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Sample records for normal gonadotropin responsiveness

  1. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor is required for normal gonadotropin responsiveness in the mouse ovary

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, Kimberly R.; Tomic, Dragana; Gupta, Rupesh K.; Babus, Janice K.; Roby, Katherine F.; Terranova, Paul F.; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2007-08-15

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) mediates the toxicity of a variety of environmental chemicals. Although little is known about the physiological role of the AHR, studies suggest that it plays an important role in regulating ovulation because Ahr deficient (AhRKO) mice have a reduced number of ovulations compared to wild-type (WT) mice. The reasons for the reduced ability of AhRKO mice to ovulate are unknown. Normal ovulation, however, requires estrous cyclicity, appropriate luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels, and LH and FSH responsiveness. Thus, the purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that Ahr deletion regulates ovulation by altering cyclicity, FSH and LH levels, follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (Fshr) and luteinizing hormone receptor (Lhcgr) levels and/or gonadotropin responsiveness. The data indicate that AhRKO and WT mice have similar levels of FSH and LH, but AhRKO mice have reduced Fshr and Lhcgr mRNA levels compared to WT mice. Furthermore, AhRKO ovaries contain fewer corpora lutea compared to WT ovaries after 5 IU equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) treatment. Lastly, both AhRKO and WT mice ovulate a similar number of eggs in response to 5 IU human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), but AhRKO mice ovulate fewer eggs than WT mice in response to 2.5 IU and 1.25 IU hCG. Collectively, these data indicate that AhRKO follicles have a reduced capacity to ovulate compared to WT follicles and that this is due to reduced responsiveness to gonadotropins. Thus, in addition to mediating toxicity of environmental chemicals, the Ahr is required for normal ovulation.

  2. WNT5a is required for normal ovarian follicle development and antagonizes gonadotropin responsiveness in granulosa cells by suppressing canonical WNT signaling

    PubMed Central

    Abedini, Atefeh; Zamberlam, Gustavo; Lapointe, Evelyne; Tourigny, Catherine; Boyer, Alexandre; Paquet, Marilène; Hayashi, Kanako; Honda, Hiroaki; Kikuchi, Akira; Price, Christopher; Boerboom, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Whereas the roles of the canonical wingless-type MMTV (mouse mammary tumor virus) integration site family (WNT) signaling pathway in the regulation of ovarian follicle growth and steroidogenesis are now established, noncanonical WNT signaling in the ovary has been largely overlooked. Noncanonical WNTs, including WNT5a and WNT11, are expressed in granulosa cells (GCs) and are differentially regulated throughout follicle development, but their physiologic roles remain unknown. Using conditional gene targeting, we found that GC-specific inactivation of Wnt5a (but not Wnt11) results in the female subfertility associated with increased follicular atresia and decreased rates of ovulation. Microarray analyses have revealed that WNT5a acts to down-regulate the expression of FSH-responsive genes in vitro, and corresponding increases in the expression of these genes have been found in the GCs of conditional knockout mice. Unexpectedly, we found that WNT5a regulates its target genes not by signaling via the WNT/Ca2+ or planar cell polarity pathways, but rather by inhibiting the canonical pathway, causing both β-catenin (CTNNB1) and cAMP responsive element binding (CREB) protein levels to decrease via a glycogen synthase kinase-3β-dependent mechanism. We further found that WNT5a prevents follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing protein from up-regulating the CTNNB1 and CREB proteins and their target genes, indicating that WNT5a functions as a physiologic inhibitor of gonadotropin signaling. Together, these findings identify WNT5a as a key regulator of follicle development and gonadotropin responsiveness.—Abedini, A., Zamberlam, G., Lapointe, E., Tourigny, C., Boyer, A., Paquet, M., Hayashi, K., Honda, H., Kikuchi, A., Price, C., Boerboom, D. WNT5a is required for normal ovarian follicle development and antagonizes gonadotropin responsiveness in granulosa cells by suppressing canonical WNT signaling. PMID:26667040

  3. WNT5a is required for normal ovarian follicle development and antagonizes gonadotropin responsiveness in granulosa cells by suppressing canonical WNT signaling.

    PubMed

    Abedini, Atefeh; Zamberlam, Gustavo; Lapointe, Evelyne; Tourigny, Catherine; Boyer, Alexandre; Paquet, Marilène; Hayashi, Kanako; Honda, Hiroaki; Kikuchi, Akira; Price, Christopher; Boerboom, Derek

    2016-04-01

    Whereas the roles of the canonical wingless-type MMTV (mouse mammary tumor virus) integration site family (WNT) signaling pathway in the regulation of ovarian follicle growth and steroidogenesis are now established, noncanonical WNT signaling in the ovary has been largely overlooked. Noncanonical WNTs, including WNT5a and WNT11, are expressed in granulosa cells (GCs) and are differentially regulated throughout follicle development, but their physiologic roles remain unknown. Using conditional gene targeting, we found that GC-specific inactivation ofWnt5a(but notWnt11) results in the female subfertility associated with increased follicular atresia and decreased rates of ovulation. Microarray analyses have revealed that WNT5a acts to down-regulate the expression of FSH-responsive genesin vitro, and corresponding increases in the expression of these genes have been found in the GCs of conditional knockout mice. Unexpectedly, we found that WNT5a regulates its target genes not by signalingviathe WNT/Ca(2+)or planar cell polarity pathways, but rather by inhibiting the canonical pathway, causing both β-catenin (CTNNB1) and cAMP responsive element binding (CREB) protein levels to decreaseviaa glycogen synthase kinase-3β-dependent mechanism. We further found that WNT5a prevents follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing protein from up-regulating the CTNNB1 and CREB proteins and their target genes, indicating that WNT5a functions as a physiologic inhibitor of gonadotropin signaling. Together, these findings identify WNT5a as a key regulator of follicle development and gonadotropin responsiveness.-Abedini, A., Zamberlam, G., Lapointe, E., Tourigny, C., Boyer, A., Paquet, M., Hayashi, K., Honda, H., Kikuchi, A., Price, C., Boerboom, D. WNT5a is required for normal ovarian follicle development and antagonizes gonadotropin responsiveness in granulosa cells by suppressing canonical WNT signaling.

  4. Comparison between spontaneous gonadotropin concentration profiles and gonadotropin response to low-dose gonadotropin-releasing hormone in prepubertal and early pubertal boys and patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism: assessment by using ultrasensitive, time-resolved immunofluorometric assay.

    PubMed

    Goji, K; Tanikaze, S

    1992-05-01

    To assess whether nocturnal gonadotropin concentration profiles in children could be predicted by measurement of peak gonadotropin levels after gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) administration, we measured spontaneous gonadotropin levels every 20 min and the gonadotropin responses to low-dose GnRH using an ultrasensitive, time-resolved immunofluorometric assay in 61 boys with short stature and/or delayed puberty. Spontaneous nocturnal LH pulses were observed in 58 out of 61 patients. After GnRH administration in a dose of 25 ng/kg, all of the 61 patients had significant LH and FSH responses, and GnRH-stimulated peak LH and FSH levels were highly correlated with maximal spontaneous nocturnal LH and FSH levels, respectively (r = 0.83 for LH and r = 0.91 for FSH; p less than 0.00001). Analysis of individual subjects revealed that GnRH-stimulated peak LH levels were almost identical to maximal nocturnal LH levels in the subjects whose GnRH-stimulated peak LH levels were between 5 and 10 IU/L, whereas GnRH-stimulated peak LH levels tended to be higher than maximal nocturnal levels in the subjects whose GnRH-stimulated peak LH levels were 5 IU/L or lower. To determine if there were any parameters in the gonadotropin response to GnRH that might be useful in distinguishing early pubertal boys from prepubertal boys, we evaluated the gonadotropin response to GnRH in 44 prepubertal and 10 early pubertal normal short boys. Although maximal nocturnal LH levels did not overlap between prepubertal and pubertal groups, GnRH-stimulated LH peak levels overlapped considerably between the two groups. Even the GnRH-stimulated peak LH to peak FSH ratio overlapped between the two groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Gonadotropin and estrogen responses in freshwater turtle (Chrysemys picta) from Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    Kitana, Noppadon; Khonsue, Wichase; Won, Seung Jae; Lance, Valentine A; Callard, Ian P

    2006-10-01

    As a result of chemical waste disposal on the Massachusetts Military Reservation, a Superfund site on Cape Cod, MA, contaminated groundwater plumes have formed. These plumes are of concern due to the widespread use of groundwater wells as a drinking water source by the local population. Prior observations on a sentinel species Chrysemys picta field-trapped from ponds on Cape Cod suggested deficits in reproductive processes including lower levels of vitellogenin, estradiol-17beta, oviduct weights, and oocyte numbers in females and lower testicular weight and sperm count in males. Possible loci in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal-liver axis at which xenobiotics may act were determined in turtles trapped from Moody Pond (a test site) and Washburn Pond (a reference site). Specifically, gonadotropin and estrogen responses were assessed using plasma steroids and vitellogenin as markers. Basal vitellogenin levels were significantly lower in Moody Pond females; however, vitellogenin responses to estradiol-17beta were the same in both groups, indicating a normal hepatic response to estrogen. In contrast, estradiol-17beta secretion was not stimulated by gonadotropin in Moody Pond females, compared to Washburn animals. Basal plasma testosterone and the response to gonadotropin in males were similar, although steroid levels in Moody Pond animals were slower to return to baseline after gonadotropin injection. The results suggest that a low-level mixture of xenobiotic contaminants may interfere with the steroid metabolic pathways in turtles exposed to the test site, but not the reference site, environment.

  6. Gonadotropin-induced testosterone response in peripubertal male alligators.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Thea M; Gunderson, Mark P; Milnes, Matthew R; Guillette, Louis J

    2004-02-01

    Based on the response to three different gonadotropin challenges, we evaluated seasonal production of testosterone in a group of captive-raised four-year-old male alligators that varied in size. To stimulate gonadal steroidogenesis, we injected each alligator with ovine FSH (150 ng/ml plasma). Plasma testosterone concentrations were measured in repeated blood samples taken between 0 and 72 h after FSH injection. To determine if there was seasonal variation in response, we repeated the experiment on the same alligators three times during the breeding season (March, May, and July, 2000). All alligators responded to exogenous FSH by exhibiting increased plasma concentrations of testosterone (p < 0.0001 for all months). However, the degree of the response depended on body size. Thus, larger alligators produced more testosterone and were more affected by changes in season compared to smaller alligators. We have previously observed that juvenile male alligators display seasonal changes in plasma testosterone concentrations that mimic the cycle observed in adult males. Our present data suggest that seasonal changes in plasma testosterone appear to be associated not only with changes in gonadotropin release but in gonadal responsiveness as well. We propose, given these observations, that alligators experience an extended period of puberty, during which the gonads synthesize gradually increasing steroid hormone concentrations. These peripubertal animals are not juveniles but sub-adults capable of responding to the seasonal signals associated with reproductive timing in adults.

  7. Polymorphisms in gonadotropin and gonadotropin receptor genes as markers of ovarian reserve and response in in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    La Marca, Antonio; Sighinolfi, Giovanna; Argento, Cindy; Grisendi, Valentina; Casarini, Livio; Volpe, Annibale; Simoni, Manuela

    2013-03-15

    Since gonadotropins are the fundamental hormones that control ovarian activity, genetic polymorphisms may alter gonadal responsiveness to glycoproteins; hence they are important regulators of hormone activity at the target level. The establishment of the pool of primordial follicles takes place during fetal life and is mainly under genetic control. Consequently, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in gonadotropins and their receptors do not seem to be associated with any significant modification in the endowment of nongrowing follicles in the ovary. Indeed, the age at menopause, a biological characteristic strongly related to ovarian reserve, as well as markers of functional ovarian reserve such as anti-Müllerian hormone and antral follicle count, are not different in women with different genetic variants. Conversely, some polymorphisms in FSH receptor (FSHR) seem to be associated with modifications in ovarian activity. In particular, studies suggest that the Ser680 genotype for FSHR is a factor of relative resistance to FSH stimulation resulting in slightly higher FSH serum levels, thus leading to a prolonged duration of the menstrual cycle. Moreover, some FSHR gene polymorphisms show a positive association with ovarian response to exogenous gonadotropin administration, hence exhibiting some potential for a pharmacogenetic estimation of the FSH dosage in controlled ovarian stimulation. The study of SNPs of the FSHR gene is an interesting field of research that could provide us with new information about the way each woman responds to exogenous gonadotropin administration during ovulation induction.

  8. Effects of soy consumption on gonadotropin secretion and acute pituitary responses to gonadotropin-releasing hormone in women.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, Jill; Lasley, Bill L; Nakajima, Steven T; Setchell, Kenneth D R; Schneeman, Barbara O

    2002-04-01

    Soy contains the isoflavone phytoestrogens, genistein and daidzein. These isoflavones are partial estrogen agonists in cell and animal models, but effects from dietary soy in humans are unclear. Experiments were conducted in pre- and postmenopausal women to examine whether dietary isoflavones from soy behave as estrogen agonists, antagonists or have no effect on the estrogen-sensitive pituitary. Pituitary sensitivity to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), an estrogen-sensitive endpoint, was measured during GnRH challenge tests administered before, during and after dietary soy consumption. The response to an isoflavone-rich soy food diet was examined in five premenopausal and seven postmenopausal women using transdermal estrogen replacement therapy. Estrogen agonists suppress gonadotropin concentrations and enhance GnRH priming (enhanced gonadotropin secretion in response to repeated doses of GnRH), whereas antagonists elevate gonadotropin concentrations and have no effect on GnRH priming. Each subject consumed 50 g textured soy protein containing 60 mg total isoflavones daily for 10-14 d. Baseline estradiol concentrations were consistent among study periods. In both pre- and postmenopausal women, soy consumption did not affect mean baseline or peak luteinizing hormone (LH) concentrations, indicating a lack of estrogen-like effect at the level of the pituitary. However, in postmenopausal subjects, mean LH secretion decreased after discontinuing soy, suggesting a residual estrogenic effect. In one premenopausal woman, enhanced LH secretion was observed after soy treatment, suggesting there may be subpopulations of women who are highly sensitive to isoflavones.

  9. Serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone strongly correlates with intratesticular testosterone in gonadotropin-suppressed normal men receiving various dosages of human chorionic gonadotropin

    PubMed Central

    Amory, John K.; Coviello, Andrea D.; Page, Stephanie T.; Anawalt, Bradley D.; Matsumoto, Alvin M.; Bremner, William J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine if serum concentrations of testosterone precursors would correlate with intratesticular testosterone (ITT) concentration measured directly by testicular aspiration and allow for a less invasive means of inferring ITT. Design: Controlled clinical study. Setting: Healthy volunteers in an academic research environment. Patients: Twenty-nine normal men. Intervention: We determined ITT concentration by testicular aspiration before and after treatment in men receiving exogenous testosterone to block endogenous gonadotropin production and randomly assigned to one of four doses of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) (0, 125 IU, 250 IU, 500 IU every other day) for 3 weeks. Outcome measures: The association between serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone, androstenedione and dihydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and ITT. Results: With testosterone administration alone, serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone decreased significantly and increased significantly when 500 IU hCG was administered. End-of-treatment ITT strongly correlated with serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone. Moreover, serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone, but not androstenedione or DHEA, was independently associated with end-of-treatment ITT by multivariate linear regression. Conclusion: Serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone is highly correlated with ITT in gonadotropin suppressed normal men receiving testosterone and stimulated with hCG. Serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone is a surrogate biomarker of ITT and may be useful in research and in men receiving gonadotropin therapy for infertility. PMID:17462643

  10. Development of gonadotropin-releasing hormone secretion and pituitary response.

    PubMed

    Glanowska, Katarzyna M; Burger, Laura L; Moenter, Suzanne M

    2014-11-05

    Acquisition of a mature pattern of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion from the CNS is a hallmark of the pubertal process. Little is known about GnRH release during sexual maturation, but it is assumed to be minimal before later stages of puberty. We studied spontaneous GnRH secretion in brain slices from male mice during perinatal and postnatal development using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) to detect directly the oxidation of secreted GnRH. There was good correspondence between the frequency of GnRH release detected by FSCV in the median eminence of slices from adults with previous reports of in vivo luteinizing hormone (LH) pulse frequency. The frequency of GnRH release in the late embryonic stage was surprisingly high, reaching a maximum in newborns and remaining elevated in 1-week-old animals despite low LH levels. Early high-frequency GnRH release was similar in wild-type and kisspeptin knock-out mice indicating that this release is independent of kisspeptin-mediated excitation. In vivo treatment with testosterone or in vitro treatment with gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) reduced GnRH release frequency in slices from 1-week-old mice. RF9, a putative GnIH antagonist, restored GnRH release in slices from testosterone-treated mice, suggesting that testosterone inhibition may be GnIH-dependent. At 2-3 weeks, GnRH release is suppressed before attaining adult patterns. Reduction in early life spontaneous GnRH release frequency coincides with the onset of the ability of exogenous GnRH to induce pituitary LH secretion. These findings suggest that lack of pituitary secretory response, not lack of GnRH release, initially blocks downstream activation of the reproductive system.

  11. The forkhead transcription factor, FOXP3, is required for normal pituitary gonadotropin expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Jung, Deborah O; Jasurda, Jake S; Egashira, Noboru; Ellsworth, Buffy S

    2012-05-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis is central to normal reproductive function. This pathway begins with the release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone in systematic pulses by the hypothalamus. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone is bound by receptors on gonadotroph cells in the anterior pituitary gland and stimulates the synthesis and secretion of luteinizing hormone and, to some extent, follicle-stimulating hormone. Once stimulated by these glycoprotein hormones, the gonads begin gametogenesis and the synthesis of sex hormones. In humans, mutations of the forkhead transcription factor, FOXP3, lead to an autoimmune disorder known as immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, and enteropathy, X-linked syndrome. Mice with a mutation in the Foxp3 gene have a similar autoimmune syndrome and are infertile. To understand why FOXP3 is required for reproductive function, we are investigating the reproductive phenotype of Foxp3 mutant mice (Foxp3(sf/Y)). Although the gonadotroph cells appear to be intact in Foxp3(sf/Y) mice, luteinizing hormone beta (Lhb) and follicle-stimulating hormone beta (Fshb) expression are significantly decreased, demonstrating that these mice exhibit a hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Hypothalamic expression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone is not significantly decreased in Foxp3(sf/Y) males. Treatment of Foxp3(sf/Y) males with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor agonist does not rescue expression of Lhb or Fshb. Interestingly, we do not detect Foxp3 expression in the pituitary or hypothalamus, suggesting that the infertility seen in Foxp3(sf/Y) males is a secondary effect, possibly due to loss of FOXP3 in immune cells. Pituitary expression of glycoprotein hormone alpha (Cga) and prolactin (Prl) are significantly reduced in Foxp3(sf/Y) males, whereas the precursor for adrenocorticotropic hormone, pro-opiomelanocortin (Pomc), is increased. Human patients diagnosed with IPEX often exhibit thyroiditis due to destruction of the thyroid gland by

  12. The Forkhead Transcription Factor, FOXP3, Is Required for Normal Pituitary Gonadotropin Expression in Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Deborah O.; Jasurda, Jake S.; Egashira, Noboru; Ellsworth, Buffy S.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis is central to normal reproductive function. This pathway begins with the release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone in systematic pulses by the hypothalamus. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone is bound by receptors on gonadotroph cells in the anterior pituitary gland and stimulates the synthesis and secretion of luteinizing hormone and, to some extent, follicle-stimulating hormone. Once stimulated by these glycoprotein hormones, the gonads begin gametogenesis and the synthesis of sex hormones. In humans, mutations of the forkhead transcription factor, FOXP3, lead to an autoimmune disorder known as immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, and enteropathy, X-linked syndrome. Mice with a mutation in the Foxp3 gene have a similar autoimmune syndrome and are infertile. To understand why FOXP3 is required for reproductive function, we are investigating the reproductive phenotype of Foxp3 mutant mice (Foxp3sf/Y). Although the gonadotroph cells appear to be intact in Foxp3sf/Y mice, luteinizing hormone beta (Lhb) and follicle-stimulating hormone beta (Fshb) expression are significantly decreased, demonstrating that these mice exhibit a hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Hypothalamic expression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone is not significantly decreased in Foxp3sf/Y males. Treatment of Foxp3sf/Y males with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor agonist does not rescue expression of Lhb or Fshb. Interestingly, we do not detect Foxp3 expression in the pituitary or hypothalamus, suggesting that the infertility seen in Foxp3sf/Y males is a secondary effect, possibly due to loss of FOXP3 in immune cells. Pituitary expression of glycoprotein hormone alpha (Cga) and prolactin (Prl) are significantly reduced in Foxp3sf/Y males, whereas the precursor for adrenocorticotropic hormone, pro-opiomelanocortin (Pomc), is increased. Human patients diagnosed with IPEX often exhibit thyroiditis due to destruction of the thyroid gland by

  13. Serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone strongly correlates with intratesticular testosterone in gonadotropin-suppressed normal men receiving various dosages of human chorionic gonadotropin.

    PubMed

    Amory, John K; Coviello, Andrea D; Page, Stephanie T; Anawalt, Bradley D; Matsumoto, Alvin M; Bremner, William J

    2008-02-01

    To determine if serum concentrations of testosterone precursors would correlate with intratesticular testosterone (ITT) concentration measured directly by testicular aspiration and allow for a less invasive means of inferring ITT. Controlled clinical study. Healthy volunteers in an academic research environment. Twenty-nine normal men. We determined ITT concentration by testicular aspiration before and after treatment in men receiving exogenous T to block endogenous gonadotropin production and randomly assigned to one of four doses of hCG (0, 125 IU, 250 IU, or 500 IU every other day) for 3 weeks. The association between serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17OH-P), androstenedione, and DHEA and ITT. With T administration alone, serum 17OH-P decreased significantly and increased significantly when 500 IU hCG was administered. End-of-treatment ITT strongly correlated with serum 17OH-P. Moreover, serum 17OH-P, but not androstenedione or DHEA, was independently associated with end-of-treatment ITT by multivariate linear regression. Serum 17OH-P is highly correlated with ITT in gonadotropin-suppressed normal men receiving T and stimulated with hCG. Serum 17OH-P is a surrogate biomarker of ITT and may be useful in research and in men receiving gonadotropin therapy for infertility.

  14. Relationship Between 17-Hydroxyprogesterone Responses to Human Chorionic Gonadotropin and Markers of Ovarian Follicle Morphology in Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Maas, Kevin H.; Chuan, Sandy S.; Cook-Andersen, Heidi; Su, H. Irene; Duleba, A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have increased 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP) responses to gonadotropin stimulation although individual variability is substantial, as reflected by exaggerated as well as normal responses. The relationship between 17-OHP responses to gonadotropin stimulation and markers of ovarian function has not been assessed. Objective: To determine whether 17-OHP responses are associated with antral follicle count (AFC), anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH), or inhibin B (Inh B) levels in PCOS and normal women. Design: Prospective study. Setting: Research center at an academic medical center. Participants: Women with PCOS (n = 18) and normal controls (n = 18). Interventions: Blood samples were obtained before and 24 hours after administration of 25 μg recombinant-human chorionic gonadotropin. Ovarian imaging was conducted with three-dimensional pelvic ultrasound. Main Outcome Measures: Basal and stimulated levels of 17-OHP, androgens, estrogen, AMH, Inh B, and AFC. Results: In women with PCOS, 17-OHP responses were heterogeneous and inversely correlated with AMH and Inh B levels, but not AFC. In a subgroup of PCOS women with exaggerated 17-OHP responses, AMH levels were equivalent to that of normal women. In PCOS women with normal 17-OHP responses, AMH levels were markedly elevated. Conclusion: Based on heterogeneous 17-OHP responses to human chorionic gonadotropin in women with PCOS, AMH levels are inversely linked to ovarian androgen production while positively correlated with AFC. These findings suggest that in PCOS, AMH production may reflect redistribution of the follicle population or regulation by intraovarian mechanisms. PMID:25313914

  15. Estradiol potentiation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone responsiveness in the anterior pituitary is mediated by an increase in gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, M.; Peegel, H.; Katta, V.

    1985-02-15

    In order to investigate the mechanism by which 17 beta-estradiol potentiates the action of gonadotropin-releasing hormone on the anterior pituitary in vitro, cultured pituitary cells from immature female rats were used as the model system. Cultures exposed to estradiol at concentrations ranging from 10(-10) to 10(-6) mol/L exhibited a significant augmentation of luteinizing hormone release in response to a 4-hour gonadotropin-releasing hormone (10 mumol/L) challenge at a dose of 10(-9) mol/L compared to that of control cultures. The estradiol augmentation of luteinizing hormone release was also dependent on the duration of estradiol exposure. When these cultures were incubated with tritium-labeled L-leucine, an increase in incorporation of radiolabeled amino acid into total proteins greater than that in controls was observed. A parallel stimulatory effect of estradiol on iodine 125-labeled D-Ala6 gonadotropin-releasing hormone binding was observed. Cultures incubated with estradiol at different concentrations and various lengths of time showed a significant increase in gonadotropin-releasing hormone binding capacity and this increase was abrogated by cycloheximide. Analysis of the binding data showed that the increase in gonadotropin-releasing hormone binding activity was due to a change in the number of gonadotropin-releasing hormone binding sites rather than a change in the affinity. These results suggest that (1) estradiol treatment increases the number of pituitary receptors for gonadotropin-releasing hormone, (2) the augmentary effect of estradiol on luteinizing hormone release at the pituitary level might be mediated, at least in part, by the increase in the number of binding sites of gonadotropin-releasing hormone, and (3) new protein synthesis may be involved in estradiol-mediated gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor induction.

  16. Induction of ovulation for gamete intrafallopian transfer (GIFT) using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist and "pure" FSH: results obtained in 30 normally menstruating women.

    PubMed

    La Sala, G B; Cantarelli, M; Parolari, G; Dessanti, L; Dall'Asta, D; Torelli, M G; Salvatore, V; Dotti, C; Cavalieri, S; Brai, L

    1988-01-01

    About 30% of the ovulation induction cycles in GIFT and FIVET programmes are cancelled due to an inadequate response of patients to gonadotropins and/or clomiphene citrate. GnRH agonist-gonadotropins and/or "pure" FSH combination has been successful in inducing ovulation in patients with a previous history of cycle cancellation and/or alterations in the menstrual cycles. In order to reduce the number of cycle cancellations and obtain more homogeneous oocytes, GnRH agonist-gonadotropins and/or "pure" FSH combination in all candidates for GIFT and FIVET has been recently hypothesised. The Authors report results obtained from GnRH agonist-"pure" FSH combination in 30 normally menstruating patients of the GIFT programme: in 93% of cases the harvested oocytes were preovulatory, in 27.6% of cycles and in 28.6% of the GIFTs respectively an ongoing pregnancy was obtained. While the results obtained must be considered preliminary, they nevertheless suggest that the use of a combination of GnRH-agonist "pure" FSH in all patients in the GIFT programme may be of real clinical validity.

  17. Altered ovarian responsiveness to gonadotropins in neonatally irradiated immature rats

    SciTech Connect

    Freud, A.; Sod-Moriah, U.A.

    1988-01-01

    Female rats which were exposed to a single low dose of gamma irradiation (6R or 15R) at the age of 8 days produce smaller litters when mature than untreated controls. In order to study the possibility that such an impaired reproductive performance could result from a reduced ovulation rate, neonatally irradiated females were treated with PMSG (12 iu/rat) at the age of 26 days. Another group of rats, similarly treated, was further injected with hCG (5 iu/rat) 48 hours later. Animals were killed 48, 55, 60 and 72 hours after PMSG treatment or 72 and 120 after hCG injection. The results indicated that PMSG treatment increased the ovarian weight of non-irradiated controls as well as of irradiated rats and in all animals induced a proestrus like profile of LH. Only a combined treatment of PMSG and hCG resulted in ovulation and corpora lutea formation with significantly increased numbers of corpora lutea in the ovaries of the irradiated rats. The latter was associated with higher progesterone plasma levels not correlated to the number of corpora lutea. The gradual decrease in the number of ovarian binding sites for hCG with increased radiation dose and the increased association constant in the 15R group could not explain the increased sensitivity of the ovary to exogenous gonadotropins which results from neonatal exposure to low doses of gamma irradiation.

  18. Strength-duration characteristics of estrogen effects on gonadotropin response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone in women. I. Effects of varying duration of estradiol administration.

    PubMed

    Keye, W R; Jaffe, R B

    1975-12-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of increased serum concentrations of estradiol of varying durations upon the gonadotropin responses to synthetic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH or LRF). Beginning at 8:00 PM on the first day of the menstrual cycle, subjects received im injections of estradiol benzoate (E2B), 5 mug/kg initially, followed by 2.5 mug/kg every 12 h for a total of 3, 5, 7, 9, or 11 injections. Twelve h after the last E2B injection, or 36, 60, 84, 108, or 132 h after the first injection of E2B (2 subjects at each time interval), each subject received 100 mug GnRH, iv. In addition, each subject received 100 mug GnRH iv during one of the seven days of the antecedent (control) menstrual cycle during which no exogenous estradiol was administered. When GnRH was infused 36 h after the initiation of E2B pretreatment, there was no significant LH or FSH increase. In contrast, LH and FSH responses were augmented and prolonged when compared with control cycles when GnRH was administered at 84, 108, or 132 h. At 60 h, responses of LH were augmented, although not to as great a degree. FSH responses were not augmented at 60 h. Expressed as maximal increase from baseline, gonadotropin responses following E2B were 1 1/2 to 9 times those achieved during control cycles (without E2B). Since mean serum estradiol concentrations at 36 h (185.9 +/- 20.0), when gonadotropin responses were absent, were similar to those at 60 (157.7 +/- 31.6), 84 (186.2 +/- 38.1), 108 (181.3 +/- 46.7), and 132 h (128.0 +/- 43.0 pg/ml), when responses were augmented, these results support the concept that the modulating effect of estradiol on pituitary response is dependent upon the duration of exposure of the hypothalamic-pituitary system to increased concentrations of estradiol. It is probable that the duration of the late follicular phase rise in serum estradiol is responsible, at least in part, for the augmented gonadotropin response seen at midcycle.

  19. Regulation of gonadotropin receptors, gonadotropin responsiveness, and cell multiplication by somatomedin-C and insulin in cultured pig Leydig cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bernier, M.; Chatelain, P.; Mather, J.P.; Saez, J.M.

    1986-11-01

    The author have investigated the effects of insulin and somatomedin-C/insulin like growth factor I(Sm-C) in purified porcine Leydig cells in vitro on gonadotrophins (hCG) receptor number, hCG responsiveness (cAMP and testosterone production), and thymidine incorporation into DNA. Leydig cells cultured in a serum-free medium containing transferrin, vitamin E, and insulin (5 ..mu..g/ml) maintained fairly constant both hCG receptors and hCG responsiveness. When they were cultured for 3 days in the same medium without insulin, there was a dramatic decline (more than 80%) in both hCG receptor number and hCG responsiveness. However the cAMP but not the testosterone response to forskolin was normal. Both insulin and Sm-C at nanomolar concentrations prevent the decline of both hCG receptors and hCG-induced cAMP production. At nanomolar concentrations, Sm-C and insulin enhanced hCG-induced testosterone production but the effect of Sm-C was significantly higher than that of insulin. However, the effect of insulin at higher concentrations (5 ..mu..g/ml) was significantly higher than that of Sm-C at 50 ng/ml. In contrast, at nanomolar concentrations only Sm-C stimulated (/sup 3/H)-thymidine incorporation into DNA and cell multiplication, the stimulatory effect of insulin on these parameters, was seen only at micromolar concentrations. These results indicate that both Sm-C and insulin acting through the receptors increase Leydig cell steroidogenic responsiveness to hCG by increasing hCG receptor number and improving some step beyond cAMP formation. In contrast, the mitogenic effects of insulin are mediated only through Sm-C receptors.

  20. Ovarian Hyper-Response to Administration of an GnRH-Agonist Without Gonadotropins

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun Tae; Bae, Hyo Sook; Kim, Tak

    2011-01-01

    Several case reports have indicated that a small subgroup of patients may develop ovarian hyperstimulation following the administration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa) without gonadotropins. However, since only few such cases have been published, it is unclear what course to follow in subsequent cycles after ovarian hyperstimulation in the first cycle using only GnRHa. A 33-yr-old woman was referred to in vitro fertilization for oocyte donation. A depot preparation (3.75 mg) of tryptorelin without gonadotropins induced ovarian multifollicular enlargement with high estradiol level, and was followed by human chorionic gonadotropin administration and oocyte retrieval. In a subsequent cycle of the same patient, a low dose of tryptorelin (0.05 mg) did not induce ovarian hyperstimulation, and resulted in clinical pregnancy. This report shows potential management of ovarian hyperstimulation following the administration of GnRHa without gonadotropins. PMID:22022197

  1. Serotoninergic involvement in gonadotropin and TSH secretion in normal cycling and postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Krause, B T; Möller, S; Schmeisser, J O

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the influence of a specific serotonin receptor blockade on pituitary hormone secretion in normal cycling women and postmenopausal women not receiving hormone replacement therapy. Serotonin receptor blockade was performed by using the HT-3 receptor subtype antagonist ondansetron as an i.v. bolus injection of 8 mg. Blood samples were taken before as well as 20, 30 and 40 min after ondansetron administration for the estimation of LH, FSH, and TSH. We could not find any hormonal changes in the normal cycling women. The postmenopausal women showed a significant decline in LH secretion, whereas FSH and TSH levels remained unchanged. Our results suggest serotoninergic involvement in LH secretion in postmenopausal hypoestrogenic hypergonadism.

  2. Ovarian response to repeated administration of alternating exogenous gonadotropin regimens in the ocelot (Leopardus pardalis) and tigrinus (Leopardus tigrinus).

    PubMed

    da Paz, Regina Celia Rodrigues; Dias, Eduardo Antunes; Adania, Cristina Harumi; Barnabe, Valquíria Hippólito; Barnabe, Renato Campanarut

    2006-10-01

    Exogenous gonadotropins are used to stimulate ovarian follicular growth and ovulation in mammalian species, including wild cats. However, successes in application of assisted reproduction techniques in nondomestic felids have been sparse. Our objectives were to assess the effectiveness of alternating gonadotropin regimens on ovarian responses. Five adult female ocelots and four adult female tigrinus were treated four to six times, using alternating eCG/hCG and pFSH/pLH at 4-month intervals. Laparoscopies were done to assess follicular development and to collect oocytes from matures follicles. The average number of follicles and corpus luteum (CL) per stimulation was higher in ocelots (7.0 +/- 0.8; mean +/- S.E.M.) than in tigrinus (2.5 +/- 0.4; P < 0.05), but the percentage of mature oocytes did not differ between the two species (mean range, 54-55%). Within species, both gonadotropin regimens were equally effective in inducing follicular growth and oocyte maturation. The total number of ovarian structures and oocyte maturation percentages did not decrease in either species with sequential stimulations. In summary, female ocelots and tigrinus continued to respond to repeated alternating ovarian stimulation protocols. In conclusion, the use of alternating gonadotropin regimens may permit more intensive reproductive management in these endangered cats.

  3. Withholding gonadotropins until human chorionic gonadotropin administration.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Rony; Kligman, Isaac; Davis, Owen; Rosenwaks, Zev

    2010-11-01

    Withholding gonadotropins in women who exhibit high estradiol responses before follicles reach full maturation is called "coasting." Coasting, or suspending gonadotropin administration, can be an effective strategy for decreasing the risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) while reducing cancelation rates. In in vitro fertilization cycles, mechanistically it is believed that withholding gonadotropins starves smaller follicles, induces apoptosis, and decreases the potential for these follicles to elaborate vascular endothelial growth factor, a known mediator of OHSS. It is generally accepted that coasting should be initiated when the estradiol (E₂) level is >3000 pg/mL in the setting of immature follicles. The human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) trigger should be administered when the E₂ level subsequently drops to a "safe" level. Cycle cancellation should be considered if, after 3 to 4 days of coasting, the E₂ level remains excessively elevated. Oocyte retrieval may also be cancelled if the E₂ level on the day after hCG trigger drops precipitously. In gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa)-based protocols, one can consider withholding GnRHa administration if the E₂ level continues to increase after a few days of coasting. Current data seem to show that the coasting period is short and/or is less likely to be required in GnRH-antagonist protocols as compared with GnRHa-based protocols. Large randomized control trials are still needed to establish the relative efficacy of coasting versus embryo cryopreservation in the context of OHSS prevention.

  4. Reproductive responses of dairy cows with ovarian cysts to simultaneous human chorionic gonadotropin or gonadotropin-releasing hormone and cloprostenol compared to gonadotropin-releasing hormone alone treatment

    PubMed Central

    Taktaz, T.; Kafi, M.; Mokhtari, Adel; Heidari, M.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Bovine ovarian cysts are a common cause of economic loss in modern dairy herds. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the reproductive responses to three protocols using hCG, GnRH and cloprostenol when the definite diagnosis of the type of ovarian cyst is/is not possible in dairy cows. Materials and Methods: A total of 144 lactating dairy cows with ovarian cysts were divided into three groups. At diagnosis (Day 0), cows in Group 1 (the conventional method, n=47) were injected with 0.02 mg of a GnRH analogue i.m. (Buserelin); cows in Group 2 (n=47) were intramuscularly treated with 0.02 mg Buserelin plus 500 µg cloprostenol; and cows in Group 3 (n=50) were intramuscularly treated with 1500 IU hCG plus 500 µg cloprostenol. All cows received 500 µg cloprostenol intramuscularly on Day 10. Results: No statistically significant differences were found in the recovery time, interval to conception, conception rate at first AI, and pregnancy rates by Days 70 and 100 after treatment among the three groups. Conclusions: Simultaneous treatment of ovarian cysts with hCG or GnRH and cloprostenol appeared to have no advantage over the conventional method, GnRH alone, in dairy cows. Furthermore, hCG and GnRH have an equal therapeutic effect in cows with ovarian cysts. PMID:27047149

  5. Chorionic gonadotropin and its receptor are both expressed in human retina, possible implications in normal and pathological conditions.

    PubMed

    Dukic-Stefanovic, Sladjana; Walther, Jan; Wosch, Sebastian; Zimmermann, Gerolf; Wiedemann, Peter; Alexander, Henry; Claudepierre, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Extra-gonadal role of gonadotropins has been re-evaluated over the last 20 years. In addition to pituitary secretion of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), the CNS has been clearly identified as a source of hCG acting locally to influence behaviour. Here we demonstrated that human retina is producing this gonadotropin that acts as a neuroactive molecule. Müller glial and retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells are producing hCG that may affects neighbour cells expressing its receptor, namely cone photoreceptors. It was previously described that amacrine and retinal ganglion (RGC) cells are targets of the gonadotropin releasing hormone that control the secretion of all gonadotropins. Therefore our findings suggest that a complex neuroendocrine circuit exists in the retina, involving hCG secreting cells (glial and RPE), hCG targets (photoreceptors) and hCG-release controlling cells (amacrine and RGC). The exact physiological functions of this circuit have still to be identified, but the proliferation of photoreceptor-derived tumor induced by hCG demonstrated the need to control this neuroendocrine loop.

  6. Dual trigger with combination of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist and human chorionic gonadotropin significantly improves the live-birth rate for normal responders in GnRH-antagonist cycles.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming-Huei; Wu, Frank Shao-Ying; Lee, Robert Kuo-Kuang; Li, Sheng-Hsiang; Lin, Shyr-Yeu; Hwu, Yuh-Ming

    2013-11-01

    To investigate whether dual triggering of final oocyte maturation with a combination of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) can improve the live-birth rate for normal responders in GnRH-antagonist in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF-ICSI) cycles. Retrospective cohort study. Infertility unit of a university-affiliated medical center. Normal responders to controlled ovarian hyperstimulation who were undergoing IVF-ICSI with a GnRH antagonist protocol. Standard dosage of hCG trigger (6,500 IU of recombinant hCG) versus dual trigger (0.2 mg of triptorelin and 6,500 IU of recombinant hCG). Live-birth, clinical pregnancy, and implantation rates per cycle. A total of 376 patients with 378 completed cycles with embryo transfer were enrolled (hCG trigger/control group: n = 187; dual trigger/study group: n = 191). The dual trigger group demonstrated statistically significantly higher implantation (29.6% vs. 18.4%), clinical pregnancy (50.7% vs. 40.1%), and live-birth (41.3% vs. 30.4%) rates as compared with the hCG trigger group. There was no statistically significant difference in terms of patient demographics, cycle parameters, or embryo quality. Dual trigger of final oocyte maturation with a GnRH-agonist and a standard dosage of hCG in normal responders statistically significantly improves implantation, clinical pregnancy, and live-birth rates in GnRH-antagonist IVF cycles. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of Detection of Normal Puberty in Girls by a Hormonal Sleep Test and a Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Agonist Test

    PubMed Central

    Bordini, Brian; Yu, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Context: The magnitude of sleep-related gonadotropin rise required to activate pubertal feminization is not established. Objective: The objective of the study was to determine the normal relationship of pubertal hormone responses to sleep and to GnRH agonist (GnRHag) challenge across the female pubertal transition. Design/Setting: This was a prospective study in a General Clinical Research Center. Participants: Sixty-two healthy 6- to 13-year-old volunteer girls participated in the study. Interventions: Interventions included overnight blood sampling followed by GnRHag (leuprolide acetate) injection. Primary Outcome Variables: The primary outcome variables included LH, FSH, and estradiol. Results: LH levels rose steadily during sleep and after GnRHag throughout the prepubertal years. The LH response to sleep and GnRHag correlated well across groups (eg, r = 0.807, peak vs 4 h post-GnRHag value); however, this correlation was less robust than in boys (r = 0.964, P < .01). Sleep peak LH of 1.3 U/L or greater had 85% sensitivity and 2.1 U/L or greater 96% specificity for detecting puberty (thelarche). The LH 1-hour post-GnRHag value of 3.2 U/L or greater had 95% sensitivity and 5.5 U/L or greater 96% specificity for detecting puberty. Girls entered puberty at lower LH levels than boys. FSH levels rose day and night during the prepubertal years to reach 1.0 U/L or greater during puberty but discriminated puberty poorly. Estradiol of 34 pg/mL or greater at 20–24 hours after GnRHag was 95% sensitive and 60 pg/mL or greater was 95% specific for puberty. Thirty-six percent of overweight early pubertal girls had meager hormonal evidence of puberty. Conclusions: These data suggest that sleep-related pubertal hormone levels critical for puberty are normally reflected in the responses to GnRHag testing across the normal female pubertal transition. Inconsistencies between clinical and hormonal staging may arise from peripubertal cyclicity of neuroendocrine function and from

  8. Assessing the adequacy of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist leuprolide to trigger oocyte maturation and management of inadequate response.

    PubMed

    Chang, Frank E; Beall, Stephanie A; Cox, Jeris M; Richter, Kevin S; DeCherney, Alan H; Levy, Michael J

    2016-10-01

    To compare outcomes of in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles with adequate versus inadequate response to the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist trigger rescued with the use of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) retrigger, and to identify risk factors associated with an inadequate trigger. Retrospective cohort study. Private practice. Women at high risk for ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome who underwent an autologous IVF cycle and used GnRH agonist to trigger oocyte maturation before oocyte retrieval. Patients were triggered with GnRH agonist for final oocyte maturation before retrieval. Patients with an inadequate response, defined by low post-trigger serum LH and P concentrations or failure to recover oocytes after aspiration of several follicles, were retriggered with hCG. Number of oocytes retrieved, fertilization rate, clinical pregnancy, and live birth. Two percent of patients triggered with GnRH agonist had an inadequate response and were retriggered with hCG. There was no statistically significant difference in clinical outcomes between the cycles that were retriggered with hCG and successful GnRH agonist triggers. Low body mass index, low baseline LH, and higher total dosage of gonadotropins required for stimulation were associated with an increased risk of having an inadequate response to the GnRH agonist trigger. A small minority of patients triggered with GnRH agonist had an inadequate response. Rescheduling of oocyte retrieval after hCG retrigger yielded similar IVF outcomes. Evaluation of trigger response based on serum LH and P concentrations is time dependent. Patient characteristics suggestive of hypothalamic hypofunction were predictive of an inadequate response to the GnRH agonist trigger. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  9. New trends in combined use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonists with gonadotropins or pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone in ovulation induction and assisted reproductive technologies.

    PubMed

    Gordon, K; Danforth, D R; Williams, R F; Hodgen, G D

    1992-10-01

    The use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists as adjunctive therapy with gonadotropins for ovulation induction in in vitro fertilization and other assisted reproductive technologies has become common clinical practice. With the recent advent of potent gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonists free from the marked histamine-release effects that stymied earlier compounds, an attractive alternative method may be available. We have established the feasibility of combining gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist-induced inhibition of endogenous gonadotropins with exogenous gonadotropin therapy for ovulation induction in a nonhuman primate model. Here, the principal benefits to be gained from using the gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist rather than the gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist are the immediate inhibition of pituitary gonadotropin secretion without the "flare effect," which brings greater safety and convenience for patients and the medical team and saves time and money. We have also recently demonstrated the feasibility of combining gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist with pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone therapy for the controlled restoration of gonadotropin secretion and gonadal steroidogenesis culminating in apparently normal (singleton) ovulatory cycles. This is feasible only with gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonists because, unlike gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists, they achieve control of the pituitary-ovarian axis without down regulation of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor system. This capacity to override gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist-induced suppression of pituitary-ovarian function may allow new treatment modalities to be employed for women who suffer from chronic hyperandrogenemia with polycystic ovarian disease.

  10. Ovarian response to gonadotropin treatment initiated relative to wave emergence in ultrasonographically monitored ewes.

    PubMed

    Rubianes, E; Ungerfeld, R; Viñoles, C; Rivero, A; Adams, G P

    1997-06-01

    Follicular recruitment and luteal response to superovulatory treatment initiated relative to the status of the first wave of the ovine estrous cycle (Wave 1) were studied. All ewes (n = 25) received an intravaginal progestagen sponge to synchronize estrous cycles, and ewes were monitored daily by transrectal ultrasonography. Multiple-dose FSH treatment (total dose = 100 mg NIH-FSH-P1) was initiated on the day of ovulation (Day 0 group) in 16 ewes. In the remaining 9 ewes, FSH treatment was started 3 d after emergence of the largest follicle of Wave 1 (Day 3 group). Ewes received PGF(2alpha) with the last 2 FSH treatments to induce luteolysis. Daily blood samples were taken to determine progesterone profiles and to evaluate the luteal response subsequent to superovulation. The ovulation rate was determined by ultrasonography and correlated with direct observation of the ovaries during laparotomy 5 to 6 d after superovulatory estrus when the uterus was flushed to collect embryos. Results confirmed that follicular recruitment was suppressed by the presence of a large, growing follicle. In the Day 0 and Day 3 groups, respectively, mean numbers (+/- SEM) of large follicles (>/= 4 mm) recruited were 6.4 +/- 0.6 and 2.7 +/- 0.7 (P < 0.01) at 48 h after the onset of treatment, and 6.7 +/- 0.5 and 5.1 +/- 0.6 (P = 0.08) at 72 h after the onset of treatment. Ovulation rates were 5.6 +/- 0.8 and 3.3 +/- 0.8 in the respective groups (P < 0.05). The number of transferable embryos was 1.8 +/- 0.5 and 0.3 +/- 0.2 in the respective groups (P < 0.05). Short luteal phases (gonadotropin treatment initiated at the time of emergence of Wave 1 induced a superovulatory response in ewes. Response was influenced by the status of the follicular wave. The presence of a large growing follicle

  11. Impaired ovarian response to exogenous gonadotropins in female rat offspring born to mothers perinatally exposed to Bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Santamaría, C G; Rodriguez, H A; Abud, J E; Rivera, O E; Muñoz-de-Toro, M; Luque, E H

    2017-06-23

    The ovary is sensitive to disruption by the environmental estrogen Bisphenol A (BPA). Our aim was to investigate whether perinatal exposure to BPA (50μg/kgday), orally administered, affects ovarian response to exogenous gonadotrophins (PMSG or PMSG+hCG) in prepubertal female offspring. An altered response to gonadotrophins was observed in BPA-exposed rats. Increased proportion of antral follicles, altered levels of ovarian steroidogenic enzymes, gonadotropin receptors, AR and ERβ were observed in PMSG group. Besides that, in response to PMSG+hCG, a persistent high Fshr mRNA expression and a decreased number of follicles with high expression of PR before ovulation were observed. After ovulation, there was an increase in antral atretic follicles, reduced Lhcgr mRNA expression and high serum levels of E2. Therefore, an early exposure to a low dose of BPA during perinatal period induces ovarian changes leading to an altered response to exogenous gonadotropin treatment later in life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Recombinant gonadotropins.

    PubMed

    Lathi, R B; Milki, A A

    2001-10-01

    Recombinant DNA technology makes it possible to produce large amounts of human gene products for pharmacologic applications, supplanting the need for human tissues. The genes for the alpha and beta subunits of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) have been characterized and cloned. Recombinant FSH (rFSH) has been shown to be safe and effective in the treatment of fertility disorders. In comparison with the urinary gonadotropin products, human menopausal gonadotropins (HMG), and urinary follitropins (uFSH), rFSH is more potent and better tolerated by patients. Recombinant HCG appears to be as efficacious as urinary HCG with the benefit of improved local tolerance. Recombinant LH (rLH) is likely to be recommended as a supplement to rFSH for ovulation induction in hypogonadotropic women. It may also benefit in vitro fertilization patients undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation with rFSH combined with pituitary suppression, with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist or antagonist.

  13. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase mediates gonadotropin subunit gene expression and LH release responses to endogenous gonadotropin-releasing hormones in goldfish.

    PubMed

    Klausen, Christian; Booth, Morgan; Habibi, Hamid R; Chang, John P

    2008-08-01

    The possible involvement of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in mediating the stimulatory actions of two endogenous goldfish gonadotropin-releasing hormones (salmon (s)GnRH and chicken (c)GnRH-II) on gonadotropin synthesis and secretion was examined. Western blot analysis revealed the presence of ERK and phosphorylated (p)ERK in goldfish brain, pituitary, liver, ovary, testis and muscle tissue extracts, as well as extracts of dispersed goldfish pituitary cells and HeLa cells. Interestingly, a third ERK-like immunoreactive band of higher molecular mass was detected in goldfish tissue and pituitary cell extracts in addition to the ERK1-p44- and ERK2-p42-like immunoreactive bands. Incubation of primary cultures of goldfish pituitary cells with either a PKC-activating 4beta-phorbol ester (TPA) or a synthetic diacylglycerol, but not a 4alpha-phorbol ester, elevated the ratio of pERK/total (t)ERK for all three ERK isoforms. The stimulatory effects of TPA were attenuated by the PKC inhibitor GF109203X and the MEK inhibitor PD98059. sGnRH and cGnRH-II also elevated the ratio of pERK/tERK for all three ERK isoforms, in a time-, dose- and PD98059-dependent manner. In addition, treatment with PD98059 reduced the sGnRH-, cGnRH-II- and TPA-induced increases in gonadotropin subunit mRNA levels in Northern blot studies and sGnRH- and cGnRH-II-elicited LH release in cell column perifusion studies with goldfish pituitary cells. These results indicate that GnRH and PKC can activate ERK through MEK in goldfish pituitary cells. More importantly, the present study suggests that GnRH-induced gonadotropin subunit gene expression and LH release involve MEK/ERK signaling in goldfish.

  14. Risk factors for a suboptimal response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist trigger during in vitro fertilization cycles.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Laura; Murphy, Lauren A; Gumer, Arielle; Reichman, David E; Rosenwaks, Zev; Cholst, Ina N

    2015-09-01

    To identify risk factors for a suboptimal response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist trigger in in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles. Retrospective cohort study. Academic medical center. All 424 patients undergoing fresh IVF cycles (n = 500) between August 2007 and June 2013 in whom a GnRH agonist was used as all or part of the ovulation trigger. GnRH-antagonist-based IVF cycles triggered with leuprolide acetate alone or in combination with low-dose human chorionic gonadotropin. Suboptimal response to GnRH-agonist trigger, as defined by a serum luteinizing hormone (LH) level <15 mIU/mL on the morning after trigger. The rate of suboptimal response to the GnRH-agonist trigger was 5.2%. Patients with a suboptimal hormone response had lower follicle-stimulating hormone (<0.1 vs. 3.48) and LH (<0.1 vs. 2.51) levels on day 2 of the cycle start, lower LH (0.109 vs. 0.596) on the day of trigger, and required longer stimulation and more gonadotropins than those with an adequate response. Suboptimal responders were also more likely to have irregular menses and be on long-term oral contraception. Patients with an undetectable LH on the day of trigger had a 25% chance of a suboptimal LH surge. In our study cohort, limiting the use of the GnRH-agonist trigger alone to patients with a trigger day LH ≥0.5 would have reduced the rate of suboptimal response from 5.2% to 0.2%. Long-term hormonal contraception use is an independent risk factor for suboptimal response to GnRH-agonist trigger. Patients with very low endogenous serum LH levels on the day of LH trigger are at increased risk for a suboptimal GnRH-agonist trigger response. Understanding the at-risk phenotype and using trigger day LH as a marker for increased risk of suboptimal GnRH-agonist trigger response can be helpful for individualizing treatment and selecting a safe and efficacious trigger medication for patients undergoing IVF. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by

  15. Normalizing Catastrophe: An Educational Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jickling, Bob

    2013-01-01

    Processes of normalizing assumptions and values have been the subjects of theoretical framing and critique for several decades now. Critique has often been tied to issues of environmental sustainability and social justice. Now, in an era of global warming, there is a rising concern that the results of normalizing of present values could be…

  16. Normalizing Catastrophe: An Educational Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jickling, Bob

    2013-01-01

    Processes of normalizing assumptions and values have been the subjects of theoretical framing and critique for several decades now. Critique has often been tied to issues of environmental sustainability and social justice. Now, in an era of global warming, there is a rising concern that the results of normalizing of present values could be…

  17. Testosterone production in response to exogenous gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH challenge) depends on social environment and color polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Cain, Kristal E; Pryke, Sarah R

    2017-04-01

    Testosterone is an important mediator of behavior, morphology and physiology. A cascade of signals regulates the amount of testosterone (T) circulating in the plasma; in response to stimulus the hypothalamus releases gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), which triggers secretion of gonadotropins from the pituitary, stimulating the synthesis and release of T from the gonads. Previous work has shown that changes to the social environment can alter circulating T-levels, which may have important fitness consequences, but it is currently unclear whether these changes are due to alterations in the signal from the brain, or changes in the ability of the pituitary and gonads to respond to this signal. Further, the strength and direction of response to a changing environment may differ according to life-history strategy. Species with genetically determined alternative strategies offer a pathway for examining these differences. Here we use a finch with a genetically determined polymorphism, the Gouldian finch (Erythrura gouldiae), to determine whether T-levels change in response to social environment. We also use injections of GnRH to determine whether these changes are due to alterations in the ability of the pituitary and gonads to respond to this signal. We found that social environment (presence of females) had a rapid effect on male circulating T-levels, and that this difference was reflected in responsiveness to GnRH. We observed no overall morph differences in T-levels, but we did observe morph differences in the pattern of T secretion across environments, and morph differences in the repeatability of T-levels across time and environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Physiologic responses following gonadotropin-releasing hormone immunization in intact male dogs.

    PubMed

    Donovan, C E; Greer, M; Kutzler, M A

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the use of a commercial gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) vaccine as a method of temporary and reversible immunocastration in intact male dogs. Four privately owned dogs were vaccinated twice at 4-week intervals. Blood samples were collected at 0, 4, 12 and 20 weeks following the initial vaccination. These samples were analysed for GnRH antibody titres, luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone concentrations. Scrotal measurements were made at the time of sample collection, and testicular volume was calculated using the formula of an ellipsoid. As a result of vaccination, dogs displayed an elevated GnRH antibody titre, decreased LH and testosterone concentrations and decreased testicular volume, which reversed by the end of the study period. Therefore, these results suggest that immunizing against GnRH may be a possible choice for temporary and reversible immunocastration. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. Effects of momorcharins on ovarian response to gonadotropin-induced superovulation in mice.

    PubMed

    Ng, T B; Tam, P P; Hon, W K; Choi, H L; Yeung, H W

    1988-01-01

    Alpha- and beta-momorcharins, which are abortifacient proteins isolated from Momordica charantia seeds, were tested for a possible effect on ovulation and plasma levels of ovarian steroids in mice induced to superovulate by PMSG and hCG. The plant proteins did not affect follicular recruitment and maturation as evidenced by ovarian histology and serum 17 beta-estradiol level. Both proteins diminished the number of oocytes ovulated when given on the day prior to or on the day of PMSG treatment, but not when given after the gonadotropin injection; they also increased the incidence of follicular atresia. The number of corpora lutea was slightly reduced by treatment with the proteins, but there was no long-term suppression of the serum progesterone level. After mating, animals which have previously been treated with the plant proteins underwent pregnancy resulting in a litter size similar to that of controls.

  20. Isolated gonadotropin deficiency secondary to glioma in septum pellucidum.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, M; Namiki, M; Okuyama, A; Arita, N; Mizutani, S; Sonoda, T

    1988-01-01

    A 21-year-old man, who had had normal sexuality beforehand, noticed a decrease in libido and potency, as well as loss of ejaculation. Endocrine evaluation showed normal serum levels of gonadotropins but a low testosterone level. The response to clomiphene citrate was poor while those to luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and human chorionic gonadotropin were within normal limits. A tumor found in the septum pellucidum through brain-computerized tomography was resected. Histologically it proved to be a mixed tumor composed of astrocytoma and oligodendroglioma. Three months after the operation the patient had recovered normal sexual functions and endocrine evaluations, including the responsiveness to clomiphene citrate, had been restored. This case suggests the existence of some stimulatory fiber for the secretion of luteinizing hormone in the septum pellucidum.

  1. Structure-function relationship of gonadotropins

    SciTech Connect

    Bellet, D.; Bidart, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    In this book, investigators highlight progress recently made in research on the structure-function relationship of gonadotropins. The contributors provide coverage of major breakthroughs such as the cloning of the ovarian receptor for lutropin and choriogonadotropin, the elucidation of the structure of this receptor, and the first crystallographic studies of human chorionic gonadotropin. The book also describes significant advances in the epitope mapping of gonadotropins, the immunochemical and biochemical study of their structure, the examination of regulatory processes involved in subunit association, and the elucidation of the complex mechanisms responsible for regulation and expression of gonadotropin genes.

  2. Serum insulin-like factor 3 is highly correlated with intratesticular testosterone in normal men with acute, experimental gonadotropin deficiency stimulated with low-dose human chorionic gonadotropin: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Roth, Mara Y; Lin, Kat; Bay, Katrine; Amory, John K; Anawalt, Bradley D; Matsumoto, Alvin M; Marck, Brett T; Bremner, William J; Page, Stephanie T

    2013-01-01

    To study the potential role for using serum biomarkers, including insulin-like factor 3 (INSL3), 17α-hydroxyprogesterone, antimüllerian hormone, and inhibin B, as correlates of intratesticular T (IT-T) concentrations in men. Prospective, randomized, controlled trial. University-based medical center. Thirty-seven healthy men aged 18-50 years. All men received the GnRH antagonist acyline, plus very low doses of hCG (0 IU, 15 IU, 60 IU, or 125 IU) SC every other day or 7.5 g T gel daily (75 mg delivered). The IT-T concentrations obtained by percutaneous testicular aspiration with simultaneous serum protein and steroid concentrations were measured at baseline and after 10 days of treatment. Intratesticular and serum hormone and gonadotropin concentrations. After 10 days of gonadotropin suppression, serum INSL3 decreased by more than 90% and correlated highly with IT-T concentrations. In contrast, serum inhibin B, antimüllerian hormone, and 17α-hydroxyprogesterone did not correlate with IT-T. Serum INSL3 increased with the dose of hCG administered and returned to baseline after treatment. Serum INSL3 correlates highly with IT-T and serum T concentrations during acute gonadotropin suppression in men. Human chorionic gonadotropin stimulates dose-dependent increases in INSL3 and IT-T in healthy men and might be a useful biomarker of IT-T concentration in some clinical settings. NCT# 00839319. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  3. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (Gnrhr) gene knock out: Normal growth and development of sensory, motor and spatial orientation behavior but altered metabolism in neonatal and prepubertal mice

    PubMed Central

    Busby, Ellen R.; Sherwood, Nancy M.

    2017-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is important in the control of reproduction, but its actions in non-reproductive processes are less well known. In this study we examined the effect of disrupting the GnRH receptor in mice to determine if growth, metabolism or behaviors that are not associated with reproduction were affected. To minimize the effects of other hormones such as FSH, LH and sex steroids, the neonatal-prepubertal period of 2 to 28 days of age was selected. The study shows that regardless of sex or phenotype in the Gnrhr gene knockout line, there was no significant difference in the daily development of motor control, sensory detection or spatial orientation among the wildtype, heterozygous or null mice. This included a series of behavioral tests for touch, vision, hearing, spatial orientation, locomotory behavior and muscle strength. Neither the daily body weight nor the final weight on day 28 of the kidney, liver and thymus relative to body weight varied significantly in any group. However by day 28, metabolic changes in the GnRH null females compared with wildtype females showed a significant reduction in inguinal fat pad weight normalized to body weight; this was accompanied by an increase in glucose compared with wildtype females shown by Student-Newman-Keuls Multiple Comparison test and Student's unpaired t tests. Our studies show that the GnRH-GnRHR system is not essential for growth or motor/sensory/orientation behavior during the first month of life prior to puberty onset. The lack of the GnRH-GnRHR axis, however, did affect females resulting in reduced subcutaneous inguinal fat pad weight and increased glucose with possible insulin resistance; the loss of the normal rise of estradiol at postnatal days 15–28 may account for the altered metabolism in the prepubertal female pups. PMID:28346489

  4. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (Gnrhr) gene knock out: Normal growth and development of sensory, motor and spatial orientation behavior but altered metabolism in neonatal and prepubertal mice.

    PubMed

    Busby, Ellen R; Sherwood, Nancy M

    2017-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is important in the control of reproduction, but its actions in non-reproductive processes are less well known. In this study we examined the effect of disrupting the GnRH receptor in mice to determine if growth, metabolism or behaviors that are not associated with reproduction were affected. To minimize the effects of other hormones such as FSH, LH and sex steroids, the neonatal-prepubertal period of 2 to 28 days of age was selected. The study shows that regardless of sex or phenotype in the Gnrhr gene knockout line, there was no significant difference in the daily development of motor control, sensory detection or spatial orientation among the wildtype, heterozygous or null mice. This included a series of behavioral tests for touch, vision, hearing, spatial orientation, locomotory behavior and muscle strength. Neither the daily body weight nor the final weight on day 28 of the kidney, liver and thymus relative to body weight varied significantly in any group. However by day 28, metabolic changes in the GnRH null females compared with wildtype females showed a significant reduction in inguinal fat pad weight normalized to body weight; this was accompanied by an increase in glucose compared with wildtype females shown by Student-Newman-Keuls Multiple Comparison test and Student's unpaired t tests. Our studies show that the GnRH-GnRHR system is not essential for growth or motor/sensory/orientation behavior during the first month of life prior to puberty onset. The lack of the GnRH-GnRHR axis, however, did affect females resulting in reduced subcutaneous inguinal fat pad weight and increased glucose with possible insulin resistance; the loss of the normal rise of estradiol at postnatal days 15-28 may account for the altered metabolism in the prepubertal female pups.

  5. Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone Agonist Overuse: Urologists’ Response to Reimbursement and Characteristics Associated with Persistent Overuse

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Shellie D.; Nielsen, Matthew E.; Carpenter, William R.; Jackson, George L.; Wheeler, Stephanie B.; Liu, Huan; Weinberger, Morris

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Medicare reimbursement cuts have been associated with declining Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone (GnRH) agonist overuse in localized prostate cancer. Medical school affiliation and foreign training have been associated with persistent overuse. However, physician-level prescribing changes and the practice type of persistent overusers have not been examined. We sought to describe physician-level changes in GnRH agonist overuse and test the association of time in practice and solo practice type with GnRH agonist overuse. METHODS We matched American Medical Association physician data for 2,138 urologists to SEER–Medicare data for 12,943 men diagnosed with early stage and lower grade adenocarcinoma of the prostate between 2000 and 2007. We conducted a population-based, retrospective study using multi-level modeling to control for patient and provider characteristics. RESULTS Three distinct patterns of GnRH agonist overuse were observed. Urologists’ time in practice was not associated with GnRH agonist overuse (OR 0.89; 95% CI 0.75–1.05).However, solo practice type (OR 1.65; 95% CI 1.34–2.02), medical school affiliation (OR 0.65; 95% CI 0.55–0.77), and patient race were. Compared to non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks (OR 1.76; 95% CI 1.37–2.27), Hispanics (OR 1.41; 95% CI 1.12–1.79) and men of “other” race (OR 1.44; 95% CI 1.04–1.99) had greater odds of receiving unnecessary GnRH agonists. CONCLUSIONS GnRH agonist overuse remains high among some urologists who may be professionally isolated and difficult to reach. These urologists treat more vulnerable populations, which may contribute to health disparities in prostate cancer treatment quality. Nonetheless, these findings provide guidance to develop interventions to address overuse in prostate cancer. PMID:25849354

  6. Characterization of bovine early growth response factor-1 and its gonadotropin-dependent regulation in ovarian follicles prior to ovulation.

    PubMed

    Sayasith, Khampoune; Brown, Kristy A; Lussier, Jacques G; Doré, Monique; Sirois, Jean

    2006-10-01

    Early growth response factor-1 (EGR-1) is a transcription factor that is involved in the transactivation of several genes. The objective of this study was to characterize gonadotropin-dependent regulation of bovine EGR-1 in preovulatory follicles prior to ovulation. Bovine EGR-1 cDNA was obtained by RT-PCR, 5'- and 3'-RACE, its open reading frame composed of 1623 bp, and its coding region encodes a 540-amino acid protein that displays 62-93% identity to known mammalian homologs. The regulation of EGR-1 mRNA was studied in bovine preovulatory follicles which were isolated 0-24 h post-hCG using semiquantitative RT-PCR/Southern blot. Results revealed that the levels of EGR-1 mRNA were very low in follicles at 0 h, markedly increased at 6 h (P < 0.05) when compared to 0 h, and decreased between 12 and 24 h post-hCG. High levels of the EGR-1 mRNA were also observed in corpus luteum, uterus, kidney, pituitary, and spleen, moderate and low in other bovine tissues tested. Analyses performed on isolated preparations of granulosa and theca cells indicated that EGR-1 mRNA was regulated in both cell types, with a predominant expression in granulosa cells. Immunohistochemistry on sections of preovulatory follicles isolated before and after hCG confirmed its protein expression in granulosa cells, 24 h post-hCG. Studies of EGR-1 regulation in primary granulosa cells cultured with forskolin showed that levels of EGR-1 mRNA were low at 0 h, highly increased at 6 h post-forskolin (P < 0.05), and declined to steady state thereafter. Immunoblotting confirmed forskolin-induced EGR-1 protein in cultures. Interestingly, overexpression of EGR-1 increased the levels of mRNA for prostaglandin (PG) G/H synthase-2 (PGHS-2), PG E synthase (PGES), PG E2 receptor (EP2), LH receptor (LH-R), but not for cytochrome P450-side chain cleavage (P450scc), and cytochrome P450 aromatase (P450arom) in granulosa cultures. Thus, this study reports for the first time, a gonadotropin-dependent induction of

  7. Luteal phase support with estrogen in addition to progesterone increases pregnancy rates in in vitro fertilization cycles with poor response to gonadotropins.

    PubMed

    Kutlusoy, Fatma; Guler, Ismail; Erdem, Mehmet; Erdem, Ahmet; Bozkurt, Nuray; Biberoglu, Ebru H; Biberoglu, Kutay O

    2014-05-01

    In this study, our objective was to determine the effect of adding estradiol hemihydrate (E2) to progestin (P) for luteal phase support on pregnancy outcome in in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles with poor response to gonadotropins. Ninety-five women with poor ovarian response who underwent controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) with gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist or GnRH antagonist plus gonadotropin protocol for IVF were prospectively randomized into three groups of luteal phase support after oocyte retrieval. Group 1 (n = 33) received only intravaginal progesterone gel (Crinone 8% gel). Group 2 (n = 27) and Group 3 (n = 35) received intravaginal progesterone plus oral 2 and 6 mg estradiol hemihydrate, respectively. Main outcome measures were overall and clinical pregnancy rates (PRs) per patient. Serum LH, E2 and P levels at 7th and 14th days of luteal phase were also measured. Overall and clinical PRs were significantly higher in 2 mg E2 + P than P-only group (44% versus 18% and 37% versus 12.1%, respectively). There were no statistically significant differences between 6 mg E2 + P versus P-only and 2 mg E2 + P versus 6 mg E2 + P groups regarding PRs. Addition of 2 mg/day E2 in addition to P for luteal support significantly increase overall and clinical PRs in cycles with poor response to gonadotropins after IVF.

  8. Expression and production of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in the normal secretory endometrium: evidence of CGB7 and/or CGB6 beta hCG subunit gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Gerolf; Ackermann, Wilfried; Alexander, Henry

    2012-03-01

    We have previously confirmed glandular cell CGB and CGA subunit mRNA gene expression as well as the expression of their dimeric and single-subunit human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) proteins in normal secretory transformed endometrium. The objective of this study was to investigate the endometrial epithelial gene locus of the human hCG/LH gene cluster from CGB genes responsible for gene expression. For this study, endometrial specimens were selected from women characterized using our endometrium score and hCG staining index that had normal secretory transformed endometrium and optimal hCG staining. Using full-length CGB mRNA sequence analysis, we found that epithelial CGB is (co)expressed as the product of gene locus CGB7 and CGB6 (48%), as single CGB7 (42%), or to a lower percentage as single CGB6 (10%). In addition to known differences between these genes and CGB5, the nucleotide sequence of the mRNA differs between CGB7 and CGB6 in the untranslated promoter region and in translated exon 2. Immunohistochemical results show that endometrial joint CGB7 and CGB6, single CGB7, and single CGB6 mRNA expression lead to the release of endometrial hCG. Gene-specific antibodies for CGB7 reveal secretory endometrial hCG production, which is not observed for gene-specific CGB5 antibodies, whereas the placenta is positive for CGB5 and negative for CGB7 antibody as revealed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot hCG isoform analysis. Only endometrial CGB7 expression seems to be supported specifically by secretory endometrial transcription factors. In conclusion, epithelial hCG is expressed and produced as CGB7 and/or CGB6 but not CGB5, and it is produced together with CGA as a secretory transformation marker in the normal secretory phase endometrium.

  9. Comparison of therapeutic response to gonadotropin therapy between chinese male adolescents and young adults with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism caused by pituitary stalk interruption.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q; Jiang, W; Li, G; Tang, L; Hu, Y

    2014-08-01

    Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) is common in pituitary stalk interruption (PSI) patients. However, the optimal timing and effective regimen in the management of the pituitary-gonadal axis deficiency is still controversial. This study involved a retrospective review of 38 male patients with HH resulting from PSI. The HH patients were subdivided according to their ages into 2 experiment groups: Group I (adolescents, 14-18 years old, 25 cases) and Group II (young adults, 18-24 years old, 13 cases). To compare the therapeutic response to exogenous gonadotropin, a control analysis was carried out in the experimental groups with age-matched control groups. Before gonadotropin therapy, no significant increases in gonadal hormones were noted in either of the 2 experimental groups. After treatment with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) for less than 6 months, the hormone levels of pituitary-gonadal axis significantly increased in group I than in group II. After adding the human menopause gonadotropin (hMG) for 6 months, the gonadal hormone levels of group II were significantly increased. In addition, the Tanner stage and penis lengths in group I were significantly improved. There was no significant adverse impact on BMI and height velocity (HV) after less than one year therapy. A prolonged hypogonadotropic period without treatment may be responsible for testicular dysfunction in HH males caused by PSI. Early supplementary therapy with hCG and hMG is beneficial for the recovery of gonadal hormone and development of secondary sexual characteristics. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Gonadotropin excretion and body composition.

    PubMed

    Penny, R; Goldstein, I P; Frasier, S D

    1978-02-01

    Urinary follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) excretion was correlated with calculated total body water (TBW) and body fat (BF) in 140 normal girls and 142 normal boys, ages 3 to 16 years. In girls, there was a significant increase in gonadotropin excretion at the time of a significant increase in BF as a percent of body weight and decrease in TBW as a percent of body weight. Pubertal changes in body composition were seen in girls at the same chronological age and stage of puberty as increased gonadotropin excretion. Similar findings were observed in boys. Pubertal changes in body composition (an increase in TBW as a percent of body weight and decrease of BF as a percent of body weight) accompanied significantly increased gonadotropin excretion. Both developmental changes were seen at the same chronological age and stage of puberty. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that characteristic changes in body composition as well as the other hallmarks of puberty, including menarche in girls, result from increased gonadotropin and gonadal steroid secretion. They do not support the hypothesis that changes of body composition trigger increased hypothalamic function and hormone secretion leading to the subsequent events of puberty.

  11. Humoral immune responses against gonadotropin releasing hormone elicited by immunization with phage-peptide constructs obtained via phage display.

    PubMed

    Samoylov, Alexandre; Cochran, Anna; Schemera, Bettina; Kutzler, Michelle; Donovan, Caitlin; Petrenko, Valery; Bartol, Frank; Samoylova, Tatiana

    2015-12-20

    Phage display is based on genetic engineering of phage coat proteins resulting in fusion peptides displayed on the surface of phage particles. The technology is widely used for generation of phages with novel characteristics for numerous applications in biomedicine and far beyond. The focus of this study was on development of phage-peptide constructs that stimulate production of antibodies against gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH). Phage-peptide constructs that elicit production of neutralizing GnRH antibodies can be used for anti-fertility and anti-cancer applications. Phage-GnRH constructs were generated via selection from a phage display library using several types of GnRH antibodies as selection targets. Such phage constructs were characterized for sequence similarities to GnRH peptide and frequency of their occurrence in the selection rounds. Five of the constructs with suitable characteristics were tested in mice as a single dose 5×10(11) virions (vir) vaccine and were found to be able to stimulate production of GnRH-specific antibodies, but not to suppress testosterone (indirect indicator of GnRH antibody neutralizing properties). Next, one of the constructs was tested at a higher dose of 2×10(12) vir per mouse in combination with a poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)-based adjuvant. This resulted in multifold increase in GnRH antibody production and significant reduction of serum testosterone, indicating that antibodies produced in response to the phage-GnRH immunization possess neutralizing properties. To achieve optimal immune responses for desired applications, phage-GnRH constructs can be modified with respect to flanking sequences of GnRH-like peptides displayed on phage. Anticipated therapeutic effects also might be attained using optimized phage doses, a combination of several constructs in a single treatment, or application of adjuvants and advanced phage delivery systems.

