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Sample records for normal human trigeminal

  1. Expression of varicella-zoster virus and herpes simplex virus in normal human trigeminal ganglia

    SciTech Connect

    Vafai, A.; Wellish, M.; Devlin, M.; Gilden, D.H. ); Murray, R.S. Veterans Administration Medical Center, Denver, CO )

    1988-04-01

    Lysates of radiolabeled explants from four human trigeminal ganglia were immunoprecipitated with antibodies to varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and to herpes simplex virus. Both herpes simplex virus- and VZV-specific proteins were detected in lysates of all four ganglia. Absence of reactivity in ganglion explants with monoclonal antibodies suggested that herpes simplex virus and VZV were not reactivated during the culture period. In situ hybridization studies demonstrated the presence of RNA transcripts from the VZV immediate early gene 63. This approach to the detection of herpes simplex virus and VZV expression in human ganglia should facilitate analysis of viral RNA and proteins in human sensory ganglia.

  2. Non-Invasive Mapping of Human Trigeminal Brainstem Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Jaymin; Knudsen, Jamie; Anderson, Julie; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David

    2008-01-01

    The human trigeminal system mediates facial pain and somatosensory processing. The anatomic location of neuronal substrates and axonal pathways of the trigeminal system have previously been characterized with conventional in vitro methods. The present investigation implemented diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and probabilistic tractography to first segment the peripheral trigeminal circuitry; trigeminal nerve branches (ophthalmic, maxillary and mandibular nerves), ganglion and nerve root. Subsequent segmentations involved the spinal trigeminal and trigeminal thalamic tracts, which respectively convey information to spinal trigeminal nuclei and ventral thalamic regions. This latter procedure also identified (1) spinal thalamic (anterolateral) system pathways (propagating pain and temperature information from the body); (2) trigeminal lemniscus (touch and face position) and 3) medial lemniscus (touch and limb position). The anatomic location of the identified pain and somatosensory pathways compared well with previous functional findings in human trigeminal system as well as the tract position in human histological cross-sections. Probabilistic tractography may be a useful method to further comprehend the functional and structural properties of trigeminal and other related systems. Application of DTI to map pain and somatosensory pathways in conjunction with a characterization of function properties of pain and somatosensory processing would further define the systematic changes that occur in trigeminal pathology. PMID:18956455

  3. Human herpesvirus 1 meningoencephalitis after trigeminal neuralgia surgery.

    PubMed

    Prim, Núria; Benito, Natividad; Montes, Guillermo; Pomar, Virginia; Molet, Joan; Rabella, Núria

    2013-07-01

    We report a case of human herpesvirus 1 (HHV-1) meningoencephalitis in a patient who underwent trigeminal neuralgia surgery. Although this surgery has been reported to increase the risk of mucocutaneous HHV-1 recurrence, to our knowledge, an association between trigeminal surgery and HHV-1 encephalitis has not been previously described.

  4. Evoked taste thresholds in a normal population and the application of electrogustometry to trigeminal nerve disease.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, R; Ferguson, M M; Strang, R; Turner, J W; Bone, I

    1987-01-01

    No standardised method for taste threshold measurement is available and therefore comparison between clinical studies is difficult. An electrogustometer was evaluated in normal subjects. No sex difference in taste threshold was noted; however, there was a significant elevation in detection threshold with age and smoking. Electrogustometric values both in patients before and after surgery for trigeminal neuralgia and in patients with trigeminal sensory neuropathy were determined. Many patients with trigeminal nerve disorders had abnormal electrogustometric detection thresholds suggesting that there is possibly an accessory taste pathway through the trigeminal nerve, although in some individuals the site of lesion may be in the brain stem. Electrogustometry is a convenient method for clinically assessing taste. Images PMID:3819752

  5. Cellular Localization of Aquaporin-1 in the Human and Mouse Trigeminal Systems

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Minxia; Marshall, Charles; Ding, Jiong; Hu, Gang; Xiao, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies reported that a subpopulation of mouse and rat trigeminal neurons express water channel aquaporin-1 (AQP1). In this study we make a comparative investigation of AQP1 localization in the human and mouse trigeminal systems. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence results showed that AQP1 was localized to the cytoplasm and cell membrane of some medium and small-sized trigeminal neurons. Additionally, AQP1 was found in numerous peripheral trigeminal axons of humans and mice. In the central trigeminal root and brain stem, AQP1 was specifically expressed in astrocytes of humans, but was restricted to nerve fibers within the central trigeminal root and spinal trigeminal tract and nucleus in mice. Furthermore, AQP1 positive nerve fibers were present in the mucosal and submucosal layers of human and mouse oral tissues, but not in the muscular and subcutaneous layers. Fluorogold retrograde tracing demonstrated that AQP1 positive trigeminal neurons innervate the mucosa but not skin of cheek. These results reveal there are similarities and differences in the cellular localization of AQP1 between the human and mouse trigeminal systems. Selective expression of AQP1 in the trigeminal neurons innervating the oral mucosa indicates an involvement of AQP1 in oral sensory transduction. PMID:23029502

  6. Corneal hypoesthesia with normal sub-basal nerve density following surgery for trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Virinder K; Elalfy, Mohamed S; Al-Aqaba, Mouhamed; Gupta, Ankur; Basu, Surajit; Dua, Harminder S

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the corneal sub-basal nerve plexus in patients presenting with hypoesthesia following surgery for trigeminal neuralgia. Twenty-one patients who had unilateral medically uncontrolled trigeminal neuralgia and underwent ipsilateral surgery from 2006 to 2012 were included. Of these, 10 had microvascular decompression (MVD group) and 11 had balloon compression of the trigeminal ganglion (BC group). Slit lamp examination, Cochet-Bonnet aesthesiometery and in vivo confocal microscopy were carried out on both eyes of each patient. Nerve density data were statistically analysed. Corneal sensations and sub-basal nerve densities in MVD group were normal and equal in both the operated and unoperated sides, indicating that there was no intra-operative damage of the ophthalmic division of the trigeminal nerve (V1). However, those in BC group, despite having significantly reduced corneal sensations on the operated side (p = 0.007), did not demonstrate any significant difference in their sub-basal nerve densities (p = 0.477). No patient had any ocular symptoms. This study supports the hypothesis that complete ganglionic damage and/or postganglionic damage of V1 results in corneal hypoesthesia and neurotrophic keratitis, but partial ganglionic or preganglionic damage would preserve trophic function despite hypoesthesia and not result in clinically significant symptoms or signs of neurotrophic keratitis. The trophic and sensory functions of V1 are therefore independent and can be dissociated by disease or injury. © 2015 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Alphaherpesvirus DNA replication in dissociated human trigeminal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Cohrs, Randall J; Badani, Hussain; Bos, Nathan; Scianna, Charles; Hoskins, Ian; Baird, Nicholas L; Gilden, Don

    2016-10-01

    Analysis of the frequency and PCR-quantifiable abundance of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and varicella zoster virus (VZV) DNA in multiple biological replicates of cells from dissociated randomly distributed human trigeminal ganglia (TG) of four subjects revealed an increase in both parameters and in both viruses during 5 days of culture, with no further change by 10 days. Dissociated TG provides a platform to analyze initiation of latent virus DNA replication within 5 days of culture.

  8. Endogenous angiotensinergic system in neurons of rat and human trigeminal ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Imboden, Hans; Patil, Jaspal; Nussberger, Juerg; Nicoud, Françoise; Hess, Benno; Ahmed, Nermin; Schaffner, Thomas; Wellner, Maren; Müller, Dominik; Inagami, Tadashi; Senbonmatsu, Takaaki; Pavel, Jaroslav; Saavedra, Juan M.

    2009-01-01

    To clarify the role of Angiotensin II (Ang II) in the sensory system and especially in the trigeminal ganglia, we studied the expression of angiotensinogen (Ang-N)-, renin-, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)- and cathepsin D-mRNA, and the presence of Ang II and substance P in the rat and human trigeminal ganglia. The rat trigeminal ganglia expressed substantial amounts of Ang-N- and ACE mRNA as determined by quantitative real time PCR. Renin mRNA was untraceable in rat samples. Cathepsin D was detected in the rat trigeminal ganglia indicating the possibility of existence of pathways alternative to renin for Ang I formation. In situ hybridization in rat trigeminal ganglia revealed expression of Ang-N mRNA in the cytoplasm of numerous neurons. By using immunocytochemistry, a number of neurons and their processes in both the rat and human trigeminal ganglia were stained for Ang II. Post in situ hybridization immunocytochemistry reveals that in the rat trigeminal ganglia some, but not all Ang-N mRNA-positive neurons marked for Ang II. In some neurons Substance P was found colocalized with Ang II. Angiotensins from rat trigeminal ganglia were quantitated by radioimmunoassay with and without prior separation by high performance liquid chromatography. Immunoreactive angiotensin II (ir-Ang II) was consistently present and the sum of true Ang II (1-8) octapeptide and its specifically measured metabolites were found to account for it. Radioimmunological and immunocytochemical evidence of ir-Ang II in neuronal tissue is compatible with Ang II as a neurotransmitter. In conclusion, these results suggest that Ang II could be produced locally in the neurons of rat trigeminal ganglia. The localization and colocalization of neuronal Ang II with Substance P in the trigeminal ganglia neurons may be the basis for a participation and function of Ang II in the regulation of nociception and migraine pathology. PMID:19323983

  9. Trigeminal Neuralgia

    MedlinePlus

    Trigeminal neuralgia Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Trigeminal neuralgia is a chronic pain condition that affects the trigeminal nerve, ... face to your brain. If you have trigeminal neuralgia, even mild stimulation of your face — such as ...

  10. Topical review: modulation of trigeminal sensory input in humans: mechanisms and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Lobbezoo, Frank; Trulsson, Mats; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Svensson, Peter; Cadden, Samuel W; van Steenberghe, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    In this review, the modulatory effects of tooth and implant loading, orofacial pain, and psychological factors on somatosensory and jaw-motor function in humans are assessed. Experimental studies on the control of jaw actions have revealed that patients with prostheses supported by osseointegrated implants show an impairment of fine motor control of the mandible. One possibility is that this may be related to the loss of afferent information from periodontal ligament mechanoreceptors, which results in considerably higher and more variable forces to hold and manipulate food between the teeth. However, psychophysical investigations have shown that patients still perceive mechanical stimuli exerted on osseointegrated implants in the jawbone. The use of somatosensory evoked potentials may revealed what specific receptor groups are responsible for this so-called osseoperception phenomenon. Orofacial pain is another modulator of trigeminal system functioning. Experimental jaw muscle pain has several effects on the somatosensory and motor function of the masticatory system, all of them serving to warn the individual about the ongoing damaging of tissues. Finally, the influence of mental state on the sensory and motor functions of the trigeminal system will be addressed. While some animal studies suggest that psychological stress can reduce acute pain, less speculative are the findings in human subjects that the anticipation of receiving a painful stimulus or undertaking difficult mental tasks can modulate jaw reflexes, including those evoked by mechanical stimuli applied to the teeth. Since such stimuli occur regularly during normal oral activities, the study of the resulting motor effects may yield clinically meaningful results in the context of other variables that modulate mandibular function.

  11. [Jaw opening reflex: a new electrophysiologic method for objective assessment of trigeminal sensory disorders. I. Method and normal values].

    PubMed

    Hassfeld, S; Meinck, H M

    1992-12-01

    Retrospective analysis of trigeminal nerve evoked potentials in 40 consecutive patients, most of them with traumatic nerve lesions, showed that in 12 cases no trigeminal nerve SEP were obtainable, and 11 of the remaining 28 patients had normal trigeminal nerve SEP. Therefore the jaw-opening reflex was investigated as a potential tool for electrophysiologic analysis of facial sensory disturbances. The jaw-opening reflex was investigated in 60 healthy subjects (31 female, 29 male) aged 23-82 years. It was elicited by electrical 0.1 ms square wave pulses delivered to the lower and upper lips and to the infraorbital region on either side at a rate below 1 per 5s. The EMG responses were recorded from the bilateral masseter and temporalis muscles at a moderate voluntary activation. Under these conditions, the jaw-opening reflex reveals itself as two inhibitory pauses of the ongoing EMG on both sides, the onset latency of the first EMG-suppression being 10-15 ms, and of the second 35-50 ms. Particular attention was paid to the stimulus strength at threshold (TR) to evoke the jaw-opening reflex. We found that the jaw-opening reflex was constantly evoked by weak stimuli applied to the 2nd and 3rd trigeminal branches. Bilateral reflex responses with unilateral stimulation were a regular finding. The reflex responses increase with increasing stimulus strength (Fig. 1). Moderate to forcible activation of the jaw closing muscles is a prerequisite for optimum recordings of the jaw-opening reflex (Fig. 2).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Neuropeptides released from trigeminal neurons promote the stratification of human corneal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Ji-Ae; Mizuno, Yukari; Ohki, Chihiro; Chikama, Tai-ichiro; Sonoda, Koh-Hei; Kiuchi, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-07

    To examine the effects of neural cells on the stratification of and junctional protein expression by corneal epithelial cells with a coculture system. PC12 cells induced to undergo neuronal differentiation or rat trigeminal nerve cells were cultured together with simian virus 40-transformed human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells on opposite sides of a collagen vitrigel membrane. Stratification of HCE cells was examined by immunofluorescence analysis with antibodies to zonula occludens-1. Expression of junctional proteins in HCE cells was assessed by RT-PCR and immunoblot analyses. The presence of neural cells (PC12 cells or trigeminal neurons) markedly promoted the stratification of HCE cells as well as increased the amounts of N-cadherin mRNA and protein in these cells. These effects of the neural cells were mimicked by conditioned medium prepared from differentiating PC12 cells or by the neuropeptides substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Furthermore, the stimulatory effects of trigeminal neurons on the stratification of and N-cadherin expression by HCE cells were inhibited by antagonists of substance P or of CGRP. These results suggest that trigeminal neurons play an important role in the differentiation of corneal epithelial cells. Neuropeptides released from these neurons may thus regulate adhesion between corneal epithelial cells and thereby contribute to the establishment and maintenance of corneal structure and function.

  13. The neuronal correlates of intranasal trigeminal function – An ALE meta-analysis of human functional brain imaging data

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Jessica; Kopietz, Rainer; Frasnelli, Johannes; Wiesmann, Martin; Hummel, Thomas; Lundström, Johan N.

    2009-01-01

    Almost every odor we encounter in daily life has the capacity to produce a trigeminal sensation. Surprisingly, few functional imaging studies exploring human neuronal correlates of intranasal trigeminal function exist, and results are to some degree inconsistent. We utilized activation likelihood estimation (ALE), a quantitative voxel-based meta-analysis tool, to analyze functional imaging data (fMRI/PET) following intranasal trigeminal stimulation with carbon dioxide (CO2), a stimulus known to exclusively activate the trigeminal system. Meta-analysis tools are able to identify activations common across studies, thereby enabling activation mapping with higher certainty. Activation foci of nine studies utilizing trigeminal stimulation were included in the meta-analysis. We found significant ALE scores, thus indicating consistent activation across studies, in the brainstem, ventrolateral posterior thalamic nucleus, anterior cingulate cortex, insula, precentral gyrus, as well as in primary and secondary somatosensory cortices – a network known for the processing of intranasal nociceptive stimuli. Significant ALE values were also observed in the piriform cortex, insula, and the orbitofrontal cortex, areas known to process chemosensory stimuli, and in association cortices. Additionally, the trigeminal ALE statistics were directly compared with ALE statistics originating from olfactory stimulation, demonstrating considerable overlap in activation. In conclusion, the results of this meta-analysis map the human neuronal correlates of intranasal trigeminal stimulation with high statistical certainty and demonstrate that the cortical areas recruited during the processing of intranasal CO2 stimuli include those outside traditional trigeminal areas. Moreover, through illustrations of the considerable overlap between brain areas that process trigeminal and olfactory information; these results demonstrate the interconnectivity of flavor processing. PMID:19913573

  14. Lateralization in human nasal chemoreception: differences in bilateral electrodermal responses related to olfactory and trigeminal stimuli.

    PubMed

    Brand, G; Millot, J L; Saffaux, M; Morand-Villeneuve, N

    2002-07-18

    The study of olfactory lateralization in humans has given rise to many publications, but the findings have often been contradictory. There is growing evidence to suggest that the nature of the olfactory stimulus influences the processes of lateralization. An important factor could be the trigeminal component. Indeed, most odorants simultaneously stimulate both olfactory (CN I) and trigeminal (CN V) systems which differ in terms of their central projections, ipsilaterally for CN I and contralaterally for CN V. The aim of this study was to investigate variations in psychophysiological measurements between a nasal input with low (phenyl ethyl alcohol (PEA)) and high (allyl isothiocyanate (AIC)) intranal trigeminal stimulation. In a first experiment (20 subjects), the intensity, hedonicity and irritation levels of stimulus were tested with a psychophysical evaluation to study the possible influences of perceptual characteristics. A second experiment (37 subjects) used bilateral electrodermal recordings and compared the skin conductance responses (SCRs) for both nasal inputs on either monorhinal and birhinal stimulations. Firstly, the electrodermal activity (EDA) results showed no differences between the two nostrils for PEA as well as AIC, but differences in relation to the type of stimulus, e.g. higher amplitude in response to AIC versus PEA. Secondly, the results indicated bilateral differences in EDA recordings related to the nature of the stimulus and are discussed in terms of hemispheric asymmetric activation.

  15. Excitability of the human trigeminal motoneuronal pool and interactions with other brainstem reflex pathways

    PubMed Central

    Cruccu, G; Truini, A; Priori, A

    2001-01-01

    We studied the properties of motoneurones and Ia-motoneuronal connections in the human trigeminal system, and their functional interactions with other brainstem reflex pathways mediated by non-muscular (Aβ) afferents. With surface EMG recordings we tested the recovery cycles of the heteronymous H-reflex in the temporalis muscle and the homonymous silent period in the masseter muscle both elicited by stimulation of the masseteric nerve at the infratemporal fossa in nine healthy subjects. In four subjects single motor-unit responses were recorded from the temporalis muscle. In six subjects we also tested the effect of the stimulus to the mental nerve on the temporalis H-reflex and, conversely, the effect of Ia input (stimulus to the masseteric nerve) on the R1 component of the blink reflex in the orbicularis oculi muscle. The recovery cycle of the H-reflex showed a suppression peaking at the 5-20 ms interval; conversely the time course of the masseteric silent period was facilitated at comparable intervals. The inhibition of the test H-reflex was inversely related to the level of background voluntary contraction. Single motor units were unable to fire consistently in response to the test stimulus at intervals shorter than 50 ms. Mental nerve stimulation strongly depressed the H-reflex. The time course of this inhibition coincided with the EMG inhibition elicited by mental nerve stimulation during voluntary contraction. The trigeminal Ia input facilitated the R1 component of the blink reflex when the supraorbital test stimulation preceded the masseteric conditioning stimulation by 2 ms. We conclude that the time course of the recovery cycle of the heteronymous H-reflex in the temporalis muscle reflects the after-hyperpolarization potential (AHP) of trigeminal motoneurones, and that the Ia trigeminal input is integrated with other brainstem reflexes. PMID:11230527

  16. RNA-Seq Analysis of Human Trigeminal and Dorsal Root Ganglia with a Focus on Chemoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Flegel, Caroline; Schöbel, Nicole; Altmüller, Janine; Becker, Christian; Tannapfel, Andrea; Hatt, Hanns; Gisselmann, Günter

    2015-01-01

    The chemosensory capacity of the somatosensory system relies on the appropriate expression of chemoreceptors, which detect chemical stimuli and transduce sensory information into cellular signals. Knowledge of the complete repertoire of the chemoreceptors expressed in human sensory ganglia is lacking. This study employed the next-generation sequencing technique (RNA-Seq) to conduct the first expression analysis of human trigeminal ganglia (TG) and dorsal root ganglia (DRG). We analyzed the data with a focus on G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and ion channels, which are (potentially) involved in chemosensation by somatosensory neurons in the human TG and DRG. For years, transient receptor potential (TRP) channels have been considered the main group of receptors for chemosensation in the trigeminal system. Interestingly, we could show that sensory ganglia also express a panel of different olfactory receptors (ORs) with putative chemosensory function. To characterize OR expression in more detail, we performed microarray, semi-quantitative RT-PCR experiments, and immunohistochemical staining. Additionally, we analyzed the expression data to identify further known or putative classes of chemoreceptors in the human TG and DRG. Our results give an overview of the major classes of chemoreceptors expressed in the human TG and DRG and provide the basis for a broader understanding of the reception of chemical cues. PMID:26070209

  17. Latent Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Infection Does Not Induce Apoptosis in Human Trigeminal Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Lindemann, Anja; Sinicina, Inga; Strupp, Michael; Brandt, Thomas; Hüfner, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) can establish lifelong latency in human trigeminal ganglia. Latently infected ganglia contain CD8+ T cells, which secrete granzyme B and are thus capable of inducing neuronal apoptosis. Using immunohistochemistry and single-cell reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), higher frequency and transcript levels of caspase-3 were found in HSV-1-negative compared to HSV-1-positive ganglia and neurons, respectively. No terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay-positive neurons were detected. The infiltrating T cells do not induce apoptosis in latently infected neurons. PMID:25762734

  18. Dose-Response Functions for the Olfactory, Nasal Trigeminal, and Ocular Trigeminal Detectability of Airborne Chemicals by Humans.

    PubMed

    Cometto-Muñiz, J Enrique; Abraham, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    We gathered from the literature 47 odor and 37 trigeminal (nasal and ocular) chemesthetic psychometric (i.e., detectability or dose-response) functions from a group of 41 chemicals. Vapors delivered were quantified by analytical methods. All functions were very well fitted by the sigmoid (logistic) equation: y = 1 / (1 + e({-(x-C)/D})), where parameter C quantifies the detection threshold concentration and parameter D the steepness of the function. Odor and chemesthetic functions showed no concentration overlap: olfactory functions grew along the parts per billion (ppb by volume) range or lower, whereas trigeminal functions grew along the part per million (ppm by volume) range. Although, on average, odor detectability rose from chance detection to perfect detection within 2 orders of magnitude in concentration, chemesthetic detectability did it within one. For 16 compounds having at least 1 odor and 1 chemesthetic function, the average gap between the 2 functions was 4.6 orders of magnitude in concentration. A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) using 5 chemical descriptors that had previously described stand-alone odor and chemesthetic threshold values, also holds promise to describe, and eventually predict, olfactory and chemesthetic detectability functions, albeit functions from additional compounds are needed to strengthen the QSAR.

  19. No relevant modulation of TRPV1-mediated trigeminal pain by intranasal carbon dioxide in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Jürgens, Tim P; Reetz, Romy; May, Arne

    2013-04-10

    Nasal insufflation of CO2 has been shown to exert antinociceptive respectively antihyperalgesic effects in animal pain models using topical capsaicin with activation of TRPV1-receptor positive nociceptive neurons. Clinical benefit from CO2 inhalation in patients with craniofacial pain caused by a putative activation of TRPV1 receptor positive trigeminal neurons has also been reported. These effects are probably mediated via an activation of TRPV1 receptor - positive neurons in the nasal mucosa with subsequent central inhibitory effects (such as conditioned pain modulation). In this study, we aimed to examine the effects of intranasal CO2 on a human model of craniofacial pain elicited by nasal application of capsaicin. In a first experiment, 48 healthy volunteers without previous craniofacial pain received intranasal capsaicin to provoke trigeminal pain elicited by activation of TRVP1 positive nociceptive neurons. Then, CO2 or air was insufflated alternatingly into the nasal cavity at a flow rate of 1 l/min for 60 sec each. In the subsequent experiment, all participants were randomized into 2 groups of 24 each and received either continuous nasal insufflation of CO2 or placebo for 18:40 min after nociceptive stimulation with intranasal capsaicin. In both experiments, pain was rated on a numerical rating scale every 60 sec. Contrary to previous animal studies, the effects of CO2 on experimental trigeminal pain were only marginal. In the first experiment, CO2 reduced pain ratings only minimally by 5.3% compared to air if given alternatingly with significant results for the main factor GROUP (F1,47=4.438; p=0.041) and the interaction term TIME*GROUP (F2.6,121.2=3.3; p=0.029) in the repeated-measures ANOVA. However, these effects were abrogated after continuous insufflation of CO2 or placebo with no significant changes for the main factors or the interaction term. Although mild modulatory effects of low-flow intranasal CO2 could be seen in this human model of TRPV-1

  20. No relevant modulation of TRPV1-mediated trigeminal pain by intranasal carbon dioxide in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nasal insufflation of CO2 has been shown to exert antinociceptive respectively antihyperalgesic effects in animal pain models using topical capsaicin with activation of TRPV1-receptor positive nociceptive neurons. Clinical benefit from CO2 inhalation in patients with craniofacial pain caused by a putative activation of TRPV1 receptor positive trigeminal neurons has also been reported. These effects are probably mediated via an activation of TRPV1 receptor - positive neurons in the nasal mucosa with subsequent central inhibitory effects (such as conditioned pain modulation). In this study, we aimed to examine the effects of intranasal CO2 on a human model of craniofacial pain elicited by nasal application of capsaicin. Methods In a first experiment, 48 healthy volunteers without previous craniofacial pain received intranasal capsaicin to provoke trigeminal pain elicited by activation of TRVP1 positive nociceptive neurons. Then, CO2 or air was insufflated alternatingly into the nasal cavity at a flow rate of 1 l/min for 60 sec each. In the subsequent experiment, all participants were randomized into 2 groups of 24 each and received either continuous nasal insufflation of CO2 or placebo for 18:40 min after nociceptive stimulation with intranasal capsaicin. In both experiments, pain was rated on a numerical rating scale every 60 sec. Results Contrary to previous animal studies, the effects of CO2 on experimental trigeminal pain were only marginal. In the first experiment, CO2 reduced pain ratings only minimally by 5.3% compared to air if given alternatingly with significant results for the main factor GROUP (F1,47 = 4.438; p = 0.041) and the interaction term TIME*GROUP (F2.6,121.2 = 3.3; p = 0.029) in the repeated-measures ANOVA. However, these effects were abrogated after continuous insufflation of CO2 or placebo with no significant changes for the main factors or the interaction term. Conclusions Although mild modulatory effects of low

  1. Gene therapy for trigeminal pain in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tzabazis, Alexander Z.; Klukinov, Michael; Feliciano, David P.; Wilson, Steven P.; Yeomans, David C.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of a single direct injection of viral vector encoding for encephalin to induce a widespread expression of the transgene and potential analgesic effect in trigeminal behavioral pain models in mice. After direct injection of HSV-1 based vectors encoding for human preproenkephalin (SHPE) or the lacZ reporter gene (SHZ.1, control virus) into the trigeminal ganglia in mice, we performed an orofacial formalin test and assessed the cumulative nociceptive behavior at different time points after injection of the viral vectors. We observed an analgesic effect on nociceptive behavior that lasted up to 8 weeks after a single injection of SHPE into the trigeminal ganglia. Control virus injected animals showed nociceptive behavior similar to naïve mice. The analgesic effect of SHPE injection was reversed/attenuated by subcutaneous naloxone injections, a μ-opioid receptor antagonist. SHPE injected mice also showed normalization in withdrawal latencies upon thermal noxious stimulation of inflamed ears after subdermal complete Freund’s adjuvans injection indicating widespread expression of the transgene. Quantitative immunohistochemistry of trigeminal ganglia showed expression of human preproenkephalin after SHPE injection. Direct injection of viral vectors proved to be useful for exploring the distinct pathophysiology of the trigeminal system and could also be an interesting addition to the pain therapists’ armamentarium. PMID:24572785

  2. Neurochemical dynamics of acute orofacial pain in the human trigeminal brainstem nuclear complex.

    PubMed

    de Matos, Nuno M P; Hock, Andreas; Wyss, Michael; Ettlin, Dominik A; Brügger, Mike

    2017-09-04

    The trigeminal brainstem sensory nuclear complex is the first central relay structure mediating orofacial somatosensory and nociceptive perception. Animal studies suggest a substantial involvement of neurochemical alterations at such basal CNS levels in acute and chronic pain processing. Translating this animal based knowledge to humans is challenging. Human related examining of brainstem functions are challenged by MR related peculiarities as well as applicability aspects of experimentally standardized paradigms. Based on our experience with an MR compatible human orofacial pain model, the aims of the present study were twofold: 1) from a technical perspective, the evaluation of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3 T regarding measurement accuracy of neurochemical profiles in this small brainstem nuclear complex and 2) the examination of possible neurochemical alterations induced by an experimental orofacial pain model. Data from 13 healthy volunteers aged 19-46 years were analyzed and revealed high quality spectra with significant reductions in total N-acetylaspartate (N-acetylaspartate + N-acetylaspartylglutamate) (-3.7%, p = 0.009) and GABA (-10.88%, p = 0.041) during the pain condition. These results might reflect contributions of N-acetylaspartate and N-acetylaspartylglutamate in neuronal activity-dependent physiologic processes and/or excitatory neurotransmission, whereas changes in GABA might indicate towards a reduction in tonic GABAergic functioning during nociceptive signaling. Summarized, the present study indicates the applicability of (1)H-MRS to obtain neurochemical dynamics within the human trigeminal brainstem sensory nuclear complex. Further developments are needed to pave the way towards bridging important animal based knowledge with human research to understand the neurochemistry of orofacial nociception and pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Induction of varicella zoster virus DNA replication in dissociated human trigeminal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Cohrs, Randall J; Badani, Hussain; Baird, Nicholas L; White, Teresa M; Sanford, Bridget; Gilden, Don

    2017-02-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV), a human neurotropic alphaherpesvirus, becomes latent after primary infection and reactivates to produce zoster. To study VZV latency and reactivation, human trigeminal ganglia removed within 24 h after death were mechanically dissociated, randomly distributed into six-well tissue culture plates and incubated with reagents to inactivate nerve growth factor (NGF) or phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-kinase) pathways. At 5 days, VZV DNA increased in control and PI3-kinase inhibitor-treated cultures to the same extent, but was significantly more abundant in anti-NGF-treated cultures (p = 0.001). Overall, VZV DNA replication is regulated in part by an NGF pathway that is PI3-kinase-independent.

  4. Expression of herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) in the cornea and trigeminal ganglia of normal and HSV-1 infected mice.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, S Krisztian; Tiwari, Vaibhav; Prandovszky, Emese; Dosa, Sandor; Bacsa, Sarolta; Valyi-Nagy, Klara; Shukla, Deepak; Valyi-Nagy, Tibor

    2009-10-01

    Herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) plays a critical role in the regulation of inflammation through interaction with its natural ligands LIGHT and lymphotoxin alpha and also serves as one of the entry receptors of herpes simplex virus (HSV). The purpose of this study was to better understand the expression of HVEM in the cornea and trigeminal ganglia (TG), which are important targets of HSV infection. Immunohistochemistry was used to define HVEM expression in the cornea and TG of normal and HSV-1 infected mice euthanized 2 to 5 days or 7 months following corneal inoculation of virus. We found that HVEM is widely expressed in the normal corneal epithelium and endothelium, is weakly and focally expressed in the corneal stroma, and is expressed in a portion of neurons and non-neuronal cells in the TG. Acute HSV-1 keratitis and ganglionitis were associated with increased HVEM expression in the corneal epithelium and stroma and in neurons and non-neuronal cells of TG, and many inflammatory cells in these tissues also expressed HVEM. TG derived from mice 7 months after virus inoculation demonstrated latent HSV-1 infection that was associated with increased HVEM expression in neurons and non-neuronal cells relative to uninfected control tissues. Latent TG also contained focal infiltrates of mononuclear inflammatory cells, many of which expressed HVEM. Corneas derived from latently infected mice demonstrated chronic keratitis, with no evidence of virus replication or increased HVEM expression in the corneal epithelium, and inflammatory cells present showed only weak HVEM expression. HVEM is expressed in the cornea and TG and therefore may serve as an HSV entry receptor in these tissues. Furthermore, these findings raise the possibility that changes in HVEM expression following ocular HSV-1 infection can modulate HSV spread and infection-induced inflammation in the cornea and TG.

  5. Evaluation of Trigeminal Sensitivity to Ammonia in Asthmatics and Healthy Human Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Maja; Diamond, Jeanmarie; Schuster, Benno; Dalton, Pamela

    2009-01-01

    Background Asthmatics often report the triggering or exacerbation of respiratory symptoms following exposure to airborne irritants, which in some cases may result from stimulation of irritant receptors in the upper airways inducing reflexive broncho-constriction. Ammonia (NH3) is a common constituent of commercially available household products, and in high concentration has the potential to elicit sensory irritation in the eyes and upper respiratory tract of humans. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the irritation potential of ammonia in asthmatics and healthy volunteers and to determine whether differences in nasal or ocular irritant sensitivity to ammonia between these two groups could account for the exacerbation of symptoms reported by asthmatics following exposure to an irritant. Methods 25 healthy and 15 mild/moderate persistent asthmatic volunteers, with reported sensitivity to household cleaning products, were evaluated for their sensitivity to the ocular and nasal irritancy of NH3. Lung function was evaluated at baseline and multiple time points following exposure. Results Irritation thresholds did not differ between asthmatics and healthy controls, nor did ratings of odor intensity, annoyance and irritancy following exposure to NH3 concentrations at and above the irritant threshold for longer periods of time (30 sec).Importantly, no changes in lung function occurred following exposure to NH3 for any individuals in either group. Conclusion Despite heightened symptom reports to environmental irritants among asthmatics, the ocular and nasal trigeminal system of mild-moderate asthmatics does not appear to be more sensitive or more reactive than that of non-asthmatics, nor does short duration exposure to ammonia at irritant levels induce changes in lung function. At least in brief exposures, the basis for some asthmatics to experience adverse responses to volatile compounds in everyday life may arise from factors other than trigeminally

  6. The composition of trigeminal nerve branches in normal adult chickens and after debeaking at different ages.

    PubMed

    Dubbeldam, J L; De Bakker, M A; Bout, R G

    1995-06-01

    The long term effects of amputation of the tip of the beak were studied in adult hens that were debeaked on the day of hatching, at the age of 8 d and at 6 wk, by EM analysis of fibre spectra of the medial branch of the ophthalmic nerve and of the intramandibular nerve. Three categories of fibre were distinguished for further analysis, i.e. unmyelinated axons, small myelinated fibres and large myelinated fibres. In normal birds the ophthalmic nerve contains relatively more large fibres than the intramandibular nerve. Amputation consistently results in a reduction of the number of large fibres and a substantial increase in the number of small myelinated fibres. The proportion of unmyelinated axons is rather variable, but is not affected by beak trimming. Age at debeaking has no effect. The observations are inconclusive concerning the possibility of heightened nociception.

  7. Trigeminal Neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Cruccu, Giorgio

    2017-04-01

    Although trigeminal neuralgia is well known to neurologists, recent developments in classification and clinical diagnosis, new MRI methods, and a debate about surgical options necessitate an update on the topic. Currently, a worldwide controversy exists regarding the classification, diagnostic process, and surgical treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. This controversy has been caused on one side by the recognition that some 50% of patients with trigeminal neuralgia, apart from characteristic paroxysmal attacks, also have continuous pain in the same territory, which results in greater diagnostic difficulties and is associated with a lower response to medical and surgical treatments. In contrast, recent developments in MRI methods allow differentiation between a mere neurovascular contact and an effective compression of the trigeminal root by an anomalous vessel, which implies more difficulties in the choice of surgical treatment, with the indication for microvascular decompression becoming more restricted. This article proposes that the diagnosis of trigeminal neuralgia, with or without concomitant continuous pain, must rely on clinical grounds only. Diagnostic tests are necessary to distinguish three etiologic categories: idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia (nothing is found), classic trigeminal neuralgia (an anomalous vessel produces morphologic changes of the trigeminal root near its entry into the pons), and secondary trigeminal neuralgia (due to major neurologic disease, such as multiple sclerosis or tumors at the cerebellopontine angle). Carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine (ie, voltage-gated, frequency-dependent sodium channel blockers) are still the first-choice medical treatment, although many patients experience significant side effects, and those with concomitant continuous pain respond less well to treatment. The development of sodium channel blockers that are selective for the sodium channel 1.7 (Nav1.7) receptor will hopefully help. Although all the surgical

  8. Selective retention of herpes simplex virus-specific T cells in latently infected human trigeminal ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Verjans, Georges M. G. M.; Hintzen, Rogier Q.; van Dun, Jessica M.; Poot, Angelique; Milikan, Johannes C.; Laman, Jon D.; Langerak, Anton W.; Kinchington, Paul R.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.

    2007-01-01

    Primary infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and varicella zoster virus (VZV) results in lifelong latent infections of neurons in sensory ganglia such as the trigeminal ganglia (TG). It has been postulated that T cells retained in TG inhibit reactivation of latent virus. The acquisition of TG specimens of individuals within hours after death offered the unique opportunity to characterize the phenotype and specificity of TG-resident T cells in humans. High numbers of activated CD8+ T cells expressing a late effector memory phenotype were found to reside in latently infected TG. The T cell infiltrate was oligoclonal, and T cells selectively clustered around HSV-1 but not VZV latently infected neurons. Neuronal damage was not observed despite granzyme B expression by the neuron-interacting CD8+ T cells. The TG-resident T cells, mainly CD8+ T cells, were directed against HSV-1 and not to VZV, despite neuronal expression of VZV proteins. The results implicate that herpesvirus latency in human TG is associated with a local, persistent T cell response, comprising activated late effector memory CD8+ T cells that appear to control HSV-1 latency by noncytolytic pathways. In contrast, T cells do not seem to be directly involved in controlling VZV latency in human TG. PMID:17360672

  9. Trigeminal neuralgia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 117. Zakrzewska JM, Chen HI, Lee JYK. Trigeminal and glossopharyngeal neuralgia. In: McMohan ... A.M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the ...

  10. The representation of experimental tooth pain from upper and lower jaws in the human trigeminal pathway.

    PubMed

    Weigelt, A; Terekhin, P; Kemppainen, P; Dörfler, A; Forster, C

    2010-06-01

    FMRI was used to study the differences of cerebral processing of nociceptive input from the 2nd and the 3rd branches of the trigeminal nerve by electrical stimulation of the tooth pulps of the upper and lower canines. The focus of the study was an investigation of the different levels of the trigeminal system in brainstem, thalamus and in cortical regions which are known to be involved in pain processing. Increased blood oxygen level dependency (BOLD) signals were found ipsilaterally in the trigeminal ganglion and the spinal nucleus (SpV) of the trigeminal nerve. SpV-related activations showed some somatotopic organization. Bilateral activation was found in the structures of the antinociceptive system in the midbrain. Contralateral activations were encountered at the level of the pons. In the thalamus ipsilateral activations were found in the ventral parts. Bilateral activation occurred in the medial dorsal nuclei. At the cortical level BOLD activations were encountered bilaterally in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1, lateral pain system), the cingulate and insular cortex (medial pain system). In the cortex a small difference in the representation of the two trigeminal branches was detected only in S1 on both hemispheres. These findings demonstrate that trigeminal pain markedly activates the lateral and medial pain projection systems and the majority of the affected brain regions showed no difference regarding the input from lower or upper tooth. This lack of discrimination may explain why sometimes it is difficult for patients to locate the exact source of the intraoral clinical pain conditions.

  11. Normalization in human somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Gijs Joost; Arnedo, Vanessa; Offen, Shani; Heeger, David J; Grant, Arthur C

    2015-11-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to measure activity in human somatosensory cortex and to test for cross-digit suppression. Subjects received stimulation (vibration of varying amplitudes) to the right thumb (target) with or without concurrent stimulation of the right middle finger (mask). Subjects were less sensitive to target stimulation (psychophysical detection thresholds were higher) when target and mask digits were stimulated concurrently compared with when the target was stimulated in isolation. fMRI voxels in a region of the left postcentral gyrus each responded when either digit was stimulated. A regression model (called a forward model) was used to separate the fMRI measurements from these voxels into two hypothetical channels, each of which responded selectively to only one of the two digits. For the channel tuned to the target digit, responses in the left postcentral gyrus increased with target stimulus amplitude but were suppressed by concurrent stimulation to the mask digit, evident as a shift in the gain of the response functions. For the channel tuned to the mask digit, a constant baseline response was evoked for all target amplitudes when the mask was absent and responses decreased with increasing target amplitude when the mask was concurrently presented. A computational model based on divisive normalization provided a good fit to the measurements for both mask-absent and target + mask stimulation. We conclude that the normalization model can explain cross-digit suppression in human somatosensory cortex, supporting the hypothesis that normalization is a canonical neural computation.

  12. Trigeminal neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Cruccu, Giorgio; Finnerup, Nanna B.; Jensen, Troels S.; Scholz, Joachim; Sindou, Marc; Svensson, Peter; Zakrzewska, Joanna M.; Nurmikko, Turo

    2016-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is an exemplary condition of neuropathic facial pain. However, formally classifying TN as neuropathic pain based on the grading system of the International Association for the Study of Pain is complicated by the requirement of objective signs confirming an underlying lesion or disease of the somatosensory system. The latest version of the International Classification of Headache Disorders created similar difficulties by abandoning the term symptomatic TN for manifestations caused by major neurologic disease, such as tumors or multiple sclerosis. These diagnostic challenges hinder the triage of TN patients for therapy and clinical trials, and hamper the design of treatment guidelines. In response to these shortcomings, we have developed a classification of TN that aligns with the nosology of other neurologic disorders and neuropathic pain. We propose 3 diagnostic categories. Classical TN requires demonstration of morphologic changes in the trigeminal nerve root from vascular compression. Secondary TN is due to an identifiable underlying neurologic disease. TN of unknown etiology is labeled idiopathic. Diagnostic certainty is graded possible when pain paroxysms occur in the distribution of the trigeminal nerve branches. Triggered paroxysms permit the designation of clinically established TN and probable neuropathic pain. Imaging and neurophysiologic tests that establish the etiology of classical or secondary TN determine definite neuropathic pain. PMID:27306631

  13. Spontaneous trigeminal allodynia in rats: a model of primary headache.

    PubMed

    Oshinsky, Michael L; Sanghvi, Menka M; Maxwell, Christina R; Gonzalez, Dorian; Spangenberg, Rebecca J; Cooper, Marnie; Silberstein, Stephen D

    2012-10-01

    Animal models are essential for studying the pathophysiology of headache disorders and as a screening tool for new therapies. Most animal models modify a normal animal in an attempt to mimic migraine symptoms. They require manipulation to activate the trigeminal nerve or dural nociceptors. At best, they are models of secondary headache. No existing model can address the fundamental question: How is a primary headache spontaneously initiated? In the process of obtaining baseline periorbital von Frey thresholds in a wild-type Sprague-Dawley rat, we discovered a rat with spontaneous episodic trigeminal allodynia (manifested by episodically changing periorbital pain threshold). Subsequent mating showed that the trait is inherited. Animals with spontaneous trigeminal allodynia allow us to study the pathophysiology of primary recurrent headache disorders. To validate this as a model for migraine, we tested the effects of clinically proven acute and preventive migraine treatments on spontaneous changes in rat periorbital sensitivity. Sumatriptan, ketorolac, and dihydroergotamine temporarily reversed the low periorbital pain thresholds. Thirty days of chronic valproic acid treatment prevented spontaneous changes in trigeminal allodynia. After discontinuation, the rats returned to their baseline of spontaneous episodic threshold changes. We also tested the effects of known chemical human migraine triggers. On days when the rats did not have allodynia and showed normal periorbital von Frey thresholds, glycerol trinitrate and calcitonin gene related peptide induced significant decreases in the periorbital pain threshold. This model can be used as a predictive model for drug development and for studies of putative biomarkers for headache diagnosis and treatment.

  14. Evidence of ancillary trigeminal innervation of levator palpebrae in the general population.

    PubMed

    Lehman, A M; Dong, C C; Harries, A M; Patel, A; Honey, C R; Patel, M S

    2014-02-01

    The cranial synkineses are a group of disorders encompassing a variety of involuntary co-contractions of the facial, masticatory, or extraocular muscles that occur during a particular volitional movement. The neuroanatomical pathways for synkineses largely remain undefined. Our studies explored a normal synkinesis long observed in the general population - that of jaw opening during efforts to open the eyelids widely. To document this phenomenon, we observed 186 consecutive participants inserting or removing contact lenses to identify jaw opening. Seeking electrophysiological evidence, in a second study we enrolled individuals undergoing vascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia or hemifacial spasm, without a history of jaw-winking, ptosis, or strabismus, to record any motor responses in levator palpebrae superioris (LPS) upon stimulation of the trigeminal motor root. Stimulus was applied to the trigeminal motor root while an electrode in levator recorded the response. We found that 37 participants (20%) opened their mouth partially or fully during contact lens manipulation. In the second study, contraction of LPS with trigeminal motor stimulation was documented in two of six patients, both undergoing surgery for trigeminal neuralgia. We speculate these results might provide evidence of an endogenous synkinesis, indicating that trigeminal-derived innervation of levator could exist in a significant minority of the general population. Our observations demonstrate plasticity in the human cranial nerve innervation pattern and may have implications for treating Marcus Gunn jaw-winking.

  15. Gamma Knife rhizotomy-induced histopathology in multiple sclerosis-related trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Phillips, David B; Del Bigio, Marc R; Kaufmann, Anthony M

    2014-12-01

    In this report, the authors describe the pathological changes in the human trigeminal nerve after Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Three trigeminal nerves of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS)-related trigeminal neuralgia (MSTN) after Gamma Knife radiosurgery and other ablative procedures were examined by a neuropathologist. These cases were compared with 3 patients with typical TN who underwent partial surgical rhizotomy following recurrent symptoms after gasserian injury procedures, as well as with autopsy specimens from patients with and without MSTN. The three irradiated MS-TN specimens exhibited axon loss, demyelination, myelin debris, and fibrosis. Mild lymphocytic infiltrate was present in all 3 samples from MS-TN patients. The nonirradiated trigeminal nerve samples were generally well myelinated with rare degenerating axons. The microscopic findings in trigeminal nerve autopsy specimens were normal in patients without TN, with MS but not TN, and MS-TN. The inflammation observed in MS-TN specimens collected following Gamma Knife radiosurgery has not previously been described in the literature. These data provide new insight into the changes that occur in trigeminal nerve following stereotactic radiosurgery.

  16. Subcutaneous Botulinum toxin type A reduces capsaicin-induced trigeminal pain and vasomotor reactions in human skin.

    PubMed

    Gazerani, Parisa; Pedersen, Natalia Spicina; Staahl, Camilla; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2009-01-01

    The present human study aimed at investigating the effect of subcutaneous administration of Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT/A) on capsaicin-induced trigeminal pain, neurogenic inflammation and experimentally induced cutaneous pain modalities. Fourteen healthy males (26.3+/-2.6 years) were included in this double-blind and placebo-controlled trial. The subjects received subcutaneous BoNT/A (22.5U) and isotonic saline in the mirror sides of their forehead. Pain and neurogenic inflammation was induced by four intradermal injections of capsaicin (100mug/muL) (before, and days 1, 3 and 7 after treatments). The capsaicin-induced pain intensity, pain area, the area of secondary hyperalgesia, the area of visible flare and vasomotor reactions were recorded together with cutaneous heat, electrical and pressure pain thresholds. BoNT/A reduced the capsaicin-induced trigeminal pain intensity compared to saline (F=37.9, P<0.001). The perceived pain area was smaller for the BoNT/A-treated side compared to saline (F=7.8, P<0.05). BoNT/A reduced the capsaicin-induced secondary hyperalgesia (F=5.3, P<0.05) and flare area (F=10.3, P<0.01) compared to saline. BoNT/A reduced blood flow (F(1,26)=109.5, P<0.001) and skin temperature (F(1,26)=63.1, P<0.001) at the capsaicin injection sites compared to saline and its suppressive effect was maximal at days 3 and 7 (P<0.05, post hoc test). BoNT/A elevated cutaneous heat pain thresholds (F=17.1, P<0.001) compared to saline; however, no alteration was recorded for electrical or pressure pain thresholds (P>0.05). Findings from the present study suggest that BoNT/A appears to preferentially target Cfibers and probably TRPV1-receptors, block neurotransmitter release and subsequently reduce pain, neurogenic inflammation and cutaneous heat pain threshold.

  17. Characterization of Neuronal Populations in the Human Trigeminal Ganglion and Their Association with Latent Herpes Simplex Virus-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Anja K. E.; Sinicina, Inga; Strupp, Michael; Brandt, Thomas; Theil, Diethilde; Hüfner, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    Following primary infection Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) establishes lifelong latency in the neurons of human sensory ganglia. Upon reactivation HSV-1 can cause neurological diseases such as facial palsy, vestibular neuritis or encephalitis. Certain populations of sensory neurons have been shown to be more susceptible to latent infection in the animal model, but this has not been addressed in human tissue. In the present study, trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons expressing six neuronal marker proteins were characterized, based on staining with antibodies against the GDNF family ligand receptor Ret, the high-affinity nerve growth factor receptor TrkA, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), the antibody RT97 against 200kDa neurofilament, calcitonin gene-related peptide and peripherin. The frequencies of marker-positive neurons and their average neuronal sizes were assessed, with TrkA-positive (61.82%) neurons being the most abundant, and Ret-positive (26.93%) the least prevalent. Neurons positive with the antibody RT97 (1253 µm2) were the largest, and those stained against peripherin (884 µm2) were the smallest. Dual immunofluorescence revealed at least a 4.5% overlap for every tested marker combination, with overlap for the combinations TrkA/Ret, TrkA/RT97 and Ret/nNOS lower, and the overlap between Ret/CGRP being higher than would be expected by chance. With respect to latent HSV-1 infection, latency associated transcripts (LAT) were detected using in situ hybridization (ISH) in neurons expressing each of the marker proteins. In contrast to the mouse model, co-localization with neuronal markers Ret or CGRP mirrored the magnitude of these neuron populations, whereas for the other four neuronal markers fewer marker-positive cells were also LAT-ISH+. Ret and CGRP are both known to label neurons related to pain signaling. PMID:24367603

  18. Perception of trigeminal mixtures.

    PubMed

    Filiou, Renée-Pier; Lepore, Franco; Bryant, Bruce; Lundström, Johan N; Frasnelli, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The trigeminal system is a chemical sense allowing for the perception of chemosensory information in our environment. However, contrary to smell and taste, we lack a thorough understanding of the trigeminal processing of mixtures. We, therefore, investigated trigeminal perception using mixtures of 3 relatively receptor-specific agonists together with one control odor in different proportions to determine basic perceptual dimensions of trigeminal perception. We found that 4 main dimensions were linked to trigeminal perception: sensations of intensity, warmth, coldness, and pain. We subsequently investigated perception of binary mixtures of trigeminal stimuli by means of these 4 perceptual dimensions using different concentrations of a cooling stimulus (eucalyptol) mixed with a stimulus that evokes warmth perception (cinnamaldehyde). To determine if sensory interactions are mainly of central or peripheral origin, we presented stimuli in a physical "mixture" or as a "combination" presented separately to individual nostrils. Results showed that mixtures generally yielded higher ratings than combinations on the trigeminal dimensions "intensity," "warm," and "painful," whereas combinations yielded higher ratings than mixtures on the trigeminal dimension "cold." These results suggest dimension-specific interactions in the perception of trigeminal mixtures, which may be explained by particular interactions that may take place on peripheral or central levels.

  19. Chemosensory properties of the trigeminal system.

    PubMed

    Viana, Félix

    2011-01-19

    The capacity of cutaneous, including trigeminal endings, to detect chemicals is known as chemesthesis or cutaneous chemosensation. This sensory function involves the activation of nociceptor and thermoreceptor endings and has a protective or defensive function, as many of these substances are irritants or poisonous. However, humans have also developed a liking for the distinct sharpness or pungency of many foods, beverages, and spices following activation of the same sensory afferents. Our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of chemosensation in the trigeminal system has experienced enormous progress in the past decade, following the cloning and functional characterization of several ion channels activated by physical and chemical stimuli. This brief review attempts to summarize our current knowledge in this field, including a functional description of various sensory channels, especially TRP channels, involved in trigeminal chemosensitivy. Finally, some of these new findings are discussed in the context of the pathophysiology of trigeminal chemosensation, including pain, pruritus, migraine, cough, airway inflammation, and ophthalmic diseases.

  20. Pancreastatin molecular forms in normal human plasma.

    PubMed

    Kitayama, N; Tateishi, K; Funakoshi, A; Miyasaka, K; Shimazoe, T; Kono, A; Iwamoto, N; Matsuoka, Y

    1994-01-01

    Circulating molecular forms with pancreastatin (PST)-like immunoreactivity in plasma from normal subjects were examined. An immunoreactive form corresponding to a human PST-like sequence [human chromogranin-A-(250-301)] (hPST-52) and a larger form (mol wt 15-21 kDa) were detected by gel filtration of plasma from normal subjects. On high performance liquid chromatography, predominant immunoreactive forms coeluted with the three larger forms which were purified from the xenograft of human pancreatic islet cell carcinoma cell line QGP-1N cells and with synthetic hPST-52. The fraction containing larger forms purified from xenograft of QGP-1N cells had biological activity equivalent to that of hPST-52 on the inhibition of pancreatic exocrine secretion. These results suggest that the larger molecular forms as well as hPST-52 may be physiologically important circulating forms of PST in human.

  1. Familial classic trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Fernández Rodríguez, B; Simonet, C; Cerdán, D M; Morollón, N; Guerrero, P; Tabernero, C; Duarte, J

    2017-03-24

    The classic form of trigeminal neuralgia is usually sporadic (no familial clustering). However, around 2% of all cases of trigeminal neuralgia may be familial. Describing this entity may be useful for diagnosing this process and may also be key to determining the underlying causes of sporadic classical trigeminal neuralgia. We report on cases in a series of 5 families with at least 2 members with classic trigeminal neuralgia, amounting to a total of 11 cases. We recorded cases of familial classical trigeminal neuralgia between March 2014 and March 2015 by systematically interviewing all patients with a diagnosis of trigeminal neuralgia who visited the neurology department on an outpatient basis. In our sample, most patients with familial classic trigeminal neuralgia were women. Mean age at onset was 62.9±13.93 years, decreasing in subsequent generations. V2 was the most frequently affected branch. Most of our patients responded well to medical treatment, and surgery was not effective in all cases. These family clusters support the hypothesis that classic trigeminal neuralgia may have a genetic origin. Several causes have been suggested, including inherited anatomical changes affecting the base of the skull which would promote compression of the trigeminal nerve by vascular structures, familial AHT (resulting in tortuous vessels that would compress the trigeminal nerve), and mutations in the gene coding for calcium channels leading to hyperexcitability. Classic trigeminal neuralgia may be an autosomal dominant disorder displaying genetic anticipation. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. TRPV1 receptor in the human trigeminal ganglion and spinal nucleus: immunohistochemical localization and comparison with the neuropeptides CGRP and SP.

    PubMed

    Quartu, Marina; Serra, Maria Pina; Boi, Marianna; Poddighe, Laura; Picci, Cristina; Demontis, Roberto; Del Fiacco, Marina

    2016-12-01

    This work presents new data concerning the immunohistochemical occurrence of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) receptor in the human trigeminal ganglion (TG) and spinal nucleus of subjects at different ontogenetic stages, from prenatal life to postnatal old age. Comparisons are made with the sensory neuropeptides calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP). TRPV1-like immunoreactive (LI) material was detected by western blot in homogenates of TG and medulla oblongata of subjects at prenatal and adult stages of life. Immunohistochemistry showed that expression of the TRPV1 receptor is mostly restricted to the small- and medium-sized TG neurons and to the caudal subdivision of the spinal trigeminal nucleus (Sp5C). The extent of the TRPV1-LI TG neuronal subpopulation was greater in subjects at early perinatal age than at late perinatal age and in postnatal life. Centrally, the TRPV1 receptor localized to fibre tracts and punctate elements, which were mainly distributed in the spinal tract, lamina I and inner lamina II of the Sp5C, whereas stained cells were rare. The TRPV1 receptor colocalized partially with CGRP and SP in the TG, and was incompletely codistributed with both neuropeptides in the spinal tract and in the superficial laminae of the Sp5C. Substantial differences were noted with respect to the distribution of the TRPV1-LI structures described in the rat Sp5C and with respect to the temporal expression of the receptor during the development of the rat spinal dorsal horn. The distinctive localization of TRPV1-LI material supports the concept of the involvement of TRPV1 receptor in the functional activity of the protopathic compartment of the human trigeminal sensory system, i.e. the processing and neurotransmission of thermal and pain stimuli.

  3. Spontaneous Trigeminal Allodynia in Rats: A Model of Primary Headache

    PubMed Central

    Oshinsky, Michael L.; Sanghvi, Menka M.; Maxwell, Christina R.; Gonzalez, Dorian; Spangenberg, Rebecca J.; Cooper, Marnie; Silberstein, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    Animal models are essential for studying the pathophysiology of headache disorders and as a screening tool for new therapies. Most animal models modify a normal animal in an attempt to mimic migraine symptoms. They require manipulation to activate the trigeminal nerve or dural nociceptors. At best, they are models of secondary headache. No existing model can address the fundamental question: How is a primary headache spontaneously initiated? In the process of obtaining baseline periorbital von Frey thresholds in a wild-type Sprague-Dawley rat, we discovered a rat with spontaneous episodic trigeminal allodynia (manifested by episodically changing periorbital pain threshold). Subsequent mating showed that the trait is inherited. Animals with spontaneous trigeminal allodynia allow us to study the pathophysiology of primary recurrent headache disorders. To validate this as a model for migraine, we tested the effects of clinically proven acute and preventive migraine treatments on spontaneous changes in rat periorbital sensitivity. Sumatriptan, ketorolac, and dihydroergotamine temporarily reversed the low periorbital pain thresholds. Thirty days of chronic valproic acid treatment prevented spontaneous changes in trigeminal allodynia. After discontinuation, the rats returned to their baseline of spontaneous episodic threshold changes. We also tested the effects of known chemical human migraine triggers. On days when the rats did not have allodynia and showed normal periorbital von Frey thresholds, glycerol trinitrate and calcitonin gene related peptide induced significant decreases in the periorbital pain threshold. This model can be used as a predictive model for drug development and for studies of putative biomarkers for headache diagnosis and treatment. PMID:22963523

  4. Effects of caffeine on the trigeminal blink reflex.

    PubMed

    Schicatano, Edward J

    2005-04-01

    The acoustic startle and trigeminal blink reflexes share the same motor output. Since caffeine has been shown to augment the startle reflex, it was proposed that caffeine would also increase the trigeminal blink reflex. In 6 humans, the effects of caffeine (100 mg) on the trigeminal blink reflex were investigated. Reflex blinks were elicited by stimulation of the supraorbital branch of the trigeminal nerve. Following ingestion of caffeinated coffee, reflex blinks increased in amplitude and duration and occurred at a shorter latency than reflex blinks following ingestion of decaffeinated coffee. Since the blink reflex is a brainstem reflex, these results suggest that the psychomotor effects of caffeine facilitate brainstem processing.

  5. NORMAL HUMAN VARIATION: REFOCUSSING THE ENHANCEMENT DEBATE

    PubMed Central

    Kahane, Guy; Savulescu, Julian

    2015-01-01

    This article draws attention to several common mistakes in thinking about biomedical enhancement, mistakes that are made even by some supporters of enhancement. We illustrate these mistakes by examining objections that John Harris has recently raised against the use of pharmacological interventions to directly modulate moral decision-making. We then apply these lessons to other influential figures in the debate about enhancement. One upshot of our argument is that many considerations presented as powerful objections to enhancement are really strong considerations in favour of biomedical enhancement, just in a different direction. Another upshot is that it is unfortunate that much of the current debate focuses on interventions that will radically transform normal human capacities. Such interventions are unlikely to be available in the near future, and may not even be feasible. But our argument shows that the enhancement project can still have a radical impact on human life even if biomedical enhancement operated entirely within the normal human range. PMID:23906367

  6. Normal human variation: refocussing the enhancement debate.

    PubMed

    Kahane, Guy; Savulescu, Julian

    2015-02-01

    This article draws attention to several common mistakes in thinking about biomedical enhancement, mistakes that are made even by some supporters of enhancement. We illustrate these mistakes by examining objections that John Harris has recently raised against the use of pharmacological interventions to directly modulate moral decision-making. We then apply these lessons to other influential figures in the debate about enhancement. One upshot of our argument is that many considerations presented as powerful objections to enhancement are really strong considerations in favour of biomedical enhancement, just in a different direction. Another upshot is that it is unfortunate that much of the current debate focuses on interventions that will radically transform normal human capacities. Such interventions are unlikely to be available in the near future, and may not even be feasible. But our argument shows that the enhancement project can still have a radical impact on human life even if biomedical enhancement operated entirely within the normal human range.

  7. Gating of trigemino-facial reflex from low-threshold trigeminal and extratrigeminal cutaneous fibres in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, A; Scarpini, C

    1992-01-01

    Changes in the size of the test components (R1 and R2) of the trigemino-facial reflex were studied after electrical subliminal conditioning stimulation were applied to the trigeminal, median and sural nerves. After conditioning activation of the trigeminal nerve (below the reflex threshold), the early R1 reflex component showed phasic facilitation, peaking at about 50 ms of interstimulus delay, followed by a long-lasting inhibition recovering at 300-400 ms. The same conditioning stimulation resulted in a monotonic inhibition of the late R2, starting at 15-20 ms, with a maximum at 100-150 ms and lasting 300-400 ms. Intensity threshold for both the R1 and R2 changes ranged from 0.90 to 0.95 times the perception threshold. A similar longlasting inhibition of the R2 reflex response was also seen after conditioning stimulation applied to low-threshold cutaneous afferents of the median and sural nerves. The minimum effective conditioning-test interval was 25-30 ms and 40-45 ms respectively and lasted 600-700 ms. By contrast the early R1 reflex response exhibited a slight long-lasting facilitation with a time course similar to that of the R2 inhibition. The threshold intensity to obtain facilitation of the R1 and inhibition of the R2 test responses after conditioning volley in the median and sural nerves was similar and ranged from 0.9 to 1.2 times the perception threshold. These results demonstrate that low-threshold cutaneous afferents from trigeminal and limb nerves exert powerful control on trigeminal reflex pathways, probably via a common neural substrate. There is evidence that, in addition to any post-synaptic mechanism which might be operating, presynaptic control is a primary factor contributing to these changes. Images PMID:1328539

  8. 3D Normal Human Neural Progenitor Tissue-Like Assemblies: A Model of Persistent VZV Infection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a neurotropic human alphaherpesvirus that causes varicella upon primary infection, establishes latency in multiple ganglionic neurons, and can reactivate to cause zoster. Live attenuated VZV vaccines are available; however, they can also establish latent infections and reactivate. Studies of VZV latency have been limited to the analyses of human ganglia removed at autopsy, as the virus is strictly a human pathogen. Recently, terminally differentiated human neurons have received much attention as a means to study the interaction between VZV and human neurons; however, the short life-span of these cells in culture has limited their application. Herein, we describe the construction of a model of normal human neural progenitor cells (NHNP) in tissue-like assemblies (TLAs), which can be successfully maintained for at least 180 days in three-dimensional (3D) culture, and exhibit an expression profile similar to that of human trigeminal ganglia. Infection of NHNP TLAs with cell-free VZV resulted in a persistent infection that was maintained for three months, during which the virus genome remained stable. Immediate-early, early and late VZV genes were transcribed, and low-levels of infectious VZV were recurrently detected in the culture supernatant. Our data suggest that NHNP TLAs are an effective system to investigate long-term interactions of VZV with complex assemblies of human neuronal cells.

  9. [Humanization and nursing assistance to normal childbirth].

    PubMed

    Moura, Fernanda Maria de Jesus S Pires; Crizostomo, Cilene Delgado; Nery, Inez Sampaio; Mendonça, Rita de Cássia Magalhães; de Araújo, Olívia Dias; da Rocha, Silvana Santiago

    2007-01-01

    Bibliographical study that sought to identify the scientific production about humanization and nursing assistance to normal childbirth. The sources were scientific articles from SCIELO-Brasil's database, from 2000 to 2007. We obtained 13 articles as result from the search, which were grouped in the following categories: childbirth medicalization, humanization of assistance to childbirth, companion during childbirth and performance of the obstetric nurse. The analysis pointed out that the current paradigm is centralized on childbirth intervention, despite of humanization movements defending the natural and physiological childbirth made by the nurse. We concluded that qualified and humanized assistance to childbirth and birth privileges women's respect, dignity and autonomy, regarding women's active role in the birth process.

  10. Dynamic mapping of normal human hippocampal development.

    PubMed

    Gogtay, Nitin; Nugent, Tom F; Herman, David H; Ordonez, Anna; Greenstein, Deanna; Hayashi, Kiralee M; Clasen, Liv; Toga, Arthur W; Giedd, Jay N; Rapoport, Judith L; Thompson, Paul M

    2006-01-01

    The hippocampus, which plays an important role in memory functions and emotional responses, has distinct subregions subserving different functions. Because the volume and shape of the hippocampus are altered in many neuropsychiatric disorders, it is important to understand the trajectory of normal hippocampal development. We present the first dynamic maps to reveal the anatomical sequence of normal human hippocampal development. A novel hippocampal mapping technique was applied to a database of prospectively obtained brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans (100 scans in 31 children and adolescents), scanned every 2 yr for 6-10 yr between ages 4 and 25. Our results establish that the structural development of the human hippocampus is remarkably heterogeneous, with significant differences between posterior (increase over time) and anterior (loss over time) subregions. These distinct developmental trajectories of hippocampal subregions may parallel differences in their functional development.

  11. The scent of salience — Is there olfactory-trigeminal conditioning in humans?

    PubMed Central

    Moessnang, C.; Pauly, K.; Kellermann, T.; Krämer, J.; Finkelmeyer, A.; Hummel, T.; Siegel, S.J.; Schneider, F.; Habel, U.

    2014-01-01

    Pavlovian fear conditioning has been thoroughly studied in the visual, auditory and somatosensory domain, but evidence is scarce with regard to the chemosensory modality. Under the assumption that Pavlovian conditioning relies on the supra-modal mechanism of salience attribution, the present study was set out to attest the existence of chemosensory aversive conditioning in humans as a specific instance of salience attribution. fMRI was performed in 29 healthy subjects during a differential aversive conditioning paradigm. Two odors (rose, vanillin) served as conditioned stimuli (CS), one of which (CS+) was intermittently coupled with intranasally administered CO2. On the neural level, a robust differential response to the CS+ emerged in frontal, temporal, occipito-parietal and subcortical brain regions, including the amygdala. These changes were paralleled by the development of a CS+-specific connectivity profile of the anterior midcingulate cortex (aMCC), which is a key structure for processing salience information in order to guide adaptive response selection. Increased coupling could be found between key nodes of the salience network (anterior insula, neo-cerebellum) and sensorimotor areas, representing putative input and output structures of the aMCC for exerting adaptive motor control. In contrast, behavioral and skin conductance responses did not show significant effects of conditioning, which has been attributed to contingency unawareness. These findings imply substantial similarities of conditioning involving chemosensory and other sensory modalities, and suggest that salience attribution and adaptive control represent a general, modality-independent principle underlying Pavlovian conditioning. PMID:23558094

  12. Intracranial Trigeminal Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial trigeminal schwannomas are rare tumors. Patients usually present with symptoms of trigeminal nerve dysfunction, the most common symptom being facial pain. MRI is the imaging modality of choice and is usually diagnostic in the appropriate clinical setting. The thin T2-weighted CISS 3D axial sequence is important for proper assessment of the cisternal segment of the nerve. They are usually hypointense on T1, hyperintense on T2 with avid enhancement post gadolinium. CT scan is supplementary to MRI, particularly for tumors located in the skull base. Imaging plays a role in diagnosis and surgical planning. In this pictorial essay, we retrospectively reviewed imaging findings in nine patients with pathologically proven trigeminal schwannoma. Familiarity with the imaging findings of intracranial trigeminal schwannoma may help to diagnose this entity. PMID:25924170

  13. Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging to Evaluate Microstructural Changes and Outcomes after Radiofrequency Rhizotomy of Trigeminal Nerves in Patients with Trigeminal Neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-Tian; Yang, Jen-Tsung; Yeh, Mei-Yu; Weng, Hsu-Huei; Chen, Chih-Feng; Tsai, Yuan-Hsiung

    2016-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is characterized by facial pain that may be sudden, intense, and recurrent. Our aim was to investigate microstructural tissue changes of the trigeminal nerve in patients with trigeminal neuralgia resulting from neurovascular compression by diffusion tensor imaging, and to test the predictive value of diffusion tensor imaging for determining outcomes after radiofrequency rhizotomy. Forty-three patients with trigeminal neuralgia were recruited, and diffusion tensor imaging was performed before radiofrequency rhizotomy. By selecting the cisternal segment of the trigeminal nerve manually, we measured the volume of trigeminal nerve, fractional anisotropy, apparent diffusion coefficient, axial diffusivity, and radial diffusivity. The apparent diffusion coefficient and mean value of fractional anisotropy, axial diffusivity, and radial diffusivity were compared between the affected and normal side in the same patient, and were correlated with pre-rhizotomy and post-rhizotomy visual analogue scale pain scores. The results showed the affected side had significantly decreased fractional anisotropy, increased apparent diffusion coefficient and radial diffusivity, and no significant change of axial diffusivity. The volume of the trigeminal nerve on affected side was also significantly smaller. There was a trend of fractional anisotropy reduction and visual analogue scale pain score reduction (P = 0.072). The results suggest that demyelination without axonal injury, and decreased size of the trigeminal nerve, are the microstructural abnormalities of the trigeminal nerve in patients with trigeminal neuralgia caused by neurovascular compression. The application of diffusion tensor imaging in understanding the pathophysiology of trigeminal neuralgia, and predicting the treatment effect has potential and warrants further study.

  14. Triggering trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Di Stefano, Giulia; Maarbjerg, Stine; Nurmikko, Turo; Truini, Andrea; Cruccu, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Although it is widely accepted that facial pain paroxysms triggered by innocuous stimuli constitute a hallmark sign of trigeminal neuralgia, very few studies to date have systematically investigated the role of the triggers involved. In the recently published diagnostic classification, triggered pain is an essential criterion for the diagnosis of trigeminal neuralgia but no study to date has been designed to address this issue directly. In this study, we set out to determine, in patients with trigeminal neuralgia, how frequently triggers are present, which manoeuvres activate them and where cutaneous and mucosal trigger zones are located. Methods Clinical characteristics focusing on trigger factors were collected from 140 patients with trigeminal neuralgia, in a cross-sectional study design. Results Provocation of paroxysmal pain by various trigger manoeuvres was reported by 136 of the 140 patients. The most frequent manoeuvres were gentle touching of the face (79%) and talking (54%). Trigger zones were predominantly reported in the perioral and nasal region. Conclusion This study confirms that in trigeminal neuralgia, paroxysmal pain is associated with triggers in virtually all patients and supports the use of triggers as an essential diagnostic feature of trigeminal neuralgia.

  15. Uncommon Cause of Trigeminal Neuralgia: Tentorial Ossification over Trigeminal Notch

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Sun Woo; Han, Kyung Ream; Kim, Seung Ho; Jeong, Won Ho; Kim, Eun Jin; Choi, Jin Wook; Kim, Chan

    2015-01-01

    Ossification of the tentorium cerebelli over the trigeminal notch is rare, but it may cause compression of the trigeminal nerve, leading to trigeminal neuralgia (TN). We were unable to find any previously reported cases with radiological evaluation, although we did find one case with surgically proven ossification of the tentorium cerebelli. Here, we present a case of TN caused by tentorial ossification over the trigeminal notch depicted on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT). PMID:26380124

  16. The variability problem of normal human walking.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Erik B; Alkjær, Tine

    2012-03-01

    Previous investigations have suggested considerable inter-individual variability in the time course pattern of net joint moments during normal human walking, although the limited sample sizes precluded statistical analyses. The purpose of the present study was to obtain joint moment patterns from a group of normal subjects and to test whether or not the expected differences would prove to be statistically significant. Fifteen healthy male subjects were recorded on video while they walked across two force platforms. Ten kinematic and kinetic parameters were selected and input to a statistical cluster analysis to determine whether or not the 15 subjects could be divided into different 'families' (clusters) of walking strategy. The net joint moments showed a variability corroborating earlier reports. The cluster analysis showed that the 15 subjects could be grouped into two clusters of 5 and 10 subjects, respectively. Five parameters differed significantly, so the group of 5 subjects was characterized by (1) a higher peak knee joint extensor moment, (2) more flexed knee joint angle at heel strike, (3) during the whole stance phase, (4) lower peak knee joint flexor moment and (5) lower ankle joint angle at flat foot position. Calculation of bone-on-bone forces in the knee joint showed a value of 64 N/kg body weight in the K+ group and 55 N/kg in the K- group (p<0.05). It is unknown if differences of similar magnitude contribute to early joint degeneration in some individuals while not in others.

  17. [Pharmacotherapy of trigeminal neuralgia].

