Science.gov

Sample records for normal phase liquid

  1. Normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography of triacylglycerols.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, S H; Netting, A G

    1988-08-31

    Triacylglycerols have been separated by normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on silica utilising a solvent system consisting of dry acetonitrile-half water saturated hexane (0.7:99.3). This solvent system is UV transparent allowing detection at 200 nm and affords a separation in which retention is primarily dependent on the number of constituent double bonds. There is also a slight separation on chainlength, the longer chainlengths being eluted first. The system is therefore complementary to currently used reversed-phase HPLC systems. Chromatograms for some polyunsaturated fats and oils are given, and the most polyunsaturated triacylglycerols from linseed oil are analysed in more detail. Data are given for the separation and quantitation of the pentafluorobenzyl esters of constituent fatty acids from these triacylglycerols by a similar normal-phase HPLC system.

  2. Purification of flavonoids from licorice using an off-line preparative two-dimensional normal-phase liquid chromatography/reversed-phase liquid chromatography method.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yunpeng; Fu, Yanhui; Fu, Qing; Cai, Jianfeng; Xin, Huaxia; Dai, Mei; Jin, Yu

    2016-07-01

    An orthogonal (71.9%) off-line preparative two-dimensional normal-phase liquid chromatography/reversed-phase liquid chromatography method coupled with effective sample pretreatment was developed for separation and purification of flavonoids from licorice. Most of the nonflavonoids were firstly removed using a self-made Click TE-Cys (60 μm) solid-phase extraction. In the first dimension, an industrial grade preparative chromatography was employed to purify the crude flavonoids. Click TE-Cys (10 μm) was selected as the stationary phase that provided an excellent separation with high reproducibility. Ethyl acetate/ethanol was selected as the mobile phase owing to their excellent solubility for flavonoids. Flavonoids co-eluted in the first dimension were selected for further purification using reversed-phase liquid chromatography. Multiple compounds could be isolated from one normal-phase fraction and some compounds with bad resolution in one-dimensional liquid chromatography could be prepared in this two-dimensional system owing to the orthogonal separation. Moreover, this two-dimensional liquid chromatography method was beneficial for the preparation of relatively trace flavonoid compounds, which were enriched in the first dimension and further purified in the second dimension. Totally, 24 flavonoid compounds with high purity were obtained. The results demonstrated that the off-line two-dimensional liquid chromatography method was effective for the preparative separation and purification of flavonoids from licorice.

  3. Microporous membrane liquid-liquid extraction coupled on-line with normal-phase liquid chromatography for the determination of cationic surfactants in river and waste water.

    PubMed

    Norberg, J; Thordarson, E; Mathiasson, L; Jönsson, J A

    2000-02-11

    Membrane-based continuous liquid-liquid extraction combined on-line with normal-phase liquid chromatography is proposed for the determination of cationic surfactants in complex aqueous samples. The technique has the potential for complete automation. Selective enrichment of cationic surfactants from spiked river water and waste-water samples with simultaneous removal of matrix constituents, followed by a quantitative transfer of the extract onto a liquid chromatographic column and separation of the surfactant homologues yielding low detection limits, has been realised. The homologues of alkyldimethylbenzylammonium chloride (Dodigen 226) were chosen as model compounds in the method development. Dodigen homologues were ion-paired with heptanoic acid and extracted into chlorobutane by means of microporous membrane liquid-liquid extraction. It was thereby possible to attain an enrichment of over 250 times for one of the homologues, viz. the concentration in the organic liquid is 250 times higher than in the original sample. Detection limits for the three best-detected homologues of the mixture were in the range 0.7-5 microg/l in spiked river water samples. Ion-pair normal-phase liquid chromatography, again with heptanoic acid as counter-ion, gave the necessary separation of the surfactant homologues.

  4. Metal-organic framework MIL-100(Fe) as the stationary phase for both normal-phase and reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yan-Yan; Yang, Cheng-Xiong; Yan, Xiu-Ping

    2013-01-25

    Metal-organic framework MIL-100(Fe) was explored as a novel stationary phase for both normal-phase and reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography. Two groups of analytes (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, naphthalene and 1-chloronaphthalene; aniline, acetanilide, 2-nitroaniline and 1-naphthylamine) were used to test the separation performance of MIL-100(Fe) in the reverse-phase mode, while the isomers of chloroaniline or toluidine were employed to evaluate its performance in the normal-phase mode. The MIL-100(Fe) packed column gave a baseline separation of all the tested analytes with good precision. The separation was controlled by negative enthalpy change and entropy change in the reverse-phase mode, but positive enthalpy change and entropy change in the normal-phase mode. The relative standard deviations of retention time, peak area, peak height, and half peak width for eleven replicate separations of the tested analytes were 0.2-0.7%, 0.5-3.6%, 0.6-2.3% and 0.8-1.7%, respectively. The mesoporous cages, accessible windows, excellent chemical and solvent stability, metal active sites and aromatic pore walls make MIL-100(Fe) a good candidate as a novel stationary phase for both normal-phase and reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography. PMID:23290359

  5. On-line comprehensive two-dimensional normal-phase liquid chromatography × reversed-phase liquid chromatography for preparative isolation of Peucedanum praeruptorum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Yuan; Li, Jia-Fu; Jian, Ya-Mei; Wu, Zhen; Fang, Mei-Juan; Qiu, Ying-Kun

    2015-03-27

    A new on-line comprehensive preparative two-dimensional normal-phase liquid chromatography × reversed-phase liquid chromatography (2D NPLC × RPLC) system was developed for the separation of complicated natural products. It was based on the use of a silica gel packed medium-pressure column as the first dimension and an ODS preparative HPLC column as the second dimension. The two dimensions were connected with normal-phase (NP) and reversed-phase (RP) enrichment units, involving a newly developed airflow assisted adsorption (AAA) technique. The instrument operation and the performance of this NPLC × RPLC separation method were illustrated by gram-scale isolation of ethanol extract from the roots of Peucedanum praeruptorum. In total, 19 compounds with high purity were obtained via automated multi-step preparative separation in a short period of time using this system, and their structures were comprehensively characterized by ESI-MS, (1)H NMR, and (13)C NMR. Including two new compounds, five isomers in two groups with identical HPLC and TLC retention values were also obtained and identified by 1D NMR and 2D NMR. This is the first report of an NPLC × RPLC system successfully applied in an on-line preparative process. This system not only solved the interfacing problem of mobile-phase immiscibility caused by NP and RP separation, it also exhibited apparent advantages in separation efficiency and sample treatment capacity compared with conventional methods.

  6. On-line comprehensive two-dimensional normal-phase liquid chromatography×reversed-phase liquid chromatography for preparative isolation of toad venom.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia-Fu; Fang, Hua; Yan, Xia; Chang, Fang-Rong; Wu, Zhen; Wu, Yun-Long; Qiu, Ying-Kun

    2016-07-22

    An on-line comprehensive preparative two-dimensional normal-phase liquid chromatography×reversed-phase liquid chromatography (2D NPLC×RPLC) system was constructed with a newly developed vacuum evaporation assisted adsorption (VEAA) interface, allowing fast removal of NPLC solvent in the vacuum condition and successfully solving the solvent incompatibility problem between NPLC and RPLC. The system achieved on-line solvent exchange within the two dimensions and its performance was illustrated by gram-scale isolation of crude extract from the venom of Bufo bufo gargarizans. Within separation time of ∼20h, 19 compounds were obtained with high purity in a single run. With the VEAA interface, the 2D system exhibited apparent advantages in separation efficiency and automation compared with conventional methods, indicating its promising application in the routine separation process for complicated natural products. PMID:27328884

  7. High performance liquid chromatographic separations of gas oil samples and their hydrotreated products using commercial normal phases.

    PubMed

    Oro, Nicole E; Lucy, Charles A

    2011-10-28

    Three commercially available high performance liquid chromatography columns are used in normal phase or quasi-normal phase mode for the separation of gas oil samples. The columns are tested with 20 analytical standards to determine their suitability for separations of petroleum samples and their ability to separate the nitrogen group-types (pyrrole and pyridine) found in petroleum. The columns studied are polymeric hypercrosslinked polystyrene (HGN), a biphenyl phase, and a Chromegabond "DNAP" column from ES Industries. The HGN column separates gas oils based on both ring structure and heteroatom, while the biphenyl phase has low retention of most compounds studied in quasi-normal phase mode. The "DNAP" column is selective for nitrogen-containing compounds, separating them from PAHs as well as oxygen and sulphur compounds. Retention data of standards on all three columns is shown, along with chromatograms of gas oil samples on the HGN and "DNAP" columns.

  8. Chromatographic performance of synthetic polycrystalline diamond as a stationary phase in normal phase high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Peristyy, Anton; Paull, Brett; Nesterenko, Pavel N

    2015-04-24

    The chromatographic properties of high pressure high temperature synthesised diamond (HPHT) are investigated in normal phase mode of high performance liquid chromatography. Purified nonporous irregular shape particles of average particles size 1.2 μm and specific surface area 5.1 m(2) g(-1) were used for packing 100×4.6 mm ID or 50×4.6 mm ID stainless steel columns. The retention behaviour of several classes of compounds including alkyl benzenes, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), alkylphenylketones, phenols, aromatic acids and bases were studied using n-hexane-2-propanol mixtures as mobile phase. The results are compared with those observed for microdispersed sintered detonation nanodiamond (MSDN) and porous graphitic carbon (PGC). HPHT diamond revealed distinctive separation selectivity, which is orthogonal to that observed for porous graphitic carbon; while selectivities of HPHT diamond and microdispersed sintered detonation nanodiamonds are similar. Owing to non-porous particle nature, columns packed with high pressure high temperature diamond exhibited excellent mass transfer and produce separations with maximum column efficiency of 128,200 theoretical plates per meter.

  9. Separation and characterization of bufadienolides in toad skin using two-dimensional normal-phase liquid chromatography×reversed-phase liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun; Jin, Hongli; Li, Xiaolong; Zhao, Jianqiang; Guo, Xiujie; Wang, Jixia; Guo, Zhimou; Zhang, Xiuli; Tao, Yanduo; Liu, Yanfang; Chen, Deliang; Liang, Xinmiao

    2016-07-15

    Bufadienolides possess various bioactivities especially antitumor. Due to the high structural diversity, the separation of bufadienolides often suffers from coelution problem on conventional RP columns. In this work, an off-line two-dimensional normal-phase liquid chromatography×reversed-phase liquid chromatography (2D-NPLC×RPLC) method was developed to separate and characterize bufadienolides in toad skin. Several RP and NP columns were evaluated with five reference bufadienlides. The XUnion C18 and XAmide columns exhibited superior chromatographic performances for bufadienlide separation, and were selected in RPLC and NPLC, respectively. RPLC was used in the second-dimension for the good compatibility with MS, while NPLC was adopted in the first-dimension. The orthogonality of the 2D-NPLC×RPLC system was investigated by the geometric approach using fifteen bufadienolide mixtures. The result was 49.6%, demonstrating reasonable orthogonality of this 2D-LC system. By combining the 2D-LC system with MS, 64 bufadienlides including 33 minor ones and 11 pairs of isomers in toad skin were identified. This off-line 2D-NPLC×RPLC allowed to solve the coelution problem of bufadienlides in one-dimension RPLC, and thus facilitated the identification significantly.

  10. Stability of Wavy Films in Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flows at Normal and Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakotaiah, V.; Jayawardena, S. S.

    1996-01-01

    For flow rates of technological interest, most gas-liquid flows in pipes are in the annular flow regime, in which, the liquid moves along the pipe wall in a thin, wavy film and the gas flows in the core region. The waves appearing on the liquid film have a profound influence on the transfer rates, and hence on the design of these systems. We have recently proposed and analyzed two boundary layer models that describe the characteristics of laminar wavy films at high Reynolds numbers (300-1200). Comparison of model predictions to 1-g experimental data showed good agreement. The goal of our present work is to understand through a combined program of experimental and modeling studies the characteristics of wavy films in annular two-phase gas-liquid flows under normal as well as microgravity conditions in the developed and entry regions.

  11. Alternative solvents for improving the greenness of normal phase liquid chromatography of lipid classes.

    PubMed

    Prache, Nolwenn; Abreu, Sonia; Sassiat, Patrick; Thiébaut, Didier; Chaminade, Pierre

    2016-09-16

    An evaluation of solvents alternative to n-heptane (d-limonene and hexamethyldisiloxane) and chloroform (cyclopentyl methyl ether, 2-methyltetrahydrofuran and isopentyl acetate) was developed for lipid classes separation of non-polar cholesteryl ester to highly polar phospholipids by high-performance liquid chromatography on bare silica stationary phase and evaporative light-scattering detection. Screening of alternative solvents was used to estimate their compatibility with liquid chromatography and evaporative light-scattering detection and to evaluate their chromatographic selectivity. This work shows that n-heptane can be advantageously replaced by hexamethyldisiloxane. An increase of non-polar lipids retention is observed with hexamethyldisiloxane as weak solvent. Chloroform, which is largely used for lipid analysis, might be replaced efficaciously by cyclopentyl methyl ether, 2-methyltetrahydrofuran or isopentyl acetate. Aside from offering a different selectivity, the gradients composed by one or both alternative solvents gave efficient and comparable or even better separations than those obtained with conventional solvents. PMID:27554026

  12. An investigation into the flow behavior of a single phase gas system and a two phase gas/liquid system in normal gravity with nonuniform heating from above

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disimile, Peter J.; Heist, Timothy J.

    1990-01-01

    The fluid behavior in normal gravity of a single phase gas system and a two phase gas/liquid system in an enclosed circular cylinder heated suddenly and nonuniformly from above was investigated. Flow visualization was used to obtain qualitative data on both systems. The use of thermochromatic liquid crystal particles as liquid phase flow tracers was evaluated as a possible means of simultaneously gathering both flow pattern and temperature gradient data for the two phase system. The results of the flow visualization experiments performed on both systems can be used to gain a better understanding of the behavior of such systems in a reduced gravity environment and aid in the verification of a numerical model of the system.

  13. Effect of trace amounts of water in the mobile phase of normal-phase enantioselective high-performance liquid chromatography on selectivity and resolution of optical isomers.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Rustum, Abu M

    2009-04-01

    The irreproducibility of normal-phase enantioselective high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) could be attributed to the presence or absence of trace amounts of water in one or more components of the mobile phase. The effect of trace amounts of water on chromatographic characteristics in normal-phase enantioselective HPLC was investigated by deliberate addition of controlled, trace amounts of water into the mobile phase for the separation of T-3811ME and its undesired enantiomer. Commercial 2-propanol was pre-mixed with 2% (v/v) water and then used for preparation of the mobile phase in combination with such organic modifiers as ethanol and methanol at different ratios. The results showed up to 30% improvement in the resolution (Rs), 4% in selectivity (alpha), and 39% in efficiency (plate number N) compared to using a mobile phase prepared from neat commercial 2-propanol. Thus, the effect of trace amounts of water in the mobile phase of normal-phase enantioselective HPLC was demonstrated. PMID:19406020

  14. Normal-phase liquid chromatography-atmospheric-pressure photoionization-mass spectrometry analysis of cholesterol and phytosterol oxidation products.

    PubMed

    Grün, Christian H; Besseau, Sophie

    2016-03-25

    During thermal processing of sterols, complex mixtures of sterol oxidation products may be formed. Here, a new method for the separation and detection of such products is described. The method is based on normal-phase liquid chromatography (NPLC) for separation and atmospheric-pressure photoionization-mass spectrometry (APPI-MS) for detection. The method was optimized using commercial cholesterol oxidation products and tested on an experimentally derived mixture of phytosterol oxidation products. The investigated parameters include solvent and dopant selection, dopant concentration, polar modifiers, the type of stationary phase, and flow rate. Best chromatographic separation and highest sensitivity were achieved using a diol-bonded silica column, employing a solvent system consisting of hexane and isopropanol. The dopant of choice was chlorobenzene, added post-column to the solvent stream at 10% of the flow rate. The developed NPLC-APPI-MS method proved to be a valuable tool for the separation and detection of sterol oxidation products. PMID:26774121

  15. Normal-phase liquid chromatography-atmospheric-pressure photoionization-mass spectrometry analysis of cholesterol and phytosterol oxidation products.

    PubMed

    Grün, Christian H; Besseau, Sophie

    2016-03-25

    During thermal processing of sterols, complex mixtures of sterol oxidation products may be formed. Here, a new method for the separation and detection of such products is described. The method is based on normal-phase liquid chromatography (NPLC) for separation and atmospheric-pressure photoionization-mass spectrometry (APPI-MS) for detection. The method was optimized using commercial cholesterol oxidation products and tested on an experimentally derived mixture of phytosterol oxidation products. The investigated parameters include solvent and dopant selection, dopant concentration, polar modifiers, the type of stationary phase, and flow rate. Best chromatographic separation and highest sensitivity were achieved using a diol-bonded silica column, employing a solvent system consisting of hexane and isopropanol. The dopant of choice was chlorobenzene, added post-column to the solvent stream at 10% of the flow rate. The developed NPLC-APPI-MS method proved to be a valuable tool for the separation and detection of sterol oxidation products.

  16. Retentivity, selectivity and thermodynamic behavior of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on charge-transfer and hypercrosslinked stationary phases under conditions of normal phase high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ping; Lucy, Charles A

    2016-03-11

    Charge-transfer and hypercrosslinked polystyrene phases offer retention and separation for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and thus have potential for petroleum analysis. The size, shape and planarity selectivity for PAH standards on charge-transfer (DNAP column) and hypercrosslinked polystyrene (HC-Tol and 5HGN columns) phases are different under normal phase liquid chromatography (NPLC). The HC-Tol column behaves like a conventional NPLC column with low retention of PAHs. Retention of PAHs on the DNAP and 5HGN are strong and increases with the number of aromatic rings. The main retention mechanism is through π-π interactions and dipole-induced dipole interaction. Thermodynamics indicates that the retention mechanism of PAHs remains unchanged over the temperature range 20-60°C. In addition, on either DNAP or 5HGN column, both linear and bent PAHs are retained through the same mechanism. But DNAP possesses smaller π-π interaction and higher planarity selectivity than 5HGN for PAHs. This is suggestive that DNAP interacts with PAHs through a disordered phase arrangement, while 5HGN behaves as an ordered adsorption phase.

  17. Improved normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography procedure for the determination of carotenoids in cereals.

    PubMed

    Panfili, Gianfranco; Fratianni, Alessandra; Irano, Mario

    2004-10-20

    Besides the health benefits associated with whole-grain consumption, cereals are recognized sources of health-enhancing bioactive components such as carotenoids, which are a group of yellow pigments involved in the prevention of many degenerative diseases and which have been used for a long time as indicators of the color quality of durum wheat and pasta products. This work reports a fast, sensitive, and selective procedure for the extraction and determination of carotenoids from cereals and cereal byproducts. The method involves sample saponification and extraction followed by normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, allowing the separation of the main carotenoids pigments of cereals, especially lutein and zeaxanthin. An application of the established method to various species of cereals and cereal byproducts is also shown. The highest carotenoid levels were found in maize (approximately 11.14 mg/kg of dry weight), which contains high amounts of beta-cryptoxanthin (2.40 mg/kg of dry weight), and, among the cereals considered, has the highest content of zeaxanthin (6.43 mg/kg of dry weight) and alpha+beta-carotene (1.44 mg/kg of dry weight). With the exception of maize, lutein is the main compound found (from 0.23 to 2.65 mg/kg of dry weight in oat and durum wheat, respectively). Moreover, whereas alpha+beta-carotene and zeaxanthin are principally localized in the germ, lutein is equally distributed along the kernel. PMID:15478994

  18. Direct enantioselective separation of bevantolol by high-performance liquid chromatography on normal and reverse cellulose chiral stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Aboul-Enein, H Y; Serignese, V

    1994-01-01

    A direct, isocratic and simple chromatographic method is described for the enantiomeric separation of bevantolol (BEV) using normal and reverse cellulose tris (3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate) chiral stationary phases (CSPs) known as Chiralcel OD and Chiralcel OD-R, respectively. The effect of various alcohols present in the mobile phase on the separation factor (a) and resolution factor (Rs) has been studied. The method has been used to determine and identify the BEV enantiomers in human urine after oral administration of racemic BEV. The chiral recognition mechanism(s) between the analyte and these chiral stationary phases is proposed.

  19. Proanthocyanidins in wild sea buckthorn (Hippophaë rhamnoides) berries analyzed by reversed-phase, normal-phase, and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with UV and MS detection.

    PubMed

    Kallio, Heikki; Yang, Wei; Liu, Pengzhan; Yang, Baoru

    2014-08-01

    A rapid and sensitive method for profiling of proanthocyanidins (PAs) of sea buckthorn (Hippophaë rhamnoides) berries was established based on aqueous, acidified acetone extraction. The extract was purified by Sephadex column chromatography and analyzed using reversed-phase, normal-phase, and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC). Negative ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) in single ion recording (SIR) and full scan modes combined with UV detection were used to define the combinations and ratios of PA oligomer classes. PAs with degree of polymerization from 2 to 11 were detected by HILIC-ESI-MS. Quantification of dimeric, trimeric, and tetrameric PAs was carried out with ESI-MS-SIR, and their molar proportions were 40, 40, and 20%, respectively. Only B-type PAs were found, and (epi)gallocatechins were the main monomeric units. More than 60 combinations of (epi)catechins and (epi)gallocatechins of proanthocyanidin dimers and trimers were found. A majority of the PAs were shown to be higher polymers based on the HILIC-UV analysis.

  20. Separations of substituted benzenes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using normal- and reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography with UiO-66 as the stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Chao-Yan; Yan, Zeng-Guang; Bai, Li-Ping; Wang, Xiayan; Huang, Hongliang; Zhou, You-Ya; Xie, Yabo; Li, Fa-Sheng; Li, Jian-Rong

    2014-11-28

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have great potential for applications in chromatography due to their highly tailorable porous structures and unique properties. In this work, the stable MOF UiO-66 was evaluated as both a normal-phase (NP-) and a reverse-phase (RP-) stationary phase in the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to separate substituted benzenes (SBs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). It was found that the mobile phase composition has a significant effect on the HPLC separation. Baseline RP-HPLC separations of xylene isomers; naphthalene and anthracene; naphthalene and chrysene; and naphthalene, fluorene, and chrysene were achieved using MeOH/H2O ratios of 80:20, 75:25, 85:15, and 75:25, respectively, on the UiO-66 column. Similarly, baseline NP-HPLC separations of xylene isomers and ethylbenzene; ethylbenzene, styrene, o-xylene, and m-xylene; and several PAHs were also obtained on the UiO-66 column with different mobile phase compositions. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) of retention time, peak height, peak area, and half peak width for five replicate separations of the tested analytes were within the ranges 0.2-0.4%, 0.2-1.6%, 0.7-3.9%, 0.4-1.1%, respectively. We also evaluated other critical HPLC parameters, including injected sample mass, column temperature, and the thermodynamic characters of both the RP-HPLC and the NP-HPLC separation processes. It was confirmed that the separation of SBs on a UiO-66 column was an exothermic process, controlled by both enthalpy change (ΔH) and entropy change (ΔS). The reverse shape selectivity, size selectivity, stacking effect, and electrostatic force played vital roles in the separations of these analytes. To the best of our knowledge, this method is one of the very few examples of using MOFs as the stationary phase in both NP-HPLC and RP-HPLC. MOF-based stationary phases may thus be applied in the separations and analyses of SBs and PAHs in environmental samples.

  1. A rapid method for the simultaneous quantification of the major tocopherols, carotenoids, free and esterified sterols in canola (Brassica napus) oil using normal phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Flakelar, Clare L; Prenzler, Paul D; Luckett, David J; Howitt, Julia A; Doran, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    A normal phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was developed to simultaneously quantify several prominent bioactive compounds in canola oil vis. α-tocopherol, γ-tocopherol, δ-tocopherol, β-carotene, lutein, β-sitosterol, campesterol and brassicasterol. The use of sequential diode array detection (DAD) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) allowed direct injection of oils, diluted in hexane without derivatisation or saponification, greatly reducing sample preparation time, and permitting the quantification of both free sterols and intact sterol esters. Further advantages over existing methods included increased analytical selectivity, and a chromatographic run time substantially less than other reported normal phase methods. The HPLC-DAD-MS/MS method was applied to freshly extracted canola oil samples as well as commercially available canola, palm fruit, sunflower and olive oils. PMID:27507459

  2. LIGHT NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLS) are hydrocarbons that exist as a separate, immiscible phase when in contact with water and/or air. ifferences in the physical and chemical properties of water and NAPL result in the formation of a physical interface between the liquids which preve...

  3. Identification and Quantification of Glycoproteins Using Ion-Pairing Normal-phase Liquid Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Wen; Nothaft, Harald; Szymanski, Christine M.; Kelly, John

    2009-01-01

    Glycoprotein structure determination and quantification by MS requires efficient isolation of glycopeptides from a proteolytic digest of complex protein mixtures. Here we describe that the use of acids as ion-pairing reagents in normal-phase chromatography (IP-NPLC) considerably increases the hydrophobicity differences between non-glycopeptides and glycopeptides, thereby resulting in the reproducible isolation of N-linked high mannose type and sialylated glycopeptides from the tryptic digest of a ribonuclease B and fetuin mixture. The elution order of non-glycopeptides relative to glycopeptides in IP-NPLC is predictable by their hydrophobicity values calculated using the Wimley-White water/octanol hydrophobicity scale. O-linked glycopeptides can be efficiently isolated from fetuin tryptic digests using IP-NPLC when N-glycans are first removed with PNGase. IP-NPLC recovers close to 100% of bacterial N-linked glycopeptides modified with non-sialylated heptasaccharides from tryptic digests of periplasmic protein extracts from Campylobacter jejuni 11168 and its pglD mutant. Label-free nano-flow reversed-phase LC-MS is used for quantification of differentially expressed glycopeptides from the C. jejuni wild-type and pglD mutant followed by identification of these glycoproteins using multiple stage tandem MS. This method further confirms the acetyltransferase activity of PglD and demonstrates for the first time that heptasaccharides containing monoacetylated bacillosamine are transferred to proteins in both the wild-type and mutant strains. We believe that IP-NPLC will be a useful tool for quantitative glycoproteomics. PMID:19525481

  4. Implication of on-line Fourier transform infrared detection in the separation of aromatic compounds via normal-phase liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Wachholz, S.; Geibler, H.; Bleck, J.

    1988-01-01

    Normal-phase liquid chromatography has been used to separate nitrogen heterocyclics and aromatics with polar groups which are known to be present together in solvent refined coal. The identification of the separated components was accomplished by on-line coupling of the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer as a chromatographic detector. The separation of these model compounds was carried out using Li Chrosorb NH/sub 2/ and CN in series. Chloroform was used as mobile phase. All the compounds could be identified in spite of incomplete separation in some cases. A suitable interface adapted to the different methods of HPLC and FTIR allowed the detection of about 5 ..mu..g per injected compound.

  5. Analysis of oil-biodiesel samples by high performance liquid chromatography using the normal phase column of new generation and the evaporative light scattering detector.

    PubMed

    Fedosov, Sergey N; Fernandes, Natalia A; Firdaus, Mohd Y

    2014-01-24

    Conversion of vegetable oil to biodiesel is usually monitored by gas chromatography. This is not always convenient because of (i) an elaborate derivatization of the samples; (ii) inhibition of this process by methanol and water; (iii) low stability of the derivatives under storage. HPLC methods are apparently more convenient, but none of the described variants had won a wide recognition so far. This can be ascribed to the problems of reproducibility (in the case of normal phase chromatography) and limited separation of some analytes (in the case of reverse phase chromatography). Here we report an HPLC procedure suitable for separation of biodiesel, free fatty acids, glycerides, glycerol and lecithin. The normal phase column of new generation (Poroshell 120 HILIC) and the novel gradient were used. The method was tested on both the artificial mixtures and the crude reaction samples. Elution of the analytes was monitored by an evaporative light scattering detector. This method is usually confined to a very limited range of masses, where only a part of the complex calibration curve is used. We have analyzed the light scattering signal within a very broad range of masses, whereupon the calibration curves were produced. The data were approximated by the appropriate equations used afterward to recalculate the signal to the mass in a convenient way. An experimental conversion of rapeseed oil to biodiesel was performed by a liquid lipase formulation. This process was monitored by HPLC to illustrate advantages of the suggested registration method.

  6. Chiral separations in normal phase liquid chromatography: enantioselectivity of recently commercialized polysaccharide-based selectors. Part I: enantioselectivity under generic screening conditions.

    PubMed

    Younes, Ahmed A; Mangelings, Debby; Vander Heyden, Yvan

    2011-06-01

    Four recently commercialized polysaccharide-based chiral stationary phases, Sepapak(®) 1, Sepapak(®) 2, Sepapak(®) 3, and Sepapak(®) 4, now called Lux(®) Cellulose-1, Lux(®) Cellulose-2, Lux(®) Amylose-2 and Lux(®) Cellulose-4, respectively, were examined for their enantioselectivity on a set of 61 racemic compounds by applying the screening conditions of a previously developed chiral screening strategy in normal phase liquid chromatography (NPLC) [N. Matthijs et al., J. Chromatogr. A 1041 (2004) 119-133]. The enantioselectivity on these phases was compared to that on the initial set of polysaccharide-based phases, Chiralpak(®) AD-H, Chiralcel(®) OD-H, and Chiralcel(®) OJ-H, used in the earlier defined strategy. The results showed that 53 compounds out of 61 (86.9%) were resolved on the initial set of chiral stationary phases (CSPs) using two mobile phases per compound, either heptane-ethanol-diethylamine (DEA) or heptane-isopropanol-DEA for testing basic compounds and heptane-ethanol-trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) or heptane-isopropanol-TFA for acidic, bifunctional and neutral compounds. The recently commercialized set of columns gave 54 separations in total (88.5%). Our results indicated that ethanol (EtOH) as polar modifier provides a higher success rate and better resolutions than isopropanol (IPA) on both sets of stationary phases. However, the usefulness of the mobile phase with IPA as polar modifier cannot be neglected for complementarity reasons. It was found that the screening is improved by the introduction of the recently commercialized polysaccharides based CSPs since they provided enantioseparation for compounds that were not resolved by the traditional CSPs. The combination between the initial and the recently commercialized CSPs showed enantioresolution for 55 compounds out of 61 (90%), among which 47 were baseline resolved.

  7. Liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometric bioanalysis using normal-phase columns with aqueous/organic mobile phases - a novel approach of eliminating evaporation and reconstitution steps in 96-well SPE.

    PubMed

    Naidong, Weng; Shou, Wilson Z; Addison, Thomas; Maleki, Saber; Jiang, Xiangyu

    2002-01-01

    Bioanalytical methods using automated 96-well solid-phase extraction (SPE) and liquid chromatography with electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) are widely used in the pharmaceutical industry. SPE methods typically require manual steps of drying of the eluates and reconstituting of the analytes with a suitable injection solvent possessing elution strength weaker than the mobile phase. In this study, we demonstrated a novel approach of eliminating these two steps in 96-well SPE by using normal-phase LC/MS/MS methods with low aqueous/high organic mobile phases, which consisted of 70-95% organic solvent, 5-30% water, and small amount of volatile acid or buffer. While the commonly used SPE elution solvents (i.e. acetonitrile and methanol) have stronger elution strength than a mobile phase on reversed-phase chromatography, they are weaker elution solvents than a mobile phase for normal-phase LC/MS/MS and therefore can be injected directly. Analytical methods for a range of polar pharmaceutical compounds, namely, omeprazole, metoprolol, fexofenadine, pseudoephedrine as well as rifampin and its metabolite 25-desacetyl-rifampin, in biological fluids, were developed and optimized based on the foregoing principles. As a result of the time saving, a batch of 96 samples could be processed in one hour. These bioanalytical LC/MS/MS methods were validated according to "Guidance for Industry - Bioanalytical Method Validation" recommended by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of the United States.

  8. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) of coal liquefaction process streams using normal-phase separation with uv diode array detection

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, D.J.; McKinney, D.E.; Hou, Lei; Hatcher, P.G.

    1994-01-01

    This study demonstrated the considerable potential of using two-dimensional, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with normal-phase separation and ultraviolet (UV) diode array detection for the examination of filtered process liquids and the 850{degrees}F{sup {minus}} distillate materials derived from direct coal liquefaction process streams. A commercially available HPLC column (Hypersil Green PAH-2) provided excellent separation of the complex mixture of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) found in coal-derived process streams process. Some characteristics of the samples delineated by separation could be attributed to processing parameters. Mass recovery of the process derived samples was low (5--50 wt %). Penn State believes, however, that, improved recovery can be achieved. High resolution mass spectrometry and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) also were used in this study to characterize the samples and the HPLC fractions. The GC/MS technique was used to preliminarily examine the GC-elutable portion of the samples. The GC/MS data were compared with the data from the HPLC technique. The use of an ultraviolet detector in the HPLC work precludes detecting the aliphatic portion of the sample. The GC/MS allowed for identification and quantification of that portion of the samples. Further development of the 2-D HPLC analytical method as a process development tool appears justified based on the results of this project.

  9. Study of different HILIC, mixed-mode, and other aqueous normal-phase approaches for the liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry-based determination of challenging polar pesticides.

    PubMed

    Vass, Andrea; Robles-Molina, José; Pérez-Ortega, Patricia; Gilbert-López, Bienvenida; Dernovics, Mihaly; Molina-Díaz, Antonio; García-Reyes, Juan F

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the performance of different chromatographic approaches for the liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC-MS(/MS)) determination of 24 highly polar pesticides. The studied compounds, which are in most cases unsuitable for conventional LC-MS(/MS) multiresidue methods were tested with nine different chromatographic conditions, including two different hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) columns, two zwitterionic-type mixed-mode columns, three normal-phase columns operated in HILIC-mode (bare silica and two silica-based chemically bonded columns (cyano and amino)), and two standard reversed-phase C18 columns. Different sets of chromatographic parameters in positive (for 17 analytes) and negative ionization modes (for nine analytes) were examined. In order to compare the different approaches, a semi-quantitative classification was proposed, calculated as the percentage of an empirical performance value, which consisted of three main features: (i) capacity factor (k) to characterize analyte separation from the void, (ii) relative response factor, and (iii) peak shape based on analytes' peak width. While no single method was able to provide appropriate detection of all the 24 studied species in a single run, the best suited approach for the compounds ionized in positive mode was based on a UHPLC HILIC column with 1.8 μm particle size, providing appropriate results for 22 out of the 24 species tested. In contrast, the detection of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid could only be achieved with a zwitterionic-type mixed-mode column, which proved to be suitable only for the pesticides detected in negative ion mode. Finally, the selected approach (UHPLC HILIC) was found to be useful for the determination of multiple pesticides in oranges using HILIC-ESI-MS/MS, with limits of quantitation in the low microgram per kilogram in most cases. Graphical Abstract HILIC improves separation of multiclass polar pesticides.

  10. Study of different HILIC, mixed-mode, and other aqueous normal-phase approaches for the liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry-based determination of challenging polar pesticides.

    PubMed

    Vass, Andrea; Robles-Molina, José; Pérez-Ortega, Patricia; Gilbert-López, Bienvenida; Dernovics, Mihaly; Molina-Díaz, Antonio; García-Reyes, Juan F

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the performance of different chromatographic approaches for the liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC-MS(/MS)) determination of 24 highly polar pesticides. The studied compounds, which are in most cases unsuitable for conventional LC-MS(/MS) multiresidue methods were tested with nine different chromatographic conditions, including two different hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) columns, two zwitterionic-type mixed-mode columns, three normal-phase columns operated in HILIC-mode (bare silica and two silica-based chemically bonded columns (cyano and amino)), and two standard reversed-phase C18 columns. Different sets of chromatographic parameters in positive (for 17 analytes) and negative ionization modes (for nine analytes) were examined. In order to compare the different approaches, a semi-quantitative classification was proposed, calculated as the percentage of an empirical performance value, which consisted of three main features: (i) capacity factor (k) to characterize analyte separation from the void, (ii) relative response factor, and (iii) peak shape based on analytes' peak width. While no single method was able to provide appropriate detection of all the 24 studied species in a single run, the best suited approach for the compounds ionized in positive mode was based on a UHPLC HILIC column with 1.8 μm particle size, providing appropriate results for 22 out of the 24 species tested. In contrast, the detection of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid could only be achieved with a zwitterionic-type mixed-mode column, which proved to be suitable only for the pesticides detected in negative ion mode. Finally, the selected approach (UHPLC HILIC) was found to be useful for the determination of multiple pesticides in oranges using HILIC-ESI-MS/MS, with limits of quantitation in the low microgram per kilogram in most cases. Graphical Abstract HILIC improves separation of multiclass polar pesticides

  11. Sample handling and contamination encountered when coupling offline normal phase high performance liquid chromatography fraction collection of petroleum samples to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Oro, Nicole E; Whittal, Randy M; Lucy, Charles A

    2012-09-01

    Normal phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is used to separate a gas oil petroleum sample, and the fractions are collected offline and analyzed on a high resolution Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer (FT-ICR MS). The separation prior to MS analysis dilutes the sample significantly; therefore the fractions need to be prepared properly to achieve the best signal possible. The methods used to prepare the HPLC fractions for MS analysis are described, with emphasis placed on increasing the concentration of analyte species. The dilution effect also means that contamination in the MS spectra needs to be minimized. The contamination from molecular sieves, plastics, soap, etc. and interferences encountered during the offline fraction collection process are described and eliminated. A previously unreported MS contamination of iron formate clusters with a 0.8 mass defect in positive mode electrospray is also described. This interference resulted from the stainless steel tubing in the HPLC system. Contamination resulting from what has tentatively been assigned as palmitoylglycerol and stearoylglycerol was also observed; these compounds have not previously been reported as contaminant peaks.

  12. Sample handling and contamination encountered when coupling offline normal phase high performance liquid chromatography fraction collection of petroleum samples to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Oro, Nicole E; Whittal, Randy M; Lucy, Charles A

    2012-09-01

    Normal phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is used to separate a gas oil petroleum sample, and the fractions are collected offline and analyzed on a high resolution Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer (FT-ICR MS). The separation prior to MS analysis dilutes the sample significantly; therefore the fractions need to be prepared properly to achieve the best signal possible. The methods used to prepare the HPLC fractions for MS analysis are described, with emphasis placed on increasing the concentration of analyte species. The dilution effect also means that contamination in the MS spectra needs to be minimized. The contamination from molecular sieves, plastics, soap, etc. and interferences encountered during the offline fraction collection process are described and eliminated. A previously unreported MS contamination of iron formate clusters with a 0.8 mass defect in positive mode electrospray is also described. This interference resulted from the stainless steel tubing in the HPLC system. Contamination resulting from what has tentatively been assigned as palmitoylglycerol and stearoylglycerol was also observed; these compounds have not previously been reported as contaminant peaks. PMID:22840706

  13. Normal-Phase Open Column versus Reversed-Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography: Separation of Chlorophyll a and Chlorophyll b from their Diastereomers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaber, Peter M.

    1985-01-01

    Background information, procedures used, and typical results obtained are provided for an experiment involving the separation of chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b from their diastereomers. Reasons why the experiment can be easily integrated into most laboratory curricula where high-performance liquid chromatography capabilities exist are given. (JN)

  14. Phase comparison technique for measuring liquid-liquid phase equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.; Daridon, J. L.; Lagourette, B.; Ye, S.

    1999-04-01

    In this article, a new method is demonstrated to measure the liquid-liquid phase equilibrium for binary systems. A phase comparison technique was employed to real-time display the phase-time curve in a "wave form (time) object" of Hewlett-Packard visual engineering environment. It was found that the phase-time curve showed a distorted wave form when liquid-liquid phase transition took place. The abnormal curve can therefore be used to detect liquid-liquid phase transitions. Measurements were performed in several binary systems such as nitromethane+1-hexanol, nitromethane+butanol, and nitroethane+n-hexane. The experimental results are in good agreement with those in the literature.

  15. Evaluation of new silica-based humic acid stationary phase for the separation of tocopherols in cold-pressed oils by normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ayyildiz, Hamide Filiz

    2015-03-01

    A new humic acid stationary phase was prepared by immobilizing humic acid onto aminopropyl silica via an amide linkage formation and used, for the first time, for the separation and quantification of the tocopherol compounds in cold-pressed oil samples under normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography conditions. Parameters affecting the chromatographic separation such as mobile phase composition and flow rate were optimized. By evaluating the calculations of capacity factor, asymmetry factor, resolution, selectivity factor, and theoretical plate number, the best separation was obtained with isocratic elution of n-hexane and isopropyl alcohol (99:1% v/v) at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. The effluent was monitored by a fluorescence detector set at excitation and emission wavelengths 295 and 330 nm, respectively. All compounds were separated in 20 min. The method was validated according to international guidelines and found to be linear in a wide concentration range, also the mean recovery of the compounds ranged from 97.9 to 99.2%, with a CV less than 2.7% in all cases. The results showed that the developed stationary phase is suitable for the separation and quantification of the tocopherol compounds in real oil samples.

  16. Deviations from Fermi-liquid behavior in (2+1)-dimensional quantum electrodynamics and the normal phase of high-Tc superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitchison, I. J. R.; Mavromatos, N. E.

    1996-04-01

    We argue that the gauge-fermion interaction in multiflavor quantum electrodynamics in (2+1) dimensions is responsible for non-Fermi-liquid behavior in the infrared, in the sense of leading to the existence of a nontrivial (quasi)fixed point that lies between the trivial fixed point (at infinite momenta) and the region where dynamical symmetry breaking and mass generation occurs. This quasifixed-point structure implies slowly varying, rather than fixed, couplings in the intermediate regime of momenta, a situation which resembles that of (four-dimensional) ``walking technicolor'' models of particle physics. The inclusion of wave-function renormalization yields marginal O(1/N) corrections to the ``bulk'' non-Fermi-liquid behavior caused by the gauge interaction in the limit of infinite flavor number. Such corrections lead to the appearance of modified critical exponents. In particular, at low temperatures there appear to be logarithmic scaling violations of the linear resistivity of the system of order O(1/N). The connection with the anomalous normal-state properties of certain condensed-matter systems relevant for high-temperature superconductivity is briefly discussed. The relevance of the large (flavor) N expansion to the Fermi-liquid problem is emphasized. As a partial result of our analysis, we point out the absence of charge-density-wave instabilities from the effective low-energy theory, as a consequence of gauge invariance.

  17. PHASE CHANGE LIQUIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Susan S. Sorini; John F. Schabron

    2006-03-01

    Work is being performed to develop a new shipping system for frozen environmental samples (or other materials) that uses an optimal phase change liquid (PCL) formulation and an insulated shipping container with an on-board digital temperature data logger to provide a history of the temperature profile within the container during shipment. In previous work, several PCL formulations with temperatures of fusion ranging from approximately -14 to -20 C were prepared and evaluated. Both temperature of fusion and heat of fusion of the formulations were measured, and an optimal PCL formulation was selected. The PCL was frozen in plastic bags and tested for its temperature profile in a cooler using a digital temperature data logger. This testing showed that the PCL formulation can maintain freezer temperatures (< -7 to -20 C) for an extended period, such as the time for shipping samples by overnight courier. The results of the experiments described in this report provide significant information for use in developing an integrated freezer system that uses a PCL formulation to maintain freezer temperatures in coolers for shipping environmental samples to the laboratory. Experimental results show the importance of the type of cooler used in the system and that use of an insulating material within the cooler improves the performance of the freezer system. A new optimal PCL formulation for use in the system has been determined. The new formulation has been shown to maintain temperatures at < -7 to -20 C for 47 hours in an insulated cooler system containing soil samples. These results are very promising for developing the new technology.

  18. Vapor-liquid phase separator permeability results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, S. W. K.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1981-01-01

    Continued studies are described in the area of vapor-liquid phase separator work with emphasis on permeabilities of porous sintered plugs (stainless steel, nominal pore size 2 micrometer). The temperature dependence of the permeability has been evaluated in classical fluid using He-4 gas at atmospheric pressure and in He-2 on the basis of a modified, thermosmotic permeability of the normal fluid.

  19. Liquid-phase compositions from vapor-phase analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, W. Jr. ); Cochran, H.D. )

    1990-02-01

    Arsenic normally is not considered to be a contaminant. However, because arsenic was found in many cylinders of UF{sub 6}, including in corrosion products, a study was performed of the distribution of the two arsenic fluorides, AsF{sub 3} and AsF{sub 5}, between liquid and vapor phases. The results of the study pertain to condensation or vaporization of liquid UF{sub 6}. This study includes use of various experimental data plus many extrapolations necessitated by the meagerness of the experimental data. The results of this study provide additional support for the vapor-liquid equilibrium model of J.M. Prausnitz and his coworkers as a means of describing the distribution of various impurities between vapor and liquid phases of UF{sub 6}. Thus, it is concluded that AsF{sub 3} will tend to concentrate in the liquid phase but that the concentration of AsF{sub 5} in the vapor phase will exceed its liquid-phase concentration by a factor of about 7.5, which is in agreement with experimental data. Because the weight of the liquid phase in a condensation operation may be in the range of thousands of times that of the vapor phase, most of any AsF{sub 5} will be in the liquid phase in spite of this separation factor of 7.5. It may also be concluded that any arsenic fluorides fed into a uranium isotope separation plant will either travel with other low-molecular-weight gases or react with materials present in the plant. 25 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. Development and implementation of a stereoselective normal-phase liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for the determination of intrinsic metabolic clearance in human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingru; Caporuscio, Christian; Dai, Jun; Witkusa, Michael; Rose, Anne; Santella, Joseph; D'Arienzo, Celia; Wang-Iverson, David B; Tymiak, Adrienne A

    2008-11-01

    The stereoselective determination of stereoisomers in biological samples provides vital information on stereospecific metabolism and pharmacokinetic profiles of the drugs. Despite the unique advantage and the great success of normal-phase (NP) HPLC for the separations of drug stereoisomers using polysaccharide-type chiral stationary phases (CSPs), the technique is rarely applied to quantitative HPLC-MS-MS bioanalysis. This is, at least in part, due to the incompatibility between the usual mobile phase (n-hexane or n-heptane) in normal-phase HPLC and the MS ionization sources which poses a potential detonation hazard. An environmentally friendly and nonflammable alternative solvent, ethoxynonafluorobutane (ENFB), was reported previously to potentially provide an ideal solution for combining the powers of stereoselective NP chromatographic separation and MS-MS detection. In this study, a stereoselective NP-HPLC-MS-MS method was developed using ENFB to quantify a pair of Bristol Myers Squibb (BMS) proprietary drug stereoisomers and their ketone metabolite for an in vitro study, which demonstrated, for the first time, the practical applicability and utility of ENFB for bioanalysis in pharmaceutical industry. The effects of different organic modifiers and temperature, as well as the comparison between ENFB and the usual solvent, heptane, for the separation, are discussed. The resolution of the stereoisomers was achieved using 63% of 3:1 mixture of ethanol and methanol with 37% ENFB on a Chiralpak AD-H column at 50 degrees C. High sensitivity was obtained using the MS-MS detection in the positive ion atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mode. The lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) for the first stereoisomer and the ketone metabolite was 5 ng/mL, and was 10 ng/mL for the second isomer in the human liver microsome-potassium phosphate buffer matrix. The linear dynamic range of 5-1000 ng/mL for both isomers and 10-1000 ng/mL for the metabolite were demonstrated

  1. Preparation and kinetic performance assessment of thick film 10-20 μm open tubular silica capillaries in normal phase high pressure liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Forster, Simon; Kolmar, Harald; Altmaier, Stephan

    2013-11-01

    It is well-known that the open tubular column design basically can offer very high plate numbers. Experimental realization has however not kept pace with theoretical considerations, lacking efficient methods for the deposition of a thick film porous layer within a microbore capillary. A previously published sol-gel synthesis method was extended from 20 μm to 10 μm inner diameter fused silica capillaries and the resulting columns were compared to a monolithic reference capillary in terms of kinetic performance at pressure maximum. Column permeability was investigated and pressure/flow-diagrams were obtained with a 400-fold permeability gain for the open tubes. Structural characterizations regarding layer thickness and surface porosity were carried out and displayed via scanning electron microscopy and nitrogen sorption analysis. Chromatographic results in normal phase mode at elevated mobile phase flow rate reveal the intrinsic performance potential of this column format when it comes to kinetic performance limitation plots, which were constructed for all columns prepared and compared to the monolithic silica reference capillary.

  2. Stereoselective determination of a novel chiral insecticide, sulfoxaflor, in brown rice, cucumber and apple by normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zenglong; Dong, Fengshou; Xu, Jun; Liu, Xingang; Cheng, Youpu; Liu, Na; Tao, Yan; Zheng, Yongquan

    2014-02-01

    An effective high-performance liquid chromatography method was developed for the stereoselective determination of a new sulfoximines insecticide, sulfoxaflor, in brown rice, cucumber and apple. Target compounds were extracted with acetonitrile and an aliquot cleaned with Cleanert PestiCarb/PSA (primary and secondary amine) cartridge. Five polysaccharide-based columns were investigated on the separation of sulfoxaflor stereoisomers and the best was achieved on a ChromegaChiral CCA column with n-hexane/ethanol/methanol (90:2:8, v/v/v) as mobile phase by UV detection at 220 nm at 20ºC. The resolutions of the four stereoisomers were 1.85, 1.54 and 3.08, and the elution order was identified by optical rotation and stereoisomers ratio. The mean recoveries of sulfoxaflor stereoisomers ranged from 77.1% to 99.3%, with relative standard deviations less than 8.9% at three concentration levels in all matrices. The limits of detection for all stereoisomers varied from 0.05 mg/kg to 0.07 mg/kg, while the limit of quantification did not exceed 0.22 mg/kg. The method was then successfully applied to determine the sulfoxaflor stereoisomers in authentic samples, confirming that it is convenient and reliable for stereoselective determination of sulfoxaflor stereoisomers in food.

  3. Liquid-Phase Adsorption Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooney, David O.

    1987-01-01

    Describes an experiment developed and used in the unit operations laboratory course at the University of Wyoming. Involves the liquid-phase adsorption of an organic compound from aqueous solution on activated carbon, and is relevant to adsorption processes in general. (TW)

  4. Novel phase behavior in normal alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Sirota, E.B.; King, H.E. Jr.; Hughes, G.J.; Wan, W.K. )

    1992-01-27

    X-ray scattering studies on aligned films of binary mixtures of the normal alkanes C{sub 23}H{sub 48} and C{sub 28}H{sub 58} reveal, for the first time in such materials, the existence of a new equilibrium phase having the symmetry of a smectic crystal, possibly a hexatic. This phase occurs between the hexagonally packed {ital R}{sub II} and the lower-temperature orthorhombic {ital R}{sub I}, plastic crystalline, layered, rotator phases. We argue that this loss of order is due to local distortion fluctuations in the hexagonal phase. Furthermore, we have identified an {ital ABC}-to-{ital ABAB} restacking transition within the ordered {ital R}{sub II} phase.

  5. Enantioselective determination of mexiletine and its metabolites p-hydroxymexiletine and hydroxymethylmexiletine in rat plasma by normal-phase liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: application to pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Godoy, Ana Leonor Pardo Campos; Parisi, Caio Cesar; Marques, Maria Paula; Coelho, Eduardo Barbosa; Lanchote, Vera Lucia

    2009-07-01

    Mexiletine (MEX), hydroxymethylmexiletine (HMM) and p-hydroxymexiletine (PHM) were analyzed in rat plasma by LC-MS/MS. The plasma samples were prepared by liquid-liquid extraction using methyl-tert-butyl ether as extracting solvent. MEX, HMM, and PHM enantiomers were resolved on a Chiralpak(R) AD column. Validation of the method showed a relative standard deviation (precision) and relative errors (accuracy) of less than 15% for all analytes studied. Quantification limits were 0.5 ng ml(-1) for the MEX and 0.2 ng ml(-1) for the HMM and PHM enantiomers. The validated method was successfully applied to quantify the enantiomers of MEX and its metabolites in plasma samples of rats (n = 6) treated with a single oral dose of racemic MEX. PMID:18973279

  6. Liquid-phase chromatography detector

    DOEpatents

    Voigtman, E.G.; Winefordner, J.D.; Jurgensen, A.R.

    1983-11-08

    A liquid-phase chromatography detector comprises a flow cell having an inlet tubular conduit for receiving a liquid chromatographic effluent and discharging it as a flowing columnar stream onto a vertically adjustable receiving surface spaced apart from and located vertically below and in close proximity to the discharge end of the tubular conduit; a receiver adapted to receive liquid overflowing from the receiving surface; an exit conduit for continuously removing liquid from the receiver; a light source for focusing fluorescence-producing light pulses on the flowing columnar stream as it passes from the outlet of the conduit to the receiving surface and a fluorescence detector to detect the produced fluorescence; a source of light pulse for producing acoustic waves in the columnar stream as it passes from the conduit outlet to the receiving surface; and a piezoelectric transducer adapted to detect those waves; and a source of bias voltage applied to the inlet tubular conduit and adapted to produce ionization of the liquid flowing through the flow cell so as to produce photocurrents therein and an electrical system to detect and record the photocurrents. This system is useful in separating and detecting individual chemical compounds from mixtures thereof. 5 figs.

  7. Liquid-phase chromatography detector

    DOEpatents

    Voigtman, Edward G.; Winefordner, James D.; Jurgensen, Arthur R.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid-phase chromatography detector comprising a flow cell having an inlet tubular conduit for receiving a liquid chromatographic effluent and discharging it as a flowing columnar stream onto a vertically adjustable receiving surface spaced apart from and located vertically below and in close proximity to the discharge end of the tubular conduit; a receiver adapted to receive liquid overflowing from the receiving surface; an exit conduit for continuously removing liquid from the receiver; a light source for focussing fluorescence-producing light pulses on the flowing columnar stream as it passes from the outlet of the conduit to the receiving surface and a fluorescence detector to detect the produced fluorescence; a source of light pulse for producing acoustic waves in the columnar stream as it passes from the conduit outlet to the receiving surface; and a piezoelectric transducer adapted to detect those waves; and a source of bias voltage applied to the inlet tubular conduit and adapted to produce ionization of the liquid flowing through the flow cell so as to produce photocurrents therein and an electrical system to detect and record the photocurrents. This system is useful in separating and detecting individual chemical compounds from mixtures thereof.

  8. Models for a liquid-liquid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buldyrev, S. V.; Franzese, G.; Giovambattista, N.; Malescio, G.; Sadr-Lahijany, M. R.; Scala, A.; Skibinsky, A.; Stanley, H. E.

    2002-02-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to study two- and three-dimensional models with the isotropic double-step potential which in addition to the hard core has a repulsive soft core of larger radius. Our results indicate that the presence of two characteristic repulsive distances (hard core and soft core) is sufficient to explain liquid anomalies and a liquid-liquid phase transition, but these two phenomena may occur independently. Thus liquid-liquid transitions may exist in systems like liquid metals, regardless of the presence of the density anomaly. For 2D, we propose a model with a specific set of hard core and soft core parameters, that qualitatively reproduces the phase diagram and anomalies of liquid water. We identify two solid phases: a square crystal (high density phase), and a triangular crystal (low density phase) and discuss the relation between the anomalies of liquid and the polymorphism of the solid. Similarly to real water, our 2D system may have the second critical point in the metastable liquid phase beyond the freezing line. In 3D, we find several sets of parameters for which two fluid-fluid phase transition lines exist: the first line between gas and liquid and the second line between high-density liquid (HDL) and low-density liquid (LDL). In all cases, the LDL phase shows no density anomaly in 3D. We relate the absence of the density anomaly with the positive slope of the LDL-HDL phase transition line.

  9. Mixed Stationary Liquid Phases for Gas-Liquid Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koury, Albert M.; Parcher, Jon F.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a laboratory technique for use in an undergraduate instrumental analysis course that, using the interpretation of window diagrams, prepares a mixed liquid phase column for gas-liquid chromatography. A detailed procedure is provided. (BT)

  10. Vapors-liquid phase separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederking, T. H. K.; Brown, G. S.; Chuang, C.; Kamioka, Y.; Kim, Y. I.; Lee, J. M.; Yuan, S. W. K.

    1980-10-01

    The use of porous plugs, mostly with in the form of passive devices with constant area were considered as vapor-liquid phase separators for helium 2 storage vessels under reduced gravity. The incorporation of components with variable cross sectional area as a method of flow rate modification was also investigated. A particular device which uses a shutter-type system for area variation was designed and constructed. This system successfully permitted flor rate changes of up to plus or minus 60% from its mean value.

  11. Simultaneous determination and quantification of seven major phospholipid classes in human blood using normal-phase liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray mass spectrometry and the application in diabetes nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Pang, Li-Qiong; Liang, Qiong-Lin; Wang, Yi-Ming; Ping, Li; Luo, Guo-An

    2008-06-15

    A rapid and specific analytical method for simultaneous determination and quantification of seven major phospholipid classes in human blood was developed by normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. The optimal separation was achieved by using mobile phase hexane (A) and 2-propanol with water, formic acid and ammonia as modifiers (B) using an HPLC diol column. Isocratic elution method was used for better repeatability and no balance time. The seven major phospholipid classes in human blood that were detected including phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylinositol (PI) phosphatidylcholine (PC), lysophosphatidylcholine (Lyso-PC), and sphingomyelin (SM). That can be separated in this condition. Every phospholipid class contains many molecular species which have similar structure. The structure of phospholipids molecular species was identified by ion-trap MS(n) which produced ion fragments. And the qualification was completed by TOF-MS which shows good accuracy. Through the accurate quantification of one representative phospholipids molecule in each class, a method for simultaneous estimation hundreds of molecular species in seven major classes was established. The intra-day and inter-day precision and recovery had been investigated in detail. The RSD of precision for most compound is below 8% and RE is below 10%. Recovery is almost over 80%. This method was applied to phospholipids disorder related with diabetes nephropathy successfully. The concentrations of most phospholipids for normal people are higher than that for diabetic nephropathy (DN) patients in three phases. For most of phospholipids, with the development of DN the concentration was decreasing. PMID:18524699

  12. Liquid Phase Miscibility Gap Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelles, S. H.; Markworth, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    The manner in which the microstructural features of liquid-phase miscibility gap alloys develop was determined. This will allow control of the microstructures and the resultant properties of these alloys. The long-duration low gravity afforded by the shuttle will allow experiments supporting this research to be conducted with minimal interference from buoyancy effects and gravitationally driven convection currents. Ground base studies were conducted on Al-In, Cu-Pb, and Te-Tl alloys to determine the effect of cooling rate, composition, and interfacial energies on the phase separation and solidification processes that influence the development of microstructure in these alloys. Isothermal and directional cooling experiments and simulations are conducted. The ground based activities are used as a technological base from which flight experiments formulated and to which these flight experiments are compared.

  13. Transient liquid phase ceramic bonding

    DOEpatents

    Glaeser, Andreas M.

    1994-01-01

    Ceramics are joined to themselves or to metals using a transient liquid phase method employing three layers, one of which is a refractory metal, ceramic or alloy. The refractory layer is placed between two metal layers, each of which has a lower melting point than the refractory layer. The three layers are pressed between the two articles to be bonded to form an assembly. The assembly is heated to a bonding temperature at which the refractory layer remains solid, but the two metal layers melt to form a liquid. The refractory layer reacts with the surrounding liquid and a single solid bonding layer is eventually formed. The layers may be designed to react completely with each other and form refractory intermetallic bonding layers. Impurities incorporated into the refractory metal may react with the metal layers to form refractory compounds. Another method for joining ceramic articles employs a ceramic interlayer sandwiched between two metal layers. In alternative embodiments, the metal layers may include sublayers. A method is also provided for joining two ceramic articles using a single interlayer. An alternate bonding method provides a refractory-metal oxide interlayer placed adjacent to a strong oxide former. Aluminum or aluminum alloys are joined together using metal interlayers.

  14. Liquid-liquid phase transition in a two-dimensional system with anomalous liquid properties.

    PubMed

    Urbic, Tomaz

    2013-12-01

    The phase diagram of the two-dimensional particles interacting through a smooth version of Stell-Hemmer interaction was studied using Monte Carlo computer simulations. By evaluating the pressure-volume isotherms, we observed liquid-liquid, liquid-gas phase transitions and three stable crystal phases. The model shows the liquid-liquid critical point in stable liquid phase and is confirmed by observing properties of other thermodynamic functions such as heat capacity and isothermal compressibility, for example. The liquid-gas and the liquid-liquid critical points were estimated within the thermodynamic limit.

  15. Liquid phase chromatography on microchips.

    PubMed

    Kutter, Jörg P

    2012-01-20

    Over the past twenty years, the field of microfluidics has emerged providing one of the main enabling technologies to realize miniaturized chemical analysis systems, often referred to as micro-Total Analysis Systems (uTAS), or, more generally, Lab-on-a-Chip Systems (LOC) [1,2]. While microfluidics was driven forward a lot from the engineering side, especially with respect to ink jet and dispensing technology, the initial push and interest from the analytical chemistry community was through the desire to develop miniaturized sensors, detectors, and, very early on, separation systems. The initial almost explosive development of, in particular, chromatographic separation systems on microchips, has, however, slowed down in recent years. This review takes a closer, critical look at how liquid phase chromatography has been implemented in miniaturized formats over the past several years, what is important to keep in mind when developing or working with separations in a miniaturized format, and what challenges and pitfalls remain.

  16. Studies on Normal and Microgravity Annular Two Phase Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakotaiah, V.; Jayawardena, S. S.; Nguyen, L. T.

    1999-01-01

    Two-phase gas-liquid flows occur in a wide variety of situations. In addition to normal gravity applications, such flows may occur in space operations such as active thermal control systems, power cycles, and storage and transfer of cryogenic fluids. Various flow patterns exhibiting characteristic spatial and temporal distribution of the two phases are observed in two-phase flows. The magnitude and orientation of gravity with respect to the flow has a strong impact on the flow patterns observed and on their boundaries. The identification of the flow pattern of a flow is somewhat subjective. The same two-phase flow (especially near a flow pattern transition boundary) may be categorized differently by different researchers. Two-phase flow patterns are somewhat simplified in microgravity, where only three flow patterns (bubble, slug and annular) have been observed. Annular flow is obtained for a wide range of gas and liquid flow rates, and it is expected to occur in many situations under microgravity conditions. Slug flow needs to be avoided, because vibrations caused by slugs result in unwanted accelerations. Therefore, it is important to be able to accurately predict the flow pattern which exists under given operating conditions. It is known that the wavy liquid film in annular flow has a profound influence on the transfer of momentum and heat between the phases. Thus, an understanding of the characteristics of the wavy film is essential for developing accurate correlations. In this work, we review our recent results on flow pattern transitions and wavy films in microgravity.

  17. Liquid phase sintering of silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Cutler, R.A.; Virkar, A.V.; Hurford, A.C.

    1989-05-09

    Liquid phase sintering is used to densify silicon carbide based ceramics using a compound comprising a rare earth oxide and aluminum oxide to form liquids at temperatures in excess of 1,600 C. The resulting sintered ceramic body has a density greater than 95% of its theoretical density and hardness in excess of 23 GPa. Boron and carbon are not needed to promote densification and silicon carbide powder with an average particle size of greater than one micron can be densified via the liquid phase process. The sintered ceramic bodies made by the present invention are fine grained and have secondary phases resulting from the liquid phase. 4 figs.

  18. Liquid phase sintering of silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Cutler, Raymond A.; Virkar, Anil V.; Hurford, Andrew C.

    1989-01-01

    Liquid phase sintering is used to densify silicon carbide based ceramics using a compound comprising a rare earth oxide and aluminum oxide to form liquids at temperatures in excess of 1600.degree. C. The resulting sintered ceramic body has a density greater than 95% of its theoretical density and hardness in excess of 23 GPa. Boron and carbon are not needed to promote densification and silicon carbide powder with an average particle size of greater than one micron can be densified via the liquid phase process. The sintered ceramic bodies made by the present invention are fine grained and have secondary phases resulting from the liquid phase.

  19. Modeling liquid-liquid phase transitions and quasicrystal formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skibinsky, Anna

    In this thesis, studies which concern two different subjects related to phase transitions in fluids and crystalline solids are presented. Condensed matter formation, structure, and phase transitions are modeled using molecular dynamics simulations of simple discontinuous potentials with attractive and repulsive interactions. Novel phase diagrams are proposed for quasicrystals, crystals, and liquids. In the first part of the thesis, the formation of a quasicrystal in a two dimensional monodisperse system is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations of hard sphere particles interacting via a two-dimensional square-well potential. It is found that for certain values of the square-well parameters more than one stable crystalline phase can form. By quenching the liquid phase at a very low temperature, an amorphous phase is obtained. When this the amorphous phase is heated, a quasicrystalline structure with five-fold symmetry forms. From estimations of the Helmholtz potentials of the stable crystalline phases and of the quasicrystal, it is concluded that within a specific temperature range, the observed quasicrystal phase can be the stable phase. The second part of the thesis concerns a study of the liquid-liquid phase transition for a single-component system in three dimensions, interacting via an isotropic potential with a repulsive soft-core shoulder at short distance and an attractive well at an intermediate distance. The potential is similar to potentials used to describe such liquid systems as colloids, protein solutions, or liquid metals. It is shown that the phase diagram for such a potential can have two lines of first-order fluid-fluid phase transitions: one separating a gas and a low-density liquid (LDL), and another between the LDL and a high-density liquid (HDL). Both phase transition lines end in a critical point, a gas-LDL critical point and, depending on the potential parameters, either a gas-HDL critical point or a LDL-HDL critical point. A

  20. Profile and quantification of human stratum corneum ceramides by normal-phase liquid chromatography coupled with dynamic multiple reaction monitoring of mass spectrometry: development of targeted lipidomic method and application to human stratum corneum of different age groups.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhi-Xin; Zhang, Jin-Lan; Shen, Chun-Ping; Ma, Lin

    2016-09-01

    Skin, the largest organ of the human body, serves as the primary barrier to the external environment. Ceramides are one of the main constituents of stratum corneum (SC), playing an important role in skin barrier function. Therefore, comprehensive profiling and quantification of SC ceramide is important. Herein, a new targeted lipidomic method for human SC ceramide profiling and quantification is presented and tested. Normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with dynamic multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (NP-HPLC-dMRM-MS) was used to separate ceramides into subclasses and then characterize different ceramides within each subclass on the basis of their characteristics. In total, 483 ceramides were quantified in a single run within 20 min, covering 12 subclasses as well as some glycosylated ceramides not previously reported. Each subclass had typical standard substances (if available) that served to establish representative standard curves and were used for related substances with no standards. Linearity range, limit of quantification (LOQ), limit of detection (LOD), precision, accuracy, stability, and matrix effects were validated. dMRM increased sensitivity and accuracy greatly compared with common MRM (cMRM). This method was successfully applied to the study of human SC from different age groups. A total of 193 potential biomarkers were found to indicate age differences between children and adults. This method is an innovative approach for high-throughput quantification of SC ceramide. Graphical Abstract Method establishment (MRM spectra by the established method) and method application (score scatter plots of authentic samples). PMID:27473427

  1. Determination of (R)-timolol in (S)-timolol maleate active pharmaceutical ingredient: validation of a new supercritical fluid chromatography method with an established normal phase liquid chromatography method.