  12. Circulating prolactin and its response to TRH following administration of testosterone undecanoate in normal men.

    PubMed

    Kicovic, P M; Luisi, M; Franchi, F; Krempl, S

    1978-10-01

    To investigate the effect of orally administered testosterone undercanoate (TU) on circulating prolactin (PRL) and PRL response to TRH stimulation, 8 eugonadal male volunteers, aged 19--30, presenting with normal plasma levels of FSH, LH, testosterone (T), estradiol (E2) and PRL, were given 120 mg/day of TU for 6 days. Plasma PRL levels were measured daily during the pre-treatment phase (3 days), treatment phase (6 days) and post-treatment phase (3 days) by radioimmunoassay. The TRH Test (200 micrograms iv) was done on the 3rd day of the pretreatment phase and on the treatment phase. No significant changes in circulating PRL levels or in PRL response to TRH stimulation were observed. Plasma T and E2 levels showed a slight, but not significant tendency to increase, while gonadotropin levels remained unchanged.

  13. Mach bands explained by response normalization

    PubMed Central

    Kingdom, Frederick A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Mach bands are the illusory dark and bright bars seen at the foot and knee of a luminance trapezoid. First demonstrated by Ernst Mach in the latter part of the 19th century, Mach bands are a test bed not only for models of brightness illusions but of spatial vision in general. Up until 50 years ago the dominant explanation of Mach Bands was that they were caused by lateral inhibition among retinal neurons. More recently, the dominant idea has been that Mach bands are a consequence of a visual process that generates a sparse, binary description of the image in terms of “edges” and “bars”. Another recent explanation is that Mach bands result from learned expectations about the pattern of light typically found on sharply curved surfaces. In keeping with recent multi-scale filtering accounts of brightness illusions as well as current physiology, I show however that Mach bands are most simply explained by response normalization, whereby the gains of early visual channels are adjusted on a local basis to make their responses more equal. I show that a simple one-dimensional model of response normalization explains the range of conditions under which Mach bands occur, and as importantly, the conditions under which they do not occur. PMID:25408643

  14. Does pre-treatment with micronized progesterone affect the ovarian response to a gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist flare-up protocol?

    PubMed

    Loutradis, D; Stefanidis, K; Drakakis, P; Kallianidis, K; El Sheikh, A; Milingos, S; Siskos, K; Michalas, S

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the ovarian response and the receptivity of the endometrium in women pre-treated with micronized progesterone. Eighty-two normogonodotropic women undergoing in vitro fertilization were studied. Thirty received micronized progesterone 1500 mg/day from day 21 of the cycle for a minimum of 2 weeks, and 52 did not receive micronized progesterone (control group). A gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist (GnRH-a) was administered to all the patients in the follicular phase (flare-up). Twenty-five cycles were cancelled for fertilization failure due to male factor, 12 (40%) in the progesterone group and 13 (25%) in the control group (p = 0.271). There was no difference in the number of oocytes retrieved (7.3 +/- 5 vs. 8.2 +/- 4), fertilization rate (50.8% vs. 65%), clinical pregnancy rate (16.6% vs. 25%) or implantation rate (8% vs. 14%). In the progesterone group cases without fertilization, we performed two biopsies to evaluate the receptivity of the endometrium. Pinopode expression was noted 7 days after oocyte retrieval. It seems that the administration of micronized progesterone in the previous cycle does not affect the ovarian response to the combination of follicular phase GnRH-a and gonadotropins, nor the receptivity of the endometrium.

  15. Klinefelter syndrome with low gonadotropin levels.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Kripa Elizabeth; Jebasingh, Felix K; Kapoor, Nitin; Paul, Thomas Vizhalil

    2015-12-29

    Klinefelter syndrome is usually characterised by the presence of a eunuchoid body habitus and testes that are usually small and firm, with low testosterone, and elevated luteinising hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone levels, consistent with hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Low levels of gonadotropins in karyotypically proven cases are not expected, they are extremely rare occurrences. We report a case of a patient who was diagnosed to have Klinefelter syndrome (47 XXY) with low gonadotropin levels. The rest of his anterior pituitary hormonal profile was normal with no lesions in the pituitary gland on imaging. He was continued on androgen replacement therapy.

  16. Differential responsiveness of luteinized human granulosa cells to gonadotropins and insulin-like growth factor I for induction of aromatase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Christman, G.M.; Randolph, J.F. Jr.; Peegel, H.; Menon, K.M. )

    1991-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the in vitro responsiveness of cultured luteinized human granulosa cells over time to insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), human follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) for the induction of aromatase activity. Granulosa cells were retrieved from preovulatory follicles in patients undergoing in vitro fertilization. Cells were cultured for a period of 72 hours or 10 days. The ability of hCG, human FSH, and/or IGF-I to induce aromatase activity was assayed by the stereospecific release of tritium from (1B-3H)androstenedione. Short-term cultures (72 hours) demonstrated a marked rise in aromatase activity in response to human FSH and IGF-I, whereas a smaller response to hCG was observed. In contrast, 10-day cultures demonstrated responsiveness predominantly to hCG rather than human FSH for the induction of aromatase activity with no remarkable effect of IGF-I. Luteinized human granulosa cells undergo a transformation from an initial human FSH and IGF-I responsive state to an hCG responsive state in long-term cultures.

  17. The effect of water quality on the immunoreactivity of stress-response cells and gonadotropin-secreting cells in the pituitary gland of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Mousa, Mostafa A; Ibrahim, Amal A E; Hashem, Amal M; Khalil, Noha A

    2015-03-01

    The present experiments investigated the effect of water quality characteristics on the condition factor, the ovarian activity, cortisol level, and the immunoreactivity of stress-response cells (adrenocorticotropic hormone; ACTH- and melanin stimulating hormone; MSH- and somatolactin; SL- secreting cells) and gonadotropin (GTH)-secreting cells in the pituitary gland of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus. After 3 months of exposure to mixtures of water from different sources (Tap and Lake Manzalah waters), with high levels of minerals and heavy metals, water quality affected the number, size, and immunostaining of stress-response-immunoreactive (ir) cells and GTH-ir cells, which showed a dramatic decrease in their size. The integrated optical density (IOD) of immunoreactivity of MSH- and GTH- cells was significantly increased; however, it was significantly decreased for ACTH- and SL- cells. Also, high levels of cortisol were observed in females exposed to waters with high concentrations of minerals and heavy metals. In parallel, low values of gonadosomatic index (GSI%) and the ovarian histology revealed a decrease of maturing follicles concomitant with an increase of atretic follicles in females exposed to Lake Manzalah polluted water. Taken together, the increased activity of stress-response-ir pituitary cells, serum cortisol level and ovarian atretic follicles in response to elevated concentrations of minerals and heavy metals, supports the possible role of ACTH, MSH, and SL in the adaptive stress response of fish. Therefore, minerals and heavy metals must be considered when discussing tilapia aquaculture status. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Ignoring the challenge? Male black redstarts (Phoenicurus ochruros) do not increase testosterone levels during territorial conflicts but they do so in response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Apfelbeck, Beate; Goymann, Wolfgang

    2011-11-07

    Competition elevates plasma testosterone in a wide variety of vertebrates, including humans. The 'challenge hypothesis' proposes that seasonal peaks in testosterone during breeding are caused by social challenges from other males. However, during experimentally induced male-male conflicts, testosterone increases only in a minority of songbird species tested so far. Why is this so? Comparative evidence suggests that species with a short breeding season may not elevate testosterone levels during territory defence. These species may even be limited in their physiological capability to increase testosterone levels, which can be tested by injecting birds with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). We studied two populations of black redstarts that differ in breeding altitude, morphology and the length of their breeding season. Unexpectedly, males of neither population increased testosterone in response to a simulated territorial intrusion, but injections with GnRH resulted in a major elevation of testosterone. Thus, black redstarts would have been capable of mounting a testosterone response during the male-male challenge. Our data show, for the first time, that the absence of an androgen response to male-male challenges is not owing to physiological limitations to increase testosterone. Furthermore, in contrast to comparative evidence between species, populations of black redstarts with a long breeding season do not show the expected elevation in testosterone during male-male challenges.

  19. Ignoring the challenge? Male black redstarts (Phoenicurus ochruros) do not increase testosterone levels during territorial conflicts but they do so in response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone

    PubMed Central

    Apfelbeck, Beate; Goymann, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Competition elevates plasma testosterone in a wide variety of vertebrates, including humans. The ‘challenge hypothesis’ proposes that seasonal peaks in testosterone during breeding are caused by social challenges from other males. However, during experimentally induced male–male conflicts, testosterone increases only in a minority of songbird species tested so far. Why is this so? Comparative evidence suggests that species with a short breeding season may not elevate testosterone levels during territory defence. These species may even be limited in their physiological capability to increase testosterone levels, which can be tested by injecting birds with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). We studied two populations of black redstarts that differ in breeding altitude, morphology and the length of their breeding season. Unexpectedly, males of neither population increased testosterone in response to a simulated territorial intrusion, but injections with GnRH resulted in a major elevation of testosterone. Thus, black redstarts would have been capable of mounting a testosterone response during the male–male challenge. Our data show, for the first time, that the absence of an androgen response to male–male challenges is not owing to physiological limitations to increase testosterone. Furthermore, in contrast to comparative evidence between species, populations of black redstarts with a long breeding season do not show the expected elevation in testosterone during male–male challenges. PMID:21325321

  20. Parents' Responses to Normal and Premature Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frodi, Ann; Willie, Diana

    This paper discusses a series of three studies investigating the influence of infants' characteristics and signaling behavior on parents. Videotapes of either smiling/cooing/gurgling or crying infants were used to elicit parents' physiological and affective responses. Measured physiological responses included skin conductance, heart rate, and…

  1. Dose-response relationship of 15alpha-hydroxylated sex steroids to gonadotropin-releasing hormones and pituitary extract in male sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus).

    PubMed

    Young, Bradley A; Bryan, Mara B; Glenn, Jessica R; Yun, Sang Seon; Scott, Alexander P; Li, Weiming

    2007-03-01

    The sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) is one of the earliest extant vertebrates for which the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis has been shown to control and regulate reproduction in a similar fashion to gnathostome vertebrates. While the two forms of gonadotropin-releasing hormones in the sea lamprey (GnRH I and GnRH III) have been studied extensively, their in vivo effect on synthesis of 15alpha-hydroxytestosterone (15alpha-T) and 15alpha-hydroxyprogesterone (15alpha-P) have only been partially characterized. In the present study, plasma concentrations of 15alpha-T and 15alpha-P were measured in prespermiating sea lampreys that were given a single injection of either GnRH I or GnRH III in doses ranging from 5 to 100 microg/kg, or of pituitary extract (as a source of gonadotropin). Plasma was sampled at 1-6h and 6-48 h post-injection, in separate experiments, in order to characterize the peak and duration of responses. 15alpha-T plasma concentrations increased slightly in response to all three treatments, but not in a dose-dependent manner, and the timing of peak concentrations varied between doses. However, 15alpha-P plasma concentrations showed a greater range of response (between 1 and 100 ng/ml) and were clearly correlated with the injection dose. Plasma concentrations of 15alpha-P also responded to far lower doses of GnRH I and GnRH III than any other steroid previously investigated in lampreys. The plasma concentrations of 15alpha-P peaked at 6h after injection for all three treatments, and levels reached a mean of 53.1 ng/ml. In female lampreys that were injected twice with 50 microg/ml GnRH I or III, 15alpha-T concentrations did not exceed 0.5 ng/ml and 15alpha-P concentrations did not exceed 1 ng/ml. These results lend further support to the hypothesis that 15alpha-P plays an important role in the reproductive endocrinology of male lampreys.

  2. Plasma prorenin response to human chorionic gonadotropin in ovarian-hyperstimulated women: correlation with the number of ovarian follicles and steroid hormone concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Itskovitz, J; Sealey, J E; Glorioso, N; Rosenwaks, Z

    1987-01-01

    Plasma prorenin and active renin were measured before and after human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) administration in two groups of patients undergoing ovarian stimulation for 4-6 days with follicle-stimulating hormone alone or in combination with luteinizing hormone, for in vitro fertilization. Baseline total plasma renin (prorenin plus active renin; n = 12) averaged 25 +/- 8 ng/ml per hr (mean +/- SD). Total renin did not change during ovarian stimulation but it increased to 46 +/- 16 ng/ml per hr (P less than 0.05) 1 or 2 days later, just before hCG administration. Thirty-six hours after hCG administration, just before laparoscopy and egg retrieval, total renin was 123 +/- 97 ng/ml per hr; a peak of 182 +/- 143 ng/ml per hr occurred 2-6 days later--i.e., during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. In eight of the patients who did not conceive, total renin returned to baseline 14 days after hCG administration. In four who conceived, a nadir was reached (57 +/- 13 ng/ml per hr) 8-12 days after hCG administration and then total renin increased again as the plasma beta hCG measurement began to rise. By day 16 it averaged 225 +/- 157 ng/ml per hr. In a second group of five patients active renin and prorenin were measured separately. Active renin comprised less than 20% of the total renin at all times. It was unchanged until day 4 after hCG administration and then increased significantly only when plasma progesterone was high. Thus, the initial response to hCG was entirely due to an increase in prorenin. A highly significant correlation was observed between the number of follicles and the total renin increases on the day of aspiration (r = 0.93, P less than 0.001) and at the peak (r = 0.89, P less than 0.001). After hCG administration, a temporal relationship was observed between the rise in total renin and plasma estradiol and progesterone levels. These results demonstrate that plasma prorenin increases markedly after administration of hCG and that the rise is

  3. Human chorionic gonadotropin regulates endothelial cell responsiveness to interleukin 1 and amplifies the cytokine-mediated effect on cell proliferation, migration and the release of angiogenic factors.

    PubMed

    Bourdiec, Amélie; Bédard, David; Rao, C V; Akoum, Ali

    2013-08-01

    Successful embryonic implantation requires an appropriate communication network between the embryo and its near environment within the implantation site. Herein, we examined whether human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), the major embryonic signal, targets endothelial cells and regulate their responsiveness to interleukin 1 (IL1), one of the earliest signals released by embryonic cells. Human microvascular endothelial cell proliferation and migration following exposure to various concentrations of hCG and/or IL1B for different time periods were analyzed by BrdU incorporation and wound healing assays. The expression of soluble (s) and membrane-bound (mb) IL1 receptors (IL1Rs), IL1R antagonist (IL1RN), luteinizing hormone/choriogonadotropin receptor (LHCGR), and IL8 was determined by real-time PCR, Western blot, and ELISA. Cell proliferation and migration increased in response to IL1B and further in the presence of hCG. IL1B up-regulated both the signaling IL1R1 and the inhibitory IL1R2, while adding hCG further increased IL1R1 and significantly downregulated IL1R2. This translated into an increased secretion of IL8, which was inhibited in cells where IL1R2 was overexpressed. These findings reveal a new mechanism by which hCG may target endothelial cells to directly stimulate angiogenesis and favor embryonic growth. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Early spring sex differences in luteinizing hormone response to gonadotropin releasing hormone in co-occurring resident and migrant dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis).

    PubMed

    Greives, Timothy J; Fudickar, Adam M; Atwell, Jonathan W; Meddle, Simone L; Ketterson, Ellen D

    2016-09-15

    To optimally time reproduction, animals must coordinate changes in the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. The extent of intra-species variation in seasonal timing of reproductive function is considerable, both within and among populations. Dark-eyed junco (Junco hyemalis) populations are known to differ in their reproductive timing response to cues experienced in the same habitat in late winter/early spring. Specifically in juncos cohabitating on shared wintering grounds, residents initiate breeding and reproductive activity but migrants delay reproductive development and prepare to migrate before breeding. Here, we test the hypothesis that the pituitary gland acts as a 'control point' to modulate differential HPG axis activity across populations. We sampled free-living resident and migrant juncos on their shared over-wintering grounds in March, thus all individuals were experiencing the same environmental cues, including photoperiod. We predicted that during this critical time of transition, residents would more readily respond to repeated gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulation with increases in luteinizing hormone (LH), in contrast to migrants, which should delay full reproductive activity. Our data indicate that migrant females, while still on the overwintering grounds, have a reduced LH response to repeated GnRH injections compared to resident females. Male migrant and resident birds did not differ in their responsiveness to repeated GnRH. Our results suggest a sex difference in the costs of mistimed activation of the HPG axis, with female migrants being less responsive than residents females and males to repeated stimulation. Further, our data implicate a key role for the pituitary in regulating appropriate reproductive timing responses.

  5. Multivariate Models for Normal and Binary Responses in Intervention Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pituch, Keenan A.; Whittaker, Tiffany A.; Chang, Wanchen

    2016-01-01

    Use of multivariate analysis (e.g., multivariate analysis of variance) is common when normally distributed outcomes are collected in intervention research. However, when mixed responses--a set of normal and binary outcomes--are collected, standard multivariate analyses are no longer suitable. While mixed responses are often obtained in…

  6. Multivariate Models for Normal and Binary Responses in Intervention Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pituch, Keenan A.; Whittaker, Tiffany A.; Chang, Wanchen

    2016-01-01

    Use of multivariate analysis (e.g., multivariate analysis of variance) is common when normally distributed outcomes are collected in intervention research. However, when mixed responses--a set of normal and binary outcomes--are collected, standard multivariate analyses are no longer suitable. While mixed responses are often obtained in…

  7. [Relationship between the immunomodulating effects of chorionic gonadotropin and the initial functional activity of the splenocytes mediating the adoptive immune response].

    PubMed

    Shirshev, S V; Kevorkov, N N

    1993-01-01

    CBA and (CBA x C57BL/6)F1 male mice were used in experiments. One h incubation of splenocytes with chorionic gonadotropin (CG) in doses 10 or 50 MU/ml statistically significantly reduced the count of antibody-producing cells detectable in the syngeneic transfer system. Addition of conA or recombinant human interleukin 2 to the splenocyte culture did not alter the processes of the formation of antibody-producing cells. Addition of CG simultaneously with conA resulted in discontinuation of the immunosuppression induced by a low hormone dose, whereas 50 MU/ml of CG in the presence of conA had a marked immunodepressant effect. Combination of interleukin 2 with CG lead either to immunosuppression cessation (10 MU/ml) or to more than twofold stimulation of the adoptive immune response (50 MU/ml). Voltaren, a cycloxygenase inhibitor, was used in some experiments to elucidate the degree of endogenic prostaglandin relationships with the mechanisms of CG immunomodulating effects. Cycloxygenase activity was found to be related to the immunosuppressive effect of CG low dose, whereas the costimulating effect of a high dose of the hormone in the presence of interleukin 2 was unrelated to endogenic prostaglandin synthesis.

  8. Ovulation induction with pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) or gonadotropins in a case of hypothalamic amenorrhea and diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Georgopoulos, N A; Markou, K B; Pappas, A P; Protonatariou, A; Vagenakis, G A; Sykiotis, G P; Dimopoulos, P A; Tzingounis, V A

    2001-12-01

    Hypothalamic amenorrhea is a treatable cause of infertility. Our patient was presented with secondary amenorrhea and diabetes insipidus. Cortisol and prolactin responded normally to a combined insulin tolerance test (ITT) and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) challenge, while thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) response to TRH was diminished, and no response of growth hormone to ITT was detected. Both luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels increased following gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) challenge. No response of LH to clomiphene citrate challenge was detected. Magnetic resonance imaging findings demonstrated a midline mass occupying the inferior hypothalamus, with posterior lobe not visible and thickened pituitary stalk. Ovulation induction was carried out first with combined human menopausal gonadotropins (hMG/LH/FSH) (150 IU/day) and afterwards with pulsatile GnRH (150 ng/kg/pulse). Ovulation was achieved with both pulsatile GnRH and combine gonadotropin therapy. Slightly better results were achieved with the pulsatile GnRH treatment.

  9. Hindbrain lactate regulates preoptic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuron GnRH-I protein but not AMPK responses to hypoglycemia in the steroid-primed ovariectomized female rat.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, P K; Briski, K P

    2015-07-09

    Steroid positive-feedback activation of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) neuroendocrine axis propagates the pre ovulatory LH surge, a crucial component of female reproduction. Our work shows that this key event is restrained by inhibitory metabolic input from hindbrain A2 noradrenergic neurons. GnRH neurons express the ultra-sensitive energy sensor adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK); here, we investigated the hypothesis that GnRH nerve cell AMPK and peptide neurotransmitter responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia are controlled by hindbrain lack of the oxidizable glycolytic end-product L-lactate. Data show that hypoglycemic inhibition of LH release in steroid-primed ovariectomized female rats was reversed by coincident caudal hindbrain lactate infusion. Western blot analyses of laser-microdissected A2 neurons demonstrate hypoglycemic augmentation [Fos, estrogen receptor-beta (ER-β), phosphoAMPK (pAMPK)] and inhibition (dopamine-beta-hydroxylase, GLUT3, MCT2) of protein expression in these cells, responses that were normalized by insulin plus lactate treatment. Hypoglycemia diminished rostral preoptic GnRH nerve cell GnRH-I protein and pAMPK content; the former, but not the latter response was reversed by lactate. Results implicate caudal hindbrain lactoprivic signaling in hypoglycemia-induced suppression of the LH surge, demonstrating that lactate repletion of that site reverses decrements in A2 catecholamine biosynthetic enzyme and GnRH neuropeptide precursor protein expression. Lack of effect of lactate on hypoglycemic patterns of GnRH AMPK activity suggests that this sensor is uninvolved in metabolic-inhibition of positive-feedback-stimulated hypophysiotropic signaling to pituitary gonadotropes.

  10. Microdose gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist in the absence of exogenous gonadotropins is not sufficient to induce multiple follicle development.

    PubMed

    Chung, Karine; Fogle, Robin; Bendikson, Kristin; Christenson, Kamilee; Paulson, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Because the effectiveness of the "microdose flare" stimulation protocol often is attributed to the dramatic endogenous gonadotropin release induced by the GnRH agonist, the aim of this study was to determine whether use of microdose GnRH agonist alone could induce multiple ovarian follicle development in normal responders. Based on these data, the duration of gonadotropin rise is approximately 24 to 48 hours and is too brief to sustain continued multiple follicle growth.

  11. The rate of high ovarian response in women identified at risk by a high serum AMH level is influenced by the type of gonadotropin.

    PubMed

    Arce, Joan-Carles; Klein, Bjarke M; La Marca, Antonio

    2014-06-01

    The aim was to compare ovarian response and clinical outcome of potential high-responders after stimulation with highly purified menotropin (HP-hMG) or recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone (rFSH) for in vitro fertilisation/intracytoplasmic sperm injection. Retrospective analysis was performed on data collected in two randomized controlled trials, one conducted following a long GnRH agonist protocol and the other with an antagonist protocol. Potential high-responders (n = 155 and n = 188 in the agonist and antagonist protocol, respectively) were defined as having an initial anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) value >75th percentile (5.2 ng/ml). In both protocols, HP-hMG stimulation in women in the high AMH category was associated with a significantly lower occurrence of high response (≥15 oocytes retrieved) than rFSH stimulation; 33% versus 51% (p = 0.025) and 31% versus 49% (p = 0.015) in the long agonist and antagonist protocol, respectively. In the potential high-responder women, trends for improved live birth rate were observed with HP-hMG compared with rFSH (long agonist protocol: 33% versus 20%, p = 0.074; antagonist protocol: 34% versus 23%, p = 0.075; overall population: 34% versus 22%, p = 0.012). In conclusion, the type of gonadotropin used for ovarian stimulation influences high-response rates and potentially clinical outcome in women identified as potential high-responders.

  12. Dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) levels reflect endogenous LH production and response to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) challenge in the older female macaque (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Francisco M.; Chen, Jiangang; Gee, Nancy A.; Lohstroh, Pete; Lasley, Bill L.

    2012-01-01

    Hypothesis We propose that the adrenal gland of an older higher primate female animal model will respond to a human chorionic gonadotropic (hCG) hormone challenge by secreting additional dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS). Such a response in surgically and chemically-castrated animals will provide proof-of-concept and a validated animal model for future studies to explore the rise of DHEAS during the menopausal transition of women. Methods Twenty four 18–26 y/o female cynomolgus monkeys were screened for ovarian function then either ovariectomized (n=4) or treated with a gonadotropic releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) (n=20) to block ovarian steroid production. Following a recovery period from surgery or down-regulation, a single dose challenge (1,000 IU; IM) of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) was then administered in order to determine if LH/CG could accelerate circulating DHEAS production. Serum DHEAS, bioactive LH and urinary metabolites of ovarian sex steroids were monitored before, during and following these treatments. Results Circulating LH bioactivity and immunoreactive DHEAS concentrations were suppressed in all animals 14 days post administration of GnRHa. Urinary metabolites of estradiol and progesterone remained low following surgery or the flare reaction to GnRHa. Circulating DHEAS levels were increased following hCG administration and the increase in individual animals was proportional to the pre-treatment DHEAS baseline. Circulating DHEAS concentrations were positively correlated to endogenous LH bioactive concentrations prior to, and were increased by hCG challenge while no concomitant change was observed in ovarian steroid hormone excretion. Conclusion These data demonstrate a positive adrenal androgen response to LH/CG in older female higher primates and suggests a mechanism for the rise in adrenal androgen production during the menopausal transition in women. These results also illustrate that the nonhuman primate animal model can be

  13. Seasonal changes in expression of genes encoding five types of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptors and responses to GnRH analog in the pituitary of masu salmon.

    PubMed

    Jodo, Aya; Kitahashi, Takashi; Taniyama, Shinya; Ueda, Hiroshi; Urano, Akihisa; Ando, Hironori

    2005-10-01

    Five types of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRH-R) genes, designated as msGnRH-R1, R2, R3, R4, and R5, are expressed in the brain and pituitary of masu salmon (Oncorhynchus masou). In the present study, seasonal changes in the expression of these five genes were examined in the pituitary to elucidate their roles in GnRH action during growth and sexual maturation. In addition, the seasonal variation of these genes in response to GnRH was examined in a GnRH analog (GnRHa) implantation experiment. Pituitary samples were collected 1 week after the implantation every month from immaturity through spawning. The absolute amount of GnRH-R mRNA in single pituitaries was determined by real-time PCR assays. Among the five genes, R4 was predominantly expressed in the pituitaries. In the immature fish, the amount of GnRH-R mRNA varied with seasons and subtypes. In the pre-spawning period, R1 and R4 mRNAs in both sexes and R2 and R3 mRNAs in the females increased 4- to 20-fold and then decreased in the spawning season. The effects of GnRHa treatment were significantly different in both sexes. In the females, GnRHa tended to elevate the expression of all the subtypes of GnRH-R genes in various stages during the experimental period, whereas it had almost no apparent effects in the males. These results indicate that the expression of the five GnRH-R genes is seasonally variable and may be related to the responses of the pituitary hormone genes to GnRH, and the regulation of GnRH-R genes by GnRH is different in both sexes.

  14. Alterations in the ability of the bovine pituitary gland to secrete gonadotropins in vitro during the first follicle-stimulating hormone increase of the estrous cycle and in response to exogenous steroids.

    PubMed

    Lane, E A; Padmanabhan, V; Roche, J F; Crowe, M A

    2005-02-01

    The objective was to determine if the endocrine status of the animal dictates the responsiveness of gonadotrophs to estradiol, activin, inhibin and follistatin; hormones implicated in the differential release of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). Bovine pituitaries were obtained at 13 (n=8), 30 (n=24) and 66 (n=8) h after the onset of estrus, corresponding to before, during and the end of the first FSH increase of the estrous cycle which follows the pre-ovulatory gonadotropin surge in heifers. Heifers slaughtered at 30 h received no treatment, or were treated with progesterone with or without estradiol before slaughter to suppress the first transient FSH increase. Secretion of FSH from cultured pituitary cells, reflecting the prior in vivo status, was greater (P<0.01) at 30 h than 13 or 66 h, whereas, LH secretion was less (P<0.01) at 13 h compared with 30 h. Treatment with exogenous steroids decreased (P<0.05) the pituitary gland's ability to subsequently secrete FSH and LH. Inhibin and, to a greater extent, estradiol decreased (P<0.01) mean FSH secretion but increased (P<0.05) mean LH secretion. These findings suggest that estradiol and inhibin both have the ability to differentially modulate basal gonadotropin secretion during the first FSH increase of the bovine estrous cycle. Differential regulation of LH and FSH is mediated via an alteration in gonadotropin biosynthesis and basal secretion. Furthermore, the secretory capability of cultured pituitary cells and basal gonadotropin secretion reflect the prior endocrine status of the animal from which pituitaries were obtained.

  15. 21 CFR 522.1079 - Serum gonadotropin and chorionic gonadotropin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Serum gonadotropin and chorionic gonadotropin. 522.1079 Section 522.1079 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM...

  16. 21 CFR 522.1079 - Serum gonadotropin and chorionic gonadotropin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Serum gonadotropin and chorionic gonadotropin. 522.1079 Section 522.1079 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM...

  17. 21 CFR 522.1079 - Serum gonadotropin and chorionic gonadotropin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Serum gonadotropin and chorionic gonadotropin. 522.1079 Section 522.1079 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM...

  18. 21 CFR 522.1079 - Serum gonadotropin and chorionic gonadotropin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Serum gonadotropin and chorionic gonadotropin. 522.1079 Section 522.1079 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM...

  19. 21 CFR 522.1079 - Serum gonadotropin and chorionic gonadotropin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Serum gonadotropin and chorionic gonadotropin. 522.1079 Section 522.1079 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM...

  20. Insight into the neuroendocrine site and cellular mechanism by which cortisol suppresses pituitary responsiveness to gonadotropin-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Breen, Kellie M; Davis, Tracy L; Doro, Lisa C; Nett, Terry M; Oakley, Amy E; Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Rispoli, Louisa A; Wagenmaker, Elizabeth R; Karsch, Fred J

    2008-02-01

    Stress-like elevations in plasma glucocorticoids rapidly inhibit pulsatile LH secretion in ovariectomized sheep by reducing pituitary responsiveness to GnRH. This effect can be blocked by a nonspecific antagonist of the type II glucocorticoid receptor (GR) RU486. A series of experiments was conducted to strengthen the evidence for a mediatory role of the type II GR and to investigate the neuroendocrine site and cellular mechanism underlying this inhibitory effect of cortisol. First, we demonstrated that a specific agonist of the type II GR, dexamethasone, mimics the suppressive action of cortisol on pituitary responsiveness to GnRH pulses in ovariectomized ewes. This effect, which became evident within 30 min, documents mediation via the type II GR. We next determined that exposure of cultured ovine pituitary cells to cortisol reduced the LH response to pulse-like delivery of GnRH by 50% within 30 min, indicating a pituitary site of action. Finally, we tested the hypothesis that suppression of pituitary responsiveness to GnRH in ovariectomized ewes is due to reduced tissue concentrations of GnRH receptor. Although cortisol blunted the amplitude of GnRH-induced LH pulses within 1-2 h, the amount of GnRH receptor mRNA or protein was not affected over this time frame. Collectively, these observations provide evidence that cortisol acts via the type II GR within the pituitary gland to elicit a rapid decrease in responsiveness to GnRH, independent of changes in expression of the GnRH receptor.

  1. Oral Progestin Priming Increases Ovarian Sensitivity to Gonadotropin Stimulation and Improves Luteal Function in the Cat1

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Rosemary A.; Pelican, Katharine M.; Crosier, Adrienne E.; Pukazhenthi, Budhan S.; Wildt, David E.; Ottinger, Mary Ann; Howard, JoGayle

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT As the only domesticated species known to exhibit both induced and spontaneous ovulation, the cat is a model for understanding the nuances of ovarian control. To explore ovarian sensitivity to exogenous gonadotropins and the influence of progestin priming, we conducted a study of queens that were down-regulated with oral progestin or allowed to cycle normally, followed by low or high doses of equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). Our metrics included 1) fecal steroid metabolite profiles before and after ovulation induction, 2) laparoscopic examination of ovarian follicles and corpora lutea (CL) on Days 2 and 17 (Day 0 = hCG administration), and 3) ovariohysterectomy (Day 17) to assess CL progesterone concentrations, morphometrics, and histology. Reproductive tracts from time-matched, naturally mated queens (n = 6) served as controls. Every progestin-primed cat (n = 12) produced the desired response of morphologically similar, fresh CL (regardless of eCG/hCG dose) by Day 2, whereas 41.7% of unprimed counterparts (n = 12) failed to ovulate or had variable-aged CL suggestive of prior spontaneous ovulation (P < 0.05). The ovarian response to low, but not high, eCG/hCG was improved (P < 0.05) in primed compared to unprimed cats, indicating increased sensitivity to gonadotropin in the progestin-primed ovary. Progestin priming prevented hyperelevated fecal steroid metabolites and normalized CL progesterone capacity, but only when combined with low eCG/hCG. However, priming failed to prevent ancillary CL formation, smaller CL mass, or abnormal luteal cell density, which were common to all eCG/hCG-treated cats. Thus, the domestic cat exposed to eCG/hCG produces CL with structural and functional aberrations. These anomalies can be partially mitigated by progestin priming, possibly due to a protective effect of progestin associated with enhanced ovarian sensitivity to gonadotropins. PMID:23100619

  2. Discrete Latent Markov Models for Normally Distributed Response Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmittmann, Verena D.; Dolan, Conor V.; van der Maas, Han L. J.; Neale, Michael C.

    2005-01-01

    Van de Pol and Langeheine (1990) presented a general framework for Markov modeling of repeatedly measured discrete data. We discuss analogical single indicator models for normally distributed responses. In contrast to discrete models, which have been studied extensively, analogical continuous response models have hardly been considered. These…

  3. Response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone challenge: Seasonal variation in steroid production in a viviparous lizard, Tiliqua nigrolutea.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Ashley; Jones, Susan M

    2017-04-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis plays a central role in the regulation of gamete maturation, sex steroid production and the stimulation of reproductive behaviours in vertebrates. In seasonal breeders, the timely activation and deactivation of this control system is important to ensure successful reproduction: this process is not well understood in species which breed irregularly. Males of the viviparous blotched blue-tongued lizard, Tiliqua nigrolutea, breed annually, while females display a multiennial cycle. We investigated seasonal variation in hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis responsiveness in both sexes of T. nigrolutea. We measured changes in plasma concentrations of testosterone and estrogen in response to a single intraperitoneal injection of a GnRH agonist, chicken-II LH-RH, at three reproductively distinct times of year. Plasma testosterone concentrations in males were significantly increased during gonadal quiescence, but not initial or final spermatogenesis. There was no estrogen response in males at any time of year. Conversely, in females, there was an increase in plasma testosterone, but not estrogen, concentration, in reproductively quiescent females several months in advance of a successful pregnancy. These results indicate clear variation in HPG axis activity with sex, season and reproductive condition in this seasonally breeding viviparous lizard. This study opens the way for further investigation into the mechanisms by which internal (body condition) and external seasonal cues (temperature and photoperiod) are coordinated to regulate reproduction in irregularly-breeding reptiles.

  4. A Normalization Model of Attentional Modulation of Single Unit Responses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joonyeol; Maunsell, John H. R.

    2009-01-01

    Although many studies have shown that attention to a stimulus can enhance the responses of individual cortical sensory neurons, little is known about how attention accomplishes this change in response. Here, we propose that attention-based changes in neuronal responses depend on the same response normalization mechanism that adjusts sensory responses whenever multiple stimuli are present. We have implemented a model of attention that assumes that attention works only through this normalization mechanism, and show that it can replicate key effects of attention. The model successfully explains how attention changes the gain of responses to individual stimuli and also why modulation by attention is more robust and not a simple gain change when multiple stimuli are present inside a neuron's receptive field. Additionally, the model accounts well for physiological data that measure separately attentional modulation and sensory normalization of the responses of individual neurons in area MT in visual cortex. The proposal that attention works through a normalization mechanism sheds new light a broad range of observations on how attention alters the representation of sensory information in cerebral cortex. PMID:19247494

  5. 21 CFR 556.304 - Gonadotropin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... residues of total gonadotropins (human chorionic gonadotropin and pregnant mare serum gonadotropin) is 42... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gonadotropin. 556.304 Section 556.304 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL...

  6. 21 CFR 556.304 - Gonadotropin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... residues of total gonadotropins (human chorionic gonadotropin and pregnant mare serum gonadotropin) is 42... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gonadotropin. 556.304 Section 556.304 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL...

  7. The effect of age on the ovarian response to gonadotropin and on pregnancy rate in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guido, M; Belosi, C; Selvaggi, L; Lattanzi, F; Apa, R; Fulghesu, A M; Lanzone, A

    2003-06-01

    Recent studies have proposed that, in women affected by the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), aging is able to regularize the menstrual cyclicity. To evaluate the ovarian response in PCOS patients according to their age, we studied 33 PCOS patients, 20 of whom with an age ranging from 28 to 34 years (younger PCOS) and 13 ranging from 35 to 45 years (older PCOS). All patients underwent an ovulation induction therapeutic protocol with low-dose recombinant follicle stimulating hormone, for a total of 80 cycles (44 cycles for the younger PCOS group and 36 cycles for the older PCOS group). No significant difference was found between the days of therapy (12.3 +/- 5.4 vs. 13.5 +/- 5.6 days), total amount of drugs (980.7 +/- 568.9 IU vs. 1063.9 +/- 469.5 IU) or ovulation rate (93% vs. 89%) in the two groups. The two groups showed a significant difference in the maximum estradiol level (2053.5 +/- 1497.2 vs. 1269.0 +/- 911.5 pmol/l, p < 0.01), the number of the recruited and preovulatory follicles (1.7 +/- 2.5 vs. 0.64 +/- 0.9, p < 0.05 and 1.7 +/- 1.1 vs. 1.2 +/- 0.5, p < 0.01, respectively) and the pregnancy rate (36% vs. 14%, p < 0.05). In conclusion, our data clearly showed that, also in PCOS, advanced age is a negative prognostic factor in the ovarian response to ovulation induction therapies.

  8. Ovarian response and embryo production in llamas treated with equine chorionic gonadotropin alone or with a progestin-releasing vaginal sponge at the time of follicular wave emergence.

    PubMed

    Huanca, W; Cordero, A; Huanca, T; Cardenas, O; Adams, G P; Ratto, M H

    2009-10-01

    The objective of the study was to compare the ovulatory response and embryo production in llamas (Lama glama) treated with a single dose of equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) alone or combined with intravaginal medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) at the time of follicular wave emergence. Llamas with a growing follicle >or=7 mm in diameter were assigned to one of the following groups: (1) Control (n=28): Nonstimulated llamas were mated and embryos were collected 7 d after mating. (2) eCG (n=32): Llamas were given 5mg luteinizing hormone (LH) (Day 0) to induce ovulation, 1000 IU eCG on Day 2, a luteolytic dose of prostaglandin F(2alpha) on Day 6, mating on Day 7, and embryo collection on Day 14. (3) eCG+MPA (n=34): Llamas were treated as those in the eCG group, but a sponge containing 60 mg MPA was placed intravaginally from Days 2 to 6. Llamas that did not respond to synchronization or superstimulation were excluded, leaving data from n=26, 26, and 27 in the control, eCG, and eCG+MPA groups, respectively, for statistical analysis. The mean (+/-SD) number of follicles>7 mm at the time of mating was greatest in the eCG group, intermediate in the eCG+MPA group, and lowest in the control group (16.6+/-5.3, 12.9+/-3.7, and 1.0+/-0.0, respectively, P<0.001). The number of corpora lutea was similar between eCG and eCG+MPA groups (10.1+/-2.9 and 8.6+/-3.7, respectively); both were higher (P<0.001) than in controls (0.9+/-0.3). The number of embryos did not differ significantly between the eCG and eCG+MPA groups (4.8+/-2.8 and 3.5+/-3.0, respectively), but both were higher (P<0.001) than in the controls (0.7+/-0.4). In conclusion, eCG, with or without MPA effectively induced a superovulatory response and multiple embryo production in llamas.

  9. Normal Caloric Responses during Acute Phase of Vestibular Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Uk; Park, Seong-Ho; Kim, Hyo-Jung; Koo, Ja-Won

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose We report a novel finding of caloric conversion from normal responses into unilateral paresis during the acute phase of vestibular neuritis (VN). Methods We recruited 893 patients with a diagnosis of VN at Dizziness Clinic of Seoul National University Bundang Hospital from 2003 to 2014 after excluding 28 patients with isolated inferior divisional VN (n=14) and those without follow-up tests despite normal caloric responses initially (n=14). We retrospectively analyzed the neurotological findings in four (0.5%) of the patients who showed a conversion from initially normal caloric responses into unilateral paresis during the acute phase. Results In those four patients, the initial caloric tests were performed within 2 days of symptom onset, and conversion into unilateral caloric paresis was documented 1–4 days later. The clinical and laboratory findings during the initial evaluation were consistent with VN in all four patients except for normal findings in bedside head impulse tests in one of them. Conclusions Normal findings in caloric tests should be interpreted with caution during the acute phase of suspected VN. Follow-up evaluation should be considered when the findings of the initial caloric test are normal, but VN remains the most plausible diagnosis. PMID:26932259

  10. Seasonal changes of responses to gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog in expression of growth hormone/prolactin/somatolactin genes in the pituitary of masu salmon.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Ramji Kumar; Taniyama, Shinya; Kitahashi, Takashi; Ando, Hironori; Yamauchi, Kohei; Zohar, Yonathan; Ueda, Hiroshi; Urano, Akihisa

    2003-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is considered to stimulate secretion of growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), and somatolactin (SL) at particular stages of growth and sexual maturation in teleost fishes. We therefore examined seasonal variation in the pituitary levels of GH/PRL/SL mRNAs, and tried to clarify seasonal changes of responses to GnRH in expression of GH/PRL/SL genes, in the pituitaries of growing and maturing masu salmon (Oncorhynchus masou). Pituitary samples were monthly collected one week after implantation with GnRH analog (GnRHa). The levels of mRNAs encoding GH, PRL, and SL precursors in single pituitaries were determined by a real-time polymerase chain reaction method. The fork lengths and body weights of control and GnRHa-implanted fish of both sexes gradually increased and peaked out in September of 2-year-old (2+) when fish spawned. GnRHa implantation did not stimulate somatic growth, nor elevate gonadosomatic index (GSI) of 1+ and 2+ males, whereas it significantly increased GSI of 2+ females in late August to early September. The GnRHa-implanted 1+ males had higher levels of GH and PRL mRNAs in July, and SL mRNA from June to August than the control males. The levels of GH, PRL, and SL mRNAs in the control and GnRHa-implanted 1+ females, however, did not show any significant changes. Afterward, the PRL mRNA levels elevated in the control 2+ fish of both sexes in spring. GnRHa elevated the GH mRNA levels in both males and females in 2+ winter, and the PRL mRNA levels in females in early spring. Regardless of sex and GnRHa-implantation, the SL mRNA levels increased during sexual maturation. In growing and maturing masu salmon, expression of genes encoding GH, PRL, and SL in the pituitary is thus sensitive to GnRH in particular seasons probably in relation to physiological roles of the hormones.

  11. New insights regarding glucocorticoids, stress and gonadotropin suppression.

    PubMed

    Breen, Kellie M; Karsch, Fred J

    2006-07-01

    This review highlights our recent work investigating the inhibitory effects of acute, physiologic stress-like increases in cortisol on reproductive neuroendocrine activity in sheep, the mechanisms responsible for this suppression, and the relevance of enhanced glucocorticoid secretion to stress-induced inhibition of gonadotropin secretion in this species. Initial studies established that cortisol rapidly suppresses pulsatile luteinizing hormone secretion. In ovariectomized ewes, this inhibition reflects the reduction of pituitary responsiveness to gonadotropin-releasing hormone mediated by the type II glucocorticoid receptor, rather than the suppression in hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone release. Studies in ovary-intact ewes, however, uncovered an alternative mode of cortisol action. During the follicular phase of the estrous cycle, cortisol reduces luteinizing hormone pulse frequency, most likely via the inhibition of gonadotropin-releasing hormone pulsatility. Recent preliminary evidence in ovariectomized ewes demonstrates increased cortisol secretion is essential for disruption of pulsatile luteinizing hormone secretion in response to a psychosocial stress. Taken together, our observations reveal diverse inhibitory actions of cortisol on gonadotropin secretion and that this glucocorticoid is not only sufficient, but necessary for suppression of reproductive neuroendocrine activity in response to certain types of stress.

  12. Pituitary-testicular responsiveness in male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, R L; Reitz, R E

    1974-01-01

    An isolated deficiency of pituitary gonadotropins was demonstrated in six 46 XY males, 22 to 36 years of age, with and without anosmia. Undetectable or low levels of serum follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) clearly separated hypogonadotropic from normal adult males. Chronic (8-12 wk) administration of clomiphene citrate caused no increase in serum FSH or LH in gonadotropin-deficient subjects. However, the administration of synthetic luteinizing hormone releasing factor (LRF) resulted in the appearance of serum LH and, to a lesser degree, serum FSH in three subjects tested. While levels of plasma testosterone were significantly lower in gonadotropin-deficient subjects, plasma androstenedione and dehydroepiandrosterone were in a range similar to that of age-matched normal men. Treatment with human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) increased levels of plasma testosterone to normal adult male values in all gonadotropin-deficient subjects. Cessation of treatment with HCG resulted in the return of plasma testosterone to low, pretreatment levels. That HCG therapy with resultant normal levels of plasma testosterone may somehow stimulate endogenous gonadotropin secretion in gonadotropin-deficient subjects was not evident. The adult male levels of serum FSH and LH after LRF, and plasma testosterone after HCG, confirm pituitary and Leydig cell responsiveness in these subjects. Images PMID:11344554

  13. Normalization of cell responses in cat striate cortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeger, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Simple cells in the striate cortex have been depicted as half-wave-rectified linear operators. Complex cells have been depicted as energy mechanisms, constructed from the squared sum of the outputs of quadrature pairs of linear operators. However, the linear/energy model falls short of a complete explanation of striate cell responses. In this paper, a modified version of the linear/energy model is presented in which striate cells mutually inhibit one another, effectively normalizing their responses with respect to stimulus contrast. This paper reviews experimental measurements of striate cell responses, and shows that the new model explains a significantly larger body of physiological data.

  14. Multiple object response normalization in monkey inferotemporal cortex.

    PubMed

    Zoccolan, Davide; Cox, David D; DiCarlo, James J

    2005-09-07

    The highest stages of the visual ventral pathway are commonly assumed to provide robust representation of object identity by disregarding confounding factors such as object position, size, illumination, and the presence of other objects (clutter). However, whereas neuronal responses in monkey inferotemporal cortex (IT) can show robust tolerance to position and size changes, previous work shows that responses to preferred objects are usually reduced by the presence of nonpreferred objects. More broadly, we do not yet understand multiple object representation in IT. In this study, we systematically examined IT responses to pairs and triplets of objects in three passively viewing monkeys across a broad range of object effectiveness. We found that, at least under these limited clutter conditions, a large fraction of the response of each IT neuron to multiple objects is reliably predicted as the average of its responses to the constituent objects in isolation. That is, multiple object responses depend primarily on the relative effectiveness of the constituent objects, regardless of object identity. This average effect becomes virtually perfect when populations of IT neurons are pooled. Furthermore, the average effect cannot simply be explained by attentional shifts but behaves as a primarily feedforward response property. Together, our observations are most consistent with mechanistic models in which IT neuronal outputs are normalized by summed synaptic drive into IT or spiking activity within IT and suggest that normalization mechanisms previously revealed at earlier visual areas are operating throughout the ventral visual stream.

  15. Successful quadruplet pregnancy following ovulation induced with human menopausal gonadotropin and human chorionic gonadotropin.

    PubMed

    Lauersen, N H; Buchman, M; Beling, C G

    1974-01-01

    A case report of a quadruplet pregnancy that followed the induction of ovulation by human chorionic gonadotropin and human menopausal gonadotropin is presented. Examination revealed 4 separate placentas, indicating development from 4 different ova. The infants all did well at term, with no signs of respiratory distress syndrome, and have developed normally. Early diagnosis by ultrasonography and complete early bedrest are important for fetal survival. Hospitalization at Week 27-28 of pregnancy is essential, and a complete, competent staff able to handle high-risk patients should be available. Intravenous ethanol infusion is useful during early labor. The patient must be carefully observed for postpartum hemorrhage and should be followed in the recovery room for 24 hours.

  16. Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone inhibits gonadal development and maintenance by decreasing gonadotropin synthesis and release in male quail.

    PubMed

    Ubuka, Takayoshi; Ukena, Kazuyoshi; Sharp, Peter J; Bentley, George E; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2006-03-01

    Until recently, any neuropeptide that directly inhibits gonadotropin secretion had not been identified. We recently identified a novel hypothalamic dodecapeptide that directly inhibits gonadotropin release in quail and termed it gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH). The action of GnIH on the inhibition of gonadotropin release is mediated by a novel G protein-coupled receptor in the quail pituitary. This new gonadotropin inhibitory system is considered to be a widespread property of birds and provides us with an unprecedented opportunity to study the regulation of avian reproduction from an entirely novel standpoint. To understand the physiological role(s) of GnIH in avian reproduction, we investigated GnIH actions on gonadal development and maintenance in male quail. Continuous administration of GnIH to mature birds via osmotic pumps for 2 wk decreased the expressions of gonadotropin common alpha and LHbeta subunit mRNAs in a dose-dependent manner. Plasma LH and testosterone concentrations were also decreased dose dependently. Furthermore, administration of GnIH to mature birds induced testicular apoptosis and decreased spermatogenic activity in the testis. In immature birds, daily administration of GnIH for 2 wk suppressed normal testicular growth and rise in plasma testosterone concentrations. An inhibition of juvenile molt also occurred after GnIH administration. These results indicate that GnIH inhibits gonadal development and maintenance through the decrease in gonadotropin synthesis and release. GnIH may explain the phenomenon of photoperiod-induced gonadal regression before an observable decline in hypothalamic GnRH in quail. To our knowledge, GnIH is the first identified hypothalamic neuropeptide inhibiting reproductive function in any vertebrate class.

  17. Genetically modified mouse models addressing gonadotropin function.

    PubMed

    Ratner, Laura D; Rulli, Susana B; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T

    2014-03-01

    The development of genetically modified animals has been useful to understand the mechanisms involved in the regulation of the gonadotropin function. It is well known that alterations in the secretion of a single hormone is capable of producing profound reproductive abnormalities. Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a glycoprotein hormone normally secreted by the human placenta, and structurally and functionally it is related to pituitary LH. LH and hCG bind to the same LH/hCG receptor, and hCG is often used as an analog of LH to boost gonadotropin action. There are many physiological and pathological conditions where LH/hCG levels and actions are elevated. In order to understand how elevated LH/hCG levels may impact on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis we have developed a transgenic mouse model with chronic hCG hypersecretion. Female mice develop many gonadal and extragonadal phenotypes including obesity, infertility, hyperprolactinemia, and pituitary and mammary gland tumors. This article summarizes recent findings on the mechanisms involved in pituitary gland tumorigenesis and hyperprolactinemia in the female mice hypersecreting hCG, in particular the relationship of progesterone with the hyperprolactinemic condition of the model. In addition, we describe the role of hyperprolactinemia as the main cause of infertility and the phenotypic abnormalities in these mice, and the use of dopamine agonists bromocriptine and cabergoline to normalize these conditions. Copyright © 2014 Society for Biology of Reproduction & the Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research of Polish Academy of Sciences in Olsztyn. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  18. Spin response of a normal Fermi liquid with noncentral interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Pethick, C. J.; Schwenk, A.

    2009-11-15

    We consider the spin response of a normal Fermi liquid with noncentral interactions under conditions intermediate between the collisionless and hydrodynamic regimes. This problem is of importance for calculations of neutrino properties in dense matter. By expressing the deviation of the quasiparticle distribution function from equilibrium in terms of eigenfunctions of the transport equation under the combined influence of collisions and an external field, we derive a closed expression for the spin-density-spin-density response function and compare its predictions with that of a relaxation-time approximation. Our results indicate that the relaxation-time approximation is reliable for neutrino properties under astrophysically relevant conditions.

  19. Relationships between nonlinear normal modes and response to random inputs

    SciTech Connect

    Schoneman, Joseph D.; Allen, Matthew S.; Kuether, Robert J.

    2016-07-25

    The ability to model nonlinear structures subject to random excitation is of key importance in designing hypersonic aircraft and other advanced aerospace vehicles. When a structure is linear, superposition can be used to construct its response to a known spectrum in terms of its linear modes. Superposition does not hold for a nonlinear system, but several works have shown that a system's dynamics can still be understood qualitatively in terms of its nonlinear normal modes (NNMs). Here, this work investigates the connection between a structure's undamped nonlinear normal modes and the spectrum of its response to high amplitude random forcing. Two examples are investigated: a spring-mass system and a clamped-clamped beam modeled within a geometrically nonlinear finite element package. In both cases, an intimate connection is observed between the smeared peaks in the response spectrum and the frequency-energy dependence of the nonlinear normal modes. In order to understand the role of coupling between the underlying linear modes, reduced order models with and without modal coupling terms are used to separate the effect of each NNM's backbone from the nonlinear couplings that give rise to internal resonances. In the cases shown here, uncoupled, single-degree-of-freedom nonlinear models are found to predict major features in the response with reasonable accuracy; a highly inexpensive approximation such as this could be useful in design and optimization studies. More importantly, the results show that a reduced order model can be expected to give accurate results only if it is also capable of accurately predicting the frequency-energy dependence of the nonlinear modes that are excited.

  20. Relationships between nonlinear normal modes and response to random inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoneman, Joseph D.; Allen, Matthew S.; Kuether, Robert J.

    2017-02-01

    The ability to model nonlinear structures subject to random excitation is of key importance in designing hypersonic aircraft and other advanced aerospace vehicles. When a structure is linear, superposition can be used to construct its response to a known spectrum in terms of its linear modes. Superposition does not hold for a nonlinear system, but several works have shown that a system's dynamics can still be understood qualitatively in terms of its nonlinear normal modes (NNMs). This work investigates the connection between a structure's undamped nonlinear normal modes and the spectrum of its response to high amplitude random forcing. Two examples are investigated: a spring-mass system and a clamped-clamped beam modeled within a geometrically nonlinear finite element package. In both cases, an intimate connection is observed between the smeared peaks in the response spectrum and the frequency-energy dependence of the nonlinear normal modes. In order to understand the role of coupling between the underlying linear modes, reduced order models with and without modal coupling terms are used to separate the effect of each NNM's backbone from the nonlinear couplings that give rise to internal resonances. In the cases shown here, uncoupled, single-degree-of-freedom nonlinear models are found to predict major features in the response with reasonable accuracy; a highly inexpensive approximation such as this could be useful in design and optimization studies. More importantly, the results show that a reduced order model can be expected to give accurate results only if it is also capable of accurately predicting the frequency-energy dependence of the nonlinear modes that are excited.

  1. Relationships between nonlinear normal modes and response to random inputs

    SciTech Connect

    Schoneman, Joseph D.; Allen, Matthew S.; Kuether, Robert J.

    2016-07-25

    The ability to model nonlinear structures subject to random excitation is of key importance in designing hypersonic aircraft and other advanced aerospace vehicles. When a structure is linear, superposition can be used to construct its response to a known spectrum in terms of its linear modes. Superposition does not hold for a nonlinear system, but several works have shown that a system's dynamics can still be understood qualitatively in terms of its nonlinear normal modes (NNMs). Here, this work investigates the connection between a structure's undamped nonlinear normal modes and the spectrum of its response to high amplitude random forcing. Two examples are investigated: a spring-mass system and a clamped-clamped beam modeled within a geometrically nonlinear finite element package. In both cases, an intimate connection is observed between the smeared peaks in the response spectrum and the frequency-energy dependence of the nonlinear normal modes. In order to understand the role of coupling between the underlying linear modes, reduced order models with and without modal coupling terms are used to separate the effect of each NNM's backbone from the nonlinear couplings that give rise to internal resonances. In the cases shown here, uncoupled, single-degree-of-freedom nonlinear models are found to predict major features in the response with reasonable accuracy; a highly inexpensive approximation such as this could be useful in design and optimization studies. More importantly, the results show that a reduced order model can be expected to give accurate results only if it is also capable of accurately predicting the frequency-energy dependence of the nonlinear modes that are excited.

  2. Relationships between nonlinear normal modes and response to random inputs

    DOE PAGES

    Schoneman, Joseph D.; Allen, Matthew S.; Kuether, Robert J.

    2016-07-25

    The ability to model nonlinear structures subject to random excitation is of key importance in designing hypersonic aircraft and other advanced aerospace vehicles. When a structure is linear, superposition can be used to construct its response to a known spectrum in terms of its linear modes. Superposition does not hold for a nonlinear system, but several works have shown that a system's dynamics can still be understood qualitatively in terms of its nonlinear normal modes (NNMs). Here, this work investigates the connection between a structure's undamped nonlinear normal modes and the spectrum of its response to high amplitude random forcing.more » Two examples are investigated: a spring-mass system and a clamped-clamped beam modeled within a geometrically nonlinear finite element package. In both cases, an intimate connection is observed between the smeared peaks in the response spectrum and the frequency-energy dependence of the nonlinear normal modes. In order to understand the role of coupling between the underlying linear modes, reduced order models with and without modal coupling terms are used to separate the effect of each NNM's backbone from the nonlinear couplings that give rise to internal resonances. In the cases shown here, uncoupled, single-degree-of-freedom nonlinear models are found to predict major features in the response with reasonable accuracy; a highly inexpensive approximation such as this could be useful in design and optimization studies. More importantly, the results show that a reduced order model can be expected to give accurate results only if it is also capable of accurately predicting the frequency-energy dependence of the nonlinear modes that are excited.« less

  3. Decrease of Delta Oscillatory Responses in Cognitively Normal Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Emek-Savaş, Derya Durusu; Özmüş, Gülin; Güntekin, Bahar; Dönmez Çolakoğlu, Berril; Çakmur, Raif; Başar, Erol; Yener, Görsev G

    2017-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common progressive neurodegenerative disorder. This study aims to compare sensory-evoked oscillations (SEOs) and event-related oscillations (EROs) of visual modality in cognitively normal PD patients and healthy controls. Sixteen PD and 16 age-, gender-, and education-matched healthy controls participated in the study. A simple flashlight was used for SEO and a classical visual oddball paradigm was used for target ERO. Oscillatory responses in the delta frequency range (0.5-3.5 Hz) were examined. Significantly lower delta ERO and SEO responses were found in PD patients than healthy controls. Delta ERO responses were decreased at all frontal, central and parietal locations, whereas delta SEO responses were decreased over mid and right central locations in PD. According to the notion that SEO reflects the activity of sensory networks and ERO reflects cognitive networks, these findings indicate that PD patients have impairments in both cognitive and sensory networks of visual modality. Decreased delta ERO responses indicate that the subliminal cognitive changes in PD can be detected by electrophysiological methods. These results demonstrate that brain oscillatory responses have the potential to be studied as a biomarker for visual cognitive and sensory networks in PD.

  4. Biologically Active Chorionic Gonadotropin: Synthesis by the Human Fetus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGregor, W. G.; Kuhn, R. W.; Jaffe, R. B.

    1983-04-01

    The kidney, and to a slight extent the liver, of human fetuses were found to synthesize and secrete the α subunit common to glycoprotein hormones. Fetal lung and muscle did not synthesize this protein. Since fetal kidney and liver were previously found to synthesize β chorionic gonadotropin, their ability to synthesize bioactive chorionic gonadotropin was also determined. The newly synthesized hormone bound to mouse Leydig cells and elicited a biological response: namely, the synthesis of testosterone. These results suggest that the human fetus may participate in metabolic homeostasis during its development.

  5. The recordability of two sonomotor responses in young normal subjects.

    PubMed

    McCaslin, Devin L; Jacobson, Gary P; Harry, Todd

    2008-01-01

    It has been reported that up to 40% of patients over age 60 fail to generate a vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP; Su et al, 2004). When this occurs it is difficult to determine whether the absent VEMP represents evidence of bilateral impairment of the vestibulocollic reflex pathway or a normal age-related variant (i.e., idiopathic absence). The purpose of the present investigation was to determine whether both VEMPs and PAMs could be recorded reliably in a sample of neurologically and otologically intact young adults. If both could be obtained with high reliability in normal subjects, then the bilateral presence of PAM in the bilateral absence of VEMP, at least in younger patients, could be used to support the contention that the absent VEMP represented evidence of bilateral impairment. A descriptive study. Attempts were made to record both the VEMP and a second sonomotor response, the postauricular muscle potential (PAM) from 20 young adults. Results showed both the VEMP and the PAM were present in 90% of the ears. Both the VEMP and PAM responses were bilaterally absent for one subject. Also, the VEMP and PAM were unilaterally absent for two subjects. Subjects who generated VEMPs also generated a PAM in at least one ear. The present investigation represents an initial step in the determination of whether the presence of PAMs in the absence of VEMPs can be used as a method of validating the presence of an impairment affecting the vestibulocollic reflex pathway.

  6. Cephalic phase responses, craving and food intake in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Nederkoorn, C; Smulders, F T; Jansen, A

    2000-08-01

    Cephalic phase responses (CPRs) are elicited during exposure to food cues. They gear up the body to optimize digestion or they compensate for unwanted changes during a meal. The cue reactivity model of binge eating predicts that CPRs are experienced as craving for food, thereby increasing food intake and playing a role in abnormal eating behaviour. The present experiment was designed to measure CPRs in normal women and to examine its relationship with craving, food intake and restraint. Results show that normal subjects do react to food exposure with changes in heart rate, heart rate variability (HRV), salivation, blood pressure, skin conductance and gastric activity. These CPRs presumably gear up the body and presumably do not reflect compensatory responses. Significant correlations between restraint and blood pressure, between blood pressure and craving, and between craving and food intake were also found. These results are in line with the cue reactivity model and suggest that research into physiological CPRs and craving in the field of eating disorders is valuable. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  7. Extragonadal actions of chorionic gonadotropin

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Prajna

    2011-01-01

    The primary embryonic signal in primates is chorionic gonadotropin (CG, designated hCG in humans), that is classically associated with corpus luteum rescue and progesterone production. However, research over the past decade has revealed the presence of the hCG receptor in a variety of extragonadal tissues. Additionally, discoveries of the multiple variants of hCG, namely, native hCG, hyperglycosylated hCG (hyp-hCG) and the β-subunit of the hyperglycosylated hCG (hCG-free β) has established a role for extragonadal actions of hCG. For the initiation and maintenance of pregnancy, hCG mediates multiple placental, uterine and fetal functions. Some of these include development of syncytiotrophoblast cells, mitotic growth and differentiation of the endometrium, localized suppression of the maternal immune system, modulation of uterine morphology and gene expression and coordination of intricate signal transduction between the endometrium. Recurrent pregnancy loss, preeclampsia and endometriosis are associated with altered responses of hCG, all of which have a detrimental effect on pregnancy. A role for hyp-hCG in mediating the development of both trophoblastic and non-trophoblastic tumors has also been suggested. Other significant non-gonadal applications of hCG include predicting preeclampsia, determining the risk of Down’s syndrome and gestational trophoblastic disease, along with relaxing myometrial contractility and preventing recurrent miscarriages. Presence of hCG free-β in serum of cancer patients enables its usage as a diagnostic tumor marker. Thus, the extragonadal functions of hCG encompasses a wide spectrum of applications and is an open area for continued investigation. PMID:21845366

  8. Universal temperature-dependent normalized optoacoustic response of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, Elena V.; Liopo, Anton; Oraevsky, Alexander A.; Ermilov, Sergey A.

    2015-03-01

    We found and interpreted the universal temperature-dependent optoacoustic (photoacoustic) response (ThOR) in blood; the normalized ThOR is invariant with respect to hematocrit at the hemoglobin's isosbestic point. The unique compartmentalization of hemoglobin, the primary optical absorber at 805 nm, inside red blood cells (RBCs) explains the effect. We studied the temperature dependence of Gruneisen parameter in blood and aqueous solutions of hemoglobin and for the first time experimentally observed transition through the zero optoacoustic response at temperature T0, which was proved to be consistent for various blood samples. On the other hand, the hemoglobin solutions demonstrated linear concentration function of the temperature T0. When this function was extrapolated to the average hemoglobin concentration inside erythrocytes, the temperature T0 was found equivalent to that measured in whole and diluted blood. The obtained universal curve of blood ThOR was validated in both transparent and light scattering media. The discovered universal optoacoustic temperature dependent blood response provides foundation for future development of non-invasive in vivo temperature monitoring in vascularized tissues and blood vessels.

  9. The normal response to prolonged passive head up tilt testing

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, M; Williams, T; Gordon, C; Chamberlain-Webbe..., R; Sutton, R

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To define the responses to head up tilt in a large group of normal adult subjects using the most widely employed protocol for tilt testing.
METHODS—127 normal subjects aged 19-88 years (mean (SD), 49 (20) years) without a previous history of syncope underwent tilt testing at 60° for 45 minutes or until syncope intervened. Blood pressure monitoring was performed with digital photoplethysmography, providing continuous, non-invasive, beat to beat heart rate and pressure measurements.
RESULTS—13% of subjects developed vasovagal syncope after a mean (SD) tilt time of 31.7 (12.4) minutes (range 8.5-44.9 minutes). Severe cardioinhibition during syncope was observed less often than is reported in patients investigated for syncope. There were no differences in the age or sex distributions of subjects with positive or negative outcomes, or in the proportions with cardioinhibitory and vasodepressor vasovagal syncope compared with previously reported patient populations. Subjects with negative outcomes showed age related differences in heart rate and blood pressure behaviour throughout tilt.
CONCLUSIONS—False positive results with tilting appear to be common. This has important implications for the use of diagnostic tilt testing. The magnitude of the heart rate and blood pressure changes observed during negative tilts largely invalidates previously suggested criteria for abnormal non-syncopal outcomes.


Keywords: syncope; head up tilt; postural hypotension PMID:11040011

  10. Photoacoustic monitoring of tumor and normal tissue response to radiation

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Laurie J.; Seshadri, Mukund

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is a recognized characteristic of tumors that influences efficacy of radiotherapy (RT). Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is a relatively new imaging technique that exploits the optical characteristics of hemoglobin to provide information on tissue oxygenation. In the present study, PAI based measures of tumor oxygen saturation (%sO2) were compared to oxygen-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements of longitudinal relaxation rate (R1 = 1/T1) and ex-vivo histology in patient derived xenograft (PDX) models of head and neck cancer. PAI was utilized to assess early changes (24 h) in %sO2 following RT and chemoRT (CRT) and to assess changes in salivary gland hemodynamics following radiation. A significant increase in tumor %sO2 and R1 was observed following oxygen inhalation. Good spatial correlation was observed between PAI, MRI and histology. An early increase in %sO2 after RT and CRT detected by PAI was associated with significant tumor growth inhibition. Twenty four hours after RT, PAI also detected loss of hemodynamic response to gustatory stimulation in murine salivary gland tissue suggestive of radiation-induced vascular damage. Our observations illustrate the utility of PAI in detecting tumor and normal tissue hemodynamic response to radiation in head and neck cancers. PMID:26883660

  11. Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome prevention strategies: oral contraceptive pills-dual gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist suppression with step-down gonadotropin protocols.

    PubMed

    Damario, Mark A

    2010-11-01

    The identification of patients at high risk for excessive responses to ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer is essential in the tailoring of safe and effective treatment strategies. Known factors associated with increased sensitivity to gonadotropins include polycystic ovary syndrome, young age, prior ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS), high baseline antral follicle count, and high baseline ovarian volume. Although several treatment strategies have been proposed for these patients, this report describes the experience using the dual suppression with gonadotropin step-down protocol. This protocol uses oral contraceptive pretreatment in combination with a long gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist followed by a programmed step-down in gonadotropin dosing. Hormonal characteristics of dual suppression include an improved luteinizing hormone-to-follicle-stimulating hormone ratio and lower serum androgens, particularly dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate. Clinical characteristics of the protocol include a lower cancellation rate and favorable clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates per initiated cycle while mitigating the risk of OHSS.

  12. Plasma prolactin changes during the administration of human menopausal gonadotropins in nonovulatory women.

    PubMed

    Kemmann, E; GEMZELL, C A; Beinert, W C; Beling, C B; Jones, J R

    1977-09-15

    Plasma prolactin concentrations were determined in 16 nonovulatory women during treatment with human meonpausal gonadotropins (hMG). In eight patients with initially normal prolactin levels of less than 20 ng. per milliliter, a significant rise was noted at the end of hMG administration, this is thought to be a response to increased endogenous estrogen concentrations. A similar rise in plasma prolactin levels was seen in some but not all of the eight patients with initially elevated "basal" prolactin concentrations. Three of these hyperprolactinemic patients had radiographic evidence of a pituitary lesion--either a pituitary adenoma or a "microadenoma"--but the variance in prolactin response could not be explained on this basis. The two groups of normo- and hyper-prolactinemic patients showed no significant difference in the required dosage and duration or hMG treatment, plasma estradiol-17 beta response, and ovulatory and pregnancy outcome.

  13. Syneretic response of aging normal human lens to pressure.

    PubMed

    Bettelheim, Frederick A; Lizak, Martin J; Zigler, J Samuel

    2003-01-01

    The study was designed to observe whether a reversible syneretic response to pressure is operative in normal human lenses and whether such a response demonstrates a uniform age dependence. Seven sections (from the anterior outer cortex to the posterior outer cortex) of 10 human lenses were imaged at 2 atmospheres (atm) pressure and the T(1) (spin-lattice) and T(2) (spin-spin) relaxation data on each section were collected. The pressure was then released and NMR relaxographic data were collected under 1 atm. Both T(1) and T(2) relaxation times were at their minimum in the nuclear region and at their maximum at the two outer cortexes. With increasing pressure, T(2) relaxation times decreased. The pressure-dependent change in T(2) relaxation times decreased with age. Changes in T(1) relaxation times showed no consistent pressure or age dependence. The population index of T(2) relaxation, M(2), had a maximum in the nucleus and a minimum in the two cortexes. The population index of T(1) relaxation, M(1,) was minimal in the nucleus and maximal at the two cortexes. M(2) increased with increasing pressure, whereas M(1) did not show consistent pressure dependence. The percentage of change in M(2) (DeltaM(2)) showed a statistically significant increase with increasing age, whereas the %DeltaM(1) showed no significant age-dependent trend. The positional dependence of relaxation times and the population indexes indicated that spin-spin relaxation represents the behavior of the bound water and the spin-lattice relaxation that of total water. As pressure increases, the strength of hydrogen bonding as well as the amount of bound water increases. The pressure-induced change in the total water is minimal. Thus, the free water-to-bound water ratio decreases with increasing pressure, demonstrating a significant syneretic response. The extent of reversible syneretic response decreases with age and is actually reversed in older lenses. The implication is that the ability of the human

  14. Regulation of tonic gonadotropin release in prepubertal female hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.G.; Matt, K.S.; Prestowitz, W.F.; Stetson, M.H.

    1982-04-01

    Basal serum gonadotropin levels were monitored weekly in female hamsters from birth to 10 weeks of age. Hamsters raised on three different photoperiods presented uniform pre- and postpubertal patterns of serum LH and FSH, suggesting that gonadotropin release in the young hamster occurs independently of ambient photoperiod. In all groups, serum LH levels increased gradually in animals up to 4 weeks of age, after which levels plateaued at 50--100 ng/ml. Serum FSH was markedly elevated in 2- and 3-week-old hamsters (800--1200 ng/ml), but remained at 200--400 ng/ml in all other groups. We next examined the change in the responsiveness of the pituitary to exogenous gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) challenge. Female hamsters 2 days of age failed to respond to any dose (0.025--1000 ng) of GnRH, while 10-day old females responded in typical dose-dependent fashion. GnRH-stimulated LH release first occurred in 6-day-old hamsters and was maximal by day 9, whereas FSH release first occurred on day 8 and was maximal by day 9. The prepubertal pattern of gonadotropin release can, in part, be explained on the basis of the development of pituitary GnRH sensitivity, which occurs independently of photoperiod.

  15. The steroid response to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) stimulation in men with Klinefelter syndrome does not change using immunoassay or mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Roli, L; Santi, D; Belli, S; Tagliavini, S; Cavalieri, S; De Santis, M C; Baraldi, E; Fanelli, F; Mezzullo, M; Granata, A R; Pagotto, U; Pasquali, R; Rochira, V; Carani, C; Simoni, M; Trenti, T

    2017-08-01

    Liquid-chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was developed in parallel to Immunoassays (IAs) and today is proposed as the "gold standard" for steroid assays. Leydig cells of men with Klinefelter syndrome (KS) are able to respond to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) stimulation, even if testosterone (T) production was impaired. The aim was to evaluate how results obtained by IAs and LC-MS/MS can differently impact on the outcome of a clinical research on gonadal steroidogenesis after hCG stimulation. A longitudinal, prospective, case-control clinical trial. (clinicaltrial.gov NCT02788136) was carried out, enrolling KS men and healthy age-matched controls, stimulated by hCG administration. Serum steroids were evaluated at baseline and for 5 days after intramuscular injection of 5000 IU hCG using both IAs and LC-MS/MS. 13 KS patients (36 ± 9 years) not receiving T replacement therapy and 14 controls (32 ± 8 years) were enrolled. T, progesterone, cortisol, 17-hydroxy-progesterone (17OHP) and androstenedione, were significantly higher using IAs than LC-MS/MS. IAs and LC-MS/MS showed direct correlation for all five steroids, although the constant overestimation detected by IAs. Either methodology found the same 17OHP and T increasing profile after hCG stimulation, with equal areas under the curves (AUCs). Although a linearity between IA and LC-MS/MS is demonstrated, LC-MS/MS is more sensitive and accurate, whereas IA shows a constant overestimation of sex steroid levels. This result suggests the need of reference intervals built on the specific assay. This fundamental difference between these two methodologies opens a deep reconsideration of what is needed to improve the accuracy of steroid hormone assays.

