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Sample records for normal t-cell development

  1. Critical Requirement of GABPα for Normal T Cell Development*

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shuyang; Zhao, Dong-Mei; Jothi, Raja; Xue, Hai-Hui

    2010-01-01

    GA binding protein (GABP) consists of GABPα and GABPβ subunits. GABPα is a member of Ets family transcription factors and binds DNA via its conserved Ets domain, whereas GABPβ does not bind DNA but possesses transactivation activity. In T cells, GABP has been demonstrated to regulate the gene expression of interleukin-7 receptor α chain (IL-7Rα) and postulated to be critical in T cell development. To directly investigate its function in early thymocyte development, we used GABPα conditional knock-out mice where the exons encoding the Ets DNA-binding domain are flanked with LoxP sites. Ablation of GABPα with the Lck-Cre transgene greatly diminished thymic cellularity, blocked thymocyte development at the double negative 3 (DN3) stage, and resulted in reduced expression of T cell receptor (TCR) β chain in DN4 thymocytes. By chromatin immunoprecipitation, we demonstrated in DN thymocytes that GABPα is associated with transcription initiation sites of genes encoding key molecules in TCR rearrangements. Among these GABP-associated genes, knockdown of GABPα expression by RNA interference diminished expression of DNA ligase IV, Artemis, and Ku80 components in DNA-dependent protein kinase complex. Interestingly, forced expression of prearranged TCR but not IL-7Rα can alleviate the DN3 block in GABPα-targeted mice. Our observations collectively indicate that in addition to regulating IL-7Rα expression, GABP is critically required for TCR rearrangements and hence normal T cell development. PMID:20139079

  2. Normal Development and Function of T Cells in Proline Rich 7 (Prr7) Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hrdinka, Matous; Sudan, Kritika; Just, Sissy; Drobek, Ales; Stepanek, Ondrej; Schlüter, Dirk; Reinhold, Dirk; Jordan, Bryen A.; Gintschel, Patricia; Schraven, Burkhart; Kreutz, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Transmembrane adaptor proteins (TRAPs) are important organisers for the transduction of immunoreceptor-mediated signals. Prr7 is a TRAP that regulates T cell receptor (TCR) signalling and potently induces cell death when overexpressed in human Jurkat T cells. Whether endogenous Prr7 has a similar functional role is currently unknown. To address this issue, we analysed the development and function of the immune system in Prr7 knockout mice. We found that loss of Prr7 partially impairs development of single positive CD4+ T cells in the thymus but has no effect on the development of other T cell subpopulations, B cells, NK cells, or NKT cells. Moreover, Prr7 does not affect the TCR signalling pathway as T cells derived from Prr7 knockout and wild-type animals and stimulated in vitro express the same levels of the activation marker CD69, and retain their ability to proliferate and activate induced cell death programs. Importantly, Prr7 knockout mice retained the capacity to mount a protective immune response when challenged with Listeria monocytogenes infection in vivo. In addition, T cell effector functions (activation, migration, and reactivation) were normal following induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in Prr7 knockout mice. Collectively, our work shows that loss of Prr7 does not result in a major immune system phenotype and suggests that Prr7 has a dispensable function for TCR signalling. PMID:27657535

  3. T cells develop normally in the absence of both Deltex1 and Deltex2.

    PubMed

    Lehar, Sophie M; Bevan, Michael J

    2006-10-01

    Deltex1, Deltex2, and Deltex4 form a family of related proteins that are the mammalian homologues of Drosophila Deltex, a known regulator of Notch signals. Deltex1 is highly induced by Notch signaling in thymocytes, and overexpression of Deltex1 in T-cell progenitors can block Notch signals, suggesting that Deltex1 may play an important role in regulating Notch signals during T-cell development. A recent report found that T cells develop normally in mice carrying a targeted deletion in the Deltex1 gene (S. Storck, F. Delbos, N. Stadler, C. Thirion-Delalande, F. Bernex, C. Verthuy, P. Ferrier, J. C. Weill, and C. A. Reynaud, Mol. Cell. Biol. 25: 1437-1445, 2005), suggesting that other Deltex homologues may compensate in Deltex1-deficient T cells. We generated mice that lack expression of both Deltex1 and Deltex2 by gene targeting and further reduced expression of Deltex4 in Deltex1/Deltex2 double-deficient T-cell progenitors using RNA interference. Using a sensitive in vitro assay, we found that Notch signaling is more potent in cells expressing lower levels of Deltex proteins. Nevertheless, we were unable to detect any significant defects in thymocyte maturation in Deltex1/Deltex2 double-knockout mice. Together these data suggest that Deltex can act as a negative regulator of Notch signals in T cells but that endogenous levels of Deltex1 and Deltex2 are not important for regulating Notch signals during thymocyte development.

  4. Normal T-cell development and immune functions in TRIM-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Kölsch, Uwe; Arndt, Börge; Reinhold, Dirk; Lindquist, Jonathan A; Jüling, Nicole; Kliche, Stefanie; Pfeffer, Klaus; Bruyns, Eddy; Schraven, Burkhart; Simeoni, Luca

    2006-05-01

    The transmembrane adaptor molecule TRIM is strongly expressed within thymus and in peripheral CD4(+) T cells. Previous studies suggested that TRIM is an integral component of the T-cell receptor (TCR)/CD3 complex and might be involved in regulating TCR cycling. To elucidate the in vivo function of TRIM, we generated TRIM-deficient mice by homologous recombination. TRIM(-/-) mice develop normally and are healthy and fertile. However, the animals show a mild reduction in body weight that appears to be due to a decrease in the size and/or cellularity of many organs. The morphology and anatomy of nonlymphoid as well as primary and secondary lymphoid organs is normal. The frequency of thymocyte and peripheral T-cell subsets does not differ from control littermates. In addition, a detailed analysis of lymphocyte development revealed that TRIM is not required for either positive or negative selection. Although TRIM(-/-) CD4(+) T cells showed an augmented phosphorylation of the serine/threonine kinase Akt, the in vitro characterization of peripheral T cells indicated that proliferation, survival, activation-induced cell death, migration, adhesion, TCR internalization and recycling, TCR-mediated calcium fluxes, tyrosine phosphorylation, and mitogen-activated protein family kinase activation are not affected in the absence of TRIM. Similarly, the in vivo immune response to T-dependent and T-independent antigens as well as the clinical course of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a complex Th1-mediated autoimmune model, is comparable to that of wild-type animals. Collectively, these results demonstrate that TRIM is dispensable for T-cell development and peripheral immune functions. The lack of an evident phenotype could indicate that TRIM shares redundant functions with other transmembrane adaptors involved in regulating the immune response.

  5. Fetal-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T cell responses develop during normal human pregnancy and exhibit broad functional capacity.

    PubMed

    Lissauer, David; Piper, Karen; Goodyear, Oliver; Kilby, Mark D; Moss, Paul A H

    2012-07-15

    Tolerance of the semiallogeneic fetus presents a significant challenge to the maternal immune system during human pregnancy. T cells with specificity for fetal epitopes have been detected in women with a history of previous pregnancy, but it has been thought that such fetal-specific cells were generally deleted during pregnancy as a mechanism to maintain maternal tolerance of the fetus. We used MHC-peptide dextramer multimers containing an immunodominant peptide derived from HY to identify fetal-specific T cells in women who were pregnant with a male fetus. Fetal-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes were observed in half of all pregnancies and often became detectable from the first trimester. The fetal-specific immune response increased during pregnancy and persisted in the postnatal period. Fetal-specific cells demonstrated an effector memory phenotype and were broadly functional. They retained their ability to proliferate, secrete IFN-γ, and lyse target cells following recognition of naturally processed peptide on male cells. These data show that the development of a fetal-specific adaptive cellular immune response is a normal consequence of human pregnancy and that unlike reports from some murine models, fetal-specific T cells are not deleted during human pregnancy. This has broad implications for study of the natural physiology of pregnancy and for the understanding of pregnancy-related complications.

  6. Rapid Copper Acquisition by Developing Murine Mesothelioma: Decreasing Bioavailable Copper Slows Tumor Growth, Normalizes Vessels and Promotes T Cell Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Crowe, Andrew; Jackaman, Connie; Beddoes, Katie M.; Ricciardo, Belinda; Nelson, Delia J.

    2013-01-01

    Copper, an essential trace element acquired through nutrition, is an important co-factor for pro-angiogenic factors including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Decreasing bioavailable copper has been used as an anti-angiogenic and anti-cancer strategy with promising results. However, the role of copper and its potential as a therapy in mesothelioma is not yet well understood. Therefore, we monitored copper levels in progressing murine mesothelioma tumors and analyzed the effects of lowering bioavailable copper. Copper levels in tumors and organs were assayed using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Mesothelioma tumors rapidly sequestered copper at early stages of development, the copper was then dispersed throughout growing tumor tissues. These data imply that copper uptake may play an important role in early tumor development. Lowering bioavailable copper using the copper chelators, penicillamine, trientine or tetrathiomolybdate, slowed in vivo mesothelioma growth but did not provide any cures similar to using cisplatin chemotherapy or anti-VEGF receptor antibody therapy. The impact of copper lowering on tumor blood vessels and tumor infiltrating T cells was measured using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Copper lowering was associated with reduced tumor vessel diameter, reduced endothelial cell proliferation (reduced Ki67 expression) and lower surface ICAM/CD54 expression implying reduced endothelial cell activation, in a process similar to endothelial normalization. Copper lowering was also associated with a CD4+ T cell infiltrate. In conclusion, these data suggest copper lowering is a potentially useful anti-mesothelioma treatment strategy that slows tumor growth to provide a window of opportunity for inclusion of other treatment modalities to improve patient outcomes. PMID:24013775

  7. Normalization of CD4+ T Cell Metabolism Reverses Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yiming; Choi, Seung-Chul; Xu, Zhiwei; Perry, Daniel J.; Seay, Howard; Croker, Byron P.; Sobel, Eric S.; Brusko, Todd M.; Morel, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease in which autoreactive CD4+ T cells play an essential role. CD4+ T cells rely on glycolysis for inflammatory effector functions, but recent studies have shown that mitochondrial metabolism supports their chronic activation. How these processes contribute to lupus is unclear. Here, we show that both glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidative metabolism are elevated in CD4+ T cells from lupus-prone B6.Sle1.Sle2.Sle3 (TC) mice as compared to non-autoimmune controls. In vitro, both the mitochondrial metabolism inhibitor metformin and the glucose metabolism inhibitor 2-Deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) reduced IFNγ production, although at different stages of activation. Metformin also restored the defective IL-2 production by TC CD4+ T cells. In vivo, treatment of TC mice and other lupus models with a combination of metformin and 2DG normalized T cell metabolism and reversed disease biomarkers. Further, CD4+ T cells from SLE patients also exhibited enhanced glycolysis and mitochondrial metabolism that correlated with their activation status, and their excessive IFNγ production was significantly reduced by metformin in vitro. These results suggest that normalization of T cell metabolism through the dual inhibition of glycolysis and mitochondrial metabolism is a promising therapeutic venue for SLE. PMID:25673763

  8. Serine Phosphorylation of SLP76 Is Dispensable for T Cell Development but Modulates Helper T Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Navas, Victor H.; Cuche, Céline; Alcover, Andres

    2017-01-01

    The adapter protein SLP76 is a key orchestrator of T cell receptor (TCR) signal transduction. We previously identified a negative feedback loop that modulates T cell activation, involving phosphorylation of Ser376 of SLP76 by the hematopoietic progenitor kinase 1 (HPK1). However, the physiological relevance of this regulatory mechanism was still unknown. To address this question, we generated a SLP76-S376A-expressing knock-in mouse strain and investigated the effects of Ser376 mutation on T cell development and function. We report here that SLP76-S376A-expressing mice exhibit normal thymocyte development and no detectable phenotypic alterations in mature T cell subsets or other lymphoid and myeloid cell lineages. Biochemical analyses revealed that mutant T cells were hypersensitive to TCR stimulation. Indeed, phosphorylation of several signaling proteins, including SLP76 itself, phospholipase Cγ1 and the protein kinases AKT and ERK1/2, was increased. These modifications correlated with increased Th1-type and decreased Th2-type cytokine production by SLP76-S376A T cells, but did not result in significant changes of proliferative capacity nor activation-induced cell death susceptibility. Hence, our results reveal that SLP76-Ser376 phosphorylation does not mediate all HPK1-dependent regulatory effects in T cells but it fine-tunes helper T cell responses. PMID:28107427

  9. Specific requirement for CD3ɛ in T cell development

    PubMed Central

    DeJarnette, Jan B.; Sommers, Connie L.; Huang, Kun; Woodside, Kenneth J.; Emmons, Rebecca; Katz, Kenneth; Shores, Elizabeth W.; Love, Paul E.

