different age groups and was about 4:6, 3.5:6.5, 3:7, 2:8, and 1.5:8.5 in the 3rd, 4th and 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th and 9th, and 10th decades of life, respectively. Both ER and PR were present in all age groups and the numbers of both receptors were maximal during the 4th decade. The distribution and staining patterns for both ER and PR were recorded in different age groups. The contiguous pattern of ER, which is considered pathognomonic of breast carcinoma, was not seen except in one case in the 6th decade. Moderately stained ER and PR receptor sites predominated throughout. The study of normal breast tissue of similar age might provide comparisons that will help histopathologists to make clinical diagnoses from breast biopsies. Clin. Anat. 29:729-737, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27038435

  2. Innate immune response in CF airway epithelia: hyperinflammatory?

    PubMed

    Machen, Terry E

    2006-08-01

    The lack of functional cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in the apical membranes of CF airway epithelial cells abolishes cAMP-stimulated anion transport, and bacteria, eventually including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, bind to and accumulate in the mucus. Flagellin released from P. aeruginosa triggers airway epithelial Toll-like receptor 5 and subsequent NF-kappaB signaling and production and release of proinflammatory cytokines that recruit neutrophils to the infected region. This response has been termed hyperinflammatory because so many neutrophils accumulate; a response that damages CF lung tissue. We first review the contradictory data both for and against the idea that epithelial cells exhibit larger-than-normal proinflammatory signaling in CF compared with non-CF cells and then review proposals that might explain how reduced CFTR function could activate such proinflammatory signaling. It is concluded that apparent exaggerated innate immune response of CF airway epithelial cells may have resulted not from direct effects of CFTR on cellular signaling or inflammatory mediator production but from indirect effects resulting from the absence of CFTRs apical membrane channel function. Thus, loss of Cl-, HCO3-, and glutathione secretion may lead to reduced volume and increased acidification and oxidation of the airway surface liquid. These changes concentrate proinflammatory mediators, reduce mucociliary clearance of bacteria and subsequently activate cellular signaling. Loss of apical CFTR will also hyperpolarize basolateral membrane potentials, potentially leading to increases in cytosolic [Ca2+], intracellular Ca2+, and NF-kappaB signaling. This hyperinflammatory effect of CF on intracellular Ca2+ and NF-kappaB signaling would be most prominently expressed during exposure to both P. aeruginosa and also endocrine, paracrine, or nervous agonists that activate Ca2+ signaling in the airway epithelia. PMID:16825601

  3. Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging with virtual touch tissue quantification: measurements of normal breast tissue and dependence on the degree of pre-compression.

    PubMed

    Wojcinski, Sebastian; Brandhorst, Kathrin; Sadigh, Gelareh; Hillemanns, Peter; Degenhardt, Friedrich

    2013-12-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (ARFI) with Virtual Touch tissue quantification (VTTQ) enables the determination of shear wave velocity in meters per second (m/s). We investigated shear wave velocity in normal breast tissue and analyzed the influence of the degree of pre-compression on the measurements. In repeated measurements and with normal pre-compression, the mean shear wave velocity in breast parenchyma was significantly higher than that in breast adipose tissue (3.33 ± 1.18 m/s vs. 2.90 ± 1.10 m/s; p < 0.001; 712 measurements in 89 patients). Furthermore, we found a significant positive correlation between degree of pre-compression and velocity measurements. Shear wave velocities with low, moderate and high pre-compression were 1.89, 3.18 and 4.39 m/s in parenchyma, compared with 1.46, 2.55 and 3.64 m/s in adipose tissue, respectively (p < 0.001; 360 measurements in 60 patients). VTTQ of breast tissue is a feasible method with high accuracy; however, the degree of pre-compression applied may significantly influence the measurements.

  4. Normal and tumor-derived myoepithelial cells differ in their ability to interact with luminal breast epithelial cells for polarity and basement membrane deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Ronnov-Jessen, Lone; Villadsen, Rene; Rank, Fritz; Bissell, Mina J.; Petersen, Ole William

    2001-10-04

    The signals that determine the correct polarity of breast epithelial structures in vivo are not understood. We have shown previously that luminal epithelial cells can be polarized when cultured within a reconstituted basement membrane gel. We reasoned that such cues in vivo may be given by myoepithelial cells. Accordingly, we used an assay where luminal epithelial cells are incorrectly polarized to test this hypothesis. We show that culturing human primary luminal epithelial cells within collagen-I gels leads to formation of structures with no lumina and with reverse polarity as judged by dual stainings for sialomucin, epithelial specific antigen or occludin. No basement membrane is deposited, and {beta}4-integrin staining is negative. Addition of purified human myoepithelial cells isolated from normal glands corrects the inverse polarity, and leads to formation of double-layered acini with central lumina. Among the laminins present in the human breast basement membrane (laminin-1, -5 and -10/11), laminin-1 was unique in its ability to substitute for myoepithelial cells in polarity reversal. Myoepithelial cells were purified also from four different breast cancer sources including a biphasic cell line. Three out of four samples either totally lacked the ability to interact with luminal epithelial cells, or conveyed only correction of polarity in a fraction of acini. This behavior was directly related to the ability of the tumor myoepithelial cells to produce {alpha}-1 chain of laminin. In vivo, breast carcinomas were either negative for laminin-1 (7/12 biopsies) or showed a focal, fragmented deposition of a less intensely stained basement membrane (5/12 biopsies). Dual staining with myoepithelial markers revealed that tumorassociated myoepithelial cells were either negative or weakly positive for expression of laminin-1, establishing a strong correlation between loss of laminin-1 and breast cancer. We conclude that the double-layered breast acinus may be

  5. Comparison of normal tissue pharmacokinetics with {sup 111}In/{sup 9}Y monoclonal antibody m170 for breast and prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann, Joerg; O'Donnell, Robert T.; Richman, Carol M. . E-mail: sjdenardo@ucdavis.edu

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: Radioactivity deposition in normal tissues limits the dose deliverable by radiopharmaceuticals (RP) in radioimmunotherapy (RIT). This study investigated the absorbed radiation dose in normal tissues for prostate cancer patients in comparison to breast cancer patients for 2 RPs using the monoclonal antibody (MAb) m170. Methods and Materials: {sup 111}In-DOTA-glycylglycylglycyl-L-p-isothiocyanatophenylalanine amide (GGGF)-m170 and {sup 111}In-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) 2-iminothiolane (2IT)-m170, representing the same MAb and chelate with and without a cleavable linkage, were studied in 13 breast cancer and 26 prostate cancer patients. Dosimetry for {sup 9}Y was calculated using {sup 111}In MAb pharmacokinetics from the initial imaging study for each patient, using reference man- and patient-specific masses. Results: The reference man-specific radiation doses (cGy/MBq) were not significantly different for the breast and the prostate cancer patients for both RPs in all but one tissue-RP combination (liver, DOTA-2IT). The patient-specific doses had differences between the groups most of which can be related to weight differences. Conclusions: Similar normal tissue doses were calculated for two groups of patients having different cancers and genders. This similarity combined with continued careful analysis of the imaging data might allow the use of higher starting doses in early phase RIT studies.

  6. Evidence of inherent spontaneous polarization in the metazoan integument epithelia.

    PubMed Central

    Athenstaedt, H; Claussen, H

    1983-01-01

    The live integument epithelia of the metazoa have an inherent spontaneous polarization (an inherent permanent electric dipole moment) of corresponding direction perpendicular to the integument surface. The existence of the inherent polarization was proved by their temperature dependence, i.e., by the pyroelectric (PE) effect. Quantitative PE measurements were carried out on a number of integument epithelia of vertebrates (a) in vivo, (b) on fresh epidermis preparations, and (c) on dead, air-dried epidermis specimens of the same species. The demonstrated spontaneous polarization is not dependent on the living state and not caused by a potential difference between the outer and inner integument surface. Dead, dry epidermis samples (potential difference less than 0.01 mV) as well as dead, dry integument appendages (bristles, hairs), and dead cuticles (of arthropoda, annelida, nematoda) showed an inherent dipole moment of the same orientation as the live epidermis. The findings reveal a relationship between the direction (vector) of inherent spontaneous polarization and that of growth (morphogenesis) in the animal epidermis, their appendages, and cuticles. We conclude (a) that the inherent spontaneous polarization is present in live individual epithelial cells of the metazoan integument, and (b) that this physical property is related to the structural and functional cell polarity of integument epithelia and possibly of other epithelia. Images FIGURE 10 PMID:6838974

  7. Telomerase activity of the Lugol-stained and -unstained squamous epithelia in the process of oesophageal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Inai, M; Kano, M; Shimada, Y; Sakurai, T; Chiba, T; Imamura, M

    2001-09-28

    Up-regulation of telomerase has been reported in many cancers. Our aim was to characterize telomerase activity in various states of the oesophagus to facilitate better understanding of carcinogenesis of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma. During endoscopic examinations, we obtained 45 Lugol-stained normal epithelia, 31 Lugol-unstained epithelia (14 oesophagitis, 7 mild dysplasia, 5 severe dysplasia and 5 intramucosal cancer) and 9 advanced cancer. Telomerase activity was semi-quantified by a telomeric repeat amplification protocol using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase mRNA was examined by in situ hybridization. In the Lugol-stained normal epithelia, telomerase activity increased in proportion to the increase of severity of the accompanying lesions, with a rank order of advanced cancer, intramucosal cancer, mild dysplasia and oesophagitis. In the Lugol-unstained lesions and advanced cancer, telomerase activity was highest in advanced cancer. Up-regulation of telomerase in normal squamous epithelium may be a marker of progression of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

  8. Effect of methionine replacement by homocystine in cultures containing both malignant rat breast carcinosarcoma (Walker-256) cells and normal adult rat liver fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Halpern, B C; Ezzell, R; Hardy, D N; Clark, B R; Ashe, H; Halpern, R M; Smith, R A

    1975-01-01

    When malignant W-256 rat breast carcinosarcoma cells are mixed with an equal number of normal adult rat liver fibroblasts and allowed to grow in a medium containing sufficient L-methionine and an excess of vitamin B12 and of folic acid, the malignant cells outgrow the normal cells, and within 2 weeks the tissue culture flasks contain only neoplastic cells. However, when ample DL-homocystine or homocysteine replaces methionine in the medium containing the same amount of vitamin B12 and folic acid, and seeded with the same type and number of malignant and normal cells, the malignant cells die and the normal cells thrive. Substantiating this conclusion are the results of injections into rats of comparable numbers of cells from each group after 3 weeks of growth in tissue culture. Fatal malignancies are produced by the homocystein-cultivated cells.

  9. Rapid Discrimination of Malignant Breast Lesions from Normal Tissues Utilizing Raman Spectroscopy System: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of In Vitro Studies

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Hongyuan; Wei, Zhigong; Xiao, Yue; Xu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of Raman spectroscopy system in the detection of malignant breast lesions through a systemic review and meta-analysis of published studies. Methods We conducted a comprehensive literature search of PubMed and Embase from 2000 to June 2015. Published studies that evaluated the diagnostic performance of Raman spectroscopy in distinguishing malignant breast lesions from benign lesions and normal tissues were included in our study. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic odds ratio, and the area under the curve of summary receiver-operating characteristic curves was derived. A Revised Tool for the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies guidelines was used to assess the quality of included studies. Results The initial search produced a total of 157 articles after removing duplicates. Nine studies (8 in vitro and 1 in vivo) were eligible in this meta-analysis. We analyzed the eight in vitro studies with 1756 lesions, the pooled sensitivity and specificity of Raman spectroscopy system for the diagnosis of malignant breast lesions were 0.92 (95% CI 0.86–0.96) and 0.97 (97% CI 0.93–0.98), respectively. Diagnostic odds ratio was 266.70 (95% CI 89.38–795.79), and the area under the curve of summary receiver-operating characteristic curves was 0.98 (95% CI 0.97–0.99). Significant heterogeneity was found between studies. There was no evidence of considerable publication bias. Conclusions Raman spectroscopy system is an optical diagnostic technology with great value for detecting malignant breast lesions. At the same time, it has advantages of being non-invasive, real-time, and easy to use. Thus it deserves to be further explored for intra-operatory breast tumor margin detection. PMID:27459193

  10. Amount of stroma is associated with mammographic density and stromal expression of oestrogen receptor in normal breast tissues.

    PubMed

    Gabrielson, Marike; Chiesa, Flaminia; Paulsson, Janna; Strell, Carina; Behmer, Catharina; Rönnow, Katarina; Czene, Kamila; Östman, Arne; Hall, Per

    2016-07-01

    Following female sex and age, mammographic density is considered one of the strongest risk factors for breast cancer. Despite the association between mammographic density and breast cancer risk, little is known about the underlying histology and biological basis of breast density. To better understand the mechanisms behind mammographic density we assessed morphology, proliferation and hormone receptor status in relation to mammographic density in breast tissues from healthy women. Tissues were obtained from 2012-2013 by ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy from 160 women as part of the Karma (Karolinska mammography project for risk prediction for breast cancer) project. Mammograms were collected through routine mammography screening and mammographic density was calculated using STRATUS. The histological composition, epithelial and stromal proliferation status and hormone receptor status were assessed through immunohistochemical staining. Higher mammographic density was significantly associated with a greater proportion of stromal and epithelial tissue and a lower proportion of adipose tissue. Epithelial expression levels of Ki-67, oestrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) were not associated with mammographic density. Epithelial Ki-67 was associated with a greater proportion of epithelial tissue, and epithelial PR was associated with a greater proportion of stromal and a lower proportion of adipose tissue. Epithelial ER was not associated with any tissues. In contrast, expression of ER in the stroma was significantly associated with a greater proportion of stroma, and negatively associated with the amount of adipose tissue. High mammographic density is associated with higher amount of stroma and epithelium and less amount of fat, but is not associated with a change in epithelial proliferation or receptor status. Increased expressions of both epithelial PR and stromal ER are associated with a greater proportion of stroma, suggesting hormonal involvement

  11. Comparative regulation of gene expression by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 in cells derived from normal mammary tissue and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Beaudin, Sarah G; Robilotto, Samantha; Welsh, JoEllen

    2016-01-01

    Previous genomic profiling of immortalized, non-tumorigenic human breast epithelial cells identified a set of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D) regulated genes with potential relevance to breast cancer prevention. In this report, we characterized the effect of 1,25D on a subset of these genes in six cell lines derived from mammary tissue and breast cancers. Non-tumorigenic cell lines included hTERT-HME1, HME and MCF10A cells which are often used to model normal breast epithelial cells. Breast cancer cell lines included MCF7 cells (a model of early stage, estrogen-dependent disease), DCIS.com cells (a derivative of MCF10A cells that models in situ breast cancer) and Hs578T cells (a model of metastatic disease). All of these cell lines express the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and exhibit anti-cancer responses to 1,25D such as changes in proliferation, apoptosis, metabolism, or invasion. Our comparative data demonstrate highly variable responses to 1,25D (100nM, 24h) between the cell lines. In both hTERT-HME1 and HME cell lines, CYP24A1, SLC1A1 and ITGB3 were up-regulated whereas KDR, GLUL and BIRC3 were down-regulated in response to 1,25D. In contrast, no changes in SLC1A1, ITGB3 or GLUL expression were detected in 1,25D treated MCF10A cells although KDR and BIRC3 were down-regulated by 1,25D. The effects of 1,25D on these genes in the breast cancer cell lines were blunted, with the DCIS.com cells exhibiting the most similar responses to the immortalized hTERT-HME1 and HME cells. The differences in cellular responses were not due to general impairment in VDR function as robust CYP24A1 induction was observed in all cell lines. Thus, our data indicate that the genomic changes induced by 1,25D are highly cell-type specific even in model cell lines derived from the same tissue. The implication of these findings is that genomic responses to changes in vitamin D status in vivo are likely to be distinct from individual to individual, particularly in neoplastic tissue. PMID

  12. Cystic fibrosis airway epithelial Ca2+ i signaling: the mechanism for the larger agonist-mediated Ca2+ i signals in human cystic fibrosis airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Carla M Pedrosa; Paradiso, Anthony M; Carew, Mark A; Shears, Stephen B; Boucher, Richard C

    2005-03-18

    In cystic fibrosis (CF) airways, abnormal epithelial ion transport likely initiates mucus stasis, resulting in persistent airway infections and chronic inflammation. Mucus clearance is regulated, in part, by activation of apical membrane receptors coupled to intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)(i)) mobilization. We have shown that Ca(2+)(i) signals resulting from apical purinoceptor (P2Y(2)-R) activation are increased in CF compared with normal human airway epithelia. The present study addressed the mechanism for the larger apical P2Y(2)-R-dependent Ca(2+)(i) signals in CF human airway epithelia. We show that the increased Ca(2+)(i) mobilization in CF was not specific to P2Y(2)-Rs because it was mimicked by apical bradykinin receptor activation, and it did not result from a greater number of P2Y(2)-R or a more efficient coupling between P2Y(2)-Rs and phospholipase C-generated inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate. Rather, the larger apical P2Y(2)-R activation-promoted Ca(2+)(i) signals in CF epithelia resulted from an increased density and Ca(2+) storage capacity of apically confined endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) stores. To address whether the ER up-regulation resulted from ER retention of misfolded DeltaF508 CFTR or was an acquired response to chronic luminal airway infection/inflammation, three approaches were used. First, ER density was studied in normal and CF sweat duct human epithelia expressing high levels of DeltaF508 CFTR, and it was found to be the same in normal and CF epithelia. Second, apical ER density was morphometrically analyzed in airway epithelia from normal subjects, DeltaF508 homozygous CF patients, and a disease control, primary ciliary dyskinesia; it was found to be greater in both CF and primary ciliary dyskinesia. Third, apical ER density and P2Y(2)-R activation-mobilized Ca(2+)(i), which were investigated in airway epithelia in a long term culture in the absence of luminal infection, were similar in normal and CF epithelia. To directly test whether

  13. Breast cancer 1 (BRCA1)-deficient embryos develop normally but are more susceptible to ethanol-initiated DNA damage and embryopathies.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Aaron M; Miller-Pinsler, Lutfiya; Wells, Peter G

    2016-04-01

    The breast cancer 1 (brca1) gene is associated with breast and ovarian cancers, and heterozygous (+/-) brca1 knockout progeny develop normally, suggesting a negligible developmental impact. However, our results show BRCA1 plays a broader biological role in protecting the embryo from oxidative stress. Sox2-promoted Cre-expressing hemizygous males were mated with floxed brca1 females, and gestational day 8 +/- brca1 conditional knockout embryos with a 28% reduction in protein expression were exposed in culture to the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-initiating drug ethanol (EtOH). Untreated +/- brca1-deficient embryos developed normally, but when exposed to EtOH exhibited increased levels of oxidatively damaged DNA, measured as 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine, γH2AX, which is a marker of DNA double strand breaks that can result from 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine, formation, and embryopathies at EtOH concentrations that did not affect their brca1-normal littermates. These results reveal that even modest BRCA1 deficiencies render the embryo more susceptible to drug-enhanced ROS formation, and corroborate a role for DNA oxidation in the mechanism of EtOH teratogenesis. PMID:26629949

  14. Breast cancer 1 (BRCA1)-deficient embryos develop normally but are more susceptible to ethanol-initiated DNA damage and embryopathies☆

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Aaron M.; Miller-Pinsler, Lutfiya; Wells, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    The breast cancer 1 (brca1) gene is associated with breast and ovarian cancers, and heterozygous (+/−) brca1 knockout progeny develop normally, suggesting a negligible developmental impact. However, our results show BRCA1 plays a broader biological role in protecting the embryo from oxidative stress. Sox2-promoted Cre-expressing hemizygous males were mated with floxed brca1 females, and gestational day 8 +/− brca1 conditional knockout embryos with a 28% reduction in protein expression were exposed in culture to the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-initiating drug ethanol (EtOH). Untreated +/− brca1-deficient embryos developed normally, but when exposed to EtOH exhibited increased levels of oxidatively damaged DNA, measured as 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine, γH2AX, which is a marker of DNA double strand breaks that can result from 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine, formation, and embryopathies at EtOH concentrations that did not affect their brca1-normal littermates. These results reveal that even modest BRCA1 deficiencies render the embryo more susceptible to drug-enhanced ROS formation, and corroborate a role for DNA oxidation in the mechanism of EtOH teratogenesis. PMID:26629949

  15. Differential regulation of cell proliferation and protease secretion by epidermal growth factor and amphiregulin in tumoral versus normal breast epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Silvy, M; Giusti, C; Martin, P-M; Berthois, Y

    2001-01-01

    Amphiregulin (AR) is a heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (EGF)-related peptide that seems to play an important role in mammary epithelial cell growth regulation. We have investigated the regulation of AR-gene expression and -protein secretion by EGF in normal breast epithelial cells (HMECs), as well as in the tumoral breast epithelial cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB231. EGF induced a dose-dependent increase of AR mRNA level in both normal and tumoral cells. Thus, 10−8M EGF stimulated AR expression in HMECs to 140–300% of control. A similar EGF concentration increased AR mRNA level to 550% and 980% of control in MCF-7 and MDA-MB231 cells, respectively. This was accompanied by an accumulation of AR into conditioned culture media. However, HMECs secreted in response to EGF, 5–10 fold more AR than tumour cells. Furthermore, the potential participation of AR in the regulation of the plasminogen activator (PA)/plasmin system was investigated. Whereas HMEC-proliferation was stimulated by AR, the levels of secreted urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and type-1 plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAi-1) remained unaffected. Conversely, AR failed to regulate the proliferation of tumoral cell lines but induced an accumulation of uPA and PAi-1 into culture media. This was accompanied by an increase of the number of tumoral cells that invaded matrigel in vitro. Moreover, the presence of a neutralizing anti-uPA receptor antibody reversed the increased invasiveness of MDA-MB231 cells induced by AR. These data reveal differential behaviour of normal versus tumoral breast epithelial cells in regard to the action of AR and demonstrate that, in a number of cases, AR might play a significant role in tumour progression through the regulation of the PA/plasmin system. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11286474

  16. A study of the effect of formalin preservation on normal and cancerous breast tissues using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changizi, V.; Wilkinson, S.; Hall, C. J.; Grossmann, G.

    2006-09-01

    Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) has the ability to provide information on a molecular and supra-molecular scale from biological tissue specimens. It has been postulated that this information will be useful in providing histopathological diagnoses for certain diseases of the breast. In this category, we include cancer, a major health problem for a number of populations around the world. So far studies in our group have been made using flash-frozen tissue samples. This limits the range and ease of use of the technique. If we were able to obtain the same information from preserved tissues then a more extensive use of SAXS diagnosis would be possible. Here we report on the first investigations into this possibility. In the research reported in this paper, 84 human breast biopsies including cancer and normal tissues were obtained from human patients. Small angle scatter data were collected at station 2.1 of the SRS at the Daresbury Laboratory, UK using a beam size of 0.25 mm 2 at the sample and a wavelength of 1.54 Å. The sample to detector distance was 2000 mm. The results verify that there is a quantifiable difference between the scatter curves from flash-frozen cancer and normal breast tissue in the range of scatter vector Q between 0.4 and 0.7 nm -1. After preserving the tissues in formalin, the difference between the normal and cancerous tissues is less marked. The preservation of the tissue in formalin can essentially mask the effects that disease would have on the tissue supra-molecular structure rendering the preserved specimens of less useful for this histopathology technique.

  17. Long-term exposure of MCF-12A normal human breast epithelial cells to ethanol induces epithelial mesenchymal transition and oncogenic features

    PubMed Central

    GELFAND, ROBERT; VERNET, DOLORES; BRUHN, KEVIN; VADGAMA, JAYDUTT; GONZALEZ-CADAVID, NESTOR F.

    2016-01-01

    Alcoholism is associated with breast cancer incidence and progression, and moderate chronic consumption of ethanol is a risk factor. The mechanisms involved in alcohol's oncogenic effects are unknown, but it has been speculated that they may be mediated by acetaldehyde. We used the immortalized normal human epithelial breast cell line MCF-12A to determine whether short- or long-term exposure to ethanol or to acetaldehyde, using in vivo compatible ethanol concentrations, induces their oncogenic transformation and/or the acquisition of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). Cultures of MCF-12A cells were incubated with 25 mM ethanol or 2.5 mM acetaldehyde for 1 week, or with lower concentrations (1.0–2.5 mM for ethanol, 1.0 mM for acetaldehyde) for 4 weeks. In the 4-week incubation, cells were also tested for anchorage-independence, including isolation of soft agar selected cells (SASC) from the 2.5 mM ethanol incubations. Cells were analyzed by immunocytofluorescence, flow cytometry, western blotting, DNA microarrays, RT/PCR, and assays for miRs. We found that short-term exposure to ethanol, but not, in general, to acetaldehyde, was associated with transcriptional upregulation of the metallothionein family genes, alcohol metabolism genes, and genes suggesting the initiation of EMT, but without related phenotypic changes. Long-term exposure to the lower concentrations of ethanol or acetaldehyde induced frank EMT changes in the monolayer cultures and in SASC as demonstrated by changes in cellular phenotype, mRNA expression, and microRNA expression. This suggests that low concentrations of ethanol, with little or no mediation by acetaldehyde, induce EMT and some traits of oncogenic transformation such as anchorage-independence in normal breast epithelial cells. PMID:27035792

  18. Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk A woman’s hormone levels normally change throughout ... the development of breast cancer. Important Information about Breast Cancer Risk Factors At present, the factors known to ...

  19. Loss of CFTR chloride channels alters salt absorption by cystic fibrosis airway epithelia in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zabner, J; Smith, J J; Karp, P H; Widdicombe, J H; Welsh, M J

    1998-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by the loss of functional CFTR Cl- channels. However, it is not understood how this defect disrupts salt and liquid movement in the airway or whether it alters the NaCl concentration in the thin liquid film covering the airway surface. Using a new approach, we found that CF airway surface liquid had a higher NaCl concentration than normal. Both CF and non-CF epithelia absorbed salt and liquid; however, expression of CFTR Cl- channels was required for maximal absorption. Thus, loss of CFTR elevates the salt concentration in CF airway surface liquid and in sweat by related mechanisms; the elevated NaCl concentration is due to a block in transcellular Cl- movement. The high NaCl may predispose CF airways to bacterial infections by inhibiting endogenous antibacterial defenses. PMID:9774978

  20. Homeostatic regulation of intestinal epithelia by intraepithelial gamma delta T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Komano, H; Fujiura, Y; Kawaguchi, M; Matsumoto, S; Hashimoto, Y; Obana, S; Mombaerts, P; Tonegawa, S; Yamamoto, H; Itohara, S

    1995-01-01

    Although T cells bearing gamma delta T-cell receptors have long been known to be present in the epithelial lining of many organs, their specificity and function remain elusive. In the present study, we examined the intestinal epithelia of T-cell-receptor mutant mice, which were deficient in either gamma delta T cells or alpha beta T cells, and of normal littermates. The absence of gamma delta T cells was associated with a reduction in epithelial cell turnover and a downregulation of the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. No such effects were observed in alpha beta T-cell-deficient mice. These findings indicate that intraepithelial gamma delta T cells regulate the generation and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7597094

  1. Involvement of extracellular matrix constituents in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lochter, Andre; Bissell, Mina J

    1995-06-01

    It has recently been established that the extracellular matrix is required for normal functional differentiation of mammary epithelia not only in culture, but also in vivo. The mechanisms by which extracellular matrix affects differentiation, as well as the nature of extracellular matrix constituents which have major impacts on mammary gland function, have only now begun to be dissected. The intricate variety of extracellular matrix-mediated events and the remarkable degree of plasticity of extracellular matrix structure and composition at virtually all times during ontogeny, make such studies difficult. Similarly, during carcinogenesis, the extracellular matrix undergoes gross alterations, the consequences of which are not yet precisely understood. Nevertheless, an increasing amount of data suggests that the extracellular matrix and extracellular matrix-receptors might participate in the control of most, if not all, of the successive stages of breast tumors, from appearance to progression and metastasis.

  2. The presence of HLA-DR antigens on lactating human breast epithelium and milk fat globule membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, R A; Ormerod, M G; Greaves, M F

    1980-01-01

    HLA-DR antigens have been demonstrated on the secretory epithelia of lactating breast using rabbit anti-p28,33 ('Ia-like') and mouse monoclonal anti-HLA-DR 'framework'. Normal non-lactating breast, benign or malignant tumours, epithelial cells from normal breast or isolated from milk and a presumptive breast carcinoma cell line (MCF-7) were all HLA-DR-negative. HLA-DR, HLA (ABC 'framework') and beta 2-microglobulin determinants were also demonstrated on the surface of milk fat globules (MFG) which were unreactive with monoclonal antibodies to thymus cells or leucocytes. A monoclonal antibody detecting allelic HLA-DR determinants (HLA-DRw 1,2,6) was positive on 40% of MFG samples tested, positive reactions being concordant, when tested, with blood B lymphocytes. Antisera raised against MFG membranes also contain anti-HLA-DR activity. Whether the breast epithelial cells synthesize HLA-DR molecules or acquire these passively from mononuclear cells which infiltrate during lactation is not yet resolved. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7002399

  3. Clonality of lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) and metachronous invasive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Aulmann, Sebastian; Penzel, Roland; Longerich, Thomas; Funke, Benjamin; Schirmacher, Peter; Sinn, Hans Peter

    2008-02-01

    Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) of the breast is generally considered an indicator for a bilaterally increased risk of invasive breast cancer (IBC). However, as recent studies suggested a clonal relationship between a subset of synchronous LCIS and invasive lobular carcinomas (ILC), we aimed to examine a possible precursor role for LCIS and IBC occurring in the same breast at a later time. Out of a consecutive series of 88 LCIS, nine patients developed IBC (5 ILC and 4 invasive ductal carcinomas) between 2 and 10 years after initial biopsy. For each case, mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy was analyzed in normal mammary gland epithelia, LCIS and IBC by PCR, direct DNA sequencing and phylogenetic tree clustering. Two cases of LCIS and ILC showed identical patterns of heteroplasmy. In one further case, additional mtDNA mutations were present in the ILC following LCIS. The remaining two cases of ILC and all 4 IDC were clonally unrelated to the previously diagnosed LCIS. While the overall risk for the development of invasive breast cancer following LCIS is relatively low and the majority of cases are clonally unrelated, our data clearly show that some LCIS eventually do progress to ILC. Thus, LCIS represents both an indicator lesion for an increased risk of subsequent invasive breast cancer and in some cases a precursor of ILC. PMID:17380381

  4. Effect of different cytokines on mammaglobin and maspin gene expression in normal leukocytes: possible relevance to the assays for the detection of micrometastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ballestrero, A; Garuti, A; Bertolotto, M; Rocco, I; Boy, D; Nencioni, A; Ottonello, L; Patrone, F

    2005-01-01

    In cancer patients, the ability to detect disseminated tumour cells in peripheral blood or bone marrow could improve prognosis and consent both early detection of metastatic disease and monitoring of the efficacy of systemic therapy. These objectives remain elusive mainly due to the lack of specific genetic markers for solid tumours. The use of surrogate tissue-specific markers can reduce the specificity of the assays and give rise to a clinically unacceptable false-positive rate. Mammaglobin (MAM) and maspin are two putative breast tissue-specific markers frequently used for detection of occult tumour cells in the peripheral blood, bone marrow and lymph nodes of breast cancer patients. In this study, it was evaluated whether MAM and maspin gene expression may be induced in the normal blood and bone marrow cells exposed to a panel of cytokines, including chemotactic factors (C5a, interleukin (IL)-8), LPS, proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β) and growth factors (IL-3, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor). The experimental data show that all cytokines included in the panel, except for IL-8, were able to induce maspin expression; on the contrary, MAM gene was never induced. These results suggest that MAM is more specific than maspin and that the possible interference of cytokines should be taken into account in interpreting molecular assays for detection of isolated tumour cells. PMID:15841077

  5. CFTR–SLC26 transporter interactions in epithelia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Transport mechanisms that mediate the movements of anions must be coordinated tightly in order to respond appropriately to physiological stimuli. This process is of paramount importance in the function of diverse epithelial tissues of the body, such as, for example, the exocrine pancreatic duct and the airway epithelia. Disruption of any of the finely tuned components underlying the transport of anions such as Cl−, HCO3−, SCN−, and I− may contribute to a plethora of disease conditions. In many anion-secreting epithelia, the interactions between the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and solute carrier family 26 (SLC26) transporters determine the final exit of anions across the apical membrane and into the luminal compartment. The molecular identification of CFTR and many SLC26 members has enabled the acquisition of progressively more detailed structural information about these transport molecules. Studies employing a vast array of increasingly sophisticated approaches have culminated in a current working model which places these key players within an interactive complex, thereby setting the stage for future work. PMID:22685498

  6. Dynamics of Bacterial Community Composition in the Malaria Mosquito's Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Tchioffo, Majoline T.; Boissière, Anne; Abate, Luc; Nsango, Sandrine E.; Bayibéki, Albert N.; Awono-Ambéné, Parfait H.; Christen, Richard; Gimonneau, Geoffrey; Morlais, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The Anopheles midgut hosts diverse bacterial communities and represents a complex ecosystem. Several evidences indicate that mosquito midgut microbiota interferes with malaria parasite transmission. However, the bacterial composition of salivary glands and ovaries, two other biologically important tissues, has not been described so far. In this study, we investigated the dynamics of the bacterial communities in the mosquito tissues from emerging mosquitoes until 8 days after a blood meal containing Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes and described the temporal colonization of the mosquito epithelia. Bacterial communities were identified in the midgut, ovaries, and salivary glands of individual mosquitoes using pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. We found that the mosquito epithelia share a core microbiota, but some bacteria taxa were more associated with one or another tissue at a particular time point. The bacterial composition in the tissues of emerging mosquitoes varied according to the breeding site, indicating that some bacteria are acquired from the environment. Our results revealed temporal variations in the bacterial community structure, possibly as a result of the mosquito physiological changes. The abundance of Serratia significantly correlated with P. falciparum infection both in the midgut and salivary glands of malaria challenged mosquitoes, which suggests that interactions occur between microbes and parasites. These bacteria may represent promising targets for vector control strategies. Overall, this study points out the importance of characterizing bacterial communities in malaria mosquito vectors. PMID:26779155

  7. Patterns of allelic loss (LOH) in vulvar squamous carcinomas and adjacent noninvasive epithelia.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, M. C.; Mutter, G. L.; Trivijisilp, P.; Boynton, K. A.; Sun, D.; Crum, C. P.

    1998-01-01

    The pathogenesis of carcinoma of the vulva is diverse and includes both human papilloma virus (HPV)-positive and HPV-negative pathways. The objective of this study was to correlate the morphology with patterns of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) within four vulvar carcinomas and in adjacent vulvar epithelia. Tumors were categorized as HPV positive or negative by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. Forty-one different sites of normal squamous mucosa, hyperplasia, vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN), and carcinoma were microdissected in duplicate, and each extracted DNA was analyzed in duplicate for LOH at 10 chromosomal loci by PCR and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Patterns of LOH were compared within different sites of tumors and between the tumor and the noninvasive epithelia. Of three tumors with multiple invasive foci analyzed, divergent patterns of LOH were identified in two, correlating in one with differences in tumor grade. In one HPV-16-positive case, multiple sites of VIN displayed heterogeneity for LOH consistent with divergent clonal or subclonal populations, some of which were not shared by the tumor. In one HPV-negative case, LOH was found in foci of hyperplasia and differentiated VIN (atypical hyperplasia), the latter sharing LOH with the invasive carcinoma at some but not all chromosomal loci. This study suggests that a genetic relationship exists between VIN and carcinoma, irrespective of HPV involvement. It also suggests that in HPV-negative tumors, allelic loss may predate the onset of invasive carcinoma and, in some cases, cellular atypia (VIN). However, the divergent patterns of LOH observed imply that many genetic alterations in the adjacent vulvar epithelium are not directly related to the invasive carcinoma. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9588899

  8. SMAD4 is a potential prognostic marker in human breast carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nan-nan; Xi, Yue; Callaghan, Michael U.; Fribley, Andrew; Moore-Smith, Lakisha; Zimmerman, Jacquelyn W.; Pasche, Boris

    2014-01-01

    SMAD4 is a downstream mediator of transforming growth factor beta. While its tumor suppressor function has been investigated as a prognostic biomarker in several human malignancies, its role as a prognostic marker in breast carcinoma is still undefined. We investigated SMAD4 expression in breast carcinoma samples of different histologic grades to evaluate the association between SMAD4 and outcome in breast cancer. We also investigated the role of SMAD4 expression status in MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells in responding to TGF-β stimulation. SMAD4 expression was assessed in 53 breast ductal carcinoma samples and in the surrounding normal tissue from 50 of the samples using immunohistochemistry, Western blot, and real-time PCR. TGF-β-SMAD and non-SMAD signaling was assessed by Western blot in MDA-MB-468 cells with and without SMAD4 restoration. SMAD4 expression was reduced in ductal breast carcinoma as compared to surrounding uninvolved ductal breast epithelia (p <0.05). SMAD4 expression levels decreased from Grade 1 to Grade 3 ductal breast carcinoma as assessed by immunohistochemistry (p <0.05). Results were recapitulated by tissue array. In addition, immunohistochemistry results were further confirmed at the protein and mRNA level. We then found that non-SMAD MEK/MAPK signaling was significantly different between SMAD4 expressing MDA-MB-468 cells and SMAD4-null MDA-MB-468 cells. This is the first study indicating that SMAD4 plays a key role in shifting MAPK signaling. Further, we have demonstrated that SMAD4 has a potential role in the development of breast carcinoma and SMAD4 was a potential prognostic marker of breast carcinoma. Our findings further support the role of SMAD4 in breast carcinoma development. In addition, we observed an inverse relationship between SMAD4 levels and breast carcinoma histological grade. Our finding indicated that SMAD4 expression level in breast cancer cells played a role in responding non-SMAD signaling but not the canonic SMAD

  9. Molecular polymorphism of a cell surface proteoglycan: distinct structures on simple and stratified epithelia.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, R D; Bernfield, M

    1988-12-01

    Epithelial cells are organized into either a single layer (simple epithelia) or multiple layers (stratified epithelia). Maintenance of these cellular organizations requires distinct adhesive mechanisms involving many cell surface molecules. One such molecule is a cell surface proteoglycan, named syndecan, that contains both heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate chains. This proteoglycan binds cells to fibrillar collagens and fibronectin and thus acts as a receptor for interstitial matrix. The proteoglycan is restricted to the basolateral surface of simple epithelial cells, but is located over the entire surface of stratified epithelial cells, even those surfaces not contacting matrix. We now show that the distinct localization in simple and stratified epithelia correlates with a distinct proteoglycan structure. The proteoglycan from simple epithelia (modal molecular size, 160 kDa) is larger than that from stratified epithelia (modal molecular size, 92 kDa), but their core proteins are identical in size and immunoreactivity. The proteoglycan from simple epithelia has more and larger heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate chains than the proteoglycan from stratified epithelia. Thus, the cell surface proteoglycan shows a tissue-specific structural polymorphism due to distinct posttranslational modifications. This polymorphism likely reflects distinct proteoglycan functions in simple and stratified epithelia, potentially meeting the different adhesive requirements of the cells in these different organizations.

  10. Detection of mitoses in embryonic epithelia using motion field analysis.

    PubMed

    Siva, Parthipan; Wayne Brodland, G; Clausi, David

    2009-04-01

    Although computer simulations indicate that mitosis may be important to the mechanics of morphogenetic movements, algorithms to identify mitoses in bright field images of embryonic epithelia have not previously been available. Here, the authors present an algorithm that identifies mitoses and their orientations based on the motion field between successive images. Within this motion field, the algorithm seeks 'mitosis motion field prototypes' characterised by convergent motion in one direction and divergent motion in the orthogonal direction, the local motions produced by the division process. The algorithm uses image processing, vector field analyses and pattern recognition to identify occurrences of this prototype and to determine its orientation. When applied to time-lapse images of gastrulation and neurulation-stage amphibian (Ambystoma mexicanum) embryos, the algorithm achieves identification accuracies of 68 and 67%, respectively and angular accuracies of the order of 30 degrees , values sufficient to assess the role of mitosis in these developmental processes. PMID:19051076

  11. In vitro synthesis of primary specific anti-breast cancer antibodies by normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Norkina, Oxana; Lum, Lawrence G.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we developed a unique in vitro model to mimic the endogenous tumor microenvironment to understand the effect of immunotherapy with activated T-cells (ATC) armed with anti-CD3 × anti-Her2 bispecific antibody (aATC) on antibody response by naive immune cells. This model contained a co-culture of naïve peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), breast cancer cells (SK-BR-3), ATC or aATC and CpG ODNs. Culture supernatants were tested at various time points for anti-SK-BR-3 antibodies by ELISA, Western blot and flow cytometry. PBMC cocultured with non-irradiated aATC or irradiated (*) aATC showed significant increases in anti-tumor antibody production at day 14 (P < 0.0001) in the presence of CpG-ODN compared to unstimulated PBMC cultures (n = 9). Antibody specificity was confirmed by ELISA, Western blot and flow cytometry. Co-cultures containing *aATC and CpG showed significantly enhanced levels of IgG2 (P < 0.001) and cytokines that promote IgG2 synthesis including IL-13 (P < 0.02), IFNγ (P < 0.01) and GM-CSF (P < 0.05) compared to unstimulated PBMC control (n = 3). We show that aATC targeting and lysis of tumor cells induces an anti-tumor antibody response in our in vitro model. This model provides a unique opportunity to evaluate the interactions of T-cells, B-cells, and antigen-presenting cells leading to specific anti-tumor antibody responses. PMID:21713642

  12. [Effects of tree diameter at breast height and soil moisture on transpiration of Schima superba based on sap flow pattern and normalization].

    PubMed

    Mei, Ting-ting; Zhao, Ping; Wang, Quan; Cai, Xi-an; Yu, Meng-hao; Zhu, Li-wei; Zou, Lü-liu; Zeng, Xiao-ping

    2010-10-01

    The eigenvalues of continuous sap flow pattern, i. e. , skewness and kurtosis, were used to investigate the water usage of Schima superba with different diameter at breast height (DBH), and the method of normalization was firstly applied to eliminate the effects of strong affecting factor (photosynthetic active radiation, PAR) to explore the possible relationship between weak affecting factor (soil moisture) and sap flow. Generally, the trees with larger DBH had smaller skewness of sap flux density and later-appeared but larger peak values, suggesting that much more water was transpired, and the larger trees showed smaller skewness and later-appeared larger peak values in wet season than in dry season, suggesting that more water was transpired in wet season. On the other hand, smaller trees had lesser differences in the skewness between dry and wet seasons, suggesting that there was no significant difference in the transpiration between the two seasons. The relationship between individual tree's transpiration and soil moisture was significant and positive after the two parameters being normalized with PAR peak values. When the soil moisture content was higher, the transpiration of the trees with larger DBH was steadily increasing with soil moisture, while that of the trees with moderate or smaller DBH had opposite trend, presumably due to their transpiration and water absorption were approached to the limit.

  13. Correlating two-photon excited fluorescence imaging of breast cancer cellular redox state with seahorse flux analysis of normalized cellular oxygen consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Jue; Wright, Heather J.; Chan, Nicole; Tran, Richard; Razorenova, Olga V.; Potma, Eric O.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2016-06-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) imaging of the cellular cofactors nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and oxidized flavin adenine dinucleotide is widely used to measure cellular metabolism, both in normal and pathological cells and tissues. When dual-wavelength excitation is used, ratiometric TPEF imaging of the intrinsic cofactor fluorescence provides a metabolic index of cells-the "optical redox ratio" (ORR). With increased interest in understanding and controlling cellular metabolism in cancer, there is a need to evaluate the performance of ORR in malignant cells. We compare TPEF metabolic imaging with seahorse flux analysis of cellular oxygen consumption in two different breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). We monitor metabolic index in living cells under both normal culture conditions and, for MCF-7, in response to cell respiration inhibitors and uncouplers. We observe a significant correlation between the TPEF-derived ORR and the flux analyzer measurements (R=0.7901, p<0.001). Our results confirm that the ORR is a valid dynamic index of cell metabolism under a range of oxygen consumption conditions relevant for cancer imaging.

  14. 17beta-Estradiol inhibits Ca2+-dependent homeostasis of airway surface liquid volume in human cystic fibrosis airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Coakley, Ray D; Sun, Hengrui; Clunes, Lucy A; Rasmussen, Julia E; Stackhouse, James R; Okada, Seiko F; Fricks, Ingrid; Young, Steven L; Tarran, Robert

    2008-12-01

    Normal airways homeostatically regulate the volume of airway surface liquid (ASL) through both cAMP- and Ca2+-dependent regulation of ion and water transport. In cystic fibrosis (CF), a genetic defect causes a lack of cAMP-regulated CFTR activity, leading to diminished Cl- and water secretion from airway epithelial cells and subsequent mucus plugging, which serves as the focus for infections. Females with CF exhibit reduced survival compared with males with CF, although the mechanisms underlying this sex-related disadvantage are unknown. Despite the lack of CFTR, CF airways retain a limited capability to regulate ASL volume, as breathing-induced ATP release activates salvage purinergic pathways that raise intracellular Ca2+ concentration to stimulate an alternate pathway to Cl- secretion. We hypothesized that estrogen might affect this pathway by reducing the ability of airway epithelia to respond appropriately to nucleotides. We found that uridine triphosphate-mediated (UTP-mediated) Cl- secretion was reduced during the periovulatory estrogen maxima in both women with CF and normal, healthy women. Estrogen also inhibited Ca2+ signaling and ASL volume homeostasis in non-CF and CF airway epithelia by attenuating Ca2+ influx. This inhibition of Ca2+ signaling was prevented and even potentiated by estrogen antagonists such as tamoxifen, suggesting that antiestrogens may be beneficial in the treatment of CF lung disease because they increase Cl- secretion in the airways. PMID:19033671

  15. The specific role of pRb in p16 (INK4A) -mediated arrest of normal and malignant human breast cells.

    PubMed

    Bazarov, Alexey V; Lee, Won Jae; Bazarov, Irina; Bosire, Moses; Hines, William C; Stankovich, Basha; Chicas, Agustin; Lowe, Scott W; Yaswen, Paul

    2012-03-01

    RB family proteins pRb, p107 and p130 have similar structures and overlapping functions, enabling cell cycle arrest and cellular senescence. pRb, but not p107 or p130, is frequently mutated in human malignancies. In human fibroblasts acutely exposed to oncogenic ras, pRb has a specific role in suppressing DNA replication, and p107 or p130 cannot compensate for the loss of this function; however, a second p53/p21-dependent checkpoint prevents escape from growth arrest. This model of oncogene-induced senescence requires the additional loss of p53/p21 to explain selection for preferential loss of pRb function in human malignancies. We asked whether similar rules apply to the role of pRb in growth arrest of human epithelial cells, the source of most cancers. In two malignant human breast cancer cell lines, we found that individual RB family proteins were sufficient for the establishment of p16-initiated senescence, and that growth arrest in G 1 was not dependent on the presence of functional pRb or p53. However, senescence induction by endogenous p16 was delayed in primary normal human mammary epithelial cells with reduced pRb but not with reduced p107 or p130. Thus, under these circumstances, despite the presence of functional p53, p107 and p130 were unable to completely compensate for pRb in mediating senescence induction. We propose that early inactivation of pRb in pre-malignant breast cells can, by itself, extend proliferative lifespan, allowing acquisition of additional changes necessary for malignant transformation.

