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Sample records for normal gonadotropin responsiveness

  1. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor is required for normal gonadotropin responsiveness in the mouse ovary

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, Kimberly R.; Tomic, Dragana; Gupta, Rupesh K.; Babus, Janice K.; Roby, Katherine F.; Terranova, Paul F.; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2007-08-15

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) mediates the toxicity of a variety of environmental chemicals. Although little is known about the physiological role of the AHR, studies suggest that it plays an important role in regulating ovulation because Ahr deficient (AhRKO) mice have a reduced number of ovulations compared to wild-type (WT) mice. The reasons for the reduced ability of AhRKO mice to ovulate are unknown. Normal ovulation, however, requires estrous cyclicity, appropriate luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels, and LH and FSH responsiveness. Thus, the purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that Ahr deletion regulates ovulation by altering cyclicity, FSH and LH levels, follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (Fshr) and luteinizing hormone receptor (Lhcgr) levels and/or gonadotropin responsiveness. The data indicate that AhRKO and WT mice have similar levels of FSH and LH, but AhRKO mice have reduced Fshr and Lhcgr mRNA levels compared to WT mice. Furthermore, AhRKO ovaries contain fewer corpora lutea compared to WT ovaries after 5 IU equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) treatment. Lastly, both AhRKO and WT mice ovulate a similar number of eggs in response to 5 IU human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), but AhRKO mice ovulate fewer eggs than WT mice in response to 2.5 IU and 1.25 IU hCG. Collectively, these data indicate that AhRKO follicles have a reduced capacity to ovulate compared to WT follicles and that this is due to reduced responsiveness to gonadotropins. Thus, in addition to mediating toxicity of environmental chemicals, the Ahr is required for normal ovulation.

  2. WNT5a is required for normal ovarian follicle development and antagonizes gonadotropin responsiveness in granulosa cells by suppressing canonical WNT signaling.

    PubMed

    Abedini, Atefeh; Zamberlam, Gustavo; Lapointe, Evelyne; Tourigny, Catherine; Boyer, Alexandre; Paquet, Marilène; Hayashi, Kanako; Honda, Hiroaki; Kikuchi, Akira; Price, Christopher; Boerboom, Derek

    2016-04-01

    Whereas the roles of the canonical wingless-type MMTV (mouse mammary tumor virus) integration site family (WNT) signaling pathway in the regulation of ovarian follicle growth and steroidogenesis are now established, noncanonical WNT signaling in the ovary has been largely overlooked. Noncanonical WNTs, including WNT5a and WNT11, are expressed in granulosa cells (GCs) and are differentially regulated throughout follicle development, but their physiologic roles remain unknown. Using conditional gene targeting, we found that GC-specific inactivation ofWnt5a(but notWnt11) results in the female subfertility associated with increased follicular atresia and decreased rates of ovulation. Microarray analyses have revealed that WNT5a acts to down-regulate the expression of FSH-responsive genesin vitro, and corresponding increases in the expression of these genes have been found in the GCs of conditional knockout mice. Unexpectedly, we found that WNT5a regulates its target genes not by signalingviathe WNT/Ca(2+)or planar cell polarity pathways, but rather by inhibiting the canonical pathway, causing both β-catenin (CTNNB1) and cAMP responsive element binding (CREB) protein levels to decreaseviaa glycogen synthase kinase-3β-dependent mechanism. We further found that WNT5a prevents follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing protein from up-regulating the CTNNB1 and CREB proteins and their target genes, indicating that WNT5a functions as a physiologic inhibitor of gonadotropin signaling. Together, these findings identify WNT5a as a key regulator of follicle development and gonadotropin responsiveness.-Abedini, A., Zamberlam, G., Lapointe, E., Tourigny, C., Boyer, A., Paquet, M., Hayashi, K., Honda, H., Kikuchi, A., Price, C., Boerboom, D. WNT5a is required for normal ovarian follicle development and antagonizes gonadotropin responsiveness in granulosa cells by suppressing canonical WNT signaling.

  3. WNT5a is required for normal ovarian follicle development and antagonizes gonadotropin responsiveness in granulosa cells by suppressing canonical WNT signaling

    PubMed Central

    Abedini, Atefeh; Zamberlam, Gustavo; Lapointe, Evelyne; Tourigny, Catherine; Boyer, Alexandre; Paquet, Marilène; Hayashi, Kanako; Honda, Hiroaki; Kikuchi, Akira; Price, Christopher; Boerboom, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Whereas the roles of the canonical wingless-type MMTV (mouse mammary tumor virus) integration site family (WNT) signaling pathway in the regulation of ovarian follicle growth and steroidogenesis are now established, noncanonical WNT signaling in the ovary has been largely overlooked. Noncanonical WNTs, including WNT5a and WNT11, are expressed in granulosa cells (GCs) and are differentially regulated throughout follicle development, but their physiologic roles remain unknown. Using conditional gene targeting, we found that GC-specific inactivation of Wnt5a (but not Wnt11) results in the female subfertility associated with increased follicular atresia and decreased rates of ovulation. Microarray analyses have revealed that WNT5a acts to down-regulate the expression of FSH-responsive genes in vitro, and corresponding increases in the expression of these genes have been found in the GCs of conditional knockout mice. Unexpectedly, we found that WNT5a regulates its target genes not by signaling via the WNT/Ca2+ or planar cell polarity pathways, but rather by inhibiting the canonical pathway, causing both β-catenin (CTNNB1) and cAMP responsive element binding (CREB) protein levels to decrease via a glycogen synthase kinase-3β-dependent mechanism. We further found that WNT5a prevents follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing protein from up-regulating the CTNNB1 and CREB proteins and their target genes, indicating that WNT5a functions as a physiologic inhibitor of gonadotropin signaling. Together, these findings identify WNT5a as a key regulator of follicle development and gonadotropin responsiveness.—Abedini, A., Zamberlam, G., Lapointe, E., Tourigny, C., Boyer, A., Paquet, M., Hayashi, K., Honda, H., Kikuchi, A., Price, C., Boerboom, D. WNT5a is required for normal ovarian follicle development and antagonizes gonadotropin responsiveness in granulosa cells by suppressing canonical WNT signaling. PMID:26667040

  4. Comparison between spontaneous gonadotropin concentration profiles and gonadotropin response to low-dose gonadotropin-releasing hormone in prepubertal and early pubertal boys and patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism: assessment by using ultrasensitive, time-resolved immunofluorometric assay.

    PubMed

    Goji, K; Tanikaze, S

    1992-05-01

    To assess whether nocturnal gonadotropin concentration profiles in children could be predicted by measurement of peak gonadotropin levels after gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) administration, we measured spontaneous gonadotropin levels every 20 min and the gonadotropin responses to low-dose GnRH using an ultrasensitive, time-resolved immunofluorometric assay in 61 boys with short stature and/or delayed puberty. Spontaneous nocturnal LH pulses were observed in 58 out of 61 patients. After GnRH administration in a dose of 25 ng/kg, all of the 61 patients had significant LH and FSH responses, and GnRH-stimulated peak LH and FSH levels were highly correlated with maximal spontaneous nocturnal LH and FSH levels, respectively (r = 0.83 for LH and r = 0.91 for FSH; p less than 0.00001). Analysis of individual subjects revealed that GnRH-stimulated peak LH levels were almost identical to maximal nocturnal LH levels in the subjects whose GnRH-stimulated peak LH levels were between 5 and 10 IU/L, whereas GnRH-stimulated peak LH levels tended to be higher than maximal nocturnal levels in the subjects whose GnRH-stimulated peak LH levels were 5 IU/L or lower. To determine if there were any parameters in the gonadotropin response to GnRH that might be useful in distinguishing early pubertal boys from prepubertal boys, we evaluated the gonadotropin response to GnRH in 44 prepubertal and 10 early pubertal normal short boys. Although maximal nocturnal LH levels did not overlap between prepubertal and pubertal groups, GnRH-stimulated LH peak levels overlapped considerably between the two groups. Even the GnRH-stimulated peak LH to peak FSH ratio overlapped between the two groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Gonadotropin-induced testosterone response in peripubertal male alligators.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Thea M; Gunderson, Mark P; Milnes, Matthew R; Guillette, Louis J

    2004-02-01

    Based on the response to three different gonadotropin challenges, we evaluated seasonal production of testosterone in a group of captive-raised four-year-old male alligators that varied in size. To stimulate gonadal steroidogenesis, we injected each alligator with ovine FSH (150 ng/ml plasma). Plasma testosterone concentrations were measured in repeated blood samples taken between 0 and 72 h after FSH injection. To determine if there was seasonal variation in response, we repeated the experiment on the same alligators three times during the breeding season (March, May, and July, 2000). All alligators responded to exogenous FSH by exhibiting increased plasma concentrations of testosterone (p < 0.0001 for all months). However, the degree of the response depended on body size. Thus, larger alligators produced more testosterone and were more affected by changes in season compared to smaller alligators. We have previously observed that juvenile male alligators display seasonal changes in plasma testosterone concentrations that mimic the cycle observed in adult males. Our present data suggest that seasonal changes in plasma testosterone appear to be associated not only with changes in gonadotropin release but in gonadal responsiveness as well. We propose, given these observations, that alligators experience an extended period of puberty, during which the gonads synthesize gradually increasing steroid hormone concentrations. These peripubertal animals are not juveniles but sub-adults capable of responding to the seasonal signals associated with reproductive timing in adults.

  6. Effects of soy consumption on gonadotropin secretion and acute pituitary responses to gonadotropin-releasing hormone in women.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, Jill; Lasley, Bill L; Nakajima, Steven T; Setchell, Kenneth D R; Schneeman, Barbara O

    2002-04-01

    Soy contains the isoflavone phytoestrogens, genistein and daidzein. These isoflavones are partial estrogen agonists in cell and animal models, but effects from dietary soy in humans are unclear. Experiments were conducted in pre- and postmenopausal women to examine whether dietary isoflavones from soy behave as estrogen agonists, antagonists or have no effect on the estrogen-sensitive pituitary. Pituitary sensitivity to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), an estrogen-sensitive endpoint, was measured during GnRH challenge tests administered before, during and after dietary soy consumption. The response to an isoflavone-rich soy food diet was examined in five premenopausal and seven postmenopausal women using transdermal estrogen replacement therapy. Estrogen agonists suppress gonadotropin concentrations and enhance GnRH priming (enhanced gonadotropin secretion in response to repeated doses of GnRH), whereas antagonists elevate gonadotropin concentrations and have no effect on GnRH priming. Each subject consumed 50 g textured soy protein containing 60 mg total isoflavones daily for 10-14 d. Baseline estradiol concentrations were consistent among study periods. In both pre- and postmenopausal women, soy consumption did not affect mean baseline or peak luteinizing hormone (LH) concentrations, indicating a lack of estrogen-like effect at the level of the pituitary. However, in postmenopausal subjects, mean LH secretion decreased after discontinuing soy, suggesting a residual estrogenic effect. In one premenopausal woman, enhanced LH secretion was observed after soy treatment, suggesting there may be subpopulations of women who are highly sensitive to isoflavones.

  7. Polymorphisms in gonadotropin and gonadotropin receptor genes as markers of ovarian reserve and response in in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    La Marca, Antonio; Sighinolfi, Giovanna; Argento, Cindy; Grisendi, Valentina; Casarini, Livio; Volpe, Annibale; Simoni, Manuela

    2013-03-15

    Since gonadotropins are the fundamental hormones that control ovarian activity, genetic polymorphisms may alter gonadal responsiveness to glycoproteins; hence they are important regulators of hormone activity at the target level. The establishment of the pool of primordial follicles takes place during fetal life and is mainly under genetic control. Consequently, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in gonadotropins and their receptors do not seem to be associated with any significant modification in the endowment of nongrowing follicles in the ovary. Indeed, the age at menopause, a biological characteristic strongly related to ovarian reserve, as well as markers of functional ovarian reserve such as anti-Müllerian hormone and antral follicle count, are not different in women with different genetic variants. Conversely, some polymorphisms in FSH receptor (FSHR) seem to be associated with modifications in ovarian activity. In particular, studies suggest that the Ser680 genotype for FSHR is a factor of relative resistance to FSH stimulation resulting in slightly higher FSH serum levels, thus leading to a prolonged duration of the menstrual cycle. Moreover, some FSHR gene polymorphisms show a positive association with ovarian response to exogenous gonadotropin administration, hence exhibiting some potential for a pharmacogenetic estimation of the FSH dosage in controlled ovarian stimulation. The study of SNPs of the FSHR gene is an interesting field of research that could provide us with new information about the way each woman responds to exogenous gonadotropin administration during ovulation induction.

  8. Development of gonadotropin-releasing hormone secretion and pituitary response.

    PubMed

    Glanowska, Katarzyna M; Burger, Laura L; Moenter, Suzanne M

    2014-11-05

    Acquisition of a mature pattern of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion from the CNS is a hallmark of the pubertal process. Little is known about GnRH release during sexual maturation, but it is assumed to be minimal before later stages of puberty. We studied spontaneous GnRH secretion in brain slices from male mice during perinatal and postnatal development using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) to detect directly the oxidation of secreted GnRH. There was good correspondence between the frequency of GnRH release detected by FSCV in the median eminence of slices from adults with previous reports of in vivo luteinizing hormone (LH) pulse frequency. The frequency of GnRH release in the late embryonic stage was surprisingly high, reaching a maximum in newborns and remaining elevated in 1-week-old animals despite low LH levels. Early high-frequency GnRH release was similar in wild-type and kisspeptin knock-out mice indicating that this release is independent of kisspeptin-mediated excitation. In vivo treatment with testosterone or in vitro treatment with gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) reduced GnRH release frequency in slices from 1-week-old mice. RF9, a putative GnIH antagonist, restored GnRH release in slices from testosterone-treated mice, suggesting that testosterone inhibition may be GnIH-dependent. At 2-3 weeks, GnRH release is suppressed before attaining adult patterns. Reduction in early life spontaneous GnRH release frequency coincides with the onset of the ability of exogenous GnRH to induce pituitary LH secretion. These findings suggest that lack of pituitary secretory response, not lack of GnRH release, initially blocks downstream activation of the reproductive system.

  9. Strength-duration characteristics of estrogen effects on gonadotropin response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone in women. I. Effects of varying duration of estradiol administration.

    PubMed

    Keye, W R; Jaffe, R B

    1975-12-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of increased serum concentrations of estradiol of varying durations upon the gonadotropin responses to synthetic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH or LRF). Beginning at 8:00 PM on the first day of the menstrual cycle, subjects received im injections of estradiol benzoate (E2B), 5 mug/kg initially, followed by 2.5 mug/kg every 12 h for a total of 3, 5, 7, 9, or 11 injections. Twelve h after the last E2B injection, or 36, 60, 84, 108, or 132 h after the first injection of E2B (2 subjects at each time interval), each subject received 100 mug GnRH, iv. In addition, each subject received 100 mug GnRH iv during one of the seven days of the antecedent (control) menstrual cycle during which no exogenous estradiol was administered. When GnRH was infused 36 h after the initiation of E2B pretreatment, there was no significant LH or FSH increase. In contrast, LH and FSH responses were augmented and prolonged when compared with control cycles when GnRH was administered at 84, 108, or 132 h. At 60 h, responses of LH were augmented, although not to as great a degree. FSH responses were not augmented at 60 h. Expressed as maximal increase from baseline, gonadotropin responses following E2B were 1 1/2 to 9 times those achieved during control cycles (without E2B). Since mean serum estradiol concentrations at 36 h (185.9 +/- 20.0), when gonadotropin responses were absent, were similar to those at 60 (157.7 +/- 31.6), 84 (186.2 +/- 38.1), 108 (181.3 +/- 46.7), and 132 h (128.0 +/- 43.0 pg/ml), when responses were augmented, these results support the concept that the modulating effect of estradiol on pituitary response is dependent upon the duration of exposure of the hypothalamic-pituitary system to increased concentrations of estradiol. It is probable that the duration of the late follicular phase rise in serum estradiol is responsible, at least in part, for the augmented gonadotropin response seen at midcycle.

  10. Regulation of gonadotropin receptors, gonadotropin responsiveness, and cell multiplication by somatomedin-C and insulin in cultured pig Leydig cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bernier, M.; Chatelain, P.; Mather, J.P.; Saez, J.M.

    1986-11-01

    The author have investigated the effects of insulin and somatomedin-C/insulin like growth factor I(Sm-C) in purified porcine Leydig cells in vitro on gonadotrophins (hCG) receptor number, hCG responsiveness (cAMP and testosterone production), and thymidine incorporation into DNA. Leydig cells cultured in a serum-free medium containing transferrin, vitamin E, and insulin (5 ..mu..g/ml) maintained fairly constant both hCG receptors and hCG responsiveness. When they were cultured for 3 days in the same medium without insulin, there was a dramatic decline (more than 80%) in both hCG receptor number and hCG responsiveness. However the cAMP but not the testosterone response to forskolin was normal. Both insulin and Sm-C at nanomolar concentrations prevent the decline of both hCG receptors and hCG-induced cAMP production. At nanomolar concentrations, Sm-C and insulin enhanced hCG-induced testosterone production but the effect of Sm-C was significantly higher than that of insulin. However, the effect of insulin at higher concentrations (5 ..mu..g/ml) was significantly higher than that of Sm-C at 50 ng/ml. In contrast, at nanomolar concentrations only Sm-C stimulated (/sup 3/H)-thymidine incorporation into DNA and cell multiplication, the stimulatory effect of insulin on these parameters, was seen only at micromolar concentrations. These results indicate that both Sm-C and insulin acting through the receptors increase Leydig cell steroidogenic responsiveness to hCG by increasing hCG receptor number and improving some step beyond cAMP formation. In contrast, the mitogenic effects of insulin are mediated only through Sm-C receptors.

  11. Withholding gonadotropins until human chorionic gonadotropin administration.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Rony; Kligman, Isaac; Davis, Owen; Rosenwaks, Zev

    2010-11-01

    Withholding gonadotropins in women who exhibit high estradiol responses before follicles reach full maturation is called "coasting." Coasting, or suspending gonadotropin administration, can be an effective strategy for decreasing the risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) while reducing cancelation rates. In in vitro fertilization cycles, mechanistically it is believed that withholding gonadotropins starves smaller follicles, induces apoptosis, and decreases the potential for these follicles to elaborate vascular endothelial growth factor, a known mediator of OHSS. It is generally accepted that coasting should be initiated when the estradiol (E₂) level is >3000 pg/mL in the setting of immature follicles. The human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) trigger should be administered when the E₂ level subsequently drops to a "safe" level. Cycle cancellation should be considered if, after 3 to 4 days of coasting, the E₂ level remains excessively elevated. Oocyte retrieval may also be cancelled if the E₂ level on the day after hCG trigger drops precipitously. In gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa)-based protocols, one can consider withholding GnRHa administration if the E₂ level continues to increase after a few days of coasting. Current data seem to show that the coasting period is short and/or is less likely to be required in GnRH-antagonist protocols as compared with GnRHa-based protocols. Large randomized control trials are still needed to establish the relative efficacy of coasting versus embryo cryopreservation in the context of OHSS prevention.

  12. Reproductive responses of dairy cows with ovarian cysts to simultaneous human chorionic gonadotropin or gonadotropin-releasing hormone and cloprostenol compared to gonadotropin-releasing hormone alone treatment

    PubMed Central

    Taktaz, T.; Kafi, M.; Mokhtari, Adel; Heidari, M.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Bovine ovarian cysts are a common cause of economic loss in modern dairy herds. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the reproductive responses to three protocols using hCG, GnRH and cloprostenol when the definite diagnosis of the type of ovarian cyst is/is not possible in dairy cows. Materials and Methods: A total of 144 lactating dairy cows with ovarian cysts were divided into three groups. At diagnosis (Day 0), cows in Group 1 (the conventional method, n=47) were injected with 0.02 mg of a GnRH analogue i.m. (Buserelin); cows in Group 2 (n=47) were intramuscularly treated with 0.02 mg Buserelin plus 500 µg cloprostenol; and cows in Group 3 (n=50) were intramuscularly treated with 1500 IU hCG plus 500 µg cloprostenol. All cows received 500 µg cloprostenol intramuscularly on Day 10. Results: No statistically significant differences were found in the recovery time, interval to conception, conception rate at first AI, and pregnancy rates by Days 70 and 100 after treatment among the three groups. Conclusions: Simultaneous treatment of ovarian cysts with hCG or GnRH and cloprostenol appeared to have no advantage over the conventional method, GnRH alone, in dairy cows. Furthermore, hCG and GnRH have an equal therapeutic effect in cows with ovarian cysts. PMID:27047149

  13. Chorionic gonadotropin and its receptor are both expressed in human retina, possible implications in normal and pathological conditions.

    PubMed

    Dukic-Stefanovic, Sladjana; Walther, Jan; Wosch, Sebastian; Zimmermann, Gerolf; Wiedemann, Peter; Alexander, Henry; Claudepierre, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Extra-gonadal role of gonadotropins has been re-evaluated over the last 20 years. In addition to pituitary secretion of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), the CNS has been clearly identified as a source of hCG acting locally to influence behaviour. Here we demonstrated that human retina is producing this gonadotropin that acts as a neuroactive molecule. Müller glial and retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells are producing hCG that may affects neighbour cells expressing its receptor, namely cone photoreceptors. It was previously described that amacrine and retinal ganglion (RGC) cells are targets of the gonadotropin releasing hormone that control the secretion of all gonadotropins. Therefore our findings suggest that a complex neuroendocrine circuit exists in the retina, involving hCG secreting cells (glial and RPE), hCG targets (photoreceptors) and hCG-release controlling cells (amacrine and RGC). The exact physiological functions of this circuit have still to be identified, but the proliferation of photoreceptor-derived tumor induced by hCG demonstrated the need to control this neuroendocrine loop.

  14. Ovarian response to gonadotropin treatment initiated relative to wave emergence in ultrasonographically monitored ewes.

    PubMed

    Rubianes, E; Ungerfeld, R; Viñoles, C; Rivero, A; Adams, G P

    1997-06-01

    Follicular recruitment and luteal response to superovulatory treatment initiated relative to the status of the first wave of the ovine estrous cycle (Wave 1) were studied. All ewes (n = 25) received an intravaginal progestagen sponge to synchronize estrous cycles, and ewes were monitored daily by transrectal ultrasonography. Multiple-dose FSH treatment (total dose = 100 mg NIH-FSH-P1) was initiated on the day of ovulation (Day 0 group) in 16 ewes. In the remaining 9 ewes, FSH treatment was started 3 d after emergence of the largest follicle of Wave 1 (Day 3 group). Ewes received PGF(2alpha) with the last 2 FSH treatments to induce luteolysis. Daily blood samples were taken to determine progesterone profiles and to evaluate the luteal response subsequent to superovulation. The ovulation rate was determined by ultrasonography and correlated with direct observation of the ovaries during laparotomy 5 to 6 d after superovulatory estrus when the uterus was flushed to collect embryos. Results confirmed that follicular recruitment was suppressed by the presence of a large, growing follicle. In the Day 0 and Day 3 groups, respectively, mean numbers (+/- SEM) of large follicles (>/= 4 mm) recruited were 6.4 +/- 0.6 and 2.7 +/- 0.7 (P < 0.01) at 48 h after the onset of treatment, and 6.7 +/- 0.5 and 5.1 +/- 0.6 (P = 0.08) at 72 h after the onset of treatment. Ovulation rates were 5.6 +/- 0.8 and 3.3 +/- 0.8 in the respective groups (P < 0.05). The number of transferable embryos was 1.8 +/- 0.5 and 0.3 +/- 0.2 in the respective groups (P < 0.05). Short luteal phases (gonadotropin treatment initiated at the time of emergence of Wave 1 induced a superovulatory response in ewes. Response was influenced by the status of the follicular wave. The presence of a large growing follicle

  15. Recombinant gonadotropins.

    PubMed

    Lathi, R B; Milki, A A

    2001-10-01

    Recombinant DNA technology makes it possible to produce large amounts of human gene products for pharmacologic applications, supplanting the need for human tissues. The genes for the alpha and beta subunits of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) have been characterized and cloned. Recombinant FSH (rFSH) has been shown to be safe and effective in the treatment of fertility disorders. In comparison with the urinary gonadotropin products, human menopausal gonadotropins (HMG), and urinary follitropins (uFSH), rFSH is more potent and better tolerated by patients. Recombinant HCG appears to be as efficacious as urinary HCG with the benefit of improved local tolerance. Recombinant LH (rLH) is likely to be recommended as a supplement to rFSH for ovulation induction in hypogonadotropic women. It may also benefit in vitro fertilization patients undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation with rFSH combined with pituitary suppression, with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist or antagonist.

  16. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase mediates gonadotropin subunit gene expression and LH release responses to endogenous gonadotropin-releasing hormones in goldfish.

    PubMed

    Klausen, Christian; Booth, Morgan; Habibi, Hamid R; Chang, John P

    2008-08-01

    The possible involvement of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in mediating the stimulatory actions of two endogenous goldfish gonadotropin-releasing hormones (salmon (s)GnRH and chicken (c)GnRH-II) on gonadotropin synthesis and secretion was examined. Western blot analysis revealed the presence of ERK and phosphorylated (p)ERK in goldfish brain, pituitary, liver, ovary, testis and muscle tissue extracts, as well as extracts of dispersed goldfish pituitary cells and HeLa cells. Interestingly, a third ERK-like immunoreactive band of higher molecular mass was detected in goldfish tissue and pituitary cell extracts in addition to the ERK1-p44- and ERK2-p42-like immunoreactive bands. Incubation of primary cultures of goldfish pituitary cells with either a PKC-activating 4beta-phorbol ester (TPA) or a synthetic diacylglycerol, but not a 4alpha-phorbol ester, elevated the ratio of pERK/total (t)ERK for all three ERK isoforms. The stimulatory effects of TPA were attenuated by the PKC inhibitor GF109203X and the MEK inhibitor PD98059. sGnRH and cGnRH-II also elevated the ratio of pERK/tERK for all three ERK isoforms, in a time-, dose- and PD98059-dependent manner. In addition, treatment with PD98059 reduced the sGnRH-, cGnRH-II- and TPA-induced increases in gonadotropin subunit mRNA levels in Northern blot studies and sGnRH- and cGnRH-II-elicited LH release in cell column perifusion studies with goldfish pituitary cells. These results indicate that GnRH and PKC can activate ERK through MEK in goldfish pituitary cells. More importantly, the present study suggests that GnRH-induced gonadotropin subunit gene expression and LH release involve MEK/ERK signaling in goldfish.

  17. Normalizing Catastrophe: An Educational Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jickling, Bob

    2013-01-01

    Processes of normalizing assumptions and values have been the subjects of theoretical framing and critique for several decades now. Critique has often been tied to issues of environmental sustainability and social justice. Now, in an era of global warming, there is a rising concern that the results of normalizing of present values could be…

  18. Isolated gonadotropin deficiency secondary to glioma in septum pellucidum.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, M; Namiki, M; Okuyama, A; Arita, N; Mizutani, S; Sonoda, T

    1988-01-01

    A 21-year-old man, who had had normal sexuality beforehand, noticed a decrease in libido and potency, as well as loss of ejaculation. Endocrine evaluation showed normal serum levels of gonadotropins but a low testosterone level. The response to clomiphene citrate was poor while those to luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and human chorionic gonadotropin were within normal limits. A tumor found in the septum pellucidum through brain-computerized tomography was resected. Histologically it proved to be a mixed tumor composed of astrocytoma and oligodendroglioma. Three months after the operation the patient had recovered normal sexual functions and endocrine evaluations, including the responsiveness to clomiphene citrate, had been restored. This case suggests the existence of some stimulatory fiber for the secretion of luteinizing hormone in the septum pellucidum.

  19. Structure-function relationship of gonadotropins

    SciTech Connect

    Bellet, D.; Bidart, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    In this book, investigators highlight progress recently made in research on the structure-function relationship of gonadotropins. The contributors provide coverage of major breakthroughs such as the cloning of the ovarian receptor for lutropin and choriogonadotropin, the elucidation of the structure of this receptor, and the first crystallographic studies of human chorionic gonadotropin. The book also describes significant advances in the epitope mapping of gonadotropins, the immunochemical and biochemical study of their structure, the examination of regulatory processes involved in subunit association, and the elucidation of the complex mechanisms responsible for regulation and expression of gonadotropin genes.

  20. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (Gnrhr) gene knock out: Normal growth and development of sensory, motor and spatial orientation behavior but altered metabolism in neonatal and prepubertal mice.

    PubMed

    Busby, Ellen R; Sherwood, Nancy M

    2017-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is important in the control of reproduction, but its actions in non-reproductive processes are less well known. In this study we examined the effect of disrupting the GnRH receptor in mice to determine if growth, metabolism or behaviors that are not associated with reproduction were affected. To minimize the effects of other hormones such as FSH, LH and sex steroids, the neonatal-prepubertal period of 2 to 28 days of age was selected. The study shows that regardless of sex or phenotype in the Gnrhr gene knockout line, there was no significant difference in the daily development of motor control, sensory detection or spatial orientation among the wildtype, heterozygous or null mice. This included a series of behavioral tests for touch, vision, hearing, spatial orientation, locomotory behavior and muscle strength. Neither the daily body weight nor the final weight on day 28 of the kidney, liver and thymus relative to body weight varied significantly in any group. However by day 28, metabolic changes in the GnRH null females compared with wildtype females showed a significant reduction in inguinal fat pad weight normalized to body weight; this was accompanied by an increase in glucose compared with wildtype females shown by Student-Newman-Keuls Multiple Comparison test and Student's unpaired t tests. Our studies show that the GnRH-GnRHR system is not essential for growth or motor/sensory/orientation behavior during the first month of life prior to puberty onset. The lack of the GnRH-GnRHR axis, however, did affect females resulting in reduced subcutaneous inguinal fat pad weight and increased glucose with possible insulin resistance; the loss of the normal rise of estradiol at postnatal days 15-28 may account for the altered metabolism in the prepubertal female pups.

  1. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (Gnrhr) gene knock out: Normal growth and development of sensory, motor and spatial orientation behavior but altered metabolism in neonatal and prepubertal mice

    PubMed Central

    Busby, Ellen R.; Sherwood, Nancy M.

    2017-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is important in the control of reproduction, but its actions in non-reproductive processes are less well known. In this study we examined the effect of disrupting the GnRH receptor in mice to determine if growth, metabolism or behaviors that are not associated with reproduction were affected. To minimize the effects of other hormones such as FSH, LH and sex steroids, the neonatal-prepubertal period of 2 to 28 days of age was selected. The study shows that regardless of sex or phenotype in the Gnrhr gene knockout line, there was no significant difference in the daily development of motor control, sensory detection or spatial orientation among the wildtype, heterozygous or null mice. This included a series of behavioral tests for touch, vision, hearing, spatial orientation, locomotory behavior and muscle strength. Neither the daily body weight nor the final weight on day 28 of the kidney, liver and thymus relative to body weight varied significantly in any group. However by day 28, metabolic changes in the GnRH null females compared with wildtype females showed a significant reduction in inguinal fat pad weight normalized to body weight; this was accompanied by an increase in glucose compared with wildtype females shown by Student-Newman-Keuls Multiple Comparison test and Student's unpaired t tests. Our studies show that the GnRH-GnRHR system is not essential for growth or motor/sensory/orientation behavior during the first month of life prior to puberty onset. The lack of the GnRH-GnRHR axis, however, did affect females resulting in reduced subcutaneous inguinal fat pad weight and increased glucose with possible insulin resistance; the loss of the normal rise of estradiol at postnatal days 15–28 may account for the altered metabolism in the prepubertal female pups. PMID:28346489

  2. Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone Agonist Overuse: Urologists’ Response to Reimbursement and Characteristics Associated with Persistent Overuse

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Shellie D.; Nielsen, Matthew E.; Carpenter, William R.; Jackson, George L.; Wheeler, Stephanie B.; Liu, Huan; Weinberger, Morris

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Medicare reimbursement cuts have been associated with declining Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone (GnRH) agonist overuse in localized prostate cancer. Medical school affiliation and foreign training have been associated with persistent overuse. However, physician-level prescribing changes and the practice type of persistent overusers have not been examined. We sought to describe physician-level changes in GnRH agonist overuse and test the association of time in practice and solo practice type with GnRH agonist overuse. METHODS We matched American Medical Association physician data for 2,138 urologists to SEER–Medicare data for 12,943 men diagnosed with early stage and lower grade adenocarcinoma of the prostate between 2000 and 2007. We conducted a population-based, retrospective study using multi-level modeling to control for patient and provider characteristics. RESULTS Three distinct patterns of GnRH agonist overuse were observed. Urologists’ time in practice was not associated with GnRH agonist overuse (OR 0.89; 95% CI 0.75–1.05).However, solo practice type (OR 1.65; 95% CI 1.34–2.02), medical school affiliation (OR 0.65; 95% CI 0.55–0.77), and patient race were. Compared to non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks (OR 1.76; 95% CI 1.37–2.27), Hispanics (OR 1.41; 95% CI 1.12–1.79) and men of “other” race (OR 1.44; 95% CI 1.04–1.99) had greater odds of receiving unnecessary GnRH agonists. CONCLUSIONS GnRH agonist overuse remains high among some urologists who may be professionally isolated and difficult to reach. These urologists treat more vulnerable populations, which may contribute to health disparities in prostate cancer treatment quality. Nonetheless, these findings provide guidance to develop interventions to address overuse in prostate cancer. PMID:25849354

  3. Characterization of bovine early growth response factor-1 and its gonadotropin-dependent regulation in ovarian follicles prior to ovulation.

    PubMed

    Sayasith, Khampoune; Brown, Kristy A; Lussier, Jacques G; Doré, Monique; Sirois, Jean

    2006-10-01

    Early growth response factor-1 (EGR-1) is a transcription factor that is involved in the transactivation of several genes. The objective of this study was to characterize gonadotropin-dependent regulation of bovine EGR-1 in preovulatory follicles prior to ovulation. Bovine EGR-1 cDNA was obtained by RT-PCR, 5'- and 3'-RACE, its open reading frame composed of 1623 bp, and its coding region encodes a 540-amino acid protein that displays 62-93% identity to known mammalian homologs. The regulation of EGR-1 mRNA was studied in bovine preovulatory follicles which were isolated 0-24 h post-hCG using semiquantitative RT-PCR/Southern blot. Results revealed that the levels of EGR-1 mRNA were very low in follicles at 0 h, markedly increased at 6 h (P < 0.05) when compared to 0 h, and decreased between 12 and 24 h post-hCG. High levels of the EGR-1 mRNA were also observed in corpus luteum, uterus, kidney, pituitary, and spleen, moderate and low in other bovine tissues tested. Analyses performed on isolated preparations of granulosa and theca cells indicated that EGR-1 mRNA was regulated in both cell types, with a predominant expression in granulosa cells. Immunohistochemistry on sections of preovulatory follicles isolated before and after hCG confirmed its protein expression in granulosa cells, 24 h post-hCG. Studies of EGR-1 regulation in primary granulosa cells cultured with forskolin showed that levels of EGR-1 mRNA were low at 0 h, highly increased at 6 h post-forskolin (P < 0.05), and declined to steady state thereafter. Immunoblotting confirmed forskolin-induced EGR-1 protein in cultures. Interestingly, overexpression of EGR-1 increased the levels of mRNA for prostaglandin (PG) G/H synthase-2 (PGHS-2), PG E synthase (PGES), PG E2 receptor (EP2), LH receptor (LH-R), but not for cytochrome P450-side chain cleavage (P450scc), and cytochrome P450 aromatase (P450arom) in granulosa cultures. Thus, this study reports for the first time, a gonadotropin-dependent induction of

  4. Expression and production of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in the normal secretory endometrium: evidence of CGB7 and/or CGB6 beta hCG subunit gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Gerolf; Ackermann, Wilfried; Alexander, Henry

    2012-03-01

    We have previously confirmed glandular cell CGB and CGA subunit mRNA gene expression as well as the expression of their dimeric and single-subunit human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) proteins in normal secretory transformed endometrium. The objective of this study was to investigate the endometrial epithelial gene locus of the human hCG/LH gene cluster from CGB genes responsible for gene expression. For this study, endometrial specimens were selected from women characterized using our endometrium score and hCG staining index that had normal secretory transformed endometrium and optimal hCG staining. Using full-length CGB mRNA sequence analysis, we found that epithelial CGB is (co)expressed as the product of gene locus CGB7 and CGB6 (48%), as single CGB7 (42%), or to a lower percentage as single CGB6 (10%). In addition to known differences between these genes and CGB5, the nucleotide sequence of the mRNA differs between CGB7 and CGB6 in the untranslated promoter region and in translated exon 2. Immunohistochemical results show that endometrial joint CGB7 and CGB6, single CGB7, and single CGB6 mRNA expression lead to the release of endometrial hCG. Gene-specific antibodies for CGB7 reveal secretory endometrial hCG production, which is not observed for gene-specific CGB5 antibodies, whereas the placenta is positive for CGB5 and negative for CGB7 antibody as revealed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot hCG isoform analysis. Only endometrial CGB7 expression seems to be supported specifically by secretory endometrial transcription factors. In conclusion, epithelial hCG is expressed and produced as CGB7 and/or CGB6 but not CGB5, and it is produced together with CGA as a secretory transformation marker in the normal secretory phase endometrium.

  5. Humoral immune responses against gonadotropin releasing hormone elicited by immunization with phage-peptide constructs obtained via phage display.

    PubMed

    Samoylov, Alexandre; Cochran, Anna; Schemera, Bettina; Kutzler, Michelle; Donovan, Caitlin; Petrenko, Valery; Bartol, Frank; Samoylova, Tatiana

    2015-12-20

    Phage display is based on genetic engineering of phage coat proteins resulting in fusion peptides displayed on the surface of phage particles. The technology is widely used for generation of phages with novel characteristics for numerous applications in biomedicine and far beyond. The focus of this study was on development of phage-peptide constructs that stimulate production of antibodies against gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH). Phage-peptide constructs that elicit production of neutralizing GnRH antibodies can be used for anti-fertility and anti-cancer applications. Phage-GnRH constructs were generated via selection from a phage display library using several types of GnRH antibodies as selection targets. Such phage constructs were characterized for sequence similarities to GnRH peptide and frequency of their occurrence in the selection rounds. Five of the constructs with suitable characteristics were tested in mice as a single dose 5×10(11) virions (vir) vaccine and were found to be able to stimulate production of GnRH-specific antibodies, but not to suppress testosterone (indirect indicator of GnRH antibody neutralizing properties). Next, one of the constructs was tested at a higher dose of 2×10(12) vir per mouse in combination with a poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)-based adjuvant. This resulted in multifold increase in GnRH antibody production and significant reduction of serum testosterone, indicating that antibodies produced in response to the phage-GnRH immunization possess neutralizing properties. To achieve optimal immune responses for desired applications, phage-GnRH constructs can be modified with respect to flanking sequences of GnRH-like peptides displayed on phage. Anticipated therapeutic effects also might be attained using optimized phage doses, a combination of several constructs in a single treatment, or application of adjuvants and advanced phage delivery systems.

  6. Circulating prolactin and its response to TRH following administration of testosterone undecanoate in normal men.

    PubMed

    Kicovic, P M; Luisi, M; Franchi, F; Krempl, S

    1978-10-01

    To investigate the effect of orally administered testosterone undercanoate (TU) on circulating prolactin (PRL) and PRL response to TRH stimulation, 8 eugonadal male volunteers, aged 19--30, presenting with normal plasma levels of FSH, LH, testosterone (T), estradiol (E2) and PRL, were given 120 mg/day of TU for 6 days. Plasma PRL levels were measured daily during the pre-treatment phase (3 days), treatment phase (6 days) and post-treatment phase (3 days) by radioimmunoassay. The TRH Test (200 micrograms iv) was done on the 3rd day of the pretreatment phase and on the treatment phase. No significant changes in circulating PRL levels or in PRL response to TRH stimulation were observed. Plasma T and E2 levels showed a slight, but not significant tendency to increase, while gonadotropin levels remained unchanged.

  7. Mach bands explained by response normalization

    PubMed Central

    Kingdom, Frederick A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Mach bands are the illusory dark and bright bars seen at the foot and knee of a luminance trapezoid. First demonstrated by Ernst Mach in the latter part of the 19th century, Mach bands are a test bed not only for models of brightness illusions but of spatial vision in general. Up until 50 years ago the dominant explanation of Mach Bands was that they were caused by lateral inhibition among retinal neurons. More recently, the dominant idea has been that Mach bands are a consequence of a visual process that generates a sparse, binary description of the image in terms of “edges” and “bars”. Another recent explanation is that Mach bands result from learned expectations about the pattern of light typically found on sharply curved surfaces. In keeping with recent multi-scale filtering accounts of brightness illusions as well as current physiology, I show however that Mach bands are most simply explained by response normalization, whereby the gains of early visual channels are adjusted on a local basis to make their responses more equal. I show that a simple one-dimensional model of response normalization explains the range of conditions under which Mach bands occur, and as importantly, the conditions under which they do not occur. PMID:25408643

  8. Does pre-treatment with micronized progesterone affect the ovarian response to a gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist flare-up protocol?

    PubMed

    Loutradis, D; Stefanidis, K; Drakakis, P; Kallianidis, K; El Sheikh, A; Milingos, S; Siskos, K; Michalas, S

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the ovarian response and the receptivity of the endometrium in women pre-treated with micronized progesterone. Eighty-two normogonodotropic women undergoing in vitro fertilization were studied. Thirty received micronized progesterone 1500 mg/day from day 21 of the cycle for a minimum of 2 weeks, and 52 did not receive micronized progesterone (control group). A gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist (GnRH-a) was administered to all the patients in the follicular phase (flare-up). Twenty-five cycles were cancelled for fertilization failure due to male factor, 12 (40%) in the progesterone group and 13 (25%) in the control group (p = 0.271). There was no difference in the number of oocytes retrieved (7.3 +/- 5 vs. 8.2 +/- 4), fertilization rate (50.8% vs. 65%), clinical pregnancy rate (16.6% vs. 25%) or implantation rate (8% vs. 14%). In the progesterone group cases without fertilization, we performed two biopsies to evaluate the receptivity of the endometrium. Pinopode expression was noted 7 days after oocyte retrieval. It seems that the administration of micronized progesterone in the previous cycle does not affect the ovarian response to the combination of follicular phase GnRH-a and gonadotropins, nor the receptivity of the endometrium.

  9. Klinefelter syndrome with low gonadotropin levels.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Kripa Elizabeth; Jebasingh, Felix K; Kapoor, Nitin; Paul, Thomas Vizhalil

    2015-12-29

    Klinefelter syndrome is usually characterised by the presence of a eunuchoid body habitus and testes that are usually small and firm, with low testosterone, and elevated luteinising hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone levels, consistent with hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Low levels of gonadotropins in karyotypically proven cases are not expected, they are extremely rare occurrences. We report a case of a patient who was diagnosed to have Klinefelter syndrome (47 XXY) with low gonadotropin levels. The rest of his anterior pituitary hormonal profile was normal with no lesions in the pituitary gland on imaging. He was continued on androgen replacement therapy.

  10. Differential responsiveness of luteinized human granulosa cells to gonadotropins and insulin-like growth factor I for induction of aromatase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Christman, G.M.; Randolph, J.F. Jr.; Peegel, H.; Menon, K.M. )

    1991-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the in vitro responsiveness of cultured luteinized human granulosa cells over time to insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), human follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) for the induction of aromatase activity. Granulosa cells were retrieved from preovulatory follicles in patients undergoing in vitro fertilization. Cells were cultured for a period of 72 hours or 10 days. The ability of hCG, human FSH, and/or IGF-I to induce aromatase activity was assayed by the stereospecific release of tritium from (1B-3H)androstenedione. Short-term cultures (72 hours) demonstrated a marked rise in aromatase activity in response to human FSH and IGF-I, whereas a smaller response to hCG was observed. In contrast, 10-day cultures demonstrated responsiveness predominantly to hCG rather than human FSH for the induction of aromatase activity with no remarkable effect of IGF-I. Luteinized human granulosa cells undergo a transformation from an initial human FSH and IGF-I responsive state to an hCG responsive state in long-term cultures.

  11. The effect of water quality on the immunoreactivity of stress-response cells and gonadotropin-secreting cells in the pituitary gland of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Mousa, Mostafa A; Ibrahim, Amal A E; Hashem, Amal M; Khalil, Noha A

    2015-03-01

    The present experiments investigated the effect of water quality characteristics on the condition factor, the ovarian activity, cortisol level, and the immunoreactivity of stress-response cells (adrenocorticotropic hormone; ACTH- and melanin stimulating hormone; MSH- and somatolactin; SL- secreting cells) and gonadotropin (GTH)-secreting cells in the pituitary gland of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus. After 3 months of exposure to mixtures of water from different sources (Tap and Lake Manzalah waters), with high levels of minerals and heavy metals, water quality affected the number, size, and immunostaining of stress-response-immunoreactive (ir) cells and GTH-ir cells, which showed a dramatic decrease in their size. The integrated optical density (IOD) of immunoreactivity of MSH- and GTH- cells was significantly increased; however, it was significantly decreased for ACTH- and SL- cells. Also, high levels of cortisol were observed in females exposed to waters with high concentrations of minerals and heavy metals. In parallel, low values of gonadosomatic index (GSI%) and the ovarian histology revealed a decrease of maturing follicles concomitant with an increase of atretic follicles in females exposed to Lake Manzalah polluted water. Taken together, the increased activity of stress-response-ir pituitary cells, serum cortisol level and ovarian atretic follicles in response to elevated concentrations of minerals and heavy metals, supports the possible role of ACTH, MSH, and SL in the adaptive stress response of fish. Therefore, minerals and heavy metals must be considered when discussing tilapia aquaculture status.

  12. Ignoring the challenge? Male black redstarts (Phoenicurus ochruros) do not increase testosterone levels during territorial conflicts but they do so in response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Apfelbeck, Beate; Goymann, Wolfgang

    2011-11-07

    Competition elevates plasma testosterone in a wide variety of vertebrates, including humans. The 'challenge hypothesis' proposes that seasonal peaks in testosterone during breeding are caused by social challenges from other males. However, during experimentally induced male-male conflicts, testosterone increases only in a minority of songbird species tested so far. Why is this so? Comparative evidence suggests that species with a short breeding season may not elevate testosterone levels during territory defence. These species may even be limited in their physiological capability to increase testosterone levels, which can be tested by injecting birds with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). We studied two populations of black redstarts that differ in breeding altitude, morphology and the length of their breeding season. Unexpectedly, males of neither population increased testosterone in response to a simulated territorial intrusion, but injections with GnRH resulted in a major elevation of testosterone. Thus, black redstarts would have been capable of mounting a testosterone response during the male-male challenge. Our data show, for the first time, that the absence of an androgen response to male-male challenges is not owing to physiological limitations to increase testosterone. Furthermore, in contrast to comparative evidence between species, populations of black redstarts with a long breeding season do not show the expected elevation in testosterone during male-male challenges.

  13. Parents' Responses to Normal and Premature Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frodi, Ann; Willie, Diana

    This paper discusses a series of three studies investigating the influence of infants' characteristics and signaling behavior on parents. Videotapes of either smiling/cooing/gurgling or crying infants were used to elicit parents' physiological and affective responses. Measured physiological responses included skin conductance, heart rate, and…

  14. Plasma prorenin response to human chorionic gonadotropin in ovarian-hyperstimulated women: correlation with the number of ovarian follicles and steroid hormone concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Itskovitz, J; Sealey, J E; Glorioso, N; Rosenwaks, Z

    1987-01-01

    Plasma prorenin and active renin were measured before and after human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) administration in two groups of patients undergoing ovarian stimulation for 4-6 days with follicle-stimulating hormone alone or in combination with luteinizing hormone, for in vitro fertilization. Baseline total plasma renin (prorenin plus active renin; n = 12) averaged 25 +/- 8 ng/ml per hr (mean +/- SD). Total renin did not change during ovarian stimulation but it increased to 46 +/- 16 ng/ml per hr (P less than 0.05) 1 or 2 days later, just before hCG administration. Thirty-six hours after hCG administration, just before laparoscopy and egg retrieval, total renin was 123 +/- 97 ng/ml per hr; a peak of 182 +/- 143 ng/ml per hr occurred 2-6 days later--i.e., during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. In eight of the patients who did not conceive, total renin returned to baseline 14 days after hCG administration. In four who conceived, a nadir was reached (57 +/- 13 ng/ml per hr) 8-12 days after hCG administration and then total renin increased again as the plasma beta hCG measurement began to rise. By day 16 it averaged 225 +/- 157 ng/ml per hr. In a second group of five patients active renin and prorenin were measured separately. Active renin comprised less than 20% of the total renin at all times. It was unchanged until day 4 after hCG administration and then increased significantly only when plasma progesterone was high. Thus, the initial response to hCG was entirely due to an increase in prorenin. A highly significant correlation was observed between the number of follicles and the total renin increases on the day of aspiration (r = 0.93, P less than 0.001) and at the peak (r = 0.89, P less than 0.001). After hCG administration, a temporal relationship was observed between the rise in total renin and plasma estradiol and progesterone levels. These results demonstrate that plasma prorenin increases markedly after administration of hCG and that the rise is

  15. Early spring sex differences in luteinizing hormone response to gonadotropin releasing hormone in co-occurring resident and migrant dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis).

    PubMed

    Greives, Timothy J; Fudickar, Adam M; Atwell, Jonathan W; Meddle, Simone L; Ketterson, Ellen D

    2016-09-15

    To optimally time reproduction, animals must coordinate changes in the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. The extent of intra-species variation in seasonal timing of reproductive function is considerable, both within and among populations. Dark-eyed junco (Junco hyemalis) populations are known to differ in their reproductive timing response to cues experienced in the same habitat in late winter/early spring. Specifically in juncos cohabitating on shared wintering grounds, residents initiate breeding and reproductive activity but migrants delay reproductive development and prepare to migrate before breeding. Here, we test the hypothesis that the pituitary gland acts as a 'control point' to modulate differential HPG axis activity across populations. We sampled free-living resident and migrant juncos on their shared over-wintering grounds in March, thus all individuals were experiencing the same environmental cues, including photoperiod. We predicted that during this critical time of transition, residents would more readily respond to repeated gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulation with increases in luteinizing hormone (LH), in contrast to migrants, which should delay full reproductive activity. Our data indicate that migrant females, while still on the overwintering grounds, have a reduced LH response to repeated GnRH injections compared to resident females. Male migrant and resident birds did not differ in their responsiveness to repeated GnRH. Our results suggest a sex difference in the costs of mistimed activation of the HPG axis, with female migrants being less responsive than residents females and males to repeated stimulation. Further, our data implicate a key role for the pituitary in regulating appropriate reproductive timing responses.

  16. Multivariate Models for Normal and Binary Responses in Intervention Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pituch, Keenan A.; Whittaker, Tiffany A.; Chang, Wanchen

    2016-01-01

    Use of multivariate analysis (e.g., multivariate analysis of variance) is common when normally distributed outcomes are collected in intervention research. However, when mixed responses--a set of normal and binary outcomes--are collected, standard multivariate analyses are no longer suitable. While mixed responses are often obtained in…

  17. Hindbrain lactate regulates preoptic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuron GnRH-I protein but not AMPK responses to hypoglycemia in the steroid-primed ovariectomized female rat.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, P K; Briski, K P

    2015-07-09

    Steroid positive-feedback activation of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) neuroendocrine axis propagates the pre ovulatory LH surge, a crucial component of female reproduction. Our work shows that this key event is restrained by inhibitory metabolic input from hindbrain A2 noradrenergic neurons. GnRH neurons express the ultra-sensitive energy sensor adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK); here, we investigated the hypothesis that GnRH nerve cell AMPK and peptide neurotransmitter responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia are controlled by hindbrain lack of the oxidizable glycolytic end-product L-lactate. Data show that hypoglycemic inhibition of LH release in steroid-primed ovariectomized female rats was reversed by coincident caudal hindbrain lactate infusion. Western blot analyses of laser-microdissected A2 neurons demonstrate hypoglycemic augmentation [Fos, estrogen receptor-beta (ER-β), phosphoAMPK (pAMPK)] and inhibition (dopamine-beta-hydroxylase, GLUT3, MCT2) of protein expression in these cells, responses that were normalized by insulin plus lactate treatment. Hypoglycemia diminished rostral preoptic GnRH nerve cell GnRH-I protein and pAMPK content; the former, but not the latter response was reversed by lactate. Results implicate caudal hindbrain lactoprivic signaling in hypoglycemia-induced suppression of the LH surge, demonstrating that lactate repletion of that site reverses decrements in A2 catecholamine biosynthetic enzyme and GnRH neuropeptide precursor protein expression. Lack of effect of lactate on hypoglycemic patterns of GnRH AMPK activity suggests that this sensor is uninvolved in metabolic-inhibition of positive-feedback-stimulated hypophysiotropic signaling to pituitary gonadotropes.

  18. Ovulation induction with pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) or gonadotropins in a case of hypothalamic amenorrhea and diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Georgopoulos, N A; Markou, K B; Pappas, A P; Protonatariou, A; Vagenakis, G A; Sykiotis, G P; Dimopoulos, P A; Tzingounis, V A

    2001-12-01

    Hypothalamic amenorrhea is a treatable cause of infertility. Our patient was presented with secondary amenorrhea and diabetes insipidus. Cortisol and prolactin responded normally to a combined insulin tolerance test (ITT) and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) challenge, while thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) response to TRH was diminished, and no response of growth hormone to ITT was detected. Both luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels increased following gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) challenge. No response of LH to clomiphene citrate challenge was detected. Magnetic resonance imaging findings demonstrated a midline mass occupying the inferior hypothalamus, with posterior lobe not visible and thickened pituitary stalk. Ovulation induction was carried out first with combined human menopausal gonadotropins (hMG/LH/FSH) (150 IU/day) and afterwards with pulsatile GnRH (150 ng/kg/pulse). Ovulation was achieved with both pulsatile GnRH and combine gonadotropin therapy. Slightly better results were achieved with the pulsatile GnRH treatment.

  19. Microdose gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist in the absence of exogenous gonadotropins is not sufficient to induce multiple follicle development.

    PubMed

    Chung, Karine; Fogle, Robin; Bendikson, Kristin; Christenson, Kamilee; Paulson, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Because the effectiveness of the "microdose flare" stimulation protocol often is attributed to the dramatic endogenous gonadotropin release induced by the GnRH agonist, the aim of this study was to determine whether use of microdose GnRH agonist alone could induce multiple ovarian follicle development in normal responders. Based on these data, the duration of gonadotropin rise is approximately 24 to 48 hours and is too brief to sustain continued multiple follicle growth.

  20. The rate of high ovarian response in women identified at risk by a high serum AMH level is influenced by the type of gonadotropin.

    PubMed

    Arce, Joan-Carles; Klein, Bjarke M; La Marca, Antonio

    2014-06-01

    The aim was to compare ovarian response and clinical outcome of potential high-responders after stimulation with highly purified menotropin (HP-hMG) or recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone (rFSH) for in vitro fertilisation/intracytoplasmic sperm injection. Retrospective analysis was performed on data collected in two randomized controlled trials, one conducted following a long GnRH agonist protocol and the other with an antagonist protocol. Potential high-responders (n = 155 and n = 188 in the agonist and antagonist protocol, respectively) were defined as having an initial anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) value >75th percentile (5.2 ng/ml). In both protocols, HP-hMG stimulation in women in the high AMH category was associated with a significantly lower occurrence of high response (≥15 oocytes retrieved) than rFSH stimulation; 33% versus 51% (p = 0.025) and 31% versus 49% (p = 0.015) in the long agonist and antagonist protocol, respectively. In the potential high-responder women, trends for improved live birth rate were observed with HP-hMG compared with rFSH (long agonist protocol: 33% versus 20%, p = 0.074; antagonist protocol: 34% versus 23%, p = 0.075; overall population: 34% versus 22%, p = 0.012). In conclusion, the type of gonadotropin used for ovarian stimulation influences high-response rates and potentially clinical outcome in women identified as potential high-responders.

  1. Seasonal changes in expression of genes encoding five types of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptors and responses to GnRH analog in the pituitary of masu salmon.

    PubMed

    Jodo, Aya; Kitahashi, Takashi; Taniyama, Shinya; Ueda, Hiroshi; Urano, Akihisa; Ando, Hironori

    2005-10-01

    Five types of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRH-R) genes, designated as msGnRH-R1, R2, R3, R4, and R5, are expressed in the brain and pituitary of masu salmon (Oncorhynchus masou). In the present study, seasonal changes in the expression of these five genes were examined in the pituitary to elucidate their roles in GnRH action during growth and sexual maturation. In addition, the seasonal variation of these genes in response to GnRH was examined in a GnRH analog (GnRHa) implantation experiment. Pituitary samples were collected 1 week after the implantation every month from immaturity through spawning. The absolute amount of GnRH-R mRNA in single pituitaries was determined by real-time PCR assays. Among the five genes, R4 was predominantly expressed in the pituitaries. In the immature fish, the amount of GnRH-R mRNA varied with seasons and subtypes. In the pre-spawning period, R1 and R4 mRNAs in both sexes and R2 and R3 mRNAs in the females increased 4- to 20-fold and then decreased in the spawning season. The effects of GnRHa treatment were significantly different in both sexes. In the females, GnRHa tended to elevate the expression of all the subtypes of GnRH-R genes in various stages during the experimental period, whereas it had almost no apparent effects in the males. These results indicate that the expression of the five GnRH-R genes is seasonally variable and may be related to the responses of the pituitary hormone genes to GnRH, and the regulation of GnRH-R genes by GnRH is different in both sexes.

  2. 21 CFR 522.1079 - Serum gonadotropin and chorionic gonadotropin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Serum gonadotropin and chorionic gonadotropin. 522.1079 Section 522.1079 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM...

  3. 21 CFR 522.1079 - Serum gonadotropin and chorionic gonadotropin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Serum gonadotropin and chorionic gonadotropin. 522.1079 Section 522.1079 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM...

  4. 21 CFR 522.1079 - Serum gonadotropin and chorionic gonadotropin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Serum gonadotropin and chorionic gonadotropin. 522.1079 Section 522.1079 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM...

  5. 21 CFR 522.1079 - Serum gonadotropin and chorionic gonadotropin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Serum gonadotropin and chorionic gonadotropin. 522.1079 Section 522.1079 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM...

  6. 21 CFR 522.1079 - Serum gonadotropin and chorionic gonadotropin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Serum gonadotropin and chorionic gonadotropin. 522.1079 Section 522.1079 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM...

  7. Insight into the neuroendocrine site and cellular mechanism by which cortisol suppresses pituitary responsiveness to gonadotropin-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Breen, Kellie M; Davis, Tracy L; Doro, Lisa C; Nett, Terry M; Oakley, Amy E; Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Rispoli, Louisa A; Wagenmaker, Elizabeth R; Karsch, Fred J

    2008-02-01

    Stress-like elevations in plasma glucocorticoids rapidly inhibit pulsatile LH secretion in ovariectomized sheep by reducing pituitary responsiveness to GnRH. This effect can be blocked by a nonspecific antagonist of the type II glucocorticoid receptor (GR) RU486. A series of experiments was conducted to strengthen the evidence for a mediatory role of the type II GR and to investigate the neuroendocrine site and cellular mechanism underlying this inhibitory effect of cortisol. First, we demonstrated that a specific agonist of the type II GR, dexamethasone, mimics the suppressive action of cortisol on pituitary responsiveness to GnRH pulses in ovariectomized ewes. This effect, which became evident within 30 min, documents mediation via the type II GR. We next determined that exposure of cultured ovine pituitary cells to cortisol reduced the LH response to pulse-like delivery of GnRH by 50% within 30 min, indicating a pituitary site of action. Finally, we tested the hypothesis that suppression of pituitary responsiveness to GnRH in ovariectomized ewes is due to reduced tissue concentrations of GnRH receptor. Although cortisol blunted the amplitude of GnRH-induced LH pulses within 1-2 h, the amount of GnRH receptor mRNA or protein was not affected over this time frame. Collectively, these observations provide evidence that cortisol acts via the type II GR within the pituitary gland to elicit a rapid decrease in responsiveness to GnRH, independent of changes in expression of the GnRH receptor.

  8. Oral Progestin Priming Increases Ovarian Sensitivity to Gonadotropin Stimulation and Improves Luteal Function in the Cat1

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Rosemary A.; Pelican, Katharine M.; Crosier, Adrienne E.; Pukazhenthi, Budhan S.; Wildt, David E.; Ottinger, Mary Ann; Howard, JoGayle

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT As the only domesticated species known to exhibit both induced and spontaneous ovulation, the cat is a model for understanding the nuances of ovarian control. To explore ovarian sensitivity to exogenous gonadotropins and the influence of progestin priming, we conducted a study of queens that were down-regulated with oral progestin or allowed to cycle normally, followed by low or high doses of equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). Our metrics included 1) fecal steroid metabolite profiles before and after ovulation induction, 2) laparoscopic examination of ovarian follicles and corpora lutea (CL) on Days 2 and 17 (Day 0 = hCG administration), and 3) ovariohysterectomy (Day 17) to assess CL progesterone concentrations, morphometrics, and histology. Reproductive tracts from time-matched, naturally mated queens (n = 6) served as controls. Every progestin-primed cat (n = 12) produced the desired response of morphologically similar, fresh CL (regardless of eCG/hCG dose) by Day 2, whereas 41.7% of unprimed counterparts (n = 12) failed to ovulate or had variable-aged CL suggestive of prior spontaneous ovulation (P < 0.05). The ovarian response to low, but not high, eCG/hCG was improved (P < 0.05) in primed compared to unprimed cats, indicating increased sensitivity to gonadotropin in the progestin-primed ovary. Progestin priming prevented hyperelevated fecal steroid metabolites and normalized CL progesterone capacity, but only when combined with low eCG/hCG. However, priming failed to prevent ancillary CL formation, smaller CL mass, or abnormal luteal cell density, which were common to all eCG/hCG-treated cats. Thus, the domestic cat exposed to eCG/hCG produces CL with structural and functional aberrations. These anomalies can be partially mitigated by progestin priming, possibly due to a protective effect of progestin associated with enhanced ovarian sensitivity to gonadotropins. PMID:23100619

  9. Response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone challenge: Seasonal variation in steroid production in a viviparous lizard, Tiliqua nigrolutea.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Ashley; Jones, Susan M

    2017-04-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis plays a central role in the regulation of gamete maturation, sex steroid production and the stimulation of reproductive behaviours in vertebrates. In seasonal breeders, the timely activation and deactivation of this control system is important to ensure successful reproduction: this process is not well understood in species which breed irregularly. Males of the viviparous blotched blue-tongued lizard, Tiliqua nigrolutea, breed annually, while females display a multiennial cycle. We investigated seasonal variation in hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis responsiveness in both sexes of T. nigrolutea. We measured changes in plasma concentrations of testosterone and estrogen in response to a single intraperitoneal injection of a GnRH agonist, chicken-II LH-RH, at three reproductively distinct times of year. Plasma testosterone concentrations in males were significantly increased during gonadal quiescence, but not initial or final spermatogenesis. There was no estrogen response in males at any time of year. Conversely, in females, there was an increase in plasma testosterone, but not estrogen, concentration, in reproductively quiescent females several months in advance of a successful pregnancy. These results indicate clear variation in HPG axis activity with sex, season and reproductive condition in this seasonally breeding viviparous lizard. This study opens the way for further investigation into the mechanisms by which internal (body condition) and external seasonal cues (temperature and photoperiod) are coordinated to regulate reproduction in irregularly-breeding reptiles.

  10. 21 CFR 556.304 - Gonadotropin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... residues of total gonadotropins (human chorionic gonadotropin and pregnant mare serum gonadotropin) is 42... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gonadotropin. 556.304 Section 556.304 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL...

  11. 21 CFR 556.304 - Gonadotropin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... residues of total gonadotropins (human chorionic gonadotropin and pregnant mare serum gonadotropin) is 42... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gonadotropin. 556.304 Section 556.304 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL...

  12. 21 CFR 556.304 - Gonadotropin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... residues of total gonadotropins (human chorionic gonadotropin and pregnant mare serum gonadotropin) is 42... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gonadotropin. 556.304 Section 556.304 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL...

  13. 21 CFR 556.304 - Gonadotropin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... residues of total gonadotropins (human chorionic gonadotropin and pregnant mare serum gonadotropin) is 42... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gonadotropin. 556.304 Section 556.304 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL...

  14. 21 CFR 556.304 - Gonadotropin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... residues of total gonadotropins (human chorionic gonadotropin and pregnant mare serum gonadotropin) is 42... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gonadotropin. 556.304 Section 556.304 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL...

  15. The effect of age on the ovarian response to gonadotropin and on pregnancy rate in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guido, M; Belosi, C; Selvaggi, L; Lattanzi, F; Apa, R; Fulghesu, A M; Lanzone, A

    2003-06-01

    Recent studies have proposed that, in women affected by the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), aging is able to regularize the menstrual cyclicity. To evaluate the ovarian response in PCOS patients according to their age, we studied 33 PCOS patients, 20 of whom with an age ranging from 28 to 34 years (younger PCOS) and 13 ranging from 35 to 45 years (older PCOS). All patients underwent an ovulation induction therapeutic protocol with low-dose recombinant follicle stimulating hormone, for a total of 80 cycles (44 cycles for the younger PCOS group and 36 cycles for the older PCOS group). No significant difference was found between the days of therapy (12.3 +/- 5.4 vs. 13.5 +/- 5.6 days), total amount of drugs (980.7 +/- 568.9 IU vs. 1063.9 +/- 469.5 IU) or ovulation rate (93% vs. 89%) in the two groups. The two groups showed a significant difference in the maximum estradiol level (2053.5 +/- 1497.2 vs. 1269.0 +/- 911.5 pmol/l, p < 0.01), the number of the recruited and preovulatory follicles (1.7 +/- 2.5 vs. 0.64 +/- 0.9, p < 0.05 and 1.7 +/- 1.1 vs. 1.2 +/- 0.5, p < 0.01, respectively) and the pregnancy rate (36% vs. 14%, p < 0.05). In conclusion, our data clearly showed that, also in PCOS, advanced age is a negative prognostic factor in the ovarian response to ovulation induction therapies.

  16. Ovarian response and embryo production in llamas treated with equine chorionic gonadotropin alone or with a progestin-releasing vaginal sponge at the time of follicular wave emergence.

    PubMed

    Huanca, W; Cordero, A; Huanca, T; Cardenas, O; Adams, G P; Ratto, M H

    2009-10-01

    The objective of the study was to compare the ovulatory response and embryo production in llamas (Lama glama) treated with a single dose of equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) alone or combined with intravaginal medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) at the time of follicular wave emergence. Llamas with a growing follicle >or=7 mm in diameter were assigned to one of the following groups: (1) Control (n=28): Nonstimulated llamas were mated and embryos were collected 7 d after mating. (2) eCG (n=32): Llamas were given 5mg luteinizing hormone (LH) (Day 0) to induce ovulation, 1000 IU eCG on Day 2, a luteolytic dose of prostaglandin F(2alpha) on Day 6, mating on Day 7, and embryo collection on Day 14. (3) eCG+MPA (n=34): Llamas were treated as those in the eCG group, but a sponge containing 60 mg MPA was placed intravaginally from Days 2 to 6. Llamas that did not respond to synchronization or superstimulation were excluded, leaving data from n=26, 26, and 27 in the control, eCG, and eCG+MPA groups, respectively, for statistical analysis. The mean (+/-SD) number of follicles>7 mm at the time of mating was greatest in the eCG group, intermediate in the eCG+MPA group, and lowest in the control group (16.6+/-5.3, 12.9+/-3.7, and 1.0+/-0.0, respectively, P<0.001). The number of corpora lutea was similar between eCG and eCG+MPA groups (10.1+/-2.9 and 8.6+/-3.7, respectively); both were higher (P<0.001) than in controls (0.9+/-0.3). The number of embryos did not differ significantly between the eCG and eCG+MPA groups (4.8+/-2.8 and 3.5+/-3.0, respectively), but both were higher (P<0.001) than in the controls (0.7+/-0.4). In conclusion, eCG, with or without MPA effectively induced a superovulatory response and multiple embryo production in llamas.

  17. Normal Caloric Responses during Acute Phase of Vestibular Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Uk; Park, Seong-Ho; Kim, Hyo-Jung; Koo, Ja-Won

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose We report a novel finding of caloric conversion from normal responses into unilateral paresis during the acute phase of vestibular neuritis (VN). Methods We recruited 893 patients with a diagnosis of VN at Dizziness Clinic of Seoul National University Bundang Hospital from 2003 to 2014 after excluding 28 patients with isolated inferior divisional VN (n=14) and those without follow-up tests despite normal caloric responses initially (n=14). We retrospectively analyzed the neurotological findings in four (0.5%) of the patients who showed a conversion from initially normal caloric responses into unilateral paresis during the acute phase. Results In those four patients, the initial caloric tests were performed within 2 days of symptom onset, and conversion into unilateral caloric paresis was documented 1–4 days later. The clinical and laboratory findings during the initial evaluation were consistent with VN in all four patients except for normal findings in bedside head impulse tests in one of them. Conclusions Normal findings in caloric tests should be interpreted with caution during the acute phase of suspected VN. Follow-up evaluation should be considered when the findings of the initial caloric test are normal, but VN remains the most plausible diagnosis. PMID:26932259

  18. Seasonal changes of responses to gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog in expression of growth hormone/prolactin/somatolactin genes in the pituitary of masu salmon.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Ramji Kumar; Taniyama, Shinya; Kitahashi, Takashi; Ando, Hironori; Yamauchi, Kohei; Zohar, Yonathan; Ueda, Hiroshi; Urano, Akihisa

    2003-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is considered to stimulate secretion of growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), and somatolactin (SL) at particular stages of growth and sexual maturation in teleost fishes. We therefore examined seasonal variation in the pituitary levels of GH/PRL/SL mRNAs, and tried to clarify seasonal changes of responses to GnRH in expression of GH/PRL/SL genes, in the pituitaries of growing and maturing masu salmon (Oncorhynchus masou). Pituitary samples were monthly collected one week after implantation with GnRH analog (GnRHa). The levels of mRNAs encoding GH, PRL, and SL precursors in single pituitaries were determined by a real-time polymerase chain reaction method. The fork lengths and body weights of control and GnRHa-implanted fish of both sexes gradually increased and peaked out in September of 2-year-old (2+) when fish spawned. GnRHa implantation did not stimulate somatic growth, nor elevate gonadosomatic index (GSI) of 1+ and 2+ males, whereas it significantly increased GSI of 2+ females in late August to early September. The GnRHa-implanted 1+ males had higher levels of GH and PRL mRNAs in July, and SL mRNA from June to August than the control males. The levels of GH, PRL, and SL mRNAs in the control and GnRHa-implanted 1+ females, however, did not show any significant changes. Afterward, the PRL mRNA levels elevated in the control 2+ fish of both sexes in spring. GnRHa elevated the GH mRNA levels in both males and females in 2+ winter, and the PRL mRNA levels in females in early spring. Regardless of sex and GnRHa-implantation, the SL mRNA levels increased during sexual maturation. In growing and maturing masu salmon, expression of genes encoding GH, PRL, and SL in the pituitary is thus sensitive to GnRH in particular seasons probably in relation to physiological roles of the hormones.

  19. New insights regarding glucocorticoids, stress and gonadotropin suppression.

    PubMed

    Breen, Kellie M; Karsch, Fred J

    2006-07-01

    This review highlights our recent work investigating the inhibitory effects of acute, physiologic stress-like increases in cortisol on reproductive neuroendocrine activity in sheep, the mechanisms responsible for this suppression, and the relevance of enhanced glucocorticoid secretion to stress-induced inhibition of gonadotropin secretion in this species. Initial studies established that cortisol rapidly suppresses pulsatile luteinizing hormone secretion. In ovariectomized ewes, this inhibition reflects the reduction of pituitary responsiveness to gonadotropin-releasing hormone mediated by the type II glucocorticoid receptor, rather than the suppression in hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone release. Studies in ovary-intact ewes, however, uncovered an alternative mode of cortisol action. During the follicular phase of the estrous cycle, cortisol reduces luteinizing hormone pulse frequency, most likely via the inhibition of gonadotropin-releasing hormone pulsatility. Recent preliminary evidence in ovariectomized ewes demonstrates increased cortisol secretion is essential for disruption of pulsatile luteinizing hormone secretion in response to a psychosocial stress. Taken together, our observations reveal diverse inhibitory actions of cortisol on gonadotropin secretion and that this glucocorticoid is not only sufficient, but necessary for suppression of reproductive neuroendocrine activity in response to certain types of stress.

  20. Pituitary-testicular responsiveness in male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, R L; Reitz, R E

    1974-01-01

    An isolated deficiency of pituitary gonadotropins was demonstrated in six 46 XY males, 22 to 36 years of age, with and without anosmia. Undetectable or low levels of serum follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) clearly separated hypogonadotropic from normal adult males. Chronic (8-12 wk) administration of clomiphene citrate caused no increase in serum FSH or LH in gonadotropin-deficient subjects. However, the administration of synthetic luteinizing hormone releasing factor (LRF) resulted in the appearance of serum LH and, to a lesser degree, serum FSH in three subjects tested. While levels of plasma testosterone were significantly lower in gonadotropin-deficient subjects, plasma androstenedione and dehydroepiandrosterone were in a range similar to that of age-matched normal men. Treatment with human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) increased levels of plasma testosterone to normal adult male values in all gonadotropin-deficient subjects. Cessation of treatment with HCG resulted in the return of plasma testosterone to low, pretreatment levels. That HCG therapy with resultant normal levels of plasma testosterone may somehow stimulate endogenous gonadotropin secretion in gonadotropin-deficient subjects was not evident. The adult male levels of serum FSH and LH after LRF, and plasma testosterone after HCG, confirm pituitary and Leydig cell responsiveness in these subjects. Images PMID:11344554

  1. Normalization of cell responses in cat striate cortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeger, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Simple cells in the striate cortex have been depicted as half-wave-rectified linear operators. Complex cells have been depicted as energy mechanisms, constructed from the squared sum of the outputs of quadrature pairs of linear operators. However, the linear/energy model falls short of a complete explanation of striate cell responses. In this paper, a modified version of the linear/energy model is presented in which striate cells mutually inhibit one another, effectively normalizing their responses with respect to stimulus contrast. This paper reviews experimental measurements of striate cell responses, and shows that the new model explains a significantly larger body of physiological data.

  2. Successful quadruplet pregnancy following ovulation induced with human menopausal gonadotropin and human chorionic gonadotropin.

