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Sample records for normal neonatal hip

  1. Disparity between Clinical and Ultrasound Examinations in Neonatal Hip Screening

    PubMed Central

    Kyung, Bong Soo; Jeong, Woong Kyo; Park, Si Young

    2016-01-01

    Background For early detection of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH), neonatal hip screening using clinical examination and/or ultrasound has been recommended. Although there have been many studies on the reliability of both screening techniques, there is still controversy in the screening strategies; clinical vs. selective or universal ultrasound screening. To determine the screening strategy, we assessed the agreement among the methods; clinical examination by an experienced pediatric orthopedic surgeon, sonographic morphology, and sonographic stability. Methods From January 2004 to June 2009, a single experienced pediatric orthopedic surgeon performed clinical hip screenings for 2,686 infants in the neonatal unit and 43 infants who were referred due to impressions of hip dysplasia before 3 months of age. Among them, 156 clinically unstable or high-risk babies selectively received bilateral hip ultrasound examinations performed by the same surgeon using the modified Graf method. The results were analyzed statistically to detect any correlations between the clinical and sonographic findings. Results Although a single experienced orthopedic surgeon conducted all examinations, we detected only a limited relationship between the results of clinical and ultrasound examinations. Ninety-three percent of the clinically subluxatable hips were normal or immature based on static ultrasound examination, and 74% of dislocating hips and 67% of limited abduction hips presented with the morphology below Graf IIa. A total of 80% of clinically subluxatable, 42% of dislocating and 67% of limited abduction hips appeared stable or exhibited minor instability on dynamic ultrasound examination. About 7% of clinically normal hips were abnormal upon ultrasound examination; 5% showed major instability and 3% showed dysplasia above Graf IIc. Clinical stability had small coefficients between ultrasound examinations; 0.39 for sonographic stability and 0.37 for sonographic morphology

  2. Late developmental dislocation of the hip after initial normal evaluation: a report of five cases.

    PubMed

    Raimann, Alfredo; Baar, Alejandro; Raimann, Roberto; Morcuende, Jose A

    2007-01-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) denotes a wide spectrum of pathologies ranging from hip instability to frank dislocation. The current understanding is that cases of late diagnosis were missed during the newborn period. However, there is some evidence that a number of hip subluxations or dislocations may have been clinically stable in the neonatal period, but dislocate late. We present 5 cases of otherwise healthy children with normal physical examinations and hip radiographs in the first 3 months of life who later developed hip dislocations. Four of the 5 cases required surgical open reduction. In light of these cases and others in the literature, normal neonatal screening for DDH does not assure that continued normal development of the hip joint will happen. Our study confirms the existence of another entity in the wide spectrum of DDH: the late hip dislocation. Therefore, hip evaluations should be continued beyond the neonatal period until the child begins to walk. Parents should be informed that hip dislocation can occur in a late form, and they should be encouraged to take their children for repeated evaluations even if the neonatal screening is normal.

  3. Ultrasound examination for the early determination of dysplasia and congenital dislocation of neonatal hips.

    PubMed

    Schuler, P; Feltes, E; Kienapfel, H; Griss, P

    1990-09-01

    Hip sonography enables an accurate and clinically relevant evaluation of hip maturation during the first days of human life. Experience has shown that an integration of hip sonography into neonatal screening programs is useful and necessary because clinical and even roentgenographic examination does not always establish a confirmed diagnosis of dysplasia.

  4. Normal anatomy and imaging of the hip: emphasis on impingement assessment.

    PubMed

    Jesse, Mary Kristen; Petersen, Brian; Strickland, Colin; Mei-Dan, Omer

    2013-07-01

    A comprehensive knowledge of normal hip anatomy and imaging techniques is essential in the evaluation and assessment of the patient with hip pain. This article reviews the osseous, soft tissue, and vascular components of the hip and the normal anatomical variants encountered in routine hip imaging. Basic and advanced hip imaging is discussed with particular emphasis on radiographic and computed tomography measurements and their utility in evaluating patients with developmental hip dysplasia and femoroacetabular impingement syndrome.

  5. Hip joint contact forces in normal subjects and subjects with total hip prostheses: walking and stair and ramp negotiation.

    PubMed

    Stansfield, B W; Nicol, A C

    2002-02-01

    To calculate the hip joint contact force in normal subjects and subjects with total hip replacements. An observational study of age matched normal subjects and subjects with hip joint replacements. Hip joint contact forces have been calculated using musculo-skeletal models and measured in vivo using instrumented hip prostheses. There are few examples of studies performed on subjects in the 40-60 year age range. This study characterises the forces in both normal subjects and subjects with hip joint replacements for these 'young' subjects. Motion analysis and force plate data were used as input to a three-dimensional model of the leg. Five male and six female normal subjects and five male subjects with hip prostheses were studied. Each subject was observed walking and negotiating stairs and a ramp. Hip joint contact forces in both thigh and pelvic-based co-ordinate systems are presented. Subjects cadence, speed and stride length are given. In general subjects with hip replacements exhibited lower hip joint contact forces than age matched normal subjects. It is suggested that this was the results of the lower speeds, stride lengths and cadences adopted by the subjects with hip replacements. The characterisation of hip joint contact forces provides essential information for prosthetic joint design and testing. The comparison of hip joint contact forces in normal subjects with those in subjects with prosthetic joints provides evidence of, not only actual use of joints, but also of possible levels of force that might be applied to hip prostheses if subjects returned to normal use.

  6. Developmental dysplasia of the hip in neonates: evolution of acetabular dysplasia after hip stabilization by brief Pavlik harness treatment.

    PubMed

    Bin, K; Laville, J-M; Salmeron, F

    2014-06-01

    The recommended treatment duration in neonates with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) varies depending on whether prolonged Pavlik harness therapy is believed to favourably affect the course of the acetabular dysplasia. According to one theory, several months of additional Pavlik harness therapy after achieving hip reduction contributes to correct the acetabular dysplasia. Another theory holds that hip dislocation induces the acetabular dysplasia, which corrects spontaneously once the femoral head is properly seated in the acetabulum. Here, we evaluated this second theory by studying outcomes after early brief Pavlik harness therapy. Acetabular dysplasia associated with neonatal hip instability undergoes self-correction provided stable hip reduction is achieved very early after birth. Therefore, the duration of Pavlik harness therapy can be substantially shortened. We defined hip instability as either reducible hip dislocation or a very easily dislocatable hip with a soft clunk precluding determination of spontaneous hip position as dislocated or reduced. Static and dynamic ultrasound scans were obtained. Patients with ultrasonographic instability (pubo-femoral distance>5mm with less than 50% of coverage) underwent a second physical examination and received treatment. We re-evaluated 42 abnormal hips in 30 patients after a mean follow-up of 6.7 years (range, 5-14 years). Mean age at treatment initiation was 5 days (range, 1-15 days) and mean treatment duration was 34 days (range, 15-75 days). Mean acetabular angle was 20° (range, 12°-30°) and mean Wiberg's lateral centre-edge angle was 30° (range, 22°-35°). Blunting of the lateral angle of the bony roof was noted in 8 hips at last follow-up. In 1 patient whose hip was stable clinically but unstable by ultrasonography at 21 days of age, recurrent dislocation occurred at 5 months of age. The Severin class was 1a in all patients. Despite continuing controversy about whether hip dislocation induces

  7. Neonatal Sweet's Syndrome Associated with Rectovestibular Fistula with Normal Anus.

    PubMed

    Shinozuka, Jun; Tomiyama, Hideki; Tanaka, Shin-Ichiro; Tahara, Junko; Awaguni, Hitoshi; Makino, Shigeru; Maruyama, Rikken; Imashuku, Shinsaku

    2015-05-25

    Sweet's syndrome, characterized by fever and a painful erythematous rash with a dermal neutrophilic infiltrate, develops primarily due to paraneoplastic phenomena in adults. Sweet's syndrome is very rare in neonates. We report a Japanese female neonate (age <2 months), who developed Sweet's syndrome with episodes of perineal infection in association with congenital rectovestibular fistula with normal anus. Sweet's syndrome was diagnosed basing on clinical features and histopathology of biopsied skin tissues. Rectovestibular fistula was confirmed after the signs of inflammation subsided and the rash disappeared. In the literature, we found another case of neonatal Sweet's syndrome associated with rectovestibular fistula in a Japanese female neonate. The perineal region should be screened for anomalies following diagnosis of Sweet's syndrome in neonates.

  8. [Ultrasonography of the neonatal hip: state of the art and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Ortore, P; Fodor, G; Silverio, R; Milani, C; Psenner, K

    1996-01-01

    Since the first studies by Graf, medical interest for neonatal hip sonography (US) has grown, till the redefinition of the name itself of the pathologic condition, which has been recently renamed developmental dysplasia of the hip. After briefly reviewing our personal series of patients (18,388 hips studied from March, 1986, through June, 1995, with 2.81% positives according to Graf, 0.65% of them with subluxated hips), several issues are discussed relative to US of the neonatal hip in the study of dysplasia, namely: 1) technique, 2) measurements, 3) unstable hips, 4) screening, 5) protocols, 6) perspectives. Relative to the technique, Graf's method is currently the method of choice because it is easy to perform (single scanning) and repeatable, different from what other authors, particularly Novick and Harcke, suggested; they use a dynamic approach with more scans and different stress tests. Moreover, in Graf's technique, special attention is paid to the need for correct measurements, which phase was criticized by Couture who complained of its claimed complexity. Hip measurements are an important step in the study of this condition thanks to the information they yield the physician who can thus customize the therapy. The problem of the unstable hip and focal ligament laxity is discussed, which is hypothesized to be a possible cause of hip dysplasia misdiagnosis; according to Graf and Tönnis, this condition is related mostly to hormonal factors and has no actual clinical importance in the possible evolution to a pathologic condition. US of the neonatal hip must be set in a general screening program for newborns to be carried out by the 6th week of life to achieve optimal recovery in positive newborns, without limiting it to supposedly at risk groups. Moreover, the cost-benefit ratio of US screening is emphasized, provided that both medical staff and units are used correctly. A working diagnostic-therapeutic protocol is needed to plan standard epidemiologic

  9. Septic arthritis of the neonatal hip: acute management and late reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Samora, Julie Balch; Klingele, Kevin

    2013-10-01

    Septic arthritis of the hip in neonates is rare but can have devastating consequences. Presenting signs and symptoms may differ from those encountered in older children, which may result in diagnostic challenge or delay. Many risk factors predispose neonates to septic arthritis, including the presence of transphyseal vessels and invasive procedures. Bacterial infection of the joint occurs via hematogenous invasion, extension from an adjacent site, or direct inoculation. A strong correlation exists between younger age at presentation and severity of residual hip deformity. Diagnosis is based on clinical examination, laboratory markers, and ultrasound evaluation. Early management includes parenteral antibiotics and surgical drainage. Late-stage management options include femoral and pelvic osteotomies, trochanteric arthroplasty, arthrodesis, pelvic support procedures, and nonsurgical measures. Early diagnosis and management continues to be the most important prognostic factor for a favorable outcome in the neonate with septic arthritis.

  10. Hip arthroplasty. Part 2: normal and abnormal radiographic findings.

    PubMed

    Pluot, E; Davis, E T; Revell, M; Davies, A M; James, S L J

    2009-10-01

    This review addresses the normal and abnormal radiographic findings that can be encountered during the follow-up of patients with total hip arthroplasty (THA). The relative significance of different patterns of radiolucency, bone sclerosis, and component position is discussed. The normal or pathological significance of these findings is correlated with design, surface, and fixation of the prosthetic components. It is essential to have a good knowledge of expected and unexpected radiological evolution according to the different types of prostheses. This paper emphasizes the importance of serial studies compared with early postoperative radiographs during follow-up in order to report accurately any sign of prosthetic failure and trigger prompt specialist referral. Basic technical guidelines and schedule recommendations for radiological follow-up are summarized.

  11. Umbilical cord insertion: normal location in neonates.

    PubMed

    Salgado, L; Paz, J E

    1992-12-01

    The distances between the xyphoid appendix and the insertion point of the umbilical cord (XU) and between the xyphoid appendix and upper edge of the pubic symphysis (XP) were measured in 201 newborn infants. The mean ratio XU/XP was 0.62 (S.D. 0.044) with no differences between sexes nor correlations with weight or length. Ratios lying between 0.53 and 0.71 can be considered as within the normal range.

  12. Multi-contrast human neonatal brain atlas: application to normal neonate development analysis.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Kenichi; Mori, Susumu; Donohue, Pamela K; Ernst, Thomas; Anderson, Lynn; Buchthal, Steven; Faria, Andreia; Jiang, Hangyi; Li, Xin; Miller, Michael I; van Zijl, Peter C M; Chang, Linda

    2011-05-01

    MRI is a sensitive method for detecting subtle anatomic abnormalities in the neonatal brain. To optimize the usefulness for neonatal and pediatric care, systematic research, based on quantitative image analysis and functional correlation, is required. Normalization-based image analysis is one of the most effective methods for image quantification and statistical comparison. However, the application of this methodology to neonatal brain MRI scans is rare. Some of the difficulties are the rapid changes in T1 and T2 contrasts and the lack of contrast between brain structures, which prohibits accurate cross-subject image registration. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), which provides rich and quantitative anatomical contrast in neonate brains, is an ideal technology for normalization-based neonatal brain analysis. In this paper, we report the development of neonatal brain atlases with detailed anatomic information derived from DTI and co-registered anatomical MRI. Combined with a diffeomorphic transformation, we were able to normalize neonatal brain images to the atlas space and three-dimensionally parcellate images into 122 regions. The accuracy of the normalization was comparable to the reliability of human raters. This method was then applied to babies of 37-53 post-conceptional weeks to characterize developmental changes of the white matter, which indicated a posterior-to-anterior and a central-to-peripheral direction of maturation. We expect that future applications of this atlas will include investigations of the effect of prenatal events and the effects of preterm birth or low birth weights, as well as clinical applications, such as determining imaging biomarkers for various neurological disorders. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Do German-speaking paediatric orthopaedic surgeons agree on diagnostics and treatment of the neonatal hip?].

    PubMed

    Seidl, T; Placzek, R; Funk, J F

    2012-04-01

    Ultrasound examination of the neonatal hip has been an integral part of the German programme for the "early detection of disease in childhood" since 01.01.1996. The aim of this study is to determine if any consensus exists among German-speaking paediatric orthopaedic specialists concerning diagnosis and treatment of the neonatal hip 15 years after legal implementation of hip ultrasound screening by the Graf technique. A questionnaire was sent to all members of the German speaking Association of Paediatric Orthopaedic Surgeons (Vereinigung für Kinderorthopädie - VKO). The query included questions concerning education and field of activity of the member as well as information on the diagnostics of neonatal hip with regard to examiner, technical equipment, and type of screening. In addition, four cases were presented with clinical history, clinical findings, and rateable Graf sonogram (case 1: 3 days old ♀, type D; case 2: 2 days old ♀, type IV; case 3: 4 weeks old ♀, type II a; case 4: 4 months old ♀, type III a) and a treatment recommendation was requested for each case. 78 of 179 contactable VKO members participated in this survey. 75.6 % of the participants are specialists with additional qualification in paediatric orthopaedic surgery. 68 % of the participants work in a hospital. As stated by 61.5 % of the participants the ultrasound examination of the neonatal hip is primarily done by orthopaedic surgeons. One participant stated that the examination is performed primarily by medical-technical assistants. The majority of participants use a 7.5-MHz linear transducer for ultrasound examination, a positioning device according to Graf and a foot switch as technical equipment. State-of-the-art equipment as recommended by Graf including in addition to the above mentioned an upright image display and a transducer guiding arm system is available to only 21.8 % of the participating VKO members. 23 of 50 participants stated that a general screening is performed

  14. High-frequency (1000 Hz) tympanometry in normal neonates.

    PubMed

    Kei, Joseph; Allison-Levick, Julie; Dockray, Jacqueline; Harrys, Rachel; Kirkegard, Christina; Wong, Janet; Maurer, Marion; Hegarty, Jayne; Young, June; Tudehope, David

    2003-01-01

    The characteristics of high frequency (1000 Hz) acoustic admittance results obtained from normal neonates were described in this study. Participants were 170 healthy neonates (96 boys and 74 girls) aged between 1 and 6 days (mean = 3.26 days, SD = 0.92). Transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs), and 226 Hz and 1000 Hz probe tone tympanograms were obtained from the participants using a Madsen Capella OAE/middle ear analyser. The results showed that of the 170 neonates, 34 were not successfully tested in both ears, 14 failed the TEOAE screen in one or both ears, and 122 (70 boys, 52 girls) passed the TEOAE screen in both ears and also maintained an acceptable probe seal during tympanometry. The 1000 Hz tympanometric data for the 122 neonates (244 ears) showed a single-peaked tympanogram in 225 ears (92.2%), a flat-sloping tympanogram in 14 ears (5.7%), a double-peaked tympanogram in 3 ears (1.2%) and other unusual shapes in 2 ears (0.8%). There was a significant ear effect, with right ears showing significantly higher mean peak compensated static admittance and tympanometric width, but lower mean acoustic admittance at +200 daPa and gradient than left ears. No significant gender effects or its interaction with ear were found. The normative tympanometric data derived from this cohort may serve as a guide for detecting middle ear dysfunction in neonates.

  15. Contributions of individual muscles to hip joint contact force in normal walking.

    PubMed

    Correa, Tomas A; Crossley, Kay M; Kim, Hyung J; Pandy, Marcus G

    2010-05-28

    The human hip joint withstands high contact forces during daily activity and is therefore susceptible to injury and structural deterioration over time. Knowledge of muscle-force contributions to hip joint loading may assist in the development of strategies to prevent and manage conditions such as osteoarthritis, femoro-acetabular impingement and fracture. The main aim of this study was to determine the contributions of individual muscles to hip contact force in normal walking. Muscle contributions to hip contact force were calculated based on a previously published dynamic optimization solution for normal walking, which provided the time histories of joint motion, ground reaction forces, and muscle forces during the stance and swing phases of gait. The force developed by each muscle plus its contribution to the ground reaction force were used to determine the muscle's contribution to hip contact force. Muscles were the major contributors to hip contact force, with gravitational and centrifugal forces combined contributing less than 5% of the total contact force. Four muscles that span the hip - gluteus medius, gluteus maximus, iliopsoas, and hamstrings - contributed most significantly to the three components of the hip contact force and hip contact impulse (integral of hip contact force over time). Three muscles that do not span the hip - vasti, soleus, and gastrocnemius - also contributed substantially to hip joint loading. These results provide additional insight into lower-limb muscle function during walking and may also be relevant to studies of cartilage degeneration and bone remodelling at the hip.

  16. The diagnosis and management of neonatal hip instability: results of a clinical and targeted ultrasound screening program.

    PubMed

    Vane, Andrew G S; Gwynne Jones, David P; Dunbar, John D; Theis, Jean-Claude

    2005-01-01

    This article reports the results of a neonatal hip screening program comprising clinical screening and targeted ultrasound performed by orthopaedic surgeons. Over 7 years, from 1995 to 2001, there were 15,397 live births in the authors' region. Seven hundred thirty-three babies (4.8% of births) were referred for hip ultrasound: 80% for risk factors and 20% for instability. Eighty-three babies (5.4/1,000) were splinted in a Pavlik harness. Three of these subsequently required surgery (1.9/1,000). Ten patients (0.65/1000) presented with hip dislocation after 12 weeks of age, nine of whom required open or closed reduction (0.56/1,000). From 1978 to 1985, when neonatal pediatricians clinically screened all babies, 18 babies presented late from 13,707 births (1.3/1000). Since the introduction of orthopaedic screening and targeted ultrasound, there has been a significant reduction in late diagnosis in the authors' institution.

  17. Comparison of mechanoreceptor quantities in hip joints of developmental dysplasia of the hip patients with normal hips.

    PubMed

    Desteli, Engin Eren; Gülman, Ali Birol; Imren, Yunus; Kaymaz, Figen

    2014-01-01

    Joint mechanoreceptors are afferent neural elements involved in pain sensation and tactile sense. We aimed to detect the free nerve endings (FNE) and other types of mechanoreceptors and to compare their quantities in human hip joint capsule (HJC) and ligamentum capitis femoris (LCF) of babies with developmantal dysplasia of hip (DDH) and intrauterine ex foetuses (control group) to find out whether there is an increase in the amount of mechanoreceptors in hip joint due to the occured anatomical chages. We took 15 LCF and HJC biopsies from 15 patients undergoing hip surgery for DDH, and 15 HJC and LCFs from intrauterine ex fetuses. Total of 60 specimens were investigated. The mean age of the babies was 10.3 months (6-18 months) at the time of surgery. Full thickness 1 × 1 cm HJC and LCF portions were taken as biopsy specimens. An immunohistochemical technique was performed for neurogenic protein S-100 and examined under light microscopy. FNEs were detected in all four different tissues (type IVa). Other types of mechanoreceptors (Type I-II and III) were not detected in any of the specimens. The positive rates of FNE staining in the control group were % 2.60 ± 1.24 for the LCF and % 2.67 ± 1.11 for the HJC respectively and FNE staining in the DDH group were found to be % 2.67 ± 1.11 for the LCF and % 2.73 ± 1.16 for the HJC. We did not find a statistically significant difference in number of FNEs between the specimens of the DDH group and the control group (p>0.05), also there was no statistically significant difference in number of FNEs between the HJC and LCF within each group (p>0.05). Our results suggest that the number of FNEs does not increase in HJC and LCF of DDH patients even though LCF hypertrophy and capsular elongation occurs.

  18. [Development of the normal infantile hip joints assessed by MRI].

    PubMed

    Wierusz-Kozłowska, M; Ziemiański, A; Kruczyński, J; Borkowski, W

    2000-01-01

    The paper provides an overview of the time of appearance of the secondary ossification centers and closure of the growth plates of the acetabulum and proximal epiphysis of the femur: the triradiate cartilage, the acetabular roof growth cartilage, the subcapital growth cartilage, the growth cartilage of the major trochanter, the growth cartilage of the minor trochanter. The study is based upon 62 MRI scans of healthy hips in 45 patients aged 3-21. The examined hips showed no pathologic traits--neither in the MRI scan nor in X-ray investigation. In Spin Echo and Turbo Spin Echo sequential imaging all obtained slices were used, on GRADIENT ECHO: FISP 3D, FLASH 2D, and FLASH 3D FAT SAT only chosen slices were included in the study. This way the following results were obtained: the ossification center of the major trochanter appears at the age of 3 in girls and at the age of 6 in boys, while the ossification center of the minor trochanter appears at the age of 6 in both sexes. The times of complete ossification of following growth cartilages were observed: for the triradiate cartilage ossification was observed at age 12-15 in girls and 15-16 in boys; for the cartilage of the acetabular roof ossification was noted at age 12-15 in girls and 15-18 in boys; ossification in the subcapital growth cartilage occurred at age 15-17 in girls and 16-18 in boys; the major trochanter growth cartilage ossifies at age 15-16 in girls and 16-18 in boys; for the minor trochanter ossification of the growth cartilage occurs at age 14-16 in girls and at age 16-18 in boys. The secondary ossification center of the pubic bone appears at age 9-11 in girls and 13-16 in boys and the secondary ossification center of the acetabular roof appears at age 13-17 in girls and boys. This study expand our knowledge on the development of the hip joint and facilitate the assessment of hip pathology.

  19. Perinatal factors associated with neonatal thyroid-stimulating hormone in normal newborns

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was to evaluate the effect of neonatal, maternal, and delivery factors on neonatal thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) of healthy newborns. Methods Medical records of 705 healthy infants born through normal vaginal delivery were reviewed. Neonatal TSH levels obtained by neonatal screening tests were analyzed in relation to perinatal factors and any associations with free thyroxine (FT4) and 17-α hydroxyprogesterone (17OHP) levels. Results An inverse relationship was found between TSH and sampling time after birth. Twin babies and neonates born by vacuum-assisted delivery had higher TSH levels than controls. First babies had higher TSH levels than subsequent babies. Birth weight, gestational age, maternal age and duration from the rupture of the membrane to birth were not related to neonatal TSH. There were no significant differences in TSH level according to sex, Apgar scores, labor induction, the presence of maternal disease and maternal medications. There was a positive association between TSH and 17OHP level but not between TSH and FT4 level. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that sampling time, mode of delivery, birth order, and 17OHP level were significant factors affecting neonatal TSH level. Conclusion Neonatal TSH levels of healthy normal newborns are related with multiple factors. Acute stress during delivery may influence the neonatal TSH level in early neonatal period. PMID:28164073

  20. Effects of normal and abnormal loading conditions on morphogenesis of the prenatal hip joint: application to hip dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Giorgi, Mario; Carriero, Alessandra; Shefelbine, Sandra J.; Nowlan, Niamh C.

    2015-01-01

    Joint morphogenesis is an important phase of prenatal joint development during which the opposing cartilaginous rudiments acquire their reciprocal and interlocking shapes. At an early stage of development, the prenatal hip joint is formed of a deep acetabular cavity that almost totally encloses the head. By the time of birth, the acetabulum has become shallower and the femoral head has lost substantial sphericity, reducing joint coverage and stability. In this study, we use a dynamic mechanobiological simulation to explore the effects of normal (symmetric), reduced and abnormal (asymmetric) prenatal movements on hip joint shape, to understand their importance for postnatal skeletal malformations such as developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). We successfully predict the physiological trends of decreasing sphericity and acetabular coverage of the femoral head during fetal development. We show that a full range of symmetric movements helps to maintain some of the acetabular depth and femoral head sphericity, while reduced or absent movements can lead to decreased sphericity and acetabular coverage of the femoral head. When an abnormal movement pattern was applied, a deformed joint shape was predicted, with an opened asymmetric acetabulum and the onset of a malformed femoral head. This study provides evidence for the importance of fetal movements in the prevention and manifestation of congenital musculoskeletal disorders such as DDH. PMID:26163754

  1. Effects of normal and abnormal loading conditions on morphogenesis of the prenatal hip joint: application to hip dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, Mario; Carriero, Alessandra; Shefelbine, Sandra J; Nowlan, Niamh C

    2015-09-18

    Joint morphogenesis is an important phase of prenatal joint development during which the opposing cartilaginous rudiments acquire their reciprocal and interlocking shapes. At an early stage of development, the prenatal hip joint is formed of a deep acetabular cavity that almost totally encloses the head. By the time of birth, the acetabulum has become shallower and the femoral head has lost substantial sphericity, reducing joint coverage and stability. In this study, we use a dynamic mechanobiological simulation to explore the effects of normal (symmetric), reduced and abnormal (asymmetric) prenatal movements on hip joint shape, to understand their importance for postnatal skeletal malformations such as developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). We successfully predict the physiological trends of decreasing sphericity and acetabular coverage of the femoral head during fetal development. We show that a full range of symmetric movements helps to maintain some of the acetabular depth and femoral head sphericity, while reduced or absent movements can lead to decreased sphericity and acetabular coverage of the femoral head. When an abnormal movement pattern was applied, a deformed joint shape was predicted, with an opened asymmetric acetabulum and the onset of a malformed femoral head. This study provides evidence for the importance of fetal movements in the prevention and manifestation of congenital musculoskeletal disorders such as DDH.

  2. Hip Joint Contact Force in the Emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae) during Normal Level Walking

    PubMed Central

    Goetz, Jessica E.; Derrick, Timothy R.; Pedersen, Douglas R.; Robinson, Duane A.; Conzemius, Michael G.; Baer, Thomas E.; Brown, Thomas D.

    2008-01-01

    The emu is a large, (bipedal) flightless bird that potentially can be used to study various orthopaedic disorders in which load protection of the experimental limb is a limitation of quadrupedal models. An anatomy-based analysis of normal emu walking gait was undertaken to determine hip contact forces for comparison with human data. Kinematic and kinetic data captured for two laboratory-habituated emus were used to drive the model. Muscle attachment data were obtained by dissection, and bony geometries were obtained by CT scan. Inverse dynamics calculations at all major lower-limb joints were used in conjunction with optimization of muscle forces to determine hip contact forces. Like human walking gait, emu ground reaction forces showed a bimodal distribution over the course of the stance phase. Two-bird averaged maximum hip contact force was approximately 5.5 times body weight, directed nominally axially along the femur. This value is only modestly larger than optimization-based hip contact forces reported in literature for humans. The interspecies similarity in hip contact forces makes the emu a biomechanically attractive animal in which to model loading-dependent human orthopaedic hip disorders. PMID:18206892

  3. Geometrical values of the normal and arthritic hip and knee detected with the EOS imaging system.

    PubMed

    Than, Peter; Szuper, Kinga; Somoskeöy, Szabolcs; Warta, Vilmos; Illés, Tamás

    2012-06-01

    EOS 2D/3D is an integrated, low-dose orthopedic digital radioimaging solution, which, due to its groundbreaking properties, has recently shown an increasing application in scoliosis surgery. Its integrated sterEOS 3D software allows creation of patient-specific three-dimensional (3D) lower limb models, and can produce geometrical parameters in 3D. Currently there are a limited number of reports on EOS for lower limb applications. Three-dimensional reconstructions of 256 hip and knee joints of 128 healthy subjects, as well as 53 hips and 46 knees of 69 patients with hip or knee arthritis, were evaluated based on orthogonal EOS two-dimensional (2D) images. Measurements for hips included femur and tibia length, total length of the extremity, femoral antetorsion and offset, femoral neck length, neck-shaft and hip-knee-shaft (HKS) angles. Lower limb alignment in both frontal and sagittal planes were determined in normal and arthritic knees. Values were compared with those obtained by standard methods published by others. Normal hip and knee geometrical parameters were found in our healthy subjects. In osteoarthritic cases, values for neck-shaft angle, femoral antetorsion, femur length and total length of the extremity were shown to decrease non-significantly. Evaluation of lower limb alignment in healthy and arthritic knees showed normal values in healthy subjects apart from three cases with an average six degrees varus. Arthritic knees were most frequently found to have a varus angulation, with the exception of 11 cases with normal or valgus alignment. EOS 2D/3D with its sterEOS 3D reconstruction is useful for a comprehensive 3D examination of the lower limb. In the near future it may be suitable for daily routine diagnostics of orthopedic lower limb deformities as a primary examination method.

  4. Hip range-of-motion (ROM) is less than normal after rotational acetabular osteotomy for developmental dysplasia of the hip: A simulated ROM analysis.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Hidetoshi; Takao, Masaki; Nakahara, Ichiro; Sakai, Takashi; Nishii, Takashi; Sugano, Nobuhiko

    2016-02-01

    The optimal reorientation of the acetabulum for developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is unknown in terms of hip range-of-motion (ROM). The simulated ROMs of 52 DDHs after rotational acetabular osteotomy (RAO) with several patterns of femoral head coverage and those of 73 normal hips were analyzed using computer models reconstructed from CT images. After RAO with a lateral center edge angle (LCEA) of 30° and an anterior center edge angle (ACEA) of 55° producing coverage similar to that of normal hips, the maximal flexion and maximal internal rotation at 110° flexion with 20° adduction were significantly smaller than those of the normal group. To achieve ROMs after RAO similar to those of the normal group, an LCEA of 30° with an ACEA of 45°, an LCEA of 25° with an ACEA of 45° to 50°, and an LCEA of 20° with an ACEA of 50° could be preferred angles to target, even though they provided smaller coverage than that of normal hips. After RAO producing femoral head coverage similar to that of normal hips, the maximal flexion and the maximal internal rotation at 110° flexion with 20° adduction were significantly smaller than those of the normal group.

  5. The Normal and Abnormal Equine Neonatal Musculoskeletal System.

    PubMed

    Levine, David G

    2015-12-01

    The first weeks of life are critical in many aspects, and the musculoskeletal system is no exception. Being able to stand and nurse within hours of life is necessary for survival. Laxity, flexural deformities, and skeletal immaturity can all make it difficult for neonates to ambulate. The increased vascularity to bones and cartilage mixed with the newly forming immune system also make neonates susceptible to infections that we rarely see in adult animals. This article concentrates on orthopedic conditions seen in the first 2 weeks of life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Normalization of widespread pressure pain hypersensitivity after total hip replacement in patients with hip osteoarthritis is associated with clinical and functional improvements.

    PubMed

    Aranda-Villalobos, Pilar; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Navarro-Espigares, Jose L; Hernández-Torres, Elisa; Villalobos, Mercedes; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Arroyo-Morales, Manuel

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the relevance of ongoing nociceptive joint inputs to the maintenance of widespread pain hypersensitivity in patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA) and to determine whether a reversal in the widespread pressure hypersensitivity together with an improvement in pain and function occurs after total hip replacement in these patients. Forty patients with hip OA participated. Twenty patients underwent total hip replacement, and the other 20 patients were assigned to a waiting list. Pressure-pain thresholds (PPTs) over the second metacarpal bone and the gluteus medius, vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, and tibialis anterior muscles were assessed bilaterally with a pressure algometer before and 3 months after total hip replacement surgery. Assessments of pain intensity (by visual analog scale [VAS]), physical function (by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index), and health status (by the Short Form 12 health survey and the EuroQol 5-domain index) were also performed. Patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty exhibited a reduction in widespread pressure pain hyperalgesia (increases in PPTs) over local and distant pain-free areas, as compared with before surgery and as compared with the patients assigned to the waiting list. PPTs were related to hip pain intensity, and significant correlations were found between higher VAS scores and lower average PPTs over all points assessed (-0.409 < r < -0.306, P < 0.05). Patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty exhibited a greater decrease in pain intensity and greater increases in function and health status than did those who were on the waiting list. Changes in the intensity of hip pain were moderately associated with changes in pressure pain sensitivity in the hip arthroplasty group. Normalization of widespread pressure pain hyperalgesia was found after successful hip joint replacement in patients with hip OA. Altered pain processing seems to be driven by ongoing peripheral joint

  7. Abnormal ventricular development in preterm neonates with visually normal MRIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jie; Wang, Yalin; Lao, Yi; Ceschin, Rafael; Mi, Liang; Nelson, Marvin D.; Panigrahy, Ashok; Leporé, Natasha

    2015-12-01

    Children born preterm are at risk for a wide range of neurocognitive and neurobehavioral disorders. Some of these may stem from early brain abnormalities at the neonatal age. Hence, a precise characterization of neonatal neuroanatomy may help inform treatment strategies. In particular, the ventricles are often enlarged in neurocognitive disorders, due to atrophy of surrounding tissues. Here we present a new pipeline for the detection of morphological and relative pose differences in the ventricles of premature neonates compared to controls. To this end, we use a new hyperbolic Ricci flow based mapping of the ventricular surfaces of each subjects to the Poincaré disk. Resulting surfaces are then registered to a template, and a between group comparison is performed using multivariate tensor-based morphometry. We also statistically compare the relative pose of the ventricles within the brain between the two groups, by performing a Procrustes alignment between each subject's ventricles and an average shape. For both types of analyses, differences were found in the left ventricles between the two groups.

  8. Hip contact force in presence of aberrant bone geometry during normal and pathological gait.

    PubMed

    Bosmans, Lode; Wesseling, Mariska; Desloovere, Kaat; Molenaers, Guy; Scheys, Lennart; Jonkers, Ilse

    2014-11-01

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) often present aberrant hip geometry, specifically increased femoral anteversion and neck-shaft angle. Furthermore, altered gait patterns are present within this population. We analyzed the effect of aberrant femoral geometry, as present in CP subjects, on hip contact force (HCF) during pathological and normal gait. We ran dynamic simulations of CP-specific and normal gait using two musculoskeletal models (MSMs), one reflecting normal femoral geometry and one reflecting proximal femoral deformities. The combination of aberrant bone geometry and CP-specific gait characteristics reduced HCF compared to normal gait on a CP subject-specific MSM, but drastically changed the orientation of the HCF vector. The HCF was orientated more vertically and anteriorly than compared to HCF orientation during normal gait. Furthermore, subjects with more pronounced bony deformities encountered larger differences in resultant HCF and HCF orientation. When bone deformities were not accounted for in MSMs of pathologic gait, the HCF orientation was more similar to normal children. Thus, our results support a relation between aberrant femoral geometry and joint loading during pathological/normal gait and confirm a compensatory effect of altered gait kinematics on joint loading.

  9. Relationship between proximal femoral and acetabular alignment in normal hip joints using 3-dimensional computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Buller, Leonard T; Rosneck, James; Monaco, Feno M; Butler, Robert; Smith, Travis; Barsoum, Wael K

    2012-02-01

    The bony architecture of the hip depends upon functional adaptation to mechanical usage via the dynamic interaction between the acetabulum and femoral head. Acetabular retroversion is thought to be a contributing factor of pincer-type femoroacetabular impingement. Studies of pathological hip joints suggest proximal femoral anatomy compensates for acetabular retroversion. HYPOTHESIS/ PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine if a predictable relationship exists between proximal femoral and acetabular angles, age, and gender in normal hip joints. We hypothesized that, through functional adaptation to mechanical loading, a complementary developmental relationship exists between the acetabulum and proximal femur. Descriptive laboratory study. The femoral neck version, femoral neck shaft angle, acetabular version, acetabular inclination, and center edge angle were measured in 230 normal hip joints in 115 adults using 3-dimensional reconstruction software. Correlations between the angles, age, and gender were examined using the methods of stepwise regression and backward elimination. Regarding side-to-side comparison and variability, there was no statistically significant difference between the left and right sides in the average value of each angle measurement. The correlations specifically between angles, age, and gender were similar on the left and right sides for all pairs except femoral version and acetabular inclination. Regarding significant findings of the study, a positive correlation (P < .05) was found between femoral version and acetabular version (0.38° to 1°). A positive correlation was found between femoral neck shaft angle and acetabular version (0.21° to 1°). A negative correlation was found between femoral neck shaft angle and age (-0.17° to 1°). A positive correlation was found between acetabular version and female gender (2.6° to 1°). A positive correlation was found between center edge angle and female gender (2.8° to 1°). A

  10. Hip strength and range of motion: Normal values from a professional football league.

    PubMed

    Mosler, Andrea B; Crossley, Kay M; Thorborg, Kristian; Whiteley, Rod J; Weir, Adam; Serner, Andreas; Hölmich, Per

    2017-04-01

    To determine the normal profiles for hip strength and range of motion (ROM) in a professional football league in Qatar, and examine the effect of leg dominance, age, past history of injury, and ethnicity on these profiles. Cross-sectional cohort study. Participants included 394 asymptomatic, male professional football players, aged 18-40 years. Strength was measured using a hand held dynamometer with an eccentric test in side-lying for hip adduction and abduction, and the squeeze test in supine with 45° hip flexion. Range of motion measures included: hip internal and external rotation in 90° flexion, hip IR in prone, bent knee fall out and hip abduction in side-lying. Demographic information was collected and the effect on the profiles was analysed using linear mixed models with repeated measures. Strength values (mean±SD) were: adduction=3.0±0.6Nm/kg, abduction=2.6±0.4Nm/kg, adduction/abduction ratio=1.2±0.2, Squeeze test=3.6±0.8N/kg. Range of motion values: internal rotation in flexion=32±8°, external rotation=38±8°, internal rotation in prone=38±8°, bent knee fall out=13±4.4cm, abduction in side-lying=50±7.3°. Leg dominance had no clinically relevant effect on these profiles. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that age had a minor influence on squeeze strength (-0.03N/kg/year), external rotation (-0.30°/year) and abduction range (-0.19°/year) but past history of injury, and ethnicity did not. Normal values are documented for hip strength and range of motion that can be used as reference profiles in the clinical assessment, screening, and management of professional football players. Leg dominance, recent past injury history and ethnicity do not need to be accounted for when using these profiles for comparison purposes. Copyright © 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Finite element prediction of cartilage contact stresses in normal human hips.

    PubMed

    Harris, Michael D; Anderson, Andrew E; Henak, Corinne R; Ellis, Benjamin J; Peters, Christopher L; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2012-07-01

    Our objectives were to determine cartilage contact stress during walking, stair climbing, and descending stairs in a well-defined group of normal volunteers and to assess variations in contact stress and area among subjects and across loading scenarios. Ten volunteers without history of hip pain or disease with normal lateral center-edge angle and acetabular index were selected. Computed tomography imaging with contrast was performed on one hip. Bone and cartilage surfaces were segmented from volumetric image data, and subject-specific finite element models were constructed and analyzed using a validated protocol. Acetabular contact stress and area were determined for seven activities. Peak stress ranged from 7.52±2.11 MPa for heel-strike during walking (233% BW) to 8.66 ± 3.01 MPa for heel-strike during descending stairs (261% BW). Average contact area across all activities was 34% of the surface area of the acetabular cartilage. The distribution of contact stress was highly non-uniform, and more variability occurred among subjects for a given activity than among activities for a single subject. The magnitude and area of contact stress were consistent between activities, although inter-activity shifts in contact pattern were found as the direction of loading changed. Relatively small incongruencies between the femoral and acetabular cartilage had a large effect on the contact stresses. These effects tended to persist across all simulated activities. These results demonstrate the diversity and trends in cartilage contact stress in healthy hips during activities of daily living and provide a basis for future comparisons between normal and pathologic hips. Copyright © 2012 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  12. Is the T1ρ MRI profile of hyaline cartilage in the normal hip uniform?

    PubMed

    Rakhra, Kawan S; Cárdenas-Blanco, Arturo; Melkus, Gerd; Schweitzer, Mark E; Cameron, Ian G; Beaulé, Paul E

    2015-04-01

    T1ρ MRI is an imaging technique sensitive to proteoglycan (PG) content of hyaline cartilage. However, normative T1ρ values have not been established for the weightbearing cartilage of the hip, and it is not known whether it is uniform or whether there is topographic variation. Knowledge of the T1ρ profile of hyaline cartilage in the normal hip is important for establishing a baseline against which comparisons can be made to experimental and clinical arthritic subjects. In this diagnostic study, we determined (1) the T1ρ MRI values of hyaline cartilage of the normal hip; and (2) whether the T1ρ MRI profile of the normal hip hyaline cartilage is uniform. Fourteen asymptomatic volunteers (11 men, three women; mean age, 35 years) prospectively underwent 1.5-T T1ρ MRI of a single hip. The weightbearing hyaline cartilage bilayer of the acetabulum and femoral head was evaluated on sagittal images and segmented into four zones: (1) anterior; (2) anterosuperior; (3) posterosuperior; and (4) and posterior. For the full region of interest and within each zone and each sagittal slice, we calculated the mean T1ρ relaxation value, a parameter that indirectly quantifies PG content, where T1ρ is inversely related to PG concentration. There was variation in the T1ρ relaxation values depending on zone (anterior to posterior) and slice (medial to lateral). When combining the most anterior quadrants (Zones 1 and 2), the T1ρ relaxation values were lower than those in the combined posterior quadrants (Zones 3 and 4) (30.4 msec versus 32.2 msec, respectively; p = 0.002), reflecting higher PG concentration. There was a difference between the T1ρ relaxation values of the sagittal slices (p = 0.038), most pronounced anteriorly in Zone 1 (26.6 msec, p = 0.001). With a selective combination of zones and slices, there were lower mean T1ρ values in the anterolateral-most region compared with the remainder of the weightbearing portion of the hip (28.6 msec versus 32.2 msec

  13. Are "normal hips" being labeled as femoroacetabular impingement due to EE angle?

    PubMed

    You, Tian; Yang, Bei; Zhang, Xin-Tao; Jiang, Xiao-Cheng; Wang, Shuang; Zhang, Wen-Tao

    2017-03-01

    Gluteal muscle contracture (GMC) is a clinical syndrome characterized by gait abnormality and limb dysfunction, as well as secondary deformities of pelvis and femur. Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) typically could be diagnosed on the basis of computed tomography (CT) such as the equatorial-edge angle (EE angle), but it did not work well in GMC patients. In this study, we retrospected all image data and found small EE angles in GMCs, which meant retroverted acetabulum; however, none of them showed no symptoms and signs of FAI. Therefore, we had reasons to think that, some normal hips with unbalanced hip myodynamia as same as GMCs, may be incorrectly diagnosed as FAI through measuring EE angle only.In consequence, the paper was designed to assess the use of the EE angle in the assessment of FAI in the diagnosis, as described by Werner.Twenty-three patients (46 hips) were collected and calculated with the "equatorial-edge angle" (EE angle) by CT scans. All of them were excluded from FAI.Review of the hips showed a mean EE angle was 12.93°, with a minimum of -3.42° and a maximum of 24.08°. The mean value for males and females were 13.52° and 12.40°, respectively, without statistical significance, although the mean value of left hips and right sides reached 13.32° and 12.54° individually, not having statistical differences neither. There were not any symptoms or signs of FAI in all patients. Thus, the reduced EE angle could suggest the local excessive coverage of the femoral head by the anterior acetabular edge, but might not be a reasonably good predictor of FAI.GMC patient's acetabular deformity mainly manifests as increased retroversion, which may be the anatomical basis for FAI and lead to high risks of the acetabular impingement. However, all patients in this study showed no symptoms and signs of FAI, suggesting that the measurement of EE angle can only be applied to assessing those people with normal hip myodynamia, and the bone deformity and the

  14. ‘Pseudotumour’ invading the proximal femur with normal metal ions following metal on metal hip resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Harry; Sugand, Kapil; Ali, Ibrahim; Smith, Jay

    2015-01-01

    A 75-year-old woman who had undergone hybrid metal-on-metal hip resurfacing 8 years earlier underwent revision arthroplasty because of hip, groin and lateral thigh pain. The main differential was aseptic loosening; however, serum cobalt and chromium levels were normal. Multiple imaging modalities revealed a periprosthetic, cystic soft tissue mass adjacent to the proximal femur. A large ‘pseudotumour’ with proximal femoral invasion was found at revision arthroplasty. We report the first finding of a ‘pseudotumour’ invading the proximal femur with normal metal ions following metal on metal hip resurfacing. PMID:25670783

  15. DPOAE suppression tuning: Cochlear immaturity in premature neonates or auditory aging in normal-hearing adults?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdala, Carolina

    2001-12-01

    Previous work has shown that distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) suppression tuning curves (STCs) recorded from premature neonates are narrower than adult STCs at both low and high frequencies. This has been interpreted to indicate an immaturity in cochlear function prior to term birth. However, an alternative explanation for this finding is that adult DPOAE STCs are broadened and reflect cochlear hair cell loss in normal-hearing adults due to aging, and natural exposure to noise and ototoxins. This alternative hypothesis can be tested by studying suppression tuning in normal-hearing school-aged children. If normal-hearing children, who have not aged significantly or been exposed to noise/ototoxins, have DPOAE suppression tuning similar to adults, the auditory aging hypothesis can be ruled out. However, if children have tuning similar to premature neonates and dissimilar from adults, it implicates aging or other factors intrinsic to the adult cochlea. DPOAE STCs were recorded at 1500, 3000, and 6000 Hz using optimal parameters in normal-hearing children and adults. DPOAE STCs collected previously from premature neonates were used for age comparisons. In general, results indicate that tuning curves from children are comparable to adult STCs and significantly different from neonatal STCS at 1500 and 6000 Hz. Only the growth of suppression was not adultlike in children and only at 6000 Hz. These findings do not strongly support the auditory aging hypothesis as a primary explanation for previously observed neonatal-adult differences in DPOAE suppression tuning. It suggests that these age differences are most likely due to immaturities in the neonatal cochlea. However, nonadultlike suppression growth observed in children at 6000 Hz warrants further attention and may be indicative of subtle alternations in the adult cochlea at high frequencies.

  16. Determination of Normal Anal Position Index Using a Modified Technique in Turkish Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Ertürk, Nazile; Kandemir, Ömer

    2017-01-01

    Aim: This study was aimed to determine the normal position of the anus using the anal position index (API) in an attempt to develop a more sensitive method for measuring API. To investigate API in a wide range of neonates, both term and preterm infants were included in the present study. Materials and Methods: API was determined by measuring the anus-fourchette (FA) and anus-coccyx (AC) distance in female neonates and the anus-scrotum and AC distance in male neonates. API is defined as the ratio of the FA (scrotum) distance to the AC distance. A digital caliper was used for all measurements. The FA or scrotum and coccyx-fourchette or -scrotum distances were measured using digital calipers. Results: A total of 267 neonates (females, 143; males 124) were included in this study. Of these, 36 were borderline premature infants (birth at 35–37 weeks gestation) and 231 were term infants (birth at 38–42 weeks gestation). The mean API was 1.06 ± 0.04 in female and 0.90 ± 0.08 in male neonates. When premature infants were analyzed separately, the mean API was 1.12 ± 0.08 in female and 0.99 ± 0.09 in male neonates. No significant difference in API values was observed between term and preterm neonates (P < 0.05). Conclusions: API values that differ from the previous studies were identified in the present study. We believe our modified method allows for more accurate measurements of the API in newborns. According to our method, the anus should be considered as anteriorly located if API is <1 in female and < 0.9 in male neonates. In addition, the present study is the first to measure API using digital calipers. Digital calipers were found to be convenient and are useful in determining the API with high accuracy (to within 0.01 cm). PMID:28082773

  17. Hyaline cartilage thickness in radiographically normal cadaveric hips: comparison of spiral CT arthrographic and macroscopic measurements.

    PubMed

    Wyler, Annabelle; Bousson, Valérie; Bergot, Catherine; Polivka, Marc; Leveque, Eric; Vicaut, Eric; Laredo, Jean-Denis

    2007-02-01

    To assess spiral multidetector computed tomographic (CT) arthrography for the depiction of cartilage thickness in hips without cartilage loss, with evaluation of anatomic slices as the reference standard. Permission to perform imaging studies in cadaveric specimens of individuals who had willed their bodies to science was obtained from the institutional review board. Two independent observers measured the femoral and acetabular hyaline cartilage thickness of 12 radiographically normal cadaveric hips (from six women and five men; age range at death, 52-98 years; mean, 76.5 years) on spiral multidetector CT arthrographic reformations and on coronal anatomic slices. Regions of cartilage loss at gross or histologic examination were excluded. CT arthrographic and anatomic measurements in the coronal plane were compared by using Bland-Altman representation and a paired t test. Differences between mean cartilage thicknesses at the points of measurement were tested by means of analysis of variance. Interobserver and intraobserver reproducibilities were determined. At CT arthrography, mean cartilage thickness ranged from 0.32 to 2.53 mm on the femoral head and from 0.95 to 3.13 mm on the acetabulum. Observers underestimated cartilage thickness in the coronal plane by 0.30 mm +/- 0.52 (mean +/- standard error) at CT arthrography (P < .001) compared with the anatomic reference standard. Ninety-five percent of the differences between CT arthrography and anatomic values ranged from -1.34 to 0.74 mm. The difference between mean cartilage thicknesses at the different measurement points was significant for coronal spiral multidetector CT arthrography and anatomic measurement of the femoral head and acetabulum and for sagittal and transverse CT arthrography of the femoral head (P < .001). Changes in cartilage thickness from the periphery to the center of the joint ("gradients") were found by means of spiral multidetector CT arthrography and anatomic measurement. Spiral

  18. Neonatal morbidity and mortality for repeated cesarean section vs. normal vaginal delivery to uncomplicated term pregnancies at Srinagarind Hospital.

    PubMed

    Wankaew, Nootwadee; Jirapradittha, Junya; Kiatchoosakun, Pakaphan

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the morbidities and mortality of neonates delivered by elective repeated cesarean section vs. normal vaginal delivery among women with uncomplicated term pregnancies. A retrospective descriptive study was done between January 2009 and December 2011 to determine the morbidities and mortality among uncomplicated term pregnancies at Srinagarind Hospital. Three hundred seventy two neonates delivered by elective repeated cesarean section vs. 1,581 by normal vaginal delivery. A significantly greater number of neonates in the elective repeated cesarean section group required oxygen for neonatal resuscitation compared to neonates in the normal vaginal delivery group (37.6% vs. 20.9%, p < 0.001). Neonates delivered by elective repeated cesarean section were more frequently admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (1.1% vs. 0%, p < 0.001) and had longer hospital stays (4.56 +/- 2.45 vs. 4.07 +/- 1.44 days, p < 0.001). The latter not only had a higher rate of respiratory distress syndrome (0.8% vs. 0%, p < 0.001) and transient tachypnea of the newborn (3.2% vs. 0.3%, p < 0.001), which required more respiratory support, they also had a higher rate of infection (2.4% vs. 0.8%, p < 0.05) than neonates delivered by normal vaginal delivery. Neonates born by normal vaginal delivery, however had more birth trauma and hyperbilirubinemia than neonates born by elective repeated cesarean section (8.8% vs. 2.4%, p < 0.001 and 31.8% vs. 22.6%, p < 0.05, respectively). There was no difference in the mortality rate between the groups. Even among uncomplicated term pregnancies, cesarean section is associated with more neonatal respiratory morbidity and sepsis while those delivered by normal vaginal delivery tend to have a higher rate of birth trauma and hyperbilirubinemia. Clinicians should therefore be concerned about the route of delivery and the probability of negative neonatal outcomes.

  19. International normalized ratio testing with point-of-care coagulometer in healthy term neonates.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Shigeo; Baba, Toru; Ueno, Daizo; Ohishi, Akira

    2014-07-09

    Neonates routinely receive vitamin K to prevent vitamin K deficiency bleeding, which is associated with a high mortality rate and a high frequency of neurological sequelae. A coagulation screening test might be necessary to detect prophylactic failure or incomplete prophylaxis. However, venous access and the volume of blood required for such testing can be problematic. CoaguChek XS is a portable device designed to monitor prothrombin time while only drawing a small volume of blood. Although the device is used in adults and children, studies have not been performed to evaluate its clinical utility in neonates, and the reference value is unknown in this population. The objectives of the present study were to determine the reference intervals (RIs) for international normalized ratio (INR) using the CoaguChek XS by capillary puncture in healthy term neonates, to evaluate factors that correlate with INR, and to evaluate the device by assessing its ease of use in clinical practice. This study included 488 healthy term neonates born at a perinatal center between July 2012 and June 2013. The INRs determined by CoaguChek XS were measured in 4-day-old neonates. The enrolled neonates were orally administered vitamin K 6-12 h after birth. A RI for INRs in 4-day-old neonates was established using the CoaguChek XS with a median value of 1.10 and a range of 0.90-1.30. A significant difference in the INR was noted between male (median value, 1.10; RI, 0.90-1.30) and female (median value, 1.10; RI, 0.90-1.24) neonates (p = 0.049). The INR was found to correlate with gestational age, birth weight, and hematocrit value. The CoaguChek XS device is safe, fast, and convenient for performing INR assays in neonates. Our study is the first to establish a RI for INRs that were measured using the CoaguChek XS in healthy term neonates.

  20. International normalized ratio testing with point-of-care coagulometer in healthy term neonates

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Neonates routinely receive vitamin K to prevent vitamin K deficiency bleeding, which is associated with a high mortality rate and a high frequency of neurological sequelae. A coagulation screening test might be necessary to detect prophylactic failure or incomplete prophylaxis. However, venous access and the volume of blood required for such testing can be problematic. CoaguChek XS is a portable device designed to monitor prothrombin time while only drawing a small volume of blood. Although the device is used in adults and children, studies have not been performed to evaluate its clinical utility in neonates, and the reference value is unknown in this population. The objectives of the present study were to determine the reference intervals (RIs) for international normalized ratio (INR) using the CoaguChek XS by capillary puncture in healthy term neonates, to evaluate factors that correlate with INR, and to evaluate the device by assessing its ease of use in clinical practice. Methods This study included 488 healthy term neonates born at a perinatal center between July 2012 and June 2013. The INRs determined by CoaguChek XS were measured in 4-day-old neonates. Results The enrolled neonates were orally administered vitamin K 6-12 h after birth. A RI for INRs in 4-day-old neonates was established using the CoaguChek XS with a median value of 1.10 and a range of 0.90–1.30. A significant difference in the INR was noted between male (median value, 1.10; RI, 0.90–1.30) and female (median value, 1.10; RI, 0.90–1.24) neonates (p = 0.049). The INR was found to correlate with gestational age, birth weight, and hematocrit value. Conclusions The CoaguChek XS device is safe, fast, and convenient for performing INR assays in neonates. Our study is the first to establish a RI for INRs that were measured using the CoaguChek XS in healthy term neonates. PMID:25008798

  1. Contemporary patterns of spontaneous labor with normal neonatal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Landy, Helain J; Branch, D Ware; Burkman, Ronald; Haberman, Shoshana; Gregory, Kimberly D; Hatjis, Christos G; Ramirez, Mildred M; Bailit, Jennifer L; Gonzalez-Quintero, Victor H; Hibbard, Judith U; Hoffman, Matthew K; Kominiarek, Michelle; Learman, Lee A; Van Veldhuisen, Paul; Troendle, James; Reddy, Uma M

    2010-12-01

    To use contemporary labor data to examine the labor patterns in a large, modern obstetric population in the United States. Data were from the Consortium on Safe Labor, a multicenter retrospective study that abstracted detailed labor and delivery information from electronic medical records in 19 hospitals across the United States. A total of 62,415 parturients were selected who had a singleton term gestation, spontaneous onset of labor, vertex presentation, vaginal delivery, and a normal perinatal outcome. A repeated-measures analysis was used to construct average labor curves by parity. An interval-censored regression was used to estimate duration of labor, stratified by cervical dilation at admission and centimeter by centimeter. Labor may take more than 6 hours to progress from 4 to 5 cm and more than 3 hours to progress from 5 to 6 cm of dilation. Nulliparous and multiparous women appeared to progress at a similar pace before 6 cm. However, after 6 cm, labor accelerated much faster in multiparous than in nulliparous women. The 95 percentiles of the second stage of labor in nulliparous women with and without epidural analgesia were 3.6 and 2.8 hours, respectively. A partogram for nulliparous women is proposed. In a large, contemporary population, the rate of cervical dilation accelerated after 6 cm, and progress from 4 cm to 6 cm was far slower than previously described. Allowing labor to continue for a longer period before 6 cm of cervical dilation may reduce the rate of intrapartum and subsequent repeat cesarean deliveries in the United States.

  2. Contemporary Patterns of Spontaneous Labor With Normal Neonatal Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Landy, Helain J.; Branch, D. Ware; Burkman, Ronald; Haberman, Shoshana; Gregory, Kimberly D.; Hatjis, Christos G.; Ramirez, Mildred M.; Bailit, Jennifer L.; Gonzalez-Quintero, Victor H.; Hibbard, Judith U.; Hoffman, Matthew K.; Kominiarek, Michelle; Learman, Lee A.; Van Veldhuisen, Paul; Troendle, James; Reddy, Uma M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To use contemporary labor data to examine the labor patterns in a large, modern obstetric population in the United States. Methods Data were from the Consortium on Safe Labor, a multicenter retrospective study that abstracted detailed labor and delivery information from electronic medical records in 19 hospitals across the United States. A total of 62,415 parturients were selected who had a singleton term gestation, spontaneous onset of labor, vertex presentation, vaginal delivery, and a normal perinatal outcome. A repeated-measures analysis was used to construct average labor curves by parity. An interval-censored regression was used to estimate duration of labor stratified by cervical dilation at admission and centimeter by centimeter. Results Labor may take over 6 hours to progress from 4 to 5 cm and over 3 hours to progress from 5 to 6 cm of dilation. Nulliparas and multiparas appeared to progress at a similar pace before 6 cm. However, after 6 cm labor accelerated much faster in multiparas than in nulliparas. The 95th percentile of the 2nd stage of labor in nulliparas with and without epidural analgesia was 3.6 and 2.8 hours, respectively. A partogram for nulliparas is proposed. Conclusion In a large, contemporary population, the rate of cervical dilation accelerated after 6 cm and progress from 4 to 6 cm was far slower than previously described. Allowing labor to continue for a longer period before 6 cm of cervical dilation may reduce the rate of intrapartum and subsequent repeat cesarean deliveries in the United States. PMID:21099592

  3. Lipodystrophy, Diabetes and Normal Serum Insulin in PPARγ-Deficient Neonatal Mice

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Peter E.; Ye, Xiu Zhen; DeChellis, Melissa A.; Davis, Vannessa M.; Duan, Sheng Zhong; Mortensen, Richard M.; Milstone, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a pleiotropic ligand activated transcription factor that acts in several tissues to regulate adipocyte differentiation, lipid metabolism, insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis. PPARγ also regulates cardiomyocyte homeostasis and by virtue of its obligate role in placental development is required for embryonic survival. To determine the postnatal functions of PPARγ in vivo we studied globally deficient neonatal mice produced by epiblast-restricted elimination of PPARγ. PPARγ-rescued placentas support development of PPARγ-deficient embryos that are viable and born in near normal numbers. However, PPARγ-deficient neonatal mice show severe lipodystrophy, lipemia, hepatic steatosis with focal hepatitis, relative insulin deficiency and diabetes beginning soon after birth and culminating in failure to thrive and neonatal lethality between 4 and 10 days of age. These abnormalities are not observed with selective PPARγ2 deficiency or with deficiency restricted to hepatocytes, skeletal muscle, adipocytes, cardiomyocytes, endothelium or pancreatic beta cells. These observations suggest important but previously unappreciated functions for PPARγ1 in the neonatal period either alone or in combination with PPARγ2 in lipid metabolism, glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity. PMID:27505464

  4. A patient-specific model of the biomechanics of hip reduction for neonatal Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip: Investigation of strategies for low to severe grades of Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip.

    PubMed

    Huayamave, Victor; Rose, Christopher; Serra, Sheila; Jones, Brendan; Divo, Eduardo; Moslehy, Faissal; Kassab, Alain J; Price, Charles T

    2015-07-16

    A physics-based computational model of neonatal Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip (DDH) following treatment with the Pavlik Harness (PV) was developed to obtain muscle force contribution in order to elucidate biomechanical factors influencing the reduction of dislocated hips. Clinical observation suggests that reduction occurs in deep sleep involving passive muscle action. Consequently, a set of five (5) adductor muscles were identified as mediators of reduction using the PV. A Fung/Hill-type model was used to characterize muscle response. Four grades (1-4) of dislocation were considered, with one (1) being a low subluxation and four (4) a severe dislocation. A three-dimensional model of the pelvis-femur lower limb of a representative 10 week-old female was generated based on CT-scans with the aid of anthropomorphic scaling of anatomical landmarks. The model was calibrated to achieve equilibrium at 90° flexion and 80° abduction. The hip was computationally dislocated according to the grade under investigation, the femur was restrained to move in an envelope consistent with PV restraints, and the dynamic response under passive muscle action and the effect of gravity was resolved. Model results with an anteversion angle of 50° show successful reduction Grades 1-3, while Grade 4 failed to reduce with the PV. These results are consistent with a previous study based on a simplified anatomically-consistent synthetic model and clinical reports of very low success of the PV for Grade 4. However our model indicated that it is possible to achieve reduction of Grade 4 dislocation by hyperflexion and the resultant external rotation.

  5. [Dysplasia in the development of the hip].

    PubMed

    Moraleda, L; Albiñana, J; Salcedo, M; Gonzalez-Moran, G

    2013-01-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) causes anatomical changes that cause early coxarthrosis. Although risf factors have been determined, the aetiology and physiopathology remains exactly unknown. Neonatal screening with physical examination and ultrasound have been stablished in order to diagnose this disease early in life. A diagnosis in the first months of life is essential as it enables a normal hip to form and prevent the appearance of early coxarthrosis. Treatment principles are to be able to reduce the hip without provoking avascular necrosis of the femoral head, and to normalize the acetabular development. Knowledge of the orthopaedic and surgical options is essential in order to achieve success in the treatment.

  6. Residual hip dysplasia at 1 year after treatment for neonatal hip instability is not related to degenerative joint disease in young adulthood: a 21-year follow-up study including dGEMRIC.

    PubMed

    Wenger, D; Siversson, C; Dahlberg, L E; Tiderius, C J

    2016-03-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is associated with an increased risk of early hip osteoarthritis (OA). We aimed to examine the outcome at the completion of growth in a cohort of children who had residual acetabular dysplasia at age 1 year following early treatment for neonatal instability of the hip (NIH). We examined 21 of 30 subjects who had been treated with the von Rosen splint neonatally for NIH and had residual acetabular dysplasia at age 1 year. Mean follow-up time was 21 years (range 17-24). Signs of OA and acetabular dysplasia were assessed by radiography. Cartilage quality was assessed by delayed Gadolinium Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage (dGEMRIC), a tool for molecular imaging of cartilage quality, at 1.5 T. Patient reported outcome (PRO) was assessed by the 12-item WOMAC score. No study participant had radiographic OA (defined as Kellgren-Lawrence grade ≥2) or minimum joint space width (JSW) ≤2 mm. The mean dGEMRIC index was 630 ms (95% CI: 600-666, range: 516-825) suggesting good cartilage quality. The mean 12-item WOMAC score was 1.2. Two of three radiographic measurements of DDH correlated positively to the dGEMRIC index. Children treated neonatally for NIH have good hip function and no signs of cartilage degeneration at 21-year follow-up, despite residual dysplasia at age 1 year. Unexpectedly, radiographic signs of dysplasia were associated with better cartilage quality, as assessed with dGEMRIC. This may indicate cartilage adaptation to increased mechanical stress in mild hip dysplasia. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Low Normal TSH levels are Associated with Impaired BMD and Hip Geometry in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Su Jin; Kim, Kyoung Min; Lee, Eun Young; Song, Mi Kyung; Kang, Dae Ryong; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Youm, Yoosik; Yun, Young Mi; Park, Hyun-Young; Kim, Chang Oh; Rhee, Yumie

    2016-01-01

    Subclinical hyperthyroidism is known to be associated with the risk of fractures in elderly people. However, there are few studies assessing whether low normal thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels affect bone density and geometry. Here, we aimed to assess the influence of the TSH level on bone mineral density (BMD) and geometry in elderly euthyroid subjects. This was a cross-sectional cohort study. A total of 343 men and 674 women with euthyroidism were included and analyzed separately. The subjects were divided into tertiles based on the serum TSH level. The BMD and geometry were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and a hip structural analysis program. Multiple regression analysis was used to compute the odds ratios of osteoporosis in the lower TSH tertile group and the association between geometry parameters and the TSH level. We found that the femoral neck and total hip BMDs were lower in the lower TSH tertile group. In women, the cross-sectional area and cortical thickness of the femur were negatively associated with the TSH level in all three regions (the narrow neck, intertrochanter, and femoral shaft); however, in men, these geometry parameters were significantly associated with the TSH level only in the intertrochanter region. The buckling ratio, a bone geometry parameter representing cortical instability, was significantly higher in the lower TSH tertile group in all three regions in women, but not in men. Our results indicated that lower TSH levels in the euthyroid range are related to lower BMD and weaker femoral structure in elderly women. PMID:28053824

  8. Low Normal TSH levels are Associated with Impaired BMD and Hip Geometry in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su Jin; Kim, Kyoung Min; Lee, Eun Young; Song, Mi Kyung; Kang, Dae Ryong; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Youm, Yoosik; Yun, Young Mi; Park, Hyun-Young; Kim, Chang Oh; Rhee, Yumie

    2016-12-01

    Subclinical hyperthyroidism is known to be associated with the risk of fractures in elderly people. However, there are few studies assessing whether low normal thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels affect bone density and geometry. Here, we aimed to assess the influence of the TSH level on bone mineral density (BMD) and geometry in elderly euthyroid subjects. This was a cross-sectional cohort study. A total of 343 men and 674 women with euthyroidism were included and analyzed separately. The subjects were divided into tertiles based on the serum TSH level. The BMD and geometry were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and a hip structural analysis program. Multiple regression analysis was used to compute the odds ratios of osteoporosis in the lower TSH tertile group and the association between geometry parameters and the TSH level. We found that the femoral neck and total hip BMDs were lower in the lower TSH tertile group. In women, the cross-sectional area and cortical thickness of the femur were negatively associated with the TSH level in all three regions (the narrow neck, intertrochanter, and femoral shaft); however, in men, these geometry parameters were significantly associated with the TSH level only in the intertrochanter region. The buckling ratio, a bone geometry parameter representing cortical instability, was significantly higher in the lower TSH tertile group in all three regions in women, but not in men. Our results indicated that lower TSH levels in the euthyroid range are related to lower BMD and weaker femoral structure in elderly women.