  16. A high response to controlled ovarian stimulation induces premature luteinization with a negative impact on pregnancy outcomes in a gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist cycle

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Hwa Seon; Cha, Sun Hwa; Kim, Hye Ok; Song, In Ok; Min, Eung Gi; Yang, Kwang Moon

    2015-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to investigate the relationship between serum progesterone (P4) levels on the day of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) administration and the pregnancy rate among women undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization (IVF) or intracytoplasmic sperm injection-embryo transfer (ICSI-ET) using a flexible antagonist protocol. Methods This prospective study included 200 IVF and ICSI-ET cycles in which a flexible antagonist protocol was used. The patients were divided into five distinct groups according to their serum P4 levels at the time of hCG administration (0.80, 0.85, 0.90, 0.95, and 1.00 ng/mL). The clinical pregnancy rate (CPR) was calculated for each P4 interval. Statistically significant differences were observed at a serum P4 level of 0.9 ng/mL. These data suggest that a serum P4 concentration of 0.9 ng/mL may represent the optimal threshold level for defining premature luteinization (PL) based on the presence of a significant negative impact on the CPR. Results The CPR for each round of ET was significantly lower in the PL group defined using this threshold (25.8% vs. 41.8%; p=0.019), and the number of oocytes retrieved was significantly higher than in the non-PL group (17.3±7.2 vs. 11.0±7.2; p=0.001). Elevated serum P4 levels on the day of hCG administration were associated with a reduced CPR, despite the retrieval of many oocytes. Conclusion Measuring serum P4 values at the time of hCG administration is necessary in order to determine the optimal strategy for embryo transfer. PMID:26816874

  17. A high response to controlled ovarian stimulation induces premature luteinization with a negative impact on pregnancy outcomes in a gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist cycle.

    PubMed

    Koo, Hwa Seon; Cha, Sun Hwa; Kim, Hye Ok; Song, In Ok; Min, Eung Gi; Yang, Kwang Moon; Park, Chan Woo

    2015-12-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the relationship between serum progesterone (P4) levels on the day of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) administration and the pregnancy rate among women undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization (IVF) or intracytoplasmic sperm injection-embryo transfer (ICSI-ET) using a flexible antagonist protocol. This prospective study included 200 IVF and ICSI-ET cycles in which a flexible antagonist protocol was used. The patients were divided into five distinct groups according to their serum P4 levels at the time of hCG administration (0.80, 0.85, 0.90, 0.95, and 1.00 ng/mL). The clinical pregnancy rate (CPR) was calculated for each P4 interval. Statistically significant differences were observed at a serum P4 level of 0.9 ng/mL. These data suggest that a serum P4 concentration of 0.9 ng/mL may represent the optimal threshold level for defining premature luteinization (PL) based on the presence of a significant negative impact on the CPR. The CPR for each round of ET was significantly lower in the PL group defined using this threshold (25.8% vs. 41.8%; p=0.019), and the number of oocytes retrieved was significantly higher than in the non-PL group (17.3±7.2 vs. 11.0±7.2; p=0.001). Elevated serum P4 levels on the day of hCG administration were associated with a reduced CPR, despite the retrieval of many oocytes. Measuring serum P4 values at the time of hCG administration is necessary in order to determine the optimal strategy for embryo transfer.

  18. Clinical iron deficiency disturbs normal human responses to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Frise, Matthew C; Cheng, Hung-Yuan; Nickol, Annabel H; Curtis, M Kate; Pollard, Karen A; Roberts, David J; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Dorrington, Keith L; Robbins, Peter A

    2016-06-01

    Iron bioavailability has been identified as a factor that influences cellular hypoxia sensing, putatively via an action on the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway. We therefore hypothesized that clinical iron deficiency would disturb integrated human responses to hypoxia. We performed a prospective, controlled, observational study of the effects of iron status on hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. Individuals with absolute iron deficiency (ID) and an iron-replete (IR) control group were exposed to two 6-hour periods of isocapnic hypoxia. The second hypoxic exposure was preceded by i.v. infusion of iron. Pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) was serially assessed with Doppler echocardiography. Thirteen ID individuals completed the study and were age- and sex-matched with controls. PASP did not differ by group or study day before each hypoxic exposure. During the first 6-hour hypoxic exposure, the rise in PASP was 6.2 mmHg greater in the ID group (absolute rises 16.1 and 10.7 mmHg, respectively; 95% CI for difference, 2.7-9.7 mmHg, P = 0.001). Intravenous iron attenuated the PASP rise in both groups; however, the effect was greater in ID participants than in controls (absolute reductions 11.1 and 6.8 mmHg, respectively; 95% CI for difference in change, -8.3 to -0.3 mmHg, P = 0.035). Serum erythropoietin responses to hypoxia also differed between groups. Clinical iron deficiency disturbs normal responses to hypoxia, as evidenced by exaggerated hypoxic pulmonary hypertension that is reversed by subsequent iron administration. Disturbed hypoxia sensing and signaling provides a mechanism through which iron deficiency may be detrimental to human health. ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01847352). M.C. Frise is the recipient of a British Heart Foundation Clinical Research Training Fellowship (FS/14/48/30828). K.L. Dorrington is supported by the Dunhill Medical Trust (R178/1110). D.J. Roberts was supported by R&D funding from National Health Service (NHS) Blood and Transplant and

  19. Clinical iron deficiency disturbs normal human responses to hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Frise, Matthew C.; Cheng, Hung-Yuan; Nickol, Annabel H.; Curtis, M. Kate; Pollard, Karen A.; Roberts, David J.; Ratcliffe, Peter J.; Dorrington, Keith L.; Robbins, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Iron bioavailability has been identified as a factor that influences cellular hypoxia sensing, putatively via an action on the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway. We therefore hypothesized that clinical iron deficiency would disturb integrated human responses to hypoxia. METHODS. We performed a prospective, controlled, observational study of the effects of iron status on hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. Individuals with absolute iron deficiency (ID) and an iron-replete (IR) control group were exposed to two 6-hour periods of isocapnic hypoxia. The second hypoxic exposure was preceded by i.v. infusion of iron. Pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) was serially assessed with Doppler echocardiography. RESULTS. Thirteen ID individuals completed the study and were age- and sex-matched with controls. PASP did not differ by group or study day before each hypoxic exposure. During the first 6-hour hypoxic exposure, the rise in PASP was 6.2 mmHg greater in the ID group (absolute rises 16.1 and 10.7 mmHg, respectively; 95% CI for difference, 2.7–9.7 mmHg, P = 0.001). Intravenous iron attenuated the PASP rise in both groups; however, the effect was greater in ID participants than in controls (absolute reductions 11.1 and 6.8 mmHg, respectively; 95% CI for difference in change, –8.3 to –0.3 mmHg, P = 0.035). Serum erythropoietin responses to hypoxia also differed between groups. CONCLUSION. Clinical iron deficiency disturbs normal responses to hypoxia, as evidenced by exaggerated hypoxic pulmonary hypertension that is reversed by subsequent iron administration. Disturbed hypoxia sensing and signaling provides a mechanism through which iron deficiency may be detrimental to human health. TRIAL REGISTRATION. ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01847352). FUNDING. M.C. Frise is the recipient of a British Heart Foundation Clinical Research Training Fellowship (FS/14/48/30828). K.L. Dorrington is supported by the Dunhill Medical Trust (R178/1110). D.J. Roberts was

  20. GATA4 and GATA6 Knockdown During Luteinization Inhibits Progesterone Production and Gonadotropin Responsiveness in the Corpus Luteum of Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Convissar, Scott M; Bennett, Jill; Baumgarten, Sarah C; Lydon, John P; DeMayo, Francesco J; Stocco, Carlos

    2015-12-01

    The surge of luteinizing hormone triggers the genomic reprogramming, cell differentiation, and tissue remodeling of the ovulated follicle, leading to the formation of the corpus luteum. During this process, called luteinization, follicular granulosa cells begin expressing a new set of genes that allow the resulting luteal cells to survive in a vastly different hormonal environment and to produce the extremely high amounts of progesterone (P4) needed to sustain pregnancy. To better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of luteal P4 production in vivo, the transcription factors GATA4 and GATA6 were knocked down in the corpus luteum by crossing mice carrying Gata4 and Gata6 floxed genes with mice carrying Cre recombinase fused to the progesterone receptor. This receptor is expressed exclusively in granulosa cells after the luteinizing hormone surge, leading to recombination of floxed genes during follicle luteinization. The findings demonstrated that GATA4 and GATA6 are essential for female fertility, whereas targeting either factor alone causes subfertility. When compared to control mice, serum P4 levels and luteal expression of key steroidogenic genes were significantly lower in conditional knockdown mice. The results also showed that GATA4 and GATA6 are required for the expression of the receptors for prolactin and luteinizing hormone, the main luteotropic hormones in mice. The findings demonstrate that GATA4 and GATA6 are crucial regulators of luteal steroidogenesis and are required for the normal response of luteal cells to luteotropins.

  1. Magnetic response measurements of mesoscopic superconducting and normal metal rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluhm, Hendrik

    The main part of this thesis reports three experiments on the magnetic response of mesoscopic superconducting and normal metal rings using a scanning SQUID microscope. The first experiment explores the magnetic response and fluxoid transitions of superconducting, mesoscopic bilayer aluminum rings in the presence of two coupled order parameters arising from the layered structure. For intermediate couplings, metastable states that have different phase winding numbers around the ring in each of the two order parameters were observed. Larger coupling locks the relative phase, so that the two order parameters are only manifest in the temperature dependence of the response. With increasing proximitization, this signature gradually disappears. The data can be described with a two-order-parameter Ginzburg-Landau theory. The second experiment concentrates on fluxoid transitions in similar, but single-layer rings. Near the critical temperature, the transitions, which are induced by applying a flux to the ring, only admit a single fluxoid at a time. At lower temperatures, several fluxoids enter or leave at once, and the final state approaches the ground state. Currently available theoretical frameworks cannot quantitatively explain the data. Heating and quasiparticle diffusion are likely important for a quantitative understanding of this experiment, which could provide a model system for studying the nonlinear dynamics of superconductors far from equilibrium. The third and most important scanning SQUID study concerns 33 individual mesoscopic gold rings. All measured rings show a paramagnetic linear susceptibility and a poorly understood anomaly around zero field, both of which are likely due to unpaired defect spins. The response of sufficiently small rings also has a component that is periodic in the flux through the ring, with a period close to h/e. Its amplitude varies in sign and magnitude from ring to ring, and its typical value and temperature dependence agree with

  2. Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG) Regression Curve for Predicting Response to EMA/CO (Etoposide, Methotrexate, Actinomycin D, Cyclophosphamide and Vincristine) Regimen in Gestational Trophoblastic Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Rattanaburi, Athithan; Boonyapipat, Sathana; Supasinth, Yuthasak

    2015-01-01

    An hCG regression curve has been used to predict the natural history and response to chemotherapy in gestational trophoblastic disease. We constructed hCG regression curves in high-risk gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) treated with EMA/CO and identified an optimal hCG level to detect EMA/CO resistance in GTN. Eighty-one women with GTN treated with EMA/CO were classified as primary high-risk GTN (n=65) and single agent-resistance GTN (n=16). The hCG levels prior to each course of chemotherapy were plotted in the 10th, 50th, and 90th percentiles to construct the hCG regression curves. Diagnostic performance was evaluated for an optimal cut-off value. The median hCG levels were 264,482 mIU/mL mIU/mL and 495.5 mIU/mL mIU/mL for primary high-risk GTN and single agent-resistance GTN, respectively. The 50th percentile of the hCG level in primary high-risk GTN and single agent-resistance turned to normal before the 4th and the 2nd course of chemotherapy, respectively. The 90th percentile of the hCG level in primary high-risk GTN and single agent-resistance turned to normal before the 9th and the 2nd course of chemotherapy, respectively. The hCG level of ≥118.6 mIU/mL mIU/mL at the 5thcourse of EMA/CO predicted the EMA/CO resistance in primary high-risk GTN patients with a sensitivity of 85.7% and a specificity of 100%. EMA/CO resistance in primary high-risk GTN can be predicted by using an hCG regression curve in combination with the cut-off value of 118.6 mIU/mL at the 5thcourse of chemotherapy.

  3. Effect of gonadotropin secretion rate on the radiosensitivity of the rat luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone neuron and gonadotroph

    SciTech Connect

    Winterer, J.; Barnes, K.M.; Lichter, A.S.; Deluca, A.M.; Loriaux, D.L.; Cutler, G.B. Jr.

    1988-03-01

    To test the hypothesis that the functional state of hypothalamic LHRH neurons and pituitary gonadotrophs might alter their radiosensitivity, we determined the experimental conditions under which the gonadotropin response to castration could be impaired by a single dose of cranial irradiation. Single doses of cranial irradiation greater than 2000 rads were lethal to unshielded rats. Shielding of the oropharynx and esophagus allowed the animals to survive doses up to 5000 rads. Doses between 2000 and 5000 rads had no effect on basal gonadotropin levels for as long as 3 months after irradiation. Irradiation caused a dose- and time-dependent impairment, however, in the gonadotropin response to castration. Impairment of the gonadotropin levels of castrate animals occurred in animals that were irradiated either before or after castration. However, rats irradiated in the castrate state showed a decreased susceptibility to irradiation damage. Additionally, stimulation of the pituitary by LHRH agonist (LHRHa) 3 h before irradiation significantly reduced the impairment of gonadotropin secretion 12-20 weeks after irradiation (P less than 0.05). Thus, increased functional activity of the rat hypothalamus or pituitary at the time of irradiation, induced by either castration or acute LHRHa administration, was associated with some protection against the gonadotropin-lowering effect of irradiation. Based upon these data, we hypothesize that stimulation of gonadotropin secretion at the time of therapeutic cranial irradiation in humans might protect against subsequent impairment of gonadotropin secretion.

  4. Monoclonal antibodies to gonadotropin subunits

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, P.H.; Moyle, W.R.; Canfield, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    The production of monoclonal antibodies to peptide hormones, with their unifocal binding sites, can provide tools for understanding hormone structure and function. The paper focuses on techniques that are important for the study of monoclonal antibodies to chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), including hybridoma production, methods of screening for desired clones, properties of the monoclonal antibodies, effect of antibodies on hormone-receptor interaction, inhibition of binding of radiolabeled hCG, inhibition of hCG induced steroidogenesis, determination of relative orientation of epitopes, and synergistic actions of monoclonal antibodies to hCG.

  5. RESPONSES OF BRIGHT, NORMAL, AND RETARDED CHILDREN TO LEARNING TASKS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CARRIER, NEIL A.; AND OTHERS

    THE RELATIONSHIPS AMONG THE VARIABLES OF INTELLIGENCE, LEARNING TASK PERFORMANCE, EMOTIONAL TENSION, AND TASK MOTIVATION WERE STUDIED. ABOUT 120 BRIGHT, NORMAL, AND RETARDED CHILDREN PERFORMED SIX TRIALS OF NUMBER LEARNING, CONCEPT FORMATION, PROBLEM SOLVING, PERCEPTUAL-MOTOR COORDINATION, AND VERBAL LEARNING TASKS. DURING THE LEARNING SESSIONS,…

  6. RESPONSES OF BRIGHT, NORMAL, AND RETARDED CHILDREN TO LEARNING TASKS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CARRIER, NEIL A.; AND OTHERS

    THE RELATIONSHIPS AMONG THE VARIABLES OF INTELLIGENCE, LEARNING TASK PERFORMANCE, EMOTIONAL TENSION, AND TASK MOTIVATION WERE STUDIED. ABOUT 120 BRIGHT, NORMAL, AND RETARDED CHILDREN PERFORMED SIX TRIALS OF NUMBER LEARNING, CONCEPT FORMATION, PROBLEM SOLVING, PERCEPTUAL-MOTOR COORDINATION, AND VERBAL LEARNING TASKS. DURING THE LEARNING SESSIONS,…

  7. Impulse Response of a Density Contrast Wedge Using Normal Coordinates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Dezhang

    The exact impulse solutions of a point source for a penetrable wedge (rhonerho ', upsilon = upsilon ') and a shallow water wedge using normal coordinates are presented. This is the extension of Biot and Tolstoy's exact solution in normal coordinates for a rigid wedge. Our solutions reduce to known solutions for rigid (rho'toinfty ), free (rho'to 0), and homogeneous (rho' = rho) wedges. The direct, reflected, transmitted and diffracted waves are well separated in time domain. The reflected (transmitted) part can be described by the direct waves traveling from the images around the image circle to the receiver, the amplitude depends on the number of times that the actual wave is reflected from the wedge walls. The diffracted part of the solution is not the solution for an ideal wedge (rigid or free) multiplied by an impedance factor. Transmission of acoustic wave in a wedge shaped waveguide (shallow water wedge) can also be solved in a normal mode formulation. An array of sources can excite single mode transmission in the waveguide. Alternatively, a combination of the wedge solution for a set of source positions can also be chosen to excite a single mode. The normal mode technique and wedge solution using normal coordinates give the same signal amplitudes. We compare our wedge solutions with the laboratory experimental measurements given by Tindle et al. The good agreements of the theoretical predictions with their experimental data suggests that the exact solution of an isovelocity wedge can be applied for a more general penetrable wedge by incorporating the total reflections if the velocity contrast is as close enough to 1.0.

  8. Auditory brainstem response and late latency response in individuals with tinnitus having normal hearing

    PubMed Central

    Konadath, Sreeraj; Manjula, Puttabasappa

    2016-01-01

    Summary Tinnitus is a commonly encountered complaint in routine audiology practice. The pathophysiology and exact generation site of tinnitus is not precisely established. Auditory brainstem response (ABR) and late latency response (LLR) findings in individuals with tinnitus show mixed results in the literature. Majority of studies have focused on individuals having tinnitus with peripheral hearing loss. The present study explores ABR and LLR characteristics among tinnitus patients with normal audiometric presentation; with no direct indication of any cochlear lesion. This study aims at characterizing the ABR and LLR findings in individuals with tinnitus having normal audiometric presentation. ABR and LLR waveform characteristics were recorded and compared between participants with tinnitus (Group 1) and those without tinnitus (Group 2). The ABR analysis indicated no significant differences in latency and amplitude between Groups 1 and 2. However, patients with tinnitus showed abnormally reduced absolute amplitudes of peaks I and V. LLR analysis indicated no significant differences in latency and amplitude between Groups 1 and 2 except enhanced amplitude of P1. The reduced amplitude of peaks I and V along with normal absolute latencies of peaks I, III and V indicate that the origin of tinnitus is possibly due to reduced excitation of auditory nerve fibres arising from a peripheral hearing loss beyond 8 kHz. The P1 amplitude enhancement could be attributed to mechanism explaining central gain model; which suggests that central auditory structures recalibrates the mean firing rate, considering the reduced output from sensory structures, generating neural noise perceived as tinnitus. PMID:27904821

  9. Pattern of human chorionic gonadotropin binding in the polycystic ovary

    SciTech Connect

    Brawer, J.; Richard, M.; Farookhi, R. )

    1989-08-01

    The histologic evolution of polycystic ovaries in the estradiol valerate-treated rat coincides with the development of a unique plasma pattern of luteinizing hormone. To assess the role of luteinizing hormone in polycystic ovaries, it is necessary to evaluate the luteinizing hormone sensitivity of the specific tissues in the polycystic ovary. Therefore, we examined the pattern of luteinizing hormone binding sites in polycystic ovaries. Rats at 4 or 8 weeks after estradiol valerate treatment each received an intrajugular injection of iodine 125-labeled human chorionic gonadotropin. Some rats also received a 1000-fold excess of unlabeled human chorionic gonadotropin in the same injection. Ovaries were prepared for autoradiography. Dense accumulations of grains occurred over the theca of normal and atretic secondary follicles in all ovaries and over clusters of secondary interstitial cells. The iodine label was variable over the typically hypertrophied theca of precystic follicles. The theca of definitive cysts showed little or no label. These results indicate that cyst formation coincides with the loss of luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotropin binding to the affected follicles.

  10. High-normal blood pressure is associated with increased resting sympathetic activity but normal responses to stress tests.

    PubMed

    Hering, Dagmara; Kara, Tomas; Kucharska, Wiesława; Somers, Virend K; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof

    2013-06-01

    High-normal blood pressure (BP) increases the risk of cardiovascular (CV) disease. The mechanisms underlying this increased risk are not clear. Sympathetic activation appears to be a potential mechanism linking high-normal BP to CV disease. This study examined whether high-normal BP compared with optimal BP is linked to sympathoexcitation at rest and/or during laboratory stressors. Heart rate (HR), BP and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) were obtained at rest and during stress tests (sustained handgrip and mental stress) in 18 subjects (15 males and three females) with high-normal BP (systolic BP of 130-139 mmHg, diastolic BP of 85-89 mmHg, or both) and in 12 subjects (10 males and two females) with optimal BP (< 120/80 mmHg) matched for age (34 ± 3 years in both groups) and body mass index (25 ± 2 kg/m(2) in both groups). Despite the higher resting BP levels, MSNA was higher in subjects with high-normal BP than in the optimal BP group (26 ± 3 vs 18 ± 2 bursts/min, p< 0.05). During sustained handgrip, MSNA increased by 37 ± 14% in high-normal BP group compared with an increase of 49 ± 15% in optimal BP group (p = 0.55). Changes during mental stress were 50 ± 28% and 37 ± 12%, respectively (p = 0.73). There were no significant differences in SBP responses to handgrip and mental stress between the high-normal and optimal BP groups. Baseline HR and chronotropic responses to stress tests were comparable between the two groups. In comparison with optimal BP, high-normal BP is associated with increased resting MSNA, but normal neural and circulatory responses to stress tests. These findings suggest that tonic activation of the sympathetic nervous system may precede overt arterial hypertension and contribute to an excess risk of CV disease in subjects with high-normal BP.

  11. Letrozole, Gonadotropin, or Clomiphene for Unexplained Infertility.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Michael P; Legro, Richard S; Coutifaris, Christos; Alvero, Ruben; Robinson, Randal D; Casson, Peter; Christman, Gregory M; Ager, Joel; Huang, Hao; Hansen, Karl R; Baker, Valerie; Usadi, Rebecca; Seungdamrong, Aimee; Bates, G Wright; Rosen, R Mitchell; Haisenleder, Daniel; Krawetz, Stephen A; Barnhart, Kurt; Trussell, J C; Ohl, Dana; Jin, Yufeng; Santoro, Nanette; Eisenberg, Esther; Zhang, Heping

    2015-09-24

    The standard therapy for women with unexplained infertility is gonadotropin or clomiphene citrate. Ovarian stimulation with letrozole has been proposed to reduce multiple gestations while maintaining live birth rates. We enrolled couples with unexplained infertility in a multicenter, randomized trial. Ovulatory women 18 to 40 years of age with at least one patent fallopian tube were randomly assigned to ovarian stimulation (up to four cycles) with gonadotropin (301 women), clomiphene (300), or letrozole (299). The primary outcome was the rate of multiple gestations among women with clinical pregnancies. After treatment with gonadotropin, clomiphene, or letrozole, clinical pregnancies occurred in 35.5%, 28.3%, and 22.4% of cycles, and live birth in 32.2%, 23.3%, and 18.7%, respectively; pregnancy rates with letrozole were significantly lower than the rates with standard therapy (gonadotropin or clomiphene) (P=0.003) or gonadotropin alone (P<0.001) but not with clomiphene alone (P=0.10). Among ongoing pregnancies with fetal heart activity, the multiple gestation rate with letrozole (9 of 67 pregnancies, 13%) did not differ significantly from the rate with gonadotropin or clomiphene (42 of 192, 22%; P=0.15) or clomiphene alone (8 of 85, 9%; P=0.44) but was lower than the rate with gonadotropin alone (34 of 107, 32%; P=0.006). All multiple gestations in the clomiphene and letrozole groups were twins, whereas gonadotropin treatment resulted in 24 twin and 10 triplet gestations. There were no significant differences among groups in the frequencies of congenital anomalies or major fetal and neonatal complications. In women with unexplained infertility, ovarian stimulation with letrozole resulted in a significantly lower frequency of multiple gestation but also a lower frequency of live birth, as compared with gonadotropin but not as compared with clomiphene. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01044862.).

  12. Serum levels of beta-subunit of chorionic gonadotropin in patients with pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Gil-del-Alamo, P; Saccomanno, K; Lania, A; Pettersson, K S; Beck-Peccoz, P; Spada, A

    1995-07-01

    Many studies have shown that normal and tumoral pituitary is able to synthesize chorionic gonadotropin (CG). The aim of the present work was to investigate the circulating levels of free beta-subunit of CG (CG-beta) in a large number of patients with pituitary tumors in basal conditions and after thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) injection. The study includes 27 healthy subjects, 23 patients with prolactinoma, 20 with growth hormone-secreting adenoma and 77 with non-functioning pituitary adenoma (NFPA). The CG-beta was evaluated using a new one-step immunometric assay employing two monoclonal antibodies directed against epitopes present only on the free CG-beta and showing a detection limit of 0.04 U/l and a cross-reactivity with complete CG < 0.01%. In basal conditions, serum CG-beta was undetectable in healthy subjects and in the majority of patients, while in seven patients with NFPA and four with prolactinoma the CG-beta values ranged between 0.05 and 0.72 U/l. In these 11 patients serum levels of intact CG were found within the normal range (normal range < 5 U/l), while two patients with NFPA and one with prolactinoma had levels of free alpha-subunit inappropriately high with respect to gonadotropins and thyrotropin. Injection of TRH caused CG-beta to increase in two out of 16 patients with NFPA, whereas it was ineffective in 12 healthy subjects and 10 patients with prolactinoma. The present data indicate that detectable level of CG-beta not associated with hypersecretion of the intact CG molecule may be observed in about 10% of patients with NFPA or prolactinoma, while abnormal CG-beta responses to TRH are observed infrequently in individual patients with NFPA.

  13. Beta-human chorionic gonadotropin producing osteosarcoma of the sacrum in a 26-year-old woman: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Glass, Ryan; Asirvatham, Jaya Ruth; Kahn, Leonard; Aziz, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Ectopic secretion of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin is considered a poor prognostic marker in epithelial tumors. However, very few cases have been reported in sarcomas. We present the case of a 26-year-old female who presented with a metastatic osteosarcoma. She underwent usual testing prior to starting treatment and was found to have elevated levels of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin. As the patient was not pregnant, another source of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin secretion had to be considered. The tumor cells demonstrated positive staining for beta-human chorionic gonadotropin by immunohistochemistry, and serum levels of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin were used to monitor tumor progression and response to chemotherapy. We review the literature and discuss a potential role of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin in the treatment of such patients.

  14. Is the assumption of normality or log-normality for continuous response data critical for benchmark dose estimation?

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Kan; Gift, Jeffrey S.; Setzer, R. Woodrow

    2013-11-01

    Continuous responses (e.g. body weight) are widely used in risk assessment for determining the benchmark dose (BMD) which is used to derive a U.S. EPA reference dose. One critical question that is not often addressed in dose–response assessments is whether to model the continuous data as normally or log-normally distributed. Additionally, if lognormality is assumed, and only summarized response data (i.e., mean ± standard deviation) are available as is usual in the peer-reviewed literature, the BMD can only be approximated. In this study, using the “hybrid” method and relative deviation approach, we first evaluate six representative continuous dose–response datasets reporting individual animal responses to investigate the impact on BMD/BMDL estimates of (1) the distribution assumption and (2) the use of summarized versus individual animal data when a log-normal distribution is assumed. We also conduct simulation studies evaluating model fits to various known distributions to investigate whether the distribution assumption has influence on BMD/BMDL estimates. Our results indicate that BMDs estimated using the hybrid method are more sensitive to the distribution assumption than counterpart BMDs estimated using the relative deviation approach. The choice of distribution assumption has limited impact on the BMD/BMDL estimates when the within dose-group variance is small, while the lognormality assumption is a better choice for relative deviation method when data are more skewed because of its appropriateness in describing the relationship between mean and standard deviation. Additionally, the results suggest that the use of summarized data versus individual response data to characterize log-normal distributions has minimal impact on BMD estimates. - Highlights: • We investigate to what extent the distribution assumption can affect BMD estimates. • Both real data analysis and simulation study are conducted. • BMDs estimated using hybrid method are more

  15. Is the assumption of normality or log-normality for continuous response data critical for benchmark dose estimation?

    PubMed

    Shao, Kan; Gift, Jeffrey S; Setzer, R Woodrow

    2013-11-01

    Continuous responses (e.g. body weight) are widely used in risk assessment for determining the benchmark dose (BMD) which is used to derive a U.S. EPA reference dose. One critical question that is not often addressed in dose-response assessments is whether to model the continuous data as normally or log-normally distributed. Additionally, if lognormality is assumed, and only summarized response data (i.e., mean±standard deviation) are available as is usual in the peer-reviewed literature, the BMD can only be approximated. In this study, using the "hybrid" method and relative deviation approach, we first evaluate six representative continuous dose-response datasets reporting individual animal responses to investigate the impact on BMD/BMDL estimates of (1) the distribution assumption and (2) the use of summarized versus individual animal data when a log-normal distribution is assumed. We also conduct simulation studies evaluating model fits to various known distributions to investigate whether the distribution assumption has influence on BMD/BMDL estimates. Our results indicate that BMDs estimated using the hybrid method are more sensitive to the distribution assumption than counterpart BMDs estimated using the relative deviation approach. The choice of distribution assumption has limited impact on the BMD/BMDL estimates when the within dose-group variance is small, while the lognormality assumption is a better choice for relative deviation method when data are more skewed because of its appropriateness in describing the relationship between mean and standard deviation. Additionally, the results suggest that the use of summarized data versus individual response data to characterize log-normal distributions has minimal impact on BMD estimates.

  16. Sex-specific association of sex hormones and gonadotropins, with brain amyloid and hippocampal neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Ho; Byun, Min Soo; Yi, Dahyun; Choe, Young Min; Choi, Hyo Jung; Baek, Hyewon; Sohn, Bo Kyung; Lee, Jun-Young; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Jee Wook; Lee, Younghwa; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Woo, Jong Inn; Lee, Dong Young

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to examine the sex-specific association between serum sex hormones and gonadotropins and the cerebral beta-amyloid (Aβ) burden and hippocampal neurodegeneration in subjects with normal cognition and impaired cognition. Two hundred sixty-five older subjects received clinical assessments, serum measurements of sex hormones, gonadotropins, (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B-positron emission tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. In females, higher free testosterone and gonadotropin levels were associated with lower cerebral Aβ positivity. In males, free testosterone was positively related to hippocampal volume with significant interaction with cognitive status. Further subgroup analyses showed that the association was significant only in impaired cognition but not in normal cognition. Free estradiol was not associated with Aβ burden or hippocampal neurodegeneration in either sex. These results suggest that testosterone might inhibit the early pathological accumulation of Aβ in females and delay neurodegeneration in males. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Leg contracture in mice: an assay of normal tissue response

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, H.B.

    1984-07-01

    Leg contracture, defined as the difference in extensibility of the control and irradiated hind legs of mice, was found to correlate with single doses of radiation from about 20 to 80 Gy. The time of development of the early phase of the response coincided with that reported for the appearance of the acute skin response, and in some cases, partially reversed as this reaction healed. The contracture then progressed again at a moderate rate through 90 days, and then more slowly through one year. Skin contraction, measured by decrease in intertattoo distance, was assayed in the same mice. It followed the same time course as leg contracture, but had a different dose-response relationship. To determine the contribution of skin contraction to the overall leg contracture response, mice were sacrificed and the leg contracture measured before and after the removal of the skin of the leg. After doses of up to 30 Gy, little contracture remained from skinning the leg, indicating that skin contraction was largely responsible for leg contracture in this dose range. After doses of about 45 Gy and above, some contracture remained in the skinned legs, although less than in intact legs. There was little or no enhancement of either skin contraction or leg contracture by the hypoxic cell sensitizers metronidazole or misonidazole.

  18. Characterization of renal response to prolonged immersion in normal man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, M.; Denunzio, A. G.; Ramachandran, M.

    1980-01-01

    ?jDuring the initial phase of space flight, there is a translocation of fluid from the lower parts of the body to the central vascular compartment with a resultant natriuresis, diuresis, and weight loss. Because water immersion is regarded as an appropriate model for studying the redistribution of fluid that occurs in weightlessness, an immersion study of relatively prolonged duration was carried out in order to characterize the temporal profile of the renal adaptation to central hypervolemia. Twelve normal male subjects underwent an immersion study of 8-h duration in the sodium-replete state. Immersion resulted in marked natriuresis and diuresis which were sustained throughout the immersion period. The failure of that natriuresis and diuresis of immersion to abate or cease despite marked extracellular fluid volume contraction as evidenced by a mean weight loss of -2.2 + or - 0.3 kg suggests that central blood volume was not restored to normal and that some degree of central hypervolemia probably persisted.

  19. Novel action of pituitary urocortin 2 in the regulation of expression and secretion of gonadotropins.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Takahiro; Yamauchi, Naoko; Shibasaki, Tamotsu

    2009-04-01

    Urocortins 2 (Ucn 2), one of the corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) peptide family, is thought to be an endogenous ligand for CRF type 2 receptor (CRF-R2). We previously demonstrated that Ucn 2 is expressed in the corticotrophs of rat pituitary, and the mRNA expression and secretion of Ucn 2 in corticotrophs of rat anterior pituitary are regulated by CRF and glucocorticoids. Since CRF-R2 has been reported to be expressed on gonadotrophs of the rat pituitary, we hypothesized that pituitary Ucn 2 may control the expression and secretion of gonadotropins. Monolayer culture of rat anterior pituitary cells showed that the secretion of gonadotropins was suppressed by Ucn 2. A CRF-R2 selective antagonist, adenoviral-mediated expression of short interfering RNA against CRF-R2, and anti-Ucn 2 rabbit IgG increased the secretion and mRNA expression of gonadotropins. intraperitoneal injection of anti-Ucn 2 IgG into immature male rats significantly increased the secretion and mRNA expression of gonadotropins compared with those in normal rabbit IgG-injected rats. Daily i.p. injection of anti-Ucn 2 IgG into immature female rats induced a tendency toward earlier occurrence of menarche compared with normal rabbit IgG-injected rats. These findings suggest that pituitary Ucn 2 is involved in the regulatory mechanism of the expression and secretion of gonadotropins through its tonic and inhibitory action on gonadotrophs in a paracrine manner.

  20. Renal redox response to normal pregnancy in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Sasser, Jennifer M.; West, Crystal A.; Baylis, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Normal pregnancy involves increased renal sodium reabsorption, metabolism, and oxygen consumption, which can cause increased oxidative stress (OS). OS can decrease nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and cause pregnancy complications. In this study we examined the NO synthases (NOS) and redox state in the kidney cortex and aorta in early (E), mid (M), and late (L) pregnant (P) (days 3, 12, 20) and 2–4 days postpartum (PP) rats compared with virgin rats (V). Protein abundance of endothelial NOS (eNOS) was unchanged and neuronal NOS (nNOS)α fell at LP in the kidney cortex. Kidney cortex nNOSβ was elevated at MP, LP, and PP. No changes in aortic NOS isoforms were observed. Kidney cortex nitrotyrosine (NT) abundance decreased in EP, MP, and PP, whereas aortic NT increased in EP, MP, and PP. The NADPH oxidase subunit p22phox decreased in the kidney cortex at EP while aortic p22phox increased in EP and LP. No changes in kidney cortex NADPH-dependent superoxide production or hydrogen peroxide levels were noted. Kidney cortex cytosolic (CuZn) superoxide dismutase (SOD) was unchanged, while mitochondrial SOD decreased at EP and extracellular SOD decreased at MP and LP in the kidney cortex. Despite falls in abundance of kidney cortex SODs, total antioxidant capacity (TAC) was elevated in EP, MP, and PP in the kidney cortex. Aortic CuZn SOD deceased at PP, while the other aortic SODs and aortic TAC did not change. Data from this study suggest that the kidney cortex is protected from OS during normal rat pregnancy via an increase in antioxidant activity. PMID:23283939

  1. A normal tissue dose response model of dynamic repair processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alber, Markus; Belka, Claus

    2006-01-01

    A model is presented for serial, critical element complication mechanisms for irradiated volumes from length scales of a few millimetres up to the entire organ. The central element of the model is the description of radiation complication as the failure of a dynamic repair process. The nature of the repair process is seen as reestablishing the structural organization of the tissue, rather than mere replenishment of lost cells. The interactions between the cells, such as migration, involved in the repair process are assumed to have finite ranges, which limits the repair capacity and is the defining property of a finite-sized reconstruction unit. Since the details of the repair processes are largely unknown, the development aims to make the most general assumptions about them. The model employs analogies and methods from thermodynamics and statistical physics. An explicit analytical form of the dose response of the reconstruction unit for total, partial and inhomogeneous irradiation is derived. The use of the model is demonstrated with data from animal spinal cord experiments and clinical data about heart, lung and rectum. The three-parameter model lends a new perspective to the equivalent uniform dose formalism and the established serial and parallel complication models. Its implications for dose optimization are discussed.

  2. Effect of prenatal and neonatal exposure to lead on gonadotropin receptors and steroidogenesis in rat ovaries

    SciTech Connect

    Wiebe, J.P.; Barr, K.J.; Buckingham, K.D.

    1988-01-01

    Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with lead chloride (20 or 200 ppm) or sodium chloride (controls) in their drinking water, either prior to pregnancy or during pregnancy and lactation, and female offspring were examined at weaning (21 d) or at 150 d. Other female rats were treated from d 21 to 35. Tissue (blood, kidney, bone) lead levels, body, ovary, and uterus weights, ovarian steroidogenesis, and gonadotropin (luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone) levels, and gonadotropin-receptor binding were determined. Prenatal and/or postnatal exposure to lead at these levels (20 and 200 ppm) did not affect tissue weights but did cause a significant decrease in gonadotropin-receptor binding in the prepubertal, pubertal and adult females. Conversion of progesterone to androstenedione and dihydrotestosterone was significantly decreased in 21-d-old rats; in 150-d-old females, the prenatal and/or postnatal exposure to lead resulted in significantly increased conversion to the 5-alpha-reduced steroid, normally high during puberty. The results demonstrate that lead exposure prior to mating may affect gonadotropin-receptor binding in the offspring and that lead exposure (in utero, via mother's milk, or post weaning) may significantly alter steroid production and gonadotropin binding in ovaries of the prepubertal, pubertal, and adult female.

  3. The Role of Human Chorionic Gonadotropin as Tumor Marker: Biochemical and Clinical Aspects.

    PubMed

    Sisinni, Lorenza; Landriscina, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Tumor markers are biological substances that are produced/released mainly by malignant tumor cells, enter the circulation in detectable amounts and are potential indicators of the presence of a tumor. The most useful biochemical markers are the tumor-specific molecules, i.e., receptors, enzymes, hormones, growth factors or biological response modifiers that are specifically produced by tumor cells and not, or minimally, by the normal counterpart (Richard et al. Principles and practice of gynecologic oncology. Wolters Kluwer Health, Philadelphia, 2009). Based on their specificity and sensitivity in each malignancy, biomarkers are used for screening, diagnosis, disease monitoring and therapeutic response assessment in clinical management of cancer patients.This chapter is focused on human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), a hormone with a variety of functions and widely used as a tumor biomarker in selected tumors. Indeed, hCG is expressed by both trophoblastic and non-trophoblastic human malignancies and plays a role in cell transformation, angiogenesis, metastatization, and immune escape, all process central to cancer progression. Of note, hCG testing is crucial for the clinical management of placental trophoblastic malignancies and germ cell tumors of the testis and the ovary. Furthermore, the production of hCG by tumor cells is accompanied by varying degrees of release of the free subunits into the circulation, and this is relevant for the management of cancer patients (Triozzi PL, Stevens VC, Oncol Rep 6(1):7-17, 1999).The name chorionic gonadotropin was conceived: chorion derives from the latin chordate meaning afterbirth, gonadotropin indicates that the hormone is a gonadotropic molecule, acting on the ovaries and promoting steroid production (Cole LA, Int J Endocrinol Metab 9(2):335-352, 2011). The function, the mechanism of action and the interaction between hCG and its receptor continue to be the subject of intensive investigation, even though many issues about

  4. Determination of human chorionic gonadotropin.

    PubMed

    Stenman, Ulf-Håkan; Alfthan, Henrik

    2013-12-01

    Determination of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is used for diagnosis and monitoring of pregnancy, pregnancy related disorders, for trophoblastic and some nontrophoblastic tumors. In addition, hCG is determined for doping control in males. Assay of hCG is complicated by the occurrence of different molecular forms, which are detected to various degrees by different assays. The main form of hCG in circulation and in patients with trophoblastic tumors is intact heterodimeric hCG. The free β subunit (hCGβ) is a minor form in plasma in both conditions, but it may be the major form aggressive trophoblastic cancer. Therefore, assays measuring hCG and hCGβ together are mainly used for diagnosis of pregnancy and trophoblastic diseases. When excreted into urine, most of hCG (and hCGβ) is broken down to the core fragment of hCGβ (hCGβcf), which is the main immunoreactive form of hCG in urine during pregnancy. Specific determination of hCGβ is of value in screening for Down's syndrome and diagnosis of nontrophoblastic cancer. hCGbcf is of limited utility but it is important because it may disturb assay of hCG in pregnancy.

  5. Treatment of gonadotropin dependent precocious puberty due to hypothalamic hamartoma with gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist depot

    PubMed Central

    de Brito, V. N; Latronico, A.; Arnhold, I.; Lo, L.; Domenice, S.; Albano, M.; Fragoso, M.; Mendonca, B.

    1999-01-01

    The gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) secreting hypothalamic hamartoma (HH) is a congenital malformation consisting of a heterotopic mass of nervous tissue that contains GnRH neurosecretory neurons attached to the tuber cinereum or the floor of the third ventricle. HH is a well recognised cause of gonadotropin dependent precocious puberty (GDPP). Long term data are presented on eight children (five boys and three girls) with GDPP due to HH. Physical signs of puberty were observed before 2 years of age in all patients. At presentation with sexual precocity, the mean height standard deviation (SD) for chronological age was +1.60 (1.27) and the mean height SD for bone age was −0.92 (1.77). Neurological symptoms were absent at presentation and follow up. The hamartoma diameter ranged from 5 to 18 mm and did not change in six patients who had magnetic resonance imaging follow up. All patients were treated clinically with GnRH agonists (GnRH-a). The duration of treatment varied from 2.66 to 8.41 years. Seven of the eight children had satisfactory responses to treatment, shown by regression of pubertal signs, suppression of hormonal levels, and improvement of height SD for bone age and predicted height. One patient had a severe local reaction to GnRH-a with failure of hormonal suppression and progression of pubertal signs. It seems that HH is benign and that GnRH-a treatment provides satisfactory and safe control for most children with GDPP due to HH.

 PMID:10325702

  6. Impact of gonadotropins on oocyte maturation, fertilisation and developmental competence in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuemei; Tsai, Tony; Qiao, Jie; Zhang, Zhan; Feng, Huai L

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the dose-dependent effects of gonadotropins, either singly (Bravelle (B), Luveris (L), Menupur (M), Repronex (R), Gonal-F (G), Follism (F) and Norvarel (N)) or in combination (Menupur+Bravelle; Repronext+Bravelle; and Bravelle+Norvarel), on rates of oocyte maturation, fertilisation and early embryo development in vitro in an animal model. Bovine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were purchased commercially and cultured in TCM-199 with 10% fetal bovine serum supplemented with varying concentrations of gonadotropin (0, 5, 10, 20, 40IU or United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) mL-1) for 24 and 48h according to current IVF clinical stimulation protocols. All gonadotropins enhanced oocyte maturation in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. Individually, Gonal-F (Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany), Follism (Merck Co, Whitehouse Station, NJ, USA) and Repronext (Ferring, Parsippany, NJ, USA) promoted oocyte maturation; in combination, they effectively enhanced COC expansion and increased the maturation competence of MII oocytes. However, high concentrations of gonadotropins may result in maturation arrest. Specific combinations of gonadotropins may change the rate of early embryonic development (8-16-cells) and morula-blastocyst formation. These data provide support for the responsiveness of bovine oocytes to gonadotropins in vitro and the need to consider variations in the relative concentrations and ratio of combinations (FSH/LH or human chorionic gonadotropin) for optimisation of oocyte developmental competence. The results of the present study could be applied to therapeutic clinical stimulation protocols and help improve IVF success rates.

  7. Practice guideline: Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus: Response to shunting and predictors of response

    PubMed Central

    Halperin, John J.; Kurlan, Roger; Schwalb, Jason M.; Cusimano, Michael D.; Gronseth, Gary; Gloss, David

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated evidence for utility of shunting in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) and for predictors of shunting effectiveness. Methods: We identified and classified relevant published studies according to 2004 and 2011 American Academy of Neurology methodology. Results: Of 21 articles, we identified 3 Class I articles. Conclusions: Shunting is possibly effective in iNPH (96% chance subjective improvement, 83% chance improvement on timed walk test at 6 months) (3 Class III). Serious adverse event risk was 11% (1 Class III). Predictors of success included elevated Ro (1 Class I, multiple Class II), impaired cerebral blood flow reactivity to acetazolamide (by SPECT) (1 Class I), and positive response to either external lumbar drainage (1 Class III) or repeated lumbar punctures. Age may not be a prognostic factor (1 Class II). Data are insufficient to judge efficacy of radionuclide cisternography or aqueductal flow measurement by MRI. Recommendations: Clinicians may choose to offer shunting for subjective iNPH symptoms and gait (Level C). Because of significant adverse event risk, risks and benefits should be carefully weighed (Level B). Clinicians should inform patients with iNPH with elevated Ro and their families that they have an increased chance of responding to shunting compared with those without such elevation (Level B). Clinicians may counsel patients with iNPH and their families that (1) positive response to external lumbar drainage or to repeated lumbar punctures increases the chance of response to shunting, and (2) increasing age does not decrease the chance of shunting being successful (both Level C). PMID:26644048

  8. Adult height in short children born SGA treated with growth hormone and gonadotropin releasing hormone analog: results of a randomized, dose-response GH trial.

    PubMed

    Lem, Annemieke J; van der Kaay, Danielle C M; de Ridder, Maria A J; Bakker-van Waarde, Willie M; van der Hulst, Flip J P C M; Mulder, Jaap C; Noordam, Cees; Odink, Roel J; Oostdijk, Wilma; Schroor, Eelco J; Sulkers, Eric J; Westerlaken, Ciska; Hokken-Koelega, Anita C S

    2012-11-01

    GH treatment is effective in improving height in short children born small for gestational age (SGA). GH is thought to have limited effect when started during adolescence. The aim of this study was to investigate GH treatment efficacy in short SGA children when treatment was started during adolescence; to assess whether GH 2 mg/m(2) · d during puberty improves adult height (AH) compared with 1 mg/m(2) · d; and to assess whether an additional 2-yr postponement of puberty by GnRH analog (GnRHa) improves AH in children who are short at the start of puberty (<140 cm), with a poor AH expectation. In this longitudinal, randomized, dose-response GH trial, we included 121 short SGA children (60 boys) at least 8 yr of age. We performed intention-to-treat analyses on all children and uncensored case analyses on 84 children who reached AH. Besides, we evaluated growth during 2 yr of combined GH/GnRHa and subsequent GH treatment until AH in a subgroup of 40 pubertal children with a height of less than 140 cm at the start. Short SGA children started treatment at a median age of 11.2 yr, when 46% had already started puberty. Median height increased from -2.9 at start to -1.7 sd score (SDS) at AH (P < 0.001). Treatment with GH 2 vs. 1 mg/m(2) · d during puberty resulted in significantly better AH (P = 0.001), also after correction for gender, age at start, height SDS at start, treatment years before puberty, and target height SDS. AH was similar in children who started puberty at less than 140 cm and received GH/GnRHa, compared with children who started puberty greater than 140 cm and received GH only (P = 0.795). When started in adolescence, GH treatment significantly improves AH in short SGA children, particularly with GH 2 mg/m(2) · d during puberty. When SGA children are short at the start of puberty, they can benefit from combined GH/GnRHa treatment.

  9. Responses to a saline load in gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist-pretreated premenopausal women receiving progesterone or estradiol-progesterone therapy.

    PubMed

    Stachenfeld, Nina S; Keefe, David L; Taylor, Hugh S

    2005-01-01

    The effects of estradiol (E(2)) and progesterone (P(4)) on fluid and sodium regulation may have important clinical implications with respect to cardiovascular and renal disease as well as reproductive syndromes such as preeclampsia and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. We tested the hypothesis that sodium excretion is reduced in response to a sodium load during combined P(4)-E(2) treatment, but P(4) administration alone has little effect on sodium regulation. Fifteen women (22 +/- 2 yr) used a GnRH antagonist to suppress endogenous E(2) and P(4) for 9 d; for d 4-9, eight subjects used P(4) (200 mg/d), and seven subjects used P(4) with E(2) (two E(2) patches, 0.1 mg/d each). On d 3 and 9, isotonic saline (0.9% NaCl) was infused [120 min at 0.1 ml/kg body weight (BW).min], followed by 120 min of rest. Compared with GnRH antagonist alone, P([P4]) increased from 1.6 +/- 0.8 to 9.4 +/- 2.3 ng/ml (5.1 +/- 2.5 to 29.9 +/- 7.3 nmol/liter, P < 0.05) in the P(4) treated group, with no change in P([E2]). In the P(4)-E(2) treated group P([P4]) increased from 1.6 +/- 0.5 to 6.7 +/- 0.6 ng/ml (5.1 +/- 1.6 to 21.3 +/- 1.6 nmol/liter, P < 0.05 and P([E2]) increased from 17.9 +/- 6.3 to 200 +/- 41 pg/ml (65.7 +/- 23 to 734.6 +/- 150.0 pmol/liter, P < 0.05). Before isotonic saline infusion, renal sodium and water excretion were similar under all conditions, but during isotonic saline infusion, cumulative sodium excretion was lower in the P(4)-E(2) treated women (34.1 +/- 5.1 mEq) compared with GnRH antagonist (50.2 +/- 11.4 mEq). Sodium excretion was unaffected by P(4) treatment (48.0 +/- 8.2 and 41.2 +/- 5.1 mEq, for GnRH antagonist and P(4)). Compared with GnRH antagonist alone, P(4)-E(2) treatment increased distal sodium reabsorption and transiently decreased proximal sodium reabsorption, whereas P(4) treatment did not alter either distal or proximal sodium reabsorption. Before isotonic saline infusion, the plasma aldosterone (Ald) concentration was greater during P(4) treatment

  10. Differential gene expression in normal and transformed human mammary epithelial cells in response to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Diego F; Sha, Wei; Hower, Valerie; Blekherman, Greg; Laubenbacher, Reinhard; Akman, Steven; Torti, Suzy V; Shulaev, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a key role in breast carcinogenesis. To investigate whether normal and malignant breast epithelial cells differ in their responses to oxidative stress, we examined the global gene expression profiles of three cell types, representing cancer progression from a normal to a malignant stage, under oxidative stress. Normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), an immortalized cell line (HMLER-1), and a tumorigenic cell line (HMLER-5), were exposed to increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by treatment with glucose oxidase. Functional analysis of the metabolic pathways enriched with differentially expressed genes demonstrates that normal and malignant breast epithelial cells diverge substantially in their response to oxidative stress. While normal cells exhibit the up-regulation of antioxidant mechanisms, cancer cells are unresponsive to the ROS insult. However, the gene expression response of normal HMEC cells under oxidative stress is comparable to that of the malignant cells under normal conditions, indicating that altered redox status is persistent in breast cancer cells, which makes them resistant to increased generation of ROS. This study discusses some of the possible adaptation mechanisms of breast cancer cells under persistent oxidative stress that differentiate them from the response to acute oxidative stress in normal mammary epithelial cells. PMID:21397008

  11. Animal models for aberrations of gonadotropin action.

    PubMed

    Peltoketo, Hellevi; Zhang, Fu-Ping; Rulli, Susana B

    2011-12-01

    During the last two decades a large number of genetically modified mouse lines with altered gonadotropin action have been generated. These mouse lines fall into three categories: the lack-of-function mice, gain-of-function mice, and the mice generated by breeding the abovementioned lines with other disease model lines. The mouse strains lacking gonadotropin action have elucidated the necessity of the pituitary hormones in pubertal development and function of gonads, and revealed the processes from the original genetic defect to the pathological phenotype such as hypo- or hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Conversely, the strains of the second group depict consequences of chronic gonadotropin action. The lines vary from those expressing constitutively active receptors and those secreting follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) with slowly increasing amounts to those producing human choriogonadotropin (hCG), amount of which corresponds to 2000-fold luteinizing hormone (LH)/hCG biological activity. Accordingly, the phenotypes diverge from mild anomalies and enhanced fertility to disrupted gametogenesis, but eventually chronic, enhanced and non-pulsatile action of both FSH and LH leads to female and male infertility and/or hyper- and neoplasias in most of the gonadotropin gain-of-function mice. Elevated gonadotropin levels also alter the function of several extra-gonadal tissues either directly or indirectly via increased sex steroid production. These effects include promotion of tumorigenesis in tissues such as the pituitary, mammary and adrenal glands. Finally, the crossbreedings of the current mouse strains with other disease models are likely to uncover the contribution of gonadotropins in novel biological systems, as exemplified by the recent crossbreed of LHCG receptor deficient mice with Alzheimer disease mice.

  12. Thymulin gene therapy prevents the reduction in circulating gonadotropins induced by thymulin deficiency in mice

    PubMed Central

    Reggiani, Paula C.; Vesenbeckh, Silvan M.; Pléau, Jean M.; Sosa, Yolanda E.; Cónsole, Gloria M.; Schade, Rüdiger; Henklein, Peter; Dardenne, Mireille

    2009-01-01

    Integrity of the thymus during perinatal life is necessary for a proper maturation of the pituitary-gonadal axis in mice and other mammalian species. Thus congenitally athymic (nude) female mice show significantly reduced levels of circulating gonadotropins, a fact that seems to be causally related to a number of reproductive derangements described in these mutants. Interestingly, a number of in vitro studies suggest that the thymic peptide thymulin may be involved in thymus-pituitary communication. To determine the consequences of low serum thymulin in otherwise normal animals, we induced short (8 days)- and long (33 days)-term thymulin deficiency in C57BL/6 mice by neonatally injecting (intraperitoneally) an anti-thymulin serum and assessed their circulating gonadotropin levels at puberty and thereafter. Control mice received an irrelevant antiserum. Gonadotropins were measured by radioimmunoassay and thymulin by bioassay. Both long- and short-term serum thymulin immunoneutralization resulted in a significant reduction in the serum levels of gonadotropins at 33 and 45 days of age. Subsequently, we injected (intramuscularly) an adenoviral vector harboring a synthetic DNA sequence (5′-ATGCAAGCCAAATCTCAAGGTGGATCCAACTAGTAG-3′) encoding a biologically active analog of thymulin, methionine-FTS, in newborn nude mice (which are thymulin deficient) and measured circulating gonadotropin levels when the animals reached 52 days of age. It was observed that neonatal thymulin gene therapy in the athymic mice restored their serum thymulin levels and prevented the reduction in circulating gonadotropin levels that typically emerges in these mutants after puberty. Our results indicate that thymulin plays a relevant physiological role in the thymus-pituitary-gonadal axis. PMID:17389714

  13. Evidence for a gonadotropin from nonpregnant subjects that has physical, immunological, and biological similarities to human chorionic gonadotropin.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, H C; Hodgen, G D; Matsuura, S; Lin, L J; Gross, E; Reichert, L E; Birken, S; Canfield, R E; Ross, G T

    1976-01-01

    Substances from urinary extracts of normal, nonpregnant subjects and human pituitary gonadotropin preparations were found to react similarly to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in a radioimmunoassay system that is highly specific for hCG and without crossreactivity to human luteinizing hormone (hLH). The antiserum was produced in a rabbit immunized with a bovine albumin conjugate of the unique carboxyl-terminal peptide (residues 123-145) isolated from a tryptic digest of the reduced, S-carboxymethylated hCGbeta subunit. The antibody recognition site on the peptide was found to reside on the last 15 amino acid residues of the carboxyl-terminal peptide, as evidenced by the competitive binding activities against 125I-labeled hCG of a series of peptides chemically synthesized according to the carboxyl-terminal sequence of HCGbeta. In order to elucidate the nature of the crossreacting substance in urinary extracts, a human postmenopausal urinary preparation (Pergonal) and a kaolin-acetone extract of urine from a patient with Klinefelter's syndrome were subjected to gel chromatography on Sephadex G-100. The results indicate that fractions showing immunocrossreactivity with the antiserum to hCGbeta-carboxyl-terminal peptide coeluted with 125I-labeled hCG which was separated distinctly from hLH. The same fractions from this postmenopausal urinary gonadotropin preparation exhibited in vitro biological activity proportional to the immunocrossreactivity of the hCG-specific antiserum. Concentration of postmenopausal women's urine by acetone precipitation retained approximately five times more immunoreactivity per unit volume than kaolin-acetone extraction, when assayed with the antiserum to hCGbeta-carboxyl-terminal peptide. PMID:60763

  14. Effect of certain toxicants on gonadotropin-induced ovarian non-esterified cholesterol depletion and steroidogenic enzyme stimulation of the common carp Cyprinus carpio in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, D.; Guha, D.; Kumar, V. )

    1992-06-01

    Isolated ovarian tissues from the common carp, Cyprinus carpio were incubated in vitro to obtain a discrete effect of four common toxicants of industrial origin, namely phenol, sulfide, mercuric chloride and cadmium chloride, on gonadotropin-induced alteration of nonesterified and esterified cholesterol and steroidogenic enzymes, delta 5-3 beta-HSD and 17 beta-HSD activity. Stage II ovarian tissue containing 30-40% mature oocytes were shown to be most responsive to gonadotropins in depleting only nonesterified cholesterol moiety and stimulating the activity of both. Safe doses of above mentioned toxicants when added separately to stage II ovarian tissue with oLH (1 microgram/incubation) gonadotropin-induced depletion of nonesterified cholesterol and gonadotropin-induced stimulation of the activity of both enzymes was significantly inhibited. Esterified cholesterol remained almost unaltered. Findings clearly indicate the impairment of gonadotropin induced fish ovarian steroidogenesis by the four toxicants separately.

  15. Linear Mixed Models for Skew-Normal Independent bivariate responses with an application to Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar; Lachos, Victor H.; Abanto-Valle, Carlos A.; Ghosh, Pulak

    2010-01-01

    Bivariate clustered (correlated) data often encountered in epidemiological and clinical research are routinely analyzed under a linear mixed model framework with underlying normality assumptions of the random effects and within-subject errors. However, such normality assumptions might be questionable if the data-set particularly exhibit skewness and heavy tails. Using a Bayesian paradigm, we use the skew-normal/independent (SNI) distribution as a tool for modeling clustered data with bivariate non-normal responses in a linear mixed model framework. The SNI distribution is an attractive class of asymmetric thick-tailed parametric structure which includes the skew-normal distribution as a special case. We assume that the random effects follows multivariate skew-normal/independent distributions and the random errors follow symmetric normal/independent distributions which provides substantial robustness over the symmetric normal process in a linear mixed model framework. Specific distributions obtained as special cases, viz. the skew-t, the skew-slash and the skew-contaminated normal distributions are compared, along with the default skew-normal density. The methodology is illustrated through an application to a real data which records the periodontal health status of an interesting population using periodontal pocket depth (PPD) and clinical attachment level (CAL). PMID:20740568

  16. Experimental and computational study of inter- and intra- species specificity of gonadotropins for various gonadotropin receptors.

    PubMed

    Aizen, Joseph; Kowalsman, Noga; Kobayashi, Makito; Hollander, Lian; Sohn, Young Chang; Yoshizaki, Goro; Niv, Masha Y; Levavi-Sivan, Berta

    2012-11-25

    The gonadotropins follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) and their receptors play critical roles in vertebrate reproduction. In order to study intra- and interspecies ligand promiscuity of gonadotropins, COS-7 cells were transiently transfected with one of the gonadotropin receptor genes, FSHR or LHR, and tested for activation by gonadotropins from representative fish orders: Aquilliformes (eel; e), Salmoniformes (trout; tr), and Perciformes (tilapia; ta), and of mammalian origin: porcine (p), bovine (b) and human (h). The study reveals complex relations between the gonadotropin hormones and their receptors. Each gonadotropin activated its own cognate receptor. However, taLHR was also activated by hCG and eLHR was activated by hFSH, hCG, and trFSH. For FSHR, the only cross-reactivity detected was for hFSHR, which was activated by pFSH and bFSH. These findings are of great interest and applicability in the context of activation of various GTHRs by their ligands and by ligands from other vertebrates. Analysis of the three-dimensional models of the structures highlights the importance of residues outside of the currently established hormone-receptor interface region. In addition, the interface residues in taFSHR and the effect of exon duplication, which causes an insert in the LRR domain, are suggested to affect the interaction and binding of taFSH.

  17. 21 CFR 556.304 - Gonadotropin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS TOLERANCES FOR RESIDUES OF NEW ANIMAL DRUGS IN FOOD Specific Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.304 Gonadotropin. (a) Acceptable daily intake (ADI). The ADI for...

  18. 21 CFR 556.304 - Gonadotropin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS TOLERANCES FOR RESIDUES OF NEW ANIMAL DRUGS IN FOOD Specific Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.304 Gonadotropin. (a) Acceptable daily intake (ADI). The ADI for...

  19. 21 CFR 556.304 - Gonadotropin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS TOLERANCES FOR RESIDUES OF NEW ANIMAL DRUGS IN FOOD Specific Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.304 Gonadotropin. (a) Acceptable daily intake (ADI). The ADI for...

  20. 21 CFR 522.1081 - Chorionic gonadotropin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chorionic gonadotropin. 522.1081 Section 522.1081 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS §...

  1. 21 CFR 522.1081 - Chorionic gonadotropin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chorionic gonadotropin. 522.1081 Section 522.1081 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS §...

  2. 21 CFR 522.1081 - Chorionic gonadotropin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chorionic gonadotropin. 522.1081 Section 522.1081 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS §...

  3. 21 CFR 522.1081 - Chorionic gonadotropin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chorionic gonadotropin. 522.1081 Section 522.1081 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS §...

  4. 21 CFR 522.1081 - Chorionic gonadotropin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chorionic gonadotropin. 522.1081 Section 522.1081 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS §...

  5. Tibialis anterior response to sudden ankle displacements in normal and Parkinsonian subjects.

    PubMed

    Chan, C W; Kearney, R E; Jones, G M

    1979-09-14

    It is well known that in Parkinsonian subjects with akinesia, reaction times are increased but reflex latencies remain normal. We have attempted to use this knowledge to distinguish between 'reflex' and 'voluntary' components of the electromyographic (EMG) response to ankle displacement. The EMG and torque responses of tibialis anterior (TA) to randomly applied servo-controlled plantar-flexing displacements of the ankle with and without the subject's intentional opposition were examined in 9 Parkinsonian and 9 age-matched normal humans. To obtain a measure of akinesia, the response latency to a visual stimulus was subsequently measured in the same subjects. Three principal findings emerged. (1) The intermediate latency EMG component (PSR) of the response evoked by ankle displacement with the subject instructed to relax was more regularly evoked and of lower threshold in Parkinsonians than in normals. This finding corresponds to the enlarged M2 component in upper limb muscles. However, the facilitation of PSR was not found to be associated with an increase in torque. In fact, the patients did not exhibit more stiffness than normals under our experimental conditions. (2) Mean latency estimate of the PSR was indistinguishable between Parkinsonians and normals. This finding puts the PSR in the nature of a reflex. Indeed, in accordance with reflex behaviour which is proportional to input characteristics, its area increased linearly with increase in the magnitude of displacement velocity. (3) In contrast, the 'late' EMG response (FSR) evoked by opposing sudden ankle displacement exhibited a significantly longer latency in 6 out of 8 Parkinsonians than normals. In the same patients, the EMG response latency to a visual signal was similarly increased. The delay of FSR in akinesia patients thus argued against its being a stereotyped reflex. The result is discussed with reference to the recent finding that preprogrammed responses are delayed in Parkinsonians.

  6. Wt p53 impairs response to chemotherapy: make lemonade to spare normal cells

    PubMed Central

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V.

    2012-01-01

    As published recently in Cancer Cell, p53 impairs the apoptotic response to chemotherapy and clinical outcome in breast cancer. I discuss that, while treating tumors lacking wt p53, this phenomenon can be exploited to protect normal cells from chemotherapy because all normal cells have wt p53. Also, several therapeutic paradigms can be reassessed, including the role of cellular senescence in cancer therapy. PMID:22802145

  7. Effects of human chorionic gonadotropin, estradiol, and progesterone on interleukin-18 expression in human decidual tissues.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Zhu, Hong; Li, Bing; Liu, Mingxing; Liu, Dan; Deng, Meilian; Wang, Yanming; Xia, Xuefeng; Jiang, Qingping; Chen, Dunjin

    2017-04-01

    Interleukin (IL)-18 is a proinflammatory cytokine which mediates a myriad of inflammatory responses during pregnancy. Changes in IL-18 levels have been linked to complications during pregnancy. This study was designed to assess the effects of estradiol, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), and progesterone on IL-18 expression in human decidual tissues. Uterine deciduas from women with normal pregnancy, spontaneous abortion, and progesterone treated spontaneous abortion were collected, and the effects of hormones on the viability of decidual cells and IL-18 secretion were detected by MTT and ELISA assays. We found that Estradiol, hCG, and progesterone inhibited decidual cell growth independent of dosage and time.IL-18 secretion in the spontaneous abortion group was increased in the decidual cells over time, but all hormones significantly reduced its secretion (p < 0.05). Our results indicate that estradiol, hCG, and progesterone can reduce IL-18 secretion in the cultured endometrial stromal cells from patients who experienced spontaneous abortion to the levels observed following normal pregnancy. Progesterone can significantly reduce IL-18 expression and increase growth of CD56+ CD16- uNK cells, suggesting that these activities may underlie the mechanism by which progesterone improves pregnancy outcomes.

  8. [Effect of primary ovarian insufficiency on the molecular heterogeneity of pituitary gonadotropins].

    PubMed

    Mason, M; Fonseca, M E; Ruiz, J E; Morán, C; Zárate, A

    1992-08-01

    It is known that hypophysial gonadotropins circulate in different molecular forms which are provided with different biological activity and that the proportion of such varieties keep a relation with the concentrations of estrogens in circulation. In physiological menopause predominate the great molecular forms which have a lesser biological activity and when estrogens are administrated a change is produced to smaller molecular forms. The present study tries to determine if in cases of ovarian insufficiency of long duration as in precocious menopause and the syndrome of refractory ovary the chromatographic conduct of gonadotropin is similar. Six patients with precocious menopause, and three with the syndrome of refractory ovary, were studied, in order to make a comparison of chromatographic pattern of FSF and LH in serum, with the one found in women with normal ovarian function and with physiologic menopause. The chromatographic analysis was done by filtration in gel of the serum and the subsequent determination of LH and FSH by RIA of double antibody. It was found that the chromatographic pattern of patients with ovarian insufficiency of long duration, characteristically presents larger molecular forms, specially in the refractory ovary syndrome with a greater alteration in the profile of LH. With base on these results it is concluded that the duration of ovarian insufficiency determine the type of molecular form, predominant, of gonadotropins. Also it is suggested that for the syndrome of refractory ovary, the greater heterogenicity of gonadotropins may explain part of physiopathogeny.

  9. Ventral frontal satiation-mediated responses to food aromas in obese and normal-weight women.

    PubMed

    Eiler, William J A; Dzemidzic, Mario; Case, K Rose; Armstrong, Cheryl L H; Mattes, Richard D; Cyders, Melissa A; Considine, Robert V; Kareken, David A

    2014-06-01

    Sensory properties of foods promote and guide consumption in hunger states, whereas satiation should dampen the sensory activation of ingestive behaviors. Such activation may be disordered in obese individuals. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we studied regional brain responses to food odor stimulation in the sated state in obese and normal-weight individuals targeting ventral frontal regions known to be involved in coding for stimulus reward value. Forty-eight women (25 normal weight; 23 obese) participated in a 2-day (fed compared with fasting) fMRI study while smelling odors of 2 foods and an inedible, nonfood object. Analyses were conducted to permit an examination of both general and sensory-specific satiation (satiation effects specific to a given food). Normal-weight subjects showed significant blood oxygen level-dependent responses in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) to food aromas compared with responses induced by the odor of an inedible object. Normal-weight subjects also showed general (but not sensory-specific) satiation effects in both the vmPFC and orbitofrontal cortex. Obese subjects showed no differential response to the aromas of food and the inedible object when fasting. Within- and between-group differences in satiation were driven largely by changes in the response to the odor of the inedible stimulus. Responses to food aromas in the obese correlated with trait negative urgency, the tendency toward negative affect-provoked impulsivity. Ventral frontal signaling of reward value may be disordered in obesity, with negative urgency heightening responses to food aromas. The observed nature of responses to food and nonfood stimuli suggests that future research should independently quantify each to fully understand brain reward signaling in obesity. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  10. Normal sensory and range of motion (ROM) responses during Thoracic Slump Test (ST) in asymptomatic subjects.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Ketaki C; Eapen, Charu; Kumar, Senthil P

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the normal sensory and range of motion (ROM) responses during the movement components of Thoracic Slump Test (Thoracic ST) in asymptomatic subjects. Sixty asymptomatic subjects were included in the study. Thoracic ST was performed in two sequences, proximal initiation, which was proximal to distal and distal initiation, which was distal to proximal. Subjects were randomized into four groups depending on the order of sequences and sides. Outcome measures of sensory responses (intensity, type, and location) and ROM responses were recorded after each sequence. Friedman's test was done to compare between sensory responses of the subjects. Between-component comparison for prevalence of sensory responses within each sequence was done using Kruskal-Wallis test and Wilcoxonsigned ranks test was used for between-component comparisons of intensity of symptoms within each sequence of testing. Independent t test was used to assess the ROM responses. Results show the prevalence of sensory responses, its nature, area and intensity. These sensory and ROM responses may be considered as normal response of Thoracic ST. The intensity of the symptoms of proximal initiation sequence (1.09±1.35 cm) was significant (P<0.05) when compared to distal initiation sequence (0.08±1.26 cm). The change in the ROM was significant (P<0.05) for distal initiation (7.55±4.51 degrees) when compared to proximal initiation (4.96±3.76 degrees). These normal responses may be used as a reference when using the Thoracic ST as an assessment technique.

  11. Capturing Abnormal Personality With Normal Personality Inventories: An Item Response Theory Approach

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Kate E.; Roberts, Brent W.; Krueger, Robert F.; Blonigen, Daniel M.; Hicks, Brian M.

    2009-01-01

    Correlational and factor-analytic methods indicate that abnormal and normal personality constructs may be tapping the same underlying latent trait. However, they do not systematically demonstrate that measures of abnormal personality capture more extreme ranges of the latent trait than measures of normal range personality. Item Response Theory (IRT) methods, in contrast, do provide this information. In the present study, we use IRT methods to evaluate the range of the latent trait assessed with a normal personality measure and a measure of psychopathy as one example of an abnormal personality construct. Contrary to the expectation that the measure of psychopathy would be more extreme than the measure of normal personality traits, the measures overlapped substantially in terms of the regions of the latent trait for which they provide information. Moreover, both types of inventories were limited in terms of measurement bandwidth, such that they did not provide information across the entire latent trait continuum. Implications and future directions are discussed. PMID:19012660

  12. Capturing abnormal personality with normal personality inventories: an item response theory approach.

    PubMed

    Walton, Kate E; Roberts, Brent W; Krueger, Robert F; Blonigen, Daniel M; Hicks, Brian M

    2008-12-01

    Correlational and factor-analytic methods indicate that abnormal and normal personality constructs may be tapping the same underlying latent trait. However, they do not systematically demonstrate that measures of abnormal personality capture more extreme ranges of the latent trait than measures of normal range personality. Item Response Theory (IRT) methods, in contrast, do provide this information. In the present study, we use IRT methods to evaluate the range of the latent trait assessed with a normal personality measure and a measure of psychopathy as one example of an abnormal personality construct. Contrary to the expectation that the measure of psychopathy would be more extreme than the measure of normal personality traits, the measures overlapped substantially in terms of the regions of the latent trait for which they provide information. Moreover, both types of inventories were limited in terms of measurement bandwidth, such that they did not provide information across the entire latent trait continuum. Implications and future directions are discussed.

  13. EFFECTS OF ORTHOKINETIC SEGMENTS UPON MOTOR RESPONSES OF NORMAL MALE COLLEGE STUDENTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CRENSHAW, WILLIAM A.

    THIS STUDY ASSESSES THE EFFECTS OF ORTHOKINETIC SEGMENTS UPON THE MOTOR RESPONSES OF NORMAL MALE COLLEGE STUDENTS PERFORMING THE VERTICAL JUMP AND THE STANDING BROAD JUMP. THE VARIOUS PLACINGS OF THE ELASTIC AND INELASTIC FIELDS OF THE SEGMENTS UPON THE AGONIST AND ANTAGONIST THIGH MUSCLES OF STUDENTS WERE NOTED AND COMPARED WITH PERFORMANCE…

  14. [The proportion of molecular forms of gonadotropins changes in patients with polycystic ovaries].

    PubMed

    Mason, M; Hernández-Valencia, M; Zárate, A; Fonseca, M E; Ochoa, R

    1997-09-01

    It is known that protein hormones circulate as different molecular forms and the relative proportion of these isoforms changes according to endocrine milieu. In particular gonadotropins, both LH and FSH, isoforms suffer variations related to the estrogen levels; thus sera obstained from menopausal women show a predominance of larger molecular forms which are considered as having lesser biological activity and the administration of estrogen replacement therapy is followed by the appearance of intermediate molecular forms possessing higher biological activity. This chormatographic pattern with predominance of intermediate isoforms is typical at midcycle in sera from normal women at the periovulatory stage. Present study showed that sera obtained from anovulatory women, such as patients with polycystic ovaries a predominance of larger and smaller molecular weight isoforms, exhibiting a chromatographic pattern different from that observed in normal women. It is speculate that there is some imbalance between the ovarian steroid synthesis and gonadotropin production in the stage of tertiary structural conformation.