    PubMed

    Ramirez, H; Martinez, C; Oliva, J; Montini, C

    1989-12-01

    The efficacy of drug treatment on 119 patients with trigeminal neuralgia is reported in the present paper. Among them, 112 were idiopathic trigeminal neuralgias while only 7 cases were secondary trigeminal neuralgias. All patients were treated with drugs at different stages of the evolution of the neuralgia. Carbamazepine was used on all patients. 12.6% was treated with imipramine (tricyclic antidepressive drug), 4 patients received amphetamines due to psychiatric emergencies, 4 patients were treated with phenytoin before this study and three patients received baclofen during short periods of follow-up. Drug therapy was the only treatment method in 51 patients. In 43 patients it was combined with peripheral surgical treatments including injections of alcohol and neurectomies. 16.8% of the patients were treated with drugs and acupuncture; the results of this experience will be reported in a future paper. Only 4.2% (5 patients) underwent neurosurgical treatment: one ponto cerebellar angle tumour, one electrocoagulation of the gasserian ganglion through the stereotaxic method and three cases of microvascular decompression of the trigeminal root. Clinical, pharmacological and neurophysiological aspects of trigeminal neuralgia pharmacotherapy are discussed.

  18. Neuronal development in the trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus of the duck under normal and hypothyroid states: I. A light microscopic morphometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Y; Narayanan, C H

    1987-01-01

    Light microscopic morphometric procedures were used in order to examine the effects of propylthiouracil (PTU) on the development of the mesencephalic nucleus of the trigeminal nerve in the duck. A single vascular injection of a 0.2% solution of PTU was administered at a dosage of 2 microliter/gm embryo weight on embryonic day nine (E9). Control embryos received a similar dose of Ringer's solution. The following parameters of cytodifferentiation of cells of the mesencephalic nucleus of V were studied: somal area profiles, nuclear area, and nuclear cytoplasmic ratios. In addition, the frequency of beak clapping was recorded from E16. Significant differences were observed in somal area profiles in the experimental group at E16 and E18 and in nuclear area profiles from E16 through hatching. Beak activity in the experimental embryos was drastically reduced. It is concluded that PTU induces a retardation in the differentiation of cells of the mesencephalic nucleus of V which may lead to behavior deficits as evidenced by reduction of beak activity. These observations provide a basis for the study of interactions between thyroid hormone and specific neuronal systems in the emergence of an adaptive function.

  19. Relaxographic studies of aging normal human lenses.

    PubMed

    Bettelheim, Frederick A; Lizak, Martin J; Zigler, J Samuel

    2002-12-01

    Ten excised normal human lenses of various ages were studied. Seven sections of each lens, from anterior outer cortex to posterior outer cortex were imaged and the T(1) (spin-lattice) and T(2) (spin-spin) relaxation data on each section were collected. T(1) and T(2) relaxation were analysed by fitting pixel intensity to one term exponential expressions. Both T(1) and T(2) relaxation times showed minimal values in the nuclear region and maxima at the two outer cortexes. The pre-exponential terms of the fittings of both T(1) and T(2) relaxation,M(1) and M(2), were normalized in order to eliminate instrumental variations over a 2 year period. M(2) had a maximum in the nucleus and minima in the two cortexes. M(1) exhibited minimal value in the nucleus and maxima at the two cortexes. The positional dependence of T(2) relaxation times as well as that of M(2) indicated that they represent the behavior of the bound water in the lens. The positional dependence of M(1) suggests that this relaxation represents the total water that has a minimal value in the nucleus. The T(2) relaxation time decreases with increase in the age of the lens at each location. The slope of the change in T(2) relaxation time with age is greatest in the outer cortexes and diminishes as one proceeds to the nucleus. T(1) relaxation times and M(1) do not show significant change with age. This and the age dependence of the other relaxographic parameters imply that the aging of the lens involves major changes in its hydration properties that are more accentuated in the cortexes. The interpretation of these changes is in agreement with the syneretic theory of lens aging.

  20. Antibodies to endogenous tear protein in normal human tears.

    PubMed

    Remington, Susann G; Crow, Jean M; Nelson, J Daniel

    2009-10-01

    To identify endogenous tear proteins immunoselected by antibodies from normal human ocular tears. Proteins were immunoselected from normal human tear samples without the addition of primary antibodies. Captured proteins were electrophoresed in polyacrylamide gels and silver stained. Human tears were also used as primary antibodies on immunoblots of tear proteins. Lysozyme, lipocalin-1, and lactoferrin were immunoselected from normal human tear samples without the addition of primary antibodies. Antibodies from normal tears recognized lysozyme on immunoblots of tear proteins. Normal human ocular tears contain antibodies to endogenous tear protein.

  1. Chemosensory Information Processing between Keratinocytes and Trigeminal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sondersorg, Anna Christina; Busse, Daniela; Kyereme, Jessica; Rothermel, Markus; Neufang, Gitta; Gisselmann, Günter; Hatt, Hanns; Conrad, Heike

    2014-01-01

    Trigeminal fibers terminate within the facial mucosa and skin and transmit tactile, proprioceptive, chemical, and nociceptive sensations. Trigeminal sensations can arise from the direct stimulation of intraepithelial free nerve endings or indirectly through information transmission from adjacent cells at the peripheral innervation area. For mechanical and thermal cues, communication processes between skin cells and somatosensory neurons have already been suggested. High concentrations of most odors typically provoke trigeminal sensations in vivo but surprisingly fail to activate trigeminal neuron monocultures. This fact favors the hypothesis that epithelial cells may participate in chemodetection and subsequently transmit signals to neighboring trigeminal fibers. Keratinocytes, the major cell type of the epidermis, express various receptors that enable reactions to multiple environmental stimuli. Here, using a co-culture approach, we show for the first time that exposure to the odorant chemicals induces a chemical communication between human HaCaT keratinocytes and mouse trigeminal neurons. Moreover, a supernatant analysis of stimulated keratinocytes and subsequent blocking experiments with pyrodoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2′,4′-disulfonate revealed that ATP serves as the mediating transmitter molecule released from skin cells after odor stimulation. We show that the ATP release resulting from Javanol® stimulation of keratinocytes was mediated by pannexins. Consequently, keratinocytes act as chemosensors linking the environment and the trigeminal system via ATP signaling. PMID:24790106

  2. Changes in sensory and pain perception thresholds after linear polarized near-infrared light radiation in the trigeminal region.

    PubMed

    Kashima, Koji; Watanabe, Naoshi; Higashinaka, Shuichi; Maeda, Sho; Shiba, Ryosuke

    2005-07-01

    Linearly polarized light in the near-infrared portion of the spectrum has recently been associated with a variety of musculoskeletal disorders including temporomandibular disorders. The purpose of this study was to determine whether short-term linearly polarized near-infrared light radiation in the trigeminal region affects sensory and pain perception thresholds in the trigeminally mediated region and in the cervically mediated region of normal subjects. Thirty-five normal female volunteers participated in this study. Each subject received an 8-minute course of irradiation in the right cheek, and sensory/nociceptive perception thresholds were compared before and immediately after the irradiation in the right cheek and the right forearm. As a result, this study demonstrated a significant elevation of the heat-induced pain threshold in both regions and a tendency for the warm sensation threshold to elevate in the cervical region. In addition, a significant increase in vibratory sensitivity was observed in the trigeminal region. In conclusion, our results provided additional evidence that the warming sensation has a negative feedback influence on heat pain intensity in humans, and provides a theoretical basis for the application of linear polarized near-infrared light radiation to the trigeminal region.

  3. Chemosensory Properties of the Trigeminal System

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The capacity of cutaneous, including trigeminal endings, to detect chemicals is known as chemesthesis or cutaneous chemosensation. This sensory function involves the activation of nociceptor and thermoreceptor endings and has a protective or defensive function, as many of these substances are irritants or poisonous. However, humans have also developed a liking for the distinct sharpness or pungency of many foods, beverages, and spices following activation of the same sensory afferents. Our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of chemosensation in the trigeminal system has experienced enormous progress in the past decade, following the cloning and functional characterization of several ion channels activated by physical and chemical stimuli. This brief review attempts to summarize our current knowledge in this field, including a functional description of various sensory channels, especially TRP channels, involved in trigeminal chemosensitivy. Finally, some of these new findings are discussed in the context of the pathophysiology of trigeminal chemosensation, including pain, pruritus, migraine, cough, airway inflammation, and ophthalmic diseases. PMID:22778855

  4. Transcutaneous trigeminal nerve stimulation induces a long-term depression-like plasticity of the human blink reflex.

    PubMed

    Pilurzi, Giovanna; Mercante, Beniamina; Ginatempo, Francesca; Follesa, Paolo; Tolu, Eusebio; Deriu, Franca

    2016-02-01

    The beneficial effects of trigeminal nerve stimulation (TNS) on several neurological disorders are increasingly acknowledged. Hypothesized mechanisms include the modulation of excitability in networks involved by the disease, and its main site of action has been recently reported at brain stem level. Aim of this work was to test whether acute TNS modulates brain stem plasticity using the blink reflex (BR) as a model. The BR was recorded from 20 healthy volunteers before and after 20 min of cyclic transcutaneous TNS delivered bilaterally to the infraorbital nerve. Eleven subjects underwent sham-TNS administration and were compared to the real-TNS group. In 12 subjects, effects of unilateral TNS were tested. The areas of the R1 and R2 components of the BR were recorded before and after 0 (T0), 15 (T15), 30 (T30), and 45 (T45) min from TNS. In three subjects, T60 and T90 time points were also evaluated. Ipsi- and contralateral R2 areas were significantly suppressed after bilateral real-TNS at T15 (p = 0.013), T30 (p = 0.002), and T45 (p = 0.001), while R1 response appeared unaffected. The TNS-induced inhibitory effect on R2 responses lasted up to 60 min. Real- and sham-TNS protocols produced significantly different effects (p = 0.005), with sham-TNS being ineffective at any time point tested. Bilateral TNS was more effective (p = 0.009) than unilateral TNS. Acute TNS induced a bilateral long-lasting inhibition of the R2 component of the BR, which resembles a long-term depression-like effect, providing evidence of brain stem plasticity produced by transcutaneous TNS. These findings add new insight into mechanisms of TNS neuromodulation and into physiopathology of those neurological disorders where clinical benefits of TNS are recognized.

  5. Dietary grape seed polyphenols repress neuron and glia activation in trigeminal ganglion and trigeminal nucleus caudalis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Inflammation and pain associated with temporomandibular joint disorder, a chronic disease that affects 15% of the adult population, involves activation of trigeminal ganglion nerves and development of peripheral and central sensitization. Natural products represent an underutilized resource in the pursuit of safe and effective ways to treat chronic inflammatory diseases. The goal of this study was to investigate effects of grape seed extract on neurons and glia in trigeminal ganglia and trigeminal nucleus caudalis in response to persistent temporomandibular joint inflammation. Sprague Dawley rats were pretreated with 200 mg/kg/d MegaNatural-BP grape seed extract for 14 days prior to bilateral injections of complete Freund's adjuvant into the temporomandibular joint capsule. Results In response to grape seed extract, basal expression of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 1 was elevated in neurons and glia in trigeminal ganglia and trigeminal nucleus caudalis, and expression of the glutamate aspartate transporter was increased in spinal glia. Rats on a normal diet injected with adjuvant exhibited greater basal levels of phosphorylated-p38 in trigeminal ganglia neurons and spinal neurons and microglia. Similarly, immunoreactive levels of OX-42 in microglia and glial fibrillary acidic protein in astrocytes were greatly increased in response to adjuvant. However, adjuvant-stimulated levels of phosphorylated-p38, OX-42, and glial fibrillary acidic protein were significantly repressed in extract treated animals. Furthermore, grape seed extract suppressed basal expression of the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide in spinal neurons. Conclusions Results from our study provide evidence that grape seed extract may be beneficial as a natural therapeutic option for temporomandibular joint disorders by suppressing development of peripheral and central sensitization. PMID:21143976

  6. The effects of Botulinum Toxin type A on capsaicin-evoked pain, flare, and secondary hyperalgesia in an experimental human model of trigeminal sensitization.

    PubMed

    Gazerani, Parisa; Staahl, Camilla; Drewes, Asbjøn M; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2006-06-01

    The trigeminovascular system is involved in migraine. Efficacy of Botulinum Toxin type A (BoNT-A) in migraine has been investigated in clinical studies but the mechanism of action remains unexplored. It is hypothesized that BoNT-A inhibits peripheral sensitization of nociceptive fibers and indirectly reduces central sensitization. We examined the effect of intramuscular injection of BoNT-A on an experimental human model of trigeminal sensitization induced by intradermal capsaicin injection to the forehead. BoNT-A (BOTOX) or saline was injected intramuscularly in precranial, neck and shoulder muscles to 32 healthy male volunteers in a double blind-randomized manner. Intradermally capsaicin-induced pain, flare and secondary hyperalgesia were obtained before and 1, 4 and 8 weeks after the above treatments. A significant suppressive effect of BoNT-A on pain, flare and hyperalgesia area was observed. The pain intensity area was significantly smaller in BoNT-A group (9.16+/-0.83 cm x s) compared to saline group (15.41+/-0.83cm x s) (P=0.011). The flare area was also reduced significantly in BoNT-A group (29.81+/-0.69 cm2) compared to saline group (39.71+/-0.69 cm2) (P<0.001). Similarly, the mean area of secondary hyperalgesia was significantly smaller in BoNT-A group (4.25+/-0.91 cm2) compared to saline group (7.03+/-0.91 cm2) (P=0.040). Post hoc analysis showed significant differences across the trials with a remarkable suppression effect of BoNT-A on capsaicin-induced sensory and vasomotor reactions as early as week1 (P<0.001). BoNT-A presented suppressive effects on the trigeminal/cervical nociceptive system activated by intradermal injection of capsaicin to the forehead. The effects are suggested to be caused by a local peripheral effect of BoNT-A on cutaneous nociceptors.

  7. Trigeminal autonomic cephalgias

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary points 1. Trigeminal autonomic cephalgias (TACs) are headaches/facial pains classified together based on:a suspected common pathophysiology involving the trigeminovascular system, the trigeminoparasympathetic reflex and centres controlling circadian rhythms;a similar clinical presentation of trigeminal pain, and autonomic activation. 2. There is much overlap in the diagnostic features of individual TACs. 3. In contrast, treatment response is relatively specific and aids in establishing a definitive diagnosis. 4. TACs are often presentations of underlying pathology; all patients should be imaged. 5. The aim of the article is to provide the reader with a broad introduction to, and an overview of, TACs. The reading list is extensive for the interested reader. PMID:26516482

  8. Normal and abnormal human vestibular ocular function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, R. J.; Black, F. O.

    1986-01-01

    The major motivation of this research is to understand the role the vestibular system plays in sensorimotor interactions which result in spatial disorientation and motion sickness. A second goal was to explore the range of abnormality as it is reflected in quantitative measures of vestibular reflex responses. The results of a study of vestibular reflex measurements in normal subjects and preliminary results in abnormal subjects are presented in this report. Statistical methods were used to define the range of normal responses, and determine age related changes in function.

  9. Three-Dimensional Normal Human Neural Progenitor Tissue-Like Assemblies: A Model of Persistent Varicella-Zoster Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Thomas J.; McCarthy, Maureen; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Cohrs, Randall J.; Kaufer, Benedikt B.

    2013-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a neurotropic human alphaherpesvirus that causes varicella upon primary infection, establishes latency in multiple ganglionic neurons, and can reactivate to cause zoster. Live attenuated VZV vaccines are available; however, they can also establish latent infections and reactivate. Studies of VZV latency have been limited to the analyses of human ganglia removed at autopsy, as the virus is strictly a human pathogen. Recently, terminally differentiated human neurons have received much attention as a means to study the interaction between VZV and human neurons; however, the short life-span of these cells in culture has limited their application. Herein, we describe the construction of a model of normal human neural progenitor cells (NHNP) in tissue-like assemblies (TLAs), which can be successfully maintained for at least 180 days in three-dimensional (3D) culture, and exhibit an expression profile similar to that of human trigeminal ganglia. Infection of NHNP TLAs with cell-free VZV resulted in a persistent infection that was maintained for three months, during which the virus genome remained stable. Immediate-early, early and late VZV genes were transcribed, and low-levels of infectious VZV were recurrently detected in the culture supernatant. Our data suggest that NHNP TLAs are an effective system to investigate long-term interactions of VZV with complex assemblies of human neuronal cells. PMID:23935496

  10. Three-dimensional normal human neural progenitor tissue-like assemblies: a model of persistent varicella-zoster virus infection.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Thomas J; McCarthy, Maureen; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Cohrs, Randall J; Kaufer, Benedikt B

    2013-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a neurotropic human alphaherpesvirus that causes varicella upon primary infection, establishes latency in multiple ganglionic neurons, and can reactivate to cause zoster. Live attenuated VZV vaccines are available; however, they can also establish latent infections and reactivate. Studies of VZV latency have been limited to the analyses of human ganglia removed at autopsy, as the virus is strictly a human pathogen. Recently, terminally differentiated human neurons have received much attention as a means to study the interaction between VZV and human neurons; however, the short life-span of these cells in culture has limited their application. Herein, we describe the construction of a model of normal human neural progenitor cells (NHNP) in tissue-like assemblies (TLAs), which can be successfully maintained for at least 180 days in three-dimensional (3D) culture, and exhibit an expression profile similar to that of human trigeminal ganglia. Infection of NHNP TLAs with cell-free VZV resulted in a persistent infection that was maintained for three months, during which the virus genome remained stable. Immediate-early, early and late VZV genes were transcribed, and low-levels of infectious VZV were recurrently detected in the culture supernatant. Our data suggest that NHNP TLAs are an effective system to investigate long-term interactions of VZV with complex assemblies of human neuronal cells.

  11. Analysis of Individual Human Trigeminal Ganglia for Latent Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 and Varicella-Zoster Virus Nucleic Acids Using Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Cohrs, Randall J.; Randall, Jessica; Smith, John; Gilden, Donald H.; Dabrowski, Christine; van der Keyl, Harjeet; Tal-Singer, Ruth

    2000-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) establish latent infections in the peripheral nervous system following primary infection. During latency both virus genomes exhibit limited transcription, with the HSV-1 LATs and at least four VZV transcripts consistently detected in latently infected human ganglia. In this study we used real-time PCR quantitation to determine the viral DNA copy number in individual trigeminal ganglia (TG) from 17 subjects. The number of HSV-1 genomes was not significantly different between the left and right TG from the same individual and varied per subject from 42.9 to 677.9 copies per 100 ng of DNA. The number of VZV genomes was also not significantly different between left and right TG from the same individual and varied per subject from 37.0 to 3,560.5 copies per 100 ng of DNA. HSV-1 LAT transcripts were consistently detected in ganglia containing latent HSV-1 and varied in relative expression by >500-fold. Of the three VZV transcripts analyzed, only transcripts mapping to gene 63 were consistently detected in latently infected ganglia and varied in relative expression by >2,000-fold. Thus, it appears that, similar to LAT transcription in HSV-1 latently infected ganglia, VZV gene 63 transcription is a hallmark of VZV latency. PMID:11090142

  12. Expression of Herpes Simplex Virus 1-Encoded MicroRNAs in Human Trigeminal Ganglia and Their Relation to Local T-Cell Infiltrates ▿

    PubMed Central

    Held, Kathrin; Junker, Andreas; Dornmair, Klaus; Meinl, Edgar; Sinicina, Inga; Brandt, Thomas; Theil, Diethilde; Derfuss, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1) is a neurotropic virus which establishes lifelong latency in human trigeminal ganglia (TG). Currently, two nonexclusive control mechanisms of HSV-1 latency are discussed: antiviral CD8+ T cells and viral microRNAs (miRNAs) encoded by the latency associated transcript (LAT). We investigate here to what extent these mechanisms may contribute to the maintenance of HSV-1 latency. We show that only a small proportion of LAT+ neurons is surrounded by T cells in human TG. This indicates that viral latency in human TG might be controlled by other mechanisms such as viral miRNAs. Therefore, we assessed TG sections for the presence of HSV-1 miRNA, DNA, and mRNA by combining LAT in situ hybridization, T-cell immunohistochemistry, and single cell analysis of laser-microdissected sensory neurons. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) revealed that LAT+ neurons with or without surrounding T cells were always positive for HSV-1 miRNAs and DNA. Furthermore, ICP0 mRNA could rarely be detected only in LAT+ neurons, as analyzed by single-cell RT-PCR. In contrast, in LAT− neurons that were surrounded by T cells, neither miRNAs nor the DNA of HSV-1, HSV-2, or varicella-zoster virus could be detected. These data indicate that the majority of LAT+ neurons is not directly controlled by T cells. However, miRNA expression in every latently infected neuron would provide an additional checkpoint before viral replication is initiated. PMID:21795359

  13. Power flow in normal human voice production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krane, Michael

    2016-11-01

    The principal mechanisms of energy utilization in voicing are quantified using a simplified model, in order to better define voice efficiency. A control volume analysis of energy utilization in phonation is presented to identify the energy transfer mechanisms in terms of their function. Conversion of subglottal airstream potential energy into useful work done (vocal fold vibration, flow work, sound radiation), and into heat (sound radiation absorbed by the lungs, glottal jet dissipation) are described. An approximate numerical model is used to compute the contributions of each of these mechanisms, as a function of subglottal pressure, for normal phonation. Acknowledge support of NIH Grant 2R01DC005642-10A1.

  14. Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging to Evaluate Microstructural Changes and Outcomes after Radiofrequency Rhizotomy of Trigeminal Nerves in Patients with Trigeminal Neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shu-Tian; Yang, Jen-Tsung; Yeh, Mei-Yu; Weng, Hsu-Huei; Chen, Chih-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is characterized by facial pain that may be sudden, intense, and recurrent. Our aim was to investigate microstructural tissue changes of the trigeminal nerve in patients with trigeminal neuralgia resulting from neurovascular compression by diffusion tensor imaging, and to test the predictive value of diffusion tensor imaging for determining outcomes after radiofrequency rhizotomy. Forty-three patients with trigeminal neuralgia were recruited, and diffusion tensor imaging was performed before radiofrequency rhizotomy. By selecting the cisternal segment of the trigeminal nerve manually, we measured the volume of trigeminal nerve, fractional anisotropy, apparent diffusion coefficient, axial diffusivity, and radial diffusivity. The apparent diffusion coefficient and mean value of fractional anisotropy, axial diffusivity, and radial diffusivity were compared between the affected and normal side in the same patient, and were correlated with pre-rhizotomy and post-rhizotomy visual analogue scale pain scores. The results showed the affected side had significantly decreased fractional anisotropy, increased apparent diffusion coefficient and radial diffusivity, and no significant change of axial diffusivity. The volume of the trigeminal nerve on affected side was also significantly smaller. There was a trend of fractional anisotropy reduction and visual analogue scale pain score reduction (P = 0.072). The results suggest that demyelination without axonal injury, and decreased size of the trigeminal nerve, are the microstructural abnormalities of the trigeminal nerve in patients with trigeminal neuralgia caused by neurovascular compression. The application of diffusion tensor imaging in understanding the pathophysiology of trigeminal neuralgia, and predicting the treatment effect has potential and warrants further study. PMID:27997548

  15. Fatty acid uptake in normal human myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Vyska, K.; Meyer, W.; Stremmel, W.; Notohamiprodjo, G.; Minami, K.; Machulla, H.J.; Gleichmann, U.; Meyer, H.; Koerfer, R. )

    1991-09-01

    Fatty acid binding protein has been found in rat aortic endothelial cell membrane. It has been identified to be a 40-kDa protein that corresponds to a 40-kDa fatty acid binding protein with high affinity for a variety of long chain fatty acids isolated from rat heart myocytes. It is proposed that this endothelial membrane fatty acid binding protein might mediate the myocardial uptake of fatty acids. For evaluation of this hypothesis in vivo, influx kinetics of tracer-labeled fatty acids was examined in 15 normal subjects by scintigraphic techniques. Variation of the plasma fatty acid concentration and plasma perfusion rate has been achieved by modulation of nutrition state and exercise conditions. The clinical results suggest that the myocardial fatty acid influx rate is saturable by increasing fatty acid plasma concentration as well as by increasing plasma flow. For analysis of these data, functional relations describing fatty acid transport from plasma into myocardial tissue in the presence and absence of an unstirred layer were developed. The fitting of these relations to experimental data indicate that the free fatty acid influx into myocardial tissue reveals the criteria of a reaction on a capillary surface in the vicinity of flowing plasma but not of a reaction in extravascular space or in an unstirred layer and that the fatty acid influx into normal myocardium is a saturable process that is characterized by the quantity corresponding to the Michaelis-Menten constant, Km, and the maximal velocity, Vmax, 0.24 {plus minus} 0.024 mumol/g and 0.37 {plus minus} 0.013 mumol/g(g.min), respectively. These data are compatible with a nondiffusional uptake process mediated by the initial interaction of fatty acids with the 40-kDa membrane fatty acid binding protein of cardiac endothelial cells.

  16. Autophagy in term normal human placentas.

    PubMed

    Signorelli, P; Avagliano, L; Virgili, E; Gagliostro, V; Doi, P; Braidotti, P; Bulfamante, G P; Ghidoni, R; Marconi, A M

    2011-06-01

    Autophagy is an inducible catabolic process that responds to environment and is essential for cell survival during stress, starvation and hypoxia. Its function in the human placenta it is not yet understood. We collected 14 placentas: 7 at vaginal delivery and 7 at elective caesarean section after uneventful term pregnancies. The presence of autophagy was assessed in different placental areas by immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. We found that autophagy is significantly higher in placentas obtained from cesarean section than in those from vaginal delivery. Moreover there is a significant inverse relationship between autophagy and umbilical arterial glucose concentration.

  17. Radiosurgical management of trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Chan, Michael D; Shaw, Edward G; Tatter, Stephen B

    2013-10-01

    Over the past several decades, stereotactic radiosurgery has become a viable noninvasive treatment option for patients with trigeminal neuralgia. The scientific literature regarding the radiosurgical treatment of trigeminal neuralgia has evolved to identify factors that predict both efficacy and toxicity. Radiosurgical management has, thus, become complementary to medical management, microvascular decompression, and percutaneous ablative procedures. Thus, effective management often requires multidisciplinary collaboration. The intent of this review is to discuss the role of radiosurgery in the modern management of trigeminal neuralgia and to review radiosurgical outcomes, targeting, and controversies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. DNA amplification is rare in normal human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.A.; Watt, F.M.; Hudson, D.L.; Stark, G.R. ); Smith, H.S.; Hancock, M.C. )

    1990-03-01

    Three types of normal human cells were selected in tissue culture with three drugs without observing a single amplification event from a total of 5 x 10{sup 8} cells. No drug-resistant colonies were observed when normal foreskin keratinocytes were selected with N-(phosphonacetyl)-L-aspartate or with hydroxyurea or when normal mammary epithelial cells were selected with methotrexate. Some slightly resistant colonies with limited potential for growth were obtained when normal diploid fibroblast cells derived from fetal lung were selected with methotrexate or hydroxyurea but careful copy-number analysis of the dihydrofolate reductase and ribonucleotide reductase genes revealed no evidence of amplification. The rarity of DNA amplification in normal human cells contrasts strongly with the situation in tumors and in established cell lines, where amplification of onogenes and of genes mediating drug resistance is frequent. The results suggest that tumors and cell lines have acquired the abnormal ability to amplify DNA with high frequency.

  19. Acute peripheral facial palsy: is there a trigeminal nerve involvement?

    PubMed

    Uluduz, Derya; Kiziltan, Meral E; Akalin, Mehmet Ali

    2010-07-26

    The aim of this study was to investigate trigeminal nerve involvement in patients with peripheral facial palsy. In total, 25 patients with facial nerve palsy and 19 controls were tested by electrophysiological methods regarding their facial and trigeminal nerve functions within 1 month after disease onset. The presence of an abnormal blink reflex was determined in patients with peripheral facial palsy by comparing paralytic and non-paralytic sides (12.3+/-1.1 and 10.8+/-1.3, respectively; p=0.001). However, the average masseter inhibitory reflex difference between the paretic and non-paralytic sides of patients compared with the corresponding side-to-side comparison for controls was not statistically significant. The masseter inhibitory reflex response was abnormal in some cases. These findings suggest that the masseter inhibitory reflex, a trigemino-trigeminal reflex, was normal in most of our patients with peripheral facial palsy, but may be abnormal in individual cases. Our study showed that subclinical disorders affecting the trigeminal pathways occur in individual patients with idiopathic facial palsy, while the majority of patients have no trigeminal nerve involvement.

  20. Development of a reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay to detect feline herpesvirus-1 latency-associated transcripts in the trigeminal ganglia and corneas of cats that did not have clinical signs of ocular disease.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Wendy M; Stiles, Jean; Guptill-Yoran, Lynn; Krohne, Sheryl G

    2004-03-01

    To develop a reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay to detect feline herpesvirus-1 (FHV-1) latency-associated transcripts (LATs) in the corneas and trigeminal ganglia of cats that did not have clinical signs of ocular disease. Corneas and trigeminal ganglia obtained from 21 cats necropsied at the Indiana Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory and 25 cats euthanatized at a humane shelter; none of the cats had a recent history of respiratory tract or ocular disease, and all had normal results for ophthalmic examinations. Both corneas and both trigeminal ganglia were harvested from each cat. An initial PCR assay detected FHV-1 DNA in the corneas and trigeminal ganglia. The RNA was then isolated from samples positive for FHV-1 DNA, and an RT-PCR assay was used to detect LATs. FHV-1 DNA was detected in 45 of 92 (48.9%) corneas and 38 of 92 (41.3%) trigeminal ganglia. In many samples, the RNA had degraded and RT-PCR assay was not possible. Of the samples subjected to RT-PCR assay, none of the 39 corneas but 4 of 16 trigeminal ganglia had positive results when tested for LATs. Analysis of the results indicated that a high percentage of cats that did not have clinical signs of ocular disease had detectable FHV-1 DNA in their corneas and trigeminal ganglia. This study documents that the RT-PCR assay can successfully identify LATs and may serve as a tool to better understand the biologic characteristics of FHV-1 and its relationship to clinical disease.

  1. Trigeminal neuralgia - diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Maarbjerg, Stine; Di Stefano, Giulia; Bendtsen, Lars; Cruccu, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is characterized by touch-evoked unilateral brief shock-like paroxysmal pain in one or more divisions of the trigeminal nerve. In addition to the paroxysmal pain, some patients also have continuous pain. TN is divided into classical TN (CTN) and secondary TN (STN). Etiology and pathophysiology Demyelination of primary sensory trigeminal afferents in the root entry zone is the predominant pathophysiological mechanism. Most likely, demyelination paves the way for generation of ectopic impulses and ephaptic crosstalk. In a significant proportion of the patients, the demyelination is caused by a neurovascular conflict with morphological changes such as compression of the trigeminal root. However, there are also other unknown etiological factors, as only half of the CTN patients have morphological changes. STN is caused by multiple sclerosis or a space-occupying lesion affecting the trigeminal nerve. Differential diagnosis and treatment Important differential diagnoses include trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias, posttraumatic or postherpetic pain and other facial pains. First line treatment is prophylactic medication with sodium channel blockers, and second line treatment is neurosurgical intervention. Future perspectives Future studies should focus on genetics, unexplored etiological factors, sensory function, the neurosurgical outcome and complications, combination and neuromodulation treatment as well as development of new drugs with better tolerability.

  2. Immunohistochemical characterization of FHIT expression in normal human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kujan, Omar; Abuderman, Abdulwahab; Al-Shawaf, Ahmad Zahi

    2016-01-01

    Background Fragile histidine triad (FHIT) is a tumor suppressor gene that is commonly inactivated in human tumors. Interestingly, the normal pattern of FHIT expression is largely unknown. Aim This study is aimed to characterize the expression of FHIT protein in normal human tissues. Materials and methods A total of 119 normal human tissue specimens were analyzed for the FHIT expression using immunohistochemistry technique. The inclusion criteria included: normal/inflammatory tissue with no evidence of cellular atypia. Results All studied specimens were stained positively with FHIT and showed either nuclear or cytoplasmic expression. Interestingly, the pattern of FHIT staining was similar among different specimens from each organ. FHIT is located predominantly in the nucleus, although cytoplasmic staining is also present in some cell types. Oral squamous epithelium, breast ductal epithelium, squamous and tubal metaplastic epithelium of the uterine cervix, esophageal squamous epithelium, salivary glands, and bronchial epithelia all strongly expressed the nuclear protein. In connective tissue, FHIT has shown strong cytoplasmic expression in histocytes including macrophages and dendritic cells, fibroblasts, and myofibroblasts. Conclusion Documentation of the pattern of FHIT expression in normal tissues will contribute to our understanding of the normal function of this protein and to interpretation of potentially altered FHIT expression in human tumors. PMID:28250975

  3. Typical and atypical neurovascular relations of the trigeminal nerve in the cerebellopontine angle: an anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Rusu, M C; Ivaşcu, R V; Cergan, R; Păduraru, D; Podoleanu, L

    2009-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to anatomically evaluate in adults the neurovascular trigeminal relations in the cerebellopontine angle (CPA), from a morphological and topographical perspective and thus to improve, detail and debate the pre-existing information, with educational and surgical implications. For the present anatomical study we performed bilateral dissections on 20 human adult skull bases, in formalin-fixed cadavers, at the level of the cerebellopontine angle, using the anatomical superior approach; we also studied 20 additional drawn specimens-cerebellum and brainstems, from autopsied cadavers, in order to better document the vasculature at the trigeminal root entry zone (REZ). The most constant but not exclusive neurovascular relations of the trigeminal nerves were those with the superior cerebellar artery (SCA) and the superior petrosal vein (the petrosal vein of Dandy). The regular possibility for the SCA to appear divided into a medial and a lateral branch and these to represent individual trigeminal relations at the level of the pontine cistern or REZ must not be neglected. The petrosal vein tributaries can also represent superior, inferior, or interradicular trigeminal relations. Arterioles emerging from the SCA or the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) represented trigeminal relations either at the REZ or were coursing between the trigeminal roots. A dissected specimen presented a radicular trigeminal artery emerging from the basilar artery and entering the trigeminal cavum inferior to the nerve. Another specimen presented two bony lamellae superior to the trigeminal nerve at the entrance in the trigeminal cavum-these lamellae were embedded within the lateral border of tentorium cerebelli and the posterior petroclinoid ligament. So we bring here an evidence-based support extremely useful not only for specialists dealing with this area but also for educational purposes. It appears important not only to consider the typical anatomy at

  4. Retinoic acid suppresses interleukin 6 production in normal human osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, N; Sammons, J; Khokher, M A; Hassan, H T

    2000-03-01

    Systemic long-term retinoid therapy for chronic skin diseases significantly reduced bone turnover markers within days and led to bone abnormalities. Retinoic acid (RA) plays a key role in the regulation of mouse bone cell proliferation, differentiation and functions. Meanwhile, there is little information of RA effect on human osteoblast and osteoclast cell development and function. Interleukin 6 (IL-6) is a pleiotropic cytokine with profound effects on bone metabolism. Thus, the present study examined the RA effect on cell differentiation, alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin production as well as IL-6 production in normal human osteoblasts. The number of large differentiated osteoblast cells decreased in RA-treated cultures P<0.05. The production of bone specific markers, alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin, was also reduced in RA-treated cultures. Normal human osteoblasts produced 31.0+/-4.8 pg IL-6 per ml in control cultures. Within 24 h, RA at all four concentrations reduced Il-6 production from normal human osteoblasts. The pharmacological concentration of 10(-5) M RA suppressed 90% of IL-6 production. The present study shows for the first time that RA profoundly inhibits IL-6 production in normal human osteoblasts within 24 h and in a dose-dependent manner. RA was shown previously to inhibit IL-6 production in several other normal and malignant human cell types. The associated decrease in osteoblast cell differentiation, alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin production could result from the rapid RA-inhibition of IL-6 production. Thus, RA inhibition of IL-6 production in normal human osteoblasts may contribute to the bone abnormalities seen after systemic long-term retinoid therapy in some patients. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  5. Decorin and biglycan of normal and pathologic human corneas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funderburgh, J. L.; Hevelone, N. D.; Roth, M. R.; Funderburgh, M. L.; Rodrigues, M. R.; Nirankari, V. S.; Conrad, G. W.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: Corneas with scars and certain chronic pathologic conditions contain highly sulfated dermatan sulfate, but little is known of the core proteins that carry these atypical glycosaminoglycans. In this study the proteoglycan proteins attached to dermatan sulfate in normal and pathologic human corneas were examined to identify primary genes involved in the pathobiology of corneal scarring. METHODS: Proteoglycans from human corneas with chronic edema, bullous keratopathy, and keratoconus and from normal corneas were analyzed using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), quantitative immunoblotting, and immunohistology with peptide antibodies to decorin and biglycan. RESULTS: Proteoglycans from pathologic corneas exhibit increased size heterogeneity and binding of the cationic dye alcian blue compared with those in normal corneas. Decorin and biglycan extracted from normal and diseased corneas exhibited similar molecular size distribution patterns. In approximately half of the pathologic corneas, the level of biglycan was elevated an average of seven times above normal, and decorin was elevated approximately three times above normal. The increases were associated with highly charged molecular forms of decorin and biglycan, indicating modification of the proteins with dermatan sulfate chains of increased sulfation. Immunostaining of corneal sections showed an abnormal stromal localization of biglycan in pathologic corneas. CONCLUSIONS: The increased dermatan sulfate associated with chronic corneal pathologic conditions results from stromal accumulation of decorin and particularly of biglycan in the affected corneas. These proteins bear dermatan sulfate chains with increased sulfation compared with normal stromal proteoglycans.

  6. Decorin and biglycan of normal and pathologic human corneas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funderburgh, J. L.; Hevelone, N. D.; Roth, M. R.; Funderburgh, M. L.; Rodrigues, M. R.; Nirankari, V. S.; Conrad, G. W.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: Corneas with scars and certain chronic pathologic conditions contain highly sulfated dermatan sulfate, but little is known of the core proteins that carry these atypical glycosaminoglycans. In this study the proteoglycan proteins attached to dermatan sulfate in normal and pathologic human corneas were examined to identify primary genes involved in the pathobiology of corneal scarring. METHODS: Proteoglycans from human corneas with chronic edema, bullous keratopathy, and keratoconus and from normal corneas were analyzed using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), quantitative immunoblotting, and immunohistology with peptide antibodies to decorin and biglycan. RESULTS: Proteoglycans from pathologic corneas exhibit increased size heterogeneity and binding of the cationic dye alcian blue compared with those in normal corneas. Decorin and biglycan extracted from normal and diseased corneas exhibited similar molecular size distribution patterns. In approximately half of the pathologic corneas, the level of biglycan was elevated an average of seven times above normal, and decorin was elevated approximately three times above normal. The increases were associated with highly charged molecular forms of decorin and biglycan, indicating modification of the proteins with dermatan sulfate chains of increased sulfation. Immunostaining of corneal sections showed an abnormal stromal localization of biglycan in pathologic corneas. CONCLUSIONS: The increased dermatan sulfate associated with chronic corneal pathologic conditions results from stromal accumulation of decorin and particularly of biglycan in the affected corneas. These proteins bear dermatan sulfate chains with increased sulfation compared with normal stromal proteoglycans.

  7. Bilateral sensory deprivation of trigeminal afferent fibres on corticomotor control of human tongue musculature: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Kothari, M; Baad-Hansen, L; Svensson, P

    2016-09-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has demonstrated changes in motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in human limb muscles following modulation of sensory afferent inputs. The aim of this study was to determine whether bilateral local anaesthesia (LA) of the lingual nerve affects the excitability of the tongue motor cortex (MI) as measured by TMS. The effect on MEPs after bilateral LA of the lingual nerve was studied, while the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle served as a control in ten healthy participants. MEPs were measured on the right side of the tongue dorsum in four different conditions: (i) immediately prior to anaesthesia (baseline), (ii) during bilateral LA block of the lingual nerve, (iii) after anaesthesia had subjectively subsided (recovery) and (iv) 3 h after bilateral lingual block injection. MEPs were assessed using stimulus-response curves in steps of 10% of motor threshold (T). Eight stimuli were given at each stimulus level. The amplitudes of the tongue MEPs were significantly influenced by the stimulus intensity (P < 0·001) but not by condition (P = 0·186). However, post hoc tests showed that MEPS were statistically significantly higher during bilateral LA block condition compared with baseline at T + 40%, T + 50% and T + 60% (P < 0·028) and also compared with recovery at T + 60% (P = 0·010) as well as at 3 h after injection at T + 50% and T + 60% (P < 0·029). Bilateral LA block of the lingual nerve seems to be associated with a facilitation of the corticomotor pathways related to the tongue musculature.

  8. [Reflexotherapy in neuralgias of the trigeminal nerve].

    PubMed

    Grechko, V E; Puzin, M N; Mamedbekov, F N

    1986-01-01

    Acupuncture was used in 82 patients with trigeminal neuralgila. In 17 patients trigeminal neuralgia was predominantly of the central and in 65 of the peripheral genesis. Selection of points for acupuncture was based on the findings about electrical conductivity of symmetrical acupuncture points on the patient's face. The study has shown that the method of acupuncture in patients with trigeminal neuralgia should be used differentially. It is effective only in patients with peripheral trigeminal neuralgia.

  9. MRI of the Trigeminal Nerve in Patients With Trigeminal Neuralgia Secondary to Vascular Compression.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Marion A; Frederickson, Andrew M; Branstetter, Barton F; Zhu, Xiao; Sekula, Raymond F

    2016-03-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a debilitating facial pain disorder, frequently caused by vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve. Vascular compression that results in trigeminal neuralgia occurs along the cisternal segment of the nerve. Imaging combined with clinical information is critical to correctly identify patients who are candidates for microvascular decompression. The purpose of this article is to review trigeminal nerve anatomy and to provide strategies for radiologists to recognize important MRI findings in patients with trigeminal neuralgia.

  10. Historical characterization of trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Eboli, Paula; Stone, James L; Aydin, Sabri; Slavin, Konstantin V

    2009-06-01

    TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA IS a well known clinical entity characterized by agonizing, paroxysmal, and lancinating facial pain, often triggered by movements of the mouth or eating. Historical reviews of facial pain have attempted to describe this severe pain over the past 2.5 millennia. The ancient Greek physicians Hippocrates, Aretaeus, and Galen, described kephalalgias, but their accounts were vague and did not clearly correspond with what we now term trigeminal neuralgia. The first adequate description of trigeminal neuralgia was given in 1671, followed by a fuller description by physician John Locke in 1677. André described the convulsive-like condition in 1756, and named it tic douloureux; in 1773, Fothergill described it as "a painful affection of the face;" and in 1779, John Hunter more clearly characterized the entity as a form of "nervous disorder" with reference to pain of the teeth, gums, or tongue where the disease "does not reside." One hundred fifty years later, the neurological surgeon Walter Dandy equated neurovascular compression of the trigeminal nerve with trigeminal neuralgia.

  11. Loss of Brain Aerobic Glycolysis in Normal Human Aging.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Manu S; Vlassenko, Andrei G; Blazey, Tyler M; Su, Yi; Couture, Lars E; Durbin, Tony J; Bateman, Randall J; Benzinger, Tammie L-S; Morris, John C; Raichle, Marcus E

    2017-08-01

    The normal aging human brain experiences global decreases in metabolism, but whether this affects the topography of brain metabolism is unknown. Here we describe PET-based measurements of brain glucose uptake, oxygen utilization, and blood flow in cognitively normal adults from 20 to 82 years of age. Age-related decreases in brain glucose uptake exceed that of oxygen use, resulting in loss of brain aerobic glycolysis (AG). Whereas the topographies of total brain glucose uptake, oxygen utilization, and blood flow remain largely stable with age, brain AG topography changes significantly. Brain regions with high AG in young adults show the greatest change, as do regions with prolonged developmental transcriptional features (i.e., neoteny). The normal aging human brain thus undergoes characteristic metabolic changes, largely driven by global loss and topographic changes in brain AG. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Role of Imaging for Trigeminal Neuralgia: A Segmental Approach to High-Resolution MRI.

    PubMed

    Seeburg, Daniel P; Northcutt, Benjamin; Aygun, Nafi; Blitz, Ari M

    2016-07-01

    High-resolution MRI affords exquisite anatomic detail and allows radiologists to scrutinize the entire course of the trigeminal nerve (cranial nerve [CN] V). This article focuses first on the normal MRI appearance of the course of CN V and how best to image each segment. Special attention is then devoted to the role of MRI in presurgical evaluation of patients with neurovascular conflict and in identifying secondary causes of trigeminal neuralgia, including multiple sclerosis. Fundamental concepts in postsurgical imaging after neurovascular decompression are also addressed. Finally, how imaging has been used to better understand the etiology of trigeminal neuralgia is discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Collagen polymorphism in normal and cirrhotic human liver.

    PubMed Central

    Seyer, J M; Hutcheson, E T; Kang, A H

    1977-01-01

    Collagens in normal human liver and in alcoholic cirrhotic liver were investigated. Collagens were solubilized by limited proteolysis with pepsin under nondenaturing conditions, and after purification, were fractionated into types I and III by selective precipitation with NaCl. After carboxymethyl cellulose and agarose chromatography, the resulting alpha-chains from each of the collagen types were analyzed with respect to their amino acid and carbohydrate compositions. A comparison of the results obtained from normal liver with those from the diseases organ revealed no significant differences. The isolated human liver alpha1(I) and alpha1(III) chains were digested with CNBr and the generated peptides were separated and purified by a combination of ion-exchange and molecular sieve chromatography. The molecular weight and the amino acid and the carbohydrate compositions of each of the peptides were identical to those of the corresponding human skin peptides except for the slightly higher content of hydroxylysine in some of the peptides. The relative content of type III in relation to type I collagen in both normal anc cirrhotic liver was determined by digesting washed liver homogenates directly with CNBr and quantitating the resultant alpha1(I) and alpha 1(III) peptides after chromatographic separation. The relative quantities of these peptides indicated that normal human liver contained an average of 47% type III, with the remainder being type I. Cirrhotic liver, on the other hand, contained a significantly smaller proportion of type III, ranging from 18 to 34% in different samples, with a corresponding increase in type I. These findings indicate that although the amino acid and carbohydrate compositions of collagens deposited in cirrhotic liver are normal, the fibrotic process of alcoholic liver disease in humans is accompanied by an alteration in tissue collagen polymorphism, and suggest that the observed alterations may have pathogenetic implications. PMID:833273

  14. Botulinum toxin in trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Álvarez, Federico; Hernando de la Bárcena, Ignacio; Marzo-Sola, María Eugenia

    2017-01-06

    Trigeminal neuralgia is one of the most disabling facial pain syndromes, with a significant impact on patients' quality of life. Pharmacotherapy is the first choice for treatment but cases of drug resistance often require new strategies, among which various interventional treatments have been used. In recent years a new therapeutic strategy consisting of botulinum toxin has emerged, with promising results. We reviewed clinical cases and case series, open-label studies and randomized clinical trials examining the use of botulinum toxin for drug-refractory trigeminal neuralgia published in the literature. The administration of botulinum toxin has proven to be a safe and effective therapeutic strategy in patients with drug-refractory idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia, but many questions remain unanswered as to the precise role of botulinum toxin in the treatment of this disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Trigeminal neuralgia: a new therapy?

    PubMed

    Collet, C; Haen, P; Laversanne, S; Brignol, L; Thiéry, G

    2013-12-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is a rare form of neuropathic pain that results in sudden, unilateral and recurrent pains in the distribution of one or more branches of the trigeminal nerve. The aetiology of TN remains unclear and several theories have been proposed. Many medical and surgical methods have been applied with only partial effectiveness and several side effects. New hypotheses and therapeutic methods are urgently needed. Using evidence presented in a literature review and in our own case report, we hypothesize that pain resulting from trigeminal neuralgia can be caused by demyelinating lesions in the trigger zone. These lesions can be repaired through the injection of fat containing Adipose-Derived Stem Cells (ADSC). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparative decellularization and recellularization of normal versus emphysematous human lungs.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Darcy E; Bonenfant, Nicholas R; Parsons, Charles S; Sokocevic, Dino; Brooks, Elice M; Borg, Zachary D; Lathrop, Melissa J; Wallis, John D; Daly, Amanda B; Lam, Ying Wai; Deng, Bin; DeSarno, Michael J; Ashikaga, Takamaru; Loi, Roberto; Weiss, Daniel J

    2014-03-01

    Acellular whole human lung scaffolds represent a unique opportunity for ex vivo tissue engineering. However, it remains unclear whether lungs from individuals with chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can be appropriately decellularized and recellularized. To assess this, cadaveric human lungs from normal (non-smoking) patients and from patients with COPD (smoking history) were decellularized and found by histochemical and immunohistochemical staining, electron microscopy, and mass spectrometry to retain characteristic histological architecture and extracellular matrix components (ECM) reflecting either normal or COPD, particularly emphysematous, origin. Inoculation of human bronchial epithelial cells, endothelial progenitor cells, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, and lung fibroblasts via airway or vascular routes into small, excised segments of the decellularized lungs demonstrated that normal lung scaffolds robustly supported initial engraftment and growth of each cell type for up to one month. In contrast, despite initial binding, all cell types inoculated into decellularized emphysematous lungs did not survive beyond one week. However, cell attachment and proliferation on solubilized ECM homogenates of decellularized normal and emphysematous lungs coated onto tissue culture plates was comparable and not impaired, suggesting that the 3-dimensional decellularized emphysematous scaffolds may lack the necessary ECM architecture to support sustained cell growth. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparative Decellularization and Recellularization of Normal versus Emphysematous Human Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Darcy. E.; Bonenfant, Nicholas. R.; Parsons, Charles; Sokocevic, Dino; Brooks, Elice. M.; Borg, Zachary. D.; Lathrop, Melissa. J.; Wallis, John. D.; Daly, Amanda. B.; Lam, Ying Wai; Deng, Bin; DeSarno, Michael. J.; Ashikaga, Takamaru; Loi, Roberto; Weiss, Daniel. J.

    2014-01-01

    Acellular whole human lung scaffolds represent a unique opportunity for ex vivo tissue engineering. However, it remains unclear whether lungs from individuals with chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can be appropriately decellularized and recellularized. To assess this, cadaveric human lungs from normal (non-smoking) patients and from patients with COPD (smoking history) were decellularized and found by histochemical and immunohistochemical staining, electron microscopy, and mass spectrometry to retain characteristic histological architecture and extracellular matrix components (ECM) reflecting either normal or COPD, particularly emphysematous, origin. Inoculation of human bronchial epithelial cells, endothelial progenitor cells, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, and lung fibroblasts via airway or vascular routes into small, excised segments of the decellularized lungs demonstrated that normal lung scaffolds robustly supported initial engraftment and growth of each cell type for up to one month. In contrast, despite initial binding, all cell types inoculated into decellularized emphysematous lungs did not survive beyond one week. However, cell attachment and proliferation on solubilized ECM homogenates of decellularized normal and emphysematous lungs coated onto tissue culture plates was comparable and not impaired, suggesting that the 3-dimensional decellularized emphysematous scaffolds may lack the necessary ECM architecture to support sustained cell growth. PMID:24461327

  18. Detection of human cytomegalovirus in normal and neoplastic breast epithelium

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) establishes a persistent life-long infection, and can cause severe pathology in the fetus and the immunocompromised host[1]. Breast milk is the primary route of transmission in humans worldwide, and breast epithelium is thus a likely site of persistent infection and/or reactivation, though this phenomenon has not previously been demonstrated. Increasing evidence indicates HCMV infection can modulate signaling pathways associated with oncogenesis. We hypothesized that persistent HCMV infection occurs in normal adult breast epithelium and that persistent viral expression might be associated with normal and neoplastic ductal epithelium. Methods Surgical biopsy specimens of normal breast (n = 38) breast carcinoma (n = 39) and paired normal breast from breast cancer patients (n = 21) were obtained. Specimens were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, PCR and DNA sequencing for evidence of HCMV antigens and nucleic acids. Results We detected HCMV expression specifically in glandular epithelium in 17/27 (63%) of normal adult breast cases evaluated. In contrast, HCMV expression was evident in the neoplastic epithelium of 31/32 (97%) patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC) cases evaluated (p = 0.0009). Conclusions These findings are the first to demonstrate that persistent HCMV infection occurs in breast epithelium in a significant percentage of normal adult females. HCMV expression was also evident in neoplastic breast epithelium in a high percentage of normal and neoplastic breast tissues obtained from breast cancer patients, raising the possibility that viral infection may be involved in the neoplastic process. PMID:21429243

  19. Autophagy in Normal and Abnormal Early Human Pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Avagliano, Laura; Terraneo, Laura; Virgili, Eleonora; Martinelli, Carla; Doi, Patrizia; Samaja, Michele; Bulfamante, Gaetano Pietro; Marconi, Anna Maria

    2015-07-01

    Autophagy is an inducible catabolic process by which cells degrade and recycle materials to survive stress, starvation, and hypoxia. The aim of this study was to evaluate autophagy at the fetal-maternal interface, to assess autophagy involvement during the early phase of human gestation, and to explore autophagic modification in case of early abnormal pregnancy outcome. Specimens were collected from first-trimester normal gestations undergoing legal termination of pregnancy and first-trimester sporadic spontaneous miscarriages. Autophagy was studied in villous and decidual samples by transmission electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and Western blotting. Autophagy markers were found in cytotrophoblast, syncytiotrophoblast, extravillous trophoblast, and decidual stromal cells. Autophagy is physiologically involved in early normal gestation. Compared with normal pregnancy, spontaneous miscarriage presents an increase in autophagy expression in villous specimens due to an increment in concentration of autophagic vacuole in syncytiotrophoblast, suggesting a cytoprotective mechanism of the cells to respond to microenvironmental challenge. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Raman spectroscopic identification of normal and malignant human stomach cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jipeng; Guo, Jianyu; Wu, Liangping; Sun, Zhenrong; Cai, Weiying; Wang, Zugeng

    2005-12-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy is employed to identify the normal and malignant human stomach cells. For the cancer cell, the reduced intensity of the Raman peak at 1250 cm^(-1) indicates that the protein secondary structure transforms from ?-sheet or disordered structures to ?-helical, while the increased intensity of the symmetric PO2 stretching vibration mode at 1094 cm^(-1) shows the increased DNA content. The ratio of the intensity at 1315 cm^(-1) to that at 1340 cm^(-1) reduces from 1.8 for the normal cell to 1.1 for the cancer cell in the course of canceration, and the ratio of the intensity at 1655 cm^(-1) to that at 1450 cm^(-1) increases from 1.00 for the cancer cell to 1.26 for the normal cell which indicates that the canceration of stomach cell may induce saturation of the lipid chain.

  1. The human renal lymphatics under normal and pathological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Y; Akasaka, Y; Kiguchi, H; Akishima-Fukasawa, Y; Hasegawa, T; Ito, K; Kimura-Matsumoto, M; Ishiguro, S; Morita, H; Sato, S; Soh, S; Ishii, T

    2006-01-01

    Ishikawa Y, Akasaka Y, Kiguchi H, Akishima-Fukasawa Y, Hasegawa T, Ito K, Kimura-Matsumoto M, Ishiguro S, Morita H, Sato S, Soh S & Ishii T (2006) Histopathology 49, 265–273 The human renal lymphatics under normal and pathological conditions Aims The renal lymphatics have not been fully documented in humans. The aim of this study was to clarify the morphology of the human renal lymphatic system under normal and pathological conditions by immunohistochemistry using anti-D2-40 antibody. Methods and results Normal and pathological renal tissues obtained at autopsy as well as nephrectomy specimens with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) were used. Thin sections were immunostained with antibodies against D2-40 and CD31. In normal kidney, D2-40+ lymphatics were abundant in the interstitium around the interlobar and arcuate arteries/veins but sporadic in those around the glomeruli or between the tubules in the cortex. A few lymphatics contained erythrocytes in their lumina. Lymphatics were seldom present in the medulla. In RCC cases, lymphatics were evident at the tumour margin, whereas CD31+ capillaries were abundant throughout the tumour and lymphatics were increased in the fibrous interstitium around the tumour. Lymphatic invasion by RCC cells was also detectable. D2-40+ lymphatics were evident in other pathological conditions and end-stage kidney had a denser lymphatic distribution than normal kidney. Conclusions Lymphatics are abundant around the arteries/veins and are also present in the renal cortex and medulla. D2-40 immunostaining is helpful for investigating the pathophysiological role of renal lymphatics. PMID:16918973

  2. The human renal lymphatics under normal and pathological conditions.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Y; Akasaka, Y; Kiguchi, H; Akishima-Fukasawa, Y; Hasegawa, T; Ito, K; Kimura-Matsumoto, M; Ishiguro, S; Morita, H; Sato, S; Soh, S; Ishii, T

    2006-09-01

    The renal lymphatics have not been fully documented in humans. The aim of this study was to clarify the morphology of the human renal lymphatic system under normal and pathological conditions by immunohistochemistry using anti-D2-40 antibody. Normal and pathological renal tissues obtained at autopsy as well as nephrectomy specimens with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) were used. Thin sections were immunostained with antibodies against D2-40 and CD31. In normal kidney, D2-40+ lymphatics were abundant in the interstitium around the interlobar and arcuate arteries/veins but sporadic in those around the glomeruli or between the tubules in the cortex. A few lymphatics contained erythrocytes in their lumina. Lymphatics were seldom present in the medulla. In RCC cases, lymphatics were evident at the tumour margin, whereas CD31+ capillaries were abundant throughout the tumour and lymphatics were increased in the fibrous interstitium around the tumour. Lymphatic invasion by RCC cells was also detectable. D2-40+ lymphatics were evident in other pathological conditions and end-stage kidney had a denser lymphatic distribution than normal kidney. Lymphatics are abundant around the arteries/veins and are also present in the renal cortex and medulla. D2-40 immunostaining is helpful for investigating the pathophysiological role of renal lymphatics.

  3. Performance of Junctional Tourniquets in Normal Human Volunteers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    PERFORMANCE OF JUNCTIONAL TOURNIQUETS IN NORMAL HUMAN VOLUNTEERS John F. Kragh, Jr., MD, Russ S. Kotwal, MD, MPH, Andrew P. Cap, MD, PhD, James K...Cancio, MD ABSTRACT Background. Inguinal bleeding is a common and pre- ventable cause of death on the battlefield. Four FDA-cleared junctional ...tourniquets (Combat Ready Clamp [CRoC], Ab- dominal Aortic and Junctional Tourniquet [AAJT], Junc- tional Emergency Treatment Tool [JETT], and SAM Junc- tional

  4. Pharmacological treatment of trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Di Stefano, Giulia; Truini, Andrea

    2017-10-01

    Unique among the different neuropathic pain conditions, trigeminal neuralgia frequently has an excellent response to some selected drugs, which, on the other hand, often entail disabling side effects. Physicians should be therefore acquainted with the management of these drugs and the few alternative options. Areas covered: This article, based on a systematic literature review, describes the pharmacological options, and indicates the future perspectives for treating trigeminal neuralgia. The article therefore provides current, evidence-based knowledge about the pharmacological treatment of trigeminal neuralgia, and suggests a practical approach to the various drugs, including starting dose, titration and side effects. Expert commentary: Carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine are the reference standard drugs for treating patients with trigeminal neuralgia. They are effective in most patients. The undesired effects however cause withdrawal from treatment or a dosage reduction to an insufficient level in many patients. Sodium channel blockers selective for the sodium channel 1.7 (Nav1.7) receptor, currently under development, might be an alternative, better-tolerated pharmacological option in the next future.

  5. Super Normal Vector for Human Activity Recognition with Depth Cameras.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaodong; Tian, YingLi

    2017-05-01

    The advent of cost-effectiveness and easy-operation depth cameras has facilitated a variety of visual recognition tasks including human activity recognition. This paper presents a novel framework for recognizing human activities from video sequences captured by depth cameras. We extend the surface normal to polynormal by assembling local neighboring hypersurface normals from a depth sequence to jointly characterize local motion and shape information. We then propose a general scheme of super normal vector (SNV) to aggregate the low-level polynormals into a discriminative representation, which can be viewed as a simplified version of the Fisher kernel representation. In order to globally capture the spatial layout and temporal order, an adaptive spatio-temporal pyramid is introduced to subdivide a depth video into a set of space-time cells. In the extensive experiments, the proposed approach achieves superior performance to the state-of-the-art methods on the four public benchmark datasets, i.e., MSRAction3D, MSRDailyActivity3D, MSRGesture3D, and MSRActionPairs3D.

  6. Human peripheral nerve macrophages in normal and pathological conditions.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, B; Monaco, S; Giannini, C; Ferrari, S; Zanusso, G; Rizzuto, N

    1993-09-01

    We investigated, by immunocytochemistry and immune electron microscopy, the immunophenotype, morphology and functional properties of human peripheral nervous system (PNS) macrophages (M phi) under normal and pathological conditions. Endoneurial M phi disclosed an elongated, ramified morphology, with the main processes oriented along the major axis of nerve fibers; they shared several lineage-related and functional markers with monocyte/macrophages and central nervous system (CNS) microglia, including CD4, CR3, CR4 and FcRIII. In addition, basal expression of HLA-DR antigens was exclusively confined to M phi in normal PNS. In the course of unrelated pathological conditions, resident M phi underwent activation with transformation to hypertrophic cells or foamy phagocytes and up-regulation of the markers expressed in normal conditions; new expression of a macrophagic antigen was detected on activated M phi. In different neuropathies, HLA-DR expression was also detected on non-myelin forming Schwann cells with ultrastructural features indicative of denervation. The present results demonstrate that the human PNS is provided with an intrinsic population of immunocompetent and potentially phagocytic M phi, which represent the peripheral counterpart of CNS microglia.

  7. Human factors of flight-deck checklists: The normal checklist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degani, Asaf; Wiener, Earl L.

    1991-01-01

    Although the aircraft checklist has long been regarded as the foundation of pilot standardization and cockpit safety, it has escaped the scrutiny of the human factors profession. The improper use, or the non-use, of the normal checklist by flight crews is often cited as the probable cause or at least a contributing factor to aircraft accidents. An attempt is made to analyze the normal checklist, its functions, format, design, length, usage, and the limitations of the humans who must interact with it. The development of the checklist from the certification of a new model to its delivery and use by the customer are discussed. The influence of the government, particularly the FAA Principle Operations Inspector, the manufacturer's philosophy, the airline's culture, and the end user, the pilot, influence the ultimate design and usage of this device. The effects of airline mergers and acquisitions on checklist usage and design are noted. In addition, the interaction between production pressures and checklist usage and checklist management are addressed. Finally, a list of design guidelines for normal checklists is provided.

  8. General anesthesia suppresses normal heart rate variability in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matchett, Gerald; Wood, Philip

    2014-06-01

    The human heart normally exhibits robust beat-to-beat heart rate variability (HRV). The loss of this variability is associated with pathology, including disease states such as congestive heart failure (CHF). The effect of general anesthesia on intrinsic HRV is unknown. In this prospective, observational study we enrolled 100 human subjects having elective major surgical procedures under general anesthesia. We recorded continuous heart rate data via continuous electrocardiogram before, during, and after anesthesia, and we assessed HRV of the R-R intervals. We assessed HRV using several common metrics including Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA), Multifractal Analysis, and Multiscale Entropy Analysis. Each of these analyses was done in each of the four clinical phases for each study subject over the course of 24 h: Before anesthesia, during anesthesia, early recovery, and late recovery. On average, we observed a loss of variability on the aforementioned metrics that appeared to correspond to the state of general anesthesia. Following the conclusion of anesthesia, most study subjects appeared to regain their normal HRV, although this did not occur immediately. The resumption of normal HRV was especially delayed on DFA. Qualitatively, the reduction in HRV under anesthesia appears similar to the reduction in HRV observed in CHF. These observations will need to be validated in future studies, and the broader clinical implications of these observations, if any, are unknown.

  9. Gene profile identifies zinc transporters differentially expressed in normal human organs and human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Zhang, Y; Cui, X; Yao, W; Yu, X; Cen, P; Hodges, S E; Fisher, W E; Brunicardi, F C; Chen, C; Yao, Q; Li, M

    2013-03-01

    Deregulated expression of zinc transporters was linked to several cancers. However, the detailed expression profile of all human zinc transporters in normal human organs and in human cancer, especially in pancreatic cancer is not available. The objectives of this study are to investigate the complete expression patterns of 14 ZIP and 10 ZnT transporters in a large number of normal human organs and in human pancreatic cancer tissues and cell lines. We examined the expression patterns of ZIP and ZnT transporters in 22 different human organs and tissues, 11 pairs of clinical human pancreatic cancer specimens and surrounding normal/benign tissues, as well as 10 established human pancreatic cancer cell lines plus normal human pancreatic ductal epithelium (HPDE) cells, using real time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The results indicate that human zinc transporters have tissue specific expression patterns, and may play different roles in different organs or tissues. Almost all the ZIPs except for ZIP4, and most ZnTs were down-regulated in human pancreatic cancer tissues compared to the surrounding benign tissues. The expression patterns of individual ZIPs and ZnTs are similar among different pancreatic cancer lines. Those results and our previous studies suggest that ZIP4 is the only zinc transporter that is significantly up-regulated in human pancreatic cancer and might be the major zinc transporter that plays an important role in pancreatic cancer growth. ZIP4 might serve as a novel molecular target for pancreatic cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  10. Lysyl oxidase activity in human normal skins and postburn scars.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, T; Hino, N; Fuyamada, H; Nagatsu, T; Aoyama, H

    1976-09-06

    Lysyl oxidase activity of human normal skins derived from the frontal thighs of 33 subjects showed large variations and the mean value was 11 455 +/- 7 172 (S.D.) cpm/g of wet weight tissue. The age of lesion affected the lysyl oxidase activity in postburn scars. Granulation tissues showed a fairly low activity; however, the activity increased sharply within 2--3 months, and reached a significantly higher value than that of normal skin. The high level of activity continued for up to 2--3 years, then gradually decreased to normal range after 5 years or so. Lysyl oxidase activity was detected only after 4 M urea treatment of tissues. Benzylamine oxidase activity also showed large variations in both normal skins and postburn scars, with mean values of: 0.128 +/- 0.077 (S.D.) and 0.145 +/- 0.090 (S.D.) mmol/g of wet weight/h, respectively. No correlation was observed between lysyl oxidase and benzylamine oxidase activities. The granulation tissues showed significantly high values of benzylamine oxidase activity in contrast to the low values of lysyl oxidase activity.

  11. Characterization of integrin receptors in normal and neoplastic human brain.

    PubMed Central

    Paulus, W.; Baur, I.; Schuppan, D.; Roggendorf, W.

    1993-01-01

    We studied the immunohistochemical expression of integrin alpha and beta chains in the normal and neoplastic human brain. Normal astrocytes expressed alpha 2, alpha 3, alpha 6, beta 1, and beta 4 chains in some areas facing major interstitial tissues, but they were consistently negative for the other integrins examined (alpha 4, alpha 5, alpha V, alpha L, alpha M, alpha X, beta 2, beta 3). Neoplastic astrocytes in vivo and in vitro showed increased expression of alpha 3 and beta 1, and some also of alpha 5, alpha V, beta 3, and beta 4. Neoexpression of alpha 4 and reduced levels of beta 4 were detected in glioblastoma vascular proliferations compared with normal endothelial cells. Oligodendroglioma, ependymoma, choroid plexus papilloma, pituitary adenoma, and meningioma cells showed the same integrin pattern as their normal counterparts. Adhesion assays using the astrocytoma cell lines U-138 MG and U-373 MG revealed strong attachment to collagen types I to VI and undulin, which was inhibited by antibodies to beta 1, but not by those to alpha 2, alpha 3, alpha 6, and alpha V. We conclude that astrocytomas show increased levels or neoexpression of various integrins and strong attachment to various extracellular matrix components, which appears to be almost exclusively mediated by beta 1-integrins. Images Figure 1 PMID:8317546

  12. Effects of ozone in normal human epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, James T; Pelle, Edward; Dong, Kelly; Brahmbhatt, Krupa; Yarosh, Dan; Pernodet, Nadine

    2013-05-01

    Ozone is a tropospheric pollutant that can form at ground level as a result of an interaction between sunlight and hydrocarbon engine emissions. As ozone is an extremely oxidative reaction product, epidermal cells are in the outer layer of defense against ozone. We exposed normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) to concentrations of ozone that have been measured in cities and assayed for its effects. Hydrogen peroxide and IL-1α levels both increased while ATP levels decreased. We found a decrease in the NAD-dependent histone deacetylase, sirtuin 3. Lastly, we found that ozone increased DNA damage as evaluated by Comet assay. Taken together, our results show increased damage to NHEK that will ultimately impair normal cellular function as a result of an environmentally relevant ozone exposure. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Effects of water immersion on plasma catecholamines in normal humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, M.; Johnson, G.; Denunzio, A. G.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in order to determine whether water immersion to the neck (NI) alters plasma catecholamines in normal humans. Eight normal subjects were studied during a seated control study (C) and during 4 hr of NI, and the levels of norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (E) as determined by radioenzymatic assay were measured hourly. Results show that despite the induction of a marked natriuresis and diuresis indicating significant central hypervolemia, NI failed to alter plasma NE or E levels compared with those of either C or the corresponding prestudy 1.5 hr. In addition, the diuresis and natriuresis was found to vary independently of NE. These results indicate that the response of the sympathetic nervous system to acute volume alteration may differ from the reported response to chronic volume expansion.

  14. Optical Properties of Human Cancer and Normal Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander, Christopher; Sun, Nan; Johnson, Jeffrey; Stack, Sharon; Tanner, Carol; Ruggiero, Steven

    2014-03-01

    We have investigated the optical properties of human oral and ovarian cancer and normal cells. Specifically, we have measured the absolute optical extinction for both whole cells and intra-cellular material in aqueous suspension. Measurements were conducted over a wavelength range of 250 to 1000nm with 1 nm resolution using Light Transmission Spectroscopy (LTS). This provides both the absolute extinction of materials under study and, with Mie inversion, the absolute number of particles of a given diameter as a function of diameter in the range of 1 to 3000 nm. Our preliminary studies show significant differences in both the extinction and particle size distributions associated with cancer versus normal cells, which appear to be correlated with differences in the particle size distribution in the range of ~ 50 to 250 nm.

  15. Immortalization of human normal and NF1 neurofibroma Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Chang, Lung-Ji; Neubauer, Debbie R; Muir, David F; Wallace, Margaret R

    2016-10-01

    Neurofibromas, which are benign Schwann cell tumors, are the hallmark feature in the autosomal dominant condition neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) and are associated with biallelic loss of NF1 gene function. There is a need for effective therapies for neurofibromas, particularly the larger, plexiform neurofibromas. Tissue culture is an important tool for research. However, it is difficult to derive enriched human Schwann cell cultures, and most enter replicative senescence after 6-10 passages, impeding cell-based research in NF1. Through exogenous expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase and murine cyclin-dependent kinase (mCdk4), normal (NF1 wild-type), neurofibroma-derived Schwann cells heterozygous for NF1 mutation, and neurofibroma-derived Schwann cells homozygous for NF1 mutation were immortalized, including some matched samples from the same NF1 patient. Initial experiments employed retroviral vectors, while subsequent work utilized lentiviral vectors carrying these genes because of improved efficiency. Expression of both transgenes was required for immortalization. Molecular and immunohistochemical analysis indicated that these cell lines are of Schwann cell lineage and have a range of phenotypes, many of which are consistent with their primary cultures. This is the first report of immortalization and detailed characterization of multiple human NF1 normal nerve and neurofibroma-derived Schwann cell lines, which will be highly useful research tools to study NF1 and other Schwann tumor biology and conditions.

  16. Doublecortin expression in the normal and epileptic adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y W J; Curtis, M A; Gibbons, H M; Mee, E W; Bergin, P S; Teoh, H H; Connor, B; Dragunow, M; Faull, R L M

    2008-12-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is a neurological disorder associated with spontaneous recurrent complex partial seizures and hippocampal sclerosis. Although increased hippocampal neurogenesis has been reported in animal models of MTLE, increased neurogenesis has not been reported in the hippocampus of adult human MTLE cases. Here we showed that cells expressing doublecortin (Dcx), a microtubule-associated protein expressed in migrating neuroblasts, were present in the hippocampus and temporal cortex of the normal and MTLE adult human brain. In particular, increased numbers of Dcx-positive cells were observed in the epileptic compared with the normal temporal cortex. Importantly, 56% of Dcx-expressing cells in the epileptic temporal cortex coexpressed both the proliferative cell marker, proliferating cell nuclear antigen and early neuronal marker, TuJ1, suggesting that they may be newly generated neurons. A subpopulation of Dcx-positive cells in the epileptic temporal cortex also coexpressed the mature neuronal marker, NeuN, suggesting that epilepsy may promote the generation of new neurons in the temporal cortex. This study has identified, for the first time, a novel population of Dcx-positive cells in the adult human temporal cortex that can be upregulated by epilepsy and thus, raises the possibility that these cells may have functional significance in the pathophysiology of epilepsy.

  17. Hemodynamic aspects of normal human feto-placental (umbilical) circulation.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Ganesh; Sonesson, Sven-Erik; Flo, Kari; Räsänen, Juha; Odibo, Anthony

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the changes in normal circulatory dynamics that occur during the course of pregnancy is essential for improving our knowledge of pathophysiological mechanisms associated with feto-placental diseases. The umbilical circulation is the lifeline of the fetus, and it is accessible for noninvasive assessment. However, not all hemodynamic parameters can be reliably measured in utero using currently available technology. Experimental animal studies have been crucial in validating major concepts related to feto-placental circulatory physiology, but caution is required in directly translating the findings of such studies into humans due to species differences. Furthermore, it is important to establish normal reference ranges and take into account gestational age associated changes while interpreting the results of clinical investigation. Therefore, it is necessary to critically evaluate, synthesize and summarize the knowledge available from the studies performed on human pregnancies to be able to appropriately apply them in clinical practice. This narrative review is an attempt to present contemporary concepts on hemodynamics of feto-placental circulation based on human studies. © 2016 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  18. A quantitative transcriptome reference map of the normal human brain.