  9. Normal neonatal hearing screening did not preclude sensorineural hearing loss in two-year-old very preterm infants.

    PubMed

    van Noort-van der Spek, Inge L; Goedegebure, André; Hartwig, Nico G; Kornelisse, René F; Franken, Marie-Christine J P; Weisglas-Kuperus, Nynke

    2017-10-01

    Very preterm infants are at risk of neonatal hearing loss. However, it is unknown whether infants with a normal neonatal hearing screening result risk sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) at a later age. This cohort study was conducted at the Erasmus Medical University Center Rotterdam, the Netherlands, on 77 very preterm infants born between October 2005 and September 2008. All infants underwent auditory brainstem response audiometry during neonatal hearing screening and at two years of corrected age. The frequency of SNHL in infants with a normal neonatal hearing screening was analysed and the risk factors associated with newly diagnosed SNHL in these infants were examined. We found that 3.9% (3/77) of the very preterm infants showed permanent hearing loss during their neonatal hearing screening. In addition, a relatively high prevalence of newly diagnosed SNHL (4.3%) was found in three of the 70 infants followed up at the age of two. The total prevalence rate of permanent hearing loss in the cohort was approximately 8%. A normal outcome of neonatal hearing screening did not guarantee normal hearing at two years of age in this very preterm cohort and paediatricians should be alert to the possibility of late-onset SNHL. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Relationship between femoroacetabular contact areas and hip position in the normal joint: an in vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    Signorelli, Cecilia; Lopomo, Nicola; Bonanzinga, Tommaso; Marcheggiani Muccioli, Giulio Maria; Safran, Marc R; Marcacci, Maurilio; Zaffagnini, Stefano

    2013-02-01

    Different approaches have been proposed to diagnose femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) condition and hip instability. It is still debatable which test is the most effective to make a correct diagnosis. The true mechanics of the hip during particular physical examination manoeuvres is unknown. Eight fresh frozen hips were passively taken through 3 different commonly used positions for FAI diagnosis and hip instability: 90° Flexion-Adduction-Internal Rotation, Hyperextension-Adduction-External Rotation and Hyperextension-Neutral-External Rotation. Kinematics and anatomical data were acquired by an optoelectronic system. The contact areas between acetabulum and femoral head were analysed to determine whether these tests are able to localize regions of the hip that may give patients pain. In the hip positions where the femur was in Hyperextension-External Rotation, the contact area was mainly concentrated in the posterosuperior area of the acetabulum, while during 90° Flexion-Adduction-Internal Rotation position, there was a wider distribution of contact, not specific to the anterolateral acetabulum. The results confirm the ability of the Hyperextension-External Rotation tests to particularly analyse the posterior region of the acetabulum. Placing the hip in 90° of Flexion-Adduction-Internal Rotation allows for testing a wider zone of the acetabulum and is not specific to abutment of the femoral head-neck region against the anterolateral acetabulum.

  11. Dependence of normal development of skeletal muscle in neonatal rats on load bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohira, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Yoshinaga, T.; Kawano, F.; Nomura, T.; Nonaka, I.; Allen, D. L.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2000-01-01

    Antigravity function plays an important role in determining the morphological and physiological properties of the neuromuscular system. Inhibition of the normal development of the neuromuscular system is induced by hindlimb unloading during the neonatal period in rats. However, the role of gravitational loading on the development of skeletal muscle in rats is not well understood. It could be hypothesized that during the early postnatal period, i.e. when minimal weight-supporting activity occurs, the activity imposed by gravity would be of little consequence in directing the normal development of the skeletal musculature. We have addressed this issue by limiting the amount of postnatal weight-support activity of the hindlimbs of rats during the lactation period. We have focused on the development of three characteristics of the muscle fibers, i.e. size, myonuclear number and myosin heavy chain expression.

  12. Dependence of normal development of skeletal muscle in neonatal rats on load bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohira, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Yoshinaga, T.; Kawano, F.; Nomura, T.; Nonaka, I.; Allen, D. L.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2000-01-01

    Antigravity function plays an important role in determining the morphological and physiological properties of the neuromuscular system. Inhibition of the normal development of the neuromuscular system is induced by hindlimb unloading during the neonatal period in rats. However, the role of gravitational loading on the development of skeletal muscle in rats is not well understood. It could be hypothesized that during the early postnatal period, i.e. when minimal weight-supporting activity occurs, the activity imposed by gravity would be of little consequence in directing the normal development of the skeletal musculature. We have addressed this issue by limiting the amount of postnatal weight-support activity of the hindlimbs of rats during the lactation period. We have focused on the development of three characteristics of the muscle fibers, i.e. size, myonuclear number and myosin heavy chain expression.

  13. Excessive Gestational Weight Gain in the First Trimester among Women with Normal Glucose Tolerance and Resulting Neonatal Adiposity

    PubMed Central

    Josefson, Jami L.; Simons, Hannah; Zeiss, Dinah M.; Metzger, Boyd E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess whether weight gain above or below Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommended amounts in an ethnically diverse obstetric population with normal glucose tolerance is associated with differences in neonatal adiposity. Study Design In this prospective cohort study, healthy women with normal glucose tolerance based on the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups guidelines were enrolled. Gestational weight at multiple time points were collected. Neonatal adiposity was measured by air displacement plethysmography at 24-72 hours of life. Analyses included Fisher's exact test, ANOVA, and a trajectory analysis using a group-based weight gain trajectory model with a censored normal distribution. Result Overweight and obese women were more likely to exceed IOM weight gain guidelines. Regardless, there was no significant difference in %body fat of neonates born to mothers who either met or exceeded gestational weight gain guidelines. Gestational weight gain timing influenced neonatal anthropometrics: women who gained excessively by the first prenatal visit had neonates with significantly higher birth weight (3.91 kg vs. 3.45 kg, p<0.001), and %body fat (13.7% vs. 10.9%, p=0.0001) compared to women who had steady, moderate gestational weight gain. Conclusion Avoidance of excessive gestational weight gain in the first trimester may prevent high amounts of neonatal adiposity. PMID:27583397

  14. Robust estimation of cerebral hemodynamics in neonates using multilayered diffusion model for normal and oblique incidences.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Idan; Harbater, Osnat; Gannot, Israel

    2014-07-01

    The diffusion approximation is useful for many optical diagnostics modalities, such as near-infrared spectroscopy. However, the simple normal incidence, semi-infinite layer model may prove lacking in estimation of deep-tissue optical properties such as required for monitoring cerebral hemodynamics, especially in neonates. To answer this need, we present an analytical multilayered, oblique incidence diffusion model. Initially, the model equations are derived in vector-matrix form to facilitate fast and simple computation. Then, the spatiotemporal reflectance predicted by the model for a complex neonate head is compared with time-resolved Monte Carlo (TRMC) simulations under a wide range of physiologically feasible parameters. The high accuracy of the multilayer model is demonstrated in that the deviation from TRMC simulations is only a few percent even under the toughest conditions. We then turn to solve the inverse problem and estimate the oxygen saturation of deep brain tissues based on the temporal and spatial behaviors of the reflectance. Results indicate that temporal features of the reflectance are more sensitive to deep-layer optical parameters. The accuracy of estimation is shown to be more accurate and robust than the commonly used single-layer diffusion model. Finally, the limitations of such approaches are discussed thoroughly.

  15. Comparison of Oxidative Stress Markers and Serum Cortisol between Normal Labor and Selective Cesarean Section Born Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Nejad, Rasoul Kaviany; Shfiee, Gholamreza; Pezeshki, Nasrolah; Sohrabi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction An imbalance between antioxidant and oxidant-generating systems in newborns can cause oxidative damage. The effect of modes of delivery on oxidative stress in neonates is not fully investigated. Aim This study was aimed to examine the effects of modes of delivery on oxidative stress markers and cortisol in newborns. Materials and Methods In this study 60 term neonates {30 born via Normal Delivery (ND) and 30 born via elective Caesarean Delivery (CS)} at birth were enrolled. Glutathione Peroxidase (GPx), Catalase (CAT) and Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) activities were determined in umbilical cord blood in all neonates. Moreover serum cortisol, uric acid and Total Antioxidant Capacity (TAC) were measured. Results GPx and SOD activities in cesarean born neonates were significantly higher than those of control subjects (p<0.05). TAC and CAT were not significantly different between the two groups. Serum cortisol was lower in caesarean born subjects as compared to normal born neonates. On the other hand uric acid concentration was higher in caesarean born neonates. Conclusion The obtained data indicated that babies born via caesarean section might be predisposed to pathological conditions due to altered antioxidant levels. PMID:27504275

  16. Population-based study of the incidence of congenital hip dysplasia in preterm infants from the Survey of Neonates in Pomerania (SNiP).

    PubMed

    Lange, A E; Lange, J; Ittermann, Till; Napp, M; Krueger, Paul-Christian; Bahlmann, H; Kasch, R; Heckmann, M

    2017-03-16

    Some etiological factors involved in developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) occur in the last trimester of pregnancy, which could result in a decreased incidence of DDH in preterm infants. The aim of this study was to compare the incidence of DDH between preterm and term infants. Ultrasound of the hip joint was performed in 2,534 term infants and 376 preterm infants within the population-based Survey of Neonates in Pomerania (SNiP) study. A total of 42 (1.66%) term infants had DDH (Graf type II c, 0.8%; type D, 0.3% left and 0.4% right; type III a, 0.2% left). Eighteen infants had bilateral findings. Hip dysplasia occurred more frequently in female neonates (32/1,182 vs. 10/1,302, p < 0.023; 95% CI 0.012-0.022, χ (2) test). A familial disposition for DDH was found in 169 (6.7%) term infants and 181 (7.1%) infants in the overall population. In preterm infants, dysplasia of the hip was found in only three late preterm infants with gestational age between 36 and 37 weeks (n = 97) and not in preterm infants <36 weeks gestational age (n = 279). Regression analysis revealed a narrowly significant association between gestational week of birth and DDH (relative risk = 1.17; 95% confidence interval 0.99-1.37; p = 0.065). Our study suggests that preterm infants <36 weeks gestational age have a decreased risk of DDH.

  17. Normal hip, knee and ankle range of motion in the Turkish population.

    PubMed

    Hallaçeli, Hasan; Uruç, Vedat; Uysal, Halil Hakan; Ozden, Raif; Hallaçeli, Ciğdem; Soyuer, Ferhan; Ince Parpucu, Tuba; Yengil, Erhan; Cavlak, Uğur

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain the effect of gender and cultural habits on hip, knee and ankle range of motion (ROM) and to determine the differences between the ROM of right and left side symmetric joints of the lower extremities. The study included 987 (513 males and 474 females) healthy volunteers. Individuals with a history of illness, prior surgery or trauma involving any joint of either lower extremity were excluded from the study. The terminology and techniques of measurements used were those suggested by the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. Left side passive hip flexion and active internal rotation was higher than the right side. Passive flexion of the hip joint was higher in male subjects and internal and external rotation was higher in female subjects. In the knee joint, passive extension was higher in males. Plantarflexion and inversion of the ankle joint were higher in male subjects and dorsiflexion and eversion were higher in female subjects. The differences were considered insignificant in clinical terms as all were less than 3 degrees. There is no clinically significantly difference between right and left side hip, knee and ankle joints ROM. Gender and cultural habits do not appear to have clinically significantly effects on lower extremity joint ROM.

  18. Characterization of wear debris from metal-on-metal hip implants during normal wear versus edge-loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Kovochich, Michael; Fung, Ernest S; Donovan, Ellen; Unice, Kenneth M; Paustenbach, Dennis J; Finley, Brent L

    2017-05-08

    Advantages of second-generation metal-on-metal (MoM) hip implants include low volumetric wear rates and the release of nanosized wear particles that are chemically inert and readily cleared from local tissue. In some patients, edge loading conditions occur, which result in higher volumetric wear. The objective of this study was to characterize the size, morphology, and chemistry of wear particles released from MoM hip implants during normal (40° angle) and edge-loading (65° angle with microseparation) conditions. The mean primary particle size by volume under normal wear was 35 nm (range: 9-152 nm) compared with 95 nm (range: 6-573 nm) under edge-loading conditions. Hydrodynamic diameter analysis by volume showed that particles from normal wear were in the nano- (<100 nm) to submicron (<1000 nm) size range, whereas edge-loading conditions generated particles that ranged from <100 nm up to 3000-6000 nm in size. Particles isolated from normal wear were primarily chromium (98.5%) and round to oval in shape. Edge-loading conditions generated more elongated particles (4.5%) (aspect ratio ≥ 2.5) and more CoCr alloy particles (9.3%) compared with normal wear conditions (1.3% CoCr particles). By total mass, edge-loading particles contained approximately 640-fold more cobalt than normal wear particles. Our findings suggest that high wear conditions are a potential risk factor for adverse local tissue effects in MoM patients who experience edge loading. This study is the first to characterize both the physical and chemical characteristics of MoM wear particles collected under normal and edge-loading conditions. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Normalization of priming solution ionized calcium concentration improves hemodynamic stability of neonates receiving venovenous ECMO.

    PubMed

    Meliones, J N; Moler, F W; Custer, J R; Dekeon, M K; Chapman, R A; Bartlett, R H

    1995-01-01

    The authors' objectives in this investigation were: 1) to prospectively determine whether a normocalcemic priming solution would result in elimination of hypocalcemia after the initiation of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO); 2) to investigate whether normocalcemia would result in improvements in the patient's hemodynamics during the initiation of ECMO; and 3) to further define the relationship between ionized calcium measurements and total calcium, serum total protein, serum albumin, and total magnesium. This was a prospective study done in our neonatal intensive care unit, and included nine neonatal patients placed on ECMO for cardiopulmonary support. The bypass circuit was primed in the standardized manner with 100 mg calcium chloride. Circuit ionized calcium measurements were performed, and additional calcium chloride was added to normalize the ionized calcium in the priming solution. Ionized calcium was measured from the circuit and the patient before the initiation of ECMO, and then again from the patient 5, 10, 15, 30, 60, 120, and 240 minutes after the initiation of ECMO. The patients' mean arterial pressure was measured simultaneously with each ionized calcium measurement. Ionized calcium, serum total calcium, total protein, serum albumin, and total magnesium were measured from blood samples simultaneously collected four times daily. There was no significant change in the ionized calcium measured in the patients after the initiation of ECMO. There was, however, a significant increase in blood pressure 5 min after the initiation of ECMO (62 +/- 7 mmHg vs 53 +/- 6 mmHg, p = 0.01). Thereafter, there was no difference in blood pressure measured when compared with pre ECMO values. A poor correlation was demonstrated between ionized calcium and total calcium (r2 = 0.35), serum total protein (r2 = 0.26), serum albumin (r2 = 0.27), and total magnesium (r2 = 0.05). On the basis of the authors' data, the initiation of ECMO with a normocalcemic prime results

  20. Normal range of osteoblastic activity in total hip arthroplasties on single-photon emission computed tomography bone scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Jin, Senpei; Boktor, Raef R; Kc Man, Kenneth; Pitman, Alexander G

    2016-09-01

    Knowledge of the normal range of periprosthetic osteoblastic activity around total hip arthroplasties is required for rational diagnosis of complications. The aim of this study was to establish such a normal range for single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Clinical utility of such a range is confident differentiation of normal from abnormal arthroplasties. A total of 122 asymptomatic acetabular cups (age: 0-22 years) and 71 femoral stems (age: 0-20 years) were scanned with SPECT/CT. Two acetabular and three femoral activity ratios to normal reference bone were defined [acetabular axial (AA/RA), acetabular coronal (AC/RA), RA=reference acetabulum; femoral calcar (FC/RF), femoral mid-stem (FM/RF), femoral stem tip (FS/RF), RF=reference femur]. Upper cut-off of normal was defined as mean +3 SD (rounded). Two time breakpoints were analysed (12 and 24 months). The upper cut-off for the normal range was 1.0 for AA/RA, 1.5 for AC/RA and 2.2 for all thee of FC/RF, FM/RF and FS/RF. AA/RA, FM/RF and FS/RF showed no statistically significant temporal trends. AC/RA showed stabilization of activity after 12 months and FC/RF after 24 months. Measured activity ratios that fall within our normal range are likely to represent normal periprosthetic osteoblastic activity. Measured activity ratios that fall above the upper cut-offs of our normal range are likely to be abnormal. The cut-offs are robust in clinical practice and have utility in discriminating normal from abnormal stabilized arthroplasties where visual interpretation is ambiguous. Elevated AC/RA under 12 months and FC/RF under 24 months may represent normal periprosthetic activity and should be interpreted with caution.

  1. Echosonogrametric diagnosis of developmental dysplasia of the hip.

    PubMed

    Vrdoljak, J; Bojić, D

    1998-12-01

    In view of adding to ultrasonographic scanning of the neonatal hip through various projections and in order to improve the measurement and quantification base of the normal and dysplastic neonatal hip, the research was conducted on anatomic hip preparation of full-term still-born baby. The research on a clinical sample covered 600 ultrasonically examined normal and dysplastic hips. Ultrasonographic serial scanning was performed on various planes using linear transducer with 5 and 7.5 MHz and with or without a water pillow. On the clinical sample of the particular group various projections were applied and results compared with projections obtained on anatomic preparation. Concluded was that with several projections frontal sonographic projections tomographic examination of the hip joint could be performed. Better insight of the position of the femoral head at rest in neutral and flexed positions, the relative stability of the hip with motion and stress and the depth and configuration of the bony and cartilaginous portions of the acetabulum could be obtained if, besides frontal sections, cross sections of the hip were used. Sufficient measurement data echosonogrametric parameters were indispensable for an adequate definition of all hip joint structures.

  2. Biomechanical study of plantar pressures during walking in male soccer players with increased vs. normal hip alpha angles.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Marco; Abraham, Christoph; Ficklscherer, Andreas; Lahner, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is accompanied by increased hip alpha angles, in particular in athletes with high impact sports. The aim of our study was to investigate the dynamic function of the foot during walking in male soccer players with increased versus normal alpha angles. Plantar pressures of 20 injury-free male soccer players were recorded during barefoot walking at 1.6 m/s. Ten subjects had bilaterally increased (>55°) (IA) and ten subjects normal (<50°) hip alpha angles (NA). Both standing and kicking leg were analyzed. Compared to NA, IA showed lower force-time-integrals (-23%; p< 0.01), pressure-time-integrals (-29%; p< 0.001) and relative loads (p< 0.05) under the heel. In IA contact area of the hallux is about 13% (p< 0.05) reduced. In IA relative loads are increased under the lateral midfoot (p< 0.05) and the second toe (p< 0.05). Higher loading of the lateral midfoot is also reflected in the increased force-time integral (+33%; p< 0.001). No differences between legs and no interactions, indicating a specifity in kicking or standing leg, are found. Compared to NA, soccer players with IA show a forward shifting of the center of pressure which indicates a compensatory mechanism of the foot during walking.

  3. Development of hydrogen excretion between feeds in breast and artificially fed full-term normal neonates.

    PubMed

    Davies, A G; Fitzgerald, A; Robb, T A; Davidson, G P

    1989-04-01

    The breath hydrogen test for carbohydrate malabsorption has been proved to be sensitive, specific and noninvasive. This study was performed to determine its applicability in the newborn period. Postprandial hydrogen excretion in the first 5 days of life was measured in 105 full-term normal newborns, who were either artificially or breast fed. Samples of expired air were collected via a nasopharyngeal catheter at 30 min intervals between feeds. Some babies showed no hydrogen production after 5 days, while others produced high (200 parts/10(6] levels. The incidence of hydrogen production increased postnatally--more than 80% of babies produced hydrogen by 5 days of age. None of the babies was unwell or developed frequent or loose stools suggestive of clinical carbohydrate malabsorption. It is therefore postulated that these high hydrogen levels reflect biochemical evidence of clinically insignificant carbohydrate malabsorption in this age group. This study shows clearly that an interfeed interval of 4 h in these babies is insufficient to cause breath hydrogen levels to fall in a predictable way. The ethical and practical difficulties in fasting these infants for longer periods suggest that conventional carbohydrate challenges with breath hydrogen estimations will be difficult in the neonate.

  4. Evaluation of growth and development pattern in normal, low and very low birth weight neonates at 18 months of age.

    PubMed

    Abdeyazdan, Zahra; Ehsanpour, Soheila; Hemmati, Elahe

    2014-01-01

    Growth and development monitoring could lead to general judgment about children's health. With advances in NICUs establishment, the survival rate of very low birth weight (VLBW) neonates has increased in many countries including Iran. Because of the lack of studies about growth and development pattern of low birth weight (LBW) and VLBW neonates in Iran, the present study aimed to compare growth and development of normal, low and very low birth weight neonates at 18 months of age. In a cross- sectional descriptive study, 214 children with age 18 months were enrolled (90 LBW, 90 LBW and 34 VLBW) and their growth and development were assessed. Data gathering tool was a researcher made questionnaire including anthropometrics measures and developmental key points. Data analyzed by descriptive (mean and SD) and inferential (ANOVA) tests using SPSS version 15. There were significant differences in the mean of anthropometric indexes between three groups. Majority of subjects in three groups had normal weight growth trend. Mean scores of gross motor and fine motor development indexes had significant association with birth weight. Meanwhile, there was no significant association between mean scores of social/cognitive and also language developmental aspects and birth weight. Findings revealed that in LBW and VLBW children, growth indexes at the age of 18 months are so far from those of NBW neonates. Further nationwide prospective studies, with a longer period of time is needed to estimate when Iranian LBW children reach at the levels of NBW ones.

  5. What Are Normal Metal Ion Levels After Total Hip Arthroplasty? A Serologic Analysis of Four Bearing Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Brian T; Ortiz, Philippe A; Boles, John W; Lee, Yuo-Yu; Padgett, Douglas E; Westrich, Geoffrey H

    2017-05-01

    The recent experiences with adverse local tissue reactions have highlighted the need to establish what are normal serum levels of cobalt (Co), chromium (Cr), and titanium (Ti) after hip arthroplasty. Serum Co, Cr, and Ti levels were measured in 80 nonconsecutive patients with well-functioning unilateral total hip arthroplasty and compared among 4 bearing surfaces: ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC); ceramic-on-polyethylene (CoP); metal-on-polyethylene (MoP), and dual mobility (DM). The preoperative and most recent University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) scores were compared among the different bearing surfaces. No significant difference was found among serum Co and Cr levels between the 4 bearing surface groups (P = .0609 and P = .1577). Secondary analysis comparing metal and ceramic femoral heads demonstrated that the metal group (MoP, modular dual mobility (Stryker Orthopedics, Mahwah, NJ) [metal]) had significant higher serum Co levels compared with the ceramic group (CoC, CoP, MDM [ceramic]) (1.05 mg/L ± 1.25 vs 0.59 mg/L ± 0.24; P = .0411). Spearman coefficient identified no correlation between metal ion levels and patient-reported outcome scores. No serum metal ion level differences were found among well-functioning total hip arthroplasty with modern bearing couples. Significantly higher serum Co levels were seen when comparing metal vs ceramic femoral heads in this study and warrants further investigation. Metal ion levels did not correlate with patient-reported outcome measures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of translation in the normal and dysplastic hip using three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging and voxel-based registration.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, K; Sakai, T; Koyanagi, J; Yoshikawa, H; Sugamoto, K

    2011-06-01

    To elucidate in vivo hip instability by comparing normal hips to hips with acetabular dysplasia by evaluating three-dimensional (3D) translations of the femoral head center (FHC) at different hip positions using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Forty normal hips and 22 dysplastic female hips were examined. MRI was performed at four different positions bilaterally: neutral, 45° of flexion, 15° of extension, and the Patrick position. Femoral and pelvic bones were separately extracted at the neutral position and superimposed over the images of each different position using voxel-based registration. The distance between the acetabular center and FHC at neutral position was defined as 3D-migration. The distance between FHC at neutral position and that at each different position was defined as 3D-translation. Two-way repeated measures analysis of variance was performed to consider the dependency between right and left-side data, and multiple linear regression analyses were performed to assess independent relationships. The center-edge (CE) angle was the determinant for 3D-migration (β=-0.415, P=0.001), and there was a statistical significant difference in 3D-migration between normal female hips and dysplastic hips (P=0.047). From neutral to the Patrick position, the FHC of normal and dysplastic hips translated postero-infero-medially by 1.12±0.39mm (0.45-1.85mm) and 1.97±0.84mm (0.95-4.34mm), respectively, and the difference between the groups was statistically significant (P=0.005). CE angle was the determinant for 3D-translation from neutral to the Patrick position (β=-0.730, P<0.001). The average root mean square error in 3D-translation was 0.172mm and 0.193mm for intra- and interobserver reproducibility, respectively. Hip instability was increased in proportion to the severity of acetabular dysplasia. A 3D MRI voxel-based registration technique can show in vivo morphology and kinematics of the native hip without exposure to radioactivity. Copyright © 2011

  7. Labor Patterns in Women Attempting Vaginal Birth After Cesarean With Normal Neonatal Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    GRANTZ, Katherine L.; GONZALEZ-QUINTERO, Victor; TROENDLE, James; REDDY, Uma M.; HINKLE, Stefanie N.; KOMINIAREK, Michelle A.; LU, Zhaohui; ZHANG, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe labor patterns in women with a trial of labor after cesarean (TOLAC) with normal neonatal outcomes. Study Design In a retrospective observational study at 12 U.S. centers (2002–2008), we examined time interval for each centimeter of cervical dilation and compared labor progression stratified by spontaneous or induced labor in 2,892 multiparous women with TOLAC (second delivery) and 56,301 nulliparous women at 37 0/7 to 41 6/7 weeks of gestation. Analyses were performed including women with intrapartum cesarean delivery, and then repeated limiting only to women who delivered vaginally. Results Labor was induced in 23.4% of TOLAC and 44.1% of nulliparous women (P<.001). Cesarean delivery rates were 57.7% in TOLAC versus 19.0% in nulliparous women (P<.001). Oxytocin was used in 52.4% of TOLAC versus 64.3% of nulliparous women with spontaneous labor (P<.001) and 89.8% of TOLAC versus 91.6% of nulliparous women with induced labor (P=.099); however, TOLAC had lower maximum doses of oxytocin compared to nulliparous women: median (90th percentile): 6 (18) mU/min versus 12 (28) mU/min, respectively (P<.001). Median (95th percentile) labor duration for TOLAC versus nulliparous women with spontaneous labor from 4–10cm was 0.9 (2.2) hours longer (P=.007). For women who entered labor spontaneously and achieved vaginal delivery, labor patterns for TOLAC were similar to nulliparous women. For induced labor, labor duration for TOLAC versus nulliparous women from 4–10cm was 1.5 (4.6) hours longer (P<.001). For women who achieved vaginal delivery, labor patterns were slower for induced TOLAC compared to nulliparous women. Conclusions Labor duration for TOLAC was slower compared to nulliparous labor, particularly for induced labor. By improved understanding of the rates of progress at different points in labor, this new information on labor curves in women undergoing TOLAC, particularly for induction, should help physicians when managing labor. PMID

  8. Labor patterns in women attempting vaginal birth after cesarean with normal neonatal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Grantz, Katherine L; Gonzalez-Quintero, Victor; Troendle, James; Reddy, Uma M; Hinkle, Stefanie N; Kominiarek, Michelle A; Lu, Zhaohui; Zhang, Jun

    2015-08-01

    We sought to describe labor patterns in women with a trial of labor after cesarean (TOLAC) with normal neonatal outcomes. In a retrospective observational study at 12 US centers (2002 through 2008), we examined time interval for each centimeter of cervical dilation and compared labor progression stratified by spontaneous or induced labor in 2892 multiparous women with TOLAC (second delivery) and 56,301 nulliparous women at 37 0/7 to 41 6/7 weeks of gestation. Analyses were performed including women with intrapartum cesarean delivery, and also limiting only to women who delivered vaginally. Labor was induced in 23.4% of TOLAC and 44.1% of nulliparous women (P < .001). Cesarean delivery rates were 57.7% in TOLAC vs 19.0% in nulliparous women (P < .001). Oxytocin was used in 52.4% of TOLAC vs 64.3% of nulliparous women with spontaneous labor (P < .001) and 89.8% of TOLAC vs 91.6% of nulliparous women with induced labor (P = .099); however, TOLAC had lower maximum doses of oxytocin compared to nulliparous women: median (90th percentile): 6 (18) mU/min vs 12 (28) mU/min, respectively (P < .001). Median (95th percentile) labor duration for TOLAC vs nulliparous women with spontaneous labor from 4-10 cm was 0.9 (2.2) hours longer (P = .007). For women who entered labor spontaneously and achieved vaginal delivery, labor patterns for TOLAC were similar to nulliparous women. For induced labor, labor duration for TOLAC vs nulliparous women from 4-10 cm was 1.5 (4.6) hours longer (P < .001). For women who achieved vaginal delivery, labor patterns were slower for induced TOLAC compared to nulliparous women. Labor duration for TOLAC was slower compared to nulliparous labor, particularly for induced labor. By improved understanding of the rates of progress at different points in labor, this new information on labor curves in women undergoing TOLAC, particularly for induction, should help physicians when managing labor. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Automatic Evaluation of Scan Adequacy and Dysplasia Metrics in 2-D Ultrasound Images of the Neonatal Hip.

    PubMed

    Quader, Niamul; Hodgson, Antony J; Mulpuri, Kishore; Schaeffer, Emily; Abugharbieh, Rafeef

    2017-03-21

    Ultrasound (US) imaging of an infant's hip joint is widely used for early detection of developmental dysplasia of the hip. In current US-based diagnosis of developmental dysplasia of the hip, trained clinicians acquire US images and, if they judge them to be adequate (i.e., to contain relevant hip joint structures), analyze them manually to extract clinically useful dysplasia metrics. However, both the scan adequacy classification and dysplasia metrics extraction steps exhibit significant variability within and between both clinicians and institutions, which can result in significant over- and undertreatment rates. To reduce the subjectivity resulting from this variability, we propose a computational image analysis technique that automatically identifies adequate images and subsequently extracts dysplasia metrics from these 2-D US images. Our automatic method uses local phase symmetry-based image measures to robustly identify intensity-invariant geometric features of bone/cartilage boundaries from the US images. Using the extracted geometric features, we trained a random forest classifier to classify images as adequate or inadequate, and in the adequate images we used a subset of the geometric features to calculate key dysplasia metrics. We validated our method on a data set of 693 US scans collected from 35 infants. Our approach produces excellent agreement with clinician adequacy classifications (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve = 0.985) and in reducing variability in the measured developmental dysplasia of the hip metrics (p < 0.05). The automatically computed dysplasia metrics appear to be slightly biased toward higher Graf categories than the manually estimated metrics, which could potentially reduce missed early diagnoses.

  10. Normal neonatal microbiome variation in relation to environmental factors, infection and allergy.

    PubMed

    Madan, Juliette C; Farzan, Shohreh F; Hibberd, Patricia L; Karagas, Margaret R

    2012-12-01

    Bacterial colonization of the infant intestinal tract begins at birth. We are at the forefront of understanding complex relationships between bacteria and multiple parameters of health of the developing infant. Moreover, the establishment of the microbiome in the critical neonatal period is potentially foundational for lifelong health and disease susceptibility. Recent studies utilizing state-of-the-art culture-independent technologies have begun to increase our knowledge about the gut microbiome in infancy, the impact of multiple exposures, and its effects on immune response and clinical outcomes such as allergy and infection. Postnatal exposures play a central role in the complex interactions between the nearly blank canvas of the neonatal intestine, whereas genetic factors do not appear to be a major factor. Infant microbial colonization is affected by delivery mode, dietary exposures, antibiotic exposure, and environmental toxicants. Successive microbiome acquisition in infancy is likely a determinant of early immune programming, subsequent infection, and allergy risk. The novel investigation of the neonatal microbiome is beginning to unearth substantial information, with a focus on immune programming that coevolves with the developing microbiome early in life. Several exposures common to neonatal and infant populations could exert pressure on the development of the microbiome and major diseases including allergy and infection in large populations.

  11. Normal radiological unossified hip joint space and femoral head size development during growth in 675 children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Veronika; Jorysz, Gabriele; Arnoldi, Andreas; Utzschneider, Sandra; Wegener, Bernd; Jansson, Volkmar; Heimkes, Bernhard

    2017-03-01

    Evaluation of hip joint space width during child growth is important to aid in the early diagnosis of hip pathology in children. We established reference values for hip joint space and femoral head size for each age. Hip joint space development during growth was retrospectively investigated medial and cranial in 1350 hip joints of children using standard anteroposterior supine plain pelvic radiographs. Maximum capital femoral epiphysis diameter and femoral radii were further more investigated. Hip joint space values show a slow decline during growth. Joint space was statistically significantly (p < 0.006) larger in boys than girls. Our hip joint space measurements on supine subjects seem slightly larger than those reported by Hughes on standing subjects. Evaluation of the femoral head diameter and the radii showed a size curve quite parallel to the known body growth charts. Radii medial and perpendicular to the physis are not statistically significantly different. We recommend to compare measurements of hip joint space at two locations to age dependent charts using the same imaging technique. During growth, a divergence in femoral head size from the expected values or loss of the spherical shape should raise the question of hip disorder. Clin. Anat. 30:267-275, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Hip pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain involves any pain in or around the hip joint. You may not feel pain from your hip ... 2012:chap 48. Read More Hip fracture surgery Hip joint replacement Patient Instructions Hip fracture - discharge Hip or ...

  13. Do Patients With Borderline Dysplasia Have Inferior Outcomes After Hip Arthroscopic Surgery for Femoroacetabular Impingement Compared With Patients With Normal Acetabular Coverage?

    PubMed

    Cvetanovich, Gregory L; Levy, David M; Weber, Alexander E; Kuhns, Benjamin D; Mather, Richard C; Salata, Michael J; Nho, Shane J

    2017-07-01

    The literature contains conflicting reports regarding whether outcomes of hip arthroscopic surgery for patients with borderline dysplasia are inferior to outcomes in patients with normal acetabular coverage. To assess differences in the outcomes of hip arthroscopic surgery for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) in groups of patients with borderline dysplasia and normal coverage. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A registry of consecutive patients who had undergone primary hip arthroscopic surgery with capsular plication for FAI between January 2012 and January 2014 were divided based on the preoperative lateral center-edge angle (LCEA) into 2 distinct groups: (1) borderline dysplasia (LCEA 18°-25°) and (2) normal acetabular coverage (LCEA 25.1°-40°). There were 36 patients in the borderline dysplastic group and 312 patients in the normal coverage group. The primary outcome measure was the Hip Outcome Score-Activities of Daily Living (HOS-ADL) at a minimum of 2 years postoperatively. Secondary outcome measures included the HOS-Sports and modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS). The mean preoperative LCEA differed significantly between groups (23.4° ± 1.5° for borderline dysplastic, 32.5° ± 3.8° for normal coverage; P < .001). The borderline dysplastic group had a higher percentage of female patients than the normal coverage group (27/36 [75%] vs 177/312 [57%], respectively; P = .048). There were no differences in other preoperative demographics and radiographic parameters. At a minimum 2 years after hip arthroscopic surgery (mean follow-up, 2.6 ± 0.6 years), both groups demonstrated significant improvements in all patient-reported outcome scores ( P < .001 in all cases). There were no significant differences between the borderline dysplastic and normal coverage groups in final outcome scores, score improvements, or percentage of patients experiencing clinically significant improvements. One patient in the borderline dysplastic group (3%) underwent revision hip

  14. An EMG-to-Force Processing approach for estimating in vivo hip muscle forces in normal human walking.

    PubMed

    Bogey, Ross A; Barnes, Lee A

    2016-10-12

    The force of a single muscle is not directly measurable without invasive methods. Yet invasive techniques are not appropriate for clinical use, thus a non-invasive technique that combined the electromyographic (EMG) signal and a neuromuscular model was developed to determine in vivo active muscle forces at the hip. The EMG-to-force processing (EFP) model included active and passive moment components, and the net EFP moment was compared with the hip moment obtained with standard inverse dynamics techniques ("gold standard"). The two methods were compared at percent gait cycle intervals, and the correlation coefficient between methods was excellent (r2=91). The closeness of fit confirms that the approach is a reasonable approximation of net moment and, possibly, individual muscle forces. The greatest estimated hip force was produced by a hip abductor. A novel finding was that the hip adductors did not behave a single synergistic group. The Adductor Magnus synergistically assisted other hip extensors, and produced forces that were out-of-phase with the other hip adductor forces. Rectus Femoris was only active during hip flexion (not knee extension).

  15. Ultrasonographic evaluation of hip morphology in osteochondrodysplasias.

    PubMed

    De Pellegrin, M P; Mackenzie, W G; Harcke, H T

    2000-01-01

    The developing hip in children with osteochondrodysplasias has not been well-described because of delayed ossification and limitations of conventional radiologic techniques. Twenty-four children with various osteochondrodysplasias were evaluated by ultrasonography. Variation in the configuration of the acetabulum included a horizontal acetabular roof owing to delayed iliac development and a notched acetabular roof with lateral bone deficiency. All children had thickened acetabular cartilage except for one child with osteogenesis imperfecta. Coxa vara was a common finding. All neonates displayed a very small beta angle (mean, 42 degrees) because the labrum lay more vertically, secondary to deep engagement of the femoral head in the acetabulum. Proximal femoral ossification was delayed in most children, which allows use of ultrasonography at a later age than is possible in the normal pediatric population. Hip ultrasonography in children with skeletal dysplasias can aid in early diagnosis and is useful in assessing hip morphology and development.

  16. Term neonates with infection and shock display high cortisol precursors despite low levels of normal cortisol.

    PubMed

    Khashana, Abdelmoneim; Ojaniemi, Marja; Leskinen, Markku; Saarela, Timo; Hallman, Mikko

    2016-02-01

    Neonatal therapy-resistant septic shock is a common problem in middle and low-income countries. We investigated whether newborn infants with infection and therapy-resistant hypotension showed evidence of abnormal levels of cortisol or cortisol precursors. A total of 60 term or near term neonates with evidence of infection were enrolled after informed consent. Of these, 30 had an infection and refractory shock and 30 had an infection without shock. There were no detectable differences between the groups in the length of gestation, birth weight or gender distribution. Serum was obtained during days four and 14 after birth. Cortisol and cortisol precursor concentrations were analysed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The cortisol concentrations were low considering the expected responses to stress and they did not differ between the groups. The infants with infection and shock had higher serum dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) levels than those without shock (319.0 ± 110.3 μg/dL, versus 22.3 ± 18.3 μg/dL; p < 0.0001) and they also had higher 17-hydroxy-pregnenolone, pregnenolone and progesterone concentrations. There were no detectable differences in the levels of 17-hydroxy-progesterone, 11-deoxy-cortisol, cortisol or cortisone. Septic newborn infants with therapy-resistant hypotension had very high DHEA levels, suggesting that 3-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity limited the rate of cortisol synthesis. ©2015 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Propensity for hip dislocation in normal gait loading versus sit-to-stand maneuvers in posterior wall acetabular fractures.

    PubMed

    Marmor, Meir; McDonald, Erik; Buckley, Jenni M; Matityahu, Amir

    2013-09-01

    Treatment of posterior wall (PW) fractures of the acetabulum is guided by the size of the broken wall fragment and by hip instability. Biomechanical testing of hip instability typically is done by simulating the single-leg-stance (SLS) phase of gait, but this does not represent daily activities, such as sit-to-stand (STS) motion. We conducted a study to examine and compare hip instability after PW fractures in SLS and STS loading. We hypothesized that wall fragment size and distance from the dome (DFD) of the acetabulum to the simulated fracture would correlate with hip instability and, in the presence of a PW fracture, the hip would be more unstable during STS loading than during SLS loading. Incremental PW osteotomies were made in 6 cadaveric acetabula. After each osteotomy, a 1200-N load was applied to the acetabulum to simulate SLS and STS loading until dislocation occurred. All hip joints in the cadaveric models were more unstable in STS loading than in SLS loading. PW fragments at time of dislocation were larger (P<.001) in SLS loading (85% ± 13%; range, 81%-100%) than in STS loading (40% ± 7%; range, 33%-52%). Mean (SD) DFD at time of dislocation was 15.0 (3.5) mm (range, 14.4-19.6 mm) in STS loading and 5.3 (4.3) mm (range, 0.1-10.0 mm) in SLS loading (P<.04). There was more hip instability in STS loading than in SLS loading. In STS loading, hips dislocated with a PW fracture size of 33% or more and a DFD of 20 mm or less.

  18. The relationship between transverse plane leg rotation and transverse plane motion at the knee and hip during normal walking.

    PubMed

    Nester, C

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the clinical hypothesis that the magnitude and temporal characteristics of rearfoot complex motion are closely correlated with those of the transverse plane motion at the knee and hip. Twenty subjects underwent kinematic assessment during walking at 108 steps/minute. The transverse plane rotation of the leg relative to the foot was used to indicate rearfoot complex pronation and supination. Taking into account errors inherent in kinematic assessment involving skin mounted markers, it is unlikely that a correlation exists between the range of internal leg rotation during the contact phase and the total range of transverse plane leg rotation during gait and the corresponding values for the transverse plane motion at the knee and hip. Correlation tests were performed to assess the temporal characteristics of the motions at the joints that showed that there was no correlation between the transverse plane motion in the rearfoot complex, knee and hip. Thus the hypothesis that the magnitude and temporal characteristics of rearfoot complex motion are closely correlated with the transverse plane motion at the knee and hip was rejected.

  19. Coordination strategies for limb forces during weight-bearing locomotion in normal rats, and in rats spinalized as neonates

    PubMed Central

    Giszter, Simon F; Davies, Michelle R; Graziani, Virginia

    2010-01-01

    Some rats spinally transected as neonates (ST rats) achieve weight-supporting independent locomotion. The mechanisms of coordinated hindlimb weight support in such rats are not well understood. To examine these in such ST rats and normal rats, rats with better than 60% of weight supported steps on a treadmill as adults were trained to cross an instrumented runway. Ground reaction forces, coordination of hindlimb and forelimb forces and the motions of the center of pressure were assessed. Normal rats crossed the runway with a diagonal trot. On average hindlimbs bore about 80% of the vertical load carried by forelimbs, although this varied. Forelimbs and hindlimb acted synergistically to generate decelerative and propulsive rostrocaudal forces, which averaged 15% of body weight with maximums of 50% . Lateral forces were very small (<8% of body weight). Center of pressure progressed in jumps along a straight line with mean lateral deviations <1 cm. ST rats hindlimbs bore about 60% of the vertical load of forelimbs, significantly less compared to intact (p<0.05). ST rats showed similar mean rostrocaudal forces, but with significantly larger maximum fluctuations of up to 80% of body weight (p<0.05). Joint force-plate recordings showed forelimbs and hindlimb rostrocaudal forces in ST rats were opposing and significantly different from intact rats (p<0.05). Lateral forces were ~20% of body weight and significantly larger than in normal rats (p<0.05). Center of pressure zig-zagged, with mean lateral deviations of ~ 2cm and a significantly larger range (p<0.05). The haunches were also observed to roll more than normal rats. The locomotor strategy of injured rats using limbs in opposition was presumably less efficient but their complex gait was statically stable. Because forelimbs and hindlimbs acted in opposition, the trunk was held compressed. Force coordination was likely managed largely by the voluntary control in forelimbs and trunk. PMID:18612631

  20. Cyclical pattern of non-nutritive sucking in normal and high-risk neonates.

    PubMed

    Simbrón, Alicia V; Sorbera-Ferrer, Lucas; Gómez de Ferraris, María E; Carranza, Miriam L

    2013-01-01

    This study determined patterns of suction cycles by recording sucking pressure in full-term infants, normal pre-term infants and newborns with pathology (hypoxia at birth). Associations between these patterns and some clinical parameters were established in order to evaluate feeding capacity for the purpose of guiding specific stimulation and aiding hospital discharge in better health conditions. Seventy-five infants of both sexes were assessed after informed consent, grouped by their status at birth. Body weight and Apgar score were determined. Sucking pressure was evaluated with an ad-hoc device. Maximum and minimum pressure scores and the number of suction cycles were measured. Data were analyzed statistically at a significance level of p < 0.05. Maximum sucking pressure values varied between study groups. Full-term infants showed the highest pressure values and number of suction cycles. In pre-term infants, lower pressure values and fewer suction cycles were observed. Those with hypoxia showed great variability in both parameters. This study found a cyclical pattern of non-nutritive sucking in normal and high-risk newborns. Normal and preterm infants showed a significant direct correlation between suction cycles and Apgar scores at 5 minutes, but the infants with pathology due to hypoxia group did not show the same association. These findings are an important tool that will contribute to improving newborn maternal nutrition and optimizing the quality of life for high-risk newborns in our environment.

  1. Developmental Dislocation (Dysplasia) of the Hip (DDH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... developmental dysplasia (dislocation) of the hip (DDH), the hip joint has not formed normally. The ball is loose ... be taken to provide detailed pictures of the hip joint. Treatment When DDH is detected at birth, it ...

  2. Cross-Modality Validation of Acetabular Surface Models Using 3-D Ultrasound Versus Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Normal and Dysplastic Infant Hips.

    PubMed

    Diederichs, Chad; Heath, Alana; Hareendranathan, Abhilash R; Zonoobi, Dornoosh; Kuntze, Gregor; Dulai, Sukhdeep; Mabee, Myles G; Ronsky, Janet L; Jaremko, Jacob L

    2016-09-01

    Current imaging diagnosis of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) in infancy relies on 2-D ultrasound (US), which is highly operator-dependent. 3-D US offers more complete, and potentially more reliable, imaging of infant hip geometry. We sought to validate the fidelity of acetabular surface models obtained by 3-D US against those obtained concurrently by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). 3-D US and MRI scans were performed on the same d in 20 infants with normal to severely dysplastic hips (mean age, 57 d; range 13-181 d). 3-D US was performed by two observers using a Philips VL13-5 probe. Coronal 3-D multi-echo data image combination (MEDIC) magnetic resonance (MR) images (1-mm slice thickness) were obtained, usually without sedation, in a 1.5 T Siemens unit. Acetabular surface models were generated for 40 hips from 3-D US and MRI using semi-automated tracing software, separately by three observers. For each hip, the 3-D US and MRI models were co-registered to overlap as closely as possible using Amira software, and the root mean square (RMS) distances between points on the models were computed. 3-D US scans took 3.2 s each. Inter-modality variability was visually minimal. Mean RMS distance between corresponding points on the acetabular surface at 3-D US and MRI was 0.4 ± 0.3 mm, with 95% confidence interval <1 mm. Mean RMS errors for inter-observer and intra-observer comparisons were significantly less for 3-D US than for MRI, while inter-scan and inter-modality comparisons showed no significant difference. Acetabular geometry was reproduced by 3-D US surface models within 1 mm of the corresponding 3-D MRI surface model, and the 3-D US models were more reliable. This validates the fidelity of 3-D US modeling and encourages future use of 3-D US in assessing infant acetabulum anatomy, which may be useful to detect and monitor treatment of hip dysplasia.

  3. Comparison of MR-arthrography and CT-arthrography in hyaline cartilage-thickness measurement in radiographically normal cadaver hips with anatomy as gold standard.

    PubMed

    Wyler, A; Bousson, V; Bergot, C; Polivka, M; Leveque, E; Vicaut, E; Laredo, Jean-Denis

    2009-01-01

    To compare magnetic resonance (MR)-arthrography and multidetector-spiral-computed-tomography (MDSCT)-arthrography in cartilage-thickness measurement, in hips without cartilage loss, with coronal anatomic slices as gold standard. Institutional review board permission to study cadavers of individuals who willed their bodies to science was obtained. Two independent observers measured femoral and acetabular cartilage thicknesses of 12 radiographically normal hips (six women, five men; age range, 52-98 years; mean age, 76.5 years), on MDSCT-arthrographic and MR-arthrographic reformations, and on coronal anatomic slices, excluding regions of cartilage loss. Inter- and intraobserver reproducibilities were determined. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to test differences between MR-arthrographic and MDSCT-arthrographic measurement errors compared to anatomy. By MR-arthrography, cartilage was not measurable at approximately 50% of points on sagittal and transverse sections, compared to 0-6% of the points by MDSCT-arthrography. In the coronal plane, the difference between MDSCT-arthrographic and MR-arthrographic measurement errors was not significant (P=0.93). In the coronal plane, MR-arthrography and MDSCT-arthrography were similarly accurate for measuring hip cartilage thickness.

  4. Biometry of the anterior border of the human hip bone: normal values and their use in sex determination.

    PubMed Central

    Gómez Pellico, L; Fernández Camacho, F J

    1992-01-01

    Sixteen different variables and 3 indices for the anterior border of 42 human hip bones from a Spanish skeletal collection were studied. Values for 15 of these variables and for the 3 indices are reported. We were unable to detect statistically significant differences between means relating to side in any of the variables and indices studied. Statistically significant differences were detected between means in relation to sex for 4 variables (distance from the anterior superior iliac spine to the pubic tubercle, distance from the anterior inferior iliac spine to the iliopubic eminence, distance from the anterior inferior iliac spine to the pubic tubercle, length of the notch between the anterior inferior iliac spine and the iliopubic eminence). These variables could be used for sex determination from the human hip bone or its fragments. PMID:1304579

  5. Long-term influence of normal variation in neonatal characteristics on human brain development

    PubMed Central

    Walhovd, Kristine B.; Fjell, Anders M.; Brown, Timothy T.; Kuperman, Joshua M.; Chung, Yoonho; Hagler, Donald J.; Roddey, J. Cooper; Erhart, Matthew; McCabe, Connor; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Amaral, David G.; Bloss, Cinnamon S.; Libiger, Ondrej; Schork, Nicholas J.; Darst, Burcu F.; Casey, B. J.; Chang, Linda; Ernst, Thomas M.; Frazier, Jean; Gruen, Jeffrey R.; Kaufmann, Walter E.; Murray, Sarah S.; van Zijl, Peter; Mostofsky, Stewart; Dale, Anders M.; Jernigan, Terry L.; McCabe, Connor; Chang, Linda; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Newman, Erik; Dale, Anders M.; Ernst, Thomas; Dale, Anders M.; Van Zijl, Peter; Kuperman, Joshua; Murray, Sarah; Bloss, Cinnamon; Schork, Nicholas J.; Appelbaum, Mark; Gamst, Anthony; Thompson, Wesley; Bartsch, Hauke; Jernigan, Terry L.; Dale, Anders M.; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Chang, Linda; Ernst, Thomas; Keating, Brian; Amaral, David; Sowell, Elizabeth; Kaufmann, Walter; Van Zijl, Peter; Mostofsky, Stewart; Casey, B.J.; Ruberry, Erika J.; Powers, Alisa; Rosen, Bruce; Kenet, Tal; Frazier, Jean; Kennedy, David; Gruen, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    It is now recognized that a number of cognitive, behavioral, and mental health outcomes across the lifespan can be traced to fetal development. Although the direct mediation is unknown, the substantial variance in fetal growth, most commonly indexed by birth weight, may affect lifespan brain development. We investigated effects of normal variance in birth weight on MRI-derived measures of brain development in 628 healthy children, adolescents, and young adults in the large-scale multicenter Pediatric Imaging, Neurocognition, and Genetics study. This heterogeneous sample was recruited through geographically dispersed sites in the United States. The influence of birth weight on cortical thickness, surface area, and striatal and total brain volumes was investigated, controlling for variance in age, sex, household income, and genetic ancestry factors. Birth weight was found to exert robust positive effects on regional cortical surface area in multiple regions as well as total brain and caudate volumes. These effects were continuous across birth weight ranges and ages and were not confined to subsets of the sample. The findings show that (i) aspects of later child and adolescent brain development are influenced at birth and (ii) relatively small differences in birth weight across groups and conditions typically compared in neuropsychiatric research (e.g., Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, schizophrenia, and personality disorders) may influence group differences observed in brain parameters of interest at a later stage in life. These findings should serve to increase our attention to early influences. PMID:23169628

  6. Hip fusion as hip salvage procedure in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Fucs, Patricia M De Moraes Barros; Yamada, Helder H

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of the spastic hip in Cerebral Palsy (CP) remains a challenge especially in cases of advance changes. Many options are available and the key for a good outcome is to find the best surgical procedure to an individualized patient. The hip fusion is one of the surgical options. The authors presented a group of spastic CP with painful chronic hip subluxation and dislocation treated with hip fusion with a mean follow-up period of 14.5 years. Surgical technique, post-operative management and outcomes were shown, also with the observations done regarding the evolution of the contralateral hip after the hip fusion. They concluded that the hip arthrodesis is an option for patients with spastic CP with painful subluxation or dislocated hips with the goal of pain relief maintain or improve functional status, and facilitating the care. The best candidate is a young ambulatory patient with normal contralateral hip and normal spinal alignment.

  7. Hip Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... clues about the underlying cause. Problems within the hip joint itself tend to result in pain on the ... tendons and other soft tissues that surround your hip joint. Hip pain can sometimes be caused by diseases ...

  8. Evaluation of biocompatible osteoconductive polymer shelf arthroplasty for the surgical correction of hip dysplasia in normal dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Lussier, B; Lanthier, T; Martineau-Doizé, B

    1994-01-01

    Biocompatible osteoconductive polymer (BOP) shelf arthroplasty was performed on ten nondysplastic dogs, divided into five groups. Each group was evaluated at 6, 13, 17, 26 or 39 weeks postsurgery. Evaluation consisted of clinical, radiological and histological studies. The dogs were injected with three fluorochrome markers, 28 days, 14 days and 6 hours before euthanasia. Transverse sections of undecalcified arthroplasty site were examined by microradiography and fluorescence microscopy; surface-stained sections were evaluated by light microscopy. The BOP shelf arthroplasty was not technically difficult. Minimal mineralization of the shelf was noted by radiography, 26 and 39 weeks postop. A moderate to large amount of fibrous mature connective tissue was observed around the BOP fibers throughout the study. Bone ingrowth occurred around the BOP fibers, but was minimal within them. This osseous proliferation of the arthroplasty was very slow to take place; it was first noted microscopically 17 weeks postsurgery and was still minimal 39 weeks after surgery. These findings suggest that there may be interference to the osteoconductive properties of BOP by fibrous tissue. Ossification of the shelf arthroplasty was too unsatisfactory to recommend its use for the treatment of canine hip dysplasia. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:7954118

  9. Neonatal magnetocardiography.

    PubMed

    Anastasiadis, P G; Anninos, P; Kotini, A; Koutlaki, N; Garas, A; Galazios, G

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to test the validity of magnetocardiography (MCG) in the estimation of neonatal cardiac rhythm using a single channel superconductive quantum interference device (SQUID). Our study population consisted of 50 neonates who were delivered normally between 37-41 weeks of gestation from clinically uncomplicated pregnancies. There was also a neonate included in the study in which the diagnosis of "hypoplastic left heart syndrome" was demonstrated by U/S Doppler examination. Maternal age ranged from 18 to 39 years (mean=29.15, SD=6.13). Our study results revealed 44 neonates with normal cardiac rhythm, four with ventricular tachycardia (VT), one with ventricular tachycardia (VT) and extrasystolic beats and one with bradycardia. The neonate with the hypoplastic left heart syndrome presented frequent episodes of ventricular bigeminy in the magnetocardiographic trace. M-mode echocardiography confirmed the diagnosis of the seven cases of arrhythmia in our study group. Results gained from the study lead us to believe that MCG could provide clinical practice with a non-invasive, rapid and easy to perform method, which could be used as an adjunct to conventional methods for the evaluation of neonatal cardiac rhythm.

  10. Quantitative histology of cartilage vascular canals in the human rib. Findings in normal neonates and children and in achondrogenesis II-hypochondrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gruber, H E; Lachman, R S; Rimoin, D L

    1990-12-01

    Knowledge of the structure of cartilage vascular canals is important for a more thorough understanding of the development of cartilage and the growth plate in the human neonate and growing child. We have studied the costochondral junction of 6 normal neonates and 12 normal children (age 4 months-16 years) and utilised quantitative histomorphometry to define the percentage tissue area occupied by canals and the number of canals/mm2. Both percentage canal area and the number of canals/mm2 were significantly greater in newborn vs. older children (percentage area: 0.42 +/- 0.15 (mean +/- S.E.M.) vs. 0.08 +/- 0.04, P = 0.003; number/mm2: 0.2 +/- 0.09 vs. 0.04 +/- 0.02, P = 0.02). Eight newborn patients with achondrogenesis II-hypochondrogenesis were also studied. Both percentage canal area and number were significantly elevated above normal (percentage area: 5.22 +/- 1.01, P less than 0.001; number/mm2: 1.45 +/- 0.26, P less than 0.001). Results presented here demonstrate that: (i) quantitative differences in vascular canal area and numbers occur during development; (ii) 10-fold increases in vascular canal area and number are present in achondrogenesis II-hypochondrogenesis. Data from normal subjects will provide normative values against which vascular abnormalities in other skeletal dysplasias can be compared.

  11. 'Something normal in a very, very abnormal environment'--Nursing work to honour the life of dying infants and children in neonatal and paediatric intensive care in Australia.

    PubMed

    Bloomer, Melissa J; Endacott, Ruth; Copnell, Beverley; O'Connor, Margaret

    2016-04-01

    The majority of deaths of children and infants occur in paediatric and neonatal intensive care settings. For nurses, managing an infant/child's deterioration and death can be very challenging. Nurses play a vital role in how the death occurs, how families are supported leading up to and after the infant/child's death. This paper describes the nurses' endeavours to create normality amidst the sadness and grief of the death of a child in paediatric and neonatal ICU. Focus groups and individual interviews with registered nurses from NICU and PICU settings gathered data on how neonatal and paediatric intensive care nurses care for families when a child dies and how they perceived their ability and preparedness to provide family care. Four themes emerged from thematic analysis: (1) respecting the child as a person; (2) creating opportunities for family involvement/connection; (3) collecting mementos; and (4) planning for death. Many of the activities described in this study empowered parents to participate in the care of their child as death approached. Further work is required to ensure these principles are translated into practice.

  12. Neonatal hematology.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Miron, Jose; Miller, Jacob; Vogel, Adam M

    2013-11-01

    Neonatal hematology is a complex and dynamic process in the pediatric population. Surgeons frequently encounter hematologic issues regarding hemostasis, inflammation, and wound healing. This publication provides a surgeon-directed review of hematopoiesis in the newborn, as well as an overview of the current understanding of their hemostatic profile under normal and pathologic conditions. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. INNOPLANT Total Hip Replacement System.

    PubMed

    Harper, Tisha A M

    2017-07-01

    Total hip replacement is a salvage procedure that is done to alleviate discomfort secondary to osteoarthritis in the hip, which is most often a result of hip dysplasia. Commercially available total hip replacement implants for small animal patients are classified as cemented or cementless. The INNOPLANT Total Hip Replacement system includes modular, screw-in cementless components that were developed to improve implant stability by maintaining as much normal anatomic structure, and by extension biomechanics of the coxofemoral joint, as possible. As a newer system, there are few data and no long-term studies available in the veterinary literature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Neonatal septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Halder, D; Seng, Q B; Malik, A S; Choo, K E

    1996-09-01

    Neonatal septic arthritis has always been considered as separate from its counterpart in older children. The condition is uncommon but serious. Affected neonates usually survive, but with permanent skeletal deformities. Ten cases of neonatal septic arthritis were diagnosed between January 1989 and December 1993 in the neonatal intensive care units of two referral hospitals in the state of Kelantan, Malaysia. All except one neonate was born prematurely. The mean age of presentation was 15.6 days. Joint swelling (10/10), increased warmth (7/10) and erythema of the overlying skin (7/10) were the common presenting signs. Vague constitutional symptoms preceded the definitive signs of septic arthritis in all cases. The total white cell counts were raised with shift to the left. The knee (60%) was not commonly affected, followed by the hip (13%) and ankle (13%). Three neonates had multiple joint involvement. Coexistence of arthritis with osteomyelitis was observed in seven neonates. The commonest organism isolated was methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (9/10). Needle aspiration was performed in nine neonates and one had incision with drainage. Follow up data was available for five neonates and two of these had skeletal morbidity. Early diagnosis by frequent examination of the joints, prompt treatment and control of nosocomial infection are important for management.

  15. Neonatal Cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Amy G.; Sokol, Ronald J.

    2013-01-01

    Cholestatic jaundice is a common presenting feature of neonatal hepatobiliary and metabolic dysfunction. Any infant who remains jaundiced beyond age 2 to 3 weeks should have the serum bilirubin level fractionated into a conjugated (direct) and unconjugated (indirect) portion. Conjugated hyperbilirubinemia is never physiologic or normal. The differential diagnosis of cholestasis is extensive, and a step-wise approach based on the initial history and physical examination is useful to rapidly identify the underlying etiology. Early recognition of neonatal cholestasis is essential to ensure timely treatment and optimal prognosis. Even when specific treatment is not available, infants who have cholestasis benefit from early medical management and optimization of nutrition. Future studies are necessary to determine the most reliable and cost-effective method of universal screening for neonatal cholestasis. PMID:24244109

  16. Hip Fracture

    MedlinePlus

    ... make older people more likely to trip and fall — one of the most common causes of hip ... Taking steps to maintain bone density and avoid falls can help prevent hip fracture. Signs and symptoms ...

  17. Rose Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... with your health provider.AspirinThe body breaks down aspirin to get rid of it. Rose hip contains ... of vitamin C might decrease the breakdown of aspirin. Taking large amount of rose hip along with ...

  18. Hip Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... exercise can reduce stiffness and increase flexibility and muscle strength. People who have an artificial hip should talk ... and cross-country skiing. These exercises can increase muscle strength and cardiovascular fitness without injuring the new hip. ...

  19. Hip Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... replacement is an operation in which a damaged hip joint is removed and replaced with an artificial joint. ... are many medical conditions that can damage the hip joint. (Watch the video to learn about what goes ...

  20. Hip Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Hip Ultrasound Hip ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures of muscles, tendons, ligaments, ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  1. High Frequency Tympanometry (1,000 Hz) for Neonates with Normal and Abnormal Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions

    PubMed Central

    Rezaei, Mohammad; Nahrani, Morteza Hamidi; Bolandi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives This paper aimed at evaluating the characteristics of high-frequency (1,000 Hz) acoustic admittance (ya) for the neonates with transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE) as either pass or refer group. Subjects and Methods Using a 1,000 Hz probe tone, 297neonates (152 male, 145 female aged 0–104 days old) were evaluated. Tympanometric parameters admittance value at +200 dapa, middle ear admittance, and tympanometric peak pressure were calculated for each tympanogram. Results The mean of ya was 0.9678 mmho in the TEOAE for the pass group and 0.7229 mmho in the refer group. The mean of acoustic admittance at +200 (y200) was 2.0657 in the TEOAE for the pass group and 1.7191 for the refer group. The mean of Tpp was 23/8591 in the TEOAE for the pass group and 59/7619 for the refer group. Conclusions There were significant differences in the distribution of different types of tympanograms, the mean of ya, tympanic peak pressure, and y200 between the TEOAEs for the pass and the refer groups. PMID:27942601

  2. Perioperative oral nutritional supplements in normally or mildly undernourished geriatric patients submitted to surgery for hip fracture: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Botella-Carretero, José I; Iglesias, Borja; Balsa, José A; Arrieta, Francisco; Zamarrón, Isabel; Vázquez, Clotilde

    2010-10-01

    Oral nutritional supplements have been recommended after orthopedic surgery in geriatric patients. This has been shown to be effective even in normally nourished or mildly undernourished geriatric patients. Whether perioperative administration of these products is also effective and suitable is not known. Randomized, controlled, open, paralleled two-arms clinical trial, comparing energy-protein supplements (40 g of protein and 400 kcal per day), with no intervention in normally nourished or mildly undernourished patients. Outcomes were serum proteins, body mass index, postoperative complications among others. 60 Elderly patients were included. Patients in the intervention group (n = 30) ingested 52.2 ± 12.1% of the prescribed supplements per day for 5.8 ± 1.8 days before surgery and until hospital discharge. There was a significant change in serum albumin at follow-up (F = 22.536, P < 0.001), and between the two groups (F = 5.763, P = 0.002), favouring the intervention. The same was observed for serum prealbumin (F = 6.654, P = 0.001 within subjects, F = 2.865, P = 0.045 for interaction). Logistic regression showed that only supplemented proteins per day (OR[95%CI] = 0.925[0.869-0.985]) were associated with less postoperative complications (R(2) = 0.323, χ(2) = 11.541, P = 0.003). Perioperative supplements in geriatric patients with hip fracture submitted to surgery showed better recovery of plasma proteins. Higher daily protein intakes were associated with less postoperative complications. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  3. Motivation, justification, normalization: talk strategies used by Canadian medical tourists regarding their choices to go abroad for hip and knee surgeries.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Keri; Crooks, Valorie A; Chouinard, Vera; Snyder, Jeremy; Johnston, Rory; Casey, Victoria

    2014-04-01

    Contributing to health geography scholarship on the topic, the objective of this paper is to reveal Canadian medical tourists' perspectives regarding their choices to seek knee replacement or hip replacement or resurfacing (KRHRR) at medical tourism facilities abroad rather than domestically. We address this objective by examining the 'talk strategies' used by these patients in discussing their choices and the ways in which such talk is co-constructed by others. Fourteen interviews were conducted with Canadians aged 42-77 who had gone abroad for KRHRR. Three types of talk strategies emerged through thematic analysis of their narratives: motivation, justification, and normalization talk. Motivation talk referenced participants' desires to maintain or resume physical activity, employment, and participation in daily life. Justification talk emerged when participants described how limitations in the domestic system drove them abroad. Finally, being a medical tourist was talked about as being normal on several bases. Among other findings, the use of these three talk strategies in patients' narratives surrounding medical tourism for KRHRR offers new insight into the language-health-place interconnection. Specifically, they reveal the complex ways in which medical tourists use talk strategies to assert the soundness of their choice to shift the site of their own medical care on a global scale while also anticipating, if not even guarding against, criticism of what ultimately is their own patient mobility. These talk strategies provide valuable insight into why international patients are opting to engage in the spatially explicit practice of medical tourism and who and what are informing their choices.

  4. Values for bony acetabular roof angle and percentage femoral head cover in a selective ultrasound neonatal hip-screening programme: effect of age, sex and side.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, A Graham; Wilkinson, Sally; Elton, Robert A

    2017-02-22

    Published maturation curves for bony acetabular roof or α angle (AA) and percentage femoral head cover (FHC) with age are sparse. We aimed to determine typical values for AA and FHC in 2236 infants referred to a selective ultrasound screening programme. There was increase in the values of first measurement of AA and FHC related to the logarithm of age. Males had greater values than females (P<0.001) and right hips had greater values than left (P<0.001) for both measurements. Significant side differences have not been reported previously. Treatment decisions should be made on the basis of sex, side and age-specific data.

  5. Avascular necrosis and the Aberdeen splint in developmental dysplasia of the hip.

    PubMed

    Williams, P R; Jones, D A; Bishay, M

    1999-11-01

    Between January 1987 and December 1988 there were 7575 births in the Swansea maternity unit. Of these 823 (10.9%) were considered to be at 'high risk' for developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). Static ultrasound examination was performed in each case and the results classified on the basis of the method of Graf. A total of 117 type III-IV hips in 83 infants was splinted using the Aberdeen splint. Radiographs of these hips were taken at six and 12 months. Hilgenreiner's measurements of the acetabular angle were made in all cases and the development of the femoral capital epiphysis was assessed by measuring the epiphyseal area. The effect of splintage on the acetabular angle and the epiphyseal area between the normal and abnormal splinted hips was compared. Radiographs of 16 normal infants (32 normal unsplinted hips) were used as a control group. This cohort has now been followed up for a minimum of nine years. There have been no complications as a result of splintage. The failure rate was 1.7% or 0.25 per 1000 live births. No statistical difference was found when comparing the effect of splintage on the acetabular angle and epiphyseal area between normal and abnormal splinted hips and normal unsplinted hips. Our study has shown that while the Aberdeen splint had a definite but small failure rate, it was safe in that it did not produce avascular necrosis. The current conventional view that a low rate of splintage is always best is therefore brought into question if the Aberdeen splint is chosen for the management of neonatal DDH.