    1998-01-01

    T cell antigen receptor (TCR) and pre-TCR complexes are composed of clonotypic heterodimers in association with dimers of signal transducing invariant subunits (CD3γ, -δ, -ɛ, and ζ). The role of individual invariant subunits in T cell development has been investigated by generating gene-specific mutations in mice. Mutation of CD3γ, -δ, or ζ results in an incomplete block in development, characterized by reduced numbers of mature T cells that express low levels of TCR. In contrast, mature T cells are absent from CD3ɛ−/− mice, and thymocyte development is arrested at the early CD4−CD8− stage. Although these results suggest that CD3ɛ is essential for pre-TCR and TCR expression/function, their interpretation is complicated by the fact that expression of the CD3γ and CD3δ genes also is reduced in CD3ɛ−/− mice. Thus, it is unclear whether the phenotype of CD3ɛ−/− mice reflects the collective effects of CD3γ, -δ, and -ɛ deficiency. By removing the selectable marker (PGK-NEO) from the targeted CD3ɛ gene via Cre/loxP-mediated recombination, we generated mice that lack CD3ɛ yet retain normal expression of the closely linked CD3γ and CD3δ genes. These (CD3ɛΔ/Δ) mice exhibited an early arrest in T cell development, similar to that of CD3ɛ−/− mice. Moreover, the developmental defect could be rescued by expression of a CD3ɛ transgene. These results identify an essential role for CD3ɛ in T cell development not shared by the CD3γ, CD3δ, or ζ-family proteins and provide further evidence that PGK-NEO can influence the expression of genes in its proximity. PMID:9843989

  10. Development of promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger-expressing innate CD4 T cells requires stronger T-cell receptor signals than conventional CD4 T cells.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yu; Zhu, Lingqiao; Sofi, Hanief; Lapinski, Philip E; Horai, Reiko; Mueller, Kristen; Stritesky, Gretta L; He, Xi; Teh, Hung-Sia; Wiest, David L; Kappes, Dietmar J; King, Philip D; Hogquist, Kristin A; Schwartzberg, Pamela L; Sant'Angelo, Derek B; Chang, Cheong-Hee

    2012-10-02

    MHC class II-expressing thymocytes and thymic epithelial cells can mediate CD4 T-cell selection resulting in functionally distinct thymocyte-selected CD4 (T-CD4) and epithelial-selected CD4 (E-CD4) T cells, respectively. However, little is known about how T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling influences the development of these two CD4 T-cell subsets. To study TCR signaling for T-CD4 T-cell development, we used a GFP reporter system of Nur77 in which GFP intensity directly correlates with TCR signaling strength. T-CD4 T cells expressed higher levels of GFP than E-CD4 T cells, suggesting that T-CD4 T cells received stronger TCR signaling than E-CD4 T cells during selection. Elimination of Ras GTPase-activating protein enhanced E-CD4 but decreased T-CD4 T-cell selection efficiency, suggesting a shift to negative selection. Conversely, the absence of IL-2-inducible T-cell kinase that causes poor E-CD4 T-cell selection due to insufficient TCR signaling improved T-CD4 T-cell generation, consistent with rescue from negative selection. Strong TCR signaling during T-CD4 T-cell development correlates with the expression of the transcription factor promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein. However, although modulation of the signaling strength affected the efficiency of T-CD4 T-cell development during positive and negative selection, the signaling strength is not as important for the effector function of T-CD4 T cells. These findings indicate that innate T-CD4 T cells, together with invariant natural killer T cells and γδ T cells, receive strong TCR signals during their development and that signaling requirements for the development and the effector functions are distinct.

  11. T cell development in B cell-deficient mice. V. Stopping anti-mu treatment results in Igh-restricted expansion of the T suppressor cell repertoire concomitant with the development of normal immunoglobulin levels

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    B cell-deficient (anti-mu-treated) mice have proven to be a valuable tool with which to examine the influence of Ig idiotypic determinants upon the development of the Ts repertoire. We have previously reported that ABA-specific Ts repertoires matured in normal and Ig-deficient environments differ from one another in their composition, and consequently, their functionally expressed Igh restrictions. The present report characterizes the impact of natural development of mature B cell activity upon the composition of the Ts repertoire. After stopping anti-mu treatment of C.AL-20 mice, ABA-specific Ts repertoires undergo a defined expansion shown by their acquisition of an additional Ts network that displays Igh restrictions characteristic of normal C.AL- 20 mice. This Igh-1d-restricted repertoire can be readily shown within 2 wk of major increases in surface Ig spleen cells and total serum Ig levels in these mice. At the same time, the original Ts restriction specificity (Igh-1a-restricted) generated in the Ig-deficient environment of anti-mu. C.AL-20 mice, is not lost for at least 20 wk. The resulting dual Ts repertoire, characterized by expression of parallel, idiotypically restricted Ts networks, is demonstrable for at least 13 wk. These findings favor an important role for Ig determinants in determining the makeup of the T cell repertoire, and ultimately, the composition of immunologic networks as a whole. PMID:2941514

  12. A role for Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Beta in T cell development

    PubMed Central

    Mothe-Satney, Isabelle; Murdaca, Joseph; Sibille, Brigitte; Rousseau, Anne-Sophie; Squillace, Raphaëlle; Le Menn, Gwenaëlle; Rekima, Akila; Larbret, Frederic; Pelé, Juline; Verhasselt, Valérie; Grimaldi, Paul A.; Neels, Jaap G.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolism plays an important role in T cell biology and changes in metabolism drive T cell differentiation and fate. Most research on the role of metabolism in T lymphocytes focuses on mature T cells while only few studies have investigated the role of metabolism in T cell development. In this study, we report that activation or overexpression of the transcription factor Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor β (PPARβ) increases fatty acid oxidation in T cells. Furthermore, using both in vivo and in vitro models, we demonstrate that PPARβ activation/overexpression inhibits thymic T cell development by decreasing proliferation of CD4−CD8− double-negative stage 4 (DN4) thymocytes. These results support a model where PPARβ activation/overexpression favours fatty acid- instead of glucose-oxidation in developing T cells, thereby hampering the proliferative burst normally occurring at the DN4 stage of T cell development. As a consequence, the αβ T cells that are derived from DN4 thymocytes are dramatically decreased in peripheral lymphoid tissues, while the γδ T cell population remains untouched. This is the first report of a direct role for a member of the PPAR family of nuclear receptors in the development of T cells. PMID:27680392

  13. CCR7-mediated migration in the thymus controls γδ T-cell development.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Annika; Ravens, Sarina; Fleige, Henrike; Haas, Jan D; Oberdörfer, Linda; Łyszkiewicz, Marcin; Förster, Reinhold; Prinz, Immo

    2014-05-01

    αβ T-cell development and selection proceed while thymocytes successively migrate through distinct regions of the thymus. For γδ T cells, the interplay of intrathymic migration and cell differentiation is less well understood. Here, we crossed C-C chemokine receptor (CCR)7-deficient (Ccr7(-/-) ) and CCR9-deficient mice (Ccr9(-/-) ) to mice with a TcrdH2BeGFP reporter background to investigate the impact of thymic localization on γδ T-cell development. γδ T-cell frequencies and numbers were decreased in CCR7-deficient and increased in CCR9-deficient mice. Transfer of CCR7- or CCR9-deficient BM into irradiated C57BL/6 WT recipients reproduced these phenotypes, pointing toward cell-intrinsic migration defects. Monitoring recent thymic emigrants by intrathymic labeling allowed us to identify decreased thymic γδ T-cell output in CCR7-deficient mice. In vitro, CCR7-deficient precursors showed normal γδ T-cell development. Immunohistology revealed that CCR7 and CCR9 expression was important for γδ T-cell localization within thymic medulla or cortex, respectively. However, γδ T-cell motility was unaltered in CCR7- or CCR9-deficient thymi. Together, our results suggest that proper intrathymic localization is important for normal γδ T-cell development.

  14. Asymmetric cell division during T cell development controls downstream fate

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Kim; Shimoni, Raz; Charnley, Mirren; Ludford-Menting, Mandy J.; Hawkins, Edwin D.; Ramsbottom, Kelly; Oliaro, Jane; Izon, David; Ting, Stephen B.; Reynolds, Joseph; Lythe, Grant; Molina-Paris, Carmen; Melichar, Heather; Robey, Ellen; Humbert, Patrick O.; Gu, Min

    2015-01-01

    During mammalian T cell development, the requirement for expansion of many individual T cell clones, rather than merely expansion of the entire T cell population, suggests a possible role for asymmetric cell division (ACD). We show that ACD of developing T cells controls cell fate through differential inheritance of cell fate determinants Numb and α-Adaptin. ACD occurs specifically during the β-selection stage of T cell development, and subsequent divisions are predominantly symmetric. ACD is controlled by interaction with stromal cells and chemokine receptor signaling and uses a conserved network of polarity regulators. The disruption of polarity by deletion of the polarity regulator, Scribble, or the altered inheritance of fate determinants impacts subsequent fate decisions to influence the numbers of DN4 cells arising after the β-selection checkpoint. These findings indicate that ACD enables the thymic microenvironment to orchestrate fate decisions related to differentiation and self-renewal. PMID:26370500

  15. CD27 cooperates with the pre-T cell receptor in the regulation of murine T cell development

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    CD27 is a lymphocyte-specific member of the TNF receptor family and has a TNF-related transmembrane ligand, CD70. The CD27/CD70 receptor-ligand pair cooperates with the TCR in the regulation of the peripheral T cell response. The study presented here reveals that CD27 may play a similar role in thymic pre-T cell development. We have previously cloned the cDNA encoding murine CD27, prepared specific mAbs and observed that murine CD27 is expressed on virtually all thymocytes, with the exception of a subpopulation of CD4-8- precursor T cells. It is shown here that induction of murine CD27 expression occurs at the transition from the CD4-8-25+ to the CD4-8-25- precursor T cell stage and is regulated by the pre-TCR. Therefore, we investigated whether CD27 contributes to pre-TCR-mediated thymocyte development. Pre-TCR function was mimicked by the induction of CD3 signaling in thymocytes of recombination activating gene (RAG)-deficient mice. This in vivo anti- CD3 epsilon mAb treatment induces an about fifty fold numerical expansion of CD4-8-25+ thymocytes and their differentiation to the CD4+8+25- stage. Co-injection of anti-CD27 mAb inhibited the CD3- mediated expansion and differentiation of the CD4-8-25+ precursor population. Also, injection of anti-CD27 mAb in TCR alpha-/- mutant mice led to a reduction in the absolute number of CD4+8+25- thymocytes. We present evidence that in these in vivo systems, anti-CD27 mAb inhibits CD27-ligand interaction. Therefore, we conclude that CD27 may contribute to normal murine T cell development by synergizing with the pre-TCR-mediated signal. PMID:8760821

  16. New development in CAR-T cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenguang; Wu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Yang; Han, Weidong

    2017-02-21

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells (CAR-T cells) have yielded unprecedented efficacy in B cell malignancies, most remarkably in anti-CD19 CAR-T cells for B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) with up to a 90% complete remission rate. However, tumor antigen escape has emerged as a main challenge for the long-term disease control of this promising immunotherapy in B cell malignancies. In addition, this success has encountered significant hurdles in translation to solid tumors, and the safety of the on-target/off-tumor recognition of normal tissues is one of the main reasons. In this mini-review, we characterize some of the mechanisms for antigen loss relapse and new strategies to address this issue. In addition, we discuss some novel CAR designs that are being considered to enhance the safety of CAR-T cell therapy in solid tumors.

