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Sample records for normal colonic epithelial

  1. Cell surface glycopeptides from human intestinal epithelial cell lines derived from normal colon and colon adenocarcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Youakim, A.; Herscovics, A.

    1985-11-01

    The cell surface glycopeptides from an epithelial cell line (CCL 239) derived from normal human colon were compared with those from three cell lines (HCT-8R, HCT-15, and CaCo-2) derived independently from human colonic adenocarcinomas. Cells were incubated with D-(2-TH)mannose or L-(5,6-TH)fucose for 24 h and treated with trypsin to release cell surface components which were then digested exhaustively with Pronase and fractionated on Bio-Gel P-6 before and after treatment with endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H. The most noticeable difference between the labeled glycopeptides from the tumor and CCL 239 cells was the presence in the former of an endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H-resistant high molecular weight glycopeptide fraction which was eluted in the void volume of Bio-Gel P-6. This fraction was obtained with both labeled mannose and fucose as precursors. However, acid hydrolysis of this fraction obtained after incubation with (2-TH)mannose revealed that as much as 60-90% of the radioactivity was recovered as fucose. Analysis of the total glycopeptides (cell surface and cell pellet) obtained after incubation with (2-TH)mannose showed that from 40-45% of the radioactivity in the tumor cells and less than 10% of the radioactivity in the CCL 239 cells was recovered as fucose. After incubation of the HCT-8R cells with D-(1,6-TH)glucosamine and L-(1- UC)fucose, strong acid hydrolysis of the labeled glycopeptide fraction excluded from Bio-Gel P-6 produced TH-labeled N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylgalactosamine.

  2. PKH26 Staining Defines Distinct Subsets of Normal Human Colon Epithelial Cells at Different Maturation Stages

    PubMed Central

    Pastò, Anna; Marchesi, Maddalena; Diamantini, Adamo; Frasson, Chiara; Curtarello, Matteo; Lago, Claudia; Pilotto, Giorgia; Parenti, Anna Rosita; Esposito, Giovanni; Agostini, Marco; Nitti, Donato; Amadori, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aim Colon crypts are characterized by a hierarchy of cells distributed along the crypt axis. Aim of this paper was to develop an in vitro system for separation of epithelial cell subsets in different maturation stages from normal human colon. Methodology and Major Findings Dissociated colonic epithelial cells were stained with PKH26, which allows identification of distinct populations based on their proliferation rate, and cultured in vitro in the absence of serum. The cytofluorimetric expression of CK20, Msi-1 and Lgr5 was studied. The mRNA levels of several stemness-associated genes were also compared in cultured cell populations and in three colon crypt populations isolated by microdissection. A PKHpos population survived in culture and formed spheroids; this population included subsets with slow (PKHhigh) and rapid (PKHlow) replicative rates. Molecular analysis revealed higher mRNA levels of both Msi-1 and Lgr-5 in PKHhigh cells; by cytofluorimetric analysis, Msi-1+/Lgr5+ cells were only found within PKHhigh cells, whereas Msi-1+/Lgr5− cells were also observed in the PKHlow population. As judged by qRT-PCR analysis, the expression of several stemness-associated markers (Bmi-1, EphB2, EpCAM, ALDH1) was highly enriched in Msi-1+/Lgr5+ cells. While CK20 expression was mainly found in PKHlow and PKHneg cells, a small PKHhigh subset co-expressed both CK20 and Msi-1, but not Lgr5; cells with these properties also expressed Mucin, and could be identified in vivo in colon crypts. These results mirrored those found in cells isolated from different crypt portions by microdissection, and based on proliferation rates and marker expression they allowed to define several subsets at different maturation stages: PKHhigh/Lgr5+/Msi-1+/CK20−, PKHhigh/Lgr5−/Msi-1+/CK20+, PKHlow/Lgr5−/Msi-1+/Ck20−, and PKHlow/Lgr5−/Msi-1−/CK20+ cells. Conclusions Our data show the possibility of deriving in vitro, without any selection strategy, several distinct cell

  3. Liver X receptor ligand cytotoxicity in colon cancer cells and not in normal colon epithelial cells depends on LXRβ subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Courtaut, Flavie; Derangère, Valentin; Chevriaux, Angélique; Ladoire, Sylvain; Cotte, Alexia K; Arnould, Laurent; Boidot, Romain; Rialland, Mickaël; Ghiringhelli, François; Rébé, Cédric

    2015-09-29

    Increasing evidence indicates that Liver X Receptors (LXRs) have some anticancer properties. We recently demonstrated that LXR ligands induce colon cancer cell pyroptosis through an LXRβ-dependent pathway. In the present study, we showed that human colon cancer cell lines presented differential cytoplasmic localizations of LXRβ. This localization correlated with caspase-1 activation and cell death induction under treatment with LXR ligand. The association of LXRβ with the truncated form of RXRα (t-RXRα) was responsible for the sequestration of LXRβ in the cytoplasm in colon cancer cells. Moreover t-RXRα was not expressed in normal colon epithelial cells. These cells presented a predominantly nuclear localization of LXRβ and were resistant to LXR ligand cytotoxicity. Our results showed that predominant cytoplasmic localization of LXRβ, which occurs in colon cancer cells but not in normal colon epithelial cells, allowed LXR ligand-induced pyroptosis. This study strengthens the hypothesis that LXRβ could be a promising target in cancer therapy.

  4. Liver X Receptor ligand cytotoxicity in colon cancer cells and not in normal colon epithelial cells depends on LXRβ subcellular localization

    PubMed Central

    Chevriaux, Angélique; Ladoire, Sylvain; Cotte, Alexia K.; Arnould, Laurent; Boidot, Romain; Rialland, Mickaël; Ghiringhelli, François; Rébé, Cédric

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that Liver X Receptors (LXRs) have some anticancer properties. We recently demonstrated that LXR ligands induce colon cancer cell pyroptosis through an LXRβ-dependent pathway. In the present study, we showed that human colon cancer cell lines presented differential cytoplasmic localizations of LXRβ. This localization correlated with caspase-1 activation and cell death induction under treatment with LXR ligand. The association of LXRβ with the truncated form of RXRα (t-RXRα) was responsible for the sequestration of LXRβ in the cytoplasm in colon cancer cells. Moreover t-RXRα was not expressed in normal colon epithelial cells. These cells presented a predominantly nuclear localization of LXRβ and were resistant to LXR ligand cytotoxicity. Our results showed that predominant cytoplasmic localization of LXRβ, which occurs in colon cancer cells but not in normal colon epithelial cells, allowed LXR ligand-induced pyroptosis. This study strengthens the hypothesis that LXRβ could be a promising target in cancer therapy. PMID:26450852

  5. Modulation of distal colonic epithelial barrier function by dietary fibre in normal rats

    PubMed Central

    Mariadason, J; Catto-Smith, A; Gibson, P

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Dietary fibre influences the turnover and differentiation of the colonic epithelium, but its effects on barrier function are unknown. 
AIMS—To determine whether altering the type and amount of fibre in the diet affects paracellular permeability of intestinal epithelium, and to identify the mechanisms of action. 
METHODS—Rats were fed isoenergetic low fibre diets with or without supplements of wheat bran (10%) or methylcellulose (10%), for four weeks. Paracellular permeability was determined by measurement of conductance and 51Cr-EDTA flux across tissue mounted in Ussing chambers. Faecal short chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentrations were assessed by gas chromatography, epithelial kinetics stathmokinetically, and mucosal brush border hydrolase activities spectrophotometrically. 
RESULTS—Body weight was similar across the dietary groups. Conductance and 51Cr-EDTA flux were approximately 25% higher in animals fed no fibre, compared with those fed wheat bran or methylcellulose in the distal colon, but not in the caecum or jejunum. Histologically, there was no evidence of epithelial injury or erosion associated with any diet. The fibres exerted different spectra of effects on luminal SCFA concentrations and pH, and on mucosal indexes, but both bulked the faeces, were trophic to the epithelium, and stimulated expression of a marker of epithelial differentiation. 
CONCLUSIONS—Both a fermentable and a non-fermentable fibre reduce paracellular permeability specifically in the distal colon, possibly by promoting epithelial cell differentiation. The mechanisms by which the two fibres exert their effects are likely to be different. 

 Keywords: colon; differentiation; epithelium; fibre; paracellular permeability; proliferation PMID:10026327

  6. Effects of a Mediterranean Diet Intervention on Anti- and Pro-Inflammatory Eicosanoids, Epithelial Proliferation, and Nuclear Morphology in Biopsies of Normal Colon Tissue.

    PubMed

    Djuric, Zora; Turgeon, D Kim; Ren, Jianwei; Neilson, Andrew; Plegue, Missy; Waters, Ian G; Chan, Alexander; Askew, Leah M; Ruffin, Mack T; Sen, Ananda; Brenner, Dean E

    2015-01-01

    This randomized trial evaluated the effects of intervention with either a Healthy Eating or a Mediterranean diet on colon biomarkers in 120 healthy individuals at increased colon cancer risk. The hypothesis was that eicosanoids and markers of proliferation would be favorably affected by the Mediterranean diet. Colon epithelial biopsy tissues and blood samples were obtained at baseline and after 6 mo of intervention. Colonic eicosanoid concentrations were evaluated by HPLC-MS-MS, and measures of epithelial proliferation and nuclear morphology were evaluated by image analysis of biopsy sections. There was little change in proinflammatory eicosanoids and in plasma cytokine concentrations with either dietary intervention. There was, however, a 50% increase in colonic prostaglandin E3 (PGE3), which is formed from eicosapentanoic acid, in the Mediterranean arm. Unlike PGE2, PGE3, was not significantly affected by regular use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs at baseline, and normal weight subjects had significantly higher colon PGE3 than overweight or obese subjects. Increased proliferation in the colon at baseline, by Ki67 labeling, was associated with morphological features that defined smaller nuclei in the epithelial cells, lower colon leukotriene concentrations and higher plasma cytokine concentrations. Dietary intervention had little effect on measures of epithelial proliferation or of nuclear morphology. The increase in PGE3 with a Mediterranean diet indicates that in normal colon, diet might affect protective pathways to a greater extent than proinflammatory and proliferative pathways. Hence, biomarkers from cancer models might not be relevant in a true prevention setting.

  7. Nuclear microscopy of rat colon epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, M.; Rajendran, Reshmi; Ng, Mary; Udalagama, Chammika; Rodrigues, Anna E.; Watt, Frank; Jenner, Andrew Michael

    2011-10-01

    Using Nuclear microscopy, we have investigated iron distributions in the colons of Sprague Dawley rats, in order to elucidate heme uptake. Four groups of five Sprague Dawley rats (mean weight 180 g) were fed different purified diets containing either heme diet (2.5% w/w hemoglobin), high fat diet (HFD) (18% w/w fat, 1% w/w cholesterol), 'western' diet (combination of hemoglobin 2.5% and 18% fat, 1% cholesterol) or control diet (7% w/w fat). After 4 weeks, animals were sacrificed by exsanguination after anaesthesia. Thin sections of frozen colon tissue were taken, freeze dried and scanned using nuclear microscopy utilising the techniques PIXE, RBS and STIM. The new data acquisition system (IonDaq) developed in CIBA was used to obtain high resolution images and line scans were used to map the iron distributions across the colon boundaries. The nuclear microscope results indicate that when HFD is given in addition to heme, the iron content of the epithelial cells that line the colon decreases, and the zinc in the smooth muscle wall increases. This implies that the level of heme and fat in diet has an important role in colon health, possibly by influencing epithelial cells directly or changing luminal composition such as bacterial flora or levels of metabolites and cytotoxins.

  8. Epithelial NAIPs protect against colonic tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Allam, Ramanjaneyulu; Maillard, Michel H; Tardivel, Aubry; Chennupati, Vijaykumar; Bega, Hristina; Yu, Chi Wang; Velin, Dominique; Schneider, Pascal; Maslowski, Kendle M

    2015-03-01

    NLR family apoptosis inhibitory proteins (NAIPs) belong to both the Nod-like receptor (NLR) and the inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) families. NAIPs are known to form an inflammasome with NLRC4, but other in vivo functions remain unexplored. Using mice deficient for all NAIP paralogs (Naip1-6(Δ/Δ)), we show that NAIPs are key regulators of colorectal tumorigenesis. Naip1-6(Δ/Δ) mice developed increased colorectal tumors, in an epithelial-intrinsic manner, in a model of colitis-associated cancer. Increased tumorigenesis, however, was not driven by an exacerbated inflammatory response. Instead, Naip1-6(Δ/Δ) mice were protected from severe colitis and displayed increased antiapoptotic and proliferation-related gene expression. Naip1-6(Δ/Δ) mice also displayed increased tumorigenesis in an inflammation-independent model of colorectal cancer. Moreover, Naip1-6(Δ/Δ) mice, but not Nlrc4-null mice, displayed hyper-activation of STAT3 and failed to activate p53 18 h after carcinogen exposure. This suggests that NAIPs protect against tumor initiation in the colon by promoting the removal of carcinogen-elicited epithelium, likely in a NLRC4 inflammasome-independent manner. Collectively, we demonstrate a novel epithelial-intrinsic function of NAIPs in protecting the colonic epithelium against tumorigenesis. PMID:25732303

  9. Hydrogen sulfide lowers proliferation and induces protective autophagy in colon epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ya C; Wang, Xiao J; Yu, Le; Chan, Francis K L; Cheng, Alfred S L; Yu, Jun; Sung, Joseph J Y; Wu, William K K; Cho, Chi H

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is a gaseous bacterial metabolite that reaches high levels in the large intestine. In the present study, the effect of H(2)S on the proliferation of normal and cancerous colon epithelial cells was investigated. An immortalized colon epithelial cell line (YAMC) and a panel of colon cancer cell lines (HT-29, SW1116, HCT116) were exposed to H(2)S at concentrations similar to those found in the human colon. H(2)S inhibited normal and cancerous colon epithelial cell proliferation as measured by MTT assay. The anti-mitogenic effect of H(2)S was accompanied by G(1)-phase cell cycle arrest and the induction of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(Cip). Moreover, exposure to H(2)S led to features characteristic of autophagy, including increased formation of LC3B(+) autophagic vacuoles and acidic vesicular organelles as determined by immunofluorescence and acridine orange staining, respectively. Abolition of autophagy by RNA interference targeting Vps34 or Atg7 enhanced the anti-proliferative effect of H(2)S. Further mechanistic investigation revealed that H(2)S stimulated the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and inhibited the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and S6 kinase. Inhibition of AMPK significantly reversed H(2)S-induced autophagy and inhibition of cell proliferation. Collectively, we demonstrate that H(2)S inhibits colon epithelial cell proliferation and induces protective autophagy via the AMPK pathway. PMID:22679478

  10. Epithelial cell adhesion and gastrointestinal colonization of Lactobacillus in poultry.

    PubMed

    Spivey, Megan A; Dunn-Horrocks, Sadie L; Duong, Tri

    2014-11-01

    Administration of probiotic Lactobacillus cultures is an important alternative to the use of antibiotic growth promoters and has been demonstrated to improve animal health, growth performance, and preharvest food safety in poultry production. Whereas gastrointestinal colonization is thought to be critical to their probiotic functionality, factors important to Lactobacillus colonization in chickens are not well understood. In this study we investigate epithelial cell adhesion in vitro and colonization of Lactobacillusin vivo in broiler chickens. Adhesion of Lactobacillus cultures to epithelial cells was evaluated using the chicken LMH cell line. Lactobacillus cultures were able adhere effectively to LMH cells relative to Bacillus subtilis and Salmonella Typhimurium. Epithelial cell adhesion was similar for Lactobacillus crispatus TDCC 75, L. cristpatus TDCC 76, and Lactobacillus gallinarum TDCC 77, and all 3 were more adherent than L. gallinarum TDCC 78. However, when colonization was evaluated in the ileum and cecum of broiler chicks, L. crispatus TDCC 75 and L. gallinarum TDCC 77 were more persistent than L. crispatus TDCC 76 and L. gallinarum TDCC 78. The reduction of growth in medium supplemented with oxgal was greater for L. gallinarum TDCC 78 than L. gallinarum TDCC 77, suggesting that whereas adhesion was similar for the 2 strains, the difference in colonization between L. gallinarum strains may be due in part to their bile sensitivity. This study demonstrates that whereas adhesion to epithelial cells may be important in predicting gastrointestinal colonization, other factors including bile tolerance may also contribute to the colonization of Lactobacillus in poultry. Additionally, the chicken LMH cell line is expected to provide a platform for investigating mechanisms of Lactobacillus adhesion to epithelial tissue and evaluating the probiotic potential Lactobacillus in poultry.

  11. Expression of lactoperoxidase in differentiated mouse colon epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Wook; Esworthy, R Steven; Hahn, Maria A; Pfeifer, Gerd P; Chu, Fong-Fong

    2012-05-01

    Lactoperoxidase (LPO) is known to be present in secreted fluids, such as milk and saliva. Functionally, LPO teams up with dual oxidases (DUOXs) to generate bactericidal hypothiocyanite in the presence of thiocyanate. DUOX2 is expressed in intestinal epithelium, but there is little information on LPO expression in this tissue. To fill the gap of knowledge, we have analyzed Lpo gene expression and its regulation in mouse intestine. In wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 (B6) mouse intestine, an appreciable level of mouse Lpo gene expression was detected in the colon, but not the ileum. However, in B6 mice deficient in glutathione peroxidase (GPx)-1 and -2, GPx1/2-double-knockout (DKO), which had intestinal pathology, the colon Lpo mRNA levels increased 5- to 12-fold depending on mouse age. The Lpo mRNA levels in WT and DKO 129S1/SvlmJ (129) colon were even higher, 9- and 5-fold, than in B6 DKO colon. Higher levels of Lpo protein and enzymatic activity were also detected in the 129 mouse colon compared to B6 colon. Lpo protein was expressed in the differentiated colon epithelial cells, away from the crypt base, as shown by immunohistochemistry. Similar to human LPO mRNA, mouse Lpo mRNA had multiple spliced forms, although only the full-length variant 1 was translated. Higher methylation was found in the 129 than in the B6 strain, in DKO than in control colon, and in older than in juvenile mice. However, methylation of the Lpo intragenic CpG island was not directly induced by inflammation, because dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis did not increase DNA methylation in B6 DKO colon. Also, Lpo DNA methylation is not correlated with gene expression.

  12. Ulcerative colitis--a disease characterised by the abnormal colonic epithelial cell?

    PubMed

    Gibson, P R; van de Pol, E; Barratt, P J; Doe, W F

    1988-04-01

    The leakiness of the cell membranes of colonic epithelial cells isolated by the collagenase/Dispase technique from normal or diseased colons was assessed in a 4 h 51Cr release assay. Cells from normal, adenoma bearing or cancer bearing colons showed 51Cr release of 8% or less in almost all of 46 cell populations tested. In contrast, cells from mucosa affected by ulcerative colitis [11.9 (4.3%) n = 23] or Crohn's disease [8.4 (2.7%) n = 18] released significantly more 51Cr than the non-inflamed groups. Values are expressed as mean (SD). Overall, release values were greater in ulcerative colitis than Crohn's disease (p less than 0.01). In Crohn's disease, cells obtained from histologically inflamed mucosa released significantly more 51Cr [9.7 (2.5%) n = 11] than those from non-inflamed mucosa [6.4 (1.5%) n = 7, p less than 0.02] whereas, in ulcerative colitis, abnormal release values were found in 8 of 13 cell populations isolated from mucosa showing no histological evidence of active disease. In five patients with distal ulcerative colitis, cells from mucosa not apparently involved demonstrated normal 51Cr release in four of five studies despite abnormal release from cells from involved mucosa suggesting that a diffuse abnormality of the colonic epithelial cell is not usually present. These data indicate that chronic mucosal inflammation per se is associated with abnormalities of the colonic epithelial cell but that, in ulcerative colitis, the abnormality remains in many patients with quiescent disease. Identification of the local factors responsible for such an abnormality may contribute to an understanding of the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. PMID:3371720

  13. Adiponectin stimulates proliferation and cytokine secretion in colonic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ogunwobi, Olorunseun Olatunji; Beales, Ian L P

    2006-05-15

    Adiponectin is a recently described mediator secreted by adipose tissue. Here we report the growth promoting and pro-inflammatory actions of adiponectin on colonic epithelial cancer cells. Full-length and globular adiponectin produced an identical stimulation of HT-29 cell growth that was blocked by inhibition of adenylate cyclase and protein kinase A and partially inhibited by a pan-specific protein kinase C inhibitor, but was unaffected by specific inhibition of extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) or p38 MAP kinase. Globular adiponectin but not full-length adiponectin significantly increased the secretion and mRNA levels of IL-8, GM-CSF and MCP-1. Globular adiponectin doubled IL-1beta-stimulated IL-8 and GM-CSF secretion. Adiponectin-stimulated cytokine secretion was blocked by pharmacological inhibitors of NF-kappaB, ERK and p38 MAP kinase. Globular adiponectin increased phosphorylation of both ERK and p38 MAP kinase and increased the nuclear translocation of active NF-kappaB. Adiponectin has pro-proliferative and pro-inflammatory actions on colonic epithelial cells; these appear to be differentially activated by the adiponectin isoforms. Adiponectin may have a role in the regulation of gastrointestinal mucosal function, inflammation and colon carcinogenesis.

  14. Intestinal trefoil factor confers colonic epithelial resistance to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Taupin, D R; Kinoshita, K; Podolsky, D K

    2000-01-18

    Intestinal trefoil factor (ITF) is an essential regulator of colonic epithelial restitution, the rapid migration of colonocytes over mucosal wounds. High levels of ITF are frequently present in colorectal cancers and derived cell lines. Mucosal restitution requires the detachment of epithelium from substrate, which would be expected to induce apoptosis. However, mice deficient in ITF showed an increase in colonocyte apoptosis unaccompanied by changes in expression of receptor-related (TNFR/Fas) or stress-related (Bcl-family) cell death regulators. An ITF-expressing colonic (HT-ITF1) cell line was resistant to apoptosis induced by serum starvation and ceramide. Exogenous ITF also protected another human colonic carcinoma-derived cell line (HCT116) and a nontransformed rat intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6) from apoptosis. This effect was abrogated by wortmannin and tyrphostin A25, indicating the potential involvement of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor activation. Expression of phosphorylated Akt, which lies downstream of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activation, was elevated in this HT-29-ITF line. p53-dependent cell death in the AGS human gastric cancer cell line after etoposide was similarly inhibited by transient expression of ITF but not a C-terminal truncation mutant of ITF, and it required functional phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and EGF receptor. These findings support a central role for ITF in the maintenance of intestinal mucosal continuity, and conversely demonstrate the potential for ITF expression to confer resistance of colorectal tumors to therapy.

  15. Aldosterone induces myofibroblast EGF secretion to regulate epithelial colonic permeability.

    PubMed

    Miró, Lluïsa; Pérez-Bosque, Anna; Maijó, Mònica; Amat, Concepció; Naftalin, Richard J; Moretó, Miquel

    2013-05-01

    In vivo studies show that raised aldosterone (Aldo) during low-Na adaptation regulates the growth of pericryptal myofibroblasts and reduces the permeability of the colonic epithelium. The aim of this study was to reproduce in vitro the in vivo condition of increased Aldo using human CCD-18Co myofibroblasts and T84 colonic epithelial cells to measure myofibroblast and epithelial proliferation and the expression of intercellular junction proteins. Proliferation was quantified by measuring 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation. The myofibroblast expression of EGF, VEGFa, and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) was measured by real-time PCR and the expression of junctional complex proteins by Western blot. Aldo stimulated the proliferation of myofibroblasts by 70% (P < 0.05) and increased EGF mRNA expression by 30% (P < 0.05) without affecting VEGFa and TGF-β1. EGF concentration in the incubation medium increased by 30% (P < 0.05) 24 h after Aldo addition, and these effects were prevented by the addition of spironolactone. Myofibroblast proliferation in response to Aldo was mediated by EGF receptor (EGFR) and involved both MAPKK and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathways. When T84 cells were incubated with medium from myofibroblasts stimulated with Aldo (conditioned medium), the expression of β-catenin and claudin IV was increased by 30% (P < 0.05) and proliferation by 40% (P < 0.05). T84 proliferation decreased when α-EGF, or the EGFR antagonist AG1478, was present. Results in vivo indicate that rats fed a low-salt diet showed an increased expression of EGF and EGFR in the colonic mucosa. These results support the view that changes in colonic permeability during low-Na adaptation are mediated by the EGF secreted by myofibroblasts in response to raised Aldo. PMID:23467299

  16. Role of EP4 receptor and prostaglandin transporter in prostaglandin E2-induced alteration in colonic epithelial barrier integrity.

    PubMed

    Lejeune, Manigandan; Leung, Pearl; Beck, Paul L; Chadee, Kris

    2010-11-01

    Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) is a proinflammatory lipid mediator produced in excess in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). PGE(2) couples to and signals via four different E-prostanoid (EP) receptors, namely EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4. In this study, we determined a role for PGE(2) and EP4 receptors in altering colonic epithelial barrier integrity. In healthy colonic mucosa, EP4 receptors were localized on apical plasma membrane of epithelial cells at the tip of mucosal folds, whereas, in patients with IBD and in rats with dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis, they were diffusely overexpressed throughout the mucosa. Similarly, expression of EP4 receptor was polarized in T84 colonic epithelial monolayer and mimics the normal epithelium. Apical exposure of T84 monolayer with high levels of PGE(2) decreased barrier integrity, which was abrogated by an EP4 receptor antagonist. To reveal the mechanism of vectorial transport of basally produced PGE(2) toward apical EP4 receptors, we identified prostaglandin transporters (PGT) in human colonic epithelia. PGT were least expressed on epithelial cells at the colonic mucosal folds of control subjects but overexpressed in epithelial cells of patients with IBD or animals with DSS-induced colitis. T84 monolayer also expressed PGT, which increased twofold following stimulation with TNF-α. Importantly, in T84 monolayer stimulated with TNF-α, there was a corresponding increase in the uptake and vectorial transport of (3)H-PGE(2) to the apical surface. Knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of PGT significantly decreased vectorial transport of (3)H-PGE(2). These studies unravel a mechanism whereby EP4 receptor and PGT play a role in PGE(2)-induced alteration of epithelial barrier integrity in colitis.

  17. Detection of colon malignancy using differential normalized fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Panjehpour, Masoud; Overholt, Bergein F.; Buckley, Paul F., III; Edwards, Donna H.

    1996-04-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence was used for direct in-vivo diagnosis of colon malignancy without requiring biopsy. The methodology was applied in a clinical study in order to differentiate adenomatous polyps from hyperplastic polyps in the colon. The measurements were performed in vivo during routine colonoscopy. Detection of the fluorescence signal from the tissue was performed using laser excitation. This report describes the differential normalized fluorescence (DNF) procedure using the amplified spectral differences between the normalized fluorescence of polyps and normal tissue. Data related to various grades of pathology of colonic tissues are discussed. In this preliminary study, the DNF procedure provides a general trend which corresponds to severity of dysplasia associated with colon malignancy.

  18. LPS receptor subunits have antagonistic roles in epithelial apoptosis and colonic carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kuo, W-T; Lee, T-C; Yang, H-Y; Chen, C-Y; Au, Y-C; Lu, Y-Z; Wu, L-L; Wei, S-C; Ni, Y-H; Lin, B-R; Chen, Y; Tsai, Y-H; Kung, J T; Sheu, F; Lin, L-W; Yu, L C-H

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is characterized by unlimited proliferation and suppression of apoptosis, selective advantages for tumor survival, and chemoresistance. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) signaling is involved in both epithelial homeostasis and tumorigenesis, but the relative roles had by LPS receptor subunits CD14 and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) are poorly understood. Our study showed that normal human colonocytes were CD14(+)TLR4(-), whereas cancerous tissues were CD14(+)TLR4(+), by immunofluorescent staining. Using a chemical-induced CRC model, increased epithelial apoptosis and decreased tumor multiplicity and sizes were observed in TLR4-mutant mice compared with wild-type (WT) mice with CD14(+)TLR4(+) colonocytes. WT mice intracolonically administered a TLR4 antagonist displayed tumor reduction associated with enhanced apoptosis in cancerous tissues. Mucosa-associated LPS content was elevated in response to CRC induction. Epithelial apoptosis induced by LPS hypersensitivity in TLR4-mutant mice was prevented by intracolonic administration of neutralizing anti-CD14. Moreover, LPS-induced apoptosis was observed in primary colonic organoid cultures derived from TLR4 mutant but not WT murine crypts. Gene silencing of TLR4 increased cell apoptosis in WT organoids, whereas knockdown of CD14 ablated cell death in TLR4-mutant organoids. In vitro studies showed that LPS challenge caused apoptosis in Caco-2 cells (CD14(+)TLR4(-)) in a CD14-, phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C-, sphingomyelinase-, and protein kinase C-ζ-dependent manner. Conversely, expression of functional but not mutant TLR4 (Asp299Gly, Thr399Ile, and Pro714His) rescued cells from LPS/CD14-induced apoptosis. In summary, CD14-mediated lipid signaling induced epithelial apoptosis, whereas TLR4 antagonistically promoted cell survival and cancer development. Our findings indicate that dysfunction in the CD14/TLR4 antagonism may contribute to normal epithelial transition to carcinogenesis, and

  19. A link between lipid metabolism and epithelial-mesenchymal transition provides a target for colon cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Martínez, Ruth; Álvarez-Fernández, Mónica; Vargas, Teodoro; Molina, Susana; García, Belén; Herranz, Jesús; Moreno-Rubio, Juan; Reglero, Guillermo; Pérez-Moreno, Mirna; Feliu, Jaime; Malumbres, Marcos; de Molina, Ana Ramírez

    2015-01-01

    The alterations in carbohydrate metabolism that fuel tumor growth have been extensively studied. However, other metabolic pathways involved in malignant progression, demand further understanding. Here we describe a metabolic acyl-CoA synthetase/stearoyl-CoA desaturase ACSL/SCD network causing an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) program that promotes migration and invasion of colon cancer cells. The mesenchymal phenotype produced upon overexpression of these enzymes is reverted through reactivation of AMPK signaling. Furthermore, this network expression correlates with poorer clinical outcome of stage-II colon cancer patients. Finally, combined treatment with chemical inhibitors of ACSL/SCD selectively decreases cancer cell viability without reducing normal cells viability. Thus, ACSL/SCD network stimulates colon cancer progression through conferring increased energetic capacity and invasive and migratory properties to cancer cells, and might represent a new therapeutic opportunity for colon cancer treatment. PMID:26451612

  20. Uptake and distribution of carotenoids, retinol, and tocopherols in human colonic epithelial cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Nair, P P; Lohani, A; Norkus, E P; Feagins, H; Bhagavan, H N

    1996-11-01

    Studies suggest that micronutrients such as the tocopherols, retinol, and the carotenoids have a chemopreventive action against colonic carcinogenesis and that they may be essential for the functioning and structural integrity of the gastrointestinal epithelium. In this study, we have determined the concentrations of tocopherols, retinol, and the carotenoids in human colonic epithelial cells using a noninvasive procedure developed in this laboratory (G.P. Albaugh et al., Int. J. Cancer, 52: 347-350, 1992). In subjects on a normal diet, almost all of these micronutrients were restricted to cells in the density range of rho 1.065-1.090 and rho 1.090-1.110. The lighter fraction (rho 1.033-1.064), representing the most senescent subpopulation, retained these micronutrients only when the subjects were on diets rich in vegetables. Cells isolated from subjects on their usual diets gave the following values expressed as ng/10(7) cells: alpha-tocopherol, 93-151; gamma-tocopherol, 152-280; retinol, 12-20; lutein, 4-18; cryptoxanthin, not detected; lycopene, 0-17; alpha-carotene, 3-7; and beta-carotene, 6-9. Peak responses in specific micronutrients following 5 days on a high carotenoid diet showed a lag period of at least 5 days, corresponding to the turnover rates of the epithelium itself. The evidence suggests that uptake of these micronutrients by the colonic mucosa occurs in the deep cryptal zone where the actively proliferating cells extract the nutrients from the systemic circulation.

  1. Validation of methylation biomarkers that distinguish normal colon mucosa of cancer patients from normal colon mucosa of patients without cancer.

    PubMed

    Cesaroni, Matteo; Powell, Jasmine; Sapienza, Carmen

    2014-07-01

    We have validated differences in DNA methylation levels of candidate genes previously reported to discriminate between normal colon mucosa of patients with colon cancer and normal colon mucosa of individuals without cancer. Here, we report that CpG sites in 16 of the 30 candidate genes selected show significant differences in mean methylation level in normal colon mucosa of 24 patients with cancer and 24 controls. A support vector machine trained on these data and data for an additional 66 CpGs yielded an 18-gene signature, composed of ten of the validated candidate genes plus eight additional candidates. This model exhibited 96% sensitivity and 100% specificity in a 40-sample training set and classified all eight samples in the test set correctly. Moreover, we found a moderate-strong correlation (Pearson coefficients r = 0.253-0.722) between methylation levels in colon mucosa and methylation levels in peripheral blood for seven of the 18 genes in the support vector model. These seven genes, alone, classified 44 of the 48 patients in the validation set correctly and five CpGs selected from only two of the seven genes classified 41 of the 48 patients in the discovery set correctly. These results suggest that methylation biomarkers may be developed that will, at minimum, serve as useful objective and quantitative diagnostic complements to colonoscopy as a cancer-screening tool. These data also suggest that it may be possible to monitor biomarker methylation levels in tissues collected much less invasively than by colonoscopy.

  2. Different expression of calgizzarin (S100A11) in normal colonic epithelium, adenoma and colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Melle, Christian; Ernst, Günther; Schimmel, Bettina; Bleul, Annett; Mothes, Henning; Kaufmann, Roland; Settmacher, Utz; Von Eggeling, Ferdinand

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to detect proteomic markers usable to distinguish colorectal carcinoma from colon adenoma for a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms in the process of tumourigenesis. Therefore, we microdissected colon carcinoma tissue, epithelial colon adenoma tissue as well as normal adjacent colon epithelium and determined protein profiles by SELDI-TOF MS. A multitude of significantly different signals was detected. For their identification colon biopsis were lysed and subjected to a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis for separation. Subsequently, we identified nearly 100 proteins by tryptic digestion, peptide fingerprint mapping and database search. Calgizzarin (S100A11; S100C) identified by peptide fingerprint mapping correlated very well with a significantly differentially expressed signal found in prior protein profiling. Using an immunodepletion assay we confirmed the identity of this signal as calgizzarin. To localise calgizzarin in tissues we performed immunohistochemistry. For further confirmation of the identity of calgizzarin we re-analysed IHC-positive as well as IHC-negative tissue sections on ProteinChip arrays. This work demonstrates that biomarkers in colorectal cancer can be detected, identified and assessed by a proteomic approach comprising tissue-microdissection, protein profiling and immunological techniques. PMID:16327996

  3. Chemoprevention studies of the flavonoids quercetin and rutin in normal and azoxymethane-treated mouse colon.

    PubMed

    Yang, K; Lamprecht, S A; Liu, Y; Shinozaki, H; Fan, K; Leung, D; Newmark, H; Steele, V E; Kelloff, G J; Lipkin, M

    2000-09-01

    In this study we investigated the chemopreventive effects of quercetin and rutin when added to standard AIN-76A diet and fed to normal and azoxymethane (AOM)-treated mice. Early changes in colonic mucosa were analyzed, including colonic cell proliferation, apoptotic cell death, cyclin D(1) expression and focal areas of dysplasia (FAD). The findings show that the number of colonic epithelial cells per crypt column increased (P: < 0.01) in each normal mouse group fed the flavonoids; AOM administration increased colonic crypt cell proliferation and resulted in a marked rise of bromodeoxyuridine-labeled cells in the lower proliferative zone of the crypt. Both supplementary dietary quercetin and rutin increased the apoptotic index and caused a redistribution of apoptotic cells along the crypt axis in normal mice fed a standard AIN-76A diet. The number of apoptotic cells/column and apoptotic indices markedly increased (P: < 0.01) in the AOM-treated group compared with untreated animals; apoptotic cells expanded throughout the colonic crypts after flavonoid supplementation and AOM administration. Positive cyclin D(1) expression was detected in mice on diets supplemented either with quercetin (P: < 0.01) or rutin (P: < 0.05). AOM administration resulted in the formation of FAD. Both the number of mice exhibiting FAD and the total numer of FAD observed were significantly reduced (P: < 0.01) in AOM-treated animals fed flavonoids compared with mice maintained on the standard AIN-76A diet. Surprisingly, however, quercetin alone was able to induce FAD in 22% of normal mice fed the standard AIN-76A diet.

  4. Colonization and epithelial adhesion in the pathogenesis of neonatal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Bendel, Catherine M

    2003-10-01

    Candida species are important nosocomial pathogens in the newborn population, particularly among the premature very-low-birth-weight infants in neonatal intensive care units. Candida colonization of the neonatal skin and gastrointestinal tract is an important first step in the pathogenesis of invasive disease. C albicans is the most commonly isolated species in colonized or infected infants. Over the past decade the incidence of both colonization and infection with other Candida species, particularly C parapsilosis, has risen dramatically. Colonization of the infant occurs early in life and is affected by a variety of common practices in neonatal intensive care. Microbial factors also augment colonization, including the ability of Candida to adhere to human epithelium. A better understanding of the complex interactions between host risk factors and virulence traits of colonizing yeast may allow the risk of systemic spread to be reduced in the population of premature infants.

  5. Infrared spectroscopic characteristics of normal and malignant colonic epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupnik, Eduardo; Jackson, Michael; Bird, Ranjana P.; Smith, Ian C. P.; Mantsch, Henry H.

    1998-04-01

    IR spectroscopy is being widely used to study the biochemical changes associated with cancer. In particular, based upon the hypothesis that biochemical changes associated with cancer precede morphological manifestations of the disease, IR spectroscopy is being evaluated as a potential early diagnostic and prognostic tool. In the current study, IR spectroscopy was applied to the study of colon tissue from rats treated with the specific colon carcinogen azoxymethane, to determine whether tumor induction was associated with identifiable spectroscopic changes in the colon. Characteristic spectra were found for each layer of the colon. Spectra of normal-appearing mucosa and tumors form treated animals then compared to spectra of control mucosa. Differences between tumors and control mucosa were apparent, indicating changes in cellular biochemistry associated with tumor development. In particular, differences in absorptions attributed to nucleic acids were seen, indicating alterations in the structure of cellular DNA in malignant and carcinogen treated tissues. Interestingly, spectra of carcinogen treated rates exhibit characteristics intermediate between those of normal mucosa and tumors. Application of multivariate analysis allowed non-subjective classification of the spectra into three distinct classes with and accuracy of 86.7 percent. The separate classification of control and treated mucosa suggests that IR spectroscopy, when combined with the appropriate classifier, can indeed detect biochemical changes in tissue before physical manifestation of the disease process.

  6. Validation of methylation biomarkers that distinguish normal colon mucosa of cancer patients from normal colon mucosa of patients without cancer.

    PubMed

    Cesaroni, Matteo; Powell, Jasmine; Sapienza, Carmen

    2014-07-01

    We have validated differences in DNA methylation levels of candidate genes previously reported to discriminate between normal colon mucosa of patients with colon cancer and normal colon mucosa of individuals without cancer. Here, we report that CpG sites in 16 of the 30 candidate genes selected show significant differences in mean methylation level in normal colon mucosa of 24 patients with cancer and 24 controls. A support vector machine trained on these data and data for an additional 66 CpGs yielded an 18-gene signature, composed of ten of the validated candidate genes plus eight additional candidates. This model exhibited 96% sensitivity and 100% specificity in a 40-sample training set and classified all eight samples in the test set correctly. Moreover, we found a moderate-strong correlation (Pearson coefficients r = 0.253-0.722) between methylation levels in colon mucosa and methylation levels in peripheral blood for seven of the 18 genes in the support vector model. These seven genes, alone, classified 44 of the 48 patients in the validation set correctly and five CpGs selected from only two of the seven genes classified 41 of the 48 patients in the discovery set correctly. These results suggest that methylation biomarkers may be developed that will, at minimum, serve as useful objective and quantitative diagnostic complements to colonoscopy as a cancer-screening tool. These data also suggest that it may be possible to monitor biomarker methylation levels in tissues collected much less invasively than by colonoscopy. PMID:24806665

  7. Amiloride-sensitive epithelial Na+ channel currents in surface cells of rat rectal colon.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, A; Yamaguchi, S; Ishikawa, T

    2004-02-01

    Surface cells of the mammalian distal colon are shown to molecularly express the amiloride-sensitive epithelial Na+ channel composed of three homologous subunits (alpha-, beta-, and gamma-ENaC). However, because basic electrophysiological properties of amiloride-sensitive Na+ channels expressed in these cells are largely unknown at the cellular level, functional evidence for the involvement of the subunits in the native channels is incomplete. Using electrophysiological techniques, we have now characterized functional properties of native ENaC in surface cells of rectal colon (RC) of rats fed a normal Na+ diet. Ussing chamber experiments showed that apical amiloride inhibited a basal short-circuit current in mucosal preparation of RC with an apparent half-inhibition constant (Ki) value of 0.20 microM. RT-PCR analysis confirmed the presence of transcripts of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-rENaC in rectal mucosa. Whole cell patch-clamp experiments in surface cells of intact crypts acutely isolated from rectal mucosa identified an inward cationic current, which was inhibited by amiloride with a Ki value of 0.12 microM at a membrane potential of -64 mV, the inhibition being weakly voltage dependent. Conductance ratios of the currents were Li+ (1.8) > Na+ (1) > K+ ( approximately 0), respectively. Amiloride-sensitive current amplitude was almost the same at 15 or 150 mM extracellular Na+, suggesting a high Na+ affinity for current activation. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that a heterooligomer composed of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-ENaC may be the molecular basis of the native channels, which are responsible for amiloride-sensitive electrogenic Na+ absorption in rat rectal colon. PMID:14576089

  8. The influence of aqueous extracts of selected Potentilla species on normal human colon cells.

    PubMed

    Tomczyk, Michał; Paduch, Roman; Wiater, Adrian; Pleszczyńska, Małgorzata; Kandefer-Szerszeń, Martyna; Szczodrak, Janusz

    2013-01-01

    Potentilla L. (Rosaceae) species have been used in traditional medicine in Asia, Europe and Northern America. This study analyzed the biological activity of aqueous extracts of Potentilla species (Rosaceae): Dasiphora fruticosa (syn. P. fruticosa), P. norvegica, P. pensylvanica, P. thuringiaca, P. crantzii and P. nepalensis. The activities were tested using MTT, NR and DPPH assays on normal human colon epithelium (CCD 841 CoTr) and colon myofibroblast (CCD-18Co) cells. Moreover, cell morphology using the May-Grünwald-Giemsa method, IL-6 by ELISA, and nitric oxide (NO) analysis with the Griess method in culture supernatants were performed after 24 h. Extracts were tested at dose levels between 25 and 250 microg/mL. For ELISA, 15 microg/mL was chosen. All extracts suppressed the metabolism of myofibroblasts, while epithelial cells' mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity decreased after incubation with extracts. All extracts showed a free radical scavenging (DPPH) effect in a concentration-dependent manner. The most potent was the extract from D. fruticosa, while the least action was observed for P. thuringiaca. Potentilla extracts stimulated, IL-6 production in tested cells but the level of the cytokine was found to decrease in epithelial cells. Pre-incubation of cells with LPS resulted in increased IL-6 secretion. Modulation of NO production after extract addition and cell pre-incubation with LPS was also observed. Potentilla extracts may be interesting natural factors modulating the main features of cells forming the colon wall, and thus may be potentially useful in the prophylaxis or healing of colon disorders. PMID:23757943

  9. Growth control in colon epithelial cells: gadolinium enhances calcium-mediated growth regulation.

    PubMed

    Attili, Durga; Jenkins, Brian; Aslam, Muhammad Nadeem; Dame, Michael K; Varani, James

    2012-12-01

    Gadolinium, a member of the lanthanoid family of transition metals, interacts with calcium-binding sites on proteins and other biological molecules. The overall goal of the present investigation was to determine if gadolinium could enhance calcium-induced epithelial cell growth inhibition in the colon. Gadolinium at concentrations as low as 1-5 μM combined with calcium inhibits proliferation of human colonic epithelial cells more effectively than calcium alone. Gadolinium had no detectable effect on calcium-induced differentiation in the same cells based on change in cell morphology, induction of E-cadherin synthesis, and translocation of E-cadherin from the cytosol to the cell surface. When the colon epithelial cells were treated with gadolinium and then exposed to increased calcium concentrations, movement of extracellular calcium into the cell was suppressed. In contrast, gadolinium treatment had no effect on ionomycin-induced release of stored intracellular calcium into the cytoplasm. Whether these in vitro observations can be translated into an approach for reducing abnormal proliferation in the colonic mucosa (including polyp formation) is not known. These results do, however, provide an explanation for our recent findings that a multi-mineral supplement containing all of the naturally occurring lanthanoid metals including gadolinium are more effective than calcium alone in preventing colon polyp formation in mice on a high-fat diet.

  10. In vivo measurement of DNA synthesis rates of colon epithelial cells in carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sylvia Jeewon; Turner, Scott; Killion, Salena; Hellerstein, Marc K. . E-mail: march@nature.berkeley.edu

    2005-05-27

    We describe here a highly sensitive technique for measuring DNA synthesis rates of colon epithelial cells in vivo. Male SD rats were given {sup 2}H{sub 2}O (heavy water). Colon epithelial cells were isolated, DNA was extracted, hydrolyzed to deoxyribonucleosides, and the deuterium enrichment of the deoxyribose moiety was determined by gas chromatographic/mass spectrometry. Turnover time of colon crypts and the time for migration of cells from basal to top fraction of the crypts were measured. These data were consistent with cell cycle analysis and bromodeoxyuridine labeling. By giving different concentrations of a promoter, dose-dependent increases in DNA synthesis rates were detected, demonstrating the sensitivity of the method. Administration of a carcinogen increased DNA synthesis rates cell proliferation in all fractions of the crypt. In conclusion, DNA synthesis rates of colon epithelial cells can be measured directly in vivo using stable-isotope labeling. Potential applications in humans include use as a biomarker for cancer chemoprevention studies.

  11. Butyrate and bioactive proteolytic form of Wnt-5a regulate colonic epithelial proliferation and spatial development.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Sakiyama, Toshio; Hasebe, Takumu; Musch, Mark W; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Yasushi; He, Tong-Chuan; Lichtenstein, Lev; Naito, Yuji; Itoh, Yoshito; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Jabri, Bana; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus; Chang, Eugene B

    2016-01-01

    Proliferation and spatial development of colonic epithelial cells are highly regulated along the crypt vertical axis, which, when perturbed, can result in aberrant growth and carcinogenesis. In this study, two key factors were identified that have important and counterbalancing roles regulating these processes: pericrypt myofibroblast-derived Wnt-5a and the microbial metabolite butyrate. Cultured YAMC cell proliferation and heat shock protein induction were analzyed after butryate, conditioned medium with Wnt5a activity, and FrzB containing conditioned medium. In vivo studies to modulate Hsp25 employed intra-colonic wall Hsp25 encoding lentivirus. To silence Wnt-5a in vivo, intra-colonic wall Wnt-5a silencing RNA was used. Wnt-5a, secreted by stromal myofibroblasts of the lower crypt, promotes proliferation through canonical β-catenin activation. Essential to this are two key requirements: (1) proteolytic conversion of the highly insoluble ~40 kD Wnt-5a protein to a soluble 36 mer amino acid peptide that activates epithelial β-catenin and cellular proliferation, and (2) the simultaneous inhibition of butyrate-induced Hsp25 by Wnt-5a which is necessary to arrest the proliferative process in the upper colonic crypt. The interplay and spatial gradients of these factors insures that crypt epithelial cell proliferation and development proceed in an orderly fashion, but with sufficient plasticity to adapt to physiological perturbations including inflammation. PMID:27561676

  12. Calpains are involved in Entamoeba histolytica-induced death of HT-29 colonic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yun Soo; Song, Kyoung-Ju; Kim, Ju Young; Lee, Young Ah; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Lee, Sang Kyou; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2011-06-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is an enteric tissue-invading protozoan parasite that can cause amebic colitis and liver abscess in humans. E. histolytica has the capability to kill colon epithelial cells in vitro; however, information regarding the role of calpain in colon cell death induced by ameba is limited. In this study, we investigated whether calpains are involved in the E. histolytica-induced cell death of HT-29 colonic epithelial cells. When HT-29 cells were co-incubated with E. histolytica, the propidium iodide stained dead cells markedly increased compared to that in HT-29 cells incubated with medium alone. This pro-death effect induced by ameba was effectively blocked by pretreatment of HT-29 cells with the calpain inhibitor, calpeptin. Moreover, knockdown of m- and µ-calpain by siRNA significantly reduced E. histolytica-induced HT-29 cell death. These results suggest that m- and µ-calpain may be involved in colon epithelial cell death induced by E. histolytica. PMID:21738275

  13. Butyrate and bioactive proteolytic form of Wnt-5a regulate colonic epithelial proliferation and spatial development

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Sakiyama, Toshio; Hasebe, Takumu; Musch, Mark W.; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Yasushi; He, Tong-Chuan; Lichtenstein, Lev; Naito, Yuji; Itoh, Yoshito; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Jabri, Bana; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus; Chang, Eugene B.

    2016-01-01

    Proliferation and spatial development of colonic epithelial cells are highly regulated along the crypt vertical axis, which, when perturbed, can result in aberrant growth and carcinogenesis. In this study, two key factors were identified that have important and counterbalancing roles regulating these processes: pericrypt myofibroblast-derived Wnt-5a and the microbial metabolite butyrate. Cultured YAMC cell proliferation and heat shock protein induction were analzyed after butryate, conditioned medium with Wnt5a activity, and FrzB containing conditioned medium. In vivo studies to modulate Hsp25 employed intra-colonic wall Hsp25 encoding lentivirus. To silence Wnt-5a in vivo, intra-colonic wall Wnt-5a silencing RNA was used. Wnt-5a, secreted by stromal myofibroblasts of the lower crypt, promotes proliferation through canonical β-catenin activation. Essential to this are two key requirements: (1) proteolytic conversion of the highly insoluble ~40 kD Wnt-5a protein to a soluble 36 mer amino acid peptide that activates epithelial β-catenin and cellular proliferation, and (2) the simultaneous inhibition of butyrate-induced Hsp25 by Wnt-5a which is necessary to arrest the proliferative process in the upper colonic crypt. The interplay and spatial gradients of these factors insures that crypt epithelial cell proliferation and development proceed in an orderly fashion, but with sufficient plasticity to adapt to physiological perturbations including inflammation. PMID:27561676

  14. Malignant transformation of colonic epithelial cells by a colon-derived long noncoding RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin, Jeffrey L.; Rankin, Carl R.; Levy, Shawn; Snoddy, Jay R.; Zhang, Bing; Washington, Mary Kay; Thomson, J. Michael; Whitehead, Robert H.; Coffey, Robert J.

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •Non-coding RNAs are found in the colonic crypt progenitor compartment. •Colonocytes transformed by ncNRFR are highly invasive and metastatic. •ncNRFR has a region similar to the miRNA, let-7 family. •ncNRFR expression alters let-7 activity as measured by reporter construct. •ncNRFR expression upregulates let-7b targets. -- Abstract: Recent progress has been made in the identification of protein-coding genes and miRNAs that are expressed in and alter the behavior of colonic epithelia. However, the role of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in colonic homeostasis is just beginning to be explored. By gene expression profiling of post-mitotic, differentiated tops and proliferative, progenitor-compartment bottoms of microdissected adult mouse colonic crypts, we identified several lncRNAs more highly expressed in crypt bottoms. One identified lncRNA, designated non-coding Nras functional RNA (ncNRFR), resides within the Nras locus but appears to be independent of the Nras coding transcript. Stable overexpression of ncNRFR in non-transformed, conditionally immortalized mouse colonocytes results in malignant transformation, as determined by growth in soft agar and formation of highly invasive tumors in nude mice. Moreover, ncNRFR appears to inhibit the function of the tumor suppressor let-7. These results suggest precise regulation of ncNRFR is necessary for proper cell growth in the colonic crypt, and its misregulation results in neoplastic transformation.

  15. Characterisation of colonic dysplasia-like epithelial atypia in murine colitis

    PubMed Central

    Randall-Demllo, Sarron; Fernando, Ruchira; Brain, Terry; Sohal, Sukhwinder Singh; Cook, Anthony L; Guven, Nuri; Kunde, Dale; Spring, Kevin; Eri, Rajaraman

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine if exacerbation of pre-existing chronic colitis in Winnie (Muc2 mutant) mice induces colonic dysplasia. METHODS Winnie mice and C57BL6 as a genotype control, were administered 1% w/v dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) orally, followed by drinking water alone in week-long cycles for a total of three cycles. After the third cycle, mice were killed and colonic tissue collected for histological and immunohistochemical evaluation. Inflammation and severity of dysplasia in the colonic mucosa were assessed in H&E sections of the colon. Epithelial cell proliferation was assessed using Ki67 and aberrant β-catenin signalling assessed with enzyme-based immunohistochemistry. Extracted RNA from colonic segments was used for the analysis of gene expression using real-time quantitative PCR. Finally, the distribution of Cxcl5 was visualised using immunohistochemistry. RESULTS Compared to controls, Winnie mice exposed to three cycles of DSS displayed inflammation mostly confined to the distal-mid colon with extensive mucosal hyperplasia and regenerative atypia resembling epithelial dysplasia. Dysplasia-like changes were observed in 100% of Winnie mice exposed to DSS, with 55% of these animals displaying changes similar to high-grade dysplasia, whereas high-grade changes were absent in wild-type mice. Occasional penetration of the muscularis mucosae by atypical crypts was observed in 27% of Winnie mice after DSS. Atypical crypts however displayed no evidence of oncogenic nuclear β-catenin accumulation, regardless of histological severity. Expression of Cav1, Trp53 was differentially regulated in the distal colon of Winnie relative to wild-type mice. Expression of Myc and Ccl5 was increased by DSS treatment in Winnie only. Furthermore, increased Ccl5 expression correlated with increased complexity in abnormal crypts. While no overall difference in Cxcl5 mucosal expression was observed between treatment groups, epithelial Cxcl5 protein appeared to be diminished in the

  16. Role of urokinase and its receptor in basal and stimulated colonic epithelial cell migration in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, A; Gibson, P

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Migration of colonic epithelial cells is important for mucosal repair following injury. The urokinase (u-PA) system regulates migration in other cell types.
AIM—To examine the role of u-PA and its receptor (u-PAR) in colonic epithelial cell migration.
METHODS—Migration was assessed over 24 hours in circular wounds made in confluent monolayers of LIM1215 and Caco-2 human colon cancer cells. The function of u-PA and u-PAR was ablated with antisense oligonucleotides to block expression, with synthetic u-PA peptides to block interaction, and with aprotinin to block u-PA mediated proteolysis.
RESULTS—Migration was stimulated two to threefold by exogenous u-PA, an effect dependent on u-PAR binding but independent of u-PA mediated mitogenesis and proteolysis. Expression of u-PA and u-PAR was inhibited by 80% by the appropriate antisense oligonucleotide. Basal migration and the motogenic effects of butyrate, epidermal growth factor, and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate were suppressed by the u-PAR antisense oligonucleotide (40-60%) but were at best minimally affected following inhibition of u-PA expression and binding. 
CONCLUSIONS—In an in vitro model of wounded colonic epithelium, u-PAR promotes cell migration through mechanisms that are not exclusively dependent on u-PA binding. Therefore, u-PA and u-PAR may contribute to colonic mucosal repair in vivo.


Keywords: colon; migration; urokinase; urokinase receptor; epidermal growth factor; butyrate; protein kinase C PMID:10861271

  17. A pilot study comparing protein expression in different segments of the normal colon and rectum and in normal colon versus adenoma in patients with Lynch syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chongjuan; Chen, Jinyun; Pande, Mala; Lynch, Patrick M.; Frazier, Marsha L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Lynch syndrome (LS) is a common inherited predisposition to colorectal cancer (CRC). In LS patients, CRC is predominantly located in the right colon, as opposed to sporadic CRC, which usually affects the left colon or rectum. Previous studies have demonstrated a clear distinction in gene expression between sporadic CRC and normal colon at different locations in the colorectum. However, little is known about LS gene expression profiles in different areas of the colorectum. Here, we compared the protein expression profiles for normal colorectal samples among different locations as well as between adenomas and matched normal tissue in LS. Methods Protein from 33 tissue samples (27 normal tissues and 6 adenomas) from 9 patients with LS was extracted for reverse-phase protein array (RPPA) analysis. The antibody panel used for RPPA included 109 key proteins involved in various cancer-related pathways. Cluster 3.0 was used for unsupervised and supervised clustering analysis. Results IGF1R and COL6A1 were expressed significantly differently between the normal right and normal left colon (q<0.05); FN1, COL6A1, and IGF1R were expressed significantly differently between the normal right colon and normal rectum (q<0.05). In the adenomas and matched normal tissue, PEA-15 was the only protein with significantly different expression (q<0.05). Conclusion We found differences in protein expression between normal tissues from the right colon, left colon, and rectum as well as between adenomas and matched normal tissue. However, those differences should be further confirmed in a larger sample size. PMID:23604467

  18. Aberrant, ectopic expression of VEGF and VEGF receptors 1 and 2 in malignant colonic epithelial cells. Implications for these cells growth via an autocrine mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, Amrita; Jones, Michael K.; Szabo, Sandor; Tarnawski, Andrzej S.

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: •Malignant colonic epithelial cells express VEGF and its receptors. •Cultured colon cancer cells secrete VEGF into the medium. •Inhibition of VEGF receptor significantly decreases colon cancer cell proliferation. •VEGF is critical for colon cancer cell growth. -- Abstract: Vascular endothelial growth factor A (referred to as VEGF) is implicated in colon cancer growth. Currently, the main accepted mechanism by which VEGF promotes colon cancer growth is via the stimulation of angiogenesis, which was originally postulated by late Judah Folkman. However, the cellular source of VEGF in colon cancer tissue; and, the expression of VEGF and its receptors VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 in colon cancer cells are not fully known and are subjects of controversy. Material and methods: We examined and quantified expression of VEGF, VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 in three different human colonic tissue arrays containing sections of adenocarcinoma (n = 43) and normal mucosa (n = 41). In human colon cancer cell lines HCT116 and HT29 and normal colon cell lines NCM356 and NCM460, we examined expression of VEGF, VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 mRNA and protein, VEGF production and secretion into the culture medium; and, the effect of a potent, selective inhibitor of VEGF receptors, AL-993, on cell proliferation. Results: Human colorectal cancer specimens had strong expression of VEGF in cancer cells and also expressed VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2.In vitro studies showed that human colon cancer cell lines, HCT116 and HT29, but not normal colonic cell lines, express VEGF, VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 and secrete VEGF into the medium up to a concentration 2000 pg/ml within 48 h. Furthermore, we showed that inhibition of VEGF receptors using a specific VEGF-R inhibitor significantly reduced proliferation (by >50%) of cultured colon cancer cell lines. Conclusions: Our findings support the contention that VEGF generated by colon cancer cells stimulates their growth directly through an autocrine mechanism that is

  19. A high-affinity and specific carrier-mediated mechanism for uptake of thiamine pyrophosphate by human colonic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nabokina, Svetlana M; Said, Hamid M

    2012-08-01

    All mammals require exogenous sources of thiamine (vitamin B1), as they lack the ability to synthesize the vitamin. These sources are dietary and bacterial (the latter is in reference to the vitamin, which is synthesized by the normal microflora of the large intestine). Bacterially generated thiamine exists in the free, as well as the pyrophosphorylated [thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP)], form. With no (or very little) phosphatase activity in the colon, we hypothesized that the bacterially generated TPP can also be taken up by colonocytes. To test this hypothesis, we examined [(3)H]TPP uptake in the human-derived, nontransformed colonic epithelial NCM460 cells and purified apical membrane vesicles isolated from the colon of human organ donors. Uptake of TPP by NCM460 cells occurred without metabolic alterations in the transported substrate and 1) was pH- and Na(+)-independent, but energy-dependent, 2) was saturable as a function of concentration (apparent K(m) = 0.157 ± 0.028 μM), 3) was highly specific for TPP and not affected by free thiamine (or its analogs) or by thiamine monophosphate and unrelated folate derivatives, 4) was adaptively regulated by extracellular substrate (TPP) level via what appears to be a transcriptionally mediated mechanism(s), and 5) appeared to be influenced by an intracellular Ca(2+)/calmodulin-mediated regulatory pathway. These findings suggest the involvement of a carrier-mediated mechanism for TPP uptake by colonic NCM460 cells, which was further confirmed by results from studies of native human colonic apical membrane vesicles. The results also suggest that the bacterially synthesized TPP in the large intestine is bioavailable and may contribute to overall body homeostasis of vitamin B1 and, especially, to the cellular nutrition of the local colonocytes.

  20. Induction of aberrant trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 27 by inflammation in mouse colonic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Takeshima, Hideyuki; Ikegami, Daigo; Wakabayashi, Mika; Niwa, Tohru; Kim, Young-Joon; Ushijima, Toshikazu

    2012-12-01

    A field for cancerization (field defect), where genetic and epigenetic alterations are accumulated in normal-appearing tissues, is involved in human carcinogenesis, especially cancers associated with chronic inflammation. Although aberrant DNA methylation is involved in the field defect and induced by chronic inflammation, it is still unclear for trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3), which is involved in gene repression independent of DNA methylation and functions as a pre-mark for aberrant DNA methylation. In this study, using a mouse colitis model induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS), we aimed to clarify whether aberrant H3K27me3 is induced by inflammation and involved in a field defect. ChIP-on-chip analysis of colonic epithelial cells revealed that H3K27me3 levels were increased or decreased for 266 genomic regions by aging, and more extensively (23 increased and 3574 decreased regions) by colitis. Such increase or decrease of H3K27me3 was induced as early as 2 weeks after the initiation of DSS treatment, and persisted at least for 16 weeks even after the inflammation disappeared. Some of the aberrant H3K27me3 in colonic epithelial cells was carried over into colon tumors. Furthermore, H3K27me3 acquired at Dapk1 by colitis was followed by increased DNA methylation, supporting its function as a pre-mark for aberrant DNA methylation. These results demonstrated that aberrant H3K27me3 can be induced by exposure to a specific environment, such as colitis, and suggested that aberrant histone modification, in addition to aberrant DNA methylation, is involved in the formation of a field defect.

  1. Entamoeba histolytica contains an occludin-like protein that can alter colonic epithelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Goplen, Michael; Lejeune, Manigandan; Cornick, Steve; Moreau, France; Chadee, Kris

    2013-01-01

    The exact mechanism by which Entamoeba histolytica disrupts the human colonic epithelium and invades the mucosa has yet to be clearly elucidated. E. histolytica produces a diverse array of putative virulent factors such as glycosidase, cysteine proteinases and amebapore that can modulate and/or disrupt epithelial barrier functions. However, it is currently thought that E. histolytica produces numerous other molecules and strategies to disrupt colonic mucosal defenses. In this study, we document a putative mechanism whereby the parasite alters the integrity of human epithelium by expressing a cognate tight junction protein of the host. We detected this protein as "occludin-like" as revealed by immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation studies and visualization by confocal microscopy using antibodies highly specific for human occludin. We propose that E. histolytica occludin-like protein might displace mucosal epithelial occludin-occludin tight junction interactions resulting in epithelial disruption analogous to sub mucosal human dendritic cells sampling luminal contents. These results indicate that E. histolytica occludin is a putative virulent component that can play a role in the pathogenesis of intestinal amebiasis.

  2. Entamoeba histolytica induces cell death of HT29 colonic epithelial cells via NOX1-derived ROS.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeong Ah; Kim, Ju Young; Lee, Young Ah; Min, Arim; Bahk, Young Yil; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2013-02-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, which causes amoebic colitis and occasionally liver abscess in humans, is able to induce host cell death. However, signaling mechanisms of colon cell death induced by E. histolytica are not fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the signaling role of NOX in cell death of HT29 colonic epithelial cells induced by E. histolytica. Incubation of HT29 cells with amoebic trophozoites resulted in DNA fragmentation that is a hallmark of apoptotic cell death. In addition, E. histolytica generate intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a contact-dependent manner. Inhibition of intracellular ROS level with treatment with DPI, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases (NOXs), decreased Entamoeba-induced ROS generation and cell death in HT29 cells. However, pan-caspase inhibitor did not affect E. histolytica-induced HT29 cell death. In HT29 cells, catalytic subunit NOX1 and regulatory subunit Rac1 for NOX1 activation were highly expressed. We next investigated whether NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1)-derived ROS is closely associated with HT29 cell death induced by E. histolytica. Suppression of Rac1 by siRNA significantly inhibited Entamoeba-induced cell death. Moreover, knockdown of NOX1 by siRNA, effectively inhibited E. histolytica-triggered DNA fragmentation in HT29 cells. These results suggest that NOX1-derived ROS is required for apoptotic cell death in HT29 colon epithelial cells induced by E. histolytica.

  3. Epigenetic differences in normal colon mucosa of cancer patients suggest altered dietary metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Silviera, Matthew L; Smith, Brian P; Powell, Jasmine; Sapienza, Carmen

    2012-03-01

    We have compared DNA methylation in normal colon mucosa between patients with colon cancer and patients without cancer. We identified significant differences in methylation between the two groups at 114 to 874 genes. The majority of the differences are in pathways involved in the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, and amino acids. We also compared transcript levels of genes in the insulin signaling pathway. We found that the mucosa of patients with cancer had significantly higher transcript levels of several hormones regulating glucose metabolism and significantly lower transcript levels of a glycolytic enzyme and a key regulator of glucose and lipid homeostasis. These differences suggest that the normal colon mucosa of patients with cancer metabolizes dietary components differently than the colon mucosa of controls. Because the differences identified are present in morphologically normal tissue, they may be diagnostic of colon cancer and/or prognostic of colon cancer susceptibility.

  4. AMP-18 protects barrier function of colonic epithelial cells: role of tight junction proteins

    PubMed Central

    Walsh-Reitz, Margaret M.; Huang, Erick F.; Musch, Mark W.; Chang, Eugene B.; Martin, Terence E.; Kartha, Sreedharan; Toback, F. Gary

    2005-01-01

    AMP-18, a novel gastric antrum mucosal protein, and a synthetic peptide of amino acids 77-97, have mitogenic and motogenic properties for epithelial cells. The possibility that AMP-18 is also protective was evaluated in the colonic mucosa of mice and monolayer cultures of human colonic epithelial Caco2/bbe (C2) cells. Administration of AMP peptide to mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colonic injury delayed the onset of bloody diarrhea, and reduced weight loss. Treatment of C2 cells with AMP peptide protected monolayers against decreases in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) induced by the oxidant monochloramine, indomethacin, or DSS. A molecular mechanism for these barrier-protective effects was sought by asking if AMP peptide acted on specific tight junction (TJ) proteins. Immunoblots of detergent-insoluble fractions of C2 cells treated with AMP peptide exhibited increased accumulation of specific TJ proteins. Occludin immunoreactivity was also increased in detergent-insoluble fractions obtained from colonic mucosal cells of mice injected with AMP peptide. Laser scanning confocal microscopy (CF) supported the capacity of AMP peptide to enhance accumulation of occludin and ZO-1 in TJ domains of C2 cell monolayers, and together with immunoblot analysis showed that the peptide protected against loss of these TJ proteins following oxidant injury. AMP peptide also protected against a fall in TER during disruption of actin filaments by cytochalasin D, and stabilized perijunctional actin during oxidant injury when assessed by CF. These findings suggest that AMP-18 could protect the intestinal mucosal barrier by acting on specific TJ proteins and stabilizing perijunctional actin. PMID:15961882

  5. Colorectal epithelial cell proliferative kinetics and risk factors for colon cancer in sporadic adenoma patients.

    PubMed

    Bostick, R M; Fosdick, L; Grandits, G A; Lillemoe, T J; Wood, J R; Grambsch, P; Louis, T A; Potter, J D

    1997-12-01

    Colorectal epithelial cell proliferative kinetics are altered in patients at increased risk for colon cancer: proliferation rates [labeling index (LI)] are higher and there is a shift of the proliferative zone from one confined to the lower 60% of the colonic crypt to one that includes the entire crypt (higher phi(h)). To assess factors associated with LI and phi(h), we performed a cross-sectional analysis using baseline rectal mucosal biopsies from sporadic adenoma patients participating in a chemoprevention trial. Biopsies (taken without preparatory cleansing) were taken 10 cm above the level of the anus, and proliferation was assessed by detection of endogenous S-phase-associated proliferating cell nuclear antigen by immunohistochemical methods. High-quality, scorable biopsies were obtained for 115 patients, and using analysis of covariance and multiple linear regression, the LI and phi(h) were evaluated in relation to diet and other lifestyle factors, demographics, anthropometrics, family history of colon cancer, and polyp history. Statistically significant findings included the following: (a) The LI for those in the upper versus the lowest tertile of vegetable and fruit consumption was, proportionately, 35% lower (3.4% versus 5.3%; P < 0.001); for vitamin supplement users versus nonusers, it was 36% lower (3.3 versus 5.2%; P < 0.001); for recurrent versus incident polyp patients, it was 36% higher (6.2 versus 4.0%; P < 0.001); and for those with rectal polyps only versus those with colon polyps only, it was 28% higher (6.0 versus 4.3%; P = 0.05); and (b) the phi(h) for those in the upper versus the lowest tertile of sucrose consumption was, proportionately, 48% higher (7.1% versus 3.7%; P = 0.01). These results indicate that (a) colorectal epithelial cell proliferation rates are higher in recurrent adenoma patients than in incident adenoma patients and in patients with rectal adenomas only versus those with colon adenomas only, but they are lower in patients

  6. Colonization of human epithelial cell lines by Corynebacterium ulcerans from human and animal sources.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Elena; Ott, Lisa; Hasselt, Kristin; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luiza; Tauch, Andreas; Burkovski, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    Corynebacterium ulcerans is an emerging pathogen transmitted by a zoonotic pathway to humans. Despite rising numbers of infections and potentially fatal outcomes, data on the colonization of the human host are lacking up to now. In this study, adhesion of two C. ulcerans isolates to human epithelial cells, invasion of host cells and the function of two putative virulence factors with respect to these processes were investigated. C. ulcerans strains BR-AD22 and 809 were able to adhere to Detroit562 and HeLa cells, and invade these epithelial cell lines with a rate comparable to other pathogens as shown by scanning electron microscopy, fluorescence microscopy and replication assays. Infection led to detrimental effects on the cells as deduced from measurements of transepithelial resistance. Mutant strains of putative virulence factors phospholipase D and DIP0733 homologue CULC22_00609 generated in this study showed no influence on colonization under the experimental conditions tested. The data presented here indicate a high infectious potential of this emerging pathogen.

  7. Mesenchymal Cancer Cell-Stroma Crosstalk Promotes Niche Activation, Epithelial Reversion, and Metastatic Colonization

    PubMed Central

    del Pozo Martin, Yaiza; Park, Danielle; Ramachandran, Anassuya; Ombrato, Luigi; Calvo, Fernando; Chakravarty, Probir; Spencer-Dene, Bradley; Derzsi, Stefanie; Hill, Caroline S.; Sahai, Erik; Malanchi, Ilaria

    2015-01-01

    Summary During metastatic colonization, tumor cells must establish a favorable microenvironment or niche that will sustain their growth. However, both the temporal and molecular details of this process remain poorly understood. Here, we found that metastatic initiating cells (MICs) exhibit a high capacity for lung fibroblast activation as a result of Thrombospondin 2 (THBS2) expression. Importantly, inhibiting the mesenchymal phenotype of MICs by blocking the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-associated kinase AXL reduces THBS2 secretion, niche-activating ability, and, consequently, metastatic competence. Subsequently, disseminated metastatic cells revert to an AXL-negative, more epithelial phenotype to proliferate and decrease the phosphorylation levels of TGF-β-dependent SMAD2-3 in favor of BMP/SMAD1-5 signaling. Remarkably, newly activated fibroblasts promote this transition. In summary, our data reveal a crosstalk between cancer cells and their microenvironment whereby the EMT status initially triggers and then is regulated by niche activation during metastatic colonization. PMID:26670048

  8. Inflammasome-independent NLRP3 is required for epithelial-mesenchymal transition in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Wang, Yajing; Du, Qianming; Lu, Ping; Fan, Huimin; Lu, Jinrong; Hu, Rong

    2016-03-15

    Inflammasome NLRP3 plays a crucial role in the process of colitis and colitis--associated colon cancer. Even though much is known regarding the NLRP3 inflammasome that regulates pro-inflammatory cytokine release in innate immune cells, the role of NLRP3 in non-immune cells is still unclear. In this study, we showed that NLRP3 was highly expressed in mesenchymal-like colon cancer cells (SW620), and was upregulated by tumor necrosis factors-α (TNF-α) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) respectively, during EMT in colon cancer epithelial cells HCT116 and HT29. Knockdown of NLRP3 retained epithelial spindle-like morphology of HCT116 and HT29 cells and reversed the mesenchymal characteristic of SW620 cells, indicated by the decreased expression of vimentin and MMP9 and increased expression of E-cadherin. In addition, knockdown of NLRP3 in colorectal carcinoma cells displayed diminished cell migration and invasion. Interestingly, during the EMT process induced by TNF-α or TGF-β1, the cleaved caspase-1 and ASC speck were not detected, indicating that NLRP3 functions in an inflammasome-independent way. Further studies demonstrated that NLRP3 protein expression was regulated by NF-κB signaling in TNF-α or TGF-β1-induced EMT, as verified by the NF-κB inhibitor Bay 11-7082. Moreover, NLRP3 knockdown reduced the expression of Snail1, indicating that NLRP3 may promote EMT through regulating Snail1. In summary, our results showed that the NLRP3 expression, not the inflammasome activation, was required for EMT in colorectal cancer cells. PMID:26968633

  9. CDDO-Me protects against space radiation-induced transformation of human colon epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Eskiocak, Ugur; Kim, Sang Bum; Roig, Andres I; Kitten, Erin; Batten, Kimberly; Cornelius, Crystal; Zou, Ying S; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W

    2010-07-01

    Radiation-induced carcinogenesis is a major concern both for astronauts on long-term space missions and for cancer patients being treated with therapeutic radiation. Exposure to radiation induces oxidative stress and chronic inflammation, which are critical initiators and promoters of carcinogenesis. Many studies have demonstrated that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antioxidants can reduce the risk of radiation-induced cancer. In this study, we found that a synthetic triterpenoid, CDDO-Me (bardoxolone methyl), was able to protect human colon epithelial cells (HCECs) against radiation-induced transformation. HCECs that were immortalized by ectopic expression of hTERT and cdk4 and exhibit trisomy for chromosome 7 (a non-random chromosome change that occurs in 37% of premalignant colon adenomas) can be transformed experimentally with one combined exposure to 2 Gy of protons at 1 GeV/nucleon followed 24 h later by 50 cGy of (56)Fe ions at 1 GeV/nucleon. Transformed cells showed an increase in proliferation rate and in both anchorage-dependent and independent colony formation ability. A spectrum of chromosome aberrations was observed in transformed cells, with 40% showing loss of 17p (e.g. loss of one copy of p53). Pretreatment of cells with pharmacological doses of CDDO-Me, which has been shown to induce antioxidative as well as anti-inflammatory responses, prevented the heavy-ion-induced increase in proliferation rate and anchorage-dependent and independent colony formation efficiencies. Taken together, these results demonstrate that experimentally immortalized human colon epithelial cells with a non-random chromosome 7 trisomy are valuable premalignant cellular reagents that can be used to study radiation-induced colorectal carcinogenesis. The utility of premalignant HCECs to test novel compounds such as CDDO-Me that can be used to protect against radiation-induced neoplastic transformation is also demonstrated. PMID:20681796

  10. Gut microbiota facilitates dietary heme-induced epithelial hyperproliferation by opening the mucus barrier in colon

    PubMed Central

    Ijssennagger, Noortje; Belzer, Clara; Hooiveld, Guido J.; Dekker, Jan; van Mil, Saskia W. C.; Müller, Michael; Kleerebezem, Michiel; van der Meer, Roelof

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer risk is associated with diets high in red meat. Heme, the pigment of red meat, induces cytotoxicity of colonic contents and elicits epithelial damage and compensatory hyperproliferation, leading to hyperplasia. Here we explore the possible causal role of the gut microbiota in heme-induced hyperproliferation. To this end, mice were fed a purified control or heme diet (0.5 μmol/g heme) with or without broad-spectrum antibiotics for 14 d. Heme-induced hyperproliferation was shown to depend on the presence of the gut microbiota, because hyperproliferation was completely eliminated by antibiotics, although heme-induced luminal cytotoxicity was sustained in these mice. Colon mucosa transcriptomics revealed that antibiotics block heme-induced differential expression of oncogenes, tumor suppressors, and cell turnover genes, implying that antibiotic treatment prevented the heme-dependent cytotoxic micelles to reach the epithelium. Our results indicate that this occurs because antibiotics reinforce the mucus barrier by eliminating sulfide-producing bacteria and mucin-degrading bacteria (e.g., Akkermansia). Sulfide potently reduces disulfide bonds and can drive mucin denaturation and microbial access to the mucus layer. This reduction results in formation of trisulfides that can be detected in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, trisulfides can serve as a novel marker of colonic mucolysis and thus as a proxy for mucus barrier reduction. In feces, antibiotics drastically decreased trisulfides but increased mucin polymers that can be lysed by sulfide. We conclude that the gut microbiota is required for heme-induced epithelial hyperproliferation and hyperplasia because of the capacity to reduce mucus barrier function. PMID:26216954

  11. Colonic epithelial ion transport is not affected in patients with diverticulosis

    PubMed Central

    Osbak, Philip S; Bindslev, Niels; Poulsen, Steen S; Kaltoft, Nicolai; Tilotta, Maria C; Hansen, Mark B

    2007-01-01

    Background Colonic diverticular disease is a bothersome condition with an unresolved pathogenesis. It is unknown whether a neuroepithelial dysfunction is present. The aim of the study was two-fold; (1) to investigate colonic epithelial ion transport in patients with diverticulosis and (2) to adapt a miniaturized Modified Ussing Air-Suction (MUAS) chamber for colonic endoscopic biopsies. Methods Biopsies were obtained from the sigmoid part of the colon. 86 patients were included. All patients were referred for colonoscopy on suspicion of neoplasia and they were without pathological findings at colonoscopy (controls) except for diverticulosis in 22 (D-patients). Biopsies were mounted in MUAS chambers with an exposed area of 5 mm2. Electrical responses to various stimulators and inhibitors of ion transport were investigated together with histological examination. The MUAS chamber was easy to use and reproducible data were obtained. Results Median basal short circuit current (SCC) was 43.8 μA·cm-2 (0.8 – 199) for controls and 59.3 μA·cm-2 (3.0 – 177.2) for D-patients. Slope conductance was 77.0 mS·cm-2 (18.6 – 204.0) equal to 13 Ω·cm2 for controls and 96.6 mS·cm-2 (8.4 – 191.4) equal to 10.3 Ω·cm2 for D-patients. Stimulation with serotonin, theophylline, forskolin and carbachol induced increases in SCC in a range of 4.9 – 18.6 μA·cm-2, while inhibition with indomethacin, bumetanide, ouabain and amiloride decreased SCC in a range of 6.5 – 27.4 μA·cm-2, and all with no significant differences between controls and D-patients. Histological examinations showed intact epithelium and lamina propria before and after mounting for both types of patients. Conclusion We conclude that epithelial ion transport is not significantly altered in patients with diverticulosis and that the MUAS chamber can be adapted for studies of human colonic endoscopic biopsies. PMID:17888183

  12. Intestinal Epithelial Toll-Like Receptor 4 Signaling Affects Epithelial Function and Colonic Microbiota and Promotes a Risk for Transmissible Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Dheer, Rishu; Santaolalla, Rebeca; Davies, Julie M.; Lang, Jessica K.; Phillips, Matthew C.; Pastorini, Cristhine; Vazquez-Pertejo, Maria T.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence obtained from gene knockout studies supports the role of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in intestinal inflammation and microbiota recognition. Increased epithelial TLR4 expression is observed in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. However, little is known of the effect of increased TLR4 signaling on intestinal homeostasis. Here, we examined the effect of increased TLR4 signaling on epithelial function and microbiota by using transgenic villin-TLR4 mice that overexpress TLR4 in the intestinal epithelium. Our results revealed that villin-TLR4 mice are characterized by increases in the density of mucosa-associated bacteria and bacterial translocation. Furthermore, increased epithelial TLR4 signaling was associated with an impaired epithelial barrier, altered expression of antimicrobial peptide genes, and altered epithelial cell differentiation. The composition of the colonic luminal and mucosa-associated microbiota differed between villin-TLR4 and wild-type (WT) littermates. Interestingly, WT mice cohoused with villin-TLR4 mice displayed greater susceptibility to acute colitis than singly housed WT mice did. The results of this study suggest that epithelial TLR4 expression shapes the microbiota and affects the functional properties of the epithelium. The changes in the microbiota induced by increased epithelial TLR4 signaling are transmissible and exacerbate dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis. Together, our findings imply that host innate immune signaling can modulate intestinal bacteria and ultimately the host's susceptibility to colitis. PMID:26755160

  13. Aberrant epithelial GREM1 expression initiates colonic tumorigenesis from cells outside the stem cell niche.

    PubMed

    Davis, Hayley; Irshad, Shazia; Bansal, Mukesh; Rafferty, Hannah; Boitsova, Tatjana; Bardella, Chiara; Jaeger, Emma; Lewis, Annabelle; Freeman-Mills, Luke; Giner, Francesc C; Rodenas-Cuadrado, Pedro; Mallappa, Sreelakshmi; Clark, Susan; Thomas, Huw; Jeffery, Rosemary; Poulsom, Richard; Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel; Novelli, Marco; Chetty, Runjan; Silver, Andrew; Sansom, Owen J; Greten, Florian R; Wang, Lai Mun; East, James E; Tomlinson, Ian; Leedham, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome (HMPS) is characterized by the development of mixed-morphology colorectal tumors and is caused by a 40-kb genetic duplication that results in aberrant epithelial expression of the gene encoding mesenchymal bone morphogenetic protein antagonist, GREM1. Here we use HMPS tissue and a mouse model of the disease to show that epithelial GREM1 disrupts homeostatic intestinal morphogen gradients, altering cell fate that is normally determined by position along the vertical epithelial axis. This promotes the persistence and/or reacquisition of stem cell properties in Lgr5-negative progenitor cells that have exited the stem cell niche. These cells form ectopic crypts, proliferate, accumulate somatic mutations and can initiate intestinal neoplasia, indicating that the crypt base stem cell is not the sole cell of origin of colorectal cancer. Furthermore, we show that epithelial expression of GREM1 also occurs in traditional serrated adenomas, sporadic premalignant lesions with a hitherto unknown pathogenesis, and these lesions can be considered the sporadic equivalents of HMPS polyps.