  15. Specific gonadotropin binding to Pseudomonas maltophilia.

    PubMed

    Richert, N D; Ryan, R J

    1977-03-01

    Binding of 125I-labeled human chorionic gonadotropin to Pseudomonas maltophilia is dependent on time, temperature, and pH and the binding to this procaryotic species is hormone-specific and saturable. The equilibrium dissociation constant is 2.3 X 10(-9) M. There are no cooperative interactions between binding sites (Hill coefficient, 1.05). The number of sites is estimaated as 240 fmol/100 mug of protein. NaCl and KCl, at concentrations from 1 to 10 mM, have no effect on binding. Divalent cations (Mg2+ and Ca2+) and 1 mM EDTA inhibit hormone binding. Binding is destroyed by heat or by treatment with Pronase of alpha-chymotrypsin and is increased by phospholipase C. Binding of the labeled gonadotropin is not observed with other gram-negative organisms--e.g., Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas testosteroni, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacter aerogenes, or Enterobacter cloacae.

  16. Multifocal pupillary light response fields in normal subjects and patients with visual field defects.

    PubMed

    Tan, L; Kondo, M; Sato, M; Kondo, N; Miyake, Y

    2001-04-01

    The optimal conditions for recording focal pupillary light responses with a multifocal stimulation technique were determined, and the technique was applied to normal subjects and patients with visual field defects. Thirty-seven hexagonal stimuli were presented on a TV monitor with a visual field of 40 degrees diameter under a constant background illumination. Using a slow (4.7 Hz) m-sequence, reliable focal responses were obtained in both normal subjects and patients. The pupillary field and visual field were well correlated in patients with retinal diseases, but the correlation was not strong in patients with optic-nerve diseases. Pupillary light responses were reduced in the blind hemifield in patients with post-geniculate lesions. These results indicate that the multifocal stimulation technique can be used clinically to obtain a pupillary field for objective visual field testing.

  17. Pitch-induced responses in the right auditory cortex correlate with musical ability in normal listeners.

    PubMed

    Puschmann, Sebastian; Özyurt, Jale; Uppenkamp, Stefan; Thiel, Christiane M

    2013-10-23

    Previous work compellingly shows the existence of functional and structural differences in human auditory cortex related to superior musical abilities observed in professional musicians. In this study, we investigated the relationship between musical abilities and auditory cortex activity in normal listeners who had not received a professional musical education. We used functional MRI to measure auditory cortex responses related to auditory stimulation per se and the processing of pitch and pitch changes, which represents a prerequisite for the perception of musical sequences. Pitch-evoked responses in the right lateral portion of Heschl's gyrus were correlated positively with the listeners' musical abilities, which were assessed using a musical aptitude test. In contrast, no significant relationship was found for noise stimuli, lacking any musical information, and for responses induced by pitch changes. Our results suggest that superior musical abilities in normal listeners are reflected by enhanced neural encoding of pitch information in the auditory system.

  18. Gonadotropin Pulsatllity in FemaIe Long Distance Runners

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-24

    8 in Ovarian Follicles 3. Development of the Endometrium 10 B. Gonadotropin Regulation During the 11 Menstrual Cycle 1. overvrew of Gonadotropin...changes in gonadotropin and ovarian steroids throughout the cycle. The development of the ovarian follicle and endometrium are also shown. ’ j...3. Development of the Endometrium During menstruation, bleeding occurs due to a sloughing off of the endometrium from the previous menstrual cycle

  19. Tumor Cell Response to Synchrotron Microbeam Radiation Therapy Differs Markedly From Cells in Normal Tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Crosbie, Jeffrey C.; Anderson, Robin L.; Rothkamm, Kai; Restall, Christina M.; Cann, Leonie; Ruwanpura, Saleela; Meachem, Sarah; Yagi, Naoto; Svalbe, Imants; Lewis, Robert A.; Williams, Bryan R.G.; Rogers, Peter A.W.

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: High-dose synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) can be effective at destroying tumors in animal models while causing very little damage to normal tissues. The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular processes behind this observation of potential clinical importance. Methods and Materials: MRT was performed using a lattice of 25 {mu}m-wide, planar, polychromatic, kilovoltage X-ray microbeams, with 200-{mu}m peak separation. Inoculated EMT-6.5 tumor and normal mouse skin tissues were harvested at defined intervals post-MRT. Immunohistochemical detection of {gamma}-H2AX allowed precise localization of irradiated cells, which were also assessed for proliferation and apoptosis. Results: MRT significantly reduced tumor cell proliferation by 24 h post-irradiation (p = 0.002). An unexpected finding was that within 24 h of MRT, peak and valley irradiated zones were indistinguishable in tumors because of extensive cell migration between the zones. This was not seen in MRT-treated normal skin, which appeared to undergo a coordinated repair response. MRT elicited an increase in median survival times of EMT-6.5 and 67NR tumor-inoculated mice similar to that achieved with conventional radiotherapy, while causing markedly less normal tissue damage. Conclusions: This study provides evidence of a differential response at a cellular level between normal and tumor tissues after synchrotron MRT.

  20. In vitro evaluation of gene expression changes for gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophic tyrosine kinase, receptor, type 2, in response to bisphenol A treatment.

    PubMed

    Warita, Katsuhiko; Mitsuhashi, Tomoko; Ohta, Ken-ichi; Suzuki, Shingo; Hoshi, Nobuhiko; Miki, Takanori; Takeuchi, Yoshiki

    2013-03-01

    We evaluated the effects of bisphenol A (BPA) on embryonic mouse hypothalamic cells. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) indicated that gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (Gnrh1) expression in 0.02-20 μM BPA-treated cells did not differ from that in control cells but decreased significantly in 200 μMBPAtreated cells. The mRNA level for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf), which participates in GNRH1 secretory system development, decreased significantly in 200 μM BPA-treated cells, but that for neurotrophic tyrosine kinase, receptor, type 2 (Ntrk2), did not change. This indicates that Gnrh1 gene expression in mice fetuses is not affected by exposure to <20 μM BPA and that the adverse effects of BPA on the BDNF-NTRK2 neurotrophin system are induced by decrease in the mRNA level of the ligand, not of its receptor.

  1. Laboratory observations of fault strength in response to changes in normal stress

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilgore, Brian D.; Lozos, Julian; Beeler, Nicholas M.; Oglesby, David

    2012-01-01

    Changes in fault normal stress can either inhibit or promote rupture propagation, depending on the fault geometry and on how fault shear strength varies in response to the normal stress change. A better understanding of this dependence will lead to improved earthquake simulation techniques, and ultimately, improved earthquake hazard mitigation efforts. We present the results of new laboratory experiments investigating the effects of step changes in fault normal stress on the fault shear strength during sliding, using bare Westerly granite samples, with roughened sliding surfaces, in a double direct shear apparatus. Previous experimental studies examining the shear strength following a step change in the normal stress produce contradictory results: a set of double direct shear experiments indicates that the shear strength of a fault responds immediately, and then is followed by a prolonged slip-dependent response, while a set of shock loading experiments indicates that there is no immediate component, and the response is purely gradual and slip-dependent. In our new, high-resolution experiments, we observe that the acoustic transmissivity and dilatancy of simulated faults in our tests respond immediately to changes in the normal stress, consistent with the interpretations of previous investigations, and verify an immediate increase in the area of contact between the roughened sliding surfaces as normal stress increases. However, the shear strength of the fault does not immediately increase, indicating that the new area of contact between the rough fault surfaces does not appear preloaded with any shear resistance or strength. Additional slip is required for the fault to achieve a new shear strength appropriate for its new loading conditions, consistent with previous observations made during shock loading.

  2. Log normal distribution of cellular uptake of radioactivity: implications for biologic responses to radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Neti, Prasad V S V; Howell, Roger W

    2006-06-01

    It is widely recognized that radiopharmaceuticals are generally distributed nonuniformly in tissues. Such nonuniformities are observed over the entire range of spatial levels, ranging from organ to subcellular levels. The implications of nonuniform distributions of radioactivity for dosimetry, and ultimately for the biologic response of tissues containing radioactivity, have been investigated extensively. However, there is a paucity of experimental data on the distribution of cellular activity within a population of cells. In the present study, the distribution of activity per cell is experimentally determined and its implications for predicting biologic response are examined. Chinese hamster V79 cells were exposed to different concentrations of (210)Po-citrate. The radiolabeled cells were washed, seeded into culture dishes or glass slides, covered with photographic emulsion, and stored in an opaque container. Subsequently, the emulsion was developed, thereby resulting in observable alpha-particle tracks that were scored. The distribution of activity per cell was found to be well described by a log normal distribution function. Theoretic modeling of cell survival as a function of mean activity per cell showed that survival curves differed substantially when the activity per cell was log normally distributed versus when it was assumed conventionally that every cell in the population contained the mean activity. The present study provides experimental evidence of log normal cellular uptake of radioactivity. Theoretic calculations show that a log normal distribution of cellular activity can have a substantial impact on modeling the biologic response of cell populations.

  3. Skew-normal/independent linear mixed models for censored responses with applications to HIV viral loads

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar; Lachos, Victor H.; Castro, Luis M.; Dey, Dipak K.

    2012-01-01

    Often in biomedical studies, the routine use of linear mixed-effects models (based on Gaussian assumptions) can be questionable when the longitudinal responses are skewed in nature. Skew-normal/elliptical models are widely used in those situations. Often, those skewed responses might also be subjected to some upper and lower quantification limits (viz. longitudinal viral load measures in HIV studies), beyond which they are not measurable. In this paper, we develop a Bayesian analysis of censored linear mixed models replacing the Gaussian assumptions with skew-normal/independent (SNI) distributions. The SNI is an attractive class of asymmetric heavy-tailed distributions that includes the skew-normal, the skew-t, skew-slash and the skew-contaminated normal distributions as special cases. The proposed model provides flexibility in capturing the effects of skewness and heavy tail for responses which are either left- or right-censored. For our analysis, we adopt a Bayesian framework and develop a MCMC algorithm to carry out the posterior analyses. The marginal likelihood is tractable, and utilized to compute not only some Bayesian model selection measures but also case-deletion influence diagnostics based on the Kullback-Leibler divergence. The newly developed procedures are illustrated with a simulation study as well as a HIV case study involving analysis of longitudinal viral loads. PMID:22685005

  4. Absence of diurnal variation in visceromotor response to colorectal distention in normal Long Evans rats

    PubMed Central

    Welting, Olaf; Cailotto, Cathy; Kalsbeek, Andries; van den Wijngaard, Rene

    2016-01-01

    Background: Enhanced colorectal sensitivity (i.e. visceral hypersensitivity) is thought to be a pathophysiological mechanism in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In healthy men a circadian variation in rectal perception to colonic distention was described. Disturbed day and night rhythms, which occur in shift work and trans meridian flights, are associated with the prevalence of IBS. This raises the question whether disruptions of circadian control are responsible for the observed pathology in IBS. Prior to investigating altered rhythmicity in relation to visceral hypersensitivity in a rat model for IBS, it is relevant to establish whether normal rats display circadian variation similar to healthy men.  Methodology and findings: In rodents colorectal distension leads to reproducible contractions of abdominal musculature. We used quantification of this so called visceromotor response (VMR) by electromyography (EMG) to assess visceral sensitivity in rats. We assessed the VMR in normal male Long Evans rats at different time points of the light/dark cycle. Although a control experiment with male maternal separated rats confirmed that intentionally inflicted (i.e. stress induced) changes in VMR can be detected, normal male Long Evans rats showed no variation in VMR along the light/dark cycle in response to colorectal distension. Conclusions: In the absence of a daily rhythm of colorectal sensitivity in normal control rats it is not possible to investigate possible aberrancies in our rat model for IBS. PMID:26925229

  5. Evidence for cAMP as a mediator of gonadotropin secretion from male pituitaries

    SciTech Connect

    Bourne, G.A.; Baldwin, D.M.

    1987-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to use sodium flufenamate, a compound that inhibits gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-stimulated adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) production in the pituitary, to evaluate the potential role of cAMP as a mediator of GnRH-stimulated gonadotropin secretion from male pituitaries. Quartered male pituitaries were perifused at 37/sup 0/C and sequential effluent fractions collected every 10 min. Infusions of GnRH resulted in a twofold increase in luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) secretion. Cycloheximide, 5 ..mu..M, completely inhibited the GnRH-stimulated LH and FSH secretion. Infusions of 0.1 mM flufenamate had similar effects on gonadotropin secretion as cycloheximide, whereas the administration of 5 mM dibutyryl cAMP in combination with GnRH and flufenamate restored the secretory responses of both hormones. The flufenamate-inhibited GnRH stimulated LH and FSH release, which was restored by DBcAMP and appeared to be protein synthesis dependent and specific for cAMP.These results suggest an indirect role for cAMP as a mediator of gonadotropin secretion from male pituitaries. However, in contrast to female pituitaries, the secretion of these hormones form male pituitaries is completely dependent on cAMP and de novo protein synthesis.

  6. Dynamic Response in an Elastic-Plastic Projectile Due to Normal Impact

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    A^’Avm^l ™A/679o/ TECHNICAL REPORT ARLCB-TR-8501 9 DYNAMIC RESPONSE IN AN ELASTIC-PLASTIC PROJECTILE DUE TO NORMAL IMPACT P . C. T. CHEN J. E...PROJECTILE DUE TO NORMAL IMPACT 5. TYPE OF REPORT 4 PERIOD COVERED Final S. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHORfa; P . C. T. Chen, J...the following material data will be used: E = 208 GPa, p = 0.783 g/cc, v = 0.293 ay = 1.3 GPa, Ep = 4 GPa, CD 1 Cristescu, N., Dynamic

  7. Differential Transcriptional Response in Macrophages Infected with Cell Wall Deficient versus Normal Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yu-Rong; Gao, Kun-Shan; Ji, Rui; Yi, Zheng-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Host-pathogen interactions determine the outcome following infection by mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Under adverse circumstances, normal Mtb can form cell-wall deficient (CWD) variants within macrophages, which have been considered an adaptive strategy for facilitating bacterial survival inside macrophages. However, the molecular mechanism by which infection of macrophages with different phenotypic Mtb elicits distinct responses of macrophages is not fully understood. To explore the molecular events triggered upon Mtb infection of macrophages, differential transcriptional responses of RAW264.7 cells infected with two forms of Mtb, CWD-Mtb and normal Mtb, were studied by microarray analysis. Some of the differentially regulated genes were confirmed by RT-qPCR in both RAW264.7 cells and primary macrophages. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway was used to analyze functions of differentially expressed genes. Distinct gene expression patterns were observed between CWD-Mtb and normal Mtb group. Mapt was up-regulated, while NOS2 and IL-11 were down-regulated in CWD-Mtb infected RAW264.7 cells and primary macrophages compared with normal Mtb infected ones. Many deregulated genes were found to be related to macrophages activation, immune response, phagosome maturation, autophagy and lipid metabolism. KEGG analysis showed that the differentially expressed genes were mainly involved in MAPK signaling pathway, nitrogen metabolism, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and focal adhesion. Taken together, the present study showed that differential macrophage responses were induced by intracellular CWD-Mtb an normal Mtb infection, which suggested that interactions between macrophages and different phenotypic Mtb are very complex. The results provide evidence for further understanding of pathogenesis of CWD-Mtb and may help in improving strategies to eliminate intracellular CWD-Mtb. PMID:25552926

  8. Human cytokine responses induced by Gram-positive cell walls of normal intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Chen, T; Isomäki, P; Rimpiläinen, M; Toivanen, P

    1999-01-01

    The normal microbiota plays an important role in the health of the host, but little is known of how the human immune system recognizes and responds to Gram-positive indigenous bacteria. We have investigated cytokine responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to Gram-positive cell walls (CW) derived from four common intestinal indigenous bacteria, Eubacterium aerofaciens (Eu.a.), Eubacterium limosum(Eu.l.), Lactobacillus casei(L.c.), and Lactobacillus fermentum (L.f.). Our results indicate that Gram-positive CW of the normal intestinal microbiota can induce cytokine responses of the human PBMC. The profile, level and kinetics of these responses are similar to those induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or CW derived from a pathogen, Streptococcus pyogenes (S.p.). Bacterial CW are capable of inducing production of a proinflammatory cytokine, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and an anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, but not that of IL-4 or interferon-gamma (IFN-γ). Monocytes are the main cell population in PBMC to produce TNF-α and IL-10. Induction of cytokine secretion is serum-dependent; both CD14-dependent and -independent pathways are involved. These findings suggest that the human cytokine responses induced by Gram-positive CW of the normal intestinal microbiota are similar to those induced by LPS or Gram-positive CW of the pathogens. PMID:10540188

  9. Blood pressure and renal haemodynamic response to salt during the normal menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Pechère-Bertschi, A; Maillard, M; Stalder, H; Brunner, H R; Burnier, M

    2000-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate prospectively blood pressure and the renal haemodynamic response to salt during the normal menstrual cycle. A total of 35 healthy normotensive young women not on oral contraceptives were enrolled; 17 were studied in the follicular phase and 18 in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. The women in each group were then randomly allocated to receive a low-sodium (40 mmol/day) or a high-sodium (250 mmol/day) diet for a 7-day period in two consecutive menstrual cycles. At the end of each dietary period, 24 h ambulatory blood pressure, urinary sodium excretion, plasma renin activity, plasma catecholamine levels and renal haemodynamics were measured. Our results show that the blood pressure response to salt is comparable during the luteal and the follicular phases of the normal menstrual cycle and is characterized by a salt-resistant pattern. In the kidney, effective renal plasma flow was significantly greater and the filtration fraction lower (P<0.05) after salt loading in women studied in the luteal phase compared with women investigated in the follicular phase. This study thus demonstrates that the female hormone status does not affect the blood pressure response to sodium in young normotensive women. However, in contrast with systemic haemodynamics, the renal response to salt varies during the normal menstrual cycle, suggesting that female sex hormones play a role (direct or indirect) in the regulation of renal haemodynamics.

  10. Normalizing and scaling of data to derive human response corridors from impact tests.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Arun, Mike W J; Pintar, Frank A

    2014-06-03

    It is well known that variability is inherent in any biological experiment. Human cadavers (Post-Mortem Human Subjects, PMHS) are routinely used to determine responses to impact loading for crashworthiness applications including civilian (motor vehicle) and military environments. It is important to transform measured variables from PMHS tests (accelerations, forces and deflections) to a standard or reference population, termed normalization. The transformation process should account for inter-specimen variations with some underlying assumptions used during normalization. Scaling is a process by which normalized responses are converted from one standard to another (example, mid-size adult male to large-male and small-size female adults, and to pediatric populations). These responses are used to derive corridors to assess the biofidelity of anthropomorphic test devices (crash dummies) used to predict injury in impact environments and design injury mitigating devices. This survey examines the pros and cons of different approaches for obtaining normalized and scaled responses and corridors used in biomechanical studies for over four decades. Specifically, the equal-stress equal-velocity and impulse-momentum methods along with their variations are discussed in this review. Methods ranging from subjective to quasi-static loading to different approaches are discussed for deriving temporal mean and plus minus one standard deviation human corridors of time-varying fundamental responses and cross variables (e.g., force-deflection). The survey offers some insights into the potential efficacy of these approaches with examples from recent impact tests and concludes with recommendations for future studies. The importance of considering various parameters during the experimental design of human impact tests is stressed.

  11. Ejection fraction response to exercise in patients with chest pain and normal coronary arteriograms

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, R.L.; Lee, K.L.; Cobb, F.; Jones, R.H.

    1981-11-01

    In this study we describe the ejection fraction response to upright exercise using first-pass radionuclide angiocardiography in a group of 60 patients with chest pain, normal coronary ateriograms and normal resting ventricular function. A wide range of resting function (heart rate and ejection fraction) and exercise function (heart rate, ejection fraction, peak work load and estimated peak oxygen uptake) were measured. The ejection fraction response to exercise demonstrated wide variation, ranging from a decrease of 23% to an increase of 24%. Six of 22 clinical and radionuclide angiocardiographic variables (resting ejection fraction, peak work load, age, sex, body surface area and the change in end-diastolic volume index with exercise) were significant univariate predictors of the ejection fraction response to exercise. Multivariable analysis identified resting ejection fraction, the change in end-diastolic volume index with exercise and either sex or peak work load as variables that provided significant independent predictive information. These observations indicate that the ejection fraction response to exercise is a complex response that is influenced by multiple physiologic variables. The wide variation in this population suggests that the ejection fraction response to exercise is not a reliable test for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease because of its low specificity.

  12. Normal minimal erythema dose responses in patients with suspected photosensitivity disorders.

    PubMed

    Que, Syril Keena T; Brauer, Jeremy A; Soter, Nicholas A; Cohen, David E

    2012-12-01

    Our study identified the most common diagnoses in patients with a history of photosensitivity or with a photodistributed eruption and normal minimal erythema dose (MED) responses. We retrospectively reviewed the diagnoses and phototest results of 319 patients who were phototested at the New York University Photomedicine Section of the Charles C. Harris Skin and Cancer Pavilion from 1993 to 2009. Patients were phototested if they had a history of photosensitivity or had an eruption with a distribution that suggested photosensitivity. The majority of patients with normal MEDs were diagnosed with polymorphous light eruption, followed by contact or photocontact dermatitis, photodistributed dermatitis not otherwise specified (idiopathic), solar urticaria and photoexacerbated atopic dermatitis. The clinical history of photosensitivity and physical findings remain as important metrics in the diagnosis of patients with photodistributed dermatoses and normal MEDs. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Equine Chorionic Gonadotropin and Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Stimulation Increase the Number of Luteinized Follicles and the Progesterone Level Compared with Cabergoline Stimulation in Anoestrus Bitches.

    PubMed

    Jurczak, A; Domosławska, A; Bukowska, B; Janowski, T

    2016-08-01

    In this study, ovarian morphologies and blood progesterone concentrations following oestrous induction in bitches were examined. Fifty-three clinically healthy anoestrus bitches received cabergoline at a daily dose of 5 μg/kg of body weight per os for 21 days (group I) or subcutaneous equine chorionic gonadotropin at a dose of 20 IU/kg of body weight for five consecutive days with an additional 500 IU s.c. per bitch of human chorionic gonadotropin on the last day of treatment (group II). Twenty bitches that spontaneously displayed oestrous signs were left untreated and served as controls (group III). The induced oestrous rates and ovulation rates in groups I and II were 60.0% vs 64.3% and 86.7% vs 83.3%, respectively. Morphological assessments of the ovarian structures after ovariohysterectomy revealed an increase in the number of luteinized follicles and cysts in group II compared with the two other groups (p < 0.001). In contrast, the numbers of corpora lutea and follicles were similar in all groups. In accordance with the above-mentioned alteration, the progesterone concentration in the gonadotropin group (II) was increased (p < 0.001) in the periovulatory period compared with the other two groups. During the entire sampling period, the progesterone profiles in the cabergoline (I) and control (III) groups were similar and typical of normally cycling bitches. In conclusion, gonadotropin treatment is associated with an increased progesterone level during the periovulatory period that probably originates from luteinized follicles, whereas cabergoline treatment induces cycles with both physiological progesterone concentrations and ovarian morphologies.

  14. Differences in leucocyte-endothelium interactions between normal and adenocarcinoma bearing tissues in response to radiation.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, N. Z.; Ross, B. A.; Gulledge, C.; Klitzman, B.; Dodge, R.; Dewhirst, M. W.

    1994-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that the interaction between leucocytes and endothelial cells in tumour tissues is greatly diminished compared with normal tissues under several induced inflammatory conditions. Radiation has been reported to cause release of inflammatory mediators and to promote neutrophil adhesions to cultured endothelial monolayers. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that radiation would cause increased leucocyte rolling and adhesion in both tumour and normal tissues. We examined these two parameters in response to 6 Gy of gamma-radiation in mammary adenocarcinomas implanted into rat skinfold window chambers as well as normal (i.e. non-tumour-bearing) preparations. Leucocyte rolling and adhesion were measured in terms of flux of rolling leucocytes (F(rolling)) and density of adhering leucocytes (D(adhering)) in microvessels. F(rolling) and D(adhering) were measured in two groups of preparations: irradiated and control. In normal preparations, F(rolling) and D(adhering) were both increased significantly by radiation. In contrast, in adenocarcinoma-bearing preparations, F(rolling) and D(adhering) were either unchanged (in the tumour centre) or reduced (in tumour periphery and the normal tissue surrounding the tumour) by radiation. Radiation did not cause changes in haemodynamics in these preparations, thus the observed changes in leucocyte rolling and adhesion could not be accounted for by haemodynamic factors. These results indicate that: (1) in normal preparations, radiation could cause inflammation as manifested by increased leucocyte rolling and adhesion; and (2) in tumour-bearing preparations, radiation caused changes in the vascular surface properties such that they became less adhesive to leucocytes. Such differences in radiation response may have important implications for radiation therapy and provide new insights into the unique features of tumours. Images Figure 2 PMID:8180019

  15. Effect of 2 different anesthesia methods on stress response in neurosurgical patients with hypertension or normal

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Jiang, Shan; Wu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hypertensive patients in neurosurgery are becoming more common, which increased the risk of surgical stress response. Meanwhile, the relationship between hypertension and anesthesia methods is unclear on the stress response. The purpose of this study is to compare the effect of different anesthesia methods on high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP), blood glucose, and leucocyte levels in neurosurgical patients with hypertension or normal. Eighty neurosurgical patients were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 20): balanced anesthesia group (A), balanced anesthesia with hypertension group (B), total intravenous anesthesia group (C), total intravenous anesthesia with hypertension group (D). The levels of Hs-CRP, blood glucose, leucocyte count, and neutrophil percentage and were detected at before anesthesia (T0), during anesthesia (T1), 2 hours post anesthesia (T2), 24 hours post anesthesia (T3). Patients with hypertension had higher Hs-CRP expression, blood glucose, and neutrophil percentage at time T0 than those of normal, but not leucocyte count. At time T3, patients with hypertension in D group had lower Hs-CRP expression than those in B group (P < 0.01). Patients with normal in C group had lower Hs-CRP expression (P < 0.01), blood glucose (P < 0.05), and leukocyte count (P < 0.05) than those in A group. Both hypertension history and anesthesia method had significant effects on the Hs-CRP expression, blood glucose, and leukocyte count. Total intravenous anesthesia decreases Hs-CRP expressions more efficiently than balanced anesthesia in neurosurgical patients with hypertension or normal. Moreover, total intravenous anesthesia can availably reduce the perioperative stress response by attenuating the increase of blood glucose and leukocyte count in normal tensive patients. PMID:27583931

  16. Response of Seedlings of a Dwarf and a Normal Strain of Watermelon to Gibberellins 1

    PubMed Central

    Loy, J. Brent; Liu, Peter B. W.

    1974-01-01

    Hypocotyl and root elongation in a dwarf and a normal strain of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus [Thunb.] Matsu.) in the absence or presence of different gibberellins was investigated in seedlings grown under gold fluorescent light or in darkness. The normal strain, “Sugar Baby,” responded only slightly to the gibberellic acids employed. At appropriate concentrations all of the gibberellic acids were capable of normalizing growth in the monorecessive dwarf strain, WB-2, in darkness or in light. Gibberellins A4+7 and A7 were effective in stimulating hypocotyl elongation at concentrations 10 to 15 times lower than that needed for a response to GA1 or GA3. Dark-grown dwarfs responded to about a 3-fold lower concentration of GA4+7 than those grown in light. In contrast to hypocotyl elongation, root elongation was greater in the dwarf than in the normal strain. Concentrations of gibberellic acids which enhanced hypocotyl elongation of WB-2 plants, inhibited root growth proportionately. Anatomically, the response of the dwarf strain to GA4+7 was primarily in terms of increased cell division. Dark-enhanced elongation of both SB and WB-2 was due almost solely to increased cell elongation. The results suggest that, at least in some species, a major component of dark-enhanced growth (or light-inhibited growth) is physiologically distinct from gibberellic acid-stimulated elongation. PMID:16658700

  17. Quantitative radiation dose-response relationships for normal tissues in man - I. Gustatory tissues response during photon and neutron radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mossman, K.L.

    1982-08-01

    Quantitative radiation dose-response curves for normal gustatory tissue in man were studied. Taste function, expressed as taste loss, was evaluated in 84 patients who were given either photon or neutron radiotherapy for tumors in the head and neck region. Patients were treated to average tumor doses of 6600 cGy (photon) or 2200 cGy intervals for photon patients and 320-cGy intervals for neutron patients during radiotherapy. The dose-response curves for photons and neutrons were analyzed by fitting a four-parameter logistic equation to the data. Photon and neutron curves differed principally in their relative position along the dose axis. Comparison of the dose-response curves were made by determination of RBE. At 320 cGy, the lowest neutron dose at which taste measurements were made, RBE = 5.7. If this RBE is correct, then the therapeutic gain factor may be equal to or less than 1, indicating no biological advantage in using neutrons over photons for this normal tissue. These studies suggest measurements of taste function and evaluation of dose-response relationships may also be useful in quantitatively evaluating the efficacy of chemical modifiers of radiation response such as hypoxic cell radiosensitizers and radioprotectors.

  18. Normalization of the heart rate response to exercise 6 months after cardiac transplantation.

    PubMed

    Buendía Fuentes, F; Martínez-Dolz, L; Almenar Bonet, L; Sánchez-Lázaro, I; Navarro Manchón, J; Sánchez-Gómez, J M; Raso Raso, R; Agüero-Ramón-Llin, J; Sancho-Tello de Carranza, M J; Salvador Sanz, A

    2010-10-01

    Heart transplant recipients show an abnormal heart rate (HR) response to exercise due to complete cardiac denervation after surgery. They present elevated resting HR, minimal increase in HR during exercise, with maximal HR reached during the recovery period. The objective of this study was to study the frequency of normalization of the abnormal HR in the first 6 months after transplantation. We prospectively studied 27 heart transplant recipients who underwent treadmill exercise tests at 2 and 6 months after heart transplantation (HT). HR responses to exercise were classified as normal or abnormal, depending on achieving all of the following criteria: (1) increased HR for each minute of exercise, (2) highest HR at the peak exercise intensity, and (3) decreased HR for each minute of the recovery period. The HR response at 2 months was compared with the results at 6 months post-HT. At 2 months post-HT, 96.3% of the patients showed abnormal HR responses to exercise. Four months later, 11 patients (40.7%) had normalized HR responses (P<.001), which also involved a significant decrease in the time to achieve the highest HR after exercise (124.4±63.8 seconds in the first test and 55.6±44.6 seconds in the second). A significant improvement in exercise capacity and chronotropic competence was also shown in tests performed at 6 months after surgery. We observed important improvements in HR responses to exercise at 6 months after HT, which may represent early functional cardiac reinnervation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Nystagmus responses in a group of normal humans during earth-horizontal axis rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, Conrad, III; Furman, Joseph M. R.

    1989-01-01

    Horizontal eye movement responses to earth-horizontal yaw axis rotation were evaluated in 50 normal human subjects who were uniformly distributed in age (20-69 years) and each age group was then divided by gender. Subjects were rotated with eyes open in the dark, using clockwise and counter-clockwise 60 deg velocity trapezoids. The nystagmus slow component velocity is analyzed. It is shown that, despite large intersubject variability, parameters which describe earth-horizontal yaw axis responses are loosely interrelated, and some of them vary significantly with gender and age.

  20. Nystagmus responses in a group of normal humans during earth-horizontal axis rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, Conrad, III; Furman, Joseph M. R.

    1989-01-01

    Horizontal eye movement responses to earth-horizontal yaw axis rotation were evaluated in 50 normal human subjects who were uniformly distributed in age (20-69 years) and each age group was then divided by gender. Subjects were rotated with eyes open in the dark, using clockwise and counter-clockwise 60 deg velocity trapezoids. The nystagmus slow component velocity is analyzed. It is shown that, despite large intersubject variability, parameters which describe earth-horizontal yaw axis responses are loosely interrelated, and some of them vary significantly with gender and age.

  1. Endocrine disrupting chemicals affect the gonadotropin releasing hormone neuronal network.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Johanna K; Heger, Sabine

    2014-04-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals have been shown to alter the pubertal process. The controlling levels of the Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) network involve GnRH itself, KiSS1, and the transcriptional regulators enhanced at puberty 1 (EAP1), Thyroid Transcription Factor 1 (TTF1), and Yin Yang 1 (YY1). While Genistein and Bisphenol A (BPA) have been shown to advance the advent of puberty, exposure to Dioxin delayed pubertal onset. Utilizing in vitro approaches, we observed that Genistein and BPA suppress inhibitory and activate stimulatory components of the GnRH network, while Dioxin exhibit an inhibitory effect at all regulatory hierarchical levels of the GnRH network. It repressed KiSS1, Gnrh, Ttf1 and Yy1 transcription via the xenobiotic response element (XRE), while EAP1 was not affected. Therefore, EDCs alter the neuroendocrine GnRH regulatory network at all hierarchical levels.

  2. Gonadotropin regulation of in vitro androgen production by reptilian testes.

    PubMed

    Wo Tsui, H; Licht, P

    1977-04-01

    The hormonal regulation of in vitro androgen production by minced testes from 7 species of reptiles representing the 3 major orders was studied using purified follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) from tetrapod species. Androgen content was measured by radioimmunoassay. All 7 species showed a dose-dependent response to all preparations of FSH and LH tested. However, variations were found depending on the species tested and the source of the hormone. All snake hormones were particularly inactive in turtles. Some of the variation in relative potencies of hormone reflect phylogenetic specificity in the testes. Synergism between FSH and LH was tested in the sea turtle. While subliminal doses of FSH and LH produced a small stimulation of androgen production, each alone was ineffective. Both gonadotropins have intrinsic activity with regard to the stimulation of steroidogenesis.

  3. Neurological damage disrupts normal sex differences in psychophysiological responsiveness to music.

    PubMed

    Belfi, Amy M; Chen, Kuan-Hua; Schneider, Brett; Tranel, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Men and women often display different physiological responses to emotional stimuli, and these responses can be affected by brain damage. Here, we investigated how brain damage differentially affects electrodermal responses based on sex. We studied neurologically normal, healthy adults and a sample of neurological patients. Participants listened to music, an emotional stimulus that reliably elicits skin conductance responses (SCRs). Electrodermal activity was recorded while participants listened to musical clips. When analyzing the data without regard to sex, there were no differences between healthy and brain-damaged participants in their SCRs. However, we found a significant interaction between brain injury status and sex. For men, brain damage significantly reduced SCRs. For women, there were no differences between brain-damaged participants and neurologically healthy participants. These findings illustrate the importance of including demographic variables, such as sex, when investigating brain-behavior relationships with a psychophysiological dependent variable. © 2015 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  4. Optimization of correlated multi-response quality engineering by the upside-down normal loss function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeybek, Melis; Köksoy, Onur

    2016-08-01

    Most of the published literature on robust design is basically concerned with a single response. However, the reality is that common industrial problems usually involve several quality characteristics, which are often correlated. Traditional approaches to multidimensional quality do not offer much information on how much better or worse a process is when finding optimal settings. Köksoy and Fan [Engineering Optimization 44 (8): 935-945] pointed out that the upside-down normal loss function provides a more reasonable risk assessment to the losses of being off-target in product engineering research. However, they only consider the single-response case. This article generalizes their idea to more than one response under possible correlations and co-movement effects of responses on the process loss. The response surface methodology has been adapted, estimating the expected multivariate upside-down normal loss function of a multidimensional system to find the optimal control factor settings of a given problem. The procedure and its merits are illustrated through an example.

  5. Gene Expression Profile Analysis as a Prognostic Indicator of Normal Tissue Response to Simulated Space Radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Story, Michael; Stivers, David N.

    2004-01-01

    This project was funded as a pilot project to determine the feasibility of using gene expression profiles to characterize the response of human cells to exposure to particulate radiations such as those encountered in the spaceflight environment. We proposed to use microarray technology to examine the gene expression patterns of a bank of well-characterized human fibroblast cell cultures. These fibroblast cultures were derived from breast or head and neck cancer patients who exhibited normal, minimal, or severe normal tissue reactions following low LET radiation exposure via radiotherapy. Furthermore, determination of SF2 values from fibroblasts cultured from these individuals were predictive of risk for severe late reactions. We hypothesized that by determining the expression of thousands of genes we could identify gene expression patterns that reflect how normal tissues respond to high Z and energy (HZE) particles, that is, that there are molecular signatures for HZE exposures. We also hypothesized that individuals who are intrinsically radiosensitive may elicit a unique response. Because this was funded as a pilot project we focused our initial studies on logistics and appropriate experimental design, and then to test our hypothesis that there is a unique molecular response to specific particles, in this case C and Fe, for primary human skin fibroblasts.

  6. Temperature and humidity modify airway response to inhaled histamine in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Amirav, I; Plit, M

    1989-11-01

    The airway response to inhaled histamine is known to be influenced by various stimuli (e.g., infection, ozone). Temperature (T) has been shown to affect it in vitro. We studied whether T and humidity (H) modify airway response to inhaled histamine in normal subjects. Twelve normal subjects 21 to 46 yr of age (mean age, 29 yr) performed two similar histamine inhalation tests, the only difference being the conditions of the inspired air. One test was done while breathing cold dry air (mean T +/- SEM, -17.3 +/- 1.8 degrees C; relative H, 0%), and the other while breathing warm humid air (mean T +/- SEM, 33.9 +/- 0.5 degrees C; relative H, 100%). Whereas the geometric mean histamine concentration required to produce a 15% fall in FEV1 in the warm humid tests was 22.7 mg/ml, it was 11.9 mg/ml in the cold dry test (p less than 0.01). It is concluded that the T and H of inspired air modify the airway response to inhaled histamine in normal subjects.

  7. Effect of aspirin dose, preparation, and withdrawal on platelet response in normal volunteers.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Jacqueline L; Alberts, Mark J

    2006-09-15

    A significant difference in individual response to aspirin therapy has been described, and studies have shown that a minimal response to aspirin may be associated with increased risk for some cardiovascular events. However, it remains unclear if aspirin dose, coating, or termination alters the antiplatelet effects of aspirin. Normal volunteers were randomly assigned to enteric-coated or uncoated aspirin 81 or 325 mg and monitored over 12 days with a point-of-care aspirin assay that incorporates the platelet agonist arachidonic acid. The antiplatelet response was greater with a 325-mg dose than with an 81-mg dose. A coating slowed the antiplatelet response to the 81-mg dose only. There were no differences among the groups after maximum response was achieved between days 4 and 7. There was significant recovery of platelet aggregation <48 hours after the cessation of aspirin, with a return to baseline values by the fifth day. A significant interpatient variation in response to the 4 dosing regimes was observed. In conclusion, the antiplatelet response was more rapid to a 325-mg/day dose of aspirin compared with an 81-mg/day dose. An enteric-coated preparation delayed the time of response to an 81-mg/day dose. These results suggest that aspirin dose and preparation may be important mediators of the antiplatelet effects of aspirin in some patients.

  8. Alanine aminotransferase normalization at week 8 predicts viral response during hepatitis C treatment.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Umit Bilge; Akin, Mustafa Salih; Yalaki, Serkan

    2013-12-14

    To investigate alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and sustained virological response (SVR) in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) during peginterferon-ribavirin treatment. One hundred and fifty-one genotype 1 CHC patients underwent treatment for 48 wk with peginterferon and ribavirin, and were retrospectively divided into two groups as having a rapid virological response (RVR) (Group 1, n = 52) and not having an RVR (Group 2, n = 99). We also subdivided each group into two according to the initial ALT level being high (Group 1h and Group 2h) or normal (Group 1n and Group 2n). HCV RNA and ALT levels were measured at baseline; at 4, 12, 24 and 48 wk during the treatment period; and at 24 wk follow-up. ALT levels were also obtained at 8 wk. According to the results of ALT, patients were enrolled in either the follow-up abnormal or follow-up normalized ALT groups at each interval. Patients with high and normal ALT levels were compared for each interval in terms of SVR. The SVR rates were 83% vs 40% (P = 0.000), 82% vs 84% (P = 0.830), and 37% vs 44% (P = 0.466) when comparing Group 1 with 2, 1h with 1n, and 2h with 2n, respectively. In Group 2h, the SVR rates were 34% vs 40% (P = 0.701), 11% vs 52% (P = 0.004), 12% vs 50% (P = 0.007), 7% vs 50% (P = 0.003), 6% vs 53% (P = 0.001), and 0% vs 64% (P = 0.000) when comparing patients with high and normalized ALT levels at week 4, 8, 12, 24, 48 and 72, respectively. The multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that RVR (OR = 7.05; 95%CI: 3.1-16.05, P = 0.000), complete early virological response (cEVR) (OR = 17.55; 95%CI: 6.32-48.76, P = 0.000), normalization of ALT at 8 wk (OR = 3.04; 95%CI: 1.31-7.06, P = 0.008), and at 12 wk (OR = 4.21; 95%CI: 1.65-10.76, P = 0.002) were identified as independent significant predictive factors for SVR. Normalization of ALT at 8 wk may predict viral response during peginterferon-ribavirin treatment in genotype-1 CHC patients especially without RVR.

  9. Differentiating shunt-responsive normal pressure hydrocephalus from Alzheimer disease and normal aging: pilot study using automated MRI brain tissue segmentation.

    PubMed

    Serulle, Yafell; Rusinek, Henry; Kirov, Ivan I; Milch, Hannah; Fieremans, Els; Baxter, Alexander B; McMenamy, John; Jain, Rajan; Wisoff, Jeffrey; Golomb, James; Gonen, Oded; George, Ajax E

    2014-10-01

    Evidence suggests that normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) is underdiagnosed in day to day radiologic practice, and differentiating NPH from cerebral atrophy due to other neurodegenerative diseases and normal aging remains a challenge. To better characterize NPH, we test the hypothesis that a prediction model based on automated MRI brain tissue segmentation can help differentiate shunt-responsive NPH patients from cerebral atrophy due to Alzheimer disease (AD) and normal aging. Brain segmentation into gray and white matter (GM, WM), and intracranial cerebrospinal fluid was derived from pre-shunt T1-weighted MRI of 15 shunt-responsive NPH patients (9 men, 72.6 ± 8.0 years-old), 17 AD patients (10 men, 72.1 ± 11.0 years-old) chosen as a representative of cerebral atrophy in this age group; and 18 matched healthy elderly controls (HC, 7 men, 69.7 ± 7.0 years old). A multinomial prediction model was generated based on brain tissue volume distributions. GM decrease of 33% relative to HC characterized AD (P < 0.005). High preoperative ventricular and near normal GM volumes characterized NPH. A multinomial regression model based on gender, GM and ventricular volume had 96.3% accuracy differentiating NPH from AD and HC. In conclusion, automated MRI brain tissue segmentation differentiates shunt-responsive NPH with high accuracy from atrophy due to AD and normal aging. This method may improve diagnosis of NPH and improve our ability to distinguish normal from pathologic aging.

  10. Concomitant responses of upper airway stabilizing muscles to transcranial magnetic stimulation in normal men.

    PubMed

    Sériès, Frédéric; Wang, Wei; Mélot, Christian; Similowski, Thomas

    2008-04-01

    Upper airway stabilizing muscles play a crucial role in the maintenance of upper airway patency. Transcranial magnetic stimulation allows the investigation of the corticomotor activation process for respiratory muscles. This technique has also been used to evaluate the genioglossus corticomotor response. The aims of this study were to characterize the response of different upper airway stabilizing muscles to focal cortical stimulation of the genioglossus. Alae nasi, genioglossus, levator palatini, palatoglossus and diaphragm motor-evoked potential responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation were recorded during expiration, tidal inspiration and deep inspiration in nine normal awake subjects. A concomitant response of the four studied upper airway muscles was observed in the majority of cortical stimuli. The response of these muscles was independent of the diaphragmatic one that was only occasionally observed. Significant positive relationships were found between alae nasi, levator palatini and palatoglossus motor-evoked potential latencies and amplitudes and the corresponding values of the genioglossus. We conclude that transcranial magnetic stimulation applied in the genioglossus area induces a concomitant motor response of upper airway stabilizing muscles with consistent changes in their motor responses during inspiratory manoeuvres.

  11. Relationship Between Psychophysiological Responses to Aversive Odors and Nutritional Status During Normal Aging.

    PubMed

    Joussain, Pauline; Ferdenzi, Camille; Djordjevic, Jelena; Bensafi, Moustafa

    2017-07-01

    Psychophysiological responses to disgusting and pleasant smells are one of the most important aspects of olfaction. These emotional signals can constitute an alert against toxic substances, and they may play a major role in food selection and nutritional intake. The aim of this study was to test this hypothesis by examining whether individual physiological responses to odors could predict the subject's nutritional status. Because aging is associated with changes in emotional response to smells, we also examined how aging affects the relationship between olfaction and nutrition. Twenty young and 20 old participants perceived a series of odorants while their psychophysiological responses were simultaneously measured, and completed the Mini-Nutritional Assessment (MNA) questionnaire. Regression between individual correlation coefficients (r-values between odor perceptual ratings and physiological parameters) and individual MNA scores revealed that appropriateness of the physiological responses to aversive odors predicted nutritional status (R2 = 0.22, P < 0.007): participants with higher electromyogram corrugator activity in response to aversive smells had better nutritional status. Furthermore, this relationship was significant in old (R2 = 0.45, P < 0.005) but not young participants (R2 = 0.04, P > 0.44). Taken together, preserved functioning of somatic markers in response to odors during normal aging is associated with better nutritional status, and may facilitate healthier food selection. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Brain response to food stimulation in obese, normal weight, and successful weight loss maintainers

    PubMed Central

    Sweet, Lawrence H.; Hassenstab, Jason J.; McCaffery, Jeanne M.; Raynor, Hollie A.; Bond, Dale S.; Demos, Kathryn E.; Haley, Andreana P.; Cohen, Ronald A.; Del Parigi, Angelo; Wing, Rena R.

    2012-01-01

    As many people struggle with maintenance of weight loss, the study of successful weight loss maintainers (SWLM) can yield important insights into factors contributing to weight loss maintenance. However, little research has examined how SWLM differ from people who are obese or normal weight (NW) in brain response to orosensory stimulation. The goal of this study was to determine if SWLM exhibit different brain responses to orosensory stimulation. Brain response to one-minute orosensory stimulation with a lemon lollipop was assessed using functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) among 49 participants, including SWLM (n=17), NW (n=18) and obese (n=14) controls. Significant brain responses were observed in nine brain regions, including the bilateral insula, left inferior frontal gyrus, left putamen, and other sensory regions. All regions also exhibited significant attenuation of this response over one minute. The SWLM exhibited greater response compared to the other groups in all brain regions. Findings suggest that the response to orosensory stimulation peaks within 40 seconds and attenuates significantly between 40-60 seconds in regions associated with sensation, reward, and inhibitory control. Greater reactivity among the SWLM suggests that greater sensory reactivity to orosensory stimulation, increased anticipated reward, and subsequently greater inhibitory processing are associated with weight loss maintenance. PMID:22569002

  13. Proprietary tomato extract improves metabolic response to high-fat meal in healthy normal weight subjects

    PubMed Central

    Deplanque, Xavier; Muscente-Paque, Delphine; Chappuis, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation is a risk factor for atherosclerosis. Lycopene and tomato-based products have been described as potent inhibitors of LDL oxidation. Objectives To evaluate the effect of a 2-week supplementation with a carotenoid-rich tomato extract (CRTE) standardized for a 1:1 ratio of lycopene and phytosterols, on post-prandial LDL oxidation after a high-fat meal. Design In a randomized, double-blind, parallel-groups, placebo-controlled study, 146 healthy normal weight individuals were randomly assigned to a daily dose of CRTE standardized for tomato phytonutrients or placebo during 2 weeks. Oxidized LDL (OxLDL), glucose, insulin, and triglyceride (TG) responses were measured for 8 h after ingestion of a high-fat meal before and at the end of intervention. Results Plasma lycopene, phytofluene, and phytoene were increased throughout the study period in the CRTE group compared to placebo. CRTE ingestion significantly improved changes in OxLDL response to high-fat meal compared to placebo after 2 weeks (p<0.0001). Changes observed in glucose, insulin, and TG responses were not statistically significant after 2 weeks of supplementation, although together they may suggest a trend of favorable effect on metabolic outcomes after a high-fat meal. Conclusions Two-week supplementation with CRTE increased carotenoids levels in plasma and improved oxidized LDL response to a high-fat meal in healthy normal weight individuals. PMID:27707453

  14. Disparity vergence responses before versus after repetitive vergence therapy in binocularly normal controls

    PubMed Central

    Talasan, Henry; Scheiman, Mitchell; Li, Xiaobo; Alvarez, Tara L.

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to determine whether significant changes would be observed between vergence eye movements before and after 12 hr of repetitive vergence therapy (1 hr per day on different days) in subjects with normal binocular vision compared to controls. Disparity vergence responses from 23 subjects were studied. An assessment protocol that minimized the influence of the near dissociated phoria on the disparity vergence system was designed. The following parameters were quantified for the responses: latency, time to peak velocity, settling time, peak velocity, and accuracy (difference between the response and stimulus amplitudes). The following outcomes were observed when comparing the results after vergence therapy to the baseline measurements: (a) near point of convergence and near dissociated phoria did not significantly change (p > 0.15); (b) latency, time to peak velocity, and settling time significantly decreased (p ≤ 0.01); and (c) accuracy significantly improved (p < 0.01). Results support that vergence peak velocity is dependent on the subject's near dissociated phoria. The accuracy and temporal properties of vergence eye movement responses from subjects with normal binocular vision can be improved after vergence therapy. These methods can be utilized within future studies to quantitatively assess vergence therapy techniques for patients with binocular dysfunction. PMID:26762276

  15. Sleep restriction increases the neuronal response to unhealthy food in normal-weight individuals.

    PubMed

    St-Onge, M-P; Wolfe, S; Sy, M; Shechter, A; Hirsch, J

    2014-03-01

    Sleep restriction alters responses to food. However, the underlying neural mechanisms for this effect are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a neural system that is preferentially activated in response to unhealthy compared with healthy foods. Twenty-five normal-weight individuals, who normally slept 7-9 h per night, completed both phases of this randomized controlled study. Each participant was tested after a period of five nights of either 4 or 9 h in bed. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was performed in the fasted state, presenting healthy and unhealthy food stimuli and objects in a block design. Neuronal responses to unhealthy, relative to healthy food stimuli after each sleep period were assessed and compared. After a period of restricted sleep, viewing unhealthy foods led to greater activation in the superior and middle temporal gyri, middle and superior frontal gyri, left inferior parietal lobule, orbitofrontal cortex, and right insula compared with healthy foods. These same stimuli presented after a period of habitual sleep did not produce marked activity patterns specific to unhealthy foods. Further, food intake during restricted sleep increased in association with a relative decrease in brain oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) activity observed in the right insula. This inverse relationship between insula activity and food intake and enhanced activation in brain reward and food-sensitive centers in response to unhealthy foods provides a model of neuronal mechanisms relating short sleep duration to obesity.

  16. Regional and splenic lymphocyte proliferative responses of mice exposed to normal or irradiated Schistosoma mansoni cercariae

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, F.A.; Wilson, E.M.

    1982-05-01

    Developing larvae of Schistosoma mansoni migrate through various tissues en route to the liver and mesenteric veins of their definitive host. Regional (lymph node) and systemic (spleen) blastogenic responses to cercarial, adult and egg antigens were measured in CBA/J mice at various times after exposure to normal or irradiated S. mansoni cercariae. Among the separate lymph node groups studied were those draining the tail, thoracic region, intestines, head and neck, and the pelvis. Blastogenic responses were assayed by a micromethod requiring 10(5) cells in 20 microliter volumes per culture. Up to 5 weeks post-cercarial exposure the pattern of responses in lymphoid tissues of infected mice coincided with the migratory route of the parasites. Following oviposition, cellular reactivity was pronounced in all lymph node groups. The reactivity of mice exposed to irradiated cercariae followed a pattern suggestive of a sustained antigenic stimulus only in the nodes draining the tail and lungs. Splenic (systemic) reactivity was roughly comparable between the two exposure groups. These data show the independence and vast differences in the host regional responses following normal or irradiated cercarial exposure.

  17. Paradoxical consequence of human chorionic gonadotropin misuse.

    PubMed

    Pektezel, Mehmet Yasir; Bas, Demet Funda; Topcuoglu, Mehmet Akif; Arsava, Ethem Murat

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is commonly misused as a weight reducing or performance enhancing agent but is associated with increased risk of thromboembolic events. A 29-year-old female with a history of obesity was admitted to our center with a diagnosis of ischemic stroke. Etiologic workup revealed a large patent foramen ovale and history of recent use of hCG as part of a weight loss regimen. This report highlights the potential complications of hCG therapy, particularly when used for unapproved indications and without medical supervision.

  18. [Gonadotropin levels and spermatogenesis in infertile patients].

    PubMed

    Scarselli, G; DID, S

    1976-06-01

    165 STERILE MALE PATIENTS UNDERWENT SEMEN EXAMINATIONS AND SERUM GONADOTROPINS DOSAGE. In 47 of these patients a testicular biopsy was preformed. The results of the statistical analysis showed a significant correlation between the sperm count and the FSH in addition to a close and precise relation between the initial stages of the spermatogenesis and FSH. No correlation was found to exist in regard to the LH. The Authors finally showed their interpertation of such data, with the possibility of different prognosis in subjects having severe oligozoospermia, but with a bioptic picture which did or did not present damage at the spermatid maturation stage.

  19. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone stimulates prolactin release from lactotrophs in photoperiodic species through a gonadotropin-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Helen L; Hodson, David J; Gregory, Susan J; Townsend, Julie; Tortonese, Domingo J

    2008-02-01

    Previous studies have provided evidence for a paracrine interaction between pituitary gonadotrophs and lactotrophs. Here, we show that GnRH is able to stimulate prolactin (PRL) release in ovine primary pituitary cultures. This effect was observed during the breeding season (BS), but not during the nonbreeding season (NBS), and was abolished by the application of bromocriptine, a specific dopamine agonist. Interestingly, GnRH gained the ability to stimulate PRL release in NBS cultures following treatment with bromocriptine. In contrast, thyrotropin-releasing hormone, a potent secretagogue of PRL, stimulated PRL release during both the BS and NBS and significantly enhanced the PRL response to GnRH during the BS. These results provide evidence for a photoperiodically modulated functional interaction between the GnRH/gonadotropic and prolactin axes in the pituitary gland of a short day breeder. Moreover, the stimulation of PRL release by GnRH was shown not to be mediated by the gonadotropins, since immunocytochemical, Western blotting, and PCR studies failed to detect pituitary LH or FSH receptor protein and mRNA expressions. Similarly, no gonadotropin receptor expression was observed in the pituitary gland of the horse, a long day breeder. In contrast, S100 protein, a marker of folliculostellate cells, which are known to participate in paracrine mechanisms within this tissue, was detected throughout the pituitaries of both these seasonal breeders. Therefore, an alternative gonadotroph secretory product, a direct effect of GnRH on the lactotroph, or another cell type, such as the folliculostellate cell, may be involved in the PRL response to GnRH in these species.

  20. Estimating Non-Normal Latent Trait Distributions within Item Response Theory Using True and Estimated Item Parameters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sass, D. A.; Schmitt, T. A.; Walker, C. M.

    2008-01-01

    Item response theory (IRT) procedures have been used extensively to study normal latent trait distributions and have been shown to perform well; however, less is known concerning the performance of IRT with non-normal latent trait distributions. This study investigated the degree of latent trait estimation error under normal and non-normal…

  1. [Impact of gonadotropins in women suffering from cancer].

    PubMed

    Valdelièvre, Constance; Sonigo, Charlotte; Comtet, Marjorie; Simon, Cynthia; Eskenazi, Sarah; Grynberg, Michaël

    2016-03-01

    The role of gonadotropins in the genesis of malignant diseases, in particular gynecologic cancers, is still controversial. The production of ovarian steroids, as a consequence of FSH and LH actions, may constitute a bias to draw reliable conclusions. Over the past decades, the use of exogenous gonadotropins has markedly increased in cancer patients, candidates for fertility preservation, and in survivors facing infertility as a consequence of gonadotoxic treatments. In gynecologic cancers, high serum estradiol levels may be problematic and can therefore be overcome by specific protocols of ovarian stimulation. However, exogenous gonadotropin administration in cancer patients should systematically be included in a multidisciplinary approach. The present article discusses the possible role of gonadotropins as tumorigenic factors and the use of exogenous gonadotropins in females suffering from cancer.

  2. Normalization of neuronal responses in cortical area MT across signal strengths and motion directions

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jianbo; Niu, Yu-Qiong; Wiesner, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Multiple visual stimuli are common in natural scenes, yet it remains unclear how multiple stimuli interact to influence neuronal responses. We investigated this question by manipulating relative signal strengths of two stimuli moving simultaneously within the receptive fields (RFs) of neurons in the extrastriate middle temporal (MT) cortex. Visual stimuli were overlapping random-dot patterns moving in two directions separated by 90°. We first varied the motion coherence of each random-dot pattern and characterized, across the direction tuning curve, the relationship between neuronal responses elicited by bidirectional stimuli and by the constituent motion components. The tuning curve for bidirectional stimuli showed response normalization and can be accounted for by a weighted sum of the responses to the motion components. Allowing nonlinear, multiplicative interaction between the two component responses significantly improved the data fit for some neurons, and the interaction mainly had a suppressive effect on the neuronal response. The weighting of the component responses was not fixed but dependent on relative signal strengths. When two stimulus components moved at different coherence levels, the response weight for the higher-coherence component was significantly greater than that for the lower-coherence component. We also varied relative luminance levels of two coherently moving stimuli and found that MT response weight for the higher-luminance component was also greater. These results suggest that competition between multiple stimuli within a neuron's RF depends on relative signal strengths of the stimuli and that multiplicative nonlinearity may play an important role in shaping the response tuning for multiple stimuli. PMID:24899674

  3. Differential response of normal and malignant urothelial cells to CHK1 and ATM inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, W-T; Catto, J W F; Meuth, M

    2015-05-28

    While DNA damage response pathways are well characterized in cancer cells, much less is known about their status in normal cells. These pathways protect tumour cells from DNA damage and replication stress and consequently present potential therapeutic targets. Here we characterize the response of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT)-immortalized normal human urothelial (NHU) and bladder cancer cell lines to agents that disrupt the DNA damage response. Effects of replication and DNA damage response inhibitors on cell cycle progression, checkpoint induction and apoptosis were analysed in hTERT-NHU and bladder cancer cell lines. The primary signalling cascade responding to replication stress in malignant cells (ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) and Rad3-related-checkpoint kinase 1 (ATR-CHK1)) is not activated in hTERT-NHU cells after treatment with a replication inhibitor and these cells do not depend upon CHK1 for protection from apoptosis during replication stress. Instead, ATM signalling is rapidly activated under these conditions. Intriguingly, an ATM inhibitor suppressed S-phase checkpoint activation after exposure to replication inhibitors and stopped entry of cells into S-phase indicating G1 checkpoint activation. Consistent with this, hTERT-NHU cells treated with the ATM inhibitor showed increased levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p19(INK4D), reduced levels of cyclin D1 and CDK4, and reduced phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein. In contrast, a bladder cancer cell line cotreated with ATM and replication inhibitors progressed more slowly through S phase and showed a marked increase in apoptosis. Taken together, our findings suggest that ATM and CHK1 signalling cascades have different roles in tumour and normal epithelial cells, confirming these as promising therapeutic targets.

  4. Effect of short-term fasting on lipolytic responsiveness in normal and obese human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, R.R.; Peters, E.J.; Klein, S.; Holland, O.B.; Rosenblatt, J.; Gary, H. Jr.

    1987-02-01

    In this study the rate of lipolysis (fatty acid and glycerol release into blood) has been quantified in both normal weight and obese volunteers after both 15 and 87 h of fasting. In each study, the basal rate and subsequent response to epinephrine infusion were determined. The rate of appearance (R/sub a/) of free fatty acids (FFA) and glycerol were quantified by infusion of (1- TC)palmitate and D-5-glycerol, respectively. Substrate flux rates per unit of body fat mass and lean body mass were calculated from total body water measurements using H2 YO dilution. In normal volunteers, the basal R/sub a/ FFA and R/sub a/ glycerol rose markedly with 87 h of fasting, whereas the increases were more modest in the obese subjects. However, the rate of mobilization of fat, in relation to the lean body mass, was higher in the obese subjects than in the normal subjects after 15 h of fasting, and the values were similar in both groups after 87 h of fasting. There was an increased lipolytic response to epinephrine after fasting in both groups. This increased sensitivity may have resulted from the enhancement of fatty acid-triglyceride substrate cycling that occurred after fasting.

  5. Effects of Agaricus blazei Murill extract on immune responses in normal BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Tang, Nou-Ying; Yang, Jai-Sing; Lin, Jing-Pin; Hsia, Te-Chun; Fan, Ming-Jen; Lin, Jen-Jyh; Weng, Shu-Wen; Ma, Yi-Shih; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Shen, Jiann-Jong; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2009-01-01

    Agaricus blazei Murill (ABM) has shown particularly strong results in treating and preventing cancer and has also traditionally been used as a food source in Brazil. However, the exact immune responses regarding the phagocytosis of macrophage and, the activity of natural killer (NK) cells in normal mice after exposure to ABM extract was unclear. The goal of this study was to investigate whether or not ABM extract can promote immune responses in normal BALB/c mice. BALB/c mice were treated with different doses of ABM extract for different time periods. The results indicated that ABM extract significantly promoted the proliferation of splenocytes both in vitro and in vivo. ABM extract promoted the levels of interleukein-6 (IL-6) and, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) but reduced the levels of IL-4 in vitro and in vivo. The percentage of macrophages with phagocytosis after ABM extract treatment increased and these effects were of dose-dependent manners, both in vitro and in vivo. YAC-1 target cells were killed by NK cells from the mice after treatment with ABM extract at 3 and 6 mg/kg/day for up to 14 days at target cell ratios of 25:1 and 50:1. Taken together, these results show that ABM extract promoted immunomodulations in normal BALB/c mice in vitro and in vivo.

  6. Brainstem auditory-evoked response (BAER) in client-owned pet ferrets with normal hearing.

    PubMed

    Piazza, S; Huynh, M; Cauzinille, L

    2014-06-07

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of brainstem auditory-evoked response (BAER) testing in pet ferrets in a clinical setting, and to describe a routine method and baseline data for normal hearing ferrets for future investigation of deafness in this species. Twenty-eight clinically normal client-owned ferrets were included. BAER measurements were recorded under general anaesthesia (isoflurane delivered by mask), from subcutaneously placed needle electrodes. A 'click' stimulus applied by insert earphone with an intensity of 90 dB sound pressure level (SPL) was used. The final BAER waveform represents an average of 500 successive responses. Morphology of the waveform was studied; amplitude and latency measures were determined and means were calculated. The BAER waveform of the normal ferret included 4 reproducible waves named I, II, III and V, as previously described in dogs and cats. Measurements of latencies are consistent with previous laboratory research using experimental ferrets. In the present study, a reliable routine protocol for clinical evaluation of the hearing function in the pet ferret was established. This procedure can be easily and safely performed in a clinical setting in ferrets as young as eight weeks of age. The prevalence of congenital deafness in ferrets is currently unknown but may be an important consideration, especially in ferrets with a white coat. BAER test is a useful screening for congenital deafness in this species. British Veterinary Association.

  7. Simultaneous control of two rhythmical behaviors. I. Locomotion with paw-shake response in normal cat.

    PubMed

    Carter, M C; Smith, J L

    1986-07-01

    We investigated the ability of normal cats, trained to maintain a constant position while walking on a treadmill, to combine the paw-shake response with quadrupedal locomotion. Hindlimb paw-shake responses were elicited during walking after the right hindpaw was wrapped with tape. To assess intralimb and interlimb coordination of the combined behaviors, electromyographic (EMG) recordings from forelimb extensor muscles and from selected flexor and extensor muscles at the three major hindlimb joints were correlated with joint motion by using high-speed, cinefilm analysis. When paw shaking was combined with walking, the response occurred during the swing phase of the taped hindlimb. To accommodate the paw-shake response, swing duration of the shaking hindlimb and of the homolateral forelimb increased and was followed by a brief recovery step. Concurrently, to compensate for the response, stance durations of the contralateral forelimb and hindlimb increased. The magnitude of these adjustments in interlimb coordination was influenced by the number of paw-shake cycles, which ranged from one to four oscillations. Transitions between the muscle synergies for the paw-shake response and swing were smooth in the shaking limb. Early in the swing phase, when the flexor muscles were still active (F phase), the paw shake was initiated by an early onset of knee extensor activity, which preceded extensor activity at the hip and ankle. This action provided a transition from the general reciprocal synergy between flexor and extensor muscles of locomotion to the mixed synergy that is typical of the paw shake (30). Following the last paw-shake cycle, an extensor synergy initiated the E-1 phase of swing, and the resultant joint motion was in-phase extension of the hip, knee, and ankle to lower the paw for stance. Average cycle period and burst duration for muscles participating in the paw-shake response were similar to those reported for normal cats assuming a standing posture (28, 30

  8. Over-the-road tests of nuclear materials package response to normal environments

    SciTech Connect

    Gwinn, K.W.; Glass, R.E.; Edwards, K.R.

    1991-12-01

    In support of the development of American National Standards Institute standards for the transport of radioactive materials, Sandia has a program to characterize the normal transport environment. This program includes both analytical modeling of package and trailer responses, and over-the-road tests to measure those responses. This paper presents the results of a series of over-the-road tests performed using Chem-Nuclear equipment in the Barnwell, SC, area. The test events included a variety of road types such as rough concrete, shock events such as railroad grade crossings, and driver responses such as sharp turns. The response of the package and trailer to these events was measured with accelerometers at various locations to determine the inertial loads. Either load cells or strain gages were used to measure tiedown response. These accelerations and loads were measured on systems with flexible and ``rigid`` tiedowns. The results indicated that while significant accelerations occur on the trailer bed, these do not translate into equivalent loads in either the package or the tiedown system. This indicates that trailer-bed response should not be used in determining the load factor for fatigue calculations of the package components or in determining design loads for tiedowns.

  9. Use of the Hayling Task to Measure Inhibition of Prepotent Responses in Normal Aging and Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belleville, Sylvie; Rouleau, Nancie; Van der Linden, Martial

    2006-01-01

    This study measures the effect of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and normal aging on the inhibition of prepotent responses. AD patients, normal aged controls, and young subjects were tested with the Hayling task, which measures the ability to inhibit a semantically constrained response, and with the Stroop procedure. AD patients showed a severe deficit…

  10. Surface modification of microparticles causes differential uptake responses in normal and tumoral human breast epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patiño, Tania; Soriano, Jorge; Barrios, Lleonard; Ibáñez, Elena; Nogués, Carme

    2015-06-01

    The use of micro- and nanodevices as multifunctional systems for biomedical applications has experienced an exponential growth during the past decades. Although a large number of studies have focused on the design and fabrication of new micro- and nanosystems capable of developing multiple functions, a deeper understanding of their interaction with cells is required. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of different microparticle surfaces on their interaction with normal and tumoral human breast epithelial cell lines. For this, AlexaFluor488 IgG functionalized polystyrene microparticles (3 μm) were coated with Polyethyleneimine (PEI) at two different molecular weights, 25 and 750 kDa. The effect of microparticle surface properties on cytotoxicity, cellular uptake and endocytic pathways were assessed for both normal and tumoral cell lines. Results showed a differential response between the two cell lines regarding uptake efficiency and mechanisms of endocytosis, highlighting the potential role of microparticle surface tunning for specific cell targeting.

  11. Indentation loading response of a resonance sensor--discriminating prostate cancer and normal tissue.

    PubMed

    Jalkanen, Ville; Andersson, Britt M; Bergh, Anders; Ljungberg, Börje; Lindahl, Olof A

    2013-10-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer among men worldwide. Mechanical properties of prostate tissue are promising for distinguishing prostate cancer from healthy prostate tissue. The aim was to investigate the indentation loading response of a resonance sensor for discriminating prostate cancer tissue from normal tissue. Indentation measurements were done on prostate tissue specimens ex vivo from 10 patients from radical prostatectomy. The measurement areas were analysed using standard histological methods. The stiffness parameter was linearly dependent on the loading force (average R(2 )= 0.90) and an increased loading force caused a greater stiffness contrast of prostate cancer vs normal tissue. The accuracy of the stiffness contrast was assessed by the ROC curve with the area under the curve being 0.941 for a loading force of 12.8 mN. The results are promising for the development of a resonance sensor instrument for detecting prostate cancer.

  12. Modeling the biological response of normal human cells, including repair processes, to fractionated carbon beam irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Mami; Suzuki, Masao; Liu, Cuihua; Kaneko, Yumiko; Fukuda, Shigekazu; Ando, Koichi; Matsufuji, Naruhiro

    2013-01-01

    To understand the biological response of normal cells to fractionated carbon beam irradiation, the effects of potentially lethal damage repair (PLDR) and sublethal damage repair (SLDR) were both taken into account in a linear-quadratic (LQ) model. The model was verified by the results of a fractionated cell survival experiment with normal human fibroblast cells. Cells were irradiated with 200-kV X-rays and monoenergetic carbon ion beams (290 MeV/u) at two irradiation depths, corresponding to linear energy transfers (LETs) of approximately 13 keV/μm and 75 keV/μm, respectively, at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences. When we only took into account the repair factor of PLDR, γ, which was derived from the delayed assay, the cell survival response to fractionated carbon ion irradiation was not fully explained in some cases. When both the effects of SLDR and PLDR were taken into account in the LQ model, the cell survival response was well reproduced. The model analysis suggested that PLDR occurs in any type of radiation. The γ factors ranged from 0.36–0.93. In addition, SLD was perfectly repaired during the fraction interval for the lower LET irradiations but remained at about 30% for the high-LET irradiation. PMID:23449640

  13. Differential regulation of two forms of gonadotropin-releasing hormone messenger ribonucleic acid by gonadotropins in human immortalized ovarian surface epithelium and ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung-Hye; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Auersperg, Nelly; Leung, Peter C K

    2006-06-01

    Although gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) has been shown to play a role as an autocrine/ paracrine regulator of cell growth in ovarian surface epithelium and ovarian cancer, the factors which regulate the expression of GnRH and its receptor in these cells are not well characterized. In the present study, we employed real-time PCR to determine the potential regulatory effect of gonadotropins on the expression levels of GnRH I (the mammalian GnRH), GnRH II (a second form of GnRH) and their common receptor (GnRHR) in immortalized ovarian surface epithelial (IOSE-80 and IOSE-80PC) cells and ovarian cancer cell lines (A2780, BG-1, CaOV-3, OVCAR-3 and SKOV-3). The cells were treated with increasing concentrations (100 and 1000 ng/ml) of recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) or luteinizing hormone (LH) for 24 h. Treatment with FSH or LH reduced GnRH II mRNA levels in both IOSE cell lines and in three out of five ovarian cancer cell lines (A2780, BG-1 and OVCAR-3). A significant decrease in GnRHR mRNA levels was observed in IOSE and ovarian cancer cells, except CaOV-3 cells, following treatment with FSH or LH. In contrast, treatment with either FSH or LH had no effect on GnRH I mRNA levels in these cells, suggesting that gonadotropins regulate the two forms of GnRH and its receptor differentially. In separate experiments, the effect of gonadotropins on the anti-proliferative action of GnRH I and GnRH II agonists in IOSE-80, OVCAR-3 and SKOV-3 cells was investigated. The cells were pretreated with FSH or LH (100 ng/ml) for 24 h after which they were treated with either GnRH I or GnRH II (100 ng/ml) for 2 days, and cell growth was assessed by the MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide] assay. Pretreatment of the cells with FSH or LH significantly reversed the growth inhibitory effect of GnRH I and GnRH II agonists in these cell types. These results provide the first demonstration of a potential interaction between gonadotropins and the

  14. Landscape response to normal fault growth and linkage in the Southern Apennines, Italy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roda-Boluda, Duna; Whittaker, Alex

    2016-04-01

    It is now well-established that landscape can record spatial and temporal variations in tectonic rates. However, decoding this information to extract detailed histories of fault growth is often a complex problem that requires careful integration of tectonic and geomorphic data sets. Here, we present new data addressing both normal fault evolution and coupled landscape response for two normal faults in the Southern Apennines: the Vallo di Diano and East Agri faults. By integrating published constraints with new data, we show that these faults have total throws of up to 2100 m, and Holocene throw rates of up to 1 mm/yr at their maximum. We demonstrate that geomorphology is effectively recording tectonics, with relief, channel and catchment slopes varying along fault strike as normal fault activity does. Therefore, valuable information about fault growth and interaction can be extracted from their geomorphic expression. We use the spatial distribution of knickpoints on the footwall channels to infer two episodes of base level change, which can be associated with distinct fault interaction events. From our detailed fault throw profiles, we reconstruct the amount of throw accumulated after each of these events, and the segments involved in each, and we use slip rate enhancement factors derived from fault interaction theory to estimate the magnitude of the tectonic perturbation in each case. From this approach, we are able to reconstruct pre-linkage throw rates, and we estimate that fault linkage events likely took place 0.7 ± 0.2 Ma and 1.9 ± 0.6 Ma in the Vallo di Diano fault, and 1.1 ± 0.1 and 2.3 ± 0.9 Ma in the East Agri fault. Our study suggests that both faults started their activity at 3.6 ± 0.5 Ma. These fault linkage scenarios are consistent with the knickpoint heights, and may relate to soft-linkage interaction with the Southern Apennines normal fault array, the existence of which has been the subject of considerable debate. Our combined geomorphic and

  15. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone in the ovary.

    PubMed

    Metallinou, Chryssa; Asimakopoulos, Byron; Schröer, Andreas; Nikolettos, Nikos

    2007-12-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) plays a pivotal role in the physiology of reproduction in mammals. GnRH acts by binding to the GnRH receptor (GnRHR). In humans, only 1 conventional GnRH receptor subtype (type I GnRH receptor) has been found. In the human genome, 2 forms of GnRH have been identified, GnRH-I (mammal GnRH) and GnRH-II (chicken GnRH II). Both forms and their common receptor are expressed, apart from the hypothalamus, in various compartments of the human ovary. Gonadal steroids, gonadotropins, and GnRH itself controls the regulation of the GnRH/GnRHR system gene expression in the human ovary. The 2 types of GnRH acting paracrinally/autocrinally influence ovarian steroidogenesis, decrease the proliferation, and induce apoptosis of ovarian cells. In this review, the biology of GnRH/GnRHR system in humans, the potential roles of GnRH, and the direct effects of GnRH analogues in ovarian cells are discussed.