    PubMed

    Lauersen, N H; Buchman, M; Beling, C G

    1974-01-01

    A case report of a quadruplet pregnancy that followed the induction of ovulation by human chorionic gonadotropin and human menopausal gonadotropin is presented. Examination revealed 4 separate placentas, indicating development from 4 different ova. The infants all did well at term, with no signs of respiratory distress syndrome, and have developed normally. Early diagnosis by ultrasonography and complete early bedrest are important for fetal survival. Hospitalization at Week 27-28 of pregnancy is essential, and a complete, competent staff able to handle high-risk patients should be available. Intravenous ethanol infusion is useful during early labor. The patient must be carefully observed for postpartum hemorrhage and should be followed in the recovery room for 24 hours.

  3. Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone inhibits gonadal development and maintenance by decreasing gonadotropin synthesis and release in male quail.

    PubMed

    Ubuka, Takayoshi; Ukena, Kazuyoshi; Sharp, Peter J; Bentley, George E; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2006-03-01

    Until recently, any neuropeptide that directly inhibits gonadotropin secretion had not been identified. We recently identified a novel hypothalamic dodecapeptide that directly inhibits gonadotropin release in quail and termed it gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH). The action of GnIH on the inhibition of gonadotropin release is mediated by a novel G protein-coupled receptor in the quail pituitary. This new gonadotropin inhibitory system is considered to be a widespread property of birds and provides us with an unprecedented opportunity to study the regulation of avian reproduction from an entirely novel standpoint. To understand the physiological role(s) of GnIH in avian reproduction, we investigated GnIH actions on gonadal development and maintenance in male quail. Continuous administration of GnIH to mature birds via osmotic pumps for 2 wk decreased the expressions of gonadotropin common alpha and LHbeta subunit mRNAs in a dose-dependent manner. Plasma LH and testosterone concentrations were also decreased dose dependently. Furthermore, administration of GnIH to mature birds induced testicular apoptosis and decreased spermatogenic activity in the testis. In immature birds, daily administration of GnIH for 2 wk suppressed normal testicular growth and rise in plasma testosterone concentrations. An inhibition of juvenile molt also occurred after GnIH administration. These results indicate that GnIH inhibits gonadal development and maintenance through the decrease in gonadotropin synthesis and release. GnIH may explain the phenomenon of photoperiod-induced gonadal regression before an observable decline in hypothalamic GnRH in quail. To our knowledge, GnIH is the first identified hypothalamic neuropeptide inhibiting reproductive function in any vertebrate class.

  4. Spin response of a normal Fermi liquid with noncentral interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Pethick, C. J.; Schwenk, A.

    2009-11-15

    We consider the spin response of a normal Fermi liquid with noncentral interactions under conditions intermediate between the collisionless and hydrodynamic regimes. This problem is of importance for calculations of neutrino properties in dense matter. By expressing the deviation of the quasiparticle distribution function from equilibrium in terms of eigenfunctions of the transport equation under the combined influence of collisions and an external field, we derive a closed expression for the spin-density-spin-density response function and compare its predictions with that of a relaxation-time approximation. Our results indicate that the relaxation-time approximation is reliable for neutrino properties under astrophysically relevant conditions.

  5. Relationships between nonlinear normal modes and response to random inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoneman, Joseph D.; Allen, Matthew S.; Kuether, Robert J.

    2017-02-01

    The ability to model nonlinear structures subject to random excitation is of key importance in designing hypersonic aircraft and other advanced aerospace vehicles. When a structure is linear, superposition can be used to construct its response to a known spectrum in terms of its linear modes. Superposition does not hold for a nonlinear system, but several works have shown that a system's dynamics can still be understood qualitatively in terms of its nonlinear normal modes (NNMs). This work investigates the connection between a structure's undamped nonlinear normal modes and the spectrum of its response to high amplitude random forcing. Two examples are investigated: a spring-mass system and a clamped-clamped beam modeled within a geometrically nonlinear finite element package. In both cases, an intimate connection is observed between the smeared peaks in the response spectrum and the frequency-energy dependence of the nonlinear normal modes. In order to understand the role of coupling between the underlying linear modes, reduced order models with and without modal coupling terms are used to separate the effect of each NNM's backbone from the nonlinear couplings that give rise to internal resonances. In the cases shown here, uncoupled, single-degree-of-freedom nonlinear models are found to predict major features in the response with reasonable accuracy; a highly inexpensive approximation such as this could be useful in design and optimization studies. More importantly, the results show that a reduced order model can be expected to give accurate results only if it is also capable of accurately predicting the frequency-energy dependence of the nonlinear modes that are excited.

  6. Relationships between nonlinear normal modes and response to random inputs

    DOE PAGES

    Schoneman, Joseph D.; Allen, Matthew S.; Kuether, Robert J.

    2016-07-25

    The ability to model nonlinear structures subject to random excitation is of key importance in designing hypersonic aircraft and other advanced aerospace vehicles. When a structure is linear, superposition can be used to construct its response to a known spectrum in terms of its linear modes. Superposition does not hold for a nonlinear system, but several works have shown that a system's dynamics can still be understood qualitatively in terms of its nonlinear normal modes (NNMs). Here, this work investigates the connection between a structure's undamped nonlinear normal modes and the spectrum of its response to high amplitude random forcing.more » Two examples are investigated: a spring-mass system and a clamped-clamped beam modeled within a geometrically nonlinear finite element package. In both cases, an intimate connection is observed between the smeared peaks in the response spectrum and the frequency-energy dependence of the nonlinear normal modes. In order to understand the role of coupling between the underlying linear modes, reduced order models with and without modal coupling terms are used to separate the effect of each NNM's backbone from the nonlinear couplings that give rise to internal resonances. In the cases shown here, uncoupled, single-degree-of-freedom nonlinear models are found to predict major features in the response with reasonable accuracy; a highly inexpensive approximation such as this could be useful in design and optimization studies. More importantly, the results show that a reduced order model can be expected to give accurate results only if it is also capable of accurately predicting the frequency-energy dependence of the nonlinear modes that are excited.« less

  7. Relationships between nonlinear normal modes and response to random inputs

    SciTech Connect

    Schoneman, Joseph D.; Allen, Matthew S.; Kuether, Robert J.

    2016-07-25

    The ability to model nonlinear structures subject to random excitation is of key importance in designing hypersonic aircraft and other advanced aerospace vehicles. When a structure is linear, superposition can be used to construct its response to a known spectrum in terms of its linear modes. Superposition does not hold for a nonlinear system, but several works have shown that a system's dynamics can still be understood qualitatively in terms of its nonlinear normal modes (NNMs). Here, this work investigates the connection between a structure's undamped nonlinear normal modes and the spectrum of its response to high amplitude random forcing. Two examples are investigated: a spring-mass system and a clamped-clamped beam modeled within a geometrically nonlinear finite element package. In both cases, an intimate connection is observed between the smeared peaks in the response spectrum and the frequency-energy dependence of the nonlinear normal modes. In order to understand the role of coupling between the underlying linear modes, reduced order models with and without modal coupling terms are used to separate the effect of each NNM's backbone from the nonlinear couplings that give rise to internal resonances. In the cases shown here, uncoupled, single-degree-of-freedom nonlinear models are found to predict major features in the response with reasonable accuracy; a highly inexpensive approximation such as this could be useful in design and optimization studies. More importantly, the results show that a reduced order model can be expected to give accurate results only if it is also capable of accurately predicting the frequency-energy dependence of the nonlinear modes that are excited.

  8. Biologically Active Chorionic Gonadotropin: Synthesis by the Human Fetus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGregor, W. G.; Kuhn, R. W.; Jaffe, R. B.

    1983-04-01

    The kidney, and to a slight extent the liver, of human fetuses were found to synthesize and secrete the α subunit common to glycoprotein hormones. Fetal lung and muscle did not synthesize this protein. Since fetal kidney and liver were previously found to synthesize β chorionic gonadotropin, their ability to synthesize bioactive chorionic gonadotropin was also determined. The newly synthesized hormone bound to mouse Leydig cells and elicited a biological response: namely, the synthesis of testosterone. These results suggest that the human fetus may participate in metabolic homeostasis during its development.

  9. Universal temperature-dependent normalized optoacoustic response of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, Elena V.; Liopo, Anton; Oraevsky, Alexander A.; Ermilov, Sergey A.

    2015-03-01

    We found and interpreted the universal temperature-dependent optoacoustic (photoacoustic) response (ThOR) in blood; the normalized ThOR is invariant with respect to hematocrit at the hemoglobin's isosbestic point. The unique compartmentalization of hemoglobin, the primary optical absorber at 805 nm, inside red blood cells (RBCs) explains the effect. We studied the temperature dependence of Gruneisen parameter in blood and aqueous solutions of hemoglobin and for the first time experimentally observed transition through the zero optoacoustic response at temperature T0, which was proved to be consistent for various blood samples. On the other hand, the hemoglobin solutions demonstrated linear concentration function of the temperature T0. When this function was extrapolated to the average hemoglobin concentration inside erythrocytes, the temperature T0 was found equivalent to that measured in whole and diluted blood. The obtained universal curve of blood ThOR was validated in both transparent and light scattering media. The discovered universal optoacoustic temperature dependent blood response provides foundation for future development of non-invasive in vivo temperature monitoring in vascularized tissues and blood vessels.

  10. The normal response to prolonged passive head up tilt testing

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, M; Williams, T; Gordon, C; Chamberlain-Webbe..., R; Sutton, R

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To define the responses to head up tilt in a large group of normal adult subjects using the most widely employed protocol for tilt testing.
METHODS—127 normal subjects aged 19-88 years (mean (SD), 49 (20) years) without a previous history of syncope underwent tilt testing at 60° for 45 minutes or until syncope intervened. Blood pressure monitoring was performed with digital photoplethysmography, providing continuous, non-invasive, beat to beat heart rate and pressure measurements.
RESULTS—13% of subjects developed vasovagal syncope after a mean (SD) tilt time of 31.7 (12.4) minutes (range 8.5-44.9 minutes). Severe cardioinhibition during syncope was observed less often than is reported in patients investigated for syncope. There were no differences in the age or sex distributions of subjects with positive or negative outcomes, or in the proportions with cardioinhibitory and vasodepressor vasovagal syncope compared with previously reported patient populations. Subjects with negative outcomes showed age related differences in heart rate and blood pressure behaviour throughout tilt.
CONCLUSIONS—False positive results with tilting appear to be common. This has important implications for the use of diagnostic tilt testing. The magnitude of the heart rate and blood pressure changes observed during negative tilts largely invalidates previously suggested criteria for abnormal non-syncopal outcomes.


Keywords: syncope; head up tilt; postural hypotension PMID:11040011

  11. Photoacoustic monitoring of tumor and normal tissue response to radiation

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Laurie J.; Seshadri, Mukund

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is a recognized characteristic of tumors that influences efficacy of radiotherapy (RT). Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is a relatively new imaging technique that exploits the optical characteristics of hemoglobin to provide information on tissue oxygenation. In the present study, PAI based measures of tumor oxygen saturation (%sO2) were compared to oxygen-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements of longitudinal relaxation rate (R1 = 1/T1) and ex-vivo histology in patient derived xenograft (PDX) models of head and neck cancer. PAI was utilized to assess early changes (24 h) in %sO2 following RT and chemoRT (CRT) and to assess changes in salivary gland hemodynamics following radiation. A significant increase in tumor %sO2 and R1 was observed following oxygen inhalation. Good spatial correlation was observed between PAI, MRI and histology. An early increase in %sO2 after RT and CRT detected by PAI was associated with significant tumor growth inhibition. Twenty four hours after RT, PAI also detected loss of hemodynamic response to gustatory stimulation in murine salivary gland tissue suggestive of radiation-induced vascular damage. Our observations illustrate the utility of PAI in detecting tumor and normal tissue hemodynamic response to radiation in head and neck cancers. PMID:26883660

  12. Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome prevention strategies: oral contraceptive pills-dual gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist suppression with step-down gonadotropin protocols.

    PubMed

    Damario, Mark A

    2010-11-01

    The identification of patients at high risk for excessive responses to ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer is essential in the tailoring of safe and effective treatment strategies. Known factors associated with increased sensitivity to gonadotropins include polycystic ovary syndrome, young age, prior ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS), high baseline antral follicle count, and high baseline ovarian volume. Although several treatment strategies have been proposed for these patients, this report describes the experience using the dual suppression with gonadotropin step-down protocol. This protocol uses oral contraceptive pretreatment in combination with a long gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist followed by a programmed step-down in gonadotropin dosing. Hormonal characteristics of dual suppression include an improved luteinizing hormone-to-follicle-stimulating hormone ratio and lower serum androgens, particularly dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate. Clinical characteristics of the protocol include a lower cancellation rate and favorable clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates per initiated cycle while mitigating the risk of OHSS.

  13. Plasma prolactin changes during the administration of human menopausal gonadotropins in nonovulatory women.

    PubMed

    Kemmann, E; GEMZELL, C A; Beinert, W C; Beling, C B; Jones, J R

    1977-09-15

    Plasma prolactin concentrations were determined in 16 nonovulatory women during treatment with human meonpausal gonadotropins (hMG). In eight patients with initially normal prolactin levels of less than 20 ng. per milliliter, a significant rise was noted at the end of hMG administration, this is thought to be a response to increased endogenous estrogen concentrations. A similar rise in plasma prolactin levels was seen in some but not all of the eight patients with initially elevated "basal" prolactin concentrations. Three of these hyperprolactinemic patients had radiographic evidence of a pituitary lesion--either a pituitary adenoma or a "microadenoma"--but the variance in prolactin response could not be explained on this basis. The two groups of normo- and hyper-prolactinemic patients showed no significant difference in the required dosage and duration or hMG treatment, plasma estradiol-17 beta response, and ovulatory and pregnancy outcome.

  14. Regulation of tonic gonadotropin release in prepubertal female hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.G.; Matt, K.S.; Prestowitz, W.F.; Stetson, M.H.

    1982-04-01

    Basal serum gonadotropin levels were monitored weekly in female hamsters from birth to 10 weeks of age. Hamsters raised on three different photoperiods presented uniform pre- and postpubertal patterns of serum LH and FSH, suggesting that gonadotropin release in the young hamster occurs independently of ambient photoperiod. In all groups, serum LH levels increased gradually in animals up to 4 weeks of age, after which levels plateaued at 50--100 ng/ml. Serum FSH was markedly elevated in 2- and 3-week-old hamsters (800--1200 ng/ml), but remained at 200--400 ng/ml in all other groups. We next examined the change in the responsiveness of the pituitary to exogenous gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) challenge. Female hamsters 2 days of age failed to respond to any dose (0.025--1000 ng) of GnRH, while 10-day old females responded in typical dose-dependent fashion. GnRH-stimulated LH release first occurred in 6-day-old hamsters and was maximal by day 9, whereas FSH release first occurred on day 8 and was maximal by day 9. The prepubertal pattern of gonadotropin release can, in part, be explained on the basis of the development of pituitary GnRH sensitivity, which occurs independently of photoperiod.

  15. A high response to controlled ovarian stimulation induces premature luteinization with a negative impact on pregnancy outcomes in a gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist cycle

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Hwa Seon; Cha, Sun Hwa; Kim, Hye Ok; Song, In Ok; Min, Eung Gi; Yang, Kwang Moon

    2015-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to investigate the relationship between serum progesterone (P4) levels on the day of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) administration and the pregnancy rate among women undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization (IVF) or intracytoplasmic sperm injection-embryo transfer (ICSI-ET) using a flexible antagonist protocol. Methods This prospective study included 200 IVF and ICSI-ET cycles in which a flexible antagonist protocol was used. The patients were divided into five distinct groups according to their serum P4 levels at the time of hCG administration (0.80, 0.85, 0.90, 0.95, and 1.00 ng/mL). The clinical pregnancy rate (CPR) was calculated for each P4 interval. Statistically significant differences were observed at a serum P4 level of 0.9 ng/mL. These data suggest that a serum P4 concentration of 0.9 ng/mL may represent the optimal threshold level for defining premature luteinization (PL) based on the presence of a significant negative impact on the CPR. Results The CPR for each round of ET was significantly lower in the PL group defined using this threshold (25.8% vs. 41.8%; p=0.019), and the number of oocytes retrieved was significantly higher than in the non-PL group (17.3±7.2 vs. 11.0±7.2; p=0.001). Elevated serum P4 levels on the day of hCG administration were associated with a reduced CPR, despite the retrieval of many oocytes. Conclusion Measuring serum P4 values at the time of hCG administration is necessary in order to determine the optimal strategy for embryo transfer. PMID:26816874

  16. Clinical iron deficiency disturbs normal human responses to hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Frise, Matthew C.; Cheng, Hung-Yuan; Nickol, Annabel H.; Curtis, M. Kate; Pollard, Karen A.; Roberts, David J.; Ratcliffe, Peter J.; Dorrington, Keith L.; Robbins, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Iron bioavailability has been identified as a factor that influences cellular hypoxia sensing, putatively via an action on the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway. We therefore hypothesized that clinical iron deficiency would disturb integrated human responses to hypoxia. METHODS. We performed a prospective, controlled, observational study of the effects of iron status on hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. Individuals with absolute iron deficiency (ID) and an iron-replete (IR) control group were exposed to two 6-hour periods of isocapnic hypoxia. The second hypoxic exposure was preceded by i.v. infusion of iron. Pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) was serially assessed with Doppler echocardiography. RESULTS. Thirteen ID individuals completed the study and were age- and sex-matched with controls. PASP did not differ by group or study day before each hypoxic exposure. During the first 6-hour hypoxic exposure, the rise in PASP was 6.2 mmHg greater in the ID group (absolute rises 16.1 and 10.7 mmHg, respectively; 95% CI for difference, 2.7–9.7 mmHg, P = 0.001). Intravenous iron attenuated the PASP rise in both groups; however, the effect was greater in ID participants than in controls (absolute reductions 11.1 and 6.8 mmHg, respectively; 95% CI for difference in change, –8.3 to –0.3 mmHg, P = 0.035). Serum erythropoietin responses to hypoxia also differed between groups. CONCLUSION. Clinical iron deficiency disturbs normal responses to hypoxia, as evidenced by exaggerated hypoxic pulmonary hypertension that is reversed by subsequent iron administration. Disturbed hypoxia sensing and signaling provides a mechanism through which iron deficiency may be detrimental to human health. TRIAL REGISTRATION. ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01847352). FUNDING. M.C. Frise is the recipient of a British Heart Foundation Clinical Research Training Fellowship (FS/14/48/30828). K.L. Dorrington is supported by the Dunhill Medical Trust (R178/1110). D.J. Roberts was

  17. GATA4 and GATA6 Knockdown During Luteinization Inhibits Progesterone Production and Gonadotropin Responsiveness in the Corpus Luteum of Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Convissar, Scott M; Bennett, Jill; Baumgarten, Sarah C; Lydon, John P; DeMayo, Francesco J; Stocco, Carlos

    2015-12-01

    The surge of luteinizing hormone triggers the genomic reprogramming, cell differentiation, and tissue remodeling of the ovulated follicle, leading to the formation of the corpus luteum. During this process, called luteinization, follicular granulosa cells begin expressing a new set of genes that allow the resulting luteal cells to survive in a vastly different hormonal environment and to produce the extremely high amounts of progesterone (P4) needed to sustain pregnancy. To better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of luteal P4 production in vivo, the transcription factors GATA4 and GATA6 were knocked down in the corpus luteum by crossing mice carrying Gata4 and Gata6 floxed genes with mice carrying Cre recombinase fused to the progesterone receptor. This receptor is expressed exclusively in granulosa cells after the luteinizing hormone surge, leading to recombination of floxed genes during follicle luteinization. The findings demonstrated that GATA4 and GATA6 are essential for female fertility, whereas targeting either factor alone causes subfertility. When compared to control mice, serum P4 levels and luteal expression of key steroidogenic genes were significantly lower in conditional knockdown mice. The results also showed that GATA4 and GATA6 are required for the expression of the receptors for prolactin and luteinizing hormone, the main luteotropic hormones in mice. The findings demonstrate that GATA4 and GATA6 are crucial regulators of luteal steroidogenesis and are required for the normal response of luteal cells to luteotropins.

  18. Magnetic response measurements of mesoscopic superconducting and normal metal rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluhm, Hendrik

    The main part of this thesis reports three experiments on the magnetic response of mesoscopic superconducting and normal metal rings using a scanning SQUID microscope. The first experiment explores the magnetic response and fluxoid transitions of superconducting, mesoscopic bilayer aluminum rings in the presence of two coupled order parameters arising from the layered structure. For intermediate couplings, metastable states that have different phase winding numbers around the ring in each of the two order parameters were observed. Larger coupling locks the relative phase, so that the two order parameters are only manifest in the temperature dependence of the response. With increasing proximitization, this signature gradually disappears. The data can be described with a two-order-parameter Ginzburg-Landau theory. The second experiment concentrates on fluxoid transitions in similar, but single-layer rings. Near the critical temperature, the transitions, which are induced by applying a flux to the ring, only admit a single fluxoid at a time. At lower temperatures, several fluxoids enter or leave at once, and the final state approaches the ground state. Currently available theoretical frameworks cannot quantitatively explain the data. Heating and quasiparticle diffusion are likely important for a quantitative understanding of this experiment, which could provide a model system for studying the nonlinear dynamics of superconductors far from equilibrium. The third and most important scanning SQUID study concerns 33 individual mesoscopic gold rings. All measured rings show a paramagnetic linear susceptibility and a poorly understood anomaly around zero field, both of which are likely due to unpaired defect spins. The response of sufficiently small rings also has a component that is periodic in the flux through the ring, with a period close to h/e. Its amplitude varies in sign and magnitude from ring to ring, and its typical value and temperature dependence agree with

  19. RESPONSES OF BRIGHT, NORMAL, AND RETARDED CHILDREN TO LEARNING TASKS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CARRIER, NEIL A.; AND OTHERS

    THE RELATIONSHIPS AMONG THE VARIABLES OF INTELLIGENCE, LEARNING TASK PERFORMANCE, EMOTIONAL TENSION, AND TASK MOTIVATION WERE STUDIED. ABOUT 120 BRIGHT, NORMAL, AND RETARDED CHILDREN PERFORMED SIX TRIALS OF NUMBER LEARNING, CONCEPT FORMATION, PROBLEM SOLVING, PERCEPTUAL-MOTOR COORDINATION, AND VERBAL LEARNING TASKS. DURING THE LEARNING SESSIONS,…

  20. Auditory brainstem response and late latency response in individuals with tinnitus having normal hearing

    PubMed Central

    Konadath, Sreeraj; Manjula, Puttabasappa

    2016-01-01

    Summary Tinnitus is a commonly encountered complaint in routine audiology practice. The pathophysiology and exact generation site of tinnitus is not precisely established. Auditory brainstem response (ABR) and late latency response (LLR) findings in individuals with tinnitus show mixed results in the literature. Majority of studies have focused on individuals having tinnitus with peripheral hearing loss. The present study explores ABR and LLR characteristics among tinnitus patients with normal audiometric presentation; with no direct indication of any cochlear lesion. This study aims at characterizing the ABR and LLR findings in individuals with tinnitus having normal audiometric presentation. ABR and LLR waveform characteristics were recorded and compared between participants with tinnitus (Group 1) and those without tinnitus (Group 2). The ABR analysis indicated no significant differences in latency and amplitude between Groups 1 and 2. However, patients with tinnitus showed abnormally reduced absolute amplitudes of peaks I and V. LLR analysis indicated no significant differences in latency and amplitude between Groups 1 and 2 except enhanced amplitude of P1. The reduced amplitude of peaks I and V along with normal absolute latencies of peaks I, III and V indicate that the origin of tinnitus is possibly due to reduced excitation of auditory nerve fibres arising from a peripheral hearing loss beyond 8 kHz. The P1 amplitude enhancement could be attributed to mechanism explaining central gain model; which suggests that central auditory structures recalibrates the mean firing rate, considering the reduced output from sensory structures, generating neural noise perceived as tinnitus. PMID:27904821

  1. Pattern of human chorionic gonadotropin binding in the polycystic ovary

    SciTech Connect

    Brawer, J.; Richard, M.; Farookhi, R. )

    1989-08-01

    The histologic evolution of polycystic ovaries in the estradiol valerate-treated rat coincides with the development of a unique plasma pattern of luteinizing hormone. To assess the role of luteinizing hormone in polycystic ovaries, it is necessary to evaluate the luteinizing hormone sensitivity of the specific tissues in the polycystic ovary. Therefore, we examined the pattern of luteinizing hormone binding sites in polycystic ovaries. Rats at 4 or 8 weeks after estradiol valerate treatment each received an intrajugular injection of iodine 125-labeled human chorionic gonadotropin. Some rats also received a 1000-fold excess of unlabeled human chorionic gonadotropin in the same injection. Ovaries were prepared for autoradiography. Dense accumulations of grains occurred over the theca of normal and atretic secondary follicles in all ovaries and over clusters of secondary interstitial cells. The iodine label was variable over the typically hypertrophied theca of precystic follicles. The theca of definitive cysts showed little or no label. These results indicate that cyst formation coincides with the loss of luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotropin binding to the affected follicles.

  2. Serum levels of beta-subunit of chorionic gonadotropin in patients with pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Gil-del-Alamo, P; Saccomanno, K; Lania, A; Pettersson, K S; Beck-Peccoz, P; Spada, A

    1995-07-01

    Many studies have shown that normal and tumoral pituitary is able to synthesize chorionic gonadotropin (CG). The aim of the present work was to investigate the circulating levels of free beta-subunit of CG (CG-beta) in a large number of patients with pituitary tumors in basal conditions and after thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) injection. The study includes 27 healthy subjects, 23 patients with prolactinoma, 20 with growth hormone-secreting adenoma and 77 with non-functioning pituitary adenoma (NFPA). The CG-beta was evaluated using a new one-step immunometric assay employing two monoclonal antibodies directed against epitopes present only on the free CG-beta and showing a detection limit of 0.04 U/l and a cross-reactivity with complete CG < 0.01%. In basal conditions, serum CG-beta was undetectable in healthy subjects and in the majority of patients, while in seven patients with NFPA and four with prolactinoma the CG-beta values ranged between 0.05 and 0.72 U/l. In these 11 patients serum levels of intact CG were found within the normal range (normal range < 5 U/l), while two patients with NFPA and one with prolactinoma had levels of free alpha-subunit inappropriately high with respect to gonadotropins and thyrotropin. Injection of TRH caused CG-beta to increase in two out of 16 patients with NFPA, whereas it was ineffective in 12 healthy subjects and 10 patients with prolactinoma. The present data indicate that detectable level of CG-beta not associated with hypersecretion of the intact CG molecule may be observed in about 10% of patients with NFPA or prolactinoma, while abnormal CG-beta responses to TRH are observed infrequently in individual patients with NFPA.

  3. Is the assumption of normality or log-normality for continuous response data critical for benchmark dose estimation?

    PubMed

    Shao, Kan; Gift, Jeffrey S; Setzer, R Woodrow

    2013-11-01

    Continuous responses (e.g. body weight) are widely used in risk assessment for determining the benchmark dose (BMD) which is used to derive a U.S. EPA reference dose. One critical question that is not often addressed in dose-response assessments is whether to model the continuous data as normally or log-normally distributed. Additionally, if lognormality is assumed, and only summarized response data (i.e., mean±standard deviation) are available as is usual in the peer-reviewed literature, the BMD can only be approximated. In this study, using the "hybrid" method and relative deviation approach, we first evaluate six representative continuous dose-response datasets reporting individual animal responses to investigate the impact on BMD/BMDL estimates of (1) the distribution assumption and (2) the use of summarized versus individual animal data when a log-normal distribution is assumed. We also conduct simulation studies evaluating model fits to various known distributions to investigate whether the distribution assumption has influence on BMD/BMDL estimates. Our results indicate that BMDs estimated using the hybrid method are more sensitive to the distribution assumption than counterpart BMDs estimated using the relative deviation approach. The choice of distribution assumption has limited impact on the BMD/BMDL estimates when the within dose-group variance is small, while the lognormality assumption is a better choice for relative deviation method when data are more skewed because of its appropriateness in describing the relationship between mean and standard deviation. Additionally, the results suggest that the use of summarized data versus individual response data to characterize log-normal distributions has minimal impact on BMD estimates.

  4. Beta-human chorionic gonadotropin producing osteosarcoma of the sacrum in a 26-year-old woman: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Glass, Ryan; Asirvatham, Jaya Ruth; Kahn, Leonard; Aziz, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Ectopic secretion of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin is considered a poor prognostic marker in epithelial tumors. However, very few cases have been reported in sarcomas. We present the case of a 26-year-old female who presented with a metastatic osteosarcoma. She underwent usual testing prior to starting treatment and was found to have elevated levels of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin. As the patient was not pregnant, another source of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin secretion had to be considered. The tumor cells demonstrated positive staining for beta-human chorionic gonadotropin by immunohistochemistry, and serum levels of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin were used to monitor tumor progression and response to chemotherapy. We review the literature and discuss a potential role of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin in the treatment of such patients.

  5. Leg contracture in mice: an assay of normal tissue response

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, H.B.

    1984-07-01

    Leg contracture, defined as the difference in extensibility of the control and irradiated hind legs of mice, was found to correlate with single doses of radiation from about 20 to 80 Gy. The time of development of the early phase of the response coincided with that reported for the appearance of the acute skin response, and in some cases, partially reversed as this reaction healed. The contracture then progressed again at a moderate rate through 90 days, and then more slowly through one year. Skin contraction, measured by decrease in intertattoo distance, was assayed in the same mice. It followed the same time course as leg contracture, but had a different dose-response relationship. To determine the contribution of skin contraction to the overall leg contracture response, mice were sacrificed and the leg contracture measured before and after the removal of the skin of the leg. After doses of up to 30 Gy, little contracture remained from skinning the leg, indicating that skin contraction was largely responsible for leg contracture in this dose range. After doses of about 45 Gy and above, some contracture remained in the skinned legs, although less than in intact legs. There was little or no enhancement of either skin contraction or leg contracture by the hypoxic cell sensitizers metronidazole or misonidazole.

  6. Characterization of renal response to prolonged immersion in normal man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, M.; Denunzio, A. G.; Ramachandran, M.

    1980-01-01

    ?jDuring the initial phase of space flight, there is a translocation of fluid from the lower parts of the body to the central vascular compartment with a resultant natriuresis, diuresis, and weight loss. Because water immersion is regarded as an appropriate model for studying the redistribution of fluid that occurs in weightlessness, an immersion study of relatively prolonged duration was carried out in order to characterize the temporal profile of the renal adaptation to central hypervolemia. Twelve normal male subjects underwent an immersion study of 8-h duration in the sodium-replete state. Immersion resulted in marked natriuresis and diuresis which were sustained throughout the immersion period. The failure of that natriuresis and diuresis of immersion to abate or cease despite marked extracellular fluid volume contraction as evidenced by a mean weight loss of -2.2 + or - 0.3 kg suggests that central blood volume was not restored to normal and that some degree of central hypervolemia probably persisted.

  7. Side Effects of Injectable Fertility Drugs (Gonadotropins)

    MedlinePlus

    ... implant in the uterus goes up. • Ectopic (Tubal) Pregnancies. While ectopic pregnancies occur in 1% to 2% of naturally occurring ... in gonadotropin cycles the rate is slightly increased. Ectopic pregnancies can be life threatening and require treatment with ...

  8. A normal tissue dose response model of dynamic repair processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alber, Markus; Belka, Claus

    2006-01-01

    A model is presented for serial, critical element complication mechanisms for irradiated volumes from length scales of a few millimetres up to the entire organ. The central element of the model is the description of radiation complication as the failure of a dynamic repair process. The nature of the repair process is seen as reestablishing the structural organization of the tissue, rather than mere replenishment of lost cells. The interactions between the cells, such as migration, involved in the repair process are assumed to have finite ranges, which limits the repair capacity and is the defining property of a finite-sized reconstruction unit. Since the details of the repair processes are largely unknown, the development aims to make the most general assumptions about them. The model employs analogies and methods from thermodynamics and statistical physics. An explicit analytical form of the dose response of the reconstruction unit for total, partial and inhomogeneous irradiation is derived. The use of the model is demonstrated with data from animal spinal cord experiments and clinical data about heart, lung and rectum. The three-parameter model lends a new perspective to the equivalent uniform dose formalism and the established serial and parallel complication models. Its implications for dose optimization are discussed.

  9. Effect of prenatal and neonatal exposure to lead on gonadotropin receptors and steroidogenesis in rat ovaries

    SciTech Connect

    Wiebe, J.P.; Barr, K.J.; Buckingham, K.D.

    1988-01-01

    Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with lead chloride (20 or 200 ppm) or sodium chloride (controls) in their drinking water, either prior to pregnancy or during pregnancy and lactation, and female offspring were examined at weaning (21 d) or at 150 d. Other female rats were treated from d 21 to 35. Tissue (blood, kidney, bone) lead levels, body, ovary, and uterus weights, ovarian steroidogenesis, and gonadotropin (luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone) levels, and gonadotropin-receptor binding were determined. Prenatal and/or postnatal exposure to lead at these levels (20 and 200 ppm) did not affect tissue weights but did cause a significant decrease in gonadotropin-receptor binding in the prepubertal, pubertal and adult females. Conversion of progesterone to androstenedione and dihydrotestosterone was significantly decreased in 21-d-old rats; in 150-d-old females, the prenatal and/or postnatal exposure to lead resulted in significantly increased conversion to the 5-alpha-reduced steroid, normally high during puberty. The results demonstrate that lead exposure prior to mating may affect gonadotropin-receptor binding in the offspring and that lead exposure (in utero, via mother's milk, or post weaning) may significantly alter steroid production and gonadotropin binding in ovaries of the prepubertal, pubertal, and adult female.

  10. The Role of Human Chorionic Gonadotropin as Tumor Marker: Biochemical and Clinical Aspects.

    PubMed

    Sisinni, Lorenza; Landriscina, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Tumor markers are biological substances that are produced/released mainly by malignant tumor cells, enter the circulation in detectable amounts and are potential indicators of the presence of a tumor. The most useful biochemical markers are the tumor-specific molecules, i.e., receptors, enzymes, hormones, growth factors or biological response modifiers that are specifically produced by tumor cells and not, or minimally, by the normal counterpart (Richard et al. Principles and practice of gynecologic oncology. Wolters Kluwer Health, Philadelphia, 2009). Based on their specificity and sensitivity in each malignancy, biomarkers are used for screening, diagnosis, disease monitoring and therapeutic response assessment in clinical management of cancer patients.This chapter is focused on human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), a hormone with a variety of functions and widely used as a tumor biomarker in selected tumors. Indeed, hCG is expressed by both trophoblastic and non-trophoblastic human malignancies and plays a role in cell transformation, angiogenesis, metastatization, and immune escape, all process central to cancer progression. Of note, hCG testing is crucial for the clinical management of placental trophoblastic malignancies and germ cell tumors of the testis and the ovary. Furthermore, the production of hCG by tumor cells is accompanied by varying degrees of release of the free subunits into the circulation, and this is relevant for the management of cancer patients (Triozzi PL, Stevens VC, Oncol Rep 6(1):7-17, 1999).The name chorionic gonadotropin was conceived: chorion derives from the latin chordate meaning afterbirth, gonadotropin indicates that the hormone is a gonadotropic molecule, acting on the ovaries and promoting steroid production (Cole LA, Int J Endocrinol Metab 9(2):335-352, 2011). The function, the mechanism of action and the interaction between hCG and its receptor continue to be the subject of intensive investigation, even though many issues about

  11. Determination of human chorionic gonadotropin.

    PubMed

    Stenman, Ulf-Håkan; Alfthan, Henrik

    2013-12-01

    Determination of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is used for diagnosis and monitoring of pregnancy, pregnancy related disorders, for trophoblastic and some nontrophoblastic tumors. In addition, hCG is determined for doping control in males. Assay of hCG is complicated by the occurrence of different molecular forms, which are detected to various degrees by different assays. The main form of hCG in circulation and in patients with trophoblastic tumors is intact heterodimeric hCG. The free β subunit (hCGβ) is a minor form in plasma in both conditions, but it may be the major form aggressive trophoblastic cancer. Therefore, assays measuring hCG and hCGβ together are mainly used for diagnosis of pregnancy and trophoblastic diseases. When excreted into urine, most of hCG (and hCGβ) is broken down to the core fragment of hCGβ (hCGβcf), which is the main immunoreactive form of hCG in urine during pregnancy. Specific determination of hCGβ is of value in screening for Down's syndrome and diagnosis of nontrophoblastic cancer. hCGbcf is of limited utility but it is important because it may disturb assay of hCG in pregnancy.

  12. Treatment of gonadotropin dependent precocious puberty due to hypothalamic hamartoma with gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist depot

    PubMed Central

    de Brito, V. N; Latronico, A.; Arnhold, I.; Lo, L.; Domenice, S.; Albano, M.; Fragoso, M.; Mendonca, B.

    1999-01-01

    The gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) secreting hypothalamic hamartoma (HH) is a congenital malformation consisting of a heterotopic mass of nervous tissue that contains GnRH neurosecretory neurons attached to the tuber cinereum or the floor of the third ventricle. HH is a well recognised cause of gonadotropin dependent precocious puberty (GDPP). Long term data are presented on eight children (five boys and three girls) with GDPP due to HH. Physical signs of puberty were observed before 2 years of age in all patients. At presentation with sexual precocity, the mean height standard deviation (SD) for chronological age was +1.60 (1.27) and the mean height SD for bone age was −0.92 (1.77). Neurological symptoms were absent at presentation and follow up. The hamartoma diameter ranged from 5 to 18 mm and did not change in six patients who had magnetic resonance imaging follow up. All patients were treated clinically with GnRH agonists (GnRH-a). The duration of treatment varied from 2.66 to 8.41 years. Seven of the eight children had satisfactory responses to treatment, shown by regression of pubertal signs, suppression of hormonal levels, and improvement of height SD for bone age and predicted height. One patient had a severe local reaction to GnRH-a with failure of hormonal suppression and progression of pubertal signs. It seems that HH is benign and that GnRH-a treatment provides satisfactory and safe control for most children with GDPP due to HH.

 PMID:10325702

  13. Impact of gonadotropins on oocyte maturation, fertilisation and developmental competence in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuemei; Tsai, Tony; Qiao, Jie; Zhang, Zhan; Feng, Huai L

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the dose-dependent effects of gonadotropins, either singly (Bravelle (B), Luveris (L), Menupur (M), Repronex (R), Gonal-F (G), Follism (F) and Norvarel (N)) or in combination (Menupur+Bravelle; Repronext+Bravelle; and Bravelle+Norvarel), on rates of oocyte maturation, fertilisation and early embryo development in vitro in an animal model. Bovine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were purchased commercially and cultured in TCM-199 with 10% fetal bovine serum supplemented with varying concentrations of gonadotropin (0, 5, 10, 20, 40IU or United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) mL-1) for 24 and 48h according to current IVF clinical stimulation protocols. All gonadotropins enhanced oocyte maturation in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. Individually, Gonal-F (Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany), Follism (Merck Co, Whitehouse Station, NJ, USA) and Repronext (Ferring, Parsippany, NJ, USA) promoted oocyte maturation; in combination, they effectively enhanced COC expansion and increased the maturation competence of MII oocytes. However, high concentrations of gonadotropins may result in maturation arrest. Specific combinations of gonadotropins may change the rate of early embryonic development (8-16-cells) and morula-blastocyst formation. These data provide support for the responsiveness of bovine oocytes to gonadotropins in vitro and the need to consider variations in the relative concentrations and ratio of combinations (FSH/LH or human chorionic gonadotropin) for optimisation of oocyte developmental competence. The results of the present study could be applied to therapeutic clinical stimulation protocols and help improve IVF success rates.

  14. Responses to a saline load in gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist-pretreated premenopausal women receiving progesterone or estradiol-progesterone therapy.

    PubMed

    Stachenfeld, Nina S; Keefe, David L; Taylor, Hugh S

    2005-01-01

    The effects of estradiol (E(2)) and progesterone (P(4)) on fluid and sodium regulation may have important clinical implications with respect to cardiovascular and renal disease as well as reproductive syndromes such as preeclampsia and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. We tested the hypothesis that sodium excretion is reduced in response to a sodium load during combined P(4)-E(2) treatment, but P(4) administration alone has little effect on sodium regulation. Fifteen women (22 +/- 2 yr) used a GnRH antagonist to suppress endogenous E(2) and P(4) for 9 d; for d 4-9, eight subjects used P(4) (200 mg/d), and seven subjects used P(4) with E(2) (two E(2) patches, 0.1 mg/d each). On d 3 and 9, isotonic saline (0.9% NaCl) was infused [120 min at 0.1 ml/kg body weight (BW).min], followed by 120 min of rest. Compared with GnRH antagonist alone, P([P4]) increased from 1.6 +/- 0.8 to 9.4 +/- 2.3 ng/ml (5.1 +/- 2.5 to 29.9 +/- 7.3 nmol/liter, P < 0.05) in the P(4) treated group, with no change in P([E2]). In the P(4)-E(2) treated group P([P4]) increased from 1.6 +/- 0.5 to 6.7 +/- 0.6 ng/ml (5.1 +/- 1.6 to 21.3 +/- 1.6 nmol/liter, P < 0.05 and P([E2]) increased from 17.9 +/- 6.3 to 200 +/- 41 pg/ml (65.7 +/- 23 to 734.6 +/- 150.0 pmol/liter, P < 0.05). Before isotonic saline infusion, renal sodium and water excretion were similar under all conditions, but during isotonic saline infusion, cumulative sodium excretion was lower in the P(4)-E(2) treated women (34.1 +/- 5.1 mEq) compared with GnRH antagonist (50.2 +/- 11.4 mEq). Sodium excretion was unaffected by P(4) treatment (48.0 +/- 8.2 and 41.2 +/- 5.1 mEq, for GnRH antagonist and P(4)). Compared with GnRH antagonist alone, P(4)-E(2) treatment increased distal sodium reabsorption and transiently decreased proximal sodium reabsorption, whereas P(4) treatment did not alter either distal or proximal sodium reabsorption. Before isotonic saline infusion, the plasma aldosterone (Ald) concentration was greater during P(4) treatment

  15. Experimental and computational study of inter- and intra- species specificity of gonadotropins for various gonadotropin receptors.

    PubMed

    Aizen, Joseph; Kowalsman, Noga; Kobayashi, Makito; Hollander, Lian; Sohn, Young Chang; Yoshizaki, Goro; Niv, Masha Y; Levavi-Sivan, Berta

    2012-11-25

    The gonadotropins follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) and their receptors play critical roles in vertebrate reproduction. In order to study intra- and interspecies ligand promiscuity of gonadotropins, COS-7 cells were transiently transfected with one of the gonadotropin receptor genes, FSHR or LHR, and tested for activation by gonadotropins from representative fish orders: Aquilliformes (eel; e), Salmoniformes (trout; tr), and Perciformes (tilapia; ta), and of mammalian origin: porcine (p), bovine (b) and human (h). The study reveals complex relations between the gonadotropin hormones and their receptors. Each gonadotropin activated its own cognate receptor. However, taLHR was also activated by hCG and eLHR was activated by hFSH, hCG, and trFSH. For FSHR, the only cross-reactivity detected was for hFSHR, which was activated by pFSH and bFSH. These findings are of great interest and applicability in the context of activation of various GTHRs by their ligands and by ligands from other vertebrates. Analysis of the three-dimensional models of the structures highlights the importance of residues outside of the currently established hormone-receptor interface region. In addition, the interface residues in taFSHR and the effect of exon duplication, which causes an insert in the LRR domain, are suggested to affect the interaction and binding of taFSH.

  16. 21 CFR 522.1081 - Chorionic gonadotropin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chorionic gonadotropin. 522.1081 Section 522.1081 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS §...

  17. 21 CFR 522.1081 - Chorionic gonadotropin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chorionic gonadotropin. 522.1081 Section 522.1081 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS §...

  18. 21 CFR 522.1081 - Chorionic gonadotropin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chorionic gonadotropin. 522.1081 Section 522.1081 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS §...

  19. 21 CFR 522.1081 - Chorionic gonadotropin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chorionic gonadotropin. 522.1081 Section 522.1081 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS §...

  20. 21 CFR 522.1081 - Chorionic gonadotropin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chorionic gonadotropin. 522.1081 Section 522.1081 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS §...

  1. Tibialis anterior response to sudden ankle displacements in normal and Parkinsonian subjects.

    PubMed

    Chan, C W; Kearney, R E; Jones, G M

    1979-09-14

    It is well known that in Parkinsonian subjects with akinesia, reaction times are increased but reflex latencies remain normal. We have attempted to use this knowledge to distinguish between 'reflex' and 'voluntary' components of the electromyographic (EMG) response to ankle displacement. The EMG and torque responses of tibialis anterior (TA) to randomly applied servo-controlled plantar-flexing displacements of the ankle with and without the subject's intentional opposition were examined in 9 Parkinsonian and 9 age-matched normal humans. To obtain a measure of akinesia, the response latency to a visual stimulus was subsequently measured in the same subjects. Three principal findings emerged. (1) The intermediate latency EMG component (PSR) of the response evoked by ankle displacement with the subject instructed to relax was more regularly evoked and of lower threshold in Parkinsonians than in normals. This finding corresponds to the enlarged M2 component in upper limb muscles. However, the facilitation of PSR was not found to be associated with an increase in torque. In fact, the patients did not exhibit more stiffness than normals under our experimental conditions. (2) Mean latency estimate of the PSR was indistinguishable between Parkinsonians and normals. This finding puts the PSR in the nature of a reflex. Indeed, in accordance with reflex behaviour which is proportional to input characteristics, its area increased linearly with increase in the magnitude of displacement velocity. (3) In contrast, the 'late' EMG response (FSR) evoked by opposing sudden ankle displacement exhibited a significantly longer latency in 6 out of 8 Parkinsonians than normals. In the same patients, the EMG response latency to a visual signal was similarly increased. The delay of FSR in akinesia patients thus argued against its being a stereotyped reflex. The result is discussed with reference to the recent finding that preprogrammed responses are delayed in Parkinsonians.

  2. Wt p53 impairs response to chemotherapy: make lemonade to spare normal cells

    PubMed Central

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V.

    2012-01-01

    As published recently in Cancer Cell, p53 impairs the apoptotic response to chemotherapy and clinical outcome in breast cancer. I discuss that, while treating tumors lacking wt p53, this phenomenon can be exploited to protect normal cells from chemotherapy because all normal cells have wt p53. Also, several therapeutic paradigms can be reassessed, including the role of cellular senescence in cancer therapy. PMID:22802145

  3. Normal sensory and range of motion (ROM) responses during Thoracic Slump Test (ST) in asymptomatic subjects.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Ketaki C; Eapen, Charu; Kumar, Senthil P

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the normal sensory and range of motion (ROM) responses during the movement components of Thoracic Slump Test (Thoracic ST) in asymptomatic subjects. Sixty asymptomatic subjects were included in the study. Thoracic ST was performed in two sequences, proximal initiation, which was proximal to distal and distal initiation, which was distal to proximal. Subjects were randomized into four groups depending on the order of sequences and sides. Outcome measures of sensory responses (intensity, type, and location) and ROM responses were recorded after each sequence. Friedman's test was done to compare between sensory responses of the subjects. Between-component comparison for prevalence of sensory responses within each sequence was done using Kruskal-Wallis test and Wilcoxonsigned ranks test was used for between-component comparisons of intensity of symptoms within each sequence of testing. Independent t test was used to assess the ROM responses. Results show the prevalence of sensory responses, its nature, area and intensity. These sensory and ROM responses may be considered as normal response of Thoracic ST. The intensity of the symptoms of proximal initiation sequence (1.09±1.35 cm) was significant (P<0.05) when compared to distal initiation sequence (0.08±1.26 cm). The change in the ROM was significant (P<0.05) for distal initiation (7.55±4.51 degrees) when compared to proximal initiation (4.96±3.76 degrees). These normal responses may be used as a reference when using the Thoracic ST as an assessment technique.

  4. EFFECTS OF ORTHOKINETIC SEGMENTS UPON MOTOR RESPONSES OF NORMAL MALE COLLEGE STUDENTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CRENSHAW, WILLIAM A.

    THIS STUDY ASSESSES THE EFFECTS OF ORTHOKINETIC SEGMENTS UPON THE MOTOR RESPONSES OF NORMAL MALE COLLEGE STUDENTS PERFORMING THE VERTICAL JUMP AND THE STANDING BROAD JUMP. THE VARIOUS PLACINGS OF THE ELASTIC AND INELASTIC FIELDS OF THE SEGMENTS UPON THE AGONIST AND ANTAGONIST THIGH MUSCLES OF STUDENTS WERE NOTED AND COMPARED WITH PERFORMANCE…

  5. Specific gonadotropin binding to Pseudomonas maltophilia.

    PubMed

    Richert, N D; Ryan, R J

    1977-03-01

    Binding of 125I-labeled human chorionic gonadotropin to Pseudomonas maltophilia is dependent on time, temperature, and pH and the binding to this procaryotic species is hormone-specific and saturable. The equilibrium dissociation constant is 2.3 X 10(-9) M. There are no cooperative interactions between binding sites (Hill coefficient, 1.05). The number of sites is estimaated as 240 fmol/100 mug of protein. NaCl and KCl, at concentrations from 1 to 10 mM, have no effect on binding. Divalent cations (Mg2+ and Ca2+) and 1 mM EDTA inhibit hormone binding. Binding is destroyed by heat or by treatment with Pronase of alpha-chymotrypsin and is increased by phospholipase C. Binding of the labeled gonadotropin is not observed with other gram-negative organisms--e.g., Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas testosteroni, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacter aerogenes, or Enterobacter cloacae.

  6. Pitch-induced responses in the right auditory cortex correlate with musical ability in normal listeners.

    PubMed

    Puschmann, Sebastian; Özyurt, Jale; Uppenkamp, Stefan; Thiel, Christiane M

    2013-10-23

    Previous work compellingly shows the existence of functional and structural differences in human auditory cortex related to superior musical abilities observed in professional musicians. In this study, we investigated the relationship between musical abilities and auditory cortex activity in normal listeners who had not received a professional musical education. We used functional MRI to measure auditory cortex responses related to auditory stimulation per se and the processing of pitch and pitch changes, which represents a prerequisite for the perception of musical sequences. Pitch-evoked responses in the right lateral portion of Heschl's gyrus were correlated positively with the listeners' musical abilities, which were assessed using a musical aptitude test. In contrast, no significant relationship was found for noise stimuli, lacking any musical information, and for responses induced by pitch changes. Our results suggest that superior musical abilities in normal listeners are reflected by enhanced neural encoding of pitch information in the auditory system.

  7. Multifocal pupillary light response fields in normal subjects and patients with visual field defects.

    PubMed

    Tan, L; Kondo, M; Sato, M; Kondo, N; Miyake, Y

    2001-04-01

    The optimal conditions for recording focal pupillary light responses with a multifocal stimulation technique were determined, and the technique was applied to normal subjects and patients with visual field defects. Thirty-seven hexagonal stimuli were presented on a TV monitor with a visual field of 40 degrees diameter under a constant background illumination. Using a slow (4.7 Hz) m-sequence, reliable focal responses were obtained in both normal subjects and patients. The pupillary field and visual field were well correlated in patients with retinal diseases, but the correlation was not strong in patients with optic-nerve diseases. Pupillary light responses were reduced in the blind hemifield in patients with post-geniculate lesions. These results indicate that the multifocal stimulation technique can be used clinically to obtain a pupillary field for objective visual field testing.

  8. Tumor Cell Response to Synchrotron Microbeam Radiation Therapy Differs Markedly From Cells in Normal Tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Crosbie, Jeffrey C.; Anderson, Robin L.; Rothkamm, Kai; Restall, Christina M.; Cann, Leonie; Ruwanpura, Saleela; Meachem, Sarah; Yagi, Naoto; Svalbe, Imants; Lewis, Robert A.; Williams, Bryan R.G.; Rogers, Peter A.W.

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: High-dose synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) can be effective at destroying tumors in animal models while causing very little damage to normal tissues. The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular processes behind this observation of potential clinical importance. Methods and Materials: MRT was performed using a lattice of 25 {mu}m-wide, planar, polychromatic, kilovoltage X-ray microbeams, with 200-{mu}m peak separation. Inoculated EMT-6.5 tumor and normal mouse skin tissues were harvested at defined intervals post-MRT. Immunohistochemical detection of {gamma}-H2AX allowed precise localization of irradiated cells, which were also assessed for proliferation and apoptosis. Results: MRT significantly reduced tumor cell proliferation by 24 h post-irradiation (p = 0.002). An unexpected finding was that within 24 h of MRT, peak and valley irradiated zones were indistinguishable in tumors because of extensive cell migration between the zones. This was not seen in MRT-treated normal skin, which appeared to undergo a coordinated repair response. MRT elicited an increase in median survival times of EMT-6.5 and 67NR tumor-inoculated mice similar to that achieved with conventional radiotherapy, while causing markedly less normal tissue damage. Conclusions: This study provides evidence of a differential response at a cellular level between normal and tumor tissues after synchrotron MRT.

  9. In vitro evaluation of gene expression changes for gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophic tyrosine kinase, receptor, type 2, in response to bisphenol A treatment.

    PubMed

    Warita, Katsuhiko; Mitsuhashi, Tomoko; Ohta, Ken-ichi; Suzuki, Shingo; Hoshi, Nobuhiko; Miki, Takanori; Takeuchi, Yoshiki

    2013-03-01

    We evaluated the effects of bisphenol A (BPA) on embryonic mouse hypothalamic cells. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) indicated that gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (Gnrh1) expression in 0.02-20 μM BPA-treated cells did not differ from that in control cells but decreased significantly in 200 μMBPAtreated cells. The mRNA level for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf), which participates in GNRH1 secretory system development, decreased significantly in 200 μM BPA-treated cells, but that for neurotrophic tyrosine kinase, receptor, type 2 (Ntrk2), did not change. This indicates that Gnrh1 gene expression in mice fetuses is not affected by exposure to <20 μM BPA and that the adverse effects of BPA on the BDNF-NTRK2 neurotrophin system are induced by decrease in the mRNA level of the ligand, not of its receptor.

  10. Laboratory observations of fault strength in response to changes in normal stress

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilgore, Brian D.; Lozos, Julian; Beeler, Nicholas M.; Oglesby, David

    2012-01-01

    Changes in fault normal stress can either inhibit or promote rupture propagation, depending on the fault geometry and on how fault shear strength varies in response to the normal stress change. A better understanding of this dependence will lead to improved earthquake simulation techniques, and ultimately, improved earthquake hazard mitigation efforts. We present the results of new laboratory experiments investigating the effects of step changes in fault normal stress on the fault shear strength during sliding, using bare Westerly granite samples, with roughened sliding surfaces, in a double direct shear apparatus. Previous experimental studies examining the shear strength following a step change in the normal stress produce contradictory results: a set of double direct shear experiments indicates that the shear strength of a fault responds immediately, and then is followed by a prolonged slip-dependent response, while a set of shock loading experiments indicates that there is no immediate component, and the response is purely gradual and slip-dependent. In our new, high-resolution experiments, we observe that the acoustic transmissivity and dilatancy of simulated faults in our tests respond immediately to changes in the normal stress, consistent with the interpretations of previous investigations, and verify an immediate increase in the area of contact between the roughened sliding surfaces as normal stress increases. However, the shear strength of the fault does not immediately increase, indicating that the new area of contact between the rough fault surfaces does not appear preloaded with any shear resistance or strength. Additional slip is required for the fault to achieve a new shear strength appropriate for its new loading conditions, consistent with previous observations made during shock loading.

  11. Absence of diurnal variation in visceromotor response to colorectal distention in normal Long Evans rats

    PubMed Central

    Welting, Olaf; Cailotto, Cathy; Kalsbeek, Andries; van den Wijngaard, Rene

    2016-01-01

    Background: Enhanced colorectal sensitivity (i.e. visceral hypersensitivity) is thought to be a pathophysiological mechanism in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In healthy men a circadian variation in rectal perception to colonic distention was described. Disturbed day and night rhythms, which occur in shift work and trans meridian flights, are associated with the prevalence of IBS. This raises the question whether disruptions of circadian control are responsible for the observed pathology in IBS. Prior to investigating altered rhythmicity in relation to visceral hypersensitivity in a rat model for IBS, it is relevant to establish whether normal rats display circadian variation similar to healthy men.  Methodology and findings: In rodents colorectal distension leads to reproducible contractions of abdominal musculature. We used quantification of this so called visceromotor response (VMR) by electromyography (EMG) to assess visceral sensitivity in rats. We assessed the VMR in normal male Long Evans rats at different time points of the light/dark cycle. Although a control experiment with male maternal separated rats confirmed that intentionally inflicted (i.e. stress induced) changes in VMR can be detected, normal male Long Evans rats showed no variation in VMR along the light/dark cycle in response to colorectal distension. Conclusions: In the absence of a daily rhythm of colorectal sensitivity in normal control rats it is not possible to investigate possible aberrancies in our rat model for IBS. PMID:26925229

  12. Evidence for cAMP as a mediator of gonadotropin secretion from male pituitaries

    SciTech Connect

    Bourne, G.A.; Baldwin, D.M.

    1987-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to use sodium flufenamate, a compound that inhibits gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-stimulated adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) production in the pituitary, to evaluate the potential role of cAMP as a mediator of GnRH-stimulated gonadotropin secretion from male pituitaries. Quartered male pituitaries were perifused at 37/sup 0/C and sequential effluent fractions collected every 10 min. Infusions of GnRH resulted in a twofold increase in luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) secretion. Cycloheximide, 5 ..mu..M, completely inhibited the GnRH-stimulated LH and FSH secretion. Infusions of 0.1 mM flufenamate had similar effects on gonadotropin secretion as cycloheximide, whereas the administration of 5 mM dibutyryl cAMP in combination with GnRH and flufenamate restored the secretory responses of both hormones. The flufenamate-inhibited GnRH stimulated LH and FSH release, which was restored by DBcAMP and appeared to be protein synthesis dependent and specific for cAMP.These results suggest an indirect role for cAMP as a mediator of gonadotropin secretion from male pituitaries. However, in contrast to female pituitaries, the secretion of these hormones form male pituitaries is completely dependent on cAMP and de novo protein synthesis.

  13. Dynamic Response in an Elastic-Plastic Projectile Due to Normal Impact

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    A^’Avm^l ™A/679o/ TECHNICAL REPORT ARLCB-TR-8501 9 DYNAMIC RESPONSE IN AN ELASTIC-PLASTIC PROJECTILE DUE TO NORMAL IMPACT P . C. T. CHEN J. E...PROJECTILE DUE TO NORMAL IMPACT 5. TYPE OF REPORT 4 PERIOD COVERED Final S. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHORfa; P . C. T. Chen, J...the following material data will be used: E = 208 GPa, p = 0.783 g/cc, v = 0.293 ay = 1.3 GPa, Ep = 4 GPa, CD 1 Cristescu, N., Dynamic

  14. Differential Transcriptional Response in Macrophages Infected with Cell Wall Deficient versus Normal Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yu-Rong; Gao, Kun-Shan; Ji, Rui; Yi, Zheng-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Host-pathogen interactions determine the outcome following infection by mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Under adverse circumstances, normal Mtb can form cell-wall deficient (CWD) variants within macrophages, which have been considered an adaptive strategy for facilitating bacterial survival inside macrophages. However, the molecular mechanism by which infection of macrophages with different phenotypic Mtb elicits distinct responses of macrophages is not fully understood. To explore the molecular events triggered upon Mtb infection of macrophages, differential transcriptional responses of RAW264.7 cells infected with two forms of Mtb, CWD-Mtb and normal Mtb, were studied by microarray analysis. Some of the differentially regulated genes were confirmed by RT-qPCR in both RAW264.7 cells and primary macrophages. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway was used to analyze functions of differentially expressed genes. Distinct gene expression patterns were observed between CWD-Mtb and normal Mtb group. Mapt was up-regulated, while NOS2 and IL-11 were down-regulated in CWD-Mtb infected RAW264.7 cells and primary macrophages compared with normal Mtb infected ones. Many deregulated genes were found to be related to macrophages activation, immune response, phagosome maturation, autophagy and lipid metabolism. KEGG analysis showed that the differentially expressed genes were mainly involved in MAPK signaling pathway, nitrogen metabolism, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and focal adhesion. Taken together, the present study showed that differential macrophage responses were induced by intracellular CWD-Mtb an normal Mtb infection, which suggested that interactions between macrophages and different phenotypic Mtb are very complex. The results provide evidence for further understanding of pathogenesis of CWD-Mtb and may help in improving strategies to eliminate intracellular CWD-Mtb. PMID:25552926

  15. Human cytokine responses induced by Gram-positive cell walls of normal intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Chen, T; Isomäki, P; Rimpiläinen, M; Toivanen, P

    1999-01-01

    The normal microbiota plays an important role in the health of the host, but little is known of how the human immune system recognizes and responds to Gram-positive indigenous bacteria. We have investigated cytokine responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to Gram-positive cell walls (CW) derived from four common intestinal indigenous bacteria, Eubacterium aerofaciens (Eu.a.), Eubacterium limosum(Eu.l.), Lactobacillus casei(L.c.), and Lactobacillus fermentum (L.f.). Our results indicate that Gram-positive CW of the normal intestinal microbiota can induce cytokine responses of the human PBMC. The profile, level and kinetics of these responses are similar to those induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or CW derived from a pathogen, Streptococcus pyogenes (S.p.). Bacterial CW are capable of inducing production of a proinflammatory cytokine, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and an anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, but not that of IL-4 or interferon-gamma (IFN-γ). Monocytes are the main cell population in PBMC to produce TNF-α and IL-10. Induction of cytokine secretion is serum-dependent; both CD14-dependent and -independent pathways are involved. These findings suggest that the human cytokine responses induced by Gram-positive CW of the normal intestinal microbiota are similar to those induced by LPS or Gram-positive CW of the pathogens. PMID:10540188

  16. Blood pressure and renal haemodynamic response to salt during the normal menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Pechère-Bertschi, A; Maillard, M; Stalder, H; Brunner, H R; Burnier, M

    2000-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate prospectively blood pressure and the renal haemodynamic response to salt during the normal menstrual cycle. A total of 35 healthy normotensive young women not on oral contraceptives were enrolled; 17 were studied in the follicular phase and 18 in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. The women in each group were then randomly allocated to receive a low-sodium (40 mmol/day) or a high-sodium (250 mmol/day) diet for a 7-day period in two consecutive menstrual cycles. At the end of each dietary period, 24 h ambulatory blood pressure, urinary sodium excretion, plasma renin activity, plasma catecholamine levels and renal haemodynamics were measured. Our results show that the blood pressure response to salt is comparable during the luteal and the follicular phases of the normal menstrual cycle and is characterized by a salt-resistant pattern. In the kidney, effective renal plasma flow was significantly greater and the filtration fraction lower (P<0.05) after salt loading in women studied in the luteal phase compared with women investigated in the follicular phase. This study thus demonstrates that the female hormone status does not affect the blood pressure response to sodium in young normotensive women. However, in contrast with systemic haemodynamics, the renal response to salt varies during the normal menstrual cycle, suggesting that female sex hormones play a role (direct or indirect) in the regulation of renal haemodynamics.

  17. Normalizing and scaling of data to derive human response corridors from impact tests.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Arun, Mike W J; Pintar, Frank A

    2014-06-03

    It is well known that variability is inherent in any biological experiment. Human cadavers (Post-Mortem Human Subjects, PMHS) are routinely used to determine responses to impact loading for crashworthiness applications including civilian (motor vehicle) and military environments. It is important to transform measured variables from PMHS tests (accelerations, forces and deflections) to a standard or reference population, termed normalization. The transformation process should account for inter-specimen variations with some underlying assumptions used during normalization. Scaling is a process by which normalized responses are converted from one standard to another (example, mid-size adult male to large-male and small-size female adults, and to pediatric populations). These responses are used to derive corridors to assess the biofidelity of anthropomorphic test devices (crash dummies) used to predict injury in impact environments and design injury mitigating devices. This survey examines the pros and cons of different approaches for obtaining normalized and scaled responses and corridors used in biomechanical studies for over four decades. Specifically, the equal-stress equal-velocity and impulse-momentum methods along with their variations are discussed in this review. Methods ranging from subjective to quasi-static loading to different approaches are discussed for deriving temporal mean and plus minus one standard deviation human corridors of time-varying fundamental responses and cross variables (e.g., force-deflection). The survey offers some insights into the potential efficacy of these approaches with examples from recent impact tests and concludes with recommendations for future studies. The importance of considering various parameters during the experimental design of human impact tests is stressed.

  18. Equine Chorionic Gonadotropin and Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Stimulation Increase the Number of Luteinized Follicles and the Progesterone Level Compared with Cabergoline Stimulation in Anoestrus Bitches.

    PubMed

    Jurczak, A; Domosławska, A; Bukowska, B; Janowski, T

    2016-08-01

    In this study, ovarian morphologies and blood progesterone concentrations following oestrous induction in bitches were examined. Fifty-three clinically healthy anoestrus bitches received cabergoline at a daily dose of 5 μg/kg of body weight per os for 21 days (group I) or subcutaneous equine chorionic gonadotropin at a dose of 20 IU/kg of body weight for five consecutive days with an additional 500 IU s.c. per bitch of human chorionic gonadotropin on the last day of treatment (group II). Twenty bitches that spontaneously displayed oestrous signs were left untreated and served as controls (group III). The induced oestrous rates and ovulation rates in groups I and II were 60.0% vs 64.3% and 86.7% vs 83.3%, respectively. Morphological assessments of the ovarian structures after ovariohysterectomy revealed an increase in the number of luteinized follicles and cysts in group II compared with the two other groups (p < 0.001). In contrast, the numbers of corpora lutea and follicles were similar in all groups. In accordance with the above-mentioned alteration, the progesterone concentration in the gonadotropin group (II) was increased (p < 0.001) in the periovulatory period compared with the other two groups. During the entire sampling period, the progesterone profiles in the cabergoline (I) and control (III) groups were similar and typical of normally cycling bitches. In conclusion, gonadotropin treatment is associated with an increased progesterone level during the periovulatory period that probably originates from luteinized follicles, whereas cabergoline treatment induces cycles with both physiological progesterone concentrations and ovarian morphologies.

  19. Differences in leucocyte-endothelium interactions between normal and adenocarcinoma bearing tissues in response to radiation.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, N. Z.; Ross, B. A.; Gulledge, C.; Klitzman, B.; Dodge, R.; Dewhirst, M. W.

    1994-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that the interaction between leucocytes and endothelial cells in tumour tissues is greatly diminished compared with normal tissues under several induced inflammatory conditions. Radiation has been reported to cause release of inflammatory mediators and to promote neutrophil adhesions to cultured endothelial monolayers. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that radiation would cause increased leucocyte rolling and adhesion in both tumour and normal tissues. We examined these two parameters in response to 6 Gy of gamma-radiation in mammary adenocarcinomas implanted into rat skinfold window chambers as well as normal (i.e. non-tumour-bearing) preparations. Leucocyte rolling and adhesion were measured in terms of flux of rolling leucocytes (F(rolling)) and density of adhering leucocytes (D(adhering)) in microvessels. F(rolling) and D(adhering) were measured in two groups of preparations: irradiated and control. In normal preparations, F(rolling) and D(adhering) were both increased significantly by radiation. In contrast, in adenocarcinoma-bearing preparations, F(rolling) and D(adhering) were either unchanged (in the tumour centre) or reduced (in tumour periphery and the normal tissue surrounding the tumour) by radiation. Radiation did not cause changes in haemodynamics in these preparations, thus the observed changes in leucocyte rolling and adhesion could not be accounted for by haemodynamic factors. These results indicate that: (1) in normal preparations, radiation could cause inflammation as manifested by increased leucocyte rolling and adhesion; and (2) in tumour-bearing preparations, radiation caused changes in the vascular surface properties such that they became less adhesive to leucocytes. Such differences in radiation response may have important implications for radiation therapy and provide new insights into the unique features of tumours. Images Figure 2 PMID:8180019

  20. Effect of 2 different anesthesia methods on stress response in neurosurgical patients with hypertension or normal

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Jiang, Shan; Wu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hypertensive patients in neurosurgery are becoming more common, which increased the risk of surgical stress response. Meanwhile, the relationship between hypertension and anesthesia methods is unclear on the stress response. The purpose of this study is to compare the effect of different anesthesia methods on high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP), blood glucose, and leucocyte levels in neurosurgical patients with hypertension or normal. Eighty neurosurgical patients were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 20): balanced anesthesia group (A), balanced anesthesia with hypertension group (B), total intravenous anesthesia group (C), total intravenous anesthesia with hypertension group (D). The levels of Hs-CRP, blood glucose, leucocyte count, and neutrophil percentage and were detected at before anesthesia (T0), during anesthesia (T1), 2 hours post anesthesia (T2), 24 hours post anesthesia (T3). Patients with hypertension had higher Hs-CRP expression, blood glucose, and neutrophil percentage at time T0 than those of normal, but not leucocyte count. At time T3, patients with hypertension in D group had lower Hs-CRP expression than those in B group (P < 0.01). Patients with normal in C group had lower Hs-CRP expression (P < 0.01), blood glucose (P < 0.05), and leukocyte count (P < 0.05) than those in A group. Both hypertension history and anesthesia method had significant effects on the Hs-CRP expression, blood glucose, and leukocyte count. Total intravenous anesthesia decreases Hs-CRP expressions more efficiently than balanced anesthesia in neurosurgical patients with hypertension or normal. Moreover, total intravenous anesthesia can availably reduce the perioperative stress response by attenuating the increase of blood glucose and leukocyte count in normal tensive patients. PMID:27583931

  1. Quantitative radiation dose-response relationships for normal tissues in man - I. Gustatory tissues response during photon and neutron radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mossman, K.L.

    1982-08-01

    Quantitative radiation dose-response curves for normal gustatory tissue in man were studied. Taste function, expressed as taste loss, was evaluated in 84 patients who were given either photon or neutron radiotherapy for tumors in the head and neck region. Patients were treated to average tumor doses of 6600 cGy (photon) or 2200 cGy intervals for photon patients and 320-cGy intervals for neutron patients during radiotherapy. The dose-response curves for photons and neutrons were analyzed by fitting a four-parameter logistic equation to the data. Photon and neutron curves differed principally in their relative position along the dose axis. Comparison of the dose-response curves were made by determination of RBE. At 320 cGy, the lowest neutron dose at which taste measurements were made, RBE = 5.7. If this RBE is correct, then the therapeutic gain factor may be equal to or less than 1, indicating no biological advantage in using neutrons over photons for this normal tissue. These studies suggest measurements of taste function and evaluation of dose-response relationships may also be useful in quantitatively evaluating the efficacy of chemical modifiers of radiation response such as hypoxic cell radiosensitizers and radioprotectors.

  2. Nystagmus responses in a group of normal humans during earth-horizontal axis rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, Conrad, III; Furman, Joseph M. R.

    1989-01-01

    Horizontal eye movement responses to earth-horizontal yaw axis rotation were evaluated in 50 normal human subjects who were uniformly distributed in age (20-69 years) and each age group was then divided by gender. Subjects were rotated with eyes open in the dark, using clockwise and counter-clockwise 60 deg velocity trapezoids. The nystagmus slow component velocity is analyzed. It is shown that, despite large intersubject variability, parameters which describe earth-horizontal yaw axis responses are loosely interrelated, and some of them vary significantly with gender and age.

  3. Neurological damage disrupts normal sex differences in psychophysiological responsiveness to music.

    PubMed

    Belfi, Amy M; Chen, Kuan-Hua; Schneider, Brett; Tranel, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Men and women often display different physiological responses to emotional stimuli, and these responses can be affected by brain damage. Here, we investigated how brain damage differentially affects electrodermal responses based on sex. We studied neurologically normal, healthy adults and a sample of neurological patients. Participants listened to music, an emotional stimulus that reliably elicits skin conductance responses (SCRs). Electrodermal activity was recorded while participants listened to musical clips. When analyzing the data without regard to sex, there were no differences between healthy and brain-damaged participants in their SCRs. However, we found a significant interaction between brain injury status and sex. For men, brain damage significantly reduced SCRs. For women, there were no differences between brain-damaged participants and neurologically healthy participants. These findings illustrate the importance of including demographic variables, such as sex, when investigating brain-behavior relationships with a psychophysiological dependent variable.

  4. Gonadotropin regulation of in vitro androgen production by reptilian testes.

    PubMed

    Wo Tsui, H; Licht, P

    1977-04-01

    The hormonal regulation of in vitro androgen production by minced testes from 7 species of reptiles representing the 3 major orders was studied using purified follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) from tetrapod species. Androgen content was measured by radioimmunoassay. All 7 species showed a dose-dependent response to all preparations of FSH and LH tested. However, variations were found depending on the species tested and the source of the hormone. All snake hormones were particularly inactive in turtles. Some of the variation in relative potencies of hormone reflect phylogenetic specificity in the testes. Synergism between FSH and LH was tested in the sea turtle. While subliminal doses of FSH and LH produced a small stimulation of androgen production, each alone was ineffective. Both gonadotropins have intrinsic activity with regard to the stimulation of steroidogenesis.

  5. Endocrine disrupting chemicals affect the gonadotropin releasing hormone neuronal network.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Johanna K; Heger, Sabine

    2014-04-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals have been shown to alter the pubertal process. The controlling levels of the Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) network involve GnRH itself, KiSS1, and the transcriptional regulators enhanced at puberty 1 (EAP1), Thyroid Transcription Factor 1 (TTF1), and Yin Yang 1 (YY1). While Genistein and Bisphenol A (BPA) have been shown to advance the advent of puberty, exposure to Dioxin delayed pubertal onset. Utilizing in vitro approaches, we observed that Genistein and BPA suppress inhibitory and activate stimulatory components of the GnRH network, while Dioxin exhibit an inhibitory effect at all regulatory hierarchical levels of the GnRH network. It repressed KiSS1, Gnrh, Ttf1 and Yy1 transcription via the xenobiotic response element (XRE), while EAP1 was not affected. Therefore, EDCs alter the neuroendocrine GnRH regulatory network at all hierarchical levels.

  6. Optimization of correlated multi-response quality engineering by the upside-down normal loss function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeybek, Melis; Köksoy, Onur

    2016-08-01

    Most of the published literature on robust design is basically concerned with a single response. However, the reality is that common industrial problems usually involve several quality characteristics, which are often correlated. Traditional approaches to multidimensional quality do not offer much information on how much better or worse a process is when finding optimal settings. Köksoy and Fan [Engineering Optimization 44 (8): 935-945] pointed out that the upside-down normal loss function provides a more reasonable risk assessment to the losses of being off-target in product engineering research. However, they only consider the single-response case. This article generalizes their idea to more than one response under possible correlations and co-movement effects of responses on the process loss. The response surface methodology has been adapted, estimating the expected multivariate upside-down normal loss function of a multidimensional system to find the optimal control factor settings of a given problem. The procedure and its merits are illustrated through an example.