    PubMed

    Caracausi, Maria; Vitale, Lorenza; Pelleri, Maria Chiara; Piovesan, Allison; Bruno, Samantha; Strippoli, Pierluigi

    2014-10-01

    We performed an innovative systematic meta-analysis of 60 gene expression profiles of whole normal human brain, to provide a quantitative transcriptome reference map of it, i.e. a reference typical value of expression for each of the 39,250 known, mapped and 26,026 uncharacterized (unmapped) transcripts. To this aim, we used the software named Transcriptome Mapper (TRAM), which is able to generate transcriptome maps based on gene expression data from multiple sources. We also analyzed differential expression by comparing the brain transcriptome with those derived from human foetal brain gene expression, from a pool of human tissues (except the brain) and from the two normal human brain regions cerebellum and cerebral cortex, which are two of the main regions severely affected when cognitive impairment occurs, as happens in the case of trisomy 21. Data were downloaded from microarray databases, processed and analyzed using TRAM software and validated in vitro by assaying gene expression through several magnitude orders by 'real-time' reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The excellent agreement between in silico and experimental data suggested that our transcriptome maps may be a useful quantitative reference benchmark for gene expression studies related to the human brain. Furthermore, our analysis yielded biological insights about those genes which have an intrinsic over-/under-expression in the brain, in addition offering a basis for the regional analysis of gene expression. This could be useful for the study of chromosomal alterations associated to cognitive impairment, such as trisomy 21, the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability.

  19. Regulation of p53 during senescence in normal human keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Reuben H; Kang, Mo K; Kim, Terresa; Yang, Paul; Bae, Susan; Williams, Drake W; Phung, Samantha; Shin, Ki-Hyuk; Hong, Christine; Park, No-Hee

    2015-01-01

    p53, the guardian of the genome, is a tumor suppressor protein and critical for the genomic integrity of the cells. Many studies have shown that intracellular level of p53 is enhanced during replicative senescence in normal fibroblasts, and the enhanced level of p53 is viewed as the cause of senescence. Here, we report that, unlike in normal fibroblasts, the level of intracellular p53 reduces during replicative senescence and oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) in normal human keratinocytes (NHKs). We found that the intracellular p53 level was also decreased in age-dependent manner in normal human epithelial tissues. Senescent NHKs exhibited an enhanced level of p16INK4A, induced G2 cell cycle arrest, and lowered the p53 expression and transactivation activity. We found that low level of p53 in senescent NHKs was due to reduced transcription of p53. The methylation status at the p53 promoter was not altered during senescence, but senescent NHKs exhibited notably lower level of acetylated histone 3 (H3) at the p53 promoter in comparison with rapidly proliferating cells. Moreover, p53 knockdown in rapidly proliferating NHKs resulted in the disruption of fidelity in repaired DNA. Taken together, our study demonstrates that p53 level is diminished during replicative senescence and OIS and that such diminution is associated with H3 deacetylation at the p53 promoter. The reduced intracellular p53 level in keratinocytes of the elderly could be a contributing factor for more frequent development of epithelial cancer in the elderly because of the loss of genomic integrity of cells. PMID:26138448

  20. MRI as an essential diagnostic approach for trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Kedarnath, N S; Shruthi, R

    2015-03-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a well recognised disorder frequently reported to the dentist. The diagnosis of trigeminal neuralgia is primarily based on history and clinical criteria. The clinical findings do not differentiate idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia from symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia. We describe a case of cliviopetrosal meningioma presenting as trigeminal neuralgia and discuss the importance of magnetic resonance imaging as an essential diagnostic approach when trigeminal neuralgia occurs concurrently with a brain tumour.

  1. Trigeminal trophic syndrome with histopathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Dolohanty, Lindsey B; Richardson, Steven J; Herrmann, David N; Markman, John; Mercurio, Mary Gail

    2015-03-01

    We present the case of a 49-year-old woman with trigeminal trophic syndrome (TTS), also known as trophic trigeminal neuralgia, trigeminal neurotrophic ulceration, and/or trigeminal neuropathy with nasal ulceration. Our case represents an uncommon report of intractable itching and chronic pain associated with TTS. Emphasis was placed on skin biopsy histology, which revealed no neuronal innervation of the affected scalp despite reports of intractable itching and chronic pain. Trigeminal trophic syndrome of the V1 branch of the trigeminal nerve secondary to herpes zoster (HZ) with correlated histology is described. This article provides a discussion of TTS and correlated histology as well as a brief discussion of intractable itching and postherpetic neuralgia.

  2. [Trigeminal neuralgia secondary to petrous endostosis].

    PubMed

    Mata-Gómez, Jacinto; Royano-Sánchez, Manuel; Bejarano-Parra, Macarena; Gilete-Tejero, Ignacio; Rico-Cotelo, María; Ortega-Martínez, Marta

    2017-03-10

    Arterial neurovascular compression is hypothesised to be the main cause of primary trigeminal neuralgia. Although it is the most common cause, other pathologies, such as tumours in the cerebellopontine angle, can cause trigeminal pain. We report a case of a 44-year-old female patient with right trigeminal neuralgia without satisfactory response to medical treatment. Cerebral MRI showed no structural injuries. During microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve, endostosis of the internal aspect of the petrous bone was found to compress the trigeminal nerve. The pain disappeared completely in the early postsurgical period, after the complete drilling of the endostosis and microvascular decompression. The patient remains asymptomatic one year later. Endostosis of the petrous bone is a rare cause of trigeminal neuralgia. A proper review of preoperative studies would enable the definitive surgical approach to be optimised.

  3. Vulnerability of Normal Human Mammary Epithelial Cells to Oncogenic Transformation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    algorithm for CpG-island detection. BMC Bioinformatics 7: 446. 17. Gardiner-Garden M, Frommer M (1987) CpG islands in vertebrate genomes. J Mol Biol...it does not have a CpG island according to the original criteria (Gardiner-Garden and Frommer 1987). H3K4me3 and H3Ac are present in miR-205...culture of normal human mammary epithelial cells. Cancer Res 69: 7557–7568. Gardiner-GardenM, Frommer M. 1987. CpG islands in vertebrate genomes. J Mol

  4. Multiphoton microscopic imaging of human normal and cancerous oesophagus tissue.

    PubMed

    Chen, W S; Wang, Y; Liu, N R; Zhang, J X; Chen, R

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, microstructures of human oesophageal submucosa are evaluated using multiphoton microscopy, based on two-photon excited fluorescence and second harmonic generation. The content and distribution of collagen, elastic fibers and cancer cells in normal and cancerous submucosa layer have been distinctly obtained and briefly discussed. The variation of these components is very relevant to the pathology in oesophagus, especially in early oesophageal cancer. Our results further indicate that the multiphoton microscopy technique has the potential application in vivo in clinical diagnosis and monitoring of early oesophageal cancer. © 2013 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2013 Royal Microscopical Society.

  5. Cationic channels in normal and dystrophic human myotubes.

    PubMed

    Vandebrouck, C; Duport, G; Cognard, C; Raymond, G

    2001-01-01

    Human skeletal muscle cells obtained from normal and Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients were cocultured with explants of rat dorsal root ganglions. Single-channel recordings were performed with the cell-attached configuration of the patch-clamp technique and negative pressure was applied via the patch-pipette in order to mechanically stimulate the membrane patch. Inward elementary current activity was recorded under control or negative pressure conditions. Its occurrence and mean open probability were higher in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Amplitude histograms reveal that these channels have a small unitary conductance of around 10 pS in 110 mM Ca2+ and could be inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by gadolinium. Results show that the membrane stress favoured calcium permeation through these channels. Taken together these data provide arguments for the involvement of such channels in calcium overload previously observed in cocultured dystrophic human (Duchenne muscular dystrophy) muscle cells.

  6. Ophthalmic branch radiofrequency thermocoagulation for atypical trigeminal neuralgia:a case report.

    PubMed

    Du, Shibin; Ma, Xiaoliang; Li, Xiaoqin; Yuan, Hongjie

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is an intense neuralgia involving facial areas supplied by trigeminal nerve. The pain is characterized by sudden onset, short persistence, sharp or lancinating. Trigeminal neuralgia commonly affects frontal areas, infraorbital or paranasal areas, mandibular areas and teeth. While Trigeminal neuralgia affecting merely the upper eyelid is rare. Here we report a case of atypical Trigeminal neuralgia confined to the upper eyelid. The patient was pain free during the follow-up period of 6 months after unusual ophthalmic branch radiofrequency thermocoagulation. A 55-year-old female patient was diagnosed as primary trigeminal neuralgia involving the right upper eyelid. As the pain could not be controlled by drug therapy, peripheral nerve branch radiofrequency thermocoagulation was recommended. A combination of infratrochlear, supratrochlear and lacrimal radiofrequency thermocoagulation was implemented in this case. The point where the bridge of the nose abuts the supraorbital ridge and the point slightly above the lateral canthus along outer border of the orbit were selected respectively as the puncture sites. After positive diagnostic test, radiofrequency thermocoagulation of the above-mentioned nerve branches was performed respectively. The patient was pain free immediately after the treatment and during the follow-up period of 6 months. Trigeminal neuralgia is a common severe and chronic facial neuralgia which requires accurate diagnosis and effective therapy. With typical clinical symptoms, normal neurological signs, normal CT and MRI findings, the patient was diagnosed as classic trigeminal neuralgia. As the patient was drug resistant, some invasive treatments were considered. Peripheral branch neurolysis was chosen for its minimal invasiveness, convenience, low risk and not affecting further invasive treatments. According to the anatomic data and the diagnostic test results, infratrochlear, supratrochlear and lacrimal nerve were responsible

  7. Post-apopletic trigeminal trophic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, G; Argenziano, G; Cicarelli, G; Cusano, F; Delfino, M

    2001-03-01

    Trigeminal trophic syndrome is an uncommon clinical entity in which cutaneous trophic ulceration develops with continuous manipulation of trigeminal dermatomes. Patients spontaneously refer picking, rubbing and/or scratching at the affected areas because of hypo-anaesthesia, paraesthesia and/or pain following damage of the sensory trigeminal fibres or nuclei. We herein describe a patient who developed the syndrome as a sequela of brain stem infarction. Diagnosis by scrape cytology in ruling-out basal cell carcinoma and other ulcerative skin diseases is discussed and the importance of neurological examination in disclosing hemi-anaesthesia of trigeminal dermatome(s) is emphasized.

  8. Divergent viral presentation among human tumors and adjacent normal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Song; Wendl, Michael C.; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A.; Wylie, Kristine; Ye, Kai; Jayasinghe, Reyka; Xie, Mingchao; Wu, Song; Niu, Beifang; Grubb, Robert; Johnson, Kimberly J.; Gay, Hiram; Chen, Ken; Rader, Janet S.; Dipersio, John F.; Chen, Feng; Ding, Li

    2016-01-01

    We applied a newly developed bioinformatics system called VirusScan to investigate the viral basis of 6,813 human tumors and 559 adjacent normal samples across 23 cancer types and identified 505 virus positive samples with distinctive, organ system- and cancer type-specific distributions. We found that herpes viruses (e.g., subtypes HHV4, HHV5, and HHV6) that are highly prevalent across cancers of the digestive tract showed significantly higher abundances in tumor versus adjacent normal samples, supporting their association with these cancers. We also found three HPV16-positive samples in brain lower grade glioma (LGG). Further, recurrent HBV integration at the KMT2B locus is present in three liver tumors, but absent in their matched adjacent normal samples, indicating that viral integration induced host driver genetic alterations are required on top of viral oncogene expression for initiation and progression of liver hepatocellular carcinoma. Notably, viral integrations were found in many genes, including novel recurrent HPV integrations at PTPN13 in cervical cancer. Finally, we observed a set of HHV4 and HBV variants strongly associated with ethnic groups, likely due to viral sequence evolution under environmental influences. These findings provide important new insights into viral roles of tumor initiation and progression and potential new therapeutic targets. PMID:27339696

  9. Terahertz spectroscopic investigation of human gastric normal and tumor tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Dibo; Li, Xian; Cai, Jinhui; Ma, Yehao; Kang, Xusheng; Huang, Pingjie; Zhang, Guangxin

    2014-09-01

    Human dehydrated normal and cancerous gastric tissues were measured using transmission time-domain terahertz spectroscopy. Based on the obtained terahertz absorption spectra, the contrasts between the two kinds of tissue were investigated and techniques for automatic identification of cancerous tissue were studied. Distinctive differences were demonstrated in both the shape and amplitude of the absorption spectra between normal and tumor tissue. Additionally, some spectral features in the range of 0.2~0.5 THz and 1~1.5 THz were revealed for all cancerous gastric tissues. To systematically achieve the identification of gastric cancer, principal component analysis combined with t-test was used to extract valuable information indicating the best distinction between the two types. Two clustering approaches, K-means and support vector machine (SVM), were then performed to classify the processed terahertz data into normal and cancerous groups. SVM presented a satisfactory result with less false classification cases. The results of this study implicate the potential of the terahertz technique to detect gastric cancer. The applied data analysis methodology provides a suggestion for automatic discrimination of terahertz spectra in other applications.

  10. Ketogenic diet: electrophysiological effects on the normal human cortex.

    PubMed

    Cantello, Roberto; Varrasi, Claudia; Tarletti, Roberto; Cecchin, Michela; D'Andrea, Federico; Veggiotti, Pierangelo; Bellomo, Giorgio; Monaco, Francesco

    2007-09-01

    To explore the cortical electrophysiology of the ketogenic diet (KD) in the normal human. KD is effective against refractory epilepsy, but its precise mechanism is obscure. At the transmitter level, an enhancement of GABA inhibition has often been proposed. We studied eight healthy volunteers undergoing a "classic" KD for 2 weeks. We measured several biochemical variables at baseline (T0), after 1 week (T1) and 2 weeks (T2) of KD, then 3 months after the KD conclusion (T3). Ketosis was quantified as 24-h ketonuria. At the same time, we studied the motor cortical excitability by means of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). We also quantitatively evaluated the EEG signal in search of frequency shifts over the rolandic areas. Significant (p < 0.05) neurophysiological changes appeared at T2. These consisted of a strengthening of short-latency cortical inhibition (SICI), a TMS index which is thought to reflect GABA-A inhibition in the cortex. Then, there was an enhancement of the beta EEG band over the perirolandic region, similar to that following administration of GABA-A agonists. All changes disappeared at T3. A standard, short-term KD affected the cortical physiology of the normal human. The main changes were an augmented SICI and an increased perirolandic beta EEG activity, which are compatible with a lower level of neural excitation within the cortex.

  11. Disposition of human fibrinopeptide A in normal and nephrectomized rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Harenberg, J.; Stehle, G.; Waibel, S.; Hermann, H.J.; Eisenhut, M.; Zimmermann, R.

    1983-10-01

    The distribution, elimination, and metabolism of human fibrinopeptide A (FPA) were studied in normal and nephrectomized rabbits. The activity of /sup 125/I-labeled desamino-tyrosyl human FPA (DAT-FPA) was followed over 4 hours after i.v. administration. Results show that in normal rabbits (n . 10) DAT-FPA is eliminated from plasma in four phases with half-lives of 30 sec, 3.5 min, 15 min, and 90 min. The distribution of /sup 123/I-labeled DAT-FPA in plasma was determined in 15 control rabbits with scintigraphy over 2 hours. DAT-FPA was distributed primarily in the cardiovascular system, liver, and kidneys. In some animals minimal radioactivity was detected over the gall bladder. Radioactivity accumulated rapidly in the urinary bladder, approximately 50% being recorded after 15 min and 90% after 120 min. In the heart area radioactivity decreased with half-lives of 25 sec, 7.5 min, 25 min, and 180 min. Nephrectomized rabbits had similar initial fast distribution of DAT-FPA after administration of /sup 125/I-labeled (n . 10) and /sup 123/I-labeled peptide (n . 10). The estimated half-life of the slow component was in the order of several hours. The results of the scintigraphic and gel chromatographic studies show that FPA is primarily excreted in the urine. Previously reported half-lives of FPA reflect distribution rather than steady state conditions.

  12. Transcription abnormalities potentiate apoptosis of normal human fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Andera, L.; Wasylyk, B.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Apoptosis is a natural process by which damaged and potentially tumorigenic cells are removed. Induction of apoptosis is important in chemotherapy aimed at eliminating cancer cells. We address the mechanisms by which this process can be triggered in cells that are recalcitrant to cell death induced by DNA-damaging agents. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Normal human fibroblasts and lymphoblasts, and fibroblasts with defined genetic changes, were treated with DNA-damaging agents and inhibitors of transcription. Western blotting was used to study the expression of some of the key factors involved in the response to DNA damage and the induction of apoptosis, namely, p53, p21WAFI,Cip1, Mdm2, Bax, and CD95 (Fas/APO1). Apoptosis was followed by various criteria, including DNA fragmentation, specific proteolysis, cell morphology, viability, and FACS scan for sub-G1 cells. RESULTS: Normal human fibroblasts were more resistant than lymphoblasts to DNA damage-induced apoptosis. The DNA-damaging agents mitomycin C and cisplatin induced rapid apoptosis of fibroblasts with defects in the repair of transcribed DNA, compared with wild-type cells or those with defects in overall genome repair. Short-term treatment with inhibitors of RNA polymerase II transcription, actinomycin D, and alpha-amanitin induced rapid cell death of normal fibroblasts. These results show that there is a link between defective transcription and apoptosis. Treatments and genetic backgrounds that favored apoptosis were associated with efficient and prolonged induction of p53 and often altered or imbalanced expression of its downstream effectors p21WAFI,Cip1 and Mdm2, whereas there were no changes in Bax or CD95 (Fas/APO1). CONCLUSION: Transcription inhibitors increase p53 levels and are better inducers of apoptosis than DNA-damaging agents in some cell types. Apoptosis might be triggered by blocked polymerases and/or faulty expression of downstream effectors. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 PMID

  13. p120 GAP requirement in normal and malignant human hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    There is evidence to suggest that the p120 GAP (GAP), originally described as an inhibitor of p21ras, may also serve as a downstream effector of ras-regulated signal transduction. To determine whether GAP expression is required for the growth of human normal and leukemic hematopoietic cells, we used GAP antisense oligodeoxynucleotides to inhibit it and analyzed the effects of this inhibition on the colony- forming ability of nonadherent, T lymphocyte-depleted mononuclear cells and of highly purified progenitors (CD34+ MNC) obtained from the bone marrow and peripheral blood of healthy volunteers or chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, bcr-abl-positive) patients. The acute myelogenous leukemia cell line MO7, the Philadelphia BV173 cell line, and the acute promyelocytic leukemia NB4 and HL-60 cell lines were similarly examined. GAP antisense treatment inhibited colony formation from normal myelo-, erythro-, and megakaryopoietic progenitor cells as well as from CML progenitor cells. Proliferation of MO7 (growth factor- dependent) and BV173 (bcr-abl-dependent) cells, but not that of NB4 and HL-60 (growth factor-independent) cells, was also inhibited, even though a specific downregulation of GAP was observed in each cell line, as analyzed by either or both mRNA and protein expression. Stimulation of MO7 cells with hematopoietic growth factors increased the expression of GAP as well as the levels of active GTP-bound p21ras. Stimulation of GAP expression was inhibited upon GAP antisense treatment. These data indicate that p120 GAP is involved in human normal and leukemic hemopoiesis and strongly suggest that GAP is not only a p21ras inhibitor (signal terminator), but also a positive signal transducer. PMID:8245773

  14. Controlled thermocoagulation in trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, B; Thomas, D G

    1986-01-01

    Results of 280 radiofrequency lesions on 229 patients with trigeminal neuralgia are presented with three months to eight years (average 3.8 years) follow up. The patients were aged from 18-91 years. There was a high overall success rate of 94%. The complication rate has been low, with sensory paraesthesiae the commonest (15%) and cranial nerve palsies very rare (2.4%) compared to other reported series. PMID:3746327

  15. Rehabilitation of the trigeminal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Iro, Heinrich; Bumm, Klaus; Waldfahrer, Frank

    2005-01-01

    When it comes to restoring impaired neural function by means of surgical reconstruction, sensory nerves have always been in the role of the neglected child when compared with motor nerves. Especially in the head and neck area, with its either sensory, motor or mixed cranial nerves, an impaired sensory function can cause severe medical conditions. When performing surgery in the head and neck area, sustaining neural function must not only be highest priority for motor but also for sensory nerves. In cases with obvious neural damage to sensory nerves, an immediate neural repair, if necessary with neural interposition grafts, is desirable. Also in cases with traumatic trigeminal damage, an immediate neural repair ought to be considered, especially since reconstructive measures at a later time mostly require for interposition grafts. In terms of the trigeminal neuralgia, commonly thought to arise from neurovascular brainstem compression, a pharmaceutical treatment is considered as the state of the art in terms of conservative therapy. A neurovascular decompression of the trigeminal root can be an alternative in some cases when surgical treatment is sought after. Besides the above mentioned therapeutic options, alternative treatments are available. PMID:22073060

  16. Multimodality Management of Trigeminal Schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Niranjan, Ajay; Barnett, Samuel; Anand, Vijay; Agazzi, Siviero

    2016-08-01

    Patients presenting with trigeminal schwannomas require multimodality management by a skull base surgical team that can offer expertise in both transcranial and transnasal approaches as well as radiosurgical and microsurgical strategies. Improvement in neurologic symptoms, preservation of cranial nerve function, and control of mass effect are the primary goals of management for trigeminal schwannomas. Complete surgical resection is the treatment of choice but may not be possible in all cases. Radiosurgery is an option as primary management for small- to moderate-sized tumors and can be used for postoperative residuals or recurrences. Planned surgical resection followed by SRS for residual tumor is an effective option for larger trigeminal schwannomas. The endoscopic resection is an excellent approach for patients with an extradural tumor or tumors isolated to the Meckel cave. A detailed analysis of a tumor and its surroundings based on high-quality imaging can help better estimate the expected outcome from each treatment. An expert skull base team should be able to provide precise counseling for each patient's situation for selecting the best option.

  17. Human cancers overexpress genes that are specific to a variety of normal human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lotem, Joseph; Netanely, Dvir; Domany, Eytan; Sachs, Leo

    2005-01-01

    We have analyzed gene expression data from three different kinds of samples: normal human tissues, human cancer cell lines, and leukemic cells from lymphoid and myeloid leukemia pediatric patients. We have searched for genes that are overexpressed in human cancer and also show specific patterns of tissue-dependent expression in normal tissues. Using the expression data of the normal tissues, we identified 4,346 genes with a high variability of expression and clustered these genes according to their relative expression level. Of 91 stable clusters obtained, 24 clusters included genes preferentially expressed either only in hematopoietic tissues or in hematopoietic and one to two other tissues; 28 clusters included genes preferentially expressed in various nonhematopoietic tissues such as neuronal, testis, liver, kidney, muscle, lung, pancreas, and placenta. Analysis of the expression levels of these two groups of genes in the human cancer cell lines and leukemias identified genes that were highly expressed in cancer cells but not in their normal counterparts and, thus, were overexpressed in the cancers. The different cancer cell lines and leukemias varied in the number and identity of these overexpressed genes. The results indicate that many genes that are overexpressed in human cancer cells are specific to a variety of normal tissues, including normal tissues other than those from which the cancer originated. It is suggested that this general property of cancer cells plays a major role in determining the behavior of the cancers, including their metastatic potential. PMID:16339305

  18. Human penile erection and organic impotence: normal histology and histopathology.

    PubMed

    Conti, G; Virag, R

    1989-01-01

    A very large amount of human material (7 embryos, 12 stillborns, 12 penes of males aged between 2 and 86 years, as well as bioptical material from 80 subjects affected by impotence problems) has been examined so as to study the penis arterial and venous walls, the blood flow regulation mechanisms and the intracavernal trabecular morphology. The amount of muscle tissue and of collagenous connective tissue has been numerically quantified by computer-assisted methods. This study enables the authors to underline three fundamental facts: (a) it confirms the normal penile erection mechanism, and the consequent theory, (b) it confirms that vascular sclerosis is a systemic phenomenon correlated to age, and that the penis is not exempt, and (c) in the case of impotence problems, the same sclerosis phenomenon may appear at an earlier age, and therefore induce pathological impotence.

  19. Differential Intracochlear Sound Pressure Measurements in Normal Human Temporal Bones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Hideko Heidi; Dong, Wei; Olson, Elizabeth S.; Merchant, Saumil N.; Ravicz, Michael E.; Rosowski, John J.

    2009-02-01

    We present the first simultaneous sound pressure measurements in scala vestibuli and scala tympani of the cochlea in human cadaveric temporal bones. Micro-scale fiberoptic pressure sensors enabled the study of differential sound pressure at the cochlear base. This differential pressure is the input to the cochlear partition, driving cochlear waves and auditory transduction. Results showed that: pressure of scala vestibuli was much greater than scala tympani except at low and high frequencies where scala tympani pressure affects the input to the cochlea; the differential pressure proved to be an excellent measure of normal ossicular transduction of sound (shown to decrease 30-50 dB with ossicular disarticulation, whereas the individual scala pressures were significantly affected by non-ossicular conduction of sound at high frequencies); the middle-ear gain and differential pressure were generally bandpass in frequency dependence; and the middle-ear delay in the human was over twice that of the gerbil. Concurrent stapes velocity measurements allowed determination of the differential impedance across the partition and round-window impedance. The differential impedance was generally resistive, while the round-window impedance was consistent with a compliance in conjunction with distributed inertia and damping. Our techniques can be used to study inner-ear conductive pathologies (e.g., semicircular dehiscence), as well as non-ossicular cochlear stimulation (e.g., round-window stimulation) - situations that cannot be completely quantified by measurements of stapes velocity or scala-vestibuli pressure by themselves.

  20. Complement Interaction with Trypanosomatid Promastigotes in Normal Human Serum

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez, Mercedes; Moreno, Inmaculada; López-Trascasa, Margarita; Toraño, Alfredo

    2002-01-01

    In normal human serum (NHS), axenic promastigotes of Crithidia, Phytomonas, and Leishmania trigger complement activation, and from 1.2 to 1.8 × 105 C3 molecules are deposited per promastigote within 2.5 min. In Leishmania, promastigote C3 binding capacity remains constant during in vitro metacyclogenesis. C3 deposition on promastigotes activated through the classical complement pathway reaches a 50% maximum after ∼50 s, and represents >85% of total C3 bound. In C1q- and C2-deficient human sera, promastigotes cannot activate the classical pathway (CP) unless purified C1q or C2 factors, respectively, are supplemented, demonstrating a requirement for CP factor in promastigote C3 opsonization. NHS depleted of natural anti-Leishmania antibodies cannot trigger promastigote CP activation, but IgM addition restores C3 binding. Furthermore, Leishmania binds natural antibodies in ethylenediaminetetracetic acid (EDTA)-treated NHS; after EDTA removal, promastigote-bound IgM triggers C3 deposition in natural antibody-depleted NHS. Serum collectins and pentraxins thus do not participate significantly in NHS promastigote C3 opsonization. Real-time kinetic analysis of promastigote CP-mediated lysis indicates that between 85–95% of parasites are killed within 2.5 min of serum contact. These data indicate that successful Leishmania infection in man must immediately follow promastigote transmission, and that Leishmania evasion strategies are shaped by the selective pressure exerted by complement. PMID:11854358

  1. Altered Human Memory Modification in the Presence of Normal Consolidation.

    PubMed

    Censor, Nitzan; Buch, Ethan R; Nader, Karim; Cohen, Leonardo G

    2016-09-01

    Following initial learning, the memory is stabilized by consolidation mechanisms, and subsequent modification of memory strength occurs via reconsolidation. Yet, it is not clear whether consolidation and memory modification are the same or different systems-level processes. Here, we report disrupted memory modification in the presence of normal consolidation of human motor memories, which relate to differences in lesioned brain structure after stroke. Furthermore, this behavioral dissociation was associated with macrostructural network architecture revealed by a graph-theoretical approach, and with white-matter microstructural integrity measured by diffusion-weighted MRI. Altered macrostructural network architecture and microstructural integrity of white-matter underlying critical nodes of the related network predicted disrupted memory modification. To the best of our knowledge, this provides the first evidence of mechanistic differences between consolidation, and subsequent memory modification through reconsolidation, in human procedural learning. These findings enable better understanding of these memory processes, which may guide interventional strategies to enhance brain function and resulting behavior. Published by Oxford University Press 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  2. Microsurgical anatomy of the trigeminal nerve.

    PubMed

    Joo, Wonil; Yoshioka, Fumitaka; Funaki, Takeshi; Mizokami, Koji; Rhoton, Albert L

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to review surgical anatomy of the trigeminal nerve. We also demonstrate some pictures involving the trigeminal nerve and its surrounding connective and neurovascular structures. Ten adult cadaveric heads were studied, using a magnification ranging from 3× to 40×, after perfusion of the arteries and veins with colored latex. The trigeminal nerve is the largest and most complex of the cranial nerves. It serves as a major conduit of sensory input from the face and provides motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. Because of its size and complexity, it is essential to have thorough knowledge of the nerve before diagnoses and treatment of the pathologic processes in the orofacial, temporomandibular, infratemporal, and pterygopalatine areas. The trigeminal nerve is encountered with imaging or surgery of the skull base surgery. Thus, a comprehensive knowledge of the anatomy of the trigeminal nerve is crucial for performing the surgical procedures without significant complication.

  3. Trigeminal neuralgia caused by a trigeminocerebellar artery.

    PubMed

    Amagasaki, Kenichi; Abe, Shoko; Watanabe, Saiko; Naemura, Kazuaki; Nakaguchi, Hiroshi

    2014-10-01

    This 31-year-old woman presented with typical right trigeminal neuralgia caused by a trigeminocerebellar artery, manifesting as pain uncontrollable with medical treatment. Preoperative neuroimaging studies demonstrated that the offending artery had almost encircled the right trigeminal nerve. This finding was confirmed intraoperatively, and decompression was completed. The neuralgia resolved after the surgery; the patient had slight transient hypesthesia, which fully resolved within the 1st month after surgery. The neuroimaging and intraoperative findings showed that the offending artery directly branched from the upper part of the basilar artery and, after encircling and supplying tiny branches to the nerve root, maintained its diameter and coursed toward the rostral direction of the cerebellum, which indicated that the artery supplied both the trigeminal nerve and the cerebellum. The offending artery was identified as the trigeminocerebellar artery. This case of trigeminal neuralgia caused by a trigeminocerebellar artery indicates that this variant is important for a better understanding of the vasculature of the trigeminal nerve root.

  4. Trigeminal neuralgia and facial pain imaging.

    PubMed

    Graff-Radford, Steven; Gordon, Rachael; Ganal, John; Tetradis, Sotirois

    2015-06-01

    The trigeminal nerve or fifth cranial nerve has an extensive distribution in the head and face. It is the source for pain conduction and thereby is often implicated in a variety of disorders including inflammatory and neoplastic diseases. To determine the disease source, understanding the trigeminal nerve anatomy is essential, and further being able to image the trigeminal nerve provides insight into the location and type of pathology. The best approach to imaging is to consider the nerve in segments. The nerve segments may be divided into the brainstem, cisternal, Meckel's cave, cavernous sinus, and peripheral divisions. This review utilizes these segments to explore imaging options to help understand trigeminal neuralgia and pain in the trigeminal nerve distribution.

  5. Transcriptional repressor DREAM regulates trigeminal noxious perception.

    PubMed

    Benedet, Tomaso; Gonzalez, Paz; Oliveros, Juan C; Dopazo, Jose M; Ghimire, Kedar; Palczewska, Malgorzata; Mellstrom, Britt; Naranjo, Jose R

    2017-05-01

    Expression of the downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM) protein in dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord is related to endogenous control mechanisms of acute and chronic pain. In primary sensory trigeminal neurons, high levels of endogenous DREAM protein are preferentially localized in the nucleus, suggesting a major transcriptional role. Here, we show that transgenic mice expressing a dominant active mutant of DREAM in trigeminal neurons show increased responses following orofacial sensory stimulation, which correlates with a decreased expression of prodynorphin and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in trigeminal ganglia. Genome-wide analysis of trigeminal neurons in daDREAM transgenic mice identified cathepsin L and the monoglyceride lipase as two new DREAM transcriptional targets related to pain. Our results suggest a role for DREAM in the regulation of trigeminal nociception. This article is part of the special article series "Pain". © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  6. Transient receptor potential channels encode volatile chemicals sensed by rat trigeminal ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Lübbert, Matthias; Kyereme, Jessica; Schöbel, Nicole; Beltrán, Leopoldo; Wetzel, Christian Horst; Hatt, Hanns

    2013-01-01

    Primary sensory afferents of the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia constantly transmit sensory information depicting the individual's physical and chemical environment to higher brain regions. Beyond the typical trigeminal stimuli (e.g. irritants), environmental stimuli comprise a plethora of volatile chemicals with olfactory components (odorants). In spite of a complete loss of their sense of smell, anosmic patients may retain the ability to roughly discriminate between different volatile compounds. While the detailed mechanisms remain elusive, sensory structures belonging to the trigeminal system seem to be responsible for this phenomenon. In order to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the activation of the trigeminal system by volatile chemicals, we investigated odorant-induced membrane potential changes in cultured rat trigeminal neurons induced by the odorants vanillin, heliotropyl acetone, helional, and geraniol. We observed the dose-dependent depolarization of trigeminal neurons upon application of these substances occurring in a stimulus-specific manner and could show that distinct neuronal populations respond to different odorants. Using specific antagonists, we found evidence that TRPA1, TRPM8, and/or TRPV1 contribute to the activation. In order to further test this hypothesis, we used recombinantly expressed rat and human variants of these channels to investigate whether they are indeed activated by the odorants tested. We additionally found that the odorants dose-dependently inhibit two-pore potassium channels TASK1 and TASK3 heterologously expressed In Xenopus laevis oocytes. We suggest that the capability of various odorants to activate different TRP channels and to inhibit potassium channels causes neuronal depolarization and activation of distinct subpopulations of trigeminal sensory neurons, forming the basis for a specific representation of volatile chemicals in the trigeminal ganglia.

  7. Transient Receptor Potential Channels Encode Volatile Chemicals Sensed by Rat Trigeminal Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Schöbel, Nicole; Beltrán, Leopoldo; Wetzel, Christian Horst; Hatt, Hanns

    2013-01-01

    Primary sensory afferents of the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia constantly transmit sensory information depicting the individual’s physical and chemical environment to higher brain regions. Beyond the typical trigeminal stimuli (e.g. irritants), environmental stimuli comprise a plethora of volatile chemicals with olfactory components (odorants). In spite of a complete loss of their sense of smell, anosmic patients may retain the ability to roughly discriminate between different volatile compounds. While the detailed mechanisms remain elusive, sensory structures belonging to the trigeminal system seem to be responsible for this phenomenon. In order to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the activation of the trigeminal system by volatile chemicals, we investigated odorant-induced membrane potential changes in cultured rat trigeminal neurons induced by the odorants vanillin, heliotropyl acetone, helional, and geraniol. We observed the dose-dependent depolarization of trigeminal neurons upon application of these substances occurring in a stimulus-specific manner and could show that distinct neuronal populations respond to different odorants. Using specific antagonists, we found evidence that TRPA1, TRPM8, and/or TRPV1 contribute to the activation. In order to further test this hypothesis, we used recombinantly expressed rat and human variants of these channels to investigate whether they are indeed activated by the odorants tested. We additionally found that the odorants dose-dependently inhibit two-pore potassium channels TASK1 and TASK3 heterologously expressed In Xenopus laevis oocytes. We suggest that the capability of various odorants to activate different TRP channels and to inhibit potassium channels causes neuronal depolarization and activation of distinct subpopulations of trigeminal sensory neurons, forming the basis for a specific representation of volatile chemicals in the trigeminal ganglia. PMID:24205061

  8. Persistent trigeminal artery supply to an intrinsic trigeminal nerve arteriovenous malformation: a rare cause of trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Choudhri, Omar; Heit, Jeremy J; Feroze, Abdullah H; Chang, Steven D; Dodd, Robert L; Steinberg, Gary K

    2015-02-01

    Infratentorial arteriovenous malformations (AVM) associated with the trigeminal nerve root entry zone are a known cause of secondary trigeminal neuralgia (TN). The treatment of both TN and AVM can be challenging, especially if the AVM is embedded within the trigeminal nerve. A persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) can rarely supply these intrinsic trigeminal nerve AVM. We present a 64-year-old man with TN from a right trigeminal nerve AVM supplied by a PTA variant. The patient underwent microvascular decompression and a partial resection of the AVM with relief of facial pain symptoms. His residual AVM was subsequently treated with CyberKnife radiosurgery (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA, USA). A multimodality approach may be required for the treatment of trigeminal nerve associated PTA AVM and important anatomic patterns need to be recognized before any treatment. Herein, we report to our knowledge the third documented patient with a posterior fossa AVM supplied by a PTA and the first PTA AVM presenting as facial pain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A quantitative transcriptome reference map of the normal human hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Caracausi, Maria; Rigon, Vania; Piovesan, Allison; Strippoli, Pierluigi; Vitale, Lorenza; Pelleri, Maria Chiara

    2016-01-01

    We performed an innovative systematic meta-analysis of 41 gene expression profiles of normal human hippocampus to provide a quantitative transcriptome reference map of it, i.e. a reference typical value of expression for each of the 30,739 known mapped and the 16,258 uncharacterized (unmapped) transcripts. For this aim, we used the software called TRAM (Transcriptome Mapper), which is able to generate transcriptome maps based on gene expression data from multiple sources. We also analyzed differential expression by comparing the hippocampus with the whole brain transcriptome map to identify a typical expression pattern of this subregion compared with the whole organ. Finally, due to the fact that the hippocampus is one of the main brain region to be severely affected in trisomy 21 (the best known genetic cause of intellectual disability), a particular attention was paid to the expression of chromosome 21 (chr21) genes. Data were downloaded from microarray databases, processed, and analyzed using TRAM software. Among the main findings, the most over-expressed loci in the hippocampus are the expressed sequence tag cluster Hs.732685 and the member of the calmodulin gene family CALM2. The tubulin folding cofactor B (TBCB) gene is the best gene at behaving like a housekeeping gene. The hippocampus vs. the whole brain differential transcriptome map shows the over-expression of LINC00114, a long non-coding RNA mapped on chr21. The hippocampus transcriptome map was validated in vitro by assaying gene expression through several magnitude orders by "Real-Time" reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The highly significant agreement between in silico and experimental data suggested that our transcriptome map may be a useful quantitative reference benchmark for gene expression studies related to human hippocampus. Furthermore, our analysis yielded biological insights about those genes that have an intrinsic over-/under-expression in the hippocampus.

  10. Characterizing the normal proteome of human ciliary body

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The ciliary body is the circumferential muscular tissue located just behind the iris in the anterior chamber of the eye. It plays a pivotal role in the production of aqueous humor, maintenance of the lens zonules and accommodation by changing the shape of the crystalline lens. The ciliary body is the major target of drugs against glaucoma as its inhibition leads to a drop in intraocular pressure. A molecular study of the ciliary body could provide a better understanding about the pathophysiological processes that occur in glaucoma. Thus far, no large-scale proteomic investigation has been reported for the human ciliary body. Results In this study, we have carried out an in-depth LC-MS/MS-based proteomic analysis of normal human ciliary body and have identified 2,815 proteins. We identified a number of proteins that were previously not described in the ciliary body including importin 5 (IPO5), atlastin-2 (ATL2), B-cell receptor associated protein 29 (BCAP29), basigin (BSG), calpain-1 (CAPN1), copine 6 (CPNE6), fibulin 1 (FBLN1) and galectin 1 (LGALS1). We compared the plasma proteome with the ciliary body proteome and found that the large majority of proteins in the ciliary body were also detectable in the plasma while 896 proteins were unique to the ciliary body. We also classified proteins using pathway enrichment analysis and found most of proteins associated with ubiquitin pathway, EIF2 signaling, glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. Conclusions More than 95% of the identified proteins have not been previously described in the ciliary body proteome. This is the largest catalogue of proteins reported thus far in the ciliary body that should provide new insights into our understanding of the factors involved in maintaining the secretion of aqueous humor. The identification of these proteins will aid in understanding various eye diseases of the anterior segment such as glaucoma and presbyopia. PMID:23914977

  11. Impact of gemifloxacin on the normal human intestinal microflora.

    PubMed

    Barker, P J; Sheehan, R; Teillol-Foo, M; Palmgren, A C; Nord, C E

    2001-02-01

    Gemifloxacin is a new fluoroquinolone that has been shown to possess a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity against gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms including methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant staphylococci, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and most members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of gemifloxacin on the human intestinal microflora. Gemifloxacin was given in oral doses of 320 mg for 7 days to 10 healthy subjects and 5 subjects received a once-daily dose of matched placebo for 7 days. Faecal samples were collected prior to administration (days -8 and -6), during the administration period (days 2 and 4) and after withdrawal of administration (days 8, 11, 21, 28 and 56). In the aerobic intestinal microflora the numbers of enterobacteria were suppressed during the gemifloxacin administration and the numbers of enterococci and streptococci were also decreased. No other aerobic microorganisms were affected. In the anaerobic microflora the numbers of anaerobic cocci and lactobacilli were suppressed during the gemifloxacin administration while no other changes occurred. The microflora was normalized 49 days after the administration of gemifloxacin had stopped. No selection or overgrowth of resistant bacterial strains or yeasts occurred. The ecological impact of gemifloxacin was shown to be selective and similar to that of ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin and ofloxacin.

  12. Accelerated aging syndromes, are they relevant to normal human aging?

    PubMed

    Dreesen, Oliver; Stewart, Colin L

    2011-09-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria (HGPS) and Werner syndromes are diseases that clinically resemble some aspects of accelerated aging. HGPS is caused by mutations in theLMNA gene resulting in post-translational processing defects that trigger Progeria in children. Werner syndrome, arising from mutations in the WRN helicase gene, causes premature aging in young adults. What are the molecular mechanism(s) underlying these disorders and what aspects of the diseases resemble physiological human aging? Much of what we know stems from the study of patient derived fibroblasts with both mutations resulting in increased DNA damage, primarily at telomeres. However, in vivo patients with Werner's develop arteriosclerosis, among other pathologies. In HGPS patients, including iPS derived cells from HGPS patients, as well as some mouse models for Progeria, vascular smooth muscle (VSM) appears to be among the most severely affected tissues. Defective Lamin processing, associated with DNA damage, is present in VSM from old individuals, indicating processing defects may be a factor in normal aging. Whether persistent DNA damage, particularly at telomeres, is the root cause for these pathologies remains to be established, since not all progeroid Lmna mutations result in DNA damage and genome instability.

  13. Neuropeptides of human thymus in normal and pathological conditions.

    PubMed

    Mignini, F; Sabbatini, M; D'Andrea, V; Cavallotti, C

    2011-05-01

    Human thymus of healthy subjects and patients affected by thymoma-associated Myastenia Gravis were studied in order to visualize and compare the morphological distributive pattern of four neuropeptides: vasoactive intestinal peptide, substance P, neuropeptide Y, and neurotensin. Based on our observations, we formulated hypotheses on their relations in neuro-immunomodulation under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Immuno-histochemical staining for neuropeptides was performed and morphological and morphometrical analyses were conducted on healthy and diseased thymus. In normal thymus, a specific distributive pattern was observed for the several neuropeptide-positive nerves in different thymus lobular zones. In particular substance P-positive fibers were observed in subcapsular zone, specifically located into parenchyma, where they represent the almost total amount of fibers; neurotensin-positive fibers were observed primarily located in parenchyma than perivascular site of several thymus lobular zones, and more abundant the cortico-medullary and medullary zones. Instead VIP- and NPY-positive fibers were widely distributed in perivascular and parenchymal sites of several thymus lobular zones. In thymoma, the distribution of neuropeptide-positive fibers was quantitatively reduced, while cells immunopositive to VIP and substance P were quantitatively increased and dispersed. Observation of the perivascular and parenchymal distribution of the analyzed neuropeptides suggests evidence that a regulatory function is performed by nerves and cells that secrete neuropeptide into the thymus. The alteration of neuropeptide patterns in thymoma suggests that these neurotransmitters play a role in autoimmune diseases such as Myastenia Gravis.

  14. 7Li NMR study of normal human erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettegrew, J. W.; Post, J. F. M.; Panchalingam, K.; Withers, G.; Woessner, D. E.

    The biological action of lithium is of great interest because of the therapeutic efficacy of the cation in manic-depressive illness. To investigate possible molecular interactions of lithium, 7Li NMR studies were conducted on normal human erythrocytes which had been incubated with lithium chloride. The uptake of lithium ions was followed by 7Li NMR, using a dysprosium, tripolyphosphate shift reagent. Lithium uptake followed single-exponential kinetics with a time constant of 14.7 h. The intracellular lithium relaxation times were T 1 ⋍ 5 s and T 2 ⋍ 0.15 s, which implies a lengthening of the lithium correlation time. It was found that lithium does not interact significantly with hemoglobin, the erythrocyte membrane, or artificial phospholipid membranes. Based on measurements of lithium T1 and T2 in concentrated agar gels, the large difference between T1 and T2 for intracellular lithium ions may be due to diffusion of the hydrated lithium ion through heterogeneous electrostatic field gradients created by the erythrocyte membrane-associated cytoskeletal network. Lithium binding to the membrane-associated cytoskeleton, however, cannot be ruled out. Because of the large differences between T1 and T2 of intracellular lithium ions, 1Li NMR may be a sensitive and promising noninvasive method to probe the intracellular environment.

  15. Laser-Capture Microdissection: Refining Estimates of the Quantity and Distribution of Latent Herpes Simplex Virus 1 and Varicella-Zoster Virus DNA in Human Trigeminal Ganglia at the Single-Cell Level

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kening; Lau, Tsz Y.; Morales, Melissa; Mont, Erik K.; Straus, Stephen E.

    2005-01-01

    There remains uncertainty and some controversy about the percentages and types of cells in human sensory nerve ganglia that harbor latent herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) DNA. We developed and validated laser-capture microdissection and real-time PCR (LCM/PCR) assays for the presence and copy numbers of HSV-1 gG and VZV gene 62 sequences in single cells recovered from sections of human trigeminal ganglia (TG) obtained at autopsy. Among 970 individual sensory neurons from five subjects, 2.0 to 10.5% were positive for HSV-1 DNA, with a median of 11.3 copies/positive cell, compared with 0.2 to 1.5% of neurons found to be positive by in situ hybridization (ISH) for HSV-1 latency-associated transcripts (LAT), the classical surrogate marker for HSV latency. This indicates a more pervasive latent HSV-1 infection of human TG neurons than originally thought. Combined ISH/LCM/PCR assays revealed that the majority of the latently infected neurons do not accumulate LAT to detectable levels. We detected VZV DNA in 1.0 to 6.9% of individual neurons from 10 subjects. Of the total 1,722 neurons tested, 4.1% were VZV DNA positive, with a median of 6.9 viral genomes/positive cell. After removal by LCM of all visible neurons on a slide, all surrounding nonneuronal cells were harvested and assayed: 21 copies of HSV-1 DNA were detected in ∼5,200 nonneuronal cells, while nine VZV genomes were detected in ∼14,200 nonneuronal cells. These data indicate that both HSV-1 and VZV DNAs persist in human TG primarily, if not exclusively, in a moderate percentage of neuronal cells. PMID:16254342

  16. Syneretic response of aging normal human lens to pressure.

    PubMed

    Bettelheim, Frederick A; Lizak, Martin J; Zigler, J Samuel

    2003-01-01

    The study was designed to observe whether a reversible syneretic response to pressure is operative in normal human lenses and whether such a response demonstrates a uniform age dependence. Seven sections (from the anterior outer cortex to the posterior outer cortex) of 10 human lenses were imaged at 2 atmospheres (atm) pressure and the T(1) (spin-lattice) and T(2) (spin-spin) relaxation data on each section were collected. The pressure was then released and NMR relaxographic data were collected under 1 atm. Both T(1) and T(2) relaxation times were at their minimum in the nuclear region and at their maximum at the two outer cortexes. With increasing pressure, T(2) relaxation times decreased. The pressure-dependent change in T(2) relaxation times decreased with age. Changes in T(1) relaxation times showed no consistent pressure or age dependence. The population index of T(2) relaxation, M(2), had a maximum in the nucleus and a minimum in the two cortexes. The population index of T(1) relaxation, M(1,) was minimal in the nucleus and maximal at the two cortexes. M(2) increased with increasing pressure, whereas M(1) did not show consistent pressure dependence. The percentage of change in M(2) (DeltaM(2)) showed a statistically significant increase with increasing age, whereas the %DeltaM(1) showed no significant age-dependent trend. The positional dependence of relaxation times and the population indexes indicated that spin-spin relaxation represents the behavior of the bound water and the spin-lattice relaxation that of total water. As pressure increases, the strength of hydrogen bonding as well as the amount of bound water increases. The pressure-induced change in the total water is minimal. Thus, the free water-to-bound water ratio decreases with increasing pressure, demonstrating a significant syneretic response. The extent of reversible syneretic response decreases with age and is actually reversed in older lenses. The implication is that the ability of the human

  17. [Update on the management of trigeminal neuralgia].

    PubMed

    Alcántara Montero, A; Sánchez Carnerero, C I

    2016-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is one of the most severe facial pain syndromes. The annual incidence varies between 4-13% and has a significant effect on patient quality of life. The initial treatment of trigeminal neuralgia is pharmacological, and although other drugs have demonstrated efficacy, albeit in more limited form, carbamazepine is the only drug with sufficient level of evidence. When medical treatment fails, surgery should be considered and can opt for open surgery or minimally invasive percutaneous techniques. This paper reviews the medical and surgical therapeutic options for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia, based on current available evidence.

  18. Overview and History of Trigeminal Neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Patel, Smruti K; Liu, James K

    2016-07-01

    Although the symptoms associated with trigeminal neuralgia have been well documented, the root cause of this disease initially eluded most surgeons. Although early remedies were haphazard because of a lack of understanding about the condition, near the 20th century both medical and procedural therapies were established for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. These treatments include a variety of medications, chemoneurolysis, radiofrequency lesioning, percutaneous ablative procedures, stereotactic radiosurgery, and open rhizotomy and microvascular decompression. This report recounts the history of trigeminal neuralgia, from its earliest descriptions to the historical evolution of nonsurgical and surgical therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Factors Determining Outcome After Trigeminal Nerve Surgery for Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Zuniga, John R; Yates, David M

    2016-07-01

    in preoperative pain intensity levels among the 3 cohorts (P = .16), but there were statistical differences at 3 months (P = .007), 6 months (P < .0001), and 12 months (P < .0001). There were no statistical differences between the CR and ICR cohorts at 3 months (P = .502), 6 months (P = .1), and 12 months (P = .2). There was no effect by age, gender, injury type, Sunderland classification, injury etiology, duration from injury to repair, health comorbidity, or repair type on the outcome. The recurrence of neuropathic pain after trigeminal nerve repair for neuropathic pain is likely multifactorial and might not depend on factors that normally affect sensory recovery in patients who have no neuropathic pain (ie, age, duration of injury, type of injury, or repair type) and undergo trigeminal nerve surgery. These differences indicate that the understanding of trigeminal neuropathic pain is incomplete. Predictive outcomes of treatment will probably improve when the etiology is better defined to allow target- and site-specific treatment. In the meantime, trigeminal nerve surgery is a treatment option that offers a chance of decreasing or resolving pain intensity. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Physiological brainstem mechanisms of trigeminal nociception: An fMRI study at 3T.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Laura H; Sprenger, Christian; May, Arne

    2016-01-01

    The brainstem is a major site of processing and modulation of nociceptive input and plays a key role in the pathophysiology of various headache disorders. However, human imaging studies on brainstem function following trigeminal nociceptive stimulation are scarce as brainstem specific imaging approaches have to address multiple challenges such as magnetic field inhomogeneities and an enhanced level of physiological noise. In this study we used a viable protocol for brainstem fMRI of standardized trigeminal nociceptive stimulation to achieve detailed insight into physiological brainstem mechanisms of trigeminal nociception. We conducted a study of 21 healthy participants using a nociceptive ammonia stimulation of the left nasal mucosa with an optimized MR acquisition protocol for high resolution brainstem echoplanar imaging in combination with two different noise correction techniques. Significant BOLD responses to noxious ammonia stimulation were observed in areas typically involved in trigeminal nociceptive processing such as the spinal trigeminal nuclei (sTN), thalamus, secondary somatosensory cortex, insular cortex and cerebellum as well as in a pain modulating network including the periaqueductal gray area, hypothalamus (HT), locus coeruleus and cuneiform nucleus (CNF). Activations of the left CNF were positively correlated with pain intensity ratings. Employing psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analysis we found enhanced functional connectivity of the sTN with the contralateral sTN and HT following trigeminal nociception. We also observed enhanced functional connectivity of the CNF with the RVM during painful stimulation thus implying an important role of these two brainstem regions in central pain processing. The chosen approach to study trigeminal nociception with high-resolution fMRI offers new insight into human pain processing and might thus lead to a better understanding of headache pathophysiology.

  1. Fragmentation of DNA in morphologically normal human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Avendaño, Conrado; Franchi, Anahí; Taylor, Steven; Morshedi, Mahmood; Bocca, Silvina; Oehninger, Sergio

    2009-04-01

    To evaluate DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa with normal morphological appearance. Prospective study. Academic tertiary center. Fertile, subfertile, and infertile men were studied. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate-fluorescein nick-end labeling assay and morphology assessment by phase contrast in the swim-up fractions. Simultaneous assessment of the percentage of normally shaped sperm and DNA fragmentation. No DNA fragmentation was found in spermatozoa with normal morphology in any of the samples from the fertile group. In only one sample from the subfertile group did we observed normally shaped sperm cells exhibiting DNA fragmentation. However, in all the samples from the infertile group, we observed normal spermatozoa with DNA fragmentation. Spermatozoa from this late group exhibited a high proportion of DNA damage. In infertile men with moderate and severe teratozoospermia, the spermatozoa with apparently normal morphology present in the motile fractions after swim-up may have DNA fragmentation.

  2. Influences of smoking and caffeine consumption on trigeminal pain processing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many human and animal studies have shown the influence of nicotine and caffeine on pain perception and processing. This study aims to investigate whether smoking or caffeine consumption influences trigeminal pain processing. Methods Sixty healthy subjects were investigated using simultaneous recordings of the nociceptive blink reflex (nBR) and pain related evoked potentials (PREP) following nociceptive electrical stimulation on both sides of the forehead (V1). Thirty subjects were investigated before and after smoking a cigarette, as well as before and after taking a tablet of 400 mg caffeine. Results After smoking PREP showed decreased N2 and P2 latencies indicating central facilitation at supraspinal (thalamic or cortical) level. PREP amplitudes were not changed. NBR showed a decreased area under the curve (AUC) indicating central inhibition at brainstem level. After caffeine intake no significant changes were observed comparing nBR and PREP results before consumption. Conclusions Smoking influences trigeminal pain processing on supraspinal and brainstem level. In the investigated setting, caffeine consumption does not significantly alter trigeminal pain processing. This observation might help in the further understanding of the pathophysiology of pain disorders that are associated with excessive smoking habits such as cluster headache. Previous smoking has to be taken into account when performing electrophysiological studies to avoid bias of study results. PMID:24928141

  3. Influences of smoking and caffeine consumption on trigeminal pain processing.

    PubMed

    Holle, Dagny; Heber, Anke; Naegel, Steffen; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Katsarava, Zaza; Obermann, Mark

    2014-06-13

    Many human and animal studies have shown the influence of nicotine and caffeine on pain perception and processing. This study aims to investigate whether smoking or caffeine consumption influences trigeminal pain processing. Sixty healthy subjects were investigated using simultaneous recordings of the nociceptive blink reflex (nBR) and pain related evoked potentials (PREP) following nociceptive electrical stimulation on both sides of the forehead (V1). Thirty subjects were investigated before and after smoking a cigarette, as well as before and after taking a tablet of 400 mg caffeine. After smoking PREP showed decreased N2 and P2 latencies indicating central facilitation at supraspinal (thalamic or cortical) level. PREP amplitudes were not changed. NBR showed a decreased area under the curve (AUC) indicating central inhibition at brainstem level. After caffeine intake no significant changes were observed comparing nBR and PREP results before consumption. Smoking influences trigeminal pain processing on supraspinal and brainstem level. In the investigated setting, caffeine consumption does not significantly alter trigeminal pain processing. This observation might help in the further understanding of the pathophysiology of pain disorders that are associated with excessive smoking habits such as cluster headache. Previous smoking has to be taken into account when performing electrophysiological studies to avoid bias of study results.

  4. Clinical iron deficiency disturbs normal human responses to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Frise, Matthew C; Cheng, Hung-Yuan; Nickol, Annabel H; Curtis, M Kate; Pollard, Karen A; Roberts, David J; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Dorrington, Keith L; Robbins, Peter A

    2016-06-01

    Iron bioavailability has been identified as a factor that influences cellular hypoxia sensing, putatively via an action on the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway. We therefore hypothesized that clinical iron deficiency would disturb integrated human responses to hypoxia. We performed a prospective, controlled, observational study of the effects of iron status on hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. Individuals with absolute iron deficiency (ID) and an iron-replete (IR) control group were exposed to two 6-hour periods of isocapnic hypoxia. The second hypoxic exposure was preceded by i.v. infusion of iron. Pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) was serially assessed with Doppler echocardiography. Thirteen ID individuals completed the study and were age- and sex-matched with controls. PASP did not differ by group or study day before each hypoxic exposure. During the first 6-hour hypoxic exposure, the rise in PASP was 6.2 mmHg greater in the ID group (absolute rises 16.1 and 10.7 mmHg, respectively; 95% CI for difference, 2.7-9.7 mmHg, P = 0.001). Intravenous iron attenuated the PASP rise in both groups; however, the effect was greater in ID participants than in controls (absolute reductions 11.1 and 6.8 mmHg, respectively; 95% CI for difference in change, -8.3 to -0.3 mmHg, P = 0.035). Serum erythropoietin responses to hypoxia also differed between groups. Clinical iron deficiency disturbs normal responses to hypoxia, as evidenced by exaggerated hypoxic pulmonary hypertension that is reversed by subsequent iron administration. Disturbed hypoxia sensing and signaling provides a mechanism through which iron deficiency may be detrimental to human health. ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01847352). M.C. Frise is the recipient of a British Heart Foundation Clinical Research Training Fellowship (FS/14/48/30828). K.L. Dorrington is supported by the Dunhill Medical Trust (R178/1110). D.J. Roberts was supported by R&D funding from National Health Service (NHS) Blood and Transplant and

  5. Clinical iron deficiency disturbs normal human responses to hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Frise, Matthew C.; Cheng, Hung-Yuan; Nickol, Annabel H.; Curtis, M. Kate; Pollard, Karen A.; Roberts, David J.; Ratcliffe, Peter J.; Dorrington, Keith L.; Robbins, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Iron bioavailability has been identified as a factor that influences cellular hypoxia sensing, putatively via an action on the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway. We therefore hypothesized that clinical iron deficiency would disturb integrated human responses to hypoxia. METHODS. We performed a prospective, controlled, observational study of the effects of iron status on hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. Individuals with absolute iron deficiency (ID) and an iron-replete (IR) control group were exposed to two 6-hour periods of isocapnic hypoxia. The second hypoxic exposure was preceded by i.v. infusion of iron. Pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) was serially assessed with Doppler echocardiography. RESULTS. Thirteen ID individuals completed the study and were age- and sex-matched with controls. PASP did not differ by group or study day before each hypoxic exposure. During the first 6-hour hypoxic exposure, the rise in PASP was 6.2 mmHg greater in the ID group (absolute rises 16.1 and 10.7 mmHg, respectively; 95% CI for difference, 2.7–9.7 mmHg, P = 0.001). Intravenous iron attenuated the PASP rise in both groups; however, the effect was greater in ID participants than in controls (absolute reductions 11.1 and 6.8 mmHg, respectively; 95% CI for difference in change, –8.3 to –0.3 mmHg, P = 0.035). Serum erythropoietin responses to hypoxia also differed between groups. CONCLUSION. Clinical iron deficiency disturbs normal responses to hypoxia, as evidenced by exaggerated hypoxic pulmonary hypertension that is reversed by subsequent iron administration. Disturbed hypoxia sensing and signaling provides a mechanism through which iron deficiency may be detrimental to human health. TRIAL REGISTRATION. ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01847352). FUNDING. M.C. Frise is the recipient of a British Heart Foundation Clinical Research Training Fellowship (FS/14/48/30828). K.L. Dorrington is supported by the Dunhill Medical Trust (R178/1110). D.J. Roberts was

  6. Alloantigen presenting function of normal human CD34+ hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Rondelli, D; Andrews, R G; Hansen, J A; Ryncarz, R; Faerber, M A; Anasetti, C

    1996-10-01

    The identification of the CD34 molecule, expressed almost exclusively on human hematopoietic stem cells and committed progenitors, and the development of CD34-specific monoclonal antibodies have made procurement of relatively pure populations of CD34+ marrow cells for autologous transplantation feasible. Characterization of the immunogenicity of CD34+ marrow cells may facilitate the design of successful strategies to use these cells for allogeneic transplantation. CD34+ marrow cells from normal volunteers were enriched to greater than 98% purity by immunoaffinity chromatography on column followed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Purified CD34+ cells were tested for expression of HLA-DR and other accessory molecules, and function in hematopoietic colony growth and mixed leukocyte culture (MLC) assays. Greater than 95% CD34+ cells were positive for HLA-DR and 74% +/- 10% were highly positive for CD18, the common beta-chain of a leukointegrin family. CD34+/CD18- cells were small, agranular lymphocytes which contained the majority of precursors for colony-forming cells detected in long-term cultures. They produced almost no stimulation of purified T cells from HLA-DR-incompatible individuals in bulk MLC or in limiting dilution assay. In contrast, CD34+/CD18+ cells were large, were enriched for cells forming mixed colonies in short- but not long-term assays, and were capable of stimulating allogeneic T cells. CD86, a natural ligand for the T-cell activation molecule CD28, was coexpressed with CD18 in 6% +/- 3% of CD34+ cells. CD34+/CD86+ cells, but not CD34+/CD86- cells, exhibited strong alloantigen presenting function. Thus, pluripotent hematopoietic activity and alloantigen presenting function are attributes of distinct subsets of CD34+ marrow cells. CD34+/CD18- or CD34+/CD86- cells may be more effective than either the whole CD34+ population or unseparated marrow in engrafting allogeneic recipients and may also facilitate induction of tolerance.

  7. Effects of formaldehyde on normal xenotransplanted human tracheobronchial epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Ura, H.; Nowak, P.; Litwin, S.; Watts, P.; Bonfil, R. D.; Klein-Szanto, A. J.

    1989-01-01

    Epithelial cells obtained from autopsies of full-term fetuses or infants less than 1 year old were isolated, amplified in primary cultures and inoculated in deepithelialized rat tracheas. These tracheas were then sealed and transplanted subcutaneously into irradiated athymic nude mice. Four weeks after transplantation the tracheal lumen was completely covered by epithelium, most of which was of mucociliary respiratory type. At this stage, tracheal transplants containing tracheobronchial epithelium from 20 different donors were exposed to silastic devices containing 0, 0.5, 1 and 2 mg paraformaldehyde. The tracheal transplants were examined histologically at 2, 4, 8, and 16 weeks after transplantation. Before sacrifice, all animals were injected with a single pulse of tritiated thymidine. Important epithelial alterations could be seen in the formaldehyde treated transplants with a maximum effect visible at 2 weeks after exposure. The highest dose of 2 mg produced, in most cases, numerous areas of epithelial erosion and inflammation whereas this effect was not as evident with the lower doses. All doses produced areas of hyperplastic epithelium alternating with areas of pleomorphic-atrophic epithelium. Although the differences in predominance of different types of epithelium was not clearly dose-dependent, the labeling index (LI) showed dose dependence between 2 and 4 weeks after initiation of exposure. The maximum mean LI was three to four times higher than normal, although in some focal hyperplastic-metaplastic lesions the LI was increased up to 20 times. These studies show that formaldehyde, although toxic at higher doses, is able to elicit at lower doses a proliferative response of the human respiratory epithelium that is not preceded by a massive toxic effect. This response is similar, although less intense than that of the rat respiratory epithelium in which formaldehyde proved to be a carcinogen. Images Figure 2 Figure 5 PMID:2913828

  8. Color Vision Sensitivity in Normally Dichromatic Species and Humans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    postre - ceptoral color processing. To test this, we determined color discrimination thresholds in normally occurring dichromats, including the chipmunk, the 13-lined ground squirrel, and the tree shrew.

  9. Effective Management of Trigeminal Neuralgia by Neurostimulation

    PubMed Central

    Abd-Elsayed, Alaa A.; Grandhi, Ravi; Sachdeva, Harsh

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatment of trigeminal neuralgia can be challenging for many physicians; patients who do not respond to conventional treatments and traditional surgical approaches often continue to suffer with pain. The peripheral nerve stimulator (PNS) has been used to treat many chronic pain conditions, but few reports exist about its use to treat trigeminal neuralgia. Case Report We present the case of a patient with trigeminal neuralgia resistant to conventional techniques of pain management. Conservative pain management was attempted but was ineffective. As a result, a PNS was placed with minimally invasive surgery. Pain scores were recorded before and after the procedure, and the patient reported complete resolution of her pain. Conclusion PNS implantation can be a safe and effective method to treat trigeminal neuralgia. More research is needed to define its mechanism of action. PMID:26130986

  10. Direct action and modulating effect of (+)- and (-)-nicotine on ion channels expressed in trigeminal sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, Benjamin S P; Lehmann, Ramona; Thiel, Ulrike; Ziemba, Paul M; Beltrán, Leopoldo R; Sherkheli, Muhammad A; Jeanbourquin, Philippe; Hugi, Alain; Werner, Markus; Gisselmann, Günter; Hatt, Hanns

    2014-04-05

    Nicotine sensory perception is generally thought to be mediated by nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptors. However, recent data strongly support the idea that other receptors (e.g., transient receptor potential A1 channel, TRPA1) and other pathways contribute to the detection mechanisms underlying the olfactory and trigeminal cell response to nicotine flavor. This is in accordance with the reported ability of humans to discriminate between (+)- and (-)- nicotine enantiomers. To get a more detailed understanding of the molecular and cellular basis underlying the sensory perception of nicotine, we studied the activity of (+)- and (-)-nicotine on cultured murine trigeminal sensory neurons and on a range of heterologously expressed receptors. The human TRPA1 channel is activated by (-)-nicotine. In this work, we show that (+)-nicotine is also an activator of this channel. Pharmacological experiments using nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and transient receptor potential blockers revealed that trigeminal neurons express one or more unidentified receptors that are sensitive to (+)- and/or (-)-nicotine. Results also indicate that the presence of extracellular calcium ions is required to elicit trigeminal neuron responses to (+)- and (-)-nicotine. Results also show that both (+)-nicotine and (-)-nicotine can block 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor-mediated responses in recombinant expression systems and in cultured trigeminal neurons expressing 5-HT3 receptors. Our investigations broaden the spectra of receptors that are targets for nicotine enantiomers and give new insights into the physiological role of nicotine.

  11. Trigemino-cardiac reflex during microvascular trigeminal decompression in cases of trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Bernhard

    2005-01-01

    The trigemino-cardiac reflex (TCR) is a well-recognized phenomenon consisting of bradycardia, arterial hypotension, apnea, and gastric hypermotility during ocular surgery or other manipulations in and around the orbit. Thus far, it could bee shown that central stimulation of the trigeminal nerve during transsphenoidal surgery and surgery for tumors in the cerebellopontine angle can lead to TCR. In cases of microvascular trigeminal decompression for trigeminal neuralgia, no data of the possible occurrence of TCR are available. TCR was defined as a drop in mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) and the heart rate (HR) of more than 20% to the baseline values before the stimulus and coinciding with the manipulation of the trigeminal nerve. Electronic anesthetic recorded perioperative HR and MABP values were reviewed retrospectively in 28 patients who received microvascular trigeminal decompression in cases of trigeminal neuralgia and were divided into two subgroups on the basis of occurrence of TCR during surgery. Of the 28 patients, 5 (18%) showed evidence of TCR during manipulation at the trigeminal radix by separation from microvascular structures. Their HR fell 46% and their MABP 57% during operative procedures near the trigeminal nerve as compared with levels immediately before the stimulus. After cessation of manipulation, HR and MABP returned (spontaneously) to levels before the stimulus. Risk factors of TCR were compared with results from the literature. In conclusion, the present results give evidence of TCR during manipulation of the central part of the trigeminal nerve during microvascular trigeminal decompression in cases of trigeminal neuralgia under a standardized anesthetic protocol.

  12. Treatment options in trigeminal neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Obermann, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is 4.3 per 100,000 persons per year, with a slightly higher incidence for women (5.9/100,000) compared with men (3.4/100,000). There is a lack of certainty regarding the aetiology and pathophysiology of TN. The treatment of TN can be very challenging despite the numerous options patients and physicians can choose from. This multitude of treatment options poses the question as to which treatment fits which patient best. The preferred medical treatment for TN consists of anticonvulsant drugs, muscle relaxants and neuroleptic agents. Large-scale placebo-controlled clinical trials are scarce. For patients refractory to medical therapy, Gasserian ganglion percutaneous techniques, gamma knife surgery and microvascular decompression are the most promising invasive treatment options. PMID:21179603

  13. Increased phase synchronization of spontaneous calcium oscillations in epileptic human versus normal rat astrocyte cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balázsi, Gábor; Cornell-Bell, Ann H.; Moss, Frank

    2003-06-01

    Stochastic synchronization analysis is applied to intracellular calcium oscillations in astrocyte cultures prepared from epileptic human temporal lobe. The same methods are applied to astrocyte cultures prepared from normal rat hippocampus. Our results indicate that phase-repulsive coupling in epileptic human astrocyte cultures is stronger, leading to an increased synchronization in epileptic human compared to normal rat astrocyte cultures.

  14. Neuromodulation and Devices in Trigeminal Neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Weber, Kevin

    2017-09-14

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a severe facial pain disorder that has been studied for decades. Classical trigeminal neuralgia (CTN) is either idiopathic or caused by neurovascular compression. The related painful trigeminal neuropathies are often secondary to other causes, such as multiple sclerosis or trauma. Therapies for trigeminal neuralgia and neuropathy have often been pharmacologic or surgical. Pharmacologic therapies are not effective in some cases and often cause side effects, some substantial. Surgery can have comorbidity (such as anesthesia dolorosa, or painful differentiation of the affected nerve distribution) and also is not always effective. There is a desire, as in all chronic conditions, to find effective treatments with minimal morbidity and side effects. We review several devices including neuromodulation, ranging in invasiveness, for treatment of trigeminal neuralgia and neuropathy. We review existing data on sphenopalatine ganglion blocks, transcranial magnetic stimulation, transcortical direct stimulation, deep brain stimulation, spinal cord stimulation, peripheral nerve stimulation, and transcutaneous electrical stimulation for CTN and pain trigeminal neuropathies. We also offer hope for further research in this area with the goal of discovering a device that can provide treatment for many with few side effects and minimal morbidity. © 2017 American Headache Society.