  17. T cell development critically depends on prethymic stromal patched expression.

    PubMed

    Uhmann, Anja; van den Brandt, Jens; Dittmann, Kai; Hess, Ina; Dressel, Ralf; Binder, Claudia; Lühder, Fred; Christiansen, Hans; Fassnacht, Martin; Bhandoola, Avinash; Wienands, Jürgen; Reichardt, Holger M; Hahn, Heidi

    2011-03-15

    We recently described that T cell specification in mice deficient in the Hedgehog (Hh) receptor Patched (Ptch) is blocked at the level of the common lymphoid progenitor in the bone marrow (BM). Adoptive transfer of wild-type BM in Ptch-deficient mice provides evidence that T cell development strictly depends on Ptch expression in the nonhematopoietic compartment. Transplantation experiments using BM deficient in the glucocorticoid receptor exclude any involvement of the stress hormone corticosterone in our model. Using cell-type-specific knockout mice, we show that T cell development is independent of T cell-intrinsic Ptch expression. Furthermore, Ptch expression by the thymus stroma is dispensable, as revealed by fetal thymus organ culture and thymus transplantation. In contrast, analysis of the earliest thymic progenitors in Ptch-deficient mice indicated that Ptch is required for the development or supply of thymic homing progenitors that give rise to earliest thymic progenitors. Collectively, our findings identified Ptch as an exclusive T cell-extrinsic factor necessary for proper development of T cells at their prethymic stage. This observation may be important for current considerations using Hh inhibitors upstream of Ptch in diseases accompanied by aberrant Hh signaling.

  18. Knock-in Mutation of the Distal Four Tyrosines of Linker for Activation of T Cells Blocks Murine T Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Sommers, Connie L.; Menon, Rashmi K.; Grinberg, Alexander; Zhang, Weiguo; Samelson, Lawrence E.; Love, Paul E.

    2001-01-01

    The integral membrane adapter protein linker for activation of T cells (LAT) performs a critical function in T cell antigen receptor (TCR) signal transduction by coupling the TCR to downstream signaling pathways. After TCR engagement, LAT is tyrosine phosphorylated by ZAP-70 creating docking sites for multiple src homology 2–containing effector proteins. In the Jurkat T cell line, the distal four tyrosines of LAT bind PLCγ-1, Grb2, and Gads. Mutation of these four tyrosine residues to phenylalanine (4YF) blocked TCR-mediated calcium mobilization, Erk activation, and nuclear factor (NF)-AT activation. In this study, we examined whether these four tyrosine residues were essential for T cell development by generating LAT “knock-in” mutant mice that express the 4YF mutant protein under the control of endogenous LAT regulatory sequences. Significantly, the phenotype of 4YF knock-in mice was identical to LAT−/− (null) mice; thymocyte development was arrested at the immature CD4−CD8− stage and no mature T cells were present. Knock-in mice expressing wild-type LAT protein, generated by a similar strategy, displayed a normal T cell developmental profile. These results demonstrate that the distal four tyrosine residues of LAT are essential for preTCR signaling and T cell development in vivo. PMID:11457888

  19. c-Myb is essential for early T cell development

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Robert D.; Bender, Timothy P.; Siu, Gerald

    1999-01-01

    The c-Myb transcription factor is important for fetal hematopoiesis and has been proposed to mediate later stages of lymphocyte development. Using homozygous null c-Myb/Rag1 chimeric mice, we have determined that c-Myb plays an important role in the differentiation of macrophages and lymphocytes from precursor stem cells. We also determine that deletion of c-Myb leads to a complete block in early T cell development just before the oligopotent thymocyte matures into the definitive T cell precursor. These data indicate that c-Myb plays an important role at multiple stages of hematopoiesis and is required at an early stage of T cell development. PMID:10323859

  20. Development and function of T cells in mice with a disrupted CD2 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Killeen, N; Stuart, S G; Littman, D R

    1992-01-01

    CD2 is a T cell surface glycoprotein that mediates cellular adhesion and can participate in signal transduction. It is expressed early in thymocyte ontogeny and consequently has been proposed to participate in T cell development. To study the in vivo function of CD2, the murine gene was inactivated using the technique of homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells. Homozygous mutant mice are healthy and have an apparently normal complement of lymphocytes. They mount effective immune responses similar to those of wild type controls. In particular, the generation and function of cytotoxic T cells was found to be normal as was the production of antibodies following immunization. Selection of thymocytes expressing either MHC class I- or class II-restricted transgenic T cell receptors was also grossly normal in the absence of CD2. Thus, CD2 may be dispensable for the development and function of T cells. Within the context of other targetted mutations, these mice should be useful in defining the precise roles of various cell surface molecules involved in T cell responses. Images PMID:1358605

  1. Development and function of follicular helper T cells.

    PubMed

    Ise, Wataru

    2015-01-01

    Most currently available vaccines rely on the induction of long-lasting protective humoral immune responses by memory B cells and plasma cells. Antibody responses against most antigens require interactions between antigen-specific B cells and CD4(+) T cells. Follicular helper T cells (TFH cells) are specialized subset of T cells that provide help to B cells and are essential for germinal center formation, affinity maturation, and the development of high-affinity antibodies. TFH-cell differentiation is a multistage process involving B-cell lymphoma 6 and other transcription factors, cytokines, and costimulation through inducible costimulator (ICOS) and several other molecules. This article reviews recent advances in our understanding of TFH cell biology, including their differentiation, transcriptional regulation, and function.

  2. Prethymic CD34+ progenitors capable of developing into T cells are not committed to the T cell lineage.

    PubMed

    Blom, B; Res, P; Noteboom, E; Weijer, K; Spits, H

    1997-04-15

    Progenitor cells that seed the fetal thymus are derived from the fetal liver and the bone marrow. These cells migrate through the fetal blood to the thymus. In this work, we address which peripheral progenitor cells have the potential to become T cells and whether these progenitor cells are already committed to the T cell lineage. All CD34+CD38- precursor cells, regardless of their origin, are able to develop into T cells in a hybrid human/mouse fetal thymic organ culture. Previously, we found that the more differentiated CD34+CD38+ progenitor cells from fetal liver cannot develop into T cells. In this work, we show that CD34+CD38+ cells from fetal bone marrow and cord blood are capable of T cell development. In spite of the T cell-developing potential, we did not detect rearrangements of TCR-delta or TCR-beta loci in any of the CD34+ peripheral precursors. CD34+ fetal bone marrow cell subpopulations express pre-TCR-alpha. However, we could not detect expression of pT alpha or of recombination-activating gene 1 in CD34+ cord blood cells. Since cord blood CD34+ cells should contain the direct progenitors of the CD34+ thymocytes, our data do not support the notion that in humans commitment to the T cell lineage occurs before the cells migrate into the thymus.

  3. Bax alpha perturbs T cell development and affects cell cycle entry of T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Brady, H J; Gil-Gómez, G; Kirberg, J; Berns, A J

    1996-01-01

    Bax alpha can heterodimerize with Bcl-2 and Bcl-X(L), countering their effects, as well as promoting apoptosis on overexpression. We show that bax alpha transgenic mice have greatly reduced numbers of mature T cells, which results from an impaired positive selection in the thymus. This perturbation in positive selection is accompanied by an increase in the number of cycling thymocytes. Further to this, mature T cells overexpressing Bax alpha have lower levels of p27Kip1 and enter S phase more rapidly in response to interleukin-2 stimulation than do control T cells, while the converse is true of bcl-2 transgenic T cells. These data indicate that apoptotic regulatory proteins can modulate the level of cell cycle-controlling proteins and thereby directly impact on the cell cycle. Images PMID:9003775

  4. T-cell accumulation and regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted upregulation in adipose tissue in obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity is associated with chronic inflammation, which includes increased macrophage accumulation in adipose tissue (AT) and upregulation of chemokines and cytokines. T cells also play important roles in chronic inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis but have not been well studied in obesity....

  5. Coupling of T cell receptor specificity to natural killer T cell development by bivalent histone H3 methylation.

    PubMed

    Dobenecker, Marc-Werner; Kim, Jong Kyong; Marcello, Jonas; Fang, Terry C; Prinjha, Rab; Bosselut, Remy; Tarakhovsky, Alexander

    2015-03-09

    The fidelity of T cell immunity depends greatly on coupling T cell receptor signaling with specific T cell effector functions. Here, we describe a chromatin-based mechanism that enables integration of TCR specificity into definite T cell lineage commitment. Using natural killer T cells (iNKT cell) as a model of a T cell subset that differentiates in response to specific TCR signaling, we identified a key role of histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) in coupling iNKT cell TCR specificity with the generation of iNKT cells. We found that the Zbtb16/PLZF gene promoter that drives iNKT cell differentiation possesses a bivalent chromatin state characterized by the simultaneous presence of negative and positive H3K27me3 and H3K4me3 modifications. Depletion of H3K27me3 at the Zbtb16/PLZF promoter leads to uncoupling of iNKT cell development from TCR specificity and is associated with accumulation of iNKT-like CD4(+) cells that express a non-iNKT cell specific T cell repertoire. In turn, stabilization of H3K27me3 leads to a drastic reduction of the iNKT cell population. Our data suggest that H3K27me3 levels at the bivalent Zbtb16/PLZF gene define a threshold enabling precise coupling of TCR specificity to lineage commitment.

  6. Fli-1 overexpression in hematopoietic progenitors deregulates T cell development and induces pre-T cell lymphoblastic leukaemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Monique F M A; Chan, Angela C; Dagger, Samantha; Bradley, Cara K; Wei, Andrew; Izon, David J

    2013-01-01

    The Ets transcription factor Fli-1 is preferentially expressed in hematopoietic tissues and cells, including immature T cells, but the role of Fli-1 in T cell development has not been closely examined. To address this we retrovirally overexpressed Fli-1 in various in vitro and in vivo settings and analysed its effect on T cell development. We found that Fli-1 overexpression perturbed the DN to DP transition and inhibited CD4 development whilst enhancing CD8 development both in vitro and in vivo. Surprisingly, Fli-1 overexpression in vivo eventuated in development of pre-T cell lymphoblastic leukaemia/lymphoma (pre-T LBL). Known Fli-1 target genes such as the pro-survival Bcl-2 family members were not found to be upregulated. In contrast, we found increased NOTCH1 expression in all Fli-1 T cells and detected Notch1 mutations in all tumours. These data show a novel function for Fli-1 in T cell development and leukaemogenesis and provide a new mouse model of pre-T LBL to identify treatment options that target the Fli-1 and Notch1 signalling pathways.

  7. Comparative proteomics of exosomes secreted by tumoral Jurkat T cells and normal human T cell blasts unravels a potential tumorigenic role for valosin-containing protein

    PubMed Central

    Sanclemente, Manuel; Iturralde, María; Naval, Javier; Alava, María Angeles; Martínez-Lostao, Luis; Thierse, Hermann-Josef; Anel, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    We have previously characterized that FasL and Apo2L/TRAIL are stored in their bioactive form inside human T cell blasts in intraluminal vesicles present in multivesicular bodies. These vesicles are rapidly released to the supernatant in the form of exosomes upon re-activation of T cells. In this study we have compared for the first time proteomics of exosomes produced by normal human T cell blasts with those produced by tumoral Jurkat cells, with the objective of identify proteins associated with tumoral exosomes that could have a previously unrecognized role in malignancy. We have identified 359 and 418 proteins in exosomes from T cell blasts and Jurkat cells, respectively. Interestingly, only 145 (around a 40%) are common. The major proteins in both cases are actin and tubulin isoforms and the common interaction nodes correspond to these cytoskeleton and related proteins, as well as to ribosomal and mRNA granule proteins. We detected 14 membrane proteins that were especially enriched in exosomes from Jurkat cells as compared with T cell blasts. The most abundant of these proteins was valosin-containing protein (VCP), a membrane ATPase involved in ER homeostasis and ubiquitination. In this work, we also show that leukemic cells are more sensitive to cell death induced by the VCP inhibitor DBeQ than normal T cells. Furthermore, VCP inhibition prevents functional exosome secretion only in Jurkat cells, but not in T cell blasts. These results suggest VCP targeting as a new selective pathway to exploit in cancer treatment to prevent tumoral exosome secretion. PMID:27086912

  8. Comparative proteomics of exosomes secreted by tumoral Jurkat T cells and normal human T cell blasts unravels a potential tumorigenic role for valosin-containing protein.