  7. Gene Expression Profile Analysis as a Prognostic Indicator of Normal Tissue Response to Simulated Space Radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Story, Michael; Stivers, David N.

    2004-01-01

    This project was funded as a pilot project to determine the feasibility of using gene expression profiles to characterize the response of human cells to exposure to particulate radiations such as those encountered in the spaceflight environment. We proposed to use microarray technology to examine the gene expression patterns of a bank of well-characterized human fibroblast cell cultures. These fibroblast cultures were derived from breast or head and neck cancer patients who exhibited normal, minimal, or severe normal tissue reactions following low LET radiation exposure via radiotherapy. Furthermore, determination of SF2 values from fibroblasts cultured from these individuals were predictive of risk for severe late reactions. We hypothesized that by determining the expression of thousands of genes we could identify gene expression patterns that reflect how normal tissues respond to high Z and energy (HZE) particles, that is, that there are molecular signatures for HZE exposures. We also hypothesized that individuals who are intrinsically radiosensitive may elicit a unique response. Because this was funded as a pilot project we focused our initial studies on logistics and appropriate experimental design, and then to test our hypothesis that there is a unique molecular response to specific particles, in this case C and Fe, for primary human skin fibroblasts.

  8. Temperature and humidity modify airway response to inhaled histamine in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Amirav, I; Plit, M

    1989-11-01

    The airway response to inhaled histamine is known to be influenced by various stimuli (e.g., infection, ozone). Temperature (T) has been shown to affect it in vitro. We studied whether T and humidity (H) modify airway response to inhaled histamine in normal subjects. Twelve normal subjects 21 to 46 yr of age (mean age, 29 yr) performed two similar histamine inhalation tests, the only difference being the conditions of the inspired air. One test was done while breathing cold dry air (mean T +/- SEM, -17.3 +/- 1.8 degrees C; relative H, 0%), and the other while breathing warm humid air (mean T +/- SEM, 33.9 +/- 0.5 degrees C; relative H, 100%). Whereas the geometric mean histamine concentration required to produce a 15% fall in FEV1 in the warm humid tests was 22.7 mg/ml, it was 11.9 mg/ml in the cold dry test (p less than 0.01). It is concluded that the T and H of inspired air modify the airway response to inhaled histamine in normal subjects.

  9. Effect of aspirin dose, preparation, and withdrawal on platelet response in normal volunteers.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Jacqueline L; Alberts, Mark J

    2006-09-15

    A significant difference in individual response to aspirin therapy has been described, and studies have shown that a minimal response to aspirin may be associated with increased risk for some cardiovascular events. However, it remains unclear if aspirin dose, coating, or termination alters the antiplatelet effects of aspirin. Normal volunteers were randomly assigned to enteric-coated or uncoated aspirin 81 or 325 mg and monitored over 12 days with a point-of-care aspirin assay that incorporates the platelet agonist arachidonic acid. The antiplatelet response was greater with a 325-mg dose than with an 81-mg dose. A coating slowed the antiplatelet response to the 81-mg dose only. There were no differences among the groups after maximum response was achieved between days 4 and 7. There was significant recovery of platelet aggregation <48 hours after the cessation of aspirin, with a return to baseline values by the fifth day. A significant interpatient variation in response to the 4 dosing regimes was observed. In conclusion, the antiplatelet response was more rapid to a 325-mg/day dose of aspirin compared with an 81-mg/day dose. An enteric-coated preparation delayed the time of response to an 81-mg/day dose. These results suggest that aspirin dose and preparation may be important mediators of the antiplatelet effects of aspirin in some patients.

  10. Normal and abnormal face selectivity of the M170 response in developmental prosopagnosics.

    PubMed

    Harris, Alison M; Duchaine, Bradley C; Nakayama, Ken

    2005-01-01

    Developmental prosopagnosia is a lifelong impairment in face recognition despite normal low-level visual processing. Here we used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to examine the M170 response, a component occurring approximately 170 ms after stimulus onset, in a group of five developmental prosopagnosics. In normal subjects, the M170 is "face-selective", with a consistently higher amplitude to faces than to a wide variety of other visual stimulus categories; the N170, a component recorded using event-related potentials (ERP) and thought to be analogous to the M170, also shows this "face selectivity". Two previous ERP studies with developmental prosopagnosics have found attenuation or absence of face selectivity in the N170 response of these subjects [Bentin, S., Deouell, L. Y., and Soroker, N. (1999). Selective visual streaming in face recognition: Evidence from developmental prosopagnosia. Neuroreport, 10, 823-827; Kress, T., and Daum, I. (2003). Event-related potentials reflect impaired face recognition in patients with congenital prosopagnosia. Neuroscience Letters, 352, 133-136]. Three of our developmental prosopagnosic group showed this non-selective pattern at the M170 while the remaining two prosopagnosics were indistinguishable from normal controls. Thus, impaired face recognition is not necessarily correlated with an absence of the "face-selective" M170. Furthermore, ERP recordings collected simultaneously in the two developmental prosopagnosics with seemingly selective M170s also showed N170s within the same normal selective range, demonstrating that the face-selective signals found with MEG are not due to differences between MEG and ERP. While the presence of face selectivity at these neurophysiological markers is insufficient for predicting normal behavioral performance with faces, it could help to distinguish different classes of face recognition deficits.

  11. Gonadotropins in European sea bass: Endocrine roles and biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Mazón, María José; Molés, Gregorio; Rocha, Ana; Crespo, Berta; Lan-Chow-Wing, Olivier; Espigares, Felipe; Muñoz, Iciar; Felip, Alicia; Carrillo, Manuel; Zanuy, Silvia; Gómez, Ana

    2015-09-15

    Follicle stimulating hormone (Fsh) and luteinizing hormone (Lh) are central endocrine regulators of the gonadal function in vertebrates. They act through specific receptors located in certain cell types found in the gonads. In fish, the differential roles of these hormones are being progressively elucidated due to the development of suitable tools for their study. In European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax), isolation of the genes coding for the gonadotropin subunits and receptors allowed in first instance to conduct expression studies. Later, to overcome the limitation of using native hormones, recombinant dimeric gonadotropins, which show different functional characteristics depending on the cell system and DNA construct, were generated. In addition, single gonadotropin beta-subunits have been produced and used as antigens for antibody production. This approach has allowed the development of detection methods for native gonadotropins, with European sea bass being one of the few species where both gonadotropins can be detected in their native form. By administering recombinant gonadotropins to gonad tissues in vitro, we were able to study their effects on steroidogenesis and intracellular pathways. Their administration in vivo has also been tested for use in basic studies and as a biotechnological approach for hormone therapy and assisted reproduction strategies. In addition to the production of recombinant hormones, gene-based therapies using somatic gene transfer have been offered as an alternative. This approach has been tested in sea bass for gonadotropin delivery in vivo. The hormones produced by the genes injected were functional and have allowed studies on the action of gonadotropins in spermatogenesis.

  12. Concomitant responses of upper airway stabilizing muscles to transcranial magnetic stimulation in normal men.

    PubMed

    Sériès, Frédéric; Wang, Wei; Mélot, Christian; Similowski, Thomas

    2008-04-01

    Upper airway stabilizing muscles play a crucial role in the maintenance of upper airway patency. Transcranial magnetic stimulation allows the investigation of the corticomotor activation process for respiratory muscles. This technique has also been used to evaluate the genioglossus corticomotor response. The aims of this study were to characterize the response of different upper airway stabilizing muscles to focal cortical stimulation of the genioglossus. Alae nasi, genioglossus, levator palatini, palatoglossus and diaphragm motor-evoked potential responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation were recorded during expiration, tidal inspiration and deep inspiration in nine normal awake subjects. A concomitant response of the four studied upper airway muscles was observed in the majority of cortical stimuli. The response of these muscles was independent of the diaphragmatic one that was only occasionally observed. Significant positive relationships were found between alae nasi, levator palatini and palatoglossus motor-evoked potential latencies and amplitudes and the corresponding values of the genioglossus. We conclude that transcranial magnetic stimulation applied in the genioglossus area induces a concomitant motor response of upper airway stabilizing muscles with consistent changes in their motor responses during inspiratory manoeuvres.

  13. Regional and splenic lymphocyte proliferative responses of mice exposed to normal or irradiated Schistosoma mansoni cercariae

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, F.A.; Wilson, E.M.

    1982-05-01

    Developing larvae of Schistosoma mansoni migrate through various tissues en route to the liver and mesenteric veins of their definitive host. Regional (lymph node) and systemic (spleen) blastogenic responses to cercarial, adult and egg antigens were measured in CBA/J mice at various times after exposure to normal or irradiated S. mansoni cercariae. Among the separate lymph node groups studied were those draining the tail, thoracic region, intestines, head and neck, and the pelvis. Blastogenic responses were assayed by a micromethod requiring 10(5) cells in 20 microliter volumes per culture. Up to 5 weeks post-cercarial exposure the pattern of responses in lymphoid tissues of infected mice coincided with the migratory route of the parasites. Following oviposition, cellular reactivity was pronounced in all lymph node groups. The reactivity of mice exposed to irradiated cercariae followed a pattern suggestive of a sustained antigenic stimulus only in the nodes draining the tail and lungs. Splenic (systemic) reactivity was roughly comparable between the two exposure groups. These data show the independence and vast differences in the host regional responses following normal or irradiated cercarial exposure.

  14. Disparity vergence responses before versus after repetitive vergence therapy in binocularly normal controls

    PubMed Central

    Talasan, Henry; Scheiman, Mitchell; Li, Xiaobo; Alvarez, Tara L.

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to determine whether significant changes would be observed between vergence eye movements before and after 12 hr of repetitive vergence therapy (1 hr per day on different days) in subjects with normal binocular vision compared to controls. Disparity vergence responses from 23 subjects were studied. An assessment protocol that minimized the influence of the near dissociated phoria on the disparity vergence system was designed. The following parameters were quantified for the responses: latency, time to peak velocity, settling time, peak velocity, and accuracy (difference between the response and stimulus amplitudes). The following outcomes were observed when comparing the results after vergence therapy to the baseline measurements: (a) near point of convergence and near dissociated phoria did not significantly change (p > 0.15); (b) latency, time to peak velocity, and settling time significantly decreased (p ≤ 0.01); and (c) accuracy significantly improved (p < 0.01). Results support that vergence peak velocity is dependent on the subject's near dissociated phoria. The accuracy and temporal properties of vergence eye movement responses from subjects with normal binocular vision can be improved after vergence therapy. These methods can be utilized within future studies to quantitatively assess vergence therapy techniques for patients with binocular dysfunction. PMID:26762276

  15. Proprietary tomato extract improves metabolic response to high-fat meal in healthy normal weight subjects

    PubMed Central

    Deplanque, Xavier; Muscente-Paque, Delphine; Chappuis, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation is a risk factor for atherosclerosis. Lycopene and tomato-based products have been described as potent inhibitors of LDL oxidation. Objectives To evaluate the effect of a 2-week supplementation with a carotenoid-rich tomato extract (CRTE) standardized for a 1:1 ratio of lycopene and phytosterols, on post-prandial LDL oxidation after a high-fat meal. Design In a randomized, double-blind, parallel-groups, placebo-controlled study, 146 healthy normal weight individuals were randomly assigned to a daily dose of CRTE standardized for tomato phytonutrients or placebo during 2 weeks. Oxidized LDL (OxLDL), glucose, insulin, and triglyceride (TG) responses were measured for 8 h after ingestion of a high-fat meal before and at the end of intervention. Results Plasma lycopene, phytofluene, and phytoene were increased throughout the study period in the CRTE group compared to placebo. CRTE ingestion significantly improved changes in OxLDL response to high-fat meal compared to placebo after 2 weeks (p<0.0001). Changes observed in glucose, insulin, and TG responses were not statistically significant after 2 weeks of supplementation, although together they may suggest a trend of favorable effect on metabolic outcomes after a high-fat meal. Conclusions Two-week supplementation with CRTE increased carotenoids levels in plasma and improved oxidized LDL response to a high-fat meal in healthy normal weight individuals. PMID:27707453

  16. Paradoxical consequence of human chorionic gonadotropin misuse.

    PubMed

    Pektezel, Mehmet Yasir; Bas, Demet Funda; Topcuoglu, Mehmet Akif; Arsava, Ethem Murat

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is commonly misused as a weight reducing or performance enhancing agent but is associated with increased risk of thromboembolic events. A 29-year-old female with a history of obesity was admitted to our center with a diagnosis of ischemic stroke. Etiologic workup revealed a large patent foramen ovale and history of recent use of hCG as part of a weight loss regimen. This report highlights the potential complications of hCG therapy, particularly when used for unapproved indications and without medical supervision.

  17. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone stimulates prolactin release from lactotrophs in photoperiodic species through a gonadotropin-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Helen L; Hodson, David J; Gregory, Susan J; Townsend, Julie; Tortonese, Domingo J

    2008-02-01

    Previous studies have provided evidence for a paracrine interaction between pituitary gonadotrophs and lactotrophs. Here, we show that GnRH is able to stimulate prolactin (PRL) release in ovine primary pituitary cultures. This effect was observed during the breeding season (BS), but not during the nonbreeding season (NBS), and was abolished by the application of bromocriptine, a specific dopamine agonist. Interestingly, GnRH gained the ability to stimulate PRL release in NBS cultures following treatment with bromocriptine. In contrast, thyrotropin-releasing hormone, a potent secretagogue of PRL, stimulated PRL release during both the BS and NBS and significantly enhanced the PRL response to GnRH during the BS. These results provide evidence for a photoperiodically modulated functional interaction between the GnRH/gonadotropic and prolactin axes in the pituitary gland of a short day breeder. Moreover, the stimulation of PRL release by GnRH was shown not to be mediated by the gonadotropins, since immunocytochemical, Western blotting, and PCR studies failed to detect pituitary LH or FSH receptor protein and mRNA expressions. Similarly, no gonadotropin receptor expression was observed in the pituitary gland of the horse, a long day breeder. In contrast, S100 protein, a marker of folliculostellate cells, which are known to participate in paracrine mechanisms within this tissue, was detected throughout the pituitaries of both these seasonal breeders. Therefore, an alternative gonadotroph secretory product, a direct effect of GnRH on the lactotroph, or another cell type, such as the folliculostellate cell, may be involved in the PRL response to GnRH in these species.

  18. [Impact of gonadotropins in women suffering from cancer].

    PubMed

    Valdelièvre, Constance; Sonigo, Charlotte; Comtet, Marjorie; Simon, Cynthia; Eskenazi, Sarah; Grynberg, Michaël

    2016-03-01

    The role of gonadotropins in the genesis of malignant diseases, in particular gynecologic cancers, is still controversial. The production of ovarian steroids, as a consequence of FSH and LH actions, may constitute a bias to draw reliable conclusions. Over the past decades, the use of exogenous gonadotropins has markedly increased in cancer patients, candidates for fertility preservation, and in survivors facing infertility as a consequence of gonadotoxic treatments. In gynecologic cancers, high serum estradiol levels may be problematic and can therefore be overcome by specific protocols of ovarian stimulation. However, exogenous gonadotropin administration in cancer patients should systematically be included in a multidisciplinary approach. The present article discusses the possible role of gonadotropins as tumorigenic factors and the use of exogenous gonadotropins in females suffering from cancer.

  19. Effects of Agaricus blazei Murill extract on immune responses in normal BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Tang, Nou-Ying; Yang, Jai-Sing; Lin, Jing-Pin; Hsia, Te-Chun; Fan, Ming-Jen; Lin, Jen-Jyh; Weng, Shu-Wen; Ma, Yi-Shih; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Shen, Jiann-Jong; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2009-01-01

    Agaricus blazei Murill (ABM) has shown particularly strong results in treating and preventing cancer and has also traditionally been used as a food source in Brazil. However, the exact immune responses regarding the phagocytosis of macrophage and, the activity of natural killer (NK) cells in normal mice after exposure to ABM extract was unclear. The goal of this study was to investigate whether or not ABM extract can promote immune responses in normal BALB/c mice. BALB/c mice were treated with different doses of ABM extract for different time periods. The results indicated that ABM extract significantly promoted the proliferation of splenocytes both in vitro and in vivo. ABM extract promoted the levels of interleukein-6 (IL-6) and, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) but reduced the levels of IL-4 in vitro and in vivo. The percentage of macrophages with phagocytosis after ABM extract treatment increased and these effects were of dose-dependent manners, both in vitro and in vivo. YAC-1 target cells were killed by NK cells from the mice after treatment with ABM extract at 3 and 6 mg/kg/day for up to 14 days at target cell ratios of 25:1 and 50:1. Taken together, these results show that ABM extract promoted immunomodulations in normal BALB/c mice in vitro and in vivo.

  20. Brainstem auditory-evoked response (BAER) in client-owned pet ferrets with normal hearing.

    PubMed

    Piazza, S; Huynh, M; Cauzinille, L

    2014-06-07

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of brainstem auditory-evoked response (BAER) testing in pet ferrets in a clinical setting, and to describe a routine method and baseline data for normal hearing ferrets for future investigation of deafness in this species. Twenty-eight clinically normal client-owned ferrets were included. BAER measurements were recorded under general anaesthesia (isoflurane delivered by mask), from subcutaneously placed needle electrodes. A 'click' stimulus applied by insert earphone with an intensity of 90 dB sound pressure level (SPL) was used. The final BAER waveform represents an average of 500 successive responses. Morphology of the waveform was studied; amplitude and latency measures were determined and means were calculated. The BAER waveform of the normal ferret included 4 reproducible waves named I, II, III and V, as previously described in dogs and cats. Measurements of latencies are consistent with previous laboratory research using experimental ferrets. In the present study, a reliable routine protocol for clinical evaluation of the hearing function in the pet ferret was established. This procedure can be easily and safely performed in a clinical setting in ferrets as young as eight weeks of age. The prevalence of congenital deafness in ferrets is currently unknown but may be an important consideration, especially in ferrets with a white coat. BAER test is a useful screening for congenital deafness in this species.

  1. Surface modification of microparticles causes differential uptake responses in normal and tumoral human breast epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patiño, Tania; Soriano, Jorge; Barrios, Lleonard; Ibáñez, Elena; Nogués, Carme

    2015-06-01

    The use of micro- and nanodevices as multifunctional systems for biomedical applications has experienced an exponential growth during the past decades. Although a large number of studies have focused on the design and fabrication of new micro- and nanosystems capable of developing multiple functions, a deeper understanding of their interaction with cells is required. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of different microparticle surfaces on their interaction with normal and tumoral human breast epithelial cell lines. For this, AlexaFluor488 IgG functionalized polystyrene microparticles (3 μm) were coated with Polyethyleneimine (PEI) at two different molecular weights, 25 and 750 kDa. The effect of microparticle surface properties on cytotoxicity, cellular uptake and endocytic pathways were assessed for both normal and tumoral cell lines. Results showed a differential response between the two cell lines regarding uptake efficiency and mechanisms of endocytosis, highlighting the potential role of microparticle surface tunning for specific cell targeting.

  2. Differential regulation of two forms of gonadotropin-releasing hormone messenger ribonucleic acid by gonadotropins in human immortalized ovarian surface epithelium and ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung-Hye; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Auersperg, Nelly; Leung, Peter C K

    2006-06-01

    Although gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) has been shown to play a role as an autocrine/ paracrine regulator of cell growth in ovarian surface epithelium and ovarian cancer, the factors which regulate the expression of GnRH and its receptor in these cells are not well characterized. In the present study, we employed real-time PCR to determine the potential regulatory effect of gonadotropins on the expression levels of GnRH I (the mammalian GnRH), GnRH II (a second form of GnRH) and their common receptor (GnRHR) in immortalized ovarian surface epithelial (IOSE-80 and IOSE-80PC) cells and ovarian cancer cell lines (A2780, BG-1, CaOV-3, OVCAR-3 and SKOV-3). The cells were treated with increasing concentrations (100 and 1000 ng/ml) of recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) or luteinizing hormone (LH) for 24 h. Treatment with FSH or LH reduced GnRH II mRNA levels in both IOSE cell lines and in three out of five ovarian cancer cell lines (A2780, BG-1 and OVCAR-3). A significant decrease in GnRHR mRNA levels was observed in IOSE and ovarian cancer cells, except CaOV-3 cells, following treatment with FSH or LH. In contrast, treatment with either FSH or LH had no effect on GnRH I mRNA levels in these cells, suggesting that gonadotropins regulate the two forms of GnRH and its receptor differentially. In separate experiments, the effect of gonadotropins on the anti-proliferative action of GnRH I and GnRH II agonists in IOSE-80, OVCAR-3 and SKOV-3 cells was investigated. The cells were pretreated with FSH or LH (100 ng/ml) for 24 h after which they were treated with either GnRH I or GnRH II (100 ng/ml) for 2 days, and cell growth was assessed by the MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide] assay. Pretreatment of the cells with FSH or LH significantly reversed the growth inhibitory effect of GnRH I and GnRH II agonists in these cell types. These results provide the first demonstration of a potential interaction between gonadotropins and the

  3. Landscape response to normal fault growth and linkage in the Southern Apennines, Italy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roda-Boluda, Duna; Whittaker, Alex

    2016-04-01

    It is now well-established that landscape can record spatial and temporal variations in tectonic rates. However, decoding this information to extract detailed histories of fault growth is often a complex problem that requires careful integration of tectonic and geomorphic data sets. Here, we present new data addressing both normal fault evolution and coupled landscape response for two normal faults in the Southern Apennines: the Vallo di Diano and East Agri faults. By integrating published constraints with new data, we show that these faults have total throws of up to 2100 m, and Holocene throw rates of up to 1 mm/yr at their maximum. We demonstrate that geomorphology is effectively recording tectonics, with relief, channel and catchment slopes varying along fault strike as normal fault activity does. Therefore, valuable information about fault growth and interaction can be extracted from their geomorphic expression. We use the spatial distribution of knickpoints on the footwall channels to infer two episodes of base level change, which can be associated with distinct fault interaction events. From our detailed fault throw profiles, we reconstruct the amount of throw accumulated after each of these events, and the segments involved in each, and we use slip rate enhancement factors derived from fault interaction theory to estimate the magnitude of the tectonic perturbation in each case. From this approach, we are able to reconstruct pre-linkage throw rates, and we estimate that fault linkage events likely took place 0.7 ± 0.2 Ma and 1.9 ± 0.6 Ma in the Vallo di Diano fault, and 1.1 ± 0.1 and 2.3 ± 0.9 Ma in the East Agri fault. Our study suggests that both faults started their activity at 3.6 ± 0.5 Ma. These fault linkage scenarios are consistent with the knickpoint heights, and may relate to soft-linkage interaction with the Southern Apennines normal fault array, the existence of which has been the subject of considerable debate. Our combined geomorphic and

  4. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone in the ovary.

    PubMed

    Metallinou, Chryssa; Asimakopoulos, Byron; Schröer, Andreas; Nikolettos, Nikos

    2007-12-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) plays a pivotal role in the physiology of reproduction in mammals. GnRH acts by binding to the GnRH receptor (GnRHR). In humans, only 1 conventional GnRH receptor subtype (type I GnRH receptor) has been found. In the human genome, 2 forms of GnRH have been identified, GnRH-I (mammal GnRH) and GnRH-II (chicken GnRH II). Both forms and their common receptor are expressed, apart from the hypothalamus, in various compartments of the human ovary. Gonadal steroids, gonadotropins, and GnRH itself controls the regulation of the GnRH/GnRHR system gene expression in the human ovary. The 2 types of GnRH acting paracrinally/autocrinally influence ovarian steroidogenesis, decrease the proliferation, and induce apoptosis of ovarian cells. In this review, the biology of GnRH/GnRHR system in humans, the potential roles of GnRH, and the direct effects of GnRH analogues in ovarian cells are discussed.

  5. Sex-related differences in the normal cardiac response to upright exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Higginbotham, M.B.; Morris, K.G.; Coleman, R.E.; Cobb, F.R.

    1984-09-01

    In previous studies from this laboratory, it was found that approximately 30% of women with chest pain and normal coronary arteries demonstrated either a decrease in or a failure to increase radionuclide ejection fraction during exercise. To examine the hypothesis that this apparent abnormality in left ventricular function represents a physiologic difference between men and women, a prospective study was made of central and peripheral cardiovascular responses to exercise in 31 age-matched healthy volunteers (16 women and 15 men). A combination of quantitative radionuclide (technetium) angiography and expired-gas analysis was used to measure ejection fraction and relative changes in end-diastolic counts, stroke counts, count output, and arteriovenous oxygen difference during symptom-limited upright bicycle exercise. Normal male and female volunteers demonstrated comparable baseline left ventricular function and similar aerobic capacity, as determined by weight-adjusted peak oxygen consumption. However, their cardiac responses to exercise were significantly different. The ejection fraction increased by 5 points or more in 14 of 15 men, but in only seven of the 16 women. End-diastolic counts increased by 30% in women, but was unchanged in men. Because decreases in ejection fraction were matched by increases in end-diastolic counts, relative increases in stroke counts and count output were the same for men and women. These data demonstrate a basic difference between men and women with respect to the mechanism by which they achieve a normal response of stroke volume to exercise; these differences must be taken into account when measurements of cardiac function during exercise stress are used for diagnostic purposes.

  6. Evidence for cAMP as a mediator of gonadotropin secretion from female pituitaries

    SciTech Connect

    Bourne, G.A.; Baldwin, D.M.

    1987-09-01

    Sodium flufenamate, which inhibited gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-stimulated increases in adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP), was used to evaluate the potential role of cAMP as a mediator of GnRH-stimulated gonadotropin secretion. Quartered pituitaries from diestrous II female rats were perifused at 37/sup 0/C, and sequential effluent fractions were collected every 10 min. Administration of GnRH resulted in a characteristic biphasic response for both luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), whereas 5 ..mu..M cycloheximide inhibited the secondary augmented responses (phase II) of both hormones. Infusions of 0.1 mM flufenamate inhibited GnRH-stimulated gonadotropin secretion in a manner similar to that of cycloheximide, whereas the administration of 5 mM dibutyryl cAMP in combination with GnRH and flufenamate resulted in the restoration of LH and FSH secretion. The dibutyryl cAMP-restored response appeared to be protein synthesis dependent and specific for cAMP. These results suggest that although the cyclic nucleotide is not involved in the acute release of LH and FSH, it does appear to play a pivotal but indirect role in phase II release of the hormones, by effects involving the stimulation of de novo protein synthesis.

  7. Lack of shunt response in suspected idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus with Alzheimer disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Roy; Patel, Sunil; Lee, Edward B; Jackson, Eric M; Lopinto, Joanna; Arnold, Steven E; Clark, Christopher M; Basil, Anuj; Shaw, Leslie M; Xie, Sharon X; Grady, M Sean; Trojanowski, John Q

    2010-10-01

    To determine the impact of cortical Alzheimer disease pathology on shunt responsiveness in individuals treated for idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH), 37 patients clinically diagnosed with iNPH participated in a prospective study in which performance on neurologic, psychometric, and gait measures before and 4 months after shunting was correlated with amyloid β plaques, neuritic plaques, and neurofibrillary tangles observed in cortical biopsies obtained during shunt insertion. No complications resulted from biopsy acquisition. Moderate to severe pathology was associated with worse baseline cognitive performance and diminished postoperative improvement on NPH symptom severity scales, gait measures, and cognitive instruments compared to patients lacking pathology.

  8. Response to hypogravity of normal in vitro cultured follicular cells from thyroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meli, Antonella; Perrella, Giuseppina; Curcio, Francesco; Saverio, F.; Impiombato, Ambesi

    Aim of this investigation is the study of molecular modifications occurring in differentiated mammalian cells exposed to gravitational changes. The test system chosen is a well characterized clone of differentiated, normal thyroid follicular cells (FRTL5) in long-term culture. As a follow-up to our recent experiment performed during the MASER-7 sounding rocket mission, flown for European Space Agency by Swedish Space Corporation in May 1996, we evaluated FRTL5 cells responses to Thyroid Stimulating Hormone dependent cAMP production under acute hypogravity conditions obtained in a fast rotating clinostat. Following this approach, we evaluated the FRTL5 cells response to TSH under microgravity conditions in order to optimize experimental tools and strategies in preparation to, and in between real flight missions.

  9. Absence of a normal cortisol awakening response (CAR) in adolescent males with Asperger syndrome (AS).

    PubMed

    Brosnan, Mark; Turner-Cobb, Julie; Munro-Naan, Zoe; Jessop, David

    2009-08-01

    In addition to abnormalities in social and communication development, a 'need for sameness' and 'resistance to change' are features of autistic spectrum disorders first identified by Kanner in 1943. Our ability to react to change is modulated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, a feature of which is a dramatic increase in cortisol upon waking, the Cortisol Awakening Response (CAR). This study examined whether the CAR was evident in 20 adolescent males with Asperger Syndrome (AS) and 18 age-matched typically developing (TD) controls (aged 11-16). Whilst a significant CAR was evidenced in the TD control group, this was not the case for those with AS. A normal diurnal decrease in cortisol, however, was evident in both groups. The implication that individuals with AS may have an impaired response to change in their environment due to a refractory HPA axis is discussed.

  10. Metabolic response of normal man and insulin-infused diabetics to postprandial exercise.

    PubMed

    Nelson, J D; Poussier, P; Marliss, E B; Albisser, A M; Zinman, B

    1982-05-01

    Physical exercise is often performed during absorption of meals. We have characterized the metabolic response to 45 min of moderate exercise (approximately 55% of estimated maximal oxygen uptake) beginning 30 min after breakfast in seven healthy controls. Nine insulin-dependent diabetes were studied in an identical manner, with glycemia controlled by a closed-loop "artificial endocrine pancreas" controlled by a closed-loop "artificial endocrine pancreas" (AEP). Responses were compared to those during breakfast without exercise. In the controls, onset of exercise rapidly reversed the rise in both glycemia and insulin (IRI) that occurred with breakfast alone, both returning to fasting levels (glycemia, 80 +/- 3 mg/dl; IRI, 0.38 +/- 0.10 ng/ml). After exercise, small and transient increments occurred (glycemia, 33 +/- 6 mg/dl; IRI, 0.81 +/- 0.15 ng/ml). In the diabetics, prior overnight intravenous insulin normalized fasting glycemia (98 +/- 4 mg/dl), and its postbreakfast excursion was identical to that of controls, as were those of most measured substrates. Similarly, with exercise, glycemia returned rapidly to fasting levels, accompanied by an appropriate decrease in insulin infusion rates. "Free" IRI levels mirrored changes in infusion rates by the AEP, with a decrease in insulin requirement of 30% during exercise as compared to breakfast alone (P less than 0.05). Thus, in both diabetics treated with the AEP and in normals, the responses to postprandial exercise required rapid modulation of insulin delivery. To demonstrate the effect of postprandial exercise on preprogrammed open-loop insulin replacement, four diabetic subjects were studied during breakfast with and without exercise while receiving a fixed open-loop insulin infusion pattern (6.1 +/- 0.7 U over 140 +/- 8 min). The glycemic response to breakfast alone was entirely normalized. However, symptomatic hypoglycemia occurred in all subjects when exercise was initiated 30 min after breakfast. The diabetic

  11. An item response theory integration of normal and abnormal personality scales.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Douglas B; Simms, Leonard J; Clark, Lee Anna; Livesley, W John; Widiger, Thomas A

    2010-01-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM–IV–TR) currently conceptualizes personality disorders (PDs) as categorical syndromes that are distinct from normal personality. However, an alternative dimensional viewpoint is that PDs are maladaptive expressions of general personality traits. The dimensional perspective postulates that personality pathology exists at a more extreme level of the latent trait than does general personality. This hypothesis was examined using item response theory analyses comparing scales from two personality pathology instruments—the Dimensional Assessment of Personality Pathology-Basic Questionnaire (DAPP-BQ; Livesley & Jackson, in press) and the Schedule for Nonadaptive and Adaptive Personality (SNAP; Clark, 1993; Clark, Simms, Wu, & Casillas, in press)—with scales from an instrument designed to assess normal range personality, the NEO Personality Inventory–Revised (NEO PI-R; Costa & McCrae, 1992). The results indicate that respective scales from these instruments assess shared latent constructs, with the NEO PI-R providing more information at the lower (normal) range and the DAPP-BQ and SNAP providing more information at the higher (abnormal) range. Nevertheless, the results also demonstrated substantial overlap in coverage. Implications of the findings are discussed with respect to the study and development of items that would provide specific discriminations along underlying trait continua.

  12. Role of the leukocyte response in normal and immunocompromised host after Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Edwin; Apewokin, Senu; Madan, Rajat

    2017-02-20

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of healthcare-associated infections in the United States. Clinically, C. difficile-associated disease can present as asymptomatic colonization, self-limited diarrheal illness or severe colitis (that may result in death). This variability in disease course and outcomes suggests that host factors play an important role as key determinants of disease severity. Currently, there are several scoring indices to estimate severity of C. difficile-associated disease. Leukocytosis and renal failure are considered to be the most important predictors of C. difficile disease severity in hosts with a normal immune system. The degree of leukocytosis which is considered significant for severe disease and how it is scored vary amongst scoring indices. None of the scores have been prospectively validated, and while total WBC count is useful to estimate the magnitude of the host response in most patient populations, in immune-compromised patients like those receiving chemotherapy, solid organ transplant patients or hematopoietic stem cell transplants the WBC response can be variable or even absent making this marker of severity difficult to interpret. Other cellular subsets like neutrophils, eosinophils and lymphocytes provide important information about the host immune status and play an important role in the immune response against C. difficile infection. However, under the current scoring systems the role of these cellular subsets have been underestimated and only total white blood cell counts are taken into account. In this review we highlight the role of host leukocyte response to C. difficile challenge in the normal and immunocompromised host, and propose possible ways that would allow for a better representation of the different immune cell subsets (neutrophils, lymphocytes and eosinophils) in the current scoring indices.

  13. Cidofovir selectivity is based on the different response of normal and cancer cells to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cidofovir (CDV) proved efficacious in treatment of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) hyperplasias. Antiproliferative effects of CDV have been associated with apoptosis induction, S-phase accumulation, and increased levels of tumor suppressor proteins. However, the molecular mechanisms for the selectivity and antitumor activity of CDV against HPV-transformed cells remain unexplained. Methods We evaluated CDV drug metabolism and incorporation into cellular DNA, in addition to whole genome gene expression profiling by means of microarrays in two HPV+ cervical carcinoma cells, HPV- immortalized keratinocytes, and normal keratinocytes. Results Determination of the metabolism and drug incorporation of CDV into genomic DNA demonstrated a higher rate of drug incorporation in HPV+ tumor cells and immortalized keratinocytes compared to normal keratinocytes. Gene expression profiling clearly showed distinct and specific drug effects in the cell types investigated. Although an effect on inflammatory response was seen in all cell types, different pathways were identified in normal keratinocytes compared to immortalized keratinocytes and HPV+ tumor cells. Notably, Rho GTPase pathways, LXR/RXR pathways, and acute phase response signaling were exclusively activated in immortalized cells. CDV exposed normal keratinocytes displayed activated cell cycle regulation upon DNA damage signaling to allow DNA repair via homologous recombination, resulting in genomic stability and survival. Although CDV induced cell cycle arrest in HPV- immortalized cells, DNA repair was not activated in these cells. In contrast, HPV+ cells lacked cell cycle regulation, leading to genomic instability and eventually apoptosis. Conclusions Taken together, our data provide novel insights into the mechanism of action of CDV and its selectivity for HPV-transformed cells. The proposed mechanism suggests that this selectivity is based on the inability of HPV+ cells to respond to DNA damage, rather than on a

  14. The expanding role of recombinant gonadotropins in assisted reproduction.

    PubMed

    Adams, T E; Boime, I

    2008-07-01

    Using recombinant gonadotropins for assisted reproduction of domestic species is still in its infancy. Yet, the purity, potency and pathogen-free nature of recombinant gonadotropins make them attractive alternatives to tissue-derived gonadotropic agents. In this study, the authors summarize the work to date using recombinant gonadotropins to enhance the - fertility of domestic animals and they discussed their recent studies examining the biopotency of single chain analogues of human gonadotropins. In these studies, single chain analogues of follicle stimulating hormone (Fc alpha), chorionic gonadotropin (CG beta alpha) or a gonadotropin construct with dual activity (FcCG beta alpha) were administered to sheep pre-treated with antisera directed against GnRH. Ovulation was induced 3 days after analogue administration using hCG (1000 IU, iv). Although Fc alpha or CG beta alpha alone induced only modest oestradiol production during the pre-hCG period, serum concentrations of oestradiol were markedly increased (p < 0.05) 3 days after administration of FcCG beta alpha or the Fc alpha + CG beta alpha combination. Final ovarian weight was significantly increased (p < 0.05) in animals receiving Fc alpha, Fc alpha + CG beta alpha or FcCG beta alpha. Collectively, these observations demonstrate that the single chain analogues of the human gonadotropins are active in sheep.

  15. Implementing a Finite-State Off-Normal and Fault Response System for Robust Tokamak Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eidietis, N. W.; Humphreys, D. A.; Sammuli, B.; Walker, M. L.

    2015-11-01

    The initial implementation and testing of a finite state off-normal & fault response (ONFR) system on the DIII-D and KSTAR tokamaks is presented. Robust ONFR will be critical to the operation of ITER as the physical consequences of unexpected events will be far more extreme than in present devices. ``Off-normal'' refers to unexpected plasma events (e.g. disruptions) and plasma events that are expected but still require asynchronous response (e.g. neoclassical tearing modes). ``Fault'' refers to hardware failure. ONFR priorities are to (1) protect the device from damage, (2) minimize recovery time between shots by avoiding unnecessary initiation of mitigation procedures, and (3) maximize the useful pulse length of a given shot by providing for discharge recovery after deleterious events. The detailed implementation of finite-state ONFR using Matlab/Simulink and Stateflow exported to the DIII-D and KSTAR plasma control systems is described, as are initial tests of multi-stage locked mode handling on both devices. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  16. Neuroendocrine regulation of gonadotropin secretion in seasonally breeding birds

    PubMed Central

    Ubuka, Takayoshi; Bentley, George E.; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Seasonally breeding birds detect environmental signals, such as light, temperature, food availability, and presence of mates to time reproduction. Hypothalamic neurons integrate external and internal signals, and regulate reproduction by releasing neurohormones to the pituitary gland. The pituitary gland synthesizes and releases gonadotropins which in turn act on the gonads to stimulate gametogenesis and sex steroid secretion. Accordingly, how gonadotropin secretion is controlled by the hypothalamus is key to our understanding of the mechanisms of seasonal reproduction. A hypothalamic neuropeptide, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), activates reproduction by stimulating gonadotropin synthesis and release. Another hypothalamic neuropeptide, gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH), inhibits gonadotropin synthesis and release directly by acting on the pituitary gland or indirectly by decreasing the activity of GnRH neurons. Therefore, the next step to understand seasonal reproduction is to investigate how the activities of GnRH and GnIH neurons in the hypothalamus and their receptors in the pituitary gland are regulated by external and internal signals. It is possible that locally-produced triiodothyronine resulting from the action of type 2 iodothyronine deiodinase on thyroxine stimulates the release of gonadotropins, perhaps by action on GnRH neurons. The function of GnRH neurons is also regulated by transcription of the GnRH gene. Melatonin, a nocturnal hormone, stimulates the synthesis and release of GnIH and GnIH may therefore regulate a daily rhythm of gonadotropin secretion. GnIH may also temporally suppress gonadotropin secretion when environmental conditions are unfavorable. Environmental and social milieus fluctuate seasonally in the wild. Accordingly, complex interactions of various neuronal and hormonal systems need to be considered if we are to understand the mechanisms underlying seasonal reproduction. PMID:23531789

  17. High-throughput screening normalized to biological response: application to antiviral drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dhara A; Patel, Anand C; Nolan, William C; Huang, Guangming; Romero, Arthur G; Charlton, Nichole; Agapov, Eugene; Zhang, Yong; Holtzman, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The process of conducting cell-based phenotypic screens can result in data sets from small libraries or portions of large libraries, making accurate hit picking from multiple data sets important for efficient drug discovery. Here, we describe a screen design and data analysis approach that allow for normalization not only between quadrants and plates but also between screens or batches in a robust, quantitative fashion, enabling hit selection from multiple data sets. We independently screened the MicroSource Spectrum and NCI Diversity Set II libraries using a cell-based phenotypic high-throughput screening (HTS) assay that uses an interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE)-driven luciferase-reporter assay to identify interferon (IFN) signal enhancers. Inclusion of a per-plate, per-quadrant IFN dose-response standard curve enabled conversion of ISRE activity to effective IFN concentrations. We identified 45 hits based on a combined z score ≥2.5 from the two libraries, and 25 of 35 available hits were validated in a compound concentration-response assay when tested using fresh compound. The results provide a basis for further analysis of chemical structure in relation to biological function. Together, the results establish an HTS method that can be extended to screening for any class of compounds that influence a quantifiable biological response for which a standard is available.

  18. Nociceptors lacking TRPV1 and TRPV2 have normal heat responses.

    PubMed

    Woodbury, C Jeffery; Zwick, Melissa; Wang, Shuying; Lawson, Jeffrey J; Caterina, Michael J; Koltzenburg, Martin; Albers, Kathryn M; Koerber, H Richard; Davis, Brian M

    2004-07-14

    Vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) has been proposed to be the principal heat-responsive channel for nociceptive neurons. The skin of both rat and mouse receives major projections from primary sensory afferents that bind the plant lectin isolectin B4 (IB4). The majority of IB4-positive neurons are known to be heat-responsive nociceptors. Previous studies suggested that, unlike rat, mouse IB4-positive cutaneous afferents did not express TRPV1 immunoreactivity. Here, multiple antisera were used to confirm that mouse and rat have different distributions of TRPV1 and that TRPV1 immunoreactivity is absent in heat-sensitive nociceptors. Intracellular recording in TRPV1(-/-) mice was then used to confirm that TRPV1 was not required for detecting noxious heat. TRPV1(-/-) mice had more heat-sensitive neurons, and these neurons had normal temperature thresholds and response properties. Moreover, in TRPV1(-/-) mice, 82% of heat-responsive neurons did not express immunoreactivity for TRPV2, another putative noxious heat channel.

  19. Attenuated insulin response and normal insulin sensitivity in lean patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Penesova, A; Rovensky, J; Zlnay, M; Dedik, L; Radikova, Z; Koska, J; Vigas, M; Imrich, R

    2005-01-01

    Chronic low-grade inflammation is associated with insulin resistance. The aim of this study was to determine insulin response to intravenous glucose load and insulin sensitivity in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Fourteen nonobese male patients with AS and 14 matched healthy controls underwent frequent-sampling intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIVGTT). Insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity were calculated using the computer-minimal and homeostasis-model assessment 2 (HOMA2) models. Fasting glucose, insulin, cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglyceride levels, HOMA2, glucose effectiveness, insulin sensitivity and insulin response to FSIVGTT did not differ between patients and controls. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin (IL)-6 concentrations tended to be higher in AS patients than in controls. Second-phase beta-cell responsiveness was 37% lower (p = 0.05) in AS patients than in controls. A negative correlation was found between the percentage of beta-cell secretion and IL-6 in all subjects (r = -0.54, p = 0.006). We found normal insulin sensitivity but attenuated glucose utilization in the second phase of FSIVGTT in AS patients. Our results indicate that elevated IL-6 levels may play a pathophysiological role in attenuating beta-cell responsiveness, which may explain the association between elevated IL-6 levels and increased risk for type 2 diabetes.

  20. Sensitive subgroups and normal variation in pulmonary function response to air pollution episodes.

    PubMed Central

    Brunekreef, B; Kinney, P L; Ware, J H; Dockery, D; Speizer, F E; Spengler, J D; Ferris, B G

    1991-01-01

    The Clean Air Act requires that sensitive subgroups of exposed populations be protected from adverse health effects of air pollution exposure. Hence, data suggesting the existence of sensitive subgroups can have an important impact on regulatory decisions. Some investigators have interpreted differences among individuals in observed pulmonary function response to air pollution episodes as evidence that individuals differ in their sensitivity. An alternative explanation is that the differences are due entirely to normal variation in repeated pulmonary function measurements. This paper investigates this question by reanalyzing data from three studies of children exposed to air pollution episodes to determine whether the observed variability in pulmonary function response indicates differences in sensitivity or natural interoccasion variability. One study investigated exposures to total suspended particulates (TSP), the other two investigated exposure to ozone. In all studies, each child's response to air pollution exposures was summarized by regressing that child's set of pulmonary function measurements on the air pollution concentrations on the day or days before measurement. The within-child and between-child variances of these slopes were used to test the hypothesis of variable sensitivity. Regression slopes did not vary significantly among children exposed to episodes of high TSP concentration, but there was evidence of heterogeneity in both studies of ozone exposures. The finding of heterogeneous response to ozone exposure is consistent with the epidemiologic and chamber studies of ozone exposures, but the lack of evidence for heterogeneous response to TSP exposures implies that observed variation in response can be explained by sampling variability rather than the presence of sensitive subgroup. PMID:2050060

  1. What is the normal response to structural differentiation within the slump and straight leg raise tests?

    PubMed

    Herrington, Lee; Bendix, Katie; Cornwell, Catherine; Fielden, Nicola; Hankey, Karen

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the effect of structural differentiation or sensitising manoeuvres on responses of normal subjects to standard neurodynamic tests of straight leg raise (SLR) and slump test. Eighty-eight (39 males and 49 females) asymptomatic subjects were examined (aged 18-39 mean age 21.9+/-4.1 years). Knee flexion angle was measured using a goniometer during the slump test in two conditions cervical flexion and extension. Hip flexion angle was measured using a goniometer during SLR test in two conditions; ankle dorsi-flexion and neutral. The change in knee flexion, following addition of the structural differentiating manoeuvre to the slump test, was a significant increase in knee flexion angle for both males (change in knee angle; 6.6+/-4.7 degrees /18.7+/-17.5%, p<0.01) and females (change in knee angle 5.4+/-5.8 degrees /17.6+/-23.7%, p<0.01), though showed no difference between sides (p>0.05). During the SLR test, a significant reduction in hip flexion occurred following structural differentiation for both groups (change in hip angle; males = 9.5+/-8.3 degrees /21.5+/-18.8%, p<0.01; females = 15.2+/-9.5 degrees /25.9+/-13.9%, p<0.01), though showed no difference between sides (p>0.05). Structural differentiating manoeuvres have a significant effect on test response in terms of range of movement even in normal asymptomatic individuals. These responses should be taken into account during the assessment clinical reasoning process.

  2. The tumor suppressor PTEN regulates motor responses to striatal dopamine in normal and Parkinsonian animals.

    PubMed

    Stavarache, Mihaela A; Musatov, Sergei; McGill, Marlon; Vernov, Mary; Kaplitt, Michael G

    2015-10-01

    Phosphatase and Tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is a dual lipid-protein phosphatase known primarily as a growth preventing tumor suppressor. PTEN is also expressed in neurons, and pathways modulated by PTEN can influence neuronal function. Here we report a novel function of PTEN as a regulator of striatal dopamine signaling in a model of Parkinson's disease (PD). Blocking PTEN expression with an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector expressing a small hairpin RNA (shRNA) resulted in reduced responses of cultured striatal neurons to dopamine, which appeared to be largely due to reduction in D2 receptor activation. Co-expression of shRNA-resistant wild-type and mutant forms of PTEN indicated that the lipid-phosphatase activity was essential for this effect. In both normal and Parkinsonian rats, inhibition of striatal PTEN in vivo resulted in motor dysfunction and impaired responses to dopamine, particularly D2 receptor agonists. Expression of PTEN mutants confirmed the lipid-phosphatase activity as critical, while co-expression of a dominant-negative form of Akt overcame the PTEN shRNA effect. These results identify PTEN as a key mediator of striatal responses to dopamine, and suggest that drugs designed to potentiate PTEN expression or activity, such as cancer chemotherapeutics, may also be useful for improving striatal responses to dopamine in conditions of dopamine depletion such as PD. This also suggests that strategies which increase Akt or decrease PTEN expression or function, such as growth factors to prevent neuronal death, may have a paradoxical effect on neurological functioning by inhibiting striatal responses to dopamine.

  3. Estrogen normalizes perinatal nicotine-induced hypertensive responses in adult female rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Daliao; Huang, Xiaohui; Yang, Shumei; Zhang, Lubo

    2013-06-01

    Perinatal nicotine exposure caused a sex-dependent heightened vascular response to angiotensin II (Ang II) and increased blood pressure in adult male but not in female rat offspring. The present study tested the hypothesis that estrogen normalizes perinatal nicotine-induced hypertensive response to Ang II in female offspring. Nicotine was administered to pregnant rats via subcutaneous osmotic minipumps from day 4 of gestation to day 10 after birth. Ovariectomy and 17β-estradiol replacement were performed on 8-week-old female offspring. At 5 months of age, Ang II-induced blood pressure responses were not changed by nicotine treatment in the sham groups. In contrast, nicotine significantly enhanced Ang II-induced blood pressure responses as compared with saline control in the ovariectomy groups, which was associated with increased Ang II-induced vascular contractions. These heightened responses were abrogated by 17β-estradiol replacement. In addition, nicotine enhanced Ang II receptor type I, NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase type 2 protein expressions, and reactive oxygen species production of aortas as compared with saline control in the ovariectomy groups. Antioxidative agents, both apocynin and tempol, inhibited Ang II-induced vascular contraction and eliminated the differences of contractions between nicotine-treated and control ovariectomy rats. These findings support a key role of estrogen in the sex difference of perinatal nicotine-induced programming of vascular dysfunction, and suggest that estrogen may counteract heightened reactive oxygen species production, leading to protection of females from development programming of hypertensive phenotype in adulthood.

  4. Abnormal Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR) Findings in a Near-Normal Hearing Child with Noonan Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jalaei, Bahram; Zakaria, Mohd Normani; Sidek, Dinsuhaimi

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Noonan syndrome (NS) is a heterogeneous genetic disease that affects many parts of the body. It was named after Dr. Jacqueline Anne Noonan, a paediatric cardiologist. Case Report: We report audiological tests and auditory brainstem response (ABR) findings in a 5-year old Malay boy with NS. Despite showing the marked signs of NS, the child could only produce a few meaningful words. Audiological tests found him to have bilateral mild conductive hearing loss at low frequencies. In ABR testing, despite having good waveform morphology, the results were atypical. Absolute latency of wave V was normal but interpeak latencies of wave’s I-V, I-II, II-III were prolonged. Interestingly, interpeak latency of waves III-V was abnormally shorter. Conclusion: Abnormal ABR results are possibly due to abnormal anatomical condition of brainstem and might contribute to speech delay. PMID:28229064

  5. The sympathetic skin response: normal values, elucidation of afferent components and application limits.

    PubMed

    Uncini, A; Pullman, S L; Lovelace, R E; Gambi, D

    1988-11-01

    The sympathetic skin response (SSR), recorded at the hand and foot, was elicited using different classes of stimuli in 20 normal controls and 10 patients with peripheral neuropathy. We found that SSR latencies changed significantly with different recording sites, but not with different stimulation sites. Additionally, after ischemic conduction block of the arm in 3 normal controls, the previously obtainable SSR recorded at the hand became unobtainable with median nerve stimulation. Also, in one patient with subacute ganglionitis and 3 patients with demyelinating neuropathies, the SSR could not be elicited by electrical stimulation, but it could with deep inspiration. These results suggest that large diameter myelinated fibers may serve as afferents for the SSR. Furthermore, these findings imply that an unobtainable SSR by electrical stimulation may be due not only to dysfunction of the autonomic efferent nerve fibers, but also to abnormalities of the sensory afferents of the reflex. Therefore, investigations of autonomic dysfunction utilizing the SSR must be interpreted with caution in patients with peripheral neuropathies.

  6. Proinflammatory response induced by Newcastle disease virus in tumor and normal cells

    PubMed Central

    Ginting, Teridah Ernala; Suryatenggara, Jeremiah; Christian, Salomo; Mathew, George

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the specific role of immune responses induced by lentogenic Newcastle disease virus (NDV) for its antitumor effect. Materials and methods NDV LaSota strain was used to infect the following human cells: non-small cell lung carcinoma (A549), glioblastoma (U87MG and T98G), mammary gland adenocarcinoma (MCF7 and MDA-MB-453), hepatocellular carcinoma (Huh7), transformed embryonic kidney cells (HEK293), primary monocytes, lung fibroblast (HF19), skin fibroblast (NB1RGB) and rat astroglia (RCR-1) at 0.001 multiplicity of infection. NDV-induced cytotoxicity and expression of proinflammatory cytokines were analyzed using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-Yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and multiplex enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. Results Tumor cells (A549, U87MG, T98G, Huh7, MDA-MB-453, and MCF7) showed viability of <44%, while normal cell lines HEK293, NB1RGB, and RCR-1 showed 84%, 73%, and 69% viability at 72 hours postinfection, respectively. Proinflammatory cytokine profiling showed that NDV mainly induced the secretion of interferon (IFN)-α, IFN-β, and IFN-λ in tumor cells and only IFN-λ in normal cells. In addition, NDV infection induced the production of interleukin (IL)-6 in most cells. Conclusion Our findings suggest a new perspective regarding the role of IFN-λ and IL-6 in the mechanism of tumor selectivity and oncolysis of NDV. PMID:28293547

  7. Surface modification of microparticles causes differential uptake responses in normal and tumoral human breast epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Patiño, Tania; Soriano, Jorge; Barrios, Lleonard; Ibáñez, Elena; Nogués, Carme

    2015-01-01

    The use of micro- and nanodevices as multifunctional systems for biomedical applications has experienced an exponential growth during the past decades. Although a large number of studies have focused on the design and fabrication of new micro- and nanosystems capable of developing multiple functions, a deeper understanding of their interaction with cells is required. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of different microparticle surfaces on their interaction with normal and tumoral human breast epithelial cell lines. For this, AlexaFluor488 IgG functionalized polystyrene microparticles (3 μm) were coated with Polyethyleneimine (PEI) at two different molecular weights, 25 and 750 kDa. The effect of microparticle surface properties on cytotoxicity, cellular uptake and endocytic pathways were assessed for both normal and tumoral cell lines. Results showed a differential response between the two cell lines regarding uptake efficiency and mechanisms of endocytosis, highlighting the potential role of microparticle surface tunning for specific cell targeting. PMID:26068810

  8. Prolonged Postocclusive Hyperemia Response in Patients with Normal-Tension Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Wierzbowska, Joanna; Wojtkiewicz, Stanisław; Zbieć, Anna; Wierzbowski, Robert; Liebert, Adam; Maniewski, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Background It is believed that endothelial dysfunction may be a link between systemic and ocular dysregulation in glaucoma. The aim of this study was to evaluate peripheral vascular reactive hyperemia in response to occlusion test and to correlate peripheral vascular findings with retrobulbar hemodynamics parameters in patients with normal-tension glaucoma. Material/Methods Forty-eight patients with normal-tension glaucoma (mean age 58.1 years, 38 women) and 40 control subjects (mean age 54.1 years, 36 women) were subjected to a brachial arterial occlusion test and color Doppler imaging (LOGIQ 9, GE Medical Systems) of the retrobulbar arteries. Finger hyperemia was assessed by using a 2-channel laser Doppler flowmeter (MBF-3D, Moor Instruments, Ltd.). Time parameters (time to peak flow, half-time of hyperemia, time of recovery) and amplitude parameters (maximum hyperemia response, biological zero) of the post-occlusive reactive hyperemia signal pattern as well as velocities and resistance index of the ophthalmic, central retinal, and short posterior ciliary arteries were evaluated and compared between study groups. Results In glaucoma patients, time to peak flow and half-time of hyperemia were significantly longer (21.4 vs. 12.0 s, p=0.02 and 74.1 vs. 44.2 s, p=0.03, respectively) and biological zero was significantly lower (2.4 vs. 3.2, p=0.01) comparing with healthy subjects. In glaucoma patients, peak-systolic and end-diastolic velocities of central retinal artery were significantly lower (12.8 vs.14.1, p=0.03 and 3.9 vs. 4.7, p=0.01, respectively) and resistance index of this artery was significantly higher (0.69 vs. 0.67, p=0.03) compared to controls. In the glaucoma group, maximum hyperemic response was negatively correlated with the resistance index of temporal short posterior ciliary arteries (r=−0.4, p=0.01), whereas in the control group half-time of hyperemia was negatively correlated with end-diastolic velocity of the central retinal artery (r=−0

  9. Assessment of cardiovascular response to treadmill exercise in normal healthy Indian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Pande, Sushma S; Pande, Santosh R; Dhore, Rajendra B; Daphale, Ajay V; Parate, Vrushali R; Patel, Shishir S; Agrekar, Sushil H

    2012-01-01

    The study aims to assess the cardiovascular response to treadmill exercise test in healthy Indian adolescents. A group of 50 healthy adolescents took part in the study. Cardiovascular response was assessed by using treadmill exercise test as per Bruce protocol. Pulse rate, blood pressure and ECG were recorded before, during and after undertaking the treadmill test. Mean age and body mass index (BMI) were 18.7 +/- 0.51 yrs. and 21.4 +/- 3.44 kg/m2 respectively. Karl Pearson Correlation analysis showed highly significant negative correlation between BMI and exercise time (r = -0.598, P<0.001) and between resting DBP and Exercise Time (r = -0.424, P<0.002). While BMI and DBP showed highly significant positive correlation (r = 0.463, P<0.001). During exercise pulse and SBP rose and DBP fell. SBP rose from mean 122 to 175 (rise by 53 mm of Hg) and DBP fell from mean 78 to 65 (fall by 13 mm of Hg). One min recovery pulse was 156 indicating 22% fall from target heart rate. All the parameters returned to near resting value at 6 min recovery. In 30% students DBP showed exaggerated response i.e. rise during exercise. These students had more BMI and higher resting DBP as compared to other students, which could be the reason for exaggerated response in these participants. In ECG there were no significant ST/T changes during exercise or recovery period. This study provides normal data for small sample of healthy Indian adolescents when subjected to treadmill exercise test.

  10. Hypovolemia Induced Orthostatic Hypotension in Presyncopal Astronauts and Normal Subjects Relates to Hypo-Sympathetic Responsiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meck, Janice V.; Stenger, Michael B.; Platts, Steven H.; Ziegler, Michael G.

    2007-01-01

    Circulating blood volume is reduced during spaceflight, leaving astronauts hemodynamically compromised after landing. Because of this hypovolemia, crew members are able to withstand a postflight 10 minute upright tilt test only if they are able to mount a hyper-sympathetic response. Previous work from this laboratory has shown that about 30% of astronauts, primarily female, have postflight sympathetic responses to tilt that are equal to or less than their preflight responses and thus, they become presyncopal. Part of the mission of the cardiovascular lab at the Johnson Space Center is to identify susceptible crewmembers before flight so that individualized countermeasures can be prescribed. The goal of this study was to develop a ground based model of hypovolemia that could be used for this purpose We tested the hypothesis that hypovolemia alone, in the absence of spaceflight, would reproduce the landing day rate of presyncope during upright tilt in normal volunteers. Further, we hypothesized that, during hypovolemia, subjects who had sympathetic responses that were equal to or less than their normovolemic responses would become presyncopal during upright tilt tests. We studied 20 subjects, 13 male and 7 female, on two separate occasions: during normovolemia and hypovolemia. We induced hypovolemia with intravenous furosemide 40 hours prior to the experiment day, followed by a 10MEq Na diet. On the normovolemia and hypovolemia test days, plasma volume, tilt tolerance and supine and standing arterial pressure, heart rate and plasma norepinephrine levels were measured. A two factor, repeated measures analysis of variance was performed to examine the differences between group (presyncopal vs. non-presyncopal) and day (normovolemia vs. hypovolemia) effects. There were no differences in baseline arterial pressure between normovolemia and hypovolemia or between presyncopal and non-presyncopal groups, but heart rates were higher with hypovolemia in both groups (presyncopal

  11. Electrically evoked auditory nerve responses in the cochlea with normal outer hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Tianying.; Guo, Menghe; He, Wenxuan; Miller, Josef M; Nuttall, Alfred L

    2010-01-01

    As hybrid cochlear implant devices are increasingly used for restoring hearing in patients with residual hearing it is important to understand electrically evoked responses in cochleae having functional hair cells. To test the hypothesis that extracochlear electrical stimulation (EES) from sinusoidal current can provoke an auditory nerve response with normal frequency selectivity, the EES-evoked compound action potential (ECAP) was investigated in this study. Brief sinusoidal electrical currents, delivered via a round window electrode, were used to evoke ECAP. The ECAP waveform was observed to be the same as the acoustically evoked CAP (ACAP), except for a shorter latency. The input/output and intensity/latency functions of ACAPs and ECAPs were also similar. The maximum acoustic masking for both ACAP and ECAP occurred near probe frequencies. Since the masked tuning curve of a CAP reflects the frequency selectivity of neural excitation, these data demonstrate a highly specific activation of the auditory nerve, which would result in high degree of frequency selectivity. This frequency selectivity likely results from the cochlear traveling wave caused by electrically stimulated outer hair cells. PMID:22034583

  12. Shear response of a frictional interface to a normal load modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bureau, L.; Baumberger, T.; Caroli, C.

    2000-11-01

    We study the shear response of a sliding multicontact interface submitted to a harmonically modulated normal load, without loss of contact. We measure, at low velocities (V<100 μm s-1), the average value F¯ of the friction force and the amplitude of its first and second harmonic components. The excitation frequency (f=120 Hz) is chosen much larger than the natural one, associated with the dynamical aging of the interface. We show the following: (i) In agreement with the engineering thumb rule, even a modest modulation induces a substantial decrease of F¯. (ii) The Rice-Ruina state and rate model, though appropriate to describe the slow frictional dynamics, must be extended when dealing with our ``high'' frequency regime. That is, the rheology which controls the shear strength must explicitly account not only for the plastic response of the adhesive junctions between load-bearing asperities, but also for the elastic contribution of the asperities bodies. This ``elastoplastic'' friction model leads to predictions in excellent quantitative agreement with all our experimental data.

  13. Electrically evoked auditory nerve responses in the cochlea with normal outer hair cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Tianying; Guo, Menghe; He, Wenxuan; Miller, Josef M; Nuttall, Alfred L

    2009-12-01

    As hybrid cochlear implant devices are increasingly used for restoring hearing in patients with residual hearing it is important to understand electrically evoked responses in cochleae having functional hair cells. To test the hypothesis that extracochlear electrical stimulation (EES) from sinusoidal current can provoke an auditory nerve response with normal frequency selectivity, the EES-evoked compound action potential (ECAP) was investigated in this study. Brief sinusoidal electrical currents, delivered via a round window electrode, were used to evoke ECAP. The ECAP waveform was observed to be the same as the acoustically evoked CAP (ACAP), except for a shorter latency. The input/output and intensity/latency functions of ACAPs and ECAPs were also similar. The maximum acoustic masking for both ACAP and ECAP occurred near probe frequencies. Since the masked tuning curve of a CAP reflects the frequency selectivity of neural excitation, these data demonstrate a highly specific activation of the auditory nerve, which would result in high degree of frequency selectivity. This frequency selectivity likely results from the cochlear traveling wave caused by electrically stimulated outer hair cells.

  14. University Loaned Normal Uranium Slug Disposition Study: University survey responses. Predecisional draft

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, G.W. Jr.

    1992-09-01

    During the 1950`s and 1960`s, the Atomic Energy Commission loaned rejected natural uranium slugs from the Savannah River Site to United States universities for use in subcritical assemblies. Currently, there are sixty-two universities holding 91,798 slugs, containing about 167 metric tons of natural uranium. It was originally planned that the universities would return the material to Fernald when they no longer required it. Fernald has not received slugs since it was shut down in 1988. The Department of Energy`s Office of Weapons and Materials Planning requested that the Planning Support Group develop information to assist them in facilitating the return of the unwanted slugs to one or more of their facilities and develop alternatives for the ultimate disposition of this material. This supplemental report to the University Loaned Normal Uranium Slug Disposition Study documents responses to and summarizes the results of a survey of fifty-eight universities. University contacts and survey responses covering loaned slug descriptions, historical information, radiological data, current status, and plans and schedules are documented.

  15. Cellular and Humoral Antibody Responses of Normal Pastel and Sapphire Mink to Goat Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lodmell, D. L.; Bergman, R. K.; Hadlow, W. J.; Munoz, J. J.

    1971-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether normal sapphire and royal pastel mink differ immunologically at the cellular and humoral levels. Two days after primary intraperitoneal (ip) inoculation of goat erythrocytes (GE), essentially no 19 or 7S plaque-forming cells (PFC) per 106 cells were detected in spleen or in abdominal and peripheral lymph nodes of either color phase. On the 4th day, more 19S PFC were detected in pastel than in sapphire tissues; pastel tissues also contained 7S PFC, whereas essentially none was present in sapphires until the 6th day. After an ip booster inoculation, the number of PFC was markedly different between the two color phases. These differences were most apparent in spleen and peripheral lymph nodes. In parallel with differences observed in PFC responses between the color phases, total hemolysin and 2-mercaptoethanol-resistant hemolysin titers of pastels exceeded those of sapphires in all but one interval after the primary, and at every interval after the booster, inoculation. These data indicate that sapphire mink are not immunological cripples, nor are they immunologically hyperactive, but that differences do exist between sapphire and royal pastel mink, especially in the response to booster injections of GE. PMID:16557957

  16. Cellular and humoral antibody responses of normal pastel and sapphire mink to goat erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lodmell, D L; Bergman, R K; Hadlow, W J; Munoz, J J

    1971-02-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether normal sapphire and royal pastel mink differ immunologically at the cellular and humoral levels. Two days after primary intraperitoneal (ip) inoculation of goat erythrocytes (GE), essentially no 19 or 7S plaque-forming cells (PFC) per 10(6) cells were detected in spleen or in abdominal and peripheral lymph nodes of either color phase. On the 4th day, more 19S PFC were detected in pastel than in sapphire tissues; pastel tissues also contained 7S PFC, whereas essentially none was present in sapphires until the 6th day. After an ip booster inoculation, the number of PFC was markedly different between the two color phases. These differences were most apparent in spleen and peripheral lymph nodes. In parallel with differences observed in PFC responses between the color phases, total hemolysin and 2-mercaptoethanol-resistant hemolysin titers of pastels exceeded those of sapphires in all but one interval after the primary, and at every interval after the booster, inoculation. These data indicate that sapphire mink are not immunological cripples, nor are they immunologically hyperactive, but that differences do exist between sapphire and royal pastel mink, especially in the response to booster injections of GE.

  17. Auditory Brainstem Response Altered in Humans With Noise Exposure Despite Normal Outer Hair Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Bramhall, Naomi F.; Konrad-Martin, Dawn; McMillan, Garnett P.; Griest, Susan E.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Recent animal studies demonstrated that cochlear synaptopathy, a partial loss of inner hair cell-auditory nerve fiber synapses, can occur in response to noise exposure without any permanent auditory threshold shift. In animal models, this synaptopathy is associated with a reduction in the amplitude of wave I of the auditory brainstem response (ABR). The goal of this study was to determine whether higher lifetime noise exposure histories in young people with clinically normal pure-tone thresholds are associated with lower ABR wave I amplitudes. Design Twenty-nine young military Veterans and 35 non Veterans (19 to 35 years of age) with normal pure-tone thresholds were assigned to 1 of 4 groups based on their self-reported lifetime noise exposure history and Veteran status. Suprathreshold ABR measurements in response to alternating polarity tone bursts were obtained at 1, 3, 4, and 6 kHz with gold foil tiptrode electrodes placed in the ear canal. Wave I amplitude was calculated from the difference in voltage at the positive peak and the voltage at the following negative trough. Distortion product otoacoustic emission input/output functions were collected in each participant at the same four frequencies to assess outer hair cell function. Results After controlling for individual differences in sex and distortion product otoacoustic emission amplitude, the groups containing participants with higher reported histories of noise exposure had smaller ABR wave I amplitudes at suprathreshold levels across all four frequencies compared with the groups with less history of noise exposure. Conclusions Suprathreshold ABR wave I amplitudes were reduced in Veterans reporting high levels of military noise exposure and in non Veterans reporting any history of firearm use as compared with Veterans and non Veterans with lower levels of reported noise exposure history. The reduction in ABR wave I amplitude in the groups with higher levels of noise exposure cannot be accounted

  18. Normal response function method for mass and stiffness matrix updating using complex FRFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, S.; Modak, S. V.

    2012-10-01

    Quite often a structural dynamic finite element model is required to be updated so as to accurately predict the dynamic characteristics like natural frequencies and the mode shapes. Since in many situations undamped natural frequencies and mode shapes need to be predicted, it has generally been the practice in these situations to seek updating of only mass and stiffness matrix so as to obtain a reliable prediction model. Updating using frequency response functions (FRFs) has been one of the widely used approaches for updating, including updating of mass and stiffness matrices. However, the problem with FRF based methods, for updating mass and stiffness matrices, is that these methods are based on use of complex FRFs. Use of complex FRFs to update mass and stiffness matrices is not theoretically correct as complex FRFs are not only affected by these two matrices but also by the damping matrix. Therefore, in situations where updating of only mass and stiffness matrices using FRFs is required, the use of complex FRFs based updating formulation is not fully justified and would lead to inaccurate updated models. This paper addresses this difficulty and proposes an improved FRF based finite element model updating procedure using the concept of normal FRFs. The proposed method is a modified version of the existing response function method that is based on the complex FRFs. The effectiveness of the proposed method is validated through a numerical study of a simple but representative beam structure. The effect of coordinate incompleteness and robustness of method under presence of noise is investigated. The results of updating obtained by the improved method are compared with the existing response function method. The performance of the two approaches is compared for cases of light, medium and heavily damped structures. It is found that the proposed improved method is effective in updating of mass and stiffness matrices in all the cases of complete and incomplete data and

  19. 'Getting back to normal' or 'a new type of normal'? A qualitative study of patients' responses to the existential threat of cancer.

    PubMed

    Baker, P; Beesley, H; Fletcher, I; Ablett, J; Holcombe, C; Salmon, P

    2016-01-01

    Existential concerns about cancer have been studied extensively in palliative care but less so in curative settings. The present report aims to describe ways in which patients viewed the continuity or discontinuity of their identity in the face of the mortal threat of cancer. Twenty-eight patients with breast, prostate or lung cancer attending pre-treatment, treatment or follow-up appointments were interviewed about their emotional experiences following diagnosis. Qualitative analysis followed an inductive, constant comparative approach. Patients spoke of 'getting back to normal', but presented two distinct accounts of 'normality'. Some, particularly those only recently diagnosed, maintained continuity to past identity by upholding previous routines, emphasising resilience and minimising the impact of cancer. Others talked of a new 'normality' discontinuous with their past. Most accounts, however, evidenced elements of continuity and discontinuity, often in ostensibly contradictory ways. We suggest that holding contradictory perspectives simultaneously characterises an intermediate stage of adjustment for some patients: between reliance on continuity with the past in the aftermath of diagnosis and, later, a sense of being a new person, changed by cancer. Practitioners should appreciate that patients' wishes for 'normality' can signify very different responses to cancer, and that holding such contradictory orientations is functional, not aberrant.

  20. Effect of sleep deprivation on the growth hormone response to the alpha-3 adrenergic receptor agonist, clonidine, in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Lal, S; Thavundayil, J X; Krishnan, B; Nair, N P; Schwartz, G; Kiely, M E; Guyda, H

    1997-01-01

    One night's sleep deprivation (SD) increased the growth hormone (GH) response to clonidine (20 ug/kg i.v.) in 11 normal men ( p < 0.005). This finding may indicate that SD enhances alpha-2 adrenergic receptor function or that the GH response to GH releasing factor in increased by SD.

  1. Modeling the response of normal and ischemic cardiac tissue to electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Sunil Mani

    Heart disease, the leading cause of death worldwide, is often caused by ventricular fibrillation. A common treatment for this lethal arrhythmia is defibrillation: a strong electrical shock that resets the heart to its normal rhythm. To design better defibrillators, we need a better understanding of both fibrillation and defibrillation. Fundamental mysteries remain regarding the mechanism of how the heart responds to a shock, particularly anodal shocks and the resultant hyperpolarization. Virtual anodes play critical roles in defibrillation, and one cannot build better defibrillators until these mechanisms are understood. We are using mathematical modeling to numerically simulate observed phenomena, and are exploring fundamental mechanisms responsible for the heart's electrical behavior. Such simulations clarify mechanisms and identify key parameters. We investigate how systolic tissue responds to an anodal shock and how refractory tissue reacts to hyperpolarization by studying the dip in the anodal strength-interval curve. This dip is due to electrotonic interaction between regions of depolarization and hyperpolarization following a shock. The dominance of the electrotonic mechanism over calcium interactions implies the importance of the spatial distribution of virtual electrodes. We also investigate the response of localized ischemic tissue to an anodal shock by modeling a regional elevation of extracellular potassium concentration. This heterogeneity leads to action potential instability, 2:1 conduction block (alternans), and reflection-like reentry at the boarder of the normal and ischemic regions. This kind of reflection (reentry) occurs due to the delay between proximal and distal segments to re-excite the proximal segment. Our numerical simulations are based on the bidomain model, the state-of-the-art mathematical description of how cardiac tissue responds to shocks. The dynamic LuoRudy model describes the active properties of the membrane. To model ischemia

  2. [Stimulation test of the adenohypophysis with arginine, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GRH), and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) in 45, XO patients with Turner's syndrome (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Rudolf, K; Kyank, H; Göretzlehner, G; Kunkel, S

    1980-01-01

    Pituitary stimulation tests with arginine, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GRH) and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) were performed in five 45, XO patients with Turner's syndrome. Their ages ranged from 12--17 years. Serum levels of LH, FSH, PRL, HGH, and TSH were measured by RIA. The hypothalamo-pituitary system appeared normal in the patients with Turner's syndrome.