  16. Changes in Normal Liver and Spleen Volume after Radioembolization with {sup 90}Y-Resin Microspheres in Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients: Findings and Clinical Significance

    SciTech Connect

    Paprottka, Philipp M. Schmidt, G. P.; Trumm, C. G.; Hoffmann, R. T.; Reiser, M. F.; Jakobs, T. F.

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: In clinical trials with yttrium-90-resin-microspheres for the management of colorectal cancer liver metastases, it was observed that radioembolization might result in splenomegaly and an increase in portal vein size. Subclinical hepatitis in normal liver tissue as well as the effects of radioembolization and prior chemotherapy are suspected to be responsible for this phenomenon. The purpose of this study was to quantify the changes in liver and spleen volume and portal vein diameter after radioembolization. Methods: Twenty-seven patients with liver-dominant metastatic disease from breast cancer who had not responded to chemotherapy or had to abandon chemotherapy because of its toxic effects were evaluated. Changes in liver and spleen volume and portal vein diameter as well as liver tumor volume and diameter were quantified using computed tomography scans. Results: Radioembolization was associated with a significant mean decrease in the whole liver volume of 10.2% (median 16.7%; P = 0.0024), mainly caused by a reduction in the right lobe volume (mean 16.0%; P < 0.0001). These changes were accompanied by a significant increase in the diameter of the main portal vein (mean 6.8%; P < 0.0001) as well as splenic volume (mean 50.4%; P < 0.0001). Liver-tumor volume and diameter decreased by a median of 24 and 39.7%. Conclusions: Radioembolization is an effective treatment for tumor size reduction in patients with breast cancer liver metastases. Treatment is associated with changes of hepatic parenchymal volume, splenic volume, and portal vein size that appear not to represent clinically important sequelae in this patient cohort.

  17. Postrigor tumble marination strategies for improving color and water-holding capacity in normal and pale broiler breast fillets.

    PubMed

    Gorsuch, V; Alvarado, C Z

    2010-05-01

    Pale or pale, soft, and exudative-like meat can be caused by a decline in pH early postmortem while carcass temperatures are still high. This decrease in pH leads to protein denaturation, attributing to the pale color and poor water-holding capacity that is characteristic of this lesser quality meat. Marination with NaCl and phosphates has been shown to improve protein functionality, thereby reducing lost meat yield and improving meat quality. However, there are few studies relating marination with phosphates to improvements in pale meat. Therefore, the purpose of this experiment was to determine if meat quality improvements could be obtained in pale meat via marination with various phosphate and NaCl treatments without altering the quality and stability of normal or pale meat. The treatments used in this study were 1) sodium tripolyphosphate, an industry control; 2) a high pH phosphate (11.9); 3) a sodium tripolyphosphate and high pH mixture; 4) an agglomerated phosphate; and 5) a nonagglomerated phosphate. The marinades used in this study increased the pH, decreased the L* values of the pale fillets, and improved water-holding capacity. There were no significant differences in overall flavor preference for any of the 5 phosphate treatments. There was also no difference in oxidation or shelf-life trends in either the pale or normal fillets marinated with each of the 5 treatments. The results of this study were that marination with phosphates can be used to marinate pale meat without altering flavor, increasing the development of oxidation, or reducing shelf life. PMID:20371853

  18. Circadian Rhythms and Breast Cancer: The Role of Per2 in Doxorubicin-Induced Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Megan I; Engelbrecht, Anna-Mart

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian circadian rhythms form an integral physiological system allowing for the synchronisation of all metabolic processes to daily light/dark cycles, thereby optimising their efficacy. Circadian disruptions have been implicated in the onset and progression of various cancers, including those arising in the breast. Several links between the circadian protein Per2 and DNA damage responses exist. Aberrant Per2 expression results in potent downstream effects on both cell cycle and apoptotic targets, suggestive of a tumour suppressive role for Per2. Due to the severe dose limiting side effects associated with current chemotherapeutic strategies, including the use of doxorubicin, a need for more effective adjuvant therapies to increase cancer cell susceptibility has arisen. This study was therefore aimed at characterizing the role of Per2 in normal breast epithelia (MCF-12A) and in ER(-) breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) and also at determining the role of Per2 in doxorubicin-induced cell death. In both cell lines Per2 protein expression displayed a 24-hour circadian rhythm in both cell lines. Per2 was located predominantly in the cytoplasm, with nuclear localization observed with lower cytoplasmic fluorescent intensities. Our results show that Per2 silencing effectively sensitizes the chemoresistant MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells to the cytotoxic effects of doxorubicin. PMID:26347774

  19. Intensity modulated radiotherapy and 3D conformal radiotherapy for whole breast irradiation: a comparative dosimetric study and introduction of a novel qualitative index for plan evaluation, the normal tissue index

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Jackie; Suttie, Clare; Bromley, Regina; Morgia, Marita; Lamoury, Gillian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We report on a retrospective dosimetric study, comparing 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and hybrid intensity modulated radiotherapy (hIMRT). We evaluated plans based on their planning target volume coverage, dose homogeneity, dose to organs at risk (OARs) and exposure of normal tissue to radiation. The Homogeneity Index (HI) was used to assess the dose homogeneity in the target region, and we describe a new index, the normal tissue index (NTI), to assess the dose in the normal tissue inside the tangent treatment portal. Methods Plans were generated for 25 early-stage breast cancer patients, using a hIMRT technique. These were compared with the 3DCRT plans of the treatment previously received by the patients. Plan quality was evaluated using the HI, NTI and dose to OARs. Results The hIMRT technique was significantly more homogenous than the 3DCRT technique, while maintaining target coverage. The hIMRT technique was also superior at minimising the amount of tissue receiving D105% and above (P < 0.0001). The ipsilateral lung and contralateral breast maximum were significantly lower in the hIMRT plans (P < 0.05 and P < 0.005), but the 3DCRT technique achieved a lower mean heart dose in left-sided breast cancer patients (P < 0.05). Conclusion Hybrid intensity modulated radiotherapy plans achieved improved dose homogeneity compared to the 3DCRT plans and superior outcome with regard to dose to normal tissues. We propose that the addition of both HI and NTI in evaluating the quality of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) breast plans provides clinically relevant comparators which more accurately reflect the new paradigm of treatment goals and outcomes in the era of breast IMRT. PMID:26451240

  20. Intensity modulated radiotherapy and 3D conformal radiotherapy for whole breast irradiation: a comparative dosimetric study and introduction of a novel qualitative index for plan evaluation, the normal tissue index

    SciTech Connect

    Yim, Jackie; Suttie, Clare; Bromley, Regina; Morgia, Marita; Lamoury, Gillian

    2015-09-15

    We report on a retrospective dosimetric study, comparing 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and hybrid intensity modulated radiotherapy (hIMRT). We evaluated plans based on their planning target volume coverage, dose homogeneity, dose to organs at risk (OARs) and exposure of normal tissue to radiation. The Homogeneity Index (HI) was used to assess the dose homogeneity in the target region, and we describe a new index, the normal tissue index (NTI), to assess the dose in the normal tissue inside the tangent treatment portal. Plans were generated for 25 early-stage breast cancer patients, using a hIMRT technique. These were compared with the 3DCRT plans of the treatment previously received by the patients. Plan quality was evaluated using the HI, NTI and dose to OARs. The hIMRT technique was significantly more homogenous than the 3DCRT technique, while maintaining target coverage. The hIMRT technique was also superior at minimising the amount of tissue receiving D{sub 105%} and above (P < 0.0001). The ipsilateral lung and contralateral breast maximum were significantly lower in the hIMRT plans (P < 0.05 and P < 0.005), but the 3DCRT technique achieved a lower mean heart dose in left-sided breast cancer patients (P < 0.05). Hybrid intensity modulated radiotherapy plans achieved improved dose homogeneity compared to the 3DCRT plans and superior outcome with regard to dose to normal tissues. We propose that the addition of both HI and NTI in evaluating the quality of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) breast plans provides clinically relevant comparators which more accurately reflect the new paradigm of treatment goals and outcomes in the era of breast IMRT.

  1. Adenovirus entry from the apical surface of polarized epithelia is facilitated by the host innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Kotha, Poornima L N; Sharma, Priyanka; Kolawole, Abimbola O; Yan, Ran; Alghamri, Mahmoud S; Brockman, Trisha L; Gomez-Cambronero, Julian; Excoffon, Katherine J D A

    2015-03-01

    Prevention of viral-induced respiratory disease begins with an understanding of the factors that increase or decrease susceptibility to viral infection. The primary receptor for most adenoviruses is the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR), a cell-cell adhesion protein normally localized at the basolateral surface of polarized epithelia and involved in neutrophil transepithelial migration. Recently, an alternate isoform of CAR, CAREx8, has been identified at the apical surface of polarized airway epithelia and is implicated in viral infection from the apical surface. We hypothesized that the endogenous role of CAREx8 may be to facilitate host innate immunity. We show that IL-8, a proinflammatory cytokine and a neutrophil chemoattractant, stimulates the protein expression and apical localization of CAREx8 via activation of AKT/S6K and inhibition of GSK3β. Apical CAREx8 tethers infiltrating neutrophils at the apical surface of a polarized epithelium. Moreover, neutrophils present on the apical-epithelial surface enhance adenovirus entry into the epithelium. These findings suggest that adenovirus evolved to co-opt an innate immune response pathway that stimulates the expression of its primary receptor, apical CAREx8, to allow the initial infection the intact epithelium. In addition, CAREx8 is a new target for the development of novel therapeutics for both respiratory inflammatory disease and adenoviral infection.

  2. Effects of Hydrostatic Pressure on Carcinogenic Properties of Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Tokuda, Shinsaku; Kim, Young Hak; Matsumoto, Hisako; Muro, Shigeo; Hirai, Toyohiro; Mishima, Michiaki; Furuse, Mikio

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between chronic inflammation and cancer is well known. The inflammation increases the permeability of blood vessels and consequently elevates pressure in the interstitial tissues. However, there have been only a few reports on the effects of hydrostatic pressure on cultured cells, and the relationship between elevated hydrostatic pressure and cell properties related to malignant tumors is less well understood. Therefore, we investigated the effects of hydrostatic pressure on the cultured epithelial cells seeded on permeable filters. Surprisingly, hydrostatic pressure from basal to apical side induced epithelial stratification in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) I and Caco-2 cells, and cavities with microvilli and tight junctions around their surfaces were formed within the multi-layered epithelia. The hydrostatic pressure gradient also promoted cell proliferation, suppressed cell apoptosis, and increased transepithelial ion permeability. The inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) promoted epithelial stratification by the hydrostatic pressure whereas the activation of PKA led to suppressed epithelial stratification. These results indicate the role of the hydrostatic pressure gradient in the regulation of various epithelial cell functions. The findings in this study may provide clues for the development of a novel strategy for the treatment of the carcinoma. PMID:26716691

  3. The beetle amnion and serosa functionally interact as apposed epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Hilbrant, Maarten; Horn, Thorsten; Koelzer, Stefan; Panfilio, Kristen A

    2016-01-01

    Unlike passive rupture of the human chorioamnion at birth, the insect extraembryonic (EE) tissues – the amnion and serosa – actively rupture and withdraw in late embryogenesis. Withdrawal is essential for development and has been a morphogenetic puzzle. Here, we use new fluorescent transgenic lines in the beetle Tribolium castaneum to show that the EE tissues dynamically form a basal-basal epithelial bilayer, contradicting the previous hypothesis of EE intercalation. We find that the EE tissues repeatedly detach and reattach throughout development and have distinct roles. Quantitative live imaging analyses show that the amnion initiates EE rupture in a specialized anterior-ventral cap. RNAi phenotypes demonstrate that the serosa contracts autonomously. Thus, apposition in a bilayer enables the amnion as 'initiator' to coordinate with the serosa as 'driver' to achieve withdrawal. This EE strategy may reflect evolutionary changes within the holometabolous insects and serves as a model to study interactions between developing epithelia. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13834.001 PMID:26824390

  4. Brefeldin A inhibition of apical Na+ channels in epithelia.

    PubMed

    Fisher, R S; Grillo, F G; Sariban-Sohraby, S

    1996-01-01

    Brefeldin A (BFA) is used to probe trafficking of proteins through the central vacuolar system (CVS) in a variety of cells. Transepithelial Na+ transport by high-resistance epithelia, such as A6 cultured cells, is inhibited by BFA. Apical Na+ channels, as well as basolateral pumps and K+ channels, are complex proteins that probably traverse the CVS for routing to the plasma membrane. BFA (5 micrograms/ml) decreases transepithelial Na+ current near zero and increases resistance reversibly after 4 h. Longer exposures are toxic. When tissues were treated for 20 h with 0.2 microgram/ml BFA, Na+ transport also was reversibly inhibited. Using noise analysis, we found that BFA drastically reduced apical Na+ channel density. The increase in single channel current was consistent with cell hyperpolarization. After apical permeabilization with nystatin, changes in transepithelial current reflect changes in basolateral membrane transport. Transport at this membrane was inhibited by ouabain and cycloheximide, but not by BFA. After BFA, aldosterone was ineffective, suggesting that an intact CVS is required for stimulation by this hormone. Thus BFA inhibition of Na+ transport is localized at the apical membrane. Implications for channel turnover as a mechanism for regulating the Na+ transport rate are discussed.

  5. Functional Differences between Keratins of Stratified and Simple Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Hutton, Elizabeth; Paladini, Rudolph D.; Yu, Qian-Chun; Yen, Mei; Coulombe, Pierre A.; Fuchs, Elaine

    1998-01-01

    Dividing populations of stratified and simple epithelial tissues express keratins 5 and 14, and keratins 8 and 18, respectively. It has been suggested that these keratins form a mechanical framework important to cellular integrity, since their absence gives rise to a blistering skin disorder in neonatal epidermis, and hemorrhaging within the embryonic liver. An unresolved fundamental issue is whether different keratins perform unique functions in epithelia. We now address this question using transgenic technology to express a K16-14 hybrid epidermal keratin transgene and a K18 simple epithelial keratin transgene in the epidermis of mice null for K14. Under conditions where the hybrid epidermal keratin restored a wild-type phenotype to newborn epidermis, K18 partially but not fully rescued. The explanation does not appear to reside in an inability of K18 to form 10-nm filaments with K5, which it does in vitro and in vivo. Rather, it appears that the keratin network formed between K5 and K18 is deficient in withstanding mechanical stress, leading to perturbations in the keratin network in regions of the skin that are subjected either to natural or to mechanically induced trauma. Taken together, these findings suggest that the loss of a type I epidermal keratin cannot be fully compensated by its counterpart of simple epithelial cells, and that in vivo, all keratins are not equivalent. PMID:9786957

  6. Derivation of muscles of the Aristotle's lantern from coelomic epithelia.

    PubMed

    Dolmatov, Igor Y; Mashanov, Vladimir S; Zueva, Olga R

    2007-02-01

    Transmission electron microscopy was employed to study structural changes in the lantern muscles occurring during the transition from young to adult in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus nudus. A comparative examination of four major lantern muscles (compass depressors, compass elevators, protractors and retractors) suggests that myogenesis involves four consecutive stages. At the initial stage, the muscles show the organization of a mesentery delimited by pseudostratified coelomic epithelia, which are composed of peritoneal cells spanning the whole height of each epithelium, and myoepithelial cells, which are clustered together to fill the interstices between the basal processes of the peritoneal cells. During the next stage, the clusters of myoepithelial cells partly "sink" into the underlying connective tissue. At the third stage of muscularization, the myoepithelial cells increase in size and further invade the underlying connective tissue so that the myoepithelium splits into an apical peritoneal layer and a deeper mass of myoepithelial cells immersed in the connective tissue. However, these two layers are connected by a continuous basal lamina. This is thus the first description of an intermediate developmental stage between pseudostratified myoepithelim and genuine echinoderm muscles. For such a myoepithelium, we propose the term "immersed myoepithelium". At the most advanced stage of myogenesis, the myocytes detach completely from the epithelium to form subepithelial muscle bundles. Myogenesis in the sea urchin takes a long time during which continuous myogenic differentiation occurs in the coelomic epithelium and the newly formed myocytes and associated neurons penetrate into the underlying connective tissue.

  7. Epigenetic Analysis of Laser Capture Microdissected Fetal Epithelia1

    PubMed Central

    Seelan, Ratnam S.; Warner, Dennis R.; Mukhopadhyay, Partha M.; Andres, Sarah A.; Smolenkova, Irina A.; Wittliff, James L.; Pisano, M. Michele; Greene, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) is a superior method for non-destructive collection of specific cell populations from tissue sections. While DNA, RNA and protein have been analyzed from LCM-procured samples, epigenetic analyses, particularly of fetal, highly hydrated tissue, have not been attempted. A standardized protocol with quality assurance measures was established to procure cells by LCM of the medial edge epithelia (MEE) of the fetal palatal processes for isolation of intact microRNA for expression analyses and genomic DNA for CpG methylation analyses. MicroRNA preparations, obtained using the RNAqueous® Micro kit (Life Technologies), exhibited better yields and higher quality than those obtained using the Arcturus® PicoPure® RNA Isolation kit (Life Technologies). The approach was validated using real-time PCR to determine expression of selected microRNAs (miR-99a and miR-200b) and pyrosequencing to determine CpG methylation status of selected genes (Aph1a and Dkk4) in the MEE. These studies describe an optimized approach for employing LCM of epithelial cells from fresh frozen fetal tissue that enables quantitative analyses of miRNA expression levels and CpG methylation. PMID:23911529

  8. Multispectral reflectance enhancement for breast cancer visualization in the operating room

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Barreras, Gaspar; Real, Eusebio; Laughney, Ashley M.; Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Paulsen, Keith D.; López-Higuera, José M.; Pogue, Brian W.; Conde, Olga M.

    2015-03-01

    A color enhancement method to optimize the visualization of breast tumors in cancer pathology is proposed. Light scattering measurements are minimally invasive, and allow the estimation of tissue morphology and composition to guide the surgeon in resection surgeries. The usability of scatter and absorption signatures acquired with a microsampling reflectance spectral imaging system was improved employing an empirical approximation to the Mie theory to estimate the scattering power on a per-pixel basis. The proposed methodology generates a new image with blended color and diagnostic purposes coming from the emphasis or highlighting of specific wavelengths or features. These features can be the specific absorbent tissue components (oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, etc.), additional parameters as scattering power or amplitude or even the combination of both. The goal is to obtain an improved and inherent tissue contrast working only with the local reflectance of tissue. To this aim, it is provided a visual interpretation of what is considered non-malignant (normal epithelia and stroma, benign epithelia and stroma, inflammation), malignant (DCIS, IDC, ILC) and adipose tissue. Consequently, a fast visualization map of the intracavity area can be offered to the surgeon providing relevant diagnostic information. No labeling or extrinsic indicators are required for proposed methodology and therefore the possibility of transferring absorption and scattering features simultaneously into visualization, fusing their effects into a single image, can guide surgeons efficiently.

  9. Structure and functions of keratin proteins in simple, stratified, keratinized and cornified epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Bragulla, Hermann H; Homberger, Dominique G

    2009-01-01

    Historically, the term ‘keratin’ stood for all of the proteins extracted from skin modifications, such as horns, claws and hooves. Subsequently, it was realized that this keratin is actually a mixture of keratins, keratin filament-associated proteins and other proteins, such as enzymes. Keratins were then defined as certain filament-forming proteins with specific physicochemical properties and extracted from the cornified layer of the epidermis, whereas those filament-forming proteins that were extracted from the living layers of the epidermis were grouped as ‘prekeratins’ or ‘cytokeratins’. Currently, the term ‘keratin’ covers all intermediate filament-forming proteins with specific physicochemical properties and produced in any vertebrate epithelia. Similarly, the nomenclature of epithelia as cornified, keratinized or non-keratinized is based historically on the notion that only the epidermis of skin modifications such as horns, claws and hooves is cornified, that the non-modified epidermis is a keratinized stratified epithelium, and that all other stratified and non-stratified epithelia are non-keratinized epithelia. At this point in time, the concepts of keratins and of keratinized or cornified epithelia need clarification and revision concerning the structure and function of keratin and keratin filaments in various epithelia of different species, as well as of keratin genes and their modifications, in view of recent research, such as the sequencing of keratin proteins and their genes, cell culture, transfection of epithelial cells, immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. Recently, new functions of keratins and keratin filaments in cell signaling and intracellular vesicle transport have been discovered. It is currently understood that all stratified epithelia are keratinized and that some of these keratinized stratified epithelia cornify by forming a Stratum corneum. The processes of keratinization and cornification in skin modifications are

  10. Bioelectric Characterization of Epithelia from Neonatal CFTR Knockout Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, John T.; Tyler, Scott R.; Zhang, Yulong; Lee, Ben J.; Liu, Xiaoming; Sun, Xingshen; Sui, Hongshu; Liang, Bo; Luo, Meihui; Xie, Weiliang; Yi, Yaling; Zhou, Weihong; Song, Yi; Keiser, Nicholas; Wang, Kai; de Jonge, Hugo R.

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening, recessive, multiorgan genetic disorder caused by the loss of CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel function found in many types of epithelia. Animal models that recapitulate the human disease phenotype are critical to understanding pathophysiology in CF and developing therapies. CFTR knockout ferrets manifest many of the phenotypes observed in the human disease, including lung infections, pancreatic disease and diabetes, liver disease, malnutrition, and meconium ileus. In the present study, we have characterized abnormalities in the bioelectric properties of the trachea, stomach, intestine, and gallbladder of newborn CF ferrets. Short-circuit current (ISC) analysis of CF and wild-type (WT) tracheas revealed the following similarities and differences: (1) amiloride-sensitive sodium currents were similar between genotypes; (2) responses to 4,4′-diisothiocyano-2,2′-stilbene disulphonic acid were 3.3-fold greater in CF animals, suggesting elevated baseline chloride transport through non-CFTR channels in a subset of CF animals; and (3) a lack of 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX)/forskolin–stimulated and N-(2-Naphthalenyl)-((3,5-dibromo-2,4-dihydroxyphenyl)methylene)glycine hydrazide (GlyH-101)–inhibited currents in CF animals due to the lack of CFTR. CFTR mRNA was present throughout all levels of the WT ferret and IBMX/forskolin–inducible ISC was only observed in WT animals. However, despite the lack of CFTR function in the knockout ferret, the luminal pH of the CF ferret gallbladder, stomach, and intestines was not significantly changed relative to WT. The WT stomach and gallbladder exhibited significantly enhanced IBMX/forskolin ISC responses and inhibition by GlyH-101 relative to CF samples. These findings demonstrate that multiple organs affected by disease in the CF ferret have bioelectric abnormalities consistent with the lack of cAMP-mediated chloride transport. PMID:23782101

  11. Emergence and Dynamics of Polar Order in Developing Epithelia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhadifar, Reza

    2011-03-01

    Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) is a conserved process in many vertebrate and invertebrate tissues, and is fundamental for the coordination of cell behavior and patterning. A well-studied example is the orientational pattern of hairs in the wing of the adult fruit fly Drosophila, which is an important model organism in biology. The Drosophila wing is an epithelium, i.e., a two-dimensional sheet of cells, which grows from a few cells to thousands of cells during the course of development. In the wing epithelium, planar polarity is established by an anisotropic distribution of PCP proteins within cells. The distribution of these proteins in a given cell affects the polarity of neighboring cells, such that at the end of wing development a large-scale PCP orientational order emerges. Here we present a theoretical study of planar polarity in developing epithelia based on a vertex model, which takes into account cell mechanics, cell adhesion, and cell division, combined with experimental results obtained from time-lapse imaging of the wing development. We show that in experiment, polarity order does not develop de novo at the end of wing development, but rather cells are initially polarized at an angle with respect to their final polarity axis. During wing development, the polarity axes of cells reorient towards their final direction. We identify a basic mechanism to generate such a large-scale initial polarization, based on the growth of a small number of cells with an initially random PCP distribution. Finally, we study the effect of shear and oriented cell division on dynamics of PCP order, showing that these two processes can robustly reorient the polarity axes of cells.

  12. Accumulation of multipotent progenitors with a basal differentiation bias during aging of human mammary epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Garbe, James C; Pepin, Francois; Pelissier, Fanny; Sputova, Klara; Fridriksdottir, Agla J; Guo, Diana E; Villadsen, Rene; Park, Morag; Petersen, Ole W; Borowsky, Alexander D.; Stampfer, Martha R; LaBarge, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    Women over 50 years of age account for 75% of new breast cancer diagnoses, and the majority of these tumors are of a luminal subtype. Although age-associated changes, including endocrine profiles and alterations within the breast microenvironment, increase cancer risk, an understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie these observations is lacking. In this study, we generated a large collection of normal human mammary epithelial cell strains from women aged 16 to 91 years, derived from primary tissues, to investigate the molecular changes that occur in aging breast cells. We found that in finite-lifespan cultured and uncultured epithelial cells, aging is associated with a reduction of myoepithelial cells and an increase in luminal cells that express keratin 14 and integrin α6, a phenotype that is usually expressed exclusively in myoepithelial cells in women under 30. Changes to the luminal lineage resulted from age-dependent expansion of defective multipotent progenitors that gave rise to incompletely differentiated luminal or myoepithelial cells. The aging process therefore results in both a shift in the balance of luminal/myoepithelial lineages and to changes in the functional spectrum of multipotent progenitors, which together increase the potential for malignant transformation. Together, our findings provide a cellular basis to explain the observed vulnerability to breast cancer that increases with age. PMID:22552289

  13. The CCAAT/Enhancer-Binding Protein Beta-2 Isoform (CEBPβ-2) Upregulates Galectin-7 Expression in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Campion, Carole G.; Labrie, Marilyne; Grosset, Andrée-Anne; St-Pierre, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Galectin-7 is considered a gene under the control of p53. However, elevated expression of galectin-7 has been reported in several forms of cancer harboring an inactive p53 pathway. This is especially true for breast cancer where galectin-7 expression is readily expressed in a high proportion in basal-like breast cancer tissues, conferring cancer cells with increased resistance to cell death and metastatic properties. These observations suggest that other transcription factors are capable of inducing galectin-7 expression. In the present work, we have examined the role of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (C/EBPβ) in inducing expression of galectin-7. C/EBP proteins have been shown to contribute to breast cancer by upregulating pro-metastatic genes. We paid particular attention to C/EBPβ-2 (also known as LAP2), the most transcriptionally active of the C/EBPβ isoforms. Our results showed that ectopic expression of C/EBPβ-2 in human breast cancer cells was sufficient to induce expression of galectin-7 at both the mRNA and protein levels. In silico analysis further revealed the presence of an established CEBP element in the galectin-7 promoter. Mutation of this binding site abolished the transcriptional activity of the galectin-7 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed that C/EBPβ-2 binds to the endogenous galectin-7 promoter. Analysis of galectin-7 protein expression in normal epithelia and in breast carcinoma by immunohistochemistry further showed the expression pattern of C/EBPβ closely micmicked that of galectin-7, most notably in mammary myoepithelial cells and basal-like breast cancer where galectin-7 is preferentially expressed. Taken together, our findings suggest that C/EBPβ is an important mediator of galectin-7 gene activation in breast cancer cells and highlight the different transcriptional mechanisms controlling galectin-7 in cancer cells. PMID:24789216

  14. Teaching normal birth, normally.

    PubMed

    Hotelling, Barbara A

    2009-01-01

    Teaching normal-birth Lamaze classes normally involves considering the qualities that make birth normal and structuring classes to embrace those qualities. In this column, teaching strategies are suggested for classes that unfold naturally, free from unnecessary interventions. PMID:19436595

  15. New insights into the development and differentiation of the human anorectal epithelia. Are there clinical consequences?

    PubMed Central

    Zehm, Sarah; Illig, Romana; Moser, Patrizia; Aigner, Felix

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The epithelial lining of the anorectum still raises discussions concerning the levels of transition between the various zones and leads to an incomplete understanding of the immmunoprofile of rectal carcinoma. Since the expression of cytokeratins depends on the epithelial cell-type and the parahox-gene CDX2 is important for the development of the colorectal epithelium, we investigated different cytokeratins and CDX2 in the anorectum of human prenatal stages and in adult normal and neoplastic anorecta. Materials and Methods The differentiation and spatiotemporal distribution of the epithelial zones were examined in 33 human embryos and fetuses, in a 2-year-old child and four adults. In comparison, 17 specimens of ultralow rectal adenocarcinoma and 4 specimens of anal carcinoma were investigated. Monoclonal antibodies were directed against cytokeratin (CK) 18, 20, 7 and 14 and CDX2. Results Due to the cytokeratin profile and to CDX2 expression, the different anorectal zones could already be differentiated in human prenatal life. We showed that anorectal epithelial differentiation including the squamous epithelia ran in a craniocaudal direction, and that the anorectal zone was a transitional zone between rectal zone and anal transitional zone where CK 7, 18, 20 and CDX2 are simultaneously expressed. All cases of rectal adenocarcinoma showed positivity for CK 18, 20 and CDX2, and three also labelled for CK 7, whereas CK 14 was only expressed in the cases of anal carcinoma. Conclusions Our results elucidate the connection between the prenatal pattern and the origin of the different types of anorectal carcinoma. PMID:20563874

  16. Cellular targets of estrogen signaling in regeneration of inner ear sensory epithelia

    PubMed Central

    McCullar, Jennifer S.; Oesterle, Elizabeth C.

    2010-01-01

    Estrogen signaling in auditory and vestibular sensory epithelia is a newly emerging focus propelled by the role of estrogen signaling in many other proliferative systems. Understanding the pathways with which estrogen interacts can provide a means to identify how estrogen may modulate proliferative signaling in inner ear sensory epithelia. Reviewed herein are two signaling families, EGF and TGFβ. Both pathways are involved in regulating proliferation of supporting cells in mature vestibular sensory epithelia and have well characterized interactions with estrogen signaling in other systems. It is becoming increasingly clear that elucidating the complexity of signaling in regeneration will be necessary for development of therapeutics that can initiate regeneration and prevent progression to a pathogenic state. PMID:19450430

  17. Drosophila Stardust interacts with Crumbs to control polarity of epithelia but not neuroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hong, Y; Stronach, B; Perrimon, N; Jan, L Y; Jan, Y N

    2001-12-01

    Establishing cellular polarity is critical for tissue organization and function. Initially discovered in the landmark genetic screen for Drosophila developmental mutants, bazooka, crumbs, shotgun and stardust mutants exhibit severe disruption in apicobasal polarity in embryonic epithelia, resulting in multilayered epithelia, tissue disintegration, and defects in cuticle formation. Here we report that stardust encodes single PDZ domain MAGUK (membrane-associated guanylate kinase) proteins that are expressed in all primary embryonic epithelia from the onset of gastrulation. Stardust colocalizes with Crumbs at the apicolateral boundary, although their expression patterns in sensory organs differ. Stardust binds to the carboxy terminus of Crumbs in vitro, and Stardust and Crumbs are mutually dependent in their stability, localization and function in controlling the apicobasal polarity of epithelial cells. However, for the subset of ectodermal cells that delaminate and form neuroblasts, their polarity requires the function of Bazooka, but not of Stardust or Crumbs.

  18. Ablation of Coactivator Med1 Switches the Cell Fate of Dental Epithelia to That Generating Hair

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thai; Sakai, Kiyoshi; He, Bing; Fong, Chak; Oda, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    Cell fates are determined by specific transcriptional programs. Here we provide evidence that the transcriptional coactivator, Mediator 1 (Med1), is essential for the cell fate determination of ectodermal epithelia. Conditional deletion of Med1 in vivo converted dental epithelia into epidermal epithelia, causing defects in enamel organ development while promoting hair formation in the incisors. We identified multiple processes by which hairs are generated in Med1 deficient incisors: 1) dental epithelial stem cells lacking Med 1 fail to commit to the dental lineage, 2) Sox2-expressing stem cells extend into the differentiation zone and remain multi-potent due to reduced Notch1 signaling, and 3) epidermal fate is induced by calcium as demonstrated in dental epithelial cell cultures. These results demonstrate that Med1 is a master regulator in adult stem cells to govern epithelial cell fate. PMID:24949995

  19. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Breast Cancer What is Breast Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... tumors form in the breast tissue. Who Gets Breast Cancer? Breast cancer is one of the most common ...

  20. Cytoskeleton in motion: the dynamics of keratin intermediate filaments in epithelia.

    PubMed

    Windoffer, Reinhard; Beil, Michael; Magin, Thomas M; Leube, Rudolf E

    2011-09-01

    Epithelia are exposed to multiple forms of stress. Keratin intermediate filaments are abundant in epithelia and form cytoskeletal networks that contribute to cell type-specific functions, such as adhesion, migration, and metabolism. A perpetual keratin filament turnover cycle supports these functions. This multistep process keeps the cytoskeleton in motion, facilitating rapid and protein biosynthesis-independent network remodeling while maintaining an intact network. The current challenge is to unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of the keratin cycle in relation to actin and microtubule networks and in the context of epithelial tissue function.

  1. Activation status of Wnt/ß-catenin signaling in normal and neoplastic breast tissues: relationship to HER2/neu expression in human and mouse.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Sara; Tan, Grace A; Giri, Dilip D; Zhou, Xi Kathy; Howe, Louise R

    2012-01-01

    Wnt/ß-catenin signaling is strongly implicated in neoplasia, but the role of this pathway in human breast cancer has been controversial. Here, we examined Wnt/ß-catenin pathway activation as a function of breast cancer progression, and tested for a relationship with HER2/neu expression, using a human tissue microarray comprising benign breast tissues, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and invasive carcinomas. Cores were scored for membranous ß-catenin, a key functional component of adherens junctions, and for nucleocytoplasmic ß-catenin, a hallmark of Wnt/ß-catenin pathway activation. Only 82% of benign samples exhibited membrane-associated ß-catenin, indicating a finite frequency of false-negative staining. The frequency of membrane positivity was similar in DCIS samples, but was significantly reduced in carcinomas (45%, P<0.001), consistent with loss of adherens junctions during acquisition of invasiveness. Negative membrane status in cancers correlated with higher grade (P = 0.04) and estrogen receptor-negative status (P = 0.03), both indices of poor prognosis. Unexpectedly, a substantial frequency of nucleocytoplasmic ß-catenin was observed in benign breast tissues (36%), similar to that in carcinomas (35%). Positive-staining basal nuclei observed in benign breast may identify putative stem cells. An increased frequency of nucleocytoplasmic ß-catenin was observed in DCIS tumors (56%), suggesting that pathway activation may be an early event in human breast neoplasia. A correlation was observed between HER2/neu expression and nucleocytoplasmic ß-catenin in node-positive carcinomas (P = 0.02). Furthermore, cytoplasmic ß-catenin was detected in HER2/neu-induced mouse mammary tumors. The Axin2(NLSlacZ) mouse strain, a previously validated reporter of mammary Wnt/ß-catenin signaling, was utilized to define in vivo transcriptional consequences of HER2/neu-induced ß-catenin accumulation. Discrete hyperplastic foci observed in mammary glands from

  2. Accelerated geroncogenesis in hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Javier A; Folguera-Blasco, Núria; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Fernández-Arroyo, Salvador; Joven, Jorge; Alarcón, Tomás

    2016-03-15

    The geroncogenesis hypothesis postulates that the decline in metabolic cellular health that occurs naturally with aging drives a "field effect" predisposing normal tissues for cancer development. We propose that mutations in the cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1/2 might trigger "accelerated geroncogenesis" in breast and ovarian epithelia. By speeding up the rate at which the metabolic threshold becomes "permissive" with survival and expansion of genomically unstable pre-tumoral epithelial cells, BRCA haploinsufficiency-driven metabolic reprogramming would operate as a bona fide oncogenic event enabling malignant transformation and tumor formation in BRCA carriers. The metabolic facet of BRCA1 one-hit might involve tissue-specific alterations in acetyl-CoA, α-ketoglutarate, NAD+, FAD, or S-adenosylmethionine, critical factors for de/methylation or de/acetylation dynamics in the nuclear epigenome. This in turn might induce faulty epigenetic reprogramming at the "install phase" that directs cell-specific differentiation of breast/ovarian epithelial cells, which can ultimately determine the penetrance of BRCA defects during developmental windows of susceptibility. This model offers a framework to study whether metabolic drugs that prevent or revert metabolic reprogramming induced by BRCA haploinsufficiency might displace the "geroncogenic risk" of BRCA carriers to the age typical for those without the mutation. The identification of the key nodes that directly communicate changes in cellular metabolism to the chromatin in BRCA haploinsufficient cells may allow the epigenetic targeting of genomic instability using exclusively metabolic means. The validation of accelerated geroncogenesis as an inherited "one-hit" metabolic "field effect" might offer new strategies to therapeutically revisit the apparently irreversible genetic-hereditary fate of women with hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndrome. PMID:26943589

  3. Accelerated geroncogenesis in hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Menendez, Javier A.; Folguera-Blasco, Núria; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Fernández-Arroyo, Salvador; Joven, Jorge; Alarcón, Tomás

    2016-01-01

    The geroncogenesis hypothesis postulates that the decline in metabolic cellular health that occurs naturally with aging drives a “field effect” predisposing normal tissues for cancer development. We propose that mutations in the cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1/2 might trigger “accelerated geroncogenesis” in breast and ovarian epithelia. By speeding up the rate at which the metabolic threshold becomes “permissive” with survival and expansion of genomically unstable pre-tumoral epithelial cells, BRCA haploinsufficiency-driven metabolic reprogramming would operate as a bona fide oncogenic event enabling malignant transformation and tumor formation in BRCA carriers. The metabolic facet of BRCA1 one-hit might involve tissue-specific alterations in acetyl-CoA, α-ketoglutarate, NAD+, FAD, or S-adenosylmethionine, critical factors for de/methylation or de/acetylation dynamics in the nuclear epigenome. This in turn might induce faulty epigenetic reprogramming at the “install phase” that directs cell-specific differentiation of breast/ovarian epithelial cells, which can ultimately determine the penetrance of BRCA defects during developmental windows of susceptibility. This model offers a framework to study whether metabolic drugs that prevent or revert metabolic reprogramming induced by BRCA haploinsufficiency might displace the “geroncogenic risk” of BRCA carriers to the age typical for those without the mutation. The identification of the key nodes that directly communicate changes in cellular metabolism to the chromatin in BRCA haploinsufficient cells may allow the epigenetic targeting of genomic instability using exclusively metabolic means. The validation of accelerated geroncogenesis as an inherited “one-hit” metabolic “field effect” might offer new strategies to therapeutically revisit the apparently irreversible genetic-hereditary fate of women with hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndrome. PMID:26943589

  4. Striatins as plaque molecules of zonulae adhaerentes in simple epithelia, of tessellate junctions in stratified epithelia, of cardiac composite junctions and of various size classes of lateral adherens junctions in cultures of epithelia- and carcinoma-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Franke, Werner W; Rickelt, Steffen; Zimbelmann, Ralf; Dörflinger, Yvette; Kuhn, Caecilia; Frey, Norbert; Heid, Hans; Rosin-Arbesfeld, Rina

    2015-03-01

    Proteins of the striatin family (striatins 1-4; sizes ranging from 90 to 110 kDa on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) are highly homologous in their amino acid sequences but can differ in their cell-type-specific gene expression patterns and biological functions. In various cell types, we have found one, two or three polypeptides of this evolutionarily old and nearly ubiquitous family of proteins known to serve as scaffold proteins for diverse protein complexes. Light and electron microscopic immunolocalization methods have revealed striatins in mammalian cell-cell adherens junctions (AJs). In simple epithelia, we have localized striatins as constitutive components of the plaques of the subapical zonulae adhaerentes of cells, including intestinal, glandular, ductal and urothelial cells and hepatocytes. Striatins colocalize with E-cadherin or E-N-cadherin heterodimers and with the plaque proteins α- and β-catenin, p120 and p0071. In some epithelia and carcinomas and in cultured cells derived therefrom, striatins are also seen in lateral AJs. In stratified epithelia and in corresponding squamous cell carcinomas, striatins can be found in plaques of some forms of tessellate junctions. Moreover, striatins are major plaque proteins of composite junctions (CJs; areae compositae) in the intercalated disks connecting cardiomyocytes, colocalizing with other CJ molecules, including plectin and ankyrin-G. We discuss the "multimodulator" scaffold roles of striatins in the initiation and regulation of the formation of various complex particles and structures. We propose that striatins are included in the diagnostic candidate list of proteins that, in the CJs of human hearts, can occur in mutated forms in the pathogeneses of hereditary cardiomyopathies, as seen in some types of genetically determined heart damage in boxer dogs. PMID:25501894

  5. Acute regulation of tight junction ion selectivity in human airway epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Andrea N.; Itani, Omar A.; Moninger, Thomas O.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Electrolyte transport through and between airway epithelial cells controls the quantity and composition of the overlying liquid. Many studies have shown acute regulation of transcellular ion transport in airway epithelia. However, whether ion transport through tight junctions can also be acutely regulated is poorly understood both in airway and other epithelia. To investigate the paracellular pathway, we used primary cultures of differentiated human airway epithelia and assessed expression of claudins, the primary determinants of paracellular permeability, and measured transepithelial electrical properties, ion fluxes, and La3+ movement. Like many other tissues, airway epithelia expressed multiple claudins. Moreover, different cell types in the epithelium expressed the same pattern of claudins. To evaluate tight junction regulation, we examined the response to histamine, an acute regulator of airway function. Histamine stimulated a rapid and transient increase in the paracellular Na+ conductance, with a smaller increase in Cl− conductance. The increase was mediated by histamine H1 receptors and depended on an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration. These results suggest that ion flow through the paracellular pathway can be acutely regulated. Such regulation could facilitate coupling of the passive flow of counter ions to active transcellular transport, thereby controlling net transepithelial salt and water transport. PMID:19208806

  6. Lypd8 promotes the segregation of flagellated microbiota and colonic epithelia.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Ryu; Kurakawa, Takashi; Nakano, Takashi; Kayama, Hisako; Kinoshita, Makoto; Motooka, Daisuke; Gotoh, Kazuyoshi; Kimura, Taishi; Kamiyama, Naganori; Kusu, Takashi; Ueda, Yoshiyasu; Wu, Hong; Iijima, Hideki; Barman, Soumik; Osawa, Hideki; Matsuno, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Junichi; Ohba, Yusuke; Nakamura, Shota; Iida, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Umemoto, Eiji; Sano, Koichi; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2016-04-01

    Colonic epithelial cells are covered by thick inner and outer mucus layers. The inner mucus layer is free of commensal microbiota, which contributes to the maintenance of gut homeostasis. In the small intestine, molecules critical for prevention of bacterial invasion into epithelia such as Paneth-cell-derived anti-microbial peptides and regenerating islet-derived 3 (RegIII) family proteins have been identified. Although there are mucus layers providing physical barriers against the large number of microbiota present in the large intestine, the mechanisms that separate bacteria and colonic epithelia are not fully elucidated. Here we show that Ly6/PLAUR domain containing 8 (Lypd8) protein prevents flagellated microbiota invading the colonic epithelia in mice. Lypd8, selectively expressed in epithelial cells at the uppermost layer of the large intestinal gland, was secreted into the lumen and bound flagellated bacteria including Proteus mirabilis. In the absence of Lypd8, bacteria were present in the inner mucus layer and many flagellated bacteria invaded epithelia. Lypd8(-/-) mice were highly sensitive to intestinal inflammation induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). Antibiotic elimination of Gram-negative flagellated bacteria restored the bacterial-free state of the inner mucus layer and ameliorated DSS-induced intestinal inflammation in Lypd8(-/-) mice. Lypd8 bound to flagella and suppressed motility of flagellated bacteria. Thus, Lypd8 mediates segregation of intestinal bacteria and epithelial cells in the colon to preserve intestinal homeostasis. PMID:27027293

  7. Freshwater Sponges Have Functional, Sealing Epithelia with High Transepithelial Resistance and Negative Transepithelial Potential

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Emily D. M.; Goss, Greg G.; Leys, Sally P.