  15. Selectively targeting pain in the trigeminal system

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Yeong; Kim, Kihwan; Li, Hai Ying; Chung, Gehoon; Park, Chul-Kyu; Kim, Joong Soo; Jung, Sung Jun; Lee, Min Kyung; Ahn, Dong Kuk; Hwang, Se Jin; Kang, Youngnam; Binshtok, Alexander M.; Bean, Bruce P.; Woolf, Clifford J.; Oh, Seog Bae

    2015-01-01

    We tested whether it is possible to selectively block pain signals in the orofacial area by delivering the permanently charged lidocaine derivative QX-314 into nociceptors via TPRV1 channels. We examined the effects of co-applied QX-314 and capsaicin on nociceptive, proprioceptive, and motor function in the rat trigeminal system. QX-314 alone failed to block voltage-gated sodium channel currents (INa) and action potentials (APs) in trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons. However, co-application of QX-314 and capsaicin blocked INa and APs in TRPV1-positive TG and dental nociceptive neurons, but not in TRPV1-negative TG neurons or in small neurons from TRPV1 knock-out mice. Immunohistochemistry revealed that TRPV1 is not expressed by trigeminal motor and trigeminal mesencephalic neurons. Capsaicin had no effect on rat trigeminal motor and proprioceptive mesencephalic neurons and therefore should not allow QX-314 to enter these cells. Co-application of QX-314 and capsaicin inhibited the jaw-opening reflex evoked by noxious electrical stimulation of the tooth pulp when applied to a sensory but not a motor nerve, and produced long-lasting analgesia in the orofacial area. These data show that selective block of pain signals can be achieved by co-application of QX-314 with TRPV1 agonists. This approach has potential utility in the trigeminal system for treating dental and facial pain. PMID:20236764

  16. Gamma knife radiosurgery to the trigeminal ganglion for treatment of trigeminal neuralgia secondary to vertebrobasilar ectasia

    PubMed Central

    Somaza, Salvador; Hurtado, Wendy; Montilla, Eglee; Ghaleb, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Background: We report the result obtained using Gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery on the trigeminal ganglion (TG) in a patient with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) secondary to vertebrobasilar ectasia (VBE). Case Description: Retrospective review of medical records corresponding to one patient with VBE-related trigeminal pain treated with radiosurgery. Because of the impossibility of visualization of the entry zone or the path of trigeminal nerve through the pontine cistern, we proceeded with stereotactic radiosurgery directed to the TG. The maximum radiation dose was 86 Gy with a 8-mm and a 4-mm collimator. The follow-up period was 24 months. The pain disappeared in 15 days, passing from Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI) grade V to BNI grade IIIa in 4 months and then to grade I. The patient did not experience noticeable subjective facial numbness. Conclusions: This experience showed that Gamma knife radiosurgery was effective in the management of VBE-related trigeminal pain, using the TG as radiosurgical target. PMID:25593782

  17. Utility of Brainstem Trigeminal Evoked Potentials in Patients With Primary Trigeminal Neuralgia Treated by Microvascular Decompression.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jin; Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Hua; Tang, Yin-Da; Ying, Ting-Ting; Li, Shi-Ting

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the characteristics of brainstem trigeminal evoked potentials (BTEP) waveform in patients with and without trigeminal neuralgia (TN), and to discuss the utility of BTEP in patients with primary TN treated by microvascular decompression (MVD). A retrospective review of 43 patients who underwent BTEP between January 2016 and June 2016, including 33 patients with TN who underwent MVD and 10 patients without TN. Brainstem trigeminal evoked potentials characteristics of TN and non-TN were summarized, in particular to compare the BTEP changes between pre- and post-MVD, and to discover the relationship between BTEP changes and surgical outcome. Brainstem trigeminal evoked potentials can be recorded in patients without trigeminal neuralgia. Abnormal BTEP could be recorded when different branches were stimulated. After decompression, the original W2, W3 disappeared and then replaced by a large wave in most patients, or original wave poorly differentiated improved in some patients, showed as shorter latency and (or) amplitude increased. Brainstem trigeminal evoked potentials waveform of healthy side in patients with trigeminal neuralgia was similar to the waveform of patients without TN. In 3 patients, after decompression the W2, W3 peaks increased, and the latency, duration, IPLD did not change significantly. Until discharge, 87.9% (29/33) of the patients presented complete absence of pain without medication (BNI I) and 93.9% (31/33) had good pain control without medication (BNI I-II). Brainstem trigeminal evoked potentials can reflect the conduction function of the trigeminal nerve to evaluate the functional level of the trigeminal nerve conduction pathway. The improvement and restoration of BTEP waveforms are closely related to the postoperative curative effect.

  18. Ultrasound-Guided Pulsed Radiofrequency Application via the Pterygopalatine Fossa: A Practical Approach to Treat Refractory Trigeminal Neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Nader, Antoun; Bendok, Bernard R; Prine, Jeremy J; Kendall, Mark C

    2015-01-01

    Although pharmacological therapy is the primary treatment modality for trigeminal neuralgia associated pain, ineffective analgesia and dose limiting side effects often prompt patients to seek alternative pharmacological solutions such as interventional nerve blockade. Blockade of the Gasserian ganglion or its branches is an effective analgesic procedure for trigeminal neuralgia, traditionally performed using fluoroscopy or CT imaging. Ultrasonography allows point of care and real time visualization of needle placement within the surrounding anatomical structures. The use of ultrasonography with pulsed radiofrequency therapy for trigeminal neuralgia has not been reported. Our case is a 66-year-old male suffering from trigeminal neuralgia for 4 years that was refractory to pharmacologic therapy. Neurological examination was normal with no sensory deficit. Imaging showed no vascular compression or mass involving the trigeminal nerve. A diagnostic ultrasound-guided trigeminal nerve block via the pterygopalatine fossa with 4 mL of bupivacaine 0.25% and 4 mg dexamethasone provided immediate pain relief (100%) with sustained analgesia >50% at 2 weeks. Pain relief was not sustained at one month, with return to pretreatment symptoms. A series of injections were performed with similar intermittent analgesic effectiveness. The decision was made that the patient was a suitable candidate for pulsed radiofrequency application in the pterygopalatine fossa. We successfully used an alternative approach through the pterygopalatine fossa to treat trigeminal neuralgia using ultrasound guidance in an office setting. Our case demonstrates the utility of ultrasound-guidance pulsed radiofrequency treatment in the pterygopalatine fossa as a potential alternative to other percutaneous techniques for patients with medical refractory trigeminal neuralgia.

  19. In vitro suppression of normal human bone marrow progenitor cells by human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, H N; Crumpacker, C S; Chatis, P A

    1991-01-01

    Incubation of normal human nonadherent and T-cell-depleted bone marrow cells with HIVIIIB at multiplicities of infection (MOI) ranging from 0.0001:1 to 1:1 reverse transcriptase (RT) units resulted in the dose-dependent suppression of the in vitro growth of erythroid burst-forming unit (BFU-E), granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM), and T-lymphocyte (CFU-TL) colonies of progenitor cells. Maximum inhibition of colony formation was observed at a 1:1 ratio of virus to bone marrow cells. At this MOI, BFU-E and CFU-GM colonies were inhibited by 60 to 80%, while CFU-TL colonies were totally suppressed. Inhibition of colony formation was also observed at an MOI of 0.1:1 but not with further log dilutions of the virus. Incubation of the virus with antibody to gp160 resulted in the complete reversal of stem cell suppression and the normalization of colony growth in vitro. For BFU-E and CFU-GM colonies, this reversal was observed with dilutions of antibody up to 1:100 and was no longer observed at titers greater than 1:500. The CFU-TL colony number normalized at titers between 1:10 and 1:50. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) also suppressed by 50% the growth of colonies derived from CD34+ stem cell fractions. Infection of CD34+ cells and T-cell-depleted, nonadherent cell fractions was demonstrated by detection with HIV-specific DNA probe following amplification by polymerase chain reaction. The results suggest that HIV can directly infect human bone marrow progenitor cells and affect their ability to proliferate and give rise to colonies in vitro. The results indicate a direct role for the virus in bone marrow suppression and a possible mechanism for the cytopenias observed in patients with AIDS. Images PMID:2002542

  20. Invasive 3-Dimensional Organotypic Neoplasia from Multiple Normal Human Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Ridky, Todd W.; Chow, Jennifer M.; Wong, David J.; Khavari, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Refined cancer models are required to assess the burgeoning number of potential targets for cancer therapeutics within a rapid and clinically relevant context. Here we utilize tumor-associated genetic pathways to transform primary human epithelial cells from epidermis, oropharynx, esophagus, and cervix into genetically defined tumors within a human 3-dimensional (3-D) tissue environment incorporating cell-populated stroma and intact basement membrane. These engineered organotypic tissues recapitulated natural features of tumor progression, including epithelial invasion through basement membrane, a complex process critically required for biologic malignancy in 90% of human cancers. Invasion was rapid, and potentiated by stromal cells. Oncogenic signals in 3-D tissue, but not 2-D culture, resembled gene expression profiles from spontaneous human cancers. Screening well-characterized signaling pathway inhibitors in 3-D organotypic neoplasia helped distil a clinically faithful cancer gene signature. Multi-tissue 3-D human tissue cancer models may provide an efficient and relevant complement to current approaches to characterize cancer progression. PMID:21102459

  1. Radiofrequency trigeminal rhizolysis for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia secondary to brainstem infarction. Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Foroohar, M; Herman, M; Heller, S; Levy, R M

    1997-01-15

    Although percutaneous radiofrequency trigeminal rhizolysis (RFL) has been used to treat idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia thought secondary to multiple sclerosis, the use of RFL for trigeminal neuralgia caused by brainstem infarction has not been advocated. The authors report two patients with trigeminal neuralgia following pontine infarction in whom aggressive medical management failed, but who were successfully treated with RFL. Pain relief has persisted for the 3- and 6-year duration of follow-up examinations. Descending trigeminal reticular fibers may be affected by brainstem infarction and result in trigeminal neuralgia; thus, treatment by rhizotomy may be effective in decreasing the peripheral afferent input into the spinal trigeminal nucleus thus decreasing the pain. These two cases demonstrate the utility of RFL in the relief of ischemia-induced trigeminal neuralgia and lead the authors to suggest that its use be broadened to include this indication.

  2. Management of trigeminal neuralgia in sclerosteosis

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Emerson Magno; Beer-Furlan, André; Duarte, Kleber Paiva; Fonoff, Erich Talamoni; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen

    2013-01-01

    Background: Sclerosteosis is a rare bone disorder characterized by a progressive craniotubular hyperostosis. The diagnosis of sclerosteosis is based on characteristic clinical and radiographic features and a family history consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance. The skull overgrowth may lead to lethal elevation of intracranial pressure, distortion of the face, and entrapment of cranial nerves, resulting in recurrent facial palsy or secondary trigeminal neuralgia. Cases Description: The authors reported cases of two siblings who were diagnosed with familial sclerosteosis and presented with secondary trigeminal neuralgia. The patients were 28 and 40-year-old and presented with pain in the right V2-V3 and V3 distributions, respectively. The facial pain was resistant to medications and was treated with percutaneous techniques. The foramen ovale puncture was complicated initially and the difficulty increased over the years due to stenosis of the foramen. Conclusion: The treatment of the trigeminal neuralgia secondary to hyperostosis and resistant to medications presents a dilemma. The narrowing of the foramen oval and difficulty in the identifying and approaching of the foramen makes the percutaneous technique a challenge for the neurosurgeon in patients harboring sclerosteosis. Microvascular decompression should not be considered since the primary cause of the trigeminal neuralgia is the nerve entrapment by the narrowing of neurovascular foramina and not the neurovascular conflict related to essential trigeminal neuralgia. Stereotactic radiosurgery may be a good treatment option, but there is a lack of published data supporting the use of this method in cranial hyperostosis. PMID:24349870

  3. Management of trigeminal neuralgia in sclerosteosis.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, Emerson Magno; Beer-Furlan, André; Duarte, Kleber Paiva; Fonoff, Erich Talamoni; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen

    2013-01-01

    Sclerosteosis is a rare bone disorder characterized by a progressive craniotubular hyperostosis. The diagnosis of sclerosteosis is based on characteristic clinical and radiographic features and a family history consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance. The skull overgrowth may lead to lethal elevation of intracranial pressure, distortion of the face, and entrapment of cranial nerves, resulting in recurrent facial palsy or secondary trigeminal neuralgia. The authors reported cases of two siblings who were diagnosed with familial sclerosteosis and presented with secondary trigeminal neuralgia. The patients were 28 and 40-year-old and presented with pain in the right V2-V3 and V3 distributions, respectively. The facial pain was resistant to medications and was treated with percutaneous techniques. The foramen ovale puncture was complicated initially and the difficulty increased over the years due to stenosis of the foramen. The treatment of the trigeminal neuralgia secondary to hyperostosis and resistant to medications presents a dilemma. The narrowing of the foramen oval and difficulty in the identifying and approaching of the foramen makes the percutaneous technique a challenge for the neurosurgeon in patients harboring sclerosteosis. Microvascular decompression should not be considered since the primary cause of the trigeminal neuralgia is the nerve entrapment by the narrowing of neurovascular foramina and not the neurovascular conflict related to essential trigeminal neuralgia. Stereotactic radiosurgery may be a good treatment option, but there is a lack of published data supporting the use of this method in cranial hyperostosis.

  4. Trigeminal star-like platinum complexes induce cancer cell senescence through quadruplex-mediated telomere dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiao-Hui; Mu, Ge; Zhong, Yi-Fang; Zhang, Tian-Peng; Cao, Qian; Ji, Liang-Nian; Zhao, Yong; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2016-12-01

    Two trigeminal star-like platinum complexes were synthesized to induce the formation of human telomere G-quadruplex (hTel G4) with extremely high selectivity and affinity. The induced hTel G4 activates strong telomeric DNA damage response (TDDR), resulting in telomere dysfunction and cell senescence.

  5. Meningitis and Bacteremia Due to Neisseria cinerea following a Percutaneous Rhizotomy of the Trigeminal Ganglion.

    PubMed

    von Kietzell, M; Richter, H; Bruderer, T; Goldenberger, D; Emonet, S; Strahm, C

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria cinerea is a human commensal. The first known case of meningitis and bacteremia due to Neisseria cinerea following percutaneous glycerol instillation of the trigeminal ganglion is reported. Conventional phenotypic methods and complete 16S RNA gene sequencing accurately identified the pathogen. Difficulties in differentiation from pathogenic neisseriae are discussed.

  6. Meningitis and Bacteremia Due to Neisseria cinerea following a Percutaneous Rhizotomy of the Trigeminal Ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Richter, H.; Bruderer, T.; Goldenberger, D.; Emonet, S.; Strahm, C.

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria cinerea is a human commensal. The first known case of meningitis and bacteremia due to Neisseria cinerea following percutaneous glycerol instillation of the trigeminal ganglion is reported. Conventional phenotypic methods and complete 16S RNA gene sequencing accurately identified the pathogen. Difficulties in differentiation from pathogenic neisseriae are discussed. PMID:26511743

  7. Normal human synovial fluid: osmolality and exercise-induced changes.

    PubMed

    Baumgarten, M; Bloebaum, R D; Ross, S D; Campbell, P; Sarmiento, A

    1985-12-01

    We measured the osmolality of human synovial fluid in the knees of healthy young adults following minimum activity and exercise. These results were compared with each subject's blood-serum osmolality. The synovial fluid was hyperosmolal with minimum activity, decreasing to blood-serum levels after exercise.

  8. Distribution of beta-endorphin immunoreactivity in normal human pituitary.

    PubMed Central

    Mendelsohn, G; D'Agostino, R; Eggleston, J C; Baylin, S B

    1979-01-01

    Recent immunohistochemical demonstration of calcitonin in rat pituitary has suggested that calcitonin, in addition to ACTH, endorphins, lipotropins, and melanocyte-stimulating hormones might be derived from a 31,000-dalton glycoprotein percursor molecule. This immunoperoxidase study demonstrates a similar distribution for beta-endorphin and ACTH immunoreactivity in human pituitary; however, the two peptides are not necessarily present in the same cells at all times. Calcitonin could not be demonstrated in human pituitary under conditions suitable for demonstration of the peptide in thyroid C cells. Weakly positive immunostaining could be obtained only with much increase in antiserum concentration and length of incubation, and higher concentrations of calcitonin were needed to abolish staining in preabsorption studies. It thus appears that the immunoreactive calcitonin in human pituitary differs from that in thyroid C cells. Likewise, we could not demonstrate immunoreactive endorphin in any developmental stage of medullary thyroid carcinoma. Our study suggests that caution should be applied in considering a physiologic role for calcitonin in the pituitary and in postulating a common peptide origin for endorphin and calcitonin in humans. Images PMID:221539

  9. Tractography delineates microstructural changes in the trigeminal nerve after focal radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Hodaie, Mojgan; Chen, David Qixiang; Quan, Jessica; Laperriere, Normand

    2012-01-01

    Focal radiosurgery is a common treatment modality for trigeminal neuralgia (TN), a neuropathic facial pain condition. Assessment of treatment effectiveness is primarily clinical, given the paucity of investigational tools to assess trigeminal nerve changes. Since diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) provides information on white matter microstructure, we explored the feasibility of trigeminal nerve tractography and assessment of DTI parameters to study microstructural changes after treatment. We hypothesized that trigeminal tractography provides more information than 2D-MR imaging, allowing detection of unique, focal changes in the target area after radiosurgery. Changes in specific diffusivities may provide insight into the mechanism of action of radiosurgery on the trigeminal nerve. Five TN patients (4 females, 1 male, average age 67 years) treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery, 80 Gy/100% isodose line underwent 3Tesla MR trigeminal nerve tractography before and sequentially up to fourteen months after treatment. Fractional anisotropy (FA), radial (RD) and axial (AD) diffusivities were calculated for the radiosurgical target area defined as the region-of-interest. Areas outside target and the contralateral nerve served as controls. Trigeminal tractography accurately detected the radiosurgical target. Radiosurgery resulted in 47% drop in FA values at the target with no significant change in FA outside the target, demonstrating highly focal changes after treatment. RD but not AD changed markedly, suggesting that radiosurgery primarily affects myelin. Tractography was more sensitive than conventional gadolinium-enhanced post-treatment MR, since FA changes were detected regardless of trigeminal nerve enhancement. In subjects with long term follow-up, recovery of FA/RD correlated with pain recurrence. DTI parameters accurately detect the effects of focal radiosurgery on the trigeminal nerve, serving as an in vivo imaging tool to study TN. This study is a proof of principle

  10. [A case of trigeminal neurinoma with marked extracranial extension].

    PubMed

    Fushimi, S; Miura, S; Suda, Y; Fujii, S; Kowada, M

    1987-10-01

    A case of trigeminal neurinoma with marked extracranial extension is reported with a review of the literature. A 60-year-old female noticed numbness over the left side of the face during the proceeding 15 years. Two years prior to admission, she began to complain of itching and lancinating pain at the left lateral aspect of the nose. Neurologic examination on admission revealed diminished corneal reflex on the left side and hypesthesia in the distribution of the left trigeminal nerve. There was no weakness or atrophy of the ipsilateral masticatory muscles. The remaining cranial nerves and cerebellar functions were normal. Craniograms showed destruction of the left petrous apex, enlargement of the left superior orbital fissure and an extensive bone defect in the floor of the left middle cranial fossa. CT disclosed a huge heterogeneously enhancing mass lesion in the left middle cranial fossa, which extended posteriorly into the left cerebellopontine angle and inferiorly into the pterygoid and infratemporal fossae. Cerebral angiograms revealed medial displacement of the left internal cerebral artery in the ganglionic, cavernous and supraclinoid portions, and elevation of the left middle cerebral artery in the sphenoidal portion. Although the left meningohypophyseal trunk was dilated, no tumor stain was observed. A transantral biopsy specimen provided the diagnosis of neurinoma with Antoni type A tissue. The patient was followed up at the outpatient clinic as radical operations were not agreed upon. Eight cases of trigeminal neurinoma with extracranial extension are reviewed including the presented case. There were two males and six females, and the age varied from 16 to 65 years.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Human papilloma virus DNAs immortalize normal human mammary epithelial cells and reduce their growth factor requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Band, V.; Zajchowski, D.; Kulesa, V.; Sager, R. )

    1990-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) types 16 and 18 are most commonly associated with cervical carcinoma in patients and induce immortalization of human keratinocytes in culture. HPV has not been associated with breast cancer. This report describes the immortalization of normal human mammary epithelial cells (76N) by plasmid pHPV18 or pHPV16, each containing the linearized viral genome. Transfectants were grown continuously for more than 60 passages, whereas 76N cells senesce after 18-20 passages. The transfectants also differ from 76N cells in cloning in a completely defined medium called D2 and growing a minimally supplemented defined medium (D3) containing epidermal growth factor. All transfectant tested contain integrated HPV DNA, express HPV RNA, and produce HPV E7 protein. HPV transfectants do not form tumors in a nude mouse assay. It is concluded that products of the HPV genome induce immortalization of human breast epithelial cells and reduce their growth factor requirements. This result raises the possibility that HPV might be involved in breast cancer. Furthermore, other tissue-specific primary epithelial cells that are presently difficult to grown and investigate may also be immortalized by HPV.

  12. Formaldehyde solutions in simulated sweat increase human melanoma but not normal human keratinocyte cells proliferation.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, M; Cravello, B; Tonello, S; Renò, F

    2016-12-01

    Our skin is in close contact with clothes most of the time thus risking potentially noxious chemicals contact. One of the potentially harmful manufacturing by-products that can be released by textiles when sweating is formaldehyde, used as an anti-crease treatment. As it is known to be carcinogenic to humans and a potent skin sensitizer, the aim of this study was to investigate its effects on both normal human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) and on a highly invasive malignant melanoma cell line (SK-MEL-28) in order to contribute to the definition of safety cut-off to be applied to the production processes. Formaldehyde concentrations below the commonly accepted limits (10-50μM) were obtained by diluting formaldehyde in simulated sweat (UNI EN ISO 105-E04). The effects on cell proliferation were evaluated by cell counting, while ERK pathway activation was evaluated by western blot. Low concentrations of formaldehyde (10μM) in both acidic and alkaline simulated sweat were able to increase malignant melanoma cell proliferation, while not affecting normal keratinocytes. Melanoma proliferation increase was greater in acidic (pH=5.5) than in alkaline (pH=8) conditions. Moreover, formaldehyde stimulation was able to induce ERK pathway activation. The data obtained suggest the need for an even increasing attention to the potentially harmful effects of textile manufacturing by-products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Specific binding of beta-endorphin to normal human erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chenet, B.; Hollis, V. Jr.; Kang, Y.; Simpkins, C.

    1986-03-05

    Beta-endorphin (BE) exhibits peripheral functions which may not be mediated by interactions with receptors in the brain. Recent studies have demonstrated binding of BE to both opioid and non-opioid receptors on lymphocytes and monocytes. Abood has reported specific binding of /sup 3/H-dihydromorphine in erythrocytes. Using 5 x 10/sup -11/M /sup 125/I-beta-endorphin and 10/sup -5/M unlabeled BE, they have detected 50% specific binding to human erythrocytes. This finding is supported by results from immunoelectron microscopy using rabbit anti-BE antibody and biotinylated secondary antibody with avidin-biotin complexes horseradish peroxidase. Binding is clearly observed and is confined to only one side of the cells. Conclusions: (1) BE binding to human erythrocytes was demonstrated by radioreceptor assay and immunoelectron microscopy, and (2) BE binding sites exist on only one side of the cells.

  14. Amino acid immunoreactivity in normal human retina and after brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Clairton F; Acosta, Monica L; Polkinghorne, Philip J; McGhee, Charles N J; Kalloniatis, Michael

    2013-09-01

    We localised amino acids in the mid-peripheral aged human retina and a retina that had undergone radiation treatment 10 years earlier. The distribution pattern of glutamate, γ-amino butyric acid (GABA), glycine, glutamine and taurine, reflected patterns established in the primate retina. The retina that had undergone radiation exposure displayed both anatomical and neurochemical remodelling. The proximal retina comprised around 40 to 45 per cent of the total retina and neuronal kinesis and aberrant neuronal projections were also present. Amino acid neurochemistry was strikingly different with Müller cells displaying GABA loading, glycinergic neurons displaced and displaying a very high level of glycine labelling. We conclude that radiation exposure triggered these changes in the human retina and likely reflects general remodelling of structure and function following ischaemic damage to endothelial cells.

  15. Trigeminal pathways deliver a low molecular weight drug from the nose to the brain and orofacial structures.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Neil J; Hanson, Leah R; Frey, William H

    2010-06-07

    Intranasal delivery has been shown to noninvasively deliver drugs from the nose to the brain in minutes along the olfactory and trigeminal nerve pathways, bypassing the blood-brain barrier. However, no one has investigated whether nasally applied drugs target orofacial structures, despite high concentrations observed in the trigeminal nerve innervating these tissues. Following intranasal administration of lidocaine to rats, trigeminally innervated structures (teeth, temporomandibular joint (TMJ), and masseter muscle) were found to have up to 20-fold higher tissue concentrations of lidocaine than the brain and blood as measured by ELISA. This concentration difference could allow intranasally administered therapeutics to treat disorders of orofacial structures (i.e., teeth, TMJ, and masseter muscle) without causing unwanted side effects in the brain and the rest of the body. In this study, an intranasally administered infrared dye reached the brain within 10 minutes. Distribution of dye is consistent with dye entering the trigeminal nerve after intranasal administration through three regions with high drug concentrations in the nasal cavity: the middle concha, the maxillary sinus, and the choana. In humans the trigeminal nerve passes through the maxillary sinus to innervate the maxillary teeth. Delivering lidocaine intranasally may provide an effective anesthetic technique for a noninvasive maxillary nerve block. Intranasal delivery could be used to target vaccinations and treat disorders with fewer side effects such as tooth pain, TMJ disorder, trigeminal neuralgia, headache, and brain diseases.

  16. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Trigeminal Chemosensation

    PubMed Central

    Gerhold, Kristin A.; Bautista, Diana M.

    2010-01-01

    Three sensory systems, olfaction, taste, and somatosensation, are dedicated to the detection of chemicals in the environment. Trigeminal somatosensory neurons enable us to detect a wide range of environmental stimuli, including pressure, temperature, and chemical irritants, within the oral and nasal mucosa. Natural plant-derived irritants have served as powerful pharmacological tools for identifying receptors underlying somatosensation. This is illustrated by the use of capsaicin, menthol, and wasabi to identify the heat-sensitive ion channel TRPV1, the cold-sensitive ion channel TRPM8, and the irritant receptor TRPA1, respectively. In addition to TRP channels, members of the two-pore potassium channel family have also been implicated in trigeminal chemosensation. KCNK18 was recently identified as a target for hydroxy-α-sanshool, the tingling and numbing compound produced in Schezuan peppers and other members of the Xanthoxylum genus. The role of these channels in trigeminal thermosensation and pain will be discussed. PMID:19686135

  17. Trigeminal neuralgia treatment dosimetry of the Cyberknife

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Anthony; Lo, Anthony T.; Dieterich, Sonja; Soltys, Scott G.; Gibbs, Iris C.; Chang, Steve G.; Adler, John R.

    2012-04-01

    There are 2 Cyberknife units at Stanford University. The robot of 1 Cyberknife is positioned on the patient's right, whereas the second is on the patient's left. The present study examines whether there is any difference in dosimetry when we are treating patients with trigeminal neuralgia when the target is on the right side or the left side of the patient. In addition, we also study whether Monte Carlo dose calculation has any effect on the dosimetry. We concluded that the clinical and dosimetric outcomes of CyberKnife treatment for trigeminal neuralgia are independent of the robot position. Monte Carlo calculation algorithm may be useful in deriving the dose necessary for trigeminal neuralgia treatments.

  18. Neurophysiological model of the normal and abnormal human pupil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krenz, W.; Robin, M.; Barez, S.; Stark, L.

    1985-01-01

    Anatomical, experimental, and computer simulation studies were used to determine the structure of the neurophysiological model of the pupil size control system. The computer simulation of this model demonstrates the role played by each of the elements in the neurological pathways influencing the size of the pupil. Simulations of the effect of drugs and common abnormalities in the system help to illustrate the workings of the pathways and processes involved. The simulation program allows the user to select pupil condition (normal or an abnormality), specific site along the neurological pathway (retina, hypothalamus, etc.) drug class input (barbiturate, narcotic, etc.), stimulus/response mode, display mode, stimulus type and input waveform, stimulus or background intensity and frequency, the input and output conditions, and the response at the neuroanatomical site. The model can be used as a teaching aid or as a tool for testing hypotheses regarding the system.

  19. Neurophysiological model of the normal and abnormal human pupil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krenz, W.; Robin, M.; Barez, S.; Stark, L.

    1985-01-01

    Anatomical, experimental, and computer simulation studies were used to determine the structure of the neurophysiological model of the pupil size control system. The computer simulation of this model demonstrates the role played by each of the elements in the neurological pathways influencing the size of the pupil. Simulations of the effect of drugs and common abnormalities in the system help to illustrate the workings of the pathways and processes involved. The simulation program allows the user to select pupil condition (normal or an abnormality), specific site along the neurological pathway (retina, hypothalamus, etc.) drug class input (barbiturate, narcotic, etc.), stimulus/response mode, display mode, stimulus type and input waveform, stimulus or background intensity and frequency, the input and output conditions, and the response at the neuroanatomical site. The model can be used as a teaching aid or as a tool for testing hypotheses regarding the system.

  20. Mineral density volume gradients in normal and diseased human tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Djomehri, Sabra I.; Candell, Susan; Case, Thomas; Browning, Alyssa; Marshall, Grayson W.; Yun, Wenbing; Lau, S. H.; Webb, Samuel; Ho, Sunita P.; Aikawa, Elena

    2015-04-09

    Clinical computed tomography provides a single mineral density (MD) value for heterogeneous calcified tissues containing early and late stage pathologic formations. The novel aspect of this study is that, it extends current quantitative methods of mapping mineral density gradients to three dimensions, discretizes early and late mineralized stages, identifies elemental distribution in discretized volumes, and correlates measured MD with respective calcium (Ca) to phosphorus (P) and Ca to zinc (Zn) elemental ratios. To accomplish this, MD variations identified using polychromatic radiation from a high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) benchtop unit were correlated with elemental mapping obtained from a microprobe X-ray fluorescence (XRF) using synchrotron monochromatic radiation. Digital segmentation of tomograms from normal and diseased tissues (N=5 per group; 40-60 year old males) contained significant mineral density variations (enamel: 2820-3095mg/cc, bone: 570-1415mg/cc, cementum: 1240-1340mg/cc, dentin: 1480-1590mg/cc, cementum affected by periodontitis: 1100-1220mg/cc, hypomineralized carious dentin: 345-1450mg/cc, hypermineralized carious dentin: 1815-2740mg/cc, and dental calculus: 1290-1770mg/cc). A plausible linear correlation between segmented MD volumes and elemental ratios within these volumes was established, and Ca/P ratios for dentin (1.49), hypomineralized dentin (0.32-0.46), cementum (1.51), and bone (1.68) were observed. Furthermore, varying Ca/Zn ratios were distinguished in adapted compared to normal tissues, such as in bone (855-2765) and in cementum (595-990), highlighting Zn as an influential element in prompting observed adaptive properties. Hence, results provide insights on mineral density gradients with elemental concentrations and elemental footprints that in turn could aid in elucidating mechanistic processes for pathologic formations.

  1. Mineral density volume gradients in normal and diseased human tissues

    DOE PAGES

    Djomehri, Sabra I.; Candell, Susan; Case, Thomas; ...

    2015-04-09

    Clinical computed tomography provides a single mineral density (MD) value for heterogeneous calcified tissues containing early and late stage pathologic formations. The novel aspect of this study is that, it extends current quantitative methods of mapping mineral density gradients to three dimensions, discretizes early and late mineralized stages, identifies elemental distribution in discretized volumes, and correlates measured MD with respective calcium (Ca) to phosphorus (P) and Ca to zinc (Zn) elemental ratios. To accomplish this, MD variations identified using polychromatic radiation from a high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) benchtop unit were correlated with elemental mapping obtained from a microprobe X-raymore » fluorescence (XRF) using synchrotron monochromatic radiation. Digital segmentation of tomograms from normal and diseased tissues (N=5 per group; 40-60 year old males) contained significant mineral density variations (enamel: 2820-3095mg/cc, bone: 570-1415mg/cc, cementum: 1240-1340mg/cc, dentin: 1480-1590mg/cc, cementum affected by periodontitis: 1100-1220mg/cc, hypomineralized carious dentin: 345-1450mg/cc, hypermineralized carious dentin: 1815-2740mg/cc, and dental calculus: 1290-1770mg/cc). A plausible linear correlation between segmented MD volumes and elemental ratios within these volumes was established, and Ca/P ratios for dentin (1.49), hypomineralized dentin (0.32-0.46), cementum (1.51), and bone (1.68) were observed. Furthermore, varying Ca/Zn ratios were distinguished in adapted compared to normal tissues, such as in bone (855-2765) and in cementum (595-990), highlighting Zn as an influential element in prompting observed adaptive properties. Hence, results provide insights on mineral density gradients with elemental concentrations and elemental footprints that in turn could aid in elucidating mechanistic processes for pathologic formations.« less

  2. Mineral Density Volume Gradients in Normal and Diseased Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Djomehri, Sabra I.; Candell, Susan; Case, Thomas; Browning, Alyssa; Marshall, Grayson W.; Yun, Wenbing; Lau, S. H.; Webb, Samuel; Ho, Sunita P.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical computed tomography provides a single mineral density (MD) value for heterogeneous calcified tissues containing early and late stage pathologic formations. The novel aspect of this study is that, it extends current quantitative methods of mapping mineral density gradients to three dimensions, discretizes early and late mineralized stages, identifies elemental distribution in discretized volumes, and correlates measured MD with respective calcium (Ca) to phosphorus (P) and Ca to zinc (Zn) elemental ratios. To accomplish this, MD variations identified using polychromatic radiation from a high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) benchtop unit were correlated with elemental mapping obtained from a microprobe X-ray fluorescence (XRF) using synchrotron monochromatic radiation. Digital segmentation of tomograms from normal and diseased tissues (N=5 per group; 40-60 year old males) contained significant mineral density variations (enamel: 2820-3095mg/cc, bone: 570-1415mg/cc, cementum: 1240-1340mg/cc, dentin: 1480-1590mg/cc, cementum affected by periodontitis: 1100-1220mg/cc, hypomineralized carious dentin: 345-1450mg/cc, hypermineralized carious dentin: 1815-2740mg/cc, and dental calculus: 1290-1770mg/cc). A plausible linear correlation between segmented MD volumes and elemental ratios within these volumes was established, and Ca/P ratios for dentin (1.49), hypomineralized dentin (0.32-0.46), cementum (1.51), and bone (1.68) were observed. Furthermore, varying Ca/Zn ratios were distinguished in adapted compared to normal tissues, such as in bone (855-2765) and in cementum (595-990), highlighting Zn as an influential element in prompting observed adaptive properties. Hence, results provide insights on mineral density gradients with elemental concentrations and elemental footprints that in turn could aid in elucidating mechanistic processes for pathologic formations. PMID:25856386

  3. Quantitation of small intestinal permeability during normal human drug absorption

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding the quantitative relationship between a drug’s physical chemical properties and its rate of intestinal absorption (QSAR) is critical for selecting candidate drugs. Because of limited experimental human small intestinal permeability data, approximate surrogates such as the fraction absorbed or Caco-2 permeability are used, both of which have limitations. Methods Given the blood concentration following an oral and intravenous dose, the time course of intestinal absorption in humans was determined by deconvolution and related to the intestinal permeability by the use of a new 3 parameter model function (“Averaged Model” (AM)). The theoretical validity of this AM model was evaluated by comparing it to the standard diffusion-convection model (DC). This analysis was applied to 90 drugs using previously published data. Only drugs that were administered in oral solution form to fasting subjects were considered so that the rate of gastric emptying was approximately known. All the calculations are carried out using the freely available routine PKQuest Java (http://www.pkquest.com) which has an easy to use, simple interface. Results Theoretically, the AM permeability provides an accurate estimate of the intestinal DC permeability for solutes whose absorption ranges from 1% to 99%. The experimental human AM permeabilities determined by deconvolution are similar to those determined by direct human jejunal perfusion. The small intestinal pH varies with position and the results are interpreted in terms of the pH dependent octanol partition. The permeability versus partition relations are presented separately for the uncharged, basic, acidic and charged solutes. The small uncharged solutes caffeine, acetaminophen and antipyrine have very high permeabilities (about 20 x 10-4 cm/sec) corresponding to an unstirred layer of only 45 μm. The weak acid aspirin also has a large AM permeability despite its low octanol partition at pH 7.4, suggesting

  4. Normal accidents: human error and medical equipment design.

    PubMed

    Dain, Steven

    2002-01-01

    High-risk systems, which are typical of our technologically complex era, include not just nuclear power plants but also hospitals, anesthesia systems, and the practice of medicine and perfusion. In high-risk systems, no matter how effective safety devices are, some types of accidents are inevitable because the system's complexity leads to multiple and unexpected interactions. It is important for healthcare providers to apply a risk assessment and management process to decisions involving new equipment and procedures or staffing matters in order to minimize the residual risks of latent errors, which are amenable to correction because of the large window of opportunity for their detection. This article provides an introduction to basic risk management and error theory principles and examines ways in which they can be applied to reduce and mitigate the inevitable human errors that accompany high-risk systems. The article also discusses "human factor engineering" (HFE), the process which is used to design equipment/ human interfaces in order to mitigate design errors. The HFE process involves interaction between designers and endusers to produce a series of continuous refinements that are incorporated into the final product. The article also examines common design problems encountered in the operating room that may predispose operators to commit errors resulting in harm to the patient. While recognizing that errors and accidents are unavoidable, organizations that function within a high-risk system must adopt a "safety culture" that anticipates problems and acts aggressively through an anonymous, "blameless" reporting mechanism to resolve them. We must continuously examine and improve the design of equipment and procedures, personnel, supplies and materials, and the environment in which we work to reduce error and minimize its effects. Healthcare providers must take a leading role in the day-to-day management of the "Perioperative System" and be a role model in

  5. Reconstruction of normal and pathological human epidermis on polycarbonate filter.

    PubMed

    De Vuyst, Evelyne; Charlier, Céline; Giltaire, Séverine; De Glas, Valérie; de Rouvroit, Catherine Lambert; Poumay, Yves

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides methods suitable for the culture of primary human keratinocytes in serum-free culture conditions, starting from very small skin biopsies. It also explains procedures required for reconstruction of a stratified epidermis on polycarbonate filter, starting from keratinocytes cultured in serum-free conditions. Tissues reconstructed according to this method have been proven suitable for characterization of epidermal morphogenesis and for in vitro studies of the epidermal barrier. Utilization of the same method for successful isolation of keratinocytes from a patient suffering from Darier's disease and the reconstruction of a pathological epidermis which displays the same histological features as in vivo are also presented.

  6. Glucose homeostasis during spontaneous labor in normal human pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Maheux, P C; Bonin, B; Dizazo, A; Guimond, P; Monier, D; Bourque, J; Chiasson, J L

    1996-01-01

    Using stable isotope, glucose turnover was measured in six normal pregnant women during the various stages of labor; during the latent (A1) and active (A2) phases of cervical dilatation, during fetal expulsion (B), and during placental expulsion (C). These data were compared to measurements made in five postpartum women. Pancreatic hormones and cortisol were also measured. In four other normal women undergoing spontaneous labor, catecholamines and free fatty acids were measured. Plasma glucose increased throughout labor from 4.0 +/- 0.2 (A1) to 5.5 +/- 0.5 mmol/L (C) (P < 0.01), compared to 4.7 +/- 0.1 in the postpartum women. Glucose utilization and production were increased throughout labor at 33.4 +/- 3.1 and 32.8 +/- 3.1 mumol/kg min, respectively, compared to 8.2 +/- 0.9 in postpartum women. Glucose metabolic clearance was also increased to 7.5 +/- 0.8 mL/kg.min compared to that in nonpregnant women (1.8 +/- 0.3). Plasma insulin remained at 59 +/- 5 pmol/L during stages A1, A2, and B, but increased to 115 +/- 15 pmol/L during stage C. Plasma glucagon was increased throughout labor at 127 +/- 7 pg/mL, compared to 90 +/- 4 pg/mL in control postpartum women. Plasma cortisol increased during labor from 921 +/- 136 to 2018 +/- 160 nmol/L, compared to 645 +/- 355 during the postpartum period. Epinephrine and norepinephrine also increased during labor from 218 +/- 132 pmol/L and 1.09 +/- 0.16 nmol/L to 1119 +/- 158 and 3.61 +/- 1.04, respectively. It is concluded that labor is associated with a marked increase in glucose utilization and production. These findings suggest that muscle contraction (uterus and skeletal) independent of insulin is a major regulator of glucose utilization during labor. Furthermore, the increase in hepatic glucose production could be favored by an increase in glucagon, catecholamines, and cortisol.

  7. Maintenance of the normal flora of human skin grafts transplanted to mice.

    PubMed

    Kearney, J N; Gowland, G; Holland, K T; Cunliffe, W J

    1982-10-01

    Full-thickness human cadaver skin was maintained on the dorso-lateral thoracic region of hairless mice whose immune rejection mechanism was suppressed using anti-mouse-thymocyte globulin. The bacterial profile of the pregrafted skin did not differ significantly from the normal human microflora. In contrast, the murine skin exhibited quantitative and qualitative differences from the human flora, in particular by the complete absence of Propionibacterium acnes, the dominant bacterium on sebum-rich areas of human skin. The normal microbial profile of the human grafts was maintained throughout the experimental period despite the novel environmental milieu. There was little contamination of the grafts from the normal murine flora. It was concluded that the grafted human skin would provide a realistic model for studying the ecology of human cutaneous micro-organisms.

  8. Effects of Load on Normal Human Osteoblast Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reseland, J. E.; Devakottai, Sundar; Sundaresan, A.

    2013-02-01

    The effects of load on the secretion and expression of bone markers were tested at different stages of differentiation of primary human osteoblasts. NHOs were both seeded with and without cytodex 3 beads (Sigma),transferred to a NASA rotating wall vessel (modeled microgravity) and harvested at day 7 and day 14. Differentiated and undifferentiated NHOs were loaded at 6-50G for 30 min and compared to cells incubated at 1G after 1 day and 3 days. Collectively the results demonstrate that load has a differential effect on osteoblast differentiation as seen in modeled microgravity and shows specificity in expression of bone cell markers vs. expression of secreted paracrine signaling markers.

  9. Nonlinear time series analysis of normal and pathological human walking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingwell, Jonathan B.; Cusumano, Joseph P.

    2000-12-01

    Characterizing locomotor dynamics is essential for understanding the neuromuscular control of locomotion. In particular, quantifying dynamic stability during walking is important for assessing people who have a greater risk of falling. However, traditional biomechanical methods of defining stability have not quantified the resistance of the neuromuscular system to perturbations, suggesting that more precise definitions are required. For the present study, average maximum finite-time Lyapunov exponents were estimated to quantify the local dynamic stability of human walking kinematics. Local scaling exponents, defined as the local slopes of the correlation sum curves, were also calculated to quantify the local scaling structure of each embedded time series. Comparisons were made between overground and motorized treadmill walking in young healthy subjects and between diabetic neuropathic (NP) patients and healthy controls (CO) during overground walking. A modification of the method of surrogate data was developed to examine the stochastic nature of the fluctuations overlying the nominally periodic patterns in these data sets. Results demonstrated that having subjects walk on a motorized treadmill artificially stabilized their natural locomotor kinematics by small but statistically significant amounts. Furthermore, a paradox previously present in the biomechanical literature that resulted from mistakenly equating variability with dynamic stability was resolved. By slowing their self-selected walking speeds, NP patients adopted more locally stable gait patterns, even though they simultaneously exhibited greater kinematic variability than CO subjects. Additionally, the loss of peripheral sensation in NP patients was associated with statistically significant differences in the local scaling structure of their walking kinematics at those length scales where it was anticipated that sensory feedback would play the greatest role. Lastly, stride-to-stride fluctuations in the

  10. [Thyroid stimulating immunoglobulin bioassay using cultured normal human thyroid cells].

    PubMed

    Ando, M; Yamauchi, K; Tanaka, H; Mori, Y; Takatsuki, K; Yamamoto, M; Matsui, N; Tomita, A

    1985-08-20

    It is currently believed that the thyroid stimulating immunoglobulin (TSI) of Graves' disease is involved in the pathogenesis of hyperthyroidism through the stimulation of the adenylate cyclase-cyclic AMP system. To evaluate this mechanism, TSI in the serum of patients with Graves' disease was determined by its ability to generate cyclic AMP (cAMP) in monolayer cells prepared from a normal thyroid gland. The thyroid tissue was digested with collagenase, and the liberated follicles were collected from the supernatant and cultured for 7 days. One gram of thyroid tissue yielded more than 1 X 10(7) monolayer cells which were stored in aliquots at -80C. Cells (1 approximately 2 X 10(4)/0.28 cm2 microtiter well) were incubated for 4 hours in 0.2 ml Hanks solution poor in NaCl, with various amounts of bovine TSH (bTSH) or 1.5 mg/ml Graves' serum IgG extracted by polyethylene glycol. cAMP accumulated in medium and cells was measured by RIA. Total cAMP (both medium and cells) was about 4 times higher when NaCl was deleted from Hanks solution. Moreover, as more than 90% of the cAMP was released into the medium, it was possible to omit the measurement of cellular cAMP, which requires extraction. The increase in medium cAMP concentration was dependent upon the number of cells, incubation time, and dose of bTSH. Time course and dose response curves in medium cAMP stimulated by IgG from 3 Graves' patients paralleled those of bTSH equivalent units. Accordingly, TSI activity could be expressed in bTSH equivalent units (bTSH microUeq). The assay could detect 1.0 or 3.3 microU/ml of bTSH and was highly reproducible. TSI activity in all of 16 IgGs from normal subjects was under 3.3 bTSH microUeq/ml, while it was greater than 3.3 bTSH microUeq/ml in IgGs from 33 of 37 (89%) untreated patients with Graves disease. Of the 13 patients followed for 2 to 7 months while on antithyroid drugs, 12 had greater than 3.3 bTSH microUeq/ml and, with the exception of one, all showed a decrease in

  11. [Malignant lymphoma in a perineural spreading along trigeminal nerve, which developed as trigeminal neuralgia].

    PubMed

    Mano, Tomoo; Matsuo, Koji; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Ozawa, Hiroaki; Arakawa, Toshinao

    2014-01-01

    A rare cause of trigeminal neuralgia is malignant lymphoma which spread along the trigeminal nerve. We report a 79-year-old male presented with 4-month history of neuralgic pain in right cheek. He was diagnosed as classical trigeminal neuralgia. It had improved through medication of carbamazepine. Four months later, the dull pain unlike neuralgia complicated on the right cheeks, it was ineffective with the medication. Furthermore, diplopia and facial palsy as the other cranial nerve symptoms appeared. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed contrast-enhanced mass lesion extend both external pterygoid muscle and brainstem through the swelling trigeminal nerve. The patient was pathological diagnosed of diffuse large B cell lymphoma by biopsy. Malignant lymphoma should be considered in the different diagnosis of cases with a minimal single cranial nerve symptom.

  12. Three-Dimensional Normal Human Neural Progenitor Tissue-Like Assemblies: A Model for Persistent Varicell-Zoster Virus Infection and Platform to Study Viral Infectivity and Oxidative Stress and Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, T. J.; McCarthy, M.; Osterrieder, N.; Cohrs, R. J.; Kaufer, B. B.

    2014-01-01

    The environment of space results in a multitude of challenges to the human physiology that present barriers to extended habitation and exploration. Over 40 years of investigation to define countermeasures to address space flight adaptation has left gaps in our knowledge regarding mitigation strategies partly due to the lack of investigative tools, monitoring strategies, and real time diagnostics to understand the central causative agent(s) responsible for physiologic adaptation and maintaining homeostasis. Spaceflight-adaptation syndrome is the combination of space environmental conditions and the synergistic reaction of the human physiology. Our work addresses the role of oxidative stress and damage (OSaD) as a negative and contributing Risk Factor (RF) in the following areas of combined spaceflight related dysregulation: i) radiation induced cellular damage [1], [2] ii) immune impacts and the inflammatory response [3], [4] and iii) varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation [5]. Varicella-zoster (VZV)/Chicken Pox virus is a neurotropic human alphaherpesvirus resulting in varicella upon primary infection, suppressed by the immune system becomes latent in ganglionic neurons, and reactivates under stress events to re-express in zoster and possibly shingles. Our laboratory has developed a complex threedimensional (3D) normal human neural tissue model that emulates several characteristics of the human trigeminal ganglia (TG) and allows the study of combinatorial experimentation which addresses, simultaneously, OSaD associated with Spaceflight adaptation and habitation [6].

  13. Disposition of soy isoflavones in normal human breast tissue.

    PubMed

    Bolca, Selin; Urpi-Sarda, Mireia; Blondeel, Phillip; Roche, Nathalie; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Possemiers, Sam; Al-Maharik, Nawaf; Botting, Nigel; De Keukeleire, Denis; Bracke, Marc; Heyerick, Arne; Manach, Claudine; Depypere, Herman

    2010-04-01

    Despite decades of research on the relation between soy and breast cancer, questions regarding the absorption, metabolism, and distribution of isoflavones in breast tissue largely remain unanswered. We evaluated the potential health effects of isoflavone consumption on normal breast tissue; isoflavone concentrations, metabolites, and biodistribution were investigated and compared with 17beta-estradiol exposure. In this dietary intervention study, healthy women were randomly allocated to a soy milk (n = 11; 16.98-mg genistein and 5.40-mg daidzein aglycone equivalents per dose), soy supplement (n = 10; 5.27-mg genistein and 17.56-mg daidzein aglycone equivalents per dose), or control (n = 10) group. After a run-in period > or = 4 d, 3 doses of soy milk or soy supplements were taken daily for 5 d before an esthetic breast reduction. Blood and breast biopsies were collected during surgery and analyzed with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. After soy administration, genistein and total daidzein concentrations, which were expressed as aglycone equivalents, ranged from 135.1 to 2831 nmol/L and 105.1 to 1397 nmol/L, respectively, in hydrolyzed serum and from 92.33 to 493.8 pmol/g and 22.15 to 770.8 pmol/g, respectively, in hydrolyzed breast tissue. The major metabolites identified in nonhydrolyzed samples were genistein-7-O-glucuronide and daidzein-7-O-glucuronide, with an overall glucuronidation of 98%. Total isoflavones showed a breast adipose/glandular tissue distribution of 40:60, and their mean (+/-SEM) derived 17beta-estradiol equivalents toward estrogen receptor beta were 21 +/- 4-fold and 40 +/- 10-fold higher than the 17beta-estradiol concentrations in adipose (0.283 +/- 0.089 pmol/g, P < 0.001) and glandular (0.246 +/- 0.091 pmol/g, P = 0.001) fractions, respectively. After intake of soy milk and soy supplements, isoflavones reach exposure levels in breast tissue at which potential health effects may occur.

  14. Analysis of in vivo somatic mutations in normal human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, P.K.; Sahota, A.; Boyadjiev, S.A.

    1994-09-01

    We have used the APRT locus located at 16q24.3 to study the nature of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in human T lymphocytes in vivo. T lymphocytes were isolated from blood from APRT (+/{minus}) obligated heterozygotes with known germline mutations. The cells were immediatley placed in culture medium containing 100 {mu}M 2,6-diaminopurine (DAP) to select for drug-resistant clones ({minus}/{minus}) already present. These clones were first examined using polymorphic CA microsatellite repeat markers D16S303 and D16S305 that are distal and proximal to APRT, respectively. The retention of heterozygosity of these markers is suggestive of minor changes in the APRT gene, the exact nature of which were determined by DNA sequencing. Nineteen out of 70 DAP-resistant clones from one heterozygote showed APRT sequence changes. The loss of heterozygosity of markers D16S303 and D16S305 in the remaining clones suggests LOH involving multilocus chromosomal events. These clones were then sequentially typed using additional CA repeat markers proximal and distal to APRT. The extent of LOH in these clones was found to vary from <5 cM to almost the entire 16q arm. Preliminary results suggest that there are multiple sites along the chromosome from which LOH proceeds distally in these clones. Cytogenetic analysis of 10 clones suggested mitotic recombination in 9 and deletion in one. Studies are in progress to further characterize the molecular mechanisms of LOH.

  15. The physiology of the normal human breast: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Mills, Dixie; Gordon, Eva J; Casano, Ashley; Lahti, Sarah Michelle; Nguyen, Tinh; Preston, Alex; Tondre, Julie; Wu, Kuan; Yanase, Tiffany; Chan, Henry; Chia, David; Esfandiari, Mahtash; Himmel, Tiffany; Love, Susan M

    2011-12-01

    The physiology of the nonlactating human breast likely plays a key role in factors that contribute to the etiology of breast cancer and other breast conditions. Although there has been extensive research into the physiology of lactation, few reports explore the physiology of the resting mammary gland, including mechanisms by which compounds such as hormones, drugs, and potential carcinogens enter the breast ducts. The purpose of this study was to explore transport of exogenous drugs into ductal fluid in nonlactating women and determine if their concentrations in the fluid are similar to those observed in the breast milk of lactating women. We selected two compounds that have been well characterized during lactation, caffeine and cimetidine. Caffeine passively diffuses into breast milk, but cimetidine is actively transported and concentrated in breast milk. After ingestion of caffeine and cimetidine, 14 nonlactating subjects had blood drawn and underwent ductal lavage at five time points over 12 h to measure drug levels in the fluid and blood. The concentrations of both caffeine and cimetidine in lavage fluid were substantially less than those observed in breast milk. Our results support recent evidence that the cimetidine transporter is not expressed in the nonlactating mammary gland, and highlight intriguing differences in the physiology and molecular transport of the lactating and nonlactating breast. The findings of this exploratory study warrant further exploration into the physiology of the nonlactating mammary gland to elucidate factors involved in disease initiation and progression.

  16. [Orofacial pain - Trigeminal neuralgia and posttraumatic trigeminal neuropathy: Common features and differences].

    PubMed

    Thieme, V

    2016-02-01

    Neuropathic pain is the result of a lesion or disease of the somatosensory system in the peripheral or central nervous system. Classical trigeminal neuralgia and posttraumatic trigeminal neuropathy are pain disorders which oral and maxillofacial surgeons and dentists are confronted with in the differential diagnostics in routine daily practice. The etiopathogenesis of classical trigeminal neuralgia is attributable to pathological blood vessel-nerve contact in the trigeminal nerve root entry zone to the brain stem. The typical pain symptoms are characterized by sudden stabbing pain attacks. The pharmaceutical prophylaxis is based on the individually titrated administration of anticonvulsant drugs. The indications for interventional treatment are dependent on the course, response to drug treatment, resilience and wishes of the patient. The neuropathic mechanism of posttraumatic trigeminal neuropathy originates from nerve damage, which leads to peripheral and central sensitization with lowering of the pain threshold and multiple somatosensory disorders. The prophylaxis consists of avoidance of excessive acute and long-lasting pain stimuli. Against the background of the biopsychosocial pain model, the treatment of posttraumatic trigeminal neuropathy necessitates a multimodal, interdisciplinary concept.

  17. Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging Can Identify Trigeminal System Abnormalities in Classical Trigeminal Neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    DeSouza, Danielle D.; Hodaie, Mojgan; Davis, Karen D.

    2016-01-01

    Classical trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is a chronic pain disorder that has been described as one of the most severe pains one can suffer. The most prevalent theory of TN etiology is that the trigeminal nerve is compressed at the root entry zone (REZ) by blood vessels. However, there is significant evidence showing a lack of neurovascular compression (NVC) for many cases of classical TN. Furthermore, a considerable number of patients who are asymptomatic have MR evidence of NVC. Since there is no validated animal model that reproduces the clinical features of TN, our understanding of TN pathology mainly comes from biopsy studies that have limitations. Sophisticated structural MRI techniques including diffusion tensor imaging provide new opportunities to assess the trigeminal nerves and CNS to provide insight into TN etiology and pathogenesis. Specifically, studies have used high-resolution structural MRI methods to visualize patterns of trigeminal nerve-vessel relationships and to detect subtle pathological features at the trigeminal REZ. Structural MRI has also identified CNS abnormalities in cortical and subcortical gray matter and white matter and demonstrated that effective neurosurgical treatment for TN is associated with a reversal of specific nerve and brain abnormalities. In conclusion, this review highlights the advanced structural neuroimaging methods that are valuable tools to assess the trigeminal system in TN and may inform our current understanding of TN pathology. These methods may in the future have clinical utility for the development of neuroimaging-based biomarkers of TN. PMID:27807409

  18. Effect of Ceftaroline on Normal Human Intestinal Microflora▿

    PubMed Central

    Panagiotidis, Georgios; Bäckström, Tobias; Asker-Hagelberg, Charlotte; Jandourek, Alena; Weintraub, Andrej; Nord, Carl Erik

    2010-01-01

    Ceftaroline is a new broad-spectrum cephalosporin being developed for the treatment of serious bacterial infections, including those caused by aerobic Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of administration of ceftaroline on the intestinal flora of healthy subjects. Twelve healthy subjects (6 males and 6 females), 20 to 41 years of age, received ceftaroline (600 mg) by intravenous infusion every 12 h (q12h) for 7 days. Plasma and feces were collected for determination of ceftaroline concentration and analysis of fecal flora. Fecal specimens were cultured on nonselective and selective media. Different colony types were counted, isolated in pure culture, and identified to the genus level. All new strains of colonizing bacteria were tested for susceptibility to ceftaroline. The concentrations of ceftaroline in plasma were as follows: on day 2, 17.5 to 34.8 mg/liter; on day 5, 19.7 to 33.2 mg/liter; and on day 7, 18.0 to 29.8 mg/liter. No ceftaroline concentrations were found on day −1, 9, 14, or 21. No measurable concentrations in feces were found on day −1, 2, 5, 7, 9, 14, or 21. There was a minor impact on the numbers of Escherichia coli strains, while the numbers of enterococci and Candida albicans strains were not affected. There were moderate decreases in the numbers of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli during the first 7 days, while the numbers of clostridia increased during the same period. No impact on the numbers of Bacteroides bacteria was noticed. No new colonizing aerobic or anaerobic bacteria resistant to ceftaroline (MIC ≥ 4 mg/liter) were found. Ceftaroline had no significant ecological impact on the human intestinal microflora. PMID:20231399

  19. Ecological impact of MCB3837 on the normal human microbiota.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Mamun-Ur; Dalhoff, Axel; Bäckström, Tobias; Björkhem-Bergman, Linda; Panagiotidis, Georgios; Weintraub, Andrej; Nord, Carl Erik

    2014-08-01

    MCB3837 is a novel, water-soluble, injectable prodrug that is rapidly converted to the active substance MCB3681 in vivo following intravenous (i.v.) administration. Both MCB3837 and MCB3681 are oxazolidinone-quinolone hybrid molecules. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of MCB3681 on the human skin, nose, oropharyngeal and intestinal microbiota following administration of MCB3837. Twelve healthy male subjects received i.v. MCB3837 (6 mg/kg body weight) once daily for 5 days. Skin, nose, saliva and faecal samples were collected on Day -1 (pre dose), during administration on Days 2 and 5, and post dose on Days 8, 12 and 19. Micro-organisms were identified to genus level. No measurable concentrations of MCB3681 were found in any saliva samples or in the faecal samples on Day -1. On Day 2, 10 volunteers had faecal MCB3681 concentrations between 16.5 mg/kg faeces and 275.1mg/kg faeces; no MCB3681 in faeces could be detected in two of the volunteers. On Day 5, all volunteers had faecal concentrations of MCB3681 ranging from 98.9 to 226.3 mg/kg. MCB3681 caused no ecological changes in the skin, nasal and oropharyngeal microbiota. The numbers of enterococci, bifidobacteria, lactobacilli and clostridia decreased in the intestinal microbiota during administration of the drug. Numbers of Escherichia coli, other enterobacteria and Candida were not affected during the study. There was no impact on the number of Bacteroides. The faecal microbiota was normalised on Day 19. No new colonising aerobic or anaerobic Gram-positive bacteria with MCB3681 minimum inhibitory concentrations of ≥4 mg/L were found. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  20. Interferon-γ induces senescence in normal human melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Suiquan; Zhou, Miaoni; Lin, Fuquan; Liu, Dongyin; Hong, Weisong; Lu, Liangjun; Zhu, Yiping; Xu, Aie

    2014-01-01

    Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) plays an important role in the proceedings of vitiligo through recruiting lymphocytes to the lesional skin. However, the potential effects of IFN-γ on skin melanocytes and the subsequent contribution to the vitiligo pathogenesis are still unclear. To investigate the effects of IFN-γ on viability and cellular functions of melanocytes. Primary human melanocytes were treated with IFN-γ. Cell viability, apoptosis, cell cycle melanin content and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level were measured. mRNA expression was examined by real-time PCR. The release of interleukin 6 (IL-6) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP-70) was monitored by ELISA. β-galactosidase staining was utilized to evaluate melanocyte senescence. Persistent IFN-γ treatment induced viability loss, apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and senescence in melanocytes. Melanocyte senescence was characterized as the changes in pigmentation and morphology, as well as the increase of β-galactosidase activity. Increase of p21Cip1/Waf1 protein was evident in melanocytes after IFN-γ treatment. IFN-γ induction of senescence was attenuated by siRNAs against p21, Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) or signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), but not by JAK1 siRNA nor by p53 inhibitor pifithrin-α. IFN-γ treatment increased the accumulation of intracellular ROS in melanocytes, while ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) effectively inhibited IFN-γ induced p21 expression and melanocyte senescence. IL-6 and HSP-70 release was significantly induced by IFN-γ treatment, which was largely inhibited by NAC. The increase of IL-6 and HSP-70 release could also be observed in senescent melanocytes. IFN-γ can induce senescence in melanocytes and consequently enhance their immuno-competency, leading to a vitiligo-prone milieu.

  1. Interferon-γ Induces Senescence in Normal Human Melanocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Suiquan; Zhou, Miaoni; Lin, Fuquan; Liu, Dongyin; Hong, Weisong; Lu, Liangjun; Zhu, Yiping; Xu, Aie

    2014-01-01

    Background Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) plays an important role in the proceedings of vitiligo through recruiting lymphocytes to the lesional skin. However, the potential effects of IFN-γ on skin melanocytes and the subsequent contribution to the vitiligo pathogenesis are still unclear. Objective To investigate the effects of IFN-γ on viability and cellular functions of melanocytes. Methods Primary human melanocytes were treated with IFN-γ. Cell viability, apoptosis, cell cycle melanin content and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level were measured. mRNA expression was examined by real-time PCR. The release of interleukin 6 (IL-6) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP-70) was monitored by ELISA. β-galactosidase staining was utilized to evaluate melanocyte senescence. Results Persistent IFN-γ treatment induced viability loss, apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and senescence in melanocytes. Melanocyte senescence was characterized as the changes in pigmentation and morphology, as well as the increase of β-galactosidase activity. Increase of p21Cip1/Waf1 protein was evident in melanocytes after IFN-γ treatment. IFN-γ induction of senescence was attenuated by siRNAs against p21, Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) or signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), but not by JAK1 siRNA nor by p53 inhibitor pifithrin-α. IFN-γ treatment increased the accumulation of intracellular ROS in melanocytes, while ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) effectively inhibited IFN-γ induced p21 expression and melanocyte senescence. IL-6 and HSP-70 release was significantly induced by IFN-γ treatment, which was largely inhibited by NAC. The increase of IL-6 and HSP-70 release could also be observed in senescent melanocytes. Conclusion IFN-γ can induce senescence in melanocytes and consequently enhance their immuno-competency, leading to a vitiligo-prone milieu. PMID:24681574

  2. Trigeminal Neuralgia due to Vertebrobasilar Dolichoectasia

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Wuilker Knoner; Guasti, André Accioly; da Silva, Benjamin Franklin; Guasti, José Antonio

    2012-01-01

    We presented a case of drug-resistant trigeminal neuralgia attributed to vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia, a rare condition characterized by enlargement, tortuosity, or elongation of intracranial arteries. Dolichoectatic vessels can cause dysfunction of cranial nerves through direct vascular compression. The relationships of vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia with the particularities of neurovascular conflict and images findings are discussed. PMID:22937350

  3. Trigeminal nerve: Anatomic correlation with MR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, D.L.; Pech, P.; Pojunas, K.W.; Kilgore, D.P.; Williams, A.L.; Haughton, V.M.

    1986-06-01

    Through correlation with cryomicrotic sections, the appearance of the trigeminal nerve and its branches on magnetic resonance images is described in healthy individuals and in patients with tumors involving this nerve. Coronal images are best for defining the different parts of the nerve and for making a side-to-side comparison. Sagittal images are useful to demonstrate tumors involving the Gasserian ganglion.

  4. Wnt inhibitory factor (WIF)-1 promotes melanogenesis in normal human melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Park, Tae Jun; Kim, Misun; Kim, Hyeran; Park, Sun Yi; Park, Kyoung-Chan; Ortonne, Jean-Paul; Kang, Hee Young

    2014-01-01

    Wnt signaling plays a role in the differentiation as well as the development of melanocytes. Using a microarray analysis, hyperpigmentary skin of melasma expressed high levels of Wnt inhibitory factor-1 (WIF-1) compared with perilesional normal skin. In this study, the expression and functional roles of WIF-1 on melanocytes were investigated. WIF-1 was expressed both in the melanocytes of normal human skin and in cultured melanocytes. The upregulation of WIF-1 on cultured normal human melanocytes significantly induced expressions of MITF and tyrosinase, which were associated with increased melanin content and tyrosinase activity. Consistent with the stimulatory effect of WIF-1, WIF-1 siRNA reduced melanogenesis in the cells. Moreover, WIF-1 increases pigmentation in melanocytes co-cultured with WIF-1-overexpressed fibroblasts and of organ-cultured human skin. These findings suggest that melanocytes express WIF-1 constitutively in vivo and in vitro and that WIF-1 promotes melanogenesis in normal human melanocytes.

  5. Microstructural abnormalities of the trigeminal nerve by diffusion-tensor imaging in trigeminal neuralgia without neurovascular compression

    PubMed Central

    Sunil, Kumar; Ashish, Awasthi; Jayantee, Kalita; Usha Kant, Misra

    2015-01-01

    Microstructural changes of the trigeminal nerve in trigeminal neuralgia due to neurovascular compression have been reported by using diffusion tensor imaging. Other aetiologies such as primary demyelinating lesions, brain stem infarction and nerve root infiltration by tumour affecting the trigeminal pathway may also present as trigeminal neuralgia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the microstructural tissue abnormalities in the trigeminal nerve in symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia not related to neurovascular compression using diffusion tensor imaging. Mean values of the quantitative diffusion parameters of trigeminal nerve, fractional anisotropy and apparent diffusion coefficient, were measured in a group of four symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia patients without neurovascular compression who showed focal non-enhancing T2-hyperintense lesions in the pontine trigeminal pathway. These diffusion parameters were compared between the affected and unaffected sides in the same patient and with four age-matched healthy controls. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed hyperintense lesions in the dorsolateral part of the pons along the central trigeminal pathway on T2-fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences. The mean fractional anisotropy value on the affected side was significantly decreased (P = 0.001) compared to the unaffected side and healthy controls. Similarly, the mean apparent diffusion coefficient value was significantly higher (P = 0.001) on the affected side compared to the unaffected side and healthy controls. The cause of trigeminal neuralgia in our patients was abnormal pontine lesions affecting the central trigeminal pathway. The diffusion tensor imaging results suggest that microstructural tissue abnormalities of the trigeminal nerve also exist even in non-neurovascular compression-related trigeminal neuralgia. PMID:26678753

  6. Microstructural abnormalities of the trigeminal nerve by diffusion-tensor imaging in trigeminal neuralgia without neurovascular compression.

    PubMed

    Neetu, Soni; Sunil, Kumar; Ashish, Awasthi; Jayantee, Kalita; Usha Kant, Misra

    2016-02-01

    Microstructural changes of the trigeminal nerve in trigeminal neuralgia due to neurovascular compression have been reported by using diffusion tensor imaging. Other aetiologies such as primary demyelinating lesions, brain stem infarction and nerve root infiltration by tumour affecting the trigeminal pathway may also present as trigeminal neuralgia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the microstructural tissue abnormalities in the trigeminal nerve in symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia not related to neurovascular compression using diffusion tensor imaging. Mean values of the quantitative diffusion parameters of trigeminal nerve, fractional anisotropy and apparent diffusion coefficient, were measured in a group of four symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia patients without neurovascular compression who showed focal non-enhancing T2-hyperintense lesions in the pontine trigeminal pathway. These diffusion parameters were compared between the affected and unaffected sides in the same patient and with four age-matched healthy controls. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed hyperintense lesions in the dorsolateral part of the pons along the central trigeminal pathway on T2-fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences. The mean fractional anisotropy value on the affected side was significantly decreased (P = 0.001) compared to the unaffected side and healthy controls. Similarly, the mean apparent diffusion coefficient value was significantly higher (P = 0.001) on the affected side compared to the unaffected side and healthy controls. The cause of trigeminal neuralgia in our patients was abnormal pontine lesions affecting the central trigeminal pathway. The diffusion tensor imaging results suggest that microstructural tissue abnormalities of the trigeminal nerve also exist even in non-neurovascular compression-related trigeminal neuralgia. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Reduction of pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure activity in awake rats by seizure-triggered trigeminal nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Fanselow, E E; Reid, A P; Nicolelis, M A

    2000-11-01

    Stimulation of the vagus nerve has become an effective method for desynchronizing the highly coherent neural activity typically associated with epileptic seizures. This technique has been used in several animal models of seizures as well as in humans suffering from epilepsy. However, application of this technique has been limited to unilateral stimulation of the vagus nerve, typically delivered according to a fixed duty cycle, independently of whether ongoing seizure activity is present. Here, we report that stimulation of another cranial nerve, the trigeminal nerve, can also cause cortical and thalamic desynchronization, resulting in a reduction of seizure activity in awake rats. Furthermore, we demonstrate that providing this stimulation only when seizure activity begins results in more effective and safer seizure reduction per second of stimulation than with previous methods. Seizure activity induced by intraperitoneal injection of pentylenetetrazole was recorded from microwire electrodes in the thalamus and cortex of awake rats while the infraorbital branch of the trigeminal nerve was stimulated via a chronically implanted nerve cuff electrode. Continuous unilateral stimulation of the trigeminal nerve reduced electrographic seizure activity by up to 78%, and bilateral trigeminal stimulation was even more effective. Using a device that automatically detects seizure activity in real time on the basis of multichannel field potential signals, we demonstrated that seizure-triggered stimulation was more effective than the stimulation protocol involving a fixed duty cycle, in terms of the percent seizure reduction per second of stimulation. In contrast to vagus nerve stimulation studies, no substantial cardiovascular side effects were observed by unilateral or bilateral stimulation of the trigeminal nerve. These findings suggest that trigeminal nerve stimulation is safe in awake rats and should be evaluated as a therapy for human seizures. Furthermore, the results

  8. X Chromosome Abnormalities and Cognitive Development: Implications for Understanding Normal Human Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walzer, Stanley

    1985-01-01

    Argues that knowledge from studies of individuals with sex chromosome abnormalities can further understanding of aspects of normal human development. Studies of XO girls, XXY boys, XXX girls, and males with a fragile X chromosome are summarized to demonstrate how results contribute to knowledge about normal cognitive development and about…

  9. X Chromosome Abnormalities and Cognitive Development: Implications for Understanding Normal Human Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walzer, Stanley

    1985-01-01

    Argues that knowledge from studies of individuals with sex chromosome abnormalities can further understanding of aspects of normal human development. Studies of XO girls, XXY boys, XXX girls, and males with a fragile X chromosome are summarized to demonstrate how results contribute to knowledge about normal cognitive development and about…

  10. Elastic modulus of orbicularis oculi muscle in normal humans, humans with Graves' eye disease, and cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Oestreicher, J H; Frueh, B R

    1995-06-01

    We built an experimental apparatus to investigate the passive elastic characteristics of orbicularis oculi muscle and examined specimens from normal humans, humans with stable Graves' eye disease, and cynomolgus monkeys. Stress-strain curves were determined and found to be exponential. The elastic modulus (Young's modulus), analogous to the stiffness of the material, was calculated as a function of strain. Elastic modulus as a function of instantaneous stress was linear. Monkey elastic modulus values were determined, but did not allow meaningful interspecies comparison because of the small sample size. No significant difference was found between normal humans and humans with Graves' eye disease with respect to elastic modulus values.

  11. Clinical value of a self-designed training model for pinpointing and puncturing trigeminal ganglion.

    PubMed

    He, Yu-Quan; He, Shu; Shen, Yun-Xia; Qian, Cheng

    2014-04-01

    OBJECTIVES. A training model was designed for learners and young physicians to polish their skills in clinical practices of pinpointing and puncturing trigeminal ganglion. METHODS. A head model, on both cheeks of which the deep soft tissue was replaced by stuffed organosilicone and sponge while the superficial soft tissue, skin and the trigeminal ganglion were made of organic silicon rubber for an appearance of real human being, was made from a dried skull specimen and epoxy resin. Two physicians who had experiences in puncturing foramen ovale and trigeminal ganglion were selected to test the model, mainly for its appearance, X-ray permeability, handling of the puncture, and closure of the puncture sites. Four inexperienced physicians were selected afterwards to be trained combining Hartel's anterior facial approach with the new method of real-time observation on foramen ovale studied by us. RESULTS. Both appearance and texture of the model were extremely close to those of a real human. The fact that the skin, superficial soft tissue, deep muscles of the cheeks, and the trigeminal ganglion made of organic silicon rubber all had great elasticity resulted in quick closure and sealing of the puncture sites. The head model made of epoxy resin had similar X-ray permeability to a human skull specimen under fluoroscopy. The soft tissue was made of radiolucent material so that the training can be conducted with X-ray guidance. After repeated training, all the four young physicians were able to smoothly and successfully accomplish the puncture. CONCLUSION. This self-made model can substitute for cadaver specimen in training learners and young physicians on foramen ovale and trigeminal ganglion puncture. It is very helpful for fast learning and mastering this interventional operation skill, and the puncture accuracy can be improved significantly with our new method of real-time observation on foramen ovale.