  16. Acute fructose administration decreases the glycemic response to an oral glucose tolerance test in normal adults.

    PubMed

    Moore, M C; Cherrington, A D; Mann, S L; Davis, S N

    2000-12-01

    In animal models, a small (catalytic) dose of fructose administered with glucose decreases the glycemic response to the glucose load. Therefore, we examined the effect of fructose on glucose tolerance in 11 healthy human volunteers (5 men and 6 women). Each subject underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) on 2 separate occasions, at least 1 week apart. Each OGTT consisted of 75 g glucose with or without 7.5 g fructose (OGTT+F or OGTT-F), in random order. Arterialized blood samples were obtained from a heated dorsal hand vein twice before ingestion of the carbohydrate and every 15 min for 2 h afterward. The area under the curve (AUC) of the change in plasma glucose was 19% less in OGTT+F vs. OGTT-F (P: < 0.05). Glucose tolerance was improved by fructose in 9 subjects and worsened in 2. All 6 subjects with the largest glucose AUC during OGTT-F had a decreased response during OGTT+F (31 +/- 5% decrease). The insulin AUC did not differ between the 2 studies. Of the 9 subjects with improved glucose tolerance during the OGTT+F, 5 had smaller insulin AUC during the OGTT+F than the OGTT-F. Plasma glucagon concentrations declined similarly during OGTT-F and OGTT+F. The blood lactate response was about 50% greater during the OGTT+F (P: < 0.05). Neither nonesterified fatty acid nor triglyceride concentrations differed between the two OGTT. In conclusion, low dose fructose improves the glycemic response to an oral glucose load in normal adults without significantly enhancing the insulin or triglyceride response. Fructose appears most effective in those normal individuals who have the poorest glucose tolerance.

  17. Sex-related differences in the normal cardiac response to upright exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Higginbotham, M.B.; Morris, K.G.; Coleman, R.E.; Cobb, F.R.

    1984-09-01

    In previous studies from this laboratory, it was found that approximately 30% of women with chest pain and normal coronary arteries demonstrated either a decrease in or a failure to increase radionuclide ejection fraction during exercise. To examine the hypothesis that this apparent abnormality in left ventricular function represents a physiologic difference between men and women, a prospective study was made of central and peripheral cardiovascular responses to exercise in 31 age-matched healthy volunteers (16 women and 15 men). A combination of quantitative radionuclide (technetium) angiography and expired-gas analysis was used to measure ejection fraction and relative changes in end-diastolic counts, stroke counts, count output, and arteriovenous oxygen difference during symptom-limited upright bicycle exercise. Normal male and female volunteers demonstrated comparable baseline left ventricular function and similar aerobic capacity, as determined by weight-adjusted peak oxygen consumption. However, their cardiac responses to exercise were significantly different. The ejection fraction increased by 5 points or more in 14 of 15 men, but in only seven of the 16 women. End-diastolic counts increased by 30% in women, but was unchanged in men. Because decreases in ejection fraction were matched by increases in end-diastolic counts, relative increases in stroke counts and count output were the same for men and women. These data demonstrate a basic difference between men and women with respect to the mechanism by which they achieve a normal response of stroke volume to exercise; these differences must be taken into account when measurements of cardiac function during exercise stress are used for diagnostic purposes.

  18. Evidence for cAMP as a mediator of gonadotropin secretion from female pituitaries

    SciTech Connect

    Bourne, G.A.; Baldwin, D.M.

    1987-09-01

    Sodium flufenamate, which inhibited gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-stimulated increases in adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP), was used to evaluate the potential role of cAMP as a mediator of GnRH-stimulated gonadotropin secretion. Quartered pituitaries from diestrous II female rats were perifused at 37/sup 0/C, and sequential effluent fractions were collected every 10 min. Administration of GnRH resulted in a characteristic biphasic response for both luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), whereas 5 ..mu..M cycloheximide inhibited the secondary augmented responses (phase II) of both hormones. Infusions of 0.1 mM flufenamate inhibited GnRH-stimulated gonadotropin secretion in a manner similar to that of cycloheximide, whereas the administration of 5 mM dibutyryl cAMP in combination with GnRH and flufenamate resulted in the restoration of LH and FSH secretion. The dibutyryl cAMP-restored response appeared to be protein synthesis dependent and specific for cAMP. These results suggest that although the cyclic nucleotide is not involved in the acute release of LH and FSH, it does appear to play a pivotal but indirect role in phase II release of the hormones, by effects involving the stimulation of de novo protein synthesis.

  19. Dose-response characteristics of neonatal exposure to genistein on pituitary responsiveness to gonadotropin releasing hormone and volume of the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area (SDN-POA) in postpubertal castrated female rats.

    PubMed

    Faber, K A; Hughes, C L

    1993-01-01

    Estrogen exposure during critical periods of development promotes androgenization of the brain, which is reflected in altered morphology, behavior, and cyclic hormone secretion in females. Previous work in our laboratory demonstrated that neonatal female rats injected with pharmaceutical or naturally occurring estrogens had decreased GnRH-induced LH secretion and increased volume of the SDN-POA as 42 day castrates. The current experiment defines the dose-response characteristics of neonatal exposure to the isoflavonoid phytoestrogen genistein (G) on pituitary sensitivity to GnRH and SDN-POA volume. Litters of rat pups received subcutaneous injections of either corn oil, 1, 10, 100, 200, 400, 500, or 1000 micrograms of G on days 1 to 10 of life. The litters were ovariectomized and weaned on day 21. On day 42 blood was drawn from right atrial catheters immediately prior to, 5, 10, 15, and 30 min following a single injection of 50 ng/kg of GnRH. Only the 10 micrograms dose of G was associated with increased pituitary response to GnRH, while progressive increases in exposure levels of G were associated with decreasing LH secretion. The SDN-POA volume was increased in only the 500 micrograms and 1000 micrograms exposure groups compared to controls. The results confirm that low doses of G have nonandrogenizing, pituitary-sensitizing effects, while higher doses of G mimic the more typical effects of estrogens. The use of both morphologic and physiologic end points more completely defines the reproductive consequences of environmental estrogen exposure during critical periods of CNS development.

  20. Lack of shunt response in suspected idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus with Alzheimer disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Roy; Patel, Sunil; Lee, Edward B; Jackson, Eric M; Lopinto, Joanna; Arnold, Steven E; Clark, Christopher M; Basil, Anuj; Shaw, Leslie M; Xie, Sharon X; Grady, M Sean; Trojanowski, John Q

    2010-10-01

    To determine the impact of cortical Alzheimer disease pathology on shunt responsiveness in individuals treated for idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH), 37 patients clinically diagnosed with iNPH participated in a prospective study in which performance on neurologic, psychometric, and gait measures before and 4 months after shunting was correlated with amyloid β plaques, neuritic plaques, and neurofibrillary tangles observed in cortical biopsies obtained during shunt insertion. No complications resulted from biopsy acquisition. Moderate to severe pathology was associated with worse baseline cognitive performance and diminished postoperative improvement on NPH symptom severity scales, gait measures, and cognitive instruments compared to patients lacking pathology.

  1. Absence of a normal cortisol awakening response (CAR) in adolescent males with Asperger syndrome (AS).

    PubMed

    Brosnan, Mark; Turner-Cobb, Julie; Munro-Naan, Zoe; Jessop, David

    2009-08-01

    In addition to abnormalities in social and communication development, a 'need for sameness' and 'resistance to change' are features of autistic spectrum disorders first identified by Kanner in 1943. Our ability to react to change is modulated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, a feature of which is a dramatic increase in cortisol upon waking, the Cortisol Awakening Response (CAR). This study examined whether the CAR was evident in 20 adolescent males with Asperger Syndrome (AS) and 18 age-matched typically developing (TD) controls (aged 11-16). Whilst a significant CAR was evidenced in the TD control group, this was not the case for those with AS. A normal diurnal decrease in cortisol, however, was evident in both groups. The implication that individuals with AS may have an impaired response to change in their environment due to a refractory HPA axis is discussed.

  2. Response to hypogravity of normal in vitro cultured follicular cells from thyroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meli, Antonella; Perrella, Giuseppina; Curcio, Francesco; Saverio, F.; Impiombato, Ambesi

    Aim of this investigation is the study of molecular modifications occurring in differentiated mammalian cells exposed to gravitational changes. The test system chosen is a well characterized clone of differentiated, normal thyroid follicular cells (FRTL5) in long-term culture. As a follow-up to our recent experiment performed during the MASER-7 sounding rocket mission, flown for European Space Agency by Swedish Space Corporation in May 1996, we evaluated FRTL5 cells responses to Thyroid Stimulating Hormone dependent cAMP production under acute hypogravity conditions obtained in a fast rotating clinostat. Following this approach, we evaluated the FRTL5 cells response to TSH under microgravity conditions in order to optimize experimental tools and strategies in preparation to, and in between real flight missions.

  3. An Item Response Theory Integration of Normal and Abnormal Personality Scales

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Douglas B.; Simms, Leonard J.; Clark, Lee Anna; Livesley, W. John; Widiger, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    The DSM-IV-TR currently conceptualizes personality disorders (PDs) as categorical syndromes that are distinct from normal personality. However, an alternative dimensional viewpoint is that PDs are maladaptive expressions of general personality traits. The dimensional perspective postulates that personality pathology exists at a more extreme level of the latent trait than does general personality. This hypothesis was examined using item response theory analyses comparing scales from two personality pathology instruments – the Dimensional Assessment of Personality Pathology-Basic Questionnaire (DAPP-BQ; Livesley & Jackson, in press) and the Schedule for Nonadaptive and Adaptive Personality (SNAP; Clark, 1993; Clark, Simms, Wu, & Casillas, in press) – with scales from an instrument designed to assess normal range personality, the NEO Personality Inventory – Revised (NEO PI-R; Costa & McCrae, 1992). The results indicate that respective scales from these instruments assess shared latent constructs, with the NEO PI-R providing more information at the lower (normal) range and the DAPP-BQ and SNAP providing more information at the higher (abnormal) range. Nevertheless, the results also demonstrated substantial overlap in coverage. Implications of the findings are discussed with respect to the study and development of items that would provide specific discriminations along underlying trait continua. PMID:20458359

  4. An item response theory integration of normal and abnormal personality scales.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Douglas B; Simms, Leonard J; Clark, Lee Anna; Livesley, W John; Widiger, Thomas A

    2010-01-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM–IV–TR) currently conceptualizes personality disorders (PDs) as categorical syndromes that are distinct from normal personality. However, an alternative dimensional viewpoint is that PDs are maladaptive expressions of general personality traits. The dimensional perspective postulates that personality pathology exists at a more extreme level of the latent trait than does general personality. This hypothesis was examined using item response theory analyses comparing scales from two personality pathology instruments—the Dimensional Assessment of Personality Pathology-Basic Questionnaire (DAPP-BQ; Livesley & Jackson, in press) and the Schedule for Nonadaptive and Adaptive Personality (SNAP; Clark, 1993; Clark, Simms, Wu, & Casillas, in press)—with scales from an instrument designed to assess normal range personality, the NEO Personality Inventory–Revised (NEO PI-R; Costa & McCrae, 1992). The results indicate that respective scales from these instruments assess shared latent constructs, with the NEO PI-R providing more information at the lower (normal) range and the DAPP-BQ and SNAP providing more information at the higher (abnormal) range. Nevertheless, the results also demonstrated substantial overlap in coverage. Implications of the findings are discussed with respect to the study and development of items that would provide specific discriminations along underlying trait continua.

  5. Role of the leukocyte response in normal and immunocompromised host after Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Edwin; Apewokin, Senu; Madan, Rajat

    2017-02-20

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of healthcare-associated infections in the United States. Clinically, C. difficile-associated disease can present as asymptomatic colonization, self-limited diarrheal illness or severe colitis (that may result in death). This variability in disease course and outcomes suggests that host factors play an important role as key determinants of disease severity. Currently, there are several scoring indices to estimate severity of C. difficile-associated disease. Leukocytosis and renal failure are considered to be the most important predictors of C. difficile disease severity in hosts with a normal immune system. The degree of leukocytosis which is considered significant for severe disease and how it is scored vary amongst scoring indices. None of the scores have been prospectively validated, and while total WBC count is useful to estimate the magnitude of the host response in most patient populations, in immune-compromised patients like those receiving chemotherapy, solid organ transplant patients or hematopoietic stem cell transplants the WBC response can be variable or even absent making this marker of severity difficult to interpret. Other cellular subsets like neutrophils, eosinophils and lymphocytes provide important information about the host immune status and play an important role in the immune response against C. difficile infection. However, under the current scoring systems the role of these cellular subsets have been underestimated and only total white blood cell counts are taken into account. In this review we highlight the role of host leukocyte response to C. difficile challenge in the normal and immunocompromised host, and propose possible ways that would allow for a better representation of the different immune cell subsets (neutrophils, lymphocytes and eosinophils) in the current scoring indices.

  6. Cidofovir selectivity is based on the different response of normal and cancer cells to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cidofovir (CDV) proved efficacious in treatment of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) hyperplasias. Antiproliferative effects of CDV have been associated with apoptosis induction, S-phase accumulation, and increased levels of tumor suppressor proteins. However, the molecular mechanisms for the selectivity and antitumor activity of CDV against HPV-transformed cells remain unexplained. Methods We evaluated CDV drug metabolism and incorporation into cellular DNA, in addition to whole genome gene expression profiling by means of microarrays in two HPV+ cervical carcinoma cells, HPV- immortalized keratinocytes, and normal keratinocytes. Results Determination of the metabolism and drug incorporation of CDV into genomic DNA demonstrated a higher rate of drug incorporation in HPV+ tumor cells and immortalized keratinocytes compared to normal keratinocytes. Gene expression profiling clearly showed distinct and specific drug effects in the cell types investigated. Although an effect on inflammatory response was seen in all cell types, different pathways were identified in normal keratinocytes compared to immortalized keratinocytes and HPV+ tumor cells. Notably, Rho GTPase pathways, LXR/RXR pathways, and acute phase response signaling were exclusively activated in immortalized cells. CDV exposed normal keratinocytes displayed activated cell cycle regulation upon DNA damage signaling to allow DNA repair via homologous recombination, resulting in genomic stability and survival. Although CDV induced cell cycle arrest in HPV- immortalized cells, DNA repair was not activated in these cells. In contrast, HPV+ cells lacked cell cycle regulation, leading to genomic instability and eventually apoptosis. Conclusions Taken together, our data provide novel insights into the mechanism of action of CDV and its selectivity for HPV-transformed cells. The proposed mechanism suggests that this selectivity is based on the inability of HPV+ cells to respond to DNA damage, rather than on a

  7. The expanding role of recombinant gonadotropins in assisted reproduction.

    PubMed

    Adams, T E; Boime, I

    2008-07-01

    Using recombinant gonadotropins for assisted reproduction of domestic species is still in its infancy. Yet, the purity, potency and pathogen-free nature of recombinant gonadotropins make them attractive alternatives to tissue-derived gonadotropic agents. In this study, the authors summarize the work to date using recombinant gonadotropins to enhance the - fertility of domestic animals and they discussed their recent studies examining the biopotency of single chain analogues of human gonadotropins. In these studies, single chain analogues of follicle stimulating hormone (Fc alpha), chorionic gonadotropin (CG beta alpha) or a gonadotropin construct with dual activity (FcCG beta alpha) were administered to sheep pre-treated with antisera directed against GnRH. Ovulation was induced 3 days after analogue administration using hCG (1000 IU, iv). Although Fc alpha or CG beta alpha alone induced only modest oestradiol production during the pre-hCG period, serum concentrations of oestradiol were markedly increased (p < 0.05) 3 days after administration of FcCG beta alpha or the Fc alpha + CG beta alpha combination. Final ovarian weight was significantly increased (p < 0.05) in animals receiving Fc alpha, Fc alpha + CG beta alpha or FcCG beta alpha. Collectively, these observations demonstrate that the single chain analogues of the human gonadotropins are active in sheep.

  8. Drosophila hematopoiesis under normal conditions and in response to immune stress.

    PubMed

    Letourneau, Manon; Lapraz, Francois; Sharma, Anurag; Vanzo, Nathalie; Waltzer, Lucas; Crozatier, Michèle

    2016-11-01

    The emergence of hematopoietic progenitors and their differentiation into various highly specialized blood cell types constitute a finely tuned process. Unveiling the genetic cascades that control blood cell progenitor fate and understanding how they are modulated in response to environmental changes are two major challenges in the field of hematopoiesis. In the last 20 years, many studies have established important functional analogies between blood cell development in vertebrates and in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Thereby, Drosophila has emerged as a powerful genetic model for studying mechanisms that control hematopoiesis during normal development or in pathological situations. Moreover, recent advances in Drosophila have highlighted how intricate cell communication networks and microenvironmental cues regulate blood cell homeostasis. They have also revealed the striking plasticity of Drosophila mature blood cells and the presence of different sites of hematopoiesis in the larva. This review provides an overview of Drosophila hematopoiesis during development and summarizes our current knowledge on the molecular processes controlling larval hematopoiesis, both under normal conditions and in response to an immune challenge, such as wasp parasitism. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  9. Whey protein enhances normal inflammatory responses during cutaneous wound healing in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Prolonged wound healing is a complication of diabetes that contributes to mortality. Impaired wound healing occurs as a consequence of excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Whey protein (WP) is able to reduce the oxygen radicals and increase the levels of the antioxidant glutathione. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether dietary supplementation with WP could enhance normal inflammatory responses during wound healing in diabetic rats. Animals were assigned into a wounded control group (WN), a wounded diabetic group (WD) and a wounded diabetic group orally supplemented with whey protein (WDWP) at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight. Results Whey protein was found to significantly decrease the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO) and ROS. A significant restoration of the glutathione level was observed in WDWP rats. During the early wound healing stage, IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-4 and neutrophil infiltration were significantly decreased in WD mice. WP supplementation was found to restore the levels of these inflammatory markers to the levels observed in control animals. In addition, the time required for wound healing was significantly prolonged in diabetic rats. WP was found to significantly decrease the time required for wound healing in WDWP rats. Conclusion In conclusion, dietary supplementation with WP enhances the normal inflammatory responses during wound healing in diabetic mice by restoring the levels of oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines. PMID:22168406

  10. Implementing a Finite-State Off-Normal and Fault Response System for Robust Tokamak Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eidietis, N. W.; Humphreys, D. A.; Sammuli, B.; Walker, M. L.

    2015-11-01

    The initial implementation and testing of a finite state off-normal & fault response (ONFR) system on the DIII-D and KSTAR tokamaks is presented. Robust ONFR will be critical to the operation of ITER as the physical consequences of unexpected events will be far more extreme than in present devices. ``Off-normal'' refers to unexpected plasma events (e.g. disruptions) and plasma events that are expected but still require asynchronous response (e.g. neoclassical tearing modes). ``Fault'' refers to hardware failure. ONFR priorities are to (1) protect the device from damage, (2) minimize recovery time between shots by avoiding unnecessary initiation of mitigation procedures, and (3) maximize the useful pulse length of a given shot by providing for discharge recovery after deleterious events. The detailed implementation of finite-state ONFR using Matlab/Simulink and Stateflow exported to the DIII-D and KSTAR plasma control systems is described, as are initial tests of multi-stage locked mode handling on both devices. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  11. Whey protein enhances normal inflammatory responses during cutaneous wound healing in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Ebaid, Hossam; Salem, Amir; Sayed, Abdalla; Metwalli, Ali

    2011-12-14

    Prolonged wound healing is a complication of diabetes that contributes to mortality. Impaired wound healing occurs as a consequence of excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Whey protein (WP) is able to reduce the oxygen radicals and increase the levels of the antioxidant glutathione. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether dietary supplementation with WP could enhance normal inflammatory responses during wound healing in diabetic rats. Animals were assigned into a wounded control group (WN), a wounded diabetic group (WD) and a wounded diabetic group orally supplemented with whey protein (WDWP) at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight. Whey protein was found to significantly decrease the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO) and ROS. A significant restoration of the glutathione level was observed in WDWP rats. During the early wound healing stage, IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-4 and neutrophil infiltration were significantly decreased in WD mice. WP supplementation was found to restore the levels of these inflammatory markers to the levels observed in control animals. In addition, the time required for wound healing was significantly prolonged in diabetic rats. WP was found to significantly decrease the time required for wound healing in WDWP rats. In conclusion, dietary supplementation with WP enhances the normal inflammatory responses during wound healing in diabetic mice by restoring the levels of oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines.

  12. Neuroendocrine regulation of gonadotropin secretion in seasonally breeding birds

    PubMed Central

    Ubuka, Takayoshi; Bentley, George E.; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Seasonally breeding birds detect environmental signals, such as light, temperature, food availability, and presence of mates to time reproduction. Hypothalamic neurons integrate external and internal signals, and regulate reproduction by releasing neurohormones to the pituitary gland. The pituitary gland synthesizes and releases gonadotropins which in turn act on the gonads to stimulate gametogenesis and sex steroid secretion. Accordingly, how gonadotropin secretion is controlled by the hypothalamus is key to our understanding of the mechanisms of seasonal reproduction. A hypothalamic neuropeptide, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), activates reproduction by stimulating gonadotropin synthesis and release. Another hypothalamic neuropeptide, gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH), inhibits gonadotropin synthesis and release directly by acting on the pituitary gland or indirectly by decreasing the activity of GnRH neurons. Therefore, the next step to understand seasonal reproduction is to investigate how the activities of GnRH and GnIH neurons in the hypothalamus and their receptors in the pituitary gland are regulated by external and internal signals. It is possible that locally-produced triiodothyronine resulting from the action of type 2 iodothyronine deiodinase on thyroxine stimulates the release of gonadotropins, perhaps by action on GnRH neurons. The function of GnRH neurons is also regulated by transcription of the GnRH gene. Melatonin, a nocturnal hormone, stimulates the synthesis and release of GnIH and GnIH may therefore regulate a daily rhythm of gonadotropin secretion. GnIH may also temporally suppress gonadotropin secretion when environmental conditions are unfavorable. Environmental and social milieus fluctuate seasonally in the wild. Accordingly, complex interactions of various neuronal and hormonal systems need to be considered if we are to understand the mechanisms underlying seasonal reproduction. PMID:23531789

  13. High-throughput screening normalized to biological response: application to antiviral drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dhara A; Patel, Anand C; Nolan, William C; Huang, Guangming; Romero, Arthur G; Charlton, Nichole; Agapov, Eugene; Zhang, Yong; Holtzman, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The process of conducting cell-based phenotypic screens can result in data sets from small libraries or portions of large libraries, making accurate hit picking from multiple data sets important for efficient drug discovery. Here, we describe a screen design and data analysis approach that allow for normalization not only between quadrants and plates but also between screens or batches in a robust, quantitative fashion, enabling hit selection from multiple data sets. We independently screened the MicroSource Spectrum and NCI Diversity Set II libraries using a cell-based phenotypic high-throughput screening (HTS) assay that uses an interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE)-driven luciferase-reporter assay to identify interferon (IFN) signal enhancers. Inclusion of a per-plate, per-quadrant IFN dose-response standard curve enabled conversion of ISRE activity to effective IFN concentrations. We identified 45 hits based on a combined z score ≥2.5 from the two libraries, and 25 of 35 available hits were validated in a compound concentration-response assay when tested using fresh compound. The results provide a basis for further analysis of chemical structure in relation to biological function. Together, the results establish an HTS method that can be extended to screening for any class of compounds that influence a quantifiable biological response for which a standard is available.

  14. Nociceptors lacking TRPV1 and TRPV2 have normal heat responses.

    PubMed

    Woodbury, C Jeffery; Zwick, Melissa; Wang, Shuying; Lawson, Jeffrey J; Caterina, Michael J; Koltzenburg, Martin; Albers, Kathryn M; Koerber, H Richard; Davis, Brian M

    2004-07-14

    Vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) has been proposed to be the principal heat-responsive channel for nociceptive neurons. The skin of both rat and mouse receives major projections from primary sensory afferents that bind the plant lectin isolectin B4 (IB4). The majority of IB4-positive neurons are known to be heat-responsive nociceptors. Previous studies suggested that, unlike rat, mouse IB4-positive cutaneous afferents did not express TRPV1 immunoreactivity. Here, multiple antisera were used to confirm that mouse and rat have different distributions of TRPV1 and that TRPV1 immunoreactivity is absent in heat-sensitive nociceptors. Intracellular recording in TRPV1(-/-) mice was then used to confirm that TRPV1 was not required for detecting noxious heat. TRPV1(-/-) mice had more heat-sensitive neurons, and these neurons had normal temperature thresholds and response properties. Moreover, in TRPV1(-/-) mice, 82% of heat-responsive neurons did not express immunoreactivity for TRPV2, another putative noxious heat channel.

  15. Patients with MS under daclizumab therapy mount normal immune responses to influenza vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yen Chih; Winokur, Paige; Blake, Andrew; Wu, Tianxia; Manischewitz, Jody; King, Lisa R.; Romm, Elena; Golding, Hana

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the potential immunosuppressive role of daclizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against the α chain of the interleukin 2 receptor, in vivo, by comparing immune responses to the 2013 seasonal influenza vaccination between patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) on long-term daclizumab therapy and controls. Methods: Previously defined subpopulations of adaptive immune cells known to correlate with the immune response to the influenza vaccination were evaluated by 12-color flow cytometry in 23 daclizumab-treated patients with MS and 14 MS or healthy controls before (D0) and 1 day (D1) and 7 days (D7) after administration of the 2013 Afluria vaccine. Neutralizing antibody titers and CD4+, CD8+ T cell, B cell, and natural killer cell proliferation to 3 strains of virus contained in the Afluria vaccine were assessed at D0, D7, and 180 days postvaccination. Results: Daclizumab-treated patients and controls demonstrated comparable, statistically significant expansions of previously defined subpopulations of activated CD8+ T cells and B cells that characterize the development of effective immune responses to the influenza vaccine, while proliferation of T cells to influenza and control antigens was diminished in the daclizumab cohort. All participants fulfilled FDA criteria for seroconversion or seroprotection in antibody assays. Conclusion: Despite the mild immunosuppressive effects of daclizumab in vivo demonstrated by an increased incidence of infectious complications in clinical trials, patients with MS under daclizumab therapy mount normal antibody responses to influenza vaccinations. PMID:26848487

  16. Attenuated insulin response and normal insulin sensitivity in lean patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Penesova, A; Rovensky, J; Zlnay, M; Dedik, L; Radikova, Z; Koska, J; Vigas, M; Imrich, R

    2005-01-01

    Chronic low-grade inflammation is associated with insulin resistance. The aim of this study was to determine insulin response to intravenous glucose load and insulin sensitivity in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Fourteen nonobese male patients with AS and 14 matched healthy controls underwent frequent-sampling intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIVGTT). Insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity were calculated using the computer-minimal and homeostasis-model assessment 2 (HOMA2) models. Fasting glucose, insulin, cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglyceride levels, HOMA2, glucose effectiveness, insulin sensitivity and insulin response to FSIVGTT did not differ between patients and controls. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin (IL)-6 concentrations tended to be higher in AS patients than in controls. Second-phase beta-cell responsiveness was 37% lower (p = 0.05) in AS patients than in controls. A negative correlation was found between the percentage of beta-cell secretion and IL-6 in all subjects (r = -0.54, p = 0.006). We found normal insulin sensitivity but attenuated glucose utilization in the second phase of FSIVGTT in AS patients. Our results indicate that elevated IL-6 levels may play a pathophysiological role in attenuating beta-cell responsiveness, which may explain the association between elevated IL-6 levels and increased risk for type 2 diabetes.

  17. Pituitary apoplexy following gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist administration with gonadotropin-secreting pituitary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Sasagawa, Yasuo; Tachibana, Osamu; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Koya, Daisuke; Iizuka, Hideaki

    2015-03-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists are widely used in hormone therapy for prostate cancer. We report a patient with pituitary apoplexy following this therapy as a rare complication and review the related literature. A 62-year-old man presented with elevated prostate specific antigen. Transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy of the prostate gland revealed adenocarcinoma. Whole-body (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/CT scan showed FDG-uptake in the pituitary region. MRI also demonstrated a pituitary tumor, diagnosed as an incidental non-functioning adenoma. The patient received his first dose of GnRH agonist (leuprolide 11.25mg) against prostate cancer. He complained of a severe headache 10 minutes after leuprolide administration and suffered from right third nerve palsy in the next 48 hours. MRI demonstrated a high intensity area on T1-weighted images, diagnosed as pituitary apoplexy. The patient underwent transsphenoidal surgery. Pathology revealed predominantly necrotic tissue and a gonadotropin secreting pituitary adenoma. Overall, 15 patients, including ours, have been reported with pituitary apoplexy after GnRH agonists with pathologic gonadotropin secreting adenoma. Fourteen of 15 patients were male. Pituitary apoplexy developed within 4 hours after administration of the agents in 8/15 patients. The combined data suggest that GnRH agonists have the potential to precipitate pituitary apoplexy in men with gonadotropin secreting adenoma. Therefore, prior to GnRH agonist therapy for prostate cancer, a known pituitary adenoma should be treated. Otherwise, the patients should be cautiously observed for any symptomatic change following drug administration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Postprandial glucose response to selected tropical fruits in normal glucose-tolerant Nigerians.

    PubMed

    Edo, A; Eregie, A; Adediran, O; Ohwovoriole, A; Ebengho, S

    2011-01-01

    The glycemic response to commonly eaten fruits in Nigeria has not been reported. Therefore, this study assessed the plasma glucose response to selected fruits in Nigeria. Ten normal glucose-tolerant subjects randomly consumed 50 g carbohydrate portions of three fruits: banana (Musa paradisiaca), pineapple (Ananus comosus), and pawpaw (Carica papaya), and a 50-g glucose load at 1-week intervals. Blood samples were collected in the fasting state and half-hourly over a 2-h period post-ingestion of the fruits or glucose. The samples were analyzed for plasma glucose concentrations. Plasma glucose responses were assessed by the peak plasma glucose concentration, maximum increase in plasma glucose, 2-h postprandial plasma glucose level, and incremental area under the glucose curve and glycemic index (GI). The results showed that the blood glucose response to these three fruits was similar in terms of their incremental areas under the glucose curve, maximum increase in plasma glucose, and glycemic indices (GIs). The 2-h postprandial plasma glucose level of banana was significantly higher than that of pineapple, P < 0.025. The mean ± SEM GI values were as follows: pawpaw; 86 ± 26.8%; banana, 75.1 ± 21.8%; pineapple, 64.5 ± 11.3%. The GI of glucose is taken as 100. The GI of pineapple was significantly lower than that of glucose (P < 0.05). Banana, pawpaw, and pineapple produced a similar postprandial glucose response. Measured portions of these fruits may be used as fruit exchanges with pineapple having the most favorable glycemic response.

  19. Sensitive subgroups and normal variation in pulmonary function response to air pollution episodes.

    PubMed Central

    Brunekreef, B; Kinney, P L; Ware, J H; Dockery, D; Speizer, F E; Spengler, J D; Ferris, B G

    1991-01-01

    The Clean Air Act requires that sensitive subgroups of exposed populations be protected from adverse health effects of air pollution exposure. Hence, data suggesting the existence of sensitive subgroups can have an important impact on regulatory decisions. Some investigators have interpreted differences among individuals in observed pulmonary function response to air pollution episodes as evidence that individuals differ in their sensitivity. An alternative explanation is that the differences are due entirely to normal variation in repeated pulmonary function measurements. This paper investigates this question by reanalyzing data from three studies of children exposed to air pollution episodes to determine whether the observed variability in pulmonary function response indicates differences in sensitivity or natural interoccasion variability. One study investigated exposures to total suspended particulates (TSP), the other two investigated exposure to ozone. In all studies, each child's response to air pollution exposures was summarized by regressing that child's set of pulmonary function measurements on the air pollution concentrations on the day or days before measurement. The within-child and between-child variances of these slopes were used to test the hypothesis of variable sensitivity. Regression slopes did not vary significantly among children exposed to episodes of high TSP concentration, but there was evidence of heterogeneity in both studies of ozone exposures. The finding of heterogeneous response to ozone exposure is consistent with the epidemiologic and chamber studies of ozone exposures, but the lack of evidence for heterogeneous response to TSP exposures implies that observed variation in response can be explained by sampling variability rather than the presence of sensitive subgroup. PMID:2050060

  20. What is the normal response to structural differentiation within the slump and straight leg raise tests?

    PubMed

    Herrington, Lee; Bendix, Katie; Cornwell, Catherine; Fielden, Nicola; Hankey, Karen

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the effect of structural differentiation or sensitising manoeuvres on responses of normal subjects to standard neurodynamic tests of straight leg raise (SLR) and slump test. Eighty-eight (39 males and 49 females) asymptomatic subjects were examined (aged 18-39 mean age 21.9+/-4.1 years). Knee flexion angle was measured using a goniometer during the slump test in two conditions cervical flexion and extension. Hip flexion angle was measured using a goniometer during SLR test in two conditions; ankle dorsi-flexion and neutral. The change in knee flexion, following addition of the structural differentiating manoeuvre to the slump test, was a significant increase in knee flexion angle for both males (change in knee angle; 6.6+/-4.7 degrees /18.7+/-17.5%, p<0.01) and females (change in knee angle 5.4+/-5.8 degrees /17.6+/-23.7%, p<0.01), though showed no difference between sides (p>0.05). During the SLR test, a significant reduction in hip flexion occurred following structural differentiation for both groups (change in hip angle; males = 9.5+/-8.3 degrees /21.5+/-18.8%, p<0.01; females = 15.2+/-9.5 degrees /25.9+/-13.9%, p<0.01), though showed no difference between sides (p>0.05). Structural differentiating manoeuvres have a significant effect on test response in terms of range of movement even in normal asymptomatic individuals. These responses should be taken into account during the assessment clinical reasoning process.

  1. Anticipatory responses to a self-applied load in normal subjects and hemiparetic patients.

    PubMed

    Bennis, N; Roby-Brami, A; Dufossé, M; Bussel, B

    1996-01-01

    A bimanual loading task was studied in eight right-handed normal subjects and nine hemiparetic patients in order to detect anticipatory adjustments and to analyse the reflex and voluntary, responses induced by the perturbation. The left forearm (or the impaired side in patients) was flexed at approximately 90 degrees and free to rotate in a vertical sagittal plane. It was held to resist a load (2-3 kg) dropped either by an experimenter (control situation), or by the subject himself with no visual control (self-applied situation). The load was dropped from the right hand by normal subjects and from the unimpaired hand by hemiparetic patients. The initial distance the load fell was 0.05-0.35 m. The elbow movements of the limb receiving the load were recorded with a linear accelerometer at the wrist, a potentiometer at the elbow and via the EMG signals from flexor muscles. Normal subjects always made an anticipatory flexion movement prior to the impact in the self-applied situation, but not in the control situation. The anticipatory flexion of hemiparetic patients was slower and longer. The amplitude of the anticipatory flexion at the time of impact and its duration were correlated with the mass of the load and the initial distance between the two hands in both groups. The anticipatory flexion reduced the distance through which the load fell and thus its kinetic energy at impact. The impact induced a brisk extension which was always smaller in the self-applied situation for a given kinetic energy. In normal subjects, the amplitude of the monosynaptic reflex (MSR) following the impact in flexor muscles was usually greater in the self-applied situation, but its gain was either reduced or unchanged. The gain of the functional stretch reflex (FSR) was consistently reduced in the self-applied situation. Depression of the FSR gain occurred in only two hemiparetic patients who had the best recovered motor function. Anticipation always ended up minimizing the perturbation

  2. Final heights of boys with normal growth hormone responses to provocative tests following priming.

    PubMed

    Gonc, E Nazli; Kandemir, Nurgun; Ozon, Alev; Alikasifoglu, Ayfer

    2008-10-01

    Priming with sex steroids prior to growth hormone (GH) stimulation tests for the diagnosis of GH deficiency is still debatable. We analyzed the auxological data of boys with growth retardation who had normal GH responses to stimulation tests only after priming to establish the validity of priming in the diagnosis of GH deficiency. We also analyzed the effect of different protocols for priming and their efficiency in the diagnosis of GH deficiency. Fifty boys with growth retardation who failed to respond to unprimed GH stimulation tests but responded normally to primed tests were included in the study. Thirty-one of 50 boys responded to GH stimulation tests after single low dose testosterone, 11/50 boys after single conventional dose, and 8/50 boys with multiple-dose testosterone. The study group was followed till final height; height velocity, final height and height SDS were compared to parental and mid-parental heights to determine whether or not the children achieved their height potential. Mean final height SDS of the study group (-1.27 +/- 0.72 SDS) was similar to mid-parental (-1.38 +/- 0.72 SDS) (p = 0.249) and maternal height SDS (-1.26 +/- 1.05 SDS) (p = 0.941), whereas it was greater than the paternal height SDS (-1.7 +/- 0.86) (p = 0.001). The final height SDS of the study group was correlated to maternal, paternal and mid-parental height SDS. Height velocity after the test was greater than the previous height velocity. Final height SDS of the boys who responded to the GH stimulation tests with different priming protocols were compared and found to be similar. Normal responders in primed GH tests grow normally to their target height, suggesting that priming might be a valuable method in the assessment of GH status. Use of priming in the GH stimulation tests of peripubertal boys with decreased growth rate may help avoid unnecessary GH therapy. Multiple-dose testing might exclude GHD in a patient population who failed to respond to a single dose of

  3. The tumor suppressor PTEN regulates motor responses to striatal dopamine in normal and Parkinsonian animals.

    PubMed

    Stavarache, Mihaela A; Musatov, Sergei; McGill, Marlon; Vernov, Mary; Kaplitt, Michael G

    2015-10-01

    Phosphatase and Tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is a dual lipid-protein phosphatase known primarily as a growth preventing tumor suppressor. PTEN is also expressed in neurons, and pathways modulated by PTEN can influence neuronal function. Here we report a novel function of PTEN as a regulator of striatal dopamine signaling in a model of Parkinson's disease (PD). Blocking PTEN expression with an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector expressing a small hairpin RNA (shRNA) resulted in reduced responses of cultured striatal neurons to dopamine, which appeared to be largely due to reduction in D2 receptor activation. Co-expression of shRNA-resistant wild-type and mutant forms of PTEN indicated that the lipid-phosphatase activity was essential for this effect. In both normal and Parkinsonian rats, inhibition of striatal PTEN in vivo resulted in motor dysfunction and impaired responses to dopamine, particularly D2 receptor agonists. Expression of PTEN mutants confirmed the lipid-phosphatase activity as critical, while co-expression of a dominant-negative form of Akt overcame the PTEN shRNA effect. These results identify PTEN as a key mediator of striatal responses to dopamine, and suggest that drugs designed to potentiate PTEN expression or activity, such as cancer chemotherapeutics, may also be useful for improving striatal responses to dopamine in conditions of dopamine depletion such as PD. This also suggests that strategies which increase Akt or decrease PTEN expression or function, such as growth factors to prevent neuronal death, may have a paradoxical effect on neurological functioning by inhibiting striatal responses to dopamine.

  4. Estrogen normalizes perinatal nicotine-induced hypertensive responses in adult female rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Daliao; Huang, Xiaohui; Yang, Shumei; Zhang, Lubo

    2013-06-01

    Perinatal nicotine exposure caused a sex-dependent heightened vascular response to angiotensin II (Ang II) and increased blood pressure in adult male but not in female rat offspring. The present study tested the hypothesis that estrogen normalizes perinatal nicotine-induced hypertensive response to Ang II in female offspring. Nicotine was administered to pregnant rats via subcutaneous osmotic minipumps from day 4 of gestation to day 10 after birth. Ovariectomy and 17β-estradiol replacement were performed on 8-week-old female offspring. At 5 months of age, Ang II-induced blood pressure responses were not changed by nicotine treatment in the sham groups. In contrast, nicotine significantly enhanced Ang II-induced blood pressure responses as compared with saline control in the ovariectomy groups, which was associated with increased Ang II-induced vascular contractions. These heightened responses were abrogated by 17β-estradiol replacement. In addition, nicotine enhanced Ang II receptor type I, NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase type 2 protein expressions, and reactive oxygen species production of aortas as compared with saline control in the ovariectomy groups. Antioxidative agents, both apocynin and tempol, inhibited Ang II-induced vascular contraction and eliminated the differences of contractions between nicotine-treated and control ovariectomy rats. These findings support a key role of estrogen in the sex difference of perinatal nicotine-induced programming of vascular dysfunction, and suggest that estrogen may counteract heightened reactive oxygen species production, leading to protection of females from development programming of hypertensive phenotype in adulthood.

  5. Heme Oxygenase-1 Determines the Differential Response of Breast Cancer and Normal Cells to Piperlongumine

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ha-Na; Jin, Hyeon-Ok; Park, Jin-Ah; Kim, Jin-Hee; Kim, Ji-Young; Kim, BoRa; Kim, Wonki; Hong, Sung-Eun; Lee, Yun-Han; Chang, Yoon Hwan; Hong, Seok-Il; Hong, Young Jun; Park, In-Chul; Surh, Young-Joon; Lee, Jin Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Piperlongumine, a natural alkaloid isolated from the long pepper, selectively increases reactive oxygen species production and apoptotic cell death in cancer cells but not in normal cells. However, the molecular mechanism underlying piperlongumine-induced selective killing of cancer cells remains unclear. In the present study, we observed that human breast cancer MCF-7 cells are sensitive to piperlongumine-induced apoptosis relative to human MCF-10A breast epithelial cells. Interestingly, this opposing effect of piperlongumine appears to be mediated by heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Piperlongumine upregulated HO-1 expression through the activation of nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) signaling in both MCF-7 and MCF-10A cells. However, knockdown of HO-1 expression and pharmacological inhibition of its activity abolished the ability of piperlongumine to induce apoptosis in MCF-7 cells, whereas those promoted apoptosis in MCF-10A cells, indicating that HO-1 has anti-tumor functions in cancer cells but cytoprotective functions in normal cells. Moreover, it was found that piperlongumine-induced Nrf2 activation, HO-1 expression and cancer cell apoptosis are not dependent on the generation of reactive oxygen species. Instead, piperlongumine, which bears electrophilic α,β-unsaturated carbonyl groups, appears to inactivate Kelch-like ECH-associated protein-1 (Keap1) through thiol modification, thereby activating the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway and subsequently upregulating HO-1 expression, which accounts for piperlongumine-induced apoptosis in cancer cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that direct interaction of piperlongumine with Keap1 leads to the upregulation of Nrf2-mediated HO-1 expression, and HO-1 determines the differential response of breast normal cells and cancer cells to piperlongumine. PMID:25813625

  6. Cognitive impairment predicts worse short-term response to spinal tap test in normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Wolfsegger, Thomas; Topakian, Raffi

    2017-08-15

    In patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH), the spinal tap test (STT) is commonly used to predict ventriculoperitoneal shunt responsiveness. Clinical improvement following STT usually is measured by testing gait function. In our study, we investigated the impact of cognitive impairment on gait improvement after STT. 22 patients with the clinical and radiological diagnosis of iNPH underwent gait analyses (mobile measuring system Medilogic) before and 2-4h after STT in self-paced gait velocity over 7m. Prior to STT, cognition was evaluated by the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE). MMSE<24/30 points was used to define the subgroup of patients with cognitive impairment (iNPH-CI). Spatio-temporal parameters of gait before STT vs. after STT were analyzed with ANOVA with repeated measures. 1. Baseline gait parameters did not differ between the two groups: patients with iNPH and normal cognition (n=11) and patients with iNPH-CI (n=11). 2. Following STT, there was significant improvement of gait parameters in patients without cognitive impairment, while patients with iNPH-CI did not benefit from STT. Subjects with iNPH have a higher probability of lack of gait improvement 2-4h following STT, if cognitive impairment is present. Further studies are needed to elucidate the associations of cognitive impairment and quantitative gait parameters measured early and at later time points after STT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The sympathetic skin response: normal values, elucidation of afferent components and application limits.

    PubMed

    Uncini, A; Pullman, S L; Lovelace, R E; Gambi, D

    1988-11-01

    The sympathetic skin response (SSR), recorded at the hand and foot, was elicited using different classes of stimuli in 20 normal controls and 10 patients with peripheral neuropathy. We found that SSR latencies changed significantly with different recording sites, but not with different stimulation sites. Additionally, after ischemic conduction block of the arm in 3 normal controls, the previously obtainable SSR recorded at the hand became unobtainable with median nerve stimulation. Also, in one patient with subacute ganglionitis and 3 patients with demyelinating neuropathies, the SSR could not be elicited by electrical stimulation, but it could with deep inspiration. These results suggest that large diameter myelinated fibers may serve as afferents for the SSR. Furthermore, these findings imply that an unobtainable SSR by electrical stimulation may be due not only to dysfunction of the autonomic efferent nerve fibers, but also to abnormalities of the sensory afferents of the reflex. Therefore, investigations of autonomic dysfunction utilizing the SSR must be interpreted with caution in patients with peripheral neuropathies.

  8. Proinflammatory response induced by Newcastle disease virus in tumor and normal cells

    PubMed Central

    Ginting, Teridah Ernala; Suryatenggara, Jeremiah; Christian, Salomo; Mathew, George

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the specific role of immune responses induced by lentogenic Newcastle disease virus (NDV) for its antitumor effect. Materials and methods NDV LaSota strain was used to infect the following human cells: non-small cell lung carcinoma (A549), glioblastoma (U87MG and T98G), mammary gland adenocarcinoma (MCF7 and MDA-MB-453), hepatocellular carcinoma (Huh7), transformed embryonic kidney cells (HEK293), primary monocytes, lung fibroblast (HF19), skin fibroblast (NB1RGB) and rat astroglia (RCR-1) at 0.001 multiplicity of infection. NDV-induced cytotoxicity and expression of proinflammatory cytokines were analyzed using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-Yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and multiplex enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. Results Tumor cells (A549, U87MG, T98G, Huh7, MDA-MB-453, and MCF7) showed viability of <44%, while normal cell lines HEK293, NB1RGB, and RCR-1 showed 84%, 73%, and 69% viability at 72 hours postinfection, respectively. Proinflammatory cytokine profiling showed that NDV mainly induced the secretion of interferon (IFN)-α, IFN-β, and IFN-λ in tumor cells and only IFN-λ in normal cells. In addition, NDV infection induced the production of interleukin (IL)-6 in most cells. Conclusion Our findings suggest a new perspective regarding the role of IFN-λ and IL-6 in the mechanism of tumor selectivity and oncolysis of NDV. PMID:28293547

  9. Surface modification of microparticles causes differential uptake responses in normal and tumoral human breast epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Patiño, Tania; Soriano, Jorge; Barrios, Lleonard; Ibáñez, Elena; Nogués, Carme

    2015-01-01

    The use of micro- and nanodevices as multifunctional systems for biomedical applications has experienced an exponential growth during the past decades. Although a large number of studies have focused on the design and fabrication of new micro- and nanosystems capable of developing multiple functions, a deeper understanding of their interaction with cells is required. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of different microparticle surfaces on their interaction with normal and tumoral human breast epithelial cell lines. For this, AlexaFluor488 IgG functionalized polystyrene microparticles (3 μm) were coated with Polyethyleneimine (PEI) at two different molecular weights, 25 and 750 kDa. The effect of microparticle surface properties on cytotoxicity, cellular uptake and endocytic pathways were assessed for both normal and tumoral cell lines. Results showed a differential response between the two cell lines regarding uptake efficiency and mechanisms of endocytosis, highlighting the potential role of microparticle surface tunning for specific cell targeting. PMID:26068810

  10. Abnormal Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR) Findings in a Near-Normal Hearing Child with Noonan Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jalaei, Bahram; Zakaria, Mohd Normani; Sidek, Dinsuhaimi

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Noonan syndrome (NS) is a heterogeneous genetic disease that affects many parts of the body. It was named after Dr. Jacqueline Anne Noonan, a paediatric cardiologist. Case Report: We report audiological tests and auditory brainstem response (ABR) findings in a 5-year old Malay boy with NS. Despite showing the marked signs of NS, the child could only produce a few meaningful words. Audiological tests found him to have bilateral mild conductive hearing loss at low frequencies. In ABR testing, despite having good waveform morphology, the results were atypical. Absolute latency of wave V was normal but interpeak latencies of wave’s I-V, I-II, II-III were prolonged. Interestingly, interpeak latency of waves III-V was abnormally shorter. Conclusion: Abnormal ABR results are possibly due to abnormal anatomical condition of brainstem and might contribute to speech delay. PMID:28229064

  11. Efficacy of porcine gonadotropins for repeated stimulation of ovarian activity for oocyte retrieval and in vitro embryo production and cryopreservation in Siberian tigers (Panthera tigris altaica).

    PubMed

    Crichton, Elizabeth G; Bedows, Elliott; Miller-Lindholm, Amanda K; Baldwin, David M; Armstrong, Douglas L; Graham, Laura H; Ford, J Joe; Gjorret, Jakob O; Hyttel, Poul; Pope, C Earle; Vajta, Gabor; Loskutoff, Naida M

    2003-01-01

    A comparison of the amino acid sequences demonstrated that Siberian tiger gonadotropins are more homologous with those of porcine than any other commercially available preparation. The present study measured the efficacy of repeated ovarian stimulation with purified porcine gonadotropins on the follicular, hormonal, and immunogenic responses in Siberian tigers as well as on the ability of oocytes retrieved by laparoscopic follicular aspiration to fertilize and cleave in vitro. Controlled rate and vitrification cryopreservation methods were also compared for their ability to support ongoing cleavage following thawing of presumptive 2- to 4-cell tiger embryos generated in vitro. Vitrification supported continued embryonic cleavage in vitro while controlled rate freezing did not. Stereological microscopy indicated an excellent ovarian response with the recovery of quality cumulus-oocyte complexes that apparently fertilized and cleaved in vitro. However, ultrastructural and physiological examination revealed abnormal and unnatural responses such as the failure of some cumulus-oocyte complexes to reach maturity and progestagen levels to approach normalcy. At the same time, analyses of blood for antibodies failed to detect an immune reaction to these foreign gonadotropins in an assay that tested positive for the chorionic gonadotropin-stimulated domestic cat. Together, these observations suggest that porcine gonadotropins may be effective for the ovarian stimulation of tigers but that some modifications to administration protocols are needed to produce a more natural response.

  12. Prolonged Postocclusive Hyperemia Response in Patients with Normal-Tension Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Wierzbowska, Joanna; Wojtkiewicz, Stanisław; Zbieć, Anna; Wierzbowski, Robert; Liebert, Adam; Maniewski, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Background It is believed that endothelial dysfunction may be a link between systemic and ocular dysregulation in glaucoma. The aim of this study was to evaluate peripheral vascular reactive hyperemia in response to occlusion test and to correlate peripheral vascular findings with retrobulbar hemodynamics parameters in patients with normal-tension glaucoma. Material/Methods Forty-eight patients with normal-tension glaucoma (mean age 58.1 years, 38 women) and 40 control subjects (mean age 54.1 years, 36 women) were subjected to a brachial arterial occlusion test and color Doppler imaging (LOGIQ 9, GE Medical Systems) of the retrobulbar arteries. Finger hyperemia was assessed by using a 2-channel laser Doppler flowmeter (MBF-3D, Moor Instruments, Ltd.). Time parameters (time to peak flow, half-time of hyperemia, time of recovery) and amplitude parameters (maximum hyperemia response, biological zero) of the post-occlusive reactive hyperemia signal pattern as well as velocities and resistance index of the ophthalmic, central retinal, and short posterior ciliary arteries were evaluated and compared between study groups. Results In glaucoma patients, time to peak flow and half-time of hyperemia were significantly longer (21.4 vs. 12.0 s, p=0.02 and 74.1 vs. 44.2 s, p=0.03, respectively) and biological zero was significantly lower (2.4 vs. 3.2, p=0.01) comparing with healthy subjects. In glaucoma patients, peak-systolic and end-diastolic velocities of central retinal artery were significantly lower (12.8 vs.14.1, p=0.03 and 3.9 vs. 4.7, p=0.01, respectively) and resistance index of this artery was significantly higher (0.69 vs. 0.67, p=0.03) compared to controls. In the glaucoma group, maximum hyperemic response was negatively correlated with the resistance index of temporal short posterior ciliary arteries (r=−0.4, p=0.01), whereas in the control group half-time of hyperemia was negatively correlated with end-diastolic velocity of the central retinal artery (r=−0

  13. Upper normal values of blood pressure response to exercise in Olympic athletes.

    PubMed

    Caselli, Stefano; Vaquer Segui, Antonia; Quattrini, Filippo; Di Gacinto, Barbara; Milan, Alberto; Assorgi, Riccardo; Verdile, Luisa; Spataro, Antonio; Pelliccia, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    Exercise test is widespread performed in athletes to assess cardiovascular adaptations during effort; however, scarce information exists relative to the behavior of blood pressure during exercise in athletes. We sought to define the normal values and upper limits of blood pressure response to exercise in a large population of elite, healthy athletes. A total of 1,876 healthy, normotensive elite athletes (aged 25 ± 6 years, 64% male) underwent a comprehensive clinical evaluation including maximal bicycle exercise test. At maximum exercise, the systolic blood pressure increased significantly (Δ = +69 ± 18 mm Hg; P< .001), whereas diastolic blood pressure showed minimal change (Δ = +1 ± 7 mm Hg; P= .001). The upper reference values were 220 mm Hg in male and 200 mm Hg in female athletes for systolic blood pressure, and 85 mm Hg in male and 80 mm Hg in female for diastolic blood pressure. A subgroup of 142 athletes (7.5%) showed high blood pressure response to exercise, that is, increase in systolic and/or diastolic blood pressure above the 95th percentile. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that endurance and mixed sport disciplines, body mass index, and baseline systolic blood pressure were the strongest determinants for high blood pressure response to exercise. The gender-specific reference values for systolic and diastolic blood pressure at maximum exercise in athletes were defined. A small subset (7.5%) of athletes showed higher blood pressure response, in the absence of target organ disease or metabolic abnormalities, and associated with superior physical performance and larger cardiac remodeling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Antibody response following Hepatitis B vaccination in peritoneal dialysis patients: does normalized urea clearance matter?

    PubMed Central

    Dervisoglu, Erkan; Simsek, Melih; Yilmaz, Ahmet

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Data on the factors that contribute to the antibody response to hepatitis B virus vaccination in peritoneal dialysis patients are scarce. The current study was conducted on a group of peritoneal dialysis patients to learn how the response to hepatitis B virus vaccination varies according to the patient's clearance of urea normalized to total body water (Kt/V). METHODS: A convenience sample of 33 peritoneal dialysis patients (13 women and 20 men, with a mean age of 49±12 years) was administered double doses (20 µg IM in each deltoid muscle) of recombinant hepatitis B vaccine at 0, 1, 2, and 6 months. Response to immunization was measured at one to three months after the final dose of vaccine. The subjects were divided into groups according to the level of antibodies to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs), including non-responders (<10 IU/L), weak responders (10-100 IU/L), and good responders (>100 IU/L). RESULTS: Among non-responders, weak responders, and good responders, significant differences were found in age (54±12 vs. 56±9 vs. 45±12 years, respectively; p = 0.049) and recombinant human erythropoietin use (20 vs. 29 vs. 76%, respectively; p = 0.016). No significant differences in weekly total Kt/V (p = 0.704), weekly peritoneal Kt/V (p = 0.064) and residual glomerular filtration rate (p = 0.355) were found across the three groups. CONCLUSIONS: Delivered clearance measured by weekly peritoneal Kt/V and total clearance measured by weekly total Kt/V did not predict the response to hepatitis B virus vaccination in patients on peritoneal dialysis. PMID:22179159

  15. Antibody response following hepatitis B vaccination in peritoneal dialysis patients: does normalized urea clearance matter?

    PubMed

    Dervisoglu, Erkan; Simsek, Melih; Yilmaz, Ahmet

    2011-01-01

    Data on the factors that contribute to the antibody response to hepatitis B virus vaccination in peritoneal dialysis patients are scarce. The current study was conducted on a group of peritoneal dialysis patients to learn how the response to hepatitis B virus vaccination varies according to the patient's clearance of urea normalized to total body water (Kt/V). A convenience sample of 33 peritoneal dialysis patients (13 women and 20 men, with a mean age of 49 ± 12 years) was administered double doses (20 μg IM in each deltoid muscle) of recombinant hepatitis B vaccine at 0, 1, 2, and 6 months. Response to immunization was measured at one to three months after the final dose of vaccine. The subjects were divided into groups according to the level of antibodies to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs), including non-responders ( < 10 IU/L), weak responders (10-100 IU/L), and good responders ( > 100 IU/L). Among non-responders, weak responders, and good responders, significant differences were found in age (54 ± 12 vs. 56 ± 9 vs. 45 ± 12 years, respectively; p = 0.049) and recombinant human erythropoietin use (20 vs. 29 vs. 76%, respectively; p = 0.016). No significant differences in weekly total Kt/V (p = 0.704), weekly peritoneal Kt/V (p = 0.064) and residual glomerular filtration rate (p = 0.355) were found across the three groups. Delivered clearance measured by weekly peritoneal Kt/V and total clearance measured by weekly total Kt/V did not predict the response to hepatitis B virus vaccination in patients on peritoneal dialysis.

  16. Assessment of cardiovascular response to treadmill exercise in normal healthy Indian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Pande, Sushma S; Pande, Santosh R; Dhore, Rajendra B; Daphale, Ajay V; Parate, Vrushali R; Patel, Shishir S; Agrekar, Sushil H

    2012-01-01

    The study aims to assess the cardiovascular response to treadmill exercise test in healthy Indian adolescents. A group of 50 healthy adolescents took part in the study. Cardiovascular response was assessed by using treadmill exercise test as per Bruce protocol. Pulse rate, blood pressure and ECG were recorded before, during and after undertaking the treadmill test. Mean age and body mass index (BMI) were 18.7 +/- 0.51 yrs. and 21.4 +/- 3.44 kg/m2 respectively. Karl Pearson Correlation analysis showed highly significant negative correlation between BMI and exercise time (r = -0.598, P<0.001) and between resting DBP and Exercise Time (r = -0.424, P<0.002). While BMI and DBP showed highly significant positive correlation (r = 0.463, P<0.001). During exercise pulse and SBP rose and DBP fell. SBP rose from mean 122 to 175 (rise by 53 mm of Hg) and DBP fell from mean 78 to 65 (fall by 13 mm of Hg). One min recovery pulse was 156 indicating 22% fall from target heart rate. All the parameters returned to near resting value at 6 min recovery. In 30% students DBP showed exaggerated response i.e. rise during exercise. These students had more BMI and higher resting DBP as compared to other students, which could be the reason for exaggerated response in these participants. In ECG there were no significant ST/T changes during exercise or recovery period. This study provides normal data for small sample of healthy Indian adolescents when subjected to treadmill exercise test.

  17. Gonadotropins in European sea bass: Endocrine roles and biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Mazón, María José; Molés, Gregorio; Rocha, Ana; Crespo, Berta; Lan-Chow-Wing, Olivier; Espigares, Felipe; Muñoz, Iciar; Felip, Alicia; Carrillo, Manuel; Zanuy, Silvia; Gómez, Ana

    2015-09-15

    Follicle stimulating hormone (Fsh) and luteinizing hormone (Lh) are central endocrine regulators of the gonadal function in vertebrates. They act through specific receptors located in certain cell types found in the gonads. In fish, the differential roles of these hormones are being progressively elucidated due to the development of suitable tools for their study. In European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax), isolation of the genes coding for the gonadotropin subunits and receptors allowed in first instance to conduct expression studies. Later, to overcome the limitation of using native hormones, recombinant dimeric gonadotropins, which show different functional characteristics depending on the cell system and DNA construct, were generated. In addition, single gonadotropin beta-subunits have been produced and used as antigens for antibody production. This approach has allowed the development of detection methods for native gonadotropins, with European sea bass being one of the few species where both gonadotropins can be detected in their native form. By administering recombinant gonadotropins to gonad tissues in vitro, we were able to study their effects on steroidogenesis and intracellular pathways. Their administration in vivo has also been tested for use in basic studies and as a biotechnological approach for hormone therapy and assisted reproduction strategies. In addition to the production of recombinant hormones, gene-based therapies using somatic gene transfer have been offered as an alternative. This approach has been tested in sea bass for gonadotropin delivery in vivo. The hormones produced by the genes injected were functional and have allowed studies on the action of gonadotropins in spermatogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Pituitary gonadotropin and testicular gonadotropin receptor expression in Atlantic cod (Gadusmorhua L.) during the first reproductive season: Effects of photoperiod modulation.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Fernanda Ferreira Loureiro; Andersson, Eva; Mittelholzer, Christian; Karlsen, Orjan; Taranger, Geir Lasse; Schulz, Rüdiger W

    2011-08-01

    Pituitary mRNA levels of gonadotropin β-subunits and of their cognate receptors in the testis were studied during puberty in Atlantic cod under normal and experimental photoperiod conditions that suppressed, delayed or accelerated testis maturation. Results are discussed in context with changes in testicular histology and plasma androgen levels, considered as end points of gonadotropic regulation. Up-regulation of fshb was closely associated with the onset of puberty, decreased when spermatogenesis was completed and reached minimum levels after spawning. These results demonstrate, for the first time using an experimental approach, that activation of Fsh-dependent signaling is associated with spermatogonial proliferation and formation of spermatogenic cysts. Changes in fshr expression were less prominent and could be explained by changes in the cellular composition and RNA content of cod testis tissue. At more advanced stages of development (spermiogenesis, spermiation and spawning), lhb and, one month later, lhcgr transcript levels increased and reached peak values in spawning fish, in a positive feedback loop involving plasma androgens and Lh/Lhcgr-dependent signaling. This loop was broken by a loss of lhb expression at the end of the spawning season. Continuous light (LL) from summer solstice, ~8 months prior to spawning, suppressed the start of testis maturation and the changes in gonadotropin and receptor mRNA levels, while LL from winter solstice initially up-regulated lhb and lhcgr expression, before resulting in a precocious termination of the spawning season and low expression of all four genes. Our studies provide experimental evidence for a clear functional discrimination of cod gonadotropins. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Hypovolemia Induced Orthostatic Hypotension in Presyncopal Astronauts and Normal Subjects Relates to Hypo-Sympathetic Responsiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meck, Janice V.; Stenger, Michael B.; Platts, Steven H.; Ziegler, Michael G.

    2007-01-01

    Circulating blood volume is reduced during spaceflight, leaving astronauts hemodynamically compromised after landing. Because of this hypovolemia, crew members are able to withstand a postflight 10 minute upright tilt test only if they are able to mount a hyper-sympathetic response. Previous work from this laboratory has shown that about 30% of astronauts, primarily female, have postflight sympathetic responses to tilt that are equal to or less than their preflight responses and thus, they become presyncopal. Part of the mission of the cardiovascular lab at the Johnson Space Center is to identify susceptible crewmembers before flight so that individualized countermeasures can be prescribed. The goal of this study was to develop a ground based model of hypovolemia that could be used for this purpose We tested the hypothesis that hypovolemia alone, in the absence of spaceflight, would reproduce the landing day rate of presyncope during upright tilt in normal volunteers. Further, we hypothesized that, during hypovolemia, subjects who had sympathetic responses that were equal to or less than their normovolemic responses would become presyncopal during upright tilt tests. We studied 20 subjects, 13 male and 7 female, on two separate occasions: during normovolemia and hypovolemia. We induced hypovolemia with intravenous furosemide 40 hours prior to the experiment day, followed by a 10MEq Na diet. On the normovolemia and hypovolemia test days, plasma volume, tilt tolerance and supine and standing arterial pressure, heart rate and plasma norepinephrine levels were measured. A two factor, repeated measures analysis of variance was performed to examine the differences between group (presyncopal vs. non-presyncopal) and day (normovolemia vs. hypovolemia) effects. There were no differences in baseline arterial pressure between normovolemia and hypovolemia or between presyncopal and non-presyncopal groups, but heart rates were higher with hypovolemia in both groups (presyncopal

  20. Fructose normalizes specific counterregulatory responses to hypoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gabriely, Ilan; Shamoon, Harry

    2005-03-01

    We have previously reported that specific counterregulatory responses to hypoglycemia were augmented by an infusion of fructose in nondiabetic humans. We hypothesized that this effect was due to the interaction of a "catalytic" dose of fructose with the regulatory protein for glucokinase in glucose-sensing cells that drive counterregulation. To examine whether fructose could restore counterregulatory responses in type 1 diabetic patients with defective counterregulation, we performed stepped hypoglycemic clamp studies (5.0, 4.4, 3.9, and 3.3 mmol/l glucose steps, 50 min each) in eight intensively treated patients (HbA(1c) 6.4 +/- 0.7%) on two separate occasions: without (control) or with coinfusion of fructose (1.2 mg . kg(-1) . min(-1)). Fructose induced a resetting of the glycemic threshold for secretion of epinephrine to higher plasma glucose concentrations (from 3.3 +/- 0.1 to 3.9 +/- 0.1 mmol/l; P = 0.001) and markedly augmented the increment in epinephrine (by 56%; P < 0.001). The amplification of epinephrine responses was specific; plasma norepinephrine, glucagon, growth hormone, and cortisol were unaffected. Hypoglycemia-induced endogenous glucose production ([3-(3)H]-glucose) rose by 90% (P < 0.001) in the fructose studies, compared with -2.0% (NS) in control. In concert, the glucose infusion rates during the 3.9- and 3.3-mmol/l steps were significantly lower with fructose (2.3 +/- 0.6 and 0.0 +/- 0.0 vs. 5.9 +/- 1.15 and 3.9 +/- 1.0 micromol . kg(-1) . min(-1), respectively; P < 0.001 for both), indicating the more potent counterregulatory response during fructose infusion. We conclude that infusion of fructose nearly normalizes the epinephrine and endogenous glucose production responses to hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetic patients with impaired counterregulation, suggesting that defects in these responses may be dependent on glucokinase-mediated glucose sensing.

  1. DNA damage and the bystander response in tumor and normal cells exposed to X-rays.

    PubMed

    Subhashree, M; Venkateswarlu, R; Karthik, K; Shangamithra, V; Venkatachalam, P

    2017-09-01

    Monolayer and suspension cultures of tumor (BMG-1, CCRF-CEM), normal (AG1522, HADF, lymphocytes) and ATM-mutant (GM4405) human cells were exposed to X-rays at doses used in radiotherapy (high dose and high dose-rate) or radiological imaging (low dose and low dose-rate). Radiation-induced DNA damage, its persistence, and possible bystander effects were evaluated, based on DNA damage markers (γ-H2AX, p53(ser15)) and cell-cycle-specific cyclins (cyclin B1 and cyclin D1). Dose-dependent DNA damage and a dose-independent bystander response were seen after exposure to high dose and high dose-rate radiation. The level of induced damage (expression of p53(ser15), γ-H2AX) depended on ATM status. However, low dose and dose-rate exposures neither increased expression of marker proteins nor induced a bystander response, except in the CCRF-CEM cells. Bystander effects after high-dose irradiation may contribute to stochastic and deterministic effects. Precautions to protect unexposed regions or to inhibit transmission of DNA damage signaling might reduce radiation risks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Electrically evoked auditory nerve responses in the cochlea with normal outer hair cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Tianying; Guo, Menghe; He, Wenxuan; Miller, Josef M; Nuttall, Alfred L

    2009-12-01

    As hybrid cochlear implant devices are increasingly used for restoring hearing in patients with residual hearing it is important to understand electrically evoked responses in cochleae having functional hair cells. To test the hypothesis that extracochlear electrical stimulation (EES) from sinusoidal current can provoke an auditory nerve response with normal frequency selectivity, the EES-evoked compound action potential (ECAP) was investigated in this study. Brief sinusoidal electrical currents, delivered via a round window electrode, were used to evoke ECAP. The ECAP waveform was observed to be the same as the acoustically evoked CAP (ACAP), except for a shorter latency. The input/output and intensity/latency functions of ACAPs and ECAPs were also similar. The maximum acoustic masking for both ACAP and ECAP occurred near probe frequencies. Since the masked tuning curve of a CAP reflects the frequency selectivity of neural excitation, these data demonstrate a highly specific activation of the auditory nerve, which would result in high degree of frequency selectivity. This frequency selectivity likely results from the cochlear traveling wave caused by electrically stimulated outer hair cells.

  3. Stimulation of contacts in ventral but not dorsal subthalamic nucleus normalizes response switching in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Greenhouse, Ian; Gould, Sherrie; Houser, Melissa; Aron, Adam R.

    2014-01-01

    Switching between responses is a key executive function known to rely on the frontal cortex and the basal ganglia. Here we aimed to establish with greater anatomical specificity whether such switching could be mediated via different possible frontal–basal-ganglia circuits. Accordingly, we stimulated dorsal vs. ventral contacts of electrodes in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in Parkinson's patients during switching performance, and also studied matched controls. The patients underwent three sessions: once with bilateral dorsal contact stimulation, once with bilateral ventral contact stimulation, and once Off stimulation. Patients Off stimulation showed abnormal patterns of switching, and stimulation of the ventral contacts but not the dorsal contacts normalized the pattern of behavior relative to controls. This provides some of the first evidence in humans that stimulation of dorsal vs. ventral STN DBS contacts has differential effects on executive function. As response switching is an executive function known to rely on prefrontal cortex, these results suggest that ventral contact stimulation affected an executive/associative cortico-basal ganglia circuit. PMID:23562963

  4. A finite element framework for computation of protein normal modes and mechanical response.

    PubMed

    Bathe, Mark

    2008-03-01

    A computational framework based on the Finite Element Method is presented to calculate the normal modes and mechanical response of proteins and their supramolecular assemblies. Motivated by elastic network models, proteins are treated as continuum elastic solids with molecular volume defined by their solvent-excluded surface. The discretized Finite Element representation is obtained using a surface simplification algorithm that facilitates the generation of models of arbitrary prescribed spatial resolution. The procedure is applied to a mutant of T4 phage lysozyme, G-actin, syntenin, cytochrome-c', beta-tubulin, and the supramolecular assembly filamentous actin (F-actin). Equilibrium thermal fluctuations of alpha-carbon atoms and their inter-residue correlations compare favorably with all-atom-based results, the Rotational-Translational Block procedure, and experiment. Additionally, the free vibration and compressive buckling responses of F-actin are in quantitative agreement with experiment. The proposed methodology is applicable to any protein or protein assembly and facilitates the incorporation of specific atomic-level interactions, including aqueous-electrolyte-mediated electrostatic effects and solvent damping. The procedure is equally applicable to proteins with known atomic coordinates as it is to electron density maps of proteins, protein complexes, and supramolecular assemblies of unknown atomic structure.

  5. University Loaned Normal Uranium Slug Disposition Study: University survey responses. Predecisional draft

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, G.W. Jr.

    1992-09-01

    During the 1950`s and 1960`s, the Atomic Energy Commission loaned rejected natural uranium slugs from the Savannah River Site to United States universities for use in subcritical assemblies. Currently, there are sixty-two universities holding 91,798 slugs, containing about 167 metric tons of natural uranium. It was originally planned that the universities would return the material to Fernald when they no longer required it. Fernald has not received slugs since it was shut down in 1988. The Department of Energy`s Office of Weapons and Materials Planning requested that the Planning Support Group develop information to assist them in facilitating the return of the unwanted slugs to one or more of their facilities and develop alternatives for the ultimate disposition of this material. This supplemental report to the University Loaned Normal Uranium Slug Disposition Study documents responses to and summarizes the results of a survey of fifty-eight universities. University contacts and survey responses covering loaned slug descriptions, historical information, radiological data, current status, and plans and schedules are documented.

  6. Cellular and Humoral Antibody Responses of Normal Pastel and Sapphire Mink to Goat Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lodmell, D. L.; Bergman, R. K.; Hadlow, W. J.; Munoz, J. J.

    1971-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether normal sapphire and royal pastel mink differ immunologically at the cellular and humoral levels. Two days after primary intraperitoneal (ip) inoculation of goat erythrocytes (GE), essentially no 19 or 7S plaque-forming cells (PFC) per 106 cells were detected in spleen or in abdominal and peripheral lymph nodes of either color phase. On the 4th day, more 19S PFC were detected in pastel than in sapphire tissues; pastel tissues also contained 7S PFC, whereas essentially none was present in sapphires until the 6th day. After an ip booster inoculation, the number of PFC was markedly different between the two color phases. These differences were most apparent in spleen and peripheral lymph nodes. In parallel with differences observed in PFC responses between the color phases, total hemolysin and 2-mercaptoethanol-resistant hemolysin titers of pastels exceeded those of sapphires in all but one interval after the primary, and at every interval after the booster, inoculation. These data indicate that sapphire mink are not immunological cripples, nor are they immunologically hyperactive, but that differences do exist between sapphire and royal pastel mink, especially in the response to booster injections of GE. PMID:16557957

  7. Cellular and humoral antibody responses of normal pastel and sapphire mink to goat erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lodmell, D L; Bergman, R K; Hadlow, W J; Munoz, J J

    1971-02-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether normal sapphire and royal pastel mink differ immunologically at the cellular and humoral levels. Two days after primary intraperitoneal (ip) inoculation of goat erythrocytes (GE), essentially no 19 or 7S plaque-forming cells (PFC) per 10(6) cells were detected in spleen or in abdominal and peripheral lymph nodes of either color phase. On the 4th day, more 19S PFC were detected in pastel than in sapphire tissues; pastel tissues also contained 7S PFC, whereas essentially none was present in sapphires until the 6th day. After an ip booster inoculation, the number of PFC was markedly different between the two color phases. These differences were most apparent in spleen and peripheral lymph nodes. In parallel with differences observed in PFC responses between the color phases, total hemolysin and 2-mercaptoethanol-resistant hemolysin titers of pastels exceeded those of sapphires in all but one interval after the primary, and at every interval after the booster, inoculation. These data indicate that sapphire mink are not immunological cripples, nor are they immunologically hyperactive, but that differences do exist between sapphire and royal pastel mink, especially in the response to booster injections of GE.

  8. Shear response of a frictional interface to a normal load modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bureau, L.; Baumberger, T.; Caroli, C.

    2000-11-01

    We study the shear response of a sliding multicontact interface submitted to a harmonically modulated normal load, without loss of contact. We measure, at low velocities (V<100 μm s-1), the average value F¯ of the friction force and the amplitude of its first and second harmonic components. The excitation frequency (f=120 Hz) is chosen much larger than the natural one, associated with the dynamical aging of the interface. We show the following: (i) In agreement with the engineering thumb rule, even a modest modulation induces a substantial decrease of F¯. (ii) The Rice-Ruina state and rate model, though appropriate to describe the slow frictional dynamics, must be extended when dealing with our ``high'' frequency regime. That is, the rheology which controls the shear strength must explicitly account not only for the plastic response of the adhesive junctions between load-bearing asperities, but also for the elastic contribution of the asperities bodies. This ``elastoplastic'' friction model leads to predictions in excellent quantitative agreement with all our experimental data.