    PubMed

    Bosque, Alberto; Dietz, Lisa; Gallego-Lleyda, Ana; Sanclemente, Manuel; Iturralde, María; Naval, Javier; Alava, María Angeles; Martínez-Lostao, Luis; Thierse, Hermann-Josef; Anel, Alberto

    2016-05-17

    We have previously characterized that FasL and Apo2L/TRAIL are stored in their bioactive form inside human T cell blasts in intraluminal vesicles present in multivesicular bodies. These vesicles are rapidly released to the supernatant in the form of exosomes upon re-activation of T cells. In this study we have compared for the first time proteomics of exosomes produced by normal human T cell blasts with those produced by tumoral Jurkat cells, with the objective of identify proteins associated with tumoral exosomes that could have a previously unrecognized role in malignancy. We have identified 359 and 418 proteins in exosomes from T cell blasts and Jurkat cells, respectively. Interestingly, only 145 (around a 40%) are common. The major proteins in both cases are actin and tubulin isoforms and the common interaction nodes correspond to these cytoskeleton and related proteins, as well as to ribosomal and mRNA granule proteins. We detected 14 membrane proteins that were especially enriched in exosomes from Jurkat cells as compared with T cell blasts. The most abundant of these proteins was valosin-containing protein (VCP), a membrane ATPase involved in ER homeostasis and ubiquitination. In this work, we also show that leukemic cells are more sensitive to cell death induced by the VCP inhibitor DBeQ than normal T cells. Furthermore, VCP inhibition prevents functional exosome secretion only in Jurkat cells, but not in T cell blasts. These results suggest VCP targeting as a new selective pathway to exploit in cancer treatment to prevent tumoral exosome secretion.

  9. Eosinophils orchestrate cancer rejection by normalizing tumor vessels and enhancing infiltration of CD8(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Carretero, Rafael; Sektioglu, Ibrahim M; Garbi, Natalio; Salgado, Oscar C; Beckhove, Philipp; Hämmerling, Günter J

    2015-06-01

    Tumor-associated eosinophilia is frequently observed in cancer. However, despite numerous studies of patients with cancer and mouse models of cancer, it has remained uncertain if eosinophils contribute to tumor immunity or are mere bystander cells. Here we report that activated eosinophils were essential for tumor rejection in the presence of tumor-specific CD8(+) T cells. Tumor-homing eosinophils secreted chemoattractants that guided T cells into the tumor, which resulted in tumor eradication and survival. Activated eosinophils initiated substantial changes in the tumor microenvironment, including macrophage polarization and normalization of the tumor vasculature, which are known to promote tumor rejection. Thus, our study presents a new concept for eosinophils in cancer that may lead to novel therapeutic strategies.

  10. Development and function of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan Min; Ghali, Joanna; Zhang, Geoff Yu; Hu, Min; Wang, Ya; Sawyer, Andrew; Zhou, Jimmy Jianheng; Hapudeniya, Dhanushka A; Wang, Yiping; Cao, Qi; Zheng, Guoping; Harris, David C; Alexander, Stephen I

    2016-02-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been recognized as having a major role in maintaining peripheral tolerance and preventing and limiting autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases. Tregs derive from the thymus and also develop peripherally. In this review, we discuss recent progress in our understanding of the basic mechanisms involved in Treg development and function in protecting against autoimmunity in the periphery, including thymic selection, peripheral induction and the many mechanisms of Treg suppression. Specifically in kidney disease, Tregs have been shown to play a role in limiting injury and may potentially have a therapeutic role.

  11. Innate Memory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Jameson, Stephen C.; Lee, You Jeong; Hogquist, Kristin A.

    2015-01-01

    Memory T cells are usually considered to be a feature of a successful immune response against a foreign antigen, and such cells can mediate potent immunity. However, in mice, alternative pathways have been described, through which naïve T cells can acquire the characteristics and functions of memory T cells without encountering specific foreign antigen or the typical signals required for conventional T cell differentiation. Such cells reflect a response to the internal rather the external environment, and hence such cells are called innate memory T cells. In this review, we describe how innate memory subsets were identified, the signals that induce their generation and their functional properties and potential role in the normal immune response. The existence of innate memory T cells in mice raises questions about whether parallel populations exist in humans, and we discuss the evidence for such populations during human T cell development and differentiation. PMID:25727290

  12. SHARPIN controls the development of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Redecke, Vanessa; Chaturvedi, Vandana; Kuriakose, Jeeba; Häcker, Hans

    2016-06-01

    SHARPIN is an essential component of the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC) complex that controls signalling pathways of various receptors, including the tumour necrosis factor receptor (TNFR), Toll-like receptor (TLR) and antigen receptor, in part by synthesis of linear, non-degrading ubiquitin chains. Consistent with SHARPIN's function in different receptor pathways, the phenotype of SHARPIN-deficient mice is complex, including the development of inflammatory systemic and skin diseases, the latter of which depend on TNFR signal transduction. Given the established function of SHARPIN in primary and malignant B cells, we hypothesized that SHARPIN might also regulate T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling and thereby control T-cell biology. Here, we focus primarily on the role of SHARPIN in T cells, specifically regulatory T (Treg) cells. We found that SHARPIN-deficient (Sharpin(cpdm/cpdm) ) mice have significantly reduced numbers of FOXP3(+) Treg cells in lymphoid organs and the peripheral blood. Competitive reconstitution of irradiated mice with mixed bone marrow from wild-type and SHARPIN-deficient mice revealed an overall reduced thymus population with SHARPIN-deficient cells with almost complete loss of thymic Treg development. Consistent with this cell-intrinsic function of SHARPIN in Treg development, TCR stimulation of SHARPIN-deficient thymocytes revealed reduced activation of nuclear factor-κB and c-Jun N-terminal kinase, establishing a function of SHARPIN in TCR signalling, which may explain the defective Treg development. In turn, in vitro generation and suppressive activity of mature SHARPIN-deficient Treg cells were comparable to wild-type cells, suggesting that maturation, but not function, of SHARPIN-deficient Treg cells is impaired. Taken together, these findings show that SHARPIN controls TCR signalling and is required for efficient generation of Treg cells in vivo, whereas the inhibitory function of mature Treg cells appears to be

  13. Regulatory T Cell Effect on CD8(+) T Cell Responses to Human Herpesvirus 8 Infection and Development of Kaposi's Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Lepone, Lauren M; Rappocciolo, Giovanna; Piazza, Paolo A; Campbell, Diana M; Jenkins, Frank J; Rinaldo, Charles R

    2017-03-02

    We assessed CD8(+) T cell reactivity to human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8; Kaposi's sarcoma [KS]-associated herpesvirus) and the role of CD4(+)CD25(hi)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg) in HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected participants of the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study who did or did not develop KS. There were similarly low CD8(+) T cell interferon-γ responses to MHC class I-restricted epitopes of HHV-8 lytic and latent proteins over 5.7 years before KS in participants who developed KS compared to those who did not. T cell reactivity to HHV-8 antigens was low relative to responses to a combination of cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus and influenza A virus (CEF) peptide epitopes, and dominant HIV peptide epitopes. There was no change in %Treg in the HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected participants who did not develop KS, whereas there was a significant increase in %Treg in HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected participants who developed KS beginning 1.8 years before development of KS. Removal of Treg enhanced HHV-8-specific T cell responses in HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected participants who did or did not develop KS, with a similar pattern observed in response to CEF and HIV peptides. Thus, long-term, low levels of anti-HHV-8 CD8(+) T cell reactivity were present in both HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected men who did and did not develop KS. This was related to moderately enhanced Treg function.

  14. Distinct p21 requirements for regulating normal and self-reactive T cells through IFN-γ production.

    PubMed

    Daszkiewicz, Lidia; Vázquez-Mateo, Cristina; Rackov, Gorjana; Ballesteros-Tato, André; Weber, Kathrin; Madrigal-Avilés, Adrián; Di Pilato, Mauro; Fotedar, Arun; Fotedar, Rati; Flores, Juana M; Esteban, Mariano; Martínez-A, Carlos; Balomenos, Dimitrios

    2015-01-09

    Self/non-self discrimination characterizes immunity and allows responses against pathogens but not self-antigens. Understanding the principles that govern this process is essential for designing autoimmunity treatments. p21 is thought to attenuate autoreactivity by limiting T cell expansion. Here, we provide direct evidence for a p21 role in controlling autoimmune T cell autoreactivity without affecting normal T cell responses. We studied C57BL/6, C57BL/6/lpr and MRL/lpr mice overexpressing p21 in T cells, and showed reduced autoreactivity and lymphadenopathy in C57BL/6/lpr, and reduced mortality in MRL/lpr mice. p21 inhibited effector/memory CD4(+) CD8(+) and CD4(-)CD8(-) lpr T cell accumulation without altering defective lpr apoptosis. This was mediated by a previously non-described p21 function in limiting T cell overactivation and overproduction of IFN-γ, a key lupus cytokine. p21 did not affect normal T cell responses, revealing differential p21 requirements for autoreactive and normal T cell activity regulation. The underlying concept of these findings suggests potential treatments for lupus and autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome, without compromising normal immunity.

  15. Statistical Physics of T-Cell Development and Pathogen Specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Košmrlj, Andrej; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2013-04-01

    In addition to an innate immune system that battles pathogens in a nonspecific fashion, higher organisms, such as humans, possess an adaptive immune system to combat diverse (and evolving) microbial pathogens. Remarkably, the adaptive immune system mounts pathogen-specific responses, which can be recalled upon reinfection with the same pathogen. It is difficult to see how the adaptive immune system can be preprogrammed to respond specifically to a vast and unknown set of pathogens. Although major advances have been made in understanding pertinent molecular and cellular phenomena, the precise principles that govern many aspects of an immune response are largely unknown. We discuss complementary approaches from statistical mechanics and cell biology that can shed light on how key components of the adaptive immune system, T cells, develop to enable pathogen-specific responses against many diverse pathogens. The mechanistic understanding that emerges has implications for how host genetics may influence the development of T cells with differing responses to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection.

  16. Thyroiditis in T cell-depleted rats: suppression of the autoallergic response by reconstitution with normal lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Penhale, W J; Irvine, W J; Inglis, J R; Farmer, A

    1976-07-01

    Qualititive, quantitative and functional differences were found in lymphoid cells of female thymectomized and irradiated (Tx-X) PVG/c strain rats as compared to normal females of the same strain. Tx-X rats were lymphopenic and had reduced numbers of cells within spleen and cervical lymph nodes, depressed transformation responses of peripheral blood lymphocytes to PHA and lower percentage killing of their spleen cells by anti-T-cell serum and complement. There was an increased percentage of immunoglobulin-bearing cells in the lymph nodes. Reconstitution of Tx-X rats by the intravenous route using syngeneic lymph node cells, spleen cells or thymocytes abrogated the autoimmune responses to thyroid components generally observed in this state. Lymph node and spleen cells, but not thymocytes, also prevented thyroid changes when given intraperitoneally. In contrast, bone marrow cells appeared to give enhanced responses. Quntitative studies showed that the relative proportions of the suppressor or autoregulatory cells in various lymphoid tissues were lymph node greater than spleen greater than thymus. Complete abrogation of the autoimmune responses was possible only when cells were administered within a short time of final dose of irradiation and moderate thyroid change was again seen if transfer was delayed for 14 days post-irradiation. At 28 days reconstitution had no influence on the development of the autoimmune responses. Preliminary characterization studies using an anti-T-cell serum and fractionation of lymph node cells on a linear Ficoll gradient suggested that autoregulatory cell is a large T cell.

  17. The ThPOK transcription factor differentially affects the development and function of self-specific CD8(+) T cells and regulatory CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Twu, Yuh-Ching; Teh, Hung-Sia

    2014-03-01

    The zinc finger transcription factor ThPOK plays a crucial role in CD4 T-cell development and CD4/CD8 lineage decision. In ThPOK-deficient mice, developing T cells expressing MHC class II-restricted T-cell receptors are redirected into the CD8 T-cell lineage. In this study, we investigated whether the ThPOK transgene affected the development and function of two additional types of T cells, namely self-specific CD8 T cells and CD4(+) FoxP3(+) T regulatory cells. Self-specific CD8 T cells are characterized by high expression of CD44, CD122, Ly6C, 1B11 and proliferation in response to either IL-2 or IL-15. The ThPOK transgene converted these self-specific CD8 T cells into CD4 T cells. The converted CD4(+) T cells are no longer self-reactive, lose the characteristics of self-specific CD8 T cells, acquire the properties of conventional CD4 T cells and survive poorly in peripheral lymphoid organs. By contrast, the ThPOK transgene promoted the development of CD4(+) FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells resulting in an increased recovery of CD4(+) FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells that expressed higher transforming growth factor-β-dependent suppressor activity. These studies indicate that the ThPOK transcription factor differentially affects the development and function of self-specific CD8 T cells and CD4(+) FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells.