    2010-01-01

    Epithelial tissue — the sealed and polarized layer of cells that regulates transport of ions and solutes between the environment and the internal milieu — is a defining characteristic of the Eumetazoa. Sponges, the most ancient metazoan phylum [1], [2], are generally believed to lack true epithelia [3], [4], [5], but their ability to occlude passage of ions has never been tested. Here we show that freshwater sponges (Demospongiae, Haplosclerida) have functional epithelia with high transepithelial electrical resistance (TER), a transepithelial potential (TEP), and low permeability to small-molecule diffusion. Curiously, the Amphimedon queenslandica sponge genome lacks the classical occluding genes [5] considered necessary to regulate sealing and control of ion transport. The fact that freshwater sponge epithelia can seal suggests that either occluding molecules have been lost in some sponge lineages, or demosponges use novel molecular complexes for epithelial occlusion; if the latter, it raises the possibility that mechanisms for occlusion used by sponges may exist in other metazoa. Importantly, our results imply that functional epithelia evolved either several times, or once, in the ancestor of the Metazoa. PMID:21124779

  8. Induction of apoptotic cell death by phytoestrogens by up-regulating the levels of phospho-p53 and p21 in normal and malignant estrogen receptor α-negative breast cells.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hye-Sook; Ju, Ji-Hyun; Jang, Kibeom; Shin, Incheol

    2011-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanism by which phytoestrogens suppress the growth of normal (MCF-10A) and malignant (MDA-MB-231) estrogen receptor α (ERα)-negative breast cells. We hypothesized that phytoestrogen inhibits the proliferation of ERα-negative breast cancer cells. We found that all tested phytoestrogens (genistein, apigenin, and quercetin) suppressed the growth of both MCF-10A and MDA-MB-231 cells, as revealed by proliferation assays. These results were accompanied by an increase in the sub-G0/G1 apoptotic fractions as well as an increase in the cell population in the G2/M phase in both cell types, as revealed by cell cycle analysis. When we assessed the effect of phytoestrogens on the level of intracellular signaling molecules by Western blot analysis, we found that phytoestrogens increased the level of active p53 (phospho-p53) without changing the p53 level in both MCF-10A and MDA-MB-231 cells. Phytoestrogens also induced an increase in p21, a p53 target gene, and a decrease in either Bcl-xL or cyclin B1 in both cell types. In contrast, the protein levels of phosphatase and tensin homolog, cyclin D1, cell division control protein 2 homolog, phospho-cell division control protein 2 homolog, and p27 were not changed after phytoestrogen treatment. Our data indicate that phytoestrogens induce apoptotic cell death of ERα-negative breast cancer cells via p53-dependent pathway and suggest that phytoestrogens may be promising agents in the treatment and prevention of ERα-negative breast cancer.

  9. The role of complement in gonococcal infection of cervical epithelia.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Jennifer L

    2008-12-30

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is an exclusive human pathogen that causes the sexually transmitted disease, gonorrhea. The gonococcus has developed an exquisite repertoire of mechanisms by which it is able to evade host innate and adaptive immune responses. Our previous data indicate that the predominately asymptomatic nature ofgonococcal cervicitis may, in part, be attributed to the ability of these bacteria to subvert the normal function of complement to promote cervical disease. Herein we describe the interaction of N. gonorrhoeae with the complement alternative pathway with a particular focus on the importance of this interaction in promoting gonococcal cervicitis.

  10. Discordant assessment of tumor biomarkers by histopathological and molecular assays in the EORTC randomized controlled 10041/BIG 03-04 MINDACT trial breast cancer : Intratumoral heterogeneity and DCIS or normal tissue components are unlikely to be the cause of discordance.

    PubMed

    Viale, Giuseppe; Slaets, Leen; de Snoo, Femke A; Bogaerts, Jan; Russo, Leila; van't Veer, Laura; Rutgers, Emiel J T; Piccart-Gebhart, Martine J; Stork-Sloots, Lisette; Dell'Orto, Patrizia; Glas, Annuska M; Cardoso, Fatima

    2016-02-01

    Accurate identification of breast cancer patients most likely to benefit from adjuvant systemic therapies is crucial. Better understanding of differences between methods can lead to an improved ER, PgR, and HER-2 assessment. The purpose of this preplanned translational research is to investigate the correlation of central IHC/FISH assessments with microarray mRNA readouts of ER, PgR, and HER-2 status in the MINDACT trial and to determine if any discordance could be attributed to intratumoral heterogeneity or the DCIS and normal tissue components in the specimens. MINDACT is an international, prospective, randomized, phase III trial investigating the clinical utility of MammaPrint in selecting patients with early breast cancer for adjuvant chemotherapy (n = 6694 patients). Gene-expression data were obtained by TargetPrint; IHC and/or FISH were assessed centrally (n = 5788; 86 %). Macroscopic and microscopic evaluation of centrally submitted FFPE blocks identified 1427 cases for which the very same sample was submitted for gene-expression analysis. TargetPrint ER had a positive agreement of 98 %, and a negative agreement of 95 % with central pathology. Corresponding figures for PgR were 85 and 94 % and for HER-2 72 and 99 %. Agreement of mRNA versus central protein was not different when the same or a different portion of the tumor tissue was analyzed or when DCIS and/or normal tissue was included in the sample subjected to mRNA assays. This is the first large analysis to assess the discordance rate between protein and mRNA analysis of breast cancer markers, and to look into intratumoral heterogeneity, DCIS, or normal tissue components as a potential cause of discordance. The observed difference between mRNA and protein assessment for PgR and HER-2 needs further research; the present analysis does not support intratumoral heterogeneity or the DCIS and normal tissue components being likely causes of the discordance.

  11. Ultrasound - Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... discharge) and to characterize potential abnormalities seen on mammography or breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ultrasound imaging ... supply in breast lesions . Supplemental Breast Cancer Screening Mammography is the only screening tool for breast cancer ...

  12. Breast pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - breast; Mastalgia; Mastodynia; Breast tenderness ... There are many possible causes for breast pain. For example, hormone level changes from menstruation or pregnancy often cause breast tenderness. Some swelling and tenderness just before your period ...

  13. Small Activating RNA Restores the Activity of the Tumor Suppressor HIC-1 on Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yan; Guo, Shanyu; Dai, Qiancheng; Yu, Yingyan; Zhang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    HIC-1 is a gene that is hypermethylated in cancer, and commonly downregulated in human breast cancer. However, the precise mechanisms and molecular pathways regulated by HIC-1 remain unclear. We assessed HIC-1 expression on a tissue microarray containing 80 cases of breast cancer. We also analyzed its biological function by restoring HIC-1 expression using 5-aza-2′ deoxycytidine (5-CdR) and small-activating RNAs for the reversal of HIC-1 tumor suppressive effects on MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines. An Agilent Q44h global expressing microarray was probed after restoring the expression of HIC-1. Data demonstrated that HIC-1 expression was reduced significantly in breast cancer tissues. HIC-1 immunohistochemistry resulted in mean staining scores in cancer tissue and normal ductal epithelia of 3.54 and 8.2, respectively (p<0.01). 5-CdR partially reversed HIC-1 expression, and modulated cell growth and apoptosis. dsHIC1-2998, an saRNA, showed activating efficacy in breast cancer cells. A group of differentially expressed genes were characterized by cDNA microarray. Upon saRNA treatment, genes upregulated included those involved in immune activation, cell cycle interference, the induction of apoptosis, anti-metastasis, and cell differentiation. Downregulated genes included oncogenes and those that play roles in cell invasion, cell growth, and cell division. Our findings may provide valuable resources not only for gene functional studies, but also for potential clinical applications to develop novel drug targets. PMID:24489730

  14. Bioimpedance analysis for the characterization of breast cancer cells in suspension.

    PubMed

    Guofeng Qiao; Wei Wang; Wei Duan; Fan Zheng; Sinclair, A J; Chatwin, C R

    2012-08-01

    The bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) technique is potentially a useful tool to differentiate malignancy based on the variation of electrical properties presented by different tissues and cells. The different tissues and cells present variant electrical resistance and reactance when excited at different frequencies. The main purpose of this area of research is to use impedance measurements over a low-frequency bandwidth ranging from 1 kHz to 3 MHz to 1) differentiate the pathological stages of cancer cells under laboratory conditions and 2) permit the extraction of electrical parameters related to cellular information for further analysis. This provides evidence to form the basis of bioimpedance measurement at the cellular level and aids the potential future development of rapid diagnostics from biopsy materials. Three cell lines, representing normal breast epithelia and different pathological stages of breast cancer, have been measured using a standard impedance analyzer driving a four-electrode chamber filled with different cell suspensions. We identify the specific BIS profile for each cell type and determine whether these can be differentiated. In addition, the electrical parameters, e.g., the intracellular conductivity, membrane capacitance/capacity, characteristic frequency, are extracted by the use of equivalent circuit models and physical models to provide details of the cell electric signatures for further analysis of cancer cell pathology. PMID:22692870

  15. The role of non-coding RNAs in the regulation of stem cells and progenitors in the normal mammary gland and in breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    Tordonato, Chiara; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Nicassio, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The outlook on stem cell (SC) biology is shifting from a rigid hierarchical to a more flexible model in which the identity and the behavior of adult SCs, far from being fixed, are determined by the dynamic integration of cell autonomous and non-autonomous mechanisms. Within this framework, the recent discovery of thousands of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) with regulatory function is redefining the landscape of transcriptome regulation, highlighting the interplay of epigenetic, transcriptional, and post-transcriptional mechanisms in the specification of cell fate and in the regulation of developmental processes. Furthermore, the expression of ncRNAs is often tissue- or even cell type-specific, emphasizing their involvement in defining space, time and developmental stages in gene regulation. Such a role of ncRNAs has been investigated in embryonic and induced pluripotent SCs, and in numerous types of adult SCs and progenitors, including those of the breast, which will be the topic of this review. We will focus on ncRNAs with an important role in breast cancer, in particular in mammary cancer SCs and progenitors, and highlight the ncRNA-based circuitries whose subversion alters a number of the epigenetic, transcriptional, and post-transcriptional events that control “stemness” in the physiological setting. PMID:25774169

  16. Multifunctional T Lymphocytes Generated After Therapy With an Antitumor Gallotanin-Rich Normalized Fraction Are Related to Primary Tumor Size Reduction in a Breast Cancer Model.

    PubMed

    Urueña, Claudia; Gomez, Alejandra; Sandoval, Tito; Hernandez, John; Li, Shaoping; Barreto, Alfonso; Fiorentino, Susana

    2015-09-01

    Natural compounds are promising sources for anticancer therapies because of their multifunctional activity and low toxicity. Although the host immune response (IR) is clearly implicated in tumor control, the relationship between natural therapies and IR has not yet been elucidated. The present work evaluates IR induction after treatment with a gallotannin-rich fraction from Caesalpinia spinosa (P2Et). Breast tumor 4T1 cells were used to evaluate antitumor properties and IR activation. Apoptosis and expression of immunogenic cell death (ICD) markers were assessed in vitro, whereas IR and postvaccination tumor evolution were assessed in vivo. P2Et fraction induced apoptotic cell death, displaying phosphatidylserine externalization and DNA fragmentation. ICD markers such as calreticulin, high-mobility group box 1 translocation from nuclei to cytoplasm, and ATP secretion were observed. Primary tumor control was improved by vaccination with P2Et-pretreated 4T1 cells (t-P2Et), yielding long-lasting ex vivo multifunctional CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes (interleukin [IL]-2(+), tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α(+), interferon [IFN]-γ(+)) that secrete IL-2, TNF-α, IL-4, IL-5, and IFN-γ after specific 4T1 cell stimulation. The present study constitutes the first demonstration of a long-lasting antitumor IR induction and primary tumor reduction induced by a complex natural fraction. These data reveal the potential use of this fraction as an adjuvant in breast cancer treatment.

  17. CEACAM1-4S, a cell-cell adhesion molecule, mediates apoptosis and reverts mammary carcinoma cells to a normal morphogenic phenotype in a 3D culture.

    PubMed

    Kirshner, Julia; Chen, Charng-Jui; Liu, Pingfang; Huang, Jie; Shively, John E

    2003-01-21

    In a 3D model of breast morphogenesis, CEACAM1 (carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1) plays an essential role in lumen formation in a subline of the nonmalignant human breast cell line (MCF10A). We show that mammary carcinoma cells (MCF7), which do not express CEACAM1 or form lumena when grown in Matrigel, are restored to a normal morphogenic program when transfected with CEACAM1-4S, the short cytoplasmic isoform of CEACAM1 that predominates in breast epithelia. During the time course of lumen formation, CEACAM1-4S was found initially between the cells, and in mature acini, it was found exclusively in an apical location, identical to its expression pattern in normal breast. Lumena were formed by apoptosis as opposed to necrosis of the central cells within the alveolar structures, and apoptotic cells within the lumena expressed CEACAM1-4S. Dying cells exhibited classical hallmarks of apoptosis, including nuclear condensation, membrane blebbing, caspase activation, and DNA laddering. Apoptosis was mediated by Bax translocation to the mitochondria and release of cytochrome c into the cytoplasm, and was partially inhibited by culturing cells with caspase inhibitors. The dynamic changes in CEACAM1 expression during morphogenesis, together with studies implicating extracellular matrix and integrin signaling, suggest that a morphogenic program integrates cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix signaling to produce the lumena in mammary glands. This report reveals a function of CEACAM1-4S relevant to cellular physiology that distinguishes it from its related long cytoplasmic domain isoform.

  18. Mechanisms of membrane transport of folates into cells and across epithelia.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Rongbao; Diop-Bove, Ndeye; Visentin, Michele; Goldman, I David

    2011-08-21

    Until recently, the transport of folates into cells and across epithelia has been interpreted primarily within the context of two transporters with high affinity and specificity for folates, the reduced folate carrier and the folate receptors. However, there were discrepancies between the properties of these transporters and characteristics of folate transport in many tissues, most notably the intestinal absorption of folates, in terms of pH dependency and substrate specificity. With the recent cloning of the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) and the demonstration that this transporter is mutated in hereditary folate malabsorption, an autosomal recessive disorder, the molecular basis for this low-pH transport activity is now understood. This review focuses on the properties of PCFT and briefly addresses the two other folate-specific transporters along with other facilitative and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters with folate transport activities. The role of these transporters in the vectorial transport of folates across epithelia is considered. PMID:21568705

  19. Cellular Barriers after Extravasation: Leukocyte Interactions with Polarized Epithelia in the Inflamed Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Reglero-Real, Natalia; García-Weber, Diego; Millán, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    During the inflammatory response, immune cells egress from the circulation and follow a chemotactic and haptotactic gradient within the tissue, interacting with matrix components in the stroma and with parenchymal cells, which guide them towards the sites of inflammation. Polarized epithelial cells compartmentalize tissue cavities and are often exposed to inflammatory challenges such as toxics or infections in non-lymphoid tissues. Apicobasal polarity is critical to the specialized functions of these epithelia. Indeed, a common feature of epithelial dysfunction is the loss of polarity. Here we review evidence showing that apicobasal polarity regulates the inflammatory response: various polarized epithelia asymmetrically secrete chemotactic mediators and polarize adhesion receptors that dictate the route of leukocyte migration within the parenchyma. We also discuss recent findings showing that the loss of apicobasal polarity increases leukocyte adhesion to epithelial cells and the consequences that this could have for the inflammatory response towards damaged, infected or transformed epithelial cells. PMID:26941485

  20. Why Are My Breasts Different Sizes?

    MedlinePlus

    ... breasts is perfectly normal. It's quite common for girls to have different-sized breasts or nipples, especially ... its partner — is quite common in humans. When girls begin puberty, usually between the ages of 8 ...

  1. Luminal acetylcholine does not affect the activity of the CFTR in tracheal epithelia of pigs.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Nikolaus P; Kummer, Wolfgang; Clauss, Wolfgang G; Fronius, Martin

    2015-11-01

    Fluid homeostasis mediated by the airway epithelium is required for proper lung function, and the CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) Cl(-) channel is crucial for these processes. Luminal acetylcholine (ACh) acts as an auto-/paracrine mediator to activate Cl(-) channels in airway epithelia and evidence exists showing that nicotinic ACh receptors activate CFTR in murine airway epithelia. The present study investigated whether or not luminal ACh regulates CFTR activity in airway epithelia of pigs, an emerging model for investigations of human airway disease and cystic fibrosis (CF) in particular. Transepithelial ion currents of freshly dissected pig tracheal preparations were measured with Ussing chambers. Application of luminal ACh (100 μM) induced an increase of the short-circuit current (I(SC)). The ACh effect was mimicked by muscarine and pilocarpine (100 μM each) and was sensitive to muscarinic receptor antagonists (atropine, 4-DAMP, pirenzepine). No changes of the I(SC) were observed by nicotine (100 μM) and ACh responses were not affected by nicotine or mecamylamine (25 μM). Luminal application of IBMX (I, 100 μM) and forskolin (F, 10 μM), increase the I(SC) and the I/F-induced current were decreased by the CFTR inhibitor GlyH-101 (GlyH, 50 μM) indicating increased CFTR activity by I/F. In contrast, GlyH did not affect the ACh-induced current, indicating that the ACh response does not involve the activation of the CFTR. Results from this study suggest that luminal ACh does not regulate the activity of the CFTR in tracheal epithelia of pigs which opposes observation from studies using mice airway epithelium.

  2. Luminal acetylcholine does not affect the activity of the CFTR in tracheal epithelia of pigs.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Nikolaus P; Kummer, Wolfgang; Clauss, Wolfgang G; Fronius, Martin

    2015-11-01

    Fluid homeostasis mediated by the airway epithelium is required for proper lung function, and the CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) Cl(-) channel is crucial for these processes. Luminal acetylcholine (ACh) acts as an auto-/paracrine mediator to activate Cl(-) channels in airway epithelia and evidence exists showing that nicotinic ACh receptors activate CFTR in murine airway epithelia. The present study investigated whether or not luminal ACh regulates CFTR activity in airway epithelia of pigs, an emerging model for investigations of human airway disease and cystic fibrosis (CF) in particular. Transepithelial ion currents of freshly dissected pig tracheal preparations were measured with Ussing chambers. Application of luminal ACh (100 μM) induced an increase of the short-circuit current (I(SC)). The ACh effect was mimicked by muscarine and pilocarpine (100 μM each) and was sensitive to muscarinic receptor antagonists (atropine, 4-DAMP, pirenzepine). No changes of the I(SC) were observed by nicotine (100 μM) and ACh responses were not affected by nicotine or mecamylamine (25 μM). Luminal application of IBMX (I, 100 μM) and forskolin (F, 10 μM), increase the I(SC) and the I/F-induced current were decreased by the CFTR inhibitor GlyH-101 (GlyH, 50 μM) indicating increased CFTR activity by I/F. In contrast, GlyH did not affect the ACh-induced current, indicating that the ACh response does not involve the activation of the CFTR. Results from this study suggest that luminal ACh does not regulate the activity of the CFTR in tracheal epithelia of pigs which opposes observation from studies using mice airway epithelium. PMID:26286842

  3. ID4 controls luminal lineage commitment in normal mammary epithelium and inhibits BRCA1 function in basal-like breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Baker, Laura A; Holliday, Holly; Swarbrick, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Inhibitor of differentiation (ID) proteins are key regulators of development and tumorigenesis. One member of this family, ID4, controls lineage commitment during mammary gland development by acting upstream of key developmental pathways. Recent evidence suggests an emerging role for ID4 as a lineage-dependent proto-oncogene that is overexpressed and amplified in a subset of basal-like breast cancers (BLBCs), conferring poor prognosis. Several lines of evidence suggest ID4 may suppress BRCA1 function in BLBC and in doing so, define a subset of BLBC patients who may respond to therapies traditionally used in BRCA1-mutant cancers. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of the requirement for ID4 in mammary lineage commitment and the role for ID4 in BLBC. We address current shortfalls in this field and identify important areas of future research. PMID:27412917

  4. Identification of differentially expressed genes from multipotent epithelia at the onset of an asexual development

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Lorenzo; Chaurasia, Ankita; Lapébie, Pascal; Dru, Philippe; Helm, Rebecca R.; Copley, Richard R.; Tiozzo, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Organisms that have evolved alternative modes of reproduction, complementary to the sexual mode, are found across metazoans. The chordate Botryllus schlosseri is an emerging model for asexual development studies. Botryllus can rebuild its entire body from a portion of adult epithelia in a continuous and stereotyped process called blastogenesis. Anatomy and ontogenies of blastogenesis are well described, however molecular signatures triggering this developmental process are entirely unknown. We isolated tissues at the site of blastogenesis onset and from the same epithelia where this process is never triggered. We linearly amplified an ultra-low amount of mRNA (<10ng) and generated three transcriptome datasets. To provide a conservative landscape of transcripts differentially expressed between blastogenic vs. non-blastogenic epithelia we compared three different mapping and analysis strategies with a de novo assembled transcriptome and partially assembled genome as references, additionally a self-mapping strategy on the dataset. A subset of differentially expressed genes were analyzed and validated by in situ hybridization. The comparison of different analyses allowed us to isolate stringent sets of target genes, including transcripts with potential involvement in the onset of a non-embryonic developmental pathway. The results provide a good entry point to approach regenerative event in a basal chordate. PMID:27264734

  5. Differential and Cooperative Cell Adhesion Regulates Cellular Pattern in Sensory Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Togashi, Hideru

    2016-01-01

    Animal tissues are composed of multiple cell types arranged in complex and elaborate patterns. In sensory epithelia, including the auditory epithelium and olfactory epithelium, different types of cells are arranged in unique mosaic patterns. These mosaic patterns are evolutionarily conserved, and are thought to be important for hearing and olfaction. Recent progress has provided accumulating evidence that the cellular pattern formation in epithelia involves cell rearrangements, movements, and shape changes. These morphogenetic processes are largely mediated by intercellular adhesion systems. Differential adhesion and cortical tension have been proposed to promote cell rearrangements. Many different types of cells in tissues express various types of cell adhesion molecules. Although cooperative mechanisms between multiple adhesive systems are likely to contribute to the production of complex cell patterns, our current understanding of the cooperative roles between multiple adhesion systems is insufficient to entirely explain the complex mechanisms underlying cellular patterning. Recent studies have revealed that nectins, in cooperation with cadherins, are crucial for the mosaic cellular patterning in sensory organs. The nectin and cadherin systems are interacted with one another, and these interactions provide cells with differential adhesive affinities for complex cellular pattern formations in sensory epithelia, which cannot be achieved by a single mechanism.

  6. Identification of differentially expressed genes from multipotent epithelia at the onset of an asexual development.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Lorenzo; Chaurasia, Ankita; Lapébie, Pascal; Dru, Philippe; Helm, Rebecca R; Copley, Richard R; Tiozzo, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Organisms that have evolved alternative modes of reproduction, complementary to the sexual mode, are found across metazoans. The chordate Botryllus schlosseri is an emerging model for asexual development studies. Botryllus can rebuild its entire body from a portion of adult epithelia in a continuous and stereotyped process called blastogenesis. Anatomy and ontogenies of blastogenesis are well described, however molecular signatures triggering this developmental process are entirely unknown. We isolated tissues at the site of blastogenesis onset and from the same epithelia where this process is never triggered. We linearly amplified an ultra-low amount of mRNA (<10ng) and generated three transcriptome datasets. To provide a conservative landscape of transcripts differentially expressed between blastogenic vs. non-blastogenic epithelia we compared three different mapping and analysis strategies with a de novo assembled transcriptome and partially assembled genome as references, additionally a self-mapping strategy on the dataset. A subset of differentially expressed genes were analyzed and validated by in situ hybridization. The comparison of different analyses allowed us to isolate stringent sets of target genes, including transcripts with potential involvement in the onset of a non-embryonic developmental pathway. The results provide a good entry point to approach regenerative event in a basal chordate. PMID:27264734

  7. Loss of anion transport without increased sodium absorption characterizes newborn porcine cystic fibrosis airway epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jeng-Haur; Stoltz, David A.; Karp, Philip H.; Ernst, Sarah E.; Pezzulo, Alejandro A.; Moninger, Thomas O.; Rector, Michael V.; Reznikov, Leah R.; Launspach, Janice L.; Chaloner, Kathryn; Zabner, Joseph; Welsh, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Defective transepithelial electrolyte transport is thought to initiate cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Yet, how loss of CFTR affects electrolyte transport remains uncertain. CFTR−/− pigs spontaneously develop lung disease resembling human CF. At birth, their airways exhibit a bacterial host defense defect, but are not inflamed. Therefore, we studied ion transport in newborn nasal and tracheal/bronchial epithelia in tissue, cultures, and in vivo. CFTR−/− epithelia showed markedly reduced Cl− and HCO3− transport. However, in contrast to a widely held view, lack of CFTR did not increase transepithelial Na+ or liquid absorption or reduce periciliary liquid depth. Like human CF, CFTR−/− pigs showed increased amiloride-sensitive voltage and current, but lack of apical Cl− conductance caused the change, not increased Na+ transport. These results indicate that CFTR provides the predominant transcellular pathway for Cl− and HCO3− in porcine airway epithelia, and reduced anion permeability may initiate CF airway disease. PMID:21145458

  8. Differential and Cooperative Cell Adhesion Regulates Cellular Pattern in Sensory Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Togashi, Hideru

    2016-01-01

    Animal tissues are composed of multiple cell types arranged in complex and elaborate patterns. In sensory epithelia, including the auditory epithelium and olfactory epithelium, different types of cells are arranged in unique mosaic patterns. These mosaic patterns are evolutionarily conserved, and are thought to be important for hearing and olfaction. Recent progress has provided accumulating evidence that the cellular pattern formation in epithelia involves cell rearrangements, movements, and shape changes. These morphogenetic processes are largely mediated by intercellular adhesion systems. Differential adhesion and cortical tension have been proposed to promote cell rearrangements. Many different types of cells in tissues express various types of cell adhesion molecules. Although cooperative mechanisms between multiple adhesive systems are likely to contribute to the production of complex cell patterns, our current understanding of the cooperative roles between multiple adhesion systems is insufficient to entirely explain the complex mechanisms underlying cellular patterning. Recent studies have revealed that nectins, in cooperation with cadherins, are crucial for the mosaic cellular patterning in sensory organs. The nectin and cadherin systems are interacted with one another, and these interactions provide cells with differential adhesive affinities for complex cellular pattern formations in sensory epithelia, which cannot be achieved by a single mechanism. PMID:27695692

  9. Influence of exercise on airway epithelia in cystic fibrosis: a review.

    PubMed

    Cholewa, Jason Michael; Paolone, Vincent J

    2012-07-01

    Regular exercise is recommended as part of cystic fibrosis (CF) physiotherapy. Exercise delays the development of pulmonary disease in CF patients; however, the cellular mechanisms responsible for these improvements are unclear. This review expands on the hypothesis that exercise improves CF pathophysiological ion dysregulation via purinergic and adrenergic pathways by describing the effects of 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), and arginine-vasopressin (AVP) on CF airway epithelia. Activation of AMPK decreases Na(+) absorption, increases airway surface liquid, and reduces oxidative stress and inflammation. Plasma ANP inhibits the basolateral Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and may therefore reduce epithelial water absorption. Airway epithelia respond to plasma AVP and secrete AVP in response to elevated bradykinin. AVP stimulates the basolateral Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) exchanger, thereby increasing Cl(-) secretion, reducing Na(+) absorption, and promoting basolateral to luminal water flux. In addition, AVP may increase cilia beat frequency in airway epithelia via a Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism. This review will describe the effects of exercise on AMPK activation, ANP release, and AVP secretion; we hypothesize that the mechanical and metabolic perturbations that occur with exercise may be beneficial in preventing CF lung pathogenesis by improving airway hydration, mucociliary clearance, and reducing markers of inflammation. PMID:22297805

  10. Identification of differentially expressed genes from multipotent epithelia at the onset of an asexual development.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Lorenzo; Chaurasia, Ankita; Lapébie, Pascal; Dru, Philippe; Helm, Rebecca R; Copley, Richard R; Tiozzo, Stefano

    2016-06-06

    Organisms that have evolved alternative modes of reproduction, complementary to the sexual mode, are found across metazoans. The chordate Botryllus schlosseri is an emerging model for asexual development studies. Botryllus can rebuild its entire body from a portion of adult epithelia in a continuous and stereotyped process called blastogenesis. Anatomy and ontogenies of blastogenesis are well described, however molecular signatures triggering this developmental process are entirely unknown. We isolated tissues at the site of blastogenesis onset and from the same epithelia where this process is never triggered. We linearly amplified an ultra-low amount of mRNA (<10ng) and generated three transcriptome datasets. To provide a conservative landscape of transcripts differentially expressed between blastogenic vs. non-blastogenic epithelia we compared three different mapping and analysis strategies with a de novo assembled transcriptome and partially assembled genome as references, additionally a self-mapping strategy on the dataset. A subset of differentially expressed genes were analyzed and validated by in situ hybridization. The comparison of different analyses allowed us to isolate stringent sets of target genes, including transcripts with potential involvement in the onset of a non-embryonic developmental pathway. The results provide a good entry point to approach regenerative event in a basal chordate.

  11. Posterior midgut epithelial cells differ in their organization of the membrane skeleton from other drosophila epithelia.

    PubMed

    Baumann, O

    2001-11-01

    In epithelial cells, the various components of the membrane skeleton are segregated within specialized subregions of the plasma membrane, thus contributing to the development and stabilization of cell surface polarity. It has previously been shown that, in various Drosophila epithelia, the membrane skeleton components ankyrin and alphabeta-spectrin reside at the lateral surface, whereas alphabeta(H)-spectrin is restricted to the apical domain. By use of confocal immunofluorescence microscopy, the present study characterizes the membrane skeleton of epithelial cells in the posterior midgut, leading to a number of unexpected results. First, ankyrin and alphabeta-spectrin are not detected on the entire lateral surface but appear to be restricted to the apicolateral area, codistributing with fasciclin III at smooth septate junctions. The presumptive ankyrin-binding proteins neuroglian and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, however, do not colocalize with ankyrin. Second, alphabeta(H)-spectrin is enriched at the apical domain but is also present in lower amounts on the entire lateral surface, colocalizing apicolaterally with ankyrin/alphabeta-spectrin. Finally, despite the absence of zonulae adherentes, F-actin, beta(H)-spectrin, and nonmuscle myosin-II are enriched in the midlateral region. Thus, the model established for the organization of the membrane skeleton in Drosophila epithelia does not hold for the posterior midgut, and there is quite some variability between the different epithelia with respect to the organization of the membrane skeleton.

  12. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4-dependent calcium influx and ATP release in mouse and rat gastric epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Mihara, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Boudaka, Ammar Abdullkader; Muhammad, Jibran Sualeh; Tominaga, Makoto; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To explore the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) and its physiological meaning in mouse and rat gastric epithelia. METHODS: RT-PCR and immunochemistry were used to detect TRPV4 mRNA and protein expression in mouse stomach and a rat normal gastric epithelial cell line (RGE1-01), while Ca2+-imaging and electrophysiology were used to evaluate TRPV4 channel activity. ATP release was measured by a luciferin-luciferase assay. Gastric emptying was also compared between WT and TRPV4 knockout mice. RESULTS: TRPV4 mRNA and protein were detected in mouse tissues and RGE1-01 cells. A TRPV4-specific agonist (GSK1016790A) increased intracellular Ca2+ concentrations and/or evoked TRPV4-like current activities in WT mouse gastric epithelial cells and RGE1-01 cells, but not TRPV4KO cells. GSK1016790A or mechanical stimuli induced ATP release from RGE1-01 cells while TRPV4 knockout mice displayed delayed gastric emptying in vivo. CONCLUSION: TRPV4 is expressed in mouse and rat gastric epithelium and contributes to ATP release and gastric emptying. PMID:27350729

  13. What Is Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Types of breast cancers What is breast cancer? Breast cancer starts when cells in the breast ... breast cancer? ” and Non-cancerous Breast Conditions . How Breast Cancer Spreads Breast cancer can spread through the lymph ...

  14. Optimal reference genes for normalization of qRT-PCR data from archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded breast tumors controlling for tumor cell content and decay of mRNA.

    PubMed

    Tramm, Trine; Sørensen, Brita S; Overgaard, Jens; Alsner, Jan

    2013-09-01

    Reliable determination of gene-expression levels from qRT-PCR requires accurate normalization of target genes to reference genes in order to remove nonbiological variation. Reference genes are ideally constitutively expressed in every cell, but many genes used for normalization has been shown to vary with tissue type, cellular proliferation, cancer progression, and degradation of nucleic acids. Gene-expression analysis is increasingly performed on degraded mRNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue (FFPE), giving the option of examining retrospective cohorts. The aim of this study was to select robust reference genes showing stable expression over time in FFPE, controlling for various content of tumor tissue and decay of mRNA because of variable length of storage of the tissue. Sixteen reference genes were quantified by qRT-PCR in 40 FFPE breast tumor samples, stored for 1 to 29 years. Samples included 2 benign lesions and 38 carcinomas with varying tumor content. Stability of the reference genes were determined by the geNorm algorithm. mRNA was successfully extracted from all samples, and the 16 genes quantified in the majority of samples. Results showed 14% loss of amplifiable mRNA per year, corresponding to a half-life of 4.6 years. The 4 most stable expressed genes were CALM2, RPL37A, ACTB, and RPLP0. Several of the other examined genes showed considerably instability over time (GAPDH, PSMC4, OAZ1, IPO8). In conclusion, we identified 4 genes robustly expressed over time and independent of neoplastic tissue content in the FFPE block. Other widely used reference genes were concluded to be less suited for retrospective analysis of FFPE breast samples.

  15. The Non-Proliferative Nature of Ascidian Folliculogenesis as a Model of Highly Ordered Cellular Topology Distinct from Proliferative Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Azzag, Karim; Chelin, Yoann; Rousset, François; Le Goff, Emilie; Martinand-Mari, Camille; Martinez, Anne-Marie; Maurin, Bernard; Daujat-Chavanieu, Martine; Godefroy, Nelly; Averseng, Julien; Mangeat, Paul; Baghdiguian, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have addressed why and how mono‐stratified epithelia adopt a polygonal topology. One major additional, and yet unanswered question is how the frequency of different cell shapes is achieved and whether the same distribution applies between non-proliferative and proliferative epithelia. We compared different proliferative and non-proliferative epithelia from a range of organisms as well as Drosophila melanogaster mutants, deficient for apoptosis or hyperproliferative. We show that the distribution of cell shapes in non‐proliferative epithelia (follicular cells of five species of tunicates) is distinctly, and more stringently organized than proliferative ones (cultured epithelial cells and Drosophila melanogaster imaginal discs). The discrepancy is not supported by geometrical constraints (spherical versus flat monolayers), number of cells, or apoptosis events. We have developed a theoretical model of epithelial morphogenesis, based on the physics of divided media, that takes into account biological parameters such as cell‐cell contact adhesions and tensions, cell and tissue growth, and which reproduces the effects of proliferation by increasing the topological heterogeneity observed experimentally. We therefore present a model for the morphogenesis of epithelia where, in a proliferative context, an extended distribution of cell shapes (range of 4 to 10 neighbors per cell) contrasts with the narrower range of 5-7 neighbors per cell that characterizes non proliferative epithelia. PMID:26000769

  16. The role of intracellular calcium signals in inflammatory responses of polarised cystic fibrosis human airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Carla Maria Pedrosa

    2006-01-01

    Hyperinflammatory host responses to bacterial infection have been postulated to be a key step in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Previous studies have indicated that the CF airway epithelium itself contributes to the hyperinflammation of CF airways via an excessive inflammatory response to bacterial infection. However, it has been controversial whether the hyperinflammation of CF epithelia results from mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and/or is a consequence of persistent airways infection. Recent studies have demonstrated that intracellular calcium (Ca2+i) signals consequent to activation of apical G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) by pro-inflammatory mediators are increased in CF airway epithelia. Because of the relationship between Ca2+i mobilisation and inflammatory responses, the mechanism for the increased Ca2+i signals in CF was investigated and found to result from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ store expansion. The ER Ca2+ store expansion imparts a hyperinflammatory phenotype to chronically infected airway epithelia as a result of the larger Ca2+i mobilisation coupled to an excessive inflammatory response following GPCR activation. The ER expansion is not dependent on ER retention of misfolded DeltaF508 CFTR, but reflects an epithelial response acquired following persistent luminal airway infection. With respect to the mechanism of ER expansion in CF, the current view is that chronic airway epithelial infection triggers an unfolded protein response as a result of the increased flux of newly synthesised inflammatory mediators and defensive factors into the ER compartment. This unfolded protein response is coupled to X-box binding protein 1 (XBP-1) mRNA splicing and transcription of genes associated with the expansion of the protein-folding capacity of the ER (e.g. increases in ER chaperones and ER membranes). These studies have revealed a novel adaptive response in chronically infected airway epithelia

  17. Dense Breasts

    MedlinePlus

    ... woman’s breasts. It is most commonly determined using mammography, a diagnostic test that uses low dose x- ... woman’s breasts, which is most commonly determined through mammography. The breast is made up of glandular, connective, ...

  18. Breast Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Most women experience breast changes at some time. Your age, hormone levels, and medicines you take may cause lumps, bumps, and discharges (fluids that are not breast milk). If you have a breast lump, pain, ...

  19. Ultrastructural and immunohistochemical localization of plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase 4 in Ca2+-transporting epithelia.

    PubMed

    Alexander, R Todd; Beggs, Megan R; Zamani, Reza; Marcussen, Niels; Frische, Sebastian; Dimke, Henrik

    2015-10-01

    Plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPases (PMCAs) participate in epithelial Ca(2+) transport and intracellular Ca(2+) signaling. The Pmca4 isoform is enriched in distal nephron isolates and decreased in mice lacking the epithelial transient receptor potential vanilloid 5 Ca(2+) channel. We therefore hypothesized that Pmca4 plays a significant role in transcellular Ca(2+) flux and investigated the localization and regulation of Pmca4 in Ca(2+)-transporting epithelia. Using antibodies directed specifically against Pmca4, we found it expressed only in the smooth muscle layer of mouse and human intestines, whereas pan-specific Pmca antibodies detected Pmca1 in lateral membranes of enterocytes. In the kidney, Pmca4 showed broad localization to the distal nephron. In the mouse, expression was most abundant in segments coexpressing the epithelial ransient receptor potential vanilloid 5 Ca(2+) channel. Significant, albeit lower, expression was also evident in the region encompassing the cortical thick ascending limbs, macula densa, and early distal tubules as well as smooth muscle layers surrounding renal vessels. In the human kidney, a similar pattern of distribution was observed, with the highest PMCA4 expression in Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter-positive tubules. Electron microscopy demonstrated Pmca4 localization in distal nephron cells at both the basolateral membrane and intracellular perinuclear compartments but not submembranous vesicles, suggesting rapid trafficking to the plasma membrane is unlikely to occur in vivo. Pmca4 expression was not altered by perturbations in Ca(2+) balance, pointing to a housekeeping function of the pump in Ca(2+)-transporting epithelia. In conclusion, Pmca4 shows a divergent expression pattern in Ca(2+)-transporting epithelia, inferring diverse roles for this isoform not limited to transepithelial Ca(2+) transport. PMID:26180241

  20. Proteomic analysis of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) intestinal epithelia: physiological acclimation to short-term starvation.

    PubMed

    Baumgarner, Bradley L; Bharadwaj, Anant S; Inerowicz, Dorota; Goodman, Angela S; Brown, Paul B

    2013-03-01

    The intestinal epithelia form the first line of defense against harmful agents in the gut lumen of most monogastric vertebrates, including teleost fishes. Previous investigations into the effect of starvation on the intestinal epithelia of teleost fishes have focused primarily on changes in morphological characteristics and targeted molecular analysis of specific enzymes. The goal of this study was to use a comprehensive approach to help reveal how the intestinal epithelia of carnivorous teleost fishes acclimate to short-term nutrient deprivation. We utilized two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) to conduct the proteomic analysis of the mucosal and epithelial layer of the anterior gut intestinal tract (GIT) from satiation fed vs. 4 week starved rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). A total of 40 proteins were determined to be differentially expressed and were subsequently picked for in-gel trypsin digestion. Peptide mass fingerprint analysis was conducted using matrix assisted laser desorption time-of-flight/time-of-flight. Nine of the 11 positively identified proteins were directly related to innate immunity. The expression of α-1 proteinase inhibitor decreased in starved vs. fed fish. Also, the concentration of one leukocyte elastase inhibitor (LEI) isomer decreased in starved fish, though the concentration of another LEI isomer increased in due to starvation. In addition, starvation promoted an increased concentration of the important xenobiotic-transporter p-glycoprotein. Finally, starvation resulted in a significant increase in type II keratin E2. Overall, our results indicate that starvation promoted a reduced capacity to inhibit enzymatic stress but increased xenobiotic resistance and paracellular permeability of epithelial cells in the anterior intestine of rainbow trout.

  1. Models for study of the specificity by which indigenous lactobacilli adhere to murine gastric epithelia.

    PubMed

    Kotarski, S F; Savage, D C

    1979-12-01

    A Lactobacillus strain isolated from a mouse (indigenous) and another strain isolated from swine feces (nonindigenous) were compared in two model systems for their ability to adhere in vitro and in vivo to keratinizing squamous and columnar epithelia of mouse stomachs. In one model, stomachs dissected from specific-pathogen-free or germfree mice were injected with suspensions of lactobacilli labeled with [(3)H]thymidine and incubated at 37 degrees C. Thereafter, the non-secreting and secreting tissues were separated and washed vigorously. The radioactivity remaining with each tissue was counted by liquid scintillation spectrometry. When the radioactivity remaining with these tissues ranged between 500 and 100,000 cpm, the calculated radioactivity (disintegrations per minute) was related linearly to the number of lactobacilli adhering to the tissue. The estimate of the number of bacteria adherent to the tissue was not influenced significantly by artifacts in the techniques used. In this model, both Lactobacillus strains adhered in equally high numbers to both types of epithelial surfaces from stomachs from germfree mice. In contrast, in the second model, in which germfree mice were monoassociated with one or the other of the Lactobacillus strains, only the strain indigenous to the mouse formed dense layers on the epithelia of the nonsecreting portions of the stomachs, although both strains maintained high population levels throughout the gastrointestinal tracts of the animals. The capacity to adhere to the mucosal surface is undoubtedly necessary for lactobacilli to colonize gastric epithelia in mice. Our findings suggest, however, that nutritional or environmental conditions dictate whether particular Lactobacillus strains can colonize particular surfaces in the stomachs of living animals.

  2. Expression and localization of aqua-glyceroporins AQP3 and AQP9 in rat oral epithelia.

    PubMed

    Poveda, Marlene; Hashimoto, Sadamitsu; Enokiya, Yasunobu; Matsuki-Fukushima, Miwako; Sasaki, Hodaka; Sakurai, Kaoru; Shimono, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are a family of small integral membrane proteins made up of 6 hydrophobic, a-helical, membrane-spanning domains surrounding a highly selective aqueous pore. AQP3, AQP7, and AQP9, termed aqua-glyceroporins, are known to be involved in the transport of water, glycerol, and other small molecules. In this study, we investigated the expression and localization of aqua-glyceroporins in rat oral stratified squamous epithelia of the palate, the buccal mucosa, the inferior aspect of the tongue, and the oral floor by using RT-PCR, immunofluorescence, and immunogold electron microscopy. AQP3 and AQP9 mRNAs were expressed in whole oral epithelium. Immunostaining for AQP3 was recognized in each type of epithelium. The results suggest that AQP3 synthesis begins predominantly in the cytoplasm of the basal cells. During the process of epithelial cell differentiation, AQP3 protein appears to accumulate and be transported to the plasma membrane, from where it is incorporated into the cornified or surface layers. The intracellular localization of AQP3 appears to correlate with the differentiation of keratinocytes, suggesting that it acts as an enhancer of the physiological permeability barrier together with membrane coating granules. The distribution pattern of AQP9 was limited to the marginal areas of the basal and suprabasal layers, which was different from that of AQP3. This difference in distribution between AQP3 and AQP9 suggests that AQP9 in rat oral epithelia acts as a channel by facilitating glycerol uptake from the blood through the endothelial cells of the capillary vessels to the oral stratified squamous epithelium. AQP3 and AQP9 facilitate both transcellular osmotic water flow and glycerol transport as pore-like passive transporters in the keratinocytes of oral epithelia, and may play a key role in not only hydration and the permeability barrier, but also cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, development, and wound healing by generating ATP.

  3. EPHA7 and EPHA10 Physically Interact and Differentially Co-localize in Normal Breast and Breast Carcinoma Cell Lines, and the Co-localization Pattern Is Altered in EPHB6-expressing MDA-MB-231 Cells.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Candace; Segovia, Briana; Kandpal, Raj P

    Erythropoietin-producing hepatocellular carcinoma cell (EPH) receptors comprise the most abundant receptor tyrosine kinase family characterized to date in mammals including humans. These proteins are involved in axon guidance, tissue organization, vascular development and the intricate process of various diseases including cancer. These diverse functions of EPH receptors are attributed, in part, to their abilities for heterodimerization. While the interacting partners of kinase-deficient EPHB6 receptor have been characterized, the interaction of the kinase-dead EPHA10 with any other receptor has not been identified. By using co-immunoprecipitation, we demonstrated physical interaction between kinase-deficient EPHA10 with kinase-sufficient EPHA7 receptor. Immunocytochemical analyses have revealed that these two receptors co-localize on the cell surface, and soluble portions of the receptors exist as a complex in the cytoplasm as well as the nuclei. While EPHA7 and EPHA10 co-localize similarly on the membrane in MCF10A and MCF7 cells, they were differentially co-localized in MDA-MB-231 cells stably transfected with empty pcDNA vector (MDA-MB-231-PC) or an expression construct of EPHB6 (MDA-MB-231-B6). The full-length isoforms of these receptors were co-localized on the cell surface, and the soluble forms were present as a complex in the cytoplasm as well as the nucleus in MDA-MB-231-PC cells. MDA-MB-231-B6 cells, on the other hand, were distinguished by the absence of any signal in the nuclei. Our results represent the first demonstration of physical interaction between EPHA10 and EPHA7 and their cellular co-localization. Furthermore, these observations also suggest gene-regulatory functions of the complex of the soluble forms of these receptors in breast carcinoma cells of differential invasiveness. PMID:27566654

  4. Androgens and the breast.

    PubMed

    Dimitrakakis, Constantine; Bondy, Carolyn

    2009-01-01

    Androgens have important physiological effects in women while at the same time they may be implicated in breast cancer pathologies. However, data on the effects of androgens on mammary epithelial proliferation and/or breast cancer incidence are not in full agreement. We performed a literature review evaluating current clinical, genetic and epidemiological data regarding the role of androgens in mammary growth and neoplasia. Epidemiological studies appear to have significant methodological limitations and thus provide inconclusive results. The study of molecular defects involving androgenic pathways in breast cancer is still in its infancy. Clinical and nonhuman primate studies suggest that androgens inhibit mammary epithelial proliferation and breast growth while conventional estrogen treatment suppresses endogenous androgens. Abundant clinical evidence suggests that androgens normally inhibit mammary epithelial proliferation and breast growth. Suppression of androgens using conventional estrogen treatment may thus enhance estrogenic breast stimulation and possibly breast cancer risk. Addition of testosterone to the usual hormone therapy regimen may diminish the estrogen/progestin increase in breast cancer risk but the impact of this combined use on mammary gland homeostasis still needs evaluation.