  9. Electrically evoked auditory nerve responses in the cochlea with normal outer hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Tianying.; Guo, Menghe; He, Wenxuan; Miller, Josef M; Nuttall, Alfred L

    2010-01-01

    As hybrid cochlear implant devices are increasingly used for restoring hearing in patients with residual hearing it is important to understand electrically evoked responses in cochleae having functional hair cells. To test the hypothesis that extracochlear electrical stimulation (EES) from sinusoidal current can provoke an auditory nerve response with normal frequency selectivity, the EES-evoked compound action potential (ECAP) was investigated in this study. Brief sinusoidal electrical currents, delivered via a round window electrode, were used to evoke ECAP. The ECAP waveform was observed to be the same as the acoustically evoked CAP (ACAP), except for a shorter latency. The input/output and intensity/latency functions of ACAPs and ECAPs were also similar. The maximum acoustic masking for both ACAP and ECAP occurred near probe frequencies. Since the masked tuning curve of a CAP reflects the frequency selectivity of neural excitation, these data demonstrate a highly specific activation of the auditory nerve, which would result in high degree of frequency selectivity. This frequency selectivity likely results from the cochlear traveling wave caused by electrically stimulated outer hair cells. PMID:22034583

  10. Auditory Brainstem Response Altered in Humans With Noise Exposure Despite Normal Outer Hair Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Bramhall, Naomi F.; Konrad-Martin, Dawn; McMillan, Garnett P.; Griest, Susan E.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Recent animal studies demonstrated that cochlear synaptopathy, a partial loss of inner hair cell-auditory nerve fiber synapses, can occur in response to noise exposure without any permanent auditory threshold shift. In animal models, this synaptopathy is associated with a reduction in the amplitude of wave I of the auditory brainstem response (ABR). The goal of this study was to determine whether higher lifetime noise exposure histories in young people with clinically normal pure-tone thresholds are associated with lower ABR wave I amplitudes. Design Twenty-nine young military Veterans and 35 non Veterans (19 to 35 years of age) with normal pure-tone thresholds were assigned to 1 of 4 groups based on their self-reported lifetime noise exposure history and Veteran status. Suprathreshold ABR measurements in response to alternating polarity tone bursts were obtained at 1, 3, 4, and 6 kHz with gold foil tiptrode electrodes placed in the ear canal. Wave I amplitude was calculated from the difference in voltage at the positive peak and the voltage at the following negative trough. Distortion product otoacoustic emission input/output functions were collected in each participant at the same four frequencies to assess outer hair cell function. Results After controlling for individual differences in sex and distortion product otoacoustic emission amplitude, the groups containing participants with higher reported histories of noise exposure had smaller ABR wave I amplitudes at suprathreshold levels across all four frequencies compared with the groups with less history of noise exposure. Conclusions Suprathreshold ABR wave I amplitudes were reduced in Veterans reporting high levels of military noise exposure and in non Veterans reporting any history of firearm use as compared with Veterans and non Veterans with lower levels of reported noise exposure history. The reduction in ABR wave I amplitude in the groups with higher levels of noise exposure cannot be accounted

  11. Relationship between serum gonadotropins and pituitary immunoreactive gonadotropins and steroid receptors during the first FSH increase of the estrous cycle and following steroid treatment in heifers.

    PubMed

    Lane, Elizabeth A; Sweeney, Torres; Ryan, Marion; Roche, James F; Crowe, Mark A

    2009-05-01

    The objectives were to determine the effects of (i) time during the first FSH increase of the estrous cycle (time-course study) and (ii) exogenous steroid treatment (steroid feedback study) on the relationship between circulating serum gonadotropins, and the proportions of pituitary cells immunoreactive for gonadotropins and steroid receptors during the estrous cycle in heifers. Pituitaries were collected from heifers (n=40) slaughtered at 13h (n=8), 30h (n=24) and 66h (n=8) after estrous onset, corresponding to before, during and after the first FSH increase of the estrous cycle. Heifers slaughtered during the FSH increase (at 30h) either received no treatment (n=8), or were treated (n=16) with estradiol benzoate and/or progesterone before slaughter. During the time-course study, the proportion of pituitary cells immunoreactive for FSH increased (P<0.05) during the first transient FSH increase reflecting serum concentrations. The proportion of pituitary cells immunoreactive for LH was unaltered, a reflection of serum LH concentrations. The proportion of estrogen receptors (ER)-alpha, but not ER-beta, was decreased (P<0.05) at 30h compared with at either 13 or 66h. During the steroid feedback study, exogenous progesterone with or without estradiol suppressed (P<0.05) the proportions of pituitary cells immunoreactive for gonadotropins, serum FSH concentrations and LH pulse frequency. Steroid treatment did not alter the proportion of pituitary cells positive for estrogen receptors (alpha and beta). While progesterone receptors (PR) were not detected in the anterior pituitary by immunohistochemistry during the early estrous cycle or in response to steroid treatment, quantitative real-time PCR revealed that mRNA for progesterone receptors was expressed at very low levels. The expression of pituitary PR mRNA was decreased (P<0.05) at 30 and 66h compared with 13h, and was suppressed (P<0.05) following steroid treatments. Alterations in pituitary steroid receptors are

  12. Normal response function method for mass and stiffness matrix updating using complex FRFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, S.; Modak, S. V.

    2012-10-01

    Quite often a structural dynamic finite element model is required to be updated so as to accurately predict the dynamic characteristics like natural frequencies and the mode shapes. Since in many situations undamped natural frequencies and mode shapes need to be predicted, it has generally been the practice in these situations to seek updating of only mass and stiffness matrix so as to obtain a reliable prediction model. Updating using frequency response functions (FRFs) has been one of the widely used approaches for updating, including updating of mass and stiffness matrices. However, the problem with FRF based methods, for updating mass and stiffness matrices, is that these methods are based on use of complex FRFs. Use of complex FRFs to update mass and stiffness matrices is not theoretically correct as complex FRFs are not only affected by these two matrices but also by the damping matrix. Therefore, in situations where updating of only mass and stiffness matrices using FRFs is required, the use of complex FRFs based updating formulation is not fully justified and would lead to inaccurate updated models. This paper addresses this difficulty and proposes an improved FRF based finite element model updating procedure using the concept of normal FRFs. The proposed method is a modified version of the existing response function method that is based on the complex FRFs. The effectiveness of the proposed method is validated through a numerical study of a simple but representative beam structure. The effect of coordinate incompleteness and robustness of method under presence of noise is investigated. The results of updating obtained by the improved method are compared with the existing response function method. The performance of the two approaches is compared for cases of light, medium and heavily damped structures. It is found that the proposed improved method is effective in updating of mass and stiffness matrices in all the cases of complete and incomplete data and

  13. Poor cognitive outcome in shunt-responsive idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Koivisto, Anne M; Alafuzoff, Irina; Savolainen, Sakari; Sutela, Anna; Rummukainen, Jaana; Kurki, Mitja; Jääskeläinen, Juha E; Soininen, Hilkka; Rinne, Jaakko; Leinonen, Ville

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) causes cognitive decline that can be alleviated by shunting, but long-term outcome studies are scarce. To elucidate the long-term cognitive condition of shunt-responsive iNPH patients. The follow-up data (Kuopio University Hospital NPH Registry) of 146 patients diagnosed with iNPH by clinical and radiological examination, 24-hour intraventricular pressure monitoring, frontal cortical biopsy, and response to the shunt were analyzed for signs of dementia. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, and specified memory disorder criteria were used. Median follow-up was 4.8 years. At the end of follow-up, 117 (80%) of the 146 iNPH patients had cognitive decline and 67 (46%) had clinical dementia. The most common clinical diagnoses were Alzheimer disease and vascular dementia. In multivariate analysis of the 146 iNPH patients, memory deficit as a first symptom before shunt (odds ratio [OR] 18.3; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.9-175), male sex (OR 3.29; 95% CI 1.11-9.73), age (OR 1.17 year; 95% CI 1.07-1.28), and follow-up time (OR 1.20 year; 95% CI 1.02-1.40) predicted dementia. Interestingly, 8 (5%) iNPH patients had dementia without any signs of other neurodegenerative diseases in clinical, neuroradiological, or brain biopsy evaluation. These patients initially presented a full triad of symptoms, with gait disturbance being the most frequent initial symptom followed by deterioration in cognition. The novel findings were (a) a significant risk of dementia in iNPH initially responsive to cerebrospinal fluid shunt, (b) cognitive impairment most commonly due to iNPH-related dementia followed by concurrent degenerative brain disease, and (c) a subgroup with dementia related to iNPH without comorbidities.

  14. Association between shunt-responsive idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus and alcohol.

    PubMed

    Hickman, Thu-Trang; Shuman, Matthew E; Johnson, Tatyana A; Yang, Felix; Rice, Rebecca R; Rice, Isaac M; Chung, Esther H; Wiemann, Robert; Tinl, Megan; Iracheta, Christine; Chen, Grace; Flynn, Patricia; Mondello, Mary Beth; Thompson, Jillian; Meadows, Mary-Ellen; Carroll, Rona S; Yang, Hong Wei; Xing, Hongyan; Pilgrim, David; Chiocca, E Antonio; Dunn, Ian F; Golby, Alexandra J; Johnson, Mark D

    2017-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) is characterized by ventriculomegaly, gait difficulty, incontinence, and dementia. The symptoms can be ameliorated by CSF drainage. The object of this study was to identify factors associated with shunt-responsive iNPH. METHODS The authors reviewed the medical records of 529 patients who underwent shunt placement for iNPH at their institution between July 2001 and March 2015. Variables associated with shunt-responsive iNPH were identified using bivariate and multivariate analyses. Detailed alcohol consumption information was obtained for 328 patients and was used to examine the relationship between alcohol and shunt-responsive iNPH. A computerized patient registry from 2 academic medical centers was queried to determine the prevalence of alcohol abuse among 1665 iNPH patients. RESULTS Bivariate analysis identified associations between shunt-responsive iNPH and gait difficulty (OR 4.59, 95% CI 2.32-9.09; p < 0.0001), dementia (OR 1.79, 95% CI 1.14-2.80; p = 0.01), incontinence (OR 1.77, 95% CI 1.13-2.76; p = 0.01), and alcohol use (OR 1.98, 95% CI 1.23-3.16; p = 0.03). Borderline significance was observed for hyperlipidemia (OR 1.56, 95% CI 0.99-2.45; p = 0.054), a family history of hyperlipidemia (OR 3.09, 95% CI 0.93-10.26, p = 0.054), and diabetes (OR 1.83, 95% CI 0.96-3.51; p = 0.064). Multivariate analysis identified associations with gait difficulty (OR 3.98, 95% CI 1.81-8.77; p = 0.0006) and alcohol (OR 1.94, 95% CI 1.10-3.39; p = 0.04). Increased alcohol intake correlated with greater improvement after CSF drainage. Alcohol abuse was 2.5 times more prevalent among iNPH patients than matched controls. CONCLUSIONS Alcohol consumption is associated with the development of shunt-responsive iNPH.

  15. 'Getting back to normal' or 'a new type of normal'? A qualitative study of patients' responses to the existential threat of cancer.

    PubMed

    Baker, P; Beesley, H; Fletcher, I; Ablett, J; Holcombe, C; Salmon, P

    2016-01-01

    Existential concerns about cancer have been studied extensively in palliative care but less so in curative settings. The present report aims to describe ways in which patients viewed the continuity or discontinuity of their identity in the face of the mortal threat of cancer. Twenty-eight patients with breast, prostate or lung cancer attending pre-treatment, treatment or follow-up appointments were interviewed about their emotional experiences following diagnosis. Qualitative analysis followed an inductive, constant comparative approach. Patients spoke of 'getting back to normal', but presented two distinct accounts of 'normality'. Some, particularly those only recently diagnosed, maintained continuity to past identity by upholding previous routines, emphasising resilience and minimising the impact of cancer. Others talked of a new 'normality' discontinuous with their past. Most accounts, however, evidenced elements of continuity and discontinuity, often in ostensibly contradictory ways. We suggest that holding contradictory perspectives simultaneously characterises an intermediate stage of adjustment for some patients: between reliance on continuity with the past in the aftermath of diagnosis and, later, a sense of being a new person, changed by cancer. Practitioners should appreciate that patients' wishes for 'normality' can signify very different responses to cancer, and that holding such contradictory orientations is functional, not aberrant.

  16. [The response of free alpha-subunit of glycoprotein hormones to LH-RH administration (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Hamamoto, T; Nishimura, R; Ashitaka, Y; Tojo, S

    1982-05-20

    The responses of immunoreactive free alpha-subunit of glycoprotein hormones to LH-RH administration were studied in normal men and women, and in patients with hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, trophoblastic disease and isolated ectopic alpha-subunit producing tumor. In patients with hypergonadotropic hypergonadism, basal levels of serum alpha-subunit were elevated and the responses to LH-RH were also excessive compared to those of normal men and women. Conversely, in hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, basal levels of alpha-subunit were significantly low and its response to LH-RH was barely detectable. The response of alpha-subunit to constant intravenous infusion of LH-RH (1 microgram/kg/h) was studied in 4 normal men. Both LH and alpha-subunit revealed biphasic patterns of elevation. Its releasing pattern suggests the possibility that two pools of gonadotropin are involved in the production and secretion of alpha-subunit. In patients with trophoblastic disease secreting low levels of hCG (18 mIU/ml), the responses of alpha-subunit as well as pituitary gonadotropin to LH-RH were normal. However, in cases of high concentrations of hCG (1000 mIU/ml), the responses of alpha-subunit and gonadotropin were suppressed. After the administration of LH-RH to a patient with an isolated ectopic alpha-subunit producing tumor, the serum concentration of pituitary gonadotropin increased within the normal range, although that of alpha-subunit did not show a significant change. These results suggest that the production of alpha-subunit by tumors may be autonomous in contrast with a regulatory production in the pituitary.

  17. A new, sensitive graphical method for detecting deviations from the normal distribution of drug responses: the NTV plot.

    PubMed Central

    Endrenyi, L; Patel, M

    1991-01-01

    1. A new graphical method was developed for the detection of deviations from the normal distribution. The approach took advantage of the similarity of graphical features of a graded dose-response relationship and a cumulative normal distribution. 2. The behaviour of the new normal test variable (NTV) plot was evaluated, in comparison with that of the probit plot and probability density functions (the generalization of histograms), for various assumed distributions. These included skewed distributions and composites of normal distributions with a variety of separations, ratios of peak sizes and widths. 3. The NTV approach generally detected deviations from the normal distribution more sensitively than the probit plot. 4. The NTV and probit plots may be able to identify biomadality by complementary approaches. 5. The characteristics of the three graphical representations were illustrated by a simulated sample from a composite of normal distributions and by an example of sparteine metabolism in 142 Cuna Amerindians. PMID:1931466

  18. Change in human chorionic gonadotropin in gestational trophoblastic disease observed during the course of chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, S C; Hsieh, C Y; Ouyang, P C

    1991-01-01

    This study investigates the physicochemical characteristics of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD), with special reference to the clinical course of chemotherapy and prognosis. In gel high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), the hCG molecules from normal pregnancy and from the hydatidiform mole had the same molecular form as standard purified hCG, whereas hCG from choriocarcinoma was inconsistent in molecular form, containing molecules which are smaller, the same or larger than those of standard purified hCG. In two fatal choriocarcinoma patients, large hCG and large hCG alpha were found in the urine samples collected within one month prior to death. In a chromatofocusing study, the chromatofocusing pattern of hCG from GTD was acidic and similar to that of early pregnancy. The chromatofocusing patterns did not alter or were altered only slightly during the course of chemotherapy. In a Concanavalin A-Sepharose (Con A) chromatography study, the Con A binding shifted from low to high binding in patients with GTD who were responsive to chemotherapy. In summary, the molecular form, electric charge and Con A binding of hydatidiform mole hCG are similar to those of early pregnancy hCG and standard purified hCG, whereas the molecular form and Con A binding of choriocarcinoma are different from those of early pregnancy hCG and standard purified hCG. The presence of smaller or larger molecular forms of hCG may be an ominous sign, whereas the presence of high Con A binding may be a favorable sign. The chromatofocusing pattern seems to be unrelated to the clinical course of chemotherapy.

  19. Role of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues in metastatic male breast cancer: results from a pooled analysis.

    PubMed

    Di Lauro, Luigi; Pizzuti, Laura; Barba, Maddalena; Sergi, Domenico; Sperduti, Isabella; Mottolese, Marcella; Amoreo, Carla Azzurra; Belli, Franca; Vici, Patrizia; Speirs, Valerie; Santini, Daniele; De Maria, Ruggero; Maugeri-Saccà, Marcello

    2015-05-17

    Male breast cancer is a rare malignancy. Despite the lack of prospectively generated data from trials in either the adjuvant or metastatic setting, patients are commonly treated with hormone therapies. Much controversy exists over the use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues in metastatic male breast cancer patients. We conducted this study to provide more concrete ground on the use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues in this setting. We herein present results from a pooled analysis including 60 metastatic male breast cancer patients treated with either an aromatase inhibitor or cyproterone acetate as a monotherapy (23 patients) or combined with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue (37 patients). Overall response rate was 43.5% in patients treated with monotherapy and 51.3% with combination therapy (p = 0.6). Survival outcomes favored combination therapy in terms of median progression-free survival (11.6 months versus 6 months; p = 0.05), 1-year progression-free survival rate (43.2% versus 21.7%; p = 0.05), median overall survival (29.7 months versus 22 months; p = 0.05), and 2-year survival rate (64.9% versus 43.5%; p = 0.05). In metastatic male breast cancer patients, the combined use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues and aromatase inhibitors or antiandrogens seems to be associated with greater efficacy, particularly in terms of survival outcomes, compared with monotherapy. Collectively, these results encourage considering these agents in the metastatic setting.

  20. [Stimulation test of the adenohypophysis with arginine, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GRH), and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) in 45, XO patients with Turner's syndrome (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Rudolf, K; Kyank, H; Göretzlehner, G; Kunkel, S

    1980-01-01

    Pituitary stimulation tests with arginine, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GRH) and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) were performed in five 45, XO patients with Turner's syndrome. Their ages ranged from 12--17 years. Serum levels of LH, FSH, PRL, HGH, and TSH were measured by RIA. The hypothalamo-pituitary system appeared normal in the patients with Turner's syndrome.

  1. Effect of sleep deprivation on the growth hormone response to the alpha-3 adrenergic receptor agonist, clonidine, in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Lal, S; Thavundayil, J X; Krishnan, B; Nair, N P; Schwartz, G; Kiely, M E; Guyda, H

    1997-01-01

    One night's sleep deprivation (SD) increased the growth hormone (GH) response to clonidine (20 ug/kg i.v.) in 11 normal men ( p < 0.005). This finding may indicate that SD enhances alpha-2 adrenergic receptor function or that the GH response to GH releasing factor in increased by SD.

  2. Modeling the response of normal and ischemic cardiac tissue to electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Sunil Mani

    Heart disease, the leading cause of death worldwide, is often caused by ventricular fibrillation. A common treatment for this lethal arrhythmia is defibrillation: a strong electrical shock that resets the heart to its normal rhythm. To design better defibrillators, we need a better understanding of both fibrillation and defibrillation. Fundamental mysteries remain regarding the mechanism of how the heart responds to a shock, particularly anodal shocks and the resultant hyperpolarization. Virtual anodes play critical roles in defibrillation, and one cannot build better defibrillators until these mechanisms are understood. We are using mathematical modeling to numerically simulate observed phenomena, and are exploring fundamental mechanisms responsible for the heart's electrical behavior. Such simulations clarify mechanisms and identify key parameters. We investigate how systolic tissue responds to an anodal shock and how refractory tissue reacts to hyperpolarization by studying the dip in the anodal strength-interval curve. This dip is due to electrotonic interaction between regions of depolarization and hyperpolarization following a shock. The dominance of the electrotonic mechanism over calcium interactions implies the importance of the spatial distribution of virtual electrodes. We also investigate the response of localized ischemic tissue to an anodal shock by modeling a regional elevation of extracellular potassium concentration. This heterogeneity leads to action potential instability, 2:1 conduction block (alternans), and reflection-like reentry at the boarder of the normal and ischemic regions. This kind of reflection (reentry) occurs due to the delay between proximal and distal segments to re-excite the proximal segment. Our numerical simulations are based on the bidomain model, the state-of-the-art mathematical description of how cardiac tissue responds to shocks. The dynamic LuoRudy model describes the active properties of the membrane. To model ischemia

  3. Intratubular trophoblasts in the contralateral testis caused elevation of serum human chorionic gonadotropin following complete remission of stage II testicular tumor: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Satoshi; Kawai, Koji; Onozawa, Mizuki; Ando, Satoshi; Miyazaki, Jun; Nagata, Chigusa; Noguchi, Masayuki; Yamasaki, Kazumitsu; Uchida, Katsunori; Iwamoto, Teruaki; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 22-year-old male who had a history of metastatic right testicular tumor successfully treated with chemotherapy and surgery. Twenty-one months after the initial treatment, the serum human chorionic gonadotropin started to increase gradually, but whole body imaging including the left testis revealed no abnormal finding except testicular microlithiasis. A biopsy of the left testis revealed intratubular germ cell neoplasia, unclassified type. After the human chorionic gonadotropin level reached 6.6 mIU/ml, he underwent left high orchiectomy. Histology demonstrated a small malignant germ cell tumor as well as intratubular germ cell neoplasia, unclassified type, both of which were negative for human chorionic gonadotropin staining. Besides these lesions, there were tiny foci of human chorionic gonadotropin-immunoreactive intratubular trophoblasts. Serum human chorionic gonadotropin normalized immediately after the orchiectomy, and he had no sign of recurrence at 6 months. The present case will provide new insight into the diagnosis of testicular tumor recurrence with isolated elevation of a serum tumor marker.

  4. Speech-evoked brainstem response in normal adolescent and children speakers of Brazilian Portuguese.

    PubMed

    Sanfins, Milaine Dominici; Borges, Leticia Reis; Ubiali, Thalita; Donadon, Caroline; Diniz Hein, Thais Antonelli; Hatzopoulos, Stavros; Colella-Santos, Maria Francisca

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to analyze the coding responses of speech sounds (syllable/da/) in children and adolescent speakers of Brazilian Portuguese with typical development and normal hearing, aged between 8 and 16 years, in order to establish normative data of speech ABR response. This normative data can be used as a reference for speech ABR responses and also to enable the diagnosis in individuals with different pathologies. The analyze for absolute latency of speech sounds, more specifically the syllable/da/, for speech-ABR in children and adolescent speakers of Brazilian Portuguese with typical development were: right ear - wave V (6,43-6,57), wave A (7,35-7,57), wave C (18,19-18,46), wave D (21,99-22,42), wave E (30,73-31,05), wave F (39,19-39,55) and wave O (47,75-48,24) and left ear - wave V (6,44-6,57), wave A (7,36-7,59), wave C (18,26-18,55), wave D (22,22 -22,50), wave E (30,58-30,97), wave F (39,05-39,35) and wave O (47,78-48,13). For the amplitude values (μv), the responses were within the following ranges: right ear - wave V (0,10-0,14), wave A (0,19-0,25), wave C (0,08-0,13), wave D (0,11-0,17), wave E (0,17-0,42), wave F (0,14-0,33) and wave O (0,11-0,31) and left ear - wave V (0,09-0,13), wave A (0,08-0,23), wave C (0,08-0,14), wave D (0,10-0,15), wave E (0,20-0,26), wave F (0,16-0,22) and wave O (0,12-0,20). For the values of complex VA (slope: μv/ms and area μv x ms) the follow values obtained were: right ear - slope (0,32-0,42) and area (0,29-0,38) and left ear - slope (0,30-0,39) and area (0,27-0,35). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Myocardial muscarinic receptor upregulation and normal response to isoproterenol in denervated hearts by familial amyloid polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Delahaye, N; Le Guludec, D; Dinanian, S; Delforge, J; Slama, M S; Sarda, L; Dollé, F; Mzabi, H; Samuel, D; Adams, D; Syrota, A; Merlet, P

    2001-12-11

    Patients with familial amyloid polyneuropathy, a rare hereditary form of amyloidosis, have progressive autonomic neuropathy. The disease usually does not induce heart failure but is associated with sudden death, conduction disturbances, and an increased risk of complications during anesthesia. Although cardiac sympathetic denervation has been clearly demonstrated, the postsynaptic status of the cardiac autonomic nervous system remains unelucidated. Twenty-one patients were studied (age, 39+/-11 years; normal coronary arteries; left ventricular ejection fraction 68+/-9%). To evaluate the density and affinity constants of myocardial muscarinic receptors, PET with (11)C-MQNB (methylquinuclidinyl benzilate), a specific hydrophilic antagonist, was used. Cardiac beta-receptor functional efficiency was studied by the heart rate (HR) response to intravenous infusion of isoproterenol (5 minutes after 2 mg of atropine, 5, 10, and 15 ng/kg per minute during 5 minutes per step). The mean muscarinic receptor density was higher in patients than in control subjects (B'(max), 35.5+/-8.9 versus 26.1+/-6.7 pmol/mL, P=0.003), without change in receptor affinity. The increase in HR after injection of atropine as well as of MQNB was lower in patients compared with control subjects despite a similar basal HR (DeltaHR after atropine, 11+/-21% versus 62+/-17%; P<0.001), consistent with parasympathetic denervation. Incremental infusion of isoproterenol induced a similar increase in HR in patients and control subjects. Cardiac autonomic denervation in familial amyloid polyneuropathy results in an upregulation of myocardial muscarinic receptors but without change in cardiac beta-receptor responsiveness to catecholamines.

  6. Development of Auditory Evoked Responses in Normally Developing Preschool Children and Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Stephen, Julia M; Hill, Dina E; Peters, Amanda; Flynn, Lucinda; Zhang, Tongsheng; Okada, Yoshio

    2017-08-04

    The cortical responses to auditory stimuli undergo rapid and dramatic changes during the first 3 years of life in normally developing (ND) children, with decreases in latency and changes in amplitude in the primary peaks. However, most previous studies have focused on children >3 years of age. The analysis of data from the early stages of development is challenging because the temporal pattern of the evoked responses changes with age (e.g., additional peaks emerge with increasing age) and peak latency decreases with age. This study used the topography of the auditory evoked magnetic field (AEF) to identify the auditory components in ND children between 6 and 68 months (n = 48). The latencies of the peaks in the AEF produced by a tone burst (ISI 2 ± 0.2 s) during sleep decreased with age, consistent with previous reports in awake children. The peak latencies of the AEFs in ND children and children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) were compared. Previous studies indicate that the latencies of the initial components of the auditory evoked potential (AEP) and the AEF are delayed in children with ASD when compared to age-matched ND children >4 years of age. We speculated whether the AEF latencies decrease with age in children diagnosed with ASD as in ND children, but with uniformly longer latencies before the age of about 4 years. Contrary to this hypothesis, the peak latencies did not decrease with age in the ASD group (24-62 months, n = 16) during sleep (unlike in the age-matched controls), although the mean latencies were longer in the ASD group as in previous studies. These results are consistent with previous studies indicating delays in auditory latencies, and they indicate a different maturational pattern in ASD children and ND children. Longitudinal studies are needed to confirm whether the AEF latencies diverge with age, starting at around 3 years, in these 2 groups of children. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Low protein alimentation normalizes renal haemodynamic response to acute protein ingestion in type 1 diabetic children.

    PubMed

    Castellino, P; De Santo, N G; Capasso, G; Anastasio, P; Coppola, S; Capodicasa, G; Perna, A; Torella, R; Salvatore, T; Giordano, C

    1989-02-01

    The effect of an acute protein load (2 g kg-1 bodyweight [BW]) was studied in nine type 1 diabetic children. Patients were maintained on two different dietary regimens. In study one, patients were on a high protein diet providing from 2.7 to 1.8 g of protein/kg of BW per day. In study two, patients were reevaluated after three weeks of a diet providing from 1.0 to 1.2 g kg-1 of BW per day of protein. In study one (High Protein Diet), we failed to observe any rise in GFR and RPF following the protein meal (137 +/- 21 basal vs. 110 +/- 14 and 472 +/- 93 basal vs. 494 +/- 93 ml/1.73 m2 of SA min-1 at 60 min. This is in contrast with results from seven age matched controls consuming a free diet, which showed a significant rise in both GFR and RPF. In study two (low protein diet), basal GFR was significantly reduced. However after the protein load, both GFR (92 +/- 11 vs. 126 +/- 18 ml/1.73 m2 of SA min-1) and RPF (467 +/- 83 vs. 705 +/- 102 ml/1.73 m2 min-1) rose significantly (P less than 0.05 vs. basal). The data indicate that: 1. short term protein restriction reduces significantly GFR in type 1 diabetic children; 2. diabetic children maintained on an high protein intake show an altered haemodynamic response to protein ingestion; 3. a normal response to protein ingestion can be restored by short term dietary protein restriction.

  8. Radiation-quality dependent cellular response in mutation induction in normal human cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masao; Tsuruoka, Chizuru; Uchihori, Yukio; Kitamura, Hisashi; Liu, Cui Hua

    2009-09-01

    We studied cellular responses in normal human fibroblasts induced with low-dose (rate) or low-fluence irradiations of different radiation types, such as gamma rays, neutrons and high linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ions. The cells were pretreated with low-dose (rate) or low-fluence irradiations (approximately 1 mGy/7-8 h) of 137Cs gamma rays, 241Am-Be neutrons, helium, carbon and iron ions before irradiations with an X-ray challenging dose (1.5 Gy). Helium (LET = 2.3 keV/microm), carbon (LET = 13.3 keV/microm) and iron (LET = 200 keV/microm) ions were produced by the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC), Japan. No difference in cell-killing effect, measured by a colony forming assay, was observed among the pretreatment with different radiation types. In mutation induction, which was detected in the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) locus to measure 6-thioguanine resistant clones, there was no difference in mutation frequency induced by the X-ray challenging dose between unpretreated and gamma-ray pretreated cells. In the case of the pretreatment of heavy ions, X-ray-induced mutation was around 1.8 times higher in helium-ion pretreated and 4.0 times higher in carbon-ion pretreated cells than in unpretreated cells (X-ray challenging dose alone). However, the mutation frequency in cells pretreated with iron ions was the same level as either unpretreated or gamma-ray pretreated cells. In contrast, it was reduced at 0.15 times in cells pretreated with neutrons when compared to unpretreated cells. The results show that cellular responses caused by the influence of hprt mutation induced in cells pretreated with low-dose-rate or low-fluence irradiations of different radiation types were radiation-quality dependent manner.

  9. Dynamic elastic moduli in magnetic gels: Normal modes and linear response.

    PubMed

    Pessot, Giorgio; Löwen, Hartmut; Menzel, Andreas M

    2016-09-14

    In the perspective of developing smart hybrid materials with customized features, ferrogels and magnetorheological elastomers allow a synergy of elasticity and magnetism. The interplay between elastic and magnetic properties gives rise to a unique reversible control of the material behavior by applying an external magnetic field. Albeit few works have been performed on the time-dependent properties so far, understanding the dynamic behavior is the key to model many practical situations, e.g., applications as vibration absorbers. Here we present a way to calculate the frequency-dependent elastic moduli based on the decomposition of the linear response to an external stress in normal modes. We use a minimal three-dimensional dipole-spring model to theoretically describe the magnetic and elastic interactions on the mesoscopic level. Specifically, the magnetic particles carry permanent magnetic dipole moments and are spatially arranged in a prescribed way, before they are linked by elastic springs. An external magnetic field aligns the magnetic moments. On the one hand, we study regular lattice-like particle arrangements to compare with previous results in the literature. On the other hand, we calculate the dynamic elastic moduli for irregular, more realistic particle distributions. Our approach measures the tunability of the linear dynamic response as a function of the particle arrangement, the system orientation with respect to the external magnetic field, as well as the magnitude of the magnetic interaction between the particles. The strength of the present approach is that it explicitly connects the relaxational modes of the system with the rheological properties as well as with the internal rearrangement of the particles in the sample, providing new insight into the dynamics of these remarkable materials.

  10. Dynamic elastic moduli in magnetic gels: Normal modes and linear response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pessot, Giorgio; Löwen, Hartmut; Menzel, Andreas M.

    2016-09-01

    In the perspective of developing smart hybrid materials with customized features, ferrogels and magnetorheological elastomers allow a synergy of elasticity and magnetism. The interplay between elastic and magnetic properties gives rise to a unique reversible control of the material behavior by applying an external magnetic field. Albeit few works have been performed on the time-dependent properties so far, understanding the dynamic behavior is the key to model many practical situations, e.g., applications as vibration absorbers. Here we present a way to calculate the frequency-dependent elastic moduli based on the decomposition of the linear response to an external stress in normal modes. We use a minimal three-dimensional dipole-spring model to theoretically describe the magnetic and elastic interactions on the mesoscopic level. Specifically, the magnetic particles carry permanent magnetic dipole moments and are spatially arranged in a prescribed way, before they are linked by elastic springs. An external magnetic field aligns the magnetic moments. On the one hand, we study regular lattice-like particle arrangements to compare with previous results in the literature. On the other hand, we calculate the dynamic elastic moduli for irregular, more realistic particle distributions. Our approach measures the tunability of the linear dynamic response as a function of the particle arrangement, the system orientation with respect to the external magnetic field, as well as the magnitude of the magnetic interaction between the particles. The strength of the present approach is that it explicitly connects the relaxational modes of the system with the rheological properties as well as with the internal rearrangement of the particles in the sample, providing new insight into the dynamics of these remarkable materials.

  11. White noise analysis of Phycomyces light growth response system. I. Normal intensity range.

    PubMed Central

    Lipson, E D

    1975-01-01

    The Wiener-Lee-Schetzen method for the identification of a nonlinear system through white gaussian noise stimulation was applied to the transient light growth response of the sporangiophore of Phycomyces. In order to cover a moderate dynamic range of light intensity I, the imput variable was defined to be log I. The experiments were performed in the normal range of light intensity, centered about I0 = 10(-6) W/cm2. The kernels of the Wierner functionals were computed up to second order. Within the range of a few decades the system is reasonably linear with log I. The main nonlinear feature of the second-order kernel corresponds to the property of rectification. Power spectral analysis reveals that the slow dynamics of the system are of at least fifth order. The system can be represented approximately by a linear transfer function, including a first-order high-pass (adaptation) filter with a 4 min time constant and an underdamped fourth-order low-pass filter. Accordingly a linear electronic circuit was constructed to simulate the small scale response characteristics. In terms of the adaptation model of Delbrück and Reichardt (1956, in Cellular Mechanisms in Differentiation and Growth, Princeton University Press), kernels were deduced for the dynamic dependence of the growth velocity (output) on the "subjective intensity", a presumed internal variable. Finally the linear electronic simulator above was generalized to accommodate the large scale nonlinearity of the adaptation model and to serve as a tool for deeper test of the model. PMID:1203444

  12. Differential Effects of Lovastatin on Cisplatin Responses in Normal Human Mesothelial Cells versus Cancer Cells: Implication for Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yandong; Felley-Bosco, Emanuela; Marti, Thomas M.; Stahel, Rolf A.

    2012-01-01

    The cancer killing efficacy of standard chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin (CDDP) is limited by their side effects to normal tissues. Therefore, research efforts optimizing the safety and efficacy of those agents are clinically relevant. We did screen for agents that specifically protect normal human mesothelial cells against CDDP without reducing the cancer cell killing efficacy. Lovastatin was identified from the screen. Lovastatin at a pharmacologically relevant concentration strongly arrested the proliferation of normal cells, whereas cancer cells were less affected. CDDP-induced DNA damage response was not activated and normal cells showed enhanced tolerance to CDDP when normal cells were treated with the combination of CDDP and lovastatin. We demonstrate that interfering with protein geranylgeranylation is involved in the lovastatin-mediated CDDP protective effect in normal cells. In contrast to normal cells, in cancer cells lovastatin did not change the CDDP-induced response, and cancer cells were not protected by lovastatin. Furthermore, lovastatin at the pharmacological relevant concentration per se induced DNA damage, oxidative stress and autophagy in cancer cells but not in normal mesothelial cells. Therefore, our data suggest that lovastatin has a potential to improve the therapeutic index of cisplatin-based therapy. PMID:23028957

  13. Human Chorionic Gonadotropin and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schüler-Toprak, Susanne; Treeck, Oliver; Ortmann, Olaf

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is well known as a malignancy being strongly influenced by female steroids. Pregnancy is a protective factor against breast cancer. Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) is a candidate hormone which could mediate this antitumoral effect of pregnancy. For this review article, all original research articles on the role of HCG in breast cancer were considered, which are listed in PubMed database and were written in English. The role of HCG in breast cancer seems to be a paradox. Placental heterodimeric HCG acts as a protective agent by imprinting a permanent genomic signature of the mammary gland determining a refractory condition to malignant transformation which is characterized by cellular differentiation, apoptosis and growth inhibition. On the other hand, ectopic expression of β-HCG in various cancer entities is associated with poor prognosis due to its tumor-promoting function. Placental HCG and ectopically expressed β-HCG exert opposite effects on breast tumorigenesis. Therefore, mimicking pregnancy by treatment with HCG is suggested as a strategy for breast cancer prevention, whereas targeting β-HCG expressing tumor cells seems to be an option for breast cancer therapy. PMID:28754015

  14. The role of PPAR in myocardial response to ischemia in normal and diseased heart.

    PubMed

    Ravingerova, Tana; Adameova, Adriana; Carnicka, Slavka; Nemcekova, Martina; Kelly, Tara; Matejikova, Jana; Galatou, Eleftheria; Barlaka, Eleftheria; Lazou, Antigone

    2011-12-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR), ligand-activated transcription factors, belong to the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily regulating expression of genes involved in different aspects of lipid metabolism, inflammation and cardiac energy production. Activation of PPAR-α isoform by its natural ligands, fatty acids (FA) and eicosanoids, promotes mitochondrial FA oxidation as the primary ATP-generating pathway. On the other hand, PPAR-γ regulates lipid anabolism or storage, while, until recently, the function of PPAR-β/δ has been less explored. Under conditions associated with acute or chronic oxygen deprivation, PPAR-α modulates expression of genes that determine substrate switch (FA vs. glucose) aimed at maintenance of basic cardiac function. Although PPAR-α and PPAR-γ synthetic agonists, hypolipidemic and antidiabetic drugs, have been reported to protect the heart against ischemia/reperfusion injury, it is still a matter of debate whether PPAR activation plays a beneficial or detrimental role in myocardial response to ischemia, in particular, in pathological conditions. This article reviews some findings demonstrating the impact of PPAR activation on cardiac resistance to ischemia in normal and pathologically altered heart. Specifically, it addresses the issue of susceptibility to ischemia in the diabetic myocardium, with particular regards to the role of PPAR. Finally, involvement of PPAR in the mechanisms of lipid-independent cardioprotective effects of some hypolipidemic drugs is also discussed.

  15. Identification and validation of reference genes for transcript normalization in strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) defense responses.

    PubMed

    Amil-Ruiz, Francisco; Garrido-Gala, José; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Folta, Kevin M; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Caballero, José L

    2013-01-01

    Strawberry (Fragaria spp) is an emerging model for the development of basic genomics and recombinant DNA studies among rosaceous crops. Functional genomic and molecular studies involve relative quantification of gene expression under experimental conditions of interest. Accuracy and reliability are dependent upon the choice of an optimal reference control transcript. There is no information available on validated endogenous reference genes for use in studies testing strawberry-pathogen interactions. Thirteen potential pre-selected strawberry reference genes were tested against different tissues, strawberry cultivars, biotic stresses, ripening and senescent conditions, and SA/JA treatments. Evaluation of reference candidate's suitability was analyzed by five different methodologies, and information was merged to identify best reference transcripts. A combination of all five methods was used for selective classification of reference genes. The resulting superior reference genes, FaRIB413, FaACTIN, FaEF1α and FaGAPDH2 are strongly recommended as control genes for relative quantification of gene expression in strawberry. This report constitutes the first systematic study to identify and validate optimal reference genes for accurate normalization of gene expression in strawberry plant defense response studies.

  16. Optical spectroscopy of radiotherapy and photodynamic therapy responses in normal rat skin shows vascular breakdown products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teles de Andrade, Cintia; Nogueira, Marcelo S.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Marra, Kayla; Gunn, Jason; Andreozzi, Jacqueline; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Kurachi, Cristina; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) and radiotherapy are non-systemic cancer treatment options with different mechanisms of damage. So combining these techniques has been shown to have some synergy, and can mitigate their limitations such as low PDT light penetration or radiotherapy side effects. The present study monitored the induced tissue changes after PDT, radiotherapy, and a combination protocol in normal rat skin, using an optical spectroscopy system to track the observed biophysical changes. The Wistar rats were treated with one of the protocols: PDT followed by radiotherapy, PDT, radiotherapy and radiotherapy followed by PDT. Reflectance spectra were collected in order to observe the effects of these combined therapies, especially targeting vascular response. From the reflectance, information about oxygen saturation, met-hemoglobin and bilirubin concentration, blood volume fraction (BVF) and vessel radius were extracted from model fitting of the spectra. The rats were monitored for 24 hours after treatment. Results showed that there was no significant variation in the vessel size or BVF after the treatments. However, the PDT caused a significant increase in the met-hemoglobin and bilirubin concentrations, indicating an important blood breakdown. These results may provide an important clue on how the damage establishment takes place, helping to understand the effect of the combination of those techniques in order to verify the existence of a known synergistic effect.

  17. The Mechanisms of Compensatory Responses of the Respiratory System to Simulated Central Hypervolemia in Normal Subjects.

    PubMed

    Segizbaeva, M O; Donina, Zh A; Aleksandrov, V G; Aleksandrova, N P

    2015-01-01

    The compensatory responses of the respiratory system to simulated central hypervolemia (CHV) were investigated in 14 normal subjects. The central hypervolemia was caused by a short-time passive head-down tilt (HDT, -30°, 30 min). The results show that CHV increased the mechanical respiratory load and the airway resistance, slowed the inspiratory flow, increased the duration of the inspiratory phase, reduced the respiratory rate, but not changed the minute ventilation. CHV induced a significant rise in inspiratory swings of alveolar pressure (184%), based on the inspiratory occlusion pressure measurement. These changes indicate a compensatory increase in the inspiratory muscle contraction force. A stable level of minute ventilation during CHV was an effect of increased EMG activity of parasternal muscles more than twice (P<0.01). A contribution of the diaphragm and scalene muscles to ventilation during spontaneous breathing in HDT was reduced. An increase of genioglossus contractile activity during HDT contributed to the stabilization of airway patency. These results suggest that a coordinated modulation of inspiratory muscles activity allows preserving a constant level of minute ventilation during a short-time intrathoracic blood volume expansion. The mechanisms of respiratory load compensation seem to be mediated by afferent information from the lung and respiratory muscle receptors and from the segmentary reflexes and intrinsic properties of the muscle fibers.

  18. Responses to cochlear normalized speech stimuli in the auditory nerve of cat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recio, Alberto; Rhode, William S.; Kiefte, Michael; Kluender, Keith R.

    2002-05-01

    Previous studies of auditory-nerve fiber (ANF) representation of vowels in cats and rodents (chinchillas and guinea pigs) have shown that, at amplitudes typical for conversational speech (60-70 dB), neuronal firing rate as a function of characteristic frequency alone provides a poor representation of spectral prominences (e.g., formants) of speech sounds. However, ANF rate representations may not be as inadequate as they appear. Here, it is investigated whether some of this apparent inadequacy owes to the mismatch between animal and human cochlear characteristics. For all animal models tested in earlier studies, the basilar membrane is shorter and encompasses a broader range of frequencies than that of humans. In this study, a customized speech synthesizer was used to create a rendition of the vowel [eh] with formant spacing and bandwidths that fit the cat cochlea in proportion to the human cochlea. In these vowels, the spectral envelope is matched to cochlear distance rather than to frequency. Recordings of responses to this cochlear normalized [eh] in auditory-nerve fibers of cats demonstrate that rate-based encoding of vowel sounds is capable of distinguishing spectral prominences even at 70-80-dB SPL. When cochlear dimensions are taken into account, rate encoding in ANF appears more informative than was previously believed.

  19. Identification and Validation of Reference Genes for Transcript Normalization in Strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) Defense Responses

    PubMed Central

    Amil-Ruiz, Francisco; Garrido-Gala, José; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Folta, Kevin M.; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Caballero, José L.

    2013-01-01

    Strawberry (Fragaria spp) is an emerging model for the development of basic genomics and recombinant DNA studies among rosaceous crops. Functional genomic and molecular studies involve relative quantification of gene expression under experimental conditions of interest. Accuracy and reliability are dependent upon the choice of an optimal reference control transcript. There is no information available on validated endogenous reference genes for use in studies testing strawberry-pathogen interactions. Thirteen potential pre-selected strawberry reference genes were tested against different tissues, strawberry cultivars, biotic stresses, ripening and senescent conditions, and SA/JA treatments. Evaluation of reference candidate’s suitability was analyzed by five different methodologies, and information was merged to identify best reference transcripts. A combination of all five methods was used for selective classification of reference genes. The resulting superior reference genes, FaRIB413, FaACTIN, FaEF1α and FaGAPDH2 are strongly recommended as control genes for relative quantification of gene expression in strawberry. This report constitutes the first systematic study to identify and validate optimal reference genes for accurate normalization of gene expression in strawberry plant defense response studies. PMID:23940602

  20. Landscape response to normal fault footwall uplift in the Basin and Range Province, western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, M. A.; Barnes, J. B.; Colgan, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    Constraining the deformation history of western North America is important for understanding how tectonic plates accommodate large kinematic changes along their margins. Since the Miocene, a large portion of Pacific - North American plate motion has been accommodated by extension in the Basin and Range Province between the Sierra Nevada and the Colorado Plateau. Although many ranges in the province are physiographically similar, they developed with significant spatiotemporal variations in range-scale fault displacements and rates. Here, we examine the landscape response to changing fault-slip rates by comparing existing thermochronologic data to new geomorphic observations. Low-temperature thermochronologic data from the northwestern Nevada portion of the Basin and Range indicate that faulting began ~12 Ma, with a second phase of rapid slip beginning ~4-3 Ma documented in some ranges. We used the NED DEM (10 m resolution) to measure channel morphology and geologic maps to account for lithologic variations and faults. Bedrock channel profile analyses from several uplifted footwalls (Pine Forest Range, Santa Rosa Range, Jackson Mountains) reveal patterns in concavity (θ) and normalized steepness index (ksn) indicative of unsteady slip, even in footwalls where thermochronologic data does not exist or is not capable of identifying the recent uplift. Some channels possess mean concavity indices of θmean = ~0.6, which falls within the range for channels in equilibrium (0.35 < θ < 0.6). However, in many cases, channel profiles possess prominent convexities that separate them into two distinct segments. Mean ksn values of the segments below these knickpoints are ~3 times greater than those above them (ksn = ~200 vs. ~70 m0.9). Concavity indices for segments below the knickpoints are significantly lower (θmean ~0.2) than the higher elevation segments (θmean ~0.5), suggesting that while the higher segments are in equilibrium, the lower segments are in the process of

  1. Production response to corn silage produced from normal, brown midrib, or waxy corn hybrids.

    PubMed

    Barlow, J S; Bernard, J K; Mullis, N A

    2012-08-01

    The objective was to evaluate the nutrient intake and digestibility and milk production response of lactating dairy cows fed diets based on corn silage produced from 3 different types of corn hybrids. Experimental diets contained 36.4% of the dietary dry matter (DM) from corn silage produced from normal (Agratech 1021, AgraTech Seeds Inc., Atlanta, GA), brown midrib (BMR; Mycogen F2F797, Mycogen Seeds, Indianapolis, IN), or waxy (Master's Choice 590, Master's Choice Hybrids, Ullin, IL) hybrids. Thirty-six multiparous and primiparous Holstein cows (66 ± 22 d in milk, 41 ± 8 kg/d of milk) were used in an 11-wk completely randomized design trial during the fall of 2009. All cows were fed a diet containing normal corn silage during the first 2wk of the trial before being assigned to 1 of 3 treatments for the following 9 wk. Data collected during the first 2 wk were used as a covariate in the statistical analysis. No difference was observed in dry matter intake (DMI) among treatments, which averaged 22.6 kg/d. Milk yield was higher for cows fed BMR (37.6 kg/d) compared with waxy (35.2 kg/d) but was similar to that of cows fed control (36.2 kg/d). Milk fat percentage tended to be lower for cows fed control (3.28%) compared with those fed BMR (3.60%) or waxy (3.55%) corn silage. Milk protein percentage tended to be lower for cows fed control (2.79%) compared with waxy (2.89%) but similar to that of those fed BMR (2.85%). No differences were observed in yield of milk components. Energy-corrected milk (ECM) yield and dairy efficiency (ECM:DMI) did not differ among treatments. Cows fed BMR tended to gain more body weight compared with those fed control and waxy. Results of this trial are consistent with previous reports in which cows fed diets based on corn silage produced from BMR hybrids have higher milk yield compared with those fed other hybrids. Corn silage produced from the waxy hybrid supported a similar yield of ECM because of higher milk components, but milk yield

  2. Pseudotumour Cerebri Presentation in a Child Under the Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Agonist Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gül, Ülkü; Kaçar Bayram, Ayşe; Kendirci, Mustafa; Hatipoğlu, Nihal; Okdemir, Deniz; Gümüş, Hakan; Kurtoğlu, Selim

    2016-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues are common treatment option in central precocious puberty in childhood as well as in endometriosis, infertility, and prostate cancer in adults. Pseudotumor cerebri is a rare side effect observed in adults. We present the case of a girl with precocious puberty treated with triptorelin acetate who developed pseudotumor cerebri after the 4th dose. She had headaches, and her blood pressure was detected to be above the 99 percentile. There were no causes underlying of hypertension such as cardiac, renal, or endocrine. Neurological examination was normal except bilateral papilledema. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging was normal. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) opening pressure was elevated. Triptorelin therapy was ceased and acetazolamide was applied; CSF pressure returned to normal. We observed pseudotumor cerebri after precocious puberty treatment, a finding for the first time ever seen in childhood. PMID:27087351

  3. Power source effects of soft plasma jet and the differential response of skin cancer and normal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Nathaniel; Dobrynin, Danil; Fridman, Alexander; Choi, Eun Ha

    2014-10-01

    The effects of pulsed power direct current energy sources were compared using an indirect discharge plasma jet applied to treat cancerous and normal skin cells. Two power supplies with different voltage and current profiles were compared and optimized through the measurement of physical parameters and evaluated through the treatment of skin cells using an atmospheric pressure nitrogen gas plasma jet. Plasma density and temperature, power output, gas output temperature, and reactive species production were measured. Cell morphology, viability, and ROS generation were investigated using staining. A differential response has been shown between the normal and cancerous cell lines. The cancer cells viability reduced while normal cells did not over the same treatment time.

  4. The performance of subcutaneously injected Fertinex when used as the sole gonadotropin for in vitro fertilization stimulation.

    PubMed

    Miller, K A; Patton, G W; Queenan, J T

    1998-04-01

    To assess the performance of Fertinex (urofollitropin; Serono Laboratories, Norwell, MA) in stimulating the development of multiple follicles and initiating subsequent pregnancy in patients undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) for IVF. Prospective observational study. Private assisted reproductive technology (ART) center. Ninety-three women who underwent an IVF cycle of COH in which Fertinex was used as the sole gonadotropin. The COH protocol included Fertinex with leuprolide acetate down-regulation in the late luteal phase or the early follicular phase. Embryo transfer was performed after 3 days of culture. Stimulation parameters, embryologic data, and pregnancy rates (PRs). Ninety-three patients underwent 97 cycles of COH, with a cancellation rate of 13.4%. The clinical PR was 42% per initiation, 49% per retrieval, and 51% per transfer. Shorter stimulation periods, lower estradiol levels either per follicle punctured or per oocyte retrieved, and slower embryo development were observed. Patients responded to Fertinex in three distinct stimulation patterns: escalating response with a peak estradiol level of < or =3,000 pg/mL, escalating response with a peak estradiol level of >3,000 pg/mL, or escalating response characterized by a drop in the estradiol level or a plateau before hCG administration. All three responses had similar PRs. Fertinex can be used successfully as the sole gonadotropin for COH in ART without compromising high PRs. Traditional estradiol response curves or cancellation criteria may not apply when Fertinex is used as the sole gonadotropin for COH in ART.

  5. Azelaic acid modulates the inflammatory response in normal human keratinocytes through PPARgamma activation.

    PubMed

    Mastrofrancesco, Arianna; Ottaviani, Monica; Aspite, Nicaela; Cardinali, Giorgia; Izzo, Enzo; Graupe, Klaus; Zouboulis, Christos C; Camera, Emanuela; Picardo, Mauro

    2010-09-01

    Azelaic acid (AzA), a nine-carbon dicarboxylic acid, is an agent for the topical treatment of acne. It has also been shown to be effective in rosacea; however, the mechanism of action has not been clarified. Because inflammation is a common feature of both conditions, we investigated the effects of azelaic acid on the inflammatory response of normal human keratinocytes to ultraviolet B light, which is a photosensitizer agent in rosacea. AzA, at 20 mM, a concentration achievable following topical application of a 15% gel, suppresses ultraviolet B light-induced interleukins-1beta, -6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha mRNA expression and protein secretion. Mechanistically, azelaic acid significantly reduced the ultraviolet B light-induced nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kB p65 subunit and the phosphorylation of the p38 mitogen and stress-activated protein kinase. Moreover, as peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor gamma, (PPARgamma) which has a crucial role in the control of inflammation, is activated by fatty acids and products of lipid peroxidation, we further investigated the effect of azelaic acid on the expression of this nuclear receptor. AzA induced peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor-gamma mRNA and its transcriptional activity. The PPARgamma antagonist GW9662 abrogated the inhibitory effects of AzA on the UVB-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines release and on the cell proliferation. Our study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms of the activity of azelaic acid and lands additional evidences for its therapeutic effects on inflammatory skin diseases, such as rosacea.

  6. Cerebrovascular response to acute hypocapnic and eucapnic hypoxia in normal man

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, William; Wasserman, Albert J.; Baker, James P.; Patterson, John L.

    1970-01-01

    Alterations in human cerebral blood flow and related blood constituents were studied during exposure to acute hypoxia. Observations were made during serial inhalation of decreasing O2 concentrations with and without maintenance of normocarbia, during 8 min inhalation of 10% O2, and after hyperventilation at an arterial PO2 of about 40 mm Hg. In the range of hypoxemia studied, from normal down to arterial PO2 of about 40 mm Hg, the magnitude of the cerebral vasodilator response to hypoxia appeared to be largely dependent upon the coexisting arterial CO2 tension. The mean slope of the increase in cerebral blood flow with decreasing arterial O2 tension rose more quickly (P < 0.05) when eucapnia was maintained when compared with the slope derived under similar hypoxic conditions without maintenance of eucapnia. When 12 subjects inhaled 10% oxygen, cerebral blood flow rose to more than 135% of control in four whose mean decrease in arterial CO2 tension was - 2.0 mm Hg. The remaining eight had flows ranging from 97 to 120% of control, and their mean decrease in CO2 tension was - 5.1 mm Hg. When mean arterial PO2 was 37 mm Hg, hyperventilation was carried out in 10 subjects. Arterial PO2 increased insignificantly, arterial PCO2 declined from 34 to 27 mm Hg (P < 0.05), and cerebral blood flow which had been 143% of control decreased to 109%, a figure not significantly different from control. These data demonstrate the powerful counterbalancing constrictor effects of modest reductions in CO2 tension on the vasodilator influence of hypoxia represented by arterial PO2 reductions to about 40 mm Hg. Indeed, mild hyperventilation completely overcame the vasodilator effect provided by an arterial O2 tension as low as 40 mm Hg. The effects of hypoxia on the control of the cerebral circulation must be analyzed in terms of the effects of any associated changes in CO2 tension. PMID:5480859

  7. Microvascular resistance in response to iodinated contrast media in normal and functionally impaired kidneys.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Osamu; Takano, Masamichi; Uchiyama, Saori; Fukuizumi, Isamu; Shimura, Tetsuro; Matsushita, Masato; Komiyama, Hidenori; Inami, Toru; Murakami, Daisuke; Munakata, Ryo; Ohba, Takayoshi; Hata, Noritake; Seino, Yoshihiko; Shimizu, Wataru

    2015-12-01

    Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is considered to result from intrarenal vasoconstriction, and occurs more frequently in impaired than in normal kidneys. It was hypothesized that iodinated contrast media would markedly change renal blood flow and vascular resistance in functionally impaired kidneys. Thirty-six patients were enrolled (32 men; mean age, 75.3 ± 7.6 years) undergoing diagnostic coronary angiography and were divided into two groups based on the presence of chronic kidney disease (CKD), defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of < 60 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) (CKD and non-CKD groups, n = 18 in both). Average peak velocity (APV) and renal artery resistance index (RI) were measured by Doppler flow wire before and after administration of the iodinated contrast media. The APV and the RI were positively and inversely correlated with the eGFR at baseline, respectively (APV, R = 0.545, P = 0.001; RI, R = -0.627, P < 0.001). Mean RI was significantly higher (P = 0.015) and APV was significantly lower (P = 0.026) in the CKD than in the non-CKD group. Both APV (P < 0.001) and RI (P = 0.002) were significantly changed following contrast media administration in the non-CKD group, but not in the CKD group (APV, P = 0.258; RI, P = 0.707). Although renal arterial resistance was higher in patients with CKD, it was not affected by contrast media administration, suggesting that patients with CKD could have an attenuated response to contrast media.

  8. Ocular motor responses to abrupt interaural head translation in normal humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramat, Stefano; Zee, David S.; Shelhamer, M. J. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    We characterized the interaural translational vestibulo-ocular reflex (tVOR) in 6 normal humans to brief (approximately 200 ms), high-acceleration (0.4-1.4g) stimuli, while they fixed targets at 15 or 30 cm. The latency was 19 +/- 5 ms at 15-cm and 20 +/- 12 ms at 30-cm viewing. The gain was quantified using the ratio of actual to ideal behavior. The median position gain (at time of peak head velocity) was 0.38 and 0.37, and the median velocity gain, 0.52 and 0.62, at 15- and 30-cm viewing, respectively. These results suggest the tVOR scales proportionally at these viewing distances. Likewise, at both viewing distances, peak eye velocity scaled linearly with peak head velocity and gain was independent of peak head acceleration. A saccade commonly occurred in the compensatory direction, with a greater latency (165 vs. 145 ms) and lesser amplitude (1.8 vs. 3.2 deg) at 30- than 15-cm viewing. Even with saccades, the overall gain at the end of head movement was still considerably undercompensatory (medians 0.68 and 0.77 at 15- and 30-cm viewing). Monocular viewing was also assessed at 15-cm viewing. In 4 of 6 subjects, gains were the same as during binocular viewing and scaled closely with vergence angle. In sum the low tVOR gain and scaling of the response with viewing distance and head velocity extend previous results to higher acceleration stimuli. tVOR latency (approximately 20 ms) was lower than previously reported. Saccades are an integral part of the tVOR, and also scale with viewing distance.

  9. Ocular motor responses to abrupt interaural head translation in normal humans.

    PubMed

    Ramat, Stefano; Zee, David S

    2003-08-01

    We characterized the interaural translational vestibulo-ocular reflex (tVOR) in 6 normal humans to brief (approximately 200 ms), high-acceleration (0.4-1.4g) stimuli, while they fixed targets at 15 or 30 cm. The latency was 19 +/- 5 ms at 15-cm and 20 +/- 12 ms at 30-cm viewing. The gain was quantified using the ratio of actual to ideal behavior. The median position gain (at time of peak head velocity) was 0.38 and 0.37, and the median velocity gain, 0.52 and 0.62, at 15- and 30-cm viewing, respectively. These results suggest the tVOR scales proportionally at these viewing distances. Likewise, at both viewing distances, peak eye velocity scaled linearly with peak head velocity and gain was independent of peak head acceleration. A saccade commonly occurred in the compensatory direction, with a greater latency (165 vs. 145 ms) and lesser amplitude (1.8 vs. 3.2 deg) at 30- than 15-cm viewing. Even with saccades, the overall gain at the end of head movement was still considerably undercompensatory (medians 0.68 and 0.77 at 15- and 30-cm viewing). Monocular viewing was also assessed at 15-cm viewing. In 4 of 6 subjects, gains were the same as during binocular viewing and scaled closely with vergence angle. In sum the low tVOR gain and scaling of the response with viewing distance and head velocity extend previous results to higher acceleration stimuli. tVOR latency (approximately 20 ms) was lower than previously reported. Saccades are an integral part of the tVOR, and also scale with viewing distance.

  10. Ocular motor responses to abrupt interaural head translation in normal humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramat, Stefano; Zee, David S.; Shelhamer, M. J. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    We characterized the interaural translational vestibulo-ocular reflex (tVOR) in 6 normal humans to brief (approximately 200 ms), high-acceleration (0.4-1.4g) stimuli, while they fixed targets at 15 or 30 cm. The latency was 19 +/- 5 ms at 15-cm and 20 +/- 12 ms at 30-cm viewing. The gain was quantified using the ratio of actual to ideal behavior. The median position gain (at time of peak head velocity) was 0.38 and 0.37, and the median velocity gain, 0.52 and 0.62, at 15- and 30-cm viewing, respectively. These results suggest the tVOR scales proportionally at these viewing distances. Likewise, at both viewing distances, peak eye velocity scaled linearly with peak head velocity and gain was independent of peak head acceleration. A saccade commonly occurred in the compensatory direction, with a greater latency (165 vs. 145 ms) and lesser amplitude (1.8 vs. 3.2 deg) at 30- than 15-cm viewing. Even with saccades, the overall gain at the end of head movement was still considerably undercompensatory (medians 0.68 and 0.77 at 15- and 30-cm viewing). Monocular viewing was also assessed at 15-cm viewing. In 4 of 6 subjects, gains were the same as during binocular viewing and scaled closely with vergence angle. In sum the low tVOR gain and scaling of the response with viewing distance and head velocity extend previous results to higher acceleration stimuli. tVOR latency (approximately 20 ms) was lower than previously reported. Saccades are an integral part of the tVOR, and also scale with viewing distance.

  11. Normal mitogen-induced suppression of the interleukin-6 (IL-6) response and its deficiency in systemic lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Warrington, R.J.; Rutherford, W.J. )

    1990-01-01

    A low-frequency suppressor-cell population in normal peripheral blood inhibits the B-cell CESS response to IL-6, following pokeweed mitogen stimulation. The suppression of IL-6 responsiveness is radiation sensitive, directed against CESS targets and not mediated by inhibition of IL-6 production, and associated with nonspecific cytotoxic activity against CESS targets. The generation of these cytolytic cells is also radiation sensitive. A correlation was found between PWM-induced cytotoxicity against CESS and the suppression of IL-6-dependent IgG production. But cytotoxicity toward CESS targets is not responsible for this suppression because IL-2 induces equivalent or greater nonspecific cytotoxicity against CESS in the total absence of suppression of CESS-derived IgG production and suppression is also induced by mitogen-activated PBL separated from CESS targets by a cell-impermeable membrane. This suppression was not mediated by TNF alpha/beta or IFN-gamma. In systemic lupus erythematosus, suppression of IL-6-dependent IgG production is impaired in patients with active disease (29.2 +/- 13.7%) compared to patients with inactive disease (70 +/- 19.5%) or normal controls (82.8 +/- 9.2%). There is also a defect in mitogen-induced nonspecific cytotoxicity in active SLE (specific lysis 15.1 +/- 3.5%, compared to 34 +/- 4% in normals). Pokeweed mitogen-activated PBL can therefore normally induce suppression of B-cell IL-6 responses and this response is deficient in lupus.

  12. [Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone in regulation of reproduction and behavior in mammalians].

    PubMed

    Meng, Fansen; Chen, Xuequn; Du, Jizeng

    2013-03-01

    RF-amide related peptide (RFRP) is the orthologue of gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) in mammals. The bodies of RFRP cell are located in the dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (DMH) and the fibers project to preoptic area (POA) and median eminence of the hypothalamus. Its receptor mainly distributes in hypothalamus. RFRP fibers project to GnRH cells to regulate mammalian reproduction axis. This paper reviews the progress of current researches on RFRP in regulation of animal behaviors, including reproduction, food intake, anxiety and stress response.

  13. A bias in the "mass-normalized" DTT response - An effect of non-linear concentration-response curves for copper and manganese

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charrier, Jessica G.; McFall, Alexander S.; Vu, Kennedy K.-T.; Baroi, James; Olea, Catalina; Hasson, Alam; Anastasio, Cort

    2016-11-01

    The dithiothreitol (DTT) assay is widely used to measure the oxidative potential of particulate matter. Results are typically presented in mass-normalized units (e.g., pmols DTT lost per minute per microgram PM) to allow for comparison among samples. Use of this unit assumes that the mass-normalized DTT response is constant and independent of the mass concentration of PM added to the DTT assay. However, based on previous work that identified non-linear DTT responses for copper and manganese, this basic assumption (that the mass-normalized DTT response is independent of the concentration of PM added to the assay) should not be true for samples where Cu and Mn contribute significantly to the DTT signal. To test this we measured the DTT response at multiple PM concentrations for eight ambient particulate samples collected at two locations in California. The results confirm that for samples with significant contributions from Cu and Mn, the mass-normalized DTT response can strongly depend on the concentration of PM added to the assay, varying by up to an order of magnitude for PM concentrations between 2 and 34 μg mL-1. This mass dependence confounds useful interpretation of DTT assay data in samples with significant contributions from Cu and Mn, requiring additional quality control steps to check for this bias. To minimize this problem, we discuss two methods to correct the mass-normalized DTT result and we apply those methods to our samples. We find that it is possible to correct the mass-normalized DTT result, although the correction methods have some drawbacks and add uncertainty to DTT analyses. More broadly, other DTT-active species might also have non-linear concentration-responses in the assay and cause a bias. In addition, the same problem of Cu- and Mn-mediated bias in mass-normalized DTT results might affect other measures of acellular redox activity in PM and needs to be addressed.

  14. Androgen synthesis in the gonadotropin-suppressed human testes can be markedly suppressed by ketoconazole.

    PubMed

    Roth, M Y; Nya-Ngatchou, J J S; Lin, K; Page, S T; Anawalt, B D; Matsumoto, A M; Marck, B T; Bremner, W J; Amory, J K

    2013-03-01

    The concentration of intratesticular testosterone (IT-T) required for human spermatogenesis is unknown because spermatogenesis can persist despite the markedly reduced IT-T concentrations observed with LH suppression. Methods to lower IT-T further are needed to determine the relationship between IT-T and spermatogenesis. The objective of the study was to determine the effect of inhibiting the synthesis and metabolism of testosterone (T) on IT-T in gonadotropin-suppressed human testes. Forty normal men participated in a blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized trial at an academic center. INTERVENTION/OUTCOME MEASURES: All men were first administered the GnRH antagonist acyline to suppress LH. Forty-eight hours after acyline administration, subjects were randomly assigned to placebo, ketoconazole (to inhibit T synthesis) at 400 or 800 mg, dutasteride (to inhibit T metabolism) 2.5 mg, or anastrazole (to inhibit T metabolism) 1 mg, daily for 7 days (n = 8/group). Intratesticular steroid concentrations were measured 48 hours after acyline administration alone and again after 7 days of combination treatment. After 7 days of combination treatment, the median IT-T (25th, 75th percentile) in the placebo group was 14 (8.0, 21.2) ng/mL. IT-T was reduced to 3.7 (2.5, 7.1) ng/mL in the ketoconazole 400 mg group and 1.7 (0.8, 4.0) ng/mL in the ketoconazole 800 mg group (P < .001 vs placebo for both comparisons). IT-T concentrations in the dutasteride and anastrazole groups were similar to placebo. Combining inhibition of steroidogenesis with gonadotropin suppression lowers IT-T more than gonadotropin suppression alone. This combination might be useful to determine the minimum IT-T concentration necessary for human spermatogenesis, information essential for developing male hormonal contraceptives.

  15. Species and community response to above normal precipitation following prolonged drought in the northern Mojave Desert

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, B.W.; Ostler, W.K.

    1993-12-31

    Little information is available on how desert plant communities that are dominated by perennial species respond to normal and above normal precipitation following prolonged drought. Intuitively, one would expect total canopy cover to increase. Whether a concomitant increase in the density of perennial species also occurs is unknown. Even less is known about how individual species respond to above normal precipitation following drought. From 1987 through 1991 a prolonged drought occurred in much of the western United States, including the northern Mojave Desert. In March 1991 the northern Mojave Desert received well above normal precipitation. The following two winters (December--March) also had above normal precipitation (150 to 200 % of normal, unpublished data). Ongoing vegetation characterization studies by the US Department of Energy (DOE) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, allowed EG&G Energy Measurements to collect data that could be used to infer how both vegetation associations and individual species respond to above normal precipitation following prolonged drought. This paper reports the preliminary results.

  16. Representation of the vowel /epsilon/ in normal and impaired auditory nerve fibers: model predictions of responses in cats.

    PubMed

    Zilany, Muhammad S A; Bruce, Ian C

    2007-07-01

    The temporal response of auditory-nerve (AN) fibers to a steady-state vowel is investigated using a computational auditory-periphery model. The model predictions are validated against a wide range of physiological data for both normal and impaired fibers in cats. The model incorporates two parallel filter paths, component 1 (C1) and component 2 (C2), which correspond to the active and passive modes of basilar membrane vibration, respectively, in the cochlea. The outputs of the two filters are subsequently transduced by two separate functions, added together, and then low-pass filtered by the inner hair cell (IHC) membrane, which is followed by the IHC-AN synapse and discharge generator. The C1 response dominates at low and moderate levels and is responsible for synchrony capture and multiformant responses seen in the vowel responses. The C2 response dominates at high levels and contributes to the loss of synchrony capture observed in normal and impaired fibers. The interaction between C1 and C2 responses explains the behavior of AN fibers in the transition region, which is characterized by two important observations in the vowel responses: First, all components of the vowel undergo the C1/C2 transition simultaneously, and second, the responses to the nonformant components of the vowel become substantial.

  17. Therapeutic uses of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs.

    PubMed

    Andreyko, J L; Marshall, L A; Dumesic, D A; Jaffe, R B

    1987-01-01

    Since the discovery and synthesis of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in 1971, numerous long-acting agonistic and antagonistic analogs have been synthesized. Agonistic analogs were found to desensitize pituitary GnRH receptors with chronic use, resulting in decreased gonadotropin secretion and a hypogonadal state. These analogs are being investigated as potential contraceptives and in the treatment of several conditions in which decreased gonadal steroid production is desired. Substantial progress has been made in these areas. The purpose of this review is to provide the clinician with data regarding the potential clinical utility of this class of peptides.

  18. Ventral frontal satiation-mediated responses to food aromas in obese and normal-weight women123

    PubMed Central

    Eiler, William JA; Dzemidzic, Mario; Case, K Rose; Armstrong, Cheryl LH; Mattes, Richard D; Cyders, Melissa A; Considine, Robert V; Kareken, David A

    2014-01-01

    Background: Sensory properties of foods promote and guide consumption in hunger states, whereas satiation should dampen the sensory activation of ingestive behaviors. Such activation may be disordered in obese individuals. Objective: Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we studied regional brain responses to food odor stimulation in the sated state in obese and normal-weight individuals targeting ventral frontal regions known to be involved in coding for stimulus reward value. Design: Forty-eight women (25 normal weight; 23 obese) participated in a 2-day (fed compared with fasting) fMRI study while smelling odors of 2 foods and an inedible, nonfood object. Analyses were conducted to permit an examination of both general and sensory-specific satiation (satiation effects specific to a given food). Results: Normal-weight subjects showed significant blood oxygen level–dependent responses in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) to food aromas compared with responses induced by the odor of an inedible object. Normal-weight subjects also showed general (but not sensory-specific) satiation effects in both the vmPFC and orbitofrontal cortex. Obese subjects showed no differential response to the aromas of food and the inedible object when fasting. Within- and between-group differences in satiation were driven largely by changes in the response to the odor of the inedible stimulus. Responses to food aromas in the obese correlated with trait negative urgency, the tendency toward negative affect-provoked impulsivity. Conclusions: Ventral frontal signaling of reward value may be disordered in obesity, with negative urgency heightening responses to food aromas. The observed nature of responses to food and nonfood stimuli suggests that future research should independently quantify each to fully understand brain reward signaling in obesity. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02041039. PMID:24695888

  19. Quantitative bioassays for measuring biologically functional gonadotropins based on eel gonadotropic receptors.

    PubMed

    Minegishi, Y; Dirks, R P; de Wijze, D L; Brittijn, S A; Burgerhout, E; Spaink, H P; van den Thillart, G E E J M

    2012-08-01

    Significant declines in eel stocks have been noted in many parts of the world. Because eel aquaculture is dependent on wild-caught juveniles, there is a need to achieve artificial reproduction. Adult eel maturation is currently induced by repeated injections of purified gonadotropin (human chorionic gonadotropin [hCG]) or pituitary extract. Thus the determination of the biological efficacy and quantification of internal levels of gonadotropic hormones is important for optimizing artificial reproduction protocols. To quantify the plasma levels of biologically functional gonadotropic hormones, we developed a bioassay for luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) based on the stable expression of receptors in HEK293 cells of the Japanese eel Anguilla japonica LH (ajLHR) and the European eel Anguilla anguilla FSH (aaFSHR), respectively. Such cells also contain a firefly luciferase reporter gene driven by a cAMP-responsive element (CRE-Luc). We found that the obtained stable cells, with ajLHR, responded linearly to a more than 100,000-fold concentration range of hCG diluted in saline. The cells with aaFSHR showed a linear response to a 1000-fold concentration range of salmon pituitary extract mixed with saline. The biological functionality of the LH and FSH bioassays was validated using hCG, human FSH, and pituitary extracts from salmon, carp and eel. Since the toxins in eel plasma damaged the HEK293 cells, the protocol was adapted to selectively inactivate the toxins by heating at 37°C for 24h. This process successfully enabled the monitoring of hormone levels in blood plasma sampled from hCG-injected eels. In this paper, we describe the development of gonadotropin bioassays that will be useful for improving reproduction protocols in eel aquaculture.