  6. Does the optimal position of the acetabular fragment should be within the radiological normal range for all developmental dysplasia of the hip? A patient-specific finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuyi; Peng, Jianping; Li, De; Zhang, Linlin; Wang, Hui; Jiang, Leisheng; Chen, Xiaodong

    2016-10-04

    The success of Bernese periacetabular osteotomy depends significantly on how extent the acetabular fragment can be corrected to its optimal position. This study was undertaken to investigate whether correcting the acetabular fragment into the so-called radiological "normal" range is the best choice for all developmental dysplasia of the hip with different severities of dysplasia from the biomechanical view? If not, is there any correlation between the biomechanically optimal position of the acetabular fragment and the severity of dysplasia? Four finite element models with different severities of dysplasia were developed. The virtual periacetabular osteotomy was performed with the acetabular fragment rotated anterolaterally to incremental center-edge angles; then, the contact area and pressure and von Mises stress in the cartilage were calculated at different correction angles. The optimal position of the acetabular fragment for patients 1, 2, and 3 was when the acetabular fragment rotated 17° laterally (with the lateral center-edge angle of 36° and anterior center-edge angle of 58°; both were slightly larger than the "normal" range), 25° laterally following further 5° anterior rotation (with the lateral center-edge angle of 31° and anterior center-edge angle of 51°; both were within the "normal" range), and 30° laterally following further 10° anterior rotation (with the lateral center-edge angle of 25° and anterior center-edge angle of 40°; both were less than the "normal" range), respectively. The optimal corrective position of the acetabular fragment is severity dependent rather than within the radiological "normal" range for developmental dysplasia of the hip. We prudently proposed that the optimal correction center-edge angle of mild, moderate, and severe developmental dysplasia of the hip is slightly larger than the "normal" range, within the "normal" range, and less than the lower limit of the "normal" range, respectively.

  7. Prevention of congenital dislocation of the hip in the newborn.

    PubMed

    Miranda, L; Palomo, J M; Monzonis, J; Marti, V

    1988-01-01

    Routine examination and early treatment of any instability in the hips of newborns has recently been called into question after a period of universal agreement. The hips of 49,937 neonates were prospectively studied by a general hip screening. Every unstable hip--449 in 317 children--was immediately treated with a Von Rosen splint for a 3-month-period. Overall, satisfactory reduction of the incidence of established congenital dislocation of the hip (CDH) was achieved. Risk factors leading to unstable hips (sex, first birth, and breech birth) and the development of CDH (time of stabilization) were considered.

  8. Reference values for three channels of amplitude-integrated EEG using the Brainz BRM3 cerebral function monitor in normal term neonates: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nimisha; Pappas, Athina; Thomas, Ronald; Shankaran, Seetha

    2015-03-01

    Amplitude-integrated electroencephalography (EEG) is a form of continuous EEG using a select number of electrodes (2-4), which can be used for bedside monitoring of brain functions in critically ill neonates. There is a paucity of normative amplitude-integrated EEG data for term healthy neonates especially for unilateral channels that are available for newer cerebral function monitors. To define absolute amplitudes for all three available channels and also to determine if route of delivery or presence of a caput succedaneum would affect amplitude-integrated EEG amplitude voltages. This is a prospective observational study of 80 healthy term neonates (gestational age ≥ 38 weeks) who had three-channel amplitude-integrated EEG recorded for 90 minutes within 12 hours of birth using the Brainz BRM3 cerebral function monitor. Median maximum and median minimum voltages obtained were 16.96 μV and 8.13 μV for the cross-cerebral (CC), 14.42 μV and 7.13 μV for the right unilateral, and 13.16 μV and 6.51 μV for the left unilateral aEEG channels, respectively. There were no statistically significant difference amplitude voltages for any channel based on route of delivery. The presence of a caput succedaneum was associated with a decrease in the median and mean of the maximum and minimum amplitude voltages for CC channel. Median maximum and median minimum voltages for the CC channel among the caput and normal scalp examination groups were 14.62 μV vs 17.27 μV (P = 0.022) and 7.21 μV vs 8.24 μV (P = 0.004), respectively. Similarly, mean maximum and mean minimum voltages for the CC channel were 15.42 μV vs 17.59 μV (P = 0.038) and 7.27 μV vs 8.25 μV (P = 0.005) in the caput and normal scalp examination groups, respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The effects of rose hip (Rosa canina) on plasma antioxidative activity and C-reactive protein in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and normal controls: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Kirkeskov, Bente; Christensen, Robin; Bügel, Susanne; Bliddal, Henning; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Christensen, Lars Porskjær; Andersen, Jens Rikardt

    2011-08-15

    Rose hip (Rosa canina) has been used as an herbal remedy against a wide range of ailments including inflammatory disorders. The anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties of rose hips have been evaluated in vitro and active constituents have been isolated. Rose hip contains antioxidant nutrients and an anti-inflammatory galactolipid. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disease where activated cells release reactive oxygen substances. Thus it could be relevant to investigate if rose hip had an anti-inflammatory and/or antioxidant effect in this situation. In this open case-control study 20 female patients with RA and 10 female controls were given 10.5 g rose hip powder daily (Litozin®) for 28 days. Blood samples were analysed at baseline and follow-up for the capacity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and catalase and the inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP). The participants kept a food diary for the first 3 days and the last 3 days of the intervention period. The RA-patients completed The Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire at baseline and follow-up. CRP-concentrations of both patients and healthy controls did not change. Nor was any effect found on the activity of antioxidant enzymes. There was no difference in food intake at baseline, but in the last week the RA-group reduced their energy intake. 10.5 g Litozin® in 28 days had neither effect on clinical symptoms or laboratory measurements in patients with RA or healthy controls. This is in contrast to previous intervention studies with rose hip powder that found a reduction in the concentration of CRP. The results of the present study indicate that a daily amount of approximately 10 g rose hip powder for one month has no anti-inflammatory and/or antioxidant effect. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect(s) of preterm birth on normal retinal vascular development and oxygen-induced retinopathy in the neonatal rat.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong; Yang, Xiangmin; Wang, Yusheng; Chu, Zhaojie; Liu, Tao; Zhu, Tong; Gao, Xiang; Ma, Zhen

    2013-12-01

    Maturity is a critical factor in the pathogenesis of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). One widely used method for studying this condition is that of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). The general conditions of an OIR term animal, both at the time of birth and following birth, differ from those of the preterm infant. This, to simulate preterm conditions and to provide a basis for further studies on ROP, we investigated the effect(s) of preterm birth on retinal vascularization using the neonatal rat. Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were delivered preterm by caesarean section on the day 19 of gestation. Term pups were used as controls. On the day of birth, preterm and term pups were housed under conditions of room air or cyclic oxygen. Retinas of pups housed in room air on days 4, 7, 10, 14, 18 and 22, as well as pups housed in oxygen on days 14, 18, and 22 were whole-mounted and stained with isolectin-B4. On day 18, cross-sections of the retina were cut and stained with hematoxylin and eosin for the identification of preretinal neovascular tufts. Images of avascular and neovascular areas were compared using light and fluorescence microscopy. Preterm pups had significantly larger avascular retinal areas than term rats on the various postnatal days. After exposure to cyclic oxygen, preterm pups demonstrated significantly larger avascular (days 14 and 18) and neovascular areas (day 18) compared with term rats. On day 22, residual retinopathy of preterm pups was greater than that of term pups. Preterm birth of rats, which are comparable in their physiology to humans, had negative effects on retinal vascularization. The impaired retinal vascular development and subsequent vasoproliferation resulting from hyperoxia in preterm pups is more severe and enduring.

  11. Hip arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    de Amorim Cabrita, Henrique Antônio Berwanger; de Castro Trindade, Christiano Augusto; de Campos Gurgel, Henrique Melo; Leal, Rafael Demura; de Souza Marques, Ricardo da Fonseca

    2015-01-01

    Hip arthroscopy is a safe method for treating a variety of pathological conditions that were unknown until a decade ago. Femoroacetabular impingement is the commonest of these pathological conditions and the one with the best results when treated early on. The instruments and surgical technique for hip arthroscopy continue to evolve. New indications for hip arthroscopy has been studied as the ligamentum teres injuries, capsular repair in instabilities, dissection of the sciatic nerve and repair of gluteal muscles tears (injuries to the hip rotator cuff), although still with debatable reproducibility. The complication rate is low, and ever-better results with fewer complications should be expected with the progression of the learning curve.

  12. Ultrasonography of the hip.

    PubMed

    Nestorova, Rodina; Vlad, Violeta; Petranova, Tzvetanka; Porta, Francesco; Radunovic, Goran; Micu, Mihaela C; Iagnocco, Annamaria

    2012-09-01

    A complete physical examination of the hip is often difficult due to its size and deep position. During the last two decades, ultrasonography (US) of the hip has been widely accepted as a useful diagnostic tool in patients with hip pain and /or limited range of motion. It is commonly used in both adults and children. This technique allows evaluation of different anatomical structures and their pathological changes, such as joint recess (joint effusion, synovial hypertrophy), changes within the bursae (bursitis), tendons and muscles (tendinopathy, ruptures, calcifications), as well as changes in the bony profile of the joint surfaces, ischial tuberosity, and greater trochanter (erosions, osteophytes, calcific deposits). US is very useful for guided procedures in hip joint and periarticular soft tissues under direct visualization. The needle aspiration of synovial fluid and steroid injections are commonly-applied activities in daily rheumatology practice. The relatively limited acoustic windows available to the US beam are the principal limitations to hip US. Therefore, conducting a detailed examination of some important structures together with the interpretation of Doppler signal (sometimes undetectable) is not easy, requiring good knowledge of the modality. The aim of this review is to analyze the current literature about US of the hip and to describe the most frequently-observed normal and pathological findings.

  13. Ultrasound anatomy in the normal neonatal and infant foot: an anatomic introduction to ultrasound assessment of foot deformities.

    PubMed

    Aurell, Y; Johansson, A; Hansson, G; Wallander, H; Jonsson, K

    2002-09-01

    The aim of this study was to establish guidelines for US assessment of the talo-crural, the talo-navicular and the calcaneo-cuboid joints during the first year of life, which could serve as a reference while studying foot deformities. The feet of 54 healthy children were examined at birth and at the age of 4, 7 and 12 months by using three easily defined and reproducible US projections. With a medial projection the relation of the navicular in relation to the medial malleolus and the head of the talus was studied. A lateral projection revealed the calcaneo-cuboid relationship and a dorsal projection the talo-navicular alignment in the sagittal plane. Normal values for measurements of these cartilaginous relationships were established for the different age groups. Intra- and inter-observer reliability was assessed and found to be acceptable ( r=0.53-0.90, Pearson correlation coefficient). With US it is possible to obtain reproducible planes of investigation that give reliable information about the talo-crural, the talo-navicular and the calcaneo-cuboid relationships during the first year of life.

  14. Biodynamic total hip prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Pipino, F; Calderale, P M

    1987-09-01

    The biodynamic total hip prosthesis which was devised in 1977-78 and implanted in 1979 was derived from a series of experimental studies and a lengthy clinical experience, both dating back to 1968. This prosthesis introduced two new and original concepts into the field of prosthetic hip surgery: 1) the biequatorial design of the cup; 2) the preservation of the femoral neck. This prosthetic system is based on maximum preservation of the bone stock as well as hip function. The biequatorial cup allows for positioning corresponding to that of the normal acetabulum. The femoral component incorporates features (collar, sagittal and frontal angulation, external surface, etc.) which facilitate proximal cortical fixation and cancellous metaphyseal biological anchoring, thus ensuring total adhesion. The average 3.5 years follow-up (maximum 7 years, minimum one year) in 280 cases confirms the effectiveness of this prosthesis and the validity of the basic principles on which it is founded.

  15. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (Gnrhr) gene knock out: Normal growth and development of sensory, motor and spatial orientation behavior but altered metabolism in neonatal and prepubertal mice

    PubMed Central

    Busby, Ellen R.; Sherwood, Nancy M.

    2017-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is important in the control of reproduction, but its actions in non-reproductive processes are less well known. In this study we examined the effect of disrupting the GnRH receptor in mice to determine if growth, metabolism or behaviors that are not associated with reproduction were affected. To minimize the effects of other hormones such as FSH, LH and sex steroids, the neonatal-prepubertal period of 2 to 28 days of age was selected. The study shows that regardless of sex or phenotype in the Gnrhr gene knockout line, there was no significant difference in the daily development of motor control, sensory detection or spatial orientation among the wildtype, heterozygous or null mice. This included a series of behavioral tests for touch, vision, hearing, spatial orientation, locomotory behavior and muscle strength. Neither the daily body weight nor the final weight on day 28 of the kidney, liver and thymus relative to body weight varied significantly in any group. However by day 28, metabolic changes in the GnRH null females compared with wildtype females showed a significant reduction in inguinal fat pad weight normalized to body weight; this was accompanied by an increase in glucose compared with wildtype females shown by Student-Newman-Keuls Multiple Comparison test and Student's unpaired t tests. Our studies show that the GnRH-GnRHR system is not essential for growth or motor/sensory/orientation behavior during the first month of life prior to puberty onset. The lack of the GnRH-GnRHR axis, however, did affect females resulting in reduced subcutaneous inguinal fat pad weight and increased glucose with possible insulin resistance; the loss of the normal rise of estradiol at postnatal days 15–28 may account for the altered metabolism in the prepubertal female pups. PMID:28346489

  16. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (Gnrhr) gene knock out: Normal growth and development of sensory, motor and spatial orientation behavior but altered metabolism in neonatal and prepubertal mice.

    PubMed

    Busby, Ellen R; Sherwood, Nancy M

    2017-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is important in the control of reproduction, but its actions in non-reproductive processes are less well known. In this study we examined the effect of disrupting the GnRH receptor in mice to determine if growth, metabolism or behaviors that are not associated with reproduction were affected. To minimize the effects of other hormones such as FSH, LH and sex steroids, the neonatal-prepubertal period of 2 to 28 days of age was selected. The study shows that regardless of sex or phenotype in the Gnrhr gene knockout line, there was no significant difference in the daily development of motor control, sensory detection or spatial orientation among the wildtype, heterozygous or null mice. This included a series of behavioral tests for touch, vision, hearing, spatial orientation, locomotory behavior and muscle strength. Neither the daily body weight nor the final weight on day 28 of the kidney, liver and thymus relative to body weight varied significantly in any group. However by day 28, metabolic changes in the GnRH null females compared with wildtype females showed a significant reduction in inguinal fat pad weight normalized to body weight; this was accompanied by an increase in glucose compared with wildtype females shown by Student-Newman-Keuls Multiple Comparison test and Student's unpaired t tests. Our studies show that the GnRH-GnRHR system is not essential for growth or motor/sensory/orientation behavior during the first month of life prior to puberty onset. The lack of the GnRH-GnRHR axis, however, did affect females resulting in reduced subcutaneous inguinal fat pad weight and increased glucose with possible insulin resistance; the loss of the normal rise of estradiol at postnatal days 15-28 may account for the altered metabolism in the prepubertal female pups.

  17. Hip arthroscopy

    MedlinePlus

    Johnson D, Weiss WM. Basic arthroscopic principles. In: Miller MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic ... 11. Sanchez VMI, Meza AO. Hip arthroscopy. In: Miller MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic ...

  18. The Hyperflexible Hip

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Alexander E.; Bedi, Asheesh; Tibor, Lisa M.; Zaltz, Ira; Larson, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Dance, gymnastics, figure skating, and competitive cheerleading require a high degree of hip range of motion. Athletes who participate in these sports use their hips in a mechanically complex manner. Evidence Acquisition: A search of the entire PubMed database (through December 2013) and additional searches of the reference lists of pertinent articles. Study Design: Systematic review. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Results: Whether innate or acquired, dancers and gymnasts have some hypermobility that allows their hips to be placed in potentially impinging or unstable positions required for their given activity. Such extremes of motion can result in both intra-articular and extra-articular impingement as well as compensatory osseous and muscular pathology. In addition, dancers and gymnasts are susceptible to impingement-induced instability. Dancers with innate generalized hyperlaxity are at increased risk of injury because of their activities and may require longer recovery times to return to play. Both nonoperative and operative treatments (arthroscopic and open) have an important role in returning flexibility athletes to their preoperative levels of sport and dance. Conclusion: Because of the extreme hip motion required and the compensatory soft tissue laxity in dancers and gymnasts, these athletes may develop instability, impingement, or combinations of both. This frequently occurs in the setting of subtle pathoanatomy or in patients with normal bony anatomy. With appropriate surgical indications and the correct operative technique, the treating surgeon can anticipate high levels of return to play for the gymnast and dancer with hip pain. PMID:26137181

  19. Reproduction of Hip Offset and Leg Length in Navigated Total Hip Arthroplasty: How Accurate Are We?

    PubMed

    Ellapparadja, Pregash; Mahajan, Vivek; Deakin, Angela H; Deep, Kamal

    2015-06-01

    This study assesses how accurately we can restore hip offset and leg length in navigated total hip arthroplasty (THA). 152 consecutive patients with navigated THA formed the study group. The contra-lateral hip formed control for measuring hip offset and leg length. All radiological measurements were made using Orthoview digital software. In the normal hip offset group, the mean is 75.73 (SD- 8.61). In the reconstructed hip offset group, the mean is 75.35 (SD - 7.48). 95.39% had hip offset within 6 mm of opposite side while 96.04% had leg length restored within 6 mm of contra-lateral side. Equivalence test revealed that the two groups of hip offsets were essentially the same. We conclude that computer navigation can successfully reproduce hip offset and leg length accurately.

  20. A longitudinal study of angiogenic (placental growth factor) and anti-angiogenic (soluble endoglin and soluble VEGF receptor-1) factors in normal pregnancy and patients destined to develop preeclampsia and deliver a small-for-gestational-age neonate

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Roberto; Nien, Jyh Kae; Espinoza, Jimmy; Todem, David; Fu, Wenjiang; Chung, Hwan; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Gotsch, Francesca; Erez, Offer; Mazaki-tovi, Shali; Gomez, Ricardo; Edwin, Sam; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Levine, Richard J.; Karumanchi, Ananth

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Accumulating evidence suggests that an imbalance between pro-angiogenic [i.e. vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and placental growth factor (PlGF)] and anti-angiogenic factors [i.e. soluble VEGF receptor-1 (sVEGFR-1, also referred to as sFlt1) is involved in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia (PE). Endoglin is a protein that regulates the pro-angiogenic effects of transforming growth factor β, and its soluble form has been recently implicated in the pathophysiology of PE. The objective of this study was to determine if changes in maternal plasma concentration of these angiogenic and anti-angiogenic factors differ prior to development of disease among patients with normal pregnancies, and those destined to develop PE (preterm and term) or to deliver an SGA neonate. Methods This longitudinal nested case-control study included 144 singleton pregnancies in the following groups: 1) patients with uncomplicated pregnancies who delivered appropriate for gestational age (AGA) neonates (n=46); 2) patients who delivered an SGA neonate but did not develop PE (n=56); and 3) patients who developed PE (n=42). Longitudinal samples were collected at each prenatal visit, which was scheduled at four-week intervals from the first or early second trimester until delivery. Plasma concentrations of soluble endoglin (s-Eng), sVEGFR-1 and PlGF were determined by specific and sensitive ELISA. Results 1) Patients destined to deliver an SGA neonate had higher plasma concentrations of s-Eng throughout gestation than those with normal pregnancies; 2) patients destined to develop preterm PE and term PE had significantly higher concentrations of s-Eng than those with normal pregnancies at 23 and 30 weeks, respectively (for preterm PE: p<0.036 and for term PE: 0=0.002); 3) patients destined to develop PE (term or preterm) and those who delivered an SGA neonate had lower plasma concentrations of PlGF than those with normal pregnancy throughout gestation, and the maternal

  1. Hip Microfracture

    PubMed Central

    McGill, Kevin C.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Nho, Shane J.

    2010-01-01

    Microfracture is a marrow-stimulating technique used in the hip to treat cartilage defects associated with femoro-acetabular impingement, instability, or traumatic hip injury. These defects have a low probability of healing spontaneously and therefore often require surgical intervention. Originally adapted from the knee, microfracture is part of a spectrum of cartilage repair options that include palliative procedures such as debridement and lavage, reparative procedures such as marrow-stimulating techniques (abrasion arthroplasty and microfracture), and restorative procedures such as autologous chondrocyte implantation and osteochondral allograft/autografts. The basic indications for microfracture of the hip include focal and contained lesions typically less than 4 cm in diameter, full-thickness (Outerbridge grade IV) defects in weightbearing areas, unstable lesions with intact subchondral bone, and focal lesions without evidence of surrounding chondromalacia. Although not extensively studied in the hip, there are some small clinical series with promising early outcomes. Although the widespread use of microfracture in the hip is hindered by difficulties in identifying lesions on preoperative imaging and instrumentation to circumvent the femoral head, this technique continues to gain acceptance as an initial treatment for small, focal cartilage defects. PMID:26069544

  2. Growth characteristics of the fetal ligament of the head of femur: significance in congenital hip disease.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Measurement of the length and width of the ligament of the head of femur (ligamentum teres) in 140 normal human fetuses between 12 weeks and term provides limits for growth changes in this structure. These observations provide no morphological evidence of a significant difference between males and females, or between the right and left sides, to explain the female and left hip preponderance reported in congenital hip disease. The ligament is shown to be variable in length, width, and shape, and it is not a distinctly linear structure through linearity may increase with age. Tests of femoral head mobility support the opinion that this ligament must play a role in fetal and neonatal hip joint stability. Weak correlation only was demonstrated between the ligament variables and acetabular depth, which suggests that ligament shape and socket shape are not closely related. Comparison of measurements from normal and 12 dysplastic or subluxated joints provides no evidence to support previous observations that this structure is unusually long in abnormal hip joints which are not frankly dislocated. Images FIG. 1 PMID:7445537

  3. Review of neonatal EEG.

    PubMed

    Husain, Aatif M

    2005-03-01

    Neonatal electroencephalography (EEG) presents some of the most difficult challenges in EEG interpretation. It differs significantly in many ways from EEG of older children and adults. Technologically, acquisition of a neonatal EEG is significantly more difficult and different than an adult EEG. There are numerous features that are age-specific and change almost week-to-week in the preterm infant. Some features may be normal at one age and abnormal if they persist for several weeks. Many of these features also have different implications in neonates as compared to older individuals. These issues mandate a different approach to neonatal EEG interpretation. In this article an overview of neonatal EEG is presented. After a brief discussion of relevant technical issues, various normal EEG features encountered in neonates are discussed. This is followed by a discussion of the ontogeny of EEG, starting from the age of viability to the first few months of life. A description of various abnormalities follows. Finally, an approach to analysis of a neonatal EEG is presented.

  4. Neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Stefanovic, Iva Mihatov

    2011-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is the most common cause of neonatal deaths with high mortality despite treatment. Neonatal sepsis can be classified into two subtypes depending upon onset of symptoms. There are many factors that make neonates more susceptable to infection. Signs of sepsis in neonates are often non-specific and high degree of suspicion is needed for early diagnosis. Some laboratory parameters can be helpful for screening of neonates with neonatal sepsis, but none of it is specific and sensitive enough to be used singly. Diagnostic approach mostly focuses on history and review of non specific signs and symptoms. Antibiotic treatment is the mainstay of treatment and supportive care is equally important. The aim of this review is to give an overview of neonatal sepsis, including incidence, etiology, clinical picture, diagnostics and therapy.

  5. Periventricular leukomalacia in a neonatal calf

    PubMed Central

    KOYAMA, Kenji; FUJITA, Riku; MAEZAWA, Masaki; FUKUMOTO, Natsuko; HORIUCHI, Noriyuki; INOKUMA, Hisashi; KOBAYASHI, Yoshiyasu

    2016-01-01

    A 10-day-old, Japanese Black, female calf had shown astasia since just after birth. Focal symmetrical periventricular malacic lesions of the cerebrum and suppurative arthritis of the left hip joint were observed in macroscopic examination. Histologically, the cerebral lesions were confirmed as periventricular leukomalacia (PVL). The location and histological features of the lesions were similar to PVL in humans, caused by neonatal ischemia/hypovolemia. This is the first report of PVL in a neonatal calf. PMID:27010465

  6. Pilot evaluation of anterior dynamic ultrasound screening for developmental dysplasia of the hip in an Australian regional hospital.

    PubMed

    Charlton, S; Muir, L; Skinner, T C; Walters, L

    2012-01-01

    Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip (DDH) is the most common notifiable musculoskeletal birth defect in South Australia (SA). Despite routine screening by physical examination of the hips in the neonatal period and at 6 weeks of age, the risk of late diagnosis is increased in rural areas. It is assumed this is due to the examining doctors' reduced clinical expertise. Introducing Anterior Dynamic Ultrasound (ADUS) has reduced the late detection rates in Sweden to almost zero, and may benefit Australian infants in rural areas if routine screening was introduced. This study reports on a small implementation pilot in a SA regional hospital where volunteer postnatal mothers consented to their babies having ADUS examinations. The pilot was evaluated by collecting results of physical examination, ADUS, and surveying parental impressions of the screening test. Hips of 86 infants underwent ADUS during the implementation pilot. Parents' perceptions were mainly very positive and indicated ADUS was an accessible and acceptable screening test. Of the hips scanned, three were found to have maximum movement of the femoral head of >3 mm and were deemed to demonstrate increased laxity. Four hips described as loose or mobile on clinical examination were found to be within normal limits of maximum mobility on ADUS. This study has demonstrated that a larger scale implementation project would be feasible in regional Australia, and would enable researchers to better understand how to reduce the late diagnosis rate of DDH in rural areas.

  7. Conversion of fused hip to total hip arthroplasty with presurgical and postsurgical gait studies.

    PubMed

    Bonin, Stephanie J; Eltoukhy, Moataz A; Hodge, W Andrew; Asfour, Shihab S

    2012-03-01

    This case study presents a subject with a fused hip converted to total hip arthroplasty. Kinematic gait analysis was conducted on 3 occasions, presurgery, 4 months postsurgery, and 2.5 years postsurgery. Presurgery data showed decreased cadence and shorter step length; sound limb possessed increased hip, knee range of motion (ROM), and increased knee flexion during stance; the affected limb had minimal hip motion and normal knee ROM with abnormal pattern. At 4 months postsurgery, the sound limb showed decreased step length, whereas the affected limb showed increased knee extension during stance and increased hip ROM. Data obtained at 2.5 years postsurgery indicated decreased cadence and speed and increased ROM in both limbs. The total hip arthroplasty had provided relief of chronic back and affected hip pain and improved mobility. Gait-specific training is recommended. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Internal snapping hip syndrome in dynamic ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Maczuch, Jarosław; Skupiński, Jarosław; Kukawska-Sysio, Karolina; Wawrzynek, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Snapping hip syndrome is an audible or palpable snap in a hip joint during movement which may be accompanied by pain or locking. It is typically seen in young athletes performing activities requiring repeated extreme movements of the hip. It may also follow a physical trauma, intramuscular injections or surgeries. There are two main forms of snapping hip: extra- or intra-articular. Extra-articular snapping hip is elicited by an abnormal movement of specific tendons and is divided into two forms: internal and external. The internal form of snapping hip syndrome is attributed to an abrupt movement of an iliopsoas tendon against an iliopectineal eminence. Radiograph results in patients with this form of snapping tend to be normal. Dynamic ultrasound is the gold standard diagnostic technique in both forms of extra-articular snapping hip syndrome. The objective of the following text is to describe a step-by-step dynamic ultrasonography examination in internal extra-articular snapping hip syndrome in accordance to the proposed checklist protocol. To evaluate abrupt movement of an involved tendon, the patient needs to perform specific provocation tests during the examination. With its real-time imaging capabilities, dynamic ultrasonography detects the exact mechanism of the abnormal tendon friction during hip movement in a noninvasive way. It also allows for a diagnosis of additional hip tissue changes which may be causing the pain. PMID:27679733

  9. Conus hip prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Wagner, H; Wagner, M

    2001-01-01

    50 years ago, prosthetic replacement of the hip joint ushered in a new epoch in orthopaedics. Total hip replacement made it possible to remove a severely diseased, painful hip and restore normal function and a normal quality of life to the afflicted patient. The early results of total hip replacement are almost all spectacular and hip replacement has become the most successful type of orthopaedic surgery. These good results using an approach that was technically relatively simple resulted in a temptation to implant prosthetic hip joints with ever increasing frequency in ever younger patients. This led to the emergence of new problems, which were not so clearly recognised at the outset: it emerged that the stability of prosthetic hip joints was of limited duration. This had the following consequence: If a total hip prosthesis is implanted in an elderly person whose remaining life-expectancy is shorter than the longevity of the prosthesis, hip replacement is a life-long solution. We can therefore say that, for a patient who has only 10 to 15 years left to live, their hip problem is solved by total hip replacement. For young people, who still have a long life expectancy in front of them, it is different. They will experience failure of the artificial joint and require further surgery. The commonest and most important type of failure in total hip prostheses is aseptic loosening, which is associated with resorption of bone at the site of the prosthesis. The cause of this phenomenon has only gradually been recognised in the course of the years. Initially, the unanimous opinion was that the methacrylate cement, used to fix the components of the prosthesis in the bone, was the definitive cause of aseptic loosening because fissures and fractures of the cement were almost always found during surgical revision of loosened joints. There was talk of "cement disease" and great efforts were made to improve the quality of the cement and the cementing technique. Moreover, even

  10. [Anti-anemia therapy with prophylactic administration of Fe2+ in normal pregnancy and its effect on prepartum hematologic parameters in the mother and neonate].

    PubMed

    Roztocil, A; Charvátová, M; Harastová, L; Zahrádková, J; Studeník, P; Sochorová, V; Vajcíková, H; Drastichová, V; Burnog, T; Pilka, L

    1994-06-01

    Eighty-four non-anaemic pregnant women were treated, starting between the 20th-24th week of Pregnancy, with Actiferrin Compositum--1 capsule per day--from the 36th with 2 capsules per day up to childbirth. The group was compared with the results in 57 non-anaemic not treated pregnant women. Haematological parameters were recorded before the onset of treatment, during the first stage of labour and in neonates on the first day after delivery. By means of the non-paired t-test no significant differences were disclosed between the groups; nevertheless the percentage values of haemoglobin, haematocrit, erythrocytes and serum iron were higher in the treated group, as compared with the non-treated one. Also the ferritin values in neonates of the non-treated group were lower, as compared with the treated group. The paired t-test was highly significant in the Actiferrin treated patients as regards haemoglobin, haematocrit and transferrin values. The results provide evidence that it is indicated to administer as a routine measure Actiferrin Compositum to all pregnant women as prevention of pre-partum anaemia of the mother and low ferritin levels in the neonate.

  11. Biliary atresia and neonatal hepatobiliary scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Wynchank, S.; Guillet, J.; Leccia, F.; Soubiran, G.; Blanquet, P.

    1984-03-01

    Hepatobiliary scintigraphy using Tc-99m diethyl IDA was performed on 14 jaundiced neonates. It aided greatly the differential diagnosis between neonatal hepatitis and biliary atresia. Limitations in the interpretation of the results are described, as neonatal hepatitis may be accompanied by biliary excretion ranging from zero to normal. Also both biliary atresia (intra- and extrahepatic) and neonatal hepatitis may show no biliary excretion within 24 hours.

  12. Hip flexor strain - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... flexor - aftercare; Hip flexor injury - aftercare; Hip flexor tear - aftercare; Iliopsoas strain - aftercare; Strained iliopsoas muscle - aftercare; Torn iliopsoas muscle - aftercare; Psoas strain - aftercare

  13. The Orthology Clause in the Next Generation Sequencing Era: Novel Reference Genes Identified by RNA-seq in Humans Improve Normalization of Neonatal Equine Ovary RT-qPCR Data

    PubMed Central

    Scarlet, Dragos; Ertl, Reinhard; Aurich, Christine; Steinborn, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Background Vertebrate evolution is accompanied by a substantial conservation of transcriptional programs with more than a third of unique orthologous genes showing constrained levels of expression. Moreover, there are genes and exons exhibiting excellent expression stability according to RNA-seq data across a panel of eighteen tissues including the ovary (Human Body Map 2.0). Results We hypothesized that orthologs of these exons would also be highly uniformly expressed across neonatal ovaries of the horse, which would render them appropriate reference genes (RGs) for normalization of reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) data in this context. The expression stability of eleven novel RGs (C1orf43, CHMP2A, EMC7, GPI, PSMB2, PSMB4, RAB7A, REEP5, SNRPD3, VCP and VPS29) was assessed by RT-qPCR in ovaries of seven neonatal fillies and compared to that of the expressed repetitive element ERE-B, two universal (OAZ1 and RPS29) and four traditional RGs (ACTB, GAPDH, UBB and B2M). Expression stability analyzed with the software tool RefFinder top ranked the normalization factor constituted of the genes SNRPD3 and VCP, a gene pair that is not co-expressed according to COEXPRESdb and GeneMANIA. The traditional RGs GAPDH, B2M, ACTB and UBB were only ranked 3rd and 12th to 14th, respectively. Conclusions The functional diversity of the novel RGs likely facilitates expression studies over a wide range of physiological and pathological contexts related to the neonatal equine ovary. In addition, this study augments the potential for RT-qPCR-based profiling of human samples by introducing seven new human RG assays (C1orf43, CHMP2A, EMC7, GPI, RAB7A, VPS29 and UBB). PMID:26536597

  14. Cumulative hip contact stress predicts osteoarthritis in DDH.

    PubMed

    Mavcic, Blaz; Iglic, Ales; Kralj-Iglic, Veronika; Brand, Richard A; Vengust, Rok

    2008-04-01

    Hip stresses are generally believed to influence whether a hip develops osteoarthritis (OA); similarly, various osteotomies have been proposed to reduce contact stresses and the risk of OA. We asked whether elevated hip contact stress predicted osteoarthritis in initially asymptomatic human hips. We identified 58 nonoperatively treated nonsubluxated hips with developmental dysplasia (DDH) without symptoms at skeletal maturity; the control group included 48 adult hips without hip disease. The minimum followup was 20 years (mean, 29 years; range, 20-41 years). Peak contact stress was computed with the HIPSTRESS method using anteroposterior pelvic radiographs at skeletal maturity. The cumulative contact stress was determined by multiplying the peak contact stress by age at followup. We compared WOMAC scores and radiographic indices of OA. Dysplastic hips had higher mean peak contact and higher mean cumulative contact stress than normal hips. Mean WOMAC scores and percentage of asymptomatic hips in the study group (mean age 51 years) were similar to those in the control group (mean age 68 years). After adjusting for gender and age, the cumulative contact stress, Wiberg center-edge angle, body mass index, but not the peak contact stress, independently predicted the final WOMAC score in dysplastic hips but not in normal hips. Cumulative contact stress predicted early hip OA better than the Wiberg center-edge angle. Level II, prognostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  15. Capsular Management in Hip Arthroscopy: An Anatomic, Biomechanical, and Technical Review

    PubMed Central

    Kuhns, Benjamin D.; Weber, Alexander E.; Levy, David M.; Bedi, Asheesh; Mather, Richard C.; Salata, Michael J.; Nho, Shane J.

    2016-01-01

    Hip arthroscopy has become an increasingly utilized surgical technique for the treatment of the young, active patients with hip pain. The clinical outcomes of hip arthroscopy in this patient population have been largely successful; however, there is increasing interest in the contribution of hip capsule in postoperative clinical and functional outcomes. The structure and function of the normal hip capsule will be reviewed. Capsular contributions to hip stability will be discussed in the setting of hip arthroscopy with an emphasis on diagnosis-based considerations. Lastly, clinical outcomes following hip arthroscopy will be discussed as they relate to capsular management. PMID:26973840

  16. Neonatal jaundice.

    PubMed

    McKiernan, Pat

    2012-06-01

    Neonatal jaundice lasting greater than 2 weeks should be investigated. Pale stools and dark or yellow urine are evidence of liver disease, which should be urgently investigated. The neonatal hepatitis syndrome has many causes, and a structured approach to investigation is mandatory. It should be possible to confirm or exclude biliary atresia within one week, so that definitive surgery is not delayed unnecessarily. Babies with the neonatal hepatitis syndrome should have vigorous fat-soluble vitamin supplementation, including parenteral vitamin K if coagulation is abnormal. The prognosis for infants with idiopathic neonatal hepatitis and multifactorial cholestasis is excellent.

  17. Neonatal anemia.

    PubMed

    Aher, Sanjay; Malwatkar, Kedar; Kadam, Sandeep

    2008-08-01

    Neonatal anemia and the need for red blood cell (RBC) transfusions are very common in neonatal intensive care units. Neonatal anemia can be due to blood loss, decreased RBC production, or increased destruction of erythrocytes. Physiologic anemia of the newborn and anemia of prematurity are the two most common causes of anemia in neonates. Phlebotomy losses result in much of the anemia seen in extremely low birthweight infants (ELBW). Accepting a lower threshold level for transfusion in ELBW infants can prevent these infants being exposed to multiple donors.

  18. In vivo and in vitro characterization of neonatal hyperparathyroidism resulting from a de novo, heterozygous mutation in the Ca2+-sensing receptor gene: normal maternal calcium homeostasis as a cause of secondary hyperparathyroidism in familial benign hypocalciuric hypercalcemia.

    PubMed Central

    Bai, M; Pearce, S H; Kifor, O; Trivedi, S; Stauffer, U G; Thakker, R V; Brown, E M; Steinmann, B

    1997-01-01

    We characterized the in vivo, cellular and molecular pathophysiology of a case of neonatal hyperparathyroidism (NHPT) resulting from a de novo, heterozygous missense mutation in the gene for the extracellular Ca2+ (Ca2+(o))-sensing receptor (CaR). The female neonate presented with moderately severe hypercalcemia, markedly undermineralized bones, and multiple metaphyseal fractures. Subtotal parathyroidectomy was performed at 6 wk; hypercalcemia recurred rapidly but the bone disease improved gradually with reversion to an asymptomatic state resembling familial benign hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FBHH). Dispersed parathyroid cells from the resected tissue showed a set-point (the level of Ca2+(o) half maximally inhibiting PTH secretion) substantially higher than for normal human parathyroid cells (approximately 1.8 vs. approximately 1.0 mM, respectively); a similar increase in set-point was observed in vivo. The proband's CaR gene showed a missense mutation (R185Q) at codon 185, while her normocalcemic parents were homozygous for wild type (WT) CaR sequence. Transient expression of the mutant R185Q CaR in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells revealed a substantially attenuated Ca2+(o)-evoked accumulation of total inositol phosphates (IP), while cotransfection of normal and mutant receptors showed an EC50 (the level of Ca2+(o) eliciting a half-maximal increase in IPs) 37% higher than for WT CaR alone (6.3+/-0.4 vs. 4.6+/-0.3 mM Ca2+(o), respectively). Thus this de novo, heterozygous CaR mutation may exert a dominant negative action on the normal CaR, producing NHPT and more severe hypercalcemia than typically seen with FBHH. Moreover, normal maternal calcium homeostasis promoted additional secondary hyperparathyroidism in the fetus, contributing to the severity of the NHPT in this case with FBHH. PMID:9011580

  19. Hip psychometrics.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Peter; Bernstein, Joseph; Wainer, Howard

    2009-07-30

    When data are abundant relative to the number of questions asked of them, answers can be formulated using little more than those data. But when data grow more sparse, so too does our tendency to lean on strong models to help us draw inferences. In this research we show how a strong item response model embedded within a fully Bayesian framework allows us to answer two important questions about the reliability and consistency of the clinical diagnosis of hip fractures from very limited data. We also show how the model automatically adjusts diagnoses for biases among the surgeons judging the radiographs. This research illustrates how a Bayesian approach expands the range of problems on which item response models can profitably be used.

  20. Total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed Central

    Siopack, J S; Jergesen, H E

    1995-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty, or surgical replacement of the hip joint with an artificial prosthesis, is a reconstructive procedure that has improved the management of those diseases of the hip joint that have responded poorly to conventional medical therapy. In this review we briefly summarize the evolution of total hip arthroplasty, the design and development of prosthetic hip components, and the current clinical indications for this procedure. The possible complications of total hip arthroplasty, its clinical performance over time, and future directions in hip replacement surgery are also discussed. Images PMID:7725707

  1. The neonatal tear film.

    PubMed

    Lawrenson, John G; Murphy, Paul J; Esmaeelpour, Marieh

    2003-12-01

    The importance of the tear film for the integrity of the ocular surface is well established. Full-term neonates produce tears normally, but low spontaneous blink rates during early life raises important questions regarding tear dynamics and stability. Although an afferent neural pathway that could potentially detect tear break-up is in place at birth, there is indirect evidence that the neonatal tear film is adapted to resist evaporation-mediated tear thinning. This adaptation presumably prevents drying of the ocular surface during long inter-blink periods. However, low rates of tear turnover may have important implications for the defence of the eye against potential pathogens.

  2. Screening in Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip (DDH).

    PubMed

    Paton, Robin W

    2017-10-01

    Screening for Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip (DDH) is a controversial subject. Screening may be by universal neonatal clinical examination (Ortolani or Barlow manoeuvres) with the addition of sonographic imaging of the hip (selective 'at risk' hips or universal screening in the neonate). In the UK, the NIPE guidelines recommend universal neonatal clinical assessment of the hip joints, a General Practitioner 6-8 week clinical 'hip check' and assessment clinically with sonographic imaging at 4-6 weeks for certain 'at risk' hips for pathological DDH. The effectiveness and difficulties arising from the UK current screening policy (clinical and sonographic) are highlighted. The purpose of the review was to assess the risk factors and efficacy of diagnostic methods in DDH, based on longitudinal cohort studies of 10 years or more. Hip screening in DDH does not meet most of the World Health Organisation's criteria for an effective screening programme and should only be considered as surveillance due to its low sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV). There is a significant risk of over diagnosis and over treatment. There is no International consensus on screening in DDH. Pathological DDH is mainly a female condition and 'at risk'/General Practitioner screening identifies few pathological cases in male subjects. The General Practitioner 6-8 week 'hip check' has a very low PPV for pathological DDH and is of doubtful value in screening and diagnosis. Unilateral limitation of hip abduction is a time dependent and useful clinical sign in the diagnosis of pathological DDH. The majority of the previously considered 'at risk' factors are not true risk factors with little or no association with pathological DDH. Copyright © 2017 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Neonatal teeth.

    PubMed

    Kovac, J; Kovac, D

    2011-01-01

    Teeth that are present at birth are called natal teeth, and teeth that emerge through the gingiva during the first 4 weeks of life are called neonatal teeth. The incidence of the appearance of natal and neonatal teeth has been reported to be between once every 800 and once every 6000 births. Natal and neonatal teeth may be uncomfortable for a nursing mother and present a risk of aspiration and swallowing by the infant if they are loose. Also, they may cause irritation and trauma to the infant's soft tissues. Under these circumstances, natal and neonatal teeth need to be extracted. In this article, a case report of two neonatal teeth in a five week old girl is presented. The teeth were present in the mandibular incisor region and were excessively mobile and caused discomfort for the nursing mother. They were extracted because of the fear of aspiration (Fig. 4, Ref. 10).

  4. Transient osteoporosis of the hip.

    PubMed

    Vernon, L F; Dooley, J C; Neidorf, D L

    1997-06-01

    Transient osteoporosis of the hip is an uncommon but probably underdiagnosed condition. There appears to be a predisposition for the condition in middle-aged males and in women in their third trimester of pregnancy. The etiology remains unclear, with theories that include vascular and neurologic disturbances. Clinical signs are usually pain in the hip area with functional disability of the affected limb. Plane film radiographs may be completely normal or show only minimal osteopenia. This report describes a 40-year-old male in whom transient osteoporosis of the hip was diagnosed. The patient's symptoms were initially interpreted as being due to sciatica; however, careful evaluation, further diagnostic work-up in the form of magnetic resonance imaging, and the clinical course of the disease ultimately led to the correct diagnosis. Resolution occurred gradually with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy and rest. This case demonstrates the need for further evaluation of patients with hip-area pain who may have negative x-rays of the hip joint but continue to be symptomatic.

  5. [The hip joint in neuromuscular disorders].

    PubMed

    Strobl, W M

    2009-07-01

    Physiologic motor and biomechanical parameters are prerequisites for normal hip development and hip function. Disorders of muscle activity and lack of weight bearing due to neuromuscular diseases may cause clinical symptoms such as an unstable hip or reduced range of motion. Disability and handicap because of pain, hip dislocation, osteoarthritis, gait disorders, or problems in seating and positioning are dependent on the severity of the disease, the time of occurrence, and the means of prevention and treatment. Preservation of pain-free and stable hip joints should be gained by balancing muscular forces and by preventing progressive dislocation. Most important is the exact indication of therapeutic options such as movement and standing therapy as well as drugs and surgery.

  6. Total hip arthroplasty in the ankylosed hip.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Megan A; Huo, Michael H

    2011-12-01

    Altered biomechanics secondary to hip ankylosis often result in degeneration of the lumbar spine, ipsilateral knee, and contralateral hip and knee. Symptoms in these joints may be reduced with conversion total hip arthroplasty (THA) of the ankylosed hip. THA in the ankylosed hip is a technically challenging procedure, and the overall clinical outcome is generally less satisfactory than routine THA performed for osteoarthritis and other etiologies. Functional integrity of the hip abductor muscles is the most important predictor of walking ability following conversion THA. Many patients experience persistent limp, and it can take up to 2 years to fully assess final functional outcome. Risk factors cited for increased risk of failed THA include prior surgical ankylosis and age <50 years at the time of conversion THA.

  7. Neonatal medications.

    PubMed

    Ward, Robert M; Stiers, Justin; Buchi, Karen

    2015-04-01

    Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) is reaching epidemic proportions related to perinatal use of opioids. There are many approaches to assess and manage NAS, including one we have outlined. A standardized approach is likely to reduce length of stay and variability in practice. Circumcision is a frequent, painful procedure performed in the neonatal period. The rationale for providing analgesia is presented as well as a review of methods. Pharmacogenomics and pharmacogenetics have expanded our understanding of diseases and their drug therapy. Some applications of pharmacogenomics to the neonatal period are presented, along with pediatric challenges of developmental expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes.

  8. Hip: Anatomy and US technique

    PubMed Central

    Molini, L.; Precerutti, M.; Gervasio, A.; Draghi, F.; Bianchi, S.

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) has always had a relatively limited role in the evaluation of the hip due to the deep location of this joint. However, many hip diseases are well detectable at US, but before approaching such a study it is necessary to be thoroughly familiar with the normal anatomy and related US images. The study technique is particularly important as optimization of various parameters is required, such as probe frequency, focalization, positioning of the probe, etc. Also the patient’s position is important, as it varies according to the area requiring examination. For the study of the anterior structures, the patient should be in the supine position; for the medial structures, the leg should be abducted and rotated outward with the knee flexed; for the lateral structures, the patient should be in the controlateral decubitus position; for the posterior structures the patient must be in the prone position. US study of the hip includes assessment of the soft tissues, tendons, ligaments and muscles, and also of the bone structures, joint space and serous bursae. The purpose of this article is to review the normal anatomy of the hip as well as the US anatomy of this joint. PMID:23397030

  9. A neonate with Coombs-negative hemolytic jaundice with spherocytes but normal erythrocyte indices: a rare case of autosomal-recessive hereditary spherocytosis due to alpha-spectrin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yaish, H M; Christensen, R D; Agarwal, A

    2013-05-01

    The diagnosis of hereditary spherocytosis (HS) in a newborn infant is generally made on the basis of a positive family history, spherocytes on blood film and Coombs-negative hemolytic jaundice of variable severity with an elevated mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) and a low mean corpuscular volume (MCV). In general, sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) quantification of erythrocyte membrane proteins is not needed to make the clinical diagnosis of HS. However, we observed that a neonate with no family history of HS, but with abundant spherocytosis on repeated blood films, Coombs-negative hemolytic jaundice and normal MCHC and MCV measurements, where SDS-PAGE revealed alpha-spectrin deficiency, a rare autosomal-recessive variety of HS that generally has a severe clinical phenotype.

  10. Hip fracture: diagnosis, treatment, and secondary prevention.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Kim Edward; Muncie, Herbert L; LeBlanc, Leanne L

    2014-06-15

    Hip fractures cause significant morbidity and are associated with increased mortality. Women experience 80% of hip fractures, and the average age of persons who have a hip fracture is 80 years. Most hip fractures are associated with a fall, although other risk factors include decreased bone mineral density, reduced level of activity, and chronic medication use. Patients with hip fractures have pain in the groin and are unable to bear weight on the affected extremity. During the physical examination, displaced fractures present with external rotation and abduction, and the leg will appear shortened. Plain radiography with cross-table lateral view of the hip and anteroposterior view of the pelvis usually confirms the diagnosis. If an occult hip fracture is suspected and plain radiography is normal, magnetic resonance imaging should be ordered. Most fractures are treated surgically unless the patient has significant comorbidities or reduced life expectancy. The consulting orthopedic surgeon will choose the surgical procedure. Patients should receive prophylactic antibiotics, particularly against Staphylococcus aureus, before surgery. In addition, patients should receive thromboembolic prophylaxis, preferably with low-molecular-weight heparin. Rehabilitation is critical to long-term recovery. Unless contraindicated, bisphosphonate therapy should be used to reduce the risk of another hip fracture. Some patients may benefit from a fall-prevention assessment.

  11. Neonatal conjunctivitis

    MedlinePlus

    Newborn conjunctivitis; Conjunctivitis of the newborn; Ophthalmia neonatorum; Eye infection - neonatal conjunctivitis ... diseases spread through sexual contact to prevent newborn conjunctivitis caused by these infections. Putting eye drops into ...

  12. Hip fracture surgeries

    MedlinePlus

    ... References Goulet JA. Hip dislocations. In: Browner BD, Jupiter JB, Krettek C, Anderson PA, eds. Skeletal Trauma: ... Baumgaertner MR. Intertrochanteric hip fractures. In: Browner BD, Jupiter JB, Krettek C, Anderson PA, eds. Skeletal Trauma: ...

  13. Hip Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... or falling can all sometimes lead to hip injuries. These include Strains Bursitis Dislocations Fractures Certain diseases also lead to hip injuries or problems. Osteoarthritis can cause pain and limited ...

  14. Hip Implant Systems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medical Devices Products and Medical Procedures Implants and Prosthetics Metal-on-Metal Hip Implants Hip Implants Share ... femoral head) is removed and replaced with a prosthetic ball made of metal or ceramic, and the ...

  15. Hip replacement - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgery to replace all or part of your hip joint with an artificial joint called a prosthesis. This ... You're in the Hospital You had a hip joint replacement surgery to replace all or part of ...

  16. Hip joint injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007633.htm Hip joint injection To use the sharing features on this ... injection is a shot of medicine into the hip joint. The medicine helps relieve pain and inflammation. It ...

  17. Studies on Diarrhea in Neonatal Calves III. Acid-base and Serum Electrolyte Values in Normal Calves from Birth to Ten Days of Age

    PubMed Central

    Butler, D. G.; Willoughby, R. A.; McSherry, B. J.

    1971-01-01

    A detailed clinical examination was conducted and blood samples were collected from a total of 151 normal calves as soon as possible after birth and at two to three day intervals until the calves were ten days old. The mean venous pH values for calves from birth to ten days of age was 7.38 ± 0.05. The mean serum sodium, potassium, magnesium, inorganic phosphate, calcium and chloride ion concentrations in normal calves from birth to ten days of age were 148 ± 13, 5.4 ± 0.8, 2.1 ± 0.4, 4.3 ± 0.8, 5.6 ± 0.5, 95 ±5, mEq/litre respectively. The mean serum osmolality in normal calves from birth to ten days of age was 280 ± 12 mOsm/litre. PMID:4251412

  18. The Hip Restoration Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Stubbs, Allston Julius; Atilla, Halis Atil

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Despite the rapid advancement of imaging and arthroscopic techniques about the hip joint, missed diagnoses are still common. As a deep joint and compared to the shoulder and knee joints, localization of hip symptoms is difficult. Hip pathology is not easily isolated and is often related to intra and extra-articular abnormalities. In light of these diagnostic challenges, we recommend an algorithmic approach to effectively diagnoses and treat hip pain. Methods In this review, hip pain is evaluated from diagnosis to treatment in a clear decision model. First we discuss emergency hip situations followed by the differentiation of intra and extra-articular causes of the hip pain. We differentiate the intra-articular hip as arthritic and non-arthritic and extra-articular pain as surrounding or remote tissue generated. Further, extra-articular hip pain is evaluated according to pain location. Finally we summarize the surgical treatment approach with an algorithmic diagram. Conclusion Diagnosis of hip pathology is difficult because the etiologies of pain may be various. An algorithmic approach to hip restoration from diagnosis to rehabilitation is crucial to successfully identify and manage hip pathologies. Level of evidence: V. PMID:28066734

  19. Hip Labral Tear

    MedlinePlus

    ... the outside rim of the socket of your hip joint. In addition to cushioning the hip joint, the labrum acts like a rubber seal or gasket to help hold the ball at the top of your thighbone securely within your hip socket. Athletes who participate in such sports as ...

  20. Diagnosis of Developmental Dislocation of the Hip by Sonospectrography

    PubMed Central

    Korkusuz, Feza

    2008-01-01

    Because not all infants can be screened for DDH by experts, early diagnosis of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) by primary health care professionals is important. We developed a broadband electroacoustic sound transmission-detection (sonospectrography) system and explored its utility in 22 patients (average age, 5.9 years; range, 0.3–14 years) with unilateral DDH in this preliminary study. Distinct from ultrasonography, the sonospectrography system functions by sound transmission and recording through tissues to differentiate between normal and abnormal hips. All hips were examined at four different hip and knee positions. The normal hip served as the control. The sonospectrography system was able to detect unilateral DDH. Dysplastic hips had lower sound transmission values when compared to normal hips in all patients and all four positions; however, the highest (X = 88.8 ± 30.2 Hz) and lowest (X = 8.3 ± 5.4 Hz) sound transmission mean values were obtained at different positions in the normal hips and those with DDH. Sound transmission values of dysplastic hips were always lower than that of normal hips when the hip and knee was flexed during measurements. Sound transmission values decreased with age. The sonospectrography system may offer a new noninvasive method in the diagnosis of unilateral DDH but requires further study of sensitivity and specificity of detecting dysplastic hips without subluxation in newborn infants. Level of Evidence: Level IV, case series. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18274713

  1. Asymmetric Hip Rotation in Professional Baseball Pitchers.

    PubMed

    McCulloch, Patrick C; Patel, Jayesh K; Ramkumar, Prem N; Noble, Philip C; Lintner, David M

    2014-02-01

    There is a renewed interest in examining the association between hip range of motion and injury in athletes, and the data on baseball players are conflicting. Understanding whether asymmetrical hip rotation is a normal adaptation or a risk factor for injury will help therapists, trainers, and physicians develop rehabilitation programs to improve kinetic energy transfer and prevent injury. As our knowledge of hip pathology among baseball pitchers improves, establishing baselines for hip motion is critical in the further assessment of injury. Because of the repetitive nature of throwing sports and the adaptive changes documented in the shoulder, elite baseball pitchers would have characteristic patterns of hip internal and external rotations on their dominant throwing side (stance) and their nondominant side (stride) in extension. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Computer software was used to measure passive internal and external rotations on digital photographs of 111 professional baseball pitchers. In right-handed pitchers, there was significantly more internal rotation in the stance hip than the stride hip (32.2° ± 8.2° vs 30.8° ± 8.4°; P = .0349) and significantly more external rotation in the stride hip than the stance hip (36.3° ± 7.7° vs 30.8° ± 9.7°; P < .0001). While the mean difference in external rotation was 4.7°, 32% of the subjects had a >10° increase in external rotation on the stride hip relative to the stance hip. This population was statistically different from the remaining group for older age (P = .0053), lower body mass index (P = .0379), and more years in professional baseball (P = .0328). In the smaller number of left-handed pitchers, side-to-side differences in hip rotation were found but were not statistically significant. Pitchers showed more internal rotation on their stance hip and more external rotation on their stride hip. Although the mean differences are small, there is a subset of pitchers with defined

  2. Asymmetric Hip Rotation in Professional Baseball Pitchers

    PubMed Central

    McCulloch, Patrick C.; Patel, Jayesh K.; Ramkumar, Prem N.; Noble, Philip C.; Lintner, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is a renewed interest in examining the association between hip range of motion and injury in athletes, and the data on baseball players are conflicting. Understanding whether asymmetrical hip rotation is a normal adaptation or a risk factor for injury will help therapists, trainers, and physicians develop rehabilitation programs to improve kinetic energy transfer and prevent injury. As our knowledge of hip pathology among baseball pitchers improves, establishing baselines for hip motion is critical in the further assessment of injury. Hypothesis: Because of the repetitive nature of throwing sports and the adaptive changes documented in the shoulder, elite baseball pitchers would have characteristic patterns of hip internal and external rotations on their dominant throwing side (stance) and their nondominant side (stride) in extension. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Computer software was used to measure passive internal and external rotations on digital photographs of 111 professional baseball pitchers. Results: In right-handed pitchers, there was significantly more internal rotation in the stance hip than the stride hip (32.2° ± 8.2° vs 30.8° ± 8.4°; P = .0349) and significantly more external rotation in the stride hip than the stance hip (36.3° ± 7.7° vs 30.8° ± 9.7°; P < .0001). While the mean difference in external rotation was 4.7°, 32% of the subjects had a >10° increase in external rotation on the stride hip relative to the stance hip. This population was statistically different from the remaining group for older age (P = .0053), lower body mass index (P = .0379), and more years in professional baseball (P = .0328). In the smaller number of left-handed pitchers, side-to-side differences in hip rotation were found but were not statistically significant. Conclusion: Pitchers showed more internal rotation on their stance hip and more external rotation on their stride hip. Although the mean

  3. Neonatal pain

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback. PMID:24330444

  4. Neonatal pain.

    PubMed

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback.

  5. Tuberculosis of hip in children: A retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Myung-Sang; Kim, Sung-Soo; Lee, Sung-Rak; Moon, Young-Wan; Moon, Jeong-Lim; Moon, Seog-In

    2012-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) of hip constitutes nearly 15% of all cases of osteoarticular tuberculosis. We report a retrospective study carried out on 43 children with hip TB. Materials and Methods: Forty-three children of TB hip treated between 1971 and 2000 were analysed. Twenty-four children of the early series were treated with streptomycin (S), isoniazid (H) and PAS (Pa) for 18 months (3HPaS, 15 HPa), while 19 children in the later series were treated with isoniazid (H), rifampicin (R) and ethambutol (E) or pyrazinamide (Z) for 12 months [(12 RHE(Z)]. Five out of 18 children with radiologically normal appearing type hip TB were treated with chemotherapy alone and 38 children were subjected to surgery; simple synovectomy alone in 31 hips, joint debridement in six hips, and proximal femoral varisation osteotomy in one. After surgery hips were immobilized in cast for one to three months according to the severity of the disease and patients pain tolerance, and then were mobilized under leg traction in bed gradually till pain subsided completely. Results: TB of hip healed with minimum sequelae in all children. In 18 Type one hip TB, normal hip (synovial form) anatomy was maintained, and in 25 patients with advanced lesions some defect in the femoral head and acetabulum was noticed, though painless good hip motion was maintained. Excellent to good results were obtained in 31 children (73.1%), fair in eight (18.6%), and poor in four (9.3%). In four patients with poor results, there was some residual morphological defect in the hip. None developed ankylosis of hip. Conclusion: We achieved good outcome with minimum sequelae in this series. The management goal should be aimed not only to heal the disease but also to maintain a painless mobile hip and anatomical cephalocotyloid relationship until maturity, and retard the development of secondary osteoarthritis. PMID:22448058

  6. [History of hip arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Płomiński, Janusz; Kwiatkowski, Krzysztof

    2007-02-01

    The authors present the history of hip prosthesis in treatment of coxarthrosis. Despite eighty years of experience the problem of gaining good and long-term results still exist and is difficult to solve. Even changing the way on cementless stabilization of prosthesis doesn't has result in solving the problem of aseptic loosening of hip arthroplasty. Problems of wear derbies made the producers find new to reduce particulate debris. The future of hip arthroplasty is connected with hip resurfacing. Moreover, the higher number of primary hip plasty the more prosthesis are loosening. The treatment is far more difficult and more expensive.

  7. Rhodococcus equi hyperimmune plasma decreases pneumonia severity after a randomised experimental challenge of neonatal foals.

    PubMed

    Sanz, M G; Loynachan, A; Horohov, D W

    2016-03-12

    Since a vaccine is not available against Rhodococcus equi, R equi-specific hyperimmune plasma (HIP) is commonly used, although its efficacy remains controversial. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of a commercially available HIP to prevent clinical rhodococcal pneumonia in neonatal foals after experimental challenge. British Veterinary Association.

  8. Association between pelvic muscle mass and canine hip dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Cardinet, G H; Kass, P H; Wallace, L J; Guffy, M M

    1997-05-15

    To investigate the relationship between pelvic muscle mass and development and expression of canine hip dysplasia (CHD). Prospective study. 5 Greyhounds with anatomically normal hip joints, 59 German Shepherd Dogs (23 with CHD, 24 with near-normal hip joints, and 12 with normal hip joints), and 18 German Shepherd Dog-Greyhound crossbreeds (7 with CHD, 6 with near-normal hip joints, and 5 with normal hip joints) between 12 and 47 months old in which pelvic muscle mass was evaluated. Pectineal muscle and hip joint development were evaluated in 25 German Shepherd Dogs at 8 and 16 or 24 weeks of age. For evaluation of pelvic muscle mass, individual pelvic muscles were weighed and hip joints were assigned a score on the basis of severity of degenerative changes. For evaluation of pectineal muscle development, muscle sections were stained and examined. Pelvic muscle mass was greatest in Greyhounds, intermediate in crossbred dogs, and smallest in German Shepherd Dogs. Differences in pelvic muscle mass among breeds were attributable to differences in weights of individual muscles. Hip score was negatively correlated with pelvic muscle mass and weights of selected pelvic muscles. Dogs with pectineal hypotrophy at 8 weeks of age had type-2 muscle fiber paucity or muscle fiber-type grouping at 16 or 24 weeks of age. At 8 weeks of age, hip joints were composed of multiple centers of ossification, and the acetabulum was largely cartilaginous. By 24 weeks of age, the pelvic bones were largely, although incompletely, fused. Diminished pelvic muscle mass in dogs with CHD and altered muscle fiber size and composition in 8-week-old dogs that subsequently develop CHD strongly suggest that abnormalities of pelvic musculature are associated with development of CHD. The complex development of the hip joint from multiple centers of ossification may make the joint susceptible to abnormal modeling forces that would result from abnormalities in pelvic muscle mass.

  9. Oxidative stress in the neonate.

    PubMed

    Robles, R; Palomino, N; Robles, A

    2001-11-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the oxidative state of term and preterm neonates at the moment of birth and during the first days of life, and the influence of exposure to oxygen on the premature neonates.A total of 20 neonates were selected. Group A: 10 healthy full-term neonates, and Group B: 10 preterm neonates with no other pathology associated, requiring oxygen therapy. Venous samples were taken in cord at 3 and 72 h in Group A, and in cord at 3, 24 and 72 h and 7 days in Group B.Hydroperoxides, Q10 coenzyme (Co Q10) and alpha-tocopherol were measured within the erythrocyte membrane. Levels of hydroperoxides present in erythrocyte membrane were higher than normal both in Group A and in Group B at birth. This increase was greater in the group of premature neonates. Levels of alpha-tocopherol at birth increase significantly at 72 h in term neonates. Among the premature newborns, alpha-tocopherol levels are two to three times lower at birth and do not rise to higher levels as in the term neonate group. Fall in levels of Co Q10 in erythrocyte membranes is observed, and perhaps is due to the role of Co Q10 in maintaining the pool of reduced tocopherol. At birth, the neonate presents an increase of markers of oxidative stress and a decrease of their antioxidant defenses. This difference is greater as gestational age decreases. The application of oxygen therapy resulted in these levels which remain low throughout the study period.

  10. Neonatal sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Birju A; Padbury, James F

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis continues to be a common and significant health care burden, especially in very-low-birth-weight infants (VLBW <1500 g). Though intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis has decreased the incidence of early-onset group B streptococcal infection dramatically, it still remains a major cause of neonatal sepsis. Moreover, some studies among VLBW preterm infants have shown an increase in early-onset sepsis caused by Escherichia coli. As the signs and symptoms of neonatal sepsis are nonspecific, early diagnosis and prompt treatment remains a challenge. There have been a myriad of studies on various diagnostic markers like hematological indices, acute phase reactants, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, cytokines, and cell surface markers among others. Nonetheless, further research is needed to identify a biomarker with high diagnostic accuracy and validity. Some of the newer markers like inter α inhibitor proteins have shown promising results thereby potentially aiding in early detection of neonates with sepsis. In order to decrease the widespread, prolonged use of unnecessary antibiotics and improve the outcome of the infants with sepsis, reliable identification of sepsis at an earlier stage is paramount. PMID:24185532

  11. Neonatal sepsis

    MedlinePlus

    ... better the outcome. Possible Complications Complications may include: Disability Death When to Contact a Medical Professional Seek medical help right away for an infant that shows symptoms of neonatal sepsis. Prevention Pregnant women may need preventive antibiotics if they have: Chorioamnionitis ...