  3. Intratubular trophoblasts in the contralateral testis caused elevation of serum human chorionic gonadotropin following complete remission of stage II testicular tumor: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Satoshi; Kawai, Koji; Onozawa, Mizuki; Ando, Satoshi; Miyazaki, Jun; Nagata, Chigusa; Noguchi, Masayuki; Yamasaki, Kazumitsu; Uchida, Katsunori; Iwamoto, Teruaki; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 22-year-old male who had a history of metastatic right testicular tumor successfully treated with chemotherapy and surgery. Twenty-one months after the initial treatment, the serum human chorionic gonadotropin started to increase gradually, but whole body imaging including the left testis revealed no abnormal finding except testicular microlithiasis. A biopsy of the left testis revealed intratubular germ cell neoplasia, unclassified type. After the human chorionic gonadotropin level reached 6.6 mIU/ml, he underwent left high orchiectomy. Histology demonstrated a small malignant germ cell tumor as well as intratubular germ cell neoplasia, unclassified type, both of which were negative for human chorionic gonadotropin staining. Besides these lesions, there were tiny foci of human chorionic gonadotropin-immunoreactive intratubular trophoblasts. Serum human chorionic gonadotropin normalized immediately after the orchiectomy, and he had no sign of recurrence at 6 months. The present case will provide new insight into the diagnosis of testicular tumor recurrence with isolated elevation of a serum tumor marker.

  4. Dynamic elastic moduli in magnetic gels: Normal modes and linear response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pessot, Giorgio; Löwen, Hartmut; Menzel, Andreas M.

    2016-09-01

    In the perspective of developing smart hybrid materials with customized features, ferrogels and magnetorheological elastomers allow a synergy of elasticity and magnetism. The interplay between elastic and magnetic properties gives rise to a unique reversible control of the material behavior by applying an external magnetic field. Albeit few works have been performed on the time-dependent properties so far, understanding the dynamic behavior is the key to model many practical situations, e.g., applications as vibration absorbers. Here we present a way to calculate the frequency-dependent elastic moduli based on the decomposition of the linear response to an external stress in normal modes. We use a minimal three-dimensional dipole-spring model to theoretically describe the magnetic and elastic interactions on the mesoscopic level. Specifically, the magnetic particles carry permanent magnetic dipole moments and are spatially arranged in a prescribed way, before they are linked by elastic springs. An external magnetic field aligns the magnetic moments. On the one hand, we study regular lattice-like particle arrangements to compare with previous results in the literature. On the other hand, we calculate the dynamic elastic moduli for irregular, more realistic particle distributions. Our approach measures the tunability of the linear dynamic response as a function of the particle arrangement, the system orientation with respect to the external magnetic field, as well as the magnitude of the magnetic interaction between the particles. The strength of the present approach is that it explicitly connects the relaxational modes of the system with the rheological properties as well as with the internal rearrangement of the particles in the sample, providing new insight into the dynamics of these remarkable materials.

  5. Radiation-quality dependent cellular response in mutation induction in normal human cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masao; Tsuruoka, Chizuru; Uchihori, Yukio; Kitamura, Hisashi; Liu, Cui Hua

    2009-09-01

    We studied cellular responses in normal human fibroblasts induced with low-dose (rate) or low-fluence irradiations of different radiation types, such as gamma rays, neutrons and high linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ions. The cells were pretreated with low-dose (rate) or low-fluence irradiations (approximately 1 mGy/7-8 h) of 137Cs gamma rays, 241Am-Be neutrons, helium, carbon and iron ions before irradiations with an X-ray challenging dose (1.5 Gy). Helium (LET = 2.3 keV/microm), carbon (LET = 13.3 keV/microm) and iron (LET = 200 keV/microm) ions were produced by the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC), Japan. No difference in cell-killing effect, measured by a colony forming assay, was observed among the pretreatment with different radiation types. In mutation induction, which was detected in the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) locus to measure 6-thioguanine resistant clones, there was no difference in mutation frequency induced by the X-ray challenging dose between unpretreated and gamma-ray pretreated cells. In the case of the pretreatment of heavy ions, X-ray-induced mutation was around 1.8 times higher in helium-ion pretreated and 4.0 times higher in carbon-ion pretreated cells than in unpretreated cells (X-ray challenging dose alone). However, the mutation frequency in cells pretreated with iron ions was the same level as either unpretreated or gamma-ray pretreated cells. In contrast, it was reduced at 0.15 times in cells pretreated with neutrons when compared to unpretreated cells. The results show that cellular responses caused by the influence of hprt mutation induced in cells pretreated with low-dose-rate or low-fluence irradiations of different radiation types were radiation-quality dependent manner.

  6. White noise analysis of Phycomyces light growth response system. I. Normal intensity range.

    PubMed Central

    Lipson, E D

    1975-01-01

    The Wiener-Lee-Schetzen method for the identification of a nonlinear system through white gaussian noise stimulation was applied to the transient light growth response of the sporangiophore of Phycomyces. In order to cover a moderate dynamic range of light intensity I, the imput variable was defined to be log I. The experiments were performed in the normal range of light intensity, centered about I0 = 10(-6) W/cm2. The kernels of the Wierner functionals were computed up to second order. Within the range of a few decades the system is reasonably linear with log I. The main nonlinear feature of the second-order kernel corresponds to the property of rectification. Power spectral analysis reveals that the slow dynamics of the system are of at least fifth order. The system can be represented approximately by a linear transfer function, including a first-order high-pass (adaptation) filter with a 4 min time constant and an underdamped fourth-order low-pass filter. Accordingly a linear electronic circuit was constructed to simulate the small scale response characteristics. In terms of the adaptation model of Delbrück and Reichardt (1956, in Cellular Mechanisms in Differentiation and Growth, Princeton University Press), kernels were deduced for the dynamic dependence of the growth velocity (output) on the "subjective intensity", a presumed internal variable. Finally the linear electronic simulator above was generalized to accommodate the large scale nonlinearity of the adaptation model and to serve as a tool for deeper test of the model. PMID:1203444

  7. Differential Effects of Lovastatin on Cisplatin Responses in Normal Human Mesothelial Cells versus Cancer Cells: Implication for Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yandong; Felley-Bosco, Emanuela; Marti, Thomas M.; Stahel, Rolf A.

    2012-01-01

    The cancer killing efficacy of standard chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin (CDDP) is limited by their side effects to normal tissues. Therefore, research efforts optimizing the safety and efficacy of those agents are clinically relevant. We did screen for agents that specifically protect normal human mesothelial cells against CDDP without reducing the cancer cell killing efficacy. Lovastatin was identified from the screen. Lovastatin at a pharmacologically relevant concentration strongly arrested the proliferation of normal cells, whereas cancer cells were less affected. CDDP-induced DNA damage response was not activated and normal cells showed enhanced tolerance to CDDP when normal cells were treated with the combination of CDDP and lovastatin. We demonstrate that interfering with protein geranylgeranylation is involved in the lovastatin-mediated CDDP protective effect in normal cells. In contrast to normal cells, in cancer cells lovastatin did not change the CDDP-induced response, and cancer cells were not protected by lovastatin. Furthermore, lovastatin at the pharmacological relevant concentration per se induced DNA damage, oxidative stress and autophagy in cancer cells but not in normal mesothelial cells. Therefore, our data suggest that lovastatin has a potential to improve the therapeutic index of cisplatin-based therapy. PMID:23028957

  8. The role of PPAR in myocardial response to ischemia in normal and diseased heart.

    PubMed

    Ravingerova, Tana; Adameova, Adriana; Carnicka, Slavka; Nemcekova, Martina; Kelly, Tara; Matejikova, Jana; Galatou, Eleftheria; Barlaka, Eleftheria; Lazou, Antigone

    2011-12-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR), ligand-activated transcription factors, belong to the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily regulating expression of genes involved in different aspects of lipid metabolism, inflammation and cardiac energy production. Activation of PPAR-α isoform by its natural ligands, fatty acids (FA) and eicosanoids, promotes mitochondrial FA oxidation as the primary ATP-generating pathway. On the other hand, PPAR-γ regulates lipid anabolism or storage, while, until recently, the function of PPAR-β/δ has been less explored. Under conditions associated with acute or chronic oxygen deprivation, PPAR-α modulates expression of genes that determine substrate switch (FA vs. glucose) aimed at maintenance of basic cardiac function. Although PPAR-α and PPAR-γ synthetic agonists, hypolipidemic and antidiabetic drugs, have been reported to protect the heart against ischemia/reperfusion injury, it is still a matter of debate whether PPAR activation plays a beneficial or detrimental role in myocardial response to ischemia, in particular, in pathological conditions. This article reviews some findings demonstrating the impact of PPAR activation on cardiac resistance to ischemia in normal and pathologically altered heart. Specifically, it addresses the issue of susceptibility to ischemia in the diabetic myocardium, with particular regards to the role of PPAR. Finally, involvement of PPAR in the mechanisms of lipid-independent cardioprotective effects of some hypolipidemic drugs is also discussed.

  9. Identification and validation of reference genes for transcript normalization in strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) defense responses.

    PubMed

    Amil-Ruiz, Francisco; Garrido-Gala, José; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Folta, Kevin M; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Caballero, José L

    2013-01-01

    Strawberry (Fragaria spp) is an emerging model for the development of basic genomics and recombinant DNA studies among rosaceous crops. Functional genomic and molecular studies involve relative quantification of gene expression under experimental conditions of interest. Accuracy and reliability are dependent upon the choice of an optimal reference control transcript. There is no information available on validated endogenous reference genes for use in studies testing strawberry-pathogen interactions. Thirteen potential pre-selected strawberry reference genes were tested against different tissues, strawberry cultivars, biotic stresses, ripening and senescent conditions, and SA/JA treatments. Evaluation of reference candidate's suitability was analyzed by five different methodologies, and information was merged to identify best reference transcripts. A combination of all five methods was used for selective classification of reference genes. The resulting superior reference genes, FaRIB413, FaACTIN, FaEF1α and FaGAPDH2 are strongly recommended as control genes for relative quantification of gene expression in strawberry. This report constitutes the first systematic study to identify and validate optimal reference genes for accurate normalization of gene expression in strawberry plant defense response studies.

  10. The Mechanisms of Compensatory Responses of the Respiratory System to Simulated Central Hypervolemia in Normal Subjects.

    PubMed

    Segizbaeva, M O; Donina, Zh A; Aleksandrov, V G; Aleksandrova, N P

    2015-01-01

    The compensatory responses of the respiratory system to simulated central hypervolemia (CHV) were investigated in 14 normal subjects. The central hypervolemia was caused by a short-time passive head-down tilt (HDT, -30°, 30 min). The results show that CHV increased the mechanical respiratory load and the airway resistance, slowed the inspiratory flow, increased the duration of the inspiratory phase, reduced the respiratory rate, but not changed the minute ventilation. CHV induced a significant rise in inspiratory swings of alveolar pressure (184%), based on the inspiratory occlusion pressure measurement. These changes indicate a compensatory increase in the inspiratory muscle contraction force. A stable level of minute ventilation during CHV was an effect of increased EMG activity of parasternal muscles more than twice (P<0.01). A contribution of the diaphragm and scalene muscles to ventilation during spontaneous breathing in HDT was reduced. An increase of genioglossus contractile activity during HDT contributed to the stabilization of airway patency. These results suggest that a coordinated modulation of inspiratory muscles activity allows preserving a constant level of minute ventilation during a short-time intrathoracic blood volume expansion. The mechanisms of respiratory load compensation seem to be mediated by afferent information from the lung and respiratory muscle receptors and from the segmentary reflexes and intrinsic properties of the muscle fibers.

  11. Optical spectroscopy of radiotherapy and photodynamic therapy responses in normal rat skin shows vascular breakdown products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teles de Andrade, Cintia; Nogueira, Marcelo S.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Marra, Kayla; Gunn, Jason; Andreozzi, Jacqueline; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Kurachi, Cristina; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) and radiotherapy are non-systemic cancer treatment options with different mechanisms of damage. So combining these techniques has been shown to have some synergy, and can mitigate their limitations such as low PDT light penetration or radiotherapy side effects. The present study monitored the induced tissue changes after PDT, radiotherapy, and a combination protocol in normal rat skin, using an optical spectroscopy system to track the observed biophysical changes. The Wistar rats were treated with one of the protocols: PDT followed by radiotherapy, PDT, radiotherapy and radiotherapy followed by PDT. Reflectance spectra were collected in order to observe the effects of these combined therapies, especially targeting vascular response. From the reflectance, information about oxygen saturation, met-hemoglobin and bilirubin concentration, blood volume fraction (BVF) and vessel radius were extracted from model fitting of the spectra. The rats were monitored for 24 hours after treatment. Results showed that there was no significant variation in the vessel size or BVF after the treatments. However, the PDT caused a significant increase in the met-hemoglobin and bilirubin concentrations, indicating an important blood breakdown. These results may provide an important clue on how the damage establishment takes place, helping to understand the effect of the combination of those techniques in order to verify the existence of a known synergistic effect.

  12. Identification and Validation of Reference Genes for Transcript Normalization in Strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) Defense Responses

    PubMed Central

    Amil-Ruiz, Francisco; Garrido-Gala, José; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Folta, Kevin M.; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Caballero, José L.

    2013-01-01

    Strawberry (Fragaria spp) is an emerging model for the development of basic genomics and recombinant DNA studies among rosaceous crops. Functional genomic and molecular studies involve relative quantification of gene expression under experimental conditions of interest. Accuracy and reliability are dependent upon the choice of an optimal reference control transcript. There is no information available on validated endogenous reference genes for use in studies testing strawberry-pathogen interactions. Thirteen potential pre-selected strawberry reference genes were tested against different tissues, strawberry cultivars, biotic stresses, ripening and senescent conditions, and SA/JA treatments. Evaluation of reference candidate’s suitability was analyzed by five different methodologies, and information was merged to identify best reference transcripts. A combination of all five methods was used for selective classification of reference genes. The resulting superior reference genes, FaRIB413, FaACTIN, FaEF1α and FaGAPDH2 are strongly recommended as control genes for relative quantification of gene expression in strawberry. This report constitutes the first systematic study to identify and validate optimal reference genes for accurate normalization of gene expression in strawberry plant defense response studies. PMID:23940602

  13. Responses to cochlear normalized speech stimuli in the auditory nerve of cat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recio, Alberto; Rhode, William S.; Kiefte, Michael; Kluender, Keith R.

    2002-05-01

    Previous studies of auditory-nerve fiber (ANF) representation of vowels in cats and rodents (chinchillas and guinea pigs) have shown that, at amplitudes typical for conversational speech (60-70 dB), neuronal firing rate as a function of characteristic frequency alone provides a poor representation of spectral prominences (e.g., formants) of speech sounds. However, ANF rate representations may not be as inadequate as they appear. Here, it is investigated whether some of this apparent inadequacy owes to the mismatch between animal and human cochlear characteristics. For all animal models tested in earlier studies, the basilar membrane is shorter and encompasses a broader range of frequencies than that of humans. In this study, a customized speech synthesizer was used to create a rendition of the vowel [eh] with formant spacing and bandwidths that fit the cat cochlea in proportion to the human cochlea. In these vowels, the spectral envelope is matched to cochlear distance rather than to frequency. Recordings of responses to this cochlear normalized [eh] in auditory-nerve fibers of cats demonstrate that rate-based encoding of vowel sounds is capable of distinguishing spectral prominences even at 70-80-dB SPL. When cochlear dimensions are taken into account, rate encoding in ANF appears more informative than was previously believed.

  14. Production response to corn silage produced from normal, brown midrib, or waxy corn hybrids.

    PubMed

    Barlow, J S; Bernard, J K; Mullis, N A

    2012-08-01

    The objective was to evaluate the nutrient intake and digestibility and milk production response of lactating dairy cows fed diets based on corn silage produced from 3 different types of corn hybrids. Experimental diets contained 36.4% of the dietary dry matter (DM) from corn silage produced from normal (Agratech 1021, AgraTech Seeds Inc., Atlanta, GA), brown midrib (BMR; Mycogen F2F797, Mycogen Seeds, Indianapolis, IN), or waxy (Master's Choice 590, Master's Choice Hybrids, Ullin, IL) hybrids. Thirty-six multiparous and primiparous Holstein cows (66 ± 22 d in milk, 41 ± 8 kg/d of milk) were used in an 11-wk completely randomized design trial during the fall of 2009. All cows were fed a diet containing normal corn silage during the first 2wk of the trial before being assigned to 1 of 3 treatments for the following 9 wk. Data collected during the first 2 wk were used as a covariate in the statistical analysis. No difference was observed in dry matter intake (DMI) among treatments, which averaged 22.6 kg/d. Milk yield was higher for cows fed BMR (37.6 kg/d) compared with waxy (35.2 kg/d) but was similar to that of cows fed control (36.2 kg/d). Milk fat percentage tended to be lower for cows fed control (3.28%) compared with those fed BMR (3.60%) or waxy (3.55%) corn silage. Milk protein percentage tended to be lower for cows fed control (2.79%) compared with waxy (2.89%) but similar to that of those fed BMR (2.85%). No differences were observed in yield of milk components. Energy-corrected milk (ECM) yield and dairy efficiency (ECM:DMI) did not differ among treatments. Cows fed BMR tended to gain more body weight compared with those fed control and waxy. Results of this trial are consistent with previous reports in which cows fed diets based on corn silage produced from BMR hybrids have higher milk yield compared with those fed other hybrids. Corn silage produced from the waxy hybrid supported a similar yield of ECM because of higher milk components, but milk yield

  15. Pseudotumour Cerebri Presentation in a Child Under the Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Agonist Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gül, Ülkü; Kaçar Bayram, Ayşe; Kendirci, Mustafa; Hatipoğlu, Nihal; Okdemir, Deniz; Gümüş, Hakan; Kurtoğlu, Selim

    2016-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues are common treatment option in central precocious puberty in childhood as well as in endometriosis, infertility, and prostate cancer in adults. Pseudotumor cerebri is a rare side effect observed in adults. We present the case of a girl with precocious puberty treated with triptorelin acetate who developed pseudotumor cerebri after the 4th dose. She had headaches, and her blood pressure was detected to be above the 99 percentile. There were no causes underlying of hypertension such as cardiac, renal, or endocrine. Neurological examination was normal except bilateral papilledema. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging was normal. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) opening pressure was elevated. Triptorelin therapy was ceased and acetazolamide was applied; CSF pressure returned to normal. We observed pseudotumor cerebri after precocious puberty treatment, a finding for the first time ever seen in childhood. PMID:27087351

  16. Microvascular resistance in response to iodinated contrast media in normal and functionally impaired kidneys.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Osamu; Takano, Masamichi; Uchiyama, Saori; Fukuizumi, Isamu; Shimura, Tetsuro; Matsushita, Masato; Komiyama, Hidenori; Inami, Toru; Murakami, Daisuke; Munakata, Ryo; Ohba, Takayoshi; Hata, Noritake; Seino, Yoshihiko; Shimizu, Wataru

    2015-12-01

    Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is considered to result from intrarenal vasoconstriction, and occurs more frequently in impaired than in normal kidneys. It was hypothesized that iodinated contrast media would markedly change renal blood flow and vascular resistance in functionally impaired kidneys. Thirty-six patients were enrolled (32 men; mean age, 75.3 ± 7.6 years) undergoing diagnostic coronary angiography and were divided into two groups based on the presence of chronic kidney disease (CKD), defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of < 60 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) (CKD and non-CKD groups, n = 18 in both). Average peak velocity (APV) and renal artery resistance index (RI) were measured by Doppler flow wire before and after administration of the iodinated contrast media. The APV and the RI were positively and inversely correlated with the eGFR at baseline, respectively (APV, R = 0.545, P = 0.001; RI, R = -0.627, P < 0.001). Mean RI was significantly higher (P = 0.015) and APV was significantly lower (P = 0.026) in the CKD than in the non-CKD group. Both APV (P < 0.001) and RI (P = 0.002) were significantly changed following contrast media administration in the non-CKD group, but not in the CKD group (APV, P = 0.258; RI, P = 0.707). Although renal arterial resistance was higher in patients with CKD, it was not affected by contrast media administration, suggesting that patients with CKD could have an attenuated response to contrast media.

  17. Ocular motor responses to abrupt interaural head translation in normal humans.

    PubMed

    Ramat, Stefano; Zee, David S

    2003-08-01

    We characterized the interaural translational vestibulo-ocular reflex (tVOR) in 6 normal humans to brief (approximately 200 ms), high-acceleration (0.4-1.4g) stimuli, while they fixed targets at 15 or 30 cm. The latency was 19 +/- 5 ms at 15-cm and 20 +/- 12 ms at 30-cm viewing. The gain was quantified using the ratio of actual to ideal behavior. The median position gain (at time of peak head velocity) was 0.38 and 0.37, and the median velocity gain, 0.52 and 0.62, at 15- and 30-cm viewing, respectively. These results suggest the tVOR scales proportionally at these viewing distances. Likewise, at both viewing distances, peak eye velocity scaled linearly with peak head velocity and gain was independent of peak head acceleration. A saccade commonly occurred in the compensatory direction, with a greater latency (165 vs. 145 ms) and lesser amplitude (1.8 vs. 3.2 deg) at 30- than 15-cm viewing. Even with saccades, the overall gain at the end of head movement was still considerably undercompensatory (medians 0.68 and 0.77 at 15- and 30-cm viewing). Monocular viewing was also assessed at 15-cm viewing. In 4 of 6 subjects, gains were the same as during binocular viewing and scaled closely with vergence angle. In sum the low tVOR gain and scaling of the response with viewing distance and head velocity extend previous results to higher acceleration stimuli. tVOR latency (approximately 20 ms) was lower than previously reported. Saccades are an integral part of the tVOR, and also scale with viewing distance.

  18. Ocular motor responses to abrupt interaural head translation in normal humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramat, Stefano; Zee, David S.; Shelhamer, M. J. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    We characterized the interaural translational vestibulo-ocular reflex (tVOR) in 6 normal humans to brief (approximately 200 ms), high-acceleration (0.4-1.4g) stimuli, while they fixed targets at 15 or 30 cm. The latency was 19 +/- 5 ms at 15-cm and 20 +/- 12 ms at 30-cm viewing. The gain was quantified using the ratio of actual to ideal behavior. The median position gain (at time of peak head velocity) was 0.38 and 0.37, and the median velocity gain, 0.52 and 0.62, at 15- and 30-cm viewing, respectively. These results suggest the tVOR scales proportionally at these viewing distances. Likewise, at both viewing distances, peak eye velocity scaled linearly with peak head velocity and gain was independent of peak head acceleration. A saccade commonly occurred in the compensatory direction, with a greater latency (165 vs. 145 ms) and lesser amplitude (1.8 vs. 3.2 deg) at 30- than 15-cm viewing. Even with saccades, the overall gain at the end of head movement was still considerably undercompensatory (medians 0.68 and 0.77 at 15- and 30-cm viewing). Monocular viewing was also assessed at 15-cm viewing. In 4 of 6 subjects, gains were the same as during binocular viewing and scaled closely with vergence angle. In sum the low tVOR gain and scaling of the response with viewing distance and head velocity extend previous results to higher acceleration stimuli. tVOR latency (approximately 20 ms) was lower than previously reported. Saccades are an integral part of the tVOR, and also scale with viewing distance.

  19. Normal mitogen-induced suppression of the interleukin-6 (IL-6) response and its deficiency in systemic lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Warrington, R.J.; Rutherford, W.J. )

    1990-01-01

    A low-frequency suppressor-cell population in normal peripheral blood inhibits the B-cell CESS response to IL-6, following pokeweed mitogen stimulation. The suppression of IL-6 responsiveness is radiation sensitive, directed against CESS targets and not mediated by inhibition of IL-6 production, and associated with nonspecific cytotoxic activity against CESS targets. The generation of these cytolytic cells is also radiation sensitive. A correlation was found between PWM-induced cytotoxicity against CESS and the suppression of IL-6-dependent IgG production. But cytotoxicity toward CESS targets is not responsible for this suppression because IL-2 induces equivalent or greater nonspecific cytotoxicity against CESS in the total absence of suppression of CESS-derived IgG production and suppression is also induced by mitogen-activated PBL separated from CESS targets by a cell-impermeable membrane. This suppression was not mediated by TNF alpha/beta or IFN-gamma. In systemic lupus erythematosus, suppression of IL-6-dependent IgG production is impaired in patients with active disease (29.2 +/- 13.7%) compared to patients with inactive disease (70 +/- 19.5%) or normal controls (82.8 +/- 9.2%). There is also a defect in mitogen-induced nonspecific cytotoxicity in active SLE (specific lysis 15.1 +/- 3.5%, compared to 34 +/- 4% in normals). Pokeweed mitogen-activated PBL can therefore normally induce suppression of B-cell IL-6 responses and this response is deficient in lupus.

  20. A bias in the "mass-normalized" DTT response - An effect of non-linear concentration-response curves for copper and manganese

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charrier, Jessica G.; McFall, Alexander S.; Vu, Kennedy K.-T.; Baroi, James; Olea, Catalina; Hasson, Alam; Anastasio, Cort

    2016-11-01

    The dithiothreitol (DTT) assay is widely used to measure the oxidative potential of particulate matter. Results are typically presented in mass-normalized units (e.g., pmols DTT lost per minute per microgram PM) to allow for comparison among samples. Use of this unit assumes that the mass-normalized DTT response is constant and independent of the mass concentration of PM added to the DTT assay. However, based on previous work that identified non-linear DTT responses for copper and manganese, this basic assumption (that the mass-normalized DTT response is independent of the concentration of PM added to the assay) should not be true for samples where Cu and Mn contribute significantly to the DTT signal. To test this we measured the DTT response at multiple PM concentrations for eight ambient particulate samples collected at two locations in California. The results confirm that for samples with significant contributions from Cu and Mn, the mass-normalized DTT response can strongly depend on the concentration of PM added to the assay, varying by up to an order of magnitude for PM concentrations between 2 and 34 μg mL-1. This mass dependence confounds useful interpretation of DTT assay data in samples with significant contributions from Cu and Mn, requiring additional quality control steps to check for this bias. To minimize this problem, we discuss two methods to correct the mass-normalized DTT result and we apply those methods to our samples. We find that it is possible to correct the mass-normalized DTT result, although the correction methods have some drawbacks and add uncertainty to DTT analyses. More broadly, other DTT-active species might also have non-linear concentration-responses in the assay and cause a bias. In addition, the same problem of Cu- and Mn-mediated bias in mass-normalized DTT results might affect other measures of acellular redox activity in PM and needs to be addressed.

  1. [Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone in regulation of reproduction and behavior in mammalians].

    PubMed

    Meng, Fansen; Chen, Xuequn; Du, Jizeng

    2013-03-01

    RF-amide related peptide (RFRP) is the orthologue of gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) in mammals. The bodies of RFRP cell are located in the dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (DMH) and the fibers project to preoptic area (POA) and median eminence of the hypothalamus. Its receptor mainly distributes in hypothalamus. RFRP fibers project to GnRH cells to regulate mammalian reproduction axis. This paper reviews the progress of current researches on RFRP in regulation of animal behaviors, including reproduction, food intake, anxiety and stress response.

  2. Ventral frontal satiation-mediated responses to food aromas in obese and normal-weight women123

    PubMed Central

    Eiler, William JA; Dzemidzic, Mario; Case, K Rose; Armstrong, Cheryl LH; Mattes, Richard D; Cyders, Melissa A; Considine, Robert V; Kareken, David A

    2014-01-01

    Background: Sensory properties of foods promote and guide consumption in hunger states, whereas satiation should dampen the sensory activation of ingestive behaviors. Such activation may be disordered in obese individuals. Objective: Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we studied regional brain responses to food odor stimulation in the sated state in obese and normal-weight individuals targeting ventral frontal regions known to be involved in coding for stimulus reward value. Design: Forty-eight women (25 normal weight; 23 obese) participated in a 2-day (fed compared with fasting) fMRI study while smelling odors of 2 foods and an inedible, nonfood object. Analyses were conducted to permit an examination of both general and sensory-specific satiation (satiation effects specific to a given food). Results: Normal-weight subjects showed significant blood oxygen level–dependent responses in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) to food aromas compared with responses induced by the odor of an inedible object. Normal-weight subjects also showed general (but not sensory-specific) satiation effects in both the vmPFC and orbitofrontal cortex. Obese subjects showed no differential response to the aromas of food and the inedible object when fasting. Within- and between-group differences in satiation were driven largely by changes in the response to the odor of the inedible stimulus. Responses to food aromas in the obese correlated with trait negative urgency, the tendency toward negative affect-provoked impulsivity. Conclusions: Ventral frontal signaling of reward value may be disordered in obesity, with negative urgency heightening responses to food aromas. The observed nature of responses to food and nonfood stimuli suggests that future research should independently quantify each to fully understand brain reward signaling in obesity. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02041039. PMID:24695888

  3. Therapeutic uses of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs.

    PubMed

    Andreyko, J L; Marshall, L A; Dumesic, D A; Jaffe, R B

    1987-01-01

    Since the discovery and synthesis of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in 1971, numerous long-acting agonistic and antagonistic analogs have been synthesized. Agonistic analogs were found to desensitize pituitary GnRH receptors with chronic use, resulting in decreased gonadotropin secretion and a hypogonadal state. These analogs are being investigated as potential contraceptives and in the treatment of several conditions in which decreased gonadal steroid production is desired. Substantial progress has been made in these areas. The purpose of this review is to provide the clinician with data regarding the potential clinical utility of this class of peptides.

  4. Quantitative bioassays for measuring biologically functional gonadotropins based on eel gonadotropic receptors.

    PubMed

    Minegishi, Y; Dirks, R P; de Wijze, D L; Brittijn, S A; Burgerhout, E; Spaink, H P; van den Thillart, G E E J M

    2012-08-01

    Significant declines in eel stocks have been noted in many parts of the world. Because eel aquaculture is dependent on wild-caught juveniles, there is a need to achieve artificial reproduction. Adult eel maturation is currently induced by repeated injections of purified gonadotropin (human chorionic gonadotropin [hCG]) or pituitary extract. Thus the determination of the biological efficacy and quantification of internal levels of gonadotropic hormones is important for optimizing artificial reproduction protocols. To quantify the plasma levels of biologically functional gonadotropic hormones, we developed a bioassay for luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) based on the stable expression of receptors in HEK293 cells of the Japanese eel Anguilla japonica LH (ajLHR) and the European eel Anguilla anguilla FSH (aaFSHR), respectively. Such cells also contain a firefly luciferase reporter gene driven by a cAMP-responsive element (CRE-Luc). We found that the obtained stable cells, with ajLHR, responded linearly to a more than 100,000-fold concentration range of hCG diluted in saline. The cells with aaFSHR showed a linear response to a 1000-fold concentration range of salmon pituitary extract mixed with saline. The biological functionality of the LH and FSH bioassays was validated using hCG, human FSH, and pituitary extracts from salmon, carp and eel. Since the toxins in eel plasma damaged the HEK293 cells, the protocol was adapted to selectively inactivate the toxins by heating at 37°C for 24h. This process successfully enabled the monitoring of hormone levels in blood plasma sampled from hCG-injected eels. In this paper, we describe the development of gonadotropin bioassays that will be useful for improving reproduction protocols in eel aquaculture.

  5. Responses to methylphenidate in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and normal children: update 2002.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, J L; Inoff-Germain, G

    2002-01-01

    Since the positive effects of stimulants on disruptive behavior were described (Bradley & Bowen, 1941), further pediatric studyhas been limited almost exclusively to samples of hyperkinetic school-age children. Because these agents normally were viewed as arousing in their effects on the central nervous system, but were calming in their therapeutic effects on these children, stimulant effects on Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) were interpreted as being 'paradoxical.' Investigation of effects in normal children and adolescents and in those with disorders unrelated to Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), as well as in young adult samples, however, indicate that stimulants appear to have similar behavioral effects in normal and in hyperactive children. This brief report is an update (as of August 2002) on studies of stimulants in ADHD and normal children, with particular focus on MPH.

  6. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone/human chorionic gonadotropin beta based recombinant antibodies and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Talwar, G P; Vyas, Hemant K; Purswani, Shilpi; Gupta, Jagdish C

    2009-12-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) are unique targets for the control of fertility. Immunological approaches to neutralizing these hormones have additional utility in cancer treatment. Vaccines have been developed against both GnRH and hCG and these have undergone Phase I/II clinical trials documenting their safety, reversibility and efficacy. The heterospecies dimer hCG vaccine prevented pregnancy in women of proven fertility without impairment of ovulation or derangement of menstrual regularity and bleeding profiles. The protective threshold of antibody titers to achieve efficacy was determined in these first-ever trials. Recently, a recombinant vaccine against the beta subunit of hCG linked to the B subunit of heat labile enterotoxin has been made and expressed as a glycosylated conjugate in Pichia pastoris. Experiments indicate its ability to generate antibodies above the protective threshold in all immunized Balb/c mice. Ectopic expression of hCG/hCGbeta is observed in many advanced stage cancers of various origins. A chimeric high affinity and specific recombinant antibody against hCGbeta linked to curcumin kills hCGbeta expressing T lymphoblastic leukemia cells without any deleterious effect. Several synthetic and recombinant vaccines have been developed against GnRH. These reduce serum testosterone to castration levels causing atrophy of the prostate. Three Phase I/II clinical trials conducted in India and Austria have shown that these vaccines elicit non-surgical reduction of testosterone, a fall in prostate specific antigen and clinical improvement of prostate carcinoma patients. A multimer recombinant vaccine against GnRH has high efficacy for sterilization of pigs and other animals.

  7. Catecholamine secretion and adrenal nerve activity in response to movements of normal and inflamed knee joints in cats.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, A; Sato, Y; Schmidt, R F

    1986-01-01

    The effects of articular stimulation on adrenal catecholamine secretion and adrenal sympathetic nerve activity were studied using halothane anaesthetized cats. Various natural passive movements were applied to the normal and inflamed knee joints. Rhythmic flexions and extensions as well as rhythmic inward and outward rotation of normal knee joints within their physiological range of motion did not change nerve activity or the secretion of adrenal catecholamines. Static outward rotation in the normal working range was also ineffective. However, as soon as this static rotation was extended into the noxious range, significant increases in both of these variables were elicited. In the acutely inflamed knee joint, various passive movements produced increases in both adrenal sympathetic and catecholamine secretion. Especially noteworthy was the finding that movements of the inflamed knee joint that were within the normal range of motion produced increases in all variables. Articularly induced increases in adrenal sympathetic nerve activity were diminished by severing various hind-limb somatic afferent nerves and abolished by complete denervation of the knee joint. Additionally, section of the adrenal sympathetic nerves eliminated the catecholamine secretion response. From these data it was concluded that the responses observed in these experiments were reflexes having an afferent limb in hind-limb nerves and an efferent limb in the adrenal sympathetic nerves. A contribution of supraspinal structures was suggested for the reflex responses of sympatho-adrenal medullary function evoked by knee joint stimulations, since spinal transection at the C2 level completely abolished the responses. PMID:3795070

  8. Peek-a-What? Infants' Response to the Still-Face Task after Normal and Interrupted Peek-a-Boo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigelow, Ann E.; Best, Caitlin

    2013-01-01

    Infants' sensitivity to the vitality or tension envelope within dyadic social exchanges was investigated by examining their responses following normal and interrupted games of peek-a-boo embedded in a Still-Face Task. Infants 5-6 months old engaged in two modified Still-Face Tasks with their mothers. In one task, the initial interaction ended with…

  9. The effect of Yohimbine, an alpha2 adrenergic receptor antagonist, on the growth hormone response to apomorphine in normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Lal, S; Thavundayil, J X; Krishnan, B; Nair, N P; Schwartz, G; Guyda, H

    1996-01-01

    Yohimbine HCl (16 mg po) administered 30 min before clonidine (CLON) (2 ug/kg infused over 10 min) (N = 5) or apomorphine HCl (Apo) (0.5 mg sc) (N = 10) antagonized the growth hormone (GH) response to CLON but had no effect on the GH response to Apo in normal men. This finding suggests that in humans, alpha2 adrenergic mechanisms do not modulate dopaminergic function, at least not in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, and that the GH response to Apo is not mediated via an alpha2 adrenergic link. PMID:8820174

  10. Discrete element modeling of Martian pit crater formation in response to extensional fracturing and dilational normal faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, Kevin J.; Wyrick, Danielle Y.; Ferrill, David A.

    2011-04-01

    Pit craters, circular to elliptical depressions that lack a raised rim or ejecta deposits, are common on the surface of Mars. Similar structures are also found on Earth, Venus, the Moon, and smaller planetary bodies, including some asteroids. While it is generally accepted that these pits form in response to material drainage into a subsurface void space, the primary mechanism(s) responsible for creating the void is a subject of debate. Previously proposed mechanisms include collapse into lave tubes, dike injection, extensional fracturing, and dilational normal faulting. In this study, we employ two-dimensional discrete element models to assess both extensional fracturing and dilational normal faulting as mechanisms for forming pit craters. We also examine the effect of mechanical stratigraphy (alternating strong and weak layers) and variation in regolith thickness on pit morphology. Our simulations indicate that both extensional fracturing and dilational normal faulting are viable mechanisms. Both mechanisms lead to generally convex (steepening downward) slope profiles; extensional fracturing results in generally symmetric pits, whereas dilational normal faulting produces strongly asymmetric geometries. Pit width is established early, whereas pit depth increases later in the deformation history. Inclusion of mechanical stratigraphy results in wider and deeper pits, particularly for the dilational normal faulting, and the presence of strong near-surface layers leads to pits with distinct edges as observed on Mars. The modeling results suggest that a thicker regolith leads to wider but shallower pits that are less distinct and may be more difficult to detect in areas of thick regolith.

  11. The molecular and cellular response of normal and progressed human bronchial epithelial cells to HZE particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Story, Michael; Ding, Liang-Hao; Minna, John; Park, Seong-mi; Larsen, Jill

    We have used a model of non-oncogenically immortalized normal human bronchial epithelial cells to determine the response of such cells to particles found outside the protection of the earth’s electromagnetic field. We have identified an enhanced frequency of cellular transformation, as measured by growth in soft agar, for both 56Fe and 28Si (1 GeV/n) that is maximal (4-6 fold) at 0.25 Gy and 0.40 Gy, respectively. At 4 months post-irradiation 38 individual soft agar clones were isolated. These clones were characterized extensively for cellular and molecular changes. Gene expression analysis suggested that these clones had down-regulated several genes associated with anti-oxidant pathways including GLS2, GPX1 and 4, SOD2, PIG3, and NQO1 amongst others. As a result, many of these transformed clones were exposed to high levels of intracellular radical oxygen species (ROS), although there appeared not to be any enhanced mitochondrial ROS. DNA repair pathways associated with ATM/ATR signaling were also upregulated. However, these transformants do not develop into tumors when injected into immune-compromised mice, suggesting that they have not progressed sufficiently to become oncogenic. Therefore we chose 6 soft agar clones for continuous culture for an additional 14 months. Amongst the 6 clones, only one clone showed any significant change in phenotype. Clone 3kt-ff.2a, propagated for 18 months, were 2-fold more radioresistant, had a shortened doubling time and the background rate of transformation more than doubled. Furthermore, the morphology of transformed clones changed. Clones from this culture are being compared to the original clone as well as the parental HBEC3KT and will be injected into immune-compromised mice for oncogenic potential. Oncogenically progressed HBECs, HBEC3KT cells that overexpress a mutant RAS gene and where p53 has been knocked down, designated HBEC3KTR53, responded quite differently to HZE particle exposure. First, these cells are more

  12. Ovarian stimulation of squirrel monkeys (Saimiri boliviensis boliviensis) using pregnant mare serum gonadotropin.

    PubMed

    Schuler, A Michele; Westberry, Jenne M; Scammell, Jonathan G; Abee, Christian R; Kuehl, Thomas J; Gordon, Jon W

    2006-02-01

    The application of assisted reproductive technologies (ART) to nonhuman primates has created opportunities for improving reproductive management in breeding colonies, and for creation of new animal models by genetic modification. One impediment to the application of ART in Saimiri spp. has been the lack of an effective gonadotropin preparation for ovarian stimulation. Pregnant mare serum gonadotropin (PMSG) is inexpensive and readily available, but its repeated use in rhesus monkeys has been associated with induction of a refractory state. We have compared PMSG to recombinant human follicle stimulating hormone (rhFSH) for controlled ovarian stimulation in Bolivian squirrel monkeys. Groups of mature squirrel monkeys received rhFSH (75 IU daily) or PMSG (250 IU twice daily) by subcutaneous injection for 4 d during the breeding season (November to January) or nonbreeding season (March to September). Serum estradiol (E2) was measured daily. Follicular growth was monitored by abdominal ultrasound. During the breeding season, PMSG induced a higher E2 response than did rhFSH, with mean E2 levels being significantly higher within 3 d of stimulation. Superior follicular development in PMSG animals was confirmed by abdominal ultrasonography. During the nonbreeding season, PMSG elicited a similar increase in serum E2 levels despite the fact that basal serum E2 is typically low during the nonbreeding season. Repeated use of PMSG (< or = 3 cycles of administration) produced no attenuation of the E2 response. We conclude that PMSG is highly effective for repeated cycles of controlled ovulation stimulation in the squirrel monkey.

  13. Factors affecting pituitary gonadotropin function in users of oral contraceptive steroids.

    PubMed

    Scott, J A; Brenner, P F; Kletzky, O A; Mishell, D R

    1978-04-01

    In order to determine whether certain factors influence the direct pituitary suppressive effect of contraceptive steroid, 50 subjects who had used various formulations of oral contraceptive steroids for periods of time ranging from one to nine years were stimulated with 50 microgram of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) during the last week of oral contraceptive ingestion. The response of lutinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) was compared to the results obtained in nine control subjects with regard to: (1) age of subject. (2) type of contraceptive formulation used, and (3) length of use. Prestimulation levels of LH and FSH, respectively, were significantly decreased in 37 (74 per cent) and 42 (84 per cent) of the subjects. Following GnRH stimulation, peak responses of serum LH and FSH, respectively, were also significantly lower than those in the control subjects in 40 (80 per cent) and 45 (90 per cent of the subjects. The degree of suppression of pituitary gonadotropins, both before and after GnRH administration was significantly correlated with the type of steroid formulation used, being greatest with a combination of d-norgestrel and ethinyl estradiol. No correlation was found with length of use of oral contraceptives or age of the subjects.

  14. Gonadotropins regulate rat testicular tight junctions in vivo.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Mark J; Tarulli, Gerard A; Meachem, Sarah J; Robertson, David M; Smooker, Peter M; Stanton, Peter G

    2010-06-01

    Sertoli cell tight junctions (TJs) are an essential component of the blood-testis barrier required for spermatogenesis; however, the role of gonadotropins in their maintenance is unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effect of gonadotropin suppression and short-term replacement on TJ function and TJ protein (occludin and claudin-11) expression and localization, in an adult rat model in vivo. Rats (n = 10/group) received the GnRH antagonist, acyline, for 7 wk to suppress gonadotropins. Three groups then received for 7 d: 1) human recombinant FSH, 2) human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and rat FSH antibody (to study testicular androgen stimulation alone), and 3) hCG alone (to study testicular androgen and pituitary FSH production). TJ proteins were assessed by real-time PCR, Western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry, whereas TJ function was assessed with a biotin permeation tracer. Acyline treatment significantly reduced testis weights, serum androgens, LH and FSH, and adluminal germ cells (pachytene spermatocyte, round and elongating spermatids). In contrast to controls, acyline induced seminiferous tubule permeability to biotin, loss of tubule lumens, and loss of occludin, but redistribution of claudin-11, immunostaining. Short-term hormone replacement stimulated significant recoveries in adluminal germ cell numbers. In hCG +/- FSH antibody-treated rats, occludin and claudin-11 protein relocalized at the TJ, but such relocalization was minimal with FSH alone. Tubule lumens also reappeared, but most tubules remained permeable to biotin tracer, despite the presence of occludin. It is concluded that gonadotropins maintain Sertoli cell TJs in the adult rat via a mechanism that includes the localization of occludin and claudin-11 at functional TJs.

  15. Gonadotropins Regulate Rat Testicular Tight Junctions in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Mark J.; Tarulli, Gerard A.; Meachem, Sarah J.; Robertson, David M.; Smooker, Peter M.; Stanton, Peter G.

    2010-01-01

    Sertoli cell tight junctions (TJs) are an essential component of the blood-testis barrier required for spermatogenesis; however, the role of gonadotropins in their maintenance is unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effect of gonadotropin suppression and short-term replacement on TJ function and TJ protein (occludin and claudin-11) expression and localization, in an adult rat model in vivo. Rats (n = 10/group) received the GnRH antagonist, acyline, for 7 wk to suppress gonadotropins. Three groups then received for 7 d: 1) human recombinant FSH, 2) human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and rat FSH antibody (to study testicular androgen stimulation alone), and 3) hCG alone (to study testicular androgen and pituitary FSH production). TJ proteins were assessed by real-time PCR, Western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry, whereas TJ function was assessed with a biotin permeation tracer. Acyline treatment significantly reduced testis weights, serum androgens, LH and FSH, and adluminal germ cells (pachytene spermatocyte, round and elongating spermatids). In contrast to controls, acyline induced seminiferous tubule permeability to biotin, loss of tubule lumens, and loss of occludin, but redistribution of claudin-11, immunostaining. Short-term hormone replacement stimulated significant recoveries in adluminal germ cell numbers. In hCG ± FSH antibody-treated rats, occludin and claudin-11 protein relocalized at the TJ, but such relocalization was minimal with FSH alone. Tubule lumens also reappeared, but most tubules remained permeable to biotin tracer, despite the presence of occludin. It is concluded that gonadotropins maintain Sertoli cell TJs in the adult rat via a mechanism that includes the localization of occludin and claudin-11 at functional TJs. PMID:20357222

  16. Normal Evoked Response to Rapid Sequences of Tactile Pulses in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Santosh; Khan, Sheraz; Garel, Keri-Lee A.; Hämäläinen, Matti S.; Kenet, Tal

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a developmental disorder diagnosed behaviorally, with many documented neurophysiological abnormalities in cortical response properties. While abnormal sensory processing is not considered core to the disorder, most ASD individuals report sensory processing abnormalities. Yet, the neurophysiological correlates of these abnormalities have not been fully mapped. In the auditory domain, studies have shown that cortical responses in the early auditory cortex in ASD are abnormal in multiple ways. In particular, it has been shown that individuals with ASD have abnormal cortical auditory evoked responses to rapid, but not slow, sequences of tones. In parallel, there is substantial evidence of somatosensory processing abnormalities in ASD, including in the temporal domain. Here, we tested the somatosensory domain in ASD for abnormalities in rapid processing of tactile pulses, to determine whether abnormalities there parallel those observed in the auditory domain. Specifically, we tested the somatosensory cortex response to a sequence of two tactile pulses with different (short and long) temporal separation. We analyzed the responses in cortical space, in primary somatosensory cortex. As expected, we found no group difference in the evoked response to pulses with long (700 ms) temporal separation. Contrary to findings in the auditory domain, we also found no group differences in the evoked responses to the sequence with a short (200 ms) temporal separation. These results suggest that rapid temporal processing deficits in ASD are not generalized across multiple sensory domains, and are unlikely to underlie the behavioral somatosensory abnormalities observed in ASD. PMID:27695402

  17. Homologous radioimmunoassay for canine thyrotropin: response of normal and x-irradiated dogs to propylthiouracil

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, W.J.; Michaelson, S.

    1981-03-01

    A RIA for canine TSH (cTSH) was developed using a double antibody method. Rabbit anti-cTSH antisera was slightly cross-reactive with ovine TSH. No evidence of cross-reactivity was noted with human, bovine, rat TSH, or ovine LH. Serum cTSH in euthyroid dogs was 7.0 +- 0.9 ng/ml. Normal and x-irradiated (localized to the thyroid or cranium) dogs received 334 mg propylthiouracil (PTU) im in oil daily for 1 week as a goitrogenic challenge. A significant increase in cTSH was noted in normal dogs and in two of four dogs that received 1000 rads to the thyroid. No significant increase was observed in cTSH in any of the dogs previously given either 100 or 1000 rads to the head. Although serum T/sub 3/ and T/sub 4/ were only slightly decreased in thyroid-irradiated dogs, a significant decrease in T/sub 3/ was observed in both normal and x-irradiated dogs maintained on PTU for 1 week. The inability of head x-irradiated dogs to respond to PTU, as evidenced by the lack of increased cTSH, suggests that moderate to high doses of x irradiation can impair the ability of the hypothalamic-hypophysial-thyroid axis to respond to a goitrogenic challenge.

  18. Bronchomotor response to cold air or helium-oxygen at normal and high ambient pressures.

    PubMed

    Jammes, Y; Burnet, H; Cosson, P; Lucciano, M

    1988-05-01

    Effects of inhalation of cold air or helium-oxygen mixture on lung resistance (RL) were studied in anesthetized and tracheotomized rabbits under normal ambient pressure and in human volunteers under normo- and hyperbaric conditions. In artificially ventilated rabbits, an increase in RL occurred when the tracheal temperature fell to 10 degrees C. This effect was more than double with helium breathing compared to air, despite a lower respiratory heat loss by convection (Hc) with helium. In 3 normal humans, inhalation of cold air (mouth temperature = 8 degrees C) at sea level had no effect on RL value. However, with a helium-nitrogen-oxygen mixture, a weak but significant increase in RL due to cold gas breathing was measured in 1 subject at 2 ATA and in 2 individuals at 3.5 ATA. The density of inhaled gas mixture (air or He-N2-O2) was near the same in the three circumstances (1, 2, and 3.5 ATA) but Hc value increased with helium. At 8 ATA a 30-55% increase in RL occurred in the 3 divers during inhalation of cold gas (Hc was multiplied by 6 compared to air at sea level) and at 25 ATA the cold-induced bronchospasm ranged between 38 and 95% (Hc multiplied by 27). Thus, in rabbits and humans helium breathing enhanced the cold-induced increase in RL at normal or elevated ambient pressure, and this effect was interpreted as resulting from different mechanisms in the two circumstances.

  19. H-7, a protein kinase C inhibitor, inhibits spontaneous tone and spasmogenic responses in normal and sensitized guinea pig trachea.

    PubMed

    de Diego, A; Cortijo, J; Villagrasa, V; Perpina, M; Morcillo, E J

    1995-12-01

    1. H-7, a protein kinase C inhibitor, fully inhibited the spontaneous and stimulated (KCl 20 mM or histamine 0.5 mM) tone of trachea from normal and sensitized guinea pig. 2. H-7 depressed the concentration-contraction curves to KCl, histamine or 5-hydroxytryptamine in epithelium-denuded, indomethacin-treated, trachea from normal and sensitized guinea pigs while responses to CaCl2 (in Ca2+ -free, K+ -depolarized tissues) and acetylcholine were not affected. 3. H-7 (100 microM did not depress Ca2+ (20 microM-induced contraction of Triton X-100 skinned trachea. 4. These results suggest the involvement of PKC in the maintenance of spontaneous tone and spasmogenic responses of guinea pig trachea.

  20. CpG methylation patterns and decitabine treatment response in acute myeloid leukemia cells and normal hematopoietic precursors

    PubMed Central

    Negrotto, Soledad; Ng, Kwok Peng; Jankowska, Ania M.; Bodo, Juraj; Gopalan, Banu; Guinta, Kathryn; Mulloy, James C.; Hsi, Eric; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw; Saunthararajah, Yogen

    2011-01-01

    The DNA hypomethylating drug decitabine maintains normal hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal but induces terminal differentiation in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. The basis for these contrasting cell-fates, and for selective CpG hypomethylation by decitabine, is poorly understood. Promoter CpGs, with methylation measured by microarray, were classified by the direction of methylation change with normal myeloid maturation. In AML cells, the methylation pattern at maturation-responsive CpG suggested at least partial maturation. Consistent with partial maturation, in gene expression analyses, AML cells expressed high levels of the key lineage-specifying factor CEBPA, but relatively low levels of the key late-differentiation driver CEBPE. In methylation analysis by mass-spectrometry, CEBPE promoter CpG that are usually hypomethylated during granulocyte maturation were significantly hypermethylated in AML cells. Decitabine treatment induced cellular differentiation of AML cells, and the largest methylation decreases were at CpG that are hypomethylated with myeloid maturation, including CEBPE promoter CpG. In contrast, decitabine-treated normal HSC retained immature morphology, and methylation significantly decreased at CpG that are less methylated in immature cells. High expression of lineage-specifying factor and aberrant epigenetic repression of some key late-differentiation genes distinguishes AML cells from normal HSC and could explain the contrasting differentiation and methylation responses to decitabine. PMID:21836612

  1. Exaggerated blood pressure response to exercise is not associated with masked hypertension in patients with high normal blood pressure levels.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Alon; Cohen, Noa; Shemesh, Joseph; Koren-Morag, Nira; Leibowitz, Avshalom; Grossman, Ehud

    2014-04-01

    The association between exaggerated blood pressure (BP) response to exercise (ExBPR) and "masked hypertension" is unclear. Medical records of patients with high-normal BP who were evaluated in the Chaim Sheba Screening Institute Ramat Gan, Israel, during the years 2002-2007 and referred for 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) and exercise test were reviewed. Data on exercise tests performed in the preceding 5 years were retrieved. Reproducible ExBPR was defined when it was recorded at least twice. BP levels on 24-hour ABPM were compared between patients with a normal BP response and those with an ExBPR (systolic BP ≥200 mm Hg). Sixty-nine normotensive patients with high normal BP levels were identified. ExBPR was recorded in 43 patients and was reproducible in 28. BP levels on 24-hour ABPM were similar in patients with and without ExBPR. In patients with high-normal BP levels, ExBPR is not associated with masked hypertension.

  2. An Extended Normalization Model of Attention Accounts for Feature-Based Attentional Enhancement of Both Response and Coherence Gain

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, B. Suresh; Treue, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Paying attention to a sensory feature improves its perception and impairs that of others. Recent work has shown that a Normalization Model of Attention (NMoA) can account for a wide range of physiological findings and the influence of different attentional manipulations on visual performance. A key prediction of the NMoA is that attention to a visual feature like an orientation or a motion direction will increase the response of neurons preferring the attended feature (response gain) rather than increase the sensory input strength of the attended stimulus (input gain). This effect of feature-based attention on neuronal responses should translate to similar patterns of improvement in behavioral performance, with psychometric functions showing response gain rather than input gain when attention is directed to the task-relevant feature. In contrast, we report here that when human subjects are cued to attend to one of two motion directions in a transparent motion display, attentional effects manifest as a combination of input and response gain. Further, the impact on input gain is greater when attention is directed towards a narrow range of motion directions than when it is directed towards a broad range. These results are captured by an extended NMoA, which either includes a stimulus-independent attentional contribution to normalization or utilizes direction-tuned normalization. The proposed extensions are consistent with the feature-similarity gain model of attention and the attentional modulation in extrastriate area MT, where neuronal responses are enhanced and suppressed by attention to preferred and non-preferred motion directions respectively. PMID:27977679

  3. Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Response and Normal Tissue Regeneration After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy to Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Stinauer, Michelle A.; Diot, Quentin; Westerly, David C.; Schefter, Tracey E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To characterize changes in standardized uptake value (SUV) in positron emission tomography (PET) scans and determine the pace of normal tissue regeneration after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for solid tumor liver metastases. Methods and Materials: We reviewed records of patients with liver metastases treated with SBRT to {>=}40 Gy in 3-5 fractions. Evaluable patients had pretreatment PET and {>=}1 post-treatment PET. Each PET/CT scan was fused to the planning computed tomography (CT) scan. The maximum SUV (SUV{sub max}) for each lesion and the total liver volume were measured on each PET/CT scan. Maximum SUV levels before and after SBRT were recorded. Results: Twenty-seven patients with 35 treated liver lesions were studied. The median follow-up was 15.7 months (range, 1.5-38.4 mo), with 5 PET scans per patient (range, 2-14). Exponential decay curve fitting (r=0.97) showed that SUV{sub max} declined to a plateau of 3.1 for controlled lesions at 5 months after SBRT. The estimated SUV{sub max} decay half-time was 2.0 months. The SUV{sub max} in controlled lesions fluctuated up to 4.2 during follow-up and later declined; this level is close to 2 standard deviations above the mean normal liver SUV{sub max} (4.01). A failure cutoff of SUV{sub max} {>=}6 is twice the calculated plateau SUV{sub max} of controlled lesions. Parenchymal liver volume decreased by 20% at 3-6 months and regenerated to a new baseline level approximately 10% below the pretreatment level at 12 months. Conclusions: Maximum SUV decreases over the first months after SBRT to plateau at 3.1, similar to the median SUV{sub max} of normal livers. Transient moderate increases in SUV{sub max} may be observed after SBRT. We propose a cutoff SUV{sub max} {>=}6, twice the baseline normal liver SUV{sub max}, to score local failure by PET criteria. Post-SBRT values between 4 and 6 would be suspicious for local tumor persistence or recurrence. The volume of normal liver reached nadir 3

  4. Effects of leptin on gonadotropin-releasing hormone release from hypothalamic-infundibular explants and gonadotropin release from adenohypophyseal primary cell cultures: further evidence that fully nourished cattle are resistant to leptin.

    PubMed

    Amstalden, M; Harms, P G; Welsh, T H; Randel, R D; Williams, G L

    2005-01-01

    In rodents and pigs, leptin stimulates the release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) from hypothalamus, gonadotropins from adenohypophyseal (AP) explants and cells, and luteinizing hormone (LH) from full-fed animals. In the current studies, we investigated whether leptin could stimulate the release of GnRH from bovine hypothalamic-infundibular (HYP) explants and gonadotropins from bovine adenohypophyseal cells. In Experiment 1A, HYP explants collected from 17 bulls and seven steers were incubated with Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer (KRB) containing 0, 10, 100, or 1000 ng/ml recombinant ovine leptin (oleptin) for 30 min after a 3-h period of equilibration. None of the doses of leptin affected (P > 0.05) GnRH release into the media. In Experiment 1B, HYP explants collected from six steers were incubated with KRB containing 0 or 1000 ng/ml oleptin for two consecutive 30-min periods and challenged with 60 mM K(+) afterwards. Leptin did not affect (P > 0.05) basal or K(+)-stimulated release of GnRH. In Experiment 2, adenohypophyses from steers were collected at slaughter and cells dispersed and cultured for 4 days. On day 5, cells were treated with media alone (control) or media containing 10(-11), 10(-10), 10(-9), and 10(-8)M oleptin. Three independent replications were performed. None of the doses of leptin stimulated (P > 0.05) the release of LH. Although leptin at 10(-11), 10(-10), and 10(-9)M increased (P < 0.03) slightly the release of FSH compared to control-treated cells in one replicate, this effect was not confirmed in the other two replicates. Results support the hypothesis that leptin has limited effects on the release of GnRH and gonadotropins in full-fed cattle and reiterate important species differences in responsiveness to leptin.

  5. Comparison of normal and asthmatic subjects' responses to sulfate pollutant aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Utell, M.J.; Morrow, P.E.; Hyde, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    Epidemiological studies support an association between elevated levels of sulfates and acute respiratory disease. To determine if these pollutants produce airway hyperreactivity, 16 normal and 17 asthmatic subjects inhaled a control NaCl aerosol and the following sulfates: ammonium sulfate, sodium bisulfate, ammonium bisulfate, and sulfuric acid. A Lovelace generator produced particles with an average MMAD of approx. 1.0 ..mu..m (sigma/sub g/ approx. = 2.0) and concentrations of 0.1 and 1.0 mg/m/sup 3/. By double-blind randomization, all subjects breathed these aerosols for a 16-minute period. To determine if sulfate inhalation caused increased reactivity to a known bronchoconstrictor, all subjects inhaled carbachol following each 16-minute exposure. Before, during, and after exposure, pulmonary function studies were performed. When compared to NaCl, sulfate (1 mg/m/sup 3/) produced significant reductions in airway conductance and flow rates in asthmatics. The two most sensitive asthmatics demonstrated changes even at 0.1 mg/m/sup 3/ sulfate. To a far more significant degree, the bronchoconstrictor action of carbachol was potentiated by sulfates more or less in relation to their acidity in normals and asthmatics.

  6. Effect of feed restriction during calfhood on serum concentrations of metabolic hormones, gonadotropins, testosterone, and on sexual development in bulls.

    PubMed

    Brito, L F C; Barth, A D; Rawlings, N C; Wilde, R E; Crews, D H; Boisclair, Y R; Ehrhardt, R A; Kastelic, J P

    2007-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects offeed restriction during calfhood on serum concentrations of metabolic hormones, gonadotropins, and testosterone, and on sexual development in bulls. Eight beef bull calves received a control diet from 10 to 70 weeks of age. An additional 16 calves had restricted feed (75% of control) from 10 to 26 weeks of age (calfhood), followed by either control or high nutrition (n=8/group) during the peripubertal period until 70 weeks of age. Restricted feed during calfhood inhibited the hypothalamic GnRH pulse generator, reduced the pituitary response to GnRH, impaired testicular steroidogenesis, delayed puberty, and reduced testicular weight at 70 weeks of age, regardless of the nutrition during the peripubertal period. Restricted feed reduced serum IGF-I concentrations, but concentrations of leptin, insulin, and GH were not affected. In conclusion, restricted feed during calfhood impaired sexual development in bulls due to adverse effects on every level of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonad axis and these effects were not overcome by supplemental feeding during the peripubertal period. Furthermore, based on temporal associations, the effects of restricted feed on the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonad axis might be mediated by serum IGF-I concentrations. These results supported the hypotheses that the pattern of LH secretion during the early gonadotropin rise during calfhood is the main determinant of age of puberty in bulls and that gonadotropin-independent mechanisms involved in testicular growth during the peripubertal period are affected by previous LH exposure.

  7. Modulation of rat testes lipid composition by hormones: Effect of PRL (prolactin) and hCG (human chorionic gonadotropin)

    SciTech Connect

    Sebokova, E.; Wierzbicki, A.; Clandinin, M.T. )

    1988-10-01

    The effect of prolactin (PRL) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) administration for 7 days on the composition and function of rat testicular plasma membrane was investigated. Refractory state in Leydig cells desensitized by hCG decreased the binding capacity for {sup 125}I-labeled hCG and also luteinizing hormone (LH)-induced adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) and testosterone production. In testicular membranes of hCG-treated animals, a depletion of cholesterol and an increase in total phospholipid content was observed after gonadotropin injection, thereby decreasing the cholesterol-to-phospholipid ratio. Injection of high doses of PRL had no effect on the binding capacity or affinity of the LH-hCG receptor but decreased the response of Leydig cells to LH in terms of cAMP and testosterone synthesis. PRL also increased total and esterified cholesterol and decreased free cholesterol and membrane phospholipid content. The fatty acid composition of testicular lipids was significantly and selectively influenced by both hormonal treatments. These observations suggest that metabolism of cholesterol and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in testicular tissue is affected by chorionic gonadotropin and PRL and may provide the mechanism for regulating steroidogenic functions.

  8. Immunity to Brugia pahangi in athymic nude and normal mice: eosinophilia, antibody and hypersensitivity responses.

    PubMed

    Vickery, A C; Vincent, A L

    1984-11-01

    Congenitally athymic nude (nu/nu) mice, immunologically reconstituted by thymus grafting before inoculation with infective larvae, and mice heterozygous for the nu gene (nu/+), mounted potent protective humoral and cellular immune responses to Brugia pahangi. Although responses were not identical, both groups of mice produced IgM, IgG and IgE antibodies specific for adult worm antigen (S-Ag) present in a crude aqueous extract, made immediate and delayed hypersensitivity footpad swelling responses when challenged with S-Ag and eliminated their infection in the early larval stages. Heterozygotes also exhibited a marked eosinophilia which peaked coincident with larval killing. In contrast, thymus grafting of patent nudes had no effect upon microfilaraemias or adult worm burdens and did not completely protect against a challenge larval inoculum although antibodies specific for S-Ag were produced. With the occasional exceptions of moderate immediate footpad swelling and very low titres of IgM specific for S-Ag, no specific immune responses to B. pahangi were found in ungrafted nude mice which allowed full development of adult worms and supported patent infections.

  9. "Good" Students and "Involved" Mothers: Latin@ Responses to Normalization Pressures in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuero, Kimberley Kennedy; Valdez, Veronica E.

    2012-01-01

    Drawing from two in-depth qualitative studies, we used a sociocultural lens for a cross-case analysis examining how Latin@s' participation in schools is affected by ideological messages that subordinately position them in terms of their ethnicity, class, and immigrant status. We identified a range of dynamic responses to the school's normalization…

  10. The cutaneous vasoconstrictor response to venous stasis is normal in subjects with primary Raynaud's disease.

    PubMed

    Edwards, C M; Marshall, J M; Pugh, M

    1999-10-01

    In control subjects and in subjects with primary Raynaud's disease, sudden sound or a mild cool stimulus evokes the pattern of alerting response that includes cutaneous vasoconstriction but vasodilatation in forearm muscle. In control subjects, response habituates on repetition of these stimuli both within experimental sessions and over successive days. However, in subjects with primary Raynaud's disease, the cutaneous vasoconstriction and the muscle vasodilatation persist. We have now tested whether a similar disparity exists for the cutaneous vasoconstriction evoked by venous stasis, a response considered to be a veno-arteriolar reflex mediated by sympathetic fibers, but not requiring transmission through the spinal cord. In 10 subjects with primary Raynaud's disease and in 10 matched controls, a sphygmomanometer cuff on the left arm was inflated to 40 mm Hg for 2 minutes, five times on each of three experimental sessions on days 1, 3, and 5. Cutaneous red cell flux (RCF) was recorded from the pulp and dorsum of the left index finger by using a laser Doppler meter; digital vascular conductance (DCVC) was computed as RCF divided by arterial pressure. The first venous stasis, in session 1, evoked a decrease in pulp and dorsum DCVC in the control and primary Raynaud's subjects. There were no differences between the groups in the magnitudes or durations of these responses. Within session 1, the magnitude of the decrease in DCVC diminished on repetition of venous stasis in the dorsum in controls and in the pulp in primary Raynaud's subjects. We propose these effects reflected the similar reductions in baseline DCVC over time; there was no change in the duration of the responses. Repetition of venous stasis had similar effects in both groups of subjects within sessions 2 and 3. Further, judging from the mean of the responses evoked in each Session the decreases evoked in pulp and dorsum DCVC by venous stasis were fully consistent in magnitude and duration over the

  11. Hypovolemia Induced Orthostatic Hypotension in Presyncopal Astronauts and Normal Subjects Related to Hypoadrenergic Responsiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meck, Janice V.; Platts, Steven H.; Waters, Wendy W.; Shi, Shang-Jin; Hayashi, Yuho; Perez, Sondra A.; Ziegler, Michael G.

    2006-01-01

    Circulating blood volume is reduced during spaceflight, making astronauts hemodynamically compromised. After landing, astronauts separate into two groups. One group compensates for the hypovolemia with a hyper-sympathetic response during upright tilt testing and can complete a tilt test with few symptoms. The other group is unable to mount a hyper-sympathetic response and experiences orthostatic hypotension and presyncope during upright tilt tests. We tested the hypothesis that hypovolemia alone, in the absence of spaceflight, also would cause subjects to separate into presyncopal and non-presyncopal groups according to their sympathetic responses during tilt. We studied 20 subjects, including 10 veteran astronauts, on three occasions. On Days 1 (normovolemia) and 3 (hypovolemia), plasma volume, tilt tolerance and supine and standing plasma norepinephrine levels were measured. Forty hours prior to Day 3, subjects were given intravenous furosemide, followed by 36 hours of a 10MEq Na diet. Statistical comparisons were made between normovolemia and hypovolemia responses. This protocol reproduced landing day tilt test outcomes with 100% fidelity in the astronauts. Similarly to patterns reported after flight, non-presyncopal subjects had greater norepinephrine responses to tilt during hypovolemia compared to normovolemia (580 plus or minus 79 vs. 298 plus or minus 37 pg/ml, P less than 0.05), but presyncopal subjects had no increase (180 plus or minus 44 vs. 145 plus or minus 32 pg/ml, P=NS). This model can be used to predict astronauts who will become presyncopal on landing day, so that prospective, individualized countermeasures can be developed. Within patient populations, it can be used to study the interaction of volemic state and the sympathetic nervous system.

  12. Strategies for optimizing the response of cancer and normal tissues to radiation

    PubMed Central

    Moding, Everett J.; Kastan, Michael B.; Kirsch, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 50% of all patients with cancer receive radiation therapy at some point during the course of their treatment, and the majority of these patients are treated with curative intent. Despite recent advances in the planning of radiation treatment and the delivery of image-guided radiation therapy, acute toxicity and potential long-term side effects often limit the ability to deliver a sufficient dose of radiation to control tumours locally. In the past two decades, a better understanding of the hallmarks of cancer and the discovery of specific signalling pathways by which cells respond to radiation have provided new opportunities to design molecularly targeted therapies to increase the therapeutic window of radiation therapy. Here, we review efforts to develop approaches that could improve outcomes with radiation therapy by increasing the probability of tumour cure or by decreasing normal tissue toxicity. PMID:23812271

  13. Photodynamic therapy in prostate cancer: optical dosimetry and response of normal tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qun; Shetty, Sugandh D.; Heads, Larry; Bolin, Frank; Wilson, Brian C.; Patterson, Michael S.; Sirls, Larry T., II; Schultz, Daniel; Cerny, Joseph C.; Hetzel, Fred W.

    1993-06-01

    The present study explores the possibility of utilizing photodynamic therapy (PDT) in treating localized prostate carcinoma. Optical properties of ex vivo human prostatectomy specimens, and in vivo and ex vivo dog prostate glands were studied. The size of the PDT induced lesion in dog prostate was pathologically evaluated as a biological endpoint. The data indicate that the human normal and carcinoma prostate tissues have similar optical properties. The average effective attenuation depth is less in vivo than that of ex vivo. The PDT treatment generated a lesion size of up to 16 mm in diameter. The data suggest that PDT is a promising modality in prostate cancer treatment. Multiple fiber system may be required for clinical treatment.

  14. Cytidine deaminase polymorphisms and worse treatment response in normal karyotype AML.

    PubMed

    Hyo Kim, Lyoung; Sub Cheong, Hyun; Koh, Youngil; Ahn, Kwang-Sung; Lee, Chansu; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Doo Shin, Hyoung; Yoon, Sung-Soo

    2015-12-01

    The cytidine deaminase (CDA) catalyzes the irreversible hydrolytic deamination of the cytarabine (AraC) into a 1-β-D-arabinofuranosyluracil (AraU), an inactive metabolite that plays a crucial role in lowering the amount of AraC, a key chemotherapeutic drug, in the treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this study, we hypothesized that CDA polymorphisms were associated with the AraC metabolism for AML treatment and/or related clinical phenotypes. We analyzed 16 polymorphisms of CDA among 50 normal karyotype AML (NK-AML) patients, 45 abnormal karyotype AML (AK-AML) patients and 241 normal controls (NC). Several polymorphisms and haplotypes, rs532545, rs2072671, rs471760, rs4655226, rs818194 and CDA-ht3, were found to have a strong correlation with NK-AML compared with NC and these polymorphisms also revealed strong linkage disequilibrium with each other. Among them, rs2072671 (79A>C), which is located in a coding region and the resultant amino acid change K27Q, showed significant associations with NK-AML compared with NC (P=0.009 and odds ratio=2.44 in the dominant model). The AC and CC genotypes of rs2072671 (79A>C) were significantly correlated with shorter overall survival rates (P=0.03, hazard ratio=1.84) and first complete remission duration (P=0.007, hazard ratio=3.24) compared with the AA genotype in the NK-AML patients. Our results indicate that rs2072671 in CDA may be an important prognostic marker in NK-AML patients.

  15. Analysis of transcriptional responses of normalizing genes on Crassostrea brasiliana under different experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Müller, Gabrielle do Amaral E Silva; de Lima, Daína; Zacchi, Flávia Lucena; Piazza, Rômi Sharon; Lüchmann, Karim Hahn; Mattos, Jacó Joaquim; Schlenk, Daniel; Bainy, Afonso Celso Dias

    2017-02-04

    Bivalves show remarkable plasticity to environmental changes and have been proposed as sentinel organisms in biomonitoring. Studies related to transcriptional analysis using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) in these organisms have notably increased, imposing a need to identify and validate adequate reference genes for an accurate and reliable analysis. In the present study, nine reference genes were selected from transcriptome data of Crassostrea brasiliana in order to identify their suitability as qRT-PCR normalizer genes. The transcriptional patterns were analyzed in gills of oysters under three different conditions: different temperatures (18°C, 24°C or 32°C) and phenanthrene (PHE) (100 µg.L(-1) ) combined exposure; different salinities (10, 25 or 35 ‰) and PHE combined exposure and 10% of diesel fuel water-accommodated fraction (diesel-WAF) exposure. Reference gene stability was calculated using five algorithms (geNorm, NormFinder, BestKeeper, ΔCt, RefFinder). Transcripts of ankyrin-like (ANK), GAPDH-like and α tubulin-like (TUBA) genes showed minor changes in different temperature/PHE treatment. Transcripts of ANK, β actin-like and β tubulin-like genes showed better stability at salinity/PHE treatment, and ANK, TUBA and 28S ribosomal protein-like genes showed the most stable transcription pattern in oysters exposed to diesel-WAF exposure. This study constitutes the first systematic analysis on reference gene selection for qRT-PCR normalization in C. brasiliana. These genes could be employed in studies using qRT-PCR analysis under similar experimental conditions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Pretreatment of normal responders in fresh in vitro fertilization cycles: A comparison of transdermal estradiol and oral contraceptive pills

    PubMed Central

    Petrini, Allison C.; Zhou, Zhen N.; Lekovich, Jovana P.; Kligman, Isaac; Rosenwaks, Zev

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of pretreatment with transdermal estradiol (E2) compared to oral contraceptive pills (OCPs) on controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) response in normal responders undergoing fresh in vitro fertilization (IVF)-embryo transfer (ET) cycles. Methods A retrospective cohort study was performed of normal responders undergoing fresh IVF-ET cycles who received pretreatment with transdermal E2 versus OCPs prior to fresh IVF-ET. The total days of ovarian stimulation, total dosage of gonadotropins, total number of oocytes, and mature oocytes retrieved were noted. Pregnancy outcomes after ET were also recorded. Results A total of 2,092 patients met the inclusion criteria: 1,057 and 1,035 patients in the transdermal E2 and OCP groups, respectively. Patients in the OCP group had a longer duration of COS (10.7±1.63 days, p<0.01) than the E2 group (9.92±1.94 days). Patients in the OCP group also required higher cumulative doses of gonadotropins (2,657.3±1,187.9 IU) than those in the E2 group (2,550.1±1,270.2 IU, p=0.002). No statistically significant differences were found in the total and mature oocytes retrieved or in the rates of biochemical pregnancy, clinical pregnancy, spontaneous miscarriage, and live birth between the groups. Conclusion Our findings suggest that compared to OCPs, pretreatment with transdermal E2 is associated with a shorter duration of ovarian stimulation and lower gonadotropin utilization, without compromising the oocyte yield or pregnancy outcomes in normal-responder patients undergoing fresh IVF. PMID:28090462

  17. Dynamic responses of a semi-type offshore floating wind turbine during normal state and emergency shutdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhi-qiang; Li, Liang; Wang, Jin; Hu, Qiu-hao; Shen, Ma-cheng

    2016-03-01

    This paper addresses joint wind-wave induced dynamic responses of a semi-type offshore floating wind turbine (OFWT) under normal states and fault event conditions. The analysis in this paper is conducted in time domain, using an aero-hydro-servo-elastic simulation code-FAST. Owing to the unique viscous features of the reference system, the original viscous damping model implemented in FAST is replaced with a quadratic one to gain an accurate capture of viscous effects. Simulation cases involve free-decay motion in still water, steady motions in the presence of regular waves and wind as well as dynamic response in operational sea states with and without wind. Simulations also include the cases for transient responses induced by fast blade pitching after emergency shutdown. The features of platform motions, local structural loads and a typical mooring line tension force under a variety of excitations are obtained and investigated.