    PubMed

    Marley, Adrian; Connolly, Damian

    2014-01-17

    An enantioselective supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) method was developed and validated to meet the current European Pharmacopoeia requirements of a limit test for the determination of S-timolol maleate enantiomeric purity in timolol maleate drug substance. The developed method is presented as an alternative to the current normal phase high performance liquid chromatography (NP-HPLC) method described in the European Pharmacopoeia (Timolol Maleate Monograph). Using a 4.6mm×250mm Chiralcel OD-H (dp: 5μm) column and a mobile phase of (93:7) CO2/0.1% (v/v) TEA in MeOH delivered at 4.0mLmin(-1) resolution of 2.0 was achieved within 5min, representing a 3-fold reduction in run-time and an 11-fold reduction in solvent consumption relative to the NP-HPLC method. Method robustness was examined by the variation of flow rate (±0.5mLmin(-1)), column temperature (±5°C) and column back-pressure (±10bar) and resolution was maintained at ≥1.9 in all cases. R-timolol was resolved from all potential impurities and the limit of detection was improved by increasing the sample concentration threefold compared to the NP-HPLC method such that the method could detect the R-timolol enantiomer at 0.5% (w/w) with respect to S-timolol maleate. Additional validation parameters demonstrated that the potential of the method to be used for routine release testing of timolol maleate raw material for drug product manufacturing in which the quantitation of R-timolol impurity in S-timolol maleate drug substance would be a requirement. PMID:24377734

  2. Identification of molecular species of simple lipids by normal phase liquid chromatography-positive electrospray tandem mass spectrometry, and application of developed methods in comprehensive analysis of low erucic acid rapeseed oil lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalo, P. J.; Ollilainen, V.; Rocha, J. M.; Malcata, F. X.

    2006-07-01

    Mono-, di- and triacylglycerol (MAG, DAG, TAG), sterol ester (SE), free sterol (S) and free fatty acid (FFA) standards were analyzed in the presence of ammonium ions and ammonia by flow injection MS2 and MS3, and by normal phase-liquid chromatography (NP-LC) MS2 positive electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS). The MS data recorded for ammonium adducts ([M + NH4]+) of TAGs, DAGs, and MAGs were consistent with stepwise fragmentation mechanisms. In the first step, ammonium ion in [M + NH4]+ donates proton to acylglycerol and ammonia is released. In the second step, FFA is cleaved from protonated TAG, water from protonated 1,3-DAG and MAG, both FFA and water from protonated 1,2-DAG, hence leading to formation of [DAG]+ ion from TAG and 1,3-DAG, [DAG]+ and [MAG]+ ions from 1,2-DAG, and [MAG]+ ion from MAG. In the third step, [DAG]+ ion of TAG is fragmented to yield [Acyl]+, [Acyl + 74]+, [DAG - 74]+ ions, [DAG] ion of 1,3-DAG to [Acyl]+ ions, and [MAG]+ ion of MAG to protonated FAs, which are decomposed to water and [Acyl]+ ions in the fourth step. A stepwise mechanism for fragmentation of FFA was also evident from MS2 and MS3 data. Molecular species of low erucic acid rapeseed oil simple lipids were identified from characteristic ions produced in the NP-LC-ESI-MS2 of [M + NH4]+ ions. The percentage composition of the molecular species of each lipid class was calculated from integrated extracted ion chromatograms of [(M + NH4)]+ ions of SE, TAG, MAG, and FFA, of the sum of [(M + NH4)]+ and [(M + NH4) - NH3 - H2O]+ ions of both regioisomers of DAGs, and of sterol fragment ions of S.

  3. Generic mechanism for generating a liquid-liquid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzese, Giancarlo; Malescio, Gianpietro; Skibinsky, Anna; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2001-02-01

    Recent experimental results indicate that phosphorus-a single-component system-can have a high-density liquid (HDL) and a low-density liquid (LDL) phase. A first-order transition between two liquids of different densities is consistent with experimental data for a variety of materials, including single-component systems such as water, silica and carbon. Molecular dynamics simulations of very specific models for supercooled water, liquid carbon and supercooled silica predict a LDL-HDL critical point, but a coherent and general interpretation of the LDL-HDL transition is lacking. Here we show that the presence of a LDL and a HDL can be directly related to an interaction potential with an attractive part and two characteristic short-range repulsive distances. This kind of interaction is common to other single-component materials in the liquid state (in particular, liquid metals), and such potentials are often used to describe systems that exhibit a density anomaly. However, our results show that the LDL and HDL phases can occur in systems with no density anomaly. Our results therefore present an experimental challenge to uncover a liquid-liquid transition in systems like liquid metals, regardless of the presence of a density anomaly.

  4. Liquid-liquid phase transition in supercooled silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sastry, Srikanth; Austen Angell, C.

    2003-11-01

    Silicon in its liquid and amorphous forms occupies a unique position among amorphous materials. Obviously important in its own right, the amorphous form is structurally close to the group of 4-4, 3-5 and 2-6 amorphous semiconductors that have been found to have interesting pressure-induced semiconductor-to-metal phase transitions. On the other hand, its liquid form has much in common, thermodynamically, with water and other `tetrahedral network' liquids that show density maxima. Proper study of the `liquid-amorphous transition', documented for non-crystalline silicon by both experimental and computer simulation studies, may therefore also shed light on phase behaviour in these related materials. Here, we provide detailed and unambiguous simulation evidence that the transition in supercooled liquid silicon, in the Stillinger-Weber potential, is thermodynamically of first order and indeed occurs between two liquid states, as originally predicted by Aptekar. In addition we present evidence to support the relevance of spinodal divergences near such a transition, and the prediction that the transition marks a change in the liquid dynamic character from that of a fragile liquid to that of a strong liquid.

  5. Vapor-liquid phase separator studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, S. W. K.; Lee, J. M.; Kim, Y. I.; Hepler, W. A.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1983-01-01

    Porous plugs serve as both entropy rejection devices and phase separation components separating the vapor phase on the downstream side from liquid Helium 2 upstream. The liquid upstream is the cryo-reservoir fluid needed for equipment cooling by means of Helium 2, i.e Helium-4 below its lambda temperature in near-saturated states. The topics outlined are characteristic lengths, transport equations and plug results.

  6. Correlation of three-liquid-phase equilibria involving ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Escontrela, I; Arce, A; Soto, A; Marcilla, A; Olaya, M M; Reyes-Labarta, J A

    2016-08-01

    The difficulty in achieving a good thermodynamic description of phase equilibria is finding a model that can be extended to a large variety of chemical families and conditions. This problem worsens in the case of systems containing more than two phases or involving complex compounds such as ionic liquids. However, there are interesting applications that involve multiphasic systems, and the promising features of ionic liquids suggest that they will play an important role in many future processes. In this work, for the first time, the simultaneous correlation of liquid-liquid and liquid-liquid-liquid equilibrium data for ternary systems involving ionic liquids has been carried out. To that end, the phase diagram of the water + [P6 6 6 14][DCA] + hexane system has been determined at 298.15 K and 323.15 K and atmospheric pressure. The importance of this system lies in the possibility of using the surface active ionic liquid to improve surfactant enhanced oil recovery methods. With those and previous measurements, thirteen sets of equilibrium data for water + ionic liquid + oil ternary systems have been correlated. The isoactivity equilibrium condition, using the NRTL model, and some pivotal strategies are proposed to correlate these complex systems. Good agreement has been found between experimental and calculated data in all the regions (one triphasic and two biphasic) of the diagrams. The geometric aspects related to the Gibbs energy of mixing function obtained using the model, together with the minor common tangent plane equilibrium condition, are valuable tools to check the consistency of the obtained correlation results.

  7. Correlation of three-liquid-phase equilibria involving ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Escontrela, I; Arce, A; Soto, A; Marcilla, A; Olaya, M M; Reyes-Labarta, J A

    2016-08-01

    The difficulty in achieving a good thermodynamic description of phase equilibria is finding a model that can be extended to a large variety of chemical families and conditions. This problem worsens in the case of systems containing more than two phases or involving complex compounds such as ionic liquids. However, there are interesting applications that involve multiphasic systems, and the promising features of ionic liquids suggest that they will play an important role in many future processes. In this work, for the first time, the simultaneous correlation of liquid-liquid and liquid-liquid-liquid equilibrium data for ternary systems involving ionic liquids has been carried out. To that end, the phase diagram of the water + [P6 6 6 14][DCA] + hexane system has been determined at 298.15 K and 323.15 K and atmospheric pressure. The importance of this system lies in the possibility of using the surface active ionic liquid to improve surfactant enhanced oil recovery methods. With those and previous measurements, thirteen sets of equilibrium data for water + ionic liquid + oil ternary systems have been correlated. The isoactivity equilibrium condition, using the NRTL model, and some pivotal strategies are proposed to correlate these complex systems. Good agreement has been found between experimental and calculated data in all the regions (one triphasic and two biphasic) of the diagrams. The geometric aspects related to the Gibbs energy of mixing function obtained using the model, together with the minor common tangent plane equilibrium condition, are valuable tools to check the consistency of the obtained correlation results. PMID:27427420

  8. Effect of gravity on liquid phase sintering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mookherji, T.; Mcanelly, W. B.; Mckannan, E. C.

    1974-01-01

    The unique conditions offered by the earth orbital environment in material processing involving both solid and liquid phases, such as liquid phase sintering, were studied. An experimental development program involving both test and theoretical work was initiated. Experimental work using material combinations selected such that maximum information about the effect of gravity can be derived has been conducted. Wetting of the solid phase by the liquid during sintering is an important phenomenon in liquid phase sintering, and gravity has influence on both capillary phenomenon and density segregation; hence, material combinations were selected such that these two effects can be suitably studies. The experimental work is meant to form the basis for similar comparative work done under low-g conditions. The part of the model dealing with the capillary phenomenon, as related to liquid phase sintering and the effect of gravity on it, suggest that gravity will have negligible effect on the Bond number and that the cohesive force is dependent on both the amount of liquid phase and the angle of contact.

  9. Solid-liquid phase transition in argon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, T.; Tang, H. T.

    1978-01-01

    Starting from the Lennard-Jones interatomic potential, a modified cell theory has been used to describe the solid-liquid phase transition in argon. The cell-size variations may be evaluated by a self-consistent condition. With the inclusion of cell-size variations, the transition temperature, the solid and liquid densities, and the liquid-phase radial-distribution functions have been calculated. These ab initio results are in satisfactory agreement with molecular-dynamics calculations as well as experimental data on argon.

  10. Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition in Nanoconfined Silicon Carbide.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weikang; Zhang, Leining; Liu, Sida; Ren, Hongru; Zhou, Xuyan; Li, Hui

    2016-03-01

    We report theoretical evidence of a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) in liquid silicon carbide under nanoslit confinement. The LLPT is characterized by layering transitions induced by confinement and pressure, accompanying the rapid change in density. During the layering transition, the proportional distribution of tetracoordinated and pentacoordinated structures exhibits remarkable change. The tricoordinated structures lead to the microphase separation between silicon (with the dominant tricoordinated, tetracoordinated, and pentacoordinated structures) and carbon (with the dominant tricoordinated structures) in the layer close to the walls. A strong layer separation between silicon atoms and carbon atoms is induced by strong wall-liquid forces. Importantly, the pressure confinement phase diagram with negative slopes for LLPT lines indicates that, under high pressure, the LLPT is mainly confinement-induced, but under low pressure, it becomes dominantly pressure-induced.

  11. Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition in Nanoconfined Silicon Carbide.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weikang; Zhang, Leining; Liu, Sida; Ren, Hongru; Zhou, Xuyan; Li, Hui

    2016-03-01

    We report theoretical evidence of a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) in liquid silicon carbide under nanoslit confinement. The LLPT is characterized by layering transitions induced by confinement and pressure, accompanying the rapid change in density. During the layering transition, the proportional distribution of tetracoordinated and pentacoordinated structures exhibits remarkable change. The tricoordinated structures lead to the microphase separation between silicon (with the dominant tricoordinated, tetracoordinated, and pentacoordinated structures) and carbon (with the dominant tricoordinated structures) in the layer close to the walls. A strong layer separation between silicon atoms and carbon atoms is induced by strong wall-liquid forces. Importantly, the pressure confinement phase diagram with negative slopes for LLPT lines indicates that, under high pressure, the LLPT is mainly confinement-induced, but under low pressure, it becomes dominantly pressure-induced. PMID:26859609

  12. Liquid and Solid Phases of ^{3}He on Graphite.

    PubMed

    Gordillo, M C; Boronat, J

    2016-04-01

    Recent heat-capacity experiments show quite unambiguously the existence of a liquid ^{3}He phase adsorbed on graphite. This liquid is stable at an extremely low density, possibly one of the lowest found in nature. Previous theoretical calculations of the same system, and in strictly two dimensions, agree with the result that this liquid phase is not stable and the system is in the gas phase. We calculated the phase diagram of normal ^{3}He adsorbed on graphite at T=0 using quantum Monte Carlo methods. Considering a fully corrugated substrate, we observe that at densities lower than 0.006  Å^{-2} the system is a very dilute gas that, at that density, is in equilibrium with a liquid of density 0.014  Å^{-2}. Our prediction matches very well the recent experimental findings on the same system. On the contrary, when a flat substrate is considered, no gas-liquid coexistence is found, in agreement with previous calculations. We also report results on the different solid structures, and on the corresponding phase transitions that appear at higher densities.

  13. Liquid and Solid Phases of 3He on Graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordillo, M. C.; Boronat, J.

    2016-04-01

    Recent heat-capacity experiments show quite unambiguously the existence of a liquid 3He phase adsorbed on graphite. This liquid is stable at an extremely low density, possibly one of the lowest found in nature. Previous theoretical calculations of the same system, and in strictly two dimensions, agree with the result that this liquid phase is not stable and the system is in the gas phase. We calculated the phase diagram of normal 3He adsorbed on graphite at T =0 using quantum Monte Carlo methods. Considering a fully corrugated substrate, we observe that at densities lower than 0.006 Å-2 the system is a very dilute gas that, at that density, is in equilibrium with a liquid of density 0.014 Å-2 . Our prediction matches very well the recent experimental findings on the same system. On the contrary, when a flat substrate is considered, no gas-liquid coexistence is found, in agreement with previous calculations. We also report results on the different solid structures, and on the corresponding phase transitions that appear at higher densities.

  14. Liquid-Liquid phase transition in a single component system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzese, Giancarlo; Skibinsky, Anna; Buldyrev, Sergey; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2001-06-01

    Recent experimental results indicate that phosphorus, a single-component system, can have a high-density liquid (HDL) and a low-density liquid (LDL) phase. A first-order LDL-HDL transition line ending in a critical point is consistent with experimental data and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations for a variety of single-component systems such as water, silica and carbon, but a coherent and general interpretation of the LDL-HDL transition is lacking. By means of MD, we show that the LDL-HDL transition can be directly related to an interaction potential with an attractive part and with not one but `two' preferred short-range repulsive distances. This kind of interaction is common to other single-component materials in the liquid state, in particular liquid metals. For the fisrt time, we show that the LDL-HDL transition can occur in systems with no density anomaly, opening an experimental challenge to uncover a liquid-liquid transition in systems like liquid metals, regardless of the presence of the density anomaly.

  15. Liquid-liquid separation in solutions of normal and sickle cell hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkin, Oleg; Chen, Kai; Nagel, Ronald L.; Elison Hirsch, Rhoda; Vekilov, Peter G.

    2002-06-01

    We show that in solutions of human hemoglobin (Hb)oxy- and deoxy-Hb A or Sof near-physiological pH, ionic strength, and Hb concentration, liquid-liquid phase separation occurs reversibly and reproducibly at temperatures between 35 and 40°C. In solutions of deoxy-HbS, we demonstrate that the dense liquid droplets facilitate the nucleation of HbS polymers, whose formation is the primary pathogenic event for sickle cell anemia. In view of recent results that shifts of the liquid-liquid separation phase boundary can be achieved by nontoxic additives at molar concentrations up to 30 times lower than the protein concentrations, these findings open new avenues for the inhibition of the HbS polymerization.

  16. Liquid crystal phase shifters for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woehrle, Christopher D.

    Space communication satellites have historically relied heavily on high gain gimbal dish antennas for performing communications. Reflector dish antennas lack flexibility in anti-jamming capabilities, and they tend to have a high risk associated to them given the need for mechanical mechanisms to beam steer. In recent years, a great amount of investment has been made into phased array antenna technologies. Phased arrays offer increased signal flexibility at reduced financial cost and in system risk. The problem with traditional phased arrays is the significant program cost and overall complexity added to the satellite by integrating antenna elements that require many dedicated components to properly perform adaptive beam steering. Several unique methods have been proposed to address the issues that plague traditional phase shifters slated for space applications. Proposed approaches range from complex mechanical switches (MEMS) and ferroelectric devices to more robust molecular changes. Nematic liquid crystals offer adaptive beam steering capabilities that traditional phased arrays have; however, with the added benefit of reduced system cost, complexity, and increased resilience to space environmental factors. The objective of the work presented is to investigate the feasibility of using nematic liquid crystals as a means of phase shifting individual phased array elements slated for space applications. Significant attention is paid to the survivability and performance of liquid crystal and associated materials in the space environment. Performance regarding thermal extremes and interactions with charged particles are the primary factors addressed.

  17. Defects and order in liquid crystal phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Shilpa

    function interaction between columns as occurs in the case of flux lines in type-II superconductors or long polyelectrolytes in an ionic solution. We find that the centered interstitial is the lowest energy defect for a very wide range of interactions; the symmetric vacancy is preferred only for extremely short interaction ranges. Finally, we take a look at the hydrodynamics of smectic films at an air-water interface, with particular focus on the viscous response of the film under flow normal to the layers. The corrections to the response functions of the smectic phase, arising from the coupling between the flow and the smectic order parameter, are calculated. The results for the effective viscosity are illustrated by analysing smectic film flow in a channel geometry. The limiting cases of the flow, namely, motion dominated by dislocation-induced shear-softening or motion dominated by the permeation mode of mass transfer, are studied. The effect of drag from a finite depth liquid subphase is considered. The results are compared to those for hexatic and liquid films.

  18. Polymorphism in glassy silicon: Inherited from liquid-liquid phase transition in supercooled liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shiliang; Wang, Li-Min; Zhang, Xinyu; Qi, Li; Zhang, Suhong; Ma, Mingzhen; Liu, Riping

    2015-02-01

    Combining molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and Voronoi polyhedral analyses, we discussed the microstructure evolution in liquid and glassy silicon during cooling by focusing on the fraction of various clusters. Liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) is detected in supercooled liquid silicon However, freezing the high-density liquid (HDL) to the glassy state is not achieved as the quenching rate goes up to 1014 K/s. The polyamorphism in glassy silicon is found to be mainly associated with low-density liquid (LDL).

  19. Zero Sound Mode in Normal Liquid {sup 3}He

    SciTech Connect

    Albergamo, F.; Verbeni, R.; Huotari, S.; Vanko, G.; Monaco, G.

    2007-11-16

    Inelastic x-ray scattering has been utilized to study the elementary excitations of normal liquid {sup 3}He at the temperature T=1.10{+-}0.05 K and saturated vapor pressure in the wave vector range 0.15{<=}Q{<=}3.15 A{sup -1}. The present data provide direct information on the zero-sound mode in the mesoscopic wave vector range where it was expected to decay into particle-hole excitations. The obtained results show no evidence of such a decay: the zero-sound mode remains well defined in the whole explored wave number range, thus witnessing a continuous transition of the atom dynamics from the collective to the single particle regime similarly to what is usually found in simple liquids.

  20. Adsorbed solution model for prediction of normal-phase chromatography process with varying composition of the mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Piatkowski, Wojciech; Petrushka, Igor; Antos, Dorota

    2005-10-21

    The adsorbed solution model has been used to predict competitive adsorption equilibria of the solute and the active component of mobile phase in a normal-phase liquid chromatography system. The inputs to the calculations were the single adsorption isotherms accounting for energetic heterogeneity of the adsorbent surface and non-ideality of the mobile phase solution. The competitive adsorption model has been coupled with a model of the column dynamics and used for simulating of chromatography process at different mobile phase composition. The predictions have been verified by comparing the simulated and experimental chromatograms. The model allowed quantitative prediction of chromatography process on the basis of the pure-species adsorption isotherms.

  1. Improved Boat For Liquid-Phase Epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, John C.

    1991-01-01

    Liquid-phase epitaxial (LPE) growth boat redesigned. Still fabricated from ultra-high-purity graphite, but modified to permit easy disassembly and cleaning, along with improved wiping action for more complete removal of melt to reduce carry-over of gallium. Larger substrates and more uniform composition obtained.

  2. DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS -- A WORKSHOP SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    site characterization, and, therefore, DNAPL remediation, can be expected. Dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) in the subsurface are long-term sources of ground-water contamination, and may persist for centuries before dissolving completely in adjacent ground water. In respo...

  3. Liquid phase sintered compacts in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mookherji, T. K.; Mcanelly, W. B.

    1974-01-01

    A model that will explain the effect of gravity on liquid phase sintering was developed. Wetting characteristics and density segregation which are the two important phenomena in liquid phase sintering are considered in the model development. Experiments were conducted on some selected material combinations to study the gravity effects on liquid phase sintering, and to verify the validity of the model. It is concluded that: (1) The surface tension forces acting on solid particles in a one-g environment are not appreciably different from those anticipated in a 0.00001g/g sub 0 (or lower) environment. (2) The capillary forces are dependent on the contact angle, the quantity of the liquid phase, and the distance between solid particles. (3) The pores (i.e., bubbles) do not appear to be driven to the surface by gravity-produced buoyancy forces. (4) The length of time to produce the same degree of settling in a low-gravity environment will be increased significantly. (5) A low gravity environment would appear to offer a unique means of satisfactorily infiltrating a larger and/or complex shaped compact.

  4. Spin response of a normal Fermi liquid with noncentral interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Pethick, C. J.; Schwenk, A.

    2009-11-15

    We consider the spin response of a normal Fermi liquid with noncentral interactions under conditions intermediate between the collisionless and hydrodynamic regimes. This problem is of importance for calculations of neutrino properties in dense matter. By expressing the deviation of the quasiparticle distribution function from equilibrium in terms of eigenfunctions of the transport equation under the combined influence of collisions and an external field, we derive a closed expression for the spin-density-spin-density response function and compare its predictions with that of a relaxation-time approximation. Our results indicate that the relaxation-time approximation is reliable for neutrino properties under astrophysically relevant conditions.

  5. Spectral function and kinetic equation for a normal Fermi liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Arshad, M.; Siddique, I.; Kondratyev, A. S.

    2007-08-01

    On the basis of the Kadanoff-Baym (KB) version of the time-dependent Green's function method, an Ansatz for the approximation of a spectral function is offered. The Ansatz possesses all the advantages of quasiparticle and extended quasiparticle approximations and satisfies the KB equation for a spectral function in the case of slightly nonequilibrium system when disturbances in space and time are taken into consideration in the gradient approximation. This feature opens opportunities for the microscopic derivation of the Landau kinetic equation for the quasiparticle distribution function of the normal Fermi liquid and provides the widening of these equations' temperature range of validity.

  6. Liquid Crystalline Phases of Polymer Brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Kiana; Abukhdeir, Nasser; Matsen, Mark

    The phase behavior of liquid-crystal polymeric brushes in solvent are investigated using self-consistent field theory. The polymers are modeled as freely-jointed chain consisting of N rigid segments. The isotropic interactions between the polymer and the solvent are treated using the standard Flory-Huggins theory, while the anisotropic liquid-crystalline (LC) interactions between rigid segments are taken into account using the Mayer-Saupe theory. For weak LC interactions, the brush exhibits the conventional parabolic-like profile, while for strong LC interactions, the polymers crystallize into a dense brush with a step-like profile. At intermediate interaction strengths, we find the microphase-segregated phase observed previously for lattice-model calculations. In this phase, the brush exhibits a crystalline layer next to the grafting surface with an external layer similar to the conventional brush. This work was supported by NSERC of Canada.

  7. Gravitational Role in Liquid Phase Sintering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upadhyaya, Anish; Iacocca, Ronald G.; German, Randall M.

    1998-01-01

    To comprehensively understand the gravitational effects on the evolution of both the microstructure and the macrostructure during liquid phase sintering, W-Ni-Fe alloys with W content varying from 35 to 98 wt.% were sintered in microgravity. Compositions that slump during ground-based sintering also distort when sintered under microgravity. In ground-based sintering, low solid content alloys distort with a typical elephant-foot profile, while in microgravity, the compacts tend to spheroidize. This study shows that microstructural segregation occurs in both ground-based as well as microgravity sintering. In ground-based experiments, because of the density difference between the solid and the liquid phase, the solid content increases from top to the bottom of the sample. In microgravity, the solid content increases from periphery to the center of the samples. This study also shows that the pores during microgravity sintering act as a stable phase and attain anomalous shapes.

  8. Gas-Liquid Flows and Phase Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, John

    2004-01-01

    Common issues for space system designers include:Ability to Verify Performance in Normal Gravity prior to Deployment; System Stability; Phase Accumulation & Shedding; Phase Separation; Flow Distribution through Tees & Manifolds Boiling Crisis; Heat Transfer Coefficient; and Pressure Drop.The report concludes:Guidance similar to "A design that operates in a single phase is less complex than a design that has two-phase flow" is not always true considering the amount of effort spent on pressurizing, subcooling and phase separators to ensure single phase operation. While there is still much to learn about two-phase flow in reduced gravity, we have a good start. Focus now needs to be directed more towards system level problems .

  9. Class separation of lipids and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in normal phase high performance liquid chromatography - a prospect for analysis of aromatics in edible vegetable oils and biodiesel exhaust particulates.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Petter; Sadiktsis, Ioannis; Holmbäck, Jan; Westerholm, Roger

    2014-09-19

    The retention characteristics of the major lipid components in biodiesels and edible oils as well as representative polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAHs) have been investigated on five different normal phase HPLC stationary phases, in order to optimize class separation for an automatized online HPLC cleanup of PAHs prior GC-MS analysis. By stepwise comparison of different hexane/MTBE compositions as mobile phases on cyano-, phenyl-, pentabromobenzyl-, nitrophenyl- and amino-modified silica columns, the capacity and selectivity factors for each analyte and column could be calculated. It was concluded that the most suitable column for backflush isolation of PAHs in biodiesel and edible oil matrices was the pentabromobenzyl-modified silica (PBB). A previously described online HPLC-GC-MS system using the PBB column was then evaluated by qualitative and quantitative analysis of a biodiesel exhaust particulate extract and a vegetable oil reference material. The GC-MS full scan analysis of the biodiesel particulate extract showed that the lipids had been removed from the sample and a fraction containing PAHs and oxygenated derivatives thereof had been isolated. Quantified mass fractions of PAHs of the reference material BCR-458 agreed well for most of the certified PAH mass fractions in the spiked coconut oil reference material.

  10. Solid drop based liquid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Sobhi, Hamid Reza; Farahani, Hadi; Norouzi, Parviz; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Kashtiaray, Amir

    2010-04-16

    Solid drop based liquid-phase microextraction (SDLPME) is a novel sample preparation technique possessing obvious advantages of simple operation with a high pre-concentration factor, low cost and low consumption of organic solvent. SDLPME coupled with gas chromatography (GC), high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) has been widely applied to the analyses of a different variety of samples. The basic principles, parameters affecting the extraction efficiency, and the latest applications of SDLPME are reviewed in this article. PMID:19962710

  11. Liquid-phase compositions from vapor-phase analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, W. Jr.; Cochran, H.D.; Leitnaker, J.M.

    1989-09-01

    In the safe handling and processing of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}), it is often desirable to calculate vapor composition and pressure from known liquid composition and temperature. Furthermore, the ability to use analyses of equilibrium vapor-phase samples to calculate liquid-phase compositions would be economically advantageous to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in its international safeguards program and to uranium enrichment operators. The latter technique is projected to save the IAEA on the order of $1500 or more per sample. Either type of calculation could be performed with a multicomponent vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) model if this model were shown to apply to UF{sub 6} and its common impurities. This report is concerned with the distribution of four potential impurities in UF{sub 6} between liquid and vapor phases. The impurities are carbon dioxide, sulfur hexafluoride, chloryl fluoride, and Freon-114 (CClF{sub 2}CClF{sub 2}). There are no binary equilibrium data on the first three of these impurities; hence, the VLE calculations are based entirely on the thermodynamic properties of the pure components. There are two sets of binary equilibrium data for the system Freon-114-UF{sub 6} that are analyzed in terms of the model of Prausnitz et al. Calculations based on these data are compared with those based solely on the thermodynamic properties of pure Freon-114 and pure UF{sub 6}. 23 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Phase change in liquid face seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, W. F.; Winowich, N. S.; Birchak, M. J.; Kennedy, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    A study is made of boiling (or phase change) in liquid face seals. An appropriate model is set up and approximate solutions obtained. Some practical illustrative examples are given. Major conclusions are that (1) boiling may occur more often than has been suspected particularly when the sealed liquid is near saturation conditions, (2) the temperature variation in a seal clearance region may not be very great and the main reason for boiling is the flashing which occurs as the pressure decreases through the seal clearance, and (3) there are two separate values of the parameter film-thickness/angular-velocity-squared (and associated radii where phase change takes place) which provide the same separating force under a given set of operating conditions. For a given speed seal face excursions about the larger spacing are stable, but excursions about the smaller spacing are unstable, leading to a growth to the larger spacing or a catastrophic collapse.

  13. Vapor-liquid phase separator studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, S. W. K.; Hepler, W. A.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1985-01-01

    A study of porous plug use for vapor-liquid phase seperation in spaceborne cryogenic systems was conducted. The three main topics addressed were: (1) the usefulness of porous media in designs that call for variable areas and flow rates; (2) the possibility of prediction of main parameters of porous plugs for a given material; and (3) prediction of all parameters of the plug, including secondary parameters.

  14. Room-Temperature Liquid Crystal Blue Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taushanoff, Stefanie; van Le, Khoa; Twieg, Robert; Jakli, Antal

    2009-03-01

    The ``blue phases'' of a highly chiral liquid crystal are defect-studded structures of double-twist cylinders that are laced together. The three phases, BPI*, BPII* and BPIII* differ only in the packing of the double-twist cylinders. Until recently, blue phases were of limited practical use because they appeared for only a very narrow temperature range. Mixtures that show BPI* and BPII* phases for wide temperature ranges at or around room temperature are now available [1]. Relatively wide temperature BPIII (the blue fog) phase so far was available only at very high temperatures [2]. Here we present mixtures with room-temperature wide range BPIII* phase and compare the ability of chiral dopants to form the different blue phases in a base nematic mixture. PDLC films cast with blue-phase material are also examined.[3pt] [1] H. Coles and M. Pivnenko, Nature 2005 436-18 997-1000 [0pt] [2] C. V. Yelamaggad, I. S. Shashikala, G. Liao, D.S. Shankar Rao, S. K. Prasad , Q. Li A. Jakli, Chem. Mater Comm, 2006, 18, 6100-6102

  15. Liquid-phase electroepitaxy - Dopant segregation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagowski, J.; Jastrzebski, L.; Gatos, H. C.

    1980-01-01

    A theoretical model is presented which accounts for the dopant segregation in liquid-phase electroepitaxy in terms of dopant transport in the liquid phase (by electromigration and diffusion), the growth velocity, and the Peltier effect at the substrate-solution interface. The contribution of dopant electromigration to the magnitude of the effective segregation coefficient is dominant in the absence of convection; the contribution of the Peltier effect becomes significant only in the presence of pronounced convection. Quantitative expressions which relate the segregation coefficient to the growth parameters also permit the determination of the diffusion constant and electromigration mobility of the dopant in the liquid phase. The model was found to be in good agreement with the measured segregation characteristics of Sn in the electroepitaxial growth of GaAs from Ga-As solutions. For Sn in Ga-As solution at 900 C the diffusion constant was found to be 4 x 10 to the -5 sq cm/s and the electromigration velocity (toward the substrate with a positive polarity 2 x 10 to the -5 cm/s current density of 10 A/sq cm.

  16. Spin Waves and Spin Relaxation in Normal Fermi Liquids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meltzer, David Elliott

    This work explores several aspects of spin-dependent excitations in normal Fermi liquids. Chapter 1 is a general introduction and overview of the work. The Landau kinetic equation and its application to nonequilibrium proper- ties of Fermi liquids is discussed, and the properties of collective density modes are briefly reviewed. The properties of both longitu- dinal and transverse spin excitations are then outlined, leading up to a discussion of spin waves and spin diffusion, including the Leggett -Rice effect. Chapter 2 discusses the possibility of making a determination of the contribution of many-body interactions to the large effective mass in "heavy-fermion" materials, e.g. UPt(,3), by the method of conduction-electron spin resonance (CESR). It is shown that a microwave trans- mission observation of CESR might show a resonance pattern which, based on already measured parameters, would clearly distinguish among various suggested models for the strength of the many-body effects. Chapter 3 investigates the accuracy of the usual relaxation time approximations, involving the spin diffusion lifetime (tau)(,D), which are generally made in analyses of spin waves and the Leggett-Rice effect in Fermi liquids. By employing the variational methods of Ah-Sam, H(SLASHCIRC)jgaard -Jensen and Smith, and Egilsson and Pethick, we are able to determine upper and lower bounds on the effective diffusion coefficient resulting from spin wave phenomena which are accurate in the whole Fermi liquid regime. Our results indicate that the usual approximations break down for(' )T < 7 mK in ('3)He, but are accurate to within (TURN)2% in 5% ('3)He-('4)He mixtures. Chapter 4 contains a calculation of the longitudinal spin relaxa- tion time T(,1) in bulk ('3)He in the Fermi liquid (T << T(,F)) regime. The kinetic equation is used to obtain an expression for T(,1) in terms of perturbations of the scattering amplitude. These perturbations are then obtained using the induced interaction model

  17. Liquid-liquid phase transition in a family of simple models of tetrahedral liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buldyrev, Sergey; Franzese, Giancarlo; Giovambattista, Nicolas

    2013-03-01

    Liquids with tetrahedral symmetry of the first coordination shell often display anomalous thermodynamic and dynamic behavior. Sometimes, these anomalies are associated with the liquid-liquid phase transition at high pressures and low temperatures. We study a family of simple models with few parameters and investigate the conditions for the existence of the liquid-liquid phase transition. A molecule in these models consists of a hard sphere with a square well and four point particles attached to the center of the hard sphere by directional bonds arranged in tetrahedral geometry. We also impose a condition which does not allow a point particle in one molecule to include in its attractive well more than one point particle belonging to different molecules. We find an optimal range of flexibility of the bonds created by the point particles for which the model displays a clear liquid-liquid critical point in the accessible region of the phase diagram: too flexible bonds weaken the anomalies and destroy the critical point, while too rigid bonds slow down the diffusion and shift the critical point beyond the glass transition. We also investigate how minor changes in the model parameters influence crystallization which might make liquid-liquid unobservable.

  18. Phase Segregation at the Liquid-Air Interface Prior to Liquid-Liquid Equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez-Salguero, Carolina; Gracia-Fadrique, Jesús

    2015-08-13

    Binary systems with partial miscibility segregate into two liquid phases when their overall composition lies within the interval defined by the saturation points; out of this interval, there is one single phase, either solvent-rich or solute-rich. In most systems, in the one-phase regions, surface tension decreases with increasing solute concentration due to solute adsorption at the liquid-air interface. Therefore, the solute concentration at the surface is higher than in the bulk, leading to the hypothesis that phase segregation starts at the liquid-air interface with the formation of two surface phases, before the liquid-liquid equilibrium. This phenomenon is called surface segregation and is a step toward understanding liquid segregation at a molecular level and detailing the constitution of fluid interfaces. Surface segregation of aqueous binary systems of alkyl acetates with partial miscibility was theoretically demonstrated by means of a thermodynamic stability test based on energy minimization. Experimentally, the coexistence of two surface regions was verified through Brewster's angle microscopy. The observations were further interpreted with the aid of molecular dynamics simulations, which show the diffusion of the acetates from the bulk toward the liquid-air interface, where acetates aggregate into acetate-rich domains. PMID:26189700

  19. An instantaneous normal mode description of relaxation in supercooled liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyes, T.; Vijayadamodar, G. V.; Zurcher, U.

    1997-03-01

    Relaxation in supercooled liquids is formulated from the instantaneous normal modes (INM) point of view. The frequency and temperature dependence of the unstable, imaginary frequency lobe of the INM density of states, <ρu(ω,T)> (for simplicity we write ω instead of iω), is investigated and characterized over a broad temperature range, 10⩾T⩾0.42, in the unit density Lennard-Jones liquid. INM theories of diffusion invoke Im-ω modes descriptive of barrier crossing, but not all imaginary frequency modes fall into this category. There exists a cutoff frequency ωc such that modes with ω<ωc correspond to "shoulder potentials," whereas the potential profiles include barrier-crossing double wells for ω>ωc. Given that only modes with ω>ωc contribute to diffusion, the barrier crossing rate, ωh, and the self diffusion constant D, are shown to be proportional to the density of states evaluated at the cutoff frequency, <ρu(ωc,T)>. The density of states exhibits crossover behavior in its temperature dependence such that the exponential T-dependence of D(T) crosses over from Zwanzig-Bassler exp(-E2/T2) behavior at low T to Arrhenius exp(-E/T) behavior at high T; the exponential may be too weak to be observed, in which case D(T) is a power law. Based on the properties of LJ, a general INM description of strong and fragile liquids is presented, with a physical interpretation in terms of the "landscape" of the potential energy surface.

  20. Determination of Vitamin E and Vitamin A in Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals by Normal-Phase High-Performance Liquid Chromatography: Collaborative Study, Final Action 2012.10.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Adrienne

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of the AOAC Stakeholder Panel on Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals (SPIFAN) project is to establish international consensus methods for infant formula and adult nutritionals, which will benefit intermarket supply and dispute resolution. A collaborative study was conducted on AOAC First Action Method 2012.10 Simultaneous Determination of 13-cis and All-trans Vitamin A Palmitate (Retinyl Palmitate), Vitamin A Acetate (Retinyl Acetate), and Total Vitamin E (α-Tocopherol and D-α-tocopherol acetate) in Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals by Normal-Phase HPLC. Fifteen laboratories from 11 countries participated in an interlaboratory study to determine 13-cis and all-trans vitamin A palmitate (retinyl palmitate), vitamin A acetate (retinyl acetate), and total vitamin E (α-tocopherol and D-α-tocopherol acetate) in infant formula and adult nutritionals by normal-phase HPLC and all laboratories returned valid data. Eighteen test portions of nine blind duplicates of a variety of infant formula and adult nutritional products were used in the study. The matrixes included milk-based and soy-based hydrolyzed protein as well as a low fat product. Each of the samples was prepared fresh and analyzed in singlicate. As the number of samples exceeded the recommended number to be prepared in a single day, analysis took place over 2 days running 12 samples on day one and 10 samples on day two. The reference standard stock was prepared once and the six-point curve diluted freshly on each day. Results obtained from all 15 laboratories are reported. The RSDR for total vitamin A (palmitate or acetate) ranged from 6.51 to 22.61% and HorRat values ranged from 0.33 to 1.25. The RSDR for total vitamin E (as tocopherol equivalents) ranged from 3.84 to 10.78% and HorRat values ranged from 0.27 to 1.04. Except for an adult low fat matrix which generated reproducibility RSD >40% for some isomers, most SPIFAN matrixes gave results within the acceptance criteria of <16

  1. Liquid-liquid and liquid-solid phase separation and flocculation for a charged colloidal dispersion.

    PubMed

    Lai, S K; Wu, K L

    2002-10-01

    We model the intercolloidal interaction by a hard-sphere Yukawa repulsion to which is added the long-range van der Waals attraction. In comparison with the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek repulsion, the Yukawa repulsion explicitly incorporates the spatial correlations between colloids and small ions. As a result, the repulsive part can be expressed analytically and has a coupling strength depending on the colloidal volume fraction. By use of this two-body potential of mean force and in conjunction with a second-order thermodynamic perturbation theory, we construct the colloidal Helmholtz free energy and use it to calculate the thermodynamic quantities, pressure and chemical potential, needed in the determination of the liquid-liquid and liquid-solid phase diagrams. We examine, in an aqueous charged colloidal dispersion, the effects of the Hamaker constant and particle size on the conformation of a stable liquid-liquid phase transition calculated with respect to the liquid-solid coexistence phases. We find that there exists a threshold Hamaker constant or particle size whose value demarcates the stable liquid-liquid coexistence phases from their metastable counterparts. Applying the same technique and using the energetic criterion, we extend our calculations to study the flocculation phenomenon in aqueous charged colloids. Here, we pay due attention to determining the loci of a stability curve stipulated for a given temperature T0, and obtain the parametric phase diagram of the Hamaker constant vs the coupling strength or, at given surface potential, the particle size. By imposing T0 to be the critical temperature T(c), i.e., setting k(B)T0 (=k(B)T(c)) equal to a reasonable potential barrier, we arrive at the stability curve that marks the irreversible/reversible phase transition. The interesting result is that there occurs a minimum size for the colloidal particles below (above) which the colloidal dispersion is driven to an irreversible (reversible) phase

  2. Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid Calculator

    2004-02-19

    Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid or "NPAL" is a term that most environmental professionals are familiar with because NAPL has been recognized in the literature as a significant source of groundwater contamination. There are two types of NAPL: DNAPL and LNAPL. DNAPL is a ‘dense’ non-aqueous phase liquid. In this context, dense means having a density greater than water (1.0 kg/L). Trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachioroethylene (PCE) are examples of DNAPL compounds. A compound that is heaver thanmore » water means this type of NAPL will sink in an aquifer. Conversely, LNAPL is a ‘light’ non-aqueous phase liquid with a density less than water, and will float on top of the aquifer. Examples of LNAPL’s are benzene and toluene. LNAPL or DNAPL often manifest as a complex, multi-component mixture of organic compounds that can occur in environmental media. Complex multi-component mixtures distributed in soil pore-air, pore-water, soil particles and in free phase complicate residual saturation of single and multi component NAPL compounds in soil samples. The model output also includes estimates of the NAPL mass and volume and other physical and chemical properties that may be useful for characterization, modeling, and remedial system design and operation. The discovery of NAPL in the aquifer usually leads to a focused characterization for possible sources of NAPL in the vadose zone using a variety of innovative technologies and characterization methods. Often, the analytical data will indicated the presence of NAPL, yet, the NAPL will go unrecognized. Failure to recognize the NAPL can be attributed to the complicated processes of inter-media transfer or a general lack of knowledge about the physical characteristics of complex organic mixtures in environmental samples.« less

  3. Liquid-Liquid Phase Separation of Oil Bodies from Seeds.

    PubMed

    Nykiforuk, Cory L

    2016-01-01

    Fundamentally, oil bodies are discrete storage organelles found in oilseeds, comprising a hydrophobic triacylglycerol core surrounded by a half-unit phospholipid membrane and an outer shell of specialized proteins known as oleosins. Oil bodies possess a number of attributes that were exploited by SemBioSys Genetics to isolate highly enriched fractions of oil bodies through liquid-liquid phase separation for a number of commercial applications. The current chapter provides a general guide for the isolation of oil bodies from Arabidopsis and/or safflower seed, from which protocols can be refined for different oilseed sources. For SemBioSys Genetic's recombinant technology, therapeutic proteins were covalently attached to oleosins or fused in-frame with ligands which bound oil bodies, facilitating their recovery to high levels of purity during "upstream processing" of transformed seed. Core to this technology was oil body isolation consisting of simple manipulation including homogenization of seeds to free the oil bodies, followed by the removal of insoluble fractions, and phase separation to recover the oil bodies. During oil body enrichment (an increase in oil body content concomitant with removal of impurities), a number of options and tips are provided to aid researchers in the manipulation and monitoring of these robust organelles.

  4. Liquid-Liquid Phase Separation of Oil Bodies from Seeds.

    PubMed

    Nykiforuk, Cory L

    2016-01-01

    Fundamentally, oil bodies are discrete storage organelles found in oilseeds, comprising a hydrophobic triacylglycerol core surrounded by a half-unit phospholipid membrane and an outer shell of specialized proteins known as oleosins. Oil bodies possess a number of attributes that were exploited by SemBioSys Genetics to isolate highly enriched fractions of oil bodies through liquid-liquid phase separation for a number of commercial applications. The current chapter provides a general guide for the isolation of oil bodies from Arabidopsis and/or safflower seed, from which protocols can be refined for different oilseed sources. For SemBioSys Genetic's recombinant technology, therapeutic proteins were covalently attached to oleosins or fused in-frame with ligands which bound oil bodies, facilitating their recovery to high levels of purity during "upstream processing" of transformed seed. Core to this technology was oil body isolation consisting of simple manipulation including homogenization of seeds to free the oil bodies, followed by the removal of insoluble fractions, and phase separation to recover the oil bodies. During oil body enrichment (an increase in oil body content concomitant with removal of impurities), a number of options and tips are provided to aid researchers in the manipulation and monitoring of these robust organelles. PMID:26614290

  5. Normal Caloric Responses during Acute Phase of Vestibular Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Uk; Park, Seong-Ho; Kim, Hyo-Jung; Koo, Ja-Won

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose We report a novel finding of caloric conversion from normal responses into unilateral paresis during the acute phase of vestibular neuritis (VN). Methods We recruited 893 patients with a diagnosis of VN at Dizziness Clinic of Seoul National University Bundang Hospital from 2003 to 2014 after excluding 28 patients with isolated inferior divisional VN (n=14) and those without follow-up tests despite normal caloric responses initially (n=14). We retrospectively analyzed the neurotological findings in four (0.5%) of the patients who showed a conversion from initially normal caloric responses into unilateral paresis during the acute phase. Results In those four patients, the initial caloric tests were performed within 2 days of symptom onset, and conversion into unilateral caloric paresis was documented 1–4 days later. The clinical and laboratory findings during the initial evaluation were consistent with VN in all four patients except for normal findings in bedside head impulse tests in one of them. Conclusions Normal findings in caloric tests should be interpreted with caution during the acute phase of suspected VN. Follow-up evaluation should be considered when the findings of the initial caloric test are normal, but VN remains the most plausible diagnosis. PMID:26932259

  6. Interplay Between Two Phase Transitions: Crystallization and Liquid-Liquid Phase Separation in a Polyolefin Blend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Charles C.; Zhang, Xiaohua

    2006-03-01

    The correlation between liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) and crystallization at several compositions in statistical copolymer blends of poly (ethylene-co-hexene) (PEH) and poly (ethylene-co-butene) (PEB) has been examined by optical microscopy (OM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The overwhelming change in the crystallization kinetics due to the density fluctuation caused by the spontaneous spinodal LLPS is observed. This coupling mechanism suggests a new mechanism in the nucleation-crystallization process. All evidences are pointing to a cross-over mechanism from the spinodal fluctuations (of liquid-liquid phase separation) to the nucleation and than crystallization. The detailed experimental evidences and a suggested physical model will be presented.

  7. Blue-phase liquid crystal droplets

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-González, José A.; Zhou, Ye; Rahimi, Mohammad; Bukusoglu, Emre; Abbott, Nicholas L.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-01-01

    Blue phases of liquid crystals represent unique ordered states of matter in which arrays of defects are organized into striking patterns. Most studies of blue phases to date have focused on bulk properties. In this work, we present a systematic study of blue phases confined into spherical droplets. It is found that, in addition to the so-called blue phases I and II, several new morphologies arise under confinement, with a complexity that increases with the chirality of the medium and with a nature that can be altered by surface anchoring. Through a combination of simulations and experiments, it is also found that one can control the wavelength at which blue-phase droplets absorb light by manipulating either their size or the strength of the anchoring, thereby providing a liquid–state analog of nanoparticles, where dimensions are used to control absorbance or emission. The results presented in this work also suggest that there are conditions where confinement increases the range of stability of blue phases, thereby providing intriguing prospects for applications. PMID:26460039

  8. Polarization-modulated smectic liquid crystal phases.

    PubMed

    Coleman, D A; Fernsler, J; Chattham, N; Nakata, M; Takanishi, Y; Körblova, E; Link, D R; Shao, R-F; Jang, W G; Maclennan, J E; Mondainn-Monval, O; Boyer, C; Weissflog, W; Pelzl, G; Chien, L-C; Zasadzinski, J; Watanabe, J; Walba, D M; Takezoe, H; Clark, N A

    2003-08-29

    Any polar-ordered material with a spatially uniform polarization field is internally frustrated: The symmetry-required local preference for polarization is to be nonuniform, i.e., to be locally bouquet-like or "splayed." However, it is impossible to achieve splay of a preferred sign everywhere in space unless appropriate defects are introduced into the field. Typically, in materials like ferroelectric crystals or liquid crystals, such defects are not thermally stable, so that the local preference is globally frustrated and the polarization field remains uniform. Here, we report a class of fluid polar smectic liquid crystals in which local splay prevails in the form of periodic supermolecular-scale polarization modulation stripes coupled to layer undulation waves. The polar domains are locally chiral, and organized into patterns of alternating handedness and polarity. The fluid-layer undulations enable an extraordinary menagerie of filament and planar structures that identify such phases.

  9. Behavior in normal and reduced gravity of an enclosed liquid/gas system with nonuniform heating from above

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, H. D.; Schiller, D. N.; Disimile, P.; Sirignano, W. A.

    1989-01-01

    The temperature and velocity fields have been investigated for a single-phase gas system and a two-layer gas-and-liquid system enclosed in a circular cylinder being heated suddenly and nonuniformly from above. The transient response of the gas, liquid, and container walls was modelled numerically in normal and reduced gravity (10 to the -5 g). Verification of the model was accomplished via flow visualization experiments in 10 cm high by 10 cm diameter plexiglass cylinders.

  10. Wide Angle Liquid Crystal Optical Phased Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xing-Hua; Wang, Bin; Bos, Philip J.; Anderson, James E.; Pouch, John J.; Miranda, Felix A.; McManamon, Paul F.

    2004-01-01

    Accurate modeling of a high resolution, liquid crystal (LC) based, optical phased array (OPA) is shown. The simulation shows excellent agreement with a test 2-D LC OPA. The modeling method is extendable to cases where the array element size is close to the wavelength of light. The fringing fields of such a device are first studied, and subsequently reduced. This results in a device that demonstrates plus or minus 7.4 degrees of continuous beam steering at a wavelength of 1550 nm, and a diffraction efficiency (DE) higher than 72%.

  11. Liquid-liquid phase transitions and water-like anomalies in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lascaris, Erik

    In this thesis we employ computer simulations and statistical physics to understand the origin of liquid-liquid phase transitions and their relationship with anomalies typical of liquid water. Compared with other liquids, water has many anomalies. For example the density anomaly: when water is cooled below 4 °C the density decreases rather than increases. This and other anomalies have also been found to occur in a few other one-component liquids, sometimes in conjunction with the existence of a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) between a low-density liquid (LDL) and a high-density liquid (HDL). Using simple models we explain how these anomalies arise from the presence of two competing length scales. As a specific example we investigate the cut ramp potential, where we show the importance of "competition" in this context, and how one length scale can sometimes be zero. When there is a clear energetic preference for either LDL or HDL for all pressures and temperatures, then there is insufficient competition between the two liquid structures and no anomalies occur. From the simple models it also follows that anomalies can occur without the presence of a LLPT and vice versa. It remains therefore unclear if water has a LLPT that ends in a liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP), a hypothesis that was first proposed based on simulations of the ST2 water model. We confirm the existence of a LLCP in this model using finite size scaling and the Challa-Landau-Binder parameter, and show that the LLPT is not a liquid-crystal transition, as has recently been suggested. Previous research has indicated the possible existence of a LLCP in liquid silica. We perform a detailed analysis of two different silica models (WAC and BKS) at temperatures much lower than was previously simulated. Within the accessible temperature range we find no LLCP in either model, although in the case of WAC potential it is closely approached. We compare our results with those obtained for other

  12. On liquid phases in cometary nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Richard; Faillace, George A.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper we review the relevant literature and investigate conditions likely to lead to melting of H2O ice, methanol (CH3OH) ice, ethane (C2H6) ice and other volatile ices in cometary nuclei. On the basis of a heat balance model which takes account of volatiles loss, we predict the formation of occasional aqueous and hydrocarbon liquid phases in subsurface regions at heliocentric distances, rh of 1-3 AU, and 5-12 AU, respectively. Low triple-point temperatures and low vapour pressures of C2H6, C3H8, and some higher-order alkanes and alkenes, favour liquid phase formation in cometary bodies at high rh. Microporosity and the formation of a stabilization crust occluding the escape of volatiles facilitate liquid-phase formation. Characteristics of the near-surface which favour subsurface melting include; low effective surface emissivity (at low rh), high amorphous carbon content, average pore sizes of ˜10 μm or less, presence of solutes (e.g. CH3OH), mixtures of C2-C6 hydrocarbons (for melting at high rh), diurnal thermal cycling, and slow rotation rate. Applying the principles of soil mechanics, capillary forces are shown to initiate pre-melting phenomena and subsequent melting, which is expected to impart considerable strength of ˜104 Pa in partially saturated layers, reducing porosity and permeability, enhancing thermal conductivity and heat transfer. Diurnal thermal cycling is expected to have a marked effect on the composition and distribution of H2O ice in the near-surface leading to frost heave-type phenomena even where little if any true melting occurs. Where melting does take place, capillary suction in the wetted zone has the potential to enhance heat transfer via capillary wetting in a low-gravity environment, and to modify surface topography creating relatively smooth flat-bottomed features, which have a tendency to be located within small depressions. An important aspect of the "wetted layer" model is the prediction that diurnal melt-freeze cycles

  13. New generalized corresponding states correlation for surface tension of normal saturated liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Huili; Tian, Jianxiang

    2015-08-01

    A new simple correlation based on the principle of corresponding state is proposed to estimate the temperature-dependent surface tension of normal saturated liquids. The new correlation contains three coefficients obtained by fitting 17,051 surface tension data of 38 saturated normal liquids. These 38 liquids contain refrigerants, hydrocarbons and some other inorganic liquids. The new correlation requires only the triple point temperature, triple point surface tension and critical point temperature as input and is able to well represent the experimental surface tension data for each of the 38 saturated normal liquids from the triple temperature up to the point near the critical point. The new correlation gives absolute average deviations (AAD) values below 3% for all of these 38 liquids with the only exception being octane with AAD=4.30%. Thus, the new correlation gives better overall results in comparison with other correlations for these 38 normal saturated liquids.

  14. Quantum Liquid Crystal Phases in Strongly Correlated Fermionic Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Kai

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to the investigation of the quantum liquid crystal phases in strongly correlated electronic systems. Such phases are characterized by their partially broken spatial symmetries and are observed in various strongly correlated systems as being summarized in Chapter 1. Although quantum liquid crystal phases often involve…

  15. Phase-Changing Ionic Liquids: CO2 Capture with Ionic Liquids Involving Phase Change

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-01

    IMPACCT Project: Notre Dame is developing a new CO2 capture process that uses special ionic liquids (ILs) to remove CO2 from the gas exhaust of coal-fired power plants. ILs are salts that are normally liquid at room temperature, but Notre Dame has discovered a new class of ILs that are solid at room temperature and change to liquid when they bind to CO2. Upon heating, the CO2 is released for storage, and the ILs re-solidify and donate some of the heat generated in the process to facilitate further CO2 release. These new ILs can reduce the energy required to capture CO2 from the exhaust stream of a coal-fired power plant when compared to state-ofthe- art technology.

  16. Replication Experiments in Microgravity Liquid Phase Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    German, Randall M.; Johnson, John L.

    2016-05-01

    Although considerable experience exists with sintering on Earth, the behavior under reduced gravity conditions is poorly understood. This study analyzes replica microgravity liquid phase sintering data for seven tungsten alloys (35 to 88 wt pct tungsten) sintered for three hold times (1, 180, or 600 minutes) at 1773 K (1500 °C) using 0.002 pct of standard gravity. Equivalent sintering is performed on Earth using the same heating cycles. Microgravity sintering results in a lower density and more shape distortion. For Earth-based sintering, minimized distortion is associated with low liquid contents to avoid solid settling and slumping. Distortion in microgravity sintering involves viscous spreading of the component at points of contact with the containment crucible. Distortion in microgravity is minimized by short hold times; long hold times allow progressive component reshaping toward a spherical shape. Microgravity sintering also exhibits pore coalescence into large, stable voids that cause component swelling. The microgravity sintering results show good replication in terms of mass change and sintered density. Distortion is scattered but statistically similar between the replica microgravity runs. However, subtle factors, not typically of concern on Earth, emerge to influence microgravity sintering, such that ground experiments do not provide a basis to predict microgravity behavior.

  17. Two-phase liquid-liquid flows generated by impinging liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsaoulidis, Dimitrios; Li, Qi; Angeli, Panagiota

    2015-11-01

    Two-phase flows in intensified small-scale systems find increasing applications in (bio)chemical analysis and synthesis, fuel cells, polymerisation, and separation processes (solvent extraction). Current nuclear spent fuel reprocessing separation technologies have been developed many decades ago and have not taken account recent advances on process intensification which can drive down plant size and economics. In this work, intensified impinging jets will be developed to create dispersions by bringing the two liquid phases into contact through opposing small channels. A systematic set of experiments has been undertaken, to investigate the hydrodynamic characteristics, to develop predictive models, and enable comparisons with other contactors. Drop size distribution and mixing intensity will be investigated for liquid-liquid mixtures as a function of various parameters using high speed imaging and conductivity probes.

  18. CARBON DIOXIDE SEPARATION BY PHASE ENHANCED GAS-LIQUID ABSORPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Hu

    2004-09-30

    A new process called phase enhanced gas-liquid absorption has been developed in its early stage. It was found that adding another phase into the absorption system of gas/aqueous phase could enhance the absorption rate. A system with three phases was studied. In the system, gas phase was carbon dioxide. Two liquid phases were used. One was organic phase. Another was aqueous phase. By addition of organic phase into the absorption system of CO{sub 2}-aqueous phase, the absorption rate of CO{sub 2} was increased significantly. CO{sub 2} finally accumulated into aqueous phase. The experimental results proved that (1) Absorption rate of carbon dioxide was enhanced by adding organic phase into gas aqueous phase system; (2) Organic phase played the role of transportation of gas solute (CO{sub 2}). Carbon dioxide finally accumulated into aqueous phase.

  19. CARBON DIOXIDE SEPARATION BY PHASE ENHANCED GAS-LIQUID ABSORPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Hu; Adeyinka A. Adeyiga

    2004-05-01

    A new process called phase enhanced gas-liquid absorption has been developed in its early stage. It was found that adding another phase into the absorption system of gas/aqueous phase could enhance the absorption rate. A system with three phases was studied. In the system, gas phase was carbon dioxide. Two liquid phases were used. One was organic phase. Another was aqueous phase. By addition of organic phase into the absorption system of CO{sub 2}-aqueous phase, the absorption rate of CO{sub 2} was increased significantly. CO{sub 2} finally accumulated into aqueous phase. The experimental results proved that (1) Absorption rate of carbon dioxide was enhanced by adding organic phase into gas aqueous phase system; (2) Organic phase played the role of transportation of gas solute (CO{sub 2}). Carbon dioxide finally accumulated into aqueous phase.

  20. Analysis of hydrodynamic (landau) instability in liquid-propellant combustion at normal and reduced gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Margolis, S.B.

    1997-10-01

    The burning of liquid propellants is a fundamental combustion problem that is applicable to various types of propulsion and energetic systems. The deflagration process is often rather complex, with vaporization and pyrolysis occurring at the liquid/gas interface and distributed combustion occurring either in the gas phase or in a spray. Nonetheless, there are realistic limiting cases in which combustion may be approximated by an overall reaction at the liquid/gas interface. In one such limit, distributed combustion occurs in an intrusive regime, the reaction zone lying closer to the liquid/gas interface than the length scale of any disturbance of interest. Such limiting models have recently been formulated thereby significantly generalizing earlier classical models that were originally introduced to study the hydrodynamic stability of a reactive liquid/gas interface. In all of these investigations, gravity appears explicitly and plays a significant role, along with surface tension, viscosity, and, in the more recent models, certain reaction-rate parameters associated with the pressure and temperature sensitivities of the reaction itself. In particular, these parameters determine the stability of the deflagration with respect to not only classical hydrodynamic disturbances, but also with respect to reactive/diffusive influences as well. These instabilities thus lead to a number of interesting phenomena, such as the sloshing type of waves that have been observed in mixtures of HAN and triethanolammonium nitrate (TEAN) with water. Although the Froude number was treated as an O(l) quantity in these studies, the limit of small inverse Froude number corresponding to the microgravity regime is increasingly of interest. In the present work, the author formally exploits this limiting parameter regime to compare some of the features of hydrodynamic instability of liquid-propellant combustion at reduced gravity with the same phenomenon at normal gravity.

  1. Polar organic phase liquid chromatography with packed capillary columns using a vancomycin chiral stationary phase

    PubMed

    Svensson; Donnecke; Karlsson; Karlsson; Vessman

    2000-08-01

    Vancomycin immobilized on silica served as the chiral stationary phase (CSP) in this investigation with polar organic solvents as the mobile phase in liquid chromatography (LC). It was shown that trace amounts of water were beneficial for improving peak shape and efficiency. To regulate the retention and selectivity an acid and/or base were added to the mobile phase where an excess of acid was shown to be preferential for enantioseparation. An unusual increase in selectivity with increasing temperature was shown for the acidic drug, thalidomide. Additionally, nonlinear van't Hoff plots were obtained for metoprolol enantiomers that showed increased retention with increasing temperature. Metoprolol also showed unusual behavior in the polar organic phase when water was added to resemble reversed-phase chromatography, with minimum retention observed at high water or high methanol concentrations. In both instances a high degree of electrostatic interaction between metoprolol and vancomycin was concluded. Metoprolol and ten of its analogs were examined on this CSP to evaluate the enantiorecognition process. A comparison in enantioselectivity for a number of acidic and basic drugs using this CSP was also carried out using the polar organic phase, reversed phase, and normal phase LC which were all compared to the results obtained in supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). Polar organic phase LC offered a better separation of basic molecules while reversed phase LC was preferred for the resolution of acids. SFC showed the broadest enantioselectivity overall and normal phase LC indicated similar properties, as expected, to SFC but with lower column efficiency. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:10897097

  2. Bubble Formation and Detachment in Liquid Flow Under Normal and Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Kamotani, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Two-phase flows are present in a wide variety of applications for spacecraft thermal control systems design. Bubble formation and detachment is an integral part of the two-phase flow science. The authors objective is to experimentally investigate the effects of liquid cross velocity, gas velocity, and nozzle diameter on the bubble diameter at detachment under reduced and normal gravity and under relatively low gas flow rates. Results from ground (1 g) and reduced gravity experiments will be presented in this paper. For the 1 g experiment, a flow loop was designed and built to accommodate a range of liquid and gas flow rates. The reduced gravity experiment was conducted on the NASA DC-9 reduced gravity platform using the two-phase flow loop qualified for operation on the low-gravity platform. Flow visualization is accomplished using a high speed 500 frames/s camera. The results suggest that the existence of buoyancy force contributes to the faster detachment of bubbles. Buoyancy helps the detachment process which results in smaller bubbles being formed. In reduced gravity, although drag force is present, the virtual non-existence of buoyant force results in larger bubbles and longer times for detachment. Theoretical predictions are also presented in this paper and seem to agree with the experimental results.

  3. Study of Liquid Phase Shifter for ICRF on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Zhao, Yanping; Mao, Yuzhou; Qin, Chengming

    2006-07-01

    A method of current drive with Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) on Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokomak (EAST) is described. A variety of liquid silicon oil heights in the phase shifter will bring the phase difference to the current drive. It is found that the current drive can be achieved by using the phase shifter. The liquid phase shifter is one of the impedance matching systems too.

  4. Coal-Face Fracture With A Two-Phase Liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, E. R., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    In new method for mining coal without explosive, two-phase liquid such as CO2 and water, injected at high pressure into deeper ends of holes drilled in coal face. Liquid permeates coal seam through existing microfractures; as liquid seeps back toward face, pressure eventually drops below critical value at which dissolved gas flashvaporizes, breaking up coal.

  5. Metastable phase formation in undercooled liquid lead alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fecht, Hans J.

    1991-01-01

    During non-equilibrium processes metastable phases are formed instead of stable phases due to the operation of various kinetic or structural constraints. By removing the most effective nucleation sites for the stable phase using emulsified droplet samples, stable phase formation can be prohibited in a broad range of undercooling and the phase space available in the metastable regime can be mapped out. With this method the thermodynamic properties of the undercooled liquid and the metastable phase boundaries corresponding to reversible metastable (solid + liquid) phase equilibria are examined from experimental data. The analysis reveals important implications for the nucleation kinetics and the choice of the kinetically most favored solidification path.