  18. The role of human T cell lymphotropic virus type I tax in the development of cutaneous T cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Zucker-Franklin, D

    2001-09-01

    Although it has been well established that the human T cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) causes adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) in regions of the world where this virus is endemic, its role in the pathogenesis of cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) in the Western world has been less well established. Most patients with CTCL are negative for antibodies to the structural proteins of HTLV-I, and thus a causative role for this virus is usually dismissed. However, the Tax sequence of HTLV-I has been found in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of practically all patients with CTCL. Such patients express Tax mRNA and have antibodies to p40Tax, the protein encoded by this sequence. Sequence analysis of a 159-bp region of Tax extracted from CTCL cells proved to be homologous with the same region prepared from a cell line infected with prototypic HTLV-I. By in situ PCR, Tax has been demonstrated in the lymphocytes infiltrating the skin as well as in the keratinocytes of such patients. Apart from the pathophysiologic and clinical interest of these studies, these observations may have therapeutic implications. In vitro, the proliferation of HTLV-I-transformed cells can be inhibited by antisense to HTLV-I Tax. Since Tax has not been identified in the normal human genome, antisense to Tax deserves serious consideration as a treatment modality for patients whose cells have been demonstrated to harborTax.

  19. Interleukin-7 negatively regulates the development of mature T cells in fetal thymus organ cultures.

    PubMed

    DeLuca, Dominick; Clark, Dawn R

    2002-05-01

    We added antibody specific for interleukin-7 (IL-7) to chimeric fetal thymus organ cultures (FTOC) to investigate the involvement of this cytokine at distinct stages of T cell development. We report that the neutralization of IL-7 early in fetal T cell development results in a decrease in the production of mature CD4 or CD8 ('single positive', SP) or CD4/8 negative ('double negative', DN) T cell phenotypes, as defined by their expression of CD3. This loss of T cell development was not complete, but it did include the development of gammadelta T cells. However, if IL-7 was neutralized at later stages of FTOC, the production of CD4/8 positive ('double positive', DP) T cells was increased, and if the addition of the antibody was delayed further, the production of mature SP T cells was increased. This last result could be extended to both alphabeta and gammadelta T cells. These data suggested that IL-7 played a negative regulatory role in the development of progressively mature T cells. Tissue sections of FTOC showed that IL-7 was expressed in the subcapsular region of the tissue where immature T cells reside. However, IL-7 was not detected in the medullary region where mature T cells are located. These data suggest that IL-7 not only supports the development of immature fetal T cells, but it may inhibit the development of mature T cells. The production of mature fetal T cells may, therefore, be delayed until their precursors enter the medullary microenvironment, where IL-7 production is low. In this way, T cells may be prevented from maturing until negative selection or anergy events eliminate or inactivate autoreactive clones.

  20. NKL homeobox gene activities in hematopoietic stem cells, T-cell development and T-cell leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pommerenke, Claudia; Scherr, Michaela; Meyer, Corinna; Kaufmann, Maren; Battmer, Karin; MacLeod, Roderick A. F.; Drexler, Hans G.

    2017-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells represent developmentally arrested T-cell progenitors, subsets of which aberrantly express homeobox genes of the NKL subclass, including TLX1, TLX3, NKX2-1, NKX2-5, NKX3-1 and MSX1. Here, we analyzed the transcriptional landscape of all 48 members of the NKL homeobox gene subclass in CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and during lymphopoiesis, identifying activities of nine particular genes. Four of these were expressed in HSPCs (HHEX, HLX1, NKX2-3 and NKX3-1) and three in common lymphoid progenitors (HHEX, HLX1 and MSX1). Interestingly, our data indicated downregulation of NKL homeobox gene transcripts in late progenitors and mature T-cells, a phenomenon which might explain the oncogenic impact of this group of genes in T-ALL. Using MSX1-expressing T-ALL cell lines as models, we showed that HHEX activates while HLX1, NKX2-3 and NKX3-1 repress MSX1 transcription, demonstrating the mutual regulation and differential activities of these homeobox genes. Analysis of a public T-ALL expression profiling data set comprising 117 patient samples identified 20 aberrantly activated members of the NKL subclass, extending the number of known NKL homeobox oncogene candidates. While 7/20 genes were also active during hematopoiesis, the remaining 13 showed ectopic expression. Finally, comparative analyses of T-ALL patient and cell line profiling data of NKL-positive and NKL-negative samples indicated absence of shared target genes but instead highlighted deregulation of apoptosis as common oncogenic effect. Taken together, we present a comprehensive survey of NKL homeobox genes in early hematopoiesis, T-cell development and T-ALL, showing that these genes generate an NKL-code for the diverse stages of lymphoid development which might be fundamental for regular differentiation. PMID:28151996

  1. Transcriptional regulation of early T-cell development in the thymus.

    PubMed

    Seo, Wooseok; Taniuchi, Ichiro

    2016-03-01

    T-cell development occurs in multipotent progenitors arriving in the thymus, which provides a highly specialized microenvironment. Specification and sequential commitment processes to T cells begin in early thymic progenitors upon receiving thymus-specific environmental cues, resulting in the activation of the genetically programmed transcriptional cascade that includes turning on and off numerous transcription factors in a precise manner. Thus, early thymocyte differentiation has been an excellent model system to study cell differentiation processes. This review summarizes recent advances in our knowledge on thymic T-cell development from newly arrived multipotent T-cell progenitors to fully committed T-cell precursors, from the transcriptional regulation perspective.

  2. Normalization of the peripheral blood T cell receptor V beta repertoire after cultured postnatal human thymic transplantation in DiGeorge syndrome.

    PubMed

    Davis, C M; McLaughlin, T M; Watson, T J; Buckley, R H; Schiff, S E; Hale, L P; Haynes, B F; Markert, M L

    1997-03-01

    Complete DiGeorge syndrome is an immunodeficiency disease characterized by thymic aplasia and the absence of functioning peripheral T cells. A patient with this syndrome was transplanted with cultured postnatal human thymic tissue. Within 5 weeks of transplantation, flow cytometry, T cell receptor V beta sequence analysis, and cell function studies showed the presence of oligoclonal populations of nonfunctional clonally expanded peripheral T cells that were derived from pretransplantation T cells present in the skin. However, at 3 months posttransplantation, a biopsy of the transplanted thymus showed normal intrathymic T cell maturation of host T cells with normal TCR V beta expression on thymocytes. By 9 months postransplantation, peripheral T cell function was restored and the TCR V beta repertoire became polyclonal, coincident with the appearance of normal T cell function. These data suggest that the transplanted thymus was responsible for the establishment of a new T cell repertoire via thymopoiesis in the chimeric thymic graft.

  3. Interleukin-1 receptors are differentially expressed in normal and psoriatic T cells.

    PubMed

    Bebes, Attila; Kovács-Sólyom, Ferenc; Prihoda, Judit; Kui, Róbert; Kemény, Lajos; Gyulai, Rolland

    2014-01-01

    This study was carried out to examine the possible role of interleukin-1 (IL-1) in the functional insufficiency of regulatory T cells in psoriasis, by comparing the expression of IL-1 receptors on healthy control and psoriatic T cells. Patients with moderate-to-severe chronic plaque psoriasis and healthy volunteers, matched in age and sex, were selected for all experiments. CD4(+)CD25(-) effector and CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(low) regulatory T cells were separated and used for the experiments. Expression of the mRNA of IL-1 receptors (IL-1R1, IL-1R2, and sIL-1R2) was determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Cell surface IL-1 receptor expression was assessed by flow cytometry. Relative expression of the signal transmitting IL-1 receptor type 1 (IL-1R1) mRNA is higher in resting psoriatic effector and regulatory T cells, and activation induces higher IL-1R1 protein expression in psoriatic T cells than in healthy cells. Psoriatic regulatory and effector T cells express increased mRNA levels of the decoy IL-1 receptors (IL-1R2 and sIL-1R2) upon activation compared to healthy counterparts. Psoriatic T cells release slightly more sIL-1R2 into their surrounding than healthy T cells. In conclusion, changes in the expression of IL-1 receptors in psoriatic regulatory and effector T cells could contribute to the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

  4. Thyroiditis in T cell-depleted rats: suppression of the autoallergic response by reconstitution with normal lymphoid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Penhale, W J; Irvine, W J; Inglis, J R; Farmer, A

    1976-01-01

    Qualititive, quantitative and functional differences were found in lymphoid cells of female thymectomized and irradiated (Tx-X) PVG/c strain rats as compared to normal females of the same strain. Tx-X rats were lymphopenic and had reduced numbers of cells within spleen and cervical lymph nodes, depressed transformation responses of peripheral blood lymphocytes to PHA and lower percentage killing of their spleen cells by anti-T-cell serum and complement. There was an increased percentage of immunoglobulin-bearing cells in the lymph nodes. Reconstitution of Tx-X rats by the intravenous route using syngeneic lymph node cells, spleen cells or thymocytes abrogated the autoimmune responses to thyroid components generally observed in this state. Lymph node and spleen cells, but not thymocytes, also prevented thyroid changes when given intraperitoneally. In contrast, bone marrow cells appeared to give enhanced responses. Quntitative studies showed that the relative proportions of the suppressor or autoregulatory cells in various lymphoid tissues were lymph node greater than spleen greater than thymus. Complete abrogation of the autoimmune responses was possible only when cells were administered within a short time of final dose of irradiation and moderate thyroid change was again seen if transfer was delayed for 14 days post-irradiation. At 28 days reconstitution had no influence on the development of the autoimmune responses. Preliminary characterization studies using an anti-T-cell serum and fractionation of lymph node cells on a linear Ficoll gradient suggested that autoregulatory cell is a large T cell. Images Fig. 2 PMID:791546

  5. Regulation of early T cell development by the PHD finger of histone lysine methyltransferase ASH1

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Yujiro Nakayama, Yasuhiro; Taniguchi, Masaru; Kioussis, Dimitris

    2008-01-18

    We have previously isolated a mammalian homologue of Drosophila discsabsent, small, orhomeotic-1 (ash1) from the murine thymus, and recently shown that its SET domain methylates histone H3 lysine 36 (K36). Expression of ASH1 has been reported to be increased in NOD thymocytes in a BDC2.5 clonotype background, but its function in T cell development has remained elusive. Here we report that the ash1 gene is expressed at high levels in thymocytes of mice deficient for rag1 or tcra genes. ASH1 proteins are present at peri-nuclei and as nuclear speckles in thymocytes. Some of the nuclear ASH1 co-localize with RAG2. Expression of the evolutionarily conserved PHD finger of ASH1 impairs T cell development at the DP stage, and causes increased transcription from the HoxA9 promoter in vitro. Moreover, the C-terminal part of ASH1 interacts with HDAC1 repression complexes, suggesting that the PHD finger of ASH1 may be involved in down-regulation of genes for normal development of {alpha}{beta} T cells.

  6. Interleukin-1 Receptors Are Differentially Expressed in Normal and Psoriatic T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kovács-Sólyom, Ferenc; Prihoda, Judit; Kui, Róbert; Kemény, Lajos; Gyulai, Rolland

    2014-01-01

    This study was carried out to examine the possible role of interleukin-1 (IL-1) in the functional insufficiency of regulatory T cells in psoriasis, by comparing the expression of IL-1 receptors on healthy control and psoriatic T cells. Patients with moderate-to-severe chronic plaque psoriasis and healthy volunteers, matched in age and sex, were selected for all experiments. CD4+CD25− effector and CD4+CD25+CD127low regulatory T cells were separated and used for the experiments. Expression of the mRNA of IL-1 receptors (IL-1R1, IL-1R2, and sIL-1R2) was determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Cell surface IL-1 receptor expression was assessed by flow cytometry. Relative expression of the signal transmitting IL-1 receptor type 1 (IL-1R1) mRNA is higher in resting psoriatic effector and regulatory T cells, and activation induces higher IL-1R1 protein expression in psoriatic T cells than in healthy cells. Psoriatic regulatory and effector T cells express increased mRNA levels of the decoy IL-1 receptors (IL-1R2 and sIL-1R2) upon activation compared to healthy counterparts. Psoriatic T cells release slightly more sIL-1R2 into their surrounding than healthy T cells. In conclusion, changes in the expression of IL-1 receptors in psoriatic regulatory and effector T cells could contribute to the pathogenesis of psoriasis. PMID:24665164

  7. Dysfunction of irradiated thymus for the development of helper T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Amagai, T.; Kina, T.; Hirokawa, K.; Nishikawa, S.; Imanishi, J.; Katsura, Y.