  5. Androgens and the breast

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Androgens have important physiological effects in women while at the same time they may be implicated in breast cancer pathologies. However, data on the effects of androgens on mammary epithelial proliferation and/or breast cancer incidence are not in full agreement. We performed a literature review evaluating current clinical, genetic and epidemiological data regarding the role of androgens in mammary growth and neoplasia. Epidemiological studies appear to have significant methodological limitations and thus provide inconclusive results. The study of molecular defects involving androgenic pathways in breast cancer is still in its infancy. Clinical and nonhuman primate studies suggest that androgens inhibit mammary epithelial proliferation and breast growth while conventional estrogen treatment suppresses endogenous androgens. Abundant clinical evidence suggests that androgens normally inhibit mammary epithelial proliferation and breast growth. Suppression of androgens using conventional estrogen treatment may thus enhance estrogenic breast stimulation and possibly breast cancer risk. Addition of testosterone to the usual hormone therapy regimen may diminish the estrogen/progestin increase in breast cancer risk but the impact of this combined use on mammary gland homeostasis still needs evaluation. PMID:19889198

  6. Murine breast carcinoma 4T1 cells are more sensitive to atranorin than normal epithelial NMuMG cells in vitro: Anticancer and hepatoprotective effects of atranorin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Solár, Peter; Hrčková, Gabriela; Koptašíková, Lenka; Velebný, Samuel; Solárová, Zuzana; Bačkor, Martin

    2016-04-25

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the anticancer effect of atranorin (ATR) on murine 4T1 breast carcinoma cells and compare its sensitivity with normal mammary epithelial NMuMG cells in vitro. Anti-tumor and hepatoprotective activity of ATR-therapy was examined on mouse model of 4T1-induced cancer disease. ATR significantly reduced clonogenic ability of carcinoma 4T1 cells at the concentration of 75 μM, but clonogenicity of normal NMuMG cells was not affected by any of ATR concentrations tested. Moreover, flow cytometric and BrdU incorporation analysis did not confirm the inhibited entry into S-phase of the cell cyle after ATR incubation, and on the contrary, it induced apoptosis associated with the activation of caspase-3 and PARP cleavage in 4T1 cells. Although ATR did not cause any significant changes in Bcl-xL protein expression in NMuMG cells, an apparent depletion of Bcl-xL protein in 4T1 cells after 48 h ATR therapy was confirmed. Based on this result as well as the result of the total cell number decline, we can conclude that 4T1 cells are more sensitive to ATR therapy than NMuMG cells. ATR administration resulted in significantly longer survival time of BALB/c mice inoculated with 4T1 cells, what was associated with reduced tumor size and the higher numbers of apoptotic 4T1 cells. No differences were recorded in the number of BrdU-positive tumor cells between ATR-treated group and controls. Results indicate that ATR has rather proapoptotic than antiproliferative effect on 4T1 cells in vitro and in vivo and normal NMuMG cells are less sensitive to ATR. Furthermore, our studies revealed protective effect of ATR against oxidative stress in the livers of the tumor-bearing mice. PMID:26969521

  7. Murine breast carcinoma 4T1 cells are more sensitive to atranorin than normal epithelial NMuMG cells in vitro: Anticancer and hepatoprotective effects of atranorin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Solár, Peter; Hrčková, Gabriela; Koptašíková, Lenka; Velebný, Samuel; Solárová, Zuzana; Bačkor, Martin

    2016-04-25

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the anticancer effect of atranorin (ATR) on murine 4T1 breast carcinoma cells and compare its sensitivity with normal mammary epithelial NMuMG cells in vitro. Anti-tumor and hepatoprotective activity of ATR-therapy was examined on mouse model of 4T1-induced cancer disease. ATR significantly reduced clonogenic ability of carcinoma 4T1 cells at the concentration of 75 μM, but clonogenicity of normal NMuMG cells was not affected by any of ATR concentrations tested. Moreover, flow cytometric and BrdU incorporation analysis did not confirm the inhibited entry into S-phase of the cell cyle after ATR incubation, and on the contrary, it induced apoptosis associated with the activation of caspase-3 and PARP cleavage in 4T1 cells. Although ATR did not cause any significant changes in Bcl-xL protein expression in NMuMG cells, an apparent depletion of Bcl-xL protein in 4T1 cells after 48 h ATR therapy was confirmed. Based on this result as well as the result of the total cell number decline, we can conclude that 4T1 cells are more sensitive to ATR therapy than NMuMG cells. ATR administration resulted in significantly longer survival time of BALB/c mice inoculated with 4T1 cells, what was associated with reduced tumor size and the higher numbers of apoptotic 4T1 cells. No differences were recorded in the number of BrdU-positive tumor cells between ATR-treated group and controls. Results indicate that ATR has rather proapoptotic than antiproliferative effect on 4T1 cells in vitro and in vivo and normal NMuMG cells are less sensitive to ATR. Furthermore, our studies revealed protective effect of ATR against oxidative stress in the livers of the tumor-bearing mice.

  8. Breast MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    MRI - breast; Magnetic resonance imaging - breast; Breast cancer - MRI; Breast cancer screening - MRI ... the same breast or the other breast after breast cancer has been diagnosed Distinguish between scar tissue and ...

  9. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 as a key signaling pathway in normal mammary gland developmental biology and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Furth, Priscilla A; Nakles, Rebecca E; Millman, Sarah; Diaz-Cruz, Edgar S; Cabrera, M Carla

    2011-10-12

    STAT5 consists of two proteins, STAT5A/B, that impact mammary cell differentiation, proliferation, and survival. In normal development, STAT5 expression and activity are regulated by prolactin signaling with JAK2/ELF5, EGF signaling networks that include c-Src, and growth hormone, insulin growth factor, estrogen, and progesterone signaling pathways. In cancer, erythropoietin signaling can also regulate STAT5. Activation levels are influenced by AKT, caveolin, PIKE-A, Pak1, c-Myb, Brk, beta-integrin, dystroglycan, other STATs, and STAT pathway molecules JAK1, Shp2, and SOCS. TGF-β and PTPN9 can downregulate prolactin- and EGF-mediated STAT5 activation, respectively. IGF, AKT, RANKL, cyclin D1, BCL6, and HSP90A lie downstream of STAT5.

  10. Laminin and biomimetic extracellular elasticity enhance functional differentiation in mammary epithelia

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaraz, Jordi; Xu, Ren; Mori, Hidetoshi; Nelson, Celeste M.; Mroue, Rana; Spencer, Virginia A.; Brownfield, Doug; Radisky, Derek C.; Bustamante, Carlos; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-10-20

    In the mammary gland, epithelial cells are embedded in a 'soft' environment and become functionally differentiated in culture when exposed to a laminin-rich extracellular matrix gel. Here, we define the processes by which mammary epithelial cells integrate biochemical and mechanical extracellular cues to maintain their differentiated phenotype. We used single cells cultured on top of gels in conditions permissive for {beta}-casein expression using atomic force microscopy to measure the elasticity of the cells and their underlying substrata. We found that maintenance of {beta}-casein expression required both laminin signalling and a 'soft' extracellular matrix, as is the case in normal tissues in vivo, and biomimetic intracellular elasticity, as is the case in primary mammary epithelial organoids. Conversely, two hallmarks of breast cancer development, stiffening of the extracellular matrix and loss of laminin signalling, led to the loss of {beta}-casein expression and non-biomimetic intracellular elasticity. Our data indicate that tissue-specific gene expression is controlled by both the tissues unique biochemical milieu and mechanical properties, processes involved in maintenance of tissue integrity and protection against tumorigenesis.

  11. Laminin and biomimetic extracellular elasticity enhance functional differentiation in mammary epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Alcaraz, Jordi; Xu, Ren; Mori, Hidetoshi; Nelson, Celeste M; Mroue, Rana; Spencer, Virginia A; Brownfield, Doug; Radisky, Derek C; Bustamante, Carlos; Bissell, Mina J

    2008-01-01

    In the mammary gland, epithelial cells are embedded in a ‘soft' environment and become functionally differentiated in culture when exposed to a laminin-rich extracellular matrix gel. Here, we define the processes by which mammary epithelial cells integrate biochemical and mechanical extracellular cues to maintain their differentiated phenotype. We used single cells cultured on top of gels in conditions permissive for β-casein expression using atomic force microscopy to measure the elasticity of the cells and their underlying substrata. We found that maintenance of β-casein expression required both laminin signalling and a ‘soft' extracellular matrix, as is the case in normal tissues in vivo, and biomimetic intracellular elasticity, as is the case in primary mammary epithelial organoids. Conversely, two hallmarks of breast cancer development, stiffening of the extracellular matrix and loss of laminin signalling, led to the loss of β-casein expression and non-biomimetic intracellular elasticity. Our data indicate that tissue-specific gene expression is controlled by both the tissues' unique biochemical milieu and mechanical properties, processes involved in maintenance of tissue integrity and protection against tumorigenesis. PMID:18843297

  12. Prolactin and teleost ionocytes: new insights into cellular and molecular targets of prolactin in vertebrate epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Breves, Jason P.; McCormick, Stephen D.; Karlstrom, Rolf O.

    2014-01-01

    The peptide hormone prolactin is a functionally versatile hormone produced by the vertebrate pituitary. Comparative studies over the last six decades have revealed that a conserved function for prolactin across vertebrates is the regulation of ion and water transport in a variety of tissues including those responsible for whole-organism ion homeostasis. In teleost fishes, prolactin was identified as the “freshwater-adapting hormone”, promoting ion-conserving and water-secreting processes by acting on the gill, kidney, gut and urinary bladder. In mammals, prolactin is known to regulate renal, intestinal, mammary and amniotic epithelia, with dysfunction linked to hypogonadism, infertility, and metabolic disorders. Until recently, our understanding of the cellular mechanisms of prolactin action in fishes has been hampered by a paucity of molecular tools to define and study ionocytes, specialized cells that control active ion transport across branchial and epidermal epithelia. Here we review work in teleost models indicating that prolactin regulates ion balance through action on ion transporters, tight-junction proteins, and water channels in ionocytes, and discuss recent advances in our understanding of ionocyte function in the genetically and embryonically accessible zebrafish (Danio rerio). Given the high degree of evolutionary conservation in endocrine and osmoregulatory systems, these studies in teleost models are contributing novel mechanistic insight into how prolactin participates in the development, function, and dysfunction of osmoregulatory systems across the vertebrate lineage. PMID:24434597

  13. p21 suppresses inflammation and tumorigenesis on pRB-deficient stratified epithelia.

    PubMed

    Saiz-Ladera, C; Lara, M F; Garín, M; Ruiz, S; Santos, M; Lorz, C; García-Escudero, R; Martínez-Fernández, M; Bravo, A; Fernández-Capetillo, O; Segrelles, C; Paramio, J M

    2014-09-11

    The retinoblastoma gene product (pRb) controls proliferation and differentiation processes in stratified epithelia. Importantly, and in contrast to other tissues, Rb deficiency does not lead to spontaneous skin tumor formation. As the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 regulates proliferation and differentiation in the absence of pRb, we analyzed the consequences of deleting p21 in pRb-ablated stratified epithelia (hereafter pRb(ΔEpi);p21-/-). These mice display an enhancement of the phenotypic abnormalities observed in pRb(ΔEpi) animals, indicating that p21 partially compensates pRb absence. Remarkably, pRb(ΔEpi);p21-/- mice show an acute skin inflammatory phenotype and develop spontaneous epithelial tumors, particularly affecting tongue and oral tissues. Biochemical analyses and transcriptome studies reveal changes affecting multiple pathways, including DNA damage and p53-dependent signaling responses. Comparative metagenomic analyses, together with the histopathological profiles, indicate that these mice constitute a faithful model for human head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that p21, in conjunction with pRb, has a central role in regulating multiple epithelial processes and orchestrating specific tumor suppressor functions.

  14. Asymmetric distribution of Spalt in Drosophila wing squamous and columnar epithelia ensures correct cell morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wenqian; Wang, Dan; Shen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The Drosophila wing imaginal disc is a sac-like structure that is composed of two opposing cell layers: peripodial epithelium (PE, also known as squamous epithelia) and disc proper (DP, also known as pseudostratified columnar epithelia). The molecular mechanism of cell morphogenesis has been well studied in the DP but not in the PE. Although proper Dpp signalling activity is required for proper PE formation, the detailed regulation mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we found that the Dpp target gene sal is only expressed in DP cells, not in PE cells, although pMad is present in the PE. Increasing Dpp signalling activity cannot activate Sal in PE cells. The absence of Sal in the PE is essential for PE formation. The ectopic expression of sal in PE cells is sufficient to increase the PE cell height. Down-regulation of sal in the DP reduced DP cell height. We further demonstrated that the known PE cell height regulator Lines, which can convert PE into a DP cell fate, is mediated by sal mis-activation in PE because sal-RNAi and lines co-expression largely restores PE cell morphology. By revealing the microtubule distribution, we demonstrated that Lines- and Sal-heightened PE cells are morphologically similar to the intermediate cell with cuboidal morphology. PMID:27452716

  15. Prolactin and teleost ionocytes: new insights into cellular and molecular targets of prolactin in vertebrate epithelia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breves, Jason P.; McCormick, Stephen D.; Karlstrom, Rolf O.

    2014-01-01

    The peptide hormone prolactin is a functionally versatile hormone produced by the vertebrate pituitary. Comparative studies over the last six decades have revealed that a conserved function for prolactin across vertebrates is the regulation of ion and water transport in a variety of tissues including those responsible for whole-organism ion homeostasis. In teleost fishes, prolactin was identified as the “freshwater-adapting hormone”, promoting ion-conserving and water-secreting processes by acting on the gill, kidney, gut and urinary bladder. In mammals, prolactin is known to regulate renal, intestinal, mammary and amniotic epithelia, with dysfunction linked to hypogonadism, infertility, and metabolic disorders. Until recently, our understanding of the cellular mechanisms of prolactin action in fishes has been hampered by a paucity of molecular tools to define and study ionocytes, specialized cells that control active ion transport across branchial and epidermal epithelia. Here we review work in teleost models indicating that prolactin regulates ion balance through action on ion transporters, tight-junction proteins, and water channels in ionocytes, and discuss recent advances in our understanding of ionocyte function in the genetically and embryonically accessible zebrafish (Danio rerio). Given the high degree of evolutionary conservation in endocrine and osmoregulatory systems, these studies in teleost models are contributing novel mechanistic insight into how prolactin participates in the development, function, and dysfunction of osmoregulatory systems across the vertebrate lineage.

  16. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Engagement Mediates Prolyl Endopeptidase Release from Airway Epithelia via Exosomes.

    PubMed

    Szul, Tomasz; Bratcher, Preston E; Fraser, Kyle B; Kong, Michele; Tirouvanziam, Rabindra; Ingersoll, Sarah; Sztul, Elizabeth; Rangarajan, Sunil; Blalock, J Edwin; Xu, Xin; Gaggar, Amit

    2016-03-01

    Proteases are important regulators of pulmonary remodeling and airway inflammation. Recently, we have characterized the enzyme prolyl endopeptidase (PE), a serine peptidase, as a critical protease in the generation of the neutrophil chemoattractant tripeptide Pro-Gly-Pro (PGP) from collagen. However, PE has been characterized as a cytosolic enzyme, and the mechanism mediating PE release extracellularly remains unknown. We examined the role of exosomes derived from airway epithelia as a mechanism for PE release and the potential extracellular signals that regulate the release of these exosomes. We demonstrate a specific regulatory pathway of exosome release from airway epithelia and identify PE as novel exosome cargo. LPS stimulation of airway epithelial cells induces release of PE-containing exosomes, which is significantly attenuated by small interfering RNA depletion of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). These differences were recapitulated upon intratracheal LPS administration in mice competent versus deficient for TLR4 signaling. Finally, sputum samples from subjects with cystic fibrosis colonized with Pseudomonas aeruginosa demonstrate elevated exosome content and increased PE levels. This TLR4-based mechanism highlights the first report of nonstochastic release of exosomes in the lung and couples TLR4 activation with matrikine generation. The increased quantity of these proteolytic exosomes in the airways of subjects with chronic lung disease highlights a new mechanism of injury and inflammation in the pathogenesis of pulmonary disorders.

  17. Aurora Kinases Phosphorylate Lgl to Induce Mitotic Spindle Orientation in Drosophila Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Graham P.; Fletcher, Georgina C.; Brain, Ruth; Thompson, Barry J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The Lethal giant larvae (Lgl) protein was discovered in Drosophila as a tumor suppressor in both neural stem cells (neuroblasts) and epithelia. In neuroblasts, Lgl relocalizes to the cytoplasm at mitosis, an event attributed to phosphorylation by mitotically activated aPKC kinase and thought to promote asymmetric cell division. Here we show that Lgl also relocalizes to the cytoplasm at mitosis in epithelial cells, which divide symmetrically. The Aurora A and B kinases directly phosphorylate Lgl to promote its mitotic relocalization, whereas aPKC kinase activity is required only for polarization of Lgl. A form of Lgl that is a substrate for aPKC, but not Aurora kinases, can restore cell polarity in lgl mutants but reveals defects in mitotic spindle orientation in epithelia. We propose that removal of Lgl from the plasma membrane at mitosis allows Pins/LGN to bind Dlg and thus orient the spindle in the plane of the epithelium. Our findings suggest a revised model for Lgl regulation and function in both symmetric and asymmetric cell divisions. PMID:25484300

  18. Epithelia suspended in collagen gels can lose polarity and express characteristics of migrating mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Greenburg, G; Hay, E D

    1982-10-01

    This study of epithelial-mesenchymal transformation and epithelial cell polarity in vitro reveals that environmental conditions can have a profound effect on the epithelial phenotype, cell shape, and polarity as expressed by the presence of apical and basal surfaces. A number of different adult and embryonic epithelia were suspended within native collagen gels. Under these conditions, cells elongate, detach from the explants, and migrate as individual cells within the three-dimensional lattice, a previously unknown property of well-differentiated epithelia. Epithelial cells from adult and embryonic anterior lens were studied in detail. Elongated cells derived from the apical surface develop pseudopodia and filopodia characteristic of migratory cells and acquire a morphology and ultrastructure virtually indistinguishable from that of mesenchymal cells in vivo. It is concluded from these experiments that the three-dimensional collagen gel can promote dissociation, migration, and acquisition of secretory organelles by differentiated epithelial cells, and can abolish the apical-basal cell polarity characteristic of the original epithelium.

  19. Distinct energy metabolism of auditory and vestibular sensory epithelia revealed by quantitative mass spectrometry using MS2 intensity.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Kateri J; Klimek, John E; Wilmarth, Phillip A; Shin, Jung-Bum; Choi, Dongseok; David, Larry L; Gillespie, Peter G

    2012-01-31

    Measuring the abundance of many proteins over a broad dynamic range requires accurate quantitation. We show empirically that, in MS experiments, relative quantitation using summed dissociation-product ion-current intensities is accurate, albeit variable from protein to protein, and outperforms spectral counting. By applying intensities to quantify proteins in two complex but related tissues, chick auditory and vestibular sensory epithelia, we find that glycolytic enzymes are enriched threefold in auditory epithelia, whereas enzymes responsible for oxidative phosphorylation are increased at least fourfold in vestibular epithelia. This striking difference in relative use of the two ATP-production pathways likely reflects the isolation of the auditory epithelium from its blood supply, necessary to prevent heartbeat-induced mechanical disruptions. The global view of protein expression afforded by label-free quantitation with a wide dynamic range reveals molecular specialization at a tissue or cellular level.

  20. Fibroadenoma - breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider if you notice: Any new breast lumps A breast lump that your provider has checked before that grows or changes Bruising on your breast for no reason Dimpled or wrinkled skin (like an orange) on your breast Nipple changes or nipple discharge

  1. Feature Extraction and Analysis of Breast Cancer Specimen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Debnath; Robles, Rosslin John; Kim, Tai-Hoon; Bandyopadhyay, Samir Kumar

    In this paper, we propose a method to identify abnormal growth of cells in breast tissue and suggest further pathological test, if necessary. We compare normal breast tissue with malignant invasive breast tissue by a series of image processing steps. Normal ductal epithelial cells and ductal / lobular invasive carcinogenic cells also consider for comparison here in this paper. In fact, features of cancerous breast tissue (invasive) are extracted and analyses with normal breast tissue. We also suggest the breast cancer recognition technique through image processing and prevention by controlling p53 gene mutation to some greater extent.

  2. Endoscopic Breast Surgery in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-05

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  3. Ruminal and Abomasal Starch Hydrolysate Infusions Selectively Decrease the Expression of Cationic Amino Acid Transporter mRNA by Small Intestinal Epithelia of Forage-fed Beef Steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although cationic amino acids (CAA) are consid-ered essential to maximize optimal growth of cattle, transporters responsible for CAA absorption by bovine small intestinal epithelia have not been described. This study was conducted to test 2 hypotheses: 1) the duo¬denal, jejunal, and ileal epithelia ...

  4. Stimulation by Insulin of Cell Elongation and Microtubule Assembly in Embryonic Chick-Lens Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Piatigorsky, Joram; Rothschild, Sonia S.; Wollberg, Miriam

    1973-01-01

    Both fetal-calf serum and insulin cause cell elongation in explanted chick-lens epithelia from 6-day-old embryos. We show that 1 μg/ml of insulin, like serum, stimulates a doubling of cell length and an assembly of longitudinally oriented microtubules; colchicine treatment inhibits this cell elongation. In contrast to serum, insulin neither promotes further lens-cell elongation nor appreciably stimulates the synthesis of bulk proteins or of delta crystallin under the present conditions. These data indicate that the early morphological events of lens fiber differentiation can be initiated by insulin in a chemically defined, serum-free medium without significant affects upon protein synthesis. Images PMID:4515617

  5. Membrane antigens shared by renal proximal tubules and other epithelia associated with absorption and excretion.

    PubMed Central

    Miettinen, A; Linder, E

    1976-01-01

    The distribution of shared antigens in specialized surface membranes of epithelia associated with absorption and excretion was studied using antisera against isolated epithelial brush borders of renal proximal tubules. Rabbits were immunized with a membrane fraction isolated from rat kidneys and the reactions of the resulting heterologous antisera with different rat organs were studied by immunofluorescence. The antisera reacted with the following structures: epithelial brush border of renal proximal tubules, bile canaliculi and bile duct epithelium of the liver, epithelial brush border of the intestinal villi, luminal parts of some epididymal tubules, allantochorionic epithelium, and apical parts of the exocrine epithelium of the pancreatic, salivary and lacrimal glands. Both quantitative and qualitative differences in antigen contents were suggested by absorption experiments. Images Fig. 2 PMID:780015

  6. Ex vivo Method for High Resolution Imaging of Cilia Motility in Rodent Airway Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Richard; Lo, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    An ex vivo technique for imaging mouse airway epithelia for quantitative analysis of motile cilia function important for insight into mucociliary clearance function has been established. Freshly harvested mouse trachea is cut longitudinally through the trachealis muscle and mounted in a shallow walled chamber on a glass-bottomed dish. The trachea sample is positioned along its long axis to take advantage of the trachealis muscle to curl longitudinally. This allows imaging of ciliary motion in the profile view along the entire tracheal length. Videos at 200 frames/sec are obtained using differential interference contrast microscopy and a high speed digital camera to allow quantitative analysis of cilia beat frequency and ciliary waveform. With the addition of fluorescent beads during imaging, cilia generated fluid flow also can be determined. The protocol time spans approximately 30 min, with 5 min for chamber preparation, 5-10 min for sample mounting, and 10-15 min for videomicroscopy. PMID:23963287

  7. Ex vivo method for high resolution imaging of cilia motility in rodent airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Francis, Richard; Lo, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    An ex vivo technique for imaging mouse airway epithelia for quantitative analysis of motile cilia function important for insight into mucociliary clearance function has been established. Freshly harvested mouse trachea is cut longitudinally through the trachealis muscle and mounted in a shallow walled chamber on a glass-bottomed dish. The trachea sample is positioned along its long axis to take advantage of the trachealis muscle to curl longitudinally. This allows imaging of ciliary motion in the profile view along the entire tracheal length. Videos at 200 frames/sec are obtained using differential interference contrast microscopy and a high speed digital camera to allow quantitative analysis of cilia beat frequency and ciliary waveform. With the addition of fluorescent beads during imaging, cilia generated fluid flow also can be determined. The protocol time spans approximately 30 min, with 5 min for chamber preparation, 5-10 min for sample mounting, and 10-15 min for videomicroscopy. PMID:23963287

  8. Efficient, non-toxic anion transport by synthetic carriers in cells and epithelia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongyu; Valkenier, Hennie; Judd, Luke W.; Brotherhood, Peter R.; Hussain, Sabir; Cooper, James A.; Jurček, Ondřej; Sparkes, Hazel A.; Sheppard, David N.; Davis, Anthony P.

    2016-01-01

    Transmembrane anion transporters (anionophores) have potential for new modes of biological activity, including therapeutic applications. In particular they might replace the activity of defective anion channels in conditions such as cystic fibrosis. However, data on the biological effects of anionophores are scarce, and it remains uncertain whether such molecules are fundamentally toxic. Here, we report a biological study of an extensive series of powerful anion carriers. Fifteen anionophores were assayed in single cells by monitoring anion transport in real time through fluorescence emission from halide-sensitive yellow fluorescent protein. A bis-(p-nitrophenyl)ureidodecalin shows especially promising activity, including deliverability, potency and persistence. Electrophysiological tests show strong effects in epithelia, close to those of natural anion channels. Toxicity assays yield negative results in three cell lines, suggesting that promotion of anion transport may not be deleterious to cells. We therefore conclude that synthetic anion carriers are realistic candidates for further investigation as treatments for cystic fibrosis.

  9. Shot and Patronin polarise microtubules to direct membrane traffic and biogenesis of microvilli in epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Khanal, Ichha; Elbediwy, Ahmed; Diaz de la Loza, Maria del Carmen; Fletcher, Georgina C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In epithelial tissues, polarisation of microtubules and actin microvilli occurs along the apical-basal axis of each cell, yet how these cytoskeletal polarisation events are coordinated remains unclear. Here, we examine the hierarchy of events during cytoskeletal polarisation in Drosophila melanogaster epithelia. Core apical-basal polarity determinants polarise the spectrin cytoskeleton to recruit the microtubule-binding proteins Patronin (CAMSAP1, CAMSAP2 and CAMPSAP3 in humans) and Shortstop [Shot; MACF1 and BPAG1 (also known as DST) in humans] to the apical membrane domain. Patronin and Shot then act to polarise microtubules along the apical-basal axis to enable apical transport of Rab11 endosomes by the Nuf–Dynein microtubule motor complex. Finally, Rab11 endosomes are transferred to the MyoV (also known as Didum in Drosophila) actin motor to deliver the key microvillar determinant Cadherin 99C to the apical membrane to organise the biogenesis of actin microvilli. PMID:27231092

  10. Septin GTPases spatially guide microtubule organization and plus end dynamics in polarizing epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Jonathan R.; Hwang, Daniel; Bai, Xiaobo; Roy, Dheeraj

    2011-01-01

    Establishment of epithelial polarity requires the reorganization of the microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton from a radial array into a network positioned along the apicobasal axis of the cell. Little is known about the mechanisms that spatially guide the remodeling of MTs during epithelial polarization. Septins are filamentous guanine triphosphatases (GTPases) that associate with MTs, but the function of septins in MT organization and dynamics is poorly understood. In this paper, we show that in polarizing epithelia, septins guide the directionality of MT plus end movement by suppressing MT catastrophe. By enabling persistent MT growth, two spatially distinct populations of septins, perinuclear and peripheral filaments, steer the growth and capture of MT plus ends. This navigation mechanism is essential for the maintenance of perinuclear MT bundles and for the orientation of peripheral MTs as well as for the apicobasal positioning of MTs. Our results suggest that septins provide the directional guidance cues necessary for polarizing the epithelial MT network. PMID:21788367

  11. Cholera toxin enhances Na+ absorption across MCF10A human mammary epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian

    2013-01-01

    Cellular mechanisms to account for the low Na+ concentration in human milk are poorly defined. MCF10A cells, which were derived from human mammary epithelium and grown on permeable supports, exhibit amiloride- and benzamil-sensitive short-circuit current (Isc; a sensitive indicator of net ion transport), suggesting activity of the epithelial Na+ channel ENaC. When cultured in the presence of cholera toxin (Ctx), MCF10A cells exhibit greater amiloride-sensitive Isc at all time points tested (2 h to 7 days), an effect that is not reduced with Ctx washout for 12 h. Amiloride-sensitive Isc remains elevated by Ctx in the presence of inhibitors for PKA (H-89, Rp-cAMP), PI3K (LY294002), and protein trafficking (brefeldin A). Additionally, the Ctx B subunit, alone, does not replicate these effects. RT-PCR and Western blot analyses indicate no significant increase in either the mRNA or protein expression for α-, β-, or, γ-ENaC subunits. Ctx increases the abundance of both β- and γ-ENaC in the apical membrane. Additionally, Ctx increases both phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated Nedd4-2 expression. These results demonstrate that human mammary epithelia express ENaC, which can account for the low Na+ concentration in milk. Importantly, the results suggest that Ctx increases the expression but reduces the activity of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Nedd4-2, which would tend to reduce the ENaC retrieval and increase steady-state membrane residency. The results reveal a novel mechanism in human mammary gland epithelia by which Ctx regulates ENaC-mediated Na+ transport, which may have inferences for epithelial ion transport regulation in other tissues throughout the body. PMID:24371040

  12. LIGHT signals directly to intestinal epithelia to cause barrier dysfunction via cytoskeletal and endocytic mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Brad T.; Wang, Fengjun; Shen, Le; Clayburgh, Daniel R.; Su, Liping; Wang, Yingmin; Fu, Yang-Xin; Turner, Jerrold R.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS LIGHT (lymphotoxin-like inducible protein that competes with glycoprotein D for herpes virus entry on T cells) is a TNF core family member that regulates T cell activation and causes experimental inflammatory bowel disease. Additional data suggest that LIGHT may be involved in the pathogenesis of human inflammatory bowel disease. The aim of this study was to determine if LIGHT was capable of signaling directly to intestinal epithelia and to define the mechanisms and consequences of such signaling. METHODS The effects of LIGHT and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) on barrier function, cytoskeletal regulation, and tight junction structure were assessed in mice and intestinal epithelial monolayers. RESULTS LIGHT induced barrier loss in cultured epithelia via myosin II regulatory light chain (MLC) phosphorylation; both barrier loss and MLC phosphorylation were reversed by MLC kinase (MLCK) inhibition. IFN-γ pretreatment, which induced lymphotoxin β receptor (LTβR) expression, was required for these effects and neither barrier dysfunction nor intestinal epithelial MLC phosphorylation occurred in LTβR-knockout mice. In cultured monolayers, endocytosis of the tight junction protein occludin correlated with barrier loss. Internalized occludin co-localized with caveolin-1. LIGHT-induced occludin endocytosis and barrier loss were both prevented by inhibition of caveolar endocytosis. CONCLUSIONS T cell-derived LIGHT activates intestinal epithelial LTβR to disrupt barrier function. This requires MLCK activation and caveolar endocytosis. These data suggest a novel role for LIGHT in disease pathogenesis and suggest that inhibition of MLCK-dependent caveolar endocytosis may represent an approach to restoring barrier function in inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:17570213

  13. Localization of ion-regulatory epithelia in embryos and hatchlings of two cephalopods.

    PubMed

    Hu, Marian Y; Sucré, Elliott; Charmantier-Daures, Mireille; Charmantier, Guy; Lucassen, Magnus; Himmerkus, Nina; Melzner, Frank

    2010-03-01

    The tissue distribution and ontogeny of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase has been examined as an indicator for ion-regulatory epithelia in whole animal sections of embryos and hatchlings of two cephalopod species: the squid Loligo vulgaris and the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis. This is the first report of the immunohistochemical localization of cephalopod Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase with the polyclonal antibody alpha (H-300) raised against the human alpha1-subunit of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase immunoreactivity was observed in several tissues (gills, pancreatic appendages, nerves), exclusively located in baso-lateral membranes lining blood sinuses. Furthermore, large single cells in the gill of adult L. vulgaris specimens closely resembled Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase-rich cells described in fish. Immunohistochemical observations indicated that the amount and distribution of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in late cuttlefish embryos was similar to that found in juvenile and adult stages. The ion-regulatory epithelia (e.g., gills, excretory organs) of the squid embryos and paralarvae exhibited less differentiation than adults. Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activities for whole animals were higher in hatchlings of S. officinalis (157.0 +/- 32.4 micromol g (FM) (-1) h(-1)) than in those of L. vulgaris (31.8 +/- 3.3 micromol g (FM) (-1) h(-1)). S. officinalis gills and pancreatic appendages achieved activities of 94.8 +/- 18.5 and 421.8 +/- 102.3 micromol(ATP) g (FM) (-1) h(-1), respectively. High concentrations of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in late cephalopod embryos might be important in coping with the challenging abiotic conditions (low pH, high pCO(2)) that these organisms encounter inside their eggs. Our results also suggest a higher sensitivity of squid vs. cuttlefish embryos to environmental acid-base disturbances.

  14. Transcriptional regulation of IL-6 in bile duct epithelia by extracellular ATP

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jin; Sheung, Nina; Soliman, Elwy M.; Spirli, Carlo; Dranoff, Jonathan A.

    2009-01-01

    The inflammatory cytokine IL-6 is essential for cell survival after liver injury. Bile duct epithelia (BDE) markedly upregulate IL-6 release after liver injury, but the mechanisms regulating this have not been defined. Purinergic signals induce multiple potent downstream effects in BDE, so the goals of this study were to determine whether extracellular ATP regulates BDE IL-6 transcription and to identify the molecular mechanisms regulating this process. Effects of extracellular nucleotides on IL-6 transcription in primary rat bile duct epithelia were assessed. The relative effects of cAMP and cytosolic calcium were determined by use of agonists and antagonists. The role of the cAMP response element (CRE) was determined by site-directed mutagenesis. We found that ATP potently upregulated IL-6 mRNA, and that the pharmacological profile for IL-6 upregulation was most consistent with the newly identified P2Y11 receptor. This occurred in a cAMP-dependent and calcium-dependent fashion. The effect of cAMP and calcium agonists on IL-6 promoter activity was synergistic, and mutation of the IL-6 CRE blocked upregulation by ATP. Taken together, these data show that extracellular ATP acts through a mechanism involving a rat P2Y receptor functionally related to the P2Y11 receptor, cAMP, and calcium signals and that the IL-6 promoter CRE to upregulate transcription of IL-6 in BDE. Since IL-6 has such critical importance in the liver, it is likely that this pathway is of great relevance to the understanding of hepatic response to injury. PMID:19136380

  15. APICAL LOCATION OF FERROPORTIN 1 IN AIRWAY EPITHELIA AND ITS ROLE IN IRON DETOXIFICATION IN THE LUNG

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ferroportin 1 (FPN1; aka MTP1, IREG1, and SLC40A1), which was originally identified as a basolateral iron transporter crucial for nutritional iron absorption in the intestine, is expressed in airway epithelia and upregulated when these cells are exposed to iron. Using immunofluor...

  16. Development of inner ear afferent connections: forming primary neurons and connecting them to the developing sensory epithelia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritzsch, Bernd

    2003-01-01

    The molecular and cellular origin of the primary neurons of the inner ear, the vestibular and spiral neurons, is reviewed including how they connect to the specific sensory epithelia and what the molecular nature of their survival is. Primary neurons of the ear depend on a single basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH) protein for their formation, neurogenin 1 (ngn1). An immediate downstream gene is the bHLH gene neuronal differentiation (NeuroD). Targeted null mutations of ngn1 results in absence of primary neuron formation; targeted null mutation of NeuroD results in loss of almost all spiral and many vestibular neurons. NeuroD and a later expressed gene, Brn3a, play a role in pathfinding to and within sensory epithelia. The molecular nature of this pathfinding property is unknown. Reduction of hair cells in ngn1 null mutations suggests a clonal relationship with primary neurons. This relationship may play some role in specifying the identity of hair cells and the primary neurons that connect with them. Primary neuron neurites growth to sensory epithelia is initially independent of trophic factors released from developing sensory epithelia, but becomes rapidly dependent on those factors. Null mutations of specific neurotrophic factors lose distinct primary neuron populations which undergo rapid embryonic cell death.

  17. Cell-specific transcriptional profiling reveals candidate mechanisms regulating development and function of uterine epithelia in mice.

    PubMed

    Filant, Justyna; Spencer, Thomas E

    2013-10-01

    All mammalian uteri have luminal (LE) and glandular epithelia (GE) in their endometrium. The LE mediates uterine receptivity and blastocyst attachment for implantation, and the GE synthesize and secrete or transport bioactive substances involved in blastocyst implantation, uterine receptivity, and stromal cell decidualization. However, the mechanisms governing uterine epithelial development after birth and their function in the adult are not fully understood. Here, comprehensive microarray analysis was conducted on LE and GE isolated by laser capture microdissection from uteri on Postnatal Day 10 (PD 10) and day of pseudopregnancy (DOPP) 2.5 and 3.5. This data was integrated with analysis of uteri from gland-containing control and aglandular progesterone-induced uterine gland knockout mice from PD 10 and DOPP 3.5. Many genes were expressed in both epithelia, but there was greater expression of genes in the LE than in the GE. In the neonate, GE-expressed genes were enriched for morphogenesis, development, migration, and retinoic acid signaling. In the adult, LE-expressed genes were enriched for metabolic processes and steroid biosynthesis, whereas retinoid signaling, tight junction, extracellular matrix, and regulation of kinase activity were enriched in the GE. The transcriptome differences in the epithelia support the idea that each cell type has a distinct and complementary function in the uterus. The candidate genes and regulatory networks identified here provide a framework to discover new mechanisms regulating development of epithelia in the postnatal uterus and their functions in early pregnancy.

  18. Mechanisms of regulating cell topology in proliferating epithelia: impact of division plane, mechanical forces, and cell memory.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingzi; Naveed, Hammad; Kachalo, Sema; Xu, Lisa X; Liang, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of cell growth and cell division has a fundamental role in tissue formation, organ development, and cancer progression. Remarkable similarities in the topological distributions were found in a variety of proliferating epithelia in both animals and plants. At the same time, there are species with significantly varied frequency of hexagonal cells. Moreover, local topology has been shown to be disturbed on the boundary between proliferating and quiescent cells, where cells have fewer sides than natural proliferating epithelia. The mechanisms of regulating these topological changes remain poorly understood. In this study, we use a mechanical model to examine the effects of orientation of division plane, differential proliferation, and mechanical forces on animal epithelial cells. We find that regardless of orientation of division plane, our model can reproduce the commonly observed topological distributions of cells in natural proliferating animal epithelia with the consideration of cell rearrangements. In addition, with different schemes of division plane, we are able to generate different frequency of hexagonal cells, which is consistent with experimental observations. In proliferating cells interfacing quiescent cells, our results show that differential proliferation alone is insufficient to reproduce the local changes in cell topology. Rather, increased tension on the boundary, in conjunction with differential proliferation, can reproduce the observed topological changes. We conclude that both division plane orientation and mechanical forces play important roles in cell topology in animal proliferating epithelia. Moreover, cell memory is also essential for generating specific topological distributions.

  19. Primary cultured cells as sensitive in vitro model for assessment of toxicants--comparison to hepatocytes and gill epithelia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bingsheng; Liu, Chunsheng; Wang, Jingxian; Lam, Paul K S; Wu, Rudolf S S

    2006-11-16

    In an effort to develop cultured cell models for toxicity screening and environmental biomonitoring, we compared primary cultured gill epithelia and hepatocytes from freshwater tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) to assess their sensitivity to AhR agonist toxicants. Epithelia were cultured on permeable supports (terephthalate membranes, "filters") and bathed on the apical with waterborne toxicants (pseudo in vivo asymmetrical culture conditions). Hepatocytes were cultured in multi-well plates and exposed to toxicants in culture medium. Cytochrome P4501A (measured as 7-Ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase, EROD) was selected as a biomarker. For cultured gill epithelia, the integrity of the epithelia remained unchanged on exposure to model toxicants, such as 1,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), benzo(a)pyrene B[a]P, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) mixture (Aroclor 1254), and polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) mixture (DE71). A good concentration-dependent response of EROD activity was clearly observed in both cultured gill epithelia and hepatocytes. The time-course response of EROD was measured as early as 3h, and was maximal after 6h of exposure to TCDD, B[a]P and Aroclor 1254. The estimated 6h EC50 for TCDD, B[a]P, and Aroclor 1254 was 1.2 x 10(-9), 5.7 x 10(-8) and 6.6 x 10(-6)M. For the cultured hepatocytes, time-course study showed that a significant induction of EROD took place at 18 h, and the maximal induction of EROD was observed at 24h after exposure. The estimated 24h EC50 for TCDD, B[a]P, and Aroclor 1254 was 1.4 x 10(-9), 8.1 x 10(-8) and 7.3 x 10(-6)M. There was no induction or inhibition of EROD in DE71 exposure to both gill epithelia and hepatocytes. The results show that cultured gill epithelia more rapidly induce EROD and are slightly more sensitive than cultured hepatocytes, and could be used as a rapid and sensitive tool for screening chemicals and monitoring environmental AhR agonist toxicants.

  20. Expression of simple epithelial type cytokeratins in stratified epithelia as detected by immunolocalization and hybridization in situ

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Multi-layered ("stratified") epithelia differ from one-layered ("simple") polar epithelia by various architectural and functional properties as well as by their cytoskeletal complements, notably a set of cytokeratins characteristic of stratified tissue. The simple epithelial cytokeratins 8 and 18 have so far not been detected in any stratified epithelium. Using specific monoclonal antibodies we have noted, in several but not all samples of stratified epithelia, including esophagus, tongue, exocervix, and vagina, positive immunocytochemical reactions for cytokeratins 8, 18, and 19 which in some regions were selective for the basal cell layer(s) but extended into suprabasal layers in others. In situ hybridization with different probes (riboprobes, synthetic oligonucleotides) for mRNAs of cytokeratin 8 on esophageal epithelium has shown, in extended regions, relatively strong reactivity for cytokeratin 8 mRNA in the basal cell layer. In contrast, probes to cytokeratin 18 have shown much weaker hybridization which, however, was rather evenly spread over basal and suprabasal strata. These results, which emphasize the importance of in situ hybridization in studies of gene expression in complex tissues, show that the genes encoding simple epithelial cytokeratins can be expressed in stratified epithelia. This suggests that continual expression of genes coding for simple epithelial cytokeratins is compatible with the formation of squamous stratified tissues and can occur, at least in basal cell layers, simultaneously with the synthesis of certain stratification-related cytokeratins. We also emphasize differences of expression and immunoreactivity of these cytokeratins between different samples and in different regions of the same stratified epithelium and discuss the results in relation to changes of cytokeratin expression during fetal development of stratified epithelia, in response to environmental factors and during the formation of squamous cell carcinomas. PMID:2453518

  1. Foxg1-Cre Mediated Lrp2 Inactivation in the Developing Mouse Neural Retina, Ciliary and Retinal Pigment Epithelia Models Congenital High Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Obry, Antoine; Santin, Mathieu D.; Ben-Yacoub, Sirine; Pâques, Michel; Amsellem-Levera, Sabine; Bribian, Ana; Simonutti, Manuel; Augustin, Sébastien; Debeir, Thomas; Sahel, José Alain; Christ, Annabel; de Castro, Fernando; Lehéricy, Stéphane; Cosette, Pascal; Kozyraki, Renata

    2015-01-01

    Myopia is a common ocular disorder generally due to increased axial length of the eye-globe. Its extreme form high myopia (HM) is a multifactorial disease leading to retinal and scleral damage, visual impairment or loss and is an important health issue. Mutations in the endocytic receptor LRP2 gene result in Donnai-Barrow (DBS) and Stickler syndromes, both characterized by HM. To clearly establish the link between Lrp2 and congenital HM we inactivated Lrp2 in the mouse forebrain including the neural retina and the retinal and ciliary pigment epithelia. High resolution in vivo MRI imaging and ophthalmological analyses showed that the adult Lrp2-deficient eyes were 40% longer than the control ones mainly due to an excessive elongation of the vitreal chamber. They had an apparently normal intraocular pressure and developed chorioretinal atrophy and posterior scleral staphyloma features reminiscent of human myopic retinopathy. Immunomorphological and ultrastructural analyses showed that increased eye lengthening was first observed by post-natal day 5 (P5) and that it was accompanied by a rapid decrease of the bipolar, photoreceptor and retinal ganglion cells, and eventually the optic nerve axons. It was followed by scleral thinning and collagen fiber disorganization, essentially in the posterior pole. We conclude that the function of LRP2 in the ocular tissues is necessary for normal eye growth and that the Lrp2-deficient eyes provide a unique tool to further study human HM. PMID:26107939

  2. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are many risk factors. Risks that ... who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer may wish to be tested for the genes. ...

  3. Can Breast Tumors Affect the Oxidative Status of the Surrounding Environment? A Comparative Analysis among Cancerous Breast, Mammary Adjacent Tissue, and Plasma.