  12. Intranasal trigeminal sensitivity: measurements before and after nasal surgery.

    PubMed

    Scheibe, M; Schulze, S; Mueller, C A; Schuster, B; Hummel, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Nasal surgeries constitute an extensive manipulation of the nasal mucosa and therefore of structures related to trigeminal and olfactory sensitivity. While olfactory changes due to nasal surgery are relatively well investigated, there are only very few studies regarding trigeminal sensitivity. Aim of the present study was to investigate sensory changes after nasal surgery with special regard to the trigeminal sensitivity. In 38 patients prior to and around 12 weeks after nasal surgery the following psychophysical measures were performed: odor identification, odor discrimination, phenyl ethyl alcohol odor threshold, sensitivity to trigeminal stimuli, trigeminal detection thresholds and trigeminal pain thresholds. These results were compared to those of a control group (43 healthy volunteers). Psychophysical olfactory and trigeminal testing showed no major changes in patients after surgery compared to the control group. Independent from the time of measurement higher trigeminal detection thresholds were found in patients compared to healthy subjects, meaning that trigeminal thresholds were already increased before surgery. The present study revealed a decreased trigeminal sensitivity in patients already before surgery. It may be hypothesized that patients also exhibit a decreased sensitivity for nasal airflow, which may also contribute to the patients' impression of impaired nasal breathing.

  13. Botulinum Toxin as Monotherapy in Symptomatic Trigeminal Neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Lunde, Hanne Marie Bøe; Torkildsen, Øivind; Bø, Lars; Bertelsen, Anne Kjørsvik

    2016-06-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is one of the most agonizing facial pain disorders that humans endure. Studies on onabotulinum toxin A (BTX-A) treatment for TN are limited, but promising with respect to TN of no identifiable cause. We aimed to investigate the efficiency and safety of BTX-A treatment in a 60-year-old male with diabetes mellitus who in March 2013 presented with TN caused by an exostosis in Meckel's cave. The patient was medically treatment refractory due to insufficient pain relief and adverse events of hyperglycemia, and surgery was declined due to complex anatomy. As a last resort, BTX-A was injected into the pain trigger zones of the trigeminal nerve (V5). Complete analgesia was reported 2 weeks after BTX-A injection. Pain medications were discontinued and laboratory values returned to acceptable levels. Regular BTX-A treatment during the next 28 months showed sustained analgesic effect. BTX-A has an excellent safety profile and may be efficient for patients with symptomatic TN not suited for conventional therapies. © 2016 American Headache Society.

  14. Molecular Portrait of the Normal Human Breast Tissue and Its Influence on Breast Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Margan, Madalin Marius; Jitariu, Andreea Adriana; Nica, Cristian; Raica, Marius

    2016-01-01

    Normal human breast tissue consists of epithelial and nonepithelial cells with different molecular profiles and differentiation grades. This molecular heterogeneity is known to yield abnormal clones that may contribute to the development of breast carcinomas. Stem cells that are found in developing and mature breast tissue are either positive or negative for cytokeratin 19 depending on their subtype. These cells are able to generate carcinogenesis along with mature cells. However, scientific data remains controversial regarding the monoclonal or polyclonal origin of breast carcinomas. The majority of breast carcinomas originate from epithelial cells that normally express BRCA1. The consecutive loss of the BRCA1 gene leads to various abnormalities in epithelial cells. Normal breast epithelial cells also express hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) 1α and HIF-2α that are associated with a high metastatic rate and a poor prognosis for malignant lesions. The nuclear expression of estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) in normal human breast tissue is maintained in malignant tissue as well. Several controversies regarding the ability of ER and PR status to predict breast cancer outcome remain. Both ER and PR act as modulators of cell activity in normal human breast tissue. Ki-67 positivity is strongly correlated with tumor grade although its specific role in applied therapy requires further studies. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) oncoprotein is less expressed in normal human breast specimens but is highly expressed in certain malignant lesions of the breast. Unlike HER2, epidermal growth factor receptor expression is similar in both normal and malignant tissues. Molecular heterogeneity is not only found in breast carcinomas but also in normal breast tissue. Therefore, the molecular mapping of normal human breast tissue might represent a key research area to fully elucidate the mechanisms of breast carcinogenesis. PMID:27382385

  15. From The Cover: Reconstruction of functionally normal and malignant human breast tissues in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuperwasser, Charlotte; Chavarria, Tony; Wu, Min; Magrane, Greg; Gray, Joe W.; Carey, Loucinda; Richardson, Andrea; Weinberg, Robert A.

    2004-04-01

    The study of normal breast epithelial morphogenesis and carcinogenesis in vivo has largely used rodent models. Efforts at studying mammary morphogenesis and cancer with xenotransplanted human epithelial cells have failed to recapitulate the full extent of development seen in the human breast. We have developed an orthotopic xenograft model in which both the stromal and epithelial components of the reconstructed mammary gland are of human origin. Genetic modification of human stromal cells before the implantation of ostensibly normal human mammary epithelial cells resulted in the outgrowth of benign and malignant lesions. This experimental model allows for studies of human epithelial morphogenesis and differentiation in vivo and underscores the critical role of heterotypic interactions in human breast development and carcinogenesis.

  16. Muscle protein analysis. II. Two-dimensional electrophoresis of normal and diseased human skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Giometti, C.S.; Barany, M.; Danon, M.J.; Anderson, N.G.

    1980-07-01

    High-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis was used to analyze the major proteins of normal and pathological human-muscle samples. The normal human-muscle pattern contains four myosin light chains: three that co-migrate with the myosin light chains from rabbit fast muscle (extensor digitorum longus), and one that co-migrates with the light chain 2 from rabbit slow muscle (soleus). Of seven Duchenne muscular dystrophy samples, four yielded patterns with decreased amounts of actin and myosin relative to normal muscle, while three samples gave patterns comparable to that for normal muscle. Six samples from patients with myotonic dystrophy also gave normal patterns. In nemaline rod myopathy, in contrast, the pattern was deficient in two of the fast-type myosin light chains.

  17. Prevalence of trigeminal neuralgia in Al-Quseir city (Red sea Governorate), Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Tallawy, Hamdy N; Farghaly, Wafaa M; Rageh, Tarek A; Shehata, Ghaydaa A; Abdel Hakeem M, Nabil; Badry, Reda; Kandil, Mahmoud R

    2013-09-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia or tic douloureux is sometimes described as the most excruciating pain known to humanity. To estimate the prevalence of trigeminal neuralgia among the population of Al-Quseir city. This study forms a part of door to door survey of major neurological disorders in Al-Quseir city, Red sea governorate, Egypt. The total population (33,285 persons) were screened through door to door (every door) by three specialists of Neurology and fifteen female social workers. Then, positive cases were subjected to clinical and neurological examination by other three staff members of neurology. Cases were identified as suffering from trigeminal neuralgia according to the diagnostic criteria of the International headache society (IHS). We identified 4 female patients out of 13,541 persons (aged 30 years and more) suffering from trigeminal neuralgia with age specific prevalence rate of 29.5/100,000. Co-morbid depression and hypertension were observed among the affected persons. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Mastication induces long-term increases in blood perfusion of the trigeminal principal nucleus.

    PubMed

    Viggiano, A; Manara, R; Conforti, R; Paccone, A; Secondulfo, C; Lorusso, L; Sbordone, L; Di Salle, F; Monda, M; Tedeschi, G; Esposito, F

    2015-12-17

    Understanding mechanisms for vessel tone regulation within the trigeminal nuclei is of great interest because some headache syndromes are due to dysregulation of such mechanisms. Previous experiments on animal models suggest that mastication may alter neuron metabolism and blood supply in these nuclei. To investigate this hypothesis in humans, arterial spin-labeling magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to measure blood perfusion within the principal trigeminal nucleus (Vp) and in the dorsolateral-midbrain (DM, including the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus) in healthy volunteers, before and immediately after a mastication exercise consisting of chewing a gum on one side of the mouth for 1 h at 1 bite/s. The side preference for masticating was evaluated with a chewing test and the volume of the masseter muscle was measured on T1-weighted MRI scans. The results demonstrated that the mastication exercise caused a perfusion increase within the Vp, but not in the DM. This change was correlated to the preference score for the side where the exercise took place. Moreover, the basal Vp perfusion was correlated to the masseter volume. These results indicate that the local vascular tone of the trigeminal nuclei can be constitutively altered by the chewing practice and by strong or sustained chewing.

  19. A novel generalized normal distribution for human longevity and other negatively skewed data.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Henry T; Allison, David B

    2012-01-01

    Negatively skewed data arise occasionally in statistical practice; perhaps the most familiar example is the distribution of human longevity. Although other generalizations of the normal distribution exist, we demonstrate a new alternative that apparently fits human longevity data better. We propose an alternative approach of a normal distribution whose scale parameter is conditioned on attained age. This approach is consistent with previous findings that longevity conditioned on survival to the modal age behaves like a normal distribution. We derive such a distribution and demonstrate its accuracy in modeling human longevity data from life tables. The new distribution is characterized by 1. An intuitively straightforward genesis; 2. Closed forms for the pdf, cdf, mode, quantile, and hazard functions; and 3. Accessibility to non-statisticians, based on its close relationship to the normal distribution.

  20. A Novel Generalized Normal Distribution for Human Longevity and other Negatively Skewed Data

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Henry T.; Allison, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Negatively skewed data arise occasionally in statistical practice; perhaps the most familiar example is the distribution of human longevity. Although other generalizations of the normal distribution exist, we demonstrate a new alternative that apparently fits human longevity data better. We propose an alternative approach of a normal distribution whose scale parameter is conditioned on attained age. This approach is consistent with previous findings that longevity conditioned on survival to the modal age behaves like a normal distribution. We derive such a distribution and demonstrate its accuracy in modeling human longevity data from life tables. The new distribution is characterized by 1. An intuitively straightforward genesis; 2. Closed forms for the pdf, cdf, mode, quantile, and hazard functions; and 3. Accessibility to non-statisticians, based on its close relationship to the normal distribution. PMID:22623974

  1. Effect of the gamma knife treatment on the trigeminal nerve root in Chinese patients with primary trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhi-Xiu; Qian, Wei; Wu, Yu-Quan; Sun, Fang-Jie; Fei, Jun; Huang, Run-Sheng; Fang, Jing-Yu; Wu, Cai-Zhen; An, You-Ming; Wang, Daxin; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    To understand the mechanism of the gamma knife treating the trigeminal neuralgia. Using the MASEP-SRRS type gamma knife treatment system, 140 Chinese patients with trigeminal neuralgia (NT) were treated in our hospital from 2002 to 2010, in which the pain relief rate reached 95% and recurrence rate was 3% only. We investigated the effect of the gamma knife treatment on the trigeminal nerve root in 20 Chinese patients with primary trigeminal neuralgia by the magnetic resonance imager (MRI) observation. 1) The cross-sectional area of trigeminal nerve root became smaller and MRI signals were lower in the treatment side than those in the non-treatment side after the gamma knife treatment of primary trigeminal neuralgia; 2) in the treatment side, the cross-sectional area of the trigeminal nerve root decreased significantly after the gamma knife treatment; 3) there was good correlation between the clinical improvement and the MRI findings; and 4) the straight distance between the trigeminal nerve root and the brainstem did not change after the gamma knife treatment. The pain relief induced the gamma knife radiosurgery might be related with the atrophy of the trigeminal nerve root in Chinese patients with primary trigeminal neuralgia.

  2. Trigeminal pathways for hypertonic saline and light-evoked corneal reflexes

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Mostafeezur; Okamoto, Keiichiro; Thompson, Randall; Bereiter, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Cornea-evoked eyeblinks maintain tear film integrity on the ocular surface in response to dryness and protect the eye from real or potential damage. Eyelid movement following electrical stimulation has been well studied in humans and animals; however, the central neural pathways that mediate protective eyeblinks following natural nociceptive signals are less certain. The aim of this study was to assess the role of the trigeminal subnucleus interpolaris/caudalis (Vi/Vc) transition and subnucleus caudalis/upper cervical cord (Vc/C1) junction regions on orbicularis oculi electromyographic (OOemg) activity evoked by ocular surface application of hypertonic saline or exposure to bright light in urethane anesthetized male rats. The Vi/Vc and Vc/C1 regions are the main sites of termination for trigeminal afferent nerves that supply the ocular surface, while hypertonic saline (saline = 0.15-5M) and bright light (light = 5-20k lux) selectively activate ocular surface and intraocular trigeminal nerves, respectively, and excite second-order neurons at the Vi/Vc and Vc/C1 regions. Integrated OOemg activity, ipsilateral to the applied stimulus, increased with greater stimulus intensities for both modalities. Lidocaine applied to the ocular surface inhibited OOemg responses to hypertonic saline, but did not alter the response to light. Lidocaine injected into the trigeminal ganglion blocked completely the OOemg responses to hypertonic saline and light indicating a trigeminal afferent origin. Synaptic blockade by cobalt chloride of the Vi/Vc or Vc/C1 region greatly reduced OOemg responses to hypertonic saline and bright light. These data indicate that OOemg activity evoked by natural stimuli known to cause irritation or discomfort in humans depends on a relay in both the Vi/Vc transition and Vc/C1 junction regions. PMID:25086311

  3. Trigeminal pathways for hypertonic saline- and light-evoked corneal reflexes.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M; Okamoto, K; Thompson, R; Bereiter, D A

    2014-09-26

    Cornea-evoked eyeblinks maintain tear film integrity on the ocular surface in response to dryness and protect the eye from real or potential damage. Eyelid movement following electrical stimulation has been well studied in humans and animals; however, the central neural pathways that mediate protective eyeblinks following natural nociceptive signals are less certain. The aim of this study was to assess the role of the trigeminal subnucleus interpolaris/caudalis (Vi/Vc) transition and subnucleus caudalis/upper cervical cord (Vc/C1) junction regions on orbicularis oculi electromyographic (OOemg) activity evoked by ocular surface application of hypertonic saline or exposure to bright light in urethane anesthetized male rats. The Vi/Vc and Vc/C1 regions are the main sites of termination for trigeminal afferent nerves that supply the ocular surface, while hypertonic saline (saline=0.15-5M) and bright light (light=5k-20klux) selectively activate ocular surface and intraocular trigeminal nerves, respectively, and excite second-order neurons at the Vi/Vc and Vc/C1 regions. Integrated OOemg activity, ipsilateral to the applied stimulus, increased with greater stimulus intensities for both modalities. Lidocaine applied to the ocular surface inhibited OOemg responses to hypertonic saline, but did not alter the response to light. Lidocaine injected into the trigeminal ganglion blocked completely the OOemg responses to hypertonic saline and light indicating a trigeminal afferent origin. Synaptic blockade by cobalt chloride of the Vi/Vc or Vc/C1 region greatly reduced OOemg responses to hypertonic saline and bright light. These data indicate that OOemg activity evoked by natural stimuli known to cause irritation or discomfort in humans depends on a relay in both the Vi/Vc transition and Vc/C1 junction regions. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Gene expression analysis of primary normal human hepatocytes infected with human hepatitis B virus

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hyun Mi; Park, Sung Gyoo; Yea, Sung Su; Jang, Won Hee; Yang, Young-Il; Jung, Guhung

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To find the relationship between hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatocytes during the initial state of infection by cDNA microarray. METHODS: Primary normal human hepatocytes (PNHHs) were isolated and infected with HBV. From the PNHHs, RNA was isolated and inverted into complement DNA (cDNA) with Cy3- or Cy5- labeled dUTP for microarray analysis. The labeled cDNA was hybridized with microarray chip, including 4224 cDNAs. From the image of the microarray, expression profiles were produced and some of them were confirmed by RT-PCR, immunoblot analysis, and NF-κB luciferase reporter assay. RESULTS: From the cDNA microarray, we obtained 98 differentially regulated genes. Of the 98 genes, 53 were up regulated and 45 down regulated. Interestingly, in the up regulated genes, we found the TNF signaling pathway-related genes: LT-α, TRAF2, and NIK. By using RT-PCR, we confirmed the up-regulation of these genes in HepG2, Huh7, and Chang liver cells, which were transfected with pHBV1.2×, a plasmid encoding all HBV messages. Moreover, these three genes participated in HBV-mediated NF-κB activation. CONCLUSION: During the initial state of HBV infection, hepatocytes facilitate the activation of NF-κB through up regulation of LT-α, TRAF2, and NIK. PMID:16937494

  5. Long-term culture and functional characterization of follicular cells from adult normal human thyroids.

    PubMed Central

    Curcio, F; Ambesi-Impiombato, F S; Perrella, G; Coon, H G

    1994-01-01

    We have obtained long-term cultures of differentiated proliferating follicular cells from normal adult human thyroid glands. In vitro growth of such human cells has been sustained by a modified F-12 medium, supplemented with bovine hypothalamus and pituitary extracts and no added thyrotropin. Cultures have been expanded, cloned, frozen, successfully retrieved, and characterized. Functional characterization of these cells shows constitutive thyroglobulin production and release and thyrotropin-dependent adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate production, the latter apparently not associated with significant increases in DNA synthesis or cell proliferation. Genetic characterization of these cells by chromosome counting showed the normal diploid chromosome number. The ability to cultivate differentiated human thyroid follicular cells in long-term culture opens possibilities for investigating the transduction pathways of thyrotropin stimulation in normal and pathological human tissues, developing clinically relevant in vitro assays, and considering cellular and molecular therapies. Images PMID:8090760

  6. Case series: non vascular considerations in trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Balasundram, Sathesh; Cotrufo, Stefano; Liew, Colin

    2012-02-01

    An abnormal vascular course of the superior cerebellar artery is often cited as the cause for trigeminal neuralgia. However, among patients with TN-like symptoms, 6% to 16% are variously reported to have intracranial tumours. Aneurysms, tumours, or other lesions may impinge or irritate the trigeminal nerve along its course. Uncommonly, an area of demyelination from multiple sclerosis may be the precipitant. We would like to present a series of unusual lesions, all of which initially presented with neuralgic-like symptoms and were refractory to treatment. Collated case series with photographs and imaging are reviewed in this paper. Discussion of case presentation and management are done for evaluation. A wide range of other compressive lesions can cause trigeminal neuralgia. This paper illustrates the clinical presentation of atypical trigeminal neuralgia and emphasises the value of diagnostic imaging in trigeminal neuralgia patient. Suggested algorithm for management of trigeminal neuralgia.

  7. Differences in individual susceptibility affect the development of trigeminal neuralgia☆

    PubMed Central

    Duransoy, Yusuf Kurtuluş; Mete, Mesut; Akçay, Emrah; Selçuki, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a syndrome due to dysfunctional hyperactivity of the trigeminal nerve, and is characterized by a sudden, usually unilateral, recurrent lancinating pain arising from one or more divisions of the nerve. The most accepted pathogenetic mechanism for trigeminal neuralgia is compression of the nerve at its dorsal root entry zone or in its distal course. In this paper, we report four cases with trigeminal neuralgia due to an unknown mechanism after an intracranial intervention. The onset of trigeminal neuralgia after surgical interventions that are unrelated to the trigeminal nerve suggests that in patients with greater individual susceptibility, nerve contact with the vascular structure due to postoperative pressure and changes in cerebrospinal fluid flow may cause the onset of pain. PMID:25206428

  8. Trigeminal trophic syndrome: report of 3 cases affecting the scalp.

    PubMed

    Bolaji, Ranti S; Burrall, Barbara A; Eisen, Daniel B

    2013-12-01

    Trigeminal trophic syndrome (TTS) is a rare condition that results from a prior injury to the sensory distribution of the trigeminal nerve. Patients typically respond to the altered sensation with self-mutilation, most often of the nasal ala. We describe 3 patients with TTS who presented with self-induced ulcerations primarily involving the scalp. Two patients developed delusions of parasitosis (DOP) based on the resulting symptoms of TTS, which is a unique association. Trigeminal trophic syndrome may occur at extranasal sites and in any branch of the trigeminal nerve. The condition should be considered when ulcers are encountered in this nerve distribution. Symptoms such as formication may mimic DOP. Trigeminal trophic syndrome may be differentiated from DOP by the restriction of symptoms and ulcerations to the distribution of the trigeminal nerve.

  9. An animal model for trigeminal neuralgia by compression of the trigeminal nerve root.

    PubMed

    Luo, Dao-Shu; Zhang, Ting; Zuo, Chang-Xu; Zuo, Zhong-Fu; Li, Hui; Wu, Sheng-Xi; Wang, Wei; Li, Yun-Qing

    2012-01-01

    Microvascular compression of the trigeminal nerve root is a major cause of most trigeminal neuralgia (TN) in patients; however, no reliable animal model to further study the pathogenesis of TN currently exists. Our objective was to establish a novel and practical animal model for TN by chronic compression of the trigeminal (CCT) nerve root in rats, which would provide a better animal model to mimic the clinical feature of TN on the research of the pathogenesis of TN. A randomized, double blind, controlled animal trial. Sixteen adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (200-220 g) were randomly divided into 2 groups: one group that received chronic compression of the trigeminal nerve root (the CCT group, n=8) and another group that received sham operation without compression (the sham operation group, n=8). A small plastic filament was retrogressively inserted into the intracalvarium from the inferior orbital fissure until it reached the trigeminal nerve root for compression in CCT group. Animal behaviors were observed for 4 weeks after operation. Immunohistochemistry of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), isolectin B4 (IB4), substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) were performed in the trigeminal root entry zone (TREZ) and medullary dorsal horn (MDH). The orofacial mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia in the CCT rats were obviously increased after the operation and lasted for 28 days. Increased face-grooming behavior was also observed in the CCT rats and continued for over 21 days, returning to baseline by day 28. Immunohistochemistry for GFAP in the TREZ revealed a progressive extension of astrocytic processes in the ipsilateral TREZ of rats in the CCT group. Furthermore, the IB4 positive immunoreactive nonpeptidergic C-fiber terminals in the MDH were reduced for 4 weeks after the operation. Both SP and CGRP, expressed in the peptidergic C-fiber terminals, were found to be decreased in the ipsilateral MDH of CCT animals after the trigeminal

  10. Distribution of intermediate filament proteins in normal and diseased human glomeruli.

    PubMed Central

    Stamenkovic, I.; Skalli, O.; Gabbiani, G.

    1986-01-01

    The distribution of intermediate filament proteins (vimentin, desmin, and cytokeratin) was studied by means of immunofluorescence in the normal human and rat glomerulus and in pathologic human glomeruli. Antifibronectin antibodies were used as mesangial markers. In normal human glomeruli, vimentin antibodies stained endothelial cells, podocytes, and mesangial cells; desmin antibodies, surprisingly, stained podocytes. In normal rat glomeruli, the pattern of vimentin staining was the same as in humans, but desmin antibodies stained both mesangial cells and podocytes. In human and rat glomeruli cytokeratin staining was confined to segments of Bowman's capsule. In human pathologic glomeruli, vimentin and desmin antibodies stained the structures that were positive in normal glomeruli, giving a characteristic pattern for each pathologic condition examined. These results are compatible with the mesenchymal origin of podocytes and mesangial cells and suggest that both cells have smooth muscle-like phenotypic features. Mesangial cells may have slightly different differentiation paths in humans and rats, leading to a distinct expression of intermediate filament proteins. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2432791

  11. Peripheral nerve field stimulation for trigeminal neuralgia, trigeminal neuropathic pain, and persistent idiopathic facial pain.

    PubMed

    Klein, Johann; Sandi-Gahun, Sahr; Schackert, Gabriele; Juratli, Tareq A

    2016-04-01

    Peripheral nerve field stimulation (PNFS) is a promising modality for treatment of intractable facial pain. However, evidence is sparse. We are therefore presenting our experience with this technique in a small patient cohort. Records of 10 patients (five men, five women) with intractable facial pain who underwent implantation of one or several subcutaneous electrodes for trigeminal nerve field stimulation were retrospectively analyzed. Patients' data, including pain location, etiology, duration, previous treatments, long-term effects and complications, were evaluated. Four patients suffered from recurrent classical trigeminal neuralgia, one had classical trigeminal neuralgia and was medically unfit for microvascular decompression. Two patients suffered from trigeminal neuropathy attributed to multiple sclerosis, one from post-herpetic neuropathy, one from trigeminal neuropathy following radiation therapy and one from persistent idiopathic facial pain. Average patient age was 74.2 years (range 57-87), and average symptom duration was 10.6 years (range 2-17). Eight patients proceeded to implantation after successful trial. Average follow-up after implantation was 11.3 months (range 5-28). Using the visual analog scale, average pain intensity was 9.3 (range 7-10) preoperatively and 0.75 (range 0-3) postoperatively. Six patients reported absence of pain with stimulation; two had only slight constant pain without attacks. PNFS may be an effective treatment for refractory facial pain and yields high patient satisfaction. © International Headache Society 2015.

  12. ProNormz--an integrated approach for human proteins and protein kinases normalization.

    PubMed

    Subramani, Suresh; Raja, Kalpana; Natarajan, Jeyakumar

    2014-02-01

    The task of recognizing and normalizing protein name mentions in biomedical literature is a challenging task and important for text mining applications such as protein-protein interactions, pathway reconstruction and many more. In this paper, we present ProNormz, an integrated approach for human proteins (HPs) tagging and normalization. In Homo sapiens, a greater number of biological processes are regulated by a large human gene family called protein kinases by post translational phosphorylation. Recognition and normalization of human protein kinases (HPKs) is considered to be important for the extraction of the underlying information on its regulatory mechanism from biomedical literature. ProNormz distinguishes HPKs from other HPs besides tagging and normalization. To our knowledge, ProNormz is the first normalization system available to distinguish HPKs from other HPs in addition to gene normalization task. ProNormz incorporates a specialized synonyms dictionary for human proteins and protein kinases, a set of 15 string matching rules and a disambiguation module to achieve the normalization. Experimental results on benchmark BioCreative II training and test datasets show that our integrated approach achieve a fairly good performance and outperforms more sophisticated semantic similarity and disambiguation systems presented in BioCreative II GN task. As a freely available web tool, ProNormz is useful to developers as extensible gene normalization implementation, to researchers as a standard for comparing their innovative techniques, and to biologists for normalization and categorization of HPs and HPKs mentions in biomedical literature. URL: http://www.biominingbu.org/pronormz. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Maturation-associated gene expression profiles along normal human bone marrow monopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Mello, Fabiana V; Alves, Liliane R; Land, Marcelo G P; Teodósio, Cristina; Sanchez, María-Luz; Bárcena, Paloma; Peres, Rodrigo T; Pedreira, Carlos E; Costa, Elaine S; Orfao, Alberto

    2017-02-01

    Human monopoiesis is a tightly coordinated process which starts in the bone marrow (BM) haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment and leads to the production of circulating blood mature monocytes. Although mature monocytes/macrophages have been extensively studied in both normal or inflammatory conditions, monopoiesis has only been assessed in vitro and in vivo animal models, due to low frequency of the monocytic precursors in the normal human BM. Here we investigated the transcriptional profile along normal human BM monopoiesis. Five distinct maturation-associated stages of monocytic precursors were identified and isolated from (fresh) normal human BM through fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and the gene expression profile (GEP) of each monocytic precursor subset was analysed by DNA-oligonucleotide microarrays. Overall, >6000 genes (18% of the genes investigated) were expressed in ≥1 stage of BM monopoiesis at stable or variable amounts, showing early decrease in cell proliferation with increased levels of expression of genes linked with cell differentiation. The here-defined GEP of normal human BM monopoiesis might contribute to better understand monocytic differentiation and the identification of novel monocytic candidate markers, while also providing a frame of reference for the study of monocytic maturation in both neoplastic and non-neoplastic disease conditions involving monocytic precursor cells.

  14. Rare cause of trigeminal neuralgia: Meckel's cave meningocele.

    PubMed

    Alobaid, Abdullah; Schaeffer, Todd; Virojanapa, Justin; Dehdashti, Amir R

    2015-07-01

    The most common etiology of classic trigeminal neuralgia is vascular compression. However, other causes must be excluded. It is very unlikely that a meningocele presents with symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia. We present a rare case of a patient presenting with left trigeminal neuralgia. Thin-slice CT and MRI showed a transclival Meckel's cave meningocele. The patient underwent endoscopic repair of the meningocele, which resulted in complete resolution of her symptoms. Meckel's cave meningocele or encephalocele should be considered among the differential diagnoses of trigeminal neuralgia. Meningocele repair should be suggested as the first treatment option in this rare situation.

  15. Late results of bulbar trigeminal tractotomy

    PubMed Central

    Moffie, D.

    1971-01-01

    Re-examination of eight patients in whom bulbar trigeminal tractotomy had been performed 13 to 15 years previously showed that four had no complaints, and the other four had only very slight complaints about pain. In two patients a Spiller-Frazier operation had been performed after tractotomy, in two patients exairesis of the infraorbital or supraorbital nerve had been done. As bulbar trigeminal tractotomy is a major operation and the risk of recurrence is substantial, the indications for this type of operation have to remain very restricted. Theories to explain the recovery of sensation are discussed. It is possible that regeneration of transected fibres is responsible for the loss of analgesia. Images PMID:5571314

  16. Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias. Part 2: Paroxysmal hemicrania.

    PubMed

    Klasser, Gary D; Balasubramaniam, Ramesh

    2007-11-01

    Paroxysmal hemicrania (PH) is characterized by severe, strictly unilateral pain attacks lasting 2 to 30 minutes localized to orbital, supraorbital, and temporal areas accompanied by ipsilateral autonomic features. It represents 1 of 3 primary headaches classified as trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias. Although PH is rare, patients may present to dental offices seeking relief for their pain. It is important for oral health care providers to recognize PH and render an accurate diagnosis. This will avoid the pitfall of implementing unnecessary and inappropriate traditional dental treatments in hopes of alleviating this neurovascular pain. This is part 2 of a review on trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias and focuses on PH. Aspects of PH including epidemiology, genetics, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, classification and variants, diagnosis, medical management, and dental considerations are discussed.

  17. Trigeminal Neuralgia — A Debilitating Facial Pain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is characterised by sudden usually unilateral severe, brief, stabbing, recurrent episodes of pain in the distribution of one or more branches of the trigeminal nerve. Diagnosis is largely based on clinical history due to the current lack of objective investigations. MRI can identify those patients who have TN secondary to an underlying pathology such as multiple sclerosis. The first line medical management remains carbamazepine, with oxcarbazepine being the second choice medication. Both percutaneous techniques targeting the Gasserian ganglion and microvascular decompression can be considered effective in the management of TN. Microvascular decompression is considered to provide on average, the longest pain free period post surgery. There are a number of TN associations and support groups which provide a valued service to patients and clinicians. Due to a dearth of high quality studies in many aspects of the condition, TN requires further research to be conducted. PMID:26527120

  18. Inclusion of Cocoa as a Dietary Supplement Represses Expression of Inflammatory Proteins in Spinal Trigeminal Nucleus in Response to Chronic Trigeminal Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Cady, Ryan J.; Denson, Jennifer E.; Durham, Paul L.

    2013-01-01

    Scope Central sensitization is implicated in the pathology of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) and other types of orofacial pain. We investigated the effects of dietary cocoa on expression of proteins involved in the development of central sensitization in the spinal trigeminal nucleus (STN) in response to inflammatory stimulation of trigeminal nerves. Methods and results Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed either a control diet or an isocaloric diet consisting of 10% cocoa powder 14 days prior to bilateral injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) into the temporomandibular joint to promote prolonged activation of trigeminal ganglion neurons and glia. While dietary cocoa stimulated basal expression of GLAST and MKP-1 when compared to animals on a normal diet, cocoa suppressed basal calcitonin gene-related peptide levels in the STN. CFA-stimulated levels of protein kinase A, P2X3, P-p38, GFAP, and OX-42, whose elevated levels in the STN are implicated in central sensitization, were repressed to near control levels in animals on a cocoa enriched diet. Similarly, dietary cocoa repressed CFA-stimulated inflammatory cytokine expression. Conclusion Based on our findings, we speculate that cocoa enriched diets could be beneficial as a natural therapeutic option for TMD and other chronic orofacial pain conditions. PMID:23576361

  19. Apoptotic cell death increases with senescence in normal human dermal fibroblast cultures.

    PubMed

    Mammone, Thomas; Gan, David; Foyouzi-Youssefi, Reyhaneh

    2006-11-01

    Normal human dermal fibroblasts have a limited life-span in vitro and stop proliferation after a fixed number of cell divisions. This process by which cells stop proliferation is called senescence. Senescence is also characterized by a decrease in the total cell number. In this study, we characterized an increase in cell death in normal human dermal fibroblasts in vitro as a function of increasing cell passage. With increasing passage, human fibroblasts showed an increase in the number of dead cells and increased DNA fragmentation as determined by flow cytometry. Serial passage of human fibroblasts also resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction, represented by a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. The apoptotic markers caspase-3 and cytochrome c were both found to increase in senescent cells. These results suggest the activation of an apoptotic pathway within a population of human fibroblasts as a function of cell passage.

  20. Human Normal Bronchial Epithelial Cells: A Novel In Vitro Cell Model for Toxicity Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Haiyan; Xia, Bo; Liu, Hongya; Li, Jie; Lin, Shaolin; Li, Tiyuan; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Human normal cell-based systems are needed for drug discovery and toxicity evaluation. hTERT or viral genes transduced human cells are currently widely used for these studies, while these cells exhibited abnormal differentiation potential or response to biological and chemical signals. In this study, we established human normal bronchial epithelial cells (HNBEC) using a defined primary epithelial cell culture medium without transduction of exogenous genes. This system may involve decreased IL-1 signaling and enhanced Wnt signaling in cells. Our data demonstrated that HNBEC exhibited a normal diploid karyotype. They formed well-defined spheres in matrigel 3D culture while cancer cells (HeLa) formed disorganized aggregates. HNBEC cells possessed a normal cellular response to DNA damage and did not induce tumor formation in vivo by xenograft assays. Importantly, we assessed the potential of these cells in toxicity evaluation of the common occupational toxicants that may affect human respiratory system. Our results demonstrated that HNBEC cells are more sensitive to exposure of 10~20 nm-sized SiO2, Cr(VI) and B(a)P compared to 16HBE cells (a SV40-immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells). This study provides a novel in vitro human cells-based model for toxicity evaluation, may also be facilitating studies in basic cell biology, cancer biology and drug discovery. PMID:25861018

  1. Can pontine trigeminal T2-hyperintensity suggest herpetic etiology of trigeminal neuralgia?

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Carmela; Ugga, Lorenzo; Mazio, Federica; Capone, Elisa; D’Arco, Felice; Mankad, Kshitij; Caranci, Ferdinando; Marano, Enrico; Brunetti, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Background Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is usually classified into two different categories: idiopathic and secondary. We have investigated the frequency of brainstem pontine lesions in patients with idiopathic TN without multiple sclerosis (MS) or stroke, and their association with herpes zoster (HZ) infection. Methods Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of 28 patients with TN were retrospectively reviewed. Results We found seven patients with clinical suspicion of HZ infection and pontine T2 hyperintense lesions, associated with nerve atrophy in one case. Fifteen patients had a neurovascular conflict (NVC) without brainstem involvement, two of them associated with trigeminal atrophy, while four patients had only volumetric reduction of the nerve. In all patients MRI findings were ipsilateral to the side of TN. Conclusions Pontine T2 hyperintensities could be considered as a MRI sign of TN in patients without NVCs. This “trigeminal pontine sign” (TPS) is frequently found in association with herpetic infections. PMID:27942467

  2. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gene Expression in Normal and Diseased Human Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oronzi Scott, M.; Sylvester, J. E.; Heiman-Patterson, T.; Shi, Y.-J.; Fieles, W.; Stedman, H.; Burghes, A.; Ray, P.; Worton, R.; Fischbeck, K. H.

    1988-03-01

    A probe for the 5' end of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene was used to study expression of the gene in normal human muscle, myogenic cell cultures, and muscle from patients with DMD. Expression was found in RNA from normal fetal muscle, adult cardiac and skeletal muscle, and cultured muscle after myoblast fusion. In DMD muscle, expression of this portion of the gene was also revealed by in situ RNA hybridization, particularly in regenerating muscle fibers.

  3. Effect of resveratrol and zinc on intracellular zinc status in normal human prostate epithelial cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To evaluate the influence of resveratrol on cellular zinc status, normal human prostate epithelial (NHPrE) cells were treated with 6 levels of resveratrol (0, 0.5, 1, 2.5, 5 and 10 microM) and 4 levels of zinc [0, 4, 16, and 32 microM for zinc-deficient (ZD), zinc-normal (ZN), zinc-adequate (ZA), an...

  4. Object relations in borderlines, depressives, and normals: an examination of human responses on the Rorschach.

    PubMed

    Stuart, J; Westen, D; Lohr, N; Benjamin, J; Becker, S; Vorus, N; Silk, K

    1990-01-01

    Recently, researchers and clinicians have become increasingly interested in diagnostic distinctions between borderline and mood disorders. Object relations theory provides a useful framework for the comparison of these two overlapping diagnostic categories. In our study, a measure of object relations as represented on the Rorschach, developed by Blatt, Brenneis, Schimeck, and Glick (1976), was applied to data produced by borderline and depressive inpatients and by normal comparison subjects. Portions of the Blatt measure that tap the subject's experience of human action and interaction distinguish among the three diagnostic groups. Specifically, borderlines tend to understand human action as more highly motivated and human interaction as more malevolent in nature than do either depressive or normals. The data indicate that borderlines experience the object-relational world in a way that is fundamentally different from the way normals and depressives perceive it. Implications are discussed for theories of borderline object relations.

  5. Effect of inhaled 15-(s)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid on tracheobronchial clearance in normal human airways.

    PubMed Central

    Lai, C K; Polosa, R; Pavia, D; Hasani, A; Agnew, J E; Clarke, S W; Holgate, S T

    1991-01-01

    15-(s)-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE) is the predominant metabolite of arachidonic acid in normal and asthmatic human airways and a potent mucus secretagogue in canine and human airways. A study was carried out on the effect of inhaled 15-HETE on tracheobronchial clearance, measured for six hours by a radioaerosol technique, in 10 normal subjects. Subjects inhaled 80 nmol 15-HETE or the diluent (sodium phosphate buffer) on two occasions at least two weeks apart in a double blind and randomised fashion (20 minutes after radioaerosol inhalation. Tracheobronchial clearance after inhaled 15-HETE was almost identical to that after placebo for all measurements up to six hours. It is concluded that 15-HETE has no effect on tracheobronchial clearance in normal human airways and is unlikely to account for the impaired mucociliary clearance seen in asthma. PMID:1858085

  6. Absorption of orally administered /sup 65/Zn by normal human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Aamodt, R.L.; Rumble, W.F.; Johnston, G.S.; Markley, E.J.; Henkin, R.I.

    1981-12-01

    Despite studies by several investigators of human gastrointestinal 65Zn absorption, implications of these data for evaluation of functional zinc status are unclear because limited numbers of normal subjects have been studied. To evaluated zinc absorption in normal humans, 75 subjects (31 women, 44 men, ages 18 to 84 yr) were given 10 micro Ci carrier-free 65Zn orally after an overnight fast. Absorption calculated from total body retention measured 7, 14, and 21 days after administration of tracer was 65 +/- 11% (mean +/- 1 SD), range from 40 to 86%. Comparison of these results with those for patients with a variety of diseases indicate that patients exhibit a wider range of absorption and, in four of six studies patients exhibit decreased mean zinc absorption. These results of gastrointestinal zinc absorption in a large number of normal humans offer a basis for a clearer comparison with data from patients who exhibit abnormalities of zinc absorption.

  7. Evaluation of mesenchymal stem cell modulation of trigeminal neuronal responses to cold.

    PubMed

    Eskander, Michael A; Takimoto, Koyo; Diogenes, Anibal

    2017-09-30

    Tissue engineering protocols, such as regenerative endodontic procedures (REPs), comprise biologically based procedures designed to restore normal physiologic function. For REPs, the goal is reconstitution of the pulp-dentin complex by delivering mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), including the stem cells of the apical papilla (SCAP) into a root canal system. Many patients regain cold sensitivity after REPs, but the mechanism is not understood. We hypothesized that SCAP modulate nociceptive function through a paracrine mechanism that activates cold-sensitive ion channels in neurons. We established a co-culture system with human SCAP and rat trigeminal (TG) sensory neurons in order to determine the effect of SCAP co-culture on neuronal responses using whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology. TG neurons co-cultured with SCAP demonstrated increased TRPA1-mediated (p<0.01) and TRPM8-mediated inward current densities (p<0.01) at 24h in co-culture. Cold stimulation to SCAP significantly increased ATP release (p<0.01), and supernatant collected after cold stimulation to SCAP was able to activate cultured TG neurons. Co-culture with SCAP significantly increased sustained ATP-evoked inward current density (p<0.05). These data suggest that SCAP release trophic factors that act on afferent neurons to enhance cold-sensitive ion channel activity. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Structure and function of adenylate kinase isozymes in normal humans and muscular dystrophy patients.

    PubMed

    Hamada, M; Takenaka, H; Fukumoto, K; Fukamachi, S; Yamaguchi, T; Sumida, M; Shiosaka, T; Kurokawa, Y; Okuda, H; Kuby, S A

    1987-01-01

    Two isozymes of adenylate kinase from human Duchenne muscular dystrophy serum, one of which was an aberrant form specific to DMD patients, were separated by Blue Sepharose CL-6B affinity chromatography. The separated aberrant form possessed a molecular weight of 98,000 +/- 1,500, whereas the normal serum isozyme had a weight of 87,000 +/- 1,600, as determined by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, gel filtration, and sedimentation equilibrium. The sedimentation coefficients were 5.8 S and 5.6 S for the aberrant form and the normal form, respectively. Both serum isozymes are tetramers. The subunit size of the aberrant isozyme (Mr = 24,700) was very similar to that of the normal human liver isozyme, and the subunit size of the normal isozyme (Mr = 21,700) was very similar to that of the normal human muscle enzyme. The amino acid composition of the normal serum isozyme was similar to that of the muscle-type enzyme, and that of the aberrant isozyme was similar to that of the liver enzyme, with some exceptions in both cases.

  9. Magnetic measurements on human erythrocytes: Normal, beta thalassemia major, and sickle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhnini, Lama

    2003-05-01

    In this article magnetic measurements were made on human erythrocytes at different hemoglobin states (normal and reduced hemoglobin). Different blood samples: normal, beta thalassemia major, and sickle were studied. Beta thalassemia major and sickle samples were taken from patients receiving lifelong blood transfusion treatment. All samples examined exhibited diamagnetic behavior. Beta thalassemia major and sickle samples showed higher diamagnetic susceptibilities than that for the normal, which was attributed to the increase of membrane to hemoglobin volume ratio of the abnormal cells. Magnetic measurements showed that the erythrocytes in the reduced state showed less diamagnetic response in comparison with erythrocytes in the normal state. Analysis of the paramagnetic component of magnetization curves gave an effective magnetic moment of μeff=7.6 μB per reduced hemoglobin molecule. The same procedure was applied to sickle and beta thalassemia major samples and values for μeff were found to be comparable to that of the normal erythrocytes.

  10. Normalization of human RNA-seq experiments using chimpanzee RNA as a spike-in standard.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hannah; Hahn, Yoonsoo; Park, Sang-Ryoul; Chung, Sun-Ku; Jeong, Sangkyun; Yang, Inchul

    2016-08-24

    Normalization of human RNA-seq experiments employing chimpanzee RNA as a spike-in standard is reported. Human and chimpanzee RNAs exhibit single nucleotide variations (SNVs) in average 210-bp intervals. Spike-in chimpanzee RNA would behave the same as the human counterparts during the whole NGS procedures owing to the high sequence similarity. After discrimination of species origins of the NGS reads based on SNVs, the chimpanzee reads were used to read-by-read normalize biases and variations of human reads. By this approach, as many as 10,119 transcripts were simultaneously normalized for the entire NGS procedures leading to accurate and reproducible quantification of differential gene expression. In addition, incomparable data sets from different in-process degradations or from different library preparation methods were made well comparable by the normalization. Based on these results, we expect that the normalization approaches using near neighbor genomes as internal standards could be employed as a standard protocol, which will improve both accuracy and comparability of NGS results across different sample batches, laboratories and NGS platforms.

  11. The effect of methylprednisolone on intracellular calcium of normal and dystrophic human skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Vandebrouck, C; Imbert, N; Duport, G; Cognard, C; Raymond, G

    1999-07-09

    Clinical trials have shown that a glucocorticoid, the methyiprednisolone (PDN), has a beneficial effect on muscle strength and function in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients. The aim of this study was to test if the effect of PDN could be mediated via a possible action on intracellular calcium. The intracellular calcium activity, at rest and during calcium mobilizing drug superfusion protocols was recorded in normal and dystrophic human cocultured muscle cells. PDN (10 microM) pretreatment induced an elevation of the resting calcium concentration of 51, 34 and 38% in proliferating normal myoblasts, DMD myoblasts and DMD myotubes, respectively, while normal myotubes resting [Ca2+]i was not altered.

  12. High field magnetic resonance imaging of normal and pathologic human medulla oblongata.

    PubMed

    Vandersteen, M; Beuls, E; Gelan, J; Adriaensens, P; Vanormelingen, L; Palmers, Y; Freling, G

    1994-02-01

    High field proton magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been applied to depict the MR appearance of the normal excised human cervicomedullary junction, based on which neuropathologic specimens can be described. More specifically, two normal cases and one case of Chiari deformity were imaged in the transverse, sagittal, and coronal dimensions using a 9.4 Tesla vertical bore magnet. The MR images of the normal specimens reveal most of the neuroanatomical microstructures described in literature. An accurate description of the Chiari deformity could be made by comparing the MR reference images with those of the pathologic specimen. All MR detected abnormalities were confirmed by histopathology, by which no additional lesions could be found.

  13. Spectral discrimination between normal and leukemic human sera using delayed luminescence.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Jing-Ting; Bai, Hua; Tang, Guo-Qing; Lin, Lie

    2012-08-01

    In this work, photoinduced delayed luminescence (DL) was used to distinguish serum samples of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia from those of healthy volunteers. DL decay kinetics of human serum samples was measured using a homebuilt ultraweak luminescence detection system. It was found a significant difference in the weight distribution of the decay rate between normal and leukemic serum samples. A comparison of the DL kinetics parameters including the initial intensity, the peak decay rate, and the peak weight value was used in making discrimination between normal and leukemic human sera. Results in this work contribute to the development of a novel optical method for the early diagnosis of leukemia.

  14. Spectral discrimination between normal and leukemic human sera using delayed luminescence

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ping; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Jing-Ting; Bai, Hua; Tang, Guo-Qing; Lin, Lie

    2012-01-01

    In this work, photoinduced delayed luminescence (DL) was used to distinguish serum samples of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia from those of healthy volunteers. DL decay kinetics of human serum samples was measured using a homebuilt ultraweak luminescence detection system. It was found a significant difference in the weight distribution of the decay rate between normal and leukemic serum samples. A comparison of the DL kinetics parameters including the initial intensity, the peak decay rate, and the peak weight value was used in making discrimination between normal and leukemic human sera. Results in this work contribute to the development of a novel optical method for the early diagnosis of leukemia. PMID:22876344

  15. Deep sequencing as a probe of normal stem cell fate and preneoplasia in human epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Benjamin D.

    2016-01-01

    Using deep sequencing technology, methods based on the sporadic acquisition of somatic DNA mutations in human tissues have been used to trace the clonal evolution of progenitor cells in diseased states. However, the potential of these approaches to explore cell fate behavior of normal tissues and the initiation of preneoplasia remain underexploited. Focusing on the results of a recent deep sequencing study of eyelid epidermis, we show that the quantitative analysis of mutant clone size provides a general method to resolve the pattern of normal stem cell fate and to detect and characterize the mutational signature of rare field transformations in human tissues, with implications for the early detection of preneoplasia. PMID:26699486

  16. Deep sequencing as a probe of normal stem cell fate and preneoplasia in human epidermis.

    PubMed

    Simons, Benjamin D

    2016-01-05

    Using deep sequencing technology, methods based on the sporadic acquisition of somatic DNA mutations in human tissues have been used to trace the clonal evolution of progenitor cells in diseased states. However, the potential of these approaches to explore cell fate behavior of normal tissues and the initiation of preneoplasia remain underexploited. Focusing on the results of a recent deep sequencing study of eyelid epidermis, we show that the quantitative analysis of mutant clone size provides a general method to resolve the pattern of normal stem cell fate and to detect and characterize the mutational signature of rare field transformations in human tissues, with implications for the early detection of preneoplasia.

  17. Tumour and normal tissue radiobiology in mouse models: how close are mice to mini-humans?

    PubMed

    Koontz, Bridget F; Verhaegen, Frank; De Ruysscher, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    Animal modelling is essential to the study of radiobiology and the advancement of clinical radiation oncology by providing preclinical data. Mouse models in particular have been highly utilized in the study of both tumour and normal tissue radiobiology because of their cost effectiveness and versatility. Technology has significantly advanced in preclinical radiation techniques to allow highly conformal image-guided irradiation of small animals in an effort to mimic human treatment capabilities. However, the biological and physical limitations of animal modelling should be recognized and considered when interpreting preclinical radiotherapy (RT) studies. Murine tumour and normal tissue radioresponse has been shown to vary from human cellular and molecular pathways. Small animal irradiation techniques utilize different anatomical boundaries and may have different physical properties than human RT. This review addresses the difference between the human condition and mouse models and discusses possible strategies for future refinement of murine models of cancer and radiation for the benefit of both basic radiobiology and clinical translation.

  18. Differential gene expression in normal and transformed human mammary epithelial cells in response to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Diego F; Sha, Wei; Hower, Valerie; Blekherman, Greg; Laubenbacher, Reinhard; Akman, Steven; Torti, Suzy V; Shulaev, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a key role in breast carcinogenesis. To investigate whether normal and malignant breast epithelial cells differ in their responses to oxidative stress, we examined the global gene expression profiles of three cell types, representing cancer progression from a normal to a malignant stage, under oxidative stress. Normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), an immortalized cell line (HMLER-1), and a tumorigenic cell line (HMLER-5), were exposed to increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by treatment with glucose oxidase. Functional analysis of the metabolic pathways enriched with differentially expressed genes demonstrates that normal and malignant breast epithelial cells diverge substantially in their response to oxidative stress. While normal cells exhibit the up-regulation of antioxidant mechanisms, cancer cells are unresponsive to the ROS insult. However, the gene expression response of normal HMEC cells under oxidative stress is comparable to that of the malignant cells under normal conditions, indicating that altered redox status is persistent in breast cancer cells, which makes them resistant to increased generation of ROS. This study discusses some of the possible adaptation mechanisms of breast cancer cells under persistent oxidative stress that differentiate them from the response to acute oxidative stress in normal mammary epithelial cells. PMID:21397008

  19. BACE1 and BACE2 in pathologic and normal human muscle.

    PubMed

    Vattemi, Gaetano; Engel, W King; McFerrin, Janis; Pastorino, Lucia; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Askanas, Valerie

    2003-02-01

    BACE1 and BACE2 are recently discovered enzymes participating in processing of amyloid beta precursor protein (AbetaPP). Their discovery is contributing importantly to understanding the mechanism of amyloid-beta generation, and hence the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Sporadic inclusion-body myositis (s-IBM) and hereditary inclusion-body myopathy (h-IBM) are progressive muscle diseases in which overproduction of AbetaPP and accumulation of its presumably toxic proteolytic product amyloid-beta (Abeta) in abnormal muscle fibers appear to play an important upstream role in the pathogenic cascade. In normal human muscle AbetaPP was also shown to be present and presumably playing a role (a) at neuromuscular junctions and (b) during muscle development. To investigate whether BACE1 and BACE2 play a role in normal and diseased human muscle, we have now studied them by immunocytochemistry and immunoblotting in 35 human muscle biopsies, including: 5 s-IBM; 5 chromosome-9p1-linked quadriceps-sparing h-IBM; and 25 control muscle biopsies. In addition, expression of BACE1 and BACE2 was studied in normal cultured human muscle. Our studies demonstrate that BACE1 and BACE2 (a) are expressed in normal adult muscle at the postsynaptic domain of neuromuscular junctions, and in cultured human muscle; (b) are accumulated in the form of plaque-like inclusions in both s-IBM and h-IBM vacuolated muscle fibers; and (c) are immunoreactive in necrotizing muscle fibers. Accordingly, BACE1 and BACE2 participate in normal and abnormal processes of human muscle, suggesting that their functions are broader than previously thought.

  20. Precise cannulation of the foramen ovale in trigeminal neuralgia complicating osteogenesis imperfecta with basilar invagination: technical case report.

    PubMed

    Hajioff, D; Dorward, N L; Wadley, J P; Crockard, H A; Palmer, J D

    2000-04-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a rare feature of basilar invagination, which is itself a complication of osteochondrodysplastic disorders. Microvascular decompression is an unattractive option in medically refractory cases. The conventional percutaneous approach to the trigeminal ganglion is anatomically impossible because the foramen ovale points inferiorly and posteromedially. We report a new technique for image-guided trigeminal injection in a patient with basilar invagination complicating osteogenesis imperfecta. A 26-year-old woman with osteogenesis imperfecta presented with a 3-year history of typical left maxillary division trigeminal neuralgia, which was poorly controlled by carbamazepine at the maximum tolerated dose. She had obvious cranial deformities, left optic atrophy, delayed left eye closure, tongue atrophy, but normal facial sensation and corneal reflexes. A computed tomographic scan and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed severe basilar invagination. Frameless stereotactic glycerol injection of the left trigeminal ganglion was performed under general anesthesia using the infrared-based EasyGuide Neuro system (Philips Medical Systems, Best, The Netherlands) with magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomographic registration. The displaced and distorted left foramen ovale was cannulated via a true frameless stereotactic method with the trajectory determined by virtual pointer elongation. The needle placement was confirmed with injection of contrast medium into the trigeminal cistern. The path needed to enter the foramen traversed the right cheek, soft palate, and left tonsil. The patient went home pain-free with a preserved corneal reflex and no complications. Frameless stereotaxy allows customization to individual patient anatomy and may be adapted to a variety of percutaneous procedures used in areas where the anatomy is complex.

  1. Distinct p53 genomic binding patterns in normal and cancer-derived human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Botcheva K.; McCorkle S. R.; McCombie W. R.; Dunn J. J.; Anderson C. W.

    2011-12-15

    We report here genome-wide analysis of the tumor suppressor p53 binding sites in normal human cells. 743 high-confidence ChIP-seq peaks representing putative genomic binding sites were identified in normal IMR90 fibroblasts using a reference chromatin sample. More than 40% were located within 2 kb of a transcription start site (TSS), a distribution similar to that documented for individually studied, functional p53 binding sites and, to date, not observed by previous p53 genome-wide studies. Nearly half of the high-confidence binding sites in the IMR90 cells reside in CpG islands, in marked contrast to sites reported in cancer-derived cells. The distinct genomic features of the IMR90 binding sites do not reflect a distinct preference for specific sequences, since the de novo developed p53 motif based on our study is similar to those reported by genome-wide studies of cancer cells. More likely, the different chromatin landscape in normal, compared with cancer-derived cells, influences p53 binding via modulating availability of the sites. We compared the IMR90 ChIPseq peaks to the recently published IMR90 methylome1 and demonstrated that they are enriched at hypomethylated DNA. Our study represents the first genome-wide, de novo mapping of p53 binding sites in normal human cells and reveals that p53 binding sites reside in distinct genomic landscapes in normal and cancer-derived human cells.

  2. Modeling normal and malignant human hematopoiesis in vivo through newborn NSG xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Fumihiko

    2013-12-01

    Various strains of immune-compromised mice have been developed to investigate human normal and malignant stem cells in vivo. NOD/SCID mice harboring complete null mutation of Il2rg (NSG mice) lack T cells, B cells, and NK cells, and support high levels of engraftment by human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells (CB HSCs) and acute myeloid leukemia stem cells (AML LSCs). In addition to achieving high levels of human hematopoietic cell engraftment, use of newborn NSG mice as recipients has enabled the investigation into how human CB HSCs generate mature immune subsets in vivo. Moreover, through establishing an in vivo model of human primary AML by xenotransplantation of human LSCs into newborn NSG mice, functional properties of human AML such as cell cycle, location, and self-renewal capacity can be examined in vivo. Newborn NSG xenogeneic transplantation model may facilitate the understanding of human normal and malignant hematopoiesis and contribute to the development of novel therapies against hematologic diseases.

  3. A review of cavernous malformations with trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Kazuhide; Hasegawa, Mitsuhiro; Hayashi, Takuro; Nagahisa, Shinya; Hirose, Yuichi

    2014-10-01

    Cavernous malformation with trigeminal neuralgia is relatively rare; only 10 cases have been reported. In deciding treatment strategies, it is helpful to classify cavernous malformation according to its origin, as follows: in the Gasserian ganglion (Type G); between the cisternal and intra-axial portions of the trigeminal nerve root (Type C); in the intra-axial trigeminal nerve root in the pons (Type P); or in the spinal tract of the trigeminal nerve root (Type S). A 62-year-old male presented with left trigeminal neuralgia (V2 area) and left facial hypoesthesia. Imaging studies revealed a cerebellopontine angle mass lesion with characteristics of a cavernous malformation and evidence of hemorrhage. The lesion was completely removed via a left anterior transpetrosal approach. The mass was attached to the trigeminal nerve root; it was located between the cisternal and intra-axial portions of the nerve root, and feeding off microvessels from the trigeminal nerve vascular plexus. Histological examination confirmed a cavernous malformation. In this case, the cavernous malformation was Type C. We review cases of cavernous malformation with trigeminal neuralgia and discuss therapeutic strategies according to the area of origin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Meckel's cave epidermoid with trigeminal neuralgia: CT findings.

    PubMed

    Kapila, A; Steinbaum, S; Chakeres, D W

    1984-12-01

    An epidermoid tumor of Meckel's cave was found in a middle-aged woman with trigeminal neuralgia. On CT the lesion had negative attenuation numbers of fat and extended from an expanded Meckel's cave through the porous trigeminus into the ambient and cerebellopontine angle cisterns. Surgical excision provided relief of the patient's trigeminal neuralgia.

  5. Dopamine D2 receptor expression in the corticotroph cells of the human normal pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Pivonello, Rosario; Waaijers, Marlijn; Kros, Johan M; Pivonello, Claudia; de Angelis, Cristina; Cozzolino, Alessia; Colao, Annamaria; Lamberts, Steven W J; Hofland, Leo J

    2017-08-01

    The dopamine D2 receptor is the main dopamine receptor expressed in the human normal pituitary gland. The aim of the current study was to evaluate dopamine D2 receptor expression in the corticotroph cell populations of the anterior lobe and pars intermedia, as well as posterior lobe of the human normal pituitary gland by immunohistochemistry. Human normal pituitary gland samples obtained from routine autopsies were used for the study. In all cases, histology together with immunostaining for adrenocorticotropic hormone, melanocyte-stimulating hormone, prolactin, and neurofilaments were performed and compared to the immunostaining for D2 receptor. D2 receptor was heterogeneously expressed in the majority of the cell populations of the anterior and posterior lobe as well as in the area localized between the anterior and posterior lobe, and arbitrary defined as "intermediate zone". This zone, characterized by the presence of nerve fibers included the residual pars intermedia represented by the colloid-filled cysts lined by the remnant melanotroph cells strongly expressing D2 receptors, and clusters of corticotroph cells, belonging to the anterior lobe but localized within the cysts and adjacent to the posterior lobe, variably expressing D2 receptors. D2 dopamine receptor is expressed in the majority of the cell populations of the human normal pituitary gland, and particularly, in the different corticotroph cell populations localized in the anterior lobe and the intermediate zone of the pituitary gland.

  6. Assessing the Toxicities of Regulated and Unregulated Disinfection By-products in Normal Human Colon Cells.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presence of over six hundred disinfection by-products (DBPs) and less than half of the total organic halides present in finished water has created a need for short-term in vitro assays to address toxicities that might be associated with human exposure. . We are using a normal...

  7. Exogenous normal mammary epithelial mitochondria suppress glycolytic metabolism and glucose uptake of human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xian-Peng; Elliott, Robert L; Head, Jonathan F

    2015-10-01

    We hypothesized that normal mitochondria inhibited cancer cell proliferation and increased drug sensitivity by the mechanism of suppression of cancer aerobic glycolysis. To demonstrate the mechanism, we used real-time PCR and glycolysis cell-based assay to measure gene expression of glycolytic enzymes and glucose transporters, and extracellular lactate production of human breast cancer cells. We found that isolated fluorescent probe-stained mitochondria of MCF-12A (human mammary epithelia) could enter into human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7, T47D, and MDA-MB-231, confirmed by fluorescent and confocal microscopy. Mitochondria from the untransformed human mammary epithelia increased drug sensitivity of MCF-7 cells to paclitaxel. Real-time PCR showed that exogenous normal mitochondria of MCF-12A suppressed gene expression of glycolytic enzymes, lactate dehydrogenase A, and glucose transporter 1 and 3 of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Glycolysis cell-based assay revealed that normal mitochondria significantly suppressed lactate production in culture media of MCF-7, T47D, and MDA-MB-231 cells. In conclusion, normal mitochondria suppress cancer proliferation and increase drug sensitivity by the mechanism of inhibition of cancer cell glycolysis and glucose uptake.

  8. Looking at Images with Human Figures: Comparison between Autistic and Normal Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Geest, J. N.; Kemner, C.; Camfferman, G.; Verbaten, M. N.; van Engeland, H.

    2002-01-01

    In this study, the looking behavior of 16 autistic and 14 non-autistic children toward cartoon-like scenes that included a human figure was measured quantitatively using an infrared eye-tracking device. Fixation behavior of autistic children was similar to that of their age-and IQ-matched normal peers. Results do not support the idea that autistic…

  9. Characterization of human retinal vessel arborisation in normal and amblyopic eyes using multifractal analysis.

    PubMed

    Tălu, Stefan; Vlăduţiu, Cristina; Lupaşcu, Carmen A

    2015-01-01

    To characterize the human retinal vessel arborisation in normal and amblyopic eyes using multifractal geometry and lacunarity parameters. Multifractal analysis using a box counting algorithm was carried out for a set of 12 segmented and skeletonized human retinal images, corresponding to both normal (6 images) and amblyopia states of the retina (6 images). It was found that the microvascular geometry of the human retina network represents geometrical multifractals, characterized through subsets of regions having different scaling properties that are not evident in the fractal analysis. Multifractal analysis of the amblyopia images (segmented and skeletonized versions) show a higher average of the generalized dimensions (Dq ) for q=0, 1, 2 indicating a higher degree of the tree-dimensional complexity associated with the human retinal microvasculature network whereas images of healthy subjects show a lower value of generalized dimensions indicating normal complexity of biostructure. On the other hand, the lacunarity analysis of the amblyopia images (segmented and skeletonized versions) show a lower average of the lacunarity parameter Λ than the corresponding values for normal images (segmented and skeletonized versions). The multifractal and lacunarity analysis may be used as a non-invasive predictive complementary tool to distinguish amblyopic subjects from healthy subjects and hence this technique could be used for an early diagnosis of patients with amblyopia.

  10. Characterization of human retinal vessel arborisation in normal and amblyopic eyes using multifractal analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tălu, Stefan; Vlăduţiu, Cristina; Lupaşcu, Carmen A.

    2015-01-01

    AIM To characterize the human retinal vessel arborisation in normal and amblyopic eyes using multifractal geometry and lacunarity parameters. METHODS Multifractal analysis using a box counting algorithm was carried out for a set of 12 segmented and skeletonized human retinal images, corresponding to both normal (6 images) and amblyopia states of the retina (6 images). RESULTS It was found that the microvascular geometry of the human retina network represents geometrical multifractals, characterized through subsets of regions having different scaling properties that are not evident in the fractal analysis. Multifractal analysis of the amblyopia images (segmented and skeletonized versions) show a higher average of the generalized dimensions (Dq) for q=0, 1, 2 indicating a higher degree of the tree-dimensional complexity associated with the human retinal microvasculature network whereas images of healthy subjects show a lower value of generalized dimensions indicating normal complexity of biostructure. On the other hand, the lacunarity analysis of the amblyopia images (segmented and skeletonized versions) show a lower average of the lacunarity parameter Λ than the corresponding values for normal images (segmented and skeletonized versions). CONCLUSION The multifractal and lacunarity analysis may be used as a non-invasive predictive complementary tool to distinguish amblyopic subjects from healthy subjects and hence this technique could be used for an early diagnosis of patients with amblyopia. PMID:26558216

  11. Assessing the Toxicities of Regulated and Unregulated Disinfection By-products in Normal Human Colon Cells.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presence of over six hundred disinfection by-products (DBPs) and less than half of the total organic halides present in finished water has created a need for short-term in vitro assays to address toxicities that might be associated with human exposure. . We are using a normal...

  12. Imaging of matrix-disorder in normal and pathological human dermis using nonlinear optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin; Xie, Shusen; Zheng, Liqin; Jiang, Xingshan

    2009-11-01

    In dermis, collagen and elastin are important structural proteins of extracellular maxtrix. The matrix-disorder is associated with various physiologic processes, such as localized scleroderma, anetoderma, photoaging. In this work, we demonstrate the capability of nonlinear optical microscopy in imaging structural proteins in normal and pathological human dermis.

  13. Looking at Images with Human Figures: Comparison between Autistic and Normal Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Geest, J. N.; Kemner, C.; Camfferman, G.; Verbaten, M. N.; van Engeland, H.

    2002-01-01

    In this study, the looking behavior of 16 autistic and 14 non-autistic children toward cartoon-like scenes that included a human figure was measured quantitatively using an infrared eye-tracking device. Fixation behavior of autistic children was similar to that of their age-and IQ-matched normal peers. Results do not support the idea that autistic…

  14. Identification of normal and cancerous human colorectal muscularis propria by multiphoton microscopy in different sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yi; Chen, Zhifen; Kang, Deyong; li, Lianhuang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Guan, Guoxian; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) as a potential diagnostic tool is attractive. MPM can effectively provide information about morphological and biochemical changes in biological tissues at the molecular level. In this paper, we attempt to identify normal and cancerous human colorectal muscularis propria by multiphoton microscopy in different sections (both in transverse and longitudinal sections). The results show that MPM can display different microstructure changes in the transverse and longitudinal sections of colorectal muscularis propria. MPM also can quantitatively describe the alteration of collagen content between normal and cancerous muscle layers. These are important pathological findings that MPM images can bring more detailed complementary information about tissue architecture and cell morphology through observing the transverse and longitudinal sections of colorectal muscularis propria. This work demonstrates that MPM can be better for identifying the microstructural characteristics of normal and cancerous human colorectal muscularis propria in different sections.

  15. Insulin binding properties of normal and transformed human epidermal cultured keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Verrando, P.; Ortonne, J.P.

    1985-10-01

    Insulin binding to its receptors was studied in cultured normal and transformed (A431 line) human epidermal keratinocytes. The specific binding was a temperature-dependent, saturable process. Normal keratinocytes possess a mean value of about 80,000 receptors per cell. Fifteen hours exposure of the cells to insulin lowered their receptor number (about 65% loss in available sites); these reappeared when the hormone was removed from the culture medium. In the A431 epidermoid carcinoma cell line, there is a net decrease in insulin binding (84% of the initial bound/free hormone ratio in comparison with normal cells) essentially related to a loss in receptor affinity for insulin. Thus, cultured human keratinocytes which express insulin receptors may be a useful tool in understanding skin pathology related to insulin disorders.

  16. Cdx2 modulates proliferation in normal human intestinal epithelial crypt cells

    SciTech Connect

    Escaffit, Fabrice; Pare, Frederic; Gauthier, Remy; Rivard, Nathalie; Boudreau, Francois; Beaulieu, Jean-Francois . E-mail: Jean-Francois.Beaulieu@USherbrooke.ca

    2006-03-31

    The homeobox gene Cdx2 is involved in the regulation of the expression of intestine specific markers such as sucrase-isomaltase and lactase-phlorizin hydrolase. Previous studies performed with immortalized or transformed intestinal cell lines have provided evidence that Cdx2 can promote morphological and functional differentiation in these experimental models. However, no data exist concerning the implication of this factor in normal human intestinal cell physiology. In the present work, we have investigated the role of Cdx2 in normal human intestinal epithelial crypt (HIEC) cells that lack this transcription factor. The establishment of HIEC cells expressing Cdx2 in an inducible manner shows that forced expression of Cdx2 significantly alters the proliferation of intestinal crypt cells and stimulates dipeptidylpeptidase IV expression but is not sufficient to trigger intestinal terminal differentiation. These observations suggest that Cdx2 requires additional factors to activate the enterocyte differentiation program in normal undifferentiated cells.

  17. Detection of interleukin-8 in exudates from normal and inflamed human dental pulp tissues.

    PubMed

    Guo, X; Niu, Z; Xiao, M; Yue, L; Lu, H

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the level of IL-8 in exudates clinically obtained from normal and inflamed human dental pulp tissues so as to reveal the possible relationship between IL-8 and pulpitis. Samples of 2 microliters of pulpal exudate from each normal or clinically diagnosed as acute or chronic pulpitis teeth was obtained by filter paper strips and IL-8 level was measured by ELISA method. No IL-8 was detected in the samples from normal pulp, but significant amount of IL-8 appeared in inflamed pulp tissues, and the level of IL-8 in exudates of acute stage of pulpitis was higher than that of chronic stage (P < 0.01). This study demonstrates that IL-8 is produced and accumulated in pulp inflammation and may play a role in the occurrence and development of human pulpitis.

  18. Glucagon-like-peptide-1 receptor expression in normal and diseased human thyroid and pancreas.

    PubMed

    Waser, Beatrice; Blank, Annika; Karamitopoulou, Eva; Perren, Aurel; Reubi, Jean C

    2015-03-01

    Glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP1) analogs may induce thyroid or pancreatic diseases in animals, raising questions about their use in diabetic patients. There is, however, controversy regarding expression of GLP1 receptors (GLP1R) in human normal and diseased thyroid and pancreas. Here, 221 human thyroid and pancreas samples were analyzed for GLP1R immunohistochemistry and compared with quantitative in vitro GLP1R autoradiography. Neither normal nor hyperplastic human thyroids containing parafollicular C cells express GLP1R with either method. Papillary thyroid cancer do not, and medullary thyroid carcinomas rarely express GLP1R. Insulin- and somatostatin-producing cells in the normal pancreas express a high density of GLP1R, whereas acinar cells express them in low amounts. Ductal epithelial cells do not express GLP1R. All benign insulinomas express high densities of GLP1R, whereas malignant insulinomas rarely express them. All ductal pancreatic carcinomas are GLP1R negative, whereas 6/20 PanIN 1/2 and 0/12 PanIN 3 express GLP1R. Therefore, normal thyroid, including normal and hyperplastic C cells, or papillary thyroid cancer are not targets for GLP1 analogs in humans. Conversely, all pancreatic insulin- and somatostatin-producing cells are physiological GLP1 targets, as well as most acini. As normal ductal epithelial cells or PanIN 3 or ductal pancreatic carcinomas do not express GLP1R, it seems unlikely that GLP1R is related to neoplastic transformation in pancreas. GLP1R-positive medullary thyroid carcinomas and all benign insulinomas are candidates for in vivo GLP1R targeting.

  19. Genome-wide quantification of rare somatic mutations in normal human tissues using massively parallel sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Margaret L.; Kinde, Isaac; Tomasetti, Cristian; McMahon, K. Wyatt; Rosenquist, Thomas A.; Grollman, Arthur P.; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert; Papadopoulos, Nickolas

    2016-01-01

    We present the bottleneck sequencing system (BotSeqS), a next-generation sequencing method that simultaneously quantifies rare somatic point mutations across the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. BotSeqS combines molecular barcoding with a simple dilution step immediately before library amplification. We use BotSeqS to show age- and tissue-dependent accumulations of rare mutations and demonstrate that somatic mutational burden in normal human tissues can vary by several orders of magnitude, depending on biologic and environmental factors. We further show major differences between the mutational patterns of the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes in normal tissues. Lastly, the mutation spectra of normal tissues were different from each other, but similar to those of the cancers that arose in them. This technology can provide insights into the number and nature of genetic alterations in normal tissues and can be used to address a variety of fundamental questions about the genomes of diseased tissues. PMID:27528664

  20. Enophthalmos and Hemifacial Skeletal Atrophy After Trigeminal Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Satchi, Khami; McNab, Alan A

    2016-01-18

    A 60-year-old woman presented with several years increasing right upper eyelid ptosis. She had undergone surgical decompression of the right trigeminal nerve in the posterior cranial fossa 15 years earlier for trigeminal neuralgia. This left her with permanent numbness in the second and third divisions of the trigeminal nerve. In addition to the ptosis, she was found to have right enophthalmos and a smaller right face. CT scans showed a smaller midfacial skeleton on the right and a depressed orbital floor. The changes were different to those seen in silent sinus syndrome. Photographs taken over many years showed the facial changes were acquired and came on gradually many years after the trigeminal nerve injury. It is possible that trigeminal nerve injury may lead to trophic changes in the facial skeleton, but these have not been previously reported.