  14. Interleukin-8 production by the human colon epithelial cell line HT-29: modulation by interleukin-13.

    PubMed Central

    Kolios, G.; Robertson, D. A.; Jordan, N. J.; Minty, A.; Caput, D.; Ferrara, P.; Westwick, J.

    1996-01-01

    1. We have determined which cytokines induce and modulate the production of the chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8) by the human colonic epithelial cell line HT-29. 2. Growth arrested cell cultures were stimulated with the human recombinant cytokines interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), interleukin-13 (IL-13), interleukin-10 (IL-10) or vehicle added alone or in combination. The production of IL-8 was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and IL-8 messenger RNA expression by Northern blot analysis. 3. The production of IL-8 in unstimulated cells was undetectable by both ELISA and Northern blot analysis. 4. HT-29 cells produced IL-8 following stimulation with IL-1 alpha or TNF-alpha in a time- and a concentration-dependent manner, while IFN-gamma, IL-10 and IL-13 did not induce IL-8 production by HT-29 cells. 5. IL-13 was found to up-regulate significantly (P < 0.01) the IL-1 alpha but not the TNF-alpha-induced IL-8 generation by HT-29 cells. In contrast, IL-10 had no effect on either IL-1 alpha or TNF-alpha-induced IL-8 production. 6. Experiments using cycloheximide demonstrated that this synergistic effect of IL-13 and IL-1 alpha on IL-8 secretion was not through de novo protein synthesis. Using actinomycin-D, we demonstrated that the IL-13 up-regulation was at the level of transcription rather than messenger RNA stability. 7. These findings suggest that colonic epithelial cells have a functional IL-13 receptor, which is coupled to an up-regulation of IL-1 alpha, but not TNF-alpha induced IL-8 generation. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:8886420

  15. LINE-1 hypomethylation in normal colon mucosa is associated with poor survival in Chinese patients with sporadic colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuchen; Li, Yiwei; Nie, Jia; Li, Dawei; Peng, Junjie; Lian, Peng; Li, Bin; Cai, Guoxiang; Li, Xinxiang; Cai, Sanjun

    2015-01-01

    Genetic and epigenetic pathways are not independent in colorectal cancer (CRC) carcinogenesis. We aimed to determine the influence of various molecular features on Chinese patients' colon cancer-specific survival (CCSS). Various genetic and epigenetic modifications were detected in paired tumor and normal mucosa tissue samples. The prognostic variables regarding patient CCSS were determined. Overall, 127 patients, including 83 males and 44 females, completed a median follow-up of 65 (3–85) months. A mean LINE-1 methylation rate of 64.62% (range, 9.45–86.93) was observed. Hypermethylation at the hMLH1 gene promoter was detected in 26 (20.47%) patients. KRAS was mutated in 52 (40.94%) patients. Sixteen (12.60%) patients were confirmed as microsatellite instability (MSI)-High, and 76 (59.84%) were found to have loss of heterozygosity at 18q. The LINE-1 methylation level, MSI status, perineural invasion and distant metastases were confirmed as independent prognostic factors for patient CCSS. A stratified survival analysis further revealed that certain subgroups of patients with LINE-1 hypomethylation had significantly worse survival (all p < 0.05). Our data revealed that both genetic and epigenetic abnormalities can concurrently exist during colonic tumorigenesis. As a global epigenetic change, LINE-1 hypomethylation in normal colon mucosa might be associated with a worse outcome in certain Chinese patients with colon cancer. PMID:26172297

  16. LINE-1 hypomethylation in normal colon mucosa is associated with poor survival in Chinese patients with sporadic colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Changhua; Li, Qingguo; Wu, Yuchen; Li, Yiwei; Nie, Jia; Li, Dawei; Peng, Junjie; Lian, Peng; Li, Bin; Cai, Guoxiang; Li, Xinxiang; Cai, Sanjun

    2015-09-15

    Genetic and epigenetic pathways are not independent in colorectal cancer (CRC) carcinogenesis. We aimed to determine the influence of various molecular features on Chinese patients' colon cancer-specific survival (CCSS). Various genetic and epigenetic modifications were detected in paired tumor and normal mucosa tissue samples. The prognostic variables regarding patient CCSS were determined. Overall, 127 patients, including 83 males and 44 females, completed a median follow-up of 65 (3-85) months. A mean LINE-1 methylation rate of 64.62% (range, 9.45-86.93) was observed. Hypermethylation at the hMLH1 gene promoter was detected in 26 (20.47%) patients. KRAS was mutated in 52 (40.94%) patients. Sixteen (12.60%) patients were confirmed as microsatellite instability (MSI)-High, and 76 (59.84%) were found to have loss of heterozygosity at 18q. The LINE-1 methylation level, MSI status, perineural invasion and distant metastases were confirmed as independent prognostic factors for patient CCSS. A stratified survival analysis further revealed that certain subgroups of patients with LINE-1 hypomethylation had significantly worse survival (all p < 0.05). Our data revealed that both genetic and epigenetic abnormalities can concurrently exist during colonic tumorigenesis. As a global epigenetic change, LINE-1 hypomethylation in normal colon mucosa might be associated with a worse outcome in certain Chinese patients with colon cancer. PMID:26172297

  17. Comparison and correlation of candidal colonization in diabetic patients and normal individuals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus is a common universal endocrine disorder with decreased host immunity towards infections. In these people the most common opportunistic infection is oral candidiasis. Oral candidiasis is most commonly caused by yeast like fungus Candida albicans. In healthy individuals these microorganisms are believed to be commensals but in diabetic patients, it forms severe colonization, even in the absence of any clinically evident oral candidiasis. This type of subclinical colonization can make them more prone to develop deeper mucosal colonization with further dissemination via blood. The aim of this study is to compare the frequency and severity of oral candidal colonization in diabetic patients with normal individuals through cytological method. Methods 30 cases of diabetic patients and 30 cases of normal healthy individuals were examined to determine the oral candidal colonization through oral exfoliative cytological methods. Statistical analysis was done using the Chi - square test. Results A statistically significant increase in the candidal colonization was observed in diabetic patients as compared to normal individuals. Conclusions Oral exfoliative cytological method is an easy and effective chair side technique to assess the oral candidal colonization in the diabetic group. PMID:24991533

  18. ApoE deficiency promotes colon inflammation and enhances the inflammatory potential of oxidized-LDL and TNF-α in primary colon epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    El-Bahrawy, Ali H.; Tarhuni, Abdelmetalab; Kim, Hogyoung; Subramaniam, Venkat; Benslimane, Ilyes; Elmajeed, Zakaria Y. Abd; Okpechi, Samuel C.; Ghonim, Mohamed A.; Hemeida, Ramadan A.M.; Abo-yousef, Amira M.; El-Sherbiny, Gamal A.; Abdel-Raheem, Ihab T.; Kim, Jong; Naura, Amarjit S.; Boulares, A. Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Although deficiency in Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) is linked to many diseases, its effect on colon homoeostasis remains unknown. ApoE appears to control inflammation by regulating nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). The present study was designed to examine whether ApoE deficiency affects factors of colon integrity in vivo and given the likelihood that ApoE deficiency increases oxidized lipids and TNF-α, the present study also examined whether such deficiency enhances the inflammatory potential of oxidized-LDL (oxLDL) and TNF-α in colon epithelial cells (CECs), in vitro. Here we show that ApoE deficiency is associated with chronic inflammation systemically and in colonic tissues as assessed by TNF-α levels. Increased colon TNF-α mRNA coincided with a substantial increase in cyclooxygenase (COX)-2. ApoE deficiency enhanced the potential of oxLDL and TNF-α to induce COX-2 expression as well as several other inflammatory factors in primary CECs. Interestingly, oxLDL enhanced TGF-β expression only in ApoE−/−, but not in wild-type, epithelial cells. ApoE deficiency appears to promote COX-2 expression enhancement through a mechanism that involves persistent NF-κB nuclear localization and PI3 and p38 MAP kinases but independently of Src. In mice, ApoE deficiency promoted a moderate increase in crypt length, which was associated with opposing effects of an increase in cell proliferation and apoptosis at the bottom and top of the crypt respectively. Our results support the notion that ApoE plays a central role in colon homoeostasis and that ApoE deficiency may constitute a risk factor for colon pathologies. PMID:27538678

  19. THE ROLE OF GSH EFFLUX IN STAUROSPORINE-INDUCED APOPTOSIS IN COLONIC EPITHELIAL CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Circu, Magdalena L.; Stringer, Sarah; Rhoads, Carol Ann; Moyer, Mary Pat; Aw, Tak Yee

    2008-01-01

    Staurosporine (STP) was shown to induce cell apoptosis through formation of reactive oxygen species, but a role for cellular redox has not been defined. In this study, we report that STP (2μM) caused apoptosis (24±3% at 24h) of human colon adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line HT29 that was preceded by significant GSH and GSSG efflux (6h), but independent of changes in cellular GSH/GSSG redox status. The blockade of GSH efflux by γ-glutamyl glutamate (γ-GG) or ophthalmic acid was associated with apoptosis attenuation; however, γ-GG administration after peak GSH efflux (8h) did not confer cytoprotection. Moreover, lowering cellular GSH through inhibition of its synthesis prevented extracellular GSH accumulation and cell apoptosis, thus validating a link between cellular GSH export and the trigger of cell apoptosis. Inhibition of γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT1 EC 2.3.2.2)-catalyzed extracellular GSH degradation with acivicin significantly blocked GSH efflux, suggesting that GSH breakdown is a driving force for GSH export. Interestingly, acivicin treatment enhanced extracellular GSSG accumulation, consistent with GSH oxidation. STP-induced HT29 cell apoptosis was associated with caspase-3 activation independent of caspase-8 or caspase-9 activity; accordingly, inhibitors of the latter caspases were without effect on STP-induced apoptosis. STP similarly induced GSH efflux and apoptosis in a nonmalignant human NCM460 colonic cell line in association with caspase-3 activation. Collectively, our results demonstrate that STP induction of apoptosis in malignant and non-malignant colonic cells is temporally linked to the export of cellular GSH and the activation of caspase-3 without caspase-8 or -9 involvement. PMID:18840413

  20. Effects of longterm epidermal growth factor treatment on the normal rat colon.

    PubMed Central

    Kissmeyer-Nielsen, P; Vinter-Jensen, L; Smerup, M

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Epidermal growth factor (EGF) exerts trophic effects on the mucosa of damaged and defunctioned colon, but the effects on the normal large bowel wall are not known. AIMS--To investigate the effect of systemic EGF treatment on growth and morphology of normal rat colon. METHODS--Rats were treated with subcutaneous biosynthetic EGF injections of 150 micrograms/kg/day for 28 days. The weight of the histological colonic wall layers and the luminal surface area were measured using quantitative morphometric analysis (stereology). The colon was subdivided into proximal and distal parts. RESULTS--EGF treatment increased the total colon wet weight by 23% compared with controls (p < 0.005). The weight increase occurred in the mucosal (33%) and the submucosal layers of the bowel wall (36%) and there was a 69% increase of the total luminal surface area (p = 0.001). In the proximal part of colon of EGF rats there was a 68% increase in mucosal weight (p < 0.005) accompanied by a 79% increase in the mucosal surface area compared with controls (p < 0.005), whereas submucosal and muscularis propria weights were identical. In distal colon, the mucosal weight increased 28% in the EGF group (p < 0.005), the mucosal surface area increased by 72% after treatment (p < 0.01). Furthermore there was a 34% increase in the weight of submucosa (p < 0.001) in the distal colon among EGF rats. CONCLUSIONS--Treatment of rats with EGF has a stimulating role on the mucosa and luminal surface area of the entire functioning colon and a trophic effect on the submucosa of the distal colon. Images Figure 1 PMID:8707092

  1. Effects of dietary supplementation with fructooligosaccharides on colonic microbiota populations and epithelial cell proliferation in neonatal pigs.

    PubMed

    Howard, M D; Gordon, D T; Pace, L W; Garleb, K A; Kerley, M S

    1995-10-01

    Two experiments were conducted with neonatal pigs to determine the effects of feeding fructooligosaccharides on cecal and colonic microbiota, proliferation of cecal and colonic epithelial mucosa, and short-chain fatty acid concentrations in the cecum. Experiment 1 consisted of feeding neonatal pigs diets containing either 0 or 3 g fructooligosaccharies/L of formula for 15 days and then examining the large intestine for changes in cecal and proximal colonic microbiota; cecal pH; short-chain fatty acid concentrations; morphology of cecal, proximal, and distal colonic epithelial mucosa; gross necropsy; and histopathology. Supplementation with fructooligosacchariudes (FOS) did not alter cell counts of viable bifidobacterial organisms or total anaerobic microbiota, cecal pH, or concentrations of short-chain fatty acids. Cecal mucosal cell density and labeled cells increased with FOS consumption. Proximal colonic mucosal crypt height, leading edge, labeled cells, proliferation zone, and labeling index increased with FOS consumption. Distal colonic mucosal crypt height, leading edge, cell density, labeling index, and labeled cells increased with FOS consumption. Gross necropsy and histopathology found no significan lesions. In Experiment 2, neonatal pigs were fed diets containing either 0 or 3 g fructooligosaccharides/L of formula for 6 days. Fecal samples were collected on the first full day of feeding and on days 3 and 6 after initiation of feeding. On days 1 and 3, concentrations of bifidobacteria were similar between diets; however, on day 6, pigs consuming FOS tended to have greater numbers of bifidobacteria (p = 0.08). These data suggest dietary consumption of FOS will enhance bifidobacteria populations and prevent colonic epithelial mucosa atrophy in neonates fed an elemental diet.

  2. Lactic acid fermentation of germinated barley fiber and proliferative function of colonic epithelial cells in loperamide-induced rats.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jeong Ryae; Choi, Joon Hyuk

    2010-08-01

    To develop a functional food from the dietary fiber fraction of germinated barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) (GBF), lactic acid fermentation was attempted using Lactobacillus acidophilus, Streptococcus thermophilus, and Bifidobacterium bifidus. The quality characteristics of the lactic acid-fermented product and its effect on gastrointestinal function in an animal model were examined. The anaerobic fermentation of 1% and 2% GBF yielded lactic acid bacteria at 8.9 +/- 1.0 x 10(8) and 1.6 +/- 0.2 x 10(9) colony-forming units/mL, and it was considered acceptable for consumption by sensory assessment. To determine the effect on gastrointestinal function, Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with three types of diets: a normal chow diet and chow diets supplemented with 10% lactic acid bacteria or a yogurt fermented with 2% GBF (GBFY). The rats fed GBFY for 6 weeks gained less body weight, excreted more fecal mass, and had improved gastrointestinal transit as examined with barium sulfate. The effect of GBFY on colonic epithelial proliferation was investigated through loperamide (LPM)-induced constipation in rats. The rats fed with GBFY for 6 weeks were intraperitoneally administered LPM twice daily for 7 days. GBFY supplementation decreased fecal excretion and moisture content in feces and depleted goblet cells as observed by hematoxylin and eosin stain. However, the rats supplemented with GBFY prior to the LPM administration had enhanced bowel movement, mucin secretion, and production of short-chain fatty acids compared with values for the LPM-alone group. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the GBFY supplement increased the numbers of nuclei stained positively for Ki-67 and extended from the base to the middle zone of crypts. These results indicate that GBFY alleviates constipation via the proliferation of the colonic crypts in LPM-administered rats.

  3. Phyllanthus emblica Fruit Extract Activates Spindle Assembly Checkpoint, Prevents Mitotic Aberrations and Genomic Instability in Human Colon Epithelial NCM460 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xihan; Wang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    The fruit of Phyllanthus emblica Linn. (PE) has been widely consumed as a functional food and folk medicine in Southeast Asia due to its remarkable nutritional and pharmacological effects. Previous research showed PE delays mitotic progress and increases genomic instability (GIN) in human colorectal cancer cells. This study aimed to investigate the similar effects of PE by the biomarkers related to spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), mitotic aberrations and GIN in human NCM460 normal colon epithelial cells. Cells were treated with PE and harvested differently according to the biomarkers observed. Frequencies of micronuclei (MN), nucleoplasmic bridge (NPB) and nuclear bud (NB) in cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay were used as indicators of GIN. Mitotic aberrations were assessed by the biomarkers of chromosome misalignment, multipolar division, chromosome lagging and chromatin bridge. SAC activity was determined by anaphase-to- metaphase ratio (AMR) and the expression of core SAC gene budding uninhibited by benzimidazoles related 1 (BubR1). Compared with the control, PE-treated cells showed (1) decreased incidences of MN, NPB and NB (p < 0.01); (2) decreased frequencies of all mitotic aberration biomarkers (p < 0.01); and (3) decreased AMR (p < 0.01) and increased BubR1 expression (p < 0.001). The results revealed PE has the potential to protect human normal colon epithelial cells from mitotic and genomic damages partially by enhancing the function of SAC. PMID:27598149

  4. Phyllanthus emblica Fruit Extract Activates Spindle Assembly Checkpoint, Prevents Mitotic Aberrations and Genomic Instability in Human Colon Epithelial NCM460 Cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xihan; Wang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    The fruit of Phyllanthus emblica Linn. (PE) has been widely consumed as a functional food and folk medicine in Southeast Asia due to its remarkable nutritional and pharmacological effects. Previous research showed PE delays mitotic progress and increases genomic instability (GIN) in human colorectal cancer cells. This study aimed to investigate the similar effects of PE by the biomarkers related to spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), mitotic aberrations and GIN in human NCM460 normal colon epithelial cells. Cells were treated with PE and harvested differently according to the biomarkers observed. Frequencies of micronuclei (MN), nucleoplasmic bridge (NPB) and nuclear bud (NB) in cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay were used as indicators of GIN. Mitotic aberrations were assessed by the biomarkers of chromosome misalignment, multipolar division, chromosome lagging and chromatin bridge. SAC activity was determined by anaphase-to- metaphase ratio (AMR) and the expression of core SAC gene budding uninhibited by benzimidazoles related 1 (BubR1). Compared with the control, PE-treated cells showed (1) decreased incidences of MN, NPB and NB (p < 0.01); (2) decreased frequencies of all mitotic aberration biomarkers (p < 0.01); and (3) decreased AMR (p < 0.01) and increased BubR1 expression (p < 0.001). The results revealed PE has the potential to protect human normal colon epithelial cells from mitotic and genomic damages partially by enhancing the function of SAC. PMID:27598149

  5. Vasopressin regulation of epithelial colonic proliferation and permeability is mediated by pericryptal platelet-derived growth factor A.

    PubMed

    Miró, Lluïsa; Pérez-Bosque, Anna; Maijó, Mònica; Naftalin, Richard J; Moretó, Miquel

    2014-10-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) has trophic effects on the rat distal colon, increasing the growth of pericryptal myofibroblasts and reducing the colonic crypt wall permeability. This study aimed to reproduce in vitro the effects of AVP observed in vivo using cultures of human CCD-18Co myofibroblasts and T84 colonic epithelial cells. Proliferation of myofibroblasts was quantified by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation; the expression of platelet-derived growth factor A (PDGFA), platelet-derived growth factor B, epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor-β and vascular endothelial growth factor was measured by PCR and the expression of epithelial junction proteins by Western blot. Arginine vasopressin stimulated myofibroblast proliferation and the expression of PDGFA without affecting the expression of platelet-derived growth factor B, epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor-β or vascular endothelial growth factor. These effects were prevented when AVP receptor inhibitors were present in the medium. Pre-incubation of CCD-18Co cells with anti-PDGF antibody or with an inhibitor of the PDGF receptor abolished the effects of AVP. When colonocytes were incubated with medium obtained from myofibroblasts incubated with AVP, both cell proliferation and the expression of epithelial junction proteins increased; however, direct incubation of colonocytes with AVP did not modify these variables. These results demonstrate that AVP stimulates myofibroblast proliferation and induces PDGFA secretion, implying that PDGFA mediates local myofibroblast proliferation by an autocrine feedback loop and regulates epithelial proliferation and permeability by a paracrine mechanism. PMID:25085844

  6. Capsaicin induces NKCC1 internalization and inhibits chloride secretion in colonic epithelial cells independently of TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Bouyer, Patrice G; Tang, Xu; Weber, Christopher R; Shen, Le; Turner, Jerrold R; Matthews, Jeffrey B

    2013-01-15

    Colonic chloride secretion is regulated via the neurohormonal and immune systems. Exogenous chemicals (e.g., butyrate, propionate) can affect chloride secretion. Capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of the chili peppers, exerts various effects on gastrointestinal function. Capsaicin is known to activate the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1), expressed in the mesenteric nervous system. Recent studies have also demonstrated its presence in epithelial cells but its role remains uncertain. Because capsaicin has been reported to inhibit colonic chloride secretion, we tested whether this effect of capsaicin could occur by direct action on epithelial cells. In mouse colon and model T84 human colonic epithelial cells, we found that capsaicin inhibited forskolin-dependent short-circuit current (FSK-I(sc)). Using PCR and Western blot, we demonstrated the presence of TRPV1 in colonic epithelial cells. In T84 cells, TRPV1 localized at the basolateral membrane and in vesicular compartments. In permeabilized monolayers, capsaicin activated apical chloride conductance, had no effect on basolateral potassium conductance, but induced NKCC1 internalization demonstrated by immunocytochemistry and basolateral surface biotinylation. AMG-9810, a potent inhibitor of TRPV1, did not prevent the inhibition of the FSK-I(sc) by capsaicin. Neither resiniferatoxin nor N-oleoyldopamine, two selective agonists of TRPV1, blocked the FSK-I(sc). Conversely capsaicin, resiniferatoxin, and N-oleoyldopamine raised intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) in T84 cells and AMG-9810 blocked the rise in [Ca(2+)](i) induced by capsaicin and resiniferatoxin suggesting the presence of a functional TRPV1 channel. We conclude that capsaicin inhibits chloride secretion in part by causing NKCC1 internalization, but by a mechanism that appears to be independent of TRPV1. PMID:23139219

  7. Green tea polyphenol causes differential oxidative environments in tumor versus normal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Hsu, Stephen; Lewis, Jill; Wataha, John; Dickinson, Douglas; Singh, Baldev; Bollag, Wendy B; Lockwood, Petra; Ueta, Eisaku; Osaki, Tokio; Schuster, George

    2003-10-01

    Green tea polyphenols (GTPPs) are considered beneficial to human health, especially as chemopreventive agents. Recently, cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) were identified in tumor and certain normal cell cultures incubated with high concentrations of the most abundant GTPP, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). If EGCG also provokes the production of ROS in normal epithelial cells, it may preclude the topical use of EGCG at higher doses. The current study examined the oxidative status of normal epithelial, normal salivary gland, and oral carcinoma cells treated with EGCG, using ROS measurement and catalase and superoxide dismutase activity assays. The results demonstrated that high concentrations of EGCG induced oxidative stress only in tumor cells. In contrast, EGCG reduced ROS in normal cells to background levels. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and 5-bromodeoxyuridine incorporation data were also compared between the two oral carcinoma cell lines treated by EGCG, which suggest that a difference in the levels of endogenous catalase activity may play an important role in reducing oxidative stress provoked by EGCG in tumor cells. It is concluded that pathways activated by GTPPs or EGCG in normal epithelial versus tumor cells create different oxidative environments, favoring either normal cell survival or tumor cell destruction. This finding may lead to applications of naturally occurring polyphenols to enhance the effectiveness of chemo/radiation therapy to promote cancer cell death while protecting normal cells.

  8. Biobanking of Fresh-Frozen Human Adenocarcinomatous and Normal Colon Tissues: Which Parameters Influence RNA Quality?

    PubMed

    Galissier, Thibaut; Schneider, Christophe; Nasri, Saviz; Kanagaratnam, Lukshe; Fichel, Caroline; Coquelet, Christelle; Diebold, Marie-Danièle; Kianmanesh, Reza; Bellon, Georges; Dedieu, Stéphane; Marchal Bressenot, Aude; Boulagnon-Rombi, Camille

    2016-01-01

    Medical research projects become increasingly dependent on biobanked tissue of high quality because the reliability of gene expression is affected by the quality of extracted RNA. Hence, the present study aimed to determine if clinical, surgical, histological, and molecular parameters influence RNA quality of normal and tumoral frozen colonic tissues. RNA Quality Index (RQI) was evaluated on 241 adenocarcinomas and 115 matched normal frozen colon tissues collected between October 2006 and December 2012. RQI results were compared to patients' age and sex, tumor site, kind of surgery, anastomosis failure, adenocarcinoma type and grade, tumor cell percentage, necrosis extent, HIF-1α and cleaved caspase-3 immunohistochemistry, and BRAF, KRAS and microsatellites status. The RQI was significantly higher in colon cancer tissue than in matched normal tissue. RQI from left-sided colonic cancers was significantly higher than RQI from right-sided cancers. The RNA quality was not affected by ischemia and storage duration. According to histological control, 7.9% of the samples were unsatisfactory because of inadequate sampling. Biobanked tumoral tissues with RQI ≥5 had lower malignant cells to stromal cells ratio than samples with RQI <5 (p <0.05). Cellularity, necrosis extent and mucinous component did not influence RQI results. Cleaved caspase-3 and HIF-1α immunolabelling were not correlated to RQI. BRAF, KRAS and microsatellites molecular status did not influence RNA quality. Multivariate analysis revealed that the tumor location, the surgical approach (laparoscopy versus open colectomy) and the occurrence of anastomotic leakage were the only parameters influencing significantly RQI results of tumor samples. We failed to identify parameter influencing RQI of normal colon samples. These data suggest that RNA quality of colonic adenocarcinoma biospecimens is determined by clinical and surgical parameters. More attention should be paid during the biobanking procedure of

  9. Biobanking of Fresh-Frozen Human Adenocarcinomatous and Normal Colon Tissues: Which Parameters Influence RNA Quality?

    PubMed Central

    Galissier, Thibaut; Schneider, Christophe; Nasri, Saviz; Kanagaratnam, Lukshe; Fichel, Caroline; Coquelet, Christelle; Diebold, Marie-Danièle; Kianmanesh, Reza; Bellon, Georges; Dedieu, Stéphane; Marchal Bressenot, Aude

    2016-01-01

    Medical research projects become increasingly dependent on biobanked tissue of high quality because the reliability of gene expression is affected by the quality of extracted RNA. Hence, the present study aimed to determine if clinical, surgical, histological, and molecular parameters influence RNA quality of normal and tumoral frozen colonic tissues. RNA Quality Index (RQI) was evaluated on 241 adenocarcinomas and 115 matched normal frozen colon tissues collected between October 2006 and December 2012. RQI results were compared to patients’ age and sex, tumor site, kind of surgery, anastomosis failure, adenocarcinoma type and grade, tumor cell percentage, necrosis extent, HIF-1α and cleaved caspase-3 immunohistochemistry, and BRAF, KRAS and microsatellites status. The RQI was significantly higher in colon cancer tissue than in matched normal tissue. RQI from left-sided colonic cancers was significantly higher than RQI from right-sided cancers. The RNA quality was not affected by ischemia and storage duration. According to histological control, 7.9% of the samples were unsatisfactory because of inadequate sampling. Biobanked tumoral tissues with RQI ≥5 had lower malignant cells to stromal cells ratio than samples with RQI <5 (p <0.05). Cellularity, necrosis extent and mucinous component did not influence RQI results. Cleaved caspase-3 and HIF-1α immunolabelling were not correlated to RQI. BRAF, KRAS and microsatellites molecular status did not influence RNA quality. Multivariate analysis revealed that the tumor location, the surgical approach (laparoscopy versus open colectomy) and the occurrence of anastomotic leakage were the only parameters influencing significantly RQI results of tumor samples. We failed to identify parameter influencing RQI of normal colon samples. These data suggest that RNA quality of colonic adenocarcinoma biospecimens is determined by clinical and surgical parameters. More attention should be paid during the biobanking procedure of

  10. Phenotype transformation of immortalized NCM460 colon epithelial cell line by TGF-β1 is associated with chromosome instability.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Wen, Bin

    2016-10-01

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) within tumor microenvironment has a pivotal function in cancer initiation and tumorigenesis, and hence this study was to observe the malignant transformation induced by TGF-β1 in an immortalized colon epithelial cell line NCM460 for better understanding the mechanisms of colon carcinogenesis. Immortalized colon epithelial cell line NCM460 was used as the model of this study, and was treated with different concentrations of TGF-β1 for different time. Then, immunofluorescence was performed to observe the change of phenotype hallmarks including adherent junction protein E-cadherin, cytoskeleton protein vimentin, and tight junction marker ZO-1, western blotting analysis was performed to detect the expression of the above three markers and two transcription factors (Snail and Slug) involved in the transformation by TGF-β1. In addition, chromosome instability (CHI) including analysis of DNA-ploid was detected by flow cytometry. Our results revealed significant loss or reduction of ZO-1 and E-cadherin, and robust emergence of vimentin in the cell line NCM460 after a 15-, 20-, and 25-day treatment with 10 ng/ml TGF-β1. Interestingly, 20 and 25 days after stimulation with 5 ng/ml TGF-β1, expression of E-cadherin and ZO-1 revealed a pattern roughly similar to that of 10 ng/ml TGF-β1, especially, both expressions was vanished and vimentin expression was dramatically increased at days 25 after TGF-β1 stimulation. After a stimulation with 10 ng/ml TGF-β1 for 15, 20, and 25 days, the levels of Snail and Slug expression in the cells were significantly up-regulated, compared with the cells treated with TGF-β1 inhibitor LY364947, PBS or balnk control (P < 0.01). Our results found that many abnormal mitotic patterns including lagging chromosomes and anaphase bridges in NCM460 cells were induced by TGF-β1 after its stimulation for 15, 20, and 25 days. Very few mitotic cells with treatment of PBS for 15, 20 and 25 days were

  11. Tissue-specific patterns of gene expression in the epithelium and stroma of normal colon in healthy individuals in an aspirin intervention trial.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sushma S; Makar, Karen W; Li, Lin; Zheng, Yingye; Yang, Peiying; Levy, Lisa; Rudolph, Rebecca Y; Lampe, Paul D; Yan, Min; Markowitz, Sanford D; Bigler, Jeannette; Lampe, Johanna W; Potter, John D

    2015-12-01

    Regular aspirin use reduces colon adenoma and carcinoma incidence. UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT) are involved in aspirin metabolism and clearance, and variant alleles in UGT1A6 have been shown to alter salicylic acid metabolism and risk of colon neoplasia. In a randomized, cross-over, placebo-controlled trial of 44 healthy men and women, homozygous for UGT1A6*1 or UGT1A6*2, we explored differences between global epithelial and stromal expression, using Affymetrix U133 + 2.0 microarrays and tested effects of 60-day aspirin supplementation (325 mg/d) on epithelial and stromal gene expression and colon prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels. We conducted a comprehensive study of differential gene expression between normal human colonic epithelium and stroma from healthy individuals. Although no statistically significant differences in gene expression were observed in response to aspirin or UGT1A6 genotype, we have identified the genes uniquely and reproducibly expressed in each tissue type and have analyzed the biologic processes they represent. Here we describe in detail how the data, deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) - accession number GSE71571 - was generated including the basic analysis as contained in the manuscript published in BMC Medical Genetics with the PMID 25927723 (Thomas et al., 2015 [9]).

  12. Tissue-specific patterns of gene expression in the epithelium and stroma of normal colon in healthy individuals in an aspirin intervention trial

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Sushma S.; Makar, Karen W.; Li, Lin; Zheng, Yingye; Yang, Peiying; Levy, Lisa; Rudolph, Rebecca Y.; Lampe, Paul D.; Yan, Min; Markowitz, Sanford D.; Bigler, Jeannette; Lampe, Johanna W.; Potter, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Regular aspirin use reduces colon adenoma and carcinoma incidence. UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT) are involved in aspirin metabolism and clearance, and variant alleles in UGT1A6 have been shown to alter salicylic acid metabolism and risk of colon neoplasia. In a randomized, cross-over, placebo-controlled trial of 44 healthy men and women, homozygous for UGT1A6*1 or UGT1A6*2, we explored differences between global epithelial and stromal expression, using Affymetrix U133 + 2.0 microarrays and tested effects of 60-day aspirin supplementation (325 mg/d) on epithelial and stromal gene expression and colon prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels. We conducted a comprehensive study of differential gene expression between normal human colonic epithelium and stroma from healthy individuals. Although no statistically significant differences in gene expression were observed in response to aspirin or UGT1A6 genotype, we have identified the genes uniquely and reproducibly expressed in each tissue type and have analyzed the biologic processes they represent. Here we describe in detail how the data, deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) – accession number GSE71571 – was generated including the basic analysis as contained in the manuscript published in BMC Medical Genetics with the PMID 25927723 (Thomas et al., 2015 [9]). PMID:26697360

  13. Cultivated Vaginal Microbiomes Alter HIV-1 Infection and Antiretroviral Efficacy in Colonized Epithelial Multilayer Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Pyles, Richard B.; Vincent, Kathleen L.; Baum, Marc M.; Elsom, Barry; Miller, Aaron L.; Maxwell, Carrie; Eaves-Pyles, Tonyia D.; Li, Guangyu; Popov, Vsevolod L.; Nusbaum, Rebecca J.; Ferguson, Monique R.

    2014-01-01

    There is a pressing need for modeling of the symbiotic and at times dysbiotic relationship established between bacterial microbiomes and human mucosal surfaces. In particular clinical studies have indicated that the complex vaginal microbiome (VMB) contributes to the protection against sexually-transmitted pathogens including the life-threatening human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1). The human microbiome project has substantially increased our understanding of the complex bacterial communities in the vagina however, as is the case for most microbiomes, very few of the community member species have been successfully cultivated in the laboratory limiting the types of studies that can be completed. A genetically controlled ex vivo model system is critically needed to study the complex interactions and associated molecular dialog. We present the first vaginal mucosal culture model that supports colonization by both healthy and dysbiotic VMB from vaginal swabs collected from routine gynecological patients. The immortalized vaginal epithelial cells used in the model and VMB cryopreservation methods provide the opportunity to reproducibly create replicates for lab-based evaluations of this important mucosal/bacterial community interface. The culture system also contains HIV-1 susceptible cells allowing us to study the impact of representative microbiomes on replication. Our results show that our culture system supports stable and reproducible colonization by VMB representing distinct community state types and that the selected representatives have significantly different effects on the replication of HIV-1. Further, we show the utility of the system to predict unwanted alterations in efficacy or bacterial community profiles following topical application of a front line antiretroviral. PMID:24676219

  14. Arvelexin inhibits colonic inflammation by suppression of NF-κB activation in dextran sulfate sodium-induced mice and TNF-α-induced colonic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eu-Jin; Shin, Ji-Sun; Chung, Kyung-Sook; Lee, Yong Sup; Cho, Young-Wuk; Baek, Nam-In; Chung, Hae-Gon; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2012-08-01

    Recently, we reported the anti-inflammatory effects of arvelexin isolated from Brassica rapa in macrophages. In the present study, the effects of arvelexin were investigated in a dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis mouse model and in a cellular model. In the DSS-induced colitis model, arvelexin significantly reduced the severity of colitis, as assessed by disease activity, colonic damage, neutrophil infiltration, and levels of colonic iNOS. Moreover, arvelexin inhibited the expressions of IL-8, IP-10, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1 in HT-29 colonic epithelial cells. Arvelexin also inhibited the TNF-α-induced adhesion of U937 monocytic cells to HT-29 cells. Furthermore, arvelexin reduced p65 NF-κB subunit translocation to the nucleus and IκBα degradation in the colonic tissues and in TNF-α-induced HT-29 cells. These results demonstrate that the ameliorative effects of arvelexin on colonic injury are mainly related to its ability to inhibit the inflammatory responses via NF-κB inactivation, and support its possible therapeutic role in colitis.

  15. Aqueous Extracts of Selected Potentilla Species Modulate Biological Activity of Human Normal Colon Cells.

    PubMed

    Paduch, Roman; Wiater, Adrian; Locatelli, Marcello; Pleszczyńska, Malgorzata; Tomczyk, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Potentilla L. (Rosaceae) species have been used in traditional and in folk medicine for many years. This study characterized the activity of extracts from aerial parts of selected Potentilla species: P. argentea, P. anserina, P. grandiflora and P. erecta as well as one species of closely related to the genus Potentilla, Drymocallis rupestris (syn. P. rupestris). The biological activities were analyzed using MTT, NR and DPPH assays on CCD 841 CoTr and CCD-18Co cells. Moreover, cell morphology and cytoskeletal actin F-filaments organization and IL-6 and IL-10 levels by ELISA were analyzed after 24 h of incubation. Potentilla extracts at dose levels between 25 and 250 µg/mL were analyzed. For ELISA, 15 µg/mL and 30 μg/mL were chosen. When mitochondrial succinyl dehydrogenase activity was tested (MTT assay) only extract obtained from P. erecta at lower concentrations (up to 125 µg/mL) suppressed metabolism of myofibroblasts, while epithelial cells mitochondrial enzyme activity increased after incubation with all extracts. In Neutral Red (NR) method cellular membrane disturbance of both cell cultures was found after D. rupestris and P. grandiflora addition. Moreover, strong influence on epithelial cells was also found for P. anserina. All extracts showed similar, concentration-dependent free radical scavenging (DPPH) effect. Potentilla extracts, especially at lower concentration, decreased IL-6 production in myofibroblasts but the level of the cytokine was found to be stable in epithelial cells. IL-10 analysis revealed that P. argentea, D. rupestris, P. erecta extracts decrease cytokine level in myofibroblasts, while only when higher concentration were applied, decreased cytokine level produced by epithelial cells was found. F-actin filaments staining revealed that Potentilla extracts significantly influence on cellular cytoskeleton organization. Potentilla extracts influence on cells of human colon wall lining modulating the main features of them (viability

  16. Okadaic Acid Toxin at Sublethal Dose Produced Cell Proliferation in Gastric and Colon Epithelial Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    del Campo, Miguel; Toledo, Héctor; Lagos, Néstor

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of Okadaic Acid (OA) on the proliferation of gastric and colon epithelial cells, the main target tissues of the toxin. We hypothesized that OA, at sublethal doses, activates multiple signaling pathways, such as Erk and Akt, through the inhibition of PP2A. To demonstrate this, we carried out curves of doses and time response against OA in AGS, MKN-45 and Caco 2 cell lines, and found an increase in the cell proliferation at sublethal doses, at 24 h or 48 h exposure. Indeed, cells can withstand high concentrations of the toxin at 4 h exposure, the time chosen considering the maximum time before total gastric emptying. We have proved that this increased proliferation is due to an overexpression of Cyclin B, a cyclin that promotes the passage from G2 to mitosis. In addition, we have demonstrated that OA induces activation of Akt and Erk in the three cells lines, showing that OA can activate pathways involved in oncogenesis. In conclusion, this study contributes to the knowledge about the possible effects of chronic OA consumption. PMID:24317467

  17. Helicobacter bilis Gamma-Glutamyltranspeptidase Enhances Inflammatory Stress Response via Oxidative Stress in Colon Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Javed, Sundus; Mejías-Luque, Raquel; Kalali, Behnam; Bolz, Christian; Gerhard, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter bilis (H. bilis) infection is associated with cases of inflammatory bowel Disease, thyphlocolitis, hepatitis and cholecystitis. However, little is known about the bacterial virulence determinants or the molecular mechanisms involved. Recently, H. bilis γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (HBgGT) was shown to be a virulence factor decreasing host cell viability. Bacterial gGTs play a key role in synthesis and degradation of glutathione and enables the bacteria to utilize extracellular glutamine and glutathione as sources of glutamate. gGT-mediated loss of cell viability has so far been linked to DNA damage via oxidative stress, but the signaling cascades involved herein have not been described. In this study, we identified enhanced ROS production induced by HBgGT as a central factor involved in the activation of the oxidative stress response cascades, which finally activate CREB, AP-1 and NF-κB in H. bilis infected colon cancer cells. IL-8, an important pro-inflammatory chemokine that is a common downstream target of these transcription factors, was up-regulated upon H. bilis infection in an HBgGT dependent manner. Moreover, the induction of these signaling responses and inflammatory cytokine production in host cells could be linked to HBgGT-mediated glutamine deprivation. This study implicates for the first time HBgGT as an important regulator of signaling cascades regulating inflammation in H. bilis infected host epithelial cells that could be responsible for induction of inflammatory disorders by the bacterium. PMID:24009737

  18. A Neu differentiation factor (NDF) domain essential for proliferation and alterations in morphology of colonic epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Whoriskey, J S; Pekar, S K; Elliott, G S; Hara, S; Liu, N; Lenz, D M; Zamborelli, T; Mayer, J P; Tarpley, J E; Lacey, D L; Ratzkin, B; Yoshinaga, S K

    1998-01-01

    The Neu Differentiation Factors (NDFs, also termed "heregulins") are a family of proteins that were first isolated as ligands for the HER2 (ergB2, or p185neu) receptor protein tyrosine kinase. Here we show that NDF acts to stimulate the proliferation and alter the cellular morphology of colonic epithelial cells in culture. Dramatic NDF-induced changes in cellular morphology were noted in the colonic epithelial cell line, LIM 1215. In addition, the expression of specific cell proteins, such as carcinoembryonic antigen and integrin beta 4, was induced in LIM 1215 cells by NDF. These effects were more pronounced with the beta isoform than with the alpha isoform of NDF. The EGF-homology domain of NDF beta was sufficient to stimulate the proliferation and alteration in cell morphology. The use of chemically synthesized chimeric NDF alpha and NDF beta proteins enabled use to identify a region of seven amino acids in the EGF-homology domain of NDF beta that is required for both activities. These in vitro experiments suggest that NDF may act as a regulator of growth and differentiation of colonic epithelial cells in vivo.

  19. TGFβ-Id1 Signaling Opposes Twist1 and Promotes Metastatic Colonization Via a Mesenchymal-to-Epithelial Transition

    PubMed Central

    Stankic, Marko; Pavlovic, Svetlana; Chin, Yvette; Brogi, Edi; Padua, David; Norton, Larry; Massague, Joan; Benezra, Robert

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY ID genes are required for breast cancer colonization of the lungs, but the mechanism remains poorly understood. Here, we show that Id1 expression induces a stem-like phenotype in breast cancer cells, while retaining epithelial properties, contrary to the notion that cancer stem-like properties are inextricably linked to the mesenchymal state. During metastatic colonization, Id1 induces a mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET), specifically in cells whose mesenchymal state is dependent on the Id1 target protein Twist1 but not at the primary site, where this state is controlled by the zinc-finger protein Snail1. Knockdown of Id expression in metastasizing cells prevents MET and dramatically reduces lung colonization. Furthermore, Id1 is induced by TGFβ only in cells that have first undergone EMT, demonstrating that EMT is a pre-requisite for subsequent Id1-induced MET during lung colonization. Collectively, these studies underscore the importance of Id-mediated phenotypic switching during distinct stages of breast cancer metastasis. PMID:24332369

  20. Ex vivo characterization of normal and adenocarcinoma colon samples by Mueller matrix polarimetry.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Iftikhar; Ahmad, Manzoor; Khan, Karim; Ashraf, Sumara; Ahmad, Shakil; Ikram, Masroor

    2015-05-01

    Mueller matrix polarimetry along with polar decomposition algorithm was employed for the characterization of ex vivo normal and adenocarcinoma human colon tissues by polarized light in the visible spectral range (425-725 nm). Six derived polarization metrics [total diattenuation (DT ), retardance (RT ), depolarization(ΔT ), linear diattenuation (DL), retardance (δ), and depolarization (ΔL)] were compared for normal and adenocarcinoma colon tissue samples. The results show that all six polarimetric properties for adenocarcinoma samples were significantly higher as compared to the normal samples for all wavelengths. The Wilcoxon rank sum test illustrated that total retardance is a good candidate for the discrimination of normal and adenocarcinoma colon samples. Support vector machine classification for normal and adenocarcinoma based on the four polarization properties spectra (ΔT , ΔL, RT ,and δ) yielded 100% accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity, while both DTa nd DL showed 66.6%, 33.3%, and 83.3% accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity, respectively. The combination of polarization analysis and given classification methods provides a framework to distinguish the normal and cancerous tissues. PMID:26021717

  1. Ex vivo characterization of normal and adenocarcinoma colon samples by Mueller matrix polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Iftikhar; Ahmad, Manzoor; Khan, Karim; Ashraf, Sumara; Ahmad, Shakil; Ikram, Masroor

    2015-05-01

    Mueller matrix polarimetry along with polar decomposition algorithm was employed for the characterization of ex vivo normal and adenocarcinoma human colon tissues by polarized light in the visible spectral range (425-725 nm). Six derived polarization metrics [total diattenuation (DT), retardance (RT), depolarization (ΔT), linear diattenuation (DL), retardance (δ), and depolarization (ΔL)] were compared for normal and adenocarcinoma colon tissue samples. The results show that all six polarimetric properties for adenocarcinoma samples were significantly higher as compared to the normal samples for all wavelengths. The Wilcoxon rank sum test illustrated that total retardance is a good candidate for the discrimination of normal and adenocarcinoma colon samples. Support vector machine classification for normal and adenocarcinoma based on the four polarization properties spectra (ΔT, ΔL, RT,and δ) yielded 100% accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity, while both DT and D showed 66.6%, 33.3%, and 83.3% accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity, respectively. The combination of polarization analysis and given classification methods provides a framework to distinguish the normal and cancerous tissues.

  2. Direct effect of croton oil on intestinal epithelial cells and colonic smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Lan, Mei; Wu, Han-Ping; Shi, Yong-Quan; Lu, Ju; Ding, Jie; Wu, Kai-Cun; Jin, Jian-Ping; Fan, Dai Ming

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the direct effect of croton oil (CO) on human intestinal epithelial cell (HIEC) and guinea pig colonic smooth muscle cells in vitro. METHODS: Growth curves of HIEC were drawn by MTT colorimetry. The dynamics of cell proliferation was analyzed with flow cytometry, and morphological changes were observed under light and electron microscopy after long-term (6 weeks) treatment with CO.Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA was detected by dot blot in HIEC treated with CO. Genes related to CO were screened by DD-PCR, and the direct effect of CO on the contractility of isolated guinea pig colonic smooth muscle cells was observed. RESULTS: High concentration (20-40 mg·L-1) CO inhibited cell growth significantly (1, 3, 5, 7 d OD sequence: (20 mg·L-1 ) 0.040 ± 0.003, 0.081 ± 0.012, 0.147 ± 0.022,0.024 ± 0.016; (40 mg·L-1) 0.033 ± 0.044, 0.056 ± 0.012, 0.104 ± 0.010, 0.189 ± 0.006; OD control 0.031 ± 0.008, 0.096 ± 0.012, 0.173 ± 0.009, 0.300 ± 0.016, P < 0.01), which appeared to be related directly to the dosage. Compared with the control, the fraction number of cells in G1 phase decreased from 0.60 to 0.58, while that in S phase increased from 0.30 to 0.34 and DNA index also increased after 6 weeks of treatment with CO (the dosage was increased gradually from 4 to 40 mg·L-1). Light microscopic observation revealed that cells had karyomegaly, less plasma and karyoplasm lopsidedness. Electron microscopy also showed an increase in cell proliferation and in the quantity of abnormal nuclei with pathologic mitosis. Expression of COX-2 mRNA decreased significantly in HIEC treated with CO. Thirteen differential cDNA fragments were cloned from HIEC treated with CO, one of which was 100 percent homologous with human mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase subunit II. The length of isolated guinea pig colonic smooth muscle cells was significantly shortened after treatment with CO (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: At a high CO concentration ( > 20 mg·L-1

  3. Empirical comparison of color normalization methods for epithelial-stromal classification in H and E images

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Amit; Sha, Lingdao; Vahadane, Abhishek Ramnath; Deaton, Ryan J.; Kumar, Neeraj; Macias, Virgilia; Gann, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Color normalization techniques for histology have not been empirically tested for their utility for computational pathology pipelines. Aims: We compared two contemporary techniques for achieving a common intermediate goal – epithelial-stromal classification. Settings and Design: Expert-annotated regions of epithelium and stroma were treated as ground truth for comparing classifiers on original and color-normalized images. Materials and Methods: Epithelial and stromal regions were annotated on thirty diverse-appearing H and E stained prostate cancer tissue microarray cores. Corresponding sets of thirty images each were generated using the two color normalization techniques. Color metrics were compared for original and color-normalized images. Separate epithelial-stromal classifiers were trained and compared on test images. Main analyses were conducted using a multiresolution segmentation (MRS) approach; comparative analyses using two other classification approaches (convolutional neural network [CNN], Wndchrm) were also performed. Statistical Analysis: For the main MRS method, which relied on classification of super-pixels, the number of variables used was reduced using backward elimination without compromising accuracy, and test - area under the curves (AUCs) were compared for original and normalized images. For CNN and Wndchrm, pixel classification test-AUCs were compared. Results: Khan method reduced color saturation while Vahadane reduced hue variance. Super-pixel-level test-AUC for MRS was 0.010–0.025 (95% confidence interval limits ± 0.004) higher for the two normalized image sets compared to the original in the 10–80 variable range. Improvement in pixel classification accuracy was also observed for CNN and Wndchrm for color-normalized images. Conclusions: Color normalization can give a small incremental benefit when a super-pixel-based classification method is used with features that perform implicit color normalization while the gain is

  4. Breast Cancer Stem Cells Transition between Epithelial and Mesenchymal States Reflective of their Normal Counterparts

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Suling; Cong, Yang; Wang, Dong; Sun, Yu; Deng, Lu; Liu, Yajing; Martin-Trevino, Rachel; Shang, Li; McDermott, Sean P.; Landis, Melissa D.; Hong, Suhyung; Adams, April; D’Angelo, Rosemarie; Ginestier, Christophe; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Clouthier, Shawn G.; Birnbaum, Daniel; Wong, Stephen T.; Zhan, Ming; Chang, Jenny C.; Wicha, Max S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Previous studies have suggested that breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) mediate metastasis, are resistant to radiation and chemotherapy, and contribute to relapse. Although several BCSC markers have been described, it is unclear whether these markers identify the same or independent BCSCs. Here, we show that BCSCs exist in distinct mesenchymal-like (epithelial-mesenchymal transition [EMT]) and epithelial-like (mesenchymal-epithelial transition [MET]) states. Mesenchymal-like BCSCs characterized as CD24−CD44+ are primarily quiescent and localized at the tumor invasive front, whereas epithelial-like BCSCs express aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), are proliferative, and are located more centrally. The gene-expression profiles of mesenchymal-like and epithelial-like BCSCs are remarkably similar across different molecular subtypes of breast cancer, and resemble those of distinct basal and luminal stem cells found in the normal breast. We propose that the plasticity of BCSCs that allows them to transition between EMT- and MET-like states endows these cells with the capacity for tissue invasion, dissemination, and growth at metastatic sites. PMID:24511467

  5. Simple method for the preparation of single cell suspensions from normal and tumorous rat colonic mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Perret, V; Lev, R; Pigman, W

    1977-01-01

    Viable single cell suspensions from rat colonic epithelium were obtained by using phosphate buffered saline containing 0-2 M mannitol. The method, which requires no prior enzyme treatment, provides undamaged cells in high yield within one hour. The procedure was also applied to neoplastic rat colonic tissue, which was induced by repeated intrarectal infusion of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea. Comparison between normal and neoplastic cells has shown that the latter have a higher nucleus: cytoplasm ratio and a higher metabolic activity. Images Figure PMID:873323

  6. The GacA global regulator of Vibrio fischeri is required for normal host tissue responses that limit subsequent bacterial colonization.

    PubMed

    Whistler, Cheryl A; Koropatnick, Tanya A; Pollack, Amber; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J; Ruby, Edward G

    2007-03-01

    Harmful and beneficial bacterium-host interactions induce similar host-tissue changes that lead to contrasting outcomes of association. A life-long association between Vibrio fischeri and the light organ of its host Euprymna scolopes begins when the squid collects bacteria from the surrounding seawater using mucus secreted from ciliated epithelial appendages. Following colonization, the bacterium causes changes in host tissue including cessation of mucus shedding, and apoptosis and regression of the appendages that may limit additional bacterial interactions. We evaluated whether delivery of morphogenic signals is influenced by GacA, a virulence regulator in pathogens, which also influences squid-colonization by V. fischeri. Low-level colonization by a GacA mutant led to regression of the ciliated appendages. However, the GacA mutant did not induce cessation of mucus shedding, nor did it trigger apoptosis in the appendages, a phenotype that normally correlates with their regression. Because apoptosis is triggered by lipopolysaccharide, we examined the GacA mutant and determined that it had an altered lipopolysaccharide profile as well as an increased sensitivity to detergents. GacA-mutant-colonized animals were highly susceptible to invasion by secondary colonizers, suggesting that the GacA mutant's inability to signal the full programme of light-organ responses permitted the prolonged recruitment of additional symbionts.

  7. Human Normal Bronchial Epithelial Cells: A Novel In Vitro Cell Model for Toxicity Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Haiyan; Xia, Bo; Liu, Hongya; Li, Jie; Lin, Shaolin; Li, Tiyuan; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Human normal cell-based systems are needed for drug discovery and toxicity evaluation. hTERT or viral genes transduced human cells are currently widely used for these studies, while these cells exhibited abnormal differentiation potential or response to biological and chemical signals. In this study, we established human normal bronchial epithelial cells (HNBEC) using a defined primary epithelial cell culture medium without transduction of exogenous genes. This system may involve decreased IL-1 signaling and enhanced Wnt signaling in cells. Our data demonstrated that HNBEC exhibited a normal diploid karyotype. They formed well-defined spheres in matrigel 3D culture while cancer cells (HeLa) formed disorganized aggregates. HNBEC cells possessed a normal cellular response to DNA damage and did not induce tumor formation in vivo by xenograft assays. Importantly, we assessed the potential of these cells in toxicity evaluation of the common occupational toxicants that may affect human respiratory system. Our results demonstrated that HNBEC cells are more sensitive to exposure of 10~20 nm-sized SiO2, Cr(VI) and B(a)P compared to 16HBE cells (a SV40-immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells). This study provides a novel in vitro human cells-based model for toxicity evaluation, may also be facilitating studies in basic cell biology, cancer biology and drug discovery. PMID:25861018

  8. Mutated epithelial cadherin is associated with increased tumorigenicity and loss of adhesion and of responsiveness to the motogenic trefoil factor 2 in colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Efstathiou, J A; Liu, D; Wheeler, J M; Kim, H C; Beck, N E; Ilyas, M; Karayiannakis, A J; Mortensen, N J; Kmiot, W; Playford, R J; Pignatelli, M; Bodmer, W F

    1999-03-01

    Epithelial (E)-cadherin and its associated cytoplasmic proteins (alpha-, beta-, and gamma-catenins) are important mediators of epithelial cell-cell adhesion and intracellular signaling. Much evidence exists suggesting a tumor/invasion suppressor role for E-cadherin, and loss of expression, as well as mutations, has been described in a number of epithelial cancers. To investigate whether E-cadherin gene (CDH1) mutations occur in colorectal cancer, we screened 49 human colon carcinoma cell lines from 43 patients by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and direct sequencing. In addition to silent changes, polymorphisms, and intronic variants in a number of the cell lines, we detected frameshift single-base deletions in repeat regions of exon 3 (codons 120 and 126) causing premature truncations at codon 216 in four replication-error-positive (RER+) cell lines (LS174T, HCT116, GP2d, and GP5d) derived from 3 patients. In LS174T such a mutation inevitably contributes to its lack of E-cadherin protein expression and function. Transfection of full-length E-cadherin cDNA into LS174T cells enhanced intercellular adhesion, induced differentiation, retarded proliferation, inhibited tumorigenicity, and restored responsiveness to the migratory effects induced by the motogenic trefoil factor 2 (human spasmolytic polypeptide). These results indicate that, although inactivating E-cadherin mutations occur relatively infrequently in colorectal cancer cell lines overall (3/43 = 7%), they are more common in cells with an RER+ phenotype (3/10 = 30%) and may contribute to the dysfunction of the E-cadherin-catenin-mediated adhesion/signaling system commonly seen in these tumors. These results also indicate that normal E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion can restore the ability of colonic tumor cells to respond to trefoil factor 2.

  9. Intestinal anti-inflammatory activity of red wine extract: unveiling the mechanisms in colonic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Carla; Ferreira, Elisabete; Freitas, Víctor; Almeida, Leonor; Barbosa, Rui M; Laranjinha, João

    2013-02-26

    The development of new therapeutic approaches, combining efficacy and safety against intestinal inflammation, notably inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), has emerged as an important goal due to the significant side effects and the lack of effectiveness of standard current therapies. Recently, several studies described the health-promoting effects of red wine, including anti-inflammatory properties, but the molecular mechanisms underlying its beneficial role remain largely unknown. Red wine is rich in phenolic compounds and it has been suggested that the positive effect of red wine intake might be attributed not only to the antioxidant properties of these compounds but also to the modulation of signalling cascades in connection with physiological and pathophysiological conditions such as inflammatory processes. This study assesses the potential anti-inflammatory action of a red wine extract (RWE) enriched in polyphenols in a cellular model of intestinal inflammation using cytokines-stimulated HT-29 colon epithelial cells. RWE suppressed cytokines-induced IκB degradation and interleukin-8 production in a dose-dependent manner. Coherently, key inflammatory mediators downstream NF-κB activation; notably cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase were maintained at low levels by RWE in the presence of the cytokines. Additionally, RWE inhibited both the increase of nitric oxide derived from iNOS and of protein tyrosine nitration, a biomarker of nitrosative stress that typically requires the reaction of nitric oxide with the superoxide radical. Taken together, the anti-inflammatory action of RWE, mechanistically supported by the modulation of cascades orchestrated by NF-κB and involving nitric oxide, suggests that RWE (a readily straightforward preparation when compared with the purification of specific compounds) may represent a simple and inexpensive therapeutic strategy in the context of intestinal inflammation.

  10. Paraneoplastic Erythrocytosis of Colon Cancer, with Serum Erythropoietin within the Normal Reference Range

    PubMed Central

    Kitayama, Hiromitsu; Kondo, Tomohiro; Sugiyama, Junko; Hirayama, Michiaki; Oyamada, Yumiko; Tsuji, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 75 Final Diagnosis: Erythropoietin-secreting colon cancer Symptoms: None Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Immunohistochemistry Specialty: Hematology Objective: Rare disease Background: Paraneoplastic erythrocytosis can be brought on by ectopic erythropoietin production usually in kidney, brain, and liver tumor with increase of serum erythropoietin level. We report here a paraneoplastic erythrocytosis of colon cancer with serum erythropoietin within the normal reference, which required an immunohistologic test for erythropoietin-antibody to be diagnosed. Case Report: Our case report was of a 75-year-old woman with erythrocytosis. Her hemoglobin and serum erythropoietin levels were 191 g/dL and 12.6 IU/L (reference range, 9.1–32.8), respectively. Colonoscopy revealed an advanced sigmoid colon tumor 20 mm in diameter. She underwent colectomy, and immunohistochemical examination showed the colon adenocarcinoma was focally positive for erythropoietin-antibody. One month after the surgery, her hemoglobin level decreased to 117 g/L. Conclusions: Colon cancer can cause paraneoplastic erythrocytosis, and it is important to consider not simply the absolute serum erythropoietin level but also the serum erythropoietin level relative to simultaneously measured hemoglobin level. We should include paraneoplastic erythrocytosis as a differential diagnosis in cases of high hemoglobin level unexplained by other diseases. PMID:27318703

  11. Scaffold-Free Coculture Spheroids of Human Colonic Adenocarcinoma Cells and Normal Colonic Fibroblasts Promote Tumorigenicity in Nude Mice123

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-il; Lee, Jisu; Kwon, Ju-Lee; Park, Hong-Bum; Lee, Su-Yel; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Sung, Jaekye; Kim, Jin Man; Song, Kyu Sang; Kim, Kyung-Hee

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to form a scaffold-free coculture spheroid model of colonic adenocarcinoma cells (CACs) and normal colonic fibroblasts (NCFs) and to use the spheroids to investigate the role of NCFs in the tumorigenicity of CACs in nude mice. We analysed three-dimensional (3D) scaffold-free coculture spheroids of CACs and NCFs. CAC Matrigel invasion assays and tumorigenicity assays in nude mice were performed to examine the effect of NCFs on CAC invasive behaviour and tumorigenicity in 3D spheroids. We investigated the expression pattern of fibroblast activation protein-α (FAP-α) by immunohistochemical staining. CAC monocultures did not form densely-packed 3D spheroids, whereas cocultured CACs and NCFs formed 3D spheroids. The 3D coculture spheroids seeded on a Matrigel extracellular matrix showed higher CAC invasiveness compared to CACs alone or CACs and NCFs in suspension. 3D spheroids injected into nude mice generated more and faster-growing tumors compared to CACs alone or mixed suspensions consisting of CACs and NCFs. FAP-α was expressed in NCFs-CACs cocultures and xenograft tumors, whereas monocultures of NCFs or CACs were negative for FAP-α expression. Our findings provide evidence that the interaction between CACs and NCFs is essential for the tumorigenicity of cancer cells as well as for tumor propagation. PMID:26947885

  12. Aloe vera gel facilitates re-epithelialization of corneal alkali burn in normal and diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Atiba, Ayman; Wasfy, Tamer; Abdo, Walied; Ghoneim, Ahmed; Kamal, Tarek; Shukry, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the efficacy of topical applied aloe vera (AV) and to facilitate the repair of the standardized alkaline corneal ulcer in normal and diabetic rats. Materials and methods The corneal alkali-burn injury model was established unilaterally in Wistar rats by filter paper saturated with 0.01 M NaOH contacting the eyes for 45 seconds. Rats were divided into four groups: normal control (NC), normal AV (NAV), diabetic control (DC), and diabetic AV (DAV). NAV and DAV groups were treated with AV gel eye drops four times daily, and NC and DC groups were treated with normal saline for 3 days. Corneal epithelial wound closure and degree of edema were recorded using slit lamp and optical coherence tomography at 0, 24, 48, and 72 hours postwounding. Histological examination was conducted to evaluate the degree of inflammation and the healing effect. Results Corneal epithelial wound healing was better in the NAV group than in the NC group, and it was significantly higher in the DAV group than in the DC group (P<0.05). In comparison to the DC group, DAV treated with AV demonstrated a marked reduction in edema at 48 and 72 hours. Histologically, corneal re-epithelialization was complete and higher in DAV group than that in DC group; moreover, the inflammatory cells were increased in DC group than DAV group (P<0.05). Conclusion This study demonstrated the efficacy of AV for enhanced corneal re-epithelialization, as well as reduced inflammatory response after alkali burn in rats; therefore, it could be useful as a therapy for diabetic keratopathy. PMID:26604672

  13. Analysis of normal and diseased colon mucosa using ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boustany, Nada N.; Manoharan, Ramasamy; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    1996-04-01

    Ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy was used to characterize normal and diseased colon mucosa in vitro. A tunable mode-locked Titanium:Sapphire laser operating at 76 MHz was used to irradiate normal and diseased colon tissue samples with 251 nm light generated from the third harmonic of the fundamental radiation. The Raman scattered light was collected and analyzed using a 1 meter spectrometer fitted with a UV coated, liquid nitrogen cooled CCD detector. The measured spectra show prominent bands that correspond to those of known tissue constituents including nucleic acids, aromatic amino acids and lipids. Using the Raman lineshapes measured from pure solutions of nucleotides, tryptophan, tyrosine, FAD, and from lipid-rich serosal fat, the colon spectra were modeled by a least square fitting algorithm whereby the colon spectra were assumed to be a linear combination of the pure biochemical lineshapes. The relative Raman scattering cross section of each biochemical was determined so that the relative concentration of each compound with respect to the others, could be extracted from a given tissue spectrum.

  14. Comprehensive site-specific whole genome profiling of stromal and epithelial colonic gene signatures in human sigmoid colon and rectal tissue.

    PubMed

    Knight, Jason M; Kim, Eunji; Ivanov, Ivan; Davidson, Laurie A; Goldsby, Jennifer S; Hullar, Meredith A J; Randolph, Timothy W; Kaz, Andrew M; Levy, Lisa; Lampe, Johanna W; Chapkin, Robert S

    2016-09-01

    The strength of associations between various exposures (e.g., diet, tobacco, chemopreventive agents) and colorectal cancer risk may partially depend on the complex interaction between epithelium and stroma across anatomic subsites. Currently, baseline data describing genome-wide coding and long noncoding gene expression profiles in the healthy colon specific to tissue type and location are lacking. Therefore, colonic mucosal biopsies from 10 healthy participants who were enrolled in a clinical study to evaluate effects of lignan supplementation on gut resiliency were used to characterize the site-specific global gene expression signatures associated with stromal vs. epithelial cells in the sigmoid colon and rectum. Using RNA-seq, we demonstrate that tissue type and location patterns of gene expression and upstream regulatory pathways are distinct. For example, consistent with a key role of stroma in the crypt niche, mRNAs associated with immunoregulatory and inflammatory processes (i.e., CXCL14, ANTXR1), smooth muscle contraction (CALD1), proliferation and apoptosis (GLP2R, IGFBP3), and modulation of extracellular matrix (MMP2, COL3A1, MFAP4) were all highly expressed in the stroma. In comparison, HOX genes (HOXA3, HOXD9, HOXD10, HOXD11, and HOXD-AS2, a HOXD cluster antisense RNA 2), and WNT5B expression were also significantly higher in sigmoid colon compared with the rectum. These findings provide strong impetus for considering colorectal tissue subtypes and location in future observational studies and clinical trials designed to evaluate the effects of exposures on colonic health.

  15. Comprehensive site-specific whole genome profiling of stromal and epithelial colonic gene signatures in human sigmoid colon and rectal tissue.

    PubMed

    Knight, Jason M; Kim, Eunji; Ivanov, Ivan; Davidson, Laurie A; Goldsby, Jennifer S; Hullar, Meredith A J; Randolph, Timothy W; Kaz, Andrew M; Levy, Lisa; Lampe, Johanna W; Chapkin, Robert S

    2016-09-01

    The strength of associations between various exposures (e.g., diet, tobacco, chemopreventive agents) and colorectal cancer risk may partially depend on the complex interaction between epithelium and stroma across anatomic subsites. Currently, baseline data describing genome-wide coding and long noncoding gene expression profiles in the healthy colon specific to tissue type and location are lacking. Therefore, colonic mucosal biopsies from 10 healthy participants who were enrolled in a clinical study to evaluate effects of lignan supplementation on gut resiliency were used to characterize the site-specific global gene expression signatures associated with stromal vs. epithelial cells in the sigmoid colon and rectum. Using RNA-seq, we demonstrate that tissue type and location patterns of gene expression and upstream regulatory pathways are distinct. For example, consistent with a key role of stroma in the crypt niche, mRNAs associated with immunoregulatory and inflammatory processes (i.e., CXCL14, ANTXR1), smooth muscle contraction (CALD1), proliferation and apoptosis (GLP2R, IGFBP3), and modulation of extracellular matrix (MMP2, COL3A1, MFAP4) were all highly expressed in the stroma. In comparison, HOX genes (HOXA3, HOXD9, HOXD10, HOXD11, and HOXD-AS2, a HOXD cluster antisense RNA 2), and WNT5B expression were also significantly higher in sigmoid colon compared with the rectum. These findings provide strong impetus for considering colorectal tissue subtypes and location in future observational studies and clinical trials designed to evaluate the effects of exposures on colonic health. PMID:27401218

  16. TNFα/IFNγ Mediated Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction Is Attenuated by MicroRNA-93 Downregulation of PTK6 in Mouse Colonic Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Beard, Richard S.; Eitner, Rebecca A.; Chen, Liwei; Wu, Mack H.

    2016-01-01

    Since inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) represent significant morbidity and mortality in the US, the need for defining novel drug targets and inflammatory mechanisms would be of considerable benefit. Although protein tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6, also known as breast tumor kinase BRK) has been primarily studied in an oncogenic context, it was noted that PTK6 null mice exhibited significantly enhanced colonic epithelial barrier function. Considering that the inflammatory functions of PTK6 have not yet been explored, we hypothesized that cytokines responsible for mediating IBD, such as TNFα/IFNγ, may solicit the action of PTK6 to alter barrier function. After first assessing critical mediators of TNFα/IFNγ driven epithelial barrier dysfunction, we further explored the possibility of PTK6 in this inflammatory context. In this report, we showed that PTK6 siRNA and PTK6 null young adult mouse colonic epithelial cells (YAMC) exhibited significant attenuation of TNFα/IFNγ induced barrier dysfunction as measured by electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) assay and permeability assays. In addition, PTK6 null cells transfected with PTK6 cDNA displayed restored barrier dysfunction in response to TNFα/IFNγ, while the cells transfected with vector alone showed similar attenuation of barrier dysfunction. Furthermore, using subcellular fractionation and immunocytochemistry experiments, we found that PTK6 plays a role in FoxO1 nuclear accumulation leading to down-regulation of claudin-3, a tight junction protein. Moreover, we searched for relevant miRNA candidates putative for targeting PTK6 in order to identify and assess the impact of microRNA that target PTK6 with respect to TNFα/IFNγ induced barrier dysfunction. Subsequently, we assayed likely targets and determined their effectiveness in attenuating PTK6 expression as well as cytokine induced barrier dysfunction. Results showed that miR-93 reduced PTK6 expression and attenuated TNFα/IFNγ imposed decrease in

  17. Ultrasonic differentiation of normal versus malignant breast epithelial cells in monolayer cultures

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Timothy E.; Goodrich, Jeffrey B.; Ambrose, Brady J.; Patel, Hemang; Kwon, Soonjo; Pearson, Lee H.

    2010-01-01

    Normal and malignant mammary epithelial cells were studied using laboratory measurements, wavelet analysis, and numerical simulations of monolayer cell cultures to determine whether microscopic breast cancer can be detected in vitro with high-frequency ultrasound. Pulse-echo waveforms were acquired by immersing a broadband, unfocused 50-MHz transducer in the growth media of cell culture well plates and collecting the first reflection from the well bottoms. The simulations included a multilayer pulse-reflection model and a model of two-dimensional arrays of spherical cells and nuclei. The results show that normal and malignant cells produce time-domain signals and spectral features that are significantly different. PMID:21110531

  18. Pre-existing Epithelial Diversity in Normal Human Livers: A Tissue-tethered Cytometric Analysis in Portal/Periportal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Isse, Kumiko; Lesniak, Andrew; Grama, Kedar; Maier, John; Specht, Susan; Castillo-Rama, Marcela; Lunz, John; Roysam, Badrinath; Michalopoulos, George; Demetris, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Routine light microscopy identifies two distinct epithelial cell populations in normal human livers: hepatocytes and biliary epithelial cells (BEC). Considerable epithelial diversity, however, arises during disease states when a variety of hepatocyte-BEC hybrid cells appear. This has been attributed to activation and differentiation of putative hepatic progenitor cells (HPC) residing in the Canals of Hering and/or metaplasia of pre-existing mature epithelial cells. A novel analytic approach consisting of multiplex labeling, high resolution whole slide imaging (WSI), and automated image analysis was used to determine if more complex epithelial cell phenotypes pre-existed in normal adult human livers, which might provide an alternative explanation for disease-induced epithelial diversity. “Virtually digested” WSI enabled quantitative cytometric analyses of individual cells displayed in a variety of formats (e.g. scatter plots) while still tethered to the WSI and tissue structure. We employed biomarkers specifically-associated with mature epithelial forms (HNF4α for hepatocytes, CK19 and HNF1β for BEC) and explored for the presence of cells with hybrid biomarker phenotypes. Results showed abundant hybrid cells in portal bile duct BEC, canals of Hering, and immediate periportal hepatocytes. These bi-potential cells likely serve as a reservoir for the epithelial diversity of ductular reactions, appearance of hepatocytes in bile ducts, and the rapid and fluid transition of BEC to hepatocytes, and vice versa. Conclusion Novel imaging and computational tools enable increased information extraction from tissue samples and quantify the considerable pre-existent hybrid epithelial diversity in normal human liver. This computationally-enabled tissue analysis approach offers much broader potential beyond the results presented here. PMID:23150208

  19. Inhibition of TGF-β signaling in normal lung epithelial cells confers resistance to ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Anna; Zagurovskaya, Marianna; Gupta, Seema; Shareef, Mohammed M.; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Ahmed, Mansoor M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To address the functional role of radiation-induced TGF-β signaling in normal epithelial background, we selected spontaneously immortalized lung epithelial cell line derived from the normal lung tissue of dominant-negative mutant of TGF-β RII (ΔRII) transgenic mouse that expressed conditionally ΔRII under the control of metallothionein promoter (MT-1) and assessed it's impact on radio-sensitivity. Method and Materials Spontaneously immortalized lung epithelial cell culture (SILECC) was established and all analyses were performed within 50 passages. Colony-forming and TUNEL assays were used to assess the clonogenic inhibition and apoptosis respectively. Western blot analysis was performed to assess the kinetics of p21, bax and RII proteins. TGF-β responsive promoter activity was measured using dual-luciferase reporter assay. Results Exposure to ZnSO4 inhibited TGF-β signaling induced either by recombinant TGF-β1 or ionizing radiation. SILECC treated either with ZnSO4 or neutralizing antibody against TGF-β showed a significant increase in radio-resistance when compared to untreated cells. Furthermore, the expression of the ΔRII inhibited the radiation-induced up-regulation of the TGF-β effector gene p21waf1/cip1.. Conclusions Our findings imply that inhibition of radiation-induced TGF-β signaling via abrogation of RII function enhances radio-resistance of the normal lung epithelial cells, and this can be directly attributed to the loss of TGF-β signaling function. PMID:17448872

  20. Differentiation of normal and cultured preneoplastic tracheal epithellal cells in rats: importance of epithelial mesenchymal interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Terzaghi, M.; Klein-Szanto, A.J.P.

    1980-11-01

    Changes in the dependence on mesenchymal tissues for survival and differentiation in inbred F344 female rats were investigated in tracheal epithelial cells exposed to 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). Fresh suspensions of normal tracheal epithelium or cultured preneoplastic cells were inoculated into isolated organ segments (trachea, esophagus, bladder, or small intestine) or into Dacron containers that were then implanted subdermally into isogenic recipients. At various times after cell inoculation and implantation, tissues were removed for histologic evaluation. Normal cells inoculated into frozen-thawed trachea, esophagus, bladder, and intestine yielded a regular mucociliary epithelium. Normal cell inocula did not, however, survive in trachea previously heated (100/sup 0/C), fixed in ethanol, or digested with collagenese; nor did normal cells survive in Dacron containers unless tracheal fibroblasts plus epithelial cells were inoculated together. DMBA- and TPA-exposed cell populations with increased growth capacity in vitro survived and differentiated on all of the above substrates. For survival and differentiation in vivo, preneoplastic cells appeared to have less stringent substrate requirements than did normal cells. Application of the described techniques to the study of changes occurring early in the development of neoplastic disease is discussed.

  1. Nitric oxide regulation of colonic epithelial ion transport: a novel role for enteric glia in the myenteric plexus.

    PubMed

    MacEachern, Sarah J; Patel, Bhavik A; McKay, Derek M; Sharkey, Keith A

    2011-07-01

    Enteric glia are increasingly recognized as important in the regulation of a variety of gastrointestinal functions.Here we tested the hypothesis that nicotinic signalling in the myenteric plexus results in the release of nitric oxide (NO) from neurons and enteric glia to modulate epithelial ion transport. Ion transport was assessed using full-thickness or muscle-stripped segments of mouse colon mounted in Ussing chambers. The cell-permeant NO-sensitive dye DAR-4M AM and amperometry were utilized to identify the cellular sites of NO production within the myenteric plexus and the contributions from specific NOS isoforms. Nicotinic receptors were localized using immunohistochemistry. Nicotinic cholinergic stimulation of colonic segments resulted in NO-dependent changes in epithelial active electrogenic ion transport that were TTX sensitive and significantly altered in the absence of the myenteric plexus. Nicotinic stimulation of the myenteric plexus resulted in NO production and release from neurons and enteric glia, which was completely blocked in the presence of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) I and NOS II inhibitors. Using the NO scavenger 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (PTIO), neuronal and enteric glial components of NO production were demonstrated. Nicotinic receptors were identified on enteric neurons, which express NOS I, and enteric glia, which express NOS II. These data identify a unique pathway in the mouse colon whereby nicotinic cholinergic signalling in myenteric ganglia mobilizes NO from NOS II in enteric glia, which in coordinated activity with neurons in the myenteric plexus modulates epithelial ion transport, a key component of homeostasis and innate immunity.

  2. Intestinal epithelial HuR modulates distinct pathways of proliferation and apoptosis and attenuates small intestinal and colonic tumor development.

    PubMed

    Giammanco, Antonina; Blanc, Valerie; Montenegro, Grace; Klos, Coen; Xie, Yan; Kennedy, Susan; Luo, Jianyang; Chang, Sung-Hee; Hla, Timothy; Nalbantoglu, Ilke; Dharmarajan, Sekhar; Davidson, Nicholas O

    2014-09-15

    HuR is a ubiquitous nucleocytoplasmic RNA-binding protein that exerts pleiotropic effects on cell growth and tumorigenesis. In this study, we explored the impact of conditional, tissue-specific genetic deletion of HuR on intestinal growth and tumorigenesis in mice. Mice lacking intestinal expression of HuR (Hur (IKO) mice) displayed reduced levels of cell proliferation in the small intestine and increased sensitivity to doxorubicin-induced acute intestinal injury, as evidenced by decreased villus height and a compensatory shift in proliferating cells. In the context of Apc(min/+) mice, a transgenic model of intestinal tumorigenesis, intestinal deletion of the HuR gene caused a three-fold decrease in tumor burden characterized by reduced proliferation, increased apoptosis, and decreased expression of transcripts encoding antiapoptotic HuR target RNAs. Similarly, Hur(IKO) mice subjected to an inflammatory colon carcinogenesis protocol [azoxymethane and dextran sodium sulfate (AOM-DSS) administration] exhibited a two-fold decrease in tumor burden. Hur(IKO) mice showed no change in ileal Asbt expression, fecal bile acid excretion, or enterohepatic pool size that might explain the phenotype. Moreover, none of the HuR targets identified in Apc(min/+)Hur(IKO) were altered in AOM-DSS-treated Hur(IKO) mice, the latter of which exhibited increased apoptosis of colonic epithelial cells, where elevation of a unique set of HuR-targeted proapoptotic factors was documented. Taken together, our results promote the concept of epithelial HuR as a contextual modifier of proapoptotic gene expression in intestinal cancers, acting independently of bile acid metabolism to promote cancer. In the small intestine, epithelial HuR promotes expression of prosurvival transcripts that support Wnt-dependent tumorigenesis, whereas in the large intestine epithelial HuR indirectly downregulates certain proapoptotic RNAs to attenuate colitis-associated cancer. Cancer Res; 74(18); 5322-35. ©2014 AACR.

  3. Inhibition of microRNA-31-5p protects human colonic epithelial cells against ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Bum; Zhang, Lu; Barron, Summer; Shay, Jerry W.

    2014-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), endogenous non-coding small RNAs, are sensitive to environmental changes, and their differential expression is important for adaptation to the environment. However, application of miRNAs as a clinical prognostic or diagnostic tool remains unproven. In this study we demonstrate a chronic/persistent change of miRNAs from the plasma of a colorectal cancer susceptible mouse model (CPC;Apc) about 250 days after exposure to a simulated solar particle event (SPE). Differentially expressed miRNAs were identified compared to unirradiated control mice, including miR-31-5p, which we investigated further. To address the cellular function of miR-31-5p, we transfected a miR-31-5p mimic (sense) or inhibitor (antisense) into immortalized human colonic epithelial cells followed by gamma-irradiation. A miR-31-5p mimic sensitized but a miR-31-5p inhibitor protected colonic epithelial cells against radiation induced killing. We found that the miR-31-5p mimic inhibited the induction of hMLH1 expression after irradiation, whereas the miR-31-5p inhibitor increased the basal level of hMLH1 expression. The miR-31-5p inhibitor failed to modulate radiosensitivity in an hMLH1-deficient HCT116 colon cancer cell line but protected HCT116 3-6 and DLD-1 (both hMLH1-positive) colon cancer cell lines. Our findings demonstrate that miR-31-5p has an important role in radiation responses through regulation of hMLH1 expression. Targeting this pathway could be a promising therapeutic strategy for future personalized anti-cancer radiotherapy.