    PubMed

    Panis, C; Victorino, V J; Herrera, A C S A; Cecchini, A L; Simão, A N C; Tomita, L Y; Cecchini, R

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated the oxidative profile of breast tumors in comparison with their normal adjacent breast tissue. Our study indicates that breast tumors present enhanced oxidative/nitrosative stress, with concomitant augmented antioxidant capacity when compared to the adjacent normal breast. These data indicate that breast cancers may be responsible for the induction of a prooxidant environment in the mammary gland, in association with enhanced TNF-α and nitric oxide. PMID:26697139

  4. Can Breast Tumors Affect the Oxidative Status of the Surrounding Environment? A Comparative Analysis among Cancerous Breast, Mammary Adjacent Tissue, and Plasma.

    PubMed

    Panis, C; Victorino, V J; Herrera, A C S A; Cecchini, A L; Simão, A N C; Tomita, L Y; Cecchini, R

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated the oxidative profile of breast tumors in comparison with their normal adjacent breast tissue. Our study indicates that breast tumors present enhanced oxidative/nitrosative stress, with concomitant augmented antioxidant capacity when compared to the adjacent normal breast. These data indicate that breast cancers may be responsible for the induction of a prooxidant environment in the mammary gland, in association with enhanced TNF-α and nitric oxide.

  5. Laser Hole-Drilling as a Probe of Morphogenetic Stresses in Embryonic Epithelia: Experimental Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaoyan; Hutson, M. Shane

    2008-03-01

    During the development of an organism, sheets of epithelial cells expand, contract and bend due to forces generated within the cell sheets. These forces can be probed by laser hole-drilling -- a method borrowed from the analysis of residual stress in manufactured widgets -- in which a laser microbeam ablates a single cell surface or the edge shared by adjacent cells. We have applied this method to the embryonic epithelia of GFP-labeled fruit fly (Drosophila) embryos. After ablation of one shared edge, we follow the recoil dynamics (strain relaxation) of adjacent cell edges (with time resolution down to 2 ms). The recoils show two distinct phases; and the initial recoil velocity can be consistently retrieved through a double-exponential fit. We observe a strong correlation between the initial recoil velocity and the orientation of the ablated cell edge. This correlation is particularly pronounced in embryos during late dorsal closure. Measuring orientation with respect to the long (anterior-posterior) axis of the embryo, both the recoil velocities and the distribution of cell edge orientations have sharp peaks near 30 and 150 . In early dorsal closure, the distribution of cell edge orientation has three much weaker peaks and the recoil velocities only show a weak maximum near 90 .

  6. Hematopoietic lineage skewing and intestinal epithelia degeneration in aged mice with telomerase RNA component deletion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jichun; Bryant, Mark A; Dent, James J; Sun, Yu; Desierto, Marie J; Young, Neal S

    2015-12-01

    A deletion of a telomerase RNA component (Terc(-/-)) in C57BL/6 (B6) mice resulted in hematopoietic lineage skewing with increased neutrophils and CD11b(+) myeloid cells and decreased red blood cells and CD45R(+) B lymphocytes when animals reach ages older than 12 months. There was no decline in bone marrow (BM) c-Kit(+)Sca-1(+)Lin(-) (KSL) cells in old Terc(-/-) mice, and the lineage skewing phenomenon was not transferred when BM cells from old Terc(-/-) donors were transplanted into young B6 recipients. Necropsy and histological examinations found minimal to no change in the lung, spleen and liver but detected severe epithelia degeneration, ulceration and infection in small and large intestines, leading to enteritis, typhlitis and colitis in old Terc(-/-) mice. In a mouse model of dextran-sulfate-sodium-induced typhlitis and colitis, development of intestinal pathology was associated with increases in neutrophils and CD11b(+) myeloid cells and a decrease in CD45R(+) B cells, similar to those observed in old Terc(-/-) mice. Treatment of 11-13 month old Terc(-/-) mice with antibiotic trimethoprim-sulfa water reduced neutrophils and myeloid cells and increased B lymphocytes in the blood, indicating that mitigation of intestinal infection and inflammation could alleviate hematological abnormalities in old Terc(-/-) animals. PMID:26523501

  7. Hematopoietic lineage skewing and intestinal epithelia degeneration in aged mice with telomerase RNA component deletion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jichun; Bryant, Mark A; Dent, James J; Sun, Yu; Desierto, Marie J; Young, Neal S

    2015-12-01

    A deletion of a telomerase RNA component (Terc(-/-)) in C57BL/6 (B6) mice resulted in hematopoietic lineage skewing with increased neutrophils and CD11b(+) myeloid cells and decreased red blood cells and CD45R(+) B lymphocytes when animals reach ages older than 12 months. There was no decline in bone marrow (BM) c-Kit(+)Sca-1(+)Lin(-) (KSL) cells in old Terc(-/-) mice, and the lineage skewing phenomenon was not transferred when BM cells from old Terc(-/-) donors were transplanted into young B6 recipients. Necropsy and histological examinations found minimal to no change in the lung, spleen and liver but detected severe epithelia degeneration, ulceration and infection in small and large intestines, leading to enteritis, typhlitis and colitis in old Terc(-/-) mice. In a mouse model of dextran-sulfate-sodium-induced typhlitis and colitis, development of intestinal pathology was associated with increases in neutrophils and CD11b(+) myeloid cells and a decrease in CD45R(+) B cells, similar to those observed in old Terc(-/-) mice. Treatment of 11-13 month old Terc(-/-) mice with antibiotic trimethoprim-sulfa water reduced neutrophils and myeloid cells and increased B lymphocytes in the blood, indicating that mitigation of intestinal infection and inflammation could alleviate hematological abnormalities in old Terc(-/-) animals.

  8. MicroRNAs as key regulators of GTPase-mediated apical actin reorganization in multiciliated epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Mercey, Olivier; Kodjabachian, Laurent; Barbry, Pascal; Marcet, Brice

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Multiciliated cells (MCCs), which are present in specialized vertebrate tissues such as mucociliary epithelia, project hundreds of motile cilia from their apical membrane. Coordinated ciliary beating in MCCs contributes to fluid propulsion in several biological processes. In a previous work, we demonstrated that microRNAs of the miR-34/449 family act as new conserved regulators of MCC differentiation by specifically repressing cell cycle genes and the Notch pathway. Recently, we have shown that miR-34/449 also modulate small GTPase pathways to promote, in a later stage of differentiation, the assembly of the apical actin network, a prerequisite for proper anchoring of centrioles-derived neo-synthesized basal bodies. We characterized several miR-34/449 targets related to small GTPase pathways including R-Ras, which represents a key and conserved regulator during MCC differentiation. Direct RRAS repression by miR-34/449 is necessary for apical actin meshwork assembly, notably by allowing the apical relocalization of the actin binding protein Filamin-A near basal bodies. Our studies establish miR-34/449 as central players that orchestrate several steps of MCC differentiation program by regulating distinct signaling pathways. PMID:27144998

  9. Formation of a Bazooka-Stardust complex is essential for plasma membrane polarity in epithelia.

    PubMed

    Krahn, Michael P; Bückers, Johanna; Kastrup, Lars; Wodarz, Andreas

    2010-09-01

    Apical-basal polarity in Drosophila melanogaster epithelia depends on several evolutionarily conserved proteins that have been assigned to two distinct protein complexes: the Bazooka (Baz)-PAR-6 (partitioning defective 6)-atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) complex and the Crumbs (Crb)-Stardust (Sdt) complex. These proteins operate in a functional hierarchy, in which Baz is required for the proper subcellular localization of all other proteins. We investigated how these proteins interact and how this interaction is regulated. We show that Baz recruits Sdt to the plasma membrane by direct interaction between the Postsynaptic density 95/Discs large/Zonula occludens 1 (PDZ) domain of Sdt and a region of Baz that contains a phosphorylation site for aPKC. Phosphorylation of Baz causes the dissociation of the Baz-Sdt complex. Overexpression of a nonphosphorylatable version of Baz blocks the dissociation of Sdt from Baz, causing phenotypes very similar to those of crb and sdt mutations. Our findings provide a molecular mechanism for the phosphorylation-dependent interaction between the Baz-PAR-3 and Crb complexes during the establishment of epithelial polarity.

  10. Impaired Cell Volume Regulation in Intestinal Crypt Epithelia of Cystic Fibrosis Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valverde, M. A.; O'Brien, J. A.; Sepulveda, F. V.; Ratcliff, R. A.; Evans, M. J.; Colledge, W. H.

    1995-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a disease characterized by abnormalities in the epithelia of the lungs, intestine, salivary and sweat glands, liver, and reproductive systems, often as a result of inadequate hydration of their secretions. The primary defect in cystic fibrosis is the altered activity of a cAMP-activated Cl^- channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel. However, it is not clear how a defect in the CFTR Cl^- channel function leads to the observed pathological changes. Although much is known about the structural properties and regulation of the CFTR, little is known of its relationship to cellular functions other than the cAMP-dependent Cl^- secretion. Here we report that cell volume regulation after hypotonic challenge is also defective in intestinal crypt epithelial cells isolated from CFTR -/- mutant mice. Moreover, the impairment of the regulatory volume decrease in CFTR -/- crypts appears to be related to the inability of a K^+ conductance to provide a pathway for the exit of this cation during the volume adjustments. This provides evidence that the lack of CFTR protein may have additional consequences for the cellular function other than the abnormal cAMP-mediated Cl^- secretion.

  11. Establishment of a Reverse Genetics System for Studying Human Bocavirus in Human Airway Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Fang; Luo, Yong; Shen, Weiran; Lei-Butters, Diana C. M.; Chen, Aaron Yun; Li, Yi; Tang, Liang; Söderlund-Venermo, Maria; Engelhardt, John F.; Qiu, Jianming

    2012-01-01

    Human bocavirus 1 (HBoV1) has been identified as one of the etiological agents of wheezing in young children with acute respiratory-tract infections. In this study, we have obtained the sequence of a full-length HBoV1 genome (including both termini) using viral DNA extracted from a nasopharyngeal aspirate of an infected patient, cloned the full-length HBoV1 genome, and demonstrated DNA replication, encapsidation of the ssDNA genome, and release of the HBoV1 virions from human embryonic kidney 293 cells. The HBoV1 virions generated from this cell line-based production system exhibits a typical icosahedral structure of approximately 26 nm in diameter, and is capable of productively infecting polarized primary human airway epithelia (HAE) from the apical surface. Infected HAE showed hallmarks of lung airway-tract injury, including disruption of the tight junction barrier, loss of cilia and epithelial cell hypertrophy. Notably, polarized HAE cultured from an immortalized airway epithelial cell line, CuFi-8 (originally derived from a cystic fibrosis patient), also supported productive infection of HBoV1. Thus, we have established a reverse genetics system and generated the first cell line-based culture system for the study of HBoV1 infection, which will significantly advance the study of HBoV1 replication and pathogenesis. PMID:22956907

  12. Titanium dioxide nanoparticle impact and translocation through ex vivo, in vivo and in vitro gut epithelia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background TiO2 particles are commonly used as dietary supplements and may contain up to 36% of nano-sized particles (TiO2-NPs). Still impact and translocation of NPs through the gut epithelium is poorly documented. Results We show that, in vivo and ex vivo, agglomerates of TiO2-NPs cross both the regular ileum epithelium and the follicle-associated epithelium (FAE) and alter the paracellular permeability of the ileum and colon epithelia. In vitro, they accumulate in M-cells and mucus-secreting cells, much less in enterocytes. They do not cause overt cytotoxicity or apoptosis. They translocate through a model of FAE only, but induce tight junctions remodeling in the regular ileum epithelium, which is a sign of integrity alteration and suggests paracellular passage of NPs. Finally we prove that TiO2-NPs do not dissolve when sequestered up to 24 h in gut cells. Conclusions Taken together these data prove that TiO2-NPs would possibly translocate through both the regular epithelium lining the ileum and through Peyer’s patches, would induce epithelium impairment, and would persist in gut cells where they would possibly induce chronic damage. PMID:24666995

  13. Tubal Ligation Induces Quiescence in the Epithelia of the Fallopian Tube Fimbria.

    PubMed

    Tiourin, Ekaterina; Velasco, Victor S; Rosales, Miguel A; Sullivan, Peggy S; Janzen, Deanna M; Memarzadeh, Sanaz

    2015-10-01

    Tubal ligation keeps the fimbriated end of the fallopian tube intact while interrupting the conduit for sperm and egg between the uterus and ovary. Tubal ligation is associated with an approximately 20% decreased risk of high-grade serous ovarian cancers, which mounting evidence suggests arise from the distal fallopian tube epithelium. We postulated that biological changes at the epithelial cellular level of the distal fallopian tube may account for the surgical procedure's observed risk reduction. We compared the histology, presence of epithelial progenitors (basally located CD44-positive cells), and degree of epithelial proliferation (Ki67-positive cells) of distal fallopian tube from 10 patients with previous tubal ligation and 10 age-matched patients with uncut fallopian tubes. A significantly reduced population of proliferating epithelial progenitors (basally located CD44/Ki67 dual-positive cells) was detected in the tubal ligated specimens (P = .0002). To functionally assess the effect of tubal ligation, a murine model was utilized to compare the growth capacity of distal fallopian tube epithelial cells isolated from either ligated or sham-operated tubal epithelia. Murine fallopian tube epithelial cells isolated after tubal ligation showed a significantly reduced capacity to grow organoids in culture compared to sham-operated controls (P = .002). The findings of this study show that tubal ligation is associated with a reduced presence and decreased proliferation of progenitor cells in the distal fallopian tube epithelium. These compositional and functional changes suggest that tubal ligation induces quiescence of distal fallopian tube epithelial cells.

  14. HIV-Enhancing Factors Are Secreted by Reproductive Epithelia upon Inoculation with Bacterial Vaginosis-Associated Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Eade, Colleen R; Diaz, Camila; Chen, Sixue; Cole, Amy L; Cole, Alexander M

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is a common reproductive infection in which commensal vaginal lactobacilli are displaced by a mixed population of pathogenic bacteria. Bacterial vaginosis increases susceptibility to HIV, and it has been suggested that host innate immune responses to pathogenic bacteria contribute to enhanced infection, yet the cellular mechanisms mediating the increased HIV susceptibility remain uncharacterized. We evaluated the HIV-enhancing effects of bacterial vaginosis by inoculating endocervical epithelia with Atopobium vaginae, a bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria, and assaying secreted factors for HIV-enhancing activity. When epithelia and A. vaginae were cocultured, we observed increased HIV-enhancing activity mediated by secreted low molecular weight factors. From this complex mixture we identified several upregulated host proteins, which functioned in combination to enhance HIV infection. These studies suggest that the host immune response to bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria results in the release of HIV-enhancing factors. The combined activity of bacterial vaginosis-induced proteins likely mediates HIV enhancement.

  15. Breast Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  16. Types of Breast Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... the key statistics about breast cancer? Types of breast cancers Breast cancer can be separated into different types ... than invasive ductal carcinoma. Less common types of breast cancer Inflammatory breast cancer This uncommon type of invasive ...

  17. Breast self-exam

    MedlinePlus

    Self-examination of the breast; BSE; Breast cancer - BSE; Breast cancer screening - self exam ... American Cancer Society. Recommendations for early breast cancer detection in women without breast symptoms. Revised October 20, ... ...

  18. Iron transport across the skin and gut epithelia of Pacific hagfish: Kinetic characterisation and effect of hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Glover, Chris N; Niyogi, Som; Blewett, Tamzin A; Wood, Chris M

    2016-09-01

    In most animals, the acquisition of the essential trace metal iron (Fe) is achieved by the gut, but in hagfishes, the skin is a nutrient absorbing epithelium, and thus may also play a role in Fe uptake. In the current study, the absorption of Fe, as Fe(II), across the intestinal and cutaneous epithelia of Pacific hagfish (Eptatretus cirrhatus) was investigated. Both epithelia absorbed Fe, with saturation at lower tested concentrations, superseded by a diffusive component at higher Fe exposure concentrations. Affinity constants (Km) of 9.4 and 137μM, and maximal Fe transport rates (Jmax) of 0.81 and 0.57nmolcm(-2)h(-1) were determined for the skin and the gut, respectively. This characterises the skin as a relatively high-affinity Fe transport epithelium. The majority of the absorbed Fe in the skin remained in the tissue, whereas in the gut, most absorbed Fe was found in the serosal fluid, suggesting distinct mechanisms of Fe handling between the two epithelia. To determine if reduced dissolved oxygen altered Fe transport, hagfish were subjected to hypoxia for 24h, before Fe transport was again assessed. Hypoxia had no effect on Fe transport across gut or skin, likely owing to the relative lack of change in haematological variables, and thus an unaltered Fe demand under such conditions. These data are the first to kinetically characterise the absorption of a nutritive trace metal across the epithelia of hagfish and add to the growing understanding of the role of the skin in nutritive transport in this group.

  19. Aromatase and cyclooxygenases: enzymes in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Brueggemeier, Robert W; Richards, Jeanette A; Petrel, Trevor A

    2003-09-01

    Aromatase (estrogen synthase) is the cytochrome P450 enzyme complex that converts C19 androgens to C18 estrogens. Aromatase activity has been demonstrated in breast tissue in vitro, and expression of aromatase is highest in or near breast tumor sites. Thus, local regulation of aromatase by both endogenous factors as well as exogenous medicinal agents will influence the levels of estrogen available for breast cancer growth. The prostaglandin PGE2 increases intracellular cAMP levels and stimulates estrogen biosynthesis, and previous studies in our laboratories have shown a strong linear association between aromatase (CYP19) expression and expression of the cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2) in breast cancer specimens. To further investigate the pathways regulating COX and CYP19 gene expression, studies were performed in normal breast stromal cells, in breast cancer cells from patients, and in breast cancer cell lines using selective pharmacological agents. Enhanced COX enzyme levels results in increased production of prostaglandins, such as PGE2. This prostaglandin increased aromatase activity in breast stromal cells, and studies with selective agonists and antagonists showed that this regulation of signaling pathways occurs through the EP1 and EP2 receptor subtypes. COX-2 gene expression was enhanced in breast cancer cell lines by ligands for the various peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), and differential regulation was observed between hormone-dependent and -independent breast cancer cells. Thus, the regulation of both enzymes in breast cancer involves complex paracrine interactions, resulting in significant consequences on the pathogenesis of breast cancer. PMID:14623550

  20. Confocal laser scanning and electron microscopical studies on osmoregulatory epithelia in the branchial cavity of the lobster homarus gammarus

    PubMed

    Haond; Flik; Charmantier

    1998-06-01

    The adult lobster Homarus gammarus is a weak hyper-regulator at low salinity. The objective of this study was to locate the ion-transporting tissues in the branchial chamber of this species, using electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy with a fluorescent vital stain for mitochondria, DASPMI, which is widely used to locate mitochondria-rich cells in ion-transporting epithelia of fish. A thick mitochondria-rich epithelium is present on the inner side of the branchiostegite and over the entire surface of the epipodites. Ultrastructural observations confirm that this tissue has features typical of an ion-transporting epithelium. When the lobster is transferred to low salinity, these epithelia undergo marked ultrastructural changes, such as an increase in thickness related to the development of basolateral infoldings, the appearance of numerous vesicles and an increase in height of the apical microvilli. In the gills, the branchial filaments are lined by a thin and poorly differentiated epithelium, containing numerous mitochondria; no significant ultrastructural changes were observed in the gills of animals acclimated to low salinity. In summary, in H. gammarus, no evidence of osmoregulatory structures was found in the gills. Differentiated ion-transporting epithelia are present in the branchial cavity, on the inner side of the branchiostegite and on the epipodites; these organs are probably involved in osmoregulation. PMID:9576892

  1. What Is Breast in the Bone?

    PubMed Central

    Shemanko, Carrie S.; Cong, Yingying; Forsyth, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    The normal developmental program that prolactin generates in the mammary gland is usurped in the cancerous process and can be used out of its normal cellular context at a site of secondary metastasis. Prolactin is a pleiotropic peptide hormone and cytokine that is secreted from the pituitary gland, as well as from normal and cancerous breast cells. Experimental and epidemiologic data suggest that prolactin is associated with mammary gland development, and also the increased risk of breast tumors and metastatic disease in postmenopausal women. Breast cancer spreads to the bone in approximately 70% of cases with advanced breast cancer. Despite treatment, new bone metastases will still occur in 30%–50% of patients. Only 20% of patients with bone metastases survive five years after the diagnosis of bone metastasis. The breast cancer cells in the bone microenvironment release soluble factors that engage osteoclasts and/or osteoblasts and result in bone breakdown. The breakdown of the bone matrix, in turn, enhances the proliferation of the cancer cells, creating a vicious cycle. Recently, it was shown that prolactin accelerated the breast cancer cell-mediated osteoclast differentiation and bone breakdown by the regulation of breast cancer-secreted proteins. Interestingly, prolactin has the potential to affect multiple proteins that are involved in both breast development and likely bone metastasis, as well. Prolactin has normal bone homeostatic roles and, combined with the natural “recycling” of proteins in different tissues that can be used for breast development and function, or in bone function, increases the impact of prolactin signaling in breast cancer bone metastases. Thus, this review will focus on the role of prolactin in breast development, bone homeostasis and in breast cancer to bone metastases, covering the molecular aspects of the vicious cycle. PMID:27782069

  2. Fluid transport across leaky epithelia: central role of the tight junction and supporting role of aquaporins.

    PubMed

    Fischbarg, Jorge

    2010-10-01

    laboratory of Adrian Hill for fluid transport across other leaky epithelia. PMID:20959616

  3. Role of Ca2+ in responses of airway epithelia to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, flagellin, ATP, and thapsigargin.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhu; Bettega, Kelly; Carroll, Susheela; Buchholz, Kerry R; Machen, Terry E

    2007-01-01

    Neither Pseudomonas aeruginosa nor flagellin affected cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca](i)) in airway epithelial cell lines JME and Calu-3, but bacteria or flagellin activated NF-kappaB, IL-8 promoter, and IL-8 secretion. ATP (purinergic agonist) and thapsigargin (blocks Ca(2+) pump, releases endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+), and triggers Ca(2+) entry through plasma membrane channels) both increased [Ca](i) but hardly stimulated NF-kappaB and IL-8. ATP and thapsigargin elicited larger, synergistic activations of NF-kappaB and IL-8 secretion when combined with flagellin. BAPTA-AM (to buffer [Ca](i)) or Ca(2+)-free solution reduced increases in [Ca](i) due to ATP or thapsigargin and also reduced NF-kappaB activation and IL-8 secretion triggered by flagellin, ATP, thapsigargin, ATP + flagellin, and thapsigargin + flagellin. IL-8 promoter analysis showed that AP-1 and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP)beta/nuclear factor for IL-6 (NF-IL6) sites were important for IL-8 expression, and the NF-kappaB-binding site was critical for activation by all agonists and for activation by [Ca](i). Thus increased [Ca](i) was not required for P. aeruginosa- or flagellin-activated NF-kappaB and IL-8 expression and secretion, and increased [Ca](i) was only weakly stimulatory during activation by ATP or thapsigargin. However, ATP- or thapsigargin-induced increases in [Ca](i) synergized with flagellin or P. aeruginosa, and buffering or reducing [Ca](i) reduced these responses. Thus [Ca](i) plays an important regulatory role in P. aeruginosa- or flagellin-activated innate immune responses in airway epithelia. Dose-dependent responses indicated that flagellin-ATP synergism occurred most prominently at ATP concentrations ([ATP]) > 10 microM and [flagellin] >10(-8) g/ml and during steady increases rather than oscillations in [Ca](i). PMID:16963531

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm-associated homoserine lactone C12 rapidly activates apoptosis in airway epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzer, Christian; Fu, Zhu; Patanwala, Maria; Hum, Lauren; Lopez-Guzman, Mirielle; Illek, Beate; Kong, Weidong; Lynch, Susan V.; Machen, Terry E.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) forms biofilms in lungs of cystic fibrosis CF) patients, a process regulated by quorum sensing molecules including N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone, C12. C12 (10–100 μM) rapidly triggered events commonly associated with the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in JME (CFΔF508CFTR, nasal surface) epithelial cells: depolarization of mitochondrial (mito) membrane potential (Δψmito) and release of cytochrome C (cytoC) from mitos into cytosol and activation of caspases 3/7, 8 and 9. C12 also had novel effects on the endoplasmic reticulum (release of both Ca2+ and ER-targeted GFP and oxidized contents into the cytosol). Effects began within 5 minutes and were complete in 1–2 hrs. C12 caused similar activation of caspases and release of cytoC from mitos in Calu-3 (wtCFTR, bronchial gland) cells, showing that C12-triggered responses occurred similarly in different airway epithelial types. C12 had nearly identical effects on three key aspects of the apoptosis response (caspase 3/7, depolarization of Δψmito and reduction of redox potential in the ER) in JME and CFTR-corrected JME cells (adenoviral expression), showing that CFTR was likely not an important regulator of C12-triggered apoptosis in airway epithelia. Exposure of airway cultures to biofilms from PAO1wt caused depolarization of Δψmito and increases in Cacyto like 10–50 μM C12. In contrast, biofilms from PAO1ΔlasI (C12 deficient) had no effect, suggesting that C12 from P. aeruginosa biofilms may contribute to accumulation of apoptotic cells that cannot be cleared from CF lungs. A model to explain the effects of C12 is proposed. PMID:22233488

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm-associated homoserine lactone C12 rapidly activates apoptosis in airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Schwarzer, Christian; Fu, Zhu; Patanwala, Maria; Hum, Lauren; Lopez-Guzman, Mirielle; Illek, Beate; Kong, Weidong; Lynch, Susan V; Machen, Terry E

    2012-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) forms biofilms in lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, a process regulated by quorum-sensing molecules including N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (C12). C12 (10-100 µM) rapidly triggered events commonly associated with the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in JME (CF ΔF508CFTR, nasal surface) epithelial cells: depolarization of mitochondrial (mito) membrane potential (Δψ(mito)) and release of cytochrome C (cytoC) from mitos into cytosol and activation of caspases 3/7, 8 and 9. C12 also had novel effects on the endoplasmic reticulum (release of both Ca(2+) and ER-targeted GFP and oxidized contents into the cytosol). Effects began within 5 min and were complete in 1-2 h. C12 caused similar activation of caspases and release of cytoC from mitos in Calu-3 (wtCFTR, bronchial gland) cells, showing that C12-triggered responses occurred similarly in different airway epithelial types. C12 had nearly identical effects on three key aspects of the apoptosis response (caspase 3/7, depolarization of Δψ(mito) and reduction of redox potential in the ER) in JME and CFTR-corrected JME cells (adenoviral expression), showing that CFTR was likely not an important regulator of C12-triggered apoptosis in airway epithelia. Exposure of airway cultures to biofilms from PAO1wt caused depolarization of Δψ(mito) and increases in Ca(cyto) like 10-50 µM C12. In contrast, biofilms from PAO1ΔlasI (C12 deficient) had no effect, suggesting that C12 from P. aeruginosa biofilms may contribute to accumulation of apoptotic cells that cannot be cleared from CF lungs. A model to explain the effects of C12 is proposed.

  6. Expression of CYP4F12 in gastrointestinal and urogenital epithelia.

    PubMed

    Stark, Katarina; Schauer, Lydia; Sahlén, Göran E; Ronquist, Gunnar; Oliw, Ernst H

    2004-04-01

    Cytochrome P450 4F12 (CYP4F12) was originally cloned from human liver and small intestine. CYP4F12 can oxidize arachidonic acid, two stable prostaglandin H2 analogues, and an antihistamine, ebastine, but the tissue distribution and catalytic properties of CYP4F12 have not been fully investigated. An antipeptide polyclonal antibody was raised against the C-terminal of CYP4F12 (PLNVGLQ), evaluated by Western blot analysis and used for immunohistological analysis of 50 human tissues. Western blot analysis of recombinant CYP4F12, expressed in yeast, and microsomal proteins from adult and foetal liver, kidney, placenta at term, seminal vesicles, the prostate gland and purified prostasomes showed that the polyclonal antibody detected a protein of the expected size, approximately 60 kDa. CYP4F12 mRNA could be detected in seminal vesicles and prostate gland by reverse transcription-PCR. Prominent CYP4F12 immunoreactivity occurred, inter alia, in the epithelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract (stomach, small intestine, and colon), collecting tubules, transitional epithelium, ovarian follicles, the endothelium of microvessels of placental villi (first trimester), and epidermis. We screened recombinant CYP4F12 for catalytic activity. Arachidonic acid (20:4n-6) was hydroxylated at C18 and laurate at C11, but significant amounts of metabolites of 18:2n-6, 20:3n-9, 20:5n-3, 22:5n-6, and some prostaglandins could not be detected. We conclude that CYP4F12 is widely distributed in gastrointestinal and urogenital epithelia and exhibits a narrow substrate specificity. PMID:15078342

  7. Purinergic P2Y receptors in airway epithelia: from ion transport to immune functions.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yuan; Ko, Wing-hung

    2014-02-25

    The regulated transport of salt and water is essential to the integrated function of many organ systems, including the respiratory, reproductive, and digestive tracts. Airway epithelial fluid secretion is a passive process that is driven by osmotic forces, which are generated by ion transport. The main determinant of a luminally-directed osmotic gradient is the mucosal transport of chloride ions (Cl(-)) into the lumen. As with many epithelial cells, a number of classic signal transduction cascades are involved in the regulation of ion transport. There are two well-known intracellular signaling systems: an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) and an increase in the rate of synthesis of cyclic nucleotides, such as cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Therefore, Cl(-) secretion is primarily activated via the opening of apical Ca(2+)- or cAMP-dependent Cl(-) channels at the apical membrane. The opening of basolateral Ca(2+)- or cAMP-activated K(+) channels, which hyperpolarizes the cell to maintain the driving force for Cl(-) exit through apical Cl(-) channels that are constitutively open, is also important in regulating transepithelial ion transport. P2Y receptors are expressed in the apical and/or basolateral membranes of virtually all polarized epithelia to control the transport of fluid and electrolytes. Human airway epithelial cells express multiple nucleotide receptors. Extracellular nucleotides, such as UTP and ATP, are calcium-mobilizing secretagogues. They are released into the extracellular space from airway epithelial cells and act on the same cell in an autocrine fashion to stimulate transepithelial ion transport. In addition, recent data support the role of P2Y receptors in releasing inflammatory cytokines in the bronchial epithelium and other immune cells.

  8. c-Jun N-terminal kinase mediates disassembly of apical junctions in model intestinal epithelia.

    PubMed

    Naydenov, Nayden G; Hopkins, Ann M; Ivanov, Andrei I

    2009-07-01

    Dynamic remodeling of intercellular junctions is a critical determinant of epithelial barrier function in both physiological and pathophysiological states. While the disassembly of epithelial tight junctions (TJ) and adherens junctions (AJ) has been well-described in response to pathogens and other external stressors, the role of stress-related signaling in TJ/AJ regulation remains poorly understood. The aim of this study was to define the role of stress-activated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in disruption of intercellular junctions in model intestinal epithelia. We show that rapid AJ/TJ disassembly triggered by extracellular calcium depletion of T84 and SK-CO15 cell monolayers was accompanied by activation (phosphorylation) of JNK, and prevented by pharmacological inhibitors of JNK. The opposite process, TJ/AJ reassembly, was accelerated by JNK inhibition and suppressed by the JNK activator anisomycin. JNK1 but not JNK2 was found to colocalize with intercellular junctions, and siRNA-mediated downregulation of JNK1 attenuated the TJ/AJ disruption caused by calcium depletion. JNK inhibition also blocked formation of characteristic contractile F-actin rings in calcium-depleted epithelial cells, suggesting that JNK regulates junctions by remodeling the actin cytoskeleton. In this role JNK acts downstream of the actin-reorganizing Rho-dependent kinase (ROCK), since ROCK inhibition abrogated JNK phosphorylation and TJ/AJ disassembly after calcium depletion. Furthermore, JNK acts upstream of F-actin-membrane linker proteins of the ERM (ezrin-radixin-moesin) family, but in a complex relationship yet to be fully elucidated. Taken together, our findings suggest a novel role for JNK in the signaling pathway that links ROCK and F-actin remodeling during disassembly of epithelial junctions.

  9. Transillumination breast spectroscopy (TIBS): a biomarker of breast tissue density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmore, Kristina M.; Knight, Julia A.; Jong, Roberta; Lilge, Lothar

    2005-08-01

    A primary goal of preventive oncology is the identification of women at increased risk for breast cancer who would benefit most from risk reducing interventions. An established physical risk assessment technique is the use of mammography to quantify the dense tissue content of the breast. Women with a majority of the breast occupied by dense tissue are at four to six times greater risk of breast cancer than women with the least density. The main drawback of mammography is that it requires exposure to ionising radiation and there are concerns regarding use in young women. Another potential physical risk assessment is Transillumination Breast Spectroscopy (TIBS). TIBS uses non-ionizing optical radiation to measure bulk tissue properties and thus is applicable to women of any age. This study examines the feasibility of using TIBS in vivo to detect mammographic density as an interim indicator of breast cancer risk. TIBS measurements were completed on 300 women with radiological normal mammograms. White light (625 to 1060 nm) was delivered to the breast tissue and transmitted light was detected on the opposite side of the breast. Principal component analysis was used to reduce the spectral data and generate individual 'risk' scores. Agreement between the obtained 'risk' scores and mammographic density was established using density cluster analysis, the Kappa statistic and logistic regression. The agreement between breast density assessed by mammography and by TIBS was statistically significant for all 'risk' scores. Logistic regression indicated a strong association between the TIBS scores and mammographic density. TIBS provides an alternative to x-ray derived mammographic density as a biomarker of breast density and hence cancer risk.

  10. WHITE STRIPING AND WOODEN BREAST DEFECTS INFLUENCE MEAT QUALITY AND MUSCLE PROTEIN CHARACTERISTICS IN BROILER BREAST MEAT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to determine the effects of the wooden breast (WB) and white striping (WS) myopathies on meat quality and protein characteristics of broiler breast meat. Breast fillets (Pectoralis major) from a commercial processing plant were segregated into four groups: normal (neither WS nor W...

  11. Signal enhancement ratio (SER) quantified from breast DCE-MRI and breast cancer risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shandong; Kurland, Brenda F.; Berg, Wendie A.; Zuley, Margarita L.; Jankowitz, Rachel C.; Sumkin, Jules; Gur, David

    2015-03-01

    Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is recommended as an adjunct to mammography for women who are considered at elevated risk of developing breast cancer. As a key component of breast MRI, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) uses a contrast agent to provide high intensity contrast between breast tissues, making it sensitive to tissue composition and vascularity. Breast DCE-MRI characterizes certain physiologic properties of breast tissue that are potentially related to breast cancer risk. Studies have shown that increased background parenchymal enhancement (BPE), which is the contrast enhancement occurring in normal cancer-unaffected breast tissues in post-contrast sequences, predicts increased breast cancer risk. Signal enhancement ratio (SER) computed from pre-contrast and post-contrast sequences in DCE-MRI measures change in signal intensity due to contrast uptake over time and is a measure of contrast enhancement kinetics. SER quantified in breast tumor has been shown potential as a biomarker for characterizing tumor response to treatments. In this work we investigated the relationship between quantitative measures of SER and breast cancer risk. A pilot retrospective case-control study was performed using a cohort of 102 women, consisting of 51 women who had diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer and 51 matched controls (by age and MRI date) with a unilateral biopsy-proven benign lesion. SER was quantified using fully-automated computerized algorithms and three SER-derived quantitative volume measures were compared between the cancer cases and controls using logistic regression analysis. Our preliminary results showed that SER is associated with breast cancer risk, after adjustment for the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS)-based mammographic breast density measures. This pilot study indicated that SER has potential for use as a risk factor for breast cancer risk assessment in women at elevated risk of developing breast cancer.

  12. Breast phantom for mammary tissue characterization by near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, D. A.; Cristiano, K. L.; Gutiérrez, J. C.

    2013-11-01

    Breast cancer is a disease associated to a high morbidity and mortality in the entire world. In the study of early detection of breast cancer the development of phantom is so important. In this research we fabricate a breast phantom using a ballistic gel with special modifications to simulate a normal and abnormal human breast. Optical properties of woman breast in the near infrared region were modelled with the phantom we developed. The developed phantom was evaluated with near infrared spectroscopy in order to study its relation with breast tissue. A good optical behaviour was achieved with the model fabricated.

  13. Breast Feeding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Children's Centre, Paris (France).

    This set of documents consists of English, French, and Spanish translations of four pamphlets on breast-feeding. The pamphlets provide information designed for lay persons, academics and professionals, health personnel and educators, and policy-makers. The contents cover health-related differences between breast and bottle milk; patterns of…

  14. Hierarchical Clustering of Breast Cancer Methylomes Revealed Differentially Methylated and Expressed Breast Cancer Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, I-Hsuan; Chen, Dow-Tien; Chang, Yi-Feng; Lee, Yu-Ling; Su, Chia-Hsin; Cheng, Ching; Tsai, Yi-Chien; Ng, Swee-Chuan; Chen, Hsiao-Tan; Lee, Mei-Chen; Chen, Hong-Wei; Suen, Shih-Hui; Chen, Yu-Cheng; Liu, Tze-Tze; Chang, Chuan-Hsiung; Hsu, Ming-Ta

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic transformation of normal cells often involves epigenetic alterations, including histone modification and DNA methylation. We conducted whole-genome bisulfite sequencing to determine the DNA methylomes of normal breast, fibroadenoma, invasive ductal carcinomas and MCF7. The emergence, disappearance, expansion and contraction of kilobase-sized hypomethylated regions (HMRs) and the hypomethylation of the megabase-sized partially methylated domains (PMDs) are the major forms of methylation changes observed in breast tumor samples. Hierarchical clustering of HMR revealed tumor-specific hypermethylated clusters and differential methylated enhancers specific to normal or breast cancer cell lines. Joint analysis of gene expression and DNA methylation data of normal breast and breast cancer cells identified differentially methylated and expressed genes associated with breast and/or ovarian cancers in cancer-specific HMR clusters. Furthermore, aberrant patterns of X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) was found in breast cancer cell lines as well as breast tumor samples in the TCGA BRCA (breast invasive carcinoma) dataset. They were characterized with differentially hypermethylated XIST promoter, reduced expression of XIST, and over-expression of hypomethylated X-linked genes. High expressions of these genes were significantly associated with lower survival rates in breast cancer patients. Comprehensive analysis of the normal and breast tumor methylomes suggests selective targeting of DNA methylation changes during breast cancer progression. The weak causal relationship between DNA methylation and gene expression observed in this study is evident of more complex role of DNA methylation in the regulation of gene expression in human epigenetics that deserves further investigation. PMID:25706888

  15. Multivariate normality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crutcher, H. L.; Falls, L. W.

    1976-01-01

    Sets of experimentally determined or routinely observed data provide information about the past, present and, hopefully, future sets of similarly produced data. An infinite set of statistical models exists which may be used to describe the data sets. The normal distribution is one model. If it serves at all, it serves well. If a data set, or a transformation of the set, representative of a larger population can be described by the normal distribution, then valid statistical inferences can be drawn. There are several tests which may be applied to a data set to determine whether the univariate normal model adequately describes the set. The chi-square test based on Pearson's work in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries is often used. Like all tests, it has some weaknesses which are discussed in elementary texts. Extension of the chi-square test to the multivariate normal model is provided. Tables and graphs permit easier application of the test in the higher dimensions. Several examples, using recorded data, illustrate the procedures. Tests of maximum absolute differences, mean sum of squares of residuals, runs and changes of sign are included in these tests. Dimensions one through five with selected sample sizes 11 to 101 are used to illustrate the statistical tests developed.

  16. The calcium pump plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase 2 (PMCA2) regulates breast cancer cell proliferation and sensitivity to doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Amelia A.; Milevskiy, Michael J. G.; Lee, Wei C.; Curry, Merril C.; Smart, Chanel E.; Saunus, Jodi M.; Reid, Lynne; da Silva, Leonard; Marcial, Daneth L.; Dray, Eloise; Brown, Melissa A.; Lakhani, Sunil R.; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J.; Monteith, Gregory R.

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of Ca2+ transport is vital in physiological processes, including lactation, proliferation and apoptosis. The plasmalemmal Ca2+ pump isoform 2 (PMCA2) a calcium ion efflux pump, was the first protein identified to be crucial in the transport of Ca2+ ions into milk during lactation in mice. In these studies we show that PMCA2 is also expressed in human epithelia undergoing lactational remodeling and also report strong PMCA2 staining on apical membranes of luminal epithelia in approximately 9% of human breast cancers we assessed. Membrane protein expression was not significantly associated with grade or hormone receptor status. However, PMCA2 mRNA levels were enriched in Basal breast cancers where it was positively correlated with survival. Silencing of PMCA2 reduced MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell proliferation, whereas silencing of the related isoforms PMCA1 and PMCA4 had no effect. PMCA2 silencing also sensitized MDA-MB-231 cells to the cytotoxic agent doxorubicin. Targeting PMCA2 alone or in combination with cytotoxic therapy may be worthy of investigation as a therapeutic strategy in breast cancer. PMCA2 mRNA levels are also a potential tool in identifying poor responders to therapy in women with Basal breast cancer. PMID:27148852

  17. Crumbs and stardust act in a genetic pathway that controls the organization of epithelia in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Tepass, U; Knust, E

    1993-09-01

    We provide evidence that the genes crumbs (crb) and stardust (sdt) encode critical components of a pathway that acts at the apical pole of epithelial cells to control the cytoarchitecture of ectodermally derived epithelia of the Drosophila embryo. We describe the developmental defects caused by sdt mutations, which are very similar to those associated with mutations in crb. In both mutants the epithelial structure of ectodermal cells breaks down during early organogenesis, leading to the formation of irregular clusters of cells and cell death in some epithelia. Certain cells can, however, compensate for the loss of crb or sdt function in a tissue-specific manner, later reassuming an epithelial cell shape and forming small epithelial vesicles, suggesting that, besides crb and sdt, other tissue-specific components are involved in this process. The crb protein (CRB) is continuously expressed in wild-type embryos in cells of the ectoderm and ectodermally derived epithelia. In sdt mutant embryos CRB is present only during gastrulation, but becomes undetectable during germ band extension; the protein is again visible during early organogenesis, at the time when the sdt mutant phenotype becomes apparent. In sdt mutant embryos, CRB is associated with the apical membrane only in well-differentiated epithelial cells, but it is expressed diffusely in the cytoplasm of cells which have lost epithelial morphology. Our results suggest that time- and tissue-specific control mechanisms exist to establish and maintain epithelial cell structure. Mosaic experiments suggest that sdt is required cell autonomously, in contrast to crb, the requirement of which appears to be non-cell-autonomous. Double mutant combinations of crb and sdt suggest that these genes are part of a common genetic pathway (crb/sdt pathway), in which sdt acts downstream of crb and is activated by the latter.

  18. NEU1 Sialidase Expressed in Human Airway Epithelia Regulates Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and MUC1 Protein Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Lillehoj, Erik P.; Hyun, Sang Won; Feng, Chiguang; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Anguo; Guang, Wei; Nguyen, Chinh; Luzina, Irina G.; Atamas, Sergei P.; Passaniti, Antonino; Twaddell, William S.; Puché, Adam C.; Wang, Lai-Xi; Cross, Alan S.; Goldblum, Simeon E.

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial cells (ECs) lining the airways provide a protective barrier between the external environment and the internal host milieu. These same airway epithelia express receptors that respond to danger signals and initiate repair programs. Because the sialylation state of a receptor can influence its function and is dictated in part by sialidase activity, we asked whether airway epithelia express catalytically active sialidase(s). Human primary small airway and A549 ECs expressed NEU1 sialidase at the mRNA and protein levels, and NEU1 accounted for >70% of EC sialidase activity. Blotting with Maackia amurensis and peanut agglutinin lectins established epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and MUC1 as in vivo substrates for NEU1. NEU1 associated with EGFR and MUC1, and NEU1-EGFR association was regulated by EGF stimulation. NEU1 overexpression diminished EGF-stimulated EGFR Tyr-1068 autophosphorylation by up to 44% but enhanced MUC1-dependent Pseudomonas aeruginosa adhesion by 1.6–1.7-fold and flagellin-stimulated ERK1/2 activation by 1.7–1.9-fold. In contrast, NEU1 depletion increased EGFR activation (1.5-fold) and diminished MUC1-mediated bacterial adhesion (38–56%) and signaling (73%). These data indicate for the first time that human airway epithelia express catalytically active NEU1 sialidase that regulates EGFR- and MUC1-dependent signaling and bacterial adhesion. NEU1 catalytic activity may offer an additional level of regulation over the airway epithelial response to ligands, pathogens, and injurious stimuli. PMID:22247545

  19. A whole new ball game: Stem cell-derived epithelia in the study of host-microbe interactions.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Jhansi L; Young, Vincent B

    2016-02-01

    Recent advances in developmental and stem cell biology have resulted in techniques that enable the generation and maintenance of complex epithelium in vitro. While these models have been utilized to study host development and disease, a renewed appreciation of host-microbe interactions has sparked interest in employing these new techniques to study microbes at the epithelial interface. Here we review the current advances in host-microbe interactions that have resulted from experiments using these complex epithelia. Furthermore we highlight aspects of these techniques that warrant further development to facilitate the study of host-microbe interactions.