  12. The effects of therapeutic hip exercise with abdominal core activation on recruitment of the hip muscles.

    PubMed

    Chan, Mandy Ky; Chow, Ka Wai; Lai, Alfred Ys; Mak, Noble Kc; Sze, Jason Ch; Tsang, Sharon Mh

    2017-07-21

    Core stabilization has been utilized for rehabilitation and prevention of lower limb musculoskeletal injuries. Previous studies showed that activation of the abdominal core muscles enhanced the hip muscle activity in hip extension and abduction exercises. However, the lack of the direct measurement and quantification of the activation level of the abdominal core muscles during the execution of the hip exercises affect the level of evidence to substantiate the proposed application of core exercises to promote training and rehabilitation outcome of the hip region. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of abdominal core activation, which is monitored directly by surface electromyography (EMG), on hip muscle activation while performing different hip exercises, and to explore whether participant characteristics such as gender, physical activity level and contractile properties of muscles, which is assessed by tensiomyography (TMG), have confounding effect to the activation of hip muscles in enhanced core condition. Surface EMG of bilateral internal obliques (IO), upper gluteus maximus (UGMax), lower gluteus maximus (LGMax), gluteus medius (GMed) and biceps femoris (BF) of dominant leg was recorded in 20 young healthy subjects while performing 3 hip exercises: Clam, side-lying hip abduction (HABD), and prone hip extension (PHE) in 2 conditions: natural core activation (NC) and enhanced core activation (CO). EMG signals normalized to percentage of maximal voluntary isometric contraction (%MVIC) were compared between two core conditions with the threshold of the enhanced abdominal core condition defined as >20%MVIC of IO. Enhanced abdominal core activation has significantly promoted the activation level of GMed in all phases of clam exercise (P < 0.05), and UGMax in all phases of PHE exercise (P < 0.05), LGMax in eccentric phases of all 3 exercises (P < 0.05), and BF in all phases of all 3 exercises except the eccentric phase of PHE exercise (P

  13. HIP/PAP prevents excitotoxic neuronal death and promotes plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Haldipur, Parthiv; Dupuis, Nina; Degos, Vincent; Moniaux, Nicolas; Chhor, Vibol; Rasika, Sowmyalakshmi; Schwendimann, Leslie; le Charpentier, Tifenn; Rougier, Elodie; Amouyal, Paul; Amouyal, Gilles; Dournaud, Pascal; Bréchot, Christian; El Ghouzzi, Vincent; Faivre, Jamila; Fleiss, Bobbi; Mani, Shyamala; Gressens, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Excitotoxicity plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of perinatal brain injuries. Among the consequences of excessive activation of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamate are oxidative stress caused by free radical release from damaged mitochondria, neuronal death and subsequent loss of connectivity. Drugs that could protect nervous tissue and support regeneration are attractive therapeutic options. The hepatocarcinoma intestine pancreas protein/pancreatitis-associated protein I (HIP/PAP) or Reg3α, which is approved for clinical testing for the protection and regeneration of the liver, is upregulated in the central nervous system following injury or disease. Here, we examined the neuroprotective/neuroregenerative potential of HIP/PAP following excitotoxic brain injury. Methods We studied the expression of HIP/PAP and two of its putative effectors, cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein 19 (ARPP19) and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43), in the neonatal brain, and the protective/regenerative properties of HIP/PAP in three paradigms of perinatal excitotoxicity: intracerebral injection of the NMDA agonist ibotenate in newborn pups, a pediatric model of traumatic brain injury, and cultured primary cortical neurons. Results HIP/PAP, ARPP19, and GAP-43 were expressed in the neonatal mouse brain. HIP/PAP prevented the formation of cortical and white matter lesions and reduced neuronal death and glial activation following excitotoxic insults in vivo. In vitro, HIP/PAP promoted neuronal survival, preserved neurite complexity and fasciculation, and protected cell contents from reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced damage. Interpretation HIP/PAP has strong neuroprotective/neuroregenerative potential following excitotoxic injury to the developing brain, and could represent an interesting therapeutic strategy in perinatal brain injury. PMID:25493266

  14. Complex primary total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Boisgard, S; Descamps, S; Bouillet, B

    2013-02-01

    Although total hip arthroplasty is now a classic procedure that is well controlled by orthopedic surgeons, some cases remain complex. Difficulties may be due to co-morbidities: obesity, skin problems, muscular problems, a history of neurological disease or associated morphological bone deformities. Obese patients must be informed of their specific risks and a surgical approach must be used that obtains maximum exposure. Healing of incisions is not a particular problem, but adhesions must be assessed. Neurological diseases may require tenotomy and the use of implants that limit instability. Specific techniques or implants are necessary to respect hip biomechanics (offset, neck-shaft angle) in case of a large lever arm or coxa vara. In case of arthrodesis, before THA can be performed, the risk of infection must be specifically evaluated if the etiology is infection, and the strength of the gluteal muscles must be determined. Congenital hip dysplasia presents three problems: the position and coverage of the cup, placement of a specific or custom made femoral stem, with an osteotomy if necessary, and finally lowering the femoral head into the cup by freeing the soft tissues or a shortening osteotomy. Acetabular dysplasia should not be underestimated in the presence of significant bone defect (BD), and reconstruction with a bone graft can be proposed. Sequelae from acetabular fractures presents a problem of associated BD. Internal fixation hardware is rarely an obstacle but the surgical approach should take this into account. Treatment of acetabular protrusio should restore a normal center of rotation, and prevent recurrent progressive protrusion. The use of bone grafts and reinforcement rings are indispensible. Femoral deformities may be congenital or secondary to trauma or osteotomy. They must be evaluated to restore hip biomechanics that are as close to normal as possible. Fixation of implants should restore anteversion, length and the lever arm. Most problems that

  15. Turned head--adducted hip--truncal curvature syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Hamanishi, C; Tanaka, S

    1994-01-01

    One hundred and eight neonates and infants who showed the clinical triad of a head turned to one side, adduction contracture of the hip joint on the occipital side of the turned head, and truncal curvature, which we named TAC syndrome, were studied. These cases included seven with congenital and five with late infantile dislocations of the hip joint and 14 who developed muscular torticollis. Forty one were among 7103 neonates examined by one of the authors. An epidemiological analysis confirmed the aetiology of the syndrome to be environmental. The side to which the head was turned and that of the adducted hip contracture showed a high correlation with the side of the maternal spine on which the fetus had been lying. TAC syndrome is an important asymmetrical deformity that should be kept in mind during neonatal examination, and may be aetiologically related to the unilateral dislocation of the hip joint, torticollis, and infantile scoliosis which develop after a vertex presentation. Images PMID:8048823

  16. Neonatal Infectious Diseases: Evaluation of Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Spearman, Paul W.; Stoll, Barbara J.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Neonatal sepsis remains a feared cause of morbidity and mortality in the neonatal period. Maternal, neonatal and environmental factors are associated with risk of infection, and a combination of prevention strategies, judicious neonatal evaluation and early initiation of therapy are required to prevent adverse outcomes. The following chapter reviews recent trends in epidemiology, and provides an update on risk factors, diagnostic methods and management of neonatal sepsis. PMID:23481106

  17. Neonatal infectious diseases: evaluation of neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Gonzalez, Andres; Spearman, Paul W; Stoll, Barbara J

    2013-04-01

    Neonatal sepsis remains a feared cause of morbidity and mortality in the neonatal period. Maternal, neonatal, and environmental factors are associated with risk of infection, and a combination of prevention strategies, judicious neonatal evaluation, and early initiation of therapy are required to prevent adverse outcomes. This article reviews recent trends in epidemiology and provides an update on risk factors, diagnostic methods, and management of neonatal sepsis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Dementia and Hip Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Susan M.; Menzies, Isaura B.; Bukata, Susan V.; Mendelson, Daniel A.; Kates, Stephen L.

    2010-01-01

    Dementia and hip fractures are 2 conditions that are seen primarily in older adults, and both are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. An individual with dementia is up to 3 times more likely than a cognitively intact older adult to sustain a hip fracture. This may occur via several mechanisms, including (1) risk factors that are common to both outcomes; (2) the presence of dementia increasing hip fracture incidence via intermediate risk factors, such as falls, osteoporosis, and vitamin D; and (3) treatment of dementia causing side effects that increase hip fracture risk. We describe a model that applies these 3 mechanisms to explain the relationship between dementia and hip fractures. Comprehensive understanding of these pathways and their relative influence on the outcome of hip fracture will guide the development of effective interventions and potentially improve prevention efforts. PMID:23569663

  19. Sex-specific hip osteoarthritis-associated gait abnormalities: Alterations in dynamic hip abductor function differ in men and women.

    PubMed

    Foucher, Kharma C

    2017-10-01

    Hip osteoarthritis results in abnormal gait mechanics, but it is not known whether abnormalities are the same in men and women. The hypothesis tested was that gait abnormalities are different in men and women with hip osteoarthritis vs. sex-specific asymptomatic groups. 150 subjects with mild through severe radiographic hip osteoarthritis and 159 asymptomatic subjects were identified from an Institutional Review Board-approved motion analysis data repository. Sagittal plane hip range of motion and peak external moments about the hip, in all three planes, averaged from normal speed walking trials, were compared for men and women, with and without hip osteoarthritis using analysis of variance. There were significant sex by group interactions for the external peak hip adduction and external rotation moments (P=0.009-0.045). Although asymptomatic women had peak adduction and external rotation moments that were respectively 12% higher and 23% lower than asymptomatic men (P=0.026-0.037), these variables did not differ between men and women with hip osteoarthritis (P≥0.684). The osteoarthritis vs. asymptomatic group difference in the peak hip adduction moment was 45% larger in women than in men. The osteoarthritis vs. asymptomatic group difference in the peak hip external rotation moment was 55% larger for men than for women (P<0.001). Sex did not influence the association between radiographic severity and gait variables. Normal sex differences in gait were not seen in hip osteoarthritis. Sex-specific adaptations may reflect different aspects of hip abductor function. Men and women with hip osteoarthritis may require different interventions to improve function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Natal and neonatal teeth].

    PubMed

    Baumgart, Manuela; Lussi, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    Natal teeth have been defined as teeth which are present at birth, while neonatal teeth erupt during the first 30 days. Their occurrence is rare, the prevalence ranges from 1:2000 to 1:3000 with a higher frequency in the lip and palate clefts and syndroms. In about 85% natal or neonatal teeth are lower central incisors (60% in pairs), rare are upper teeth, molars and multiple teeth. In almost 90% they are part of the deciduous dentition. A lot of possible causes of early eruption are discussed, but only the relation to hereditary factors seems to be evident. An autosomal dominant trait is often described. The appearance of these teeth is dependent on the degree of maturity, but most of the time it is loose, small, discoloured and hypoplastic. Histologically, enamel hypoplasia with normal prism structure is apparent. No significant disturbances of the dentin structures are observed, only cervically dentin becomes atubular with spaces and enclosed cells. A large vascular pulp and failure of root formation are further investigations. Our microhardness measurements showed values from 24.3-32.4 KHN for enamel and 48.3-62.2 KHN for dentin, while normal deciduous teeth have an enamel hardness of 322.0 +/- 17.5 KHN. The thickness of enamel was never more than 280 microm compared to up to 1200 microm in normal teeth. This shows the retarded development of natal and neonatal teeth, because mineralization has not finished at the time of birth. In accordance with developmental age tooth structure and appearence are normal. In consideration of complications as Riga-Fede-disease, feeding problems, possibility of infection and hypermobility most of the time extraction is the treatment of choice, but in the interest of protecting the child this decision should be made carefully.

  1. Neonatal L-glutamine modulates anxiety-like behavior, cortical spreading depression, and microglial immunoreactivity: analysis in developing rats suckled on normal size- and large size litters.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Denise Sandrelly Cavalcanti; Francisco, Elian da Silva; Lima, Cássia Borges; Guedes, Rubem Carlos Araújo

    2017-02-01

    In mammals, L-glutamine (Gln) can alter the glutamate-Gln cycle and consequently brain excitability. Here, we investigated in developing rats the effect of treatment with different doses of Gln on anxiety-like behavior, cortical spreading depression (CSD), and microglial activation expressed as Iba1-immunoreactivity. Wistar rats were suckled in litters with 9 and 15 pups (groups L 9 and L 15; respectively, normal size- and large size litters). From postnatal days (P) 7-27, the animals received Gln per gavage (250, 500 or 750 mg/kg/day), or vehicle (water), or no treatment (naive). At P28 and P30, we tested the animals, respectively, in the elevated plus maze and open field. At P30-35, we measured CSD parameters (velocity of propagation, amplitude, and duration). Fixative-perfused brains were processed for microglial immunolabeling with anti-IBA-1 antibodies to analyze cortical microglia. Rats treated with Gln presented an anxiolytic behavior and accelerated CSD propagation when compared to the water- and naive control groups. Furthermore, CSD velocity was higher (p < 0.001) in the L 15 compared to the L 9 condition. Gln treatment increased Iba1 immunolabeling both in the parietal cortex and CA1 hippocampus, indicating microglial activation. The Gln effect was dose-dependent for anxiety-like behavior and CSD in both litter sizes, and for microglial activation in the L 15 groups. Besides confirming previous electrophysiological findings (CSD acceleration after Gln), our data demonstrate for the first time a behavioral and microglial activation that is associated with early Gln treatment in developing animals, and that is possibly operated via changes in brain excitability.

  2. Hip fracture after hemiplegia.

    PubMed Central

    Mulley, G.; Espley, A. J.

    1979-01-01

    In a series of 57 hemiplegic patients who subsequently fractured their hips, it was found that hip fracture occurred significantly more often on the hemiplegic side. Hip fracture was equally common in right- and left-sided hemiplegia, and often occurred within one year of the stroke. Two factors seem to be important in the genesis of hip fractures in hemiplegic patients: the tendency of stroke patients to fall to the affected side as a result of impaired locomotor function, and the development of disuse osteoporosis in the hemiplegic limb. PMID:471862

  3. History and physical examination of the hip: the basics.

    PubMed

    Martin, Hal David; Palmer, Ian James

    2013-09-01

    The history and physical examination of the hip is the key component for evaluation of patients presenting with hip pain. As our understanding of the anatomy and biomechanics of the normal hip vs the pathologic hip advances, the physical examination progresses as well. As with the shoulder and knee examinations, there are critical steps that form the basis of the examination of the hip joint. This hip examination contains 21 steps, which compares well with the shoulder 20 step exam and the knee 33 step exam. Consideration should be given for the hip as comprised of 4 layers: the osseous, capsulolabral, musculotendinous, and neurovascular. The hip represents the link between the upper body and lower body, therefore the fifth layer, the kinematic chain, plays an essential role in treatment recommendations. A clinical evaluation of the hip that incorporates this multifactor thought process will lead to an accurate diagnosis in a timely manner. This paper is a description of the 21 core examinations of a standardized clinical evaluation of the hip.

  4. Microinstability of the hip: a previously unrecognized pathology

    PubMed Central

    Bolia, Ioanna; Chahla, Jorge; Locks, Renato; Briggs, Karen; Philippon, Marc J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Hip microinstability is an established diagnosis; however, its occurrence is still debated by many physicians. Diagnosis of hip microinstability is often challenging, due to a lack of specific signs or symptoms, and patients may remain undiagnosed for long periods. This may lead to early manifestation of degenerative joint disease. Consequently, careful patient and family history must be obtained and diagnostic imaging should follow. After a thorough clinical evaluation of the patient with suspected hip microinstability, the physician should focus on how to improve symptoms and functionality in daily and sports activities. Purpose The purpose of this review article was to give a current update regarding this diagnosis and to provide a complete diagnostic approach in order to effectively treat hip microinstability. Methods We reviewed the literature on the diagnosis, the non-operative and operative indications for the treatment of this complex and often misdiagnosed pathology. Conclusion Conservative treatment is considered the best initial approach, though, surgical intervention should be considered if symptoms persist or other hip pathology exists. Successful surgical intervention, such as hip arthroscopy, should focus on restoring the normal anatomy of the hip joint in order to regain its functionality. The role of the hip joint capsule has gained particular research interest during the last years, and its repair or reconstruction during hip arthroscopy is considered necessary in order to avoid iatrogenic hip microinstability. Various capsular closure/plication techniques have been developed towards this direction with encouraging results. Level of evidence V. PMID:28066740

  5. Investigation of association between hip morphology and prevalence of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wei-Nan; Wang, Fu-You; Chen, Cheng; Zhang, Ying; Gong, Xiao-Yuan; Zhou, Kai; Chen, Zhi; Wang, Duan; Zhou, Zong-Ke; Yang, Liu

    2016-03-22

    The cause of hip osteoarthritis (OA) remains unclear, morphologic abnormality of hip was thought to be a contributing factor to hip OA. The hypothesis was that there were subtle anatomical morphology differences of the hip between normal and OA subjects; the objective of this study was to explore these anatomical differences which are predisposing to hip OA based on CT 3D reconstruction. Ninety-three normal subjects (186 hips) and 66 mild-to-moderate hip OA subjects (132 hips) were recruited in this study. Three parameters of the head-neck relationship were assessed: translation, rotation and concavity. Translation was the potential translational movements of femoral head related to the neck's axis. Rotation was described by the physeal scar to evaluate the rotation tendency of femoral head related to the neck at the head-neck junction. Concavity was used to assess the sphericity of the head as it joins the neck. The femoral neck anteversion angle and some parameters of the acetabulum: anteversion, inclination and CE angle were measured too. By comparison, it was found that OA subjects had less femoral head sphericity, head-neck junction concavity, acetabular and femoral neck anteversion angle; but greater acetabular coverage. These characteristics increased the risk of hip OA in OA subjects.

  6. Investigation of association between hip morphology and prevalence of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Wei-Nan; Wang, Fu-You; Chen, Cheng; Zhang, Ying; Gong, Xiao-Yuan; Zhou, Kai; Chen, Zhi; Wang, Duan; Zhou, Zong-Ke; Yang, Liu

    2016-01-01

    The cause of hip osteoarthritis (OA) remains unclear, morphologic abnormality of hip was thought to be a contributing factor to hip OA. The hypothesis was that there were subtle anatomical morphology differences of the hip between normal and OA subjects; the objective of this study was to explore these anatomical differences which are predisposing to hip OA based on CT 3D reconstruction. Ninety-three normal subjects (186 hips) and 66 mild-to-moderate hip OA subjects (132 hips) were recruited in this study. Three parameters of the head-neck relationship were assessed: translation, rotation and concavity. Translation was the potential translational movements of femoral head related to the neck’s axis. Rotation was described by the physeal scar to evaluate the rotation tendency of femoral head related to the neck at the head-neck junction. Concavity was used to assess the sphericity of the head as it joins the neck. The femoral neck anteversion angle and some parameters of the acetabulum: anteversion, inclination and CE angle were measured too. By comparison, it was found that OA subjects had less femoral head sphericity, head-neck junction concavity, acetabular and femoral neck anteversion angle; but greater acetabular coverage. These characteristics increased the risk of hip OA in OA subjects. PMID:27002423

  7. Neonatal hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Amy G; Whitington, Peter F

    2013-12-01

    Neonatal hemochromatosis is a clinical condition in which severe liver disease in the newborn is accompanied by extrahepatic siderosis. Gestational alloimmune liver disease (GALD) has been established as the cause of fetal liver injury resulting in nearly all cases of NH. In GALD, a women is exposed to a fetal antigen that she does not recognize as "self" and subsequently begins to produce IgG antibodies that are directed against fetal hepatocytes. These antibodies bind to fetal liver antigen and activate the terminal complement cascade resulting in hepatocyte injury and death. GALD can cause congenital cirrhosis or acute liver failure with and without iron overload and siderosis. Practitioners should consider GALD in cases of fetal demise, stillbirth, and neonatal acute liver failure. Identification of infants with GALD is important as treatment is available and effective for subsequent pregnancies.

  8. [Neonatal intussusception].

    PubMed

    Cuervo, J L

    2015-01-13

    Intussusception in infants and young children is a relatively common entity with a well defined clinical picture and a favorable outcome in most cases.The neonatal intussusceptions is extremely rare and does not have a well-defined clinical picture since its clinical manifestations vary according to the gestational time it occurs, the response of the injured intestine and the gestational age of the child concerned. Two new cases of neonatal intussusceptions are presented and a review of the world literature is performed. Given the stage of intussusceptions (pre- or postnatal) occurs and gestational age of the affected infant (preterm or term), there are three entities with clinical characteristics, topography and evolution rather different: prenatal or intrauterine intussusception, postnatal intussusception in the preterm and postnatal intussusception in the term infant.

  9. Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a problem with the way a baby's hip joint forms before, during, or after birth — causing an unstable hip. In severe cases, the hip joint can dislocate or cause trouble walking. Mild cases ...

  10. Transient Synovitis of the Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... inflammation and swelling of the tissues around the hip joint. Usually only one hip is affected. This condition ... to reduce the swelling and inflammation around the hip joint.Your child's doctor will probably ask you to ...

  11. Imaging approach to persistent neonatal jaundice

    SciTech Connect

    Kirks, D.; Coleman, R.E.; Filston, H.C.; Rosenberg, E.R.; Merten, D.F.

    1984-03-01

    Fifteen patients with persistent neonatal jaundice were evaluated by sonography and radionuclide scintigraphy. The sonographic features of both neonatal hepatitis and biliary atresia are nonspecific. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy after phenobarbital pretreatment in patients with neonatal hepatitis demonstrates normal hepatic extraction and delayed tracer excretion into the gastrointestinal tract. If there is neonatal hepatitis with severe hepatocellular damage, the hepatic extraction of tracer activity is decreased and excretion may be delayed or absent. Patients under 3 months of age with biliary atresia have normal hepatic extraction of tracer with no excretion into the gastrointestinal tract. Sonography in patients with a choledochal cyst shows a cystic mass in the porta hepatis with associated bile-duct dilatation. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy confirms that the choledochal cyst communicates with the biliary system. Initial sonography demonstrates hepatobiliary anatomy; subsequent phenobarbital-enhanced radionuclide scintigraphy determines hepatobiliary function. An expedient diagnostic approach is recommended for the evaluation of persistent neonatal jaundice.

  12. Long-term follow-up of open reduction surgery for developmental dislocation of the hip.

    PubMed

    Holman, Joel; Carroll, Kristen L; Murray, Kathleen A; Macleod, Lynne M; Roach, James W

    2012-03-01

    We posed 2 questions: what is the long-term result of open reduction surgery in developmental dysplasia of the hip, and is there an age at surgery above which the outcome was too poor to recommend the operation? Between 1955 and 1995, 148 patients with 179 dislocated hips had open reduction surgery for developmental dysplasia of the hip (141 anterior and 38 Ludloff medial approaches). We attempted to locate all 148 patients for the follow-up evaluation. Fifty-three patients (36%) with 66 hips (37%) were located and participated in the study. These 66 hips represented 34% of the anterior open reductions and 47% of the Ludloff medial reductions. Twenty-two of the 66 hips had Severin IV or worse outcomes and included 7 with total hip arthroplasties and 2 with hip fusions. Age at surgery was significantly lower for Severin I, II, and III, compared with Severin IV and above (P=0.003, 0.001, 0.003) with outcomes deteriorating substantially after age 3. Approximately half of the hips required further surgery for dysplasia. All hips that sustained osseous necrosis had Severin IV or worse outcomes, and hips that redislocated and required revision surgery only achieved Severin I or II ratings 18% of the time. Nine "normal" hips became dysplastic and 3 had pelvic osteotomies as teenagers. Two other normal hips developed osseous necrosis during treatment of the contralateral hip. Results deteriorate as the age at surgery increases. Osseous necrosis and redislocation predict a poor functional and radiographic result. The "normal" hip may develop insidious dysplasia and also may be injured during treatment of the involved hip. Above age 3, some patients may not have sufficient acetabular growth to remodel a surgically reduced hip. Level IV--case series.

  13. Total hip replacement in dancers.

    PubMed

    Buyls, Inge R A E; Rietveld, A B M Boni; Ourila, Tiia; Emerton, Mark E; Bird, H A

    2013-04-01

    A case report of a professional contemporary dancer who successfully returned to the stage after bilateral total hip replacements (THR) for osteoarthritis is presented, together with her own commentary and a retrospective cohort study of total hip replacements in dancers. In the presented cohort, there were no post-operative dislocations or infections, the original pain had been relieved, rehabilitation was objectively normal and all resumed their dance (teaching) activities. Nevertheless, they were disappointed about the prolonged rehabilitation. Due to their high demands as professional dancers, post-operative expectations were too optimistic in view of the usual quick and favourable results of THR in the older and less physically active, general population. In all dancers with unilateral osteoarthritis, the left hip was involved, which may reflect the tendency to use the left leg as standing leg and be suggestive that strenuous physical activity may lead to osteoarthritis. Better rehabilitation guidelines are needed for dancer patients undergoing THR, especially drawing their attention to realistic post-operative expectations.

  14. Isokinetic imbalance of hip muscles in soccer players with osteitis pubis.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Walaa Sayed; Abdelraouf, Osama Ragaa; Elhafez, Salam Mohamed; Abdel-Aziem, Amr Almaz; Nassif, Nagui Sobhi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we compared the isokinetic torques of hip flexors/extensors and abductors/adductors in soccer players suffering from osteitis pubis (OP), with normal soccer players. Twenty soccer male athletes with OP and 20 normal soccer athletes were included in this study. Peak torque/body weight (PT/BW) was recorded from hip flexor/extensor and abductor/adductor muscles during isokinetic concentric contraction modes at angular velocity of 2.1 rad · s(-1), for both groups. The results showed a significant difference between the normal and OP groups for hip flexors (P < 0.05). The normal group had significant, lower PT/BW value than the OP group for their hip flexors (P < 0.05). The hip flexor/extensor PT ratio of OP affected and non-affected limbs was significantly different from that of normal dominant and non-dominant limbs. There were no significant differences between the normal and OP groups for hip extensor, adductor and abductor muscles (P > 0.05). Regarding the hip adductor/abductor PT ratio, there was no significant difference between the normal and OP groups of athletes (P > 0.05). The OP group displayed increase in hip flexor strength that disturbed the hip flexor/extensor torque ratio of OP. Therefore, increasing the hip extensor strength should be part of rehabilitation programmes of patients with OP.

  15. Evaluation of Hip Internal and External Rotation Range of Motion as an Injury Risk Factor for Hip, Abdominal and Groin Injuries in Professional Baseball Players

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Richard; Zhou, Hanbing; Thompson, Matthew; Dawson, Courtney; Nguyen, Joseph; Coleman, Struan

    2015-01-01

    Normal hip range of motion (ROM) is essential in running and transfer of energy from lower to upper extremities during overhead throwing. Dysfunctional hip ROM may alter lower extremity kinematics and predispose athletes to hip and groin injuries. The purpose of this study is characterize hip internal/external ROM (Arc) and its effect on the risk of hip, hamstring, and groin injuries in professional baseball players. Bilateral hip internal and external ROM was measured on all baseball players (N=201) in one professional organization (major and minor league) during spring training. Players were organized according to their respective positions. All injuries were documented prospectively for an entire MLB season (2010 to 2011). Data was analyzed according to position and injuries during the season. Total number of players (N=201) with an average age of 24±3.6 (range=17-37). Both pitchers (N=93) and catchers (N=22) had significantly decreased mean hip internal rotation and overall hip arc of motion compared to the positional players (N=86). Players with hip, groin, and hamstring injury also had decreased hip rotation arc when compared to the normal group. Overall, there is a correlation between decreased hip internal rotation and total arc of motion with hip, hamstring, and groin injuries. PMID:26793294

  16. Total Hip Arthroplasty for Hip Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Monzón, Daniel Godoy; Iserson, Kenneth V.; Jauregui, José; Musso, Carlos; Piccaluga, Francisco; Buttaro, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This study aimed to determine the dislocation and reoperation rate, functional outcomes, and the survival rate of the unique subset of very old but lucid and independent patients with hip fractures following a total hip arthroplasty (THA) and geriatric team-coordinated perioperative care. Method: Between 2000 and 2006, previously independent ambulatory patients ≥80 years old presenting with an intracapsular hip fracture were given THAs under the care of an integrated orthopedic surgery–geriatric service. Their fracture-related complications, ambulation, mental status, and survival were followed for 5 to 11 years postinjury. Results: Five years postinjury, 57 (61.3%) patients of the original study group were living. In all, 3 (3.2%) patients had postoperative hip dislocations (and 2 patients had dislocation twice) and 2 reoperations were needed within the first postoperative month. There were no hip dislocations or reoperations after the first year. Radiographs obtained on 88% of the surviving patients at 5 years postoperatively showed that all remained unchanged from their immediate postoperative images. Nearly half of the patients were still able to ambulate as they did preoperatively and their mixed-model equation was statistically unchanged. Conclusion: This study of patients >80 years old with previously good functional status demonstrates that with appropriate surgical (best prosthesis, good operating technique, and regional anesthesia) and geriatric (pre- and postoperative assessments, close follow-up, medication adjustments, and fall-prevention instruction) care, they have few hip dislocations and reoperations, survive postfracture at least as long as their noninjured contemporaries, and continue to function and ambulate as they did prior to their injury. PMID:24660092

  17. Formed HIP Can Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Kester Diederik

    2015-07-27

    The intent of this report is to document a procedure used at LANL for HIP bonding aluminum cladding to U-10Mo fuel foils using a formed HIP can for the Domestic Reactor Conversion program in the NNSA Office of Material, Management and Minimization, and provide some details that may not have been published elsewhere. The HIP process is based on the procedures that have been used to develop the formed HIP can process, including the baseline process developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The HIP bonding cladding process development is summarized in the listed references. Further iterations with Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) to refine the process to meet production and facility requirements is expected.

  18. Review on squeaking hips

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Yadin David; Munir, Selin; Donohoo, Shane; Walter, William Lindsay

    2015-01-01

    Squeaking is a well-recognized complication for hard-on-hard bearings. The nature of squeaking is not yet completely understood however it is considered a multifactorial phenomenon. Patient, implant, and surgical factors play a role in squeaking. It is believed that mechanisms damaging the fluid film lubrication in which these bearings function optimally have a critical role. Such mechanisms include edge loading, stripe wear, impingement, third body particles and ceramic fracture. The resonance of metallic parts can produce noise in the human audible range hence the implant metallurgic composition and design may play a role. Implant positioning can facilitate impingement and edge loading enhancing the occurrence of squeaking. The recent introduction of large heads (> 36 mm) 4th generation ceramic-on-ceramic bearing may accentuate the conditions facilitating noise formation; however the current literature is insufficient. Clinically, squeaking may manifest in extreme hip positions or during normal gait cycle however it is rarely associated with pain. Evaluations of patients with squeaking include clinical and radiographic assessments. Computer tomography is recommended as it can better reveal ceramic breakage and implant malposition. The treatments for most squeaking patients include reassurance and activity modification. However for some, noise can be a problem, requiring further surgical intervention. In the occurrence of ceramic fracture, implant failure, extreme components malposition, instability and impingement, surgery should be advised. This review will aim to discuss the current literature regarding squeaking. PMID:26601063

  19. [Hip dysplasia in adolescence].

    PubMed

    Barthès, X; Seringe, R

    1995-01-01

    Hip growth continues on till adolescence with the fusion of the different ossification centers. Does this growth exist in hip dysplasia? What is the role of surgery at adolescence? Is an additional varus osteotomy indicated with a pelvic osteotomy? Clinical and radiological criteria of adolescent hip dysplasia were studied in a series of 18 patients (mean age 12 years). The 28 hips were divided into 4 groups depending on the treatment: non operated hips (group 1, N = 8), hips operated on only by pelvic osteotomy (group 2, N = 8), hips operated on by combined pelvic and femoral osteotomies (group 3, N = 9), and hips operated on only by femoral osteotomy (group 4, N = 3). Tonnis's clinical criteria were used. The acetabular index of the weight bearing zone, the center-edge angle of Wiberg, the acetabular angle of Idelberger and Frank, the neck-shaft angle, the head coverage index were measured and compared between the 4 groups (average follow-up was 46 months). We noted continuation of growth of the acetabulum at adolescence with a correction of moderate hip dysplasia when the head was covered (group 1), the acetabular index of the weight-bearing zone decreased from 20.1 degrees to 11.1 degrees; the center-edge angle of Wiberg increased from 15.25 degrees to 23 degrees. The comparison of groups 2 and 3 showed that an additional femoral osteotomy does not change significantly the radiologic results. Does surgery benefit at adolescence from the growth which exists during this period? The clinical results and the evolution of arthrosis following a Chiari pelvic osteotomy are better when the operation is performed early. A pelvic osteotomy is indicated in symptomatic hips, when the congruity is abnormal, with deficient head coverage, as well as moderate dysplasia when the evolution of the acetabular parameters are not satisfactory. A femoral osteotomy in addition to a pelvic osteotomy does not seem justified.

  20. Neonatal somatosensory evoked potentials persist during hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Nevalainen, Päivi; Lauronen, Leena; Metsäranta, Marjo; Lönnqvist, Tuula; Ahtola, Eero; Vanhatalo, Sampsa

    2017-06-01

    Treatment with therapeutic hypothermia has challenged the use of amplitude-integrated electroencephalography in predicting outcomes after perinatal asphyxia. In this study, we assessed the feasibility and gain of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) during hypothermia. This retrospective study comprised neonates from 35 + 6 to 42 + 2 gestational weeks and treated for asphyxia or hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy at Helsinki University Hospital between 14 February 2007 and 23 December 2009. This period was partly before the introduction of routine therapeutic hypothermia, which enabled us to include normothermic neonates who would these days receive hypothermia treatment. We analysed SEPs from 47 asphyxiated neonates and compared the results between 23 normothermic and 24 hypothermic neonates. Our data showed that hypothermia led to SEP latencies lengthening by a few milliseconds, but the essential gain for predicting outcomes by SEPs was preserved during hypothermia. Of the 24 hypothermic neonates, bilaterally absent SEPs were associated with poor outcome in 2/2 neonates, normal SEPs were associated with good outcomes in 13/15 neonates and 5/7 neonates with unilaterally absent or grossly delayed SEPs had a poor outcome. Our findings indicated that SEPs were a reliable tool for evaluating the somatosensory system in asphyxiated neonates in both normothermic and hypothermic conditions. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Prevention of hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Meunier, P J

    1993-11-30

    For a 50-year old Caucasian woman today, the risk of a hip fracture over her remaining life-time is about 17%. Tomorrow the situation will clearly be worse because the continuous increase in life expectancy will cause a three-fold increase in worldwide fracture incidence over the next 60 years. Through diagnostic bone mass measurements at the hip and assessment of biochemical parameters, a great deal has been learned in recent years about reduction of hip fracture risk. Preventive strategies are based on prevention of falls, use of hip protectors, and prevention of bone fragility. The latter includes the optimization of peak bone mass during childhood, postmenopausal estrogen replacement therapy, and also late prevention consisting in reversing senile secondary hyperparathyroidism, which plays an important role in the decrease of skeletal strength. This secondary hyperparathyroidism, which results from both vitamin D insufficiency and low calcium intake, is preventable with vitamin D3 and calcium supplements. They have recently been shown capable of providing effective prevention of hip fractures in elderly women living in nursing homes, with a reduction of about 25% in the number of hip fractures noted in a 3-year controlled study in 3,270 women (intention-to-treat analysis). In conclusion, it is never too early to reduce the risk of osteoporosis and never too late to prevent hip fractures.

  2. THE ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN HIP STRENGTH AND HIP KINEMATICS DURING A SINGLE LEG HOP IN RECREATIONAL ATHLETES POST ACL RECONSTRUCTION COMPARED TO HEALTHY CONTROLS.

    PubMed

    Tate, Jeremiah; Suckut, Tell; Wages, Jensen; Lyles, Heather; Perrin, Benjamin

    2017-06-01

    Only a small amount of evidence exists linking hip abductor weakness to dynamic knee valgus during static and dynamic activities. The associations of hip extensor strength and hip kinematics during the landing of a single leg hop are not known. Purpose: To determine if relationships exist between hip extensor and abductor strength and hip kinematics in both involved and uninvolved limb during the landing phase of a single leg hop in recreational athletes post anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The presence of similar associations was also evaluated in healthy recreational athletes. Controlled Laboratory Study; Cross-sectional. Twenty-four recreational college-aged athletes participated in the study (12 post ACL reconstruction; 12 healthy controls). Sagittal and frontal plane hip kinematic data were collected for five trials during the landing of a single leg hop. Hip extensor and abductor isometric force production was measured using a hand-held dynamometer and normalized to participants' height and weight. Dependent and independent t-tests were used to analyze for any potential differences in hip strength or kinematics within and between groups, respectively. Pearson's r was used to demonstrate potential associations between hip strength and hip kinematics for both limbs in the ACL group and the right limb in the healthy control group. Independent t-tests revealed that participants post ACL reconstruction exhibited less hip extensor strength (0.18 N/Ht*BW vs. 0.25 N/Ht*BW, p=<.01) and landed with greater hip adduction (9.0 º vs. 0.8 º, p=<.01) compared with their healthy counterparts. In the ACL group, Pearson's r demonstrated a moderate and indirect relationship (r=-.62, p=.03) between hip extensor strength and maximum hip abduction/adduction angle in the involved limb. A moderate and direct relationship between hip abductor strength and maximum hip flexion angle was demonstrated in the both the involved (r=.62) and uninvolved limb (r=.65

  3. An anatomic arthroscopic description of the hip capsular ligaments for the hip arthroscopist.

    PubMed

    Telleria, Jessica J M; Lindsey, Derek P; Giori, Nicholas J; Safran, Marc R

    2011-05-01

    To examine and describe the normal anatomic intra-articular locations of the hip capsular ligaments in the central and peripheral compartments of the hip joint. Eight paired fresh-frozen human cadaveric hips (mean age, 73.3 years) were carefully dissected free of soft tissue to expose the hip capsule. Needles were placed through the capsule along the macroscopic borders of the hip capsular ligaments. Arthroscopy was performed on each hip, and the relations of the needles, and thus the ligaments, to the arthroscopic portals and other soft-tissue and osseous landmarks in the hip were recorded by use of a clock-face reference system. The iliofemoral ligament (ILFL) ran from 12:45 to 3 o'clock. The ILFL was pierced by the anterolateral and anterior portals just within its lateral and medial borders, respectively. The pubofemoral ligament was located from the 3:30 to the 5:30 clock position; the lateral border was at the psoas-U perimeter, and the medial border was at the junction of the anteroinferior acetabulum and the cotyloid fossa. The ischiofemoral ligament (ISFL) ran from the 7:45 to the 10:30 clock position. The posterolateral portal pierced the ISFL just inside its superior/lateral border, and the inferior/lateral border was located at the posteroinferior acetabulum. In the peripheral compartment the lateral ILFL and superior/lateral ISFL borders were in proximity to the lateral synovial fold. The medial ILFL and lateral pubofemoral ligament borders were closely approximated to the medial synovial fold. The hip capsular ligaments have distinct and consistent arthroscopic locations within the hip joint and are associated with clearly identifiable landmarks in the central and peripheral compartments. The standard hip arthroscopy portals are closely related to the borders of the hip capsular ligaments. These findings will help orthopaedic surgeons know which structures are being addressed during arthroscopic surgery and may help in the development of future hip

  4. Transient osteoporosis of the hip.

    PubMed

    McWalter, Patricia; Hassan, Ahmed

    2009-01-01

    Transient osteoporosis of the hip is an uncommon cause of hip pain, mostly affecting healthy middle-aged men and also women in the third trimester of pregnancy. We present a case of transient osteoporosis of the hip in a 33-year-old non-pregnant female patient. This case highlights the importance of considering a diagnosis of transient osteoporosis of the hip in patients who present with hip pain.

  5. Hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, M.; Kowalczuk, M.; Simunovic, N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia is controversial in the orthopaedic community, as the outcome literature has been variable and inconclusive. We hypothesise that outcomes of hip arthroscopy may be diminished in the setting of hip dysplasia, but outcomes may be acceptable in milder or borderline cases of hip dysplasia. Methods A systematic search was performed in duplicate for studies investigating the outcome of hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia up to July 2015. Study parameters including sample size, definition of dysplasia, outcomes measures, and re-operation rates were obtained. Furthermore, the levels of evidence of studies were collected and quality assessment was performed. Results The systematic review identified 18 studies investigating hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia, with 889 included patients. Criteria used by the studies to diagnose hip dysplasia and borderline hip dysplasia included centre edge angle in 72% of studies but the range of angles were quite variable. Although 89% of studies reported improved post-operative outcome scores in the setting of hip dysplasia, revision rates were considerable (14.1%), with 9.6% requiring conversion to total hip arthroplasty. Conclusion The available orthopaedic literature suggests that although improved outcomes are seen in hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia, there is a high rate of re-operation and conversion to total hip arthroplasty. Furthermore, the criteria used to define hip dysplasia vary considerably among published studies. Cite this article: M. Yeung, M. Kowalczuk, N. Simunovic, O. R. Ayeni. Hip arthroscopy in the setting of hip dysplasia: A systematic review. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:225–231. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.56.2000533. PMID:27313136

  6. [The "hip value" as a criterium for the operative treatment of CDH in juveniles (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Brückl, R; Tönnis, D

    1981-10-01

    Planimetric measuring was performed at the X-rays of the pelvis of 2027 mainly juvenile patients in order to determine the socalled "hip value". We were able to define a clear statistical difference between normal and pathological values. It was possible to use the hip value as a parameter for the displasia of the hip and with additional clinical data to give a prognosis about the development of pathological hips. In addition to this guide lines for corrective operative procedures could be established. Extreme displastic joints with a hip value of more than 30 need immediate operative treatment, severe displasia with a hip value above 20 should be treated operatively as soon as possible before the end of the growth period. In milder cases of hip displasia operative treatment can be delayed until the patient starts to feel pain in the affected hip.

  7. [Epidemiology of hip fracture].

    PubMed

    Hagino, Hiroshi

    2006-12-01

    Age- and gender-specific numbers of patients with hip fracture increase with age and peaked at the age 80-84; however, age- and gender-specific incidences increase exponentially with age. According to the recent nation-wide survey, the most common cause of hip fractures was a simple fall, 68.8% sustained fractures in-doors, and the incidences were higher in the winter than the summer period. More than 90% of patients with hip fracture were treated surgically and about 3/4 of patients with femoral neck fractures were treated with hemi-arthroplasty. Hip fractures for Asian people including Japanese are lower than those for Caucasians living in Northern Europe and North America; however, recent reports from the Asian area indicated an increase in the incidence with time.

  8. Minimally invasive hip replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscles around the hip are cut or detached. Description To perform this surgery: A cut will be ... 30 centimeters) long. The surgeon will use special instruments to work through the small cut. Surgery involves ...

  9. Ultrasound: Infant Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... hip area, and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  10. HIP osteoarthritis and work.

    PubMed

    Harris, E Clare; Coggon, David

    2015-06-01

    Epidemiological evidence points strongly to a hazard of hip osteoarthritis from heavy manual work. Harmful exposures may be reduced by the elimination or redesign of processes and the use of mechanical aids. Reducing obesity might help to protect workers whose need to perform heavy lifting cannot be eliminated. Particularly high relative risks have been reported in farmers, and hip osteoarthritis is a prescribed occupational disease in the UK for long-term employees in agriculture. Even where it is not attributable to employment, hip osteoarthritis impacts importantly on the capacity to work. Factors that may influence work participation include the severity of disease, the physical demands of the job, age and the size of the employer. Published research does not provide a strong guide to the timing of return to work following hip arthroplasty for osteoarthritis, and it is unclear whether patients should avoid heavy manual tasks in their future employment.

  11. Ultrasound: Infant Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... hip area, and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  12. Hip joint replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... A socket, which is usually made of strong metal. A liner, which fits inside the socket. It ... are now trying other materials, like ceramic or metal. The liner allows the hip to move smoothly. ...

  13. HIP OSTEOARTHRITIS AND WORK

    PubMed Central

    Harris, E Clare; Coggon, David

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence points strongly to a hazard of hip osteoarthritis from heavy manual work. Harmful exposures may be reduced by elimination or redesign of processes and use of mechanical aids. Reducing obesity might help to protect workers whose need to perform heavy lifting cannot be eliminated. Particularly high relative risks have been reported in farmers, and hip osteoarthritis is a prescribed occupational disease in the UK for long-term employees in agriculture. Even where it is not attributable to employment, hip osteoarthritis impacts importantly on capacity to work. Factors that may influence work participation include the severity of disease, the physical demands of the job, age, and the size of the employer. Published research does not provide a strong guide to the timing of return to work following hip arthroplasty for osteoarthritis, and it is unclear whether patients should avoid heavy manual tasks in their future employment. PMID:26612242

  14. Neonatal resuscitation: Current issues

    PubMed Central

    Chadha, Indu A

    2010-01-01

    The following guidelines are intended for practitioners responsible for resuscitating neonates. They apply primarily to neonates undergoing transition from intrauterine to extrauterine life. The updated guidelines on Neonatal Resuscitation have assimilated the latest evidence in neonatal resuscitation. Important changes with regard to the old guidelines and recommendations for daily practice are provided. Current controversial issues concerning neonatal resuscitation are reviewed and argued in the context of the ILCOR 2005 consensus. PMID:21189881

  15. Neonatal lupus.

    PubMed

    Robles, David T; Jaramillo, Lorena; Hornung, Robin L

    2006-12-10

    An otherwise healthy 5-week-old infant with erythematous plaques predominantly on the face and scalp presented to our dermatology clinic. The mother had been diagnosed with lupus erythematosus 2 years earlier but her disease was quiescent. Neonatal lupus is a rare condition associated with transplacental transfer of IgG anti-SSA/Ro and anti-SSB/La antibodies from the mother to the fetus. Active connective tissue disease in the mother does not have to be present and in fact is often absent. Although the cutaneous, hematologic and hepatic manifestations are transient, the potential for permanent heart block makes it necessary for this to be carefully ruled out. As in this case, the dermatologist may be the one to make the diagnosis and should be aware of the clinical presentation, work-up, and management of this important disease.

  16. HIP ARTHROSCOPY IN ATHLETES

    PubMed Central

    Polesello, Giancarlo Cavalli; Keiske Ono, Nelson; Bellan, Davi Gabriel; Honda, Emerson Kiyoshi; Guimarães, Rodrigo Pereira; Junior, Walter Riccioli; Do Val Sella, Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    To confirm the therapeutic importance of hip arthroplasty in athletes whose pain precludes sportive function of the hip joint, being able to minimize it to the extent of helping on the return of sports practice at satisfactory levels. Methods: 49 athlete patients (51 hips) submitted to hip arthroscopy complaining of pain and inability to practice sports were assessed. Follow-up time ranged from 12 to 74 months (mean: 39.0 months). Preoperatively, pain site, severity according to Facial Expression Scale (FES) and the degree of disability using the modified Harris Hip Score (HHS) were assessed. Different diagnoses were provided, which led to the indication of arthroscopy, such as femoralacetabular impact, acetabular lip injury not secondary to femoral-acetabular impact, etc. Postoperatively, the patients were assessed by using the same methods as used at baseline and by the subjective analysis of return to sports activities. Results: Based on pre-and postoperative HHS and FES, the statistical analysis showed significance between values. We found some improvement in all cases and return to sports activities at a satisfactory level in most of the cases. Conclusion: As a result of our study, we confirm that arthroscopy in athletes with local hip injuries is an effective technique, able to promote the return to sports practice in most of the cases, without pain, and with an effective joint function, provided well indicated. PMID:26998449

  17. Interventions for Hip Pain in the Maturing Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Gomberawalla, M. Mustafa; Kelly, Bryan T.; Bedi, Asheesh

    2014-01-01

    Context: Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) alters hip mechanics, results in hip pain, and may lead to secondary osteoarthritis (OA) in the maturing athlete. Hip impingement can be caused by osseous abnormalities in the proximal femur or acetabulum. These impingement lesions may cause altered loads within the hip joint, which result in repetitive collision damage or sheer forces to the chondral surfaces and acetabular labrum. These anatomic lesions and resultant abnormal mechanics may lead to early osteoarthritic changes. Evidence Acquisition: Relevant articles from the years 1995 to 2013 were identified using MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the bibliographies of reviewed publications. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: Improvements in hip arthroscopy have allowed FAI to be addressed utilizing the arthroscope. Adequately resecting the underlying osseous abnormalities is essential to improving hip symptomatology and preventing further chondral damage. Additionally, preserving the labrum by repairing the damaged tissue and restoring the suction seal may theoretically help normalize hip mechanics and prevent further arthritic changes. The outcomes of joint-preserving treatment options may be varied in the maturing athlete due to the degree of underlying OA. Irreversible damage to the hip joint may have already occurred in patients with moderate to advanced OA. In the presence of preexisting arthritis, these patients may only experience fair or even poor results after hip arthroscopy, with early conversion to hip replacement. For patients with advanced hip arthritis, total hip arthroplasty remains a treatment option to reliably improve symptoms with good to excellent outcomes and return to low-impact activities. Conclusion: Advances in the knowledge base and treatment techniques of intra-articular hip pain have allowed surgeons to address this complex clinical problem with promising outcomes. Traditionally, open surgical dislocations for hip preservation surgery have shown good

  18. [Surgical treatment of hip osteoarthritis: hpdete on hip arthroscopy].

    PubMed

    Ilizaliturri Sánchez, Víctor M; Camacho Galindo, Javier

    2007-10-01

    Arthroscopic surgery of the hip is a routine procedure in an increasing number of institutions around the world. Indications for this procedure increase as more experience is developed. Thanks to hip arthroscopy some intraarticular lesions like labral or ligamentum teres tears and cartilage lesions have been recognized. All of these have the potential to develop hip osteoarthritis. Open techniques for the treatment of femoroacetabular impingement have been transformed to arthroscopic techniques. Femoroacetabular impingement has the potential to cause hip osteoarthritis. The role of hip arthroscopy in the treatment of formally established hip osteoarthritis is limited and has better results in young patients with early degenerative changes.

  19. Sonographic Assessment of Hip Swaddling Techniques in Infants With and Without DDH.

    PubMed

    Harcke, Howard T; Karatas, Ali F; Cummings, Susan; Bowen, James R

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this single-examination pilot study was to confirm the ability to perform hip sonography while swaddled and to ascertain whether the various swaddling techniques influenced hip position and dynamics. Dynamic sonography was used to evaluate 30 infants in both swaddled and unswaddled positions who were being seen in clinic for suspected or documented developmental dysplasia of the hip. A "treatment group" of 16 infants (32 hips) treated in a Pavlik harness and a "nontreatment group" of 14 untreated infants (28 hips) were studied.Criteria for comparing sonographic results between swaddled and unswaddled hip positions included femoral head position, instability, and range-of-motion restriction. Tight swaddling with a blanket was applied in 11 "nontreatment group" cases (20 hips; in 2 cases, only 1 hip studied) and produced limited flexion and abduction. One unstable left hip dislocated when tightly swaddled. Safe swaddling technique in 12 cases (24 hips) showed no limitation of flexion and abduction of the legs and no change in stability by sonography. Commercial swaddling products appeared to mildly restrict leg motion in 14 hips, but there was no change in hip position in the "nontreatment group." However, the commercial swaddling products changed the hip position in 3 Pavlik harness cases. Swaddling techniques that allow a free range of leg motion may not affect hip stability in normal infants or those being treated with Pavlik harness. Swaddling with restricted leg motion increases potential for hip instability. Tight swaddling dislocated 1 unstable hip, and commercial swaddling products judged to apply only mild restriction of leg motion negatively impacted 3 cases being treated for developmental dysplasia of the hip with Pavlik harness. On the basis of this pilot study, we advise caution when swaddling infants, especially with techniques that restrict leg motion. Further study of the long-term effects of swaddling is warranted. Level II.

  20. The Epidemiology and Demographics of Hip Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Loder, Randall T.; Skopelja, Elaine N.

    2011-01-01

    The etiology of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is unknown. There are many insights, however, from epidemiologic/demographic information. A systematic medical literature review regarding DDH was performed. There is a predominance of left-sided (64.0%) and unilateral disease (63.4%). The incidence per 1000 live births ranges from 0.06 in Africans in Africa to 76.1 in Native Americans. There is significant variability in incidence within each racial group by geographic location. The incidence of clinical neonatal hip instability at birth ranges from 0.4 in Africans to 61.7 in Polish Caucasians. Predictors of DDH are breech presentation, positive family history, and gender (female). Children born premature, with low birth weights, or to multifetal pregnancies are somewhat protected from DDH. Certain HLA A, B, and D types demonstrate an increase in DDH. Chromosome 17q21 is strongly associated with DDH. Ligamentous laxity and abnormalities in collagen metabolism, estrogen metabolism, and pregnancy-associated pelvic instability are well-described associations with DDH. Many studies demonstrate an increase of DDH in the winter, both in the northern and southern hemispheres. Swaddling is strongly associated with DDH. Amniocentesis, premature labor, and massive radiation exposure may increase the risk of DDH. Associated conditions are congenital muscular torticollis and congenital foot deformities. The opposite hip is frequently abnormal when using rigorous radiographic assessments. The role of acetabular dysplasia and adult hip osteoarthritis is complex. Archeological studies demonstrate that the epidemiology of DDH may be changing. PMID:24977057

  1. Management of hip disorders in patients with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Flynn, John M; Miller, Freeman

    2002-01-01

    Hip disorders are common in patients with cerebral palsy and cover a wide clinical spectrum, from the hip at risk to subluxation, dislocation, and dislocation with degeneration and pain. Although the hip is normal at birth, a combination of muscle imbalance and bony deformity leads to progressive dysplasia. The spasticity or contracture usually involves the adductor and iliopsoas muscles; thus, the majority of hips subluxate in a posterosuperior direction. Many patients with untreated dislocations develop pain by early adulthood. Because physical examination alone is unreliable, an anteroposterior radiograph of the pelvis is required for diagnosis. Soft-tissue lengthening is recommended for children as soon as discernable hip subluxation (hip abduction <30 degrees, migration index >25%) is recognized. One-stage comprehensive hip reconstruction is effective treatment for children 4 years of age or older who have a migration index >60% but who have not yet developed advanced degenerative changes of the femoral head. Salvage options for the skeletally mature patient with a neglected hip are limited.

  2. Neurophysiological aspects of neonatal seizures.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kazuyoshi

    2014-05-01

    Recently, amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG) has been increasingly used and proved useful in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) for the management of neonatal seizures. It does not replace, but is supplementary to standard EEG. This article reviews some of findings obtained with standard EEGs, and tries to interpret them with recent findings in the field of basic science. Seizures mainly occur in active-REM sleep in neonates. This is in sharp contrast to those in older children and adults, in whom epileptic seizures occur mainly in NREM sleep. This may be explained by neurotransmitter effects on sleep mechanisms of the neonatal brain that are different from those of older individuals. When all clinical seizures have no electrical correlates, they are non-epileptic, but when the correlation between clinical seizures and frequent electrical discharges are inconsistent, they should rather be considered epileptic, reflecting progression of status epilepticus causing electro-clinical dissociation. Electro-clinical dissociation is not a characteristic of neonatal seizures per se, but a feature of prolonged status epilepticus in adults as well as children. It occurs when prolonged status epilepticus itself causes a progressively severe encephalopathy, or when status occurs in the presence of a severe underlying encephalopathy. In neonates without pre-existing brain damage, frequent seizures per se may cause mild depression characterized by the loss of high voltage slow patterns, an important constituent of slow wave sleep reflecting cortico-cortical connectivity. Mild depression only in the acute stage is not associated with neurological sequelae, but previously damaged brain may be more vulnerable than normal brain.

  3. [Diagnostic and prognostic values of standard and dynamic ultrasound in early detection and treatment of developmental hip deformity].

    PubMed

    Pajić, Milos; Vukasinović, Zoran

    2007-01-01

    A clinical examination of a newborn infant is indispensable, but certainly insufficient for a diagnosis of developmental deformity of the hip (DDH) to be made. The use of the ultrasound in the diagnostics of DDH, beside the visualization and making the respective clinical findings objective, made possible verification (still without a distinction of the tissues) of the two basic categories of the primary condition of a newborn baby hips. The purpose of this study was to find out the optimal methodological procedure for the early detection of DDH in newborn infants and sucklings. During 2002 and 2003, at the Neonatal Department of the Clinic for Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Novi Sad, as well as at the Institute for Orthopaedic Surgery "Banjica" Belgrade, there were 4016 newborn infants examined, i.e. 8032 hips clinically and by ultrasound. The standard Graf's methodological procedure was applied completely, supplemented by the dynamic examination by pushing back and streching femora along, that is by the techniques of Couture and Harcke. In order to categorize the condition of the hip of a newborn infant, the sonographic classification of R. Graaf, Th. Harcke and D. Pajidćwas used. The ultrasound analysis demonstrated a frequency of the sonotype lI in 552 (13.08%) of the newborn infants, the sonotype lI in 2934 (73.00%), the sonotype iII+ in 481 (11.97%) and the pathological cases with sonotypes IlIg+42 (1.04%), lIl 17 (0.42%), IlII 15 (0.37%) and IV5 (0.12%). The total number of unstable critical, discentering and discentered cases of DDH was 79 (1.95%). The incidence of DDH was three times more frequent in girls, mostly bilateral; when unilateral, it was more frequent in the left one.T he results of the early treatment were uniformly excellent, but in two cases there was established osteochondritis of the first degree (Pavlik's harness 1, Von Rosen's splint 1). iIt as been proven that the clinical examination was inevitable, but insufficient for diagnosis of DDH

  4. Epidemiology of hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Kannus, P; Parkkari, J; Sievänen, H; Heinonen, A; Vuori, I; Järvinen, M

    1996-01-01

    There were an estimated 1.66 million hip fractures world-wide in 1990. According to the epidemiologic projections, this worldwide annual number will rise to 6.26 million by the year 2050. This rise will be in great part due to the huge increase in the elderly population of the world. However, the age-specific incidence rates of hip fractures have also increased during the recent decades and in many countries this rise has not leveled off. In the districts where this increase has either showed or leveled off, the change seems to especially concern women's cervical fractures. In men, the increase has continued unabated almost everywhere. Reasons for the age-specific increase are not known: increase in the age-adjusted incidence of falls of the elderly individuals with accompanying deterioration in the age-adjusted bone quality (strength, mineral density) may partially explain the phenomenon. The growth of the elderly population will be more marked in Asia, Latin America, the Middle East, and Africa than in Europe and North America, and it is in the former regions that the greatest increments in hip fracture are projected so that these regions will account for over 70% of the 6.26 million hip fractures in the year 2050. The incidence rates of hip fractures vary considerably from population to population and race to race but increase exponentially with age in every group. Highest incidences have been described in the whites of Northern Europe (Scandinavia) and North America. In Finland, for example, the 1991 incidence of hip fractures was 1.1% for women and 0.7% for men over 70 years of age. Among elderly nursing home residents, the figures can be as high as 6.2% and 4.9%. The lifetime risk of a hip fracture is 16%-18% in white women and 5%-6% in white men. At the age of 80 years, every fifth woman and at the age of 90 years almost every second woman has suffered a hip fracture. Since populations are aging worldwide, the mean age of the hip fracture patients are

  5. Hip Resurfacing: An Alternative to Conventional Hip Replacement?

    MedlinePlus

    ... bone is reshaped and capped with a metal prosthesis. The hip socket is fitted with a metal ... but higher levels may be problematic. The socket prosthesis for a traditional hip replacement is usually lined ...

  6. Computational Modelling and Movement Analysis of Hip Joint with Muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siswanto, W. A.; Yoon, C. C.; Salleh, S. Md.; Ngali, M. Z.; Yusup, Eliza M.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the model of hip joint and the main muscles are modelled by finite elements. The parts included in the model are hip joint, hemi pelvis, gluteus maximus, quadratus femoris and gamellus inferior. The materials that used in these model are isotropic elastic, Mooney Rivlin and Neo-hookean. The hip resultant force of the normal gait and stair climbing are applied on the model of hip joint. The responses of displacement, stress and strain of the muscles are then recorded. FEBio non-linear solver for biomechanics is employed to conduct the simulation of the model of hip joint with muscles. The contact interfaces that used in this model are sliding contact and tied contact. From the analysis results, the gluteus maximus has the maximum displacement, stress and strain in the stair climbing. Quadratus femoris and gamellus inferior has the maximum displacement and strain in the normal gait however the maximum stress in the stair climbing. Besides that, the computational model of hip joint with muscles is produced for research and investigation platform. The model can be used as a visualization platform of hip joint.

  7. [Transient neonatal myasthenia gravis].

    PubMed

    Licht, C; Model, P; Kribs, A; Herkenrath, P; Michalk, D V; Haupt, W F; Göhring, U J; Roth, B

    2002-08-01

    Ten to twenty percent of the offspring of mothers suffering from myasthenia gravis (MG) also develop transient neonatal MG, since maternal antibodies are able to cross the placenta. We report the course of two newborns of a mother with MG and a healthy father. The first pregnancy was complicated during the 3rd trimester by a hydramnion. The newborn presented with generalized muscle weakness, respiratory distress, weak sounding, anaemia, and poor sucking. Mechanical ventilation was necessary. Confirmation of the diagnosis was achieved by the result of repetitive muscle stimulation, showing a typical decrement in the EMG, and measurement of serum antiacetylcholin receptor antibodies. For 3 months, the infant was treated with neostigmin (cholinesterase inhibitor). After 26 days of hospitalization, the patient was released and followed up regularly. Myasthenic symptoms completely resolved. Side effects of the treatment were not observed. The course of the second pregnancy was normal. This second newborn was healthy. Our case report is remarkable for the very different presentation of two children of the same mother with MG during pregnancy and after delivery, with one child developing severe transient neonatal MG, initially requiring intensive care unit (ICU) treatment followed by quick recovery, and one child being healthy. We also present a score for monitoring the clinical course and adjusting anticholinesterase therapy accordingly.

  8. Complications in Hip Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Naoki; Khanduja, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Recent developments in hip arthroscopic techniques and technology have made it possible in many cases to avoid open surgical dislocation for treating a variety of pathology in the hip. Although early reports suggest favourable results’ using hip arthroscopy and it has been shown to be a relatively safe procedure, complications do exist and can sometimes lead to significant morbidity. Methods This is a review article. The aim of this manuscript is to present the most frequent and/or serious complications that could occur at or following hip arthroscopy and some guidelines to avoid these complications. Conclusion Most complications of hip arthroscopy are minor or transient but serious complications can occur as well. A lot of complication e.g. acetabular labral puncture go unreported. Appropriate education and training, precise and meticulous surgical technique with correct instrumentation, the right indication in the right patient and adherence to advice from mentors and experienced colleagues are all essential factors for a successful outcome. Level of evidence: V. PMID:28066747

  9. Neonatal euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Kon, Alexander A

    2009-12-01

    Despite advances in the care of infants, there remain many newborns whose medical conditions are incompatible with sustained life. At times, healthcare providers and parents may agree that prolonging life is not an appropriate goal of care, and they may redirect treatment to alleviate suffering. While pediatric palliative treatment protocols are gaining greater acceptance, there remain some children whose suffering is unrelenting despite maximal efforts. Due to the realization that some infants suffer unbearably (ie, the burdens of suffering outweigh the benefits of life), the Dutch have developed a protocol for euthanizing these newborns. In this review, I examine the ethical aspects of 6 forms of end of life care, explain the ethical arguments in support of euthanasia, review the history and verbiage of the United States regulations governing limiting and withdrawing life-prolonging interventions in infants, describe the 3 categories of neonates for whom the Dutch provide euthanasia, review the published analyses of the Dutch protocol, and finally present some practical considerations should some form of euthanasia ever be deemed appropriate.

  10. [Neonatal resuscitation].

    PubMed

    Burón Martínez, E; Aguayo Maldonado, J

    2006-11-01

    At birth approximately 10 % of term or near-term neonates require initial stabilization maneuvers to establish a cry or regular breathing, maintain a heart rate greater than 100 beats per minute (bpm), and good color and muscular tone. About 1 % requires ventilation and very few infants receive chest compressions or medication. However, birth asphyxia is a worldwide problem and can lead to death or serious sequelae. Recently, the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) and the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) published new guidelines on resuscitation at birth. These guidelines review specific questions such as the use of air or 100 % oxygen in the delivery room, dose and routes of adrenaline delivery, the peripartum management of meconium-stained amniotic fluid, and temperature control. Assisted ventilation in preterm infants is briefly described. New devices to improve the care of newborn infants, such as the laryngeal mask airway or CO2 detectors to confirm tracheal tube placement, are also discussed. Significant changes have occurred in some practices and are included in this document.

  11. [Increased incidence of developmental hip dysplasia in hypertrophic newborn infants].

    PubMed

    Peschgens, T; Skopnik, H; Casser, H R; Rauschning-Sikora, K; Heimann, G

    1993-01-01

    "Lack of space" in utero is considered to be a major factor in the aetiology of the congenital dislocation of the hip. This study tries to answer the question whether hypertrophy of a newborn has to be regarded as a risk factor on the basis of the principle mentioned above. The results of postnatal clinical and sonographical examination performed on 98 large-for-gestational-age (LGA-) newborn were compared to those performed on 310 newborn children during a non selective screening program. Among the LGA-newborn pathological hip joints were found more often mainly female LGA-newborn infants were affected. It seemed that the birth weight did not correlate to the extent of the retardation of the hip joint development. It was again confirmed that the restriction to only clinical diagnostic procedures in the neonatal period is not effective in the early diagnosis of the malformation. Hypertrophy of a newborn has to be considered as a risk factor behind the development of congenital dislocation of the hip. It is recommended to examine all LGA-newborn infants post partum by clinical and most importantly also by sonographical means to recognize a retardation of hip joint development.

  12. Three-dimensional morphology and bony range of movement in hip joints in patients with hip dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, I; Takao, M; Sakai, T; Miki, H; Nishii, T; Sugano, N

    2014-05-01

    To confirm whether developmental dysplasia of the hip has a risk of hip impingement, we analysed maximum ranges of movement to the point of bony impingement, and impingement location using three-dimensional (3D) surface models of the pelvis and femur in combination with 3D morphology of the hip joint using computer-assisted methods. Results of computed tomography were examined for 52 hip joints with DDH and 73 normal healthy hip joints. DDH shows larger maximum extension (p = 0.001) and internal rotation at 90° flexion (p < 0.001). Similar maximum flexion (p = 0.835) and external rotation (p = 0.713) were observed between groups, while high rates of extra-articular impingement were noticed in these directions in DDH (p < 0.001). Smaller cranial acetabular anteversion (p = 0.048), centre-edge angles (p < 0.001), a circumferentially shallower acetabulum, larger femoral neck anteversion (p < 0.001), and larger alpha angle were identified in DDH. Risk of anterior impingement in retroverted DDH hips is similar to that in retroverted normal hips in excessive adduction but minimal in less adduction. These findings might be borne in mind when considering the possibility of extra-articular posterior impingement in DDH being a source of pain, particularly for patients with a highly anteverted femoral neck.

  13. Hip impingement: beyond femoroacetabular

    PubMed Central

    Bardakos, Nikolaos V.

    2015-01-01

    In the last 20 years, femoroacetabular impingement has been at the forefront of clinical practice as a cause of hip pain in young adults. As arthroscopic techniques for the hip continue to evolve, the possible presence of a new group of conditions creating mechanical conflict in and around the hip joint (ischiofemoral, subspine and iliopsoas impingement) has recently been elucidated whilst interest in already known ‘impingement’ syndromes (pelvic-trochanteric and pectineofoveal impingement) is now revived. This article attempts to increase awareness of these relatively uncommon clinical entities by describing their pathomorphology, contact mechanics, treatment and published results available to present. It is hoped that such knowledge will diversify therapeutic options for the clinician, thereby improving outcomes in a small but not negligible portion of patients with previously unexplained persistent symptoms. PMID:27011843

  14. Hip fractures in children.

    PubMed

    Boardman, Matthew J; Herman, Martin J; Buck, Brian; Pizzutillo, Peter D

    2009-03-01

    Hip fractures account for <1% of all pediatric fractures. Most are caused by high-energy mechanisms, but pathologic hip fractures also occur, usually from low-energy trauma. Complications occur at a high rate because the vascular and osseous anatomy of the child's proximal femur is vulnerable to injury. Surgical options vary based on the child's age, Delbet classification type, and degree of displacement. Anatomic reduction and surgical stabilization are indicated for most displaced hip fractures. Other options include smooth-wire or screw fixation, often supplemented by spica cast immobilization in younger children, or compression screw and side plate fixation. Achievement of fracture stability is more important than preservation of the proximal femoral physis. Capsular decompression after reduction and fixation may diminish the risk of osteonecrosis. Osteonecrosis, coxa vara, premature physeal closure of the proximal femur, and nonunion are complications that account for poor outcomes.

  15. [A neonatal case of congenital myotonic dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Ghizzi, C; Cavalli, C; Benedetti, M; Bolognani, M; Biban, P

    2000-01-01

    Congenital myotonic dystrophy is a rare autosomal disease, caused by an increased number of cytosine-thymine-guanine (CTG) trinucleotide on chromosome 19q. In the neonatal period the most peculiar clinical features are arthrogryposis, hypotonia, facial diplegia, respiratory and feeding difficulties. Clinical and electrical myotonic discharges are difficult to elicit in the newborn. We report a case of congenital myotonic dystrophy in a female newly born presenting with hypotonia, diaphragmatic paralysis, facial diplegia, and contractures of hips, knees and ankles. The diagnosis was confirmed by genetical study on lymphocyte DNA.