  6. Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition and Glass Transition in a Monoatomic Model System

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Limei; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Giovambattista, Nicolas; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2010-01-01

    We review our recent study on the polyamorphism of the liquid and glass states in a monatomic system, a two-scale spherical-symmetric Jagla model with both attractive and repulsive interactions. This potential with a parametrization for which crystallization can be avoided and both the glass transition and the liquid-liquid phase transition are clearly separated, displays water-like anomalies as well as polyamorphism in both liquid and glassy states, providing a unique opportunity to study the interplay between the liquid-liquid phase transition and the glass transition. Our study on a simple model may be useful in understanding recent studies of polyamorphism in metallic glasses. PMID:21614201

  7. Liquid Crystals: The Phase of the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ondris-Crawford, Renate; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Liquid crystal displays are currently utilized to convey information via graphic displays. Presents experiments and explanations that employ the concept of liquid crystals to learn concepts related to the various states of matter, electric and magnetic forces, refraction of light, and optics. Discusses applications of liquid crystal technology.…

  8. Liquid disordered-liquid ordered phase coexistence in bicelles containing unsaturated lipids and cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Miranda L; Davis, James H

    2016-04-01

    Magnetically orienting bicelles are often made by combining the long chain phospholipid 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) with the short chain phospholipid 1,2-dicaproyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DCPC) in buffer. These bicelles orient with their bilayer normals perpendicular to the external magnetic field. We have examined the phase behaviour of DMPC/DCPC bicelles and the effects of cholesterol and the unsaturated phospholipid 1,2-dipalmitoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPoPC) as a function of temperature using static solid state (2)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. As expected, cholesterol has an ordering effect on the long phospholipid chains and this is reflected in the phase behaviour of the bicelle mixtures. Liquid disordered-liquid ordered, fluid-fluid phase coexistence is observed in DMPC/cholesterol/DCPC bicelles with cholesterol mole fractions of 0.13 and higher. DPoPC/DMPC/cholesterol/DCPC bicelles also exhibit two fluid phase coexistence over a broad range of temperatures and compositions. Bicelles can provide a useful medium in which to study membrane bound peptides and proteins. The orientation parallel to the magnetic field is favourable for studying membrane peptides/proteins because information about the orientation of relevant molecular bonds or internuclear vectors can be obtained directly from the resulting (2)H spectra. Lanthanide ions can be used to flip the bicelles to have their bilayer normals parallel to the external magnetic field. Yb(3+) was used to flip the DPoPC/DMPC/cholesterol/DCPC bicelles while Eu(3+) was found to be ineffective at flipping bicelles containing cholesterol in the present work.

  9. Comparing two tetraalkylammonium ionic liquids. II. Phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Lima, Thamires A; Paschoal, Vitor H; Faria, Luiz F O; Ribeiro, Mauro C C; Ferreira, Fabio F; Costa, Fanny N; Giles, Carlos

    2016-06-14

    Phase transitions of the ionic liquids n-butyl-trimethylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [N1114][NTf2], and methyl-tributylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [N1444][NTf2], were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, and Raman spectroscopy. XRD and Raman spectra were obtained as a function of temperature at atmospheric pressure, and also under high pressure at room temperature using a diamond anvil cell (DAC). [N1444][NTf2] experiences glass transition at low temperature, whereas [N1114][NTf2] crystallizes or not depending on the cooling rate. Both the ionic liquids exhibit glass transition under high pressure. XRD and low-frequency Raman spectra provide a consistent physical picture of structural ordering-disordering accompanying the thermal events of crystallization, glass transition, cold crystallization, pre-melting, and melting. Raman spectra in the high-frequency range of some specific cation and anion normal modes reveal conformational changes of the molecular structures along phase transitions.

  10. Analysis of Hydrodynamic (Landau) Instability in Liquid-Propellant Combustion at Normal and Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, Stephen B.

    1997-01-01

    The burning of liquid propellants is a fundamental combustion problem that is applicable to various types of propulsion and energetic systems. The deflagration process is often rather complex, with vaporization and pyrolysis occurring at the liquid/gas interface and distributed combustion occurring either in the gas phase or in a spray. Nonetheless, there are realistic limiting cases in which combustion may be approximated by an overall reaction at the liquid/gas interface. In one such limit, the gas flame occurs under near-breakaway conditions, exerting little thermal or hydrodynamic influence on the burning propellant. In another such limit, distributed combustion occurs in an intrusive regime, the reaction zone lying closer to the liquid/gas interface than the length scale of any disturbance of interest. Finally, the liquid propellant may simply undergo exothermic decomposition at the surface without any significant distributed combustion, such as appears to occur in some types of HydroxylAmmonium Nitrate (HAN)-based liquid propellants at low pressures. Such limiting models have recently been formulated,thereby significantly generalizing earlier classical models that were originally introduced to study the hydrodynamic stability of a reactive liquid/gas interface. In all of these investigations, gravity appears explicitly and plays a significant role, along with surface tension, viscosity, and, in the more recent models, certain reaction-rate parameters associated with the pressure and temperature sensitivities of the reaction itself. In particular, these parameters determine the stability of the deflagration with respect to not only classical hydrodynamic disturbances, but also with respect to reactive/diffusive influences as well. Indeed, the inverse Froude number, representing the ratio of buoyant to inertial forces, appears explicitly in all of these models, and consequently, in the dispersion relation that determines the neutral stability boundaries beyond

  11. Liquid crystal gratings from nematic to blue phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yan-qing; Hu, Wei; Lin, Xiao-wen; Srivastava, Abhishek; Chigrinov, Vladimir G.

    2012-10-01

    Some of our recent progress on liquid crystal (LC) gratings, from nematic to blue phase, is reviewed in this invited talk. The first kind of grating is fabricated by periodically adjusting the LC directors to form alternate micro phase retarders and polarization rotators in a cell placed between crossed polarizers. The second one is demonstrated by means of photoalignment technique with alternate orthogonal homogeneously-aligned domains. To improve the response time of the gratings, several approaches are also proposed by using dual-frequency addressed nematic LC, ferroelectric LC and blue phase LC, which shows great performance including high transmittance, polarization independency and submillisecond response. At last, to obtain other controllable LC microstructures rather than simple 1D/2D gratings, we develop a micro-lithography system with a digital micro-mirror device as dynamic mask forms. It may instantly generate arbitrary micro-images on photoalignment layers and further guides the LC molecule orientations. Besides normal phase gratings, more complex patterns such as quasicrystal structures are demonstrated. Some new applications such as tunable multiport optical switching and vector beam generations are expected.

  12. Methods to control phase inversions and enhance mass transfer in liquid-liquid dispersions

    DOEpatents

    Tsouris, Constantinos; Dong, Junhang

    2002-01-01

    The present invention is directed to the effects of applied electric fields on liquid-liquid dispersions. In general, the present invention is directed to the control of phase inversions in liquid-liquid dispersions. Because of polarization and deformation effects, coalescence of aqueous drops is facilitated by the application of electric fields. As a result, with an increase in the applied voltage, the ambivalence region is narrowed and shifted toward higher volume fractions of the dispersed phase. This permits the invention to be used to ensure that the aqueous phase remains continuous, even at a high volume fraction of the organic phase. Additionally, the volume fraction of the organic phase may be increased without causing phase inversion, and may be used to correct a phase inversion which has already occurred. Finally, the invention may be used to enhance mass transfer rates from one phase to another through the use of phase inversions.

  13. Solid-liquid phase boundaries of lens protein solutions.

    PubMed Central

    Berland, C R; Thurston, G M; Kondo, M; Broide, M L; Pande, J; Ogun, O; Benedek, G B

    1992-01-01

    We report measurement of the solid-liquid phase boundary, or liquidus line, for aqueous solutions of three pure calf gamma-crystallin proteins: gamma II, gamma IIIa, and gamma IIIb. We also studied the liquidus line for solutions of native gamma IV-crystallin calf lens protein, which consists of 85% gamma IVa/15% gamma IVb. In all four proteins the liquidus phase boundaries lie higher in temperature than the previously determined liquid-liquid coexistence curves. Thus, over the range of concentration and temperature for which liquid-liquid phase separation occurs, the coexistence of a protein crystal phase with a protein liquid solution phase is thermodynamically stable relative to the metastable separated liquid phases. The location of the liquidus lines clearly divides these four crystallin proteins into two groups: those in which liquidus lines flatten at temperatures greater than 70 degrees C: gamma IIIa and gamma IV, and those in which liquidus lines flatten at temperatures less than 50 degrees C: gamma II and gamma IIIb. We have analyzed the form of the liquidus lines by using specific choices for the structures of the Gibbs free energy in solution and solid phases. By applying the thermodynamic conditions for equilibrium between the two phases to the resulting chemical potentials, we can estimate the temperature-dependent free energy change upon binding of protein and water into the solid phase. PMID:1741375

  14. Phase-Shifting Liquid Crystal Interferometers for Microgravity Fluid Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, DeVon W.; Marshall, Keneth L.

    2002-01-01

    tends to become more transparent, thus introducing a rather large amount of error into the phase-shifting measurement. While that error can be greatly reduced by normalization, we prefer eliminating the source of the error. To that end, we have pursued development of a 'blend' of custom dyes that will not exhibit these properties. That goal has not yet been fully achieved. Guardalben, et al, presented a similar set of interferograms in a paper partially funded by this grant. Shearing interferometers are a second class of common path interferometers. Typically they consist of a thick glass plate optimized for equal reflection from the front and back surface. While not part of the original thrust of the project, through the course of laboratory work, we demonstrated a prototype of a shearing interferometer capable of phase shifting using a commercial liquid crystal retardation plate. A schematic of this liquid crystal shearing interferometer (LCSI) and a sample set of interferograms are in the reference. This work was also supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460, the University of Rochester, and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority. The support of DOE does not constitute an endorsement by DOE of the views expressed in this article. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  15. Structure of liquid phosphorus: A liquid-liquid phase transition via constant-pressure first-principles molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishita, Tetsuya

    2001-12-01

    Constant-pressure first-principles molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out to study structural phase transitions of liquid black phosphorus. By compressing the tetrahedral molecular liquid (a low-pressure phase), a structural phase transition from the molecular to polymeric liquid (a high-pressure phase) was successfully realized just as observed in the recent experiment by Katayama et al. [Nature 170 (2000) 403]. Structural properties in the polymeric liquid were investigated and it is found that the covalent p-state bonds are dominant within the first nearest neighbors of each atom. However, further compression of the polymeric liquid shows that the covalent bonding is weakened as pressure is increased. As a result, liquid phosphorus becomes similar to the simple liquid in which atoms form a close-packed structure at very high pressure.

  16. Ferrofluid-based liquid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhi-Guo; Zhang, Yufeng; Lee, Hian Kee

    2010-11-19

    A new mode of liquid-phase microextraction based on a ferrofluid has been developed. The ferrofluid was composed of silica-coated magnetic particles and 1-octanol as the extractant solvent. The 1-octanol was firmly confined within the silica-coated particles, preventing it from being lost during extraction. Sixteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were used as model compounds in the development and evaluation of the extraction procedure in combination with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Parameters affecting the extraction efficiency were investigated in detail. The optimal conditions were as follows: 20mL sample volume, 10mg of the silica-coated magnetic particles (28mg of ferrofluid), agitation at 20Hz, 20min extraction time, and 2min by sonication with 100μL acetonitrile as the final extraction solvent. Under optimal extraction conditions, enrichment factors ranging from 102- to 173-fold were obtained for the analytes. The limits of detection and the limits of quantification were in the range of 16.8 and 56.7pgmL(-1) and 0.06 and 0.19ngmL(-1), respectively. The linearities were between 0.5-100 and 1-100ngmL(-1) for different PAHs. As the ferrofluid can respond to and be attracted by a magnet, the extraction can be easily achieved by reciprocating movement of an external magnet that served to agitate the sample. No other devices were needed in this new approach of extraction. This new technique is affordable, efficient and convenient for microextraction, and offers portability for potential onsite extraction. PMID:20961552

  17. Comparing two tetraalkylammonium ionic liquids. I. Liquid phase structure.

    PubMed

    Lima, Thamires A; Paschoal, Vitor H; Faria, Luiz F O; Ribeiro, Mauro C C; Giles, Carlos

    2016-06-14

    X-ray scattering experiments at room temperature were performed for the ionic liquids n-butyl-trimethylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [N1114][NTf2], and methyl-tributylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [N1444][NTf2]. The peak in the diffraction data characteristic of charge ordering in [N1444][NTf2] is shifted to longer distances in comparison to [N1114][NTf2], but the peak characteristic of short-range correlations is shifted in [N1444][NTf2] to shorter distances. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed for these ionic liquids using force fields available from the literature, although with new sets of partial charges for [N1114](+) and [N1444](+) proposed in this work. The shifting of charge and adjacency peaks to opposite directions in these ionic liquids was found in the static structure factor, S(k), calculated by MD simulations. Despite differences in cation sizes, the MD simulations unravel that anions are allowed as close to [N1444](+) as to [N1114](+) because anions are located in between the angle formed by the butyl chains. The more asymmetric molecular structure of the [N1114](+) cation implies differences in partial structure factors calculated for atoms belonging to polar or non-polar parts of [N1114][NTf2], whereas polar and non-polar structure factors are essentially the same in [N1444][NTf2]. Results of this work shed light on controversies in the literature on the liquid structure of tetraalkylammonium based ionic liquids.

  18. Comparing two tetraalkylammonium ionic liquids. I. Liquid phase structure.

    PubMed

    Lima, Thamires A; Paschoal, Vitor H; Faria, Luiz F O; Ribeiro, Mauro C C; Giles, Carlos

    2016-06-14

    X-ray scattering experiments at room temperature were performed for the ionic liquids n-butyl-trimethylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [N1114][NTf2], and methyl-tributylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [N1444][NTf2]. The peak in the diffraction data characteristic of charge ordering in [N1444][NTf2] is shifted to longer distances in comparison to [N1114][NTf2], but the peak characteristic of short-range correlations is shifted in [N1444][NTf2] to shorter distances. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed for these ionic liquids using force fields available from the literature, although with new sets of partial charges for [N1114](+) and [N1444](+) proposed in this work. The shifting of charge and adjacency peaks to opposite directions in these ionic liquids was found in the static structure factor, S(k), calculated by MD simulations. Despite differences in cation sizes, the MD simulations unravel that anions are allowed as close to [N1444](+) as to [N1114](+) because anions are located in between the angle formed by the butyl chains. The more asymmetric molecular structure of the [N1114](+) cation implies differences in partial structure factors calculated for atoms belonging to polar or non-polar parts of [N1114][NTf2], whereas polar and non-polar structure factors are essentially the same in [N1444][NTf2]. Results of this work shed light on controversies in the literature on the liquid structure of tetraalkylammonium based ionic liquids. PMID:27306015

  19. A new liquid-source version of liquid phase electroepitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevorkyan, V. A.

    2003-02-01

    A novel technique is proposed for controlling the current supplied to a growth-solution by using individual solute components in the liquid-source. One and two liquid-source versions of this method were developed. Criteria were also established for selecting the configuration and characteristic dimensions of the growth cell. In this growth cell liquid-source components are transported to the growth-solution by electromigration, and with minimal influence from other transport mechanisms. A theoretical model for two liquid sources, current-controlled growth was developed for A 3B 5 binary and A 3B 51- xC 5x ternary compounds. This model describes the composition profile and growth velocity dependence on the growth parameters. In particular, it was shown that depending on the current passed through each of the liquid-sources, layers with increasing, decreasing or uniform compositions could be grown. Numerical simulation results showed a good agreement with the experimental data on the electroepitaxial growth of InAs and InAs 1- xP x. The values of the calculated and experimental data for μAsρIn and μPρIn were 3.5×10 -7 and 8×10 -7 cm 3/s A, respectively.

  20. Modeling of the primary rearrangement stage of liquid phase sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik Tahir, Abdul; Malik, Amer; Amberg, Gustav

    2016-10-01

    The dimensional variations during the rearrangement stage of liquid phase sintering could have a detrimental effect on the dimensional tolerances of the sintered product. A numerical approach to model the liquid phase penetration into interparticle boundaries and the accompanied dimensional variations during the primary rearrangement stage of liquid phase sintering is presented. The coupled system of the Cahn–Hilliard and the Navier–Stokes equations is used to model the penetration of the liquid phase, whereas the rearrangement of the solid particles due to capillary forces is modeled using the equilibrium equation for a linear elastic material. The simulations are performed using realistic physical properties of the phases involved and the effect of green density, wettability and amount of liquid phase is also incorporated in the model. In the first step, the kinetics of the liquid phase penetration and the rearrangement of solid particles connected by a liquid bridge is modeled. The predicted and the calculated (analytical) results are compared in order to validate the numerical model. The numerical model is then extended to simulate the dimensional changes during primary rearrangement stage and a qualitative match with the published experimental data is achieved.

  1. Liquid-Liquid Phase Transformation in Silicon: Evidence from First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakse, N.; Pasturel, A.

    2007-11-01

    We report results of first principles molecular dynamics simulations that confirm early speculations on the presence of liquid-liquid phase transition in undercooled silicon. However, we find that structural and electronic properties of both low-density liquid (LDL) and high-density liquid (HDL) phases are quite different from those obtained by empirical calculations, the difference being more pronounced for the HDL phase. The discrepancy between quantum and classical simulations is attributed to the inability of empirical potentials to describe changes in chemical bonds induced by density and temperature variations.

  2. Transient-Liquid-Phase and Liquid-Film-Assisted Joining ofCeramics

    SciTech Connect

    Sugar, Joshua D.; McKeown, Joseph T.; Akashi, Takaya; Hong, SungM.; Nakashima, Kunihiko; Glaeser, Andreas M.

    2005-02-09

    Two joining methods, transient-liquid-phase (TLP) joining and liquid-film-assisted joining (LFAJ), have been used to bond alumina ceramics. Both methods rely on multilayer metallic interlayers designed to form thin liquid films at reduced temperatures. The liquid films either disappear by interdiffusion (TLP) or promote ceramic/metal interface formation and concurrent dewetting of the liquid film (LFAJ). Progress on extending the TLP method to lower temperatures by combining low-melting-point (<450 C) liquids and commercial reactive-metal brazes is described. Recent LFAJ work on joining alumina to niobium using copper films is presented.

  3. Cephalic phase metabolic responses in normal weight adults.

    PubMed

    Bruce, D G; Storlien, L H; Furler, S M; Chisholm, D J

    1987-08-01

    The presence and physiologic importance of cephalic phase insulin release in humans remains controversial. The aim of these studies was to determine whether cephalic phase insulin release could be demonstrated in normal weight subjects and whether it would be associated with changes in blood glucose, free fatty acid, and pancreatic polypeptide levels. The studies were followed by a hyperglycemic clamp to determine whether cephalic responses would alter overall glucose disposal or glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. In all, 17 subjects were studied on two occasions with and without (control study) presentation of food stimuli. Tease-feeding alone (n = 6), or the administration of a sweet taste alone (aspartame, n = 5) failed to stimulate cephalic responses. However, the presentation of the combined stimuli (tease meals plus sweet taste, n = 7) resulted in a significant fall (P less than .005) in blood glucose levels and a variable rise in serum insulin (% insulin rise 38 +/- 15%, P less than .05) and C-peptide levels (7 +/- 6%, NS) within five minutes of the food presentation when compared with control studies, with no change seen in free fatty acid or pancreatic polypeptide levels. The blood glucose fall correlated strongly (r = .90, P less than .01) with a score of the subjective response to the food and taste.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. On the mode-coupling treatment of collective density fluctuations for quantum liquids: para-hydrogen and normal liquid helium.

    PubMed

    Kletenik-Edelman, Orly; Reichman, David R; Rabani, Eran

    2011-01-28

    A novel quantum mode coupling theory combined with a kinetic approach is developed for the description of collective density fluctuations in quantum liquids characterized by Boltzmann statistics. Three mode-coupling approximations are presented and applied to study the dynamic response of para-hydrogen near the triple point and normal liquid helium above the λ-transition. The theory is compared with experimental results and to the exact imaginary time data generated by path integral Monte Carlo simulations. While for liquid para-hydrogen the combination of kinetic and quantum mode-coupling theory provides semi-quantitative results for both short and long time dynamics, it fails for normal liquid helium. A discussion of this failure based on the ideal gas limit is presented. PMID:21280769

  5. On the mode-coupling treatment of collective density fluctuations for quantum liquids: para-hydrogen and normal liquid helium.

    PubMed

    Kletenik-Edelman, Orly; Reichman, David R; Rabani, Eran

    2011-01-28

    A novel quantum mode coupling theory combined with a kinetic approach is developed for the description of collective density fluctuations in quantum liquids characterized by Boltzmann statistics. Three mode-coupling approximations are presented and applied to study the dynamic response of para-hydrogen near the triple point and normal liquid helium above the λ-transition. The theory is compared with experimental results and to the exact imaginary time data generated by path integral Monte Carlo simulations. While for liquid para-hydrogen the combination of kinetic and quantum mode-coupling theory provides semi-quantitative results for both short and long time dynamics, it fails for normal liquid helium. A discussion of this failure based on the ideal gas limit is presented.

  6. Chromatographic behavior of small organic compounds in low-temperature high-performance liquid chromatography using liquid carbon dioxide as the mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Motono, Tomohiro; Nagai, Takashi; Kitagawa, Shinya; Ohtani, Hajime

    2015-07-01

    Low-temperature high-performance liquid chromatography, in which a loop injector, column, and detection cell were refrigerated at -35ºC, using liquid carbon dioxide as the mobile phase was developed. Small organic compounds (polyaromatic hydrocarbons, alkylbenzenes, and quinones) were separated by low-temperature high-performance liquid chromatography at temperatures from -35 to -5ºC. The combination of liquid carbon dioxide mobile phase with an octadecyl-silica (C18 ) column provided reversed phase mode separation, and a bare silica-gel column resulted in normal phase mode separation. In both the cases, nonlinear behavior at approximately -15ºC was found in the relationship between the temperature and the retention factors of the analytes (van't Hoff plots). In contrast to general trends in high-performance liquid chromatography, the decrease in temperature enhanced the separation efficiency of both the columns.

  7. Solid–Liquid Phase Change Driven by Internal Heat Generation

    SciTech Connect

    John Crepeau; Ali s. Siahpush

    2012-07-01

    This article presents results of solid-liquid phase change, the Stefan Problem, where melting is driven internal heat generation, in a cylindrical geometry. The comparison between a quasi-static analytical solution for Stefan numbers less than one and numerical solutions shows good agreement. The computational results of phase change with internal heat generation show how convection cells form in the liquid region. A scale analysis of the same problem shows four distinct regions of the melting process.

  8. The liquid-liquid phase transition in silicon revealed by snapshots of valence electrons.

    PubMed

    Beye, Martin; Sorgenfrei, Florian; Schlotter, William F; Wurth, Wilfried; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2010-09-28

    The basis for the anomalies of water is still mysterious. Quite generally tetrahedrally coordinated systems, also silicon, show similar thermodynamic behavior but lack--like water--a thorough explanation. Proposed models--controversially discussed--explain the anomalies as a remainder of a first-order phase transition between high and low density liquid phases, buried deeply in the "no man's land"--a part of the supercooled liquid region where rapid crystallization prohibits any experimental access. Other explanations doubt the existence of the phase transition and its first-order nature. Here, we provide experimental evidence for the first-order-phase transition in silicon. With ultrashort optical pulses of femtosecond duration we instantaneously heat the electronic system of silicon while the atomic structure as defined by the much heavier nuclear system remains initially unchanged. Only on a picosecond time scale the energy is transferred into the atomic lattice providing the energy to drive the phase transitions. With femtosecond X-ray pulses from FLASH, the free-electron laser at Hamburg, we follow the evolution of the valence electronic structure during this process. As the relevant phases are easily distinguishable in their electronic structure, we track how silicon melts into the low-density-liquid phase while a second phase transition into the high-density-liquid phase only occurs after the latent heat for the first-order phase transition has been transferred to the atomic structure. Proving the existence of the liquid-liquid phase transition in silicon, the hypothesized liquid-liquid scenario for water is strongly supported.

  9. Liquid hydrogen suction dip and slosh wave excitation during draining under normal and reduced gravity environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Shyu, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    The paper discusses the dynamical behavior of vapor ingestion, liquid residual at the incipience of suction dip, slosh wave excitation under normal and reduced gravity and different flow rates during liquid hydrogen draining. Liquid residuals at the incipience of suction dip increase as the values of gravity decrease. Also liquid residuals increase with the draining flow rates. Lower ratio of Bond number and Weber number are unable to excite slosh waves. Lower flow rates and higher gravity excites waves with lower frequencies and higher wave amplitude slosh waves.

  10. Spatial Normalization of Reverse Phase Protein Array Data

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Poorvi; Molinelli, Evan J.; Miller, Martin L.; Wang, Weiqing; Korkut, Anil; Liu, Wenbin; Ju, Zhenlin; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon; Sander, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Reverse phase protein arrays (RPPA) are an efficient, high-throughput, cost-effective method for the quantification of specific proteins in complex biological samples. The quality of RPPA data may be affected by various sources of error. One of these, spatial variation, is caused by uneven exposure of different parts of an RPPA slide to the reagents used in protein detection. We present a method for the determination and correction of systematic spatial variation in RPPA slides using positive control spots printed on each slide. The method uses a simple bi-linear interpolation technique to obtain a surface representing the spatial variation occurring across the dimensions of a slide. This surface is used to calculate correction factors that can normalize the relative protein concentrations of the samples on each slide. The adoption of the method results in increased agreement between technical and biological replicates of various tumor and cell-line derived samples. Further, in data from a study of the melanoma cell-line SKMEL-133, several slides that had previously been rejected because they had a coefficient of variation (CV) greater than 15%, are rescued by reduction of CV below this threshold in each case. The method is implemented in the R statistical programing language. It is compatible with MicroVigene and SuperCurve, packages commonly used in RPPA data analysis. The method is made available, along with suggestions for implementation, at http://bitbucket.org/rppa_preprocess/rppa_preprocess/src. PMID:25501559

  11. The liquid to vapor phase transition in excited nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, J.B.; Moretto, L.G.; Phair, L.; Wozniak, G.J.; Beaulieu, L.; Breuer, H.; Korteling, R.G.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Lefort, T.; Pienkowski, L.; Ruangma, A.; Viola, V.E.; Yennello, S.J.

    2001-05-08

    For many years it has been speculated that excited nuclei would undergo a liquid to vapor phase transition. For even longer, it has been known that clusterization in a vapor carries direct information on the liquid-vapor equilibrium according to Fisher's droplet model. Now the thermal component of the 8 GeV/c pion + 197 Au multifragmentation data of the ISiS Collaboration is shown to follow the scaling predicted by Fisher's model, thus providing the strongest evidence yet of the liquid to vapor phase transition.

  12. Phase transitions and separations in a distorted liquid crystalline mixture.

    PubMed

    Kasch, Nicholas; Dierking, Ingo

    2015-08-14

    A theoretical method is proposed for modelling phase transitions and phase ranges in a multi-component liquid crystalline mixture where the liquid crystal structure is distorted and defects are formed. This method employs the Maier-Saupe and Kobayashi-McMillan theories of liquid crystalline ordering and the Flory-Huggins theory of mixtures. It builds on previous work on mixed systems that can form smectic-A and nematic phases by incorporating "distortion factors" into the expression for the local free energy of the mixture, which account for the effects of a deviation of the liquid crystal structure from the uniform nematic and smectic-A states. The method allows a simple description of chiral defect phases such as the blue phase and the twist grain boundary phase. In a previous work, it was shown that a model of the blue phase along these lines could effectively explain the observed effect whereby an added guest compound can stabilize the phase by separating into the high energy defect regions of the structure. It is shown here that with the correct choice of guest material a similar effect could be observed for the twist grain boundary phase.

  13. Phase transitions and separations in a distorted liquid crystalline mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasch, Nicholas; Dierking, Ingo

    2015-08-01

    A theoretical method is proposed for modelling phase transitions and phase ranges in a multi-component liquid crystalline mixture where the liquid crystal structure is distorted and defects are formed. This method employs the Maier-Saupe and Kobayashi-McMillan theories of liquid crystalline ordering and the Flory-Huggins theory of mixtures. It builds on previous work on mixed systems that can form smectic-A and nematic phases by incorporating "distortion factors" into the expression for the local free energy of the mixture, which account for the effects of a deviation of the liquid crystal structure from the uniform nematic and smectic-A states. The method allows a simple description of chiral defect phases such as the blue phase and the twist grain boundary phase. In a previous work, it was shown that a model of the blue phase along these lines could effectively explain the observed effect whereby an added guest compound can stabilize the phase by separating into the high energy defect regions of the structure. It is shown here that with the correct choice of guest material a similar effect could be observed for the twist grain boundary phase.

  14. High-efficiency and fast-response tunable phase grating using a blue phase liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jin; Li, Yan; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2011-04-15

    We demonstrate a tunable phase grating using a polymer-stabilized blue phase liquid crystal. Because of the electric-field-induced rectangularlike phase profile, a high diffraction efficiency of 40% is achieved. Moreover, this device shows submillisecond response time. The proposed tunable phase grating holds great potential for photonics and display applications. PMID:21499371

  15. Relationship between the liquid liquid phase transition and dynamic behaviour in the Jagla model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Limei; Ehrenberg, Isaac; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2006-09-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we study a spherically symmetric 'two-scale' Jagla potential with both repulsive and attractive ramps. This potential displays a liquid-liquid phase transition with a positively sloped coexistence line ending at a critical point well above the equilibrium melting line. We study the dynamic behaviour in the vicinity of this liquid-liquid critical point. Below the critical point, we find that the dynamics in the more ordered high density liquid (HDL) are much slower then the dynamics in the less ordered low density liquid (LDL). Moreover, the behaviour of the diffusion constant and relaxation time in the HDL phase follows approximately an Arrhenius law, while in the LDL phase the slope of the Arrhenius fit increases upon cooling. Above the critical pressure, as we cool the system at constant pressure, the behaviour of the dynamics smoothly changes with temperature. It resembles the behaviour of the LDL at high temperatures and resembles the behaviour of the HDL at low temperatures. This dynamic crossover happens in the vicinity of the Widom line (the extension of the coexistence line into the one-phase region) which also has a positive slope. Our work suggests a possible general relation between a liquid-liquid phase transition and the change in dynamics.

  16. Suppression of phase transitions in a confined rodlike liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Grigoriadis, Christos; Duran, Hatice; Steinhart, Martin; Kappl, Michael; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Floudas, George

    2011-11-22

    The nematic-to-isotropic, crystal-to-nematic, and supercooled liquid-to-glass temperatures are studied in the liquid crystal 4-pentyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (5CB) confined in self-ordered nanoporous alumina. The nematic-to-isotropic and the crystal-to-nematic transition temperatures are reduced linearly with the inverse pore diameter. The finding that the crystalline phase is completely suppressed in pores having diameters of 35 nm and below yields an estimate of the critical nucleus size. The liquid-to-glass temperature is reduced in confinement as anticipated by the model of rotational diffusion within a cavity. These results provide the pertinent phase diagram for a confined liquid crystal and are of technological relevance for the design of liquid crystal-based devices with tunable optical, thermal, and dielectric properties.

  17. Structural crossover in a supercooled metallic liquid and the link to a liquid-to-liquid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, S.; Blodgett, M.; Kelton, K. F.; Ma, J. L.; Fan, J.; Wang, X.-L.

    2016-05-01

    Time-resolved synchrotron measurements were carried out to capture the structure evolution of an electrostatically levitated metallic-glass-forming liquid during free cooling. The experimental data shows a crossover in the liquid structure at ˜1000 K, about 115 K below the melting temperature and 150 K above the crystallization temperature. The structure change is characterized by a dramatic growth in the extended-range order below the crossover temperature. Molecular dynamics simulations have identified that the growth of the extended-range order was due to an increased correlation between solute atoms. These results provide structural evidence for a liquid-to-liquid-phase-transition in the supercooled metallic liquid.

  18. A single-component liquid-phase hydrogen storage material.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wei; Campbell, Patrick G; Zakharov, Lev N; Liu, Shih-Yuan

    2011-12-01

    The current state-of-the-art for hydrogen storage is compressed H(2) at 700 bar. The development of a liquid-phase hydrogen storage material has the potential to take advantage of the existing liquid-based distribution infrastructure. We describe a liquid-phase hydrogen storage material that is a liquid under ambient conditions (i.e., at 20 °C and 1 atm pressure), air- and moisture-stable, and recyclable; releases H(2) controllably and cleanly at temperatures below or at the proton exchange membrane fuel cell waste-heat temperature of 80 °C; utilizes catalysts that are cheap and abundant for H(2) desorption; features reasonable gravimetric and volumetric storage capacity; and does not undergo a phase change upon H(2) desorption.

  19. Liquid jet pumps for two-phase flows

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, R.G.

    1995-06-01

    Isothermal compression of a bubbly secondary fluid in a mixing-throat and diffuser is described by a one-dimensional flow model of a liquid-jet pump. Friction-loss coefficients used in the four equations may be determined experimentally, or taken from the literature. The model reduces to the liquid-jet gas compressor case if the secondary liquid is zero. Conversely, a zero secondary-gas flow reduces the liquid-jet gas and liquid (LJGL) model to that of the familiar liquid-jet liquid pump. A ``jet loss`` occurs in liquid-jet pumps if the nozzle tip is withdrawn from the entrance plane of the throat, and jet loss is included in the efficiency equations. Comparisons are made with published test data for liquid-jet liquid pumps and for liquid-jet gas compressors. The LJGL model is used to explore jet pump responses to two-phase secondary flows, nozzle-to-throat area ratio, and primary-jet velocity. The results are shown in terms of performance curves versus flow ratios. Predicted peak efficiencies are approximately 50 percent. Under sever operating conditions, LJGL pump performance curves exhibit maximum-flow ratios or cut-offs. Cut-offs occurs when two-phase secondary-flow steams attain sonic values at the entry of the mixing throat. A dimensionless number correlates flow-ratio cut-offs with pump geometry and operating conditions. Throat-entry choking of the secondary flow can be predicted, hence avoided, in designing jet pumps to hand two-phase fluids.

  20. Nuclear Liquid-Gas Phase Transition: Experimental Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostino, M.; Bruno, M.; Gulminelli, F.; Cannata, F.; Chomaz, Ph.; Casini, G.; Geraci, E.; Gramegna, F.; Moroni, A.; Vannini, G.

    2005-03-01

    The connection between the thermodynamics of charged finite nuclear systems and the asymptotically measured partitions in heavy ion collisions is discussed. Different independent signals compatible with a liquid-to-gas-like phase transition are reported. In particular abnormally large fluctuations in the measured observables are presented as a strong evidence of a first order phase transition with negative heat capacity.

  1. Stimuli-Responsive Cubosomes Formed from Blue Phase Liquid Crystals.

    PubMed

    Bukusoglu, Emre; Wang, Xiaoguang; Martinez-Gonzalez, Jose A; de Pablo, Juan J; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2015-11-18

    Cubosomes formed from blue phase liquid crystals (BPs) dispersed in aqueous media exhibit optical responses to biological amphiphiles. In this study, the formation of aqueous dispersions of BPs is reported, and the effects of confinement and lipids on the phase behavior, optical appearance, and morphology of BP droplets are characterized.

  2. Entropy Calculations for a Supercooled Liquid Crystalline Blue Phase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, U.

    2007-01-01

    We observed, using polarized light microscopy, the supercooling of the blue phase (BPI) of cholesteryl proprionate and measured the corresponding liquid crystalline phase transition temperatures. From these temperatures and additional published data we have provided, for the benefit of undergraduate physics students, a nontraditional example…

  3. Theory of bent-core liquid-crystal phases and phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubensky, T. C.; Radzihovsky, Leo

    2002-09-01

    We study phases and phase transitions that can take place in the recently discovered bow-shaped or bent-core liquid-crystal molecules. We show that to completely characterize phases exhibited by such bent-core molecules a third-rank tensor Tijk order parameter is necessary in addition to the vector and the nematic (second-rank) tensor order parameters. We present an exhaustive list of possible liquid phases, characterizing them by their space-symmetry group and order parameters, and catalog the universality classes of the corresponding phase transitions that we expect to take place in such bent-core molecular liquid crystals. In addition to the conventional liquid-crystal phases such as the nematic phase, we predict the existence of other liquid phases, including the spontaneously chiral nematic (NT+2)* and chiral polar (VT+2)* phases, the orientationally ordered but optically isotropic tetrahedratic T phase, and a nematic NT phase with D2d symmetry that is neither uniaxial nor biaxial. Interestingly, the isotropic-tetrahedratic transition is continuous in mean-field theory, but is likely driven first order by thermal fluctuations. We conclude with a discussion of smectic analogs of these phases and their experimental signatures.

  4. Theory of bent-core liquid-crystal phases and phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Lubensky, T C; Radzihovsky, Leo

    2002-09-01

    We study phases and phase transitions that can take place in the recently discovered bow-shaped or bent-core liquid-crystal molecules. We show that to completely characterize phases exhibited by such bent-core molecules a third-rank tensor T(ijk) order parameter is necessary in addition to the vector and the nematic (second-rank) tensor order parameters. We present an exhaustive list of possible liquid phases, characterizing them by their space-symmetry group and order parameters, and catalog the universality classes of the corresponding phase transitions that we expect to take place in such bent-core molecular liquid crystals. In addition to the conventional liquid-crystal phases such as the nematic phase, we predict the existence of other liquid phases, including the spontaneously chiral nematic (N(T)+2)(*) and chiral polar (V(T)+2)(*) phases, the orientationally ordered but optically isotropic tetrahedratic T phase, and a nematic N(T) phase with D(2d) symmetry that is neither uniaxial nor biaxial. Interestingly, the isotropic-tetrahedratic transition is continuous in mean-field theory, but is likely driven first order by thermal fluctuations. We conclude with a discussion of smectic analogs of these phases and their experimental signatures. PMID:12366133

  5. Phase behavior and dynamics of a cholesteric liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, D.; Fragiadakis, D.; Roland, C. M.; Dabrowski, R.; Dziaduszek, J.; Urban, S.

    2014-02-21

    The synthesis, equation of state, phase diagram, and dielectric relaxation properties are reported for a new liquid crystal, 4{sup ′}-butyl-4-(2-methylbutoxy)azoxybenzene (4ABO5*), which exhibits a cholesteric phase at ambient temperature. The steepness of the intermolecular potential was characterized from the thermodynamic potential parameter, Γ = 4.3 ± 0.1 and the dynamic scaling exponent, γ = 3.5 ± 0.2. The difference between them is similar to that seen previously for nematic and smectic liquid crystals, with the near equivalence of Γ and γ consistent with the near constancy of the relaxation time of 4ABO5* at the cholesteric to isotropic phase transition (i.e., the clearing line). Thus, chirality does not cause deviations from the general relationship between thermodynamics and dynamics in the ordered phase of liquid crystals. The ionic conductivity of 4ABO5* shows strong coupling to the reorientational dynamics.

  6. Interaction between phases in the liquid-gas system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, R. S.; Smirnov, B. M.

    2016-07-01

    This work analyzes the equilibrium between a liquid and a gas over this liquid separated by an interface. Various gas forms exist inside the liquid: dissolved gas molecules attached to solvent molecules, free gas molecules, and gaseous bubbles. Thermodynamic equilibrium is maintained between two phases; the first phase is the liquid containing dissolved and free molecules, and the second phase is the gas over the liquid and bubbles inside it. Kinetics of gas transition between the internal and external gas proceeds through bubbles and includes the processes of bubbles floating up and bubble growth as a result of association due to the Smoluchowski mechanism. Evolution of a gas in the liquid is considered using the example of oxygen in water, and numerical parameters of this system are given. In the regime under consideration for an oxygen-water system, transport of oxygen into the surrounding air proceeds through micron-size bubbles with lifetimes of hours. This regime is realized if the total number of oxygen molecules in water is small compared with the numbers of solvated and free molecules in the liquid.

  7. Micellar hexagonal phases in lyotropic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, L. Q.; Gulik, A.; Itri, R.; Mariani, P.

    1992-09-01

    The hexagonal cell parameter a of the system sodium dodecyl lauryl sulfate and water as a function of volume concentration cv in phase Hα shows the functional behavior expected for micelles of finite length: a~c-1/3v. The interpretation of x-ray data based on finite micelles leads to an alternative description of the hexagonal phase Hα: spherocylindrical micelles of constant radius with length that may grow along the range of the Hα phase. Results are compared with recent statistical-mechanical calculations for the isotropic I-Hα transition. The absence of diffraction in the direction perpendicular to the hexagonal plane is ascribed to polydispersity of micellar length, which also is a necessary condition for the occurrence of direct I-Hα transitions.

  8. Microgravity Studies of Liquid-Liquid Phase Transitions in Alumina-Yttria Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynes, Buddy (Technical Monitor); Weber, Richard; Nordine, Paul

    2004-01-01

    The scientific objective of this research is to increase the fundamental knowledge base for liquid- phase processing of technologically important oxide materials. The experimental objective is to define conditions and hardware requirements for microgravity flight experiments to test and expand the experimental hypotheses that: 1. Liquid phase transitions can occur in undercooled melts by a diffusionless process. 2. Onset of the liquid phase transition is accompanied by a large change in the temperature dependence of melt viscosity. Experiments on undercooled YAG (Y3A15012)- and rare earth oxide aluminate composition liquids demonstrated a large departure from an Arrhenian temperature dependence of viscosity. Liquid YAG is nearly inviscid at its 2240 K melting point. Glass fibers were pulled from melts undercooled by ca. 600 K indicating that the viscosity is on the order of 100 Pans (1000 Poise) at 1600 K. This value of viscosity is 500 times greater than that obtained by extrapolation of data for temperatures above the melting point of YAG. These results show that the liquids are extremely fragile and that the onset of the highly non-Arrhenian viscosity-temperature relationship occurs at a temperature considerably below the equilibrium melting point of the solid phases. Further results on undercooled alumina-yttria melts containing 23-42 mole % yttrium oxide indicate that a congruent liquid-liquid phase transition occurs in the undercooled liquids. The rates of transition are inconsistent with a diffusion-limited process. This research is directed to investigation of the scientifically interesting phenomena of polyamorphism and fragility in undercooled rare earth oxide aluminum oxide liquids. The results bear on the technologically important problem of producing high value rare earth-based optical materials.

  9. Fifth-order raman spectrum of an atomic liquid: simulation and instantaneous-normal-mode calculation

    PubMed

    Ma; Stratt

    2000-07-31

    Experimental artifacts and technical difficulties in carrying out theoretical calculations have consistently frustrated attempts to obtain the two-dimensional (5th-order) Raman spectrum of a liquid. We report here a new theoretical development: the first microscopic numerical simulation of the 5th-order Raman signal in a liquid. Comparison with an instantaneous-normal-mode treatment, a fully microscopic model which interprets liquid dynamics as arising from coherent harmonic modes, shows that the 5th-order spectrum reveals profound effects stemming from dynamical anharmonicity.

  10. Containerless Liquid-Phase Processing of Ceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, J. K. Richard (Principal Investigator); Nordine, Paul C.

    1996-01-01

    The present project builds on the results of research supported under a previous NASA grant to investigate containerless liquid-phase processing of molten ceramic materials. The research used an aero-acoustic levitator in combination with cw CO2 laser beam heating to achieve containerless melting, superheating, undercooling, and solidification of poorly-conducting solids and liquids. Experiments were performed on aluminum oxide, binary aluminum oxide-silicon dioxide materials, and oxide superconductors.

  11. Nature of the first-order liquid-liquid phase transition in supercooled silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, G.; Yu, Y. J.; Tan, X. M.

    2015-08-01

    The first-order liquid-liquid phase transition in supercooled Si is revisited by long-time first-principle molecular dynamics simulations. As the focus of the present paper, its nature is revealed by analyzing the inherent structures of low-density liquid (LDL) and high-density liquid (HDL). Our results show that it is a transition between a sp3-hybridization LDL and a white-tin-like HDL. This uncovers the origin of the semimetal-metal transition accompanying it and also proves that HDL is the metastable extension of high temperature equilibrium liquid into the supercooled regime. The pressure-temperature diagram of supercooled Si thus can be regarded in some respects as shifted reflection of its crystalline phase diagram.

  12. Two phase flow of liquids in a narrow gap: Phase interference and hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Salim; Hejazi, S. Hossein; Gates, Ian D.

    2016-07-01

    Co-current flow of two immiscible liquids, such as oil and water in a planar fracture, exhibits nonlinear structures which become important in many natural and engineering systems such as subsurface flows, multiphase flows in lubrication joints, and coating flows. In this context, co-current flow of oil and water with variable rates is experimentally studied in a Hele-Shaw cell, various flow regimes are classified, and relative permeabilities for the phases are analysed thoroughly. Similar to multiphase pipe flows, multiphase flow in planar gaps shows various flow regimes, each having different flow rate/pressure gradient behaviour. As well as recovering the known results in the immiscible displacements in Hele-Shaw cell where the fluid-fluid interface remains stable/unstable for favorable/adverse viscosity ratios, it is found that the co-current flow of two fluids with different viscosities results in three distinct flow regimes. Before breakthrough of non-wetting phase, i.e, water, a "linear displacement" flow regime initially establishes at very low water injection rates. This stable movement turns into a "fingering advancement" flow regime at high water flow rates and Saffman-Taylor instability develops normal to the direction of the flow. After the breakthrough, a "droplet formation" flow regime is identified where the droplets of wetting phase, oil, are trapped in the water phase. For subsurface flow applications, we quantify these regimes through relative permeability curves. It is reported that as the water flow rate increases, the relative permeabilities and flow channels become smooth and regular. This behaviour of relative permeability and saturations shows dominance of capillary forces at low flow rates and viscous forces at higher flow rates. Variable injection rates provide the interface structures for both drainage and imbibition process, where the wetting phase saturation decreases and increases respectively. It is shown that relative permeability

  13. The Molecular Structure of the Liquid Ordered Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyman, Edward

    2014-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations reveal substructures within the liquid-ordered phase of lipid bilayers. These substructures, identified in a 10 μsec all-atom trajectory of liquid-ordered/liquid-disordered coexistence (Lo/Ld) , are composed of saturated hydrocarbon chains packed with local hexagonal order, and separated by interstitial regions enriched in cholesterol and unsaturated chains. Lipid hydrocarbon chain order parameters calculated from the Lo phase are in excellent agreement with 2H NMR measurements; the local hexagonal packing is also consistent with 1H-MAS NMR spectra of the Lo phase, NMR diffusion experiments, and small angle X-ray- and neutron scattering. The balance of cholesterol-rich to local hexagonal order is proposed to control the partitioning of membrane components into the Lo regions. The latter have been frequently associated with formation of so-called rafts, platforms in the plasma membranes of cells that facilitate interaction between components of signaling pathways.

  14. Manipulating Liquids With Acoustic Radiation Pressure Phased Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.

    1999-01-01

    High-intensity ultrasound waves can produce the effects of "Acoustic Radiation Pressure" (ARP) and "acoustic streaming." These effects can be used to propel liquid flows and to apply forces that can be used to move or manipulate floating objects or liquid surfaces. NASA's interest in ARP includes the remote-control agitation of liquids and the manipulation of bubbles and drops in liquid experiments and propellant systems. A high level of flexibility is attained by using a high-power acoustic phased array to generate, steer, and focus a beam of acoustic waves. This is called an Acoustic Radiation Pressure Phased Array, or ARPPA. In this approach, many acoustic transducer elements emit wavelets that converge into a single beam of sound waves. Electronically coordinating the timing, or "phase shift," of the acoustic waves makes it possible to form a beam with a predefined direction and focus. Therefore, a user can direct the ARP force at almost any desired point within a liquid volume. ARPPA lets experimenters manipulate objects anywhere in a test volume. This flexibility allow it to be used for multiple purposes, such as to agitate liquids, deploy and manipulate drops or bubbles, and even suppress sloshing in spacecraft propellant tanks.

  15. Electro-optic phase modulation by polymer dispersed liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicari, L.

    1997-05-01

    We present a mathematical model to describe the optical phase shift induced by polymer dispersed liquid crystals (PDLCs) on light impinging transversely on the sample. PDLCs are dispersions of liquid crystal microdroplets in a polymeric binder. Droplets appear as optically uniaxial spheres randomly oriented so that the material is optically isotropic. The application of an external electric field results in a reorientation of the liquid crystal and therefore in an electrically controllable optical uniaxicity of the material. The model is discussed by comparison with experimental data and with previous theory [F. Basile, F. Bloisi, L. Vicari, and F. Simoni, Phys. Rev. E 48, 432 (1993)].

  16. Liquid jet impingement normal to a disk in zero gravity. Ph.D. Thesis - Toledo Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labus, T. L.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental and analytical investigation was conducted to determine the free surface shapes of circular liquid jets impinging normal to sharp-edged disks under both normal and zero gravity conditions. An order of magnitude analysis was conducted indicating regions where viscous forces were not significant when computing free surface shapes. The demarcation between the viscous and inviscid region was found to depend upon the flow Reynolds number and the ratio between the jet and disk radius.

  17. Liquid-Crystal Phase Transition Probed by Fluorescent Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Toshiaki; Hanai, Nobuhiko; Inouye, Hideyuki; Nakatsuka, Hiroki

    2001-08-01

    Phase transition of four liquid crystal materials have been studied by measuring the decay times of time-resolved intensity of fluorescence from two kind of dyes, malachite green and cryptocyanine, doped in these materials. It was found that the observed fluorescence lifetimes observed depend strongly on the doped molecules and that they change depending on the phase transition of the liquid-crystal materials. These results show that the fluorescence lifetime measurements are effective molecular probes for estimating the microscopic dynamics in these materials.

  18. Contactless electromagnetic phase-shift flowmeter for liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priede, Jānis; Buchenau, Dominique; Gerbeth, Gunter

    2011-05-01

    We present a concept and test results of an eddy-current flowmeter for liquid metals. The flow rate is determined by applying a weak ac magnetic field to a liquid metal flow and measuring the flow-induced phase disturbance in the external electromagnetic field. The phase disturbance is found to be more robust than that of the amplitude used in conventional eddy-current flowmeters. The basic characteristics of this type of flowmeter are analysed using simple theoretical models, where the flow is approximated by a solid body motion. Design of such a flowmeter is presented and its test results are reported.

  19. Liquid-Liquid Phase Separation in Supersaturated Lysozyme Solutions and Associated Precipitate Formation/Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muschol, Martin; Rosenberger, Franz

    1997-01-01

    Using cloud point determinations, the phase boundaries (binodals) for metastable liquid-liquid (L-L) separation in supersaturated hen egg white lysozyme solutions with 3%, 5%, and 7% (wlv) NaCl at pH= 4.5 and protein concentrations c between 40 and 400 mg/ml were determined. The critical temperature for the binodal increased approximately linearly with salt concentration. The coexisting liquid phases both remained supersaturated but differed widely in protein concentration. No salt repartitioning was observed between the initial and the two separated liquid phases. After the L-L separation, due to the presence of the high protein concentration phase, crystallization occurred much more rapidly than in the initial solution. At high initial protein concentrations, a metastable gel phase formed at temperatures above the liquid binodal. Both crystal nucleation and gel formation were accelerated in samples that had been cycled through the binodal. Solutions in the gel and L-L regions yielded various types of precipitates. Based on theoretical considerations, previous observations with other proteins, and our experimental results with lysozyme, a generic phase diagram for globular proteins is put forth. A limited region in the (T,c) plane favorable for the growth of protein single crystals is delineated.

  20. Normalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuevas, Eduardo J.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses cornerstone of Montessori theory, normalization, which asserts that if a child is placed in an optimum prepared environment where inner impulses match external opportunities, the undeviated self emerges, a being totally in harmony with its surroundings. Makes distinctions regarding normalization, normalized, and normality, indicating how…

  1. Phase behavior of cyclic siloxane-based liquid crystalline compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Gresham, K.D.; McHugh, C.M.; Bunning, T.J.; Crane, R.L.; Klei, H.E.; Samulski, E.T.

    1993-12-31

    The phase behavior of 24 cyclic siloxane liquid crystalline compounds are compared with respect to spacer length, composition, ring size, and mesogenic phase behavior. Penta- and tetramethylhydrocyclosiloxane rings were modified by biphenyl- and/or cholesterol-based molecules. A strong dependence of ring size on thermal behavior was observed for the homopolymers. 4-membered rings seem to inhibit the formation of liquid crystalline phases for biphenyl-based mesogens. Clearing temperatures for this series followed the melting temperatures of the unattached mesogens. Cholesterol-based compounds exhibited glass transition temperatures which increased substantially with spacer group length. A tendency to layer pack for the cholesterol compound was observed as smectic-A phases were formed.

  2. Intrinsic response of polymer liquid crystals in photochemical phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Tomiki; Sasaki, Takeo; Kim, Haengboo )

    1991-01-24

    Time-resolved measurements were performed on the photochemically induced isothermal phase transition of polymer liquid crystals (PLC) with mesogenic side chains of phenyl benzoate (PAPB3) and cyanobiphenyl (PACB3) under conditions wherein the photochemical reaction of the doped photoresponsive molecule (4-butyl-4-{prime}-methoxyazobenzene, BMAB) was completed within {approximately} 10 ns, and the subsequent phase transition of the matrix PLC from nematic (N) to isotropic (I) state was followed by time-resolved measurements of the birefringence of the system. Formation of a sufficient amount of the cis isomer of BMAB with a single pulse of a laser lowered the N-I phase transition temperature of the mixture, inducing the N-I phase transition of PLCs isothermally in a time range of {approximately} 200 ms. This time range is comparable to that of low molecular weight liquid crystals, indicating that suppression in mobility of mesogens in PLCs does not affect significantly the thermodynamically controlled process.

  3. Determination of sulfonamides in butter samples by ionic liquid magnetic bar liquid-phase microextraction high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lijie; Song, Ying; Hu, Mingzhu; Xu, Xu; Zhang, Hanqi; Yu, Aimin; Ma, Qiang; Wang, Ziming

    2015-01-01

    A novel, simple, and environmentally friendly pretreatment method, ionic liquid magnetic bar liquid-phase microextraction, was developed for the determination of sulfonamides in butter samples by high-performance liquid chromatography. The ionic liquid magnetic bar was prepared by inserting a stainless steel wire into the hollow of a hollow fiber and immobilizing ionic liquid in the micropores of the hollow fiber. In the extraction process, the ionic liquid magnetic bars were used to stir the mixture of sample and extraction solvent and enrich the sulfonamides in the mixture. After extraction, the analyte-adsorbed ionic liquid magnetic bars were readily isolated with a magnet from the extraction system. It is notable that the present method was environmentally friendly since water and only several microliters of ionic liquid were used in the whole extraction process. Several parameters affecting the extraction efficiency were investigated and optimized, including the type of ionic liquid, sample-to-extraction solvent ratio, the number of ionic liquid magnetic bars, extraction temperature, extraction time, salt concentration, stirring speed, pH of the extraction solvent, and desorption conditions. The recoveries were in the range of 73.25-103.85 % and the relative standard deviations were lower than 6.84 %. The experiment results indicated that the present method was effective for the extraction of sulfonamides in high-fat content samples.

  4. Confinement effects on the liquid-liquid phase transition and anomalous properties of a monatomic water-like liquid.

    PubMed

    Sun, Gang; Giovambattista, Nicolas; Xu, Limei

    2015-12-28

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to study the effects of confinement on the phase behavior of a water-like monatomic liquid that exhibits a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) and a liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP). The liquid is confined between parallel walls and we focus on the effects of wall separation and surface chemistry (solvophobicity/solvophilicity) on the location of the LLCP, temperature of maximum density (TMD) line, and loci of compressibility maxima (CM). It is found that, independently of the surface solvophobicity/solvophilicity, the LLCP, TMD, and CM lines shift rapidly towards higher pressures and lower temperatures as the wall separation is reduced. It follows that the effects of confinement on the TMD and CM lines are indicative of the confinement effects on the LLCP/LLPT. Confinement effects are observable already when the liquid particles form ≈15 layers between the walls. For the case of water, this corresponds to a separation of ≈4-5 nm between the surfaces, larger than the confining dimension of the nanopores commonly used to study the hypothesized LLPT in confined water. Hence, our results suggest that such experiments should not be interpreted in terms of the phase diagrams proposed for bulk water.

  5. In-situ isothermal phase transitions in photochromic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Samantha J.; Gleeson, Helen F.; D'Emanuele, Antony; Serak, Svetlana V.; Grozhik, Vladimir A.

    1998-06-01

    This study examines the optical response and physical properties of the homologous series 4-n-butyl-4'-n-alkoxyazobenzene. The members of this series all exhibit liquid crystalline phase behavior, and have also been used as dopants in 4-cyano-4'- n'pentylbiphenyl (5CB), a room temperature nematic liquid crystal. The guest-host system and the azobenzene series have been characterized using optical microscopy and UV-vis spectrophotometry. Illumination of these systems with light of a suitable wavelength induces a trans-cis isomerization of the azo- dye molecules which results in a reorientation of the liquid crystal director, often to such an extent that the liquid crystal phase is disrupted, causing an in situ isothermal phase transition. The response of the liquid crystal system to a linearly polarized beam of exciting radiation is examined with the use of a probe He:Ne laser. Changes in light transmission are then detected with a photodiode. Responses are discussed in terms of homologue, cell thickness and temperature.

  6. Speckle decorrelation study of phase heterogeneous liquid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pobiedina, Valentyna; Yakunov, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    In the paper de-correlation method was applied to study the dynamics of the laser-speckle pattern caused with the ground glass and layer of transparent liquid. According to the percolation model H-bonded liquids are characterized with nano-sized structural heterogeneities that cause the phase ones for the light wave. The temporary changing phase heterogeneities modulate the speckle field produced with the ground glass. The modifying of the speckle pattern causes the slow decaying of the central peak amplitude of the cross-correlation between the first images and each subsequent one. Proposed method likely could be a foundation of new methods for contactless exploring structural dynamics of liquid systems.

  7. Stretchable liquid-crystal blue-phase gels.

    PubMed

    Castles, F; Morris, S M; Hung, J M C; Qasim, M M; Wright, A D; Nosheen, S; Choi, S S; Outram, B I; Elston, S J; Burgess, C; Hill, L; Wilkinson, T D; Coles, H J

    2014-08-01

    Liquid-crystalline polymers are materials of considerable scientific interest and technological value. An important subset of these materials exhibit rubber-like elasticity, combining the optical properties of liquid crystals with the mechanical properties of rubber. Moreover, they exhibit behaviour not seen in either type of material independently, and many of their properties depend crucially on the particular mesophase employed. Such stretchable liquid-crystalline polymers have previously been demonstrated in the nematic, chiral-nematic, and smectic mesophases. Here, we report the fabrication of a stretchable gel of blue phase I, which forms a self-assembled, three-dimensional photonic crystal that remains electro-optically switchable under a moderate applied voltage, and whose optical properties can be manipulated by an applied strain. We also find that, unlike its undistorted counterpart, a mechanically deformed blue phase exhibits a Pockels electro-optic effect, which sets out new theoretical challenges and possibilities for low-voltage electro-optic devices.

  8. Depositing spacing layers on magnetic film with liquid phase epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moody, J. W.; Shaw, R. W.; Sanfort, R. M.

    1975-01-01

    Liquid phase epitaxy spacing layer is compatible with systems which are hard-bubble proofed by use of second magnetic garnet film as capping layer. Composite is superior in that: circuit fabrication time is reduced; adherence is superior; visibility is better; and, good match of thermal expansion coefficients is provided.

  9. In situ monitoring of liquid phase electroepitaxial growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okamoto, A.; Isozumi, S.; Lagowski, J.; Gatos, H. C.

    1982-01-01

    In situ monitoring of the layer thickness during liquid phase electroepitaxy (LPEE) was achieved with a submicron resolution through precise resistance measurements. The new approach to the study and control of LPEE was applied to growth of undoped and Ge-doped GaAs layers. The in situ determined growth kinetics was found to be in excellent agreement with theory.

  10. [Gastric emptying of a solid-liquid meal in normal subjects: validity of the labeling (99mTc) of chicken liver by a multipuncture technic].

    PubMed

    Hostein, J; Capony, P; Busquet, G; Bost, R; Fournet, J

    1985-04-01

    For gastric emptying studies of a solid-liquid meal by the scintigraphic method, a valid isotope labeling method for each phase of the meal must be obtained. The aim of this study was to validate a simple chicken liver labeling method in normal subjects by multipuncture technic with 99mtechnetium. Labeling according to Meyer's method was chosen as a reference. Simultaneously, a study of the quality of liquid phase labeling by 111indium was done. The labeling process quality for each phase of the meal was assessed: a) in vitro, after incubation of the meal with human gastric juice (n = 12); b) in vivo, after meal ingestion and sequential collection of gastric contents by aspiration (n = 4). Furthermore, in 8 healthy volunteers, gastric emptying curves of the solid and liquid phases of the meal were determined scintigraphically and compared. Our results showed: a) for the solid phase: a good specificity of the marker, which was assessed in vitro and in vivo, after liver labeling with multipuncture technique (89 p. 100 and 92 p. 100 after 180 min, respectively); b) for the liquid phase: a good specificity of the marker in vitro and a poor specificity in vivo (82 p. 100 and 27 p. 100 after 180 min, respectively); c) similar half-gastric emptying times and cumulative percentages for the solid and liquid phases with both liver labeling methods. In conclusion, the multipuncture technique for chicken liver labeling may be used for gastric emptying studies in humans.

  11. On the phase-field modelling of a miscible liquid/liquid boundary.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ruilin; Vorobev, Anatoliy

    2016-02-15

    Mixing of miscible liquids is essential for numerous processes in industry and nature. Mixing, i.e. interpenetration of molecules through the liquid/liquid boundary, occurs via interfacial diffusion. Mixing can also involve externally or internally driven hydrodynamic flows, and can lead to deformation or disintegration of the liquid/liquid boundary. At the moment, the mixing dynamics remains poorly understood. The classical Fick's law, generally accepted for description of the diffusion process, does not explain the experimental observations, in particular, the recent experiments with dissolution of a liquid solute by a liquid solvent within a horizontal capillary (Stevar and Vorobev, 2012). We present the results of the numerical study aimed at development of an advanced model for the dissolution dynamics of liquid/liquid binary mixtures. The model is based on the phase-field (Cahn-Hilliard) approach that is used as a physics-based model for the thermo- and hydrodynamic evolution of binary mixtures. Within this approach, the diffusion flux is defined through the gradient of chemical potential, and, in particular, includes the effect of barodiffusion. The dynamic interfacial stresses at the miscible interface are also taken into account. The simulations showed that such an approach can accurately reproduce the shape of the solute/solvent boundary, and some aspects of the diffusion dynamics. Nevertheless, all experimentally-observed features of the diffusion motion of the solute/solvent boundary, were not reproduced. PMID:26609922

  12. On the phase-field modelling of a miscible liquid/liquid boundary.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ruilin; Vorobev, Anatoliy

    2016-02-15

    Mixing of miscible liquids is essential for numerous processes in industry and nature. Mixing, i.e. interpenetration of molecules through the liquid/liquid boundary, occurs via interfacial diffusion. Mixing can also involve externally or internally driven hydrodynamic flows, and can lead to deformation or disintegration of the liquid/liquid boundary. At the moment, the mixing dynamics remains poorly understood. The classical Fick's law, generally accepted for description of the diffusion process, does not explain the experimental observations, in particular, the recent experiments with dissolution of a liquid solute by a liquid solvent within a horizontal capillary (Stevar and Vorobev, 2012). We present the results of the numerical study aimed at development of an advanced model for the dissolution dynamics of liquid/liquid binary mixtures. The model is based on the phase-field (Cahn-Hilliard) approach that is used as a physics-based model for the thermo- and hydrodynamic evolution of binary mixtures. Within this approach, the diffusion flux is defined through the gradient of chemical potential, and, in particular, includes the effect of barodiffusion. The dynamic interfacial stresses at the miscible interface are also taken into account. The simulations showed that such an approach can accurately reproduce the shape of the solute/solvent boundary, and some aspects of the diffusion dynamics. Nevertheless, all experimentally-observed features of the diffusion motion of the solute/solvent boundary, were not reproduced.

  13. Phase transitions for a collective coordinate coupled to Luttinger liquids.

    PubMed

    Horovitz, Baruch; Giamarchi, Thierry; Le Doussal, Pierre

    2013-09-13

    We study various realizations of collective coordinates, e.g., the position of a particle, the charge of a Coulomb box, or the phase of a Bose or a superconducting condensate, coupled to Luttinger liquids with N flavors. We find that for a Luttinger parameter (1/2)phase transition from a delocalized phase into a phase with a periodic potential at strong coupling. In the delocalized phase the dynamics is dominated by an effective mass, i.e., diffusive in imaginary time, while on the transition line it becomes dissipative. At K=(1/2) there is an additional transition into a localized phase with no diffusion at zero temperature. PMID:24074101

  14. Induced smectic phases in phase diagrams of binary nematic liquid crystal mixtures.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tsang-Min; McCreary, Kathleen; Garg, Shila; Kyu, Thein

    2011-03-28

    To elucidate induced smectic A and smectic B phases in binary nematic liquid crystal mixtures, a generalized thermodynamic model has been developed in the framework of a combined Flory-Huggins free energy for isotropic mixing, Maier-Saupe free energy for orientational ordering, McMillan free energy for smectic ordering, Chandrasekhar-Clark free energy for hexagonal ordering, and phase field free energy for crystal solidification. Although nematic constituents have no smectic phase, the complexation between these constituent liquid crystal molecules in their mixture resulted in a more stable ordered phase such as smectic A or B phases. Various phase transitions of crystal-smectic, smectic-nematic, and nematic-isotropic phases have been determined by minimizing the above combined free energies with respect to each order parameter of these mesophases. By changing the strengths of anisotropic interaction and hexagonal interaction parameters, the present model captures the induced smectic A or smectic B phases of the binary nematic mixtures. Of particular importance is the fact that the calculated phase diagrams show remarkable agreement with the experimental phase diagrams of binary nematic liquid crystal mixtures involving induced smectic A or induced smectic B phase.