    1987-07-15

    The development of cytotoxic T cells and helper T cells in an intact or irradiated thymus was investigated. C57BL/6 (H-2b, Thy-1.2) mice were whole body-irradiated, or were irradiated with shielding over either the thymus or right leg and tail, and were transferred with 1.5 X 10(7) bone marrow cells from B10.Thy-1.1 mice (H-2b, Thy-1.1). At various days after reconstitution, thymus cells from the recipient mice were harvested and a peanut agglutinin low-binding population was isolated. This population was further treated with anti-Thy-1.2 plus complement to remove host-derived cells and was assayed for the frequency of cytotoxic T cell precursors (CTLp) and for the activity of helper T cells (Th). In the thymus of thymus-shielded and irradiated mice, Th activity reached normal control level by day 25, whereas CTLp frequency remained at a very low level during these days. In the thymus of whole body-irradiated mice, generation of CTLp was highly accelerated while that of Th was retarded, the period required for reconstitution being 25 days and more than 42 days for CTLp and Th, respectively. Preferential development of CTLp was also seen in right leg- and tail-shielded (L-T-shielded) and irradiated recipients. Histological observation indicated that Ia+ nonlymphoid cells were well preserved in the thymus of thymus-shielded and irradiated recipients, whereas in L-T-shielded and irradiated recipients, such cells in the medulla were markedly reduced in number. These results suggest strongly that the generation of Th but not CTLp is dependent on radiosensitive thymic component(s), and that such components may represent Ia+ cells themselves in the medulla or some microenvironment related to Ia+ cells.

  8. The transcriptional regulator PLZF induces the development of CD44 high memory phenotype T cells.

    PubMed

    Raberger, Julia; Schebesta, Alexandra; Sakaguchi, Shinya; Boucheron, Nicole; Blomberg, K Emelie M; Berglöf, Anna; Kolbe, Thomas; Smith, C I Edvard; Rülicke, Thomas; Ellmeier, Wilfried

    2008-11-18

    Transcriptional pathways controlling the development of CD44(hi) memory phenotype (MP) T cells with "innate-like" functions are not well understood. Here we show that the BTB (bric-a-brac, tramtrack, broad complex) domain-containing protein promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF) is expressed in CD44(hi), but not in CD44(lo), CD4(+) T cells. Transgenic expression of PLZF during T cell development and in CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells induced a T cell intrinsic program leading to an increase in peripheral CD44(hi) MP CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and a corresponding decrease of naïve CD44(lo) T cells. The MP CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells produced IFNgamma upon PMA/ionomycin stimulation, thus showing innate-like function. Changes in the naïve versus memory-like subset distribution were already evident in single-positive thymocytes, indicating PLZF-induced T cell developmental alterations. In addition, CD1d-restricted natural killer T cells in PLZF transgenic mice showed impaired development and were severely reduced in the periphery. Finally, after anti-CD3/CD28 stimulation, CD4(+) transgenic T cells showed reduced IL-2 and IFNgamma production but increased IL-4 secretion as a result of enhanced IL-4 production of the CD44(hi)CD62L(+) subset. Our data indicate that PLZF is a novel regulator of the development of CD44(hi) MP T cells with a characteristic partial innate-like phenotype.

  9. Role of Prolactin in the Recovered T-Cell Development of Early Partially Decapitated Chicken Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, J.; Varas, A.; Vicente, A.

    1998-01-01

    Although different experimental approaches have suggested certain regulation of the mammalian immune system by the neuroendocrine system, the precise factors involved in the process are largely unknown. In previous reports, we demonstrated important changes in the thymic development of chickens deprived of the major neuroendocrine centers by the removal of embryonic prosencephalon at 33-38 hr of incubation (DCx embryos) (Herradón et al., 1991; Moreno et al., 1995). In these embryos, there was a stopping of T-cell maturation that resulted in an accumulation of the most immature T-cell subsets (CD4-CD8- cells and CD4-CD81o cells) and, accordingly, in decreased numbers of DP (CD4+CD8+) thymocytes and mature CD3+TcRαβ + cells, but not CD3+TcRγδ lymphocytes. In the present work, we restore the thymic histology as well as the percentage of distinct T-cell subsets of DCx embryos by supplying recombinant chicken prolactin, grafting of embryonic pituitary gland, or making cephalic chick-quail chimeras. The recovery was not, however, whole and the percentage of CD3+TcRαβ thymocytes did not reach the normal values observed in 17-day-old control Sham-DCx embryos. The results are discussed on the basis of a key role for prolactin in chicken T-cell maturation. This hormone could regulate the transition of DN (CD4-CD8-) thymocytes to the DP (CD4+CD8+) cell compartment through its capacity for inducing IL-2 receptor expression on the former. PMID:9851358

  10. High-affinity FRβ-specific CAR T cells eradicate AML and normal myeloid lineage without HSC toxicity.

    PubMed

    Lynn, R C; Feng, Y; Schutsky, K; Poussin, M; Kalota, A; Dimitrov, D S; Powell, D J

    2016-06-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy, and development of new treatments to prolong remissions is warranted. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies appear promising but on-target, off-tumor recognition of antigen in healthy tissues remains a concern. Here we isolated a high-affinity (HA) folate receptor beta (FRβ)-specific single-chain variable fragment (2.48 nm KD) for optimization of FRβ-redirected CAR T-cell therapy for AML. T cells stably expressing the HA-FRβ CAR exhibited greatly enhanced antitumor activity against FRβ(+) AML in vitro and in vivo compared with a low-affinity FRβ CAR (54.3 nm KD). Using the HA-FRβ immunoglobulin G, FRβ expression was detectable in myeloid-lineage hematopoietic cells; however, expression in CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) was nearly undetectable. Accordingly, HA-FRβ CAR T cells lysed mature CD14(+) monocytes, while HSC colony formation was unaffected. Because of the potential for elimination of mature myeloid lineage, mRNA CAR electroporation for transient CAR expression was evaluated. mRNA-electroporated HA-FRβ CAR T cells retained effective antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Together, our results highlight the importance of antibody affinity in target protein detection and CAR development and suggest that transient delivery of potent HA-FRβ CAR T cells is highly effective against AML and reduces the risk for long-term myeloid toxicity.

  11. Evidence for a stepwise program of extrathymic T cell development within the human tonsil.

    PubMed

    McClory, Susan; Hughes, Tiffany; Freud, Aharon G; Briercheck, Edward L; Martin, Chelsea; Trimboli, Anthony J; Yu, Jianhua; Zhang, Xiaoli; Leone, Gustavo; Nuovo, Gerard; Caligiuri, Michael A

    2012-04-01

    The development of a broad repertoire of T cells, which is essential for effective immune function, occurs in the thymus. Although some data suggest that T cell development can occur extrathymically, many researchers remain skeptical that extrathymic T cell development has an important role in generating the T cell repertoire in healthy individuals. However, it may be important in the setting of poor thymic function or congenital deficit and in the context of autoimmunity, cancer, or regenerative medicine. Here, we report evidence that a stepwise program of T cell development occurs within the human tonsil. We identified 5 tonsillar T cell developmental intermediates: (a) CD34⁺CD38dimLin⁻ cells, which resemble multipotent progenitors in the bone marrow and thymus; (b) more mature CD34⁺CD38brightLin⁻ cells; (c) CD34⁺CD1a⁺CD11c⁻ cells, which resemble committed T cell lineage precursors in the thymus; (d) CD34⁻CD1a⁺CD3⁻CD11c⁻ cells, which resemble CD4⁺CD8⁺ double-positive T cells in the thymus; and (e) CD34⁻CD1a⁺CD3⁺CD11c⁻ cells. The phenotype of each subset closely resembled that of its thymic counterpart. The last 4 populations expressed RAG1 and PTCRA, genes required for TCR rearrangement, and all 5 subsets were capable of ex vivo T cell differentiation. TdT⁺ cells found within the tonsillar fibrous scaffold expressed CD34 and/or CD1a, indicating that this distinct anatomic region contributes to pre-T cell development, as does the subcapsular region of the thymus. Thus, we provide evidence of a role for the human tonsil in a comprehensive program of extrathymic T cell development.

  12. Differential requirement for CCR4 and CCR7 during the development of innate and adaptive αβT cells in the adult thymus.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Jennifer E; McCarthy, Nicholas I; Parnell, Sonia M; White, Andrea J; Bacon, Andrea; Serge, Arnauld; Irla, Magali; Lane, Peter J L; Jenkinson, Eric J; Jenkinson, William E; Anderson, Graham

    2014-08-01

    αβT cell development depends upon serial migration of thymocyte precursors through cortical and medullary microenvironments, enabling specialized stromal cells to provide important signals at specific stages of their development. Although conventional αβT cells are subject to clonal deletion in the medulla, entry into the thymus medulla also fosters αβT cell differentiation. For example, during postnatal periods, the medulla is involved in the intrathymic generation of multiple αβT cell lineages, notably the induction of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cell development and the completion of invariant NKT cell development. Although migration of conventional αβT cells to the medulla is mediated by the chemokine receptor CCR7, how other T cell subsets gain access to medullary areas during their normal development is not clear. In this study, we show that combining a panel of thymocyte maturation markers with cell surface analysis of CCR7 and CCR4 identifies distinct stages in the development of multiple αβT cell lineages in the thymus. Although Aire regulates expression of the CCR4 ligands CCL17 and CCL22, we show that CCR4 is dispensable for thymocyte migration and development in the adult thymus, demonstrating defective T cell development in Aire(-/-) mice is not because of a loss of CCR4-mediated migration. Moreover, we reveal that CCR7 controls the development of invariant NKT cells by enabling their access to IL-15 trans-presentation in the thymic medulla and influences the balance of early and late intrathymic stages of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cell development. Collectively, our data identify novel roles for CCR7 during intrathymic T cell development, highlighting its importance in enabling multiple αβT cell lineages to access the thymic medulla.

  13. Development of Valpha4+ NK T cells in the early stages of embryogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Y; Kanno, R; Koseki, H; Taniguchi, M

    1996-01-01

    The majority of T lymphocytes start to develop at around day 15 of gestation (d15)-d17 in the thymus and comprise the peripheral repertoire characterized by the expression of polymorphic T-cell antigen receptors (TCRs). Contrary to these conventional T cells, a subset of T cells, called natural killer (NK) T cells (most of them expressing an invariant TCR encoded by the Valpha14Jalpha281 gene with a 1-nt N-region), preferentially differentiates extrathymically and dominates the peripheral T-cell population at a high frequency (5% in splenic T cells and 40% in bone marrow T cells). Here, we investigated the development of NK T cells and found that the invariant Valpha14+ TCR transcripts and the circular DNA created by Valpha14 and Jalpha281 gene rearrangements can be detected in the embryo body at d9.5 of gestation and in the yolk sac and the fetal liver at d11.5-d13.5 of gestation, but not in the thymus, whereas T cells with Valpha1+ TCR expression, a major population in the thymus, were not observed at these early stages of gestation. Fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis also demonstrated that there exist CD3+ alpha beta+ T cells, almost all of which are Valpha14/Vbeta8+ NK+ T cells, during early embryogenesis. To our knowledge, this demonstrates for the first time that a T lymphocyte subset develops in extrathymic tissues during the early stages of embryogenesis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:8692847

  14. 77 FR 3482 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of T Cell Receptors and Chimeric Antigen...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-24

    ... Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of T Cell Receptors and Chimeric Antigen Receptors Into.../057272 and foreign equivalents thereof entitled ``Anti-MAGE-A3 T cell receptors and related materials and... Patent Application No. PCT/US2011/051537 and foreign equivalents thereof entitled ``Anti-SSX-2 T...