  16. Hip joint replacement - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... hip socket. The socket is usually made of metal. A liner that fits inside the socket. It ... usually plastic, but some surgeons use ceramic and metal. The liner allows the hip to move smoothly. ...

  17. X-Ray Exam: Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... amount of radiation to make images of the hip joints (where the legs attach to the pelvis). During ... beam of radiation through the pelvic bones and hip joints, and an image is recorded on a computer ...

  18. Unilateral neonatal cerebral infarction in full term infants

    PubMed Central

    Estan, J.; Hope, P.

    1997-01-01

    AIMS—To determine the prevalence of unilateral neonatal cerebral infarction in infants born at 32 weeks gestation and above; to describe the clinical course, imaging results, and outcome of neonatal cerebral infarction; and to investigate possible aetiology.
METHODS—Twelve cases of unilateral neonatal cerebral infarction were identified from neonatal unit records for the years 1987-93. Each case was matched with two controls.
RESULTS—All cases of neonatal cerebral infarction occurred in full term infants. The prevalence was around 1 in 4000, and neonatal cerebral infarction was found in 12% of infants presenting with neonatal seizures. Cerebral ultrasound scans failed to demonstrate lesions seen by computed tomography in nine of 12 cases. Cases were more likely than controls to require assisted ventilation for resuscitation at birth (OR 7.0, 95% confidence interval 1.04-53.5), but Apgar scores at 5 minutes were no different. One infant with neonatal cerebral infarction developed a hemiparesis, the other 11 had normal motor development when assessed at 11-60 (median 33) months. None had overt cognitive deficits or persisting seizure disorder.
CONCLUSIONS—Neonatal cerebral infarction is a relatively common cause of neonatal seizures, but the aetiology remains unclear. Parents need to be made aware of possible neurological sequelae, but most cases in this series had a normal outcome.

 Keywords: cerebral infarction; seizures; neurodevelopmental outcome; stroke; hemiplegia. PMID:9135286

  19. Extra-articular hip endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Verhelst, L.; Guevara, V.; De Schepper, J.; Van Melkebeek, J.; Pattyn, C.; Audenaert, E. A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this review is to evaluate the current available literature evidencing on peri-articular hip endoscopy (the third compartment). A comprehensive approach has been set on reports dealing with endoscopic surgery for recalcitrant trochanteric bursitis, snapping hip (or coxa-saltans; external and internal), gluteus medius and minimus tears and endoscopy (or arthroscopy) after total hip arthroplasty. This information can be used to trigger further research, innovation and education in extra-articular hip endoscopy. PMID:23610664

  20. Do hip replacements improve outcomes for hip fracture patients?

    PubMed

    Burns, R B; Moskowitz, M A; Ash, A; Kane, R L; Finch, M; McCarthy, E P

    1999-03-01

    Hip fracture is a common problem among older Americans. Two types of procedures are available for repairing hip fractures: hip replacement and open or closed reduction with or without internal fixation. The assumption has been that hip replacement produces better functional outcomes. Although that is the common wisdom, outcome studies evaluating hip replacement for treatment of hip fracture are few and have not clearly documented its superiority. To compare outcomes of hip fracture patients who receive hip replacement versus another stabilizing procedure (open or closed reduction with or without internal fixation). Prospective cohort study. We studied 332 patients (age, > 65) who were hospitalized for a femoral neck fracture and discharged alive. We examined 2 treatment groups, hip replacement versus another procedure, on 6 outcomes [Activities of Daily Living (ADLs), walking, living situation (institutionalized or not), perceived health (excellent/good vs. fair/poor), rehospitalization, and mortality] at 3 postdischarge times (6 weeks, 6 months and 1 year). Mean age was 80, 80% were female, 96% White, 28% married, and 71% had a hip replacement. The treatment groups were similar at baseline (3 months before admission as reported at discharge) on ADLs, walking, living situation, and perceived health (all P > 0.24). After adjusting for demographics, clinical characteristics, fracture characteristics, and prior ADLs, walking ability, living situation, and perceived health, patients with a hip replacement did not do better at 6 weeks, 6 months, or 1 year post-discharge on any of the 6 outcome measures (all 18 P > 0.10). A global test of all 6 outcomes finds hip replacement patients doing less well at one year (P = 0.02). Despite the commonly held belief that hip replacement is a superior treatment for hip fracture, we found no suggestion of better outcomes for hip replacement on any of 6 key outcomes.

  1. Hip injuries in young athletes.

    PubMed

    Smith, David V; Bernhardt, David T

    2010-01-01

    The hip is an area of the body commonly injured in athletes and one that requires special consideration in the pediatric and adolescent athlete. This article reviews diagnoses specific to the young athlete and discusses more recent advances in imaging of the hip and arthroscopic treatment of the hip in the young athlete.

  2. X-Ray Exam: Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Hip KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Hip A A A What's in this ... español Radiografía: cadera What It Is A hip X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  3. Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2-Year-Old Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip KidsHealth > For Parents > Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip A A A What's in this article? What ... Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Outlook Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is a problem with the way a ...

  4. Hip strength in collegiate female athletes with patellofemoral pain.

    PubMed

    Cichanowski, Heather R; Schmitt, John S; Johnson, Rob J; Niemuth, Paul E

    2007-08-01

    Decreased hip strength has been theorized to contribute to the development of patellofemoral pain. The purpose of this study was to test for strength differences of six hip muscle groups in collegiate female athletes diagnosed with unilateral patellofemoral pain compared with the unaffected leg and noninjured sport-matched controls. At four Division III schools, all collegiate female athletes experiencing unilateral patellofemoral pain were recruited during the 2004-2005 academic school year. The athletes were diagnosed with patellofemoral pain by sports medicine-trained family physicians or orthopedic surgeons. Hip strength of six different muscle groups was tested using a handheld dynamometer. The highest value of two trials was used, and strength values were normalized to body weight. The measurements from the injured leg were compared with the uninvolved leg and also with uninjured control subjects matched for sport. Thirteen athletes were diagnosed with unilateral patellofemoral pain. The injured-side hip abductor (P = 0.003) and external rotator muscle groups (P = 0.049) were significantly weaker than the noninjured sides. There were no significant differences in the other hip muscles tested. In addition, the injured legs were significantly weaker in five of the six hip muscle groups compared with the control group. The results of this study show that hip abductors and external rotators were significantly weaker between the injured and unaffected legs of the injured athletes. In addition, injured collegiate female athletes exhibited global hip weakness compared with age- and sport-matched asymptomatic controls. Screening for hip muscle weakness and adding strengthening exercises to the affected hip muscles may be important factors in managing female athletes with patellofemoral pain.

  5. Idiopathic Neonatal Colonic Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Tuncer, Oğuz; Melek, Mehmet; Kaba, Sultan; Bulan, Keziban; Peker, Erdal

    2014-01-01

    Though the perforation of the colon in neonates is rare, it is associated with more than 50% mortality in high-risk patients. We report a case of idiopathic neonatal perforation of the sigmoid colon in an 8-day-old, healthy, male neonate without any demonstrable cause. PMID:26023477

  6. Neonatal Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Selewski, David T; Charlton, Jennifer R; Jetton, Jennifer G; Guillet, Ronnie; Mhanna, Maroun J; Askenazi, David J; Kent, Alison L

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, there have been significant advancements in our understanding of acute kidney injury (AKI) and its impact on outcomes across medicine. Research based on single-center cohorts suggests that neonatal AKI is very common and associated with poor outcomes. In this state-of-the-art review on neonatal AKI, we highlight the unique aspects of neonatal renal physiology, definition, risk factors, epidemiology, outcomes, evaluation, and management of AKI in neonates. The changes in renal function with gestational and chronologic age are described. We put forth and describe the neonatal modified Kidney Diseases: Improving Global Outcomes AKI criteria and provide the rationale for its use as the standardized definition of neonatal AKI. We discuss risk factors for neonatal AKI and suggest which patient populations may warrant closer surveillance, including neonates <1500 g, infants who experience perinatal asphyxia, near term/ term infants with low Apgar scores, those treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and those requiring cardiac surgery. We provide recommendations for the evaluation and treatment of these patients, including medications and renal replacement therapies. We discuss the need for long-term follow-up of neonates with AKI to identify those children who will go on to develop chronic kidney disease. This review highlights the deficits in our understanding of neonatal AKI that require further investigation. In an effort to begin to address these needs, the Neonatal Kidney Collaborative was formed in 2014 with the goal of better understanding neonatal AKI, beginning to answer critical questions, and improving outcomes in these vulnerable populations.

  7. Traumatic posterior dislocation of hip in children.

    PubMed

    Kutty, S; Thornes, B; Curtin, W A; Gilmore, M F

    2001-02-01

    Traumatic posterior dislocation of the hip joint in children is an uncommon injury. It constitutes a true orthopedic emergency. It makes up over 80% of pediatric hip dislocations. In children, it can occur as a result of minimal trauma, which is attributed to a soft pliable acetabulum and ligamentous laxity. In skeletally mature adolescents, a greater force is required to dislocate the hip joint. Delay in reduction is associated with long-term complications such as avascular necrosis and degenerative arthritis. Avascular necrosis is related to the duration of dislocation. A poorer prognosis is associated with delay in reduction beyond 6 hours, advanced skeletal maturity, or multiple traumas. Prompt reduction minimizes complications. We report two cases of traumatic posterior dislocation of hip in children aged 3 and 14 years. Both were reduced within 6 hours of dislocation, and review at 6 months revealed normal examination and no evidence of any post-traumatic changes. Post-reduction treatment remains without a consensus. This review highlights the clinical presentation, management, and time-sensitive complications of the injury.

  8. The Hyperflexible Hip: Managing Hip Pain in the Dancer and Gymnast.

    PubMed

    Weber, Alexander E; Bedi, Asheesh; Tibor, Lisa M; Zaltz, Ira; Larson, Christopher M

    2015-07-01

    Dance, gymnastics, figure skating, and competitive cheerleading require a high degree of hip range of motion. Athletes who participate in these sports use their hips in a mechanically complex manner. A search of the entire PubMed database (through December 2013) and additional searches of the reference lists of pertinent articles. Systematic review. Level 3. Whether innate or acquired, dancers and gymnasts have some hypermobility that allows their hips to be placed in potentially impinging or unstable positions required for their given activity. Such extremes of motion can result in both intra-articular and extra-articular impingement as well as compensatory osseous and muscular pathology. In addition, dancers and gymnasts are susceptible to impingement-induced instability. Dancers with innate generalized hyperlaxity are at increased risk of injury because of their activities and may require longer recovery times to return to play. Both nonoperative and operative treatments (arthroscopic and open) have an important role in returning flexibility athletes to their preoperative levels of sport and dance. Because of the extreme hip motion required and the compensatory soft tissue laxity in dancers and gymnasts, these athletes may develop instability, impingement, or combinations of both. This frequently occurs in the setting of subtle pathoanatomy or in patients with normal bony anatomy. With appropriate surgical indications and the correct operative technique, the treating surgeon can anticipate high levels of return to play for the gymnast and dancer with hip pain.

  9. Influence of bone mineral density and hip geometry on the different types of hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Li, Yizhong; Lin, Jinkuang; Cai, Siqing; Yan, Lisheng; Pan, Yuancheng; Yao, Xuedong; Zhuang, Huafeng; Wang, Peiwen; Zeng, Yanjun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the influence of bone mineral density and hip geometry on the fragility fracture of femoral neck and trochanteric region. There were 95 menopausal females of age ≥ 50 years with fragility fracture of hip, including 55 cases of femoral neck fracture and 40 cases of trochanteric fracture. Another 63 non-fractured females with normal bone mineral density (BMD) were chosen as control. BMD, hip axis length, neck-shaft angle and structural parameters including cross surface area, cortical thickness and buckling ratio were detected and compared. Compared with control group, the patients with femoral neck fracture or trochanteric fractures had significantly lower BMD of femoral neck, as well as lower cross surface area and cortical thickness and higher buckling ratio in femoral neck and trochanteric region. There were no significant differences of BMD and structural parameters in the femoral neck fracture group and intertrochanteric fracture group. Hip axis length and neck-shaft angle were not significantly different among three groups. The significant changes of BMD and proximal femur geometry were present in the fragility fracture of femoral neck and trochanteric region. The different types of hip fractures cannot be explained by these changes.

  10. COMPLICATIONS IN HIP ARTHROSCOPY

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Marcos Emílio Kuschnaroff; Hoffmann, Rafael Barreiros; de Araújo, Lúcio Cappelli Toledo; Dani, William Sotau; José Berral, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of complications in a series of consecutive cases of hip arthroscopy; to assess the progression of the sample through a learning curve; and to recognize the causes of complications in arthroscopic hip operations. Method: 150 consecutive cases that underwent hip arthroscopy between May 2004 and December 2008 were evaluated. The complications encountered were classified in three ways: organic system affected, severity and groups of 50 consecutive cases. The data were analyzed by means of descriptive statistics and Fisher's exact test. Results: We observed 15 complications in this study (10%): ten were neurological, two were osteoarticular, one was vascular-ischemic and two were cutaneous. In the classification of severity, three were classified as major, 12 as intermediate and none as minor. The incidence of complications over the course of the learning curve did not present any statistically significant difference (p = 0.16). Conclusions: Hip arthroscopy is a surgical procedure that involves low morbidity, but which presents complications in some cases. These complications are frequently neurological and transitory, and mainly occur because of joint traction. The complication rate did not decrease with progression of our sample. PMID:27022521

  11. Treatment of hip instability.

    PubMed

    Robbins, G M; Masri, B A; Garbuz, D S; Greidanus, N; Duncan, C P

    2001-10-01

    Instability after total hip arthroplasty is a major source of patient morbidity, second only to aseptic loosening. Certain patient groups have been identified as having a greater risk of instability, including patients undergoing revision arthroplasty as early or late treatment for proximal femoral fractures.

  12. HIP quench technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, C.; Westerlund, J.; Zimmerman, F.X.

    1996-12-31

    Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) is a viable production process today for densifying metals, ceramics, and composites to achieve fully dense parts. One major drawback for conventional HIPing is the long ten to twelve hour cycle time resulting in low productivity and high processing cost. Drastic furnace improvements have been made in the late 1980`s with the advent of Uniform Rapid Cooling (URC) called HIP Quenching. This innovation allows floor/floor cycles as short as four to five hours with one hour soak depending on the material to be HIPed. A flow device such as a fan is utilized at the base of the furnace for forced gas convection in promoting main features to: (1) accelerate time for heating, soaking and cooling; (2) add combined solution heat treating; and (3) reduce thermal distortion of parts with varying cross-sections. All three points promise to positively effect better economy with improved property and quality to promote the HIP process further. This paper describes the URC technology and illustrates a couple of HIP Quench studies made for a turbine disc and efficient High Speed Steel powder consolidation.

  13. INL HIP Plate Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    B. H. Park; C. R. Clark; J. F. Jue

    2010-02-01

    This document outlines the process used to bond monolithic fuel plates by Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP). This method was developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program. These foils have been used in a number of irradiation experiments in support of the United States Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) program.

  14. Changes in hip flexor passive compliance do not account for improvement in vertical jump performance after hip flexor static stretching.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, C Brent; Cottrell, G Trevor

    2015-06-01

    To date, there is limited research investigating stretching of antagonist muscles and its effects on agonist muscle function. The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of pre-static stretching (pre-SS) of the hip flexor musculature on passive hip extension range of motion (ROM) and vertical jump height. Fifteen subjects reported to the laboratory on 4 separate days (D1, D2, D3, and D4). D1 was for familiarization, while on D2 to D4, subjects randomly completed 1 of 3 intervention conditions; no stretch (CON), hip flexor stretch (HFS), or hip extensor stretch (HES). Subject's pre- and post-intervention hip extension ROM were measured before performing 3 sets of pre- and post-maximal counter-movement vertical jumps. Vertical jump height was normalized to baseline for data analysis. A repeated-measures ANOVA with post hoc paired sample t-tests revealed a significant increase in vertical jump height in the HFS condition (1.74% ± 0.73; p ≤ 0.05) when compared with CON (-1.34% ± 0.96) or HES (-1.74% ± 0.65) conditions. There was also a significant increase in hip extension ROM after the HFS stretching protocol (6.5 ± 2.75%; p ≤ 0.05) when compared with the CON protocol (-1.73 ± 3.26); however, no significant difference when compared with the HES protocol (1.84 ± 2.79). A correlation analysis showed that the relative hip laxity of each subject had no effect on response to either condition nor did the magnitude of hip ROM change predict improvement in vertical jump. These results suggest that performing SS of the hip flexors may enhance vertical jump performance independent of changes in passive compliance of the hip flexor muscular tendon unit.

  15. Early Attempts at Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Pablo F; Morcuende, Jose A

    2005-01-01

    Over the last three centuries, treatment of hip arthritides has evolved from rudimentary surgery to modern total hip arthroplasty (THA), which is considered one of the most successful surgical interventions ever developed. We here review the history of the early hip arthroplasty procedures for hip arthritis that preceded Charley total hip arthroplasty. An evaluation of such past enterprises is relevant, and reminds us of the ephemeral nature of human industriousness, and how medical research and procedures are not isolated developments, but correlate to the social, economical, and cultural framework of their time. PMID:16089067

  16. Hip Arthroscopy: A Brief History.

    PubMed

    Kandil, Abdurrahman; Safran, Marc R

    2016-07-01

    Hip arthroscopy is a fast-growing and evolving field. Like knee and shoulder arthroscopy, hip arthroscopy began as a diagnostic procedure and then progressed to biopsy and resection of abnormalities. Subsequently, it has evolved to repair of various tissues and treatment of underlying causes. As the understanding of the hip joint and its associated pathophysiology grows, indications will continue to expand for this diagnostic and therapeutic modality. This article outlines the historic developments of hip arthroscopy, including advancements in instrumentation and techniques from the days of the first hip arthroscopies to the present day.

  17. Neonatal Venous Thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Haley, Kristina M

    2017-01-01

    Neonates are the pediatric population at highest risk for development of venous thromboembolism (VTE), and the incidence of VTE in the neonatal population is increasing. This is especially true in the critically ill population. Several large studies indicate that the incidence of neonatal VTE is up almost threefold in the last two decades. Central lines, fluid fluctuations, sepsis, liver dysfunction, and inflammation contribute to the risk profile for VTE development in ill neonates. In addition, the neonatal hemostatic system is different from that of older children and adults. Platelet function, pro- and anticoagulant proteins concentrations, and fibrinolytic pathway protein concentrations are developmentally regulated and generate a hemostatic homeostasis that is unique to the neonatal time period. The clinical picture of a critically ill neonate combined with the physiologically distinct neonatal hemostatic system easily fulfills the criteria for Virchow's triad with venous stasis, hypercoagulability, and endothelial injury and puts the neonatal patient at risk for VTE development. The presentation of a VTE in a neonate is similar to that of older children or adults and is dependent upon location of the VTE. Ultrasound is the most common diagnostic tool employed in identifying neonatal VTE, but relatively small vessels of the neonate as well as frequent low pulse pressure can make ultrasound less reliable. The diagnosis of a thrombophilic disorder in the neonatal population is unlikely to change management or outcome, and the role of thrombophilia testing in this population requires further study. Treatment of neonatal VTE is aimed at reducing VTE-associated morbidity and mortality. Recommendations for treating, though, cannot be extrapolated from guidelines for older children or adults. Neonates are at risk for bleeding complications, particularly younger neonates with more fragile intracranial vessels. Developmental alterations in the coagulation proteins as

  18. Neonatal and Perinatal Infections.

    PubMed

    Khan, Amira M; Morris, Shaun K; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2017-08-01

    Lack of success in achieving considerable reductions in neonatal mortality is a contributory factor in failing to achieve Millennium Development Goal 4.2.6 million neonates still die each year, with preterm birth and infections the two leading causes. Maternal infections and environmental and infant factors influence acquisition of viral and bacterial infections in the perinatal and neonatal period. Scaling up evidence-based interventions addressing maternal risk factors and underlying causes could reduce neonatal infections by 84%. The emergence of new infections and increasing antimicrobial resistance present public health challenges that must be addressed to achieve substantial reductions in neonatal mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Prediction of Nine Month Performance from Neonatal and Developmental Criteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, John F., Jr.; And Others

    This study investigated the ability of the Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale (NBAS), in combination with neonatal histories and developmental assessments, to predict mental and motor performance of 9-month-old infants on the Bayley Scales of Infant Development (BSID). Fourteen normal, full-term infants and 10 average-for-gestational-age,…

  20. Prediction of Nine Month Performance from Neonatal and Developmental Criteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, John F., Jr.; And Others

    This study investigated the ability of the Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale (NBAS), in combination with neonatal histories and developmental assessments, to predict mental and motor performance of 9-month-old infants on the Bayley Scales of Infant Development (BSID). Fourteen normal, full-term infants and 10 average-for-gestational-age,…

  1. Transient pseudohypoparathyroidism of the neonate.

    PubMed

    Minagawa, M; Yasuda, T; Kobayashi, Y; Niimi, H

    1995-08-01

    We report three neonates with transient hypoparathyroidism with elevated parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels to clarify further the pathogenesis of late neonatal hypocalcemia and calcium homeostasis. Clinical signs were seizures starting at age of 10 and 11 days. The biochemical features were characterized by transient hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia due to a high transport maximum of the phosphate/glomerular filtration rate, despite high PTH levels. All had normal magnesium and calcidiol levels (at least 5 micrograms/l) for their age, and this precludes hypoparathyroidism due to low magnesium levels and hyperparathyroidism due to overt vitamin D deficiency. To diagnose pseudohypoparathyroidism type I, intravenous human PTH (1-34) infusions were performed; however, they showed brisk responses of plasma and/or urine cyclic AMP in response to the PTH infusion, but the phosphaturic response to the PTH was sluggish compared to the controls. All three showed an increase in serum alkaline phosphatase activity, suggesting PTH stimulation of osteoblasts. They were treated initially with calcium lactate or (1 alpha)-hydroxycalciol/calcitriol. Their hypoparathyroid condition, however, was transient; they maintained normal serum calcium and PTH levels without medication before the age of 6 months. The etiology, possibly intracellular signal transduction distal to cyclic AMP and/or distinct from adenylate cyclase in the kidney, is developmental and the condition was resolved completely within 6 months of age. We have termed this condition "transient pseudohypoparathyroidism of the neonate".

  2. Immune Responses in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Basha, Saleem; Surendran, Naveen; Pichichero, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Neonates have little immunological memory and a developing immune system, which increases their vulnerability to infectious agents. Recent advances in understanding of neonatal immunity indicate that both innate and adaptive responses are dependent on precursor frequency of lymphocytes, antigenic dose and mode of exposure. Studies in neonatal mouse models and human umbilical cord blood cells demonstrate the capability of neonatal immune cells to produce immune responses similar to adults in some aspects but not others. This review focuses mainly on the developmental and functional mechanisms of the human neonatal immune system. In particular, the mechanism of innate and adaptive immunity and the role of neutrophils, antigen presenting cells, differences in subclasses of T lymphocytes (Th1, Th2, Tregs) and B cells are discussed. In addition, we have included the recent developments in neonatal mouse immune system. Understanding neonatal immunity is essential to development of therapeutic vaccines to combat newly emerging infectious agents. PMID:25088080

  3. A clinical comparative study of anatomic parameters before and after total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ziqiang; Zhou, Yonggang; Chai, Wei; Ji, Weiping; Cui, Guopeng; Ma, Miaoqun; Zhu, Yin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To study preoperative and postoperative hip circumference data of various types of congenital dysplasia of the hip treated with total hip replacement, including the femoral offset, femoral neck length, height, and hip abductor arm parameters. [Subjects and Methods] This study included seventy-eight cases of congenital dysplasia of the hip (I–III type). Furthermore, four parameters were measured, including the preoperative and postoperative femoral offset. Statistical data analysis was performed using the SPSS 13.0 software. [Results] The femoral offset was 33.3 ± 8.4 mm (preoperative) and 39.1 ± 7.1 mm (postoperative). The femoral head height was 59.5 ± 8.7 mm (preoperative) and 68.8 ± 11.0 mm (postoperative). The femoral neck length was 50.8 ± 10.8 mm (preoperative) and 61.5 ± 10.4 mm (postoperative). The hip abductor arm was 54.3 ± 9.6 mm (preoperative) 64.7 ± 10.1 mm (postoperative). The preoperative and postoperative parameters showed statistical differences. Furthermore, no significant differences were evidenced when comparing the postoperative hip parameters with the normal data parameters. [Conclusion] Total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia of the hip could lead to the rebuilt of an almost normal physiological anatomy for each hip case (type I–III). PMID:27512242

  4. A clinical comparative study of anatomic parameters before and after total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ziqiang; Zhou, Yonggang; Chai, Wei; Ji, Weiping; Cui, Guopeng; Ma, Miaoqun; Zhu, Yin

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] To study preoperative and postoperative hip circumference data of various types of congenital dysplasia of the hip treated with total hip replacement, including the femoral offset, femoral neck length, height, and hip abductor arm parameters. [Subjects and Methods] This study included seventy-eight cases of congenital dysplasia of the hip (I-III type). Furthermore, four parameters were measured, including the preoperative and postoperative femoral offset. Statistical data analysis was performed using the SPSS 13.0 software. [Results] The femoral offset was 33.3 ± 8.4 mm (preoperative) and 39.1 ± 7.1 mm (postoperative). The femoral head height was 59.5 ± 8.7 mm (preoperative) and 68.8 ± 11.0 mm (postoperative). The femoral neck length was 50.8 ± 10.8 mm (preoperative) and 61.5 ± 10.4 mm (postoperative). The hip abductor arm was 54.3 ± 9.6 mm (preoperative) 64.7 ± 10.1 mm (postoperative). The preoperative and postoperative parameters showed statistical differences. Furthermore, no significant differences were evidenced when comparing the postoperative hip parameters with the normal data parameters. [Conclusion] Total hip replacement on congenital dysplasia of the hip could lead to the rebuilt of an almost normal physiological anatomy for each hip case (type I-III).

  5. Use of percussion as a screening tool in the diagnosis of occult hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Tiru, Mohan; Goh, S H; Low, B Y

    2002-09-01

    Traumatic hip pain is a common clinical problem in the emergency department. There is significant morbidity in discharging a patient with an undiagnosed undisplaced hip fracture. The auscultatory percussion technique is a useful method to risk stratify patients who present with traumatic hip pain and with normal radiographs. We sought to study the sensitivity and specificity of the auscultatory percussion technique in a prospective study.

  6. Relationship between hip and core strength and frontal plane alignment during a single leg squat.

    PubMed

    Stickler, Laurie; Finley, Margaret; Gulgin, Heather

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between frontal plane kinematics of the single leg squat and strength of the trunk and hip in females. Forty healthy females participated in this study. An isometric "make" test using a dynamometer was used to assess peak force normalized to body weight for hip abduction, hip extension, hip external rotation, and a sidelying plank test. Two-dimensional software was used to analyze the frontal plane projection angle (FPPA) and pelvic angle during a single leg squat to 60°. All 4 strength factors were significantly correlated with the FPPA, ranging from r = 0.396 to r = 0.466. During multiple regression analysis, hip abduction strength was the greatest predictor of the variation in FPPA at r(2) = 0.22, p = 0.002. Thus, hip abduction strength accounted for 22% of the variation in the FPPA during the single leg squat. The only strength factor demonstrating a significant correlation with the pelvic angle was hip extension strength (r = 0.550, p < 0.001). Clinicians should consider the role of the hip abductors, hip external rotators, hip extensors and core musculature on the impact on the FPPA during a single squat, with focus on the hip abductors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Chiropractic management of hip pain after conservative hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wisdo, Jeffrey J

    2004-09-01

    To describe a case involving postsurgical hip pain that was successfully treated with a combination of chiropractic manipulation of the lumbar and pelvic region and low-tech rehabilitation 14 months postsurgery. A 45-year-old man had pain and difficulty with walking. He was diagnosed with bilateral avascular necrosis at the femoral heads. He had successful right hip arthroplasty (HA) surgery at the time of the original diagnosis and had 2 previous surgeries to the left hip joint to treat avascular necrosis, with the latter being hip arthroplasty. He had a chief complaint of left hip pain that radiated down the lateral thigh to the knee with a "clicking" of the hip noted at end range abduction and adduction, as well as an altered gait pattern associated with dysfunction of the left hip. He was treated with chiropractic manipulative therapy of the lumbar and sacroiliac joints and a rehabilitation program that consisted of in-office and home exercise programs. The patient experienced a decrease in the pain and an improvement in the flexibility and strength that led to an improved gait pattern and decreased pain. Outcomes were measured through active range of motion comparisons and use of the Harris Hip Scale Evaluation. Treatment of hip pain through chiropractic manipulation and rehabilitation is described. The patient had increases in active ranges of motion and Harris Hip scores. Additional studies should be done to evaluate the effects of chiropractic manipulations on patient outcomes following such surgeries.

  8. Total hip replacement in young adults with hip dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Dysplasia of the hip increases the risk of secondary degenerative change and subsequent total hip replacement. Here we report on age at diagnosis of dysplasia, previous treatment, and quality of life for patients born after 1967 and registered with a total hip replacement due to dysplasia in the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register. We also used the medical records to validate the diagnosis reported by the orthopedic surgeon to the register. Methods Subjects born after January 1, 1967 and registered with a primary total hip replacement in the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register during the period 1987–2007 (n = 713) were included in the study. Data on hip symptoms and quality of life (EQ-5D) were collected through questionnaires. Elaborating information was retrieved from the medical records. Results 540 of 713 patients (76%) (corresponding to 634 hips) returned the questionnaires and consented for additional information to be retrieved from their medical records. Hip dysplasia accounted for 163 of 634 hip replacements (26%), 134 of which were in females (82%). Median age at time of diagnosis was 7.8 (0–39) years: 4.4 years for females and 22 years for males. After reviewing accessible medical records, the diagnosis of hip dysplasia was confirmed in 132 of 150 hips (88%). Interpretation One quarter of hip replacements performed in patients aged 40 or younger were due to an underlying hip dysplasia, which, in most cases, was diagnosed during late childhood. The dysplasia diagnosis reported to the register was correct for 88% of the hips. PMID:21434808

  9. Lower limb length and offset in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Flecher, X; Ollivier, M; Argenson, J N

    2016-02-01

    Restoration of normal hip biomechanics is a key goal of total hip arthroplasty (THA) and favorably affects functional recovery. Furthermore, a major concern for both the surgeon and the patient is preservation or restoration of limb length equality, which must be achieved without compromising the stability of the prosthesis. Here, definitions are given for anatomic and functional limb length discrepancies and for femoral and hip offset, determined taking anteversion into account. Data on the influence of operated-limb length and offset on patient satisfaction, hip function, and prosthesis survival after THA are reviewed. Errors may adversely impact function, quality of life, and prosthetic survival and may also generate conflicts between the surgeon and patient. Surgeons rely on two- or three-dimensional preoperative templating and on intraoperative landmarks to manage offset and length. Accuracy can be improved by using computer-assisted planning or surgery and the more recently introduced EOS imaging system. The prosthetic's armamentarium now includes varus-aligned and lateralized implants, as well as implants with modular or custom-made necks, which allow restoration of the normal hip geometry, most notably in patients with coxa vara or coxa valga. Femoral anteversion must also receive careful attention. The most common errors are limb lengthening and a decrease in hip offset. When symptoms are caused by an error in length and/or offset, revision arthroplasty may deserve consideration.

  10. Fat content of hip muscles: an anteroposterior gradient.

    PubMed

    Daguet, Edouard; Jolivet, Erwan; Bousson, Valérie; Boutron, Carole; Dahmen, Natacha; Bergot, Catherine; Vicaut, Eric; Laredo, Jean-Denis

    2011-10-19

    Despite the importance of the hip muscles in protecting against hip fracture and in the outcome of hip arthroplasty, the variability in their fat content has not been previously studied. Our objectives were to evaluate the variability in the fat content of the hip muscles in a population without myopathy or a need for hip surgery with the use of computed tomography (CT), to study the relationship between hip muscle fat content and physical performance, and to identify medical conditions and lifestyle habits associated with an increase in hip muscle fat content. Ten normal subjects without a relevant medical history and ninety-nine consecutive nonsurgical patients without myopathy (age, twenty-one to ninety-four years) underwent a nonenhanced CT scan of the pelvis. Patients were asked to perform physical tests (six-meter walk, repeated chair stands, and Trendelenburg test), and their level of physical activity and medical history were recorded. Evaluation of the fat content of the hip muscles was based on the analysis of four reproducible and representative CT slices with use of custom software. The fat content varied among the muscles, with an anteroposterior gradient from the hip flexors (mean, 2%) to the hip extensors (mean, 10%). This gradient increased after fifty years of age. Fat content also varied considerably among patients. Higher fat content was associated with poorer performance on physical tests, even after adjustment for the cross-sectional area of the muscle (p < 0.05). Higher fat content was also associated with greater age, higher body-mass index, and lower physical activity (p < 0.001). The observed variability in the fat content of individuals without myopathy or a need for hip surgery should be useful for comparison with future studies of specific populations of patients, such as those with muscle weakness secondary to hip fracture or hip surgery. Simple lifestyle changes such as dietary restriction, increased physical activity, and vitamin D

  11. Hip arthroplasty. Part 1: prosthesis terminology and classification.

    PubMed

    Pluot, E; Davis, E T; Revell, M; Davies, A M; James, S L J

    2009-10-01

    Hip arthroplasty is an extremely common orthopaedic procedure and there is a wide array of implants that are in current use in the UK. The follow-up of patients who have undergone insertion of a hip prosthesis is shifting from a consultant-lead hospital service towards primary care. As this change in patient care continues it becomes increasingly important that an accurate description of the radiographic features is communicated to the primary-care practitioner so appropriate specialist input can be triggered. This review focuses on the terminology and classification of hip prostheses. This acts as a precursor for Part 2 of this series, which describes the normal and abnormal radiographic findings following hip prosthesis insertion.

  12. Neonatal lupus syndromes.

    PubMed

    Buyon, J P; Rupel, A; Clancy, R M

    2004-01-01

    The neonatal lupus syndromes (NLS), while quite rare, carry significant mortality and morbidity in cases of cardiac manifestations. Although anti-SSA/Ro-SSB/La antibodies are detected in > 85% of mothers whose fetuses are identified with congenital heart block (CHB) in a structurally normal heart, when clinicians applied this testing to their pregnant patients, the risk for a woman with the candidate antibodies to have a child with CHB was at or below 1 in 50. While the precise pathogenic mechanism of antibody-mediated injury remains unknown, it is clear that the antibodies alone are insufficient to cause disease and fetal factors are likely contributory. In vivo and in vitro evidence supports a pathologic cascade involving apoptosis of cardiocytes, surface translocation of Ro and La antigens, binding of maternal autoantibodies, secretion of profibrosing factors (e.g., TGFbeta) from the scavenging macrophages and modulation of cardiac fibroblasts to a myofibroflast scarring phenotype. The spectrum of cardiac abnormalities continues to expand, with varying degrees of block identified in utero and reports of late onset cardiomyopathy (some of which display endocardial fibroelastosis). Moreover, there is now clear documentation that incomplete blocks (including those improving in utero with dexamethasone) can progress postnatally, despite the clearance of the maternal antibodies from the neonatal circulation. Better echocardiographic measurements which identify first degree block in utero may be the optimal means of approaching pregnant women at risk. Prophylactic therapies, including treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin, await larger trials. In order to achieve advances at both the bench and bedside, national research registries established in the US and Canada are critical.

  13. Continued Expression of Neonatal Myosin Heavy Chain in Adult Dystrophic Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandman, Everett

    1985-02-01

    The expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms was examined in normal and dystrophic chicken muscle with a monoclonal antibody specific for neonatal myosin. Adult dystrophic muscle continued to contain neonatal myosin long after it disappeared from adult normal muscle. A new technique involving western blotting and peptide mapping demonstrated that the immunoreactive myosin in adult dystrophic muscle was identical to that found in neonatal normal muscle. Immunocytochemistry revealed that all fibers in the dystrophic muscle failed to repress neonatal myosin heavy chain. These studies suggest that muscular dystrophy inhibits the myosin gene switching that normally occurs during muscle maturation.

  14. Is the hip capsule thicker in diseased hips?

    PubMed Central

    Bonura, A. A.; Nairn, R.; Schweitzer, M. E.; Kolanko, N. M.; Beaule, P. E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare the thickness of the hip capsule in patients with surgical hip disease, either with cam-femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) or non-FAI hip pathology, with that of asymptomatic control hips. Methods A total of 56 hips in 55 patients underwent a 3Tesla MRI of the hip. These included 40 patients with 41 hips with arthroscopically proven hip disease (16 with cam-FAI; nine men, seven women; mean age 39 years, 22 to 58) and 25 with non-FAI chondrolabral pathology (four men, 21 women; mean age 40 years, 18 to 63) as well as 15 asymptomatic volunteers, whose hips served as controls (ten men, five women; mean age 62 years, 33 to 77). The maximal capsule thickness was measured anteriorly and superiorly, and compared within and between the three groups with a gender subanalysis using student’s t-test. The correlation between alpha angle and capsule thickness was determined using Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Results Superiorly, the hip capsule was significantly greater in cam- (p = 0.028) and non-FAI (p = 0.048) surgical groups compared with the asymptomatic group. Within groups, the superior capsule thickness was significantly greater than the anterior in cam- (p < 0.001) and non-FAI (p < 0.001) surgical groups, but not in the control group. There was no significant correlation between the alpha angle and capsule thickness. There were no gender differences identified in the thickness of the hip capsule. Conclusion The thickness of the capsule does not differ between cam- and non-FAI diseased hips, and thus may not be specific for a particular aetiology of hip disease. The capsule is, however, thicker in diseased surgical hips compared with asymptomatic control hips. Cite this article: K. S. Rakhra, A. A. Bonura, R. Nairn, M. E. Schweitzer, N. M. Kolanko, P. E. Beaule. Is the hip capsule thicker in diseased hips? Bone Joint Res 2016;5:586–593. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.511.2000495. PMID:27903506

  15. Ankle and hip postural strategies defined by joint torques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runge, C. F.; Shupert, C. L.; Horak, F. B.; Zajac, F. E.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have identified two discrete strategies for the control of posture in the sagittal plane based on EMG activations, body kinematics, and ground reaction forces. The ankle strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a single-segment-inverted pendulum and was elicited on flat support surfaces. In contrast, the hip strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a double-segment inverted pendulum divided at the hip and was elicited on short or compliant support surfaces. However, biomechanical optimization models have suggested that hip strategy should be observed in response to fast translations on a flat surface also, provided the feet are constrained to remain in contact with the floor and the knee is constrained to remain straight. The purpose of this study was to examine the experimental evidence for hip strategy in postural responses to backward translations of a flat support surface and to determine whether analyses of joint torques would provide evidence for two separate postural strategies. Normal subjects standing on a flat support surface were translated backward with a range of velocities from fast (55 cm/s) to slow (5 cm/s). EMG activations and joint kinematics showed pattern changes consistent with previous experimental descriptions of mixed hip and ankle strategy with increasing platform velocity. Joint torque analyses revealed the addition of a hip flexor torque to the ankle plantarflexor torque during fast translations. This finding indicates the addition of hip strategy to ankle strategy to produce a continuum of postural responses. Hip torque without accompanying ankle torque (pure hip strategy) was not observed. Although postural control strategies have previously been defined by how the body moves, we conclude that joint torques, which indicate how body movements are produced, are useful in defining postural control strategies. These results also illustrate how the biomechanics of the body can transform discrete control

  16. Ankle and hip postural strategies defined by joint torques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runge, C. F.; Shupert, C. L.; Horak, F. B.; Zajac, F. E.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have identified two discrete strategies for the control of posture in the sagittal plane based on EMG activations, body kinematics, and ground reaction forces. The ankle strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a single-segment-inverted pendulum and was elicited on flat support surfaces. In contrast, the hip strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a double-segment inverted pendulum divided at the hip and was elicited on short or compliant support surfaces. However, biomechanical optimization models have suggested that hip strategy should be observed in response to fast translations on a flat surface also, provided the feet are constrained to remain in contact with the floor and the knee is constrained to remain straight. The purpose of this study was to examine the experimental evidence for hip strategy in postural responses to backward translations of a flat support surface and to determine whether analyses of joint torques would provide evidence for two separate postural strategies. Normal subjects standing on a flat support surface were translated backward with a range of velocities from fast (55 cm/s) to slow (5 cm/s). EMG activations and joint kinematics showed pattern changes consistent with previous experimental descriptions of mixed hip and ankle strategy with increasing platform velocity. Joint torque analyses revealed the addition of a hip flexor torque to the ankle plantarflexor torque during fast translations. This finding indicates the addition of hip strategy to ankle strategy to produce a continuum of postural responses. Hip torque without accompanying ankle torque (pure hip strategy) was not observed. Although postural control strategies have previously been defined by how the body moves, we conclude that joint torques, which indicate how body movements are produced, are useful in defining postural control strategies. These results also illustrate how the biomechanics of the body can transform discrete control

  17. Grading and quantification of hip osteoarthritis severity by analyzing the spectral energy distribution of radiographic hip joint space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boniatis, I.; Costaridou, L.; Panagiotopoulos, E.; Panayiotakis, G.

    2009-08-01

    An image analysis system is proposed for the assessment of hip osteoarthritis (OA) severity. Sixty four hips (18 normal, 46 osteoarthritic), corresponding to 32 patients of unilateral or bilateral hip OA were studied. Employing custom developed software, 64 Region Of Interest (ROI) images of Hip Joint Spaces (HJSs) were delineated on patients' digitized radiographs. The Fourier spectrum of each HJS-ROI was computed and expressed in polar coordinates. Spectral signatures, quantifying the radial and angular distribution of HJS spectral energy were formed. Signature descriptors were generated and utilized in the design of a two-level hierarchical decision tree, used for the grading of the severity of the disease. Accordingly, at Level 1, implemented by a multiple classifier system, the discrimination between normal and osteoarthritic hips was performed. At Level 2, the hips that had been successfully characterized as osteoarthritic at Level 1, were further characterized as of ``Mild / Moderate'' or ``Severe'' OA, by the Bayes classifier. A signature descriptors based regression model was designed, so as to quantify OA-severity. The system graded OA reliably, given that the accomplished classification accuracies for Level 1 and Level 2 were 98.4% and 100%, respectively. OA-severity values, expressed by HJS-narrowing, correlated highly (r = 0.9, p < 0.001) with values predicted by the model. The system may contribute to OA-patient management.

  18. A morphological descriptors-based pattern recognition system for the characterization of hip osteoarthritis severity from X-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boniatis, I.; Costaridou, L.; Cavouras, D.; Panagiotopoulos, E.; Panayiotakis, G.

    2007-10-01

    A pattern recognition system is proposed for the characterization of hip osteoarthritis (OA) severity. Sixty-four (64) hips, corresponding to 32 unilateral and bilateral OA patients were studied. Employing the Kellgren and Lawrence scale, hips were grouped into three OA severity categories: "Normal", "Mild/Moderate", and "Severe". Utilizing custom-developed software, 64 ROIs, corresponding to patients' radiographic Hip Joint Spaces (HJSs), were determined on digitized radiographs. A Probabilistic Neural Network classifier was designed employing morphological descriptors of the HJS-ROIs. The classifier discriminated successfully between (i) normal and OA hips (92.2% accuracy) and (ii) hips of "Mild/Moderate" OA and of "Severe" OA (91.3% accuracy). The proposed system could contribute in assessing hip OA severity.

  19. Is congenital talipes equinovarus a risk factor for pathological dysplasia of the hip? : a 21-year prospective, longitudinal observational study.

    PubMed

    Paton, R W; Choudry, Q A; Jugdey, R; Hughes, S

    2014-11-01

    There is controversy whether congenital foot abnormalities are true risk factors for pathological dysplasia of the hip. Previous United Kingdom screening guidelines considered congenital talipes equinovarus (CTEV) to be a risk factor for hip dysplasia, but present guidelines do not. We assessed the potential relationship between pathological dysplasia of the hip and fixed idiopathic CTEV. We present a single-centre 21-year prospective longitudinal observational study. All fixed idiopathic CTEV cases were classified (Harrold and Walker Types 1 to 3) and the hips clinically and sonographically assessed. Sonographic Graf Type III, IV and radiological irreducible hip dislocation were considered to be pathological hip dysplasia. Over 21 years there were 139 children with 199 cases of fixed idiopathic CTEV feet. Sonographically, there were 259 normal hips, 18 Graf Type II hips, 1 Graf Type III hip and 0 Graf Type IV hip. There were no cases of radiological or sonographic irreducible hip dislocation. Fixed idiopathic CTEV should not be considered as a significant risk factor for pathological hip dysplasia. This conclusion is in keeping with the current newborn and infant physical examination guidelines in which the only risk factors routinely screened are family history and breech presentation. Our findings suggest CTEV should not be considered a significant risk factor in pathological dysplasia of the hip. ©2014 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  20. Reliability of hip examination tests for femoroacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Ratzlaff, Charles; Simatovic, Jacqueline; Wong, Hubert; Li, Linda; Ezzat, Allison; Langford, Dolores; Esdaile, John M; Kennedy, Carol; Embley, Patrick; Caves, Darryl; Hopkins, Trish; Cibere, Jolanda

    2013-10-01

    To assess the interrater reliability of hip examination tests used to assess femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) among clinicians from different disciplines. Twelve subjects were examined by 9 clinicians using 12 hip tests drawn from a review of the literature and consultation with experts in hip pain and FAI. Examiners assessed both hips of each subject and were blinded to subject history. The order in which subjects were seen, the order of tests, and order of examination of the 2 hips within each subject were all randomized. Interrater reliability (IRR) for the 10 categorical tests was summarized using overall raw agreement (ORA), positive agreement (agreement on abnormal findings), and negative agreement (agreement on normal findings). An ORA of >0.75 was considered to indicate adequate reliability. For the 2 range of motion (ROM) outcomes, IRR was summarized using the median of the absolute difference (MAD) in measurements obtained by any 2 examiners on any patient. MAD reflects the "typical" difference (in degrees) between 2 raters. Adequate reliability (ORA >0.75) was achieved for 6 of the 10 hip examination tests with categorical outcomes. Positive agreement ranged from 0.35 to 0.84, while negative agreement ranged from 0.62 to 0.99. For the ROM outcomes, examiners were, on average, within 5° of each other for flexion and 7° for internal rotation. The results provide evidence that the most common hip examination tests would likely be sufficiently reliable to allow agreement between examiners when discriminating between painful FAI and normal hips in a clinical setting. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  1. Stability of Individual Differences of Neonatal Motor and Crying Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korner, Anneliese F.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    To measure characteristic levels of energy output at the very beginning of life, the activity and crying patterns of 72 normal neonates were monitored for 1-3 days by an electronic activity monitor. (Author/MP)

  2. Successful staged hip replacement in septic hip osteoarthritis in osteopetrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Osteopetrosis is a rare, inherited, bone disorder, characterized by osteosclerosis, obliteration of the medullary cavity and calcified cartilage. The autosomal dominant form is compatible with a normal life span, although fractures often result from minimal trauma, due to the pathologic nature of bone. Osteomyelitis is common in patients with osteopetrosis because of a reduced resistance to infection, attributed to the lack of marrow vascularity and impairment of white cell function. Only one case of osteomyelitis of the proximal third of the femur has been previously reported, treated with several repeated debridements and finally with femoral head resection. Here we present for the first time a case of a staged implant of a cementless total hip prosthesis for the treatment of a septic hip in femoral neck nonunion in osteopetrosis. Case presentation A 36-years-old woman, affected by autosomal dominant osteopetrosis was referred to our department because of a septic hip arthritis associated with femoral neck septic non-union, with draining fistulas. The infection occurred early after a plate osteosynthesis for a closed perthrocanteric fracture of the femur and persisted in spite of osteosynthesis removal, surgical debridement and external fixation. In our hospital the patient underwent accurate debridement, femoral head and greater trochanter resection, preparation of the diaphyseal intramedullary canal and implant of an antibiotic-loaded cement spacer. The spacer was exchanged after one month, due to infection recurrence and four months later, a cementless total hip arthroplasty was implanted, with no clinical and laboratory signs of infection recurrence at two years follow-up. Conclusions In case of hip septic arthritis and proximal femur septic non-union, femoral head resection may not be the only option available and staged total hip arthroplasty can be considered. PMID:22472060

  3. Hip arthroscopy without traction: In vivo anatomy of the peripheral hip joint cavity.

    PubMed

    Dienst, M; Gödde, S; Seil, R; Hammer, D; Kohn, D

    2001-01-01

    To describe the in vivo anatomy of the peripheral compartment of the hip joint using a systematic sequence of examination without traction. Case series. We performed 35 hip arthroscopies without traction from an anterolateral portal in the supine position. Free draping and a good range of movement of the hip joint were used to relax parts of the capsule and increase the intra-articular volume of the area that was inspected. Each procedure was documented on a standard protocol including detailed information on technical features and normal and pathologic intra-articular findings. A comprehensive inspection of the peripheral compartment was obtained from the anterolateral portal. A systematic sequence of examination was developed separating the periphery of the hip joint into 7 areas: anterior neck area, medial neck area, medial head area, anterior head area, lateral head area, lateral neck area, and posterior area. The arthroscopic in vivo anatomy of each area is described. In 3 patients, 1 to 3 loose bodies were removed. In 1 patient with a synovial chondromatosis, 40 chondromas were retrieved. In osteoarthritis, impinging osteophytes were trimmed in 3 cases and partial synovectomy was performed in 10 patients. The following complications were observed: a temporary sensory deficit of the lateral femoral cutaneus nerve in 1 patient, scuffing of the anterior surface of the femoral head in 3 patients, detaching of an osteophyte in 1 patient, and partial tears of the anterior synovial fold in 10 patients. Arthroscopy without traction allows for a complete evaluation of hip anatomy without the loaded articular surfaces, the acetabular fossa, and the ligamentum teres. For a complete overview of both the central and peripheral part of the hip, traction is necessary for the central part.

  4. [Deafness in the neonatal period: basis for screening].

    PubMed

    Bonfils, P; François, M; Aidan, D; Avan, P; Parat, S; Boissinot, C; Narcy, P

    1995-07-01

    Deafness must be recognized in infancy in order to reduce auditory disability to a minimum. To achieve this, it is important to implement screening programmes as soon after birth as possible. In the United States, the Joint Committee on Infant Hearing recommended in 1982 that identification of hearing loss should be screened in the neonatal period. This early detection is now considered critical for optimal rehabilitative outcome. This paper presents the "state of art" neonatal screening principles and procedures. In France, neonatal screening programs for auditory dysfunction are not consistent with these principles. Evoked otoacoustic emissions represent an important advance in screening for hearing loss in normal neonates and babies from neonatal intensive care units. This method records very low intensity sound energy released by the cochlea in response to a brief sound stimulation. These otoacoustic emissions show promise as a rapid, cost-effective means of quickly discharging all babies with normal peripherical auditory systems.

  5. [Arthroscopic therapy of septic hip infections in childhood].

    PubMed

    Fernandez, F F; Langendörfer, M; Wirth, T; Eberhardt, O

    2015-06-01

    The treatment goal is to rapidly make a diagnosis and establish an effective arthroscopic therapy in order to allow the hip joint to develop normally throughout childhood with respect to anatomical and functional development. Coxarthritis suspected of being septic arthritis No experience with arthroscopy, osteomyelitis of the dorsal femoral neck requiring an intervention. Relative contraindication: absence of cannulated systems. Arthroscopic lavage of the hip joint, including revision of the femoral neck and debridement of osteomyelitis of the femoral neck with placement of an antibiotic carrier if necessary. The arthroscopy is performed using the two portal technique, placing the patient supine on a normal operation table (traction table not required). Drain for 2-3 days with mobilization after removal of the drainage. A second look arthroscopy is not normally planned but may become necessary in cases without improvement of the clinical or laboratory test parameters and after follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The two portal hip joint arthroscopy using an irrigation volume of 6-9 l is an efficient minimally invasive method to safely treat septic arthritis of the hip joint with or without concomitant femoral neck osteomyelitis. It is associated with low morbidity and offers all advantages of an arthroscopic procedure. Out of 23 children 19 could be sufficiently treated by a single arthroscopic lavage of the hip joint. In three patients an additional osseous component required a second intervention. Out of 23 children 22 achieved an excellent Harris hip score, with one girl only achieving a moderate outcome. The 22 children had an unrestricted hip function at follow-up and could return fully to previous activity levels.

  6. Does radiographic coxa profunda indicate increased acetabular coverage or depth in hip dysplasia?

    PubMed

    Fujii, Masanori; Nakamura, Tetsuro; Hara, Toshihiko; Nakashima, Yasuharu; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2015-06-01

    Although radiographic coxa profunda has been considered an indicator of acetabular overcoverage, recent studies suggest that radiographic coxa profunda is a nonspecific finding seen even in hip dysplasia. The morphologic features of coxa profunda in hip dysplasia and the frequency with which the two overlap are not well defined. We determined (1) the prevalence of radiographic coxa profunda in patients with hip dysplasia; (2) the morphologic differences of the acetabulum and pelvis between patients with hip dysplasia and control subjects; and (3) the morphologic differences between hip dysplasia with and without coxa profunda. We retrospectively reviewed the pelvic radiographs and CT scans of 70 patients (70 hips) with hip dysplasia. Forty normal hips were used as controls. Normal hips were defined as those with a lateral center-edge angle between 25° and 40°. Coxa profunda was defined as present when the acetabular fossa was observed to touch or was medial to the ilioischial line on an AP pelvic radiograph. CT measurements included acetabular version, acetabular coverage, acetabular depth, and rotational alignment of the innominate bone. The prevalence of coxa profunda was 44% (31 of 70 hips) in dysplastic hips and 73% (29 of 40 hips) in the control hips (odds ratio, 3.32; 95% CI, 1.43-7.68). Dysplastic hips had a more anteverted and globally shallow acetabulum with inwardly rotated innominate bone compared with the control hips (p < 0.001). Dysplastic hips with coxa profunda had a more anteverted acetabulum (p < 0.001) and inwardly rotated innominate bone (p < 0.002) compared with those without coxa profunda, whereas the acetabular coverage and depth did not differ between the two groups, with the numbers available. Radiographic coxa profunda was not a sign of increased acetabular coverage and depth in patients with hip dysplasia, but rather indicates classic acetabular dysplasia, defined by an anteverted acetabulum with anterolateral acetabular

  7. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented... (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace a portion of the hip...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip)...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip)...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip)...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip)...

  12. Clarification on Mechanical Characteristic in State of Stress of Osteoarthritis of the Hip Joint Using Stress Freezing Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maezaki, Nobutaka; Ezumi, Tsutomu; Hachiya, Masashi

    In this research, the Osteoarthritis of Hip Joint was pick up, the 3-dimensional stress freezing method of photoelastic method was applied, and the state of the stress in the normality hip joint and the transformable hip joint was examined. The direction and the singular point of principal stress and stress distribution were experimentally examined. At result, The Osteoarthritis of Hip Joint touches by 2 points, Osteoarthritis of Hip Joint occurrence of the new singular point with flat of the femoral head, They change the direction of the principal stress line in an existing singular point is cause.

  13. Heterotopic ossification after hip arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Amar, Eyal; Sharfman, Zachary T; Rath, Ehud

    2015-12-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) after hip arthroscopy is the abnormal formation of mature lamellar bone within extra skeletal soft tissues. HO may lead to pain, impaired range of motion and possibly revision surgery. There has been a substantial amount of recent research on the pathophysiology, prophylaxis and treatment of HO associated with open and arthroscopic hip surgery. This article reviews the literature on the aforementioned topics with a focus on their application in hip arthroscopy.

  14. Hip disease in the young, active patient: evaluation and nonarthroplasty surgical options.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Rafael J; Trousdale, Robert T; Ganz, Reinhold; Leunig, Michael

    2008-12-01

    As a distinct entity, femoroacetabular impingement has been suggested to be a preosteoarthritic mechanism. The condition occurs when the proximal femur repeatedly comes into contact with the native acetabular rim during normal hip range of motion. Early diagnosis and surgical management are imperative to delay degenerative changes associated with these conditions. Femoroacetabular impingement is most prevalent in young, active patients. Physical examination should include evaluation of gait and foot progression angle, as well as leg length measurement, hip range of motion, and abductor strength. Imaging studies, including plain radiographs and magnetic resonance arthrography, aid in accurate diagnosis. Surgical treatment options include surgical hip dislocation, periacetabular osteotomy, and hip arthroscopy.

  15. Effects of imbalanced muscle loading on hip joint development and maturation.

    PubMed

    Ford, Caleb A; Nowlan, Niamh C; Thomopoulos, Stavros; Killian, Megan L

    2017-05-01

    The mechanical loading environment influences the development and maturation of joints. In this study, the influence of imbalanced muscular loading on joint development was studied using localized chemical denervation of hip stabilizing muscle groups in neonatal mice. It was hypothesized that imbalanced muscle loading, targeting either gluteal muscles or quadriceps muscles, would lead to bilateral hip joint asymmetry, as measured by acetabular coverage, femoral head volume and bone morphometry, and femoral-acetabular shape. The contralateral hip joints as well as age-matched, uninjected mice were used as controls. Altered bone development was analyzed using micro-computed tomography, histology, and image registration techniques at postnatal days (P) 28, 56, and 120. This study found that unilateral muscle unloading led to reduced acetabular coverage of the femoral head, lower total volume, lower bone volume ratio, and lower mineral density, at all three time points. Histologically, the femoral head was smaller in unloaded hips, with thinner triradiate cartilage at P28 and thinner cortical bone at P120 compared to contralateral hips. Morphological shape changes were evident in unloaded hips at P56. Unloaded hips had lower trabecular thickness and increased trabecular spacing of the femoral head compared to contralateral hips. The present study suggests that decreased muscle loading of the hip leads to altered bone and joint shape and growth during postnatal maturation. Statement of Clinical Significance: Adaptations from altered muscle loading during postnatal growth investigated in this study have implications on developmental hip disorders that result from asymmetric loading, such as patients with limb-length inequality or dysplasia. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1128-1136, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Burkholderia cepacia sepsis among neonates.

    PubMed

    Patra, Saikat; Bhat Y, Ramesh; Lewis, Leslie Edward; Purakayastha, Jayashree; Sivaramaraju, V Vamsi; Kalwaje E, Vandana; Mishra, Swathi

    2014-11-01

    Burkholderia cepacia is a rare cause of sepsis in newborns and its transmission involves human contact with heavily contaminated medical devices and disinfectants. The authors aimed to determine epidemiology, clinical features, antibiotic sensitivity pattern, complications and outcome of blood culture proven B. cepacia infections in 12 neonates. All neonates were outborn, 5 preterm and 7 term. B. cepacia was isolated from blood in all and concurrently from CSF in three neonates. Lethargy and respiratory distress (41.7 %) were major presenting features. Five newborns (41.7 %) required mechanical ventilation for 3-7 d. Highest bacterial susceptibility was observed for meropenem (100 %), followed by cefoperazone-sulbactam, piperacillin-tazobactam, sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (all 83 %), ceftazidime (75 %) and ciprofloxacin (42 %). Piperacillin-tazobactam, ciprofloxacin and cotrimoxazole either singly or in combination led to complete recovery of 11 (91.7 %) newborns; one developed hydrocephalus. Eight of nine infants who completed 6 mo follow up were normal. Prompt recognition and appropriate antibiotic therapy for B. cepacia infection results in complete recovery in majority.

  17. A three-dimensional finite element model for biomechanical analysis of the hip.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guang-Xing; Yang, Liu; Li, Kai; He, Rui; Yang, Bin; Zhan, Yan; Wang, Zhi-Jun; Yu, Bing-Nin; Jian, Zhe

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to construct a three-dimensional (3D) finite element model of the hip. The images of the hip were obtained from Chinese visible human dataset. The hip model includes acetabular bone, cartilage, labrum, and bone. The cartilage of femoral head was constructed using the AutoCAD and Solidworks software. The hip model was imported into ABAQUS analysis system. The contact surface of the hip joint was meshed. To verify the model, the single leg peak force was loaded, and contact area of the cartilage and labrum of the hip and pressure distribution in these structures were observed. The constructed 3D hip model reflected the real hip anatomy. Further, this model reflected biomechanical behavior similar to previous studies. In conclusion, this 3D finite element hip model avoids the disadvantages of other construction methods, such as imprecision of cartilage construction and the absence of labrum. Further, it provides basic data critical for accurately modeling normal and abnormal loads, and the effects of abnormal loads on the hip.

  18. Total arthroplasty in displaced dysplastic hips with acetabular reconstruction and femoral shortening - technical note.

    PubMed

    Silva, Paulo; de Oliveira, Leandro Alves; Coelho, Danilo Lopes; do Amaral, Rogério Andrade; Rebello, Percival Rosa; de Moraes, Frederico Barra

    2014-01-01

    To describe a new procedure of total hip replacement in patient with severe developmental dysplasia of the left hip, using technique of acetabular reconstruction with autogenous bone grafts and subtrochanteric shortening femoral osteotomy. Total hip replacement done in January of 2003. The Eftekhar's classification was used and included type D, neglected dislocations. Bone graft incorporated in acetabular shelf and femoral osteotomy. Our contribution is the use of an Allis plate to better fix acetabular grafts, avoiding loosening, and cerclage around bone graft in femoral osteotomy site, which diminish pseudoarthrosis risk. This technique shows efficiency, allowing immediately resolution for this case with pain and range of motion of hip improvement. It also allows the acetabular dysplasia reconstruction, equalization of the limb length (without elevated risk of neurovascular lesion) and repairs the normal hip biomechanics due to the correction of the hip's center of rotation.

  19. Neonatal disorders of germinal matrix.

    PubMed

    Raets, M M A; Dudink, J; Govaert, P

    2015-11-01

    The germinal matrix (GM) is a richly vascularized, transient layer near the ventricles. It produces neurons and glial cells, and is present in the foetal brain between 8 and 36 weeks of gestation. At 25 weeks, it reaches its maximum volume and subsequently withers. The GM is vulnerable to haemorrhage in preterm infants. This selective vulnerability is explained by limited astrocyte end-feet coverage of microvessels, reduced expression of fibronectin and immature tight junctions. Focal lesions in the neonatal period include haemorrhage, germinolysis and stroke. Such lesions in transient layers interrupt normal brain maturation and induce neurodevelopmental sequelae.

  20. Lessons learned from study of congenital hip disease in adults

    PubMed Central

    Hartofilakidis, George; Lampropoulou-Adamidou, Kalliopi

    2016-01-01

    Orthopaedic surgeons specialising in adult hip reconstruction surgery often face the problem of osteoarthritis secondary to congenital hip disease (CHD). To achieve better communication among physicians, better treatment planning and evaluation of the results of various treatment options, an agreed terminology is needed to describe the entire pathology. Furthermore, a generally accepted classification of the deformities is necessary. Herein, the authors propose the use of the term “congenital hip disease” and its classification as dysplasia, low dislocation and high dislocation. Knowledge of the CHD natural history facilitates comprehension of the potential development and progression of the disease, which differs among the aforementioned types. This can lead to better understanding of the anatomical abnormalities found in the different CHD types and thus facilitate preoperative planning and choice of the most appropriate management for adult patients. The basic principles for improved results of total hip replacement in patients with CHD, especially those with low and high dislocation, are: Wide exposure, restoration of the normal centre of rotation and the use of special techniques and implants for the reconstruction of the acetabulum and femur. Application of these principles during total hip replacement in young female patients born with severe deformities of the hip joint has led to radical improvement of their quality of life. PMID:28032030

  1. Total hip arthroplasty in paralytic dislocation from poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Laguna, Rafael; Barrientos, Jesús

    2008-02-01

    This article presents a case of a patient with degenerative hip disease in paralytic dislocation by poliomyelitis. Poliomyelitis is an acute infection disease caused by a group of neurotrophic viruses, which has a special affinity by the anterior horns cells of the spinal cord and for certain motor nuclei of the brain stem. Paralysis is a flaccid type and characteristically paralysis is asymmetrical. It is said that the joints of the affected limb by poliomyelitis are protected from the development of osteoarthritis. Hip dislocation in poliomyelitis is an acquired deformity caused by flaccid paralysis and the resulting muscular imbalance. In young children, when the gluteus maximus and medius muscles are paralyzed and the hip flexors and adductors are of normal strength, eventual luxation of the hip is almost inevitable. Hip osteoarthritis in a limb with poliomyelitis is an unusual entity because these limbs do not support excessive loads. In patients who present with the residual effects of poliomyelitis including degenerative disease and hip dysplastic, surgery is one of the most difficult challenges faced by reconstructive surgeons. In such cases, surgeons should attempt to optimize the component position and choice, surgical approach, and soft tissue tensioning because stability of the prosthesis can be problematic.

  2. Trochanteric osteotomy in total hip replacement for congenital hip disease.

    PubMed

    Hartofilakidis, G; Babis, G C; Georgiades, G; Kourlaba, G

    2011-05-01

    We studied the effect of trochanteric osteotomy in 192 total hip replacements in 140 patients with congenital hip disease. There was bony union in 158 hips (82%), fibrous union in 29 (15%) and nonunion in five (3%). The rate of union had a statistically significant relationship with the position of reattachment of the trochanter, which depended greatly on the pre-operative diagnosis. The pre-operative Trendelenburg gait substantially improved in all three disease types (dysplasia, low and high dislocation) and all four categories of reattachment position. A persistent Trendelenburg gait post-operatively was noticed mostly in patients with defective union (fibrous or nonunion). Acetabular and femoral loosening had a statistically significant relationship with defective union and the position of reattachment of the trochanter. These results suggest that the complications of trochanteric osteotomy in total hip replacement for patients with congenital hip disease are less important than the benefits of this surgical approach.

  3. Computer-aided grading and quantification of hip osteoarthritis severity employing shape descriptors of radiographic hip joint space.

    PubMed

    Boniatis, Ioannis; Cavouras, Dionisis; Costaridou, Lena; Kalatzis, Ioannis; Panagiotopoulos, Elias; Panayiotakis, George

    2007-12-01

    A computer-based system was designed for the grading and quantification of hip osteoarthritis (OA) severity. Employing an active-contours segmentation model, 64 hip joint space (HJS) images (18 normal, 46 osteoarthritic) were obtained from the digitized radiographs of 32 unilateral and bilateral OA-patients. Shape features, generated from the HJS-images, and a hierarchical decision tree structure was used for the grading of OA. A shape features based regression model quantified the OA-severity. The system accomplished high accuracies in characterizing hips as "Normal" (100%), of "mild/moderate"-OA (93.8%) or "severe"-OA (96.7%). OA-severity values, as expressed by HJS-narrowing, correlated highly (r=0.9,p<0.001) with the values predicted by the regression model. The system may contribute to OA-patient management.

  4. Effect of increased pushoff during gait on hip joint forces

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Cara L.; Garibay, Erin J.