  15. Liquid-phase reactions induced by atmospheric pressure glow discharge with liquid electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tochikubo, Fumiyoshi; Shirai, Naoki; Uchida, Satoshi

    2014-12-01

    We experimentally investigated some of the initial reactions in a liquid induced by electron or positive-ion irradiation from an atmospheric-pressure dc glow discharge in contact with the liquid. We used an H-shaped glass reactor to observe the effects of electron irradiation and positive-ion irradiation on the liquid-phase reaction separately and simultaneously. Aqueous solutions of NaCl, AgNO3, HAuCl4, and FeCl2 are used as the electrolyte. Solutions of AgNO3 and HAuCl4 are used for the generation of Ag and Au nanoparticles, respectively. Solution of FeCl2 is used for the generation of ferromagnetic particles. Experimental results showed that electron irradiation of the liquid surface generates OH- in water and that positive-ion irradiation of the liquid surface generates H+ in water even without the dissolution of gas-phase nitrogen oxide. A possible reaction process is qualitatively discussed. We also showed that the control of reductive and oxidative environment in the liquid is possible not only by the gas composition for the plasma generation but also by the liquid composition.

  16. A phase-field-crystal model for liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Löwen, Hartmut

    2010-09-15

    On the basis of static and dynamical density functional theory, a phase-field-crystal model is derived which involves both the translational density and the orientational degree of ordering as well as a local director field. The model exhibits stable isotropic, nematic, smectic A, columnar, plastic-crystalline and orientationally ordered crystalline phases. As far as the dynamics is concerned, the translational density is a conserved order parameter while the orientational ordering is non-conserved. The derived phase-field-crystal model can serve for use in efficient numerical investigations of various nonequilibrium situations in liquid crystals.

  17. Crystal growth in a three-phase system: diffusion and liquid-liquid phase separation in lysozyme crystal growth.

    PubMed

    Heijna, M C R; van Enckevort, W J P; Vlieg, E

    2007-07-01

    In the phase diagram of the protein hen egg-white lysozyme, a region is present in which the lysozyme solution demixes and forms two liquid phases. In situ observations by optical microscopy show that the dense liquid droplets dissolve when crystals grow in this system. During this process the demixed liquid region retracts from the crystal surface. The spatial distribution of the dense phase droplets present special boundary conditions for Fick's second law for diffusion. In combination with the cylindrical symmetry provided by the kinetically roughened crystals, this system allows for a full numerical analysis. Using experimental data for setting the boundary conditions, a quasi-steady-state solution for the time-dependent concentration profile was shown to be valid. Comparison of kinetically rough growth in a phase separated system and in a nonseparated system shows that the growth kinetics for a three-phase system differs from a two-phase system, in that crystals grow more slowly but the duration of growth is prolonged.

  18. Curvature induced phase stability of an intensely heated liquid.

    PubMed

    Sasikumar, Kiran; Liang, Zhi; Cahill, David G; Keblinski, Pawel

    2014-06-21

    We use non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to study the heat transfer around intensely heated solid nanoparticles immersed in a model Lennard-Jones fluid. We focus our studies on the role of the nanoparticle curvature on the liquid phase stability under steady-state heating. For small nanoparticles we observe a stable liquid phase near the nanoparticle surface, which can be at a temperature well above the boiling point. Furthermore, for particles with radius smaller than a critical radius of 2 nm we do not observe formation of vapor even above the critical temperature. Instead, we report the existence of a stable fluid region with a density much larger than that of the vapor phase. We explain the stability in terms of the Laplace pressure associated with the formation of a vapor nanocavity and the associated effect on the Gibbs free energy. PMID:24952551

  19. Analysis of heat transfer for a normally impinging liquid-metal slot jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.

    1973-01-01

    A two-dimensional liquid-metal slot jet that is impinging normally against a uniformly heated flat plate is analyzed. The distributions of wall temperature and heat-transfer coefficient are obtained as functions of position along the plate. The liquid-metal assumptions are made that the jet is inviscid and that molecular condition is dominating heat diffusion. The solution is obtained by mapping the jet flow region into a potential plane where it occupies a strip of uniform width. The energy equation is transformed into potential coordinates, and an exact solution obtained in the strip region. Conformal mapping is then used to transform the solution into the physical plane.

  20. Comparison of normal and phase stepping shearographic NDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andhee, A.; Gryzagoridis, J.; Findeis, D.

    2005-05-01

    The paper presents results of non-destructive testing of composite main rotor helicopter blade calibration specimens using the laser based optical NDE technique known as Shearography. The tests were performed initially using the already well established near real-time non-destructive technique of Shearography, with the specimens perturbed during testing for a few seconds using the hot air from a domestic hair dryer. Subsequent to modification of the shearing device utilized in the shearographic setup, phase stepping of one of the sheared images to be captured by the CCD camera was enabled and identical tests were performed on the composite main rotor helicopter blade specimens. Considerable enhancement of the images manifesting or depicting the defects on the specimens is noted suggesting that phase stepping is a desirable enhancement technique to the traditional Shearographic setup.

  1. Electrically tunable holographic polymer templated blue phase liquid crystal grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zheng-Hong; Chen, Chao-Ping; Zhu, Ji-Liang; Yuan, Ya-Chao; Li, Yan; Hu, Wei; Li, Xiao; Li, Hong-Jing; Lu, Jian-Gang; Su, Yi-Kai

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate an alternative approach to fabricating an electrically tunable holographic polymer templated blue phase liquid crystal grating. This grating is obtained by preforming a polymer template comprised of periodic fringes, and then refilling it with a blue phase liquid crystal. Compared with conventional holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal gratings, our grating can remarkably reduce its switching voltage from 200 V to 43 V while maintaining a sub-millisecond response time. The holographic polymer templated blue phase liquid crystal (HPTBPLC) grating is free from electrode patterning, thus leading to a lower cost and more flexible applications. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB328804), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61307028), the Funds from the Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality (Grant Nos. 11JC1405300, 13ZR1420000, and 14ZR1422300), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. XDJK 2011C047).

  2. Liquid-liquid phase separation of freely falling undercooled ternary Fe-Cu-Sn alloy.

    PubMed

    Wang, W L; Wu, Y H; Li, L H; Zhai, W; Zhang, X M; Wei, B

    2015-01-01

    The active modulation and control of the liquid phase separation for high-temperature metallic systems are still challenging the development of advanced immiscible alloys. Here we present an attempt to manipulate the dynamic process of liquid-liquid phase separation for ternary Fe47.5Cu47.5Sn5 alloy. It was firstly dispersed into numerous droplets with 66 ~ 810 μm diameters and then highly undercooled and rapidly solidified under the containerless microgravity condition inside drop tube. 3-D phase field simulation was performed to explore the kinetic evolution of liquid phase separation. Through regulating the combined effects of undercooling level, phase separation time and Marangoni migration, three types of separation patterns were yielded: monotectic cell, core shell and dispersive structures. The two-layer core-shell morphology proved to be the most stable separation configuration owing to its lowest chemical potential. Whereas the monotectic cell and dispersive microstructures were both thermodynamically metastable transition states because of their highly active energy. The Sn solute partition profiles of Fe-rich core and Cu-rich shell in core-shell structures varied only slightly with cooling rate. PMID:26552711

  3. Liquid-liquid phase separation of freely falling undercooled ternary Fe-Cu-Sn alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. L.; Wu, Y. H.; Li, L. H.; Zhai, W.; Zhang, X. M.; Wei, B.

    2015-11-01

    The active modulation and control of the liquid phase separation for high-temperature metallic systems are still challenging the development of advanced immiscible alloys. Here we present an attempt to manipulate the dynamic process of liquid-liquid phase separation for ternary Fe47.5Cu47.5Sn5 alloy. It was firstly dispersed into numerous droplets with 66 ~ 810 μm diameters and then highly undercooled and rapidly solidified under the containerless microgravity condition inside drop tube. 3-D phase field simulation was performed to explore the kinetic evolution of liquid phase separation. Through regulating the combined effects of undercooling level, phase separation time and Marangoni migration, three types of separation patterns were yielded: monotectic cell, core shell and dispersive structures. The two-layer core-shell morphology proved to be the most stable separation configuration owing to its lowest chemical potential. Whereas the monotectic cell and dispersive microstructures were both thermodynamically metastable transition states because of their highly active energy. The Sn solute partition profiles of Fe-rich core and Cu-rich shell in core-shell structures varied only slightly with cooling rate.

  4. Liquid-liquid phase separation of freely falling undercooled ternary Fe-Cu-Sn alloy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, W .L.; Wu, Y. H.; Li, L. H.; Zhai, W.; Zhang, X. M.; Wei, B.

    2015-01-01

    The active modulation and control of the liquid phase separation for high-temperature metallic systems are still challenging the development of advanced immiscible alloys. Here we present an attempt to manipulate the dynamic process of liquid-liquid phase separation for ternary Fe47.5Cu47.5Sn5 alloy. It was firstly dispersed into numerous droplets with 66 ~ 810 μm diameters and then highly undercooled and rapidly solidified under the containerless microgravity condition inside drop tube. 3-D phase field simulation was performed to explore the kinetic evolution of liquid phase separation. Through regulating the combined effects of undercooling level, phase separation time and Marangoni migration, three types of separation patterns were yielded: monotectic cell, core shell and dispersive structures. The two-layer core-shell morphology proved to be the most stable separation configuration owing to its lowest chemical potential. Whereas the monotectic cell and dispersive microstructures were both thermodynamically metastable transition states because of their highly active energy. The Sn solute partition profiles of Fe-rich core and Cu-rich shell in core-shell structures varied only slightly with cooling rate. PMID:26552711

  5. Liquid-liquid phase separation of freely falling undercooled ternary Fe-Cu-Sn alloy.

    PubMed

    Wang, W L; Wu, Y H; Li, L H; Zhai, W; Zhang, X M; Wei, B

    2015-01-01

    The active modulation and control of the liquid phase separation for high-temperature metallic systems are still challenging the development of advanced immiscible alloys. Here we present an attempt to manipulate the dynamic process of liquid-liquid phase separation for ternary Fe47.5Cu47.5Sn5 alloy. It was firstly dispersed into numerous droplets with 66 ~ 810 μm diameters and then highly undercooled and rapidly solidified under the containerless microgravity condition inside drop tube. 3-D phase field simulation was performed to explore the kinetic evolution of liquid phase separation. Through regulating the combined effects of undercooling level, phase separation time and Marangoni migration, three types of separation patterns were yielded: monotectic cell, core shell and dispersive structures. The two-layer core-shell morphology proved to be the most stable separation configuration owing to its lowest chemical potential. Whereas the monotectic cell and dispersive microstructures were both thermodynamically metastable transition states because of their highly active energy. The Sn solute partition profiles of Fe-rich core and Cu-rich shell in core-shell structures varied only slightly with cooling rate.

  6. Anomalous properties and the liquid-liquid phase transition in gallium.

    PubMed

    Li, Renzhong; Sun, Gang; Xu, Limei

    2016-08-01

    A group of materials including water and silicon exhibit many anomalous behaviors, e.g., density anomaly and diffusivity anomaly (increase upon compression). These materials are hypothesized to have a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) and the critical fluctuation in the vicinity of the liquid-liquid critical point is considered as the origin of different anomalies. Liquid gallium was also reported to have a LLPT, yet whether it shows similar water-like anomalies is not yet studied. Using molecular dynamics simulations on a modified embedded-atom model, we study the thermodynamic, dynamic, and structural properties of liquid gallium as well as its LLPT. We find that, similar to water-like materials predicted to have the LLPT, gallium also shows different anomalous behaviors (e.g., density anomaly, diffusivity anomaly, and structural anomaly). We also find that its thermodynamic and structural response functions are continuous and show maxima in the supercritical region, the loci of which asymptotically approach to the other and merge to the Widom line. These phenomena are consistent with the supercritical phenomenon in a category of materials with a liquid-liquid critical point, which could be common features in most materials with a LLPT. PMID:27497564

  7. Anomalous properties and the liquid-liquid phase transition in gallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Renzhong; Sun, Gang; Xu, Limei

    2016-08-01

    A group of materials including water and silicon exhibit many anomalous behaviors, e.g., density anomaly and diffusivity anomaly (increase upon compression). These materials are hypothesized to have a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) and the critical fluctuation in the vicinity of the liquid-liquid critical point is considered as the origin of different anomalies. Liquid gallium was also reported to have a LLPT, yet whether it shows similar water-like anomalies is not yet studied. Using molecular dynamics simulations on a modified embedded-atom model, we study the thermodynamic, dynamic, and structural properties of liquid gallium as well as its LLPT. We find that, similar to water-like materials predicted to have the LLPT, gallium also shows different anomalous behaviors (e.g., density anomaly, diffusivity anomaly, and structural anomaly). We also find that its thermodynamic and structural response functions are continuous and show maxima in the supercritical region, the loci of which asymptotically approach to the other and merge to the Widom line. These phenomena are consistent with the supercritical phenomenon in a category of materials with a liquid-liquid critical point, which could be common features in most materials with a LLPT.

  8. Anomalous properties and the liquid-liquid phase transition in gallium.

    PubMed

    Li, Renzhong; Sun, Gang; Xu, Limei

    2016-08-01

    A group of materials including water and silicon exhibit many anomalous behaviors, e.g., density anomaly and diffusivity anomaly (increase upon compression). These materials are hypothesized to have a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) and the critical fluctuation in the vicinity of the liquid-liquid critical point is considered as the origin of different anomalies. Liquid gallium was also reported to have a LLPT, yet whether it shows similar water-like anomalies is not yet studied. Using molecular dynamics simulations on a modified embedded-atom model, we study the thermodynamic, dynamic, and structural properties of liquid gallium as well as its LLPT. We find that, similar to water-like materials predicted to have the LLPT, gallium also shows different anomalous behaviors (e.g., density anomaly, diffusivity anomaly, and structural anomaly). We also find that its thermodynamic and structural response functions are continuous and show maxima in the supercritical region, the loci of which asymptotically approach to the other and merge to the Widom line. These phenomena are consistent with the supercritical phenomenon in a category of materials with a liquid-liquid critical point, which could be common features in most materials with a LLPT.

  9. Modeling of liquid-vapor phase change using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, A. K.; Das, P. K.

    2015-12-01

    A model has been proposed based on smoothed particle hydrodynamics to describe gas liquid phase change. Pseudo particles of zero mass are initially placed to locate the interface. Mass generated due to phase change is assigned to the pseudo particles and their positions are updated at intervals to track the mobility of the interface. The developed algorithm has been used to simulate vapor formation around solid spheres both in the absence of gravity and in the normal gravitational field. Finally, bubble growth over a hot horizontal surface due to boiling has been simulated. Simulated results showed good matching with the reported literature.

  10. Hydrodynamic Instability in an Extended Landau/Levich Model of Liquid-Propellant Combustion at Normal and Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, S. B.

    1997-01-01

    The classical Landau/Levich models of liquid-propellant combustion, despite their relative simplicity, serve as seminal examples that correctly describe the onset of hydrodynamic instability in reactive systems. Recently, these two separate models have been combined and extended to account for a dynamic dependence, absent in the original formulations, of the local burning rate on the local pressure and temperature fields. The resulting model admits an extremely rich variety of both hydrodynamic and reactive/diffusive instabilities that can be analyzed either numerically or analytically in various limiting parameter regimes. In the present work, a formal asymptotic analysis, based on the realistic smallness of the gas-to-liquid density ratio, is developed to investigate the combined effects of gravity and other parameters on the hydrodynamic instability of the propagating liquid/gas interface. In particular, an analytical expression is derived for the neutral stability boundary A(p)(k), where A(p) is the pressure sensitivity of the burning rate and k is the wavenumber of the disturbance. The results demonstrate explicitly the stabilizing effect of gravity on long-wave disturbances, the stabilizing effect of viscosity (both liquid and gas) and surface tension on short-wave perturbations, and the instability associated with intermediate wavenumbers for negative values of A(p). In the limiting case of weak gravity, it is shown that hydrodynamic instability in liquid-propellant combustion is a long-wave instability phenomenon, whereas at normal gravity, this instability is first manifested through O(1) wavenumber disturbances. it is also demonstrated that, in general, surface tension and the viscosity of both the liquid and gas phases each produce comparable stabilizing effects in the long-wavenumber regime, thereby providing important modifications to previous analyses in which one or more of these effects were neglected.

  11. Hydrodynamic Instability in an Extended Landau/Levich Model of Liquid-Propellant Combustion at Normal and Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, Stephen B.

    1998-01-01

    The classical Landau/Levich models of liquid-propellant combustion, despite their relative simplicity, serve as seminal examples that correctly describe the onset of hydrodynamic instability in reactive systems. Recently, these two separate models have been combined and extended to account for a dynamic dependence, absent in the original formulations, of the local burning rate on the local pressure and temperature fields. The resulting model admits an extremely rich variety of both hydrodynamic and reactive/diffusive instabilities that can be analyzed either numerically or analytically in various limiting parameter regimes. In the present work, a formal asymptotic analysis, based on the realistic smallness of the gas-to-liquid density ratio, is developed to investigate the combined effects of gravity and other parameters on the hydrodynamic instability of the propagating liquid/gas interface. In particular, an analytical expression is derived for the neutral stability boundary A(sub p)(k), where A(sub p) is the pressure sensitivity of the burning rate and k is the wavenumber of the disturbance. The results demonstrate explicitly the stabilizing effect of gravity on long-wave disturbances, the stabilizing effect of viscosity (both liquid and gas) and surface tension on short-wave perturbations, and the instability associated with intermediate wavenumbers for critical negative values of A(sub p). In the limiting case of weak gravity, it is shown that hydrodynamic instability in liquid-propellant combustion is a long-wave instability phenomenon, whereas at normal gravity, this instability is first manifested through O(1) wavenumber disturbances. It is also demonstrated that, in general, surface tension and the viscosity of both the liquid and gas phases each produce comparable stabilizing effects in the large-wavenumber regime, thereby providing important modifications to previous analyses in which one or more of these effects were neglected.

  12. Two Spin Liquid phases in the anisotropic triangular Heisenberg model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorella, Sandro

    2005-03-01

    Recently there have been rather clean experimental realizations of the quantum spin 1/2 Heisenberg Hamiltonian on a 2D triangular lattice geometry in systems like Cs2Cu Cl4 and organic compounds like k-(ET)2Cu2(CN)3. These materials are nearly two dimensional and are characterized by an anisotropic antiferromagnetic superexchange. The strength of the spatial anisotropy can increase quantum fluctuations and can destabilize the magnetically ordered state leading to non conventional spin liquid phases. In order to understand these interesting phenomena we have studied, by Quantum Monte Carlo methods, the triangular lattice Heisenberg model as a function of the strength of this anisotropy, represented by the ratio r between the intra-chain nearest neighbor coupling J' and the inter-chain one J. We have found evidence of two spin liquid regions, well represented by projected BCS wave functions[1,2] of the type proposed by P. W. Anderson at the early stages of High temperature superconductivity [3]. The first spin liquid phase is stable for small values of the coupling r 0.6 and appears gapless and fractionalized, whereas the second one is a more conventional spin liquid, very similar to the one realized in the quantum dimer model in the triangular lattice[4]. It is characterized by a spin gap and a finite correlation length, and appears energetically favored in the region 0.6 r 0.9. The various phases are in good agreement with the experimental findings and supports the existence of spin liquid phases in 2D quantum spin-half systems. %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%% 1cm *[1] L. Capriotti F. Becca A. Parola and S. Sorella , Phys. Rev. Letters 87, 097201 (2001). *[2] S. Yunoki and S. Sorella Phys. Rev. Letters 92, 15003 (2004). *[3] P. W. Anderson, Science 235, 1186 (1987). *[4] P. Fendley, R. Moessner, and S. L. Sondhi Phys. Rev. B 66, 214513 (2002).

  13. Superfluid helium 2 liquid-vapor phase separation: Technology assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    A literature survey of helium 2 liquid vapor phase separation is presented. Currently, two types of He 2 phase separators are being investigated: porous, sintered metal plugs and the active phase separator. The permeability K(P) shows consistency in porous plug geometric characterization. Both the heat and mass fluxes increase with K(P). Downstream pressure regulation to adjust for varying heat loads and both temperatures is possible. For large dynamic heat loads, the active phase separator shows a maximum heat rejection rate of up to 2 W and bath temperature stability of 0.1 mK. Porous plug phase separation performance should be investigated for application to SIRTF and, in particular, that plugs of from 10 to the minus ninth square centimeters to 10 to the minus eighth square centimeters in conjunction with downstream pressure regulation be studied.

  14. Thermal Vibrational Convection in a Two-phase Stratified Liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Qingming; Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    2007-01-01

    The response of a two-phase stratified liquid system subject to a vibration parallel to an imposed temperature gradient is analyzed using a hybrid thermal lattice Boltzmann method (HTLB). The vibrations considered correspond to sinusoidal translations of a rigid cavity at a fixed frequency. The layers are thermally and mechanically coupled. Interaction between gravity-induced and vibration-induced thermal convection is studied. The ability of applied vibration to enhance the flow, heat transfer and interface distortion is investigated. For the range of conditions investigated, the results reveal that the effect of vibrational Rayleigh number and vibrational frequency on a two-phase stratified fluid system is much different than that for a single-phase fluid system. Comparisons of the response of a two-phase stratified fluid system with a single-phase fluid system are discussed.

  15. Induced smectic phases of stoichiometric liquid crystal mixtures.

    PubMed

    Sugisawa, Shin-Ya; Tabe, Yuka

    2016-03-28

    We revealed the detailed structures of induced smectic liquid crystal (LC) phases composed of a binary mixture of charge-transfer (CT) LC substances. Although neither of the constituents had highly ordered smectic phases, the mixture exhibited smectic-E (SmE) or smectic-B (SmB) phases when mixed at ratios of 1 : 1 and 2 : 3, respectively. The results of polarized optical microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, and infrared spectroscopy indicated that the induced smectic phases were stabilized by an exquisite balance between the CT interactions, dipolar interactions, and excluded volume effects. We proposed a possible model for the molecular arrangements in the SmE and SmB phases, which consistently explained the experimental results including the stoichiometric ratios.

  16. Gravitational contributions to microstructural coarsening in liquid phase sintering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kipphut, C. M.; Kishi, T.; Bose, A.; German, R. M.

    1987-01-01

    Preliminary experiments for determining the role of gravity in liquid phase sintering have been carried out. Tungsten heavy alloys were selected for this investigation because of the large density difference between solid and liquid, extensive interest in the alloys and considerable data on these alloys. By identifying and isolating the role that gravity plays in shape distortion and microstructural coarsening, further insight into the mechanisms of coarsening kinetics may be realized. Improvements in mechanical properties, shape complexity, and dimensional stability may be realized in the future from low gravity sintering.

  17. String theory, quantum phase transitions, and the emergent Fermi liquid.

    PubMed

    Cubrović, Mihailo; Zaanen, Jan; Schalm, Koenraad

    2009-07-24

    A central problem in quantum condensed matter physics is the critical theory governing the zero-temperature quantum phase transition between strongly renormalized Fermi liquids as found in heavy fermion intermetallics and possibly in high-critical temperature superconductors. We found that the mathematics of string theory is capable of describing such fermionic quantum critical states. Using the anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory correspondence to relate fermionic quantum critical fields to a gravitational problem, we computed the spectral functions of fermions in the field theory. By increasing the fermion density away from the relativistic quantum critical point, a state emerges with all the features of the Fermi liquid.

  18. 4He glass phase: A model for liquid elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tournier, Robert F.; Bossy, Jacques

    2016-08-01

    The specific heat of liquid helium confined under pressure in nanoporous material and the formation, in these conditions, of a glass phase accompanied by latent heat are known. These properties are in good agreement with a recent model predicting, in liquid elements, the formation of ultrastable glass having universal thermodynamic properties. The third law of thermodynamics involves that the specific heat decreases at low temperatures and consequently the effective transition temperature of the glass increases up to the temperature where the frozen enthalpy becomes equal to the predicted value. The glass residual entropy is about 23.6% of the melting entropy.

  19. Glass and liquid phase diagram of a polyamorphic monatomic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisman, Shaina; Giovambattista, Nicolas

    2013-02-01

    We perform out-of-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a monatomic system with Fermi-Jagla (FJ) pair potential interactions. This model system exhibits polyamorphism both in the liquid and glass state. The two liquids, low-density (LDL) and high-density liquid (HDL), are accessible in equilibrium MD simulations and can form two glasses, low-density (LDA) and high-density amorphous (HDA) solid, upon isobaric cooling. The FJ model exhibits many of the anomalous properties observed in water and other polyamorphic liquids and thus, it is an excellent model system to explore qualitatively the thermodynamic properties of such substances. The liquid phase behavior of the FJ model system has been previously characterized. In this work, we focus on the glass behavior of the FJ system. Specifically, we perform systematic isothermal compression and decompression simulations of LDA and HDA at different temperatures and determine "phase diagrams" for the glass state; these phase diagrams varying with the compression/decompression rate used. We obtain the LDA-to-HDA and HDA-to-LDA transition pressure loci, PLDA-HDA(T) and PHDA-LDA(T), respectively. In addition, the compression-induced amorphization line, at which the low-pressure crystal (LPC) transforms to HDA, PLPC-HDA(T), is determined. As originally proposed by Poole et al. [Phys. Rev. E 48, 4605 (1993)], 10.1103/PhysRevE.48.4605 simulations suggest that the PLDA-HDA(T) and PHDA-LDA(T) loci are extensions of the LDL-to-HDL and HDL-to-LDL spinodal lines into the glass domain. Interestingly, our simulations indicate that the PLPC-HDA(T) locus is an extension, into the glass domain, of the LPC metastability limit relative to the liquid. We discuss the effects of compression/decompression rates on the behavior of the PLDA-HDA(T), PHDA-LDA(T), PLPC-HDA(T) loci. The competition between glass polyamorphism and crystallization is also addressed. At our "fast rate," crystallization can be partially suppressed and the

  20. Glass and liquid phase diagram of a polyamorphic monatomic system.

    PubMed

    Reisman, Shaina; Giovambattista, Nicolas

    2013-02-14

    We perform out-of-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a monatomic system with Fermi-Jagla (FJ) pair potential interactions. This model system exhibits polyamorphism both in the liquid and glass state. The two liquids, low-density (LDL) and high-density liquid (HDL), are accessible in equilibrium MD simulations and can form two glasses, low-density (LDA) and high-density amorphous (HDA) solid, upon isobaric cooling. The FJ model exhibits many of the anomalous properties observed in water and other polyamorphic liquids and thus, it is an excellent model system to explore qualitatively the thermodynamic properties of such substances. The liquid phase behavior of the FJ model system has been previously characterized. In this work, we focus on the glass behavior of the FJ system. Specifically, we perform systematic isothermal compression and decompression simulations of LDA and HDA at different temperatures and determine "phase diagrams" for the glass state; these phase diagrams varying with the compression/decompression rate used. We obtain the LDA-to-HDA and HDA-to-LDA transition pressure loci, P(LDA-HDA)(T) and P(HDA-LDA)(T), respectively. In addition, the compression-induced amorphization line, at which the low-pressure crystal (LPC) transforms to HDA, P(LPC-HDA)(T), is determined. As originally proposed by Poole et al. [Phys. Rev. E 48, 4605 (1993)] simulations suggest that the P(LDA-HDA)(T) and P(HDA-LDA)(T) loci are extensions of the LDL-to-HDL and HDL-to-LDL spinodal lines into the glass domain. Interestingly, our simulations indicate that the P(LPC-HDA)(T) locus is an extension, into the glass domain, of the LPC metastability limit relative to the liquid. We discuss the effects of compression/decompression rates on the behavior of the P(LDA-HDA)(T), P(HDA-LDA)(T), P(LPC-HDA)(T) loci. The competition between glass polyamorphism and crystallization is also addressed. At our "fast rate," crystallization can be partially suppressed and the glass

  1. Synthesis and liquid crystal phase transitions of zirconium phosphate disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuai, Min

    Solvent-mediated self-assembly of nanoparticles is an effective and efficient way for the bottom-up organization of functional structures. The primary object of this work is to build up a model system for the study of suspensions of disk-shaped nanoparticles, and use it for the study of self-assembly and discotic liquid crystal phase transitions of discotic particles. The work was introduced by the control over the size and polydispersity of zirconium phosphate (ZrP) disks through synthesis. Systematic experiments revealed that regular-shaped alpha-zirconium phosphate crystalline disks with a size-to-thickness ratio from 1 to 50 and size polydispersity as low as 0.2 can be obtained through hydrothermal treatment in 3 M to 15 M phosphoric acid solutions. Transmission and scanning electron micrographs revealed that the growth of the disks is mediated by oriented attachment, which happened continuously throughout the hydrothermal treatment between various sized disks. Ostwald ripening is effective in improving the regularity of the shape of the disks, especially under prolonged hydrothermal treatment. Under the microwave assisted hydrothermal conditions, the rate of attachment on the flat surfaces of the disks is accelerated, which leads to the formation of the column-shaped crystals. With the ability to adjust the size, aspect ratio, and polydispersity of ZrP disks, the study on self-assembly behavior and the discotic liquid crystal phases was enabled. Firstly, liquid crystal phases of aqueous suspensions of ZrP disks were investigated. Iridescent smectic phase and the critical points of phase transitions were found. Moreover, monolayer ZrP nanosheets with extremely high aspect ratio, which were achieved by exfoliating the ZrP crystals, were also used in this study. The high aspect ratio of nanosheets produces a laminar phase at low nanosheet concentration. Chiral liquid crystal phases were demonstrated when increased the concentration of the nanosheets. The

  2. Emergent spinless Weyl semimetals between the topological crystalline insulator and normal insulator phases with glide symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Heejae; Murakami, Shuichi

    2016-05-01

    We construct a theory describing phase transitions between the spinless topological crystalline insulator phase with glide symmetry and a normal insulator phase. We show that a spinless Weyl semimetal phase should intervene between these two phases. Here, because all the bands are free from degeneracy in general, a gap closing between a single conduction band and a single valence band at phase transition generally gives rise to a pair creation of Weyl nodes; hence the Weyl semimetal phase naturally appears. We show the relationship between the change of the Z2 topological number when the system goes through the Weyl semimetal phase, and the trajectory of the Weyl nodes.

  3. Evidence of a liquid-liquid phase transition in hot dense hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Dzyabura, Vasily; Zaghoo, Mohamed; Silvera, Isaac F

    2013-05-14

    We use pulsed-laser heating of hydrogen at static pressures in the megabar pressure region to search for the plasma phase transition to liquid atomic metallic hydrogen. We heat our samples substantially above the melting line and observe a plateau in a temperature vs. laser power curve that otherwise increases with power. This anomaly in the heating curve appears correlated with theoretical predictions for the plasma phase transition. PMID:23630287

  4. Plasmas in Multiphase Media: Bubble Enhanced Discharges in Liquids and Plasma/Liquid Phase Boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Kushner, Mark Jay

    2014-07-10

    In this research project, the interaction of atmospheric pressure plasmas with multi-phase media was computationally investigated. Multi-phase media includes liquids, particles, complex materials and porous surfaces. Although this investigation addressed fundamental plasma transport and chemical processes, the outcomes directly and beneficially affected applications including biotechnology, medicine and environmental remediation (e.g., water purification). During this project, we made advances in our understanding of the interaction of atmospheric pressure plasmas in the form of dielectric barrier discharges and plasma jets with organic materials and liquids. We also made advances in our ability to use computer modeling to represent these complex processes. We determined the method that atmospheric pressure plasmas flow along solid and liquid surfaces, and through endoscopic like tubes, deliver optical and high energy ion activation energy to organic and liquid surfaces, and produce reactivity in thin liquid layers, as might cover a wound. We determined the mechanisms whereby plasmas can deliver activation energy to the inside of liquids by sustaining plasmas in bubbles. These findings are important to the advancement of new technology areas such as plasma medicine

  5. On the critical temperature, normal boiling point, and vapor pressure of ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Rebelo, Luis P N; Canongia Lopes, José N; Esperança, José M S S; Filipe, Eduardo

    2005-04-01

    One-stage, reduced-pressure distillations at moderate temperature of 1-decyl- and 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium bistriflilamide ([Ntf(2)](-)) ionic liquids (ILs) have been performed. These liquid-vapor equilibria can be understood in light of predictions for normal boiling points of ILs. The predictions are based on experimental surface tension and density data, which are used to estimate the critical points of several ILs and their corresponding normal boiling temperatures. In contrast to the situation found for relatively unstable ILs at high-temperature such as those containing [BF(4)](-) or [PF(6)](-) anions, [Ntf(2)](-)-based ILs constitute a promising class in which reliable, accurate vapor pressure measurements can in principle be performed. This property is paramount for assisting in the development and testing of accurate molecular models.

  6. Nuclear Susceptibility of Normal Liquid ^3He at Saturated Vapor Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhalchuk, A. G.; White, K. S.; Bozler, H. M.; Gould, C. M.

    2001-03-01

    The authoritative reference for the nuclear susceptibility of liquid ^3He is work done 30 years ago at Duke University.(H. Ramm, P. Pedroni, J.R. Thompson, and H. Meyer, J. Low Temp. Phys.) 2, 539 (1970). However, recent work in Grenoble(S. Triqueneaux, E. Collin, R. Harakaly, C. Bäuerle, Yu.M. Bunkov, and H. Godfrin, QFS 2000 Proceedings (to be published).) and USC(A.G. Mikhalchuk, K.S. White, H.M. Bozler, and C.M. Gould, QFS 2000 Proceedings (to be published).) has called into question the precise temperature dependence of the liquid's susceptibility and its limiting value at zero temperature. This latter quantity directly affects the first antisymmetric Landau parameter of the normal Fermi liquid. We present here our conclusions regarding this problem.

  7. Structure, Hydrodynamics, and Phase Transition of Freely Suspended Liquid Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Noel A.

    2000-01-01

    Smectic liquid crystals are phases of rod shaped molecules organized into one dimensionally (1D) periodic arrays of layers, each layer being between one and two molecular lengths thick. In the least ordered smectic phases, the smectics A and C, each layer is a two dimensional (2D) liquid. Additionally there are a variety of more ordered smectic phases having hexatic short range translational order or 2D crystalline quasi long range translational order within the layers. The inherent fluid-layer structure and low vapor pressure of smectic liquid crystals enable the long term stabilization of freely suspended, single component, layered fluid films as thin as 30A, a single molecular layer. The layering forces the films to be an integral number of smectic layers thick, quantizing their thickness in layer units and forcing a film of a particular number of layers to be physically homogeneous with respect to its layer structure over its entire area. Optical reflectivity enables the precise determination of the number of layers. These ultrathin freely suspended liquid crystal films are structures of fundamental interest in condensed matter and fluid physics. They are the thinnest known stable condensed phase fluid structures and have the largest surface-to-volume ratio of any stable fluid preparation, making them ideal for the study of the effects of reduced dimensionality on phase behavior and on fluctuation and interface phenomena. Their low vapor pressure and quantized thickness enable the effective use of microgravity to extend the study of basic capillary phenomena to ultrathin fluid films. Freely suspended films have been a wellspring of new liquid crystal physics. They have been used to provide unique experimental conditions for the study of condensed phase transitions in two dimensions. They are the only system in which the hexatic has been unambiguously identified as a phase of matter, and the only physical system in which fluctuations of a 2D XY system and

  8. Surface order at surfactant-laden interfaces between isotropic liquid crystals and liquid phases with different polarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xunda; Bahr, Christian

    2011-03-01

    We present an ellipsometry study of the interface between thermotropic liquid crystals and liquid phases consisting of various binary mixtures of water and glycerol. The liquid-crystal samples contain a small constant amount of a surfactant which induces a homeotropic anchoring at the interface. We determine the smectic or nematic order at the interface in the temperature range above the liquid-crystal-isotropic transition while the water to glycerol ratio is varied, corresponding to a systematic modification of the polarity of the liquid phase. The surface-induced order becomes less pronounced with increasing glycerol concentration in the liquid phase. The observed behavior is compared with previous studies in which the surfactant concentration in the liquid-crystal bulk phase was varied. The results indicate that in both cases the magnitude of the surfactant coverage at the interface is the key quantity which determines the liquid-crystal surface order at the interface.

  9. Microfluidic aqueous two-phase extraction of bisphenol A using ionic liquid for high-performance liquid chromatography analysis.

    PubMed

    Qi, Linlin; Wang, Yunhua; Li, Yajie; Zheng, Guoxia; Li, Changping; Su, Hongzhen

    2015-05-01

    An aqueous two-phase microfluidics (ATPM) method suitable for selective extraction of bisphenol A (BPA) in aqueous samples was developed, and a functional ionic liquid of N, N, N-trioctyl ammonium propionate (TOAP) was specially employed for the formation of a parallel flow system. Based on the analytical model, we optimized the chip design into branch-connection length pattern to achieve maximum extraction efficiency (φ max) and ensure phase separation. In combining the design flexibility and ideal reaction activity of extractant (TOAP), the developed ATPM enabled a selective and effective extraction of BPA (φ max of 95% within 2 s) from phenol derivatives. Meanwhile, the total operation time and ionic liquid consumption of the microfluidic extraction were only 2.5 min and 5 μl, respectively. The ATPM can be run at normal pH and room temperature and showed no interferences from components found in tap or beach water. To be noted, this specific extraction system was applied in real water samples; the recoveries of standard addition for all water samples spiked with BPA were from 96 to 110%. Finally, successful reuse of the chip was also realized. In all cases, the developed microfluidic chip was proven to be useful as an effective and low consumption approach in extracting BPA and should be expanded as a "green" preparative method for high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. PMID:25796523

  10. Common path point diffraction interferometer using liquid crystal phase shifting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, Carolyn R. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A common path point diffraction interferometer uses dyed, parallel nematic liquid crystals which surround an optically transparent microsphere. Coherent, collimated and polarized light is focused on the microsphere at a diameter larger than that of the microsphere. A portion of the focused light passes through the microsphere to form a spherical wavefront reference beam and the rest of the light is attenuated by the dyed liquid crystals to form an object beam. The two beams form an interferogram which is imaged by a lens onto an electronic array sensor and into a computer which determines the wavefront of the object beam. The computer phase shifts the interferogram by stepping up an AC voltage applied across the liquid crystals without affecting the reference beam.

  11. Normal Gravity Testing of a Microchannel Phase Separator for In Situ Resource Utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Stenkamp, Victoria S.; McQuillen, John (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A microchannel separator, with 2.7 millimeters as the smallest dimension, was tested, and a pore throat structure captured and removed liquid from a gas-liquid stream. The microchannel device was tested over a of gas and liquid flow rates ranging from 0.0005 up to 0. 14 volume fraction of liquid. Four liquids were tested with air. The biggest factor affecting the throughput is the capacity of liquid flow through the pore throat, which is dictated by permeability, liquid viscosity, flow area, pore throat thickness, and pressure difference across the pore throat. Typically, complete separation of gas and liquid fractions was lost when the liquid flow rate reached about 40 to 60% of the pore throat capacity. However, this could occur over a range of 10 to 90% utilization of pore throat capacity. Breakthrough occurs in the microchannel phase separator at conditions similar to the annular to plug flow transition of two-phase microgravity pipe flow implying that operating in the proper flow regime is crucial. Analysis indicates that the Bond number did not affect performance, supporting the premise that hydrodynamic, interfacial, and capillary forces are more important than gravity. However, the relative importance of gravity is better discerned through testing under reduced gravity conditions.

  12. Direct observation of a Fermi liquid-like normal state in an iron-pnictide superconductor.

    PubMed

    Tytarenko, Alona; Huang, Yingkai; de Visser, Anne; Johnston, Steve; van Heumen, Erik

    2015-01-01

    There are two prerequisites for understanding high-temperature (high-Tc) superconductivity: identifying the pairing interaction and obtaining a correct description of the normal state from which superconductivity emerges. The nature of the normal state of iron-pnictide superconductors, and the role played by correlations arising from partially screened interactions, are still under debate. Here we show that the normal state of carefully annealed electron-doped BaFe(2-x)Co(x)As2 at low temperatures has all the hallmark properties of a local Fermi liquid, with a more incoherent state emerging at elevated temperatures, an identification made possible using bulk-sensitive optical spectroscopy with high frequency and temperature resolution. The frequency dependent scattering rate extracted from the optical conductivity deviates from the expected scaling M2 (ω, T) ∝ (ħω)(2) + (pπkBT)(2) with p ≈ 1.47 rather than p = 2, indicative of the presence of residual elastic resonant scattering. Excellent agreement between the experimental results and theoretical modeling allows us to extract the characteristic Fermi liquid scale T0 ≈ 1700 K. Our results show that the electron-doped iron-pnictides should be regarded as weakly correlated Fermi liquids with a weak mass enhancement resulting from residual electron-electron scattering from thermally excited quasi-particles. PMID:26201499

  13. Prediction of Bubble Diameter at Detachment from a Wall Orifice in Liquid Cross Flow Under Reduced and Normal Gravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Kamotani, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Bubble formation and detachment is an integral part of the two-phase flow science. The objective of the present work is to theoretically investigate the effects of liquid cross-flow velocity, gas flow rate embodied in the momentum flux force, and orifice diameter on bubble formation in a wall-bubble injection configuration. A two-dimensional one-stage theoretical model based on a global force balance on the bubble evolving from a wall orifice in a cross liquid flow is presented in this work. In this model, relevant forces acting on the evolving bubble are expressed in terms of the bubble center of mass coordinates and solved simultaneously. Relevant forces in low gravity included the momentum flux, shear-lift, surface tension, drag and inertia forces. Under normal gravity conditions, the buoyancy force, which is dominant under such conditions, can be added to the force balance. Two detachment criteria were applicable depending on the gas to liquid momentum force ratio. For low ratios, the time when the bubble acceleration in the direction of the detachment angle is greater or equal to zero is calculated from the bubble x and y coordinates. This time is taken as the time at which all the detaching forces that are acting on the bubble are greater or equal to the attaching forces. For high gas to liquid momentum force ratios, the time at which the y coordinate less the bubble radius equals zero is calculated. The bubble diameter is evaluated at this time as the diameter at detachment from the fact that the bubble volume is simply given by the product of the gas flow rate and time elapsed. Comparison of the model s predictions was also made with predictions from a two-dimensional normal gravity model based on Kumar-Kuloor formulation and such a comparison is presented in this work.

  14. Dynamical and structural heterogeneities close to liquid-liquid phase transitions: The case of gallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonelli, Alex; Cajahuaringa, Samuel; de Koning, Maurice

    2013-03-01

    Liquid-liquid phase transitions (LLPT) have been proposed in order to explain the thermodynamic anomalies exhibited by some liquids. Recently, it was found, through molecular dynamics simulations, that liquid elemental gallium, described by a modified embedded-atom model, exhibits a LLPT between a high-density liquid (HDL) and a low-density liquid (LDL), about 60 K below the melting temperature. In this work, we studied the dynamics of supercooled liquid gallium close to the LLPT. Our results show a large increase in the plateau of the self-intermediate scattering function (β-relaxation process) and in the non-Gaussian parameter, indicating a pronounced dynamical heterogeneity upon the onset of the LLPT. The dynamical heterogeneity of the LDL is closely correlated to its structural heterogeneity, since the fast diffusing atoms belong to high-density domains of predominantly 9-fold coordinated atoms, whereas the slow diffusing ones are mostly in low-density domains of 8-fold coordinated atoms. The energetics suggests that the reason for the sluggish dynamics of LDL is due to its larger cohesive energy as compared to that of the HDL. Work supported by FAPESP, CNPq, CAPES, and FAEPEX/UNICAMP

  15. Liquid-phase sintering of iron aluminide-bonded ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Schneibel, J.H.; Carmichael, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    Iron aluminide intermetallics exhibit excellent oxidation and sulfidation resistance and are therefore considered as the matrix in metal matrix composites, or the binder in hard metals or cermets. In this paper the authors discuss the processing and properties of liquid-phase sintered iron aluminide-bonded ceramics. It is found that ceramics such as TiB{sub 2}, ZrB{sub 2}, TiC, and WC may all be liquid phase-sintered. nearly complete densification is achieved for ceramic volume fractions ranging up to 60%. Depending on the composition, room temperature three point-bend strengths and fracture toughnesses reaching 1,500 MPa and 30 MPa m{sup 1/2}, respectively, have been found. Since the processing was carried out in a very simple manner, optimized processing is likely to result in further improvements.

  16. Densification and shape distortion in liquid-phase sintering

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.; German, R.M.

    1999-12-01

    Densification and dimensional control are important aspects of liquid-phase sintering. The capillary force and the solid bonding affect both densification and shape preservation. Capillarity, which is orientated isotropically, causes uniform shrinkage and holds grains together to preserve the component shape in the early stage of sintering. On the other hand, solid bonding resists viscous flow and inhibits densification and shape distortion. The capillary force decreases with densification and approaches zero as pores are eliminated. Thus, shape retention eventually requires solid-grain bonding. The solid-grain bonding provides compact rigidity, which is represented by compact strength. Shape distortion occurs when the compact loses its strength. For every situation, there is a critical compact strength above which no shape distortion occurs. Distortion in liquid-phase sintering indicates that the compact strength passed below a critical level.

  17. Processes of microstructure coarsening at liquid phase sintering.

    PubMed

    Anestiev, L; Froyen, L

    2000-06-01

    A different approach to the theoretical description of the classical theory of Ostwald ripening at liquid phase sintering has been proposed. The model developed in the present approach is based on an equation describing the growth kinetics of the particles, which is different from those used until now. The model developed here accounts automatically for the influence of the initial volume fraction and predicts correctly: the time dependence of rho; at t-->infinity-rho;(3)(t)-rho;(3)(0)=Kt; the form of the distribution function after considerable coarsening time; the experimentally observed values for the relation rho(max)/rho;; and the phenomena of "abnormal growth" at liquid phase sintering.

  18. Powder metallurgy: Solid and liquid phase sintering of copper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, Rex; Weiser, Martin W.

    1993-01-01

    Basic powder metallurgy (P/M) principles and techniques are presented in this laboratory experiment. A copper based system is used since it is relatively easy to work with and is commercially important. In addition to standard solid state sintering, small quantities of low melting metals such as tin, zinc, lead, and aluminum can be added to demonstrate liquid phase sintering and alloy formation. The Taguchi Method of experimental design was used to study the effect of particle size, pressing force, sintering temperature, and sintering time. These parameters can be easily changed to incorporate liquid phase sintering effects and some guidelines for such substitutions are presented. The experiment is typically carried out over a period of three weeks.

  19. Study on the mechanism of liquid phase sintering (M-12)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohara, S.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives were to (1) obtain the data representing the growth rate of solid particles in a liquid matrix without the effect of gravity; and (2) reveal the growth behavior of solid particles during liquid phase sintering using the data obtained. Nickel and tungsten are used as the constituent materials in liquid phase sintering. The properties of the constituent metals are given. When a compact of the mixture of tungsten and nickel powders is heated and kept at 1550 C, nickel melts down but tungsten stays solid. As the density of tungsten is much greater than that of nickel, the sedimentation of tungsten particles occurs in the experiment on Earth. The difference between the experiments on Earth and in space is illustrated. The tungsten particles sink to the bottom and are brought into contact with each other. The resulting pressure at the contact point causes the accelerated dissolution of tungsten. Consequently, flat surfaces are formed at the contact sites. As a result of dissolution and reprecipitation of tungsten, the shape of particles changes to a polygon. This phenomenon is called 'flattening.' An example of flattening of tungsten particles is shown. Thus, the data obtained by the experiment on Earth may not represent the exact growth behavior of the solid particles in a liquid matrix. If the experiments were done in a microgravity environment, the data corresponding to the theoretical growth behavior of solid particles could be achieved.

  20. Holdup of the liquid slug in two phase intermittent flow

    SciTech Connect

    Barnea, D.; Brauner, N.

    1985-01-01

    A physical model for the prediction of gas holdup in liquid slugs in horizontal and vertical two phase pipe slug flow is presented. This model can also be used to yield the transitio between elongated bubbles and slug flow within the intermittent flow pattern. In addition a previously published model for predicting the stable slug length in vertical upward slug flow is extended here for the case of horizontal slug flow.

  1. Signatures of Majorana Kramers pairs in superconductor-Luttinger liquid and superconductor-quantum dot-normal lead junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Younghyun; Liu, Dong E.; Gaidamauskas, Erikas; Paaske, Jens; Flensberg, Karsten; Lutchyn, Roman M.

    2016-08-01

    Time-reversal invariant topological superconductors are characterized by the presence of Majorana Kramers pairs localized at defects. One of the transport signatures of Majorana Kramers pairs is the quantized differential conductance of 4 e2/h when such a one-dimensional superconductor is coupled to a normal-metal lead. The resonant Andreev reflection, responsible for this phenomenon, can be understood as the boundary condition change for lead electrons at low energies. In this paper, we study the stability of the Andreev reflection fixed point with respect to electron-electron interactions in the Luttinger liquid. We first calculate the phase diagram for the Luttinger liquid-Majorana Kramers pair junction and show that its low-energy properties are determined by Andreev reflection scattering processes in the spin-triplet channel, i.e., the corresponding Andreev boundary conditions are similar to that in a spin-triplet superconductor-normal lead junction. We also study here a quantum dot coupled to a normal lead and a Majorana Kramers pair and investigate the effect of local repulsive interactions leading to an interplay between Kondo and Majorana correlations. Using a combination of renormalization group analysis and slave-boson mean-field theory, we show that the system flows to a new fixed point which is controlled by the Majorana interaction rather than the Kondo coupling. This Majorana fixed point is characterized by correlations between the localized spin and the fermion parity of each spin sector of the topological superconductor. We investigate the stability of the Majorana phase with respect to Gaussian fluctuations.

  2. Vortex motion phase separator for zero gravity liquid transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Frank S. (Inventor); Fraser, Wilson M., Jr. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A vortex motion phase separator is disclosed for transferring a liquid in a zero gravity environment while at the same time separating the liquid from vapors found within either the sender or the receiving tanks. The separator comprises a rigid sender tank having a circular cross-section and rigid receiver tank having a circular cross-section. A plurality of ducts connects the sender tank and the receiver tank. Disposed within the ducts connecting the receiver tank and the sender tank is a pump and a plurality of valves. The pump is powered by an electric motor and is adapted to draw either the liquid or a mixture of the liquid and the vapor from the sender tank. Initially, the mixture drawn from the sender tank is directed through a portion of the ductwork and back into the sender tank at a tangent to the inside surface of the sender tank, thereby creating a swirling vortex of the mixture within the sender tank. As the pumping action increases, the speed of the swirling action within the sender tank increases creating an increase in the centrifugal force operating on the mixture. The effect of the centrifugal force is to cause the heavier liquid to migrate to the inside surface of the sender tank and to separate from the vapor. When this separation reaches a predetermined degree, control means is activated to direct the liquid conveyed by the pump directly into the receiver tank. At the same time, the vapor within the receiver tank is directed from the receiver tank back into the sender tank. This flow continues until substantially all of the liquid is transferred from the sender tank to the receiver tank.

  3. Transparent nematic phase in a liquid-crystal-based microemulsion.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, J; Tanaka, H

    2001-01-18

    Complex fluids are usually produced by mixing together several distinct components, the interactions between which can give rise to unusual optical and rheological properties of the system as a whole. For example, the properties of microemulsions (composed of water, oil and surfactants) are determined by the microscopic structural organization of the fluid that occurs owing to phase separation of the component elements. Here we investigate the effect of introducing an additional organizing factor into such a fluid system, by replacing the oil component of a conventional water-in-oil microemulsion with an intrinsically anisotropic fluid--a nematic liquid crystal. As with the conventional case, the fluid phase-separates into an emulsion of water microdroplets (stabilized by the surfactant as inverse micelles) dispersed in the 'oil' phase. But the properties are further influenced by a significant directional coupling between the liquid-crystal molecules and the surfactant tails that emerge (essentially radially) from the micelles. The result is a modified bulk-liquid crystal that is an ordered nematic at the mesoscopic level, but which does not exhibit the strong light scattering generally associated with bulk nematic order: the bulk material here is essentially isotropic and thus transparent.

  4. Oxidation Protection of Uranium Nitride Fuel using Liquid Phase Sintering

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Paul A. Lessing

    2012-03-01

    Two methods are proposed to increase the oxidation resistance of uranium nitride (UN) nuclear fuel. These paths are: (1) Addition of USi{sub x} (e.g. U3Si2) to UN nitride powder, followed by liquid phase sintering, and (2) 'alloying' UN nitride with various compounds (followed by densification via Spark Plasma Sintering or Liquid Phase Sintering) that will greatly increase oxidation resistance. The advantages (high thermal conductivity, very high melting point, and high density) of nitride fuel have long been recognized. The sodium cooled BR-10 reactor in Russia operated for 18 years on uranium nitride fuel (UN was used as the driver fuel for two core loads). However, the potential advantages (large power up-grade, increased cycle lengths, possible high burn-ups) as a Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel are offset by uranium nitride's extremely low oxidation resistance (UN powders oxidize in air and UN pellets decompose in hot water). Innovative research is proposed to solve this problem and thereby provide an accident tolerant LWR fuel that would resist water leaks and high temperature steam oxidation/spalling during an accident. It is proposed that we investigate two methods to increase the oxidation resistance of UN: (1) Addition of USi{sub x} (e.g. U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) to UN nitride powder, followed by liquid phase sintering, and (2) 'alloying' UN nitride with compounds (followed by densification via Spark Plasma Sintering) that will greatly increase oxidation resistance.

  5. ENHANCED SOURCE REMOVAL OF NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUID CONTAMINANTS BY CHEMICAL-BASED FLOODING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) such as gasoline and halogenated solvents (trichloroethylene (TCE) and teterachloroethylene (PCE), etc) enter the subsurface after a spill, or from leaking underground storage tanks. The presence of residual dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) ...

  6. Modeling the solid-liquid phase transition in saturated triglycerides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pink, David A.; Hanna, Charles B.; Sandt, Christophe; MacDonald, Adam J.; MacEachern, Ronald; Corkery, Robert; Rousseau, Dérick

    2010-02-01

    We investigated theoretically two competing published scenarios for the melting transition of the triglyceride trilaurin (TL): those of (1) Corkery et al. [Langmuir 23, 7241 (2007)], in which the average state of each TL molecule in the liquid phase is a discotic "Y" conformer whose three chains are dynamically twisted, with an average angle of ˜120° between them, and those of (2) Cebula et al. [J. Am. Oil Chem. Soc. 69, 130 (1992)], in which the liquid-state conformation of the TL molecule in the liquid phase is a nematic h∗-conformer whose three chains are in a modified "chair" conformation. We developed two competing models for the two scenarios, in which TL molecules are in a nematic compact-chair (or "h") conformation, with extended, possibly all-trans, chains at low-temperatures, and in either a Y conformation or an h∗ conformation in the liquid state at temperatures higher than the phase-transition temperature, T∗=319 K. We defined an h-Y model as a realization of the proposal of Corkery et al. [Langmuir 23, 7241 (2007)], and explored its predictions by mapping it onto an Ising model in a temperature-dependent field, performing a mean-field approximation, and calculating the transition enthalpy ΔH. We found that the most plausible realization of the h-Y model, as applied to the solid-liquid phase transition in TL, and likely to all saturated triglycerides, gave a value of ΔH in reasonable agreement with the experiment. We then defined an alternative h-h∗ model as a realization of the proposal of Cebula et al. [J. Am. Oil Chem. Soc. 69, 130 (1992)], in which the liquid phase exhibits an average symmetry breaking similar to an h conformation, but with twisted chains, to see whether it could describe the TL phase transition. The h-h∗ model gave a value of ΔH that was too small by a factor of ˜3-4. We also predicted the temperature dependence of the 1132 cm-1 Raman band for both models, and performed measurements of the ratios of three TL Raman

  7. Dynamic evolution of liquid-liquid phase separation during continuous cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Imhoff, S. D.; Gibbs, P. J.; Katz, M. R.; Ott, T. J.; Patterson, B. M.; Lee, W. -K.; Fezzaa, K.; Cooley, J. C.; Clarke, A. J.

    2015-03-01

    Solidification from a multiphase fluid involves many unknown quantities due to the difficulty of predicting the impact of fluid flow on chemical partitioning. Real-time x-ray radiography has been used to observe liquideliquid phase separation in Al90In10 prior to solidification. Quantitative image analysis has been used to measure the motion and population characteristics of the dispersed indium-rich liquid phase during cooling. Here we determine that the droplet growth characteristics resemble well known steady-state coarsening laws with likely enhancement by concurrent growth due to supersaturation. Simplistic views of droplet motion are found to be insufficient until late in the reaction due to a hydrodynamic instability caused by the large density difference between the dispersed and matrix liquid phases.

  8. Phase equilibria of binary liquid crystal mixtures involving induced ordered phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tsang-Min

    A phenomenological model for elucidating phase diagrams of hexagonal columnar/nematic liquid crystal mixtures has been developed on the basis of the combination of the Flory-Huggins (FH) free energy of isotropic mixing, Maier-Saupe (MS) free energy for nematic ordering, and Chandrasekhar-Clark free energy for hexagonal ordering. Self-consistent calculations show the theory is capable of predicting the various phase diagrams, covering nematic, hexagonal columnar, and isotropic phases. The model has been tested with the eutectic phase diagram of hexagonal columnar liquid crystal, 2, 3, 6, 7, 10, 11-hexapentyloxy triphenylene (HPTP)/reactive nematic mesogens, 4-(3-acryloyloxypropyloxy)-benzoic acid 2-methyl-1, 4-phenylene ester (RM257) mixtures determined by using DSC, polarized optical microscope (POM), and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD). The self-consistent calculation displays isotropic (I), nematic (N), hexagonal columnar (Colh), N + I, and Colh + I, and Colh + N coexistence regions. These phase regions has been confirmed by thermal quenching various compositions from the isotropic melt to different phase regions. Guided by the established phase diagram of HPTP/RM257 mixtures, photo-polymerization of the mixture has been carried out in different phase regions. The as-cured HPTP/p-(RM257) composites fabricated at isotropic phase (130 °C) remains single isotropic phase under optical microscope, whereas the SEM and TEM results show the bead-like microstructure with sub-micrometer scale. Polymerization-induced mesophase transition experiments have been carried out at isotropic temperatures slightly above the clearing point of the mixtures. Of particular interest is the development of liquid crystalline spherulites. Moreover, the fixation of the morphology is observed when the photopolymerization is carried out in the N, N + I, and N + Colh region. A generalized thermodynamic model for describing smectic A and smectic B ordering has been developed based on

  9. [Enrichment of nicotine in plasma with three-phase hollow fiber based liquid phase microextraction].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinlei; Luo, Mingbiao; Tang, Yuping

    2006-11-01

    A novel method for fast determination of nicotine in plasma was established by using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with a three-phase hollow fiber based liquid phase microextraction (TP-HF-LPME) technique for sample preparation. The microextraction was mediated by the pH difference between the environment inside and outside of an organic phase immobilized in the pores formed in the wall of a polypropylene hollow fiber. The pH value of the medium outside the organic phase was adjusted by adding a dilute KOH solution to form a basic donor phase while the pH value of the inner media was set to pH 3 to form an acceptor phase using a 10 mmol/L KH2PO4 solution. On working conditions, neutral nicotine molecules were firstly extracted from the original sample solution to the organic phase, and then the analyte was extracted from the organic phase to the acceptor phase. After described extraction time, 4 microL of acceptor phase was withdrawn and directly injected into HPLC system for analysis. Parameters related to TP-HF-LPME (organic solvent, pH of acceptor and donor phase, stirring rate, salt effect, methanol content in acceptor phase and extraction time) were also optimized experimentally. The proposed method integrates extraction, enrichment and clean-up into a single step, dramatically simplifying the traditional procedure to prepare a liquid sample with complex matrices such as plasma. It has been demonstrated to be a very fast, effective and virtually "green" sample preparation technique, which provided a good linear range (0.1 - 50 mg/L) with Nu of 0.999 6, a low detection limit (0.05 mg/L, S/N = 3) and a satisfactory relative standard deviation (< 5%).

  10. Mechanism of phase transition, from vapor to solid: Transient liquid phase is between the two

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahapatra, A. K.; Wang, Junyong; Zhang, Hongwei; Han, Min

    2016-08-01

    The mechanism of phase transition, from vapor to solid, is studied by producing non-stoichiometric ZnO and CdS nanoclusters (NCs) by low-energy cluster beam deposition technique, and examining their morphological and compositional evolution over a long span of time. It is concluded that the transition of vapor to solid goes through a transient liquid phase: coagulation of a large number of atomic clusters first forms liquid NCs which then solidify. The nature of the material and the experimental conditions determine crystallinity and shape of the NCs during the solidification process.

  11. Ionic liquid based three-phase liquid-liquid-liquid solvent bar microextraction for the determination of phenols in seawater samples.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liang; Lee, Hian Kee

    2011-07-15

    For the first time, an ionic liquid based three-phase liquid-liquid-liquid solvent bar microextraction (IL-LLL-SBME) was developed for the analysis of phenols in seawater samples. The ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIM][PF(6)]), was used as the intermediary solvent for LLL-SBME, enhancing the extraction efficiency for polar analytes. In the procedure, the analytes were extracted from the aqueous sample into the ionic liquid intermediary and finally, back-extracted into an aqueous acceptor solution in the lumen of the hollow fiber. The porous polypropylene membrane acted as a filter to prevent potential interfering materials from being extracted, and no additional cleanup was required. After extraction, the acceptor solution could be directly injected into a high-performance liquid chromatographic system for analysis. Six phenols, 2-nitrophenol, 4-chlorophenol, 2,3-dichlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol and pentachlorophenol were selected here as model compounds for developing and evaluating the method. The most influential extraction parameters were evaluated, including the ionic liquid, the composition of donor solution and acceptor solution, the extraction time and the extraction temperature, the effect of ionic strength, and the agitation speed. Under the most favorable extraction parameters, the method showed good linearity (from 0.05-50 to 0.5-50 μg/L, depending on the analytes) and repeatability of extractions (RSD below 8.3%, n=5). The proposed method was compared to conventional three-phase LLL-SBME and ionic liquid supported hollow fiber protected three-phase liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction, and showed higher extraction efficiency. The proposed method was demonstrated to be a simple, fast, and efficient method for the analysis of phenols from environmental water samples.

  12. Liquid-liquid phase separation in aerosol particles: imaging at the nanometer scale.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Rachel E; Wang, Bingbing; Kelly, Stephen T; Lundt, Nils; You, Yuan; Bertram, Allan K; Leone, Stephen R; Laskin, Alexander; Gilles, Mary K

    2015-04-21

    Atmospheric aerosols can undergo phase transitions including liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) while responding to changes in the ambient relative humidity (RH). Here, we report results of chemical imaging experiments using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) to investigate the LLPS of micrometer-sized particles undergoing a full hydration-dehydration cycle. Internally mixed particles composed of ammonium sulfate (AS) and either: limonene secondary organic carbon (LSOC), α, 4-dihydroxy-3-methoxybenzeneaceticacid (HMMA), or polyethylene glycol (PEG-400) were studied. Events of LLPS were observed for all samples with both techniques. Chemical imaging with STXM showed that both LSOC/AS and HMMA/AS particles were never homogeneously mixed for all measured RH's above the deliquescence point and that the majority of the organic component was located in the outer phase. The outer phase composition was estimated as 65:35 organic: inorganic in LSOC/AS and as 50:50 organic: inorganic for HMMA/AS. PEG-400/AS particles showed fully homogeneous mixtures at high RH and phase separated below 89-92% RH with an estimated 70:30% organic to inorganic mix in the outer phase. These two chemical imaging techniques are well suited for in situ analysis of the hygroscopic behavior, phase separation, and surface composition of collected ambient aerosol particles.

  13. Influence of microwave heating on liquid-liquid phase inversion and temperature rates for immiscible mixtures.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Alvin; Tadesse, Solomon; Nunes, Janine; Reznik, Aron

    2011-01-01

    Time dependencies of component temperatures for mixtures of immiscible liquids during microwave heating were studied for acetonitrile-cyclohexane and water-toluene. For the first time, we report microwave induced liquid-liquid phase inversion for acetonitrile-cyclohexane mixture: acetonitrile layer was initially at the bottom of the mixture, after 10 sec of microwave heating its density decreased and it inverted to the top of the mixture for the remainder of the microwave heating. This phase inversion could not be achieved by conventional radiant heating. The maximum rate of temperature growth for the polar component of the mixtures was 2 - 5 times larger than for the non-polar component. This suggests that microwave energy is absorbed by polar liquids (water or acetonitrile) and heat is transferred into the non-polar liquid (toluene or cyclohexane) in the mixture by conduction (in case of cyclohexane) or conduction and convection (in case of toluene). Comparison between experimental data and semi-empirical mathematical models, proposed in [Kennedy et at., 2009] showed good correlation. Average relative error between theoretical and experimental results did not exceed 7%. These results can be used to model the temperature kinetics of components for other multiphase mixtures.

  14. High-resolution calorimetric study of phase transitions in chiral smectic-C liquid crystalline phases.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Y; Le, K V; Aya, S; Isobe, M; Yao, H; Huang, C C; Takezoe, H; Ema, K

    2012-12-01

    We carried out an improved characterization of phase transitions among chiral smectic-C subphases observed for various antiferroelectric liquid crystals by precise heat capacity measurements. It was found that the phase transitions are intrinsically first order exhibiting a remarkable heat anomaly which involves little pretransitional thermal fluctuation and a finite thermal hysteresis. On the other hand, we also noticed that the critical point of the smectic-C(α)(*)-smectic-C* transition is induced by the destabilization of the smectic-C(α)(*) phase which couples with the fluctuation associated with the smectic-A-smectic-C(α)(*) phase transition.