  1. On the Normal Force Mechanotransduction of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahabikashi, Amir; Wang, Qiuyun; Wilson, James; Wu, Qianhong; Vucbmss Team

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we report a cellular biomechanics study to examine the normal force mechanotransduction of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVECs) with their implications on hypertension. Endothelial cells sense mechanical forces and adjust their structure and function accordingly. The mechanotransduction of normal forces plays a vital role in hypertension due to the higher pressure buildup inside blood vessels. Herein, HUVECs were cultured to full confluency and then exposed to different mechanical loadings using a novel microfluidic flow chamber. One various pressure levels while keeps the shear stress constant inside the flow chamber. Three groups of cells were examined, the control group (neither shear nor normal stresses), the normal pressure group (10 dyne/cm2 of shear stress and 95 mmHg of pressure), and the hypertensive group (10 dyne/cm2 of shear stress and 142 mmHg of pressure). Cellular response characterized by RT-PCR method indicates that, COX-2 expressed under normal pressure but not high pressure; Mn-SOD expressed under both normal and high pressure while this response was stronger for normal pressure; FOS and e-NOS did not respond under any condition. The differential behavior of COX-2 and Mn-SOD in response to changes in pressure, is instrumental for better understanding the pathogenesis of hypertensive cardiovascular diseases. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation under Award #1511096.

  2. Molecular mechanisms for the p38-induced cellular senescence in normal human fibroblast.

    PubMed

    Harada, Gakuro; Neng, Qian; Fujiki, Tsukasa; Katakura, Yoshinori

    2014-11-01

    We previously reported that TAK1, one of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases (MAP3Ks), represses the transcription of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene in human cancer cells and induces cellular senescence in normal diploid human cells. On the basis of these results, we presumed a link between hTERT repression and the induction of cellular senescence. In this study, we identified the MAPK p38 as a downstream mediator of TAK1, which represses hTERT transcription. Further, we observed that hTERT expression was repressed in senescent normal human fibroblast, and was attenuated on treatment with SB203580, a p38-specific inhibitor, which suggests that p38 represses hTERT expression during cellular senescence. Next, we demonstrated that repression of hTERT, irrespective of the activation status of p38, is important for the induction of cellular senescence, by using hTERT-overexpressing cells and hTERT-knockdown cells. Our results suggested that p38 is activated during the serial passagings of normal human fibroblast, which results in the repression of hTERT transcription and induction of cellular senescence. © The Authors 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Normalized Metadata Generation for Human Retrieval Using Multiple Video Surveillance Cameras

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jaehoon; Yoon, Inhye; Lee, Seungwon; Paik, Joonki

    2016-01-01

    Since it is impossible for surveillance personnel to keep monitoring videos from a multiple camera-based surveillance system, an efficient technique is needed to help recognize important situations by retrieving the metadata of an object-of-interest. In a multiple camera-based surveillance system, an object detected in a camera has a different shape in another camera, which is a critical issue of wide-range, real-time surveillance systems. In order to address the problem, this paper presents an object retrieval method by extracting the normalized metadata of an object-of-interest from multiple, heterogeneous cameras. The proposed metadata generation algorithm consists of three steps: (i) generation of a three-dimensional (3D) human model; (ii) human object-based automatic scene calibration; and (iii) metadata generation. More specifically, an appropriately-generated 3D human model provides the foot-to-head direction information that is used as the input of the automatic calibration of each camera. The normalized object information is used to retrieve an object-of-interest in a wide-range, multiple-camera surveillance system in the form of metadata. Experimental results show that the 3D human model matches the ground truth, and automatic calibration-based normalization of metadata enables a successful retrieval and tracking of a human object in the multiple-camera video surveillance system. PMID:27347961

  4. Normalized Metadata Generation for Human Retrieval Using Multiple Video Surveillance Cameras.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaehoon; Yoon, Inhye; Lee, Seungwon; Paik, Joonki

    2016-06-24

    Since it is impossible for surveillance personnel to keep monitoring videos from a multiple camera-based surveillance system, an efficient technique is needed to help recognize important situations by retrieving the metadata of an object-of-interest. In a multiple camera-based surveillance system, an object detected in a camera has a different shape in another camera, which is a critical issue of wide-range, real-time surveillance systems. In order to address the problem, this paper presents an object retrieval method by extracting the normalized metadata of an object-of-interest from multiple, heterogeneous cameras. The proposed metadata generation algorithm consists of three steps: (i) generation of a three-dimensional (3D) human model; (ii) human object-based automatic scene calibration; and (iii) metadata generation. More specifically, an appropriately-generated 3D human model provides the foot-to-head direction information that is used as the input of the automatic calibration of each camera. The normalized object information is used to retrieve an object-of-interest in a wide-range, multiple-camera surveillance system in the form of metadata. Experimental results show that the 3D human model matches the ground truth, and automatic calibration-based normalization of metadata enables a successful retrieval and tracking of a human object in the multiple-camera video surveillance system.

  5. Staphylococci of the normal human skin flora. Variety of biotypes and antibiograms without direct correlations.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, A A

    1978-05-31

    352 strains of Staphylococci of the normal human skin flora were sampled from one volunteer by single scrabbing in a ca. 3 cm2 measuring area. They were biotyped by the scheme of Pelzer et al.(1973)--a modified Baird-Parker-Scheme (1963)--and the resistance to antibiotics was investigated by the method of Bauer et al. (1966). All the nine biotypes of Staphylococci were found in variable quantities. It seems problematic to call one biotype as the main type. Morphologically identical colonies of Staphylococci from the indigenous flora of the human skin were not identical in their biotypes as previously described by Pelzer (1976). Only the investigation of all Staphylococci colonies from the culture plate can evaluate all biotypes of Staphylococci of the normal human skin flora, and can give the right quantitative correlation. Staphylococci were found to be sensitive and resistant up to four antibiotics, and one biotype did not show one type of antibiogram.

  6. Endothelin-1 and endothelin receptor mRNA expression in normal and atherosclerotic human arteries.

    PubMed

    Winkles, J A; Alberts, G F; Brogi, E; Libby, P

    1993-03-31

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a potent vasoconstrictor peptide implicated in a number of human diseases including atherosclerosis. ET-1 binds to two distinct G protein-coupled receptors, known as the ETA and ETB receptor subtypes. In this study, we have examined ET-1, ETA and ETB mRNA expression levels in human vascular cells cultured in vitro and in normal and atherosclerotic human arteries. The results indicate that (a) ET-1 mRNA is constitutively expressed by endothelial cells but not by smooth muscle cells, (b) endothelial cells express only ETB mRNA but smooth muscle cells co-express ETA and ETB mRNA, and (c) in comparison to normal aorta, ET-1 mRNA expression is elevated and endothelin receptor mRNA expression is repressed in atherosclerotic lesions.

  7. Fetal alcohol exposure reduces responsiveness of taste nerves and trigeminal chemosensory neurons to ethanol and its flavor components.

    PubMed

    Glendinning, John I; Tang, Joyce; Morales Allende, Ana Paula; Bryant, Bruce P; Youngentob, Lisa; Youngentob, Steven L

    2017-08-01

    Fetal alcohol exposure (FAE) leads to increased intake of ethanol in adolescent rats and humans. We asked whether these behavioral changes may be mediated in part by changes in responsiveness of the peripheral taste and oral trigeminal systems. We exposed the experimental rats to ethanol in utero by administering ethanol to dams through a liquid diet; we exposed the control rats to an isocaloric and isonutritive liquid diet. To assess taste responsiveness, we recorded responses of the chorda tympani (CT) and glossopharyngeal (GL) nerves to lingual stimulation with ethanol, quinine, sucrose, and NaCl. To assess trigeminal responsiveness, we measured changes in calcium levels of isolated trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons during stimulation with ethanol, capsaicin, mustard oil, and KCl. Compared with adolescent control rats, the adolescent experimental rats exhibited diminished CT nerve responses to ethanol, quinine, and sucrose and GL nerve responses to quinine and sucrose. The reductions in taste responsiveness persisted into adulthood for quinine but not for any of the other stimuli. Adolescent experimental rats also exhibited reduced TG neuron responses to ethanol, capsaicin, and mustard oil. The lack of change in responsiveness of the taste nerves to NaCl and the TG neurons to KCl indicates that FAE altered only a subset of the response pathways within each chemosensory system. We propose that FAE reprograms development of the peripheral taste and trigeminal systems in ways that reduce their responsiveness to ethanol and surrogates for its pleasant (i.e., sweet) and unpleasant (i.e., bitterness, oral burning) flavor attributes.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Pregnant mothers are advised to avoid alcohol. This is because even small amounts of alcohol can alter fetal brain development and increase the risk of adolescent alcohol abuse. We asked how fetal alcohol exposure (FAE) produces the latter effect in adolescent rats by measuring responsiveness of taste nerves and trigeminal

  8. Progerin and telomere dysfunction collaborate to trigger cellular senescence in normal human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Cao, Kan; Blair, Cecilia D; Faddah, Dina A; Kieckhaefer, Julia E; Olive, Michelle; Erdos, Michael R; Nabel, Elizabeth G; Collins, Francis S

    2011-07-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), a devastating premature aging disease, is caused by a point mutation in the lamin A gene (LMNA). This mutation constitutively activates a cryptic splice donor site, resulting in a mutant lamin A protein known as progerin. Recent studies have demonstrated that progerin is also produced at low levels in normal human cells and tissues. However, the cause-and-effect relationship between normal aging and progerin production in normal individuals has not yet been determined. In this study, we have shown in normal human fibroblasts that progressive telomere damage during cellular senescence plays a causative role in activating progerin production. Progressive telomere damage was also found to lead to extensive changes in alternative splicing in multiple other genes. Interestingly, elevated progerin production was not seen during cellular senescence that does not entail telomere shortening. Taken together, our results suggest a synergistic relationship between telomere dysfunction and progerin production during the induction of cell senescence, providing mechanistic insight into how progerin may participate in the normal aging process.

  9. Progerin and telomere dysfunction collaborate to trigger cellular senescence in normal human fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Kan; Blair, Cecilia D.; Faddah, Dina A.; Kieckhaefer, Julia E.; Olive, Michelle; Erdos, Michael R.; Nabel, Elizabeth G.; Collins, Francis S.

    2011-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), a devastating premature aging disease, is caused by a point mutation in the lamin A gene (LMNA). This mutation constitutively activates a cryptic splice donor site, resulting in a mutant lamin A protein known as progerin. Recent studies have demonstrated that progerin is also produced at low levels in normal human cells and tissues. However, the cause-and-effect relationship between normal aging and progerin production in normal individuals has not yet been determined. In this study, we have shown in normal human fibroblasts that progressive telomere damage during cellular senescence plays a causative role in activating progerin production. Progressive telomere damage was also found to lead to extensive changes in alternative splicing in multiple other genes. Interestingly, elevated progerin production was not seen during cellular senescence that does not entail telomere shortening. Taken together, our results suggest a synergistic relationship between telomere dysfunction and progerin production during the induction of cell senescence, providing mechanistic insight into how progerin may participate in the normal aging process. PMID:21670498

  10. Analysis of structural changes in normal and aneurismal human aortic tissues using FTIR microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rubin, S; Bonnier, F; Sandt, C; Ventéo, L; Pluot, M; Baehrel, B; Manfait, M; Sockalingum, G D

    2008-02-01

    Aortic aneurisms are frequently asymptomatic but can induce dramatic complications. The diagnosis is only based on the aortic diameter and not on a structural and compositional basis. In this preliminary study, we propose infrared microspectroscopy to nondestructively probe normal and aneurismal human aortas. Spectra from 19 human ascending aortic biopsies (10 normal and 9 aneurismal) were acquired using infrared microspectroscopy. A 1500 x 150 microm(2) area of each 7-microm thick cryosection was investigated using a 30-microm spatial resolution with a total of about 200 spectra per sample. Spectral differences between normal and aneurismal tissues were mainly located in spectral regions related to proteins, such as elastin and collagen, and proteoglycans (1750-1000 cm(-1)). Tissue heterogeneity and sample classification have been evaluated using hierarchical cluster analysis of individual or mean spectra and their second derivative. Using spectral range related to proteins, 100% of good classification was obtained whereas the proteoglycan spectral range was less discriminant. This in vitro study demonstrates the potential of such technique to differentiate between normal and aneurismal aortas using selected spectral ranges. Future investigations will be focused on these specific spectral regions to determine the role of elastin and collagen in the discrimination of normal and pathological aortas.

  11. Radioimmunoassay of erythropoietin: circulating levels in normal and polycythemic human beings

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, J.F.; Ebbe, S.N.; Hollander, L.; Cutting, H.O.; Miller, M.E.; Cronkite, E.P.

    1982-05-01

    Techniques are described in detail for the RIA of human Ep in unextracted plasma or serum. With 100 ..mu..l of sample, the assay is sensitive at an Ep concentration of approximately 4 mU/ml, and when required, the sensitivity can be increased to 0.4 mU/ml, a range considerably less than the concentration observed in normal human beings. This is approximately 100 times more sensitive than existing in vivo bioassays for this hormone. Studies concerned with the validation of the Ep RIA show a high degree of correlation with the polycythemic mouse bioassay. Dilutions of a variety of human serum samples show a parallel relationship with the standard reference preparation for Ep. Validation of the RIA is further confirmed by observations of appropriate increases or decreases of circulating Ep levels in physiological and clinical conditions known to be associated with stimulation or suppression of Ep secretion. Significantly different mean serum concentrations of 17.2 mU/ml for normal male subjects and 18.8 mU/ml for normal female subjects were observed. Mean plasma Ep concentrations in patients with polycythemia vera are significantly decreased, and those of patients with secondary polycythemia are significantly increased as compared to plasma levels in normal subjects. These results demonstrate an initial practical value of the Ep RA in the hematology clinic, which will most certainly be expanded with its more extensive use.

  12. Repeat Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Trigeminal Neuralgia

    SciTech Connect

    Aubuchon, Adam C.; Chan, Michael D.; Lovato, James F.; Balamucki, Christopher J.; Ellis, Thomas L.; Tatter, Stephen B.; McMullen, Kevin P.; Munley, Michael T.; Deguzman, Allan F.; Ekstrand, Kenneth E.; Bourland, J. Daniel; Shaw, Edward G.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Repeat gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKRS) for recurrent or persistent trigeminal neuralgia induces an additional response but at the expense of an increased incidence of facial numbness. The present series summarized the results of a repeat treatment series at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, including a multivariate analysis of the data to identify the prognostic factors for treatment success and toxicity. Methods and Materials: Between January 1999 and December 2007, 37 patients underwent a second GKRS application because of treatment failure after a first GKRS treatment. The mean initial dose in the series was 87.3 Gy (range, 80-90). The mean retreatment dose was 84.4 Gy (range, 60-90). The dosimetric variables recorded included the dorsal root entry zone dose, pons surface dose, and dose to the distal nerve. Results: Of the 37 patients, 81% achieved a >50% pain relief response to repeat GKRS, and 57% experienced some form of trigeminal dysfunction after repeat GKRS. Two patients (5%) experienced clinically significant toxicity: one with bothersome numbness and one with corneal dryness requiring tarsorraphy. A dorsal root entry zone dose at repeat treatment of >26.6 Gy predicted for treatment success (61% vs. 32%, p = .0716). A cumulative dorsal root entry zone dose of >84.3 Gy (72% vs. 44%, p = .091) and a cumulative pons surface dose of >108.5 Gy (78% vs. 44%, p = .018) predicted for post-GKRS numbness. The presence of any post-GKRS numbness predicted for a >50% decrease in pain intensity (100% vs. 60%, p = .0015). Conclusion: Repeat GKRS is a viable treatment option for recurrent trigeminal neuralgia, although the patient assumes a greater risk of nerve dysfunction to achieve maximal pain relief.

  13. Evaluation of a novel mouse model of intracisternal strychnine-induced trigeminal allodynia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Il-Ok; Whitehead, Ryan A; Ries, Craig R; Schwarz, Stephan K W; Puil, Ernest; MacLeod, Bernard A

    2013-08-01

    Intractable neuropathic dynamic allodynia remains one of the major symptoms of human trigeminal neuropathy and is commonly accepted to be the most excruciatingly painful condition known to humankind. At present, a validated animal model of this disorder is necessary for efficient and effective development of novel drug treatments. Intracisternal strychnine in rats has been shown to result in localized trigeminal dynamic allodynia, thus representing a possible model of trigeminal neuralgia. The purpose of this study was to validate a mouse model of trigeminal glycinergic inhibitory dysfunction using established positive (carbamazepine epoxide) and negative (morphine) controls. The actions of conventional first-line treatment (carbamazepine epoxide [CBZe]) and clinically ineffective morphine were tested for trigeminal dynamic mechanical allodynia produced by intracisternal strychnine. In mice under halothane anesthesia, we injected either strychnine (0.3 μg), strychnine with CBZe (4 ng), or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) intracisternally (i.c.). In a separate set of experiments, subcutaneous morphine (3 mg·kg(-1) sc) was injected with intracisternal strychnine. Dynamic mechanical allodynia was induced by stroking the fur with polyethylene (PE-10) tubing. The response of each mouse was rated to determine its allodynia score, and scores of each group were compared. In addition, in a separate dichotomous disequilibrium study, pairs of mice were injected with strychnine/saline, strychnine/strychnine-CBZe, or strychnine/strychnine-morphine. A blinded observer recorded which mouse of each pair had the greater global pain behaviour. Strychnine (i.c.) produced higher quantitative allodynia scores in the trigeminal distribution (mean 81.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 76.4 to 86.6) vs the aCSF group (mean 11.3%; 95% CI 8.1 to 14.4) (P < 0.0001). Carbamazepine epoxide (i.c.) completely abolished allodynia when co-injected with strychnine (mean 83.2%; 95% CI 78.1 to

  14. Human neural tuning estimated from compound action potentials in normal hearing human volunteers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschooten, Eric; Desloovere, Christian; Joris, Philip X.

    2015-12-01

    The sharpness of cochlear frequency tuning in humans is debated. Evoked otoacoustic emissions and psychophysical measurements suggest sharper tuning in humans than in laboratory animals [15], but this is disputed based on comparisons of behavioral and electrophysiological measurements across species [14]. Here we used evoked mass potentials to electrophysiologically quantify tuning (Q10) in humans. We combined a notched noise forward masking paradigm [9] with the recording of trans tympanic compound action potentials (CAP) from masked probe tones in awake human and anesthetized monkey (Macaca mulatta). We compare our results to data obtained with the same paradigm in cat and chinchilla [16], and find that CAP-Q10values in human are ˜1.6x higher than in cat and chinchilla and ˜1.3x higher than in monkey. To estimate frequency tuning of single auditory nerve fibers (ANFs) in humans, we derive conversion functions from ANFs in cat, chinchilla, and monkey and apply these to the human CAP measurements. The data suggest that sharp cochlear tuning is a feature of old-world primates.

  15. Trigeminal and polyradiculoneuritis in a dog presenting with masticatory muscle atrophy and Horner's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Panciera, R J; Ritchey, J W; Baker, J E; DiGregorio, M

    2002-01-01

    A 9-year-old, spayed female, Airedale Terrier was euthanatized and necropsied after a progressive clinical course that included Horner's syndrome of the left eye and unilateral atrophy of the masticatory muscles. Although gross lesions were limited, a polyradiculoneuritis and ganglionitis that was most severe in the trigeminal nerves and ganglia were confirmed histologically. The inflammatory infiltrate consisted predominantly of macrophages and B and T lymphocytes that were phenotypically confirmed by immunostaining. Horner's syndrome was the result of damage to postganglionic sympathetic fibers that were incorporated in segments of the inflamed trigeminal nerve and its ophthalmic branch. Histologically, the character and distribution of the inflammation was similar to previously described syndromes of suspected immune-mediated etiology in humans and animals.

  16. Antiapoptotic effects of estrogen in normal and cancer human cervical epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qifang; Li, Xin; Wang, Liqin; Feng, Ying-Hong; Zeng, Robin; Gorodeski, George

    2004-12-01

    The present study investigated the antiapoptotic effects of estrogen in normal and cancer human cervical cells and the mechanisms involved. Baseline apoptosis in human cervical epithelial cells is mediated predominantly by P2X7-receptor-induced, Ca(2+)-dependent activation of the mitochondrial (caspase-9) pathway. Treatment with 10 nM 17beta-estradiol blocked apoptosis induced by the P2X7-receptor ligands ATP and 2',3'-0-(4-benzoylbenzoyl)-ATP in normal human cervical epithelial cells (hECEs) and attenuated the effect in hECEs immortalized with human papillomavirus-16 (ECE16-1) and the cancer cervical cells HT3 and CaSki. Diethylstilbestrol and to a lesser degree estrone could mimic the effects of 17beta-estradiol, whereas actinomycin-D and cycloheximide attenuated the response. The antiapoptotic effect of estrogen did not depend on cell cycle phase, and in both normal and cancer cervical cells, it involved attenuation of activation of caspase-9 and the terminal caspase-3. However, involvement of cascades upstream to the caspase-9 differed in normal vs. cancer cervical cells. In the normal hECEs estrogen blocked P2X7-receptor-induced calcium influx. In contrast, in the cancer CaSki cells, estrogen up-regulated expression of Bcl-2 and attenuated Ca(2+)-induced mitochondrial swelling (i.e. formation of mitochondrial permeability transition pores). Estrogen had no effect on P2X7-receptor-induced apoptosis in the anaplastic SiHa and Hela cells. These results point to a novel antiapoptotic effect of estrogen in the cervix that is independent of its mitogenic function. The results also suggest that cancer cervical cells evolved antiapoptotic mechanisms that enable the cells to evade apoptosis and could therefore promote tumor progression.

  17. Activation of c-myb expression by phytohemagglutinin stimulation in normal human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Torelli, G; Selleri, L; Donelli, A; Ferrari, S; Emilia, G; Venturelli, D; Moretti, L; Torelli, U

    1985-01-01

    The expression of c-myb in normal human T lymphocytes directly derived from a normal subject and not adapted to continuous growth in culture was found to be markedly increased after phytohemagglutinin stimulation. In the same cells, the expression of c-myc mRNA is a much earlier event compared with the appearance of c-myb mRNA, which takes place soon after that of histone H3 mRNA. The increase in c-myb expression was not due to a particular T-lymphocyte subset, as shown by in situ hybridization assays. Images PMID:3915538

  18. Radiographic Comparison of Human Lung Shape During Normal Gravity and Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michels, D. B.; Friedman, P. J.; West, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    Chest radiographs in five seated normal volunteers at 1 G and 0 G were made with a view toward comparing human lung shape during normal gravity and weightlessness. Lung shape was assessed by measuring lung heights and widths in upper, middle and lower lung regions. No significant differences were found between any of the 1-G and 0-G measurements, although there was a slight tendency for the lung to become shorter and wider at 0 G. The evidence that gravity causes regional differences in ventilation by direct action on the lung is consistent with the theoretical analysis of West and Matthews (1972).

  19. Expression of neurotrimin in the normal and injured adult human spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Grijalva, I; Li, X; Marcillo, A; Salzer, J L; Levi, A D

    2006-05-01

    Neurotrimin (Ntm) is a member of the family of neural cell adhesion molecules. Its expression pattern suggests that Ntm promotes axonal fasciculation, guides nerve fibers to specific targets and stabilizes synapses as it accumulates coincident with synaptogenesis. Strong labeling of Ntm was observed in motor and sensory areas of the postnatal rat cortex. It is not known whether Ntm is present in adult human spinal cord (SC). In the present study, a monoclonal antibody specific for Ntm (1B1), is applied to the first study of the expression of Ntm in normal and injured adult human SC. (1) To investigate the expression pattern of Ntm in adult normal human SC, and (2) to observe the changes of Ntm expression after SC injury and compare the differences between normal and injured adult human SC. Human SC tissue was obtained from necropsies of patients with (n=5) and without (n=4) SC injury. The 1B1 Ntm monoclonal antibody was used for immunohistochemical staining on paraffin embedded sections with an ABC kit. (1) In total, 12 slides were analyzed for each group from both cervical and thoracic levels. Motor neurons and Clarke's neurons and glial-like cells were mild to moderately positive in all uninjured SC specimens. (2) In injured SC, no staining was observed in the injury epicenter between two and three levels proximally and distally, but was detected five levels away. (3) In patients older than 67 years of age, Ntm-positive inclusions were present in the white matter of the SC with or without injury. (4) Some meningeal cells were strongly Ntm-positive, especially in the uninjured human SC. Ntm is expressed by motor and Clarke's neurons and glial cells in uninjured human SC. The downregulation of Ntm in the injured SC suggests that its expression is regulated by afferent input. Spinal Cord (2006) 44, 275-279. doi:10.1038/sj.sc.3101840; published online 20 September 2005.

  20. A second trigeminal CGRP receptor: function and expression of the AMY1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Christopher S; Eftekhari, Sajedeh; Bower, Rebekah L; Wilderman, Andrea; Insel, Paul A; Edvinsson, Lars; Waldvogel, Henry J; Jamaluddin, Muhammad A; Russo, Andrew F; Hay, Debbie L

    2015-01-01

    Objective The trigeminovascular system plays a central role in migraine, a condition in need of new treatments. The neuropeptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), is proposed as causative in migraine and is the subject of intensive drug discovery efforts. This study explores the expression and functionality of two CGRP receptor candidates in the sensory trigeminal system. Methods Receptor expression was determined using Taqman G protein-coupled receptor arrays and immunohistochemistry in trigeminal ganglia (TG) and the spinal trigeminal complex of the brainstem in rat and human. Receptor pharmacology was quantified using sensitive signaling assays in primary rat TG neurons. Results mRNA and histological expression analysis in rat and human samples revealed the presence of two CGRP-responsive receptors (AMY1: calcitonin receptor/receptor activity-modifying protein 1 [RAMP1]) and the CGRP receptor (calcitonin receptor-like receptor/RAMP1). In support of this finding, quantification of agonist and antagonist potencies revealed a dual population of functional CGRP-responsive receptors in primary rat TG neurons. Interpretation The unexpected presence of a functional non-canonical CGRP receptor (AMY1) at neural sites important for craniofacial pain has important implications for targeting the CGRP axis in migraine. PMID:26125036

  1. Low calcium culture condition induces mesenchymal cell-like phenotype in normal human epidermal keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Takagi, Ryo; Yamato, Masayuki; Murakami, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Hiroaki; Okano, Teruo

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Normal human epidermal keratinocytes serially cultured under low calcium concentration were cytokeratin and vimentin double positive cells. {yields} The human keratinocytes expressed some epithelial stem/progenitor cell makers, mesenchymal cell markers, and markers of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. {yields} Mesenchymal cell-like phenotype in the keratinocytes was suppressed under high-calcium condition. -- Abstract: Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important cellular phenomenon in organ developments, cancer invasions, and wound healing, and many types of transformed cell lines are used for investigating for molecular mechanisms of EMT. However, there are few reports for EMT in normal human epithelial cells, which are non-transformed or non-immortalized cells, in vitro. Therefore, normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) serially cultured in low-calcium concentration medium (LCM) were used for investigating relations between differentiation and proliferation and mesenchymal-like phenotype in the present study, since long-term cultivation of NHEK is achieved in LCM. Interestingly, NHEK serially cultured in LCM consisted essentially of cytokeratin-vimentin double positive cells (98%), although the NHEK exhibited differentiation under high-calcium culture condition with 3T3 feeder layer. The vimentin expression was suppressed under high-calcium condition. These results may indicate the importance of mesenchymal-like phenotype for serially cultivation of NHEK in vitro.

  2. Energetic Differences at The Subunit Interfaces of Normal Human Hemoglobins Correlate with Their Developmental Profile†

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Lois R.; Russell, J. Eric; Popowicz, Anthony M.; Manning, Robert S.; Padovan, Julio C.; Manning, James M.

    2013-01-01

    A previously unrecognized function of normal human hemoglobins occurring during protein assembly is described - - self-regulation of subunit pairings and their durations arising from the variable strengths of their subunit interactions. Although it is known that many mutant human hemoglobins have altered subunit interface strengths, those of the normal embryonic, fetal, and adult human hemoglobins have not been considered to differ significantly. However, in a comprehensive study of both types of subunit interfaces of seven of the eight normal oxy human hemoglobins, we found that the strength, i.e. the free energies of the tetramer-dimer interfaces, contrary to previous reports, differ by 3-orders of magnitude and display an undulating profile similar to the transitions (“switches”) of various globin subunit types over time. The dimer interface strengths are also variable and correlate linearly with their developmental profile; embryonic hemoglobins are the weakest, fetal hemoglobin is of intermediate strength, and adult hemoglobins are the strongest. The pattern also correlates generally with their different O2 affinities and responses to allosteric regulatory molecules. Acetylation of fetal hemoglobin weakens its unusually strong subunit interactions and occurs progressively as its expression diminishes and adult hemoglobin A formations begins; a causal relationship is suggested. The relative contributions of globin gene order and competition among subunits due to differences in their interface strengths were found to be complementary and establish a connection between genetics, thermodynamics, and development. PMID:19583196

  3. The human fetal venous system: normal embryologic, anatomic, and physiologic characteristics and developmental abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Fasouliotis, Sozos J; Achiron, Reuven; Kivilevitch, Zvi; Yagel, Simcha

    2002-10-01

    The introduction of high-resolution ultrasonography combined with color-coded Doppler imaging offered a breakthrough in the evaluation of the human fetal venous system, considerably enhancing our understanding of fetal venous circulation in normal physiologic conditions, as well as providing us the ability to study circulatory changes in abnormal circumstances. The purpose of this study was to describe the normal anatomic development and complex of anomalies of the human fetal venous system and to review recently published series of these anomalies. Normal embryologic and anatomic development is described. An English language literature search of recent MEDLINE listings was performed to glean data from recently published series reporting prenatal diagnosis of the various anomalies and their associated malformations. Anomalies of the human fetal venous system occur sporadically, often associated with cardiac or other malformations. The pathophysiologic mechanisms leading to abnormal in utero development of the human venous system remain largely undetermined. On the basis of the type of vein involved, embryologic precursor, and etiologic correlation (primary or secondary), classification into 4 major groups is described. Prenatal evaluation of fetuses found to have anomalies of the venous system should include a careful search for cardiac anomalies, including pulmonary venous drainage, and a detailed anatomic survey of the umbilical, portal, hepatic, and ductal systems to determine aberrant communication and, if possible, to discover clues to systemic diseases or thromboembolic phenomena.

  4. Temporomandibular joint pain: A critical role for Trpv4 in the trigeminal ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Williams, Susan H.; McNulty, Amy L.; Hong, Ji Hee; Lee, Suk Hee; Rothfusz, Nicole E.; Parekh, Puja K.; Moore, Carlene; Gereau, Robert; Taylor, Andrea B.; Wang, Fan; Guilak, Farshid; Liedtke, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorder (TMJD) is known for its mastication-associated pain. TMJD is medically relevant because of its prevalence, severity, chronicity, and “therapy-refractoriness” of its pain, and its largely elusive pathogenesis. Against this background we sought to investigate pathogenetic contributions of the calcium-permeable TRPV4 ion channel, robustly expressed in the trigeminal ganglion sensory neurons, to TMJ inflammation and pain behavior. We demonstrate here that TRPV4 is critical for TMJ-inflammation evoked pain behavior in mice, and that trigeminal ganglion pro-nociceptive changes are Trpv4-dependent. As a quantitative metric, bite force was recorded as evidence of masticatory sensitization, in keeping with human translational studies. In Trpv4−/− mice with TMJ-inflammation, attenuation of bite force was significantly less than in WT mice. Similar effects were seen with systemic application of a specific TRPV4 inhibitor. TMJ-inflammation and mandibular bony changes were apparent after CFA injections, but remarkably independent of Trpv4 genotype. Intriguingly, as a result of TMJ-inflammation, WT mice exhibited significant up-regulation of TRPV4 and phosphorylated ERK in TMJ-innervating trigeminal sensory neurons, absent in Trpv4−/− mice. Mice with genetically-impaired MEK/ERK phosphorylation in neurons showed a similar resistance to reduction of bite-force as Trpv4−/− mice. Thus, TRPV4 is necessary for masticatory sensitization in TMJ-inflammation, and likely functions up-stream of MEK/ERK phosphorylation in trigeminal ganglion sensory neurons in-vivo. TRPV4 therefore represents a novel pro-nociceptive target in TMJ inflammation, and should be considered a target-of-interest in human TMJD. PMID:23726674

  5. Temporomandibular joint pain: a critical role for Trpv4 in the trigeminal ganglion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Williams, Susan H; McNulty, Amy L; Hong, Ji Hee; Lee, Suk Hee; Rothfusz, Nicole E; Parekh, Puja K; Moore, Carlene; Gereau, Robert W; Taylor, Andrea B; Wang, Fan; Guilak, Farshid; Liedtke, Wolfgang

    2013-08-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorder (TMJD) is known for its mastication-associated pain. TMJD is medically relevant because of its prevalence, severity, chronicity, the therapy-refractoriness of its pain, and its largely elusive pathogenesis. Against this background, we sought to investigate the pathogenetic contributions of the calcium-permeable TRPV4 ion channel, robustly expressed in the trigeminal ganglion sensory neurons, to TMJ inflammation and pain behavior. We demonstrate here that TRPV4 is critical for TMJ-inflammation-evoked pain behavior in mice and that trigeminal ganglion pronociceptive changes are TRPV4-dependent. As a quantitative metric, bite force was recorded as evidence of masticatory sensitization, in keeping with human translational studies. In Trpv4(-/-) mice with TMJ inflammation, attenuation of bite force was significantly less than in wildtype (WT) mice. Similar effects were seen with systemic application of a specific TRPV4 inhibitor. TMJ inflammation and mandibular bony changes were apparent after injections of complete Freund adjuvant but were remarkably independent of the Trpv4 genotype. It was intriguing that, as a result of TMJ inflammation, WT mice exhibited significant upregulation of TRPV4 and phosphorylated extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in TMJ-innervating trigeminal sensory neurons, which were absent in Trpv4(-/-) mice. Mice with genetically-impaired MEK/ERK phosphorylation in neurons showed resistance to reduction of bite force similar to that of Trpv4(-/-) mice. Thus, TRPV4 is necessary for masticatory sensitization in TMJ inflammation and probably functions upstream of MEK/ERK phosphorylation in trigeminal ganglion sensory neurons in vivo. TRPV4 therefore represents a novel pronociceptive target in TMJ inflammation and should be considered a target of interest in human TMJD.

  6. Three-Dimensional Normal Human Neutral Progenitor Tissue-Like Assemblies: A Model for Persistent Varicella-Zoster Virus Infection and Platform to Study Oxidate Stress and Damage in Multiple Hit Scenarios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.; McCarthy, M.; Osterrieder, N.; Cohrs, R. J.; Kaufer, B. B.

    2014-01-01

    The environment of space results in a multitude of challenges to the human physiology that present barriers to extended habitation and exploration. Over 40 years of investigation to define countermeasures to address space flight adaptation has left gaps in our knowledge regarding mitigation strategies partly due to the lack of investigative tools, monitoring strategies, and real time diagnostics to understand the central causative agent(s) responsible for physiologic adaptation and maintaining homeostasis. Spaceflight-adaptation syndrome is the combination of space environmental conditions and the synergistic reaction of the human physiology. Our work addresses the role of oxidative stress and damage (OSaD) as a negative and contributing Risk Factor (RF) in the following areas of combined spaceflight related dysregulation: i) radiation induced cellular damage [1], [2] ii) immune impacts and the inflammatory response [3], [4] and iii) varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation [5]. Varicella-zoster (VZV)/Chicken Pox virus is a neurotropic human alphaherpes virus resulting in varicella upon primary infection, suppressed by the immune system becomes latent in ganglionic neurons, and reactivates under stress events to re-express in zoster and possibly shingles. Our laboratory has developed a complex three-dimensional (3D) normal human neural tissue model that emulates several characteristics of the human trigeminal ganglia (TG) and allows the study of combinatorial experimentation which addresses, simultaneously, OSaD associated with Spaceflight adaptation and habitation [6]. By combining the RFs of microgravity, radiation, and viral infection we will demonstrate that living in the space environment leads to significant physiological consequences for the peripheral and subsequently the central nervous system (PNS, CNS) associated with OSaD generation and consequentially endangers long-duration and exploration-class missions.

  7. A Novel Mouse Model for Neurotrophic Keratopathy: Trigeminal Nerve Stereotactic Electrolysis through the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Giulio; Chauhan, Sunil K.; Ueno, Hiroki; Nallasamy, Nambi; Gandolfi, Stefano; Borges, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To develop a mouse model of neurotrophic keratopathy by approaching the trigeminal nerve through the brain and to evaluate changes in corneal cell apoptosis and proliferation. Methods. Six- to 8-week-old male C57BL/6 mice underwent trigeminal stereotactic electrolysis (TSE) to destroy the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve. Clinical follow-up using biomicroscopy of the cornea was performed at days 2, 4, 5, and 7. To confirm the effectiveness of the procedure, we examined the gross nerve pathology, blink reflex, and immunohistochemistry of the corneal nerves. TUNEL-positive apoptotic and Ki-67–positive proliferating corneal cells were evaluated to detect changes from the contralateral normal eye. Results. TSE was confirmed by gross histology of the trigeminal nerve and was considered effective if the corneal blink reflex was completely abolished. TSE totally abolished the blink reflex in 70% of mice and significantly reduced it in the remaining 30%. Animals with absent blink reflex were used for subsequent experiments. In these mice, a progressive corneal degeneration developed, with thinning of the corneal epithelium and eventually perforation after 7 days. In all mice, 48 hours after TSE, corneal nerves were not recognizable histologically. Seven days after TSE, an increase in cellular apoptosis in all the corneal layers and a reduction in proliferation in basal epithelial cells were detected consistently in all mice. Conclusions. TSE was able, in most cases, to induce a disease state that reflected clinical neurotrophic keratitis without damaging the periocular structures. Moreover, corneal denervation led to increased apoptosis and reduced proliferation of epithelial cells, formally implicating intact nerve function in regulating epithelial survival and turnover. PMID:21071731

  8. A novel mouse model for neurotrophic keratopathy: trigeminal nerve stereotactic electrolysis through the brain.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Giulio; Chauhan, Sunil K; Ueno, Hiroki; Nallasamy, Nambi; Gandolfi, Stefano; Borges, Lawrence; Dana, Reza

    2011-04-01

    To develop a mouse model of neurotrophic keratopathy by approaching the trigeminal nerve through the brain and to evaluate changes in corneal cell apoptosis and proliferation. Six- to 8-week-old male C57BL/6 mice underwent trigeminal stereotactic electrolysis (TSE) to destroy the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve. Clinical follow-up using biomicroscopy of the cornea was performed at days 2, 4, 5, and 7. To confirm the effectiveness of the procedure, we examined the gross nerve pathology, blink reflex, and immunohistochemistry of the corneal nerves. TUNEL-positive apoptotic and Ki-67-positive proliferating corneal cells were evaluated to detect changes from the contralateral normal eye. TSE was confirmed by gross histology of the trigeminal nerve and was considered effective if the corneal blink reflex was completely abolished. TSE totally abolished the blink reflex in 70% of mice and significantly reduced it in the remaining 30%. Animals with absent blink reflex were used for subsequent experiments. In these mice, a progressive corneal degeneration developed, with thinning of the corneal epithelium and eventually perforation after 7 days. In all mice, 48 hours after TSE, corneal nerves were not recognizable histologically. Seven days after TSE, an increase in cellular apoptosis in all the corneal layers and a reduction in proliferation in basal epithelial cells were detected consistently in all mice. TSE was able, in most cases, to induce a disease state that reflected clinical neurotrophic keratitis without damaging the periocular structures. Moreover, corneal denervation led to increased apoptosis and reduced proliferation of epithelial cells, formally implicating intact nerve function in regulating epithelial survival and turnover.

  9. Endogenous Inhibition of the Trigeminally Evoked Neurotransmission to Cardiac Vagal Neurons by Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gorini, C.; Philbin, K.; Bateman, R.

    2010-01-01

    Stimulation of the nasal mucosa by airborne irritants or water evokes a pronounced bradycardia accompanied by peripheral vasoconstriction and apnea. The dive response, which includes the trigeminocardiac reflex, is among the most powerful autonomic responses. These responses slow the heart rate and reduce myocardial oxygen consumption. Although normally cardioprotective, exaggeration of this reflex can be detrimental and has been implicated in cardiorespiratory diseases, including sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). An essential component of the diving response and trigeminocardiac reflex is activation of the parasympathetic cardiac vagal neurons (CVNs) in the nucleus ambiguus that control heart rate. This study examined the involvement of cholinergic receptors in trigeminally evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents in CVNs in an in vitro preparation from rats. CVNs were identified using a retrograde tracer injected into the fat pads at the base of the heart. Application of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor neostigmine significantly decreased the amplitude of glutamatergic neurotransmission to CVNs on stimulation of trigeminal fibers. Whereas nicotine did not have any effect on the glutamatergic responses, the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) agonist bethanechol significantly decreased the excitatory neurotransmission. Atropine, an mAChR antagonist, facilitated these responses indicating this trigeminally evoked brain stem pathway in vitro is endogenously inhibited by mAChRs. Tropicamide, an m4 mAChR antagonist, prevented the inhibitory action of the muscarinic agonist bethanechol. These results indicate that the glutamatergic synaptic neurotransmission in the trigeminally evoked pathway to CVNs is endogenously inhibited in vitro by m4 mAChRs. PMID:20719927

  10. Ethanolic Extracts of California Mugwort (Artemisia douglasiana Besser) Are Cytotoxic against Normal and Cancerous Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Somaweera, Himali; Lai, Gary C.; Blackeye, Rachel; Littlejohn, Beverly; Kirksey, Justine; Aguirre, Richard M.; LaPena, Vince; Pasqua, Anna; Hintz, Mary McCarthy

    2013-01-01

    California mugwort (Artemisia douglasiana Besser) is used by many tribes throughout California to treat a variety of conditions, including colds, allergies, and pain. California mugwort is also utilized as women’s medicine. Its use is on the rise outside of Native communities, often without the guidance of a traditional healer or experienced herbalist. Because it has been shown to have antiproliferative activity against plant and animal cells, we investigated whether California mugwort extracts have an effect on normal human cells as well as estrogen receptor positive (ER+) and estrogen receptor negative (ER−) human breast cancer cells. Ethanolic and aqueous extracts of A. douglasiana leaves were tested for cytotoxicity against unstimulated normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMC), as well as against an ER+ human breast cancer cell line (BT-474) and an ER− human breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231). An ethanolic leaf extract killed hPBMC, BT-474, and MDA-MB-231 cells with IC50 values of 23.6 ± 0.3, 27 ± 5, and 37 ± 4 μg/ml, respectively. An aqueous extract killed hPBMC with an IC50 value of 60 ± 10 μg/ml, but had no effect on the two cancer cell lines at concentrations up to 100 μg/ml. The results of this study indicate that the cytotoxicity of California mugwort extends to normal human cells, as well as cancerous cells. Therefore, until further is known about the safety of this medicine, caution should be taken when consuming extracts of California mugwort, whether as a tincture or as a tea. PMID:24073389

  11. A radioimmunoassay for erythropoietin: serum levels in normal human subjects and patients with hemopoietic disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Rege, A.B.; Brookins, J.; Fisher, J.W.

    1982-12-01

    An RIA for Ep has been developed that is highly sensitive and specific. A homogeneous Ep preparation was labeled with /sup 125/I by the chloramine-T method to a specific activity of 90 to 136 ..mu..Ci/..mu..g and immunoreactivity of 80%. Ep antiserum, which was produced to a human urinary Ep preparation (80 U/mg of protein), was adsorbed with normal human urinary and serum proteins without any loss in sensitivity of the RIA to increase the specificity of the assay. A good correlation was seen between the RIA and the exhypoxic polycythemic mouse assay (corr. coef. 0.967; slope 1.05 and ''y'' intercept 0.75). Ep titers in sera from 175 hematologically normal human subjects exhibited a normal frequency distribution and ranged between 5.8 and 36.6 mU/ml with a mean of 14.9 +/- 4.7 (S.D.) and median of 14.3. Serum Ep titers were markedly elevated in seven patients with aplastic anemia and one patient with pure red cell aplasia (1350 to 20,640 mU/ml) and were lower than normal in two patients with polycythemia vera (8.1 and 9.4 mU/ml). The serum Ep titers in a prenephrectomy patient with chronic glomerulonephritis (31.1 mU/ml) decreased to below normal levels (9.04 mU/ml) after nephrectomy. The cord serum erythropoietin titers in 10 IDM (90.82 +/- 134.1 (S.D.) mu/ml) returned to values within the normal range (13.86 +/- 5.55) on day 3 after birth, suggesting the utility of the RIA in elucidating the role of hypoxia and/or insulin in increased erythropoiesis in IDM. The serum Ep titers in patients with anemias and polycythemias were compared to those of normal human subjects and agreed well with pathophysiologic mechanisms of these hemopoietic disorders, confirming the validity of the RIA.

  12. A radioimmunoassay for erythropoietin: serum levels in normal human subjects and patients with hemopoietic disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Rege, A.B.; Brookins, J.; Fisher, J.W.

    1982-12-01

    An RIA for Ep has been developed that is highly sensitive and specific. A homogeneous Ep preparation was labeled with /sup 125/I by the chloramine-T method to a specific activity of 90 to 136 micro Ci/microgram and immunoreactivity of 80%. Ep antiserum, which was produced to a human urinary Ep preparation (80 U/mg of protein), was adsorbed with normal human urinary and serum proteins without any loss in sensitivity of the RIA to increase the specificity of the assay. A good correlation was seen between the RIA and the exhypoxic polycythemic mouse assay (corr. coef. 0.967; slope 1.05 and y intercept 0.75). Ep titers in sera from 175 hematologically normal human subjects exhibited a normal frequency distribution and ranged between 5.8 and 36.6 mU/ml with a mean of 14.9 +/- 4.7 (S.D.) and median of 14.3 Serum Ep titers were markedly elevated in seven patients with aplastic anemia and one patient with pure red cell aplasia (1350 to 20,640 mU/ml) and were lower than normal in two patients with polycythemia vera (8.1 and 9.4 mU/ml). The serum Ep titers in a prenephrectomy patient with chronic glomerulonephritis (32.1 mU/ml) decreased to below normal levels (9.04 mU/ml) after nephrectomy. The cord serum erythropoietin titers in 10 IDM (90.82 +/- 134.1 (S.D.) mu/ml) returned to values within the normal range (13.86 +/- 5.55) on day 3 after birth, suggesting the utility of the RIA in elucidating the role of hypoxia and/or insulin in increased erythropoiesis in IDM. The serum Ep titers in patients with anemias and polycythemias were compared to those of normal human subjects and agreed well with pathophysiologic mechanisms of these hemopoietic disorders, confirming the validity of the RIA.

  13. Low prevalence of high risk human papillomavirus in normal oral mucosa by hybrid capture 2

    PubMed Central

    González-Losa, Maria del Refugio; Manzano-Cabrera, Luis; Rueda-Gordillo, Florencio; Hernández-Solís, Sandra E.; Puerto-Solís, Luis

    2008-01-01

    High risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) are recognized as a necessary factor to development cervical cancer. During the last decade many studies have found HR-HPV in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and normal oral mucosa, however the association between HR-HPV and OSCC is still uncertain. The aim of the study was to determine DNA HR-HPV in normal oral cavity of healthy adults. A cross-sectional study was performed; samples from 77 patients with normal oral cavity were collected at the Dentistry school, Autonomous University of Yucatan, Merida, Yucatan, México. HR-HPV was detected by hybrid capture 2. One sample out of 77(1.2%) was positive for HR-PVH. It was from a man of 50 years old. HRHPV is present in low rate among healthy oral mucosa. Hybrid capture 2 could be a good methodology for large epidemiology studies. PMID:24031173

  14. FTIR microscopic comparative study on normal, premalignant, and malignant tissues of human intenstine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordechai, Shaul; Argov, Shmuel; Salman, Ahmad O.; Cohen, Beny; Ramesh, Jagannathan; Erukhimovitch, Vitaly; Goldstein, Jed; Sinelnikov, Igor

    2000-07-01

    Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) employs a unique approach to optical diagnosis of tissue pathology based on the characteristic molecular vibrational spectra of the tissue. The architectural changes in the cellular and sub-cellular levels developing in abnormal tissue, including a majority of cancer forms, manifest themselves in different optical signatures, which can be detected in infrared spectroscopy. The biological systems we have studied include normal, premalignant (polyp) and malignant human colonic tissues from three patients. Our method is based on microscopic infrared study (FTIR-microscopy) of thin tissue specimens and a direct comparison with normal histopathological analysis, which serves as a `gold' reference. The normal intestine tissue has a stronger absorption than polyp and cancerous types over a wide region in all three cases. The detailed analysis showed that there is a significant decrease in total phosphate and creatine contents for polyp and cancerous tissue types in comparison to the controls.

  15. Analysis of normal human eye with different age groups using infrared images.

    PubMed

    Acharya, U Rajendra; Ng, E Y K; Yee, Gerk Chang; Hua, Tan Jian; Kagathi, Manjunath

    2009-06-01

    The human body temperature is a good health indicator. All objects emit thermal radiation as a function temperature and wavelength for all wavelengths. The wavelength of infrared rays lies between visible and microwave radiations ranging between 700 nm to 0.1 mm. Infrared (IR) imaging is relatively inexpensive, noninvasive and harmless. Nowadays, it is widely used in the medical field for diagnosis. In this work, we have applied image processing techniques on the IR images of the eye for the analysis of the ocular surface temperature (OST) of the normal subjects of three categories (young, middle and old ages). In our study, 67 IR normal images were analyzed. Two parameters, average ocular temperature and the temperature deviation were proposed to study the variability of OST in different normal category subjects. Our study shows that, the two parameters proposed, show distinct ranges for different groups with 'p' values less than 0.05.

  16. Immediate induction of heat shock proteins is not protective against cryopreservation in normal human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Park, S J; Choi, H R; Nam, K M; Na, J I; Huh, C H; Park, K C

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) were first identified as proteins whose synthesis was enhanced by stresses, such as increased temperature. HSPs can protect cells from various cytotoxic factors by stabilizing proteins. Thus, it could be hypothesized that heat induced HSPs can provide protective effects against cryopreservation-induced cell death. The aim of this study was to determine whether induction of HSPs can increase the cell viability of normal human fibroblasts after cryopreservation. Cytotoxic effects of heat treatment were tested and the induction of HSPs was assessed by examining time-dependent HSP expression. A cell counting method using fluorescence microscopy was used to determine the viability of cells. In addition, the effects of geranylgeranylacetone were evaluated in terms of HSP expression and cytoskeleton changes. The results of this study showed that immediate induction of HSPs does not protect normal human fibroblasts against cryopreservation-induced cell death possibly by inducing cytoskeleton changes.

  17. Scattering properties of normal and cancerous tissues from human stomach based on phase-contrast microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Li, Zhifang; Li, Hui

    2012-12-01

    In order to study scattering properties of normal and cancerous tissues from human stomach, we collect images for human gastric specimens by using phase-contrast microscope. The images were processed by the way of mathematics morphology. The equivalent particle size distribution of tissues can be obtained. Combining with Mie scattering theory, the scattering properties of tissues can be calculated. Assume scattering of light in biological tissue can be seen as separate scattering events by different particles, total scattering properties can be equivalent to as scattering sum of particles with different diameters. The results suggest that scattering coefficient of the cancerous tissue is significantly higher than that of normal tissue. The scattering phase function is different especially in the backscattering area. Those are significant clinical benefits to diagnosis cancerous tissue

  18. Cytotoxicity of TRAIL/anticancer drug combinations in human normal cells.

    PubMed

    Meurette, Olivier; Fontaine, Anne; Rebillard, Amelie; Le Moigne, Gwenaelle; Lamy, Thierry; Lagadic-Gossmann, Dominique; Dimanche-Boitrel, Marie-Therese

    2006-12-01

    TRAIL (TNF-alpha-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand) is a promising anticancer agent. In fact, it induces apoptosis in cancer cells and not in most normal cells. Nevertheless, certain cancer cells are resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis and this could limit TRAIL's efficiency in cancer therapy. To overcome TRAIL resistance, a combination of TRAIL with chemotherapy could be used in cancer treatment. However, sensitivity of human normal cells to such combinations is not well known. We showed in this study that TRAIL/cisplatin, in contrast to TRAIL/5-fluorouracil, was toxic toward human primary hepatocytes and resting lymphocytes. Furthermore, both combinations are toxic toward PHA-IL2-activated lymphocytes. In contrast, freshly isolated neutrophils are resistant to TRAIL in combination or not with anticancer drugs.

  19. Chordin and noggin expression in the adult rat trigeminal nuclei.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yutaro; Mikawa, Sumiko; Masumoto, Kazuma; Katou, Fuminori; Sato, Kohji

    2016-12-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP) exert its biological functions by interacting with membrane bound receptors. However, functions of BMPs are also regulated in the extracellular space by secreted antagonistic regulators, such as chordin and noggin. Although the deep involvement of BMP signaling in the development and functions of the trigeminal nuclei has been postulated, little information is available for its expression in the trigeminal nuclei. We, thus, investigated chordin and noggin expression in the adult rat trigeminal nuclei using immunohistochemistry. Chordin and noggin were intensely expressed throughout the trigeminal nuclei. In addition, interesting differences are observed between chordin expression and noggin expression. For example, chordin prefers dendritic expression than noggin, suggesting that chordin is involved in the regulation of dendritic morphology and synaptic homeostasis. Furthermore, chordin and noggin were differentially expressed in the neuropil of the trigeminal nuclei. Since BMP signaling is known to play a pivotal role to make precise neural network, theses differences might be important to keep precise interneuronal connections by regulating local BMP signaling intensity in each region. Interestingly, we also detected chordin and noggin expression in axons of the trigeminal nerves. These data indicate that chordin and noggin play pivotal roles also in the adult trigeminal system.

  20. Trigeminal ganglion cells cocultured with gut express vasoactive intestinal peptide.

    PubMed

    Davis, J P; Epstein, M L

    1987-12-01

    The plasticity of neural crest cells for the expression of adrenergic and cholinergic transmitter phenotypes has been well studied. The object of this study was to determine if cells of a sensory ganglion are capable of neuropeptide transmitter plasticity. We studied whether cells of the trigeminal ganglion, which do not express the neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in vivo, would express this peptide when grown with a tissue the gut, that contains large numbers of VIP neurons. Embryonic aneural chick rectum was explanted with the embryonic quail trigeminal ganglion on the chorioallantoic membrane of chick hosts for 7-8 days. The explants were fixed, sectioned, and stained for VIP immunoreactivity (IR), for neurofilament protein immunoreactivity, and for the quail nucleolar marker. In sections of the explants we observed two populations of quail neurons: small (10-13 microns) VIP-IR cells and large (25-32 microns) cells lacking VIP-IR and resembling native trigeminal neurons. Trigeminal ganglia explanted with embryonic heart or trigeminal ganglia explanted alone lacked small VIP-IR cells but contained large VIP-negative neurons. These results show that cells of the trigeminal ganglion grown with the gut can express a neuropeptide they do not express in the absence of the gut or in vivo. Thus the embryonic trigeminal ganglion contains cells that are plastic with respect to neuropeptide expression.

  1. Two Cases of Trigeminal Neuralgia Caused by the Trigeminocerebellar Artery.

    PubMed

    Shibao, Shunsuke; Ohira, Takayuki; Kano, Tadashige; Mihara, Kan; Yoshida, Kazunari

    2016-09-01

    The trigeminocerebellar artery (TCA) is a unique branch of the basilar artery. We treated two cases of trigeminal neuralgia caused by the TCA. A 72-year-old woman had severe typical trigeminal neuralgia for ∼ 3 years. Thin-slice T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging revealed an offending TCA. During microvascular decompression (MVD), we found that the TCA was compressing the medial aspect of the trigeminal nerve. We therefore transposed the TCA loop medially and anteriorly away from the nerve and inserted shredded Teflon between the TCA and the trigeminal nerve. Postoperatively, this patient's trigeminal neuralgia resolved, and she remained pain free at her 24-month follow-up. An 80-year-old man had trigeminal neuralgia. Magnetic resonance cisternography revealed that the course of the offending artery was the same as that of the TCA, originating from the superior cerebellar artery. During the MVD, we performed the same procedure as in case 1. Postoperatively, this patient's trigeminal neuralgia resolved, and he remained pain free at his 24-month follow-up. Because the TCA has a unique anatomical course, its decompression may sometimes be difficult. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Influence of nasal trigeminal stimuli on olfactory sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Jacquot, Laurence; Monnin, Julie; Brand, Gérard

    2004-04-01

    In the nose, the capacity to detect and react to volatile chemicals is mediated by two separate but interrelated sensory pathways, the olfactory and trigeminal systems. Because most chemosensory stimulants, at sufficient concentration, produce both olfactory and trigeminal sensations (i.e., stinging, burning or pungent), it is relevant to seek how these anatomically distinct systems could interact. This study was designed to evaluate by psychophysical measurements the modifications of the olfactory sensitivity of 20 subjects to phenyl ethyl alcohol (PEA) and butanol (BUT), after trigeminal stimulation with allyl isothiocyanate (AIC). Thresholds obtained in two separate sessions, one with and the other without previous trigeminal stimulation, were compared using a two-alternative forced-choice procedure, with a classical ascending concentrations method. The results showed that, whatever the odorant (PEA or BUT), AIC trigeminal activation produced a decrease in the olfactory thresholds, corresponding to an increase in olfactory sensitivity. These data confirm that in physiological conditions the trigeminal system modulates the activity of olfactory receptor cells but do not exclude the possibility of a central modulation of olfactory information by trigeminal stimuli. These findings are discussed in terms of methodological and physiological conditions.

  3. System parameters for erythropoiesis control model: Comparison of normal values in human and mouse model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The computer model for erythropoietic control was adapted to the mouse system by altering system parameters originally given for the human to those which more realistically represent the mouse. Parameter values were obtained from a variety of literature sources. Using the mouse model, the mouse was studied as a potential experimental model for spaceflight. Simulation studies of dehydration and hypoxia were performed. A comparison of system parameters for the mouse and human models is presented. Aside from the obvious differences expected in fluid volumes, blood flows and metabolic rates, larger differences were observed in the following: erythrocyte life span, erythropoietin half-life, and normal arterial pO2.

  4. SCN2B in the Rat Trigeminal Ganglion and Trigeminal Sensory Nuclei.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Yusuke; Sato, Tadasu; Yajima, Takehiro; Fujita, Masatoshi; Hashimoto, Naoya; Shoji, Noriaki; Sasano, Takashi; Ichikawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-11-01

    The beta-2 subunit of the mammalian brain voltage-gated sodium channel (SCN2B) was examined in the rat trigeminal ganglion (TG) and trigeminal sensory nuclei. In the TG, 42.6 % of sensory neurons were immunoreactive (IR) for SCN2B. These neurons had various cell body sizes. In facial skins and oral mucosae, corpuscular nerve endings contained SCN2B-immunoreactivity. SCN2B-IR nerve fibers formed nerve plexuses beneath taste buds in the tongue and incisive papilla. However, SCN2B-IR free nerve endings were rare in cutaneous and mucosal epithelia. Tooth pulps, muscle spindles and major salivary glands were also innervated by SCN2B-IR nerve fibers. A double immunofluorescence method revealed that about 40 % of SCN2B-IR neurons exhibited calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-immunoreactivity. However, distributions of SCN2B- and CGRP-IR nerve fibers were mostly different in facial, oral and cranial structures. By retrograde tracing method, 60.4 and 85.3 % of TG neurons innervating the facial skin and tooth pulp, respectively, showed SCN2B-immunoreactivity. CGRP-immunoreactivity was co-localized by about 40 % of SCN2B-IR cutaneous and tooth pulp TG neurons. In trigeminal sensory nuclei of the brainstem, SCN2B-IR neuronal cell bodies were common in deep laminae of the subnucleus caudalis, and the subnuclei interpolaris and oralis. In the mesencephalic trigeminal tract nucleus, primary sensory neurons also exhibited SCN2B-immunoreactivity. In other regions of trigeminal sensory nuclei, SCN2B-IR cells were very infrequent. SCN2B-IR neuropil was detected in deep laminae of the subnucleus caudalis as well as in the subnuclei interpolaris, oralis and principalis. These findings suggest that SCN2B is expressed by various types of sensory neurons in the TG. There appears to be SCN2B-containing pathway in the TG and trigeminal sensory nuclei.

  5. The usual treatment of trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias.

    PubMed

    Pareja, Juan A; Álvarez, Mónica

    2013-10-01

    Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias include cluster headache, paroxysmal hemicrania, and short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection, tearing, and rhinorrhea (SUNCT). Conventional pharmacological therapy can be successful in the majority of trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias patients. Most cluster headache attacks respond to 100% oxygen inhalation, or 6 mg subcutaneous sumatriptan. Nasal spray of sumatriptan (20 mg) or zolmitriptan (5 mg) are recommended as second choice. The bouts can be brought under control by a short course of corticosteroids (oral prednisone: 60-100 mg/day, or intravenous methylprednisolone: 250-500 mg/day, for 5 days, followed by tapering off the dosage), or by long-term prophylaxis with verapamil (at least 240 mg/day). Alternative long-term preventive medications include lithium carbonate (800-1600 mg/day), methylergonovine (0.4-1.2 mg/day), and topiramate (100-200 mg/day). As a rule, paroxysmal hemicrania responds to preventive treatment with indomethacin (75-150 mg/day). A short course of intravenous lidocaine (1-4 mg/kg/hour) can reduce the flow of attacks during exacerbations of SUNCT. Lamotrigine (100-300 mg/day) is the preventive drug of choice for SUNCT. Gabapentin (800-2700 mg/day), topiramate (50-300 mg/day), and carbamazepine (200-1600 mg/day) may be of help. © 2013 American Headache Society.

  6. Hemicrania continua. Unquestionably a trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Maurice B

    2013-05-01

    Hemicrania continua (HC) is a well-known primary headache. The present version of the International Classification of Headache Disorders lists HC in the "other primary headaches" group. However, evidence has emerged demonstrating that HC is a phenotype that belongs to the trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias together with cluster headache, paroxysmal hemicrania (PH), and short-lasting, unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing. This is supported by a common general clinical picture - paroxysmal, fluctuating, unilateral, side-locked headaches located to the ocular, frontal, and/or temporal regions, accompanied by ipsilateral autonomic dysfunctions including for example, tearing and conjunctival injection. Apart from the remarkable clinical similarities, the absolute and incomparable effect of indomethacin in HC parallels the effect of this drug in PH, suggesting a shared core pathogenesis. Finally, neuroimage findings demonstrate a posterior hypothalamic activation in HC similarly to cluster headache, PH, and short-lasting, unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing. Taken together, data indicate that HC is certainly a type of trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia that should no longer be placed in a group of miscellaneous primary headache disorders.

  7. Trigeminal neuralgia: unilateral episodic facial pain.

    PubMed

    Zakrzewska, Joanna M

    2015-06-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a rare cause of episodic unilateral facial pain and often in the initial presentation dental causes need to be eliminated, as it frequently presents in the lower trigeminal divisions. The pain description is characteristic of electric shock-like pain that is light-touch provoked, paroxysmal, and occurring daily; the condition can go into remission for weeks or months, however. The first-line drug is either carbamazepine or oxcarbazepine and has to be started in low doses. Over 70% of patients will initially obtain immediate relief. If efficacy or tolerability becomes a problem, then referral to a secondary care specialist should be made. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans can determine if there is a symptomatic cause and whether surgery is indicated. Surgical options provide longest pain relief periods. Patients need to be given information about all treatment options so they can make a decision about treatment. This report is adapted from paineurope 2014; Issue 4, © Haymarket Medical Publications Ltd., and is presented with permission. paineurope is provided as a service to pain management by Mundipharma International, Ltd., and is distributed free of charge to health care professionals in Europe. Archival issues can be viewed via the Web site: www.paineurope.com , at which health professionals can find links to the original articles and request copies of the quarterly publication and access additional pain education and pain management resources.

  8. Trigeminal neuralgia and persistent idiopathic facial pain.

    PubMed

    Obermann, Mark; Holle, Dagny; Katsarava, Zaza

    2011-11-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and persistent idiopathic facial pain (PIFP) are two of the most puzzling orofacial pain conditions and affected patients are often very difficult to treat. TN is characterized by paroxysms of brief but severe pain followed by asymptomatic periods without pain. In some patients a constant dull background pain may persist. This constant dull pain sometimes makes the distinction from PIFP difficult. PIFP is defined as continuous facial pain, typically localized in a circumscribed area of the face, which is not accompanied by any neurological or other lesion identified by clinical examination or clinical investigations. The pain usually does not stay within the usual anatomic boundaries of the trigeminal nerve distribution and is a diagnosis of exclusion. Epidemiologic evidence on TN, and even more so on PIFP, is quite scarce, but generally both conditions are considered to be rare diseases. The etiology and underlying pathophysiology of TN, and more so PIFP, remain unknown. Treatment is based on only few randomized controlled clinical trials and insufficiently evaluated surgical procedures.

  9. Giant Trigeminal Schwannoma Presenting with Obstructive Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Gutierrez, Juan Carlos; Elder, Benjamin D; Olivi, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal schwannomas represent between 0.07% and 0.36% of all intracranial tumors and 0.8% to 8% of intracranial schwannomas. Selection of the appropriate management strategy requires an understanding of the tumor’s natural history and treatment outcomes. This report describes the case of a 36-year-old male who presented with a three-month history of progressive headaches, dizziness, loss of balance, decreased sleep, and cognitive decline. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large enhancing lesion centered around the left Meckel’s cave and extending into both the middle and the posterior fossa with obstructive hydrocephalus secondary to compression of the fourth ventricle. Resection of the posterior fossa component of the tumor was performed in order to relieve the mass effect upon the brainstem without attempting a radical removal of the middle fossa component and a potential risk of further cognitive impairment. The pathological exam confirmed the diagnosis of a trigeminal schwannoma. The residual tumor showed progressive spontaneous volumetric shrinkage after a subtotal surgical resection. This case shows the value of a planned conservative surgery in complex schwannomas and highlights the challenges in interpreting the treatment responses in these benign tumors, whether approached surgically or with stereotactic radiation techniques. PMID:26719829

  10. Eugenol and carvacrol excite first- and second-order trigeminal neurons and enhance their heat-evoked responses.

    PubMed

    Klein, A H; Joe, C L; Davoodi, A; Takechi, K; Carstens, M I; Carstens, E

    2014-06-20

    Eugenol and carvacrol from clove and oregano, respectively, are agonists of the warmth-sensitive transient receptor potential channel TRPV3 and the irritant-sensitive transient receptor potential ankyrin (TRPA)-1. Eugenol and carvacrol induce oral irritation that rapidly desensitizes, accompanied by brief enhancement of innocuous warmth and heat pain in humans. We presently investigated if eugenol and carvacrol activate nociceptive primary afferent and higher order trigeminal neurons and enhance their heat-evoked responses, using calcium imaging of cultured trigeminal ganglion (TG) and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, and in vivo single-unit recordings in trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc) of rats. Eugenol and carvacrol activated 20-30% of TG and 7-20% of DRG cells, the majority of which additionally responded to menthol, mustard oil and/or capsaicin. TG cell responses to innocuous (39°) and noxious (42 °C) heating were enhanced by eugenol and carvacrol. We identified dorsomedial Vc neurons responsive to noxious heating of the tongue in pentobarbital-anesthetized rats. Eugenol and carvacrol dose-dependently elicited desensitizing responses in 55% and 73% of heat-sensitive units, respectively. Responses to noxious heat were briefly enhanced by eugenol and carvacrol. Many eugenol- and carvacrol-responsive units also responded to menthol, cinnamaldehyde and capsaicin. These data support a peripheral site for eugenol and carvacrol to enhance warmth- and noxious heat-evoked responses of trigeminal neurons, and are consistent with the observation that these agonists briefly enhance warmth and heat pain on the human tongue.

  11. Substance P/Neurokinin 1 and Trigeminal System: A Possible Link to the Pathogenesis in Sudden Perinatal Deaths

    PubMed Central

    Mehboob, Riffat

    2017-01-01

    Sudden demise of a healthy fetus or a neonate is a very tragic episode in the life of parents. These deaths have been a mystery since ages but still remain unexplained. This review proposes the involvement of trigeminal nerve, neurotransmitter substance P (SP), and its receptor neurokinin 1 (NK-1R) in regulation of cardiorespiratory control in fetuses and newborns. Anomalies and immaturity of neuroregulatory systems such as trigeminal system in medulla oblongata of brainstem may provide a possible mechanism of sudden perinatal deaths. Vulnerable infants are born with respiratory center immaturity which in combination with any stressor such as cold, hypoxia, and smoking may lead to cessation of breathing and ventilatory response. SP/NK-1R may be involved in regulating the ventilatory control in neonates while it is decreased in fetal and adult life in humans, and any alterations from these may lead to irreversible sleep apnea and fatal breathing, ultimately sudden death. This review summarizes the studies performed to highlight the expression of SP or NK-1R in sudden perinatal deaths and proposes the involvement of trigeminal ganglion along with its nerve and SP/NK-1R expression alteration as one of the possible pathophysiological underlying mechanism. However, further studies are required to explore the role of SP, NK-1R, and trigeminal system in the pathogenesis of sudden infant deaths, sudden intrauterine deaths, stillbirths, and sudden deaths later in human life. PMID:28348544

  12. Eugenol and carvacrol excite first- and second-order trigeminal neurons and enhance their heat-evoked responses

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Amanda H.; Joe, Christopher L.; Davoodi, Auva; Takechi, Kenichi; Carstens, Mirela Iodi; Carstens, E

    2014-01-01

    Eugenol and carvacrol from clove and oregano, respectively, are agonists of the warmth-sensitive transient receptor potential channel TRPV3 and the irritant-sensitive TRPA1. Eugenol and carvacrol induce oral irritation that rapidly desensitizes, accompanied by brief enhancement of innocuous warmth and heat pain in humans. We presently investigated if eugenol and carvacrol activate nociceptive primary afferent and higher-order trigeminal neurons and enhance their heat-evoked responses, using calcium imaging of cultured trigeminal ganglion (TG) and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, and in vivo single-unit recordings in trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc) of rats. Eugenol and carvacrol activated 20-30% of TG and 7-20% of DRG cells, the majority of which additionally responded to menthol, mustard oil and/or capsaicin. TG cell responses to innocuous (39°) and noxious (42°C) heating were enhanced by eugenol and carvacrol. We identified dorsomedial Vc neurons responsive to noxious heating of the tongue in pentobarbital-anesthetized rats. Eugenol and carvacrol dose-dependently elicited desensitizing responses in 55% and 73% of heat-sensitive units, respectively. Responses to noxious heat were briefly enhanced by eugenol and carvacrol. Many eugenol- and carvacrol-responsive units also responded to menthol, cinnamaldehyde and capsaicin. These data support a peripheral site for eugenol and carvacrol to enhance warmth- and noxious heat-evoked responses of trigeminal neurons, and are consistent with the observation that these agonists briefly enhance warmth and heat pain on the human tongue. PMID:24759772

  13. Polymorphism of the long-wavelength cone in normal human colour vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neitz, Jay; Jacobs, Gerald H.

    1986-10-01

    Colour vision is based on the presence of multiple classes of cone each of which contains a different type of photopigment1. Colour matching tests have long revealed that the normal human has three cone types. Results from these tests have also been used to provide estimates of cone spectral sensitivities2. There are significant variations in colour matches made by individuals whose colour vision is classified as normal3-6. Some of this is due to individual differences in preretinal absorption and photopigment density, but some is also believed to arise because there is variation in the spectral positioning of the cone pigments among those who have normal colour vision. We have used a sensitive colour matching test to examine the magnitude and nature of this individual variation and here report evidence for the existence of two different long-wavelength cone mechanisms in normal humans. The different patterns of colour matches made by male and female subjects indicate these two mechanisms are inherited as an X-chromosome linked trait.

  14. Heterogeneity of uroplakin localization in human normal urothelium, papilloma and papillary carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zupancic, Dasa; Romih, Rok

    2013-01-01

    Uroplakins are differentiation-related membrane proteins of urothelium. We compared uroplakin expression and ultrastructural localization in human normal urothelium, papilloma and papillary carcinoma. Because of high recurrence rate of these tumours, treated by transurethral resection, we investigated urothelial tumour, resection border and uninvolved urothelium. Urinary bladder samples were obtained from tumour free control subjects and patients with papilloma and papillary carcinoma. Immunohistochemical and immunoelectron labelling of uroplakins were performed. In normal human urothelium with continuous uroplakin-positive superficial cell layer uroplakins were localized to flattened mature fusiform vesicles and apical plasma membrane of umbrella cells. Diverse uroplakin expression was found in papilloma and papillary carcinoma. Three aberrant differentiation stages of urothelial cells, not found in normal urothelium, were recognized in tumours. Diverse uroplakin expression and aberrant differentiation were occasionally found in resection border and in uninvolved urothelium. We demonstrated here that uroplakin expression and localization in urothelial tumours is altered when compared to normal urothelium. In patients with papilloma and papillary carcinoma immunolabelling of uroplakins at ultrastructural level shows aberrant urothelial differentiation. It is possible that aberrant differentiation stages of urothelial cells in resection border and in uninvolved urothelium contribute to high recurrence rate.