    2014-01-01

    Anterior acetabular labral tears and anterior hip pain may result from high anteriorly directed forces from the femur on the acetabulum. While providing more pushoff is known to decrease sagittal plane hip moments, it is unknown if this gait modification also decreases hip joint forces. The purpose of this study was to determine if increasing pushoff decreases hip joint forces. Nine healthy subjects walked on an instrumented force treadmill at 1.25 m/s under two walking conditions. For the natural condition, subjects were instructed to walk as they normally would. For the increased pushoff condition, subjects were instructed to “push more with your foot when you walk”. We collected motion data of markers placed on the subjects’ trunk and lower extremities to capture trunk and leg kinematics and ground reaction force data to determine joint moments. Data were processed in Visual 3D to produce the inverse kinematics and model scaling files. In OpenSim, the generic gait model (Gait2392) was scaled to the subject, and hip joint forces were calculated for the femur on the acetabulum after computing the muscle activations necessary to reproduce the experimental data. The instruction to “push more with your foot when you walk” reduced the maximum hip flexion and extension moment compared to the natural condition. The average reduction in the hip joint forces was 12.5%, 3.2% and 9.6% in the anterior, superior and medial directions respectively and 2.3% for the net resultant force. Increasing pushoff may be an effective gait modification for people with anterior hip pain. PMID:25468661

  5. [Value of preoperative planning in total hip arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    De Thomasson, E; Mazel, C; Guingand, O; Terracher, R

    2002-05-01

    Preoperative planning enables an assessment of the size of the implants needed before total hip replacement. Eggli and Müller demonstrated the reproduciblity of preoperative planning but did not evaluate its contribution to reducing limb length discrepancy. As femur lateralization and the position of the prosthetic center of rotation affect joint mechanics, it would be useful to assess their contribution to the efficacy of preoperative planning. We reviewed the files of 57 patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty for primary joint degeneration or necrosis limited to one hip. The healthy hip served as a control. The surgical plan was elaborated from the preoperative pelvis x-rays (AP and lateral views) and anatomic measurements on films obtained three months postoperatively. In 49 cases, preoperative planning predicted a restoration of the normal anatomy of the operated hip (center of rotation, femur lateralization, length of the operated limb). This objective was achieved in only 22.5% of the cases. Femur lateralization was the most difficult objective to achieve (59.2%). Equal limb length and good position of the center of rotation was achieved in 70% of the cases. For eight patients (14%) preoperative planning was not satisfactory, the implant offset not being adapted to the patient's anatomy. There are limits to preoperative planning, particularly for restitution of adequate femur lateralization. This difficulty appears to be related to three factors: inadequate adaptation of the implant to hip anatomy (14% of the cases in our experience), stiff rotation in degenerative hips inhibiting proper assessment of the length of the femoral neck, and relative imprecision of operative evaluation of femoral anteversion affecting femur lateralization and the level of the femoral cut. Although imperfect, preoperative planning is, in our opinion, essential before total hip arthroplasty in order to avoid major positioning errors and operative difficulties.

  6. Effect of increased pushoff during gait on hip joint forces.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Cara L; Garibay, Erin J

    2015-01-02

    Anterior acetabular labral tears and anterior hip pain may result from high anteriorly directed forces from the femur on the acetabulum. While providing more pushoff is known to decrease sagittal plane hip moments, it is unknown if this gait modification also decreases hip joint forces. The purpose of this study was to determine if increasing pushoff decreases hip joint forces. Nine healthy subjects walked on an instrumented force treadmill at 1.25 m/s under two walking conditions. For the natural condition, subjects were instructed to walk as they normally would. For the increased pushoff condition, subjects were instructed to "push more with your foot when you walk". We collected motion data of markers placed on the subjects' trunk and lower extremities to capture trunk and leg kinematics and ground reaction force data to determine joint moments. Data were processed in Visual3D to produce the inverse kinematics and model scaling files. In OpenSim, the generic gait model (Gait2392) was scaled to the subject, and hip joint forces were calculated for the femur on the acetabulum after computing the muscle activations necessary to reproduce the experimental data. The instruction to "push more with your foot when you walk" reduced the maximum hip flexion and extension moment compared to the natural condition. The average reduction in the hip joint forces were 12.5%, 3.2% and 9.6% in the anterior, superior and medial directions respectively and 2.3% for the net resultant force. Increasing pushoff may be an effective gait modification for people with anterior hip pain.

  7. Bacillus cereus bacteremia in a preterm neonate.

    PubMed

    Hilliard, Nicholaus J; Schelonka, Robert L; Waites, Ken B

    2003-07-01

    Bacillus cereus is an uncommon but potentially serious bacterial pathogen causing infections of the bloodstream, lungs, and central nervous system of preterm neonates. A case of bacteremia caused by B. cereus in a 19-day-old preterm neonate who was successfully treated with vancomycin, tobramycin, meropenem, and clindamycin is described. Implications for the diagnostic laboratory and clinicians when Bacillus species are detected in normally sterile sites are discussed, and the small numbers of infant infections proven to be due to this organism that have been described previously are reviewed.

  8. Neonatal acute liver failure: a diagnosis challenge.

    PubMed

    Ciocca, Mirta; Álvarez, Fernando

    2017-04-01

    Neonatal acute liver failure is a rare, very severe disease with a high rate of mortality. It is clinically and etiologically different from acute liver failure seen in older children and adults. Coagulopathy with an international normalized ratio ≥ 3 is the critical parameter that defines it. The most common causes are fetal alloimmune hepatitis, previously called neonatal hemochromatosis, viral infections, metabolic disorders, and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. There is a group of treatable diseases that require a very early diagnosis for the prescription of an adequate treatment. Patients should be immediately referred to a specialized facility where pediatric liver transplantation is available to implement such therapeutic alternative, if indicated.

  9. The Etiology of Osteoarthritis of the Hip

    PubMed Central

    Ganz, Reinhold; Leunig-Ganz, Katharina; Harris, William H.

    2008-01-01

    The etiology of osteoarthritis of the hip has long been considered secondary (eg, to congenital or developmental deformities) or primary (presuming some underlying abnormality of articular cartilage). Recent information supports a hypothesis that so-called primary osteoarthritis is also secondary to subtle developmental abnormalities and the mechanism in these cases is femoroacetabular impingement rather than excessive contact stress. The most frequent location for femoroacetabular impingement is the anterosuperior rim area and the most critical motion is internal rotation of the hip in 90° flexion. Two types of femoroacetabular impingement have been identified. Cam-type femoroacetabular impingement, more prevalent in young male patients, is caused by an offset pathomorphology between head and neck and produces an outside-in delamination of the acetabulum. Pincer-type femoroacetabular impingement, more prevalent in middle-aged women, is produced by a more linear impact between a local (retroversion of the acetabulum) or general overcoverage (coxa profunda/protrusio) of the acetabulum. The damage pattern is more restricted to the rim and the process of joint degeneration is slower. Most hips, however, show a mixed femoroacetabular impingement pattern with cam predominance. Surgical attempts to restore normal anatomy to avoid femoroacetabular impingement should be performed in the early stage before major cartilage damage is present. Level of Evidence: Level V, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18196405

  10. Arthroscopic approach and anatomy of the hip

    PubMed Central

    Aprato, Alessandro; Giachino, Matteo; Masse, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Hip arthroscopy has gained popularity among the orthopedic community and a precise assessment of indications, techniques and results is constantly brought on. Methods In this chapter the principal standard entry portals for central and peripheral compartment are discussed. The description starts from the superficial landmarks for portals placement and continues with the deep layers. For each entry point an illustration of the main structures encountered is provided and the principal structures at risk for different portals are accurately examined. Articular anatomical description is carried out from the arthroscope point of view and sub-divided into central and peripheral compartment. The two compartments are systematically analyzed and the accessible articular areas for each portal explained. Moreover, some anatomical variations that can be found in the normal hip are reported. Conclusion The anatomical knowledge of the hip joint along with a precise notion of the structures encountered with the arthroscope is an essential requirement for a secure and successful surgery. Level of evidence: V. PMID:28066735

  11. Taking care of your new hip joint

    MedlinePlus

    ... arthroplasty - precautions; Hip replacement - precautions; Osteoarthritis - hip; Osteoarthritis - knee ... NOT cross your legs. Keep your feet and knees pointed straight ahead, not turned in or out. ...

  12. Management of Neonatal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Benjamin, Daniel K; Smith, P Brian

    2009-01-01

    Invasive candidiasis (IC) is common and often fatal in extremely premature neonates. In the last decade, the therapeutic armamentarium for IC has markedly expanded; however, the pharmacokinetics, safety and efficacy of most antifungal agents in premature neonates are unknown. We will review the major systemic antifungal agents in clinical use. PMID:9849983

  13. Developmental dysplasia of the hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... hip joint may help diagnose the condition in older infants and children. A hip that is truly dislocated ... the child grows. This harness works for most infants when it is started before age 6 months, but it is less likely to work for older children. Children who do not improve, or who ...

  14. Hip-Hop Education Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Marcella Runell

    2009-01-01

    Hip-hop music and culture are often cited as being public pedagogy, meaning the music itself has intrinsic educational value. Non-profit organizations and individual educators have graciously taken the lead in utilizing hip-hop to educate. As the academy continues to debate its effectiveness, teachers and community organizers are moving forward.…

  15. Complications in neonatal surgery.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Mauricio A; Caty, Michael G

    2016-12-01

    Neonatal surgery is recognized as an independent discipline in general surgery, requiring the expertise of pediatric surgeons to optimize outcomes in infants with surgical conditions. Survival following neonatal surgery has improved dramatically in the past 60 years. Improvements in pediatric surgical outcomes are in part attributable to improved understanding of neonatal physiology, specialized pediatric anesthesia, neonatal critical care including sophisticated cardiopulmonary support, utilization of parenteral nutrition and adjustments in fluid management, refinement of surgical technique, and advances in surgical technology including minimally invasive options. Nevertheless, short and long-term complications following neonatal surgery continue to have profound and sometimes lasting effects on individual patients, families, and society. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Can viscosupplementation be used in the hip? An Italian perspective.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    Viscosupplementation is the intra-articular administration of preparations containing hyaluronic acid or hyaluronate intended to restore the normal biological properties of hyaluronic acid normally found in synovial fluid. Infiltration of hyaluronic acid in the arthritic hip is a more recent technique than viscosupplementation of the knee due to the greater technical difficulty of infiltration to the hip, which requires fluoroscopic or ultrasound guidance. The introduction of high-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid in the treatment permits a single administration and has helped diffuse hip infiltration treatment. A single infiltration reduces patient discomfort caused by the procedure and allows treatment of a larger number of patients. Although the literature has unequivocally proven the possibility of reducing pain in patients affected by hip arthritis following infiltration, the molecular weight and density, the number of infiltrations required for long-term results, and the most appropriate indications for infiltration treatment have yet to be clarified. Selecting the patient is the first obstacle to be overcome. Therefore, infiltration should be considered as an option for patients with initial pain symptoms who have not yet been listed for joint prosthesis surgery. The radiographic criteria require at least a partly preserved joint space, and the clinical criteria of persistent hip pain and full joint mobility seem to be sufficiently effective for selection.

  17. Rehabilitation following total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Garden, F H

    1994-01-01

    Rehabilitation professionals play an important role in the comprehensive postoperative management of the patient who has undergone a total hip replacement. Understanding the general surgical considerations that eventually impact the rehabilitation process is essential. Coordination of physicians, physical and occupational therapists, social services, and family members results in better quality of care. The technology and design of hip prostheses and fixation methods impact the functional outcome of total hip arthroplasty. Professionals involved in total hip arthroplasty rehabilitation should also understand the potential complications following total hip arthroplasty that oftentimes cause delays or revisions in the rehabilitation program. When these are combined with appropriate preoperative patient selection and education, as well as postoperative physical and occupational therapy programs, most patients are able to achieve a satisfactory functional outcome, including independence in basic activities of daily living and independent ambulation with an assistive device.

  18. Pain management in neonates.

    PubMed

    Carbajal, Ricardo; Gall, Olivier; Annequin, Daniel

    2004-05-01

    Multiple lines of evidence suggest an increased sensitivity to pain in neonates. Repeated and prolonged pain exposure may affect the subsequent development of pain systems, as well as potentially contribute to alterations in long-term development and behavior. Despite impressive gains in the knowledge of neonatal pain mechanisms and strategies to treat neonatal pain acquired during the last 15 years, a large gap still exists between routine clinical practice and research results. Accurate assessment of pain is crucial for effective pain management in neonates. Neonatal pain management should rely on current scientific evidence more than the attitudes and beliefs of care-givers. Parents should be informed of pain relief strategies and their participation in the health care plan to alleviate pain should be encouraged. The need for systemic analgesia for both moderate and severe pain, in conjunction with behavioral/environmental approaches to pain management, is emphasized. A main sources of pain in the neonate is procedural pain which should always be prevented and treated. Nonpharmacological approaches constitute important treatment options for managing procedural pain. Nonpharmacological interventions (environmental and preventive measures, non-nutritive sucking, sweet solutions, skin-skin contact, and breastfeeding analgesia) can reduce neonatal pain indirectly by reducing the total amount of noxious stimuli to which infants are exposed, and directly, by blocking nociceptive transduction or transmission or by activation of descending inhibitory pathways or by activating attention and arousal systems that modulate pain. Opioids are the mainstay of pharmacological pain treatment but there are other useful medications and techniques that may be used for pain relief. National guidelines are necessary to improve neonatal pain management at the institutional level, individual neonatal intensive care units need to develop specific practice guidelines regarding pain

  19. [Neonatal Volkmann's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Dandurand, M; Michel, B; Fabre, C; Stoebner, P; Meunier, L

    2009-11-01

    Acute limb compartment syndrome or Volkmann's ischaemic contracture is an acquired ischaemia of nerve and muscle causes by raised pressure within a closed fascial space. Congenital Volkmann's ischaemic contracture (CVIC) is a rare entity. A 2-day-old girl was referred with a problem of the left forearm and arm, which exhibited cold oedema with decreased mobility. Lesions were present at birth and were rapidly complicated by skin necrosis. The mother was taking olazanpine, prazepam and valpromide throughout the entire pregnancy. Delivery was complicated by shoulder dystocia requiring obstetric procedures such as suprapubic pressure, Couder's maneuver and episiotomy. On physical examination her left hemi-thorax, left arm, forearm and hand exhibited marked oedema. A large and well-demarcated bullous, fibrous and ulcerated area of skin necrosis was observed on the elbow fold and on the inner anterior part of the arm. Digital flexion with cyanosis was present. MR angiography revealed extensive oedema of the soft tissue and muscle with fascial effusion, associated with compression of the arm arteries and reduced blood flow in the forearm. A fasciotomy was performed at Day 3 of life. The postsurgical arterial MRI was normal. At Day 10 of life, the patient developed opisthotonos involving spasms and tremors associated with numerous intercritical abnormalities evoking benzodiazepine weaning syndrome. The child's neurological status was stabilized by treatment with phenobarbital and clonazepam. She was subsequently lost to follow-up. CVIC has been ascribed to multiples causes. Mechanical compression is the main recognized factor: amniotic band constriction, umbilical cord loops, compression in utero by a deceased co-twin, malposition of the hand, arm or forearm, local or general factors that can add to extraction problems: brachypelvic disproportion, extraction with forceps, oligo/polyhydramnios, pre-term delivery, pre-eclampsia, caesarean section, premature labour

  20. Computer modeling of the pathomechanics of spastic hip dislocation in children.

    PubMed

    Miller, F; Slomczykowski, M; Cope, R; Lipton, G E

    1999-01-01

    Spastic muscles about the hip cause subluxation, dislocation, and lead to acetabular dysplasia. Spastic hip disease occurs when the muscles about the hip exert forces that are too high or in the wrong direction or both. To determine the role of the hip forces in the progression of spastic hip disease and the effect of both muscle-lengthening and bony reconstructive surgeries, a computerized mathematical model of a spastic hip joint was created. The magnitude and direction of the forces of spastic hips undergoing surgery were analyzed preoperatively and postoperatively to determine which procedure is best suited for the treatment of spastic hip disease. The muscle-lengthening procedures included (a) the adductor longus, (b) the psoas, iliacus, gracilis, adductor brevis, and adductor longus, and (3) the psoas, iliacus, gracilis, adductor brevis, adductor longus, semimembranosus, and semitendinosus. The bony reconstructive and muscle-lengthening procedures included (a) lengthening the psoas, iliacus, gracilis, adductor brevis, adductor longus, semimembranosus, and semitendinosus combined with changing femoral neck anteversion from 45 to 10 degrees , (b) lengthening of the psoas, iliacus, gracilis, adductor brevis, adductor longus, semimembranosus, and semitendinosus combined with changing neck-shaft angle from 165 to 135 degrees , and (c) lengthening of the psoas, iliacus, gracilis, adductor brevis, adductor longus, semimembranosus, and semitendinosus combined with changing femoral neck anteversion from 45 to 10 degrees and neck-shaft angle from 165 to 135 degrees . Results show that a child with spastic hip disease has a hip-force magnitude 3 times that of the a child with a normal hip in the normal physiologic position. Based on this mathematical model the best to normalize the magnitude of the hip-joint reaction force, the muscles to be lengthened should include the psoas, iliacus, gracilis, adductor brevis, and the adductor longus. To normalize the direction of

  1. Neonatal Graves' Disease with Maternal Hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Akangire, Gangaram; Cuna, Alain; Lachica, Charisse; Fischer, Ryan; Raman, Sripriya; Sampath, Venkatesh

    2017-07-01

    Neonatal Graves' disease presenting as conjugated hyperbilirubinemia is a diagnostic challenge because the differential includes a gamut of liver and systemic diseases. We present a unique case of neonatal Graves' disease in a premature infant with conjugated hyperbilirubinemia born to a mother with hypothyroidism during pregnancy and remote history of Graves' disease. Infant was treated with a combination of methimazole, propranolol, and potassium iodide for 4 weeks. Thyroid function improved after 8 weeks of treatment with full recovery of thyroid function, disappearance of thyroid-stimulating antibodies, and resolution of failure to thrive and conjugated hyperbilirubinemia. This case provides several clinical vignettes as it is a rare, severe, presentation of an uncommon neonatal disease, signs, symptoms, and clinical history presented a diagnostic challenge for neonatologists and endocrinologists, normal newborn screen was misleading, and yet timely treatment led to a full recovery.

  2. Cryopreservation of ovaries from neonatal marmoset monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Motohashi, Hideyuki H.; Ishibashi, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    The ovary of neonatal nonhuman primates contains the highest number of immature oocytes, but its cryopreservation has not yet been sufficiently investigated in all life stages. In the current study, we investigated cryodamage after vitrification/warming of neonatal ovaries from a nonhuman primate, the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus). A Cryotop was used for cryopreservation of whole ovaries. The morphology of the vitrified/warmed ovaries was found to be equivalent to that of fresh ovaries. No significant difference in the number of oocytes retaining normal morphology per unit area in histological sections was found between the two groups. In an analysis of dispersed cells from the ovaries, however, the cell viability of the vitrified/warmed group tended to be decreased. The results of a comet assay showed no significant differences in DNA damage. These results show that cryopreservation of neonatal marmoset ovaries using vitrification may be useful as a storage system for whole ovaries. PMID:26876597

  3. Results of total hip arthroplasty using a bionic hip stem.

    PubMed

    Fokter, Samo K; Sarler, Taras; Strahovnik, Andrej; Repše-Fokter, Alenka

    2015-06-01

    The trabecular-orientated bionic hip stem was designed to mimic the natural force transmission through the femur in total hip arthroplasty, resulting in supposedly longer prosthesis survivability. The aim of this study was to compare the second-generation bionic hip stem to a standard uncemented hip stem. A group of 18 patients (21 hips) who underwent total hip arthroplasty with a bionic stem (bionic group) was compared with a historic group of 12 patients (12 hips) treated with standard anatomic hip stem (control group). During the first year after the procedure, the densitometric measurements of the bone around the prosthesis were taken. Radiographic and clinical assessments were additionally performed preoperatively and at the three month, six month, one year and three year follow-ups in the bionic group. In the bionic group, one patient was revised for aseptic loosening and 16 patients (19 hips) were available to the final follow-up. A significant decrease of bone mineral density was found in Gruen zones 3, 4 and 5 in the bionic group, and in zone 7 in both groups. The bionic group had a significantly higher bone mineral density in Gruen zone 1 at the one year follow-up. At the final follow-up, all prostheses were radiologically stable in both groups. Provided that a good implant position is achieved, comparable short-term results can be obtained using a bionic stem. Still, a decrease of bone mineral density in Gruen zone 7 occurred in both groups. Further studies are required to determine survivability of the bionic stem.

  4. Neonatal Brain Tumors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Bodeliwala, Shaam; Kumar, Vikas; Singh, Daljit

    2017-01-01

    Brain tumors in neonatal age group is uncommon comparing with older children and adults. In older children brain tumors are commonly infratentorial, where as in neonates, they are supratentorial. Though extracranial tumors are commoner in neonates, brain tumors cause 5-20% deaths approximately. We are presenting a review on brain tumors in neonates. PMID:28770127

  5. Structural Connectivity Asymmetry in the Neonatal Brain

    PubMed Central

    Ratnarajah, Nagulan; Rifkin-Graboi, Anne; Fortier, Marielle V.; Chong, Yap Seng; Kwek, Kenneth; Saw, Seang-Mei; Godfrey, Keith M; Gluckman, Peter D.; Meaney, Michael J.; Qiu, Anqi

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetry of the neonatal brain is not yet understood at the level of structural connectivity. We utilized DTI deterministic tractography and structural network analysis based on graph theory to determine the pattern of structural connectivity asymmetry in 124 normal neonates. We tracted white matter axonal pathways characterizing interregional connections among brain regions and inferred asymmetry in left and right anatomical network properties. Our findings revealed that in neonates, small-world characteristics were exhibited, but did not differ between the two hemispheres, suggesting that neighboring brain regions connect tightly with each other, and that one region is only a few paths away from any other region within each hemisphere. Moreover, the neonatal brain showed greater structural efficiency in the left hemisphere than that in the right. In neonates, brain regions involved in motor, language, and memory functions play crucial roles in efficient communication in the left hemisphere, while brain regions involved in emotional processes play crucial roles in efficient communication in the right hemisphere. These findings suggest that even at birth, the topology of each cerebral hemisphere is organized in an efficient and compact manner that maps onto asymmetric functional specializations seen in adults, implying lateralized brain functions in infancy. PMID:23501049

  6. Inadvertent Methylergonovine Administration to a Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, Bryan M.; O’Connell, Charles; Boutin, Mallory A.; Fatayerji, Nabil I.; Sauer, Charles W.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, Newborn Final Diagnosis: Accidental methylergonovine poisoning Symptoms: Respiratory distress Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Pediatrics and Neonatology Objective: Diagnostic/therapeutic accidents Background: Methylergonovine is an ergot alkaloid used to treat post-partum hemorrhage secondary to uterine atony. Mistaking methylergonovine for vitamin K with accidental administration to the neonate is a rare iatrogenic illness occurring almost exclusively in the delivery room setting. Complications of ergot alkaloids in neonates include respiratory depression, seizures, and death. Case Report: A term infant was inadvertently given 0.1 mg of methylergonovine intramuscularly in the right thigh. The error was only noted when the vial of medication was scanned, after administration, identifying it as methylergonovine rather than vitamin K. The local poison center was notified, and the infant was transferred to the neonatal intensive care unit for observation. Two hours after transfer, the infant was noted to have oxygen desaturations and required oxygen via nasal cannula. Supplemental oxygen was continued for 4 hours until the neonate was able to maintain normal oxygen saturations in room air. Feeding was started by 10 hours of life, and the infant was discharged home in good condition after a 72-hour stay without further complications. Conclusions: Because of the potential for serious adverse events, vigilance is required to prevent accidental administration of methylergonovine to the neonate as a result of possible confusion with vitamin K in the early post-partum period. PMID:27765939

  7. Acinetobacter baumannii neonatal mastitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Emma L; Berhane, Abeba; Zora, John Gregory; Suchdev, Parminder S

    2014-09-25

    Neonatal mastitis is a rare infection. When it does occur, infants younger than 2 months of age are typically affected and the majority of cases are caused by Staphylococcus aureus. We present the first reported case of neonatal mastitis caused by Acinetobacter baumannii, an unusual organism for this type of infection. A 15-day-old full-term Caucasian male neonate presented to our emergency room following fever at home and was admitted for routine neonatal sepsis evaluation. After admission, he developed purulent drainage from his right nipple, was diagnosed with mastitis, and was started on empiric therapy with clindamycin and cefotaxime with presumed coverage for S. aureus. Drainage culture identified pan-susceptible Acinetobacter baumannii/haemolyticus and antibiotic therapy was changed to ceftazidime. He was discharged after 5 days of ceftazidime with complete resolution of his symptoms. This case illustrates the importance of obtaining drainage cultures in mastitis cases because of the possibility of organisms besides S. aureus causing infection. Acinetobacter baumannii is considered part of the normal human flora and is associated with serious infections in intensive care units. This is the first case report describing Acinetobacter baumannii as an etiologic agent of neonatal mastitis and highlights the importance of including unusual organisms in the differential for infectious etiologies for general practitioners.

  8. Structural connectivity asymmetry in the neonatal brain.

    PubMed

    Ratnarajah, Nagulan; Rifkin-Graboi, Anne; Fortier, Marielle V; Chong, Yap Seng; Kwek, Kenneth; Saw, Seang-Mei; Godfrey, Keith M; Gluckman, Peter D; Meaney, Michael J; Qiu, Anqi

    2013-07-15

    Asymmetry of the neonatal brain is not yet understood at the level of structural connectivity. We utilized DTI deterministic tractography and structural network analysis based on graph theory to determine the pattern of structural connectivity asymmetry in 124 normal neonates. We tracted white matter axonal pathways characterizing interregional connections among brain regions and inferred asymmetry in left and right anatomical network properties. Our findings revealed that in neonates, small-world characteristics were exhibited, but did not differ between the two hemispheres, suggesting that neighboring brain regions connect tightly with each other, and that one region is only a few paths away from any other region within each hemisphere. Moreover, the neonatal brain showed greater structural efficiency in the left hemisphere than that in the right. In neonates, brain regions involved in motor, language, and memory functions play crucial roles in efficient communication in the left hemisphere, while brain regions involved in emotional processes play crucial roles in efficient communication in the right hemisphere. These findings suggest that even at birth, the topology of each cerebral hemisphere is organized in an efficient and compact manner that maps onto asymmetric functional specializations seen in adults, implying lateralized brain functions in infancy.

  9. Neonatal abstinence syndrome.

    PubMed

    Serane, V Tiroumourougane; Kurian, Ommen

    2008-09-01

    To study the substance misuse in pregnant mothers and its impact on their newborns. Case note review of the study population was undertaken. Infants of mothers who had taken substance of misuse were monitored regularly using Finnegan's score and treatment initiated based on a pre-existing protocol. The parameters that were studied included maternal drug habits, antenatal problems, and neonatal epidemiology with particular reference to growth, neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), its severity and management. Out of 32 neonates, 28 had developed neonatal withdrawal requiring treatment. The earliest presentation of NAS was at six hours and the average time of presentation of NAS was 26 hours. The dose of methadone taken by the mother related well with the likelihood of development of NAS. The most common symptoms noted at the time of diagnosis were irritable cry, increased tone, tachypnea, sleeplessness and tremor. Majority of neonates born to mothers on methadone exhibit neonatal abstinence syndrome and require pharmacological treatment. Neonates who had not exhibited symptoms of drug withdrawal within the first 3 days of life are unlikely to present with NAS requiring treatment.

  10. Neonatal outreach simulation.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Bobbi J; Manhas, Deepak

    2016-11-01

    Numerous factors contribute to neonatal morbidity and mortality, and inexperienced providers managing crisis situations is one major cause. Simulation-based medical education is an excellent modality to employ in community hospitals to help refine and refresh resuscitation skills of providers who infrequently encounter neonatal emergencies. Mounting evidence suggests that simulation-based education improves patient outcomes. Academic health centers have the potential to improve neonatal outcomes through collaborations with community hospital providers, sharing expertise in neonatal resuscitation and simulation. Community outreach programs using simulation have been successfully initiated in North America. Two examples of programs are described here, including the models for curricular development, required resources, limitations, and benefits. Considerations for initiating outreach simulation programs are discussed. In the future, research demonstrating improved neonatal outcomes using outreach simulation will be important for personnel conducting outreach programs. Neonatal outreach simulation is a promising educational endeavor that may ultimately prove important in decreasing neonatal morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Delayed treatment of septic arthritis in the neonate

    PubMed Central

    Li, YiQiang; Zhou, QingHe; Liu, YuanZhong; Chen, WeiDong; Li, JingChun; Yuan, Zhe; Yong, BiCheng; Xu, HongWen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract There is still controversy on the management of septic arthritis in neonates. This study aims to investigate the treatment of septic arthritis in neonates. We reviewed 52 neonates (37 males and 15 females) with septic arthritis in our hospital during 2004 to 2015. The mean age at onset of infection was 17.5 ± 7.6 days, mean age at admission was 32.6 ± 10.7 days. A total of 56 joints were involved (22 knees, 18 shoulders, 13 hips, and 3 other joints). Thiryt-six patients underwent surgical drainage, 14 patients were treated nonoperatively, 2 families refused treatment. Forty-four patients (48 joints) were followed for 4.5 ± 1.2 years. Based on treatment, these 48 joints were divided into an operative group and a nonoperative group. Clinical presentations, imaging examination results, treatments, and outcomes were analyzed. Among the patients who were followed-up, the time from onset to treatment in the operatively managed group (12.7 ± 8.1 days) was significantly shorter than that in the conservatively managed group (20.0 ± 8.2 days). There were no significant differences between both groups on the age at onset, age at admission, imaging score, length of hospital stay, WBC counts, and intravenous medication time. Thirty-five sites (72.9%) recovered completely. There was no significant difference on recovery rate between operative and nonoperative group. Only 33.3% of the hips recovered, this was significantly lower than that of knee/ankle (85.0%) and shoulder/elbow (78.9%). Sequels were found in 13 joints. Logistic regression indicated that sex, imaging score, and hip joint involvement were predictors of sequel. One point of imaging score increased the risk of sequels by a factor of 2.960, and hip joint involvement increased the risk of sequels by a factor of 12.712. Females were more likely to have sequels than males. Surgical drainage is recommended for early diagnosed neonatal septic arthritis and hip infections. A conservative

  12. Oral Lesions in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  13. Anterior hip pain.

    PubMed

    O'Kane, J W

    1999-10-15

    Anterior hip pain is a common complaint with many possible causes. Apophyseal avulsion and slipped capital femoral epiphysis should not be overlooked in adolescents. Muscle and tendon strains are common in adults. Subsequent to accurate diagnosis, strains should improve with rest and directed conservative treatment. Osteoarthritis, which is diagnosed radiographically, generally occurs in middle-aged and older adults. Arthritis in younger adults should prompt consideration of an inflammatory cause. A possible femoral neck stress fracture should be evaluated urgently to prevent the potentially significant complications associated with displacement. Patients with osteitis pubis should be educated about the natural history of the condition and should undergo physical therapy to correct abnormal pelvic mechanics. "Sports hernias," nerve entrapments and labral pathologic conditions should be considered in athletic adults with characteristic presentations and chronic symptoms. Surgical intervention may allow resumption of pain-free athletic activity.

  14. "In vivo" determination of hip joint separation and the forces generated due to impact loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Dennis, D A; Komistek, R D; Northcut, E J; Ochoa, J A; Ritchie, A

    2001-05-01

    Numerous supporting structures assist in the retention of the femoral head within the acetabulum of the normal hip joint including the capsule, labrum, and ligament of the femoral head (LHF). During total hip arthroplasty (THA), the LHF is often disrupted or degenerative and is surgically removed. In addition, a portion of the remaining supporting structures is transected or resected to facilitate surgical exposure. The present study analyzes the effects of LHF absence and surgical dissection in THA patients. Twenty subjects (5 normal hip joints, 10 nonconstrained THA, and 5 constrained THA) were evaluated using fluoroscopy while performing active hip abduction. All THA subjects were considered clinically successful. Fluoroscopic videos of the normal hips were analyzed using digitization, while those with THA were assessed using a computerized interactive model-fitting technique. The distance between the femoral head and acetabulum was measured to determine if femoral head separation occurred. Error analysis revealed measurements to be accurate within 0.75mm. No separation was observed in normal hips or those subjects implanted with constrained THA, while all 10 (100%) with unconstrained THA demonstrated femoral head separation, averaging 3.3mm (range 1.9-5.2mm). This study has shown that separation of the prosthetic femoral head from the acetabular component can occur. The normal hip joint has surrounding capsuloligamentous structures and a ligament attaching the femoral head to the acetabulum. We hypothesize that these soft tissue supports create a passive, resistant force at the hip, preventing femoral head separation. The absence of these supporting structures after THA may allow increased hip joint forces, which may play a role in premature polyethylene wear or prosthetic loosening.

  15. The influence of varying hip angle and pelvis position on muscle recruitment patterns of the hip abductor muscles during the clam exercise.

    PubMed

    Willcox, Emma L; Burden, Adrian M

    2013-05-01

    Within-subject, repeated-measures design. To determine the influence of pelvis position and hip angle on activation of the hip abductors while performing the clam exercise. Therapeutic exercises are regularly employed to strengthen the hip abductors to improve lower-limb and pelvis stability. While previous studies primarily have compared the activity of hip abductor muscles between various exercises, few studies have examined the influence of varying the techniques of particular exercises on the relative activation of hip abductor muscles. Such information could be used to facilitate appropriate exercise instruction. Muscle activation in 17 healthy, asymptomatic volunteers during 6 variations of the clam exercise was analyzed with surface electromyography. Electromyographic signals were recorded from the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, and tensor fasciae latae. Normalized data were examined using 2-way, repeated-measures analyses of variance. The magnitude of gluteus maximus and gluteus medius activation was significantly greater when the pelvis was in neutral rather than reclined. Furthermore, gluteus medius activation was greatest when the hip was flexed to 60°. Activation of the tensor fasciae latae was not influenced by pelvis position or hip angle. A neutral pelvis position is advocated to optimize recruitment of the gluteus maximus and gluteus medius during the clam exercise. Increasing the hip flexion angle increases activation of the gluteus medius. Tensor fasciae latae activity was relatively low and generally unaffected by variations of the clam exercise.

  16. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  1. In vivo hip joint loads and pedal forces during ergometer cycling.

    PubMed

    Damm, P; Dymke, J; Bender, A; Duda, G; Bergmann, G

    2017-07-26

    The rising prevalence of osteoarthritis and an increase in total hip replacements calls for attention to potential therapeutic activities. Cycling is considered as a low impact exercise for the hip joint and hence recommended. However, there are limited data about hip joint loading to support this claim. The aim of this study was to measure synchronously the in vivo hip joint loads and pedal forces during cycling. The in vivo hip joint loads were measured in 5 patients with instrumented hip implants. Data were collected at several combinations of power and cadence, at two saddle heights. Joint loads and pedal forces showed strong linear correlation with power. So the relationship between the external pedal forces and internal joint forces was shown. While cycling at different cadences the minimum joint loads were acquired at 60RPM. The lower saddle height configuration results in an approximately 15% increase compared to normal saddle height. The results offered new insights into the actual effects of cycling on the hip joint and can serve as useful tools while developing an optimum cycling regimen for individuals with coxarthrosis or following total hip arthroplasty. Due to the relatively low contact forces, cycling at a moderate power level of 90W at a normal saddle height is suitable for patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The effect of total hip and hip resurfacing arthroplasty on vertical ground reaction force and impulse symmetry during a sit-to-stand task.

    PubMed

    Caplan, N; Stewart, S; Kashyap, S; Banaszkiewicz, P; St Clair Gibson, A; Kader, D; Ewen, A

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of total hip arthroplasty and hip resurfacing arthroplasty on limb loading symmetry before, and after, hip reconstruction surgery during a sit-to-stand task. Fourteen patients were recruited that were about to receive either a total hip prosthesis (n=7) or a hip resurfacing prosthesis (n=7), as well as matched controls. Patients performed a sit-to-stand movement before, 3 months after, and 12 months after surgery. Peak vertical ground reaction force and impulse were measured for each leg, from which ground reaction force and impulse symmetry ratios were calculated. Before surgery, hip resurfacing patients showed a small asymmetry which was not different to normal for ground reaction force (0.88(0.28) vs. 1.00(0.11); p=0.311) or impulse (0.87(0.29) vs. 0.99(0.09); p=0.324) symmetry ratios. Total hip patients offloaded their affected hip by 30% in terms of impulse symmetry ratio (0.71(0.36) vs. 0.99(0.23); p=0.018). At 3 months following surgery asymmetries were seen that were different to normal in both hip resurfacing patients for ground reaction force (0.77(0.16); p=0.007), and total hip patients for ground reaction force (0.70(0.15); p=0.018) and impulse (0.72(0.16); p=0.011) symmetry ratios. By 12 months after surgery total hip patients regained a symmetrical loading pattern for both ground reaction force (0.95(0.06); p=0.676) and impulse (1.00(0.06); p=0.702) symmetry ratios. Hip resurfacing patients, however, performed the task by overloading their operated hip, with impulse symmetry ratio being larger than normal (1.16(0.16); p=0.035). Physiotherapists should appreciate the need for early recovery of limb loading symmetry as well as subsequent differences in the responses observed with different prostheses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Total hip replacement for hip fracture: Surgical techniques and concepts.

    PubMed

    Coomber, Ross; Porteous, Matthew; Hubble, Matthew J W; Parker, Martyn J

    2016-10-01

    When treating a hip fracture with a total hip replacement (THR) the surgical technique may differ in a number of aspects in comparison to elective arthroplasty. The hip fracture patient is more likely to have poor bone stock secondary to osteoporosis, be older, have a greater number of co-morbidities, and have had limited peri-operative work-up. These factors lead to a higher risk of complications, morbidity and perioperative mortality. Consideration should be made to performing the THR in a laminar flow theatre, by a surgeon experienced in total hip arthroplasty, using an anterolateral approach, cementing the implant in place, using a large head size and with repair of the joint capsule. Combined Ortho-geriatric care is recommended with similar post-operative rehabilitation to elective THR patients but with less expectation of short length of stay and consideration for fracture prevention measures. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Ultrasound-Assisted Hip Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Weinrauch, Patrick; Kermeci, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    We describe the use of intraoperative ultrasound for the safe development of arthroscopic portals during hip arthroscopy without the requirement for fluoroscopy. We find this technique consistently accurate, allowing the safe introduction of arthroscopic instruments into the hip with a very low rate of iatrogenic injury. We have further developed the technique for application to both central- and peripheral-compartment procedures. We now have a total experience of more than 700 procedures to date. With the described technique of ultrasound guidance for portal placement, fluoroscopy is required in fewer than 2% of hip arthroscopy procedures at our institution. PMID:24904772

  5. MUC5AC overexpression in tear film of neonates.

    PubMed

    Mantelli, Flavio; Tiberi, Eloisa; Micera, Alessandra; Lambiase, Alessandro; Visintini, Federica; Bonini, Stefano

    2007-09-01

    Full-term neonates produce tears normally, but neonatal tear film is modified to resist evaporation with a thick lipid layer that allows lower spontaneous blink rates. This adaptation presumably prevents drying of the ocular surface during long inter-blink periods. However, tear-film stability is not only based on the integrity of the lipid layer, but also reflects properties of the underlying mucus layer. Characteristics of the neonatal mucus tear-film layer have not yet been described. Tear samples were obtained from eight full-term healthy neonates (four males, four females, mean age 1.7 +/- 0.5 days) and eight healthy adult controls (four males, four females, mean age 26.3 +/- 2.5 years). Characterization of tear samples' total proteins was obtained by spectrophotometry. Western blot for major secretory mucin MUC5AC was performed on the samples. Blink rate in the neonates and adults enrolled in the study was also observed and recorded. Using the same procedure, the amount of tears collected was significantly greater in adults than in neonates (p < .01). Western Blot performed on neonatal tear samples showed a significant 76.8% increase in the expression of major secretory mucin MUC5AC as compared to healthy adult controls (p < .001). Mean blink rate recorded in neonates was significantly lower than in adults (p < .001), with a mean 1.6 +/- 0.5 blinks per minute and a mean interblink time of 33 +/- 9 seconds. As far as we are aware this is the first description of the mucus tear-film layer in neonates. The greater tear-film stability in neonates has been so far attributed to a thicker lipid layer. In our study, we show that a concomitant increase in MUC5AC protein expression in tears is present and may contribute to this greater stability; therefore, both mucus and lipid layer should be considered while evaluating tear film stability in neonates.

  6. Assessment of neonatal platelet adhesion, activation, and aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Baker-Groberg, Sandra M.; Lattimore, Susan; Recht, Michael; McCarty, Owen J.T.; Haley, Kristina M.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Acquired and inherited bleeding disorders may present in the neonatal period with devastating lifelong effects. Diagnosing bleeding disorders in the neonatal population could aid in preventing and treating the associated complications. However, currently available platelet function testing is limited in neonates owing to difficulties obtaining adequate blood volume, lack of normal reference ranges, and an incomplete understanding of the neonatal platelet functional phenotype. Objective Develop small-volume, whole blood platelet function assays to quantify and compare neonatal and adult platelet function. Methods and Results Peripheral blood was obtained from healthy, full-term neonates at 24-hours of life. Platelet activation, secretion, and aggregation were measured via flow cytometry. Platelet adhesion and aggregation were assessed under static and flow conditions. As compared to adult platelets, peripheral neonatal platelet P-selectin expression and integrin glycoprotein (GP) IIbIIIa activation was significantly reduced in response to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-agonists thrombin receptor activator peptide-6 (TRAP-6), adenosine 5′-diphosphate (ADP), and U46619 and the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-signaling pathway agonists collagen-related peptide (CRP) and rhodocytin. Neonatal platelet aggregation was markedly reduced in response to TRAP-6, ADP, U46619, CRP, and rhodocytin compared to adult platelets. The extent of neonatal and adult platelet adhesion and aggregate formation under static and shear conditions on collagen and von Willebrand factor (VWF) were similar. Conclusions As compared to adult platelets, we found neonatal platelet activation and secretion were blunted in response to GPCR- or ITAM-agonists, while the extent of neonatal platelet adhesion and aggregate formation was similar to adult platelets. PMID:26806373

  7. The Bernese periacetabular osteotomy: clinical, radiographic and mechanical 7-15-year follow-up of 26 hips.

    PubMed

    Kralj, Marko; Mavcic, Blaz; Antolic, Vane; Iglic, Ales; Kralj-Iglic, Veronika

    2005-12-01

    The Bernese periacetabular osteotomy is used in dysplastic hips to increase the load-bearing area of the hip and to prevent osteoarthritis. The aim of our work was to determine the contact hip stress before and after the osteotomy and to compare the relief of stress with the long-term radiographic and clinical outcome. We followed 26 dysplastic hips (26 patients) for 7-15 years after the index operation. Clinical evaluation was based on the WOMAC score, osteoarthrosis was evaluated with the Tönnis classification, the angles of lateral (CE) and anterior (VCA) femoral coverage were measured, and biomechanical parameters were studied. Periacetabular osteotomy increased the mean CE from 15 degrees to 37 degrees , and the mean VCA from 22 degrees to 38 degrees . The mean normalized peak contact stress was reduced from 5.2 to 3.0 kPa/N. Four hips required total hip arthroplasty after an average of 4.5 years, 8 hips showed considerable arthrosis progression, and 14 hips had no or mild arthrosis at follow-up. Preoperative WOMAC score, preoperative Tönnis grade and postoperative normalized peak contact stress were the most important predictors of outcome. The Bernese periacetabular osteotomy improves the mechanical status of the hip. Long-term success depends on the grade of arthrosis preoperatively and on the magnitude of operative correction of the contact hip stress.

  8. Assessment of gait after bilateral hip replacement. Case study.

    PubMed

    Winiarski, Sławomir; Aleksandrowicz, Krzysztof; Jarząb, Sławomir; Pozowski, Andrzej; Rutkowska-Kucharska, Alicja

    2014-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is one of the most effective methods of treatment of severe hip osteoarthritis (HOA). In many cases pathological gait patterns persist despite properly conducted surgery and disturb the normal wear of the artificial joint surfaces. The aim of the study was to conduct functional and biomechanical assessment of gait in a patient after bilateral THA due to severe degenerative changes in the hip. The assessment focused on the gait parameters which significantly deviate from a normal gait pattern at various stages of treatment. Physiotherapeutic assessment of the patient included measurements of the range of motion in lower limb joints, the Timed Up and Go test, and pain assessment. Biomechanical assessment involved measurements of spatiotemporal gait parameters and the dynamic range of motion using BTS Smart-E motion analysis system. Although clinical examinations after both the first and second procedure suggested recovery of the patient's physical function, biomechanical assessment of her gait after the second procedure indicated the presence of deviations from a normal gait pattern. Secondary to a limited range of internal/external hip rotation, extension, and abduction, corresponding indices were still in the pathological range.

  9. Primary total hip replacement versus hip resurfacing - hospital considerations.

    PubMed

    Ward, William G; Carter, Christina J; Barone, Marisa; Jinnah, Riyaz

    2011-01-01

    Multiple factors regarding surgical procedures and patient selection affect hospital staffing needs as well as hospital revenues. In order to better understand the potential impact on hospitals that hip arthroplasty device selection (standard total hip arthroplasty vs. resurfacing) creates, a review of all primary hip arthroplasties performed at one institution was designed to identify factors that impacted hospital staffing needs and revenue generation. All primary hip arthroplasties undertaken over three fiscal years (2008 to 2010) were reviewed, utilizing only hospital business office data and medical records data that had been previously extracted prior for billing purposes. Analysis confirmed differing demographics for two hip arthroplasty populations, with the resurfacing patients (compared to the conventional total hip arthroplasty population) consisting of younger patients (mean age, 50 vs. 61 years), who were more often male (75% vs. 45%), were more likely to have osteoarthritis as their primary diagnosis (83 vs. 67%) and were more often covered by managed care or commercial insurance (83 vs. 34%). They also had shorter hospital stays (mean length of stay, 2.3 vs. 4.1 days) and consequently provided a more favorable financial revenue stream to the hospital on a per patient basis. Several trends appeared during the study periods. There was a steady increase in all procedures in all groups except for the resurfacings, which decreased 26% in males and 53% in females between 2009 and 2010. Differences were observed in the demographics of patients presenting for resurfacing, compared to those presenting for conventional total hip arthroplasty. In addition to the revenue stream considerations, institutions undertaking a resurfacing program must commit the resources and planning in order to rehabilitate these patients more expeditiously than is usually required with conventional hip arthroplasty patients.

  10. Neonatal atlas construction using sparse representation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Feng; Wang, Li; Wu, Guorong; Li, Gang; Gilmore, John H; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-09-01

    Atlas construction generally includes first an image registration step to normalize all images into a common space and then an atlas building step to fuse the information from all the aligned images. Although numerous atlas construction studies have been performed to improve the accuracy of the image registration step, unweighted or simply weighted average is often used in the atlas building step. In this article, we propose a novel patch-based sparse representation method for atlas construction after all images have been registered into the common space. By taking advantage of local sparse representation, more anatomical details can be recovered in the built atlas. To make the anatomical structures spatially smooth in the atlas, the anatomical feature constraints on group structure of representations and also the overlapping of neighboring patches are imposed to ensure the anatomical consistency between neighboring patches. The proposed method has been applied to 73 neonatal MR images with poor spatial resolution and low tissue contrast, for constructing a neonatal brain atlas with sharp anatomical details. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can significantly enhance the quality of the constructed atlas by discovering more anatomical details especially in the highly convoluted cortical regions. The resulting atlas demonstrates superior performance of our atlas when applied to spatially normalizing three different neonatal datasets, compared with other start-of-the-art neonatal brain atlases.

  11. Age-Appropriate Functions and Dysfunctions of the Neonatal Neutrophil

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Shelley Melissa; Corriden, Ross; Nizet, Victor

    2017-01-01

    Neonatal and adult neutrophils are distinctly different from one another due to well-defined and documented deficiencies in neonatal cells, including impaired functions, reduced concentrations of microbicidal proteins and enzymes necessary for pathogen destruction, and variances in cell surface receptors. Neutrophil maturation is clearly demonstrated throughout pregnancy from the earliest hematopoietic precursors in the yolk sac to the well-developed myeloid progenitor cells in the bone marrow around the seventh month of gestation. Notable deficiencies of neonatal neutrophils are generally correlated with gestational age and clinical condition, so that the least functional neutrophils are found in the youngest, sickest neonates. Interruption of normal gestation secondary to preterm birth exposes these shortcomings and places the neonate at an exceptionally high rate of infection and sepsis-related mortality. Because the fetus develops in a sterile environment, neonatal adaptive immune responses are deficient from lack of antigen exposure in utero. Newborns must therefore rely on innate immunity to protect against early infection. Neutrophils are a vital component of innate immunity since they are the first cells to respond to and defend against bacterial, viral, and fungal infections. However, notable phenotypic and functional disparities exist between neonatal and adult cells. Below is review of neutrophil ontogeny, as well as a discussion regarding known differences between preterm and term neonatal and adult neutrophils with respect to cell membrane receptors and functions. Our analysis will also explain how these variations decrease with postnatal age. PMID:28293548

  12. Foetal and neonatal thyroid disorders.

    PubMed

    Radetti, G; Zavallone, A; Gentili, L; Beck-Peccoz, P; Bona, G

    2002-10-01

    Thyroid hormones have been shown to be absolutely necessary for early brain development. During pregnancy, both maternal and foetal thyroid hormones contribute to foetal brain development and maternal supply explains why most of the athyreotic newborns usually do not show any signs of hypothyroidism at birth. Foetal and/or neonatal hypothyroidism is a rare disorder. Its incidence, as indicated by neonatal screening, is about 1:4000. Abnormal thyroid development (i.e. agenesia, ectopic gland, hypoplasia) or inborn errors in thyroid hormone biosynthesis are the most common causes of permanent congenital hypothyroidism. Recent studies reported that mutations involving Thyroid Transcriptor Factors (TTF) such as TTF-1, TTF-2, PAX-8 play an important role in altered foetal thyroid development. Deficiency of transcriptor factor (Pit-1, Prop-1, LHX-3) both in mother and in the foetus represents another rare cause of foetal hypothyroidism. At birth clinical picture may be not always so obvious and typical signs appear only after several weeks but a delayed diagnosis could have severe consequences consisting of delayed physical and mental development. Even if substitutive therapy is promptly started some learning difficulties might still arise suggesting that intrauterine adequate levels of thyroid hormones are absolutely necessary for a normal neurological development. Placental transfer of maternal antithyroid antibodies inhibiting fetal thyroid function can cause transient hypothyroidism at birth. If the mother with thyroid autoimmune disease is also hypothyroid during pregnancy and she doesn't receive substitutive therapy, a worse neurological outcome may be expected for her foetus. Foetal and/or neonatal hyperthyroidism is a rare condition and its incidence has been estimated around 1:4000-40000, according to various authors. The most common causes are maternal thyroid autoimmune disorders, such as Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Rarer non autoimmune causes

  13. Neonatal hepatitis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Eve A

    2003-10-01

    Conjugated hyperbilirubinaemia in an infant indicates neonatal liver disease. This neonatal hepatitis syndrome has numerous possible causes, classified as infective, anatomic/structural, metabolic, genetic, neoplastic, vascular, toxic, immune and idiopathic. Any infant who is jaundiced at 2-4 weeks old needs to have the serum conjugated bilirubin measured, even if he/she looks otherwise well. If conjugated hyperbilirubinaemia is present, a methodical and comprehensive diagnostic investigation should be performed. Early diagnosis is critical for the best outcome. In particular, palliative surgery for extrahepatic biliary atresia has the best chance of success if performed before the infant is 8 weeks old. Definitive treatments available for many causes of neonatal hepatitis syndrome should be started as soon as possible. Alternatively, liver transplantation may be life saving. Supportive care, especially with attention to nutritional needs, is important for all infants with neonatal hepatitis syndrome.

  14. Maternal and neonatal tetanus

    PubMed Central

    Thwaites, C Louise; Beeching, Nicholas J; Newton, Charles R

    2017-01-01

    Maternal and neonatal tetanus is still a substantial but preventable cause of mortality in many developing countries. Case fatality from these diseases remains high and treatment is limited by scarcity of resources and effective drug treatments. The Maternal and Neonatal Tetanus Elimination Initiative, launched by WHO and its partners, has made substantial progress in eliminating maternal and neonatal tetanus. Sustained emphasis on improvement of vaccination coverage, birth hygiene, and surveillance, with specific approaches in high-risk areas, has meant that the incidence of the disease continues to fall. Despite this progress, an estimated 58 000 neonates and an unknown number of mothers die every year from tetanus. As of June, 2014, 24 countries are still to eliminate the disease. Maintenance of elimination needs ongoing vaccination programmes and improved public health infrastructure. PMID:25149223

  15. Monitoring neonates for ototoxicity.

    PubMed

    Garinis, Angela C; Kemph, Alison; Tharpe, Anne Marie; Weitkamp, Joern-Hendrik; McEvoy, Cynthia; Steyger, Peter S

    2017-06-22

    Neonates admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) are at greater risk of permanent hearing loss compared to infants in well mother and baby units. Several factors have been associated with this increased prevalence of hearing loss, including congenital infections (e.g. cytomegalovirus or syphilis), ototoxic drugs (such as aminoglycoside or glycopeptide antibiotics), low birth weight, hypoxia and length of stay. The aetiology of this increased prevalence of hearing loss remains poorly understood. Here we review current practice and discuss the feasibility of designing improved ototoxicity screening and monitoring protocols to better identify acquired, drug-induced hearing loss in NICU neonates. A review of published literature. We conclude that current audiological screening or monitoring protocols for neonates are not designed to adequately detect early onset of ototoxicity. This paper offers a detailed review of evidence-based research, and offers recommendations for developing and implementing an ototoxicity monitoring protocol for young infants, before and after discharge from the hospital.

  16. Neonatal mortality in Utah.

    PubMed

    Woolley, F R; Schuman, K L; Lyon, J L

    1982-09-01

    A cohort study of neonatal mortality (N = 106) in white singleton births (N = 14,486) in Utah for January-June 1975 was conducted. Using membership and activity in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS or Mormon) as a proxy for parental health practices, i.e., tobacco and alcohol abstinence, differential neonatal mortality rates were calculated. The influence of potential confounding factors was evaluated. Low activity LDS members were found to have an excess risk of neonatal death five times greater than high activity LDS, with an upper bound of a two-sided 95% confidence interval of 7.9. The data consistently indicate a lower neonatal mortality rate for active LDS members. Non-LDS were found to have a lower rate than either medium or low activity LDS.

  17. Neonatal abstinence syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    NAS; Neonatal abstinence symptoms ... may contribute to the severity of a baby's NAS symptoms. ... symptoms of withdrawal. Even after medical treatment for NAS is over and babies leave the hospital, they ...

  18. Gluteal muscle fibrosis with abduction contracture of the hip.

    PubMed

    Al Bayati, Mohammed Ali; Kraidy, Bakir Kadhum

    2016-03-01

    Gluteal muscle fibrosis with hip contracture is a rare condition and causes major disability; literature reports are sparse. The aim of this study is to present, for the first time in Iraq and the region, a case series of gluteal fibrosis and the results of surgical treatment. Seven children--six boys and one girl--diagnosed as having gluteal muscle fibrosis with hip contracture, were investigated and treated by open surgical release of fibrotic bands and physiotherapy. All patients improved dramatically over the subsequent weeks, and were able to sit and squat in the normal position. Gluteal muscle fibrosis with hip contracture is present in Iraq and more awareness is needed for early diagnosis. Surgical treatment provided excellent results. More studies are needed to delineate the aetiology of the condition.

  19. Arthroscopic treatment of unstable total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Cuéllar, Ricardo; Aguinaga, Iñaki; Corcuera, Irene; Ponte, Juan; Usabiaga, Jaime

    2010-06-01

    Hip arthroscopy may be useful in the diagnosis and treatment of apparently well-implanted but unstable total hip replacement prostheses. We present 2 cases of arthroscopically assisted capsular tightening in unstable total hip replacements. Both cases had significant capsular laxity. Case 2 had impingement of the lower part of the acetabulum with the lesser trochanter that caused hip dislocation. Early revision surgery can be avoided with the use of this technique in selected cases of unstable total hip replacements.

  20. [Neonatal lupus erythematosus].

    PubMed

    Mayet, W J; Hermann, E; Bachmann, M; Poralla, T; Meyer zum Büschenfelde, K H

    1989-01-01

    The neonatal lupus erythematosus syndrome, first described by McCuistion and Schoch in 1954, is associated with characteristic skin lesions and congenital heart block in the new-born, and the presence of Ro-(SSA), La-(SSB), or RNP antibodies in mothers and infants. A transplacental transference of maternal autoantibodies is discussed as possible pathophysiologic mechanism in neonatal lupus. The symptoms, the onset, and recently published pathogenetic concepts are reviewed.

  1. The neonatal acoustic reflex.

    PubMed

    Weatherby, L A; Bennett, M J

    1980-01-01

    Probe tones from 220 Hz to 2 000 Hz were used to measure the static and dynamic acoustic impedance of 44 neonates. Acoustic reflex thresholds to broad band noise were obtained from every neonate tested when employing the higher frequency probe tones. The reflex threshold levels measured are similar to those of adults. The static impedance values are discussed to give a possible explanation of why reflex thresholds cannot be detected using conventional 220 Hz impedance bridges.

  2. Erythropoietin and Neonatal Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Juul, Sandra E.; Pet, Gillian C.

    2015-01-01

    Certain groups of neonates are at high risk of developing long-term neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI) and might be considered candidates for neuroprotective interventions. This chapter will explore some of these high-risk groups, relevant mechanisms of brain injury, and specific mechanisms of cellular injury and death. The potential of erythropoietin (Epo) to act as a neuroprotective agent for neonatal brain injury will be discussed. Clinical trials of Epo neuroprotection in preterm and term infants are updated. PMID:26250911

  3. Association of hip pain with radiographic evidence of hip osteoarthritis: diagnostic test study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chan; Nevitt, Michael C; Niu, Jingbo; Clancy, Mary M; Lane, Nancy E; Link, Thomas M; Vlad, Steven; Tolstykh, Irina; Jungmann, Pia M; Felson, David T; Guermazi, Ali

    2015-12-02

    Is there concordance between hip pain and radiographic hip osteoarthritis? In this diagnostic test study, pelvic radiographs were assessed for hip osteoarthritis in two cohorts: the Framingham Osteoarthritis Study (community of Framingham, Massachusetts) and the Osteoarthritis Initiative (a multicenter longitudinal cohort study of osteoarthritis in the United States). Using visual representation of the hip joint, participants reported whether they had hip pain on most days and the location of the pain: anterior, groin, lateral, buttocks, or low back. In the Framingham study, participants with hip pain were also examined for hip pain with internal rotation. The authors analysed the agreement between radiographic hip osteoarthritis and hip pain, and for those with hip pain suggestive of hip osteoarthritis they calculated the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of radiographs as the diagnostic test. In the Framingham study (n=946), only 15.6% of hips in patients with frequent hip pain showed radiographic evidence of hip osteoarthritis, and 20.7% of hips with radiographic hip osteoarthritis were frequently painful. The sensitivity of radiographic hip osteoarthritis for hip pain localised to the groin was 36.7%, specificity 90.5%, positive predictive value 6.0%, and negative predictive value 98.9%. Results did not differ much for hip pain at other locations or for painful internal rotation. In the Osteoarthritis Initiative study (n=4366), only 9.1% of hips in patients with frequent pain showed radiographic hip osteoarthritis, and 23.8% of hips with radiographic hip osteoarthritis were frequently painful. The sensitivity of definite radiographic hip osteoarthritis for hip pain localised to the groin was 16.5%, specificity 94.0%, positive predictive value 7.1%, and negative predictive value 97.6%. Results also did not differ much for hip pain at other locations. Hip pain was not present in many hips with radiographic

  4. Association of hip pain with radiographic evidence of hip osteoarthritis: diagnostic test study

    PubMed Central

    Nevitt, Michael C; Niu, Jingbo; Clancy, Mary M; Lane, Nancy E; Link, Thomas M; Vlad, Steven; Tolstykh, Irina; Jungmann, Pia M.; Felson, David T; Guermazi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Study question Is there concordance between hip pain and radiographic hip osteoarthritis? Methods In this diagnostic test study, pelvic radiographs were assessed for hip osteoarthritis in two cohorts: the Framingham Osteoarthritis Study (community of Framingham, Massachusetts) and the Osteoarthritis Initiative (a multicenter longitudinal cohort study of osteoarthritis in the United States). Using visual representation of the hip joint, participants reported whether they had hip pain on most days and the location of the pain: anterior, groin, lateral, buttocks, or low back. In the Framingham study, participants with hip pain were also examined for hip pain with internal rotation. The authors analysed the agreement between radiographic hip osteoarthritis and hip pain, and for those with hip pain suggestive of hip osteoarthritis they calculated the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of radiographs as the diagnostic test. Study answer and limitations In the Framingham study (n=946), only 15.6% of hips in patients with frequent hip pain showed radiographic evidence of hip osteoarthritis, and 20.7% of hips with radiographic hip osteoarthritis were frequently painful. The sensitivity of radiographic hip osteoarthritis for hip pain localised to the groin was 36.7%, specificity 90.5%, positive predictive value 6.0%, and negative predictive value 98.9%. Results did not differ much for hip pain at other locations or for painful internal rotation. In the Osteoarthritis Initiative study (n=4366), only 9.1% of hips in patients with frequent pain showed radiographic hip osteoarthritis, and 23.8% of hips with radiographic hip osteoarthritis were frequently painful. The sensitivity of definite radiographic hip osteoarthritis for hip pain localised to the groin was 16.5%, specificity 94.0%, positive predictive value 7.1%, and negative predictive value 97.6%. Results also did not differ much for hip pain at other locations. What this

  5. Anemia in the Neonate: The Differential Diagnosis and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Nassin, Michele L; Lapping-Carr, Gabrielle; de Jong, Jill L O

    2015-07-01

    Anemia is a common problem in the neonatal period. Presenting symptoms may suggest numerous possible diagnoses ranging from anemia seen as a normal part of development to anemia due to critical pathology. An illustrative case is presented to highlight the appropriate evaluation of the neonate with significant anemia. Several important features of the evaluation of neonatal anemia are highlighted. The constellation of signs and symptoms that occur in conjunction with the anemia are critical for the evaluation. The evaluation should be performed in a step-wise process that starts by eliminating common causes of anemia. Manual review of the peripheral blood smear with a hematologist can be helpful. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Fracture After Total Hip Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... er Total Hip Replacement cont. • Dislocation • Limb length inequality • Poor fracture healing • Repeat fracture • Lack of in- ... Surgeons (AAOS). To learn more about your orthopaedic health, please visit orthoinfo.org. Page ( 5 ) AAOS does ...

  7. What Is a Hip Replacement?

    MedlinePlus

    ... reduce joint pain and stiffness. It can increase muscle strength and joint range of motion (how much you ... goals after hip replacement surgery are to: Increase muscle strength Increase your blood circulation and overall fitness Avoid ...

  8. Monoarticular Hip Involvement in Pseudogout

    PubMed Central

    Kocyigit, Figen; Kuyucu, Ersin; Kocyigit, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Pseudogout is the acutest form of arthritis in the elderly. Although clinical manifestations vary widely, polyarticular involvement is typical mimicking osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis. Monoarticular involvement is relatively rare and is generally provoked by another medical condition. There are reported cases of hip involvement by pseudogout in monoarticular form. However, all of the cases were presented as septic arthritis. In this report, we present a case of monoarticular hip involvement mimicking soft tissue abscess. We confirmed the pseudogout diagnosis after ultrasonographic evaluation of the involved hip joint and pathological and biochemical analysis of synovial fluid analysis. Diagnosis is important to avoid unnecessary medical and surgical treatment in cases of the bizarre involvement of hip in pseudogout. PMID:25838961

  9. An arthroscopic hip documentation form.

    PubMed

    Gokhale, Satesh; Khan, Munir; Kuiper, Jan-Herman; Richardson, James B; Davies, Jonathan P

    2008-07-01

    Hip arthroscopy is becoming increasingly popular. A simple, precise, and practical means of recording arthroscopic findings will be useful for diagnostic, research, and audit purposes. Basic principles of cartography exist to produce two-dimensional paper representations of our spherical planet. We used the same principles to produce a two-dimensional map of the acetabulum and femoral head. The resulting hip diagram shows the acetabulum as viewed from the side and the femoral head as viewed from above. The ligamentum teres is attached to the medial margin of the head. The head-neck junction and part of the femoral neck is shown at the opposite margin of the ligamentum teres. The hip documentation form is simple, precise, and accurate. We use it to record our findings at hip arthroscopy, which we have used to assist us in our practice.

  10. [Hip replacement in military personnel].

    PubMed

    Maksimov, I B; Paniushin, K A; Brizhan', L K; Buriachenko, B P; Varfolomeev, D I; Mimanchev, O V

    2014-01-01

    Hip joint diseases and injuries are common for orthopedic pathology among military personnel. Hip replacement is one of the most frequent operations. Authors evaluated hip replacement in 136 servicemen treated at the center of traumatology and orthopedics of Burdenko General Military Clinical Hospital of the Ministry of Defense of Russia in 2010-2013. On the basis of the conducted analysis the main disease groups were revealed, peculiarities of pathology among this category of patients. Authors proposed surgical doctrine for the treatment of this contingent. Effective surgical treatment, in particular, hip replacement surgery, conducted with the use of the proposed principles, as a rule, fully functionally cured patients and contributes to return them in the system that contributes to the strengthening of defensibility of the country.

  11. Neonatal renal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Leonardo R; Simpson, Ewurabena A; Lau, Keith K

    2011-12-01

    Neonatal renal vein thrombosis (RVT) continues to pose significant challenges for pediatric hematologists and nephrologists. The precise mechanism for the onset and propagation of renal thrombosis within the neonatal population is unclear, but there is suggestion that acquired and/or inherited thrombophilia traits may increase the risk for renal thromboembolic disease during the newborn period. This review summarizes the most recent studies of neonatal RVT, examining its most common features, the prevalence of acquired and inherited prothrombotic risk factors among these patients, and evaluates their short and long term renal and thrombotic outcomes as they may relate to these risk factors. Although there is some consensus regarding the management of neonatal RVT, the most recent antithrombotic therapy guidelines for the management of childhood thrombosis do not provide a risk-based algorithm for the acute management of RVT among newborns with hereditary prothrombotic disorders. Whereas neonatal RVT is not a condition associated with a high mortality rate, it is associated with significant morbidity due to renal impairment. Recent evidence to evaluate the effects of heparin-based anticoagulation and thrombolytic therapy on the long term renal function of these patients has yielded conflicting results. Long term cohort studies and randomized trials may be helpful to clarify the impact of acute versus prolonged antithrombotic therapy for reducing the morbidity that is associated with neonatal RVT. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Hip labral repair: options and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Harris, Joshua D

    2016-12-01

    The importance of the acetabular labrum has been increasingly recognized, playing a critical role in both normal anatomy and abnormal pathology of the hip joint. The labrum increases acetabular surface area and volume, providing a stable and durable articulation. The fibrocartilaginous composition affords a tissue capable of a lifetime of normal function in the absence of significant osseous pathology. In the setting of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) or dysplasia, bony biomechanics may cause labral injury, which may translate to patient symptoms. Long-term consequences of labral tears may include joint degeneration. Labral preservation surgery emphasizes retention of the form and function of the labrum, prioritizing labral repair (in the presence of reparable tissue) and reconstruction (in the absence of reparable tissue) over debridement. Patient-reported outcomes have consistently demonstrated significantly better results following labral repair versus debridement. In conjunction with correction of osseous abnormalities, labral surgery can improve short-term outcomes and potentially reduce the risk of long-term osteoarthritis.