  15. Electrostatic levitation studies of supercooled liquids and metastable solid phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustan, Gustav Errol

    been carried out to study the metastable phase formation in an Fe83B17 near eutectic alloy. Initial supercooling measurements using the ISU-ESL identified the formation of three metastable phases: a precipitate phase that shows stable coexistence with the deeply supercooled liquid, and two distinct bulk solidification phases. To identify the structure of the metastable phases, the Washington University Beamline ESL (WU-BESL) has been used to perform in-situ high energy x-ray diffraction measurements of the metastable phases. Based on the x-ray results, the precipitate phase has been identified as bcc-Fe, and the more commonly occurring bulk solidification product has been found to be a two-phase mixture of Fe23B6 plus fcc-Fe, which appears, upon cooling, to transform into a three phase mixture of Fe23B6, bcc-Fe, and an as-yet unidentified phase, with the transformation occurring at approximately the expected fcc-to-bcc transformation temperature of pure Fe. To further characterize the multi-phase metastable alloy, the ISU-ESL has been used to perform measurements of volume thermal expansion via the videographic technique, as well as RF susceptibility via the TDO technique. The results of the thermal expansion and susceptibility data have been found to be sensitive indicators of additional structural changes that may be occurring in the metastable solid at temperatures below 1000 K, and the susceptibility data has revealed that three distinct ferromagnetic phase transitions take place within the multi-phase mixture. Based on these results, it has been hypothesized that there may be an additional transformation taking place that leads to the formation of either bct- or o-Fe3B in addition to the Fe23B6 phase, although further work is required to test this hypothesis.

  16. Homogeneous edge-plane carbon as stationary phase for reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tian; Olesik, Susan V

    2015-04-01

    Carbon stationary phases have been widely used in HPLC due to their unique selectivity and high stability. Amorphous carbon as a stationary phase has at least two sites of interaction with analytes: basal-plane and edge-plane carbon sites. The polarity and adsorptivity of the two sites are different. In this work, the edge-plane carbon stationary phase is prepared by surface-directed liquid crystal assembly. Specific precursor polymers form discotic liquid crystal phases during the pyrolysis process. By using silica as the substrate to align the discotic liquid crystal, edge-plane carbon surfaces were formed. Similar efficiencies as observed for Hypercarb were observed in chromatograms. The column efficiency was studied as a function of linear flow rate. A minimum reduced plate height of 6 was observed in these studies. To evaluate the performance of the homogeneous edge-plane carbon stationary phase, linear solvation energy relationships were used to compare these ordered carbon surfaces to commercially available carbon stationary phases, including Hypercarb. Reversed-phase separations of nucleosides, nucleotides, and amino acids and derivatives were demonstrated using the ordered carbon surfaces, respectively. The column batch-to-batch reproducibility was also evaluated. The retention times for the analytes were reproducible within 1-6% depending on the analyte.

  17. Unified pH values of liquid chromatography mobile phases.

    PubMed

    Suu, Agnes; Jalukse, Lauri; Liigand, Jaanus; Kruve, Anneli; Himmel, Daniel; Krossing, Ingo; Rosés, Martí; Leito, Ivo

    2015-03-01

    This work introduces a conceptually new approach of measuring pH of mixed-solvent liquid chromatography (LC) mobile phases. Mobile phase pH is very important in LC, but its correct measurement is not straightforward, and all commonly used approaches have deficiencies. The new approach is based on the recently introduced unified pH (pH(abs)) scale, which enables direct comparison of acidities of solutions made in different solvents based on chemical potential of the proton in the solutions. This work represents the first experimental realization of the pH(abs) concept using differential potentiometric measurement for comparison of the chemical potentials of the proton in different solutions (connected by a salt bridge), together with earlier published reference points for obtaining the pH(abs) values (referenced to the gas phase) or pH(abs)(H₂O) values (referenced to the aqueous solution). The liquid junction potentials were estimated in the framework of Izutsu's three-component method. pH(abs) values for a number of common LC and LC-MS mobile phases have been determined. The pH(abs) scale enables for the first time direct comparison of acidities of any LC mobile phases, with different organic additives, different buffer components, etc. A possible experimental protocol of putting this new approach into chromatographic practice has been envisaged and its applicability tested. It has been demonstrated that the ionization behavior of bases (cationic acids) in the mobile phases can be better predicted by using the pH(abs)(H₂O) values and aqueous pKa values than by using the alternative means of expressing mobile phase acidity. Description of the ionization behavior of acids on the basis of pH(abs)(H₂O) values is possible if the change of their pKa values with solvent composition change is taken into account. PMID:25664372

  18. Variational studies of exotic bose liquid, spin liquid, and magnetic phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tay, Tiamhock

    The strong interest in strongly correlated systems in condensed matter physics has continued unabated for the past few decades. In recent years, the number of novel, exotic quantum phases found in theoretical studies has seen a phenomenal rise. Among those interesting quantum states are bose liquids and spin liquids, where strong quantum fluctuations have prevented the systems from developing a long range order. Our work in this thesis seeks to further the understanding of frustrated systems. In the study of a hard-core boson model with ring-only exchange interactions on a square lattice, we obtain concrete numerical realization of the unconventional Exciton Bose Liquid (EBL) phase, which possesses interesting properties such as a "Bose surface'' which resembles the Fermi surface in a metal, as well as unusual thermodynamic properties such as a T log T dependence for specific heat. An equally important result from this work is the demonstration that the widely used Gutzwiller projection on slave-particle wave functions may generally fail to capture the correct long wavelength physics in the respective systems. For the Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the kagome lattice, which is a promising candidate for realizing a spin-disordered ground state, our variational study shows that the projected Schwinger boson wave function is energetically better than the Dirac spin liquid wave function when a small antiferromagnetic second-neighbor spin coupling is added to the nearest-neighbor model. We also study the anisotropic triangular Heisenberg antiferromagnetic in magnetic field, and find simple, yet accurate wave functions for various regions of the surprisingly rich phase diagram, thus providing insights into the energetics of the competing phases in this interesting model. Finally, our work also highlights permanent-type wave functions as potentially useful constructions in variational studies of systems with short-ranged correlations, e.g., a Mott insulator and a gapped

  19. Influence of phase delay profile on diffraction efficiency of liquid crystal optical phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lin; Zhang, Jian; Wu, Li Ying

    2009-06-01

    The hardware structure and driving voltage of liquid crystal optical phased array (LCOPA) devices determine the produced phase delay characteristics. The phase delay profile influences directly the device's diffraction efficiency. In this paper, a sawtooth-shaped phase delay model of LCOPA was proposed to analyze quantitatively the influence factors of diffraction efficiency employing Fourier optics theory. Analysis results show that flyback region size is the main factor that affects diffraction efficiency. The influence extent varies with different maximum-phase-delays and grating periods. There exists an optimized curve between maximum-phase-delay and flyback region, and between maximum-phase-delay and grating period, individually. The smaller the grating period is or the larger the flyback region is, the more evident the optimization effect becomes, and the maximum increase ratio is up to 16%. Some feasible experiments were done to test theoretical analysis, and the experimental results agreed with the analysis results.

  20. Fermi-liquid breakdown in the paramagnetic phase of a pure metal.

    PubMed

    Doiron-Leyraud, N; Walker, I R; Taillefer, L; Steiner, M J; Julian, S R; Lonzarich, G G

    2003-10-01

    Fermi-liquid theory (the standard model of metals) has been challenged by the discovery of anomalous properties in an increasingly large number of metals. The anomalies often occur near a quantum critical point--a continuous phase transition in the limit of absolute zero, typically between magnetically ordered and paramagnetic phases. Although not understood in detail, unusual behaviour in the vicinity of such quantum critical points was anticipated nearly three decades ago by theories going beyond the standard model. Here we report electrical resistivity measurements of the 3d metal MnSi, indicating an unexpected breakdown of the Fermi-liquid model--not in a narrow crossover region close to a quantum critical point where it is normally expected to fail, but over a wide region of the phase diagram near a first-order magnetic transition. In this regime, corrections to the Fermi-liquid model are expected to be small. The range in pressure, temperature and applied magnetic field over which we observe an anomalous temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity in MnSi is not consistent with the crossover behaviour widely seen in quantum critical systems. This may suggest the emergence of a well defined but enigmatic quantum phase of matter.

  1. Ionic liquids in refinery desulfurization: comparison between biphasic and supported ionic liquid phase suspension processes.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, Esther; Haumann, Marco; Jess, Andreas; Seeberger, Andreas; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The desulfurization of fuel compounds in the presence of ionic liquids is reported. For this purpose, the desulfurization efficiency of a variety of imidazolium phosphate ionic liquids has been tested. Dibenzothiophene/dodecane and butylmercaptan/decane mixtures were used as model systems. Single-stage extractions reduced the sulfur content from 500 ppm to 200 ppm. In multistage extractions the sulfur content could be lowered to less than 10 ppm within seven stages. Regeneration of the ionic liquid was achieved by distillation or re-extraction procedures. Supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) materials, obtained by dispersing the ionic liquid as a thin film on highly porous silica, exhibited a significantly higher extraction performance owing to their larger surface areas, reducing the sulfur content to less than 100 ppm in one stage. Multistage extraction with these SILP materials reduced the sulfur level to 50 ppm in the second stage. The SILP technology offers very efficient utilization of ionic liquids and circumvents mass transport limitations because of the small film thickness and large surface area, and allows application of the simple packed-bed column extraction technique. PMID:19798713

  2. Preconcentration of aqueous dyes through phase-transfer liquid-phase microextraction with a room-temperature ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiu-Liang; Chang, Shuo-Kai; Lee, Chia-Ying; Chuang, Li-Lin; Wei, Guor-Tzo

    2012-09-12

    In this study, we employed the room-temperature ionic liquid [bmim][PF(6)] as both ion-pair agent and an extractant in the phase-transfer liquid-phase microextraction (PTLPME) of aqueous dyes. In the PTLPME method, a dye solution was added to the extraction solution, comprising a small amount of [bmim][PF(6)] in a relatively large amount of CH(2)Cl(2), which serves as the disperser solvent to an extraction solution. Following extraction, CH(2)Cl(2) was evaporated from the extractant, resulting in the extracted dyes being concentrated in a small volume of the ionic liquid phase to increase the enrichment factor. The enrichment factors of for the dye Methylene Blue, Neutral Red, and Methyl Red were approximately 500, 550 and 400, respectively; their detection limits were 0.014, 0.43, and 0.02 μg L(-1), respectively, with relative standard deviations of 4.72%, 4.20%, and 6.10%, respectively.

  3. Unstable modes in supercooled and normal liquids: Density of states, energy barriers, and self-diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyes, T.

    1994-09-01

    The unstable mode density of states <ρu(ω;T)> is obtained from computer simulation and is analyzed, theoretically and empirically, over a broad range of supercooled and normal liquid temperatures in the unit density Lennard-Jones liquid. The functional form of <ρu(ω;T)> is determined and the ω, T dependence is seen to be consistent with a theory given by us previously. The parameters in the theory are determined and are related to the topological features of the potential energy surface in the configuration space; it appears that diffusion involves a low degree of cooperativity at all but the lowest temperatures. It is shown that analysis of <ρu(ω;T)> yields considerable information about the energy barriers to diffusion, namely, a characteristic ω-dependent energy and the distribution of barrier heights, gν(E). The improved description of <ρu(ω;T)> obtained in the paper is used to implement normal mode theory of the self-diffusion constant D(T) with no undetermined constants; agreement with simulation in the supercooled liquid is excellent. Use of a lower frequency cutoff on the contribution of unstable modes to diffusion, in an attempt to remove spurious contributions from anharmonicities unrelated to barrier crossing, yields the Zwanzig-Bassler temperature dependence for D(T). It is argued that the distribution of barriers plays a crucial role in determining the T dependence of the self-diffusion constant.

  4. Statistical thermodynamics of liquid-liquid phase separation in ternary systems during complex coacervation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, Nisha; Bohidar, H. B.

    2010-09-01

    Liquid-liquid phase separation leading to complex coacervation in a ternary system (oppositely charged polyion and macroion in a solvent) is discussed within the framework of a statistical thermodynamics model. The polyion and the macroion in the ternary system interact to form soluble aggregates (complexes) in the solvent, which undergoes liquid-liquid phase separation. Four necessary conditions are shown to drive the phase separation: (i) (σ23)3r/Φ23c≥((64)/(9α2))(χ23Φ3)2 , (ii) r≥[(64(χ23Φ3)2)/(9α2σ233)]1/2 , (iii) χ23≥((2χ231-1))/(Φ23cΦ3) , and (iv) (σ23)2/I≥(8)/(3α)(2χ231-1) (where σ23 is the surface charge on the complex formed due to binding of the polyelectrolyte and macroion, Φ23c is the critical volume fraction of the complex, χ23 is the Flory interaction parameter between polyelectrolyte and macroion, χ231 is the same between solvent and the complex, Φ3 is the volume fraction of the macroions, I is the ionic strength of the solution, α is electrostatic interaction parameter and r is typically of the order of molecular weight of the polyions). It has been shown that coacervation always requires a hydrated medium. In the case of a colloidal macroion and polyelectrolyte coacervation, molecular weight of polyelectrolyte must satisfy the condition r≥103Da to exhibit liquid-liquid phase separation. This model has been successfully applied to study the coacervation phenomenon observed in aqueous Laponite (macroion)-gelatin (polyion) system where it was found that the coacervate volume fraction, δΦ23˜χ2312 (where δΦ23 is the volume fraction of coacervates formed during phase separation). The free energy and entropy of this process have been evaluated, and a free-energy landscape has been drawn for this system that maps the pathway leading to phase separation.

  5. Optical continuous phase-only correlator using liquid crystal television

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Yunlong; Paul-Hus, Gilles

    1993-11-01

    We use a commercially available liquid crystal television (LCTV) for encoding real-time on- axis continuous phase-only filter (POF) in a Vander Lugt type optical correlator. We show by theory and experiments that filter coded on the LCTV with phase mismatching and coupled amplitude modulation maintains a term that is the true POF with a diffraction efficiency to about 70%, plus a zero order spot. The correlation output is a superposition of the POF correlation peak with an image of the input. The filter, referred as to the phase dominant filter, behaves like the POF with advantages of on-axis correlation: high light efficiency and utilization of all the available space bandwidth product of the LCTV. Optical experimental results are shown.

  6. Asymmetric dynamic phase holographic grating in nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Chang-Yu; Shi, Hong-Xin; Ai, Yan-Bao; Yin, Xiang-Bao; Wang, Feng; Ding, Hong-Wei

    2016-09-01

    A new scheme for recording a dynamic phase grating with an asymmetric profile in C60-doped homeotropically aligned nematic liquid crystal (NLC) was presented. An oblique incidence beam was used to record the thin asymmetric dynamic phase holographic grating. The diffraction efficiency we achieved is more than 40%, exceeding the theoretical limit for symmetric profile gratings. Both facts can be explained by assuming that a grating with an asymmetric saw-tooth profile is formed in the NLC. Finally, physical mechanism and mathematical model for characterizing the asymmetric phase holographic grating were presented, based on the photo-refractive-like (PR-like) effect. Project supported by the Science and Technology Programs of the Educational Committee of Heilongjiang Province, China (Grant No. 12541730) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61405057).

  7. Luttinger liquid with complex forward scattering: Robustness and Berry phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dóra, Balázs; Moessner, Roderich

    2016-02-01

    Luttinger liquids (LLs) are one-dimensional systems with well-understood instabilities due to Umklapp or backscattering. We study a generalization of the Luttinger model, which incorporates a time reversal symmetry breaking interaction producing a complex forward scattering amplitude (g2 process). The resulting low energy state is still a LL and belongs to the family of interacting Schulz-Shastry models. Remarkably, it becomes increasingly robust against additional perturbations—for purely imaginary g2, both Umklapp and local backscattering are always irrelevant. Changing the phase of the interaction generates a nontrivial Berry phase, with a universal geometric phase difference between ground and a one boson excited state depending only on the LL parameter.

  8. Modified phase-field-crystal model for solid-liquid phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Can; Wang, Jincheng; Wang, Zhijun; Li, Junjie; Guo, Yaolin; Tang, Sai

    2015-07-01

    A modified phase-field-crystal (PFC) model is proposed to describe solid-liquid phase transitions by reconstructing the correlation function. The effects of fitting parameters of our modified PFC model on the bcc-liquid phase diagram, numerical stability, and solid-liquid interface properties during planar interface growth are examined carefully. The results indicate that the increase of the correlation function peak width at k =km will enhance the stability of the ordered phase, while the increase of peak height at k =0 will narrow the two-phase coexistence region. The third-order term in the free-energy function and the short wave-length of the correlation function have significant influences on the numerical stability of the PFC model. During planar interface growth, the increase of peak width at k =km will decrease the interface width and the velocity coefficient C , but increase the anisotropy of C and the interface free energy. Finally, the feasibility of the modified phase-field-crystal model is demonstrated with a numerical example of three-dimensional dendritic growth of a body-centered-cubic structure.

  9. Modified phase-field-crystal model for solid-liquid phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Can; Wang, Jincheng; Wang, Zhijun; Li, Junjie; Guo, Yaolin; Tang, Sai

    2015-07-01

    A modified phase-field-crystal (PFC) model is proposed to describe solid-liquid phase transitions by reconstructing the correlation function. The effects of fitting parameters of our modified PFC model on the bcc-liquid phase diagram, numerical stability, and solid-liquid interface properties during planar interface growth are examined carefully. The results indicate that the increase of the correlation function peak width at k=k(m) will enhance the stability of the ordered phase, while the increase of peak height at k=0 will narrow the two-phase coexistence region. The third-order term in the free-energy function and the short wave-length of the correlation function have significant influences on the numerical stability of the PFC model. During planar interface growth, the increase of peak width at k=k(m) will decrease the interface width and the velocity coefficient C, but increase the anisotropy of C and the interface free energy. Finally, the feasibility of the modified phase-field-crystal model is demonstrated with a numerical example of three-dimensional dendritic growth of a body-centered-cubic structure. PMID:26274309

  10. Morphologies of aerosol particles consisting of two liquid phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Mijung; Marcolli, Claudia; Krieger, Ulrich; Peter, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) might be a common feature in mixed organic/ammonium sulfate (AS)/H2O particles. Song et al. (2012) observed that in atmospheric relevant organic/AS/H2O mixtures LLPS always occurred for organic aerosol compositions with O:C < 0.56, depended on the specific functional groups of organics in the range of 0.56 < O:C < 0.80 and never appeared for O:C > 0.80. The composition of the organic fraction and the mixing state of aerosol particles may influence deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) and efflorescence relative humidity (ERH) of inorganic salts during RH cycles and also aerosol morphology. In order to determine how the deliquescence and efflorescence of AS in mixed organic/AS/H2O particles is influenced by LLPS and to identify the corresponding morphologies of the particles, we subjected organic/AS/H2O particles deposited on a hydrophobically coated substrate to RH cycles and observed the phase transitions using optical microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. In this study, we report results from 21 organic/AS/H2O systems with O:C ranging from 0.55 - 0.85 covering aliphatic and aromatic oxidized compounds. Eight systems did not show LLPS for all investigated organic-to-inorganic ratios, nine showed core-shell morphology when present in a two-liquid-phases state and four showed both, core-shell or partially engulfed configurations depending on the organic-to-inorganic ratio. While AS in aerosol particles with complete LLPS showed almost constant values of ERH = 44 ± 4 % and DRH = 77 ± 2 %, a strong reduction or complete inhibition of efflorescence occurred for mixtures that did not exhibit LLPS. To confirm these findings, we performed supplementary experiments on levitated particles in an electrodynamic balance and compared surface and interfacial tensions of the investigated mixtures. Reference Song, M., C. Marcolli, U. K. Krieger, A. Zuend, and T. Peter (2012), Liquid-liquid phase separation in

  11. Amphitropic liquid crystal phases from polyhydroxy sugar surfactants: Fundamental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou Zied, Osama K.; Hashim, Rauzah; Timimi, B. A.

    2015-03-01

    The self-assembly phenomena on a special class of poly-hydroxy sugar surfactant have been studied extensively. This class of material is classified as amphitropic liquid crystals since they exhibit both thermotropic and lyotropic liquid crystalline properties. Hence the potential applications of these non-ionic surfactants are more versatile than those from the conventional lyotropic liquid crystals including those from thermotropic phases, but the latters are yet to be realized. Unfortunately, due to the lack of interest (or even awareness), fundamental studies in thermotropic glycolipids are scanty to support application development, and any tangible progress is often mired by the complexity of the sugar stereochemistry. However, some applications may be pursued from these materials by taking the advantage of the sugar chirality and the tilted structure of the lipid organization which implies ferroelectric behavior. Here, we present our studies on the stereochemical diversity of the sugar units in glycosides that form the thermotropic/lyotropic phases. The structure to property relationship compares different chain designs and other popular polyhydroxy compounds, such as monooleins and alkylpolyglucosides. Different structural properties of these glycosides are discussed with respect to their self-assembly organization and potential applications, such as delivery systems and membrane mimetic study.

  12. Isopropylammonium Formate as a Mobile Phase Modifier for Liquid Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Matthew P.; Zhou, Ling; Camp, Suzanne E.; Danielson, Neil D.

    2012-01-01

    Isopropylammonium formate (IPAF), a new alkylammonium formate (AAF) room temperature ionic liquid, has been synthesized from isopropylamine and formic acid and characterized as an organic solvent mobile phase replacement for reversed-phase liquid chromatography (LC). Characterization of IPAF solvent properties in water such as pH, conductivity, and viscosity, as well as its synthesis, is described. The LC polarity (P′) and the solvent strength (S) parameters are determined to be 6.0 and 2.4, respectively, similar to those same parameters for methanol and acetonitrile. Application of this RTIL is demonstrated as an organic solvent replacement for reversed-phase LC to separate a test mixture of niacinamide, acetophenone and p-nitroaniline. The van Deemter plot profile for several columns of different dimensions, particle size, pore size and stationary phase are compared using an IPAF–water mobile phase. At flow rates above 2 mL/min, on-line mixing of the viscous IPAF with water appears not to be uniform. A flattening of the van Deemter profile is noted for particularly short (50 mm) wide bore (4.6 mm) columns packed with larger particles (10 µm). Small particle longer columns likely facilitated mixing at the beginning of the column generating typical linearly increasing van Deemeter curves. IPAF has been further shown as a function of temperature to be a non-denaturing modifier solvent for the separation of the protein cytochrome c from tryptophan compared to methanol. This is important to show, because the semi-preparative separation of native proteins using AAF mobile phases is the long-term goal of this research program. PMID:22718743

  13. Effect of dimensionality on vapor-liquid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sudhir Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Dimensionality play significant role on `phase transitions'. Fluids in macroscopic confinement (bulk or 3-Dimensional, 3D) do not show significant changes in their phase transition properties with extent of confinement, since the number of molecules away from the surrounding surfaces is astronomically higher than the number of molecules in close proximity of the confining surfaces. In microscopic confinement (quasi 3D to quasi-2D), however, the number of molecules away from the close proximity of the surface is not as high as is the case with macroscopic (3D) confinement. Hence, under the same thermodynamic conditions `phase transition' properties at microscopic confinement may not remain the same as the macroscopic or 3D values. Phase transitions at extremely small scale become very sensitive to the dimensions as well as the surface characteristics of the system. In this work our investigations reveal the effect of dimensionality on the phase transition from 3D to quasi-2D to 2D behavior. We have used grand canonical transition matrix Monte Carlo simulation to understand the vapor-liquid phase transitions from 3D to quasi-2D behavior. Such studies can be helpful in understanding and controlling the fluid film behaviour confined between solid surfaces of few molecular diameters, for example, in lubrication applications.

  14. Effect of dimensionality on vapor-liquid phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Sudhir Kumar

    2014-04-24

    Dimensionality play significant role on ‘phase transitions’. Fluids in macroscopic confinement (bulk or 3-Dimensional, 3D) do not show significant changes in their phase transition properties with extent of confinement, since the number of molecules away from the surrounding surfaces is astronomically higher than the number of molecules in close proximity of the confining surfaces. In microscopic confinement (quasi 3D to quasi-2D), however, the number of molecules away from the close proximity of the surface is not as high as is the case with macroscopic (3D) confinement. Hence, under the same thermodynamic conditions ‘phase transition’ properties at microscopic confinement may not remain the same as the macroscopic or 3D values. Phase transitions at extremely small scale become very sensitive to the dimensions as well as the surface characteristics of the system. In this work our investigations reveal the effect of dimensionality on the phase transition from 3D to quasi-2D to 2D behavior. We have used grand canonical transition matrix Monte Carlo simulation to understand the vapor–liquid phase transitions from 3D to quasi-2D behavior. Such studies can be helpful in understanding and controlling the fluid film behaviour confined between solid surfaces of few molecular diameters, for example, in lubrication applications.

  15. Liquid Crystal Phase Behaviour of Attractive Disc-Like Particles

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liang; Jackson, George; Müller, Erich A.

    2013-01-01

    We employ a generalized van der Waals-Onsager perturbation theory to construct a free energy functional capable of describing the thermodynamic properties and orientational order of the isotropic and nematic phases of attractive disc particles. The model mesogen is a hard (purely repulsive) cylindrical disc particle decorated with an anisotropic square-well attractive potential placed at the centre of mass. Even for isotropic attractive interactions, the resulting overall inter-particle potential is anisotropic, due to the orientation-dependent excluded volume of the underlying hard core. An algebraic equation of state for attractive disc particles is developed by adopting the Onsager trial function to characterize the orientational order in the nematic phase. The theory is then used to represent the fluid-phase behaviour (vapour-liquid, isotropic-nematic, and nematic-nematic) of the oblate attractive particles for varying values of the molecular aspect ratio and parameters of the attractive potential. When compared to the phase diagram of their athermal analogues, it is seen that the addition of an attractive interaction facilitates the formation of orientationally-ordered phases. Most interestingly, for certain aspect ratios, a coexistence between two anisotropic nematic phases is exhibited by the attractive disc-like fluids. PMID:23965962

  16. Partitioning and phase equilibria of PEGylated excipients in fluorinated liquids.

    PubMed

    Paul, Alison; Talbot, Gemma L; Bowles, James W; James, Jennifer; Griffiths, Peter C; Rogueda, Philippe G

    2010-03-15

    Mixtures of common polymeric excipients and hydrofluoroalkane (HFA) liquids show rich and complex phase behaviour. Phase diagrams and phase compositions are reported for poly(ethylene glycol)s with varying levels of end-group methylation in mixed solvent systems consisting of the model propellant 2H,3H-perfluoropentane (HPFP) and the fully fluorinated analogue perfluoropentane (PFP). Studies have been performed as a function of molecular weight as well as end group chemistry (monomethyl, MM; dimethyl, DM; and dihydroxyl, DH), and for binary polymer mixtures in HPFP/PFP solvent systems. The solvent composition required to induce phase separation by addition of the non-hydrogen bonding PFP is strongly dependent on end-group concentrations. It shows a linear increase with increasing methylation, whilst remaining insensitive to OH group concentration in dihydroxylated PEG systems. For single polymer systems it is observed that strong partitioning of the polymer is observed, and changes in polymer concentration occurring across the phase diagram are a result of changing solvent partitioning between upper and lower phases. These solvent effects are dependent on the composition (wt% PFP) in the solvent mixture. The linear dependence of solvent composition required to induce phase separation at fixed polymer concentration on end group concentrations can be used to predict the phase behaviour for mixtures of monomethylated PEG with either dimethyl or dihydroxyl PEGs, whereas mixtures of dihydroxyl with dimethyl end-capped PEGs show a deviation from linear behaviour with dominance of the dihydroxyl end groups, which is reflected in the obtained phase diagrams. This study hence progresses understanding of factors that influence solubility of PEG-type polymers in HFAs and will facilitate the identification of predictive methodologies for formulation.

  17. Dynamics and instantaneous normal modes in a liquid with density anomalies.

    PubMed

    Ciamarra, M P; Sollich, P

    2015-05-20

    We investigate the relation between the dynamical features of a supercooled liquid and those of its potential energy landscape, focusing on a model liquid with density anomalies. We consider, at fixed temperature, pairs of state points with different density but the same diffusion constant and find that surprisingly they have identical dynamical features at all length and time scales. This is shown by the collapse of their mean square displacements and of their self-intermediate scattering functions at different wavevectors. We then investigate how the features of the energy landscape change with density and establish that state points with equal diffusion constant have different landscapes. In particular, we find a correlation between the fraction of instantaneous normal modes connecting different energy minima and the diffusion constant, but unlike in other systems these two quantities are not in one-to-one correspondence with each other, showing that additional landscape features must be relevant in determining the diffusion constant.

  18. Molecular dynamics prediction and experimental evidence for density of normal and metastable liquid zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. P.; Yang, S. J.; Hu, L.; Wei, B.

    2016-06-01

    The density of normal and metastable undercooled liquid zirconium was predicted by performing molecular dynamics calculation with a system consisting of 4000 atoms and measured by electrostatic levitation experiments. The results show that the density increases linearly with the descending of temperature, including a maximum undercooling of 928 K. The density is 6.00 g cm-3 at the melting temperature, which agrees well with the experimental result of 6.06 g cm-3. Furthermore, the atomic number is increased to 32,000 on the basis of 4000 atoms and there appears only 0.02% difference. Besides, the pair distribution function was applied to display the atomic structure, which indicates the liquid structure change occurs at the first neighbor distance.

  19. A polarization independent liquid crystal phase modulation adopting surface pinning effect of polymer dispersed liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Hsin; Tsou, Yu-Shih

    2011-12-01

    A polarization-independent liquid crystal (LC) phase modulation using the surface pinning effect of polymer dispersed liquid crystals (SP-PDLC) is demonstrated. In the bulk region of the SP-PDLC, the orientations of LC directors are randomly dispersed; thus, any polarization of incident light experiences the same averaged refractive index. In the regions near glass substrates, the LC droplets are pinned. The orientations of top and bottom droplets are orthogonal. Two eigen-polarizations of an incident light experience the same phase shift. As a result, the SP-PDLC is polarization independent. Polarizer-free microlens arrays of SP-PDLC are also demonstrated. The SP-PDLC has potential for application in spatial light modulators, laser beam steering, and electrically tunable microprisms.

  20. Supersolidus Liquid Phase Sintering Modeling of Inconel 718 Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levasseur, David; Brochu, Mathieu

    2016-02-01

    Powder metallurgy of Inconel 718 superalloy is advantageous as a near-net shape process for complex parts to reduce the buy-to-fly ratio and machining cost. However, sintering Inconel 718 requires the assistance of supersolidus liquid formation to achieve near full density and involves the risk of distortion at high temperatures. The present work is focused on modeling the onset of sintering and distortion as a function of temperature, grain size, and part geometry for Inconel 718. Using experimental sintering results and data available in the literature, the supersolidus liquid phase sintering of Inconel 718 was modeled. The model was used to define a processing window where part distortion would be avoided.

  1. Numerical Simulation of Transient Liquid Phase Bonding under Temperature Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghobadi Bigvand, Arian

    Transient Liquid Phase bonding under Temperature Gradient (TG-TLP bonding) is a relatively new process of TLP diffusion bonding family for joining difficult-to-weld aerospace materials. Earlier studies have suggested that in contrast to the conventional TLP bonding process, liquid state diffusion drives joint solidification in TG-TLP bonding process. In the present work, a mass conservative numerical model that considers asymmetry in joint solidification is developed using finite element method to properly study the TG-TLP bonding process. The numerical results, which are experimentally verified, show that unlike what has been previously reported, solid state diffusion plays a major role in controlling the solidification behavior during TG-TLP bonding process. The newly developed model provides a vital tool for further elucidation of the TG-TLP bonding process.

  2. Semiphenomenological model for gas-liquid phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benilov, E. S.; Benilov, M. S.

    2016-03-01

    We examine a rarefied gas with inter-molecular attraction. It is argued that the attraction force amplifies random density fluctuations by pulling molecules from lower-density regions into high-density regions and thus may give rise to an instability. To describe this effect, we use a kinetic equation where the attraction force is taken into account in a way similar to how electromagnetic forces in plasma are treated in the Vlasov model. It is demonstrated that the instability occurs when the temperature T is lower than a certain threshold value Ts depending on the gas density. It is further shown that, even if T is only marginally lower than Ts, the instability generates clusters with density much higher than that of the gas. These results suggest that the instability should be interpreted as a gas-liquid phase transition, with Ts being the temperature of saturated vapor and the high-density clusters representing liquid droplets.

  3. Supercritical phenomenon of hydrogen beyond the liquid-liquid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Renzhong; Chen, Ji; Li, Xinzheng; Wang, Enge; Xu, Limei

    2015-06-01

    Using ab initio molecular dynamics simulation, we investigate the supercritical phenomenon associated with the liquid-liquid phase transition of hydrogen by studying the isothermal response functions, such as electric conductivity, molecular dissociation coefficient and isothermal compressibility, with respect to pressure. We find that, along each isotherm in the supercritical region, each of these response functions shows a maximum, the location of which is different for different response functions. As temperature decreases, the loci of these maxima asymptotically converge to a line of zero ordering field, known as the Widom line along which the magnitude of the response function maxima becomes larger and larger until it diverges as the critical point is approached. Thus, our study provides a possible way to locate the liquid-liquid critical point of hydrogen from the supercritical region at lower pressures. It also indicates that the supercritical phonomenon near the critical point of hydrogen is a rather general feature of second-order phase transition, it is not only true for classical systems with weak interactions but also true for highly condensed system with strong inter-atomic interactions.

  4. System for exchange of hydrogen between liquid and solid phases

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, James J.; Grohse, Edward W.; Johnson, John R.; Winsche, deceased, Warren E.

    1988-01-01

    The reversible reaction M+x/2 H.sub.2 .rarw..fwdarw.MH.sub.x, wherein M is a reversible metal hydride former that forms a hydride MH.sub.x in the presence of H.sub.2, generally used to store and recall H.sub.2, is found to proceed under an inert liquid, thereby reducing contamination, providing better temperature control, providing in situ mobility of the reactants, and increasing flexibility in process design. Thus, a slurry of particles of a metal hydride former with an inert solvent is subjected to a temperature and pressure controlled atmosphere containing H.sub.2, to store hydrogen and to release previously stored hydrogen. The direction of the flow of the H.sub.2 through the liquid is dependent upon the H.sub.2 pressure in the gas phase at a given temperature. When the actual H.sub.2 pressure is above the equilibrium absorption pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the right, i.e., the metal hydride is formed and hydrogen is stored in the solid particles. When the actual pressure in the gas phase is below the equilibrium dissociation pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the left, the metal hydride is decomposed and hydrogen is released into the gas phase.

  5. System for exchange of hydrogen between liquid and solid phases

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, J.J.; Grohse, E.W.; Johnson, J.R.; Winsche, W.E.

    1985-02-22

    The reversible reaction M + x/2 H/sub 2/ reversible MH/sub x/, wherein M is a reversible metal hydride former that forms a hydride MH/sub x/ in the presence of H/sub 2/, generally used to store and recall H/sub 2/, is found to proceed under an inert liquid, thereby reducing contamination, providing better temperature control, providing in situ mobility of the reactants, and increasing flexibility in process design. Thus, a slurry of particles of a metal hydride former with an inert solvent is subjected to a temperature and pressure controlled atmosphere containing H/sub 2/, to store hydrogen and to release previously stored hydrogen. The direction of the flow of the H/sub 2/ through the liquid is dependent upon the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase at a given temperature. When the actual H/sub 2/ pressure is above the equilibrium absorption pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the right, i.e., the metal hydride is formed and hydrogen is stored in the solid particle. When the actual pressure in the gas phase is below the equilibrium dissociation pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the left, the metal hydride is decomposed and hydrogen is released into the gas phase.

  6. Disappearance of Widom Line for Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition with Horizontal Coexistence Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jiayuan; Xu, Limei; Buldyrev, Sergey; Angell, Austen; Stanley, Gene

    2012-02-01

    The study of spherically symmetric two-scale Jagla model with both repulsive and attractive ramps has been very successful in demonstrating the anomalous behavior of liquids (especially water) and its relation with respect to the existence of a liquid-liquid (LL) critical point. However, the co-existence line of Jagla model shows a positive slope, which is opposite to what has been found in the simulations of water. To more convincingly link the result of the study on Jagla model with that of water, we applied discrete molecular dynamics to Gibson and Wilding's modified Jagla model and found that by shrinking both the attractive and repulsive ramps, the slope of the coexistence line can be reduced to zero. However, at these values of the parameters, the LL critical point becomes completely unstable with respect to crystal and glass. We further studied the Widom line, defined as extreme of response functions and also continuation of the coexistence line into one phase region, and found Widom line disappeared in the case of zero slope of the coexistence line, due to the equal enthalpy of low-density liquid (LDL) and high-density liquid (HDL).

  7. Liquid-Liquid Phase Transitions of Phosphorus via Constant-Pressure First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishita, Tetsuya

    2001-09-01

    Pressure-induced phase transitions in liquid phosphorus have been studied by constant-pressure first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. By compressing a low-pressure liquid which consists of the tetrahedral P4 molecules, a structural phase transition from the molecular to polymeric liquid (a high-pressure phase) observed in the recent experiment by Katayama et al. [Nature (London) 403, 170 (2000)] was successfully realized. It is found that this transition is caused by a breakup of the tetrahedral molecules with large volume contraction. The same transition is also realized by heating. This indicates that only the polymeric liquid can stably exist at high temperature.

  8. NGNP Process Heat Utilization: Liquid Metal Phase Change Heat Exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Mike Patterson; Vivek Utgikar; Fred Gunnerson

    2008-09-01

    One key long-standing issue that must be overcome to fully realize the successful growth of nuclear power is to determine other benefits of nuclear energy apart from meeting the electricity demands. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will most likely be producing electricity and heat for the production of hydrogen and/or oil retrieval from oil sands and oil shale to help in our national pursuit of energy independence. For nuclear process heat to be utilized, intermediate heat exchange is required to transfer heat from the NGNP to the hydrogen plant or oil recovery field in the most efficient way possible. Development of nuclear reactor - process heat technology has intensified the interest in liquid metals as heat transfer media because of their ideal transport properties. Liquid metal heat exchangers are not new in practical applications. An important rational for considering liquid metals is the potential convective heat transfer is among the highest known. Thus explains the interest in liquid metals as coolant for intermediate heat exchange from NGNP. For process heat it is desired that, intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) transfer heat from the NGNP in the most efficient way possible. The production of electric power at higher efficiency via the Brayton Cycle, and hydrogen production, requires both heat at higher temperatures and high effectiveness compact heat exchangers to transfer heat to either the power or process cycle. Compact heat exchangers maximize the heat transfer surface area per volume of heat exchanger; this has the benefit of reducing heat exchanger size and heat losses. High temperature IHX design requirements are governed in part by the allowable temperature drop between the outlet and inlet of the NGNP. In order to improve the characteristics of heat transfer, liquid metal phase change heat exchangers may be more effective and efficient. This paper explores the overall heat transfer characteristics and pressure drop of the phase change

  9. A novel procedure for phase separation in dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of the aqueous phase.

    PubMed

    March, J G; Cerdà, V

    2016-08-15

    In this paper, an alternative for handling the organic phase after a dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction using organic solvents lighter than water is presented. It is based on solidification (at -18°C) of the aqueous phase obtained after centrifugation, and the decantation, collection and analysis of the liquid organic layer. The extraction of nicotine in toluene, and its determination in eggplant samples was conducted as a proof of concept. The study has been carried out using standards prepared in water and the formation of the dispersion was assisted by sonication. The organic extract was analysed using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Satisfactory analytical figures of merit as: limit of detection (0.4µgL(-1), 2ngg(-1) wet sample), limit of quantification (1.2µgL(-1), 6.5ngg(-1) wet sample), within-day precision (RSD=7%), and linearity interval (up to 384µgL(-1) nicotine) were achieved. It constituted a contribution to the handling of organic extracts after microextraction processes. PMID:27260454

  10. Liquid-Phase Processing of Barium Titanate Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, David Thomas

    Processing of thin films introduces strict limits on the thermal budget due to substrate stability and thermal expansion mismatch stresses. Barium titanate serves as a model system for the difficulty in producing high quality thin films because of sensitivity to stress, scale, and crystal quality. Thermal budget restriction leads to reduced crystal quality, density, and grain growth, depressing ferroelectric and nonlinear dielectric properties. Processing of barium titanate is typically performed at temperatures hundreds of degrees above compatibility with metalized substrates. In particular integration with silicon and other low thermal expansion substrates is desirable for reductions in costs and wider availability of technologies. In bulk metal and ceramic systems, sintering behavior has been encouraged by the addition of a liquid forming second phase, improving kinetics and promoting densification and grain growth at lower temperatures. This approach is also widespread in the multilayer ceramic capacitor industry. However only limited exploration of flux processing with refractory thin films has been performed despite offering improved dielectric properties for barium titanate films at lower temperatures. This dissertation explores physical vapor deposition of barium titanate thin films with addition of liquid forming fluxes. Flux systems studied include BaO-B2O3, Bi2O3-BaB2O 4, BaO-V2O5, CuO-BaO-B2O3, and BaO-B2O3 modified by Al, Si, V, and Li. Additions of BaO-B2O3 leads to densification and an increase in average grain size from 50 nm to over 300 nm after annealing at 900 °C. The ability to tune permittivity of the material improved from 20% to 70%. Development of high quality films enables engineering of ferroelectric phase stability using residual thermal expansion mismatch in polycrystalline films. The observed shifts to TC match thermodynamic calculations, expected strain from the thermal expansion coefficients, as well as x-ray diffract measurements

  11. Investigating materials formation with liquid-phase and cryogenic TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Yoreo, J. J.; N. A. J. M., Sommerdijk

    2016-08-01

    The recent advent of liquid-phase transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and advances in cryogenic TEM are transforming our understanding of the physical and chemical mechanisms underlying the formation of materials in synthetic, biological and geochemical systems. These techniques have been applied to study the dynamic processes of nucleation, self-assembly, crystal growth and coarsening for metallic and semiconductor nanoparticles, (bio)minerals, electrochemical systems, macromolecular complexes, and organic and inorganic self-assembling systems. New instrumentation and methodologies that are currently on the horizon promise new opportunities for advancing the science of materials synthesis.

  12. Liquid phase synthesis of copper indium diselenide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Jakhmola, Priyanka; Agarwal, Garima; Jha, Prafulla K.; Bhatnagar, S. P.

    2014-04-24

    Nanoparticles of Copper Indium diselenide (CuInSe{sub 2}), belongs to I-III-VI{sub 2} family has been synthesized via liquid phase route using ethylenediamine as a solvent. Characterization of as-grown particles is done by XRD, HRTEM, DLS, optical microscopy and UV-Vis spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction pattern confirmed that the CuInSe2 nanoparticles obtained reveals chalcopyrite structure. Particle size evaluated from dynamic light scattering of as grown particle possessing radius of 90 nm. The bandgap of 1.05eV is obtained from UV-Vis spectrum which will applicable to the solar cell devices.

  13. Environmental information volume: Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) project

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this project is to demonstrate the commercial viability of the Liquid Phase Methanol Process using coal-derived synthesis gas, a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. This report describes the proposed actions, alternative to the proposed action, the existing environment at the coal gasification plant at Kingsport, Tennessee, environmental impacts, regulatory requirements, offsite fuel testing, and DME addition to methanol production. Appendices include the air permit application, solid waste permits, water permit, existing air permits, agency correspondence, and Eastman and Air Products literature.

  14. Geometrically-frustrated pseudogap phase of Coulomb liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramudya, Y.; Terletska, H.; Pankov, S.; Manousakis, E.; Dobrosavljević, V.

    2012-06-01

    We study a class of models with long-range repulsive interactions of the generalized Coulomb form V(r)∼1/rα. We show that decreasing the interaction exponent in the regime αliquid then survives in a broad pseudogap phase found at T>Tc, which is characterized by an unusual temperature dependence of all quantities. In contrast, the leading critical behavior very close to the charge-ordering temperature remains identical as in models with short-range interactions.

  15. Vapors-liquid phase separator. [infrared telescope heat sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederking, T. H. K.; Brown, G. S.; Chuang, C.; Kamioka, Y.; Kim, Y. I.; Lee, J. M.; Yuan, S. W. K.

    1980-01-01

    The use of porous plugs, mostly with in the form of passive devices with constant area were considered as vapor-liquid phase separators for helium 2 storage vessels under reduced gravity. The incorporation of components with variable cross sectional area as a method of flow rate modification was also investigated. A particular device which uses a shutter-type system for area variation was designed and constructed. This system successfully permitted flor rate changes of up to plus or minus 60% from its mean value.

  16. Effect of temperature in reversed phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Guillarme, D; Heinisch, S; Rocca, J L

    2004-10-15

    The high temperature liquid chromatography (HTLC) reveals interesting chromatographic properties but even now, it misses some theoretical aspects concerning the influence of high temperature on thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of chromatography: such a knowledge is very essential for method development. In this work, the effect of temperature on solute behavior has been studied using various stationary phases which are representative of the available thermally stable materials present on the market. The thermodynamic properties were evaluated by using different mobile phases: acetonitrile-water, methanol-water and pure water. The obtained results were discussed on the basis of both type of mobile phases and type of stationary phases. Type of mobile phase was found to play an important role on the retention of solutes. The kinetic aspect was studied at various temperatures ranging from ambient temperature to high temperature (typically from about 30 to 200 degrees C) by fitting the experimental data with the Knox equation and it was shown that the efficiency is improved significantly when the temperature is increased. In this paper, we also discussed the problem of temperature control for thermostating columns which may represent a significant source of peak broadening: by taking into account the three main parameters such as heat transfer, pressure drop and band broadening resulting from the preheating tube, suitable rules are set up for a judicious choice of the column internal diameter. PMID:15527119

  17. Dynamic phase coexistence in glass-forming liquids.

    PubMed

    Pastore, Raffaele; Coniglio, Antonio; Ciamarra, Massimo Pica

    2015-07-09

    One of the most controversial hypotheses for explaining the heterogeneous dynamics of glasses postulates the temporary coexistence of two phases characterized by a high and by a low diffusivity. In this scenario, two phases with different diffusivities coexist for a time of the order of the relaxation time and mix afterwards. Unfortunately, it is difficult to measure the single-particle diffusivities to test this hypothesis. Indeed, although the non-Gaussian shape of the van-Hove distribution suggests the transient existence of a diffusivity distribution, it is not possible to infer from this quantity whether two or more dynamical phases coexist. Here we provide the first direct observation of the dynamical coexistence of two phases with different diffusivities, by showing that in the deeply supercooled regime the distribution of the single-particle diffusivities acquires a transient bimodal shape. We relate this distribution to the heterogeneity of the dynamics and to the breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation, and we show that the coexistence of two dynamical phases occurs up to a timescale growing faster than the relaxation time on cooling, for some of the considered models. Our work offers a basis for rationalizing the dynamics of supercooled liquids and for relating their structural and dynamical properties.

  18. Three-dimensional colloidal crystals in liquid crystalline blue phases

    PubMed Central

    Ravnik, Miha; Alexander, Gareth P.; Yeomans, Julia M.; Žumer, Slobodan

    2011-01-01

    Applications for photonic crystals and metamaterials put stringent requirements on the characteristics of advanced optical materials, demanding tunability, high Q factors, applicability in visible range, and large-scale self-assembly. Exploiting the interplay between structural and optical properties, colloidal lattices embedded in liquid crystals (LCs) are promising candidates for such materials. Recently, stable two-dimensional colloidal configurations were demonstrated in nematic LCs. However, the question as to whether stable 3D colloidal structures can exist in an LC had remained unanswered. We show, by means of computer modeling, that colloidal particles can self-assemble into stable, 3D, periodic structures in blue phase LCs. The assembly is based on blue phases providing a 3D template of trapping sites for colloidal particles. The particle configuration is determined by the orientational order of the LC molecules: Specifically, face-centered cubic colloidal crystals form in type-I blue phases, whereas body-centered crystals form in type-II blue phases. For typical particle diameters (approximately 100 nm) the effective binding energy can reach up to a few 100 kBT, implying robustness against mechanical stress and temperature fluctuations. Moreover, the colloidal particles substantially increase the thermal stability range of the blue phases, for a factor of two and more. The LC-supported colloidal structure is one or two orders of magnitude stronger bound than, e.g., water-based colloidal crystals. PMID:21368186

  19. Liquid-liquid phase separation in hemoglobins: distinct aggregation mechanisms of the beta6 mutants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiuying; Vekilov, Peter G; Nagel, Ronald L; Hirsch, Rhoda Elison

    2004-03-01

    Reversible liquid-liquid (L-L) phase separation in the form of high concentration hemoglobin (Hb) solution droplets is favored in an equilibrium with a low-concentration Hb solution when induced by inositol-hexaphosphate in the presence of polyethylene glycol 4000 at pH 6.35 HEPES (50 mM). The L-L phase separation of Hb serves as a model to elucidate intermolecular interactions that may give rise to accelerated nucleation kinetics of liganded HbC (beta6 Lys) compared to HbS (beta6 Val) and HbA (beta6 Glu). Under conditions of low pH (pH 6.35) in the presence of inositol-hexaphosphate, COHb assumes an altered R-state. The phase lines for the three Hb variants in concentration and temperature coordinates indicate that liganded HbC exhibits a stronger net intermolecular attraction with a longer range than liganded HbS and HbA. Over time, L-L phase separation gives rise to amorphous aggregation and subsequent formation of crystals of different kinetics and habits, unique to the individual Hb. The composite of R- and T-like solution aggregation behavior indicates that this is a conformationally driven event. These results indicate that specific contact sites, thermodynamics, and kinetics all play a role in L-L phase separation and differ for the beta6 mutant hemoglobins compared to HbA. In addition, the dense liquid droplet interface or aggregate interface noticeably participates in crystal nucleation.

  20. Influence of LC Content on the Phase Structures of Side-Chain Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Tenneti, K.; Chen, X; Li, C; Shen, Z; Wan, X; Fan, X; Zhou, Q; Rong, L; Hsiao, B

    2009-01-01

    We report the phase structures of a series of poly(styrene-block-{l_brace}3'-[4-(4-n-dodecyloxybenzoyloxy)benzoyloxy]-4-(12-methacryloyloxydodecyloxy)benzoyloxybiphenyl{r_brace}) (PS-b-PMAC) side-chain liquid crystalline block copolymers (SC LCBCP). The SC liquid crystalline polymer was formed by side attaching a bent-core mesogen to the polymer backbone using a 12-carbon spacer. The phase structure of the high and low fPMAC samples were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry, small-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering, and transmission electron microscopy techniques. The PS coil block and PMAC LC block phase separate into a lamellar morphology in all of the samples investigated (volume fraction of PMAC fPMAC 0.31-0.65). However, both the LC phase and the orientation of the hierarchical structure under mechanical shear showed strong dependence on the LC content. Samples having a high fPMAC (0.5-0.65) showed a SmC2 LC phase (Smectic C denotes the LC molecules are tilted with respect to the layer normal, and 2 represents a bilayered structure), similar to that observed in PMAC homopolymers. Upon mechanical shear, these smectic layers oriented parallel to the shear plane and the BCP lamellae oriented perpendicular to the shear plane with the layer normal parallel to the vorticity direction. In samples having a lower fPMAC, the BCP lamellae laid parallel to the shear plane and the LC phase structure in these samples was columnar rectangular. A detailed structural and morphological study will be reported.

  1. Extraction of proteins with ionic liquid aqueous two-phase system based on guanidine ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qun; Wang, Yuzhi; Li, Na; Huang, Xiu; Ding, Xueqin; Lin, Xiao; Huang, Songyun; Liu, Xiaojie

    2013-11-15

    Eight kinds of green ionic liquids were synthesized, and an ionic liquid aqueous two-phase system (ILATPS) based on 1,1,3,3-tetramethylguandine acrylate (TMGA) guanidine ionic liquid was first time studied for the extraction of proteins. Single factor experiments proved that the extraction efficiency of bovine serum albumin (BSA) was influenced by the mass of IL, K2HPO4 and BSA, also related to the separation time and temperature. The optimum conditions were determined through orthogonal experiment by the five factors described above. The results showed that under the optimum conditions, the extraction efficiency could reach up to 99.6243%. The relative standard deviations (RSD) of extraction efficiencies in precision experiment, repeatability experiment and stability experiment were 0.8156% (n=5), 1.6173% (n=5) and 1.6292% (n=5), respectively. UV-vis and FT-IR spectra confirmed that there were no chemical interactions between BSA and ionic liquid in the extraction process, and the conformation of the protein was not changed after extraction. The conductivity, DLS and TEM were combined to investigate the microstructure of the top phase and the possible mechanism for the extraction. The results showed that hydrophobic interaction, hydrogen bonding interaction and the salt out effect played important roles in the transferring process, and the aggregation and embrace phenomenon was the main driving force for the separation. All these results proved that guanidine ionic liquid-based ATPSs have the potential to offer new possibility in the extraction of proteins. PMID:24148423

  2. Volume phase transitions of cholesteric liquid crystalline gels

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, Akihiko

    2015-05-07

    We present a mean field theory to describe anisotropic deformations of a cholesteric elastomer without solvent molecules and a cholesteric liquid crystalline gel immersed in isotropic solvents at a thermal equilibrium state. Based on the neoclassical rubber theory of nematic elastomers, we derive an elastic energy and a twist distortion energy, which are important to determine the shape of a cholesteric elastomer (or gel). We demonstrate that when the elastic energy dominates in the free energy, the cholesteric elastomer causes a spontaneous compression in the pitch axis and elongates along the director on the plane perpendicular to the pitch axis. Our theory can qualitatively describe the experimental results of a cholesteric elastomer. We also predict the first-order volume phase transitions and anisotropic deformations of a gel at the cholesteric-isotropic phase transition temperature. Depending on a chirality of a gel, we find a prolate or oblate shape of cholesteric gels.

  3. Olefin Epoxidation in Aqueous Phase Using Ionic-Liquid Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Cokoja, Mirza; Reich, Robert M; Wilhelm, Michael E; Kaposi, Marlene; Schäffer, Johannes; Morris, Danny S; Münchmeyer, Christian J; Anthofer, Michael H; Markovits, Iulius I E; Kühn, Fritz E; Herrmann, Wolfgang A; Jess, Andreas; Love, Jason B

    2016-07-21

    Hydrophobic imidazolium-based ionic liquids (IL) act as catalysts for the epoxidation of unfunctionalized olefins in water using hydrogen peroxide as oxidant. Although the catalysts are insoluble in both the substrate and in water, surprisingly, they are very well soluble in aqueous H2 O2 solution, owing to perrhenate-H2 O2 interactions. Even more remarkably, the presence of the catalyst also boosts the solubility of substrate in water. This effect is crucially dependent on the cation design. Hence, the imidazolium perrhenates enable both the transfer of hydrophobic substrate into the aqueous phase, and serve as actual catalysts, which is unprecedented. At the end of the reaction and in absence of H2 O2 the IL catalyst forms a third phase next to the lipophilic product and water and can easily be recycled.

  4. Olefin Epoxidation in Aqueous Phase Using Ionic-Liquid Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Cokoja, Mirza; Reich, Robert M; Wilhelm, Michael E; Kaposi, Marlene; Schäffer, Johannes; Morris, Danny S; Münchmeyer, Christian J; Anthofer, Michael H; Markovits, Iulius I E; Kühn, Fritz E; Herrmann, Wolfgang A; Jess, Andreas; Love, Jason B

    2016-07-21

    Hydrophobic imidazolium-based ionic liquids (IL) act as catalysts for the epoxidation of unfunctionalized olefins in water using hydrogen peroxide as oxidant. Although the catalysts are insoluble in both the substrate and in water, surprisingly, they are very well soluble in aqueous H2 O2 solution, owing to perrhenate-H2 O2 interactions. Even more remarkably, the presence of the catalyst also boosts the solubility of substrate in water. This effect is crucially dependent on the cation design. Hence, the imidazolium perrhenates enable both the transfer of hydrophobic substrate into the aqueous phase, and serve as actual catalysts, which is unprecedented. At the end of the reaction and in absence of H2 O2 the IL catalyst forms a third phase next to the lipophilic product and water and can easily be recycled. PMID:27219852

  5. Reversible Nanoparticle Cubic Lattices in Blue Phase Liquid Crystals.

    PubMed

    Gharbi, Mohamed Amine; Manet, Sabine; Lhermitte, Julien; Brown, Sarah; Milette, Jonathan; Toader, Violeta; Sutton, Mark; Reven, Linda

    2016-03-22

    Blue phases (BPs), a distinct class of liquid crystals (LCs) with 3D periodic ordering of double twist cylinders involving orthogonal helical director twists, have been theoretically studied as potential templates for tunable colloidal crystals. Here, we report the spontaneous formation of thermally reversible, cubic crystal nanoparticle (NP) assemblies in BPs. Gold NPs, functionalized to be highly miscible in cyanobiphenyl-based LCs, were dispersed in BP mixtures and characterized by polarized optical microscopy and synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The NPs assemble by selectively migrating to periodic strong trapping sites in the BP disclination lines. The NP lattice, remarkably robust given the small particle size (4.5 nm diameter), is commensurate with that of the BP matrix. At the BP I to BP II phase transition, the NP lattice reversibly switches between two different cubic structures. The simultaneous presence of two different symmetries in a single material presents an interesting opportunity to develop novel dynamic optical materials.

  6. The Nematic Phases of Bent-Core Liquid Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Gleeson, Helen F; Kaur, Sarabjot; Görtz, Verena; Belaissaoui, Abdel; Cowling, Stephen; Goodby, John W

    2014-01-01

    Over the last ten years, the nematic phases of liquid crystals formed from bent-core structures have provoked considerable research because of their remarkable properties. This Minireview summarises some recent measurements of the physical properties of these systems, as well as describing some new data. We concentrate on oxadiazole-based materials as exemplars of this class of nematogens, but also describe some other bent-core systems. The influence of molecular structure on the stability of the nematic phase is described, together with progress in reducing the nematic transition temperatures by modifications to the molecular structure. The physical properties of bent-core nematic materials have proven difficult to study, but patterns are emerging regarding their optical and dielectric properties. Recent breakthroughs in understanding the elastic and flexoelectric behaviour are summarised. Finally, some exemplars of unusual electric field behaviour are described. PMID:24700653

  7. Dual-period tunable phase grating using polymer stabilized blue phase liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing; Xing, Yufei; Li, Qing

    2015-10-01

    Dual-period tunable phase grating using polymer stabilized blue phase liquid crystal is demonstrated by controlling its driving scheme. High efficiencies of 35.3% for the small-period phase grating and 28.7% for the large-period phase grating have been achieved because of the rectangular-like phase profile which shows good agreement with the simulation results. The diffraction angle can be alternatively tuned, as well as the diffraction efficiency. Moreover, this device also possesses polarization independency and fast response with a rise time of 826 μs and a decay time of 1.143 ms which shows great potential for diffractive optics. PMID:26421571

  8. Liquid-liquid phase separation in aerosol particles: Imaging at the Nanometer Scale

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Rachel; Wang, Bingbing; Kelly, Stephen T.; Lundt, Nils; You, Yuan; Bertram, Allan K.; Leone, Stephen R.; Laskin, Alexander; Gilles, Mary K.

    2015-04-21

    Atmospheric aerosols can undergo phase transitions including liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) while responding to changes in the ambient relative humidity (RH). Here, we report results of chemical imaging experiments using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) to investigate the LLPS of micron sized particles undergoing a full hydration-dehydration cycle. Internally mixed particles composed of ammonium sulfate (AS) and either: limonene secondary organic carbon (LSOC), a, 4-dihydroxy-3-methoxybenzeneaceticacid (HMMA), or polyethylene glycol (PEG-400) were studied. Events of LLPS with apparent core-shell particle morphology were observed for all samples with both techniques. Chemical imaging with STXM showed that both LSOC/AS and HMMA/AS particles were never homogeneously mixed for all measured RH’s above the deliquescence point and that the majority of the organic component was located in the shell. The shell composition was estimated as 65:35 organic: inorganic in LSOC/AS and as 50:50 organic: inorganic for HMMA/AS. PEG-400/AS particles showed fully homogeneous mixtures at high RH and phase separated below 89-92% RH with an estimated 50:50% organic to inorganic mix in the shell. These two chemical imaging techniques are well suited for in-situ analysis of the hygroscopic behavior, phase separation, and surface composition of collected ambient aerosol particles.

  9. Growth Kinetics of Intracellular RNA/Protein Droplets: Signature of a Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Joel; Weber, Stephanie C.; Vaidya, Nilesh; Zhu, Lian; Haataja, Mikko; Brangwynne, Clifford P.

    2015-03-01

    Nonmembrane-bound organelles are functional, dynamic assemblies of RNA and/or protein that can self-assemble and disassemble within the cytoplasm or nucleoplasm. The possibility that underlying intracellular phase transitions may drive and mediate the morphological evolution of some membrane-less organelles has been supported by several recent studies. In this talk, results from a collaborative experimental-theoretical study of the growth and dissolution kinetics of nucleoli and extranucleolar droplets (ENDs) in C. elegans embryos will be presented. We have employed Flory-Huggins solution theory, reaction-diffusion kinetics, and quantitative statistical dynamic scaling analysis to characterize the specific growth mechanisms at work. Our findings indicate that both in vivo and in vitro droplet scaling and growth kinetics are consistent with those resulting from an equilibrium liquid-liquid phase transition mediated by passive nonequilibrium growth mechanisms - simultaneous Brownian coalescence and Ostwald ripening. This supports a view in which cells can employ phase transitions to drive structural organization, while utilizing active processes, such as local transcriptional activity, to fine tune the kinetics of these phase transitions in response to given conditions.

  10. Experimental investigation of bioethanol liquid phase dehydration using natural clinoptilolite.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Samira; Ghobadian, Barat; Omidkhah, Mohammad-Reza; Towfighi, Jafar; Tavakkoli Yaraki, Mohammad

    2016-05-01

    An experimental study of bioethanol adsorption on natural Iranian clinoptilolite was carried out. Dynamic breakthrough curves were used to investigate the best adsorption conditions in bioethanol liquid phase. A laboratory setup was designed and fabricated for this purpose. In order to find the best operating conditions, the effect of liquid pressure, temperature and flow rate on breakthrough curves and consequently, maximum ethanol uptake by adsorbent were studied. The effects of different variables on final bioethanol concentration were investigated using Response Surface Methodology (RSM). The results showed that by working at optimum condition, feed with 96% (v/v) initial ethanol concentration could be purified up to 99.9% (v/v). In addition, the process was modeled using Box-Behnken model and optimum operational conditions to reach 99.9% for final ethanol concentration were found equal to 10.7 °C, 4.9 bar and 8 mL/min for liquid temperature, pressure and flow rate, respectively. Therefore, the selected natural Iranian clinoptilolite was found to be a promising adsorbent material for bioethanol dehydration process. PMID:27222748

  11. Experimental investigation of bioethanol liquid phase dehydration using natural clinoptilolite

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Samira; Ghobadian, Barat; Omidkhah, Mohammad-Reza; Towfighi, Jafar; Tavakkoli Yaraki, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    An experimental study of bioethanol adsorption on natural Iranian clinoptilolite was carried out. Dynamic breakthrough curves were used to investigate the best adsorption conditions in bioethanol liquid phase. A laboratory setup was designed and fabricated for this purpose. In order to find the best operating conditions, the effect of liquid pressure, temperature and flow rate on breakthrough curves and consequently, maximum ethanol uptake by adsorbent were studied. The effects of different variables on final bioethanol concentration were investigated using Response Surface Methodology (RSM). The results showed that by working at optimum condition, feed with 96% (v/v) initial ethanol concentration could be purified up to 99.9% (v/v). In addition, the process was modeled using Box–Behnken model and optimum operational conditions to reach 99.9% for final ethanol concentration were found equal to 10.7 °C, 4.9 bar and 8 mL/min for liquid temperature, pressure and flow rate, respectively. Therefore, the selected natural Iranian clinoptilolite was found to be a promising adsorbent material for bioethanol dehydration process. PMID:27222748

  12. Three-phase slug flow in microchips can provide beneficial reaction conditions for enzyme liquid-liquid reactions.

    PubMed

    Cech, Jiří; Přibyl, Michal; Snita, Dalimil

    2013-01-01

    Here, we introduce a solution to low stability of a two-phase slug flow with a chemical reaction occurring at the phase interface in a microfluidic reactor where substantial merging of individual reacting slugs results in the loss of uniformity of the flow. We create a three-phase slug flow by introducing a third fluid phase into the originally two-phase liquid-liquid slug flow, which generates small two-phase liquid slugs separated by gas phase. Introduction of the third phase into our system efficiently prevents merging of slugs and provides beneficial reaction conditions, such as uniform flow pattern along the whole reaction capillary, interfacial area with good reproducibility, and intensive water-oil interface renewal. We tested the three-phase flow on an enzyme hydrolysis of soybean oil and compared the reaction conversion with those from unstable two-phase slug flows. We experimentally confirmed that the three-phase slug flow arrangement provides conversions and pressure drops comparable or even better with two-phase liquid-liquid arrangements.