  20. Responses to methylphenidate in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and normal children: update 2002.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, J L; Inoff-Germain, G

    2002-01-01

    Since the positive effects of stimulants on disruptive behavior were described (Bradley & Bowen, 1941), further pediatric studyhas been limited almost exclusively to samples of hyperkinetic school-age children. Because these agents normally were viewed as arousing in their effects on the central nervous system, but were calming in their therapeutic effects on these children, stimulant effects on Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) were interpreted as being 'paradoxical.' Investigation of effects in normal children and adolescents and in those with disorders unrelated to Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), as well as in young adult samples, however, indicate that stimulants appear to have similar behavioral effects in normal and in hyperactive children. This brief report is an update (as of August 2002) on studies of stimulants in ADHD and normal children, with particular focus on MPH.

  1. Pregnant mare's serum gonadotropin. III. Hemispaying and the reversal of the antifertility faculty of pregnant mare's serum gonadotropin.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, A; Pal, A K; Gupta, T

    1977-10-01

    A single injection of 10 IU of pregnant mare's serum gonadotropin (PMSG) on day 5 of pregancy caused wastage of the fetoplacental unit by day 16 of pregnancy. Semispaying, which seems to subtract approximately 50% of the ovarian steroid contribution, at 24, 48, and 72 hours following the PMSG schedule prevented the antifertility faculty of the hormone preparation. However, hemicastration at 96 hours following the gonadotropin regimen was found to be ineffective, and 100% of the test animals showed complete termination of pregnancy. Experimental data collectively tempt us to propose that an estrogen excess, particularly of follicular origin in both ovaries, is essential for more than 72 hours following gonadotropin sensitization before the antifertility faculty of PMSG can be demonstrated.

  2. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone/human chorionic gonadotropin beta based recombinant antibodies and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Talwar, G P; Vyas, Hemant K; Purswani, Shilpi; Gupta, Jagdish C

    2009-12-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) are unique targets for the control of fertility. Immunological approaches to neutralizing these hormones have additional utility in cancer treatment. Vaccines have been developed against both GnRH and hCG and these have undergone Phase I/II clinical trials documenting their safety, reversibility and efficacy. The heterospecies dimer hCG vaccine prevented pregnancy in women of proven fertility without impairment of ovulation or derangement of menstrual regularity and bleeding profiles. The protective threshold of antibody titers to achieve efficacy was determined in these first-ever trials. Recently, a recombinant vaccine against the beta subunit of hCG linked to the B subunit of heat labile enterotoxin has been made and expressed as a glycosylated conjugate in Pichia pastoris. Experiments indicate its ability to generate antibodies above the protective threshold in all immunized Balb/c mice. Ectopic expression of hCG/hCGbeta is observed in many advanced stage cancers of various origins. A chimeric high affinity and specific recombinant antibody against hCGbeta linked to curcumin kills hCGbeta expressing T lymphoblastic leukemia cells without any deleterious effect. Several synthetic and recombinant vaccines have been developed against GnRH. These reduce serum testosterone to castration levels causing atrophy of the prostate. Three Phase I/II clinical trials conducted in India and Austria have shown that these vaccines elicit non-surgical reduction of testosterone, a fall in prostate specific antigen and clinical improvement of prostate carcinoma patients. A multimer recombinant vaccine against GnRH has high efficacy for sterilization of pigs and other animals.

  3. Catecholamine secretion and adrenal nerve activity in response to movements of normal and inflamed knee joints in cats.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, A; Sato, Y; Schmidt, R F

    1986-01-01

    The effects of articular stimulation on adrenal catecholamine secretion and adrenal sympathetic nerve activity were studied using halothane anaesthetized cats. Various natural passive movements were applied to the normal and inflamed knee joints. Rhythmic flexions and extensions as well as rhythmic inward and outward rotation of normal knee joints within their physiological range of motion did not change nerve activity or the secretion of adrenal catecholamines. Static outward rotation in the normal working range was also ineffective. However, as soon as this static rotation was extended into the noxious range, significant increases in both of these variables were elicited. In the acutely inflamed knee joint, various passive movements produced increases in both adrenal sympathetic and catecholamine secretion. Especially noteworthy was the finding that movements of the inflamed knee joint that were within the normal range of motion produced increases in all variables. Articularly induced increases in adrenal sympathetic nerve activity were diminished by severing various hind-limb somatic afferent nerves and abolished by complete denervation of the knee joint. Additionally, section of the adrenal sympathetic nerves eliminated the catecholamine secretion response. From these data it was concluded that the responses observed in these experiments were reflexes having an afferent limb in hind-limb nerves and an efferent limb in the adrenal sympathetic nerves. A contribution of supraspinal structures was suggested for the reflex responses of sympatho-adrenal medullary function evoked by knee joint stimulations, since spinal transection at the C2 level completely abolished the responses. PMID:3795070

  4. Peek-a-What? Infants' Response to the Still-Face Task after Normal and Interrupted Peek-a-Boo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigelow, Ann E.; Best, Caitlin

    2013-01-01

    Infants' sensitivity to the vitality or tension envelope within dyadic social exchanges was investigated by examining their responses following normal and interrupted games of peek-a-boo embedded in a Still-Face Task. Infants 5-6 months old engaged in two modified Still-Face Tasks with their mothers. In one task, the initial interaction ended with…

  5. Comparing Autistic and Normal Children along the Dimensions of Reinforcement Maximization, Stimulus Sampling, and Responsiveness to Extinction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullins, Marc; Rincover, Arnold

    1985-01-01

    Compared to mental and chronological age-matched groups of normal children, six autistic children (1) did not maximize reinforcement; (2) sampled less, and less efficiently; and (3) were much less responsive to extinction. Autistic sampling behavior was redirected by stimulus change. Results are viewed as perhaps causally related to many…

  6. The effect of Yohimbine, an alpha2 adrenergic receptor antagonist, on the growth hormone response to apomorphine in normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Lal, S; Thavundayil, J X; Krishnan, B; Nair, N P; Schwartz, G; Guyda, H

    1996-01-01

    Yohimbine HCl (16 mg po) administered 30 min before clonidine (CLON) (2 ug/kg infused over 10 min) (N = 5) or apomorphine HCl (Apo) (0.5 mg sc) (N = 10) antagonized the growth hormone (GH) response to CLON but had no effect on the GH response to Apo in normal men. This finding suggests that in humans, alpha2 adrenergic mechanisms do not modulate dopaminergic function, at least not in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, and that the GH response to Apo is not mediated via an alpha2 adrenergic link. PMID:8820174

  7. Object relations in borderlines, depressives, and normals: an examination of human responses on the Rorschach.

    PubMed

    Stuart, J; Westen, D; Lohr, N; Benjamin, J; Becker, S; Vorus, N; Silk, K

    1990-01-01

    Recently, researchers and clinicians have become increasingly interested in diagnostic distinctions between borderline and mood disorders. Object relations theory provides a useful framework for the comparison of these two overlapping diagnostic categories. In our study, a measure of object relations as represented on the Rorschach, developed by Blatt, Brenneis, Schimeck, and Glick (1976), was applied to data produced by borderline and depressive inpatients and by normal comparison subjects. Portions of the Blatt measure that tap the subject's experience of human action and interaction distinguish among the three diagnostic groups. Specifically, borderlines tend to understand human action as more highly motivated and human interaction as more malevolent in nature than do either depressive or normals. The data indicate that borderlines experience the object-relational world in a way that is fundamentally different from the way normals and depressives perceive it. Implications are discussed for theories of borderline object relations.

  8. Discrete element modeling of Martian pit crater formation in response to extensional fracturing and dilational normal faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, Kevin J.; Wyrick, Danielle Y.; Ferrill, David A.

    2011-04-01

    Pit craters, circular to elliptical depressions that lack a raised rim or ejecta deposits, are common on the surface of Mars. Similar structures are also found on Earth, Venus, the Moon, and smaller planetary bodies, including some asteroids. While it is generally accepted that these pits form in response to material drainage into a subsurface void space, the primary mechanism(s) responsible for creating the void is a subject of debate. Previously proposed mechanisms include collapse into lave tubes, dike injection, extensional fracturing, and dilational normal faulting. In this study, we employ two-dimensional discrete element models to assess both extensional fracturing and dilational normal faulting as mechanisms for forming pit craters. We also examine the effect of mechanical stratigraphy (alternating strong and weak layers) and variation in regolith thickness on pit morphology. Our simulations indicate that both extensional fracturing and dilational normal faulting are viable mechanisms. Both mechanisms lead to generally convex (steepening downward) slope profiles; extensional fracturing results in generally symmetric pits, whereas dilational normal faulting produces strongly asymmetric geometries. Pit width is established early, whereas pit depth increases later in the deformation history. Inclusion of mechanical stratigraphy results in wider and deeper pits, particularly for the dilational normal faulting, and the presence of strong near-surface layers leads to pits with distinct edges as observed on Mars. The modeling results suggest that a thicker regolith leads to wider but shallower pits that are less distinct and may be more difficult to detect in areas of thick regolith.

  9. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist triptorelin inhibits estradiol-induced serum response element (SRE) activation and c-fos expression in human endometrial, ovarian and breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gründker, Carsten; Günthert, Andreas R; Hellriegel, Martin; Emons, Günter

    2004-11-01

    The majority of human endometrial (>80%), ovarian (>80%) and breast (>50%) cancers express GnRH receptors. Their spontaneous and epidermal growth-factor-induced proliferation is dose- and time-dependently reduced by treatment with GnRH and its agonists. In this study, we demonstrate that the GnRH agonist triptorelin inhibits estradiol (E2)-induced cancer cell proliferation. The proliferation of quiescent estrogen receptor alpha (ER alpha)-/ER beta-positive, but not of ER alpha-negative/ER beta-positive endometrial, ovarian and breast cancer cell lines, was significantly stimulated (P<0.001) (ANOVA) after treatment with E2 (10(-8) M). This effect was time- and dose-dependently antagonized by simultaneous treatment with triptorelin. The inhibitory effect was maximal at 10(-5) M concentration of triptorelin (P<0.001). In addition, we could show that, in ER alpha-/ER beta-positive cell lines, E2 induces activation of serum response element (SRE) and expression of the immediate early-response gene c-fos. These effects were blocked by triptorelin (P<0.001). E2-induced activation of estrogen-response element (ERE) was not affected by triptorelin. The transcriptional activation of SRE by E2 is due to ER alpha activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. This pathway is impeded by GnRH, resulting in a reduction of E2-induced SRE activation and, in consequence, a reduction of E2-induced c-fos expression. This causes downregulation of E2-induced cancer cell proliferation.

  10. The molecular and cellular response of normal and progressed human bronchial epithelial cells to HZE particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Story, Michael; Ding, Liang-Hao; Minna, John; Park, Seong-mi; Larsen, Jill

    We have used a model of non-oncogenically immortalized normal human bronchial epithelial cells to determine the response of such cells to particles found outside the protection of the earth’s electromagnetic field. We have identified an enhanced frequency of cellular transformation, as measured by growth in soft agar, for both 56Fe and 28Si (1 GeV/n) that is maximal (4-6 fold) at 0.25 Gy and 0.40 Gy, respectively. At 4 months post-irradiation 38 individual soft agar clones were isolated. These clones were characterized extensively for cellular and molecular changes. Gene expression analysis suggested that these clones had down-regulated several genes associated with anti-oxidant pathways including GLS2, GPX1 and 4, SOD2, PIG3, and NQO1 amongst others. As a result, many of these transformed clones were exposed to high levels of intracellular radical oxygen species (ROS), although there appeared not to be any enhanced mitochondrial ROS. DNA repair pathways associated with ATM/ATR signaling were also upregulated. However, these transformants do not develop into tumors when injected into immune-compromised mice, suggesting that they have not progressed sufficiently to become oncogenic. Therefore we chose 6 soft agar clones for continuous culture for an additional 14 months. Amongst the 6 clones, only one clone showed any significant change in phenotype. Clone 3kt-ff.2a, propagated for 18 months, were 2-fold more radioresistant, had a shortened doubling time and the background rate of transformation more than doubled. Furthermore, the morphology of transformed clones changed. Clones from this culture are being compared to the original clone as well as the parental HBEC3KT and will be injected into immune-compromised mice for oncogenic potential. Oncogenically progressed HBECs, HBEC3KT cells that overexpress a mutant RAS gene and where p53 has been knocked down, designated HBEC3KTR53, responded quite differently to HZE particle exposure. First, these cells are more

  11. The neuropeptide Gonadotropin-releasing hormone modifies the spontaneous muscular contraction in the earthworm: Eisenia foetida.

    PubMed

    Luis Quintanar, J; Gutiérrez-García, Karina; Castillo-Hernández, Luis

    2011-12-01

    We investigated whether the Gonadotropin-releasing hormone affects the spontaneous muscular contraction in the earthworm Eisenia foetida. In addition, we investigated the presence of Gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor in ventral nerve cord by immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone induced a significant increase on both amplitude and muscular tone and decrease in the frequency of spontaneous muscular contraction. We found the presence of immunoreactive material to Gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor in the ventral nerve cord, likewise the Gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor mRNA expression. In conclusion, the Gonadotropin-releasing hormone modifies the spontaneous muscular contraction in E. foetida and these effects can be due to the activation of the Gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor.

  12. Learning Disabled and Normal Children's Responses to Requests for Clarification Which Vary in Explicitness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearl, Ruth A.; And Others

    The study involving 67 learning disabled (LD) children (grades 1 through 8) was designed to track the developmental course of the understanding of the more subtle forms of feedback (i.e., facial expression), to examine LD children's understanding of nonexplicit requests for clarification relative to that of normal achieving children, and to…

  13. Using an APOS Framework to Understand Teachers' Responses to Questions on the Normal Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bansilal, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    This study is an exploration of teachers' engagement with concepts embedded in the normal distribution. The participants were a group of 290 in-service teachers enrolled in a teacher development program. The research instrument was an assessment task that can be described as an "unknown percentage" problem, which required the application…

  14. Impaired developmental competence of oocytes in adult prenatally androgenized female rhesus monkeys undergoing gonadotropin stimulation for in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Dumesic, Daniel A; Schramm, R Dee; Peterson, Eric; Paprocki, Ann Marie; Zhou, Rao; Abbott, David H

    2002-03-01

    To determine whether prenatal T propionate exposure beginning gestational d 40-44 (early-treated) or 100-115 (late-treated) affects oocyte competence, five early-treated and five late-treated prenatally androgenized and five normal monkeys underwent recombinant human FSH injections with oocyte-retrieval after hCG administration. Serum FSH, LH, estradiol (E(2)), progesterone (P(4)), androstenedione (A(4)), T, and dihydrotestosterone were measured basally, during gonadotropin stimulation and at oocyte-retrieval; fasting serum glucose and insulin also were determined basally and at oocyte-retrieval. Follicle fluid sex steroids were analyzed. Oocyte number, nuclear maturity, and fertilization were comparable among female groups, but the percentage of zygotes developing into blastocysts was reduced in early-treated prenatally androgenized females. The intrafollicular P(4)/E(2) ratio was significantly elevated in early-treated prenatally androgenized females, whereas intrafollicular P(4)/A(4) and T/A(4) ratios were significantly increased in all prenatally androgenized females. Early-treated prenatally androgenized females demonstrated persistent LH hypersecretion. They also were unable to suppress circulating insulin levels during gonadotropin stimulation. Circulating sex steroid levels and serum P(4)/E(2), P(4)/A(4), and E(2)/androgen ratios were similar in all females. Early prenatal androgenization in monkeys receiving gonadotropins impairs oocyte developmental competence and seems to induce premature follicle differentiation in the presence of LH hypersecretion and relative insulin excess.

  15. Normalization of visceral adiposity is required to normalize plasma apolipoprotein B levels in response to a healthy eating/physical activity lifestyle modification program in viscerally obese men.

    PubMed

    Pelletier-Beaumont, Emilie; Arsenault, Benoit J; Alméras, Natalie; Bergeron, Jean; Tremblay, Angelo; Poirier, Paul; Després, Jean-Pierre

    2012-04-01

    Little is known about how visceral adipose tissue (VAT) influences circulating apolipoprotein B (apoB) levels, which reflect atherogenic risk. We have examined the effects of a 1-year lifestyle modification program on plasma apoB levels in viscerally obese men and compared post-intervention levels to those of a reference group of lean healthy men. Fasting plasma apoB levels were measured in 107 non-diabetic, viscerally obese men, before and after a 1-year lifestyle intervention program aiming at improving nutritional and physical activity/exercise habits. After the intervention, subjects significantly decreased their volume of VAT (Δ = -26 ± 18%, p < 0.0001) measured by computed tomography and significantly, but modestly reduced their fasting apoB levels (Δ = -3 ± 14%, p = 0.04). When compared to the reference group, men in the intervention group still had higher apoB levels suggesting that they did not "normalize" their apoB concentrations to the level of the healthy non-obese reference men. To further explore the relationship between VAT and apoB, men in the intervention group were stratified according to quartiles of VAT achieved after the intervention. Only men of the lowest quartile of VAT (corresponding to 844 ± 42 cm(3), similar to the value of the reference group; 809 ± 52 cm(3) of VAT) showed plasma apoB levels which were similar to those of the reference group (0.98 ± 0.21 vs. 0.99 ± 0.24 g/L, NS, for lowest VAT quartile and reference group, respectively). These results suggest that, in order to "normalize" apoB levels in response to a lifestyle modification program, viscerally obese dyslipidemic men need to achieve levels of VAT similar to healthy non-obese men. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Failure of antibody to carbohydrate-rich gonadotropin to inhibit rapid ovarian growth in landlocked Atlantic salmon

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegand, M.D.; Idler, D.R.

    1984-08-01

    The discovery of a carbohydrate-poor gonadotropin has resulted in a reassessment of the role of the classical, carbohydrate-rich gonadotropin (Con A II GtH) in teleost ovarian development. Prolonged treatment of landlocked Atlantic salmon with antibody to Con A II GtH failed to inhibit rapid ovarian growth or accumulation of triglyceride or vitellogenin derivative. Sera from antibody-treated fish showed substantial capacity to bind Con A II GtH indicating that antibody treatment successfully removed endogenous Con A II GtH from the circulation. These results are consistent with previous reports that a factor other than Con A II GtH is responsible for stimulating yolk accumulation.

  17. Ovarian stimulation of squirrel monkeys (Saimiri boliviensis boliviensis) using pregnant mare serum gonadotropin.

    PubMed

    Schuler, A Michele; Westberry, Jenne M; Scammell, Jonathan G; Abee, Christian R; Kuehl, Thomas J; Gordon, Jon W

    2006-02-01

    The application of assisted reproductive technologies (ART) to nonhuman primates has created opportunities for improving reproductive management in breeding colonies, and for creation of new animal models by genetic modification. One impediment to the application of ART in Saimiri spp. has been the lack of an effective gonadotropin preparation for ovarian stimulation. Pregnant mare serum gonadotropin (PMSG) is inexpensive and readily available, but its repeated use in rhesus monkeys has been associated with induction of a refractory state. We have compared PMSG to recombinant human follicle stimulating hormone (rhFSH) for controlled ovarian stimulation in Bolivian squirrel monkeys. Groups of mature squirrel monkeys received rhFSH (75 IU daily) or PMSG (250 IU twice daily) by subcutaneous injection for 4 d during the breeding season (November to January) or nonbreeding season (March to September). Serum estradiol (E2) was measured daily. Follicular growth was monitored by abdominal ultrasound. During the breeding season, PMSG induced a higher E2 response than did rhFSH, with mean E2 levels being significantly higher within 3 d of stimulation. Superior follicular development in PMSG animals was confirmed by abdominal ultrasonography. During the nonbreeding season, PMSG elicited a similar increase in serum E2 levels despite the fact that basal serum E2 is typically low during the nonbreeding season. Repeated use of PMSG (< or = 3 cycles of administration) produced no attenuation of the E2 response. We conclude that PMSG is highly effective for repeated cycles of controlled ovulation stimulation in the squirrel monkey.

  18. Factors affecting pituitary gonadotropin function in users of oral contraceptive steroids.

    PubMed

    Scott, J A; Brenner, P F; Kletzky, O A; Mishell, D R

    1978-04-01

    In order to determine whether certain factors influence the direct pituitary suppressive effect of contraceptive steroid, 50 subjects who had used various formulations of oral contraceptive steroids for periods of time ranging from one to nine years were stimulated with 50 microgram of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) during the last week of oral contraceptive ingestion. The response of lutinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) was compared to the results obtained in nine control subjects with regard to: (1) age of subject. (2) type of contraceptive formulation used, and (3) length of use. Prestimulation levels of LH and FSH, respectively, were significantly decreased in 37 (74 per cent) and 42 (84 per cent) of the subjects. Following GnRH stimulation, peak responses of serum LH and FSH, respectively, were also significantly lower than those in the control subjects in 40 (80 per cent) and 45 (90 per cent of the subjects. The degree of suppression of pituitary gonadotropins, both before and after GnRH administration was significantly correlated with the type of steroid formulation used, being greatest with a combination of d-norgestrel and ethinyl estradiol. No correlation was found with length of use of oral contraceptives or age of the subjects.

  19. Gonadotropins Regulate Rat Testicular Tight Junctions in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Mark J.; Tarulli, Gerard A.; Meachem, Sarah J.; Robertson, David M.; Smooker, Peter M.; Stanton, Peter G.

    2010-01-01

    Sertoli cell tight junctions (TJs) are an essential component of the blood-testis barrier required for spermatogenesis; however, the role of gonadotropins in their maintenance is unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effect of gonadotropin suppression and short-term replacement on TJ function and TJ protein (occludin and claudin-11) expression and localization, in an adult rat model in vivo. Rats (n = 10/group) received the GnRH antagonist, acyline, for 7 wk to suppress gonadotropins. Three groups then received for 7 d: 1) human recombinant FSH, 2) human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and rat FSH antibody (to study testicular androgen stimulation alone), and 3) hCG alone (to study testicular androgen and pituitary FSH production). TJ proteins were assessed by real-time PCR, Western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry, whereas TJ function was assessed with a biotin permeation tracer. Acyline treatment significantly reduced testis weights, serum androgens, LH and FSH, and adluminal germ cells (pachytene spermatocyte, round and elongating spermatids). In contrast to controls, acyline induced seminiferous tubule permeability to biotin, loss of tubule lumens, and loss of occludin, but redistribution of claudin-11, immunostaining. Short-term hormone replacement stimulated significant recoveries in adluminal germ cell numbers. In hCG ± FSH antibody-treated rats, occludin and claudin-11 protein relocalized at the TJ, but such relocalization was minimal with FSH alone. Tubule lumens also reappeared, but most tubules remained permeable to biotin tracer, despite the presence of occludin. It is concluded that gonadotropins maintain Sertoli cell TJs in the adult rat via a mechanism that includes the localization of occludin and claudin-11 at functional TJs. PMID:20357222

  20. Gonadotropins regulate rat testicular tight junctions in vivo.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Mark J; Tarulli, Gerard A; Meachem, Sarah J; Robertson, David M; Smooker, Peter M; Stanton, Peter G

    2010-06-01

    Sertoli cell tight junctions (TJs) are an essential component of the blood-testis barrier required for spermatogenesis; however, the role of gonadotropins in their maintenance is unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effect of gonadotropin suppression and short-term replacement on TJ function and TJ protein (occludin and claudin-11) expression and localization, in an adult rat model in vivo. Rats (n = 10/group) received the GnRH antagonist, acyline, for 7 wk to suppress gonadotropins. Three groups then received for 7 d: 1) human recombinant FSH, 2) human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and rat FSH antibody (to study testicular androgen stimulation alone), and 3) hCG alone (to study testicular androgen and pituitary FSH production). TJ proteins were assessed by real-time PCR, Western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry, whereas TJ function was assessed with a biotin permeation tracer. Acyline treatment significantly reduced testis weights, serum androgens, LH and FSH, and adluminal germ cells (pachytene spermatocyte, round and elongating spermatids). In contrast to controls, acyline induced seminiferous tubule permeability to biotin, loss of tubule lumens, and loss of occludin, but redistribution of claudin-11, immunostaining. Short-term hormone replacement stimulated significant recoveries in adluminal germ cell numbers. In hCG +/- FSH antibody-treated rats, occludin and claudin-11 protein relocalized at the TJ, but such relocalization was minimal with FSH alone. Tubule lumens also reappeared, but most tubules remained permeable to biotin tracer, despite the presence of occludin. It is concluded that gonadotropins maintain Sertoli cell TJs in the adult rat via a mechanism that includes the localization of occludin and claudin-11 at functional TJs.

  1. Progestin Exposure Before Gonadotropin Stimulation Improves Embryo Development after In Vitro Fertilization in the Domestic Cat1

    PubMed Central

    Pelican, Katharine M.; Spindler, Rebecca E.; Pukazhenthi, Budhan S.; Wildt, David E.; Ottinger, Mary A.; Howard, JoGayle

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of progestin priming and ovarian quiescence on response to exogenous gonadotropin stimulation in the cat. Because a subpopulation of cats routinely ovulated spontaneously, there also was the opportunity to examine the ovary's reaction to the added impact of endogenously secreted progestagen. Queens were given 1) equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) plus human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) only (control; n = 9 cats), 2) GnRH antagonist (antide) injections followed by eCG and hCG (n = 9), and 3) a progestin implant (levonorgestrel) followed by eCG and hCG (n = 9). Laparoscopy was used to assess ovarian activity and aspirate follicular oocytes that were graded on the basis of morphology. In five cats per treatment, half of the high-quality oocytes were assessed for glucose, pyruvate, and lactate metabolism as well as nuclear maturation. Remaining oocytes were inseminated in vitro, cultured, and examined at 72 h after insemination for cleavage. In the remaining four cats per treatment, all oocytes were inseminated in vitro and assessed at 72, 120, and 168 h after insemination for embryo developmental stage. Cats pretreated with progestin had more follicles and produced more embryos per donor (including at the combined morula/blastocyst stage) than controls or females treated with GnRH antagonist (P < 0.05). There were no differences among groups (P > 0.05) in oocyte carbohydrate metabolism, nuclear maturation metrics, or fertilization success, although there was a tendency toward improvements in all three (P < 0.2) in progestin-treated females. Interestingly, cats that spontaneously ovulated within 60 days of treatment onset also produced more embryos per cat than induced-ovulation counterparts (P < 0.05). Results indicate that prior exposure to exogenous progestin (via implant) or endogenous progestagen (via spontaneous ovulation) improves ovarian responsiveness to gonadotropins in the cat through a mechanism that is independent of

  2. Bronchomotor response to cold air or helium-oxygen at normal and high ambient pressures.

    PubMed

    Jammes, Y; Burnet, H; Cosson, P; Lucciano, M

    1988-05-01

    Effects of inhalation of cold air or helium-oxygen mixture on lung resistance (RL) were studied in anesthetized and tracheotomized rabbits under normal ambient pressure and in human volunteers under normo- and hyperbaric conditions. In artificially ventilated rabbits, an increase in RL occurred when the tracheal temperature fell to 10 degrees C. This effect was more than double with helium breathing compared to air, despite a lower respiratory heat loss by convection (Hc) with helium. In 3 normal humans, inhalation of cold air (mouth temperature = 8 degrees C) at sea level had no effect on RL value. However, with a helium-nitrogen-oxygen mixture, a weak but significant increase in RL due to cold gas breathing was measured in 1 subject at 2 ATA and in 2 individuals at 3.5 ATA. The density of inhaled gas mixture (air or He-N2-O2) was near the same in the three circumstances (1, 2, and 3.5 ATA) but Hc value increased with helium. At 8 ATA a 30-55% increase in RL occurred in the 3 divers during inhalation of cold gas (Hc was multiplied by 6 compared to air at sea level) and at 25 ATA the cold-induced bronchospasm ranged between 38 and 95% (Hc multiplied by 27). Thus, in rabbits and humans helium breathing enhanced the cold-induced increase in RL at normal or elevated ambient pressure, and this effect was interpreted as resulting from different mechanisms in the two circumstances.

  3. Neural responses to silent lipreading in normal hearing male and female subjects.

    PubMed

    Ruytjens, Liesbet; Albers, Frans; van Dijk, Pim; Wit, Hero; Willemsen, Antoon

    2006-09-01

    In the past, researchers investigated silent lipreading in normal hearing subjects with functional neuroimaging tools and showed how the brain processes visual stimuli that are normally accompanied by an auditory counterpart. Previously, we showed activation differences between males and females in primary auditory cortex during silent lipreading, i.e. only the female group significantly activated the primary auditory region during lipreading. Here we report and discuss the overall activation pattern in males and females. We used positron emission tomography to study silent lipreading in 19 normal hearing subjects (nine females). Prior to scanning, subjects were tested on their lipreading ability and only good lipreaders were included in the study. Silent lipreading was compared with a static image. In the whole group, activations were found mainly in the left hemisphere with major clusters in superior temporal, inferior parietal, inferior frontal and precentral regions. The female group showed more clusters and these clusters were larger than in the male group. Sex differences were found mainly in right inferior frontal and left inferior parietal regions and to a lesser extent in bilateral angular and precentral gyri. The sex differences in the parietal multimodal region support our previous hypothesis that the male and female brain process visual speech stimuli differently without differences in overt lipreading ability. Specifically, females associate the visual speech image with the corresponding auditory speech sound whereas males focus more on the visual image itself.

  4. Homologous radioimmunoassay for canine thyrotropin: response of normal and x-irradiated dogs to propylthiouracil

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, W.J.; Michaelson, S.

    1981-03-01

    A RIA for canine TSH (cTSH) was developed using a double antibody method. Rabbit anti-cTSH antisera was slightly cross-reactive with ovine TSH. No evidence of cross-reactivity was noted with human, bovine, rat TSH, or ovine LH. Serum cTSH in euthyroid dogs was 7.0 +- 0.9 ng/ml. Normal and x-irradiated (localized to the thyroid or cranium) dogs received 334 mg propylthiouracil (PTU) im in oil daily for 1 week as a goitrogenic challenge. A significant increase in cTSH was noted in normal dogs and in two of four dogs that received 1000 rads to the thyroid. No significant increase was observed in cTSH in any of the dogs previously given either 100 or 1000 rads to the head. Although serum T/sub 3/ and T/sub 4/ were only slightly decreased in thyroid-irradiated dogs, a significant decrease in T/sub 3/ was observed in both normal and x-irradiated dogs maintained on PTU for 1 week. The inability of head x-irradiated dogs to respond to PTU, as evidenced by the lack of increased cTSH, suggests that moderate to high doses of x irradiation can impair the ability of the hypothalamic-hypophysial-thyroid axis to respond to a goitrogenic challenge.

  5. Normal Evoked Response to Rapid Sequences of Tactile Pulses in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Santosh; Khan, Sheraz; Garel, Keri-Lee A.; Hämäläinen, Matti S.; Kenet, Tal

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a developmental disorder diagnosed behaviorally, with many documented neurophysiological abnormalities in cortical response properties. While abnormal sensory processing is not considered core to the disorder, most ASD individuals report sensory processing abnormalities. Yet, the neurophysiological correlates of these abnormalities have not been fully mapped. In the auditory domain, studies have shown that cortical responses in the early auditory cortex in ASD are abnormal in multiple ways. In particular, it has been shown that individuals with ASD have abnormal cortical auditory evoked responses to rapid, but not slow, sequences of tones. In parallel, there is substantial evidence of somatosensory processing abnormalities in ASD, including in the temporal domain. Here, we tested the somatosensory domain in ASD for abnormalities in rapid processing of tactile pulses, to determine whether abnormalities there parallel those observed in the auditory domain. Specifically, we tested the somatosensory cortex response to a sequence of two tactile pulses with different (short and long) temporal separation. We analyzed the responses in cortical space, in primary somatosensory cortex. As expected, we found no group difference in the evoked response to pulses with long (700 ms) temporal separation. Contrary to findings in the auditory domain, we also found no group differences in the evoked responses to the sequence with a short (200 ms) temporal separation. These results suggest that rapid temporal processing deficits in ASD are not generalized across multiple sensory domains, and are unlikely to underlie the behavioral somatosensory abnormalities observed in ASD. PMID:27695402

  6. Quantitative radiation dose-response relationships for normal tissues in man. II. Response of the salivary glands during radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mossman, K.L.

    1983-08-01

    A quantitative dose-response curve for salivary gland function in patients during radiotherapy is presented. Salivary-function data used in this study were obtained from four previously published reports. All patients were treated with /sup 60/Co teletherapy to the head and neck using conventional treatment techniques. Salivary dysfunction was determined at specific dose levels by comparing salivary flow rates before therapy with flow rates at specific dose intervals during radiotherapy up to a total dose of 6000 cGy. Fifty percent salivary dysfunction occurred after 1000 cGy and eighty percent dysfunction was observed by the end of the therapy course (6000 cGy). The salivary-function curve was also compared to the previously published dose-response curve for taste function. Comparisons of the two curves indicate that salivary dysfunction precedes taste loss and that the shapes of the dose-response curves are different. A new term, tissue tolerance ratio, defined as the ratio of responses of two tissues given the same radiation dose, was used to make the comparisons between gustatory and salivary gland tissue effects. Measurements of salivary gland function and analysis of dose-response curves may be useful in evaluating chemical modifiers of radiation response.

  7. Quantitative radiation dose-response relationships for normal tissues in man. II. Response of the salivary glands during radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mossman, K.L.

    1983-08-01

    A quantitative dose-response curve for salivary gland function in patients during radiotherapy is presented. Salivary-function data used in this study were obtained from four previously published reports. All patients were treated wih /sup 60/Co teletherapy to the head and neck using conventional treatment techniques. Salivary dysfunction was determined at specific dose levels by comparing salivary flow rates before therapy with flow rates at specific dose intervals during radiotherapy up to a total dose of 6000 cGy. Fifty percent salivary dysfunction occurred after 1000 cGy and eighty percent dysfunction was observed by the end of the therapy course (6000 cGy). The salivary-function curve was also compared to the previously published dose-response curve for taste function. Comparisons of the two curves indicate that salivary dysfunction precedes taste loss and that the shapes of the dose-response curves are different. A new term, tissue tolerance ratio, defined as the ratio of responses of two tissues given the same radiation dose, was used to make the comparisons between gustatory and salivary gland tissue effects. Measurements of salivary gland function and analysis of dose-response curves may be useful in evaluating chemical modifiers of radiation response.

  8. Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Response and Normal Tissue Regeneration After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy to Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Stinauer, Michelle A.; Diot, Quentin; Westerly, David C.; Schefter, Tracey E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To characterize changes in standardized uptake value (SUV) in positron emission tomography (PET) scans and determine the pace of normal tissue regeneration after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for solid tumor liver metastases. Methods and Materials: We reviewed records of patients with liver metastases treated with SBRT to {>=}40 Gy in 3-5 fractions. Evaluable patients had pretreatment PET and {>=}1 post-treatment PET. Each PET/CT scan was fused to the planning computed tomography (CT) scan. The maximum SUV (SUV{sub max}) for each lesion and the total liver volume were measured on each PET/CT scan. Maximum SUV levels before and after SBRT were recorded. Results: Twenty-seven patients with 35 treated liver lesions were studied. The median follow-up was 15.7 months (range, 1.5-38.4 mo), with 5 PET scans per patient (range, 2-14). Exponential decay curve fitting (r=0.97) showed that SUV{sub max} declined to a plateau of 3.1 for controlled lesions at 5 months after SBRT. The estimated SUV{sub max} decay half-time was 2.0 months. The SUV{sub max} in controlled lesions fluctuated up to 4.2 during follow-up and later declined; this level is close to 2 standard deviations above the mean normal liver SUV{sub max} (4.01). A failure cutoff of SUV{sub max} {>=}6 is twice the calculated plateau SUV{sub max} of controlled lesions. Parenchymal liver volume decreased by 20% at 3-6 months and regenerated to a new baseline level approximately 10% below the pretreatment level at 12 months. Conclusions: Maximum SUV decreases over the first months after SBRT to plateau at 3.1, similar to the median SUV{sub max} of normal livers. Transient moderate increases in SUV{sub max} may be observed after SBRT. We propose a cutoff SUV{sub max} {>=}6, twice the baseline normal liver SUV{sub max}, to score local failure by PET criteria. Post-SBRT values between 4 and 6 would be suspicious for local tumor persistence or recurrence. The volume of normal liver reached nadir 3

  9. Exaggerated blood pressure response to exercise is not associated with masked hypertension in patients with high normal blood pressure levels.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Alon; Cohen, Noa; Shemesh, Joseph; Koren-Morag, Nira; Leibowitz, Avshalom; Grossman, Ehud

    2014-04-01

    The association between exaggerated blood pressure (BP) response to exercise (ExBPR) and "masked hypertension" is unclear. Medical records of patients with high-normal BP who were evaluated in the Chaim Sheba Screening Institute Ramat Gan, Israel, during the years 2002-2007 and referred for 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) and exercise test were reviewed. Data on exercise tests performed in the preceding 5 years were retrieved. Reproducible ExBPR was defined when it was recorded at least twice. BP levels on 24-hour ABPM were compared between patients with a normal BP response and those with an ExBPR (systolic BP ≥200 mm Hg). Sixty-nine normotensive patients with high normal BP levels were identified. ExBPR was recorded in 43 patients and was reproducible in 28. BP levels on 24-hour ABPM were similar in patients with and without ExBPR. In patients with high-normal BP levels, ExBPR is not associated with masked hypertension.

  10. CpG methylation patterns and decitabine treatment response in acute myeloid leukemia cells and normal hematopoietic precursors

    PubMed Central

    Negrotto, Soledad; Ng, Kwok Peng; Jankowska, Ania M.; Bodo, Juraj; Gopalan, Banu; Guinta, Kathryn; Mulloy, James C.; Hsi, Eric; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw; Saunthararajah, Yogen

    2011-01-01

    The DNA hypomethylating drug decitabine maintains normal hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal but induces terminal differentiation in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. The basis for these contrasting cell-fates, and for selective CpG hypomethylation by decitabine, is poorly understood. Promoter CpGs, with methylation measured by microarray, were classified by the direction of methylation change with normal myeloid maturation. In AML cells, the methylation pattern at maturation-responsive CpG suggested at least partial maturation. Consistent with partial maturation, in gene expression analyses, AML cells expressed high levels of the key lineage-specifying factor CEBPA, but relatively low levels of the key late-differentiation driver CEBPE. In methylation analysis by mass-spectrometry, CEBPE promoter CpG that are usually hypomethylated during granulocyte maturation were significantly hypermethylated in AML cells. Decitabine treatment induced cellular differentiation of AML cells, and the largest methylation decreases were at CpG that are hypomethylated with myeloid maturation, including CEBPE promoter CpG. In contrast, decitabine-treated normal HSC retained immature morphology, and methylation significantly decreased at CpG that are less methylated in immature cells. High expression of lineage-specifying factor and aberrant epigenetic repression of some key late-differentiation genes distinguishes AML cells from normal HSC and could explain the contrasting differentiation and methylation responses to decitabine. PMID:21836612

  11. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone mRNA and gonadotropin beta-subunit mRNA expression in the adult female rat exposed to ethanol in utero.

    PubMed

    Wilson, M E; Marshall, M T; Bollnow, M R; McGivern, R F; Handa, R J

    1995-10-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that exposure of female rats to ethanol in utero results in long-term deficits in reproductive function, including a delayed onset of puberty and an early onset of acyclicity. In the present studies, we determined if changes in reproduction are correlated with changes in gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) mRNA expression in the brain or gonadotropin subunit mRNA expression in the anterior pituitary gland. We used in situ hybridization histochemical techniques to examine the density of GnRH mRNA and the distribution of GnRH mRNA-containing cells in the basal forebrain, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to quantitate the beta-subunit mRNA of luteinizing hormone (LH beta) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH beta) in the anterior pituitary gland of adult (3 months of age) fetal alcohol-exposed (FAE) female rats. For GnRH mRNA measurements, animals were gonadectomized 4 days before use. Three groups of animals were examined. FAE females were derived from pregnant dams fed a liquid diet containing 35% ethanol-derived calories from gestational day 14 until parturition. Dams of control animals were either pair-fed (PF) an isocaloric diet with sucrose substituted for ethanol or maintained on normal laboratory rat chow [chow-fed (CF)]. Serial blood samples taken by indwelling right atrial cannulae demonstrated significantly smaller pulses of LH (p < 0.05) and FSH (p < 0.05) in ovariectomized FAE females at 3 months of age, compared with PF and CF controls. Distribution of GnRH mRNA-containing cells was mapped throughout the forebrain, and the number of autoradiographic silver grains/cell was determined.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. H-7, a protein kinase C inhibitor, inhibits spontaneous tone and spasmogenic responses in normal and sensitized guinea pig trachea.

    PubMed

    de Diego, A; Cortijo, J; Villagrasa, V; Perpina, M; Morcillo, E J

    1995-12-01

    1. H-7, a protein kinase C inhibitor, fully inhibited the spontaneous and stimulated (KCl 20 mM or histamine 0.5 mM) tone of trachea from normal and sensitized guinea pig. 2. H-7 depressed the concentration-contraction curves to KCl, histamine or 5-hydroxytryptamine in epithelium-denuded, indomethacin-treated, trachea from normal and sensitized guinea pigs while responses to CaCl2 (in Ca2+ -free, K+ -depolarized tissues) and acetylcholine were not affected. 3. H-7 (100 microM did not depress Ca2+ (20 microM-induced contraction of Triton X-100 skinned trachea. 4. These results suggest the involvement of PKC in the maintenance of spontaneous tone and spasmogenic responses of guinea pig trachea.

  13. An Extended Normalization Model of Attention Accounts for Feature-Based Attentional Enhancement of Both Response and Coherence Gain

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, B. Suresh; Treue, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Paying attention to a sensory feature improves its perception and impairs that of others. Recent work has shown that a Normalization Model of Attention (NMoA) can account for a wide range of physiological findings and the influence of different attentional manipulations on visual performance. A key prediction of the NMoA is that attention to a visual feature like an orientation or a motion direction will increase the response of neurons preferring the attended feature (response gain) rather than increase the sensory input strength of the attended stimulus (input gain). This effect of feature-based attention on neuronal responses should translate to similar patterns of improvement in behavioral performance, with psychometric functions showing response gain rather than input gain when attention is directed to the task-relevant feature. In contrast, we report here that when human subjects are cued to attend to one of two motion directions in a transparent motion display, attentional effects manifest as a combination of input and response gain. Further, the impact on input gain is greater when attention is directed towards a narrow range of motion directions than when it is directed towards a broad range. These results are captured by an extended NMoA, which either includes a stimulus-independent attentional contribution to normalization or utilizes direction-tuned normalization. The proposed extensions are consistent with the feature-similarity gain model of attention and the attentional modulation in extrastriate area MT, where neuronal responses are enhanced and suppressed by attention to preferred and non-preferred motion directions respectively. PMID:27977679

  14. An Extended Normalization Model of Attention Accounts for Feature-Based Attentional Enhancement of Both Response and Coherence Gain.

    PubMed

    Schwedhelm, Philipp; Krishna, B Suresh; Treue, Stefan

    2016-12-01

    Paying attention to a sensory feature improves its perception and impairs that of others. Recent work has shown that a Normalization Model of Attention (NMoA) can account for a wide range of physiological findings and the influence of different attentional manipulations on visual performance. A key prediction of the NMoA is that attention to a visual feature like an orientation or a motion direction will increase the response of neurons preferring the attended feature (response gain) rather than increase the sensory input strength of the attended stimulus (input gain). This effect of feature-based attention on neuronal responses should translate to similar patterns of improvement in behavioral performance, with psychometric functions showing response gain rather than input gain when attention is directed to the task-relevant feature. In contrast, we report here that when human subjects are cued to attend to one of two motion directions in a transparent motion display, attentional effects manifest as a combination of input and response gain. Further, the impact on input gain is greater when attention is directed towards a narrow range of motion directions than when it is directed towards a broad range. These results are captured by an extended NMoA, which either includes a stimulus-independent attentional contribution to normalization or utilizes direction-tuned normalization. The proposed extensions are consistent with the feature-similarity gain model of attention and the attentional modulation in extrastriate area MT, where neuronal responses are enhanced and suppressed by attention to preferred and non-preferred motion directions respectively.

  15. Auditory brainstem responses to CE-Chirp® stimuli for normal ears and those with sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung-Woo; Han, Kyu-Hee; Jang, Hyun-Kyung; Chang, Sun O; Jung, Hyunseo; Lee, Jun Ho

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of the characteristic differences between click-and CE-Chirp-evoked auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) in normal hearing and sensorineural hearing loss. A prospective study. Ears with normal hearing and with sensorineural hearing loss were evaluated. Pure-tone audiometry and click-and CE-Chirp evoked ABRs exams were conducted for all ears. Visual detection levels, wave-V amplitudes, and latencies of the ABRs were assessed. Twenty-two ears with normal hearing and 22 ears with sloping type sensorineural hearing loss were examined. In normal-hearing ears, mean amplitudes were larger for CE-chirps than for clicks at all intensities until 80 dB nHL, at which the amplitudes dropped off, presumably due to upward spread of excitation. In ears with sensorineural hearing loss, however the drop-off was less significant at 80 dB nHL. Comparisons with pure-tone audiometry findings revealed ABRs to CE-Chirps to correlate at 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 kHz, and to clicks at 1, 2, 3, and 4 kHz. The CE-Chirp has advantages over clicks for examining normal ears. However, under high-level stimulation, these advantages are no longer present. In ears with sensorineural hearing loss, the upward spread of excitation is less prominent. The CE-Chirps results correlate significantly to low frequency audiometric findings at 0.5 kHz, while clicks do not.

  16. Matched-Comparative Modeling of Normal and Diseased Human Airway Responses Using a Microengineered Breathing Lung Chip.

    PubMed

    Benam, Kambez H; Novak, Richard; Nawroth, Janna; Hirano-Kobayashi, Mariko; Ferrante, Thomas C; Choe, Youngjae; Prantil-Baun, Rachelle; Weaver, James C; Bahinski, Anthony; Parker, Kevin K; Ingber, Donald E

    2016-11-23

    Smoking represents a major risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but it is difficult to characterize smoke-induced injury responses under physiological breathing conditions in humans due to patient-to-patient variability. Here, we show that a small airway-on-a-chip device lined by living human bronchiolar epithelium from normal or COPD patients can be connected to an instrument that "breathes" whole cigarette smoke in and out of the chips to study smoke-induced pathophysiology in vitro. This technology enables true matched comparisons of biological responses by culturing cells from the same individual with or without smoke exposure. These studies led to identification of ciliary micropathologies, COPD-specific molecular signatures, and epithelial responses to smoke generated by electronic cigarettes. The smoking airway-on-a-chip represents a tool to study normal and disease-specific responses of the human lung to inhaled smoke across molecular, cellular and tissue-level responses in an organ-relevant context. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of leptin on gonadotropin-releasing hormone release from hypothalamic-infundibular explants and gonadotropin release from adenohypophyseal primary cell cultures: further evidence that fully nourished cattle are resistant to leptin.

    PubMed

    Amstalden, M; Harms, P G; Welsh, T H; Randel, R D; Williams, G L

    2005-01-01

    In rodents and pigs, leptin stimulates the release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) from hypothalamus, gonadotropins from adenohypophyseal (AP) explants and cells, and luteinizing hormone (LH) from full-fed animals. In the current studies, we investigated whether leptin could stimulate the release of GnRH from bovine hypothalamic-infundibular (HYP) explants and gonadotropins from bovine adenohypophyseal cells. In Experiment 1A, HYP explants collected from 17 bulls and seven steers were incubated with Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer (KRB) containing 0, 10, 100, or 1000 ng/ml recombinant ovine leptin (oleptin) for 30 min after a 3-h period of equilibration. None of the doses of leptin affected (P > 0.05) GnRH release into the media. In Experiment 1B, HYP explants collected from six steers were incubated with KRB containing 0 or 1000 ng/ml oleptin for two consecutive 30-min periods and challenged with 60 mM K(+) afterwards. Leptin did not affect (P > 0.05) basal or K(+)-stimulated release of GnRH. In Experiment 2, adenohypophyses from steers were collected at slaughter and cells dispersed and cultured for 4 days. On day 5, cells were treated with media alone (control) or media containing 10(-11), 10(-10), 10(-9), and 10(-8)M oleptin. Three independent replications were performed. None of the doses of leptin stimulated (P > 0.05) the release of LH. Although leptin at 10(-11), 10(-10), and 10(-9)M increased (P < 0.03) slightly the release of FSH compared to control-treated cells in one replicate, this effect was not confirmed in the other two replicates. Results support the hypothesis that leptin has limited effects on the release of GnRH and gonadotropins in full-fed cattle and reiterate important species differences in responsiveness to leptin.

  18. Free β-human chorionic gonadotropin, total human chorionic gonadotropin and maternal risk of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Toriola, Adetunji T; Tolockiene, Egle; Schock, Helena; Surcel, Helja-Marja; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Wadell, Goran; Toniolo, Paolo; Lundin, Eva; Grankvist, Kjell; Lukanova, Annekatrin

    2014-01-01

    Background We investigated whether the free β-human chorionic gonadotropin (free β-hCG) would provide additional information to that provided by total hCG alone and thus be useful in future epidemiological studies relating hCG to maternal breast cancer risk. Materials & methods Cases (n = 159) and controls (n = 286) were a subset of our previous study within the Northern Sweden Maternity Cohort on total hCG during primiparous pregnancy and breast cancer risk. Results The associations between total hCG (hazard ratio: 0.79; 95% CI: 0.49–1.27), free β-hCG (hazard ratio: 0.85; 95% CI: 0.33–2.18) and maternal risk of breast cancer were very similar in all analyses and mutual adjustment for either one had minor effects on the risk estimates. Conclusion In the absence of a reliable assay on intact hCG, total hCG alone can be used in epidemiological studies investigating hCG and breast cancer risk, as free β-hCG does not appear to provide any additional information. PMID:24559445

  19. [Normal ventilatory response to hypoxia and hypercapnia at an altitude of 2240 meters].

    PubMed

    Vázquez-García, J C; Arellano-Vega, S L; Regalado-Pineda, J; Pérez-Padilla, J R

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the ventilatory response to hypoxia and hypercapnia in healthy residents of Mexico City at 2240 m above sea level. 15 healthy subjects, 10 women and 5 men, were studied (mean age 38; range 26-76). All completed one or two tests of ventilatory response to hypoxia and hypercapnia as described by Rebuck-Campbell and Read, respectively. The results were analyzed by linear regression using the minute ventilation as the dependent variable and SaO2 (hypoxia) or PCO2 (hypercapnia) as the independent variables. Seven subjects had very low or no response to hypoxia. The mean hypoxia slope was 0.7 +/- 0.6 L/min/% (+/- SD) and the hypercapnia slope was 3.0 +/- 1.4 L/min/mmHg. The intercepts were 176 +/- 278 for SaO2 and 3.0 +/- 7 for PCO2. A low respiratory response to hypoxia was found in Mexico City Healthy residents. The response to hypercapnia was similar in slope to other studies but had an intercept shifted to lower values. The Mexico City residents showed a behavior typical of patients with chronic hypoxemia or of dwellers at high altitudes.

  20. Comparison of normal and asthmatic subjects' responses to sulfate pollutant aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Utell, M.J.; Morrow, P.E.; Hyde, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    Epidemiological studies support an association between elevated levels of sulfates and acute respiratory disease. To determine if these pollutants produce airway hyperreactivity, 16 normal and 17 asthmatic subjects inhaled a control NaCl aerosol and the following sulfates: ammonium sulfate, sodium bisulfate, ammonium bisulfate, and sulfuric acid. A Lovelace generator produced particles with an average MMAD of approx. 1.0 ..mu..m (sigma/sub g/ approx. = 2.0) and concentrations of 0.1 and 1.0 mg/m/sup 3/. By double-blind randomization, all subjects breathed these aerosols for a 16-minute period. To determine if sulfate inhalation caused increased reactivity to a known bronchoconstrictor, all subjects inhaled carbachol following each 16-minute exposure. Before, during, and after exposure, pulmonary function studies were performed. When compared to NaCl, sulfate (1 mg/m/sup 3/) produced significant reductions in airway conductance and flow rates in asthmatics. The two most sensitive asthmatics demonstrated changes even at 0.1 mg/m/sup 3/ sulfate. To a far more significant degree, the bronchoconstrictor action of carbachol was potentiated by sulfates more or less in relation to their acidity in normals and asthmatics.

  1. The presence of gonadotropin binding sites in the intracellular organelles of human ovaries.

    PubMed

    Rao, C V; Mitra, S; Sanfilippo, J; Carman, F R

    1981-03-15

    The nuclei (N), plasma membranes (PM), mitochondria-lysosomes, rough endoplasmic reticulum, and combined (light, medium, and heavy) Golgi (G) fractions were isolated from human ovaries. The purities of these fractions were evaluated by assays of appropriate marker enzymes, which revealed that some fractions were very pure but that others had minor contamination. When tested, all of the fractions exhibited 125I-labeled human chorionic gonadotropin (125I-hCG)-specific binding. This intracellular 125I-hCG binding was not due to PM contamination because: (1) N, which had no detectable 5'-nucleotidase (5'-NE) activity, a marker for PM, exhibited 125I-hCG-specific binding; (2) the G, which had only a fraction of the 5'-NE activity of PM, exhibited as much binding as PM; and (3) the ratios between specific 125I-hCG binding and 5'-NE activity in other fractions were not the same as for PM. They should have been the same if PM contamination was responsible for the 125I-hCG binding observed in other organelles. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that gonadotropin-binding sites are present in various intracellular organelles as well as in PM of human ovaries.

  2. Skin-stringer panel normal mode response experimental data and finite element computer program documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudder, F. F., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    Detailed information is presented for the analytical and the experimental programs described in the report on Effects of Design Details on Structural Response to Acoustic Excitation, NASA CR-1959. This is a supplement to the basic report and detailed experimental data from all the specimens described in that report are discussed and presented in tabular form.

  3. Ovarian response in consecutive cycles of ovarian stimulation in normally ovulating women.

    PubMed

    Ahmed Ebbiary, N A; Morgan, C; Martin, K; Afnan, M; Newton, J R

    1995-03-01

    Ovarian stimulation combined with intra-uterine insemination (IUI) is an effective treatment of non-tubal infertility but most women undergo several cycles of treatment to achieve a pregnancy. This prospective study was designed to assess the consistency (or variation) of ovarian responses and the effect of various ovarian stimulation protocols on this consistency in consecutive cycles of ovarian stimulation and IUI in women with non-ovulatory infertility. A total of 86 regularly menstruating ovulating patients each completed three to six cycles of ovarian stimulation and IUI (n = 347 cycles). Ovarian stimulation was achieved by sequential clomiphene citrate/human menopausal gonadotrophin (HMG), HMG-only or combined gonadotrophin-releasing hormone analogue--HMG protocols in 33, 29 and 24 patients respectively, and each patient used the same protocol consistently throughout the study. Standard methods were used to monitor ovarian response and to perform IUI. Using each patient as her own control, repeated measurements analysis of variance revealed consistency of ovarian response in consecutive ovarian stimulation cycles, as shown by the number and mean diameter of maturing pre-ovulatory follicles, peak plasma oestradiol, duration of stimulation and mean HMG requirements. This consistency existed using any of the ovarian stimulation protocols. We conclude that regularly menstruating and ovulating women are likely to have similar ovarian responses in consecutive cycles of ovarian stimulation and IUI if the same ovarian stimulation protocol is used consistently.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. "Good" Students and "Involved" Mothers: Latin@ Responses to Normalization Pressures in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuero, Kimberley Kennedy; Valdez, Veronica E.

    2012-01-01

    Drawing from two in-depth qualitative studies, we used a sociocultural lens for a cross-case analysis examining how Latin@s' participation in schools is affected by ideological messages that subordinately position them in terms of their ethnicity, class, and immigrant status. We identified a range of dynamic responses to the school's normalization…

  5. Immunity to Brugia pahangi in athymic nude and normal mice: eosinophilia, antibody and hypersensitivity responses.

    PubMed

    Vickery, A C; Vincent, A L

    1984-11-01

    Congenitally athymic nude (nu/nu) mice, immunologically reconstituted by thymus grafting before inoculation with infective larvae, and mice heterozygous for the nu gene (nu/+), mounted potent protective humoral and cellular immune responses to Brugia pahangi. Although responses were not identical, both groups of mice produced IgM, IgG and IgE antibodies specific for adult worm antigen (S-Ag) present in a crude aqueous extract, made immediate and delayed hypersensitivity footpad swelling responses when challenged with S-Ag and eliminated their infection in the early larval stages. Heterozygotes also exhibited a marked eosinophilia which peaked coincident with larval killing. In contrast, thymus grafting of patent nudes had no effect upon microfilaraemias or adult worm burdens and did not completely protect against a challenge larval inoculum although antibodies specific for S-Ag were produced. With the occasional exceptions of moderate immediate footpad swelling and very low titres of IgM specific for S-Ag, no specific immune responses to B. pahangi were found in ungrafted nude mice which allowed full development of adult worms and supported patent infections.

  6. Modulation of rat testes lipid composition by hormones: Effect of PRL (prolactin) and hCG (human chorionic gonadotropin)

    SciTech Connect

    Sebokova, E.; Wierzbicki, A.; Clandinin, M.T. )

    1988-10-01

    The effect of prolactin (PRL) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) administration for 7 days on the composition and function of rat testicular plasma membrane was investigated. Refractory state in Leydig cells desensitized by hCG decreased the binding capacity for {sup 125}I-labeled hCG and also luteinizing hormone (LH)-induced adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) and testosterone production. In testicular membranes of hCG-treated animals, a depletion of cholesterol and an increase in total phospholipid content was observed after gonadotropin injection, thereby decreasing the cholesterol-to-phospholipid ratio. Injection of high doses of PRL had no effect on the binding capacity or affinity of the LH-hCG receptor but decreased the response of Leydig cells to LH in terms of cAMP and testosterone synthesis. PRL also increased total and esterified cholesterol and decreased free cholesterol and membrane phospholipid content. The fatty acid composition of testicular lipids was significantly and selectively influenced by both hormonal treatments. These observations suggest that metabolism of cholesterol and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in testicular tissue is affected by chorionic gonadotropin and PRL and may provide the mechanism for regulating steroidogenic functions.

  7. Effect of feed restriction during calfhood on serum concentrations of metabolic hormones, gonadotropins, testosterone, and on sexual development in bulls.

    PubMed

    Brito, L F C; Barth, A D; Rawlings, N C; Wilde, R E; Crews, D H; Boisclair, Y R; Ehrhardt, R A; Kastelic, J P

    2007-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects offeed restriction during calfhood on serum concentrations of metabolic hormones, gonadotropins, and testosterone, and on sexual development in bulls. Eight beef bull calves received a control diet from 10 to 70 weeks of age. An additional 16 calves had restricted feed (75% of control) from 10 to 26 weeks of age (calfhood), followed by either control or high nutrition (n=8/group) during the peripubertal period until 70 weeks of age. Restricted feed during calfhood inhibited the hypothalamic GnRH pulse generator, reduced the pituitary response to GnRH, impaired testicular steroidogenesis, delayed puberty, and reduced testicular weight at 70 weeks of age, regardless of the nutrition during the peripubertal period. Restricted feed reduced serum IGF-I concentrations, but concentrations of leptin, insulin, and GH were not affected. In conclusion, restricted feed during calfhood impaired sexual development in bulls due to adverse effects on every level of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonad axis and these effects were not overcome by supplemental feeding during the peripubertal period. Furthermore, based on temporal associations, the effects of restricted feed on the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonad axis might be mediated by serum IGF-I concentrations. These results supported the hypotheses that the pattern of LH secretion during the early gonadotropin rise during calfhood is the main determinant of age of puberty in bulls and that gonadotropin-independent mechanisms involved in testicular growth during the peripubertal period are affected by previous LH exposure.

  8. The cutaneous vasoconstrictor response to venous stasis is normal in subjects with primary Raynaud's disease.

    PubMed

    Edwards, C M; Marshall, J M; Pugh, M

    1999-10-01

    In control subjects and in subjects with primary Raynaud's disease, sudden sound or a mild cool stimulus evokes the pattern of alerting response that includes cutaneous vasoconstriction but vasodilatation in forearm muscle. In control subjects, response habituates on repetition of these stimuli both within experimental sessions and over successive days. However, in subjects with primary Raynaud's disease, the cutaneous vasoconstriction and the muscle vasodilatation persist. We have now tested whether a similar disparity exists for the cutaneous vasoconstriction evoked by venous stasis, a response considered to be a veno-arteriolar reflex mediated by sympathetic fibers, but not requiring transmission through the spinal cord. In 10 subjects with primary Raynaud's disease and in 10 matched controls, a sphygmomanometer cuff on the left arm was inflated to 40 mm Hg for 2 minutes, five times on each of three experimental sessions on days 1, 3, and 5. Cutaneous red cell flux (RCF) was recorded from the pulp and dorsum of the left index finger by using a laser Doppler meter; digital vascular conductance (DCVC) was computed as RCF divided by arterial pressure. The first venous stasis, in session 1, evoked a decrease in pulp and dorsum DCVC in the control and primary Raynaud's subjects. There were no differences between the groups in the magnitudes or durations of these responses. Within session 1, the magnitude of the decrease in DCVC diminished on repetition of venous stasis in the dorsum in controls and in the pulp in primary Raynaud's subjects. We propose these effects reflected the similar reductions in baseline DCVC over time; there was no change in the duration of the responses. Repetition of venous stasis had similar effects in both groups of subjects within sessions 2 and 3. Further, judging from the mean of the responses evoked in each Session the decreases evoked in pulp and dorsum DCVC by venous stasis were fully consistent in magnitude and duration over the

  9. Hypovolemia Induced Orthostatic Hypotension in Presyncopal Astronauts and Normal Subjects Related to Hypoadrenergic Responsiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meck, Janice V.; Platts, Steven H.; Waters, Wendy W.; Shi, Shang-Jin; Hayashi, Yuho; Perez, Sondra A.; Ziegler, Michael G.

    2006-01-01

    Circulating blood volume is reduced during spaceflight, making astronauts hemodynamically compromised. After landing, astronauts separate into two groups. One group compensates for the hypovolemia with a hyper-sympathetic response during upright tilt testing and can complete a tilt test with few symptoms. The other group is unable to mount a hyper-sympathetic response and experiences orthostatic hypotension and presyncope during upright tilt tests. We tested the hypothesis that hypovolemia alone, in the absence of spaceflight, also would cause subjects to separate into presyncopal and non-presyncopal groups according to their sympathetic responses during tilt. We studied 20 subjects, including 10 veteran astronauts, on three occasions. On Days 1 (normovolemia) and 3 (hypovolemia), plasma volume, tilt tolerance and supine and standing plasma norepinephrine levels were measured. Forty hours prior to Day 3, subjects were given intravenous furosemide, followed by 36 hours of a 10MEq Na diet. Statistical comparisons were made between normovolemia and hypovolemia responses. This protocol reproduced landing day tilt test outcomes with 100% fidelity in the astronauts. Similarly to patterns reported after flight, non-presyncopal subjects had greater norepinephrine responses to tilt during hypovolemia compared to normovolemia (580 plus or minus 79 vs. 298 plus or minus 37 pg/ml, P less than 0.05), but presyncopal subjects had no increase (180 plus or minus 44 vs. 145 plus or minus 32 pg/ml, P=NS). This model can be used to predict astronauts who will become presyncopal on landing day, so that prospective, individualized countermeasures can be developed. Within patient populations, it can be used to study the interaction of volemic state and the sympathetic nervous system.

  10. Strategies for optimizing the response of cancer and normal tissues to radiation

    PubMed Central

    Moding, Everett J.; Kastan, Michael B.; Kirsch, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 50% of all patients with cancer receive radiation therapy at some point during the course of their treatment, and the majority of these patients are treated with curative intent. Despite recent advances in the planning of radiation treatment and the delivery of image-guided radiation therapy, acute toxicity and potential long-term side effects often limit the ability to deliver a sufficient dose of radiation to control tumours locally. In the past two decades, a better understanding of the hallmarks of cancer and the discovery of specific signalling pathways by which cells respond to radiation have provided new opportunities to design molecularly targeted therapies to increase the therapeutic window of radiation therapy. Here, we review efforts to develop approaches that could improve outcomes with radiation therapy by increasing the probability of tumour cure or by decreasing normal tissue toxicity. PMID:23812271

  11. Oxygen saturation response to exercise in healthy pregnant women: a simple protocol and normal range

    PubMed Central

    Langford, Edward; Khwanda, Ahmad; Langford, Kate

    2010-01-01

    Measurement of oxygen saturation on excercise, using a pulse oximeter, has been advocated in the assessment of women with shortness of breath in pregnancy. However, there is currently no standard protocol for this. The aims of this study were to determine the normal range for oxygen saturation at rest and on moderate exercise in healthy women from 24 weeks gestation and to evaluate a simple, widely applicable exercise protocol in which women walked at their own pace for 100 metres then up two flights of stairs. The protocol achieved 60–85% maximum predicted heart rate in 99% of women at a median gestation of 31+3 weeks, with a wide range of Hb and BMI. There was a mean 0.3% fall in oxygen saturation on exertion but oxygen saturation did not fall below 95% in any of the women. PMID:27582845

  12. Photodynamic therapy in prostate cancer: optical dosimetry and response of normal tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qun; Shetty, Sugandh D.; Heads, Larry; Bolin, Frank; Wilson, Brian C.; Patterson, Michael S.; Sirls, Larry T., II; Schultz, Daniel; Cerny, Joseph C.; Hetzel, Fred W.

    1993-06-01

    The present study explores the possibility of utilizing photodynamic therapy (PDT) in treating localized prostate carcinoma. Optical properties of ex vivo human prostatectomy specimens, and in vivo and ex vivo dog prostate glands were studied. The size of the PDT induced lesion in dog prostate was pathologically evaluated as a biological endpoint. The data indicate that the human normal and carcinoma prostate tissues have similar optical properties. The average effective attenuation depth is less in vivo than that of ex vivo. The PDT treatment generated a lesion size of up to 16 mm in diameter. The data suggest that PDT is a promising modality in prostate cancer treatment. Multiple fiber system may be required for clinical treatment.

  13. Quadruple Injection of Hypothalamic Peptides to Evaluate Pituitary Function in Normal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenborn, K. C.; Jubiz, William

    1985-01-01

    A single intravenous injection of four hypothalamic releasing hormones—corticotropin-, growth hormone-, gonadotropin- and thyrotropin-releasing hormones—was administered to normal subjects. Except for the plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) level, a statistically significant increase in all anterior pituitary hormone levels occurred. Transient flushing was the only consistent side effect. In the same persons, results were compared with those obtained with insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a single-dose overnight metyrapone test. Growth hormone and cortisol responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia were similar but prolactin increment was less than that obtained by the peptide injection. ACTH increments from both tests were substantially less than those obtained by the overnight metyrapone test. We conclude that pituitary function can be effectively studied in normal subjects by the combination of a metyrapone test with a triple bolus of growth hormone-, thytropin- and gonadotropin-releasing hormones, but not by a quadruple bolus of the hypothalamic peptides. Compared with insulin-induced hypoglycemia, this approach yields more information with fewer side effects. PMID:3919507

  14. Quadruple injection of hypothalamic peptides to evaluate pituitary function in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Kaltenborn, K C; Jubiz, W

    1985-01-01

    A single intravenous injection of four hypothalamic releasing hormones-corticotropin-, growth hormone-, gonadotropin- and thyrotropin-releasing hormones-was administered to normal subjects. Except for the plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) level, a statistically significant increase in all anterior pituitary hormone levels occurred. Transient flushing was the only consistent side effect. In the same persons, results were compared with those obtained with insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a single-dose overnight metyrapone test. Growth hormone and cortisol responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia were similar but prolactin increment was less than that obtained by the peptide injection. ACTH increments from both tests were substantially less than those obtained by the overnight metyrapone test. We conclude that pituitary function can be effectively studied in normal subjects by the combination of a metyrapone test with a triple bolus of growth hormone-, thytropin- and gonadotropin-releasing hormones, but not by a quadruple bolus of the hypothalamic peptides. Compared with insulin-induced hypoglycemia, this approach yields more information with fewer side effects.

  15. Cytidine deaminase polymorphisms and worse treatment response in normal karyotype AML.

    PubMed

    Hyo Kim, Lyoung; Sub Cheong, Hyun; Koh, Youngil; Ahn, Kwang-Sung; Lee, Chansu; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Doo Shin, Hyoung; Yoon, Sung-Soo

    2015-12-01

    The cytidine deaminase (CDA) catalyzes the irreversible hydrolytic deamination of the cytarabine (AraC) into a 1-β-D-arabinofuranosyluracil (AraU), an inactive metabolite that plays a crucial role in lowering the amount of AraC, a key chemotherapeutic drug, in the treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this study, we hypothesized that CDA polymorphisms were associated with the AraC metabolism for AML treatment and/or related clinical phenotypes. We analyzed 16 polymorphisms of CDA among 50 normal karyotype AML (NK-AML) patients, 45 abnormal karyotype AML (AK-AML) patients and 241 normal controls (NC). Several polymorphisms and haplotypes, rs532545, rs2072671, rs471760, rs4655226, rs818194 and CDA-ht3, were found to have a strong correlation with NK-AML compared with NC and these polymorphisms also revealed strong linkage disequilibrium with each other. Among them, rs2072671 (79A>C), which is located in a coding region and the resultant amino acid change K27Q, showed significant associations with NK-AML compared with NC (P=0.009 and odds ratio=2.44 in the dominant model). The AC and CC genotypes of rs2072671 (79A>C) were significantly correlated with shorter overall survival rates (P=0.03, hazard ratio=1.84) and first complete remission duration (P=0.007, hazard ratio=3.24) compared with the AA genotype in the NK-AML patients. Our results indicate that rs2072671 in CDA may be an important prognostic marker in NK-AML patients.

  16. Pretreatment of normal responders in fresh in vitro fertilization cycles: A comparison of transdermal estradiol and oral contraceptive pills

    PubMed Central

    Petrini, Allison C.; Zhou, Zhen N.; Lekovich, Jovana P.; Kligman, Isaac; Rosenwaks, Zev

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of pretreatment with transdermal estradiol (E2) compared to oral contraceptive pills (OCPs) on controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) response in normal responders undergoing fresh in vitro fertilization (IVF)-embryo transfer (ET) cycles. Methods A retrospective cohort study was performed of normal responders undergoing fresh IVF-ET cycles who received pretreatment with transdermal E2 versus OCPs prior to fresh IVF-ET. The total days of ovarian stimulation, total dosage of gonadotropins, total number of oocytes, and mature oocytes retrieved were noted. Pregnancy outcomes after ET were also recorded. Results A total of 2,092 patients met the inclusion criteria: 1,057 and 1,035 patients in the transdermal E2 and OCP groups, respectively. Patients in the OCP group had a longer duration of COS (10.7±1.63 days, p<0.01) than the E2 group (9.92±1.94 days). Patients in the OCP group also required higher cumulative doses of gonadotropins (2,657.3±1,187.9 IU) than those in the E2 group (2,550.1±1,270.2 IU, p=0.002). No statistically significant differences were found in the total and mature oocytes retrieved or in the rates of biochemical pregnancy, clinical pregnancy, spontaneous miscarriage, and live birth between the groups. Conclusion Our findings suggest that compared to OCPs, pretreatment with transdermal E2 is associated with a shorter duration of ovarian stimulation and lower gonadotropin utilization, without compromising the oocyte yield or pregnancy outcomes in normal-responder patients undergoing fresh IVF. PMID:28090462

  17. Pretreatment of normal responders in fresh in vitro fertilization cycles: A comparison of transdermal estradiol and oral contraceptive pills.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Nigel; Petrini, Allison C; Zhou, Zhen N; Lekovich, Jovana P; Kligman, Isaac; Rosenwaks, Zev

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of pretreatment with transdermal estradiol (E2) compared to oral contraceptive pills (OCPs) on controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) response in normal responders undergoing fresh in vitro fertilization (IVF)-embryo transfer (ET) cycles. A retrospective cohort study was performed of normal responders undergoing fresh IVF-ET cycles who received pretreatment with transdermal E2 versus OCPs prior to fresh IVF-ET. The total days of ovarian stimulation, total dosage of gonadotropins, total number of oocytes, and mature oocytes retrieved were noted. Pregnancy outcomes after ET were also recorded. A total of 2,092 patients met the inclusion criteria: 1,057 and 1,035 patients in the transdermal E2 and OCP groups, respectively. Patients in the OCP group had a longer duration of COS (10.7±1.63 days, p<0.01) than the E2 group (9.92±1.94 days). Patients in the OCP group also required higher cumulative doses of gonadotropins (2,657.3±1,187.9 IU) than those in the E2 group (2,550.1±1,270.2 IU, p=0.002). No statistically significant differences were found in the total and mature oocytes retrieved or in the rates of biochemical pregnancy, clinical pregnancy, spontaneous miscarriage, and live birth between the groups. Our findings suggest that compared to OCPs, pretreatment with transdermal E2 is associated with a shorter duration of ovarian stimulation and lower gonadotropin utilization, without compromising the oocyte yield or pregnancy outcomes in normal-responder patients undergoing fresh IVF.

  18. Task-evoked BOLD responses are normal in areas of diaschisis after stroke.

    PubMed

    Fair, Damien A; Snyder, Abraham Z; Connor, Lisa Tabor; Nardos, Binyam; Corbetta, Maurizio

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral infarction can cause diaschisis, a reduction of blood flow and metabolism in areas of the cortex distant from the site of the lesion. Although the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal is increasingly used to examine the neural correlates of recovery in stroke, its reliability in areas of diaschisis is uncertain. The effect of chronic diaschisis as measured by resting positron emission tomography on task-evoked BOLD responses during word-stem completion in a block design fMRI study was examined in 3 patients, 6 months after a single left hemisphere stroke involving the inferior frontal gyrus and operculum. The BOLD responses were minimally affected in areas of chronic diaschisis. Within the confines of this study, the mechanism underlying the BOLD signal, which includes a mismatch between neuronally driven increases in blood flow and a corresponding increase in oxygen use, appears to be intact in areas of chronic diaschisis.