  20. Cleavage of functional IL-2 receptor alpha chain (CD25) from murine corneal and conjunctival epithelia by MMP-9

    PubMed Central

    De Paiva, Cintia S; Yoon, Kyung-Chul; Pangelinan, Solherny B; Pham, Sapa; Puthenparambil, Larry M; Chuang, Eliseu Y; Farley, William J; Stern, Michael E; Li, De-Quan; Pflugfelder, Stephen C

    2009-01-01

    Background IL-2 has classically been considered a cytokine that regulates T cell proliferation and differentiation, signaling through its heterotrimeric receptor (IL-2R) consisting of α (CD25), β (CD122), γ chains (CD132). Expression of IL-2R has also been detected in mucosal epithelial cells. Soluble IL-2Rα (CD25) has been reported as an inflammatory marker. We evaluated the expression of CD25 and CD122 in the ocular surface epithelium and investigated the mechanism of proteolytic cleavage of CD25 from these cells. Methods Desiccating stress (DS) was used as an inducer of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). DS was created by subjecting C57BL/6 and MMP-9 knockout (BKO) mice and their wild-type littermates (WT) mice to a low humidity and drafty environment for 5 days (DS5). A separate group of C57BL/6 mice was subjected to DS5 and treatment with topical 0.025% doxycycline, a MMP inhibitor, administered QID. The expression of CD25 and CD122 was evaluated in cryosections by dual-label laser scanning confocal microscopy. Western blot was used to measure relative levels of CD25 in epithelial lysates. Gelatinase activity was evaluated by in situ zymography. Soluble CD25 in tear fluid was measured by an immunobead assay. Results CD25 and CD122 were abundantly expressed in cornea (all layers) and conjunctiva epithelia (apical and subapical layers) in nonstressed control mice. After desiccating stress, we found that immunoreactivity to CD25, but not CD122, decreased by the ocular surface epithelia and concentration of soluble CD25 in tears increased as MMP-9 staining increased. CD25 was preserved in C57BL/6 mice topically treated with an MMP-9 inhibitor and in MMP-9 knock-out mice. MMP-9 treatment of human cultured corneal epithelial cells decreased levels of CD25 protein in a concentration dependent fashion. Conclusion Our results indicate that functional IL-2R is produced by the ocular surface epithelia and that CD25 is proteolytic cleaved to its soluble form by MMP-9

  1. Breast Cancer Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast Cancer - Overview Request Permissions Print to PDF Breast Cancer - Overview Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , ... bean-shaped organs that help fight infection. About breast cancer Cancer begins when healthy cells in the breast ...

  2. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) Surgery for breast cancer Most women with breast cancer have some type ... Relieve symptoms of advanced cancer Surgery to remove breast cancer There are two main types of surgery to ...

  3. Learning about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Breast Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast ... Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast cancer? Breast cancer is a common disease. Each year, ...

  4. Fibrocystic breast disease

    MedlinePlus

    Fibrocystic breast disease; Mammary dysplasia; Diffuse cystic mastopathy; Benign breast disease; Glandular breast changes ... FF, Fort GG, et al, eds. Fibrocystic breast disease. In: Ferri FF, ed. Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2015 . ...

  5. Premenstrual breast changes

    MedlinePlus

    Premenstrual tenderness and swelling of the breasts; Breast tenderness - premenstrual; Breast swelling - premenstrual ... Symptoms of premenstrual breast tenderness may range from mild to ... most severe just before each menstrual period Improve during ...

  6. Breast enlargement in males

    MedlinePlus

    Gynecomastia; Breast enlargement in a male ... The condition may occur in one or both breasts. It begins as a small lump beneath the nipple, which may be tender. One breast may be larger than the other. Enlarged breasts ...

  7. Stroma in Breast Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Arendt, Lisa M.; Rudnick, Jenny A.; Keller, Patricia J.; Kuperwasser, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    It is increasingly apparent that normal and malignant breast tissues require complex local and systemic stromal interactions for development and progression. During development, mammary cell fate specification and differentiation require highly regulated contextual signals derived from the stroma. Likewise, during breast carcinoma development, the tissue stroma can provide tumor suppressing and tumor-promoting environments that serve to regulate neoplastic growth of the epithelium. This review focuses on the role of the stroma as a mediator of normal mammary development, as well as a critical regulator of malignant conversion and progression in breast cancer. Recognition of the important role of the stroma during the progression of breast cancers leads to the possibility of new targets for treatment of the initial breast cancer lesion as well as prevention of recurrence. PMID:19857593

  8. Normalizing Rejection.

    PubMed

    Conn, Vicki S; Zerwic, Julie; Jefferson, Urmeka; Anderson, Cindy M; Killion, Cheryl M; Smith, Carol E; Cohen, Marlene Z; Fahrenwald, Nancy L; Herrick, Linda; Topp, Robert; Benefield, Lazelle E; Loya, Julio

    2016-02-01

    Getting turned down for grant funding or having a manuscript rejected is an uncomfortable but not unusual occurrence during the course of a nurse researcher's professional life. Rejection can evoke an emotional response akin to the grieving process that can slow or even undermine productivity. Only by "normalizing" rejection, that is, by accepting it as an integral part of the scientific process, can researchers more quickly overcome negative emotions and instead use rejection to refine and advance their scientific programs. This article provides practical advice for coming to emotional terms with rejection and delineates methods for working constructively to address reviewer comments. PMID:26041785

  9. Breast ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Hacker NF, Friedland ML. Breast disease. In: Hacker NF, Gambone JC, Hobel CJ, eds. Hacker and Moore's Essentials of Obstetrics and Gynecology . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 30. Harvey ...

  10. Breast lift

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... are made to accommodate a higher position for the areola and nipple, as well as to remove excess skin and breast tissue. Stitches usually follow the circumference of the areola, the natural lower crease ...

  11. Breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... drink per day (women at high risk for breast cancer should not drink alcohol at all) ... Services Task Force. Risk assessment, genetic counseling, and ... cancer treatment. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute. Date ...

  12. Breast Density and Your Breast Mammogram Report

    MedlinePlus

    Breast Density and Your Mammogram Report Regular mammograms are the best way to find breast cancer early. But if ... But in some women, there’s little change. Breast density is very common, and is not abnormal. How ...

  13. Normal development.

    PubMed

    Girard, Nadine; Koob, Meriam; Brunel, Herv

    2016-01-01

    Numerous events are involved in brain development, some of which are detected by neuroimaging. Major changes in brain morphology are depicted by brain imaging during the fetal period while changes in brain composition can be demonstrated in both pre- and postnatal periods. Although ultrasonography and computed tomography can show changes in brain morphology, these techniques are insensitive to myelination that is one of the most important events occurring during brain maturation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is therefore the method of choice to evaluate brain maturation. MRI also gives insight into the microstructure of brain tissue through diffusion-weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Metabolic changes are also part of brain maturation and are assessed by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Understanding and knowledge of the different steps in brain development are required to be able to detect morphologic and structural changes on neuroimaging. Consequently alterations in normal development can be depicted. PMID:27430460

  14. The basal keratin network of stratified squamous epithelia: defining K15 function in the absence of K14

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Keratin 5 and keratin 14 have been touted as the hallmarks of the basal keratin networks of all stratified squamous epithelia. Absence of K14 gives rise to epidermolysis bullosa simplex, a human blistering skin disorder involving cytolysis in the basal layer of epidermis. To address the puzzling question of why this disease is primarily manifested in skin rather than other stratified squamous epithelia, we ablated the K14 gene in mice and examined various tissues expressing this gene. We show that a key factor is the presence of another keratin, K15, which was hitherto unappreciated as a basal cell component. We show that the levels of K15 relative to K14 vary dramatically among stratified squamous epithelial tissues, and with neonatal development. In the absence of K14, K15 makes a bona fide, but ultrastructurally distinct, keratin filament network with K5. In the epidermis of neonatal mutant mice, K15 levels are low and do not compensate for the loss of K14. In contrast, the esophagus is unaffected in the neonatal mutant mice, but does appear to be fragile in the adult. Parallel to this phenomenon is that esophageal K14 is expressed at extremely low levels in the neonate, but rises in postnatal development. Finally, despite previous conclusions that the formation of suprabasal keratin filaments might depend upon K5/K14, we find that a wide variety of suprabasal networks composed of different keratins can form in the absence of K14 in the basal layer. PMID:7539810

  15. Male breast cancer-review of literature on a rare microscopic variant (oncocytic carcinoma).

    PubMed

    Marla, Nisha Jayashankar; Pai, Muktha Ramesh; Swethadri, Gumballi Krishnamurthy; Fernandes, Hilda

    2013-06-01

    Breast cancer is uncommon in males. Approximately 85 % of male mammary carcinomas are of the infiltrating duct type. One of the uncommon subtypes is oncocytic carcinoma (OC). Oncocytic tumors may occur in several different anatomical sites such as meninges, choroid plexus, soft tissue, and gastrointestinal tract; they tend to affect more frequently the endocrine and glandular epithelia such as salivary gland and renal tubules that have high metabolic activity. At present, OC is a morphological entity, and there is no practical reason for including OC into everyday reports, since any significant clinical features are found. However, more cases of OC of the breast have to be studied in view of the fact that oncocytic tumors of colon, thyroid, and meninges seem to be resistant to radiation therapy, a finding that might be taken into consideration when planning the treatment in breast carcinomas. PMID:24426578

  16. Cell birth and survival following seasonal periods of cell proliferation in the chemosensory epithelia of red-backed salamanders, Plethodon cinereus.

    PubMed

    Dawley, Ellen M; Nelsen, Meaghan; Lopata, Adrianne; Schwartz, Jessica; Bierly, Alison

    2006-01-01

    In addition to the continuous low levels of neurogenesis typical of adult vertebrates to replace damaged chemoreceptor cells, red-backed salamanders (Plethodon cinereus) experience an up-regulation of chemoreceptor epithelial cell proliferation on a seasonal basis. Significantly more cell division occurs in late spring than at any other time of the year, and we investigated the fate and life span of these newly generated cells. We used 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) immunocytochemical cell birth dating to examine cell proliferation and cell migration in the main olfactory and vomeronasal epithelia of red-backed salamanders collected in late spring who were allowed to survive for one hour or three, four, 25, 28, 42, 49 and 100 days post-injection. We examined new neuron growth in the vomeronasal and olfactory epithelia using antibodies against Growth Associated Protein-43 (GAP-43), a protein whose synthesis is up-regulated during axon growth. We also tracked apoptosis within both types of chemosensory epithelia using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick-end labeling (TUNEL). BrdU-immunoreactive cells were located extensively throughout the vomeronasal epithelia, particularly in the area posterior to the entrance of the nasolacrimal duct, not only after three days of survival, but also all of the longer experimental survival periods as well; BrdU-ir cells within the olfactory epithelia were rarely located after longer survival periods. Salamanders collected in late spring displayed extensive GAP-43 labeling in the vomeronasal epithelia posterior to the entrance of the nasolacrimal duct, indicating a large population of young vomeronasal receptor neurons. Finally, apoptotic cells were evident in this same post-nasolacrimal-duct-area of the vomeronasal organ and in the olfactory epithelium. We suggest that vomeronasal receptor neurons born in late spring function throughout the summer and may be associated with the animals' extensive territoriality

  17. Lactation following conservation surgery and radiotherapy for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Varsos, G.; Yahalom, J. )

    1991-02-01

    A 38-year-old woman with early stage invasive breast cancer was treated with wide excision of the tumor, axillary lymph node dissection, and breast irradiation. Three years later, she gave birth to a normal baby. She attempted breast feeding and had full lactation from the untreated breast. The irradiated breast underwent only minor changes during pregnancy and postpartum but produced small amounts of colostrum and milk for 2 weeks postpartum. There are only a few reports of lactation after breast irradiation. These cases are reviewed, and possible factors affecting breast function after radiotherapy are discussed. Because of scant information available regarding its safety for the infant, nursing from the irradiated breast is not recommended.

  18. Spectral imaging of breast fibroadenoma using second-harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Liqin; Wang, Yuhua

    2014-09-01

    Fibroadenoma (FA), typically composed of stroma and epithelial cells, is a very common benign breast disease. Women with FA are associated with an increased risk of future breast cancer. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the potential of multiphoton laser scanning microscopy (MPLSM) for characterizing the morphology of collagen in the human breast fibroadenomas. In the study, high-contrast SHG images of human normal breast tissues and fibroadenoma tissues were obtained for comparison. The morphology of collagen was different between normal breast tissue and fibroadenoma. This study shows that MPLSM has the ability to distinguish fibroadenoma tissues from the normal breast tissues based on the noninvasive SHG imaging. With the advent of the clinical portability of miniature MPLSM, we believe that the technique has great potential to be used in vivo studies and for monitoring the treatment responses of fibroadenomas in clinical.

  19. Mutating the Conserved Q-loop Glutamine 1291 Selectively Disrupts Adenylate Kinase-dependent Channel Gating of the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Adenylate Kinase Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) and Reduces Channel Function in Primary Human Airway Epithelia.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qian; Ernst, Sarah E; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Shah, Viral S; Ver Heul, Amanda R; Welsh, Michael J; Randak, Christoph O

    2015-05-29

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and two other non-membrane-bound ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, exhibit adenylate kinase activity in the presence of physiologic concentrations of ATP and AMP or ADP (ATP + AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). The crystal structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of an SMC protein in complex with the adenylate kinase bisubstrate inhibitor P(1),P(5)-di(adenosine-5') pentaphosphate (Ap5A) suggests that AMP binds to the conserved Q-loop glutamine during the adenylate kinase reaction. Therefore, we hypothesized that mutating the corresponding residue in CFTR, Gln-1291, selectively disrupts adenylate kinase-dependent channel gating at physiologic nucleotide concentrations. We found that substituting Gln-1291 with bulky side-chain amino acids abolished the effects of Ap5A, AMP, and adenosine 5'-monophosphoramidate on CFTR channel function. 8-Azidoadenosine 5'-monophosphate photolabeling of the AMP-binding site and adenylate kinase activity were disrupted in Q1291F CFTR. The Gln-1291 mutations did not alter the potency of ATP at stimulating current or ATP-dependent gating when ATP was the only nucleotide present. However, when physiologic concentrations of ADP and AMP were added, adenylate kinase-deficient Q1291F channels opened significantly less than wild type. Consistent with this result, we found that Q1291F CFTR displayed significantly reduced Cl(-) channel function in well differentiated primary human airway epithelia. These results indicate that a highly conserved residue of an ABC transporter plays an important role in adenylate kinase-dependent CFTR gating. Furthermore, the results suggest that adenylate kinase activity is important for normal CFTR channel function in airway epithelia.

  20. Mutating the Conserved Q-loop Glutamine 1291 Selectively Disrupts Adenylate Kinase-dependent Channel Gating of the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Adenylate Kinase Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) and Reduces Channel Function in Primary Human Airway Epithelia*

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Qian; Ernst, Sarah E.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Shah, Viral S.; Ver Heul, Amanda R.; Welsh, Michael J.; Randak, Christoph O.

    2015-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and two other non-membrane-bound ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, exhibit adenylate kinase activity in the presence of physiologic concentrations of ATP and AMP or ADP (ATP + AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). The crystal structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of an SMC protein in complex with the adenylate kinase bisubstrate inhibitor P1,P5-di(adenosine-5′) pentaphosphate (Ap5A) suggests that AMP binds to the conserved Q-loop glutamine during the adenylate kinase reaction. Therefore, we hypothesized that mutating the corresponding residue in CFTR, Gln-1291, selectively disrupts adenylate kinase-dependent channel gating at physiologic nucleotide concentrations. We found that substituting Gln-1291 with bulky side-chain amino acids abolished the effects of Ap5A, AMP, and adenosine 5′-monophosphoramidate on CFTR channel function. 8-Azidoadenosine 5′-monophosphate photolabeling of the AMP-binding site and adenylate kinase activity were disrupted in Q1291F CFTR. The Gln-1291 mutations did not alter the potency of ATP at stimulating current or ATP-dependent gating when ATP was the only nucleotide present. However, when physiologic concentrations of ADP and AMP were added, adenylate kinase-deficient Q1291F channels opened significantly less than wild type. Consistent with this result, we found that Q1291F CFTR displayed significantly reduced Cl− channel function in well differentiated primary human airway epithelia. These results indicate that a highly conserved residue of an ABC transporter plays an important role in adenylate kinase-dependent CFTR gating. Furthermore, the results suggest that adenylate kinase activity is important for normal CFTR channel function in airway epithelia. PMID:25887396

  1. Expression of the retinoblastoma protein is regulated in normal human tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Cordon-Cardo, C.; Richon, V. M.

    1994-01-01

    The nuclear phosphoprotein encoded by the retinoblastoma gene (pRB) appears to play a central role in control of cell division and differentiation. It is generally accepted that pRB is ubiquitously expressed. We investigated the expression of pRB in normal human tissues using immunochemical techniques to determine the expression of pRB in specific cell types. Maturing cells, both proliferating and nonproliferating, rather than their progenitors possess the highest levels of pRB. Cells of stratified epithelia, such as those from cervix, display strong immunostaining in the nondividing maturing suprabasal layer, whereas basal cells showed low to undetectable levels of pRB. Similar patterns of expression were observed in simple epithelia and hematopoietic cells contained within distinguishable proliferating compartments and in germ cell development. These studies are crucial to our understanding of processes involved in control of differentiation (tumorigenesis) as well as tumor progression. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8129035

  2. Reference breast temperature: proposal of an equation

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Gladis Aparecida Galindo Reisemberger; Brioschi, Marcos Leal; Vargas, José Viriato Coelho; Morais, Keli Cristiane Correia; Dalmaso, Carlos; Neves, Eduardo Borba

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To develop an equation to estimate the breast reference temperature according to the variation of room and core body temperatures. Methods Four asymptomatic women were evaluated for three consecutive menstrual cycles. Using thermography, the temperature of breasts and eyes was measured as indirect reference of core body and room temperatures. To analyze the thermal behavior of the breasts during the cycle, the core body and room temperatures were normalized by means of a mathematical equation. Results We performed 180 observations and the core temperature had the highest correlation with the breast temperature, followed by room temperature. The proposed prediction model could explain 45.3% of the breast temperature variation, with variable room temperature variable; it can be accepted as a way to estimate the reference breast temperature at different room temperatures. Conclusion The average breast temperature in healthy women had a direct relation with the core and room temperature and can be estimated mathematically. It is suggested that an equation could be used in clinical practice to estimate the normal breast reference temperature in young women, regardless of the day of the cycle, therefore assisting in evaluation of anatomical studies. PMID:26761549

  3. Epigenetic suppression of neprilysin regulates breast cancer invasion

    PubMed Central

    Stephen, H M; Khoury, R J; Majmudar, P R; Blaylock, T; Hawkins, K; Salama, M S; Scott, M D; Cosminsky, B; Utreja, N K; Britt, J; Conway, R E

    2016-01-01

    In women, invasive breast cancer is the second most common cancer and the second cause of cancer-related death. Therefore, identifying novel regulators of breast cancer invasion could lead to additional biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Neprilysin, a cell-surface enzyme that cleaves and inactivates a number of substrates including endothelin-1 (ET1), has been implicated in breast cancer, but whether neprilysin promotes or inhibits breast cancer cell progression and metastasis is unclear. Here, we asked whether neprilysin expression predicts and functionally regulates breast cancer cell invasion. RT–PCR and flow cytometry analysis of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines revealed decreased neprilysin expression compared with normal epithelial cells. Expression was also suppressed in invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) compared with normal tissue. In addition, in vtro invasion assays demonstrated that neprilysin overexpression decreased breast cancer cell invasion, whereas neprilysin suppression augmented invasion. Furthermore, inhibiting neprilysin in MCF-7 breast cancer cells increased ET1 levels significantly, whereas overexpressing neprilysin decreased extracellular-signal related kinase (ERK) activation, indicating that neprilysin negatively regulates ET1-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. To determine whether neprilysin was epigenetically suppressed in breast cancer, we performed bisulfite conversion analysis of breast cancer cells and clinical tumor samples. We found that the neprilysin promoter was hypermethylated in breast cancer; chemical reversal of methylation in MDA-MB-231 cells reactivated neprilysin expression and inhibited cancer cell invasion. Analysis of cancer databases revealed that neprilysin methylation significantly associates with survival in stage I IDC and estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer subtypes. These results demonstrate that neprilysin negatively regulates the ET axis in breast cancer

  4. Performance assessment of a pendant-geometry CT scanner for breast cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boone, John M.; Kwan, Alexander L. C.; Nelson, Thomas R.; Shah, Nikula; Burkett, George; Seibert, J. A.; Lindfors, Karen K.; Roos, Gerhardt

    2005-04-01

    While mammography is the gold standard for breast cancer screening worldwide, it is widely recognized that mammography has limitations, especially in women with dense breasts. In response to the need for a more sensitive approach to breast cancer screening, a CT scanner specifically for breast imaging in the pendant geometry was designed, fabricated, and is currently in clinical evaluation. The spatial resolution and noise properties are discussed, and breast images from a normal volunteer and a patient with breast cancer demonstrate very promising breast CT image quality from a qualitative perspective.

  5. Androgens and breast cancer in men and women.

    PubMed

    Dimitrakakis, Constantine

    2011-09-01

    Abundant clinical evidence suggests that androgens normally inhibit mammary epithelial proliferation and breast growth. Clinical and nonhuman primate studies support the notion that androgens inhibit mammary proliferation and, thus, may protect from breast cancer. On the other hand, administration of conventional estrogen treatment suppresses endogenous androgens and may, thus, enhance estrogenic breast stimulation and possibly breast cancer risk. Addition of testosterone to the usual hormone therapy regimen may diminish the estrogen/progestin increase in breast cancer risk, but the impact of this combined use on mammary gland homeostasis still needs evaluation.

  6. The transareolar incision for breast augmentation revisited.

    PubMed

    Kompatscher, Peter; Schuler, Christine; Beer, Gertrude M

    2004-01-01

    Of the various possible incisions for breast augmentation, the transareolar access has gained only limited popularity. The potential side effects of this incision are said to be altered nipple sensation, impaired lactation, an increased rate of infections with capsular fibrosis, well visible scar formation with hypopigmentation, and the need for an additional access in case a breast ptosis correction should prove necessary at a later date. The purpose of this retrospective study was to judge advantages and limitations of transareolar breast augmentation, and to verify whether the reluctant attitude toward this surgical approach is justified. A sample of 18 patients with a transareolar, retropectoral breast augmentation was selected for a retrospective evaluation. The suitability of the technique in general was examined together with early postoperative complications, sensory changes, and late complications on the basis of an evaluation system for cosmetic surgical results. The study showed that only women with an areolar diameter of 3.5 cm or more without pronounced breast ptosis were suitable for the transareolar access. No early infections were noted. The rate of capsular fibrosis was 11%. Two years after breast augmentation, 16 women (89%) judged their breast sensation to be normal, but objective assessment showed that mean pressure and vibration sensation were moderately compromised in all parts of the breast. The scars were of good quality, with very little hypopigmentation. With appropriate patient selection, respecting the advantages and limitations, the transareolar incision has its definite place among the different incisions for breast augmentation. PMID:15164231

  7. Automated assessment of bilateral breast volume asymmetry as a breast cancer biomarker during mammographic screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Alex C.; Hitt, Austin; Voisin, Sophie; Tourassi, Georgia

    2013-03-01

    The biological concept of bilateral symmetry as a marker of developmental stability and good health is well established. Although most individuals deviate slightly from perfect symmetry, humans are essentially considered bilaterally symmetrical. Consequently, increased fluctuating asymmetry of paired structures could be an indicator of disease. There are several published studies linking bilateral breast size asymmetry with increased breast cancer risk. These studies were based on radiologists' manual measurements of breast size from mammographic images. We aim to develop a computerized technique to assess fluctuating breast volume asymmetry in screening mammograms and investigate whether it correlates with the presence of breast cancer. Using a large database of screening mammograms with known ground truth we applied automated breast region segmentation and automated breast size measurements in CC and MLO views using three well established methods. All three methods confirmed that indeed patients with breast cancer have statistically significantly higher fluctuating asymmetry of their breast volumes. However, statistically significant difference between patients with cancer and benign lesions was observed only for the MLO views. The study suggests that automated assessment of global bilateral asymmetry could serve as a breast cancer risk biomarker for women undergoing mammographic screening. Such biomarker could be used to alert radiologists or computer-assisted detection (CAD) systems to exercise increased vigilance if higher than normal cancer risk is suspected.

  8. Automated assessment of bilateral breast volume asymmetry as a breast cancer biomarker during mammographic screening

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Alex C; Hitt, Austin N; Voisin, Sophie; Tourassi, Georgia

    2013-01-01

    The biological concept of bilateral symmetry as a marker of developmental stability and good health is well established. Although most individuals deviate slightly from perfect symmetry, humans are essentially considered bilaterally symmetrical. Consequently, increased fluctuating asymmetry of paired structures could be an indicator of disease. There are several published studies linking bilateral breast size asymmetry with increased breast cancer risk. These studies were based on radiologists manual measurements of breast size from mammographic images. We aim to develop a computerized technique to assess fluctuating breast volume asymmetry in screening mammograms and investigate whether it correlates with the presence of breast cancer. Using a large database of screening mammograms with known ground truth we applied automated breast region segmentation and automated breast size measurements in CC and MLO views using three well established methods. All three methods confirmed that indeed patients with breast cancer have statistically significantly higher fluctuating asymmetry of their breast volumes. However, statistically significant difference between patients with cancer and benign lesions was observed only for the MLO views. The study suggests that automated assessment of global bilateral asymmetry could serve as a breast cancer risk biomarker for women undergoing mammographic screening. Such biomarker could be used to alert radiologists or computer-assisted detection (CAD) systems to exercise increased vigilance if higher than normal cancer risk is suspected.

  9. Effect of very low doses of gamma radiation on motility of gill ciliated epithelia of Mytilus edulis.

    PubMed

    Karpenko, A A; Ivanovsky YuA

    1993-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of gamma radiation on the motility of mussel gill ciliated epithelia was conducted using dose rates of 0.9 and 2 mGy/h. There was a definite decrease in the beat frequency and a distortion of the metachronal wave by 20-30 min after irradiation with 0.9 Gy/h. With a total dose of 0.9 mGy, the beat frequency was decreased 2- to 2.5-fold. In the period after irradiation a restoration of the metachronal wave was observed, but the beat frequency was about 50% of the control level. Gamma irradiation completely stopped the beating of the cilia when given at a dose rate of 2 mGy/h.

  10. Immunohistochemical localization of fibrillin-1 protein in the cells of chick corneal and conjunctival epithelia during pre- and postnatal development.

    PubMed

    de las Casas, Carmen Maestro; Peña-Melian, Angel; Martínez-Alvarez, Concepción; Martínez-Sanz, Elena; Pérez-Miguelsanz, Juliana

    2009-01-01

    Fibrillin-1 protein is a microfibrillar glycoprotein component of the extracellular matrix, widely distributed in ocular connective tissues. In this work, we show for the first time the expression pattern of fibrillin-1 protein in the corneal and conjunctival epithelia and in stromal keratocytes during embryo development. After hatching, protein expression was maintained in the corneal epithelium cells and nonsecreting epithelium cells of the conjunctiva and disappeared in the stromal keratocytes. In the limbus region, the basal cells were negative, while superficial cells were positive for the antibody. The expression in corneal epithelial cells suggests a role for fibrillin in development and disease. Therefore, some basal cells of the limbus region do not show fibrillin-1 immunolocalization, and this may be correlated with stem cell or stem-like properties.

  11. Heterogeneity, Cell Biology and Tissue Mechanics of Pseudostratified Epithelia: Coordination of Cell Divisions and Growth in Tightly Packed Tissues.

    PubMed

    Strzyz, P J; Matejcic, M; Norden, C

    2016-01-01

    Pseudostratified epithelia (PSE) are tightly packed proliferative tissues that are important precursors of the development of diverse organs in a plethora of species, invertebrate and vertebrate. PSE consist of elongated epithelial cells that are attached to the apical and basal side of the tissue. The nuclei of these cells undergo interkinetic nuclear migration (IKNM) which leads to all mitotic events taking place at the apical surface of the epithelium. In this review, we discuss the intricacies of proliferation in PSE, considering cell biological, as well as the physical aspects. First, we summarize the principles governing the invariability of apical nuclear migration and apical cell division as well as the importance of apical mitoses for tissue proliferation. Then, we focus on the mechanical and structural features of these tissues. Here, we discuss how the overall architecture of pseudostratified tissues changes with increased cell packing. Lastly, we consider possible mechanical cues resulting from these changes and their potential influence on cell proliferation.

  12. Breast biopsy - stereotactic

    MedlinePlus

    ... you have breast cancer . Two main types of breast cancer may be found: Ductal carcinoma starts in the tubes (ducts) that move milk from the breast to the nipple. Most breast cancers are of this ... Lobular carcinoma starts in parts of the breast called lobules, ...

  13. Breast biopsy - ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... you have breast cancer. Two main types of breast cancer may be found: Ductal carcinoma starts in the tubes (ducts) that move milk from the breast to the nipple. Most breast cancers are of this ... Lobular carcinoma starts in parts of the breast called lobules, ...

  14. The 34th Annual Fall Meeting of the American Physiological Society and the International Conference on Hydrogen Ion Transport in Epithelia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physiologist, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Provided are abstracts of papers presented at the annual American Physiological Society meeting and International Conference on Hydrogen Ion Transport in Epithelia. Papers are grouped by such topic areas as lung fluid balance, renal cardiovascular integration, smooth muscle physiology, neuroendocrines (pituitary), exercise physiology, mechanics of…

  15. APOL1 Localization in Normal Kidney and Nondiabetic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Madhavan, Sethu M.; O'Toole, John F.; Konieczkowski, Martha; Ganesan, Santhi; Bruggeman, Leslie A.

    2011-01-01

    In patients of African ancestry, genetic variants in APOL1, which encodes apolipoprotein L1, associate with the nondiabetic kidney diseases, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN), and hypertensive nephropathy. Understanding the renal localization of APOL1 may provide clues that will ultimately help elucidate the mechanisms by which APOL1 variants promote nephropathy. Here, we used immunohistology to examine APOL1 localization in normal human kidney sections and in biopsies demonstrating either FSGS (n = 8) or HIVAN (n = 2). Within normal glomeruli, APOL1 only localized to podocytes. Compared with normal glomeruli, fewer cells stained for APOL1 in FSGS and HIVAN glomeruli, even when expression of the podocyte markers GLEPP1 and synaptopodin appeared normal. APOL1 localized to proximal tubular epithelia in normal kidneys, FSGS, and HIVAN. We detected APOL1 in the arteriolar endothelium of normal and diseased kidney sections. Unexpectedly, in both FSGS and HIVAN but not normal kidneys, the media of medium artery and arterioles contained a subset of α-smooth muscle actin-positive cells that stained for APOL1. Comparing the renal distribution of APOL1 in nondiabetic kidney disease to normal kidney suggests that a previously unrecognized arteriopathy may contribute to disease pathogenesis in patients of African ancestry. PMID:21997392

  16. Breast Reconstruction

    MedlinePlus

    If you need a mastectomy, you have a choice about whether or not to have surgery to rebuild the shape of the breast. Instead of ... be done at the same time as the mastectomy, or it may be done later on. If ...

  17. Breast pain

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Breast pain may be cyclical (worse before a period) or non-cyclical, originating from the breast or the chest wall, and occurs at some time in 70% of women. Cyclical breast pain resolves spontaneously in 20-30% of women, but tends to recur in 60% of women. Non-cyclical pain responds poorly to treatment but tends to resolve spontaneously in half of women. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for breast pain? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to January 2006 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 22 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: a low-fat diet, antibiotics, bromocriptine, danazol, diuretics, evening primrose oil, gestrinone, gonadorelin analogues, hormone replacement therapy, lisuride, progestogens, pyridoxine, tamoxifen, tibolone, topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, toremifene, and vitamin E. PMID:19454068

  18. Breast pain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Breast pain may be cyclical (worse before a period) or non-cyclical, originating from the breast or the chest wall, and occurs at some time in 70% of women. Cyclical breast pain resolves spontaneously in 20% to 30% of women, but tends to recur in 60% of women. Non-cyclical pain responds poorly to treatment but tends to resolve spontaneously in half of women. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for breast pain? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 24 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics, bromocriptine, combined oral contraceptive pill, danazol, diuretics, evening primrose oil, gestrinone, gonadorelin analogues, hormone replacement therapy (HRT), lisuride, low-fat diet, progestogens, pyridoxine, tamoxifen, tibolone, topical or oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), toremifene, and vitamin E. PMID:21477394

  19. Breast pain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Breast pain may be cyclical (worse before a period) or non-cyclical, originating from the breast or the chest wall, and occurs at some time in 70% of women. Cyclical breast pain resolves spontaneously in 20% to 30% of women, but tends to recur in 60% of women. Non-cyclical pain responds poorly to treatment but tends to resolve spontaneously in half of women. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for breast pain? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to February 2014 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 11 studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: bra wearing, combined oral contraceptive pill, danazol, gonadorelin analogues, progestogens, tamoxifen, and topical or oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

  20. General Information about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  1. Risks of Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... cancer screening: Cancer Screening Overview General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  2. Study on mouse model of triple-negative breast cancer: association between higher parity and triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun; Wang, Xuan; Sun, Baocun; Li, Man; Zhao, Xiulan; Gu, Yanjun; Cui, Yanfen; Li, Yan

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the association between high parity and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), and explore the etiologic mechanisms of TNBC in Tientsin Albinao 2 (TA2) mice model. After the TA2 mice model with high parity and TNBC had been established, the cell proliferation and apoptosis were detected by immunohistochemical and TUNEL staining in mammary epithelia from different conditions, which included non-pregnancy, low and high gravidity in pregnancy, and carcinogenesis. Apoptotic signaling was analyzed by measuring bcl-2, bax, caspase-3, and caspase-9 expression using immunohistochemistry (IHC), western blot, and real-time PCR technique. Estrogen receptor α (ERα) and progesterone receptor (PR) were determined by immunohistochemical staining and real-time PCR. Both proliferation and apoptosis in mammary epithelia changed with the increasing of parity. Immunohistochemistry revealed increased cell proliferation and apoptosis were related with upregulation of ERα, PR, bcl-2, bax, caspase-3, and caspase-9 expression, especially during the fourth pregnancy. Mammary gland in the fourth pregnancy stage was the closest to precancerous. In precancerous mammary gland, cell proliferation rate was much higher than apoptosis rate. High parity could increase the ovarian hormones level and alter ovarian hormone receptor levels in TA2 mice, and their sensitivity to ovarian hormones result in the imbalance between cell proliferation and apoptosis in precancerous mammary epithelial cells.

  3. Molecular specialization of breast vasculature: A breast-homing phage-displayed peptide binds to aminopeptidase P in breast vasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essler, Markus; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2002-02-01

    In vivo phage display identifies peptides that selectively home to the vasculature of individual organs, tissues, and tumors. Here we report the identification of a cyclic nonapeptide, CPGPEGAGC, which homes to normal breast tissue with a 100-fold selectivity over nontargeted phage. The homing of the phage is inhibited by its cognate synthetic peptide. Phage localization in tissue sections showed that the breast-homing phage binds to the blood vessels in the breast, but not in other tissues. The phage also bound to the vasculature of hyperplastic and malignant lesions in transgenic breast cancer mice. Expression cloning with a phage-displayed cDNA library yielded a phage that specifically bound to the breast-homing peptide. The cDNA insert was homologous to a fragment of aminopeptidase P. The homing peptide bound aminopeptidase P from malignant breast tissue in affinity chromatography. Antibodies against aminopeptidase P inhibited the in vitro binding of the phage-displayed cDNA to the peptide and the in vivo homing of phage carrying the peptide. These results indicate that aminopeptidase P is the receptor for the breast-homing peptide. This peptide may be useful in designing drugs for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer.

  4. Breast Cancer (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Breast Cancer KidsHealth > For Kids > Breast Cancer Print A A ... for it when they are older. What Is Breast Cancer? The human body is made of tiny building ...

  5. Breast Cancer Disparities

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  6. Risks of Breast Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... larger and longer than these conducted so far. Breastfeeding Some women who undergo breast augmentation can successfully ... breast implant silicone shell into breast milk during breastfeeding. Although there are currently no established methods for ...

  7. Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men between ... 60 and 70. Breast lumps usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. ...

  8. Breast lump removal

    MedlinePlus

    Lumpectomy; Wide local excision; Breast conservation surgery; Breast-sparing surgery; Partial mastectomy ... If the breast cancer can be seen on imaging tests but the doctor cannot feel it when examining you, a wire ...

  9. IGF-1R inhibition in mammary epithelia promotes canonical Wnt signaling and Wnt1-driven tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rota, Lauren M.; Albanito, Lidia; Shin, Marcus E.; Goyeneche, Corey L.; Shushanov, Sain; Gallagher, Emily J.; LeRoith, Derek; Lazzarino, Deborah A.; Wood, Teresa L.

    2014-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) are an aggressive disease subtype which unlike other subtypes lack an effective targeted therapy. Inhibitors of the insullin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) have been considered for use in treating TNBC. Here we provide genetic evidence that IGF-1R inhibition promotes development of Wnt1-mediated murine mammary tumors that offer a model of TNBC. We found that in a double transgenic mouse model carrying activated Wnt-1 and mutant IGF-1R, a reduction in IGF-1R signaling reduced tumor latency and promoted more aggressive phenotypes. These tumors displayed a squamal cell phenotype with increased expression of keratins 5/6 and β-catenin. Notably, cell lineage analyses revealed an increase in basal (CD29hi/CD24+) and luminal (CD24+/CD61+/CD29lo) progenitor cell populations, along with increased Nanog expression and decreased Elf5 expression. In these doubly transgenic mice, lung metastases developed with characteristics of the primary tumors, unlike MMTV-Wnt1 mice. Mechanistic investigations showed that pharmacological inhibition of the IGF-1R in vitro was sufficient to increase the tumorsphere-forming efficiency of MMTV-Wnt1 tumor cells. Tumors from doubly transgenic mice also exhibited an increase in the expression ratio of the IGF-II-sensitive, A isoform of the insulin receptor vs the IR-B isoform, which in vitro resulted in enhanced expression of β-catenin. Overall, our results revealed that in Wnt-driven tumors an attenuation of IGF-1R signaling accelerates tumorigenesis and promotes more aggressive phenotypes, with potential implications for understanding TNBC pathobiology and treatment. PMID:25092896

  10. Human Papilloma Viruses and Breast Cancer – Assessment of Causality

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, James Sutherland; Glenn, Wendy K.; Whitaker, Noel James

    2016-01-01

    High risk human papilloma viruses (HPVs) may have a causal role in some breast cancers. Case–control studies, conducted in many different countries, consistently indicate that HPVs are more frequently present in breast cancers as compared to benign breast and normal breast controls (odds ratio 4.02). The assessment of causality of HPVs in breast cancer is difficult because (i) the HPV viral load is extremely low, (ii) HPV infections are common but HPV associated breast cancers are uncommon, and (iii) HPV infections may precede the development of breast and other cancers by years or even decades. Further, HPV oncogenesis can be indirect. Despite these difficulties, the emergence of new evidence has made the assessment of HPV causality, in breast cancer, a practical proposition. With one exception, the evidence meets all the conventional criteria for a causal role of HPVs in breast cancer. The exception is “specificity.” HPVs are ubiquitous, which is the exact opposite of specificity. An additional reservation is that the prevalence of breast cancer is not increased in immunocompromised patients as is the case with respect to HPV-associated cervical cancer. This indicates that HPVs may have an indirect causal influence in breast cancer. Based on the overall evidence, high-risk HPVs may have a causal role in some breast cancers. PMID:27747193

  11. Synchronous luminescence spectroscopy of human breast tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, S. K.; Gupta, P. K.

    1998-06-01

    We report, to our knowledge, the first use of synchronous luminescence (SL) spectroscopy for autofluorescence diagnosis of cancer. The spectral narrowing effect of the SL spectroscopy led to an easier identification of the different fluorophores present in human breast tissues and provided relative estimate of their concentration in qualitative agreement with the estimates obtained from conventional excitation and emission spectroscopy. Further, the SL spectra from human breast tissues could discriminate cancerous tissues from benign tumors and normal tissues with a sensitivity and specificity of 100% in a study involving 34 patients with breast tumor (19 ductal carcinomas and 15 fibroadenomas).

  12. Adhesion between peptides/antibodies and breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, J.; Paetzell, E.; Bogorad, A.; Soboyejo, W. O.

    2010-06-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were used to measure the adhesion forces between the receptors on breast cancer cells specific to human luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) peptides and antibodies specific to the EphA2 receptor. The adhesion forces between LHRH-coated AFM tips and human MDA-MB-231 cells (breast cancer cells) were shown to be about five times greater than those between LHRH-coated AFM tips and normal Hs578Bst breast cells. Similarly, those between EphA2 antibody-coated AFM tips and breast cancer cells were over five times greater than those between EphA2 antibody-coated AFM tips and normal breast cells. The results suggest that AFM can be used for the detection of breast cancer cells in biopsies. The implications of the results are also discussed for the early detection and localized treatment of cancer.

  13. Breast tomography with synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Silvia; Arfelli, Fulvia; Dreossi, Diego; Montanari, Francesco; Longo, Renata; Olivo, Alessandro; Poropat, Paolo; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Palma, Ludovico D.; Castelli, Edoardo

    2002-05-01

    A feasibility study of breast CT with synchrotron radiation is currently being carried on at Elettra, the Trieste synchrotron radiation facility. Breast CT cannot be implemented easily with conventional radiographic tubes, due to the high dose that would be delivered to the breast by a polychromatic X-ray spectrum. The possibility of tuning the beam energy, available at a synchrotron radiation beamline, allows a significant reduction in the delivered dose, and at the same time the use of monochromatic beams avoids beam hardening artifacts on the reconstructed image. Images of in vitro breast tissue samples have been acquired by means of a high efficiency linear array detector coupled to a VLSI single photon counting readout electronics. The pixel width, determining the pixel size of the reconstructed image, is 200 micrometers , while the pixel height, determining the CT slice thickness, is 300 micrometers . Tomograms have been reconstructed by means of standard filtered backprojection algorithms. Images of normal and pathologic breast tissue samples show a good visibility of glandular structure. The delivered dose was in all cases comparable to the one delivered in clinical planar mammography. Due to the promising results we obtained, in vivo studies are under evaluation.

  14. Optical imaging for breast cancer prescreening

    PubMed Central

    Godavarty, Anuradha; Rodriguez, Suset; Jung, Young-Jin; Gonzalez, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer prescreening is carried out prior to the gold standard screening using X-ray mammography and/or ultrasound. Prescreening is typically carried out using clinical breast examination (CBE) or self-breast examinations (SBEs). Since CBE and SBE have high false-positive rates, there is a need for a low-cost, noninvasive, non-radiative, and portable imaging modality that can be used as a prescreening tool to complement CBE/SBE. This review focuses on the various hand-held optical imaging devices that have been developed and applied toward early-stage breast cancer detection or as a prescreening tool via phantom, in vivo, and breast cancer imaging studies. Apart from the various optical devices developed by different research groups, a wide-field fiber-free near-infrared optical scanner has been developed for transillumination-based breast imaging in our Optical Imaging Laboratory. Preliminary in vivo studies on normal breast tissues, with absorption-contrasted targets placed in the intramammary fold, detected targets as deep as 8.8 cm. Future work involves in vivo imaging studies on breast cancer subjects and comparison with the gold standard X-ray mammography approach. PMID:26229503

  15. NASA SMART Probe: Breast Cancer Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mah, Robert W.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    There is evidence in breast cancer and other malignancies that the physiologic environment within a tumor correlates with clinical outcome. We are developing a unique percutaneous Smart Probe to be used at the time of needle biopsy of the breast. The Smart Probe will simultaneously measure multiple physiologic parameters within a breast tumor. Direct and indirect measurements of tissue oxygen levels, blood flow, pH, and tissue fluid pressure will be analyzed in real-time. These parameters will be interpreted individually and collectively by innovative neural network techniques using advanced intelligent software. The goals are 1) develop a pecutaneous Smart Probe with multiple sensor modalities and applying advanced Information Technologies to provide real time diagnostic information of the tissue at tip of the probe, 2) test the percutaneous Smart Probe in women with benign and malignant breast masses who will be undergoing surgical biopsy, 3) correlate probe sensor data with benign and malignant status of breast masses, 4) determine whether the probe can detect physiologic differences within a breast tumor, and its margins, and in adjacent normal breast tissue, 5) correlate probe sensor data with known prognostic factors for breast caner, including tumor size, tumor grade, axillary lymph node metastases, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor status.