  4. Discriminating adenocarcinoma from normal colonic mucosa through deconvolution of Raman spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambraia Lopes, Patricia; Moreira, Joaquim Agostinho; Almeida, Abilio; Esteves, Artur; Gregora, Ivan; Ledinsky, Martin; Lopes, Jose Machado; Henrique, Rui; Oliveira, Albino

    2011-12-01

    In this work, we considered the feasibility of Raman spectroscopy for discriminating between adenocarcinomatous and normal mucosal formalin-fixed colonic tissues. Unlike earlier studies in colorectal cancer, a spectral deconvolution model was implemented to derive spectral information. Eleven samples of human colon were used, and 55 spectra were analyzed. Each spectrum was resolved into 25 bands from 975 to 1720 cm-1, where modes of proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids are observed. From a comparative study of band intensities, those presenting higher differences between tissue types were correlated to biochemical assignments. Results from fitting procedure were further used as inputs for linear discriminant analysis, where combinations of band intensities and intensity ratios were tested, yielding accuracies up to 81%. This analysis yields objective discriminating parameters after fitting optimization. The bands with higher diagnosis relevance detected by spectra deconvolution enable to confine the study to some spectral regions instead of broader ranges. A critical view upon limitations of this approach is presented, along with a comparison of our results to earlier ones obtained in fresh colonic tissues. This enabled to assess the effect of formalin fixation in colonic tissues, and determine its relevance in the present analysis.

  5. Four carcinoembryonic antigen subfamily members, CEA, NCA, BGP and CGM2, selectively expressed in the normal human colonic epithelium, are integral components of the fuzzy coat.

    PubMed

    Frängsmyr, L; Baranov, V; Hammarström, S

    1999-01-01

    To elucidate which of the seven transcriptionally active genes of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) subfamily are expressed in human colon, we first examined mRNA expression using reverse transcriptase PCR. The result showed the CEA, nonspecific crossreacting antigen 50/90 (NCA), biliary glycoprotein (BGP), and carcinoembryonic antigen gene family member 2 (CGM2) mRNAs were expressed in the colon. To determine the cellular sources of these members within normal colonic mucosa, in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry were then performed. CEA and NCA mRNAs were clearly detectable in the cytoplasm of columnar and goblet cells at the free luminal surface and the upper crypts with low hybridization in the mid crypt and the crypt base. In contrast, BGP and CGM2 mRNAs were restricted only to columnar cells at the upper third of the crypts and the luminal surface. Colon epithelium expression of CEA, NCA, BGP and CGM2 coincided with that of corresponding mRNAs. Ultrastructurally, CEA, NCA, BGP and CGM2 were localized mainly to the apical surface glycocalyx, the fuzzy coat, of columnar cells. Interestingly, these molecules were localized in different microdomains within the fuzzy coat. Furthermore, BGP was highly expressed in the fuzzy coat of cryptal caveolated cells. As integral components of the fuzzy coat, CEA, NCA, BGP and CGM2 can hardly function as intercellular adhesion molecules; they possibly play an important role in epithelial-microbial interactions.

  6. Progesterone facilitates chromosome instability (aneuploidy) in p53 null normal mammary epithelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goepfert, T. M.; McCarthy, M.; Kittrell, F. S.; Stephens, C.; Ullrich, R. L.; Brinkley, B. R.; Medina, D.

    2000-01-01

    Mammary epithelial cells from p53 null mice have been shown recently to exhibit an increased risk for tumor development. Hormonal stimulation markedly increased tumor development in p53 null mammary cells. Here we demonstrate that mammary tumors arising in p53 null mammary cells are highly aneuploid, with greater than 70% of the tumor cells containing altered chromosome number and a mean chromosome number of 56. Normal mammary cells of p53 null genotype and aged less than 14 wk do not exhibit aneuploidy in primary cell culture. Significantly, the hormone progesterone, but not estrogen, increases the incidence of aneuploidy in morphologically normal p53 null mammary epithelial cells. Such cells exhibited 40% aneuploidy and a mean chromosome number of 54. The increase in aneuploidy measured in p53 null tumor cells or hormonally stimulated normal p53 null cells was not accompanied by centrosome amplification. These results suggest that normal levels of progesterone can facilitate chromosomal instability in the absence of the tumor suppressor gene, p53. The results support the emerging hypothesis based both on human epidemiological and animal model studies that progesterone markedly enhances mammary tumorigenesis.

  7. Wild-type and IL10-null mice have differential colonic epithelial gene expression responses to dietary supplementation with synbiotic Bifidobacterium animalis subspecies lactis and inulin.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Shiu-Ming; Chan, Wan-Chun; Hu, Zihua

    2014-03-01

    Prebiotic plus probiotic (synbiotic) supplementations promote fermentation and have shown anti-inflammatory activity in colonic epithelium. However, in many instances, patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have demonstrated adverse effects after prebiotic supplementation at a dose well tolerated by normal individuals. To test the hypothesis that the host inflammation affects the colonic epithelial response to increased fermentation, the gene expression of colonic epithelium was analyzed. In a 1-way experimental design to test the effect of supplements in wild-type mice using the standard diet formulated by the American Institute of Nutrition (AIN-93G) as the control diet, fermentable fiber inulin (5%) in the absence or presence of the probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis subspecies lactis (Bb12) (10(8) CFU/kg diet) showed limited effects on gene expression as determined by whole-genome microarray. Bb12 supplementation alone was known not to increase fermentation and here instead significantly upregulated genes in nucleic acid metabolic processes. The effects of the synbiotic diet were then determined in mice exposed to LPS-induced inflammation in a 2-way experimental design testing the effect of diet and LPS. The microarray and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses on the wild-type mice revealed that LPS-induced changes in the colonic epithelium were 4- to 10-fold less in the synbiotic diet group compared with the control diet group. Unlike the wild-type mice, anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 10 (IL10)-null mice (susceptible to IBD) given the synbiotic diet, compared with those given the control diet, had 3- to 40-fold increased expression of inflammation-related genes such as Cxcl1 (chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 1) and S100a9 (S100 calcium binding protein A9) in the absence and presence of LPS exposure. These contrasting intestinal epithelial responses to increased fermentation in wild-type and IL10-null mice are similar

  8. Diagnostic Challenges Caused by Endoscopic Biopsy of Colonic Polyps: A Systematic Evaluation of Epithelial Misplacement With Review of Problematic Polyps From the Bowel Cancer Screening Program, United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Panarelli, Nicole C; Somarathna, Thusitha; Samowitz, Wade S; Kornacki, Susan; Sanders, Scott A; Novelli, Marco R; Shepherd, Neil A; Yantiss, Rhonda K

    2016-08-01

    Endoscopic mucosal biopsy may misplace mucosal elements into the submucosa of colonic adenomas, mimicking invasive adenocarcinoma. Biopsy-related misplacement can be more challenging to recognize than typical misplaced epithelium (pseudoinvasion) in pedunculated polyps. We compared the features of 16 polyps with biopsy-related misplaced epithelium with those of 10 adenomas with pseudoinvasion and 10 adenomas with invasive adenocarcinoma and performed Ki67 and p53 immunostaining on all cases. Features of misplaced epithelium in polyps referred to the Bowel Cancer Screening Program Expert Board in the United Kingdom were also evaluated for the same morphologic features. Biopsy-related epithelial misplacement occurred in adenomas throughout the colon and often appeared infiltrative (69%), including epithelial cells singly dispersed within reactive fibroinflammatory stroma or granulation tissue (44%). Misplaced epithelium displayed only low-grade cytologic features and was associated with extruded mucin (75%), tattoo pigment (63%), and misplaced normal glands (38%); scant lamina propria and muscularis mucosae were often present (88% and 44%, respectively). Cases referred to the Bowel Cancer Screening Program Expert Board also contained infiltrative-appearing misplaced epithelium (91%) that was cytologically low grade (72%), contained nondysplastic glands (11%), and showed other signs of injury. In contrast, misplaced epithelium in pedunculated polyps always had a lobular contour with a rim of lamina propria, hemorrhage, and/or hemosiderin. Invasive carcinomas showed malignant cytology and desmoplasia; most (70%) lacked features of trauma. Ki67 and p53 staining was patchy and weak in the misplaced epithelium, whereas invasive carcinomas showed increased staining for one or both markers. Pathologists should be aware that endoscopically manipulated adenomas may contain misplaced epithelium that simulates malignancy. PMID:26975041

  9. CDDO-Me Protects Normal Lung and Breast Epithelial Cells but Not Cancer Cells from Radiation

    PubMed Central

    El-Ashmawy, Mariam; Delgado, Oliver; Cardentey, Agnelio; Wright, Woodring E.; Shay, Jerry W.

    2014-01-01

    Although radiation therapy is commonly used for treatment for many human diseases including cancer, ionizing radiation produces reactive oxygen species that can damage both cancer and healthy cells. Synthetic triterpenoids, including CDDO-Me, act as anti-inflammatory and antioxidant modulators primarily by inducing the transcription factor Nrf2 to activate downstream genes containing antioxidant response elements (AREs). In the present series of experiments, we determined if CDDO-Me can be used as a radioprotector in normal non-cancerous human lung and breast epithelial cells, in comparison to lung and breast cancer cell lines. A panel of normal non-cancerous, partially cancer progressed, and cancer cell lines from both lung and breast tissue was exposed to gamma radiation with and without pre-treatment with CDDO-Me. CDDO-Me was an effective radioprotector when given ∼18 hours before radiation in epithelial cells (average dose modifying factor (DMF) = 1.3), and Nrf2 function was necessary for CDDO-Me to exert these radioprotective effects. CDDO-Me did not protect cancer lines tested from radiation-induced cytotoxicity, nor did it protect experimentally transformed human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) with progressive oncogenic manipulations. CDDO-Me also protected human lymphocytes against radiation-induced DNA damage. A therapeutic window exists in which CDDO-Me protects normal cells from radiation by activating the Nrf2 pathway, but does not protect experimentally transformed or cancer cell lines. This suggests that use of this oral available, non-toxic class of drug can protect non-cancerous healthy cells during radiotherapy, resulting in better outcomes and less toxicity for patients. PMID:25536195

  10. CDDO-Me protects normal lung and breast epithelial cells but not cancer cells from radiation.

    PubMed

    El-Ashmawy, Mariam; Delgado, Oliver; Cardentey, Agnelio; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W

    2014-01-01

    Although radiation therapy is commonly used for treatment for many human diseases including cancer, ionizing radiation produces reactive oxygen species that can damage both cancer and healthy cells. Synthetic triterpenoids, including CDDO-Me, act as anti-inflammatory and antioxidant modulators primarily by inducing the transcription factor Nrf2 to activate downstream genes containing antioxidant response elements (AREs). In the present series of experiments, we determined if CDDO-Me can be used as a radioprotector in normal non-cancerous human lung and breast epithelial cells, in comparison to lung and breast cancer cell lines. A panel of normal non-cancerous, partially cancer progressed, and cancer cell lines from both lung and breast tissue was exposed to gamma radiation with and without pre-treatment with CDDO-Me. CDDO-Me was an effective radioprotector when given ∼18 hours before radiation in epithelial cells (average dose modifying factor (DMF) = 1.3), and Nrf2 function was necessary for CDDO-Me to exert these radioprotective effects. CDDO-Me did not protect cancer lines tested from radiation-induced cytotoxicity, nor did it protect experimentally transformed human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) with progressive oncogenic manipulations. CDDO-Me also protected human lymphocytes against radiation-induced DNA damage. A therapeutic window exists in which CDDO-Me protects normal cells from radiation by activating the Nrf2 pathway, but does not protect experimentally transformed or cancer cell lines. This suggests that use of this oral available, non-toxic class of drug can protect non-cancerous healthy cells during radiotherapy, resulting in better outcomes and less toxicity for patients.

  11. Analysis of differential protein expression in normal and neoplastic human breast epithelial cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.; Chubb, C.; Huberman, E.; Giometti, C.S.

    1997-07-01

    High resolution two dimensional get electrophoresis (2DE) and database analysis was used to establish protein expression patterns for cultured normal human mammary epithelial cells and thirteen breast cancer cell lines. The Human Breast Epithelial Cell database contains the 2DE protein patterns, including relative protein abundances, for each cell line, plus a composite pattern that contains all the common and specifically expressed proteins from all the cell lines. Significant differences in protein expression, both qualitative and quantitative, were observed not only between normal cells and tumor cells, but also among the tumor cell lines. Eight percent of the consistently detected proteins were found in significantly (P < 0.001) variable levels among the cell lines. Using a combination of immunostaining, comigration with purified protein, subcellular fractionation, and amino-terminal protein sequencing, we identified a subset of the differentially expressed proteins. These identified proteins include the cytoskeletal proteins actin, tubulin, vimentin, and cytokeratins. The cell lines can be classified into four distinct groups based on their intermediate filament protein profile. We also identified heat shock proteins; hsp27, hsp60, and hsp70 varied in abundance and in some cases in the relative phosphorylation levels among the cell lines. Finally, we identified IMP dehydrogenase in each of the cell lines, and found the levels of this enzyme in the tumor cell lines elevated 2- to 20-fold relative to the levels in normal cells.

  12. Sensitivity to radiation of human normal, hyperthyroid, and neoplastic thyroid epithelial cells in primary culture

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.C.; Hiraoka, T.; Kopecky, K.J.; Nakamura, N.; Jones, M.P.; Ito, T.; Clifton, K.H.

    1987-07-01

    Samples of thyroid tissue removed surgically from 63 patients were cultured in vitro and exposed to X irradiation to investigate the radiosensitivities of various types of thyroid epithelial cells. A total of 76 samples were obtained, including neoplastic cells from patients with papillary carcinoma (PC) or follicular adenoma (FA), cells from hyperthyroidism (HY) patients, and normal cells from the surgical margins of PC and FA patients. Culturing of the cells was performed in a manner which has been shown to yield a predominance of epithelial cells. Results of colony formation assays indicated that cells from HY and FA patients were the least radiosensitive: when adjusted to the overall geometric mean plating efficiency of 5.5%, the average mean lethal dose Do was 97.6 cGy for HY cells and 96.7 and 94.3 cGy, respectively for neoplastic and normal cells from FA patients. Cells from PC patients were more radiosensitive, normal cells having an adjusted average Do of 85.0 cGy and PC cells a significantly lower average Do of 74.4 cGy. After allowing for this variation by cell type, in vitro radiosensitivity was not significantly related to age at surgery or sex. These results suggest that malignant thyroid cells may be especially radiosensitive.

  13. Human papilloma virus DNAs immortalize normal human mammary epithelial cells and reduce their growth factor requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Band, V.; Zajchowski, D.; Kulesa, V.; Sager, R. )

    1990-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) types 16 and 18 are most commonly associated with cervical carcinoma in patients and induce immortalization of human keratinocytes in culture. HPV has not been associated with breast cancer. This report describes the immortalization of normal human mammary epithelial cells (76N) by plasmid pHPV18 or pHPV16, each containing the linearized viral genome. Transfectants were grown continuously for more than 60 passages, whereas 76N cells senesce after 18-20 passages. The transfectants also differ from 76N cells in cloning in a completely defined medium called D2 and growing a minimally supplemented defined medium (D3) containing epidermal growth factor. All transfectant tested contain integrated HPV DNA, express HPV RNA, and produce HPV E7 protein. HPV transfectants do not form tumors in a nude mouse assay. It is concluded that products of the HPV genome induce immortalization of human breast epithelial cells and reduce their growth factor requirements. This result raises the possibility that HPV might be involved in breast cancer. Furthermore, other tissue-specific primary epithelial cells that are presently difficult to grown and investigate may also be immortalized by HPV.

  14. Transfection of normal human bronchial epithelial cells with the bcl-2 oncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C.H.; Kenyon, K.D.; Tesfaigzi, J.

    1995-12-01

    In vitro, studies examining the transformation of virus-immortalized human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells after exposure to chemical and physical carcinogens have contributed to our understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the development of lung cancer. Virus-immortalized HBE cells have been used because of both the limited life span of normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells in culture (approximately 30-35 population doublins) and their resistance to in vitro malignant transformation. For example, human papillomavirus (HPV)-immortalized HBE cells have been used to study the genetic changes that occur after exposure to {alpha}-particles in vitro. Although this model may prove to be useful for studying the 18% or less of bronchogenic carcinomas found to contain HPV sequences, it is not an appropriate model for studying the majority of lung epithelial malignancies in which HPV DNA is not detected. This view is supported by the fact that HPV-immortalized cell lines commonly exhibit aneuploidy. This results of this study suggest that: (1) NHBE cells can be transiently transfected with the pCMV{Beta} vector; and (2) the antibiotic hygromycin-resistant transfected cells.

  15. Adipocyte differentiation influences the proliferation and migration of normal and tumoral breast epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Creydt, Virginia Pistone; Sacca, Paula Alejandra; Tesone, Amelia Julieta; Vidal, Luciano; Calvo, Juan Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Stromal tissue regulates the development and differentiation of breast epithelial cells, with adipocytes being the main stromal cell type. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of adipocyte differentiation on proliferation and migration, as well as to assess the activity of heparanase and metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), in normal (NMuMG) and tumoral (LM3) murine breast epithelial cells. NMuMG and LM3 cells were grown on irradiated 3T3-L1 cells (stromal support, SS) at various degrees of differentiation [preadipocytes (preA), poorly differentiated adipocytes (pDA) and mature adipocytes (MA)] and/or were incubated in the presence of conditioned medium (CM) derived from each of these three types of differentiated cells. Cells grown on a plastic support or in fresh medium served as the controls. Cell proliferation was measured with a commercial colorimetric kit, and the motility of the epithelial cells was evaluated by means of a wound-healing assay. Heparanase activity was assessed by quantifying heparin degradation, and the expression of MMP-9 was determined using Western blotting. The results indicate that cell proliferation was increased after 24 and 48 h in the NMuMG and LM3 cells grown on preA, pDA and MA SS. In the NMuMG cells cultured on SS in the presence of all three types of CM, proliferation was enhanced. LM3 cell migration was increased in the presence of all three types of CM and in cells grown on preA SS. Heparanase activity was increased in the NMuMG cells incubated with all three types of CM, and in the LM3 cells incubated with the CM from pDA and MA. Both the NMuMG and LM3 cell lines presented basal expression of MMP-9; however, a significant increase in MMP-9 expression was observed in the LM3 cells incubated with each of the three types of CM. In conclusion, adipocyte differentiation influences normal and tumoral breast epithelial cell proliferation and migration. Heparanase and MMP-9 appear to be involved in this regulation. The

  16. Autofluorescence of normal and tumor mucosa of human colon: a comprehensive analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottiroli, Giovanni F.; Marchesini, Renato; Croce, Anna C.; Dal Fante, Marco; Cuzzoni, Carolina; Di Palma, Silvana; Spinelli, Pasquale

    1993-08-01

    Both 'in vivo' and 'ex vivo' spectrofluorometric studies of neoplastic and non-neoplastic mucosa of human colon have been carried out, in order to verify the potentials of tissue natural fluorescence as a possible parameter to distinguish normal from diseased tissues, Spectrofluorometric analysis performed at colonoscopy on patients affected by neoplasia, showed that adenocarcinoma, adenoma and non-neoplastic mucosa differ in the fluorescence emissions. The results have been interpreted according to the data obtained on cryostatic sections from biopsies by means of a microspectrofluorometric analysis carried out on each histological component.

  17. RSPO2 enriches LGR5+ spheroid colon cancer stem cells and promotes its metastasis by epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shi; Han, Xiaoyan; Wei, Bo; Fang, Jiafeng; Wei, Hongbo

    2016-01-01

    Colon cancer stem cells (CCSCs) account for the tumorigenicity of colon cancer and promote its progression and metastasis. RSPO2, the agonist of canonical Wnt/beta-catenin pathway and serves as the growth factor of intestinal stem cells (ISCs), is considered playing an important role in CCSCs. However, the specific function of RSPO2 in CCSCs remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that RSPO2 was highly expressed in CCSCs-enriched HCT116 spheroid cells. Elevates the concentration of RSPO2 in medium in favor of enriching the LGR5+ cells and increasing the LGR5 expression in HCT116 spheroid cells, meanwhile silencing of RSPO2 by small interfering RNA inhibits LGR5 expression in HCT116 spheroid cells. In addition, RSPO2 promotes spheres formation but has little effect on the proliferation of HCT116 spheroid cells in vitro. Moreover, RSPO2 also promotes the invasion of HCT116 spheroid cells through enhancing Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). These findings suggests that RSPO2 is a potential growth factor for CCSCs, helps enriching the CCSCs by serum-free DMEM/F12 medium (SFM) culture and plays a vital role in the metastasis of colon cancer. PMID:27158331

  18. The cinnamon-derived dietary factor cinnamic aldehyde activates the Nrf2-dependent antioxidant response in human epithelial colon cells.

    PubMed

    Wondrak, Georg Thomas; Villeneuve, Nicole F; Lamore, Sarah D; Bause, Alexandra S; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Donna D

    2010-05-07

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of tumor-related morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recent research suggests that pharmacological intervention using dietary factors that activate the redox sensitive Nrf2/Keap1-ARE signaling pathway may represent a promising strategy for chemoprevention of human cancer including CRC. In our search for dietary Nrf2 activators with potential chemopreventive activity targeting CRC, we have focused our studies on trans-cinnamic aldehyde (cinnamaldeyde, CA), the key flavor compound in cinnamon essential oil. Here we demonstrate that CA and an ethanolic extract (CE) prepared from Cinnamomum cassia bark, standardized for CA content by GC-MS analysis, display equipotent activity as inducers of Nrf2 transcriptional activity. In human colon cancer cells (HCT116, HT29) and non-immortalized primary fetal colon cells (FHC), CA- and CE-treatment upregulated cellular protein levels of Nrf2 and established Nrf2 targets involved in the antioxidant response including heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) and gamma-glutamyl-cysteine synthetase (gamma-GCS, catalytic subunit). CA- and CE-pretreatment strongly upregulated cellular glutathione levels and protected HCT116 cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced genotoxicity and arsenic-induced oxidative insult. Taken together our data demonstrate that the cinnamon-derived food factor CA is a potent activator of the Nrf2-orchestrated antioxidant response in cultured human epithelial colon cells. CA may therefore represent an underappreciated chemopreventive dietary factor targeting colorectal carcinogenesis.

  19. The Cinnamon-derived Dietary Factor Cinnamic Aldehyde Activates the Nrf2-dependent Antioxidant Response in Human Epithelial Colon Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wondrak, Georg T.; Villeneuve, Nicole F.; Lamore, Sarah D.; Bause, Alexandra S.; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Donna D.

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of tumor-related morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recent research suggests that pharmacological intervention using dietary factors that activate the redox sensitive Nrf2/Keap1-ARE signaling pathway may represent a promising strategy for chemoprevention of human cancer including CRC. In our search for dietary Nrf2 activators with potential chemopreventive activity targeting CRC, we have focused our studies on trans-cinnamic aldehyde (cinnamaldeyde, CA), the key flavor compound in cinnamon essential oil. Here we demonstrate that CA and an ethanolic extract (CE) prepared from Cinnamomum cassia bark, standardized for CA content by GC-MS analysis, display equipotent activity as inducers of Nrf2 transcriptional activity. In human colon cancer cells (HCT116, HT29) and non-immortalized primary fetal colon cells (FHC), CA- and CE-treatment upregulated cellular protein levels of Nrf2 and established Nrf2 targets involved in the antioxidant response including heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) and γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS, catalytic subunit). CA- and CE-pretreatment strongly upregulated cellular glutathione levels and protected HCT116 cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced genotoxicity and arsenic-induced oxidative insult. Taken together our data demonstrate that the cinnamon-derived food factor CA is a potent activator of the Nrf2-orchestrated antioxidant response in cultured human epithelial colon cells. CA may therefore represent an underappreciated chemopreventive dietary factor targeting colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:20657484

  20. Surface modification of microparticles causes differential uptake responses in normal and tumoral human breast epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patiño, Tania; Soriano, Jorge; Barrios, Lleonard; Ibáñez, Elena; Nogués, Carme

    2015-06-01

    The use of micro- and nanodevices as multifunctional systems for biomedical applications has experienced an exponential growth during the past decades. Although a large number of studies have focused on the design and fabrication of new micro- and nanosystems capable of developing multiple functions, a deeper understanding of their interaction with cells is required. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of different microparticle surfaces on their interaction with normal and tumoral human breast epithelial cell lines. For this, AlexaFluor488 IgG functionalized polystyrene microparticles (3 μm) were coated with Polyethyleneimine (PEI) at two different molecular weights, 25 and 750 kDa. The effect of microparticle surface properties on cytotoxicity, cellular uptake and endocytic pathways were assessed for both normal and tumoral cell lines. Results showed a differential response between the two cell lines regarding uptake efficiency and mechanisms of endocytosis, highlighting the potential role of microparticle surface tunning for specific cell targeting.

  1. Differential sensitivity of normal and cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells to epinephrine.

    PubMed

    Goncz, K K; Feeney, L; Gruenert, D C

    1999-09-01

    1. Exposure to epinephrine has been shown to have a range of effects on cells and tissues. A recent study suggested that the proliferative ability of CF epithelial cells, exposed to high concentrations of epinephrine (200 - 300 microM), was reduced when compared to that of normal cells. This approach could potentially provide a means to effectively separate cells with functional cyclic AMP-dependent Cl-ion transport from those defective in this pathway. 2. The sensitivity to killing by epinephrine is reported here for four different CF cell lines, three normal cell lines, and two CF epithelial cell lines complemented with wild-type (wt) CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) cDNA. 3. While each cell line exhibited varying sensitivity to 200 microM epinephrine, no predictable pattern was observed between the expression of wt-CFTR and cell survival following epinephrine exposure. Overall, normal cell lines did exhibit a greater resistance to epinephrine-induced cell death although, the most resistant cell line was derived from CF tracheal epithelium (SigmaCFTE29o-). 4. The expression of exogenous wt-CFTR increased the survival of one cell line (CFDEo-) when compared to the parent line, but in another complemented line, survival was reduced. 5. These findings suggest that while epinephrine induces cell killing, it is not consistently effective for preferential selection of normal over CF cells. Although CFTR may play a role in the mechanism(s) of epinephrine killing, other factors such as cell density, proliferative ability, cell type origin and phenotype are involved.

  2. Acute toxicity of silver and carbon nanoaerosols to normal and cystic fibrosis human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jeannet, Natalie; Fierz, Martin; Schneider, Sarah; Künzi, Lisa; Baumlin, Nathalie; Salathe, Matthias; Burtscher, Heinz; Geiser, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation of engineered nanoparticles (NP) poses a still unknown risk. Individuals with chronic lung diseases are expected to be more vulnerable to adverse effects of NP than normal subjects, due to altered respiratory structures and functions. Realistic and dose-controlled aerosol exposures were performed using the deposition chamber NACIVT. Well-differentiated normal and cystic fibrosis (CF) human bronchial epithelia (HBE) with established air-liquid interface and the human bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B were exposed to spark-generated silver and carbon nanoaerosols (20 nm diameter) at three different doses. Necrotic and apoptotic cell death, pro-inflammatory response, epithelial function and morphology were assessed within 24 h after aerosol exposure. NP exposure resulted in significantly higher necrosis in CF than normal HBE and BEAS-2B cells. Before and after NP treatment, CF HBE had higher caspase-3 activity and secreted more IL-6 and MCP-1 than normal HBE. Differentiated HBE had higher baseline secretion of IL-8 and less caspase-3 activity and MCP-1 secretion compared to BEAS-2B cells. These biomarkers increased moderately in response to NP exposure, except for MCP-1, which was reduced in HBE after AgNP treatment. No functional and structural alterations of the epithelia were observed in response to NP exposure. Significant differences between cell models suggest that more than one and fully differentiated HBE should be used in future toxicity studies of NP in vitro. Our findings support epidemiologic evidence that subjects with chronic airway diseases are more vulnerable to adverse effects of particulate air pollution. Thus, this sub-population needs to be included in nano-toxicity studies. PMID:26011645

  3. Acute toxicity of silver and carbon nanoaerosols to normal and cystic fibrosis human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jeannet, Natalie; Fierz, Martin; Schneider, Sarah; Künzi, Lisa; Baumlin, Nathalie; Salathe, Matthias; Burtscher, Heinz; Geiser, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation of engineered nanoparticles (NP) poses a still unknown risk. Individuals with chronic lung diseases are expected to be more vulnerable to adverse effects of NP than normal subjects, due to altered respiratory structures and functions. Realistic and dose-controlled aerosol exposures were performed using the deposition chamber NACIVT. Well-differentiated normal and cystic fibrosis (CF) human bronchial epithelia (HBE) with established air-liquid interface and the human bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B were exposed to spark-generated silver and carbon nanoaerosols (20 nm diameter) at three different doses. Necrotic and apoptotic cell death, pro-inflammatory response, epithelial function and morphology were assessed within 24 h after aerosol exposure. NP exposure resulted in significantly higher necrosis in CF than normal HBE and BEAS-2B cells. Before and after NP treatment, CF HBE had higher caspase-3 activity and secreted more IL-6 and MCP-1 than normal HBE. Differentiated HBE had higher baseline secretion of IL-8 and less caspase-3 activity and MCP-1 secretion compared to BEAS-2B cells. These biomarkers increased moderately in response to NP exposure, except for MCP-1, which was reduced in HBE after AgNP treatment. No functional and structural alterations of the epithelia were observed in response to NP exposure. Significant differences between cell models suggest that more than one and fully differentiated HBE should be used in future toxicity studies of NP in vitro. Our findings support epidemiologic evidence that subjects with chronic airway diseases are more vulnerable to adverse effects of particulate air pollution. Thus, this sub-population needs to be included in nano-toxicity studies.

  4. Expression Profiles of miRNA Subsets Distinguish Human Colorectal Carcinoma and Normal Colonic Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Pellatt, Daniel F; Stevens, John R; Wolff, Roger K; Mullany, Lila E; Herrick, Jennifer S; Samowitz, Wade; Slattery, Martha L

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-protein-coding RNA molecules that are commonly dysregulated in colorectal tumors. The objective of this study was to identify smaller subsets of highly predictive miRNAs. METHODS: Data come from population-based studies of colorectal cancer conducted in Utah and the Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program. Tissue samples were available for 1,953 individuals, of which 1,894 had carcinoma tissue and 1,599 had normal mucosa available for statistical analysis. Agilent Human miRNA Microarray V.19.0 was used to generate miRNA expression profiles; validation of expression levels was carried out using quantitative PCR. We used random forest analysis and verified findings with logistic modeling in separate data sets. Important microRNAs are identified and bioinformatics tools are used to identify target genes and related biological pathways. RESULTS: We identified 16 miRNAs for colon and 17 miRNAs for rectal carcinoma that appear to differentiate between carcinoma and normal mucosa; of these, 12 were important for both colon and rectal cancer, hsa-miR-663b, hsa-miR-4539, hsa-miR-17-5p, hsa-miR-20a-5p, hsa-miR-21-5p, hsa-miR-4506, hsa-miR-92a-3p, hsa-miR-93-5p, hsa-miR-145-5p, hsa-miR-3651, hsa-miR-378a-3p, and hsa-miR-378i. Estimated misclassification rates were low at 4.83% and 2.5% among colon and rectal observations, respectively. Among independent observations, logistic modeling reinforced the importance of these miRNAs, finding the primary principal components of their variation statistically significant (P<0.001 among both colon and rectal observations) and again producing low misclassification rates. Repeating our analysis without those miRNAs initially identified as important identified other important miRNAs; however, misclassification rates increased and distinctions between remaining miRNAs in terms of classification importance were reduced. CONCLUSIONS: Our data support the hypothesis that while many miRNAs are

  5. [Bioinformatic analysis of adenoma-normal mucosa SSH library of colon].

    PubMed

    Lü, Bing-Jian; Cui, Jing; Xu, Jing; Zhang, Hao; Luo, Min-Jie; Zhu, Yi-Min; Lai, Mao-De

    2006-04-01

    We established a colonic adenoma-normal mucosa suppressive subtraction hybridization (SSH) library in 1999. In this study, we wanted to explore the expression profile of all candidate genes in this library. We developed an EST pipeline which contained two in-house software packages, nucleic acid analytical software and GetUni. The nucleic acid analytical software, an integrator of the universal bioinformatics tools including phred, phd2fasta, cross_match, repeatmasker and blast2.0, can blast sequences of differential clones with the downloaded non-redundant nucleotide (NR) database. GetUni can cluster these NR sequences into Unigene via matching with the downloaded Homo Sapiens UniGene database. Sixty-two candidate genes in A-N library were obtained via the high throughput automatic gene expression bioinformatics pipeline. Gene Ontology online analysis revealed that ribosome genes and immunity-regulating genes were the two most common categories in the KEGG or Biocarta Pathway. We also detected the expression of 2 genes with highest hits, Reg4 and FAM46A, by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Both genes were up-regulated in 10 or 9 out of 10 adenomas in comparison with the paired normal mucosa, respectively. The candidate genes in A-N library would be of great significance in disclosing the molecular mechanism underlying in colonic adenoma initiation and progression.

  6. Analysis of the depolarizing properties of normal and adenomatous polyps in colon mucosa for the early diagnosis of precancerous lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega-Quijano, Noé; Fanjul-Vélez, Félix; de Cos-Pérez, Jesús; Arce-Diego, José Luis

    2011-09-01

    Optical characterization of biological tissues by means of polarimetric techniques is an area of growing interest. Polarized light can be used for malignant neoplasms detection. To our knowledge, few studies have so far focused on lesions that are prone to result in cancer. In this work we present a polarimetric study of depolarization in prepathological tissues. Specifically, we will focus on premalignant lesions in human colon due to their clinical relevance. Colonic adenoma, the potential precursor of malignant adenocarcinoma, provokes significant structural modifications in colon mucosa that affect light depolarization. The depolarizing properties of normal and adenomatous polyps mucosa are compared. The average linear degree of polarization is shown to present a strong dependence with the precancerous state of the colonic tissue. This method has the potential to enable an early diagnosis of colon cancer.

  7. Vitiligo patient-derived keratinocytes exhibit characteristics of normal wound healing via epithelial to mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Poulomi; Venkatachalam, Sandhyaa; Mamidi, Murali Krishna; Bhonde, Ramesh; Shankar, Krupa; Pal, Rajarshi

    2015-05-01

    Vitiligo is an autoimmune disorder that leads to depigmentation of skin via melanocyte dysfunction. Keratinocyte-induced toxicity is one among the several etiological factors implicated for vitiligo, and hence, autologous keratinocyte grafting is projected as one of the primary mode of treatment for vitiligo. However, reports indicate that perilesional keratinocytes not only display signatures of apoptosis but also could secrete cytokines and mediators which have antagonistic effect on proliferation or survival. Therefore, we investigated how vitiligo patients' derived keratinocytes respond to surplus amounts of inflammatory cytokines and whether they recapitulate events that take place during conventional wound healing. The primary objective of our study was to determine whether keratinocytes isolated from a vitiligo patient would undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition similar to their normal counterparts upon induction with inflammatory cytokines such as TGF-b1 and EGF. We found that these keratinocytes undergo EMT during wound repair accompanied with increase in the levels of mesenchymal markers and ECM proteins; decrease in the levels of epithelial markers and enhanced migratory ability. Besides, we also demonstrated that EMT induction leads to activation of SMAD and MAPK pathways via Ras, Raf, PAI 1, Snail, Slug and ZO1. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the characterization of primary keratinocytes isolated from vitiligo patients with respect to their wound healing capacity.

  8. Chemical carcinogen-induced decreases in genomic 5-methyldeoxycytidine content of normal human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, V L; Smith, R A; Longoria, J; Liotta, M A; Harper, C M; Harris, C C

    1987-01-01

    The genomic content of DNA 5-methyldeoxycytidine (m5dC) was measured in dividing normal human bronchial epithelial cells treated with a broad range of chemical carcinogens. At noncytotoxic concentrations, all of the carcinogenic agents tested significantly reduced cellular DNA m5dC content whereas the weakly carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic agents, benzo[e]pyrene and phenanthrene (respectively), did not. These reductions varied from 8% to 31% depending on the agent and the donor cells. The reductions in genomic m5dC levels were concentration dependent for the carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzo[a]pyrene. We speculate that carcinogen-induced perturbation of DNA m5dC patterns may lead to heritable changes in gene expression and contribute to the molecular alterations involved in the initiation and the subsequent steps of the carcinogenesis process. PMID:3472209

  9. The B-cell tumor promoter Bcl-3 suppresses inflammation-associated colon tumorigenesis in epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wanhu; Wang, Hongshan; Ha, Hye-lin; Tassi, Ilaria; Bhardwaj, Reetika; Claudio, Estefania; Siebenlist, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Bcl-3 is an atypical member of the IκB family. It associates with p50/NF-κB1 and p52/NF-κB2 homodimers in nuclei where it modulates transcription in a context-dependent manner. A subset of B cell tumors exhibits recurrent translocations of Bcl-3, resulting in overexpression. Elevated expression without translocations is also observed in various B cell lymphomas and even some solid tumors. Here we investigated the role of Bcl-3 in AOM/DSS-induced colon tumors, a mouse model for colitis-associated colorectal cancers in humans. Contrary to expectations, Bcl-3 suppressed colorectal tumor formation: Bcl-3-deficient mice were relatively protected from DSS-induced epithelial damage and developed more polyps after AOM/DSS treatment, though polyp size was unaffected. DSS-challenged mutant mice exhibited increased recruitment of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), consistent with protection of the epithelium. Loss of Bcl-3 in intestinal epithelial cells was sufficient to increase tumorigenesis. The added tumor burden in mutant mice was dependent on TNFα, a tumorigenic, NF-κB-mediated signaling pathway that was dampened by Bcl-3. These findings reveal a tumor-suppressive role for Bcl-3 in this inflammation-associated cancer model. Bcl-3 thus functions as a tumor promoter or suppressor, depending on the cellular and environmental context. PMID:27132515

  10. Fully unsupervised inter-individual IR spectral histology of paraffinized tissue sections of normal colon.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi Nguyet Que; Jeannesson, Pierre; Groh, Audrey; Piot, Olivier; Guenot, Dominique; Gobinet, Cyril

    2016-05-01

    In label-free Fourier-transform infrared histology, spectral images are individually recorded from tissue sections, pre-processed and clustered. Each single resulting color-coded image is annotated by a pathologist to obtain the best possible match with tissue structures revealed after Hematoxylin-Eosin staining. However, the main limitations of this approach are the empirical choice of the number of clusters in unsupervised classification, and the marked color heterogeneity between the clustered spectral images. Here, using normal murine and human colon tissues, we developed an automatic multi-image spectral histology to simultaneously analyze a set of spectral images (8 images mice samples and 72 images human ones). This procedure consisted of a joint Extended Multiplicative Signal Correction (EMSC) to numerically deparaffinize the tissue sections, followed by an automated joint K-Means (KM) clustering using the hierarchical double application of Pakhira-Bandyopadhyay-Maulik (PBM) validity index. Using this procedure, the main murine and human colon histological structures were correctly identified at both the intra- and the inter-individual levels, especially the crypts, secreted mucus, lamina propria and submucosa. Here, we show that batched multi-image spectral histology procedure is insensitive to the reference spectrum but highly sensitive to the paraffin model of joint EMSC. In conclusion, combining joint EMSC and joint KM clustering by double PBM application allows to achieve objective and automated batched multi-image spectral histology. PMID:26872124

  11. Photodynamic therapy with WST09 (Tookad): quantitative studies in normal colon and transplanted tumours.

    PubMed

    Woodhams, Josephine H; MacRobert, Alexander J; Novelli, Marco; Bown, Stephen G

    2006-01-15

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is attracting increasing interest for the safe destruction of localised tumours in a range of organs. However, most photosensitising drugs require a delay of hours to days between drug administration and light activation with skin photosensitivity that may last for weeks. WST09 (Tookad) is a new faster acting photosensitiser that clears within a few hours. In normal rat colon, after sensitisation with an intravenous bolus of WST09, light was delivered to a single point on the mucosa and the extent of PDT necrosis measured 3 days later. The lesion diameter was greatest with the highest dose of drug and light and the shortest drug light interval (DLI), falling rapidly with a DLI more than 5 min. In tumours transplanted subcutaneously or into the colon, the extent of necrosis only started falling with a DLI greater than 15 min, suggesting a possible window for tumour selectivity. Histological changes 3 days after PDT were essentially the same as those seen with longer acting photosensitisers. The lesion dimensions were comparable to the largest ones seen with other photosensitisers under similar experimental conditions. We conclude that WST09 is a powerful photosensitiser that produces PDT effects similar to those seen with longer acting drugs, but with the major advantages of a short DLI and rapid clearance. PMID:16052532

  12. Fully unsupervised inter-individual IR spectral histology of paraffinized tissue sections of normal colon.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi Nguyet Que; Jeannesson, Pierre; Groh, Audrey; Piot, Olivier; Guenot, Dominique; Gobinet, Cyril

    2016-05-01

    In label-free Fourier-transform infrared histology, spectral images are individually recorded from tissue sections, pre-processed and clustered. Each single resulting color-coded image is annotated by a pathologist to obtain the best possible match with tissue structures revealed after Hematoxylin-Eosin staining. However, the main limitations of this approach are the empirical choice of the number of clusters in unsupervised classification, and the marked color heterogeneity between the clustered spectral images. Here, using normal murine and human colon tissues, we developed an automatic multi-image spectral histology to simultaneously analyze a set of spectral images (8 images mice samples and 72 images human ones). This procedure consisted of a joint Extended Multiplicative Signal Correction (EMSC) to numerically deparaffinize the tissue sections, followed by an automated joint K-Means (KM) clustering using the hierarchical double application of Pakhira-Bandyopadhyay-Maulik (PBM) validity index. Using this procedure, the main murine and human colon histological structures were correctly identified at both the intra- and the inter-individual levels, especially the crypts, secreted mucus, lamina propria and submucosa. Here, we show that batched multi-image spectral histology procedure is insensitive to the reference spectrum but highly sensitive to the paraffin model of joint EMSC. In conclusion, combining joint EMSC and joint KM clustering by double PBM application allows to achieve objective and automated batched multi-image spectral histology.

  13. Differentiation between human normal colon mucosa and colon cancer tissue using ToF-SIMS imaging technique and principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ji-Won; Shon, Hyun Kyong; Yoo, Byong Chul; Kim, In Hoo; Moon, Dae Won; Lee, Tae Geol

    2008-12-01

    Human normal colon mucosa and colon cancer tissue were studied using the time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS) and principal component analysis (PCA) techniques. The surfaces of the tissues were successfully cleaned by C 602+ cluster-ion beams before the ToF-SIMS images were obtained. A PCA on the spectra and images were performed to compare differences in the peaks and images of normal and cancer tissues. Significant differences in principal component 1 (PC 1) score values for normal and cancer tissues were observed, and each PC 1 loadings had a specific peak profile of proteins. In addition, the PC images obtained from the ToF-SIMS images for normal and cancer tissues were clearly distinguishable, and the amino acid fragments associated with normal and cancer tissues were found to have originated from the lamina propria region and the epithelium cells, respectively. Based on the PCA results, structural distortion of the crypts in the cancer colon tissue could be attributed to the proliferation of the cancerous epithelium cells. This work shows that the application of the ToF-SIMS imaging technique with PCA could be a useful method of obtaining valuable information for cancer analysis.

  14. Desacetyl bisacodyl-induced epithelial Cl(-) secretion in rat colon and rectum.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Takuya; Karaki, Shin-ichiro; Tateoka, Takashi; Kuwahara, Atsukazu

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the mode of desacetyl bisacodyl (DAB)-induced secretory action in intestinal tissues using an Ussing chamber assay. DAB is the active metabolite of the laxative bisacodyl. In mucosal-submucosal preparations, mucosal application of DAB induced a transient decrease followed by subsequent increases in short-circuit current and tissue conductance in a concentration-dependent manner. DAB-induced responses occurred from the middle colon to the rectal segment but not in the proximal colon. Moreover, these responses were not observed under chloride (Cl(-))-free conditions or in the presence of DAB on the serosal side of the mucosalsubmucosal specimens. Treatment with tetrodotoxin had no effect on the DAB-induced responses; however, mucosal treatment with a COX inhibitor piroxicam resulted in the elimination of responses. These results suggest that DAB may contribute to the laxative action by inducing Cl(-) secretion which is associated with the COX signaling pathway. This study also demonstrated that the DAB target molecule is present on the mucosal side from the middle colon to the rectal segment. PMID:26912136

  15. Comparison of proteoglycans synthesized by porcine normal and polycystic renal tubular epithelial cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Beavan, L.A.; Carone, F.A.; Nakamura, S.; Jones, J.K.; Reindel, J.F.; Price, R.G. )

    1991-02-01

    Newly synthesized porcine tubular epithelial cell proteoglycans were labeled in vitro with Na2(35S)SO4. At the beginning of the labeling period (24 h) (35S) sulfate incorporated into macromolecules was measured following PD-10 chromatography. There was a significant reduction in the amount of 35S-labeled macromolecules isolated from polycystic cells compared to that from normal cells. The distribution of recovered radiolabeled material among the medium, cell surface, and intracellular fractions was similar for both normal and polycystic cells. Analysis of the proteoglycans in polycystic cells demonstrated that 86 and 73% of 35S-labeled macromolecules were of the heparan sulfate type in polycystic and normal cells, respectively. The remainder was chondroitin sulfate. Proteoglycans were characterized using DEAE-Sephacel ion-exchange chromatography, chondroitinase ABC, heparitinase, and nitrous acid digestion followed by Sepharose CL-4B gel permeation chromatography. The majority of radiolabeled material in the medium, cell surface, and intracellular fractions eluted between 0.35 and 0.39 M NaCl. However, a second peak (peak II) that eluted at 0.25 M NaCl was found in the medium from polycystic cells. This peak accounted for 27% of the total macromolecules secreted into the medium. Proteoglycans in the major peak were susceptible to nitrous acid and chondroitinase ABC digestion. A similar proportion of peak II was degraded by chondroitinase ABC. However, the remainder was only slightly susceptible to treatment with nitrous acid or heparitase. In normal cells a small amount of material eluted at a similar low charge; the proteoglycans were the same as those found in the major peak and appeared as a shoulder on this peak.

  16. Leptin and Adiponectin Modulate the Self-renewal of Normal Human Breast Epithelial Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Esper, Raymond M; Dame, Michael; McClintock, Shannon; Holt, Peter R; Dannenberg, Andrew J; Wicha, Max S; Brenner, Dean E

    2015-12-01

    Multiple mechanisms are likely to account for the link between obesity and increased risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. Two adipokines, leptin and adiponectin, are of particular interest due to their opposing biologic functions and associations with breast cancer risk. In the current study, we investigated the effects of leptin and adiponectin on normal breast epithelial stem cells. Levels of leptin in human adipose explant-derived conditioned media positively correlated with the size of the normal breast stem cell pool. In contrast, an inverse relationship was found for adiponectin. Moreover, a strong linear relationship was observed between the leptin/adiponectin ratio in adipose conditioned media and breast stem cell self-renewal. Consistent with these findings, exogenous leptin stimulated whereas adiponectin suppressed breast stem cell self-renewal. In addition to local in-breast effects, circulating factors, including leptin and adiponectin, may contribute to the link between obesity and breast cancer. Increased levels of leptin and reduced amounts of adiponectin were found in serum from obese compared with age-matched lean postmenopausal women. Interestingly, serum from obese women increased stem cell self-renewal by 30% compared with only 7% for lean control serum. Taken together, these data suggest a plausible explanation for the obesity-driven increase in postmenopausal breast cancer risk. Leptin and adiponectin may function as both endocrine and paracrine/juxtacrine factors to modulate the size of the normal stem cell pool. Interventions that disrupt this axis and thereby normalize breast stem cell self-renewal could reduce the risk of breast cancer.

  17. Butyrate delivered by butyrylated starch increases distal colonic epithelial apoptosis in carcinogen-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Julie M; Young, Graeme P; Topping, David L; Bird, Anthony R; Cobiac, Lynne; Scherer, Benjamin L; Winkler, Jessica G; Lockett, Trevor J

    2012-01-01

    Animal studies show that increasing large bowel butyrate concentration through ingestion of butyrylated or resistant starches opposes carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis, which is consistent with population data linking greater fiber consumption with lowered colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. Butyrate has been shown to regulate the apoptotic response to DNA damage. This study examined the impact of increasing large bowel butyrate concentration by dietary butyrylated starch on the colonic epithelium of rats treated with the genotoxic carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM). Four groups of 10 male rats were fed AIN-93G based-diets containing either low amylose maize starch (LAMS), LAMS with 3% tributyrin, 10% high amylose maize starch (HAMS) or 10% butyrylated HAMS (HAMSB). HAMS and HAMSB starches were cooked by heating in water. After 4 weeks, rats were injected once with AOM and killed 6 h later. Rates of apoptosis and proliferation were measured in colonic epithelium. Short-chain fatty acid concentrations in large bowel digesta and hepatic portal venous plasma were higher in HAMSB than all other groups. Apoptotic rates in the distal colon were increased by HAMSB and correlated with luminal butyrate concentrations but cellular proliferation rates were unaffected by diet. The increase in apoptosis was most marked in the base and proliferative zone of the crypt. Regulation of luminal butyrate using HAMSB increases the rates of apoptotic deletion of DNA-damaged colonocytes. We propose this pro-apoptotic function of butyrate plays a major role reducing tumour formation in the AOM-treated rat and that these data support a potential protective role of butyrate in CRC.

  18. Electroporation-assisted penetration of zinc oxide nanoparticles in ex vivo normal and cancerous human colon tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L. P.; Wu, G. Y.; Wei, H. J.; Guo, Z. Y.; Yang, H. Q.; He, Y. H.; Xie, S. S.

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we presented the research of the penetration of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) (30 and 90 nm), and electroporation (EP) assisted penetration of the ZnO NPs in the human normal colon (NC) and adenomatous colon (AC) tissues studied with optical coherence tomography (OCT) and diffuse reflectance (DR) measurement. The results have shown that the attenuation coefficient of colon tissue after the application of 30 or 90 nm ZnO NPs alone decreased approximately by 28% and 14% for NC tissue, 35% and 22% for AC tissue, respectively; while the attenuation coefficient of colon tissue after combined application of 30 or 90 nm ZnO NPs/EP decreased approximately by 46% and 30% for NC tissue, and 53% and 42% for AC tissue, respectively. The results illustrate EP can significantly increase the penetration of ZnO NPs in the colon tissue, especially in AC tissue. Through the analysis of attenuation coefficient and reflectance intensity of the colon tissue, we find that the accumulation of the ZnO NPs in the colon tissue greatly influenced the tissue optical properties.

  19. Reciprocal Paracrine Interactions Between Normal Human Epithelial and Mesenchymal Cells Protect Cellular DNA from Radiation-Induced Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Nakazawa, Yuka; Saenko, Vladimir Rogounovitch, Tatiana; Suzuki, Keiji; Mitsutake, Norisato; Matsuse, Michiko; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To explore whether interactions between normal epithelial and mesenchymal cells can modulate the extent of radiation-induced DNA damage in one or both types of cells. Methods and Materials: Human primary thyrocytes (PT), diploid fibroblasts BJ, MRC-5, and WI-38, normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), and endothelial human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells (HUV-EC-C), cultured either individually or in co-cultures or after conditioned medium transfer, were irradiated with 0.25 to 5 Gy of {gamma}-rays and assayed for the extent of DNA damage. Results: The number of {gamma}-H2AX foci in co-cultures of PT and BJ fibroblasts was approximately 25% lower than in individual cultures at 1 Gy in both types of cells. Reciprocal conditioned medium transfer to individual cultures before irradiation resulted in approximately a 35% reduction of the number {gamma}-H2AX foci at 1 Gy in both types of cells, demonstrating the role of paracrine soluble factors. The DNA-protected state of cells was achieved within 15 min after conditioned medium transfer; it was reproducible and reciprocal in several lines of epithelial cells and fibroblasts, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells but not in epithelial and endothelial cells. Unlike normal cells, human epithelial cancer cells failed to establish DNA-protected states in fibroblasts and vice versa. Conclusions: The results imply the existence of a network of reciprocal interactions between normal epithelial and some types of mesenchymal cells mediated by soluble factors that act in a paracrine manner to protect DNA from genotoxic stress.

  20. Zinc Induced G2/M Blockage is p53 and p21 Dependent in Normal Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The involvement of the p53 and p21 signal pathway in the G2/M cell cycle progression of zinc supplemented normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells was examined using the siRNA approach. Cells were cultured for one passage in different concentrations of zinc: <0.4 microM (ZD) as zinc-deficient;...

  1. Analysis of CUL-5 expression in breast epithelial cells, breast cancer cell lines, normal tissues and tumor tissues

    PubMed Central

    Fay, Michael J; Longo, Kenneth A; Karathanasis, George A; Shope, David M; Mandernach, Craig J; Leong, Jason R; Hicks, Alfred; Pherson, Kenneth; Husain, Amyna

    2003-01-01

    Background The chromosomal location of CUL-5 (11q 22-23) is associated with LOH in breast cancer, suggesting that CUL-5 may be a tumor suppressor. The purpose of this research was to determine if there is differential expression of CUL-5 in breast epithelial cells versus breast cancer cell lines, and normal human tissues versus human tumors. The expression of CUL-5 in breast epithelial cells (HMEC, MCF-10A), and breast cancer cells (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231) was examined using RT-PCR, Northern blot analysis, and Western blot analysis. The expression of mRNA for other CUL family members (CUL-1, -2, -3, -4A, and -4B) in these cells was evaluated by RT-PCR. A normal human tissue expression array and a cancer profiling array were used to examine CUL-5 expression in normal human tissues and matched normal tissues versus tumor tissues, respectively. Results CUL-5 is expressed at the mRNA and protein levels by breast epithelial cells (HMEC, MCF-10A) and breast cancer cells (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231). These cells also express mRNA for other CUL family members. The normal human tissue expression array revealed that CUL-5 is widely expressed. The cancer profiling array revealed that 82% (41/50) of the breast cancers demonstrated a decrease in CUL-5 expression versus the matched normal tissue. For the 50 cases of matched breast tissue there was a statistically significant ~2.2 fold decreased expression of CUL-5 in tumor tissue versus normal tissue (P < 0.0001). Conclusions The data demonstrate no apparent decrease in CUL-5 expression in the breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231) versus the breast epithelial cells (HMEC, MCF-10A). The decrease in CUL-5 expression in breast tumor tissue versus matched normal tissue supports the hypothesis that decreased expression of CUL-5 may play a role in breast tumorigenesis. PMID:14641918

  2. The enhancement of phase 2 enzyme activities by sodium butyrate in normal intestinal epithelial cells is associated with Nrf2 and p53.

    PubMed

    Yaku, Keisuke; Enami, Yuka; Kurajyo, Chika; Matsui-Yuasa, Isao; Konishi, Yotaro; Kojima-Yuasa, Akiko

    2012-11-01

    Dietary fiber fermentation by the colonic bacterial flora produces short-chain fatty acids, acetate, propionate and butyrate. Among them, butyrate is considered to be the major energy substrate for colonocytes and, at least in rats, seems to protect against colonic carcinogenesis. In this study, we examined the effect and the mechanisms of short-chain fatty acids on the activity of phase 2 enzymes. Sodium butyrate increased phase 2 enzyme activities in normal rat small intestine epithelial cells, Glutathione S-transferase and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO) in a dose-dependent manner(;) however, other short-chain fatty acids did not increase them. The mechanism of the induction of phase 2 enzymes with sodium butyrate sodium butyrate, but not other short-chain fatty acids was related to the increase of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) nuclear translocation and the decrease in the levels of nuclear fraction p53. Sodium butyrate also caused enhancement of Nrf2 mRNA levels and suppression of p53 mRNA levels. Sodium butyrate enhances the activities of phase 2 enzymes via an increase in the Nrf2 protein levels in the nucleus and a decrease in the mRNA and protein levels of p53.

  3. Colonic epithelial cell proliferation in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Green, S; Chapman, P; Burn, J; Burt, A; Bennett, M; Appleton, D; Varma, J; Mathers, J

    1998-01-01

    Background—Despite the recent discovery of four genes responsible for up to 90% of all cases of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), there will still be families in whom predictive testing is not possible. A phenotypic biomarker would therefore be useful. An upwards shift of the proliferative compartment in colonic crypts is reported to be one of the earliest changes in premalignant mucosa. 
Aims—To assess the role of crypt cell proliferation as a phenotypic biomarker in HNPCC. 
Patients—Thirty five patients at 50% risk of carrying the HNPCC gene (21 of whom subsequently underwent predictive testing and hence gene carrier status was known) and 18controls. 
Methods—Crypt cell proliferation was measured at five sites in the colon using two different techniques. Labelling index was determined using the monoclonal antibody MIB1 and whole crypt mitotic index was measured using the microdissection and crypt squash technique. The distribution of proliferating cells within the crypts was also assessed. 
Results—There were no significant differences in the total labelling index or mean number of mitoses per crypt, nor in the distribution of proliferating cells within the crypt, between the study and control groups at any site. When the 21 patients in whom gene carrier status was known were analysed separately there were no significant differences in the measured indices of proliferation between the HNPCC gene carriers and non-gene carriers. 
Conclusion—Crypt cell proliferation is not a discriminative marker of gene carriage in HNPCC. 

 Keywords: cell proliferation; hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer PMID:9771410

  4. Molecular Mechanisms of Malignant Transformation by Low Dose Cadmium in Normal Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kluz, Thomas; Cohen, Lisa; Shen, Steven S.; Costa, Max

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium is a carcinogenic metal, the mechanisms of which are not fully understood. In this study, human bronchial epithelial cells were transformed with sub-toxic doses of cadmium (0.01, 0.05, and 0.1 μM) and transformed clones were characterized for gene expression changes using RNA-seq, as well as other molecular measurements. 440 genes were upregulated and 47 genes were downregulated in cadmium clones relative to control clones over 1.25-fold. Upregulated genes were associated mostly with gene ontology terms related to embryonic development, immune response, and cell movement, while downregulated genes were associated with RNA metabolism and regulation of transcription. Several embryonic genes were upregulated, including the transcription regulator SATB2. SATB2 is critical for normal skeletal development and has roles in gene expression regulation and chromatin remodeling. Small hairpin RNA knockdown of SATB2 significantly inhibited growth in soft agar, indicating its potential as a driver of metal-induced carcinogenesis. An increase in oxidative stress and autophagy was observed in cadmium clones. In addition, the DNA repair protein O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase was depleted by transformation with cadmium. MGMT loss caused significant decrease in cell viability after treatment with the alkylating agent temozolomide, demonstrating diminished capacity to repair such damage. Results reveal various mechanisms of cadmium-induced malignant transformation in BEAS-2B cells including upregulation of SATB2, downregulation of MGMT, and increased oxidative stress. PMID:27186882

  5. Gene expression profiling of di-n-butyl phthalate in normal human mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gwinn, Maureen R; Whipkey, Diana L; Tennant, Lora B; Weston, Ainsley

    2007-01-01

    Studies show that female workers in the personal-care industry have an increased risk of developing cancer believed to be the result of increased exposure to toxic and/or carcinogenic chemicals found in cosmetics, hair dyes, and nail polish. One chemical found in multiple personal-care products, di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP), is a known endocrine disruptor and has been found in increased levels in women of childbearing age. The goal of this study was to elucidate mechanisms of phthalate toxicity in normal human cells to provide information concerning interindividual variation and gene-environment interactions. Normal human mammary epithelial cell strains were obtained from discarded tissues following reduction mammoplasty [Cooperative Human Tissue Network (sponsors: NCI/NDRI)]. Gene transcription in each cell strain was analyzed using high-density oligonucleotide DNA microarrays (U133A, Affymetrix) and changes in the expression of selected genes were verified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (ABI). DNA microarrays were hybridized with total RNA that was collected after DBP treatment for 5 hr and 10 hr. RNA was harvested from the vehicle control (acetone) at 10 hr. Data Mining Tool software (Affymetrix) was used to separate genes in clusters based on their expression patterns over time. Only 57 genes were found to be altered in all four cell strains following exposure to DBP. These included genes involved in fertility (inhibin, placental growth factor), immune response (tumor necrosis factor induced protein), and antioxidant status (glutathione peroxidase). Data from this study will help clarify the role of DBP in reproductive toxicity, and yield biomarkers of exposure for future epidemiology studies. PMID:17725530

  6. Gene expression profiling of di-n-butyl phthalate in normal human mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gwinn, Maureen R; Whipkey, Diana L; Tennant, Lora B; Weston, Ainsley

    2007-01-01

    Studies show that female workers in the personal-care industry have an increased risk of developing cancer believed to be the result of increased exposure to toxic and/or carcinogenic chemicals found in cosmetics, hair dyes, and nail polish. One chemical found in multiple personal-care products, di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP), is a known endocrine disruptor and has been found in increased levels in women of childbearing age. The goal of this study was to elucidate mechanisms of phthalate toxicity in normal human cells to provide information concerning interindividual variation and gene-environment interactions. Normal human mammary epithelial cell strains were obtained from discarded tissues following reduction mammoplasty [Cooperative Human Tissue Network (sponsors: NCI/NDRI)]. Gene transcription in each cell strain was analyzed using high-density oligonucleotide DNA microarrays (U133A, Affymetrix) and changes in the expression of selected genes were verified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (ABI). DNA microarrays were hybridized with total RNA that was collected after DBP treatment for 5 hr and 10 hr. RNA was harvested from the vehicle control (acetone) at 10 hr. Data Mining Tool software (Affymetrix) was used to separate genes in clusters based on their expression patterns over time. Only 57 genes were found to be altered in all four cell strains following exposure to DBP. These included genes involved in fertility (inhibin, placental growth factor), immune response (tumor necrosis factor induced protein), and antioxidant status (glutathione peroxidase). Data from this study will help clarify the role of DBP in reproductive toxicity, and yield biomarkers of exposure for future epidemiology studies.

  7. Tamoxifen Induces Expression of Immune Response-Related Genes in Cultured Normal Human Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schild-Hay, Laura J.; Leil, Tarek A.; Divi, Rao L.; Olivero, Ofelia, A.; Weston, Ainsley; Poirier, Miriam C.

    2008-01-01

    Use of tamoxifen (TAM) is associated with a 50% reduction in breast cancer incidence and an increase in endometrial cancer incidence. Here, we documented TAM-induced gene expression changes in cultured normal human mammary epithelial cells (NHMEC strains numbered 5, 16 and 40), established from tissue taken at reduction mammoplasty from 3 individuals. Cells exposed to 0, 10 or 50 μM TAM for 48 hours were evaluated for (E)-α-(deoxyguanosin-N2-yl)-tamoxifen (dG-N2-TAM) adduct formation by TAM-DNA (DNA modified with dG-N2-TAM) chemiluminescence immunoassay (CIA), gene expression changes using NCI DNA-oligonucleotide microarray, and real time (RT)-PCR. At 48 hr, cells exposed to 10 μM and 50 μM TAM were 85.6% and 48.4% viable, respectively, and there were no measurable dG-N2-TAM adducts. For microarray, cells were exposed to 10 μM TAM and genes with expression changes of ≥ 3-fold were as follows: thirteen genes up-regulated and one down-related for strain 16; seventeen genes up-regulated for strain 5; and eleven genes up-regulated for strain 40. Interferon-inducible genes (IFITM1, IFIT1, IFNA1, MXI and GIP3), and a potassium ion channel (KCNJ1) were up-regulated in all 3 strains. No significant expression changes were found for genes related to estrogen or xenobiotic metabolism. RT-PCR revealed up-regulation of interferon α (IFNA1) and confirmed the TAM-induced up-regulation of the genes identified by microarray, with the exception of GIP3 and MX1, which were not up-regulated in strain 40. Induction of interferon-related genes in the three NHMEC strains suggests that, in addition to hormonal effects, TAM exposure may enhance immune response in normal breast tissue. PMID:19155303

  8. cAMP sensitivity conferred to the epithelial Na+ channel by alpha-subunit cloned from guinea-pig colon.

    PubMed

    Schnizler, M; Mastroberardino, L; Reifarth, F; Weber, W M; Verrey, F; Clauss, W

    2000-03-01

    The rate of Na+ (re)absorption across tight epithelia such as in distal kidney nephron and colon is to a large extent controlled at the level of the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC). In kidney, antidiuretic hormone (ADH, vasopressin) stimulates the expression/activity of this channel by a cAMP/protein-kinase-A- (PKA-) mediated pathway. However, a clear upregulation of ENaC function by cAMP could not be reproduced with cloned channel subunits in the Xenopus oocyte expression system, suggesting the hypothesis that an additional factor is missing. In contrast, we show here that membrane-permeant cAMP can activate ENaC expressed in Xenopus oocytes (3.8-fold) upon replacement of the rat alpha-subunit by a new alpha-subunit cloned from guinea-pig colon (gpalpha). This alpha-subunit is 76% identical with its rat orthologue originating from ADH-insensitive rat colon. The biophysical fingerprints of the hybrid ENaC formed by this guinea-pig alpha-subunit together with rat beta- and gamma-subunits are indistinguishable from those of rat ENaC (rENaC). Injection of the PKA inhibitor PKI-(6-22)-amide into the oocyte had no effect on the basal activity of rat ENaC but inhibited the activity of gpalpha-containing hybrid ENaC and greatly decreased its stimulation by cAMP. This suggests that, unlike for rat ENaC, tonic PKA activity is required for basal function of gpalpha-containing ENaC and that PKA mediates its cAMP-induced activation. This regulatory behaviour is not common to all ENaCs containing an alpha-subunit cloned from an ADH-responsive tissue since xENaC, which was cloned from the ADH-sensitive Xenopus laevis A6 epithelia, is, when expressed in oocytes, resistant to cAMP, similar to rat ENaC. This study demonstrates that the PKA sensitivity of ENaC can depend on the nature of the ENaC alpha-subunit and raises the possibility that cAMP can stimulate ENaCs by different mechanisms. PMID:10764218

  9. Estrogens regulate the expression of NHERF1 in normal colon during the reproductive cycle of Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Cuello-Carrión, F Darío; Troncoso, Mariana; Guiñazu, Elina; Valdez, Susana R; Fanelli, Mariel A; Ciocca, Daniel R; Kreimann, Erica L

    2010-12-01

    In breast cancer cell lines, the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulator factor 1 (NHERF1) gene is regulated at the transcriptional level by estrogens, the protein expression levels correlate with the presence of estrogen receptors and the effect is blocked by anti-estrogens. However, there is limited information regarding the regulation of NHERF1 by estrogens in normal colon tissue. The NHERF1 protein has an important role in the maintenance of the intestine ultrastructure. NHERF1-deficient mice showed defects in the intestinal microvilli as well as molecular alterations in brush border membrane proteins. Here, we have studied the expression of NHERF1 in normal rat colon and uterus during the reproductive cycle of Wistar rats. We found that NHERF1 expression in rat colon during the estral cycle is modified by estrogen levels: higher expression of NHERF1 was observed during the proestrous and estrous stages and lower expression in diestrous 1 when estrogen levels decreased. In uterus, NHERF1 was expressed in the apical region of the luminal epithelium and glands in all stages of the estral cycle, and in both colon and uterus, the expression was independent of the proliferation status. Our results show that NHERF1 expression is regulated by estrogens in colon during the rat estral cycle.

  10. Intracellular pH regulates basolateral K+ and Cl- conductances in colonic epithelial cells by modulating Ca2+ activation

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The role of intracellular pH as a modulator of basolateral K+ and Cl- conductances in epithelial cells was studied using digitonin- permeabilized colonic cell layers so that cytosolic pH could be clamped at specific values, while basolateral K+ and Cl- conductances were activated by stepwise increases in intracellular free Ca2+. Increasing the intracellular pH from 6.6 to 8.0 enhanced the sensitivity of both ionic conductances to intracellular Ca2+, but changing extracellular pH had no effect. Maximal K+ and Cl- currents activated by Ca2+ were not affected by changes in intracellular pH, suggesting that protons do not alter the conduction properties of the channels. Hill analysis of the Ca2+ activation process revealed that raising the cytosolic pH from 6.6 to 8.0 reduced the K1/2 for Ca2+ activation. In the absence of Ca2+, changes in intracellular pH did not have a significant effect on the basolateral K+ and Cl- conductances. These results are consistent with the notion that changes in cytosolic pH can modulate basolateral conductances by modifying the action of calcium, perhaps by acting at or near the activation site to provide a mechanism of variable "gain control." PMID:1719125

  11. Substance P-stimulated interleukin-8 expression in human colonic epithelial cells involves Rho family small GTPases.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dezheng; Kuhnt-Moore, Sabina; Zeng, Huiyan; Pan, Amy; Wu, Jack S; Simeonidis, Simos; Moyer, Mary P; Pothoulakis, Charalabos

    2002-01-01

    Interaction of the neuropeptide substance P (SP) and its neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R) plays an important role in the pathophysiology of intestinal inflammation. SP is known to stimulate production of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 in the U-373-MG human astrocytoma cell line via activation of p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) and nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB, respectively. However, the signalling mechanisms by which SP-NK-1R interaction induces NF-kappaB activation and IL-8 expression are still not clear. In this study we demonstrate that SP stimulates IL-8 secretion and IL-8 promoter activity in the NCM460 non-transformed human colonic epithelial cell line transfected with NK-1R cDNA. Our results indicate that inhibition of endogenous Rho family proteins (RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42) by their respective dominant negative mutants significantly decreases SP-induced IL-8 secretion and IL-8 promoter activity. We also demonstrate that SP rapidly activates RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 and that co-expression of the dominant negative mutants of RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 in NK-1R cDNA-transfected NCM460 cells significantly inhibits SP-induced NF-kappaB-dependent gene expression. These results demonstrate that Rho family small GTPases RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 are novel signal transducers for SP-stimulated IL-8 expression. PMID:12169092

  12. Ecological determinants in microbial colonization of the murine gastrointestinal tract: adherence of Torulopsis pintolopesii to epithelial surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Suegara, N; Siegel, J E; Savage, D C

    1979-01-01

    Torulopsis pintolopesii is a yeast indigenous to the gastrointestinal tracts of conventional mice and rats from many colonies. In such natively colonized animals, the organism forms layers on the surface of the epithelium in the secreting portion of the stomach and can be cultured from all areas of the gastrointestinal tract. When given in water or food to germfree mice or specific pathogen-free mice possessing an indigenous microbiota free of yeast, T. pintolopesii also can be cultured from all areas of the tract at population levels ranging from 10(5) to 10(8) cells per g (wet weight). Likewise, as in its native hosts, the organism forms layers on gastric surfaces in the associated animals. The layers form on the secreting surface in both the specific pathogen-free and monoassociated ex-germfree mice. In the latter animal, however, a layer of yeast also forms on the nonsecreting gastric surface. In tests of its capacity to adhere to gastrointestinal surfaces in vitro, the organism adheres to epithelia from all areas of the mouse tract. These findings support an hypothesis that the capacity of T. pintolopesii to adhere to epithelial surfaces may be only one determinant influencing it to form layers on the gastric secreting surface in its native hosts. PMID:157978

  13. Claudin-based barrier differentiation in the colonic epithelial crypt niche involves Hopx/Klf4 and Tcf7l2/Hnf4-α cascades.

    PubMed

    Lili, Loukia N; Farkas, Attila E; Gerner-Smidt, Christian; Overgaard, Christian E; Moreno, Carlos S; Parkos, Charles A; Capaldo, Christopher T; Nusrat, Asma

    2016-01-01

    Colonic enterocytes form a rapidly renewing epithelium and barrier to luminal antigens. During renewal, coordinated expression of the claudin family of genes is vital to maintain the epithelial barrier. Disruption of this process contributes to barrier compromise and mucosal inflammatory diseases. However, little is known about the regulation of this critical aspect of epithelial cell differentiation. In order to identify claudin regulatory factors we utilized high-throughput gene microarrays and correlation analyses. We identified complex expression gradients for the transcription factors Hopx, Hnf4a, Klf4 and Tcf7l2, as well as 12 claudins, during differentiation. In vitro confirmatory methods identified 2 pathways that stimulate claudin expression; Hopx/Klf4 activation of Cldn4, 7 and 15, and Tcf7l2/Hnf4a up-regulation of Cldn23. Chromatin immunoprecipitation confirmed a Tcf7l2/Hnf4a/Claudin23 cascade. Furthermore, Hnf4a conditional knockout mice fail to induce Cldn23 during colonocyte differentiation. In conclusion, we report a comprehensive screen of colonic claudin gene expression and discover spatiotemporal Hopx/Klf4 and Tcf7l2/Hnf4a signaling as stimulators of colonic epithelial barrier differentiation. PMID:27583195

  14. SPROUTY-2 represses the epithelial phenotype of colon carcinoma cells via upregulation of ZEB1 mediated by ETS1 and miR-200/miR-150.

    PubMed

    Barbáchano, A; Fernández-Barral, A; Pereira, F; Segura, M F; Ordóñez-Morán, P; Carrillo-de Santa Pau, E; González-Sancho, J M; Hanniford, D; Martínez, N; Costales-Carrera, A; Real, F X; Pálmer, H G; Rojas, J M; Hernando, E; Muñoz, A

    2016-06-01

    SPROUTY-2 (SPRY2) is a modulator of tyrosine kinase receptor signaling with receptor- and cell type-dependent inhibitory or enhancing effects. Studies on the action of SPRY2 in major cancers are conflicting and its role remains unclear. Here we have dissected SPRY2 action in human colon cancer. Global transcriptomic analyses show that SPRY2 downregulates genes encoding tight junction proteins such as claudin-7 and occludin and other cell-to-cell and cell-to-matrix adhesion molecules in human SW480-ADH colon carcinoma cells. Moreover, SPRY2 represses LLGL2/HUGL2, PATJ1/INADL and ST14, main regulators of the polarized epithelial phenotype, and ESRP1, an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) inhibitor. A key action of SPRY2 is the upregulation of the major EMT inducer ZEB1, as these effects are reversed by ZEB1 knock-down by means of RNA interference. Consistently, we found an inverse correlation between the expression level of claudin-7 and those of SPRY2 and ZEB1 in human colon tumors. Mechanistically, ZEB1 upregulation by SPRY2 results from the combined induction of ETS1 transcription factor and the repression of microRNAs (miR-200 family, miR-150) that target ZEB1 RNA. Moreover, SPRY2 increased AKT activation by epidermal growth factor, whereas AKT and also Src inhibition reduced the induction of ZEB1. Altogether, these data suggest that AKT and Src are implicated in SPRY2 action. Collectively, these results show a tumorigenic role of SPRY2 in colon cancer that is based on the dysregulation of tight junction and epithelial polarity master genes via upregulation of ZEB1. The dissection of the mechanism of action of SPRY2 in colon cancer cells is important to understand the upregulation of this gene in a subset of patients with this neoplasia that have poor prognosis.

  15. Differential sensitivity of normal and malignant breast epithelial cells to genistein is partly mediated by p21(WAF1).

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, S; Neburi, M; Chinni, S R; Alhasan, S; Miller, F; Sarkar, F H

    2001-06-01

    Genistein, a soy metabolite, is a potential chemopreventive agent against various types of cancer. There are several studies documenting molecular alterations leading to cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells; however, no studies, to date, have shown the effect of genistein in isogenic normal and malignant breast epithelial cells. In this study, we investigated whether genistein shows any differential sensitivity to normal (MCF10A and MCF12A) and malignant (MCF10CA1a and MDA-MB-231) breast epithelial cells. We found that genistein causes a greater degree of G(2)-M arrest and induces apoptosis in malignant cell lines compared with normal breast epithelial cells. After genistein treatment, flow cytometric analysis revealed a hyperdiploid population in malignant cells that was not observed in normal cells. Cell cycle regulator p21(WAF1), which is known to be up-regulated by genistein treatment, was greatly induced at RNA and protein levels in normal cells, whereas its level was only slightly induced in malignant MDA-MB-231 cells and not detectable in malignant MCF10CA1a cells. Therefore, we investigated the causal role of p21(WAF1) in the differential sensitivity of genistein among these cell lines. We examined the effects of genistein on p21(WAF1) -/- and p21(WAF1) +/+ HCT116 cells, which were used as controls prior to studies on breast cancer cells. We found that there was a greater degree of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in p21(WAF1) -/- cells compared with p21(WAF1) +/+ HCT116 cells after genistein treatment. Flow cytometric analysis after genistein treatment showed a significant number of p21(WAF1) -/- cells in the hyperdiploid population, which are probably programmed to die through apoptotic processes. To further confirm the causal role of p21(WAF1) in genistein-mediated cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, we down-regulated p21(WAF1) by antisense p21(WAF1) cDNA transfection experiments. We found that both normal and malignant p

  16. Assessment of Corneal Epithelial Thickness in Asymmetric Keratoconic Eyes and Normal Eyes Using Fourier Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Cadarso, L.; Esteves, F.; Salgado-Borges, J.; Lopez, M.; Cadarso, C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the characteristics of asymmetric keratoconic eyes and normal eyes by Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) corneal mapping. Methods. Retrospective corneal and epithelial thickness OCT data for 74 patients were compared in three groups of eyes: keratoconic (n = 22) and normal fellow eyes (n = 22) in patients with asymmetric keratoconus and normal eyes (n = 104) in healthy subjects. Areas under the curve (AUC) of receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves for each variable were compared across groups to indicate their discrimination capacity. Results. Three variables were found to differ significantly between fellow eyes and normal eyes (all p < 0.05): minimum corneal thickness, thinnest corneal point, and central corneal thickness. These variables combined showed a high discrimination power to differentiate fellow eyes from normal eyes indicated by an AUC of 0.840 (95% CI: 0.762–0.918). Conclusions. Our findings indicate that topographically normal fellow eyes in patients with very asymmetric keratoconus differ from the eyes of healthy individuals in terms of their corneal epithelial and pachymetry maps. This type of information could be useful for an early diagnosis of keratoconus in topographically normal eyes. PMID:27379181

  17. Assessment of Corneal Epithelial Thickness in Asymmetric Keratoconic Eyes and Normal Eyes Using Fourier Domain Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Catalan, S; Cadarso, L; Esteves, F; Salgado-Borges, J; Lopez, M; Cadarso, C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the characteristics of asymmetric keratoconic eyes and normal eyes by Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) corneal mapping. Methods. Retrospective corneal and epithelial thickness OCT data for 74 patients were compared in three groups of eyes: keratoconic (n = 22) and normal fellow eyes (n = 22) in patients with asymmetric keratoconus and normal eyes (n = 104) in healthy subjects. Areas under the curve (AUC) of receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves for each variable were compared across groups to indicate their discrimination capacity. Results. Three variables were found to differ significantly between fellow eyes and normal eyes (all p < 0.05): minimum corneal thickness, thinnest corneal point, and central corneal thickness. These variables combined showed a high discrimination power to differentiate fellow eyes from normal eyes indicated by an AUC of 0.840 (95% CI: 0.762-0.918). Conclusions. Our findings indicate that topographically normal fellow eyes in patients with very asymmetric keratoconus differ from the eyes of healthy individuals in terms of their corneal epithelial and pachymetry maps. This type of information could be useful for an early diagnosis of keratoconus in topographically normal eyes.