  18. Role of vascular density and normalization in response to neoadjuvant bevacizumab and chemotherapy in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Tolaney, Sara M.; Boucher, Yves; Duda, Dan G.; Martin, John D.; Seano, Giorgio; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Barry, William T.; Goel, Shom; Lahdenrata, Johanna; Isakoff, Steven J.; Yeh, Eren D.; Jain, Saloni R.; Golshan, Mehra; Brock, Jane; Snuderl, Matija; Winer, Eric P.; Krop, Ian E.; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2015-01-01

    Preoperative bevacizumab and chemotherapy may benefit a subset of breast cancer (BC) patients. To explore potential mechanisms of this benefit, we conducted a phase II study of neoadjuvant bevacizumab (single dose) followed by combined bevacizumab and adriamycin/cyclophosphamide/paclitaxel chemotherapy in HER2-negative BC. The regimen was well-tolerated and showed a higher rate of pathologic complete response (pCR) in triple-negative (TN)BC (11/21 patients or 52%, [95% confidence interval (CI): 30,74]) than in hormone receptor-positive (HR)BC [5/78 patients or 6% (95%CI: 2,14)]. Within the HRBCs, basal-like subtype was significantly associated with pCR (P = 0.007; Fisher exact test). We assessed interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) and tissue biopsies before and after bevacizumab monotherapy and circulating plasma biomarkers at baseline and before and after combination therapy. Bevacizumab alone lowered IFP, but to a smaller extent than previously observed in other tumor types. Pathologic response to therapy correlated with sVEGFR1 postbevacizumab alone in TNBC (Spearman correlation 0.610, P = 0.0033) and pretreatment microvascular density (MVD) in all patients (Spearman correlation 0.465, P = 0.0005). Moreover, increased pericyte-covered MVD, a marker of extent of vascular normalization, after bevacizumab monotherapy was associated with improved pathologic response to treatment, especially in patients with a high pretreatment MVD. These data suggest that bevacizumab prunes vessels while normalizing those remaining, and thus is beneficial only when sufficient numbers of vessels are initially present. This study implicates pretreatment MVD as a potential predictive biomarker of response to bevacizumab in BC and suggests that new therapies are needed to normalize vessels without pruning. PMID:26578779

  19. Variable coronary vasomotor responses to acetylcholine in patients with normal coronary arteriograms: evidence for localised endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed Central

    Tousoulis, D.; Davies, G.; Lefroy, D. C.; Haider, A. W.; Crake, T.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The vasomotor responses of the epicardial coronary arteries to acetylcholine were examined in patients with normal coronary arteries and chest pain. DESIGN: Quantitative angiography was used to measure minimum lumen diameter of proximal and distal coronary artery segments at baseline, during intracoronary infusion of acetylcholine (10(-7) - 10(-3) mol/l), and following an intracoronary bolus (2 mg) of isosorbide dinitrate. PATIENTS: Coronary arteriograms were obtained in 15 patients (mean (SEM) age 48 (10) years) with normal coronary arteries and chest pain. MAIN RESULTS: In response to the low concentrations of acetylcholine (10(-7) - 10(-6) mol/1) 20 (61%) distal and 11 (41%) proximal segments showed dilatation (group 1), whereas 13 (39%) distal segments and 14 (52%) proximal segments showed constriction (group 2) (P < 0.05 v group 1). In group 1, the maximum dilatation induced by acetylcholine in the proximal and distal segments was 7.83 (1.19)% and 11.6 (2.2)% respectively. In group 2, the maximum constriction at higher concentration was 16.55 (3.3)% and 33.11 (11.63)% in the proximal and distal segments respectively. The two different patterns of the vasomotor response coexisted in eight (53%) of the 15 patients. Intracoronary isosorbide dinitrate caused a greater increase in the coronary luminal diameter of distal segments than in proximal segments in group 1 (25.63 (5.16)% v 12.43 (3.48)%, P < 0.01) but not in group 2 (12.65 (2.53)% v 10.82 (3.33)%. CONCLUSIONS: Constriction and dilatation may occur in proximal and distal coronary artery segments, suggesting local areas of endothelial dysfunction, in response to acetylcholine in patients with chest pain and angiographically normal coronary arteries. Images PMID:8800989

  20. Normal Liver Tissue Density Dose Response in Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, Christopher C.; Stinauer, Michelle A.; Diot, Quentin; Westerly, David C.; Schefter, Tracey E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Miften, Moyed

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the temporal dose response of normal liver tissue for patients with liver metastases treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Ninety-nine noncontrast follow-up computed tomography (CT) scans of 34 patients who received SBRT between 2004 and 2011 were retrospectively analyzed at a median of 8 months post-SBRT (range, 0.7-36 months). SBRT-induced normal liver tissue density changes in follow-up CT scans were evaluated at 2, 6, 10, 15, and 27 months. The dose distributions from planning CTs were mapped to follow-up CTs to relate the mean Hounsfield unit change ({Delta}HU) to dose received over the range 0-55 Gy in 3-5 fractions. An absolute density change of 7 HU was considered a significant radiographic change in normal liver tissue. Results: Increasing radiation dose was linearly correlated with lower post-SBRT liver tissue density (slope, -0.65 {Delta}HU/5 Gy). The threshold for significant change (-7 {Delta}HU) was observed in the range of 30-35 Gy. This effect did not vary significantly over the time intervals evaluated. Conclusions: SBRT induces a dose-dependent and relatively time-independent hypodense radiation reaction within normal liver tissue that is characterized by a decrease of >7 HU in liver density for doses >30-35 Gy.

  1. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs: Understanding advantages and limitations.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pratap; Sharma, Alok

    2014-07-01

    Pituitary stimulation with pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogs induces both follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH). Pituitary gonadotropin secretions are blocked upon desensitization when a continuous GnRH stimulus is provided by means of an agonist or when the pituitary receptors are occupied with a competitive antagonist. GnRH antagonists were not available originally; therefore, prolonged daily injections of agonist with its desensitizing effect were used. Today, single- and multiple-dose injectable antagonists are also available to block the LH surge and thus to cause desensitization. This review provides an overview of the use of GnRH analogs which is potent therapeutic agents that are considerably useful in a variety of clinical indications from the past to the future with some limitations. These indications include management of endometriosis, uterine leiomyomas, hirsutism, dysfunctional uterine bleeding, premenstrual syndrome, assisted reproduction, and some hormone-dependent tumours, other than ovulation induction.

  2. Luteinizing hormone and human chorionic gonadotropin: origins of difference.

    PubMed

    Choi, Janet; Smitz, Johan

    2014-03-05

    Luteinizing hormone (LH) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) are widely recognized for their roles in ovulation and the support of early pregnancy. Aside from the timing of expression, however, the differences between LH and hCG have largely been overlooked in the clinical realm because of their similar molecular structures and shared receptor. With technologic advancements, including the development of highly purified and recombinant gonadotropins, researchers now appreciate that these hormones are not as interchangeable as once believed. Although they bind to a common receptor, emerging evidence suggests that LH and hCG have disparate effects on downstream signaling cascades. Increased understanding of the inherent differences between LH and hCG will foster more effective diagnostic and prognostic assays for use in a variety of clinical contexts and support the individualization of treatment strategies for conditions such as infertility.

  3. Horizontal vestibuloocular reflex evoked by high-acceleration rotations in the squirrel monkey. I. Normal responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minor, L. B.; Lasker, D. M.; Backous, D. D.; Hullar, T. E.; Shelhamer, M. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The horizontal angular vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) evoked by high-frequency, high-acceleration rotations was studied in five squirrel monkeys with intact vestibular function. The VOR evoked by steps of acceleration in darkness (3,000 degrees /s(2) reaching a velocity of 150 degrees /s) began after a latency of 7.3 +/- 1.5 ms (mean +/- SD). Gain of the reflex during the acceleration was 14.2 +/- 5.2% greater than that measured once the plateau head velocity had been reached. A polynomial regression was used to analyze the trajectory of the responses to steps of acceleration. A better representation of the data was obtained from a polynomial that included a cubic term in contrast to an exclusively linear fit. For sinusoidal rotations of 0.5-15 Hz with a peak velocity of 20 degrees /s, the VOR gain measured 0.83 +/- 0.06 and did not vary across frequencies or animals. The phase of these responses was close to compensatory except at 15 Hz where a lag of 5.0 +/- 0.9 degrees was noted. The VOR gain did not vary with head velocity at 0.5 Hz but increased with velocity for rotations at frequencies of >/=4 Hz (0. 85 +/- 0.04 at 4 Hz, 20 degrees /s; 1.01 +/- 0.05 at 100 degrees /s, P < 0.0001). No responses to these rotations were noted in two animals that had undergone bilateral labyrinthectomy indicating that inertia of the eye had a negligible effect for these stimuli. We developed a mathematical model of VOR dynamics to account for these findings. The inputs to the reflex come from linear and nonlinear pathways. The linear pathway is responsible for the constant gain across frequencies at peak head velocity of 20 degrees /s and also for the phase lag at higher frequencies being less than that expected based on the reflex delay. The frequency- and velocity-dependent nonlinearity in VOR gain is accounted for by the dynamics of the nonlinear pathway. A transfer function that increases the gain of this pathway with frequency and a term related to the third power of head

  4. Human chorionic gonadotropin and CA 15-3 producing adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Uçkaya, G; Ozet, A; Arpaci, A; Kömürcü, S

    1998-01-01

    50 years old man suffering from primary lung adenocarcinoma presented with high levels of both beta subunit human chorionic gonadotropin (beta HCG) and cancer antigen 15-3 (CA 15-3) in the absence of elevated carcinoembrionic antigen (CEA), alfa fetoprotein (AFP) and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9). Although beta HCG or CA 15-3 high levels were reported in adenocarcinoma of lung, this is the first report of a patient with high levels of both markers.

  5. Evaluating the ovarian cancer gonadotropin hypothesis: A candidate gene study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Alice W.; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Stram, Douglas A.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; Myers, Emily J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Hein, Alexander; Vergote, Ignace; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Lambrechts, Diether; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Eilber, Ursula; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Odunsi, Kunle; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Goodman, Marc T.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Dörk, Thilo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Leminen, Arto; Edwards, Robert P.; Kelley, Joseph L.; Harter, Philipp; Schwaab, Ira; Heitz, Florian; du Bois, Andreas; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Walsh, Christine; Karlan, Beth Y.; Hogdall, Estrid; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Jensen, Allan; Vierkant, Robert A.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Goode, Ellen L.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Giles, Graham G.; Bruinsma, Fiona; Wu, Xifeng; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Lu, Karen; Liang, Dong; Bisogna, Maria; Levine, Douglas A.; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Iversen, Edwin S.; Berchuck, Andrew; Terry, Kathryn L.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bjorge, Line; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Krakstad, Camilla; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Aben, Katja K.H.; van Altena, Anne M.; Bean, Yukie; Pejovic, Tanja; Kellar, Melissa; Le, Nhu D.; Cook, Linda S.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Cybulski, Cezary; Jakubowska, Anna; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Yang, Hannah; Nedergaard, Lotte; Lundvall, Lene; Hogdall, Claus; Song, Honglin; Campbell, Ian G.; Eccles, Diana; Glasspool, Rosalind; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Carty, Karen; Paul, James; McNeish, Iain A.; Sieh, Weiva; McGuire, Valerie; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Whittemore, Alice S.; McLaughlin, John R.; Risch, Harvey A.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Menon, Usha; Ramus, Susan J.; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Harrington, Patricia; Pike, Malcolm C.; Modugno, Francesmary; Rossing, Mary Anne; Ness, Roberta B.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Stram, Daniel O.; Wu, Anna H.; Pearce, Celeste Leigh

    2016-01-01

    Objective Ovarian cancer is a hormone-related disease with a strong genetic basis. However, none of its high-penetrance susceptibility genes and GWAS-identified variants to date are known to be involved in hormonal pathways. Given the hypothesized etiologic role of gonadotropins, an assessment of how variability in genes involved in the gonadotropin signaling pathway impacts disease risk is warranted. Methods Genetic data from 41 ovarian cancer study sites were pooled and unconditional logistic regression was used to evaluate whether any of the 2185 SNPs from 11 gonadotropin signaling pathway genes was associated with ovarian cancer risk. A burden test using the admixture likelihood (AML) method was also used to evaluate gene-level associations. Results We did not find any genome-wide significant associations between individual SNPs and ovarian cancer risk. However, there was some suggestion of gene-level associations for four gonadotropin signaling pathway genes: INHBB (p = 0.045, mucinous), LHCGR (p = 0.046, high-grade serous), GNRH (p = 0.041, high-grade serous), and FSHB (p = 0.036, overall invasive). There was also suggestive evidence for INHA (p = 0.060, overall invasive). Conclusions Ovarian cancer studies have limited sample numbers, thus fewer genome-wide susceptibility alleles, with only modest associations, have been identified relative to breast and prostate cancers. We have evaluated the majority of ovarian cancer studies with biological samples, to our knowledge, leaving no opportunity for replication. Using both our understanding of biology and powerful gene-level tests, we have identified four putative ovarian cancer loci near INHBB, LHCGR, GNRH, and FSHB that warrant a second look if larger sample sizes and denser genotype chips become available. PMID:25528498

  6. Sequential designs with small samples: Evaluation and recommendations for normal responses.

    PubMed

    Nikolakopoulos, Stavros; Roes, Kit Cb; van der Tweel, Ingeborg

    2016-06-24

    Sequential monitoring is a well-known methodology for the design and analysis of clinical trials. Driven by the lower expected sample size, recent guidelines and published research suggest the use of sequential methods for the conduct of clinical trials in rare diseases. However, the vast majority of the developed and most commonly used sequential methods relies on asymptotic assumptions concerning the distribution of the test statistics. It is not uncommon for trials in (very) rare diseases to be conducted with only a few decades of patients and the use of sequential methods that rely on large-sample approximations could inflate the type I error probability. Additionally, the setting of a rare disease could make the traditional paradigm of designing a clinical trial (deciding on the sample size given type I and II errors and anticipated effect size) irrelevant. One could think of the situation where the number of patients available has a maximum and this should be utilized in the most efficient way. In this work, we evaluate the operational characteristics of sequential designs in the setting of very small to moderate sample sizes with normally distributed outcomes and demonstrate the necessity of simple corrections of the critical boundaries. We also suggest a method for deciding on an optimal sequential design given a maximum sample size and some (data driven or based on expert opinion) prior belief on the treatment effect.

  7. Study of the response of osteogenic sarcoma and adjacent normal tissues to radiation. [/sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Gaitan-Yanguas, M.

    1981-05-01

    An analysis is made of the surgical specimens of 18 patients with hystologically-proven osteosarcoma who were treated with radiation as the first treatment, and submitted 6 months later to amputation (2 patients had only a second biopsy). Plotting of dose and treatment time against persistence or sterilization of the tumor shows that there is an intermediate zone that extends from 3200 to 5000 rad in 10 days to 8000 to 10,000 rad in 60 to 70 days, inside which the tumor may or may not be destroyed. All cases located above this zone were sterilized; and all those under it showed persistence of viable tumor cells. A similar correlation is made in 47 irradiated patients of the secondary reactions of normal skin and soft tissues surrounding the tumor. An intermediate zone also exists above which all reactions were severe, in some cases reaching necrosis; below this zone, all reactions were mild. When treatment time was longer than 45 days, reactions were only moderate.

  8. Neural and vascular variability and the fMRI-BOLD response in normal aging.

    PubMed

    Kannurpatti, Sridhar S; Motes, Michael A; Rypma, Bart; Biswal, Bharat B

    2010-05-01

    Neural, vascular and structural variables contributing to the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal response variability were investigated in younger and older humans. Twelve younger healthy human subjects (six male and six female; mean age: 24 years; range: 19-27 years) and 12 older healthy subjects (five male and seven female; mean age: 58 years; range: 55-71 years) with no history of head trauma and neurological disease were scanned. Functional magnetic resonance imaging measurements using the BOLD contrast were made when participants performed a motor, cognitive or a breath hold (BH) task. Activation volume and the BOLD response amplitude were estimated for the younger and older at both group and subject levels. Mean activation volume was reduced by 45%, 40% and 38% in the elderly group during the motor, cognitive and BH tasks, respectively, compared to the younger. Reduction in activation volume was substantially higher compared to the reduction in the gray matter volume of 14% in the older compared to the younger. A significantly larger variability in the intersubject BOLD signal change occurred during the motor task, compared to the cognitive task. BH-induced BOLD signal change between subjects was significantly less-variable in the motor task-activated areas in the younger compared to older whereas such a difference between age groups was not observed during the cognitive task. Hemodynamic scaling using the BH signal substantially reduced the BOLD signal variability during the motor task compared to the cognitive task. The results indicate that the origin of the BOLD signal variability between subjects was predominantly vascular during the motor task while being principally a consequence of neural variability during the cognitive task. Thus, in addition to gray matter differences, the type of task performed can have different vascular variability weighting that can influence age-related differences in brain functional response.

  9. Neuronal networks and mediators of cortical neurovascular coupling responses in normal and altered brain states.

    PubMed

    Lecrux, C; Hamel, E

    2016-10-05

    Brain imaging techniques that use vascular signals to map changes in neuronal activity, such as blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging, rely on the spatial and temporal coupling between changes in neurophysiology and haemodynamics, known as 'neurovascular coupling (NVC)'. Accordingly, NVC responses, mapped by changes in brain haemodynamics, have been validated for different stimuli under physiological conditions. In the cerebral cortex, the networks of excitatory pyramidal cells and inhibitory interneurons generating the changes in neural activity and the key mediators that signal to the vascular unit have been identified for some incoming afferent pathways. The neural circuits recruited by whisker glutamatergic-, basal forebrain cholinergic- or locus coeruleus noradrenergic pathway stimulation were found to be highly specific and discriminative, particularly when comparing the two modulatory systems to the sensory response. However, it is largely unknown whether or not NVC is still reliable when brain states are altered or in disease conditions. This lack of knowledge is surprising since brain imaging is broadly used in humans and, ultimately, in conditions that deviate from baseline brain function. Using the whisker-to-barrel pathway as a model of NVC, we can interrogate the reliability of NVC under enhanced cholinergic or noradrenergic modulation of cortical circuits that alters brain states.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'.

  10. Effect of indomethacin on the metabolic and hormonal response to a standardized breakfast in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Luyckx, A S; Guerten, D; Scheen, A; Delporte, J P; Lefebvre, P J; Jaminet, F

    1981-01-01

    We have investigated the influence of a single oral administration of indomethacin on blood glucose, plasma free fatty acids (FFA), alpha-amino-nitrogen, insulin and glucagon concentrations in young healthy subjects. Two groups of 6 subjects were studied, the first received a standardized 500 kcal mixed meal without any previous drug administration (controls) whereas the second group received 50 mg indomethacin 2 h before ingesting an identical meal. Plasma indomethacin concentration reached its maximum (2.36 +/- 0.36 micro g/ml) 15 min after administration and declined to 0.45 +/- 0.04 micro g/ml after 2 h. Indomethacin ingestion was followed by a significant increase in blood glucose and plasma FFA reaching their maximum value at 45 min and returning to basal levels at 120 min. No simultaneous changes in plasma alpha-amino-nitrogen, insulin or glucagon levels were detected during this period. The meal was followed by a rise in blood glucose and plasma insulin as well as by a decrease in plasma FFA concentration. No significant differences were detected between the controls and the subjects receiving indomethacin. In controls, the meal was followed by a rise in plasma alpha-amino-nitrogen and a modest although significant increase in glucagon levels. In indomethacin-treated subjects, the increment of alpha-amino-nitrogen was less marked and the increase in plasma glucagon was not observed. Thus, indomethacin by itself can exert several metabolic effects; however, it does not deteriorate the blood glucose or insulin profile after a regular meal. The present work is the first to demonstrate that an inhibitor of prostaglandin synthesis inhibits the plasma glucagon rise occurring after a physiological stimulus such as a normal meal. On the basis of previous in vitro experiments, we suggest that this effect results from an inhibition of glucagon secretion by the PG synthesis inhibitor.

  11. Failure of the Normal Ureagenic Response to Amino Acids in Organic Acid-loaded Rats

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Peter M.; Walser, Mackenzie

    1980-01-01

    Propionic and methylmalonic acidemia are both known to be associated with hyperammonemia. Rats injected with 10 or 20 mmol/kg of propionate or 20 mmol/kg of methylmalonate, along with 1.5 g/kg of a mixture of amino acids, developed severe hyperammonemia, whereas rats administered the same dosages of acetate did not. In vitro, neither propionyl nor methylmalonyl CoA affected the activity of carbamyl phosphate synthetase I, ornithine transcarbamylase, nor the activation constant (KA) of carbamyl phosphate synthetase I for N-acetyl glutamate. Furthermore, rats injected with propionate showed no alteration of liver amino acid concentrations, which could explain impaired ureagenesis. Animals injected with methylmalonate showed an increase in both citrulline and aspartate, suggesting that argininosuccinic acid synthetase may also have been inhibited. Liver ATP levels were unchanged. Citrullinogenesis, measured in intact mitochondria from livers of injected animals, was reduced 20-25% by 20 mmol/kg of propionate or methylmalonate (compared with acetate). This effect was attributable to an impairment in the normal rise of liver N-acetyl glutamate content after amino acid injection. Thus, carbamyl phosphate synthetase I activation was reduced. Liver levels of acetyl CoA and free CoA were reduced. Levels of unidentified acyl CoA derivatives rose, presumably reflecting the accumulation of propionyl and methylmalonyl CoA. Thus, the principal mechanism for hyperammonemia induced by these acids is depletion of liver N-acetyl glutamate, which is in turn attributable to depletion of acetyl CoA and/or competitive inhibition by propionyl and methylmalonyl CoA of N-acetyl glutamate synthetase. Injection of methylmalonate may also have an additional inhibitory effect on argininosuccinic acid synthetase. PMID:7400325

  12. Difference in leptin hormone response to nutritional status in normal adult male albino rats.

    PubMed

    Al-Sowyan, Noorah S

    2009-01-15

    The present study investigated the effect of 14 days diet, enriched in butter, vitamin E (vit. E) and green tea, on the major regulators of energy expenditure. Leptin is the product OB gene. This 16 KDa protein is produced by mature adipocytes and is secreted in plasma. Its plasma levels are strongly correlated with adipose mass in rodents as well as in humans. Leptin inhibit food intake, reduces body weight and stimulates energy expenditure. In order to evaluate the effect of diet enriched in butter, vit. E and green tea on body weight, adipose tissue weight and organs weight, serum lipids, lipoproteins content and serum leptin levels in male albino rats supplemented for 14 days on the previous diet. This study showed that high fat diet significantly increased body weight and adipose tissue weight, while vit. E and green tea enriched diet significantly lowered body weight and adipose tissue weight, kidney and spleen weights didn't show significant changes in all the experimental groups. While liver weight decreased in diet supplemented with high fat diet. Also, the results showed that high fat diet and vit. E supplemented diet induced significant increase in total cholesterol, LDLc., triglyceride level with significant decrease in HDLc. level as compared to normal control rats. Finally green tea supplemented diet induced significant decrease in total cholesterol, LDLc., triglyceride level with insignificant increase in HDLc. level in control rats. On the other hand, high fat supplemented diet significantly increased serum leptin levels in rats compared to control group, while vit. E and green tea enriched diet significantly lowered serum leptin levels at the end of experimental period. In conclusion, improving the biological activity of leptin by diet modification may exist as a practical strategy for the treatment of obesity and related disorders and a diet rich in green tea to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) obesity and also protect the liver

  13. Activation of the Innate Immune Response against DENV in Normal Non-Transformed Human Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Bustos-Arriaga, José; García-Machorro, Jazmín; León-Juárez, Moisés; García-Cordero, Julio; Santos-Argumedo, Leopoldo; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo; Méndez-Cruz, A. René; Juárez-Delgado, Francisco J.; Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia

    2011-01-01

    Background When mosquitoes infected with DENV are feeding, the proboscis must traverse the epidermis several times (“probing”) before reaching a blood vessel in the dermis. During this process, the salivary glands release the virus, which is likely to interact first with cells of the various epidermal and dermal layers, cells which could be physiologically relevant to DENV infection and replication in humans. However, important questions are whether more abundant non-hematopoietic cells such as fibroblasts become infected, and whether they play any role in antiviral innate immunity in the very early stages of infection, or even if they might be used by DENV as primary replication cells. Methodology/Principal Findings Fibroblasts freshly released from healthy skin and infected 12 hours after their isolation show a positive signal for DENV. In addition, when primary skin fibroblast cultures were established and subsequently infected, we showed DENV-2 antigen-positive intracellular signal at 24 hours and 48 hours post-infection. Moreover, the fibroblasts showed productive infection in a conventional plaque assay. The skin fibroblasts infected with DENV-2 underwent potent signaling through both TLR3 and RIG- 1, but not Mda5, triggering up-regulation of IFNβ, TNFα, defensin 5 (HB5) and β defensin 2 (HβD2). In addition, DENV infected fibroblasts showed increased nuclear translocation of interferon (IFN) regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), but not interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7), when compared with mock-infected fibroblasts. Conclusions/Significance In this work, we demonstrated the high susceptibility to DENV infection by primary fibroblasts from normal human skin, both in situ and in vitro. Our results suggest that these cells may contribute to the pro-inflammatory and anti-viral microenvironment in the early stages of interaction with DENV-2. Furthermore, the data suggest that fibroblast may also be used as a primary site of DENV replication and provide viral

  14. Differential responses of normal human melanocytes to intra- and extracellular dsRNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Suiquan; Liu, Dongyin; Jin, Rong; Zhu, Yiping; Xu, Aie

    2015-06-01

    Viral factor has been implicated in the etiopathogenesis of vitiligo. To elucidate the effects of viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) on melanocytes and to explore the underlying mechanisms, primary cultured normal human melanocytes were treated with synthetic viral dsRNA analog poly(I:C). The results demonstrated that poly(I:C)-triggered apoptosis when transfected into melanocytes, while extracellular poly(I:C) did not have that effect. Intracellular poly(I:C)-induced melanocyte death was decreased by RIG-I or MDA5 siRNA, but not by TLR3 siRNA. Both intracellular and extracellular poly(I:C) induced the expression of IFNB, TNF, IL6, and IL8. However, extracellular poly(I:C) demonstrated a much weaker induction capacity of cytokine genes than intracellular poly(I:C). Further analysis revealed that phosphorylation of TBK1, IRF3, IRF7, and TAK1 was differentially induced by intra- or extracellular poly(I:C). NFκB inhibitor Bay 11-7082 decreased the induction of all the cytokines by poly(I:C), suggesting the ubiquitous role of NFκB in the process. Poly(I:C) treatment also induced the phosphorylation of p38 and JNK in melanocytes. Both JNK and p38 inhibitors showed suppression on the cytokine induction by intra- or extracellular poly(I:C). However, only the JNK inhibitor decreased the intracellular poly(I:C)-induced melanocyte death. Taken together, this study provides the possible mechanism of viral factor in the pathogenesis of vitiligo.

  15. Proximal Tubule Glutamine Synthetase Expression is Necessary for the Normal Response to Dietary Protein Restriction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Osis, Gunars; Handlogten, Mary E; Verlander, Jill W; Weiner, I David

    2017-03-22

    Dietary protein restriction has multiple benefits in kidney disease. Because protein intake is a major determinant of endogenous acid production, it is important that net acid excretion change in parallel during changes in dietary protein intake. Dietary protein restriction decreases endogenous acid production and ¬decreases urinary ammonia excretion, a major component of net acid excretion. Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the reaction of NH4+ and glutamate, which regenerates the essential amino acid glutamine and decreases net ammonia generation. Because renal proximal tubule GS expression increases during dietary protein restriction, this could contribute to the decreased ammonia excretion. The current study's purpose was to determine proximal tubule GS's role in the renal response to protein restriction. We generated mice with proximal tubule-specific GS deletion (PT-GS-KO) using Cre-loxP techniques. Cre-negative (Control) and PT-GS-KO mice in metabolic cages were provided 20% protein diet for 2 days and were then changed to low protein (6%) diet for the next 7 days. Additional PT-GS-KO mice were maintained on 20% protein diet. Dietary protein restriction caused a rapid decrease in urinary ammonia excretion in both genotypes, but PT-GS-KO blunted this adaptive response significantly. This occurred despite no significant genotype-dependent differences in urinary pH or in serum electrolytes. There were no significant differences between Control and PT-GS-KO mice in expression of multiple other proteins involved in renal ammonia handling. We conclude that proximal tubule glutamine synthetase expression is necessary for the appropriate decrease in ammonia excretion during dietary protein restriction.

  16. The Cervico-Ocular Reflex of normal human subjects in response to transient and sinusoidal trunk rotations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, Robert N., Jr.; Thurston, Stephen E.; Becker, Keith R.; Ackley, Charles V.; Seidman, Scott H.; Leigh, R. John

    1994-01-01

    We used the magnetic search coil technique to measure the horizontal cervico-ocular reflex (COR) of 8 subjects in response to transient or sinusoidal (0.1-1.0 Hz) trunk rotations while their heads were firmly immobilized. Although we were able to resolve eye rotations of less than 0.05 deg, the COR was hardly measurable (gain was always less than 0.07). This finding, made with the most precise measurement technique used to date, suggests that the COR makes a negligible contribution to the stability of gaze in normal subjects during natural activities.

  17. Arg-Phe-amide-related peptides influence gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kelestimur, Haluk; Kacar, Emine; Uzun, Aysegul; Ozcan, Mete; Kutlu, Selim

    2013-01-01

    The hypothalamic Arg-Phe-amide-related peptides, gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone and orthologous mammalian peptides of Arg-Phe-amide, may be important regulators of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal reproductive axis. These peptides may modulate the effects of kisspeptins because they are presently recognized as the most potent activators of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis. However, their effects on gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons have not been investigated. In the current study, the GT1–7 cell line-expressing gonadotropin-releasing hormone was used as a model to explore the effects of Arg-Pheamide-related peptides on kisspeptin activation. Intracellular calcium concentration was quantified using the calcium-sensitive dye, fura-2 acetoxymethyl ester. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone released into the medium was detected via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results showed that 100 nmol/L kisspeptin-10 significantly increased gonadotropin-releasing hormone levels (at 120 minutes of exposure) and intracellular calcium concentrations. Co-treatment of kisspeptin with 1 μmol/L gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone or 1 μmol/L Arg-Phe-amide-related peptide-1 significantly attenuated levels of kisspeptin-induced gonadotropin-releasing hormone but did not affect kisspeptin-induced elevations of intracellular calcium concentration. Overall, the results suggest that gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone and Arg-Phe-amide-related peptide-1 may have inhibitory effects on kisspeptin-activated gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons independent of the calcium signaling pathway. PMID:25206468

  18. Arg-Phe-amide-related peptides influence gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons.

    PubMed

    Kelestimur, Haluk; Kacar, Emine; Uzun, Aysegul; Ozcan, Mete; Kutlu, Selim

    2013-06-25

    The hypothalamic Arg-Phe-amide-related peptides, gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone and orthologous mammalian peptides of Arg-Phe-amide, may be important regulators of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal reproductive axis. These peptides may modulate the effects of kisspeptins because they are presently recognized as the most potent activators of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis. However, their effects on gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons have not been investigated. In the current study, the GT1-7 cell line-expressing gonadotropin-releasing hormone was used as a model to explore the effects of Arg-Pheamide-related peptides on kisspeptin activation. Intracellular calcium concentration was quantified using the calcium-sensitive dye, fura-2 acetoxymethyl ester. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone released into the medium was detected via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results showed that 100 nmol/L kisspeptin-10 significantly increased gonadotropin-releasing hormone levels (at 120 minutes of exposure) and intracellular calcium concentrations. Co-treatment of kisspeptin with 1 μmol/L gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone or 1 μmol/L Arg-Phe-amide-related peptide-1 significantly attenuated levels of kisspeptin-induced gonadotropin-releasing hormone but did not affect kisspeptin-induced elevations of intracellular calcium concentration. Overall, the results suggest that gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone and Arg-Phe-amide-related peptide-1 may have inhibitory effects on kisspeptin-activated gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons independent of the calcium signaling pathway.

  19. Gonadotropin regulation of testosterone production by primary cultured theca and granulosa cells of Atlantic croaker: II. Involvement of a mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Benninghoff, Abby D; Thomas, Peter

    2006-07-01

    Previous investigations in Atlantic croaker ovaries and primary co-cultured theca and granulosa cells have identified multiple signal transduction pathways involved in the control of gonadotropin-induced steroidogenesis, including adenylyl cyclase- and calcium-dependent signaling pathways. In the present study, evidence was obtained for an involvement of a third signal transduction pathway, a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase) signaling cascade, in the regulation of gonadal steroidogenesis in this lower vertebrate teleost model. Gonadotropin-stimulated testosterone synthesis was markedly attenuated by two antagonists of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases 1/2 (MEK1/2, also known as Map2k1/Map2k2). Moreover, treatment with gonadotropin-induced MEK1/2-dependent phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2, also known as Mapk3/Mapk1) in a concentration- and time-dependent manner in co-cultured croaker theca and granulosa cells. Active MEK1/2 was required for a complete steroidogenic response to activators of the adenylyl cyclase pathway, including forskolin and dbcAMP, suggesting that the target(s) of MAP kinase signaling are distal to cAMP generation and activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Interestingly, dbcAMP caused a similar increase of ERK1/2 phosphorylation as was observed with gonadotropin treatment, although an inhibitor of PKA did not attenuate this response. Finally, there was no evidence of cross-talk between calcium-dependent signaling pathways and this MAP kinase cascade. While drugs that block calcium-dependent signal transduction, including inhibitors of voltage-sensitive calcium channels, calmodulin, and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases, significantly reduced gonadotropin-induced testosterone accumulation, these drugs had no apparent effect on hCG-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation.

  20. Thyroiditis in T cell-depleted rats: suppression of the autoallergic response by reconstitution with normal lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Penhale, W J; Irvine, W J; Inglis, J R; Farmer, A

    1976-07-01

    Qualititive, quantitative and functional differences were found in lymphoid cells of female thymectomized and irradiated (Tx-X) PVG/c strain rats as compared to normal females of the same strain. Tx-X rats were lymphopenic and had reduced numbers of cells within spleen and cervical lymph nodes, depressed transformation responses of peripheral blood lymphocytes to PHA and lower percentage killing of their spleen cells by anti-T-cell serum and complement. There was an increased percentage of immunoglobulin-bearing cells in the lymph nodes. Reconstitution of Tx-X rats by the intravenous route using syngeneic lymph node cells, spleen cells or thymocytes abrogated the autoimmune responses to thyroid components generally observed in this state. Lymph node and spleen cells, but not thymocytes, also prevented thyroid changes when given intraperitoneally. In contrast, bone marrow cells appeared to give enhanced responses. Quntitative studies showed that the relative proportions of the suppressor or autoregulatory cells in various lymphoid tissues were lymph node greater than spleen greater than thymus. Complete abrogation of the autoimmune responses was possible only when cells were administered within a short time of final dose of irradiation and moderate thyroid change was again seen if transfer was delayed for 14 days post-irradiation. At 28 days reconstitution had no influence on the development of the autoimmune responses. Preliminary characterization studies using an anti-T-cell serum and fractionation of lymph node cells on a linear Ficoll gradient suggested that autoregulatory cell is a large T cell.

  1. Normal cortisol response to cold pressor test, but lower free thyroxine, after recovery from undernutrition.

    PubMed

    Martins, Vinicius J B; Neves, Andrea P O; Garcia, Márcia C; Spadari, Regina C; Clemente, Ana Paula G; de Albuquerque, Maria P; Hoffman, Daniel J; Sawaya, Ana L

    2016-01-14

    Undernutrition is a stressor with long-term consequences, and the effect of nutritional recovery on cortisol and thyroid hormone status is unknown. To investigate basal thyroid hormones and the cortisol response to a cold pressor test in children recovered from undernutrition, a cross-sectional study was undertaken on children (6-16 years) separated into four groups: control (n 41), stunted (n 31), underweight (n 27) and recovered (n 31). Salivary cortisol was collected over the course of 10 h: upon awakening, before and after an unpleasant and a pleasant stimulus. Cortisol upon awakening was highest in the stunted and lowest in the underweight groups: control=5·05 (95% CI 3·71, 6·89) nmol/l, stunted=6·62 (95% CI 3·97, 11·02) nmol/l, underweight=2·51 (95% CI 1·75, 3·63) nmol/l and recovered=3·46 (95% CI 2·46, 4·90) nmol/l (P=0·005). Girls had higher cortisol concentrations upon awakening compared with boys (P=0·021). The undernourished groups showed an elevated cortisol response both to the unpleasant stimulus and at the last measurement (16.00 hours) compared with that of the recovered group: AUC, control=2·07 (95% CI 1·69, 2·45) nmol/l×30 min, stunted=2·48 (95% CI 1·91, 3·06) nmol/l×30 min, underweight=2·52 (95% CI 2·07, 2·97) nmol/l×30 min, recovered=1·68 (95% CI 1·26, 2·11) nmol/l×30 min (P=0·042); and control=2·03 (95% CI 1·75, 2·39) nmol/l×30 min, stunted=2·51 (95% CI 1·97, 3·19) nmol/l×30 min, underweight=2·61 (95% CI 2·16, 3·16) nmol/l×30 min, recovered=1·70 (95% CI 1·42, 2·03) nmol/l×30 min (P=0·009). Lower free thyroxine (T4) was found in the recovered and stunted groups: control=1·28 (95% CI 1·18, 1·39) pmol/l, stunted=0·98 (95% CI 0·87, 1·10) pmol/l, underweight=1·10 (95% CI 1·01, 1·21) pmol/l and recovered=0·90 (95% CI 0·83, 0·99) pmol/l (P<0·001). Multivariate analysis showed a lower cortisol concentration along 10 h (06.00-16.00 hours) in the recovered compared with the other groups (P=0

  2. Glycemic index and postprandial blood glucose response to Japanese strawberry jam in normal adults.

    PubMed

    Kurotobi, Tomoka; Fukuhara, Kimiaki; Inage, Hiroko; Kimura, Shuichi

    2010-01-01

    We investigated in 30 healthy adults the glycemic index (GI) of five strawberry jams made from various sugar compositions. The jam containing the highest ratio of glucose showed a high GI, while that containing a high ratio of fructose, a jam made from polydextrose, showed a low GI. There was a high correlation (r=0.969, p=0.006) between the GI and the predicted GI calculated from the sugar composition of the jams. Moreover, the influence on postprandial blood glucose response after an intake of only 20 g of jam and one slice of bread with 20 g jam was measured in 8 healthy adults. The blood glucose level after an intake of 20 g of the high GI jam containing the high glucose ratio was higher than that of other jams at 15 min, but there was no significant difference after 30 min. Regardless of whether the GI was low or high, differences in the jams were not observed in the postprandial blood glucose level or the area under the curve after eating either one slice of bread (60 g) or one slice of bread with less than 20 g of jam.

  3. Response of magnesium single crystals to shock-wave loading at normal and elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garkushin, G.; Kanel, G.; Savinykh, A.; Razorenov, S.; Jones, D.; Proud, W.

    2013-06-01

    Magnesium single crystals, 0.2 mm to 3 mm thick, were shock loaded along the two axes, a, c and the direction at 45 degrees to the c-axis. At the room temperature the response is very similar to that observed by Pope and Johnson for beryllium single crystals (1974). Shock compression along the c-axis causes inelastic deformation by means of pyramidal slip and twinning and is associated with the largest HEL. The easiest basal slip was activated by shock loading along the inclined, off-axis direction and is associated with smallest HEL value. For all orientations, we observed elastic precursor decay and growth of the HEL values with increasing temperature. However, for the c-orientation the growth is caused by decrease of elastic constants and not with an increase of resolved shear stress along the pyramidal slip planes. In the other orientations the resolved shear stresses in slip planes at the HEL increased with temperature. At inclined shock compression we found two plastic shock waves for which the stress behind the first depends on the peak stress associated with the second plastic wave. The crystals demonstrate the largest spall strength at shock loading along the a-axis and smallest one at shock loading in off-axis direction.

  4. Dynamic response characteristics of high temperature superconducting maglev systems: Comparison between Halbach-type and normal permanent magnet guideways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Zheng, J.; Che, T.; Zheng, B. T.; Si, S. S.; Deng, Z. G.

    2015-12-01

    The permanent magnet guideway (PMG) is very important for the performance of the high temperature superconducting (HTS) system in terms of electromagnetic force and operational stability. The dynamic response characteristics of a HTS maglev model levitating on two types of PMG, which are the normal PMG with iron flux concentration and Halbach-type PMG, were investigated by experiments. The dynamic signals for different field-cooling heights (FCHs) and loading/unloading processes were acquired and analyzed by a vibration analyzer and laser displacement sensors. The resonant frequency, stiffness and levitation height of the model were discussed. It was found that the maglev model on the Halbach-type PMG has higher resonant frequency and higher vertical stiffness compared with the normal PMG. However, the low lateral stiffness of the model on the Halbach-type PMG indicates poor lateral stability. Besides, the Halbach-type PMG has better loading capacity than the normal PMG. These results are helpful to design a suitable PMG for the HTS system in practical applications.

  5. Differential responses of tumors and normal brain to the combined treatment of 2-DG and radiation in glioablastoma.

    PubMed

    Prasanna, Venkatesh K; Venkataramana, Neelam K; Dwarakanath, B S; Santhosh, Vani

    2009-09-01

    2-Deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), an inhibitor of glucose transport and glycolysis, enhances radiation damage selectively in tumor cells by modulating damage response pathways resulting in cell death in vitro and local tumor control. Phase I and II clinical trials in patients with malignant glioma have shown excellent tolerance to a combined treatment of orally administered 2-DG and hypofractionated radiotherapy without any acute toxicity and late radiation damage. Phase III efficacy trials are currently at an advanced stage. Re-exploratory surgery performed in 13 patients due to persistent symptoms of elevated ICP and mass effect at different follow-up periods revealed extensive tumor necrosis with well-preserved normal brain tissue adjoining the tumor included in the treatment volume as revealed by a histological examination. These observations are perhaps the first clinical evidences for differential effects of 2-DG on tumors and normal tissues in conformity with earlier in vitro and in vivo studies in normal and tumor-bearing mice.

  6. Immunoglobulin D-deficient mice can mount normal immune responses to thymus-independent and -dependent antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Nitschke, L; Kosco, M H; Köhler, G; Lamers, M C

    1993-01-01

    To examine the in vivo function of IgD we generated mice deficient for IgD by gene targeting. The IgD-mice show a reduced B-cell compartment with 30-50% less B cells in the spleen and lymph nodes but show a normal pre-B-cell compartment. The surface-IgD- B cells express two to three times more surface IgM than B cells of control animals. Serum concentrations of the immunoglobulin isotypes of IgD- mice are almost normal, indicating that surface-IgD expression is not necessary for class switching of B cells. Immunization experiments showed that IgD- mice could respond well to thymus-dependent and -independent antigens. After immunization normal germinal centers developed in the IgD- mice. These data suggest that IgD is not necessary for the induction of immune responses but may be important in homeostasis of cells in the B-cell compartment. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 5 PMID:8446604

  7. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist trigger is a better alternative than human chorionic gonadotropin in PCOS undergoing IVF cycles for an OHSS Free Clinic: A Randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Deepika; Dhoble, Snehal; Praneesh, Gautham; Rathore, Suvarna; Upadhaya, Amit; Rao, Kamini

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to evaluate if gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) trigger is a better alternative to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) of Indian origin undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles with GnRH antagonist for the prevention of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). DESIGN: Prospective randomized control trial. SETTING: Tertiary care center. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 227 patients diagnosed with PCOS, undergoing IVF in an antagonist protocol were recruited and randomly assigned into two groups: Group A (study group): GnRHa trigger 0.2 mg (n = 92) and Group B (control group): 250 μg of recombinant hCG as trigger (n = 101) 35 h before oocyte retrieval. We chose segmentation strategy, freezing all embryos in both the groups. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Continuous variables were expressed as mean ± standard deviation independent sample t-test and Kolmogorov-Smirnov test were used for continuous variables which were normally distributed and Mann-Whitney U-test for data not normally distributed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary outcome: OHSS (mild, moderate, and severe) rates. Secondary outcomes: Maturity rate of the oocytes, fertilization rate, availability of top quality embryos on day 3 (Grade 1 and Grade 2). RESULTS The incidence of moderate to severe OHSS in the hCG group was 37.6% and 0% in the GnRHa group with P < 0.001. The GnRHa group had significantly more mature oocytes retrieved (19.1 ± 11.7 vs. 14.1 ± 4.3), more fertilized oocytes (15.6 ± 5.6 vs. 11.7 ± 3.6), and a higher number of top quality cleavage embryos on day 3 (12.9 ± 4.7 vs. 7.5 ± 4.3) than the hCG group. CONCLUSIONS: The most effective strategy which significantly eliminates the occurrence of OHSS in PCOS following ovarian stimulation in antagonist IVF cycles is the use of GnRHa trigger yielding more mature oocytes and good quality embryos when compared with hCG trigger. PMID:27803584

  8. Drought responses of a normally well-watered boreal forest ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevanto, S.; Hölttä, T.; Kolari, P.; Launiainen, S.; Pumpanen, J.; Korhonen, J. F. J.; Vesala, T.; Nikinmaa, E.

    2009-04-01

    In the boreal zone water is seldom a limiting factor for plant activity. Springtime snowmelt reloads soil water reservoirs and during the short summer the amount of precipitation is usually enough to keep the ecosystem moist. In Finland, for example, the three summer months (June, July and August) account for more than 30% of the annual precipitation (700 mm/year). We have carried out ecosystem-scale atmosphere-biosphere exchange measurements at the SMEAR II station in Hyytiälä, Southern Finland since 1996. The station is surrounded by a homogenous Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stand, which was sown after prescribed burning in 1962. The measurement set up includes an eddy-covariance system for measuring CO2, water vapor and sensible heat fluxes, soil water content measurements by the TDR-system, theta probes and equi-tensiometers, radiation measurements above and inside the canopy as well as automated chamber measurements for soil respiration and shoot-scale photosynthesis. We also measure sap flow in the trees using the Granier method and water tension inside the xylem using stem diameter variation measurements. This set-up allows also estimation of the variation in the stem hydraulic conductivity as well as stem water storage capacity. During the 11 years of measurements there has been three summers when soil water content has limited activity of the ecosystem: 1999, 2002 and 2006. In this study we compared the ecosystem responses of the dry summers to the long term averages of our site and evaluated the conditions when ecosystems-scale effects on the carbon fluxes start occur. We also studied the effects of drought on different components of ecosystem respiration and the water transport and storage capacity of the pine trees. Interestingly, drought did not reduce stem or shoot respiration significantly but the first rainfall event after the drought increased soil respiration more than photosynthesis turning the ecosystem from a sink to a source of carbon.

  9. Auditory-nerve responses predict pitch attributes related to musical consonance-dissonance for normal and impaired hearing.

    PubMed

    Bidelman, Gavin M; Heinz, Michael G

    2011-09-01

    Human listeners prefer consonant over dissonant musical intervals and the perceived contrast between these classes is reduced with cochlear hearing loss. Population-level activity of normal and impaired model auditory-nerve (AN) fibers was examined to determine (1) if peripheral auditory neurons exhibit correlates of consonance and dissonance and (2) if the reduced perceptual difference between these qualities observed for hearing-impaired listeners can be explained by impaired AN responses. In addition, acoustical correlates of consonance-dissonance were also explored including periodicity and roughness. Among the chromatic pitch combinations of music, consonant intervals/chords yielded more robust neural pitch-salience magnitudes (determined by harmonicity/periodicity) than dissonant intervals/chords. In addition, AN pitch-salience magnitudes correctly predicted the ordering of hierarchical pitch and chordal sonorities described by Western music theory. Cochlear hearing impairment compressed pitch salience estimates between consonant and dissonant pitch relationships. The reduction in contrast of neural responses following cochlear hearing loss may explain the inability of hearing-impaired listeners to distinguish musical qualia as clearly as normal-hearing individuals. Of the neural and acoustic correlates explored, AN pitch salience was the best predictor of behavioral data. Results ultimately show that basic pitch relationships governing music are already present in initial stages of neural processing at the AN level.

  10. The Relationship of the Bronchodilator Response (BDR) Phenotype to Poor Asthma Control in Children with Normal Spirometry

    PubMed Central

    Galant, Stanley P.; Morphew, Tricia; Newcomb, Robert L.; Hioe, Kiem; Guijon, Olga; Liao, Otto

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship of poor asthma control to bronchodilator response (BDR) phenotypes in children with normal spirometry. Methods Asthmatic children were assessed for clinical indices of poorly controlled asthma. Pre and post bronchodilator spirometry were performed and the percent BDR determined. Multivariate logistic regression assessed the relationship of the clinical indices to BDR at ≥8%, ≥10% and ≥12% BDR thresholds. Results There were 510 controller naïve, and 169 on controller medication. In the controller naïve population the mean age (± 1SD) was 9.5 (3.4), 57.1% were male, 85.7% Hispanic. Demographics were similar in both populations. In the adjusted profile, significant clinical relationships were found particularly to positive BDR phenotypes ≥10% and ≥12% versus negative responses including younger age, (odds ratios (OR) 2.0, 2.5; P <.05), atopy (OR 1.9, 2.6;P< .01), nocturnal symptoms in females (OR 3.4, 3.8;P< .01); beta2 agonist use (OR 1.7, 2.8;P< .01); and exercise limitation (OR 2.2, 2.5;P< .01) only in the controller naïve population. Conclusions The BDR phenotype ≥10% is significantly related to poor asthma control providing a potentially useful objective tool in controller naïve children even when prebronchodilator spirometry is normal. PMID:21232757

  11. [Human chorionic gonadotropin--a well-known hormone with unknown functions].

    PubMed

    Głodek, Aleksandra; Kubiczak, Marta; Urbaniak, Paulina; Walkowiak, Grzegorz; Nowak-Markwitz, Ewa; Jankowska, Anna

    2012-10-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (CG) belongs to the glycoprotein family consisting of LH, FSH and TSH. All of these hormones are composed of two subunits: common to the whole family alpha subunit and hormone-specific beta subunit CG has paracrine effects on several processes such as placentation, implantation, angiogenesis and delaying the apoptosis of corpus luteum. Serum level of CG is used to monitor pregnancy and pregnancy disorders. Recent studies have shown that the synthesis of CG is a characteristic feature of a wide variety of malignant and non-malignant tumors. The role of CG in cancerogensis remains unclear but the main hypothesis concerns its antiapoptotic impact of the hormone on the neoplastic cells. The synthesis of functional CG requires the activity of separate genes encoding both hormone's subunits, but it is the beta subunit accessibility which controls the process. The protein synthesis must be followed by proper folding and posttranslational modifications of the molecule. Particularly glycosylation of human chorionic gonadotropin was shown to have an impact on the hormone's function. The amount and the structure of carbohydrate residuals attached to CG may be different and lead to the formation of hormone variants, which vary in molecular mass. Normal CG with a molecular mass of about 37.5 kDa is produced by the syncytiotrophoblast, while the variant with higher molecular mass - 38.5-40 kDa, described as hyperglicosylated CG, is secreted by undifferentiated trophoblast cells and some cancers. It is suggested that those forms have different but complementary biological functions. However the mechanism of the action of particular variants and signaling pathways activated by those forms are still obscure.

  12. A delayed, gonadotropin-dependent and growth-factor mediated activation of the ERK1/2 cascade negatively regulates aromatase expression in granulosa cells*

    PubMed Central

    Andric, Nebojsa; Ascoli, Mario

    2006-01-01

    Human CG and hFSH elicit a transient increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation lasting less than 60 min in immature granulosa cells expressing a low density of gonadotropin receptors. In cells expressing a high density of receptors hCG and hFSH elicit this fast transient increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation and also a delayed and more sustained increase that is detectable after 6–9 h. Both, the early and delayed increases in ERK1/2 phosphorylation can be blocked with inhibitors of PKA, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase, metalloproteases and MEK. The delayed effect, but not the early effect, can also be blocked with an inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC). Since the delayed increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation correlates with low aromatase expression in response to gonadotropins we tested the effects of the inhibitors mentioned on aromatase expression. These inhibitors had little or no effect on gonadotropin-induced aromatase expression in cells expressing a low density of receptors but they enhanced gonadotropin-induced aromatase expression in cells expressing a high density of receptors. Phorbol esters also induced a prolonged increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation and when added together with hFSH, blocked the induction of aromatase expression by hFSH in cells expressing a low density of hFSHR. A MEK inhibitor reversed the inhibitory effect of the phorbol ester on aromatase induction. We conclude that the effects of gonadotropins on ERK1/2 phosphorylation are mediated by EGF-like growth factors and that the delayed effect is partially mediated by PKC and acts as a negative regulator of aromatase expression. PMID:16973759

  13. Modulation of gonadotropin secretion by Sertoli cell inhibin, LHRH, and sex steroids.

    PubMed

    Massicotte, J; Lagacé, L; Labrie, F; Dorrington, J H

    1984-10-01

    Sertoli cell culture media (SCM) from 10-, 20-, 30-, 35-, and 40-day-old male Wistar rats were assayed to determine the inhibin activity in anterior pituitary cells in culture. In agreement with previous data, SCM did not affect the luteinizing hormone (LH) spontaneous release at all ages studied, whereas it inhibited specifically follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) spontaneous release by 40% for the 40-day-old rats. Younger animals (10-, 20-, and 30-day-old) showed a 60% inhibition of the FSH basal release. The inhibin activity was also different at all stages studied, the IC50 being markedly displaced to the right as the age increased, leading to a fivefold difference between 10- and 30- to 40-day-old rats. The same pattern was observed when the LH and FSH responses to 0.3 nM LH-releasing hormone (LHRH) were studied. SCM from 35-day-old rats did not alter total LH, whereas total FSH was markedly reduced, thus suggesting a reduced FSH synthesis in the presence of inhibin. SCM exerts an additive inhibitory effect with dihydrotestosterone on the LH response to LHRH, whereas it reverses the stimulatory effect of the androgen on spontaneous and LHRH-induced FSH release. Moreover, SCM reversed the stimulatory effect of 17 beta-estradiol on both spontaneous and LHRH-induced LH and FSH release, whereas the stimulatory effect of progesterone on FSH release was 50-80% inhibited. The present data show that inhibin activity of Sertoli cell origin can exert marked interactions with sex steroids in the control of gonadotropin secretion. These data also demonstrate that the inhibin component is an important factor in sexual maturation of the rat and that high FSH levels of 10-day-old rats could suggest a modulation by a nonandrogenic factor of gonadotropin secretion in developing rats.

  14. Insulin administration alters gonadal steroid metabolism independent of changes in gonadotropin secretion in insulin-resistant women with the polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Dunaif, A; Graf, M

    1989-01-01

    We have investigated the hypothesis that hyperinsulinemia may cause the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCO) by directly stimulating gonadal steroidogenesis and/or gonadotropin secretion. 10 insulin-resistant women with PCO and 5 age- and weight-matched ovulatory normal women had pulsatile gonadotropin release, gonadotrope sensitivity to gonadotropin-releasing hormone, and sex hormone levels studied on two consecutive study days, basally and during the infusion of insulin (mean +/- SEM steady state insulin levels, 1,254 +/- 63 microU/ml PCO vs. 907 +/- 92 microU/ml normal, P less than or equal to 0.01). Insulin acutely increased mean delta (6 h minus prestudy) levels of androstenedione (A) (P less than or equal to 0.001) and estradiol (E2) (P less than or equal to 0.05) and decreased mean plasma pool (0-6 h) levels of testosterone (T) (P less than 0.05), nonsex hormone binding globulin-bound T (P less than 0.05), and dihydrotestosterone (P less than or equal to 0.01) in the PCO women. Insulin also decreased mean plasma 6 h A to estrone (E1) ratios and increased 6 h E1 levels (both P less than or equal to 0.05) in the PCO women. There were significant sequence effects (insulin + day) in the PCO women on T/E2 ratios, indicating a carryover action of insulin. Insulin had no effects on gonadotropin release in the PCO women. In the normal women, the only significant change was an insulin or study day effect that increased mean 6 h E2 levels (P less than or equal to 0.01). There were significant spontaneous decreases in mean luteinizing hormone (p less than 0.05) and follicle-stimulating hormone levels (p less than or equal to 0.01) in the PCO but not the normal women on the second day of study. This study indicates that insulin can directly alter peripheral sex hormone levels independent of changes in gonadotropin release in insulin-resistent PCO women. Insulin decreased the levels of potent androgens in PCO women and did not increase androgen levels in normal women, arguing

  15. Thyroiditis in T cell-depleted rats: suppression of the autoallergic response by reconstitution with normal lymphoid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Penhale, W J; Irvine, W J; Inglis, J R; Farmer, A

    1976-01-01

    Qualititive, quantitative and functional differences were found in lymphoid cells of female thymectomized and irradiated (Tx-X) PVG/c strain rats as compared to normal females of the same strain. Tx-X rats were lymphopenic and had reduced numbers of cells within spleen and cervical lymph nodes, depressed transformation responses of peripheral blood lymphocytes to PHA and lower percentage killing of their spleen cells by anti-T-cell serum and complement. There was an increased percentage of immunoglobulin-bearing cells in the lymph nodes. Reconstitution of Tx-X rats by the intravenous route using syngeneic lymph node cells, spleen cells or thymocytes abrogated the autoimmune responses to thyroid components generally observed in this state. Lymph node and spleen cells, but not thymocytes, also prevented thyroid changes when given intraperitoneally. In contrast, bone marrow cells appeared to give enhanced responses. Quntitative studies showed that the relative proportions of the suppressor or autoregulatory cells in various lymphoid tissues were lymph node greater than spleen greater than thymus. Complete abrogation of the autoimmune responses was possible only when cells were administered within a short time of final dose of irradiation and moderate thyroid change was again seen if transfer was delayed for 14 days post-irradiation. At 28 days reconstitution had no influence on the development of the autoimmune responses. Preliminary characterization studies using an anti-T-cell serum and fractionation of lymph node cells on a linear Ficoll gradient suggested that autoregulatory cell is a large T cell. Images Fig. 2 PMID:791546

  16. Adaptive immune response in JAM-C-deficient mice: normal initiation but reduced IgG memory.

    PubMed

    Zimmerli, Claudia; Lee, Boris P L; Palmer, Gaby; Gabay, Cem; Adams, Ralf; Aurrand-Lions, Michel; Imhof, Beat A

    2009-04-15

    We have recently shown that junctional adhesion molecule (JAM)-C-deficient mice have leukocytic pulmonary infiltrates, disturbed neutrophil homeostasis, and increased postnatal mortality. This phenotype was partially rescued when mice were housed in ventilated isolators, suggesting an inability to cope with opportunistic infections. In the present study, we further examined the adaptive immune responses in JAM-C(-/-) mice. We found that murine conventional dendritic cells express in addition to Mac-1 and CD11c also JAM-B as ligand for JAM-C. By in vitro adhesion assay, we show that murine DCs can interact with recombinant JAM-C via Mac-1. However, this interaction does not seem to be necessary for dendritic cell migration and function in vivo, even though JAM-C is highly expressed by lymphatic sinuses of lymph nodes. Nevertheless, upon immunization and boosting with a protein Ag, JAM-C-deficient mice showed decreased persistence of specific circulating Abs although the initial response was normal. Such a phenotype has also been observed in a model of Ag-induced arthritis, showing that specific IgG2a Ab titers are reduced in the serum of JAM-C(-/-) compared with wild-type mice. Taken together, these data suggest that JAM-C deficiency affects the adaptive humoral immune response against pathogens, in addition to the innate immune system.

  17. Comparison of aggregation and feeding responses by normal and irradiated fruit flies, Ceratitis capitata and Anastrepha suspensa (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    SciTech Connect

    Galun, R.; Gothilf, S.; Blondheim, S.; Sharp, J.L.; Mazor, M.; Lachman, A.

    1985-12-01

    Olfactory, aggregatory, and feeding responses of normal (untreated) laboratory stocks of Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly), Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann), and of Caribbean fruit fly (caribfly), Anastrepha suspensa (Loew), were compared to those of flies irradiated (10 krad in air) 2 days before eclosion. Females of both species consumed greater quantities of protein hydrolysate solutions, entered protein hydrolysate-baited olfactory traps, and aggregated on agar plates containing protein hydrolysate in greater numbers than males of the same age and condition. However, male medflies consumed more sucrose than did females of the same age and condition. In the medfly, irradiation resulted in reduced olfactory response, reduced total food intake by flies of both sexes, and a significant reduction in aggregation on and intake of protein hydrolysate by females and of sugar consumption by males. In the irradiated caribfly, there was a significant reduction in olfactory response of females to yeast hydrolysate. In both sexes, aggregation on and consumption of yeast hydrolysate were reduced. Effects of irradiation on feeding behavior are discussed in relation to the biology of the flies and their control by the sterile insect release method.

  18. Neural response in vestibular organ of Helix aspersa to centrifugation and re-adaptation to normal gravity.

    PubMed

    Popova, Yekaterina; Boyle, Richard

    2015-07-01

    Gravity plays a key role in shaping the vestibular sensitivity (VS) of terrestrial organisms. We studied VS changes in the statocyst of the gastropod Helix aspersa immediately after 4-, 16-, and 32-day exposures to a 1.4G hypergravic field or following a 7-day recovery period. In the same animals we measured latencies of behavioral "negative gravitaxis" responses to a head-down pitch before and after centrifugation and found significant delays after 16- and 32-day runs. In an isolated neural preparation we recorded the electrophysiological responses of the statocyst nerve to static tilt (±19°) and sinusoids (±12°; 0.1 Hz). Spike sorting software was used to separate individual sensory cells' patterns out of a common trace. In correspondence with behavior we observed a VS decrease in animals after 16- (p < 0.05) and 32-day (p < 0.01) centrifugations. These findings reveal the capability of statoreceptors to adjust their sensitivity in response to a prolonged change in the force of gravity. Interestingly, background discharge rate increased after 16 and 32 days in hypergravity and continued to rise through the recovery period. This result indicates that adaptive mechanisms to novel gravity levels were long lasting, and re-adaptation from hypergravity is a more complex process than just "return to normal".

  19. Gonadotropin therapy in assisted reproduction: an evolutionary perspective from biologics to biotech

    PubMed Central

    Leão, Rogério de Barros F.; Esteves, Sandro C.

    2014-01-01

    Gonadotropin therapy plays an integral role in ovarian stimulation for infertility treatments. Efforts have been made over the last century to improve gonadotropin preparations. Undoubtedly, current gonadotropins have better quality and safety profiles as well as clinical efficacy than earlier ones. A major achievement has been introducing recombinant technology in the manufacturing processes for follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, and human chorionic gonadotropin. Recombinant gonadotropins are purer than urine-derived gonadotropins, and incorporating vial filling by mass virtually eliminated batch-to-batch variations and enabled accurate dosing. Recombinant and fill-by-mass technologies have been the driving forces for launching of prefilled pen devices for more patient-friendly ovarian stimulation. The most recent developments include the fixed combination of follitropin alfa + lutropin alfa, long-acting FSH gonadotropin, and a new family of prefilled pen injector devices for administration of recombinant gonadotropins. The next step would be the production of orally bioactive molecules with selective follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone activity. PMID:24714837

  20. 21 CFR 862.1155 - Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) test system. 862.1155 Section 862.1155 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Test Systems § 862.1155 Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) test system. (a) Human...

  1. IL-10 and TGF-beta cooperate in the regulatory T cell response to mucosal allergens in normal immunity and specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jutel, Marek; Akdis, Mübeccel; Budak, Ferah; Aebischer-Casaulta, Carmen; Wrzyszcz, Maria; Blaser, Kurt; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2003-05-01

    The regulation of normal and allergic immune responses to airborne allergens in the mucosa is still poorly understood, and the mechanism of specific immunotherapy (SIT) in normalizing the allergic response to such allergens is currently not clear. Accordingly, we have investigated the immunoregulatory mechanism of both normal and allergic responses to the major house-dust mite (HDM) and birch pollen allergens--Dermatophagoides pteroynyssinus (Der p)1 and Bet v 1, respectively--as well as the immunologic basis of SIT to HDM in rhinitis and asthma patients. In normal immunity to HDM and birch pollen, an allergen-specific peripheral T cell suppression to Der p 1 and Bet v 1 was observed. The deviated immune response was characterized by suppressed proliferative T cell and Th1 (IFN-gamma) and Th2 (IL-5, IL-13) cytokine responses, and increased IL-10 and TGF-beta secretion by allergen-specific T cells. Neutralization of cytokine activity showed that T cell suppression was induced by IL-10 and TGF-beta during SIT and in normal immunity to the mucosal allergens. In addition, SIT induced an antigen-specific suppressive activity in CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells of allergic individuals. Together, these results demonstrate a deviation towards a regulatory/suppressor T cell response during SIT and in normal immunity as a key event for the healthy immune response to mucosal antigens.

  2. Effect of age and gender on sudomotor and cardiovagal function and blood pressure response to tilt in normal subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, P. A.; Denq, J. C.; Opfer-Gehrking, T. L.; Dyck, P. J.; O'Brien, P. C.; Slezak, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    Normative data are limited on autonomic function tests, especially beyond age 60 years. We therefore evaluated these tests in a total of 557 normal subjects evenly distributed by age and gender from 10 to 83 years. Heart rate (HR) response to deep breathing fell with increasing age. Valsalva ratio varied with both age and gender. QSART (quantitative sudomotor axon-reflex test) volume was consistently greater in men (approximately double) and progressively declined with age for all three lower extremity sites but not the forearm site. Orthostatic blood pressure reduction was greater with increasing age. HR at rest was significantly higher in women, and the increment with head-up tilt fell with increasing age. For no tests did we find a regression to zero, and some tests seem to level off with increasing age, indicating that diagnosis of autonomic failure was possible to over 80 years of age.

  3. Biomechanical response of the bovine pia-arachnoid complex to normal traction loading at varying strain rates.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xin; Ma, Chunsheng; Zhang, Liying; Yang, King H; King, Albert I; Dong, Guang; Zhang, Jinhuan

    2007-10-01

    The pia-arachnoid complex (PAC) covering the brain plays an important role in the mechanical response of the brain due to impact or inertial loading. The mechanical properties of the bovine PAC under tensile loading have been characterized previously. However, the transverse properties of this structure, such as shear and normal traction which are equally important to understanding the skull/brain interaction under traumatic loading, have not been investigated. These material properties are essential information needed to adequately define the material model of the PAC in a finite element (FE) model of human brain. The purpose of this study was to determine, experimentally, the material properties of the PAC under normal traction loading. PAC Specimens were obtained from freshly slaughtered bovine subjects from various locations. Quasi-static and dynamic tests along the radial direction were performed at four different strain rates (0.36, 2.0, 20.5, and 116.3 s(-1)) to investigate the rate and regional effects. Results suggest that the PAC under traction loading is stiffer than brain tissue, rate dependent, and can be characterized as linearly elastic until failure. However, no regional difference was observed.

  4. The FSHB -211G>T variant attenuates serum FSH levels in the supraphysiological gonadotropin setting of Klinefelter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Busch, Alexander S; Tüttelmann, Frank; Zitzmann, Michael; Kliesch, Sabine; Gromoll, Jörg

    2015-05-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (47, XXY) is the most frequent genetic cause of male infertility and individuals share the endocrine hallmark of hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms located within the FSHB/FSHR gene were recently shown to impact serum follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels and other reproductive parameters in men. The objective of this study was to analyse the effect of FSHB-211G>T (c.-280G>T, rs10835638) as well as FSHR c.2039G>A (rs6166) and FSHR c.-29G>A (rs1394205) on endocrine and reproductive parameters in untreated and testosterone-treated Klinefelter patients. Patients were retrospectively selected from the clientele attending a university-based andrology centre. A total of 309 non-mosaic Klinefelter individuals between 18 and 65 years were included and genotyped for the variants by TaqMan assays. The untreated group comprised 248 men, in which the FSHB -211G>T allele was significantly associated with the reduced serum follicle-stimulating hormone levels (-6.5 U/l per T allele, P=1.3 × 10(-3)). Testosterone treatment (n=150) abolished the observed association. When analysing patients before and under testosterone treatment (n=89), gonadotropin levels were similarly suppressed independently of the FSHB genotype. The FSHR polymorphisms did not exhibit any significant influence in any group, neither on the endocrine nor reproductive parameters. In conclusion, a hypergonadotropic setting such as Klinefelter syndrome does not mask the FSHB -211G>T genotype effects on the follicle-stimulating hormone serum levels. The impact was indeed more pronounced compared with normal or infertile men, whereas gonadotropin suppression under testosterone treatment seems to be independent of the genotype. Thus, the FSHB -211G>T genotype is a key determinant in the regulation of gonadotropins in different reproductive-endocrine pathopyhsiologies.

  5. Mouse Models for the Study of Synthesis, Secretion, and Action of Pituitary Gonadotropins.

    PubMed

    Kumar, T Rajendra

    2016-01-01

    Gonadotropins play fundamental roles in reproduction. More than 30years ago, Cga transgenic mice were generated, and more than 20years ago, the phenotypes of Cga null mice were reported. Since then, numerous mouse strains have been generated and characterized to address several questions in reproductive biology involving gonadotropin synthesis, secretion, and action. More recently, extragonadal expression, and in some cases, functions of gonadotropins in nongonadal tissues have been identified. Several genomic and proteomic approaches including novel mouse genome editing tools are available now. It is anticipated that these and other emerging technologies will be useful to build an integrated network of gonadotropin signaling pathways in various tissues. Undoubtedly, research on gonadotropins will continue to provide new knowledge and allow us transcend from benchside to the bedside.

  6. Acute injection and chronic perfusion of kisspeptin elicit gonadotropins release but fail to trigger ovulation in the mare.

    PubMed

    Decourt, Caroline; Caraty, Alain; Briant, Christine; Guillaume, Daniel; Lomet, Didier; Chesneau, Didier; Lardic, Lionel; Duchamp, Guy; Reigner, Fabrice; Monget, Philippe; Dufourny, Laurence; Beltramo, Massimiliano; Dardente, Hugues

    2014-02-01

    Kisspeptin has emerged as the most potent gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretagogue and appears to represent the penultimate step in the central control of reproduction. In the sheep, we showed that kisspeptin could be used to manipulate gonadotropin secretion and control ovulation. Prompted by these results, we decided to investigate whether kisspeptin could be used as an ovulation-inducing agent in another photoperiodic domestic mammal, the horse. Equine kisspeptin-10 (eKp10) was administered intravenously as bolus injections or short- to long-term perfusions to Welsh pony mares, either during the anestrus season or at various stages of the cycle during the breeding season. In all the experimental conditions, eKp10 reliably increased peripheral concentrations of both luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone. The nature of the response to eKp10 was consistent across experimental conditions and physiological states: the increase in gonadotropins was always rapid and essentially transient even when eKp10 was perfused for prolonged periods. Furthermore, eKp10 consistently failed to induce ovulation in the mare. To gain insights into the underlying mechanisms, we used acute injections or perfusions of GnRH. We also cloned the equine orthologues of the kisspeptin precursor and Kiss1r; this was justified by the facts that the current equine genome assembly predicted an amino acid difference between eKp10 and Kp10 in other species while an equine orthologue for Kiss1r was missing altogether. In light of these findings, potential reasons for the divergence in the response to kisspeptin between ewe and mare are discussed. Our data highlight that kisspeptin is not a universal ovulation-inducing agent.

  7. Heterodimers reveal that two arabinose molecules are required for the normal arabinose response of AraC.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Michael E; Schleif, Robert

    2012-10-16

    AraC protein, which regulates expression of the l-arabinose operon in Escherichia coli, is a dimer whose DNA binding affinity for pairs of DNA half-sites is controlled by arabinose. Here we have addressed the question of whether the arabinose response of AraC requires the binding of one or two molecules of arabinose. This was accomplished by measuring the DNA dissociation rates of wild-type AraC and heterodimeric AraC constructs in which one subunit is capable of binding arabinose and the other subunit does not bind arabinose. Solutions consisting entirely of heterodimers were formed by spontaneous subunit exchange between two different homodimers, with heterodimers being trapped by the formation of an intersubunit disulfide bond between cysteine residues strategically positioned within the dimerization interface. We found that the normal arabinose response of AraC requires the binding of two arabinose molecules. These results provide additional constraints on mechanistic models for the action of AraC.

  8. Characterization of Transgenic Gfrp Knock-In Mice: Implications for Tetrahydrobiopterin in Modulation of Normal Tissue Radiation Responses

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Rupak; Pawar, Snehalata A.; Fu, Qiang; Gupta, Prem K.; Berbée, Maaike; Garg, Sarita; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Wang, Wenze; Biju, Prabath G.; Krager, Kimberly J.; Boerma, Marjan; Ghosh, Sanchita P.; Cheema, Amrita K.; Hendrickson, Howard P.; Aykin-Burns, Nukhet

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The free radical scavenger and nitric oxide synthase cofactor, 5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), plays a well-documented role in many disorders associated with oxidative stress, including normal tissue radiation responses. Radiation exposure is associated with decreased BH4 levels, while BH4 supplementation attenuates aspects of radiation toxicity. The endogenous synthesis of BH4 is catalyzed by the enzyme guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH1), which is regulated by the inhibitory GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). We here report and characterize a novel, Cre-Lox-driven, transgenic mouse model that overexpresses Gfrp. Results: Compared to control littermates, transgenic mice exhibited high transgene copy numbers, increased Gfrp mRNA and GFRP expression, enhanced GFRP–GTPCH1 interaction, reduced BH4 levels, and low glutathione (GSH) levels and differential mitochondrial bioenergetic profiles. After exposure to total body irradiation, transgenic mice showed decreased BH4/7,8-dihydrobiopterin ratios, increased vascular oxidative stress, and reduced white blood cell counts compared with controls. Innovation and Conclusion: This novel Gfrp knock-in transgenic mouse model allows elucidation of the role of GFRP in the regulation of BH4 biosynthesis. This model is a valuable tool to study the involvement of BH4 in whole body and tissue-specific radiation responses and other conditions associated with oxidative stress. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1436–1446. PMID:23521531

  9. Fetal-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T cell responses develop during normal human pregnancy and exhibit broad functional capacity.