  16. The Microbiota of Breast Tissue and Its Association with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Urbaniak, Camilla; Gloor, Gregory B.; Brackstone, Muriel; Scott, Leslie; Tangney, Mark

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the United States, 1 in 8 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in her lifetime. Along with genetics, the environment contributes to disease development, but what these exact environmental factors are remains unknown. We have previously shown that breast tissue is not sterile but contains a diverse population of bacteria. We thus believe that the host's local microbiome could be modulating the risk of breast cancer development. Using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing, we show that bacterial profiles differ between normal adjacent tissue from women with breast cancer and tissue from healthy controls. Women with breast cancer had higher relative abundances of Bacillus, Enterobacteriaceae and Staphylococcus. Escherichia coli (a member of the Enterobacteriaceae family) and Staphylococcus epidermidis, isolated from breast cancer patients, were shown to induce DNA double-stranded breaks in HeLa cells using the histone-2AX (H2AX) phosphorylation (γ-H2AX) assay. We also found that microbial profiles are similar between normal adjacent tissue and tissue sampled directly from the tumor. This study raises important questions as to what role the breast microbiome plays in disease development or progression and how we can manipulate this for possible therapeutics or prevention. IMPORTANCE This study shows that different bacterial profiles in breast tissue exist between healthy women and those with breast cancer. Higher relative abundances of bacteria that had the ability to cause DNA damage in vitro were detected in breast cancer patients, as was a decrease in some lactic acid bacteria, known for their beneficial health effects, including anticarcinogenic properties. This study raises important questions as to the role of the mammary microbiome in modulating the risk of breast cancer development. PMID:27342554

  17. Microbial dysbiosis is associated with human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Caiyun; Shamonki, Jaime M; Chung, Alice; Dinome, Maggie L; Chung, Maureen; Sieling, Peter A; Lee, Delphine J

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women in their lifetime. Though diet, age and genetic predisposition are established risk factors, the majority of breast cancers have unknown etiology. The human microbiota refers to the collection of microbes inhabiting the human body. Imbalance in microbial communities, or microbial dysbiosis, has been implicated in various human diseases including obesity, diabetes, and colon cancer. Therefore, we investigated the potential role of microbiota in breast cancer by next-generation sequencing using breast tumor tissue and paired normal adjacent tissue from the same patient. In a qualitative survey of the breast microbiota DNA, we found that the bacterium Methylobacterium radiotolerans is relatively enriched in tumor tissue, while the bacterium Sphingomonas yanoikuyae is relatively enriched in paired normal tissue. The relative abundances of these two bacterial species were inversely correlated in paired normal breast tissue but not in tumor tissue, indicating that dysbiosis is associated with breast cancer. Furthermore, the total bacterial DNA load was reduced in tumor versus paired normal and healthy breast tissue as determined by quantitative PCR. Interestingly, bacterial DNA load correlated inversely with advanced disease, a finding that could have broad implications in diagnosis and staging of breast cancer. Lastly, we observed lower basal levels of antibacterial response gene expression in tumor versus healthy breast tissue. Taken together, these data indicate that microbial DNA is present in the breast and that bacteria or their components may influence the local immune microenvironment. Our findings suggest a previously unrecognized link between dysbiosis and breast cancer which has potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications. PMID:24421902

  18. Heterogeneous Distribution of Fetal Microchimerism in Local Breast Cancer Environment

    PubMed Central

    Nemescu, Dragos; Ursu, Ramona Gabriela; Nemescu, Elena Roxana; Negura, Lucian

    2016-01-01

    Fetal cells enter maternal circulation during pregnancy and persist in the woman’s body for decades, achieving a form of physiological microchimerism. These cells were also evidenced in tumors. We investigated the frequency and concentration of fetal microchimerism in the local breast cancer environment. From 19 patients with confirmed breast neoplasia, after breast surgical resection, we collected three fresh specimens from the tumor core, breast tissue at tumor periphery, and adjacent normal breast tissue. The presence of male DNA was analyzed with a quantitative PCR assay for the sex determining region gene (SRY) gene. In the group of women who had given birth to at least one son, we detected fetal microchimerism in 100% of samples from tumors and their periphery and in 64% (9 of 14) of those from normal breast tissue. The tissues from the tumor and its periphery carry a significantly increased number of SRY copies compared to its neighboring common breast tissue (p = 0.005). The median of the normalized SRY-signal was about 77 (range, 3.2–21467) and 14-fold (range, 1.3–2690) greater in the tumor and respectively in the periphery than in the normal breast tissue. In addition, the relative expression of the SRY gene had a median 5.5 times larger in the tumor than in its periphery (range, 1.1–389.4). We found a heterogeneous distribution of fetal microchimerism in breast cancer environment. In women with sons, breast neoplasia harbors male cells at significantly higher levels than in peripheral and normal breast tissue. PMID:26808509

  19. β-Blockers Reduce Breast Cancer Recurrence and Breast Cancer Death: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Childers, W Kurtis; Hollenbeak, Christopher S; Cheriyath, Pramil

    2015-12-01

    The normal physiologic stress mechanism, mediated by the sympathetic nervous system, causes a release of the neurotransmitters epinephrine and norepinephrine. Preclinical data have demonstrated an effect on tumor progression and metastasis via the sympathetic nervous system mediated primarily through the β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) pathway. In vitro data have shown an increase in tumor growth, migration, tumor angiogenesis, and metastatic spread in breast cancer through activation of the β-AR. Retrospective cohort studies on the clinical outcomes of β-blockers in breast cancer outcomes showed no clear consensus. The purpose of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of the effect of β-blockers on breast cancer outcomes. A systematic review was performed using the Cochrane library and PubMed. Publications between the dates of January 2010 and December 2013 were identified. Available hazard ratios (HRs) were extracted for breast cancer recurrence, breast cancer death, and all-cause mortality and pooled using a random effects meta-analysis. A total of 7 studies contained results for at least 1 of the outcomes of breast cancer recurrence, breast cancer death, or all-cause mortality in breast cancer patients receiving β-blockers. In the 5 studies that contained results for breast cancer recurrence, there was no statistically significant risk reduction (HR, 0.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.39-1.13). Breast cancer death results were contained in 4 studies, which also suggested a significant reduction in risk (HR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.32-0.80). Among the 4 studies that reported all-cause mortality, there was no significant effect of β-blockers on risk (HR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.75-1.37). Results of this systematic review and meta-analysis suggest that the use of β-blockers significantly reduced risk of breast cancer death among women with breast cancer. PMID:26516037

  20. Breast Pain: Clinical Pattern and Aetiology in a Breast Clinic in Eastern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Egwuonwu, Ochonma A; Anyanwu, Stanley NC; Chianakwana, Gabriel U; Ihekwoaba, Eric C

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with breast pain are likely to be very worried because some consider pain in the breast as an indication of malignancy. Objective: To highlight the causes of pain in the patients are presenting to our breast clinic. Materials and Methods: A prospective study of all consenting patients with breast disease presenting to the breast clinic was conducted from January 2004 to December 2008. Results: A total of 664 patients presented to the breast clinic during the study period. Of this number, 127 presented with breast pain either as the sole symptom or in association with other symptoms. The presenting complaints were a pain, pain with lump, and pain with nipple discharge in 63 (49.6%), 59 (46.4%), and 5 (4.0%) patients, respectively. The pain was noncyclical in 96 (75.6%) patients. The site of the pain was whole breast in 87 (68.5%) patients and a lump in 40 (31.5%). The clinical diagnosis in 31 (24.4%) cases was fibrocystic disease, 28 (22.0%) cancer, 23 (18.1%) unknown, 10 (7.9%) fibroadenoma, 8 (6.3%) duct ectasia, 6 (4.7%) normal breast, and others 21 (16.5%) cases benign diseases were diagnosed. The histological diagnosis was fibrocystic changes, carcinoma, and fibroadenoma in 15 (42.9%), 10 (28.6%), and 5 (14.3%) patients, respectively. Others were benign phyllodes, abscess, duct ectasia, chronic mastitis, and lipoma, each constituting 1 (2.9%) case. Conclusion: Breast pain constitutes a small proportion of complaints to our breast clinic. Fibrocystic changes were the most common cause of breast pain both clinically and histologically. PMID:27013851

  1. [Treatment of disseminated breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Mattson, Johanna; Huovinen, Riikka

    2015-01-01

    Although several effective drugs have in recent years been introduced for the treatment of disseminated breast cancer, it is still an incurable illness. Many patients live a fairly normal life with their illness for a long time, and some of them are able to continue working in spite of the therapies. Factors considered in tailoring the treatment include tumor subtype, extent of the disease, symptoms, previous treatments and the achieved treatment outcome, and adverse effects of the treatments. PMID:26245064

  2. Cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr Virus in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Ann K.; Currie, Margaret J.; Robinson, Bridget A.; Morrin, Helen; Phung, Yen; Pearson, John F.; Anderson, Trevor P.; Potter, John D.; Walker, Logan C.

    2015-01-01

    Findings of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) studies of cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and breast cancer vary, making it difficult to determine whether either, both, or neither virus is causally associated with breast cancer. We investigated CMV and EBV in paired samples of breast cancer and normal breast tissue from 70 women using quantitative PCR. A serum sample from each woman was tested for CMV and EBV IgG. To place our results in context, we reviewed the existing literature and performed a meta-analysis of our results together with previous PCR studies of EBV, CMV, and breast cancer. Of the serology samples, 67 of 70 (96%) were EBV IgG positive and 49 of 70 (70%) were CMV IgG positive. QPCR detected EBV in 24 (34%) of the tumour and 9 (13%) of the paired normal specimens and CMV in 0 (0%) of the tumour and 2 (3%) of the paired normal specimens. Our findings, together with earlier results summarised in the meta-analysis, suggest several possibilities: variable findings may be due to limitations of molecular analyses; ‘hit and run’ oncogenesis may lead to inconsistent results; one or both viruses has a role at a later stage in breast cancer development; infection with multiple viruses increases breast cancer risk; or neither virus has a role. Future studies should focus on ways to investigate these possibilities, and should include comparisons of breast cancer tissue samples with appropriate normal tissue samples. PMID:25723522

  3. Mammary Development and Breast Cancer: A Wnt Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qing Cissy; Verheyen, Esther M.; Zeng, Yi Arial

    2016-01-01

    The Wnt pathway has emerged as a key signaling cascade participating in mammary organogenesis and breast oncogenesis. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of how the pathway regulates stem cells and normal development of the mammary gland, and discuss how its various components contribute to breast carcinoma pathology. PMID:27420097

  4. Mammary Development and Breast Cancer: A Wnt Perspective.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qing Cissy; Verheyen, Esther M; Zeng, Yi Arial

    2016-01-01

    The Wnt pathway has emerged as a key signaling cascade participating in mammary organogenesis and breast oncogenesis. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of how the pathway regulates stem cells and normal development of the mammary gland, and discuss how its various components contribute to breast carcinoma pathology. PMID:27420097

  5. Visualization of HIV-1 interactions with penile and foreskin epithelia: clues for female-to-male HIV transmission.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Minh H; Anderson, Meegan R; McRaven, Michael D; Cianci, Gianguido C; McCoombe, Scott G; Kelley, Z L; Gioia, Casey J; Fought, Angela J; Rademaker, Alfred W; Veazey, Ronald S; Hope, Thomas J

    2015-03-01

    To gain insight into female-to-male HIV sexual transmission and how male circumcision protects against this mode of transmission, we visualized HIV-1 interactions with foreskin and penile tissues in ex vivo tissue culture and in vivo rhesus macaque models utilizing epifluorescent microscopy. 12 foreskin and 14 cadaveric penile specimens were cultured with R5-tropic photoactivatable (PA)-GFP HIV-1 for 4 or 24 hours. Tissue cryosections were immunofluorescently imaged for epithelial and immune cell markers. Images were analyzed for total virions, proportion of penetrators, depth of virion penetration, as well as immune cell counts and depths in the tissue. We visualized individual PA virions breaching penile epithelial surfaces in the explant and macaque model. Using kernel density estimated probabilities of localizing a virion or immune cell at certain tissue depths revealed that interactions between virions and cells were more likely to occur in the inner foreskin or glans penis (from local or cadaveric donors, respectively). Using statistical models to account for repeated measures and zero-inflated datasets, we found no difference in total virions visualized at 4 hours between inner and outer foreskins from local donors. At 24 hours, there were more virions in inner as compared to outer foreskin (0.0495 +/- 0.0154 and 0.0171 +/- 0.0038 virions/image, p = 0.001). In the cadaveric specimens, we observed more virions in inner foreskin (0.0507 +/- 0.0079 virions/image) than glans tissue (0.0167 +/- 0.0033 virions/image, p<0.001), but a greater proportion was seen penetrating uncircumcised glans tissue (0.0458 +/- 0.0188 vs. 0.0151 +/- 0.0100 virions/image, p = 0.099) and to significantly greater mean depths (29.162 +/- 3.908 vs. 12.466 +/- 2.985 μm). Our in vivo macaque model confirmed that virions can breach penile squamous epithelia in a living model. In summary, these results suggest that the inner foreskin and glans epithelia may be important sites for HIV

  6. Identification of selective, high affinity [125I]-angiotensin and [125I]-bradykinin binding sites in rat intestinal epithelia.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, H. M.; Munday, K. A.; Poat, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    Specific [125I]-angiotensin II (AII) and [125I]-bradykinin (Bk) binding sites have been identified within epithelial membranes from rat jejunum and descending colon. These high affinity intestinal sites exhibited KD values of 0.64 +/- 0.16 nM for [125I]-AII and 0.69 +/- 0.13 nM for [125I]-Bk, which were similar to those for [125I]-AII (0.85 nM) and [125I]-Bk binding sites (1.03 nM) previously identified in renal cortex epithelia. Specific [125I]-AII binding capacity was only 19.77 +/- 2.74 fmol mg-1 in small intestine and 11.31 +/- 2.66 fmol mg-1 in descending colon epithelia while a larger population, 332.0 +/- 72.9 fmol-mg-1 of specific [125I]-Bk sites were identified in epithelial membranes from small intestine. Significant hydrolysis of both free [125I]-AII and [125I]-Bk was observed while membrane bound peptides remained relatively resistant to degradation. Whilst no corrections have been made to the observed values of KD and Bmax quoted above, one may assume that the calculated reductions in the free hormone concentration will result in a decrease of the KD value for both peptides. Loss of membrane bound peptide, particularly of [125I]-AII, may indicate that the calculated Bmax value is an underestimation. Despite the rapid degradation of unbound [125I]-AII and [125I]-Bk during incubations the kinetics of specific peptide binding were reversible and highly selective. The order of potency for specific [125I]-AII binding was [Sar1, Leu8]-AII greater than or equal to [Sar1, Thr8]-AII greater than or equal to AII greater than [Sar1, Ile8]-AII greater than or equal to [Des, Asp1, Ile8] AII greater than AIII. Specific [125I]-Bk binding was also highly selective, the order of potency being Phe8-Bk greater than or equal to Tyr8-Bk greater than or equal to Lys-Bk much greater than Des, Arg1-Bk. AII exhibited an IC50 of greater than 1mM for specific [125I]-Bk binding and likewise Phe8-Bk for specific [125I]-AII binding. PMID:2869810

  7. Matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression in breast cancer and cancer-adjacent tissues by immunohistochemical staining

    PubMed Central

    XUAN, JIAJIA; ZHANG, YUNFENG; ZHANG, XIUJUN; HU, FEN

    2015-01-01

    Although matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) has been considered a factor of crucial importance for breast cancer cells invasion and metastasis, the expression of MMP-1 in different breast cancer and cancer-adjacent tissues have not been fully examined. In the present study, immunohistochemical staining was used to detect the MMP-1 expression in non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast, cancer-adjacent normal breast tissue, lymph node metastatic non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast and normal lymph node tissue. The results showed that MMP-1 expression is different in the above tissues. MMP-1 had a positive expression in normal lymph node tissue and lymph node metastatic non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma. The MMP-1 negative expression rate was only 6.1% in non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast and 2.9% in cancer-adjacent normal breast tissue respectively. MMP-1 expression is higher in non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma and lymph node metastatic non-specific invasive ductal carcinoma compared to cancer-adjacent normal breast tissue and normal lymph node tissue. In conclusion, higher expression of MMP-1 in breast cancer may play a crucial role in promoting breast cancer metastasis. PMID:26137243

  8. Breast Cancer -- Male

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer in Men Breast Cancer in Men This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer in Men. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer in Men Overview Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  9. Breast cancer in men

    MedlinePlus

    ... in situ-male; Intraductal carcinoma-male; Inflammatory breast cancer-male; Paget disease of the nipple-male; Breast cancer-male ... The cause of breast cancer is not clear. But there are risk ... breast cancer more likely in men: Exposure to radiation Higher ...

  10. Living Beyond Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Instagram YouTube 2,600 men are diagnosed with breast cancer each year. Learn about risk factors, treatment options ... help hundreds of thousands of people affected by breast cancer. Donate Today Breast Cancer inFocus: Breast Cancer During ...

  11. Calcium-Sensing Receptor in Breast Physiology and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wonnam; Wysolmerski, John J.

    2016-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is expressed in normal breast epithelial cells and in breast cancer cells. During lactation, activation of the CaSR in mammary epithelial cells increases calcium transport into milk and inhibits parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) secretion into milk and into the circulation. The ability to sense changes in extracellular calcium allows the lactating breast to actively participate in the regulation of systemic calcium and bone metabolism, and to coordinate calcium usage with calcium availability during milk production. Interestingly, as compared to normal breast cells, in breast cancer cells, the regulation of PTHrP secretion by the CaSR becomes rewired due to a switch in its G-protein usage such that activation of the CaSR increases instead of decreases PTHrP production. In normal cells the CaSR couples to Gαi to inhibit cAMP and PTHrP production, whereas in breast cancer cells, it couples to Gαs to stimulate cAMP and PTHrP production. Activation of the CaSR on breast cancer cells regulates breast cancer cell proliferation, death and migration, in part, by stimulating PTHrP production. In this article, we discuss the biology of the CaSR in the normal breast and in breast cancer, and review recent findings suggesting that the CaSR activates a nuclear pathway of PTHrP action that stimulates cellular proliferation and inhibits cell death, helping cancer cells adapt to elevated extracellular calcium levels. Understanding the diverse actions mediated by the CaSR may help us better understand lactation physiology, breast cancer progression and osteolytic bone metastases. PMID:27746743

  12. The Helicobacter pylori VacA toxin is a urea permease that promotes urea diffusion across epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Tombola, Francesco; Morbiato, Laura; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Rappuoli, Rino; Zoratti, Mario; Papini, Emanuele

    2001-01-01

    Urease and the cytotoxin VacA are two major virulence factors of the human pathogen Helicobacter pylori, which is responsible for severe gastroduodenal diseases. Diffusion of urea, the substrate of urease, into the stomach is critically required for the survival of infecting H. pylori. We now show that VacA increases the transepithelial flux of urea across model epithelia by inducing an unsaturable permeation pathway. This transcellular pathway is selective, as it conducts thiourea, but not glycerol and mannitol, demonstrating that it is not due to a loosening of intercellular junctions. Experiments performed with different cell lines, grown in a nonpolarized state, confirm that VacA permeabilizes the cell plasma membrane to urea. Inhibition studies indicate that transmembrane pores formed by VacA act as passive urea transporters. Thus, their inhibition by the anion channel blocker 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid significantly decreases toxin-induced urea fluxes in both polarized and nonpolarized cells. Moreover, phloretin, a well-known inhibitor of eukaryotic urea transporters, blocks VacA-mediated urea and ion transport and the toxin’s main biologic effects. These data show that VacA behaves as a low-pH activated, passive urea transporter potentially capable of permeabilizing the gastric epithelium to urea. This opens the novel possibility that in vivo VacA may favor H. pylori infectivity by optimizing urease activity. PMID:11560962

  13. Amiloride‐sensitive fluid resorption in NCI‐H441 lung epithelia depends on an apical Cl− conductance

    PubMed Central

    Korbmacher, Jonas P.; Michel, Christiane; Neubauer, Daniel; Thompson, Kristin; Mizaikoff, Boris; Frick, Manfred; Dietl, Paul; Wittekindt, Oliver H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Proper apical airway surface hydration is essential to maintain lung function. This hydration depends on well‐balanced water resorption and secretion. The mechanisms involved in resorption are still a matter of debate, especially as the measurement of transepithelial water transport remains challenging. In this study, we combined classical short circuit current (ISC) measurements with a novel D2O dilution method to correlate ion and water transport in order to reveal basic transport mechanisms in lung epithelia. D2O dilution method enabled precise analysis of water resorption with an unprecedented resolution. NCI‐H441 cells cultured at an air–liquid interface resorbed water at a rate of 1.5 ± 0.4 μL/(h cm2). Water resorption and ISC were reduced by almost 80% in the presence of the bulk Cl− channel inhibitor 5‐nitro‐2‐(3‐phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid (NPPB) or amiloride, a specific inhibitor of epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). However, water resorption and ISC were only moderately affected by forskolin or cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) channel inhibitors (CFTRinh‐172 and glybenclamide). In line with previous studies, we demonstrate that water resorption depends on ENaC, and CFTR channels have only a minor but probably modulating effect on water resorption. However, the major ENaC‐mediated water resorption depends on an apical non‐CFTR Cl− conductance. PMID:24744880

  14. Growth and characterization of different human rhinovirus C types in three-dimensional human airway epithelia reconstituted in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Tapparel, Caroline; Sobo, Komla; Constant, Samuel; Huang, Song; Van Belle, Sandra; Kaiser, Laurent

    2013-11-15

    New molecular diagnostic tools have recently allowed the discovery of human rhinovirus species C (HRV-C) that may be overrepresented in children with lower respiratory tract complications. Unlike HRV-A and HRV-B, HRV-C cannot be propagated in conventional immortalized cell lines and their biological properties have been difficult to study. Recent studies have described the successful amplification of HRV-C15, HRV-C11, and HRV-C41 in sinus mucosal organ cultures and in fully differentiated human airway epithelial cells. Consistent with these studies, we report that a panel of clinical HRV-C specimens including HRV-C2, HRV-C7, HRV-C12, HRV-C15, and HRV-C29 types were all capable of mediating productive infection in reconstituted 3D human primary upper airway epithelial tissues and that the virions enter and exit preferentially through the apical surface. Similar to HRV-A and HRV-B, our data support the acid sensitivity of HRV-C. We observed also that the optimum temperature requirement during HRV-C growth may be type-dependent. - Highlights: • A 3D human upper airway epithelia reconstituted in vitro supports HRV-C growth. • HRV-Cs enter and exit preferentially at the apical side of this ALI culture system. • HRV-Cs are acid sensitive. • Temperature sensitivity may be type-dependent for HRV-Cs.

  15. Polymorphonuclear leukocyte migration across model intestinal epithelia enhances Salmonella typhimurium killing via the epithelial derived cytokine, IL-6.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, William J; Pistole, Thomas G; McCormick, Beth A

    2002-11-01

    The host response to Salmonella typhimurium involves movement of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) across the epithelium and into the intestinal lumen. Following their arrival in the lumen, the PMN attempt to combat bacterial infection by activating antimicrobial defenses such as granule release, oxidative burst, phagocytosis, and cell signaling. We sought to examine PMN-S. typhimurium interaction following PMN arrival in the lumenal compartment. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate that PMN that have transmigrated across model intestinal epithelia have an enhanced ability to kill S. typhimurium. Our data provide evidence to indicate that the extracellular release of the primary and secondary granules of PMN, myeloperoxidase and lactoferrin, respectively, is correlated with enhanced bacterial killing. Furthermore, epithelial cells, during PMN transmigration, release the cytokine IL-6. IL-6 is known to increase intracellular stores of Ca(2+), and we have determined that this epithelial released cytokine is not only responsible for priming the PMN to release their granules, but also stimulating the PMN to kill S. typhimurium. These results substantiate the pathway in which PMN transmigration activates the epithelial release of IL-6, which in turn increases intracellular Ca(2+) storage. Our results, herein, extend this pathway to include an enhanced PMN granule release and an enhanced killing of S. typhimurium.

  16. Epithelia Use Butyrophilin-like Molecules to Shape Organ-Specific γδ T Cell Compartments.

    PubMed

    Di Marco Barros, Rafael; Roberts, Natalie A; Dart, Robin J; Vantourout, Pierre; Jandke, Anett; Nussbaumer, Oliver; Deban, Livija; Cipolat, Sara; Hart, Rosie; Iannitto, Maria Luisa; Laing, Adam; Spencer-Dene, Bradley; East, Philip; Gibbons, Deena; Irving, Peter M; Pereira, Pablo; Steinhoff, Ulrich; Hayday, Adrian

    2016-09-22

    Many body surfaces harbor organ-specific γδ T cell compartments that contribute to tissue integrity. Thus, murine dendritic epidermal T cells (DETCs) uniquely expressing T cell receptor (TCR)-Vγ5 chains protect from cutaneous carcinogens. The DETC repertoire is shaped by Skint1, a butyrophilin-like (Btnl) gene expressed specifically by thymic epithelial cells and suprabasal keratinocytes. However, the generality of this mechanism has remained opaque, since neither Skint1 nor DETCs are evolutionarily conserved. Here, Btnl1 expressed by murine enterocytes is shown to shape the local TCR-Vγ7(+) γδ compartment. Uninfluenced by microbial or food antigens, this activity evokes the developmental selection of TCRαβ(+) repertoires. Indeed, Btnl1 and Btnl6 jointly induce TCR-dependent responses specifically in intestinal Vγ7(+) cells. Likewise, human gut epithelial cells express BTNL3 and BTNL8 that jointly induce selective TCR-dependent responses of human colonic Vγ4(+) cells. Hence, a conserved mechanism emerges whereby epithelia use organ-specific BTNL/Btnl genes to shape local T cell compartments. PMID:27641500

  17. Sensory epithelia of the fish inner ear in 3D: studied with high-resolution contrast enhanced microCT

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction While a number of studies have illustrated and analyzed 3D models of inner ears in higher vertebrates, inner ears in fishes have rarely been investigated in 3D, especially with regard to the sensory epithelia of the end organs, the maculae. It has been suggested that the 3D curvature of these maculae may also play an important role in hearing abilities in fishes. We therefore set out to develop a fast and reliable approach for detailed 3D visualization of whole inner ears as well as maculae. Results High-resolution microCT imaging of black mollies Poecilia sp. (Poeciliidae, Teleostei) and Steatocranus tinanti (Cichlidae, Teleostei) stained with phosphotungstic acid (PTA) resulted in good tissue contrast, enabling us to perform a reliable 3D reconstruction of all three sensory maculae of the inner ears. Comparison with maculae that have been 3D reconstructed based on histological serial sections and phalloidin-stained maculae showed high congruence in overall shape of the maculae studied here. Conclusions PTA staining and subsequent high-resolution contrast enhanced microCT imaging is a powerful method to obtain 3D models of fish inner ears and maculae in a fast and more reliable manner. Future studies investigating functional morphology, phylogenetic potential of inner ear features, or evolution of hearing and inner ear specialization in fishes may benefit from the use of 3D models of inner ears and maculae. PMID:24160754

  18. SLAH3-type anion channel expressed in poplar secretory epithelia operates in calcium kinase CPK-autonomous manner.

    PubMed

    Jaborsky, Mario; Maierhofer, Tobias; Olbrich, Andrea; Escalante-Pérez, María; Müller, Heike M; Simon, Judy; Krol, Elzbieta; Cuin, Tracey Ann; Fromm, Jörg; Ache, Peter; Geiger, Dietmar; Hedrich, Rainer

    2016-05-01

    Extrafloral nectaries secrete a sweet sugar cocktail that lures predator insects for protection from foraging herbivores. Apart from sugars and amino acids, the nectar contains the anions chloride and nitrate. Recent studies with Populus have identified a type of nectary covered by apical bipolar epidermal cells, reminiscent of the secretory brush border epithelium in animals. Border epithelia operate transepithelial anion transport, which is required for membrane potential and/or osmotic adjustment of the secretory cells. In search of anion transporters expressed in extrafloral nectaries, we identified PttSLAH3 (Populus tremula × Populus tremuloides SLAC1 Homologue3), an anion channel of the SLAC/SLAH family. When expressed in Xenopus oocytes, PttSLAH3 displayed the features of a voltage-dependent anion channel, permeable to both nitrate and chloride. In contrast to the Arabidopsis SLAC/SLAH family members, the poplar isoform PttSLAH3 is independent of phosphorylation activation by protein kinases. To understand the basis for the autonomous activity of the poplar SLAH3, we generated and expressed chimera between kinase-independent PttSLAH3 and kinase-dependent Arabidopsis AtSLAH3. We identified the N-terminal tail and, to a lesser extent, the C-terminal tail as responsible for PttSLAH3 kinase-(in)dependent action. This feature of PttSLAH3 may provide the secretory cell with a channel probably controlling long-term nectar secretion. PMID:26831448

  19. The Na-K-ATPase α1β1 heterodimer as a cell adhesion molecule in epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Dada, Laura A.; Tokhtaeva, Elmira; Sachs, George

    2012-01-01

    The ion gradients generated by the Na-K-ATPase play a critical role in epithelia by driving transepithelial transport of various solutes. The efficiency of this Na-K-ATPase-driven vectorial transport depends on the integrity of epithelial junctions that maintain polar distribution of membrane transporters, including the basolateral sodium pump, and restrict paracellular diffusion of solutes. The review summarizes the data showing that, in addition to pumping ions, the Na-K-ATPase located at the sites of cell-cell junction acts as a cell adhesion molecule by interacting with the Na-K-ATPase of the adjacent cell in the intercellular space accompanied by anchoring to the cytoskeleton in the cytoplasm. The review also discusses the experimental evidence on the importance of a specific amino acid region in the extracellular domain of the Na-K-ATPase β1 subunit for the Na-K-ATPase trans-dimerization and intercellular adhesion. Furthermore, a possible role of N-glycans linked to the Na-K-ATPase β1 subunit in regulation of epithelial junctions by modulating β1-β1 interactions is discussed. PMID:22277755

  20. Millimeter Wave Spectroscopy for Breast Cancer Diagnostics and Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, Konstantin; Chen, Shu; Afsar, Mohammed; Naber, Stephen

    2009-03-01

    Broad-band millimeter wave transmittance measurements of normal and tumorous (cancerous) human breast tissue samples have been acquired in--vitro by employing a free-space, quasi-optical spectrometer. Freshly excised breast tissues were prepared and preserved in 10% neutral-buffered formalin solution before testing. Significant differences in the transmittance profiles have been found between the normal and tumorous tissues. It has been found that despite the inhomogeneity and variable structure and composition of each single tissue, the tumorous specimens consistently manifest much higher absorption level of millimeter wave radiation than the normal ones. It has been shown that free space, quasi-optical spectrometer is capable of contributing valuable insights into the dielectric properties of normal and tumorous human breast tissues and aiding in further developments of millimeter wave spectroscopy and mammography for the breast cancer diagnostics and detection.

  1. The evolution of accelerated, partial breast irradiation as a potential treatment option for women with newly diagnosed breast cancer considering breast conservation.

    PubMed

    Dirbas, Frederick M; Jeffrey, Stefanie S; Goffinet, Don R

    2004-12-01

    Breast conservation therapy (BCT) is a safe, effective alternative to mastectomy for many women with newly diagnosed breast cancer. This approach involves local excision of the malignancy with tumor-free margins, followed by 5-7 weeks of external beam whole breast (WB) radiotherapy (XRT) to minimize the risk of an in-breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). Though clearly beneficial, the extended course of almost daily postoperative radiotherapy interrupts normal activities and lengthens care. Additional options are now available that shorten the radiotherapy treatment time to 1-5 days (accelerated) and focus an increased dose of radiation on just the breast tissue around the excision cavity (partial breast). Recent trials with accelerated, partial breast irradiation (APBI) have shown promise as a potential replacement to the longer, whole breast treatments for select women with early-stage breast cancer. Current APBI approaches include interstitial brachytherapy, intracavitary (balloon) brachytherapy, and accelerated external beam (3-D conformal) radiotherapy, all of which normally complete treatment over 5 days, while intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) condenses the entire treatment into a single dose delivered immediately after tumor excision. Each approach has benefits and limitations. This study covers over 2 decades of clinical trials exploring APBI, discusses treatment variables that appear necessary for successful implementation of this new form of radiotherapy, compares and contrasts the various APBI approaches, and summarizes current and planned randomized trials that will shape if and how APBI is introduced into routine clinical care. Some of the more important outcome variables from these trials will be local toxicity, local and regional recurrence, and overall survival. If APBI options are ultimately demonstrated to be as safe and effective as current whole breast radiotherapy approaches, breast conservation may become an even more appealing choice, and the

  2. Optically measured microvascular blood flow contrast of malignant breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Choe, Regine; Putt, Mary E; Carlile, Peter M; Durduran, Turgut; Giammarco, Joseph M; Busch, David R; Jung, Ki Won; Czerniecki, Brian J; Tchou, Julia; Feldman, Michael D; Mies, Carolyn; Rosen, Mark A; Schnall, Mitchell D; DeMichele, Angela; Yodh, Arjun G

    2014-01-01

    Microvascular blood flow contrast is an important hemodynamic and metabolic parameter with potential to enhance in vivo breast cancer detection and therapy monitoring. Here we report on non-invasive line-scan measurements of malignant breast tumors with a hand-held optical probe in the remission geometry. The probe employs diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS), a near-infrared optical method that quantifies deep tissue microvascular blood flow. Tumor-to-normal perfusion ratios are derived from thirty-two human subjects. Mean (95% confidence interval) tumor-to-normal ratio using surrounding normal tissue was 2.25 (1.92-2.63); tumor-to-normal ratio using normal tissues at the corresponding tumor location in the contralateral breast was 2.27 (1.94-2.66), and using normal tissue in the contralateral breast was 2.27 (1.90-2.70). Thus, the mean tumor-to-normal ratios were significantly different from unity irrespective of the normal tissue chosen, implying that tumors have significantly higher blood flow than normal tissues. Therefore, the study demonstrates existence of breast cancer contrast in blood flow measured by DCS. The new, optically accessible cancer contrast holds potential for cancer detection and therapy monitoring applications, and it is likely to be especially useful when combined with diffuse optical spectroscopy/tomography. PMID:24967878

  3. View point: How to make women familiar with their breasts?

    PubMed

    Khokhar, Anita

    2013-01-01

    There is a consensus among researchers about the fact that women should be familiar with their breasts but there is a lot of argument as to how to make them aware of what is normal for them. For over decades breast self examination (BSE) was advocated for the same but as an outcome of work conducted by researchers in various countires a controversy has been raised in the West. In a country like India, where breast cancer screening is not popular and limited resources are available we should question what would be the best strategy to make women familiar with their breasts to facilitate best use of BSE.

  4. The adolescent female: Breast and reproductive embryology and anatomy.

    PubMed

    Lemaine, Valerie; Simmons, Patricia S

    2013-01-01

    Congenital breast and genital tract anomalies are seen frequently in the care of children and adolescents. Breast and internal gynecologic anomalies more often present in adolescence than in early childhood. Management is best delivered through a multidisciplinary team approach. Carefully timed surgical intervention is of importance to optimize psychological, aesthetic and functional outcomes. An understanding of the female breast and genital tract embryology and anatomy is important for a meticulous clinical examination and appropriate surgical treatment. This article will review the normal embryology and anatomy of the adolescent female breast and genital tract.

  5. Diarrhoea Caused by Diffuse Metastatic Lobular Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bakker, Sjoerd F.; Moolenaar, Willem; van Santen, Marije M.; Hendriks, Mathijs P.

    2016-01-01

    A 70-year-old woman with a history of lobular breast cancer presented to our Outpatient Clinic with diarrhoea for the past 3 years. Clinical examination and laboratory research were normal. Colonoscopy showed diffuse mild erythema and a decreased vascular pattern. Biopsies from the ascending colon, transverse colon, and descending colon showed metastases of lobular breast carcinoma. Although gastrointestinal metastases are rare in breast cancer, our case emphasizes the need for further diagnostic efforts in patients with gastrointestinal symptoms and a history of breast carcinoma. PMID:27313924

  6. Lacritin-mediated regeneration of the corneal epithelia by protein polymer nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wan; Despanie, Jordan; Shi, Pu; Edman-Woolcott, Maria C.; Lin, Yi-An; Cui, Honggang; Heur, J. Martin; Fini, M. Elizabeth; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F.; MacKay, J. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The avascular corneal epithelium plays an important role in maintaining normal vision and protecting the corneal interior from environmental infections. Delayed recovery of ocular wounds caused by trauma or refractive surgery strengthens the need to accelerate corneal wound healing and better restore the ocular surface. To address this need, we fused elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) based nanoparticles SI with a model mitogenic protein called lacritin. Lacritin fused at the N-terminus of the SI diblock copolymer is called LSI. This LSI fusion protein undergoes thermo-responsive assembly of nanoparticles at physiologically relevant temperatures. In comparison to ELP nanoparticles without lacritin, LSI showed potent signs of lacritin specific effects on a human corneal epithelial cell line (HCE-T), which included enhancement of cellular uptake, calcium-mediated signaling, and closure of a scratch. In vivo, the corneas of non-obese diabetic mice (NOD) were found to be highly responsive to LSI. Fluorescein imaging and corneal histology suggested that topical administration of LSI onto the ocular surface significantly promoted corneal wound healing and epithelial integrity compared to mice treated with or without plain ELP. Most interestingly, it appears that ELP-mediated assembly of LSI is essential to produce this potent activity. This was confirmed by comparison to a control lacritin ELP fusion called LS96, which does not undergo thermally-mediated assembly at relevant temperatures. In summary, fusion of a mitogenic protein to ELP nanoparticles appears to be a promising new strategy to bioengineer more potent biopharmaceuticals with potential applications in corneal wound healing. PMID:25530855

  7. CD47 mediates post-adhesive events required for neutrophil migration across polarized intestinal epithelia

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Transepithelial migration of neutrophils (PMN) is a defining characteristic of active inflammatory states of mucosal surfaces. The process of PMN transepithelial migration, while dependent on the neutrophil beta 2 integrin CD11b/CD18, remains poorly understood. In these studies, we define a monoclonal antibody, C5/D5, raised against epithelial membrane preparations, which markedly inhibits PMN migration across polarized monolayers of the human intestinal epithelial cell line T84 in a bidirectional fashion. In T84 cells, the antigen defined by C5/D5 is upregulated by epithelial exposure to IFN-gamma, and represents a membrane glycoprotein of approximately 60 kD that is expressed on the basolateral membrane. While transepithelial migration of PMN was markedly inhibited by either C5/D5 IgG or C5/D5 Fab fragments, the antibody failed to inhibit both adhesion of PMN to T84 monolayers and adhesion of isolated T84 cells to the purified PMN integrin, CD11b/CD18. Thus, epithelial-PMN interactions blocked by C5/D5 appear to be downstream from initial CD11b/CD18-mediated adhesion of PMN to epithelial cells. Purification, microsequence analysis, and cross-blotting experiments indicate that the C5/D5 antigen represents CD47, a previously cloned integral membrane glycoprotein with homology to the immunoglobulin superfamily. Expression of the CD47 epitope was confirmed on PMN and was also localized to the basolateral membrane of normal human colonic epithelial cells. While C5/D5 IgG inhibited PMN migration even in the absence of epithelial, preincubation of T84 monolayers with C5/D5 IgG followed by antibody washout also resulted in inhibition of transmigration. These results suggest the presence of both neutrophil and epithelial components to CD47-mediated transepithelial migration. Thus, CD47 represents a potential new therapeutic target for downregulating active inflammatory disease of mucosal surfaces. PMID:8636220

  8. Classification of breast computed tomography data

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Thomas R.; Cervino, Laura I.; Boone, John M.; Lindfors, Karen K.

    2008-03-15

    Differences in breast tissue composition are important determinants in assessing risk, identifying disease in images and following changes over time. This paper presents an algorithm for tissue classification that separates breast tissue into its three primary constituents of skin, fat and glandular tissue. We have designed and built a dedicated breast CT scanner. Fifty-five normal volunteers and patients with mammographically identified breast lesions were scanned. Breast CT voxel data were filtered using a 5 pt median filter and the image histogram was computed. A two compartment Gaussian fit of histogram data was used to provide an initial estimate of tissue compartments. After histogram analysis, data were input to region-growing algorithms and classified as to belonging to skin, fat or gland based on their value and architectural features. Once tissues were classified, a more detailed analysis of glandular tissue patterns and a more quantitative analysis of breast composition was made. Algorithm performance assessment demonstrated very good or excellent agreement between algorithm and radiologist observers in 97.7% of the segmented data. We observed that even in dense breasts the fraction of glandular tissue seldom exceeded 50%. For most individuals the composition is better characterized as being a 70% (fat)-30% (gland) composition than a 50% (fat)-50% (gland) composition.

  9. Characterizing human vestibular sensory epithelia for experimental studies: new hair bundles on old tissue and implications for therapeutic interventions in ageing.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Ruth R; Jagger, Daniel J; Saeed, Shakeel R; Axon, Patrick; Donnelly, Neil; Tysome, James; Moffatt, David; Irving, Richard; Monksfield, Peter; Coulson, Chris; Freeman, Simon R; Lloyd, Simon K; Forge, Andrew

    2015-06-01

    Balance disequilibrium is a significant contributor to falls in the elderly. The most common cause of balance dysfunction is loss of sensory cells from the vestibular sensory epithelia of the inner ear. However, inaccessibility of inner ear tissue in humans severely restricts possibilities for experimental manipulation to develop therapies to ameliorate this loss. We provide a structural and functional analysis of human vestibular sensory epithelia harvested at trans-labyrinthine surgery. We demonstrate the viability of the tissue and labeling with specific markers of hair cell function and of ion homeostasis in the epithelium. Samples obtained from the oldest patients revealed a significant loss of hair cells across the tissue surface, but we found immature hair bundles present in epithelia harvested from patients >60 years of age. These results suggest that the environment of the human vestibular sensory epithelium could be responsive to stimulation of developmental pathways to enhance hair cell regeneration, as has been demonstrated successfully in the vestibular organs of adult mice.

  10. Characterizing human vestibular sensory epithelia for experimental studies: new hair bundles on old tissue and implications for therapeutic interventions in ageing

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Ruth R.; Jagger, Daniel J.; Saeed, Shakeel R.; Axon, Patrick; Donnelly, Neil; Tysome, James; Moffatt, David; Irving, Richard; Monksfield, Peter; Coulson, Chris; Freeman, Simon R.; Lloyd, Simon K.; Forge, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Balance disequilibrium is a significant contributor to falls in the elderly. The most common cause of balance dysfunction is loss of sensory cells from the vestibular sensory epithelia of the inner ear. However, inaccessibility of inner ear tissue in humans severely restricts possibilities for experimental manipulation to develop therapies to ameliorate this loss. We provide a structural and functional analysis of human vestibular sensory epithelia harvested at trans-labyrinthine surgery. We demonstrate the viability of the tissue and labeling with specific markers of hair cell function and of ion homeostasis in the epithelium. Samples obtained from the oldest patients revealed a significant loss of hair cells across the tissue surface, but we found immature hair bundles present in epithelia harvested from patients >60 years of age. These results suggest that the environment of the human vestibular sensory epithelium could be responsive to stimulation of developmental pathways to enhance hair cell regeneration, as has been demonstrated successfully in the vestibular organs of adult mice. PMID:25818177

  11. Interferon-gamma increases hPepT1-mediated uptake of di-tripeptides including the bacterial tripeptide fMLP in polarized intestinal epithelia.

    PubMed

    Buyse, Marion; Charrier, Laetitia; Sitaraman, Shanthi; Gewirtz, Andrew; Merlin, Didier

    2003-11-01

    Interferon-gamma causes a global phenotypic switch in intestinal epithelial function, in which enterocytes become immune accessory cells. The phenotypic switch is characterized by a down-regulation of membrane transporters and up-regulation of immune accessory molecules in intestinal epithelial cells. However, the effect of interferon-gamma on the intestinal epithelia di-tripeptide hPepT1 transporter has not been investigated. In this study we demonstrate that 1) interferon-gamma increases di-tripeptide uptake in dose- and time-dependent manner in model intestinal epithelia (Caco-2 BBE cell monolayers), 2) the increase in di-tripeptides induced by interferon-gamma is hPepT1 mediated, 3) interferon-gamma does not affect the hPept1 expression at the mRNA and protein levels 4) interferon-gamma increases the intracellular pH and consequently enhances the H+-electrochemical gradient across apical plasma membrane in model intestinal epithelia (Caco2-BBE monolayers). We suggest that interferon-gamma could increase the hPepT1 mediated di-tripeptides uptake in inflamed epithelial cells. Under these conditions, interferon-gamma will increase the intracellular amount of such diverse prokaryotic and eucaryotic small di-tripeptides in inflamed epithelial cells. The intracellular accumulation of such di-tripeptides may be important in enterocytes becoming immune accessory cells.

  12. Patterns and possible roles of LINE-1 methylation changes in smoke-exposed epithelia.

    PubMed

    Wangsri, Siriporn; Subbalekha, Keskanya; Kitkumthorn, Nakarin; Mutirangura, Apiwat

    2012-01-01

    Tobacco smoking and reduced methylation of long interspersed element-1 (LINE-1) are crucial in oral carcinogenesis. 5'UTR of human LINE-1 sequence contains several CpG dinucleotides which are methylated in various proportions (0-100%). Methylation levels of many LINE-1s in cancer were reduced, hypomethylated. The hypomethylation of each LINE-1 locus can promote instability of genome and repress expression of a gene located on that same chromosome. This study investigated if cigarette smoking influences LINE-1 methylation of oral mucosal cells. The methylation of human LINE-1 in clinically normal oral mucosa of current smokers was compared to non-smokers. By using the combined bisulphite restriction analysis, each LINE-1 sequence was categorised into 4 patterns depending on the methylation status and location of the two 18-bp successive CpG from 5' to 3' including (m)C(m)C, (u)C(u)C, (m)C(u)C and (u)C(m)C. Of these, (m)C and (u)C represent methylated and unmethylated CpG, respectively. The DNA bisulphite sequence demonstrated that most CpGs of (m)C(m)C and (u)C(u)C were methylated and unmethylated, respectively. Nevertheless, some CpGs of each (m)C(u)C or (u)C(m)C allele were methylated. Imaging of the digestion products was used to generate %methylation value. No significant difference in the overall LINE-1 methylation level but the differences in percentages of some methylation patterns were discovered. The %(m)C(m)C and %(u)C(u)C increased, while the %(m)C(u)C decreased in current smokers (p = 0.002, 0.015, and <0.0001, respectively). Additionally, the lower %(m)C(u)C still persisted in persons who had stopped smoking for over 1 year (p = 0.001). The %(m)C(u)C also decreased in the higher pack-year smokers (p = 0.028). Smoking possibly altered (m)C(u)C to (m)C(m)C and (u)C(u)C forms, and changes (u)C(m)C to (u)C(u)C forms. In conclusion, smoking changes methylation levels of partial methylated LINE-1s and increased the number of hypo- and hypermethylated loci

  13. Common channels for water and protons at apical and basolateral cell membranes of frog skin and urinary bladder epithelia. Effects of oxytocin, heavy metals, and inhibitors of H(+)-adenosine triphosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, B.; Lacoste, I.; Ehrenfeld, J. )

    1991-04-01

    We have compared the response of proton and water transport to oxytocin treatment in isolated frog skin and urinary bladder epithelia to provide further insights into the nature of water flow and H+ flux across individual apical and basolateral cell membranes. In isolated spontaneous sodium-transporting frog skin epithelia, lowering the pH of the apical solution from 7.4 to 6.4, 5.5, or 4.5 produced a fall in pHi in principal cells which was completely blocked by amiloride, indicating that apical Na+ channels are permeable to protons. When sodium transport was blocked by amiloride, the H+ permeability of the apical membranes of principal cells was negligible but increased dramatically after treatment with antidiuretic hormone (ADH). In the latter condition, lowering the pH of the apical solution caused a voltage-dependent intracellular acidification, accompanied by membrane depolarization, and an increase in membrane conductance and transepithelial current. These effects were inhibited by adding Hg2+ (100 microM) or dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD, 10(-5) M) to the apical bath. Net titratable H+ flux across frog skin was increased from 30 +/- 8 to 115 +/- 18 neq.h-1.cm-2 (n = 8) after oxytocin treatment (at apical pH 5.5 and serosal pH 7.4) and was completely inhibited by DCCD (10(-5) M). The basolateral membranes of the principal cells in frog skin epithelium were found to be spontaneously permeable to H+ and passive electrogenic H+ transport across this membrane was not affected by oxytocin. Lowering the pH of the basolateral bathing solution (pHb) produced an intracellular acidification and membrane depolarization (and an increase in conductance when the normal dominant K+ conductance of this membrane was abolished by Ba2+ 1 mM). These effects of low pHb were blocked by micromolar concentrations of heavy metals (Zn2+, Ni2+, Co2+, Cd2+, and Hg2+).