  13. Searching for dark matter with single phase liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Thomas S., Jr.

    The first hint that we fail to understand the nature of a large fraction of the gravitating matter in the universe came from Fritz Zwicky's measurements of the velocity distribution of the Coma cluster in 1933. Using the Virial theorem, Zwicky found that galaxies in the cluster were orbiting far too fast to remain gravitationally bound when their mass was estimated by the brightness of the visible matter. This led to the postulation that some form of non-luminous dark matter is present in galaxies comprising a large fraction of the galactic mass. The nature of this dark matter remains yet unknown over 80 years after Zwicky's measurements despite the efforts of many experiments. Dark matter is widely believed to be a beyond the Standard Model particle which brings the dark matter problem into the realm of particle physics. Supersymmetry is one widely explored extension of the Standard model, from which particles meeting the constraints on dark matter properties can naturally arise. These particles are generically termed weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), and are a currently favored dark matter candidate. A variety of experimental efforts are underway aimed towards direct detection of dark matter through observation of rare scattering of WIMPs in terrestrial detectors. Single phase liquid argon detectors are an appealing WIMP detection technique due to the scintillation properties of liquid argon and the scalability of the single phase approach. The MiniCLEAN dark matter detector is a single phase liquid argon scintillation scintillation detector with a 500 kg active mass. The modular design offers 4pi coverage with 92 optical cassettes, each containing TPB coated acrylic and a cryogenic photomultiplier tube. The MiniCLEAN detector has recently completed construction at SNOLAB. The detector is currently being commissioned, and will soon begin operation with the liquid argon target. Utilizing advanced pulse-shape discrimination techniques, MiniCLEAN will

  14. Surface confined ionic liquid as a stationary phase for HPLC

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qian; Baker, Gary A; Baker, Sheila N; Colon, Luis

    2006-01-01

    Trimethoxysilane ionosilane derivatives of room temperature ionic liquids based on alkylimidazolium bromides were synthesized for attachment to silica support material. The derivatives 1-methyl-3-(trimethoxysilylpropyl)imidazolium bromide and 1-butyl-3-(trimethoxysilylpropyl)imidazolium bromide were used to modify the surface of 3 {micro}m diameter silica particles to act as the stationary phase for HPLC. The modified particles were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and {sup 13}C and {sup 29}Si NMR spectroscopies. The surface modification procedure rendered particles with a surface coverage of 0.84 {micro}mol m{sup -2} for the alkylimidazolium bromide. The ionic liquid moiety was predominantly attached to the silica surface through two siloxane bonds of the ionosilane derivative (63%). Columns packed with the modified silica material were tested under HPLC conditions. Preliminary evaluation of the stationary phase for HPLC was performed using aromatic carboxylic acids as model compounds. The separation mechanism appears to involve multiple interactions including ion exchange, hydrophobic interaction, and other electrostatic interactions.

  15. Stabilizing blue phase liquid crystals with linearly polarized UV light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Daming; Yuan, Jiamin; Schadt, Martin; Yan, Jing; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2015-03-01

    Polymer-stabilized blue-phase liquid crystal (PS-BPLC) has become an increasingly important technology trend for information display and photonic applications. BPLC exhibits several attractive features, such as reasonably wide temperature range, submillisecond gray-to-gray response time, no need for alignment layer, optically isotropic voltageoff state, and large cell gap tolerance when an in-plane switching (IPS) cell is employed. However, some bottlenecks such as high operation voltage, relatively low transmittance, and noticeable hysteresis and prolonged response time at high field region for IPS mode, still remain to be overcome before widespread application of BPLC can be realized. To reduce operation voltage, both new BPLC materials and new device structures have been investigated. In this paper, we demonstrate the stabilization a photopolymer-embedded blue phase liquid crystal precursor using a linearly polarized UV light for first time. When the UV polarization axis is perpendicular to the stripe electrodes of an IPS cell, anisotropic polymer networks are formed through the linear photo-polymerization process and the electrostriction effect is suppressed. As a result, the measured hysteresis is dramatically reduced from 6.95% to 0.36% and the response time shortened by ~2X compared to unpolarized UV exposure. To induce larger anisotropy in polymer networks for mitigating the electrostriction effect, high-intensity linearly polarized UV exposure is preferred. It is foreseeable this method will guide future BPLC device and material development as well as manufacturing process. The dawn of BPLCD is near.

  16. Phase diagrams and kinetics of solid-liquid phase transitions in crystalline polymer blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matkar, Rushikesh A.

    A free energy functional has been formulated based on an order parameter approach to describe the competition between liquid-liquid phase separation and solid-liquid phase separation. In the free energy description, the assumption of complete solvent rejection from the crystalline phase that is inherent in the Flory diluent theory was removed as solvent has been found to reside in the crystalline phase in the form of intercalates. Using this approach, we have calculated various phase diagrams in binary blends of crystalline and amorphous polymers that show upper or lower critical solution temperature. Also, the discrepancy in the chi values obtained from different experimental methods reported in the literature for the polymer blend of poly(vinylidenefluoride) and poly(methylmethacrylate) has been discussed in the context of the present model. Experimental phase diagram for the polymer blend of poly(caprolactone) and polystyrene has also been calculated. Of particular importance is that the crystalline phase concentration as a function of temperature has been calculated using free energy minimization methods instead of assuming it to be pure. In the limit of complete immiscibility of the solvent in the crystalline phase, the Flory diluent theory is recovered. The model is extended to binary crystalline blends and the formation of eutectic, peritectic and azeotrope phase diagrams has been explained on the basis of departure from ideal solid solution behavior. Experimental eutectic phase diagram from literature of a binary blend of crystalline polymer poly(caprolactone) and trioxane were recalculated using the aforementioned approach. Furthermore, simulations on the spatio temporal dynamics of crystallization in blends of crystalline and amorphous polymers were carried out using the Ginzburg-Landau approach. These simulations have provided insight into the distribution of the amorphous polymer in the blends during the crystallization process. The simulated results

  17. Unusual liquid-liquid phase transition in aqueous mixtures of a well-known dendrimer.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Viviana C P; Annunziata, Onofrio

    2015-11-21

    Liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) has been extensively investigated for polymer and protein solutions due to its importance in mixture thermodynamics, separation science and self-assembly processes. However, to date, no experimental studies have been reported on LLPS of dendrimer solutions. Here, it is shown that LLPS of aqueous solutions containing a hydroxyl-functionalized poly(amido amine) dendrimer of fourth generation is induced in the presence of sodium sulfate. Both the LLPS temperature and salt-dendrimer partitioning between the two coexisting phases at constant temperature were measured. Interestingly, our experiments show that LLPS switches from being induced by cooling to being induced by heating as the salt concentration increases. The two coexisting phases also show opposite temperature response. Thus, this phase transition exhibits a simultaneous lower and upper critical solution temperature-type behavior. Dynamic light-scattering and dye-binding experiments indicate that no appreciable conformational change occurs as the salt concentration increases. To explain the observed phase behavior, a thermodynamic model based on two parameters was developed. The first parameter, which describes dendrimer-dendrimer interaction energy, was determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. The second parameter describes the salt salting-out strength. By varying the salting-out parameter, it is shown that the model achieves agreement not only with the location of the experimental binodal at 25 °C but also with the slope of this curve around the critical point. The proposed model also predicts that the unusual temperature behavior of this phase transition can be described as the net result of two thermodynamic factors with opposite temperature responses: salt thermodynamic non-ideality and salting-out strength.

  18. Unusual liquid-liquid phase transition in aqueous mixtures of a well-known dendrimer.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Viviana C P; Annunziata, Onofrio

    2015-11-21

    Liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) has been extensively investigated for polymer and protein solutions due to its importance in mixture thermodynamics, separation science and self-assembly processes. However, to date, no experimental studies have been reported on LLPS of dendrimer solutions. Here, it is shown that LLPS of aqueous solutions containing a hydroxyl-functionalized poly(amido amine) dendrimer of fourth generation is induced in the presence of sodium sulfate. Both the LLPS temperature and salt-dendrimer partitioning between the two coexisting phases at constant temperature were measured. Interestingly, our experiments show that LLPS switches from being induced by cooling to being induced by heating as the salt concentration increases. The two coexisting phases also show opposite temperature response. Thus, this phase transition exhibits a simultaneous lower and upper critical solution temperature-type behavior. Dynamic light-scattering and dye-binding experiments indicate that no appreciable conformational change occurs as the salt concentration increases. To explain the observed phase behavior, a thermodynamic model based on two parameters was developed. The first parameter, which describes dendrimer-dendrimer interaction energy, was determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. The second parameter describes the salt salting-out strength. By varying the salting-out parameter, it is shown that the model achieves agreement not only with the location of the experimental binodal at 25 °C but also with the slope of this curve around the critical point. The proposed model also predicts that the unusual temperature behavior of this phase transition can be described as the net result of two thermodynamic factors with opposite temperature responses: salt thermodynamic non-ideality and salting-out strength. PMID:26451401

  19. Phase-Shifting Liquid Crystal Point-Diffraction Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, DeVon W.; Marshall, Kenneth L.; Mercer, Carolyn R.

    2000-01-01

    , the limited spatial resolution and the methods required for data reduction suggest that a more useful instrument needs to be developed. The category of interferometers known as common path interferometers can eliminate much of the vibration sensitivity associated with traditional interferometry as described above. In these devices, division of the amplitude of the wavefront following the test section produces the reference beam. Examples of these instruments include shearing and point diffraction interferometers. In the latter case, shown schematically, a lens focuses light passing through the test section onto a small diffracting object. Such objects are typically either a circle of material on a high quality glass plate or a small sphere in a glass cell. The size of the focused spot is several times larger than the object so that the light not intercepted by the diffracting object forms the test beam while the diffracted light generates a spherical reference beam. While this configuration is mechanically stable, phase shifting one beam with respect to the other is difficult due to the common path. Phase shifting enables extremely accurate measurements of the phase of the interferogram using only gray scale intensity measurements and is the de facto standard of industry. Mercer and Creath 2 demonstrated phase shifting in a point diffraction interferometer using a spherical spacer in a liquid crystal cell as the diffracting object. By changing the voltage across the cell, they were able to shift the phase of the undiffracted beam relative to the reference beam generated by diffraction from the sphere. While they applied this technology to fluid measurements, the device shifted phase so slowly that it was not useful for studying transient phenomena. We have identified several technical problems that precluded operation of the device at video frame rates and intend to solve them to produce a phase-shifting liquid crystal point-diffraction interferometer operating at

  20. Morphology and crystal phase evolution of GeO 2 in liquid phase deposition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Chengbin; Sun, Wei; Wang, Wei; Li, Yi; Chu, Junhao

    2012-01-01

    Morphology and crystal phase evolution of GeO 2 in liquid phase deposition (LPD) process is investigated. Rod-like solid phases precipitate out of solution ahead of truncated cube-like phases. SEM, XRD and TEM analyses reveal that the two sorts of solid phases are tetragonal GeO 2 and hexagonal GeO 2, respectively. The tetragonal GeO 2 phases start to experience a re-dissolving process as soon as the hexagonal phases come into being. The prior precipitation of the rod-like phase arises from a relatively low solute saturation of tetragonal GeO 2. Fast growth of a tetragonal GeO 2 phase along [111] direction leads to development of a rod-like shape. The re-dissolving phenomenon does not agree with the classic growth kinetics of crystals but is strongly favored by our calculations based on thermodynamics. The GeO 2 solutes are released in a fluctuant way by germanate ions, which promotes the occurrence of the re-dissolution phenomenon. The current researches open a door for room-temperature LPD growth of not only the hexagonal GeO 2 particles and film but also the one-dimensional tetragonal GeO 2 product.

  1. Comparison of electrical and optical characteristics in gas-phase and gas-liquid phase discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qazi, H. I. A.; Nie, Qiu-Yue; Li, He-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Bao, Cheng-Yu

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an AC-excited argon discharge generated using a gas-liquid (two-phase) hybrid plasma reactor, which mainly consists of a powered needle electrode enclosed in a conical quartz tube and grounded deionized water electrode. The discharges in the gas-phase, as well as in the two-phase, exhibit two discharge modes, i.e., the low current glow-like diffuse mode and the high current streamer-like constrict mode, with a mode transition, which exhibits a negative resistance of the discharges. The optical emission spectral analysis shows that the stronger diffusion of the water vapor into the discharge region in the two-phase discharges boosts up the generation of OH (A-X) radicals, and consequently, leads to a higher rotational temperature in the water-phase plasma plume than that of the gas-phase discharges. Both the increase of the power input and the decrease of the argon flow rate result in the increase of the rotational temperature in the plasma plume of the water-phase discharge. The stable two-phase discharges with a long plasma plume in the water-phase under a low power input and gas flow rate may show a promising prospect for the degradation of organic pollutants, e.g., printing and dyeing wastewater, in the field of environmental protection.

  2. Comparison of electrical and optical characteristics in gas-phase and gas-liquid phase discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Qazi, H. I. A.; Li, He-Ping Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Bao, Cheng-Yu; Nie, Qiu-Yue

    2015-12-15

    This paper presents an AC-excited argon discharge generated using a gas-liquid (two-phase) hybrid plasma reactor, which mainly consists of a powered needle electrode enclosed in a conical quartz tube and grounded deionized water electrode. The discharges in the gas-phase, as well as in the two-phase, exhibit two discharge modes, i.e., the low current glow-like diffuse mode and the high current streamer-like constrict mode, with a mode transition, which exhibits a negative resistance of the discharges. The optical emission spectral analysis shows that the stronger diffusion of the water vapor into the discharge region in the two-phase discharges boosts up the generation of OH (A–X) radicals, and consequently, leads to a higher rotational temperature in the water-phase plasma plume than that of the gas-phase discharges. Both the increase of the power input and the decrease of the argon flow rate result in the increase of the rotational temperature in the plasma plume of the water-phase discharge. The stable two-phase discharges with a long plasma plume in the water-phase under a low power input and gas flow rate may show a promising prospect for the degradation of organic pollutants, e.g., printing and dyeing wastewater, in the field of environmental protection.

  3. Hidden Fermi liquid: Self-consistent theory for the normal state of high-Tc superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, Philip A.

    The anomalous "strange metal" properties of the normal, non-superconducting state of the high-Tc cuprate superconductors have been extensively studied for over two decades. The resistivity is robustly T-linear at high temperatures, while at low T it appears to maintain linearity near optimal doping and is T2 at higher doping. The inverse Hall angle is strictly T2 and hence has a distinct scattering lifetime from the resistivity. The transport scattering lifetime is highly anisotropic as directly measured by angle-dependent magnetoresistance (ADMR) and indirectly in more traditional transport experiments. The IR conductivity exhibits a non-integer power-law in frequency, which we take as a defining characteristic of the "strange metal". A phenomenological theory of the transport and spectroscopic properties at a self-consistent and predictive level has been much sought after, yet elusive. Hidden Fermi liquid theory (HFL) explicitly accounts for the effects of Gutzwiller projection in the t-J Hamiltonian, widely believed to contain the essential physics of the high-Tc superconductors. We show this theory to be the first self-consistent description for the normal state of the cuprates based on transparent, fundamental assumptions. Our well-defined formalism also serves as a guide for further experimental confirmation. Chapter 1 reviews the "strange metal" properties and the relevant aspects of competing models. Chapter 2 presents the theoretical foundations of the formalism. Chapters 3 and 4 derive expressions for the entire normal state relating many of the properties, for example: angle-resolved photoemission, IR conductivity, resistivity, Hall angle, and by generalizing the formalism to include the Fermi surface topology---ADMR. Self-consistency is demonstrated with experimental comparisons, including the most recent laser-ARPES and ADMR. Chapter 5 discusses entropy transport, as in the thermal conductivity, thermal Hall conductivity, and consequent metrics of non

  4. A Biaxial Banana Liquid Crystal Phase with Short-range Layer Ordering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yongqiang; Gong, Tao; Chen, Dong; Shao, Renfan; Zhu, Chenhui; Glaser, Matthew; Maclennan, Joseph; Walba, David; Clark, Noel

    2012-02-01

    W623, a single-tail, bent-core molecule with a polar termination on one end and a siloxane-terminated tail on the other, exhibits a ferroelectric, orthorhombic, fluid smectic liquid crystal phase, the SmAPF. Powder x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements reveal an exotic structural transition on cooling from the SmAPF to a SmX phase, in which resolution-limited fluid smectic layering reflections give way to four much broader peaks, indicating short-range layer ordering. This behavior points to the kind of internal frustration that gives rise to our recently discovered helical nanofilament phases. We have performed two-dimensional XRD on aligned samples and discovered that one of the four peaks is from the in-plane order. Freeze-fracture transmission electron microscope (FFTEM) measurements confirm that there is two-dimensional short-range order in the SmX phase, with one periodicity in the layer plane and another normal to the layers. The in-plane periodicity can be measured directly from the packing of fibrils to be about 8 nm, consistent with the in-plane x-ray reflection peak. We will present depolarized transmission light microscopy, high-resolution XRD, and FFTEM studies of pure W623, and of mixtures of W623 with the calamitic liquid crystal 8CB.

  5. Kinetics of diffusional droplet growth in a liquid/liquid two-phase system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glickman, M. E.; Fradkov, V. E.

    1995-01-01

    A new powerful experimental technique based on holographic observations, developed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, now permits observation of small liquid droplets coarsening. This technique was developed and used for mixed-dimensional coarsening studies. Experiments were conducted on an isopycnic two-phase alloy of succinonitrile and water, annealed isothermally over a four-month period. The succinonitrile-rich droplets precipitate from a water-rich liquid matrix having a density very close to that of the droplets. The matrix and droplets, however, have different optical indices. The results of these experiments, along with the results of computer simulation based on the quasi-static diffusion approximation developed at Rensselaer are reported. These results were published recently. Copies of these papers are attached to this report.

  6. Mechanism of continuous-phase mass transfer in agitated liquid-liquid systems

    SciTech Connect

    Skelland, A.H.P.; Moeti, L.T. )

    1990-11-01

    In this paper data are reported on 180 area-free, continuous-phase mass-transfer coefficients for 9 turbine-agitated liquid-liquid systems in baffled vessels. Criteria are established that identify the prevailing class of mass-transfer mechanisms for systems of intermediate or high interfacial tension with low {phi}---namely, k{sub c} {proportional to} D{sub c}{sup 2/3} {mu}{sub c}{sup {minus}1/3} N{sup 3/2}. It is also deduced that k{sub c} {proportional to} d{sub p}{sup 0} for the combined ranges of d{sub p}, {Delta}{rho}, and {mu}{sub c} investigated. A subsidiary result is the correlation of the k{sub c} values obtained, on the basis of local isotropic turbulence theory for the inertial subrange of eddy sizes.

  7. Method for forming single phase, single crystalline 2122 BCSCO superconductor thin films by liquid phase epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, Raghvendra K. (Inventor); Raina, Kanwal (Inventor); Solayappan, Narayanan (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A substantially single phase, single crystalline, highly epitaxial film of Bi.sub.2 CaSr.sub.2 Cu.sub.2 O.sub.8 superconductor which has a T.sub.c (zero resistance) of 83 K is provided on a lattice-matched substrate with no intergrowth. This film is produced by a Liquid Phase Epitaxy method which includes the steps of forming a dilute supercooled molten solution of a single phase superconducting mixture of oxides of Bi, Ca, Sr, and Cu having an atomic ratio of about 2:1:2:2 in a nonreactive flux such as KCl, introducing the substrate, e.g., NdGaO.sub.3, into the molten solution at 850.degree. C., cooling the solution from 850.degree. C. to 830.degree. C. to grow the film and rapidly cooling the substrate to room temperature to maintain the desired single phase, single crystalline film structure.

  8. Diffraction based phase compensation method for phase-only liquid crystal on silicon devices in operation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zichen; Yang, Haining; Robertson, Brian; Redmond, Maura; Pivnenko, Mike; Collings, Neil; Crossland, William A; Chu, Daping

    2012-06-10

    A method to measure the optical response across the surface of a phase-only liquid crystal on silicon device using binary phase gratings is described together with a procedure to compensate its spatial optical phase variation. As a result, the residual power between zero and the minima of the first diffraction order for a binary grating can be reduced by more than 10 dB, from -15.98 dB to -26.29 dB. This phase compensation method is also shown to be useful in nonbinary cases. A reduction in the worst crosstalk by 5.32 dB can be achieved when quantized blazed gratings are used. PMID:22695663

  9. Liquid/liquid metal extraction: Phase diagram topology resulting from molecular interactions between extractant, ion, oil and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, C.; Bauduin, P.; Dufrêche, J. F.; Zemb, T.; Diat, O.

    2012-11-01

    We consider the class of surfactants called "extractants" since they specifically interact with some cations and are used in liquid-liquid separation processes. We review here features of water-poor reverse micelles in water/oil/ extractant systems as determined by combined structural studies including small angle scattering techniques on absolute scale. Origins of instabilities, liquid-liquid separation as well as emulsification failure are detected. Phase diagrams contain the same multi-phase domains as classical microemulsions, but special unusual features appear due to the high spontaneous curvature directed towards the polar cores of aggregates as well as rigidity of the film made by extracting molecules.

  10. Feasibility assessment for a novel reverse-phase wet granulation process: the effect of liquid saturation and binder liquid viscosity.

    PubMed

    Wade, J B; Martin, G P; Long, D F

    2014-11-20

    A novel reverse-phase wet granulation process was developed and the feasibility of the process compared to a conventional wet granulation process. The reverse-phase granulation approach involves the immersion of the dry powder formulation into the binder liquid followed by controlled breakage to form granules. Conventional wisdom would warn against this approach due to the initial formation of a slurry or over-wetted powder formulation. However, a feasibility assessment of the novel approach was motivated by the potential advantages of eliminating traditional granule nucleation variables and reducing risk of uncontrolled granule growth. The effects of liquid saturation and binder liquid viscosity on the physical properties of granules formed using both the reverse-phase and conventional granulation processes were compared. Liquid saturation significantly affected the physical properties of granules prepared using both processes. At liquid saturation up to ∼1 the reverse-phase process typically resulted in larger, less porous granules than the conventional process. However, at a liquid saturation >1.1 the conventional process exhibited uncontrolled growth and significantly larger granule size as a result of decreased intragranular porosity. The response to liquid saturation was seen as a steady growth mechanism for the reverse-phase process compared to an induction growth mechanism for the conventional process, indicating potential robustness advantages of the reverse-phase approach. Despite institutional perceptions to the contrary, the reverse-phase process was shown to be feasible and merits further detailed investigation. PMID:25218187

  11. Effects of Gravity on Cocurrent Two-Phase Gas-Liquid Flows Through Packed Columns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motil, Brian J.; Balakotaiah, Vemuri; Kamotani, Yasuhiro

    2001-01-01

    This work presents the experimental results of research on the influence of gravity on flow pattern transitions, pressure drop and flow characteristics for cocurrent gas-liquid two-phase flow through packed columns. The flow pattern transition data indicates that the pulse flow regime exists over a wider range of gas and liquid flow rates under reduced gravity conditions compared to normal gravity cocurrent down-flow. This is illustrated by comparing the flow regime transitions found in reduced gravity with the transitions predicted by Talmor. Next, the effect of gravity on the total pressure drop in a packed column is shown to depend on the flow regime. The difference is roughly equivalent to the liquid static head for bubbly flow but begins to decrease at the onset of pulse flow. As the spray flow regime is approached by increasing the gas to liquid ratio, the effect of gravity on pressure drop becomes negligible. Finally, gravity tends to suppress the amplitude of each pressure pulse. An example of this phenomenon is presented.

  12. Reverse phase liquid chromatographic determination of some food additives.

    PubMed

    Veerabhadrarao, M; Narayan, M S; Kapur, O

    1987-01-01

    Liquid chromatographic methods are described for the separation and determination of non-nutritive sweeteners, namely, acesulfame, aspartame, saccharin, and dulcin; preservatives such as benzoic acid and p-hydroxybenzoic acid; and caffeine and vanillin in ready-to-serve beverages, ice candy, ice cream, squash beverage, tomato sauce, and dry beverage mix samples. These additives are separated on a muBondapak C18 column using methanol-acetic acid-water (20 + 5 + 75) as mobile phase and detected by UV absorption at 254 nm. Caffeine, vanillin, dulcin, and benzoic acid can be analyzed quickly by using a mobile phase of methanol-acetic acid-water (35 + 5 + 60). Aspartame can be separated in the presence of caffeine and vanillin by using the mobile phase pH 3 acetate buffer-methanol (95 + 5). Retention factors and minimum detectable limits are described. The percentage error and the percent relative standard deviation for 6 replicate samples ranged from 0.3 to 2.8 and from 1.64 to 3.60, respectively. Recovery of additives added to the foods named and analyzed by the direct method and by extraction ranged from 98.0 to 100.6% and from 91.6 to 101.8%, respectively. The proposed LC techniques are simple, rapid, and advantageous because all the additives can be detected in a single step, which makes it useful for the routine analysis of various food products.

  13. A phase-stepped point diffraction interferometer using liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, Carolyn R.; Creath, Katherine; Rashidnia, Nasser

    1995-01-01

    A new instrument, the liquid crystal point diffraction interferometer (LCPDI), has been developed for the measurement of phase objects. This instrument maintains the compact, robust design of Linnik's point diffraction interferometer (PDI) and adds to it phase stepping capability for quantitative interferogram analysis. The result is a compact, simple to align, environmentally insensitive interferometer capable of accurately measuring optical wavefronts with high data density and with automated data reduction. The design of the LCPDI is briefly discussed. An algorithm is presented for eliminating phase measurement error caused by object beam intensity variation from frame-to-frame. The LCPDI is demonstrated by measuring the temperature distribution across a heated chamber filled with silicone oil. The measured results are compared to independently measured results and show excellent agreement with them. It is expected that this instrument will have application in the fluid sciences as a diagnostic tool, particularly in space based applications where autonomy, robustness, and compactness are desirable qualities. It should also be useful for the testing of optical elements, provided a master is available for comparison.

  14. Dynamic structure factor of liquid 4He across the normal-superfluid transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferré, G.; Boronat, J.

    2016-03-01

    We have carried out a microscopic study of the dynamic structure factor of liquid 4He across the normal-superfluid transition temperature using the path integral Monte Carlo method. The ill-posed problem of the inverse Laplace transform, from the imaginary-time intermediate scattering function to the dynamic response, is tackled by stochastic optimization. Our results show a quasiparticle peak and a small and broad multiphonon contribution. In spite of the lack of strength in the collective peaks, we clearly identify the rapid dropping of the roton peak amplitude when crossing the transition temperature Tλ. Other properties such as the static structure factor, static response, and one-phonon contribution to the response are also calculated at different temperatures. The changes of the phonon-roton spectrum with the temperature are also studied. An overall agreement with available experimental data is achieved.

  15. Liquid jet impingement normal to a disk in zero gravity. Ph.D. Thesis Toledo Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labus, T. L.

    1977-01-01

    The free surface shapes of circular liquid jets impinging normal to sharp-edged disks in zero gravity are determined. Zero gravity drop tower experiments yielded three distinct flow patterns that were classified in terms of the relative effects of surface tension and inertial forces. An order of magnitude analysis was conducted that indicated regions where viscous forces were not significant in the computation of free surface shapes. The free surface analysis was simplified by transforming the governing potential flow equations and boundary conditions into the inverse plane, where the stream function and velocity potential became the coordinates. The resulting nonlinear equations were solved by standard finite difference methods, and comparisons were made with the experimental data for the inertia dominated regime.

  16. Relative hydrophobicity between the phases and partition of cytochrome-c in glycine ionic liquids aqueous two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    Wu, Changzeng; Wang, Jianji; Li, Zhiyong; Jing, Jun; Wang, Huiyong

    2013-08-30

    In this work, glycine ionic liquids tetramethylammonium glycine ([N1111][Gly]), tetraethylammonium glycine ([N2222][Gly]), tetra-n-butylammonium glycine ([N4444][Gly]), tetra-n-butylphosphonium glycine ([P4444][Gly]) and tetra-n-pentylammonium glycine ([N5555][Gly]) were synthesized and used to prepare aqueous two-phase systems (ATPSs) in the presence of K2HPO4. Binodal curves of such ATPSs and partition coefficients of a series of dinitrophenylated (DNP) amino acids in these ATPSs were determined at 298.15K to understand the effect of cationic structure of the ionic liquids on the phase-forming ability of glycine ionic liquids, relative hydrophobicity between the phases in the ionic liquids ATPSs, and polarity of the ionic liquids-rich phases. With the attempt to correlate the relative hydrophobicity of the phases in the ATPSs with their extraction capability for proteins, partition coefficients of cytochrome-c in the ATPSs were also determined. It was shown that partition coefficients of cytochrome-c were in the range from 2.83 to 20.7 under the studied pH conditions. Then, hydrophobic interactions between cytochrome-c and the ionic liquid are suggested to be the main driving force for the preferential partition of cytochrome-c in the glycine ionic liquid-rich phases of the ATPSs. Result derived from polarity of the ionic liquids-rich phases supports this mechanism.

  17. Onset of Convection in Two Liquid Layers with Phase Change

    SciTech Connect

    McFadden, G B; Coriell, S R; Gurski, K F; Cotrell, D L

    2006-09-14

    We perform linear stability calculations for horizontal fluid bilayers that can undergo a phase transformation, taking into account both buoyancy effects and thermocapillary effects in the presence of a vertical temperature gradient. We compare the familiar case of the stability of two immiscible fluids in a bilayer geometry with the less-studied case that the two fluids represent different phases of a single-component material, e.g., the water-steam system. The two cases differ in their interfacial boundary conditions: the condition that the interface is a material surface is replaced by the continuity of mass flux across the interface, together with an assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium that in the linearized equations represents the Clausius-Clapeyron relation relating the interfacial temperature and pressures. For the two-phase case, we find that the entropy difference between the phases plays a crucial role in determining the stability of the system. For small values of the entropy difference between the phases, the two-phase system can be linearly unstable to either heating from above or below. The instability is due to the Marangoni effect in combination with the effects of buoyancy (for heating from below). For larger values of the entropy difference the two-phase system is unstable only for heating from below, and the Marangoni effect is masked by effects of the entropy difference. To help understand the mechanisms driving the instability on heating from below we have performed both long-wavelength and short-wavelength analyses of the two-phase system. The short-wavelength analysis shows that the instability is driven by a coupling between the flow normal to the interface and the latent heat generation at the interface. The mechanism for the large wavelength instability is more complicated, and the detailed form of the expansion is found to depend on the Crispation and Bond numbers as well as the entropy difference. The two-phase system allows a

  18. Universality class of the structural phase transition in the normal phase of cuprate superconductors.

    PubMed

    Najafi, M N; Tavana, A

    2016-08-01

    The tetragonal-orthorhombic structural phase transition of oxygen atoms in the basal plane of YBa_{2}Cu_{3}O_{6+δ} high-T_{C} cuprate superconductors is studied numerically. By mapping the system onto the asymmetric next-nearest-neighbor Ising model, we characterize this phase transition. Results indicate the degrees of critical behavior. We show that this phase transition occurs at the temperature T_{C}≃0.148eV in the thermodynamic limit. By analyzing the critical exponents, it is found that this universality class displays some common features, with the two-dimensional three-state Potts model universality class, although the possibility of other universality classes cannot be ruled out. Conformal invariance at T=T_{c} is investigated using the Schramm-Loewner evolution (SLE) technique, and it is found that the SLE diffusivity parameter for this system is 3.34±0.01. PMID:27627249

  19. Universality class of the structural phase transition in the normal phase of cuprate superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafi, M. N.; Tavana, A.

    2016-08-01

    The tetragonal-orthorhombic structural phase transition of oxygen atoms in the basal plane of YBa2Cu3O6 +δ high-TC cuprate superconductors is studied numerically. By mapping the system onto the asymmetric next-nearest-neighbor Ising model, we characterize this phase transition. Results indicate the degrees of critical behavior. We show that this phase transition occurs at the temperature TC≃0.148 eV in the thermodynamic limit. By analyzing the critical exponents, it is found that this universality class displays some common features, with the two-dimensional three-state Potts model universality class, although the possibility of other universality classes cannot be ruled out. Conformal invariance at T =Tc is investigated using the Schramm-Loewner evolution (SLE) technique, and it is found that the SLE diffusivity parameter for this system is 3.34 ±0.01 .

  20. Structure analysis of turbulent liquid phase by POD and LSE techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Munir, S. Muthuvalu, M. S.; Siddiqui, M. I.; Heikal, M. R. Aziz, A. Rashid A.

    2014-10-24

    In this paper, vortical structures and turbulence characteristics of liquid phase in both single liquid phase and two-phase slug flow in pipes were studied. Two dimensional velocity vector fields of liquid phase were obtained by Particle image velocimetry (PIV). Two cases were considered one single phase liquid flow at 80 l/m and second slug flow by introducing gas at 60 l/m while keeping liquid flow rate same. Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) and Linear stochastic estimation techniques were used for the extraction of coherent structures and analysis of turbulence in liquid phase for both cases. POD has successfully revealed large energy containing structures. The time dependent POD spatial mode coefficients oscillate with high frequency for high mode numbers. The energy distribution of spatial modes was also achieved. LSE has pointed out the coherent structured for both cases and the reconstructed velocity fields are in well agreement with the instantaneous velocity fields.

  1. RNA footprinting analysis using ion pair reverse phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Dickman, Mark J; Conroy, Matthew J; Grasby, Jane A; Hornby, David P

    2002-01-01

    Hydroxyl radical footprinting is a powerful technique often employed in characterization of the tertiary interactions between proteins and nucleic acids. Following the generation of a nucleic acid "ladder" either by chemical or enzymatic reactions, the radiolabeled products are traditionally separated by denaturing gel electrophoresis and further quantified by phosphorimaging techniques. Here we report the use of ion pair reverse phase liquid chromatography to analyze the products of an RNA footprinting reaction using fluorescently labeled RNA molecules. This technique offers several advantages over existing procedures, including rapid analysis, automation, and direct quantification of the cleavage products without the need to employ radiolabeling. To illustrate the resolving power of this technique, we have analyzed the products of base hydrolysis, generated from a fluorescently labeled RNA molecule and have subsequently used this method to define the solvent accessibility of the substrate strand as it docks with the hairpin ribozyme. PMID:11911369

  2. Synthesis and Electrochemical Characterization of Liquid Phase Exfoliated Graphene Flakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richie, Julianna; Huffstutler, Jacob; Wasala, Milinda; Winchester, Andrew; Ghosh, Sujoy; Kar, Swastik; Talapatra, Saikat

    2014-03-01

    We will present our results on synthesis and characterization of few-layer graphene nanoflakes obtained from bulk graphite in isopropanol alcohol (IPA) using Liquid-phase exfoliation technique. Results of sample characterization using ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and galvanostatic charge-discharge will be presented. Potential use of these materials as electric double-layer capacitor (EDLC) electrodes were investigated using 6M KOH as electrolyte. We found that these devices possess specific capacitance values as high as 23F/g at a 1 mV scan rate. Several other parameters related to the EDLC performances will be presented in detail.

  3. Phase diagrams of orientational transitions in absorbing nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Zolot’ko, A. S. Ochkin, V. N.; Smayev, M. P.; Shvetsov, S. A.

    2015-05-15

    A theory of orientational transitions in nematic liquid crystals (NLCs), which employs the expansion of optical torques acting on the NLC director with respect to the rotation angle, has been developed for NLCs with additives of conformationally active compounds under the action of optical and low-frequency electric and magnetic fields. Phase diagrams of NLCs are constructed as a function of the intensity and polarization of the light field, the strength of low-frequency electric field, and a parameter that characterizes the feedback between the rotation of the NLC director and optical torque. Conditions for the occurrence of first- and second-order transitions are determined. The proposed theory agrees with available experimental data.

  4. Mass transfer mechanism in chiral reversed phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges

    2014-03-01

    The mechanism of mass transfer in chiral chromatography was investigated using an experimental protocol already applied in RPLC and HILIC chromatography. The different contributions to the reduced height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP) include the longitudinal diffusion HETP term, the solid-liquid mass transfer resistance HETP term, the short-range eddy dispersion HETP term, and the long-range eddy dispersion HETP term. Their accurate measurement permits the determination of the adsorption rate constant kads of trans-stilbene enantiomers on a column packed with Lux 5 μm Cellulose-1 particles. The experimental results demonstrate that the number of adsorption-desorption steps per unit time of chiral compounds on polysaccharide-based chiral stationary phases is four orders of magnitude smaller than that of achiral compounds.

  5. Liquid-phase oxidation of cyclohexanone over cerium oxide catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, H.C. ); Weng, H.S. )

    1990-05-01

    Catalytic oxidation of cyclohexanone in the liquid phase with glacial acetic acid as the solvent over cerium oxide was studied between 5 and 15 atm and 98 and 118 {degrees} C in a batch reactor. The products were adipic acid, glutaric acid, succinic acid, caprolactone, carbon oxides, etc. The reaction undergoes a short induction period prior to a rapid reaction regime. In both regimes, the reaction is independent of oxygen pressure when the system pressure is above 10 atm. The induction period is inversely proportional to both of the catalyst weight and cyclohexanone concentration.During the rapid reaction regime, the reaction rate was found to be proportional to the 0.5 power of the catalyst weight and to the 1.5 power of the cyclohexanone concentration. Reaction mechanisms and rate expressions are proposed. The carbon oxides produced in this study were much lower than those previously reported. The cerium oxide catalyst is stable during the reaction.

  6. Liquid jet breakup and subsequent droplet dynamics under normal gravity and in microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suñol, Francesc; González-Cinca, Ricard

    2015-07-01

    We present an experimental study on the characteristics of liquid jets in different configurations. We consider jets injected perpendicular to gravity, jets injected parallel to gravity, and jets injected in a microgravity environment. We study the role played by gravity in the jet breakup length and in the dynamics of the droplets generated after breakup. We analyze droplets obtained in the dripping and jetting regimes, focusing the study on their size, trajectory, oscillation, and rotation. The particularities of the considered injection configurations are analyzed. In normal gravity conditions, in the dripping and jetting regimes, the breakup length increases with the Weber number. The transition between these regimes occurs at Wecr ≈ 3.2. Droplets are notably larger in the dripping regime than in the jetting one. In the latter case, droplet mean size decreases as the liquid flow rate is increased. In microgravity conditions, droplet trajectories form a conical shape due to droplet bouncing after collision. When a collision takes place, coalescence tends to occur at low modified Weber numbers (Wem < 2) while bouncing is observed at higher values (Wem > 2). The surface of a droplet oscillates after bouncing or coalescence events, following a damped oscillator behavior. The observed oscillation frequency agrees with theoretical predictions.

  7. Retention mechanism for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in reversed-phase liquid chromatography with monomeric stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Rafferty, Jake L; Siepmann, J Ilja; Schure, Mark R

    2011-12-23

    Reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) is the foremost technique for the separation of analytes that have very similar chemical functionalities, but differ only in their molecular shape. This ability is crucial in the analysis of various mixtures with environmental and biological importance including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and steroids. A large amount of effort has been devoted to studying this phenomenon experimentally, but a detailed molecular-level description remains lacking. To provide some insight on the mechanism of shape selectivity in RPLC, particle-based simulations were carried out for stationary phases and chromatographic parameters that closely mimic those in an experimental study by Sentell and Dorsey [J. Chromatogr. 461 (1989) 193]. The retention of aromatic hydrocarbons ranging in size from benzene to the isomeric PAHs of the formula C(18)H(12) was examined for model RPLC systems consisting of monomeric dimethyl octadecylsilane (ODS) stationary phases with surface coverages ranging from 1.6 to 4.2 μmol/m(2) (i.e., stationary phases yielding low to intermediate shape selectivity) in contact with a 67/33 mol% acetonitrile/water mobile phase. The simulations show that the stationary phase acts as a very heterogeneous environment where analytes with different shapes prefer different spatial regions with specific local bonding environments of the ODS chains. However, these favorable retentive regions cannot be described as pre-existing cavities because the chain conformation in these local stationary phase regions adapts to accommodate the analytes.

  8. Thermal conductivity of alternative refrigerants in the liquid phase

    SciTech Connect

    Yata, J.; Hori, M.; Kobayashi, K.; Minamiyama, T.

    1996-05-01

    Measurements of the thermal conductivity of five alternative refrigerants, namely, difluoromethane (HFC-32), pentafluoroethane (HFC-125), 1,1,1-trifluorethane (HFC-143a), and dichloropentafluoropropanes (HCFC-225ca and HCFC-225cb), are carried out in the liquid phase. The range of temperature is 253-324 K for HFC-32, 257-305 K for HFC-125, 268-314 K for HFC-134a, 267-325 K for HCF-225ca, and 286-345 K for HCFC-225cb. The pressure range is from saturation to 30 MPa. The reproducibility of the data is better than 0.5%, and the accuracy of the data is estimated to be of the order of 1%. The experimental results for the thermal conductivity of each substance are correlated by an equation which is a function of temperature and pressure. A short discussion is given to the comparison of the present results with literature values for HFC-125. The saturated liquid thermal conductivity values of HFC-32, HFC-125, and HFC-143a are compared with those of chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC-22) and tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a) and it is shown that the value of HFC-32 is highest, while that of HFC-125 is lowest, among these substances. The dependence of thermal conductivity on number of fluorine atoms among the refrigerants with the same number of carbon and hydrogen atoms is discussed.

  9. Thermal conductivity of alternative refrigerants in the liquid phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yata, J.; Hori, M.; Kobayashi, K.; Minamiyama, T.

    1996-05-01

    Measurements ofthe thermal conductivity of five alternative refrigerants. namely, difluoromethane HFC-321. pentafluoroethane (HFC-125), 1,1,1-trifluoroethane (HFC-143a), and dichloropentafluoropropanes (HCFC-225ca and HCFC-225cb). are carried out in the liquid phase, The range of temperature is 253 324 K for HFC-32, 257 305 K for HFC-125, 268 314 K for HFC-134a. 267 325 K for HCFC-225ca, and 286 345 K for HCFC-225cb, The pressure rank is from saturation to 30 MPa, The reproducibility of the data is better than 0.5% and the accuracy of the data is estimated to be of the order of 1%. The experimental results for the thermal conductivity ofeach substance are correlated by an equation which is a function of temperature and pressure. A short discussion is given to the comparison of the present results with literature values for HFC-125, The saturated liquid thermal conductivity values of HFC-32. HFC-125, and HFC-143a are compared with those of chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC-22) and tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a) and it is shown that the value of HFC-32 is highest, while that of HFC-125 is lowest, among these substances, The dependence of thermal conductivity on number of fluorine atoms among the refrigerants with the same number of carbon and hydrogen atoms is discussed.

  10. Non-aqueous phase liquid spreading during soil vapor extraction

    PubMed Central

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Hunt, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Many non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) are expected to spread at the air – water interface, particularly under non-equilibrium conditions. In the vadose zone, this spreading should increase the surface area for mass transfer and the efficiency of volatile NAPL recovery by soil vapor extraction (SVE). Observations of spreading on water wet surfaces led to a conceptual model of oil spreading vertically above a NAPL pool in the vadose zone. Analysis of this model predicts that spreading can enhance the SVE contaminant recovery compared to conditions where the liquid does not spread. Experiments were conducted with spreading volatile oils hexane and heptane in wet porous media and capillary tubes, where spreading was observed at the scale of centimeters. Within porous medium columns up to a meter in height containing stagnant gas, spreading was less than ten centimeters and did not contribute significantly to hexane volatilization. Water film thinning and oil film pinning may have prevented significant oil film spreading, and thus did not enhance SVE at the scale of a meter. The experiments performed indicate that volatile oil spreading at the field scale is unlikely to contribute significantly to the efficiency of SVE. PMID:14734243

  11. Semiphenomenological model for gas-liquid phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Benilov, E S; Benilov, M S

    2016-03-01

    We examine a rarefied gas with inter-molecular attraction. It is argued that the attraction force amplifies random density fluctuations by pulling molecules from lower-density regions into high-density regions and thus may give rise to an instability. To describe this effect, we use a kinetic equation where the attraction force is taken into account in a way similar to how electromagnetic forces in plasma are treated in the Vlasov model. It is demonstrated that the instability occurs when the temperature T is lower than a certain threshold value T(s) depending on the gas density. It is further shown that, even if T is only marginally lower than T(s), the instability generates clusters with density much higher than that of the gas. These results suggest that the instability should be interpreted as a gas-liquid phase transition, with T(s) being the temperature of saturated vapor and the high-density clusters representing liquid droplets.

  12. Non-Fermi liquid phase in metallic Skyrmion crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Haruki; Parameswaran, Siddharth; Raghu, Srinivas; Vishwanath, Ashvin

    2014-03-01

    Motivated by reports of a non-Fermi liquid state in MnSi, we examine the effect of coupling phonons of an incommensurate skyrmion crystal (SkX) to conduction electrons. We find that non-Fermi liquid behavior emerges in both two and three dimensions over the entire phase, due to an anomalous electron-phonon coupling that is linked to the net skyrmion density. A small parameter, the spiral wave vector in lattice units, allows us to exercise analytic control and ignore Landau damping of phonons over a wide energy range. At the lowest energy scales the problem is similar to electrons coupled to a gauge field. The best prospects for realizing these effects is in short period skyrmion lattice systems such as MnGe or epitaxial MnSi films. We also compare our results with the unusual T 3 / 2 scaling of temperature dependent resistivity seen in high pressure experiments on MnSi. We acknowledge support from the NSF via Grant DMR-0645691, the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences via contract DE-AC02-76SF00515, and the Simons, Templeton, and Alfred P. Sloan Foundations.

  13. Stability of liquid crystalline phases in the phase-field-crystal model.

    PubMed

    Achim, Cristian V; Wittkowski, Raphael; Löwen, Hartmut

    2011-06-01

    The phase-field-crystal model for liquid crystals is solved numerically in two spatial dimensions. This model is formulated with three position-dependent order parameters, namely the reduced translational density, the local nematic order parameter, and the mean local direction of the orientations. The equilibrium free-energy functional involves local powers of the order parameters up to fourth order, gradients of the order parameters up to fourth order, and different couplings between the order parameters. The stable phases of the equilibrium free-energy functional are calculated for various coupling parameters. Among the stable liquid crystalline states are the isotropic, nematic, columnar, smectic-A, and plastic crystalline phases. The plastic crystals can have triangular, square, and honeycomb lattices and exhibit orientational patterns with a complex topology involving a sublattice with topological defects. Phase diagrams were obtained by numerical minimization of the free-energy functional. Their main features are qualitatively in line with much simpler one-mode approximations for the order parameters.

  14. Methylammonium formate as a mobile phase modifier for reversed-phase liquid chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Shau; Danielson, Neil D.

    2009-01-01

    Although alkylammonium ionic liquids such as ethylammonium nitrate and ethylammonium formate have been used as mobile phase “solvents” for liquid chromatography (LC), we have shown that methylammonium formate (MAF), in part because of its lower viscosity, can be an effective replacement for methanol (MeOH) in reversed-phase LC. Plots of log retention factor versus the fraction of MeOH and MAF in the mobile phase indicate quite comparable solvent strength slope values of 2.50 and 2.05, respectively. Using a polar endcapped C18 column, furazolidone and nitrofurantoin using 20% MAF-80% water could be separated in 22 min but no baseline separation was possible using MeOH as the modifier, even down to 10%. Suppression of silanol peak broadening effects by MAF is important permitting a baseline separation of pyridoxine, thiamine, and nicotinamide using 5% MAF-95% water at 0.7 mL/min. Using 5% MeOH-95% water, severe peak broadening for thiamine is evident. The compatibility of MAF as a mobile phase modifer for LC with mass spectrometry detection of water soluble vitamins is also shown. PMID:18849044

  15. Phase distribution measurements in liquid-liquid pipeline flows using an impedance probe

    SciTech Connect

    Angeli, P.; Hewitt, G.F.

    1996-12-31

    A high frequency impedance probe was used for volume fraction distribution measurements and flow pattern identification in oil-water flow. The signal processing technique was based on a method by van der Welle (1985) that attributes to the beginning of the signal rise or fall the contact of the interface with the probe tip. The experiments were performed in two 1 inch nominal bore horizontal test sections made from stainless steel and acrylic resin. Measurements were made for mixture velocities from 1.3 m/s to 1.7 m/s and input oil volume fractions from 25% to 85%. Under these conditions different complex flow patterns exist, whose discrimination with visual observation is difficult. The results revealed that the mixing of the liquid phases is much greater in the rougher steel pipe than in the acrylic pipe under the same conditions and also helped to clearly identify the three layer, the stratified mixed and the fully mixed flow patterns. Liquid-liquid flows appear in many industrial processes and in the petroleum industry in particular, where oil and water are often produced and transported together.

  16. Low Density Phases in a Uniformly Charged Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knüpfer, Hans; Muratov, Cyrill B.; Novaga, Matteo

    2016-07-01

    This paper is concerned with the macroscopic behavior of global energy minimizers in the three-dimensional sharp interface unscreened Ohta-Kawasaki model of diblock copolymer melts. This model is also referred to as the nuclear liquid drop model in the studies of the structure of highly compressed nuclear matter found in the crust of neutron stars, and, more broadly, is a paradigm for energy-driven pattern forming systems in which spatial order arises as a result of the competition of short-range attractive and long-range repulsive forces. Here we investigate the large volume behavior of minimizers in the low volume fraction regime, in which one expects the formation of a periodic lattice of small droplets of the minority phase in a sea of the majority phase. Under periodic boundary conditions, we prove that the considered energy {Γ}-converges to an energy functional of the limit "homogenized" measure associated with the minority phase consisting of a local linear term and a non-local quadratic term mediated by the Coulomb kernel. As a consequence, asymptotically the mass of the minority phase in a minimizer spreads uniformly across the domain. Similarly, the energy spreads uniformly across the domain as well, with the limit energy density minimizing the energy of a single droplet per unit volume. Finally, we prove that in the macroscopic limit the connected components of the minimizers have volumes and diameters that are bounded above and below by universal constants, and that most of them converge to the minimizers of the energy divided by volume for the whole space problem.

  17. Solvent systems for countercurrent chromatography: an aqueous two phase liquid system based on a room temperature ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Angel, Maria Jose; Pino, Veronica; Carda-Broch, Samuel; Berthod, Alain

    2007-06-01

    A new aqueous two phase liquid system (ATPS) based on the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride (BMIM Cl), potassium dibasic phosphate (K(2)HPO(4)) and water was recently proposed in the literature. The full phase diagram of this ATPS was prepared and some tie lines were fully determined. It was compared to classical ATPSs based on polyethylene glycol with an average molecular mass of 1000 (PEG 1000) and 10,000 (PEG 10000) and K(2)HPO(4). Two countercurrent chromatography (CCC) columns, a hydrostatic Sanki and a J type hydrodynamic CCC columns were used to test the liquid phase retention of these ATPSs in all possible configurations. It was found that the BMIM Cl ATPS liquid phases were much easier to retain in the two CCC columns than the PEG 1000 ATPS phases. Using protein and alcohol solutes, it was established that the BMIM Cl ATPS has a polarity completely different from that of the PEG 1000 ATPS. For example, ovalbumin partitions equally between the two phases of the PEG 1000 ATPS (K(D)=1.4) when it is completely located in the BMIM Cl upper phase of the ionic liquid ATPS (K(D)=180). The discrimination factor of the ionic liquid system and its intrinsic hydrophobicity were respectively found three times higher and ten times lower than the respective values of the PEG 1000 ATPS. PMID:17166506

  18. Single lipid extraction: the anchoring strength of cholesterol in liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases.

    PubMed

    Stetter, Frank W S; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Jungwirth, Pavel; Hugel, Thorsten

    2014-09-01

    Cholesterol is important for the formation of microdomains in supported lipid bilayers and is enriched in the liquid-ordered phase. To understand the interactions leading to this enrichment, we developed an AFM-based single-lipid-extraction (SLX) approach that enables us to determine the anchoring strength of cholesterol in the two phases of a phase-separated lipid membrane. As expected, the forces necessary for extracting a single cholesterol molecule from liquid-ordered phases are significantly higher than for extracting it from the liquid-disordered phases. Interestingly, application of the Bell model shows two energy barriers that correlate with the head and full length of the cholesterol molecule. The resulting lifetimes for complete extraction are 90 s and 11 s in the liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases, respectively. Molecular dynamics simulations of the very same experiment show similar force profiles and indicate that the stabilization of cholesterol in the liquid-ordered phase is mainly due to nonpolar contacts.

  19. Single Lipid Extraction: The Anchoring Strength of Cholesterol in Liquid-Ordered and Liquid-Disordered Phases

    PubMed Central

    Stetter, Frank W.S.; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Jungwirth, Pavel; Hugel, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol is important for the formation of microdomains in supported lipid bilayers and is enriched in the liquid-ordered phase. To understand the interactions leading to this enrichment, we developed an AFM-based single-lipid-extraction (SLX) approach that enables us to determine the anchoring strength of cholesterol in the two phases of a phase-separated lipid membrane. As expected, the forces necessary for extracting a single cholesterol molecule from liquid-ordered phases are significantly higher than for extracting it from the liquid-disordered phases. Interestingly, application of the Bell model shows two energy barriers that correlate with the head and full length of the cholesterol molecule. The resulting lifetimes for complete extraction are 90 s and 11 s in the liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases, respectively. Molecular dynamics simulations of the very same experiment show similar force profiles and indicate that the stabilization of cholesterol in the liquid-ordered phase is mainly due to nonpolar contacts. PMID:25185552

  20. Three-phase liquid-liquid-vapor equilibria behavior of certain binary CO/sub 2/-n-paraffin systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hottovy, J.D.; Kohn, J.P.; Luks, K.D.

    1981-07-01

    The 3-phase liquid-liquid-vapor loci of 4 binary CO/sub 2/-n-paraffin systems (n-dodecane, n-tridecane, n-tetradecane, n-pentadecane) are studied, and temperature, pressure, and molar volumes and composition of both liquid phases are reported. It is within this group of n-paraffins that the nature of the upper critical end point for the CO/sub 2/-containing binary systems changes with increasing carbon number from an upper critical solution (temperature) point where L/sub 1/ and L/sub 2/ phases become critical in presence of vapor phase to a K point, where L/sub 2/ and vapor phases become critical in the presence of L/sub 1/ phase. These 4 loci are compared with earlier obtained loci on CO/sub 2/-n-decane and CO/sub 2/-n-elcosane.

  1. Redistribution of black carbon in aerosol particles undergoing liquid-liquid phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunamonti, S.; Krieger, U. K.; Marcolli, C.; Peter, T.

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric black carbon (BC) is a major anthropogenic greenhouse agent, yet substantial uncertainties obstruct understanding its radiative forcing. Particularly debated is the extent of the absorption enhancement by internally compared to externally mixed BC, which critically depends on the interior morphology of the BC-containing particles. Here we suggest that a currently unaccounted morphology, optically very different from the customary core-shell and volume-mixing assumptions, likely occurs in aerosol particles undergoing liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS). Using Raman spectroscopy on micrometer-sized droplets, we show that LLPS of an organic/inorganic model system drives redistribution of BC into the outer (organic) phase of the host particle. This results in an inverted core-shell structure, in which a transparent aqueous core is surrounded by a BC-containing absorbing shell. Based on Mie theory calculations, we estimate that such a redistribution can increase the absorption efficiency of internally mixed BC aerosols by up to 25% compared to the core-shell approximation.

  2. Redistribution of black and brown carbon in aerosol particles undergoing liquid-liquid phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieger, U. K.; Brunamonti, S.; Marcolli, C.; Peter, T.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric black carbon (BC) and to a lesser degree brown carbon is a major anthropogenic greenhouse agent, yet substantial uncertainties obstruct understanding its radiative forcing. Particularly debated is the extent of the absorption enhancement by internally compared to externally mixed BC, which critically depends on the interior morphology of the BC-containing particles. Here we suggest that a currently unaccounted morphology, optically very different from the customary core shell and volume-mixing assumptions, likely occurs in aerosol particles undergoing liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS). Using Raman spectroscopy on micrometer-sized droplets, we show that LLPS of an organic/inorganic model system drives redistribution of BC into the outer (organic) phase of the host particle. This results in an inverted core-shell structure, in which a transparent aqueous core is surrounded by a BC-containing absorbing shell. We also study the redistribution of a model proxy for brown carbon, carminic acid, in single, levitated aqueous aerosol particles undergoing LLPS and compare the measured absorption efficiency with corresponding Mie calculations.

  3. Redistribution of black carbon in aerosol particles undergoing liquid-liquid phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunamonti, Simone; Krieger, Ulrich K.; Marcolli, Claudia; Peter, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric black carbon (BC) is a major anthropogenic greenhouse agent, yet substantial uncertainties obstruct understanding its radiative forcing. Particularly debated is the extent of the absorption enhancement by internally compared to externally mixed BC, which critically depends on the interior morphology of the BC-containing particles. Here we suggest that a currently unaccounted morphology, optically very different from the customary core-shell and volume-mixing assumptions, likely occurs in aerosol particles undergoing liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS). Using Raman spectroscopy on micrometer-sized droplets, we show that LLPS of an organic/inorganic model system drives redistribution of BC into the outer (organic) phase of the host particle. This results in an inverted core-shell structure, in which a transparent aqueous core is surrounded by a BC-containing absorbing shell. Based on Mie theory calculations, we estimate that such a redistribution can reduce the absorption efficiency of internally-mixed BC aerosols by up to 25% compared to the volume-mixing approximation.

  4. Interplay of the Glass Transition and the Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition in Water

    PubMed Central

    Giovambattista, Nicolas; Loerting, Thomas; Lukanov, Boris R.; Starr, Francis W.

    2012-01-01

    Water has multiple glassy states, often called amorphous ices. Low-density (LDA) and high-density (HDA) amorphous ice are separated by a dramatic, first-order like phase transition. It has been argued that the LDA-HDA transformation connects to a first-order liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) above the glass transition temperature Tg. Direct experimental evidence of the LLPT is challenging to obtain, since the LLPT occurs at conditions where water rapidly crystallizes. In this work, we explore the implications of a LLPT on the pressure dependence of Tg(P) for LDA and HDA by performing computer simulations of two water models – one with a LLPT, and one without. In the absence of a LLPT, Tg(P) for all glasses nearly coincide. When there is a LLPT, different glasses exhibit dramatically different Tg(P) which are directly linked with the LLPT. Available experimental data for Tg(P) are only consistent with the scenario including a LLPT. PMID:22550566

  5. Graphene via sonication assisted liquid-phase exfoliation.

    PubMed

    Ciesielski, Artur; Samorì, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Graphene, the 2D form of carbon based material existing as a single layer of atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice, has set the science and technology sectors alight with interest in the last decade in view of its astounding electrical and thermal properties, combined with its mechanical stiffness, strength and elasticity. Two distinct strategies have been undertaken for graphene production, i.e. the bottom-up and the top-down. The former relies on the generation of graphene from suitably designed molecular building blocks undergoing chemical reaction to form covalently linked 2D networks. The latter occurs via exfoliation of graphite into graphene. Bottom-up techniques, based on the organic syntheses starting from small molecular modules, when performed in liquid media, are both size limited, because macromolecules become more and more insoluble with increasing size, and suffer from the occurrence of side reactions with increasing molecular weight. Because of these reasons such a synthesis has been performed more and more on a solid (ideally catalytically active) surface. Substrate-based growth of single layers can be done also by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or via reduction of silicon carbide, which unfortunately relies on the ability to follow a narrow thermodynamic path. Top-down approaches can be accomplished under different environmental conditions. Alongside the mechanical cleavage based on the scotch tape approach, liquid-phase exfoliation (LPE) methods are becoming more and more interesting because they are extremely versatile, potentially up-scalable, and can be used to deposit graphene in a variety of environments and on different substrates not available using mechanical cleavage or growth methods. Interestingly, LPE can be applied to produce different layered systems exhibiting different compositions such as BN, MoS2, WS2, NbSe2, and TaS2, thereby enabling the tuning of numerous physico-chemical properties of the material. Furthermore, LPE can be

  6. Graphene via sonication assisted liquid-phase exfoliation.

    PubMed

    Ciesielski, Artur; Samorì, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Graphene, the 2D form of carbon based material existing as a single layer of atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice, has set the science and technology sectors alight with interest in the last decade in view of its astounding electrical and thermal properties, combined with its mechanical stiffness, strength and elasticity. Two distinct strategies have been undertaken for graphene production, i.e. the bottom-up and the top-down. The former relies on the generation of graphene from suitably designed molecular building blocks undergoing chemical reaction to form covalently linked 2D networks. The latter occurs via exfoliation of graphite into graphene. Bottom-up techniques, based on the organic syntheses starting from small molecular modules, when performed in liquid media, are both size limited, because macromolecules become more and more insoluble with increasing size, and suffer from the occurrence of side reactions with increasing molecular weight. Because of these reasons such a synthesis has been performed more and more on a solid (ideally catalytically active) surface. Substrate-based growth of single layers can be done also by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or via reduction of silicon carbide, which unfortunately relies on the ability to follow a narrow thermodynamic path. Top-down approaches can be accomplished under different environmental conditions. Alongside the mechanical cleavage based on the scotch tape approach, liquid-phase exfoliation (LPE) methods are becoming more and more interesting because they are extremely versatile, potentially up-scalable, and can be used to deposit graphene in a variety of environments and on different substrates not available using mechanical cleavage or growth methods. Interestingly, LPE can be applied to produce different layered systems exhibiting different compositions such as BN, MoS2, WS2, NbSe2, and TaS2, thereby enabling the tuning of numerous physico-chemical properties of the material. Furthermore, LPE can be

  7. Phase-Shifting Liquid Crystal Point-Diffraction Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, DeVon W.; Marshall, Kenneth L.; Mercer, Carolyn R.

    2000-01-01

    , the limited spatial resolution and the methods required for data reduction suggest that a more useful instrument needs to be developed. The category of interferometers known as common path interferometers can eliminate much of the vibration sensitivity associated with traditional interferometry as described above. In these devices, division of the amplitude of the wavefront following the test section produces the reference beam. Examples of these instruments include shearing and point diffraction interferometers. In the latter case, shown schematically, a lens focuses light passing through the test section onto a small diffracting object. Such objects are typically either a circle of material on a high quality glass plate or a small sphere in a glass cell. The size of the focused spot is several times larger than the object so that the light not intercepted by the diffracting object forms the test beam while the diffracted light generates a spherical reference beam. While this configuration is mechanically stable, phase shifting one beam with respect to the other is difficult due to the common path. Phase shifting enables extremely accurate measurements of the phase of the interferogram using only gray scale intensity measurements and is the de facto standard of industry. Mercer and Creath 2 demonstrated phase shifting in a point diffraction interferometer using a spherical spacer in a liquid crystal cell as the diffracting object. By changing the voltage across the cell, they were able to shift the phase of the undiffracted beam relative to the reference beam generated by diffraction from the sphere. While they applied this technology to fluid measurements, the device shifted phase so slowly that it was not useful for studying transient phenomena. We have identified several technical problems that precluded operation of the device at video frame rates and intend to solve them to produce a phase-shifting liquid crystal point-diffraction interferometer operating at

  8. The Influence of Disorder on Thermotropic Nematic Liquid Crystals Phase Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Popa-Nita, Vlad; Gerlič, Ivan; Kralj, Samo

    2009-01-01

    We review the theoretical research on the influence of disorder on structure and phase behavior of condensed matter system exhibiting continuous symmetry breaking focusing on liquid crystal phase transitions. We discuss the main properties of liquid crystals as adequate systems in which several open questions with respect to the impact of disorder on universal phase and structural behavior could be explored. Main advantages of liquid crystalline materials and different experimental realizations of random field-type disorder imposed on liquid crystal phases are described. PMID:19865529

  9. Preparation and Characterization of Low Molecular Weight Heparin by Liquid Phase Plasma Method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Do-Jin; Kim, Hangun; Kim, Byung Hoon; Park, Young-Kwon; Lee, Heon; Park, Sung Hoon; Jung, Sang-Chul

    2015-08-01

    An liquid phase plasma process system was applied to the production of low molecular weight heparin. The molecular weight of produed heparin decreased with increasing liquid phase plasma treatment time. The abscission of the chemical bonds between the constituents of heparin by liquid phase plasma reaction did not alter the characteristics of heparin. Formation of any by-products due to side reaction was not observed. It is suggested that heparin was depolymerized by active oxygen radicals produced during the liquid phase plasma reaction.

  10. Efficient catalyst removal and recycling in copolymerization of epoxides with carbon dioxide via simple liquid-liquid phase separation.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Koji; Fujie, Ryuhei; Shintani, Ryo; Nozaki, Kyoko

    2013-10-18

    A simple and efficient catalyst removal system has been developed in the cobalt-salen-catalyzed copolymerization of propylene oxide with carbon dioxide. The present system requires no prior modification of the catalyst, and the removal is achieved by simple addition of myristic acid, followed by organic liquid-liquid phase separation.

  11. Thick polymer-stabilized liquid crystal films for microwave phase control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikake, Hideo; Kuki, Takao; Nomoto, Toshihiro; Tsuchiya, Yuzuru; Utsumi, Yozo

    2001-05-01

    This article describes the use of thick polymer-stabilized liquid crystal films in a new design for microwave variable phase shifters. A fine μm-order sized polymer network was formed in a 100-μm-thick liquid crystal film, using a photopolymerization-induced phase-separation method to stabilize the molecular alignment of the liquid crystal. Measurement of the electro-optic properties of the liquid crystal film revealed that the relaxation response time of the liquid crystal alignment was drastically decreased by doping the polymer at a concentration of several wt %. A new variable phase shifter composed of a microstrip transmission line (length: 193 mm, width: 200 μm) was also fabricated by using the liquid crystal film as the dielectric material. This device exhibited a microwave phase shift of -80° at a frequency of 20 GHz, when a drive voltage of 70Vrms was applied vertically to the liquid crystal film.