    PubMed

    Lissauer, David; Piper, Karen; Goodyear, Oliver; Kilby, Mark D; Moss, Paul A H

    2012-07-15

    Tolerance of the semiallogeneic fetus presents a significant challenge to the maternal immune system during human pregnancy. T cells with specificity for fetal epitopes have been detected in women with a history of previous pregnancy, but it has been thought that such fetal-specific cells were generally deleted during pregnancy as a mechanism to maintain maternal tolerance of the fetus. We used MHC-peptide dextramer multimers containing an immunodominant peptide derived from HY to identify fetal-specific T cells in women who were pregnant with a male fetus. Fetal-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes were observed in half of all pregnancies and often became detectable from the first trimester. The fetal-specific immune response increased during pregnancy and persisted in the postnatal period. Fetal-specific cells demonstrated an effector memory phenotype and were broadly functional. They retained their ability to proliferate, secrete IFN-γ, and lyse target cells following recognition of naturally processed peptide on male cells. These data show that the development of a fetal-specific adaptive cellular immune response is a normal consequence of human pregnancy and that unlike reports from some murine models, fetal-specific T cells are not deleted during human pregnancy. This has broad implications for study of the natural physiology of pregnancy and for the understanding of pregnancy-related complications.

  10. Basic understanding of gonadotropin-releasing hormone-agonist triggering.

    PubMed

    Casper, Robert F

    2015-04-01

    A single bolus of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) at midcycle has been the gold standard for triggering final oocyte maturation and ovulation in assisted reproductive technology cycles. More recently, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-agonist (GnRH-a) triggering has been introduced. The GnRH-a trigger may allow a more physiologic surge of both luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone, although whether the combined surge will result in improved oocyte and embryo quality remains to be seen. However, the short duration of the LH surge with the GnRH-a trigger (approximately 34 hours) has been shown to be beneficial for preventing ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome in GnRH antagonist in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles when compared with the prolonged elevation of hCG (≥6 days) after exposure to an hCG bolus. This review discusses the physiologic basis for the use of a GnRH-a trigger in IVF cycles.

  11. Advances in the molecular understanding of gonadotropins-receptors interactions.

    PubMed

    el Tayar, N

    1996-12-20

    The extracellular domain (ECD) of gonadotropin receptors belong to the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) protein superfamily and their transmembrane domain (TMD) is characteristic of the seven alpha-helices G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). The availability of the X-ray structures of porcine ribonuclease inhibitor (RI), a LRR protein, and bacteriorhodopsin (bR) allows the construction of 3D models of the ECD and the TMD of gonadotropin receptors, respectively. The predicted models are to a large extent consistent with currently available biochemical and mutational data. The models provide a reliable basis for understanding how the hormone binds and activates its receptor. The ECD, in particular the LRR region, serves as a baseball glove which efficiently catches the large hormone and optimally orient the appropriate parts of it for interaction with the seven-transmembrane-helix domain of the receptor. This in turn is expected to lead to a conformational change to be sensed by the appropriate G-protein complex leading to the stimulation of cAMP synthesis and steroids production.

  12. Clinical uses of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues.

    PubMed Central

    Casper, R F

    1991-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (Gn-RH) analogues are synthetic derivatives of the native hypothalamic peptide with alterations in their chemical structure that result in changes in biologic activity. Several Gn-RH agonists are available for clinical use, and all act through the same mechanism: first to stimulate and then to inhibit gonadotropin and gonadal steroid secretion by downregulating the pituitary Gn-RN receptors. This review should provide clinicians with a working knowledge of the physiologic and pharmacokinetic features of Gn-RH agonists. Although over 2000 articles concerning Gn-RH analogues have been published I chose to review only those that were the first to report a novel clinical application. Gn-RH agonists have proved to be extremely efficacious in treating gonadal steroid-dependent problems such as endometriosis, uterine leiomyoma, precocious puberty and prostate and breast cancers, and they have resulted in very few side effects. Long-term use may, however, lead to skeletal calcium loss in women as a consequence of hypoestrogenism. Further research is needed to prevent this and maintain clinical efficacy. PMID:1986827

  13. Treatment situation of male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in pediatrics and proposal of testosterone and gonadotropins replacement therapy protocols

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Naoko; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Hasegawa, Yukihiro; Arisaka, Osamu; Ozono, Keiichi; Amemiya, Shin; Kikuchi, Toru; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Harada, Shohei; Miyata, Ichiro; Tanaka, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (MHH), a disorder associated with infertility, is treated with testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) and/or gonadotropins replacement therapy (GRT) (TRT and GRT, together with HRT hormone replacement therapy). In Japan, guidelines have been set for treatment during adolescence. Due to the risk of rapid maturation of bone age, low doses of testosterone or gonadotropins have been used. However, the optimal timing and methods of therapeutic intervention have not yet been established. The objective of this study was to investigate the current situation of treatment for children with MHH in Japan and to review a primary survey involving councilors of the Japanese Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and a secondary survey obtained from 26 facilities conducting HRT. The subjects were 55 patients with MHH who reached their adult height after HRT. The breakdown of the patients is as follows: 7 patients with Kallmann syndrome, 6 patients with isolated gonadotropin deficiency, 18 patients with acquired hypopituitarism due to intracranial and pituitary tumor, 22 patients with classical idiopathic hypopituitarism due to breech delivery, and 2 patients with CHARGE syndrome. The mean age at the start of HRT was 15.7 yrs and mean height was 157.2 cm. The mean age at reaching adult height was 19.4 yrs, and the mean adult height was 171.0 cm. The starting age of HRT was later than the normal pubertal age and showed a significant negative correlation with pubertal height gain, but it showed no correlation with adult height. As for spermatogenesis, 76% of the above patients treated with hCG-rFSH combined therapy showed positive results, though ranging in levels; impaired spermatogenesis was observed in some with congenital MHH, and favorable spermatogenesis was observed in all with acquired MHH. From the above, we propose the establishment of a treatment protocol for the start low-dose testosterone or low-dose gonadotropins by dividing

  14. Localization of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH), Gonadotropin-Inhibitory Hormone (GnIH), Kisspeptin and GnRH Receptor and Their Possible Roles in Testicular Activities From Birth to Senescence in Mice

    PubMed Central

    ANJUM, SHABANA; KRISHNA, AMITABH; SRIDARAN, RAJAGOPALA; TSUTSUI, KAZUYOSHI

    2013-01-01

    The changes in distribution and concentration of neuropeptides, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH), kisspeptin, and gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRH-R) were evaluated and compared with reproductive parameters, such as cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage (P450 SCC) enzyme activity, androgen receptors (AR) in the testis and serum testosterone levels, from birth to senescence in mice. The results showed the localization of these molecules mainly in the interstitial and germ cells as well as showed significant variations in immunostatining from birth to senescence. It was found that increased staining of testicular GnRH-R coincided with increased steroidogenic activity during pubertal and adult stages, whereas decreased staining coincides with decreased steroidogenic activity during senescence. Similar changes in immunostaining were confirmed by Western/slot blot analysis. Thus, these results suggest a putative role of GnRH during testicular pubertal development and senescence. Treatment with a GnRH agonist ([DTrp6, Pro9-NEt] GnRH) to mice from prepubertal to pubertal period showed a significant increase in steroidogenic activity of the mouse testis and provided further support to the role of GnRH in testicular pubertal maturation. The significant decline in GnRH-R during senescence may be due to a significant increase in GnIH synthesis during senescence causing the decrease in GnRH-R expression. It is considered that significant changes in the levels of GnRH-R may be responsible for changes in steroidogenesis that causes either pubertal activation or senescence in testis of mice. Furthermore, changes in the levels of GnRH-R may be modulated by interactions among GnRH, GnIH, and kisspeptin in the testis. PMID:23027641

  15. The biochemical properties of urinary human chorionic gonadotropin from the patients with trophoblastic disease.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, R; Endo, Y; Tanabe, K; Ashitaka, Y; Tojo, S

    1981-01-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) was extracted and purified from urine of normal pregnant women and patients with hydatidiform mole and choriocarcinoma using the sam methods. Both hCG-hydatidiform mole and hCG-choriocarcinoma as well as hCG-normal pregnancy was separated into alpha and beta subunits by SDS disc electrophoresis upon treatment with 2-mercaptoethanol and showed the same immunoreactivities against anti-hCG, -alpha hCG, and -beta hCG as hCG in each radioimmunoassay. In vivo bioassay, bioactivities of hCG- normal pregnancy and hCG-hydatidiform mole were approximately 7,000 IU/mg (2nd IS), while that of hCG--choriocarcinoma was only 400 IU/mg. Conversely, the receptor binding activities in vitro of hCG-chorio carcinoma was about 3 times more effective than the other 2. Although the amino acid composition of these hCG preparations were practically identical, a great difference in the carbohydrate composition was observed. The significant difference was that while sialic acid was undetectable in hCG-choriocarcinoma approximately 8.5% of sialic acid was found in hCG-normal pregnancy and hCG-hydatidiform mole. A parallel finding was that iodinated hCG-choriocarcinoma was taken up in large quantities by the liver in comparison to the ovary which differed from that observed with hCG-normal pregnancy and hCG-hydatidiform mole in Parlow rats. The present findings support the thesis that neoplastic or malignant transformation of trophoblasts may result in an alteration of the glycosylation process, especially the sialylation, in the biosynthesis of hCG rather than the translation steps.

  16. Expression of luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor in the rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Masanori T; Hosaka, Takeshi; Takahashi, Noriyuki; Ishizuka, Bunpei

    2006-08-01

    Luteinizing hormone (LH) influences the secretion of melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) from the pineal gland. The present study examined the possible presence of LH/chorionic gonadotropin (CG) receptor in the pineal gland of adult female rats. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analyses demonstrated that LH/CG receptor mRNA is expressed in the pineal gland. Western blotting showed that the pineal gland, like the ovary, contains an 80 kDa receptor protein. Immunohistochemistry revealed that LH/CG receptor, arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (a regulatory enzyme in melatonin biosynthesis) and serotonin (a melatonin precursor) are localized primarily to the same cells of the pineal gland. We further found that the levels of pineal LH/CG receptor protein in normal cycling female rats change significantly during the estrous cycle, being lowest at early metestrus. These results demonstrate that LH/CG receptor is expressed in the pineal gland, primarily in melatonin-synthesizing cells, namely pinealocytes. Furthermore, it is suggested that LH influences pineal melatonin secretion through binding to this receptor. In addition, LH/CG receptor levels in the pineal gland are regulated during the estrous cycle under normal physiological conditions.

  17. Suppression of boar taint in cryptorchid pigs using a vaccine against the gonadotropin-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Gutzwiller, A; Ampuero Kragten, S

    2013-12-01

    Thirteen unilaterally cryptorchid Large White pigs, which had been immunized at 4 and 8 weeks of age and a third time at 64 ± 4 kg body weight against the gonadotropin releasing hormone with the vaccine Improvac®, were slaughtered at the age of 170 ± 9 days at a body weight of 102 ± 12 kg. Twelve pigs tested negative in the olfactory test of the salivary gland; their descended testicles were small and their fat androstenone concentration was low compared to normally developed boars of a previous experiment which had been vaccinated twice with Improvac® according the manufacturer's recommendation. One cryptorchid boar, which tested positive in the olfactory test and whose testicular weight and fat androstenone concentration corresponded to values of unvaccinated boars of the same age, obviously had not responded to the vaccination. It is an open question if the vaccination protocol for normal boars is sufficient to prevent boar taint in the majority of cryptorchid pigs, too.

  18. Familial idiopathic gonadotropin deficiency not linked to gene for gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in Brazilian kindred

    SciTech Connect

    Faraco, J.; Francke, U.; Toledo, S.

    1994-09-01

    Familial idiopathic gonadotropin deficiency (FIGD) is an autosomal recessive disorder which results in failure to develop secondary sexual characteristics. The origin is a hypothalamic defect resulting in insufficient secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone GnRH (also called LHRH, luteinizing hormone releasing hormone) and follicle-stimuating hormone (FSH). FIGD has been determined to be a separate entity from Kallmann syndrome which presents with hypogonadism as well as anosmia. The FIGD phenotype appears to be analogous to the phenotype of the hpg (hypogonadal) mouse. Because the hpg phenotype is the result of a structurally abnormal GnRH gene, we have studied the GnRH gene in individuals from a previously reported Brazilian FIGD family. An informative dimorphic marker in the signal peptide sequence of the GnRH gene allowed assessment of linkage between the disease gene and the GnRH locus in this pedigree. We have concluded that the GnRH locus is not linked to the disease-causing mutation in these hypogonadal individuals. Recent evidence suggests that neuropeptide Y (NPY) may play a role in the initiation of puberty. We hypothesize that mutations in NPY may result in failure to secrete GnRH. We have characterized three diallelic frequent-cutter restriction fragment length polymorphisms within the human NPY locus, and are currently using these markers to determine if the NPY gene is linked to, and possibly the site of the disease mutation in this kindred.

  19. Reference genes selection and normalization of oxidative stress responsive genes upon different temperature stress conditions in Hypericum perforatum L.

    PubMed

    Velada, Isabel; Ragonezi, Carla; Arnholdt-Schmitt, Birgit; Cardoso, Hélia

    2014-01-01

    Reverse transcription-quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) is a widely used technique for gene expression analysis. The reliability of this method depends largely on the suitable selection of stable reference genes for accurate data normalization. Hypericum perforatum L. (St. John's wort) is a field growing plant that is frequently exposed to a variety of adverse environmental stresses that can negatively affect its productivity. This widely known medicinal plant with broad pharmacological properties (anti-depressant, anti-tumor, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antioxidant, anti-cancer, and antibacterial) has been overlooked with respect to the identification of reference genes suitable for RT-qPCR data normalization. In this study, 11 candidate reference genes were analyzed in H. perforatum plants subjected to cold and heat stresses. The expression stability of these genes was assessed using GeNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper algorithms. The results revealed that the ranking of stability among the three algorithms showed only minor differences within each treatment. The best-ranked reference genes differed between cold- and heat-treated samples; nevertheless, TUB was the most stable gene in both experimental conditions. GSA and GAPDH were found to be reliable reference genes in cold-treated samples, while GAPDH showed low expression stability in heat-treated samples. 26SrRNA and H2A had the highest stabilities in the heat assay, whereas H2A was less stable in the cold assay. Finally, AOX1, AOX2, CAT1 and CHS genes, associated with plant stress responses and oxidative stress, were used as target genes to validate the reliability of identified reference genes. These target genes showed differential expression profiles over time in treated samples. This study not only is the first systematic analysis for the selection of suitable reference genes for RT-qPCR studies in H. perforatum subjected to temperature stress conditions, but may also provide valuable information

  20. Molecular responses to stress induced in normal human caucasian melanocytes in culture by exposure to simulated solar UV.

    PubMed

    Marrot, Laurent; Belaïdi, Jean-Philippe; Jones, Christophe; Perez, Philippe; Meunier, Jean-Roch

    2005-01-01

    Melanocytes play a central role in the response of skin to sunlight exposure. They are directly involved in UV-induced pigmentation as a defense mechanism. However, their alteration can lead to melanoma, a process where the role of sun overexposure is highly probable. The transformation process whereby UV damage may result in melanoma initiation is poorly understood, especially in terms of UV-induced genotoxicity in pigmented cells, where melanin can act either as a sunscreen or as a photosensitizer. The aim of this study was to analyze the behavior of melanocytes from fair skin under irradiation mimicking environmental sunlight in terms of spectral power distribution. To do this, normal human Caucasian melanocytes in culture were exposed to simulated solar UV (SSUV, 300-400 nm). Even at relatively high doses (until 20 min exposure, corresponding to 12 kJ/m2 UV-B and 110 kJ/m2 UV-A), cell death was limited, as shown by cell viability and low occurrence of apoptosis (caspase-3 activation). Moreover, p53 accumulation was three times lower in melanocytes than in unpigmented cells such as fibroblasts after SSUV exposure. However, an important fraction of melanocyte population was arrested in G2-M phase, and this correlated well with a high induction level of the gene GADD45, 4 h after exposure. Among the genes involved in DNA repair, gene XPC was the most inducible because its expression increased more than two-fold 15 h after a 20 min exposure, whereas expression of P48 was only slightly increased. In addition, an early induction of Heme Oxygenase 1 (HO1) gene, a typical response to oxidative stress, was also observed for the first time in melanocytes. Interestingly, this induction remained significant when melanocytes were exposed to UV-A radiation only (320-400 nm), and stimulation of melanogenesis before irradiation further increased HO1 induction. These results were obtained with normal human cells after exposure to SSUV radiation, which mimicked natural sunlight

  1. Reference Genes Selection and Normalization of Oxidative Stress Responsive Genes upon Different Temperature Stress Conditions in Hypericum perforatum L

    PubMed Central

    Velada, Isabel; Ragonezi, Carla; Arnholdt-Schmitt, Birgit; Cardoso, Hélia

    2014-01-01

    Reverse transcription-quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) is a widely used technique for gene expression analysis. The reliability of this method depends largely on the suitable selection of stable reference genes for accurate data normalization. Hypericum perforatum L. (St. John's wort) is a field growing plant that is frequently exposed to a variety of adverse environmental stresses that can negatively affect its productivity. This widely known medicinal plant with broad pharmacological properties (anti-depressant, anti-tumor, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antioxidant, anti-cancer, and antibacterial) has been overlooked with respect to the identification of reference genes suitable for RT-qPCR data normalization. In this study, 11 candidate reference genes were analyzed in H. perforatum plants subjected to cold and heat stresses. The expression stability of these genes was assessed using GeNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper algorithms. The results revealed that the ranking of stability among the three algorithms showed only minor differences within each treatment. The best-ranked reference genes differed between cold- and heat-treated samples; nevertheless, TUB was the most stable gene in both experimental conditions. GSA and GAPDH were found to be reliable reference genes in cold-treated samples, while GAPDH showed low expression stability in heat-treated samples. 26SrRNA and H2A had the highest stabilities in the heat assay, whereas H2A was less stable in the cold assay. Finally, AOX1, AOX2, CAT1 and CHS genes, associated with plant stress responses and oxidative stress, were used as target genes to validate the reliability of identified reference genes. These target genes showed differential expression profiles over time in treated samples. This study not only is the first systematic analysis for the selection of suitable reference genes for RT-qPCR studies in H. perforatum subjected to temperature stress conditions, but may also provide valuable information

  2. Effect of lithium on plasma glucose, insulin and glucagon in normal and streptozotocin-diabetic rats: role of glucagon in the hyperglycaemic response.

    PubMed Central

    Hermida, O. G.; Fontela, T.; Ghiglione, M.; Uttenthal, L. O.

    1994-01-01

    1. Lithium salts, used in the treatment of affective disorders, may have adverse effects on glucose tolerance in man, and suppress glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in rats. 2. To study the interaction of these effects with pre-existing diabetes mellitus, plasma glucose and insulin responses to lithium chloride were measured in male Wistar rats made diabetic with intraperitoneal streptozotocin, and in normal controls. 3. In both normal and diabetic anaesthetized rats, intravenous lithium (4 mEq kg-1) caused a rise in plasma glucose. In absolute terms, the rise was greater in diabetic (5.2 mmol l-1) than in normal rats (2.3 mmol l-1). 4. Plasma insulin concentrations were reduced by lithium in normal rats, but the low insulin concentrations measured in the diabetic rats were not significantly changed. 5. After intravenous glucose (0.5 g kg-1), lithium-treated diabetic rats showed a second rise in plasma glucose at 60-90 min without any insulin response, while normal rats showed typically reduced insulin responses and initial glucose disappearance rates. 6. Intravenous glucose reduced plasma glucagon concentrations to a greater extent in normal than in diabetic rats, but lithium induced an equal rise in plasma glucagon in both groups, with a time-course similar to that of the hyperglycaemic effect. 7. The hyperglycaemic action of lithium is greater in the hypoinsulinaemic diabetic rats and appears to involve a stimulation of glucagon secretion in both normal and diabetic animals. PMID:8019763

  3. Insulin-resistant subjects have normal angiogenic response to aerobic exercise training in skeletal muscle, but not in adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Walton, R Grace; Finlin, Brian S; Mula, Jyothi; Long, Douglas E; Zhu, Beibei; Fry, Christopher S; Westgate, Philip M; Lee, Jonah D; Bennett, Tamara; Kern, Philip A; Peterson, Charlotte A

    2015-06-01

    Reduced vessel density in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle is associated with obesity and may result in decreased perfusion, decreased oxygen consumption, and insulin resistance. In the presence of VEGFA, Angiopoietin-2 (Angpt2) and Angiopoietin-1 (Angpt1) are central determinants of angiogenesis, with greater Angpt2:Angpt1 ratios promoting angiogenesis. In skeletal muscle, exercise training stimulates angiogenesis and modulates transcription of VEGFA, Angpt1, and Angpt2. However, it remains unknown whether exercise training stimulates vessel growth in human adipose tissue, and it remains unknown whether adipose angiogenesis is mediated by angiopoietin signaling. We sought to determine whether insulin-resistant subjects would display an impaired angiogenic response to aerobic exercise training. Insulin-sensitive (IS, N = 12) and insulin-resistant (IR, N = 14) subjects had subcutaneous adipose and muscle (vastus lateralis) biopsies before and after 12 weeks of cycle ergometer training. In both tissues, we measured vessels and expression of pro-angiogenic genes. Exercise training did not increase insulin sensitivity in IR Subjects. In skeletal muscle, training resulted in increased vessels/muscle fiber and increased Angpt2:Angpt1 ratio in both IR and IS subjects. However, in adipose, exercise training only induced angiogenesis in IS subjects, likely due to chronic suppression of VEGFA expression in IR subjects. These results indicate that skeletal muscle of IR subjects exhibits a normal angiogenic response to exercise training. However, the same training regimen is insufficient to induce angiogenesis in adipose tissue of IR subjects, which may help to explain why we did not observe improved insulin sensitivity following aerobic training.

  4. Displacement of the Lamina Cribrosa in Response to Acute Intraocular Pressure Elevation in Normal Individuals of African and European Descent

    PubMed Central

    Fazio, Massimo A.; Johnstone, John K.; Smith, Brandon; Wang, Lan; Girkin, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess if the in vivo mechanical displacement of the anterior laminar cribrosa surface (ALCS) as a response of an acute elevation in intraocular pressure (IOP) differs in individuals of European (ED) and African descent (AD). Methods Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) scans were obtained from 24 eyes of 12 individuals of AD and 18 eyes of 9 individuals of ED at their normal baseline IOP and after 60 seconds IOP elevation using ophthalmodynamometry. Change in depth (displacement) of the LC and to the prelaminar tissue (PLT) were computed in association with the change (delta) in IOP (Δ IOP), race, age, corneal thickness, corneal rigidity (ocular response analyzer [ORA]), and axial. Results In the ED group for small IOP elevations (Δ IOP < 12 mm Hg), the ALCS initially displaced posteriorly but for larger increase of IOP an anterior displacement of the lamina followed. Inversely, in the AD group the ALCS did not show a significant posterior displacement for small Δ IOP, while for larger IOP increases the ALCS significantly displaced posteriorly. Posterior displacement of the lamina cribrosa (LC) was also significantly correlated with longer axial length, higher corneal thickness, and ORA parameters. Prelaminar tissue posteriorly displaced for any magnitude of Δ IOP, in both groups. Conclusions The African descent group demonstrated a greater acute posterior bowing of the LC after adjustment for age, axial length, Bruch's membrane opening (BMO) area, and ORA parameters. Greater PLT posterior displacement was also seen in the AD group with increasing IOP, which was tightly correlated with the displacement of the LC. PMID:27367500

  5. Amifostine Induces Antioxidant Enzymatic Activities in Normal Tissues and a Transplantable Tumor That Can Affect Radiation Response

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, David J. Murley, Jeffrey S.; Kataoka, Yasushi; Baker, Kenneth L.; Kunnavakkam, Rangesh; Coleman, Mitchell C.; Spitz, Douglas R.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether amifostine can induce elevated manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) in murine tissues and a transplantable SA-NH tumor, resulting in a delayed tumor cell radioprotective effect. Methods and Materials: SA-NH tumor-bearing C3H mice were treated with a single 400 mg/kg or three daily 50 mg/kg doses of amifostine administered intraperitoneally. At selected time intervals after the last injection, the heart, liver, lung, pancreas, small intestine, spleen, and SA-NH tumor were removed and analyzed for SOD2, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) enzymatic activity. The effect of elevated SOD2 enzymatic activity on the radiation response of SA-NH cells was determined. Results: SOD2 activity was significantly elevated in selected tissues and a tumor 24 h after amifostine treatment. Catalase and GPx activities remained unchanged except for significant elevations in the spleen. GPx was also elevated in the pancreas. SA-NH tumor cells exhibited a twofold elevation in SOD2 activity and a 27% elevation in radiation resistance. Amifostine administered in three daily fractions of 50 mg/kg each also resulted in significant elevations of these antioxidant enzymes. Conclusions: Amifostine can induce a delayed radioprotective effect that correlates with elevated levels of SOD2 activity in SA-NH tumor. If limited to normal tissues, this delayed radioprotective effect offers an additional potential for overall radiation protection. However, amifostine-induced elevation of SOD2 activity in tumors could have an unanticipated deleterious effect on tumor responses to fractionated radiation therapy, given that the radioprotector is administered daily just before each 2-Gy fractionated dose.

  6. NMR-based metabonomic analysis of normal rat urine and faeces in response to (±)-venlafaxine treatment.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Contreras, José I; García-Pérez, Isabel; Meléndez-Camargo, María E; Zepeda-Vallejo, Luis G

    2016-05-10

    (±)-Venlafaxine, a bicyclic antidepressant of the serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) class, is prescribed for the treatment of depression and anxiety disorders. As is the case with other antidepressants, its precise mechanisms of action are still unknown. Pharmacometabonomic approaches allow for the detection of diverse metabolites, unlike classic methods for analysing drug interaction based on single metabolites and linear pathways. This provides a global view of the state of homeostasis during treatment and an insight into the mechanisms of action of a drug. Accordingly, the final outcome of treatment is characterised by the network of reactome pathways derived from the on-target and off-target effects of the drug. Regarding antidepressants, the drug network may be located in the gut-microbiome-brain-liver-kidney-immune-cardiovascular system axis (GMBLKICA), implying that neurotransmitters participate as signalling molecules in bidirectional communication. If their bioavailability is increased, this communication and the state of homeostasis may be disrupted. With a pharmacometabonomic approach using NMR in combination with different chemometric methods, a determination was made of subtle changes in the metabolic profile (metabotype) of urine and faeces in normal Wistar rats following a single administration of pharmacological doses of (±)-venlafaxine hydrochloride. Based on the drug-response metabotypes observed, (±)-venlafaxine had effects on gut microbial co-metabolites and osmolytes. Hence, it can be hypothesized that bidirectional communication in the multiorgan axis was perturbed by this drug, and very likely by its active metabolite, (±)-desvenlafaxine. This disrupted signalling could be related not only to therapeutic and adverse effects, but also to the lag period in treatment response.

  7. Linear response of heat conductivity of normal-superfluid interface of a polarized Fermi gas to orbital magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimian, N.; Mehrafarin, M.; Afzali, R.

    2012-01-01

    Using perturbed Bogoliubov equations, we study the linear response to a weak orbital magnetic field of the heat conductivity of the normal-superfluid interface of a polarized Fermi gas at sufficiently low temperature. We consider the various scattering regions of the BCS regime and analytically obtain the transmission coefficients and the heat conductivity across the interface in an arbitrary weak orbital field. For a definite choice of the field, we consider various values of the scattering length in the BCS range and numerically obtain the allowed values of the average and species-imbalance chemical potentials. Thus, taking Andreev reflection into account, we describe how the heat conductivity is affected by the field and the species imbalance. In particular, we show that the additional heat conductivity due to the orbital field increases with the species imbalance, which is more noticeable at higher temperatures. Our results indicate how the heat conductivity may be controlled, which is relevant to sensitive magnetic field sensors/regulators at the interface.

  8. CYT387, a novel JAK2 inhibitor, induces hematologic responses and normalizes inflammatory cytokines in murine myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Bumm, Thomas G.; Deininger, Jutta; Wood, Lisa; Aichberger, Karl J.; Loriaux, Marc M.; Druker, Brian J.; Burns, Christopher J.; Fantino, Emmanuelle

    2010-01-01

    Activating alleles of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) such as JAK2V617F are central to the pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), suggesting that small molecule inhibitors targeting JAK2 may be therapeutically useful. We have identified an aminopyrimidine derivative (CYT387), which inhibits JAK1, JAK2, and tyrosine kinase 2 (TYK2) at low nanomolar concentrations, with few additional targets. Between 0.5 and 1.5μM CYT387 caused growth suppression and apoptosis in JAK2-dependent hematopoietic cell lines, while nonhematopoietic cell lines were unaffected. In a murine MPN model, CYT387 normalized white cell counts, hematocrit, spleen size, and restored physiologic levels of inflammatory cytokines. Despite the hematologic responses and reduction of the JAK2V617F allele burden, JAK2V617F cells persisted and MPN recurred upon cessation of treatment, suggesting that JAK2 inhibitors may be unable to eliminate JAK2V617F cells, consistent with preliminary results from clinical trials of JAK2 inhibitors in myelofibrosis. While the clinical benefit of JAK2 inhibitors may be substantial, not the least due to reduction of inflammatory cytokines and symptomatic improvement, our data add to increasing evidence that kinase inhibitor monotherapy of malignant disease is not curative, suggesting a need for drug combinations to optimally target the malignant cells. PMID:20385788

  9. In Vivo Assessment of Acute UVB Responses in Normal and Xeroderma Pigmentosum (XP-C) Skin-Humanized Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    García, Marta; Llames, Sara; García, Eva; Meana, Alvaro; Cuadrado, Natividad; Recasens, Mar; Puig, Susana; Nagore, Eduardo; Illera, Nuria; Jorcano, José Luis; Del Rio, Marcela; Larcher, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    In vivo studies of UVB effects on human skin are precluded by ethical and technical arguments on volunteers and inconceivable in cancer-prone patients such as those affected with Xeroderma Pigmentosum (XP). Establishing reliable models to address mechanistic and therapeutic matters thus remains a challenge. Here we have used the skin-humanized mouse system that circumvents most current model constraints. We assessed the UVB radiation effects including the sequential changes after acute exposure with respect to timing, dosage, and the relationship between dose and degree-sort of epidermal alteration. On Caucasian-derived regenerated skins, UVB irradiation (800 J/m2) induced DNA damage (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) and p53 expression in exposed keratinocytes. Epidermal disorganization was observed at higher doses. In contrast, in African descent–derived regenerated skins, physiological hyperpigmentation prevented tissue alterations and DNA photolesions. The acute UVB effects seen in Caucasian-derived engrafted skins were also blocked by a physical sunscreen, demonstrating the suitability of the system for photoprotection studies. We also report the establishment of a photosensitive model through the transplantation of XP-C patient cells as part of a bioengineered skin. The inability of XP-C engrafted skin to remove DNA damaged cells was confirmed in vivo. Both the normal and XP-C versions of the skin-humanized mice proved proficient models to assess UVB-mediated DNA repair responses and provide a strong platform to test novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:20558577

  10. Measuring the rate of change of haemodynamic response at the onset of exercise in normal limbs and those with intermittent claudication.

    PubMed

    Meeson, S; Srodon, P D

    2005-12-01

    Patients with claudication have an inadequate haemodynamic response to exercise. Blood flow response will not only have a magnitude, but also a rate of change. There is scope for investigating these parameters, as manipulation of the factors which control them may benefit work to improve the treatment for claudication. This work compares the responses for patients with one normal limb and one with intermittent claudication. A custom-built ergometer allows unilateral, infragenicular plantar flexion exercise, whilst common femoral artery blood flow can be measured continuously by Duplex ultrasound. This apparatus was used to measure blood flow before, at the onset of and during a 5 W square-wave exercise stimulus in 15 patients. The claudicant group had a mean steady-state gain that was approximately half that of the normal group at around 170 ml min(-1) (p < 0.001) and a response time that was much shorter (p = 0.006). A mean response time of 21.0 +/- 1.4 s was achieved in claudicant limbs compared to 31.8 +/- 2.9 s in normals. However, the average rate of change of blood flow during this response time was estimated to still be greater for the normal group, at 431.7 +/- 47.1 ml min(-2), than for the claudicant group. The differences in magnitude and rate of change of limb blood flow response to exercise in claudicants were significant and may have implications for the treatment of claudication.

  11. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone in invertebrates: structure, function, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Pei-San

    2006-08-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is central to the initiation and maintenance of reproduction in vertebrates. GnRH is found in all major groups of Phylum Chordata, including the protochordates. Studies on functional and structural evolution of GnRH have, in the past, focused exclusively on chordates. However, the recent structural elucidation of an octopus GnRH-like molecule and increasing evidence that GnRH-like substances are present in multiple invertebrate phyla suggest GnRH is an ancient peptide that arose prior to the divergence of protostomes and deuterostomes. The extraordinary conservation of GnRH structure and function raises interesting questions regarding the functional role assumed by GnRH over the course of evolution. This review will focus on the current understanding of GnRH structure and function in non-chordate invertebrates. Special emphasis will be placed upon the possible and speculated functions of GnRH in mollusks.

  12. Leptin regulates gonadotropins and steroid receptors in the rats ovary.

    PubMed

    Silveira Cavalcante, Fernanda; Aiceles, Verónica; da Fonte Ramos, Cristiane

    2013-01-01

    The leptin hormone is important to satiety and an important link between the nutritional status and reproductive processes. Owing to the contradictory effects of leptin on the ovary and the failure to clarify the precise mechanism by which leptin affects the ovary, our aim was to contribute to evaluation if leptin can directly regulate the gene expression of leptin itself and its receptors, and the expression of several genes related to the ovary function by a model of tissue culture. Ovaries from Wistar dams were used at 90 days of age and were submitted to medium with presence and absence of leptin. The results can demonstrate that leptin regulates gonadotropins and steroid receptors, which could suggest that the ovarian leptin role could be secondary to the changes in these receptors expression in rats.

  13. Sex Steroid and Gonadotropin Treatment in Male Delayed Puberty.

    PubMed

    Howard, Sasha; Dunkel, Leo

    2016-01-01

    Male delayed puberty is common, affecting up to 3% of the population. Management of patients with pubertal delay is dependent on the underlying cause. The main differential diagnoses of delayed puberty in males include constitutional delay of growth and puberty (CDGP), idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Treatment of isolated CDGP involves expectant observation or short courses of low-dose sex steroid supplementation. More complex and involved management is required in males with hypogonadism to achieve both development of secondary sexual characteristics and to maximise the potential for fertility. This review will cover the options for management involving androgen or gonadotropin therapy, with discussion of benefits, limitations and specific considerations of the different treatment options.

  14. Localization of gonadotropin binding sites in human ovarian neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, R.; Kitayama, S.; Yamoto, M.; Shima, K.; Ooshima, A. )

    1989-10-01

    The binding of human luteinizing hormone and human follicle-stimulating hormone to ovarian tumor biopsy specimens from 29 patients was analyzed. The binding sites for human luteinizing hormone were demonstrated in one tumor of epithelial origin (mucinous cystadenoma) and in one of sex cord-stromal origin (theca cell tumor). The binding sites for human follicle-stimulating hormone were found in three tumors of epithelial origin (serous cystadenoma and mucinous cystadenoma) and in two of sex cord-stromal origin (theca cell tumor and theca-granulosa cell tumor). The surface-binding autoradiographic study revealed that the binding sites for gonadotropins were localized in the stromal tissue. The results suggest that gonadotropic hormones may play a role in the growth and differentiation of a certain type of human ovarian neoplasms.

  15. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist-induced pituitary apoplexy

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Fergus; Navin, Patrick; Brett, Francesca; Dennedy, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pituitary apoplexy represents an uncommon endocrine emergency with potentially life-threatening consequences. Drug-induced pituitary apoplexy is a rare but important consideration when evaluating patients with this presentation. We describe an unusual case of a patient with a known pituitary macroadenoma presenting with acute-onset third nerve palsy and headache secondary to tumour enlargement and apoplexy. This followed gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRH) agonist therapy used to treat metastatic prostate carcinoma. Following acute management, the patient underwent transphenoidal debulking of his pituitary gland with resolution of his third nerve palsy. Subsequent retrospective data interpretation revealed that this had been a secretory gonadotropinoma and GNRH agonist therapy resulted in raised gonadotropins and testosterone. Hence, further management of his prostate carcinoma required GNRH antagonist therapy and external beam radiotherapy. This case demonstrates an uncommon complication of GNRH agonist therapy in the setting of a pituitary macroadenoma. It also highlights the importance of careful, serial data interpretation in patients with pituitary adenomas. Finally, this case presents a unique insight into the challenges of managing a hormonal-dependent prostate cancer in a patient with a secretory pituitary tumour. Learning points While non-functioning gonadotropinomas represent the most common form of pituitary macroadenoma, functioning gonadotropinomas are exceedingly rare. Acute tumour enlargement, with potential pituitary apoplexy, is a rare but important adverse effect arising from GNRH agonist therapy in the presence of both functioning and non-functioning pituitary gonadotropinomas. GNRH antagonist therapy represents an alternative treatment option for patients with hormonal therapy-requiring prostate cancer, who also have diagnosed with a pituitary gonadotropinoma. PMID:27284452

  16. Auditory brainstem response latency in forward masking, a marker of sensory deficits in listeners with normal hearing thresholds.

    PubMed

    Mehraei, Golbarg; Gallardo, Andreu Paredes; Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara G; Dau, Torsten

    2017-03-01

    In rodent models, acoustic exposure too modest to elevate hearing thresholds can nonetheless cause auditory nerve fiber deafferentation, interfering with the coding of supra-threshold sound. Low-spontaneous rate nerve fibers, important for encoding acoustic information at supra-threshold levels and in noise, are more susceptible to degeneration than high-spontaneous rate fibers. The change in auditory brainstem response (ABR) wave-V latency with noise level has been shown to be associated with auditory nerve deafferentation. Here, we measured ABR in a forward masking paradigm and evaluated wave-V latency changes with increasing masker-to-probe intervals. In the same listeners, behavioral forward masking detection thresholds were measured. We hypothesized that 1) auditory nerve fiber deafferentation increases forward masking thresholds and increases wave-V latency and 2) a preferential loss of low-spontaneous rate fibers results in a faster recovery of wave-V latency as the slow contribution of these fibers is reduced. Results showed that in young audiometrically normal listeners, a larger change in wave-V latency with increasing masker-to-probe interval was related to a greater effect of a preceding masker behaviorally. Further, the amount of wave-V latency change with masker-to-probe interval was positively correlated with the rate of change in forward masking detection thresholds. Although we cannot rule out central contributions, these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that auditory nerve fiber deafferentation occurs in humans and may predict how well individuals can hear in noisy environments.

  17. Epigenetic marks in an adaptive water stress-responsive gene in tomato roots under normal and drought conditions

    PubMed Central

    González, Rodrigo M; Ricardi, Martiniano M; Iusem, Norberto D

    2013-01-01

    Tolerance to water deficits was evolutionarily relevant to the conquest of land by primitive plants. In this context, epigenetic events may have played important roles in the establishment of drought stress responses. We decided to inspect epigenetic marks in the plant organ that is crucial in the sensing of drought stress: the root. Using tomato as a crop model plant, we detected the methylated epialleles of Asr2, a protein-coding gene widespread in the plant kingdom and thought to alleviate restricted water availability. We found 3 contexts (CG, CNG, and CNN) of methylated cytosines in the regulatory region of Solanum lycopersicum Asr2 but only one context (CG) in the gene body. To test the hypothesis of a link between epigenetics marks and the adaptation of plants to drought, we explored the cytosine methylation status of Asr2 in the root resulting from water-deficit stress conditions. We found that a brief exposure to simulated drought conditions caused the removal of methyl marks in the regulatory region at 77 of the 142 CNN sites. In addition, the study of histone modifications around this model gene in the roots revealed that the distal regulatory region was rich in H3K27me3 but that its abundance did not change as a consequence of stress. Additionally, under normal conditions, both the regulatory and coding regions contained the typically repressive H3K9me2 mark, which was lost after 30 min of water deprivation. As analogously conjectured for the paralogous gene Asr1, rapidly acquired new Asr2 epialleles in somatic cells due to desiccation might be stable enough and heritable through the germ line across generations, thereby efficiently contributing to constitutive, adaptive gene expression during the evolution of desiccation-tolerant populations or species. PMID:23807313

  18. Epigenetic marks in an adaptive water stress-responsive gene in tomato roots under normal and drought conditions.

    PubMed

    González, Rodrigo M; Ricardi, Martiniano M; Iusem, Norberto D

    2013-08-01

    Tolerance to water deficits was evolutionarily relevant to the conquest of land by primitive plants. In this context, epigenetic events may have played important roles in the establishment of drought stress responses. We decided to inspect epigenetic marks in the plant organ that is crucial in the sensing of drought stress: the root. Using tomato as a crop model plant, we detected the methylated epialleles of Asr2, a protein-coding gene widespread in the plant kingdom and thought to alleviate restricted water availability. We found 3 contexts (CG, CNG, and CNN) of methylated cytosines in the regulatory region of Solanum lycopersicum Asr2 but only one context (CG) in the gene body. To test the hypothesis of a link between epigenetics marks and the adaptation of plants to drought, we explored the cytosine methylation status of Asr2 in the root resulting from water-deficit stress conditions. We found that a brief exposure to simulated drought conditions caused the removal of methyl marks in the regulatory region at 77 of the 142 CNN sites. In addition, the study of histone modifications around this model gene in the roots revealed that the distal regulatory region was rich in H3K27me3 but that its abundance did not change as a consequence of stress. Additionally, under normal conditions, both the regulatory and coding regions contained the typically repressive H3K9me2 mark, which was lost after 30 min of water deprivation. As analogously conjectured for the paralogous gene Asr1, rapidly acquired new Asr2 epialleles in somatic cells due to desiccation might be stable enough and heritable through the germ line across generations, thereby efficiently contributing to constitutive, adaptive gene expression during the evolution of desiccation-tolerant populations or species.

  19. Effect of improved nutrition during calfhood on serum metabolic hormones, gonadotropins, and testosterone concentrations, and on testicular development in bulls.

    PubMed

    Brito, Leonardo F C; Barth, Albert D; Rawlings, Norm C; Wilde, Randal E; Crews, Denny H; Mir, Priya S; Kastelic, John P

    2007-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of improved nutrition during calfhood on serum metabolic hormones, gonadotropins and testosterone concentrations, and on sexual development in bulls. Bulls received high (n=17) or control nutrition (n=16) diets from 10 to 30 week of age and the same control nutrition diet from 31 to 74 week of age. Improved nutrition during calfhood resulted in a more sustained period of elevated LH secretion (pulse frequency and total secretion in 10h) during the early gonadotropin rise. GnRH-stimulated LH secretion was not affected by diet, indicating that pituitary responsiveness was not altered; therefore, improved nutrition had direct effects on GnRH secretion by the hypothalamus. Insulin and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) concentrations were greater during calfhood in bulls receiving high nutrition, indicating that these metabolic hormones might be involved in regulating GnRH and LH secretion. Improved nutrition also resulted in increased testosterone secretion that was associated with greater circulating IGF-I concentrations, suggesting a role for this metabolic hormone in regulating Leydig cell number and function. Furthermore, improved nutrition during calfhood resulted in greater testicular weight and sperm production in mature bulls, indicating that increased LH secretion during calfhood, and increased IGF-I and testosterone concentrations during calfhood and peripubertal period were associated with greater testicular cell proliferation and enhanced function.

  20. CNS germinoma with elevated serum human chorionic gonadotropin level: Clinical characteristics and treatment outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, Hiroyuki . E-mail: ogino@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp; Shibamoto, Yuta; Takanaka, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Kazunori; Ishihara, Shun-Ichi; Yamada, Tetsuya; Sugie, Chikao; Nomoto, Yoshihito; Mimura, Mikio

    2005-07-01

    Purpose: The prognostic significance of human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) level in central nervous system germinoma remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to compare clinical characteristics and prognosis of germinoma patients with normal and high HCG titers in the serum. Methods and Materials: We undertook a multi-institutional retrospective analysis of 103 patients with central nervous system germinoma whose serum HCG and/or {beta}-HCG level had been measured before treatment between 1984 and 2002. All patients had been treated with radiation therapy either alone (n = 66) or in combination with chemotherapy (n = 37) with a median dose of 47.8 Gy. Results: HCG and/or {beta}-HCG level in the serum was high in 39% of all patients. The proportion of HCG-producing tumors was higher in the lesions at the basal ganglia than in the lesions at the other sites. No correlation was found between tumor size and HCG level, but there seemed to be a weak correlation between size and {beta}-HCG. The 5- and 10-year survival rates were 96% and 94%, respectively, in both patient groups with normal and high HCG (p = 0.99). The 5- and 10-year relapse-free survival rates were 87% and 82%, respectively, in patients with normal HCG level and were both 87% in patients with high HCG (p = 0.74). Also, no other patient-, tumor-, or treatment-related factors seemed to influence the prognosis of the patients. Conclusion: Serum HCG level does not seem to influence patient prognosis when treated with sufficient doses of radiation. Relationship between tumor size and site and HCG level should be investigated further.

  1. Effects of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist on gonadotropin levels in Masu salmon and Sockeye salmon.

    PubMed

    Amano, Masafumi; Ikuta, Kazumasa; Kitamura, Shoji

    2007-09-01

    The salmon gonadotropin-releasing hormone (sGnRH) is considered to be involved in gonadal maturation via gonadotropin (GTH) secretion in salmonid fishes. However, there is no direct evidence for endogenous sGnRH-stimulated GTH secretion in salmonids. In this study, to clarify whether endogenous sGnRH stimulates GTH secretion, we examined the effects of the mammalian GnRH (mGnRH) antagonist [Ac-Delta(3)-Pro(1), 4FD-Phe(2), D-Trp(3,6)]-mGnRH on luteinizing hormone (LH) levels in 0-year-old masu salmon Oncorhynchus masou and sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka. First, the effects of the GnRH antagonist on LH release were examined in 0-year-old precocious male masu salmon. GnRH antagonist treatment for 3 hr significantly inhibited an increase in plasma LH levels that was artificially induced by exogenous sGnRH administration, indicating that the GnRH antagonist is effective in inhibiting LH release from the pituitary. Subsequently, we examined the effect of the GnRH antagonist on LH synthesis in 0-year-old immature sockeye salmon that were pretreated with exogenous testosterone for 42 days to increase the pituitary LH contents; the testosterone treatment did not affect the plasma LH levels. GnRH antagonist treatment slightly but significantly inhibited an increase in the testosterone-stimulated pituitary LH content levels. However, no significant differences in the plasma LH levels were observed between the GnRH antagonist-treated and control groups. These results suggest that endogenous sGnRH is involved in LH secretion in salmonid fishes.

  2. High live birth rate in the subsequent IVF cycle after first-cycle poor response among women with mean age 35 and normal FSH.

    PubMed

    Moolenaar, Lobke M; Mohiuddin, Seema; Munro Davie, Moira; Merrilees, Margaret A; Broekmans, Frank J M; Mol, Ben Willem J; Johnson, Neil P

    2013-10-01

    Poor ovarian response in IVF cycles is associated with diminished ovarian reserve and poor pregnancy outcome. Little is known about pregnancy outcome after a poor response in women with a normal ovarian reserve. This retrospective study studied women undergoing IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection between January 2003 to December 2008 in the FertilityPLUS Clinic in Auckland, New Zealand. All women with a poor response in the first cycle were selected. Primary outcome was live birth after the second cycle. Secondary outcomes were poor response in the second cycle and the predictive values of female age and basal FSH at first cycle and IVF outcome at second cycle. Of the 2487 women starting IVF, 142 women (5.7%) with a poor response in the first cycle were selected, of which 66 (46.5%) women had a repeated poor response in the second cycle. There were 31 live births in the second cycle (21.8%). Female age was the only significant predictor for repeated poor response (AUC 0.69, 95% CI 0.61-0.78) and clinical pregnancy (AUC 0.66, 95% CI 0.57-0.75), but the predictive value was low. Therefore poor response in women with a normal ovarian reserve should not be a reason to discontinue further IVF treatment. Poor ovarian response in IVF cycles is associated with diminished ovarian reserve and poor pregnancy outcome. Little is known about pregnancy outcome after a poor response in women with a normal ovarian reserve. In this retrospective study, we studied women undergoing IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) between January 2003 to December 2008 in the FertilityPLUS Clinic in Auckland, New Zealand. All women with a poor response in the first cycle were selected. Primary outcome was live birth after the second cycle. Secondary outcomes were poor response in the second cycle and the predictive value of female age and basal FSH at first cycle and IVF outcome at the second cycle. Of the 2487 women starting wit IVF, a total of 142 women (5.7%) with a poor response in the

  3. Relationship between blood and urine concentrations of intact human chorionic gonadotropin and its free subunits in early pregnancy

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, R.J.; Menabawey, M.; Lowings, C.; Buck, R.H.; Chard, T.

    1987-04-01

    Paired blood and urine samples were obtained from patients between the sixth and 14th weeks of normal pregnancy. The levels of intact human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), and of the free alpha and beta subunits, were measured by specific radioimmunoassays. There was a close association between blood and urine levels of intact hCG and of the alpha subunit of hCG, but no relation between the levels of beta subunit in these sites. These findings suggest that the use of beta subunit assays may give discrepant results according to the fluid examined. By contrast, measurement of intact hCG appears to give similar results in blood and urine.

  4. Segregation patterns of polymorphic restriction sites of the gene encoding the alpha subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin in trophoblastic disease.

    PubMed Central

    Hoshina, M; Boothby, M R; Hussa, R D; Pattillo, R A; Camel, H M; Boime, I

    1984-01-01

    The gene encoding the alpha subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin contains at least two polymorphic sites in its 3' flanking region detected by restriction enzymes HindIII and EcoRI. We used these polymorphic sites as markers of tissue genotype in normal placenta, hydatidiform mole, choriocarcinoma, and peripheral leukocytes. As expected, inheritance patterns of most hydatidiform moles showed only a paternal genetic contribution. However, one uncommon DNA polymorphism pattern, homozygosity for the absence of the EcoRI site and the presence of the HindIII site, predominated in choriocarcinoma. Thus, our results suggest that moles which have this uncommon polymorphism pattern appear particularly likely to develop into choriocarcinoma. Images PMID:6201859

  5. Photosynthesis-dependent and -independent responses of stomata to blue, red and green monochromatic light: differences between the normally oriented and inverted leaves of sunflower.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yin; Noguchi, Ko; Terashima, Ichiro

    2011-03-01

    The effects of growth light environment on stomatal light responses were analyzed. We inverted leaves of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) for 2 weeks until their full expansion, and measured gas exchange properties of the adaxial and abaxial sides separately. The sensitivity to light assessed as the increase in stomatal conductance was generally higher in the abaxial stomata than in the adaxial stomata, and these differences could not be completely changed by the inversion treatment. We also treated the leaves with DCMU to inhibit photosynthesis and evaluated the photosynthesis-dependent and -independent components of stomatal light responses. The red light response of stomata in both normally oriented and inverted leaves relied only on the photosynthesis-dependent component. The blue light response involved both the photosynthesis-dependent and photosynthesis-independent components, and the relative contributions of the two components differed between the normally oriented and inverted leaves. A green light response was observed only in the abaxial stomata, which also involved the photosynthesis-dependent and photosynthesis-independent components, strongly suggesting the existence of a green light receptor in sunflower leaves. Moreover, acclimation of the abaxial stomata to strong direct light eliminated the photosynthesis-independent component in the green light response. The results showed that stomatal responses to monochromatic light change considerably in response to growth light environment, although some of these responses appear to be determined inherently.

  6. Luteinizing Hormone Secretion during Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Stimulation Tests in Obese Girls with Central Precocious Puberty

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hae Sang; Yoon, Jong Seo; Hwang, Jin Soon

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Girls with precocious puberty have high luteinizing hormone (LH) levels and advanced bone age. Obese children enter puberty at earlier ages than do non-obese children. We analyzed the effects of obesity on LH secretion during gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) tests in girls with precocious puberty. Methods: A total of 981 subjects with idiopathic precocious puberty who had undergone a GnRH stimulation testing between 2008 and 2014 were included in the study. Subjects were divided into three groups based on body mass index (BMI). Auxological data and gonadotropin levels after the GnRH stimulation test were compared. Results: In Tanner stage 2 girls, peak stimulated LH levels on GnRH test were 11.9±7.5, 10.4±6.4, and 9.1±6.1 IU/L among normal-weight, overweight, and obese subjects, respectively (p=0.035 for all comparisons). In Tanner stage 3 girls, peak stimulated LH levels were 14.9±10.9, 12.8±7.9, and 9.6±6.0 IU/L, respectively (p=0.022 for all comparisons). However, in Tanner stage 4 girls, peak stimulated LH levels were not significantly different among normal, overweight, and obese children. On multivariate analysis, BMI standard deviation score was significantly and negatively associated with peak LH (β=-1.178, p=0.001). Conclusion: In girls with central precocious puberty, increased BMI was associated with slightly lower peak stimulated LH levels at early pubertal stages (Tanner stages 2 and 3). This association was not valid in Tanner stage 4 girls. PMID:27215137

  7. Estrus behavior and fecal steroid profiles in the Asiatic lion (Panthera leo persica) during natural and gonadotropin-induced estrus.

    PubMed

    Umapathy, Govindhaswamy; Sontakke, Sadanand D; Srinivasu, K; Kiran, Thomas; Kholkute, S D; Shivaji, S

    2007-10-01

    In this paper the behavior of the Asiatic lion was studied during natural and gonadotropin-induced estrus in relation to fecal estradiol and progesterone concentration. The average length of estrus was 5.4 days and no significant difference was observed between natural and gonadotropin-induced estrus. Vocalization and rolling were the major estrus behavioral activities of Asiatic lions and the frequency of these activities were similar in both natural and gonadotropin-induced estrus and treatment with exogenous gonadotropin did not alter estrus behavioral activities. A significant positive correlation was observed between fecal estradiol and frequency of estrus behavior during natural and gonadotropin-induced estrus. Following gonadotropin treatment estrus could be induced in 69% of animals and these induced animals ovulated following hCG treatment. This study reports for the first time the successful use of the non-invasive fecal steroid assay for monitoring the induction of estrus and ovulation in the Asiatic lion.

  8. Serum LH and FSH Responses to Synthetic LH-RH in Normal Infants, Children and Patients With Turner's Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suwa, Seizo; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Effects of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) on LH and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) release were studied in 26 normal children and six patients (from 1-to 14-years-old) with Turner's syndrome. (Author)

  9. Association of pentraxin 3 with insulin resistance and glucose response following maximal aerobic exercise in obese and normal-mass individuals.

    PubMed

    Slusher, Aaron L; Huang, Chun-Jung

    2016-07-01

    Pentraxin 3 (PTX3), a cardioprotective protein, has recently been shown to be associated with improved insulin resistance (IR) and glucose metabolism. Therefore, the primary purpose of this study was to examine whether or not increased plasma PTX3 following maximal aerobic exercise would differ between obese and normal-mass subjects, and its association with the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and glucose response. Twenty-five untrained obese (n = 13 [6 males and 7 females]) and normal-mass (n = 12 [5 males and 7 females]) subjects performed an acute bout of maximal aerobic exercise to assess maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max). At baseline, plasma PTX3 concentrations are decreased in obese compared with normal-mass subjects and are negatively associated with plasma insulin and HOMA-IR values. In response to maximal exercise, plasma PTX3 responses were similar in obese and normal-mass subjects while the intensity of plasma PTX3 response as indicated by area under the curve analysis (AUCi) was not associated with HOMA-IR or glucose AUCi. However, PTX3 AUCi was positively associated with cardiorespiratory fitness levels (relative VO2max). These findings suggest that PTX3 could serve as a biomarker for both metabolic health, as well as a measurement to monitor the effectiveness of exercise interventions in obesity.

  10. Comparison of Multidimensional Item Response Models: Multivariate Normal Ability Distributions versus Multivariate Polytomous Ability Distributions. Research Report. ETS RR-08-45

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haberman, Shelby J.; von Davier, Matthias; Lee, Yi-Hsuan

    2008-01-01

    Multidimensional item response models can be based on multivariate normal ability distributions or on multivariate polytomous ability distributions. For the case of simple structure in which each item corresponds to a unique dimension of the ability vector, some applications of the two-parameter logistic model to empirical data are employed to…

  11. Response Distortion in Normal Personality Assessment: Investigating Proposed Validity Scales for the NEO-PI-R in a College Student Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fineran, Kerrie R. J.

    2009-01-01

    The NEO-PI-R (Costa & McCrae, 1992b) is an assessment of normal personality composition that is used in clinical counseling contexts as well as for personnel selection. There has been some debate regarding the necessity and usefulness of validity scales to detect response distortion on this instrument. Because the authors of the instrument,…

  12. SU-E-J-212: MR Diffusion Tensor Imaging for Assessment of Tumor and Normal Brain Tissue Responses of Juvenile Pilocytic Astrocytoma Treated by Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, P; Park, P; Li, H; Zhu, X; Mahajan, A; Grosshans, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can measure molecular mobility at the cellular level, quantified by the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). DTI may also reveal axonal fiber directional information in the white matter, quantified by the fractional anisotropy (FA). Juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma (JPA) is a rare brain tumor that occurs in children and young adults. Proton therapy (PT) is increasingly used in the treatment of pediatric brain tumors including JPA. However, the response of both tumors and normal tissues to PT is currently under investigation. We report tumor and normal brain tissue responses for a pediatric case of JPA treated with PT assessed using DTI. Methods: A ten year old male with JPA of the left thalamus received passive scattered PT to a dose of 50.4 Gy (RBE) in 28 fractions. Post PT, the patient has been followed up in seven years. At each follow up, MRI imaging including DTI was performed to assess response. MR images were registered to the treatment planning CT and the GTV mapped onto each MRI. The GTV contour was then mirrored to the right side of brain through the patient’s middle line to represent normal brain tissue. ADC and FA were measured within the ROIs. Results: Proton therapy can completely spare contra lateral brain while the target volume received full prescribed dose. From a series of MRI ADC images before and after PT at different follow ups, the enhancement corresponding to GTV had nearly disappeared more than 2 years after PT. Both ADC and FA demonstrate that contralateral normal brain tissue were not affect by PT and the tumor volume reverted to normal ADC and FA values. Conclusion: DTI allowed quantitative evaluation of tumor and normal brain tissue responses to PT. Further study in a larger cohort is warranted.

  13. Meta-chlorophenylpiperazine attenuates formalin-induced nociceptive responses through 5-HT1/2 receptors in both normal and diabetic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Takeshita, N.; Yamaguchi, I.

    1995-01-01

    1. This study was designed to investigate the effect of meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (m-CPP; a 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor agonist) on the formalin-induced nociceptive responses in normal, insulin-dependent streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic and non-insulin dependent genetically diabetic (db/db) mice. 2. A subcutaneous injection of diluted formalin (1% formaldehyde in 0.9% saline, 10 microliters) under the plantar surface of the left hindpaw induced biphasic nociceptive responses, the first and second phases considered to represent acute and chronic pain, respectively. The former response in db/db mice was significantly lower than those in normal mice, and the latter responses in STZ and db/db mice were significantly lower than those in normal mice. 3. In normal mice, m-CPP (0.32-3.2 mg ml-1, p.o.) exhibited potent antinociceptive activity, dose-dependently attenuating the first and second phase; the ID50 value of the second phase was 0.4 mg kg-1. m-CPP (0.32-3.2 mg kg-1, p.o.) also dose-dependently attenuated the formalin-induced nociceptive responses in STZ-induced diabetic mice and genetically diabetic db/db mice, and the activities were comparable to those in normal mice. 4. The antinociceptive activities of m-CPP (1 mg kg-1, p.o.) were significantly inhibited by pretreatment with pindolol (a 5-HT1-receptor antagonist, 1 mg kg-1, i.p.) or ketanserin (a 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, 1 mg kg-1, i.p.) but were hardly affected by ICS205-930 (a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, 1 mg kg-1, i.p.). 5. These results suggest that m-CPP inhibits not only acute but also chronic pain transmission through 5-HT1 and 5-HT2 receptors, and that the 5-hydroxytryptaminergic antinociceptive pathways are little affected by diabetes. PMID:8719787

  14. Regulation of pituitary gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptors by androgens in the male rabbit.

    PubMed

    Limonta, P; Ladizhenskaya, A; Gunsalus, G L; Bardin, C W; Thau, R B

    1986-01-01

    The regulation of pituitary GnRH receptors was studied in adult male rabbits after castration and androgen replacement with testosterone (T) or 7 alpha-methyl-19-nortestosterone acetate (U-15,614; T analog) supplied by Silastic capsules implanted sc. Castration increased pituitary GnRH receptors significantly, from 99.3 to 329.5 fmol/mg protein within 4 weeks, without a change in the equilibrium association constant. Serum LH concentrations increased from 0.45 to maximum levels of 2.6 ng/ml by day 8 after orchiectomy; these levels persisted throughout the 4 weeks of study. Serum FSH reached maximum levels of 33.6 ng/ml 5 days after castration. T replacement with 250, 500, and 1000 micrograms/kg X day, prevented a postcastration rise in both pituitary GnRH receptor concentrations and gonadotropin secretion, while 100 micrograms/kg X day prevented an increase in GnRH receptors, but did not completely inhibit hypersecretion of gonadotropins. Administration of T analog at doses of 6.25 and 12.5 micrograms/kg X day partially suppressed the castration-induced increase in pituitary GnRH receptor concentrations, while 25, 50, and 100 micrograms/kg X day suppressed GnRH-binding sites to the levels found in intact controls in 15 of 16 rabbits. By contrast, none of the T analog doses was able to prevent completely LH and FSH hypersecretion. The fact that both T and T analog induced dose-dependent stimulation of prostate and seminal vesicle weights indicates that there are tissue-specific differences in the sensitivity to androgens. We conclude that in the male rabbit 1) pituitary GnRH receptors significantly increase after castration; 2) this increase may partially mediate the postcastration hypersecretion of LH and FSH; 3) castration-induced effects can be prevented by androgen replacement. These results are similar to those obtained in rats, where castration increases LHRH receptors, but contrast with results in mice and hamsters, where castration either reduces or does not

  15. A single dose of the potent gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist acyline suppresses gonadotropins and testosterone for 2 weeks in healthy young men.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Karen L; Coviello, Andrea D; Page, Stephanie; Amory, John K; Anawalt, Bradley D; Bremner, William J

    2004-12-01

    Acyline is a novel GnRH antagonist that reliably inhibits gonadotropins and testosterone (T) levels in men for 48 h after a single dose up to 75 microg/kg. In this study we examined gonadotropin and T levels in 28 healthy young men administered acyline as single doses of 150 or 300 microg/kg or serial injections of 75 microg/kg. A single 300 microg/kg dose of acyline suppressed gonadotropins and T to castrate levels for 15 d (baseline, 21.1 +/- 3.1; nadir, 1.95 +/- 0.4 nmol/liter; mean +/- sem; P < 0.05). Serum acyline levels peaked 90 min after the injection of 300 microg/kg acyline to a maximum concentration of 112.4 +/- 18 ng/ml (n = 7; t(1/2) = 4.9 d). Injections of 75 microg/kg acyline every 2 d for five doses suppressed gonadotropins for more than 20 d (nadir T, 1.06 +/- 0.17 nmol/liter; P < 0.05 compared with baseline). Adverse events were mild and included erythema and pruritus at the injection site. Acyline, therefore, is one of the most potent peptide GnRH antagonists studied to date with minimal adverse events. A twice monthly injection of acyline could be used as a potent suppressor of the GnRH axis to advance the development of a hormonal male contraceptive or for treatment of hormonally dependent disease.

  16. Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) in the amphibian brain and its relationship with the gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) system: An overview.

    PubMed

    Jadhao, Arun G; Pinelli, Claudia; D'Aniello, Biagio; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that the hypothalamic neuropeptide gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) plays an important role as a primary factor regulating gonadotropin secretion in reproductive processes in vertebrates. The discovery of the presence of a gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) in the brains of birds has further contributed to our understanding of the reproduction control by the brain. GnIH plays a key role in inhibition of reproduction and acts on the pituitary gland and GnRH neurons via a novel G protein-coupled receptor (GPR147). GnIH decreases gonadotropin synthesis and release, thus inhibiting gonadal development and maintenance. The GnRH and GnIH neuronal peptidergic systems are well reported in mammals and birds, but limited information is available regarding their presence and localization in the brains of other vertebrate species, such as reptiles, amphibians and fishes. The aim of this review is to compile and update information on the localization of GnRH and GnIH neuronal systems, with a particular focus on amphibians, summarizing the neuroanatomical distribution of GnIH and GnRH and emphasizing the discovery of GnIH based on RFamide peptides and GnIH orthologous peptides found in other vertebrates and their functional significance.

  17. Synchronous activation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone gene transcription and secretion by pulsatile kisspeptin stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Han Kyoung; Kim, Hee-Dae; Park, Sung Ho; Lee, Han-Woong; Park, Jae-Yong; Seong, Jae Young; Lightman, Stafford L.; Son, Gi Hoon; Kim, Kyungjin

    2013-01-01

    Pulsatile release of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is essential for pituitary gonadotrope function. Although the importance of pulsatile GnRH secretion has been recognized for several decades, the mechanisms underlying GnRH pulse generation in hypothalamic neural networks remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate the ultradian rhythm of GnRH gene transcription in single GnRH neurons using cultured hypothalamic slices prepared from transgenic mice expressing a GnRH promoter-driven destabilized luciferase reporter. Although GnRH promoter activity in each GnRH neuron exhibited an ultradian pattern of oscillations with a period of ∼10 h, GnRH neuronal cultures exhibited partially synchronized bursts of GnRH transcriptional activity at ∼2-h intervals. Surprisingly, pulsatile administration of kisspeptin, a potent GnRH secretagogue, evoked dramatic synchronous activation of GnRH gene transcription with robust stimulation of pulsatile GnRH secretion. We also addressed the issue of hierarchical interaction between the circadian and ultradian rhythms by using Bmal1-deficient mice with defective circadian clocks. The circadian molecular oscillator barely affected basal ultradian oscillation of GnRH transcription but was heavily involved in kisspeptin-evoked responses of GnRH neurons. In conclusion, we have clearly shown synchronous bursts of GnRH gene transcription in the hypothalamic GnRH neuronal population in association with episodic neurohormone secretion, thereby providing insight into GnRH pulse generation. PMID:23509283

  18. The role of gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonists in in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Diedrich, K; Ludwig, M; Felberbaum, R E

    2001-09-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-antagonists can suppress the pituitary hormone secretion completely within a few hours, allowing the avoidance of premature luteinization within controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) for assisted reproductive technologies (ART) by midcycle administration. Two different protocols were described, which were widely used in COH in several phase II and III studies as well as in clinical practice since the GnRH-antagonists Cetrorelix (Cetrotidesound recording copyright sign; Serono International S.A., Geneva, Switzerland) and Ganirelix (Orgalutansound recording copyright sign, Antagonsound recording copyright sign; Organon, Oss, The Netherlands) are available on the market. Cetrorelix was applied in single- and multiple-dose protocols; Ganirelix was used until now only according to the multiple-dose protocol. Fertilization rates of >60% as well as clinical pregnancy rates of about 30% per transfer sound most promising. Estradiol secretion is not compromised by the GnRH-antagonists using recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) for COH. The incidence of a premature leutinizing hormone (LH) surge is far below 2% while the pituitary response remains preserved, allowing the induction of ovulation by GnRH or GnRH-agonists. However, luteal phase support remains mandatory. The incidence of severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) seems to be lower under antagonist treatment than in the long agonistic protocol. Treatment time is significantly shortened. Without any doubt GnRH-antagonists have the potential to become the new standard for controlled ovarian hyperstimulation.

  19. Pheromonal stimulation of spawning release of gametes by gonadotropin releasing hormone in the chiton, Mopalia sp.

    PubMed

    Gorbman, Aubrey; Whiteley, Arthur; Kavanaugh, Scott

    2003-03-01

    The chiton Mopalia sp., a mollusc, was exposed to various dilutions of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) in sea water to determine whether this peptide is capable of acting as a pheromone that could stimulate release of ripe gametes (spawning). Two of the peptides, lamprey GnRH-1 and tunicate GnRH-2, had this action at a higher concentration (1.0 mg/L) but dilutions to 50 microg/L no longer were effective. Three other GnRHs: lamprey GnRH-3, tunicate GnRH-1, and a modified chicken GnRH-2, had no such action under the same test conditions. Since the spawning response could be produced by some GnRHs and not by others, it would appear that some kind of molecular recognition is involved, possibly by specific binding to a receptor. In earlier preliminary experiments tunicate GnRH-2 rapidly stimulated gamete release in a hemichordate, Saccoglossus. Thus it is suggested that GnRHs, in at least some invertebrates, may function as pheromones, serving to stimulate simultaneous spawning of individuals in a population of animals, and in this way assure more successful fertilization in species that must release their gametes into the water in which they live.

  20. Human chorionic gonadotropin decreases human breast cancer cell proliferation and promotes differentiation.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xing-Hua; Wang, Yue; Wang, Nan; Yan, Ting-Bao; Xing, Wen-Jing; Zheng, Li; Zhao, Dong-Wei; Li, Yan-Qi; Liu, Long-Yue; Sun, Xue-Guang; Hu, Peng; Zhang, Tong-Cun

    2014-05-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a glycoprotein produced by placental trophoblasts. Previous studies indicated that hCG could be responsible for the pregnancy-induced protection against breast cancer in women. It is reported that hCG decreases proliferation and invasion of breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Our research also demonstrates that hCG can reduce the proliferation of MCF-7 cells by downregulating the expression of proliferation markers, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and proliferation-related Ki-67 antigen (Ki-67). Interestingly, we find here that hCG elevates the state of cellular differentiation, as characterized by the upregulation of differentiation markers, β-casein, cytokeratin-18 (CK-18), and E-cadherin. Inhibition of hCG secretion or luteinizing hormone/hCG receptors (LH/hCGRs) synthesis can weaken the effect of hCG on the induction of cell differentiation. Furthermore, hCG can suppress the expression of estrogen receptor alpha. hCG activated receptor-mediated cyclic adenosine monophosphate/protein kinase A signaling pathway. These findings indicated that a protective effect of hCG against breast cancer may be associated with its growth inhibitory and differentiation induction function in breast cancer cells.

  1. The secretory patterns of relaxin and human chorionic gonadotropin in human pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Seki, K; Uesato, T; Tabei, T; Kato, K

    1985-10-01

    Relaxin and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) were simultaneously determined in the same serum samples obtained from pregnant women. Although the secretory pattern of relaxin, in general, appeared to parallel that of hCG during human pregnancy, several discrepancies were discerned in the secretory patterns of the two hormones. The mean hCG concentration significantly differed between weeks 4-7 and 8-11 of pregnancy, but the mean relaxin concentration did not. The mean relaxin concentration began to decrease at weeks 16-19 whereas that of hCG did so at weeks 12-15. The mean relaxin concentration at weeks 4-7 was significantly higher than that at weeks 24-27, though there was no significant difference between the mean hCG concentrations in the two periods. These differences in the secretory pattern of relaxin from that of hCG indicate that relaxin secretion in pregnancy is not determined only by the circulating level of hCG. The responsiveness of the corpus luteum of pregnancy to hCG stimulation of relaxin secretion may vary as a function of the age of the corpus luteum, and this may partially account for the differences between the secretory pattern of relaxin and that of hCG observed in the present study.

  2. Pleomorphic Carcinoma of the Lung with High Serum Beta-human Chorionic Gonadotropin Level and Gynecomastia

    PubMed Central

    Hasbal, Baris; Aydin, Kubra; Bozkurt, Mustafa; Namal, Esat; Oz, Buge; Kaynak, Kamil; Demir, Gokhan

    2010-01-01

    Although gynecomastia is a well-defined paraneoplastic syndrome in patients with non-small cell lung cancer, the association with pleomorphic carcinoma has not been reported. A 50-yr-old man presented with bilateral gynecomastia and elevated serum beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (βhCG) level. Chest tomography showed a mass in the right middle lobe. Right middle lobectomy and mediastinal lymph node dissection were performed. βhCG levels decreased rapidly after surgery. Histological examination revealed pleomorphic carcinoma with positive immunostaining for βhCG. Serum βhCG levels began to increase gradually on postoperatively 4th month. Computed tomography detected recurrence and chemotherapy was started. After second cycle of chemotherapy, βhCG levels decreased dramatically again and tomography showed regression in mass. Patient died 6 months later due to brain metastasis. βhCG expression may be associated with aggressive clinical course and increased risk of recurrence, also βhCG levels may be used to evaluate therapy response in patients with pleomorphic carcinoma. PMID:21165299

  3. Paper-based microfluidic devices for electrochemical immunofiltration analysis of human chorionic gonadotropin.

    PubMed

    Cao, Liangli; Fang, Cheng; Zeng, Ruosheng; Zhao, Xiongjie; Jiang, Yuren; Chen, Zhencheng

    2017-02-02

    An electrochemical immunofiltration analysis was introduced into microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (μPADs) for the first time, which was based on photolithography and screen-printing technology. The hydrophilic test zones of the aldehyde-functionalized screen-printed electrodes (SPEs) were biofunctionalized with capture antibodies (Ab1). A sensitive immune detection method was developed by using primary signal antibody functionalized gold nanoparticles (GNPs/Ab2) and alkaline phosphatase conjugated secondary antibody (ALP-IgG). Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was performed to detect the electrochemical response. The microfluidic paper-based electrochemical immunosensor (μ-PEI) was optimized and characterized for the detection of human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG), a model analyte, in a linear range from 1.0mIUmL(-1) to 100.0 IU mL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.36mIUmL(-1). Additionally, the proposed μ-PEI was used to test HCG in real human serum and obtained satisfactory results. The disposable, efficient, sensitive and low-cost μ-PEI has exhibited great potential for the development of point-of-care testing (POCT) devices that can be applicated in healthcare monitoring.