  18. Assessment of Corneal Epithelial Thickness in Asymmetric Keratoconic Eyes and Normal Eyes Using Fourier Domain Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Catalan, S; Cadarso, L; Esteves, F; Salgado-Borges, J; Lopez, M; Cadarso, C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the characteristics of asymmetric keratoconic eyes and normal eyes by Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) corneal mapping. Methods. Retrospective corneal and epithelial thickness OCT data for 74 patients were compared in three groups of eyes: keratoconic (n = 22) and normal fellow eyes (n = 22) in patients with asymmetric keratoconus and normal eyes (n = 104) in healthy subjects. Areas under the curve (AUC) of receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves for each variable were compared across groups to indicate their discrimination capacity. Results. Three variables were found to differ significantly between fellow eyes and normal eyes (all p < 0.05): minimum corneal thickness, thinnest corneal point, and central corneal thickness. These variables combined showed a high discrimination power to differentiate fellow eyes from normal eyes indicated by an AUC of 0.840 (95% CI: 0.762-0.918). Conclusions. Our findings indicate that topographically normal fellow eyes in patients with very asymmetric keratoconus differ from the eyes of healthy individuals in terms of their corneal epithelial and pachymetry maps. This type of information could be useful for an early diagnosis of keratoconus in topographically normal eyes. PMID:27379181

  19. Effects of Platinum Nanocolloid in Combination with Gamma Irradiation on Normal Human Esophageal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Tanaka, Yoshiharu; Saitoh, Yasukazu; Miwa, Nobuhiko

    2016-05-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that platinum nanocolloid (Pt-nc), combined with lower-dose gamma irradiation at 3, 5, and 7 Gy significantly decreased proliferation and accelerated apoptosis of the human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma-derived cell line KYSE-70. The aim of the present study was to determine, under the same conditions as our previous study where gamma rays combined with Pt-nc were carcinostatic to KYSE-70 cells, if we could induce a radioprotective or the radiation-sensitizing effect on the human normal esophageal epithelial cells (HEEpiC). HEEpiC were treated with various Pt-nc concentrations and then irradiated with various gamma-ray doses. The proliferative status of HEEpiC was evaluated using trypan blue dye-exclusion and WST-8 assays. The cellular and nucleic morphological features were determined using crystal violet and Hoechst 33342 stainings, respectively. The intracellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HEEpiC was evaluated with a nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) assay. The apoptotic status was detected with caspase-3, Bax, and Bcl-2 by Western blotting. Either Pt-nc or gamma irradiation could inhibit the growth of HEEpiC; however, their combined use exerted a significant proliferation-inhibitory effect in a Pt-nc dose-dependent manner than gamma irradiation alone. Pt-nc resulted in radiation sensitization rather than radiation protection on HEEpiC in vitro similar to KYSE-70 cells, when Pt-nc was administrated alone or combined with gamma irradiation. Thus, Pt-nc has an inhibitory effect on cell proliferation, a facilitative effect on apoptosis, and a certain degree of toxicity against HEEpiC. PMID:27483929

  20. Effects of Platinum Nanocolloid in Combination with Gamma Irradiation on Normal Human Esophageal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Tanaka, Yoshiharu; Saitoh, Yasukazu; Miwa, Nobuhiko

    2016-05-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that platinum nanocolloid (Pt-nc), combined with lower-dose gamma irradiation at 3, 5, and 7 Gy significantly decreased proliferation and accelerated apoptosis of the human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma-derived cell line KYSE-70. The aim of the present study was to determine, under the same conditions as our previous study where gamma rays combined with Pt-nc were carcinostatic to KYSE-70 cells, if we could induce a radioprotective or the radiation-sensitizing effect on the human normal esophageal epithelial cells (HEEpiC). HEEpiC were treated with various Pt-nc concentrations and then irradiated with various gamma-ray doses. The proliferative status of HEEpiC was evaluated using trypan blue dye-exclusion and WST-8 assays. The cellular and nucleic morphological features were determined using crystal violet and Hoechst 33342 stainings, respectively. The intracellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HEEpiC was evaluated with a nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) assay. The apoptotic status was detected with caspase-3, Bax, and Bcl-2 by Western blotting. Either Pt-nc or gamma irradiation could inhibit the growth of HEEpiC; however, their combined use exerted a significant proliferation-inhibitory effect in a Pt-nc dose-dependent manner than gamma irradiation alone. Pt-nc resulted in radiation sensitization rather than radiation protection on HEEpiC in vitro similar to KYSE-70 cells, when Pt-nc was administrated alone or combined with gamma irradiation. Thus, Pt-nc has an inhibitory effect on cell proliferation, a facilitative effect on apoptosis, and a certain degree of toxicity against HEEpiC.

  1. Long-term exposure of MCF-12A normal human breast epithelial cells to ethanol induces epithelial mesenchymal transition and oncogenic features

    PubMed Central

    GELFAND, ROBERT; VERNET, DOLORES; BRUHN, KEVIN; VADGAMA, JAYDUTT; GONZALEZ-CADAVID, NESTOR F.

    2016-01-01

    Alcoholism is associated with breast cancer incidence and progression, and moderate chronic consumption of ethanol is a risk factor. The mechanisms involved in alcohol's oncogenic effects are unknown, but it has been speculated that they may be mediated by acetaldehyde. We used the immortalized normal human epithelial breast cell line MCF-12A to determine whether short- or long-term exposure to ethanol or to acetaldehyde, using in vivo compatible ethanol concentrations, induces their oncogenic transformation and/or the acquisition of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). Cultures of MCF-12A cells were incubated with 25 mM ethanol or 2.5 mM acetaldehyde for 1 week, or with lower concentrations (1.0–2.5 mM for ethanol, 1.0 mM for acetaldehyde) for 4 weeks. In the 4-week incubation, cells were also tested for anchorage-independence, including isolation of soft agar selected cells (SASC) from the 2.5 mM ethanol incubations. Cells were analyzed by immunocytofluorescence, flow cytometry, western blotting, DNA microarrays, RT/PCR, and assays for miRs. We found that short-term exposure to ethanol, but not, in general, to acetaldehyde, was associated with transcriptional upregulation of the metallothionein family genes, alcohol metabolism genes, and genes suggesting the initiation of EMT, but without related phenotypic changes. Long-term exposure to the lower concentrations of ethanol or acetaldehyde induced frank EMT changes in the monolayer cultures and in SASC as demonstrated by changes in cellular phenotype, mRNA expression, and microRNA expression. This suggests that low concentrations of ethanol, with little or no mediation by acetaldehyde, induce EMT and some traits of oncogenic transformation such as anchorage-independence in normal breast epithelial cells. PMID:27035792

  2. One-hit effects in cancer: Altered proteome of morphologically normal colon crypts in Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Anthony T.; Patel, Bhavinkumar B.; Li, Xin-Ming; Seeholzer, Steven H.; Coudry, Renata A.; Cooper, Harry S.; Bellacosa, Alfonso; Boman, Bruce M.; Zhang, Tao; Litwin, Samuel; Ross, Eric A.; Conrad, Peggy; Crowell, James A.; Kopelovich, Levy; Knudson, Alfred

    2008-01-01

    We studied patients with Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP), because they are virtually certain to develop colon cancer, and because much is known about the causative APC gene. We hypothesized that the inherited heterozygous mutation itself leads to changes in the proteome of morphologically normal crypts and the proteins that changed may represent targets for preventive and therapeutic agents. We determined the differential protein expression of morphologically normal colon crypts of FAP patients versus those of individuals without the mutation, using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry and validation by 2D gel Western blotting. Approximately 13% of 1,695 identified proteins were abnormally expressed in the morphologically normal crypts of APC mutation carriers, indicating that a colon crypt cell under the one-hit state is already abnormal. Many of the expression changes affect pathways consistent with the function of the APC protein, including apoptosis, cell adhesion, cell motility, cytoskeletal organization and biogenesis, mitosis, transcription and oxidative stress response. Thus, heterozygosity for a mutant APC tumor suppressor gene alters the proteome of normal-appearing crypt cells in a gene-specific manner, consistent with a detectable one-hit event. These changes may represent the earliest biomarkers of colorectal cancer development, potentially leading to the identification of molecular targets for cancer prevention. PMID:18794146

  3. Expression and function of the protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor J (PTPRJ) in normal mammary epithelial cells and breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Smart, Chanel E; Askarian Amiri, Marjan E; Wronski, Ania; Dinger, Marcel E; Crawford, Joanna; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A; Vargas, Ana Cristina; Reid, Lynne; Simpson, Peter T; Song, Sarah; Wiesner, Christiane; French, Juliet D; Dave, Richa K; da Silva, Leonard; Purdon, Amy; Andrew, Megan; Mattick, John S; Lakhani, Sunil R; Brown, Melissa A; Kellie, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor J, PTPRJ, is a tumor suppressor gene that has been implicated in a range of cancers, including breast cancer, yet little is known about its role in normal breast physiology or in mammary gland tumorigenesis. In this paper we show that PTPRJ mRNA is expressed in normal breast tissue and reduced in corresponding tumors. Meta-analysis revealed that the gene encoding PTPRJ is frequently lost in breast tumors and that low expression of the transcript associated with poorer overall survival at 20 years. Immunohistochemistry of PTPRJ protein in normal human breast tissue revealed a distinctive apical localisation in the luminal cells of alveoli and ducts. Qualitative analysis of a cohort of invasive ductal carcinomas revealed retention of normal apical PTPRJ localization where tubule formation was maintained but that tumors mostly exhibited diffuse cytoplasmic staining, indicating that dysregulation of localisation associated with loss of tissue architecture in tumorigenesis. The murine ortholog, Ptprj, exhibited a similar localisation in normal mammary gland, and was differentially regulated throughout lactational development, and in an in vitro model of mammary epithelial differentiation. Furthermore, ectopic expression of human PTPRJ in HC11 murine mammary epithelial cells inhibited dome formation. These data indicate that PTPRJ may regulate differentiation of normal mammary epithelia and that dysregulation of protein localisation may be associated with tumorigenesis.

  4. The molecular and cellular response of normal and progressed human bronchial epithelial cells to HZE particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Story, Michael; Ding, Liang-Hao; Minna, John; Park, Seong-mi; Larsen, Jill

    We have used a model of non-oncogenically immortalized normal human bronchial epithelial cells to determine the response of such cells to particles found outside the protection of the earth’s electromagnetic field. We have identified an enhanced frequency of cellular transformation, as measured by growth in soft agar, for both 56Fe and 28Si (1 GeV/n) that is maximal (4-6 fold) at 0.25 Gy and 0.40 Gy, respectively. At 4 months post-irradiation 38 individual soft agar clones were isolated. These clones were characterized extensively for cellular and molecular changes. Gene expression analysis suggested that these clones had down-regulated several genes associated with anti-oxidant pathways including GLS2, GPX1 and 4, SOD2, PIG3, and NQO1 amongst others. As a result, many of these transformed clones were exposed to high levels of intracellular radical oxygen species (ROS), although there appeared not to be any enhanced mitochondrial ROS. DNA repair pathways associated with ATM/ATR signaling were also upregulated. However, these transformants do not develop into tumors when injected into immune-compromised mice, suggesting that they have not progressed sufficiently to become oncogenic. Therefore we chose 6 soft agar clones for continuous culture for an additional 14 months. Amongst the 6 clones, only one clone showed any significant change in phenotype. Clone 3kt-ff.2a, propagated for 18 months, were 2-fold more radioresistant, had a shortened doubling time and the background rate of transformation more than doubled. Furthermore, the morphology of transformed clones changed. Clones from this culture are being compared to the original clone as well as the parental HBEC3KT and will be injected into immune-compromised mice for oncogenic potential. Oncogenically progressed HBECs, HBEC3KT cells that overexpress a mutant RAS gene and where p53 has been knocked down, designated HBEC3KTR53, responded quite differently to HZE particle exposure. First, these cells are more

  5. PAC exhibits potent anti-colon cancer properties through targeting cyclin D1 and suppressing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Al-Qasem, Abeer; Al-Howail, Huda A; Al-Swailem, Mashael; Al-Mazrou, Amer; Al-Otaibi, Basem; Al-Jammaz, Ibrahim; Al-Khalaf, Huda H; Aboussekhra, Abdelilah

    2016-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of cancer morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although response rates and overall survival have been improved in recent years, resistance to multiple drug combinations is inevitable. Therefore, the development of more efficient drugs, with fewer side effects is urgently needed. To this end, we have investigated in the present report the effect of PAC, a novel cucumin analogue, on CRC cells both in vitro and in vivo. We have shown that PAC induces apoptosis, mainly via the internal mitochondrial route, and inhibits cell proliferation through delaying the cell cycle at G2/M phase. Interestingly, the pro-apoptotic effect was mediated through STAT3-dependent down-regulation of cyclin D1 and its downstream target survivin. Indeed, change in the expression level of cyclin D1 modulated the expression of survivin and the response of CRC cells to PAC. Furthermore, using the ChIP assay, we have shown PAC-dependent reduction in the binding of STAT3 to the cyclin D1 promoter in vivo. Additionally, PAC suppressed the epithelial-to-mesenchymal process through down-regulating the mesenchymal markers (N-cadherin, vimentin and Twist1) and inhibiting the invasion/migration abilities of the CRC cells via repressing the pro-migration/invasion protein kinases AKT and ERK1/2. In addition, PAC inhibited tumor growth and repressed the JAK2/STAT3, AKT/mTOR and MEK/ERK pathways as well as their common downstream effectors cyclin D1 and survivin in humanized CRC xenografts. Collectively, these results indicate that PAC has potent anti-CRC effects, and therefore could constitute an effective alternative chemotherapeutic agent, which may consolidate the adjuvant treatment of colon cancer.

  6. p120 Catenin is required for normal tubulogenesis but not epithelial integrity in developing mouse pancreas.

    PubMed

    Hendley, Audrey M; Provost, Elayne; Bailey, Jennifer M; Wang, Yue J; Cleveland, Megan H; Blake, Danielle; Bittman, Ross W; Roeser, Jeffrey C; Maitra, Anirban; Reynolds, Albert B; Leach, Steven D

    2015-03-01

    The intracellular protein p120 catenin aids in maintenance of cell-cell adhesion by regulating E-cadherin stability in epithelial cells. In an effort to understand the biology of p120 catenin in pancreas development, we ablated p120 catenin in mouse pancreatic progenitor cells, which resulted in deletion of p120 catenin in all epithelial lineages of the developing mouse pancreas: islet, acinar, centroacinar, and ductal. Loss of p120 catenin resulted in formation of dilated epithelial tubules, expansion of ductal epithelia, loss of acinar cells, and the induction of pancreatic inflammation. Aberrant branching morphogenesis and tubulogenesis were also observed. Throughout development, the phenotype became more severe, ultimately resulting in an abnormal pancreas comprised primarily of duct-like epithelium expressing early progenitor markers. In pancreatic tissue lacking p120 catenin, overall epithelial architecture remained intact; however, actin cytoskeleton organization was disrupted, an observation associated with increased cytoplasmic PKCζ. Although we observed reduced expression of adherens junction proteins E-cadherin, β-catenin, and α-catenin, p120 catenin family members p0071, ARVCF, and δ-catenin remained present at cell membranes in homozygous p120(f/f) pancreases, potentially providing stability for maintenance of epithelial integrity during development. Adult mice homozygous for deletion of p120 catenin displayed dilated main pancreatic ducts, chronic pancreatitis, acinar to ductal metaplasia (ADM), and mucinous metaplasia that resembles PanIN1a. Taken together, our data demonstrate an essential role for p120 catenin in pancreas development.

  7. β-III tubulin modulates the behavior of Snail overexpressed during the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sobierajska, Katarzyna; Wieczorek, Katarzyna; Ciszewski, Wojciech M; Sacewicz-Hofman, Izabela; Wawro, Marta E; Wiktorska, Magdalena; Boncela, Joanna; Papiewska-Pajak, Izabela; Kwasniak, Pawel; Wyroba, Elzbieta; Cierniewski, Czeslaw S; Niewiarowska, Jolanta

    2016-09-01

    Class III β-tubulin (TUBB3) is a marker of drug resistance expressed in a variety of solid tumors. Originally, it was described as an important element of chemoresistance to taxanes. Recent studies have revealed that TUBB3 is also involved in an adaptive response to a microenvironmental stressor, e.g. low oxygen levels and poor nutrient supply in some solid tumors, independently of the microtubule targeting agent. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that TUBB3 is a marker of biological aggressiveness associated with modulation of metastatic abilities in colon cancer. The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a basic cellular process by which epithelial cells lose their epithelial behavior and become invasive cells involved in cancer metastasis. Snail is a zinc-finger transcription factor which is able to induce EMT through the repression of E-cadherin expression. In the presented studies we focused on the analysis of the TUBB3 role in EMT-induced colon adenocarcinoma cell lines HT-29 and LS180. We observed a positive correlation between Snail presence and TUBB3 upregulation in tested adenocarcinoma cell lines. The cellular and behavioral analysis revealed for the first time that elevated TUBB3 level is functionally linked to increased cell migration and invasive capability of EMT induced cells. Additionally, the post-transcriptional modifications (phosphorylation, glycosylation) appear to regulate the cellular localization of TUBB3 and its phosphorylation, observed in cytoskeleton, is probably involved in cell motility modulation.

  8. Fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy of tissue autofluorescence in normal and diseased colon measured ex vivo using a fiber-optic probe

    PubMed Central

    Coda, Sergio; Thompson, Alex J.; Kennedy, Gordon T.; Roche, Kim L.; Ayaru, Lakshmana; Bansi, Devinder S.; Stamp, Gordon W.; Thillainayagam, Andrew V.; French, Paul M. W.; Dunsby, Chris

    2014-01-01

    We present an ex vivo study of temporally and spectrally resolved autofluorescence in a total of 47 endoscopic excision biopsy/resection specimens from colon, using pulsed excitation laser sources operating at wavelengths of 375 nm and 435 nm. A paired analysis of normal and neoplastic (adenomatous polyp) tissue specimens obtained from the same patient yielded a significant difference in the mean spectrally averaged autofluorescence lifetime −570 ± 740 ps (p = 0.021, n = 12). We also investigated the fluorescence signature of non-neoplastic polyps (n = 6) and inflammatory bowel disease (n = 4) compared to normal tissue in a small number of specimens. PMID:24575345

  9. Thermal coagulation-induced changes of the optical properties of normal and adenomatous human colon tissues in vitro in the spectral range 400 1100 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Huilan; Xing, Da; Wei, Huajiang; Gu, Huaimin; Wu, Guoyong; Lu, Jianjun

    2008-04-01

    The absorption coefficients, the reduced scattering coefficients and the optical penetration depths for native and coagulated human normal and adenomatous colon tissues in vitro were determined over the range of 400-1100 nm using a spectrophotometer with an internal integrating sphere system, and the inverse adding-doubling method was applied to calculate the tissue optical properties from diffuse reflectance and total transmittance measurements. The experimental results showed that in the range of 400-1100 nm there were larger absorption coefficients (P < 0.01) and smaller reduced scattering coefficients (P < 0.01) for adenomatous colon tissues than for normal colon tissues, and there were smaller optical penetration depths for adenomatous colon tissues than for normal colon tissues, especially in the near-infrared wavelength. Thermal coagulation induced significant increase of the absorption coefficients and reduced scattering coefficients for the normal and adenomatous colon tissues, and significantly reduced decrease of the optical penetration depths for the normal and adenomatous colon tissues. The smaller optical penetration depth for coagulated adenomatous colon tissues is a disadvantage for laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT). It is necessary to adjust the application parameters of lasers to achieve optimal therapy.

  10. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING OF NORMAL HUMAN BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS EXPOSED TO TRIVALENT ARSENICALS AND DIMETHYLTHIOARSINIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lung is a major target for arsenic carcinogenesis in humans. However, the carcinogenic mode of action of arsenicals is unknown. We investigated, in human bronchial epithelial (BEAS2B) cells, the effects of inorganic arsenic (iAsIII), monomethylarsonous acid (MMAIII), dimethylarsi...

  11. Lysyl oxidase-like 2 promotes migration in noninvasive breast cancer cells but not in normal breast epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hollosi, Peter; Yakushiji, Jana K; Fong, Keith S K; Csiszar, Katalin; Fong, Sheri F T

    2009-07-15

    A growing number of studies indicate the importance of the lysyl oxidase family in the promotion of epithelial neoplasms towards their more aggressive forms. However, the role of individual family members in carcinoma progression has yet to be ascertained. In this study, we analyzed LOXL2 expression in malignantly transformed MCF-7 and normal MCF-10A mammary epithelial cell line clones stably transduced with LOXL2 in vitro, and in normal and cancerous breast tissue samples in vivo. We found LOXL2 to be catalytically active in both MCF-7 and MCF-10 clones. LOXL2 overexpression promoted a more mesenchymal morphology in both cell types, but LOXL2-induced increase in migratory ability could only be established in MCF-7 clones. We demonstrated altered localization of the LOXL2 protein in breast cancer tissue compared to normal mammary tissue, and altered localization and processing of LOXL2 protein in breast cancer cell lines compared to normal cell lines, which may allow LOXL2 to interact with different intra and extracellular components during tumor progression. Results support the role of LOXL2 in selectively promoting a metastatic phenotype in breast tumor cells. Additional data suggest epigenetic molecular mechanisms in tumor specific regulation of LOXL2 expression that could be explored as a molecular target in the prevention of breast cancer progression.

  12. Scribble is required for normal epithelial cell–cell contacts and lumen morphogenesis in the mammalian lung

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Laura L.; Schnatwinkel, Carsten; Hazelwood, Lee; Chessum, Lauren; Paudyal, Anju; Hilton, Helen; Romero, M. Rosario; Wilde, Jonathan; Bogani, Debora; Sanderson, Jeremy; Formstone, Caroline; Murdoch, Jennifer N.; Niswander, Lee A.; Greenfield, Andy; Dean, Charlotte H.

    2013-01-01

    During lung development, proper epithelial cell arrangements are critical for the formation of an arborized network of tubes. Each tube requires a lumen, the diameter of which must be tightly regulated to enable optimal lung function. Lung branching and lumen morphogenesis require close epithelial cell–cell contacts that are maintained as a result of adherens junctions, tight junctions and by intact apical–basal (A/B) polarity. However, the molecular mechanisms that maintain epithelial cohesion and lumen diameter in the mammalian lung are unknown. Here we show that Scribble, a protein implicated in planar cell polarity (PCP) signalling, is necessary for normal lung morphogenesis. Lungs of the Scrib mouse mutant Circletail (Crc) are abnormally shaped with fewer airways, and these airways often lack a visible, ‘open’ lumen. Mechanistically we show that Scrib genetically interacts with the core PCP gene Vangl2 in the developing lung and that the distribution of PCP pathway proteins and Rho mediated cytoskeletal modification is perturbed in ScribCrc/Crc lungs. However A/B polarity, which is disrupted in Drosophila Scrib mutants, is largely unaffected. Notably, we find that Scrib mediates functions not attributed to other PCP proteins in the lung. Specifically, Scrib localises to both adherens and tight junctions of lung epithelia and knockdown of Scrib in lung explants and organotypic cultures leads to reduced cohesion of lung epithelial cells. Live imaging of Scrib knockdown lungs shows that Scrib does not affect bud bifurcation, as previously shown for the PCP protein Celsr1, but is required to maintain epithelial cohesion. To understand the mechanism leading to reduced cell–cell association, we show that Scrib associates with β-catenin in embryonic lung and the sub-cellular distribution of adherens and tight junction proteins is perturbed in mutant lung epithelia. Our data reveal that Scrib is required for normal lung epithelial organisation and lumen

  13. Expression of a TGF-{beta} regulated cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor in normal and immortalized airway epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, L.A.; Bloomfield, C.; Johnson, N.F.

    1995-12-01

    Tumors arising from epithelial cells, including lung cancers are frequently resistant to factors that regulate growth and differentiation in normal in normal cells. Once such factor is transforming growth factor-{Beta} (TGF-{Beta}). Escape from the growth-inhibitory effects of TGF-{Beta} is thought to be a key step in the transformation of airway epithelial cells. most lung cancer cell lines require serum for growth. In contrast, normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells are exquisitely sensitive to growth-inhibitory and differentiating effects of TGF-{Beta}. The recent identification of a novel cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p15{sup INK4B}, which is regulated by TGF-{Beta}, suggests a mechanism by which TGF-{Beta} mediates growth arrest in NHBE cells. The purpose of this study was two-fold: (1) to determine if p15{sup INK4B} is induced by TGF-{Beta} in NHBE cells or immortalized bronchial epithelial (R.1) cells and if that induction corresponds to a G1/S cell-cycle arrest; (2) to determine the temporal relationship between p15{sup INK4B} induction, cell-cycle arrest, and the phosphorylation state of the pRB because it is thought that p15{sup INK4B} acts indirectly by preventing phosphorylation of the RB gene product. In this study, expression of p15{sup INK4B} was examined in NHBE cells and R.1 cells at different time intervals following TGF-{Beta} treatment. The expression of this kinase inhibitor and its relationship to the cell and the pRb phosphorylation state were examined in cells that were both sensitive (NHBE) and resistant (R.1) to the effects of TGF-{Beta}. These results suggest that the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p15{sup INK4B}, is involved in airway epithelial cell differentiation and that loss or reduction of expression plays a role in the resistance of transformed or neoplastic cells to the growth-inhibitory effects of TGF-{Beta}.

  14. Expression of four CEA family antigens (CEA, NCA, BGP and CGM2) in normal and cancerous gastric epithelial cells: up-regulation of BGP and CGM2 in carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kinugasa, T; Kuroki, M; Takeo, H; Matsuo, Y; Ohshima, K; Yamashita, Y; Shirakusa, T; Matsuoka, Y

    1998-03-30

    Four human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family members, CEA (CD66e), non-specific cross-reacting antigen (NCA, CD66c), biliary glycoprotein (BGP, CD66a) and CEA gene-family member 2 (CGM2), are expressed in normal mucosal epithelia of the colon. Expression of BGP and CGM2 has recently been demonstrated to be down-regulated in colorectal adenocarcinomas. We have now investigated the expression of the 4 CEA family antigens in gastric adenocarcinoma and carcinoma cell lines in comparison with adjacent normal gastric mucosa. The transcripts of the CEA, NCA and BGP genes evaluated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction were detectable at various levels in all the gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines tested, while CGM2 mRNA was detectable in the cell lines of poorly differentiated but not of well-differentiated carcinomas. The levels of CEA mRNA in normal gastric mucosa were variable but mostly increased in adenocarcinomas. The sparse expression of NCA observed in the normal tissues was markedly up-regulated in the carcinomas. In contrast to previous findings on normal and cancerous colonic tissues, the transcripts of CGM2 were totally undetectable and those of BGP were recognized only marginally, if at all, in normal gastric mucosa, while both messages were detected at significant levels in most of the gastric adenocarcinomas. This was confirmed by in situ hybridization. Our findings indicate that expression of the CEA family antigens, particularly that of BGP and CGM2, is differently regulated in epithelial cells of the colon and the stomach.

  15. MGSA/GRO transcription is differentially regulated in normal retinal pigment epithelial and melanoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Shattuck, R L; Wood, L D; Jaffe, G J; Richmond, A

    1994-01-01

    We have characterized constitutive and cytokine-regulated MGSA/GRO alpha, -beta, and -gamma gene expression in normal retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and a malignant melanoma cell line (Hs294T) to discern the mechanism for MGSA/GRO constitutive expression in melanoma. In RPE cells, constitutive MGSA/GRO alpha, -beta, and -gamma mRNAs are not detected by Northern (RNA) blot analysis although nuclear runoff experiments show that all three genes are transcribed. In Hs294T cells, constitutive MGSA/GRO alpha expression is detectable by Northern blot analysis, and the level of basal MGSA/GRO alpha transcription is 8- to 30-fold higher than in RPE cells. In contrast, in Hs294T cells, basal MGSA/GRO beta and -gamma transcription is only twofold higher than in RPE cells and no beta or gamma mRNA is detected by Northern blot. These data suggest that the constitutive MGSA/GRO alpha mRNA in Hs294T cells is due to increased basal MGSA/GRO alpha gene transcription. The cytokines interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) significantly increase the mRNA levels for all three MGSA/GRO isoforms in Hs294T and RPE cells, and both transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms are operational. Nuclear runoff assays indicate that in RPE cells, a 1-h IL-1 treatment induces a 10- to 20-fold increase in transcription of MGSA/GRO alpha, -beta and -gamma but only a 2-fold increase in Hs294T cells. Similarly, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene analysis using the MGSA/GRO alpha, -beta, and -gamma promoter regions demonstrates that IL-1 treatment induces an 8- to 14-fold increase in CAT activity in RPE cells but only a 2-fold increase in Hs294T cells. The effect of deletion or mutation of the MGSA/GRO alpha NF-kappa B element, combined with data from gel mobility shift analyses, indicates that the NF-kappa B p50/p65 heterodimer in RPE cells plays an important role in IL-1- and TNF alpha-enhanced gene transcription. In Hs294T cells, gel shift

  16. Norcantharidin Suppresses Colon Cancer Cell Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition by Inhibiting the αvβ6-ERK-Ets1 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Cheng; Li, Zequn; Niu, Zhengchuan; Niu, Wei; Xu, Zongquan; Gao, Huijie; Niu, Weibo; Wang, JiaYong; He, Zhaobin; Gao, Chao; Lin, Pengfei; Agrez, Michael; Zhang, Zongli; Niu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Norcantharidin (NCTD) is an efficacious anti-cancer drug that has been used in China for many years, but its underlying mechanism of action is still not fully understood. In the present study, we found that NCTD could induce morphological changes in colon cancer cells, causing a transition from a spindle-shaped morphology to a typical round or oval shape, which was indicative of a mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) process. Next, we investigated the mechanism by which NCTD induced the MET process. Using a transwell assay, we found that NCTD could suppress the migratory and invasive ability of colon cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, NCTD suppressed the expression of integrin αvβ6, MMP-3, and MMP-9 as well as the polymerization of F-actin, further supporting its suppressive effect on migratory and invasive ability. Furthermore, the expression of αvβ6, N-cadherin, vimentin and phosphorylated ERK was decreased, while the expression of E-cadherin was up-regulated. We verified that phosphorylated Ets1 was down-regulated substantially after treatment with NCTD. Taken together, our data demonstrated that NCTD could inhibit the EMT process of colon cancer cells by inhibiting the αvβ6-ERK-Ets1 signaling pathway. This study revealed part of the mechanism through which NCTD could reverse the EMT process in colon cancer. PMID:26846153

  17. Dietary fructooligosaccharide, xylooligosaccharide and gum arabic have variable effects on cecal and colonic microbiota and epithelial cell proliferation in mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Howard, M D; Gordon, D T; Garleb, K A; Kerley, M S

    1995-10-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine if supplementing soluble fiber (fructooligosaccharide, xylooligosaccharide or gum arabic) to a semi-elemental diet would beneficially change cecal and colonic microbiota populations and enhance epithelial cell proliferation. Experiments 1 and 2 used identical dietary regimens; mice and rats were given free access to a powdered semi-elemental diet. Animals were assigned to one of the four following treatment groups: control, no supplemental dietary fiber, fructooligosaccharide, xylooligosaccharide and gum arabic. Dietary fiber was supplied via drinking water at 30 g/L. In Experiment 1 populations of Bifidobacteria and total anaerobic flora were enumerated from the contents of the cecum and colon of weanling mice. Consumption of fructooligosaccharide increased (P < 0.05) the concentrations of Bifidobacteria and the ratio of Bifidobacteria to total anaerobic flora. In Experiment 2 tissue from the cecum and distal colon of weanling rats was examined for morphological changes of the mucosa. Consumption of xylooligosaccharide increased (P < 0.05) cecal crypt depth and labeling index relative to the other three treatments. Consumption of gum arabic and the control diet increased (P < 0.01) cecal proliferation zone. Consumption of xylooligosaccharide and the control diet increased (P < 0.01) cecal cell density (number of cells in a vertical-half of the crypt). Distal colonic crypt depth was greatest (P < 0.05) in controls and rats fed fructooligosaccharide, intermediate in those fed gum arabic, and smallest in those fed xylooligosaccharide. These results suggest that fructooligosaccharide effectively stimulates growth of Bifidobacteria and xylooligosaccharide supports a modest enhancement of cecal epithelial cell proliferation.

  18. Susceptibility of human tonsillar epithelial cells to enterovirus 71 with normal cytokine response.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guang-Cheng; Guo, Ni-Jun; Grénman, Reidar; Wang, Hong; Wang, Ying; Vuorenmma, Minna; Zhang, Qing; Zhang, Shuang; Li, Hui-Ying; Pang, Li-Li; Li, Dan-Di; Jin, Miao; Sun, Xiao-Man; Kong, Xiang-Yu; Duan, Zhao-Jun

    2016-07-01

    A recent histopathologic study implicated human tonsillar crypt epithelium as an important site for EV71 replication in EV71-caused fatal cases. This study aimed to confirm the susceptibility of human tonsillar epithelium to EV71. Two human tonsillar epithelial cell lines (UT-SCC-60A and UT-SCC-60B) were susceptive to EV71, and PI3K/AKT, p38, ERK1/2, and JNK1/2 signal pathways were activated. Interferon-α, IL-8, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-12p40 were induced and regulated by PI3K/AKT, p38, ERK1/2, and JNK1/2 signal pathways. PI3K/AKT pathway activation appeared to suppress the induction of TNF-α, which induced cell survival by inhibiting GSK-3β. The activation of NF-κB was observed but inhibited by these pathways in EV71 infection. Furthermore, ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 were essential for efficient EV71 replication. Human tonsillar epithelial cells support EV71 replication and display innate antiviral immunity in vitro, indicating that human tonsillar epithelial cells may be novel targets for EV71 infection and replication in vivo. PMID:27107253

  19. Susceptibility of human tonsillar epithelial cells to enterovirus 71 with normal cytokine response.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guang-Cheng; Guo, Ni-Jun; Grénman, Reidar; Wang, Hong; Wang, Ying; Vuorenmma, Minna; Zhang, Qing; Zhang, Shuang; Li, Hui-Ying; Pang, Li-Li; Li, Dan-Di; Jin, Miao; Sun, Xiao-Man; Kong, Xiang-Yu; Duan, Zhao-Jun

    2016-07-01

    A recent histopathologic study implicated human tonsillar crypt epithelium as an important site for EV71 replication in EV71-caused fatal cases. This study aimed to confirm the susceptibility of human tonsillar epithelium to EV71. Two human tonsillar epithelial cell lines (UT-SCC-60A and UT-SCC-60B) were susceptive to EV71, and PI3K/AKT, p38, ERK1/2, and JNK1/2 signal pathways were activated. Interferon-α, IL-8, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-12p40 were induced and regulated by PI3K/AKT, p38, ERK1/2, and JNK1/2 signal pathways. PI3K/AKT pathway activation appeared to suppress the induction of TNF-α, which induced cell survival by inhibiting GSK-3β. The activation of NF-κB was observed but inhibited by these pathways in EV71 infection. Furthermore, ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 were essential for efficient EV71 replication. Human tonsillar epithelial cells support EV71 replication and display innate antiviral immunity in vitro, indicating that human tonsillar epithelial cells may be novel targets for EV71 infection and replication in vivo.

  20. Secondhand smoke inhibits both Cl- and K+ conductances in normal human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Savitski, Amy N; Mesaros, Clementina; Blair, Ian A; Cohen, Noam A; Kreindler, James L

    2009-01-01

    Secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure is an independent risk factor for asthma, rhinosinusitis, and more severe respiratory tract infections in children and adults. Impaired mucociliary clearance with subsequent mucus retention contributes to the pathophysiology of each of these diseases, suggesting that altered epithelial salt and water transport may play an etiological role. To test the hypothesis that SHS would alter epithelial ion transport, we designed a system for in vitro exposure of mature, well-differentiated human bronchial epithelial cells to SHS. We show that SHS exposure inhibits cAMP-stimulated, bumetanide-sensitive anion secretion by 25 to 40% in a time-dependent fashion in these cells. Increasing the amount of carbon monoxide to 100 ppm from 5 ppm did not increase the amount of inhibition, and filtering SHS reduced inhibition significantly. It was determined that SHS inhibited cAMP-dependent apical membrane chloride conductance by 25% and Ba2+-sensitive basolateral membrane potassium conductance by 50%. These data confirm previous findings that cigarette smoke inhibits chloride secretion in a novel model of smoke exposure designed to mimic SHS exposure. They also extend previous findings to demonstrate an effect on basolateral K+ conductance. Therefore, pharmacological agents that increase either apical membrane chloride conductance or basolateral membrane potassium conductance might be of therapeutic benefit in patients with diseases related to SHS exposure. PMID:19943936

  1. Growth Factor–dependent Activation of αvβ3 Integrin in Normal Epithelial Cells: Implications for Tumor Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Trusolino, Livio; Serini, Guido; Cecchini, Germana; Besati, Cristina; Ambesi-Impiombato, Francesco Saverio; Marchisio, Pier Carlo; De Filippi, Rosaria

    1998-01-01

    Integrin activation is a multifaceted phenomenon leading to increased affinity and avidity for matrix ligands. To investigate whether cytokines produced during stromal infiltration of carcinoma cells activate nonfunctional epithelial integrins, a cellular system of human thyroid clones derived from normal glands (HTU-5) and papillary carcinomas (HTU-34) was employed. In HTU-5 cells, αvβ3 integrin was diffused all over the membrane, disconnected from the cytoskeleton, and unable to mediate adhesion. Conversely, in HTU-34 cells, αvβ3 was clustered at focal contacts (FCs) and mediated firm attachment and spreading. αvβ3 recruitment at FCs and ligand-binding activity, essentially identical to those of HTU-34, occurred in HTU-5 cells upon treatment with hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF). The HTU-34 clone secreted HGF/SF and its receptor was constitutively tyrosine phosphorylated suggesting an autocrine loop responsible for αvβ3 activated state. Antibody-mediated inhibition of HGF/SF function in HTU-34 cells disrupted αvβ3 enrichment at FCs and impaired adhesion. Accordingly, activation of αvβ3 in normal cells was produced by HTU-34 conditioned medium on the basis of its content of HGF/SF. These results provide the first example of a growth factor–driven integrin activation mechanism in normal epithelial cells and uncover the importance of cytokine-based autocrine loops for the physiological control of integrin activation. PMID:9722624

  2. Characterization of Epithelial Progenitors in Normal Human Palatine Tonsils and Their HPV16 E6/E7-Induced Perturbation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sung Yoon Catherine; Kannan, Nagarajan; Zhang, Lewei; Martinez, Victor; Rosin, Miriam P.; Eaves, Connie J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Human palatine tonsils are oropharyngeal lymphoid tissues containing multiple invaginations (crypts) in which the continuity of the outer surface epithelium is disrupted and the isolated epithelial cells intermingle with other cell types. We now show that primitive epithelial cells detectable in vitro in 2D colony assays and in a 3D culture system are CD44+NGFR+ and present in both surface and crypt regions. Transcriptome analysis indicated a high similarity between CD44+NGFR+ cells in both regions, although those isolated from the crypt contained a higher proportion of the most primitive (holo)clonogenic cells. Lentiviral transduction of CD44+NGFR+ cells from both regions with human papillomavirus 16-encoded E6/E7 prolonged their growth in 2D cultures and caused aberrant differentiation in 3D cultures. Our findings therefore reveal a shared, site-independent, hierarchical organization, differentiation potential, and transcriptional profile of normal human tonsillar epithelial progenitor cells. They also introduce a new model for investigating the mechanisms of their transformation. PMID:26527383

  3. HMGA1 silencing restores normal stem cell characteristics in colon cancer stem cells by increasing p53 levels

    PubMed Central

    Puca, Francesca; Colamaio, Marianna; Federico, Antonella; Gemei, Marica; Tosti, Nadia; Bastos, André Uchimura; Vecchio, Luigi Del; Pece, Salvatore; Battista, Sabrina; Fusco, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    High-mobility group A1 (HMGA1) proteins are architectural chromatinic proteins, abundantly expressed during embryogenesis and in most cancer tissues, but expressed at low levels or absent in normal adult tissues. Several studies have demonstrated that HMGA1 proteins play a causal role in neoplastic cell transformation. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of these proteins in the control of cancer stem cells (CSCs), which have emerged as a preferred target in cancer therapy, because of their role in cancer recurrence. We observed that HMGA1 is overexpressed in colon tumour stem cell (CTSC) lines compared to normal and colon cancer tissues. We demonstrated that HMGA1 silencing in CTSCs increases stem cell quiescence and reduces self-renewal and sphere-forming efficiency (SFE). The latter, together with the upregulation and asymmetric distribution of NUMB, is indicative of the recovery of an asymmetric division pattern, typical of normal stem cells. We further found that HMGA1 transcriptionally regulates p53, which is known to control the balance between symmetric and asymmetric divisions in CSCs. Therefore, our data indicate a critical role for HMGA1 in regulating both self-renewal and the symmetric/asymmetric division ratio in CSCs, suggesting that blocking HMGA1 function may be an effective anti-cancer therapy. PMID:24833610

  4. Epithelial Cell-Derived a Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase-17 Confers Resistance to Colonic Inflammation Through EGFR Activation

    PubMed Central

    Shimoda, Masayuki; Horiuchi, Keisuke; Sasaki, Aya; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Okabayashi, Koji; Hasegawa, Hirotoshi; Kitagawa, Yuko; Okada, Yasunori

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial regeneration is a key process for the recovery from ulcerative colitis (UC). Here we demonstrate that a disintegrin and metalloproteinase-17 (ADAM17), a main sheddase for tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, is essential for defensive epithelial properties against UC by promoting epithelial cell growth and goblet cell differentiation in mouse and human. Mice with systemic deletion of Adam17 developed severe dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis when compared to mice with myeloid cell Adam17 deletion or control littermates. ADAM17 was predominantly expressed by regenerating epithelia in control mice, and its loss or inhibition attenuated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation, epithelial proliferation, mucus production and barrier functions. Conversely, ectopic EGFR stimulation promoted epithelial regeneration thereby partially rescuing the severe colitis caused by ADAM17 deficiency. In UC patients, epithelial ADAM17 expression positively correlated with both cell proliferation and goblet cell number. These findings suggest that maintaining ADAM17–EGFR epithelial signaling is necessary for the recovery from UC and would be beneficial to therapeutic strategies targeting ADAM17-mediated TNF-α shedding. PMID:27077118

  5. Normal mammary epithelial cells promote carcinoma basement membrane invasion by inducing microtubule-rich protrusions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Meng-Horng; Wu, Pei-Hsun; Gilkes, Daniele; Aifuwa, Ivie; Wirtz, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Recent work suggests that the dissemination of tumor cells may occur in parallel with, and even preceed, tumor growth. The mechanism for this early invasion is largely unknown. Here, we find that mammary epithelial cells (MECs) induce neighboring breast carcinoma cells (BCCs) to cross the basement membrane by secreting soluble laminin. Laminin continuously produced by MECs induce long membrane cellular protrusions in BCCs that promote their contractility and invasion into the surrounding matrix. These protrusions depend on microtubule bundles assembled de novo through laminin-integrin β1 signaling. These results describe how non-cancerous MECs can actively participate in the invasive process of BCCs. PMID:26334095

  6. The putative role of members of the CEA-gene family (CEA, NCA an BGP) as ligands for the bacterial colonization of different human epithelial tissues.

    PubMed

    Leusch, H G; Drzeniek, Z; Hefta, S A; Markos-Pusztai, Z; Wagener, C

    1991-04-01

    Immobilized purified CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen), NCA (non-specific crossreacting antigen) and BGP I (biliary glycoprotein I) bind strains of E. coli (including EPEC) and some Salmonella species (including S. typhi, S. paratyphi A + B and S. java) while Shigella-, Yersinia- and Bacteroides- strains showed no adhesion. The binding was of high avidity, heat sensitive, dose dependent, saturable and nearly completely abolished in the presence of 10 mM alpha-methylmannoside. From inhibition studies with aromatic mannose compounds, it was suggested that in contrast to Salmonella strains E. coli strains exhibit a higher hydrophobicity in the binding region adjacent to the CEA-, NCA- and BGP-binding site. By further inhibition experiments it could be demonstrated that E. coli and Salmonella strains bind to high-mannose type oligosaccharides of these molecules via lectins on bacterial type I fimbriae. We conclude that the expression of products of this gene family on different human epithelial cells (colon-, bile canaliculi, uroepithel etc.) may function as ligands for bacterial colonization of epithelial tissues.

  7. Farnesoid X receptor signal is involved in deoxycholic acid-induced intestinal metaplasia of normal human gastric epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu; Chen, Xin; Zhou, Lu; Wang, Bang-Mao

    2015-11-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) signaling pathway is known to be involved in the metabolism of bile acid, glucose and lipid. In the present study, we demonstrated that 400 µmol/l deoxycholic acid (DCA) stimulation promotes the proliferation of normal human gastric epithelial cells (GES-1). In addition, DCA activated FXR and increased the expression of intestinal metaplasia genes, including caudal-related homeobox transcription factor 2 (Cdx2) and mucin 2 (MUC2). The treatment of FXR agonist GW4064/antagonist guggulsterone (Gug.) significantly increased/decreased the expression levels of FXR, Cdx2 and MUC2 protein in DCA-induced GES-1 cells. GW4064/Gug. also enhanced/reduced the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity and binding of the Cdx2 promoter region and NF-κB, the most common subunit p50 protein. Taken together, the results indicated that DCA is capable of modulating the expression of Cdx2 and the downstream MUC2 via the nuclear receptor FXR-NF-κB activity in normal gastric epithelial cells. FXR signaling pathway may therefore be involved in the intestinal metaplasia of human gastric mucosa.

  8. DNA methylation signatures of the AIRE promoter in thymic epithelial cells, thymomas and normal tissues.

    PubMed

    Kont, Vivian; Murumägi, Astrid; Tykocinski, Lars-Oliver; Kinkel, Sarah A; Webster, Kylie E; Kisand, Kai; Tserel, Liina; Pihlap, Maire; Ströbel, Philipp; Scott, Hamish S; Marx, Alexander; Kyewski, Bruno; Peterson, Pärt

    2011-12-01

    Mutations in the AIRE gene cause autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy (APECED), which is associated with autoimmunity towards several peripheral organs. The AIRE protein is almost exclusively expressed in medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTEC) and CpG methylation in the promoter of the AIRE gene has been suggested to control its tissue-specific expression pattern. We found that in human AIRE-positive medullary and AIRE-negative cortical epithelium, the AIRE promoter is hypomethylated, whereas in thymocytes, the promoter had high level of CpG methylation. Likewise, in mouse mTECs the AIRE promoter was uniformly hypomethylated. In the same vein, the AIRE promoter was hypomethylated in AIRE-negative thymic epithelial tumors (thymomas) and in several peripheral tissues. Our data are compatible with the notion that promoter hypomethylation is necessary but not sufficient for tissue-specific regulation of the AIRE gene. In contrast, a positive correlation between AIRE expression and histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation, an active chromatin mark, was found in the AIRE promoter in human and mouse TECs.

  9. Normal human mammary epithelial cells spontaneously escape senescence and acquire genomic changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanov, S. R.; Kozakiewicz, B. K.; Holst, C. R.; Stampfer, M. R.; Haupt, L. M.; Tlsty, T. D.

    2001-01-01

    Senescence and genomic integrity are thought to be important barriers in the development of malignant lesions. Human fibroblasts undergo a limited number of cell divisions before entering an irreversible arrest, called senescence. Here we show that human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs) do not conform to this paradigm of senescence. In contrast to fibroblasts, HMECs exhibit an initial growth phase that is followed by a transient growth plateau (termed selection or M0; refs 3-5), from which proliferative cells emerge to undergo further population doublings (approximately 20-70), before entering a second growth plateau (previously termed senescence or M1; refs 4-6). We find that the first growth plateau exhibits characteristics of senescence but is not an insurmountable barrier to further growth. HMECs emerge from senescence, exhibit eroding telomeric sequences and ultimately enter telomere-based crisis to generate the types of chromosomal abnormalities seen in the earliest lesions of breast cancer. Growth past senescent barriers may be a pivotal event in the earliest steps of carcinogenesis, providing many genetic changes that predicate oncogenic evolution. The differences between epithelial cells and fibroblasts provide new insights into the mechanistic basis of neoplastic transformation.

  10. Colonic ornithine decarboxylase in inflammatory bowel disease: ileorectal activity gradient, guanosine triphosphate stimulation, and association with epithelial regeneration but not the degree of inflammation and clinical features.

    PubMed

    Allgayer, Hubert; Roisch, Ulla; Zehnter, Elmar; Ziegenhagen, Dieter J; Dienes, Hans P; Kruis, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    The role of colonic mucosal ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) remains controversial. This study assessed mucosal ODC activity in IBD patients segment by segment with regard to patient characteristics, disease activity/duration, medication, degree of mucosal inflammation, and presence/absence of epithelial regeneration and guanosine triphosphate (GTP) stimulation. Mucosal ODC activity was determined in biopsy specimens from the terminal ileum, cecum/ascending, transverse, and descending colon, and the sigmoid/rectum of 35 patients with IBD (18 with Crohn's disease, 17 with ulcerative colitis) and 29 controls, using the amount of 14CO2 liberated from (carboxyl-14C)ornithine hydrochloride. GTP-stimulatable activity was expressed as the ratio of ODC activity in the presence and absence of GTP (70 micromol/L). Mucosal inflammation was assessed endoscopically/microscopically with previously described criteria. Presence/absence of mucosal regeneration also was determined by predefined criteria. Mucosal ODC-activity did not significantly differ in IBD patients and controls. There was a 4.4-fold activity gradient from the ileum to the rectum. Mucosal ODC activity was significantly higher in areas with epithelial regeneration compared to those without regeneration, and was stimulated by GTP by a factor of 1.42 in Crohn's disease and 1.19 in ulcerative colitis patients compared to controls (p < 0.004). On the other hand, there was no significant association/relationship of mucosal ODC activity with disease activity/duration and the endoscopic/histologic degree of mucosal inflammation. The observation of unchanged mucosal ODC activity in patients with IBD and the absence of a significant relationship with clinical and endoscopic/histologic disease characteristics speaks against a major role of ODC in IBD as a major disease marker. The role of the ileorectal gradient, the enhanced activity in areas with epithelial regeneration, and the GTP

  11. Role of microRNA221 in regulating normal mammary epithelial hierarchy and breast cancer stem-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Su-Hyung; Bai, Shoumin; He, Zhen; Malik, Fayaz; Xu, Jiahui; Zhou, Lei; Chen, Weilong; Martin-Trevino, Rachel; Wu, Xiaojian; Lan, Ping; Yi, Yongju; Ginestier, Christophe; Ibarra, Ingrid; Shang, Li; McDermott, Sean; Luther, Tahra; Clouthier, Shawn G.; Wicha, Max S.; Liu, Suling

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that lineage specific subpopulations and stem-like cells exist in normal and malignant breast tissues. Epigenetic mechanisms maintaining this hierarchical homeostasis remain to be investigated. In this study, we found the level of microRNA221 (miR-221) was higher in stem-like and myoepithelial cells than in luminal cells isolated from normal and malignant breast tissue. In normal breast cells, over-expression of miR-221 generated more myoepithelial cells whereas knock-down of miR-221 increased luminal cells. Over-expression of miR-221 stimulated stem-like cells in luminal type of cancer and the miR-221 level was correlated with clinical outcome in breast cancer patients. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) was induced by overexpression of miR-221 in normal and breast cancer cells. The EMT related gene ATXN1 was found to be a miR-221 target gene regulating breast cell hierarchy. In conclusion, we propose that miR-221 contributes to lineage homeostasis of normal and malignant breast epithelium. PMID:25686829

  12. Induction of scattering and cellular invasion by trefoil peptides in src- and RhoA-transformed kidney and colonic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Emami, S; Le Floch, N; Bruyneel, E; Thim, L; May, F; Westley, B; Rio, M; Mareel, M; Gespach, C

    2001-02-01

    Trefoil factors (TFFs) are protease-resistant peptides that promote epithelial cell migration and mucosal restitution during inflammatory conditions and wound healing in the gastrointestinal tract. To date, the molecular mechanism of TFFs action and their possible role in tumor progression are unclear. In the present study, we observed that premalignant human colonic PC/AA/C1 and canine kidney MDCK epithelial cells are not competent to invade collagen gels in response to exogenously added TFFs (pS2, spasmolytic polypeptide, and intestinal trefoil factor). In contrast, activated src and RhoA exert permissive induction of invasion by the TFFs that produce similar parallel dose-response curves in src-transformed MDCKts.src and PCmsrc cells (EC50=20-40 nM). Cell scattering is also induced by TFFs in MDCKts.src cells. Stable expression of the pS2 cDNA promotes constitutive invasiveness in MDCKts.src-pS2 cells and human colonic HCT8/S11-pS2 cells established from a sporadic tumor. Furthermore, we found that TFF-mediated cellular invasion is dependent of several signaling pathways implicated in cell transformation and survival, including phosphoinositide PI3'-kinase, phospholipase C, protein kinase C, and the rapamycin target TOR. Constitutive and intense expression of pS2 was revealed by Western blot analyses and immunohistochemistry in human colorectal tumors and their adjacent control mucosa during the neoplastic progression, from the adenoma to the liver metastases. Our studies indicated that TFFs can be involved in cell scattering and tumor invasion via autocrine loops and may serve as potential targets in the control of colon cancer progression.

  13. Induction of scattering and cellular invasion by trefoil peptides in src- and RhoA-transformed kidney and colonic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Emami, S; Le Floch, N; Bruyneel, E; Thim, L; May, F; Westley, B; Rio, M; Mareel, M; Gespach, C

    2001-02-01

    Trefoil factors (TFFs) are protease-resistant peptides that promote epithelial cell migration and mucosal restitution during inflammatory conditions and wound healing in the gastrointestinal tract. To date, the molecular mechanism of TFFs action and their possible role in tumor progression are unclear. In the present study, we observed that premalignant human colonic PC/AA/C1 and canine kidney MDCK epithelial cells are not competent to invade collagen gels in response to exogenously added TFFs (pS2, spasmolytic polypeptide, and intestinal trefoil factor). In contrast, activated src and RhoA exert permissive induction of invasion by the TFFs that produce similar parallel dose-response curves in src-transformed MDCKts.src and PCmsrc cells (EC50=20-40 nM). Cell scattering is also induced by TFFs in MDCKts.src cells. Stable expression of the pS2 cDNA promotes constitutive invasiveness in MDCKts.src-pS2 cells and human colonic HCT8/S11-pS2 cells established from a sporadic tumor. Furthermore, we found that TFF-mediated cellular invasion is dependent of several signaling pathways implicated in cell transformation and survival, including phosphoinositide PI3'-kinase, phospholipase C, protein kinase C, and the rapamycin target TOR. Constitutive and intense expression of pS2 was revealed by Western blot analyses and immunohistochemistry in human colorectal tumors and their adjacent control mucosa during the neoplastic progression, from the adenoma to the liver metastases. Our studies indicated that TFFs can be involved in cell scattering and tumor invasion via autocrine loops and may serve as potential targets in the control of colon cancer progression. PMID:11156951

  14. Vibrio fischeri Flagellin A Is Essential for Normal Motility and for Symbiotic Competence during Initial Squid Light Organ Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Millikan, Deborah S.; Ruby, Edward G.

    2004-01-01

    The motile bacterium Vibrio fischeri is the specific bacterial symbiont of the Hawaiian squid Euprymna scolopes. Because motility is essential for initiating colonization, we have begun to identify stage-specific motility requirements by creating flagellar mutants that have symbiotic defects. V. fischeri has six flagellin genes that are uniquely arranged in two chromosomal loci, flaABCDE and flaF. With the exception of the flaA product, the predicted gene products are more similar to each other than to flagellins of other Vibrio species. Immunoblot analysis indicated that only five of the six predicted proteins were present in purified flagella, suggesting that one protein, FlaF, is unique with respect to either its regulation or its function. We created mutations in two genes, flaA and flaC. Compared to a flaC mutant, which has wild-type flagellation, a strain having a mutation in the flaA gene has fewer flagella per cell and exhibits a 60% decrease in its rate of migration in soft agar. During induction of light organ symbiosis, colonization by the flaA mutant is impaired, and this mutant is severely outcompeted when it is presented to the animal as a mixed inoculum with the wild-type strain. Furthermore, flaA mutant cells are preferentially expelled from the animal, suggesting either that FlaA plays a role in adhesion or that normal motility is an advantage for retention within the host. Taken together, these results show that the flagellum of V. fischeri is a complex structure consisting of multiple flagellin subunits, including FlaA, which is essential both for normal flagellation and for motility, as well as for effective symbiotic colonization. PMID:15205434

  15. Identification of a novel substance P (SP)-neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R) microRNA-221-5p inflammatory network in human colonic epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Kai; Sideri, Aristea; Law, Ivy Ka Man; Bakirtzi, Kyriaki; Polytarchou, Christos; Iliopoulos, Dimitrios; Pothoulakis, Charalabos

    2015-01-01

    Background & aims Substance P (SP), a neuropeptide member of the tachykinin family, plays a critical role in colitis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression. However, whether SP modulates expression of microRNAs in human colonic epithelial cells remains unknown. Methods We performed microRNA profiling analysis of SP-stimulated human colonic epithelial NCM460 cells overexpressing neurokinin-1 receptor (NCM460-NK-1R). Targets of SP-regulated microRNAs were validated by real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Functions of miRNAs were tested in NCM460-NK-1R cells and the TNBS and DSS models of colitis. Results SP stimulated differential expression of 29 microRNAs, including miR-221-5p, the highest up regulated miR (by 12.6-fold) upon SP stimulation. Bioinformatic and luciferase reporter analyses identified interleukin 6 receptor (IL-6R) mRNA as a direct target of miR-221-5p in NCM460 cells. Accordingly, SP exposure of NCM460-NK-1R cells increased IL-6R mRNA expression, while overexpression of miR-221-5p reduced IL-6R expression. NF-κB and JNK inhibition decreased SP-induced miR-221-5p expression. MiR-221-5p expression was increased in both TNBS- and DSS-induced colitis and colonic biopsies from Ulcerative Colitis, but not Crohn’s Disease subjects, compared to controls. In mice, intracolonic administration of a miR-221-5p chemical inhibitor, exacerbated TNBS-and DSS-induced colitis, and increased colonic TNF-α, Cxcl10, and Col2 α 1 mRNA expression. In situ hybridization in TNBS-and DSS-exposed colons revealed increased miR-221-5p expression primarily in colonocytes. Conclusions Our results reveal a novel NK-1R-miR-221-5p-IL-6R network that protects from colitis. The use of miR-221-5p mimics may be a promising approach for colitis treatment. PMID:26645045

  16. Proto-oncogenes and p53 protein expression in normal cervical stratified squamous epithelium and cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Ngan, H Y; Liu, S S; Yu, H; Liu, K L; Cheung, A N

    1999-10-01

    The aim of this study was to study the protein expression of six proto-oncogenes (epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), c-fms, c-myc, c-kit, c-erbB-2 and pan-ras) and one tumour suppressor gene (TP53), by immunohistochemical staining of normal cervical stratified squamous epithelium and cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia (CIN). Paraffin sections of 45 normal cervical specimens, 38 CIN grade one (CIN1), 37 CIN2 and 43 CIN3 were studied. An immunohistochemical (IHC) score was derived from the intensity of staining and the percentages of cells stained. In normal cervical specimens, a higher IHC score was found with EGFR and c-fms in superficial (S), intermediate (I) and parabasal (PB) cells compared with basal cells. In contrast, a higher IHC score was found with c-erbB-2 in basal cells in normal cervical specimens. Dysplastic cells in CIN had a higher IHC score with c-myc and c-erbB-2 than normal S/I and PB cells. Dysplastic cells had a higher score with EGFR than normal basal cells. However, a higher IHC score with EGFR and c-fms was found in normal S/I cells than dysplastic cells. These findings suggested that EGFR and c-fms were activated in more differentiated normal cells but were less active in less differentiated normal basal cells. However, EGFR was reactivated in dysplastic cells. Meanwhile, c-erbB-2 was activated in less differentiated normal basal cells and dysplastic cells, and was less active in differentiated normal cells. c-myc was activated in dysplastic cells. c-fms was more active in more differentiated normal cells and was not activated in less differentiated or dysplastic cells. c-kit, pan-ras and TP53 were not activated in normal nor dysplastic cervical cells. These results suggest EGFR, c-erbB-2 and c-myc may be important proto-oncogenes in CIN and that antibodies or anti-genes targeted against them may alter the progress of CIN to invasive cancer.

  17. Deleterious Effect of p-Cresol on Human Colonic Epithelial Cells Prevented by Proanthocyanidin-Containing Polyphenol Extracts from Fruits and Proanthocyanidin Bacterial Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ximena; Carrasco-Pozo, Catalina; Escobar, Elizabeth; Navarrete, Paola; Blachier, Franςois; Andriamihaja, Mireille; Lan, Annaig; Tomé, Daniel; Cires, Marı́a José; Pastene, Edgar; Gotteland, Martin

    2016-05-11

    The protective effect of proanthocyanidin-containing polyphenol extracts from apples, avocados, cranberries, grapes, or proanthocyanidin microbial metabolites was evaluated in colonic epithelial cells exposed to p-cresol, a deleterious compound produced by the colonic microbiota from l-tyrosine. In HT29 Glc(-/+) cells, p-cresol significantly increased LDH leakage and decreased ATP contents, whereas in Caco-2 cell monolayers, it significantly decreased the transepithelial electrical resistance and increased the paracellular transport of FITC-dextran. The alterations induced by p-cresol in HT29 Glc(-/+) cells were prevented by the extracts from cranberries and avocados, whereas they became worse by extracts from apples and grapes. The proanthocyanidin bacterial metabolites decreased LDH leakage, ameliorating cell viability without improving intracellular ATP. All of the polyphenol extracts and proanthocyanidin bacterial metabolites prevented the p-cresol-induced alterations of barrier function. These results suggest that proanthocyanidin-containing polyphenol extracts and proanthocyanidin metabolites likely contribute to the protection of the colonic mucosa against the deleterious effects of p-cresol. PMID:27039931

  18. Reg4+ deep crypt secretory cells function as epithelial niche for Lgr5+ stem cells in colon

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Nobuo; Sachs, Norman; Wiebrands, Kay; Ellenbroek, Saskia I. J.; Fumagalli, Arianna; Lyubimova, Anna; Begthel, Harry; van den Born, Maaike; van Es, Johan H.; Karthaus, Wouter R.; Li, Vivian S. W.; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Peters, Peter J.; van Rheenen, Jacco; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Clevers, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5-positive (Lgr5+) stem cells reside at crypt bottoms of the small and large intestine. Small intestinal Paneth cells supply Wnt3, EGF, and Notch signals to neighboring Lgr5+ stem cells. Whereas the colon lacks Paneth cells, deep crypt secretory (DCS) cells are intermingled with Lgr5+ stem cells at crypt bottoms. Here, we report regenerating islet-derived family member 4 (Reg4) as a marker of DCS cells. To investigate a niche function, we eliminated DCS cells by using the diphtheria-toxin receptor gene knocked into the murine Reg4 locus. Ablation of DCS cells results in loss of stem cells from colonic crypts and disrupts gut homeostasis and colon organoid growth. In agreement, sorted Reg4+ DCS cells promote organoid formation of single Lgr5+ colon stem cells. DCS cells can be massively produced from Lgr5+ colon stem cells in vitro by combined Notch inhibition and Wnt activation. We conclude that Reg4+ DCS cells serve as Paneth cell equivalents in the colon crypt niche. PMID:27573849

  19. Reg4+ deep crypt secretory cells function as epithelial niche for Lgr5+ stem cells in colon.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Nobuo; Sachs, Norman; Wiebrands, Kay; Ellenbroek, Saskia I J; Fumagalli, Arianna; Lyubimova, Anna; Begthel, Harry; van den Born, Maaike; van Es, Johan H; Karthaus, Wouter R; Li, Vivian S W; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Peters, Peter J; van Rheenen, Jacco; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Clevers, Hans

    2016-09-13

    Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5-positive (Lgr5(+)) stem cells reside at crypt bottoms of the small and large intestine. Small intestinal Paneth cells supply Wnt3, EGF, and Notch signals to neighboring Lgr5(+) stem cells. Whereas the colon lacks Paneth cells, deep crypt secretory (DCS) cells are intermingled with Lgr5(+) stem cells at crypt bottoms. Here, we report regenerating islet-derived family member 4 (Reg4) as a marker of DCS cells. To investigate a niche function, we eliminated DCS cells by using the diphtheria-toxin receptor gene knocked into the murine Reg4 locus. Ablation of DCS cells results in loss of stem cells from colonic crypts and disrupts gut homeostasis and colon organoid growth. In agreement, sorted Reg4(+) DCS cells promote organoid formation of single Lgr5(+) colon stem cells. DCS cells can be massively produced from Lgr5(+) colon stem cells in vitro by combined Notch inhibition and Wnt activation. We conclude that Reg4(+) DCS cells serve as Paneth cell equivalents in the colon crypt niche.

  20. GPER mediates estrogen-induced signaling and proliferations in human breast epithelial cells, and normal and malignant breast

    PubMed Central

    Scaling, Allison L.

    2014-01-01

    17β-estradiol (estrogen), through receptor binding and activation, is required for mammary gland development. Estrogen stimulates epithelial proliferation in the mammary gland, promoting ductal elongation and morphogenesis. In addition to a developmental role, estrogen promotes proliferation in tumorigenic settings, particularly breast cancer. The proliferative effects of estrogen in the normal breast and breast tumors are attributed to estrogen receptor α. Although in vitro studies have demonstrated that the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER, previously called GPR30) can modulate proliferation in breast cancer cells both positively and negatively depending on cellular context, its role in proliferation in the intact normal or malignant breast remains unclear. Estrogen-induced GPER-dependent proliferation was assessed in the immortalized non-tumorigenic human breast epithelial cell line, MCF10A, and an ex vivo organ culture model employing human breast tissue from reduction mammoplasty or tumor resections. Stimulation by estrogen and the GPER-selective agonist G-1 increased the mitotic index in MCF10A cells and proportion of cells in the cell cycle in human breast and breast cancer explants, suggesting increased proliferation. Inhibition of candidate signaling pathways that may link GPER activation to proliferation revealed a dependence on Src, epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation by heparin-bound EGF and subsequent ERK phosphorylation. Proliferation was not dependent on matrix metalloproteinase cleavage of membrane bound pro-HB-EGF. The contribution of GPER to estrogen-induced proliferation in MCF10A cells and breast tissue was confirmed by the ability of GPER-selective antagonist G36 to abrogate estrogen- and G-1-induced proliferation, and the ability of siRNA knockdown of GPER to reduce estrogen- and G-1-induced proliferation in MCF10A cells. This is the first study to demonstrate GPER-dependent proliferation in primary normal and malignant

  1. GPER mediates estrogen-induced signaling and proliferation in human breast epithelial cells and normal and malignant breast.

    PubMed

    Scaling, Allison L; Prossnitz, Eric R; Hathaway, Helen J

    2014-06-01

    17β-Estradiol (estrogen), through receptor binding and activation, is required for mammary gland development. Estrogen stimulates epithelial proliferation in the mammary gland, promoting ductal elongation and morphogenesis. In addition to a developmental role, estrogen promotes proliferation in tumorigenic settings, particularly breast cancer. The proliferative effects of estrogen in the normal breast and breast tumors are attributed to estrogen receptor α. Although in vitro studies have demonstrated that the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER, previously called GPR30) can modulate proliferation in breast cancer cells both positively and negatively depending on cellular context, its role in proliferation in the intact normal or malignant breast remains unclear. Estrogen-induced GPER-dependent proliferation was assessed in the immortalized nontumorigenic human breast epithelial cell line, MCF10A, and an ex vivo organ culture model employing human breast tissue from reduction mammoplasty or tumor resections. Stimulation by estrogen and the GPER-selective agonist G-1 increased the mitotic index in MCF10A cells and proportion of cells in the cell cycle in human breast and breast cancer explants, suggesting increased proliferation. Inhibition of candidate signaling pathways that may link GPER activation to proliferation revealed a dependence on Src, epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation by heparin-bound EGF and subsequent ERK phosphorylation. Proliferation was not dependent on matrix metalloproteinase cleavage of membrane-bound pro-HB-EGF. The contribution of GPER to estrogen-induced proliferation in MCF10A cells and breast tissue was confirmed by the ability of GPER-selective antagonist G36 to abrogate estrogen- and G-1-induced proliferation, and the ability of siRNA knockdown of GPER to reduce estrogen- and G-1-induced proliferation in MCF10A cells. This is the first study to demonstrate GPER-dependent proliferation in primary normal and malignant

  2. Transgenic American elm shows reduced Dutch elm disease symptoms and normal mycorrhizal colonization.

    PubMed

    Newhouse, Andrew E; Schrodt, Franziska; Liang, Haiying; Maynard, Charles A; Powell, William A

    2007-07-01

    The American elm (Ulmus americana L.) was once one of the most common urban trees in eastern North America until Dutch-elm disease (DED), caused by the fungus Ophiostoma novo-ulmi, eliminated most of the mature trees. To enhance DED resistance, Agrobacterium was used to transform American elm with a transgene encoding the synthetic antimicrobial peptide ESF39A, driven by a vascular promoter from American chestnut. Four unique, single-copy transgenic lines were produced and regenerated into whole plants. These lines showed less wilting and significantly less sapwood staining than non-transformed controls after O. novo-ulmi inoculation. Preliminary observations indicated that mycorrhizal colonization was not significantly different between transgenic and wild-type trees. Although the trees tested were too young to ensure stable resistance was achieved, these results indicate that transgenes encoding antimicrobial peptides reduce DED symptoms and therefore hold promise for enhancing pathogen resistance in American elm.

  3. Validation of Normal Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells as a Model for Influenza A Infections in Human Distal Trachea

    PubMed Central

    Davis, A. Sally; Chertow, Daniel S.; Moyer, Jenna E.; Suzich, Jon; Sandouk, Aline; Dorward, David W.; Logun, Carolea; Shelhamer, James H.

    2015-01-01

    Primary normal human bronchial/tracheal epithelial (NHBE) cells, derived from the distal-most aspect of the trachea at the bifurcation, have been used for a number of studies in respiratory disease research. Differences between the source tissue and the differentiated primary cells may impact infection studies based on this model. Therefore, we examined how well-differentiated NHBE cells compared with their source tissue, the human distal trachea, as well as the ramifications of these differences on influenza A viral pathogenesis research using this model. We employed a histological analysis including morphological measurements, electron microscopy, multi-label immunofluorescence confocal microscopy, lectin histochemistry, and microarray expression analysis to compare differentiated NHBEs to human distal tracheal epithelium. Pseudostratified epithelial height, cell type variety and distribution varied significantly. Electron microscopy confirmed differences in cellular attachment and paracellular junctions. Influenza receptor lectin histochemistry revealed that α2,3 sialic acids were rarely present on the apical aspect of the differentiated NHBE cells, but were present in low numbers in the distal trachea. We bound fluorochrome bioconjugated virus to respiratory tissue and NHBE cells and infected NHBE cells with human influenza A viruses. Both indicated that the pattern of infection progression in these cells correlated with autopsy studies of fatal cases from the 2009 pandemic. PMID:25604814

  4. Cell growth inhibition and apoptosis by SDS-solubilized single-walled carbon nanotubes in normal rat kidney epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nam, Chang-Won; Kang, Su-Jin; Kang, Youn Kyung; Kwak, Mi-Kyoung

    2011-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), promising novel nanomaterials, have been applied to drug delivery and bio-imaging; however, their potential harmful effects on human health and environment have gained much attention recently. In the present study, we investigated cytotoxic effect of solubilized single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs), which were dispersed in water by sodium dodesyl sulfate (SDS), in normal rat kidney epithelial cells (NRK-52E). SDS-SWCNT (0.125-10 μg/mL)-treated NRK-52E cells showed decreased cell viability and enhanced cytotoxicity marker levels following 24-48 h incubation. In addition, SDS-SWCNT treatment evoked the cell growth inhibition: 8 μg/mL SDS-SWCNT induced the growth arrest at G(0)/G(1) phase and levels of cell cycle-related proteins such as CDK2, CDK6 and phosphorylated-retinoblastoma (pRB) were significantly reduced by CNT. Whereas, at higher concentration of SDS-SWCNT, the percentage of cell numbers in apoptotic sub-G(1) phase was substantially increased. Along with these changes, SDS-SWCNT treatment elevated protein levels for p53 and p21 with a concomitant increase in the single strand DNA breakage. Taken together, these results suggest that SDS-solubilized SWCNTs exert genotoxic effect in renal epithelial cells, and p53-dependent signaling can be associated with the growth arrest and apoptosis events upon CNT-induced DNA damage.

  5. Magnetic Nanodrug Delivery Through the Mucus Layer of Air-Liquid Interface Cultured Primary Normal Human Tracheobronchial Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Economou, E. C.; Marinelli, S.; Smith, M. C.; Routt, A. A.; Kravets, V. V.; Chu, H. W.; Spendier, K.; Celinski, Z. J.

    2016-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) and highly anisotropic barium hexaferrite (BaFe12O19) nanoparticles were coated with an anti-inflammatory drug and magnetically transported through mucus produced by primary human airway epithelial cells. Using wet planetary ball milling, dl-2-amino-3-phosphonopropionic acid-coated BaFe12O19 nano-particles (BaNPs) of 1–100 nm in diameter were prepared in water. BaNPs and conventional 20–30-nm Fe3O4 nanoparticles (FeNPs) were then encased in a polymer (PLGA) loaded with dexamethasone (Dex) and tagged for imaging. PLGA-Dex-coated BaNPs and FeNPs were characterized using dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry. Both PLGA-Dex-coated BaNPs and FeNPs were transferred to the surface of a ~100-μm thick mucus layer of air-liquid interface cultured primary normal human tracheobronchial epithelial (NHTE) cells. Within 30 min, the nanoparticles were pulled successfully through the mucus layer by a permanent neodymium magnet. The penetration time of the nanomedicine was monitored using confocal microscopy and tailored by varying the thickness of the PLGA-Dex coating around the particles. PMID:27774374

  6. Malignant transformation of human colon epithelial cells by benzo[c]phenanthrene dihydrodiolepoxides as well as 2-hydroxyamino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, Uta; Fuchs, Judith Iris; Teubner, Wera; Steinberg, Pablo . E-mail: steinber@rz.uni-potsdam.de

    2006-04-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heterocyclic aromatic amines (HCAs) ingested with food have repeatedly been suggested to be involved in the malignant transformation of colon epithelial cells. In order to test this hypothesis, HCEC cells (SV40 large T antigen-immortalized human colon epithelial cells) were incubated with a racemic mixture of benzo[c]phenanthrene dihydrodiol epoxides (B[c]PhDE), extremely potent carcinogenic PAH metabolites in vivo, or with 2-hydroxyamino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (N-OH-PhIP), the N-hydroxylated metabolite of the most abundant HCA in cooked meat. First, it was shown that HCEC cells express sulfotransferase 1A1, which is needed to metabolize N-OH-PhIP to the corresponding N-sulfonyloxy derivative, the direct precursor molecule of genotoxic nitrenium ions. Thereafter, exponentially growing HCEC cells were exposed five times to 0.1 {mu}g (0.37 nmol) B[c]PhDE/ml for 30 min or 0.72 {mu}g (3 nmol) N-OH-PhIP/ml for 24 h. Chemically treated HCEC cells showed an enhanced saturation density and grew faster than the corresponding solvent-treated cell cultures. After five treatment cycles, HCEC{sup B[c]PhDE} as well as HCEC {sup N-OH-PhIP} cells lost cell-cell contact inhibition and started piling up and forming foci in the culture flasks. Furthermore, HCEC{sup B[c]PhDE} and HCEC {sup N-OH-PhIP} cells were injected i.m. into SCID mice. Within 6 weeks after injection, eight animals out of eight injected with HCEC{sup B[c]PhDE} or HCEC {sup N-OH-PhIP} cells developed tumors at the site of injection, thus demonstrating the high tumorigenic potential of the HCEC{sup B[c]PhDE} and HCEC {sup N-OH-PhIP} cell cultures. Taken together, we show for the first time that the abovementioned active PAH metabolites as well as N-OH-PhIP are indeed able to malignantly transform human colon epithelial cells in vitro.

  7. Quantification of the global and local complexity of the epithelial-connective tissue interface of normal, dysplastic, and neoplastic oral mucosae using digital imaging.

    PubMed

    Abu Eid, Rasha; Landini, Gabriel

    2003-01-01

    This study aimed at quantifying the complexity of the epithelial-connective tissue interface (ECTI) in human normal mucosa, premalignant, and malignant lesions using fractal geometry. Two approaches were used to describe the complexity of 377 oral mucosa ECTI profiles. The box counting method was used to estimate their global fractal dimension, while local fractal dimensions were estimated using the mass radius relation at various local scales. The ECTI complexity significantly increased from normal through premalignant to malignant profiles in both global and local (over 283 microm) scales. Normal mucosa samples from different sites of the oral cavity also had different degrees of global complexity. Fractal geometry is a useful morphological marker of tissue complexity changes taking place during epithelial malignancy and premalignancy, and we propose it as a quantitative marker of epithelial complexity. PMID:14521264

  8. Ethylene bisdithiocarbamate pesticides cause cytotoxicity in transformed and normal human colon cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Lisa; Hardej, Diane

    2012-09-01

    The effects of the fungicides Maneb, Mancozeb, and Zineb were investigated in transformed colon cells, HT-29, Caco2 and non-transformed cells, CCD-18Co. Significant decreases in viability were observed with Maneb and Mancozeb in HT-29 and CCD-18Co (80-260μM), and Caco2 cells (40-180μM). No significant decreases in viability were observed in all cell types up to 800μM with Zineb. MnCl(2) and ZnCl(2) exposure produced no loss of viability in all cell types up to 400μM. Light microscopy confirmed viability analysis. Lipid peroxidation was observed with Maneb and Mancozeb in cell types tested (60-200μM). Caspase 3/7, 8, and 9 activities were observed with Maneb and Mancozeb in cell types tested (40-200μM). Maneb and Mancozeb treated HT-29 and Caco2 cells demonstrated increases in manganese and zinc concentrations (20-200μM). The lack of toxicity observed with Zineb, MnCl(2), and ZnCl(2) suggests that both the metal moiety and the organic portion of these fungicides together contribute to toxicity.

  9. Ethylene bisdithiocarbamate pesticides cause cytotoxicity in transformed and normal human colon cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Lisa; Hardej, Diane

    2012-09-01

    The effects of the fungicides Maneb, Mancozeb, and Zineb were investigated in transformed colon cells, HT-29, Caco2 and non-transformed cells, CCD-18Co. Significant decreases in viability were observed with Maneb and Mancozeb in HT-29 and CCD-18Co (80-260μM), and Caco2 cells (40-180μM). No significant decreases in viability were observed in all cell types up to 800μM with Zineb. MnCl(2) and ZnCl(2) exposure produced no loss of viability in all cell types up to 400μM. Light microscopy confirmed viability analysis. Lipid peroxidation was observed with Maneb and Mancozeb in cell types tested (60-200μM). Caspase 3/7, 8, and 9 activities were observed with Maneb and Mancozeb in cell types tested (40-200μM). Maneb and Mancozeb treated HT-29 and Caco2 cells demonstrated increases in manganese and zinc concentrations (20-200μM). The lack of toxicity observed with Zineb, MnCl(2), and ZnCl(2) suggests that both the metal moiety and the organic portion of these fungicides together contribute to toxicity. PMID:22824503

  10. Colonic Saturated Fatty Acid Concentrations and Expression of COX-1, but not Diet, Predict Prostaglandin E2 in Normal Human Colon Tissue.

    PubMed

    Sidahmed, ElKhansa; Sen, Ananda; Ren, Jianwei; Patel, Arsh; Turgeon, D Kim; Ruffin, Mack T; Brenner, Dean E; Djuric, Zora

    2016-10-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in the colon is a pro-inflammatory mediator that is associated with increased risk of colon cancer. In this study, expression of genes in the PGE2 pathway were quantified in colon biopsies from a trial of a Mediterranean versus a Healthy Eating diet in 113 individuals at high risk for colon cancer. Colon biopsies were obtained before and after 6 months of intervention. Quantitative, real-time PCR was used to measure mRNA expression of prostaglandin H synthases (PTGS1 and 2), prostaglandin E synthases (PTGES1 and 3), prostaglandin dehydrogenase (HPGD), and PGE2 receptors (PTGER2, PTGER4). The most highly expressed genes were HPGD and PTGS1. In multivariate linear regression models of baseline data, both colon saturated fatty acid concentrations and PTGS1 expression were significant, positive predictors of colon PGE2 concentrations after controlling for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, gender, age, and smoking status. The effects of dietary intervention on gene expression were minimal with small increases in expression noted for PTGES3 in both arms and in PTGER4 in the Mediterranean arm. These results indicate that short-term dietary change had little effect on enzymes in the prostaglandin pathway in the colon and other factors, such as differences in fatty acid metabolism, might be more influential. PMID:27548026

  11. Basement-membrane heparan sulphate with high affinity for antithrombin synthesized by normal and transformed mouse mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Pejler, G; David, G

    1987-01-01

    Basement-membrane proteoglycans, biosynthetically labelled with [35S]sulphate, were isolated from normal and transformed mouse mammary epithelial cells. Proteoglycans synthesized by normal cells contained mainly heparan sulphate and, in addition, small amounts of chondroitin sulphate chains, whereas transformed cells synthesized a relatively higher proportion of chondroitin sulphate. Polysaccharide chains from transformed cells were of lower average Mr and of lower anionic charge density compared with chains isolated from the untransformed counterparts, confirming results reported previously [David & Van den Berghe (1983) J. Biol. Chem. 258, 7338-7344]. A large proportion of the chains isolated from normal cells bound with high affinity to immobilized antithrombin, and the presence of 3-O-sulphated glucosamine residues, previously identified as unique markers for the antithrombin-binding region of heparin [Lindahl, Bäckström, Thunberg & Leder (1980) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77, 6551-6555], could be demonstrated. A significantly lower proportion of the chains derived from transformed cells bound with high affinity to antithrombin, and a corresponding decrease in the amount of incorporated 3-O-sulphate was observed. PMID:2963617

  12. Assessing the Toxicities of Regulated and Unregulated Disinfection By-products in Normal Human Colon Cells.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presence of over six hundred disinfection by-products (DBPs) and less than half of the total organic halides present in finished water has created a need for short-term in vitro assays to address toxicities that might be associated with human exposure. . We are using a normal...

  13. Inhibition of cancer cell epithelial mesenchymal transition by normal fibroblasts via production of 5-methoxytryptophan

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Li-Yi; Chen, Hua-Ling; Kuo, Cheng-Chin; Wu, Kenneth K.