  13. On hip and lumbar biomechanics. A study of joint load and muscular activity.

    PubMed

    Németh, G

    1984-01-01

    Loading moment of force about the hip and lumbo-sacral joints during straight and flexed knee lifting was calculated at regular intervals during the lifts, using a computerized sagittal plane model. Lift with flexed knees and burden moved close to the body was found to induce lower load. Important parameters influencing the induced joint load are discussed. EMG levels from three trunk and seven hip muscles were recorded with surface electrodes and normalized, i.e. expressed as a percentage of the recorded level of each muscle during an isometric voluntary contraction. The erector spinae, gluteus maximus and adductor magnus muscles were more activated initially in the flexed knee lifts than in the straight knee lift, while the hamstrings were more and earlier activated in the flexed knee lifts. In order to estimate what proportion of the maximum hip extensor muscle moment was used to counteract the induced load moments about the hip, assessments of maximum hip extensor muscle moments were made: the highest extensor muscle moment was exerted at 90 degrees hip flexion, decreasing with decreasing hip angle. The knee angle did not significantly influence the muscle moments exerted by the hip extensor muscles. To calculate the magnitude and direction of the hip compressive load from known load moments, the length of the moment arms of three hip extensors was determined at every fifth degree of flexion at hip flexion angles between 0 degrees and 90 degrees by combining data from autopsy specimens and patients, the latter examined by computed tomography. There were significant differences in moment arm length between men and women but there was low correlation between subject's height and length of muscular moment arms. The calculated compressive force during the lifts was about three times body weight and the direction of the compressive force passed through the area described by others as having the most severe osteoarthrotic lesions on the femoral head. Hip joint load

  14. [Functional prognostic factors in older adults with hip fracture].

    PubMed

    Infante-Castro, Celia Itxelt; Rojano-Mejía, David; Ayala-Vázquez, Graciela; Aguilar-Esparza, Grushenka

    2013-01-01

    Hip fracture is common in elderly people who fall. We now describe clinical and social factors independently associated with incomplete functional recovery. to identify clinical and social factors associated with postoperative function in elderly hip fracture. A prospective, analytical study of elderly postoperative hip fracture, using non-probability sample of cases including consecutive patients older than 60 years with postoperative hip fracture, excluding those with hyperactive and hypoactive delirium or noy independent in activities of daily life before the injury. Data were collected on age, sex, number of comorbidities, type of fracture and surgery. Within the first 24 to 48 hours we evaluated the cognitive and emotional status, family status, with a final assessment of the Katz index at 3 months after the fracture. Statistical analysis was done using logistic regression. We obtained adjusted odds ratios (ORA) associated functionality, for age < 85 years: 7.21 (95% CI, 1.79-28.98), normal cognitive status 10.74 (95% CI, 3.13-38.83), and functional family situation 8.5 (95% CI, 1.97-32.76). Age, cognitive status, and family status are important predictors of functional recovery in the short term elderly postoperative hip fracture.

  15. Cognitive Outcomes After Neonatal Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Shankaran, Seetha; McDonald, Scott A.; Vohr, Betty R.; Hintz, Susan R.; Ehrenkranz, Richard A.; Tyson, Jon E.; Yolton, Kimberly; Das, Abhik; Bara, Rebecca; Hammond, Jane; Higgins, Rosemary D.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the spectrum of cognitive outcomes of children with and without cerebral palsy (CP) after neonatal encephalopathy, evaluate the prognostic value of early developmental testing and report on school services and additional therapies. METHODS: The participants of this study are the school-aged survivors of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network randomized controlled trial of whole-body hypothermia. Children underwent neurologic examinations and neurodevelopmental and cognitive testing with the Bayley Scales of Infant Development–II at 18 to 22 months and the Wechsler intelligence scales and the Neuropsychological Assessment–Developmental Neuropsychological Assessment at 6 to 7 years. Parents were interviewed about functional status and receipt of school and support services. We explored predictors of cognitive outcome by using multiple regression models. RESULTS: Subnormal IQ scores were identified in more than a quarter of the children: 96% of survivors with CP had an IQ <70, 9% of children without CP had an IQ <70, and 31% had an IQ of 70 to 84. Children with a mental developmental index <70 at 18 months had, on average, an adjusted IQ at 6 to 7 years that was 42 points lower than that of those with a mental developmental index >84 (95% confidence interval, −49.3 to −35.0; P < .001). Twenty percent of children with normal IQ and 28% of those with IQ scores of 70 to 84 received special educational support services or were held back ≥1 grade level. CONCLUSIONS: Cognitive impairment remains an important concern for all children with neonatal encephalopathy. PMID:25713280

  16. Cognitive outcomes after neonatal encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Athina; Shankaran, Seetha; McDonald, Scott A; Vohr, Betty R; Hintz, Susan R; Ehrenkranz, Richard A; Tyson, Jon E; Yolton, Kimberly; Das, Abhik; Bara, Rebecca; Hammond, Jane; Higgins, Rosemary D

    2015-03-01

    To describe the spectrum of cognitive outcomes of children with and without cerebral palsy (CP) after neonatal encephalopathy, evaluate the prognostic value of early developmental testing and report on school services and additional therapies. The participants of this study are the school-aged survivors of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network randomized controlled trial of whole-body hypothermia. Children underwent neurologic examinations and neurodevelopmental and cognitive testing with the Bayley Scales of Infant Development-II at 18 to 22 months and the Wechsler intelligence scales and the Neuropsychological Assessment-Developmental Neuropsychological Assessment at 6 to 7 years. Parents were interviewed about functional status and receipt of school and support services. We explored predictors of cognitive outcome by using multiple regression models. Subnormal IQ scores were identified in more than a quarter of the children: 96% of survivors with CP had an IQ <70, 9% of children without CP had an IQ <70, and 31% had an IQ of 70 to 84. Children with a mental developmental index <70 at 18 months had, on average, an adjusted IQ at 6 to 7 years that was 42 points lower than that of those with a mental developmental index >84 (95% confidence interval, -49.3 to -35.0; P < .001). Twenty percent of children with normal IQ and 28% of those with IQ scores of 70 to 84 received special educational support services or were held back ≥1 grade level. Cognitive impairment remains an important concern for all children with neonatal encephalopathy. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  17. Is incidental gestational thrombocytopaenia really always safe for the neonate?

    PubMed

    Pourrat, O; Valère, G; Pierre, F

    2014-08-01

    It is widely admitted that neonates' platelet counts (PCs) are always normal in babies born to mothers with incidental gestational thrombocytopaenia. However, results of PC determinations at delivery have led us to wonder whether incidental gestational thrombocytopaenia is actually safe for the neonate under all circumstances, and to recommend that for every baby born to a mother with a pregnancy-associated thrombocytopaenia, even in the case of confirmed IGT, platelet counts on umbilical cord blood be closely monitored.

  18. Current possibilities for hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Polesello, Giancarlo Cavalli; Pereira Guimarães, Rodrigo; Ricioli Júnior, Walter; Keiske Ono, Nelson; Kiyoshi Honda, Emerson; Cavalheiro de Queiroz, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Hip arthroscopy has been popularized over the last decade and, with technical advances regarding imaging diagnostics, understanding of the physiopathology or surgical techniques, several applications have been described. Both arthroscopy for intra-articular conditions and endoscopy for extra-articular procedures can be used in diagnosing or treating different conditions. This updated article has the objective of presenting the various current possibilities for hip arthroscopy.

  19. Curved-stem Hip Resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Hip resurfacing is an attractive concept because it preserves rather than removes the femoral head and neck. Most early designs had high failure rates, but one unique design had a femoral stem. Because that particular device appeared to have better implant survival, this study assessed the clinical outcome and long-term survivorship of a hip resurfacing prosthesis. Four hundred forty-five patients (561 hips) were retrospectively reviewed after a minimum of 20 years’ followup or until death; 23 additional patients were lost to followup. Patients received a metal femoral prosthesis with a small curved stem. Three types of acetabular reconstructions were used: (1) cemented polyurethane; (2) metal-on-metal; and (3) polyethylene secured with cement or used as the liner of a two-piece porous-coated implant. Long-term results were favorable with the metal-on-metal combination only. The mean overall Harris hip score was 92 at 2 years of followup. None of the 121 patients (133 hips) who received metal-on-metal articulation experienced failure. The failure rate with polyurethane was 100%, and the failure rate with cemented polyethylene was 41%. Hip resurfacing with a curved-stem femoral component had a durable clinical outcome when a metal-on-metal articulation was used. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18338217

  20. DYSPLASIA OF HIP DEVELOPMENT: UPDATE

    PubMed Central

    Guarniero, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The term “developmental dysplasia of the hip” (DDH) includes a wide spectrum of abnormalities that affect the hip during its growth, ranging from dysplasia to joint dislocation and going through different degrees of coxofemoral subluxation. The incidence of DDH is variable, and depends on a number of factors, including geographical location. Approximately one in 1,000 newborn infants may present hip dislocation and around 10 in 1,000 present hip instability. Brazil has an incidence of five per 1,000 in terms of findings of a positive Ortolani sign, which is the early clinical sign for detecting the disorder. The risk factors for DDH include: female sex, white skin color, primiparity, young mother, breech presentation at birth, family history, oligohydramnios, newborns with greater weight and height, and deformities of the feet or spine. Hip examinations should be routine for newborns, and should be emphasized in maternity units. Among newborns and infants, the diagnosis of DDH is preeminently clinical and is made using the Ortolani and Barlow maneuvers. Conventional radiography is of limited value for confirming the diagnosis of DDH among newborns, and ultrasound of the hip is the ideal examination. The treatment of DDH is challenging, both for pediatric orthopedists and for general practitioners. The objectives of the treatment include diagnosis as early as possible, joint reduction and stabilization of the hip in a secure position. Classically, treatment options are divided according to different age groups, at the time of diagnosis. PMID:27022528

  1. Developmental dysplasia of the hip in infants with congenital muscular torticollis.

    PubMed

    Minihane, Keith P; Grayhack, John J; Simmons, Todd D; Seshadri, Roopa; Wysocki, Robert W; Sarwark, John F

    2008-09-01

    Infants with congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) are at increased risk for developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH), which has led to increased use of diagnostic procedures. Our goal in this study was to establish indications for imaging the hips of infants presenting with CMT. We reviewed the cases of 292 patients with the diagnosis of CMT, 16 of whom were found to have DDH. Each patient with DDH had an abnormal clinical hip examination. Our study results demonstrate that, despite the association of these disorders, an infant presenting with CMT does not require routine hip imaging in light of a normal clinical hip examination. The coexistence rate for CMT and DDH requiring treatment is 4.5%, which is lower than the commonly accepted 20%.

  2. A computer-based image analysis method for assessing the severity of hip joint osteoarthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boniatis, Ioannis; Costaridou, Lena; Cavouras, Dionisis; Panagiotopoulos, Elias; Panayiotakis, George

    2006-12-01

    A computer-based image analysis method was developed for assessing the severity of hip osteoarthritis (OA). Eighteen pelvic radiographs of patients with verified unilateral hip OA, were digitized and enhanced employing custom developed software. Two ROIs corresponding to osteoarthritic and contralateral-physiological radiographic Hip Joint Spaces (HJSs) were determined on each radiograph. Textural features were extracted from the HJS-ROIs utilizing the run-length matrices and Laws textural measures. A k-Nearest Neighbour based hierarchical tree structure was designed for classifying hips into three OA severity categories labeled as "Normal", "Mild/Moderate", and "Severe". Employing the run-length features, the overall classification accuracy of the hierarchical tree structure was 86.1%. The utilization of Laws' textural measures improved the system classification performance, providing an overall classification accuracy of 94.4%. The proposed method maybe of value to physicians in assessing the severity of hip OA.

  3. Clinical trials in neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Oeser, Clarissa; Lutsar, Irja; Metsvaht, Tuuli; Turner, Mark A; Heath, Paul T; Sharland, Mike

    2013-12-01

    Antibiotic licensing studies remain a problem in neonates. The classical adult clinical syndrome-based licensing studies do not apply to neonates, where sepsis is the most common infection. The main obstacle to conducting neonatal antibiotic trials is a lack of consensus on the definition of neonatal sepsis itself and the selection of appropriate endpoints. This article describes the difficulties of the clinical and laboratory definitions of neonatal sepsis and reviews the varying designs of previous neonatal sepsis trials. The optimal design of future trials of new antibiotics will need to be based on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic parameters, combined with adequately powered clinical studies to determine safety and efficacy.

  4. Results of hip resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Favetti, Fabio; Casella, Filippo; Papalia, Matteo; Panegrossi, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Background The renewed popularity of resurfacing hip arthroplasty in the last 10 years has generated a remarkable quantity of scientific contributions based on mid- and short-term follow-up. More than one paper has reported a consistent early revision rate as a consequence of biological or biomechanical failure. Two major complications are commonly described with resurfacing implants: avascular necrosis and femoral-neck fracture. A close relationship between these two events has been suggested, but not firmly demonstrated, whereas cementing technique seems to be better understood as potential cause of failure. Methods We performed an in vitro study in which four different resurfacing implants were evaluated with a simulated femoral head, two types of cement, (low and high viscosity) and two cementing techniques: direct (cement apposition directly on the femoral head) and indirect (cement poured into the femoral component). Results High-viscosity cement showed homogeneous distribution over the entire femoral head. Low-viscosity cement showed a massive polar concentration with insufficient, if not absent, distribution in the equatorial zone. Conclusion Polar cement concentration could be a risk factor for early implant failure due to two effects on the femoral head: biological (excessive local exothermic reaction could cause osteocyte necrosis) and biomechanical (which could lead to uneven load distribution on the femoral head). PMID:21234563

  5. Bursitis of the Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... Symptoms include joint pain and tenderness, swelling and warmth around the affected area. The pain is often ... your ability to function normally, you may need physical therapy to help you move again. This is ...

  6. Arthritis in hip (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Cartilage normally protects the joint, allowing for smooth movement. Cartilage also absorbs shock when pressure is placed on ... like when walking. Arthritis involves the breakdown of cartilage. Without the usual amount of cartilage, the bones ...

  7. Atazanavir in pregnancy: impact on neonatal hyperbilirubinemia.

    PubMed

    Mandelbrot, Laurent; Mazy, Fabienne; Floch-Tudal, Corinne; Meier, Françoise; Azria, Elie; Crenn-Hebert, Catherine; Treluyer, Jean Marc; Herinomenzanahary, Evelyne; Ferreira, Claudia; Peytavin, Gilles

    2011-07-01

    To study the impact on the neonate of maternal antiretroviral therapy with atazanavir (ATV). An observational study of 22 HIV-infected women receiving, for clinical indications, antiretroviral therapy with ATV 300 mg and ritonavir 100mg during pregnancy and their 23 HIV infants (including a twin pair). Mothers had received ATV for a median duration of 19 months [range 3-49] by delivery. At delivery, plasma HIV-RNA was <40 copies/mL in all patients. Liver enzymes were normal in 19/22 patients, but one woman had grade 3-4 liver toxicity. Maternal serum bilirubin concentrations were above the upper limit of normal in most patients, with grade 3 toxicity in 5 patients. All but one woman had trough ATV concentrations during pregnancy above the minimum effective concentration. The median cord blood ATV concentration was 130 ng/mL [range<30-758]; the cord/maternal ratio was 21%. All neonates were born at term [median 38.2 weeks]. Three neonates had mildly elevated AST transaminase levels. Bilirubin concentrations at birth were significantly higher than maternal concentrations, with a median of 44 μm/L [range 24-129]; values on days 2-3 were 63 [8-212]. Five neonates had jaundice requiring phototherapy, without liver damage, and recovered without sequelae. Neonates whose mothers were treated with ATV should be monitored for hyperbilirubinemia, which may be due to placental transfer of unconjugated bilirubin from the mother and/or a direct effect of transplacental ATV on bilirubin metabolism in the fetus. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Descriptive profile of hip range of motion in elite tennis players.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Pérez, Victor; Ayala, Francisco; Fernandez-Fernandez, Jaime; Vera-Garcia, Francisco J

    2016-05-01

    To describe the range of motion (ROM) profile (flexion, extension, abduction, internal and external rotation) of the hip in elite tennis players; and (b) to analyse if there are sex-related differences in the hip ROM. Cohort study. Controlled laboratory environment. 81 male and 28 female tennis players completed this study. Descriptive measures of passive hip flexion, extension and abduction, and internal and external active and passive hip rotation ROM were taken. Magnitude-based inferences on differences between sex (males vs. females) and hip (dominant vs. non-dominant) were made by standardising differences. No clinically meaningful bilateral and sex-related differences in any of the hip ROM measures. In addition, it was found that both males and females had restricted mobility measures on hip flexion (<80°), extension (<0°) and abduction (<40°). Furthermore, the 30% of males also presented restricted active and passive hip internal rotation ROM values (<25°). Finally, both males and females had normal mobility measures of hip external rotation ROM (active [>25°] and passive [35°]) Asymmetric hip joint ROM measures found during clinical examination and screening may indicate abnormalities and the need of rehabilitation (e.g., flexibility training). In addition, clinicians should include specific exercises (e.g., stretching) in their conditioning, prevention and rehabilitation programmes aiming to avoid restricted mobility of hip flexion (males = 74°; females = 78°), extension (males = -1.5; females = -0.4), abduction (males = 35°; females = 34°) and internal rotation (males = 30°; females = 35) that might be generated as a consequence of playing tennis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Hip joint geometry effects on cartilage contact stresses during a gait cycle.

    PubMed

    Hui-Hui Wu; Dong Wang; An-Bang Ma; Dong-Yun Gu

    2016-08-01

    The cartilage surface geometry of natural human hip joint is commonly regarded as sphere. It has been widely applied in computational simulation and hip joint prosthesis design. Some new geometry models have been developed and the sphere assumption has been questioned recently. The objective of this study was to analyze joint geometry effects on cartilage contact stress distribution and investigate contact patterns during a whole gait cycle. Hip surface was reconstructed from CT data of a healthy volunteer. Three finite element (FE) models of hip joint were developed from different cartilage geometries: natural geometry, sphere and rotational ellipsoid. Loads at ten instants of gait cycle were applied to these models based on published in-vivo data. FE predictions of peak contact pressure during gait of natural hip were compared with sphere and rotational ellipsoid replaced hip joint. Contact occurs mainly in upper anterior region of both acetabulum and femur distributing along sagittal plane of human body. It moves towards inferolateral aspect as the resultant joint reaction force changes during walking for natural hip. Peak pressures at the instant with maximum contact force were 7.48 MPa, 14.97 MPa and 13.12 MPa for models with natural hip surface, sphere replaced and rotational ellipsoid replaced surface respectively. During the whole gait cycle, contact pressure of natural hip ranked lowest in most of the instants, followed by rotational ellipsoid replaced and sphere replaced hip. The results indicate that rotational ellipsoid is more consistent with natural hip cartilage geometry than sphere during normal walking. This means rotational ellipsoid prosthesis could give a better description of physiological structure compared with standard sphere prosthesis. Therefore, rotational ellipsoid would be a better choice for prosthesis design.

  10. Calculating the hip center of rotation using contralateral pelvic anatomy.

    PubMed

    Durand-Hill, Matthieu; Henckel, Johann; Satchithananda, Keshthra; Sabah, Shiraz; Hua, Jia; Hothi, Harry; Langstaff, Ronald J; Skinner, John; Hart, Alister

    2016-06-01

    Failure to place an artificial hip in the optimal center of rotation results in poor hip function and costly complications. The aim of this study was to develop robust methodology to estimate hip center of rotation (hCoR) from preoperative computed tomography (CT) scans, using contralateral anatomy, in patients with unilateral diseased hips. Ten patients (five male, five female) with normal pelvic anatomy, and one patient with a unilateral dysplastic acetabulum were recruited from the London Implant Retrieval center image bank. 3D models of each pelvis were generated using commercial software. Two methods for estimation of hCoR were compared. Method 1 used a mirroring technique alone. Method 2 utilized mirroring and automatic alignment. Predicted versus actual hCoR co-ordinates were compared using intraclass correlation coefficients and paired T-tests. Both methods predicted hCoR with excellent agreement to original co-ordinates (>0.9) in all axes. Both techniques allowed prediction of the hCoR within ± 5 mm in all axes. Both techniques provided useful clinical information for planning acetabular reconstruction in patients with unilateral defects. Method 1 was less complex and is suitable for patients with developmental and degenerative pathologies. Method 2 may provide greater accuracy in a discrete group of patients with normal development prior to pathology (e.g., acetabular fractures). © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1077-1083, 2016.

  11. Measuring hip muscle strength in patients with femoroacetabular impingement and other hip pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Mayne, E.; Memarzadeh, A.; Raut, P.; Arora, A.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to systematically review the literature on measurement of muscle strength in patients with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and other pathologies and to suggest guidelines to standardise protocols for future research in the field. Methods The Cochrane and PubMed libraries were searched for any publications using the terms ‘hip’, ‘muscle’, ‘strength’, and ‘measurement’ in the ‘Title, Abstract, Keywords’ field. A further search was performed using the terms ‘femoroacetabular’ or ‘impingement’. The search was limited to recent literature only. Results A total of 29 articles were reviewed to obtain information on a number of variables. These comprised the type of device used for measurement, rater standardisation, the type of movements tested, body positioning and comparative studies of muscle strength in FAI versus normal controls. The studies found that hip muscle strength is lower in patients with FAI; this is also true for the asymptomatic hip in patients with FAI. Conclusions Current literature on this subject is limited and examines multiple variables. Our recommendations for achieving reproducible results include stabilising the patient, measuring isometric movements and maximising standardisation by using a single tester and familiarising the participants with the protocol. Further work must be done to demonstrate the reliability of any new testing method. Cite this article: E. Mayne, A. Memarzadeh, P. Raut, A. Arora, V. Khanduja. Measuring hip muscle strength in patients with femoroacetabular impingement and other hip pathologies: A systematic review. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:66–72. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.61.BJR-2016-0081. PMID:28108483

  12. Surgical hip dislocation in treatment of slipped capital femoral epiphysis

    PubMed Central

    Elmarghany, Mohammed; Abd El-Ghaffar, Tarek M.; Seddik, Mahmoud; Akar, Ahmed; Gad, Yousef; Ragheb, Eissa; Aprato, Alessandro; Massè, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    Background: Most surgeons advocate in situ fixation of the slipped epiphysis with acceptance of any persistent deformity in the proximal femur [Aronsson DD, Loder RT, Breur GJ, Weinstein SL (2006) Slipped capital femoral epiphysis: current concepts. J Am Acad Orthop Surg 14, 666–679]. This residual deformity can lead to osteoarthritis due to femoroacetabular cam impingement (FAI) [Leunig M, Slongo T, Ganz R (2008) Subcapital realignment in slipped capital femoral epiphysis: surgical hip dislocation and trimming of the stable trochanter to protect the perfusion of the epiphysis. Instr Course Lect 57, 499–507]. Objective: The primary aim of our study was to report the results of the technique of capital realignment with Ganz surgical hip dislocation and its reproducibility to restore hip anatomy and function. Patients and methods: This prospective case series study included 30 patients (32 hips, 13 left (Lt) hips, 19 right (Rt) hips) with stable chronic slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) after surgical correction with a modified Dunn procedure. This study included 22 males and eight females. The mean age of our patients was 14 years (10–18 years). The mean follow-up period was 14.5 months (6–36 months). Results: Thirty hips had excellent and good clinical and radiographic outcomes with respect to hip function and radiographic parameters. Two patients had fair to poor clinical outcome including three patients who developed Avascular Necrosis (AVN). The difference between those who developed AVN and those who did not develop AVN was statistically significant in postoperative clinical scores (p = 0.0000). The mean slip angle of the femoral head was 52.5° ± 14.6 preoperatively and was corrected to a mean value of 5.6° ± 8.2° with mean correction of 46.85° ± 14.9° (p = 0.0000). The mean postoperative alpha angle was 51.15° ± 4.2° with mean correction of 46.70 ± 14.20 (p = 0.0000). In our series, the mean postoperative Harris hip

  13. Research Summaries for Normal Birth

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Amy M.; Goer, Henci

    2007-01-01

    In this column, the authors summarize four research studies that further support the benefits of normal birth. The topics of the studies include the association of cesarean birth with an increased risk of neonatal death; the use of acupuncture and self-hypnosis as effective pain-management strategies; factors associated with amniotic-fluid embolism; and the positive influence of continuous support by lay doulas on obstetric outcomes for low-income women. PMID:18408810

  14. Maternal obesity, mode of delivery, and neonatal outcome.

    PubMed

    Blomberg, Marie

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate whether adverse neonatal outcome, defined as birth injuries or severe illnesses in the newborn, was associated with maternal body mass index (BMI) in singleton pregnancies overall and depending on mode of delivery. This was a cohort study including 1,024,471 women. Data were collected from the Swedish Medical Birth Registry. Women were categorized into six classes of BMI. Obese women were compared with normal weight women regarding adverse neonatal outcome after suitable adjustments. Four modes of delivery were evaluated: vaginal delivery; instrumental vaginal delivery; elective cesarean delivery; and emergency cesarean delivery. Compared with neonates born to women of normal weight, neonates born to women with BMIs of 40 or more (morbidly obese) were at increased risk of birth injury to the peripheral nervous system (odds ratio [OR] 3.80, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.83-5.12; 0.2% compared with 0.6%), birth injury to the skeleton (OR 2.59, 95% CI 2.10-3.21; 0.5% compared with 1.1%), respiratory distress syndrome (OR 2.08, 95% CI 1.88-2.30; 2.9 compared with 5.8%), bacterial sepsis (OR 2.90, 95% CI 2.43-3.46; 0.6% compared with 1.7%), convulsions (OR 3.43, 95% CI 2.63-4.47; 0.2% compared with 0.8%), and hypoglycemia (OR 3.48, 95% CI 3.20-3.78; 2.4% compared with 7.9%). For morbidly obese women, elective cesarean delivery and vaginal delivery were associated with twice the increased risk of adverse neonatal outcomes when compared with women of normal weight. Neonates born to morbidly obese women are at markedly increased risk of adverse neonatal outcome regardless of mode of delivery. Obstetricians should not disregard the neonatal problems associated with elective cesarean delivery for morbidly obese women. II.

  15. Defining Neonatal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of the review Although infection rates have modestly decreased in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) as a result of ongoing quality improvement measures, neonatal sepsis remains a frequent and devastating problem among hospitalized preterm neonates. Despite multiple attempts to address this unmet need, there have been minimal advances in clinical management, outcomes, and accuracy of diagnostic testing options over the last three decades. One strong contributor to a lack of medical progress is a variable case definition of disease. The inability to agree on a precise definition greatly reduces the likelihood of aligning findings from epidemiologists, clinicians, and researchers, which, in turn, severely hinders progress towards improving outcomes. Recent findings Pediatric consensus definitions for sepsis are not accurate in term infants and are not appropriate for preterm infants. In contrast to the defined multi-stage criteria for other devastating diseases encountered in the NICU (e.g., bronchopulmonary dysplasia), there is significant variability in the criteria used by investigators to substantiate the diagnosis of neonatal sepsis. Summary The lack of an accepted consensus definition for neonatal sepsis impedes our efforts towards improved diagnostic and prognostic options as well as accurate outcomes information for this vulnerable population. PMID:26766602

  16. Neonatal Haemophilus influenzae infections.

    PubMed Central

    Takala, A K; Pekkanen, E; Eskola, J

    1991-01-01

    Nine cases of neonatal Haemophilus influenzae septicaemia were recorded in Finland during 1985-9; incidence was 2.8/100,000 live births, and 1.6% of all cases of neonatal septicaemia. The onset of the disease was early in all cases, ranging from 0-6 hours after delivery. Seven of the infants were preterm and three died (overall mortality 33%). H influenzae was isolated from blood in seven of the cases, and in two neonates with clinical signs of septicaemia it was found on several surface sites and the placenta. One of the eight strains of H influenzae was capsular type b and biotype I, the rest being non-typable--a distribution similar to those previously reported. Four of the uncapsulated strains were of biotype III, and three were of biotype II. None of the strains of H influenzae was of biotype IV, which has been reported to be characteristic of neonatal and genital isolates of H influenzae. All nine mothers had some sign of infection at the time of or shortly after delivery. H influenzae was isolated from five mothers: from the blood (n = 1) or from the placenta or cervix (n = 4). The use of intrauterine devices may be a possible risk factor for neonatal H influenzae infections; two of the mothers had such devices in place during their pregnancies. PMID:2025040

  17. Monitoring neonatal seizures.

    PubMed

    Boylan, Geraldine B; Stevenson, Nathan J; Vanhatalo, Sampsa

    2013-08-01

    Neonatal seizures are a neurological emergency and prompt treatment is required. Seizure burden in neonates can be very high, status epilepticus a frequent occurrence, and the majority of seizures do not have any clinical correlate. Detection of neonatal seizures is only possible with continuous electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring. EEG interpretation requires special expertise that is not available in most neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). As a result, a simplified method of EEG recording incorporating an easy-to-interpret compressed trend of the EEG output (amplitude integrated EEG) from one of the EEG output from one or two channels has emerged as a popular way to monitor neurological function in the NICU. This is not without limitations; short duration and low amplitude seizures can be missed, artefacts are problematic and may mimic seizure-like activity and only a restricted area of the brain is monitored. Continuous multichannel EEG is the gold standard for detecting seizures and monitoring response to therapy but expert interpretation of the EEG output is generally not available. Some centres have set up remote access for neurophysiologists to the cot-side EEG, but reliable interpretation is wholly dependent on the 24 h availability of experts, an expensive solution. A more practical solution for the NICU without such expertise is an automated seizure detection system. This review outlines the current state of the art regarding cot-side monitoring of neonatal seizures in the NICU.

  18. Hip abductor, trunk extensor and ankle plantar flexor endurance in females with and without patellofemoral pain.

    PubMed

    Van Cant, Joachim; Pitance, Laurent; Feipel, Véronique

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have reported strength deficit in hip abduction, extension and external rotation in females with patellofemoral pain (PFP) when compared with healthy control; however, there is conflicting evidence for a decrease in hip muscle endurance. Therefore, it seems important to evaluate hip muscle endurance in females with PFP. Moreover, trunk extensor and ankle plantar flexor endurance have not yet been evaluate in females with PFP. To compare hip abductor, trunk extensor and ankle plantar flexor endurance between females with and without PFP. Twenty females with PFP (mean age, 21.1 years) and 76 healthy females (mean age, 20.5 years) were recruited. Subject performed three endurance clinical tests: (1) The hip abductor isometric endurance test, (2) The Sorensen test and (3) The heel rise test. Group differences were assessed using an independent t tests, or Mann-Whitney U tests for non-normally distributed data. Subjects with PFP exhibited significantly lower hip abductor, trunk extensor and ankle plantar flexor endurance than healthy controls. On average, subjects with PFP had deficits of 16% in hip abduction, 14% in trunk extension and 26% in ankle plantar flexion. Females with PFP exhibited diminished hip abductor, trunk extensor and ankle plantar flexor endurance compared to healthy controls.

  19. Disruption of the endocytic protein HIP1 results in neurological deficits and decreased AMPA receptor trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Metzler, Martina; Li, Bo; Gan, Lu; Georgiou, John; Gutekunst, Claire-Anne; Wang, Yushan; Torre, Enrique; Devon, Rebecca S.; Oh, Rosemary; Legendre-Guillemin, Valerie; Rich, Mark; Alvarez, Christine; Gertsenstein, Marina; McPherson, Peter S.; Nagy, Andras; Wang, Yu Tian; Roder, John C.; Raymond, Lynn A.; Hayden, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    Huntingtin interacting protein 1 (HIP1) is a recently identified component of clathrin-coated vesicles that plays a role in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. To explore the normal function of HIP1 in vivo, we created mice with targeted mutation in the HIP1 gene (HIP1–/–). HIP1–/– mice develop a neurological phenotype by 3 months of age manifest with a failure to thrive, tremor and a gait ataxia secondary to a rigid thoracolumbar kyphosis accompanied by decreased assembly of endocytic protein complexes on liposomal membranes. In primary hippocampal neurons, HIP1 colocalizes with GluR1-containing AMPA receptors and becomes concentrated in cell bodies following AMPA stimulation. Moreover, a profound dose-dependent defect in clathrin-mediated internalization of GluR1-containing AMPA receptors was observed in neurons from HIP1–/– mice. Together, these data provide strong evidence that HIP1 regulates AMPA receptor trafficking in the central nervous system through its function in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. PMID:12839988

  20. Group B streptococcal neonatal parotitis.

    PubMed

    Dias Costa, Filipa; Ramos Andrade, Daniel; Cunha, Filipa Inês; Fernandes, Agostinho

    2015-06-10

    Acute neonatal parotitis (ANP) is a rare condition, characterised by parotid swelling and other local inflammatory signs. The most common pathogen is Staphylococcus aureus, but other organisms can be implicated. We describe the case of a 13-day-old term newborn, previously healthy, with late-onset group B Streptococcus (GBS) bacteraemia with ANP, who presented with irritability, reduced feeding and tender swelling of the right parotid. Laboratory evaluation showed neutrophilia, elevated C reactive protein and procalcitonin, with normal serum amylase concentration. Ultrasound findings were suggestive of acute parotitis. Empiric antibiotic therapy was immediately started and adjusted when culture results became available. The newborn was discharged after 10 days, with clinical improvement within the first 72 h. Although S. aureus is the most common pathogen implicated in ANP, GBS should be included in the differential diagnosis. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  1. Group B streptococcal neonatal parotitis

    PubMed Central

    Dias Costa, Filipa; Ramos Andrade, Daniel; Cunha, Filipa Inês; Fernandes, Agostinho

    2015-01-01

    Acute neonatal parotitis (ANP) is a rare condition, characterised by parotid swelling and other local inflammatory signs. The most common pathogen is Staphylococcus aureus, but other organisms can be implicated. We describe the case of a 13-day-old term newborn, previously healthy, with late-onset group B Streptococcus (GBS) bacteraemia with ANP, who presented with irritability, reduced feeding and tender swelling of the right parotid. Laboratory evaluation showed neutrophilia, elevated C reactive protein and procalcitonin, with normal serum amylase concentration. Ultrasound findings were suggestive of acute parotitis. Empiric antibiotic therapy was immediately started and adjusted when culture results became available. The newborn was discharged after 10 days, with clinical improvement within the first 72 h. Although S. aureus is the most common pathogen implicated in ANP, GBS should be included in the differential diagnosis. PMID:26063107

  2. Feasibility and Safety of Therapeutic Hypothermia and Short Term Outcome in Neonates with Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Purkayastha, Jayashree; Lewis, Leslie Edward; Bhat, Ramesh Y; Anusha, K M

    2016-02-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia is well known for neuroprotection in asphyxiated neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. The authors aimed to study the feasibility and safety of therapeutic hypothermia and short term outcome in neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). Total 31 neonates with moderate to severe HIE were enrolled in the study. Continuous temperature recording was noted in 31 neonates; 17 neonates were studied prospectively while 14 neonates were studied retrospectively. Rectal temperature was monitored in 31 neonates and maintained between 33 and 34 °C by switching off the warmer and using ice packs. Reusable ice packs were used which were inexpensive. Therapeutic hypothermia was maintained for 72 h and babies were then rewarmed 0.5 °C every hour. Therapeutic hypothermia was feasible and inexpensive. There was no major complication during the study. MRI was done in 17 neonates; 52 % were found to have normal MRI at the end of first week. Among the study neonates (n = 31) 64.5 % were neurologically normal at the time of discharge. To conclude, therapeutic hypothermia is feasible in a low resource setting and is a safe way of neuroprotection. Short term outcome was also favourable in these neonates.

  3. Hip1r is expressed in gastric parietal cells and is required for tubulovesicle formation and cell survival in mice

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Renu N.; Al-Menhali, Asma A.; Keeley, Theresa M.; Ren, Jianhua; El-Zaatari, Mohammed; Chen, Xunsheng; Merchant, Juanita L.; Ross, Theodora S.; Chew, Catherine S.; Samuelson, Linda C.

    2008-01-01

    Huntingtin interacting protein 1 related (Hip1r) is an F-actin– and clathrin-binding protein involved in vesicular trafficking. In this study, we demonstrate that Hip1r is abundantly expressed in the gastric parietal cell, predominantly localizing with F-actin to canalicular membranes. Hip1r may provide a critical function in vivo, as demonstrated by extensive changes to parietal cells and the gastric epithelium in Hip1r-deficient mice. Electron microscopy revealed abnormal apical canalicular membranes and loss of tubulovesicles in mutant parietal cells, suggesting that Hip1r is necessary for the normal trafficking of these secretory membranes. Accordingly, acid secretory dynamics were altered in mutant parietal cells, with enhanced activation and acid trapping, as measured in isolated gastric glands. At the whole-organ level, gastric acidity was reduced in Hip1r-deficient mice, and the gastric mucosa was grossly transformed, with fewer parietal cells due to enhanced apoptotic cell death and glandular hypertrophy associated with cellular transformation. Hip1r-deficient mice had increased expression of the gastric growth factor gastrin, and mice mutant for both gastrin and Hip1r exhibited normalization of both proliferation and gland height. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that Hip1r plays a significant role in gastric physiology, mucosal architecture, and secretory membrane dynamics in parietal cells. PMID:18535670

  4. Hip external rotator strength is associated with better dynamic control of the lower extremity during landing tasks

    PubMed Central

    Malloy, Philip; Morgan, Alexander; Meinerz, Carolyn; Geiser, Christopher F.; Kipp, Kristof

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the association between hip strength and lower extremity kinematics and kinetics during unanticipated single leg landing and cutting tasks in collegiate female soccer players. Twenty-three NCAA division I female soccer players were recruited for strength testing and biomechanical analysis. Maximal isometric hip abduction and external rotation strength were measured using a hand held dynamometer and expressed as muscle torque (force × femoral length) and normalized to body weight. Three-dimensional lower extremity kinematics and kinetics were assessed with motion analysis and force plates, and an inverse dynamics approach was used to calculate net internal joint moments that were normalized to body weight. Greater hip external rotator strength was significantly associated with greater peak hip external rotation moments (r = .47; p = 0.021), greater peak knee internal rotation moments (r = .41; p = 0.048), greater hip frontal plane excursion (r = .49; p = 0.017), and less knee transverse plane excursion (r = −.56; p = .004) during unanticipated single-leg landing and cutting tasks. In addition a statistical trend was detected between hip external rotator strength and peak hip frontal plane moments (r = .39; p = .06). The results suggest that females with greater hip external rotator strength demonstrate better dynamic control of the lower extremity during unanticipated single leg landing and cutting tasks and provide further support for the link between hip strength and lower extremity landing mechanics. PMID:26110347

  5. [Surgical treatment of hip osteoarthritis: update in total hip arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Ilizaliturri Sánchez, Víctor M; Mangino Pariente, Gerardo; Camacho Galindo, Javier

    2007-10-01

    Total hip replacement is one of the most successful procedures in orthopaedic surgery. There are two different technologies for implant fixation in total hip replacement: cemented and cementless, both can be combined, which is called Hybrid arthroplasty. Long term implant stability results in long term function. The most important factor that limits longevity of well-fixed implants is the wear of the articular surfaces. Wear of the polyethylene from the acetabulum generates particles that access the implant bone or the implant-cement-bone interface. This produces an inflammatory reaction, osteolysis and implant loosening. Polyethylene of higher resistance to wear and prosthetic articulations without polyethylene (hard on hard bearings), have been introduced to improve wear particle generation. Minimally invasive surgical techniques minimize surgical trauma to sort tissue around the hip joint, facilitating a better and more rapid recovery.

  6. Total arthroplasty in displaced dysplastic hips with acetabular reconstruction and femoral shortening – technical note☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Paulo; de Oliveira, Leandro Alves; Coelho, Danilo Lopes; do Amaral, Rogério Andrade; Rebello, Percival Rosa; de Moraes, Frederico Barra

    2014-01-01

    To describe a new procedure of total hip replacement in patient with severe developmental dysplasia of the left hip, using technique of acetabular reconstruction with autogenous bone grafts and subtrochanteric shortening femoral osteotomy. Total hip replacement done in January of 2003. The Eftekhar's classification was used and included type D, neglected dislocations. Bone graft incorporated in acetabular shelf and femoral osteotomy. Our contribution is the use of an Allis plate to better fix acetabular grafts, avoiding loosening, and cerclage around bone graft in femoral osteotomy site, which diminish pseudoarthrosis risk. This technique shows efficiency, allowing immediately resolution for this case with pain and range of motion of hip improvement. It also allows the acetabular dysplasia reconstruction, equalization of the limb length (without elevated risk of neurovascular lesion) and repairs the normal hip biomechanics due to the correction of the hip's center of rotation. PMID:26229775

  7. Quantitative MRI of vastus medialis, vastus lateralis and gluteus medius muscle workload after squat exercise: comparison between squatting with hip adduction and hip abduction.

    PubMed

    Baffa, Augusto P; Felicio, Lilian R; Saad, Marcelo C; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello H; Santos, Antonio C; Bevilaqua-Grossi, Débora

    2012-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the use MRI to quantify the workload of gluteus medius (GM), vastus medialis (VM) and vastus lateralis (VL) muscles in different types of squat exercises. Fourteen female volunteers were evaluated, average age of 22 ± 2 years, sedentary, without clinical symptoms, and without history of previous lower limb injuries. Quantitative MRI was used to analyze VM, VL and GM muscles before and after squat exercise, squat associated with isometric hip adduction and squat associated with isometric hip abduction. Multi echo images were acquired to calculate the transversal relaxation times (T2) before and after exercise. Mixed Effects Model statistical analysis was used to compare images before and after the exercise (ΔT2) to normalize the variability between subjects. Imaging post processing was performed in Matlab software. GM muscle was the least active during the squat associated with isometric hip adduction and VM the least active during the squat associated with isometric hip abduction, while VL was the most active during squat associated with isometric hip adduction. Our data suggests that isometric hip adduction during the squat does not increase the workload of VM, but decreases the GM muscle workload. Squat associated with isometric hip abduction does not increase VL workload.

  8. Quantitative MRI of Vastus Medialis, Vastus Lateralis and Gluteus Medius Muscle Workload after Squat Exercise: Comparison Between Squatting with Hip Adduction and Hip Abduction

    PubMed Central

    Baffa, Augusto P.; Felicio, Lilian R.; Saad, Marcelo C.; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello H.; Santos, Antonio C.; Bevilaqua-Grossi, Débora

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the use MRI to quantify the workload of gluteus medius (GM), vastus medialis (VM) and vastus lateralis (VL) muscles in different types of squat exercises. Fourteen female volunteers were evaluated, average age of 22 ± 2 years, sedentary, without clinical symptoms, and without history of previous lower limb injuries. Quantitative MRI was used to analyze VM, VL and GM muscles before and after squat exercise, squat associated with isometric hip adduction and squat associated with isometric hip abduction. Multi echo images were acquired to calculate the transversal relaxation times (T2) before and after exercise. Mixed Effects Model statistical analysis was used to compare images before and after the exercise (ΔT2) to normalize the variability between subjects. Imaging post processing was performed in Matlab software. GM muscle was the least active during the squat associated with isometric hip adduction and VM the least active during the squat associated with isometric hip abduction, while VL was the most active during squat associated with isometric hip adduction. Our data suggests that isometric hip adduction during the squat does not increase the workload of VM, but decreases the GM muscle workload. Squat associated with isometric hip abduction does not increase VL workload. PMID:23486653

  9. Paracetamol overdose in a preterm neonate

    PubMed Central

    Isbister, G; Bucens, I; Whyte, I

    2001-01-01

    The first oral overdose of paracetamol in a neonate is reported. A 55 day old neonate, born 29 weeks premature, was accidentally given 136 mg/kg paracetamol. Treatment was with activated charcoal, supportive care, and N-acetylcysteine. There was no biochemical evidence of hepatotoxicity, and no long term sequelae. After modelling of the data, the following pharmacokinetic variables were calculated: absorption half life (tabs), 0.51 hours; volume of distribution (V/Foral), 0.80 litres/kg; clearance (CL/Foral), 0.22 litres/h; they were consistent with population pharmacokinetic studies. The increased plasma half life (Tβ) of 5.69 hours thus reflected normal slower metabolism in infants, rather than toxicity. The toxicity of paracetamol in neonates is unclear, but appears to be low because of slow oxidative metabolism and rapid glutathione synthesis. In an overdose, estimates of toxicity can be made from dose and Tβ in neonates, or from maternal toxicity in transplacental poisoning. Treatment includes N-acetylcysteine and supportive care, with activated charcoal for oral poisoning.

 PMID:11420329

  10. Patent ductus arteriosus in the premature neonate.

    PubMed

    Page, G G

    1985-03-01

    This article has reviewed current thought on the pathophysiology, medical management, and nursing implications of PDA in the premature newborn. The ductus arteriosus is a normal vascular channel that provides a route for blood flow to the descending aorta in the fetus; and it is an abnormal channel in the newborn that allows additional pulmonary blood flow to be shunted from the higher pressured aorta. Left heart volume overload and additional insults in connection with concurrent RDS and BPD were discussed. Current management for closure advocates indomethacin administration, and ligation, should indomethacin fail or be contraindicated. Continued patency with prostaglandin administration is the objective in cyanotic neonates with congenital heart disease and diminished pulmonary blood flow and in acyanotic neonates with aortic arch abnormalities that lead to decreased descending aortic flow. Nursing responsibilities encompass the well-being of the newborn as well as the family. The neonate must be assessed frequently for signs of cardiopulmonary deterioration. The neonate's responses to drug administration must be monitored for their effect on the ductus and the minimization of side effects. Care of the parents regarding support and information was discussed.

  11. Perceived loading and muscle activity during hip strengthening exercises: comparison of elastic resistance and machine exercises.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Mikkel; Jakobsen, Markus Due; Thorborg, Kristian; Sundstrup, Emil; Jay, Kenneth; Andersen, Lars L

    2013-12-01

    Decreased hip muscle strength is frequently reported in patients with hip injury or pathology. Furthermore, soccer players suffering from groin injury show decreased strength of hip muscles. Estimating 10-repetition maximum can be time-consuming and difficult, thus, using the Borg category rating 10 scale (Borg CR10 scale) can be a useful tool for estimating the intensity of exercise. The aims of this study were 1) to investigate the feasibility of the use of the Borg CR10 scale for rating strength training intensity of the hip abductor and hip adductor muscles, and 2) to compare hip muscle activity during hip abduction and hip adduction exercises using elastic resistance and isotonic machines, using electromyography (EMG). EMG activity was recorded from 11 muscles at the hip, thigh and trunk during hip adduction and hip abduction exercises in 16 untrained women, using elastic resistance and isotonic exercise machines. These recordings were normalized to maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) EMG (nEMG). The exercises were performed at four levels of perceived loading reported using the Borg CR10: light (Borg ≤2), moderate (Borg >2-<5), heavy (Borg ≥5-<7) and near maximum (Borg ≥7). Moderate to strong associations were observed between perceived loading and nEMG obtained during the adduction exercise with elastic resistance (r=0.8±0.3) as well as in machine (r=0.69±0.55) and the abduction exercise with elastic resistance (r=0.66±0.29) as well as in machine (r =0.62±0.54). The abduction exercise performed with elastic resistance displayed significantly higher gluteus medius nEMG recruitment than the in machine exercise. The results of this study show that the Borg CR10 scale can be a useful tool for estimating intensity levels during resistance training of the hip adductor and hip abductor muscles. Although elastic resistance and exercise machine seem equally effective for recruiting muscle activity of the hip adductors, the elastic resistance condition was

  12. Natal and neonatal teeth.

    PubMed

    Farsi, Deema J; Ahmed, Muhammad M

    2014-05-01

    Natal teeth (teeth present at birth) and neonatal teeth (teeth observed in the first 30 days of life) are uncommon. They may cause feeding problems and ulcerations on the ventral surface of the tongue. They can also be alarming to parents and cause discomfort with breastfeeding. A review of literature was conducted to review their etiology, significance, and clinical features with special emphasis on the complications and management. The opportunity of establishing a dental home through the early dental visits was highlighted. Furthermore, this case report details the examination and management of a 24-hour old neonate with 2 neonatal teeth. Natal teeth, although uncommon, are best referred to pediatric dentists for investigation and management.

  13. Patellofemoral pain and asymmetrical hip rotation.

    PubMed

    Cibulka, Michael T; Threlkeld-Watkins, Julie

    2005-11-01

    Patellofemoral joint problems are the most common overuse injury of the lower extremity, and altered femoral or hip rotation may play a role in patellofemoral pain. The purpose of this case report is to describe the evaluation of and intervention for a patient with asymmetrical hip rotation and patellofemoral pain. The patient was a 15-year-old girl with an 8-month history of anterior right knee pain, without known trauma or injury. Prior to intervention, her score on the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) was 24%. Right hip medial (internal) rotation was less than left hip medial rotation, and manual muscle testing showed weakness of the right hip internal rotator and abductor muscles. The intervention was aimed at increasing right hip medial rotation, improving right hip muscle strength (eg, the muscle force exerted by a muscle or a group of muscles to overcome a resistance), and eliminating anterior right knee pain. After 6 visits (14 days), passive left and right hip medial rotations were symmetrical, and her right hip internal rotator and abductor muscle grades were Good plus. Her WOMAC score was 0%. The patient had right patellofemoral pain and an uncommon pattern of asymmetrical hip rotation, with diminished hip medial rotation and excessive hip lateral (external) rotation on the right side. The patient's outcomes suggest that femoral or hip joint asymmetry may be related to patellofemoral joint pain.

  14. Coxa vara with proximal femoral growth arrest in patients who had neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    DiFazio, Rachel L; Kocher, Minider S; Berven, Sigurd; Kasser, James

    2003-01-01

    This is a retrospective review of four patients in whom a pattern of coxa vara with proximal femoral growth arrest and metaphyseal irregularities developed. These patients were all treated with neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and presented with a progressive gait disturbance and pain, leg-length discrepancy, and limited abduction. Imaging revealed coxa vara with proximal femoral growth arrest. Two patients (three hips) underwent proximal femoral valgus osteotomy, one patient underwent fixation of a femoral neck fracture with subsequent greater trochanter transfer, and one patient is being observed. This case series suggests an association between neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and this unusual pattern of coxa vara with proximal femoral growth arrest.

  15. Imaging of Hip Pain: From Radiography to Cross-Sectional Imaging Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz Santiago, Fernando; Santiago Chinchilla, Alicia; Ansari, Afshin; Guzmán Álvarez, Luis; Castellano García, Maria del Mar; Martínez Martínez, Alberto; Tercedor Sánchez, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Hip pain can have multiple causes, including intra-articular, juxta-articular, and referred pain, mainly from spine or sacroiliac joints. In this review, we discuss the causes of intra-articular hip pain from childhood to adulthood and the role of the appropriate imaging techniques according to clinical suspicion and age of the patient. Stress is put on the findings of radiographs, currently considered the first imaging technique, not only in older people with degenerative disease but also in young people without osteoarthritis. In this case plain radiography allows categorization of the hip as normal or dysplastic or with impingement signs, pincer, cam, or a combination of both. PMID:26885391

  16. Are hip hemiarthroplasty and total hip arthroplasty infections different entities? The importance of hip fractures.

    PubMed

    del Toro, M D; Nieto, I; Guerrero, F; Corzo, J; del Arco, A; Palomino, J; Nuño, E; Lomas, J M; Natera, C; Fajardo, J M; Delgado, J; Torres-Tortosa, M; Romero, A; Martín-Rico, P; Muniain, M Á; Rodríguez-Baño, J

    2014-08-01

    Hip hemiarthroplasty (HHA) and total hip arthroplasty (THA) infections are usually considered as one entity; however, they may show important differences. We analyze these differences, as well as predictors of treatment failure (TF) and poor functional status among patients with prosthetic hip infections (PHIs). A multicenter cohort study of consecutive patients with PHIs was performed. The main outcome variable was TF after the first surgical treatment performed to treat the infection. Multivariate analysis was used to identify predictors of TF. A total of 127 patients with PHI were included (43 HHA, 84 THA). Patients with HHA infections were more frequently women (88% vs. 54%; p < 0.001), had comorbidities (86% vs. 67%, p = 0.02), and were older (median age 79 vs. 65 years, p < 0.001), and the reason for arthroplasty was more frequently a fracture (100% vs. 18%, p < 0.001). Failure of initial treatment and crude mortality were more frequent among HHA patients (44% vs. 23%, p = 0.01 and 28% vs. 7%, p = 0.001, respectively). However, HHA was not associated with TF in the multivariate analysis when hip fracture was considered; thus, variables independently associated with TF were hip fracture, inadequate surgical management, prosthesis retention, and higher C-reactive protein level. Failure of the first surgical treatment was associated with poorer functional status. HHA and THA infections showed significant differences in epidemiology, clinical features, and outcome. Although patients with HHA infections had a higher risk of TF, this was related to the reason for hip implant: a hip fracture. Success of the initial management of infection is a predictor of better clinical and functional outcome.

  17. Neonatal solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Aravindan

    2017-07-11

    Neonatal tumors are different from tumors of the older children and knowledge gained from treating older children can not be extrapolated to neonates. Neonates have immature physiology and their haematopoietic and immune systems are not fully developed and the response to therapy is unpredictable. Hence it is imperative to study these tumors as separate entity. The aim of this study is to analyse this rare set of tumors in terms of their incidence, clinical features and management. All babies admitted in our hospital with tumors from January, 2011 to January 2016 were studied. Tumor-like conditions like haemangioma, lymphangioma and hamartomas were included. The age, sex distribution, type of tumor and management were studied. A total of 51 cases were registered out of which, 29 cases were haemangiomas and lymphangiomas. Of remaining 20 cases, 5 were benign ovarian cysts, 3 were neuroblastomas, 3 were congenital fibrosarcomas, 3 were sacrococcygeal teratomas. Wilm's tumor, congenital mesoblastic nephroma, haemangioendothelioma of liver and others formed the remaining six cases. Our study insists that the neonatal tumors are distinct subset of pediatric tumors, requiring careful selection of treatment modalities and most of the solid tumors can be successfully managed if diagnosed and treated early. Neonatal tumors are defined as tumors which are diagnosed before the first month of life. Some of them can be congenital (present at birth). Neonatal tumors are different from tumors in older children in terms of etiopathogenesis, behavior and response to therapy as well as long-term outcomes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Neonatal brucellosis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Alnemri, Abdul Rahman M; Hadid, Adnan; Hussain, Shaik Asfaq; Somily, Ali M; Sobaih, Badr H; Alrabiaah, Abdulkarim; Alanazi, Awad; Shakoor, Zahid; AlSubaie, Sarah; Meriki, Naema; Kambal, Abdelmageed M

    2017-02-28

    Although brucellosis is not uncommon in Saudi Arabia, neonatal brucellosis has been infrequently reported. In this case of neonatal brucellosis, Brucella abortus was isolated by blood culture from both the mother and the neonate. Serology was positive only in the mother.

  19. Key Parameters Evaluation for Hip Prosthesis with Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hongqiang; Li, Dichen; Lian, Qin; Li, Xiang; Jin, Zhongmin

    2007-09-01

    Stem length and cross section are two key parameters that influence the stability and longevity of metallic hip prosthesis in the total hip arthroplasty (THA). In order to assess their influence to the stress and fatigue behavior of hip prosthesis, a series model of hip prosthesis with round-shaped or drum-shaped cross section, and with different stem lengths were created. These models were analyzed under both static and dynamic loading conditions with finite element analysis, and dynamic loading represents normal walking was used in the dynamic analysis. The stress on the metallic stem, cement, and adjacent bone were got, micromotion on the cement-metal interface were got too. Safety factors for fatigue life of the hip prothesis were calculated based on data obtained from dynamic analysis. Static analysis shows that drum-shaped cross section can decrease the displacement of the stem, that stress on drum-shaped stem focus on the corner of the femoral neck and the distal part of hip prosthesis, whereas the stress on the round-shaped stem distributes evenly over most part of the stem, and maximum stress on stem prosthesis fluctuates with stem length bottoming out at stem length range from 80 mm to 110 mm, that drum-shaped stems with drum height 8 mm generate more stress at the distal part of stem than drum-shaped stems with drum height 10 mm and round stems do. Dynamic and fatigue analysis shows that drum-shaped stem with drum height 10 mm and stem length 90 mm has the greatest safety factor therefore long fatigue life.

  20. Lumbopelvic kinematic characteristics of golfers with limited hip rotation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sol-Bi; You, Joshua Sung H; Kwon, Oh-Yun; Yi, Chung-Hwi

    2015-01-01

    While the biomechanical characteristics of the golf swing are well established, the lumbopelvic kinematic characteristics of professional golfers with limited hip internal rotation warrant further investigation. The specific aim was to ascertain mechanical differences in lumbopelvic-hip movement of asymptomatic professional golfers with and without limited hip internal rotation during the golf swing. Controlled laboratory study. Thirty professional male golfers (aged 25-35 years and 0 handicap matched) were classified into either the limited hip internal motion (LHIM) group (range of motion<20°) or the normal hip internal motion (NHIM) group (range of motion≥30°). All participants underwent clinical tests (muscle strength, muscle length, and range of motion) and a biomechanical assessment using 8 infrared optic cameras in a motion analysis system. Independent t tests were performed to determine potential mean differences in muscle strength, length, and range of motion and lumbopelvic kinematics at P<.05. Kinematic analysis revealed that the LHIM group showed significantly greater lumbar flexion (P<.001), right and left axial rotation (P<.025), and right-side lateral bending (P=.003) than the NHIM group. A greater pelvic posterior tilt was observed in the LHIM group when compared with the NHIM group (P=.021). Clinical tests showed reduced internal rotator muscle strength and shorter muscle length in the iliopsoas (P=.017) and hamstring (P<.001) among those in the LHIM group when compared with the NHIM group. The study data suggest that constraints to hip joint internal rotation, along with muscle strength imbalances between the agonist and antagonist muscles and muscle tightness, are associated with substantially greater lumbopelvic movement during the golf swing. © 2014 The Author(s).

  1. AB104. Glucose-6 phospate dehydrogenase deficiency among mongolian neonates

    PubMed Central

    Batjargal, Khishigjargal; Nansal, Gerelmaa; Zagd, Gerelmaa; Ganbaatar, Erdenetuya

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common enzyme deficiency in humans, affecting 400 million people worldwide and a high prevalence in persons of African, Middle Asian countries. The most common clinical manifestations are neonatal jaundice and acute hemolytic anemia, which is caused by the impairment of erythrocyte’s ability to remove harmful oxidative stress triggered by exogenous agents such as drugs, infection, or fava bean ingestion. Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia caused by G6PD is strongly associated with mortality and long-term neurodevelopmental impairment. The study aims to determine a level of G6PD in healthy neonates. Methods We obtained blood spot samples from 268 infants around 24-72 hours in their age who has unsuspected intranatal and neonatal disorders. Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase “Perkin Elmer, Finland” level is determined by Victor 2D Fluorometer assay, developing of neonatal jaundice is examined by recall. Results The76.5% of all participants (n=205) was assessed 4.36±1.15 Ug/Hb in normal reference range of G6PD, other 23.5% (n=63) was 0.96±0.51 Ug/Hb with G6PD deficiency. In the both sex, 51.5% of male 0.88±0.46 Ug/Hb (n=33) and 47.6% of female (n=30) 0.97±0.55 Ug/Hb was assessed with G6PD deficiency. Developing Jaundice period in number of 63 neonates with G6PD deficiency, 86% of neonates (n=54) was in 1-4 days, 4% of neonates (n=3) was in 5-7 days and there is no sign of jaundice in 9% (n=6). Therefore neonates with G6PD deficiency, 53.9% (n=34) continued jaundice more than two weeks. Conclusions G6PD deficiency was determined in male neonates (51.5%) more than female (47.6%). The 76.5% of all participants (n=205) was assessed 4.36±1.15 Ug/Hb in normal reference range of G6PDH other 23.5% (n=63) of all participants was 0.96±0.51 Ug/Hb with G6PD deficiency. It shows that G6PD might be one potential risk of neonatal jaundice and hyperbilirubinemia in neonates in Mongolia.

  2. Cementless hydroxyapatite coated hip prostheses.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Antonio; Mateo, Jesús; Gil-Albarova, Jorge; Lobo-Escolar, Antonio; Ibarz, Elena; Gabarre, Sergio; Más, Yolanda; Gracia, Luis

    2015-01-01

    More than twenty years ago, hydroxyapatite (HA), calcium phosphate ceramics, was introduced as a coating for cementless hip prostheses. The choice of this ceramic is due to its composition being similar to organic apatite bone crystals. This ceramic is biocompatible, bioactive, and osteoconductive. These qualities facilitate the primary stability and osseointegration of implants. Our surgical experience includes the implantation of more than 4,000 cementless hydroxyapatite coated hip prostheses since 1990. The models implanted are coated with HA in the acetabulum and in the metaphyseal area of the stem. The results corresponding to survival and stability of implants were very satisfactory in the long-term. From our experience, HA-coated hip implants are a reliable alternative which can achieve long term survival, provided that certain requirements are met: good design selection, sound choice of bearing surfaces based on patient life expectancy, meticulous surgical technique, and indications based on adequate bone quality.

  3. Cementless Hydroxyapatite Coated Hip Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Antonio; Mateo, Jesús; Gil-Albarova, Jorge; Lobo-Escolar, Antonio; Ibarz, Elena; Gabarre, Sergio; Más, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    More than twenty years ago, hydroxyapatite (HA), calcium phosphate ceramics, was introduced as a coating for cementless hip prostheses. The choice of this ceramic is due to its composition being similar to organic apatite bone crystals. This ceramic is biocompatible, bioactive, and osteoconductive. These qualities facilitate the primary stability and osseointegration of implants. Our surgical experience includes the implantation of more than 4,000 cementless hydroxyapatite coated hip prostheses since 1990. The models implanted are coated with HA in the acetabulum and in the metaphyseal area of the stem. The results corresponding to survival and stability of implants were very satisfactory in the long-term. From our experience, HA-coated hip implants are a reliable alternative which can achieve long term survival, provided that certain requirements are met: good design selection, sound choice of bearing surfaces based on patient life expectancy, meticulous surgical technique, and indications based on adequate bone quality. PMID:25802848

  4. Transient Neonatal Zinc Deficiency Caused by a Heterozygous G87R Mutation in the Zinc Transporter ZnT-2 (SLC30A2) Gene in the Mother Highlighting the Importance of Zn2+ for Normal Growth and Development

    PubMed Central

    Miletta, Maria Consolata; Kernland, Kristin; Schöni, Martin H.; Petkovic, Vibor; Flück, Christa E.; Eblé, Andrée; Mullis, Primus E.

    2013-01-01

    Suboptimal dietary zinc (Zn2+) intake is increasingly appreciated as an important public health issue. Zn2+ is an essential mineral, and infants are particularly vulnerable to Zn2+ deficiency, as they require large amounts of Zn2+ for their normal growth and development. Although term infants are born with an important hepatic Zn2+ storage, adequate Zn2+ nutrition of infants mostly depends on breast milk or formula feeding, which contains an adequate amount of Zn2+ to meet the infants' requirements. An exclusively breast-fed 6 months old infant suffering from Zn2+ deficiency caused by an autosomal dominant negative G87R mutation in the Slc30a2 gene (encoding for the zinc transporter 2 (ZnT-2)) in the mother is reported. More than 20 zinc transporters characterized up to date, classified into two families (Slc30a/ZnT and Slc39a/Zip), reflect the complexity and importance of maintaining cellular Zn2+ homeostasis and dynamics. The role of ZnTs is to reduce intracellular Zn2+ by transporting it from the cytoplasm into various intracellular organelles and by moving Zn2+ into extracellular space. Zips increase intracellular Zn2+ by transporting it in the opposite direction. Thus the coordinated action of both is essential for the maintenance of Zn2+ homeostasis in the cytoplasm, and accumulating evidence suggests that this is also true for the secretory pathway of growth hormone. PMID:24194756

  5. Hip Replacement: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases) Also in Spanish Total Hip Replacement (American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons) - PDF Also in Spanish Total Hip Replacement (Arthroplasty) (Beyond the Basics) (UpToDate) ...

  6. Neonatal viability evaluation by Apgar score in puppies delivered by cesarean section in two brachycephalic breeds (English and French bulldog).

    PubMed

    Batista, M; Moreno, C; Vilar, J; Golding, M; Brito, C; Santana, M; Alamo, D

    2014-05-01

    This study tried to define neonatal viability after cesarean section in brachycephalic breeds and the efficacy of an adapted Apgar test to assess newborn survival. Data from 44 cesarean sections and 302 puppies were included. Before surgery (59-61 days after ovulation), an ultrasound evaluation defined the fetal biparietal diameter (BPD). Immediately after the uterine delivery, the pups were evaluated to detect birth defects and then, a modified Apgar score (range: 0-10) was used to define neonatal health at 5min (Apgar 1) and 60min (Apgar 2) after neonatal delivery; puppies were classified into three categories: critical neonates (score: 0-3), moderate viability neonates (score: 4-6) and normal viability neonates (score: 7-10). Mean (±SEM) value of BPD was 30.8±0.1mm and 28.9±0.1mm in English and French Bull-Dog fetus, respectively. The incidence of spontaneous neonatal mortality (4.98%, 14/281) and birth defects (6.95%) were not influenced by the sex; however, congenital anomalies and neonatal mortality were higher (p<0.01) in those litters with a greater number of neonates. In Apgar 1, the percentage of critical neonates, moderate viability neonates and normal viability neonates were 20.5%, 46.3% and 33.1% respectively; sixty minutes after birth, the critical neonates only represented 10.3% of the total puppies. Almost all neonates (238/239) showing moderate or normal viability at Apgar 1, survived for the first 24h after birth. The results of the study showed a direct relationship (p<0.01) between the Apgar score and neonatal viability. Therefore, the routine performance of the Apgar score would appear to be essential in the assessment of the status of brachycephalic breed puppies.

  7. Infection in periprosthetic hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Rui

    2012-01-01

    Fracture around the acetabulum and femur in total hip arthroplasty is a possible complication, sometimes with difficult surgical solution, namely when a sepsis is present. Periprosthetic hip fractures were classified according to a modified Vancouver classification. We treated 112 patients (67 men and 45 women) with periprosthetic hip fractures: 105 femoral fractures (94%) and seven acetabular fractures (6%). Mean follow-up was 10.6 years. For Type A (seven cases - 7%), B1 (10 cases - 10%) or C (13 cases - 12%) fractures around well fixed femoral stems we only fixed the fractures. For Type B2 (17 cases - 16%), B3 (46 cases - 44%) and D (12 cases - 11%, with associated fractures, not contemplated in the Vancouver classification) we used an uncemented long femoral stem, fixation with metallic cables and cancellous bone allografts to fill the femoral bone loss. We observed a deep infection in three patients (2.7%), three early hip dislocations treated by closed reductions, two cases with asymptomatic trochanteric non-union and one femoral refracture. In the three infection cases we performed two-stage revision with cementless hip prosthesis, using an antibiotic-loaded cement hip spacer (three to eight months), a six weeks period of parenteral antibiotics and we performed articular aspiration before revision surgery. Until now, we did not observe any re-infection. It is very important to make an early diagnosis, isolate micro-organisms and ensure their antibiotic susceptibility. The surgery solution depends on the well fixed implants and periprosthetic osteolysis and articular instability.

  8. Sagittal plane hip motion reversals during walking are associated with disease severity and poorer function in subjects with hip osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Foucher, Kharma C; Schlink, Bryan R; Shakoor, Najia; Wimmer, Markus A

    2012-05-11

    A midstance reversal of sagittal plane hip motion during walking, or motion discontinuity (MD), has previously been observed in subjects with endstage hip osteoarthritis (OA) and in patients with femoroacetabular impingement. The goal of the present study was to evaluate whether this gait pattern is a marker of OA presence or radiographic severity by analyzing a large IRB approved motion analysis data repository. We also hypothesized that subjects with the MD would show more substantial gait impairments than those with normal hip motion. We identified 150 subjects with symptomatic unilateral hip OA and Kellgren-Lawrence OA severity data on file, and a control group of 159 asymptomatic subjects whose ages fell within 2 standard deviations of the mean OA group age. From the gait data, the MD was defined as a reversal in the slope of the hip flexion angle curve during midstance. Logistic regressions and general linear models were used to test the association between the MD and OA presence, OA severity and, other gait variables. 53% of OA subjects compared to 7.5% of controls had the MD (p<0.001); occurrence of the MD was associated with OA severity (p=0.009). Within the OA subject group, subjects with the MD had reduced dynamic range of motion, peak, extension, and internal rotation moments compared to those who did not (MANCOVA p ≤ 0.042) after controlling for walking speed. We concluded that sagittal plane motion reversals are indeed associated with OA presence and severity, and with more severe gait abnormalities in subjects with hip OA.