  4. Physical-chemical and biological characterization of different preparations of equine chorionic gonadotropin

    PubMed Central

    Natal, Fabio Luis Nogueira; Ribela, Maria Teresa Carvalho Pinto; de Almeida, Beatriz Elane; de Oliveira, João Ezequiel; Bartolini, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian stimulation with commercial preparations of equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) produces extremely variable responses in domestic animals, ranging from excessive stimulation to practically no stimulation, when applied on the basis of their declared unitage. This study was conducted to analyze four commercial preparations from different manufacturers via reversed-phase HPLC (RP-HPLC) in comparison with a reference preparation and an official International Standard from the World Health Organization. The peaks obtained by this qualitative and quantitative physical–chemical analysis were compared using an in vivo bioassay based on the ovarian weight gain of prepubertal female rats. The RP-HPLC data showed one or two peaks close to a main peak (tR = 27.9 min), which were related to the in vivo bioactivity. Commercial preparations that have this altered peak showed very little or no in vivo activity, as demonstrated by rat ovarian weight and in peripubertal gilts induced to ovulate. Overall, these findings indicate that RP-HPLC can be a rapid and reliable tool to reveal changes in the physicochemical profile of commercial eCG that is apparently related to decreased biological activity of this hormone. PMID:27297410

  5. Voluntary exercise increases gonadotropin secretion in male Golden hamsters.

    PubMed

    Pieper, D R; Ali, H Y; Benson, L L; Shows, M D; Lobocki, C A; Subramanian, M G

    1995-07-01

    To determine the effect of voluntary exercise and food restriction on reproductive hormone secretion, 48 adult male hamsters were placed in cages with (EX) or without (SED) running wheels. One-half of the animals in each exercise group was fed ad libitum, and the other half was food restricted to reduce their body weight to 90 g over 4 wk. After 10 wk, the EX ad libitum-fed group had much larger testes and much higher serum follicle-stimulating hormone and testosterone levels than the other three groups, but these values in the EX food-restricted hamsters were similar to those in the SED food-restricted group. In experiment 2, 20 adult male hamsters were castrated and later implanted with silicone rubber capsules containing testosterone. Two weeks after implantation of the capsules, the serum follicle-stimulating hormone levels were higher in the EX than in the SED group of testosterone-treated hamsters, but not in animals receiving blank capsules. These data suggest that exercise increases gonadotropin secretion by inhibiting the negative feedback of testosterone.

  6. Environmental impacts on the gonadotropic system in female Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) during vitellogenesis: Photothermal effects on pituitary gonadotropins, ovarian gonadotropin receptor expression, plasma sex steroids and oocyte growth.

    PubMed

    Taranger, Geir Lasse; Muncaster, Simon; Norberg, Birgitta; Thorsen, Anders; Andersson, Eva

    2015-09-15

    The gonadotropic system and ovarian growth and development were studied during vitellogenesis in female Atlantic salmon subjected to either simulated natural photoperiod and ambient water temperature (NL-amb), or an accelerating photoperiod (short day of LD8:16 from May 10) combined with either warmed (ca 2°C above ambient; 8L-warm) or cooled water (ca 2°C below ambient; 8L-cold) from May to September. Monthly samples were collected from 10 females/group for determination of transcript levels of pituitary gonadotropin subunits (fshb and lhb) and ovarian gonadotropin receptors (fshr and lhr), plasma sex steroids (testosterone: T and estradiol-17β: E2), gonadosomatic index (GSI) and oocyte size. Short day in combination with either warmed or cooled water induced an earlier increase in pituitary fshb and lhb levels compared with NL-amb controls, and advanced ovarian growth and the seasonal profiles of T, E2. By contrast only minor effects were seen of the photothermal treatments on ovarian fshr and lhr. The 8L-cold had earlier increase in fshb, lhb and E2, but similar oocyte and gonadal growth as 8L-warm, suggesting that the 8L-cold group tried to compensate for the lower water temperature during the period of rapid gonadal growth by increasing fshb and E2 production. Both the 8L-warm and 8L-cold groups showed incomplete ovulation in a proportion of the females, possibly due to the photoperiod advancement resulting in earlier readiness of spawning occurring at a higher ambient temperature, or due to some reproductive dysfunction caused by photothermal interference with normal neuroendocrine regulation of oocyte development and maturation.

  7. SIMBIOS Normalized Water-Leaving Radiance Calibration and Validation: Sensor Response, Atmospheric Corrections, Stray Light and Sun Glint. Chapter 14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, James L.

    2001-01-01

    This Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) contract supports acquisition of match up radiometric and bio-optical data for validation of Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) and other ocean color satellites, and evaluation of uncertainty budgets and protocols for in situ measurements of normalized water leaving radiances.

  8. Tactile Functions in Learning-Disabled and Normal Children: Reliability and Validity Considerations and Commentary and Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinnealey, Moya; Royeen, Charlotte Brasic

    1989-01-01

    Kinnealey reports on a study comparing tactile functions of 30 learning-disabled and 30 normal eight-year-olds as measured by the Southern California Sensory Integration Tests and the Luria-Nebraska Neuropsychological Battery. Reliability and validity of the two measures were examined. Results showed a significant difference between the tactile…

  9. Final Oocyte Maturation in Assisted Reproduction with Human Chorionic Gonadotropin and Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone agonist (Dual Trigger)

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Sofia Andrade; Calsavara, Vinícius Fernando; Cortés, Gemma Castillón

    2016-01-01

    Final oocyte maturation with Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG) and ovarian stimulation with Follicle Stimulation Hormone (FSH) combined with Gonadotrophin-releasing Hormone (GnRH) antagonist to block Luteinizing hormone (LH) surge is a standard procedure of in vitro Fertilization (IVF) and Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection (ICSI). However, GnRH agonist has been replacing the use of hCG in certain situations, especially in patients at risk of Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome (OHSS). Some studies have also shown advantages in the combined use of GnRH agonist concurrently with hCG in inducing final oocyte maturation, a treatment known as "Dual Trigger". In theory, this method combines the advantages of both induction regimens, and it has brought promising results. The objective of this study is to compare Dual Trigger with the use of hCG alone or the use of GnRH agonist alone. A systematic review of articles on Dual Trigger and a retrospective cohort study comparing the three methods of induction of final oocyte maturation have been conducted. It has been found that Dual Triggering for poor responder patients had a statistically significant increase in the number of retrieved oocytes, mature oocytes, and fertilized embryos in the positive beta hCG rate, implantation rate, and newborn/transferred embryo (TE) rate. PMID:28050961

  10. Final Oocyte Maturation in Assisted Reproduction with Human Chorionic Gonadotropin and Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone agonist (Dual Trigger).

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Sofia Andrade de; Calsavara, Vinícius Fernando; Cortés, Gemma Castillón

    2016-12-01

    Final oocyte maturation with Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG) and ovarian stimulation with Follicle Stimulation Hormone (FSH) combined with Gonadotrophin-releasing Hormone (GnRH) antagonist to block Luteinizing hormone (LH) surge is a standard procedure of in vitro Fertilization (IVF) and Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection (ICSI). However, GnRH agonist has been replacing the use of hCG in certain situations, especially in patients at risk of Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome (OHSS). Some studies have also shown advantages in the combined use of GnRH agonist concurrently with hCG in inducing final oocyte maturation, a treatment known as "Dual Trigger". In theory, this method combines the advantages of both induction regimens, and it has brought promising results. The objective of this study is to compare Dual Trigger with the use of hCG alone or the use of GnRH agonist alone. A systematic review of articles on Dual Trigger and a retrospective cohort study comparing the three methods of induction of final oocyte maturation have been conducted. It has been found that Dual Triggering for poor responder patients had a statistically significant increase in the number of retrieved oocytes, mature oocytes, and fertilized embryos in the positive beta hCG rate, implantation rate, and newborn/transferred embryo (TE) rate.

  11. Laparoscopic oviductal artificial insemination improves pregnancy success in exogenous gonadotropin-treated domestic cats as a model for endangered felids.

    PubMed

    Conforti, Valéria A; Bateman, Helen L; Schook, Mandi W; Newsom, Jackie; Lyons, Leslie A; Grahn, Robert A; Deddens, James A; Swanson, William F

    2013-07-01

    Artificial insemination (AI) in cats traditionally uses equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) to induce follicular development and ovulation, with subsequent bilateral laparoscopic intrauterine insemination. However, long-acting hCG generates undesirable secondary ovulations in cats. Uterine AI also requires relatively high numbers of spermatozoa for fertilization (~8 × 10(6) sperm), and unfortunately, sperm recovery from felids is frequently poor. Using short-acting porcine luteinizing hormone (pLH) instead of hCG, and using the oviduct as the site of sperm deposition, could improve fertilization success while requiring fewer spermatozoa. Our objectives were to compare pregnancy and fertilization success between 1) uterine and oviductal inseminations and 2) eCG/hCG and eCG/pLH regimens in domestic cats. Sixteen females received either eCG (100 IU)/hCG (75 IU) or eCG (100 IU)/pLH (1000 IU). All females ovulated and were inseminated in one uterine horn and the contralateral oviduct using fresh semen (1 × 10(6) motile sperm/site) from a different male for each site. Pregnant females (11/16; 69%) were spayed approximately 20 days post-AI, and fetal paternity was genetically determined. The number of corpora lutea (CL) at AI was similar between hormone regimens, but hCG increased the number of CL at 20 days post-AI. Numbers of pregnancies and normal fetuses were similar between regimens. Implantation abnormalities were observed in the hCG group only. Finally, oviductal AI produced more fetuses than uterine AI. In summary, laparoscopic oviductal AI with low sperm numbers in eCG/hCG- or eCG/pLH-treated females resulted in high pregnancy and fertilization percentages in domestic cats. Our subsequent successes with oviductal AI in eCG/pLH-treated nondomestic felids to produce healthy offspring supports cross-species applicability.

  12. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) modulates auditory processing in the fish brain.

    PubMed

    Maruska, Karen P; Tricas, Timothy C

    2011-04-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (GnRH1) neurons control reproductive activity, but GnRH2 and GnRH3 neurons have widespread projections and function as neuromodulators in the vertebrate brain. While these extra-hypothalamic GnRH forms function as olfactory and visual neuromodulators, their potential effect on processing of auditory information is unknown. To test the hypothesis that GnRH modulates the processing of auditory information in the brain, we used immunohistochemistry to determine seasonal variations in these neuropeptide systems, and in vivo single-neuron recordings to identify neuromodulation in the midbrain torus semicircularis of the soniferous damselfish Abudefduf abdominalis. Our results show abundant GnRH-immunoreactive (-ir) axons in auditory processing regions of the midbrain and hindbrain. The number of extra-hypothalamic GnRH somata and the density of GnRH-ir axons within the auditory torus semicircularis also varied across the year, suggesting seasonal changes in GnRH influence of auditory processing. Exogenous application of GnRH (sGnRH and cGnRHII) caused a primarily inhibitory effect on auditory-evoked single neuron responses in the torus semicircularis. In the majority of neurons, GnRH caused a long-lasting decrease in spike rate in response to both tone bursts and playbacks of complex natural sounds. GnRH also decreased response latency and increased auditory thresholds in a frequency and stimulus type-dependent manner. To our knowledge, these results show for the first time in any vertebrate that GnRH can influence context-specific auditory processing in vivo in the brain, and may function to modulate seasonal auditory-mediated social behaviors.

  13. Proliferation and metastatic potential of endometrial cancer cells in response to metformin treatment in a high versus normal glucose environment

    PubMed Central

    de Barros Machado, Amanda; dos Reis, Vania; Weber, Sebastian; Jauckus, Julia; Brum, Ilma Simoni; von Eye Corleta, Helena; Strowitzki, Thomas; Capp, Edison; Germeyer, Ariane

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve our understanding of the potential preventive and therapeutic role of metformin, the present study aimed to investigate the capability of low-dose metformin in the efficient inhibition of cancer development and the reduction of the metastasis of endometrial adenocarcinoma type I and primary endometrial epithelial cells (eEPs), with the drug acting as a treatment in a hyperinsulinemic environment exposed to high and normal glucose conditions. The Ishikawa endometrial adenocarcinoma cell line and primary eEPs were exposed to an environment with high (17 mM) or normal glucose (5 mM) and treated with insulin, low-dose metformin (0.1 mM) or a combined treatment. Metastatic potential was assessed by migration and invasion assays, and relative cell proliferation was determined. Metformin at a low dose potently inhibited the insulin action, decreasing the ability of the endometrial cancer (EC) cell line to migrate and invade in a high and normal glucose environment, and decreasing the migration ability of the primary eEPs. In the EC cell line, the insulin treatment increased the proliferation, without any subsequent reduction of proliferation by the addition of 0.1 mM metformin; however, relative cell proliferation sensitivity to metformin was observed in the range between 1 and 5 mM regardless of the glucose concentration present. Overall, metformin at 0.1 mM is not efficient enough to decrease the proliferation in an EC cell line. However, at this concentration, metformin can inhibit the insulin action in endometrial epithelial cancer cells, demonstrating an anti-metastatic effect in high and normal glucose environments. PMID:27900046

  14. Pupil responses derived from outer and inner retinal photoreception are normal in patients with hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Aki; Collomb, Sylvie; Léon, Lorette; Münch, Mirjam

    2014-03-01

    We compared the pupil responses originating from outer versus inner retinal photoreception between patients with isolated hereditary optic neuropathy (HON, n = 8) and healthy controls (n = 8). Three different testing protocols were used. For the first two protocols, a response function of the maximal pupil contraction versus stimulus light intensity was generated and the intensity at which half of the maximal pupil contraction, the half-max intensity, was determined. For the third protocol, the pupil size after light offset, the re-dilation rate and re-dilation amplitude were calculated to assess the post-light stimulus response. Patients with HON had bilateral, symmetric optic atrophy and significant reduction of visual acuity and visual field compared to controls. There were no significant mean differences in the response curve and pupil response parameters that reflect mainly rod, cone or melanopsin activity between patients and controls. In patients, there was a significant correlation between the half-max intensity of the red light sequence and visual field loss. In conclusion, pupil responses derived from outer or inner retinal photoreception in HON patients having mild-to moderate visual dysfunction are not quantitatively different from age-matched controls. However, an association between the degree of visual field loss and the half-max intensity of the cone response suggests that more advanced stages of disease may lead to impaired pupil light reflexes.

  15. Effects of phorbol 12,13-diacetate and its influence on spasmogenic responses in normal and sensitized guinea-pig trachea.

    PubMed

    De Diego, A; Cortijo, J; Villagrasa, V; Perpiñá, M; Esplugues, J; Morcillo, E J

    1995-09-01

    We have studied the effects of phorbol 12,13-diacetate (PDA) and its influence on a variety of spasmogenic responses in trachea isolated from normal and sensitized guinea-pigs. Tracheal preparations were denuded of epithelium, treated with indomethacin (2.8 microM), and cooled to 20 degrees C. In these experimental conditions, tracheal strips contracted to PDA (0.1 nM-1 microM). Contractions to PDA (1 microM) were greater in sensitized tissues. In normal trachea, contractions to PDA (0.1 microM) were depressed by H-7, 1-(5-isoquinolinyl-sulphonyl)-2-methylpiperazine, (50 microM), amiloride (10 microM), verapamil (10 microM) and Ca(2+)-free exposure. Similar effects were obtained in sensitized trachea except that PDA-induced contraction was resistant to verapamil and Ca(2+)-free exposure. Cooling (20 degrees C) of normal trachea substantially depressed the response to CaCl2 (in K(+)-depolarized tissues), KCl, histamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine without affecting the spasm induced by acetylcholine. This inhibitory effect of cooling was not observed in sensitized trachea. PDA (0.1 microM) did not affect spasmogenic responses at 37 degrees C but counteracted the inhibitory effect of cooling in normal trachea. PDA had no effect on sensitized tissues. PDA (0.1-1 microM) did not alter Ca(2+)-induced contraction of skinned normal and sensitized trachea. These results support the hypothesis that intracellularly stored Ca2+ plays an important role in the activation of sensitized tracheal muscle.

  16. Pigment epithelium-derived factor enhances tumor response to radiation through vasculature normalization in allografted lung cancer in mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Z; Dong, Y; Peng, F; Yu, Z; Zuo, Y; Dai, Z; Chen, Y; Wang, J; Hu, X; Zhou, Q; Ma, H; Bao, Y; Gao, G; Chen, M

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to explore the potential therapeutic effects of the combination of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) and radiation on lung cancer. The Lewis lung cancer (LLC) allografts in nude mice were treated with radiation, PEDF and PEDF combined with radiation. The morphologic changes of tumor vasculature and the hypoxic fraction of tumor tissues were evaluated. Significant inhibition of tumor growth was observed when radiation was applied between the 3rd and 7th day (the vasculature normalization window) after the initiation of PEDF treatment. During the vasculature normalization window, the tumor blood vessels in PEDF-treated mice were less tortuous and more uniform than those in the LLC allograft tumor treated with phosphate-buffered saline. Meanwhile, the thickness of the basement membrane was remarkably reduced and pericyte coverage was significantly increased with the PEDF treatment. We also found that tumor hypoxic fraction decreased during the 3rd to the 7th day after PEDF treatment, suggesting improved intratumoral oxygenation. Taken together, our results show that PEDF improved the effects of radiation therapy on LLC allografts by inducing a vascular normalization window from the 3rd to the 7th day after PEDF treatment. Our findings provide a basis for treating lung cancer with the combination of PEDF and radiation.

  17. Comparison of Nocturia Response to Desmopressin Treatment between Patients with Normal and High Nocturnal Bladder Capacity Index

    PubMed Central

    Leskovar, Jurij

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To compare efficacy of desmopressin for treatment of nocturia between patients with normal and high nocturnal bladder capacity index (NBCi). Methods. Retrospective analysis of adult patients treated with desmopressin for nocturia. Patients were analyzed according to high or normal NBCi value before treatment. Results. 55 patients were identified, aged 49–84, 47 males, 8 females, who started desmopressin 0.2 mg nocte between 2009 and 2011. Two groups (N: normal and H: high NBCi) were similar regarding number, gender, age, 24 h urine volume, and nocturnal urine volume. On treatment, nocturnal volume decreased by mean of 364 mL. Number of nightly voids decreased in N group from 3.11 to 1.50, in H from 3.96 to 1.44. Nocturnal polyuria and nocturia indices also decreased significantly. NBCi remained the same in N group (0.56 on therapy) and in H group decreased to mean 0.63. All on-treatment values were statistically similar in N and H groups. Pretreatment differences were abolished with treatment. NBCi was significantly correlated to nocturia reduction—larger reduction was observed in patients with higher NBCi. In 8/55 patients, hyponatremia was detected, but without clinical consequences. Conclusions. The results indicate that the effectiveness of desmopressin on nocturia is not dependent upon the patient's pretreatment NBCi. PMID:24223034

  18. Modeling notch signaling in normal and neoplastic hematopoiesis: global gene expression profiling in response to activated notch expression.

    PubMed

    Ganapati, Uma; Tan, Hongying Tina; Lynch, Maureen; Dolezal, Milana; de Vos, Sven; Gasson, Judith C

    2007-08-01

    In normal hematopoiesis, proliferation is tightly linked to differentiation in ways that involve cell-cell interaction with stromal elements in the bone marrow stem cell niche. Numerous in vitro and in vivo studies strongly support a role for Notch signaling in the regulation of stem cell renewal and hematopoiesis. Not surprisingly, mutations in the Notch gene have been linked to a number of types of malignancies. To better define the function of Notch in both normal and neoplastic hematopoiesis, a tetracycline-inducible system regulating expression of a ligand-independent, constitutively active form of Notch1 was introduced into murine E14Tg2a embryonic stem cells. During coculture, OP9 stromal cells induce the embryonic stem cells to differentiate first to hemangioblasts and subsequently to hematopoietic stem cells. Our studies indicate that activation of Notch signaling in flk+ hemangioblasts dramatically reduces their survival and proliferative capacity and lowers the levels of hematopoietic stem cell markers CD34 and c-Kit and the myeloid marker CD11b. Global gene expression profiling of day 8 hematopoietic progenitors in the absence and presence of activated Notch yield candidate genes required for normal hematopoietic differentiation, as well as putative downstream targets of oncogenic forms of Notch including the noncanonical Wnts Wnt4 and 5A. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article.

  19. Gonadotropins in the Russian Sturgeon: Their Role in Steroid Secretion and the Effect of Hormonal Treatment on Their Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Yom-Din, Svetlana; Hollander-Cohen, Lian; Aizen, Joseph; Boehm, Benjamin; Shpilman, Michal; Golan, Matan; Hurvitz, Avshalom; Degani, Gad; Levavi-Sivan, Berta

    2016-01-01

    In the reproduction process of male and female fish, pituitary derived gonadotropins (GTHs) play a key role. To be able to specifically investigate certain functions of Luteinizing (LH) and Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) in Russian sturgeon (Acipenser gueldenstaedtii; st), we produced recombinant variants of the hormones using the yeast Pichia pastoris as a protein production system. We accomplished to create in vitro biologically active heterodimeric glycoproteins consisting of two associated α- and β-subunits in sufficient quantities. Three dimensional modelling of both GTHs was conducted in order to study the differences between the two GTHs. Antibodies were produced against the unique β-subunit of each of the GTHs, in order to be used for immunohistochemical analysis and to develop an ELISA for blood and pituitary hormone quantification. This detection technique revealed the specific localization of the LH and FSH cells in the sturgeon pituitary and pointed out that both cell types are present in substantially higher numbers in mature males and females, compared to immature fish. With the newly attained option to prevent cross-contamination when investigating on the effects of GTH administration, we compared the steroidogeneic response (estradiol and 11-Keto testosterone (11-KT) in female and males, respectively) of recombinant stLH, stFSH, and carp pituitary extract in male and female sturgeon gonads at different developmental stages. Finally, we injected commercially available gonadotropin releasing hormones analog (GnRH) to mature females, and found a moderate effect on the development of ovarian follicles. Application of only testosterone (T) resulted in a significant increase in circulating levels of 11-KT whereas the combination of GnRH + T did not affect steroid levels at all. The response pattern for estradiol demonstrated a similar situation. FSH levels showed significant increases when GnRH + T was administered, while no changes were present in

  20. Genome-wide screen of cell-cycle regulators in normal and tumor cells identifies a differential response to nucleosome depletion

    PubMed Central

    Sokolova, Maria; Turunen, Mikko; Mortusewicz, Oliver; Björklund, Mikael; Taipale, Minna; Helleday, Thomas; Taipale, Jussi

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT To identify cell cycle regulators that enable cancer cells to replicate DNA and divide in an unrestricted manner, we performed a parallel genome-wide RNAi screen in normal and cancer cell lines. In addition to many shared regulators, we found that tumor and normal cells are differentially sensitive to loss of the histone genes transcriptional regulator CASP8AP2. In cancer cells, loss of CASP8AP2 leads to a failure to synthesize sufficient amount of histones in the S-phase of the cell cycle, resulting in slowing of individual replication forks. Despite this, DNA replication fails to arrest, and tumor cells progress in an elongated S-phase that lasts several days, finally resulting in death of most of the affected cells. In contrast, depletion of CASP8AP2 in normal cells triggers a response that arrests viable cells in S-phase. The arrest is dependent on p53, and preceded by accumulation of markers of DNA damage, indicating that nucleosome depletion is sensed in normal cells via a DNA-damage -like response that is defective in tumor cells. PMID:27929715

  1. Leptin-responsive GABAergic neurons regulate fertility through pathways that result in reduced kisspeptinergic tone.

    PubMed

    Martin, Cecilia; Navarro, Víctor M; Simavli, Serap; Vong, Linh; Carroll, Rona S; Lowell, Bradford B; Kaiser, Ursula B

    2014-04-23

    The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin plays a critical role in the central transmission of energy balance to modulate reproductive function. However, the neurocircuitry underlying this interaction remains elusive, in part due to incomplete knowledge of first-order leptin-responsive neurons. To address this gap, we explored the contribution of predominantly inhibitory (GABAergic) neurons versus excitatory (glutamatergic) neurons in the female mouse by selective ablation of the leptin receptor in each neuronal population: Vgat-Cre;Lepr(lox/lox) and Vglut2-Cre;Lepr(lox/lox) mice, respectively. Female Vgat-Cre;Lepr(lox/lox) but not Vglut2-Cre;Lepr(lox/lox) mice were obese. Vgat-Cre;Lepr(lox/lox) mice had delayed or absent vaginal opening, persistent diestrus, and atrophic reproductive tracts with absent corpora lutea. In contrast, Vglut2-Cre;Lepr(lox/lox) females exhibited reproductive maturation and function comparable to Lepr(lox/lox) control mice. Intracerebroventricular administration of kisspeptin-10 to Vgat-Cre;Lepr(lox/lox) female mice elicited robust gonadotropin responses, suggesting normal gonadotropin-releasing hormone neuronal and gonadotrope function. However, adult ovariectomized Vgat-Cre;Lepr(lox/lox) mice displayed significantly reduced levels of Kiss1 (but not Tac2) mRNA in the arcuate nucleus, and a reduced compensatory luteinizing hormone increase compared with control animals. Estradiol replacement after ovariectomy inhibited gonadotropin release to a similar extent in both groups. These animals also exhibited a compromised positive feedback response to sex steroids, as shown by significantly lower Kiss1 mRNA levels in the AVPV, compared with Lepr(lox/lox) mice. We conclude that leptin-responsive GABAergic neurons, but not glutamatergic neurons, act as metabolic sensors to regulate fertility, at least in part through modulatory effects on kisspeptin neurons.

  2. The metabolic and hormonal responses to glucose infusion in anaesthetized normal and diabetic dogs controlled by an artificial B-cell.

    PubMed

    Albisser, A M; Zinman, B; Marliss, E B; Botz, C K

    1980-06-01

    The metabolic response to glucose infusion in anaesthetized normal and pancreatectomized dogs has been assessed. Normoglycaemia was achieved in the diabetic dogs with an external artificial B-cell which administered insulin into the peripheral circulation. No differences were found in the levels of blood glucose, glucagon, lactate, pyruvate and plasma non-esterified fatty acids, either in the fasting state or in response to glucose infusion. However, compared to normal animals normoglycaemic diabetic dogs had significantly elevated circulating levels of insulin and alanine at all times. Fasting levels of the same hormones and metabolites were also measured in conscious dogs. Blood pyruvate levels were higher, and plasma non-esterified fatty acid levels lower, in the anaesthetized animals. There were also minor but consistent changes in blood glucose and plasma insulin while glucagon, lactate and alanine levels were unaffected by anaesthesia. In conclusion, controlled barbiturate anaesthesia has relatively minor effects on the metabolic and hormonal status of the dog. The metabolic and hormonal response to glucose infusion in pancreatectomized dogs treated with an artificial B-cell was almost entirely normalized, except for peripheral hyperinsulinaemia and hyperalaninaemia.

  3. Commercial radioimmunoassay for beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin: falsely positive determinations due to elevated serum luteinizing hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.E. Jr.; Platoff, G.E.; Kubrock, C.A.; Stuzman, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    Among 17 men who had received seemingly curative treatment for unilateral non-seminomatous germ cell tumors for the testis and who had consistently normal serum human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) levels at a reference laboratory, 7 (41%) had at least one falsely positive commercial serum HCG determination. To investigate the cause of these falsely positive determinations the authors measured the cross reactivity of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) standards in the commercial HCG assay, and studied the relationships between commercial HCG levels and serum LH levels, serum FSH levels and gonadal status in men with and without normal gonadal function. The falsely positive HCG determinations appeared to be due to elevated serum LH levels and cross reactivity of LH in the commercial HCG assay because: 1) there was substantial cross reactivity of the LH standards in the commercial assay, 2) the serum LH was elevated in four of six men with solitary testes, 3) there was a striking correlation between elevated serum LH levels and falsely elevated commercial HCG levels in ten men with solitary or absent testes, and 4) there were no falsely positive HCG determinations in 13 normal men but there were falsely positive HCG determinations in seven of ten anorchid men.

  4. Evaluation of fault-normal/fault-parallel directions rotated ground motions for response history analysis of an instrumented six-story building

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalkan, Erol; Kwong, Neal S.

    2012-01-01

    According to regulatory building codes in United States (for example, 2010 California Building Code), at least two horizontal ground-motion components are required for three-dimensional (3D) response history analysis (RHA) of buildings. For sites within 5 km of an active fault, these records should be rotated to fault-normal/fault-parallel (FN/FP) directions, and two RHA analyses should be performed separately (when FN and then FP are aligned with the transverse direction of the structural axes). It is assumed that this approach will lead to two sets of responses that envelope the range of possible responses over all nonredundant rotation angles. This assumption is examined here using a 3D computer model of a six-story reinforced-concrete instrumented building subjected to an ensemble of bidirectional near-fault ground motions. Peak responses of engineering demand parameters (EDPs) were obtained for rotation angles ranging from 0° through 180° for evaluating the FN/FP directions. It is demonstrated that rotating ground motions to FN/FP directions (1) does not always lead to the maximum responses over all angles, (2) does not always envelope the range of possible responses, and (3) does not provide maximum responses for all EDPs simultaneously even if it provides a maximum response for a specific EDP.

  5. Effects of inhaling the vapor of Lavandula burnatii super-derived essential oil and linalool on plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), catecholamine and gonadotropin levels in experimental menopausal female rats.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kenji; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Sashida, Yutaka

    2005-02-01

    The effects of inhaling the vapor of Lavandula burnatii super-derived essential oil and one of the main components of lavender oil, linalool on plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), catecholamine and gonadotropin levels in menopausal model rats under ether-inhalation were studied. The increased plasma ACTH levels induced by ether-inhalation tended to decrease by pre-inhalation of Lavandula burnetii super and linalool vapor was induced the decrease of ACTH level. The decrease in adrenaline, noradrenaline and dopamine levels induced by ether-inhalation tended to recover, especially, the dopamine level significantly recovered to the normal level by the inhalation of Lavandula burnetii super and linalool vapor. However, the increased plasma gonadotropin levels in ovariectomized retired female rats (menopausal model rats) was significantly decreased by the inhalation of linalool. These results suggest that lavender oil or one of the main components, linalool may contribute to relieving tension and may be applicable to the treatment of menopausal disorders in human beings.

  6. Effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone II receptor (GnRHR-II) knockdown on testosterone secretion in the boar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unlike the classical gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH-I), the second mammalian GnRH isoform (GnRH-II; His5, Trp7, Tyr8) is a poor stimulator of gonadotropin secretion. In addition, GnRH-II is ubiquitously expressed, with transcript levels highest in tissues outside of the brain. A receptor speci...

  7. Use of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone for Intractable Seizures in a Girl with Precocious Puberty without Hypothalamic Hamartoma.

    PubMed

    Govil-Dalela, Tuhina; Kumar, Ajay; Moltz, Kathleen C; Chugani, Harry T

    2016-07-01

    The use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs has been reported in the treatment of gelastic seizures and precocious puberty associated with hypothalamic hamartomas, but not in other seizure types without hypothalamic hamartoma. We describe a 7.5 year-old girl whose seizures subsided after gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog implant, administered for precocious puberty.

  8. Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Partially Mediates Phthalate Association With Male and Female Anogenital Distance

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myoung Keun; Naimi, Ashley I.; Barrett, Emily; Nguyen, Ruby H.; Sathyanarayana, Sheela; Zhao, Yaqi; Thiet, Mari-Paule; Redmon, J. Bruce; Swan, Shanna H.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Prenatal exposure to phthalates disrupts male sex development in rodents. In humans, the placental glycoprotein hormone human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is required for male development, and may be a target of phthalate exposure. Objective: This study aimed to test the hypothesis that phthalates disrupt placental hCG differentially in males and females with consequences for sexually dimorphic genital development. Design: The Infant Development and Environment Study (TIDES) is a prospective birth cohort. Pregnant women were enrolled from 2010–2012 at four university hospitals. Participants: Participants were TIDES subjects (n = 541) for whom genital and phthalate measurements were available and who underwent prenatal serum screening in the first or second trimester. Main Outcome Measures: Outcomes included hCG levels in maternal serum in the first and second trimesters and anogenital distance (AGD), which is the distance from the anus to the genitals in male and female neonates. Results: Higher first-trimester urinary mono-n-butyl phthalate (MnBP; P = .01), monobenzyl phthalate (MBzP; P = .03), and mono-carboxy-isooctyl phthalate (P < .01) were associated with higher first-trimester hCG in women carrying female fetuses, and lower hCG in women carrying males. First-trimester hCG was positively correlated with the AGD z score in female neonates, and inversely correlated in males (P = 0.01). We measured significant associations of MnBP (P < .01), MBzP (P = .02), and mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP; P < .01) with AGD, after adjusting for sex differences. Approximately 52% (MnBP) and 25% (MEHP) of this association in males, and 78% in females (MBzP), could be attributed to the phthalate association with hCG. Conclusions: First-trimester hCG levels, normalized by fetal sex, may reflect sexually dimorphic action of phthalates on placental function and on genital development. PMID:26200238

  9. Long-term effects of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs in girls with central precocious puberty.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Young

    2015-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs (GnRHa) are widely used to treat central precocious puberty (CPP). The efficacy and safety of GnRHa treatment are known, but concerns regarding long-term complications are increasing. Follow-up observation results after GnRHa treatment cessation in female CPP patients up to adulthood showed that treatment (especially <6 years) was beneficial for final adult height relative to that of pretreated or untreated patients. Puberty was recovered within 1 year after GnRHa treatment discontinuation, and there were no abnormalities in reproductive function. CPP patients had a relatively high body mass index (BMI) at the time of CPP diagnosis, but BMI standard deviation score maintenance during GnRHa treatment seemed to prevent the aggravation of obesity in many cases. Bone mineral density decreases during GnRHa treatment but recovers to normal afterwards, and peak bone mass formation through bone mineral accretion during puberty is not affected. Recent studies reported a high prevalence of polycystic ovarian syndrome in CPP patients after GnRHa treatment, but it remains unclear whether the cause is the reproductive mechanism of CPP or GnRHa treatment itself. Studies of the psychosocial effects on CPP patients after GnRHa treatment are very limited. Some studies have reported decreases in psychosocial problems after GnRHa treatment. Overall, GnRHa seems effective and safe for CPP patients, based on long-term follow-up studies. There have been only a few long-term studies on GnRHa treatment in CPP patients in Korea; therefore, additional long-term follow-up investigations are needed to establish the efficacy and safety of GnRHa in the Korean population.

  10. Long-term effects of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs in girls with central precocious puberty

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs (GnRHa) are widely used to treat central precocious puberty (CPP). The efficacy and safety of GnRHa treatment are known, but concerns regarding long-term complications are increasing. Follow-up observation results after GnRHa treatment cessation in female CPP patients up to adulthood showed that treatment (especially <6 years) was beneficial for final adult height relative to that of pretreated or untreated patients. Puberty was recovered within 1 year after GnRHa treatment discontinuation, and there were no abnormalities in reproductive function. CPP patients had a relatively high body mass index (BMI) at the time of CPP diagnosis, but BMI standard deviation score maintenance during GnRHa treatment seemed to prevent the aggravation of obesity in many cases. Bone mineral density decreases during GnRHa treatment but recovers to normal afterwards, and peak bone mass formation through bone mineral accretion during puberty is not affected. Recent studies reported a high prevalence of polycystic ovarian syndrome in CPP patients after GnRHa treatment, but it remains unclear whether the cause is the reproductive mechanism of CPP or GnRHa treatment itself. Studies of the psychosocial effects on CPP patients after GnRHa treatment are very limited. Some studies have reported decreases in psychosocial problems after GnRHa treatment. Overall, GnRHa seems effective and safe for CPP patients, based on long-term follow-up studies. There have been only a few long-term studies on GnRHa treatment in CPP patients in Korea; therefore, additional long-term follow-up investigations are needed to establish the efficacy and safety of GnRHa in the Korean population. PMID:25729392

  11. Human chorionic gonadotropin is expressed virtually in all intracranial germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Takami, Hirokazu; Fukushima, Shintaro; Fukuoka, Kohei; Suzuki, Tomonari; Yanagisawa, Takaaki; Matsushita, Yuko; Nakamura, Taishi; Arita, Hideyuki; Mukasa, Akitake; Saito, Nobuhito; Kanamori, Masayuki; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Tominaga, Teiji; Kobayashi, Keiichi; Nagane, Motoo; Iuchi, Toshihiko; Tamura, Kaoru; Maehara, Taketoshi; Sugiyama, Kazuhiko; Nakada, Mitsutoshi; Kanemura, Yonehiro; Nonaka, Masahiro; Yokogami, Kiyotaka; Takeshima, Hideo; Narita, Yoshitaka; Shibui, Soichiro; Nakazato, Yoichi; Nishikawa, Ryo; Ichimura, Koichi; Matsutani, Masao

    2015-08-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) production has been utilized as a diagnostic marker for germinoma with syncytiotrophoblastic giant cells (STGC) and choriocarcinoma. Elevated hCG in germinoma is considered to predict less favorable prognosis, and an intensive treatment strategy may accordingly be applied. However, there is some evidence that any germinoma may produce hCG to varying extent. We investigated mRNA expression of the hCG β subunit (hCGβ) using real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction in 94 germ cell tumors (GCTs). Most (93.3 %) GCTs showed higher expression levels compared with that of normal brain tissue (1.09 × 10(0)-1.40 × 10(5) fold). The expression was the highest in GCTs which harbor choriocarcinoma or STGC components. The expression level of hCGβ in germinoma was highly variable (1.09 × 10(0)-5.88 × 10(4) fold) in linear but not bimodal distribution. hCG concentrations in serum and CSF correlated with gene expression, especially when GCTs with single histological component were analyzed separately. The expression was not significantly associated with recurrence in pure germinoma. These results suggest that the serum/CSF hCG levels may need to be interpreted with caution as most GCTs appear to have the capacity of producing hCG irrespective of their histology. The clinical significance of ubiquitous hCG expression in GCTs needs further investigation.

  12. The omega-3 fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid is required for normal alcohol response behaviors in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Raabe, Richard C; Mathies, Laura D; Davies, Andrew G; Bettinger, Jill C

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol addiction is a widespread societal problem, for which there are few treatments. There are significant genetic and environmental influences on abuse liability, and understanding these factors will be important for the identification of susceptible individuals and the development of effective pharmacotherapies. In humans, the level of response to alcohol is strongly predictive of subsequent alcohol abuse. Level of response is a combination of counteracting responses to alcohol, the level of sensitivity to the drug and the degree to which tolerance develops during the drug exposure, called acute functional tolerance. We use the simple and well-characterized nervous system of Caenorhabditis elegans to model the acute behavioral effects of ethanol to identify genetic and environmental factors that influence level of response to ethanol. Given the strong molecular conservation between the neurobiological machinery of worms and humans, cellular-level effects of ethanol are likely to be conserved. Increasingly, variation in long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid levels has been implicated in complex neurobiological phenotypes in humans, and we recently found that fatty acid levels modify ethanol responses in worms. Here, we report that 1) eicosapentaenoic acid, an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, is required for the development of acute functional tolerance, 2) dietary supplementation of eicosapentaenoic acid is sufficient for acute tolerance, and 3) dietary eicosapentaenoic acid can alter the wild-type response to ethanol. These results suggest that genetic variation influencing long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid levels may be important abuse liability loci, and that dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids may be an important environmental modulator of the behavioral response to ethanol.

  13. The Omega-3 Fatty Acid Eicosapentaenoic Acid Is Required for Normal Alcohol Response Behaviors in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Raabe, Richard C.; Mathies, Laura D.; Davies, Andrew G.; Bettinger, Jill C.

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol addiction is a widespread societal problem, for which there are few treatments. There are significant genetic and environmental influences on abuse liability, and understanding these factors will be important for the identification of susceptible individuals and the development of effective pharmacotherapies. In humans, the level of response to alcohol is strongly predictive of subsequent alcohol abuse. Level of response is a combination of counteracting responses to alcohol, the level of sensitivity to the drug and the degree to which tolerance develops during the drug exposure, called acute functional tolerance. We use the simple and well-characterized nervous system of Caenorhabditis elegans to model the acute behavioral effects of ethanol to identify genetic and environmental factors that influence level of response to ethanol. Given the strong molecular conservation between the neurobiological machinery of worms and humans, cellular-level effects of ethanol are likely to be conserved. Increasingly, variation in long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid levels has been implicated in complex neurobiological phenotypes in humans, and we recently found that fatty acid levels modify ethanol responses in worms. Here, we report that 1) eicosapentaenoic acid, an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, is required for the development of acute functional tolerance, 2) dietary supplementation of eicosapentaenoic acid is sufficient for acute tolerance, and 3) dietary eicosapentaenoic acid can alter the wild-type response to ethanol. These results suggest that genetic variation influencing long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid levels may be important abuse liability loci, and that dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids may be an important environmental modulator of the behavioral response to ethanol. PMID:25162400

  14. Demonstration of gonadotropin during the second half of the cycle in women using intrauterine contraception.

    PubMed

    Beling, C G; Cederqvist, L L; Fuchs, F

    1976-07-15

    A highly sensitive pregnancy test based upon partial purification of urinary gonadotropins by Sephadex gel filtration and concentration of the gonadotropin-containing fraction by lyophilization has been developed. Values over 100 I.U. per liter after Day 22 are considered to indicate conception. They are verified by radioimmunoassay (RIA) of the beta-subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) in plasma. Urine samples from users of intrauterine contraception were examined at random. Among samples collected after Day 21, 14 contained more than 100 I.U. per liter. In three of these cases, RIA of the beta-subunit HCG in plasma was employed and verified the results. The results support the hypothesis that intrauterine contraception interferes with implantation and establishment of pregnancy but not with fertilization and blastocyst formation.

  15. Lack of evidence for low-LET radiation induced bystander response in normal human fibroblasts and colon carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Marianne B. Sowa; Wilfried Goetz; Janet E. Baulch; Dinah N. Pyles; Jaroslaw Dziegielewski; Susannah Yovino; Andrew R. Snyder; Sonia M. de Toledo; Edouard I. Azzam; William F. Morgan

    2008-06-30

    Purpose: To investigate radiation induced bystander responses and to determine the role of gap junction intercellular communication and the radiation environment in propagating this response. Materials and Methods: We use medium transfer and targeted irradiation to examine radiation induced bystander effects in primary human fibroblast (AG1522) and human colon carcinoma (RKO36) cells. We examined the effect of variables such as gap junction intercellular communication, linear energy transfer (LET), and the role of the radiation environment in non-targeted responses. Endpoints included clonogenic survival, micronucleus formation and foci formation at histone 2AX over doses ranging from 10 to 100 cGy. Results: The results show no evidence of a low-LET radiation induced bystander response for the endpoints of clonogenic survival and induction of DNA damage. Nor do we see evidence of a high-LET, Fe ion radiation (1 GeV/n) induced bystander effect. However, direct comparison for 3.2 MeV α-particle exposures showed a statistically significant medium transfer bystander effect for this high-LET radiation. Conclusions: From our results, it is evident that there are many confounding factors influencing bystander responses as reported in the literature. Our observations reflect the inherent variability in biological systems and the difficulties in extrapolating from in vitro models to radiation risks in humans.

  16. Three redundant brassinosteroid early response genes encode putative bHLH transcription factors required for normal growth.

    PubMed Central

    Friedrichsen, Danielle M; Nemhauser, Jennifer; Muramitsu, Takamichi; Maloof, Julin N; Alonso, José; Ecker, Joseph R; Furuya, Masaki; Chory, Joanne

    2002-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are a class of polyhydroxylated steroids that are important regulators of plant growth and development. We have identified three closely related basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors, BEE1, BEE2, and BEE3, as products of early response genes required for full BR response. Comparison of the phenotypes of plants that overexpress BEE1 with bee1 bee2 bee3 triple-knockout mutant plants suggests that BEE1, BEE2, and BEE3 are functionally redundant positive regulators of BR signaling. Expression of BEE1, BEE2, and BEE3 is also regulated by other hormones, notably abscisic acid (ABA), a known antagonist of BR signaling. Reduced ABA response in plants overexpressing BEE1 suggests that BEE proteins may function as signaling intermediates in multiple pathways. PMID:12454087

  17. Modulation of paired-pulse responses in the dentate gyrus: effects of normal maturation and vigilance state.

    PubMed

    Blaise, J H; Bronzino, J D

    2000-01-01

    This study examined the effect of normal development and vigilance state on the modulation of dentate granule cell activity in the freely moving rat at 15, 30, and 90 days of age across three vigilance states: quiet waking, slow-wave sleep, and rapid eye movement sleep. Using paired-pulse stimulation, the paired-pulse index (PPI) was obtained for the dentate evoked field potentials elicited by the stimulation of the medial perforant path. Although significant differences in PPI values were observed during development, no significant vigilance state related changes were obtained. Preweaning infant rats, i.e., 15-day old, exhibited significantly less early (interpulse intervals, IPI= 20-50 ms) and late (IPI = 300-1,000 ms) inhibition, and less facilitation (IPI = 50-150 ms) when compared to the 90-day old adult rats during all three vigilance states. PPI values obtained from the 30-day old group fell intermediate between the 15- and 90-day old animals. These changes in PPI values provide a quantitative measure of changes in the modulation of dentate granule cell excitability during normal maturation. They can now can be used to evaluate the impact of various insults, such as prenatal protein malnutrition or neonatal stress, on hippocampal development.

  18. Ultrahigh dose-rate FLASH irradiation increases the differential response between normal and tumor tissue in mice.

    PubMed

    Favaudon, Vincent; Caplier, Laura; Monceau, Virginie; Pouzoulet, Frédéric; Sayarath, Mano; Fouillade, Charles; Poupon, Marie-France; Brito, Isabel; Hupé, Philippe; Bourhis, Jean; Hall, Janet; Fontaine, Jean-Jacques; Vozenin, Marie-Catherine

    2014-07-16

    In vitro studies suggested that sub-millisecond pulses of radiation elicit less genomic instability than continuous, protracted irradiation at the same total dose. To determine the potential of ultrahigh dose-rate irradiation in radiotherapy, we investigated lung fibrogenesis in C57BL/6J mice exposed either to short pulses (≤ 500 ms) of radiation delivered at ultrahigh dose rate (≥ 40 Gy/s, FLASH) or to conventional dose-rate irradiation (≤ 0.03 Gy/s, CONV) in single doses. The growth of human HBCx-12A and HEp-2 tumor xenografts in nude mice and syngeneic TC-1 Luc(+) orthotopic lung tumors in C57BL/6J mice was monitored under similar radiation conditions. CONV (15 Gy) triggered lung fibrosis associated with activation of the TGF-β (transforming growth factor-β) cascade, whereas no complications developed after doses of FLASH below 20 Gy for more than 36 weeks after irradiation. FLASH irradiation also spared normal smooth muscle and epithelial cells from acute radiation-induced apoptosis, which could be reinduced by administration of systemic TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-α) before irradiation. In contrast, FLASH was as efficient as CONV in the repression of tumor growth. Together, these results suggest that FLASH radiotherapy might allow complete eradication of lung tumors and reduce the occurrence and severity of early and late complications affecting normal tissue.

  19. Physiologic responses during rest on a sleep system at varied degrees of firmness in a normal population.

    PubMed

    Lahm, Ryan; Iaizzo, Paul A

    2002-09-15

    This study explores the hypothesis that a high degree of sustained muscle activity associated with a sub-optimal spinal orientation may compromise an individual's ability to relax or initiate sleep. Data from 22 participants who were considered to be part of a normal, back-pain-free population were used in these studies. Participants laid down on a mattress in a foetal position (i.e. on their sides) at three varying bed pressures while EMG activities, heart rates, blood pressures, subjective comfort levels and spinal alignment data were recorded. Minor effects of mattress inflation pressures were associated with changes in EMG activity, heart rate, blood pressure and/or subjective comfort. In contrast, spinal alignment assessment revealed significant differences between the three different inflation pressures studied (827.4, 2413.2 and 3999.0 Pa). It was concluded that in a population of normal participants, although mattress inflation pressure induced significant changes in spinal alignment, these changes were of little physiological consequence. Nevertheless, this data provides baseline information needed to assess similar correlations in a symptomatic population (e.g. those with either acute or chronic neck or back pain).

  20. Oligopeptides of Chorionic Gonadotropin β-Subunit in Induction of T Cell Differentiation into Treg and Th17.

    PubMed

    Zamorina, S A; Shirshev, S V

    2015-11-01

    The role of oligopeptides of chorionic gonadotropin β-subunit (LQGV, AQGV, and VLPALP) in induction of differentiation into T-regulatory lymphocytes (Treg) and IL-17-producing lymphocytes (Th17) was studied in an in vitro system. Chorionic gonadotropin and oligopeptides promoted CD4(+) cell differentiation into functionally active Treg (FOXP3(+)GITR(+) and FOXP3(+)CTLA-4(+)), while chorionic gonadotropin and AQGV additionally stimulated IL-10 production by these cells. In parallel, chorionic gonadotropin and oligopeptides prevented CD4(+) cell differentiation into Th17 lymphocytes (ROR-gt(+)IL-17A(+)) and suppressed IL-17A secretion. Hence, oligopeptides of chorionic gonadotropin β-subunit promoted differentiation of CD4(+) cells into Treg and, in parallel, suppress Th17 induction, thus virtually completely reproducing the effects of the hormone, which opens new vista for their use in clinical practice.

  1. Ovarian stimulation with human chorionic gonadotropin and equine chorionic gonadotropin affects prostacyclin and its receptor expression in the porcine oviduct.

    PubMed

    Małysz-Cymborska, I; Andronowska, A

    2015-10-01

    Prostaglandins are well-known mediators of crucial events in the female reproductive tract, eg, early embryo development and implantation. Prostacyclin (PGI2) is the most synthesized prostaglandin in the human oviduct during the postovulatory period, indicating its important role in supporting and regulating the oviductal environment. The present study was undertaken to determine the influence of insemination and ovarian stimulation with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)/equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) on PGI2 synthesis in the porcine oviduct on day 3 post coitus. Mature gilts (n = 25) were assigned into 2 experiments. In experiment I, gilts were divided into cyclic (control; n = 5) and inseminated (control; n = 5) groups. In experiment II, there were 3 groups of animals: inseminated (n = 5), induced ovulation/inseminated (750 IU eCG, 500 IU hCG; n = 5), and superovulated/inseminated (1,500 IU eCG, 1,000 IU hCG; n = 5) gilts. Parts of oviducts (isthmus and ampulla) were collected 3 days after phosphate-buffered saline treatment (cyclic gilts of experiment I) or insemination (all other groups). Expression of messenger RNA for PGI2 synthase (PGIS) and its receptor (IP) was measured by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT PCR) and protein levels using Western blots. Concentrations of the PGI2 metabolite 6-keto PGF1α were evaluated by enzyme immunoassay and localization of PGIS and IP in the oviductal tissues using immunohistochemical staining. Insemination by itself increased PGIS protein levels in the oviductal isthmus (P < 0.05) and IP protein expression in the ampulla (P < 0.05). The concentration of 6-keto PGF1α increased significantly in the oviductal ampulla after insemination (P < 0.05). Induction of ovulation decreased IP protein levels in the oviductal ampulla (P < 0.05), whereas superovulation reduced IP levels in both parts of the oviduct (P < 0.01). Synthesis of 6-keto PGF1α was reduced by induction of ovulation

  2. Experience-dependent enhancement of pitch-specific responses in the auditory cortex is limited to acceleration rates in normal voice range

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Ananthanarayan; Gandour, Jackson T.; Suresh, Chandan H.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine how pitch acceleration rates within and outside the normal pitch range may influence latency and amplitude of cortical pitch-specific responses (CPR) as a function of language experience (Chinese, English). Responses were elicited from a set of four pitch stimuli chosen to represent a range of acceleration rates (two each inside and outside the normal voice range) imposed on the high rising Mandarin Tone 2. Pitch-relevant neural activity, as reflected in the latency and amplitude of scalp-recorded CPR components, varied depending on language-experience and pitch acceleration of dynamic, time-varying pitch contours. Peak latencies of CPR components were shorter in the Chinese than the English group across stimuli. Chinese participants showed greater amplitude than English for CPR components at both frontocentral and temporal electrode sites in response to pitch contours with acceleration rates inside the normal voice pitch range as compared to pitch contours with acceleration rates that exceed the normal range. As indexed by CPR amplitude at the temporal sites, a rightward asymmetry was observed for the Chinese group only. Only over the right temporal site was amplitude greater in the Chinese group relative to the English. These findings may suggest that the neural mechanism(s) underlying processing of pitch in the right auditory cortex reflect experience-dependent modulation of sensitivity to acceleration in just those rising pitch contours that fall within the bounds of one’s native language. More broadly, enhancement of native pitch stimuli and stronger rightward asymmetry of CPR components in the Chinese group is consistent with the notion that long-term experience shapes adaptive, distributed hierarchical pitch processing in the auditory cortex, and reflects an interaction with higher-order, extrasensory processes beyond the sensory memory trace. PMID:26166727

  3. Gonadotropin promotion of adventitious root production on cuttings of Begonia semperflorens and Vitis vinifera.

    PubMed

    Leshem, Y; Lunenfeld, B

    1968-03-01

    Adventitious rooting of Begonia semperflorens cv. Indian Maid and Vitis vinifera cv. Semillon stem cuttings was significantly promoted by human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG). Basal sections of HCG treated cuttings upon which promoted rooting took place had markedly less endogenous gibberellin (GA) activity than non-treated controls or apical sections of treated ones, while changes in auxin levels were not found. HCG also inhibited GA(3)-induced reducing sugar release from embryoless barley endosperm halves. These findings are discussed in the light of a possible analogy to gonadotropin action in animal systems.

  4. Gonadotropin Promotion of Adventitious Root Production on Cuttings of Begonia semperflorens and Vitis vinifera 1

    PubMed Central

    Leshem, Y.; Lunenfeld, B.

    1968-01-01

    Adventitious rooting of Begonia semperflorens cv. Indian Maid and Vitis vinifera cv. Semillon stem cuttings was significantly promoted by human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG). Basal sections of HCG treated cuttings upon which promoted rooting took place had markedly less endogenous gibberellin (GA) activity than non-treated controls or apical sections of treated ones, while changes in auxin levels were not found. HCG also inhibited GA3-induced reducing sugar release from embryoless barley endosperm halves. These findings are discussed in the light of a possible analogy to gonadotropin action in animal systems. PMID:5641189

  5. Bimodal response sensitivity and bias in a test of sustained attention contrasting patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder to normal comparison group.

    PubMed

    Baerwald, Jeffrey P; Tryon, Warren W; Sandford, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    This study examined response discrimination (d') and bias (likelihood ratio) differentials in a computer-generated test of auditory and visual attention functioning. Patients with bipolar disorder (n=42) and schizophrenia (n=47) were contrasted to a normal comparison group (n=89) in two conditions: (a) simple modal responsivity (auditory and visual stimuli) and (b) ipsimodal (auditory/auditory and visual/visual) and crossmodal (auditory/visual and visual/auditory) responding. The results of this study indicated that in the simple modal condition both subject groups showed differential modal preferences but in opposite directions. The schizophrenic group showed a significant visual over auditory preference, committing more auditory commission and omission errors than visual errors. The bipolar group displayed a distinct auditory over visual response preference, committing significantly higher number of visual omission errors. Response bias analysis indicates that both diagnostic groups adopted a more liberal response bias, whereas the comparison group assumed a more conservative approach. For all groups response sensitivity improved as response bias became more neutral. The modal switching results indicated that all three groups tended to commit more commission errors (false alarms) in the auditory crossmodal switching condition (visual/auditory) by comparison with the other switching conditions. Between group comparisons for this condition showed that the schizophrenic group committed significantly more commission errors than the other groups. No significant medication effects were detected.

  6. GnRH-Induced Ca2+ Signaling Patterns and Gonadotropin Secretion in Pituitary Gonadotrophs. Functional Adaptations to Both Ordinary and Extraordinary Physiological Demands

    PubMed Central

    Durán-Pastén, Maria Luisa; Fiordelisio, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    Pituitary gonadotrophs are a small fraction of the anterior pituitary population, yet they synthesize gonadotropins: luteinizing (LH) and follicle-stimulating (FSH), essential for gametogenesis and steroidogenesis. LH is secreted via a regulated pathway while FSH release is mostly constitutive and controlled by synthesis. Although gonadotrophs fire action potentials spontaneously, the intracellular Ca2+ rises produced do not influence secretion, which is mainly driven by Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH), a decapeptide synthesized in the hypothalamus and released in a pulsatile manner into the hypophyseal portal circulation. GnRH binding to G-protein-coupled receptors triggers Ca2+ mobilization from InsP3-sensitive intracellular pools, generating the global Ca2+ elevations necessary for secretion. Ca2+ signaling responses to increasing (GnRH) vary in stereotyped fashion from subthreshold to baseline spiking (oscillatory), to biphasic (spike-oscillatory or spike-plateau). This progression varies somewhat in gonadotrophs from different species and biological preparations. Both baseline spiking and biphasic GnRH-induced Ca2+ signals control LH/FSH synthesis and exocytosis. Estradiol and testosterone regulate gonadotropin secretion through feedback mechanisms, while FSH synthesis and release are influenced by activin, inhibin, and follistatin. Adaptation to physiological events like the estrous cycle, involves changes in GnRH sensitivity and LH/FSH synthesis: in proestrus, estradiol feedback regulation abruptly changes from negative to positive, causing the pre-ovulatory LH surge. Similarly, when testosterone levels drop after orquiectomy the lack of negative feedback on pituitary and hypothalamus boosts both GnRH and LH secretion, gonadotrophs GnRH sensitivity increases, and Ca2+ signaling patterns change. In addition, gonadotrophs proliferate and grow. These plastic changes denote a more vigorous functional adaptation in response to an extraordinary functional

  7. Use of the immature rat uterotrophic assay for specific measurements of chorionic gonadotropins and follicle-stimulating hormones in vivo bioactivities.

    PubMed

    Lecompte, F; Harbeby, E; Cahoreau, C; Klett, D; Combarnous, Y

    2010-09-15

    The uterine weight growth stimulation by equine Chorionic Gonadotropin (eCG/PMSG) was found to occur at much lower eCG concentrations than ovarian growth. Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG) which has only LH activity, was found to be as active as eCG in the uterotrophic assay whereas equine Luteinizing Hormone (eLH) which has dual LH+FSH activities like eCG, exhibited a much lower potency. In contrast to hCG, porcine and ovine LH as well as pFSH and oFSH exhibited no uterotrophic activity indicating that only gonadotropins with both LH activity and long half-lives are active alone in this assay. The FSH preparations were nevertheless found to trigger a dose-dependent response, but only in the presence of a subactive dose of hCG. The uterotrophic activity of hCG was found to be suppressed in ovariectomized immature rats and to be diminished after injection of GnRH antagonist suggesting an indirect pathway implicating the hypothalamo-pituitary complex. The data in this report together with the analysis of literature suggest that choriogonadotropins exert their stimulatory role on uterine growth by an indirect mechanism involving an increase in ovarian FSH receptors and FSH release by the pituitary. At the lowest concentrations of hCG, the increase in ovarian FSH receptors without endogenous FSH release is thought to be responsible for the sensitivity of the uterotrophic assay to exogenous FSHs. In conclusion, the immature rat uterotrophic assay is a sensitive and convenient assay for eCG and hCG as well as for FSHs in the presence of a sub-active dose of hCG.

  8. GnRH-Induced Ca(2+) Signaling Patterns and Gonadotropin Secretion in Pituitary Gonadotrophs. Functional Adaptations to Both Ordinary and Extraordinary Physiological Demands.

    PubMed

    Durán-Pastén, Maria Luisa; Fiordelisio, Tatiana

    2013-09-30

    PITUITARY GONADOTROPHS ARE A SMALL FRACTION OF THE ANTERIOR PITUITARY POPULATION, YET THEY SYNTHESIZE GONADOTROPINS: luteinizing (LH) and follicle-stimulating (FSH), essential for gametogenesis and steroidogenesis. LH is secreted via a regulated pathway while FSH release is mostly constitutive and controlled by synthesis. Although gonadotrophs fire action potentials spontaneously, the intracellular Ca(2+) rises produced do not influence secretion, which is mainly driven by Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH), a decapeptide synthesized in the hypothalamus and released in a pulsatile manner into the hypophyseal portal circulation. GnRH binding to G-protein-coupled receptors triggers Ca(2+) mobilization from InsP3-sensitive intracellular pools, generating the global Ca(2+) elevations necessary for secretion. Ca(2+) signaling responses to increasing (GnRH) vary in stereotyped fashion from subthreshold to baseline spiking (oscillatory), to biphasic (spike-oscillatory or spike-plateau). This progression varies somewhat in gonadotrophs from different species and biological preparations. Both baseline spiking and biphasic GnRH-induced Ca(2+) signals control LH/FSH synthesis and exocytosis. Estradiol and testosterone regulate gonadotropin secretion through feedback mechanisms, while FSH synthesis and release are influenced by activin, inhibin, and follistatin. Adaptation to physiological events like the estrous cycle, involves changes in GnRH sensitivity and LH/FSH synthesis: in proestrus, estradiol feedback regulation abruptly changes from negative to positive, causing the pre-ovulatory LH surge. Similarly, when testosterone levels drop after orquiectomy the lack of negative feedback on pituitary and hypothalamus boosts both GnRH and LH secretion, gonadotrophs GnRH sensitivity increases, and Ca(2+) signaling patterns change. In addition, gonadotrophs proliferate and grow. These plastic changes denote a more vigorous functional adaptation in response to an extraordinary

  9. Mirtazapine, but not fluvoxamine, normalizes the blunted REM sleep response to clonidine in depressed patients: implications for subsensitivity of alpha(2)-adrenergic receptors in depression.

    PubMed

    Schittecatte, Michel; Dumont, Françoise; Machowski, Robert; Fontaine, Eric; Cornil, Catherine; Mendlewicz, Julien; Wilmotte, Jean

    2002-01-31

    To determine whether alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor (alpha2AR) subsensitivity is a state or a trait marker of depression, we consecutively challenged 32 drug-free depressed patients with a clonidine REM suppression test (CREST). We then treated the patients with fluvoxamine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, or mirtazapine, a selective alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor antagonist. The first 10 patients from each treatment group who recovered were given a second challenge test. The CREST values of the two treatment groups at each time point were compared, and also compared with the CREST values of a group of 10 normal subjects. Before treatment, the REM sleep response to clonidine in the two groups of patients was significantly blunted compared with the REM sleep response in the healthy subjects. After treatment, there was still an abnormal REM sleep response to clonidine in the fluvoxamine-treated patients, despite clinical recovery, but there was a normalized REM sleep response in the mirtazapine-treated patients. These results are compatible with the hypothesis that alpha2AR subsensitivity is a trait marker of depression and suggest that the effects of these two antidepressants on alpha2AR sensitivity may not be linked to the alleviation of depression.

  10. Response Times in Correcting Non-Normal System Events When Collocating Status, Alerts and Procedures, and Controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, Anna C.

    2002-01-01

    Currently, most of the displays in control rooms can be categorized as status, alerts/procedures, or control screens. With the advent and use of CRTs and the associated computing power available to compute and display information, it is now possible to combine these different elements of information and control onto a single display. An experiment was conducted to determine which, if any, of these functions should be collocated in order to better handle simple anticipated non-normal system events. The results indicated that there are performance benefits and subject preferences to combining all the information onto one screen or combining the status and alert/procedure information onto one screen and placing the controls in another area.

  11. A comparison of spent fuel shipping cask response to 10 CFR 71 normal conditions and realistic hot day extremes

    SciTech Connect

    Manson, S.J.; Gianoulakis, S.E.

    1994-04-01

    An examination of the effect of a realistic (though conservative) hot day environment on the thermal transient behavior of spent fuel shipping casks is made. These results are compared to those that develop under the prescribed normal thermal condition of 10 CFR 71. Of specific concern are the characteristics of propagating thermal waves, which are set up by diurnal variations of temperature and insolation in the outdoor environment. In order to arrive at a realistic approximation of these variations on a conservative hot day, actual temperature and insolation measurements have been obtained from the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) for representatively hot and high heat flux days. Thus, the use of authentic meteorological data ensures the realistic approach sought. Further supporting the desired realism of the modeling effort is the use of realistic cask configurations in which multiple laminations of structural, shielding, and other materials are expected to attenuate the propagating thermal waves. The completed analysis revealed that the majority of wall temperatures, for a wide variety of spent fuel shipping cask configurations, fall well below those predicted by enforcement of the regulatory environmental conditions of 10 CFR 71. It was found that maximum temperatures at the cask surface occasionally lie above temperatures predicted under the prescribed regulatory conditions. However, the temperature differences are small enough that the normal conservative assumptions that are made in the course of typical cask evaluations should correct for any potential violations. The analysis demonstrates that diurnal temperature variations that penetrate the cask wall all have maxima substantially less than the corresponding regulatory solutions. Therefore it is certain that vital cask components and the spent fuel itself will not exceed the temperatures calculated by use of the conditions of 10 CFR 71.

  12. A numerical modelling approach to investigate the surface processes response to normal fault growth in multi-rift settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechlivanidou, Sofia; Cowie, Patience; Finch, Emma; Gawthorpe, Robert; Attal, Mikael

    2016-04-01

    This study uses a numerical modelling approach to explore structural controls on erosional/depositional systems within rifts that are characterized by complex multiphase extensional histories. Multiphase-rift related topography is generated by a 3D discrete element model (Finch et al., Basin Res., 2004) of normal fault growth and is used to drive the landscape evolution model CHILD (Tucker et al., Comput. Geosci., 2001). Fault populations develop spontaneously in the discrete element model and grow by both tip propagation and segment linkage. We conduct a series of experiments to simulate the evolution of the landscape (55x40 km) produced by two extensional phases that differ in the direction and in the amount of extension. In order to isolate the effects of fault propagation on the drainage network development, we conduct experiments where uplift/subsidence rates vary both in space and time as the fault array evolves and compare these results with experiments using a fixed fault array geometry with uplift rate/subsidence rates that vary only spatially. In many cases, areas of sediment deposition become uplifted and vise-versa due to complex elevation changes with respect to sea level as the fault array develops. These changes from subaerial (erosional) to submarine (depositional) processes have implications for sediment volumes and sediment caliber as well as for the sediment routing systems across the rift. We also explore the consequences of changing the angle between the two phases of extension on the depositional systems and we make a comparison with single-phase rift systems. Finally, we discuss the controls of different erodibilities on sediment supply and detachment-limited versus transport-limited end-member models for river erosion. Our results provide insights into the nature and distribution of sediment source areas and the sediment routing in rift systems where pre-existing rift topography and normal fault growth exert a fundamental control on

  13. Studies on responsiveness of hepatoma cells to catecholamines. II. Comparison of beta-adrenergic responsiveness of rat ascites hepatoma cells with cultured normal rat liver cells.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, K; Matsunaga, T; Takemoto, N; Sanae, F; Koshiura, R

    1985-05-01

    The pharmacological properties of beta-adrenoceptors in rat ascites hepatoma cells were compared with those in normal rat liver cells which were cultured for 24 hr after collagenase digestion. Adenylate cyclases in the homogenates of cultured normal rat liver cells and rat ascites hepatoma cells, AH44, AH66, AH109A, AH130 and AH7974, were all activated by isoproterenol or NaF to different degrees. The enzyme in rat liver cells was activated by several beta 2-agonists but those in all hepatoma cells hardly responded. Furthermore, salbutamol, a beta 2-partial agonist, antagonized the cyclase activation by isoproterenol in AH130 cells. The Kact value of isoproterenol for the activation of adenylate cyclase in AH130 cells was smaller than that in rat liver cells. A comparison of the Ki values of beta-antagonists for the inhibition of isoproterenol-stimulated cyclase activity shows that while the Ki values of propranolol and butoxamine in AH130 cells were similar to those in rat liver cells, a significant difference was observed in the values for beta 1-selective antagonists between AH130 cells and rat liver cells. The Ki values of metoprolol and atenolol for AH130 cells were 137- and 90-fold lower, respectively, than for normal rat liver cells. From these findings, it is strongly suggested that beta-adrenoceptors in rat ascites hepatoma cells including AH130 cells have similar properties to the mammalian beta 1-receptor.

  14. Use of Finite Difference Time Domain Simulations and Debye Theory for Modelling the Terahertz Reflection Response of Normal and Tumour Breast Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Anthony J.; Pickwell-MacPherson, Emma; Wallace, Vincent P.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the capabilities of Debye theory combined with Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) methods to simulate the terahertz (THz) response of breast tissues. Being able to accurately model breast tissues in the THz regime would facilitate the understanding of image contrast parameters used in THz imaging of breast cancer. As a test case, the model was first validated using liquid water and simulated reflection pulses were compared to experimental measured pulses with very good agreement (p = 1.00). The responses of normal and cancerous breast tissues were simulated with Debye properties and the correlation with measured data was still high for tumour (p = 0.98) and less so for normal breast (p = 0.82). Sections of the time domain pulses showed clear differences that were also evident in the comparison of pulse parameter values. These deviations may arise from the presence of adipose and other inhomogeneities in the breast tissue that are not accounted for when using the Debye model. In conclusion, the study demonstrates the power of the model for simulating THz reflection imaging; however, for biological tissues extra Debye terms or a more detailed theory may be required to link THz image contrast to physiological composition and structural changes of breast tissue associated with differences between normal and tumour tissues. PMID:25010734

  15. Possession of ATM Sequence Variants as Predictor for Late Normal Tissue Responses in Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Alice Y.; Fan, Grace; Atencio, David P.; Green, Sheryl; Formenti, Silvia C.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Iyengar, Preetha B.A.; Bernstein, Jonine L.; Stock, Richard G.; Cesaretti, Jamie A.; Rosenstein, Barry S.

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: The ATM gene product is a central component of cell cycle regulation and genomic surveillance. We hypothesized that DNA sequence alterations in ATM predict for adverse effects after external beam radiotherapy for early breast cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 131 patients with a minimum of 2 years follow-up who had undergone breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy were screened for sequence alterations in ATM using DNA from blood lymphocytes. Genetic variants were identified using denaturing high performance liquid chromatography. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late morbidity scoring schemes for skin and subcutaneous tissues were applied to quantify the radiation-induced effects. Results: Of the 131 patients, 51 possessed ATM sequence alterations located within exons or in short intron regions flanking each exon that encompass putative splice site regions. Of these 51 patients, 21 (41%) exhibited a minimum of a Grade 2 late radiation response. In contrast, of the 80 patients without an ATM sequence variation, only 18 (23%) had radiation-induced adverse responses, for an odds ratio of 2.4 (95% confidence interval, 1.1-5.2). Fifteen patients were heterozygous for the G{yields}A polymorphism at nucleotide 5557, which causes substitution of asparagine for aspartic acid at position 1853 of the ATM protein. Of these 15 patients, 8 (53%) exhibited a Grade 2-4 late response compared with 31 (27%) of the 116 patients without this alteration, for an odds ratio of 3.1 (95% confidence interval, 1.1-9.4). Conclusion: Sequence variants located in the ATM gene, in particular the 5557 G{yields}A polymorphism, may predict for late adverse radiation responses in breast cancer patients.

  16. Normal Hearing Ability but Impaired Auditory Selective Attention Associated with Prediction of Response to Donepezil in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ouchi, Yoshitaka; Meguro, Kenichi; Akanuma, Kyoko; Kato, Yuriko; Yamaguchi, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Background. Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients have a poor response to the voices of caregivers. After administration of donepezil, caregivers often find that patients respond more frequently, whereas they had previously pretended to be “deaf.” We investigated whether auditory selective attention is associated with response to donepezil. Methods. The subjects were40 AD patients, 20 elderly healthy controls (HCs), and 15 young HCs. Pure tone audiometry was conducted and an original Auditory Selective Attention (ASA) test was performed with a MoCA vigilance test. Reassessment of the AD group was performed after donepezil treatment for 3 months. Results. Hearing level of the AD group was the same as that of the elderly HC group. However, ASA test scores decreased in the AD group and were correlated with the vigilance test scores. Donepezil responders (MMSE 3+) also showed improvement on the ASA test. At baseline, the responders had higher vigilance and lower ASA test scores. Conclusion. Contrary to the common view, AD patients had a similar level of hearing ability to healthy elderly. Auditory attention was impaired in AD patients, which suggests that unnecessary sounds should be avoided in nursing homes. Auditory selective attention is associated with response to donepezil in AD. PMID:26161001

  17. Effects of soft drink and table beer consumption on insulin response in normal teenagers and carbohydrate drink in youngsters.

    PubMed

    Janssens, J P; Shapira, N; Debeuf, P; Michiels, L; Putman, R; Bruckers, L; Renard, D; Molenberghs, G

    1999-08-01

    There is ample evidence that breast cancer susceptibility is induced during the developmental stages of the human breast where, in a manner related to sex-steroid hormones, insulin plays an important role. In turn, nutrition might be implicated. Regular soft drinks and table beer, both carbohydrate-containing drinks, are candidates affecting insulin concentrations. Eleven teenagers, between the ages of 13 and 17 years, consumed a soft drink and a table beer in a crossover study. The blood levels of insulin and glucose were related to anthropomorphometric and endocrine factors. In contrast to table beer, consumption of regular soft drinks induced a fast and dramatic increase in both glucose and insulin concentration within a maximum 1 hour after consumption. The insulin response was linearly correlated to the body mass index (BMI). Children with a small increase in BMI are highly sensitive to regular soft drinks with regard to glucose and insulin response. The finding suggests a vicious circle of high caloric drinks, increase in BMI and insulin response. It is one of the nutritional pathways which might affect susceptibility for breast cancer in youngsters. Table beer, a drink with fermented sugars, does not share these effects on carbohydrate metabolism.