    2016-01-01

    We reported previously that human fibroblasts release 5-methoxytryptophan (5-MTP) which inhibits cancer cell COX-2 overexpression and suppresses cancer cell migration and metastasis. To determine whether fibroblasts block cancer cell epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) via 5-MTP, we evaluated the effect of Hs68 fibroblasts (HsFb) on A549 cancer cell EMT in a two-chamber system. Co-incubation of A549 with HsFb prevented TGF-β1-induced reduction of E-cadherin and increase in Snail and N-cadherin. Transfection of HsFb with tryptophan hydroxylase-1 siRNA, which inhibited tryptophan hydroxylase-1 protein expression and 5-MTP release in HsFb abrogated the effect of HsFb on A549 EMT. Direct addition of pure 5-MTP to cultured A549 cells followed by TGF-β1 prevented TGF-β1-induced reduction of E-cadherin, and elevation of Snail, vimentin and matrix metalloproteinase 9. Administration of 5-MTP to a murine xenograft tumor model reduced vimentin protein expression in the tumor tissues compared to vehicle control which was correlated with reduction of metastasis in the 5-MTP treated mice. Our experimental data suggest that 5-MTP exerted its anti-EMT actions through inhibition of p38 MAPK activation, p65/p50 NF-κB nuclear translocation and transactivation without the involvement of COX-2 or p300 histone acetyltransferase. Our findings indicate that fibroblasts release a tryptophan metabolite, 5-MTP, to reduce cancer cell EMT, migration, invasion and metastasis. PMID:27145282

  14. Unbiased Selection of Peptide-Peptoid Hybrids Specific for Lung Cancer Compared to Normal Lung Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Matharage, Jaya M; Minna, John D; Brekken, Rolf A; Udugamasooriya, D Gomika

    2015-12-18

    To develop widely applicable diagnostic and potentially therapeutic approaches overcoming protein heterogeneity in human cancer, we have developed a technology to unbiasedly select high specificity compound(s) that bind any biomolecule (e.g., proteins, lipids, carbohydrates) presented on the cancer cell surface but not on normal cells. We utilized a peptidomimetic based on-bead two-color (OBTC) combinatorial cell screen that can detect differences between two cell surfaces at high accuracy by looking for beads (where each bead in the library had one peptide-peptoid hybrid on the surface) that only bound cancer but not normal cells. We screened a library of 393 216 compounds targeting HCC4017 lung adenocarcinoma cells (labeled in red) in the presence of HBEC30KT normal bronchial epithelial cells (labeled in green) derived from the same tissue of the same patient. This screen identified a peptide-peptoid hybrid called PPS1 which displayed high specific binding for HCC4017 cancer cells over HBEC30KT cells. Specificity was validated through on-bead, ELISA-like and magnetic bead pulldown studies, while a scrambled version of PPS1 did not show any binding. Of interest, the simple dimeric version (PPS1D1) displayed cytotoxic activity on HCC4017 cells, but not on normal HBEC30KT cells. PPS1D1 also strongly accumulated in HCC4017 lung cancer xenografts in mice over control constructs. We conclude that such combinatorial screens using tumor and normal cells from the same patient have significant potential to develop new reagents for cancer biology, diagnosis, and potentially therapy.

  15. Innate mechanisms for Bifidobacterium lactis to activate transient pro-inflammatory host responses in intestinal epithelial cells after the colonization of germ-free rats.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Pedro A; Hoffmann, Micha; Szcesny, Silke; Blaut, Michael; Haller, Dirk

    2005-08-01

    Bifidobacteria comprise a dominant microbial population group in the human intestinal tract with purported beneficial health effects on the host. In this study, we characterized the molecular mechanisms for the initial interaction of probiotic Bifidobacterium lactis strain BB12 with native and intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) lines. We showed that B. lactis-monoassociated Fisher F344 rats transiently induce phosphorylation/activation of the NF-kappaB transcriptionally active subunit RelA and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38 in native IEC at day 5 after initial bacterial colonization. In addition, Interleukin 6 (IL-6) gene expression was significantly increased at day 5, demonstrating the physiological relevance of transient transcription factor activation in IEC. In contrast, Bacteroides vulgatus-monoassociated Fisher rats revealed RelA but not p38 MAPK phosphorylation and failed to trigger significant IL-6 gene expression in native IEC. Moreover, we demonstrated that B. lactis triggers NF-kappaB RelA and p38 MAPK phosphorylation in IEC lines. Adenoviral delivery of mutant IKK-beta (Ad5dnIKKbeta) and inhibition of the p38 MAPK pathway through the pharmacological inhibitor SB203580 significantly blocked B. lactis-induced IL-6 gene expression in IEC, suggesting that B. lactis triggers NF-kappaB and MAPK signaling to induce gene expression in the intestinal epithelium. Regarding the mechanisms of bacteria epithelial cell cross-talk, B. lactis-induced IL-6 gene expression was completely inhibited in TLR2 deficient mouse embryogenic fibroblasts (MEF TLR2-/-) as well as TLR2DeltaTIR transfected Mode-K cells. In conclusion, we demonstrated that probiotic bacteria transiently trigger innate signal transduction and pro-inflammatory gene expression in the intestinal epithelium at early stages of bacterial colonization.

  16. Development of a memetic clustering algorithm for optimal spectral histology: application to FTIR images of normal human colon.

    PubMed

    Farah, Ihsen; Nguyen, Thi Nguyet Que; Groh, Audrey; Guenot, Dominique; Jeannesson, Pierre; Gobinet, Cyril

    2016-05-23

    The coupling between Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) imaging and unsupervised classification is effective in revealing the different structures of human tissues based on their specific biomolecular IR signatures; thus the spectral histology of the studied samples is achieved. However, the most widely applied clustering methods in spectral histology are local search algorithms, which converge to a local optimum, depending on initialization. Multiple runs of the techniques estimate multiple different solutions. Here, we propose a memetic algorithm, based on a genetic algorithm and a k-means clustering refinement, to perform optimal clustering. In addition, this approach was applied to the acquired FTIR images of normal human colon tissues originating from five patients. The results show the efficiency of the proposed memetic algorithm to achieve the optimal spectral histology of these samples, contrary to k-means. PMID:27110605

  17. Expression of nuclear membrane proteins in normal, hyperplastic, and neoplastic thyroid epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jieying; Kondo, Tetsuo; Yamane, Tetsu; Nakazawa, Tadao; Oish, Naoki; Mochizuki, Kunio; Katoh, Ryohei

    2015-10-01

    Emerin, lamin A/C, lamin B, and lamin-associated polypeptide 2 (LAP2) are nuclear membrane proteins that play an important role in maintaining nuclear structure and coordinating cell activity. We studied the expression and significance of nuclear membrane proteins in neoplastic thyroid cells by immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, and real-time PCR. In papillary carcinomas (PCs), the nuclear proteins most frequently expressed at high levels were emerin (82 % positive), lamin A/C (64 %), and LAP2 (82 %). Follicular carcinomas (FCs) most frequently expressed lamin B, while none of the undifferentiated carcinomas (UCs) showed strong expression of emerin or lamin A/C. In all medullary carcinomas (MCs), intermediate to high levels of expression of lamin A/C and LAP2 were found. By RT-PCR analysis, messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of all nuclear membrane proteins except emerin was higher in PC than in normal tissue. Real-time PCR analysis showed that mRNA expression of nuclear membrane protein varied between cell lines. Our findings suggest that expression of nuclear membrane proteins may be related to follicular function in normal and hyperplastic follicles, and we hypothesize that they are also involved in the proliferation and differentiation of neoplastic thyroid cells. We suggest that they reflect the biological nature and/or function of normal, hyperplastic, and neoplastic thyroid cells and may have some value in diagnosing thyroid tumors.

  18. Differential expression of gastric MUC5AC in colonic epithelial cells: TFF3-wired IL1 β/Akt crosstalk-induced mucosal immune response against Shigella dysenteriae infection.

    PubMed

    Raja, Subramaniya Bharathi; Murali, Malliga Raman; Devaraj, Halagowder; Devaraj, Sivasithamparam Niranjali

    2012-02-01

    An understanding of the signaling mechanism(s) that regulate the differential expression of gastric mucin MUC5AC in colonic epithelial cells would contribute significantly to investigations of its role in colonic mucosa infected with the bacterial pathogen Shigella dysenteriae. Here we show that S. dysenteriae-Sinduced expression of interleukin-1β upregulates MUC2 expression and the differential expression of MUC5AC. Differential expression of MUC5AC involves crosstalk between interleukin-1β and Akt, whereby the trefoil factor family peptide TFF3 activates Akt by phosphorylation of EGFR. TFF3 also downregulates E-cadherin expression, causing accumulation of β-catenin in the cytosol. Phosphorylation of GSK-3β (inactivated) by activated Akt inhibits ubiquitylation of β-catenin, leading to its nuclear translocation, which then induces the expression of MUC5AC and cyclin D1. Accumulation of cyclin D1 alters the cell cycle, promoting cell survival and proliferation. Human colon HT29MTX cells, which overexpress MUC5AC, were resistant to adherence and invasion of S. dysenteriae when compared with other mucin-secreting HT29 cell types. Thus, during infection with S. dysenteriae, crosstalk between interleukin-1β and Akt wired by TFF3 induces expression of MUC5AC in colonic epithelial cells. Differentially expressed gastric MUC5AC aids in mucosal clearance of S. dysenteriae, inhibiting adherence and invasion of the pathogen to colonic epithelial cells, which protects the host.

  19. Colonic mucosal gene expression and genotype in irritable bowel syndrome patients with normal or elevated fecal bile acid excretion

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Paula; Acosta, Andres; Busciglio, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The mucosal gene expression in rectosigmoid mucosa (RSM) in irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea (IBS-D) is unknown. Our objectives were, first, to study mRNA expression [by RT2 PCR of 19 genes pertaining to tight junctions, immune activation, intestinal ion transport and bile acid (BA) homeostasis] in RSM in IBS-D patients (n = 47) and healthy controls (n = 17) and study expression of a selected protein (PDZD3) in 10 IBS-D patients and 4 healthy controls; second, to assess RSM mRNA expression according to genotype and fecal BA excretion (high ≥2,337 μmol/48 h); and third, to determine whether genotype or mucosal mRNA expression is associated with colonic transit or BA parameters. Fold changes were corrected for false detection rate for 19 genes studied (P < 0.00263). In RSM in IBS-D patients compared with controls, mRNA expression of GUC2AB, PDZD3, and PR2Y4 was increased, whereas CLDN1 and FN1 were decreased. One immune-related gene was upregulated (C4BP4) and one downregulated (CCL20). There was increased expression of a selected ion transport protein (PDZD3) on immunohistochemistry and Western blot in IBS-D compared with controls (P = 0.02). There were no significant differences in mucosal mRNA in 20 IBS-D patients with high compared with 27 IBS-D patients with normal BA excretion. GPBAR1 (P < 0.05) was associated with colonic transit. We concluded that mucosal ion transport mRNA (for several genes and PDZD3 protein) is upregulated and barrier protein mRNA downregulated in IBS-D compared with healthy controls, independent of genotype. There are no differences in gene expression in IBS-D with high compared with normal fecal BA excretion. PMID:25930081

  20. The ethanolic extract of bark from Salix aegyptiaca L. inhibits the metastatic potential and epithelial to mesenchymal transition of colon cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Enayat, Shabnam; Banerjee, Sreeparna

    2014-01-01

    Willow bark extracts have been used for centuries as a natural pain killer. Recently their potential as anticancer agents has been reported. We have shown the high antioxidant activity, phenolic and flavonoid content in the ethanolic extract of bark (EEB) from Salix aegyptiaca, a species endogenous to the Middle East. We have also reported that incubation with EEB resulted in a reduction in cell proliferation through the induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest via the inhibition of phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase/Protein kinase B and mitogen activated protein kinases signaling pathways as strongly as commercial inhibitors. The current study demonstrates the robust inhibition of anchorage-independent growth, motility, migration, and adhesion of colon cancer cell lines HCT-116 and HT-29 by EEB. These in vitro functional changes were accompanied by a restoration of E-cadherin expression, a reduction in EGFR, SNAI1, SNAI2, and Twist1 and the matrix metalloproteases MMP9 and MMP2. Many of these proteins are involved in the process of epithelial to mesenchymal transition, which is considered as a critical step in the progression of noninvasive tumor cells into malignant, metastatic carcinomas. We therefore propose that EEB from Salix aegyptiaca is a potent nutraceutical causing cancer chemoprevention by inhibiting epithelial to mesenchymal transition and can be consumed for its health promoting effects.

  1. Histochemical Detection of Collagen Fibers by Sirius Red/Fast Green Is More Sensitive than van Gieson or Sirius Red Alone in Normal and Inflamed Rat Colon

    PubMed Central

    Antonioli, Luca; Pellegrini, Carolina; Blandizzi, Corrado; Dolfi, Amelio; Bernardini, Nunzia

    2015-01-01

    Collagen detection in histological sections and its quantitative estimation by computer-aided image analysis represent important procedures to assess tissue localization and distribution of connective fibers. Different histochemical approaches have been proposed to detect and quantify collagen deposition in paraffin slices with different degrees of satisfaction. The present study was performed to compare the qualitative and quantitative efficiency of three histochemical methods available for collagen staining in paraffin sections of colon. van Gieson, Sirius Red and Sirius Red/Fast Green stainings were carried out for collagen detection and quantitative estimation by morphometric image analysis in colonic specimens from normal rats or animals with 2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (DNBS) induced colitis. Haematoxylin/eosin staining was carried out to assess tissue morphology and histopathological lesions. Among the three investigated methods, Sirius Red/Fast Green staining allowed to best highlight well-defined red-stained collagen fibers and to obtain the highest quantitative results by morphometric image analysis in both normal and inflamed colon. Collagen fibers, which stood out against the green-stained non-collagen components, could be clearly appreciated, even in their thinner networks, within all layers of normal or inflamed colonic wall. The present study provides evidence that, as compared with Sirius Red alone or van Gieson staining, the Sirius Red/Fast Green method is the most sensitive, in terms of both qualitative and quantitative evaluation of collagen fibers, in paraffin sections of both normal and inflamed colon. PMID:26673752

  2. JARID2 is involved in transforming growth factor-beta-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition of lung and colon cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Tange, Shoichiro; Oktyabri, Dulamsuren; Terashima, Minoru; Ishimura, Akihiko; Suzuki, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Histone methylation plays a crucial role in various biological and pathological processes including cancer development. In this study, we discovered that JARID2, an interacting component of Polycomb repressive complex-2 (PRC2) that catalyzes methylation of lysine 27 of histone H3 (H3K27), was involved in Transforming Growth Factor-beta (TGF-ß)-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of A549 lung cancer cell line and HT29 colon cancer cell line. The expression of JARID2 was increased during TGF-ß-induced EMT of these cell lines and knockdown of JARID2 inhibited TGF-ß-induced morphological conversion of the cells associated with EMT. JARID2 knockdown itself had no effect in the expression of EMT-related genes but antagonized TGF-ß-dependent expression changes of EMT-related genes such as CDH1, ZEB family and microRNA-200 family. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that JARID2 was implicated in TGF-ß-induced transcriptional repression of CDH1 and microRNA-200 family genes through the regulation of histone H3 methylation and EZH2 occupancies on their regulatory regions. Our study demonstrated a novel role of JARID2 protein, which may control PRC2 recruitment and histone methylation during TGF-ß-induced EMT of lung and colon cancer cell lines.

  3. Effects of supplemental vitamin D and calcium on normal colon tissue and circulating biomarkers of risk for colorectal neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Bostick, Roberd M

    2015-04-01

    This brief review, based on an invited presentation at the 17th Workshop on Vitamin D, is to summarize a line of the author's research that has been directed at the intertwined missions of clarifying and/or developing vitamin D and calcium as preventive agents against colorectal cancer in humans, understanding the mechanisms by which these agents may reduce risk for the disease, and developing 'treatable' biomarkers of risk for colorectal cancer. The biological plausibility and observational and clinical trial evidence for vitamin D and calcium in reducing risk for colorectal neoplasms, the development of pre-neoplastic biomarkers of risk for colorectal neoplasms, and the clinical trial findings from the author's research group on the efficacy of vitamin D and calcium in modulating these biomarkers are summarized. Regarding the latter, we tested the efficacy of 800 IU (20μg) of vitamin D3 and 2.0g of calcium daily, alone and combined vs. placebo over 6 months on modulating normal colon tissue and circulating hypothesis-based biomarkers of risk for colorectal neoplasms in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2×2 factorial design clinical trial (n=92). The tissue-based biomarkers were measured in biopsies of normal-appearing rectal mucosa using immunohistochemistry with quantitative image analysis, and a panel of circulating inflammation markers was measured using enzyme-linked immunoassays (ELISA). Statistically significant proportional tissue increases in the vitamin D group relative to the placebo group were found in bax (51%), p21 (141%), APC (48%), E-cadherin (78%), MSH2 (179%), the CaSR (39%), and CYP27B1 (159%). In blood, there was a 77% statistically significant decrease in a summary inflammation z-score. The findings for calcium were similar to those for vitamin D. These findings indicate that supplemental vitamin D3 or calcium can favorably modulate multiple normal colon tissue and circulating hypothesis-based biomarkers of risk for colorectal

  4. DEK Proto-Oncogene Expression Interferes with the Normal Epithelial Differentiation Program

    PubMed Central

    Wise-Draper, Trisha M.; Morreale, Richard J.; Morris, Teresa A.; Mintz-Cole, Rachael A.; Hoskins, Elizabeth E.; Balsitis, Scott J.; Husseinzadeh, Nader; Witte, David P.; Wikenheiser-Brokamp, Kathryn A.; Lambert, Paul F.; Wells, Susanne I.

    2009-01-01

    Overexpression of the DEK gene is associated with multiple human cancers, but its specific roles as a putative oncogene are not well defined. DEK transcription was previously shown to be induced by the high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) E7 oncogene via E2F and Rb pathways. Transient DEK overexpression was able to inhibit both senescence and apoptosis in cultured cells. In at least the latter case, this mechanism involved the destabilization of p53 and the decreased expression of p53 target genes. We show here that DEK overexpression disrupts the normal differentiation program in a manner that is independent of either p53 or cell death. DEK expression was distinctly repressed upon the differentiation of cultured primary human keratinocytes, and stable DEK overexpression caused epidermal thickening in an organotypic raft model system. The observed hyperplasia involved a delay in keratinocyte differentiation toward a more undifferentiated state, and expansion of the basal cell compartment was due to increased proliferation, but not apoptosis. These phenotypes were accompanied by elevated p63 expression in the absence of p53 destabilization. In further support of bona fide oncogenic DEK activities, we report here up-regulated DEK protein levels in both human papilloma virus-positive hyperplastic murine skin and a subset of human squamous cell carcinomas. We suggest that DEK up-regulation may contribute to carcinoma development at least in part through increased proliferation and retardation of differentiation. PMID:19036808

  5. Comparison study of distinguishing cancerous and normal prostate epithelial cells by confocal and polarization diffraction imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wenhuan; Lu, Jun Qing; Yang, Li V.; Sa, Yu; Feng, Yuanming; Ding, Junhua; Hu, Xin-Hua

    2016-07-01

    Accurate classification of malignant cells from benign ones can significantly enhance cancer diagnosis and prognosis by detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs). We have investigated two approaches of quantitative morphology and polarization diffraction imaging on two prostate cell types to evaluate their feasibility as single-cell assay methods toward CTC detection after cell enrichment. The two cell types have been measured by a confocal imaging method to obtain their three-dimensional morphology parameters and by a polarization diffraction imaging flow cytometry (p-DIFC) method to obtain image texture parameters. The support vector machine algorithm was applied to examine the accuracy of cell classification with the morphology and diffraction image parameters. Despite larger mean values of cell and nuclear sizes of the cancerous prostate cells than the normal ones, it has been shown that the morphologic parameters cannot serve as effective classifiers. In contrast, accurate classification of the two prostate cell types can be achieved with high classification accuracies on measured data acquired separately in three measurements. These results provide strong evidence that the p-DIFC method has the potential to yield morphology-related "fingerprints" for accurate and label-free classification of the two prostate cell types.

  6. Comparison of Microarray Platforms for Measuring Differential MicroRNA Expression in Paired Normal/Cancer Colon Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Callari, Maurizio; Dugo, Matteo; Musella, Valeria; Marchesi, Edoardo; Chiorino, Giovanna; Grand, Maurizia Mello; Pierotti, Marco Alessandro; Daidone, Maria Grazia; Canevari, Silvana; De Cecco, Loris

    2012-01-01

    Background Microarray technology applied to microRNA (miRNA) profiling is a promising tool in many research fields; nevertheless, independent studies characterizing the same pathology have often reported poorly overlapping results. miRNA analysis methods have only recently been systematically compared but only in few cases using clinical samples. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the inter-platform reproducibility of four miRNA microarray platforms (Agilent, Exiqon, Illumina, and Miltenyi), comparing nine paired tumor/normal colon tissues. The most concordant and selected discordant miRNAs were further studied by quantitative RT-PCR. Globally, a poor overlap among differentially expressed miRNAs identified by each platform was found. Nevertheless, for eight miRNAs high agreement in differential expression among the four platforms and comparability to qRT-PCR was observed. Furthermore, most of the miRNA sets identified by each platform are coherently enriched in data from the other platforms and the great majority of colon cancer associated miRNA sets derived from the literature were validated in our data, independently from the platform. Computational integration of miRNA and gene expression profiles suggested that anti-correlated predicted target genes of differentially expressed miRNAs are commonly enriched in cancer-related pathways and in genes involved in glycolysis and nutrient transport. Conclusions Technical and analytical challenges in measuring miRNAs still remain and further research is required in order to increase consistency between different microarray-based methodologies. However, a better inter-platform agreement was found by looking at miRNA sets instead of single miRNAs and through a miRNAs – gene expression integration approach. PMID:23028787

  7. Comparison of gene expression of SOX2 and OCT4 in normal tissue, polyps, and colon adenocarcinoma using immunohistochemical staining

    PubMed Central

    Talebi, Ardeshir; Kianersi, Kianoosh; Beiraghdar, Mozhdeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cancer stem cells have been isolated and characterized in all common cancers. SOX2 and OCT4 are important genes to enhance the self-renewal ability as activate stem cells and inhibit the genes that start differentiation and thus maintain the self-renewal ability of stem cells. Also, the aim of this study is “Comparison of gene expression of SOX2 and OCT4 in normal tissue, polyps, and colon adenocarcinoma using immunohistochemical staining.” Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study conducted on 20 patients so that for each patient, a sample of healthy tissue, dysplastic polyp tissue, and colon adenocarcinoma were provided as microscopic sections and staining on each tissue was performed through immunohistochemistry method by markers OCT4 and SOX2. The collected data were interred into SPSS version 18.0, (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) software and the level of significance were considered as <0.05. Results: The study sample consisted of 20 patients including 11 men (55%) and 9 women (45%) with a mean age of 55.6 ± 9.88 years. There was no association between Oct4 and colorectal cancer (CRC) patients (P > 0.05), but there was a significant correlation between Sox2 expression and CRC (P < 0.05). Patients in many aspects such as race, type of polyp, presence of lymph node, grade and intensity of Sox2 in different types of patients’ tissues (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Regarding our findings, the expression of Sox2 would be a liable marker for evaluating of cancer progression and could be a treatment target of CRC cells. PMID:26645019

  8. Effects of high levels of dietary zinc oxide on ex vivo epithelial histamine response and investigations on histamine receptor action in the proximal colon of weaned piglets.

    PubMed

    Kröger, S; Pieper, R; Aschenbach, J R; Martin, L; Liu, P; Rieger, J; Schwelberger, H G; Neumann, K; Zentek, J

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the effect of high dietary zinc oxide (ZnO) levels on the histamine-induced secretory-type response and histamine metabolism in the porcine proximal colon. After weaning at d 26, 3 diets with low (LZn), normal (NZn), and high (HZn) concentrations of zinc (57, 164, or 2,425 mg/kg) were fed to a total of 120 piglets. Digesta and tissue samples were taken from the ascending colon after 7 ± 1, 14 ± 1, 21 ± 1, and 28 ± 1 d. Partially stripped tissue was mounted in Ussing chambers, and histamine was applied either to the serosal or mucosal compartments. Tissue was pretreated with or without aminoguanidine and amodiaquine to block the histamine-degrading enzymes diamine oxidase (DAO) and histamine -methyltransferase (HMT), respectively. Gene expression and catalytic activity of DAO and HMT in the tissue were analyzed. The numbers of mast cells were determined in tissue samples, and histamine concentration was measured in the colon digesta. Colon tissue from another 12 piglets was used for functional studies on histamine H and H receptors by using the neuronal conduction blocker tetrodotoxin (TTX) and the H and H receptor blocker chloropyramine and famotidine, respectively. After serosal histamine application to colonic tissue in Ussing chambers, the change of short-circuit current (Δ) was not affected by pretreatment and was not different between Zn feeding groups. The Δ after mucosal histamine application was numerically lower ( = 0.168) in HZn compared to LZn and NZn pigs. Mast cell numbers increased from 32 to 46 d of life ( < 0.05). Further studies elucidated that the serosal histamine response was partly inhibited by chloropyramine or famotidine ( < 0.01). The response to mucosal histamine tended to be decreased when chloropyramine but not famotidine was applied from either the serosal or the mucosal side ( = 0.055). Tetrodotoxin alone or in combination with chloropyramine resulted in a similar reduction in the mucosal

  9. Effects of high levels of dietary zinc oxide on ex vivo epithelial histamine response and investigations on histamine receptor action in the proximal colon of weaned piglets.

    PubMed

    Kröger, S; Pieper, R; Aschenbach, J R; Martin, L; Liu, P; Rieger, J; Schwelberger, H G; Neumann, K; Zentek, J

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the effect of high dietary zinc oxide (ZnO) levels on the histamine-induced secretory-type response and histamine metabolism in the porcine proximal colon. After weaning at d 26, 3 diets with low (LZn), normal (NZn), and high (HZn) concentrations of zinc (57, 164, or 2,425 mg/kg) were fed to a total of 120 piglets. Digesta and tissue samples were taken from the ascending colon after 7 ± 1, 14 ± 1, 21 ± 1, and 28 ± 1 d. Partially stripped tissue was mounted in Ussing chambers, and histamine was applied either to the serosal or mucosal compartments. Tissue was pretreated with or without aminoguanidine and amodiaquine to block the histamine-degrading enzymes diamine oxidase (DAO) and histamine -methyltransferase (HMT), respectively. Gene expression and catalytic activity of DAO and HMT in the tissue were analyzed. The numbers of mast cells were determined in tissue samples, and histamine concentration was measured in the colon digesta. Colon tissue from another 12 piglets was used for functional studies on histamine H and H receptors by using the neuronal conduction blocker tetrodotoxin (TTX) and the H and H receptor blocker chloropyramine and famotidine, respectively. After serosal histamine application to colonic tissue in Ussing chambers, the change of short-circuit current (Δ) was not affected by pretreatment and was not different between Zn feeding groups. The Δ after mucosal histamine application was numerically lower ( = 0.168) in HZn compared to LZn and NZn pigs. Mast cell numbers increased from 32 to 46 d of life ( < 0.05). Further studies elucidated that the serosal histamine response was partly inhibited by chloropyramine or famotidine ( < 0.01). The response to mucosal histamine tended to be decreased when chloropyramine but not famotidine was applied from either the serosal or the mucosal side ( = 0.055). Tetrodotoxin alone or in combination with chloropyramine resulted in a similar reduction in the mucosal

  10. Arhgap17, a RhoGTPase activating protein, regulates mucosal and epithelial barrier function in the mouse colon

    PubMed Central

    Lee, So-young; Kim, Hwain; Kim, Kyoungmi; Lee, Hyunji; Lee, Seungbok; Lee, Daekee

    2016-01-01

    Coordinated regulation of the actin cytoskeleton by the Rho GTPase family is required for the maintenance of polarity in epithelial cells as well as for their proliferation and migration. A RhoGTPase-activating protein 17 (Arhgap17) is known to be involved in multiple cellular processes in vitro, including the maintenance of tight junctions and vesicle trafficking. However, the function of Arhgap17 has not been studied in the physiological context. Here, we generated Arhgap17-deficient mice and examined the effect in the epithelial and mucosal barriers of the intestine. Reporter staining revealed that Arhgap17 expression is limited to the luminal epithelium of intestine. Arhgap17-deficient mice show an increased paracellular permeability and aberrant localization of the apical junction complex in the luminal epithelium, but do not develop spontaneous colitis. The inner mucus layer is impervious to the enteric bacteria irrespective of Tff3 downregulation in the Arhgap17-deficient mice. Interestingly however, treatment with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) causes an increased accumulation of DSS and TNF production in intraluminal cells and rapid destruction of the inner mucus layer, resulting in increased severity of colitis in mutant mice. Overall, these data reveal that Arhgap17 has a novel function in regulating transcellular transport and maintaining integrity of intestinal barriers. PMID:27229483

  11. Arhgap17, a RhoGTPase activating protein, regulates mucosal and epithelial barrier function in the mouse colon.

    PubMed

    Lee, So-Young; Kim, Hwain; Kim, Kyoungmi; Lee, Hyunji; Lee, Seungbok; Lee, Daekee

    2016-01-01

    Coordinated regulation of the actin cytoskeleton by the Rho GTPase family is required for the maintenance of polarity in epithelial cells as well as for their proliferation and migration. A RhoGTPase-activating protein 17 (Arhgap17) is known to be involved in multiple cellular processes in vitro, including the maintenance of tight junctions and vesicle trafficking. However, the function of Arhgap17 has not been studied in the physiological context. Here, we generated Arhgap17-deficient mice and examined the effect in the epithelial and mucosal barriers of the intestine. Reporter staining revealed that Arhgap17 expression is limited to the luminal epithelium of intestine. Arhgap17-deficient mice show an increased paracellular permeability and aberrant localization of the apical junction complex in the luminal epithelium, but do not develop spontaneous colitis. The inner mucus layer is impervious to the enteric bacteria irrespective of Tff3 downregulation in the Arhgap17-deficient mice. Interestingly however, treatment with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) causes an increased accumulation of DSS and TNF production in intraluminal cells and rapid destruction of the inner mucus layer, resulting in increased severity of colitis in mutant mice. Overall, these data reveal that Arhgap17 has a novel function in regulating transcellular transport and maintaining integrity of intestinal barriers.

  12. Stimulation of the proliferation of human normal esophageal epithelial cells by fumonisin B1 and its mechanism

    PubMed Central

    WANG, SHAO-KANG; WANG, TING-TING; HUANG, GUI-LING; SHI, RUO-FU; YANG, LI-GANG; SUN, GUI-JU

    2014-01-01

    Previous epidemiological studies have demonstrated a correlation between fumonisin B1 (FB1) and human esophageal cancer in China, Iran and South Africa. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of FB1 on the proliferation, cell-cycle and apoptosis of normal human esophageal epithelial cells (HEECs) and to explore the molecular mechanisms of these effects. The proliferation of HEECs treated with FB1 was assessed using a colorimetric assay, while analyses of the cell cycle and apoptosis were performed using flow cytometry and the measurement of the protein expressions of genes associated with the cell cycle was conducted using western blotting. The results showed that FB1 stimulated the proliferation of HEECs, decreased the percentage of cells in the G0/G1 phase and reduced apoptosis. The western blotting results showed that FB1 significantly increased the protein expression of cyclin D1 and significantly decreased the protein expression of cyclin E, p21 and p27. The results indicated that FB1 stimulated the proliferation of HEECs by affecting the cell cycle and apoptosis. This mechanism was associated with changes in cyclin D1, cyclin E, p21 and p27 expression. PMID:24348764

  13. Simian virus 40 large tumor antigen-immortalized normal human liver epithelial cells express hepatocyte characteristics and metabolize chemical carcinogens.

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, A M; Cole, K E; Smoot, D T; Weston, A; Groopman, J D; Shields, P G; Vignaud, J M; Juillerat, M; Lipsky, M M; Trump, B F

    1993-01-01

    Normal human liver tissue and cultured human hepatocytes are valuable models to study xenobiotic metabolism and toxicity, but they only have a limited in vitro life-span and are not readily available. This report describes the establishment of replicative cultures of human adult liver epithelial cells in serum-free medium. The longevity of three of these cultures, derived from different donors, was extended by introduction of the simian virus 40 large T antigen gene. Two cell lines, THLE-2 and -3, established with a recombinant simian virus 40 large T antigen virus have undergone > 100 population doublings, are nontumorigenic when injected into athymic nude mice, have near-diploid karyotypes, and do not express alpha-fetoprotein. The cells express cytokeratin 18 and albumin in early passage, whereas higher-passage cells in logarithmic-phase growth also express cytokeratin 19. THLE-2 and -3 cells metabolize benzo[a]pyrene, N-nitrosodimethylamine, and aflatoxin B1 to their ultimate carcinogenic metabolites that adduct DNA, which indicates functional cytochrome P450 pathways. Other enzymes involved in metabolism of chemical carcinogens, such as epoxide hydrolase, NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione S-transferases, and glutathione peroxidase are also retained by THLE cells. Thus, these immortalized human liver cells constitute an in vitro model for pharmacotoxicological studies and for the investigation of etiology and pathogenesis of human hepatocellular carcinoma. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7685115

  14. Actin stress fiber disruption and tropomysin isoform switching in normal thyroid epithelial cells stimulated by thyrotropin and phorbol esters

    SciTech Connect

    Roger, P.P.; Rickaert, F.; Lamy, F.; Authelet, M.; Dumont, J.E. )

    1989-05-01

    Thyrotropin (TSH), through cyclic AMP, promotes both proliferation and differentiation expression in dog thyroid epithelial cells in primary culture, whereas the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) also stimulates proliferation but antagonizes differentiating effects of TSH. In this study, within 20 min both factors triggered the disruption of actin-containing stress fibers. This process preceded distinct morphological changes: cytoplasmic retraction and arborization in response to TSH and cyclic AMP, cell shape distortion, and increased motility in response to TPA and diacylglycerol. TSH and TPA also induced a marked decrease in the synthesis of three high M{sub r} tropomyosin isoforms, which were not present in dog thyroid tissue but appeared in culture during cell spreading and stress fiber formation. The tropomyosin isoform switching observed here closely resembled similar processes in various cells transformed by oncogenic viruses. However, it did not correlate with differentiation or mitogenic activation. Contrasting with current hypothesis on this process in transformed cells, tropomyosin isoform switching in normal thyroid cells was preceded and thus might be caused by early disruption of stress fibers.

  15. Hypoxia primes human normal prostate epithelial cells and cancer cell lines for the NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Panchanathan, Ravichandran; Liu, Hongzhu; Choubey, Divaker

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms by which hypoxia contributes to prostatic chronic inflammation (PCI) remain largely unknown. Because hypoxia stimulates the transcriptional activity of NF-κB, which “primes” cells for inflammasome activation by inducing the expression of NLRP3 or AIM2 receptor and pro-IL-1β, we investigated whether hypoxia could activate the NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome in human normal prostate epithelial cells (PrECs) and cancer cell lines. Here we report that hypoxia (1% O2) treatment of PrECs, prostate cell lines, and a macrophage cell line (THP-1) increased the levels of NLRP3, AIM2, and pro-IL-1β. Further, hypoxia in cells potentiated activation of the NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome activity. Notably, hypoxia “primed” cells for NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome activation through stimulation of the NF-κB activity. Our observations support the idea that hypoxia in human prostatic tumors contributes to PCI, in part, by priming cells for the activation of NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome. PMID:27058421

  16. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Inhibits Ciliagenesis in Differentiated Normal Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells: Effectiveness of N-Acetylcysteine

    PubMed Central

    Mata, Manuel; Sarrion, Irene; Armengot, Miguel; Carda, Carmen; Martinez, Isidoro; Melero, Jose A.; Cortijo, Julio

    2012-01-01

    Persistent respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections have been associated with the exacerbation of chronic inflammatory diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This virus infects the respiratory epithelium, leading to chronic inflammation, and induces the release of mucins and the loss of cilia activity, two factors that determine mucus clearance and the increase in sputum volume. These alterations involve reactive oxygen species-dependent mechanisms. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) has proven useful in the management of COPD, reducing symptoms, exacerbations, and accelerated lung function decline. NAC inhibits RSV infection and mucin release in human A549 cells. The main objective of this study was to analyze the effects of NAC in modulating ciliary activity, ciliagenesis, and metaplasia in primary normal human bronchial epithelial cell (NHBEC) cultures infected with RSV. Our results indicated that RSV induced ultrastructural abnormalities in axonemal basal bodies and decreased the expression of β-tubulin as well as two genes involved in ciliagenesis, FOXJ1 and DNAI2. These alterations led to a decrease in ciliary activity. Furthermore, RSV induced metaplastic changes to the epithelium and increased the number of goblet cells and the expression of MUC5AC and GOB5. NAC restored the normal functions of the epithelium, inhibiting ICAM1 expression, subsequent RSV infection through mechanisms involving nuclear receptor factor 2, and the expression of heme oxygenase 1, which correlated with the restoration of the antioxidant capacity, the intracellular H2O2 levels and glutathione content of NHBECs. The results presented in this study support the therapeutic use of NAC for the management of chronic respiratory diseases, including COPD. PMID:23118923

  17. Respiratory syncytial virus inhibits ciliagenesis in differentiated normal human bronchial epithelial cells: effectiveness of N-acetylcysteine.

    PubMed

    Mata, Manuel; Sarrion, Irene; Armengot, Miguel; Carda, Carmen; Martinez, Isidoro; Melero, Jose A; Cortijo, Julio

    2012-01-01

    Persistent respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections have been associated with the exacerbation of chronic inflammatory diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This virus infects the respiratory epithelium, leading to chronic inflammation, and induces the release of mucins and the loss of cilia activity, two factors that determine mucus clearance and the increase in sputum volume. These alterations involve reactive oxygen species-dependent mechanisms. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) has proven useful in the management of COPD, reducing symptoms, exacerbations, and accelerated lung function decline. NAC inhibits RSV infection and mucin release in human A549 cells. The main objective of this study was to analyze the effects of NAC in modulating ciliary activity, ciliagenesis, and metaplasia in primary normal human bronchial epithelial cell (NHBEC) cultures infected with RSV. Our results indicated that RSV induced ultrastructural abnormalities in axonemal basal bodies and decreased the expression of β-tubulin as well as two genes involved in ciliagenesis, FOXJ1 and DNAI2. These alterations led to a decrease in ciliary activity. Furthermore, RSV induced metaplastic changes to the epithelium and increased the number of goblet cells and the expression of MUC5AC and GOB5. NAC restored the normal functions of the epithelium, inhibiting ICAM1 expression, subsequent RSV infection through mechanisms involving nuclear receptor factor 2, and the expression of heme oxygenase 1, which correlated with the restoration of the antioxidant capacity, the intracellular H(2)O(2) levels and glutathione content of NHBECs. The results presented in this study support the therapeutic use of NAC for the management of chronic respiratory diseases, including COPD. PMID:23118923

  18. Respiratory syncytial virus inhibits ciliagenesis in differentiated normal human bronchial epithelial cells: effectiveness of N-acetylcysteine.

    PubMed

    Mata, Manuel; Sarrion, Irene; Armengot, Miguel; Carda, Carmen; Martinez, Isidoro; Melero, Jose A; Cortijo, Julio

    2012-01-01

    Persistent respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections have been associated with the exacerbation of chronic inflammatory diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This virus infects the respiratory epithelium, leading to chronic inflammation, and induces the release of mucins and the loss of cilia activity, two factors that determine mucus clearance and the increase in sputum volume. These alterations involve reactive oxygen species-dependent mechanisms. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) has proven useful in the management of COPD, reducing symptoms, exacerbations, and accelerated lung function decline. NAC inhibits RSV infection and mucin release in human A549 cells. The main objective of this study was to analyze the effects of NAC in modulating ciliary activity, ciliagenesis, and metaplasia in primary normal human bronchial epithelial cell (NHBEC) cultures infected with RSV. Our results indicated that RSV induced ultrastructural abnormalities in axonemal basal bodies and decreased the expression of β-tubulin as well as two genes involved in ciliagenesis, FOXJ1 and DNAI2. These alterations led to a decrease in ciliary activity. Furthermore, RSV induced metaplastic changes to the epithelium and increased the number of goblet cells and the expression of MUC5AC and GOB5. NAC restored the normal functions of the epithelium, inhibiting ICAM1 expression, subsequent RSV infection through mechanisms involving nuclear receptor factor 2, and the expression of heme oxygenase 1, which correlated with the restoration of the antioxidant capacity, the intracellular H(2)O(2) levels and glutathione content of NHBECs. The results presented in this study support the therapeutic use of NAC for the management of chronic respiratory diseases, including COPD.

  19. Effects of fermentation products of pro- and prebiotics on trans-epithelial electrical resistance in an in vitro model of the colon.

    PubMed

    Commane, Daniel M; Shortt, Colette T; Silvi, Stefania; Cresci, Albert; Hughes, Roisin M; Rowland, Ian R

    2005-01-01

    Evidence from in vivo and in vitro studies suggests that the consumption of pro- and prebiotics may inhibit colon carcinogenesis; however, the mechanisms involved have, thus far, proved elusive. There are some indications from animal studies that the effects are being exerted during the promotion stage of carcinogenesis. One feature of the promotion stage of colorectal cancer is the disruption of tight junctions, leading to a loss of integrity across the intestinal barrier. We have used the Caco-2 human adenocarcinoma cell line as a model for the intestinal epithelia. Trans-epithelial electrical resistance measurements indicate Caco-2 monolayer integrity, and we recorded changes to this integrity following exposure to the fermentation products of selected probiotics and prebiotics, in the form of nondigestible oligosaccharides (NDOs). Our results indicate that NDOs themselves exert varying, but generally minor, effects upon the strength of the tight junctions, whereas the fermentation products of probiotics and NDOs tend to raise tight junction integrity above that of the controls. This effect was bacterial species and oligosaccharide specific. Bifidobacterium Bb 12 was particularly effective, as were the fermentation products of Raftiline and Raftilose. We further investigated the ability of Raftilose fermentations to protect against the negative effects of deoxycholic acid (DCA) upon tight junction integrity. We found protection to be species dependent and dependent upon the presence of the fermentation products in the media at the same time as or after exposure to the DCA. Results suggest that the Raftilose fermentation products may prevent disruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier function during damage by tumor promoters.

  20. Reference Gene Selection for qPCR Is Dependent on Cell Type Rather than Treatment in Colonic and Vaginal Human Epithelial Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Annette V.; Yemaneab, Bisrat T.; Jass, Jana; Scherbak, Nikolai

    2014-01-01

    The ability of commensal bacteria to influence gene expression in host cells under the influence of pathogenic bacteria has previously been demonstrated, however the extent of this interaction is important for understanding how bacteria can be used as probiotics. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction is the most sensitive tool for evaluating relative changes to gene expression levels. However as a result of its sensitivity an appropriate method of normalisation should be used to account for any variation incurred in preparatory experimental procedures. These variations may result from differences in the amount of starting material, quality of extracted RNA, or in the efficiency of the reverse transcriptase or polymerase enzymes. Selection of an endogenous control gene is the preferred method of normalisation, and ideally a proper validation of the gene's appropriateness for the study in question should be performed. In this study we used quantitative polymerase chain reaction data and applied four different algorithms (geNorm, BestKeeper, NormFinder, and comparative ΔCq) to evaluate eleven different genes as to their suitability as endogenous controls for use in studies involving colonic (HT-29) and vaginal (VK2/E6E7) human mucosal epithelial cells treated with probiotic and pathogenic bacteria. We found phosphoglycerate kinase 1 to be most appropriate for HT-29 cells, and ribosomal protein large P0 to be the best choice for VK2/E6E7 cells. We also showed that use of less stable reference genes can lead to less accurate quantification of expression levels of gene of interest (GOI) and also can result in decreased statistical significance for GOI expression levels when compared to control. Additionally, we found the cell type being analysed had greater influence on reference gene selection than the treatment performed. This study provides recommendations for stable endogenous control genes for use in further studies involving colonic and vaginal cell

  1. Relationship between ganglioside expression and anti-cancer effects of the monoclonal antibody against epithelial cell adhesion molecule in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Dong Hoon; Ryu, Jae-Sung; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Ko, Kisung; Ma, Jin Yeul; Hwang, Kyung-A; Choo, Young-Kug

    2011-12-31

    The human colorectal carcinoma-associated GA733 antigen epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) was initially described as a cell surface protein selectively expressed in some myeloid cancers. Gangliosides are sialic acid-containing glycosphingolipids involved in inflammation and oncogenesis. We have demonstrated that treatment with anti-EpCAM mAb and RAW264.7 cells significant inhibited the cell growth in SW620 cancer cells, but neither anti-EpCAM mAb nor RAW264.7 cells alone induced cytotoxicity. The relationship between ganglioside expression and the anti- cancer effects of anti-EpCAM mAb and RAW264.7 was investigated by high-performance thin-layer chromatography. The results demonstrated that expression of GM1 and GD1a significantly increased in the ability of anti-EpCAM to inhibit cell growth in SW620 cells. Anti-EpCAM mAb treatment increased the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins such as Bcl-2, but the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins Bax, TNF-α, caspase-3, cleaved caspase-3, and cleaved caspase-8 were unaltered. We observed that anti-EpCAM mAb significantly inhibited the growth of colon tumors, as determined by a decrease in tumor volume and weight. The expression of anti-apoptotic protein was inhibited by treatment with anti-EpCAM mAb, whereas the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins was increased. These results suggest that GD1a and GM1 were closely related to anticancer effects of anti-EpCAM mAb. In light of these results, further clinical investigation should be conducted on anti-EpCAM mAb to determine its possible chemopreventive and/or therapeutic efficacy against human colon cancer.

  2. Inactivation of α1-proteinase inhibitor by Candida albicans aspartic proteases favors the epithelial and endothelial cell colonization in the presence of neutrophil extracellular traps.

    PubMed

    Gogol, Mariusz; Ostrowska, Dominika; Klaga, Kinga; Bochenska, Oliwia; Wolak, Natalia; Aoki, Wataru; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi; Kozik, Andrzej; Rapala-Kozik, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans, a causative agent of opportunistic fungal infections in immunocompromised patients, uses ten secreted aspartic proteases (SAPs) to deregulate the homeostasis of the host organism on many levels. One of these deregulation mechanisms involves a SAP-dependent disturbance of the control over proteolytic enzymes of the host by a system of dedicated proteinase inhibitors, with one important example being the neutrophil elastase and alpha1-proteinase inhibitor (A1PI). In this study, we found that soluble SAPs 1-4 and the cell membrane-anchored SAP9 efficiently cleaved A1PI, with the major cleavage points located at the C-terminal part of A1PI in a close vicinity to the reactive-site loop that plays a critical role in the inhibition mechanism. Elastase is released by neutrophils to the environment during fungal infection through two major processes, a degranulation or formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NET). Both, free and NET-embedded elastase forms, were found to be controlled by A1PI. A local acidosis, resulting from the neutrophil activity at the infection sites, favors A1PI degradation by SAPs. The deregulation of NET-connected elastase affected a NET-dependent damage of epithelial and endothelial cells, resulting in the increased susceptibility of these host cells to candidal colonization. Moreover, the SAP-catalyzed cleavage of A1PI was found to decrease its binding affinity to a proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-8. The findings presented here suggest a novel strategy used by C. albicans for the colonization of host tissues and overcoming the host defense. PMID:26641639

  3. Growth hormone is permissive for neoplastic colon growth.

    PubMed

    Chesnokova, Vera; Zonis, Svetlana; Zhou, Cuiqi; Recouvreux, Maria Victoria; Ben-Shlomo, Anat; Araki, Takako; Barrett, Robert; Workman, Michael; Wawrowsky, Kolja; Ljubimov, Vladimir A; Uhart, Magdalena; Melmed, Shlomo

    2016-06-01

    Growth hormone (GH) excess in acromegaly is associated with increased precancerous colon polyps and soft tissue adenomas, whereas short-stature humans harboring an inactivating GH receptor mutation do not develop cancer. We show that locally expressed colon GH is abundant in conditions predisposing to colon cancer and in colon adenocarcinoma-associated stromal fibroblasts. Administration of a GH receptor (GHR) blocker in acromegaly patients induced colon p53 and adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), reversing progrowth GH signals. p53 was also induced in skin fibroblasts derived from short-statured humans with mutant GHR. GH-deficient prophet of pituitary-specific positive transcription factor 1 (Prop1)(-/-) mice exhibited induced colon p53 levels, and cross-breeding them with Apc(min+/-) mice that normally develop intestinal and colon tumors resulted in GH-deficient double mutants with markedly decreased tumor number and size. We also demonstrate that GH suppresses p53 and reduces apoptosis in human colon cell lines as well as in induced human pluripotent stem cell-derived intestinal organoids, and confirm in vivo that GH suppresses colon mucosal p53/p21. GH excess leads to decreased colon cell phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), increased cell survival with down-regulated APC, nuclear β-catenin accumulation, and increased epithelial-mesenchymal transition factors and colon cell motility. We propose that GH is a molecular component of the "field change" milieu permissive for neoplastic colon growth. PMID:27226307

  4. Apobec-1 Complementation Factor (A1CF) Inhibits Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and Migration of Normal Rat Kidney Proximal Tubular Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Liyuan; Wang, Honglian; Zhou, Yuru; Ni, Dongsheng; Hu, Yanxia; Long, Yaoshui; Liu, Jianing; Peng, Rui; Zhou, Li; Liu, Zhicheng; Lyu, Zhongshi; Mao, Zhaomin; Hao, Jin; Li, Yiman; Zhou, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Apobec-1 complementation factor (A1CF) is a member of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNP) family, which participates in site-specific posttranscriptional RNA editing of apolipoprotein B (apoB) transcript. The posttranscriptional editing of apoB mRNA by A1CF in the small intestine is required for lipid absorption. Apart from the intestine, A1CF mRNA is also reported to be highly expressed in the kidneys. However, it is remained unknown about the functions of A1CF in the kidneys. The aim of this paper is to explore the potential functions of A1CF in the kidneys. Our results demonstrated that in C57BL/6 mice A1CF was weakly expressed in embryonic kidneys from E15.5dpc while strongly expressed in mature kidneys after birth, and it mainly existed in the tubules of inner cortex. More importantly, we identified A1CF negatively regulated the process of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in kidney tubular epithelial cells. Our results found ectopic expression of A1CF up-regulated the epithelial markers E-cadherin, and down-regulated the mesenchymal markers vimentin and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in NRK52e cells. In addition, knockdown of A1CF enhanced EMT contrary to the overexpression effect. Notably, the two A1CF variants led to the similar trend in the EMT process. Taken together, these data suggest that A1CF may be an antagonistic factor to the EMT process of kidney tubular epithelial cells. PMID:26848653

  5. Normalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuevas, Eduardo J.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses cornerstone of Montessori theory, normalization, which asserts that if a child is placed in an optimum prepared environment where inner impulses match external opportunities, the undeviated self emerges, a being totally in harmony with its surroundings. Makes distinctions regarding normalization, normalized, and normality, indicating how…

  6. Ex vivo determination of glucose permeability and optical attenuation coefficient in normal and adenomatous human colon tissues using spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qingliang; Zhou, Chuanqing; Wei, Huajiang; He, Yonghong; Chai, Xinyu; Ren, Qiushi

    2012-10-01

    Recent reports have suggested that spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) is a useful tool for quantifying the permeability of hyperosmotic agents in various tissues. We report our preliminary results on quantification of glucose diffusion and assessment of the optical attenuation change due to the diffusion of glucose in normal and adenomatous human colon tissues in vitro by using a SD-OCT and then calculated the permeability coefficients (PC) and optical attenuation coefficients (AC). The PC of a 30% aqueous solution of glucose was 3.37±0.23×10-6 cm/s in normal tissue and 5.65±0.16×10-6 cm/s in cancerous colon tissue. Optical AC in a normal colon ranged from 3.48±0.37 to 2.68±0.82 mm-1 and was significantly lower than those seen in the cancerous tissue (8.48±0.95 to 3.16±0.69 mm-1, p<0.05). The results suggest that quantitative measurements of using PC and AC from OCT images could be a potentially powerful method for colon cancer detection.

  7. Culture of normal and malignant primary human mammary epithelial cells in a physiological manner simulates in vivo growth patterns and allows discrimination of cell type.

    PubMed

    Bergstraesser, L M; Weitzman, S A

    1993-06-01

    We cultured primary human mammary epithelial cells from five reduction mammoplasties and five breast carcinomas and attempted to improve culture conditions and define cell populations grown. Normal cells cultured on Matrigel basement membrane-like substance formed multicellular three-dimensional structures reminiscent of tissue ducts and alveoli, while malignant cells remained as single cells crawling through Matrigel much as malignant cells separate and invade basement membrane in vivo. This re-creation of normal and malignant breast cell morphology may facilitate studies of breast cancer cell biology and determination of malignant cell authenticity in culture. Growth of cells in a reduced oxygen concentration of 12% improved cell proliferation over room air (21%); however, cells could not proliferate in a completely physiological oxygen concentration of 6%, perhaps because of the medium used. We developed an improved medium for malignant cell growth, which lengthened their life span in culture, and a completely defined medium which supported cell proliferation for six passages. Methods to determine the epithelial nature of mammary epithelial cells are illustrated and discussed. The authenticity of malignant cells in culture was suggested by their proliferation without certain growth factors required for normal cell growth or with transforming growth factor-beta, which arrests normal cell proliferation, and by their contact independence.

  8. Immunolocalization of the human basal epithelial marker monoclonal antibody 312C8-1 in normal tissue and mammary tumours of rodents.

    PubMed

    Tsubura, A; Inui, T; Senzaki, H; Morii, S; Dairkee, S H

    1989-01-01

    Using immunoperoxidase staining of monoclonal antibody 312C8-1 against 51,000 dalton human keratin polypeptide, immunolocalization was observed in frozen sections of normal tissue and mammary tumours of adult female mice and rats. In normal tissue, the epitope was recognized in myoepithelial cells of the mammary, sweat and salivary glands, and in basal and suprabasal cells of the epidermis. However, the antibody did not react with luminal epithelial cells of the above glands or with mesenchymal cells. In spontaneous mammary tumours of mice, marker-positive tumour cells were distributed only in the outer layer of adenocarcinoma Type A, while they were scattered in some foci of adenocarcinoma Type B, and encircled the epithelial foci of pregnancy dependent tumours (plaque). All layers of epidermoid structures in adenoacanthoma revealed positivity. In rat mammary tumours induced by local dusting with 7, 12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) powder, the staining pattern of benign tumours was comparable to that of the normal mammary gland. But, in addition to basally situated cells, marker-positive tumour cells were found scattered in the foci of adenocarcinoma, and were not restricted to basal cells in squamous cell carcinoma. The marker was not found in sarcomatous tissue. This antibody can therefore also be applied to rodents, and the staining pattern can be used to identify the epithelial subclass specific marker in normal tissue and in mammary tumours.

  9. Reactive oxygen species mediate oxaliplatin-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition and invasive potential in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Lin; Li, Dan-Dan; Yang, Chen-Lu; Peng, Rui-Qing; Guo, Yi-Qun; Zhang, Xiao-Shi; Zhu, Xiao-Feng

    2016-06-01

    Therapeutic benefits offered by common chemotherapy drugs, such as oxaliplatin, are limited due to the development of resistance, which contributes to treatment failure and metastasis. The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key event contributing to the development of resistance to chemotherapeutics. Although the relationship between oxaliplatin and chemotherapy resistance has been described for decades, the molecular mechanisms have remained elusive. The aim of the present study was to investigate the underlying mechanisms of oxaliplatin-mediated metastasis. Here, we identify reactive oxygen species (ROS) as mediators that promote the oxaliplatin-induced EMT. Following oxaliplatin treatment, the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of most peroxiredoxin family genes, except for peroxiredoxin 1 (prdx1) gene, were constant or even decreased, resulting in ROS abundance. And the antioxidant guardian Nrf2 was unconspicuously raised both transcriptionally and translationally with oxaliplatin treatment as compared to those induced by topotecan treatment, which has been proved with no induced metastasis. In addition, the study evaluated high levels of ROS leading to EMT via activation of the known oncogenes Akt and Snail. Using the Akt inhibitor LY294002 or knocking down Snail expression via RNA interference (RNAi) reversed the effects of oxaliplatin on the EMT and metastasis. Our studies establish a role for the ROS-Akt-Snail axis as a mechanism by which chemotherapeutics induce EMT and cancer metastasis.

  10. A Network Biology Approach Identifies Molecular Cross-Talk between Normal Prostate Epithelial and Prostate Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Trevino, Victor; Cassese, Alberto; Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Herbert, John; Antzack, Philipp; Clarke, Kim; Davies, Nicholas; Rahman, Ayesha; Campbell, Moray J.; Bicknell, Roy; Vannucci, Marina; Falciani, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The advent of functional genomics has enabled the genome-wide characterization of the molecular state of cells and tissues, virtually at every level of biological organization. The difficulty in organizing and mining this unprecedented amount of information has stimulated the development of computational methods designed to infer the underlying structure of regulatory networks from observational data. These important developments had a profound impact in biological sciences since they triggered the development of a novel data-driven investigative approach. In cancer research, this strategy has been particularly successful. It has contributed to the identification of novel biomarkers, to a better characterization of disease heterogeneity and to a more in depth understanding of cancer pathophysiology. However, so far these approaches have not explicitly addressed the challenge of identifying networks representing the interaction of different cell types in a complex tissue. Since these interactions represent an essential part of the biology of both diseased and healthy tissues, it is of paramount importance that this challenge is addressed. Here we report the definition of a network reverse engineering strategy designed to infer directional signals linking adjacent cell types within a complex tissue. The application of this inference strategy to prostate cancer genome-wide expression profiling data validated the approach and revealed that normal epithelial cells exert an anti-tumour activity on prostate carcinoma cells. Moreover, by using a Bayesian hierarchical model integrating genetics and gene expression data and combining this with survival analysis, we show that the expression of putative cell communication genes related to focal adhesion and secretion is affected by epistatic gene copy number variation and it is predictive of patient survival. Ultimately, this study represents a generalizable approach to the challenge of deciphering cell communication

  11. A Network Biology Approach Identifies Molecular Cross-Talk between Normal Prostate Epithelial and Prostate Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Trevino, Victor; Cassese, Alberto; Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Herbert, John; Antzack, Philipp; Clarke, Kim; Davies, Nicholas; Rahman, Ayesha; Campbell, Moray J; Guindani, Michele; Bicknell, Roy; Vannucci, Marina; Falciani, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    The advent of functional genomics has enabled the genome-wide characterization of the molecular state of cells and tissues, virtually at every level of biological organization. The difficulty in organizing and mining this unprecedented amount of information has stimulated the development of computational methods designed to infer the underlying structure of regulatory networks from observational data. These important developments had a profound impact in biological sciences since they triggered the development of a novel data-driven investigative approach. In cancer research, this strategy has been particularly successful. It has contributed to the identification of novel biomarkers, to a better characterization of disease heterogeneity and to a more in depth understanding of cancer pathophysiology. However, so far these approaches have not explicitly addressed the challenge of identifying networks representing the interaction of different cell types in a complex tissue. Since these interactions represent an essential part of the biology of both diseased and healthy tissues, it is of paramount importance that this challenge is addressed. Here we report the definition of a network reverse engineering strategy designed to infer directional signals linking adjacent cell types within a complex tissue. The application of this inference strategy to prostate cancer genome-wide expression profiling data validated the approach and revealed that normal epithelial cells exert an anti-tumour activity on prostate carcinoma cells. Moreover, by using a Bayesian hierarchical model integrating genetics and gene expression data and combining this with survival analysis, we show that the expression of putative cell communication genes related to focal adhesion and secretion is affected by epistatic gene copy number variation and it is predictive of patient survival. Ultimately, this study represents a generalizable approach to the challenge of deciphering cell communication networks

  12. A Network Biology Approach Identifies Molecular Cross-Talk between Normal Prostate Epithelial and Prostate Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Trevino, Victor; Cassese, Alberto; Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Herbert, John; Antzack, Philipp; Clarke, Kim; Davies, Nicholas; Rahman, Ayesha; Campbell, Moray J; Guindani, Michele; Bicknell, Roy; Vannucci, Marina; Falciani, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    The advent of functional genomics has enabled the genome-wide characterization of the molecular state of cells and tissues, virtually at every level of biological organization. The difficulty in organizing and mining this unprecedented amount of information has stimulated the development of computational methods designed to infer the underlying structure of regulatory networks from observational data. These important developments had a profound impact in biological sciences since they triggered the development of a novel data-driven investigative approach. In cancer research, this strategy has been particularly successful. It has contributed to the identification of novel biomarkers, to a better characterization of disease heterogeneity and to a more in depth understanding of cancer pathophysiology. However, so far these approaches have not explicitly addressed the challenge of identifying networks representing the interaction of different cell types in a complex tissue. Since these interactions represent an essential part of the biology of both diseased and healthy tissues, it is of paramount importance that this challenge is addressed. Here we report the definition of a network reverse engineering strategy designed to infer directional signals linking adjacent cell types within a complex tissue. The application of this inference strategy to prostate cancer genome-wide expression profiling data validated the approach and revealed that normal epithelial cells exert an anti-tumour activity on prostate carcinoma cells. Moreover, by using a Bayesian hierarchical model integrating genetics and gene expression data and combining this with survival analysis, we show that the expression of putative cell communication genes related to focal adhesion and secretion is affected by epistatic gene copy number variation and it is predictive of patient survival. Ultimately, this study represents a generalizable approach to the challenge of deciphering cell communication networks

  13. Haplotype and diplotype analyses of variation in ERCC5 transcription cis-regulation in normal bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaolu; Crawford, Erin L; Blomquist, Thomas M; Khuder, Sadik A; Yeo, Jiyoun; Levin, Albert M; Willey, James C

    2016-07-01

    Excision repair cross-complementation group 5 (ERCC5) gene plays an important role in nucleotide excision repair, and dysregulation of ERCC5 is associated with increased lung cancer risk. Haplotype and diplotype analyses were conducted in normal bronchial epithelial cells (NBEC) to better understand mechanisms responsible for interindividual variation in transcript abundance regulation of ERCC5 We determined genotypes at putative ERCC5 cis-regulatory SNPs (cis-rSNP) rs751402 and rs2296147, and marker SNPs rs1047768 and rs17655. ERCC5 allele-specific transcript abundance was assessed by a recently developed targeted sequencing method. Syntenic relationships among alleles at rs751402, rs2296147, and rs1047768 were assessed by allele-specific PCR followed by Sanger sequencing. We then assessed association of ERCC5 allele-specific expression at rs1047768 with haplotype and diplotype structure at cis-rSNPs rs751402 and rs2296147. Genotype analysis revealed significantly (P < 0.005) higher interindividual variation in allelic ratios in cDNA samples relative to matched gDNA samples at both rs1047768 and rs17655. By diplotype analysis, mean expression was higher at the rs1047768 alleles syntenic with rs2296147 T allele compared with rs2296147 C allele. Furthermore, mean expression was lower at rs17655 C allele, which is syntenic with G allele at a linked SNP rs873601 (D' = 0.95). These data support the conclusions that in NBEC, T allele at SNP rs2296147 upregulates ERCC5, variation at rs751402 does not alter ERCC5 regulation, and that C allele at SNP rs17655 downregulates ERCC5 Variation in ERCC5 transcript abundance associated with allelic variation at these SNPs could result in variation in NER function in NBEC and lung cancer risk. PMID:27235448

  14. Effect of cytosolic pH on epithelial Na+ channel in normal and cystic fibrosis sweat ducts.

    PubMed

    Reddy, M M; Wang, X F; Quinton, P M

    2008-01-01

    The activities of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel and the amiloride-sensitive epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) are acutely coordinated in the sweat duct. However, the mechanisms responsible for cross-talk between these ion channels are unknown. Previous studies indicated that luminal pH of sweat ducts varies over 3 pH units and that the cytoplasmic pH affects both CFTR and ENaC. Therefore, using basolaterally alpha-toxin-permeabilized apical membrane preparations of sweat ducts as an experimental system, we tested the hypothesis that the cytosolic pH may mediate the cross-talk between CFTR and ENaC. We showed that while luminal pH had no effect, cytosolic pH acutely affected ENaC activity. That is, acidic pH inhibited, while basic pH activated, ENaC. pH regulation of ENaC appears to be independent of CFTR or endogenous kinase activities because basic pH independently stimulated ENaC (1) in normal ducts even when CFTR was deactivated, (2) in CF ducts that lack CFTR in the plasma membranes and (3) after blocking endogenous kinase activity with staurosporine. Considering the evidence of Na(+)/H(+) exchange (NHE) activity as shown by the expression of mRNA and function of NHE in the basolateral membrane of the sweat duct, we postulate that changes in cytosolic Na(+) ([Na(+)]( i )) may alter cytosolic pH (pH( i )) as salt loads into the cell during electrolyte absorption. These changes may play a role in coordinating the activities of ENaC and CFTR during transepithelial salt transport. PMID:18937003

  15. Immortalization of Fetal Bovine Colon Epithelial Cells by Expression of Human Cyclin D1, Mutant Cyclin Dependent Kinase 4, and Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase: An In Vitro Model for Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Kengo; Kiyono, Tohru; Isogai, Emiko; Masuda, Mizuki; Narita, Moe; Okuno, Katsuya; Koyanagi, Yukako; Fukuda, Tomokazu

    2015-01-01

    Cattle are the economically important animals in human society. They are essential for the production of livestock products such as milk and meats. The production efficiency of livestock products is negatively impacted by infection with zoonotic pathogens. To prevent and control infectious diseases, it is important to understand the interaction between cattle tissue and pathogenic bacteria. In this study, we established an in vitro infection model of an immortalized bovine colon-derived epithelial cell line by transducing the cells with lentiviral vectors containing genes encoding cell cycle regulators cyclin D1, mutant cyclin dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT). The established cell line showed continuous cell proliferation, expression of epithelial markers, and an intact karyotype, indicating that the cells maintained their original nature as colon-derived epithelium. Furthermore, we exposed the established cell line to two strains of Salmonella enterica and EHEC. Interestingly, S. Typhimurium showed higher affinity for the established cell line and invaded the cytoplasm than S. Enteritidis. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed that gene expression of Toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1), TLR 2 and TLR 3, whereas TLR 4, 5 and 6 were not detectable in established cells. Our established immortalized colon-derived epithelial cell should be a useful tool for studies evaluating the molecular mechanisms underlying bacterial infection. PMID:26624883

  16. Effects of 300 mT static magnetic field on IL-6 secretion in normal human colon myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gruchlik, Arkadiusz; Wilczok, Adam; Chodurek, Ewa; Polechoński, Władysław; Wolny, Daniel; Dzierzewicz, Zofia

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts play crucial role in the growth and development of the intestine. Colitis, small bowel injury, gastric ulcer disease and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) accompany the increase of number of activated myofibroblasts. In the last few years, the increasing production of electromagnetic (EMF) and static magnetic fields (SMF), due to the expanding use of electronic devices in everyday life, has led to a number of studies on the effects of these fields on living organisms. EMF therapy, because of its anti-inflammatory properties, may be used in medicine in IBD treatment. This mechanism has not been elucidated yet. In the present work normal human colon myofibroblasts CCD-18Co were exposed to SMF with a flux density of 300 mT. After 24 h incubation TNF-alpha-dependent IL-6 secretion was determined with ELISA kit (RandD Systems).The influence of magnetic field and its effect on cell proliferation were determined with TOX-2 (In Vitro Toxicology Assay Kit XTT Based, TOX-2, Sigma) and CyQUANT NF cell proliferation assay kit (Molecular Probes). It was shown that SMF inhibited TNF-alpha-dependent IL-6 secretion. The observed effects were statistically significant and depended on the time of incubation. Moreover, SMF triggered cell proliferation whereas it did not alter cell viability. IL-6 belongs to pro-inflammatory cytokines family and plays a crucial role in IBD. Inhibition of IL-6 secretion by SMF and lack of its cytotoxic effect seem to be advantageous whilst SMF is implicated in the treatment of inflammatory diseases associated by increase in number of activated myofibroblasts. PMID:23285697

  17. Sclerotium rolfsii Lectin Induces Stronger Inhibition of Proliferation in Human Breast Cancer Cells than Normal Human Mammary Epithelial Cells by Induction of Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Savanur, Mohammed Azharuddin; Eligar, Sachin M.; Pujari, Radha; Chen, Chen; Mahajan, Pravin; Borges, Anita; Shastry, Padma; Ingle, Arvind.; Kalraiya, Rajiv D.; Swamy, Bale M.; Rhodes, Jonathan M.; Yu, Lu-Gang; Inamdar, Shashikala R.

    2014-01-01

    Sclerotium rolfsii lectin (SRL) isolated from the phytopathogenic fungus Sclerotium rolfsii has exquisite binding specificity towards O-linked, Thomsen-Freidenreich (Galβ1-3GalNAcα1-Ser/Thr, TF) associated glycans. This study investigated the influence of SRL on proliferation of human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and ZR-75), non-tumorigenic breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A) and normal mammary epithelial cells (HMECs). SRL caused marked, dose-dependent, inhibition of proliferation of MCF-7 and ZR-75 cells but only weak inhibition of proliferation of non-tumorigenic MCF-10A and HMEC cells. The inhibitory effect of SRL on cancer cell proliferation was shown to be a consequence of SRL cell surface binding and subsequent induction of cellular apoptosis, an effect that was largely prevented by the presence of inhibitors against caspases -3, -8, or -9. Lectin histochemistry using biotin-labelled SRL showed little binding of SRL to normal human breast tissue but intense binding to cancerous tissues. In conclusion, SRL inhibits the growth of human breast cancer cells via induction of cell apoptosis but has substantially less effect on normal epithelial cells. As a lectin that binds specifically to a cancer-associated glycan, has potential to be developed as an anti-cancer agent. PMID:25364905

  18. Modulation of toll-like receptor 7 and LL-37 expression in colon and breast epithelial cells by human beta-defensin-2.

    PubMed

    Stroinigg, Nora; Srivastava, Maya D

    2005-01-01

    Breast-feeding decreases maternal breast cancer risk. Breast-fed infants have fewer infections and inflammatory-allergic diseases. We recently found inducible antimicrobial and immunomodulatory protein human beta3-defensin 2 (HBD-2) in significant amounts in human milk. We investigated if HBD-2 could contribute to benefits of breast-feeding for the mother and the child by immunomodulating effects on breast and gut epithelial cells. Human CaCo-2 colon and MCF-7 breast cell lines were cultured for 16-48 hours in RPMI 1640 5% fetal calf serum with and without HBD-2 at 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 microg/mL. RNA was extracted and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and gel electrophoresis for toll-like receptor pathway members, antimicrobial peptides, and cytokines/receptors was performed. Primers were designed with www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov and www.broad. mit.edu/cgibin/primer/primer3 www.cgi. Based on RT-PCR results, cells were stained by immunohistochemistry using anti-toll-like receptor (TLR)-7 and anti-LL37 antibodies and DAKO EnVision Plus kits. Supernatants were analyzed for interleukin (IL)-8 and liver and activation-regulated chemokine (LARC) using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In CaCo-2, messenger RNA (mRNA) for TLR-7, IL-1R-associated kinase, alpha-defensins (human neutrophil peptides 1-3), and IL-8 were down-regulated; cathelicidin/LL37 and NFkappaBp65 were up-regulated. LARC mRNA and protein were detected after 48 hours. TLR-7 protein, LARC, and IL-8 decreased with HBD-2; LL-37 protein greatly increased. In MCF-7, mRNA for LL37, inhibitor of kappaBalpha, NFkappaBp65, Tollip, MyD88, IL-1R-associated kinase, and TLR-7 were up-regulated. LARC mRNA was turned off. TLR-7 protein was induced. LARC was not detected. IL-8 was barely detectable with or without HBD-2. beta-Defensins 1 and 2; alpha-defensins 5 and 6; TLRs 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, and 10; nucleotide binding oligomerization domain protein-2, and CCR6 mRNA were unaffected. HBD-2 profoundly

  19. Developmental pathways in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Fred E.; Angus, C. William; Partis, William J.; Sigounas, George

    2012-01-01

    A hallmark of cancer is reactivation/alteration of pathways that control cellular differentiation during developmental processes. Evidence indicates that WNT, Notch, BMP and Hedgehog pathways have a role in normal epithelial cell differentiation, and that alterations in these pathways accompany establishment of the tumorigenic state. Interestingly, there is recent evidence that these pathways are intertwined at the molecular level, and these nodes of intersection may provide opportunities for effective targeted therapies. This review will highlight the role of the WNT, Notch, BMP and Hedgehog pathways in colon cancer. PMID:23032367

  20. Differential regulation of cell proliferation and protease secretion by epidermal growth factor and amphiregulin in tumoral versus normal breast epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Silvy, M; Giusti, C; Martin, P-M; Berthois, Y

    2001-01-01

    Amphiregulin (AR) is a heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (EGF)-related peptide that seems to play an important role in mammary epithelial cell growth regulation. We have investigated the regulation of AR-gene expression and -protein secretion by EGF in normal breast epithelial cells (HMECs), as well as in the tumoral breast epithelial cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB231. EGF induced a dose-dependent increase of AR mRNA level in both normal and tumoral cells. Thus, 10−8M EGF stimulated AR expression in HMECs to 140–300% of control. A similar EGF concentration increased AR mRNA level to 550% and 980% of control in MCF-7 and MDA-MB231 cells, respectively. This was accompanied by an accumulation of AR into conditioned culture media. However, HMECs secreted in response to EGF, 5–10 fold more AR than tumour cells. Furthermore, the potential participation of AR in the regulation of the plasminogen activator (PA)/plasmin system was investigated. Whereas HMEC-proliferation was stimulated by AR, the levels of secreted urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and type-1 plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAi-1) remained unaffected. Conversely, AR failed to regulate the proliferation of tumoral cell lines but induced an accumulation of uPA and PAi-1 into culture media. This was accompanied by an increase of the number of tumoral cells that invaded matrigel in vitro. Moreover, the presence of a neutralizing anti-uPA receptor antibody reversed the increased invasiveness of MDA-MB231 cells induced by AR. These data reveal differential behaviour of normal versus tumoral breast epithelial cells in regard to the action of AR and demonstrate that, in a number of cases, AR might play a significant role in tumour progression through the regulation of the PA/plasmin system. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11286474

  1. ADAM28 is expressed by epithelial cells in human normal tissues and protects from C1q-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Miyamae, Yuka; Mochizuki, Satsuki; Shimoda, Masayuki; Ohara, Kentaro; Abe, Hitoshi; Yamashita, Shuji; Kazuno, Saiko; Ohtsuka, Takashi; Ochiai, Hiroki; Kitagawa, Yuko; Okada, Yasunori

    2016-05-01

    ADAM28 (disintegrin and metalloproteinase 28), which was originally reported to be lymphocyte-specific, is over-expressed by carcinoma cells and plays a key role in cell proliferation and progression in human lung and breast carcinomas. We studied ADAM28 expression in human normal tissues and examined its biological function. By using antibodies specific to ADAM28, ADAM28 was immunolocalized mainly to epithelial cells in several tissues, including epididymis, bronchus and stomach, whereas lymphocytes in lymph nodes and spleen were negligibly immunostained. RT-PCR, immunoblotting and ELISA analyses confirmed the expression in these tissues, and low or negligible expression by lymphocytes was found in the lymph node and spleen. C1q was identified as a candidate ADAM28-binding protein from a human lung cDNA library by yeast two-hybrid system, and specific binding was demonstrated by binding assays, immunoprecipitation and surface plasmon resonance. C1q treatment of normal bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B and NHBE cells, both of which showed low-level expression of ADAM28, caused apoptosis through activation of p38 and caspase-3, and cell death with autophagy through accumulation of LC3-II and autophagosomes, respectively. C1q-induced cell death was attenuated by treatment of the cells with antibodies against the C1q receptor gC1qR/p33 or cC1qR/calreticulin. Treatment of C1q with recombinant ADAM28 prior to addition to culture media reduced C1q-induced cell death, and knockdown of ADAM28 using siRNAs increased cell death. These data demonstrate that ADAM28 is expressed by epithelial cells of several normal organs, and suggest that ADAM28 plays a role in cell survival by suppression of C1q-induced cytotoxicity in bronchial epithelial cells. PMID:26918856

  2. ADAM28 is expressed by epithelial cells in human normal tissues and protects from C1q-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Miyamae, Yuka; Mochizuki, Satsuki; Shimoda, Masayuki; Ohara, Kentaro; Abe, Hitoshi; Yamashita, Shuji; Kazuno, Saiko; Ohtsuka, Takashi; Ochiai, Hiroki; Kitagawa, Yuko; Okada, Yasunori

    2016-05-01

    ADAM28 (disintegrin and metalloproteinase 28), which was originally reported to be lymphocyte-specific, is over-expressed by carcinoma cells and plays a key role in cell proliferation and progression in human lung and breast carcinomas. We studied ADAM28 expression in human normal tissues and examined its biological function. By using antibodies specific to ADAM28, ADAM28 was immunolocalized mainly to epithelial cells in several tissues, including epididymis, bronchus and stomach, whereas lymphocytes in lymph nodes and spleen were negligibly immunostained. RT-PCR, immunoblotting and ELISA analyses confirmed the expression in these tissues, and low or negligible expression by lymphocytes was found in the lymph node and spleen. C1q was identified as a candidate ADAM28-binding protein from a human lung cDNA library by yeast two-hybrid system, and specific binding was demonstrated by binding assays, immunoprecipitation and surface plasmon resonance. C1q treatment of normal bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B and NHBE cells, both of which showed low-level expression of ADAM28, caused apoptosis through activation of p38 and caspase-3, and cell death with autophagy through accumulation of LC3-II and autophagosomes, respectively. C1q-induced cell death was attenuated by treatment of the cells with antibodies against the C1q receptor gC1qR/p33 or cC1qR/calreticulin. Treatment of C1q with recombinant ADAM28 prior to addition to culture media reduced C1q-induced cell death, and knockdown of ADAM28 using siRNAs increased cell death. These data demonstrate that ADAM28 is expressed by epithelial cells of several normal organs, and suggest that ADAM28 plays a role in cell survival by suppression of C1q-induced cytotoxicity in bronchial epithelial cells.