  12. An overview of multidimensional liquid phase separations in food analysis.

    PubMed

    Franco, Maraíssa Silva; Padovan, Rodrigo Nogueira; Fumes, Bruno Henrique; Lanças, Fernando Mauro

    2016-07-01

    Food safety is a priority public health concern that demands analytical methods capable to detect low concentration level of contaminants (e.g. pesticides and antibiotics) in different food matrices. Due to the high complexity of these matrices, a sample preparation step is in most cases mandatory to achieve satisfactory results being usually tedious, lengthy, and prone to the introduction of errors. For this reason, many research groups have focused efforts on the development of online systems capable to do the cleanup, concentration, and separation steps at once through multidimensional separation techniques (MDS). Among several possible setups, the most popular are the multidimensional chromatographic techniques (MDC) that consist in combining more than one mobile and/or stationary phase to provide a satisfactory separation. In the present review, we selected a variety of multidimensional separation systems used for food contaminant analysis in order to discuss the instrumentation aspects, the concept of orthogonality, column approaches used in these systems, and new materials that can be used in these columns. Selected classes of contaminants present in food matrices are introduced and discussed as example of the potential applications of multidimensional liquid phase separation techniques in food safety. PMID:27030380

  13. An overview of multidimensional liquid phase separations in food analysis.

    PubMed

    Franco, Maraíssa Silva; Padovan, Rodrigo Nogueira; Fumes, Bruno Henrique; Lanças, Fernando Mauro

    2016-07-01

    Food safety is a priority public health concern that demands analytical methods capable to detect low concentration level of contaminants (e.g. pesticides and antibiotics) in different food matrices. Due to the high complexity of these matrices, a sample preparation step is in most cases mandatory to achieve satisfactory results being usually tedious, lengthy, and prone to the introduction of errors. For this reason, many research groups have focused efforts on the development of online systems capable to do the cleanup, concentration, and separation steps at once through multidimensional separation techniques (MDS). Among several possible setups, the most popular are the multidimensional chromatographic techniques (MDC) that consist in combining more than one mobile and/or stationary phase to provide a satisfactory separation. In the present review, we selected a variety of multidimensional separation systems used for food contaminant analysis in order to discuss the instrumentation aspects, the concept of orthogonality, column approaches used in these systems, and new materials that can be used in these columns. Selected classes of contaminants present in food matrices are introduced and discussed as example of the potential applications of multidimensional liquid phase separation techniques in food safety.

  14. Hyperdoping silicon with selenium: solid vs. liquid phase epitaxy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shengqiang; Liu, Fang; Prucnal, S.; Gao, Kun; Khalid, M.; Baehtz, C.; Posselt, M.; Skorupa, W.; Helm, M.

    2015-01-01

    Chalcogen-hyperdoped silicon shows potential applications in silicon-based infrared photodetectors and intermediate band solar cells. Due to the low solid solubility limits of chalcogen elements in silicon, these materials were previously realized by femtosecond or nanosecond laser annealing of implanted silicon or bare silicon in certain background gases. The high energy density deposited on the silicon surface leads to a liquid phase and the fast recrystallization velocity allows trapping of chalcogen into the silicon matrix. However, this method encounters the problem of surface segregation. In this paper, we propose a solid phase processing by flash-lamp annealing in the millisecond range, which is in between the conventional rapid thermal annealing and pulsed laser annealing. Flash lamp annealed selenium-implanted silicon shows a substitutional fraction of ~ 70% with an implanted concentration up to 2.3%. The resistivity is lower and the carrier mobility is higher than those of nanosecond pulsed laser annealed samples. Our results show that flash-lamp annealing is superior to laser annealing in preventing surface segregation and in allowing scalability. PMID:25660096

  15. Impedance Spectroscopy of Liquid-Phase Sintered Silicon Carbide

    SciTech Connect

    McLachlan, D.S.; Sauti, G.; Vorster, A.; Hermann, M.

    2004-02-26

    Liquid-Phase Sintered Silicon Carbide (LPSSiC) materials were produced with different Y2O3: Al2O3 and Y2O3: SiO2 sintering additive ratios. Densification was achieved by hot pressing (HP). The ratio of the polytypes and the amount and crystalline composition of the grain boundary phases was determined using Rietveld analysis. Microstructures of the materials were related to the mechanical properties (hardness, fracture toughness and strength), which are not presented. The impedance Spectroscopy measurements were made at temperatures between 100 deg. C and 400 deg. C and analyzed using Effective Media Theories and the Brick Layer Model. In some cases, in order to correctly fit the results, it was necessary to use or model the frequency dependence of the conductivity or dielectric constant of the SiC grains using various theoretical models. The impedance arcs for the SiC grains in the different samples varied widely, probably more due to the 'semiconductor' doping of the grains or nonstoichiometry, than the SiC polytypes in the grains. The SiC grains all showed an Arrhenius behavior with energy gaps in the range 0.3 to 0.5eV.

  16. Hyperdoping silicon with selenium: solid vs. liquid phase epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shengqiang; Liu, Fang; Prucnal, S; Gao, Kun; Khalid, M; Baehtz, C; Posselt, M; Skorupa, W; Helm, M

    2015-01-01

    Chalcogen-hyperdoped silicon shows potential applications in silicon-based infrared photodetectors and intermediate band solar cells. Due to the low solid solubility limits of chalcogen elements in silicon, these materials were previously realized by femtosecond or nanosecond laser annealing of implanted silicon or bare silicon in certain background gases. The high energy density deposited on the silicon surface leads to a liquid phase and the fast recrystallization velocity allows trapping of chalcogen into the silicon matrix. However, this method encounters the problem of surface segregation. In this paper, we propose a solid phase processing by flash-lamp annealing in the millisecond range, which is in between the conventional rapid thermal annealing and pulsed laser annealing. Flash lamp annealed selenium-implanted silicon shows a substitutional fraction of ~ 70% with an implanted concentration up to 2.3%. The resistivity is lower and the carrier mobility is higher than those of nanosecond pulsed laser annealed samples. Our results show that flash-lamp annealing is superior to laser annealing in preventing surface segregation and in allowing scalability. PMID:25660096

  17. Liquid phase deposition synthesis of hexagonal molybdenum trioxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Deki, Shigehito; Beleke, Alexis Bienvenu; Kotani, Yuki; Mizuhata, Minoru

    2009-09-15

    Hexagonal molybdenum trioxide thin films with good crystallinity and high purity have been fabricated by the liquid phase deposition (LPD) technique using molybdic acid (H{sub 2}MoO{sub 4}) dissolved in 2.82% hydrofluoric acid (HF) and H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} as precursors. The crystal was found to belong to a hexagonal hydrate system MoO{sub 3}.nH{sub 2}O (napprox0.56). The unit cell lattice parameters are a=10.651 A, c=3.725 A and V=365.997 A{sup 3}. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the as-deposited samples showed well-shaped hexagonal rods nuclei that grew and where the amount increased with increase in reaction time. X-ray photon electron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra showed a Gaussian shape of the doublet of Mo 3d core level, indicating the presence of Mo{sup 6+} oxidation state in the deposited films. The deposited films exhibited an electrochromic behavior by lithium intercalation and deintercalation, which resulted in coloration and bleaching of the film. Upon dehydration at about 450 deg. C, the hexagonal MoO{sub 3}.nH{sub 2}O was transformed into the thermodynamically stable orthorhombic phase. - Abstract: SEM photograph of typical h-MoO{sub 3}.nH{sub 2}O thin film nuclei obtained after 36 h at 40 deg. C by the LPD method. Display Omitted

  18. Tertiary phase diagram of cellulose, ionic liquid and organic solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Henderson, Doug; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Mao, Yimin; Briber, Robert M.; Wang, Howard

    Cellulose is the most abundant natural polymer on earth, and widely used in products from clothing to paper. Fundamental understanding of molecular solutions of cellulose is the key to realize advanced technologies beyond cellulose fibers. It has been reported that certain ionic liquid/organic solvent mixtures dissolve cellulose. In this study, the tertiary phase diagram of microcrystalline cellulose, 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EMIMAc), and dimethylformamide (DMF) mixtures has been determined using optical cloud point method and small angle neutron scattering (SANS). Data indicate that a molar ratio of EMIMAc to cellulose repeating unit equal or greater than 3 is necessary but not sufficient in forming one-phase homogeneous solutions. A miscibility gap exists in the dilute regime, where a minimum of 5 mol% of EMIM Ac in DMF is needed to form homogenous solutions. SANS show that cellulose chains adopt Gaussian-like conformation in homogenous solutions. The solutions exhibit the characteristics of upper critical solution temperature. Clustering of cellulose chains occurs at low EMIMAc/DMF or EMIMAc/cellulose ratio, or at low temperatures. The mechanism of cellulose dissolution in tertiary mixture is discussed.

  19. Debris cloud characterization in the liquid-vapor phase

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, L.C.; Boslough, M.B.; Reinhart, W.D.; Hall, C.A.

    1993-10-01

    A series of experiments has been performed on the Sandia Hypervelocity Launcher to impact a 1.25-mm thick aluminum bumper by an aluminum flier plate 17-mm diameter by 0.92-mm thick over the velocity range of 5 km/s to 11 km/s. Radiographic techniques were employed to record the debris cloud generated upon impact. The shape of the debris cloud is found to depend on the flier plate tilt. Generally the data indicate a central core of higher density surrounded by a diffused layer. These experiments allow measurements of debris cloud expansion velocities as the material undergoes a phase change from solid fragments at impact velocities of 5 km/s to a mixture of liquid and vapor phase at higher impact velocities. The expansion velocity of the debris cloud increases with increasing impact velocity, with the high-density leading edge traveling faster than the impact velocity. There is a difference between the X-ray and photographic measurements of expansion velocities at higher impact velocities. This is believed to be due to the presence of very low- density vapor in the photographic records that are not detected using X-ray techniques.

  20. Mechanism of Phase Transition from Liquid to Gas Under Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiuying; Li, Sen; Gu, Fan

    2010-10-01

    Liquid gasification phenomenon was observable in liquid-solid dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) experiments. Starting from classical thermodynamics, this study aimed at finding the reason of liquid gasification in the DBD experiments. Fluid statics and electrohydrodynamics were adopted to analyze the mechanism of phase transition from liquid to gas. The Sumoto effect was also employed to visually explain the change in the pressure of fluid due to the electric field. It was concluded from both theoretical analysis and experiment that the change in liquid pressure was a key factor causing liquid to gasify in DBD conditions. Furthermore, it was stressed that the liquid pressure was affected by many parameters including liquid permittivity, voltage, electric intensity, size of the discharge space and uniformity of the electric field distribution, etc. All of them affected DBD liquid gasification. The related results would provide useful theoretical evidence for multi-phase DBD applications.

  1. Free volume and phase transitions of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium based ionic liquids from positron lifetime spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Beichel, Witali; Dlubek, Günter; Krause-Rehberg, Reinhard; Paluch, Marian; Pionteck, Jürgen; Pfefferkorn, Dirk; Bulut, Safak; Friedrich, Christian; Pogodina, Natalia; Krossing, Ingo

    2012-05-21

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) was used to study a series of ionic liquids (ILs) with the 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium cation ([C4MIM](+)) but different anions [Cl](-), [BF4](-), [PF6](-), [OTf](-), [NTf2](-), and [B(hfip)4](-) with increasing anion volumes. Changes of the ortho-positronium (o-Ps) lifetime parameters with temperature were observed for crystalline and amorphous (glass, supercooled, and normal liquid) states. Evidence for distinct phase transitions, e.g. melting, crystallization and solid-solid transitions, was observed in several PALS experiments. The o-Ps mean lifetime τ3 showed smaller values in the crystalline phase due to dense packing of the material compared to the amorphous phase. The o-Ps lifetime intensity I3 in the liquid state is clearly smaller than in the crystallized state. This behaviour can be attributed to a solvation of e(+) by the anions, which reduces the Ps formation probability in the normal and supercooled liquid. These phenomena were observed for the first time when applying the PALS technique to ionic liquids by us in one preliminary and in this work. Four of the ionic liquids investigated in this work ([BF4](-), [NTf2](-), [PF6](-) and [Cl](-) ILs) exhibit supercooled phases. The specific hole densities and occupied volumes of those ILs were obtained by comparing the local free volume with the specific volume from pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) experiments. From the o-Ps lifetime, the mean size vh of free volume holes of the four samples was calculated and compared with that calculated according to Fürth's hole theory. The hole volumes from both methods agree well. From the Cohen-Turnbull fitting of viscosity and conductivity against PALS/PVT results, the influence of the free volume on molecular transport properties was investigated.

  2. Improvement of peak shape in aqueous normal phase analysis of anionic metabolites.

    PubMed

    Pesek, Joseph J; Matyska, Maria T; Fischer, Steven M

    2011-12-01

    The problem of poor peak shape for multiply charged negative-ion analytes under aqueous normal phase (ANP) conditions is investigated. Because less than adequate efficiency and symmetry can occur with a variety of mobile phases, gradients and additives, and to varying degrees depending on the instrument, sources other than solute/stationary phase interactions are more likely the cause. Since it is known that many of these compounds can interact strongly with metal ions, addition of a chelating agent to the mobile phase and/or the sample solvent was tested. In particular, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is a compound that forms strong complexes with most di-and tri-valent metal ions and can be used to verify whether trace amounts of these species are the source of the problem. In addition, the retention of a number of anionic compounds was measured at various concentrations of ammonium acetate and formate with EDTA in the mobile phase. PMID:22009714

  3. Gas chromatography on wall-coated open-tubular columns with ionic liquid stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Poole, Colin F; Lenca, Nicole

    2014-08-29

    Ionic liquids have moved from novel to practical stationary phases for gas chromatography with an increasing portfolio of applications. Ionic liquids complement conventional stationary phases because of a combination of thermophysical and solvation properties that only exist for ionic solvents. Their high thermal stability and low vapor pressure makes them suitable as polar stationary phases for separations requiring high temperatures. Ionic liquids are good solvents and can be used to expand the chemical space for separations. They are the only stationary phases with significant hydrogen-bond acidity in common use; they extend the hydrogen-bond basicity of conventional stationary phases; they are as dipolar/polarizable as the most polar conventional stationary phases; and some ionic liquids are significantly less cohesive than conventional polar stationary phases. Problems in column coating techniques and related low column performance, column activity, and stationary phase reactivity require further exploration as the reasons for these features are poorly understood at present.

  4. Phase separations in mixtures of a liquid crystal and a nanocolloidal particle.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Akihiko

    2009-11-28

    We present a mean field theory to describe phase separations in mixtures of a liquid crystal and a nanocolloidal particle. By taking into account a nematic, a smectic A ordering of the liquid crystal, and a crystalline ordering of the nanoparticle, we calculate the phase diagrams on the temperature-concentration plane. We predict various phase separations, such as a smectic A-crystal phase separation and a smectic A-isotropic-crystal triple point, etc., depending on the interactions between the liquid crystal and the colloidal surface. Inside binodal curves, we find new unstable and metastable regions, which are important in the phase ordering dynamics. We also find a crystalline ordering of the nanoparticles dispersed in a smectic A phase and a nematic phase. The cooperative phenomena between liquid-crystalline ordering and crystalline ordering induce a variety of phase diagrams.

  5. Enhancement of gas-phase diffusion in the presence of liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, S.; Angert, A.

    2003-04-01

    Gas diffusion in porous media occurs in both the gas and liquid phases. In many instances, gas diffusion in the liquid phase is ignored. However, under many conditions, gas diffusion in the liquid phase may be more important than gas diffusion in the gas phase. Two different cases will be examined in this work. The first case is a continuous liquid path between the gas concentrations of interest modeled after Jury et al. (1984). The second case is the situation at low liquid saturation where liquid islands exist. For the first case, Jury's model can be rewritten as a ratio of the total gas diffusion in the gas and liquid phases to that just in the gas phase. The liquid diffusion coefficient is approximately 10-4 times the gas diffusion coefficient consistent with Jury et al. (1984). The ratio of total diffusion to gas-phase diffusion is then only a function of Henry's constant and the liquid saturation. For higher values of Henry's constant, such as for CO2 and O2, the effect of diffusion in the liquid phase is small except at high liquid saturations. For small values of Henry's constant, such as for some VOCs and explosive compounds, diffusion in the liquid phase dominates for low and moderate liquid saturation values. The second case is the enhancement of diffusion caused by liquid islands at low liquid saturation. Enhanced vapor diffusion across liquid islands has been observed and modeled by Webb and Ho (1999), where condensation and evaporation occur on opposite ends of the liquid island. Vapor diffusion enhancement of up to a factor of 10 has been observed. Similarly, gas can diffuse through the liquid island. For high values of Henry's constant, gas diffusion through liquid islands is negligible and can be ignored. For small values of Henry's constant, diffusion through liquid islands may be much greater than diffusion through gas, so the rate is enhanced. The work was sponsored by the Geneva International Center for Humanitarian Demining (GICHD) under the

  6. Liquid crystal phases of two-dimensional dipolar gases and Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless melting.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhigang; Block, Jens K; Bruun, Georg M

    2016-01-01

    Liquid crystals are phases of matter intermediate between crystals and liquids. Whereas classical liquid crystals have been known for a long time and are used in electro-optical displays, much less is known about their quantum counterparts. There is growing evidence that quantum liquid crystals play a central role in many electron systems including high temperature superconductors, but a quantitative understanding is lacking due to disorder and other complications. Here, we analyse the quantum phase diagram of a two-dimensional dipolar gas, which exhibits stripe, nematic and supersolid phases. We calculate the stiffness constants determining the stability of the nematic and stripe phases, and the melting of the stripes set by the proliferation of topological defects is analysed microscopically. Our results for the critical temperatures of these phases demonstrate that a controlled study of the interplay between quantum liquid and superfluid phases is within experimental reach for the first time, using dipolar gases. PMID:26750156

  7. Liquid crystal phases of two-dimensional dipolar gases and Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless melting

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhigang; Block, Jens K.; Bruun, Georg M.

    2016-01-01

    Liquid crystals are phases of matter intermediate between crystals and liquids. Whereas classical liquid crystals have been known for a long time and are used in electro-optical displays, much less is known about their quantum counterparts. There is growing evidence that quantum liquid crystals play a central role in many electron systems including high temperature superconductors, but a quantitative understanding is lacking due to disorder and other complications. Here, we analyse the quantum phase diagram of a two-dimensional dipolar gas, which exhibits stripe, nematic and supersolid phases. We calculate the stiffness constants determining the stability of the nematic and stripe phases, and the melting of the stripes set by the proliferation of topological defects is analysed microscopically. Our results for the critical temperatures of these phases demonstrate that a controlled study of the interplay between quantum liquid and superfluid phases is within experimental reach for the first time, using dipolar gases. PMID:26750156

  8. Ion-transfer- and photo-electrochemistry at liquid|liquid|solid electrode triple phase boundary junctions: perspectives.

    PubMed

    Marken, Frank; Watkins, John D; Collins, Andrew M

    2011-06-01

    Ion transfer at liquid|liquid junctions is one of the most fundamental processes in nature. It occurs coupled to simultaneous electron transfer at the line junction (or triple phase boundary) formed by the two liquids in contact to an electrode surface. The triple phase boundary can be assembled from a redox active microdroplet deposit of a water-immiscible liquid on a suitable electrode surface immersed into aqueous electrolyte. Ion transfer voltammetry measurements at this type of electrode allow both thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for coupled ion and electron transfer processes to be obtained. This overview summarises some recent advances in understanding and application of triple phase boundary redox processes at organic liquid|aqueous electrolyte|working electrode junctions. The design of novel types of electrodes is considered based on (i) extended triple phase boundaries, (ii) porous membrane processes, (iii) hydrodynamic effects, and (iv) generator-collector triple phase boundary systems. Novel facilitated ion transfer processes and photo-electrochemical processes at triple phase boundary electrodes are proposed. Potential future applications of triple phase boundary redox systems in electrosynthesis, sensing, and light energy harvesting are indicated.

  9. Microwave-immobilized polybutadiene stationary phase for reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Nilva P; Collins, Kenneth E; Jardim, Isabel C S F

    2004-03-19

    Polybutadiene (PBD) has been immobilized on high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) silica by microwave radiation at various power levels (52-663 W) and actuation times (3-60 min). Columns prepared from these reversed-phase HPLC materials, as well as from similar non-irradiated materials, were tested with standard sample mixtures and characterized by elemental analysis (%C) and infrared spectroscopy. A microwave irradiation of 20 min at 663 W gives a layer of immobilized PBD that presented good performance. Longer irradiation times give thicker immobilized layers having less favorable chromatographic properties.

  10. 3-D Numerical Simulation for Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flow in Aeration Tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, R.; Tian, R.; Yan, S. Y.; Li, S.

    In the crafts of activated sludge treatment, oxygen supply and the suspending state of activated sludge are primary factors to keep biochemistry process carrying on normally. However, they are all controlled by aeration. So aeration is crucial. The paper focus on aeration, use CFD software to simulate the field of aeration tank which is designed by sludge load method. The main designed size of aeration tank is: total volume: 20 000 m3; corridor width: 8m; total length of corridors: 139m; number of corridors: 3; length of one single corridor: 48m; effective depth: 4.5m; additional depth: 0.5m. According to the similarity theory, a geometrical model is set up in proportion of 10:1. The way of liquid flow is submerge to avoid liquid flow out directly. The grid is plotted by dividing the whole computational area into two parts. The bottom part which contains gas pipe and gas exit hole and the above part which is the main area are plotted by tetrahedron and hexahedron respectively. In boundary conditions, gas is defined as the primary-phase, and liquid is defined as the secondary-phase. Choosing mixture model, two-phase flow field of aeration tank is simulated by solved the Continuity equation for the mixture, Momentum equation for the mixture, Volume fraction equation for the secondary phases and Relative velocity formula when gas velocity is 10m/s, 20m/s, 30m/s. what figure shows is the contour of velocity magnitude for the mixture phase when gas velocity is 20m/s. Through analysis, the simulation tendency is agreed with actual running of aeration tank. It is feasible to use mixture model to simulate flow field of aeration tank by fluent software. According to the simulation result, the better velocity of liquid or gas (the quantity of inlet air) can be chosen by lower cost, and also the performance of aeration tank can be forecast. It will be helpful for designing and operation.

  11. Preparation and evaluation of surface-bonded tricationic ionic liquid silica as stationary phases for high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Lizhen; Shi, Xianzhe; Lu, Xin; Xu, Guowang

    2015-05-29

    Two tricationic ionic liquids were prepared and then bonded onto the surface of supporting silica materials through "thiol-ene" click chemistry as new stationary phases for high-performance liquid chromatography. The obtained columns of tricationic ionic liquids were evaluated respectively in the reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) mode and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) mode, and possess ideal column efficiency of 80,000 plates/m in the RPLC mode with naphthalene as the test solute. The tricationic ionic liquid stationary phases exhibit good hydrophobic and shape selectivity to hydrophobic compounds, and RPLC retention behavior with multiple interactions. In the HILIC mode, the retention and selectivity were evaluated through the efficient separation of nucleosides and bases as well as flavonoids, and the typical HILIC retention behavior was demonstrated by investigating retention changes of hydrophilic solutes with water volume fraction in mobile phase. The results show that the tricationic ionic liquid columns possess great prospect for applications in analysis of hydrophobic and hydrophilic samples. PMID:25890438

  12. Preparation and evaluation of surface-bonded tricationic ionic liquid silica as stationary phases for high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Lizhen; Shi, Xianzhe; Lu, Xin; Xu, Guowang

    2015-05-29

    Two tricationic ionic liquids were prepared and then bonded onto the surface of supporting silica materials through "thiol-ene" click chemistry as new stationary phases for high-performance liquid chromatography. The obtained columns of tricationic ionic liquids were evaluated respectively in the reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) mode and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) mode, and possess ideal column efficiency of 80,000 plates/m in the RPLC mode with naphthalene as the test solute. The tricationic ionic liquid stationary phases exhibit good hydrophobic and shape selectivity to hydrophobic compounds, and RPLC retention behavior with multiple interactions. In the HILIC mode, the retention and selectivity were evaluated through the efficient separation of nucleosides and bases as well as flavonoids, and the typical HILIC retention behavior was demonstrated by investigating retention changes of hydrophilic solutes with water volume fraction in mobile phase. The results show that the tricationic ionic liquid columns possess great prospect for applications in analysis of hydrophobic and hydrophilic samples.

  13. Phase Transition and Dynamics in Imidazolium-Based Ionic Liquid Crystals through a Metastable Highly Ordered Smectic Phase.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Yoko; Yamaguchi, Keito; Tomida, Kenji; Taniguchi, Natsumi; Hara, Hironori; Takikawa, Yoshinori; Sadakane, Koichiro; Nakamura, Kenji; Konishi, Takashi; Fukao, Koji

    2016-06-16

    The phase transition behavior and dynamics of ionic liquid crystals, 1-methyl-3-alkylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate with various alkyl chain lengths, were investigated by X-ray scattering, differential scanning calorimetry, optical microscopy, and dielectric relaxation spectroscopy to elucidate the mechanism of their structural and phase changes. A metastable phase was found to appear via a supercooled smectic phase on cooling. In the metastable phase, disorder in the smectic phase is partially frozen; thus, the phase has order higher than that of the smectic phase but lower than that of the crystalline phase. During the subsequent heating process, the frozen disorder activates, and a crystalline phase appears in the supercooled smectic phase before entering the smectic phase. The relationship between the phase behavior and the dynamics of charge carriers such as ions is also discussed.

  14. Heavy-liquid-beneficiation of fine coal, Phase II. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, F.J.; Keller, D.V. Jr.

    1984-11-01

    Heavy-Liquid-Beneficiation of Fine Coal is a two-phase multitask fundamental research program directed towards the development of a basic understanding of the rheology of fine-coal/heavy-liquid slurries and the application of this understanding to the development and operation of a heavy-liquid fine-coal benefication pilot test facility using cyclone technology. (HLC)

  15. The Boson peak in confined water: An experimental investigation of the liquid-liquid phase transition hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2015-10-01

    The Boson peak (BP) of deeply cooled confined water is studied by using inelastic neutron scattering (INS) in a large interval of the ( P, T) phase plane. By taking into account the different behavior of such a collective vibrational mode in both strong and fragile glasses as well as in glass-forming materials, we were able to determine the Widom line that characterizes supercooled bulk water within the frame of the liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) hypothesis. The peak frequency and width of the BP correlated with the water polymorphism of the LLPT scenario, allowing us to distinguish the "low-density liquid" (LDL) and "high-density liquid" (HDL) phases in deeply cooled bulk water.Moreover, the BP properties afford a further confirmation of theWidom line temperature T W as the ( P, T) locus in which the local structure of water transforms from a predominately LDL form to a predominately HDL form.

  16. Non-equilibrium phase transitions in a liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, K.; Roy, M.; Datta, A.

    2015-09-01

    The present manuscript describes kinetic behaviour of the glass transition and non-equilibrium features of the "Nematic-Isotropic" (N-I) phase transition of a well known liquid crystalline material N-(4-methoxybenzylidene)-4-butylaniline from the effects of heating rate and initial temperature on the transitions, through differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy. Around the vicinity of the glass transition temperature (Tg), while only a change in the baseline of the ΔCp vs T curve is observed for heating rate (β) > 5 K min-1, consistent with a glass transition, a clear peak for β ≤ 5 K min-1 and the rapid reduction in the ΔCp value from the former to the latter rate correspond to an order-disorder transition and a transition from ergodic to non-ergodic behaviour. The ln β vs 1000/T curve for the glass transition shows convex Arrhenius behaviour that can be explained very well by a purely entropic activation barrier [Dan et al., Eur. Phys. Lett. 108, 36007 (2014)]. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicates sudden freezing of the out-of-plane distortion vibrations of the benzene rings around the glass transition temperature and a considerable red shift indicating enhanced coplanarity of the benzene rings and, consequently, enhancement in the molecular ordering compared to room temperature. We further provide a direct experimental evidence of the non-equilibrium nature of the N-I transition through the dependence of this transition temperature (TNI) and associated enthalpy change (ΔH) on the initial temperature (at fixed β-values) for the DSC scans. A plausible qualitative explanation based on Mesquita's extension of Landau-deGennes theory [O. N. de Mesquita, Braz. J. Phys. 28, 257 (1998)] has been put forward. The change in the molecular ordering from nematic to isotropic phase has been investigated through fluorescence anisotropy measurements where the order parameter, quantified by the

  17. Non-equilibrium phase transitions in a liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Dan, K; Roy, M; Datta, A

    2015-09-01

    The present manuscript describes kinetic behaviour of the glass transition and non-equilibrium features of the "Nematic-Isotropic" (N-I) phase transition of a well known liquid crystalline material N-(4-methoxybenzylidene)-4-butylaniline from the effects of heating rate and initial temperature on the transitions, through differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy. Around the vicinity of the glass transition temperature (Tg), while only a change in the baseline of the ΔCp vs T curve is observed for heating rate (β) > 5 K min(-1), consistent with a glass transition, a clear peak for β ≤ 5 K min(-1) and the rapid reduction in the ΔCp value from the former to the latter rate correspond to an order-disorder transition and a transition from ergodic to non-ergodic behaviour. The ln β vs 1000/T curve for the glass transition shows convex Arrhenius behaviour that can be explained very well by a purely entropic activation barrier [Dan et al., Eur. Phys. Lett. 108, 36007 (2014)]. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicates sudden freezing of the out-of-plane distortion vibrations of the benzene rings around the glass transition temperature and a considerable red shift indicating enhanced coplanarity of the benzene rings and, consequently, enhancement in the molecular ordering compared to room temperature. We further provide a direct experimental evidence of the non-equilibrium nature of the N-I transition through the dependence of this transition temperature (TNI) and associated enthalpy change (ΔH) on the initial temperature (at fixed β-values) for the DSC scans. A plausible qualitative explanation based on Mesquita's extension of Landau-deGennes theory [O. N. de Mesquita, Braz. J. Phys. 28, 257 (1998)] has been put forward. The change in the molecular ordering from nematic to isotropic phase has been investigated through fluorescence anisotropy measurements where the order parameter, quantified by the

  18. Characterization of annular two-phase gas-liquid flows in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bousman, W. Scott; Mcquillen, John B.

    1994-01-01

    A series of two-phase gas-liquid flow experiments were developed to study annular flows in microgravity using the NASA Lewis Learjet. A test section was built to measure the liquid film thickness around the perimeter of the tube permitting the three dimensional nature of the gas-liquid interface to be observed. A second test section was used to measure the film thickness, pressure drop and wall shear stress in annular microgravity two-phase flows. Three liquids were studied to determine the effects of liquid viscosity and surface tension. The result of this study provide insight into the wave characteristics, pressure drop and droplet entrainment in microgravity annular flows.

  19. A binary phase field crystal study for liquid phase heteroepitaxial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yanli; Peng, Yingying; Chen, Zheng

    2016-09-01

    The liquid phase heteroepitaxial growth on predefined crystalline substrate is studied with binary phase field crystal (PFC) model. The purpose of this paper focuses on changes of the morphology of epitaxial films, influences of substrate vicinal angles on epitaxial growth, characteristics of islands growth on both sides of the substrate as well. It is found that the morphology of epitaxial films undergoes the following transitions: layer-by-layer growth, islands formation, mismatch dislocations nucleation and climb towards the film-substrate interface. Meanwhile, the density of steps and islands has obviously direct ratio relations with the vicinal angles. Also, preferential regions are found when islands grow on both sides of the substrate. For thinner substrate, the arrangement of islands is more orderly and the appearance of preferential growth is more obvious than that of thicker substrate. Also, the existing of preferential regions is much more valid for small substrate vicinal angles in contrast for big substrate vicinal angles.

  20. Evidence of a Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition Hot Dense Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvera, Isaac; Dzyabura, Vasily; Zaghoo, Mohamed

    2013-03-01

    We use pulsed laser heating of hydrogen at static pressures in the megabar pressure region generated in a diamond anvil cell to search for the plasma phase transition (PPT) to liquid atomic metallic hydrogen. Heating the sample substantially above the melting line we observe a plateau in a temperature vs laser power curve that otherwise increases with power. This anomaly in the heating curve is closely correlated with theoretical predictions for the PPT, falling within the theoretically predicted range and having a negative slope with increasing pressure. Details will be presented. The NSF, grant DMR-0804378 and the DOE Stockpile Stewardship Academic Alliance program, grant DE-FG52-10NA29656 supported this research.

  1. Hopf normal form with SN symmetry and reduction to systems of nonlinearly coupled phase oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashwin, Peter; Rodrigues, Ana

    2016-06-01

    Coupled oscillator models where N oscillators are identical and symmetrically coupled to all others with full permutation symmetry SN are found in a variety of applications. Much, but not all, work on phase descriptions of such systems consider the special case of pairwise coupling between oscillators. In this paper, we show this is restrictive-and we characterize generic multi-way interactions between oscillators that are typically present, except at the very lowest order near a Hopf bifurcation where the oscillations emerge. We examine a network of identical weakly coupled dynamical systems that are close to a supercritical Hopf bifurcation by considering two parameters, ɛ (the strength of coupling) and λ (an unfolding parameter for the Hopf bifurcation). For small enough λ > 0 there is an attractor that is the product of N stable limit cycles; this persists as a normally hyperbolic invariant torus for sufficiently small ɛ > 0. Using equivariant normal form theory, we derive a generic normal form for a system of coupled phase oscillators with SN symmetry. For fixed N and taking the limit 0 < ɛ ≪ λ ≪ 1, we show that the attracting dynamics of the system on the torus can be well approximated by a coupled phase oscillator system that, to lowest order, is the well-known Kuramoto-Sakaguchi system of coupled oscillators. The next order of approximation generically includes terms with up to four interacting phases, regardless of N. Using a normalization that maintains nontrivial interactions in the limit N → ∞, we show that the additional terms can lead to new phenomena in terms of coexistence of two-cluster states with the same phase difference but different cluster size.

  2. Crosslinked polymeric ionic liquids as solid-phase microextraction sorbent coatings for high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yu, Honglian; Merib, Josias; Anderson, Jared L

    2016-03-18

    Neat crosslinked polymeric ionic liquid (PIL) sorbent coatings for solid-phase microextraction (SPME) compatible with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) are reported for the first time. Six structurally different PILs were crosslinked to nitinol supports and applied for the determination of select pharmaceutical drugs, phenolics, and insecticides. Sampling conditions including sample solution pH, extraction time, desorption solvent, desorption time, and desorption solvent volume were optimized using design of experiment (DOE). The developed PIL sorbent coatings were stable when performing extractions under acidic pH and remained intact in various organic desorption solvents (i.e., methanol, acetonitrile, acetone). The PIL-based sorbent coating polymerized from the IL monomer 1-vinyl-3-(10-hydroxydecyl) imidazolium chloride [VC10OHIM][Cl] and IL crosslinker 1,12-di(3-vinylbenzylimidazolium) dodecane dichloride [(VBIM)2C12] 2[Cl] exhibited superior extraction performance compared to the other studied PILs. The extraction efficiency of pharmaceutical drugs and phenolics increased when the film thickness of the PIL-based sorbent coating was increased while many insecticides were largely unaffected. Satisfactory analytical performance was obtained with limits of detection (LODs) ranging from 0.2 to 2 μg L(-1) for the target analytes. The accuracy of the analytical method was examined by studying the relative recovery of analytes in real water samples, including tap water and lake water, with recoveries varying from 50.2% to 115.9% and from 48.8% to 116.6%, respectively. PMID:26896916

  3. Crosslinked polymeric ionic liquids as solid-phase microextraction sorbent coatings for high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yu, Honglian; Merib, Josias; Anderson, Jared L

    2016-03-18

    Neat crosslinked polymeric ionic liquid (PIL) sorbent coatings for solid-phase microextraction (SPME) compatible with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) are reported for the first time. Six structurally different PILs were crosslinked to nitinol supports and applied for the determination of select pharmaceutical drugs, phenolics, and insecticides. Sampling conditions including sample solution pH, extraction time, desorption solvent, desorption time, and desorption solvent volume were optimized using design of experiment (DOE). The developed PIL sorbent coatings were stable when performing extractions under acidic pH and remained intact in various organic desorption solvents (i.e., methanol, acetonitrile, acetone). The PIL-based sorbent coating polymerized from the IL monomer 1-vinyl-3-(10-hydroxydecyl) imidazolium chloride [VC10OHIM][Cl] and IL crosslinker 1,12-di(3-vinylbenzylimidazolium) dodecane dichloride [(VBIM)2C12] 2[Cl] exhibited superior extraction performance compared to the other studied PILs. The extraction efficiency of pharmaceutical drugs and phenolics increased when the film thickness of the PIL-based sorbent coating was increased while many insecticides were largely unaffected. Satisfactory analytical performance was obtained with limits of detection (LODs) ranging from 0.2 to 2 μg L(-1) for the target analytes. The accuracy of the analytical method was examined by studying the relative recovery of analytes in real water samples, including tap water and lake water, with recoveries varying from 50.2% to 115.9% and from 48.8% to 116.6%, respectively.

  4. A Robust Computational Method for Coupled Liquid-liquid Phase Separation and Gas-particle Partitioning Predictions of Multicomponent Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Di Stefano, A.

    2014-12-01

    Providing efficient and reliable model predictions for the partitioning of atmospheric aerosol components between different phases (gas, liquids, solids) is a challenging problem. The partitioning of water, various semivolatile organic components, inorganic acids, bases, and salts, depends simultaneously on the chemical properties and interaction effects among all constituents of a gas + aerosol system. The effects of hygroscopic particle growth on the water contents and physical states of potentially two or more liquid and/or solid aerosol phases in turn may significantly affect multiphase chemistry, the direct effect of aerosols on climate, and the ability of specific particles to act as cloud condensation or ice nuclei. Considering the presence of a liquid-liquid phase separation in aerosol particles, which typically leads to one phase being enriched in rather hydrophobic compounds and the other phase enriched in water and dissolved electrolytes, adds a high degree of complexity to the goal of predicting the gas-particle partitioning of all components. Coupled gas-particle partitioning and phase separation methods are required to correctly account for the phase behaviour of aerosols exposed to varying environmental conditions, such as changes to relative humidity. We present new theoretical insights and a substantially improved algorithm for the reliable prediction of gas-particle partitioning at thermodynamic equilibrium based on the Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients (AIOMFAC) model. We introduce a new approach for the accurate prediction of the phase distribution of multiple inorganic ions between two liquid phases, constrained by charge balance, and the coupling of the liquid-liquid equilibrium model to a robust gas-particle partitioning algorithm. Such coupled models are useful for exploring the range of environmental conditions leading to complete or incomplete miscibility of aerosol constituents which will affect

  5. Laser-induced separation of hydrogen isotopes in the liquid phase

    DOEpatents

    Freund, Samuel M.; Maier, II, William B.; Beattie, Willard H.; Holland, Redus F.

    1980-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope separation is achieved by either (a) dissolving a hydrogen-bearing feedstock compound in a liquid solvent, or (b) liquefying a hydrogen-bearing feedstock compound, the liquid phase thus resulting being kept at a temperature at which spectral features of the feedstock relating to a particular hydrogen isotope are resolved, i.e., a clear-cut isotope shift is delineated, irradiating the liquid phase with monochromatic radiation of a wavelength which at least preferentially excites those molecules of the feedstock containing a first hydrogen isotope, inducing photochemical reaction in the excited molecules, and separating the reaction product containing the first isotope from the liquid phase.

  6. Going full circle: phase-transition thermodynamics of ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Preiss, Ulrich; Verevkin, Sergey P; Koslowski, Thorsten; Krossing, Ingo

    2011-05-27

    We present the full enthalpic phase transition cycle for ionic liquids (ILs) as examples of non-classical salts. The cycle was closed for the lattice, solvation, dissociation, and vaporization enthalpies of 30 different ILs, relying on as much experimental data as was available. High-quality dissociation enthalpies were calculated at the G3 MP2 level. From the cycle, we could establish, for the first time, the lattice and solvation enthalpies of ILs with imidazolium ions. For vaporization, lattice, and dissociation enthalpies, we also developed new prediction methods in the course of our investigations. Here, as only single-ion values need to be calculated and the tedious optimization of an ion pair can be circumvented, the computational time is short. For the vaporization enthalpy, a very simple approach was found, using a surface term and the calculated enthalpic correction to the total gas-phase energy. For the lattice enthalpy, the most important constituent proved to be the calculated conductor-like screening model (COSMO) solvation enthalpy in the ideal electric conductor. A similar model was developed for the dissociation enthalpy. According to our assessment, the typical error of the lattice enthalpy would be 9.4 kJ mol(-1), which is less than half the deviation we get when using the (optimized) Kapustinskii equation or the recent volume-based thermodynamics (VBT) theory. In contrast, the non-optimized VBT formula gives lattice enthalpies 20 to 140 kJ mol(-1) lower than the ones we assessed in the cycle, because of the insufficient description of dispersive interactions. Our findings show that quantum-chemical calculations can greatly improve the VBT approaches, which were parameterized for simple, inorganic salts with ideally point-shaped charges. In conclusion, we suggest the term "augmented VBT", or "aVBT", to describe this kind of theoretical approach.

  7. Separation of gas from liquid in a two-phase flow system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, L. G.; Elliott, D. G.

    1973-01-01

    Separation system causes jets which leave two-phase nozzles to impinge on each other, so that liquid from jets tends to coalesce in center of combined jet streams while gas phase is forced to outer periphery. Thus, because liquid coalescence is achieved without resort to separation with solid surfaces, cycle efficiency is improved.

  8. Enhanced mineralization of organic compounds in nonaqueous-phase liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Labare, M.P.; Alexander, M.

    1995-11-01

    Biodegradation of phenanthrene, biphenyl, or di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate initially present in a variety of nonaqueous-phase liquids (NAPLs) was slow in samples of soil and aquifer solids. The NAPLs were hexadecane, dibutyl phthalate, 2, 2, 4 ,4, 6, 8, 8-heptamethylnonane, cyclohexane, commercial oils, crude oil, creosote, and kerosene. Slurrying the soil or aquifer solids markedly enhanced the rate and extent of mineralization of the test compounds initially in many of the NAPLs. Both the low rate and extent of mineralization of the three compounds initially in dibutyl phthalate in soil slurries and of di(2- ethylhexyl) phthalate in heptamethylnonane present in slurries of aquifer solids were increased by inoculation of acclimated microbial cultures. Increasing the NAPL volume decreased phenanthrene biodegradation in soil, but the effect of larger NAPL volume could be alleviated by slurrying and inoculation. The rate or extent of mineralization in aquifer slurries of di(2-ethylhexyi) phthalate initially in some NAPLs was increased by addition of N and P, and inoculation further enhanced the degradation.

  9. Liquid-vapor phase diagram of metals using EAM potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Chandrani

    2013-02-01

    Pair-wise additive potentials are not adequate to describe the properties of metallic systems since many body effects are completely ignored in that approximation. In this regard, the embedded atom method is more appropriate because, in addition to the pair interaction, the total energy includes an embedding energy which is the energy required to add an impurity atom to the host electron fluid. Thus EAM takes into account the many body effects to some extent. We use the Cai and Ye's EAM potential to predict the liquid vapor phase diagram and critical constants of Aluminum and Copper within a perturbation theory approach. In this method, free energy of a fluid molecule, trapped in a cage formed by its nearest neighbors, is expanded about a hard sphere reference system. The first order correction term is calculated in terms of the zero temperature isotherm of the solid obtained using the EAM potential. Higher order correction terms are added to account for the deviation of the behavior of the real fluid from the reference hard sphere fluid.

  10. Thermodynamic and kinetic simulation of transient liquid-phase bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Brad

    The use of numeric computational methods for the simulation of materials systems is becoming more prevalent and an understanding of these tools may soon be a necessity for Materials Engineers and Scientists. The applicability of numerical simulation methods to transient liquid-phase (TLP) bonding is evaluated using a type 316L/MBF-51 material system. The comparisons involve the calculation of bulk diffusivities, tracking of interface positions during dissolution, widening, and isothermal solidification stages, as well as comparison of elemental composition profiles. The simulations were performed with Thermo-Calc and DICTRA software packages and the experiments with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and optical microscopic methods. Analytical methods are also discussed to enhance understanding. The results of the investigation show that while general agreement between simulations and experiments can be obtained, assumptions made with the simulation programs may cause difficulty in interpretation of the results unless the user has sufficient, mathematical, thermodynamic, kinetic, and simulation background.

  11. Numerical Modeling of Liquid-Vapor Phase Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esmaeeli, Asghar; Arpaci, Vedat S.

    2001-01-01

    We implemented a two- and three-dimensional finite difference/front tracking technique to solve liquid-vapor phase change problems. The mathematical and the numerical features of the method were explained in great detail in our previous reports, Briefly, we used a single formula representation which incorporated jump conditions into the governing equations. The interfacial terms were distributed as singular terms using delta functions so that the governing equations would be the same as conventional conservation equations away from the interface and in the vicinity of the interface they would provide correct jump conditions. We used a fixed staggered grid to discretize these equations and an unstructured grid to explicitly track the front. While in two dimensions the front was simply a connection of small line segments, in three dimensions it was represented by a connection of small triangular elements. The equations were written in conservative forms and during the course of computations we used regriding to control the size of the elements of the unstructured grid. Moreover, we implemented a coalescence in two dimensions which allowed the merging of different fronts or two segments of the same front when they were sufficiently close. We used our code to study thermocapillary migration of bubbles, burst of bubbles at a free surface, buoyancy-driven interactions of bubbles, evaporation of drops, rapid evaporation of an interface, planar solidification of an undercooled melt, dendritic solidification, and a host of other problems cited in the reference.

  12. Theory of Phase Separation and Polarization for Pure Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Gavish, Nir; Yochelis, Arik

    2016-04-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids are attractive to numerous applications and particularly, to renewable energy devices. As solvent free electrolytes, they demonstrate a paramount connection between the material morphology and Coulombic interactions: the electrode/RTIL interface is believed to be a product of both polarization and spatiotemporal bulk properties. Yet, theoretical studies have dealt almost exclusively with independent models of morphology and electrokinetics. Introduction of a distinct Cahn-Hilliard-Poisson type mean-field framework for pure molten salts (i.e., in the absence of any neutral component), allows a systematic coupling between morphological evolution and the electrokinetic phenomena, such as transient currents. Specifically, linear analysis shows that spatially periodic patterns form via a finite wavenumber instability and numerical simulations demonstrate that while labyrinthine type patterns develop in the bulk, lamellar structures are favored near charged surfaces. The results demonstrate a qualitative phenomenology that is observed empirically and thus, provide a physically consistent methodology to incorporate phase separation properties into an electrochemical framework. PMID:26954098

  13. Gravitational effects on microstructural development in liquid phase sintered materials

    SciTech Connect

    Courtney, T.H.

    1996-09-01

    In this review the author has tried to place in perspective differing viewpoints concerning the effect of gravity in LPS. Gravity induced settling can be roughly separated into two stages; free settling of isolated particles and skeletal settling of a connected solid structure. There is disagreement over the solid phase volume fraction needed to establish a skeletal structure. The author noted that such a criterion can only be determined by examination of structures sintered for times less than that at which skeletal settling commences. If this protocol is not followed, the measured critical volume fraction is greater than the one at which a skeleton first forms. The author reviewed two mechanisms for skeletal settling. While the process is complicated, previous work strongly suggests that particles are, more-or-less, extricated from the skeleton one at a time. They then settle a distance comparable to the interparticle spacing. Repetition leads to the slow slumping observed, for example, in heavy metals. Conversely, extrication in Fe-Cu alloys leads to floating of Fe particles. Details of the extrication process have not yet been clarified, and continued work in this area might be fruitful. The author also noted that a recent model put forth to describe skeletal settling in LPS systems seems physically unrealistic. In addition, the physics underlying the model do not apply to a system in which the solid has a lesser density than the liquid.

  14. A polarization-independent liquid crystal phase modulation using polymer-network liquid crystal with orthogonal alignment layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming-Syuan; Lin, Wei-Chih; Tsou, Yu-Shih; Lin, Yi-Hsin

    2012-10-01

    A polarization-independent liquid crystal (LC) phase modulation using polymer-network liquid crystals with orthogonal alignments layers (T-PNLC) is demonstrated. T-PNLC consists of three layers. LC directors in the two layers near glass substrates are orthogonal to each other. In the middle layer, LC directors are perpendicular to the glass substrate. The advantages of such T-PNLC include polarizer-free, larger phase shift (~0.4π rad) than the residual phase type (<0.05π rad), and low operating voltage (< 30Vrms). It does not require bias voltage for avoiding scattering because the refractive index of liquid crystals matches that of polymers. The phase shift of T-PNLC is affected by the cell gap and the curing voltages. The potential applications are laser beam steering, spatial light modulators and electrically tunable micro-lens arrays.

  15. Dynamic equilibrium dissolution of complex nonaqueous phase liquid mixtures into the aqueous phase.

    PubMed

    Schluep, Mathias; Gälli, René; Imboden, Dieter M; Zeyer, Josef

    2002-07-01

    Human health risks posed by hazardous substances seeping from a pool of nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) into groundwater change over time because the more soluble compounds such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) dissolve faster into the aqueous phase than less soluble compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Long-term dissolution from diesel fuel into the aqueous phase was determined experimentally in a continuous flow-through system using the slow-stirring method. The data obtained are interpreted using a dynamic equilibrium dissolution model based on Raoult's law. The predicted temporal development of aqueous concentrations are in good agreement with the experimental results. When a compound in the NAPL approaches complete depletion, a tailing behavior is observed, which is assigned to nonequilibrium effects, such as mass transfer limitations in the NAPL phase. The model predicted an increase of the mean molar mass of the diesel fuel of 1.5% over the entire experimental period. It should be noted that, if the dissolution process were to proceed further, the change in the mean molar mass could become significant and render the simple model inaccurate. Yet the simple model supports the assessment of initial action after a contamination event as well as the planning of long-term remedial strategies. PMID:12109733

  16. Dynamic equilibrium dissolution of complex nonaqueous phase liquid mixtures into the aqueous phase.

    PubMed

    Schluep, Mathias; Gälli, René; Imboden, Dieter M; Zeyer, Josef

    2002-07-01

    Human health risks posed by hazardous substances seeping from a pool of nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) into groundwater change over time because the more soluble compounds such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) dissolve faster into the aqueous phase than less soluble compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Long-term dissolution from diesel fuel into the aqueous phase was determined experimentally in a continuous flow-through system using the slow-stirring method. The data obtained are interpreted using a dynamic equilibrium dissolution model based on Raoult's law. The predicted temporal development of aqueous concentrations are in good agreement with the experimental results. When a compound in the NAPL approaches complete depletion, a tailing behavior is observed, which is assigned to nonequilibrium effects, such as mass transfer limitations in the NAPL phase. The model predicted an increase of the mean molar mass of the diesel fuel of 1.5% over the entire experimental period. It should be noted that, if the dissolution process were to proceed further, the change in the mean molar mass could become significant and render the simple model inaccurate. Yet the simple model supports the assessment of initial action after a contamination event as well as the planning of long-term remedial strategies.

  17. Centrifugal contactor with liquid mixing and flow control vanes and method of mixing liquids of different phases

    DOEpatents

    Jubin, Robert T.; Randolph, John D.

    1991-01-01

    The invention is directed to a centrifugal contactor for solvent extraction systems. The centrifugal contactor is provided with an annular vertically oriented mixing chamber between the rotor housing and the rotor for mixing process liquids such as the aqueous and organic phases of the solvent extraction process used for nuclear fuel reprocessing. A set of stationary helically disposed vanes carried by the housing is in the lower region of the mixing chamber at a location below the process-liquid inlets for the purpose of urging the liquids in an upward direction toward the inlets and enhancing the mixing of the liquids and mass transfer between the liquids. The upper region of the mixing vessel above the inlets for the process liquids is also provided with a set helically disposed vanes carried by the housing for urging the process liquids in a downward direction when the liquid flow rates through the inlets are relatively high and the liquids contact the vane set in the upper region. The use of these opposing vane sets in the mixing zone maintains the liquid in the mixing zone at suitable levels.

  18. Metastable liquid-liquid phase transition in a single-component system with only one crystal phase and no density anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzese, G.; Malescio, G.; Skibinsky, A.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Stanley, H. E.

    2002-11-01

    We investigate the phase behavior of a single-component system in three dimensions with spherically-symmetric, pairwise-additive, soft-core interactions with an attractive well at a long distance, a repulsive soft-core shoulder at an intermediate distance, and a hard-core repulsion at a short distance, similar to potentials used to describe liquid systems such as colloids, protein solutions, or liquid metals. We showed [Nature (London) 409, 692 (2001)] that, even with no evidence of the density anomaly, the phase diagram has two first-order fluid-fluid phase transitions, one ending in a gas-low-density-liquid (LDL) critical point, and the other in a gas-high-density-liquid (HDL) critical point, with a LDL-HDL phase transition at low temperatures. Here we use integral equation calculations to explore the three-parameter space of the soft-core potential and perform molecular dynamics simulations in the interesting region of parameters. For the equilibrium phase diagram, we analyze the structure of the crystal phase and find that, within the considered range of densities, the structure is independent of the density. Then, we analyze in detail the fluid metastable phases and, by explicit thermodynamic calculation in the supercooled phase, we show the absence of the density anomaly. We suggest that this absence is related to the presence of only one stable crystal structure.

  19. Nanoparticles for Nonaqueous-phase liquids (NAPLs) Remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiemvarangkul, Pijit

    Nanotechnology has gained attention in various fields of science and engineering for more than decades. Many nanotechnologies using nanosorbents, nanosensors, and nanoparticles have been developed, studied, and used to solve environmental problems. This dissertation contributes to the applications of two types of nanoparticles: 1) using zero valent iron nanoparticle technology (nZVI) for treatment of groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons and study effect of polyelectrolyte polymers on enhancing the mobility of nZVI in porous media and 2) testing a new type of nanoparticle, nano-scale calcium peroxide (CaO2) particles (nano-peroxide); particles have been synthesized and preliminarily tests on their chemical properties and oxidizing reactions with petroleum hydrocarbons investigated. Trichloroethylene (TCE) is one of the high toxic, dense, non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) and it is one of the major problems of groundwater contamination. The direct reaction of nano-scale zerovalent iron (nZVI) particles and TCE liquid phase batch experiments shows that nZVI has capability to remove pure phase TCE and there is the reduction reaction occurred with reaction byproduct. Mass balance of nZVI-TCE reaction demonstrates that 7--9 % TCE mass was trapped in 1 g of nZVI sludge indicating that absorption occurred during the removal process confirming the absorption of TCE into nZVI sludge. The reaction and absorption abilities of nZVI are depended upon its surface areas. Increasing amount of nZVI reduces the space of batch experiment systems, so TCE removal efficiency of nZVI is decreased. These experiments show the practicability of using nZVI to directly remove TCE from contaminated groundwater. The transport of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) particles stabilized by three polyelectrolytes: polyvinyl alcohol-co-vinyl acetate-co-itaconic acid (PV3A), poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and soy proteins were examined. The study shows the increase in nZVI mobility by

  20. Thermal effect in phase-periodic electron transport in disordered mesoscopic normal metal/superconductor structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrashov, V. T.; Shaikhaidarov, R. Sh.; Sosnin, I. A.

    1996-04-01

    We report measurements of the temperature dependence of the amplitude of phase-periodic conductance oscillations in disordered normal metal (Ag) structures, attached to a superconducting (Al) wire at two points. The amplitude of oscillations reaches its maximum at temperature T *, when the Thouless energy is of the order of k B T. The results are in agreement with recent calculations by Nazarov and Stoof [Phys. Rev. Lett. 76 (1996) 823].

  1. Effect of Excipients on Liquid-Liquid Phase Separation and Aggregation in Dual Variable Domain Immunoglobulin Protein Solutions.

    PubMed

    Raut, Ashlesha S; Kalonia, Devendra S

    2016-03-01

    Liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) and aggregation can reduce the physical stability of therapeutic protein formulations. On undergoing LLPS, the protein-rich phase can promote aggregation during storage due to high concentration of the protein. Effect of different excipients on aggregation in protein solution is well documented; however data on the effect of excipients on LLPS is scarce in the literature. In this study, the effect of four excipients (PEG 400, Tween 80, sucrose, and hydroxypropyl beta-cyclodextrin (HPβCD)) on liquid-liquid phase separation and aggregation in a dual variable domain immunoglobulin protein solution was investigated. Sucrose suppressed both LLPS and aggregation, Tween 80 had no effect on either, and PEG 400 increased LLPS and aggregation. Attractive protein-protein interactions and liquid-liquid phase separation decreased with increasing concentration of HPβCD, indicating its specific binding to the protein. However, HPβCD had no effect on the formation of soluble aggregates and fragments in this study. LLPS and aggregation are highly temperature dependent; at low temperature protein exhibits LLPS, at high temperature protein exhibits aggregation, and at an intermediate temperature both phenomena occur simultaneously depending on the solution conditions.

  2. Cephalic phase insulin secretion in relation to food presentation in normal and overweight subjects.

    PubMed

    Simon, C; Schlienger, J L; Sapin, R; Imler, M

    1986-01-01

    The existence of a preabsorptive insulin reflex is well known in animals but remains controversial in humans. Glycemia and insulin variations following olfactive and visual presentation of a standard meal were studied in 25 subjects, 10 of them (5 men and 5 women) of normal weight and 15 overweight (7 men and 8 women), after a 15 hour fast. Blood samples were collected continuously, every minute for 16 minutes after the meal was presented. The presentation produced an early blood insulin increment, variable in magnitude and time course and occurring between the 3rd and 9th minute, in both normal and overweight subjects. Glycemia variations were not significant. Our study demonstrated a positive correlation between the reflex insulin release, body weight and a conscious effort to maintain current body weight. However, the differences between overweight and normal subjects remained small. The physiological and psychological determinants of the cephalic phase of insulin secretion are discussed. PMID:3517898

  3. Determination of the liquid crystals phase transition temperatures using optical rotation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiao-ling; Liu, Wei-guo; Liu, Peng; Cai, Chang-long

    2011-11-01

    Using optical rotation effect, a sensitive, simple optical analytical system is developed for determining the phase transition temperatures of liquid crystals (LCs). When a monochromatic polarized light passes through LCs sample and analyzer, the light intensity changes with temperature. Especially, during the phase transition process, the intensity varies greatly due to optical rotation effect. The variation of light intensity versus variation of temperature curve shows the phase transition temperatures of LCs clearly. The phase transition temperatures of three cholesteric liquid crystals (ChLCs) and a nematic liquid crystals (NLCs) were detected by this method, and compared with those of the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and polarized light microscope (PLM) methods.

  4. Phase and Topological Behavior of Lyotropic Chromonic Liquid Crystals in Double Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Zoey S.; Jeong, Joonwoo; Tu, Fuquan; Lohr, Matt; Lee, Daeyeon; Collings, Peter J.; Lubensky, Tom C.; Yodh, A. G.

    2013-03-01

    Lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals, assembled by non-covalent interactions, have fascinating temperature- and concentration-dependent phase behavior. Using water-oil-water double emulsions, we are able control the inner droplet chromonic phase concentration by osmosis through the oil phase. We then study the configurations of the chromonic liquid crystal phases in droplets by varying the oil types, oil soluble surfactants, and inner droplet diameter. We employ polarization microscopy to observe resulting nematic and columnar phases of Sunset Yellow FCF, and we deduce the liquid crystal configuration of both phases within the droplets. Simulations based on Jones matrices confirm droplet appearance, and preliminary observations of chromonic liquid crystal shells in oil-water-oil double emulsions are reported. Supported by UPenn MRSEC DMR 11-20901 and NSF DMR 12-05463

  5. Phase interface effects in the total enthalpy-based lattice Boltzmann model for solid-liquid phase change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rongzong; Wu, Huiying

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, phase interface effects, including the differences in thermophysical properties between solid and liquid phases and the numerical diffusion across phase interface, are investigated for the recently developed total enthalpy-based lattice Boltzmann model for solid-liquid phase change, which has high computational efficiency by avoiding iteration procedure and linear equation system solving. For the differences in thermophysical properties (thermal conductivity and specific heat) between solid and liquid phases, a novel reference specific heat is introduced to improve the total enthalpy-based lattice Boltzmann model, which makes the thermal conductivity and specific heat decoupled. Therefore, the differences in thermal conductivity and specific heat can be handled by the dimensionless relaxation time and equilibrium distribution function, respectively. As for the numerical diffusion across phase interface, it is revealed for the first time and found to be induced by solid-liquid phase change. To reduce such numerical diffusion, multiple-relaxation-time collision scheme is exploited, and a special value (one fourth) for the so-called "magic" parameter, a combination of two relaxation parameters, is found. Numerical tests show that the differences in thermophysical properties can be correctly handled and the numerical diffusion across phase interface can be dramatically reduced. Finally, theoretical analyses are carried out to offer insights into the roles of the reference specific heat and "magic" parameter in the treatments of phase interface effects.

  6. Phase-sensitive transport at a normal metal-superconductor interface close to a Josephson junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosselin, David; Hornecker, Gaston; Mélin, Régis; Feinberg, Denis

    2014-02-01

    Phase- and voltage bias-sensitive quasiparticle transport at a double NIS1IS2 interface is considered. The barriers I range from tunnel to transparent, and the intermediate region S1 has a width comparable to the superconducting coherence length. A phase difference φ is applied to the Josephson junction S1IS2. The normal and Andreev reflections at the NIS1 interface become φ sensitive, and transport is governed by interferences within the narrow S1 region in both the normal and the anomalous channels. The subgap conductance is separately (energy E) and (phase φ) symmetric. Above the superconducting gap, the conductance is, in general, not symmetric even if (E ,φ) is changed in (-E,-φ), but the symmetry is restored by averaging Fermi oscillations. The Tomasch oscillations are amplified by the phase difference. The subgap conductance exhibits a resonant structure at the energy of the Andreev bound states (ABSs) of the S1IS2 junction, providing a side spectroscopy of such states. Depending on the relative transparencies of the junctions, the resonance can increase or reduce the conductance, and it can even vanish for φ =π, featuring total reflection of quasiparticles at NS1 by the ABS at S1S2.

  7. Precipitate phases in normalized and tempered ferritic/martensitic steel P92

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yinzhong; Liu, Huan; Shang, Zhongxia; Xu, Zhiqiang

    2015-10-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steel P92 is a promising candidate for cladding and duct applications in Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor. The precipitate phases of the P92 steel normalized at 1323 K (1050 °C) for 30 min and tempered at 1038 K (765 °C) for 1 h have been investigated using transmission electron microscopes. Four types of phases consisting of M23C6, MX, M2X and sigma-FeCr were identified in the steel. MX phases consist of Nb-rich M(C,N) carbonitride, Nb-rich MC carbide, V-rich M(C,N) carbonitride, V-rich MC carbide, V-rich MN nitride, and complex MC carbides with Nb-rich MC core and V-rich MC wings. M2X phases consist of Cr-rich M2(C,N) carbonitride, Cr-rich M2C carbide and M2N nitride. Sigma-FeCr has a simple tetragonal lattice and a typical chemical formula of Fe0.45Cr0.45W0.1. M23C6 and MX are the dominant phases, while the sigma-FeCr has the lowest content. The formation of sigma-FeCr and M2X phases in the steel is also discussed.

  8. Microstructural change during (liquid phase sintering) of W-Ni-Fe alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.K.; Eun, K.Y. ); Kang, S.L

    1989-05-01

    The changes of bulk density and microstructures during heating and liquid phase sintering of 98W-1Ni-1Fe compacts prepared from 1 and 5 {mu}m W powders have been observed in order to characterize the densification behavior. The compact prepared from a fine (1 {mu}m) W powder begins to densify rapidly at about 1200{degrees}C in the solid state during heating, attaining about 95 pct density upon reaching the liquid phase sintering temperature of 1460{degrees}C. The compact prepared from a coarse (5 {mu}m) W powder begins to densify rapidly at about 1400{degrees}C in the solid state, attaining about 87 pct density upon reaching the liquid phase sintering temperature. Thus, the skeleton of grains is already formed prior to liquid formation. During the isothermal liquid phase sintering, substantial grain growth occurs, and the liquid flows into both open and closed pores, filling them sequentially from the regions with small cross-sections. The grains subsequently grow into the liquid pockets which have been formed at the pore sites. The sequential pore filling by first liquid thus is shown to be the dominant densification process during the liquid phase sintering of this alloy.

  9. Method and device for removing a non-aqueous phase liquid from a groundwater system

    DOEpatents

    Looney, Brian B.; Rossabi, Joseph; Riha, Brian D.

    2002-01-01

    A device for removing a non-aqueous phase liquid from a groundwater system includes a generally cylindrical push-rod defining an internal recess therein. The push-rod includes first and second end portions and an external liquid collection surface. A liquid collection member is detachably connected to the push-rod at one of the first and second end portions thereof. The method of the present invention for removing a non-aqueous phase liquid from a contaminated groundwater system includes providing a lance including an external hydrophobic liquid collection surface, an internal recess, and a collection chamber at the bottom end thereof. The lance is extended into the groundwater system such that the top end thereof remains above the ground surface. The liquid is then allowed to collect on the liquid collection surface, and flow downwardly by gravity into the collection chamber to be pumped upwardly through the internal recess in the lance.

  10. A Liquid-Liquid Thermoelectric Heat Exchanger as a Heat Pump for Testing Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheth, Rubik B.; Makinen, Janice; Le, Hung V.

    2016-01-01

    The primary objective of the Phase Change HX payload on the International Space Station (ISS) is to test and demonstrate the viability and performance of Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers (PCM HX). The system was required to pump a working fluid through a PCM HX to promote the phase change material to freeze and thaw as expected on Orion's Multipurpose Crew Vehicle. Due to limitations on ISS's Internal Thermal Control System, a heat pump was needed on the Phase Change HX payload to help with reducing the working fluid's temperature to below 0degC (32degF). This paper will review the design and development of a TEC based liquid-liquid heat exchanger as a way to vary to fluid temperature for the freeze and thaw phase of the PCM HX. Specifically, the paper will review the design of custom coldplates and sizing for the required heat removal of the HX.

  11. Rapid removal of nitrobenzene in a three-phase ozone loaded system with gas-liquid-liquid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, Shiyin; Zhu, Jiangpeng; Wang, Guoxiang; Ni, Lixiao; Zhang, Yong; Green, Christopher T.

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the removal rate of nitrobenzene (NB) using a new gas-liquid-liquid (G-L-L) three-phase ozone loaded system consisting of a gaseous ozone, an aqueous solvent phase, and a fluorinated solvent phase (perfluorodecalin, or FDC). The removal rate of NB was quantified in relation to six factors including 1) initial pH, 2) initial NB dosage, 3) gaseous ozone dosage, 4) free radical scavenger, 5) FDC pre-aerated gaseous ozone, and 6) reuse of FDC. The NB removal rate is positively affected by the first three factors. Compared with the conventional gas-liquid (water) (G-L) two-phase ozonation system, the free radical scavenger (tertiary butyl alcohol) has much less influence on the removal rate of NB in the G-L-L system. The FDC loaded ozone acts as an ozone reservoir and serves as the main reactive phase in the G-L-L three-phase system. The reuse of FDC has little influence on the removal rate of NB. These experimental results suggest that the oxidation efficiency of ozonation in the G-L-L three-phase system is better than that in the conventional G-L two-phase system.