  18. Urinary human chorionic gonadotropin isoform concentrations in doping control samples.

    PubMed

    Butch, Anthony W; Woldemariam, Getachew A

    2016-11-01

    Anti-doping laboratories routinely use immunoassays to measure urinary concentrations of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). To minimize immunoassay differences and false positive screen results from inactive isoforms (free β-subunit (hCGβ), β-subunit core fragment (hCGβcf)) laboratories now use intact hCG instead of total hCG immunoassays to measure hCG. To determine the distribution of hCG isoforms in urine, we determined the concentrations of intact hCG, hCGβ, and hCGβcf in male urine samples based on immunoassay total hCG concentrations using a sequential immunoextraction and a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method. hCG was isolated using antibody-conjugated magnetic beads and unique tryptic peptides were quantified by LC-MS/MS. Negative samples with detectable but low total hCG concentrations (1.2-3.5 pmol/L) had intact and hCGβ concentrations <1.2 pmol/L, and hCGβcf concentrations <2.3 pmol/L by LC-MS/MS. Urine samples from an athlete receiving hCG had intact hCG concentrations ranging from 18.8 to 57.6 pmol/L, hCGβ concentrations <0.7 pmol/L, and hCGβcf concentrations ranging from 94 to 243% of the intact hCG concentration. In 27 atypical samples with total hCG concentrations ranging from 16.7 to 412.7 pmol/L with intact hCG <2.7 pmol/L by immunoassay, all samples had intact hCG concentrations <3.8 pmol/L and hCGβ concentrations <6.2 pmol/L by LC-MS/MS. hCGβcf concentrations by LC-MS/MS varied widely and ranged from 1.03 to 21.9 pmol/L. In summary, total hCG immunoassays significantly overestimate hCG concentrations and can produce false positive results. Although the intact hCG immunoassay slightly overestimates hCG concentrations compared to LC-MS/MS, it can distinguish between cases of hCG use and atypical cases with elevated total hCG concentrations. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Elevated Oxygen Consumption Rate in Response to Acute Low- Glucose Stress: Metformin Restores Rate to Normal Level

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Emmanuel D.; Rogers, Steven C.; Zhang, Xiaomin; Azhar, Gohar; Wei, Jeanne Y.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) continues to be the leading cause of mortality among all age demographics in the United States, with the highest occurrence in populations aged 65 and older. Glucose levels, particularly hyperglycemia, are associated with the premature onset of age-related diseases including CVD. A major challenge in the treatment of elderly patients with chronically elevated blood glucose is the frequency of hypoglycemic episodes. Molecular mechanisms of hypoglycemia remain unclear, but are associated with premature onset of age-related-diseases. Here we report a mitochondrial metabolic profile assessing short-term (up to six hours) and longer-term (12–24 hours) durations of low-glucose stress. We observed that the antidiabetic biguanide and mitochondrial complex I inhibitor, metformin, can lower and restore the elevated oxygen consumption rate during shorter-term glucose stress to levels similar to that of cells cultured in normal glucose. This effect appears, in part, to involve activation of the 5′ AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). PMID:26256471

  20. Influence of Melatonin on the Proliferative and Apoptotic Responses of the Prostate under Normal and Hyperglycemic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gobbo, Marina G.; Dizeyi, Nishtman; Abrahamsson, Per-Anders; Bertilsson, Per-Anders; Masitéli, Viviane Sanches; Pytlowanciv, Eloisa Zanin; Taboga, Sebastião R.; Góes, Rejane M.

    2015-01-01

    The antitumor properties of melatonin (MLT) are known for prostate cancer cells. This study investigated whether MLT affects prostate maturation and interferes with tissue injuries induced by diabetes. MLT was administered to Wistar rats from 5 weeks of age in the drinking water (10 μg/kg b.w.), and diabetes was induced at the 13th week by streptozotocin (4.5 mg/100g b.w., i.p.). The animals were euthanized in the 14th and 21st weeks. MLT reduced the immunostained cells for androgen receptor (AR) by 10% in younger rats. Diabetes decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. MLT treatment impeded apoptosis (p = 0.02) and augmented proliferation (p = 0.0008) and PCNA content in prostate following long-term diabetes due to restoration of testosterone levels and expression of melatonin receptor type 1B. The effect of MLT (500 µM, 5 mM, and 10 mM) on androgen-dependent (22Rv1) and androgen-independent (PC3) cancer cells and human prostate epithelial cells (PNTA1) under normal and hyperglycemic conditions (HG, 450 mg/dL) was analyzed. Contrary to PNTA1 and 22Rv1 cells, MLT improved the proliferation of PC3 cells in hyperglycemic medium. The combined data indicated that MLT had proliferative and antiapoptotic effects in prostate cells subjected to HG levels and it seems to involve specific MLT pathways rather than AR. PMID:26295055

  1. Nitric oxide is involved in light-specific responses of tomato during germination under normal and osmotic stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    Piterková, Jana; Luhová, Lenka; Hofman, Jakub; Turečková, Veronika; Novák, Ondřej; Petřivalský, Marek; Fellner, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Nitric oxide (NO) is involved in the signalling and regulation of plant growth and development and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. The photoperiod-sensitive mutant 7B-1 in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) showing abscisic acid (ABA) overproduction and blue light (BL)-specific tolerance to osmotic stress represents a valuable model to study the interaction between light, hormones and stress signalling. The role of NO as a regulator of seed germination and ABA-dependent responses to osmotic stress was explored in wild-type and 7B-1 tomato under white light (WL) and BL. Methods Germination data were obtained from the incubation of seeds on germinating media of different composition. Histochemical analysis of NO production in germinating seeds was performed by fluorescence microscopy using a cell-permeable NO probe, and endogenous ABA was analysed by mass spectrometry. Key Results The NO donor S-nitrosoglutathione stimulated seed germination, whereas the NO scavenger 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (PTIO) had an inhibitory effect. Under WL in both genotypes, PTIO strongly suppressed germination stimulated by fluridone, an ABA inhibitor. The stimulatory effect of the NO donor was also observed under osmotic stress for 7B-1 seeds under WL and BL. Seed germination inhibited by osmotic stress was restored by fluridone under WL, but less so under BL, in both genotypes. This effect of fluridone was further modulated by the NO donor and NO scavenger, but only to a minor extent. Fluorescence microscopy using the cell-permeable NO probe DAF-FM DA (4-amino-5-methylamino-2′,7′-difluorofluorescein diacetate) revealed a higher level of NO in stressed 7B-1 compared with wild-type seeds. Conclusions As well as defective BL signalling, the differential NO-dependent responses of the 7B-1 mutant are probably associated with its high endogenous ABA concentration and related impact on hormonal cross-talk in germinating seeds. These

  2. Immunoregulatory activities of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) proteins: Effect of HIV recombinant and synthetic peptides on immunoglobulin synthesis and proliferative responses by normal lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, M.P.N.; Pottathil, R.; Heimer, E.P.; Schwartz, S.A.

    1988-09-01

    Recombinant and synthetic peptides corresponding to envelope proteins of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) were examined for their effects on the activities of lymphocytes from normal donors in vitro. Although lymphocytes cultured with env-gag peptides produced significant amounts of IgG, addition of env-gag peptides to a pokeweed mitogen-induced B-cell activation system resulted in suppression of immunoglobulin synthesis by normal lymphocytes. Recombinant antigens, env-gag and env-80 dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), produced a substantial proliferative response by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) as determined by (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation. PBMC precultured with HIV synthetic peptide env 578-608 also manifested significant proliferative responses as compared to control cultures. CD3/sup +/ lymphocytes precultured with recombinant HIV antigens, env-gag and env-80 DHFR, and synthetic HIV peptide, env 487-511, showed moderate but significant proliferative responses. Both recombinant antigens and synthetic peptides also produced a dose-dependent stimulatory effect on proliferation by CD3/sup /minus// lymphocytes. These studies demonstrate that recombinant and synthetic peptides of the HIV genome express immunoregulatory T- and B-cell epitopes. Identification of unique HIV epitopes with immunogenic and immunoregulatory activities is necessary for the development of an effective vaccine against HIV infection.

  3. Ceramide kinase is required for a normal eicosanoid response and the subsequent orderly migration of fibroblasts[S

    PubMed Central

    Wijesinghe, Dayanjan S.; Brentnall, Matthew; Mietla, Jennifer A.; Hoeferlin, L. Alexis; Diegelmann, Robert F.; Boise, Lawrence H.; Chalfant, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    In these studies, the role of ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P) in the wound-healing process was investigated. Specifically, fibroblasts isolated from mice with the known anabolic enzyme for C1P, ceramide kinase (CERK), ablated (CERK−/− mice) and their wild-type littermates (CERK+/+) were subjected to in vitro wound-healing assays. Simulation of mechanical trauma of a wound by scratching a monolayer of fibroblasts from CERK+/+ mice demonstrated steadily increasing levels of arachidonic acid in a time-dependent manner in stark contrast to CERK−/− fibroblasts. This observed difference was reflected in scratch-induced eicosanoid levels. Similar, but somewhat less intense, changes were observed in a more complex system utilizing skin biopsies obtained from CERK-null mice. Importantly, C1P levels increased during the early stages of human wound healing correlating with the transition from the inflammatory stage to the peak of the fibroplasia stage (e.g., proliferation and migration of fibroblasts). Finally, the loss of proper eicosanoid response translated into an abnormal migration pattern for the fibroblasts isolated from CERK−/−. As the proper migration of fibroblasts is one of the necessary steps of wound healing, these studies demonstrate a novel requirement for the CERK-derived C1P in the proper healing response of wounds. PMID:24823941

  4. Lack of evidence for low-LET radiation induced bystander response in normal human fibroblasts and colon carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sowa, Marianne B.; Goetz, Wilfried; Baulch, Janet E.; Pyles, Dinah N.; Dziegielewski, J.; Yovino, Susannah; Snyder, Andrew R.; de Toledo, S. M.; Azzam, Edouard I.; Morgan, William F.

    2010-02-01

    The conventional paradigm in radiation biology has been that DNA is the primary target for energy deposition following exposure to ionizing radiation. However, studies focusing on the non-target effects of radiation, i.e. effects occurring in cells not directly exposed to radiation, imply that the target of exposure is larger than what has traditionally been assumed and could have significant implications for radiation health risks. We have conducted an extensive study of the low-LET bystander effect including multiple cell lines and endpoints and various radiation sources and exposure scenarios. In no instance do we see evidence of a low-LET induced bystander effect. However, direct comparison for alpha particle exposure showed a statistically significant media transfer bystander effect for high-LET but not for low-LET radiation. From our results it is evident that there are many confounding factors mitigating bystander responses as reported in the literature and for the cell lines we studied that there is a LET dependence for the observed responses. Our observations reflect the inherent variability in biological systems and the difficulties in extrapolating from in vitro models to radiation risks in humans.

  5. ID1 is a functional marker for intestinal stem and progenitor cells required for normal response to injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Yantiss, Rhonda K; Nam, Hyung-Song; Chin, Yvette; Zhou, Xi Kathy; Scherl, Ellen J; Bosworth, Brian P; Subbaramaiah, Kotha; Dannenberg, Andrew J; Benezra, Robert

    2014-11-11

    LGR5 and BMI1 mark intestinal stem cells in crypt base columnar cells and +4 position cells, respectively, but characterization of functional markers in these cell populations is limited. ID1 maintains the stem cell potential of embryonic, neural, and long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cells. Here, we show in both human and mouse intestine that ID1 is expressed in cycling columnar cells, +4 position cells, and transit-amplifying cells in the crypt. Lineage tracing revealed ID1+ cells to be self-renewing, multipotent stem/progenitor cells that are responsible for the long-term renewal of the intestinal epithelium. Single ID1+ cells can generate long-lived organoids resembling mature intestinal epithelium. Complete knockout of Id1 or selective deletion of Id1 in intestinal epithelium or in LGR5+ stem cells sensitizes mice to chemical-induced colon injury. These experiments identify ID1 as a marker for intestinal stem/progenitor cells and demonstrate a role for ID1 in maintaining the potential for repair in response to colonic injury.

  6. Effects of preventing O-glycosylation on the secretion of human chorionic gonadotropin in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matzuk, M.M.; Krieger, M.; Corless, C.L.; Boime, I.

    1987-09-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a member of a family of heterodimeric glycoprotein hormones that have a common ..cap alpha.. subunit but differ in their hormone-specific ..beta..-subunits. The ..beta.. subunit of hCG (hCG..beta..) is unique among the ..beta.. subunits in that it contains four mucin-like O-linked oligosaccharides attached to a carboxyl-terminal extension. To study the effects of O-glycosylation on the secretion and assembly of hCG, expression vectors containing either hCG..beta.. gene alone or together with the hCG..cap alpha.. gene were transfected into a mutant Chinese hamster ovary cell line, 1d1D, which exhibits a reversible defect in O-glycosylation. The results reveal that hCG..beta.. can be secreted normally in the absence of its O-linked oligosaccharides. hCG..beta.. devoid of O-linked carbohydrate can also combine efficiently with hCG..cap alpha.. and be secreted as an intact dimer. The authors conclude that in Chinese hamster ovary cells, the hCG..beta.. O-linked chains play no role in the assembly and secretion of hCG. The normal and O-linked oligosaccharide-deficient forms of hCG secreted by these cells should prove useful in examining the role of O-linked chains on the biological function of hCG.

  7. Flufenamic acid modulates multiple currents in gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Kuehl-Kovarik, M. Cathleen

    2010-01-01

    Reproduction in mammals is dependent upon the appropriate neurosecretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), yet the endogenous generation of activity underlying GnRH secretion remains poorly understood. We have demonstrated that the depolarizing afterpotential (DAP), which modulates bursting activity, is reduced in isolated GnRH neurons from aged animals. Calcium-activated non-specific cation (CAN) channels contribute to the DAP in other vertebrate neurosecretory cells. We used the CAN channel blocker flufenamic acid (FFA) to examine the contribution of CAN channels to the DAP in GnRH neurons during aging. Recordings were performed on isolated fluorescent GnRH neurons from young, middle-aged and aged female mice. Flufenamic acid inhibited spontaneous activity, but significantly increased the DAP in neurons from young and middle-aged animals. Apamin did not significantly potentiate the DAP, but did reduce the effects of FFA, suggesting that the increased DAP is partially due to blockade of apamin-sensitive SK channels. Flufenamic acid increased the current underlying the DAP (IADP) and decreased the preceding fast outward current (IOUT) at all ages. These current responses were not affected by apamin, but TEA evoked similar changes. Thus, a potassium current, likely mediated through BK channels, contributes to the fast AHP and appears to offset the DAP; this current is sensitive to FFA, but insensitive to age. The effect of FFA on the DAP, but not IADP, is diminished in aged animals, possibly reflecting an age-related modulation of the apamin-sensitive SK channel. Future studies will examine the expression of SK channels during the aging process in GnRH neurons. PMID:20655884

  8. Gonadotropin hormone releasing hormone agonists alter prefrontal function during verbal encoding in young women.

    PubMed

    Craig, Michael C; Fletcher, Paul C; Daly, Eileen M; Rymer, Janice; Cutter, William J; Brammer, Mick; Giampietro, Vincent; Wickham, Harvey; Maki, Pauline M; Murphy, Declan G M

    2007-01-01

    Gonadotropin hormone releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa) are commonly used in clinical practice to suppress gonadal hormone production in the management of various gynaecological conditions and as a treatment for advanced breast and prostate cancer. Animal and human behavioural studies suggest that GnRHa may also have significant effects on memory. However, despite the widespread use of GnRHa, the underlying brain networks and/or stages of memory processing that might be modulated by GnRHa remain poorly understood. We used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine the effect of GnRHa on verbal encoding and retrieval. Neuroimaging outcomes from 15 premenopausal healthy women were assessed at baseline and 8 weeks after Gonadotrophin Releasing Hormone analogue (GnRHa) treatment. Fifteen matched wait-listed volunteers served as the control group and were assessed at similar intervals during the late follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. GnRHa was associated with changes in brain response during memory encoding but not retrieval. Specifically, GnRHa administration led to a change in the typical pattern of prefrontal activation during successful encoding, with decreased activation in left prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate, and medial frontal gyrus. Our study suggests that the memory difficulties reported by some women following GnRHa, and possibly at other times of acute ovarian hormone withdrawal (e.g. following surgical menopause and postpartum), may have a clear neurobiological basis; one that manifest during encoding of words and that is evident in decreased activation in prefrontal regions known to sub-serve deep processing of to-be-learned words.

  9. Toward developing recombinant gonadotropin-based hormone therapies for increasing fertility in the flatfish Senegalese sole

    PubMed Central

    Chauvigné, François; Ollé, Judith; González, Wendy; Duncan, Neil; Giménez, Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    Captive flatfishes, such as the Senegalese sole, typically produce very low volumes of sperm. This situation is particularly prevalent in the first generation (F1) of reared sole males, which limits the development of artificial fertilization methods and the implementation of selective breeding programs. In this study, we investigated whether combined treatments with homologous recombinant follicle-stimulating (rFsh) and luteinizing (rLh) hormones, produced in a mammalian host system, could stimulate spermatogenesis and enhance sperm production in Senegalese sole F1 males. In an initial autumn/winter experiment, weekly intramuscular injections with increasing doses of rFsh over 9 weeks resulted in the stimulation of gonad weight, androgen release, germ cell proliferation and entry into meiosis, and the expression of different spermatogenesis-related genes, whereas a subsequent single rLh injection potentiated spermatozoa differentiation. In a second late winter/spring trial corresponding to the sole’s natural prespawning and spawning periods, we tested the effect of repeated rLh injections on the amount and quality of sperm produced by males previously treated with rFsh for 4, 6, 8 or 10 weeks. These latter results showed that the combination of rFsh and rLh treatments could increase sperm production up to 7 times, and slightly improve the motility of the spermatozoa, although a high variability in the response was found. However, sustained administration of rFsh during spawning markedly diminished Leydig cell survival and the steroidogenic potential of the testis. These data suggest that in vivo application of rFsh and rLh is effective at stimulating spermatogenesis and sperm production in Senegalese sole F1 males, setting the basis for the future establishment of recombinant gonadotropin-based hormone therapies to ameliorate reproductive dysfunctions of this species. PMID:28329024

  10. Pharmacokinetics of human chorionic gonadotropin after i.m. administration in goats (Capra hircus).

    PubMed

    Saleh, M; Shahin, M; Wuttke, W; Gauly, M; Holtz, W

    2012-07-01

    The present investigation addresses the pharmacokinetics of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), intramuscularly (i.m.) administered to goats. Nine pluriparous does of the Boer goat breed, 2-6 years of age and weighing 45-60 kg, were administered 500 IU hCG (2 ml Chorulon) deep into the thigh musculature 18 h after superovulatory FSH treatment. Blood samples were drawn from the jugular vein at 2  h intervals for the first 24h, at 6 h intervals until 42 h, and at 12 h intervals until 114 h after administration. After centrifugation, plasma hCG concentrations were determined by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. Pharmacokinetical parameters were as follows: lag time, 0.4 (s.e.m. 0.1) h; absorption rate constant, 0.34 (s.e.m. 0.002) h; absorption half-life, 2.7 (s.e.m. 0.5) h; elimination rate constant, 0.02 (s.e.m. 0.002) h; biological half-life, 39.4 (s.e.m. 5.1) h; and apparent volume of distribution, 16.9 (s.e.m. 4.3) l. The plasma hCG profile was characterized by an absorption phase of 11.6 (s.e.m. 1.8) h and an elimination phase of 70.0 (s.e.m. 9.8) h, with considerable individual variation in bioavailability and pharmacokinetical parameters. Biological half-life was negatively correlated (P<0.05) with peak concentration (r=-0.76), absorption rate constant (r=-0.78), and elimination rate constant (r=-0.87). The results indicate that after rapid absorption, hCG remains in the circulation for an extended period. This has to be taken into account when assessing the stimulatory response to hCG treatment on an ovarian level.

  11. Immune Modulatory Effects of Human Chorionic Gonadotropin on Dendritic Cells Supporting Fetal Survival in Murine Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Dauven, Dominique; Ehrentraut, Stefanie; Langwisch, Stefanie; Zenclussen, Ana Claudia; Schumacher, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are critically involved in the determination of immunity vs. tolerance. Hence, DCs are key regulators of immune responses either favoring or disfavoring fetal survival. Several factors were proposed to modulate DC phenotype and function during pregnancy. Here, we studied whether the pregnancy hormone human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is involved in DC regulation. In vitro, bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) were stimulated in the presence or absence of urine-purified or recombinant hCG (rhCG) preparations. Subsequently, BMDC maturation was assessed. Cytokine secretion of activated BMDCs and their capability to enforce TH1, TH2, TH17, or Treg cell differentiation was determined after rhCG treatment. Moreover, the in vivo potential of hCG-modulated BMDCs to influence pregnancy outcome, Treg cell number, and local cytokine expression was evaluated after adoptive transfer in a murine abortion-prone model before and after conception. Both hCG preparations impaired the maturation process of BMDCs. rhCG treatment did neither alter cytokine secretion by BMDCs nor their ability to drive TH1, TH2, or TH17 differentiation. rhCG-treated BMDCs augmented the number of Treg cells within the T cell population. Adoptive transfer of rhCG-treated BMDCs after conception did not influence pregnancy outcome. However, transfer of hCG-treated BMDCs prior to mating had a protective effect on pregnancy. This positive effect was accompanied by increased Treg cell numbers and decidual IL-10 and TGF-β expression. Our results unveil the importance of hCG in retaining DCs in a tolerogenic state, thereby promoting Treg cell increment and supporting fetal survival. PMID:27895621

  12. Recognition of N-glycoforms in human chorionic gonadotropin by monoclonal antibodies and their interaction motifs.

    PubMed

    Li, Daoyuan; Zhang, Ping; Li, Fei; Chi, Lequan; Zhu, Deyu; Zhang, Qunye; Chi, Lianli

    2015-09-11

    The glycosylation of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) plays an important role in reproductive tumors. Detecting hCG N-glycosylation alteration may significantly improve the diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity of related cancers. However, developing an immunoassay directly against the N-linked oligosaccharides is unlikely because of the heterogeneity and low immunogenicity of carbohydrates. Here, we report a hydrogen/deuterium exchange and MS approach to investigate the effect of N-glycosylation on the binding of antibodies against different hCG glycoforms. Hyperglycosylated hCG was purified from the urine of invasive mole patients, and the structure of its N-linked oligosaccharides was confirmed to be more branched by MS. The binding kinetics of the anti-hCG antibodies MCA329 and MCA1024 against hCG and hyperglycosylated hCG were compared using biolayer interferometry. The binding affinity of MCA1024 changed significantly in response to the alteration of hCG N-linked oligosaccharides. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange-MS reveals that the peptide β65-83 of the hCG β subunit is the epitope for MCA1024. Site-specific N-glycosylation analysis suggests that N-linked oligosaccharides at Asn-13 and Asn-30 on the β subunit affect the binding affinity of MCA1024. These results prove that some antibodies are sensitive to the structural change of N-linked oligosaccharides, whereas others are not affected by N-glycosylation. It is promising to improve glycoprotein biomarker-based cancer diagnostics by developing combined immunoassays that can determine the level of protein and measure the degree of N-glycosylation simultaneously.

  13. Morphological changes in the retina in Pacific ocean salmon Oncorhynchus masou fry in response to neutralization of the geomagnetic field in conditions of normal illumination.

    PubMed

    Maksimovich, A A; Kondrashev, S L; Gnyubkina, V P

    2008-10-01

    The studies reported here provide the first demonstration that retinal responses in both the fry of the migratory salmon trout Oncorhynchus masou and the dwarf form of this species changed in conditions of experimental neutralization of the geomagnetic field (GMF); migratory salmon trout fry and dwarves showed different changes. The responses of different types of retinal photoreceptor in migratory salmon trout fry to neutralization of the GMF differed: while rods and double cones perceived neutralization of the GMF as the onset of darkness (the scotopic reaction), single (generally blue-sensitive) cones responded to neutralization of the GMF both as presentation of blue light or (very rarely) ultraviolet irradiation. The retina of dwarf male salmon trout responded to neutralization of the GMF with a double response: rods showed a light (photopic) response, while double (red/green-sensitive) cones produced dark (scotopic) responses. Single (blue-sensitive) cones responded to neutralization of the GMF as bright blue light. Thus, the morphological picture of the retina in dwarf male salmon trout in these experimental conditions corresponds to the perception of blue light. The initial conditions were different--normal diffuse daylight with a brightness of about 7.5 Lx. It is likely that neutralization of the magnetic field had no effect on rods, while double, red-green, cones responded as to darkness, i.e., the fish did not perceive red or green light in the visible spectrum, but perceived only blue and, possibly, ultraviolet light by means of central blue-sensitive and accessory cones. Thus, these experiments demonstrated that in conditions of normal daylight illumination, retinal photoreceptors in salmon fry respond to changes in the earth's magnetic field, i.e., objectively function as magnetoreceptors.

  14. Hereditary angioedema with normal C1 inhibitor in a French cohort: Clinical characteristics and response to treatment with icatibant

    PubMed Central

    Boccon‐Gibod, Isabelle; Launay, David; Gompel, Anne; Kanny, Gisele; Fabien, Vincent; Fain, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction The clinical characteristics and icatibant‐treatment outcomes of patients with hereditary angioedema with normal C1 inhibitor (HAE‐nC1 INH) are limited. Methods We retrospectively analyzed data from French HAE patients enrolled in the Icatibant Outcome Survey registry (from July 2009 to September 2013) to compare disease characteristics and the effectiveness and safety of acute icatibant‐treated angioedema attacks in patients with HAE‐nC1 INH, HAE with C1 INH deficiency (type I), or dysfunction (type II). Results One center in Grenoble contributed 22 patients with HAE‐nC1 INH and a family history of HAE while 15 centers across France contributed 153 patients with HAE type I and seven patients with HAE type II. Patients with HAE‐nC1 INH compared to HAE type I, respectively, were more likely to be female (88.1% vs. 63.4%), older at median age of disease onset (21 years vs. 15 years), and have a greater rate of abdominal (80% vs. 61%) and laryngeal (23% vs. 14%) attacks. Icatibant was effective in both groups though the median time to resolution of attack was significantly longer in the HAE‐nC1 INH group (20.0 h, 37 attacks) versus the HAE type I group (14.0 h, 67 attacks). Icatibant was self‐administered for 96.1% of attacks in patients with HAE‐nC1 INH and 75.8% in patients with HAE type I. No serious adverse side effects related to icatibant were reported. Conclusions These data help further define the disease characteristics of HAE‐nC1 INH in the French population and extend the limited data reporting the safe and effective use of icatibant in acute treatment of angioedema in French patients diagnosed with HAE‐nC1 INH. PMID:28250922

  15. Mechanism of hepatoprotection in proestrus female rats following trauma-hemorrhage: heme oxygenase-1-derived normalization of hepatic inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shaolong; Hu, Shunhua; Chen, Jianguo; Choudhry, Mashkoor A; Rue, Loring W; Bland, Kirby I; Chaudry, Irshad H

    2009-06-01

    Hepatic damage occurs in males and ovariectomized (OVX), not in proestrus (PE), females following trauma-hemorrhage (T-H). The mechanism responsible for hepatoprotection remains unknown. We hypothesized protection in PE is a result of enhanced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1)-derived down-regulation of liver inflammatory responses. PE and OVX rats underwent T-H (midline laparotomy, 60% blood loss). PE rats received vehicle (Veh; saline), HO-1 inhibitor chromium mesoporphyrin IX chloride (CrMP; 2.5 mg/kg), zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP; 25 mg/kg), or Akt/PI-3K inhibitor Wortmannin (Wort; 1 mg/kg) 30 min prior to resuscitation or sham operation i.p. OVX rats received Veh or 17beta-estradiol (E2; 1 mg/kg) 30 min before hemorrhage. Rats were killed 2 h thereafter. Following T-H, left ventricular performance was maintained in PE and E2 OVX rats but was depressed in OVX and CrMP-, ZnPP-, and Wort-treated PE rats; liver damage was not evident in PE rats, and CrMP, ZnPP, and Wort abrogated protection; liver HO-1, p38 MAPK, Akt/PI3K, and Bcl-2 expression increased in PE and E2 OVX rats, which was abrogated by CrMP, ZnPP, and Wort, and liver ICAM-1, caspase-3, phospho-IkappaB-alpha, and NF-kappaB expression increased in OVX and CrMP-, ZnPP-, and Wort-PE rats; liver myeloperoxidase, NF-kappaB DNA-binding activity, TNF-alpha, IL-6, plasma proinflammatory cytokines, and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractants increased in OVX and CrMP-, ZnPP-, and Wort-PE rats; and plasma estradiol levels and hepatic estrogen receptor-alpha and -beta expression decreased in OVX but were unaltered by CrMP, ZnPP, and Wort. Thus, enhanced HO-1 in PE and E2 OVX females modulates inflammatory responses and protects liver following T-H.

  16. Background Parenchymal Enhancement of the Contralateral Normal Breast: Association with Tumor Response in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jeon Hor; Yu, Hon J.; Hsu, Christine; Mehta, Rita S.; Carpenter, Philip M.; Su, Min Ying

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study investigated the association between background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) and pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). METHODS: A total of 46 patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer were analyzed. Each patient had three magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, one pre-treatment and two follow-up (F/U) MRI studies. BPE was measured as the averaged enhancement of the whole fibroglandular tissues. The pre-treatment BPE and the changes in the F/U MRI were compared between patients achieving pathologic complete response (pCR) versus those not. Subgroup analyses based on age, estrogen receptor (ER), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status of their cancers were also performed. RESULTS: The pre-treatment BPE was higher in the pCR group than that in the non-pCR group. Compared to baseline, BPE at F/U-1 was significantly decreased in the pCR group but not in the non-pCR group. In subgroup analysis based on age, these results were seen only in the younger group (< 55 years old), not in the older group (≥ 55 years old). Older patients had a significantly lower pre-treatment BPE than younger patients. In analysis based on molecular biomarkers, a significantly decreased BPE at F/U-1 was only found in the ER-negative pCR group but not in the non-pCR, nor in the ER-positive groups. CONCLUSIONS: A higher pre-treatment BPE showing a significant decrease early after starting NAC was related to pCR in pre/peri-menopausal patients. PMID:26055178

  17. Dose--response of initial G2-chromatid breaks induced in normal human fibroblasts by heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawata, T.; Durante, M.; Furusawa, Y.; George, K.; Takai, N.; Wu, H.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Dicello, J. F. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate initial chromatid breaks in prematurely condensed G2 chromosomes following exposure to heavy ions of different LET. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Exponentially growing human fibroblast cells AG1522 were irradiated with gamma-rays, energetic carbon (13 keV/ microm, 80 keV/microm), silicon (55 keV/microm) and iron (140 keV/microm, 185keV/microm, 440keV/microm) ions. Chromosomes were prematurely condensed using calyculin-A. Initial chromatid-type and isochromatid breaks in G2 cells were scored. RESULTS: The dose response curves for total chromatid breaks were linear regardless of radiation type. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) showed a LET-dependent increase, peaking around 2.7 at 55-80keV/microm and decreasing at higher LET. The dose response curves for isochromatid-type breaks were linear for high-LET radiations, but linear-quadratic for gamma-rays and 13 keV/microm carbon ions. The RBE for the induction of isochromatid breaks obtained from linear components increased rapidly between 13keV/microm (about 7) and 80keV/microm carbon (about 71), and decreased gradually until 440 keV/microm iron ions (about 66). CONCLUSIONS: High-LET radiations are more effective at inducing isochromatid breaks, while low-LET radiations are more effective at inducing chromatid-type breaks. The densely ionizing track structures of heavy ions and the proximity of sister chromatids in G2 cells result in an increase in isochromatid breaks.

  18. Clomiphene citrate versus letrozole with gonadotropins in intrauterine insemination cycles: A randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Pourali, Leila; Ayati, Sedigheh; Tavakolizadeh, Shirin; Soleimani, Hourieh; Teimouri Sani, Fatemeh

    2017-01-01

    Background: Clomiphene citrate is one of the effective drugs for infertility treatment due to oligo-ovulation or anovulation. Intrauterine insemination (IUI) is one of more adherent methods for treatment of infertile cases which is followed by controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH). Objective: the aim of this study was to evaluate Clomiphene citrate versus letrozole with gonadotropins in IUI cycles. Materials and Methods: In this prospective randomized trial, 180 infertile women who were referred to Milad Hospital were selected. The first group received 5 mg/day letrozole on day 3-7 of menstrual cycle. The second group received 100 mg/day Clomiphene in the same way as letrozole. In both groups, human menopausal gonadotropin was administered every day starting on day between 6-8 of cycle. Ovulation was triggered with urinary Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (5000 IU) when have two follicles of ≥16 mm. IUI was performed 36 hr later. Results: The number of matured follicles, cycle cancellation, and abortion were the same in both groups. Endometrial thickness was higher at the time of human menopausal gonadotropin administration in letrozole group. Chemical and clinical pregnancy rates were much higher in letrozole group. Ovarian hyperstimulation was significantly higher in clomiphene group. Conclusion: Letrozole appears to be a good alternative to clomiphene citrate with fewer side effects. PMID:28280800

  19. Structural and Functional Divergence of Gonadotropin-Inhibitory Hormone from Jawless Fish to Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Satoshi; Parhar, Ishwar S.

    2014-01-01

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) was discovered as a novel hypothalamic peptide that inhibits gonadotropin release in the quail. The presence of GnIH-homologous peptides and its receptors (GnIHRs) have been demonstrated in various vertebrate species including teleosts, suggesting that the GnIH-GnIHR family is evolutionarily conserved. In avian and mammalian brain, GnIH neurons are localized in the hypothalamic nuclei and their neural projections are widely distributed. GnIH acts on the pituitary and gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons to inhibit reproductive functions by decreasing gonadotropin release and synthesis. In addition, GnIH-GnIHR signaling is regulated by various factors, such as environmental cues and stress. However, the function of fish GnIH orthologs remains inconclusive because the physiological properties of fish GnIH peptides are debatable. This review summarizes the current research progress in GnIH-GnIHR signaling and their physiological functions in vertebrates with special emphasis on non-mammalian vertebrate species. PMID:25386165

  20. A review of luteinising hormone and human chorionic gonadotropin when used in assisted reproductive technology.

    PubMed

    Ezcurra, Diego; Humaidan, Peter

    2014-10-03

    Gonadotropins extracted from the urine of post-menopausal women have traditionally been used to stimulate folliculogenesis in the treatment of infertility and in assisted reproductive technology (ART). Products, such as human menopausal gonadotropin (hMG), consist not only of a mixture of the hormones, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinising hormone (LH) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), but also other biologically active contaminants, such as growth factors, binding proteins and prion proteins. The actual amount of molecular LH in hMG preparations varies considerably due to the purification process, thus hCG, mimicking LH action, is added to standardise the product. However, unlike LH, hCG plays a different role during the natural human menstrual cycle. It is secreted by the embryo and placenta, and its main role is to support implantation and pregnancy. More recently, recombinant gonadotropins (r-hFSH and r-hLH) have become available for ART therapies. Recombinant LH contains only LH molecules. In the field of reproduction there has been controversy in recent years over whether r-hLH or hCG should be used for ART. This review examines the existing evidence for molecular and functional differences between LH and hCG and assesses the clinical implications of hCG-supplemented urinary therapy compared with recombinant therapies used for ART.

  1. 21 CFR 862.1155 - Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) test system. 862.1155 Section 862.1155 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  2. 21 CFR 862.1155 - Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) test system. 862.1155 Section 862.1155 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  3. Rapid enlargement of an intracranial germ cell tumor after gonadotropin hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    Sasagawa, Yasuo; Tachibana, Osamu; Nakagawa, Athushi; Nakada, Satoko; Nojima, Takayuki; Koya, Daisuke; Iizuka, Hideaki

    2016-09-01

    We report a case of an intracranial germ cell tumor (iGCT) that showed rapid enlargement after human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) hormone therapy for pituitary hypogonadism. A 16-year-old boy presented with headache and was diagnosed with a suprasellar tumor. He was initially observed without surgery. Intranasal desmopressin therapy was started for central diabetes insipidus, but there was no change in the tumor size on MRI. The diagnosis of the tumor remained unknown for 4years. Levels of serum gonadotropin hormones (follicle-stimulating and luteinizing hormone) and testosterone progressively decreased, and the patient developed pituitary hypogonadism and complained about his undeveloped beard, lack of underarm hair, and erectile dysfunction. Intramuscular gonadotropin injection (hCG 5000U×2/week) was started at age 20. Eight months after the first gonadotropin injection, the MRI showed tumor growth with vivid enhancement. Craniotomy was performed and the tumor was partially resected. The histological diagnosis was immature teratoma. After surgery, the patient was treated with 5 cycles of chemotherapy with carboplatin and etoposide. He also received radiation therapy of 50Gy (20Gy tumor bed and 30Gy whole ventricles) to the residual tumor, after which the tumor decreased in size. We postulate that iGCT may be at risk of progression during hCG hormone therapy. Thus, careful monitoring is required for a patient with iGCT who receives this therapy.

  4. Metabolic status, gonadotropin secretion, and ovarian function during acute nutrient restriction of beef heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of acute nutritional restriction on metabolic status, gonadotropin secretion, and ovarian function of heifers was determined in 2 experiments. In Exp. 1, 14-mo-old heifers were fed a diet supplying 1.2 × maintenance energy requirements (1.2M). After 10 d, heifers were fed 1.2M or were res...

  5. 77 FR 4227 - Implantation or Injectable Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Gonadotropin Releasing Factor Analog...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 522 Implantation or Injectable Dosage Form New... gonadotropin releasing factor analog-diphtheria toxoid conjugate injectable solution. DATES: This rule is...: PART 522--IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS 0 1. The authority citation for...

  6. GaAs-based surface-normal optical modulator compared to Si and its wavelength response characterization using a supercontinuum laser.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Ojas P; Islam, Mohammed N; Terry, Fred L

    2011-02-28

    A GaAs-based surface-normal optical modulator using the free-carrier effect is demonstrated for the first time to our knowledge. The device exhibits ~43% modulation depth compared to 24% for a previously demonstrated Si-based device with twice the interaction length. Simulations predict ~1.8 times the speeds for GaAs-based devices compared to Si. Operation in conjunction with a supercontinuum source is used to characterize the wavelength response of the modulator. Potential for colorless operation makes the modulator a candidate for wavelength-division multiplexed networks with broadband light sources.

  7. Construction of hormonally responsive intact cell hybrids by cell fusion: transfer of. beta. -adrenergic receptor and nucleotide regulatory protein(s) in normal and desensitized cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schulster, D.; Salmon, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    Fusion of normal, untreated human erythrocytes with desensitized turkey erythrocytes increases isoproterenol stimulation of cyclic (/sup 3/H)AMP accumulation over basal rates. Moreover, pretreatment of the human erythrocytes with cholera toxin before they are fused with desensitized turkey erthythrocytes leads to a large stimulation with isoproterenol. This is even greater and far more rapid than the response obtained if turkey erythrocytes are treated directly with cholera toxin. It is concluded that the stimulation in the fused system is due to the transfer of an ADP-ribosylated subunit of nucleotide regulatory protein.

  8. Cigarette smoke induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response in normal and malignant human lung cells

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, Ellen; Stinson, Andy; Shan, Lin; Yang, Jin; Gietl, Diana; Albino, Anthony P

    2008-01-01

    Background Although lung cancer is among the few malignancies for which we know the primary etiological agent (i.e., cigarette smoke), a precise understanding of the temporal sequence of events that drive tumor progression remains elusive. In addition to finding that cigarette smoke (CS) impacts the functioning of key pathways with significant roles in redox homeostasis, xenobiotic detoxification, cell cycle control, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) functioning, our data highlighted a defensive role for the unfolded protein response (UPR) program. The UPR promotes cell survival by reducing the accumulation of aberrantly folded proteins through translation arrest, production of chaperone proteins, and increased degradation. Importance of the UPR in maintaining tissue health is evidenced by the fact that a chronic increase in defective protein structures plays a pathogenic role in diabetes, cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's syndromes, and cancer. Methods Gene and protein expression changes in CS exposed human cell cultures were monitored by high-density microarrays and Western blot analysis. Tissue arrays containing samples from 110 lung cancers were probed with antibodies to proteins of interest using immunohistochemistry. Results We show that: 1) CS induces ER stress and activates components of the UPR; 2) reactive species in CS that promote oxidative stress are primarily responsible for UPR activation; 3) CS exposure results in increased expression of several genes with significant roles in attenuating oxidative stress; and 4) several major UPR regulators are increased either in expression (i.e., BiP and eIF2α) or phosphorylation (i.e., phospho-eIF2α) in a majority of human lung cancers. Conclusion These data indicate that chronic ER stress and recruitment of one or more UPR effector arms upon exposure to CS may play a pivotal role in the etiology or progression of lung cancers, and that phospho-eIF2α and BiP may have diagnostic and

  9. Do poor-responder patients benefit from increasing the daily gonadotropin dose during controlled ovarian hyperstimulation for IVF?

    PubMed

    Haas, Jigal; Zilberberg, Eran; Machtinger, Ronit; Kedem, Alon; Hourvitz, Ariel; Orvieto, Raoul

    2015-01-01

    We aim to assess the in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer (IVF-ET) outcome in patients receiving an extremely high 450 daily dose (IU) of gonadotropins during controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) for IVF. Moreover, in those who failed to conceive while using 450 daily dose (IU) of gonadotropins, we aim to evaluate whether increasing the daily dose gonadotropins to 600 IU will improve IVF outcome. All consecutive women, admitted to our IVF unit and underwent COH consisting of daily gonadotropin dose of 450 IU were included. Ovarian stimulation characteristics, number of oocytes retrieved, number of embryo transferred and pregnancy rate were assessed. Nine-hundred one consecutive IVF cycles were evaluated. While there was no between-group difference in the duration of COH, patients who conceived were significantly younger, yielded higher number of oocytes retrieved and embryos transferred and had significantly lower cancellations. In a sub-analysis, including only those patients who failed to conceive while using 450 daily dose (IU) of gonadotropins, and who underwent a subsequent IVF cycle attempt with the used of 600 IU daily dose of gonadotropins, no improvements in COH characteristics or cancellation rates were observed with increasing the daily gonadotropin dose to 600 IU. To conclude, in poor responders undergoing COH with an extremely high daily gonadotropin dose (450 IU), the most important factors that predict IVF success are female age and the number of oocytes retrieved. Moreover, patients who failed to conceive on a daily gonadotropin dose of 450 IU will not benefit from increasing the dose to 600 IU and should therefore consider the options of egg donation or adoption.

  10. Normal pituitary hormone response to thyrotrophin and gonadotrophin releasing hormones in subjects exposed to elemental mercury vapour.

    PubMed Central

    Erfurth, E M; Schütz, A; Nilsson, A; Barregård, L; Skerfving, S

    1990-01-01

    Exposure to elemental mercury (Hg) vapour results in an accumulation of Hg in the pituitary, the thyroid, and the testis. In this study, basal serum concentrations of pituitary hormones (thyrotrophin (TSH), prolactin (PRL), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), and luteinising hormone (LH] or their response after administration of thyrotrophin and gonadotrophin releasing hormones did not differ between 11 male workers (mean urinary Hg (U Hg) concentration 26 nmol/mmol creatinine) and nine male dentists (U Hg concentration 1.3 nmol/mmol creatinine) exposed to elemental Hg vapour when compared with matched referent groups (U Hg concentration 0.6 and 0.4 nmol/mmol creatinine). Thus there was no evidence of an effect of Hg on the pituitary. Neither was there any association between exposure to Hg and serum concentrations of free thyroid hormones (S FT3, S FT4), testosterone, or cortisol. Increased plasma concentrations of selenium (Se) were associated with increased basal serum concentrations of TSH, decreased concentrations of basal serum cortisol, and decreased release of FSH. PMID:2119795

  11. Etiology and therapeutic outcomes of children with gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Eungu; Cho, Ja Hyang; Choi, Jin-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to investigate the etiology, clinical features, and outcomes of patients with gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty (GIPP). Methods The study included 16 patients (14 female and 2 male patients) who manifested secondary sexual characteristics, elevated sex hormones, or adrenal androgens with prepubertal luteinizing hormone levels after gonadotropin releasing hormone stimulation diagnosed between May 1994 and December 2015. Patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia were excluded. Clinical features, laboratory findings, treatment modalities, and outcomes were retrospectively reviewed. Results The median age at diagnosis was 2.6 years (range, 0.7–7.9 years) and median follow-up duration was 4.6 years (range, 1 month–9.8 years). Patients with McCune-Albright syndrome (n=5) and functional ovarian cysts (n=4) presented with vaginal bleeding and elevated estradiol levels (23.3±17.5 pg/mL); adrenocortical tumors (n=4) with premature pubarche and elevated dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels (87.2–6,530 µg/dL); and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-producing tumor (n=1) with premature pubarche and elevated β-human chorionic gonadotropin levels (47.4 mIU/mL). Two patients were idiopathic. Six patients transited to gonadotropin-dependent precocious puberty median 3.3 years (range, 0.3–5.1 years) after the onset of GIPP. Initial and follow-up height standard deviation scores (0.99±0.84 vs. 1.10±1.10, P=0.44) and bone age advancement (1.49±1.77 years vs. 2.02±1.95 years, P=0.06) were not significantly different. Conclusion The etiologies of GIPP are heterogeneous, and treatment and prognosis is quite different according to the etiology. Efficacy of treatment with aromatase inhibitors needs to be evaluated after long-term follow-up. PMID:27777905

  12. Gonadotropin ratio affects the in vitro growth of rhesus ovarian preantral follicles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoon Young; Yun, Jun-Won; Kim, Jong Min; Park, Chung Gyu; Rosenwaks, Zev; Liu, Hung Ching; Kang, Byeong-Cheol; Ku, Seung-Yup

    2016-01-01

    In vitro follicle growth (IVFG) strategy is critical in the fertility preservation of cancer survivors; however, its optimal protocol needs to be developed using primate models since the availability of human samples is limited. Only a few previous studies have reported the successful IVFG of rhesus monkey ovaries using low-dose follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) (0.3 or 3 ng/mL) and long-term culture (up to 5 weeks) and it is still uncertain in regard to the optimal culture duration and effective dose of treated gonadotropins applicable to the IVFG of rhesus preantral follicles. Recently, we have reported that the FSH to luteinizing hormone (LH) ratio affects the in vitro growth of murine ovarian follicles. We aimed to investigate whether gonadotropin ratios affect the efficiency of rhesus follicular growth in vitro. Ovaries were collected from six necropsied rhesus macaques (4–9 years) and preantral follicles were retrieved and cultured for 14 days using 200 mIU/mL FSH. The characteristics of follicular growth were compared between the FSH:LH=1:1 (n=24) and FSH:LH=2:1 (n=24) groups. High concentration gonadotropin treatment shortened the duration required for in vitro maturation of rhesus preantral follicles. The FSH:LH=2:1 group showed a faster follicular growth and enabled the acquisition of mature oocytes, although the expression of growth differentiation factor (GDF)-9 and anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) did not differ significantly between the two groups. Taken together, high dose gonadotropin treatment can shorten the duration of IVFG and the gonadotropin ratio is important in the IVFG of rhesus monkey ovaries. PMID:26980777

  13. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the supplementary motor area modifies breathing pattern in response to inspiratory loading in normal humans

    PubMed Central

    Nierat, Marie-Cécile; Hudson, Anna L.; Chaskalovic, Joël; Similowski, Thomas; Laviolette, Louis

    2015-01-01

    In awake humans, breathing depends on automatic brainstem pattern generators. It is also heavily influenced by cortical networks. For example, functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalographic data show that the supplementary motor area becomes active when breathing is made difficult by inspiratory mechanical loads like resistances or threshold valves, which is associated with perceived respiratory discomfort. We hypothesized that manipulating the excitability of the supplementary motor area with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation would modify the breathing pattern response to an experimental inspiratory load and possibly respiratory discomfort. Seven subjects (three men, age 25 ± 4) were studied. Breathing pattern and respiratory discomfort during inspiratory loading were described before and after conditioning the supplementary motor area with repetitive stimulation, using an excitatory paradigm (5 Hz stimulation), an inhibitory paradigm, or sham stimulation. No significant change in breathing pattern during loading was observed after sham conditioning. Excitatory conditioning shortened inspiratory time (p = 0.001), decreased tidal volume (p = 0.016), and decreased ventilation (p = 0.003), as corroborated by an increased end-tidal expired carbon dioxide (p = 0.013). Inhibitory conditioning did not affect ventilation, but lengthened expiratory time (p = 0.031). Respiratory discomfort was mild under baseline conditions, and unchanged after conditioning of the supplementary motor area. This is the first study to show that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation conditioning of the cerebral cortex can alter breathing pattern. A 5 Hz conditioning protocol, known to enhance corticophrenic excitability, can reduce the amount of hyperventilation induced by inspiratory threshold loading. Further studies are needed to determine whether and under what circumstances rTMS can have an effect on dyspnoea. PMID:26483701

  14. Gonadotropin regulation of testosterone production by primary cultured theca and granulosa cells of Atlantic croaker: I. Novel role of CaMKs and interactions between calcium- and adenylyl cyclase-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Benninghoff, Abby D; Thomas, Peter

    2006-07-01

    Theca and granulosa cells for in vitro primary culture were obtained by enzymatic digestion of mature ovarian tissue from Atlantic croaker (Micropogonias undulatus) and separation from the other cell types by Percoll density-gradient centrifugation. Histochemical staining and treatment with pregnenolone confirmed the presence in the cultured cells of enzymes involved in synthesizing the major sex steroids in croaker ovaries: testosterone, estradiol, and 17alpha,20beta,21-trihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (20beta-S). Croaker theca and granulosa cells maintained their steroidogenic response to gonadotropin when cultured with serum-supplemented media and produced high levels of testosterone for up to 5 days, although estradiol production was low. Multiple signal transduction pathways mediating gonadotropin stimulation of androgen production were identified in Atlantic croaker ovarian theca and granulosa cells in primary co-culture. Inhibitors of voltage-sensitive calcium channels (VSCCs) and calmodulin decreased the steroidogenic response to gonadotropin, whereas activators of adenylyl cyclase and protein kinase A (PKA) increased testosterone production, indicating that both calcium and PKA-dependent signaling pathways are involved in the regulation of follicular steroid production. In addition, the first evidence in vertebrates for an involvement of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMKs) in gonadal steroidogenesis was obtained, since the stimulatory effects of gonadotropin on testosterone media accumulation were attenuated by specific inhibitors of CaMKs. Some interactions among the signaling pathways were observed as demonstrated by the positive effect of elevated intracellular calcium on adenylyl cyclase activity and the reduction of forskolin- and dbcAMP-induced testosterone production by inhibitors of VSCCs, calmodulin, and CaMKs.

  15. Specificity of Tumor Necrosis Factor Toxicity for Human Mammary Carcinomas Relative to Normal Mammary Epithelium and Correlation with Response to Doxorubicin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dollbaum, Charles; Creasey, Abla A.; Dairkee, Shahnaz H.; Hiller, Alan J.; Rudolph, Alfred R.; Lin, Leo; Vitt, Charles; Smith, Helene S.

    1988-07-01

    By using a unique short-term culture system capable of growing both normal and malignant breast epithelial tissue, human recombinant tumor necrosis factor (TNF) showed preferential cytotoxicity to malignant cells as compared to the corresponding nonmalignant cells. Most of the malignant specimens were sensitive to TNF with 13 of 18 specimens showing 90% inhibition of clonal growth (ID90) by <500 units of TNF per ml of culture fluid. In contrast, all 13 nonmalignant specimens tested clustered at the resistant end of the TNF response spectrum, with ID90 values being >5000 units of TNF per ml of culture fluid. This differential sensitivity to TNF was seen in three cases in which malignant and nonmalignant breast epithelial tissues from the same patient were studied. To investigate the mechanism of resistance to TNF by normal cells, the presence of receptors for TNF was determined. Five of six cultures showed specific binding of 125I-labeled TNF and there was no relationship between the degree of resistance and the degree of specific binding. Simultaneous comparison of tumor responsiveness to doxorubicin and TNF revealed a positive correlation in ID90 values; these results may have important implications for the clinical use of TNF in cancer patients heavily pretreated with doxorubicin.

  16. BIM-23A760 influences key functional endpoints in pituitary adenomas and normal pituitaries: molecular mechanisms underlying the differential response in adenomas.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; López-Sánchez, Laura M; Gahete, Manuel D; Rivero-Cortés, Esther; Vázquez-Borrego, Mari C; Gálvez, María A; de la Riva, Andrés; Venegas-Moreno, Eva; Jiménez-Reina, Luis; Moreno-Carazo, Alberto; Tinahones, Francisco J; Maraver-Selfa, Silvia; Japón, Miguel A; García-Arnés, Juan A; Soto-Moreno, Alfonso; Webb, Susan M; Kineman, Rhonda D; Culler, Michael D; Castaño, Justo P; Luque, Raúl M

    2017-02-09

    Chimeric somatostatin/dopamine compounds such as BIM-23A760, an sst2/sst5/D2 receptors-agonist, have emerged as promising new approaches to treat pituitary adenomas. However, information on direct in vitro effects of BIM-23A760 in normal and tumoral pituitaries remains incomplete. The objective of this study was to analyze BIM-23A760 effects on functional parameters (Ca(2+) signaling, hormone expression/secretion, cell viability and apoptosis) in pituitary adenomas (n = 74), and to compare with the responses of normal primate and human pituitaries (n = 3-5). Primate and human normal pituitaries exhibited similar sst2/sst5/D2 expression patterns, wherein BIM-23A760 inhibited the expression/secretion of several pituitary hormones (specially GH/PRL), which was accompanied by increased sst2/sst5/D2 expression in primates and decreased Ca(2+) concentration in human cells. In tumoral pituitaries, BIM-23A760 also inhibited Ca(2+) concentration, hormone secretion/expression and proliferation. However, BIM-23A760 elicited stimulatory effects in a subset of GHomas, ACTHomas and NFPAs in terms of Ca(2+) signaling and/or hormone secretion, which was associated with the relative somatostatin/dopamine-receptors levels, especially sst5 and sst5TMD4. The chimeric sst2/sst5/D2 compound BIM-23A760 affects multiple, clinically relevant parameters on pituitary adenomas and may represent a valuable therapeutic tool. The relative ssts/D2 expression profile, particularly sst5 and/or sst5TMD4 levels, might represent useful molecular markers to predict the ultimate response of pituitary adenomas to BIM-23A760.

  17. BIM-23A760 influences key functional endpoints in pituitary adenomas and normal pituitaries: molecular mechanisms underlying the differential response in adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; López-Sánchez, Laura M.; Gahete, Manuel D.; Rivero-Cortés, Esther; Vázquez-Borrego, Mari C.; Gálvez, María A.; de la Riva, Andrés; Venegas-Moreno, Eva; Jiménez-Reina, Luis; Moreno-Carazo, Alberto; Tinahones, Francisco J.; Maraver-Selfa, Silvia; Japón, Miguel A.; García-Arnés, Juan A.; Soto-Moreno, Alfonso; Webb, Susan M.; Kineman, Rhonda D.; Culler, Michael D.; Castaño, Justo P.; Luque, Raúl M.

    2017-01-01

    Chimeric somatostatin/dopamine compounds such as BIM-23A760, an sst2/sst5/D2 receptors-agonist, have emerged as promising new approaches to treat pituitary adenomas. However, information on direct in vitro effects of BIM-23A760 in normal and tumoral pituitaries remains incomplete. The objective of this study was to analyze BIM-23A760 effects on functional parameters (Ca2+ signaling, hormone expression/secretion, cell viability and apoptosis) in pituitary adenomas (n = 74), and to compare with the responses of normal primate and human pituitaries (n = 3–5). Primate and human normal pituitaries exhibited similar sst2/sst5/D2 expression patterns, wherein BIM-23A760 inhibited the expression/secretion of several pituitary hormones (specially GH/PRL), which was accompanied by increased sst2/sst5/D2 expression in primates and decreased Ca2+ concentration in human cells. In tumoral pituitaries, BIM-23A760 also inhibited Ca2+ concentration, hormone secretion/expression and proliferation. However, BIM-23A760 elicited stimulatory effects in a subset of GHomas, ACTHomas and NFPAs in terms of Ca2+ signaling and/or hormone secretion, which was associated with the relative somatostatin/dopamine-receptors levels, especially sst5 and sst5TMD4. The chimeric sst2/sst5/D2 compound BIM-23A760 affects multiple, clinically relevant parameters on pituitary adenomas and may represent a valuable therapeutic tool. The relative ssts/D2 expression profile, particularly sst5 and/or sst5TMD4 levels, might represent useful molecular markers to predict the ultimate response of pituitary adenomas to BIM-23A760. PMID:28181484

  18. Dark rearing alters the normal development of spatiotemporal response properties but not of contrast detection threshold in mouse retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Akimov, Nikolay P; Rentería, René C

    2014-07-01

    The mouse visual system is immature when the eyes open two weeks after birth. As in other mammals, some of the maturation that occurs in the subsequent weeks is known to depend on visual experience. Development of the retina, which as the first stage of vision provides the visual information to the brain, also depends on light-driven activity for proper development but has been less well studied than visual cortical development. The critical properties for retinal encoding of images include detection of contrast and responsiveness to the broad range of temporal stimulus frequencies present in natural stimuli. Here we show that contrast detection threshold and temporal frequency response characteristics of ON and OFF retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), which are poor at eye opening, subsequently undergo maturation, improving RGC performance. Further, we find that depriving mice of visual experience from before birth by rearing them in the dark causes ON and OFF RGCs to have smaller receptive field centers but does not affect their contrast detection threshold development. The modest developmental increase in temporal frequency responsiveness of RGCs in mice reared on a normal light cycle was inhibited by dark rearing only in ON but not OFF RGCs. Thus, these RGC response characteristics are in many ways unaffected by the experience-dependent changes to synaptic and spontaneous activity known to occur in the mouse retina in the two weeks after eye opening, but specific differences are apparent in the ON vs. OFF RGC populations.

  19. The activation of HMGB1 as a progression factor on inflammation response in normal human bronchial epithelial cells through RAGE/JNK/NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaojin; Mi, Yanyan; Yang, Hui; Hu, Ankang; Zhang, Qingguo; Shang, Chunli

    2013-08-01

    Extracellular high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB-1) has been implicated in the inflammation response leading to the precancerous lesions of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the role of HMGB-1 in the inflammation response in normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells and its underlying mechanisms were still not fully understood. In this study, the inflammation response in NHBE cells was stimulated by 2.5, 5, and 10 μg/ml HMGB-1. However, the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) blocker RAGE-Ab (5 μg/ml) or 10 μM c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) inhibitor SP600125 could inhibit HMGB1-induced the release of inflammation cytokines including TNF-α, IL-8, IL-10, and MCP-1 in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, HMGB1-induced RAGE protein expression, JNK and NF-κB activation were attenuated by the pretreatment with RAGE-Ab or JNK inhibitor SP600125 in Western blot analysis. Our data indicated that HMGB-1 induced inflammation response in NHBE cells through activating RAGE/JNK/NF-κB pathway. HMGB-1 could act as a therapeutic target for inflammation leading NHBE cells to the precancerous lesions of NSCLC.

  20. Oxygen-Sensitive K+ Channels Modulate Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Secretion from Human Placental Trophoblast.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Paula; Sibley, Colin P; Greenwood, Susan L

    2016-01-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a key autocrine/paracrine regulator of placental syncytiotrophoblast, the transport epithelium of the human placenta. Syncytiotrophoblast hCG secretion is modulated by the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and potassium (K+) channels. Here we test the hypothesis that K+ channels mediate the effects of pO2 and ROS on hCG secretion. Placental villous explants from normal term pregnancies were cultured for 6 days at 6% (normoxia), 21% (hyperoxia) or 1% (hypoxia) pO2. On days 3-5, explants were treated with 5mM 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) or tetraethylammonium (TEA), blockers of pO2-sensitive voltage-gated K+ (KV) channels, or ROS (10-1000μM H2O2). hCG secretion and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, a marker of necrosis, were determined daily. At day 6, hCG and LDH were measured in tissue lysate and 86Rb (K+) efflux assessed to estimate syncytiotrophoblast K+ permeability. hCG secretion and 86Rb efflux were significantly greater in explants maintained in 21% pO2 than normoxia. 4-AP/TEA inhibited hCG secretion to a greater extent at 21% than 6% and 1% pO2, and reduced 86Rb efflux at 21% but not 6% pO2. LDH release and tissue LDH/hCG were similar in 6%, 21% and 1% pO2 and unaffected by 4-AP/TEA. H2O2 stimulated 86Rb efflux and hCG secretion at normoxia but decreased 86Rb efflux, without affecting hCG secretion, at 21% pO2. 4-AP/TEA-sensitive K+ channels participate in pO2-sensitive hCG secretion from syncytiotrophoblast. ROS effects on both hCG secretion and 86Rb efflux are pO2-dependent but causal links between the two remain to be established.

  1. The corticotropin-releasing hormone test in normal short children: comparison of plasma adrenocorticotropin and cortisol responses to human corticotropin-releasing hormone and insulin-induced hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Goji, K

    1989-03-01

    The human corticotropin-releasing hormone (hCRH) tests were performed in twelve normal short children, and the responses of plasma ACTH and cortisol to iv administration of 1 micrograms/kg hCRH were compared with those to insulin-induced hypoglycemia. After administration of hCRH, the mean plasma ACTH level rose from a basal value of 3.3 +/- 0.4 pmol/l (mean +/- SEM) to a peak value of 9.2 +/- 0.8 pmol/l at 30 min, and the mean plasma cortisol level rose from a basal value of 231 +/- 25 nmol/l to a peak value of 546 +/- 30 nmol/l at 30 min. The ACTH response after insulin-induced hypoglycemia was greater than that after hCRH administration; the mean peak level (P less than 0.01), the percent maximum increment (P less than 0.01), and the area under the ACTH response curve (P less than 0.01) were all significantly greater after insulin-induced hypoglycemia than those after hCRH administration. Although the mean peak cortisol level after insulin-induced hypoglycemia was about 1.3-fold higher than that after hCRH administration (P less than 0.01), neither the percent maximum increment in plasma cortisol nor the area under the cortisol response curve after insulin-induced hypoglycemia was significantly different from that after hCRH administration. Consequently, the acute increases in plasma ACTH after the administration of 1 microgram/kg hCRH stimulated the adrenal gland to almost the same cortisol response as that obtained with a much greater increase in plasma ACTH after insulin-induced hypoglycemia. These results suggest that a plasma ACTH peak of 9-11 pmol/l produces near maximum acute stimulation of adrenal steroidogenesis.

  2. Dynamic responses of the Earth's radiation belts during periods of solar wind dynamic pressure pulse based on normalized superposed epoch analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Binbin; Xiang, Zheng; Gu, Xudong; Shprits, Yuri Y.; Zhou, Chen; Zhao, Zhengyu; Zhang, Xianguo; Zuo, Pingbing

    2016-09-01

    Using the electron flux measurements obtained from five satellites (GOES 15 and POES 15, 16, 18, and 19), we investigate the flux variations of radiation belt electrons during forty solar wind dynamic pressure pulses identified between September 2012 and December 2014. By utilizing the mean duration of the pressure pulses as the epoch timeline and stretching or compressing the time phases of individual events to normalize the duration by means of linear interpolation, we have performed normalized superposed epoch analysis to evaluate the dynamic responses of radiation belt energetic electrons corresponding to various groups of solar wind and magnetospheric conditions in association with solar wind dynamic pressure pulses. Our results indicate that by adopting the timeline normalization we can reproduce the typical response of the electron radiation belts to pressure pulses. Radiation belt electron fluxes exhibit large depletions right after the Pdyn peak during the periods of northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Bz and are more likely to occur during the Pdyn pulse under southward IMF Bz conditions. For the pulse events with large negative values of (Dst)min, radiation belt electrons respond in a manner similar to those with southward IMF Bz, and the corresponding postpulse recovery can extend to L 3 and exceed the prepulse flux levels. Triggered by the solar wind pressure enhancements, deeper earthward magnetopause erosion provides favorable conditions for the prompt electron flux dropouts that extend down to L 5, and the pressure pulses with longer duration tend to produce quicker and stronger electron flux decay. In addition, the events with high electron fluxes before the Pdyn pulse tend to experience more severe electron flux dropouts during the course of the pulse, while the largest rate of electron flux increase before and after the pulse occurs under the preconditioned low electron fluxes. These new results help us understand how electron fluxes

  3. Molecular cloning of pituitary glycoprotein alpha-subunit and follicle stimulating hormone and chorionic gonadotropin beta-subunits from New World squirrel monkey and owl monkey.

    PubMed

    Scammell, Jonathan G; Funkhouser, Jane D; Moyer, Felricia S; Gibson, Susan V; Willis, Donna L

    2008-02-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize the gonadotropins expressed in pituitary glands of the New World squirrel monkey (Saimiri sp.) and owl monkey (Aotus sp.). The various subunits were amplified from total RNA from squirrel monkey and owl monkey pituitary glands by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and the deduced amino acid sequences compared to those of other species. Mature squirrel monkey and owl monkey glycoprotein hormone alpha-polypeptides (96 amino acids in length) were determined to be 80% homologous to the human sequence. The sequences of mature beta subunits of follicle stimulating hormone (FSHbeta) from squirrel monkey and owl monkey (111 amino acids in length) are 92% homologous to human FSHbeta. New World primate glycoprotein hormone alpha-polypeptides and FSHbeta subunits showed conservation of all cysteine residues and consensus N-linked glycosylation sites. Attempts to amplify the beta-subunit of luteinizing hormone from squirrel monkey and owl monkey pituitary glands were unsuccessful. Rather, the beta-subunit of chorionic gonadotropin (CG) was amplified from pituitaries of both New World primates. Squirrel monkey and owl monkey CGbeta are 143 and 144 amino acids in length and 77% homologous with human CGbeta. The greatest divergence is in the C terminus, where all four sites for O-linked glycosylation in human CGbeta, responsible for delayed metabolic clearance, are predicted to be absent in New World primate CGbetas. It is likely that CG secreted from pituitary of New World primates exhibits a relatively short half-life compared to human CG.

  4. Analysis of human luteinizing hormone and human chorionic gonadotropin preparations of different origins by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Almeida, B E; Oliveira, J E; Carvalho, C M; Dalmora, S L; Bartolini, P; Ribela, M T C P

    2010-09-21

    Specific reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography conditions are reported for the analysis of recombinant and native human luteinizing hormone (hLH) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) preparations. Heterodimeric hLH, hCG and their alpha- and beta-subunits migrated with significantly different retention times (t(R)) in the following order of increasing hydrophobicity: alpha-hCGresponse curve (r=0.99998; p<0.0001; n=20) used to assess the accuracy, precision and sensitivity of the analysis. Quantification of the different gonadotropins in the heterogeneous preparations was also carried out, but with limitations in accuracy.

  5. Treatment of idiopathic short stature: effects of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs, aromatase inhibitors and anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Dunkel, Leo

    2011-01-01

    Modulation of sex steroid action on the growth plate can, at least theoretically, increase adult height in children and adolescents with idiopathic short stature. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analog therapy during adolescence has been shown effective in a placebo-controlled study, but to obtain clinically significant increases in adult height, the treatment duration must be lengthy (several years). Furthermore, such treatment seems to compromise bone health and, because of the resulting delay in pubertal development, likely has psychosocial consequences. Therefore, GnRH analogs are no longer recommended to augment height in adolescents with short stature and normally timed puberty. Aromatase inhibitors are probably more effective than GnRH analogs in promoting increased adult height in children with short stature and, unlike GnRH analogs, do not delay pubertal development in males. However, due to a dearth of safety data with aromatase inhibitors for the treatment of short stature, their use outside a research setting is currently not recommended. Positive effects of anabolic steroids on adult height have not been documented.

  6. Effects of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist therapy on body mass index and height in girls with central precocious puberty.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Jae; Yang, Eun Mi; Seo, Ji Yeon; Kim, Chan Jong

    2012-04-01

    Treatment with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist is the treatment of choice for central precocious puberty (CPP). Many of the previous studies concerning the auxological effects of treatment with GnRH agonist in CPP have focused on final height. Much less attention has been paid to changes in body weight. However, concerns have been expressed that CPP may be associated with increased body mass index (BMI) both at initial presentation and during GnRH agonist treatment. We retrospectively reviewed the height and BMI of 38 girls with CPP. All patients were treated with GnRH agonist over 18 months. The height standard deviation score (SDS) for chronological age was significantly decreased during GnRH agonist treatment, whereas the height SDS for bone age was significantly increased. The predicted adult height was increased from 157.78±6.45 cm before treatment to 161.41±8.97 cm at 12 months after treatment. The BMI SDS for chronological age was significantly increased during treatment. The BMI SDS of normal-weight girls increased more than did the BMI SDS of overweight girls, but the increase was not significant. Preventive measures, such as increased physical activity, can be introduced to minimize possible alterations in body weight, and a long-term follow-up study is required to elucidate whether GnRH agonist treatment in Korean girls with CPP affects adult obesity.

  7. Review of outcomes after cessation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist treatment of girls with precocious puberty.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Paul; Silverman, Lawrence A; Geffner, Mitchell E; Neely, E Kirk; Gould, Errol; Danoff, Theodore M

    2014-03-01

    Although gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa) have been the standard of care of central precocious puberty (CPP) management for many years, there are still questions about the long-term consequences of treatment. With increased utilization of GnRHa treatment, it is now possible to assess posttreatment outcomes in the immediate posttreatment period and into adulthood. This literature review reports on the long-term effects of GnRHa therapy in girls with CPP after therapy has been discontinued. Published reports confirm the reversibility of hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis suppression in females after cessation of GnRHa therapy, with the majority of patients achieving ovulatory menstrual cycles of normal timing and duration. GnRHa therapy does not appear to induce polycystic ovary syndrome or have long-term negative repercussions on either bone mineral density or body composition. Evidence is currently insufficient to identify agent-specific differences in outcomes, reproductive function, and health of offspring.

  8. The enhancing effects of alcoholic extract of Nigella sativa seed on fertility potential, plasma gonadotropins and testosterone in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Parandin, Rahmatollah; Yousofvand, Namdar; Ghorbani, Rostam

    2012-01-01

    Background: The task force on plants for fertility regulation in men continued with its program to identify novel prototypes in plants alleged to have fertility regulating properties. Nigella Sativa seeds are frequently used in folk medicine in the Middle East and some Asian countries for the promotion of good health and treatment of many ailments. Objective: To evaluated the role of alcoholic extract of Nigella sativa on fertility potential, Pituitary-testicular axis hormones and Testosterone in male rats. Materials and Methods: 24 male rats were randomly divided into 3 groups; control, group A and group B, each group comprising of 8 rats. Animals in control group received 1 ml of normal saline and treatment groups (A and B) received (gavage) graded doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight of alcoholic extract of Nigella sativa seeds on a daily basis for 60 days. At the end of treatment period, fertility parameters such as body and reproductive organs weight, sperm motility, viability and count, epididymal sperm reserve (ESR), daily sperm production (DSP), blood testosterone concentration, Gonadotropins levels and fertility index were measured. Results: There was a significant difference in testes and epididymidis weight, sperm count, ESR, DSP, blood testosterone concentration, LH and fertility index in both the lower dose group and the higher group as compared to the control group. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that alcoholic extract of Nigella sativa seed especially in higher doses could increase fertility potential, LH and testosterone concentration in male rats. PMID:25246898

  9. A 15-year-old female with amenorrhea, abdominal distention, and elevated human chorionic gonadotropin: pregnancy, right? Not so fast….

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Arun; Ocon, Anthony J; Nibhanipudi, Kumara

    2012-10-01

    Nongestational choriocarcinoma, a rare ovarian tumor, may present in young women with amenorrhea, abdominal distention, and elevated urine human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), all of which may be mistaken for pregnancy. A 15-year-old Hispanic female, who reported no sexual activity, presented with 6 months of amenorrhea, abdominal pain, and progressive abdominal distension. Initially, suspicion of pregnancy was considered. Physical examination was significant for abdominal distension, but no uterine fundus or fetal anatomy could be palpated, and auscultation did not reveal any fetal heart sounds or bruits. Laboratory values showed elevated urine hCG, cancer antigen 125, and cancer antigen 19.9 levels but normal serum hCG level and was inconsistent with pregnancy. Computed tomographic scans revealed a large abdominal heterogeneous mass and pleural effusions. Salpingo-oophorectomy with total omentectomy and inversion appendectomy removed a 21 × 20.5 × 16.5-cm tumor. Pathological testing determined it to be a nongestational choriocarcinoma. This rare tumor is more common in the pediatric adolescent population than in adults. Surgical resection and chemotherapy often result in a positive prognosis. In female adolescent patients presenting with elevated hCG level, amenorrhea, and abdominal distention, choriocarcinoma should be considered, especially in those with no history of sexual activity or before menarche.

  10. Peripheral mononuclear leucocyte beta adrenoceptors and non-specific bronchial responsiveness to methacholine in young and elderly normal subjects and asthmatic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, M. J.; Crowley, J. J.; Nielson, C. P.; Charan, N. B.; Vestal, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--As beta adrenoceptor dysfunction occurs in both the normal elderly subject and in young asthmatic patients, the hypothesis was examined that age related beta adrenoceptor changes are important in the pathogenesis of late onset asthma in old age. METHODS--Subjects were non-smokers who comprised 17 young normal subjects of mean (SE) age 29.4 (1.3) years, 17 elderly normal subjects of 67.2 (1.3) years, seven young asthmatic patients of 31.0 (2.8) years, and 17 elderly asthmatic patients of 68.5 (1.4) years. All asthmatic patients withheld inhalers for 12 hours and oral treatment for 24 hours before each study day. Subjects underwent an inhaled methacholine challenge (Newcastle dosimeter method) on two nonconsecutive days. The slope of the flow at 50% of the vital capacity (FEF50) dose-response curve was derived from the percentage fall in FEE50 divided by methacholine dose (sFEF50). Beta-adrenoceptor density (Bmax) and affinity (%KH) were determined with (125I)iodocyanopindolol as the radioligand in membranes prepared from mononuclear leucocytes. RESULTS--Log sFEF50 was shown to be reproducible (repeatability coefficient 0.41) on the two study days and was inversely related to %KH but not to Bmax. Multiple regression analysis (all 58 subjects, overall R2 = 0.57) revealed an inverse relation between log sFEF50 and %KH, and between log sFEF50 and Bmax. The inverse relation between log sFEF50 and %KH was preserved whereas that between log sFEF50 and Bmax was lost when young asthmatic subjects or when all asthmatic subjects were excluded from multiple regression analysis. CONCLUSIONS--The beta adrenoceptor dysfunction observed in late onset asthma may be similar to that seen during ageing. Thus late onset asthma may represent the extreme of a spectrum of age associated beta adrenoceptor dysfunction. PMID:8153936

  11. Wastewater treatment plant effluent alters pituitary gland gonadotropin mRNA levels in juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch).

    PubMed

    Harding, Louisa B; Schultz, Irvin R; da Silva, Denis A M; Ylitalo, Gina M; Ragsdale, Dave; Harris, Stephanie I; Bailey, Stephanie; Pepich, Barry V; Swanson, Penny

    2016-09-01

    It is well known that endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) present in wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents interfere with reproduction in fish, including altered gonad development and induction of vitellogenin (Vtg), a female-specific egg yolk protein precursor produced in the liver. As a result, studies have focused on the effects of EDC exposure on the gonad and liver. However, impacts of environmental EDC exposure at higher levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonad axis are less well understood. The pituitary gonadotropins, follicle-stimulating hormone (Fsh) and luteinizing hormone (Lh) are involved in all aspects of gonad development and are subject to feedback from gonadal steroids making them a likely target of endocrine disruption. In this study, the effects of WWTP effluent exposure on pituitary gonadotropin mRNA expression were investigated to assess the utility of Lh beta-subunit (lhb) as a biomarker of estrogen exposure in juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). First, a controlled 72-h exposure to 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) and 17β-trenb