  3. Normal and tumor-derived myoepithelial cells differ in their ability to interact with luminal breast epithelial cells for polarity and basement membrane deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Ronnov-Jessen, Lone; Villadsen, Rene; Rank, Fritz; Bissell, Mina J.; Petersen, Ole William

    2001-10-04

    The signals that determine the correct polarity of breast epithelial structures in vivo are not understood. We have shown previously that luminal epithelial cells can be polarized when cultured within a reconstituted basement membrane gel. We reasoned that such cues in vivo may be given by myoepithelial cells. Accordingly, we used an assay where luminal epithelial cells are incorrectly polarized to test this hypothesis. We show that culturing human primary luminal epithelial cells within collagen-I gels leads to formation of structures with no lumina and with reverse polarity as judged by dual stainings for sialomucin, epithelial specific antigen or occludin. No basement membrane is deposited, and {beta}4-integrin staining is negative. Addition of purified human myoepithelial cells isolated from normal glands corrects the inverse polarity, and leads to formation of double-layered acini with central lumina. Among the laminins present in the human breast basement membrane (laminin-1, -5 and -10/11), laminin-1 was unique in its ability to substitute for myoepithelial cells in polarity reversal. Myoepithelial cells were purified also from four different breast cancer sources including a biphasic cell line. Three out of four samples either totally lacked the ability to interact with luminal epithelial cells, or conveyed only correction of polarity in a fraction of acini. This behavior was directly related to the ability of the tumor myoepithelial cells to produce {alpha}-1 chain of laminin. In vivo, breast carcinomas were either negative for laminin-1 (7/12 biopsies) or showed a focal, fragmented deposition of a less intensely stained basement membrane (5/12 biopsies). Dual staining with myoepithelial markers revealed that tumorassociated myoepithelial cells were either negative or weakly positive for expression of laminin-1, establishing a strong correlation between loss of laminin-1 and breast cancer. We conclude that the double-layered breast acinus may be

  4. A calibrated agent-based computer model of stochastic cell dynamics in normal human colon crypts useful for in silico experiments

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Normal colon crypts consist of stem cells, proliferating cells, and differentiated cells. Abnormal rates of proliferation and differentiation can initiate colon cancer. We have measured the variation in the number of each of these cell types in multiple crypts in normal human biopsy specimens. This has provided the opportunity to produce a calibrated computational model that simulates cell dynamics in normal human crypts, and by changing model parameter values, to simulate the initiation and treatment of colon cancer. Results An agent-based model of stochastic cell dynamics in human colon crypts was developed in the multi-platform open-source application NetLogo. It was assumed that each cell’s probability of proliferation and probability of death is determined by its position in two gradients along the crypt axis, a divide gradient and in a die gradient. A cell’s type is not intrinsic, but rather is determined by its position in the divide gradient. Cell types are dynamic, plastic, and inter-convertible. Parameter values were determined for the shape of each of the gradients, and for a cell’s response to the gradients. This was done by parameter sweeps that indicated the values that reproduced the measured number and variation of each cell type, and produced quasi-stationary stochastic dynamics. The behavior of the model was verified by its ability to reproduce the experimentally observed monocolonal conversion by neutral drift, the formation of adenomas resulting from mutations either at the top or bottom of the crypt, and by the robust ability of crypts to recover from perturbation by cytotoxic agents. One use of the virtual crypt model was demonstrated by evaluating different cancer chemotherapy and radiation scheduling protocols. Conclusions A virtual crypt has been developed that simulates the quasi-stationary stochastic cell dynamics of normal human colon crypts. It is unique in that it has been calibrated with measurements of human biopsy

  5. The colon: from banal to brilliant.

    PubMed

    Sellers, Rani S; Morton, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The colon serves as the habitat for trillions of microbes, which it must maintain, regulate, and sequester. This is managed by what is termed the mucosal barrier. The mucosal barrier separates the gut flora from the host tissues; regulates the absorption of water, electrolytes, minerals, and vitamins; and facilitates host-flora interactions. Colonic homeostasis depends on a complex interaction between the microflora and the mucosal epithelium, immune system, vasculature, stroma, and nervous system. Disruptions in the colonic microenvironment such as changes in microbial composition, epithelial cell function/proliferation/differentiation, mucus production/makeup, immune function, diet, motility, or blood flow may have substantial local and systemic consequences. Understanding the complex activities of the colon in health and disease is important in drug development, as xenobiotics can impact all segments of the colon. Direct and indirect effects of pharmaceuticals on intestinal function can produce adverse findings in laboratory animals and humans and can negatively impact drug development. This review will discuss normal colon homeostasis with examples, where applicable, of xenobiotics that disrupt normal function. PMID:24129758

  6. Biochemical and morphological effects of cigarette smoke condensate and its fractions on normal human bronchial epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Willey, J C; Grafstrom, R C; Moser, C E; Ozanne, C; Sundquvist, K; Harris, C C

    1987-04-15

    We investigated the effect of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC), two basic fractions (BIa and BIb) of CSC, the ethanol-extracted weakly acidic fraction (WAe), and the methanol-extracted neutral fraction (Nmeoh) on the clonal growth rate, plasminogen activator (PA) activity, cross-linked envelope (CLE) formation, and ornithine decarboxylase activity, epidermal growth factor (EGF) binding, thiol levels, and DNA single strand breaks in cultured human bronchial cells. Neither CSC nor any of the fractions were mitogenic over the range 0.01-100 micrograms/ml. All were growth inhibitory at higher concentrations. The 40% growth inhibitory concentrations for CSC, BIa, BIb, WAe, and Nmeoh were 10, 10, 10, 3, and 1 micrograms/ml, respectively. Effects on CLE formation, morphology, PA, and ornithine decarboxylase activities, EGF binding, and thiol levels were evaluated using 40% growth inhibitory concentrations. We found that CSC and all fractions caused an increased formation of CLEs, from a baseline of 0.5% in the untreated cells to a maximum increase of 25% induced by Nmeoh. A squamous morphological change was observed within 1 h after exposure to Nmeoh, WAe, and CSC. The BIa and BIb fractions had little effect. Only Nmeoh increased PA significantly, from 2.5 +/- 0.4 to 5.1 +/- 0.3 units/mg cellular protein. CSC and the WAe and Nmeoh (Nmeoh greater than WAe greater than CSC) fractions caused a decrease in EGF binding, in each case reaching a maximum effect after a 10-12-h incubation. This effect on EGF binding was further characterized in the case of Nmeoh. In untreated normal human bronchial epithelial cells, by Scatchard analysis the kd was 2.0 nM and there were 1.2 X 10(5) receptors/cell. In cells incubated in medium containing Nmeoh (3 micrograms/ml) the kd was 3.2 nM and there were 1.1 X 10(5) receptors/cell. Thus, inhibition of EGF binding by Nmeoh was due primarily to a decrease in the affinity. At the 40% growth inhibitory concentrations neither CSC nor any of the

  7. Effects of Lactobacillus plantarum A7 with probiotic potential on colon cancer and normal cells proliferation in comparison with a commercial strain

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi-Aliabadi, Hojjat; Mohammadi, Fatemeh; Fazeli, Hossain; Mirlohi, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Several beneficial effects have been attributed to the probiotic lactic acid bacteria. It was determined that lactobacilli can exert antiproliferative effects on the various cancer cell lines including colon cancer. Effects of lactic acid bacteria on colon cancer may vary from strain to strain and there is a need to find the new probiotic strains with tumor suppressing properties through in vitro studies. Materials and Methods: Anti-proliferative activities of heat-killed cells and cell-free supernatants of a native strain of Lactobacillus plantarum A7 and a commercial strain of lactobacillus rhamnosus GG were assessed on human colon cancer cell lines (Caco-2 and HT-29) and normal cells (L-929), using MTT assay. Cells were seeded at 2×104 cells/mlin 96 well plates and incubated for 24 hr. Then heat-killed cells (OD620: 0.025, 0.0.05, 0.1) and cell-free supernatants of bacteria were added at concentration of 2.5, 5 and 10 mg/ml. After 48 hr incubation MTT (5 mg/ml) was added and the absorbance was measured at 540 nm using ELISA plate reader. Results: Results showed that heat-killed cells and cell-free supernatants of both probiotic strains reduced the growth rate of cancer and normal cells. These results suggested that anti-proliferative effect may not be an exclusive characteris ticwhich is dedicated to officially approved probiotics. Conclusion: L. plantarum A7 could be considered as colon cancer biological product, most likely due to its advantages in significant organic acid production. PMID:25729553

  8. Assessing epithelial cell nuclear morphology by using azimuthal light scattering spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chung-Chieh; Lau, Condon; Tunnell, James W; Hunter, Martin; Kalashnikov, Maxim; Fang-Yen, Christopher; Fulghum, Stephen F; Badizadegan, Kamran; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S

    2006-11-01

    We describe azimuthal light scattering spectroscopy (phi/LSS), a novel technique for assessing epithelial-cell nuclear morphology. The difference between the spectra measured at azimuthal angles phi = 0 degrees and phi = 90 degrees preferentially isolates the single backscattering contribution due to large (approximately 10 microm) structures such as epithelial cell nuclei by discriminating against scattering from smaller organelles and diffusive background. We demonstrate the feasibility of using phi/LSS for cancer detection by showing that spectra from cancerous colon tissue exhibit significantly greater azimuthal asymmetry than spectra from normal colonic tissues. PMID:17041654

  9. Laminin alpha 5, a major transcript of normal and malignant rat liver epithelial cells, is differentially expressed in developing and adult liver.

    PubMed

    Seebacher, T; Medina, J L; Bade, E G

    1997-11-25

    The laminin family of extracellular matrix glycoproteins plays a major role in cell migration and differentiation and in tumor cell invasion. As previously shown, the laminin deposited by normal and malignant rat liver epithelial cells in their extracellular matrix (ECM) and into their ECM migration tracks does not contain a typical (EHS-like) alpha 1 heavy chain. By RT-PCR screening we have now identified two alpha chains among a total of five additional laminin chains produced by these cells. Three of the newly identified chains were not previously known for the rat. Their sequences have been deposited in the EMBL nucleotide sequence data bank. The alpha 5 chain now identified is expressed at comparably high levels by both the normal and the malignant liver epithelial cells. The chain is also expressed in fetal liver together with the alpha 2 and beta 2 chains, but it is only vestigially expressed in the mature organ as shown by RT-PCR. These results suggest for alpha 5 a role in development and production of the chain by only a small subset of cells in adult liver. At the level of detection used, no changes were observed in regenerating liver after partial hepatectomy. In addition to the alpha 5 chain, the cultured cells express the beta 1 and beta 2 light chains, indicating the expression of more than one laminin isoform by the same cell line. The expression of the alpha 5 chain and of the other new non-EHS isoform chains was also analyzed in various tissues. The malignant liver epithelial cells, but not their nontumorigenic parental cells, also express, in addition to the alpha 5 chain the alpha 2 chain, which is expressed at high level by the NBT II bladder carcinoma cell line, suggesting a relationship with malignancy. PMID:9417868

  10. Three-Dimensionally Engineered Normal Human Broncho-epithelial Tissue-Like Assemblies: Target Tissues for Human Respiratory Viral Infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, T. J.; McCarthy, M.; Lin, Y-H

    2006-01-01

    In vitro three-dimensional (3D) human broncho-epithelial (HBE) tissue-like assemblies (3D HBE TLAs) from this point forward referred to as TLAs were engineered in Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology to mimic the characteristics of in vivo tissues thus providing a tool to study human respiratory viruses and host cell interactions. The TLAs were bioengineered onto collagen-coated cyclodextran microcarriers using primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and an adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cell line (BEAS-2B) as the overlying component. The resulting TLAs share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The presence of tissue-like differentiation markers including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium markers, as well as the production of tissue mucin, further confirm these TLAs differentiated into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues. Increasing virus titers for human respiratory syncytial virus (wtRSVA2) and parainfluenza virus type 3 (wtPIV3 JS) and the detection of membrane bound glycoproteins over time confirm productive infections with both viruses. Therefore, TLAs mimic aspects of the human respiratory epithelium and provide a unique capability to study the interactions of respiratory viruses and their primary target tissue independent of the host's immune system.

  11. Exploring long-term protection of normal human fibroblasts and epithelial cells from chemotherapy in cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Apontes, Pasha; Leontieva, Olga V.; Demidenko, Zoya N.; Li, Fengzhi; Blagosklonny, Mikhail V.

    2011-01-01

    Killing of proliferating normal cells limits chemotherapy of cancer. Several strategies to selectively protect normal cells were previously suggested. Here we further explored the protection of normal cells from cell cycle-specific chemotherapeutic agents such as mitotic inhibitors (MI). We focused on a long-term cell recovery (rather than on a short-term cell survival) after a 3-day exposure to MI (paclitaxel and nocodazole). In three normal human cell types (RPE, NKE, WI-38t cells) but not in cancer cells with mutant p53, pre-treatment with nutlin-3a, a non-genotoxic inducer of wt p53, caused G1 and/or G2 arrest, thus preventing lethal mitotic arrest caused by MI and allowing normal cells to recover after removal of MI. Rapamycin, an inhibitor of the nutrient-sensing mTOR pathway, potentiated the protective effect of nutlin-3a in normal cells. Also, a combination of rapamycin and metformin, an anti-diabetic drug, induced G1 and G2 arrest selectively in normal cells and thereby protected them from MI. A combination of metformin and rapamycin also protected normal cells in low glucose conditions, whereas in contrast it was cytotoxic for cancer cells. Based on these data and the analysis of the literature, we suggest that a rational combination of metformin and rapamycin can potentiate chemotherapy with mitotic inhibitors against cancer, while protecting normal cells, thus further increasing the therapeutic window. PMID:21447859

  12. Immortalization of normal human mammary epithelial cells in two steps by direct targeting of senescence barriers does not require gross genomic alterations

    SciTech Connect

    Garbe, James C.; Vrba, Lukas; Sputova, Klara; Fuchs, Laura; Novak, Petr; Brothman, Arthur R.; Jackson, Mark; Chin, Koei; LaBarge, Mark A.; Watts, George; Futscher, Bernard W.; Stampfer, Martha R.

    2014-10-29

    Telomerase reactivation and immortalization are critical for human carcinoma progression. However, little is known about the mechanisms controlling this crucial step, due in part to the paucity of experimentally tractable model systems that can examine human epithelial cell immortalization as it might occur in vivo. We achieved efficient non-clonal immortalization of normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) by directly targeting the 2 main senescence barriers encountered by cultured HMEC. The stress-associated stasis barrier was bypassed using shRNA to p16INK4; replicative senescence due to critically shortened telomeres was bypassed in post-stasis HMEC by c-MYC transduction. Thus, 2 pathologically relevant oncogenic agents are sufficient to immortally transform normal HMEC. The resultant non-clonal immortalized lines exhibited normal karyotypes. Most human carcinomas contain genomically unstable cells, with widespread instability first observed in vivo in pre-malignant stages; in vitro, instability is seen as finite cells with critically shortened telomeres approach replicative senescence. Our results support our hypotheses that: (1) telomere-dysfunction induced genomic instability in pre-malignant finite cells may generate the errors required for telomerase reactivation and immortalization, as well as many additional “passenger” errors carried forward into resulting carcinomas; (2) genomic instability during cancer progression is needed to generate errors that overcome tumor suppressive barriers, but not required per se; bypassing the senescence barriers by direct targeting eliminated a need for genomic errors to generate immortalization. Achieving efficient HMEC immortalization, in the absence of “passenger” genomic errors, should facilitate examination of telomerase regulation during human carcinoma progression, and exploration of agents that could prevent immortalization.

  13. Immortalization of normal human mammary epithelial cells in two steps by direct targeting of senescence barriers does not require gross genomic alterations

    DOE PAGES

    Garbe, James C.; Vrba, Lukas; Sputova, Klara; Fuchs, Laura; Novak, Petr; Brothman, Arthur R.; Jackson, Mark; Chin, Koei; LaBarge, Mark A.; Watts, George; et al

    2014-10-29

    Telomerase reactivation and immortalization are critical for human carcinoma progression. However, little is known about the mechanisms controlling this crucial step, due in part to the paucity of experimentally tractable model systems that can examine human epithelial cell immortalization as it might occur in vivo. We achieved efficient non-clonal immortalization of normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) by directly targeting the 2 main senescence barriers encountered by cultured HMEC. The stress-associated stasis barrier was bypassed using shRNA to p16INK4; replicative senescence due to critically shortened telomeres was bypassed in post-stasis HMEC by c-MYC transduction. Thus, 2 pathologically relevant oncogenic agentsmore » are sufficient to immortally transform normal HMEC. The resultant non-clonal immortalized lines exhibited normal karyotypes. Most human carcinomas contain genomically unstable cells, with widespread instability first observed in vivo in pre-malignant stages; in vitro, instability is seen as finite cells with critically shortened telomeres approach replicative senescence. Our results support our hypotheses that: (1) telomere-dysfunction induced genomic instability in pre-malignant finite cells may generate the errors required for telomerase reactivation and immortalization, as well as many additional “passenger” errors carried forward into resulting carcinomas; (2) genomic instability during cancer progression is needed to generate errors that overcome tumor suppressive barriers, but not required per se; bypassing the senescence barriers by direct targeting eliminated a need for genomic errors to generate immortalization. Achieving efficient HMEC immortalization, in the absence of “passenger” genomic errors, should facilitate examination of telomerase regulation during human carcinoma progression, and exploration of agents that could prevent immortalization.« less

  14. A novel extract SB-300 from the stem bark latex of Croton lechleri inhibits CFTR-mediated chloride secretion in human colonic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Horst; Machen, Terry E; Widdicombe, Jonathan H; Carlson, Thomas J S; King, Steven R; Chow, John W S; Illek, Beate

    2004-08-01

    An oligomeric proanthocyanidin (SP-303) extracted from the bark latex of the tree Croton lechleri (family Euphorbiaceae) is a potent inhibitor of cholera toxin-induced fluid accumulation and chloride secretion. The manufacturing process for SP-303 was optimized and simplified to produce an increased yield of the herbal extract. The novel extract (named SB-300) contained on average 70.6+/-7.2% SP-303 by weight (mean +/- S.D.; n=56 lots). Here, we describe the effectiveness of SB-300 on cAMP-regulated chloride secretion, which is mediated by the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl- channel (CFTR) in human colonic T84 cells. Exposure of the apical surface to SB-300 blocked forskolin-stimulated Cl- secretion by 92.2+/-3.0% with a half-maximal inhibition constant (KB) of 4.8+/-0.8 microM. For SP-303, stimulated Cl- currents were decreased by 98.0+/-7.2 % and KB averaged 4.1+/-1.3 microM. There was no significant difference between the blocking kinetics of SP-303 and SB-300. Forskolin-stimulated whole cell Cl- currents were effectively blocked by extracellular addition of SB-300 (63+/-8.5%; n=3) and to a similar extent by SP-303 (83 +/- 0.6%; n=2; at 50 microM each). Both extracts inhibited a time- and voltage-independent Cl- conductance, which indicated the involvement of CFTR Cl- channels. We conclude that both SP-303 (used in Provir) and SB-300 (used in NSF Normal Stool Formula) are novel natural products that target the CFTR Cl- channel. SB-300 is a low cost herbal extract and may present a complementary and alternative medicine approach for the treatment of fluid loss in watery diarrhea. PMID:15234776

  15. A novel extract SB-300 from the stem bark latex of Croton lechleri inhibits CFTR-mediated chloride secretion in human colonic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Horst; Machen, Terry E; Widdicombe, Jonathan H; Carlson, Thomas J S; King, Steven R; Chow, John W S; Illek, Beate

    2004-08-01

    An oligomeric proanthocyanidin (SP-303) extracted from the bark latex of the tree Croton lechleri (family Euphorbiaceae) is a potent inhibitor of cholera toxin-induced fluid accumulation and chloride secretion. The manufacturing process for SP-303 was optimized and simplified to produce an increased yield of the herbal extract. The novel extract (named SB-300) contained on average 70.6+/-7.2% SP-303 by weight (mean +/- S.D.; n=56 lots). Here, we describe the effectiveness of SB-300 on cAMP-regulated chloride secretion, which is mediated by the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl- channel (CFTR) in human colonic T84 cells. Exposure of the apical surface to SB-300 blocked forskolin-stimulated Cl- secretion by 92.2+/-3.0% with a half-maximal inhibition constant (KB) of 4.8+/-0.8 microM. For SP-303, stimulated Cl- currents were decreased by 98.0+/-7.2 % and KB averaged 4.1+/-1.3 microM. There was no significant difference between the blocking kinetics of SP-303 and SB-300. Forskolin-stimulated whole cell Cl- currents were effectively blocked by extracellular addition of SB-300 (63+/-8.5%; n=3) and to a similar extent by SP-303 (83 +/- 0.6%; n=2; at 50 microM each). Both extracts inhibited a time- and voltage-independent Cl- conductance, which indicated the involvement of CFTR Cl- channels. We conclude that both SP-303 (used in Provir) and SB-300 (used in NSF Normal Stool Formula) are novel natural products that target the CFTR Cl- channel. SB-300 is a low cost herbal extract and may present a complementary and alternative medicine approach for the treatment of fluid loss in watery diarrhea.

  16. Degradation of the transcription factors NF-κB, STAT3, and STAT5 is involved in Entamoeba histolytica-induced cell death in Caco-2 colonic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeong Ah; Min, Arim; Lee, Young Ah; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2014-10-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a tissue-invasive protozoan parasite causing dysentery in humans. During infection of colonic tissues, amoebic trophozoites are able to kill host cells via apoptosis or necrosis, both of which trigger IL-8-mediated acute inflammatory responses. However, the signaling pathways involved in host cell death induced by E. histolytica have not yet been fully defined. In this study, we examined whether calpain plays a role in the cleavage of pro-survival transcription factors during cell death of colonic epithelial cells, induced by live E. histolytica trophozoites. Incubation with amoebic trophozoites induced activation of m-calpain in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, incubation with amoebae resulted in marked degradation of STAT proteins (STAT3 and STAT5) and NF-κB (p65) in Caco-2 cells. However, IκB, an inhibitor of NF-κB, was not cleaved in Caco-2 cells following adherence of E. histolytica. Entamoeba-induced cleavage of STAT proteins and NF-κB was partially inhibited by pretreatment of cells with a cell-permeable calpain inhibitor, calpeptin. In contrast, E. histolytica did not induce cleavage of caspase-3 in Caco-2 cells. Furthermore, pretreatment of Caco-2 cells with a calpain inhibitor, calpeptin (but not the pan-caspase inhibitor, z-VAD-fmk) or m-calpain siRNA partially reduced Entamoeba-induced DNA fragmentation in Caco-2 cells. These results suggest that calpain plays an important role in E. histolytica-induced degradation of NF-κB and STATs in colonic epithelial cells, which ultimately accelerates cell death.

  17. Physical stress and bacterial colonization

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial surface colonizers are subject to a variety of physical stresses. During the colonization of human epithelia such as on the skin or the intestinal mucosa, bacteria mainly have to withstand the mechanical stress of being removed by fluid flow, scraping, or epithelial turnover. To that end, they express a series of molecules to establish firm attachment to the epithelial surface, such as fibrillar protrusions (pili) and surface-anchored proteins that bind to human matrix proteins. In addition, some bacteria – in particular gut and urinary tract pathogens – use internalization by epithelial cells and other methods such as directed inhibition of epithelial turnover to ascertain continued association with the epithelial layer. Furthermore, many bacteria produce multi-layered agglomerations called biofilms with a sticky extracellular matrix, providing additional protection from removal. This review will give an overview over the mechanisms human bacterial colonizers have to withstand physical stresses with a focus on bacterial adhesion. PMID:25212723

  18. Physical stress and bacterial colonization.

    PubMed

    Otto, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Bacterial surface colonizers are subject to a variety of physical stresses. During the colonization of human epithelia such as on the skin or the intestinal mucosa, bacteria mainly have to withstand the mechanical stress of being removed by fluid flow, scraping, or epithelial turnover. To that end, they express a series of molecules to establish firm attachment to the epithelial surface, such as fibrillar protrusions (pili) and surface-anchored proteins that bind to human matrix proteins. In addition, some bacteria--in particular gut and urinary tract pathogens--use internalization by epithelial cells and other methods such as directed inhibition of epithelial turnover to ascertain continued association with the epithelial layer. Furthermore, many bacteria produce multilayered agglomerations called biofilms with a sticky extracellular matrix, providing additional protection from removal. This review will give an overview over the mechanisms human bacterial colonizers have to withstand physical stresses with a focus on bacterial adhesion.

  19. Evaluations of thyme extract effects in human normal bronchial and tracheal epithelial cell lines and in human lung cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Oliviero, Marinelli; Romilde, Iannarelli; Beatrice, Morelli Maria; Matteo, Valisi; Giovanna, Nicotra; Consuelo, Amantini; Claudio, Cardinali; Giorgio, Santoni; Filippo, Maggi; Massimo, Nabissi

    2016-08-25

    Thyme (Thymus vulgaris) is used traditionally to prepare herbal remedies possessing expectorant, mucolytic, antitussive and antispasmodic properties. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of a standardized hydroalcoholic extract of thyme on primary human airway (bronchial/tracheal) epithelial cell lines in a model of lung inflammation induced by LPS. In addition, the effects of thyme extract on human lung cancer cell line (H460) were analysed. Thyme extract showed significant anti-inflammatory properties by reducing the NF-κB p65 and NF-κB p52 transcription factors protein levels followed by the decrease of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1 beta and IL-8), and Muc5ac secretion in human normal bronchial and tracheal epithelial cells. Moreover, the extract showed cytotoxic effects on H460 cancer cells, modulated the release of IL-1 beta, IL-8 and down-regulated NF-κB p65 and NF-κB p52 proteins. Taken together, these results substantiated the traditional uses of thyme in the treatment of respiratory diseases. Thyme extract might be an effective treatment of chronic diseases based on inflammatory processes when hypersecretion of mucus overwhelms the ciliary clearance and obstructs airways, causing morbidity and mortality. Moreover thyme extract, evaluated in H460 lung cancer cell line, demonstrated to induce cell cytotoxicity in addition to reduce inflammatory cell signals.

  20. Evaluations of thyme extract effects in human normal bronchial and tracheal epithelial cell lines and in human lung cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Oliviero, Marinelli; Romilde, Iannarelli; Beatrice, Morelli Maria; Matteo, Valisi; Giovanna, Nicotra; Consuelo, Amantini; Claudio, Cardinali; Giorgio, Santoni; Filippo, Maggi; Massimo, Nabissi

    2016-08-25

    Thyme (Thymus vulgaris) is used traditionally to prepare herbal remedies possessing expectorant, mucolytic, antitussive and antispasmodic properties. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of a standardized hydroalcoholic extract of thyme on primary human airway (bronchial/tracheal) epithelial cell lines in a model of lung inflammation induced by LPS. In addition, the effects of thyme extract on human lung cancer cell line (H460) were analysed. Thyme extract showed significant anti-inflammatory properties by reducing the NF-κB p65 and NF-κB p52 transcription factors protein levels followed by the decrease of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1 beta and IL-8), and Muc5ac secretion in human normal bronchial and tracheal epithelial cells. Moreover, the extract showed cytotoxic effects on H460 cancer cells, modulated the release of IL-1 beta, IL-8 and down-regulated NF-κB p65 and NF-κB p52 proteins. Taken together, these results substantiated the traditional uses of thyme in the treatment of respiratory diseases. Thyme extract might be an effective treatment of chronic diseases based on inflammatory processes when hypersecretion of mucus overwhelms the ciliary clearance and obstructs airways, causing morbidity and mortality. Moreover thyme extract, evaluated in H460 lung cancer cell line, demonstrated to induce cell cytotoxicity in addition to reduce inflammatory cell signals. PMID:27369807

  1. Helminth co-infection in Helicobacter pylori infected INS-GAS mice attenuates gastric premalignant lesions of epithelial dysplasia and glandular atrophy and preserves colonization resistance of the stomach to lower bowel microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Whary, Mark T.; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Ge, Zhongming; Feng, Yan; Lofgren, Jennifer; Shi, Hai Ning; Taylor, Nancy S.; Correa, Pelayo; Versalovic, James; Wang, Timothy C.; Fox, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Higher prevalence of helminth infections in H. pylori infected children was suggested to potentially lower the life-time risk for gastric adenocarcinoma. In rodent models, helminth co-infection does not reduce Helicobacter-induced inflammation but delays progression of pre-malignant gastric lesions. Because gastric cancer in INS-GAS mice is promoted by intestinal microflora, the impact of Heligmosomoides polygyrus co-infection on H. pylori-associated gastric lesions and microflora were evaluated. Male INS-GAS mice co-infected with H. pylori and H. polygyrus for 5 months were assessed for gastrointestinal lesions, inflammation-related mRNA expression, FoxP3+ cells, epithelial proliferation, and gastric colonization with H. pylori and Altered Schaedler Flora. Despite similar gastric inflammation and high levels of proinflammatory mRNA, helminth co-infection increased FoxP3+ cells in the corpus and reduced H. pylori-associated gastric atrophy (p<0.04), dysplasia (p<0.02) and prevented H. pylori-induced changes in the gastric flora (p<0.05). This is the first evidence of helminth infection reducing H. pylori-induced gastric lesions while inhibiting changes in gastric flora, consistent with prior observations that gastric colonization with enteric microbiota accelerated gastric lesions in INS-GAS mice. Identifying how helminths reduce gastric premalignant lesions and impact bacterial colonization of the H. pylori infected stomach could lead to new treatment strategies to inhibit progression from chronic gastritis to cancer in humans. PMID:24513446

  2. Nrf2 activators modulate oxidative stress responses and bioenergetic profiles of human retinal epithelial cells cultured in normal or high glucose conditions.

    PubMed

    Foresti, Roberta; Bucolo, Claudio; Platania, Chiara Maria Bianca; Drago, Filippo; Dubois-Randé, Jean-Luc; Motterlini, Roberto

    2015-09-01

    Retinal pigment epithelial cells exert an important supporting role in the eye and develop adaptive responses to oxidative stress or high glucose levels, as observed during diabetes. Endogenous antioxidant defences are mainly regulated by Nrf2, a transcription factor that is activated by naturally-derived and electrophilic compounds. Here we investigated the effect of the Nrf2 activators dimethylfumarate (DMF) and carnosol on antioxidant pathways, oxygen consumption rate and wound healing in human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19) cultured in medium containing normal (NG, 5mM) or high (HG, 25 mM) glucose levels. We also assessed wound healing using an in vivo corneal epithelial injury model. We found that Nrf2 nuclear translocation and heme oxygenase activity increased in ARPE cells treated with 10 μM DMF or carnosol irrespective of glucose culture conditions. However, HG rendered retinal cells more sensitive to regulators of glutathione synthesis or inhibition and caused a decrease of both cellular and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. Culture in HG also reduced ATP production and mitochondrial function as measured with the Seahorse XF analyzer and electron microscopy analysis revealed morphologically damaged mitochondria. Acute treatment with DMF or carnosol did not restore mitochondrial function in HG cells; conversely, the compounds reduced cellular maximal respiratory and reserve capacity, which were completely prevented by N-acetylcysteine thus suggesting the involvement of thiols in this effect. Interestingly, the scratch assay showed that wound closure was faster in cells cultured in HG than NG and was accelerated by carnosol. This effect was reversed by an inhibitor of heme oxygenase activity. Moreover, topical application of carnosol to the cornea of diabetic rats significantly accelerated wound healing. In summary, these data indicate that culture of retinal epithelial cells in HG does not affect the activation of the Nrf2/heme oxygenase

  3. Conditional Gene Inactivation Reveals Roles for Fgf10 and Fgfr2 in Establishing a Normal Pattern of Epithelial Branching in the Mouse Lung

    PubMed Central

    Abler, Lisa L.; Mansour, Suzanne L.; Sun, Xin

    2012-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 10 (FGF10) signaling through FGF receptor 2 (FGFR2) is required for lung initiation. While studies indicate that Fgf10 and Fgfr2 are also important at later stages of lung development, their roles in early branching events remain unclear. We addressed this question through conditional inactivation of both genes in mouse subsequent to lung initiation. Inactivation of Fgf10 in lung mesenchyme resulted in smaller lobes with a reduced number of branches. Inactivation of Fgfr2 in lung epithelium resulted in disruption of lobes and small epithelial outgrowths that arose arbitrarily along the main bronchi. In both mutants, there was an increase in cell death. Also, the expression patterns of key signaling molecules implicated in branching morphogenesis were altered and a proximal lung marker was expanded distally. Our results indicate that both Fgf10 and Fgfr2 are required for a normal branching program and for proper proximal-distal patterning of the lung. PMID:19618463

  4. Lack of evidence for low-LET radiation induced bystander response in normal human fibroblasts and colon carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Marianne B. Sowa; Wilfried Goetz; Janet E. Baulch; Dinah N. Pyles; Jaroslaw Dziegielewski; Susannah Yovino; Andrew R. Snyder; Sonia M. de Toledo; Edouard I. Azzam; William F. Morgan

    2008-06-30

    Purpose: To investigate radiation induced bystander responses and to determine the role of gap junction intercellular communication and the radiation environment in propagating this response. Materials and Methods: We use medium transfer and targeted irradiation to examine radiation induced bystander effects in primary human fibroblast (AG1522) and human colon carcinoma (RKO36) cells. We examined the effect of variables such as gap junction intercellular communication, linear energy transfer (LET), and the role of the radiation environment in non-targeted responses. Endpoints included clonogenic survival, micronucleus formation and foci formation at histone 2AX over doses ranging from 10 to 100 cGy. Results: The results show no evidence of a low-LET radiation induced bystander response for the endpoints of clonogenic survival and induction of DNA damage. Nor do we see evidence of a high-LET, Fe ion radiation (1 GeV/n) induced bystander effect. However, direct comparison for 3.2 MeV α-particle exposures showed a statistically significant medium transfer bystander effect for this high-LET radiation. Conclusions: From our results, it is evident that there are many confounding factors influencing bystander responses as reported in the literature. Our observations reflect the inherent variability in biological systems and the difficulties in extrapolating from in vitro models to radiation risks in humans.

  5. Passage from normal mucosa to adenoma and colon cancer: alteration of normal sCD30 mechanisms regulating TH1/TH2 cell functions.

    PubMed

    Contasta, Ida; Berghella, Anna Maria; Pellegrini, Patrizia; Adorno, Domenico

    2003-08-01

    The pathogenesis of cancer is currently under intensive investigation to identify reliable prognostic indices for the early detection of disease. Adenomas have been identified as precursors of colorectal cancer and tumor establishment, and disease progression has been found to reflect a malfunction of the immune system. On the basis of the role of the CD30 molecule in the regulation of TH1/TH2 functions and our previous results, strongly suggesting the validity of serum TH1/TH2 cytokines in the study of tumor progression, we studied network interaction between the production of soluble (s) CD30/sBCl2 in whole blood culture [in basic conditions and after PHA, LPS, and anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (mAb) stimulation] and levels of TH1/TH2 cytokines (IL2, IFN gamma, IL12, IL4, IL5, IL10). Peripheral blood from a group of healthy subjects, as well as from patients with adenoma and colorectal cancer was used. Our objective was to gain a better insight into the role of the CD30 molecule in the passage from normal mucosa to adenoma and tumor and identify specific disease markers. Our results suggest that the decrease in CD30 expression and the abnormal increase in Bcl2 expression, observed in the peripheral cells of both adenoma and tumor groups determine an imbalance between TH1/TH2 functions. Consequently, changes in sCD30/sBcl2 culture production and TH1/TH2 cytokine serum levels may be reliable markers for tumor progression. In fact, our overall data show that a decrease of sCD30 levels in basic and PHA conditions and an increase of IFN gamma, IL4, IL5, and IL12 serum levels and sBcl2 in all activation condition are indicative of the passage from normal mucosa to adenoma; whilst a decrease of sBcl2 level in basic, LPS and anti-CD3 conditions and of IL2, IFN gamma serum levels, together with an increase of IL5 are indicative of the passage from adenoma to tumor.

  6. Isotropic 3D Nuclear Morphometry of Normal, Fibrocystic and Malignant Breast Epithelial Cells Reveals New Structural Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Nandakumar, Vivek; Kelbauskas, Laimonas; Hernandez, Kathryn F.; Lintecum, Kelly M.; Senechal, Patti; Bussey, Kimberly J.; Davies, Paul C. W.; Johnson, Roger H.; Meldrum, Deirdre R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Grading schemes for breast cancer diagnosis are predominantly based on pathologists' qualitative assessment of altered nuclear structure from 2D brightfield microscopy images. However, cells are three-dimensional (3D) objects with features that are inherently 3D and thus poorly characterized in 2D. Our goal is to quantitatively characterize nuclear structure in 3D, assess its variation with malignancy, and investigate whether such variation correlates with standard nuclear grading criteria. Methodology We applied micro-optical computed tomographic imaging and automated 3D nuclear morphometry to quantify and compare morphological variations between human cell lines derived from normal, benign fibrocystic or malignant breast epithelium. To reproduce the appearance and contrast in clinical cytopathology images, we stained cells with hematoxylin and eosin and obtained 3D images of 150 individual stained cells of each cell type at sub-micron, isotropic resolution. Applying volumetric image analyses, we computed 42 3D morphological and textural descriptors of cellular and nuclear structure. Principal Findings We observed four distinct nuclear shape categories, the predominant being a mushroom cap shape. Cell and nuclear volumes increased from normal to fibrocystic to metastatic type, but there was little difference in the volume ratio of nucleus to cytoplasm (N/C ratio) between the lines. Abnormal cell nuclei had more nucleoli, markedly higher density and clumpier chromatin organization compared to normal. Nuclei of non-tumorigenic, fibrocystic cells exhibited larger textural variations than metastatic cell nuclei. At p<0.0025 by ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis tests, 90% of our computed descriptors statistically differentiated control from abnormal cell populations, but only 69% of these features statistically differentiated the fibrocystic from the metastatic cell populations. Conclusions Our results provide a new perspective on nuclear structure variations

  7. Stromal COX-2 signaling activated by deoxycholic acid mediates proliferation and invasiveness of colorectal epithelial cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yingting; Zhu, Min; Lance, Peter

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Human colonic cancer associated fibroblasts are major sources of COX-2 and PGE{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fibroblasts interact with human colonic epithelial cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation of COX-2 signaling in the fibroblasts affects behavior of the epithelia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protein Kinase C controls the activation of COX-2 signaling. -- Abstract: COX-2 is a major regulator implicated in colonic cancer. However, how COX-2 signaling affects colonic carcinogenesis at cellular level is not clear. In this article, we investigated whether activation of COX-2 signaling by deoxycholic acid (DCA) in primary human normal and cancer associated fibroblasts play a significant role in regulation of proliferation and invasiveness of colonic epithelial cancer cells. Our results demonstrated while COX-2 signaling can be activated by DCA in both normal and cancer associated fibroblasts, the level of activation of COX-2 signaling is significantly greater in cancer associated fibroblasts than that in normal fibroblasts. In addition, we discovered that the proliferative and invasive potential of colonic epithelial cancer cells were much greater when the cells were co-cultured with cancer associated fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA than with normal fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA. Moreover, COX-2 siRNA attenuated the proliferative and invasive effect of both normal and cancer associate fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA on the colonic cancer cells. Further studies indicated that the activation of COX-2 signaling by DCA is through protein kinase C signaling. We speculate that activation of COX-2 signaling especially in cancer associated fibroblasts promotes progression of colonic cancer.

  8. The Effect of Amnion-Derived Cellular Cytokine Solution on the Epithelialization of Partial-Thickness Donor Site Wounds in Normal and Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Swine

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Juri; Hackl, Florian; Koyama, Taro; Aflaki, Pejman; Smith, Charlotte A.; Robson, Martin C.; Eriksson, Elof

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine whether amnion-derived cellular cytokine solution (ACCS) could improve the quality of epithelialization and accelerate closure of dermatome-created partial-thickness wounds in normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic pigs. Methods: Dermatome-created partial-thickness wounds were sealed with wound chambers in healthy and diabetic pigs and were injected with ACCS. Wound fluid was exchanged daily for total protein concentration, and biopsies were taken on days 6, 8, 10, and 12. Epithelialization, thickness of epidermis, number of epidermal cell layers, and rete ridges were evaluated. Results: The macroscopic appearance of the wounds and speed of healing was similar in all groups at each time point. All wounds were healed by day 6. The epidermis was thicker in the ACCS-treated diabetic wounds than in the controls (140.6 μm vs 82.7 μm on day 12 in diabetic pigs). There were more cell layers (13 vs 7.7) in ACCS-treated diabetic pigs on day 12. The number of rete ridges per 2.5 mm was greater on day 12 in the ACCS-treated diabetic wounds (13 vs 8). There was also a significant increase in the number of rete ridges in ACCS-treated nondiabetic pigs but no difference in epidermal thickness or number of cell layers. Conclusion: In diabetic pigs, we found a significantly thicker epidermis and more cell layers and rete ridges in the ACCS-treated wounds. Healthy pigs showed more rete ridges but no difference in thickness of epidermis or number of cell layers on day 12. PMID:19936023

  9. Cooperation between HNF-1α, Cdx2, and GATA-4 in initiating an enterocytic differentiation program in a normal human intestinal epithelial progenitor cell line

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Yannick D.; Paré, Fréderic; Francoeur, Caroline; Jean, Dominique; Tremblay, Eric; Boudreau, François; Escaffit, Fabrice

    2010-01-01

    In the intestinal epithelium, the Cdx, GATA, and HNF transcription factor families are responsible for the expression of differentiation markers such as sucrase-isomaltase. Although previous studies have shown that Cdx2 can induce differentiation in rat intestinal IEC-6 cells, no data are available concerning the direct implication of transcription factors on differentiation in human normal intestinal epithelial cell types. We investigated the role of Cdx2, GATA-4, and HNF-1α using the undifferentiated human intestinal epithelial crypt cell line HIEC. These transcription factors were tested on proliferation and expression of polarization and differentiation markers. Ectopic expression of Cdx2 or HNF-1α, alone or in combination, altered cell proliferation abilities through the regulation of cyclin D1 and p27 expression. HNF-1α and GATA-4 together induced morphological modifications of the cells toward polarization, resulting in the appearance of functional features such as microvilli. HNF-1α was also sufficient to induce the expression of cadherins and dipeptidylpeptidase, whereas in combination with Cdx2 it allowed the expression of the late differentiation marker sucrase-isomaltase. Large-scale analysis of gene expression confirmed the cooperative effect of these factors. Finally, although DcamKL1 and Musashi-1 expression were downregulated in differentiated HIEC, other intestinal stem cell markers, such as Bmi1, were unaffected. These observations show that, in cooperation with Cdx2, HNF-1α acts as a key factor on human intestinal cells to trigger the onset of their functional differentiation program whereas GATA-4 appears to promote morphological changes. PMID:20133952

  10. Tubulin glycylases are required for primary cilia, control of cell proliferation and tumor development in colon

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Cecilia; Papon, Laura; Cacheux, Wulfran; Marques Sousa, Patricia; Lascano, Valeria; Tort, Olivia; Giordano, Tiziana; Vacher, Sophie; Lemmers, Benedicte; Mariani, Pascale; Meseure, Didier; Medema, Jan Paul; Bièche, Ivan; Hahne, Michael; Janke, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    TTLL3 and TTLL8 are tubulin glycine ligases catalyzing posttranslational glycylation of microtubules. We show here for the first time that these enzymes are required for robust formation of primary cilia. We further discover the existence of primary cilia in colon and demonstrate that TTLL3 is the only glycylase in this organ. As a consequence, colon epithelium shows a reduced number of primary cilia accompanied by an increased rate of cell division in TTLL3-knockout mice. Strikingly, higher proliferation is compensated by faster tissue turnover in normal colon. In a mouse model for tumorigenesis, lack of TTLL3 strongly promotes tumor development. We further demonstrate that decreased levels of TTLL3 expression are linked to the development of human colorectal carcinomas. Thus, we have uncovered a novel role for tubulin glycylation in primary cilia maintenance, which controls cell proliferation of colon epithelial cells and plays an essential role in colon cancer development. PMID:25180231

  11. Suitable in vitro culture of Eimeria bovis meront II stages in bovine colonic epithelial cells and parasite-induced upregulation of CXCL10 and GM-CSF gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Hermosilla, Carlos; Stamm, Ivonne; Menge, Christian; Taubert, Anja

    2015-08-01

    We here established a suitable in vitro cell culture system based on bovine colonic epithelial cells (BCEC) for the development of Eimeria bovis merozoites I and the characterization of early parasite-induced innate epithelial host cell reactions as gene transcription of proinflammatory molecules. Both primary and permanent BCEC (BCEC (rim) and BCEC(perm)) were suitable for E. bovis merozoite I invasion and subsequent development of meronts II leading to the release of viable merozoites II. E. bovis merozoite II failed to develop any further neither into gamont nor oocyst stages in BCEC in vitro. E. bovis merozoite I induced innate epithelial host cell reactions at the level of CXC/CCL chemokines (CXCL1, CXCL8, CXCL10, CCL2), IL-6, and GM-CSF gene transcription. Overall, both BCEC types were activated by merozoite I infections since they showed significantly enhanced gene transcript levels of the immunomodulatory molecules CXCL10 and GM-CSF. However, gene transcription profiles of BCEC(prim) and BCEC(perm) revealed different reaction patterns in response to merozoite I infection with regard to quality and kinetics of chemokine/cytokine gene transcription. Although both BCEC types equally showed most prominent responses for CXCL10 and GM-CSF, the induction of CXCL1, CXCL8, CCL2, and IL-6 gene transcripts varied qualitatively and quantitatively. Our results demonstrate that BCEC seem capable to respond to E. bovis merozoite I infection by the upregulation of CXCL10 and GM-CSF gene transcription and therefore probably contribute to host innate effector mechanisms against E. bovis.

  12. Early transformative changes in normal ovarian surface epithelium induced by oxidative stress require Akt upregulation, DNA damage and epithelial-stromal interaction.

    PubMed

    King, Shelby M; Quartuccio, Suzanne M; Vanderhyden, Barbara C; Burdette, Joanna E

    2013-05-01

    Ovarian cancer is the deadliest gynecological malignancy due to detection of cancer at a late stage when the disease has metastasized. One likely progenitor cell type of ovarian cancer is the ovarian surface epithelium (OSE), which proliferates rapidly in the presence of inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress following ovulation. To determine whether oxidative stress induces DNA damage leading to spontaneous transformative changes in normal OSE, an immortalized mouse OSE cell line (MOSE cells) or normal mouse ovarian organoids were treated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and loss of contact inhibition was assessed by soft agar assay. In response to H2O2, OSE cells grown in 3D exhibited growth in soft agar but MOSE cells grown on 2D plastic did not, indicating a critical role for epithelial-stromal interactions in neoplastic initiation. Loss of contact inhibition in response to H2O2 correlated with an increase in proliferation, DNA damage and upregulation of the oncogene Akt1. Use of a reactive oxygen species scavenger or Akt inhibitor blocked H2O2-induced proliferation and growth in soft agar. Although parental MOSE cells did not undergo transformation by H2O2, MOSE cells stably overexpressing constitutively active myristoylated Akt or knockdown of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) exhibited loss of contact inhibition and increased proliferation. This study indicates that normal OSE undergo transformative changes induced by oxidative stress and that this process requires Akt upregulation and activation. A 3D model that retains tissue architecture is critical for studying this process and may lead to development of new intervention strategies directed at early stages of ovarian cancer.

  13. Toponome imaging system: in situ protein network mapping in normal and cancerous colon from the same patient reveals more than five-thousand cancer specific protein clusters and their subcellular annotation by using a three symbol code.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Sayantan; Mathew, George; Ruban, Ernie; Epstein, David B A; Krusche, Andreas; Hillert, Reyk; Schubert, Walter; Khan, Michael

    2010-12-01

    In a proof of principle study, we have applied an automated fluorescence toponome imaging system (TIS) to examine whether TIS can find protein network structures, distinguishing cancerous from normal colon tissue present in a surgical sample from the same patient. By using a three symbol code and a power of combinatorial molecular discrimination (PCMD) of 2(21) per subcellular data point in one single tissue section, we demonstrate an in situ protein network structure, visualized as a mosaic of 6813 protein clusters (combinatorial molecular phenotype or CMPs), in the cancerous part of the colon. By contrast, in the histologically normal colon, TIS identifies nearly 5 times the number of protein clusters as compared to the cancerous part (32 009). By subcellular visualization procedures, we found that many cell surface membrane molecules were closely associated with the cell cytoskeleton as unique CMPs in the normal part of the colon, while the same molecules were disassembled in the cancerous part, suggesting the presence of dysfunctional cytoskeleton-membrane complexes. As expected, glandular and stromal cell signatures were found, but interestingly also found were potentially TIS signatures identifying a very restricted subset of cells expressing several putative stem cell markers, all restricted to the cancerous tissue. The detection of these signatures is based on the extreme searching depth, high degree of dimensionality, and subcellular resolution capacity of TIS. These findings provide the technological rationale for the feasibility of a complete colon cancer toponome to be established by massive parallel high throughput/high content TIS mapping.

  14. QuickView video preview software of colon capsule endoscopy: reliability in presenting colorectal polyps as compared to normal mode reading.

    PubMed

    Farnbacher, Michael J; Krause, Horst H; Hagel, Alexander F; Raithel, Martin; Neurath, Markus F; Schneider, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. Colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) proved to be highly sensitive in detection of colorectal polyps (CP). Major limitation is the time-consuming video reading. The aim of this prospective, double-center study was to assess the theoretical time-saving potential and its possible impact on the reliability of "QuickView" (QV), in the presentation of CP as compared to normal mode (NM). METHODS. During NM reading of 65 CCE videos (mean patient´s age 56 years), all frames showing CPs were collected and compared to the number of frames presented by QV at increasing QV settings (10, 20, ... 80%). Reliability of QV in presenting polyps <6 mm and ≥6 mm (significant polyp), and identifying patients for subsequent therapeutic colonoscopy, capsule egestion rate, cleansing level, and estimated time-saving potential were assessed. RESULTS. At a 30% QV setting, the QV video presented 89% of the significant polyps and 86% of any polyps with ≥1 frame (per-polyp analysis) identified in NM before. At a 10% QV setting, 98% of the 52 patients with significant polyps could be identified (per-patient analysis) by QV video analysis. Capsule excretion rate was 74% and colon cleanliness was adequate in 85%. QV´s presentation rate correlates to the QV setting, the polyp size, and the number of frames per finding. CONCLUSIONS. Depending on its setting, the reliability of QV in presenting CP as compared to NM reading is notable. However, if no significant polyp is presented by QV, NM reading must be performed afterwards. The reduction of frames to be analyzed in QV might speed up identification of candidates for therapeutic colonoscopy. PMID:24325660

  15. Relationship of Enhanced Butyrate Production by Colonic Butyrate-Producing Bacteria to Immunomodulatory Effects in Normal Mice Fed an Insoluble Fraction of Brassica rapa L.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Sachi; Yamamoto, Kana; Yamada, Kazuki; Furuya, Kanon

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the effects of feeding a fiber-rich fraction of Brassica vegetables on the immune response through changes in enteric bacteria and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production in normal mice. The boiled-water-insoluble fraction of Brassica rapa L. (nozawana), which consists mainly of dietary fiber, was chosen as a test material. A total of 31 male C57BL/6J mice were divided into two groups and housed in a specific-pathogen-free facility. The animals were fed either a control diet or the control diet plus the insoluble B. rapa L. fraction for 2 weeks and sacrificed to determine microbiological and SCFA profiles in lower-gut samples and immunological molecules. rRNA-based quantification indicated that the relative population of Bacteroidetes was markedly lower in the colon samples of the insoluble B. rapa L. fraction-fed group than that in the controls. Populations of the Eubacterium rectale group and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, both of which are representative butyrate-producing bacteria, doubled after 2 weeks of fraction intake, accompanying a marginal increase in the proportion of colonic butyrate. In addition, feeding with the fraction significantly increased levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) and tended to increase splenic regulatory T cell numbers but significantly reduced the population of cells expressing activation markers. We demonstrated that inclusion of the boiled-water-insoluble fraction of B. rapa L. can alter the composition of the gut microbiota to decrease the numbers of Bacteroidetes and to increase the numbers of butyrate-producing bacteria, either of which may be involved in the observed shift in the production of splenic IL-10. PMID:26921420

  16. Relationship of Enhanced Butyrate Production by Colonic Butyrate-Producing Bacteria to Immunomodulatory Effects in Normal Mice Fed an Insoluble Fraction of Brassica rapa L.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Sachi; Yamamoto, Kana; Yamada, Kazuki; Furuya, Kanon; Uyeno, Yutaka

    2016-05-01

    This study was performed to determine the effects of feeding a fiber-rich fraction of Brassica vegetables on the immune response through changes in enteric bacteria and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production in normal mice. The boiled-water-insoluble fraction of Brassica rapa L. (nozawana), which consists mainly of dietary fiber, was chosen as a test material. A total of 31 male C57BL/6J mice were divided into two groups and housed in a specific-pathogen-free facility. The animals were fed either a control diet or the control diet plus the insoluble B. rapa L. fraction for 2 weeks and sacrificed to determine microbiological and SCFA profiles in lower-gut samples and immunological molecules. rRNA-based quantification indicated that the relative population of Bacteroidetes was markedly lower in the colon samples of the insoluble B. rapa L. fraction-fed group than that in the controls. Populations of the Eubacterium rectale group and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, both of which are representative butyrate-producing bacteria, doubled after 2 weeks of fraction intake, accompanying a marginal increase in the proportion of colonic butyrate. In addition, feeding with the fraction significantly increased levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) and tended to increase splenic regulatory T cell numbers but significantly reduced the population of cells expressing activation markers. We demonstrated that inclusion of the boiled-water-insoluble fraction of B. rapa L. can alter the composition of the gut microbiota to decrease the numbers of Bacteroidetes and to increase the numbers of butyrate-producing bacteria, either of which may be involved in the observed shift in the production of splenic IL-10. PMID:26921420

  17. Relationship of Enhanced Butyrate Production by Colonic Butyrate-Producing Bacteria to Immunomodulatory Effects in Normal Mice Fed an Insoluble Fraction of Brassica rapa L.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Sachi; Yamamoto, Kana; Yamada, Kazuki; Furuya, Kanon; Uyeno, Yutaka

    2016-05-01

    This study was performed to determine the effects of feeding a fiber-rich fraction of Brassica vegetables on the immune response through changes in enteric bacteria and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production in normal mice. The boiled-water-insoluble fraction of Brassica rapa L. (nozawana), which consists mainly of dietary fiber, was chosen as a test material. A total of 31 male C57BL/6J mice were divided into two groups and housed in a specific-pathogen-free facility. The animals were fed either a control diet or the control diet plus the insoluble B. rapa L. fraction for 2 weeks and sacrificed to determine microbiological and SCFA profiles in lower-gut samples and immunological molecules. rRNA-based quantification indicated that the relative population of Bacteroidetes was markedly lower in the colon samples of the insoluble B. rapa L. fraction-fed group than that in the controls. Populations of the Eubacterium rectale group and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, both of which are representative butyrate-producing bacteria, doubled after 2 weeks of fraction intake, accompanying a marginal increase in the proportion of colonic butyrate. In addition, feeding with the fraction significantly increased levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) and tended to increase splenic regulatory T cell numbers but significantly reduced the population of cells expressing activation markers. We demonstrated that inclusion of the boiled-water-insoluble fraction of B. rapa L. can alter the composition of the gut microbiota to decrease the numbers of Bacteroidetes and to increase the numbers of butyrate-producing bacteria, either of which may be involved in the observed shift in the production of splenic IL-10.

  18. Glycoprotein isolated from Styrax japonica Siebold et al. Zuccarini inhibits oxidative and pro-inflammatory responses in HCT116 colonic epithelial cells and dextran sulfate sodium-treated ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sei-Jung; Lee, Jin; Song, Sooyeon; Lim, Kye-Taek

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the anti-inflammatory potentials of a 38 kDa glycoprotein isolated from Styrax japonica Siebold et al Zuccarini (SJSZ glycoprotein). We found that SJSZ glycoprotein has concentration-dependent scavenging activity against DPPH and hydroxyl radicals in the cell-free systems. In colonic epithelial cells (HCT116 cells), the results showed that SJSZ glycoprotein inhibits the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by glucose/glucose oxidase (G/GO) in a concentration-dependent manner. Experimental mouse colitis was induced by adding dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) to the drinking water at a concentration of 4% (w/v) for 7 days. We figured out that administration of SJSZ glycoprotein (10 mg/kg) lowers the levels of disease activity index, myeloperoxidase activity, and histological inflammation in DSS-treated mice. In addition, SJSZ glycoprotein inhibited plasmic thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) formation, nitric oxide (NO) production, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, accompanying the inhibition of colonic inflammatory signal proteins (NF-κB, iNOS, and COX-2) and inflammation-related cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α). These results indicate that SJSZ glycoprotein inhibits oxidative and pro-inflammatory responses in mouse colitis. PMID:26631293

  19. 1,25(OH)2D3 attenuates TGF-β1/β2-induced increased migration and invasion via inhibiting epithelial-mesenchymal transition in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shanwen; Zhu, Jing; Zuo, Shuai; Ma, Ju; Zhang, Junling; Chen, Guowei; Wang, Xin; Pan, Yisheng; Liu, Yucun; Wang, Pengyuan

    1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) has been reported to inhibit proliferation and migration of multiple types of cancer cells. However, the mechanism underlying its anti-metastasis effect is not fully illustrated. In this study, the effect of 1,25(OH)2D3 on TGF-β1/β2-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is tested in colon cancer cells. The results suggest that 1,25(OH)2D3 inhibited TGF-β1/β2-induced increased invasion and migration of in SW-480 and HT-29 cells. 1,25(OH)2D3 also inhibited the cadherin switch in SW-480 and HT-29 cells. TGF-β1/β2-induced increased expression of EMT-related transcription factors was also inhibited by 1,25(OH)2D3. 1,25(OH)2D3 also inhibited the secretion of MMP-2 and MMP-9 and increased expression of F-actin induced by TGF-β1/β2 in SW-480 cells. Taken together, this study suggests that the suppression of EMT might be one of the mechanisms underlying the anti-metastasis effect of 1,25(OH)2D3 in colon cancer cells.

  20. Glycoprotein isolated from Styrax japonica Siebold et al. Zuccarini inhibits oxidative and pro-inflammatory responses in HCT116 colonic epithelial cells and dextran sulfate sodium-treated ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sei-Jung; Lee, Jin; Song, Sooyeon; Lim, Kye-Taek

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the anti-inflammatory potentials of a 38 kDa glycoprotein isolated from Styrax japonica Siebold et al Zuccarini (SJSZ glycoprotein). We found that SJSZ glycoprotein has concentration-dependent scavenging activity against DPPH and hydroxyl radicals in the cell-free systems. In colonic epithelial cells (HCT116 cells), the results showed that SJSZ glycoprotein inhibits the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by glucose/glucose oxidase (G/GO) in a concentration-dependent manner. Experimental mouse colitis was induced by adding dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) to the drinking water at a concentration of 4% (w/v) for 7 days. We figured out that administration of SJSZ glycoprotein (10 mg/kg) lowers the levels of disease activity index, myeloperoxidase activity, and histological inflammation in DSS-treated mice. In addition, SJSZ glycoprotein inhibited plasmic thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) formation, nitric oxide (NO) production, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, accompanying the inhibition of colonic inflammatory signal proteins (NF-κB, iNOS, and COX-2) and inflammation-related cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α). These results indicate that SJSZ glycoprotein inhibits oxidative and pro-inflammatory responses in mouse colitis.

  1. Assessment of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) signaling in paired colorectal cancer and normal colon tissue samples using computer-aided immunohistochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Messersmith, Wells; Oppenheimer, Darin; Peralba, Josep; Sebastiani, Valeria; Amador, Maria; Jimeno, Antonio; Embuscado, Erlinda; Hidalgo, Manuel; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine

    2005-12-01

    The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) plays a role in multiple tumor cell processes and is targeted by several anticancer therapies. Although EGFR mutations may determine tumor susceptibility in a small proportion of patients, knowledge of the EGFR signaling pathway status in tumors may help guide further drug development and hypothesis-driven combination studies. We aimed to validate and apply a novel computer-aided immunohistochemical (IHC) technique to characterize the status of EGFR signaling in matched colorectal tumor and normal colon tissue samples. Tissue Microarrays (TMA)were made from both cancerous and normal colorectal tissue in 18 patients and stained with antibodies against EGFR, phospho-EGFR (pEGFR), Akt, pAkt, MAPK, and pMAPK. TMA's were quantitatively scored using the Automated Cellular Imaging System (ACIS II, Chromavision, Inc). ACIS was compared against cell line Western blotting, ELISA, and visual scoring (0-3+) by a pathologist. We found that ACIS analysis was highly reproducible and results were well correlated with other techniques. A post-scan "image microdissection" technique of analyzing heterogeneous human samples showed good correlation between paired human samples [Pearson correlation for tumors, 0.922 (p < .001)]. Cancer samples had markedly higher staining of pEGFR, Akt, pAkt, MAPK, and pMAPK. We conclude that ACIS IHC of human tissue samples is quantitative, reproducible, and correlates with Western blots and ELISA in cell line pellets as well as pathologist's scores of human samples. Colorectal tumors show higher staining of pEGFR and downstream effectors compared to matched normal colorectal tissues.

  2. Conversion of Androgen Receptor Signaling From a Growth Suppressor in Normal Prostate Epithelial Cells to an Oncogene in Prostate Cancer Cells Involves a Gain of Function in c-Myc Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Vander Griend, Donald J.; Litvinov, Ivan V.; Isaacs, John T.

    2014-01-01

    In normal prostate, androgen-dependent androgen receptor (AR) signaling within prostate stromal cells induces their secretion of paracrine factors, termed “andromedins” which stimulate growth of the epithelial cells. The present studies demonstrate that androgen-dependent andromedin-driven growth stimulation is counter-balanced by androgen-induced AR signaling within normal adult prostate epithelial cells resulting in terminal G0 growth arrest coupled with terminal differentiation into ΔNp63-negative, PSA-expressing secretory luminal cells. This cell autonomous AR-driven terminal differentiation requires DNA-binding of the AR protein, is associated with decreases in c-Myc m-RNA and protein, are coupled with increases in p21, p27, and SKP-2 protein expression, and does not require functional p53. These changes result in down-regulation of Cyclin D1 protein and RB phosphoryation. shRNA knockdown documents that neither RB, p21, p27 alone or in combination are required for such AR-induced G0 growth arrest. Transgenic expression of a constitutive vector to prevent c-Myc down-regulation overrides AR-mediated growth arrest in normal prostate epithelial cells, which documents that AR-induced c-Myc down-regulation is critical in terminal growth arrest of normal prostate epithelial cells. In contrast, in prostate cancer cells, androgen-induced AR signaling paradoxically up-regulates c-Myc expression and stimulates growth as documented by inhibition of both of these responses following exposure to the AR antagonist, bicalutamide. These data document that AR signaling is converted from a growth suppressor in normal prostate epithelial cells to an oncogene in prostate cancer cells during prostatic carcinogenesis and that this conversion involves a gain of function for regulation of c-Myc expression. PMID:24948876

  3. Combining Fas mutation with interleukin-2 deficiency prevents Colitis and Lupus: implicating interleukin-2 for auto-reactive T cell expansion and Fas ligand for colon epithelial cell death.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Sheng; Sung, Sun-Sang J; Fu, Shu Man; Ju, Shyr-Te

    2003-12-26

    Both the lpr gene defect and interleukin 2-targeted mutation (IL-2 KO) in mice are lethal. Interestingly, mice bearing both mutations live significantly longer than mice with either of the single mutant genes, approximating the life span of normal controls. They do not display the major disease phenotypes of lpr and IL-2 KO mice. Systemic autoimmune response, the accumulation of the abnormal CD4-CD8-B220+ double-negative T cells, kidney disease pathology, anemia, colon damage, and lethality are prevented. Our data indicate that IL-2 is mandatory for the expansion of auto-reactive T cells in lpr mice and that CD95 (Fas) is the critical target for the development of anemia and ulcerative colitis in IL-2 KO mice in which CD178 (FasL) on intraepithelial T cells is the major effector responsible for colon damage and lethality.

  4. Characterization of AQPs in Mouse, Rat, and Human Colon and Their Selective Regulation by Bile Acids

    PubMed Central

    Yde, Jonathan; Keely, Stephen; Wu, Qi; Borg, Johan F.; Lajczak, Natalia; O’Dwyer, Aoife; Dalsgaard, Peter; Fenton, Robert A.; Moeller, Hanne B.

    2016-01-01

    In normal individuals, the epithelium of the colon absorbs 1.5–2 l of water a day to generate dehydrated feces. However, in the condition of bile acid malabsorption (BAM), an excess of bile acids in the colon results in diarrhea. Several studies have attempted to address the mechanisms contributing to BAM induced by various bile acids. However, none have addressed a potential dysregulation of aquaporin (AQP) water channels, which are responsible for the majority of transcellular water transport in epithelial cells, as a contributing factor to the onset of diarrhea and the pathogenesis of BAM. In this study, we aimed to systematically analyze the expression of AQPs in colonic epithelia from rat, mouse, and human and determine whether their expression is altered in a rat model of BAM. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics, RT-PCR, and western blotting identified various AQPs in isolated colonic epithelial cells from rats (AQP1, 3, 4, 7, 8) and mice (AQP1, 4, 8). Several AQPs were also detected in human colon (AQP1, 3, 4, 7–9). Immunohistochemistry localized AQP1 to the apical plasma membrane of epithelial cells in the bottom of the crypts, whereas AQP3 (rat, human) and AQP4 (mice, human) were localized predominantly in the basolateral plasma membrane. AQP8 was localized intracellularly and at the apical plasma membrane of epithelial cells. Rats fed sodium cholate for 72 h had significantly increased fecal water content, suggesting development of BAM-associated diarrhea. Colonic epithelial cells isolated from this model had significantly altered levels of AQP3, 7, and 8, suggesting that these AQPs may be involved in the pathogenesis of bile acid-induced diarrhea. PMID:27777930

  5. Curcumin inhibits tumor epithelial-mesenchymal transition by downregulating the Wnt signaling pathway and upregulating NKD2 expression in colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, ZEWEI; CHEN, HAITAO; XU, CHAO; SONG, LU; HUANG, LULU; LAI, YUEBIAO; WANG, YUQI; CHEN, HANLU; GU, DANLIN; REN, LILI; YAO, QINGHUA

    2016-01-01

    Tumor invasion and metastasis are closely associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). EMT refers to epithelial cells under physiological and pathological conditions that are specific to mesenchymal transition. Curcumin inhibits EMT progression via Wnt signaling. The Wnt signaling pathway is a conservative EMT-related signaling pathway that is involved in the development of various tumors. In the present study, MTS assays were employed to analyze the proliferation of curcumin-treated cells. Naked cuticle homolog 2 (NKD2), chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) and antibodies associated with EMT were examined in SW620 colorectal cancer cell lines using western blot analysis and real-time qPCR. NKD2 small-interfering RNA (siRNA) and CXCR4 expression plasmid was synthesized and transfected into the colorectal cancer cell lines, and NKD2 and CXCR4 expression levels were detected. The results showed that curcumin significantly inhibited the proliferation of colorectal cancer cells and upregulated the expression of NKD2 in SW620 colorectal cancer cells and in the xenograft, resulting in the downregulation of key markers in the Wnt signaling. In addition, the progression of ETM was inhibited due to the overexpression of E-cadherin as well as the downregulation of vimentin. Curcumin also inhibited tumor metastasis by downregulating the expression of CXCR4 significantly. The results suggested involvement of the NKD2-Wnt-CXCR4 signaling pathway in colorectal cancer cells. In addition, curcumin is inhibit this signaling and the development of colorectal cancer. PMID:26985708

  6. Normalization of raised sodium absorption and raised calcium-mediated chloride secretion by adenovirus-mediated expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator in primary human cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, L G; Boyles, S E; Wilson, J; Boucher, R C

    1995-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis airway epithelia exhibit a spectrum of ion transport properties that differ from normal, including not only defective cAMP-mediated Cl- secretion, but also increased Na+ absorption and increased Ca(2+)-mediated Cl- secretion. In the present study, we examined whether adenovirus-mediated (Ad5) transduction of CFTR can correct all of these CF ion transport abnormalities. Polarized primary cultures of human CF and normal nasal epithelial cells were infected with Ad5-CBCFTR at an moi (10(4)) which transduced virtually all cells or Ad5-CMV lacZ as a control. Consistent with previous reports, Ad5-CBCFTR, but not Ad5-CMV lacZ, corrected defective CF cAMP-mediated Cl- secretion. Basal Na+ transport rates (basal Ieq) in CF airway epithelial sheets (-78.5 +/- 9.8 microA/cm2) were reduced to levels measured in normal epithelial sheets (-30.0 +/- 2.0 microA/cm2) by Ad5-CBCFTR (-36.9 +/- 4.8 microA/cm2), but not Ad5-CMV lacZ (-65.8 +/- 6.1 microA/cm2). Surprisingly, a significant reduction in delta Ieq in response to ionomycin, a measure of Ca(2+)-mediated Cl- secretion, was observed in CFTR-expressing (corrected) CF epithelial sheets (-6.9 +/- 11.8 microA/cm2) when compared to uninfected CF epithelial sheets (-76.2 +/- 15.1 microA/cm2). Dose response effects of Ad5-CBCFTR on basal Na+ transport rates and Ca(2+)-mediated Cl- secretion suggest that the mechanism of regulation of these two ion transport functions by CFTR may be different. In conclusion, efficient transduction of CFTR corrects hyperabsorption of Na+ in primary CF airway epithelial cells and restores Ca(2+)-mediated Cl- secretion to levels observed in normal airway epithelial cells. Moreover, assessment of these ion transport abnormalities may represent important endpoints for testing the efficacy of gene therapy for cystic fibrosis. Images PMID:7533790

  7. Expression of S-100 protein, epithelial membrane antigen, carcinoembryonic antigen and alpha fetoprotein in normal salivary glands and primary salivary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Günhan, O; Evren, G; Demiriz, M; Can, C; Celasun, B; Finci, R

    1992-12-01

    The distribution of S-100 protein, epithelial membrane antigen, carcinoembryonic antigen and alpha fetoprotein was studied in 38 primary salivary gland tumors. S-100 protein, a useful marker of myoepithelial cells, was demonstrated in some benign tumors. Carcinoembryonic antigen expression was consistently positive in adenoid cystic carcinoma. Demonstration of epithelial membrane antigen helped to confirm the epithelial nature of some neoplastic cells. Alpha fetoprotein was not expressed in any of the cases examined. No correlation was found between immunopositivity and tumor behavior in the present series.

  8. Phospholipase Cϵ Activates Nuclear Factor-κB Signaling by Causing Cytoplasmic Localization of Ribosomal S6 Kinase and Facilitating Its Phosphorylation of Inhibitor κB in Colon Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Wakita, Masahiro; Edamatsu, Hironori; Li, Mingzhen; Emi, Aki; Kitazawa, Sohei; Kataoka, Tohru

    2016-06-10

    Phospholipase Cϵ (PLCϵ), an effector of Ras and Rap small GTPases, plays a crucial role in inflammation by augmenting proinflammatory cytokine expression. This proinflammatory function of PLCϵ is implicated in its facilitative role in tumor promotion and progression during skin and colorectal carcinogenesis, although their direct link remains to be established. Moreover, the molecular mechanism underlying these functions of PLCϵ remains unknown except that PKD works downstream of PLCϵ. Here we show by employing the colitis-induced colorectal carcinogenesis model, where Apc(Min) (/+) mice are administered with dextran sulfate sodium, that PLCϵ knock-out alleviates the colitis and suppresses the following tumorigenesis concomitant with marked attenuation of proinflammatory cytokine expression. In human colon epithelial Caco2 cells, TNF-α induces sustained expression of proinflammatory molecules and sustained activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and PKD, the late phases of which are suppressed by not only siRNA-mediated PLCϵ knockdown but also treatment with a lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor antagonist. Also, LPA stimulation induces these events in an early time course, suggesting that LPA mediates TNF-α signaling in an autocrine manner. Moreover, PLCϵ knockdown results in inhibition of phosphorylation of IκB by ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK) but not by IκB kinases. Subcellular fractionation suggests that enhanced phosphorylation of a scaffolding protein, PEA15 (phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes 15), downstream of the PLCϵ-PKD axis causes sustained cytoplasmic localization of phosphorylated RSK, thereby facilitating IκB phosphorylation in the cytoplasm. These results suggest the crucial role of the TNF-α-LPA-LPA receptor-PLCϵ-PKD-PEA15-RSK-IκB-NF-κB pathway in facilitating inflammation and inflammation-associated carcinogenesis in the colon. PMID:27053111

  9. Colon cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Colorectal cancer; Cancer - colon; Rectal cancer; Cancer - rectum; Adenocarcinoma - colon; Colon - adenocarcinoma ... In the United States, colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of deaths due to cancer. Early diagnosis can often lead to a complete cure. Almost ...

  10. Global gene expression analysis in time series following N-acetyl L-cysteine induced epithelial differentiation of human normal and cancer cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gustafsson, Anna C; Kupershmidt, Ilya; Edlundh-Rose, Esther; Greco, Giulia; Serafino, Annalucia; Krasnowska, Eva K; Lundeberg, Thomas; Bracci-Laudiero, Luisa; Romano, Maria-Concetta; Parasassi, Tiziana; Lundeberg, Joakim

    2005-01-01

    Background Cancer prevention trials using different types of antioxidant supplements have been carried out at several occasions and one of the investigated compounds has been the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). Studies at the cellular level have previously demonstrated that a single supplementation of NAC induces a ten-fold more rapid differentiation in normal primary human keratinocytes as well as a reversion of a colon carcinoma cell line from neoplastic proliferation to apical-basolateral differentiation [1]. The investigated cells showed an early change in the organization of the cytoskeleton, several newly established adherens junctions with E-cadherin/β-catenin complexes and increased focal adhesions, all features characterizing the differentiation process. Methods In order to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the proliferation arrest and accelerated differentiation induced by NAC treatment of NHEK and Caco-2 cells in vitro, we performed global gene expression analysis of NAC treated cells in a time series (1, 12 and 24 hours post NAC treatment) using the Affymetrix GeneChip™ Human Genome U95Av2 chip, which contains approximately 12,000 previously characterized sequences. The treated samples were compared to the corresponding untreated culture at the same time point. Results Microarray data analysis revealed an increasing number of differentially expressed transcripts over time upon NAC treatment. The early response (1 hour) was transient, while a constitutive trend was commonly found among genes differentially regulated at later time points (12 and 24 hours). Connections to the induction of differentiation and inhibition of growth were identified for a majority of up- and down-regulated genes. All of the observed transcriptional changes, except for seven genes, were unique to either cell line. Only one gene, ID-1, was mutually regulated at 1 hour post treatment and might represent a common mediator of early NAC action. The detection

  11. [Epithelial-mesenchymal transition in cancer progression].

    PubMed

    Gos, Monika; Miłoszewska, Joanna; Przybyszewska, Małgorzata

    2009-01-01

    According to recently published data, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition--a process important for embryonic development, may be involved in many pathological processes such as wound healing, tissue fibrosis or cancer progression. The EMT process in cell is driven by growth factors (EGF, PDGF, HGF) or other signaling proteins such as TGF-beta, sonic hedgehog (Shh), Wnt/beta-catenin and extracellular matrix (ECM) components that may stimulate cellular growth and migration. During cancer progression, the EMT process is necessary to the conversion of benign tumor to aggressive and highly invasive cancer. This is due to complex changes in cancer cells and their microenvironment that lead to dissolution of intracellular junctions and their detachment from basolateral membrane, and changes in the interactions between cancer cells and ECM. The loss of adhesion is accompanied by molecular and morphologic changes in cancer cells that are essential for the phenotypic change from epithelial to mesenchymal one, and the acquirement of higher migration and invasion potential. During the colonization of distant sites, a reverse process mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) takes place and metastatic cancer cells again acquire the epithelial phenotype. The EMT in cancer progression is not only specific for cancer cells. It has been suggested that also cells within tumor microenvironment e.g. cancer associated fibroblasts (CAF) are generated in part from normal epithelial cells in EMT process. The understanding of the role of EMT and MET processes in cancer progression and their relationship with cancer stem cells, cancer associated fibroblasts and other stroma cells might lead to the discovery of new, targeted cancer therapies.

  12. FXR silencing in human colon cancer by DNA methylation and KRAS signaling.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Ann M; Zhan, Le; Maru, Dipen; Shureiqi, Imad; Pickering, Curtis R; Kiriakova, Galina; Izzo, Julie; He, Nan; Wei, Caimiao; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran; Liang, Han; Kopetz, Scott; Powis, Garth; Guo, Grace L

    2014-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a bile acid nuclear receptor described through mouse knockout studies as a tumor suppressor for the development of colon adenocarcinomas. This study investigates the regulation of FXR in the development of human colon cancer. We used immunohistochemistry of FXR in normal tissue (n = 238), polyps (n = 32), and adenocarcinomas, staged I-IV (n = 43, 39, 68, and 9), of the colon; RT-quantitative PCR, reverse-phase protein array, and Western blot analysis in 15 colon cancer cell lines; NR1H4 promoter methylation and mRNA expression in colon cancer samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas; DNA methyltransferase inhibition; methyl-DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP); bisulfite sequencing; and V-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) knockdown assessment to investigate FXR regulation in colon cancer development. Immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR revealed that expression and function of FXR was reduced in precancerous lesions and silenced in a majority of stage I-IV tumors. FXR expression negatively correlated with phosphatidylinositol-4, 5-bisphosphate 3 kinase signaling and the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. The NR1H4 promoter is methylated in ~12% colon cancer The Cancer Genome Atlas samples, and methylation patterns segregate with tumor subtypes. Inhibition of DNA methylation and KRAS silencing both increased FXR expression. FXR expression is decreased early in human colon cancer progression, and both DNA methylation and KRAS signaling may be contributing factors to FXR silencing. FXR potentially suppresses epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and other oncogenic signaling cascades, and restoration of FXR activity, by blocking silencing mechanisms or increasing residual FXR activity, represents promising therapeutic options for the treatment of colon cancer.

  13. Trefoil factor-3 expression in human colon cancer liver metastasis.

    PubMed

    Babyatsky, Mark; Lin, Jing; Yio, Xianyang; Chen, Anli; Zhang, Jie-yu; Zheng, Yan; Twyman, Christina; Bao, Xiuliang; Schwartz, Myron; Thung, Swan; Lawrence Werther, J; Itzkowitz, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Deaths from colorectal cancer are often due to liver metastasis. Trefoil factor-3 (TFF3) is expressed by normal intestinal epithelial cells and its expression is maintained throughout the colon adenoma-carcinoma sequence. Our previous work demonstrated a correlation between TFF3 expression and metastatic potential in an animal model of colon cancer. The aim of this study was to determine whether TFF3 is expressed in human colon cancer liver metastasis (CCLM) and whether inhibiting TFF3 expression in colon cancer cells would alter their invasive potential in vitro. Human CCLMs were analyzed at the mRNA and protein level for TFF3 expression. Two highly metastatic rat colon cancer cell lines that either natively express TFF3 (LN cells) or were transfected with TFF3 (LPCRI-2 cells), were treated with two rat TFF3 siRNA constructs (si78 and si365), and analyzed in an in vitro invasion assay. At the mRNA and protein level, TFF3 was expressed in 17/17 (100%) CCLMs and 10/11 (91%) primary colon cancers, but not in normal liver tissue. By real time PCR, TFF3 expression was markedly inhibited by both siRNA constructs in LN and LPCRI-2 cells. The si365 and si78 constructs inhibited invasion by 44% and 53%, respectively, in LN cells, and by 74% and 50%, respectively, in LPCRI-2 cells. These results provide further evidence that TFF3 contributes to the malignant behavior of colon cancer cells. These observations may have relevance for designing new diagnostic and treatment approaches to colorectal cancer.

  14. Viable and morphologically normal boar spermatozoa alter the expression of heat-shock protein genes in oviductal epithelial cells during co-culture in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yeste, Marc; Holt, William V; Bonet, Sergi; Rodríguez-Gil, Joan E; Lloyd, Rhiannon E

    2014-09-01

    The principal aim of this study was to determine if boar spermatozoa influence the expression of four selected chaperone and heat-shock protein (HSP) genes-namely clusterin (CLU), HSP90AA1, HSPA5, and HSPA8-in oviductal epithelial cells (OECs) during in vitro co-culture. All corresponding proteins of these genes were previously identified in a sperm-interacting, 70-kDa soluble fraction derived from apical plasma membranes of OECs. The present study also sought to determine whether or not: (i) spermatozoa must directly bind to OEC for an effect on gene expression to be elicited and (ii) reproductive and nonreproductive epithelial cell types (LLC-PK1, pig kidney) respond equivalently, in terms of alterations in chaperone and HSP gene expression, during co-culture with sperm. Spermatozoa induced a significant upregulation (P < 0.05) in HSP90AA1 and HSPA5 in OECs after 3 hr, and in HSPA8 after 6 hr of co-culture when they were in direct contact with epithelial cells. Conversely, no upregulation of HSP transcription was observed when spermatozoa did not directly bind to OECs. Spermatozoa also induced a significant upregulation (P < 0.05) of the same three genes when in direct contact with LLC-PK1 cells, but the timing occurred later than with OECs. Interestingly, the extent of HSP gene upregulation induced by direct contact of spermatozoa with epithelial cells was dependent on sperm-binding index and on the viability and morphological quality of the bound sperm population. In conclusion, the upregulation of HSP genes caused by direct contact between spermatozoa and OECs, rather than nonreproductive epithelial cells, suggests HSPs could play an integral role in the modulation of sperm function in the oviductal reservoir.

  15. Multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy used to discriminate human colon cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adur, Javier; Pelegati, Vitor B.; Bianchi, Mariana; de Thomaz, André A.; Baratti, Mariana O.; Carvalho, Hernandes F.; Casco, Víctor H.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2013-02-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most diffused cancers in the Western World, ranking third worldwide in frequency of incidence after lung and breast cancers. Even if it is curable when detected and treated early, a more accurate premature diagnosis would be a suitable aim for both cancer prognostic and treatment. Combined multimodal nonlinear optical (NLO) microscopies, such as two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF), second-harmonic generation (SHG), third harmonic generation (THG), and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) can be used to detect morphological and metabolic changes associated with stroma and epithelial transformation in colon cancer disease. NLO microscopes provide complementary information about tissue microstructure, showing distinctive patterns between normal and malignant human colonic mucosa. Using a set of scoring methods significant differences both in the content, distribution and organization of stroma collagen fibrils, and lifetime components of NADH and FAD cofactors of human colon mucosa biopsies were found. Our results provide a framework for using NLO techniques as a clinical diagnostic tool for human colon cancer, and also suggest that the SHG and FLIM metrics could be applied to other intestinal disorders, which are characterized by abnormal cell proliferation and collagen assembly.

  16. Immunocytochemistry and Image Analysis of Beta-Catenin Redistribution in Normal Human Colon Cell Cultures Treated with Disinfection By-Products.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies have shown an association between the consumption of chlorinated drinking water and increased risk for colon cancer. In vivo studies proved that rodents exposed to chlorination disinfection byproducts (DBPs) developed aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in t...

  17. Glutathione-S-transferase M1 regulation of diesel exhaust particle-induced pro-inflammatory mediator expression in normal human bronchial epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) contribute substantially to ambient particulate matter (PM) air pollution in urban areas. Inhalation of PM has been associated with increased incidence of lung disease in susceptible populations. We have demonstrated that the glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) null genotype could aggravate DEP-induced airway inflammation in human subjects. Given the critical role airway epithelial cells play in the pathogenesis of airway inflammation, we established the GSTM1 deficiency condition in primary bronchial epithelial cells from human volunteers with GSTM1 sufficient genotype (GSTM1+) using GSTM1 shRNA to determine whether GSTM1 deficiency could exaggerate DEP-induced expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and IL-1β proteins. Furthermore, the mechanisms underlying GSTM1 regulation of DEP-induced IL-8 and IL-1β expression were also investigated. Methods IL-8 and IL-1β protein levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. GSTM1 deficiency in primary human bronchial epithelial cells was achieved using lentiviral GSTM1 shRNA particles and verified using real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was evaluated using flow cytometry. Phosphorylation of protein kinases was detected using immunoblotting. Results Exposure of primary human bronchial epithelial cells (GSTM1+) to 25-100 μg/ml DEP for 24 h significantly increased IL-8 and IL-1β protein expression. Knockdown of GSTM1 in these cells further elevated DEP-induced IL-8 and IL-1β expression, implying that GSTM1 deficiency aggravated DEP-induced pro-inflammatory response. DEP stimulation induced the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Akt, the downstream kinase of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), in GSTM1+ bronchial epithelial cells. Pharmacological inhibition of ERK kinase and PI3K activity blocked DEP-induced IL-8 and IL-1β expression. DEP-induced ERK and Akt

  18. Correlation between CYP1A1 transcript, protein level, enzyme activity and DNA adduct formation in normal human mammary epithelial cell strains exposed to benzo[a]pyrene

    PubMed Central

    Divi, Rao L.; Einem Lindeman, Tracey L.; Shockley, Marie E.; Keshava, Channa; Weston, Ainsley; Poirier, Miriam C.