  19. Dynamic responses of a semi-type offshore floating wind turbine during normal state and emergency shutdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhi-qiang; Li, Liang; Wang, Jin; Hu, Qiu-hao; Shen, Ma-cheng

    2016-03-01

    This paper addresses joint wind-wave induced dynamic responses of a semi-type offshore floating wind turbine (OFWT) under normal states and fault event conditions. The analysis in this paper is conducted in time domain, using an aero-hydro-servo-elastic simulation code-FAST. Owing to the unique viscous features of the reference system, the original viscous damping model implemented in FAST is replaced with a quadratic one to gain an accurate capture of viscous effects. Simulation cases involve free-decay motion in still water, steady motions in the presence of regular waves and wind as well as dynamic response in operational sea states with and without wind. Simulations also include the cases for transient responses induced by fast blade pitching after emergency shutdown. The features of platform motions, local structural loads and a typical mooring line tension force under a variety of excitations are obtained and investigated.

  20. Pial artery and subarachnoid width response to apnoea in normal humans.

    PubMed

    Wszedybyl-Winklewska, Magdalena; Wolf, Jacek; Swierblewska, Ewa; Kunicka, Katarzyna; Gruszecki, Marcin; Guminski, Wojciech; Winklewski, Pawel J; Frydrychowski, Andrzej F; Bieniaszewski, Leszek; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof

    2015-09-01

    Little is known about intracranial pressure (ICP)-cerebral haemodynamic interplay during repetitive apnoea. A recently developed method based on near-infrared transillumination/backscattering sounding (NIR-T/BSS) noninvasively measures changes in pial artery pulsation (cc-TQ) as well as subarachnoid width (sas-TQ) in humans. We tested the complex response of the pial artery and subarachnoid width to apnoea using this method. The pial artery and subarachnoid width response to consecutive apnoeas lasting 30, 60 s and maximal breath-hold (91.1 ± 23.1 s) were studied in 20 healthy volunteers. The cc-TQ and sas-TQ were measured using NIR-T/BSS; cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV), pulsatility index and resistive index were measured using Doppler ultrasound of the left internal carotid artery; heart rate (HR) and beat-to-beat SBP and DBP blood pressure were recorded using a Finometer; end-tidal CO2 (EtCO2) was measured using a medical gas analyser. Apnoea evoked a multiphasic response in blood pressure, pial artery compliance and ICP. First, SBP declined, which was accompanied by an increase in cc-TQ and sas-TQ. Directly after these changes, SBP exceeded baseline values, which was followed by a decline in cc-TQ and the return of sas-TQ to baseline. During these initial changes, CBFV remained stable. Towards the end of the apnoea, BP, cc-TQ and CBFV increased, whereas pulsatility index, resistive index and sas-TQ declined. Changes in sas-TQ were linked to changes in EtCO2, HR and SBP. Apnoea is associated with ICP swings, closely reflecting changes in EtCO2, HR and peripheral BP. The baroreflex influences the pial artery response.

  1. Normal values of esophageal pressure responses to a rapid drink challenge test in healthy subjects: results of a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Marin, I; Cisternas, D; Abrao, L; Lemme, E; Bilder, C; Ditaranto, A; Coello, R; Hani, A; Leguizamo, A M; Meixueiro, A; Remes-Troche, J; Zavala, M A; Ruiz de León, A; Perez de la Serna, J; Valdovinos, M A; Serra, J

    2017-06-01

    Multiple water swallow is increasingly used as a complementary challenge test in patients undergoing high-resolution manometry (HRM). Our aim was to establish the range of normal pressure responses during the rapid drink challenge test in a large population of healthy subjects. Pressure responses to a rapid drink challenge test (100 or 200 mL of water) were prospectively analyzed in 105 healthy subjects studied in nine different hospitals from different countries. Esophageal motility was assessed in all subjects by solid-state HRM. In 18 subjects, bolus transit was analyzed using concomitant intraluminal impedance monitoring. A virtually complete inhibition of pressure activity was observed during multiple swallow: Esophageal body pressure was above 20 mm Hg during 1 (0-8) % and above 30 mm Hg during 1 (0-5) % of the swallow period, and the pressure gradient across the esophagogastric junction was low (-1 (-7 to 4) mm Hg). At the end of multiple swallow, a postswallow contraction was evidenced in only 50% of subjects, whereas the remaining 50% had non-transmitted contractions. Bolus clearance was completed after 7 (1-30) s after the last swallow, as evidenced by multichannel intraluminal impedance. The range of normal pressure responses to a rapid drink challenge test in health has been established in a large multicenter study. Main responses are a virtually complete inhibition of esophageal pressures with a low-pressure gradient across esophagogastric junction. This data would allow the correct differentiation between normal and disease when using this test. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Role of vascular density and normalization in response to neoadjuvant bevacizumab and chemotherapy in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Tolaney, Sara M.; Boucher, Yves; Duda, Dan G.; Martin, John D.; Seano, Giorgio; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Barry, William T.; Goel, Shom; Lahdenrata, Johanna; Isakoff, Steven J.; Yeh, Eren D.; Jain, Saloni R.; Golshan, Mehra; Brock, Jane; Snuderl, Matija; Winer, Eric P.; Krop, Ian E.; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2015-01-01

    Preoperative bevacizumab and chemotherapy may benefit a subset of breast cancer (BC) patients. To explore potential mechanisms of this benefit, we conducted a phase II study of neoadjuvant bevacizumab (single dose) followed by combined bevacizumab and adriamycin/cyclophosphamide/paclitaxel chemotherapy in HER2-negative BC. The regimen was well-tolerated and showed a higher rate of pathologic complete response (pCR) in triple-negative (TN)BC (11/21 patients or 52%, [95% confidence interval (CI): 30,74]) than in hormone receptor-positive (HR)BC [5/78 patients or 6% (95%CI: 2,14)]. Within the HRBCs, basal-like subtype was significantly associated with pCR (P = 0.007; Fisher exact test). We assessed interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) and tissue biopsies before and after bevacizumab monotherapy and circulating plasma biomarkers at baseline and before and after combination therapy. Bevacizumab alone lowered IFP, but to a smaller extent than previously observed in other tumor types. Pathologic response to therapy correlated with sVEGFR1 postbevacizumab alone in TNBC (Spearman correlation 0.610, P = 0.0033) and pretreatment microvascular density (MVD) in all patients (Spearman correlation 0.465, P = 0.0005). Moreover, increased pericyte-covered MVD, a marker of extent of vascular normalization, after bevacizumab monotherapy was associated with improved pathologic response to treatment, especially in patients with a high pretreatment MVD. These data suggest that bevacizumab prunes vessels while normalizing those remaining, and thus is beneficial only when sufficient numbers of vessels are initially present. This study implicates pretreatment MVD as a potential predictive biomarker of response to bevacizumab in BC and suggests that new therapies are needed to normalize vessels without pruning. PMID:26578779

  3. Variable coronary vasomotor responses to acetylcholine in patients with normal coronary arteriograms: evidence for localised endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed Central

    Tousoulis, D.; Davies, G.; Lefroy, D. C.; Haider, A. W.; Crake, T.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The vasomotor responses of the epicardial coronary arteries to acetylcholine were examined in patients with normal coronary arteries and chest pain. DESIGN: Quantitative angiography was used to measure minimum lumen diameter of proximal and distal coronary artery segments at baseline, during intracoronary infusion of acetylcholine (10(-7) - 10(-3) mol/l), and following an intracoronary bolus (2 mg) of isosorbide dinitrate. PATIENTS: Coronary arteriograms were obtained in 15 patients (mean (SEM) age 48 (10) years) with normal coronary arteries and chest pain. MAIN RESULTS: In response to the low concentrations of acetylcholine (10(-7) - 10(-6) mol/1) 20 (61%) distal and 11 (41%) proximal segments showed dilatation (group 1), whereas 13 (39%) distal segments and 14 (52%) proximal segments showed constriction (group 2) (P < 0.05 v group 1). In group 1, the maximum dilatation induced by acetylcholine in the proximal and distal segments was 7.83 (1.19)% and 11.6 (2.2)% respectively. In group 2, the maximum constriction at higher concentration was 16.55 (3.3)% and 33.11 (11.63)% in the proximal and distal segments respectively. The two different patterns of the vasomotor response coexisted in eight (53%) of the 15 patients. Intracoronary isosorbide dinitrate caused a greater increase in the coronary luminal diameter of distal segments than in proximal segments in group 1 (25.63 (5.16)% v 12.43 (3.48)%, P < 0.01) but not in group 2 (12.65 (2.53)% v 10.82 (3.33)%. CONCLUSIONS: Constriction and dilatation may occur in proximal and distal coronary artery segments, suggesting local areas of endothelial dysfunction, in response to acetylcholine in patients with chest pain and angiographically normal coronary arteries. Images PMID:8800989

  4. Estimation of low-dose radiation-responsive proteins in the absence of genomic instability in normal human fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Yim, Ji-Hye; Yun, Jung Mi; Kim, Ji Young; Nam, Seon Young; Kim, Cha Soon

    2017-07-25

    Low-dose radiation has various biological effects such as adaptive responses, low-dose hypersensitivity, as well as beneficial effects. However, little is known about the particular proteins involved in these effects. Here, we sought to identify low-dose radiation-responsive phosphoproteins in normal fibroblast cells. We assessed genomic instability and proliferation of fibroblast cells after γ-irradiation by γ-H2AX foci and micronucleus formation analyses and BrdU incorporation assay, respectively. We screened fibroblast cells 8 h after low-dose (0.05 Gy) γ-irradiation using Phospho Explorer Antibody Microarray and validated two differentially expressed phosphoproteins using Western blotting. Cell proliferation proceeded normally in the absence of genomic instability after low-dose γ-irradiation. Phospho antibody microarray analysis and Western blotting revealed increased expression of two phosphoproteins, phospho-NFκB (Ser536) and phospho-P70S6K (Ser418), 8 h after low-dose radiation. Our findings suggest that low-dose radiation of normal fibroblast cells activates the expression of phospho-NFκB (Ser536) and phospho-P70S6K (Ser418) in the absence of genomic instability. Therefore, these proteins may be involved in DNA damage repair processes.

  5. An association between post-meal bile acid response and bone resorption in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Ewang-Emukowhate, M; Alaghband-Zadeh, J; Vincent, R P; Sherwood, R A; Moniz, C F

    2013-11-01

    The mechanism surrounding bone suppression after a meal may involve several mediators, but is yet to be clarified. Bile acids (BA) function as signalling molecules in response to feeding, and may be directly involved in bone suppression acutely after a meal. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that BA are involved in the acute bone suppression observed after a meal. A prospective study in which samples collected from volunteers fed a 400 Kcal test meal after an overnight fast were analysed for parathyroid hormone (PTH), BA, and carboxyterminal of type 1 collagen telopeptide (CTX). The study was carried out in 10 healthy male volunteers. Ethical approval was obtained from the Local Research and Ethics Committee at King's College Hospital. Total BA, glycine conjugated bile acids (GCBA), PTH and CTX showed a response to meal ingestion. There was a negative correlation between percentage change in PTH and CTX (R (2 )= -0.82, P = 0.004), and between PTH and GCBA (R (2 )= -0.39, P = 0.005). This study demonstrated an association between GCBA and PTH suppression after a meal. The drop in PTH concentration after a meal may be responsible for the suppression of bone resorption as observed by the decrease in CTX concentration.

  6. Responses of the trunk to multidirectional perturbations during unsupported sitting in normal adults.

    PubMed

    Thrasher, T Adam; Sin, Vivian W; Masani, Kei; Vette, Albert H; Craven, B Cathy; Popovic, Milos R

    2010-08-01

    Understanding how the human body responds to unexpected force perturbations during quiet sitting is important to the science of motor behavior and the design of neuroprostheses for sitting posture. In this study, the performance characteristics of the neck and trunk in healthy individuals were assessed by measuring the kinematic responses to sudden, unexpected force perturbations applied to the thorax. Perturbations were applied in eight horizontal directions. It was hypothesized that displacement of the trunk, settling time and steady-state error would increase when the perturbation direction was diagonal (i.e., anterior-lateral or posterior-lateral) due to the increased complexity of asymmetrical muscle responses. Perturbation forces were applied manually. The neck and trunk responded in a synchronized manner in which all joints achieved peak displacement simultaneously then returned directly to equilibrium. Displacement in the direction of perturbation and perpendicular to the direction of perturbation were both significantly greater in response to diagonal perturbations (p<.001). The center of mass returned to equilibrium in 3.64±1.42 s after the onset of perturbation. Our results suggest that the trunk sometimes behaves like an underdamped oscillator and is not controlled by simple stiffness when subjected to loads of approximately 200 N. The results of this study are intended to be used to develop a neuroprosthesis for artificial control of trunk stability in individuals with spinal cord injury.

  7. Normal Liver Tissue Density Dose Response in Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, Christopher C.; Stinauer, Michelle A.; Diot, Quentin; Westerly, David C.; Schefter, Tracey E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Miften, Moyed

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the temporal dose response of normal liver tissue for patients with liver metastases treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Ninety-nine noncontrast follow-up computed tomography (CT) scans of 34 patients who received SBRT between 2004 and 2011 were retrospectively analyzed at a median of 8 months post-SBRT (range, 0.7-36 months). SBRT-induced normal liver tissue density changes in follow-up CT scans were evaluated at 2, 6, 10, 15, and 27 months. The dose distributions from planning CTs were mapped to follow-up CTs to relate the mean Hounsfield unit change ({Delta}HU) to dose received over the range 0-55 Gy in 3-5 fractions. An absolute density change of 7 HU was considered a significant radiographic change in normal liver tissue. Results: Increasing radiation dose was linearly correlated with lower post-SBRT liver tissue density (slope, -0.65 {Delta}HU/5 Gy). The threshold for significant change (-7 {Delta}HU) was observed in the range of 30-35 Gy. This effect did not vary significantly over the time intervals evaluated. Conclusions: SBRT induces a dose-dependent and relatively time-independent hypodense radiation reaction within normal liver tissue that is characterized by a decrease of >7 HU in liver density for doses >30-35 Gy.

  8. Haploid parthenotes express differential response to in vitro exposure of ammonia compared to normally fertilized embryos.

    PubMed

    Nair, Ramya; Mutalik, Srinivas; Dasappa, Jagadeesh Prasad; Kalthur, Guruprasad; Adiga, Satish Kumar

    2017-04-22

    In the present study, we assessed whether absence of paternal genome imparts any differential response in embryos to chemical stress such as ammonia. Parthenogenesis was induced in MII stage oocytes using 10 mM SrCl2 in M16 medium. Parthenotes and normally fertilized embryos at 2 cell stage were exposed to different concentrations of ammonia and cultured till blastocyst. Exposure of ammonia to normally fertilized embryos resulted in significant decrease in the developmental potential (p < 0.0001) and blastocyst quality (p < 0.001). Whereas, in parthenotes, even though lower concentrations of ammonia did not have any effect, at 200 μM concentration the blastocyst rate was two times higher than control. The baseline apoptotic index was higher in parthenotes compared to normally fertilized embryos, which further increased after ammonium exposure (p < 0.001). Unlike in normally fertilized embryos ammonia exposure altered the mitochondrial distribution pattern and lead to increased expression of Oct4, Nanog and Na(+)/K(+) ion exchange channel, while the cytochrome C expression was downregulated. This indicates that haploidy and/or absence of paternal factors in the embryo results in differential tolerance to stress induced by ammonia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Horizontal vestibuloocular reflex evoked by high-acceleration rotations in the squirrel monkey. I. Normal responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minor, L. B.; Lasker, D. M.; Backous, D. D.; Hullar, T. E.; Shelhamer, M. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The horizontal angular vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) evoked by high-frequency, high-acceleration rotations was studied in five squirrel monkeys with intact vestibular function. The VOR evoked by steps of acceleration in darkness (3,000 degrees /s(2) reaching a velocity of 150 degrees /s) began after a latency of 7.3 +/- 1.5 ms (mean +/- SD). Gain of the reflex during the acceleration was 14.2 +/- 5.2% greater than that measured once the plateau head velocity had been reached. A polynomial regression was used to analyze the trajectory of the responses to steps of acceleration. A better representation of the data was obtained from a polynomial that included a cubic term in contrast to an exclusively linear fit. For sinusoidal rotations of 0.5-15 Hz with a peak velocity of 20 degrees /s, the VOR gain measured 0.83 +/- 0.06 and did not vary across frequencies or animals. The phase of these responses was close to compensatory except at 15 Hz where a lag of 5.0 +/- 0.9 degrees was noted. The VOR gain did not vary with head velocity at 0.5 Hz but increased with velocity for rotations at frequencies of >/=4 Hz (0. 85 +/- 0.04 at 4 Hz, 20 degrees /s; 1.01 +/- 0.05 at 100 degrees /s, P < 0.0001). No responses to these rotations were noted in two animals that had undergone bilateral labyrinthectomy indicating that inertia of the eye had a negligible effect for these stimuli. We developed a mathematical model of VOR dynamics to account for these findings. The inputs to the reflex come from linear and nonlinear pathways. The linear pathway is responsible for the constant gain across frequencies at peak head velocity of 20 degrees /s and also for the phase lag at higher frequencies being less than that expected based on the reflex delay. The frequency- and velocity-dependent nonlinearity in VOR gain is accounted for by the dynamics of the nonlinear pathway. A transfer function that increases the gain of this pathway with frequency and a term related to the third power of head

  10. Horizontal vestibuloocular reflex evoked by high-acceleration rotations in the squirrel monkey. I. Normal responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minor, L. B.; Lasker, D. M.; Backous, D. D.; Hullar, T. E.; Shelhamer, M. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The horizontal angular vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) evoked by high-frequency, high-acceleration rotations was studied in five squirrel monkeys with intact vestibular function. The VOR evoked by steps of acceleration in darkness (3,000 degrees /s(2) reaching a velocity of 150 degrees /s) began after a latency of 7.3 +/- 1.5 ms (mean +/- SD). Gain of the reflex during the acceleration was 14.2 +/- 5.2% greater than that measured once the plateau head velocity had been reached. A polynomial regression was used to analyze the trajectory of the responses to steps of acceleration. A better representation of the data was obtained from a polynomial that included a cubic term in contrast to an exclusively linear fit. For sinusoidal rotations of 0.5-15 Hz with a peak velocity of 20 degrees /s, the VOR gain measured 0.83 +/- 0.06 and did not vary across frequencies or animals. The phase of these responses was close to compensatory except at 15 Hz where a lag of 5.0 +/- 0.9 degrees was noted. The VOR gain did not vary with head velocity at 0.5 Hz but increased with velocity for rotations at frequencies of >/=4 Hz (0. 85 +/- 0.04 at 4 Hz, 20 degrees /s; 1.01 +/- 0.05 at 100 degrees /s, P < 0.0001). No responses to these rotations were noted in two animals that had undergone bilateral labyrinthectomy indicating that inertia of the eye had a negligible effect for these stimuli. We developed a mathematical model of VOR dynamics to account for these findings. The inputs to the reflex come from linear and nonlinear pathways. The linear pathway is responsible for the constant gain across frequencies at peak head velocity of 20 degrees /s and also for the phase lag at higher frequencies being less than that expected based on the reflex delay. The frequency- and velocity-dependent nonlinearity in VOR gain is accounted for by the dynamics of the nonlinear pathway. A transfer function that increases the gain of this pathway with frequency and a term related to the third power of head

  11. Hormones in Synergy: Regulation of the Pituitary Gonadotropin Genes

    PubMed Central

    Thackray, Varykina G.; Mellon, Pamela L.; Coss, Djurdjica

    2009-01-01

    The precise interplay of hormonal influences that governs gonadotropin hormone production by the pituitary includes endocrine, paracrine and autocrine actions of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), activin and steroids. However, most studies of hormonal regulation of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) in the pituitary gonadotrope have been limited to analyses of the isolated actions of individual hormones. LHβ and FSHβ subunits have distinct patterns of expression during the menstrual/estrous cycle as a result of the integration of activin, GnRH, and steroid hormone action. In this review, we focus on studies that delineate the interplay among these hormones in the regulation of LHβ and FSHβ gene expression in gonadotrope cells and discuss how signaling cross-talk contributes to differential expression. We also discuss how recent technological advances will help identify additional factors involved in the differential hormonal regulation of LH and FSH. PMID:19747958

  12. Luteinizing hormone and human chorionic gonadotropin: origins of difference.

    PubMed

    Choi, Janet; Smitz, Johan

    2014-03-05

    Luteinizing hormone (LH) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) are widely recognized for their roles in ovulation and the support of early pregnancy. Aside from the timing of expression, however, the differences between LH and hCG have largely been overlooked in the clinical realm because of their similar molecular structures and shared receptor. With technologic advancements, including the development of highly purified and recombinant gonadotropins, researchers now appreciate that these hormones are not as interchangeable as once believed. Although they bind to a common receptor, emerging evidence suggests that LH and hCG have disparate effects on downstream signaling cascades. Increased understanding of the inherent differences between LH and hCG will foster more effective diagnostic and prognostic assays for use in a variety of clinical contexts and support the individualization of treatment strategies for conditions such as infertility.

  13. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs: Understanding advantages and limitations.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pratap; Sharma, Alok

    2014-07-01

    Pituitary stimulation with pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogs induces both follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH). Pituitary gonadotropin secretions are blocked upon desensitization when a continuous GnRH stimulus is provided by means of an agonist or when the pituitary receptors are occupied with a competitive antagonist. GnRH antagonists were not available originally; therefore, prolonged daily injections of agonist with its desensitizing effect were used. Today, single- and multiple-dose injectable antagonists are also available to block the LH surge and thus to cause desensitization. This review provides an overview of the use of GnRH analogs which is potent therapeutic agents that are considerably useful in a variety of clinical indications from the past to the future with some limitations. These indications include management of endometriosis, uterine leiomyomas, hirsutism, dysfunctional uterine bleeding, premenstrual syndrome, assisted reproduction, and some hormone-dependent tumours, other than ovulation induction.

  14. Binding sites for gonadotropins in human postmenopausal ovaries

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, R.; Shima, K.; Yamoto, M.; Kobayashi, M.; Nishimori, K.; Hiraoka, J.

    1989-02-01

    The binding of human LH and human FSH to postmenopausal ovarian tissue from 21 patients with cervical carcinoma was analyzed. The binding sites for FSH and LH were demonstrated in postmenopausal ovarian tissue. The surface-binding sites for gonadotropins were localized in the cells of cortical stroma of the postmenopausal ovary. In addition, diffuse cytoplasmic staining of endogenous estrogen and 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity were detected immunohistochemically and histochemically in the cells of the cortical stroma. Electron microscopic study also suggested steroidogenic function in the cells of the cortical stroma. The results of the present study suggest that postmenopausal ovaries contain specific binding sites for pituitary gonadotropins and play a role in ovarian steroidogenesis.

  15. Evaluating the ovarian cancer gonadotropin hypothesis: A candidate gene study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Alice W.; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Stram, Douglas A.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; Myers, Emily J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Hein, Alexander; Vergote, Ignace; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Lambrechts, Diether; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Eilber, Ursula; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Odunsi, Kunle; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Goodman, Marc T.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Dörk, Thilo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Leminen, Arto; Edwards, Robert P.; Kelley, Joseph L.; Harter, Philipp; Schwaab, Ira; Heitz, Florian; du Bois, Andreas; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Walsh, Christine; Karlan, Beth Y.; Hogdall, Estrid; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Jensen, Allan; Vierkant, Robert A.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Goode, Ellen L.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Giles, Graham G.; Bruinsma, Fiona; Wu, Xifeng; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Lu, Karen; Liang, Dong; Bisogna, Maria; Levine, Douglas A.; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Iversen, Edwin S.; Berchuck, Andrew; Terry, Kathryn L.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bjorge, Line; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Krakstad, Camilla; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Aben, Katja K.H.; van Altena, Anne M.; Bean, Yukie; Pejovic, Tanja; Kellar, Melissa; Le, Nhu D.; Cook, Linda S.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Cybulski, Cezary; Jakubowska, Anna; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Yang, Hannah; Nedergaard, Lotte; Lundvall, Lene; Hogdall, Claus; Song, Honglin; Campbell, Ian G.; Eccles, Diana; Glasspool, Rosalind; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Carty, Karen; Paul, James; McNeish, Iain A.; Sieh, Weiva; McGuire, Valerie; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Whittemore, Alice S.; McLaughlin, John R.; Risch, Harvey A.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Menon, Usha; Ramus, Susan J.; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Harrington, Patricia; Pike, Malcolm C.; Modugno, Francesmary; Rossing, Mary Anne; Ness, Roberta B.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Stram, Daniel O.; Wu, Anna H.; Pearce, Celeste Leigh

    2016-01-01

    Objective Ovarian cancer is a hormone-related disease with a strong genetic basis. However, none of its high-penetrance susceptibility genes and GWAS-identified variants to date are known to be involved in hormonal pathways. Given the hypothesized etiologic role of gonadotropins, an assessment of how variability in genes involved in the gonadotropin signaling pathway impacts disease risk is warranted. Methods Genetic data from 41 ovarian cancer study sites were pooled and unconditional logistic regression was used to evaluate whether any of the 2185 SNPs from 11 gonadotropin signaling pathway genes was associated with ovarian cancer risk. A burden test using the admixture likelihood (AML) method was also used to evaluate gene-level associations. Results We did not find any genome-wide significant associations between individual SNPs and ovarian cancer risk. However, there was some suggestion of gene-level associations for four gonadotropin signaling pathway genes: INHBB (p = 0.045, mucinous), LHCGR (p = 0.046, high-grade serous), GNRH (p = 0.041, high-grade serous), and FSHB (p = 0.036, overall invasive). There was also suggestive evidence for INHA (p = 0.060, overall invasive). Conclusions Ovarian cancer studies have limited sample numbers, thus fewer genome-wide susceptibility alleles, with only modest associations, have been identified relative to breast and prostate cancers. We have evaluated the majority of ovarian cancer studies with biological samples, to our knowledge, leaving no opportunity for replication. Using both our understanding of biology and powerful gene-level tests, we have identified four putative ovarian cancer loci near INHBB, LHCGR, GNRH, and FSHB that warrant a second look if larger sample sizes and denser genotype chips become available. PMID:25528498

  16. Human chorionic gonadotropin and CA 15-3 producing adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Uçkaya, G; Ozet, A; Arpaci, A; Kömürcü, S

    1998-01-01

    50 years old man suffering from primary lung adenocarcinoma presented with high levels of both beta subunit human chorionic gonadotropin (beta HCG) and cancer antigen 15-3 (CA 15-3) in the absence of elevated carcinoembrionic antigen (CEA), alfa fetoprotein (AFP) and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9). Although beta HCG or CA 15-3 high levels were reported in adenocarcinoma of lung, this is the first report of a patient with high levels of both markers.

  17. Evaluating the ovarian cancer gonadotropin hypothesis: a candidate gene study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Alice W; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Doherty, Jennifer A; Stram, Douglas A; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; Myers, Emily J; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif B; Hein, Alexander; Vergote, Ignace; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Lambrechts, Diether; Wicklund, Kristine G; Eilber, Ursula; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Odunsi, Kunle; Moysich, Kirsten B; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Thompson, Pamela J; Goodman, Marc T; Wilkens, Lynne R; Dörk, Thilo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Bogdanova, Natalia; Pelttari, Liisa M; Nevanlinna, Heli; Leminen, Arto; Edwards, Robert P; Kelley, Joseph L; Harter, Philipp; Schwaab, Ira; Heitz, Florian; du Bois, Andreas; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Walsh, Christine; Karlan, Beth Y; Hogdall, Estrid; Kjaer, Susanne K; Jensen, Allan; Vierkant, Robert A; Cunningham, Julie M; Goode, Ellen L; Fridley, Brooke L; Southey, Melissa C; Giles, Graham G; Bruinsma, Fiona; Wu, Xifeng; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Lu, Karen; Liang, Dong; Bisogna, Maria; Levine, Douglas A; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Iversen, Edwin S; Berchuck, Andrew; Terry, Kathryn L; Cramer, Daniel W; Tworoger, Shelley S; Poole, Elizabeth M; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Bandera, Elisa V; Bjorge, Line; Tangen, Ingvild L; Salvesen, Helga B; Krakstad, Camilla; Massuger, Leon F A G; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Aben, Katja K H; van Altena, Anne M; Bean, Yukie; Pejovic, Tanja; Kellar, Melissa; Le, Nhu D; Cook, Linda S; Kelemen, Linda E; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Cybulski, Cezary; Jakubowska, Anna; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A; Lissowska, Jolanta; Yang, Hannah; Nedergaard, Lotte; Lundvall, Lene; Hogdall, Claus; Song, Honglin; Campbell, Ian G; Eccles, Diana; Glasspool, Rosalind; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Carty, Karen; Paul, James; McNeish, Iain A; Sieh, Weiva; McGuire, Valerie; Rothstein, Joseph H; Whittemore, Alice S; McLaughlin, John R; Risch, Harvey A; Phelan, Catherine M; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Menon, Usha; Ramus, Susan J; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Harrington, Patricia; Pike, Malcolm C; Modugno, Francesmary; Rossing, Mary Anne; Ness, Roberta B; Pharoah, Paul D P; Stram, Daniel O; Wu, Anna H; Pearce, Celeste Leigh

    2015-03-01

    Ovarian cancer is a hormone-related disease with a strong genetic basis. However, none of its high-penetrance susceptibility genes and GWAS-identified variants to date are known to be involved in hormonal pathways. Given the hypothesized etiologic role of gonadotropins, an assessment of how variability in genes involved in the gonadotropin signaling pathway impacts disease risk is warranted. Genetic data from 41 ovarian cancer study sites were pooled and unconditional logistic regression was used to evaluate whether any of the 2185 SNPs from 11 gonadotropin signaling pathway genes was associated with ovarian cancer risk. A burden test using the admixture likelihood (AML) method was also used to evaluate gene-level associations. We did not find any genome-wide significant associations between individual SNPs and ovarian cancer risk. However, there was some suggestion of gene-level associations for four gonadotropin signaling pathway genes: INHBB (p=0.045, mucinous), LHCGR (p=0.046, high-grade serous), GNRH (p=0.041, high-grade serous), and FSHB (p=0.036, overall invasive). There was also suggestive evidence for INHA (p=0.060, overall invasive). Ovarian cancer studies have limited sample numbers, thus fewer genome-wide susceptibility alleles, with only modest associations, have been identified relative to breast and prostate cancers. We have evaluated the majority of ovarian cancer studies with biological samples, to our knowledge, leaving no opportunity for replication. Using both our understanding of biology and powerful gene-level tests, we have identified four putative ovarian cancer loci near INHBB, LHCGR, GNRH, and FSHB that warrant a second look if larger sample sizes and denser genotype chips become available. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Study of the response of osteogenic sarcoma and adjacent normal tissues to radiation. [/sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Gaitan-Yanguas, M.

    1981-05-01

    An analysis is made of the surgical specimens of 18 patients with hystologically-proven osteosarcoma who were treated with radiation as the first treatment, and submitted 6 months later to amputation (2 patients had only a second biopsy). Plotting of dose and treatment time against persistence or sterilization of the tumor shows that there is an intermediate zone that extends from 3200 to 5000 rad in 10 days to 8000 to 10,000 rad in 60 to 70 days, inside which the tumor may or may not be destroyed. All cases located above this zone were sterilized; and all those under it showed persistence of viable tumor cells. A similar correlation is made in 47 irradiated patients of the secondary reactions of normal skin and soft tissues surrounding the tumor. An intermediate zone also exists above which all reactions were severe, in some cases reaching necrosis; below this zone, all reactions were mild. When treatment time was longer than 45 days, reactions were only moderate.

  19. Differences in the responses of heterozygous carriers of colorblindness and normal controls to briefly presented stimuli.

    PubMed

    Cohn, S A; Emmerich, D S; Carlson, E A

    1989-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted in order to investigate the possible effects of X-inactivation (Lyon, 1961) on female carriers of colorblindness. The results of the first experiment, like those of Grützner et al. (1976), were consistent with the prediction of the Lyon (1961) hypothesis that the retinas of female carriers are composed of mosaic patches of colorblind and normal areas. In this first experiment, rows and columns of colored spots were presented tachistoscopically, and subjects were asked to identify the colors of the spots. In the second experiment, plates from the Ishihara test of colorblindness were presented tachistoscopically and subjects were asked to identify the number which was embedded in the pattern of colored dots. Both experiments support the Lyon hypothesis in that female carriers were found to have more difficulty in perceiving patterns of colored stimuli than did control subjects, and they suggest that the amount of time that a carrier has to scan colored stimuli plays an important role in her ability to accurately perceive them.

  20. Sequential designs with small samples: Evaluation and recommendations for normal responses.

    PubMed

    Nikolakopoulos, Stavros; Roes, Kit Cb; van der Tweel, Ingeborg

    2016-06-24

    Sequential monitoring is a well-known methodology for the design and analysis of clinical trials. Driven by the lower expected sample size, recent guidelines and published research suggest the use of sequential methods for the conduct of clinical trials in rare diseases. However, the vast majority of the developed and most commonly used sequential methods relies on asymptotic assumptions concerning the distribution of the test statistics. It is not uncommon for trials in (very) rare diseases to be conducted with only a few decades of patients and the use of sequential methods that rely on large-sample approximations could inflate the type I error probability. Additionally, the setting of a rare disease could make the traditional paradigm of designing a clinical trial (deciding on the sample size given type I and II errors and anticipated effect size) irrelevant. One could think of the situation where the number of patients available has a maximum and this should be utilized in the most efficient way. In this work, we evaluate the operational characteristics of sequential designs in the setting of very small to moderate sample sizes with normally distributed outcomes and demonstrate the necessity of simple corrections of the critical boundaries. We also suggest a method for deciding on an optimal sequential design given a maximum sample size and some (data driven or based on expert opinion) prior belief on the treatment effect.

  1. Neural and vascular variability and the fMRI-BOLD response in normal aging.

    PubMed

    Kannurpatti, Sridhar S; Motes, Michael A; Rypma, Bart; Biswal, Bharat B

    2010-05-01

    Neural, vascular and structural variables contributing to the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal response variability were investigated in younger and older humans. Twelve younger healthy human subjects (six male and six female; mean age: 24 years; range: 19-27 years) and 12 older healthy subjects (five male and seven female; mean age: 58 years; range: 55-71 years) with no history of head trauma and neurological disease were scanned. Functional magnetic resonance imaging measurements using the BOLD contrast were made when participants performed a motor, cognitive or a breath hold (BH) task. Activation volume and the BOLD response amplitude were estimated for the younger and older at both group and subject levels. Mean activation volume was reduced by 45%, 40% and 38% in the elderly group during the motor, cognitive and BH tasks, respectively, compared to the younger. Reduction in activation volume was substantially higher compared to the reduction in the gray matter volume of 14% in the older compared to the younger. A significantly larger variability in the intersubject BOLD signal change occurred during the motor task, compared to the cognitive task. BH-induced BOLD signal change between subjects was significantly less-variable in the motor task-activated areas in the younger compared to older whereas such a difference between age groups was not observed during the cognitive task. Hemodynamic scaling using the BH signal substantially reduced the BOLD signal variability during the motor task compared to the cognitive task. The results indicate that the origin of the BOLD signal variability between subjects was predominantly vascular during the motor task while being principally a consequence of neural variability during the cognitive task. Thus, in addition to gray matter differences, the type of task performed can have different vascular variability weighting that can influence age-related differences in brain functional response.

  2. Neuronal networks and mediators of cortical neurovascular coupling responses in normal and altered brain states.

    PubMed

    Lecrux, C; Hamel, E

    2016-10-05

    Brain imaging techniques that use vascular signals to map changes in neuronal activity, such as blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging, rely on the spatial and temporal coupling between changes in neurophysiology and haemodynamics, known as 'neurovascular coupling (NVC)'. Accordingly, NVC responses, mapped by changes in brain haemodynamics, have been validated for different stimuli under physiological conditions. In the cerebral cortex, the networks of excitatory pyramidal cells and inhibitory interneurons generating the changes in neural activity and the key mediators that signal to the vascular unit have been identified for some incoming afferent pathways. The neural circuits recruited by whisker glutamatergic-, basal forebrain cholinergic- or locus coeruleus noradrenergic pathway stimulation were found to be highly specific and discriminative, particularly when comparing the two modulatory systems to the sensory response. However, it is largely unknown whether or not NVC is still reliable when brain states are altered or in disease conditions. This lack of knowledge is surprising since brain imaging is broadly used in humans and, ultimately, in conditions that deviate from baseline brain function. Using the whisker-to-barrel pathway as a model of NVC, we can interrogate the reliability of NVC under enhanced cholinergic or noradrenergic modulation of cortical circuits that alters brain states.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'.

  3. Normal spectrum of pulmonary parametric response map to differentiate lung collapsibility: distribution of densitometric classifications in healthy adult volunteers.

    PubMed

    Silva, Mario; Nemec, Stefan F; Dufresne, Valerie; Occhipinti, Mariaelena; Heidinger, Benedikt H; Chamberlain, Ryan; Bankier, Alexander A

    2016-09-01

    Pulmonary parametric response map (PRM) was proposed for quantitative densitometric phenotypization of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, little is known about this technique in healthy subjects. The purpose of this study was to describe the normal spectrum of densitometric classification of pulmonary PRM in a group of healthy adults. 15 healthy volunteers underwent spirometrically monitored chest CT at total lung capacity (TLC) and functional residual capacity (FRC). The paired CT scans were analyzed by PRM for voxel-by-voxel characterization of lung parenchyma according to 4 densitometric classifications: normal lung (TLC ≥ -950 HU, FRC ≥ -856 HU); expiratory low attenuation area (LAA) (TLC ≥ -950 HU, FRC < -856 HU); dual LAA (TLC<-950 HU, FRC < -856 HU); uncharacterized (TLC < -950 HU, FRC ≥ -856 HU). PRM spectrum was 78 % ± 10 % normal lung, 20 % ± 8 % expiratory LAA, and 1 % ± 1 % dual LAA. PRM was similar between genders, there was moderate correlation between dual LAA and spirometrically assessed TLC (R = 0.531; p = 0.042), and between expiratory LAA and VolExp/Insp ratio (R = -0.572; p = 0.026). PRM reflects the predominance of normal lung parenchyma in a group of healthy volunteers. However, PRM also confirms the presence of physiological expiratory LAA seemingly related to air trapping and a minimal amount of dual LAA likely reflecting emphysema. • Co-registration of inspiratory and expiratory computed tomography allows dual-phase densitometry. • Dual-phase co-registered densitometry reflects heterogeneous regional changes in lung function. • Quantification of lung in healthy subjects is needed to set reference values. • Expiratory low attenuation areas <30 % could be considered within normal range.

  4. Failure of the Normal Ureagenic Response to Amino Acids in Organic Acid-loaded Rats

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Peter M.; Walser, Mackenzie

    1980-01-01

    Propionic and methylmalonic acidemia are both known to be associated with hyperammonemia. Rats injected with 10 or 20 mmol/kg of propionate or 20 mmol/kg of methylmalonate, along with 1.5 g/kg of a mixture of amino acids, developed severe hyperammonemia, whereas rats administered the same dosages of acetate did not. In vitro, neither propionyl nor methylmalonyl CoA affected the activity of carbamyl phosphate synthetase I, ornithine transcarbamylase, nor the activation constant (KA) of carbamyl phosphate synthetase I for N-acetyl glutamate. Furthermore, rats injected with propionate showed no alteration of liver amino acid concentrations, which could explain impaired ureagenesis. Animals injected with methylmalonate showed an increase in both citrulline and aspartate, suggesting that argininosuccinic acid synthetase may also have been inhibited. Liver ATP levels were unchanged. Citrullinogenesis, measured in intact mitochondria from livers of injected animals, was reduced 20-25% by 20 mmol/kg of propionate or methylmalonate (compared with acetate). This effect was attributable to an impairment in the normal rise of liver N-acetyl glutamate content after amino acid injection. Thus, carbamyl phosphate synthetase I activation was reduced. Liver levels of acetyl CoA and free CoA were reduced. Levels of unidentified acyl CoA derivatives rose, presumably reflecting the accumulation of propionyl and methylmalonyl CoA. Thus, the principal mechanism for hyperammonemia induced by these acids is depletion of liver N-acetyl glutamate, which is in turn attributable to depletion of acetyl CoA and/or competitive inhibition by propionyl and methylmalonyl CoA of N-acetyl glutamate synthetase. Injection of methylmalonate may also have an additional inhibitory effect on argininosuccinic acid synthetase. PMID:7400325

  5. Differential responses of normal human melanocytes to intra- and extracellular dsRNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Suiquan; Liu, Dongyin; Jin, Rong; Zhu, Yiping; Xu, Aie

    2015-06-01

    Viral factor has been implicated in the etiopathogenesis of vitiligo. To elucidate the effects of viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) on melanocytes and to explore the underlying mechanisms, primary cultured normal human melanocytes were treated with synthetic viral dsRNA analog poly(I:C). The results demonstrated that poly(I:C)-triggered apoptosis when transfected into melanocytes, while extracellular poly(I:C) did not have that effect. Intracellular poly(I:C)-induced melanocyte death was decreased by RIG-I or MDA5 siRNA, but not by TLR3 siRNA. Both intracellular and extracellular poly(I:C) induced the expression of IFNB, TNF, IL6, and IL8. However, extracellular poly(I:C) demonstrated a much weaker induction capacity of cytokine genes than intracellular poly(I:C). Further analysis revealed that phosphorylation of TBK1, IRF3, IRF7, and TAK1 was differentially induced by intra- or extracellular poly(I:C). NFκB inhibitor Bay 11-7082 decreased the induction of all the cytokines by poly(I:C), suggesting the ubiquitous role of NFκB in the process. Poly(I:C) treatment also induced the phosphorylation of p38 and JNK in melanocytes. Both JNK and p38 inhibitors showed suppression on the cytokine induction by intra- or extracellular poly(I:C). However, only the JNK inhibitor decreased the intracellular poly(I:C)-induced melanocyte death. Taken together, this study provides the possible mechanism of viral factor in the pathogenesis of vitiligo.

  6. Difference in leptin hormone response to nutritional status in normal adult male albino rats.

    PubMed

    Al-Sowyan, Noorah S

    2009-01-15

    The present study investigated the effect of 14 days diet, enriched in butter, vitamin E (vit. E) and green tea, on the major regulators of energy expenditure. Leptin is the product OB gene. This 16 KDa protein is produced by mature adipocytes and is secreted in plasma. Its plasma levels are strongly correlated with adipose mass in rodents as well as in humans. Leptin inhibit food intake, reduces body weight and stimulates energy expenditure. In order to evaluate the effect of diet enriched in butter, vit. E and green tea on body weight, adipose tissue weight and organs weight, serum lipids, lipoproteins content and serum leptin levels in male albino rats supplemented for 14 days on the previous diet. This study showed that high fat diet significantly increased body weight and adipose tissue weight, while vit. E and green tea enriched diet significantly lowered body weight and adipose tissue weight, kidney and spleen weights didn't show significant changes in all the experimental groups. While liver weight decreased in diet supplemented with high fat diet. Also, the results showed that high fat diet and vit. E supplemented diet induced significant increase in total cholesterol, LDLc., triglyceride level with significant decrease in HDLc. level as compared to normal control rats. Finally green tea supplemented diet induced significant decrease in total cholesterol, LDLc., triglyceride level with insignificant increase in HDLc. level in control rats. On the other hand, high fat supplemented diet significantly increased serum leptin levels in rats compared to control group, while vit. E and green tea enriched diet significantly lowered serum leptin levels at the end of experimental period. In conclusion, improving the biological activity of leptin by diet modification may exist as a practical strategy for the treatment of obesity and related disorders and a diet rich in green tea to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) obesity and also protect the liver

  7. Activation of the Innate Immune Response against DENV in Normal Non-Transformed Human Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Bustos-Arriaga, José; García-Machorro, Jazmín; León-Juárez, Moisés; García-Cordero, Julio; Santos-Argumedo, Leopoldo; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo; Méndez-Cruz, A. René; Juárez-Delgado, Francisco J.; Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia

    2011-01-01

    Background When mosquitoes infected with DENV are feeding, the proboscis must traverse the epidermis several times (“probing”) before reaching a blood vessel in the dermis. During this process, the salivary glands release the virus, which is likely to interact first with cells of the various epidermal and dermal layers, cells which could be physiologically relevant to DENV infection and replication in humans. However, important questions are whether more abundant non-hematopoietic cells such as fibroblasts become infected, and whether they play any role in antiviral innate immunity in the very early stages of infection, or even if they might be used by DENV as primary replication cells. Methodology/Principal Findings Fibroblasts freshly released from healthy skin and infected 12 hours after their isolation show a positive signal for DENV. In addition, when primary skin fibroblast cultures were established and subsequently infected, we showed DENV-2 antigen-positive intracellular signal at 24 hours and 48 hours post-infection. Moreover, the fibroblasts showed productive infection in a conventional plaque assay. The skin fibroblasts infected with DENV-2 underwent potent signaling through both TLR3 and RIG- 1, but not Mda5, triggering up-regulation of IFNβ, TNFα, defensin 5 (HB5) and β defensin 2 (HβD2). In addition, DENV infected fibroblasts showed increased nuclear translocation of interferon (IFN) regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), but not interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7), when compared with mock-infected fibroblasts. Conclusions/Significance In this work, we demonstrated the high susceptibility to DENV infection by primary fibroblasts from normal human skin, both in situ and in vitro. Our results suggest that these cells may contribute to the pro-inflammatory and anti-viral microenvironment in the early stages of interaction with DENV-2. Furthermore, the data suggest that fibroblast may also be used as a primary site of DENV replication and provide viral

  8. Effect of indomethacin on the metabolic and hormonal response to a standardized breakfast in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Luyckx, A S; Guerten, D; Scheen, A; Delporte, J P; Lefebvre, P J; Jaminet, F

    1981-01-01

    We have investigated the influence of a single oral administration of indomethacin on blood glucose, plasma free fatty acids (FFA), alpha-amino-nitrogen, insulin and glucagon concentrations in young healthy subjects. Two groups of 6 subjects were studied, the first received a standardized 500 kcal mixed meal without any previous drug administration (controls) whereas the second group received 50 mg indomethacin 2 h before ingesting an identical meal. Plasma indomethacin concentration reached its maximum (2.36 +/- 0.36 micro g/ml) 15 min after administration and declined to 0.45 +/- 0.04 micro g/ml after 2 h. Indomethacin ingestion was followed by a significant increase in blood glucose and plasma FFA reaching their maximum value at 45 min and returning to basal levels at 120 min. No simultaneous changes in plasma alpha-amino-nitrogen, insulin or glucagon levels were detected during this period. The meal was followed by a rise in blood glucose and plasma insulin as well as by a decrease in plasma FFA concentration. No significant differences were detected between the controls and the subjects receiving indomethacin. In controls, the meal was followed by a rise in plasma alpha-amino-nitrogen and a modest although significant increase in glucagon levels. In indomethacin-treated subjects, the increment of alpha-amino-nitrogen was less marked and the increase in plasma glucagon was not observed. Thus, indomethacin by itself can exert several metabolic effects; however, it does not deteriorate the blood glucose or insulin profile after a regular meal. The present work is the first to demonstrate that an inhibitor of prostaglandin synthesis inhibits the plasma glucagon rise occurring after a physiological stimulus such as a normal meal. On the basis of previous in vitro experiments, we suggest that this effect results from an inhibition of glucagon secretion by the PG synthesis inhibitor.

  9. Food preference and intake in response to ambient odours in overweight and normal-weight females.

    PubMed

    Zoon, Harriët F A; He, Wei; de Wijk, René A; de Graaf, Cees; Boesveldt, Sanne

    2014-06-22

    In our food abundant environment, food cues play an important role in the regulation of energy intake. Odours can be considered as external cues that can signal energy content in the anticipatory phase of eating. This study aims to determine whether exposure to olfactory cues associated with energy dense foods leads to increased food intake and greater preference for energy-dense foods. In addition, we assessed whether BMI and hunger state modulated this effect. Twenty-five overweight (mean BMI: 31.3 kg/m(2), S.E.: 0.6) and 25 normal-weight (mean BMI: 21.9 kg/m(2), S.E.: 0.4) females, matched on age and restraint score, participated. In 6 separate sessions they were exposed to odours of three different categories (signalling non-food, high-energy food and low-energy food) in two motivational states (hungry and satiated). After 10 min of exposure food preference was assessed with a computerized two-item forced choice task and after 20 min a Bogus Taste Test was used to determine energy intake (kcal and g). In a hungry state, the participants ate more (p<.001) and preferred high-energy products significantly more often (p<.001) when compared to the satiated state. A trend finding for the interaction between hunger and BMI suggested that the food preference of overweight participants was less affected by their internal state (p=.068). Neither energy intake (kcal: p=.553; g: p=.683) nor food preference (p=.280) was influenced by ambient exposure to odours signalling different categories. Future studies need to explore whether food odours can indeed induce overeating. More insight is needed regarding the possible influence of context (e.g. short exposure duration, large variety of food) and personality traits (e.g. restraint, impulsive) on odour-induced overeating. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ovarian stimulation in women with high and normal body mass index: GnRH agonist versus GnRH antagonist.

    PubMed

    Marci, Roberto; Lisi, Franco; Soave, Ilaria; Lo Monte, Giuseppe; Patella, Alfredo; Caserta, Donatella; Moscarini, Massimo

    2012-10-01

    In modern society, obesity has become a major health problem and has been associated with impaired fertility. The aim of this study is to assess the role of obesity in women undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) stimulated either with GnRH agonists or with GnRH antagonists. Records of 463 women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment were reviewed. The influence of body mass index (BMI) on treatment outcome was examined, after accounting for differences in stimulation protocols. In the agonist group (286 patients), the total amount of gonadotropins used was significantly higher in patients with a BMI ≥ 25 kg/m², when compared to those with a normal BMI. The same result was found in the antagonist group (177 patients). No significant differences were found in length of stimulation, number of oocytes retrieved or number of embryos transferred. In both the antagonist and the agonist group, the number of clinical pregnancies was found to be higher in patients with normal BMI, suggesting that obesity could impair the ovarian response to exogenous gonadotropins. Considering the results obtained and the many theoretical advantages of GnRH antagonists, ovarian stimulation with GnRH antagonists is an efficient treatment for both women with normal and high BMI.

  11. Respiratory and cardiovascular responses to manual chest percussion in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Dallimore, Kate; Jenkins, Sue; Tucker, Beatrice

    1998-01-01

    The respiratory and cardiovascular responses to manual chest percussion were studied in seven naive healthy subjects. Percussion during quiet breathing, percussion with thoracic expansion exercises (TEE) and TEE alone were applied to subjects in side-lying. Inspired volume, oxygen consumption, oxygen saturation, heart rate and blood pressure were measured before, during and after each technique. Significant increases in inspired volume and heart rate occurred with all three techniques (p < 0.01). Oxygen consumption increased with all three techniques however only the increases during percussion with TEE, and TEE alone were significant (p < 0.01). Oxygen saturation increased with percussion with TEE and TEE alone (p < 0.01). No significant changes in blood pressure were observed.

  12. Comparison between pulsatile GnRH therapy and gonadotropins for ovulation induction in women with both functional hypothalamic amenorrhea and polycystic ovarian morphology.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Agathe; Dewailly, Didier; Plouvier, Pauline; Catteau-Jonard, Sophie; Robin, Geoffroy

    2016-12-01

    Ovulation induction in patients having both functional hypothalamic amenorrhea (FHA) and polycystic ovarian morphology (PCOM) has been less studied in the literature. As results remain contradictory, no recommendations have yet been established. To compare pulsatile GnRH therapy versus gonadotropins for ovulation induction in "FHA-PCOM" patients and to determine if one treatment strikes as superior to the other. A 12-year retrospective study, comparing 55 "FHA-PCOM" patients, treated either with GnRH therapy (38 patients, 93 cycles) or with gonadotropins (17 patients, 53 cycles). Both groups were similar, defined by low serum LH and E2 levels, low BMI, excessive follicle number per ovary and/or high serum AMH level. Ovulation rates were significantly lower with gonadotropins (56.6% versus 78.6%, p = 0.005), with more cancellation and ovarian hyper-responses (14% versus 34% per initiated cycle, p < 0.005). Pregnancy rates were significantly higher with GnRH therapy, whether per initiated cycle (26.9% versus 7.6%, p = 0.005) or per patient (65.8% versus 23.5%, p = 0.007). In our study, GnRH therapy was more successful and safer than gonadotropins, for ovulation induction in "FHA-PCOM" patients. If results were confirmed by prospective studies, it could become a first-line treatment for this population, just as it is for FHA women without PCOM.

  13. Proximal Tubule Glutamine Synthetase Expression is Necessary for the Normal Response to Dietary Protein Restriction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Osis, Gunars; Handlogten, Mary E; Verlander, Jill W; Weiner, I David

    2017-03-22

    Dietary protein restriction has multiple benefits in kidney disease. Because protein intake is a major determinant of endogenous acid production, it is important that net acid excretion change in parallel during changes in dietary protein intake. Dietary protein restriction decreases endogenous acid production and ¬decreases urinary ammonia excretion, a major component of net acid excretion. Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the reaction of NH4+ and glutamate, which regenerates the essential amino acid glutamine and decreases net ammonia generation. Because renal proximal tubule GS expression increases during dietary protein restriction, this could contribute to the decreased ammonia excretion. The current study's purpose was to determine proximal tubule GS's role in the renal response to protein restriction. We generated mice with proximal tubule-specific GS deletion (PT-GS-KO) using Cre-loxP techniques. Cre-negative (Control) and PT-GS-KO mice in metabolic cages were provided 20% protein diet for 2 days and were then changed to low protein (6%) diet for the next 7 days. Additional PT-GS-KO mice were maintained on 20% protein diet. Dietary protein restriction caused a rapid decrease in urinary ammonia excretion in both genotypes, but PT-GS-KO blunted this adaptive response significantly. This occurred despite no significant genotype-dependent differences in urinary pH or in serum electrolytes. There were no significant differences between Control and PT-GS-KO mice in expression of multiple other proteins involved in renal ammonia handling. We conclude that proximal tubule glutamine synthetase expression is necessary for the appropriate decrease in ammonia excretion during dietary protein restriction.

  14. Arg-Phe-amide-related peptides influence gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kelestimur, Haluk; Kacar, Emine; Uzun, Aysegul; Ozcan, Mete; Kutlu, Selim

    2013-01-01

    The hypothalamic Arg-Phe-amide-related peptides, gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone and orthologous mammalian peptides of Arg-Phe-amide, may be important regulators of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal reproductive axis. These peptides may modulate the effects of kisspeptins because they are presently recognized as the most potent activators of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis. However, their effects on gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons have not been investigated. In the current study, the GT1–7 cell line-expressing gonadotropin-releasing hormone was used as a model to explore the effects of Arg-Pheamide-related peptides on kisspeptin activation. Intracellular calcium concentration was quantified using the calcium-sensitive dye, fura-2 acetoxymethyl ester. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone released into the medium was detected via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results showed that 100 nmol/L kisspeptin-10 significantly increased gonadotropin-releasing hormone levels (at 120 minutes of exposure) and intracellular calcium concentrations. Co-treatment of kisspeptin with 1 μmol/L gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone or 1 μmol/L Arg-Phe-amide-related peptide-1 significantly attenuated levels of kisspeptin-induced gonadotropin-releasing hormone but did not affect kisspeptin-induced elevations of intracellular calcium concentration. Overall, the results suggest that gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone and Arg-Phe-amide-related peptide-1 may have inhibitory effects on kisspeptin-activated gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons independent of the calcium signaling pathway. PMID:25206468

  15. Arg-Phe-amide-related peptides influence gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons.

    PubMed

    Kelestimur, Haluk; Kacar, Emine; Uzun, Aysegul; Ozcan, Mete; Kutlu, Selim

    2013-06-25

    The hypothalamic Arg-Phe-amide-related peptides, gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone and orthologous mammalian peptides of Arg-Phe-amide, may be important regulators of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal reproductive axis. These peptides may modulate the effects of kisspeptins because they are presently recognized as the most potent activators of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis. However, their effects on gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons have not been investigated. In the current study, the GT1-7 cell line-expressing gonadotropin-releasing hormone was used as a model to explore the effects of Arg-Pheamide-related peptides on kisspeptin activation. Intracellular calcium concentration was quantified using the calcium-sensitive dye, fura-2 acetoxymethyl ester. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone released into the medium was detected via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results showed that 100 nmol/L kisspeptin-10 significantly increased gonadotropin-releasing hormone levels (at 120 minutes of exposure) and intracellular calcium concentrations. Co-treatment of kisspeptin with 1 μmol/L gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone or 1 μmol/L Arg-Phe-amide-related peptide-1 significantly attenuated levels of kisspeptin-induced gonadotropin-releasing hormone but did not affect kisspeptin-induced elevations of intracellular calcium concentration. Overall, the results suggest that gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone and Arg-Phe-amide-related peptide-1 may have inhibitory effects on kisspeptin-activated gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons independent of the calcium signaling pathway.

  16. The Cervico-Ocular Reflex of normal human subjects in response to transient and sinusoidal trunk rotations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, Robert N., Jr.; Thurston, Stephen E.; Becker, Keith R.; Ackley, Charles V.; Seidman, Scott H.; Leigh, R. John

    1994-01-01

    We used the magnetic search coil technique to measure the horizontal cervico-ocular reflex (COR) of 8 subjects in response to transient or sinusoidal (0.1-1.0 Hz) trunk rotations while their heads were firmly immobilized. Although we were able to resolve eye rotations of less than 0.05 deg, the COR was hardly measurable (gain was always less than 0.07). This finding, made with the most precise measurement technique used to date, suggests that the COR makes a negligible contribution to the stability of gaze in normal subjects during natural activities.

  17. Gonadotropin regulation of testosterone production by primary cultured theca and granulosa cells of Atlantic croaker: II. Involvement of a mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Benninghoff, Abby D; Thomas, Peter

    2006-07-01

    Previous investigations in Atlantic croaker ovaries and primary co-cultured theca and granulosa cells have identified multiple signal transduction pathways involved in the control of gonadotropin-induced steroidogenesis, including adenylyl cyclase- and calcium-dependent signaling pathways. In the present study, evidence was obtained for an involvement of a third signal transduction pathway, a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase) signaling cascade, in the regulation of gonadal steroidogenesis in this lower vertebrate teleost model. Gonadotropin-stimulated testosterone synthesis was markedly attenuated by two antagonists of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases 1/2 (MEK1/2, also known as Map2k1/Map2k2). Moreover, treatment with gonadotropin-induced MEK1/2-dependent phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2, also known as Mapk3/Mapk1) in a concentration- and time-dependent manner in co-cultured croaker theca and granulosa cells. Active MEK1/2 was required for a complete steroidogenic response to activators of the adenylyl cyclase pathway, including forskolin and dbcAMP, suggesting that the target(s) of MAP kinase signaling are distal to cAMP generation and activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Interestingly, dbcAMP caused a similar increase of ERK1/2 phosphorylation as was observed with gonadotropin treatment, although an inhibitor of PKA did not attenuate this response. Finally, there was no evidence of cross-talk between calcium-dependent signaling pathways and this MAP kinase cascade. While drugs that block calcium-dependent signal transduction, including inhibitors of voltage-sensitive calcium channels, calmodulin, and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases, significantly reduced gonadotropin-induced testosterone accumulation, these drugs had no apparent effect on hCG-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation.

  18. Thyroiditis in T cell-depleted rats: suppression of the autoallergic response by reconstitution with normal lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Penhale, W J; Irvine, W J; Inglis, J R; Farmer, A

    1976-07-01

    Qualititive, quantitative and functional differences were found in lymphoid cells of female thymectomized and irradiated (Tx-X) PVG/c strain rats as compared to normal females of the same strain. Tx-X rats were lymphopenic and had reduced numbers of cells within spleen and cervical lymph nodes, depressed transformation responses of peripheral blood lymphocytes to PHA and lower percentage killing of their spleen cells by anti-T-cell serum and complement. There was an increased percentage of immunoglobulin-bearing cells in the lymph nodes. Reconstitution of Tx-X rats by the intravenous route using syngeneic lymph node cells, spleen cells or thymocytes abrogated the autoimmune responses to thyroid components generally observed in this state. Lymph node and spleen cells, but not thymocytes, also prevented thyroid changes when given intraperitoneally. In contrast, bone marrow cells appeared to give enhanced responses. Quntitative studies showed that the relative proportions of the suppressor or autoregulatory cells in various lymphoid tissues were lymph node greater than spleen greater than thymus. Complete abrogation of the autoimmune responses was possible only when cells were administered within a short time of final dose of irradiation and moderate thyroid change was again seen if transfer was delayed for 14 days post-irradiation. At 28 days reconstitution had no influence on the development of the autoimmune responses. Preliminary characterization studies using an anti-T-cell serum and fractionation of lymph node cells on a linear Ficoll gradient suggested that autoregulatory cell is a large T cell.

  19. Normal cortisol response to cold pressor test, but lower free thyroxine, after recovery from undernutrition.

    PubMed

    Martins, Vinicius J B; Neves, Andrea P O; Garcia, Márcia C; Spadari, Regina C; Clemente, Ana Paula G; de Albuquerque, Maria P; Hoffman, Daniel J; Sawaya, Ana L

    2016-01-14

    Undernutrition is a stressor with long-term consequences, and the effect of nutritional recovery on cortisol and thyroid hormone status is unknown. To investigate basal thyroid hormones and the cortisol response to a cold pressor test in children recovered from undernutrition, a cross-sectional study was undertaken on children (6-16 years) separated into four groups: control (n 41), stunted (n 31), underweight (n 27) and recovered (n 31). Salivary cortisol was collected over the course of 10 h: upon awakening, before and after an unpleasant and a pleasant stimulus. Cortisol upon awakening was highest in the stunted and lowest in the underweight groups: control=5·05 (95% CI 3·71, 6·89) nmol/l, stunted=6·62 (95% CI 3·97, 11·02) nmol/l, underweight=2·51 (95% CI 1·75, 3·63) nmol/l and recovered=3·46 (95% CI 2·46, 4·90) nmol/l (P=0·005). Girls had higher cortisol concentrations upon awakening compared with boys (P=0·021). The undernourished groups showed an elevated cortisol response both to the unpleasant stimulus and at the last measurement (16.00 hours) compared with that of the recovered group: AUC, control=2·07 (95% CI 1·69, 2·45) nmol/l×30 min, stunted=2·48 (95% CI 1·91, 3·06) nmol/l×30 min, underweight=2·52 (95% CI 2·07, 2·97) nmol/l×30 min, recovered=1·68 (95% CI 1·26, 2·11) nmol/l×30 min (P=0·042); and control=2·03 (95% CI 1·75, 2·39) nmol/l×30 min, stunted=2·51 (95% CI 1·97, 3·19) nmol/l×30 min, underweight=2·61 (95% CI 2·16, 3·16) nmol/l×30 min, recovered=1·70 (95% CI 1·42, 2·03) nmol/l×30 min (P=0·009). Lower free thyroxine (T4) was found in the recovered and stunted groups: control=1·28 (95% CI 1·18, 1·39) pmol/l, stunted=0·98 (95% CI 0·87, 1·10) pmol/l, underweight=1·10 (95% CI 1·01, 1·21) pmol/l and recovered=0·90 (95% CI 0·83, 0·99) pmol/l (P<0·001). Multivariate analysis showed a lower cortisol concentration along 10 h (06.00-16.00 hours) in the recovered compared with the other groups (P=0

  20. Response of magnesium single crystals to shock-wave loading at normal and elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garkushin, G.; Kanel, G.; Savinykh, A.; Razorenov, S.; Jones, D.; Proud, W.

    2013-06-01

    Magnesium single crystals, 0.2 mm to 3 mm thick, were shock loaded along the two axes, a, c and the direction at 45 degrees to the c-axis. At the room temperature the response is very similar to that observed by Pope and Johnson for beryllium single crystals (1974). Shock compression along the c-axis causes inelastic deformation by means of pyramidal slip and twinning and is associated with the largest HEL. The easiest basal slip was activated by shock loading along the inclined, off-axis direction and is associated with smallest HEL value. For all orientations, we observed elastic precursor decay and growth of the HEL values with increasing temperature. However, for the c-orientation the growth is caused by decrease of elastic constants and not with an increase of resolved shear stress along the pyramidal slip planes. In the other orientations the resolved shear stresses in slip planes at the HEL increased with temperature. At inclined shock compression we found two plastic shock waves for which the stress behind the first depends on the peak stress associated with the second plastic wave. The crystals demonstrate the largest spall strength at shock loading along the a-axis and smallest one at shock loading in off-axis direction.

  1. Glycemic index and postprandial blood glucose response to Japanese strawberry jam in normal adults.

    PubMed

    Kurotobi, Tomoka; Fukuhara, Kimiaki; Inage, Hiroko; Kimura, Shuichi

    2010-01-01

    We investigated in 30 healthy adults the glycemic index (GI) of five strawberry jams made from various sugar compositions. The jam containing the highest ratio of glucose showed a high GI, while that containing a high ratio of fructose, a jam made from polydextrose, showed a low GI. There was a high correlation (r=0.969, p=0.006) between the GI and the predicted GI calculated from the sugar composition of the jams. Moreover, the influence on postprandial blood glucose response after an intake of only 20 g of jam and one slice of bread with 20 g jam was measured in 8 healthy adults. The blood glucose level after an intake of 20 g of the high GI jam containing the high glucose ratio was higher than that of other jams at 15 min, but there was no significant difference after 30 min. Regardless of whether the GI was low or high, differences in the jams were not observed in the postprandial blood glucose level or the area under the curve after eating either one slice of bread (60 g) or one slice of bread with less than 20 g of jam.

  2. Response normalization and blur adaptation: data and multi-scale model.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Sarah L; Georgeson, Mark A; Webster, Michael A

    2011-02-09

    Adapting to blurred or sharpened images alters perceived blur of a focused image (M. A. Webster, M. A. Georgeson, & S. M. Webster, 2002). We asked whether blur adaptation results in (a) renormalization of perceived focus or (b) a repulsion aftereffect. Images were checkerboards or 2-D Gaussian noise, whose amplitude spectra had (log-log) slopes from -2 (strongly blurred) to 0 (strongly sharpened). Observers adjusted the spectral slope of a comparison image to match different test slopes after adaptation to blurred or sharpened images. Results did not show repulsion effects but were consistent with some renormalization. Test blur levels at and near a blurred or sharpened adaptation level were matched by more focused slopes (closer to 1/f) but with little or no change in appearance after adaptation to focused (1/f) images. A model of contrast adaptation and blur coding by multiple-scale spatial filters predicts these blur aftereffects and those of Webster et al. (2002). A key proposal is that observers are pre-adapted to natural spectra, and blurred or sharpened spectra induce changes in the state of adaptation. The model illustrates how norms might be encoded and recalibrated in the visual system even when they are represented only implicitly by the distribution of responses across multiple channels.

  3. Response normalization and blur adaptation: Data and multi-scale model

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Sarah L.; Georgeson, Mark A.; Webster, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Adapting to blurred or sharpened images alters perceived blur of a focused image (M. A. Webster, M. A. Georgeson, & S. M. Webster, 2002). We asked whether blur adaptation results in (a) renormalization of perceived focus or (b) a repulsion aftereffect. Images were checkerboards or 2-D Gaussian noise, whose amplitude spectra had (log–log) slopes from −2 (strongly blurred) to 0 (strongly sharpened). Observers adjusted the spectral slope of a comparison image to match different test slopes after adaptation to blurred or sharpened images. Results did not show repulsion effects but were consistent with some renormalization. Test blur levels at and near a blurred or sharpened adaptation level were matched by more focused slopes (closer to 1/f) but with little or no change in appearance after adaptation to focused (1/f) images. A model of contrast adaptation and blur coding by multiple-scale spatial filters predicts these blur aftereffects and those of Webster et al. (2002). A key proposal is that observers are pre-adapted to natural spectra, and blurred or sharpened spectra induce changes in the state of adaptation. The model illustrates how norms might be encoded and recalibrated in the visual system even when they are represented only implicitly by the distribution of responses across multiple channels. PMID:21307174

  4. Expression of collapsin response mediator protein 1 in placenta of normal gestation and link to early-onset preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Chong; Wang, Chunhui; Jin, Feng; Zheng, Dongying; Liu, Caixia

    2015-04-01

    A human isoform of Collapsin Response Mediator Protein (CRMP) family proteins, CRMP-1, has been identified as a novel invasion suppressor. The aim of this study was to determine CRMP-1 expression pattern in placentas during normal pregnancy and elucidate the clinical significance of CRMP-1 expression in the placentas of women with early-onset preeclamptic pregnancies. We recruited 66 normal healthy pregnant Chinese women and 60 Chinese patients with preeclampsia [early-onset prereclampsia(ePE), n = 30 and late-onset preeclampsia(lPE) n = 30]. Gestational age-matched normal healthy pregnant women were used as controls of early-onset and late-onset preeclampsia, which were 23-33 + 6 weeks, n = 18 and control B: 34-40 weeks, n = 20). Quantitative RT-PCR, Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry were used to analyze the expressions of CRMP-1 in placentas. Expression of CRMP-1 was detected in syncytio- and cytotrophoblasts of all groups using immunohistochemistry. CRMP-1 was most abundantly expressed in syncytiotrophoblasts, moderately in cytotrophoblasts and the intermediate trophoblasts especially in the first trimester. The placental expression of CRMP-1 is particularly striking in the first trimester and decreases throughout pregnancy. There is a significant increase in CRMP-1 expression in the placenta of ePE but not of lPE, as compared to gestational-matched controls. The aberrant upregulation of CRMP-1 expression may link to the mechanism of developing ePE. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Dynamic response characteristics of high temperature superconducting maglev systems: Comparison between Halbach-type and normal permanent magnet guideways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Zheng, J.; Che, T.; Zheng, B. T.; Si, S. S.; Deng, Z. G.

    2015-12-01

    The permanent magnet guideway (PMG) is very important for the performance of the high temperature superconducting (HTS) system in terms of electromagnetic force and operational stability. The dynamic response characteristics of a HTS maglev model levitating on two types of PMG, which are the normal PMG with iron flux concentration and Halbach-type PMG, were investigated by experiments. The dynamic signals for different field-cooling heights (FCHs) and loading/unloading processes were acquired and analyzed by a vibration analyzer and laser displacement sensors. The resonant frequency, stiffness and levitation height of the model were discussed. It was found that the maglev model on the Halbach-type PMG has higher resonant frequency and higher vertical stiffness compared with the normal PMG. However, the low lateral stiffness of the model on the Halbach-type PMG indicates poor lateral stability. Besides, the Halbach-type PMG has better loading capacity than the normal PMG. These results are helpful to design a suitable PMG for the HTS system in practical applications.

  6. Differential responses of tumors and normal brain to the combined treatment of 2-DG and radiation in glioablastoma.

    PubMed

    Prasanna, Venkatesh K; Venkataramana, Neelam K; Dwarakanath, B S; Santhosh, Vani

    2009-09-01

    2-Deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), an inhibitor of glucose transport and glycolysis, enhances radiation damage selectively in tumor cells by modulating damage response pathways resulting in cell death in vitro and local tumor control. Phase I and II clinical trials in patients with malignant glioma have shown excellent tolerance to a combined treatment of orally administered 2-DG and hypofractionated radiotherapy without any acute toxicity and late radiation damage. Phase III efficacy trials are currently at an advanced stage. Re-exploratory surgery performed in 13 patients due to persistent symptoms of elevated ICP and mass effect at different follow-up periods revealed extensive tumor necrosis with well-preserved normal brain tissue adjoining the tumor included in the treatment volume as revealed by a histological examination. These observations are perhaps the first clinical evidences for differential effects of 2-DG on tumors and normal tissues in conformity with earlier in vitro and in vivo studies in normal and tumor-bearing mice.

  7. Immunoglobulin D-deficient mice can mount normal immune responses to thymus-independent and -dependent antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Nitschke, L; Kosco, M H; Köhler, G; Lamers, M C

    1993-01-01

    To examine the in vivo function of IgD we generated mice deficient for IgD by gene targeting. The IgD-mice show a reduced B-cell compartment with 30-50% less B cells in the spleen and lymph nodes but show a normal pre-B-cell compartment. The surface-IgD- B cells express two to three times more surface IgM than B cells of control animals. Serum concentrations of the immunoglobulin isotypes of IgD- mice are almost normal, indicating that surface-IgD expression is not necessary for class switching of B cells. Immunization experiments showed that IgD- mice could respond well to thymus-dependent and -independent antigens. After immunization normal germinal centers developed in the IgD- mice. These data suggest that IgD is not necessary for the induction of immune responses but may be important in homeostasis of cells in the B-cell compartment. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 5 PMID:8446604

  8. Drought responses of a normally well-watered boreal forest ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevanto, S.; Hölttä, T.; Kolari, P.; Launiainen, S.; Pumpanen, J.; Korhonen, J. F. J.; Vesala, T.; Nikinmaa, E.

    2009-04-01

    In the boreal zone water is seldom a limiting factor for plant activity. Springtime snowmelt reloads soil water reservoirs and during the short summer the amount of precipitation is usually enough to keep the ecosystem moist. In Finland, for example, the three summer months (June, July and August) account for more than 30% of the annual precipitation (700 mm/year). We have carried out ecosystem-scale atmosphere-biosphere exchange measurements at the SMEAR II station in Hyytiälä, Southern Finland since 1996. The station is surrounded by a homogenous Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stand, which was sown after prescribed burning in 1962. The measurement set up includes an eddy-covariance system for measuring CO2, water vapor and sensible heat fluxes, soil water content measurements by the TDR-system, theta probes and equi-tensiometers, radiation measurements above and inside the canopy as well as automated chamber measurements for soil respiration and shoot-scale photosynthesis. We also measure sap flow in the trees using the Granier method and water tension inside the xylem using stem diameter variation measurements. This set-up allows also estimation of the variation in the stem hydraulic conductivity as well as stem water storage capacity. During the 11 years of measurements there has been three summers when soil water content has limited activity of the ecosystem: 1999, 2002 and 2006. In this study we compared the ecosystem responses of the dry summers to the long term averages of our site and evaluated the conditions when ecosystems-scale effects on the carbon fluxes start occur. We also studied the effects of drought on different components of ecosystem respiration and the water transport and storage capacity of the pine trees. Interestingly, drought did not reduce stem or shoot respiration significantly but the first rainfall event after the drought increased soil respiration more than photosynthesis turning the ecosystem from a sink to a source