  15. Heterogeneity of uroplakin localization in human normal urothelium, papilloma and papillary carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zupancic, Dasa; Romih, Rok

    2013-01-01

    Background Uroplakins are differentiation-related membrane proteins of urothelium. We compared uroplakin expression and ultrastructural localization in human normal urothelium, papilloma and papillary carcinoma. Because of high recurrence rate of these tumours, treated by transurethral resection, we investigated urothelial tumour, resection border and uninvolved urothelium. Patients and methods Urinary bladder samples were obtained from tumour free control subjects and patients with papilloma and papillary carcinoma. Immunohistochemical and immunoelectron labelling of uroplakins were performed. Results In normal human urothelium with continuous uroplakin-positive superficial cell layer uroplakins were localized to flattened mature fusiform vesicles and apical plasma membrane of umbrella cells. Diverse uroplakin expression was found in papilloma and papillary carcinoma. Three aberrant differentiation stages of urothelial cells, not found in normal urothelium, were recognized in tumours. Diverse uroplakin expression and aberrant differentiation were occasionally found in resection border and in uninvolved urothelium. Conclusions We demonstrated here that uroplakin expression and localization in urothelial tumours is altered when compared to normal urothelium. In patients with papilloma and papillary carcinoma immunolabelling of uroplakins at ultrastructural level shows aberrant urothelial differentiation. It is possible that aberrant differentiation stages of urothelial cells in resection border and in uninvolved urothelium contribute to high recurrence rate. PMID:24294178

  16. Apoptosis in human chorionic villi and decidua in normal and ectopic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kokawa, K; Shikone, T; Nakano, R

    1998-01-01

    To investigate possible effects of implantation on apoptosis, we examined the cleavage of DNA in human chorionic villi and decidua in intrauterine and ectopic pregnancy. Very limited but detectable cleavage of DNA was recognized in the chorionic villi and decidua in normal pregnancy. A ladder pattern, characteristic of the apoptotic breakdown of DNA, was present in the villi in tubal pregnancy. High molecular weight DNA was predominant in the decidua in tubal pregnancy. Quantitative analysis of low molecular weight fragments of DNA revealed a significant increase in the villous tissue, together with a significant decrease in the decidual tissue, in tubal pregnancy as compared to those in normal pregnancy. An analysis in situ revealed that apoptotic cells were predominant in the syncytiotrophoblast in tubal pregnancy. In decidual tissue, labelled cells were occasionally seen in normal pregnancy, and their numbers decreased in tubal pregnancy. The present study demonstrates that apoptosis occurs in the villi, but not in the decidua in tubal pregnancy, unlike the situation in normal pregnancy. Our results suggest that the implantation site might affect the occurrence of apoptotic changes in early pregnancy of humans.

  17. Normalizing and scaling of data to derive human response corridors from impact tests.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Arun, Mike W J; Pintar, Frank A

    2014-06-03

    It is well known that variability is inherent in any biological experiment. Human cadavers (Post-Mortem Human Subjects, PMHS) are routinely used to determine responses to impact loading for crashworthiness applications including civilian (motor vehicle) and military environments. It is important to transform measured variables from PMHS tests (accelerations, forces and deflections) to a standard or reference population, termed normalization. The transformation process should account for inter-specimen variations with some underlying assumptions used during normalization. Scaling is a process by which normalized responses are converted from one standard to another (example, mid-size adult male to large-male and small-size female adults, and to pediatric populations). These responses are used to derive corridors to assess the biofidelity of anthropomorphic test devices (crash dummies) used to predict injury in impact environments and design injury mitigating devices. This survey examines the pros and cons of different approaches for obtaining normalized and scaled responses and corridors used in biomechanical studies for over four decades. Specifically, the equal-stress equal-velocity and impulse-momentum methods along with their variations are discussed in this review. Methods ranging from subjective to quasi-static loading to different approaches are discussed for deriving temporal mean and plus minus one standard deviation human corridors of time-varying fundamental responses and cross variables (e.g., force-deflection). The survey offers some insights into the potential efficacy of these approaches with examples from recent impact tests and concludes with recommendations for future studies. The importance of considering various parameters during the experimental design of human impact tests is stressed.

  18. Frequency of cerebellopontine angle tumours in patients with trigeminal neuralgia. .

    PubMed

    Khan Afridi, Ehtisham Ahmed; Khan, Shahbaz Ali; Qureshi, Waqar-ur-Rehman; Bhatti, Sajid Nazir; Muhammad, Gul; Mahmood, Shakir; Rehman, Abdur

    2014-01-01

    Though the classical type of trigeminal neuralgia is the most common type with the neurovascular conflict causing the symptoms, yet quite some patients have the secondary type of trigeminal neuralgia in which space occupying lesions are responsible for the symptoms. This study was conducted to determine the frequency of cerebellopontine angle tumours in patients presenting with complaints of trigeminal neuralgia. This case series descriptive study was conducted in the department of Neurosurgery, Ayub Medical College, Abbottabad, from January 2009 to January 2012. It included patients who presented with symptoms of trigeminal neuralgia. Patients were subjected to further radiological investigation like Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to look for secondary causes of trigeminal neuralgia. Among the 134 patients with age ranges 13-64 (51?4.3) years of age, 78(58.2%) were females and 56 (41.7%) were males. Frequency of cerebellopontine angle tumours in patients was 14 (10.4%), among them epidermoid was most common lesion being present in 10 (7.4%) of patients and accounted for 75% of Cerebellopontine Angle tumours in these patients. Meningioma and vestibular schwanoma accounted for 2(1.4%) cases each. In secondary trigeminal neuralgia mean age of onset of symptoms was 39.5±5.2 years as compared to classic trigeminal neuralgia which is 53±2.1 years. Trigeminal Neuralgia can be a typical symptom in cerebellopontine angle tumours like epidermoid, especially in young patients, so all the patients with trigeminal neuralgia should be investigated for lesion in cerebellopontine region.

  19. Characterization of midline medulla role in the trigeminal depressor response.

    PubMed

    Clement, M E; McCall, R B

    1989-05-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to determine the role of the midline medulla in mediating the trigeminal depressor response. Previously we found that lesions of the midline medulla abolished the decrease in blood pressure resulting from electrical stimulation of the spinal trigeminal complex. Electrical stimulation (5 Hz) of the spinal trigeminal tract elicited a decrease in arterial blood pressure that was associated with an inhibition of sympathetic nerve activity recorded from the inferior cardiac nerve of anesthetized cats. The effect of single shocks applied to the trigeminal complex on sympathetic activity was determined using computer-averaging techniques. Single shock stimulation consistently elicited an excitation of sympathetic activity that was followed by an inhibition of sympathetic nerve discharge. The gamma-aminobutyric acid antagonist picrotoxin blocked the depressor response elicited by electrical stimulation of the midline medulla but not by stimulation of the spinal trigeminal complex. Extracellular recordings of the discharges of midline medullary neurons were made to determine the effects of trigeminal stimulation on sympathoinhibitory, sympathoexcitatory, and serotonin neurons. Sympathoinhibitory and sympathoexcitatory neurons were identified by the relationship between unitary discharges and sympathetic nerve activity and by their response to baroreceptor reflex activation. Serotonin (5-HT) neurons were identified using criteria previously developed in our laboratory. These included 1) a slow regular discharge rate, 2) sensitivity to the inhibitory action of the 5-HT1A agonist 8-OH 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin, 3) failure to respond to baroreceptor reflex activation, and 4) the discharges of the 5-HT neurons were not related to sympathetic activity. Stimulation of the spinal trigeminal complex typically inhibited the discharges of sympathoinhibitory neurons. In contrast, stimulation of the trigeminal complex

  20. Radial Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy in an Individual With Primary Trigeminal Neuralgia: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dai; Meng, Ying; Hai, Hong; Yu, Xiao Tong; Ma, Yue Wen

    2017-09-28

    A patient with primary trigeminal neuralgia exhibited pain relief without medication after radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy. The 52-yr-old woman had a 3-yr history of primary trigeminal neuralgia, involving the right maxillary division (V2) and the mandibular division (V3). She became refractory to carbamazepine and exhibited hepatic dysfunction. She hence received 3000 to 6000 impulses of craniofacial radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy to the region centered on the surface projection of the trigeminal ganglion and pain areas at 10 Hz; the intensity ranged from 1.4 to 4.5 bars twice per week for 8 wks. At baseline, and 1, 2, and 5 mos after treatment, the Barrow Neurological Institute scores were IV, IIIa, II, and II, and the visual analog scale scores were 8, 3, 1, and 1, respectively. No complications or adverse effects were observed. The hepatic function returned to normal after the discontinuation of carbamazepine. This case report demonstrates the feasibility of radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy for primary trigeminal neuralgia without complications or adverse effects with careful regulation of the therapy intensity.

  1. SOX9 is expressed in normal stomach, intestinal metaplasia, and gastric carcinoma in humans.

    PubMed

    Sashikawa Kimura, Miho; Mutoh, Hiroyuki; Sugano, Kentaro

    2011-11-01

    SOX9 is a marker for stem cells in the intestine and overexpression of SOX9 is found in some types of cancer. However, the expression of SOX9 in normal stomach, precancerous intestinal metaplasia, and gastric carcinoma has not yet been clarified. This study aimed to investigate SOX9 expression in the corpus and pyloric regions of the normal human stomach, premalignant intestinal metaplasia, and gastric carcinoma by using immunohistochemistry. We evaluated SOX9 expression in 46 clinical samples (early gastric well-differentiated adenocarcinoma including surrounding intestinal metaplasia) resected under esophagogastroduodenoscopy. A small amount of SOX9 was expressed in the neck/isthmus of the corpus region and SOX9 expression was predominantly restricted to the neck/isthmus of the pyloric region in normal human stomach. In the intestinal metaplastic mucosa, SOX9- and PCNA-positive cells were located at the base of the intestinal metaplastic mucosa. Almost all of the gastric carcinoma cells expressed SOX9. SOX9 is expressed in intestinal metaplasia and gastric carcinoma in humans.

  2. Human cytokine responses induced by Gram-positive cell walls of normal intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Chen, T; Isomäki, P; Rimpiläinen, M; Toivanen, P

    1999-01-01

    The normal microbiota plays an important role in the health of the host, but little is known of how the human immune system recognizes and responds to Gram-positive indigenous bacteria. We have investigated cytokine responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to Gram-positive cell walls (CW) derived from four common intestinal indigenous bacteria, Eubacterium aerofaciens (Eu.a.), Eubacterium limosum(Eu.l.), Lactobacillus casei(L.c.), and Lactobacillus fermentum (L.f.). Our results indicate that Gram-positive CW of the normal intestinal microbiota can induce cytokine responses of the human PBMC. The profile, level and kinetics of these responses are similar to those induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or CW derived from a pathogen, Streptococcus pyogenes (S.p.). Bacterial CW are capable of inducing production of a proinflammatory cytokine, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and an anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, but not that of IL-4 or interferon-gamma (IFN-γ). Monocytes are the main cell population in PBMC to produce TNF-α and IL-10. Induction of cytokine secretion is serum-dependent; both CD14-dependent and -independent pathways are involved. These findings suggest that the human cytokine responses induced by Gram-positive CW of the normal intestinal microbiota are similar to those induced by LPS or Gram-positive CW of the pathogens. PMID:10540188

  3. Rearrangement of neuronal responses in the trigeminal system of the rat following peripheral nerve section.

    PubMed Central

    Waite, P M

    1984-01-01

    The infraorbital nerve was cut in either neonatal (on day 0) or adult (day 60) rats and the peripheral regeneration prevented. After 60 days either anatomical or electrophysiological techniques were used to study the peripheral nerve, trigeminal nucleus and somatosensory cortex. In neonatally sectioned animals the number of myelinated fibres surviving, at 60 days, in the peripheral nerve proximal to the lesion was 11% compared with 100% survival after adult nerve section. This reduction in surviving nerve fibres in neonatally lesioned animals was associated with a significant reduction in cross-sectional area of all trigeminal nuclei (principalis, oralis, interpolaris and caudalis) of 18-29%. No significant change in area was present in animals sectioned as adults. Neonatally lesioned animals also showed a reduction of approximately 20% in the number of cells visible in cross-sections of all trigeminal nuclei. Animals sectioned as neonates showed marked plasticity at all nuclei in the trigeminal complex as well as in the cortex. Deafferented cells responded to new peripheral receptive fields so that the somatotopic organization of these cells was modified. Such cells are referred to throughout as 'reactivated' cells. However, in animals sectioned as adults no evidence of plasticity could be detected in the trigeminal nuclei. Only very limited reactivation was apparent in the cortex, so that the majority of deafferented cells remained unresponsive at both sites. A detailed comparison was made of twenty-three reactivated cells and twenty-five normal cells from nucleus principalis of animals with nerve section on day 0. The reactivated cells commonly showed larger, more complex receptive fields, longer latencies and lower following frequencies, although stimulus thresholds were similar. Thus reactivated cells showed more convergence and poorer synaptic security than normal cells. However, stimulation of the contralateral thalamus produced similar responses from both

  4. Ranged-gated pulsed Doppler of the umbilical artery in human fetuses during normal pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Veille, J C; Ben-Ami, M; Sivakoff, M

    1991-07-01

    Range-gated pulsed Doppler has permitted the study of umbilical artery flow velocity waveforms (FVWs) in human fetuses and is becoming part of the antepartum fetal evaluation. No uniform method of describing such velocity waveforms and no significant body of normal values using pulsed Doppler can be found in the literature. The present study reports on a cohort of 268 patients who had pulsed Doppler umbilical artery FVWs performed during their pregnancy. The gestational age at the time of the study ranged between 16th and 42nd weeks of gestation in normal pregnancies. The systolic to diastolic (S/D) ratio was found progressively to decrease as gestation advanced; however, the range of normal values in this study was found to be quite large at all gestational ages. The present data represent normative data of the umbilical artery FVWs S/D ratio in a large number of normal pregnancies as shown by the follow-up of all the patients to delivery. Before umbilical artery waveform becomes part of the antenatal armamentarium, we advise caution before adopting rigid values that are derived from small groups. Lack of standard values for the 95th percentile may result in a premature delivery of an otherwise normal fetus.

  5. Antioxidant macromolecules in the epithelial lining fluid of the normal human lower respiratory tract.

    PubMed Central

    Cantin, A M; Fells, G A; Hubbard, R C; Crystal, R G

    1990-01-01

    We hypothesized that the alveolar structures may contain extracellular macromolecules with antioxidant properties to defend against oxidants. To evaluate this 51Cr-labeled human lung fibroblasts (HFL-1) and cat lung epithelial cells (AKD) were exposed to a H2O2-generating system and alveolar epithelial lining fluid (ELF) from healthy nonsmokers was tested for its ability to protect the lung cells from H2O2-mediated injury. The ELF provided marked antioxidant protection, with most from a H2O-soluble fraction in the 100-300-kD range. Plasma proteins with anti-H2O2 properties were in insufficient concentrations to provide the antioxidant protection observed. However, catalase, a normal intracellular antioxidant, was present in sufficient concentration to account for most of the observed anti-H2O2 properties of ELF. Depletion of ELF with an anticatalase antibody abolished the anti-H2O2 macromolecular defenses of ELF. Since catalase is not normally released by cells, a likely explanation for its presence in high concentrations in normal ELF is that it is released by lung inflammatory and parenchymal cells onto the epithelial surface of the lower respiratory tract during their normal turnover and collects there due to the slow turnover of ELF. It is likely that catalase in the ELF of normal individuals plays a role in protecting lung parenchymal cells against oxidants present in the extracellular milieu. Images PMID:2394842

  6. The distribution and expression of the Bloom's syndrome gene product in normal and neoplastic human cells.

    PubMed

    Turley, H; Wu, L; Canamero, M; Gatter, K C; Hickson, I D

    2001-07-20

    Bloom's syndrome (BS) is an autosomal recessive disorder associated with a predisposition to cancers of all types. Cells from BS sufferers display extreme genomic instability. The BS gene product, BLM, is a 159 kDa DNA helicase enzyme belonging to the RecQ family. Here, we have analysed the distribution of BLM in normal and tumour tissues from humans using a recently characterized, specific monoclonal antibody. BLM was found to be localized to nuclei in normal lymphoid tissues, but was largely absent from other normal tissues analysed with the exception of the proliferating compartment of certain tissues. In contrast, expression of BLM was observed in a variety of tumours of both lymphoid and epithelial origin. A strong correlation was observed between expression of BLM and the proliferative status of cells, as determined by staining for markers of cell proliferation (PCNA and Ki67). We conclude that BLM is a proliferation marker in normal and neoplastic cells in vivo, and, as a consequence, is expressed at a higher level in tumours than in normal quiescent tissues.

  7. Trigeminal neuralgia secondary to basilar impression: A case report

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Holanda, Maurus Marques; Pereira Neto, Normando Guedes; de Moura Peixoto, Gustavo; Pinheiro Santos, Rayan Haquim

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of trigeminal neuralgia. A 23-year-old woman with a history of 1 year of typical trigeminal neuralgia manifested the characteristics of basilar impression. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated basilar impression, deformity of the posterior fossa with asymmetry of petrous bone, and compression of medulla oblongata in the topography of the odontoid apophysis. The operation was performed through a suboccipital craniectomy. The neuralgia disappeared after surgery and remains completely resolved until today. This is the second reported case of trigeminal neuralgia in a patient with basilar impression in Brazil. PMID:25972713

  8. Trigeminal neuralgia secondary to basilar impression: A case report.

    PubMed

    de Almeida Holanda, Maurus Marques; Pereira Neto, Normando Guedes; de Moura Peixoto, Gustavo; Pinheiro Santos, Rayan Haquim

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of trigeminal neuralgia. A 23-year-old woman with a history of 1 year of typical trigeminal neuralgia manifested the characteristics of basilar impression. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated basilar impression, deformity of the posterior fossa with asymmetry of petrous bone, and compression of medulla oblongata in the topography of the odontoid apophysis. The operation was performed through a suboccipital craniectomy. The neuralgia disappeared after surgery and remains completely resolved until today. This is the second reported case of trigeminal neuralgia in a patient with basilar impression in Brazil.

  9. Spatial variability of muscle activity during human walking: the effects of different EMG normalization approaches.

    PubMed

    Cronin, N J; Kumpulainen, S; Joutjärvi, T; Finni, T; Piitulainen, H

    2015-08-06

    Human leg muscles are often activated inhomogeneously, e.g. in standing. This may also occur in complex tasks like walking. Thus, bipolar surface electromyography (sEMG) may not accurately represent whole muscle activity. This study used 64-electrode high-density sEMG (HD-sEMG) to examine spatial variability of lateral gastrocnemius (LG) muscle activity during the stance phase of walking, maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) and maximal M-waves, and determined the effects of different normalization approaches on spatial and inter-participant variability. Plantar flexion MVC, maximal electrically elicited M-waves and walking at self-selected speed were recorded in eight healthy males aged 24-34. sEMG signals were assessed in four ways: unnormalized, and normalized to MVC, M-wave or peak sEMG during the stance phase of walking. During walking, LG activity varied spatially, and was largest in the distal and lateral regions. Spatial variability fluctuated throughout the stance phase. Normalizing walking EMG signals to the peak value during stance reduced spatial variability within LG on average by 70%, and inter-participant variability by 67%. Normalizing to MVC reduced spatial variability by 17% but increased inter-participant variability by 230%. Normalizing to M-wave produced the greatest spatial variability (45% greater than unnormalized EMG) and increased inter-participant variability by 70%. Unnormalized bipolar LG sEMG may provide misleading results about representative muscle activity in walking due to spatial variability. For the peak value and MVC approaches, different electrode locations likely have minor effects on normalized results, whereas electrode location should be carefully considered when normalizing walking sEMG data to maximal M-waves. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Imaging of Keratoconic and normal human cornea with a Brillouin imaging system (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besner, Sebastien; Shao, Peng; Scarcelli, Giuliano; Pineda, Roberto; Yun, Seok-Hyun (Andy)

    2016-03-01

    Keratoconus is a degenerative disorder of the eye characterized by human cornea thinning and morphological change to a more conical shape. Current diagnosis of this disease relies on topographic imaging of the cornea. Early and differential diagnosis is difficult. In keratoconus, mechanical properties are found to be compromised. A clinically available invasive technique capable of measuring the mechanical properties of the cornea is of significant importance for understanding the mechanism of keratoconus development and improve detection and intervention in keratoconus. The capability of Brillouin imaging to detect local longitudinal modulus in human cornea has been demonstrated previously. We report our non-contact, non-invasive, clinically viable Brillouin imaging system engineered to evaluate mechanical properties human cornea in vivo. The system takes advantage of a highly dispersive 2-stage virtually imaged phased array (VIPA) to detect weak Brillouin scattering signal from biological samples. With a 1.5-mW light beam from a 780-nm single-wavelength laser source, the system is able to detect Brillouin frequency shift of a single point in human cornea less than 0.3 second, at a 5μm/30μm lateral/axial resolution. Sensitivity of the system was quantified to be ~ 10 MHz. A-scans at different sample locations on a human cornea with a motorized human interface. We imaged both normal and keratoconic human corneas with this system. Whereas no significantly difference were observed outside keratocnic cones compared with normal cornea, a highly statistically significantly decrease was found in the cone regions.

  11. New Insights in Trigeminal Anatomy: A Double Orofacial Tract for Nociceptive Input

    PubMed Central

    Henssen, Dylan J. H. A.; Kurt, Erkan; Kozicz, Tamas; van Dongen, Robert; Bartels, Ronald H. M. A.; van Cappellen van Walsum, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Orofacial pain in patients relies on the anatomical pathways that conduct nociceptive information, originating from the periphery towards the trigeminal sensory nucleus complex (TSNC) and finally, to the thalami and the somatosensorical cortical regions. The anatomy and function of the so-called trigeminothalamic tracts have been investigated before. In these animal-based studies from the previous century, the intracerebral pathways were mapped using different retro- and anterograde tracing methods. We review the literature on the trigeminothalamic tracts focusing on these animal tracer studies. Subsequently, we related the observations of these studies to clinical findings using fMRI trials. The intracerebral trigeminal pathways can be subdivided into three pathways: a ventral (contralateral) and dorsal (mainly ipsilateral) trigeminothalamic tract and the intranuclear pathway. Based on the reviewed evidence we hypothesize the co-existence of an ipsilateral nociceptive conduction tract to the cerebral cortex and we translate evidence from animal-based research to the human anatomy. Our hypothesis differs from the classical idea that orofacial pain arises only from nociceptive information via the contralateral, ventral trigeminothalamic pathway. Better understanding of the histology, anatomy and connectivity of the trigeminal fibers could contribute to the discovery of a more effective pain treatment in patients suffering from various orofacial pain syndromes. PMID:27242449

  12. Laser speckle imaging to improve clinical outcomes for patients with trigeminal neuralgia undergoing radiofrequency thermocoagulation.

    PubMed

    Ringkamp, Matthias; Wooten, Matthew; Carson, Benjamin S; Lim, Michael; Hartke, Timothy; Guarnieri, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Percutaneous treatments for trigeminal neuralgia are safe, simple, and effective for achieving good pain control. Procedural risks could be minimized by using noninvasive imaging techniques to improve the placement of the radiofrequency thermocoagulation probe into the trigeminal ganglion. Positioning of a probe is crucial to maximize pain relief and to minimize unwanted side effects, such as denervation in unaffected areas. This investigation examined the use of laser speckle imaging during probe placement in an animal model. This preclinical safety study used nonhuman primates, Macaca nemestrina (pigtail monkeys), to examine whether real-time imaging of blood flow in the face during the positioning of a coagulation probe could monitor the location and guide the positioning of the probe within the trigeminal ganglion. Data from 6 experiments in 3 pigtail monkeys support the hypothesis that laser imaging is safe and improves the accuracy of probe placement. Noninvasive laser speckle imaging can be performed safely in nonhuman primates. Because improved probe placement may reduce morbidity associated with percutaneous rhizotomies, efficacy trials of laser speckle imaging should be conducted in humans.

  13. Is There a Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Discernible Cause for Trigeminal Neuralgia? A Structured Review.

    PubMed

    Alper, Judy; Shrivastava, Raj K; Balchandani, Priti

    2017-02-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is a chronic brain condition involving the trigeminal nerve and characterized by severe and recurrent facial pain. Although the cause of TN has been researched extensively, there is a lack of convergence on the physiologic processes leading to pain symptoms. This review seeks to better elucidate the underlying pathophysiology of TN by analyzing the outcomes of studies that use magnetic resonance structural imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging to examine nerve damage in patients with TN. Performing a structured review of the literature, the authors included human magnetic resonance anatomic and diffusion-weighted imaging studies aimed at visualizing the trigeminal nerve or measuring neural damage pertaining to TN. Studies that measured and compared nerve damage in the affected and unaffected sides in patients or patients and controls were analyzed for neural changes associated with TN. Twenty-five studies met inclusion criteria. Overall, the data from the anatomic and diffusion studies showed decreased volume and cross-sectional area, decreased fractional anisotropy, and increased apparent diffusion coefficient and diffusivity associated with the affected side of patients compared with the unaffected side as well as in patients compared with controls. A review of the studies included indicates that neural differences exist between the affected and unaffected sides in patients as well as between patients and controls in both structural and diffusion metrics. The amalgamated data suggest that damage of the trigeminal nerve tissue is commonly found in patients with TN and could be a primary factor in TN pathophysiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Immunohistochemical analysis of Sonic hedgehog signalling in normal human urinary tract development

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Dagan; Winyard, Paul J D; Woolf, Adrian S

    2007-01-01

    Studies of mouse mutants have demonstrated that Sonic hedgehog (SHH) signalling has a functional role in morphogenesis and differentiation at multiple sites within the forming urinary tract, and urinary tract malformations have been reported in humans with mutations that disrupt SHH signalling. However, there is only strikingly sparse and fragmentary information about the expression of SHH and associated signalling genes in normal human urinary tract development. We used immunohistochemistry to demonstrate that SHH protein was localised in distinct urinary tract epithelia in developing normal humans, in the urothelium of the nascent bladder and in kidney medullary collecting ducts. The expression patterns of the SHH-transducing proteins Patched (PTCH) and Smoothened (SMO) were consistent with long-range paracrine signalling associated with detrusor smooth muscle differentiation in the urogenital sinus. In the developing kidney, SHH and PTCH were expressed in epithelia of the collecting system between 16–26 weeks – surprisingly, SMO was not detected. Analysis of cell proliferation and Cyclin B1 immunohistochemistry at 26 weeks, as compared with a 28 week sample in which SHH expression was down-regulated, was consistent with the idea that SHH and PTCH might influence medullary collecting duct growth by regulating the subcellular localisation of Cyclin B1 independently of SMO. Collectively, these descriptive results generate new hypotheses regarding SHH signal transduction in human urinary tract development and help to explain the varied urinary tract malformation phenotypes noted in individuals with mutations in the SHH pathway. PMID:17850284

  15. Distribution of somatostatin receptors in normal and neoplastic human tissues: recent advances and potential relevance.

    PubMed

    Reubi, J C; Schaer, J C; Markwalder, R; Waser, B; Horisberger, U; Laissue, J

    1997-01-01

    This short review describes the localization of somatostatin receptors with in vitro receptor autoradiography techniques in several non-classical, normal human somatostatin target tissues as well as in selected human tumors. In addition to brain, gut and neuroendocrine localizations, somatostatin receptors are expressed in most lymphatic tissues, including gut-associated lymphatic tissue, spleen and thymus; in the cortical and medullary area of the kidney; in the stroma of the prostate and in the epithelial cells of the thyroid. Among human tumors, the extremely high density of somatostatin receptors in medulloblastomas should be stressed as well as the favorable prognostic role of the presence of somatostatin receptors in neuroblastomas. Moreover, several types of mesenchymal tumors have somatostatin receptors as well. The receptor subtypes expressed by distinct tumors may vary: Whereas medulloblastomas and neuroblastomas predominantly express sst2, prostate cancers express sst1 rather than sst2. A further emerging somatostatin target is represented by the peritumoral veins, also known to express sst2 receptors. The multiple somatostatin targets in normal and pathological human tissues represents the basis for potential diagnostic and clinical applications of somatostatin analogs.

  16. Anti-galactose antibodies do not bind to normal human red cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, M.M.B.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.

    1986-03-01

    The authors investigated the possibility that senescent cell IgG might have an anti-galactose (anti-gal) specificity as suggested by others. Anti-gal was isolated from normal human serum with ..cap alpha.. melibiose-agarose. The assays used were hemagglutination, rosetting, phagocytosis, and /sup 125/I protein A binding assay, immunoblotting, and glycine/HCL, pH 2.3, versus sugar elutions. Results revealed binding of anti-gal to rabbit but not human RBC. Immunoblotting of anti-gal revealed labeling of approx.29 bands in rabbit red cell membranes and no labeling of autologous human red cell membranes. The authors attempted to inhibit binding of anti-gal with various sugars. Melibiose caused enhancement rather than inhibition of agglutination when used at concentrations reported by previous investigators to cause inhibition. Neither ..cap alpha.. melibiose or galactose caused inhibition of phagocytosis of senescent cells. Senescent cell IgG was not displaced from freshly isolated old red cells by incubation with melibiose or galactose as determined by an /sup 125/I protein A binding assay. The authors were also unable to elute IgG from stored red cells with galactose. The authors conclude that senescent cell IgG does not have an anti-galactose specificity. The authors were unable to demonstrate an anti-gal antibody to normal human red cells.

  17. PARP Inhibitors in Clinical Use Induce Genomic Instability in Normal Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Shuhei; Murphy, Conleth G.; Doubrovina, Ekaterina; Jasin, Maria; Moynahan, Mary Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) are the first proteins involved in cellular DNA repair pathways to be targeted by specific inhibitors for clinical benefit. Tumors harboring genetic defects in homologous recombination (HR), a DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway, are hypersensitive to PARP inhibitors (PARPi). Early phase clinical trials with PARPi have been promising in patients with advanced BRCA1 or BRCA2-associated breast, ovary and prostate cancer and have led to limited approval for treatment of BRCA-deficient ovary cancer. Unlike HR-defective cells, HR-proficient cells manifest very low cytotoxicity when exposed to PARPi, although they mount a DNA damage response. However, the genotoxic effects on normal human cells when agents including PARPi disturb proficient cellular repair processes have not been substantially investigated. We quantified cytogenetic alterations of human cells, including primary lymphoid cells and non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic epithelial cell lines, exposed to PARPi at clinically relevant doses by both sister chromatid exchange (SCE) assays and chromosome spreading. As expected, both olaparib and veliparib effectively inhibited poly-ADP-ribosylation (PAR), and caused marked hypersensitivity in HR-deficient cells. Significant dose-dependent increases in SCEs were observed in normal and non-tumorigenic cells with minimal residual PAR activity. Clinically relevant doses of the FDA-approved olaparib led to a marked increase of SCEs (5-10-fold) and chromatid aberrations (2-6-fold). Furthermore, olaparib potentiated SCE induction by cisplatin in normal human cells. Our data have important implications for therapies with regard to sustained genotoxicity to normal cells. Genomic instability arising from PARPi warrants consideration, especially if these agents will be used in people with early stage cancers, in prevention strategies or for non-oncologic indications. PMID:27428646

  18. Percutaneous balloon compression (PBC) of trigeminal ganglion for recurrent trigeminal neuralgia after microvascular decompression (MVD).

    PubMed

    Du, Y; Yang, D; Dong, X; Du, Q; Wang, H; Yu, W

    2015-12-01

    Although microvascular decompression (MVD) has become the best surgical treatment for trigeminal neuralgia, it does not achieve 100% cure rate. Re-exploration of the posterior fossa may carry increased risk over first-time MVD and is not always successful, so other treatments are needed. In this study, we evaluate the effectiveness of the patients with recurrent trigeminal neuralgia after MVD treated with percutaneous balloon compression (PBC). The clinical data of 52 recurrent trigeminal neuralgia patients after MVD who underwent PBC between November 2007 and March 2012 were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. After the PBC, 50 patients (96.2%) experienced immediate pain relief; 1 patient had occasional pain, and did not require medication; and 1 patient had no pain relief. The total efficiency was 98.1%. With a mean length of follow-up of 37.6 months, ranging from 12 to 64 months after surgery, 43 (82.7%) patients remained pain-free, 4 patients (7.7%) had mild recurrence, and 3 patients (5.8%) had severe recurrence. The mean time to recurrence was 25.1 months (5-60 months). PBC was repeated a second time in three patients, a third time in one patient. Postoperative complications included facial numbness in 51 patients (98.1%), masseter muscle weakness in 31 patients (59.6%), paresthesia in 5 patients (9.6%), and diplopia secondary to abducens nerve palsy in 1 patient (1.9%). None of the patients had serious surgical morbidities. PBC is a minimally invasive, safe and effective procedure which can be regarded as an optimized choice for recurrent trigeminal neuralgia after MVD.

  19. Expression and characterization of erythropoietin receptors on normal human bone marrow cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshino, S.; Teramura, M.; Takahashi, M.; Motoji, T.; Oshimi, K.; Ueda, M.; Mizoguchi, H.

    1989-05-01

    We studied the specific binding of /sup 125/I-labeled bioactive recombinant human erythropoietin (Epo) to human bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMNC) obtained from normal subjects. The /sup 125/I-labeled Epo bound specifically to the BMNC. Scatchard analysis of the data showed two classes of binding sites; one high affinity (Kd 0.07 nM) and the other low affinity (Kd 0.38 nM). The number of Epo binding sites per BMNC was 46 +/- 16 high-affinity receptors and 91 +/- 51 low-affinity receptors. The specific binding was displaced by unlabeled Epo, but not by other growth factors. Receptor internalization was observed significantly at 37 degrees C, but was prevented by the presence of 0.2% sodium azide. These findings indicate that human BMNC possess two classes of specific Epo receptors with characteristics of a hormone-receptor association.

  20. Transcriptome analysis of the normal human mammary cell commitment and differentiation process.

    PubMed

    Raouf, Afshin; Zhao, Yun; To, Karen; Stingl, John; Delaney, Allen; Barbara, Mary; Iscove, Norman; Jones, Steven; McKinney, Steven; Emerman, Joanne; Aparicio, Samuel; Marra, Marco; Eaves, Connie

    2008-07-03

    Mature mammary epithelial cells are generated from undifferentiated precursors through a hierarchical process, but the molecular mechanisms involved, particularly in the human mammary gland, are poorly understood. To address this issue, we isolated highly purified subpopulations of primitive bipotent and committed luminal progenitor cells as well as mature luminal and myoepithelial cells from normal human mammary tissue and compared their transcriptomes obtained using three different methods. Elements unique to each subset of mammary cells were identified, and changes that accompany their differentiation in vivo were shown to be recapitulated in vitro. These include a stage-specific change in NOTCH pathway gene expression during the commitment of bipotent progenitors to the luminal lineage. Functional studies further showed NOTCH3 signaling to be critical for this differentiation event to occur in vitro. Taken together, these findings provide an initial foundation for future delineation of mechanisms that perturb primitive human mammary cell growth and differentiation.

  1. Normal keratinization in a spontaneously immortalized aneuploid human keratinocyte cell line

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    In contrast to mouse epidermal cells, human skin keratinocytes are rather resistant to transformation in vitro. Immortalization has been achieved by SV40 but has resulted in cell lines with altered differentiation. We have established a spontaneously transformed human epithelial cell line from adult skin, which maintains full epidermal differentiation capacity. This HaCaT cell line is obviously immortal (greater than 140 passages), has a transformed phenotype in vitro (clonogenic on plastic and in agar) but remains nontumorigenic. Despite the altered and unlimited growth potential, HaCaT cells, similar to normal keratinocytes, reform an orderly structured and differentiated epidermal tissue when transplanted onto nude mice. Differentiation- specific keratins (Nos. 1 and 10) and other markers (involucrin and filaggrin) are expressed and regularly located. Thus, HaCaT is the first permanent epithelial cell line from adult human skin that exhibits normal differentiation and provides a promising tool for studying regulation of keratinization in human cells. On karyotyping this line is aneuploid (initially hypodiploid) with unique stable marker chromosomes indicating monoclonal origin. The identity of the HaCaT line with the tissue of origin was proven by DNA fingerprinting using hypervariable minisatellite probes. This is the first demonstration that the DNA fingerprint pattern is unaffected by long- term cultivation, transformation, and multiple chromosomal alterations, thereby offering a unique possibility for unequivocal identification of human cell lines. The characteristics of the HaCaT cell line clearly document that spontaneous transformation of human adult keratinocytes can occur in vitro and is associated with sequential chromosomal alterations, though not obligatorily linked to major defects in differentiation. PMID:2450098

  2. Calcium currents and transients in co-cultured contracting normal and Duchenne muscular dystrophy human myotubes.

    PubMed

    Imbert, N; Vandebrouck, C; Duport, G; Raymond, G; Hassoni, A A; Constantin, B; Cullen, M J; Cognard, C

    2001-07-15

    1. The goal of the present study was to investigate differences in calcium movements between normal and Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) human contracting myotubes co-cultured with explants of rat spinal cord with attached dorsal root ganglia. Membrane potential, variations of intracellular calcium concentration and T- and L-type calcium currents were recorded. Further, a descriptive and quantitative study by electron microscopy of the ultrastructure of the co-cultures was carried out. 2. The resting membrane potential was slightly less negative in DMD (-61.4 +/- 1.1 mV) than in normal myotubes (-65.5 +/- 0.9 mV). Both types of myotube displayed spontaneous action potentials (mean firing frequency, 0.42 and 0.16 Hz, respectively), which triggered spontaneous calcium transients measured with Indo-1. 3. The time integral under the spontaneous Ca(2+) transients was significantly greater in DMD myotubes (97 +/- 8 nM s) than in normal myotubes (67 +/- 13 nM s). 4. The L- and T-type current densities estimated from patch-clamp recordings were smaller in DMD cells (2.0 +/- 0.5 and 0.90 +/- 0.19 pA pF(-1), respectively) than in normal cells (3.9 +/- 0.7 and 1.39 +/- 0.30 pA pF(-1), respectively). 5. The voltage-dependent inactivation relationships revealed a shift in the conditioning potential at which inactivation is half-maximal (V(h,0.5)) of the T- and L-type currents towards less negative potentials, from -72.1 +/- 0.7 and -53.7 +/- 1.5 mV in normal cells to -61.9 +/- 1.4 and -29.2 +/- 1.4 mV in DMD cells, respectively. 6. Both descriptive and quantitative studies by electron microscopy suggested a more advanced development of DMD myotubes as compared to normal ones. This conclusion was supported by the significantly larger capacitance of the DMD myotubes (408 +/- 45 pF) than of the normal myotubes (299 +/- 34 pF) of the same apparent size. 7. Taken together, these results show that differences in T- and L-type calcium currents between normal and DMD myotubes cannot

  3. Calcium currents and transients in co-cultured contracting normal and Duchenne muscular dystrophy human myotubes

    PubMed Central

    Imbert, Nathalie; Vandebrouck, Clarisse; Duport, Gérard; Raymond, Guy; Hassoni, Abdul A; Constantin, Bruno; Cullen, Michael J; Cognard, Christian

    2001-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to investigate differences in calcium movements between normal and Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) human contracting myotubes co-cultured with explants of rat spinal cord with attached dorsal root ganglia. Membrane potential, variations of intracellular calcium concentration and T- and L-type calcium currents were recorded. Further, a descriptive and quantitative study by electron microscopy of the ultrastructure of the co-cultures was carried out. The resting membrane potential was slightly less negative in DMD (−61.4 ± 1.1 mV) than in normal myotubes (−65.5 ± 0.9 mV). Both types of myotube displayed spontaneous action potentials (mean firing frequency, 0.42 and 0.16 Hz, respectively), which triggered spontaneous calcium transients measured with Indo-1. The time integral under the spontaneous Ca2+ transients was significantly greater in DMD myotubes (97 ± 8 nm s) than in normal myotubes (67 ± 13 nm s). The L- and T-type current densities estimated from patch-clamp recordings were smaller in DMD cells (2.0 ± 0.5 and 0.90 ± 0.19 pA pF−1, respectively) than in normal cells (3.9 ± 0.7 and 1.39 ± 0.30 pA pF−1, respectively). The voltage-dependent inactivation relationships revealed a shift in the conditioning potential at which inactivation is half-maximal (Vh,0.5) of the T- and L-type currents towards less negative potentials, from −72.1 ± 0.7 and −53.7 ± 1.5 mV in normal cells to −61.9 ± 1.4 and −29.2 ± 1.4 mV in DMD cells, respectively. Both descriptive and quantitative studies by electron microscopy suggested a more advanced development of DMD myotubes as compared to normal ones. This conclusion was supported by the significantly larger capacitance of the DMD myotubes (408 ± 45 pF) than of the normal myotubes (299 ± 34 pF) of the same apparent size. Taken together, these results show that differences in T- and L-type calcium currents between normal and DMD myotubes cannot simply explain all observed

  4. The Sodium Iodide Symporter (NIS) and Potential Regulators in Normal, Benign and Malignant Human Breast Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, James; Curran, Catherine E.; Hennessy, Emer; Newell, John; Morris, John C.; Kerin, Michael J.; Dwyer, Roisin M.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The presence, relevance and regulation of the Sodium Iodide Symporter (NIS) in human mammary tissue remains poorly understood. This study aimed to quantify relative expression of NIS and putative regulators in human breast tissue, with relationships observed further investigated in vitro. Methods Human breast tissue specimens (malignant n = 75, normal n = 15, fibroadenoma n = 10) were analysed by RQ-PCR targeting NIS, receptors for retinoic acid (RARα, RARβ), oestrogen (ERα), thyroid hormones (THRα, THRβ), and also phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K). Breast cancer cells were treated with Retinoic acid (ATRA), Estradiol and Thyroxine individually and in combination followed by analysis of changes in NIS expression. Results The lowest levels of NIS were detected in normal tissue (Mean(SEM) 0.70(0.12) Log10 Relative Quantity (RQ)) with significantly higher levels observed in fibroadenoma (1.69(0.21) Log10RQ, p<0.005) and malignant breast tissue (1.18(0.07) Log10RQ, p<0.05). Significant positive correlations were observed between human NIS and ERα (r = 0.22, p<0.05) and RARα (r = 0.29, p<0.005), with the strongest relationship observed between NIS and RARβ (r = 0.38, p<0.0001). An inverse relationship between NIS and PI3K expression was also observed (r = −0.21, p<0.05). In vitro, ATRA, Estradiol and Thyroxine individually stimulated significant increases in NIS expression (range 6–16 fold), while ATRA and Thyroxine combined caused the greatest increase (range 16–26 fold). Conclusion Although NIS expression is significantly higher in malignant compared to normal breast tissue, the highest level was detected in fibroadenoma. The data presented supports a role for retinoic acid and estradiol in mammary NIS regulation in vivo, and also highlights potential thyroidal regulation of mammary NIS mediated by thyroid hormones. PMID:21283523

  5. The sodium iodide symporter (NIS) and potential regulators in normal, benign and malignant human breast tissue.

    PubMed

    Ryan, James; Curran, Catherine E; Hennessy, Emer; Newell, John; Morris, John C; Kerin, Michael J; Dwyer, Roisin M

    2011-01-19

    The presence, relevance and regulation of the Sodium Iodide Symporter (NIS) in human mammary tissue remains poorly understood. This study aimed to quantify relative expression of NIS and putative regulators in human breast tissue, with relationships observed further investigated in vitro. Human breast tissue specimens (malignant n = 75, normal n = 15, fibroadenoma n = 10) were analysed by RQ-PCR targeting NIS, receptors for retinoic acid (RARα, RARβ), oestrogen (ERα), thyroid hormones (THRα, THRβ), and also phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K). Breast cancer cells were treated with Retinoic acid (ATRA), Estradiol and Thyroxine individually and in combination followed by analysis of changes in NIS expression. The lowest levels of NIS were detected in normal tissue (Mean(SEM) 0.70(0.12) Log(10) Relative Quantity (RQ)) with significantly higher levels observed in fibroadenoma (1.69(0.21) Log(10)RQ, p<0.005) and malignant breast tissue (1.18(0.07) Log(10)RQ, p<0.05). Significant positive correlations were observed between human NIS and ERα (r = 0.22, p<0.05) and RARα (r = 0.29, p<0.005), with the strongest relationship observed between NIS and RARβ (r = 0.38, p<0.0001). An inverse relationship between NIS and PI3K expression was also observed (r =  0.21, p<0.05). In vitro, ATRA, Estradiol and Thyroxine individually stimulated significant increases in NIS expression (range 6-16 fold), while ATRA and Thyroxine combined caused the greatest increase (range 16-26 fold). Although NIS expression is significantly higher in malignant compared to normal breast tissue, the highest level was detected in fibroadenoma. The data presented supports a role for retinoic acid and estradiol in mammary NIS regulation in vivo, and also highlights potential thyroidal regulation of mammary NIS mediated by thyroid hormones.

  6. Dielectric spectroscopy of normal and malignant human lung cells at ultra-high frequencies.

    PubMed

    Egot-Lemaire, S; Pijanka, J; Sulé-Suso, J; Semenov, S

    2009-04-21

    Microwave techniques for biomedical applications aimed at cancer treatment or diagnosis, either by imaging or spectroscopy, are promising. Their use relies on knowledge of the dielectric properties of tissues, especially on a detectable difference between malignant and normal tissues. As most studies investigated the dielectric properties of ex vivo tissues, there is a need for better biophysical understanding of human tissues in their living state. As an essential component of tissues, cells represent valuable objects of analysis. The approach developed in this study is an investigation at cell level. Its aim was to compare human lung normal and malignant cells by dielectric spectroscopy in the beginning of the microwave range, where such information is of substantial biomedical importance. These cells were embedded in small and low-conductivity agarose hydrogels and laid on an open-ended coaxial probe connected to a vector network analyser operated from 200 MHz to 2 GHz. The comparison between normal and malignant cells was drawn using the variation of measured dielectric properties and fitting the measurements using the Maxwell-Wagner equation. Both methods revealed slight differences between the two cell lines, which were statistically significant regarding conductivities of composite gels and cells.

  7. Analysis of differential protein expression in normal and neoplastic human breast epithelial cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.; Chubb, C.; Huberman, E.; Giometti, C.S.

    1997-07-01

    High resolution two dimensional get electrophoresis (2DE) and database analysis was used to establish protein expression patterns for cultured normal human mammary epithelial cells and thirteen breast cancer cell lines. The Human Breast Epithelial Cell database contains the 2DE protein patterns, including relative protein abundances, for each cell line, plus a composite pattern that contains all the common and specifically expressed proteins from all the cell lines. Significant differences in protein expression, both qualitative and quantitative, were observed not only between normal cells and tumor cells, but also among the tumor cell lines. Eight percent of the consistently detected proteins were found in significantly (P < 0.001) variable levels among the cell lines. Using a combination of immunostaining, comigration with purified protein, subcellular fractionation, and amino-terminal protein sequencing, we identified a subset of the differentially expressed proteins. These identified proteins include the cytoskeletal proteins actin, tubulin, vimentin, and cytokeratins. The cell lines can be classified into four distinct groups based on their intermediate filament protein profile. We also identified heat shock proteins; hsp27, hsp60, and hsp70 varied in abundance and in some cases in the relative phosphorylation levels among the cell lines. Finally, we identified IMP dehydrogenase in each of the cell lines, and found the levels of this enzyme in the tumor cell lines elevated 2- to 20-fold relative to the levels in normal cells.

  8. Classification of normal and malignant human gastric mucosa tissue with confocal Raman microspectroscopy and wavelet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yaogai; Shen, Aiguo; Jiang, Tao; Ai, Yong; Hu, Jiming

    2008-02-01

    Thirty-two samples from the human gastric mucosa tissue, including 13 normal and 19 malignant tissue samples were measured by confocal Raman microspectroscopy. The low signal-to-background ratio spectra from human gastric mucosa tissues were obtained by this technique without any sample preparation. Raman spectral interferences include a broad featureless sloping background due to fluorescence and noise. They mask most Raman spectral feature and lead to problems with precision and quantitation of the original spectral information. A preprocessed algorithm based on wavelet analysis was used to reduce noise and eliminate background/baseline of Raman spectra. Comparing preprocessed spectra of malignant gastric mucosa tissues with those of counterpart normal ones, there were obvious spectral changes, including intensity increase at ˜1156 cm -1 and intensity decrease at ˜1587 cm -1. The quantitative criterion based upon the intensity ratio of the ˜1156 and ˜1587 cm -1 was extracted for classification of the normal and malignant gastric mucosa tissue samples. This could result in a new diagnostic method, which would assist the early diagnosis of gastric cancer.

  9. Biological effects of helium-neon laser irradiation on normal and wounded human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, D; Abrahamse, H

    2005-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate a number of structural, cellular, and molecular responses to heliumneon (632.8 nm) laser irradiation following a single dose of 0.5, 2.5, 5, or 10 J/cm2 on normal and wounded human skin fibroblasts. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is a form of phototherapy, involving the application of low-power monochromatic and coherent light to injuries and lesions to stimulate healing. 1 This therapy has been successfully used for pain attenuation and to induce wound healing in nonhealing defects. Changes in normal and wounded fibroblast cell morphology were evaluated by light microscopy. Cellular parameters evaluated cell proliferation, cell viability, and cytotoxicity while molecular parameters assessed the extent of DNA damage. The results clearly demonstrate that LLLT has an effect on normal and wounded(3) human skin fibroblasts. The parameters showed that doses of 0.5, 2.5, 5, and 10 J/cm2 were sufficient to produce measurable changes in fibroblast cells. A dose of 10 J/cm2 appeared to produce a significant amount of cellular and molecular damage, which could be an important consideration for other therapies, such as photodynamic therapy.

  10. Regulation of glucagon secretion in normal and diabetic human islets by γ-hydroxybutyrate and glycine.

    PubMed

    Li, Changhong; Liu, Chengyang; Nissim, Itzhak; Chen, Jie; Chen, Pan; Doliba, Nicolai; Zhang, Tingting; Nissim, Ilana; Daikhin, Yevgeny; Stokes, David; Yudkoff, Marc; Bennett, Michael J; Stanley, Charles A; Matschinsky, Franz M; Naji, Ali

    2013-02-08

    Paracrine signaling between pancreatic islet β-cells and α-cells has been proposed to play a role in regulating glucagon responses to elevated glucose and hypoglycemia. To examine this possibility in human islets, we used a metabolomic approach to trace the responses of amino acids and other potential neurotransmitters to stimulation with [U-(13)C]glucose in both normal individuals and type 2 diabetics. Islets from type 2 diabetics uniformly showed decreased glucose stimulation of insulin secretion and respiratory rate but demonstrated two different patterns of glucagon responses to glucose: one group responded normally to suppression of glucagon by glucose, but the second group was non-responsive. The non-responsive group showed evidence of suppressed islet GABA levels and of GABA shunt activity. In further studies with normal human islets, we found that γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), a potent inhibitory neurotransmitter, is generated in β-cells by an extension of the GABA shunt during glucose stimulation and interacts with α-cell GHB receptors, thus mediating the suppressive effect of glucose on glucagon release. We also identified glycine, acting via α-cell glycine receptors, as the predominant amino acid stimulator of glucagon release. The results suggest that glycine and GHB provide a counterbalancing receptor-based mechanism for controlling α-cell secretory responses to metabolic fuels.

  11. TRAIL mediates apoptosis in cancerous but not normal primary cultured cells of the human reproductive tract.

    PubMed

    Sadarangani, Anil; Kato, Sumie; Espinoza, Natalia; Lange, Soledad; Llados, Carmen; Espinosa, Marisol; Villalón, Manuel; Lipkowitz, Stanley; Cuello, Mauricio; Owen, Gareth I

    2007-01-01

    Cancer of the reproductive tract encompasses malignancies of the uterine corpus, cervix, ovary, Fallopian tube, among others and accounts for 15% of female cancer mortalities. Tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) mediates apoptosis by binding to death receptors and offers a promising cancer treatment. The goal of this study was to investigate and characterize the effect of TRAIL in endometrial cancer cell lines and normal (non-cancerous) epithelial cells of endometrial origin. We also examined the effect of TRAIL in other primary cultured cancers and normal cells of the human female reproductive tract and evaluated if TRAIL mediated apoptosis correlated with death receptors and decoy receptors 1 and 2.Herein, we demonstrate that TRAIL at concentrations which kill cancerous cells, does not mediate apoptosis or alter cell viability in normal human endometrium, ovary, cervix or Fallopian tube. The partial inhibition by a caspase 9 inhibitor and the total inhibition by a caspase 8 inhibitor demonstrates the dependency on the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. The selective mortality does not correlate with the presence of death or decoy receptors. These results suggest that TRAIL may be an effective treatment for endometrial cancer and other female reproductive cancers, with minimal secondary effects on healthy tissue.

  12. Normal genetic variation of the human foot: part 1: the paradox of normal anatomical alignment in an evolutionary epigenetic context.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Molecular genetics is changing our understanding of the developmental translation of genotype to phenotype between and within different phylogenetic groups. Together with a growing understanding of our own evolutionary relationships to common ancestors, the epigenetic processes involved enforce a reexamination of what is regarded as a normal foot structure. A revised populationist approach is proposed and supported by paleoanthropologic evidence that reflects a picture of emerging suitability for bipedalism that is driven by natural genetic divergence.

  13. Gamma Knife® radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Yen, Chun-Po; Schlesinger, David; Sheehan, Jason P

    2011-11-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is characterized by a temporary paroxysmal lancinating facial pain in the trigeminal nerve distribution. The prevalence is four to five per 100,000. Local pressure on nerve fibers from vascular loops results in painful afferent discharge from an injured segment of the fifth cranial nerve. Microvascular decompression addresses the underlying pathophysiology of the disease, making this treatment the gold standard for medically refractory trigeminal neuralgia. In patients who cannot tolerate a surgical procedure, those in whom a vascular etiology cannot be identified, or those unwilling to undergo an open surgery, stereotactic radiosurgery is an appropriate alternative. The majority of patients with typical facial pain will achieve relief following radiosurgical treatment. Long-term follow-up for recurrence as well as for radiation-induced complications is required in all patients undergoing stereotactic radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia.

  14. Radiation mechanisms of pain control in classical trigeminal neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Gorgulho, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    Classical trigeminal neuralgia is a chronic pain condition that was clinically recognized centuries ago. Nevertheless, the pathological mechanism(s) involved in the development of classical trigeminal neuralgia is still largely based on the theory of peripheral versus central nervous system origin. Limitations of both hypotheses are discussed. Evidence of radiation effects in the electrical conduction of peripheral nerves is reviewed. Results of experimental studies using modern and current radiosurgery techniques and doses are also brought to discussion in an attempt to elucidate the radiation mechanisms involved in the conduction block of excessive sensory information triggering pain attacks. Clinical features and prognostic factors associated with pain control, recurrence, and facial numbness in patients submitted to surgical procedures for classical trigeminal neuralgia are discussed in the context of the features related to the pathogenesis of this condition. Studies focusing on the electrophysiology properties of partially demyelinated trigeminal nerves submitted to radiosurgery are vital to truly advance our current knowledge in the field. PMID:22826806

  15. Arteriovenous malformation surrounding the trigeminal nerve--case report.

    PubMed

    Krischek, Boris; Yamaguchi, Sachiko; Sure, Ulrich; Benes, Ludwig; Bien, Siegfried; Bertalanffy, Helmut

    2004-02-01

    A 57-year-old man presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to the rupture of an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) located at the base of the root of the right trigeminal nerve. In contrast to previous similar cases, his history included no evidence of trigeminal neuralgia or sensory loss. Right vertebral artery angiography revealed a doubled superior cerebellar artery feeding the angioma nidus. The patient refused radiotherapy and preferred surgical treatment. Intraoperatively, a close relationship between arterial feeders and rootlets of the trigeminal nerve was observed. Complete removal of the malformation was achieved and confirmed angiographically. The postoperative course was complicated by subdural hygroma that required repeated drainage and eventually a shunting procedure. This case demonstrates that microsurgical treatment of a trigeminal AVM is feasible. However, stereotactic radiosurgery may be the preferred treatment option considering the potential for postoperative complications.

  16. Update on neuropathic pain treatment for trigeminal neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Quliti, Khalid W.

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a syndrome of unilateral, paroxysmal, stabbing facial pain, originating from the trigeminal nerve. Careful history of typical symptoms is crucial for diagnosis. Most cases are caused by vascular compression of the trigeminal root adjacent to the pons leading to focal demyelination and ephaptic axonal transmission. Brain imaging is required to exclude secondary causes. Many medical and surgical treatments are available. Most patients respond well to pharmacotherapy; carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine are first line therapy, while lamotrigine and baclofen are considered second line treatments. Other drugs such as topiramate, levetiracetam, gabapentin, pregabalin, and botulinum toxin-A are alternative treatments. Surgical options are available if medications are no longer effective or tolerated. Microvascular decompression, gamma knife radiosurgery, and percutaneous rhizotomies are most promising surgical alternatives. This paper reviews the medical and surgical therapeutic options for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia, based on available evidence and guidelines. PMID:25864062

  17. Immunosuppressive activity of human amniotic fluid of normal and abnormal pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Shohat, B; Faktor, J M

    1988-01-01

    Twenty specimens of amniotic fluid (AF) obtained between week 16 and 18 of gestation from normal pregnant women and six specimens from pregnant women in which trisomia of chromosome 21 was found were tested for immunosuppressive activity. Incubation of normal human donor lymphocytes with 0.2-1 mL of AF from normal pregnant women for one hour at 37 degrees C was sufficient for induction of significant inhibition of the ability of these cells to induce a local xenogeneic graft-versus-host reaction (GVHR) as well as inhibition of E and E-active rosette formation, the GVHR being the most sensitive test. On the other hand, amniotic fluid obtained from the six pregnant women in which trisomia of chromosome 21 was found showed no inhibitory activity in either the E or E-active rosette formation, nor in the local xenogeneic graft-versus-host reaction. AF from all the women tested was found to have no effect on phenotype expression of the lymphocytes, as tested by the monoclonal antibodies OKT4+ and OKT8+, nor on B-lymphocytes, as tested by surface immunoglobulins. No correlation was found between the alpha-fetoprotein levels in the sera of those women and the immunosuppressive activity. These findings indicate that genetic defects of the conceptus are not limited to the embryo but may affect the composition of immunosuppressive components present in normal amniotic fluid.

  18. Defining the restriction point in normal asynchronous human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jianwu; Liu, Liang; Li, Xiaolan; Tao, Deding; Hu, Junbo; Qin, Jichao

    2013-10-01

    Although the restriction point (R-point) was proposed in animal cells several decades ago, its existence in normal cells is still controversial, because, in most studies, long-term cultured cell lines rather than primary normal cells were used. Furthermore, cell synchronization was generally applied, resulting in growth imbalance between DNA synthesis and protein expression in cells. Finally, R-point was originally proposed as a unique arrest point that may be in G0 phase; however, generally believed R-point locates within G1 phase. Thus, up to now, there is no solid experimental evidence that supports the existence of R-point in asynchronous primary normal cells. In this study, we used freshly purified peripheral human blood lymphocytes, as asynchronous primary normal cells, to confirm the existence of restriction point in G1 not G0 phase. Our findings may help uncover the mystery of the deregulation of cell cycle progression in malignant tumors. © 2013 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  19. Human embryonic stem cells passaged using enzymatic methods retain a normal karyotype and express CD30.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Alison; Wojtacha, Davina; Hewitt, Zoë; Priddle, Helen; Sottile, Virginie; Di Domenico, Alex; Fletcher, Judy; Waterfall, Martin; Corrales, Néstor López; Ansell, Ray; McWhir, Jim

    2008-03-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are thought to be susceptible to chromosomal rearrangements as a consequence of single cell dissociation. Compared in this study are two methods of dissociation that do not generate single cell suspensions (collagenase and EDTA) with an enzymatic procedure using trypsin combined with the calcium-specific chelator EGTA (TEG), that does generate a single cell suspension, over 10 passages. Cells passaged by single cell dissociation using TEG retained a normal karyotype. However, cells passaged using EDTA, without trypsin, acquired an isochromosome p7 in three replicates of one experiment. In all of the TEG, collagenase and EDTA-treated cultures, cells retained consistent telomere length and potentiality, demonstrating that single cell dissociation can be used to maintain karyotypically and phenotypically normal hESCs. However, competitive genomic hybridization revealed that subkaryotypic deletions and amplifications could accumulate over time, reinforcing that present culture regimes remain suboptimal. In all cultures the cell surface marker CD30, reportedly expressed on embryonal carcinoma but not karyoptically normal ESCs, was expressed on hESCs with both normal and abnormal karyotype, but was upregulated on the latter.

  20. Expression and function of thyroid hormone receptor variants in normal and chronically diseased human liver.

    PubMed

    Chamba, A; Neuberger, J; Strain, A; Hopkins, J; Sheppard, M C; Franklyn, J A

    1996-01-01

    As the liver represents a major target organ for thyroid hormone action, we compared the expression of thyroid hormone receptor (TR) alpha and beta variants in normal human liver and liver affected by primary biliary cirrhosis, sclerosing cholangitis, cryptogenic cirrhosis, and alcoholic cirrhosis (n = 6 in each group). Western blot analysis using specific polyclonal antibodies to alpha 1 or beta 1 TRs or to the related non-T3-binding c-erbA alpha 2 variant revealed abundant expression of TRs in normal and diseased liver, with no difference in size or abundance of TR proteins. Immunocytochemistry likewise revealed abundant nuclear expression of TR proteins in normal and diseased liver, with similar patterns and intensity of staining. Despite abundant TR protein expression, Northern blot hybridization of polyadenylated ribonucleic acid (RNA; 10 micrograms) to TR complementary DNAs revealed only a weak signal for c-erbA alpha 2 messenger RNA (mRNA). Comparison of the level of expression of the thyroid hormone-regulated mRNAs encoding T4-binding globulin, sex hormone-binding globulin, cortisol-binding globulin, and transthyretin in normal and diseased tissue revealed no significant difference, suggesting that hepatocellular expression of these mRNAs is maintained in chronic liver disease despite a marked reduction in circulating T3 concentrations.

  1. Dynamic Knee Alignment and Collateral Knee Laxity and Its Variations in Normal Humans

    PubMed Central

    Deep, Kamal; Picard, Frederic; Clarke, Jon V.

    2015-01-01

    Alignment of normal, arthritic, and replaced human knees is a much debated subject as is the collateral ligamentous laxity. Traditional quantitative values have been challenged. Methods used to measure these are also not without flaws. Authors review the recent literature and a novel method of measurement of these values has been included. This method includes use of computer navigation technique in clinic setting for assessment of the normal or affected knee before the surgery. Computer navigation has been known for achievement of alignment accuracy during knee surgery. Now its use in clinic setting has added to the inventory of measurement methods. Authors dispel the common myth of straight mechanical axis in normal knees and also look at quantification of amount of collateral knee laxity. Based on the scientific studies, it has been shown that the mean alignment is in varus in normal knees. It changes from lying non-weight-bearing position to standing weight-bearing position in both coronal and the sagittal planes. It also varies with gender and race. The collateral laxity is also different for males and females. Further studies are needed to define the ideal alignment and collateral laxity which the surgeon should aim for individual knees. PMID:26636090

  2. Modulation of ABH histo-blood group antigen expression in normal and myasthenic human thymus.

    PubMed

    Sarafian, Victoria S; Marinova, Tsvetana T

    2006-10-01

    The role of ABH histo-blood group antigens (HBGA) in intercellular communication during normal and pathological processes is still uncertain. The present work investigates the expression of ABH HBGA in epithelial cells and lymphocytes in normal thymus, and characterizes the modulation of their immunoreactivity during myasthenic transformation. Immunohistochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy were applied on normal young thymus and on myasthenia gravis-associated thymomas and thymic hyperplasias. The Hassall's corpuscules in the thymus of young individuals were homogeneously stained for HBGA, while in hyperplastic glands only their central part was positive. Stromal epithelial cells permanently expressed HBGA in all tissue samples. In thymomas, mainly the lymphocytes in close proximity to antigen expressing epithelial cells were positive, while in the hyperplastic gland the most intensely stained lymphocytes were those within Hassall's corpuscules. Novel evidence for modulation of ABH antigen reactivity in normal and myasthenic human thymus is presented. It suggests that HBGA might participate in the regulation of the cross-talk in the thymocyte microenvironment throughout the ontogeny, as well as during the myasthenic transformation.

  3. Expression of metalloprotease insulin-degrading enzyme (insulysin) in normal and malignant human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Yfanti, Christina; Mengele, Karin; Gkazepis, Apostolos; Weirich, Gregor; Giersig, Cecylia; Kuo, Wen-Liang; Tang, Wei-Jen; Rosner, Marsha; Schmitt, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    Background Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE, insulysin, insulinase; EC 3.4.22.11), a thiol metalloendopeptidase, is involved in intracellular degradation of insulin, thereby inhibiting its translocation and accumulation to the nucleus. Recently, protein expression of IDE has been demonstrated in the epithelial ducts of normal breast and in breast cancer tissue (Radulescu et al., Int J Oncol 30:73; 2007). Materials and Methods Utilizing four different antibodies generated against different epitopes of the IDE molecule, we performed western blot analysis and immunohistochemical staining on several normal human tissues, on a plethora of tumor cell lines of different tissue origin, and on malignant breast and ovarian tissue. Results Applying the four IDE-directed antibodies, we demonstrate IDE expression at the protein level, both by means of immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry, in all of the tumor cell lines analyzed. Besides, IDE protein expression was found in normal tissues of the kidney, liver, lung, brain, breast and skeletal muscle, as well as in breast and ovarian cancer tissues. Immunohistochemical visualization of IDE indicated cytoplasmic localization of IDE in all of the cell lines and tissues assessed. Conclusions We performed for the first time a wide-ranging survey on IDE protein expression in normal and malignant tissues and cells and thus extend knowledge about cellular and tissue distribution of IDE, an enzyme which so far has mainly been studied in connection with Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes but not in cancer. PMID:18813847

  4. Comparison of multiple assays for detecting human antibodies directed against surface antigens on normal and malignant human tissue culture cells.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, S A; Schwarz, S; Anding, H; Hyatt, C; Williams, G M

    1977-01-01

    Four separate assays of human antibody reactivity to four separate normal and malignant human tissue culture cell lines from two patients have been evaluated using a single highly-reactive allogeneic serum. The visual and end-point cytolysis assay and the 51Chromium release assay were equally sensitive in measuring complement mediated antibody cytoxicity and both were far more sensitive than a trypan blue dye exclusion assay. The assay of antibody reactivity by hemadsorption technique was about 10 times more sensitive than any of the cytotoxicity assays. This latter assay measures only IgG antibody however. These assays showed that cell lines from different patients may differ greatly in 'reactivity' to an allogeneic serum and emphasized the importance of utilizing tumor and normal cells from the same patient when using tissue culture cells to search for tumor specific reactivity. These observations emphasize the importance of utilizing multiple assays against paired normal and malignant cells from the same patient to be certain of the specificity and magnitude of the measured antibody.

  5. Subcutaneous trigeminal nerve field stimulation for refractory trigeminal pain: a cohort analysis.

    PubMed

    Jakobs, Martin; Unterberg, Andreas; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Schuh-Hofer, Sigrid; Ahmadi, Rezvan

    2016-09-01

    Neurosurgical pain management of drug-resistant trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is highly challenging. Microvascular decompression is a first-line neurosurgical approach for classical TN with neurovascular conflict, but can show clinical relapse despite proper decompression. Second-line destructive techniques like radiofrequency thermocoagulation have become reluctantly used due to their potential for irreversible side effects. Subcutaneous peripheral nerve field stimulation (sPNFS) is a minimally invasive neuromodulatory technique which has been shown to be effective for chronic localised pain conditions. Reports on sPNFS for the treatment of trigeminal pain (sTNFS) are still sparse and primarily focused on pain intensity as outcome measure. Detailed data on the impact of sTNFS on attack frequency are currently not available. Patients were classified according to the International Headache Society classification (ICHD-3-beta). Three patients had classical TN without (n = 3) and another three TN with concomitant persistent facial pain (n = 3). Two patients suffered from post-herpetic trigeminal neuropathy (n = 2). All eight patients underwent a trial stimulation of at least 7 days with subcutaneous leads in the affected trigeminal area connected to an external neurostimulator. Of those, six patients received permanent implantation of a neurostimulator. During the follow-up (6-29 months, mean 15.2), VAS-scores, attack frequencies, oral drug intake, complications and side effects were documented. Seven out of eight patients responded to sTNFS (i.e. ≥50 % pain reduction) during the test trial. The pain intensity (according to VAS) was reduced by 83 ± 16 % (mean ± SD) and the number of attacks decreased by 73 ± 26 % (mean ± SD). Five out of six patients were able to reduce or stop pain medication. One patient developed device infection. Two patients developed stimulation-related side effects which could be resolved by reprogramming

  6. ATP-sensitive muscle afferents activate spinal trigeminal neurons with meningeal afferent input in rat - pathophysiological implications for tension-type headache.

    PubMed

    Nöbel, Moritz; Feistel, Stephan; Ellrich, Jens; Messlinger, Karl

    2016-12-01

    Tension-type headache and other primary headaches may be triggered or aggravated by disorders of pericranial muscles, which is possibly due to convergent or collateral afferent input from meningeal and muscular receptive areas. In rodent models high extracellular concentrations of ATP caused muscle nociception and central sensitization of second order neurons. In a rat model of meningeal nociception we asked if spinal trigeminal activity induced by ATP can be modulated by local anaesthesia of distinct muscles. Ongoing activity was recorded from spinal trigeminal neurons with afferent input from the cranial dura mater, the temporal muscle and neck muscles. The stable ATP analogue α,β-methylene adenosine 5'-triphosphate (α,β-meATP, 10 mM) was injected into the ipsilateral temporal muscle, 30 min later followed by injection of local anaesthetics (lidocaine, 2 %) into the ipsilateral neck muscles and/or the temporal muscle. Injection of α,β-meATP into the temporal muscle caused progressive increase in ongoing activity of most of the spinal trigeminal neurons within 30 min. Injection of lidocaine into the neck muscles and/or the temporal muscle reduced this activation to previous levels within 10 min. Distinct spinal trigeminal neurons processing meningeal nociceptive information are under the control of convergent afferent input from several pericranial muscles. Blockade of at least one of these inputs can normalize central trigeminal activity. This may explain why therapeutic manipulations of head muscles can be beneficial in primary headaches.

  7. Transcorneal stimulation of trigeminal nerve afferents to increase cerebral blood flow in rats with cerebral vasospasm: a noninvasive method to activate the trigeminovascular reflex.

    PubMed

    Atalay, Basar; Bolay, Hayrunnisa; Dalkara, Turgay; Soylemezoglu, Figen; Oge, Kamil; Ozcan, Osman Ekin

    2002-11-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate whether stimulation of trigeminal afferents in the cornea could enhance cerebral blood flow (CBF) in rats after they have been subjected to experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Cerebral vasospasm following SAH may compromise CBF and increase the risks of morbidity and mortality. Currently, there is no effective treatment for SAH-induced vasospasm. Direct stimulation of the trigeminal nerve has been shown to dilate constricted cerebral arteries after SAH; however, a noninvasive method to activate this nerve would be preferable for human applications. The authors hypothesized that stimulation of free nerve endings of trigeminal sensory fibers in the face might be as effective as direct stimulation of the trigeminal nerve. Autologous blood obtained from the tail artery was injected into the cisterna magna of 10 rats. Forty-eight and 96 hours later (five rats each) trigeminal afferents were stimulated selectively by applying transcorneal biphasic pulses (1 msec, 3 mA, and 30 Hz), and CBF enhancements were detected using laser Doppler flowmetry in the territory of the middle cerebral artery. Stimulation-induced changes in cerebrovascular parameters were compared with similar parameters in sham-operated controls (six rats). Development of vasospasm was histologically verified in every rat with SAH. Corneal stimulation caused an increase in CBF and blood pressure and a net decrease in cerebrovascular resistance. There were no significant differences between groups for these changes. Data from the present study demonstrate that transcorneal stimulation of trigeminal nerve endings induces vasodilation and a robust increase in CBF. The vasodilatory response of cerebral vessels to trigeminal activation is retained after SAH-induced vasospasm.

  8. Hemimasticatory spasm treated with microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve.

    PubMed

    Chon, Kyu-Hyon; Lee, Jong-Myong; Koh, Eun-Jeong; Choi, Ha-Young

    2012-09-01

    Hemimasticatory spasm is a very rare disorder of the trigeminal nerve characterized by paroxysmal involuntary contraction of the jaw-closing muscles. The mechanisms leading to hemimasticatory spasm are still unclear. Recently, injection of botulinum toxin has become the treatment of choice due to its excellent results. We report a case of a successful treatment of hemimasticatory spasm via microvascular decompression of the motor branch of the trigeminal nerve.