    2014-01-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) benzo(a)pyrene (BP) is thought to bind covalently to DNA, through metabolism by cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and CYP1B1, and other enzymes, to form r7, t8, t9-trihydroxy-c-10-(N 2-deoxyguanosyl)-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-benzo[a]-pyrene (BPdG). Evaluation of RNA expression data, to understand the contribution of different metabolic enzymes to BPdG formation, is typically presented as fold-change observed upon BP exposure, leaving the actual number of RNA transcripts unknown. Here, we have quantified RNA copies/ng cDNA (RNA cpn) for CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, as well as NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), which may reduce formation of BPdG adducts, using primary normal human mammary epithelial cell (NHMEC) strains, and the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. In unexposed NHMECs, basal RNA cpn values were 58–836 for CYP1A1, 336–5587 for CYP1B1 and 5943–40112 for NQO1. In cells exposed to 4.0 µM BP for 12h, RNA cpn values were 251–13234 for CYP1A1, 4133–57078 for CYP1B1 and 4456–55887 for NQO1. There were 3.5 (mean, range 0.2–15.8) BPdG adducts/108 nucleotides in the NHMECs (n = 16), and 790 in the MCF-7s. In the NHMECs, BP-induced CYP1A1 RNA cpn was highly associated with BPdG (P = 0.002), but CYP1B1 and NQO1 were not. Western blots of four NHMEC strains, chosen for different levels of BPdG adducts, showed a linear correlation between BPdG and CYP1A1, but not CYP1B1 or NQO1. Ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity, which measures CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 together, correlated with BPdG, but NQO1 activity did not. Despite more numerous levels of CYP1B1 and NQO1 RNA cpn in unexposed and BP-exposed NHMECs and MCF-7cells, BPdG formation was only correlated with induction of CYP1A1 RNA cpn. The higher level of BPdG in MCF-7 cells, compared to NHMECs, may have been due to a much increased induction of CYP1A1 and EROD. Overall, BPdG correlation was observed with CYP1A1 protein and CYP1A1/1B1 enzyme activity, but not with CYP1B1 or NQO

  19. Colonic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... where your body makes and stores stool. Many disorders affect the colon's ability to work properly. Some ... abdominal cramping and other symptoms Treatment for colonic diseases varies greatly depending on the disease and its ...

  20. Taste sensing in the colon.

    PubMed

    Kaji, Izumi; Karaki, Shin-ichiro; Kuwahara, Atsukazu

    2014-01-01

    The colonic lumen is continually exposed to many compounds, including beneficial and harmful compounds that are produced by colonic microflora. The intestinal epithelia form a barrier between the internal and luminal (external) environments. Chemical receptors that sense the luminal environment are thought to play important roles as sensors and as modulators of epithelial cell functions. The recent molecular identification of various membrane receptor proteins has revealed the sensory role of intestinal epithelial cells. Nutrient sensing by these receptors in the small intestine is implicated in nutrient absorption and metabolism. However, little is known about the physiological roles of chemosensors in the large intestine. Since 1980s, researchers have examined the effects of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), the primary products of commensal bacteria, on gut motility, secretion, and incretin release, for example. In this decade, the SCFA receptor genes and their expression were identified in the mammalian colon. Furthermore, many other chemical receptors, including taste and olfactory receptors have been found in colonic epithelial cells. These findings indicate that the large intestinal epithelia express chemosensors that detect the luminal contents, particularly bacterial metabolites, and induce the host defense systems and the modulation of systemic metabolism via incretin release. In this review, we describe the local effects of chemical stimuli on the lumen associated with the expression pattern of sensory receptors. We propose that sensory receptors expressed in the colonic mucosa play important roles in luminal chemosensing to maintain homeostasis.

  1. Overexpression of MACC1 and the association with hepatocyte growth factor/c-Met in epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    LI, HONGYU; ZHANG, HUI; ZHAO, SHUJUN; SHI, YUN; YAO, JUNGE; ZHANG, YANYAN; GUO, HUANHUAN; LIU, XINGSUO

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis-associated in colon cancer-1 (MACC1) is a gene that has been newly identified by a genome-wide search for differentially expressed genes in human colon cancer tissues, metastases and normal tissues. MACC1 exerts an important role in colon cancer metastasis through upregulation of the c-Met proto-oncogene. The tyrosine kinase receptor encoded by the c-Met oncogene exhibits the unusual property of mediating the invasive growth of epithelial cells upon binding with the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). MACC1 has been investigated with regard to colon carcinoma and MACC1 expression is associated with metastasis in various types of human cancer. However, the value of MACC1 as a potential biomarker for ovarian cancer remains unknown, although the c-Met/HGF receptor has been shown to be overexpressed in epithelial ovarian cancer tissues. To investigate the role of MACC1 in epithelial ovarian tumors, the expression levels of MACC1 mRNA in ovarian tumor specimens were analyzed together with the prognostic significance. MACC1 protein expression was also detected in the epithelial ovarian tissue specimens, and the effects of MACC1 overexpression on ovarian cancer migration, invasion and prognosis were evaluated. Due to the close association between MACC1 and c-Met expression levels in colon cancer, the expression levels of HGF/c-Met in the ovarian specimens were also examined to determine whether such a correlation is also present in epithelial ovarian cancer. A total of 92 epithelial ovarian tissue samples were used to assess the expression levels of MACC1 mRNA and protein using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical methods, respectively. The serum levels of MACC1 protein expression in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results indicated that MACC1 may be important in the malignant progression of epithelial ovarian tumors, in particular for early stage patients. Thus, MACC

  2. A review of gastrointestinal epithelial renewal and its relevance to the development of adenocarcinomas of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, G L

    1995-01-01

    Renewal of the gastrointestinal (GI) epithelium fulfills the normal functions of maintaining the integrity of the mucosa, repairing mucosal injury, and replenishing the specialized cells of the epithelium. Alterations in epithelial renewal also are intimately involved in transformation of the epithelium to benign and malignant neoplasms. Certain abnormalities in epithelial proliferation, including an increase in the rate of proliferation and expansion of proliferating cells beyond the normal zone of proliferation, are closely linked to the predisposition for and frank development of GI cancer. These abnormalities are common to all human premalignant conditions studied, including Barrett's epithelium, chronic gastritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and colon polyps; they also occur in experimental carcinogenesis. The same proliferative abnormalities have also been observed in some relatives of patients with colon neoplasms who themselves do not have any colon polyps or cancer. Several agents, including calcium, vitamins A, C, and E, and omega-3 fatty acids, have been shown to reverse the abnormal proliferation under some laboratory and clinical conditions. Moreover, some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs appear to decrease the size of colon polyps in familial polyposis and to reduce the risk for colon cancer in the general population. We await further clinical trials that will indicate whether such ordinary supplements as calcium, vitamins, fish oil, or aspirin have a role in the treatment of patients with premalignant conditions of the gastrointestinal tract.

  3. Molecular mechanisms linking adipokines to obesity-related colon cancer: focus on leptin.

    PubMed

    Drew, Janice E

    2012-02-01

    Obesity is linked to increased risk of colon cancer, currently the third most common cancer. Consequently rising levels of obesity worldwide are likely to significantly impact on obesity-related colon cancers in the decades to come. Understanding the molecular mechanisms whereby obesity increases colon cancer risk is thus a focus for research to inform strategies to prevent the increasing trend in obesity-related cancers. This review will consider research on deregulation of adipokine signalling, a consequence of altered adipokine hormone secretion from excess adipose tissue, with a focus on leptin, which has been studied extensively as a potential mediator of obesity-related colon cancer. Numerous investigations using colon cell lines in vitro, in vivo studies in rodents and investigations of colon cancer patients illuminate the complexity of the interactions of leptin with colon tissues via leptin receptors expressed by the colon epithelium. Although evidence indicates a role for leptin in proliferation of colon epithelial cells in vitro, this has been contradicted by studies in rodent models. However, recent studies have indicated that leptin may influence inflammatory mediators linked with colon cancer and also promote cell growth dependent on genotype and is implicated in growth promotion of colon cancer cells. Studies in human cancer patients indicate that there may be different tumour sub-types with varying levels of leptin receptor expression, indicating the potential for leptin to induce variable responses in the different tumour types. These studies have provided insights into the complex interplay of adipokines with responsive tissues prone to obesity-related colon cancer. Deregulation of adipokine signalling via adipokine receptors located in the colon appears to be a significant factor in obesity-related colon cancer. Molecular profiling of colon tumours will be a useful tool in future strategies to characterise the influence that adipokines may have

  4. Lysyl oxidase-like 2 expression is increased in colon and esophageal tumors and associated with less differentiated colon tumors.

    PubMed

    Fong, Sheri F T; Dietzsch, Erin; Fong, Keith S K; Hollosi, Peter; Asuncion, Lloyd; He, Qingping; Parker, M Iqbal; Csiszar, Katalin

    2007-07-01

    Lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2) belongs to an amine oxidase family whose members have been implicated in crosslink formation in stromal collagens and elastin, cell motility, and tumor development and progression. We previously demonstrated the association between increased LOXL2 expression and invasive/metastatic behavior in human breast cancer cells and mouse squamous and spindle cell carcinomas, interaction between LOXL2 and SNAIL in epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and localization of the LOXL2 gene to 8p21.2-21.3, within a minimally deleted region in several cancers, including colon and esophagus. In the present study, we analyzed LOXL2 expression in colon and esophageal tumors, and explored methylation as a regulator of LOXL2 expression. Immunohistochemistry using normal tissues demonstrated intracellular localization of LOXL2 in colonic enteroendocrine cells and esophageal squamous cells at the luminal surface, but not in mitotically active cells. Tissue array analysis of 52 colon adenocarcinomas and 50 esophageal squamous cell carcinomas revealed presence of LOXL2 expression in 83 and 92% of the samples, respectively, and a significant association between increased number of LOXL2-expressing cells and less-differentiated colon carcinomas. We determined that the methylation status of the 1150 bp 5' CpG island may contribute to the regulation of the gene. Loss of heterozygosity studies, using a microsatellite within intron 4 of the LOXL2 gene, revealed that loss of LOXL2 was unlikely to play a major role in either colon or esophageal tumors. These results suggest that increased LOXL2 expression in colon and esophageal cancer may contribute to tumor progression.

  5. WISP-2: a serum-inducible gene differentially expressed in human normal breast epithelial cells and in MCF-7 breast tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Zoubine, M N; Banerjee, S; Saxena, N K; Campbell, D R; Banerjee, S K

    2001-03-30

    WISP-2 is a Wnt-1-induced signaling protein identified as a member of CCN growth factor family. A role for this molecule during tumorigenesis is suspected but remains unproven. Here we show that WISP-2 expression was undetectable, or minimally detectable, in nontransformed human mammary epithelial cells, but was overexpressed in MCF-7 cells. Expression of WISP-2 in MCF-7 cells was modulated by serum and correlated with the serum-induced MCF-7 tumor cell proliferation, suggesting that WISP-2 is serum responsive and may be a positive regulator of tumor cell proliferation.

  6. Stimulation of colonic mucosal growth associated with oxidized redox status in rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Junqiang; Washizawa, Naohiro; Gu, Li H; Levin, Marc S; Wang, Lihua; Rubin, Deborah C; Mwangi, Simon; Srinivasan, Shanthi; Gao, Yuhao; Jones, Dean P; Ziegler, Thomas R

    2007-03-01

    Limited data in animal models suggest that colonic mucosa undergoes adaptive growth following massive small bowel resection (SBR). In vitro data suggest that intestinal cell growth is regulated by reactive oxygen species and redox couples [e.g., glutathione (GSH)/glutathione disulfide (GSSG) and cysteine (Cys)/cystine (CySS) redox]. We investigated the effects of SBR and alterations in redox on colonic growth indexes in rats after either small bowel transection (TX) or 80% midjejunoileal resection (RX). Rats were pair fed +/- blockade of endogenous GSH synthesis with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO). Indexes of colonic growth, proliferation, and apoptosis and GSH/GSSG and Cys/CySS redox potentials (E(h)) were determined. RX significantly increased colonic crypt depth, number of cells per crypt, and epithelial cell proliferation [crypt cell bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation]. Administration of BSO markedly decreased colonic mucosal GSH, GSSG, and Cys concentrations in both TX and RX groups, with a resultant oxidation of GSH/GSSG and Cys/CySS E(h). BSO did not alter colonic crypt cell apoptosis but significantly increased all colonic mucosal growth indexes (crypt depth, cells/crypt, and BrdU incorporation) in both TX and RX groups in a time- and dose-dependent manner. BSO significantly decreased plasma GSH and GSSG, oxidized GSH/GSSG E(h), and increased plasma Cys and CySS concentrations. Collectively, these data provide in vivo evidence indicating that oxidized colonic mucosal redox status stimulates colonic mucosal growth in rats. The data also suggest that GSH is required to maintain normal colonic and plasma Cys/CySS homeostasis in these animal models.

  7. Enteric dysbiosis promotes antibiotic-resistant bacterial infection: systemic dissemination of resistant and commensal bacteria through epithelial transcytosis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Linda Chia-Hui; Shih, Yi-An; Wu, Li-Ling; Lin, Yang-Ding; Kuo, Wei-Ting; Peng, Wei-Hao; Lu, Kuo-Shyan; Wei, Shu-Chen; Turner, Jerrold R; Ni, Yen-Hsuan

    2014-10-15

    Antibiotic usage promotes intestinal colonization of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. However, whether resistant bacteria gain dominance in enteric microflora or disseminate to extraintestinal viscera remains unclear. Our aim was to investigate temporal diversity changes in microbiota and transepithelial routes of bacterial translocation after antibiotic-resistant enterobacterial colonization. Mice drinking water with or without antibiotics were intragastrically gavaged with ampicillin-resistant (Amp-r) nonpathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) and given normal water afterward. The composition and spatial distribution of intestinal bacteria were evaluated using 16S rDNA sequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Bacterial endocytosis in epithelial cells was examined using gentamicin resistance assay and transmission electromicroscopy. Paracellular permeability was assessed by tight junctional immunostaining and measured by tissue conductance and luminal-to-serosal dextran fluxes. Our results showed that antibiotic treatment enabled intestinal colonization and transient dominance of orally acquired Amp-r E. coli in mice. The colonized Amp-r E. coli peaked on day 3 postinoculation and was competed out after 1 wk, as evidenced by the recovery of commensals, such as Escherichia, Bacteroides, Lachnospiraceae, Clostridium, and Lactobacillus. Mucosal penetration and extraintestinal dissemination of exogenous and endogenous enterobacteria were correlated with abnormal epithelial transcytosis but uncoupled with paracellular tight junctional damage. In conclusion, antibiotic-induced enteric dysbiosis predisposes to exogenous infection and causes systemic dissemination of both antibiotic-resistant and commensal enterobacteria through transcytotic routes across epithelial layers. These results may help explain the susceptibility to sepsis in antibiotic-resistant enteric bacterial infection.

  8. Nuclear receptor co-repressor is required to maintain proliferation of normal intestinal epithelial cells in culture and down-modulates the expression of pigment epithelium-derived factor.

    PubMed

    Doyon, Geneviève; St-Jean, Stéphanie; Darsigny, Mathieu; Asselin, Claude; Boudreau, Francois

    2009-09-11

    Stem cells of the gut epithelium constantly produce precursors that progressively undergo a succession of molecular changes resulting in growth arrest and commitment to a specific differentiation program. Few transcriptional repressors have been identified that maintain the normal intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) proliferation state. Herein, we show that the nuclear receptor co-repressor (NCoR1) is differentially expressed during the proliferation-to-differentiation IEC transition. Silencing of NCoR1 expression in proliferating cells of crypt origin resulted in a rapid growth arrest without associated cell death. A genechip profiling analysis identified several candidate genes to be up-regulated in NCoR1-deficient IEC. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF, also known as serpinf1), a suspected tumor suppressor gene that plays a key role in the inhibition of epithelial tissue growth, was significantly up-regulated in these cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments showed that the PEDF gene promoter was occupied by NCoR1 in proliferating epithelial cells. Multiple retinoid X receptor (RXR) heterodimers interacting sites of the PEDF promoter were confirmed to interact with RXR and retinoid acid receptor (RAR). Cotransfection assays showed that RXR and RAR were able to transactivate the PEDF promoter and that NCoR1 was repressing this effect. Finally, forced expression of PEDF in IEC resulted in a slower rate of proliferation. These observations suggest that NCoR1 expression is required to maintain IEC in a proliferative state and identify PEDF as a novel transcriptional target for NCoR1 repressive action.

  9. Key role of regulated upon activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted, nonstructural protein1 and myeloperoxidase in cytokine storm induced by influenza virus PR-8 (A/H1N1) infection in A549 bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Phung, Thuy Thi Bich; Sugamata, Ryuichi; Uno, Kazuko; Aratani, Yasuaki; Ozato, Keiko; Kawachi, Shoji; Thanh Nguyen, Liem; Nakayama, Toshinori; Suzuki, Kazuo

    2011-12-01

    Influenza virus infection causes severe respiratory disease such as that due to avian influenza (H5N1). Influenza A viruses proliferate in human epithelial cells, which produce inflammatory cytokines/chemokines as a "cytokine storm" attenuated with the viral nonstructural protein 1 (NS1). Cytokine/chemokine production in A549 epithelial cells infected with influenza A/H1N1 virus (PR-8) or nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) plasmid was examined in vitro. Because tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and regulated upon activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) are predominantly produced from cells infected with PR-8 virus, the effects of mRNA knockdown of these cytokines were investigated. Small interfering (si)TNF-α down-regulated RANTES expression and secretion of RANTES, interleukin (IL)-8, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1). In addition, siRANTES suppressed interferon (IFN)-γ expression and secretion of RANTES, IL-8, and MCP-1, suggesting that TNF-α stimulates production of RANTES, IL-8, MCP-1, and IFN-γ, and RANTES also increased IL-8, MCP-1, and IFN-γ. Furthermore, administration of TNF-α promoted increased secretion of RANTES, IL-8, and MCP-1. Administration of RANTES enhanced IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1 production without PR-8 infection. These results strongly suggest that, as an initial step, TNF-α regulates RANTES production, followed by increase of IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1 and IFNs concentrations. At a later stage, cells transfected with viral NS1 plasmid showed production of a large amount of IL-8 and MCP-1 in the presence of the H(2)O(2)-myeloperoxidse (MPO) system, suggesting that NS1 of PR-8 may induce a "cytokine storm" from epithelial cells in the presence of an H(2)O(2)-MPO system.

  10. [Colonic balantidiasis].

    PubMed

    González de Canales Simón, P; del Olmo Martínez, L; Cortejoso Hernández, A; Arranz Santos, T

    2000-03-01

    Balantidium coli is a Protozoa that is not usually pathogenic in man, although epidemics have been described in tropical areas. It mainly affects the colon and clinical presentation varies from asymptomatic forms to severe dysenteric syndromes. We present a case of endoscopically diagnosed colonic balantidiasis and review the most important characteristics of this parasite-induced disease. PMID:10804691

  11. Inhibition of SW620 human colon cancer cells by upregulating miRNA-145

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chen; Xu, Na; Li, Yu-Qiang; Wang, Yu; Zhu, Zhi-Tu

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the targeted inhibition of proliferation and migration of SW620 human colon cancer cells by upregulating miRNA-145 (miR-145). METHODS: Forty-five samples of colon cancer tissues and 45 normal control samples were obtained from the biological database of the First Affiliated Hospital of Liaoning Medical University. We performed quantitative analysis of miR-145 and N-ras expression in tissues; reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis of miR-145 expression in SW620 colon cancer cells and normal colonic epithelial cells; construction of miR-145 lentiviral vector and determination of miR-145 expression in SW620 cells transduced with miR-145 vector; analysis of the effect of miR-145 overexpression on SW620 cell proliferation; analysis of the effect of miR-145 overexpression on SW620 cell migration using a wound healing assay; and analysis of the effect of miR-145 on N-ras expression using Western blotting. RESULTS: miR-145 expression was significantly downregulated in colon cancer tissues, with its expression in normal colonic tissues being 4-5-fold higher (two sample t test, P < 0.05), whereas N-ras expression showed the opposite trend. miR-145 expression in SW620 cells was downregulated, which was significantly lower compared to that in colonic epithelial cells (two sample t test, P < 0.05). miR-145 vector and control were successfully packaged; expression of miR-145 in SW620 cells transduced with miR-145 was 8.2-fold of that in control cells (two sample t test, P < 0.05). The proliferation of miR-145-transduced SW620 cells was significantly decreased compared to control cells (two sample t test, P < 0.05). At 48 h in the wound healing experiment, the migration indexes and controls were (97.27% ± 9.25%) and (70.22% ± 6.53%), respectively (two sample t test, P < 0.05). N-ras expression in miR-145-tranduced SW620 cells was significantly lower than others (one-way analysis of variance, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: miR-145 is important in

  12. Targeting the metabolic pathway of human colon cancer overcomes resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Ryan M; Qiao, Guilin; Qin, Jianzhong; Jayaraman, Sundararajan; Prabhakar, Bellur S; Maker, Ajay V

    2016-01-01

    Colon cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality for which targeted therapy is needed; however, trials using apoptosis-inducing ligand monotherapy to overcome resistance to apoptosis have not shown clinical responses. Since colon cancer cells selectively uptake and rapidly metabolize glucose, a property utilized for clinical staging, we investigated mechanisms to alter glucose metabolism in order to selectively target the cancer cells and to overcome evasion of apoptosis. We demonstrate TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) resistance in the majority of human colon cancers tested and utilize the glucose analog 2-deoxy-d-glucose to sensitize TRAIL-resistant gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma cells, and not normal gastrointestinal epithelial cells, to TRAIL-induced apoptosis through enhanced death receptor 5 expression, downstream modulation of MAPK signaling and subsequent miRNA expression modulation by increasing the expression of miR-494 via MEK activation. Further, established human colon cancer xenografts treated with this strategy experience anti-tumor responses. These findings in colon adenocarcinoma support further investigation of manipulation of cellular energetics to selectively overcome resistance to apoptosis and to impart tumor regressions in established colon cancer tumors. PMID:27648301

  13. Targeting the metabolic pathway of human colon cancer overcomes resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Carr, Ryan M; Qiao, Guilin; Qin, Jianzhong; Jayaraman, Sundararajan; Prabhakar, Bellur S; Maker, Ajay V

    2016-01-01

    Colon cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality for which targeted therapy is needed; however, trials using apoptosis-inducing ligand monotherapy to overcome resistance to apoptosis have not shown clinical responses. Since colon cancer cells selectively uptake and rapidly metabolize glucose, a property utilized for clinical staging, we investigated mechanisms to alter glucose metabolism in order to selectively target the cancer cells and to overcome evasion of apoptosis. We demonstrate TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) resistance in the majority of human colon cancers tested and utilize the glucose analog 2-deoxy-d-glucose to sensitize TRAIL-resistant gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma cells, and not normal gastrointestinal epithelial cells, to TRAIL-induced apoptosis through enhanced death receptor 5 expression, downstream modulation of MAPK signaling and subsequent miRNA expression modulation by increasing the expression of miR-494 via MEK activation. Further, established human colon cancer xenografts treated with this strategy experience anti-tumor responses. These findings in colon adenocarcinoma support further investigation of manipulation of cellular energetics to selectively overcome resistance to apoptosis and to impart tumor regressions in established colon cancer tumors. PMID:27648301

  14. Targeting the metabolic pathway of human colon cancer overcomes resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Ryan M; Qiao, Guilin; Qin, Jianzhong; Jayaraman, Sundararajan; Prabhakar, Bellur S; Maker, Ajay V

    2016-01-01

    Colon cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality for which targeted therapy is needed; however, trials using apoptosis-inducing ligand monotherapy to overcome resistance to apoptosis have not shown clinical responses. Since colon cancer cells selectively uptake and rapidly metabolize glucose, a property utilized for clinical staging, we investigated mechanisms to alter glucose metabolism in order to selectively target the cancer cells and to overcome evasion of apoptosis. We demonstrate TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) resistance in the majority of human colon cancers tested and utilize the glucose analog 2-deoxy-d-glucose to sensitize TRAIL-resistant gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma cells, and not normal gastrointestinal epithelial cells, to TRAIL-induced apoptosis through enhanced death receptor 5 expression, downstream modulation of MAPK signaling and subsequent miRNA expression modulation by increasing the expression of miR-494 via MEK activation. Further, established human colon cancer xenografts treated with this strategy experience anti-tumor responses. These findings in colon adenocarcinoma support further investigation of manipulation of cellular energetics to selectively overcome resistance to apoptosis and to impart tumor regressions in established colon cancer tumors.

  15. Pharmacokinetic studies of mouse monoclonal antibodies to a rat colon carcinoma: I. Comparison of biodistribution in normal rats, syngeneic tumor-bearing rats, or tumor-bearing nude mice

    SciTech Connect

    Laborda, J.; Douillard, J.Y.; Burg, C.; Lizzio, E.F.; Ridge, J.; Levenbook, I.; Hoffman, T. )

    1990-06-01

    The pharmacokinetics of two iodine-131-({sup 131}I) labeled murine anti-rat colon carcinoma monoclonal antibodies (D3 and E4) were compared in normal Sprague Dawley rats, syngeneic BDIX rats, or nude mice bearing that tumor. Results of antibody uptake after i.v. administration were analyzed in terms of accumulation and localization indices for normal tissues and tumor. Statistically significant differences between rat and mouse tissue biodistribution were found. D3, which reacts in vitro with the tumor and several normal rat tissues, cleared quickly from the blood of rats and was specifically targeted to several normal tissues, notably the lung. Virtually no targeting to the tumor was observed. Nude mice, however, showed a slower blood clearance and specific antibody targeting only in the tumor. Similar results were seen after injection of another antibody, E4, which is tumor-specific in vitro. Data suggest that studies on the xenogeneic nude mouse model may not necessarily be relevant to the choice of monoclonal antibodies for clinical diagnostic imaging or therapy.

  16. Upregulation of activin A gene by butyrate in human colon cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sonoyama, Kei; Pholnukulkit, Pimara; Toyoda, Masahiko; Rutatip, Suriya; Kasai, Takanori

    2003-06-01

    Activin A has been reported to play a role in the progression of colorectal cancer. Because dietary fiber protects against colorectal cancer, we hypothesized that butyrate, a fermentation product of dietary fiber, may affect the expression of activin A in colon cancer cells. Semiquantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that the activin A gene was upregulated by sodium butyrate in the human colon cancer cell lines HT-29 and Caco-2 in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. However, the activin A gene did not respond to sodium butyrate in the human normal colonic cell line FHC, rat normal intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) line IEC-6, and the explant of rat colon. Flow cytometry and agarose gel electrophoresis of genomic DNA revealed that cell cycle arrest and apoptosis were induced by sodium butyrate but not exogenous activin A in HT-29 cells, indicating that activin A could not act as an autocrine factor in colon cancer cells. By assuming that activin A promotes colorectal cancer spread as a paracrine factor, our findings suggest that butyrate could act as a tumor promoter in some circumstances.

  17. Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulate matrix metalloproteinase 1-dependent invasion of human colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Cheng, Kunrong; Saxena, Neeraj; Chahdi, Ahmed; Belo, Angelica; Khurana, Sandeep; Xie, Guofeng

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulated robust human colon cancer cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-matrix metalloproteinase1 antibody pre-treatment blocks cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bile acids stimulate MMP1 expression, cell migration and MMP1-dependent invasion. -- Abstract: Mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which degrade extracellular matrix facilitate colon cancer cell invasion into the bloodstream and extra-colonic tissues; in particular, MMP1 expression correlates strongly with advanced colon cancer stage, hematogenous metastasis and poor prognosis. Likewise, muscarinic receptor signaling plays an important role in colon cancer; muscarinic receptors are over-expressed in colon cancer compared to normal colon epithelial cells. Muscarinic receptor activation stimulates proliferation, migration and invasion of human colon cancer cells. In mouse intestinal neoplasia models genetic ablation of muscarinic receptors attenuates carcinogenesis. In the present work, we sought to link these observations by showing that MMP1 expression and activation plays a mechanistic role in muscarinic receptor agonist-induced colon cancer cell invasion. We show that acetylcholine, which robustly increases MMP1 expression, stimulates invasion of HT29 and H508 human colon cancer cells into human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers - this was abolished by pre-incubation with atropine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor inhibitor, and by pre-incubation with anti-MMP1 neutralizing antibody. Similar results were obtained using a Matrigel chamber assay and deoxycholyltaurine (DCT), an amidated dihydroxy bile acid associated with colon neoplasia in animal models and humans, and previously shown to interact functionally with muscarinic receptors. DCT treatment of human colon cancer cells resulted in time-dependent, 10-fold increased MMP1 expression, and DCT-induced cell invasion was also blocked by pre

  18. Treatment with novel AP-1 and NF-κB inhibitors restores the colonic endocrine cells to normal levels in rats with DSS-induced colitis

    PubMed Central

    EL-SALHY, MAGDY; UMEZAWA, KAZUO

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of two anti-inflammatory agents on the abnormalities in colonic endocrine cells in dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis. Colitis was induced in male Wistar rats (n=45) using DSS; a further 15 rats without colitis were included in a healthy control group. The animals with DSS-induced colitis were randomly divided into 3 treatment groups as follows: i) DSS group, rats were treated with 0.5 ml of 0.5% carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC); ii) DSS-G group, rats were treated with 3-[(dodecyl thiocarbonyl)-methyl]-glutarimide (DTCM-G), a novel activator protein 1 (AP-1) inhibitor, 20 mg/kg in CMC; and iii) DSS-Q group, rats were treated with dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin, a nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) inhibitor, 15 mg/kg in CMC. The treatments were administered intraperitoneally, twice daily for 5 days, after which the animals were sacrificed and tissue samples from the colon were immunostained for chromogranin A (CgA), serotonin, peptide YY (PYY), enteroglucagon, pancreatic polypeptide (PP), somatostatin, leukocytes, B/T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, T lymphocytes, macrophages/monocytes and mast cells. The densities of these endocrine and immune cells were quantified by computer-aided image analysis. The densities of CgA-, serotonin-, PYY- and enteroglucagon-producing cells were significantly higher, and those of PP- and somatostatin-producing cells were significantly lower in the DSS-G, DSS-Q and control groups than in the DSS group. The densities of all the immune cells were lower in the DSS-G, DSS-Q and control groups than in the DSS group. The densities of all endocrine cell types and immune cells in both the DSS groups treated with anti-inflammatory agents were restored to control levels. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that there is an interaction between endocrine and immune cells during inflammation. This interaction with subsequent changes in endocrine cells is responsible for the clinical manifestation of

  19. Treatment with novel AP-1 and NF-κB inhibitors restores the colonic endocrine cells to normal levels in rats with DSS-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Umezawa, Kazuo

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of two anti-inflammatory agents on the abnormalities in colonic endocrine cells in dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis. Colitis was induced in male Wistar rats (n=45) using DSS; a further 15 rats without colitis were included in a healthy control group. The animals with DSS-induced colitis were randomly divided into 3 treatment groups as follows: i) DSS group, rats were treated with 0.5 ml of 0.5% carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC); ii) DSS‑G group, rats were treated with 3-[(dodecylthiocarbonyl)‑methyl]‑glutarimide (DTCM‑G), a novel activator protein 1 (AP-1) inhibitor, 20 mg/kg in CMC; and iii) DSS‑Q group, rats were treated with dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin, a nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) inhibitor, 15 mg/kg in CMC. The treatments were administered intraperitoneally, twice daily for 5 days, after which the animals were sacrificed and tissue samples from the colon were immunostained for chromogranin A (CgA), serotonin, peptide YY (PYY), enteroglucagon, pancreatic polypeptide (PP), somatostatin, leukocytes, B/T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, T lymphocytes, macrophages/monocytes and mast cells. The densities of these endocrine and immune cells were quantified by computer‑aided image analysis. The densities of CgA-, serotonin-, PYY- and enteroglucagon-producing cells were significantly higher, and those of PP- and somatostatin-producing cells were significantly lower in the DSS‑G, DSS‑Q and control groups than in the DSS group. The densities of all the immune cells were lower in the DSS‑G, DSS‑Q and control groups than in the DSS group. The densities of all endocrine cell types and immune cells in both the DSS groups treated with anti‑inflammatory agents were restored to control levels. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that there is an interaction between endocrine and immune cells during inflammation. This interaction with subsequent changes in endocrine cells is responsible for the

  20. Autonomous cure of damaged human intestinal epithelial cells by TLR2 and TLR4-dependent production of IL-22 in response to Spirulina polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Akira; Konishi, Yuko; Taguchi, Takahiro; Fukuoka, Satoshi; Kawaguchi, Tokuichi; Noda, Tetsuo; Shimizu, Keiji

    2013-12-01

    In order to analyze the damage of human epithelial cells, we used human quasi-normal FPCK-1-1 cells derived from a colonic polyp in a patient with familial adenomatous polyposis as a monolayer, which is co-cultured with peptidoglycan (PGN)-stimulated THP-1 cells. Co-cultured FPCK-1-1 cells showed a decreased transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and the lower level of claudin-2. When Spirulina complex polysaccharides were added one day before the start of the co-culture, there was no decrease of TER and claudin-2 (early phase damage). In contrast, when Spirulina complex polysaccharides were added to FPCK-1-1 cells after the level of TER had decreased, there was no recovery at the level of claudin-2, though the TER level recovered (late phase damage). The mucosa reconstitution is suggested to be involved in the recovery from the damaged status. Interestingly, autonomous recovery of FPCK-1-1 cells from both the early and late phase damage requires the production of IL-22, because anti-IL-22 antibodies inhibited recovery in these cases. Antibodies against either TLR2 or TLR4 inhibited the production of IL-22 from FPCK-1-1 colon epithelial cells, suggesting that signals through TLR2 and TLR4 are necessary for autonomous recovery of FPCK-1-1 colon epithelial cells by producing IL-22. In conclusion, we have established a useful model for the study of intestinal damage and recovery using human colon epithelial cells and our data suggest that damage to human colon epithelial cells can, at least in part, be recovered by the autonomous production of IL-22 in response to Spirulina complex polysaccharides. PMID:24126111

  1. "Cat scratch colon" in a patient with ischemic colitis.

    PubMed

    Park, Eui Ju; Lee, Joon Seong; Lee, Tae Hee; Choi, Dae Han; Kim, Eui Bae; Jeon, Seong Ran; Hong, Su Jin; Kim, Jin-Oh

    2015-03-01

    "Cat scratch colon" is a gross finding characterized by hemorrhagic mucosal scratches on colonoscopy. It is usually associated with a normal colon and is rarely associated with collagenous colitis. In a previous report, cat scratch colon was noted in the cecum and ascending colon, but has also been observed in the distal transverse colon. The patient in this study was also diagnosed with ischemic colitis that may have played a role in the development of cat scratch colon.

  2. MiR-34a inhibits colon cancer proliferation and metastasis by inhibiting platelet-derived growth factor receptor α.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunyan; Wang, Yulin; Lu, Shuming; Zhang, Zhuqing; Meng, Hua; Liang, Lina; Zhang, Yan; Song, Bo

    2015-11-01

    The microRNA (miRNA), miR‑34a is significant in colon cancer progression. In the present study, the role of miR‑34a in colon cancer cell proliferation and metastasis was investigated. It was found that the expression of miR‑34a in colon cancer tissues and cell lines was lower when compared with that of normal tissues and cells. Further research demonstrated that miR‑34a inhibited cell proliferation, induced G1 phase arrest, and suppressed metastasis and epithelial mesenchymal transition in colon cancer cells. Bioinformatic prediction indicated that platelet‑derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRA) was a potential target gene of miR‑34a and a luciferase assay identified that PDGFRA was a novel direct target gene of miR‑34a. In addition, assays of western blot analyses and quantitative reverse‑transcription polymerase chain reaction confirmed that miR‑34a decreased PDGFRA mRNA expression and protein levels in colon cancer cells. Assessment of cellular function indicated that miR‑34a inhibited colon cancer progression via PDGFRA. These findings demonstrate that miR‑34a may act as a negative regulator in colon cancer by targeting PDGFRA.

  3. Metastatic Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Massagué, Joan; Obenauf, Anna C.

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the main cause of death from cancer. To colonize distant organs, circulating cancer cells must overcome many obstacles through mechanisms that we are starting to understand. Infiltrating distant tissue, evading immune defences, adapting to supportive niches, surviving as latent tumour-initiating seeds, and eventually breaking out to replace the host tissue, are key steps for metastatic colonization. These obstacles make metastasis a highly inefficient process, but once metastases are established current treatments frequently fail to provide durable responses. A better understanding of the mechanistic determinants of metastatic colonization is needed to better prevent and treat metastatic cancer. PMID:26791720

  4. EVALUATION OF THE CYTOTOXICITY OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS (DBPS): TRIHALOMETHANES (THMS), HALONITROMETHANES (HNMS), AND HALOACETIC ACIDS (HAAS) IN NORMAL HUMAN COLON CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies have linked the consumption of chlorinated surface waters to an increased risk of colorectal cancer. THMs and HAAs were found to increase cancer in laboratory animals, but no toxicity studies exist for the recently identified HNMs. Normal Human colonocytes...

  5. Autophagy Protects against Colitis by the Maintenance of Normal Gut Microflora and Secretion of Mucus*

    PubMed Central

    Tsuboi, Koichiro; Nishitani, Mayo; Takakura, Atsushi; Imai, Yasuyuki; Komatsu, Masaaki; Kawashima, Hiroto

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies of inflammatory bowel diseases identified susceptible loci containing an autophagy-related gene. However, the role of autophagy in the colon, a major affected area in inflammatory bowel diseases, is not clear. Here, we show that colonic epithelial cell-specific autophagy-related gene 7 (Atg7) conditional knock-out (cKO) mice showed exacerbation of experimental colitis with more abundant bacterial invasion into the colonic epithelium. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that cKO mice had abnormal microflora with an increase of some genera. Consistently, expression of antimicrobial or antiparasitic peptides such as angiogenin-4, Relmβ, intelectin-1, and intelectin-2 as well as that of their inducer cytokines was significantly reduced in the cKO mice. Furthermore, secretion of colonic mucins that function as a mucosal barrier against bacterial invasion was also significantly diminished in cKO mice. Taken together, our results indicate that autophagy in colonic epithelial cells protects against colitis by the maintenance of normal gut microflora and secretion of mucus. PMID:26149685

  6. Autophagy Protects against Colitis by the Maintenance of Normal Gut Microflora and Secretion of Mucus.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Koichiro; Nishitani, Mayo; Takakura, Atsushi; Imai, Yasuyuki; Komatsu, Masaaki; Kawashima, Hiroto

    2015-08-14

    Genome-wide association studies of inflammatory bowel diseases identified susceptible loci containing an autophagy-related gene. However, the role of autophagy in the colon, a major affected area in inflammatory bowel diseases, is not clear. Here, we show that colonic epithelial cell-specific autophagy-related gene 7 (Atg7) conditional knock-out (cKO) mice showed exacerbation of experimental colitis with more abundant bacterial invasion into the colonic epithelium. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that cKO mice had abnormal microflora with an increase of some genera. Consistently, expression of antimicrobial or antiparasitic peptides such as angiogenin-4, Relmβ, intelectin-1, and intelectin-2 as well as that of their inducer cytokines was significantly reduced in the cKO mice. Furthermore, secretion of colonic mucins that function as a mucosal barrier against bacterial invasion was also significantly diminished in cKO mice. Taken together, our results indicate that autophagy in colonic epithelial cells protects against colitis by the maintenance of normal gut microflora and secretion of mucus.

  7. Distinct transcriptome profiles identified in normal human bronchial epithelial cells after exposure to γ-rays and different elemental particles of high Z and energy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ionizing radiation composed of accelerated ions of high atomic number (Z) and energy (HZE) deposits energy and creates damage in cells in a discrete manner as compared to the random deposition of energy and damage seen with low energy radiations such as γ- or x-rays. Such radiations can be highly effective at cell killing, transformation, and oncogenesis, all of which are concerns for the manned space program and for the burgeoning field of HZE particle radiotherapy for cancer. Furthermore, there are differences in the extent to which cells or tissues respond to such exposures that may be unrelated to absorbed dose. Therefore, we asked whether the energy deposition patterns produced by different radiation types would cause different molecular responses. We performed transcriptome profiling using human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) after exposure to γ-rays and to two different HZE particles (28Si and 56Fe) with different energy transfer properties to characterize the molecular response to HZE particles and γ-rays as a function of dose, energy deposition pattern, and time post-irradiation. Results Clonogenic assay indicated that the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for 56Fe was 3.91 and for 28Si was 1.38 at 34% cell survival. Unsupervised clustering analysis of gene expression segregated samples according to the radiation species followed by the time after irradiation, whereas dose was not a significant parameter for segregation of radiation response. While a subset of genes associated with p53-signaling, such as CDKN1A, TRIM22 and BTG2 showed very similar responses to all radiation qualities, distinct expression changes were associated with the different radiation species. Gene enrichment analysis categorized the differentially expressed genes into functional groups related to cell death and cell cycle regulation for all radiation types, while gene pathway analysis revealed that the pro-inflammatory Acute Phase Response Signaling was

  8. Identification of biomarkers of radioresponse and subsequent progression towards lung cancer in normal human bronchial epithelial cells after HZE particle irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Story, Michael; Ding, Liang-Hao; Park, Seongmi; Minna, John

    Using variants of a non-oncogenically immortalized human bronchial epithelial cell line HBEC3-KT, we have examined global gene expression patterns after low and high LET irradiation up to 24h post-IR. Using supervised analyses we have identified 427 genes whoes expression can be used to discriminate the cellular response to γ-vs Si or Fe particles even when the biological outcome, cell death, is equivalent. Furthermore, genetic background also determines gene expression response. When HBEC3-KT is compared to the HBEC3-KT cells line where mutant k-RAS is over-expressed and p53 has been knocked down, HBEC-3KTr53, principal component analysis clearly shows that the response of each cell resides in a different 3-D space, that is, basal gene expression patterns as well as the gene expression response are unique to each cell type. Using regression analysis to examine these 427 genes show clusters of genes whose temporal expression patterns are the same and which are unique to a given radiation type. Ultimately, this approach will allow for the interrogation of gene promoters to identify response elements that drive how cells respond to different radiation types. We are extending our examination to O particles and are now examining gene expression as a function of beam quality. We have made substantial progress in the determination of cellular transformation by HZE particles for these cell lines. (Transformation as defined by the ability to grow in soft agar.) For HBEC-3KT, the spontaneous transformation frequency is about 10- 7.ExposuretoeitherF eorSiparticlesinc KT r53celllinedidnotshowanyincreaseintransf ormationf requencyaf terdosesof upto1Gy, however, thesp 3KT.W ehavenowisolatedover160individualf ocithatf ormedinsof tagarf romcellculturesthatwereirradia termcultureandthenre-introducedintosof tagartoassurethattheabilitytogrowinsof tagarisclonal.T odatew 30 With these cell isolates in hand we will begin to determine tumorigenicity by subcutaneous injections in nude

  9. Boletus edulis biologically active biopolymers induce cell cycle arrest in human colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lemieszek, Marta Kinga; Cardoso, Claudia; Ferreira Milheiro Nunes, Fernando Hermínio; Ramos Novo Amorim de Barros, Ana Isabel; Marques, Guilhermina; Pożarowski, Piotr; Rzeski, Wojciech

    2013-04-25

    The use of biologically active compounds isolated from edible mushrooms against cancer raises global interest. Anticancer properties are mainly attributed to biopolymers including mainly polysaccharides, polysaccharopeptides, polysaccharide proteins, glycoproteins and proteins. In spite of the fact that Boletus edulis is one of the widely occurring and most consumed edible mushrooms, antitumor biopolymers isolated from it have not been exactly defined and studied so far. The present study is an attempt to extend this knowledge on molecular mechanisms of their anticancer action. The mushroom biopolymers (polysaccharides and glycoproteins) were extracted with hot water and purified by anion-exchange chromatography. The antiproliferative activity in human colon adenocarcinoma cells (LS180) was screened by means of MTT and BrdU assays. At the same time fractions' cytotoxicity was examined on the human colon epithelial cells (CCD 841 CoTr) by means of the LDH assay. Flow cytometry and Western blotting were applied to cell cycle analysis and protein expression involved in anticancer activity of the selected biopolymer fraction. In vitro studies have shown that fractions isolated from Boletus edulis were not toxic against normal colon epithelial cells and in the same concentration range elicited a very prominent antiproliferative effect in colon cancer cells. The best results were obtained in the case of the fraction designated as BE3. The tested compound inhibited cancer cell proliferation which was accompanied by cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1-phase. Growth inhibition was associated with modulation of the p16/cyclin D1/CDK4-6/pRb pathway, an aberration of which is a critical step in the development of many human cancers including colon cancer. Our results indicate that a biopolymer BE3 from Boletus edulis possesses anticancer potential and may provide a new therapeutic/preventive option in colon cancer chemoprevention.

  10. TFF3 is a normal breast epithelial protein and is associated with differentiated phenotype in early breast cancer but predisposes to invasion and metastasis in advanced disease.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ahmed R H; Griffiths, Andrew B; Tilby, Michael T; Westley, Bruce R; May, Felicity E B

    2012-03-01

    The trefoil protein TFF3 stimulates invasion and angiogenesis in vitro. To determine whether it has a role in breast tumor metastasis and angiogenesis, its levels were measured by immunohistochemistry in breast tissue with a specific monoclonal antibody raised against human TFF3. TFF3 is expressed in normal breast lobules and ducts, at higher levels in areas of fibrocystic change and papillomas, in all benign breast disease lesions, and in 89% of in situ and in 83% of invasive carcinomas. In well-differentiated tumor cells, TFF3 is concentrated at the luminal edge, whereas in poorly differentiated cells polarity is inverted and expression is directed toward the stroma. Expression was high in well-differentiated tumors and was associated significantly with low histological grade and with estrogen and progesterone receptor expression, accordant with induction of TFF3 mRNA by estrogen in breast cancer cells. Paradoxically, TFF3 expression was associated with muscle, neural, and lymphovascular invasion and the presence and number of involved lymph nodes, and it was an independent predictive marker of lymphovascular invasion and lymph node involvement. Consistent with an angiogenic function, TFF3 expression correlated strongly with microvessel density evaluated with CD31 and CD34. In conclusion, TFF3 is expressed in both the normal and diseased breast. Although associated with features of good prognosis, its profile of expression in invasive cancer is consistent with a role in breast tumor progression and tumor cell dissemination.

  11. White tea (Camellia sinensis) inhibits proliferation of the colon cancer cell line, HT-29, activates caspases and protects DNA of normal cells against oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Hajiaghaalipour, Fatemeh; Kanthimathi, M S; Sanusi, Junedah; Rajarajeswaran, Jayakumar

    2015-02-15

    Tea (Camellia sinensis) is one of the most consumed beverages in the world. White tea is made from the buds and young leaves of the tea plant which are steamed and dried, whilst undergoing minimal oxidation. The MTT assay was used to test the extract on the effect of the proliferation of the colorectal cancer cell line, HT-29. The extract inhibited the proliferation of HT-29 cells with an IC50 of 87μg/ml. The extract increased the levels of caspase-3, -8, and -9 activity in the cells. DNA damage in 3T3-L1 normal cells was detected by using the comet assay. The extract protected 3T3-L1 cells against H2O2-induced DNA damage. The results from this study show that white tea has antioxidant and antiproliferative effects against cancer cells, but protect normal cells against DNA damage. Regular intake of white tea can help to maintain good health and protect the body against disease.

  12. Human fetal colon cells and colon cancer cells respond differently to butyrate and PUFAs.

    PubMed

    Hofmanová, Jirina; Vaculová, Alena; Koubková, Zuzana; Hýzd'alová, Martina; Kozubík, Alois

    2009-05-01

    We verified the hypothesis suggesting modulation of the effects of sodium butyrate (NaBt) by omega-3 or omega-6 PUFAs. Comparing the response of human colon epithelial cell lines of fetal (FHC) and adenocarcinoma (HT-29, HCT-116) origin, we detected significant differences in proliferation, differentiation and apoptotic response to the treatment of NaBt, arachidonic or docosahexaenoic acids and their combination. While in FHC and HT-29 cells NaBt induced G0/G1 arrest, differentiation and low level of apoptosis, in HCT-116 cells G2/M arrest, no differentiation and high degree of apoptosis were detected. Moreover, in FHC cells significant potentiation of apoptosis accompanied by increased arrest in the cell cycle, cell detachment and decrease in differentiation were detected after combined treatment with NaBt and both PUFAs. Changes in cytokinetics induced by fatty acids were accompanied by membrane lipid unpacking, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Detection of caspase-3 activation and dynamic modulation of Mcl-1 protein expression imply their possible role in both cell differentiation and apoptotic response. Our results support the concept of modulation of NaBt effects by PUFAs, especially of omega-3 type, in colonic cells in vitro with diverse impact in cell lines derived from normal or neoplastic epithelium.

  13. Colonic mucin synthesis is increased by sodium butyrate.

    PubMed

    Finnie, I A; Dwarakanath, A D; Taylor, B A; Rhodes, J M

    1995-01-01

    The effects of sodium butyrate and sodium bromo-octanoate (an inhibitor of beta oxidation) on colonic mucus glycoprotein (mucin) synthesis have been assessed using tissue from colonic resection samples. Epithelial biopsy specimens were incubated for 16 hours in RPMI 1640 with glutamine, supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum and N-acetyl-[3H]-glucosamine ([3H]-Glc NAc), and differing concentrations of sodium butyrate. Incorporation of [3H] Glc NAc into mucin by normal epithelium at least 10 cm distant from colonic cancer was increased in the presence of sodium butyrate in a dose dependent manner, with maximum effect (476%) at a concentration of 0.1 mM (number of specimens = 24 from six patients, p < 0.001). The increase in response to butyrate was not seen when specimens were incubated in the presence of the beta oxidation inhibitor sodium bromo-octanoate 0.05 M. The striking increase in mucin synthesis that results when butyrate is added to standard nutrient medium suggests that this may be an important mechanism affecting the rate of mucin synthesis in vivo and may also explain the therapeutic effect of butyrate in colitis. PMID:7890244

  14. Colonic mucin synthesis is increased by sodium butyrate.

    PubMed

    Finnie, I A; Dwarakanath, A D; Taylor, B A; Rhodes, J M

    1995-01-01

    The effects of sodium butyrate and sodium bromo-octanoate (an inhibitor of beta oxidation) on colonic mucus glycoprotein (mucin) synthesis have been assessed using tissue from colonic resection samples. Epithelial biopsy specimens were incubated for 16 hours in RPMI 1640 with glutamine, supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum and N-acetyl-[3H]-glucosamine ([3H]-Glc NAc), and differing concentrations of sodium butyrate. Incorporation of [3H] Glc NAc into mucin by normal epithelium at least 10 cm distant from colonic cancer was increased in the presence of sodium butyrate in a dose dependent manner, with maximum effect (476%) at a concentration of 0.1 mM (number of specimens = 24 from six patients, p < 0.001). The increase in response to butyrate was not seen when specimens were incubated in the presence of the beta oxidation inhibitor sodium bromo-octanoate 0.05 M. The striking increase in mucin synthesis that results when butyrate is added to standard nutrient medium suggests that this may be an important mechanism affecting the rate of mucin synthesis in vivo and may also explain the therapeutic effect of butyrate in colitis.

  15. Neisseria meningitidis Lactate Permease Is Required for Nasopharyngeal Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Exley, Rachel M.; Goodwin, Linda; Mowe, Eva; Shaw, Jonathan; Smith, Harry; Read, Robert C.; Tang, Christoph M.

    2005-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a human specific pathogen that is part of the normal nasopharyngeal flora. Little is known about the metabolic constraints on survival of the meningococcus during colonization of the upper airways. Here we show that glucose and lactate, both carbon energy sources for meningococcal growth, are present in millimolar concentrations within nasopharyngeal tissue. We used a mutant defective for the uptake of lactate (C311ΔlctP) to investigate the contribution of this energy source during colonization. Explants of nasopharyngeal tissue were inoculated with the wild-type strain (C311) and C311ΔlctP; the mutant was recovered at significantly lower levels (P = 0.01) than C311 18 h later. This defect was not due to changes in the expression of adhesins or initial adhesion in C311ΔlctP to epithelial cells. Instead, lactate appears to be important energy source for the bacterium during colonization and is necessary for growth of the bacterium in nasopharyngeal tissue. Studies with other strains defective for the uptake of specific nutrients should provide valuable information about the environment in which N. meningitidis persists during carriage. PMID:16113293

  16. Murine breast carcinoma 4T1 cells are more sensitive to atranorin than normal epithelial NMuMG cells in vitro: Anticancer and hepatoprotective effects of atranorin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Solár, Peter; Hrčková, Gabriela; Koptašíková, Lenka; Velebný, Samuel; Solárová, Zuzana; Bačkor, Martin

    2016-04-25

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the anticancer effect of atranorin (ATR) on murine 4T1 breast carcinoma cells and compare its sensitivity with normal mammary epithelial NMuMG cells in vitro. Anti-tumor and hepatoprotective activity of ATR-therapy was examined on mouse model of 4T1-induced cancer disease. ATR significantly reduced clonogenic ability of carcinoma 4T1 cells at the concentration of 75 μM, but clonogenicity of normal NMuMG cells was not affected by any of ATR concentrations tested. Moreover, flow cytometric and BrdU incorporation analysis did not confirm the inhibited entry into S-phase of the cell cyle after ATR incubation, and on the contrary, it induced apoptosis associated with the activation of caspase-3 and PARP cleavage in 4T1 cells. Although ATR did not cause any significant changes in Bcl-xL protein expression in NMuMG cells, an apparent depletion of Bcl-xL protein in 4T1 cells after 48 h ATR therapy was confirmed. Based on this result as well as the result of the total cell number decline, we can conclude that 4T1 cells are more sensitive to ATR therapy than NMuMG cells. ATR administration resulted in significantly longer survival time of BALB/c mice inoculated with 4T1 cells, what was associated with reduced tumor size and the higher numbers of apoptotic 4T1 cells. No differences were recorded in the number of BrdU-positive tumor cells between ATR-treated group and controls. Results indicate that ATR has rather proapoptotic than antiproliferative effect on 4T1 cells in vitro and in vivo and normal NMuMG cells are less sensitive to ATR. Furthermore, our studies revealed protective effect of ATR against oxidative stress in the livers of the tumor-bearing mice. PMID:26969521

  17. Murine breast carcinoma 4T1 cells are more sensitive to atranorin than normal epithelial NMuMG cells in vitro: Anticancer and hepatoprotective effects of atranorin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Solár, Peter; Hrčková, Gabriela; Koptašíková, Lenka; Velebný, Samuel; Solárová, Zuzana; Bačkor, Martin

    2016-04-25

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the anticancer effect of atranorin (ATR) on murine 4T1 breast carcinoma cells and compare its sensitivity with normal mammary epithelial NMuMG cells in vitro. Anti-tumor and hepatoprotective activity of ATR-therapy was examined on mouse model of 4T1-induced cancer disease. ATR significantly reduced clonogenic ability of carcinoma 4T1 cells at the concentration of 75 μM, but clonogenicity of normal NMuMG cells was not affected by any of ATR concentrations tested. Moreover, flow cytometric and BrdU incorporation analysis did not confirm the inhibited entry into S-phase of the cell cyle after ATR incubation, and on the contrary, it induced apoptosis associated with the activation of caspase-3 and PARP cleavage in 4T1 cells. Although ATR did not cause any significant changes in Bcl-xL protein expression in NMuMG cells, an apparent depletion of Bcl-xL protein in 4T1 cells after 48 h ATR therapy was confirmed. Based on this result as well as the result of the total cell number decline, we can conclude that 4T1 cells are more sensitive to ATR therapy than NMuMG cells. ATR administration resulted in significantly longer survival time of BALB/c mice inoculated with 4T1 cells, what was associated with reduced tumor size and the higher numbers of apoptotic 4T1 cells. No differences were recorded in the number of BrdU-positive tumor cells between ATR-treated group and controls. Results indicate that ATR has rather proapoptotic than antiproliferative effect on 4T1 cells in vitro and in vivo and normal NMuMG cells are less sensitive to ATR. Furthermore, our studies revealed protective effect of ATR against oxidative stress in the livers of the tumor-bearing mice.

  18. Laser-capture microdissection of oropharyngeal epithelium indicates restriction of Epstein-Barr virus receptor/CD21 mRNA to tonsil epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ru; Gu, Xin; Nathan, Cherie-Ann; Hutt-Fletcher, Lindsey

    2008-01-01

    Background: Epstein-Barr virus colonizes the oropharynx of a majority of individuals. It infects B lymphocytes and epithelial cells and can contribute to the development of both lymphoid and epithelial tumors. The virus uses CD21 for attachment to B cells which constitutively express the protein. Infection of epithelial cells in vitro is also more efficient if CD21 is available. However, its potential contribution to infection in vivo has been difficult to evaluate as discrepant results with antibodies have made it difficult to determine which, if any, epithelial cells in the oropharynx express CD21. Methods: To reevaluate CD21 expression by an alternative method, epithelial cells were isolated by laser-capture microdissection from formalin-fixed sections of tissues from various parts of the oropharynx and mRNA was amplified with primers specific for the exons of CD21 which code for the Epstein-Barr virus binding site. Results: CD21 mRNA was expressed in tonsil epithelium, but not in epithelium from buccal mucosa, uvula, soft palate or tongue. Conclusions: CD21 does not contribute to infection of most normal epithelial tissues in the oropharynx, but may contribute to infection of epithelial cells in the tonsil, where virus has been demonstrated in healthy carriers. PMID:18710421

  19. Potential Role of Epithelial Cell-Derived Histone H1 Proteins in Innate Antimicrobial Defense in the Human Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Rose, F. R. A. J.; Bailey, K.; Keyte, J. W.; Chan, W. C.; Greenwood, D.; Mahida, Y. R.

    1998-01-01

    In the human gastrointestinal tract, microorganisms are present in large numbers in the colon but are sparse in the proximal small intestine. In this study, we have shown that acid extracts of fresh human terminal ileal mucosal samples mediate antimicrobial activity. Following cation-exchange chromatography, one of the eluted fractions demonstrated antibacterial activity against bacteria normally resident in the human colonic lumen. This activity was further fractionated by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and identified as histone H1 and its fragments. We have also shown that in tissue sections, immunoreactive histone H1 is present in the cytoplasm of villus epithelial cells. In vitro culturing of detached (from the basement membrane) villus epithelial cells led to the release of antimicrobial histone H1 proteins, while the cells demonstrated ultrastructural features of programmed cell death. Our studies suggest that cytoplasmic histone H1 may provide protection against penetration by microorganisms into villus epithelial cells. Moreover, intestinal epithelial cells released into the lumen may mediate antimicrobial activity by releasing histone H1 proteins and their fragments. PMID:9632593

  20. Glycosylation and sulphation of colonic mucus glycoproteins in patients with ulcerative colitis and in healthy subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Morita, H; Kettlewell, M G; Jewell, D P; Kent, P W

    1993-01-01

    Studies have been made of mucus glycoprotein biosynthesis in different regions of the lower gastrointestinal tract in normal patients and those with ulcerative colitis (UC), active or inactive, by means of 3H-glucosamine (3H-GlcNH2)--35S-sulphate double labelling of epithelial biopsy specimens under culture conditions. The time based rate of 3H-GlcNH2 labelling of mucus in rectal tissue was similar to that in active or inactive UC whereas the rate of 35SO4(2) labelling was significantly increased in active disease. The 3H specific activities measuring the amount of isotopic incorporation into surface and tissue mucus glycoproteins were increased in patients with active UC compared with normal or inactive subjects. The 35S specific activities did not differ significantly between patients with active UC and those in remission. In the rectum, glycosylation of mucus glycoproteins decreases with the increasing age of the patient. Regional differences in 3H-labelling of mucus components are reported for ascending colon, transverse colon, sigmoid colon, and rectum. Sulphation (35S-labelling) was higher in all parts of the colon in left sided UC. Results point to accelerated glycosylation of core proteins in the active phase of UC. PMID:8344580

  1. Space colonization.

    PubMed

    2002-12-01

    NASA interest in colonization encompasses space tourism; space exploration; space bases in orbit, at L1, on the Moon, or on Mars; in-situ resource utilization; and planetary terraforming. Activities progressed during 2002 in areas such as Mars colonies, hoppers, and biomass; space elevators and construction; and in-situ consumables.

  2. Space colonization.

    PubMed

    2002-12-01

    NASA interest in colonization encompasses space tourism; space exploration; space bases in orbit, at L1, on the Moon, or on Mars; in-situ resource utilization; and planetary terraforming. Activities progressed during 2002 in areas such as Mars colonies, hoppers, and biomass; space elevators and construction; and in-situ consumables. PMID:12506926

  3. Retinal pigment epithelial cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Temple, Sally

    2015-01-01

    The human retinal pigment epithelium forms early in development and subsequently remains dormant, undergoing minimal proliferation throughout normal life. Retinal pigment epithelium proliferation, however, can be activated in disease states or by removing retinal pigment epithelial cells into culture. We review the conditions that control retinal pigment epithelial proliferation in culture, in animal models and in human disease and interpret retinal pigment epithelium proliferation in context of the recently discovered retinal pigment epithelium stem cell that is responsible for most in vitro retinal pigment epithelial proliferation. Retinal pigment epithelial proliferation-mediated wound repair that occurs in selected macular diseases is contrasted with retinal pigment epithelial proliferation-mediated fibroblastic scar formation that underlies proliferative vitreoretinopathy. We discuss the role of retinal pigment epithelial proliferation in age-related macular degeneration which is reparative in some cases and destructive in others. Macular retinal pigment epithelium wound repair and regression of choroidal neovascularization are more pronounced in younger than older patients. We discuss the possibility that the limited retinal pigment epithelial proliferation and latent wound repair in older age-related macular degeneration patients can be stimulated to promote disease regression in age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26041390

  4. Berry Phenolic Compounds Increase Expression of Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor-1α (HNF-1α) in Caco-2 and Normal Colon Cells Due to High Affinities with Transcription and Dimerization Domains of HNF-1α.

    PubMed

    Real Hernandez, Luis M; Fan, Junfeng; Johnson, Michelle H; Gonzalez de Mejia, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor-1α (HNF-1α) is found in the kidneys, spleen, thymus, testis, skin, and throughout the digestive organs. It has been found to promote the transcription of various proteins involved in the management of type II diabetes, including dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV). Phenolic compounds from berries and citrus fruits are known to inhibit DPP-IV, but have not been tested for their interactions with wild-type HNF-1α. By studying the interactions of compounds from berries and citrus fruits have with HNF-1α, pre-transcriptional mechanisms that inhibit the expression of proteins such as DPP-IV may be elucidated. In this study, the interactions of berry phenolic compounds and citrus flavonoids with the dimerization and transcriptional domains of HNF-1α were characterized using the molecular docking program AutoDock Vina. The anthocyanin delphinidin-3-O-arabinoside had the highest binding affinity for the dimerization domain as a homodimer (-7.2 kcal/mol) and transcription domain (-8.3 kcal/mol) of HNF-1α. Anthocyanins and anthocyanidins had relatively higher affinities than resveratrol and citrus flavonoids for both, the transcription domain and the dimerization domain as a homodimer. The flavonoid flavone had the highest affinity for a single unit of the dimerization domain (-6.5 kcal/mol). Nuclear expression of HNF-1α was measured in Caco-2 and human normal colon cells treated with blueberry and blackberry anthocyanin extracts. All extracts tested increased significantly (P < 0.05) the nuclear expression of HNF-1α in Caco-2 cells by 85.2 to 260% compared to a control. The extracts tested increased significantly (P < 0.02) the nuclear expression of HNF-1α in normal colon cells by 48.6 to 243%. It was confirmed that delphinidin-3-O-glucoside increased by 3-fold nuclear HNF-1α expression in Caco-2 cells (P < 0.05). Anthocyanins significantly increased nuclear HNF-1α expression, suggesting that these compounds might regulate the genes HNF-1

  5. Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts in a Human HEp-2 Established Laryngeal Xenografted Tumor Are Not Derived from Cancer Cells through Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition, Phenotypically Activated but Karyotypically Normal

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mei; Wu, Chun-Ping; Pan, Jun-Yan; Zheng, Wen-Wei; Cao, Xiao-Juan; Fan, Guo-Kang

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play a crucial role in cancer progression and even initiation. However, the origins of CAFs in various cancer types remain controversial, and one of the important hypothesized origins is through epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) from cancer cells. In this study, we investigated whether the HEp-2 laryngeal cancer cells are able to generate CAFs via EMT during tumor formation, which is now still unknown. The laryngeal xenografted tumor model was established by inoculating the HEp-2 laryngeal cancer cell line in nude mice. Primary cultured CAFs from the tumor nodules and matched normal fibroblasts (NFs) from the adjacent connective tissues were subcultured, purified, and verified by immunofluorescence. Migration, invasion, and proliferation potentials were compared between the CAFs and NFs. A co-culture of CAFs with HEp-2 cells and a co-injection of CAFs with HEp-2 cells in nude mice were performed to examine the cancer-promoting potential of CAFs to further verify their identity. Karyotypic analyses of the CAFs, NFs, and HEp-2 cells were conducted. A co-culture of NFs with HEp-2 cells was also performed to examine the expression of activated markers of CAFs. A pathological examination confirmed that the laryngeal xenografted tumor model was successfully established, containing abundant CAFs. Immunocytochemical staining verified the purities and identities of the CAFs and NFs. Although the CAFs manifested higher migration, invasion, proliferation, and cancer-promoting capacities compared with the NFs, an analysis of chromosomes revealed that both the CAFs and NFs showed typical normal mouse karyotypes. In addition, the NFs co-cultured with HEp-2 cells did not show induced expressions of activated markers of CAFs. Our findings reveal that the CAFs in the HEp-2 established laryngeal xenografted tumor are not of laryngeal cancer origin but of mouse origin, indicating that the HEp-2 laryngeal cancer cells cannot generate their

  6. Interleukin 8 secretion by colonic crypt cells in vitro: response to injury suppressed by butyrate and enhanced in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, P; Rosella, O

    1995-01-01

    Epithelia from several sites exhibit inducible secretion of interleukin 8 (IL-8). This study aimed to characterise secretion of IL-8 by colonic epithelial cells in vitro. Colonic crypt cells were isolated enzymatically from resected colon and the IL-8 content of culture supernates was measured by ELISA. The rate of secretion of IL-8 accelerated and levels of IL-8 transcripts increased appreciably during culture. Exposure to tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) failed to increase secretion further. Secretion was not induced by the enzymatic digestion or by serum used in the culture medium but was significantly inhibited by butyrate, by a mean of 23%. Control experiments indicated that colonic crypt cells were the likely source. The secretion of IL-8 over 24 hours by cells from uninflamed mucosa of patients with ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease was more than twofold that from normal cells, while that from cancer bearing colons was normal. TNF alpha (10 mM) significantly suppressed IL-8 secretion only in the ulcerative colitis group and the change was different to those in the normal (p = 0.007) and Crohn's disease groups (p = 0.012). Cells from inflamed areas secreted more IL-8 than those from autologous uninflamed areas (p = 0.009) but responses to modulating factors were no different. The induction of IL-8 secretion by colonic crypt cells in vitro is probably a response to injury associated with isolation and culture. It is suppressed by butyrate and increased in inflammatory bowel disease independently of the presence of mucosal inflammation. Whether epithelial derived IL-8 plays a part in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease is not yet clear. Images Figure 2 Figure 5 PMID:7489942

  7. Keratin 8 knockdown leads to loss of the chloride transporter DRA in the colon.

    PubMed

    Asghar, M Nadeem; Priyamvada, Shubha; Nyström, Joel H; Anbazhagan, Arivarasu Natarajan; Dudeja, Pradeep K; Toivola, Diana M

    2016-06-01

    Keratins (K) are intermediate filament proteins important in protection from stress. The roles of keratins in the intestine are not clear, but K8 knockout (K8(-/-)) mice develop a Th2-type colonic inflammation, epithelial hyperproliferation, and mild diarrhea caused by a keratin level-dependent decrease in short-circuit current and net sodium and chloride absorption in the distal colon. The lack of K8 leads to mistargeting or altered levels of membrane proteins in colonocytes; however, the main transporter responsible for the keratin-related ion transport defect is unknown. We here analyzed protein and mRNA levels of candidate ion transporters CFTR, PAT-1, NHE-3, and DRA in ileum, cecum, and proximal and distal colon. Although no differences were observed for CFTR, PAT-1, or NHE-3, DRA mRNA levels were decreased by three- to fourfold and DRA protein was almost entirely lost in K8(-/-) cecum and proximal and distal colon compared with K8(+/+), whereas the levels in ileum were normal. In K8(+/-) mice, DRA mRNA levels were unaltered, while decreased DRA protein levels were detected in the proximal colon. Immunofluorescence staining confirmed the loss of DRA in K8(-/-) distal colon, while K8(+/-) displayed a similar but more patchy apical DRA distribution compared with K8(+/+) DRA was similarly decreased when K8 was knocked down in Caco-2 cells, confirming that K8 levels modulate DRA levels in an inflammation-independent manner. Taken together, the loss of DRA in the K8(-/-) mouse colon and cecum explains the dramatic chloride transport defect and diarrheal phenotype after K8 inactivation and identifies K8 as a novel regulator of DRA. PMID:27125276

  8. Stratifying risk of recurrence in stage II colorectal cancer using deregulated stromal and epithelial microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Bullock, Marc D; Pickard, Karen; Mitter, Richard; Sayan, A Emre; Primrose, John N; Ivan, Cristina; Calin, George A; Thomas, Gareth J; Packham, Graham K; Mirnezami, Alex H

    2015-03-30

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) enable colonic epithelial cells to acquire malignant characteristics and metastatic capabilities. Recently, cancer relevant miRNAs deregulated during disease progression have also been identified in tumor-associated stroma.By combining laser-microdissection (LMD) with high-throughput screening and high-sensitivity quantitation techniques, miRNA expression in colorectal cancer (CRC) specimens and paired normal colonic tissue was independently characterized in stromal and epithelial tissue compartments. Notably, deregulation of the key oncogene miR-21 was identified exclusively as a stromal phenomenon and miR-106a, an epithelial phenomenon in the malignant state.MiRNAs identified in this study successfully distinguished CRC from normal tissue and metastatic from non-metastatic tumor specimens. Furthermore, in a separate cohort of 50 consecutive patients with CRC, stromal miR-21 and miR-556 and epithelial miR-106a expression predicted short disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in stage II disease: miR-21 (DFS: HR = 2.68, p = 0.015; OS: HR = 2.47, p = 0.029); miR-556 (DFS: HR = 2.60, p = 0.018); miR-106a (DFS: HR = 2.91, p = 0.008; OS: HR = 2.25, p = 0.049); combined (All High vs. All Low. DFS: HR = 5.83, p = 0.002; OS: HR = 4.13, p = 0.007).These data support the notion that stromal as well as epithelial miRNAs play important roles during disease progression, and that mapping patterns of deregulated gene expression to the appropriate tumor strata may be a valuable aid to therapeutic decision making in CRC. PMID:25788261

  9. Clinical utility of colonic manometry in slow transit constipation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Siddharth; Heady, Sarah; Coss-Adame, Enrique; Rao, Satish S.C.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims The clinical significance of colorectal sensori-motor evaluation in patients with slow transit constipation (STC) is unclear. We investigated whether colonic manometric evaluation is useful for characterizing colonic sensorimotor dysfunction and for guiding therapy in STC. Methods 24-hour ambulatory colonic manometry was performed in 80 patients (70 females) with STC by placing a 6 sensor solid state probe, along with assessment of colonic sensation with barostat. Anorectal manometry was also performed. Manometrically, patients were categorized as having colonic neuropathy or myopathy based on gastrocolonic response, waking response and high amplitude propagated contractions (HAPC); and based on colonic sensation, as colonic hyposensitivity or hypersensitivity. Clinical response to pharmacological, biofeedback and surgical treatment was assessed at 1yr and correlated with manometric findings. Results 59% of patients had abnormal colonic manometry with features suggestive of neuropathy (26%), and myopathy (33%); 41% had normal colonic manometry. 74% patients had abnormal colonic sensation and 61% had overlapping dyssynergic defecation. Patients with neuropathy were more likely to have colonic hyposensitivity. 64% of patients with colonic myopathy or normal manometry improved with medical/biofeedback therapy when compared to 15% with colonic neuropathy (p<0.01). Selected patients with colonic neuropathy had excellent response to surgery, but many developed bacterial overgrowth. Conclusions Colonic manometry demonstrates significant colonic sensori-motor dysfunction in STC patients and reveals considerable pathophysiological heterogeneity. It can be useful for characterizing the underlying pathophysiology and for guiding clinical management in STC, especially surgery. PMID:23384415

  10. Metabolism links bacterial biofilms and colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Caroline H; Dejea, Christine M; Edler, David; Hoang, Linh T; Santidrian, Antonio F; Felding, Brunhilde H; Ivanisevic, Julijana; Cho, Kevin; Wick, Elizabeth C; Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M; Uritboonthai, Winnie; Goetz, Laura; Casero, Robert A; Pardoll, Drew M; White, James R; Patti, Gary J; Sears, Cynthia L; Siuzdak, Gary

    2015-06-01

    Bacterial biofilms in the colon alter the host tissue microenvironment. A role for biofilms in colon cancer metabolism has been suggested but to date has not been evaluated. Using metabolomics, we investigated the metabolic influence that microbial biofilms have on colon tissues and the related occurrence of cancer. Patient-matched colon cancers and histologically normal tissues, with or without biofilms, were examined. We show the upregulation of polyamine metabolites in tissues from cancer hosts with significant enhancement of N(1), N(12)-diacetylspermine in both biofilm-positive cancer and normal tissues. Antibiotic treatment, which cleared biofilms, decreased N(1), N(12)-diacetylspermine levels to those seen in biofilm-negative tissues, indicating that host cancer and bacterial biofilm structures contribute to the polyamine metabolite pool. These results show that colonic mucosal biofilms alter the cancer metabolome to produce a regulator of cellular proliferation and colon cancer growth potentially affecting cancer development and progression.

  11. Immunoscintigraphy of colorectal cancer with an antibody to epithelial membrane antigen (EMA)

    SciTech Connect

    Yiu, C.Y.; Baker, L.A.; Davidson, B.R.; Ward, M.; Roberts, K.; Clarke, G.; Ward, C.; Westwood, J.; Boulos, P.B.; Clark, C.G. )

    1990-02-01

    Immunoperoxidase staining of LICR-LON M8, a mouse monoclonal antibody reactive with epithelial membrane antigen, showed a strong reaction with colorectal cancer. This finding prompted an immunoscintigraphic study of colorectal cancer patients using this antibody. Sixteen patients had external gamma scintigraphy after intravenous injection of indium 111-labeled M8. Positive scans were obtained in 11 of the 13 patients with primary colorectal cancers, and 2 of the 3 patients with recurrent tumors. The high indium 111 background in the liver prevented the detection of hepatic metastases in 5 patients. Twelve patients had samples taken of tumor, normal colon, and venous blood at the time of surgery. The ratio of labeled antibody uptake in tumor to that of blood was 5.1 (+/- 3.6 S.D.), which was significantly different (P = 0.001) to that of the similar ratio for normal colon (2.0 +/- 1.6 S.D.). The tumor to normal colon uptake ratio was 2.6 (+/- 1.3 S.D.). These results suggest a specific uptake of indium 111-labeled M8 by colorectal cancer.

  12. Epsin is required for Dishevelled stability and Wnt signaling activation in colon cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Baojun; Tessneer, Kandice L.; McManus, John; Liu, Xiaolei; Hahn, Scott; Pasula, Satish; Wu, Hao; Song, Hoogeun; Chen, Yiyuan; Cai, Xiaofeng; Dong, Yunzhou; Brophy, Megan L.; Rahman, Ruby; Ma, Jian-Xing; Xia, Lijun; Chen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Uncontrolled canonical Wnt signaling supports colon epithelial tumor expansion and malignant transformation. Understanding the regulatory mechanisms involved is crucial for elucidating the pathogenesis of and will provide new therapeutic targets for colon cancer. Epsins are ubiquitin-binding adaptor proteins upregulated in several human cancers; however, epsins’ involvement in colon cancer is unknown. Here we show that loss of intestinal epithelial epsins protects against colon cancer by significantly reducing the stability of the crucial Wnt signaling effector, dishevelled (Dvl2), and impairing Wnt signaling. Consistently, epsins and Dvl2 are correspondingly upregulated in colon cancer. Mechanistically, epsin binds Dvl2 via its epsin N-terminal homology domain and ubiquitin-interacting motifs and prohibits Dvl2 polyubiquitination and degradation. Our findings reveal an unconventional role for epsins in stabilizing Dvl2 and potentiating Wnt signaling in colon cancer cells to ensure robust colon cancer progression. Epsins’ pro-carcinogenic role suggests they are potential therapeutic targets to combat colon cancer. PMID:25871009

  13. Secretory component: a glandular epithelial cell marker.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, J. P.; South, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    Secretory component (SC) has been demonstrated to be produced by both normal and malignantly transformed glandular epithelial cells. By an indirect immunofluorescent technique, this study surveys tumors of varied cellular origin in order to determine the reliability of SC as a marker for tumor cells derived from glandular epithelium. Both primary and metastatic tumors of glandular epithelial origin demonstrated SC fluorescence, while nonglandular epithelial tumors did not. This observation was extended to live single-cell preparations, which demonstrated intense cell-surface fluorescence only when glandular epithelial tumors cells were examined. Additionally, fixed, cytocentrifuged, single-cell preparations of glandular epithelial tumors demonstrated cytoplasmic SC fluorescence. When breast carcinoma was examined, all cases demonstrated SC, regardless of the degree of differentiation. This assay appears to have useful clinical application in that the finding of SC provides indication of the glandular epithelial origin of a malignantly transformed cell. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:6271014

  14. The Intestinal Epithelial Cell Differentiation Marker Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase (ALPi) Is Selectively Induced by Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors (HDACi) in Colon Cancer Cells in a Kruppel-like Factor 5 (KLF5)-dependent Manner*

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Joongho; Carr, Azadeh; Corner, Georgia A.; Tögel, Lars; Dávaos-Salas, Mercedes; Tran, Hoanh; Chueh, Anderly C.; Al-Obaidi, Sheren; Chionh, Fiona; Ahmed, Naseem; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Young, Joanne P.; Malo, Madhu S.; Hodin, Richard A.; Arango, Diego; Sieber, Oliver M.; Augenlicht, Leonard H.; Dhillon, Amardeep S.; Weber, Thomas K.; Mariadason, John M.