  14. Numerical modelling of biopotential field for detection of breast tumour.

    PubMed

    Ng, E Y K; Ng, W K; Sim, L S J; Rajendra Acharya, U

    2007-08-01

    Breast cancer is a disease characterised by the uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells. These cancer cells can travel through the body by way of blood or lymph nodes. Previous studies have indicated that, changes in the electrical properties of abnormal breast are more significant compared to the breast normal tissues. In the present study, a simple 2D models of breast (close to realistic), with and without artificially inserted malignant cancer were simulated, based upon electrical activity within the breast. We developed an inhomogeneous female breast model, closer to the actual, by considering a breast as a hemisphere with various layers of unequal thickness in supine condition. In order to determine the potential distribution developed due to a dipole source, isotropic homogeneous conductivity was assigned to each of these compartments and the volume conductor problem was solved using finite element method. Significant changes in the potential distribution were recoded in the malignant and normal breast regions. The surface potential decreases about 0.5%, for the small malignant region of surface area 13 mm(2) (spherical diameter=2mm). And it (surface potential) decreases about 16.4% for large malignant surface area of 615 mm(2) (spherical diameter=14 mm). Hence, the results show that, the sizes of tumours result in the reduction of surface potential and follows a fourth order polynomial equation. Thus, biofield analysis yields promising results in the detection of the breast cancer of various sizes.

  15. Recurrent read-through fusion transcripts in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Varley, Katherine E; Gertz, Jason; Roberts, Brian S; Davis, Nicholas S; Bowling, Kevin M; Kirby, Marie K; Nesmith, Amy S; Oliver, Patsy G; Grizzle, William E; Forero, Andres; Buchsbaum, Donald J; LoBuglio, Albert F; Myers, Richard M

    2014-07-01

    Read-through fusion transcripts that result from the splicing of two adjacent genes in the same coding orientation are a recently discovered type of chimeric RNA. We sought to determine if read-through fusion transcripts exist in breast cancer. We performed paired-end RNA-seq of 168 breast samples, including 28 breast cancer cell lines, 42 triple negative breast cancer primary tumors, 42 estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer primary tumors, and 56 non-malignant breast tissue samples. We analyzed the sequencing data to identify breast cancer associated read-through fusion transcripts. We discovered two recurrent read-through fusion transcripts that were identified in breast cancer cell lines, confirmed across breast cancer primary tumors, and were not detected in normal tissues (SCNN1A-TNFRSF1A and CTSD-IFITM10). Both fusion transcripts use canonical splice sites to join the last splice donor of the 5' gene to the first splice acceptor of the 3' gene, creating an in-frame fusion transcript. Western blots indicated that the fusion transcripts are translated into fusion proteins in breast cancer cells. Custom small interfering RNAs targeting the CTSD-IFITM10 fusion junction reduced expression of the fusion transcript and reduced breast cancer cell proliferation. Read-through fusion transcripts between adjacent genes with different biochemical functions represent a new type of recurrent molecular defect in breast cancer that warrant further investigation as potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Both breast cancer associated fusion transcripts identified in this study involve membrane proteins (SCNN1A-TNFRSF1A and CTSD-IFITM10), which raises the possibility that they could be breast cancer-specific cell surface markers. PMID:24929677

  16. Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the breast are often detected by physical examination, mammography, or other imaging studies. However, it is not ... full size with caption Related Articles and Media Mammography Ultrasound - Breast Breast Cancer Screening Breast Cancer Treatment ...

  17. Stereotactic (Mammographically Guided) Breast Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Z Stereotactic Breast Biopsy Stereotactic breast biopsy uses mammography – a specific type of breast imaging that uses ... the breast are often detected by physical examination, mammography, or other imaging studies. However, it is not ...

  18. Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer On This Page What are hormones? How do ... sensitive breast cancer: Adjuvant therapy for early-stage breast cancer : Research has shown that women treated for early- ...

  19. Stages of Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  20. Nanomedicine-Mediated Therapies to Target Breast Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    He, Lili; Gu, Jian; Lim, Lee Y; Yuan, Zhi-Xiang; Mo, Jingxin

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidences have suggested the existence of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs), which possess the potential of both self-renewal and differentiation. The origin of BCSCs might have relationship to the development of normal mammary stem cells. BCSCs are believed to play a key role in the initiation, recurrence and chemo-/radiotherapy resistances of breast cancer. Therefore, elimination of BCSCs is crucial for breast cancer therapy. However, conventional chemo and radiation therapies cannot eradicate BCSCs effectively. Fortunately, nanotechnology holds great potential for specific and efficient anti-BCSCs treatment. "Smart" nanocarriers can distinguish BCSCs from the other breast cancer cells and selectively deliver therapeutic agents to the BCSCs. Emerging findings suggest that BCSCs in breast cancer could be successfully inhibited and even eradicated by functionalized nanomedicines. In this review, we focus on origin of BCSCs, strategies used to target BCSCs, and summarize the nanotechnology-based delivery systems that have been applied for eliminating BCSCs in breast cancer. PMID:27679576

  1. Nanomedicine-Mediated Therapies to Target Breast Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    He, Lili; Gu, Jian; Lim, Lee Y; Yuan, Zhi-Xiang; Mo, Jingxin

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidences have suggested the existence of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs), which possess the potential of both self-renewal and differentiation. The origin of BCSCs might have relationship to the development of normal mammary stem cells. BCSCs are believed to play a key role in the initiation, recurrence and chemo-/radiotherapy resistances of breast cancer. Therefore, elimination of BCSCs is crucial for breast cancer therapy. However, conventional chemo and radiation therapies cannot eradicate BCSCs effectively. Fortunately, nanotechnology holds great potential for specific and efficient anti-BCSCs treatment. "Smart" nanocarriers can distinguish BCSCs from the other breast cancer cells and selectively deliver therapeutic agents to the BCSCs. Emerging findings suggest that BCSCs in breast cancer could be successfully inhibited and even eradicated by functionalized nanomedicines. In this review, we focus on origin of BCSCs, strategies used to target BCSCs, and summarize the nanotechnology-based delivery systems that have been applied for eliminating BCSCs in breast cancer.

  2. Nanomedicine-Mediated Therapies to Target Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Lili; Gu, Jian; Lim, Lee Y.; Yuan, Zhi-xiang; Mo, Jingxin

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidences have suggested the existence of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs), which possess the potential of both self-renewal and differentiation. The origin of BCSCs might have relationship to the development of normal mammary stem cells. BCSCs are believed to play a key role in the initiation, recurrence and chemo-/radiotherapy resistances of breast cancer. Therefore, elimination of BCSCs is crucial for breast cancer therapy. However, conventional chemo and radiation therapies cannot eradicate BCSCs effectively. Fortunately, nanotechnology holds great potential for specific and efficient anti-BCSCs treatment. “Smart” nanocarriers can distinguish BCSCs from the other breast cancer cells and selectively deliver therapeutic agents to the BCSCs. Emerging findings suggest that BCSCs in breast cancer could be successfully inhibited and even eradicated by functionalized nanomedicines. In this review, we focus on origin of BCSCs, strategies used to target BCSCs, and summarize the nanotechnology-based delivery systems that have been applied for eliminating BCSCs in breast cancer.

  3. Older breast cancer survivors' views and preferences for physical activity.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Sarah; Lavelle, Katrina

    2009-07-01

    Evidence suggests that physical activity improves quality of life and physical functioning among breast cancer patients and survivors. However, previous studies have tended to focus on younger patients, despite higher incidence and lower survival among older breast cancer survivors. In this study we explored physical activity preferences of older breast cancer survivors to inform the development of future targeted interventions. Twenty-nine female breast cancer survivors (1 to 5 years postdiagnosis) aged 59 to 86 (mean 66.54, SD 6.50) took part in either a semistructured interview or a focus group exploring physical activity patterns, motivators, facilitators, barriers, and preferences. The main factors influencing physical activity were body image, weight issues, vitality, mood, and the desire to carry on as normal. Preference was expressed for activities that were gentle, tailored to age and cancer-related abilities, holistic, involving other older breast cancer survivors, and with an instructor who was knowledgeable about both breast cancer and aging.

  4. Mammaglobin, a Valuable Diagnostic Marker for Metastatic Breast Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Spaulding, Betsy; Sienko, Anna; Liang, Yiaoming; Li, Hongbao; Nielsen, Gitte; Yub Gong, Gyung; Ro, Jae Y.; “Jim” Zhai, Qihui

    2009-01-01

    Identification of metastasis and occult micrometastases of breast cancer demands sensitive and specific diagnostic markers. In this study, we assessed the utility of a mouse monoclonal antibody to human mammaglobin for one such purpose. Immunohistochemical stains were performed on paraffin-embedded sections from a total of 284 cases, which consisted of primary breast invasive carcinomas (41 cases) with matched metastases to ipsilateral axillary lymph nodes, metastatic breast carcinoma to liver (1 case) and kidney (1 case), non-breast neoplasms (161 cases), and normal human tissues (39 cases). The results showed 31 of the 41 cases of primary breast cancer with axillary lymph node metastases were positive for mammaglobin (76%). In the meantime, we documented expression of mammaglobin in occasional cases of endometrial carcinoma (17%). Our data further validated that mammaglobin is a valuable diagnostic marker for metastatic carcinoma of breast origin, although endometrial carcinoma should be considered as a major differential diagnosis. PMID:19158935

  5. Expression and polarization of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 on human intestinal epithelia: consequences for CD11b/CD18-mediated interactions with neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Parkos, C. A.; Colgan, S. P.; Diamond, M. S.; Nusrat, A.; Liang, T. W.; Springer, T. A.; Madara, J. L.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epithelial dysfunction and patient symptoms in inflammatory intestinal diseases such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease correlate with migration of neutrophils (PMN) across the intestinal epithelium. In vitro modeling of PMN transepithelial migration has revealed distinct differences from transendothelial migration. By using polarized monolayers of human intestinal epithelia (T84), PMN transepithelial migration has been shown to be dependent on the leukocyte integrin CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1), but not on CD11a/CD18 (LFA-1). Since intercellular adhesion molecule-I (ICAM-1) is an important endothelial counterreceptor for these integrins, its expression in intestinal epithelia and role in PMN-intestinal epithelial interactions was investigated. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A panel of antibodies against different domains of ICAM-1, polarized monolayers of human intestinal epithelia (T84), and natural human colonic epithelia were used to examine the polarity of epithelial ICAM-1 surface expression and the functional role of ICAM-1 in neutrophil-intestinal epithelial adhesive interactions. RESULTS: While no surface expression of ICAM-1 was detected on unstimulated T84 cells, interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) elicited a marked expression of ICAM-1 that selectively polarized to the apical epithelial membrane. Similarly, apically restricted surface expression of ICAM-1 was detected in natural human colonic epithelium only in association with active inflammation. With or without IFN gamma pre-exposure, physiologically directed (basolateral-to-apical) transepithelial migration of PMN was unaffected by blocking monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to ICAM-1. In contrast, PMN migration across IFN gamma-stimulated monolayers in the reverse (apical-to-basolateral) direction was inhibited by anti-ICAM-1 antibodies. Adhesion studies revealed that T84 cells adhered selectively to purified CD11b/CD18 and such adherence, with or without IFN gamma pre-exposure, was unaffected by ICAM-1 m

  6. [Evaluation of asymetric implants in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Fitoussi, A; Couturaud, B; Laki, F; Alran, S; Salmon, R J

    2005-10-01

    Since more than twenty years, methods of breast reconstruction using implants have continued to evolve in order to improve their aesthetic results. Shapes and materials of these implants have also evolved to obtain contours similar to that of the natural opposite breast. Therefore it can be considered that the use of asymmetric implants is the last step in implant technology before using made to measure implants. Asymmetric implants allow obtaining different contours in harmony to the different breast shapes according to the side, left or right, of the reconstructed breast which maximise the naturalness of the result. Such implants have an axis directed towards the exterior and lower part of the chest wall, are wider than high with a thinner part on their inner edge and a concave rear side moulding the curves of the chest wall. In our own experience, we placed more than 500 asymmetric implants. When analysing retrospectively the medical records of 156 patients, no distinctive features were observed when compared to symmetric classic implants in easiness in the surgical procedure or in complications except a slightly higher rate of seroma formation. When compared to usual implants the main benefits of asymmetric implants are: to offer a wider breadth, to slope down gently on their upper and inner sides according to their concave rear side, and therefore to better match subtle curves of a normal breast. Moreover such contours allow a distribution of the volume which fit better to the usual natural breast configuration of patients who underwent surgery for breast carcinoma. At last, such implants are easy to place and a very low rate of secondary rotation has been observed. In summary, for all these reasons, asymmetric implants, can be considered to be the class one in the choice of implants for breast reconstruction after breast surgery. PMID:16198040

  7. The nurse's role in self-breast examination education.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Misty

    2012-01-01

    Do you feel comfortable with your own knowledge of self-breast examination enough to educate a patient? Assessing a patient's compliance of performing self-breast examinations should entail not only if she merely does the examination, but when she is doing them and how she is doing them. There is evidence-based practice that portrays the proper way to perform a self-breast examination. If you, as the primary nurse, are not educated on proper techniques of a self-breast examination, it is your responsibility to provide a resource to the patient that can properly demonstrate this. Women should be educated on the proper way to do a self-breast examination. The first steps should include the ideal time of month to perform the examination. This will allow women to know what is normal breast tissue and what is abnormal to aide in early detection of breast cancer. Utilizing the tools of self-breast examination, yearly mammograms and clinical breast examinations, together with consistency, are the best protection in detecting early breast cancers. PMID:23188144

  8. Breast asymmetry pattern in women with idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Norma I; Korchin, Leo

    2013-01-01

    Breast asymmetry is frequent in women with idiopathic scoliosis. To understand the pattern of breast asymmetry in these women a clinical study was performed in which 54 female patients with idiopathic scoliosis were evaluated. The information recorded for each patient included: age, weight, height, scoliosis type, Cobb angle, breast measurements, and presence of rib cage asymmetry. Breast volume was calculated using anatomic measurements (anthropomorphic method). The mean age of the group was 25 +/- 7 years. A right convex thoracic curve occurred in 85%, with a mean Cobb angle of 32 +/- 15 degrees. Our study indicated that women with idiopathic scoliosis consistently presented breast asymmetry that followed a predictable pattern. The breast on the side of the convex thoracic scoliosis curve is always smaller in volume (mean difference 59 +/- 39 mi). The affected side also presents a smaller areola, a higher position of the nipple (mean difference 2.2 +/- 1.3 cm) and a higher position of the inframammary fold (mean difference 2.1 +/- 1.4 cm) when compared to the opposite breast. Though the asymmetry is predictable, the degree to which the patient presents these changes does not correlate with the severity of the scoliosis (Cobb angle). We believe that the severity of the asymmetry is a result of the difference between the hypoplastic breast and the normal breasts. In women with very large opposite breasts the asymmetry appears to be worse.

  9. Improved development of somatic cell cloned bovine embryos by a mammary gland epithelia cells in vitro model

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li-bing; He, Xiao-ning; Si, Wan-tong; Zheng, Yue-Mao

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have established a bovine mammary gland epithelia cells in vitro model by the adenovirus-mediated telomerase (hTERT-bMGEs). The present study was conducted to confirm whether hTERT-bMGEs were effective target cells to improve the efficiency of transgenic expression and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). To accomplish this, a mammary-specific vector encoding human lysozyme and green fluorescent protein was used to verify the transgenic efficiency of hTERT-bMGEs, and untreated bovine mammary gland epithelial cells (bMGEs) were used as a control group. The results showed that the hTERT-bMGEs group had much higher transgenic efficiency and protein expression than the bMGEs group. Furthermore, the nontransgenic and transgenic hTERT-bMGEs were used as donor cells to evaluate the efficiency of SCNT. There were no significant differences in rates of cleavage or blastocysts or hatched blastocysts of cloned embryos from nontransgenic hTERT-bMGEs at passage 18 and 28 groups (82.8% vs. 81.9%, 28.6% vs. 24.8%, 58.6% vs. 55.3%, respectively) and the transgenic group (80.8%, 26.5% and 53.4%); however, they were significantly higher than the bMGEs group (71.2%, 12.8% and 14.8%), (p < 0.05). We confirmed that hTERT-bMGEs could serve as effective target cells for improving development of somatic cell cloned cattle embryos. PMID:26243608

  10. Clostridium difficile-mediated effects on human intestinal epithelia: Modelling host-pathogen interactions in a vertical diffusion chamber.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Nazila V; Kuehne, Sarah A; Minton, Nigel P; Allan, Elaine; Bajaj-Elliott, Mona

    2016-02-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is one of the leading causes of healthcare associated diarrhoea in the developed world. Although the contribution of C. difficile toxins to disease pathogenesis is now well understood, many facets of host-pathogen interactions between the human intestinal epithelia and the C. difficile bacterium that may contribute to asymptomatic carriage and/or clinical disease remain less clear. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that C. difficile strains mediate intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) antimicrobial immunity via toxin dependent and independent means and that the 'anaerobic' environment has a significant impact on bacterial-IEC interactions. Crosstalk between three C. difficile PCR ribotypes (RT) [RT027 (strain R20291), RT012 (strain 630) and RT017 (strains M68 and CF5)] and IEC cell-lines were investigated. All RTs showed significant engagement with human Toll-like receptors (TLR)-5, TLR2-CD14 and TLR2/6 as measured by IL-8 release from TLR-transfected HEK cells. Co-culture studies indicated minimal impact of R20291 and 630 TcdA and TcdB on bacterial adherence to Caco-2 cells. An apical anaerobic environment had a major effect on C. difficile-T84 crosstalk as significantly greater cytokine immunity and trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER) dysfunction was recorded when co-cultures were performed in an Ussing chamber system compared to standard 5% CO2 conditions. Overall, this study suggests that anaerobic C. difficile engagement with human IECs is a complex interplay that involves bacterial and toxin-mediated cellular events.

  11. Improved development of somatic cell cloned bovine embryos by a mammary gland epithelia cells in vitro model.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao-Ying; Ma, Li-Bing; He, Xiao-Ning; Si, Wan-Tong; Zheng, Yue-Mao

    2016-06-30

    Previous studies have established a bovine mammary gland epithelia cells in vitro model by the adenovirus-mediated telomerase (hTERT-bMGEs). The present study was conducted to confirm whether hTERT-bMGEs were effective target cells to improve the efficiency of transgenic expression and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). To accomplish this, a mammary-specific vector encoding human lysozyme and green fluorescent protein was used to verify the transgenic efficiency of hTERT-bMGEs, and untreated bovine mammary gland epithelial cells (bMGEs) were used as a control group. The results showed that the hTERT-bMGEs group had much higher transgenic efficiency and protein expression than the bMGEs group. Furthermore, the nontransgenic and transgenic hTERT-bMGEs were used as donor cells to evaluate the efficiency of SCNT. There were no significant differences in rates of cleavage or blastocysts or hatched blastocysts of cloned embryos from nontransgenic hTERT-bMGEs at passage 18 and 28 groups (82.8% vs. 81.9%, 28.6% vs. 24.8%, 58.6% vs. 55.3%, respectively) and the transgenic group (80.8%, 26.5% and 53.4%); however, they were significantly higher than the bMGEs group (71.2%, 12.8% and 14.8%), (p < 0.05). We confirmed that hTERT-bMGEs could serve as effective target cells for improving development of somatic cell cloned cattle embryos. PMID:26243608

  12. Improved development of somatic cell cloned bovine embryos by a mammary gland epithelia cells in vitro model.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao-Ying; Ma, Li-Bing; He, Xiao-Ning; Si, Wan-Tong; Zheng, Yue-Mao

    2016-06-30

    Previous studies have established a bovine mammary gland epithelia cells in vitro model by the adenovirus-mediated telomerase (hTERT-bMGEs). The present study was conducted to confirm whether hTERT-bMGEs were effective target cells to improve the efficiency of transgenic expression and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). To accomplish this, a mammary-specific vector encoding human lysozyme and green fluorescent protein was used to verify the transgenic efficiency of hTERT-bMGEs, and untreated bovine mammary gland epithelial cells (bMGEs) were used as a control group. The results showed that the hTERT-bMGEs group had much higher transgenic efficiency and protein expression than the bMGEs group. Furthermore, the nontransgenic and transgenic hTERT-bMGEs were used as donor cells to evaluate the efficiency of SCNT. There were no significant differences in rates of cleavage or blastocysts or hatched blastocysts of cloned embryos from nontransgenic hTERT-bMGEs at passage 18 and 28 groups (82.8% vs. 81.9%, 28.6% vs. 24.8%, 58.6% vs. 55.3%, respectively) and the transgenic group (80.8%, 26.5% and 53.4%); however, they were significantly higher than the bMGEs group (71.2%, 12.8% and 14.8%), (p < 0.05). We confirmed that hTERT-bMGEs could serve as effective target cells for improving development of somatic cell cloned cattle embryos.

  13. Genes that determine immunology and inflammation modify the basic defect of impaired ion conductance in cystic fibrosis epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Tim; Kumar, Vinod; Hedtfeld, Silke; Becker, Christian; Cuppens, Harry; Tamm, Stephanie; Yarden, Jennifer; Laabs, Ulrike; Siebert, Benny; Fernandez, Luis; Macek, Milan; Radojkovic, Dragica; Ballmann, Manfred; Greipel, Joachim; Cassiman, Jean-Jacques; Wienker, Thomas F; Tümmler, Burkhard

    2010-01-01

    Background The cystic fibrosis (CF) basic defect, caused by dysfunction of the apical chloride channel CFTR in the gastrointestinal and respiratory tract epithelia, has not been employed so far to support the role of CF modifier genes. Methods Patients were selected from 101 families with a total of 171 F508del-CFTR homozygous CF patients to identify CF modifying genes. A candidate gene based association study of 52 genes on 16 different chromosomes with a total of 182 genetic markers was performed. Differences in haplotype and/or diplotype distribution between case and reference CF subpopulations were analysed. Results Variants at immunologically relevant genes were associated with the manifestation of the CF basic defect (0.01

  14. Ultrastructure of the anterior intestinal epithelia of the orange-spotted grouper Epinephelus coioides larvae under different feeding regimes.

    PubMed

    Primavera-Tirol, Y H; Coloso, R M; Quinitio, G F; Ordonio-Aguilar, R; Laureta, L V

    2014-04-01

    Enterocytes of the anterior to midsection of the intestine in grouper Epinephelus coioides larvae were compared among different treatments: unfed to the point-of-no-return (PNR), fed natural food only, and co-fed natural food and artificial diet. On day 3, the nutritional condition of unfed grouper larvae regressed with its reduced enterocyte heights which were further degraded on day 4, the PNR, when all the enterocytes were in advanced stages of apoptosis. The apoptosis appeared to be internally directed via the mitochondria. Among day 3 fed larvae, enterocyte heights of those fed artificial diet did not differ from those fed natural food only. Dietary phospholipid deficiency was indicated in larvae co-fed artificial diet on day 3 with an unusually large chylomicron opening into the inter-enterocyte space, and on days 6 and 33 by intestinal steatosis. On day 19, scant to absent lipid droplets in enterocytes of larvae disclosed heightened nutritional requirement preparatory to metamorphosis. As observed in unfed day 3 and premetamorphic day 19 E. coioides, larvae undergoing critical periods and starvation during development employ apoptosis to dispose of degenerated enterocytes that are phagocytosed by adjacent healthy enterocytes without causing inflammatory distress. Upon metamorphosis, grouper larval gut develops better immunity fitness with eosinophilic granule cells observed in the intestinal epithelia of day 33 larvae. Future studies on grouper larval nutrition may consider the appropriate dietary phospholipid levels and larval competence to biosynthesize highly unsaturated fatty acid from linoleic acid vis-à-vis the use of plant ingredients in artificial diet formulations. In vivo challenge tests may validate appropriate dietary nutrient supplementation and lead to better feed formulation, matching the varying energetic demands and digestive capacities of developing E. coioides larvae.

  15. The Cdc42/Par6/aPKC polarity complex regulates apoptosis-induced compensatory proliferation in epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Stephen J.; Yashiro, Hanako; Longmore, Gregory D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background In response to stress- or tissue damage-induced apoptosis, unaffected epithelial cells undergo compensatory proliferation to maintain the integrity of the epithelium. Proximal signals regulating this response are not fully appreciated, but JNK activity appears to be critical for both apoptosis and compensatory proliferation. Since disruption of epithelial cell apical-basal polarity, as can occur in early cancer development and is correlated with increased proliferation by means not fully characterized, we considered whether disruption of the various polarity complexes could provide signals identifying damaged epithelial cells, and thus lead to apoptosis-induced compensatory proliferation. Results We identify the Cdc42/Par6/aPKC Par polarity complex as uniquely and specifically regulating apoptosis-induced compensatory proliferation in Drosophila epithelia. Genetic depletion of individual components or disruption of complex formation and localization, but not other polarity complexes, induces JNK-dependent apoptosis and JNK-dependent compensatory proliferation following radiation injury. When apoptosis execution is blocked, by P35 expression, Cdc42/Par6/aPKC depleted tissues uniquely hyperproliferate leading to tissue/organ overgrowth. Disruption of Cdc42/Par6/aPKC leads to activation of JNK through increased Rho1-Rok activity, and Rok’s capacity to activate Myosin, but not F-actin. Conclusions We show that the Cdc42/Par6/aPKC polarity complex influences both a physiologic compensatory proliferation response after irradiation injury as well as a contrived compensatory non-cell autonomous hyperproliferation response when cell autonomous apoptosis, resulting from Cdc42/Par6/aPKC disruption, is inhibited. These results suggest the possibility that in cancer where apoptotic regulation is disrupted, loss of the Cdc42/Par6/aPKC polarity complex organization or localization could contribute to tumor hyperproliferation and explain how polarity

  16. Breast Imaging Artifacts.

    PubMed

    Odle, Teresa G

    2015-01-01

    Artifacts appear on breast images for a number of reasons. Radiologic technologists play an important role in identifying artifacts that can help or hinder breast cancer diagnosis and in minimizing artifacts that degrade image quality. This article describes various artifacts that occur in breast imaging, along with their causes. The article focuses on artifacts in mammography, with a heavy emphasis on digital mammography, and on magnetic resonance imaging of the breast. Artifacts in ultrasonography of the breast, digital breast tomosynthesis, and positron emission mammography also are discussed.

  17. [Male breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Mattson, Johanna; Vehmanen, Leena

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is rare in men. Diagnosis of the illness may be delayed due to the fact that the doctor and the patient fail to suspect it. Male breast cancer is treated mainly on the same principles as female breast cancer. A man affected with breast cancer should always be directed to genetic testing, as inherited mutations increasing the risk of developing cancer are more common than in female breast cancer. Most breast cancers in men are hormone receptor positive. Among hormone treatments, the antiestrogen tamoxifen exhibits the best efficacy both in early-state and advanced cases. PMID:27188086

  18. Endocrine therapy of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalli, F.

    1986-01-01

    This book results from a meeting of the ESO (European School of Oncology) Task Force on endocrine aspects of breast cancer. The contributions stem from some of the most outstanding researchers in Europe and highlight mainly methodological issues and new avenues for future research. The chapters on basic research deal primarily with experimental strategies for studying the relationship between steroid hormones, growth factors, and oncongenes. The clinically oriented chapters treat the methodology of clinical trials. Provocative questions are raised, such as: What are the pitfalls in endocrine trials. What does statistical proof mean. How can we consider a quality of life endpoint in the adjuvant setting. Two special reports deal with the controversial issues of chemoprevention in high-risk normal women and the optimization of the hormonal contribution to the adjuvant therapy of breast cancer. Topics considered included oncogenic transformations, radiotherapy, steroid hormones, cell proliferation, tamoxifen, and preventive medicine.

  19. p63 expression in benign and malignant breast lesions.

    PubMed

    Stefanou, D; Batistatou, A; Nonni, A; Arkoumani, E; Agnantis, N J

    2004-04-01

    The p63 gene encodes six protein isoforms. The transactivating isoforms have similar actions with p53, while the N-isoforms inhibit transcription activation by p53 and transactivating isoforms. p63 is expressed in stratified epithelia and in basal cells of the prostate and salivary glands. In mammary epithelium p63 has been shown to be expressed only in the myoepithelial layer. In the present study we investigated the immunohistochemical expression of p63, in benign and malignant breast lesions, and compared it with known myoepithelial cell markers. Our material consisted of 140 benign and 126 malignant breast lesions. We used the antibodies anti-p63, anti-alpha-smooth muscle actin, anti-S-100 protein and anti-cytokeratin 14. In all benign lesions, p63 immunoreactivity was noted in the myoepithelial cell layer surrounding the luminal epithelial cells. A less continuous peripheral rim of myoepithelial cells was also highlighted with p63-staining in all situ carcinomas. All invasive breast carcinomas were devoided of peripheral p63 staining. Interestingly, strong nuclear p63 immunoreactivity was noted in a small fraction (5-15%) of epithelial cells in all cases of papillomatosis, in 62.5% of in situ ductal papillary-type carcinomas and in 33.3% of invasive papillary carcinomas. Comparable staining was observed with S-100. The stromal cells were unreactive to p63. Our findings suggest that p63 is a sensitive and specific myoepithelial marker, and may be included in immunohistochemical panels aiming to identify myoepithelial cells in problematic breast lesions. Regarding papillary neoplasms, it is possible that tumor cells acquire and exhibit at least in part a myoepithelial differentiation program.

  20. Intraoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Norman R.; Pigott, Katharine H.; Brew-Graves, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Intra-operative radiotherapy (IORT) as a treatment for breast cancer is a relatively new technique that is designed to be a replacement for whole breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in selected women suitable for breast-conserving therapy. This article reviews twelve reasons for the use of the technique, with a particular emphasis on targeted intra-operative radiotherapy (TARGIT) which uses X-rays generated from a portable device within the operating theatre immediately after the breast tumour (and surrounding margin of healthy tissue) has been removed. The delivery of a single fraction of radiotherapy directly to the tumour bed at the time of surgery, with the capability of adding EBRT at a later date if required (risk-adaptive technique) is discussed in light of recent results from a large multinational randomised controlled trial comparing TARGIT with EBRT. The technique avoids irradiation of normal tissues such as skin, heart, lungs, ribs and spine, and has been shown to improve cosmetic outcome when compared with EBRT. Beneficial aspects to both institutional and societal economics are discussed, together with evidence demonstrating excellent patient satisfaction and quality of life. There is a discussion of the published evidence regarding the use of IORT twice in the same breast (for new primary cancers) and in patients who would never be considered for EBRT because of their special circumstances (such as the frail, the elderly, or those with collagen vascular disease). Finally, there is a discussion of the role of the TARGIT Academy in developing and sustaining high standards in the use of the technique. PMID:25083504

  1. MicroRNA analysis of breast ductal fluid in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Do Canto, Luisa Matos; Marian, Catalin; Willey, Shawna; Sidawy, Mary; Da Cunha, Patricia A; Rone, Janice D; Li, Xin; Gusev, Yuriy; Haddad, Bassem R

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that microRNAs show promise as excellent biomarkers for breast cancer; however there is still a high degree of variability between studies making the findings difficult to interpret. In addition to blood, ductal lavage (DL) and nipple aspirate fluids represent an excellent opportunity for biomarker detection because they can be obtained in a less invasive manner than biopsies and circumvent the limitations of evaluating blood biomarkers with regards to tissue of origin specificity. In this study, we have investigated for the first time, through a real-time PCR array, the expression of 742 miRNAs in the ductal lavage fluid collected from 22 women with unilateral breast tumors. We identified 17 differentially expressed miRNAs between tumor and paired normal samples from patients with ductal breast carcinoma. Most of these miRNAs have various roles in breast cancer tumorigenesis, invasion and metastasis, therapeutic response, or are associated with several clinical and pathological characteristics of breast tumors. Moreover, some miRNAs were also detected in other biological fluids of breast cancer patients such as serum (miR-23b, -133b, -181a, 338-3p, -625), plasma (miR-200a), and breast milk (miR-181a). A systems biology analysis of these differentially expressed miRNAs points out possible pathways and cellular processes previously described as having an important role in breast cancer such as Wnt, ErbB, MAPK, TGF-β, mTOR, PI3K-Akt, p53 signaling pathways. We also observed a difference in the miRNA expression with respect to the histological type of the tumors. In conclusion, our findings suggest that miRNA analysis of breast ductal fluid is feasible and potentially very useful for the detection of breast cancer.

  2. Upregulation of ATM in sclerosing adenosis of the breast.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, R A; Kairouz, R; Watters, D; Lavin, M F; Kearsley, J H; Lee, C S

    1998-01-01

    The gene mutated in ataxia telangiectasia (ATM) has an established tumour suppressor role in breast cancer. ATM appears to be expressed in most normal cells, including breast epithelium, where it has been postulated to have a nuclear role in cell cycle regulation following DNA damage. However, ATM is not upregulated after DNA damage. In this study, we demonstrate an absence of immunohistologically detectable levels of ATM in the normally quiescent myoepithelial cells that line normal breast ducts. This contrasts dramatically with the significant expression of ATM in the proliferative myoepithelium of sclerosing adenosis (n = 7). This upregulation of ATM suggests that ATM expression is coupled to the proliferative status of the myoepithelium. Our results also indicate that there are factors other than ATM gene mutations that can dramatically influence ATM expression in the breast and that these factors should be considered for their possible implications in carcinogenesis. PMID:9893751

  3. A Physical Mechanism and Global Quantification of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chong; Wang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Initiation and progression of cancer depend on many factors. Those on the genetic level are often considered crucial. To gain insight into the physical mechanisms of breast cancer, we construct a gene regulatory network (GRN) which reflects both genetic and environmental aspects of breast cancer. The construction of the GRN is based on available experimental data. Three basins of attraction, representing the normal, premalignant and cancer states respectively, were found on the phenotypic landscape. The progression of breast cancer can be seen as switching transitions between different state basins. We quantified the stabilities and kinetic paths of the three state basins to uncover the biological process of breast cancer formation. The gene expression levels at each state were obtained, which can be tested directly in experiments. Furthermore, by performing global sensitivity analysis on the landscape topography, six key genes (HER2, MDM2, TP53, BRCA1, ATM, CDK2) and four regulations (HER2⊣TP53, CDK2⊣BRCA1, ATM→MDM2, TP53→ATM) were identified as being critical for breast cancer. Interestingly, HER2 and MDM2 are the most popular targets for treating breast cancer. BRCA1 and TP53 are the most important oncogene of breast cancer and tumor suppressor gene, respectively. This further validates the feasibility of our model and the reliability of our prediction results. The regulation ATM→MDM2 has been extensive studied on DNA damage but not on breast cancer. We notice the importance of ATM→MDM2 on breast cancer. Previous studies of breast cancer have often focused on individual genes and the anti-cancer drugs are mainly used to target the individual genes. Our results show that the network-based strategy is more effective on treating breast cancer. The landscape approach serves as a new strategy for analyzing breast cancer on both the genetic and epigenetic levels and can help on designing network based medicine for breast cancer. PMID:27410227

  4. Differential expression of matrix metalloproteinase-13 in association with invasion of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kotepui, Manas; Punsawad, Chuchard; Chupeerach, Chaowanee; Songsri, Apiram; Charoenkijkajorn, Lek; Petmitr, Songsak

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) has a potential role in tumour invasion and metastasis. However, its relevance to the prognosis of human breast cancer is poorly understood. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression patterns of MMP-13 protein and to determine its prognostic value in breast cancer, and to define its relation to the clinicopathological features. Immunohistochemistry analysis of MMP-13 was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of cancerous breast tissue (n = 76) and normal breast tissue (n = 20), all of which had clinicopathological information available. Based on the principle of immunoreactivity, the detection of MMP-13 on breast tissue was conducted using monoclonal antibodies against MMP-13. A semi-quantitative scoring system was used to assess the presence of, as well as the cellular localisation of MMP-13. MMP-13 expression was significantly greater in the cancerous breast tissues in comparison to those of normal breast tissues. In addition, high levels of MMP-13 expression were also found to be related to the positive detection of breast cancer cells in lymph nodes-amongst breast cancer patients. The results of this study showed that MMP-13 was frequently present in breast tumours, especially when tumours were accompanied by positive breast cancer cell detection in lymph nodes. This suggests that MMP-13 plays a potentially significant role in breast cancer invasion and metastasis. PMID:27647987

  5. Differential expression of matrix metalloproteinase-13 in association with invasion of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Punsawad, Chuchard; Chupeerach, Chaowanee; Songsri, Apiram; Charoenkijkajorn, Lek; Petmitr, Songsak

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) has a potential role in tumour invasion and metastasis. However, its relevance to the prognosis of human breast cancer is poorly understood. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression patterns of MMP-13 protein and to determine its prognostic value in breast cancer, and to define its relation to the clinicopathological features. Immunohistochemistry analysis of MMP-13 was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of cancerous breast tissue (n = 76) and normal breast tissue (n = 20), all of which had clinicopathological information available. Based on the principle of immunoreactivity, the detection of MMP-13 on breast tissue was conducted using monoclonal antibodies against MMP-13. A semi-quantitative scoring system was used to assess the presence of, as well as the cellular localisation of MMP-13. MMP-13 expression was significantly greater in the cancerous breast tissues in comparison to those of normal breast tissues. In addition, high levels of MMP-13 expression were also found to be related to the positive detection of breast cancer cells in lymph nodes-amongst breast cancer patients. The results of this study showed that MMP-13 was frequently present in breast tumours, especially when tumours were accompanied by positive breast cancer cell detection in lymph nodes. This suggests that MMP-13 plays a potentially significant role in breast cancer invasion and metastasis. PMID:27647987

  6. Breast ductal carcinoma in situ presenting as recurrent non-puerperal mastitis: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Liong, Yee Vonne; Hong, Ga Sze; Teo, Jennifer Gek Choo; Lim, Geok Hoon

    2013-08-07

    Breast ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a preinvasive form of breast cancer. It typically presents as microcalcifications which are picked up on screening mammogram. We report an atypical case of breast DCIS presenting with recurrent non-puerperal mastitis with a normal mammogram and perform a literature review.

  7. Descriptive texture analyses of cooked broiler breast fillets with the wooden condition after fresh and frozen storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of the wooden breast condition on the texture of cooked broiler breast fillets (Pectoralis major) after fresh and frozen storage. Texture characteristics of normal (NORM) and severe wooden breast (WB) fillets were studied by both sensory descr...

  8. Breast augmentation surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... a change in the shape of your breast, hardening of breast tissue, or some pain. Emotional risks ... starting 5 days after surgery. Massaging helps reduce hardening of the capsule that surrounds the implant. Ask ...

  9. Screening for Breast Problems

    MedlinePlus

    f AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ178 GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS Mammography and Other Screening Tests for Breast Problems • What ... used to screen for breast problems? • What is mammography? • Why is mammography done? • When should I start ...

  10. MRI of the Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a supplemental tool to breast screening with mammography or ultrasound. It may be used to screen ... following diagnosis, or further evaluate abnormalities seen on mammography. Breast MRI does not use ionizing radiation, and ...

  11. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer - Treatment Options Request Permissions Print to PDF Breast Cancer - Treatment Options Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... recommendations for ovarian ablation . Hormonal therapy for metastatic breast cancer Hormonal therapies are also commonly used to treat ...

  12. Breast Reconstruction Alternatives

    MedlinePlus

    ... facts before submitting any insurance claims. For a list of companies that sell breast prostheses and other accessories, see Breast Prostheses and Hair Loss Accessories List . Going flat Some women who do not have ...

  13. Breastfeeding and Breast Milk

    MedlinePlus

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Breastfeeding and Breast Milk: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Breastfeeding and Breast Milk: Condition Information​ ​​Breastfeeding, also called ...

  14. Stages of Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone pain ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels to ...

  15. Breast Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone pain ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels to ...

  16. Breast cancer staging

    MedlinePlus

    Doctors use 7 main stages to describe breast cancer. Stage 0, also called carcinoma in situ. This is cancer that is confined to the lobules or ducts in the breast. It has not spread to surrounding tissue. ...

  17. Breast Reconstruction and Prosthesis

    MedlinePlus

    ... feel of the breast after a mastectomy. A plastic surgeon can do it at the same time ... want breast reconstruction. • Have you talked with your plastic surgeon about your options? You may not be ...

  18. Breast cancer risk in metabolically healthy but overweight postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Gunter, Marc J; Xie, Xianhong; Xue, Xiaonan; Kabat, Geoffrey C; Rohan, Thomas E; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Ho, Gloria Y F; Wylie-Rosett, Judith; Greco, Theresa; Yu, Herbert; Beasley, Jeannette; Strickler, Howard D

    2015-01-15

    Adiposity is an established risk factor for postmenopausal breast cancer. Recent data suggest that high insulin levels in overweight women may play a major role in this relationship, due to insulin's mitogenic/antiapoptotic activity. However, whether overweight women who are metabolically healthy (i.e., normal insulin sensitivity) have elevated risk of breast cancer is unknown. We investigated whether overweight women with normal insulin sensitivity [i.e., homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index, or fasting insulin level, within the lowest quartile (q1)] have increased breast cancer risk. Subjects were incident breast cancer cases (N = 497) and a subcohort (N = 2,830) of Women's Health Initiative (WHI) participants with available fasting insulin and glucose levels. In multivariate Cox models, metabolically healthy overweight women, defined using HOMA-IR, were not at elevated risk of breast cancer compared with metabolically healthy normal weight women [HRHOMA-IR, 0.96; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.64-1.42]. In contrast, the risk among women with high (q3-4) HOMA-IRs was elevated whether they were overweight (HRHOMA-IR, 1.76; 95% CI, 1.19-2.60) or normal weight (HRHOMA-IR, 1.80; 95% CI, 0.88-3.70). Similarly, using fasting insulin to define metabolic health, metabolically unhealthy women (insulin q3-4) were at higher risk of breast cancer regardless of whether they were normal weight (HRinsulin, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.01-4.22) or overweight (HRinsulin, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.35-2.99), whereas metabolically healthy overweight women did not have significantly increased risk of breast cancer (HRinsulin, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.64-1.42) relative to metabolically healthy normal weight women. Metabolic health (e.g., HOMA-IR or fasting insulin) may be more biologically relevant and more useful for breast cancer risk stratification than adiposity per se. PMID:25593034

  19. Breast cancer risk in metabolically healthy but overweight postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Gunter, Marc J; Xie, Xianhong; Xue, Xiaonan; Kabat, Geoffrey C; Rohan, Thomas E; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Ho, Gloria Y F; Wylie-Rosett, Judith; Greco, Theresa; Yu, Herbert; Beasley, Jeannette; Strickler, Howard D

    2015-01-15

    Adiposity is an established risk factor for postmenopausal breast cancer. Recent data suggest that high insulin levels in overweight women may play a major role in this relationship, due to insulin's mitogenic/antiapoptotic activity. However, whether overweight women who are metabolically healthy (i.e., normal insulin sensitivity) have elevated risk of breast cancer is unknown. We investigated whether overweight women with normal insulin sensitivity [i.e., homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index, or fasting insulin level, within the lowest quartile (q1)] have increased breast cancer risk. Subjects were incident breast cancer cases (N = 497) and a subcohort (N = 2,830) of Women's Health Initiative (WHI) participants with available fasting insulin and glucose levels. In multivariate Cox models, metabolically healthy overweight women, defined using HOMA-IR, were not at elevated risk of breast cancer compared with metabolically healthy normal weight women [HRHOMA-IR, 0.96; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.64-1.42]. In contrast, the risk among women with high (q3-4) HOMA-IRs was elevated whether they were overweight (HRHOMA-IR, 1.76; 95% CI, 1.19-2.60) or normal weight (HRHOMA-IR, 1.80; 95% CI, 0.88-3.70). Similarly, using fasting insulin to define metabolic health, metabolically unhealthy women (insulin q3-4) were at higher risk of breast cancer regardless of whether they were normal weight (HRinsulin, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.01-4.22) or overweight (HRinsulin, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.35-2.99), whereas metabolically healthy overweight women did not have significantly increased risk of breast cancer (HRinsulin, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.64-1.42) relative to metabolically healthy normal weight women. Metabolic health (e.g., HOMA-IR or fasting insulin) may be more biologically relevant and more useful for breast cancer risk stratification than adiposity per se.

  20. Breast Augmentation With Autologous Fat Injection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fa-Cheng; Chen, Bing; Cheng, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Autologous fat transplantation has attracted great interest in breast augmentation for cosmetic purpose. In the present study, we reported our experience in fat grafting in breast in 105 cases, and some detailed procedure concerning efficacy and safety of grafting was evaluated. Methods Fat was harvested using 20-mL syringe attached to a 3-hole blunt cannula in a diameter not beyond 3 mm. After washing with cool normal saline to remove blood, the fat was managed with open method using cotton towel as a platform for concentration fat tissue and separating them from fluids, oil, and debris. A 14-gauge, 1-hole blunt cannula was used to place the fat through 3-mm incision on inframammary fold. The fat was infiltrated into the breast from deep to superficial subcutaneous plane. Results Between July 2002 and August 2010, 105 patients have undergone this procedure. The age distribution of the patients ranged from 18 to 45 years, with a mean of 31.3 years. Grafted fat volume has ranged from 120 to 250 mL (average, 205 mL) per breast per session. All women had a significant improvement in their breast size and shape postoperatively, and the breasts were soft and natural in appearance. Conclusions Liposuction and autologous fat transplantation is a suitable approach for augmentation mammaplasty. PMID:25003461