  9. Trigeminal laser-evoked potentials: a neurophysiological tool to detect post-surgical outcome in trigeminovascular contact neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Squintani, G; Turri, M; Donato, F; Tinazzi, M; Masotto, B; Tramontano, V; Talacchi, A; Sala, F; Moretto, G; Valeriani, M

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the nociceptive system of patients affected by trigeminal neuralgia (TN) secondary to documented vascular contact who underwent microvascular decompression. For that purpose, we used the classical trigeminal reflexes and the trigeminal laser-evoked potentials (tLEPs) before and after surgery, in order to verify any possible change after decompression and determine if there was any correlation between the neurophysiological parameters and the clinical outcome. Eleven patients affected by TN caused by trigeminovascular contact and 10 age-matched controls underwent conventional trigeminal reflexes (bilateral Blink Reflex/BR and Masseter Inhibitory Reflex stimulating infraorbital and mental nerves/MIR V2 and V3) and tLEPs. Patients repeated neurophysiological tests one week after surgery. Short-latency BR and MIR were normal in all patients before surgery and there was no statistical difference before and after surgery. Conversely, in patients before surgery, tLEPs' amplitudes were significantly lower in the affected than in the healthy side (p = 0.017 for V2 and 0.037 for V3 branches). After surgery, on the affected side, tLEP amplitude increased and the pre/post-operative difference was significant (p = 0.017 for V2 and 0.028 for V3 divisions). Nine patients referred satisfactory pain relief and the favourable clinical outcome correlated with the neurophysiological recovery. This study demonstrates that TN caused by trigeminovascular compression may be related to Aδ fibres impairment, and tLEPs are more sensitive than conventional trigeminal reflexes to reveal small fibre dysfunction and to monitor the post-surgical outcome in these patients. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  10. Transforming growth factor alpha and epidermal growth factor levels in normal human gastrointestinal mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Cartlidge, S. A.; Elder, J. B.

    1989-01-01

    Acid soluble proteins from 23 samples of normal human gastrointestinal mucosa derived from four normal adult organ donors were extracted and subjected to specific radiommunoassays for transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha) and urogastrone epidermal growth factor (URO-EGF). All tissues were found to contain immunoreactive TGF alpha and levels ranged from 57 to 4,776 pg-1 wet weight of tissue. Although levels varied between tissue donors, the distribution of TGF alpha throughout the gastrointestinal tract appeared similar in all cases. URO-EGF levels were much lower (0-216 pg g-1 wet weight). TGF alpha levels in extracts of gastrointestinal mucosa from a 7-year-old female donor were higher and the observed distribution was markedly different from adult levels. URO-EGF was not detected in mucosal or submucosal tissue extracts from this patient. Further studies in juveniles are indicated. PMID:2803941

  11. Surface modification of microparticles causes differential uptake responses in normal and tumoral human breast epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patiño, Tania; Soriano, Jorge; Barrios, Lleonard; Ibáñez, Elena; Nogués, Carme

    2015-06-01

    The use of micro- and nanodevices as multifunctional systems for biomedical applications has experienced an exponential growth during the past decades. Although a large number of studies have focused on the design and fabrication of new micro- and nanosystems capable of developing multiple functions, a deeper understanding of their interaction with cells is required. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of different microparticle surfaces on their interaction with normal and tumoral human breast epithelial cell lines. For this, AlexaFluor488 IgG functionalized polystyrene microparticles (3 μm) were coated with Polyethyleneimine (PEI) at two different molecular weights, 25 and 750 kDa. The effect of microparticle surface properties on cytotoxicity, cellular uptake and endocytic pathways were assessed for both normal and tumoral cell lines. Results showed a differential response between the two cell lines regarding uptake efficiency and mechanisms of endocytosis, highlighting the potential role of microparticle surface tunning for specific cell targeting.

  12. Gene expression profiles in anatomically and functionally distinct regions of the normal aged human brain

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Winnie S.; Dunckley, Travis; Beach, Thomas G.; Grover, Andrew; Mastroeni, Diego; Walker, Douglas G.; Caselli, Richard J.; Kukull, Walter A.; McKeel, Daniel; Morris, John C.; Hulette, Christine; Schmechel, Donald; Alexander, Gene E.; Reiman, Eric M.; Rogers, Joseph; Stephan, Dietrich A.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we have characterized and compared gene expression profiles from laser capture microdissected neurons in six functionally and anatomically distinct regions from clinically and histopathologically normal aged human brains. These regions, which are also known to be differentially vulnerable to the histopathological and metabolic features of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), include the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus (limbic and paralimbic areas vulnerable to early neurofibrillary tangle pathology in AD), posterior cingulate cortex (a paralimbic area vulnerable to early metabolic abnormalities in AD), temporal and prefrontal cortex (unimodal and heteromodal sensory association areas vulnerable to early neuritic plaque pathology in AD), and primary visual cortex (a primary sensory area relatively spared in early AD). These neuronal profiles will provide valuable reference information for future studies of the brain, in normal aging, AD and other neurological and psychiatric disorders. PMID:17077275

  13. Phosphatidic acid phosphatase activity in subcellular fractions of normal and dystrophic human muscle.

    PubMed

    Kunze, D; Rüstow, B; Olthoff, D; Jung, K

    1985-03-15

    Biopsy samples from normal and dystrophic human muscle (Duchenne type) were fractionated by differential centrifugation and microsomes, mitochondria and cytosol were assayed for phosphatidic acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.4) and marker enzymes of mitochondria and cytosol. The activity of phosphatidic acid phosphatase was significantly lower in microsomes and higher in cytosol and mitochondria of dystrophic muscle than in the corresponding subcellular fractions of normal muscle. The results support an explanation of earlier findings that there is reduced G3P incorporation into diglycerides and phosphatidylcholine and a qualitative and quantitative change in the amount of phosphatidylcholine in dystrophic microsomes. The possible reasons for the reduction in the activity of only microsomal PA-P-ase were discussed.

  14. [Differential proteins analysis among human nasal inverted papilloma and nasal polyposis and normal nasal mucosa].

    PubMed

    Meng, Qing-shu; Jin, Sheng; Zhang, Qiu-hang; Zhang, Man

    2010-04-01

    Proteomics-based approach was applied to analyze and compare the difference of proteins among human nasal inverted papilloma (NIP), nasal polyposis and normal nasal mucosa, in order to screen different proteins as marker. The total proteins of NIP, nasal polyposis and normal nasal mucosa were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). Protein image obtained by using the gel of Calibrated GS-800 Densitometer system, and determined different protein spots. Six differential proteins between NIP and nasal polyp tissue were identified, which were galectin-1, Manganese-superoxide dismutase, galectin-7, trichostatin A, prohibitin and transferring. All of them were increased in NIP. Six differential proteins were possibly involved in NIP, which provided a new way for discriminating NIP from nasal polyposis. The data would be good for the establishment of NIP protein 2-DE map.

  15. Streamlined procedure for the production of normal and altered versions of recombinant human proinsulin.

    PubMed

    Mackin, R B

    1999-04-01

    A method for the simplified, reproducible production of both normal and altered versions of human proinsulin has been developed. A polyhistidine/proinsulin fusion protein was expressed using a prokaryotic expression system and partially purified by affinity chromatography. Disulfide bonds within the polypeptide were formed prior to removal of the affinity tag. The proinsulin cleaved from the fusion protein was then subjected to a final purification step of semipreparative reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Integrity of both the normal and mutant proinsulins was confirmed by peptide mapping and mass spectrometry. The different versions of proinsulin will be used to map those residues of the substrate used in cleavage site recognition by members of the furin/PC family of converting enzymes. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  16. Effects of penicillinase on bactericidal and complement activities in normal human serum.

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, W H; Wunderlich, A C; Corbeil, L C; Davis, C E; Curd, J G

    1983-01-01

    During routine addition of penicillinase (beta-lactamase) to patients sera, we found that the capacity of some of these sera to kill serum-sensitive gram-negative organisms was significantly decreased. Further controlled studies showed that penicillinase decreased both the bactericidal activity of normal human sera and the total hemolytic activity (CH50) of complement in these sera. The decreased bactericidal activity correlated significantly (r = 0.57, P less than 0.05) with the reduction of CH50 in eight normal sera. These effects of penicillinase were time and temperature dependent. Measurement of individual complement component activities showed that penicillinase decreased the activity of C2, C4, and C3-C9, suggesting that the penicillinase preparation activated the classical pathway. These results cast doubts on the validity of bactericidal determinations when sera are pretreated with penicillinase. PMID:6603195

  17. Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) in normal human trabecular meshwork.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yutao; Munro, Drew; Layfield, David; Dellinger, Andrew; Walter, Jeffrey; Peterson, Katherine; Rickman, Catherine Bowes; Allingham, R Rand; Hauser, Michael A

    2011-04-08

    To identify the genes expressed in normal human trabecular meshwork tissue, a tissue critical to the pathogenesis of glaucoma. Total RNA was extracted from human trabecular meshwork (HTM) harvested from 3 different donors. Extracted RNA was used to synthesize individual SAGE (serial analysis of gene expression) libraries using the I-SAGE Long kit from Invitrogen. Libraries were analyzed using SAGE 2000 software to extract the 17 base pair sequence tags. The extracted sequence tags were mapped to the genome using SAGE Genie map. A total of 298,834 SAGE tags were identified from all HTM libraries (96,842, 88,126, and 113,866 tags, respectively). Collectively, there were 107,325 unique tags. There were 10,329 unique tags with a minimum of 2 counts from a single library. These tags were mapped to known unique Unigene clusters. Approximately 29% of the tags (orphan tags) did not map to a known Unigene cluster. Thirteen percent of the tags mapped to at least 2 Unigene clusters. Sequence tags from many glaucoma-related genes, including myocilin, optineurin, and WD repeat domain 36, were identified. This is the first time SAGE analysis has been used to characterize the gene expression profile in normal HTM. SAGE analysis provides an unbiased sampling of gene expression of the target tissue. These data will provide new and valuable information to improve understanding of the biology of human aqueous outflow.

  18. Characterization of two different agglutinators in the latex fixation test, occurring in normal human sera

    PubMed Central

    Klein, F.; Valkenburg, H. A.; Van Zwet, Theda L.; Lafeber, Geertruida J. M.

    1966-01-01

    Using a sensitive modification of the latex fixation test it is possible to detect a small agglutinating effect in about 60 per cent of normal human sera, after these have been heated for 30 minutes at 56°. This was shown to be caused by an IgM globulin with the properties of a rheumatoid factor. The factor is able to react with human IgG globulin and may represent an antibody to the IgG part of circulating antigen—antibody complexes. The heat treatment probably inactivates an inhibitor of the latex fixation reaction. In addition all normal human sera give an agglutination reaction with IgG coated latex at incubation temperatures of 37° or lower. It was shown that these reactions are caused by a thermolabile, non-reducible component with a sedimentation constant of about 10. This component is probably identical with the complement component C'1q. The agglutinating activity was found in the α2—β1 region after electrophoresis of untreated serum, but in the slow γ region after treatment of the serum with EDTA. This kind of agglutination may cause false positive reactions in latex tests which are carried out at 37° or less. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 3 PMID:4160336

  19. Trigeminal Neuralgia in Pregnancy: A Management Challenge.

    PubMed

    Swain, Bhanu P; Vidhya, Sri; Jadon, Ashok; Chandra, Kumar N; Kumar, Sharad

    2017-06-02

    Pregnancy is known to aggravate pre-existing chronic painful conditions. Trigeminal neuralgia (TN), albeit a disease of the elderly, may afflict pregnant females, which can further complicate its management. Teratogenic effects of the commonly used drugs on the developing fetus limit pharmacological treatment. Moreover, safety of commonly performed interventional therapies is marred by their inherent fetomaternal effects and more importantly the risk for radiation effects on the fetus due to the use of fluoroscopy. This rare coexistence of TN in pregnancy has not been reported before. Here we present a case of TN in a young woman, whose pain was aggravated when she became pregnant, and she was treated successfully by conventional radiofrequency ablation of the Gasserian ganglion. © 2017 World Institute of Pain.

  20. Differentiation between normal and tumor vasculature of animal and human glioma by FTIR imaging.

    PubMed

    Wehbe, Katia; Pineau, Raphael; Eimer, Sandrine; Vital, Anne; Loiseau, Hugues; Déléris, Gérard

    2010-12-01

    Malignant gliomas are very aggressive tumors, highly angiogenic and invading heterogeneously the surrounding brain parenchyma, making their resection very difficult. To overcome the limits of current diagnostic imaging techniques used for gliomas, we proposed using FTIR imaging, with a spatial resolution from 6 to 10 μm, to provide molecular information for their histological examination, based on discrimination between normal and tumor vasculature. Differentiation between normal and tumor blood vessel spectra by hierarchical cluster analysis was performed on tissue sections obtained from xenografted brain tumors of Rag-gamma mice 28 days after intracranial implantation of glioma cells, as well as for human brain tumors obtained in clinics. Classical pathological examination and immunohistochemistry were performed in parallel to the FTIR spectral imaging of brain tissues. First on the animal model, classification of FTIR spectra of blood vessels could be performed using spectral intervals based on fatty acyl (3050-2800 cm(-1)) and carbohydrate (1180-950 cm(-1)) absorptions, with the formation of two clusters corresponding to healthy and tumor parts of the tissue sections. Further data treatments on these two spectral intervals provided interpretable information about the molecular contents involved in the differentiation between normal and tumor blood vessels, the latter presenting a higher level of fatty acyl chain unsaturation and an unexpected loss of absorption from osidic residues. This classification method was further successfully tested on human glioma tissue sections. These findings demonstrate that FTIR imaging could highlight discriminant molecular markers to distinguish between normal and tumor vasculature, and help to delimitate areas of corresponding tissue.

  1. Normal human epithelial cells regulate the size and morphology of tissue-engineered capillaries.

    PubMed

    Rochon, Marie-Hélène; Fradette, Julie; Fortin, Véronique; Tomasetig, Florence; Roberge, Charles J; Baker, Kathleen; Berthod, François; Auger, François A; Germain, Lucie

    2010-05-01

    The survival of thick tissues/organs produced by tissue engineering requires rapid revascularization after grafting. Although capillary-like structures have been reconstituted in some engineered tissues, little is known about the interaction between normal epithelial cells and endothelial cells involved in the in vitro angiogenic process. In the present study, we used the self-assembly approach of tissue engineering to examine this relationship. An endothelialized tissue-engineered dermal substitute was produced by adding endothelial cells to the tissue-engineered dermal substitute produced by the self-assembly approach. The latter consists in culturing fibroblasts in the medium supplemented with serum and ascorbic acid. A network of tissue-engineered capillaries (TECs) formed within the human extracellular matrix produced by dermal fibroblasts. To determine whether epithelial cells modify TECs, the size and form of TECs were studied in the endothelialized tissue-engineered dermal substitute cultured in the presence or absence of epithelial cells. In the presence of normal keratinocytes from skin, cornea or uterine cervix, endothelial cells formed small TECs (cross-sectional area estimated at less than 50 microm(2)) reminiscent of capillaries found in the skin's microcirculation. In contrast, TECs grown in the absence of epithelial cells presented variable sizes (larger than 50 microm(2)), but the addition of keratinocyte-conditioned media or exogenous vascular endothelial growth factor induced their normalization toward a smaller size. Vascular endothelial growth factor neutralization inhibited the effect of keratinocyte-conditioned media. These results provide new direct evidence that normal human epithelial cells play a role in the regulation of the underlying TEC network, and advance our knowledge in tissue engineering for the production of TEC networks in vitro.

  2. Mind-refreshing acupuncture therapy for facial spasm, trigeminal neuralgia and stubborn facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng; Fang, Guimei

    2004-09-01

    It has been proved by clinical experiment that needling at Fengchi (GB 20), Wangu (GB 12) and Tianzhu (BL 10) can markedly improve the blood supply to the vertebral basilar artery, increase the cerebral blood flow, and relax the spasm of the vascular smooth muscles. The combined use of Shangxing (GV 23) and Yintang (EX-HN3) can give the effects of resuscitating and tranquilizing the mind, dispelling wind, dredging the channels, and relieving spasm and pain. In short, the above therapy may turn the pathological state into a normal physiological state, and bring a quicker recovery for patients with facial spasm, trigeminal neuralgia and stubborn facial paralysis.

  3. Clinical Characteristics and Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia Following Herpes Zoster.

    PubMed

    Li, Guo-wei; Lan, Qing; Zhang, Wen-chuan

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to illustrate the clinical characteristics and treatment of trigeminal neuralgia following herpes zoster. From August 1, 2011 to August 1, 2013, 23 consecutive patients with trigeminal neuralgia following herpes zoster underwent microvascular decompression (MVD) at our cranial nerve disease center. All patients underwent preoperative MRI evaluation, intraoperative observation, and clinical effect evaluation. Clinical data were collected and analyzed in our center. V2 division was the most commonly affected branch. Unlike pretrigeminal neuralgia (PTN), trigger zone was only found in a small part of patients (21.7%). Unlike PTN, the adhesions and compressions between trigeminal nerve and offending vessels were usually not serious; trigeminal nerve usually is atrophic; superior cerebellar artery was the most common offending vessels (65.2%). Of 23 patients, 19 experienced pain relief (82.6%), 1 patient suffered from hearing loss, and another one suffered from cerebrospinal fluid leak; no severe complications were found. During follow-up period, no recurrence was found (3 lost). For patients who suffered from trigeminal neuralgia following herpes zoster, trigger zone was only found in a small part of patients. The trigeminal nerve usually is atrophic; microvascular decompression was equally applied to these patients if vessel compression was confirmed.

  4. [Comparison of 51 element contents in normal human lung tissue over twenty years].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jing; Ouyang, Li; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Liu, Ya-Qiong; Xie, Qing; Chu, Hong-Da; Wu, Quan; Fan, Ti-Qiang; Wang, Jing-Yu

    2008-05-01

    Changes in content and distribution of elements in human tissues may reflect changes in environmental backgrounds, and are closely related to human health. To investigate the change in element background in normal lung tissue in different stage, we used ICP-MS, ICP-AES and GFAAS to determine 51 element contents in normal human lung samples of 1982-83 year (n = 7) and compare with those of 2004-05 year (n = 16). Samples were from healthy male adults who died suddenly, and were treated with microwave digestion and wet digestion method. The results show that the contents of 23 elements (Na, Mg, P, K, As, Mo, Ag, Ba, Bi, Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Lu) are significantly higher, and 6 elements (Zn, Ga, Ge, Se, Au and Zr) are significantly lower in the 2004-05 samples than those in the 1982-83 samples. This difference would be related to the changes in environmental backgrounds and people's living habit during twenty years. The distinctive decrease in contents of the 2004-05 samples for most measured rare earth elements (REEs) may be due to more rational usage of REEs in present, while were the soil and corps were largely abused in 1980s in China. The significant increase in contents of some useful micro-elements (Zn and Se ) in the present samples maybe because of the increased intake of these elements as people own more health consciousness. Besides, the increased contents of heavy metal Pb, Cd, Cr and Ni in the present samples may be related to the deterioration of air quality as industrialization course. More than half of measured elements have been significantly changed over twenty years, indicating that some normal value ranges of element contents should be adjusted according to the difference.

  5. Expression of glutamate transporter subtypes during normal human corticogenesis and type II lissencephaly.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Akiko; Takashima, Sachio; Yokoo, Hideaki; Rothstein, Jeffrey D; Wada, Keiji; Iwaki, Toru

    2005-03-31

    Glutamate transporters are thought to have an important role in central nervous system (CNS) development. We investigated the expression of the sodium-dependent high-affinity glutamate transporters EAAT1, EAAT2, and EAAT3 in 11 human autopsied cases without neurological disorders and in four cases with type II lissencephaly including Walker Warburg's syndrome (WWS) and Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), both of which are classified as migration disorders of the human brain. Expression of glutamate transporter subtypes was differentially regulated during normal human corticogenesis. Although EAAT1 and EAAT2 were mainly localized to the cortical astrocytes in the postnatal brain, EAAT1 was enriched in the proliferative zones and radial glia from 13 gestational weeks (GW) to 20 GW. EAAT2 was abundant in the intermediate zone until 23 GW, and transiently expressed in the radial fibers of the transitional form of radial glia into mature astrocytes as well as partly in the corticofugal axonal bundles. EAAT3 immunoreactivity was robust in the apical dendrites of the pyramidal neurons in the marginal zone and cortical plate during corticogenesis, and decreased postnatally. In the individuals with type II lissencephaly, glutamate transporters were expressed in the extrusion of neuroglial tissue. Bundles of EAAT2-immunoreactive radial fibers were prominent in the specimens at 20 GW. Thus, glutamate transporters are differentially regulated during normal and impaired corticogenesis. Altered glutamate transporter expression in type II lissencephaly suggests that glutamate metabolism is involved in the formation of the normal cortex and contributes to the disorganized cortex seen in migration disorders.

  6. Nystagmus responses in a group of normal humans during earth-horizontal axis rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, Conrad, III; Furman, Joseph M. R.

    1989-01-01

    Horizontal eye movement responses to earth-horizontal yaw axis rotation were evaluated in 50 normal human subjects who were uniformly distributed in age (20-69 years) and each age group was then divided by gender. Subjects were rotated with eyes open in the dark, using clockwise and counter-clockwise 60 deg velocity trapezoids. The nystagmus slow component velocity is analyzed. It is shown that, despite large intersubject variability, parameters which describe earth-horizontal yaw axis responses are loosely interrelated, and some of them vary significantly with gender and age.

  7. PHF10 Is Required for Cell Proliferation in Normal and SV40-Immortalized Human Fibroblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Banga, S. S.; Peng, L.; Dasgupta, T.; Palejwala, V.; Ozer, H. L.

    2010-01-01

    Normal human diploid fibroblasts have limited life span in culture and undergo replicative senescence after 50–60 population doublings. On the contrary, cancer cells typically divide indefinitely and are immortal. Expression of SV40 large T and small t antigens in human fibroblasts transiently extends their life span by 20–30 population doublings and facilitates immortalization. We have identified a rearrangement in chromosome 6 shared by SV40-transformed human fibroblasts. Rearrangements involving chromosome 6 are among the most frequent in human carcinogenesis. In this paper, we extend analysis of the 6q26–q27 region, a putative site for a growth suppressor gene designated SEN6 involved in immortalization of SV40-transformed cells. Detailed molecular characterization of the rearranged chromosomes (6q*, normal appearing; and 6qt, translocated) in the SV40-immortalized cell line HALneo by isolating each of these 2 chromosomes in mouse/HAL somatic cell hybrids is presented. Analysis of these mouse/HAL somatic cell hybrids with polymorphic and nonpolymorphic markers revealed that the 6q* has undergone a chromosomal break in the MLLT4 gene (alias AF6). This result in conjunction with previous published observations leads us to conclude that SEN6 lies between MLLT4 and TBP at chromosomal region 6q27. Examination of different genes (MLLT4, DLL1, FAM120B, PHF10) located within this interval that are expressed in HS74 normal fibroblast cells reveals that overexpression of epitope-tagged truncated PHF10 cDNAs resulted in reduced cell proliferation in multiple cell lines. Paradoxically, down-regulation of PHF10 by RNAi also resulted in loss of cell proliferation in normal fibroblast cells, indicating PHF10 function is required for cell growth. Taken together, these observations suggest that decreased cell proliferation with epitope-tagged truncated PHF10 proteins may be due to dominant negative effects or due to unregulated expression of these mutant proteins. Hence

  8. The significance of paired astrocyte nuclei in normal human nervous tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Pittella, J E; Brasileiro-Filho, G

    1987-01-01

    A quantitative study of astrocytes was carried out in 80 microscopic fields and the number of paired nuclei in 100 consecutive astrocytes of the temporo-occipital gyrus cortex was determined in 13 patients with no cerebral or liver disease. No significant correlation was found between astrocyte number and the percentage of paired nuclei. When studies on astrocytes in hepatic encephalopathy, liver cirrhosis and hepatosplenic schistosomiasis are taken into consideration it is suggested that these cells are in continuous variable renewal in normal adult human nervous tissue, as occurs in other animal species. Images Fig. 1 PMID:3654344

  9. Nystagmus responses in a group of normal humans during earth-horizontal axis rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, Conrad, III; Furman, Joseph M. R.

    1989-01-01

    Horizontal eye movement responses to earth-horizontal yaw axis rotation were evaluated in 50 normal human subjects who were uniformly distributed in age (20-69 years) and each age group was then divided by gender. Subjects were rotated with eyes open in the dark, using clockwise and counter-clockwise 60 deg velocity trapezoids. The nystagmus slow component velocity is analyzed. It is shown that, despite large intersubject variability, parameters which describe earth-horizontal yaw axis responses are loosely interrelated, and some of them vary significantly with gender and age.

  10. Quantifying normal geometric variation in human pulmonary lobar geometry from high resolution computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ho-Fung; Clark, Alys R; Hoffman, Eric A; Malcolm, Duane T K; Tawhai, Merryn H

    2015-05-01

    Previous studies of the ex vivo lung have suggested significant intersubject variability in lung lobe geometry. A quantitative description of normal lung lobe shape would therefore have value in improving the discrimination between normal population variability in shape and pathology. To quantify normal human lobe shape variability, a principal component analysis (PCA) was performed on high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) imaging of the lung at full inspiration. Volumetric imaging from 22 never-smoking subjects (10 female and 12 male) with normal lung function was included in the analysis. For each subject, an initial finite element mesh geometry was generated from a group of manually selected nodes that were placed at distinct anatomical locations on the lung surface. Each mesh used cubic shape functions to describe the surface curvilinearity, and the mesh was fitted to surface data for each lobe. A PCA was performed on the surface meshes for each lobe. Nine principal components (PCs) were sufficient to capture >90% of the normal variation in each of the five lobes. The analysis shows that lobe size can explain between 20% and 50% of intersubject variability, depending on the lobe considered. Diaphragm shape was the next most significant intersubject difference. When the influence of lung size difference is removed, the angle of the fissures becomes the most significant shape difference, and the variability in relative lobe size becomes important. We also show how a lobe from an independent subject can be projected onto the study population's PCs, demonstrating potential for abnormalities in lobar geometry to be defined in a quantitative manner.

  11. [Teflon granuloma after microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve root in a patient with recurrent trigeminal neuralgia].

    PubMed

    Rzaev, D A; Kulikova, E V; Moysak, G I; Voronina, E I; Ageeva, T A

    2016-01-01

    The use of a Teflon implant for Jannetta surgery in patients with trigeminal neuralgia is complicated in rare cases by the development of a Teflon granuloma and can cause recurrent facial pain. The article presents a clinical case of a Teflon granuloma developed after microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve root, describes the surgical findings and histological picture, and analyzes the literature, causes of granuloma development, and recommendations for treatment of these patients.

  12. Immortalization of normal human kidney epithelial cells by nickel(II)

    SciTech Connect

    Tveito, G.; Hansteen, I.L.; Dalen, H.; Haugen, A.

    1989-04-01

    The occupational and environmental hazards of nickel exposure are of great concern in environmental medicine. Nickel workers have increased risk of cancer of the nose, lung, larynx, and possibly the kidney. In the present investigation we have studied the effects of nickel ions on fetal human kidney cortex explants. The explants were continuously exposed to 5 micrograms/ml NiSO4. After 70-100 days in culture foci of phenotypically altered cells appeared. Immortalized cell lines were established and demonstrated to be of human epithelial origin. Tumorigenicity was not induced, but the cells demonstrated decreased requirement for serum, increased plating efficiency and saturation density, and formation of colonies in soft agar. Chromosome changes in the treated cells were observed. Worth mentioning are change in ploidy (3n) and abnormalities of chromosomes 1, 7, 9, 11, 13, 14 and 20; increased numbers of chromosome 17; and loss of normal chromosomes 20 and 22.

  13. Expression of splice variants of mts1 gene in normal and neoplastic human tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Ambartsumyan, N.S. |; Grigorian, M.S.; Lukanidin, E.M.

    1995-09-01

    Data on cloning of cDNA corresponding to human mts1 gene transcripts are presented. By comparing nucleotide sequences of the genomic DNA clone and cDNA of mts1, it was shown that human osteosarcoma OHS cells contain two alternative splice variants of mts1 transcripts. Alternative splicing occurs in the 5{prime}-untranslated region of the mts1 pre-mRNA. Both splice variants, hu-mts1 and hu-mts1(var), demonstrate similar stability in the cells, and each contains one open reading frame for the MTS1 protein. However, the two types of transcripts are translated with different effectiveness. The level of transcription of mts1 splice variants in different normal and neoplastic tissues and cell lines varies significantly. The role of alternative splicing as the mechanism responsible for posttranscriptional regulation of mts1 gene expression is discussed. 31 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Expression, localisation and functional activation of NFAT-2 in normal human skin, psoriasis, and cultured keratocytes

    PubMed Central

    Al-Daraji, Wael I; Malak, Tamer T.; Prescott, Richard J.; Abdellaoui, Adel; Ali, Mahmud M.; Dabash, Tarek; Zelger, Bettina G.; Zelger, Bernhard

    2009-01-01

    Ciclosporin A (CsA) is widely utilized for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases such as psoriasis. The therapeutic effects of CsA are thought to be mediated via its immunosuppressive action on infiltrating lymphocytes in skin lesions. CsA and tacrolimus block T cell activation by inhibiting the phosphatase calcineurin and preventing translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus of the transcription factor Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT). As calcineurin and NFAT 1 have been shown to be functionally active in cultured human keratocytes, expression of other NFAT family members such as NFAT-2 and possible functional activation was investigated in human keratocytes. RT-PCR and Western Analysis were used to investigate the presence of NFAT-2 mRNA and protein in human keratocytes. Tissue culture of human keratocytes and immunostaining of cells on coverslips and confocal microscopy were used to assess the degree of nuclear localisation of NFAT-2 in cultured cells. Keratome biopsies were taken from patients with psoriasis (lesional and non-lesional skin) and normal skin and immunohistochemistry was used to assess the NFAT-2 localisation in these biopsies using a well characterized anti-NFAT-2 antibody. The NFAT-2 mRNA and protein expression was demonstrated using RT-PCR and Western blotting. Moreover, the expression of NFAT-2 in normal skin, non-lesional and lesional psoriasis showed a striking basal staining suggesting a role for NFAT-2 in keratocytes proliferation. A range of cell types in the skin express NFAT-2. The expression of NFAT-2 in human keratocytes and response to different agonists provides perhaps a unique opportunity to examine the regulation, subcellular localization and kinetics of translocation of different NFATs in primary cultured human cells. In these experiments the author assessed the expression, localization of NFAT-2 in cultured human keratocytes and measured the degree of nuclear localisaion of NFAT-2 using immunofluorescence

  15. The effects of pravastatin on the normal human placenta: Lessons from ex-vivo models

    PubMed Central

    Swissa, Shani S.; Feinshtein, Valeria; Huleihel, Mahmoud; Holcberg, Gershon; Dukler, Doron

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Research in animal models and preliminary clinical studies in humans support the use of pravastatin for the prevention of preeclampsia. However, its use during pregnancy is still controversial due to limited data about its effect on the human placenta and fetus. Methods In the present study, human placental cotyledons were perfused in the absence or presence of pravastatin in the maternal reservoir (PraM). In addition, placental explants were treated with pravastatin for 5, 24 and 72 h under normoxia and hypoxia. We monitored the secretion of placental growth factor (PlGF), soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1), soluble endoglin (sEng), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and activation and the fetal vasoconstriction response to angiotensin-II. Results The concentrations of PlGF, sFlt-1 and sEng were not significantly altered by pravastatin in PraM cotyledons and in placental explants compared to control. Under hypoxic conditions, pravastatin decreased sFlt-1 concentrations. eNOS expression was significantly increased in PraM cotyledons but not in pravastatin-treated placental explants cultured under normoxia or hypoxia. eNOS phosphorylation was not significantly affected by pravastatin. The feto-placental vascular tone and the fetal vasoconstriction response to angiotensin-II, did not change following exposure of the maternal circulation to pravastatin. Conclusion We found that pravastatin does not alter the essential physiological functions of the placenta investigated in the study. The relevance of the study lays in the fact that it expands the current knowledge obtained thus far regarding the effect of the drug on the normal human placenta. This data is reassuring and important for clinicians that consider the treatment of high-risk patients with pravastatin, a treatment that exposes some normal pregnancies to the drug. PMID:28199380

  16. Cadmium malignantly transforms normal human breast epithelial cells into a basal-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Benbrahim-Tallaa, Lamia; Tokar, Erik J; Diwan, Bhalchandra A; Dill, Anna L; Coppin, Jean-François; Waalkes, Michael P

    2009-12-01

    Breast cancer has recently been linked to cadmium exposure. Although not uniformly supported, it is hypothesized that cadmium acts as a metalloestrogenic carcinogen via the estrogen receptor (ER). Thus, we studied the effects of chronic exposure to cadmium on the normal human breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A, which is ER-negative but can convert to ER-positive during malignant transformation. Cells were continuously exposed to low-level cadmium (2.5 muM) and checked in vitro and by xenograft study for signs of malignant transformation. Transformant cells were molecularly characterized by protein and transcript analysis of key genes in breast cancer. Over 40 weeks of cadmium exposure, cells showed increasing secretion of matrix metalloproteinase-9, loss of contact inhibition, increased colony formation, and increasing invasion, all typical for cancer cells. Inoculation of cadmium-treated cells into mice produced invasive, metastatic anaplastic carcinoma with myoepithelial components. These cadmium-transformed breast epithelial (CTBE) cells displayed characteristics of basal-like breast carcinoma, including ER-alpha negativity and HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) negativity, reduced expression of BRCA1 (breast cancer susceptibility gene 1), and increased CK5 (cytokeratin 5) and p63 expression. CK5 and p63, both breast stem cell markers, were prominently overexpressed in CTBE cell mounds, indicative of persistent proliferation. CTBE cells showed global DNA hypomethylation and c-myc and k-ras overexpression, typical in aggressive breast cancers. CTBE cell xenograft tumors were also ER-alpha negative. Cadmium malignantly transforms normal human breast epithelial cells-through a mechanism not requiring ER-alpha-into a basal-like cancer phenotype. Direct cadmium induction of a malignant phenotype in human breast epithelial cells strongly fortifies a potential role in breast cancer.

  17. Lipid-mediated transfection of normal adult human hepatocytes in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Ourlin, J C; Vilarem, M J; Daujat, M; Harricane, M C; Domergue, J; Joyeux, H; Baulieux, J; Maurel, P

    1997-04-05

    The aim of this work was to develop a procedure for the lipid-mediated transfection of DNA into normal adult human hepatocytes in culture. Cells were plated in a serum-free culture medium at various cell densities, on plastic or collagen-coated dishes, both in the absence and in the presence of epidermal growth factor (EGF). The cells were incubated for various periods of time with mixtures of DNA-lipofectin or DNA-3 beta[N-(N',N'-dimethylaminoethane)-carbamoyl] cholesterol (DC-chol) liposomes, and the efficiency of transfection was assessed by measuring the activity of reporter genes, beta-galactosidase or chloramphenicol acetyl-transferase (CAT). For comparison, similar experiments were carried out with human cell lines including HepG2, Caco-2, and WRL68. The efficiency of transfection (in percentage of cells) was not significantly different after transfection with lipofectin or DC-chol and comprised between 0.04 and 1.7% (extreme values) for different cultures. The efficiency of transfection decreased as the age or density of the culture increased and increased in cultures treated with EGF. Direct measurement of the rate of DNA synthesis suggested that the efficiency of transfection was related to the number of cells entering the S phase. Under the same conditions, the efficiency of transfection was one to two orders of magnitude greater in the three cell lines. A plasmid harboring 660 bp of the 5'-flanking region of CYP1A1 (containing two xenobiotic enhancer elements) fused upstream of the promoter of thymidine kinase and the CAT reporter gene was constructed. When this plasmid was transfected in human hepatocytes, CAT activity was induced as expected. We conclude that normal adult human hepatocytes can be transfected with exogenous DNA and that the transfected construct is regulated in the manner expected from in vivo studies.

  18. Visual Acuity of Simulated Thalamic Visual Prostheses in Normally Sighted Humans

    PubMed Central

    Jeffries, Ailsa; Pezaris, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Simulation in normally sighted individuals is a crucial tool to evaluate the performance of potential visual prosthesis designs prior to human implantation of a device. Here, we investigated the effects of electrode count on visual acuity, learning rate and response time in 16 normally sighted subjects using a simulated thalamic visual prosthesis, providing the first performance reports for thalamic designs. A new letter recognition paradigm using a multiple-optotype two-alternative forced choice task was adapted from the Snellen eye chart, and specifically devised to be readily communicated to both human and non-human primate subjects. Validation of the method against a standard Snellen acuity test in 21 human subjects showed no significant differences between the two tests. The novel task was then used to address three questions about simulations of the center-weighted phosphene patterns typical of thalamic designs: What are the expected Snellen acuities for devices with varying numbers of contacts, do subjects display rapid adaptation to the new visual modality, and can response time in the task provide clues to the mechanisms of perception in low-resolution artificial vision? Population performance (hit rate) was significantly above chance when viewing Snellen 20/200 optotypes (Log MAR 1.0) with 370 phosphenes in the central 10 degrees of vision, ranging to Snellen 20/800 (Log MAR 1.6) with 25 central phosphenes. Furthermore, subjects demonstrated learning within the 1–2 hours of task experience indicating the potential for an effective rehabilitation and possibly better visual performance after a longer period of training. Response time differences suggest that direct letter perception occurred when hit rate was above 75%, whereas a slower strategy like feature-based pattern matching was used in conditions of lower relative resolution. As pattern matching can substantially boost effective acuity, these results suggest post-implant therapy should specifically

  19. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the MATP gene are associated with normal human pigmentation variation.

    PubMed

    Graf, Justin; Hodgson, Richard; van Daal, Angela

    2005-03-01

    Human physical pigmentation is determined by the type and amount of melanin and the process of pigmentation production probably involves more than 100 genes. A failure to synthesize melanin results in oculocutaneous albinism (OCA). A recently identified form of OCA results from mutations in the Membrane Associated Transporter Protein (MATP) gene. The role of MATP in human pigmentation is not clear. We investigated the role of two nonpathogenic nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the MATP gene to determine if they are associated with normal human skin, hair, and eye color variation. A total of 608 individuals from four different population groups (456 Caucasians, 31 Asians, 70 African-Americans, and 51 Australian Aborigines) were genotyped for c.814G>A (p.Glu272Lys) and c.1122C>G (p.Phe374Leu). Results indicate that the allele frequencies of both polymorphisms are significantly different between population groups. The two alleles, 374Leu and 272Lys, are significantly associated with dark hair, skin, and eye color in Caucasians. The odds ratios (ORs) of the LeuLeu genotype for black hair and olive skin are 25.63 and 28.65, respectively, and for the LysLys genotype are 43.23 and 8.27, respectively. The OR for eye color is lower at 3.48 for the LeuLeu and 6.57 for LysLys genotypes. This is the first report of this highly significant association of MATP polymorphisms with normal human pigmentation variation.

  20. An individual urinary proteome analysis in normal human beings to define the minimal sample number to represent the normal urinary proteome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The urinary proteome has been widely used for biomarker discovery. A urinary proteome database from normal humans can provide a background for discovery proteomics and candidate proteins/peptides for targeted proteomics. Therefore, it is necessary to define the minimum number of individuals required for sampling to represent the normal urinary proteome. Methods In this study, inter-individual and inter-gender variations of urinary proteome were taken into consideration to achieve a representative database. An individual analysis was performed on overnight urine samples from 20 normal volunteers (10 males and 10 females) by 1DLC/MS/MS. To obtain a representative result of each sample, a replicate 1DLCMS/MS analysis was performed. The minimal sample number was estimated by statistical analysis. Results For qualitative analysis, less than 5% of new proteins/peptides were identified in a male/female normal group by adding a new sample when the sample number exceeded nine. In addition, in a normal group, the percentage of newly identified proteins/peptides was less than 5% upon adding a new sample when the sample number reached 10. Furthermore, a statistical analysis indicated that urinary proteomes from normal males and females showed different patterns. For quantitative analysis, the variation of protein abundance was defined by spectrum count and western blotting methods. And then the minimal sample number for quantitative proteomic analysis was identified. Conclusions For qualitative analysis, when considering the inter-individual and inter-gender variations, the minimum sample number is 10 and requires a balanced number of males and females in order to obtain a representative normal human urinary proteome. For quantitative analysis, the minimal sample number is much greater than that for qualitative analysis and depends on the experimental methods used for quantification. PMID:23170922

  1. Human papillomaviruses (HPV) in tissue specimens of oral squamous cell papillomas and normal oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Kansky, Andrej A; Seme, Katja; Maver, Polona J; Luzar, Bostjan; Gale, Nina; Poljak, Mario

    2006-01-01

    The etiology of oral squamous cell papillomas (OSCP) is still unresolved. The presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) was examined, using PCR and three different consensus primers, in tissue specimens obtained from 49 patients with OSCP and 49 tissue specimens of histologically-normal oral mucosa obtained from the same number of individuals, who matched the patients with OSCP in age, gender and localization of the obtained tissue specimens. Amplifiable DNA was recovered from 44 out of 49 and 45 out of 49 tissue specimens of OSCP and normal oral mucosa, respectively. HPV-6 was detected in three and HPV-16 in one out of 44 OSCP specimens tested. Three tissue specimens of normal oral mucosa were HPV DNA-positive, harboring HPV-6, HPV-11 and HPV-31. Since no significant difference in the prevalence of HPV DNA between the patients with OSCP and the control subjects (9.1% vs. 6.7%; p=0.694) was observed, HPV is deemed to play a limited role in the etiology of OSCP, at least in Europe.

  2. Human papillomavirus DNA in oral squamous cell carcinomas and normal oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Kansky, A A; Poljak, M; Seme, K; Kocjan, B J; Gale, N; Luzar, B; Golouh, R

    2003-01-01

    To elucidate the putative etiologic role of human papillomaviruses (HPV) in oral carcinogenesis, a comparative study was carried out on 62 tissue specimens of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and on 62 specimens of histologically normal oral mucosa obtained from the individuals who matched the subjects with OSCC in age, gender, localization of obtained tissue specimens, drinking and smoking habits. Internal control amplification showed that amplifiable DNA was recovered from 59/62 and 61/62 tissue samples of OSCC and normal oral mucosa, respectively. The amplification with two different HPV L1 and one HPV E6 consensus primer sets showed the presence of the HPV DNA genotypes 16, 33, 58 in 5/59 (8.4%) OSCC specimens and HPV genotypes 11, 16, 31, 68 in 4/61 (6.6%) tissue samples of normal oral mucosa tested. In the study in which a comparative examination of the presence of HPV DNA was for the first time performed on the tissue samples of the patients with OSCC and the age- and gender-matched control subjects there was no significant difference in the prevalence of HPV DNA among both study groups. Our results suggest that occasional findings of HPV DNA in OSCC tissue specimens may be the result of an incidental HPV colonization of oral mucosa, rather than of viral infection, and that HPVs play a limited role in the etiopathogenesis of the majority of OSCC.

  3. The Effect of Phototherapy on Cancer Predisposition Genes of Diabetic and Normal Human Skin Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Tangtrakulwanich, Boonsin; Sangkhathat, Surasak

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether LED light at different wavelengths affects the expression profile of 143 cancer predisposition genes in both diabetic and normal human fibroblasts. In this study, both diabetic and normal fibroblast cell lines were cultured and irradiated with red (635 nm), green (520 nm), and blue (465 nm) LED light for 10 minutes at 0.67 J/cm2 each. After that, mRNA from all cell lines was extracted for microarray analysis. We found that green light activates EPHB2, KIT, ANTXR2, ESCO2, MSR1, EXT1, TSC1, KIT, NF1, BUB1B, FANCD2, EPCAM, FANCD2, NF, DIS3L2, and RET in normal fibroblast cells, while blue and red light can upregulate RUNX1, PDGFRA, EHBP1, GPC3, AXIN2, KDR, GLMN, MSMB, EPHB2, MSR1, KIT, FANCD2, BMPR1A, BUB1B, PDE11A, and RET. Therefore, genetic screening before phototherapy treatment may be required. PMID:28386563

  4. Sumatriptan Inhibits TRPV1 Channels in Trigeminal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Evans, M. Steven; Cheng, Xiangying; Jeffry, Joseph A.; Disney, Kimberly E.; Premkumar, Louis S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To understand a possible role for transient potential receptor vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channels in sumatriptan relief of pain mediated by trigeminal nociceptors. Background TRPV1 channels are expressed in small nociceptive sensory neurons. In dorsal root ganglia (DRG), TRPV1-containing nociceptors mediate certain types of inflammatory pain. Neurogenic inflammation of cerebral dura and blood vessels in the trigeminal nociceptive system is thought to be important in migraine pain, but the ion channels important in transducing migraine pain are not known. Sumatriptan is an agent effective in treatment of migraine and cluster headache. We hypothesized that sumatriptan might modulate activity of TRPV1 channels found in the trigeminal nociceptive system. Methods We used immunohistochemistry to detect the presence of TRPV1 channel protein, whole cell recording in acutely dissociated trigeminal ganglia (TG) to detect functionality of TRPV1 channels, and whole cell recording in trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC) to detect effects on release of neurotransmitters from trigeminal neurons onto second order sensory neurons. Effects specifically on TG neurons that project to cerebral dura were assessed by labeling dural nociceptors with DiI. Results Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that TRPV1 channels are present in cerebral dura, trigeminal ganglion, and in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis. Capsaicin, a TRPV1 agonist, produced depolarization and repetitive action potential firing in current clamp recordings and large inward currents in voltage clamp recordings from acutely dissociated TG neurons, demonstrating that TRPV1 channels are functional in trigeminal neurons. Capsaicin increased spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) in neurons of layer II in TNC slices, showing that these channels have a physiological effect on central synaptic transmission. Sumatriptan (10 μM), a selective anti-migraine drug inhibited TRPV1-mediated inward currents in TG. and

  5. Significance of neurovascular contact in classical trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Maarbjerg, Stine; Wolfram, Frauke; Gozalov, Aydin; Olesen, Jes; Bendtsen, Lars

    2015-02-01

    Neurovascular contact is considered a frequent cause of classical trigeminal neuralgia and microvascular decompression with transposition of a blood vessel is preferred over other surgical options in medically refractory patients with classical trigeminal neuralgia. However, the prevalence of neurovascular contact has not been investigated in a representative cohort of patients with classical trigeminal neuralgia based in a neurological setting and using high-quality neuroimaging and blinded evaluation. We aimed to investigate whether presence and degree of neurovascular contact are correlated to pain side in classical trigeminal neuralgia. Consecutive classical trigeminal neuralgia patients with unilateral symptoms were referred to 3.0 T magnetic resonance imaging and included in a cross-sectional study. Magnetic resonance imaging scans were evaluated blindly and graded according to presence and degree of neurovascular contact. Severe neurovascular contact was defined as displacement or atrophy of the trigeminal nerve. A total of 135 patients with classical trigeminal neuralgia were included. Average age of disease onset was 53.0 years (95% confidence interval mean 40.5-55.5) and current age was 60.1 years (95% % confidence interval mean 57.5-62.7). Eighty-two (61%, 95% confidence interval 52-69%) patients were female. Neurovascular contact was prevalent both on the symptomatic and asymptomatic side [89% versus 78%, P = 0.014, odds ratio = 2.4 (1.2-4.8), P = 0.017], while severe neurovascular contact was highly prevalent on the symptomatic compared to the asymptomatic side [53% versus 13%, P < 0.001, odds ratio = 11.6 (4.7-28.9), P < 0.001]. Severe neurovascular contact was caused by arteries in 98%. We conclude that neurovascular contact causing displacement or atrophy of the trigeminal nerve is highly associated with the symptomatic side in classical trigeminal neuralgia as opposed to neurovascular contact in general. Our findings demonstrate that severe

  6. Pulse wave imaging in normal, hypertensive and aneurysmal human aortas in vivo: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ronny X.; Luo, Jianwen; Balaram, Sandhya K.; Chaudhry, Farooq A.; Shahmirzadi, Danial; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2013-07-01

    Arterial stiffness is a well-established biomarker for cardiovascular risk, especially in the case of hypertension. The progressive stages of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) have also been associated with varying arterial stiffness. Pulse wave imaging (PWI) is a noninvasive, ultrasound imaging-based technique that uses the pulse wave-induced arterial wall motion to map the propagation of the pulse wave and measure the regional pulse wave velocity (PWV) as an index of arterial stiffness. In this study, the clinical feasibility of PWI was evaluated in normal, hypertensive, and aneurysmal human aortas. Radiofrequency-based speckle tracking was used to estimate the pulse wave-induced displacements in the abdominal aortic walls of normal (N = 15, mean age 32.5 ± 10.2 years), hypertensive (N = 13, mean age 60.8 ± 15.8 years), and aneurysmal (N = 5, mean age 71.6 ± 11.8 years) human subjects. Linear regression of the spatio-temporal variation of the displacement waveform in the anterior aortic wall over a single cardiac cycle yielded the slope as the PWV and the coefficient of determination r2 as an approximate measure of the pulse wave propagation uniformity. The aortic PWV measurements in all normal, hypertensive, and AAA subjects were 6.03 ± 1.68, 6.69 ± 2.80, and 10.54 ± 6.52 m s-1, respectively. There was no significant difference (p = 0.15) between the PWVs of the normal and hypertensive subjects while the PWVs of the AAA subjects were significantly higher (p < 0.001) compared to those of the other two groups. Also, the average r2 in the AAA subjects was significantly lower (p < 0.001) than that in the normal and hypertensive subjects. These preliminary results suggest that the regional PWV and the pulse wave propagation uniformity (r2) obtained using PWI, in addition to the PWI images and spatio-temporal maps that provide qualitative visualization of the pulse wave, may potentially provide valuable information for the clinical characterization of aneurysms

  7. Three-dimensional counting of morphologically normal human red blood cells via digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Faliu; Moon, Inkyu; Lee, Yeon H.

    2015-01-01

    Counting morphologically normal cells in human red blood cells (RBCs) is extremely beneficial in the health care field. We propose a three-dimensional (3-D) classification method of automatically determining the morphologically normal RBCs in the phase image of multiple human RBCs that are obtained by off-axis digital holographic microscopy (DHM). The RBC holograms are first recorded by DHM, and then the phase images of multiple RBCs are reconstructed by a computational numerical algorithm. To design the classifier, the three typical RBC shapes, which are stomatocyte, discocyte, and echinocyte, are used for training and testing. Nonmain or abnormal RBC shapes different from the three normal shapes are defined as the fourth category. Ten features, including projected surface area, average phase value, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, perimeter, mean corpuscular hemoglobin surface density, circularity, mean phase of center part, sphericity coefficient, elongation, and pallor, are extracted from each RBC after segmenting the reconstructed phase images by using a watershed transform algorithm. Moreover, four additional properties, such as projected surface area, perimeter, average phase value, and elongation, are measured from the inner part of each cell, which can give significant information beyond the previous 10 features for the separation of the RBC groups; these are verified in the experiment by the statistical method of Hotelling's T-square test. We also apply the principal component analysis algorithm to reduce the dimension number of variables and establish the Gaussian mixture densities using the projected data with the first eight principal components. Consequently, the Gaussian mixtures are used to design the discriminant functions based on Bayesian decision theory. To improve the performance of the Bayes classifier and the accuracy of estimation of its error rate, the leaving-one-out technique is applied. Experimental results show that the proposed method can

  8. Three-dimensional counting of morphologically normal human red blood cells via digital holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yi, Faliu; Moon, Inkyu; Lee, Yeon H

    2015-01-01

    Counting morphologically normal cells in human red blood cells (RBCs) is extremely beneficial in the health care field. We propose a three-dimensional (3-D) classification method of automatically determining the morphologically normal RBCs in the phase image of multiple human RBCs that are obtained by off-axis digital holographic microscopy (DHM). The RBC holograms are first recorded by DHM, and then the phase images of multiple RBCs are reconstructed by a computational numerical algorithm. To design the classifier, the three typical RBC shapes, which are stomatocyte, discocyte, and echinocyte, are used for training and testing. Nonmain or abnormal RBC shapes different from the three normal shapes are defined as the fourth category. Ten features, including projected surface area, average phase value, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, perimeter, mean corpuscular hemoglobin surface density, circularity, mean phase of center part, sphericity coefficient, elongation, and pallor, are extracted from each RBC after segmenting the reconstructed phase images by using a watershed transform algorithm. Moreover, four additional properties, such as projected surface area, perimeter, average phase value, and elongation, are measured from the inner part of each cell, which can give significant information beyond the previous 10 features for the separation of the RBC groups; these are verified in the experiment by the statistical method of Hotelling's T-quare test. We also apply the principal component analysis algorithm to reduce the dimension number of variables and establish the Gaussian mixture densities using the projected data with the first eight principal components. Consequently, the Gaussian mixtures are used to design the discriminant functions based on Bayesian decision theory. To improve the performance of the Bayes classifier and the accuracy of estimation of its error rate, the leaving-one-out technique is applied. Experimental results show that the proposed method can

  9. PACAP induces neurite outgrowth in cultured trigeminal ganglion cells and recovery of corneal sensitivity after flap surgery in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Fukiage, Chiho; Nakajima, Takeshi; Takayama, Yoshiko; Minagawa, Yoko; Shearer, Thomas R; Azuma, Mitsuyoshi

    2007-02-01

    To evaluate the ability of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) to induce growth of neuronal processes in cultured trigeminal ganglion cells, and to accelerate neurite outgrowth and recovery of corneal sensitivity after creation of a corneal flap in a rabbit model of laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) surgery. Animal study. The cDNA of rabbit PACAP was sequenced, and the expression of PACAP receptors in the trigeminal ganglia from rabbits was quantified by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Trigeminal ganglion cells were isolated from rabbits and cultured for 48 hours with or without PACAP27 (bioactive N-terminal peptide from PACAP). Cells were stained with antibody against neurofilaments, and neurite outgrowth was quantified by cell counting. In the rabbit LASIK model, a corneal flap with a planned thickness of 130 microm and 8.5 mm diameter was created with a microkeratome. The rabbits then received eyedrops containing PACAP27 four times a day for eight weeks, and corneal sensitivity was measured. Neurite outgrowth was assessed by staining histologic sections of the flap area for cholinesterase. The deduced amino acid sequence of PACAP in rabbit was identical to that of human. PACAP receptor, PAC1, was highly expressed in trigeminal ganglia from newborn and adult rabbits. PACAP27 at 1 microM induced growth of neuronal processes in cultured primary trigeminal ganglion cells. In the LASIK model, extensions of neuronal processes from amputated nerve trunks in cornea were observed after administration of eyedrops containing 1 or 10 microM PACAP27. The 10 microM PACAP27 treatment also greatly accelerated recovery of corneal sensitivity. PACAP may be a candidate drug for ameliorating dry eye after LASIK surgery.

  10. Analysis of normal human retinal vascular network architecture using multifractal geometry

    PubMed Central

    Ţălu, Ştefan; Stach, Sebastian; Călugăru, Dan Mihai; Lupaşcu, Carmen Alina; Nicoară, Simona Delia

    2017-01-01

    AIM To apply the multifractal analysis method as a quantitative approach to a comprehensive description of the microvascular network architecture of the normal human retina. METHODS Fifty volunteers were enrolled in this study in the Ophthalmological Clinic of Cluj-Napoca, Romania, between January 2012 and January 2014. A set of 100 segmented and skeletonised human retinal images, corresponding to normal states of the retina were studied. An automatic unsupervised method for retinal vessel segmentation was applied before multifractal analysis. The multifractal analysis of digital retinal images was made with computer algorithms, applying the standard box-counting method. Statistical analyses were performed using the GraphPad InStat software. RESULTS The architecture of normal human retinal microvascular network was able to be described using the multifractal geometry. The average of generalized dimensions (Dq) for q=0, 1, 2, the width of the multifractal spectrum (Δα=αmax − αmin) and the spectrum arms' heights difference (|Δf|) of the normal images were expressed as mean±standard deviation (SD): for segmented versions, D0=1.7014±0.0057; D1=1.6507±0.0058; D2=1.5772±0.0059; Δα=0.92441±0.0085; |Δf|= 0.1453±0.0051; for skeletonised versions, D0=1.6303±0.0051; D1=1.6012±0.0059; D2=1.5531±0.0058; Δα=0.65032±0.0162; |Δf|= 0.0238±0.0161. The average of generalized dimensions (Dq) for q=0, 1, 2, the width of the multifractal spectrum (Δα) and the spectrum arms' heights difference (|Δf|) of the segmented versions was slightly greater than the skeletonised versions. CONCLUSION The multifractal analysis of fundus photographs may be used as a quantitative parameter for the evaluation of the complex three-dimensional structure of the retinal microvasculature as a potential marker for early detection of topological changes associated with retinal diseases. PMID:28393036

  11. Particle irradiation induces FGF2 expression in normal human lens cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, P. Y.; Bjornstad K, A.; Chang, E.; McNamara, M.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Lin, S. P.; Aragon, G.; Polansky, J. R.; Lui, G. M.; Blakely, E. A.

    2000-01-01

    Particle Irradiation Induces FGF2 Expression in Normal Human Lens Cells. Particle radiations, including both proton and helium-ion beams, have been used to successfully treat choroidal melanoma, but with the complication of radiation-induced cataract. We have investigated a role for radiation-induced changes in the expression of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) gene expression as part of the mechanism(s) underlying lens cell injury associated with cataract. Normal human lens epithelial (HLE) cells were cultured in vitro on extracellular matrix (ECM) originated from bovine corneal endothelial cells. This study reports evidence for rapid but transient induction of FGF2 transcripts, an increase of between 5- and 8-fold, within 0.5 h after exposure to particle radiation, followed by another wave of increased transcription at 2-3 h postirradiation. Immunofluorescence results confirm the enhanced levels of FGF2 protein rapidly after exposure to protons or helium ions, followed by another wave of increased activity unique to helium at 6 h postirradiation. This second wave of increased immunoreactivity was not observed in the proton-irradiated samples. Total FGF2 protein analysis after helium-ion exposures shows induced expression of three FGF2 isoforms, with an increase of up to 2-fold in the 18-kDa low-molecular-weight species. Studies of the effects of protons on individual FGF2 protein isoforms are in progress. Several mechanisms involving a role for FGF2 in radiation-induced cataract are discussed.

  12. The Fate of a Normal Human Cell Traversed by a Single Charged Particle

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, C.; Zahnreich, S.; Kraft, D.; Friedrich, T.; Voss, K.-O.; Durante, M.; Ritter, S.

    2012-01-01

    The long-term “fate” of normal human cells after single hits of charged particles is one of the oldest unsolved issues in radiation protection and cellular radiobiology. Using a high-precision heavy-ion microbeam we could target normal human fibroblasts with exactly one or five carbon ions and measured the early cytogenetic damage and the late behaviour using single-cell cloning. Around 70% of the first cycle cells presented visible aberrations in mFISH after a single ion traversal, and about 5% of the cells were still able to form colonies. In one third of selected high-proliferative colonies we observed clonal (radiation-induced) aberrations. Terminal differentiation and markers of senescence (PCNA, p16) in the descendants of cells traversed by one carbon ion occurred earlier than in controls, but no evidence of radiation-induced chromosomal instability was found. We conclude that cells surviving single-ion traversal, often carrying clonal chromosome aberrations, undergo accelerated senescence but maintain chromosomal stability. PMID:22966418

  13. Using infrared and Raman microspectroscopies to compare ex vivo involved psoriatic skin with normal human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, Marie; Lefèvre, Thierry; Pouliot, Roxane; Auger, Michèle; Laroche, Gaétan

    2015-06-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic dermatosis that affects around 3% of the world's population. The etiology of this autoimmune pathology is not completely understood. The barrier function of psoriatic skin is known to be strongly altered, but the structural modifications at the origin of this dysfunction are not clear. To develop strategies to reduce symptoms of psoriasis or adequate substitutes for modeling, a deep understanding of the organization of psoriatic skin at a molecular level is required. Infrared and Raman microspectroscopies have been used to obtain direct molecular-level information on psoriatic and healthy human skin biopsies. From the intensities and positions of specific vibrational bands, the lipid and protein distribution and the lipid order have been mapped in the different layers of the skin. Results showed a similar distribution of lipids and collagen for normal and psoriatic human skin. However, psoriatic skin is characterized by heterogeneity in lipid/protein composition at the micrometer scale, a reduction in the definition of skin layer boundaries and a decrease in lipid chain order in the stratum corneum as compared to normal skin. A global decrease of the structural organization is exhibited in psoriatic skin that is compatible with an alteration of its barrier properties.

  14. Raman Spectroscopy of DNA Packaging in Individual Human Sperm Cells distinguishes Normal from Abnormal Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huser, T; Orme, C; Hollars, C; Corzett, M; Balhorn, R

    2009-03-09

    Healthy human males produce sperm cells of which about 25-40% have abnormal head shapes. Increases in the percentage of sperm exhibiting aberrant sperm head morphologies have been correlated with male infertility, and biochemical studies of pooled sperm have suggested that sperm with abnormal shape may contain DNA that has not been properly repackaged by protamine during spermatid development. We have used micro-Raman spectroscopy to obtain Raman spectra from individual human sperm cells and examined how differences in the Raman spectra of sperm chromatin correlate with cell shape. We show that Raman spectra of individual sperm cells contain vibrational marker modes that can be used to assess the efficiency of DNA-packaging for each cell. Raman spectra obtained from sperm cells with normal shape provide evidence that DNA in these sperm is very efficiently packaged. We find, however, that the relative protein content per cell and DNA packaging efficiencies are distributed over a relatively wide range for sperm cells with both normal and abnormal shape. These findings indicate that single cell Raman spectroscopy should be a valuable tool in assessing the quality of sperm cells for in-vitro fertilization.

  15. The Fate of a Normal Human Cell Traversed by a Single Charged Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, C.; Zahnreich, S.; Kraft, D.; Friedrich, T.; Voss, K.-O.; Durante, M.; Ritter, S.

    2012-09-01

    The long-term ``fate'' of normal human cells after single hits of charged particles is one of the oldest unsolved issues in radiation protection and cellular radiobiology. Using a high-precision heavy-ion microbeam we could target normal human fibroblasts with exactly one or five carbon ions and measured the early cytogenetic damage and the late behaviour using single-cell cloning. Around 70% of the first cycle cells presented visible aberrations in mFISH after a single ion traversal, and about 5% of the cells were still able to form colonies. In one third of selected high-proliferative colonies we observed clonal (radiation-induced) aberrations. Terminal differentiation and markers of senescence (PCNA, p16) in the descendants of cells traversed by one carbon ion occurred earlier than in controls, but no evidence of radiation-induced chromosomal instability was found. We conclude that cells surviving single-ion traversal, often carrying clonal chromosome aberrations, undergo accelerated senescence but maintain chromosomal stability.

  16. Integrated Transcriptome Map Highlights Structural and Functional Aspects of the Normal Human Heart.

    PubMed

    Caracausi, Maria; Piovesan, Allison; Vitale, Lorenza; Pelleri, Maria Chiara

    2017-04-01

    A systematic meta-analysis of the available gene expression profiling datasets for the whole normal human heart generated a quantitative transcriptome reference map of this organ. Transcriptome Mapper (TRAM) software integrated 32 gene expression profile datasets from different sources returning a reference value of expression for each of the 43,360 known, mapped transcripts assayed by any of the experimental platforms used in this regard. Main findings include the visualization at the gene and chromosomal levels of the classical description of the basic histology and physiology of the heart, the identification of suitable housekeeping reference genes, the analysis of stoichiometry of gene products, and the focusing on chromosome 21 genes, which are present in one excess copy in Down syndrome subjects, presenting cardiovascular defects in 30-40% of cases. Independent in vitro validation showed an excellent correlation coefficient (r = 0.98) with the in silico data. Remarkably, heart/non-cardiac tissue expression ratio may also be used to anticipate that effects of mutations will most probably affect or not the heart. The quantitative reference global portrait of gene expression in the whole normal human heart illustrates the structural and functional aspects of the whole organ and is a general model to understand the mechanisms underlying heart pathophysiology. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 759-770, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Analysis of gene-expression profiles after gamma irradiation of normal human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Tachiiri, Seiji . E-mail: tachiiri@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Katagiri, Toyomasa; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Oya, Natsuo; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Nakamura, Yusuke

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To understand comprehensive transcriptional profile of normal human fibroblast in response to irradiation. Methods and Materials: To identify genes whose expression is influenced by {gamma} radiation, we used a cDNA microarray to analyze expression of 23,000 genes in normal human fibroblasts at 7 timepoints (1, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours) after 5 different doses (0.5, 2, 5, 15, and 50 Gy) of exposure. Results: Among the genes that showed altered expression patterns, some were already known to be regulated by irradiation, for instance ODC, EGR1, FGF2, PCNA, PKC, and several p53-target genes, including p53DINP1, BTG2, GADD45, and MDM2. The time course of each dose showed that from 350 to 600 genes were affected as to their expression; induction profiles characteristic to each dose were demonstrated. Of the total identified, only 89 genes were up-regulated; the vast majority was down-regulated over the 72-hour time course. We identified 21 genes that were distinctly induced by irradiation; 11 of them were functionally known, and 6 of those were p53-target genes. Conclusions: The results underscored the complexity of the transcriptional responses to irradiation, and the data should serve as a basis for global characterization of radiation-regulated genes and pathways.

  18. MRI-based surface area estimates in the normal adult human brain: evidence for structural organisation.

    PubMed Central

    Sisodiya, S; Free, S; Fish, D; Shorvon, S

    1996-01-01

    There are a number of quantitative relationships between geometric parameters describing the structure of the normal human cerebral cortex examined in vivo using volumetric magnetic resonance imaging. A voxel-counting method is used to estimate grey-white interface surface area. The effects of bias associated with the method are considered. In 33 normal controls, the cerebral hemispheres were symmetric in terms of total volume, irrespective of handedness, but not in terms of surface areas for right-handers. The surface area of the grey matter-white matter interface was directly proportional to the cortical grey matter volume, suggesting that growth of the neocortex is primarily tangential, with repetition of a basic structural element rather than gross alterations in the thickness of the cortex. The majority of the surface area of the grey-white interface lies within gyral white matter cores. The mean thickness of the cortex of the right cerebral hemisphere in vivo was 3.0 mm and that of the left 3.3 mm. There was a relationship between the cross-sectional area of the corpus callosum and grey-white interface surface area, suggesting that a fixed proportion and cortical neurons extend interhemispheric axons. These findings suggest that there are general architectural principles governing the organisation of the complex, but ordered, human cerebral cortex. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8621342

  19. Raman spectroscopy of DNA packaging in individual human sperm cells distinguishes normal from abnormal cells.

    PubMed

    Huser, Thomas; Orme, Christine A; Hollars, Christopher W; Corzett, Michele H; Balhorn, Rod

    2009-05-01

    Healthy human males produce sperm cells of which about 25-40% have abnormal head shapes. Increases in the percentage of sperm exhibiting aberrant sperm head morphologies have been correlated with male infertility, and biochemical studies of pooled sperm have suggested that sperm with abnormal shape may contain DNA that has not been properly repackaged by protamine during spermatid development. We have used micro-Raman spectroscopy to obtain Raman spectra from individual human sperm cells and examined how differences in the Raman spectra of sperm chromatin correlate with cell shape. We show that Raman spectra of individual sperm cells contain vibrational marker modes that can be used to assess the efficiency of DNA-packaging for each cell. Raman spectra obtained from sperm cells with normal shape provide evidence that DNA in these sperm is very efficiently packaged. We find, however, that the relative protein content per cell and DNA packaging efficiencies are distributed over a relatively wide range for sperm cells with both normal and abnormal shape. These findings indicate that single cell Raman spectroscopy should be a valuable tool in assessing the quality of sperm cells for in-vitro fertilization.

  20. Deceleration of senescence in normal human fibroblasts by withanone extracted from ashwagandha leaves.

    PubMed

    Widodo, Nashi; Shah, Navjot; Priyandoko, Didik; Ishii, Tetsuro; Kaul, Sunil C; Wadhwa, Renu

    2009-10-01

    Ashwagandha is an Ayurvedic shrub that forms a common ingredient of health supplements, tonics, and Indian home remedies designed to promote health and quality of life. Though sustained through experience and history, there are only a limited laboratory studies and experimental evidence to its effects. In our efforts to characterize Ashwagandha activities and their molecular mechanisms, we initially prepared leaf extract of Ashwagandha (i-Extract) that showed tumor-inhibitory activity. In the present study, we demonstrate that a major component of i-Extract and withanone (i-Factor) protected the normal human fibroblasts against the toxicity caused by withaferin A. It increased the in vitro division potential of normal human cells that appeared to be mediated by decreased accumulation of molecular damage, downregulation of the senescence-specific beta-galactosidase activity and the senescence marker protein, p21(WAF-1), protection against oxidative damage, and induction of proteasomal activity. To the best of our knowledge, we provide the first example of phytochemical(s) (i-Extract and withanone) that have both anticancer and antiaging activities and point to the molecular link between aging and cancer.

  1. Wound healing properties of ethyl acetate fraction of Moringa oleifera in normal human dermal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Gothai, Sivapragasam; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Tan, Woan Sean; Fakurazi, Sharida

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: Wounds are the outcome of injuries to the skin that interrupt the soft tissue. Healing of a wound is a complex and long-drawn-out process of tissue repair and remodeling in response to injury. A large number of plants are used by folklore traditions for the treatment of cuts, wounds and burns. Moringa oleifera (MO) is an herb used as a traditional folk medicine for the treatment of various skin wounds and associated diseases. The underlying mechanisms of wound healing activity of ethyl acetate fraction of MO leaves extract are completely unknown. Materials and Methods: In the current study, ethyl acetate fraction of MO leaves was investigated for its efficacy on cell viability, proliferation and migration (wound closure rate) in human normal dermal fibroblast cells. Results: Results revealed that lower concentration (12.5 µg/ml, 25 µg/ml, and 50 µg/ml) of ethyl acetate fraction of MO leaves showed remarkable proliferative and migratory effect on normal human dermal fibroblasts. Conclusion: This study suggested that ethyl acetate fraction of MO leaves might be a potential therapeutic agent for skin wound healing by promoting fibroblast proliferation and migration through increasing the wound closure rate corroborating its traditional use. PMID:27069722

  2. Using infrared and Raman microspectroscopies to compare ex vivo involved psoriatic skin with normal human skin.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Marie; Lefèvre, Thierry; Pouliot, Roxane; Auger, Michèle; Laroche, Gaétan

    2015-06-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic dermatosis that affects around 3% of the world's population. The etiology of this autoimmune pathology is not completely understood. The barrier function of psoriatic skin is known to be strongly altered, but the structural modifications at the origin of this dysfunction are not clear. To develop strategies to reduce symptoms of psoriasis or adequate substitutes for modeling, a deep understanding of the organization of psoriatic skin at a molecular level is required. Infrared and Raman microspectroscopies have been used to obtain direct molecular-level information on psoriatic and healthy human skin biopsies. From the intensities and positions of specific vibrational bands, the lipid and protein distribution and the lipid order have been mapped in the different layers of the skin. Results showed a similar distribution of lipids and collagen for normal and psoriatic human skin. However, psoriatic skin is characterized by heterogeneity in lipid/protein composition at the micrometer scale, a reduction in the definition of skin layer boundaries and a decrease in lipid chain order in the stratum corneum as compared to normal skin. A global decrease of the structural organization is exhibited in psoriatic skin that is compatible with an alteration of its barrier properties.

  3. Goblet cells of the normal human bulbar conjunctiva and their assessment by impression cytology sampling.

    PubMed

    Doughty, Michael J

    2012-07-01

    Goblet cells of the conjunctiva are the main source of mucus for the ocular surface. The objectives of this review are to consider the goblet cells as assessed by various histological, cytological and electron microscopy methods, and to assess the consistency of published reports (over more than 25 years) of goblet cell density (GCD) from impression cytology specimens from nominally healthy human subjects. Reported GCD values have been notably variable, with a range from 24 to 2226 cells/mm² for average values. Data analysis suggests that a high density of goblet cells should be expected for the healthy human conjunctiva, with a tendency toward higher values in samples taken from normally covered locations (inferior and superior bulbar conjunctiva) of the open eye (at 973 +/- 789 cells/ mm²) than in samples taken from exposed (interpalpebral) locations (at 427 +/- 376 cells/mm²). No obvious change in GCD was found with respect to age, perhaps because the variability of the data did not allow detection of any age-related decline in GCD. Analyses of published data from 33 other sources indicated a trend for GCD to be lower than normal across a spectrum of ocular surface diseases.

  4. Detection of Apoptosis and Necrosis in Normal Human Lung Cells Using 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Chwen-Ming; Ko, Wun-Chang; Yang, Liang-Yo; Lin, Chien-Ju; Wu, Jui-Sheng; Lo, Tsui-Yun; Wang, Shwu-Huey; Chen, Chien-Tsu

    2005-05-01

    This study aimed to detect apoptosis and necrosis in MRC-5, a normal human lung cell line, by using noninvasive proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR). Live MRC-5 cells were processed first for 1H NMR spectroscopy; subsequently their types and the percentage of cell death were assessed on a flow cytometer. Cadmium (Cd) and mercury (Hg) induced apoptosis and necrosis in MRC-5 cells, respectively, as revealed by phosphatidylserine externalization on a flow cytometer. The spectral intensity ratio of methylene (CH2) resonance (at 1.3 ppm) to methyl (CH3) resonance (at 0.9 ppm) was directly proportional to the percentage of apoptosis and strongly and positively correlated with PI staining after Cd treatment (r2 = 0.9868, P < 0.01). In contrast, this ratio only increased slightly within 2-h Hg treatment, and longer Hg exposure failed to produce further increase. Following 2-h Hg exposure, the spectral intensity of choline resonance (at 3.2 ppm) was abolished, but this phenomenon was absent in Cd-induced apoptosis. These findings together demonstrate that 1H NMR is a novel tool with a quantitative potential to distinguish apoptosis from necrosis as early as the onset of cell death in normal human lung cells.