  12. Determination of Atmospheric Hydroxyl Radical by Liquid Phase Scrubbing and High Performance Liquid Chromatography.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaohui

    A new in situ method for determining atmospheric hydroxyl radical (OH) was developed. This method is based on liquid phase scrubbing technique and high performance liquid chromatography (LPS-HPLC). The sampling system employs glass bubblers to trap atmospheric OH into a buffered solution containing the chemical probe, salicylic acid (o-hydroxybenzoic acid, OHBA). The reaction of OHBA with OH produces a stable fluorescent product, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,5-DHBA), which is determined by reverse phase HPLC and fluorescence detection. The atmospheric OH concentration ( (OH)) is inferred from the resulting 2,5-DHBA amount in the aqueous scrubbing solution, fraction of 2,5-DHBA in the products, air sampling flow rate, sampling time, local pressure and temperature, etc. HPLC separation efficiency and fluorescence detection sensitivity for 2,5-DHBA have been studied. The results indicate that: the reagent blank can be controlled by suitable recrystallization; pH affects both separation and detection processes; the fluorometer should be adjusted to reach its highest signal-to-noise ratio by light source selection, flow cell size selection, wavelength selection, etc. Preliminary column switch experiments reveal the possibility to automate the whole sampling and detection system to enhance the temporal resolution. During an intercomparison of tropospheric OH measurement techniques at the Caribou site, CO (relatively unpolluted air) in Fall 1993, overlapping data were obtained with long path absorption and ion-assisted coupled with MS methods. LPS -HPLC day-time (OH) s, which range from {< }10^6 to 6times10 ^6 radicals/cm^3, agree well with those derived from the other two methods, especially the latter. LPS-HPLC (OH) depends linearly on the combined effects of solar flux, ozone and water vapor, however, it has a nonlinear dependence on NO _{x} and hydrocarbons. These results are consistent with that predicted from photochemical models. Experimental results and model

  13. A Fluorogenic Aromatic Nucleophilic Substitution Reaction for Demonstrating Normal-Phase Chromatography and Isolation of Nitrobenzoxadiazole Chromophores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Key, Jessie A.; Li, Matthew D.; Cairo, Christopher W.

    2011-01-01

    Normal-phase chromatography is an essential technique for monitoring chemical reactions, identifying the presence of specific components, as well as the purification of organic compounds. An experiment to facilitate the instruction and understanding of the concepts behind normal-phase chromatography at the introductory and intermediate…

  14. Cardiorespiratory phase synchronization during normal rest and inward-attention meditation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shr-Da; Lo, Pei-Chen

    2010-06-11

    The cardiac and respiratory systems can be viewed as two self-sustained oscillators with various interactions between them. In this study, the cardiorespiratory phase synchronization (CRPS) quantified by synchrogram was investigated to explore the phase synchronization between these two systems. The synchrogram scheme was applied to electrocardiogram (ECG) and respiration signals. Particular focus was the distinct cardiac-respiratory regulation phenomena intervened by inward-attention meditation and normal relaxation. Four synchronization parameters were measured: frequency ratio, lasting length, number of epochs, and total length. The results showed that normal rest resulted in much weaker CRPS. Statistical analysis reveals that the number of synchronous epochs and the total synchronization length significantly increase (p=0.024 and 0.034 respectively) during meditation. Furthermore, a predominance of 4:1 and 5:1 rhythm-ratio synchronizations was observed during meditation. Consequently, this study concludes that CRPS can be enhanced during meditation, compared with normal relaxation, and reveals a predominance of specific frequency ratios.

  15. Mixtures of n-octyl-beta-D-glucoside and triethylene glycol mono-n-octyl ether: phase behavior and micellar structure near the liquid-liquid phase boundary.

    PubMed

    Santonicola, Gabriella M; Kaler, Eric W

    2005-10-25

    The phase behavior and microstructure of aqueous mixtures of n-octyl-beta-D-glucoside (C8betaG1) and triethylene glycol mono-n-octyl ether (C8E3) is presented. C8betaG1 forms a one-phase micellar solution in water at surfactant concentrations up to 60 wt %, whereas mixtures with C8E3 show a liquid-liquid phase transition at low surfactant concentration. The position of this phase boundary for mixtures can be rationally shifted in the temperature-composition window by altering the ratio of the two surfactants. Small-angle neutron scattering is used to determine the size and shape of the mixed micelles and to characterize the nature of the fluctuations near the cloud point of the micellar solutions. The C8betaG1/C8E3 solutions are characterized by concentration fluctuations that become progressively stronger upon approach to the liquid-liquid phase boundary, whereas micellar growth is negligible. Such observations confirm previous views of the role of the surfactant phase boundary in tuning attractive micellar interactions, which can be used effectively to change the nature and strength of interparticle interactions in colloidal dispersions. Colloidal silica particles were then added to these surfactant mixtures and were found to aggregate at conditions near the cloud point. This finding is relevant to current strategies for protein crystallization.

  16. Double-twist cylinders in liquid crystalline cholesteric blue phases observed by transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Shu; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Kawata, Yuto; Kuwahara, Ryusuke; Nishi, Ryuji; Ozaki, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Cholesteric blue phases are liquid crystalline phases in which the constituent rod-like molecules spontaneously form three-dimensional, helical structures. Despite theoretical predictions that they are composed of cylindrical substructures within which the liquid crystal molecules are doubly twisted, real space observation of the arrangement of such structures had not been performed. Through transmission electron microscopy of photopolymerized blue phases with controlled lattice plane orientations, we report real space observation and comparison of the lattice structures of blue phases I and II. The two systems show distinctly different contrasts, reflecting the theoretically predicted, body centred and simple cubic arrangement of the double-twist cylinders. Transmission electron microscopy also reveals different tendencies of the two blue phases to align on unidirectionally rubbed surfaces. We thus show that TEM observation of alignment-controlled, photopolymerized liquid crystals can be a powerful tool to investigate complex liquid crystalline order. PMID:26530779

  17. Double-twist cylinders in liquid crystalline cholesteric blue phases observed by transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shu; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Kawata, Yuto; Kuwahara, Ryusuke; Nishi, Ryuji; Ozaki, Masanori

    2015-11-01

    Cholesteric blue phases are liquid crystalline phases in which the constituent rod-like molecules spontaneously form three-dimensional, helical structures. Despite theoretical predictions that they are composed of cylindrical substructures within which the liquid crystal molecules are doubly twisted, real space observation of the arrangement of such structures had not been performed. Through transmission electron microscopy of photopolymerized blue phases with controlled lattice plane orientations, we report real space observation and comparison of the lattice structures of blue phases I and II. The two systems show distinctly different contrasts, reflecting the theoretically predicted, body centred and simple cubic arrangement of the double-twist cylinders. Transmission electron microscopy also reveals different tendencies of the two blue phases to align on unidirectionally rubbed surfaces. We thus show that TEM observation of alignment-controlled, photopolymerized liquid crystals can be a powerful tool to investigate complex liquid crystalline order.

  18. Sedimentation of a two-dimensional colloidal mixture exhibiting liquid-liquid and gas-liquid phase separation: a dynamical density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Malijevský, Alexandr; Archer, Andrew J

    2013-10-14

    We present dynamical density functional theory results for the time evolution of the density distribution of a sedimenting model two-dimensional binary mixture of colloids. The interplay between the bulk phase behaviour of the mixture, its interfacial properties at the confining walls, and the gravitational field gives rise to a rich variety of equilibrium and non-equilibrium morphologies. In the fluid state, the system exhibits both liquid-liquid and gas-liquid phase separation. As the system sediments, the phase separation significantly affects the dynamics and we explore situations where the final state is a coexistence of up to three different phases. Solving the dynamical equations in two-dimensions, we find that in certain situations the final density profiles of the two species have a symmetry that is different from that of the external potentials, which is perhaps surprising, given the statistical mechanics origin of the theory. The paper concludes with a discussion on this.

  19. Enantioselective and diastereoselective separation of synthetic pyrethroid insecticides on a novel chiral stationary phase by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xulin; Hou, Shicong; Wang, Min

    2007-07-01

    A novel chiral packing material for high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was prepared by connecting (R)-1-phenyl-2-(4-methylphenyl) ethylamine (PTE) amide derivative of (S)-isoleucine to aminopropyl silica gel through 2-amino-3,5-dinitro-1-carboxamido-benzene unit. This chiral stationary phase was applied to the enantioselective and diastereoselective separation of five pyrethroid insecticides by HPLC under normal phase condition. To achieve satisfactory baseline separation an optimization of the variables of mobile phase composition was required. The two enantiomers of fenpropathrin and four stereoisomers of fenvalerate were baseline separated using hexane-1,2-dichloroethane-2-propanol as mobile phase. The results show that the enantioselectivity of CSP is better than Pirkle type 1-A column for these compounds. Only partial separations for the cypermethrin and cyfluthrin stereoisomers were observed. Seven peaks and eight peaks were observed for cypermethrin and cyfluthrin, respectively. The elution orders were assigned by using different stereoisomer-enriched products.

  20. Rejoining of isochromatid breaks induced by heavy ions in G2-phase normal human fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawata, T.; Durante, M.; Furusawa, Y.; George, K.; Ito, H.; Wu, H.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2001-01-01

    We reported previously that exposure of normal human fibroblasts in G2 phase of the cell cycle to high-LET radiation produces a much higher frequency of isochromatid breaks than exposure to gamma rays. We concluded that an increase in the production of isochromatid breaks is a signature of initial high-LET radiation-induced G2-phase damage. In this paper, we report the repair kinetics of isochromatid breaks induced by high-LET radiation in normal G2-phase human fibroblasts. Exponentially growing human fibroblasts (AG1522) were irradiated with gamma rays or energetic carbon (290 MeV/nucleon), silicon (490 MeV/nucleon), or iron (200 MeV/nucleon) ions. Prematurely condensed chromosomes were induced by calyculin A after different postirradiation incubation times ranging from 0 to 600 min. Chromosomes were stained with Giemsa, and aberrations were scored in cells at G2 phase. G2-phase fragments, the result of the induction of isochromatid breaks, decreased quickly with incubation time. The curve for the kinetics of the rejoining of chromatid-type breaks showed a slight upward curvature with time after exposure to 440 keV/microm iron particles, probably due to isochromatid-isochromatid break rejoining. The formation of chromatid exchanges after exposure to high-LET radiation therefore appears to be underestimated, because isochromatid-isochromatid exchanges cannot be detected. Increased induction of isochromatid breaks and rejoining of isochromatid breaks affect the overall kinetics of chromatid-type break rejoining after exposure to high-LET radiation.

  1. Dielectric spectroscopy of isotropic liquids and liquid crystal phases with dispersed graphene oxide

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zangana, Shakhawan; Iliut, Maria; Boran, Gökçen; Turner, Michael; Vijayaraghavan, Aravind; Dierking, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) flakes of different sizes were prepared and dispersed in isotropic and nematic (anisotropic) fluid media. The dielectric relaxation behaviour of GO-dispersions was examined for a wide temperature (25–60 oC) and frequency range (100 Hz–2 MHz). The mixtures containing GO flakes exhibited varying dielectric relaxation processes, depending on the size of the flakes and the elastic properties of the dispersant fluid. Relaxation frequencies of the GO doped isotropic media, such as isopropanol IPA, were observed to be much lower than the GO doped thermotropic nematic medium 5CB. It is anticipated that the slow relaxation frequencies (~10 kHz) could be resulting from the relaxation modes of the GO flakes while the fast relaxation frequencies (~100 kHz) could indicate strongly slowed down molecular modes of the nematogenic molecules, which are anchored to the GO flakes via dispersion interactions. The relaxation frequencies decreased as the size of the GO flakes in the isotropic solvent was increased. Polarizing microscopy showed that GO flakes with a mean diameter of 10 μm, dispersed in water, formed a lyotropic nematic liquid crystal phase. This lyotropic nematic exhibited the slowest dielectric relaxation process, with relaxation frequencies in the order of 2 kHz, as compared to the GO-isotropic suspension and the GO-doped 5CB. PMID:27555475

  2. Dielectric spectroscopy of isotropic liquids and liquid crystal phases with dispersed graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Zangana, Shakhawan; Iliut, Maria; Boran, Gökçen; Turner, Michael; Vijayaraghavan, Aravind; Dierking, Ingo

    2016-08-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) flakes of different sizes were prepared and dispersed in isotropic and nematic (anisotropic) fluid media. The dielectric relaxation behaviour of GO-dispersions was examined for a wide temperature (25–60 oC) and frequency range (100 Hz–2 MHz). The mixtures containing GO flakes exhibited varying dielectric relaxation processes, depending on the size of the flakes and the elastic properties of the dispersant fluid. Relaxation frequencies of the GO doped isotropic media, such as isopropanol IPA, were observed to be much lower than the GO doped thermotropic nematic medium 5CB. It is anticipated that the slow relaxation frequencies (~10 kHz) could be resulting from the relaxation modes of the GO flakes while the fast relaxation frequencies (~100 kHz) could indicate strongly slowed down molecular modes of the nematogenic molecules, which are anchored to the GO flakes via dispersion interactions. The relaxation frequencies decreased as the size of the GO flakes in the isotropic solvent was increased. Polarizing microscopy showed that GO flakes with a mean diameter of 10 μm, dispersed in water, formed a lyotropic nematic liquid crystal phase. This lyotropic nematic exhibited the slowest dielectric relaxation process, with relaxation frequencies in the order of 2 kHz, as compared to the GO-isotropic suspension and the GO-doped 5CB.

  3. Dielectric spectroscopy of isotropic liquids and liquid crystal phases with dispersed graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Al-Zangana, Shakhawan; Iliut, Maria; Boran, Gökçen; Turner, Michael; Vijayaraghavan, Aravind; Dierking, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) flakes of different sizes were prepared and dispersed in isotropic and nematic (anisotropic) fluid media. The dielectric relaxation behaviour of GO-dispersions was examined for a wide temperature (25-60 (o)C) and frequency range (100 Hz-2 MHz). The mixtures containing GO flakes exhibited varying dielectric relaxation processes, depending on the size of the flakes and the elastic properties of the dispersant fluid. Relaxation frequencies of the GO doped isotropic media, such as isopropanol IPA, were observed to be much lower than the GO doped thermotropic nematic medium 5CB. It is anticipated that the slow relaxation frequencies (~10 kHz) could be resulting from the relaxation modes of the GO flakes while the fast relaxation frequencies (~100 kHz) could indicate strongly slowed down molecular modes of the nematogenic molecules, which are anchored to the GO flakes via dispersion interactions. The relaxation frequencies decreased as the size of the GO flakes in the isotropic solvent was increased. Polarizing microscopy showed that GO flakes with a mean diameter of 10 μm, dispersed in water, formed a lyotropic nematic liquid crystal phase. This lyotropic nematic exhibited the slowest dielectric relaxation process, with relaxation frequencies in the order of 2 kHz, as compared to the GO-isotropic suspension and the GO-doped 5CB. PMID:27555475

  4. Classification of ground states and normal modes for phase-frustrated multicomponent superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weston, Daniel; Babaev, Egor

    2013-12-01

    We classify ground states and normal modes for n-component superconductors with frustrated intercomponent Josephson couplings, focusing on n=4. The results should be relevant not only to multiband superconductors, but also to Josephson-coupled multilayers and Josephson-junction arrays. It was recently discussed that three-component superconductors can break time-reversal symmetry as a consequence of phase frustration. We discuss how to classify frustrated superconductors with an arbitrary number of components. Although already for the four-component case there are a large number of different combinations of phase-locking and phase-antilocking Josephson couplings, we establish that there are a much smaller number of equivalence classes where properties of frustrated multicomponent superconductors can be mapped to each other. This classification is related to the graph-theoretical concept of Seidel switching. Numerically, we calculate ground states, normal modes, and characteristic length scales for the four-component case. We report conditions of appearance of new accidental continuous ground-state degeneracies.

  5. Ultrapreconcentration and determination of organophosphorus pesticides in water by solid-phase extraction combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junhua; Zhou, Guangming; Deng, Yongli; Cheng, Hongmei; Shen, Jie; Gao, Yi; Peng, Guilong

    2016-01-01

    Solid-phase extraction coupled with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction was developed as an ultra-preconcentration method for the determination of four organophosphorus pesticides (isocarbophos, parathion-methyl, triazophos and fenitrothion) in water samples. The analytes considered in this study were rapidly extracted and concentrated from large volumes of aqueous solutions (100 mL) by solid-phase extraction coupled with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and then analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography. Experimental variables including type and volume of elution solvent, volume and flow rate of sample solution, salt concentration, type and volume of extraction solvent and sample solution pH were investigated for the solid-phase extraction coupled with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction with these analytes, and the best results were obtained using methanol as eluent and ethylene chloride as extraction solvent. Under the optimal conditions, an exhaustive extraction for four analytes (recoveries >86.9%) and high enrichment factors were attained. The limits of detection were between 0.021 and 0.15 μg/L. The relative standard deviations for 0.5 μg/L of the pesticides in water were in the range of 1.9-6.8% (n = 5). The proposed strategy offered the advantages of simple operation, high enrichment factor and sensitivity and was successfully applied to the determination of four organophosphorus pesticides in water samples.

  6. 40 CFR 227.32 - Liquid, suspended particulate, and solid phases of a material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... solid phases of a material. 227.32 Section 227.32 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... MATERIALS Definitions § 227.32 Liquid, suspended particulate, and solid phases of a material. (a) For the... obtained above prior to centrifugation and filtration. The solid phase includes all material settling...

  7. New methods and materials for solid phase extraction and high performance liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Dumont, P.J.

    1996-04-23

    This paper describes methods for solid phase extraction and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The following are described: Effects of Resin Sulfonation on the Retention of Polar Organic Compounds in Solid Phase Extraction; Ion-Chromatographic Separation of Alkali Metals In Non-Aqueous Solvents; Cation-Exchange Chromatography in Non-Aqueous Solvents; and Silicalite As a Stationary Phase For HPLC.

  8. Experimental study of nanofluidics and phase transitions of normal and superfluid 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, Angel Enriques

    This thesis addresses the experimental results of two different research topics. The first is the experimental work of pressure driven flows in the smallest, single nanotubes ever investigated. The nanotube boundary conditions and slip lengths from argon, nitrogen, water, and helium experiments were analyzed and compared to macroscopic boundary conditions. The second research topic discusses the work on ellipsometric and quartz microbalance measurements of the 2D superfluid phase diagram of 4He on alkali substrates. Ellipsometric results of sodium on HOPG provide the first evidence of the existence of the 2D critical point on an intermediate strength substrate. Pressure driven flows through single nanopores and microtubes were measured with a calibrated mass spectrometer with pressure drops up to 30 Atm. The nanopores were between 30 nm to 600 nm in diameter and etched in mica and PET membranes of several microns thickness. Microtubes several inches long of fused quartz and nickel material were tested with diameters between 1.8 micron and 25 micron. For 4He and argon gas we observed the flow transition between the free molecular and continuum regimes at 293 K and 77 K. No discrepancy between the macroscopic theory and the 30 nm nanopore data was found. Because of the exceptionally low viscosity of gaseous helium the laminar-turbulent transition could also be observed within these submicron channels. The small viscosity of 4He was too small to dampen inertial effects at a Reynolds number of 2000. In addition to single phase gas flows, our experimental technique also allows us to investigate flows in which the nano or micro scale pipe is either partially or completely filled with liquids. The position of the intrinsic liquid/vapor interface was important for understanding this type of flow. Strong evaporation and cooling at the liquid-vapor interface can lead to freezing for conventional fluids such as nitrogen and water, which in turn leads to complex intermittent

  9. Normal Auger spectra of iodine in gas phase alkali iodide molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhengfa; Caló, Antonio; Kukk, Edwin; Aksela, Helena; Aksela, Seppo

    2005-06-01

    Molecular normal Auger electron spectra following the iodine 4d ionization in gas-phase alkali iodides were investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The Auger electron spectra for LiI, NaI and KI were recorded using electron impact, and for RbI by using photo-excitation. These Auger spectra were analyzed in detail and compared to the referenced normal Auger spectra of HI [L. Karlsson, S. Svensson, P. Baltzer, M. Carlsson-Göthe, M.P. Keane, A. Naves de Brito, N. Correia, B. Wannberg, J. Phys. B 22 (1989) 3001]. An energy shift toward higher kinetic energy and a narrowing in linewidth are observed in the Auger spectra series revealing the effect of the changing environment from covalently bonded HI to ionic alkali iodide compounds. The experimental results are also compared with the theoretical ab initio calculations and with the Auger spectra of I -, computed with the multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock (MCHF) method.

  10. Formation of binary phase gratings in photopolymer-liquid crystal composites by a surface-controlled anisotropic phase separation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jae-Hong; Khoo, Iam Choon; Yu, Chang-Jae; Jung, Min-Sik; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2005-01-10

    We report on formation of binary phase gratings in photopolymer-liquid crystal (PLC) composites using a surface-controlled phase separation method. The binary nature of the PLC phase gratings is produced by employing a single step photo-ablation through an amplitude photomask which precisely controls the interfacial interactions between the LC and the photopolymer on the alignment layer. A subsequent illumination of the ultraviolet light onto the whole PLC promotes an anisotropic phase separation resulting in the formation of distinct binary patterns for the PLC structure. The electrically tunable diffraction properties of the binary phase gratings are presented.

  11. Phase conversion and interface growth in phase-separated 3He - 4He liquid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Haruka; Satoh, Takeo; Burmistrov, Serguei N.

    2005-10-01

    We have developed a method for measuring the transmission coefficient of a sound propagating through the interface in phase-separated He3-He4 liquid mixtures. The method and the results are described with discussions by examining the phase-conversion process of He3 quasiparticles driven to flow across the interface. From the data, we have determined the kinetic growth coefficient of the interface, ξ(T,P,ω) , as a function of temperature, pressure, and frequency. The temperature range of the present investigation is about 2-100mK at the pressure mainly around 1bar with sound frequency 9.64, 14.4, and 32.4MHz . The main specific features observed for the kinetic growth coefficient are, as follows: (i) there is a maximum at some temperature Tm(ω) depending on the frequency, (ii) above Tm(ω) , ξ decreases with the increase of temperature as ∝ω5/2T-3 , and (iii) below Tm(ω) , ξ becomes frequency independent and diminishes as a cube of temperature, T3 .

  12. Modified normal-phase ion-pair chromatographic methods for the facile separation and purification of imidazolium-based ionic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, ND; Schenkel, MR; Robertson, LA; Noble, RD; Gin, DL

    2012-07-04

    lmidazolium- and oligo(imidazolium)-based ionic organic compounds are important in the design of room-temperature ionic liquid materials; however, the chromatographic analysis and separation of such compounds are often difficult. A convenient and inexpensive method for effective thin-layer chromatography (TLC) analysis and column chromatography separation of imidazolium-based ionic compounds is presented. Normal-phase ion-pair TLC is used to effectively analyze homologous mixtures of these ionic compounds. Subsequent separation of the mixtures is performed using ion-pair flash chromatography on normal-phase silica gel, yielding high levels of recovery. This method also results in a complete exchange of the counter anion on the imidazolium compounds to the anion of the ion-pair reagent. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Paraelectric-antiferroelectric phase transition in achiral liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pociecha, Damian; Gorecka, Ewa; Čepič, Mojca; Vaupotič, Nataša; Gomola, Kinga; Mieczkowski, Jozef

    2005-12-01

    Critical freezing of molecular rotation in an achiral smectic phase, which leads to polar ordering through the second order paraelectric-antiferroelectric (Sm-A→Sm-APA) phase transition is studied theoretically and experimentally. Strong softening of the polar mode in the Sm-A phase and highly intensive dielectric mode in the Sm-APA phase are observed due to weak antiferroelectric interactions in the system. In the Sm-APA phase the dielectric response behaves critically upon biasing by a dc electric field. Such a behavior is found general for the antiferroelectric smectic phase with significant quadrupolar interlayer coupling.

  14. Applications of liquid-phase microextraction techniques in natural product analysis: a review.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yunyan; Chen, Xuan; Hu, Shuang; Bai, Xiaohong

    2014-11-14

    Over the last years, liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) as a simple, rapid, practical and effective sample-preparation technique, coupled with various instrumental analytical methods, has been increasingly and widely used to research and determine trace or ultra-micro-levels of both inorganic and organic analytes from different matrix-complex samples. In this review, different kinds of LPMEs such as single drop liquid-phase microextraction, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction, and hollow fibre liquid-phase microextraction are summarized and recent applications of LPMEs in trace compounds in vivo and in vitro from different natural product matrice analysis such as tea, vegetables, seeds, herbs, and galenical are also discussed. Finally, future developments and applications of LPMEs in complex sample analysis are prospected.

  15. Applications of liquid-phase microextraction techniques in natural product analysis: a review.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yunyan; Chen, Xuan; Hu, Shuang; Bai, Xiaohong

    2014-11-14

    Over the last years, liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) as a simple, rapid, practical and effective sample-preparation technique, coupled with various instrumental analytical methods, has been increasingly and widely used to research and determine trace or ultra-micro-levels of both inorganic and organic analytes from different matrix-complex samples. In this review, different kinds of LPMEs such as single drop liquid-phase microextraction, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction, and hollow fibre liquid-phase microextraction are summarized and recent applications of LPMEs in trace compounds in vivo and in vitro from different natural product matrice analysis such as tea, vegetables, seeds, herbs, and galenical are also discussed. Finally, future developments and applications of LPMEs in complex sample analysis are prospected. PMID:25441339

  16. Carbon dioxide tolerance in the single-stage liquid-phase synthesis of dimethyl ether

    SciTech Connect

    Sardesai, A.; Gunda, A.; Tartamella, T.; Lee, S.

    2000-01-01

    In the liquid-phase dimethyl ether process, methanol synthesis catalyst (Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and methanol dehydration catalyst ({gamma}-alumina) are slurred in an inert liquid medium. The inert liquid medium used in this investigation is a white mineral oil, Witco-40. This multiphase reaction is conducted in a mechanically agitated slurry reactor. In this process, syngas conversion can be significantly improved by coproduction of dimethyl ether along with methanol. The coproduction strategy improves the thermodynamic and kinetic environment of the reaction system. The effects of catalyst loadings in the slurry and the roles played by carbon dioxide in dimethyl ether synthesis were studied by conducting kinetic experiments. The liquid-phase dimethyl ether synthesis process exhibits higher carbon dioxide tolerance as compared to the liquid-phase methanol synthesis process, whose optimal carbon dioxide concentration in the unbalanced syngas feed is around 8%. These results have been experimentally confirmed.

  17. A polarization-independent liquid crystal phase modulation using polymer-network liquid crystals in a 90° twisted cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Hsin; Chen, Ming-Syuan; Lin, Wei-Chih; Tsou, Yu-Shih

    2012-07-01

    A polarization-independent liquid crystal phase modulation using polymer-network liquid crystals in a 90° twisted cell (T-PNLC) is demonstrated. T-PNLC consists of three layers. Liquid crystal (LC) directors in the two layers near glass substrates are orthogonal to each other and those two layers modulate two eigen-polarizations of an incident light. As a result, two eigen-polarizations of an incident light experience the same phase shift. In the middle layer, LC directors are perpendicular to the glass substrate and contribute no phase shift. The phase shift of T-PNLC is electrically tunable and polarization-independent. T-PNLC does not require any bias voltage for operation. The phase shift is 0.28 π rad for the voltage of 30 Vrms. By measuring and analyzing the optical phase shift of T-PNLC at the oblique incidence of transverse magnetic wave, the pretilt angle of LC directors and the effective thickness of three layers are obtained and discussed. The potential applications are spatial light modulators, laser beam steering, and micro-lens arrays.

  18. Quasi-liquid layer theory based on the bulk first-order phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzhkin, I. A. Petrenko, V. F.

    2009-01-15

    The theory of the superionic phase transition (bulk first-order transition) proposed in [1] is used to explain the existence of a quasi-liquid layer at an ice surface below its melting point. An analytical expression is derived for the quasi-liquid layer thickness. Numerical estimates are made and compared with experiment. Distinction is made between the present model and other quasi-liquid layer theories.

  19. Electrically tunable refractive index in the dark conglomerate phase of a bent-core liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraj, M.; Görtz, V.; Goodby, J. W.; Gleeson, H. F.

    2014-01-01

    Here we report an electrically tunable refractive index observed in an isotropic liquid crystal phase known as the dark conglomerate (DC) phase. This unusual change in the refractive index which has not been reported before in the DC phase of other bent-core liquid crystals occurs because of a series of electric-field-driven transformations that take place in the DC phase of the studied bent-core liquid crystal. These transformations give rise to a decrease in the refractive index of the system, when an electric field is applied across the device, and no change in the birefringence is seen during such behavior. The electro-optic phenomenon is described in detail and the possibility of exploiting this for a number of liquid crystal based device applications is discussed.

  20. HIGH PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHIC SEPARATION OF THE ENANTIOMERS OF ORGANOPHOSPHORUS PESTICIDES ON POLYSACCHARIDE CHIRAL STATIONARY PHASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-performance liquid chromatographic separation of the individual enantiomers of 12 organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) was obtained on polysaccharide enantioselective HPLC columns using alkane-alcohol mobile phase. The OP pesticides were crotoxyphos, dialifor, fonofos, fenamiph...

  1. Light-Weight, Low-Cost, Single-Phase, Liquid-Cooled Cold Plate (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Narumanchi, S.

    2013-07-01

    This presentation, 'Light-Weight, Low-Cost, Single-Phase Liquid-Cooled Cold Plate,' directly addresses program goals of increased power density, specific power, and lower cost of power electronics components through improved thermal management.

  2. Light-Weight, Single-Phase, Liquid-Cooled Cold Plate (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Narumanchi, S.

    2013-07-01

    This presentation, 'Light-Weight, Low-Cost, Single-Phase Liquid-Cooled Cold Plate,' directly addresses program goals of increased power density, specific power, and lower cost of power electronics components through improved thermal management.

  3. Investigating the Retention Mechanisms of Liquid Chromatography Using Solid-Phase Extraction Cartridges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Mary E.; Musial, Beata A.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Danielson, Neil D.; Ca, Diep

    2009-01-01

    Liquid chromatography (LC) experiments for the undergraduate analytical laboratory course often illustrate the application of reversed-phase LC to solve a separation problem, but rarely compare LC retention mechanisms. In addition, a high-performance liquid chromatography instrument may be beyond what some small colleges can purchase. Solid-phase…

  4. Polyaromatic hydrocarbons do not disturb liquid-liquid phase coexistence, but increase the fluidity of model membranes.

    PubMed

    Liland, Nina S; Simonsen, Adam C; Duelund, Lars; Torstensen, Bente E; Berntssen, Marc H G; Mouritsen, Ole G

    2014-12-01

    Polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is a group of compounds, many of which are toxic, formed by incomplete combustion or thermal processing of organic material. They are highly lipophilic and thus present in some seed oils used for human consumption as well as being increasingly common in aquaculture diets due to inclusion of vegetable oils. Cytotoxic effects of PAHs have been thought to be partly due to a membrane perturbing effect of these compounds. A series of studies were here performed to examine the effects of three different PAHs (naphthalene, phenanthrene and benzo[a]pyrene) with different molecular sizes (two, three and five rings, respectively) and fat solubility (Kow 3.29, 4.53 and 6.04, respectively) on membrane models. The effects of PAHs on liquid-liquid phase coexistence in solid-supported lipid bilayers (dioleoylphosphocholine:dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine:cholesterol) were assessed using fluorescence microscopy. Benzo[a]pyrene had a slight affinity for the liquid-ordered phase, but there were no effects of adding any of the other PAHs on the number or size of the liquid domains (liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered). Benzo[a]pyrene and phenanthrene, but not naphthalene, lowered the transition temperature (Tm) and the enthalpy (ΔH) characterising the transition from the solid to the liquid-crystalline phase in DPPC vesicles. The membrane effects of the PAH molecules are likely related to size, with bigger and more fat-soluble molecules having a fluidising effect when embedded in the membrane, possibly causing some of the observed toxic effects in fish exposed to these contaminants.

  5. A Liquid-to-Solid Phase Transition of the ALS Protein FUS Accelerated by Disease Mutation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Avinash; Lee, Hyun O; Jawerth, Louise; Maharana, Shovamayee; Jahnel, Marcus; Hein, Marco Y; Stoynov, Stoyno; Mahamid, Julia; Saha, Shambaditya; Franzmann, Titus M; Pozniakovski, Andrej; Poser, Ina; Maghelli, Nicola; Royer, Loic A; Weigert, Martin; Myers, Eugene W; Grill, Stephan; Drechsel, David; Hyman, Anthony A; Alberti, Simon

    2015-08-27

    Many proteins contain disordered regions of low-sequence complexity, which cause aging-associated diseases because they are prone to aggregate. Here, we study FUS, a prion-like protein containing intrinsically disordered domains associated with the neurodegenerative disease ALS. We show that, in cells, FUS forms liquid compartments at sites of DNA damage and in the cytoplasm upon stress. We confirm this by reconstituting liquid FUS compartments in vitro. Using an in vitro "aging" experiment, we demonstrate that liquid droplets of FUS protein convert with time from a liquid to an aggregated state, and this conversion is accelerated by patient-derived mutations. We conclude that the physiological role of FUS requires forming dynamic liquid-like compartments. We propose that liquid-like compartments carry the trade-off between functionality and risk of aggregation and that aberrant phase transitions within liquid-like compartments lie at the heart of ALS and, presumably, other age-related diseases. PMID:26317470

  6. Use of free silicon in liquid phase sintering of silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, Rishi; Baik, Sunggi

    1985-11-12

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic.

  7. Ionic liquid acceleration of solid-phase suzuki-miyaura cross-coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Revell, Jefferson D; Ganesan, A

    2002-09-01

    [reaction: see text] Room-temperature ionic liquids promote various transition metal-catalyzed reactions in the solution phase. Here, for the first time, we show that these effects are translatable to solid-phase reactions. The Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling of 4-iodophenol immobilized on polystyrene-Wang resin with various arylboronic acids was significantly accelerated by the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([bmim][BF(4)(-)]).

  8. Use of free silicon in liquid phase sintering of silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, R.; Baik, S.

    1985-11-12

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic. 4 figs.

  9. Handling of liquid holdup in Duyong two-phase flow pipeline system

    SciTech Connect

    Saad, M.R.; Singh, B. )

    1988-01-01

    This paper deals with the handling of liquids in the multi-phase flow pipeline system within Carigali's Duyong Offshore Gas Complex and the Onshore Gas Terminal, in Kerteh, Terongganu. The data and operations experience gathered necessitate changes to the operating procedures originally identified during the design phase. This is to ensure more efficient handling of liquid hold-up in the pipeline during low gas flowrates.

  10. Evaluation of mercury in liquid waste processing facilities - Phase I report

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, V.; Occhipinti, J. E.; Shah, H.; Wilmarth, W. R.; Edwards, R. E.

    2015-07-01

    This report provides a summary of Phase I activities conducted to support an Integrated Evaluation of Mercury in Liquid Waste System (LWS) Processing Facilities. Phase I activities included a review and assessment of the liquid waste inventory and chemical processing behavior of mercury using a system by system review methodology approach. Gaps in understanding mercury behavior as well as action items from the structured reviews are being tracked. 64% of the gaps and actions have been resolved.

  11. Evaluation of Mercury in Liquid Waste Processing Facilities - Phase I Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, V.; Occhipinti, J.; Shah, H.; Wilmarth, B.; Edwards, R.

    2015-07-01

    This report provides a summary of Phase I activities conducted to support an Integrated Evaluation of Mercury in Liquid Waste System (LWS) Processing Facilities. Phase I activities included a review and assessment of the liquid waste inventory and chemical processing behavior of mercury using a system by system review methodology approach. Gaps in understanding mercury behavior as well as action items from the structured reviews are being tracked. 64% of the gaps and actions have been resolved.

  12. Scaling analysis of gas-liquid two-phase flow pattern in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jinho

    1993-01-01

    A scaling analysis of gas-liquid two-phase flow pattern in microgravity, based on the dominant physical mechanism, was carried out with the goal of predicting the gas-liquid two-phase flow regime in a pipe under conditions of microgravity. The results demonstrated the effect of inlet geometry on the flow regime transition. A comparison of the predictions with existing experimental data showed good agreement.

  13. Kinetics of liquid-phase hydrogenation of phenol on a palladium catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Kotova, V.G.; Kul'kova, N.V.; Temkin, M.I.

    1988-08-01

    The kinetics of liquid-phase hydrogenation of phenol into cyclohexanone on a Pd catalyst were studied. At atmospheric pressure, the reaction rate is described by the equation previously obtained for liquid-phase hydrogenation of benzoic acid. At pressures of 0.7-4 MPa, the rate obeys a zero-order equation. The preexponential factor of the Arrhenius equation for the number of rotations in the zero-order region correspond to a transmission coefficient of /kappa/ << 1.

  14. Amphiphilic Liquid Crystal Exhibiting the Smectic A to Smectic C Phase Transition without Layer Contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Norihiro; Takanishi, Yoichi; Yamamoto, Jun; Yoshizawa, Atsushi

    2011-02-01

    We prepared an amphiphilic liquid crystal composed of a semiperfluorinated alkyl chain and a 2,3-difluoro-1,4-diphenylbenzene core, and investigated its physical properties using polarized optical microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and X-ray diffraction analysis. The compound was found to exhibit the smectic A to smectic C phase transition without layer contraction. The compound doped with a ferroelectric liquid crystal exhibited a fast electro-optical switching with a response time of 10 µs in the chiral smectic A phase in spite of the absence of a chiral smectic C phase. The phase transition behavior is interpreted using the de Vries cone model.

  15. Supercooling of aqueous dimethylsulfoxide solution at normal and high pressures: Evidence for the coexistence of phase-separated aqueous dimethylsulfoxide solutions of different water structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanno, H.; Kajiwara, K.; Miyata, K.

    2010-05-01

    Supercooling behavior of aqueous dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) solution was investigated as a function of DMSO concentration and at high pressures. A linear relationship was observed for TH (homogeneous ice nucleation temperature) and Tm (melting temperature) for the supercooling of aqueous DMSO solution at normal pressure. Analysis of the DTA (differential thermal analysis) traces for homogeneous ice crystallization in the bottom region of the TH curve for a DMSO solution of R =20 (R: moles of water/moles of DMSO) at high pressures supported the contention that the second critical point (SCP) of liquid water should exist at Pc2=˜200 MPa and at Tc2<-100 °C (Pc2: pressure of SCP, Tc2: temperature of SCP). The presence of two TH peaks for DMSO solutions (R =15, 12, and 10) suggests that phase separation occurs in aqueous DMSO solution (R ≤15) at high pressures and low temperatures (<-90 °C). The pressure dependence of the two TH curves for DMSO solutions of R =10 and 12 indicates that the two phase-separated components in the DMSO solution of R =10 have different liquid water structures [LDL-like and HDL-like structures (LDL: low-density liquid water, HDL: high-density liquid water)] in the pressure range of 120-230 MPa.

  16. Supercooling of aqueous dimethylsulfoxide solution at normal and high pressures: Evidence for the coexistence of phase-separated aqueous dimethylsulfoxide solutions of different water structures.

    PubMed

    Kanno, H; Kajiwara, K; Miyata, K

    2010-05-21

    Supercooling behavior of aqueous dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) solution was investigated as a function of DMSO concentration and at high pressures. A linear relationship was observed for T(H) (homogeneous ice nucleation temperature) and T(m) (melting temperature) for the supercooling of aqueous DMSO solution at normal pressure. Analysis of the DTA (differential thermal analysis) traces for homogeneous ice crystallization in the bottom region of the T(H) curve for a DMSO solution of R=20 (R: moles of water/moles of DMSO) at high pressures supported the contention that the second critical point (SCP) of liquid water should exist at P(c2)= approximately 200 MPa and at T(c2)<-100 degrees C (P(c2): pressure of SCP, T(c2): temperature of SCP). The presence of two T(H) peaks for DMSO solutions (R=15, 12, and 10) suggests that phase separation occurs in aqueous DMSO solution (Rphase-separated components in the DMSO solution of R=10 have different liquid water structures [LDL-like and HDL-like structures (LDL: low-density liquid water, HDL: high-density liquid water)] in the pressure range of 120-230 MPa.

  17. Study of surface-bonded dicationic ionic liquids as stationary phases for hydrophilic interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Lizhen; Li, Hua; Shan, Yuanhong; Wang, Shuangyuan; Shi, Xianzhe; Lu, Xin; Xu, Guowang

    2014-02-21

    In the present study, several geminal dicationic ionic liquids based on 1,4-bis(3-allylimidazolium)butane and 1,8-bis(3-allylimidazolium)octane in combination with different anions bromide and bis(trifluoromethanesulphonyl)imide were prepared and then bonded to the surface of 3-mercaptopropyl modified silica materials through the "thiol-ene" click chemistry as stationary phases for hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC). Compared with their monocationic analogues, the dicationic ionic liquids stationary phases presented effective retention and good selectivity for typical hydrophilic compounds under HILIC mode with the column efficiency as high as 130,000 plates/m. Moreover, the influence of different alkyl chain spacer between dications and combined anions on the retention behavior and selectivity of the dicationic ionic liquids stationary phases under HILIC mode was displayed. The results indicated that the longer linkage chain would decrease the hydrophilicity and retention on the dicationic ionic liquid stationary phase, and while differently combined anions had no difference due to the exchangeability under the common HILIC mobile phase with buffer salt. Finally, the retention mechanism was investigated by evaluating the effect of chromatographic factors on retention, including the water content in the mobile phase, the mobile phase pH and buffer salt concentration. The results showed that the dicationic ionic liquids stationary phases presented a mixed-mode retention behavior with HILIC mechanism and anion exchange.

  18. Chk1 requirement for high global rates of replication fork progression during normal vertebrate S phase.

    PubMed

    Petermann, Eva; Maya-Mendoza, Apolinar; Zachos, George; Gillespie, David A F; Jackson, Dean A; Caldecott, Keith W

    2006-04-01

    Chk1 protein kinase maintains replication fork stability in metazoan cells in response to DNA damage and DNA replication inhibitors. Here, we have employed DNA fiber labeling to quantify, for the first time, the extent to which Chk1 maintains global replication fork rates during normal vertebrate S phase. We report that replication fork rates in Chk1(-/-) chicken DT40 cells are on average half of those observed with wild-type cells. Similar results were observed if Chk1 was inhibited or depleted in wild-type DT40 cells or HeLa cells by incubation with Chk1 inhibitor or small interfering RNA. In addition, reduced rates of fork extension were observed with permeabilized Chk1(-/-) cells in vitro. The requirement for Chk1 for high fork rates during normal S phase was not to suppress promiscuous homologous recombination at replication forks, because inhibition of Chk1 similarly slowed fork progression in XRCC3(-/-) DT40 cells. Rather, we observed an increased number of replication fibers in Chk1(-/-) cells in which the nascent strand is single-stranded, supporting the idea that slow global fork rates in unperturbed Chk1(-/-) cells are associated with the accumulation of aberrant replication fork structures.

  19. Frustrated smectic liquid crystalline phases in lactic acid derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glogarová, M.; Novotná, V.

    2016-08-01

    We have prepared and studied a series of compounds with different types of molecular core and lactate unit in the chiral terminal chain. We draw a survey and comparison of their mesomorphic properties with respect to the occurrence of twist grain boundary (TGB) phases. The materials exhibit extremely wide TGBA phase more than 60K broad, unique TGBA-TGBC-SmC*-SmCA* phase sequence and unique re-entrant TGBA phase below the SmA phase. TGB phases have been induced in binary mixtures of molecules with different molecular shape and chirality (chiral lactic acid derivative and non-chiral hockey-stick mesogen). Unique effect is observed for compounds with TGBA phase, where the applied electric field transforms the planar texture into the homeotropic one, homogeneously dark in crossed polarizers. The process is analogy of the Frederiks transition so far known only for nematics. This effect, changing the bright state to the dark one, is promising for applications.

  20. Chiral-phase high-performance liquid chromatography of rotenoid racemates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abidi, S.L.

    1987-01-01

    The high-performance liquid chromatograhic (HPLC) behavior of parent rotenoids (type I) and the hydroxyl-analogues (type II) on three different chiral stationary phases (CSPs) was studied. Separations of optical isomers were achieved in various degrees depending largely upon the rotenoidal structures and the CSP types employed. Enantiomers of all but elliptone compounds were separable on β-cyclodextrin-bonded silica (CDS). Without exception, the 12a-hydroxyrotenoid antipodes were resolved on Pirkle's phenylglycine-bonded silica (PGS) despite unsuccessful attenmpts to resolve the type I rotenoidal racemates. Conversely, optical resolution of the latter rotenoids was accomplished by using a helical polytriphenylmethylacrylate-coated silica (TPS) column and the observed separation factors (α values) ranged from 1.14 to 1.90. The results from HPLC of type II rotenoids on TPS (α = 1.00–1.63) suggested that variations in E-ring structures had profound influence on the resolution outcome. Conjugated double bonds on the E-ring and the desisopropylation of the five-membered E-ring ot type II rotenoids appeared to be important structural features for chiral recognition involving the TPS substrate. In both reversed-phase (CDS) and normal-pahse (PGS and TPS) HPLC modes, the less polar enantiomers were the 6aβ,12aβ-rotenoids as observed in most cases, though this relationship was reversed in the cases of deguelin and hydroxyelliptone probably due to conformational effects of rotenoidal ring systems.

  1. [Preparation of senkyunolide I by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaozhe; Xu, Qing; Xiao, Hongbin; Liang, Xinmiao

    2004-01-01

    A method for the isolation of senkyunolide I from Chuanxiong with reversed-phase preparative high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is described. After 95% ethanol extract was obtained with solvent extraction and normal-phase silica column separation, a fraction containing senkyunolide I was acquired and subjected to preparative HPLC for the isolation of target component. In the experiment a solvent system consisting of methanol-0.05 mol/L NH4Ac aqueous solution was found effective to eliminate the interference of ferulic acid that was the major compound in the sample. Senkyunolide I and ferulic acid were separated completely by using a stepwise gradient solvent system of 10% methanol in 10 min, and 60% methanol in 10 - 40 min. The subfractions were collected and subjected to an open MCI gel CHP-20P column for desalination respectively. Senkyunolide I was obtained and the structure was identified by mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). This method is effective and reliable for the preparation of senkyunolide I from Chuanxiong.

  2. [Preparation of senkyunolide I by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaozhe; Xu, Qing; Xiao, Hongbin; Liang, Xinmiao

    2004-01-01

    A method for the isolation of senkyunolide I from Chuanxiong with reversed-phase preparative high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is described. After 95% ethanol extract was obtained with solvent extraction and normal-phase silica column separation, a fraction containing senkyunolide I was acquired and subjected to preparative HPLC for the isolation of target component. In the experiment a solvent system consisting of methanol-0.05 mol/L NH4Ac aqueous solution was found effective to eliminate the interference of ferulic acid that was the major compound in the sample. Senkyunolide I and ferulic acid were separated completely by using a stepwise gradient solvent system of 10% methanol in 10 min, and 60% methanol in 10 - 40 min. The subfractions were collected and subjected to an open MCI gel CHP-20P column for desalination respectively. Senkyunolide I was obtained and the structure was identified by mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). This method is effective and reliable for the preparation of senkyunolide I from Chuanxiong. PMID:15712944

  3. Phase grating wavefront curvature sensor based on liquid crystal spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bo; Li, Xiaoyang; Yang, Xu

    2015-08-01

    The phase grating wavefront curvature sensor based on liquid crystal spatial light modulator is introduced. A close-loop phase retrieval method based on Eigen functions of Laplacian is proposed, and its accuracy and efficiency are analyzed through numerical experiments of atmospheric phase retrieval. The results show that the close-loop phase retrieval method has a high accuracy. Moreover, it is stable regardless of modal cross coupling.

  4. A two-phase model for subcooled and superheated liquid jets

    SciTech Connect

    Muralidhar, R.; Jersey, G.R.; Krambeck, F.J.; Sundaresan, S.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes a two-phase jet model for predicting the liquid rainout (capture) and composition of subcooled and superheated HF/additive pressurized liquid releases. The parent droplets of the release mixture constitute the fist phase. The second phase can in general be a vapor-liquid fog. The drops are not in equilibrium with the fog phase with which they exchange mass and energy. The fog at any location is assumed to be in local equilibrium. Correlations are developed for predicting the initial drop size for hydrodynamic breakup of jets. Applications are discussed in this paper for HF/additive mixtures. The fog phase calculations account for HF oligomerization and HF-water complex formation in the vapor phase and equilibrium between the liquid and vapor in the fog. The model incorporates jet trajectory calculations and hence can predict the amount of liquid rained out (liquid capture) and the capture distance. The HF captures predicted by the model for various release conditions are in agreement with small and large scale release experiments.

  5. Kinetic characterization of swelling of liquid crystalline phases of glyceryl monooleate.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaehwi; Choi, Sung-Up; Yoon, Mi-Kyeong; Choi, Young Wook

    2003-10-01

    Research in this paper focuses on the kinetic evaluation of swelling of the liquid crystalline phases of glyceryl monooleate (GMO). Swelling of the lamellar and cubic liquid crystalline phases of GMO was studied using two in vitro methods, a total immersion method and a Franz cell method. The swelling of the lamellar phase and GMO having 0 %w/w initial water content was temperature dependent. The swelling ratio was greater at 20 degrees C than 37 degrees C. The water uptake increased dramatically with decreasing initial water content of the liquid crystalline phases. The swelling rates obtained using the Franz cell method with a moist nylon membrane to mimic buccal drug delivery situation were slower than the total immersion method. The swelling was studied by employing first-order and second-order swelling kinetics. The swelling of the liquid crystalline phases of GMO could be described by second-order swelling kinetics. The initial stage of the swelling (t < 4 h) followed the square root of time relationship, indicating that this model is also suitable for describing the water uptake by the liquid crystalline matrices. These results obtained from the current study demonstrate that the swelling strongly depends on temperature, the initial water content of the liquid crystalline phases and the methodology employed for measuring the swelling of GMO.

  6. Optical spectroscopy shows that the normal state of URu2Si2 is an anomalous Fermi liquid.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Urmas; Uleksin, Taaniel; Rõõm, Toomas; Lobo, Ricardo P S M; Lejay, Pascal; Homes, Christopher C; Hall, Jesse S; Kinross, Alison W; Purdy, Sarah K; Munsie, Tim; Williams, Travis J; Luke, Graeme M; Timusk, Thomas

    2012-11-20

    Fermi showed that, as a result of their quantum nature, electrons form a gas of particles whose temperature and density follow the so-called Fermi distribution. As shown by Landau, in a metal the electrons continue to act like free quantum mechanical particles with enhanced masses, despite their strong Coulomb interaction with each other and the positive background ions. This state of matter, the Landau-Fermi liquid, is recognized experimentally by an electrical resistivity that is proportional to the square of the absolute temperature plus a term proportional to the square of the frequency of the applied field. Calculations show that, if electron-electron scattering dominates the resistivity in a Landau-Fermi liquid, the ratio of the two terms, b, has the universal value of b = 4. We find that in the normal state of the heavy Fermion metal URu(2)Si(2), instead of the Fermi liquid value of 4, the coefficient b = 1 ± 0.1. This unexpected result implies that the electrons in this material are experiencing a unique scattering process. This scattering is intrinsic and we suggest that the uranium f electrons do not hybridize to form a coherent Fermi liquid but instead act like a dense array of elastic impurities, interacting incoherently with the charge carriers. This behavior is not restricted to URu(2)Si(2). Fermi liquid-like states with b ≠ 4 have been observed in a number of disparate systems, but the significance of this result has not been recognized.

  7. Optical spectroscopy shows that the normal state of URu2Si2 is an anomalous Fermi liquid

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Urmas; Uleksin, Taaniel; Rõõm, Toomas; Lobo, Ricardo P. S. M.; Lejay, Pascal; Homes, Christopher C.; Hall, Jesse S.; Kinross, Alison W.; Purdy, Sarah K.; Munsie, Tim; Williams, Travis J.; Luke, Graeme M.; Timusk, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Fermi showed that, as a result of their quantum nature, electrons form a gas of particles whose temperature and density follow the so-called Fermi distribution. As shown by Landau, in a metal the electrons continue to act like free quantum mechanical particles with enhanced masses, despite their strong Coulomb interaction with each other and the positive background ions. This state of matter, the Landau–Fermi liquid, is recognized experimentally by an electrical resistivity that is proportional to the square of the absolute temperature plus a term proportional to the square of the frequency of the applied field. Calculations show that, if electron-electron scattering dominates the resistivity in a Landau–Fermi liquid, the ratio of the two terms, b, has the universal value of b = 4. We find that in the normal state of the heavy Fermion metal URu2Si2, instead of the Fermi liquid value of 4, the coefficient b = 1 ± 0.1. This unexpected result implies that the electrons in this material are experiencing a unique scattering process. This scattering is intrinsic and we suggest that the uranium f electrons do not hybridize to form a coherent Fermi liquid but instead act like a dense array of elastic impurities, interacting incoherently with the charge carriers. This behavior is not restricted to URu2Si2. Fermi liquid-like states with b ≠ 4 have been observed in a number of disparate systems, but the significance of this result has not been recognized. PMID:23115333

  8. Phase diagrams of mixtures of a polymer and a cholesteric liquid crystal under an external field.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Akihiko

    2014-11-14

    We present a mean field theory to describe phase behaviors in mixtures of a polymer and a cholesteric liquid crystal under an external magnetic or electric field. Taking into account a chiral coupling between a polymer and a liquid crystal under the external field, we examine twist-untwist phase transitions and phase separations in the mixtures. It is found that a cholesteric-nematic phase transition can be induced by not only the external field but also concentration and temperature. Depending on the strength of the external field, we predict cholesteric-paranematic (Ch+pN), nematic-paranematic (N+pN), cholesteric-nematic (Ch+N) phase separations, etc., on the temperature-concentration plane. We also discuss mixtures of a non-chiral nematic liquid crystal and a chiral dopant. PMID:25399158

  9. Phase diagrams of mixtures of a polymer and a cholesteric liquid crystal under an external field

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, Akihiko

    2014-11-14

    We present a mean field theory to describe phase behaviors in mixtures of a polymer and a cholesteric liquid crystal under an external magnetic or electric field. Taking into account a chiral coupling between a polymer and a liquid crystal under the external field, we examine twist-untwist phase transitions and phase separations in the mixtures. It is found that a cholesteric-nematic phase transition can be induced by not only the external field but also concentration and temperature. Depending on the strength of the external field, we predict cholesteric-paranematic (Ch+pN), nematic-paranematic (N+pN), cholesteric-nematic (Ch+N) phase separations, etc., on the temperature-concentration plane. We also discuss mixtures of a non-chiral nematic liquid crystal and a chiral dopant.

  10. Temperature tuning of lasing emission from dye-doped liquid crystal at intermediate twisted phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Kuan-Cheng; Lin, Ja-Hon; Jian, Li-Hao; Chen, Yao-Hui; Wu, Jin-Jei

    2015-07-01

    Temperature tuning of lasing emission from dye-doped cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC) at intermediate twisted phase has been demonstrated in this work. With heavily doping of 42.5% chiral molecules into the nematic liquid crystals, the shifts of photonic bandgap versus temperature is obviously as thermal controlling of the sample below the certain value. By the differential scanning calorimetr measuremet, we demonstrate the phase transition from the CLC to the smectic phase when the temperature is lowered to be about 15°C. Between CLC and smectic phase, the liquid crystal mixtures are operated at intermediate twisted phase that can be used the temperature related refractive mirror. After pump by the Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, the lasing emission from this dye doped LC mixtures has been demonstrated whose emission wavelength can be tuned from 566 to 637 nm with 1.4°C variation.

  11. Microscopic Evidence for a dense liquid phase of calcium carbonate (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, A. F.; Hedges, L.; Fernandez-Martinez, A.; Raiteri, P.; Gale, J. D.; Waychunas, G.; Whitelam, S.; Banfield, J. F.; De Yoreo, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    In the classical sense, minerals are presumed to nucleate directly from solution by overcoming a size-dependent free energy barrier that scales as the ratio of the macroscopic mineral-water interfacial tension cubed to the square of the thermodynamic supersaturation. However, experimental observations of the early stages of calcium carbonate mineralization demonstrate that under certain conditions formation of the crystalline polymorphs is preceded by the apparently spontaneous appearance of nanoscopic clusters that aggregate to produce metastable amorphous phases. This aggregation-based pathway is seemingly at odds with classical expectations. This research (Wallace et al., in press, Science) uses computational approaches to characterize the thermodynamic and dynamic properties of hydrated calcium carbonate cluster species, which are thus far only loosely constrained by experimental investigations. Replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations are employed to probe the initial formation of the clusters and lattice gas simulations are used to explore the general behavior of clusters at the onset of mineralization. The results suggest the growth of carbonate clusters may indeed proceed in the absence of any significant thermodynamic barrier. Moreover, the dynamical properties of the clusters are consistent with those of a dense liquid phase. Coalescence and dehydration of the nanoscale droplets result in the formation of a phase whose structure is consistent with that of amorphous calcium carbonate. These findings indicate that a spontaneous liquid-liquid phase separation may occur within the range of supersaturations spanned by natural waters. The coexistence of the dense and dilute liquid phases is described by a liquid-liquid binodal that may express a lower critical point near ambient temperature. Though liquid-liquid separation in simulations of the CaCO3-H2O system is an unexpected result, it suggests a means of generating nano- and mesoscopic phases

  12. Liquid-liquid phase separation: characterisation of a novel device capable of separating particle carrying multiphase flows.

    PubMed

    Castell, Oliver K; Allender, Christopher J; Barrow, David A

    2009-02-01

    Capillary forces on the microscale are exploited to create a continuous flow liquid-liquid phase separator. Segmented flow regimes of immiscible fluids are generated and subsequently separated into their component phases through an array of high aspect ratio, laser machined, separation ducts (36 microm wide, 130 microm deep) in a planar, integrated, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) microdevice. A controlled pressure differential across the phase separator architecture facilitates the selective passage of the wetting, organic, phase through the separator ducts, enabling separation of microfluidic multiphase flow streams. The reported device is demonstrated to separate water and chloroform segmented flow regimes at flow rates up to 0.4 ml min(-1). Separation efficiency is quantified over a range of flow rates and applied pressure differentials, characterising device behaviour and limits of operation. Experimental measurements and observations are supported by theoretical hydrodynamic and capillary pressure modelling. The influence of material properties and geometric design parameters on phase separation is quantified and optimisation strategies proposed. The novel ability of the membrane free device to separate an organic phase containing suspended microparticulates, from an aqueous phase, is also demonstrated.

  13. Liquid-crystal phase grating based on in-plane switching.

    PubMed

    Fujieda, I

    2001-12-01

    A simple phase grating is constructed by insertion of a liquid-crystal layer between two glass plates, upon one of which a pair of transparent interdigitated electrodes is formed. With a bias application, liquid-crystal molecules align themselves along the electric field lines, which are substantially parallel to the glass plates. By controlling the degree of this in-plane switching for the liquid-crystal molecules, one can generate various phase-shift distributions for the light passing through the device. The grating characteristics are altered accordingly. Versatile design and ease of fabrication are potential advantages of this device for some future applications. PMID:18364930

  14. Analysis of Developing Gas/liquid Two-Phase Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Elena A. Tselishcheva; Michael Z. Podowski; Steven P. Antal; Donna Post Guillen; Matthias Beyer; Dirk Lucas

    2010-06-01

    The goal of this work is to develop a mechanistically based CFD model that can be used to simulate process equipment operating in the churn-turbulent regime. The simulations were performed using a state-of-the-art computational multiphase fluid dynamics code, NPHASE–CMFD [Antal et al,2000]. A complete four-field model, including the continuous liquid field and three dispersed gas fields representing bubbles of different sizes, was first carefully tested for numerical convergence and accuracy, and then used to reproduce the experimental results from the TOPFLOW test facility at Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V. Institute of Safety Research [Prasser et al,2007]. Good progress has been made in simulating the churn-turbulent flows and comparison the NPHASE-CMFD simulations with TOPFLOW experimental data. The main objective of the paper is to demonstrate capability to predict the evolution of adiabatic churn-turbulent gas/liquid flows. The proposed modelling concept uses transport equations for the continuous liquid field and for dispersed bubble fields [Tselishcheva et al, 2009]. Along with closure laws based on interaction between bubbles and continuous liquid, the effect of height on air density has been included in the model. The figure below presents the developing flow results of the study, namely total void fraction at different axial locations along the TOPFLOW facility test section. The complete model description, as well as results of simulations and validation will be presented in the full paper.

  15. Student Understanding of Liquid-Vapor Phase Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudreaux, Andrew; Campbell, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Student understanding of the equilibrium coexistence of a liquid and its vapor was the subject of an extended investigation. Written assessment questions were administered to undergraduates enrolled in introductory physics and chemistry courses. Responses have been analyzed to document conceptual and reasoning difficulties in sufficient detail to…

  16. Measuring gas-liquid partition coefficients of aroma compounds by solid phase microextraction, sampling either headspace or liquid.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Nathan W; Dungan, Stephanie R; Ebeler, Susan E

    2011-08-21

    Hydrophobic compounds are important odorants and nutrients in foods and beverages, as well as environmental contaminants and pharmaceuticals. Factors influencing their partitioning within multi-component systems and/or from the bulk liquid phase to the air are critical for understanding aroma quality and nutrient bioavailability. The equilibrium partitioning of hydrophobic analytes between air and water was analyzed using solid phase microextraction (SPME) in the headspace (HS-SPME) and via direct immersion in the liquid (DI-SPME). The compounds studied serve as models for hydrophobic aroma compounds covering a range of air-water partition coefficients that extends over four orders of magnitude. By varying the total amount of analyte as well as the ratio of vapor to liquid in the closed, static system, the partition coefficient, K(vl), can be determined without the need for an external calibration, eliminating many potential systematic errors. K(vl) determination using DI-SPME in this manner has not been demonstrated before. There was good agreement between results determined by DI-SPME and by HS-SPME over the wide range of partitioning behavior studied. This shows that these two methods are capable of providing accurate, complementary measurements. Precision in K(vl) determination depends strongly on K(vl) magnitude and the ratio of the air and liquid phases. PMID:21727981

  17. Gold nanoparticle decorated graphene oxide/silica composite stationary phase for high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaojing; Wang, Xusheng; Ren, Haixia; Jiang, Shengxiang; Wang, Licheng; Liu, Shujuan

    2014-06-01

    In the initial phase of this study, graphene oxide (GO)/silica was fabricated by assembling GO onto the silica particles, and then gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were used to modify the GO/silica to prepare a novel stationary phase for high-performance liquid chromatography. The new stationary phase could be used in both reversed-phase chromatography and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography modes. Good separations of alkylbenzenes, isomerides, amino acids, nucleosides, and nucleobases were achieved in both modes. Compared with the GO/silica phase and GNPs/silica phase, it is found that except for hydrophilicity, large π-electron systems, hydrophobicity, and coordination functions, this new stationary phase also exhibited special separation performance due to the combination of 2D GO with zero-dimensional GNPs. PMID:24723561

  18. Gold nanoparticle decorated graphene oxide/silica composite stationary phase for high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaojing; Wang, Xusheng; Ren, Haixia; Jiang, Shengxiang; Wang, Licheng; Liu, Shujuan

    2014-06-01

    In the initial phase of this study, graphene oxide (GO)/silica was fabricated by assembling GO onto the silica particles, and then gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were used to modify the GO/silica to prepare a novel stationary phase for high-performance liquid chromatography. The new stationary phase could be used in both reversed-phase chromatography and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography modes. Good separations of alkylbenzenes, isomerides, amino acids, nucleosides, and nucleobases were achieved in both modes. Compared with the GO/silica phase and GNPs/silica phase, it is found that except for hydrophilicity, large π-electron systems, hydrophobicity, and coordination functions, this new stationary phase also exhibited special separation performance due to the combination of 2D GO with zero-dimensional GNPs.

  19. Ultrahigh-vacuum chamber equipped with a reaction cell for studying liquid-phase catalytic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardin, Denis E.; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    1993-05-01

    We describe the construction and operation of a liquid-phase reaction cell designed in our laboratory that is attached to an ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) chamber equipped with the traditional surface science techniques for structure and composition analysis. The sample surface can be prepared and characterized in the UHV chamber prior to transfer in the liquid-phase reaction cell. The transfer has been designed so that there is no loss of the UHV chamber vacuum integrity, as few parts as possible come into contact with the liquid, the surface stays clean during the transfer. The liquid-phase reaction cell itself is designed to study liquid-phase hydrogenation reactions at pressures up to 2 atm and temperatures up to 70 °C. A 1-mm-diam liquid jet with a velocity up to 6 m/s is produced by a gear pump that is incident on the sample surface to allow good mass transfer at the liquid-solid interface. The progress of the reaction is followed by gas chromatography. We report the reaction rate data for the hydrogenation of cyclohexene on a platinum foil.

  20. Novel approach to study liquid crystal phase transitions using Legendre moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreehari Sastry, S.; Mallika, K.; Gowri Sankara Rao, B.; Tiong Ha, Sie; Lakshminarayana, S.

    2012-08-01

    A novel approach is proposed to investigate the phase transitions of cholesteric liquid crystals using the Legendre moments. The textures of cholesteric liquid crystals (cholesteryl butyrate, cholesteryl n-valerate, cholesteryl decanoate, and cholesteryl myristate) are captured as a function of temperature using high-resolution camera attached to the arthroscopic mode of polarizing optical microscope with hot stage. A recurrence formula is used to compute the Legendre moments of the liquid crystal textures based on the Legendre polynomial using MATLAB software. The abrupt change in the values of Legendre moments as a function of temperature gives the phase transitions of liquid crystals. The investigated transition temperatures of cholesteric liquid crystals are compared with other techniques.