  9. Auditory Brainstem Response Thresholds to Air- and Bone-Conducted CE-Chirps in Neonates and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Kensi M.; Stuart, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds to air- and bone-conducted CE-Chirps in neonates and adults. Method Thirty-two neonates with no physical or neurologic challenges and 20 adults with normal hearing participated. ABRs were acquired with a starting intensity of 30 dB normal hearing level…

  10. Auditory Brainstem Response Thresholds to Air- and Bone-Conducted CE-Chirps in Neonates and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Kensi M.; Stuart, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds to air- and bone-conducted CE-Chirps in neonates and adults. Method Thirty-two neonates with no physical or neurologic challenges and 20 adults with normal hearing participated. ABRs were acquired with a starting intensity of 30 dB normal hearing level…

  11. Radiographic evaluation of hip implants.

    PubMed

    Chang, Connie Y; Huang, Ambrose J; Palmer, William E

    2015-02-01

    Serial radiographs are the mainstay in the longitudinal assessment of hip implants. The prosthesis, periprosthetic bone, and juxta-articular soft tissues are inspected for fracture, periosteal reaction, stress shielding, calcar resorption, osteolysis, bony remodeling, metallic debris, and heterotopic ossification. Comparison radiographs best confirm implant migration, subsidence, and aseptic loosening. Infection, particle disease, reaction to metal, and mechanical impingement are important causes of postsurgical pain, but in their earliest stages they may be difficult to diagnose using radiographs. This article addresses the role of radiography following hip arthroplasty. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  12. Transient osteoporosis of the hip.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Rabeea; Ishaq, Saliha; Amjad, Hira

    2012-02-01

    Transient Osteoporosis of Hip (TOH) is an uncommon disorder of idiopathic nature, particularly in the Asian population. It has been described to mostly occur in middle aged men and women in their third trimester of pregnancy. A distinctive hallmark of this condition is that it is self limiting and resolves in a few months. The patient presents to the physician with pain on movement and impaired mobility of the affected joint, developing without any history of trauma. MRI is the main diagnostic tool. We report herein a case of a forty five year old male, who developed transient osteoporosis of the hip, and was managed conservatively.

  13. Ultrasonography of the hip and lower extremity.

    PubMed

    Malanga, Gerard A; Dentico, Richard; Halperin, Jonathan S

    2010-08-01

    Musculoskeletal ultrasonographic evaluation of the proximal lower limb includes the evaluation of the soft tissue structures, including tendons, ligaments, or muscles, and the bony structures of this region, include the hip, pubic symphysis, and sacroiliac joints. The evaluation of the hip or proximal lower limb region can be performed in an efficient and systematic manner. Ultrasonography of the lateral hip, intra-articular hip, medial thigh, and posterior thigh are discussed in the article.

  14. Gonococcal septic arthritis of the hip.

    PubMed

    Lee, A H; Chin, A E; Ramanujam, T; Thadhani, R I; Callegari, P E; Freundlich, B

    1991-12-01

    We describe a patient with a Neisseria gonorrhoeae monoarthritis of the hip. Treatment with intravenous ceftriaxone, oral doxycycline, and repeated fluoroscopic needle aspirations resulted in a complete recovery of function without residual deficit. Gonococcal monoarthritis of the hip is rare. Gonococcal hip infections appear to respond well to antibiotics and drainage by arthrocentesis. This differs from hip infections caused by other bacteria where joint damage is common and where the recommended initial treatment is open surgical drainage.

  15. Quantitative assessment of hip osteoarthritis based on image texture analysis.

    PubMed

    Boniatis, I S; Costaridou, L I; Cavouras, D A; Panagiotopoulos, E C; Panayiotakis, G S

    2006-03-01

    A non-invasive method was developed to investigate the potential capacity of digital image texture analysis in evaluating the severity of hip osteoarthritis (OA) and in monitoring its progression. 19 textural features evaluating patterns of pixel intensity fluctuations were extracted from 64 images of radiographic hip joint spaces (HJS), corresponding to 32 patients with verified unilateral or bilateral OA. Images were enhanced employing custom developed software for the delineation of the articular margins on digitized pelvic radiographs. The severity of OA for each patient was assessed by expert orthopaedists employing the Kellgren and Lawrence (KL) scale. Additionally, an index expressing HJS-narrowing was computed considering patients from the unilateral OA-group. A textural feature that quantified pixel distribution non-uniformity (grey level non-uniformity, GLNU) demonstrated the strongest correlation with the HJS-narrowing index among all extracted features and utilized in further analysis. Classification rules employing GLNU feature were introduced to characterize a hip as normal or osteoarthritic and to assign it to one of three severity categories, formed in accordance with the KL scale. Application of the proposed rules resulted in relatively high classification accuracies in characterizing a hip as normal or osteoarthritic (90.6%) and in assigning it to the correct KL scale category (88.9%). Furthermore, the strong correlation between the HJS-narrowing index and the pathological GLNU (r = -0.9, p<0.001) was utilized to provide percentages quantifying hip OA-severity. Texture analysis may contribute in the quantitative assessment of OA-severity, in the monitoring of OA-progression and in the evaluation of a chondroprotective therapy.

  16. The use of hip arthroscopy in the management of the pediatric hip

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Dennis R.

    2016-01-01

    Arthroscopy of the pediatric hip began in 1977 with a publication by Gross. Interest was relatively slow to develop in the 1980s and 1990s. Coupled with the success of hip arthroscopy in the adult, interest heightened in applying the procedure to a variety of pediatric hip disorders, given that the alternative was an open surgical hip dislocation. The success of this initial group of pediatric hip arthroscopist’s has further expanded the application of hip arthroscopy as the primary or adjunct procedure for the management of intra-articular problems of the pediatric hip. PMID:27583144

  17. Scrotal Swelling in the Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Basta, Amaya M.; Courtier, Jesse; Phelps, Andrew; Copp, Hillary L.; MacKenzie, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Discovery of scrotal swelling in a neonate can be a source of anxiety for parents, clinicians, and sonologists alike. This pictorial essay provides a focused review of commonly encountered scrotal masses and mimics specific to the neonatal setting. Although malignancy is a concern, it is very uncommon, as most neonatal scrotal masses are benign. Key discriminating features and management options are highlighted to improve the radiologist’s ability to diagnose neonatal scrotal conditions and guide treatment decisions. Neonatal scrotal processes ranging from common to uncommon will be discussed. PMID:25715370

  18. Neonatal Sepsis and Neutrophil Insufficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Melvan, John Nicholas; Bagby, Gregory J.; Welsh, David A.; Nelson, Steve; Zhang, Ping

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis has continuously been a leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality despite current advances in chemotherapy and patient intensive care facilities. Neonates are at high risk for developing bacterial infections due to quantitative and qualitative insufficiencies of innate immunity, particularly granulocyte lineage development and response to infection. Although antibiotics remain the mainstay of treatment, adjuvant therapies enhancing immune function have shown promise in treating sepsis in neonates. This chapter reviews current strategies for the clinical management of neonatal sepsis and analyzes mechanisms underlying insufficiencies of neutrophil defense in neonates with emphasis on new directions for adjuvant therapy development. PMID:20521927

  19. Dysplasia of the contralateral hip in patients with unilateral late-detected congenital dislocation of the hip: 50 years' follow-up of 48 patients.

    PubMed

    Terjesen, T

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of dysplasia in the 'normal' contralateral hip in patients with unilateral developmental dislocation of the hip (DDH) and to evaluate the long-term prognosis of such hips. A total of 48 patients (40 girls and eight boys) were treated for late-detected unilateral DDH between 1958 and 1962. After preliminary skin traction, closed reduction was achieved at a mean age of 17.8 months (4 to 65) in all except one patient who needed open reduction. In 25 patients early derotation femoral osteotomy of the contralateral hip had been undertaken within three years of reduction, and later surgery in ten patients. Radiographs taken during childhood and adulthood were reviewed. The mean age of the patients was 50.9 years (43 to 55) at the time of the latest radiological review. In all, eight patients (17%) developed dysplasia of the contralateral hip, defined as a centre-edge (CE) angle < 20° during childhood or at skeletal maturity. Six of these patients underwent surgery to improve cover of the femoral head; the dysplasia improved in two after varus femoral osteotomy and in two after an acetabular shelf operation. During long-term follow-up the dysplasia deteriorated to subluxation in two patients (CE angles 4° and 5°, respectively) who both developed osteoarthritis (OA), and one of these underwent total hip replacement at the age of 49 years. In conclusion, the long-term prognosis for the contralateral hip was relatively good, as OA occurred in only two hips (4%) at a mean follow-up of 50 years. Regular review of the 'normal' side is indicated, and corrective surgery should be undertaken in those who develop subluxation. ©2014 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  20. Neonatal Odor-Shock Conditioning Alters the Neural Network Involved in Odor Fear Learning at Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevelinges, Yannick; Sullivan, Regina M.; Messaoudi, Belkacem; Mouly, Anne-Marie

    2008-01-01

    Adult learning and memory functions are strongly dependent on neonatal experiences. We recently showed that neonatal odor-shock learning attenuates later life odor fear conditioning and amygdala activity. In the present work we investigated whether changes observed in adults can also be observed in other structures normally involved, namely…

  1. Neonatal Odor-Shock Conditioning Alters the Neural Network Involved in Odor Fear Learning at Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevelinges, Yannick; Sullivan, Regina M.; Messaoudi, Belkacem; Mouly, Anne-Marie

    2008-01-01

    Adult learning and memory functions are strongly dependent on neonatal experiences. We recently showed that neonatal odor-shock learning attenuates later life odor fear conditioning and amygdala activity. In the present work we investigated whether changes observed in adults can also be observed in other structures normally involved, namely…

  2. Hip Squeaking after Ceramic-on-ceramic Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guo-Liang; Zhu, Wei; Zhao, Yan; Ma, Qi; Weng, Xi-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The present study aimed to review the characteristics and influencing factors of squeaking after ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) total hip arthroplasty (THA) and to analyze the possible mechanisms of the audible noise. Data Sources: The data analyzed in this review were based on articles from PubMed and Web of Science. Study Selection: The articles selected for review were original articles and reviews found based on the following search terms: “total hip arthroplasty”, “ceramic-on-ceramic”, “hip squeaking”, and “hip noise.” Results: The mechanism of the squeaking remains unknown. The possible explanations included stripe wear, edge loading, a third body, fracture of the ceramic liner, and resonance of the prosthesis components. Squeaking occurrence is influenced by patient, surgical, and implant factors. Conclusions: Most studies indicated that squeaking after CoC THA was the consequence of increasing wear or impingement, caused by prosthesis design, patient characteristics, or surgical factors. However, as conflicts exist among different articles, the major reasons for the squeaking remain to be identified. PMID:27453238

  3. Subject-specific hip geometry and hip joint centre location affects calculated contact forces at the hip during gait.

    PubMed

    Lenaerts, G; Bartels, W; Gelaude, F; Mulier, M; Spaepen, A; Van der Perre, G; Jonkers, I

    2009-06-19

    Hip loading affects the development of hip osteoarthritis, bone remodelling and osseointegration of implants. In this study, we analyzed the effect of subject-specific modelling of hip geometry and hip joint centre (HJC) location on the quantification of hip joint moments, muscle moments and hip contact forces during gait, using musculoskeletal modelling, inverse dynamic analysis and static optimization. For 10 subjects, hip joint moments, muscle moments and hip loading in terms of magnitude and orientation were quantified using three different model types, each including a different amount of subject-specific detail: (1) a generic scaled musculoskeletal model, (2) a generic scaled musculoskeletal model with subject-specific hip geometry (femoral anteversion, neck-length and neck-shaft angle) and (3) a generic scaled musculoskeletal model with subject-specific hip geometry including HJC location. Subject-specific geometry and HJC location were derived from CT. Significant differences were found between the three model types in HJC location, hip flexion-extension moment and inclination angle of the total contact force in the frontal plane. No model agreement was found between the three model types for the calculation of contact forces in terms of magnitude and orientations, and muscle moments. Therefore, we suggest that personalized models with individualized hip joint geometry and HJC location should be used for the quantification of hip loading. For biomechanical analyses aiming to understand modified hip joint loading, and planning hip surgery in patients with osteoarthritis, the amount of subject-specific detail, related to bone geometry and joint centre location in the musculoskeletal models used, needs to be considered.

  4. Dynamic hip joint stiffness in individuals with total hip arthroplasty: relationships between hip impairments and dynamics of the other joints.

    PubMed

    Tateuchi, Hiroshige; Tsukagoshi, Rui; Fukumoto, Yoshihiro; Oda, Shingo; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2011-07-01

    Little is known about hip joint stiffness during walking (dynamic joint stiffness) and the effect of hip impairments on biomechanical alterations of other joints in patients with total hip arthroplasty. Twenty-four patients (mean age 61.7 years) who underwent unilateral (n=12) or bilateral total hip arthroplasty (n=12) and healthy subjects (n=12) were recruited. In addition to kinematic and kinetic variables, dynamic hip joint stiffness which was calculated as an angular coefficient of linear regression of the plot of the hip flexion moment vs. hip extension angle during the late stance of gait, was measured. Group differences were compared using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test, and relationships between primary hip impairments and secondary gait impairments were found using partial correlation coefficients adjusted for gait speed and stride length. Dynamic hip joint stiffness was 47% higher on the side with the more pronounced limp in patients with bilateral arthroplasty than in healthy controls. In the same patients, increased dynamic hip joint stiffness was significantly associated especially with increased ankle plantarflexion moment on the ipsilateral side. In patients with unilateral arthroplasty, decreased hip power was significantly related to increased ankle plantarflexor power, only on the non-operated side. We found that dynamic hip joint stiffness was an important factor in assessing relationships between hip impairments and dynamics in other joints, especially in patients with bilateral total hip arthroplasty. The effects of altering hip joint stiffness on gait biomechanics need to be explored. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Ultrasonography in the diagnosis and management of developmental hip dysplasia (UK Hip Trial): clinical and economic results of a multicentre randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Elbourne, Diana; Dezateux, Carol; Arthur, Rosemary; Clarke, N M P; Gray, Alastair; King, Andy; Quinn, Anne; Gardner, Frances; Russell, Glynn

    Clinical screening aims to identify and treat neonatal hip instability associated with increased risk of hip displacement, but risks failures of diagnosis and treatment (abduction splinting), iatrogenic effects, and costs to parents and health services. Our objectives were to assess clinical effectiveness and net cost of ultrasonography compared with clinical assessment alone, to provide guidance for management of infants with clinical hip instability. Infants with clinical hip instability were recruited from 33 centres in UK and Ireland and randomised to either ultrasonographic hip examination (n=314) or clinical assessment alone (n=315). The primary outcome was appearance on hip radiographs by 2 years. Secondary outcomes included surgical treatment, abduction splinting, level of mobility, resource use, and costs. Analysis was by intention to treat. Protocol compliance was high, and radiographic information was available for 91% of children by 12-14 months and 85% by 2 years. By age 2 years, subluxation, dislocation, or acetabular dysplasia were identified by radiography on one or both hips of 21 children in each of the groups (relative risk 1.00; 95% CI 0.56-1.80). Fewer children in the ultrasonography group had abduction splinting in the first 2 years than did those in the no-ultrasonography group (0.78; 0.65-0.94; p=0.01). Surgical treatment was required by 21 infants in the ultrasonography group (6.7%) and 25 (7.9%) in the no-ultrasonography group (0.84; 0.48-1.47). One child from the ultrasonography group and four from the no-ultrasonography group were not walking by 2 years (0.25; 0.03-2.53; p=0.37). Infants in the ultrasonography group incurred significantly higher ultrasound costs over the first 2 years (pound 42 vs pound 23, mean difference pound 19, 95% CI 11-27); total hospital costs were lower for those infants, but the difference was not significant. The use of ultrasonography in infants with screen-detected clinical hip instability allows abduction

  6. Hip Muscle Activity During 3 Side-Lying Hip-Strengthening Exercises in Distance Runners

    PubMed Central

    McBeth, Joseph M.; Earl-Boehm, Jennifer E.; Cobb, Stephen C.; Huddleston, Wendy E.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Lower extremity overuse injuries are associated with gluteus medius (GMed) weakness. Understanding the activation of muscles about the hip during strengthening exercises is important for rehabilitation. Objective: To compare the electromyographic activity produced by the gluteus medius (GMed), tensor fascia latae (TFL), anterior hip flexors (AHF), and gluteus maximus (GMax) during 3 hip-strengthening exercises: hip abduction (ABD), hip abduction with external rotation (ABD-ER), and clamshell (CLAM) exercises. Design: Controlled laboratory study. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty healthy runners (9 men, 11 women; age = 25.45 ± 5.80 years, height = 1.71 ± 0.07 m, mass = 64.43 ± 7.75 kg) participated. Intervention(s): A weight equal to 5% body mass was affixed to the ankle for the ABD and ABD-ER exercises, and an equivalent load was affixed for the CLAM exercise. A pressure biofeedback unit was placed beneath the trunk to provide positional feedback. Main Outcome Measure(s): Surface electromyography (root mean square normalized to maximal voluntary isometric contraction) was recorded over the GMed, TFL, AHF, and GMax. Results: Three 1-way, repeated-measures analyses of variance indicated differences for muscle activity among the ABD (F3,57 = 25.903, P<.001), ABD-ER (F3,57 = 10.458, P<.001), and CLAM (F3,57 = 4.640, P=.006) exercises. For the ABD exercise, the GMed (70.1 ± 29.9%), TFL (54.3 ± 19.1%), and AHF (28.2 ± 21.5%) differed in muscle activity. The GMax (25.3 ± 24.6%) was less active than the GMed and TFL but was not different from the AHF. For the ABD-ER exercise, the TFL (70.9 ± 17.2%) was more active than the AHF (54.3 ± 24.8%), GMed (53.03 ± 28.4%), and GMax (31.7 ± 24.1 %). For the CLAM exercise, the AHF (54.2 ± 25.2%) was more active than the TFL (34.4 ± 20.1%) and GMed (32.6 ± 16.9%) but was not different from the GMax (34.2 ± 24.8%). Conclusions: The ABD exercise is preferred if targeted activation of the

  7. Once daily dose gentamicin in neonates - is our dosing correct?

    PubMed

    Serane, Tiroumourougane V; Zengeya, Stanley; Penford, Gemma; Cooke, Jane; Khanna, Gitika; McGregor-Colman, Elle

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the safety and efficacy (measured by therapeutic level) of once daily gentamicin in neonates >or=32 weeks of gestation and neonatal intensive care unit. Neonates >or=32 weeks of gestation and neonates with gestational age between 32 and 36 weeks, 14 out of 65 (22%) had trough serum concentration >2 mg/L. Only 39 (60%) had peak and trough levels within the therapeutic range. All babies who had audiometric evaluation (62 out of 65) had normal hearing. Out of the 65 babies, 60 had paired serum creatinine levels estimated and none had evidence of renal dysfunction. Among term neonates, only 2 out of 50 had the trough serum concentration of >2 mg/L. In 38 (76%) of the 50 neonates, the trough serum gentamicin concentration was <2.0 mg/L and the peak level was <10 mg/L. Forty-eight babies had audiometric evaluation which was normal. A dose of 4 mg/kg/day produces serum gentamicin levels outside the therapeutic range in two-fifths of neonates between 32 and 36 +/- 6 weeks. A single dose of 4 mg/kg/day of gentamicin is appropriate for term babies and probably excessive for 32-36 weeks' neonates.

  8. Hip Replacement - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hip Replacement (Arabic) العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Bosnian (Bosanski) Total Hip Replacement Potpuna zamjena kuka - Bosanski (Bosnian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Total Hip Replacement 全髋关节置换 - 简体中文 ( ...

  9. Hip-Hop and the Academic Canon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abe, Daudi

    2009-01-01

    Over the last 30 years, the hip-hop movement has risen from the margins to become the preeminent force in US popular culture. In more recent times academics have begun to harness the power of hip-hop culture and use it as a means of infusing transformative knowledge into the mainstream academic discourse. On many college campuses, hip-hop's…

  10. [Pavlik harness for the treatment of congenital hip dysplasia types D III and IV].

    PubMed

    Zajonz, D; Strobel, S; Wojan, M; von der Höh, N; Brandmaier, P; Josten, C; Schumann, E; Heyde, C-E

    2016-01-01

    Up to 4% of all neonates in Central Europe are born with congenital hip dysplasia (CHD), the most common congenital disease of the musculoskeletal system. However, in this retrospective analysis the outcomes of infants with CHD (type D, III or IV according to Graf) have been considered, with Pavlik therapy starting within the first 12 weeks of life. Connections between the start of therapy or the first finding according to Graf`s classification and the ultrasound result achieved, as well as the X-rays taken after 1 and 2 years, were evaluated. No repositioning under Pavlik treatment or side effects and their relevance have been evaluated, especially with regard to avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head. All infants treated using Pavlik treatment for CHD between 2010 and 2012 in our clinic were determined. A total of 62 patients with 79 pathological hips were included. The infants were classified into three groups to evaluate the influence of the start of therapy on the result: group I with the first investigation and start of treatment within the first 10 days of life, group II between the 11th day and the end of week 3, group III within preventive general examinations (U3) after the 4th week. Clinical examinations and the usual ultrasound scans were performed at an average of 1, 3, and 6 months. Furthermore, after 1 and 2 years clinical and radiological investigations were carried out, as well as further examinations depending on the findings. A failure of repositioning of the Pavlik treatment occurred in group I in 1 case (2.2%), in group II in 1 case (7.1%), and in group III in 2 cases (10%). This occurs in hips type D and type III in 1 case each (3.3%) and type IV in 2 cases (10.5%). Maturation disorders of the hips were found in 1 case (2.2%) in group I, 1 case (7.1%) in group II, and 3 cases (15%) in group III. Avascular necrosis of the femoral head was proven in 2 cases (4.4%) in group I, 0% in group II, and in 1 case (5%) in group III. All patients

  11. A survey of natal and neonatal teeth in newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Hsiang; Lin, Yai-Tin; Lin, Yng-Tzer J

    2017-03-01

    Since there is no comprehensive research of natal and neonatal teeth in Taiwan, careful investigation of natal or neonatal teeth is worthy of being studied. This retrospective study investigated the prevalence and clinical characteristics of natal or neonatal teeth in a hospital setting, and analyzed the possible relationships between investigated variables of the natal or neonatal teeth. All of the 12,019 infants born at an assigned hospital between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2014 were investigated for natal or neonatal teeth. The identified individuals were reviewed for systemic diseases. Dental examinations included the location, clinical appearance, and degree of mobility. A positive family history of natal or neonatal teeth and mother's physical condition before delivery were also investigated. The collected data were analyzed using Fisher's exact test. Thirty infants were identified with a total of 43 natal or neonatal teeth (females, 19; males, 11). Most of the teeth were in the mandibular primary incisor position (97.6%). A radiographic examination confirmed that not all of the natal or neonatal teeth were supernumerary. No significant differences were observed between males and females in tooth morphology, positive family history, and treatment methods (p > 0.05) or between normal and conical shapes in positive family history, premature infant, mother's physical condition before delivery, and treatment methods (p > 0.05). Most of the natal or neonatal teeth were in the mandibular primary incisor position and not all of them were supernumerary. No gender differences were found in tooth morphology, positive family history, and treatment methods. The tooth morphology was not significantly related to a positive family history, premature delivery, or the mother's physical condition before delivery. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. [Recommendations in neonatal resuscitation].

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    The recommendations for neonatal resuscitation are not always based on sufficient scientific evidence and thus expert consensus based on current research, knowledge, and experience are useful for formulating practical protocols that are easy to follow. The latest recommendations, in 2000, modified previously published recommendations and are included in the present text.

  13. [Arthroscopy of the hip joint].

    PubMed

    Pasa, L; Hart, R; Kocis, J; Muzík, V; Veselý, R

    2005-01-01

    Arthroscopic examination of joints has recently gained wide application. Due to hip joint shape and a difficult approach to it, hip arthroscopy has long remained outside the attention and abilities of arthroscopists. The authors present their first experience with operative hip arthroscopy that offers new options for the treatment of intra-articular pathology of the hip joint. In the years 2001-2003, 24 hip arthroscopies were performed. The following pathological conditions were diagnosed and treated: loose bodies, chondral lesions of the femoral head and acetabulum, ruptures of the labrum acetabuli and ligamentum teres, impingement syndrome of the labrum acetabuli, and coxitis. No post-operative neurologic symptoms or vascular complications were observed. All procedures were carried out on patients in a supine position, with the treated joint in traction. A standard 30 degrees device and common instruments for arthroscopic surgery were used. The instruments were inserted in the articular fissure with the use of an X-ray intensifier. Movement in the hip joint during surgery is very limited due to traction, joint shape and the length of working canals. After traction is released, it is possible to examine also the intra-articular part of the femoral neck. The pre-operative complaints (clunking, painful joint) were relieved up to 4 to 6 weeks after surgery in 23 patients. In one patient primarily diagnosed with coxitis, infection was not eradicated after lavage and debridement and, because inflammation deeply affected the femoral head, the hip was eventually treated by Girdlestone arthroplasty. The results were evaluated clinically and on the basis of the Merle d'Aubigne and Postel questionnaire assessing pain and walking abilities by both the patients and the surgeon. All 24 patients reported poor or average conditions before surgery and, after surgery, 23 experienced improvement to a very good or average condition. One patient's state failed to improve and was

  14. Visual evoked potentials in neonatal hyperbilirubinemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Xiong; Wong, Virginia

    2006-01-01

    The management of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia is very standardized. However, there is a lack of an objective method to evaluate the cerebral effects of bilirubin apart from brainstem auditory evoked potentials. There were few studies evaluating the effects of hyperbilirubinemia or phototherapy on the visual pathway in infants with hyperbilirubinemia. Serial visual evoked potentials of two groups of term neonates (N = 24)--group 1 with moderate hyperbilirubinemia (n = 16) and group 2 with severe hyperbilirubinemia (n = 8)--were evaluated prospectively. All infants had regular physical, neurologic, visual, and auditory evaluations until 3 years. Four (16%) had abnormal visual evoked potentials before 1 year, and the abnormalities returned to normal thereafter. There was no significant difference in visual evoked potentials between the two groups. All had normal neurodevelopmental status by 3 years, with the exception of one child from the severe group with ABO incompatibility with transient mild motor delay, hypotonia, and abnormal visual evoked potential. There were no abnormal effects of phototherapy on visual evoked potentials in infants with neonatal hyperbilirubinemia after 1 year of age. Although our sample size was small, the results suggest that the effects of hyperbilirubinemia on visual evoked potentials might be transient. (J Child Neurol 2006;21:58-62).

  15. Approaches to the definition of neonatal hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, J C

    1997-04-01

    There is no current agreement on the definition of neonatal hypoglycemia. Three different bases for the definition are presented, with a review of evidence of relevant to each approach. (1) Not commonly encountered; requires evidence of normal distribution of blood glucose concentrations. (2) Increased risk of adverse sequelae; requires evidence of short-term and long-term sequelae of different blood glucose concentrations. (3) Benefits of intervention outweigh risks; requires evidence from randomized trials of intervention. The usual distribution of neonatal blood glucose concentrations varies with birthweight, postnatal age, nutritional intake and other factors. Clinical signs occur in some but not all babies with low blood glucose concentrations, but such signs lack specificity. Abnormality in sensory evoked potentials is associated with variations in blood glucose concentrations; these changes suggest that values less than 2.6 mmol/L have acute effects in areas of the brain with high glucose demand. Among low birthweight babies, case series suggest a high risk of impairment (50%) following symptomatic hypoglycemia, and controlled studies generally confirm an association between very low neonatal blood glucose concentrations and adverse neurodevelopment. However, these studies do not establish a level of blood glucose concentration or duration of hypoglycemia that is critical. There are no reports of randomized trials that have assessed the effect on neurodevelopment of alternative policies of glucose provision in the neonatal period. There is a need for a randomized controlled trial to assess reliably the short- and long-term clinical effects of alternative policies of the clinical management of blood glucose concentration in babies at high risk both of low neonatal blood glucose concentrations and adverse neurodevelopment.

  16. The Relationship Between Hip Strength and the Y-Balance Test.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Benjamin R; Robertson, Kaley E; Burnham, Jeremy M; Yonz, Michael C; Ireland, Mary Lloyd; Noehren, Brian

    2017-07-17

    The Y-Balance Test was developed as a test of dynamic postural control and has been shown to be predictive of lower extremity injury. However, the relationship between hip strength and performance on the Y-Balance Test has not been fully elucidated. The goal of this study was to identify the relationship between components of isometric hip strength and the Y-Balance Test, to provide clinicians better guidance as to specific areas of muscle performance to address in the event of poor performance on the Y-Balance Test. Laboratory Study. Biomechanics Laboratory. Seventy-three healthy participants, 40 males and 33 females, volunteered for this study. None. Participants completed the Y-Balance Test on the right leg. We then measured peak isometric torque in hip external rotation, abduction, and extension. Correlations were calculated between torque measurements, normalized for mass, and Y-Balance Test performance. Significant relationships were used in linear regression models to determine which variables were predictive of the Y-Balance Test performance. We found significant positive correlations between Y-Balance Test performance and hip abduction strength. We also found correlations between the Y-Balance Test and hip extension and external rotation strengths. Linear regression analysis showed hip abduction to be the only significant predictor of Y- Balance performance. We found the strongest association between the Y-Balance Test and hip abduction strength. We also showed smaller but significant associations with hip extension and external rotation strength. When entered into a linear regression analysis, hip abduction strength was the only significant predictor of Y-Balance performance. Using this information, practitioners should look to hip abduction strength when patients exhibit deficits in the Y-Balance Test.

  17. Kinematic relationship between rotation of lumbar spine and hip joints during golf swing in professional golfers.

    PubMed

    Mun, Frederick; Suh, Seung Woo; Park, Hyun-Joon; Choi, Ahnryul

    2015-05-14

    Understanding the kinematics of the lumbar spine and hip joints during a golf swing is a basic step for identifying swing-specific factors associated with low back pain. The objective of this study was to examine the kinematic relationship between rotational movement of the lumbar spine and hip joints during a golf swing. Fifteen professional golfers participated in this study with employment of six infrared cameras to record their golf swings. Anatomical reference system of the upper torso, pelvis and thigh segments, and the location of each hip and knee joint were defined by the protocols of the kinematic model of previous studies. Lumbar spine and hip joint rotational angle was calculated utilizing the Euler angle method. Cross-correlation and angle-angle plot was used to examine the degree of kinematic relationship between joints. A fairly strong coupling relationship was shown between the lumbar spine and hip rotational movements with an average correlation of 0.81. Leading hip contribution to overall rotation was markedly high in the early stage of the downswing, while the lumbar spine contributed greater towards the end of the downswing; however, the relative contributions of the trailing hip and lumbar spine were nearly equal during the entire downswing. Most of the professional golfers participated in this study used a similar coordination strategy when moving their hips and lumbar spine during golf swings. The rotation of hips was observed to be more efficient in producing the overall rotation during the downswing when compared to the backswing. These results provide quantitative information to better understand the lumbar spine and hip joint kinematic characteristics of professional golfers. This study will have great potential to be used as a normal control data for the comparison with kinematic information among golfers with low back pain and for further investigation of golf swing-specific factors associated with injury.

  18. Active hip and spine ROM differs when comparing unconstrained motion with voluntary segmental constraint.

    PubMed

    Moreside, Janice M; Barbado, David; Juan-Recio, Casto; Vera-Garcia, Francisco J

    2013-12-01

    Active range of motion trials are frequently used as a baseline for normalizing other data. However, previous research has not focused on methods utilized to achieve maximum active range of motion. Twenty-seven males (age 20-38 years) participated in this study. Active hip extension in upright standing was compared to active lumbar extension with regards to degrees of total hip and spine extension obtained. Similarly, active spine rotation whereby participants attempted to constrain associated pelvis and hip rotation was compared to rotation trials in which the pelvis and hips were free to rotate concurrently. An infra-red motion capture system and associated software were used to capture movement and determine joint angles. Results indicate that average degrees of hip extension did not differ between the two methods (p = 0.138), nor did either method result more frequently in the highest measurement. Spine extension values were significantly greater in the active spine extension manoeuvre compared to the associated back extension that occurred when participants were asked to actively extend their hip (p < 0.001). Average degrees of spine rotation were greater in the unconstrained trials: when concurrent hip and pelvis rotation were allowed to take place (p < 0.001). Of the 27 participants, 23 obtained maximum rotation during the unconstrained trials. To obtain maximum active hip joint extension, both hip and back extension trials should be collected. Maximum spine rotation is more likely to occur when the pelvis and hips are unconstrained. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. In vivo ultrasound measurement of posterior femoral glide during hip joint mobilization in healthy college students.

    PubMed

    Loubert, Peter V; Zipple, J Tim; Klobucher, Michael J; Marquardt, Eric D; Opolka, Matthew J

    2013-08-01

    Descriptive study. To measure femoral translational glide in vivo during posterior hip joint mobilization and to interpret data in the context of the normal arthrokinematic glide necessary for hip flexion. Joint play, or translational glide available at a joint, is largely influenced by the geometry of the articular surfaces. The high degree of congruence between the articular surfaces at the hip and the substantial arc of concavity of the acetabulum suggests that the amount of translational glide available at the hip should be very small. Twenty subjects received manual posteriorly directed hip mobilization at a force equal to 50% of their body weight, while concurrent ultrasound imaging of the joint was performed. Images were captured before and during application of the target mobilization force. Femoroacetabular distance for each image was measured, and the average of the 3 greatest differences between corresponding before/during mobilization values represented the translational glide produced. The amplitude of arthrokinematic glide (tangential glide) was calculated using the measured femoral head radius and hip flexion passive range of motion for each subject. The average posterior femoral translational glide was 2.0 mm (range, 0.8-4.2 mm). The average calculated tangential glide required for hip flexion passive range of motion was 53.8 mm (range, 43.2-64.8 mm). The average translational glide as a percentage of tangential glide was 3.8% (range, 1.5%-7.9%). Translational glides at the hip are small, particularly in the context of the amplitude of glide necessary for normal hip flexion range of motion.

  20. 21 CFR 888.3380 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing... Devices § 888.3380 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis is a two...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3380 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing... Devices § 888.3380 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis is a two...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3390 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer... § 888.3390 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3390 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer... § 888.3390 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3380 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing... Devices § 888.3380 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis is a...

  5. [Neonatal medicine, past and present].

    PubMed

    Salle, Bernard L; Vert, Paul

    2013-06-01

    This review deals with early neonatal medicine and its rapid development as a medical specialty, starting with the birth of neonatology in the early 19th century. Shaffer first used the term neonatology in 1963 to cover neonatal disorders and their treatment. Between the early 19th century and the 1950s, neonatal care was ensured by obstetricians, whose main goal was to reduce neonatal mortality. After the second world war, and especially the 1960s, the development of neonatal physiology and pathophysiology provided insights into neonatal diseases and their treatment, including respiratory distress, jaundice, malnutrition, and prevention of respiratory distress and brain complications, etc. Currently, neonatal mortality, regardless of birth weight, is below 2/1000, and the survival rate of premature infants, regardless of gestational age and birth weight, exceeds 85%. This represents a resounding success, despite the associated costs, ethical issues, and inevitable morbidity.

  6. Clinical outcome of design modifications to the CLS Spotorno Stem in total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    GRACEFFA, ANGELO; INDELLI, PIER FRANCESCO; LATELLA, LEONARDO; POLI, PAOLO; FULCO, ALEXANDER; MARCUCCI, MASSIMILIANO

    2016-01-01

    Purpose historically, the original CLS Spotorno Stem has demonstrated excellent survival. The design of this stem was recently modified, resulting in the introduction of a shorter, modular version (CLS Brevius). The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the functional, radiological and survivorship outcomes of the cementless CLS Brevius Stem in a multi-surgeon, single center, consecutive series study at two years post-surgery. Methods the Authors performed 170 total hip arthroplasties in 155 patients using the shorter, triple-taper stem design (CLS Brevius). The patients’ diagnoses were primary hip osteoarthritis (OA) in 74.4%, secondary hip OA in 22.6%, and post-traumatic hip OA in 3%. All operations were performed through a mini-posterior approach, with the patient in the lateral decubitus position. The mean follow-up was 32 months (24–44 months). Outcome was assessed using the Harris Hip Score (HHS). Results the mean HHS improved from 32 preoperatively to 92 points at final follow-up, while the stem survival rate was 99.4%. Overall, the results were excellent in148 hips (87%), good in 14 hips (8.2%), fair in six hips (3.6%), and poor in two hips (1.2%). Intraoperative complications included a calcar fissure in three hips (1.7%). Correct femoral offset was reproduced in 97% while the planned center of hip rotation was achieved in 98%. Only one hip underwent early stem revision; this was due to major subsidence. Conclusions the modified CLS stem design showed excellent short-term results with a low rate of early postoperative complications. One of the main findings of this study was the high correlation between the planned femoral offset and center of hip rotation and the final radiographic measurements. This high reproducibility, which indicates the ability of the system to restore normal hip anatomy, is indeed due to the extensive modularity that characterizes this stem system. Long-term follow-up studies are necessary to fully compare the outcomes of

  7. Hip-abduction torque and muscle activation in people with low back pain.

    PubMed

    Sutherlin, Mark A; Hart, Joseph M

    2015-02-01

    Individuals with a history of low back pain (LBP) may present with decreased hip-abduction strength and increased trunk or gluteus maximus (GMax) fatigability. However, the effect of hip-abduction exercise on hip-muscle function has not been previously reported. To compare hip-abduction torque and muscle activation of the hip, thigh, and trunk between individuals with and without a history of LBP during repeated bouts of side-lying hip-abduction exercise. Repeated measures. Clinical laboratory. 12 individuals with a history of LBP and 12 controls. Repeated 30-s hip-abduction contractions. Hip-abduction torque, normalized root-mean-squared (RMS) muscle activation, percent RMS muscle activation, and forward general linear regression. Hip-abduction torque reduced in all participants as a result of exercise (1.57 ± 0.36 Nm/kg, 1.12 ± 0.36 Nm/kg; P < .001), but there were no group differences (F = 0.129, P = .723) or group-by-time interactions (F = 1.098, P = .358). All participants had increased GMax activation during the first bout of exercise (0.96 ± 1.00, 1.18 ± 1.03; P = .038). Individuals with a history of LBP had significantly greater GMax activation at multiple points during repeated exercise (P < .05) and a significantly lower percent of muscle activation for the GMax (P = .050) at the start of the third bout of exercise and for the biceps femoris (P = .039) at the end of exercise. The gluteal muscles best predicted hip-abduction torque in controls, while no consistent muscles were identified for individuals with a history of LBP. Hip-abduction torque decreased in all individuals after hip-abduction exercise, although individuals with a history of LBP had increased GMax activation during exercise. Gluteal muscle activity explained hip-abduction torque in healthy individuals but not in those with a history of LBP. Alterations in hip-muscle function may exist in individuals with a history of LBP.

  8. Dimension and overlap of femoral and neck blood vessels in neonates.

    PubMed

    Tailounie, Muayyad; Mcadams, Lou A; Frost, Kristie C; Gossett, Jeffrey; Green, Jerill; Bhutta, Adnan T; Dyamenahalli, Umesh; Schmitz, Michael L; Prodhan, Parthak

    2012-05-01

    Neonates frequently require access to their central blood vessels. However, limited data exist relating to the size and the anatomical relation of the femoral and neck vessels for neonates of different postmenstrual ages. 1) The size of central blood vessels increases with postmenstrual age of the neonate. 2). External rotation with abduction at the hip will decrease the degree of overlap between the femoral artery and vein. 3) The degree of overlap decreases with increasing postmenstrual age. Prospective descriptive cohort study. Femoral and neck vessel sizes were assessed using ultrasound for three postmenstrual age groups: group A (26 ± 1 wks), group B (32 ± 1 wks), and group C (38 ± 1 wks). The degrees of overlap (major, >50% overlap; minor, ≤50% overlap; no overlap) between the femoral vessels were assessed at the level of the inguinal ligament and 1 cm below the inguinal ligament in a straight hip and in external rotation with abduction of the hip positions. A total of 52 nonconsecutive subjects (group A, seven; group B, 21; group C, 24) were studied. The mean blood vessel dimensions increased with increasing postmenstrual age. Correlation of blood vessel size to growth measurements was better in group A + group B compared to group C. Overlap between the femoral vein and the femoral artery across the neonatal age groups at the level of the inguinal ligament ranged from 57% to 79% and from 43% to 98% at 1 cm below the inguinal ligament. The degree of overlap did not decrease with positioning of the lower extremity in external rotation with abduction of the hip. In the neck blood vessels, the majority of observations showed either minor or major overlap of neck blood vessels in all three groups (group A, 79%; group B, 86%; group C, 90%). Central blood vessel size increases with increasing postmenstrual age. Correlation of blood vessel size to anthropometric measurements was better in the premature neonates compared to term neonates. A high degree of

  9. [Recommendations for neonatal transport].

    PubMed

    Moreno Hernando, J; Thió Lluch, M; Salguero García, E; Rite Gracia, S; Fernández Lorenzo, J R; Echaniz Urcelay, I; Botet Mussons, F; Herranz Carrillo, G; Sánchez Luna, M

    2013-08-01

    During pregnancy, it is not always possible to identify maternal or foetal risk factors. Infants requiring specialised medical care are not always born in centres providing intensive care and will need to be transferred to a referral centre where intensive care can be provided. Therefore Neonatal Transport needs to be considered as part of the organisation of perinatal health care. The aim of Neonatal Transport is to transfer a newborn infant requiring intensive care to a centre where specialised resources and experience can be provided for the appropriate assessment and continuing treatment of a sick newborn infant. Intrauterine transfer is the ideal mode of transport when the birth of an infant with risk factors is diagnosed. Unfortunately, not all problems can be detected in advance with enough time to safely transfer a pregnant woman. Around 30- 50% of risk factors will be diagnosed during labour or soon after birth. Therefore, it is important to have the knowledge and resources to resuscitate and stabilise a newborn infant, as well as a specialised neonatal transport system. With this specialised transport it is possible to transfer newly born infants with the same level of care that they would receive if they had been born in a referral hospital, without increasing their risks or affecting the wellbeing of the newborn. The Standards Committee of the Spanish Society of Neonatology reviewed and updated recommendations for intrauterine transport and indications for neonatal transfer. They also reviewed organisational and logistic factors involved with performing neonatal transport. The Committee review included the type of personnel who should be involved; communication between referral and receiving hospitals; documentation; mode of transport; equipment to stabilise newly born infants; management during transfer, and admission at the referral hospital.

  10. Association of Fetal Heart Rate Baseline Change and Neonatal Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Michael; Stout, Molly J; López, Julia D; Colvin, Ryan; Macones, George A; Cahill, Alison G

    2017-03-16

    Objective The objective of this study was to describe the incidence of baseline change within normal range during labor and its prediction of neonatal outcomes. Materials and Methods This was a prospective cohort of singleton, nonanomalous, term neonates with continuous electronic fetal monitoring and normal baseline fetal heart rate throughout the last 2 hours of labor. We determined baseline in 10-minute segments using Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development criteria. We evaluated baseline changes of ≥ 20 and ≥ 30 bpm for association with acidemia (umbilical cord arterial pH ≤ 7.10) and neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission. Finally, we performed a sensitivity analysis of normal neonates, excluding those with acidemia, NICU admission, or 5-minute Apgar < 4. Results Among all neonates (n = 3,021), 1,267 (41.9%) had change ≥ 20 bpm; 272 (9.0%) had ≥ 30 bpm. Among normal neonates (n = 2,939), 1,221 (41.5%) had change ≥20 bpm. Acidemia was not associated with baseline change of any direction or magnitude. NICU admission was associated with decrease ≥ 20 bpm (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 2.93; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.19 - 7.21) or any direction ≥ 20 bpm (aOR: 4.06; 95% CI: 1.46-11.29). For decrease ≥ 20 bpm, sensitivity and specificity were 40.0 and 81.7%; for any direction ≥ 20 bpm, 75.0 and 58.3%. Conclusion Changes of normal baseline are common in term labor and poorly predict morbidity, regardless of direction or magnitude.

  11. Hip joint load and muscular activation during rising exercises.

    PubMed

    Németh, G; Ekholm, J; Arborelius, U P; Schüldt, K; Harms-Ringdahl, K

    1984-01-01

    The load on the hip joint and activation of the gluteus maximus, hamstrings, adductor magnus and rectus femoris muscles during rising exercises including different adaptive adjustments were investigated in nine healthy subjects. The joint load was calculated from forces recorded with a force-measuring platform and pictures on cine-film. Levels of muscular activity were recorded with rectified, low-pass filtered, time-averaged and normalized EMGs. The loading moment about the hip joint was about 45 Nm during the initial part of the rising exercise, decreasing with smaller hip angle. Increase of the backward inclination of the trunk increased the load moment, which was maintained at about the same level during the rising exercise. Two adaptive adjustments lowered the joint load: foot position further backward and reduced resistance from the device. Foot position further forward increased the joint load. The levels of muscular activity in the hip extensors were low to medium and were slightly increased by posterior foot position and increased resistance from the device. Increased backward trunk inclination increased the activity in the final part of the rising exercise.

  12. Simultaneous Bilateral Transient Osteoporosis of the Hip without Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Masayoshi; Tasaki, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Transient osteoporosis of the hip (TOH) is a rare disorder characterized by acute severe coxalgia and temporary osteopenia in the proximal femur. Although most cases were unilateral or staged bilateral TOH, some authors reported that the pregnant patients simultaneously had TOH in their bilateral hips. However, there has been no report of simultaneous bilateral TOH in the patient without pregnancy. A 25-year-old Japanese woman without pregnancy had acute simultaneous bilateral hip pain. Plain X-ray of the bilateral hips did not show a periarticular osteopenia. However, magnetic resonance image obtained one week after the onset demonstrated increased T2-weighted signal intensity and decreased T1-weighted signal intensity in the bilateral femoral heads. She was treated conservatively, and follow-up magnetic resonance image at seven weeks after the onset returned to normal bone marrow signal intensity. Her bilateral coxalgia subsided gradually. At one year after the onset, she had no sign of symptomatic flair. Our experience with this case indicates that recognizing the possibility of simultaneous bilateral TOH is important unless the patient is pregnant, and magnetic resonance image is predictable test to make a diagnosis of TOH, even in the absence of abnormal finding on plain X-ray. PMID:27648329

  13. CoCrMo metal-on-metal hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yifeng; Hoffman, Emily; Wimmer, Markus; Fischer, Alfons; Jacobs, Joshua; Marks, Laurence

    2013-01-21

    After the rapid growth in the use of CoCrMo metal-on-metal hip replacements since the second generation was introduced circa 1990, metal-on-metal hip replacements have experienced a sharp decline in the last two years due to biocompatibility issues related to wear and corrosion products. Despite some excellent clinical results, the release of wear and corrosion debris and the adverse response of local tissues have been of great concern. There are many unknowns regarding how CoCrMo metal bearings interact with the human body. This perspective article is intended to outline some recent progresses in understanding wear and corrosion of metal-on-metal hip replacement both in vivo and in vitro. The materials, mechanical deformation, corrosion, wear-assisted corrosion, and wear products will be discussed. Possible adverse health effects caused by wear products will be briefly addressed, as well as some of the many open questions such as the detailed chemistry of corrosion, tribochemical reactions and the formation of graphitic layers. Nowadays we design almost routinely for high performance materials and lubricants for automobiles; humans are at least as important. It is worth remembering that a hip implant is often the difference between walking and leading a relatively normal life, and a wheelchair.

  14. CoCrMo Metal-on-Metal Hip Replacements

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yifeng; Hoffman, Emily; Wimmer, Markus; Fischer, Alfons; Jacobs, Joshua; Marks, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    After the rapid growth in the use of CoCrMo metal-on-metal hip replacements since the second generation was introduced circa 1990, metal-on-metal hip replacements have experienced a sharp decline in the last two years due to biocompatibility issues related to wear and corrosion products. Despite some excellent clinical results, the release of wear and corrosion debris and the adverse response of local tissues have been of great concern. There are many unknowns regarding how CoCrMo metal bearings interact with the human body. This perspective article is intended to outline some recent progresses in understanding wear and corrosion of metal-on-metal hip replacement both in-vivo and in-vitro. The materials, mechanical deformation, corrosion, wear-assisted corrosion, and wear products will be discussed. Possible adverse health effects caused by wear products will be briefly addressed, as well as some of the many open questions such as the detailed chemistry of corrosion, tribochemical reactions and the formation of graphitic layers. Nowadays we design almost routinely for high performance materials and lubricants for automobiles; humans are at least as important. It is worth remembering that a hip implant is often the difference between walking and leading a relatively normal life, and a wheelchair. PMID:23196425

  15. Maternal, neonatal and community factors influencing neonatal mortality in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Machado, Carla Jorge; Hill, Kenneth

    2005-03-01

    Child mortality (the mortality of children less than five years old) declined considerably in the developing world in the 1990s, but infant mortality declined less. The reductions in neonatal mortality were not impressive and, as a consequence, there is an increasing percentage of infant deaths in the neonatal period. Any further reduction in child mortality, therefore, requires an understanding of the determinants of neonatal mortality. 209,628 birth and 2581 neonatal death records for the 1998 birth cohort from the city of São Paulo, Brazil, were probabilistically matched. Data were from SINASC and SIM, Information Systems on Live Births and Deaths of Brazil. Logistic regression was used to find the association between neonatal mortality and the following risk factors: birth weight, gestational age, Apgar scores at 1 and 5 minutes, delivery mode, plurality, sex, maternal education, maternal age, number of prior losses, prenatal care, race, parity and community development. Infants of older mothers were less likely to die in the neonatal period. Caesarean delivery was not found to be associated with neonatal mortality. Low birth weight, pre-term birth and low Apgar scores were associated with neonatal death. Having a mother who lives in the highest developed community decreased the odds of neonatal death, suggesting that factors not measured in this study are behind such association. This result may also indicate that other factors over and above biological and more proximate factors could affect neonatal death.

  16. Birthmarks of medical significance in the neonate.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Latanya T

    2013-02-01

    Birthmarks are commonplace and most pose no significant detriment to health. It is usual for some 'birthmarks' to manifest within the first weeks to months of life and are not necessarily seen at birth. This is attributed in large part to the maturation of neonatal skin and the deepening of skin color over time. With time, increased pigment production in the skin by melanocytes eventually highlight the differences between normal and abnormal hypopigmented and hyperpigmented anomalies of the skin. Birthmarks can be seen as an isolated skin condition or serve as an important diagnostic aid for other more significant disorders. This review details four of the most common birthmarks regularly encountered in the neonatal period by perinatologists, obstetricians and pediatricians. This review emphasizes their medical significance and highlights any associated underlying systemic disease or genetic syndrome.

  17. A neonate with a vesiculopustular rash.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Dominic O; Lapping-Carr, Gabrielle; Alikhan, Mir; Tsoukas, Maria L; Stein, Sarah L; de Jong, Jill L O

    2015-01-01

    Transient myeloproliferative disorder (TMD) is a unique form of acute megakaryocytic leukemia (AMKL) that spontaneously regresses and is found in 3% to 10% of neonates with Down syndrome (DS). We report the case of a neonate with DS who presented with a widespread vesiculopustular eruption as an initial sign of TMD. Complete blood count was normal but peripheral smear revealed circulating megakaryoblasts. The severity of skin lesions correlated with the blast count. By age 2 months the TMD resolved and the patient remains disease-free after 18 months of follow-up. Several important features of TMD are highlighted: skin findings may provide an important clinical clue to TMD diagnosis; manual review of the peripheral smear is necessary when TMD is suspected; and patients with a history of TMD have a very high (∼30%) risk of recurrence with a persistent AMKL within the first 3 years of life. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Hominin Hip Biomechanics: Changing Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Warrener, Anna G

    2017-05-01

    The shape of the human pelvis reflects the unique demands placed on the hip abductor muscles (gluteus medius and gluteus minimus), which stabilize the body in the frontal plane during bipedal locomotion. This morphological shift occurred early in hominin evolution, yet important shape differences between hominin species have led to significant disagreement about abductor function and locomotor capability in these extinct taxa. A static biomechanical model that relies on a close association between skeletal measurements of the pelvis and femur has traditionally been used to reconstruct hip biomechanics in these species. However, experimental biomechanical approaches have highlighted the dynamic nature of mediolateral balance in walking and running, challenging the assumptions of the static hip model. This article reviews traditional approaches for understanding hip abductor function, shows how they have been applied to the fossil hominin record, and discusses new techniques that integrate the dynamic nature of mediolateral balance during human locomotion. Anat Rec, 300:932-945, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Hip-Hop Pop Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talley, Clarence, Sr.

    2011-01-01

    Art has a way of helping students better understand and appreciate the world around them, particularly the things that are most important to them. Hip hop is one of those generational genres that capture the attention of young students like few other things do. Drawing on this genre to get students to create art is an excellent way to demonstrate…

  20. Hip-Hop Pop Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talley, Clarence, Sr.

    2011-01-01

    Art has a way of helping students better understand and appreciate the world around them, particularly the things that are most important to them. Hip hop is one of those generational genres that capture the attention of young students like few other things do. Drawing on this genre to get students to create art is an excellent way to demonstrate…

  1. Maternal haemoglobin and short-term neonatal outcome in preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Savajols, Elodie; Burguet, Antoine; Grimaldi, Marianne; Godoy, Florence; Sagot, Paul; Semama, Denis S

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether there is a significant association between maternal haemoglobin measured before delivery and short-term neonatal outcome in very preterm neonates. We included prospectively all live births occurring from 25 to 32+6 weeks of gestation in a tertiary care centre between January 1(st) 2009 and December 31(st) 2011. Outborn infants and infants presenting with lethal malformations were excluded. Three hundred and thirty-nine mothers and 409 infants met the inclusion criteria. For each mother-infant pair a prospective record of epidemiologic data was performed and maternal haemoglobin concentration recorded within 24 hours before delivery was retrospectively researched. Maternal haemoglobin was divided into quartiles with the second and the third one regarded as reference as they were composed of normal haemoglobin values. Short-term outcome was defined as poor in case of death during hospital stay and/or grades III/IV intraventricular haemorrhage and/or periventricular leukomalacia and/or necessity of ventriculoperitoneal shunt. The global rate of poor short-term neonatal outcome was 11.4% and was significantly associated with low maternal haemoglobin values. This association remained significant after adjustment for antenatal corticosteroids therapy, gestational age, parity, mechanism of preterm birth, mode of delivery and birth weight (aOR = 2.97 CI 95% [1.36-6.47]). There was no relation between short-term neonatal outcome and high maternal haemoglobin concentration values. We show that low maternal haemoglobin concentration at delivery is an independent risk factor for poor short-term neonatal outcome in very preterm neonates. This study is one of the first to show such an association within the preterm population.

  2. [Atraumatic hip pain in young adults].

    PubMed

    González Murillo, M; Turcu, V; De Nicolás Navas, M B; Yeguas Bermejo, A

    2016-01-01

    Hip pain in the young adult is a disabling pathophysiological process may be related to multiple etiologies. The process must be determined in order to make a diagnosis and follow-up treatment. The case is presented of a 29 year old woman with anemia, atraumatic hip pain on the right side, and a limp of one month onset. The differential diagnosis includes infectious, rheumatological, tumor, avascular necrosis of hip, hip impingement, hip dysplasia, osteoarthritis and other syndromes. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Comprehensive Review of Advancements in Hip Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Chang-Kyun

    2017-01-01

    Hip arthroscopy is currently being leveraged in the diagnosis and treatment of a wide range of hip joint problems. In fact, great advancements in hip arthroscopy have resulted in an ever-expanding number of indications to which it is being applied. Minimally invasive hip arthroscopy allows for quicker initiation of rehabilitation and has attracted much attention as the field becomes increasingly focused on surgeries designed to preserve joints. This review aims to summarize the recent advances, applications, and impact of hip arthroscopy. PMID:28316958

  4. [Congenital hip dysplasia, screening and therapy].

    PubMed

    Kolb, A; Windhager, R; Chiari, C

    2015-11-01

    Congenital hip dysplasia and hip dislocation are relatively common pathological conditions of the musculoskeletal system in infants. An early and certain diagnosis can now be achieved by sonographic hip screening within the framework of screening examination programs. This early diagnostic procedure in infants is essential particularly for a conservative treatment strategy. Therefore, apart from possessing in-depth knowledge, training of the examiner in specialist courses is of central importance. This article presents an overview of the entity of congenital hip dysplasia and hip dislocation, the diagnostics and treatment with special emphasis on recent developments.

  5. [Incidence and duration of therapy of pathological hip findings in U2 and U3 examinations (SNiP study)].

    PubMed

    Lange, A; Lange, J; Thyrian, R; Haas, J P; Ekkernkamp, A; Merk, H; Hoffmann, W; Lode, H N

    2014-02-01

    Determination of the efficacy of an early ultrasound examination followed by immediate treatment of hip joint dysplasia as well as measuring the therapeutic success in a population-based cohort study of neonates. The Survey of Neonates in Pomerania (SNiP) study included 4,093 neonates which represents 95.1 % of the total neonatal population. Of these children 2,534 (61.9 %) underwent ultrasound examination of the hip joint during the U2 stage (3-10 days after birth). The mean gestational age was 38.9 weeks. The sonographic classification was performed according to Graf. Initially (U2 stage) 42 (1.66 %) children were reported to be in need of therapy (stage IIc or higher according to Graf). The analysis showed a significantly higher incidence in girls (32 girls vs. 10 boys, p < 0.023, χ(2) test) and in children who had a breech birth (116, 4.6 %). A genetic predisposition was ascertained in 180 (7.1 %) children. The children could be subdivided into two groups: 1) children who underwent hip joint ultrasound during both U2 and U3 and 2) children who were first screened at the U3 stage. Of the 49 out of 54 neonates where the ultrasound findings were positive at the U2 examination the hip joint was matured in 32 children at U3 (4-8 weeks), 11 children had to be treated for 8-12 weeks 5 children were treated for over 3 months and1 child needed surgical correction. The early diagnosis of hip maturation disorders and joint dysplasia facilitates early implementation of effective treatment. At our clinic over 60 % of the infants underwent the U2 check up and, given a pathological finding, could undergo early treatment. It was possible to successfully treat 78 % of these children with a Tübingen hip flexion splint in just 4-8 weeks. In contrast, infants who were first examined at the U3 stage needed treatment for 4-12 months. In our opinion, early diagnosis at the age of 3-10 days should be carried out for all newborns.

  6. Biotribology of artificial hip joints

    PubMed Central

    Di Puccio, Francesca; Mattei, Lorenza

    2015-01-01

    Hip arthroplasty can be considered one of the major successes of orthopedic surgery, with more than 350000 replacements performed every year in the United States with a constantly increasing rate. The main limitations to the lifespan of these devices are due to tribological aspects, in particular the wear of mating surfaces, which implies a loss of matter and modification of surface geometry. However, wear is a complex phenomenon, also involving lubrication and friction. The present paper deals with the tribological performance of hip implants and is organized in to three main sections. Firstly, the basic elements of tribology are presented, from contact mechanics of ball-in-socket joints to ultra high molecular weight polyethylene wear laws. Some fundamental equations are also reported, with the aim of providing the reader with some simple tools for tribological investigations. In the second section, the focus moves to artificial hip joints, defining materials and geometrical properties and discussing their friction, lubrication and wear characteristics. In particular, the features of different couplings, from metal-on-plastic to metal-on-metal and ceramic-on-ceramic, are discussed as well as the role of the head radius and clearance. How friction, lubrication and wear are interconnected and most of all how they are specific for each loading and kinematic condition is highlighted. Thus, the significant differences in patients and their lifestyles account for the high dispersion of clinical data. Furthermore, such consideration has raised a new discussion on the most suitable in vitro tests for hip implants as simplified gait cycles can be too far from effective implant working conditions. In the third section, the trends of hip implants in the years from 2003 to 2012 provided by the National Joint Registry of England, Wales and Northern Ireland are summarized and commented on in a discussion. PMID:25621213

  7. What happens at the adjacent knee joint after total hip arthroplasty of Crowe type III and IV dysplastic hips?

    PubMed

    Kilicarslan, Kasim; Yalcin, Nadir; Cicek, Hakan; Cila, Erdal; Yildirim, Hasan

    2012-02-01

    We prospectively evaluated 30 hips of 22 patients who had normal knees with a mean age of 53.4 years (range, 38-72 years). In the early postoperative period, genu valgum deformity was observed in all knees. Of 22 patients, 17 complained of severe pain owing to strain in the medial collateral ligament and iliotibial tract. Postoperatively, the ipsilateral extremities of the patients were extended by a mean of 16.5 mm (8-25 mm). Q angles of the patients increased by a mean of 4.4° ± 2.5° (P < .001). Although the Harris hip scores were improved (40.7-87.8 points), postoperative Lysholm-Gillquist knee scores were significantly reduced (92-76 points, P < .001). Reduction of displaced hips into the anatomical hip center and lengthening the extremity despite shortening procedure may lead to strain at the knee joint iatrogenically, particularly with the mechanical effect of tensor fascia lata, which results with changes in the knee biomechanics.

  8. Severe Pelvic Obliquity Affects Femoral Offset in Patients with Total Hip Arthroplasty but Not Leg-Length Inequality

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Xianlong; Chen, Yunsu; Peng, Xiaochun; Mao, Yuanqing; Yang, Yang; Fu, Beigang; Wang, Xiuhui; Tang, Tingting

    2015-01-01

    Leg-length inequality is an extensively studied complication of total hip arthroplasty in normal patients. However, few studies have focused on the pelvic obliquity of coronal pelvic malrotation. We hypothesized that pelvic obliquity with a fixed abduction/adduction contracture deformity of the hip may intraoperatively affect the release of soft tissues, ultimately resulting in a leg-length inequality. This study also investigated whether the femoral and vertical offsets of total hip arthroplasty were correlated with pelvic obliquity. This prospective study divided 98 patients into six groups based on the inclination of pelvic obliquity before total hip arthroplasty. Leg-length inequality, variation of pelvic obliquity, offset, and vertical offset were measured after total hip arthroplasty. Leg-length inequality and vertical offset were not significantly different among groups, whereas the variation of pelvic obliquity was significantly higher in type IIC pelvic obliquity than in other groups. Type IC pelvic obliquity had a significantly shorter offset than did the other groups, which may have been an important factor leading to type IC pelvic obliquity. Pelvic obliquity exhibited no significant effect on leg-length inequality in patients with total hip arthroplasty. A shorter offset may be caused by the higher tension of the abductor in the operated hip, which may result in the formation of type IC pelvic obliquity. Releasing the abductor contracture and restoring femoral offset are important for increasing hip stability and maintaining pelvic balance following total hip arthroplasty. PMID:26673427

  9. Computed tomography compared to magnetic resonance imaging in occult or suspect hip fractures. A retrospective study in 44 patients.

    PubMed

    Collin, David; Geijer, Mats; Göthlin, Jan H

    2016-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) for evaluation of occult and suspect hip fractures has been proposed as a good second-line investigation. The diagnostic precision compared to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is unclear. To compare the diagnostic performance of CT and MRI in a retrospective study on patients with suspect and occult hip fractures. Forty-four elderly consecutive patients with low-energy trauma to the hip were identified where negative or suspect CT was followed by MRI. Primary reporting and review by two observers as well as the diagnostic performance of the two modalities were compared. Surgical treatment and clinical course were used as outcomes. Compared to the primary reports, the CT reviewers found fewer normal and no suspect cases. MRI changed the primary diagnoses in 27 cases, and in 14 and 15 cases, respectively, at review. There was no disagreement on MRI diagnoses. In our patient population, MRI was deemed a more reliable modality for hip fracture diagnosis in comparison to CT. For clinical decision making, MRI seems to have a higher accuracy than CT. A negative CT finding cannot completely rule out a hip fracture in patients where clinical findings of hip fracture persevere. • Experience is highly influential in diagnosing occult or suspect hip fractures at CT • Inconclusive hip CT shows high inter-rater reliability at experienced review • There was low diagnostic accuracy via CT compared to MRI for all interpreters • Hip fractures can readily be diagnosed at MRI regardless of radiological experience.

  10. Severe Pelvic Obliquity Affects Femoral Offset in Patients with Total Hip Arthroplasty but Not Leg-Length Inequality.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Xianlong; Chen, Yunsu; Peng, Xiaochun; Mao, Yuanqing; Yang, Yang; Fu, Beigang; Wang, Xiuhui; Tang, Tingting

    2015-01-01

    Leg-length inequality is an extensively studied complication of total hip arthroplasty in normal patients. However, few studies have focused on the pelvic obliquity of coronal pelvic malrotation. We hypothesized that pelvic obliquity with a fixed abduction/adduction contracture deformity of the hip may intraoperatively affect the release of soft tissues, ultimately resulting in a leg-length inequality. This study also investigated whether the femoral and vertical offsets of total hip arthroplasty were correlated with pelvic obliquity. This prospective study divided 98 patients into six groups based on the inclination of pelvic obliquity before total hip arthroplasty. Leg-length inequality, variation of pelvic obliquity, offset, and vertical offset were measured after total hip arthroplasty. Leg-length inequality and vertical offset were not significantly different among groups, whereas the variation of pelvic obliquity was significantly higher in type IIC pelvic obliquity than in other groups. Type IC pelvic obliquity had a significantly shorter offset than did the other groups, which may have been an important factor leading to type IC pelvic obliquity. Pelvic obliquity exhibited no significant effect on leg-length inequality in patients with total hip arthroplasty. A shorter offset may be caused by the higher tension of the abductor in the operated hip, which may result in the formation of type IC pelvic obliquity. Releasing the abductor contracture and restoring femoral offset are important for increasing hip stability and maintaining pelvic balance following total hip arthroplasty.

  11. Neonates with extra-renal pelvis: the first 2 years.

    PubMed

    Katzir, Ze'ev; Witzling, Michaela; Nikolov, Gallina; Gvirtz, Gabriela; Arbel, Eliana; Kohelet, David; Boaz, Mona; Smetana, Shmuel; Lorberboym, Mordechai

    2005-06-01

    Extra-renal pelvis (ERpel) is a common ultrasonographic finding among neonates who have undergone recurrent ultrasound examinations for a better definition of prenatal renal pelvic dilatation. This study tries to determine whether or not ERpel has important prognostic implications. Seventy-nine neonates (17 female) were examined. All had a diagnosis of prenatal renal pelvis dilatation, which was shown by postnatal ultrasound to be ERpel. Sixty ERpel neonates were examined 1.5 months to 2.5 months after the ultrasound (US) diagnosis by both Tc-99m diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid (DPTA) dynamic renal scanning and (99m)Tc-pertechnetate direct cystography. Clinical assessment, urine cultures and renal ultrasound follow-up were maintained for 2 years. The proportion of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in patients with ERpel was compared with that of the total neonatal and infantile population with normal US scans in the region of our hospital. Associated minor congenital malformations were found in 12 of 79 neonates (15.2%). Four had a family history of ERpel. Among 60 neonates who underwent renal scanning, 36 (60%) were found to have urinary retention in the collecting system. Another nine (15%) had vesico-ureteral (VU) reflux, of which seven had urinary retention. Fifteen (25%) showed normal isotope imaging. Urinary tract infection was di