  15. T cells in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Piccinni, Marie-Pierre

    2005-01-01

    Maternal tolerance of the fetal allograft could be the result of the integration of numerous mechanisms promoted by different cells present in the decidua. Decidual macrophages and dendritic cells, which are found in close association with T lymphocytes are the most potent activators of T lymphocyte responses and could play a sentinel function for the immune system, initiating antigen-specific T cell responses to fetal antigens. T cell cytokines produced in response to fetal molecules could have a role in the maintenance or in the failure of pregnancy. The levels of LIF, IL-4, IL-10 and M-CSF produced by decidual T cells of women suffering from unexplained spontaneous abortion are lower than those of normal pregnant women indicating that these cytokines may contribute to the maintenance of pregnancy. T cells from the cumulus oophorus surrounding the preimplantation embryo produce LIF and IL-4. These findings suggest that cytokines produced by maternal T cells create a suitable microenvironment for preimplantation embryo development and maintenance of pregnancy. T cell cytokine profile could be modulated by the hormones present in the microenvironment of T cells: high doses of progesterone present at fetomaternal interface and in the cumulus induce the production of IL-4 and LIF, whereas relaxin induces IFN-gamma production.

  16. Disruption of alpha beta but not of gamma delta T cell development by overexpression of the helix-loop-helix protein Id3 in committed T cell progenitors.

    PubMed Central

    Blom, B; Heemskerk, M H; Verschuren, M C; van Dongen, J J; Stegmann, A P; Bakker, A Q; Couwenberg, F; Res, P C; Spits, H

    1999-01-01

    Enforced expression of Id3, which has the capacity to inhibit many basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors, in human CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells that have not undergone T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements inhibits development of the transduced cells into TCRalpha beta and gamma delta cells in a fetal thymic organ culture (FTOC). Here we document that overexpression of Id3, in progenitors that have initiated TCR gene rearrangements (pre-T cells), inhibits development into TCRalpha beta but not into TCRgamma delta T cells. Furthermore, Id3 impedes expression of recombination activating genes and downregulates pre-Talpha mRNA. These observations suggest possible mechanisms by which Id3 overexpression can differentially affect development of pre-T cells into TCRalpha beta and gamma delta cells. We also observed that cell surface CD4(-)CD8(-)CD3(-) cells with rearranged TCR genes developed from Id3-transduced but not from control-transduced pre-T cells in an FTOC. These cells had properties of both natural killer (NK) and pre-T cells. These findings suggest that bHLH factors are required to control T cell development after the T/NK developmental checkpoint. PMID:10329625

  17. Development of Auto Antigen-specific Regulatory T Cells for Diabetes Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are essential for normal immune surveillance, and their dysfunction can lead to the development of autoimmune diseases, such as type-1 diabetes (T1D). T1D is a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease characterized by islet β cell destruction, hypoinsulinemia, and severely altered glucose homeostasis. Tregs play a critical role in the development of T1D and participate in peripheral tolerance. Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) can be utilized to obtain a renewable source of healthy Tregs to treat T1D as they have the ability to produce almost all cell types in the body, including Tregs. However, the right conditions for the development of antigen (Ag)-specific Tregs from PSCs (i.e., PSC-Tregs) remain undefined, especially molecular mechanisms that direct differentiation of such Tregs. Auto Ag-specific PSC-Tregs can be programmed to be tissue-associated and infiltrate to local inflamed tissue (e.g., islets) to suppress autoimmune responses after adoptive transfer, thereby avoiding potential overall immunosuppression from non-specific Tregs. Developing auto Ag-specific PSC-Tregs can reduce overall immunosuppression after adoptive transfer by accumulating inflamed islets, which drives forward the use of therapeutic PSC-Tregs for cell-based therapies in T1D. PMID:27799873

  18. Development of a device for selective removal of CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Hirokazu; Ninomiya, Kasumi; Yoshida, Makoto; Matsuo, Hidenori; Shibuya, Noritoshi

    2003-06-01

    To control antigen (Ag)-specific immune cells is important in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. In particular, controlling the immune response of autoimmune T cells is effective in the treatment of these diseases. The development of a device that can remove CD4+ T cells specifically by extracorporeal circulation is now in progress, with the aim to deplete autoimmune T cells. We developed a removal material made of polypropylene non-woven fabrics with anti human CD4 monoclonal antibody immobilized on the surface. Using a column packed with the removal material, we succeeded in removing CD4+ T cells specifically from peripheral whole blood by direct perfusion. Moreover, CD4+ T cells can be specifically removed even from blood with lower surface antigen density by in vitro activation.

  19. Specificity for the tumor-associated self-antigen WT1 drives the development of fully functional memory T cells in the absence of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Pospori, Constandina; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; Voisine, Cecile; Perro, Mario; King, Judith; Fallah-Arani, Farnaz; Flutter, Barry; Chakraverty, Ronjon; Stauss, Hans J; Morris, Emma C

    2011-06-23

    Recently, vaccines against the Wilms Tumor antigen 1 (WT1) have been tested in cancer patients. However, it is currently not known whether physiologic levels of WT1 expression in stem and progenitor cells of normal tissue result in the deletion or tolerance induction of WT1-specific T cells. Here, we used an human leukocyte antigen-transgenic murine model to study the fate of human leukocyte antigen class-I restricted, WT1-specific T cells in the thymus and in the periphery. Thymocytes expressing a WT1-specific T-cell receptor derived from high avidity human CD8 T cells were positively selected into the single-positive CD8 population. In the periphery, T cells specific for the WT1 antigen differentiated into CD44-high memory phenotype cells, whereas T cells specific for a non-self-viral antigen retained a CD44(low) naive phenotype. Only the WT1-specific T cells, but not the virus-specific T cells, displayed rapid antigen-specific effector function without prior vaccination. Despite long-term persistence of WT1-specific memory T cells, the animals did not develop autoimmunity, and the function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells was unimpaired. This is the first demonstration that specificity for a tumor-associated self-antigen may drive differentiation of functionally competent memory T cells.

  20. Cytosolic Sequestration of Prep1 Influences Early Stages of T Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Penkov, Dmitry; Palazzolo, Martina; Mondino, Anna; Blasi, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    Objective Prep1 and Pbx2 are the main homeodomain DNA-binding proteins of the TALE (three amino acid loop extension) family expressed in the thymus. We previously reported reduced Pbx2 expression and defective thymocyte maturation in Prep1 hypomorphic mice. To further investigate the role of this homeodomain DNA-binding protein in T cell development, we generated transgenic mice expressing the N-terminal fragment of Pbx1 (Pbx1NT) under the control of the Lck proximal promoter. Principal Findings Pbx1NT causes Prep1 cytosolic sequestration, abolishes Prep1-dependent DNA-binding activity and results in reduced Pbx2 expression in developing thymocytes. Transgenic thymi reveal increased numbers of CD4− CD8− CD44− (DN3 and DN4) thymocytes, due to a higher frequency of DN2 and DN4 Pbx1NT thymocytes in the S phase. Transgenic thymocytes however do not accumulate at later stages, as revealed by a normal representation of CD4/CD8 double positive and single positive thymocytes, due to a higher rate of apoptotic cell death of DN4 Pbx1NT thymocytes. Conclusion The results obtained by genetic (Prep1 hypomorphic) and functional (Pbx1NT transgenic) inactivation of Prep1 support nonredundant roles for this homeodomain protein during different stages of T cell development. PMID:18560600

  1. Thymosin increases production of T-cell growth factor by normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Zatz, M M; Oliver, J; Samuels, C; Skotnicki, A B; Sztein, M B; Goldstein, A L

    1984-01-01

    The in vitro incubation of phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes with thymosin results in a marked and reproducible increase in production of T-cell growth factor, which is dose dependent and most pronounced in the first 24 hr of culture. Incubation of lymphocytes with thymosin alone failed to induce any production of T-cell growth factor. The biological activity of thymosin fraction 5 cannot be attributed to the activity of thymosin alpha 1, one of the well-characterized peptide components of fraction 5. These data provide the basis for (i) a potential mechanism for the in vivo immunorestorative effects of thymosin in primary and secondary immunodeficiencies and (ii) identification of an additional, but as yet undefined, immunoregulatory component of thymosin fraction 5. PMID:6609371

  2. Thymus-autonomous T cell development in the absence of progenitor import.

    PubMed

    Martins, Vera C; Ruggiero, Eliana; Schlenner, Susan M; Madan, Vikas; Schmidt, Manfred; Fink, Pamela J; von Kalle, Christof; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer

    2012-07-30

    Thymus function is thought to depend on a steady supply of T cell progenitors from the bone marrow. The notion that the thymus lacks progenitors with self-renewal capacity is based on thymus transplantation experiments in which host-derived thymocytes replaced thymus-resident cells within 4 wk. Thymus grafting into T cell-deficient mice resulted in a wave of T cell export from the thymus, followed by colonization of the thymus by host-derived progenitors, and cessation of T cell development. Compound Rag2(-/-)γ(c)(-/-)Kit(W/Wv) mutants lack competitive hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and are devoid of T cell progenitors. In this study, using this strain as recipients for wild-type thymus grafts, we noticed thymus-autonomous T cell development lasting several months. However, we found no evidence for export of donor HSCs from thymus to bone marrow. A diverse T cell antigen receptor repertoire in progenitor-deprived thymus grafts implied that many thymocytes were capable of self-renewal. Although the process was most efficient in Rag2(-/-)γ(c)(-/-)Kit(W/Wv) hosts, γ(c)-mediated signals alone played a key role in the competition between thymus-resident and bone marrow-derived progenitors. Hence, the turnover of each generation of thymocytes is not only based on short life span but is also driven via expulsion of resident thymocytes by fresh progenitors entering the thymus.

  3. Type I interferons regulate eomesodermin expression and the development of unconventional memory CD8(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Martinet, Valérie; Tonon, Sandrine; Torres, David; Azouz, Abdulkader; Nguyen, Muriel; Kohler, Arnaud; Flamand, Véronique; Mao, Chai-An; Klein, William H; Leo, Oberdan; Goriely, Stanislas

    2015-05-08

    CD8(+) T-cell memory phenotype and function are acquired after antigen-driven activation. Memory-like cells may also arise in absence of antigenic exposure in the thymus or in the periphery. Eomesodermin (Eomes) is a key transcription factor for the development of these unconventional memory cells. Herein, we show that type I interferon signalling in CD8(+) T cells directly activates Eomes gene expression. Consistent with this observation, the phenotype, function and age-dependent expansion of 'virtual memory' CD8(+) T cells are strongly affected in absence of type I interferon signalling. In addition, type I interferons induce a sustained expansion of 'virtual memory' CD8(+) T cells in an Eomes-dependent fashion. We further show that the development of 'innate thymic' CD8(+) T cells is dependent on the same pathway. In conclusion, we demonstrate that type I interferon signalling in CD8(+) T cells drives Eomes expression and thereby regulates the function and homeostasis of memory-like CD8(+) T cells.

  4. On the prenatal initiation of T cell development in the opossum Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Victoria L; Miller, Robert D

    2017-04-01

    Thymus-dependent lymphocytes (T cells) are a critical cell lineage in the adaptive immune system of all jawed vertebrates. In eutherian mammals the initiation of T cell development takes place prenatally and the offspring of many species are born relatively immuno-competent. Marsupials, in contrast, are born in a comparatively altricial state and with a less well developed immune system. As such, marsupials are valuable models for studying the peri- and postnatal initiation of immune system development in mammals. Previous results supported a lack of prenatal T cell development in a variety of marsupial species. In the gray short-tailed opossum, Monodelphis domestica, however, there was evidence that αβT cells were present on postnatal day 1 and likely initiated development prenatally. Demonstrated here is the presence of CD3ε(+) lymphocytes in late-stage embryos at a site in the upper thoracic cavity, the site of an early developing thymus. CD3ε(+) cells were evident as early as 48 h prior to parturition. In day 14 embryos, where there is clear organogenesis, CD3ε(+) cells were only found at the site of the early thymus, consistent with no extra-thymic sites of T cell development in the opossum. These observations are the first evidence of prenatal T cell lineage commitment in any marsupial.

  5. Pitfalls in global normalization of ChIP-seq data in CD4(+) T cells treated with butyrate: A possible solution strategy.

    PubMed

    Furusawa, Yukihiro; Endo, Takaho A; Obata, Yuuki; Ohara, Osamu; Ohno, Hiroshi; Hase, Koji

    2014-12-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) play a central role in the suppression of inflammatory and allergic responses. Colonization of certain gut commensal microbes such as Clostridia class IV and XIVa in the gut can induce development of colonic Treg cells contributing to the maintenance of gut immune homeostasis. Clostridia-derived butyrate promotes the differentiation of naïve T cells into Treg cells through upregulation of Foxp3, the master transcription factor of Treg cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) analysis revealed that treatment of naïve T cells with butyrate induces Treg-polarizing conditions by enhanced histone H3 acetylation in the promoter and conserved non-coding sequence regions of the Foxp3 locus. In general, global normalization was utilized for ChIP-seq analysis to compare the data obtained from two or more samples. However, global normalization is not appropriate for the evaluation of ChIP-seq data when treatment can affect the total amount of target protein. Here, we introduce a unique normalization method for ChIP-seq analysis in cells treated with butyrate, a pan-HDAC inhibitor that is likely to affect total acetylation levels of histone H3.