    2014-01-01

    The histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) sodium butyrate promotes differentiation of colon cancer cells as evidenced by induced expression and enzyme activity of the differentiation marker intestinal alkaline phosphatase (ALPi). Screening of a panel of 33 colon cancer cell lines identified cell lines sensitive (42%) and resistant (58%) to butyrate induction of ALP activity. This differential sensitivity was similarly evident following treatment with the structurally distinct HDACi, MS-275. Resistant cell lines were significantly enriched for those harboring the CpG island methylator phenotype (p = 0.036, Chi square test), and resistant cell lines harbored methylation of the ALPi promoter, particularly of a CpG site within a critical KLF/Sp regulatory element required for butyrate induction of ALPi promoter activity. However, butyrate induction of an exogenous ALPi promoter-reporter paralleled up-regulation of endogenous ALPi expression across the cell lines, suggesting the presence or absence of a key transcriptional regulator is the major determinant of ALPi induction. Through microarray profiling of sensitive and resistant cell lines, we identified KLF5 to be both basally more highly expressed as well as preferentially induced by butyrate in sensitive cell lines. KLF5 overexpression induced ALPi promoter-reporter activity in resistant cell lines, KLF5 knockdown attenuated butyrate induction of ALPi expression in sensitive lines, and butyrate selectively enhanced KLF5 binding to the ALPi promoter in sensitive cells. These findings demonstrate that butyrate induction of the cell differentiation marker ALPi is mediated through KLF5 and identifies subsets of colon cancer cell lines responsive and refractory to this effect. PMID:25037223

  15. Combination of Gefitinib and DNA Methylation Inhibitor Decitabine Exerts Synergistic Anti-Cancer Activity in Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pin-jia; Huang, Guo-bin; Li, Bin; Zheng, De-qing; Yu, Xiu-rong; Luo, Xiao-yong

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the treatment of human colon cancer, the chemotherapy efficacy against colon cancer is still unsatisfactory. In the present study, effects of concomitant inhibition of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and DNA methyltransferase were examined in human colon cancer cells. We demonstrated that decitabine (a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor) synergized with gefitinib (an EGFR inhibitor) to reduce cell viability and colony formation in SW1116 and LOVO cells. However, the combination of the two compounds displayed minimal toxicity to NCM460 cells, a normal human colon mucosal epithelial cell line. The combination was also more effective at inhibiting the AKT/mTOR/S6 kinase pathway. In addition, the combination of decitabine with gefitinib markedly inhibited colon cancer cell migration. Furthermore, gefitinib synergistically enhanced decitabine-induced cytotoxicity was primarily due to apoptosis as shown by Annexin V labeling that was attenuated by z-VAD-fmk, a pan caspase inhibitor. Concomitantly, cell apoptosis resulting from the co-treatment of gefitinib and decitabine was accompanied by induction of BAX, cleaved caspase 3 and cleaved PARP, along with reduction of Bcl-2 compared to treatment with either drug alone. Interestingly, combined treatment with these two drugs increased the expression of XIAP-associated factor 1 (XAF1) which play an important role in cell apoptosis. Moreover, small interfering RNA (siRNA) depletion of XAF1 significantly attenuated colon cancer cells apoptosis induced by the combination of the two drugs. Our findings suggested that gefitinib in combination with decitabine exerted enhanced cell apoptosis in colon cancer cells were involved in mitochondrial-mediated pathway and induction of XAF1 expression. In conclusion, based on the observations from our study, we suggested that the combined administration of these two drugs might be considered as a novel therapeutic regimen for treating colon cancer. PMID

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa pili bind to asialoGM1 which is increased on the surface of cystic fibrosis epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Saiman, L; Prince, A

    1993-01-01

    The basis for the unique association of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung has remained obscure despite major advances in the understanding of the molecular genetic cause of this disease. There is evidence to suggest that abnormalities in CF transmembrane conductance regulator function result in alterations in the glycosylation of epithelial components. The number of asialoGM1 residues, as representative of a class of glycolipids which contain a GalNAc beta 1-4Gal sequence for P. aeruginosa attachment, was quantified by flow cytometric studies of respiratory epithelial cells in primary culture from both CF patients and normal subjects. Superficial asialoGM1 was detected on 12% of the CF cells as compared with 2.9% of the cells from normal control subjects (P = 0.03, chi 2 = 4.73), and more asialoGM1 residues were exposed on CF cells after modification by P. aeruginosa exoproducts. AsialoGM1, but not the sialylated glycolipid GM1, was demonstrated to be a receptor for 125I-labeled P. aeruginosa pilin, a major adhesin for this organism, and exogenous asialoGM1 was found to competitively inhibit P. aeruginosa adherence to epithelial cells, thus, confirming the biological role of the asialoGM1 receptor. Quantitative and qualitative differences in the sialylation of superficial glycolipids in CF epithelial cells may directly contribute to the colonization of the CF lung by P. aeruginosa. Images PMID:8104958

  17. Teaching normal birth, normally.

    PubMed

    Hotelling, Barbara A

    2009-01-01

    Teaching normal-birth Lamaze classes normally involves considering the qualities that make birth normal and structuring classes to embrace those qualities. In this column, teaching strategies are suggested for classes that unfold naturally, free from unnecessary interventions. PMID:19436595

  18. Enteric dysbiosis promotes antibiotic-resistant bacterial infection: systemic dissemination of resistant and commensal bacteria through epithelial transcytosis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Linda Chia-Hui; Shih, Yi-An; Wu, Li-Ling; Lin, Yang-Ding; Kuo, Wei-Ting; Peng, Wei-Hao; Lu, Kuo-Shyan; Wei, Shu-Chen; Turner, Jerrold R.

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic usage promotes intestinal colonization of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. However, whether resistant bacteria gain dominance in enteric microflora or disseminate to extraintestinal viscera remains unclear. Our aim was to investigate temporal diversity changes in microbiota and transepithelial routes of bacterial translocation after antibiotic-resistant enterobacterial colonization. Mice drinking water with or without antibiotics were intragastrically gavaged with ampicillin-resistant (Amp-r) nonpathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) and given normal water afterward. The composition and spatial distribution of intestinal bacteria were evaluated using 16S rDNA sequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Bacterial endocytosis in epithelial cells was examined using gentamicin resistance assay and transmission electromicroscopy. Paracellular permeability was assessed by tight junctional immunostaining and measured by tissue conductance and luminal-to-serosal dextran fluxes. Our results showed that antibiotic treatment enabled intestinal colonization and transient dominance of orally acquired Amp-r E. coli in mice. The colonized Amp-r E. coli peaked on day 3 postinoculation and was competed out after 1 wk, as evidenced by the recovery of commensals, such as Escherichia, Bacteroides, Lachnospiraceae, Clostridium, and Lactobacillus. Mucosal penetration and extraintestinal dissemination of exogenous and endogenous enterobacteria were correlated with abnormal epithelial transcytosis but uncoupled with paracellular tight junctional damage. In conclusion, antibiotic-induced enteric dysbiosis predisposes to exogenous infection and causes systemic dissemination of both antibiotic-resistant and commensal enterobacteria through transcytotic routes across epithelial layers. These results may help explain the susceptibility to sepsis in antibiotic-resistant enteric bacterial infection. PMID:25059827

  19. Specific accumulation of orally administered redox nanotherapeutics in the inflamed colon reducing inflammation with dose-response efficacy.

    PubMed

    Vong, Long Binh; Mo, John; Abrahamsson, Bertil; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2015-07-28

    Although current medications for ulcerative colitis (UC) are effective to some extent, there are still some limitation of their use due to the non-specific distribution, drug metabolism in the gastrointestinal tract, and severe adverse effects. In our previous studies, we developed oral redox nanoparticles (RNP(O)) that specifically accumulated and scavenged overproduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) in an inflamed colon. However, the mechanism leading to specific accumulation of RNP(O) in an inflamed colon is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the cellular uptake of RNP(O) into ROS-treated epithelial colonic cells in vitro, and compared to the untreated cells, found a significantly increased uptake in ROS-treated cells. In vivo, we discovered that orally administered RNP(O) were not internalized into the cells of a normal colon. A significant amount of disintegrated RNP(O) was detected in the cells of an inflamed colon of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis mice, resulting in scavenging of ROS and suppression of inflammation with low adverse effects. Furthermore, we confirmed a significant reduction of disease activity and a robust dose response efficacy following RNP(O) treatment in acute DSS-induced colitis mice, outperforming the positive control 5-aminosalicylic acid. Oral administration of RNP(O) is a promising approach to develop a new therapy for UC disease. PMID:25998050

  20. Colon cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - colon cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on colon cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org/cancer/colonandrectumcancer/index Colon Cancer Alliance -- www.ccalliance.org National ...

  1. Inhibition of the transcription factor Sp1 suppresses colon cancer stem cell growth and induces apoptosis in vitro and in nude mouse xenografts.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingying; Zhang, Wenjing; Guo, Zheng; Ma, Feng; Wu, Yao; Bai, Yang; Gong, Wei; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Tianming; Zhi, Fachao; Zhang, Yali; Wang, Jide; Jiang, Bo

    2013-10-01

    The transcription factor specificity protein 1 (Sp1) plays a role in the development and progression of various types of human cancers, while cancer stem cells (CSCs) are important in cancer cell self-renewal, resistance to chemotherapy and metastatic potential. This study investigated the role of Sp1 in colon CSC growth and apoptosis. Colon CSCs were successfully enriched using special culture medium and identified by typical CSC gene expression. In a quiescent state, these CSCs formed spheres with slow proliferation; overexpressed Sp1, CD44, CD166 and CD133 proteins; upregulated mesenchymal markers; and a downregulated epithelial marker were noted. In ex vivo experiments, the Sp1 protein was expressed in 74.8% of colon cancer tissues, whereas it was expressed only in 42.2% of the distant normal colon mucosae. Furthermore, inhibition of SP1 expression using Sp1 siRNA or mithramycin A (MIT) led to marked suppression of CSC growth and induced apoptosis. In addition, the percentage of CD44+/CD166+ cells was significantly downregulated both in vivo and in vitro following Sp1 inhibition. In conclusion, Sp1 suppression attenuated the characteristics of colon CSCs. Thus, Sp1 inhibition may be potentially useful for the future development of a novel therapeutic strategy to control colon cancer.

  2. Epithelial Sodium Channels in Pulmonary Epithelial Progenitor and Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Jiang, Bi-Jie; Zhao, Run-Zhen; Ji, Hong-Long

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration of the epithelium of mammalian lungs is essential for restoring normal function following injury, and various cells and mechanisms contribute to this regeneration and repair. Club cells, bronchioalveolar stem cells (BASCs), and alveolar type II epithelial cells (ATII) are dominant stem/progenitor cells for maintaining epithelial turnover and repair. Epithelial Na+ channels (ENaC), a critical pathway for transapical salt and fluid transport, are expressed in lung epithelial progenitors, including club and ATII cells. Since ENaC activity and expression are development- and differentiation-dependent, apically located ENaC activity has therefore been used as a functional biomarker of lung injury repair. ENaC activity may be involved in the migration and differentiation of local and circulating stem/progenitor cells with diverse functions, eventually benefiting stem cells spreading to re-epithelialize injured lungs. This review summarizes the potential roles of ENaC expressed in native progenitor and stem cells in the development and regeneration of the respiratory epithelium. PMID:27570489

  3. Epithelial Sodium Channels in Pulmonary Epithelial Progenitor and Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Jiang, Bi-Jie; Zhao, Run-Zhen; Ji, Hong-Long

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration of the epithelium of mammalian lungs is essential for restoring normal function following injury, and various cells and mechanisms contribute to this regeneration and repair. Club cells, bronchioalveolar stem cells (BASCs), and alveolar type II epithelial cells (ATII) are dominant stem/progenitor cells for maintaining epithelial turnover and repair. Epithelial Na(+) channels (ENaC), a critical pathway for transapical salt and fluid transport, are expressed in lung epithelial progenitors, including club and ATII cells. Since ENaC activity and expression are development- and differentiation-dependent, apically located ENaC activity has therefore been used as a functional biomarker of lung injury repair. ENaC activity may be involved in the migration and differentiation of local and circulating stem/progenitor cells with diverse functions, eventually benefiting stem cells spreading to re-epithelialize injured lungs. This review summarizes the potential roles of ENaC expressed in native progenitor and stem cells in the development and regeneration of the respiratory epithelium. PMID:27570489

  4. Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor subtype 2 in human colonic mucosa: Down-regulation in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Chatzaki, Ekaterini; Anton, Peter A; Million, Mulugeta; Lambropoulou, Maria; Constantinidis, Theodoros; Kolios, George; Taché, Yvette; Grigoriadis, Dimitri E

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To assess corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 2 (CRF2) expression in the colon of healthy subjects and patients with ulcerative colitis (UC). METHODS: We examined CRF2 gene and protein expression in the distal/sigmoid colonic mucosal biopsies from healthy subjects and patients with UC (active or disease in remission), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and functional bowel disease (FBD) by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence. RESULTS: Gene expression of CRF2 was demonstrated in the normal human colonic biopsies, but not in the human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line Caco2. Receptor protein localization showed immunoreactive CRF2 receptors in the lamina propria and in the epithelial cells of the distal/sigmoid biopsy samples. Interestingly, CRF2 immunoreactivity was no longer observed in epithelial cells of patients with mild-moderately active UC and disease in remission, while receptor protein expression did not change in the lamina propria. No differences in CRF2 expression profile were observed in distal/sigmoid intestinal biopsies from HIV infection and FBD patients, showing no signs of inflammation. CONCLUSION: The down-regulation of the CRF2 receptor in the distal/sigmoid biopsies of UC patients is indicative of change in CRF2 signalling associated with the process of inflammation. PMID:23539366

  5. Downregulation of miRNA-30c and miR-203a is associated with hepatitis C virus core protein-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in normal hepatocytes and hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongjing; Wu, Jilin; Liu, Meizhou; Yin, Hui; He, Jiantai; Zhang, Bo

    2015-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) Core protein has been demonstrated to induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and is associated with cancer progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, how the Core protein regulates EMT is still unclear. In this study, HCV Core protein was overexpressed by an adenovirus. The protein levels of EMT markers were measured by Western blot. The xenograft animal model was established by inoculation of HepG2 cells. Results showed that ectopic expression of HCV core protein induced EMT in L02 hepatocytes and HepG2 tumor cells by upregulating vimentin, Sanl1, and Snal2 expression and downregulating E-cadherin expression. Moreover, Core protein downregulated miR-30c and miR-203a levels in L02 and HepG2 cells, but artificial expression of miR-30c and miR-203a reversed Core protein-induced EMT. Further analysis showed that ectopic expression of HCV core protein stimulated cell proliferation, inhibited apoptosis, and increased cell migration, whereas artificial expression of miR-30c and miR-203a significantly reversed the role of Core protein in these cell functions in L02 and HepG2 cells. In the HepG2 xenograft tumor models, artificial expression of miR-30c and miR-203a inhibited EMT and tumor growth. Moreover, L02 cells overexpressing Core protein can form tumors in nude mice. In HCC patients, HCV infection significantly shortened patients' survival time, and loss of miR-30c and miR-203 expression correlated with poor survival. In conclusion, HCV core protein downregulates miR-30c and miR-203a expression, which results in activation of EMT in normal hepatocytes and HCC tumor cells. The Core protein-activated-EMT is involved in the carcinogenesis and progression of HCC. Loss of miR-30c and miR-203a expression is a marker for the poor prognosis of HCC.

  6. Qualitative and quantitative comparison of colonic microendoscopy image features to histopathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Sandra P.; Powless, Amy J.; Lai, Keith; Laryea, Jonathan A.; Mizell, Jason S.; Muldoon, Timothy J.

    2015-03-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States, affecting more than 130,000 Americans every year1. Determining tumor margins prior to surgical resection is essential to providing optimal treatment and reducing recurrence rates. Colorectal cancer recurrence can occur in up to 20% of cases, commonly within three years after curative treatment. Typically, when colorectal cancers are resected, a margin of normal tissue on both sides of the tumor is required. The minimum margin required for colon cancer is 5 cm and for the lower rectum 2 cm. However, usually more normal tissue is taken on both sides of the tumor because the blood supply to the entire segment is removed with the surgery and therefore the entire segment must be removed. Anastomotic recurrences may result from inadequate margins. Pathologists look at the margins to ensure that there is no residual tumor and this is usually documented in the pathology report. We have developed a portable, point-of-care fiber bundle microendoscopy imaging system for detection of abnormalities in colonic epithelial microstructure. The system comprises a laptop, a modified fiber bundle image guide with a 1mm active area diameter and custom LabVIEW interface, and is approved for imaging surgically resected colon tissue at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. The microendoscopy probe provides high-resolution images of superficial epithelial histology in real-time to assist surgical guidance and to localize occult regions of dysplasia which may not be visible. Microendoscopy images of freshly resected human colonic epithelium were acquired using the microendoscopy device and subsequently mosaicked using custom post-processing software. Architectural changes in the glands were mapped to histopathology H&E slides taken from the precise location of the microendoscopy images. Qualitatively, glandular distortion and placement of image guide was used to map normal and dysplastic areas of

  7. Increased colonic sodium absorption in rats with chronic renal failure is partially mediated by AT1 receptor agonism.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Marguerite; Freel, Robert W

    2008-08-01

    To test the hypothesis that colonic Na(+) transport is altered in the 5/6 nephrectomized rat model of chronic renal failure (CRF), we measured Na(+) fluxes across distal colon from control (CON), CRF, and CRF rats treated with the angiotensin II (ANG II) receptor antagonist losartan (+LOS). We also evaluated overall fluid and Na(+) balance and compared colonic protein and mRNA expression profiles for electroneutral [sodium-hydrogen exchanger (NHE)] and electrogenic Na(+) transport [epithelial sodium channel (ENaC)] in these groups. Consistent with a 60% enhancement in colonic Na(+) absorption in CRF, urinary Na(+) excretion increased by about 50% while serum Na(+) homeostasis was maintained. These CRF-induced changes in Na(+) handling were normalized by treatment with LOS. Net Na(+) absorption was also stimulated in in vitro tissues from CON rats following acute serosal addition of ANG II (10(-7) M), and this increase was blocked by AT(1) antagonism but not by an AT(2) antagonist. In CRF, colonic protein and mRNA expression variably increased for apical NHE2, NHE3, and ENaC alpha-, beta-, gamma-subunits, whereas expression of basolateral NHE1 and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase (alpha-isoform) remained unaltered. Upregulation of the ENaC subunit mRNA was attenuated somewhat by LOS treatment. Previously, we showed that colonic AT(1) receptor protein is upregulated twofold in CRF, and here we find that AT(1) and AT(2) mRNA and AT(2) protein abundance is unchanged in CRF. We conclude that Na(+) absorption in CRF rat distal colon is increased due to elevated expression of proteins mediating electroneutral and electrogenic uptake and that it is partially mediated by AT(1) receptors. PMID:18535292

  8. microRNA-17 Is the Most Up-Regulated Member of the miR-17-92 Cluster during Early Colon Cancer Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Kirsten Nguyen; Nielsen, Boye Schnack; Lindebjerg, Jan; Hansen, Torben Frøstrup; Holst, René; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2015-01-01

    Deregulated microRNAs play a role in the development and progression of colon cancer, but little is known about their tissue and cell distribution in the continuum of normal mucosa through the premalignant adenoma to invasive adenocarcinoma. The aim of this study was to examine the expression pattern of the miR-17-92 cluster (miR-17, miR-18, miR-19, miR-20 and miR-92) as well as miR-21, miR-31, miR-135b, and miR-145 in early clinically diagnosed colon cancer. MicroRNAs were analysed by chromogenic in situ hybridisation in the normal-adenoma-adenocarcinoma sequence of nine adenocarcinomas developed in mucosal colon polyps. Subsequently, the expression of selected microRNAs was validated in 24 mucosal colon cancer polyps. Expression of miR-17 was confined to the epithelial cells, and the expression levels increased in the transitional zone from normal to adenomatous tissue. The miR-17-92 cluster members, miR-19b, miR-20a, and miR-92a, followed the same expression pattern, but miR-17 was the most predominant. An increased expression of miR-21 was found in the tumour-associated stroma with the most dramatic increase from adenoma to adenocarcinoma, while the number of positive miR-145 fibroblast-like cells in the normal lamina propria (stroma) decreased in a stepwise manner throughout the normal-adenoma-adenocarcinoma sequence. It is concluded that the expression of miR-17, miR-21, and miR-145 changes at early stages of the normal-adenoma-adenocarcinoma sequence. Thus, these microRNAs may play a role in the development of colon cancer. PMID:26465597

  9. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition can suppress major attributes of human epithelial tumor-initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Celià-Terrassa, Toni; Meca-Cortés, Óscar; Mateo, Francesca; Martínez de Paz, Alexia; Rubio, Nuria; Arnal-Estapé, Anna; Ell, Brian J.; Bermudo, Raquel; Díaz, Alba; Guerra-Rebollo, Marta; Lozano, Juan José; Estarás, Conchi; Ulloa, Catalina; ρlvarez-Simón, Daniel; Milà, Jordi; Vilella, Ramón; Paciucci, Rosanna; Martínez-Balbás, Marian; García de Herreros, Antonio; Gomis, Roger R.; Kang, Yibin; Blanco, Jerónimo; Fernández, Pedro L.; Thomson, Timothy M.

    2012-01-01

    Malignant progression in cancer requires populations of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) endowed with unlimited self renewal, survival under stress, and establishment of distant metastases. Additionally, the acquisition of invasive properties driven by epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is critical for the evolution of neoplastic cells into fully metastatic populations. Here, we characterize 2 human cellular models derived from prostate and bladder cancer cell lines to better understand the relationship between TIC and EMT programs in local invasiveness and distant metastasis. The model tumor subpopulations that expressed a strong epithelial gene program were enriched in highly metastatic TICs, while a second subpopulation with stable mesenchymal traits was impoverished in TICs. Constitutive overexpression of the transcription factor Snai1 in the epithelial/TIC-enriched populations engaged a mesenchymal gene program and suppressed their self renewal and metastatic phenotypes. Conversely, knockdown of EMT factors in the mesenchymal-like prostate cancer cell subpopulation caused a gain in epithelial features and properties of TICs. Both tumor cell subpopulations cooperated so that the nonmetastatic mesenchymal-like prostate cancer subpopulation enhanced the in vitro invasiveness of the metastatic epithelial subpopulation and, in vivo, promoted the escape of the latter from primary implantation sites and accelerated their metastatic colonization. Our models provide new insights into how dynamic interactions among epithelial, self-renewal, and mesenchymal gene programs determine the plasticity of epithelial TICs. PMID:22505459

  10. PINCH-2 presents functional copy number variation and suppresses migration of colon cancer cells by paracrine activity.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan Hee; Rha, Sun Young; Ahn, Joong Bae; Shin, Sang Joon; Kwon, Woo Sun; Kim, Tae Soo; An, Sungwhan; Kim, Nam Kyu; Yang, Woo-ick; Chung, Hyun Cheol

    2015-05-15

    In recent years, characterization of cancer and its environment has become necessary. However, studies of the cancer microenvironment remain insufficient. Copy number variations (CNVs) occur in 40% of cancer-related genes, but few studies have reported the correlation between CNVs in morphologically normal tissues adjacent to cancer and cancer progression. In this study, we evaluated cancer cell migration and invasion according to the genetic differences between cancer tissues and their surrounding normal tissues. To study the field cancerization effect, we screened 89 systemic metastasis-related CNVs from morphologically normal tissues adjacent to colon cancers. Among these CNVs, LIM and senescent cell antigen-like domain 2 (PINCH-2) showed copy number amplification and upregulation of mRNA in the nonrelapsed group compared to the systemic relapse group. PINCH-2 expression in colon cancer cells was lower than that in normal epithelial colon cells at both the protein and mRNA levels. Suppression of PINCH-2 resulted in decreased formation of the PINCH-2-IPP (PINCH-2, integrin-linked kinase and α-parvin) complex and reciprocally increased formation of the PINCH-1-IPP complex. Although PINCH-2 expression of survival pathway-related proteins (Akt and phospho-Akt) did not change upon suppression of PINCH-2 expression, cell migration-related proteins [matrix-metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and -11] were upregulated through autocrine and paracrine activation. Thus, PINCH-2 participates in decreased systemic recurrence by competitively regulating IPP complex formation with PINCH-1, thereby suppressing autocrine and paracrine effects on motility in colon cancer. This genetic change in morphologically normal tissue suggests a field cancerization effect of the tumor microenvironment in cancer progression.

  11. Toll-like Receptor Signaling Activation by Entamoeba histolytica Induces Beta Defensin 2 in Human Colonic Epithelial Cells: Its Possible Role as an Element of the Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Ayala-Sumuano, Jorge-Tonatiuh; Téllez-López, Victor M.; Domínguez-Robles, M. del Carmen; Shibayama-Salas, Mineko; Meza, Isaura

    2013-01-01

    Background Entamoeba histolytica, a protozoan parasite of humans, produces dysenteric diarrhea, intestinal mucosa damage and extraintestinal infection. It has been proposed that the intestinal microbiota composition could be an important regulatory factor of amebic virulence and tissue invasion, particularly if pathogenic bacteria are present. Recent in vitro studies have shown that Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites induced human colonic CaCo2 cells to synthesize TLR-2 and TLR-4 and proinflammatory cytokines after binding to the amebic Gal/GalNac lectin carbohydrate recognition domain. The magnitude of the inflammatory response induced by trophozoites and the subsequent cell damage were synergized when cells had previously been exposed to pathogenic bacteria. Methodology/Principal Findings We show here that E. histolytica activation of the classic TLR pathway in CaCo2 cells is required to induce β defensin-2 (HBD2) mRNA expression and production of a 5-kDa cationic peptide with similar properties to the antimicrobial HBD2 expressed by CaCo2 cells exposed to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. The induced peptide showed capacity to permeabilize membranes of bacteria and live trophozoites. This activity was abrogated by inhibition of TLR2/4-NFκB pathway or by neutralization with an anti-HBD2 antibody. Conclusions/Significance Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites bind to human intestinal cells and induce expression of HBD2; an antimicrobial molecule with capacity to destroy pathogenic bacteria and trophozoites. HDB2's possible role as a modulator of the course of intestinal infections, particularly in mixed ameba/bacteria infections, is discussed. PMID:23469306

  12. Expression profile of undifferentiated cell transcription factor 1 in normal and cancerous human epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Mouallif, Mustapha; Albert, Adelin; Zeddou, Mustapha; Ennaji, My Mustapha; Delvenne, Philippe; Guenin, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Undifferentiated cell Transcription Factor 1 (UTF1) is a chromatin-bound protein involved in stem cell differentiation. It was initially reported to be restricted to stem cells or germinal tissues. However, recent work suggests that UTF1 is also expressed in somatic cells and that its expression may increase during carcinogenesis. To further clarify the expression profile of UTF1, we evaluated UTF1 expression levels immunohistochemically in eight normal human epithelia (from breast, prostate, endometrium, bladder, colon, oesophagus, lung and kidney) and their corresponding tumours as well as in several epithelial cell lines. We showed UTF1 staining in normal and tumour epithelial tissues, but with varying intensities according to the tissue location. In vitro analyses also revealed that UTF1 is expressed in somatic epithelial cell lines even in the absence of Oct4A and Sox2, its two main known regulators. The comparison of UTF1 levels in normal and tumoral tissues revealed significant overexpression in endometrial and prostatic adenocarcinomas, whereas lower intensity of the staining was observed in renal and colic tumours, suggesting a potential tissue-specific function of UTF1. Altogether, these results highlight a potential dual role for UTF1, acting either as an oncogene or as a tumour suppressor depending on the tissue. These findings also question its role as a specific marker for stem cells. PMID:24738751

  13. An uncommon focal epithelial hyperplasia manifestation.

    PubMed

    dos Santos-Pinto, Lourdes; Giro, Elisa Maria Aparecida; Pansani, Cyneu Aguiar; Ferrari, Junia; Massucato, Elaine Maria Sgavioli; Spolidório, Luis Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia is a rare, contagious disease associated with infection of the oral mucosa by human papillomavirus types 13 or 32, characterized by multiple soft papules of the same color as the adjacent normal mucosa. It mainly affects the lower lip, buccal mucosa, and tongue. The purpose of this case report was to describe a rare verrucal lesion located in the upper gingiva that was clinically and histologically consistent with focal epithelial hyperplasia. PMID:19941767

  14. Luminal bacterial flora determines physiological expression of intestinal epithelial cytoprotective heat shock proteins 25 and 72.

    PubMed

    Arvans, Donna L; Vavricka, Stephan R; Ren, Hongyu; Musch, Mark W; Kang, Lisa; Rocha, Flavio G; Lucioni, Alvaro; Turner, Jerrold R; Alverdy, John; Chang, Eugene B

    2005-04-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSP) 25 and 72 are expressed normally by surface colonocytes but not by small intestinal enterocytes. We hypothesized that luminal commensal microflora maintain the observed colonocyte HSP expression. The ability of the small intestine to respond to bacteria and their products and modulate HSPs has not been determined. The effects of luminal bacterial flora in surgically created midjejunal self-filling (SFL) vs. self-emptying (SEL) small-bowel blind loops on epithelial HSP expression were studied. HSP25 and HSP72 expression were assessed by immunoblot and immunohistochemistry. SFL were chronically colonized, whereas SEL contained levels of bacteria normal for the proximal small intestine. SFL creation significantly increased HSP25 and HSP72 expression relative to corresponding sections from SEL. Metronidazole treatment, which primarily affects anaerobic bacteria as well as a diet lacking fermentable fiber, significantly decreased SFL HSP expression. Small bowel incubation with butyrate ex vivo induced a sustained and significant upregulation of HSP25 and altered HSP72 expression, confirming the role of short-chain fatty acids. To determine whether HSPs induction altered responses to an injury, effects of the oxidant, monochloramine, on epithelial resistance and short-circuit current (I(sc)) responses to carbachol and glucose were compared. Increased SFL HSP expression was associated with protection against oxidant-induced decreases in transmural resistance and I(sc) responses to glucose, but not secretory responses to carbachol. In conclusion, luminal microflora and their metabolic byproducts direct expression of HSPs in gut epithelial cells, an effect that contributes to preservation of epithelial cell viability under conditions of stress.

  15. [Colonic histiocytosis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Remmele, W; Endris, R

    1977-02-01

    Macrophages accumulating various substances can be detected in the mucosa of the small and large bowel under physiological and various pathological conditions. Among these the so-called PAS-positive macrophages have attracted much attention in recent times. Abundant occurrence of such cells in the intestinal mucosa has been termed "colonic histiocytosis". The occurrence of PAS-positive macrophages was investigated in 200 unselected and otherwise normal biopsy specimens of rectal mucosa; no correlation was found between the occurrence of these cells on the one hand and any intestinal or extraintestinal disease on the other. PAS-positive macrophages were mostly found close to the surface of the mucosa or to the cryptal epithelium as well as between the crypts. It is suggested to abandon the term "colonic histiocytosis" since it induces a false impression of a disease entity in the clinician (and may be related falsely e.g. to "histiocytosis X", and since the clinician may tend to attribute unnecessary importance to this harmless finding.

  16. IL-1β stimulation of CCD-18co myofibroblasts enhances repair of epithelial monolayers through Wnt-5a.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Meera; Marchbank, Tania; Moyer, Mary P; Playford, Raymond J; Sanderson, Ian R; Kruidenier, Laurens

    2012-12-01

    Subepithelial myofibroblasts are involved in the initiation and coordination of intestinal epithelial repair, but the molecular signaling pathways are largely unknown. The cellular adaptations that occur during repair range from dedifferentiation and migration to proliferation and redifferentiation, in a way that is strongly reminiscent of normal crypt-to-villus epithelial maturation. We therefore hypothesized that Wnt/β-catenin signaling may have a pivotal role in intestinal epithelial wound repair. We used the established scratch wound method in Caco-2 cells and in nontransformed NCM460 cells to monitor the effects of IL-1β-stimulated colonic myofibroblasts (CCD-18co) on intestinal epithelial repair, with immunoblotting and immunodepletion to examine the conditioned media. Conditioned media from IL-1β-stimulated, but not -untreated, myofibroblasts increased Caco-2 wound closure twofold over 24 h. IL-1β-stimulated myofibroblasts downregulated the differentiation marker sucrase-isomaltase in the Caco-2 cells, whereas the proliferation marker c-myc was upregulated. Array expression profiling identified Wnt-5a as the Wnt-related gene that was most upregulated (28-fold) by IL-1β stimulation of CCDs. Recombinant Wnt-5a enhanced proliferation of Caco-2 and NCM460 cells. In scratch assays, it increased migration of the leading edge in both cell lines. Wnt-5a immunodepletion of the IL-1β-CCD conditioned media abrogated the ability to enhance the repair. Wnt-5a often acts through a noncanonical signal transduction pathway. Further experiments supported this pathway in epithelial wound healing: IL-1β-CCD-mediated repair was not affected by the addition of the canonical Wnt antagonist Dickkopf-1. Furthermore, media from stimulated myofibroblasts (but not Wnt-5a-depleted media) increased c-jun in Caco-2 cell nuclear extracts. Myofibroblast-mediated noncanonical Wnt-5a signaling is therefore important in the dedifferentiation and migration stages of epithelial wound

  17. Autoinducer-2 Production in Campylobacter jejuni Contributes to Chicken Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Quiñones, Beatriz; Miller, William G.; Bates, Anna H.; Mandrell, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    Inactivation of luxS, encoding an AI-2 biosynthesis enzyme, in Campylobacter jejuni strain 81-176 significantly reduced colonization of the chick lower gastrointestinal tract, chemotaxis toward organic acids, and in vitro adherence to LMH chicken hepatoma cells. Thus, AI-2 production in C. jejuni contributes to host colonization and interactions with epithelial cells. PMID:19011073

  18. Different Effects of BORIS/CTCFL on Stemness Gene Expression, Sphere Formation and Cell Survival in Epithelial Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Alberti, Loredana; Losi, Lorena; Leyvraz, Serge; Benhattar, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells are cancer cells characterized by stem cell properties and represent a small population of tumor cells that drives tumor development, progression, metastasis and drug resistance. To date, the molecular mechanisms that generate and regulate cancer stem cells are not well defined. BORIS (Brother of Regulator of Imprinted Sites) or CTCFL (CTCF-like) is a DNA-binding protein that is expressed in normal tissues only in germ cells and is re-activated in tumors. Recent evidences have highlighted the correlation of BORIS/CTCFL expression with poor overall survival of different cancer patients. We have previously shown an association of BORIS-expressing cells with stemness gene expression in embryonic cancer cells. Here, we studied the role of BORIS in epithelial tumor cells. Using BORIS-molecular beacon that was already validated, we were able to show the presence of BORIS mRNA in cancer stem cell-enriched populations (side population and spheres) of cervical, colon and breast tumor cells. BORIS silencing studies showed a decrease of sphere formation capacity in breast and colon tumor cells. Importantly, BORIS-silencing led to down-regulation of hTERT, stem cell (NANOG, OCT4, SOX2 and BMI1) and cancer stem cell markers (ABCG2, CD44 and ALDH1) genes. Conversely, BORIS-induction led to up-regulation of the same genes. These phenotypes were observed in cervical, colon and invasive breast tumor cells. However, a completely different behavior was observed in the non-invasive breast tumor cells (MCF7). Indeed, these cells acquired an epithelial mesenchymal transition phenotype after BORIS silencing. Our results demonstrate that BORIS is associated with cancer stem cell-enriched populations of several epithelial tumor cells and the different phenotypes depend on the origin of tumor cells.

  19. In Vitro Spatial and Temporal Analysis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Colonization of Human Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Prince, Oliver A.; Krunkosky, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is an important cause of respiratory disease, especially in school-age children and young adults. We employed normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells in air-liquid interface culture to study the interaction of M. pneumoniae with differentiated airway epithelium. These airway cells, when grown in air-liquid interface culture, polarize, form tight junctions, produce mucus, and develop ciliary function. We examined both qualitatively and quantitatively the role of mycoplasma gliding motility in the colonization pattern of developing airway cells, comparing wild-type M. pneumoniae and mutants thereof with moderate to severe defects in gliding motility. Adherence assays with radiolabeled mycoplasmas demonstrated a dramatic reduction in binding for all strains with airway cell polarization, independent of acquisition of mucociliary function. Adherence levels dropped further once NHBE cells achieved terminal differentiation, with mucociliary activity strongly selecting for full gliding competence. Analysis over time by confocal microscopy demonstrated a distinct colonization pattern that appeared to originate primarily with ciliated cells, but lateral spread from the base of the cilia was slower than expected. The data support a model in which the mucociliary apparatus impairs colonization yet cilia provide a conduit for mycoplasma access to the host cell surface and suggest acquisition of a barrier function, perhaps associated with tethered mucin levels, with NHBE cell polarization. PMID:24478073

  20. Intestinal epithelial vitamin D receptor signaling inhibits experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weicheng; Chen, Yunzi; Golan, Maya Aharoni; Annunziata, Maria L; Du, Jie; Dougherty, Urszula; Kong, Juan; Musch, Mark; Huang, Yong; Pekow, Joel; Zheng, Changqing; Bissonnette, Marc; Hanauer, Stephen B; Li, Yan Chun

    2013-09-01

    The inhibitory effects of vitamin D on colitis have been previously documented. Global vitamin D receptor (VDR) deletion exaggerates colitis, but the relative anticolitic contribution of epithelial and nonepithelial VDR signaling is unknown. Here, we showed that colonic epithelial VDR expression was substantially reduced in patients with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Moreover, targeted expression of human VDR (hVDR) in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) protected mice from developing colitis. In experimental colitis models induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid, dextran sulfate sodium, or CD4(+)CD45RB(hi) T cell transfer, transgenic mice expressing hVDR in IECs were highly resistant to colitis, as manifested by marked reductions in clinical colitis scores, colonic histological damage, and colonic inflammation compared with WT mice. Reconstitution of Vdr-deficient IECs with the hVDR transgene completely rescued Vdr-null mice from severe colitis and death, even though the mice still maintained a hyperresponsive Vdr-deficient immune system. Mechanistically, VDR signaling attenuated PUMA induction in IECs by blocking NF-κB activation, leading to a reduction in IEC apoptosis. Together, these results demonstrate that gut epithelial VDR signaling inhibits colitis by protecting the mucosal epithelial barrier, and this anticolitic activity is independent of nonepithelial immune VDR actions.

  1. Oncolytic reovirus against ovarian and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Hirasawa, Kensuke; Nishikawa, Sandra G; Norman, Kara L; Alain, Tommy; Kossakowska, Anna; Lee, Patrick W K

    2002-03-15

    Reovirus selectively replicates in and destroys cancer cells with an activated Ras signaling pathway. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of using reovirus (serotype 3, strain Dearing) as an antihuman colon and ovarian cancer agent. In in vitro studies, reovirus infection in human colon and ovarian cell lines was assessed by cytopathic effect as detected by light microscopy, [(35)S]Methionine labeling of infected cells for viral protein synthesis and progeny virus production by plaque assay. We observed that reovirus efficiently infected all five human colon cancer cell lines (Caco-2, DLD-1, HCT-116, HT-29, and SW48) and four human ovarian cancer cell lines (MDAH2774, PA-1, SKOV3, and SW626) which were tested, but not a normal colon cell line (CCD-18Co) or a normal ovarian cell line (NOV-31). We also observed that the Ras activity in the human colon and ovarian cancer cell lines was elevated compared with that in normal colon and ovarian cell lines. In animal models, intraneoplastic as well as i.v. inoculation of reovirus resulted in significant regression of established s.c. human colon and ovarian tumors implanted at the hind flank. Histological studies revealed that reovirus infection in vivo was restricted to tumor cells, whereas the surrounding normal tissue remained uninfected. Additionally, in an i.p. human ovarian cancer xenograft model, inhibition of ascites tumor formation and the survival of animals treated with live reovirus was significantly greater than of control mice treated with UV-inactivated reovirus. Reovirus infection in ex vivo primary human ovarian tumor surgical samples was also confirmed, further demonstrating the potential of reovirus therapy. These results suggest that reovirus holds promise as a novel agent for human colon and ovarian cancer therapy. PMID:11912142

  2. Elevated HOXB9 expression promotes differentiation and predicts a favourable outcome in colon adenocarcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, J; Niu, M; Wang, P; Zhu, X; Li, S; Song, J; He, H; Wang, Y; Xue, L; Fang, W; Zhang, H

    2014-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the tumour suppressive proteins and the underlying mechanisms that suppress colon cancer progression. Homeodomain-containing transcription factor HOXB9 plays an important role in embryogenesis and cancer development. We here aim to uncover the potential role of HOXB9 in the regulation of colon adenocarcinoma progression including epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Methods: HOXB9 expression in colon adenocarcinoma cells and patients was analysed by western blot and immunohistochemistry separately. Correlation between HOXB9 expressions with patients' survival was assessed by Kaplan–Meier analysis. HOXB9-regulated target gene expression was determined by RNA sequencing in HOXB9-overexpressing colon adenocarcinoma cells. Results: Elevated HOXB9 expression was identified in well-differentiated colon adenocarcinoma patients and was associated with a better overall patients' survival. Overexpression of HOXB9 inhibited colon adenocarcinoma cell growth, migration, invasion in vitro and tumour growth, liver as well as lung metastases in nude mice; whereas silencing HOXB9 promoted these functions. HOXB9 promoted colon adenocarcinoma differentiation via a mechanism that stimulates mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition, involving downregulation of EMT-promoting transcriptional factors including Snail, Twist, FOXC2 and ZEB1 and upregulation of epithelial proteins including E-cadherin, claudins-1, -4, -7, occludin and ZO-1. Conclusions: HOXB9 is a novel tumour suppressor that inhibits colon adenocarcinoma progression by inducing differentiation. Elevated expression of HOXB9 predicts a longer survival in colon adenocarcinoma patients. PMID:25025961

  3. Bacteroides fragilis toxin 2 damages human colonic mucosa in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Riegler, M; Lotz, M; Sears, C; Pothoulakis, C; Castagliuolo, I; Wang, C; Sedivy, R; Sogukoglu, T; Cosentini, E; Bischof, G; Feil, W; Teleky, B; Hamilton, G; LaMont, J; Wenzl, E

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Strains of Bacteroides fragilis producing a 20 kDa protein toxin (B fragilis toxin (BFT) or fragilysin) are associated with diarrhoea in animals and humans. Although in vitro results indicate that BFT damages intestinal epithelial cells in culture, the effects of BFT on native human colon are not known. 
AIMS—To examine the electrophysiological and morphological effects of purified BFT-2 on human colonic mucosa in vitro. 
METHODS—For resistance (R) measurements, colonic mucosa mounted in Ussing chambers was exposed to luminal or serosal BFT-2 (1.25-10 nM) and after four hours morphological damage was measured on haematoxylin and eosin stained sections using morphometry. F actin distribution was assessed using confocal microscopy. 
RESULTS—Serosal BFT-2 for four hours was four-, two-, seven-, and threefold more potent than luminal BFT-2 in decreasing resistance, increasing epithelial 3H-mannitol permeability, and damaging crypt and surface colonocytes, respectively (p<0.05). Confocal microscopy showed reduced colonocyte F actin staining intensity after exposure to BFT-2. 
CONCLUSIONS—BFT-2 increases human colonic permeability and damages human colonic epithelial cells in vitro. These effects may be important in the development of diarrhoea and intestinal inflammation caused by B fragilis in vivo. 

 Keywords: B fragilis toxin; toxin mediated colonocyte damage; actin filaments; transepithelial resistance; morphometry PMID:10075957

  4. Prolactin signaling enhances colon cancer stemness by modulating Notch signaling in a Jak2-STAT3/ERK manner.

    PubMed

    Neradugomma, Naveen K; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Tawfik, Ossama W; Goffin, Vincent; Kumar, T Rajendra; Jensen, Roy A; Anant, Shrikant

    2014-04-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is a secretory cytokine produced by various tissues. Binding to the cognate PRL receptor (PRLR), it activates intracellular signaling via janus kinase (JAK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins. PRL regulates diverse activities under normal and abnormal conditions, including malignancies. Previous clinical data suggest serum PRL levels are elevated in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. In this study, we first determined the expression of PRL and PRLR in colon cancer tissue and cell lines. Higher levels of PRLR expression were observed in the cancer cells and cell lines compared with normal colonic epithelial cells. Incubation of colon cancer cells with PRL-induced JAK2, STAT3 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation and increased expression of Jagged 1, which is a Notch-1 receptor ligand. Notch signaling regulates CRC stem cell population. We observed increased accumulation of the cleaved/active form of Notch-1 receptor (Notch intracellular domain) and increased expression of Notch responsive genes HEY1, HES1 and stem cell marker genes DCLK1, LGR5, ALDH1 and CD44. Finally, inhibiting PRL induced JAK2-STAT3 and JAK2-ERK1/2 using AG490 and PD98059, respectively, leads to complete abrogation of Notch signaling, suggesting a role for this pathway in regulating CRC stem cells. Together, our results demonstrate that cytokine signaling induced by PRL is active in colorectal cancers and may provide a novel target for therapeutic intervention.

  5. The metalloproteinase matrilysin is preferentially expressed by epithelial cells in a tissue-restricted pattern in the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, C L; Heppner, K J; Rudolph, L A; Matrisian, L M

    1995-01-01

    To explore the role of the matrix metalloproteinase matrilysin (MAT) in normal tissue remodeling, we cloned the murine homologue of MAT from postpartum uterus using RACE polymerase chain reaction and examined its pattern of expression in embryonic, neonatal, and adult mice. The murine coding sequence and the corresponding predicted protein sequence were found to be 75% and 70% identical to the human sequences, respectively, and organization of the six exons comprising the gene is similar to the human gene. Northern analysis and in situ hybridization revealed that MAT is expressed in the normal cycling, pregnant, and postpartum uterus, with levels of expression highest in the involuting uterus at early time points (6 h to 1.5 days postpartum). The mRNA was confined to epithelial cells lining the lumen and some glandular structures. High constitutive levels of MAT transcripts were also detected in the small intestine, where expression was localized to the epithelial Paneth cells at the base of the crypts. Similarly, MAT expression was found in epithelial cells of the efferent ducts, in the initial segment and cauda of the epididymis, and in an extra-hepatic branch of the bile duct. MAT transcripts were detectable only by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in the colon, kidney, lung, skeletal muscle, skin, stomach, juvenile uterus, and normal, lactating, and involuting mammary gland, as was expression primarily late in embryogenesis. Analysis of MAT expression during postnatal development indicated that although MAT is expressed in the juvenile small intestine and reproductive organs, the accumulation of significant levels of MAT mRNA appears to correlate with organ maturation. These results show that MAT expression is restricted to specific organs in the mouse, where the mRNA is produced exclusively by epithelial cells, and suggest that in addition to matrix degradation and remodeling, MAT may play an important role in the differentiated function of

  6. Maspin is a deoxycholate-inducible, anti-apoptotic stress-response protein differentially expressed during colon carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Claire M; Holubec, Hana; Crowley-Skillicorn, Cheray; Nguyen, Huy; Bernstein, Harris; Wilcox, George; Bernstein, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Increased maspin expression in the colon is related to colon cancer risk and patient survival. Maspin is induced by the hydrophobic bile acid, deoxycholate (DOC), which is an endogenous carcinogen and inducer of oxidative stress and DNA damage in the colon. Persistent exposure of colon epithelial cells, in vitro, to high physiologic levels of DOC results in increased constitutive levels of maspin protein expression associated with the development of apoptosis resistance. When an apoptosis-resistant colon epithelial cell line (HCT-116RC) developed in the authors’ laboratory was treated with a maspin-specific siRNA probe, there was a statistically significant increase in apoptosis compared to treatment with an siRNA control probe. These results indicate, for the first time, that maspin is an anti-apoptotic protein in the colon. Immunohistochemical evaluation of maspin expression in human colonic epithelial cells during sporadic colon carcinogenesis (131 human tissues evaluated) indicated a statistically significant increase in maspin protein expression beginning at the polyp stage of carcinogenesis. There was no statistically significant difference in maspin expression between hyperplastic/adenomatous polyps and colonic adenocarcinomas. The absence of “field defects” in the non-neoplastic colonic mucosa of patients with colonic neoplasia indicates that maspin may drive the growth of tumors, in part, through its anti-apoptotic function. PMID:22162927

  7. Retinal pigment epithelial change and partial lipodystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, T. M.; Holdright, D. R.; Schulenberg, W. E.; Turner, R. C.; Joplin, G. F.

    1988-01-01

    Cuticular drusen and retinal pigment epithelial changes were found incidentally in a 27 year old Lebanese woman during assessment of partial lipodystrophy. Her vision was normal despite involvement of both maculae. The patient had hypocomplementaemia, but serum C3 nephritic factor was absent and renal function was normal. She had impaired glucose tolerance and a continuous infusion of glucose with model assessment (CIGMA) test revealed low normal tissue insulin sensitivity and high normal pancreatic beta cell function. Mild fasting hypertriglyceridaemia (2.0 mmol/l) may have been secondary to impaired insulin sensitivity. Endocrine function was otherwise normal apart from a completely absent growth hormone response to adequate hypoglycaemia. The simultaneous occurrence of partial lipodystrophy and retinal pigmentary epithelial and basement membrane changes appears to be a newly recognized syndrome. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:3255937

  8. Management of colonic volvulus.

    PubMed

    Gingold, Daniel; Murrell, Zuri

    2012-12-01

    Colonic volvulus is a common cause of large bowel obstruction worldwide. It can affect all parts of the colon, but most commonly occurs in the sigmoid and cecal areas. This disease has been described for centuries, and was studied by Hippocrates himself. Currently, colonic volvulus is the third most common cause of large bowel obstruction worldwide, and is responsible for ∼15% of large bowel obstructions in the United States. This article will discuss the history of colonic volvulus, and the predisposing factors that lead to this disease. Moreover, the epidemiology and diagnosis of each type of colonic volvulus, along with the various treatment options will be reviewed. PMID:24294126

  9. Expression of a new mucin-type glycoprotein in select epithelial dysplasias and neoplasms detected immunocytochemically with Mab A-80.

    PubMed

    Shin, S S; Gould, V E; Gould, J E; Warren, W H; Gould, K A; Yaremko, M L; Manderino, G L; Rittenhouse, H G; Tomita, J T; Jansson, D S

    1989-12-01

    We studied by immunocytochemistry 573 tissue and 106 cytologic samples of human tumors, non-neoplastic proliferative lesions and normal tissues with the monoclonal antibody (Mab) A-80 that recognizes a mucinous glycoprotein from the colon carcinoma cell line LS-174T. The spectrum of benign and malignant breast lesions was studied as were epithelial tumors of the colon, stomach, pancreas, lung, salivary glands, thyroid, prostate, kidney, endometrium, skin and mesothelium; non-epithelial tumors included lymphomas, melanomas, gliomas, meningiomas, and sarcomas of soft tissue and bone. With a single exception, breast carcinomas regardless of histologic type were reactive while few fibroadenomas stained weakly and focally. In fibrocystic disease, the presence and intensity of the reactivity paralleled the severity of the epithelial proliferation, e.g. staining was strong in foci of severe or atypical hyperplasia, borderline lesions and carcinomas in situ; apocrine metaplasia stained often but less strongly. Barrett's mucosa, colonic polyps and most gastric and colonic carcinomas stained regardless of glandular features while small cell neuroendocrine carcinomas did not. Adenocarcinomas of the pancreas and lung, and a subset of large cell lung carcinomas reacted whereas neuroendocrine carcinomas of those sites did not. Carcinomas of endometrium, ovary and prostate reacted variably whereas thyroid and renal carcinomas and mesotheliomas were either negative or weakly reactive despite the presence of glands. Lymphomas, skin adnexal tumors, nevi, schwannomas, melanomas, gliomas and sarcomas generally did not react but occasional A-80-positive cells were seen in rare sarcomas and meningiomas. Immunostaining patterns in cytologic specimens were similar to the aforementioned. We conclude that Mab A-80 is an excellent marker for breast carcinomas, and for certain proliferative forms of fibrocystic disease that may precede or be associated with carcinomatous transformation. In

  10. The Acinetobacter baumannii biofilm-associated protein plays a role in adherence to human epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Brossard, Kari A; Campagnari, Anthony A

    2012-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a significant source of nosocomial infections worldwide. This bacterium has the ability to survive and persist on multiple abiotic surfaces in health care facilities, and once a focus has been established, this opportunistic pathogen is difficult to eradicate. This paper demonstrates that the A. baumannii biofilm-associated protein (Bap) is necessary for mature biofilm formation on medically relevant surfaces, including polypropylene, polystyrene, and titanium. Scanning electron microscopy analyses of biofilms show that Bap is required for three-dimensional tower structure and water channel formation. In conjunction with persistence on abiotic surfaces, adherence to eukaryotic cells is an important step in bacterial colonization resulting in infection of the host. We have described Bap as the surface structure involved in adherence of A. baumannii to both normal human bronchial epithelial cells and normal human neonatal keratinocytes. However, Bap is not involved in internalization of the bacterium in these two cell lines. Furthermore, this study shows that the presence of Bap increases the bacterial cell surface hydrophobicity. The results of this study are pertinent, as the data lead to a better understanding of the role of Bap in biofilm formation on medical surfaces and in colonization of the host.

  11. Urokinase and the intestinal mucosa: evidence for a role in epithelial cell turnover

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, P; Birchall, I; Rosella, O; Albert, V; Finch, C; Barkla, D; Young, G

    1998-01-01

    Background—The functions of urokinase in intestinal epithelia are unknown. 
Aims—To determine the relation of urokinase expressed by intestinal epithelial cells to their position in the crypt-villus/surface axis and of mucosal urokinase activity to epithelial proliferative kinetics in the distal colon. 
Methods—Urokinase expression was examined immunohistochemically in human intestinal mucosa. Urokinase activity was measured colorimetrically in epithelial cells isolated sequentially from the crypt-villus axis of the rat small intestine. In separate experiments, urokinase activity and epithelial kinetics (measured stathmokinetically) were measured in homogenates of distal colonic mucosa of 14 groups of eight rats fed diets known to alter epithelial turnover. 
Results—From the crypt base, an ascending gradient of expression and activity of urokinase was associated with the epithelial cells. Median mucosal urokinase activities in each of the dietary groups of rats correlated positively with autologous median number of metaphase arrests per crypt (r=0.68; p<0.005) and per 100 crypt cells (r=0.75; p<0.001), but not with crypt column height. 
Conclusions—Localisation of an enzyme capable of leading to digestion of cell substratum in the region where cells are loosely attached to their basement membrane, and the association of its activity with indexes of cell turnover, suggest a role for urokinase in facilitating epithelial cell loss in the intestine. 

 Keywords: urokinase; intestinal epithelium; colon; epithelial proliferation PMID:9824347

  12. Differential localization of LGR5 and Nanog in clusters of colon cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Amsterdam, Abraham; Raanan, Calanit; Schreiber, Letizia; Freyhan, Ora; Fabrikant, Yakov; Melzer, Ehud; Givol, David

    2013-05-01

    One paradigm of cancer development claims that cancer emerges at the niche of tissue stem cells and these cells continue to proliferate in the tumor as cancer stem cells. LGR5, a membrane receptor, was recently found to be a marker of normal colon stem cells in colon polyps and is also expressed in colon cancer stem cells. Nanog, an embryonic stem cell nuclear factor, is expressed in several embryonic tissues, but Nanog expression is not well documented in cancerous stem cells. Our aim was to examine whether both LGR5 and Nanog are expressed in the same clusters of colon stem cells or cancer stem cells, using immunocytochemistry with specific antibodies to each antigen. We analyzed this aspect using paraffin embedded tumor tissue sections obtained from 18 polyps and 36 colon cancer specimens at stages I-IV. Antibodies to LGR5 revealed membrane and cytoplasm immunostaining of scattered labeled cells in normal crypts, with no labeling of Nanog. However, in close proximity to the tumors, staining to LGR5 was much more intensive in the crypts, including that of the epithelial cells. In cancer tissue, positive LGR5 clusters of stem cells were observed mainly in poorly differentiated tumors and in only a few scattered cells in the highly differentiated tumors. In contrast, antibodies to Nanog mainly stained the growing edges of carcinoma cells, leaving the poorly differentiated tumor cells unlabeled, including the clustered stem cells that could be detected even by direct morphological examination. In polyp tissues, scattered labeled cells were immunostained with antibodies to Nanog and to a much lesser extent with antibodies to LGR5. We conclude that expression of LGR5 is probably specific to stem cells of poorly differentiated tumors, whereas Nanog is mainly expressed at the edges of highly differentiated tumors. However, some of the cell layers adjacent to the carcinoma cell layers that still remained undifferentiated, expressed mainly Nanog with only a few cells

  13. Intraepithelial lymphocytes in normal human intestine do not express proteins associated with cytolytic function.

    PubMed Central

    Chott, A.; Gerdes, D.; Spooner, A.; Mosberger, I.; Kummer, J. A.; Ebert, E. C.; Blumberg, R. S.; Balk, S. P.

    1997-01-01

    Human small intestine contains a very large population of intraepithelial T lymphocytes (IELs) that are oligoclonal, appear functionally to be cytolytic T cells, and may contribute to the normal and pathological turnover of intestinal epithelial cells. This report addresses the cytolytic function of IELs in normal small intestine by examining their expression of molecules that carry out cell-mediated cytolysis. Immunohistochemical analyses of granzyme B, perforin, Fas ligand, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha demonstrated these proteins were not expressed by small intestinal IELs in situ. These proteins also were not expressed by colonic IELs or by lamina propria lymphocytes in the small or large intestine. Granzyme A, however, was expressed by a large fraction of IELs. In contrast to these in situ results, isolated and in vitro activated IELs were shown to express effector proteins consistent with cytolytic T cells, including granzyme B, Fas ligand, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interferon-gamma. These results are most consistent with the vast majority of IELs in normal human small intestine being resting cytolytic T cells and suggest that these cells do not contribute to the apoptotic cell death of epithelial cells in normal intestine. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9250156

  14. Radionuclide transit in patients with colon interposition

    SciTech Connect

    Isolauri, J.; Koskinen, M.O.; Markkula, H.

    1987-10-01

    To assess radionuclide transit in interposed segments of the colon, we examined 25 patients with colon interposition for benign esophageal disease. No such assessment has been reported previously. The most common indications for operation were esophageal strictures that developed after lye ingestion and reflux strictures not responding to other treatment. The operations were performed without thoracotomy by blunt esophageal dissection in 80% of the patients. There were 18 antiperistaltic and seven isoperistaltic colon grafts. A large-field gamma camera and computer system were used. Data were collected at time intervals of 0.5 second during the first 30 seconds and at intervals of 30 seconds up to 20 minutes. The 5% and 90% stomach filling times, times to 50% and 25% activity levels, and residual activity levels as a percentage of the maxima were calculated in the upper, middle, and lower thirds of the colon grafts and of the normal esophagus of 10 healthy control subjects. The examinations were performed with the subject in a sitting position. All parameters showed that emptying of the colon graft was markedly slower than that of the normal esophagus. The intra-abdominal third of the graft had a residual activity of 50.5% +/- 15.7% after 20 minutes' observation. No differences between antiperistaltic and isoperistaltic grafts were observed. Reconstruction with proximal cologastric anastomosis and a short intra-abdominal colon graft segments is suggested.

  15. Translocations in epithelial cancers

    PubMed Central

    Chad Brenner, J.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.

    2009-01-01

    Genomic translocations leading to the expression of chimeric transcripts characterize several hematologic, mesenchymal and epithelial malignancies. While several gene fusions have been linked to essential molecular events in hematologic malignancies, the identification and characterization of recurrent chimeric transcripts in epithelial cancers has been limited. However, the recent discovery of the recurrent gene fusions in prostate cancer has sparked a revitalization of the quest to identify novel rearrangements in epithelial malignancies. Here, the molecular mechanisms of gene fusions that drive several epithelial cancers and the recent technological advances that increase the speed and reliability of recurrent gene fusion discovery are explored. PMID:19406209

  16. Insulin-like growth factors and their binding proteins in human colonocytes: preferential degradation of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 in colonic cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Michell, N. P.; Langman, M. J.; Eggo, M. C.

    1997-01-01

    We have compared the expression of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs) in ten paired samples of normal and tumour colonic tissue with regard to both mRNA and protein. We have compared sensitivity of these tissues to IGF-I using primary cultures of epithelial cells of colonic mucosa, and we have examined the production of IGFs and IGFBPs by these cells. In the tissues, IGFBP-2 mRNA was expressed in all normal and cancer samples but other IGFBPs showed variable expression. mRNAs for IGF-I were expressed in all normal and cancer tissues but IGF-II mRNA was only detected in cancer tissue (3 out of 10). Immunostaining of sections of normal and cancer tissue was negative for IGF-I and IGF-II; IGFBP-2 was positive in 2 out of 10 cancer tissues and 7 out of 10 normal tissues; IGFBP-3 was positive in 7 out of 10 cancer tissues and 7 out of 10 normal tissues; and IGFBP-4 was positive in 5 out of 10 cancer tissues and 6 out of 10 normal tissues. In the cells in culture, cancer cells showed increased incorporation of [35S]methionine into protein and [3H]thymidine into DNA (P < 0.02) when treated with IGF-I. Western blotting of serum-free conditioned media from cells in culture showed that 8 out of 10 normal and 3 out of 10 cancer cultures produced a 32-kDa immunoreactive IGFBP-2. No IGFBP-3 was secreted by any culture but 24-kDa IGFBP-4 was found in 3 out of 10 normal and 5 out of 10 cancer tissues. Because of the discrepancy between mRNA and protein expression for IGFBP-2, degradation of native IGFBPs was assessed using tissue extracts. Colon cancer extracts were able to degrade exogenous IGFBP-2, IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-4, whereas normal tissue extracts were without effect on IGFBP-2. We conclude that IGFBPs are synthesized and secreted by cells of the colonic mucosa but that proteolysis of secreted IGFBP-2 occurs in colon cancer tissue. This selective degradation may confer a growth advantage. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5

  17. Sulforaphane Preconditioning Sensitizes Human Colon Cancer Cells towards the Bioreductive Anticancer Prodrug PR-104A.

    PubMed

    Erzinger, Melanie M; Bovet, Cédric; Hecht, Katrin M; Senger, Sabine; Winiker, Pascale; Sobotzki, Nadine; Cristea, Simona; Beerenwinkel, Niko; Shay, Jerry W; Marra, Giancarlo; Wollscheid, Bernd; Sturla, Shana J

    2016-01-01

    The chemoprotective properties of sulforaphane (SF), derived from cruciferous vegetables, are widely acknowledged to arise from its potent induction of xenobiotic-metabolizing and antioxidant enzymes. However, much less is known about the impact of SF on the efficacy of cancer therapy through the modulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes. To identify proteins modulated by a low concentration of SF, we treated HT29 colon cancer cells with 2.5 μM SF. Protein abundance changes were detected by stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture. Among 18 proteins found to be significantly up-regulated, aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3), bioactivating the DNA cross-linking prodrug PR-104A, was further characterized. Preconditioning HT29 cells with SF reduced the EC50 of PR-104A 3.6-fold. The increase in PR-104A cytotoxicity was linked to AKR1C3 abundance and activity, both induced by SF in a dose-dependent manner. This effect was reproducible in a second colon cancer cell line, SW620, but not in other colon cancer cell lines where AKR1C3 abundance and activity were absent or barely detectable and could not be induced by SF. Interestingly, SF had no significant influence on PR-104A cytotoxicity in non-cancerous, immortalized human colonic epithelial cell lines expressing either low or high levels of AKR1C3. In conclusion, the enhanced response of PR-104A after preconditioning with SF was apparent only in cancer cells provided that AKR1C3 is expressed, while its expression in non-cancerous cells did not elicit such a response. Therefore, a subset of cancers may be susceptible to combined food-derived component and prodrug treatments with no harm to normal tissues. PMID:26950072

  18. Sulforaphane Preconditioning Sensitizes Human Colon Cancer Cells towards the Bioreductive Anticancer Prodrug PR-104A

    PubMed Central

    Erzinger, Melanie M.; Bovet, Cédric; Hecht, Katrin M.; Senger, Sabine; Winiker, Pascale; Sobotzki, Nadine; Cristea, Simona; Beerenwinkel, Niko; Shay, Jerry W.; Marra, Giancarlo; Wollscheid, Bernd; Sturla, Shana J.

    2016-01-01

    The chemoprotective properties of sulforaphane (SF), derived from cruciferous vegetables, are widely acknowledged to arise from its potent induction of xenobiotic-metabolizing and antioxidant enzymes. However, much less is known about the impact of SF on the efficacy of cancer therapy through the modulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes. To identify proteins modulated by a low concentration of SF, we treated HT29 colon cancer cells with 2.5 μM SF. Protein abundance changes were detected by stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture. Among 18 proteins found to be significantly up-regulated, aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3), bioactivating the DNA cross-linking prodrug PR-104A, was further characterized. Preconditioning HT29 cells with SF reduced the EC50 of PR-104A 3.6-fold. The increase in PR-104A cytotoxicity was linked to AKR1C3 abundance and activity, both induced by SF in a dose-dependent manner. This effect was reproducible in a second colon cancer cell line, SW620, but not in other colon cancer cell lines where AKR1C3 abundance and activity were absent or barely detectable and could not be induced by SF. Interestingly, SF had no significant influence on PR-104A cytotoxicity in non-cancerous, immortalized human colonic epithelial cell lines expressing either low or high levels of AKR1C3. In conclusion, the enhanced response of PR-104A after preconditioning with SF was apparent only in cancer cells provided that AKR1C3 is expressed, while its expression in non-cancerous cells did not elicit such a response. Therefore, a subset of cancers may be susceptible to combined food-derived component and prodrug treatments with no harm to normal tissues. PMID:26950072

  19. Water and electrolyte absorption by the colon in tropical sprue.

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishna, B S; Mathan, V I

    1982-01-01

    A defect in colonic absorption of electrolytes and water was demonstrated in patients with tropical sprue by perfusing the colon with normal saline containing a non-absorbable marker. Colonic water absorption correlated negatively with stool weight and was abnormal in patients with steatorrhoea. The possible mechanisms producing this defect are discussed. This defect may be related to colonocyte damage produced by unabsorbed unsaturated fatty acids in patients with steatorrhoea. PMID:7117904

  20. Clinical significance of HOTAIR expression in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Zhi-Fen; Zhao, Dan; Li, Xi-Qing; Cui, Yong-Xia; Ma, Ning; Lu, Chuang-Xin; Liu, Ming-Yue; Zhou, Yun

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To detect the expression of the long noncoding RNA HOTAIR in colon cancer and analyze its relationship with clinicopathological parameters of colon cancer. METHODS: Total RNA was extracted from 80 colon cancer tissues and matched tumor-adjacent normal colon tissues and reverse transcribed. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to detect the expression of HOTAIR. The relationship between the expression of HOTAIR and clinicopathological parameters of colon cancer was analyzed. RESULTS: The expression of HOTAIR was significantly higher in colon cancer tissues than in matched tumor-adjacent normal colon tissues (P < 0.05). HOTAIR expression was significantly higher in cases with lymph node metastasis than in those without metastasis; in lowly differentiated and undifferentiated cases than in highly and moderately differentiated cases; and in stages III + IV cases than in stages I + II cases (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: HOTAIR expression is upregulated in colon cancer, suggesting that HOTAIR plays an important role in the tumorigenesis, development and metastasis of colon cancer. HOTAIR may act as an oncogene and represents a new molecular target for the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:27298568

  1. Ciliary neurotrophic factor promotes the activation of corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells and accelerates corneal epithelial wound healing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qingjun; Chen, Peng; Di, Guohu; Zhang, Yangyang; Wang, Yao; Qi, Xia; Duan, Haoyun; Xie, Lixin

    2015-05-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), a well-known neuroprotective cytokine, has been found to play an important role in neurogenesis and functional regulations of neural stem cells. As one of the most innervated tissue, however, the role of CNTF in cornea epithelium remains unclear. This study was to explore the roles and mechanisms of CNTF in the activation of corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells and wound healing of both normal and diabetic mouse corneal epithelium. In mice subjecting to mechanical removal of corneal epithelium, the corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cell activation and wound healing were promoted by exogenous CNTF application, while delayed by CNTF neutralizing antibody. In cultured corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells, CNTF enhanced the colony-forming efficiency, stimulated the mitogenic proliferation, and upregulated the expression levels of corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cell-associated transcription factors. Furthermore, the promotion of CNTF on the corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cell activation and wound healing was mediated by the activation of STAT3. Moreover, in diabetic mice, the content of CNTF in corneal epithelium decreased significantly when compared with that of normal mice, and the supplement of CNTF promoted the diabetic corneal epithelial wound healing, accompanied with the advanced activation of corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells and the regeneration of corneal nerve fibers. Thus, the capability of expanding corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells and promoting corneal epithelial wound healing and nerve regeneration indicates the potential application of CNTF in ameliorating limbal stem cell deficiency and treating diabetic keratopathy.

  2. Bile acids reduce the apoptosis-inducing effects of sodium butyrate on human colon adenoma (AA/C1) cells: implications for colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    McMillan, L; Butcher, S; Wallis, Y; Neoptolemos, J P; Lord, J M

    2000-06-24

    Butyrate is produced in the colon by fermentation of dietary fibre and induces apoptosis in colon adenoma and cancer cell lines, which may contribute to the protective effect of a high fibre diet against colorectal cancer (CRC). However, butyrate is present in the colon together with unconjugated bile acids, which are tumour promoters in the colon. We show here that bile acids deoxycholate (DCA) and chenodeoxycholate (CDCA), at levels present in the colon, gave a modest increase in cell proliferation and decreased spontaneous apoptosis in AA/C1 adenoma cells. Bile acids significantly inhibited the induction of apoptosis by butyrate in AA/C1 cells. However, the survival-inducing effects of bile acids on AA/C1 cells could be overcome by increasing the concentration of sodium butyrate. These results suggest that dysregulation of apoptosis in colonic epithelial cells by dietary factors is a key factor in the pathophysiology of CRC.

  3. Dimethoxy Curcumin Induces Apoptosis by Suppressing Survivin and Inhibits Invasion by Enhancing E-Cadherin in Colon Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Dai, Fang; Chen, Zhehang; Wang, Saisai; Cheng, Xiaobin; Sheng, Qinsong; Lin, Jianjiang; Chen, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Dimethoxy curcumin (DMC) is a kind of lipophilic analog of curcumin with great improvement in chemical and metabolic stability. DMC has been studied in breast and renal cancer, but no research in colon cancer has been found yet. MATERIAL AND METHODS Two colon cancer cells (HT-29 and SW480) and one normal human colon mucosal epithelial cell (NCM460) were used in this study. We studied the effect of DMC on the proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Transwell migration assay was used to estimate the inhibition of DMC on invasion. Moreover, the expressions of PARP, caspase-3, survivin and E-cadherin were detected to uncover the related signaling pathways by western blotting assay both in vitro and in vivo. RESULTS DMC significantly inhibited the growth of colon cancer cells in dose-dependent manner; IC50 for DMC was calculated to be 43.4, 28.2 and 454.8µM on HT-29, SW480 and NCM460. DMC significantly increased the apoptosis in both HT-29 (p=0.0051) and SW480 (p=0.0013) cells in vitro, and significantly suppressed the growth of both cell lines in vivo. Moreover, DMC reduced the number of migrated cells in both HT-29 (p=0.007) and SW480 (p=0.004) cells. By western blotting analysis, the cleavage of pro-caspases-3 and PARP were clearly induced by DMC to their active form, while the expression of survivin was reduced and E-cadherin was enhanced in both cells in vitro and in vivo. CONCLUSIONS DMC may exert an effective anti-tumor effect in colon cancer cells by down-regulating survivin and upregulating E-cadherin. PMID:27614381

  4. MicroRNA-155 deletion promotes tumorigenesis in the azoxymethane-dextran sulfate sodium model of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, Kandy T; Enos, Reilly T; McClellan, Jamie L; Cranford, Taryn L; Chatzistamou, Ioulia; Singh, Udai P; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash S; Fan, Daping; Murphy, E Angela

    2016-03-15

    Clinical studies have linked microRNA-155 (miR-155) expression in the tumor microenvironment to poor prognosis. However, whether miR-155 upregulation is predictive of a pro- or antitumorigenic response is unclear, as the limited preclinical data available remain controversial. We examined miR-155 expression in tumor tissue from colon cancer patients. Furthermore, we investigated the role of this microRNA in proliferation and apoptosis, inflammatory processes, immune cell populations, and transforming growth factor-β/SMAD signaling in a chemically induced (azoxymethane-dextran sulfate sodium) mouse model of colitis-associated colon cancer. We found a higher expression of miR-155 in the tumor region than in nontumor colon tissue of patients with colon cancer. Deletion of miR-155 in mice resulted in a greater number of polyps/adenomas, an increased symptom severity score, a higher grade of epithelial dysplasia, and a decrease in survival. Surprisingly, these findings were associated with an increase in apoptosis in the normal mucosa, but there was no change in proliferation. The protumorigenic effects of miR-155 deletion do not appear to be driven solely by dysregulation of inflammation, as both genotypes had relatively similar levels of inflammatory mediators. The enhanced tumorigenic response in miR-155(-/-) mice was associated with alterations in macrophages and neutrophils, as markers for these populations were decreased and increased, respectively. Furthermore, we demonstrated a greater activation of the transforming growth factor-β/SMAD pathway in miR-155(-/-) mice, which was correlated with the increased tumorigenesis. Given the multiple targets of miR-155, careful evaluation of its role in tumorigenesis is necessary prior to any consideration of its potential as a biomarker and/or therapeutic target in colon cancer.

  5. Dimethoxy Curcumin Induces Apoptosis by Suppressing Survivin and Inhibits Invasion by Enhancing E-Cadherin in Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dong; Dai, Fang; Chen, Zhehang; Wang, Saisai; Cheng, Xiaobin; Sheng, Qinsong; Lin, Jianjiang; Chen, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Background Dimethoxy curcumin (DMC) is a kind of lipophilic analog of curcumin with great improvement in chemical and metabolic stability. DMC has been studied in breast and renal cancer, but no research in colon cancer has been found yet. Material/Methods Two colon cancer cells (HT-29 and SW480) and one normal human colon mucosal epithelial cell (NCM460) were used in this study. We studied the effect of DMC on the proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Transwell migration assay was used to estimate the inhibition of DMC on invasion. Moreover, the expressions of PARP, caspase-3, survivin and E-cadherin were detected to uncover the related signaling pathways by western blotting assay both in vitro and in vivo. Results DMC significantly inhibited the growth of colon cancer cells in dose-dependent manner; IC50 for DMC was calculated to be 43.4, 28.2 and 454.8μM on HT-29, SW480 and NCM460. DMC significantly increased the apoptosis in both HT-29 (p=0.0051) and SW480 (p=0.0013) cells in vitro, and significantly suppressed the growth of both cell lines in vivo. Moreover, DMC reduced the number of migrated cells in both HT-29 (p=0.007) and SW480 (p=0.004) cells. By western blotting analysis, the cleavage of pro-caspases-3 and PARP were clearly induced by DMC to their active form, while the expression of survivin was reduced and E-cadherin was enhanced in both cells in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions DMC may exert an effective anti-tumor effect in colon cancer cells by down-regulating survivin and upregulating E-cadherin. PMID:27614381

  6. Diagnostic microRNA markers to screen for sporadic human colon cancer in stool: I. Proof of principle.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Farid E; Ahmed, Nancy C; Vos, Paul W; Bonnerup, Chris; Atkins, James N; Casey, Michelle; Nuovo, Gerard J; Naziri, Wade; Wiley, John E; Mota, Helvecio; Allison, Ron R

    2013-01-01

    To present proof-of-principle application for employing micro(mi)RNAs as diagnostic markers for colon cancer, we carried out global microarray expression studies on stool samples obtained from fifteen individuals (three controls, and three each with TNM stage 0-1, stage 2, stage 3, and stage 4 colon cancer), using Affymetrix GeneChip miRNA 3.0 Array, to select for a panel of miRNA genes for subsequent focused semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis studies. Microarray results showed 202 preferentially expressed miRNA genes that were either increased (141 miRNAs), or reduced (61 miRNAs) in expression. We then conducted a stem-loop reverse transcriptase (RT)-TaqMan® minor groove binding (MGB) probes, followed by a modified qPCR expression study on 20 selected miRNAs. Twelve of the miRNAs exhibited increased and 8 decreased expression in stool from 60 individuals (20 controls, 20 with tumor-lymph node-metastatic (TNM) stage 0-1, 10 with stage 2, five with stage 3, and 5 with stage 4 colon cancer) to quantitatively monitor miRNA changes at various TNM stages of colon cancer progression. We also used laser-capture microdissection (LCM) of colon mucosal epithelial tissue samples (three control samples, and three samples from each of the four stages of colon cancer, for a total of 15 samples) to find concordance or lack thereof with stool findings. The reference housekeeping pseudogene-free ribosomal gene (18S rRNA), which shows little variation in expression, was employed as a normalization standard for relative PCR quantification. Results of the PCR analyses confirmed that twelve miRNAs (miR-7, miR-17, miR-20a, miR-21, miR-92a, miR-96, miR-106a, miR-134, miR-183, miR-196a, miR-199a-3p and miR214) had an increased expression in the stool of patients with colon cancer, and that later TNM carcinoma stages exhibited a more pronounced expression than did adenomas. On the other hand, eight miRNAs (miR-9, miR-29b, miR-127-5p, miR-138, miR-143, miR-146a, mi

  7. Quantitative assessment of cytosolic Salmonella in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Knodler, Leigh A; Nair, Vinod; Steele-Mortimer, Olivia

    2014-01-01

    Within mammalian cells, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) inhabits a membrane-bound vacuole known as the Salmonella-containing vacuole (SCV). We have recently shown that wild type S. Typhimurium also colonizes the cytosol of epithelial cells. Here we sought to quantify the contribution of cytosolic Salmonella to the total population over a time course of infection in different epithelial cell lines and under conditions of altered vacuolar escape. We found that the lysosomotropic agent, chloroquine, acts on vacuolar, but not cytosolic, Salmonella. After chloroquine treatment, vacuolar bacteria are not transcriptionally active or replicative and appear degraded. Using a chloroquine resistance assay, in addition to digitonin permeabilization, we found that S. Typhimurium lyses its nascent vacuole in numerous epithelial cell lines, albeit with different frequencies, and hyper-replication in the cytosol is also widespread. At later times post-infection, cytosolic bacteria account for half of the total population in some epithelial cell lines, namely HeLa and Caco-2 C2Bbe1. Both techniques accurately measured increased vacuole lysis in epithelial cells upon treatment with wortmannin. By chloroquine resistance assay, we also determined that Salmonella pathogenicity island-1 (SPI-1), but not SPI-2, the virulence plasmid nor the flagellar apparatus, was required for vacuolar escape and cytosolic replication in epithelial cells. Together, digitonin permeabilization and the chloroquine resistance assay will be useful, complementary tools for deciphering the mechanisms of SCV lysis and Salmonella replication in the epithelial cell cytosol.

  8. Colon cancer screening

    MedlinePlus

    Screening for colon cancer; Colonoscopy - screening; Sigmoidoscopy - screening; Virtual colonoscopy - screening; Fecal immunochemical test; Stool DNA test; sDNA test; Colorectal cancer - screening; Rectal ...

  9. TRPV3, a thermosensitive channel is expressed in mouse distal colon epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, Takashi; Yamada, Takahiro; Ugawa, Shinya; Ishida, Yusuke; Shimada, Shoichi

    2009-05-22

    The thermo-transient receptor potential (thermoTRP) subfamily is composed of channels that are important in nociception and thermo-sensing. Here, we show a selective expression of TRPV3 channel in the distal colon throughout the gastrointestinal tract. Expression analyses clearly revealed that TRPV3 mRNA and proteins were expressed in the superficial epithelial cells of the distal colon, but not in those of the stomach, duodenum or proximal colon. In a subset of primary epithelial cells cultured from the distal colon, carvacrol, an agonist for TRPV3, elevated cytosolic Ca{sup 2+}concentration in a concentration-dependent manner. This response was inhibited by ruthenium red, a TRPV channel antagonist. Organotypic culture supported that the carvacrol-responsive cells were present in superficial epithelial cells. Moreover, application of carvacrol evoked ATP release in primary colonic epithelial cells. We conclude that TRPV3 is present in absorptive cells in the distal colon and may be involved in a variety of cellular functions.

  10. Colon tumors with the simultaneous induction of driver mutations in APC, KRAS, and PIK3CA still progress through the adenoma-to-carcinoma sequence

    PubMed Central

    Hadac, Jamie N.; Leystra, Alyssa A.; Olson, Terrah J. Paul; Maher, Molly E.; Payne, Susan N; Yueh, Alexander E.; Schwartz, Alexander R.; Albrecht, Dawn M.; Clipson, Linda; Pasch, Cheri A.; Matkowskyj, Kristina A.; Halberg, Richard B.; Deming, Dustin A.

    2015-01-01

    Human colorectal cancers often possess multiple mutations, including 3–6 driver mutations per tumor. The timing of when these mutations occur during tumor development and progression continues to be debated. More advanced lesions carry a greater number of driver mutations, indicating that colon tumors might progress from adenomas to carcinomas through the stepwise accumulation of mutations following tumor initiation. However, mutations that have been implicated in tumor progression have been identified in normal-appearing epithelial cells of the colon, leaving the possibility that these mutations might be present prior to the initiation of tumorigenesis. We utilized mouse models of colon cancer to investigate whether tumorigenesis still occurs through the adenoma-to-carcinoma sequence when multiple mutations are present at the time of tumor initiation. To create a model in which tumors could concomitantly possess mutations in Apc, Kras, and Pik3ca, we developed a novel minimally invasive technique to administer an adenovirus expressing Cre recombinase to a focal region of the colon. Here we demonstrate that the presence of these additional driver mutations at the time of tumor initiation results in increased tumor multiplicity and an increased rate of progression to invasive adenocarcinomas. These cancers can even metastasize to retroperitoneal lymph nodes or the liver. However, despite having as many as three concomitant driver mutations at the time of initiation, these tumors still proceed through the adenoma-to-carcinoma sequence. PMID:26276752

  11. HDAC turnover, CtIP acetylation and dysregulated DNA damage signaling in colon cancer cells treated with sulforaphane and related dietary isothiocyanates.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Praveen; Kidane, Ariam I; Yu, Tian-Wei; Dashwood, Wan-Mohaiza; Bisson, William H; Löhr, Christiane V; Ho, Emily; Williams, David E; Dashwood, Roderick H

    2013-06-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) and acetyltransferases have important roles in the regulation of protein acetylation, chromatin dynamics and the DNA damage response. Here, we show in human colon cancer cells that dietary isothiocyanates (ITCs) inhibit HDAC activity and increase HDAC protein turnover with the potency proportional to alkyl chain length, i.e., AITC < sulforaphane (SFN) < 6-SFN < 9-SFN. Molecular docking studies provided insights into the interactions of ITC metabolites with HDAC3, implicating the allosteric site between HDAC3 and its co-repressor. ITCs induced DNA double-strand breaks and enhanced the phosphorylation of histone H2AX, ataxia telangiectasia and Ra