  6. Essential role of Rap signal in pre-TCR-mediated beta-selection checkpoint in alphabeta T-cell development.

    PubMed

    Kometani, Kohei; Moriyama, Masaki; Nakashima, Yasuhiro; Katayama, Yoshinori; Wang, Shu-Fang; Yamasaki, Sho; Saito, Takashi; Hattori, Masakazu; Minato, Nagahiro

    2008-12-01

    We demonstrate that lck promoter-driven conditional expression of transgenic SPA-1, a Rap GTPase-activation protein, causes a profound defect of alphabeta T-cell development at the CD4/CD8 double-negative (DN) stage due to enhanced cell death without affecting gammadelta T-cell development. The effect was specific to the DN stage, because CD4 promoter-driven SPA-1 expression hardly affected T-cell development. Rap1A17, a dominant-negative Rap mutant, interfered with the generation of double-positive (DP) cells from Rag2(-/-) fetal thymocytes in vitro in the presence of anti-CD3epsilon antibody and Notch ligand. Rap GTPases were activated in a DN cell line by the expression of self-oligomerizing CD3 (CD8:CD3epsilon chimera), which substituted autonomous pre-T-cell receptor (TCR) signal, inducing CD69 expression and CD25 down-regulation. Reciprocally, expression of C3G, a Rap guanine nucleotide exchange factor, in both normal and Rag2(-/-) DN cells markedly enhanced Notch-dependent generation and expansion of DP cells without additional anti-CD3epsilon antibody, thus bypassing pre-TCR. Defective alphabeta T-cell development in the conditional SPA-1-transgenic mice was restored completely by introducing a p53(-/-) mutation. These results suggest that endogenous Rap GTPases downstream of pre-TCR play an essential role in rescuing pre-T cells from the p53-mediated checkpoint response, thus allowing Notch-mediated expansion and differentiation.

  7. Human natural regulatory T cell development, suppressive function and post-thymic maturation in a humanized mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Onoe, Takashi; Kalscheuer, Hannes; Danzl, Nichole; Chittenden, Meredith; Zhao, Guiling; Yang, Yong-Guang; Sykes, Megan

    2011-01-01

    CD4+ regulatory T (Treg) cells control adaptive immune responses and promote self-tolerance. Various humanized mouse models have been developed in efforts to reproduce and study a human immune system. However, in models that require T cell differentiation in the recipient murine thymus, only low numbers of T cells populate the peripheral immune systems. T cells are positively selected by mouse MHC and therefore do not function well in an HLA-restricted manner. In contrast, cotransplantation of human fetal thymus/liver and i.v. injection of CD34+ cells from the same donor achieves multilineage human lymphohematopoietic reconstitution, including dendritic cells (DCs) and formation of secondary lymphoid organs, in NOD/SCID mice. Strong antigen-specific immune responses and homeostatic expansion of human T cells that is dependent on peripheral human APCs occurs. We now demonstrate that FoxP3+ Helios+ “natural” Tregs develop normally in human fetal thymic grafts and are present in peripheral blood, spleen and lymph nodes of these humanized mice. Humanized mice exhibit normal reversal of CD45 isoform expression in association with thymic egress, post-thymic “naïve” to “activated” phenotypic conversion, and suppressive function. These studies demonstrate the utility of this humanized mouse model for the study of human Treg ontogeny, immunobiology and therapy. PMID:21876039

  8. Oligoclonal CD8+ T cells play a critical role in the development of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Trott, Daniel W; Thabet, Salim R; Kirabo, Annet; Saleh, Mohamed A; Itani, Hana; Norlander, Allison E; Wu, Jing; Goldstein, Anna; Arendshorst, William J; Madhur, Meena S; Chen, Wei; Li, Chung-I; Shyr, Yu; Harrison, David G

    2014-11-01

    Recent studies have emphasized a role of adaptive immunity, and particularly T cells, in the genesis of hypertension. We sought to determine the T-cell subtypes that contribute to hypertension and renal inflammation in angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Using T-cell receptor spectratyping to examine T-cell receptor usage, we demonstrated that CD8(+) cells, but not CD4(+) cells, in the kidney exhibited altered T-cell receptor transcript lengths in Vβ3, 8.1, and 17 families in response to angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Clonality was not observed in other organs. The hypertension caused by angiotensin II in CD4(-/-) and MHCII(-/-) mice was similar to that observed in wild-type mice, whereas CD8(-/-) mice and OT1xRAG-1(-/-) mice, which have only 1 T-cell receptor, exhibited a blunted hypertensive response to angiotensin II. Adoptive transfer of pan T cells and CD8(+) T cells but not CD4(+)/CD25(-) cells conferred hypertension to RAG-1(-/-) mice. In contrast, transfer of CD4(+)/CD25(+) cells to wild-type mice receiving angiotensin II decreased blood pressure. Mice treated with angiotensin II exhibited increased numbers of kidney CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. In response to a sodium/volume challenge, wild-type and CD4(-/-) mice infused with angiotensin II retained water and sodium, whereas CD8(-/-) mice did not. CD8(-/-) mice were also protected against angiotensin-induced endothelial dysfunction and vascular remodeling in the kidney. These data suggest that in the development of hypertension, an oligoclonal population of CD8(+) cells accumulates in the kidney and likely contributes to hypertension by contributing to sodium and volume retention and vascular rarefaction.

  9. Interleukin-21 (IL-21) synergizes with IL-2 to enhance T-cell receptor-induced human T-cell proliferation and counteracts IL-2/transforming growth factor-β-induced regulatory T-cell development

    PubMed Central

    Battaglia, Alessandra; Buzzonetti, Alexia; Baranello, Cinzia; Fanelli, Mara; Fossati, Marco; Catzola, Valentina; Scambia, Giovanni; Fattorossi, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a mainstay for current immunotherapeutic protocols but its usefulness in patients is reduced by severe toxicities and because IL-2 facilitates regulatory T (Treg) cell development. IL-21 is a type I cytokine acting as a potent T-cell co-mitogen but less efficient than IL-2 in sustaining T-cell proliferation. Using various in vitro models for T-cell receptor (TCR)-dependent human T-cell proliferation, we found that IL-21 synergized with IL-2 to make CD4+ and CD8+ T cells attain a level of expansion that was impossible to obtain with IL-2 alone. Synergy was mostly evident in naive CD4+ cells. IL-2 and tumour-released transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) are the main environmental cues that cooperate in Treg cell induction in tumour patients. Interleukin-21 hampered Treg cell expansion induced by IL-2/TGF-β combination in naive CD4+ cells by facilitating non-Treg over Treg cell proliferation from the early phases of cell activation. Conversely, IL-21 did not modulate the conversion of naive activated CD4+ cells into Treg cells in the absence of cell division. Treg cell reduction was related to persistent activation of Stat3, a negative regulator of Treg cells associated with down-modulation of IL-2/TGF-β-induced phosphorylation of Smad2/3, a positive regulator of Treg cells. In contrast to previous studies, IL-21 was completely ineffective in counteracting the suppressive activity of Treg cells on naive and memory, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Present data provide proof-of-concept for evaluating a combinatorial approach that would reduce the IL-2 needed to sustain T-cell proliferation efficiently, thereby reducing toxicity and controlling a tolerizing mechanism responsible for the contraction of the T-cell response. PMID:23278180

  10. Influence of Ganoderma lucidum (Curt.: Fr.) P. Karst. on T-cell-mediated immunity in normal and immunosuppressed mice line CBA/Ca.

    PubMed

    Nizhenkovska, Iryna V; Pidchenko, Vitalii T; Bychkova, Nina G; Bisko, Nina A; Rodnichenko, Angela Y; Kozyko, Natalya O

    2015-09-01

    The article presents the results of the investigation of the effect of biomass powder of the fungus Ganoderma lucidum on T-cell-mediated immunity in normal and immunosuppressed mice CBA/Ca. Delayed-type hypersensitivity assay was used. Experimental immunodeficiency was established with intraperitoneal injection of the immunosuppressant cyclophosphamide at a single dose of 150 mg/kg on the first day of the experiment. Results of the study show that the administration of biomass powder of Ganoderma lucidum in a dose of 0.5 mg/kg orally for 10 days increases the delayed-type hypersensitivity response in normal mice CBA/Ca. Administration of 0.5 mg/kg of biomass powder of the fungus Ganoderma lucidum for 10 days blocked the development of the T-cell-mediated immunosuppression, induced by administration of cyclophosphamide and restored the delayed-type hypersensitivity response in immunosuppressed mice. Key words: fungus Ganoderma lucidum cyclophosphamide immunodeficiency T-cell-mediated immunity delayed-type hypersensitivity.

  11. Interleukin-7 receptor alpha is essential for the development of gamma delta + T cells, but not natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Mice that lack a functional gamma c subunit of the receptors for interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-7, IL-9, and IL-15 display profound defects in lymphoid development. The IL-7/IL-7R system represents a critical interaction for conventional T and B cell development. In this report, the role of IL-7R alpha in the development of lymphoid lineages other than conventional T and B cells was examined. We demonstrate that gamma delta + T cells were absent in IL-7R alpha-deficient mice, whereas the development and function of natural killer cells were normal. Thus, IL-7R alpha function is required for the development of gamma delta + T cells but not natural killer cells. PMID:8691145

  12. Normal immunoglobulin G protects against experimental allergic encephalomyelitis by inducing transferable T cell unresponsiveness to myelin basic protein.

    PubMed

    Pashov, A; Dubey, C; Kaveri, S V; Lectard, B; Huang, Y M; Kazatchkine, M D; Bellon, B

    1998-06-01

    Normal human IgG for intravenous use (IVIg), administered intraperitoneally, protected Lewis rats against experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) induced by immunization with myelin basic protein (MBP). We demonstrate that protection was associated with an acquired unresponsiveness of lymphocytes to MBP and a decreased ability of the cells to produce IL-2, IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha and, to a lesser degree, IL-4 and IL-10, in the presence of the antigen. Lymph node (LN) cells of protected rats failed to passively transfer EAE to naive syngeneic animals. Our observations indicate that, rather than inducing selective immune deviation, IVIg induces preferential MBP unresponsiveness of Th1 cells. Whereas LN and splenic cells of IVIg-treated rats did not proliferate nor secrete IL-2 in the presence of the antigen, proliferation was restored by adding exogeneous recombinant IL-2. In contrast, LN cells of IVIg-treated rats proliferated normally and produced IL-2 in the presence of concanavalin A, indicating the selectivity for MBP of the anergy induced by IVIg when given at the time of immunization with the antigen. Treatment with IVIg also allowed a resistance to the secondary induction of EAE, indicating that IVIg protects from EAE but does not interfere with the processes that eventually lead to resistance to re-challenge. These data document the immunomodulatory effects of IVIg in T cell-dependent experimental autoimmune disease and further suggest a role for normal Ig in the selection of functional T cell repertoires.

  13. IL-7 enhances thymic human T cell development in "human immune system" Rag2-/-IL-2Rgammac-/- mice without affecting peripheral T cell homeostasis.

    PubMed

    van Lent, Anja U; Dontje, Wendy; Nagasawa, Maho; Siamari, Rachida; Bakker, Arjen Q; Pouw, Stephan M; Maijoor, Kelly A; Weijer, Kees; Cornelissen, Jan J; Blom, Bianca; Di Santo, James P; Spits, Hergen; Legrand, Nicolas

    2009-12-15

    IL-7 is a central cytokine in the development of hematopoietic cells, although interspecies discrepancies have been reported. By coculturing human postnatal thymus hematopoietic progenitors and OP9-huDL1 stromal cells, we found that murine IL-7 is approximately 100-fold less potent than human IL-7 for supporting human T cell development in vitro. We investigated the role of human IL-7 in newborn BALB/c Rag2(-/-)gamma(c)(-/-) mice transplanted with human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) as an in vivo model of human hematopoiesis using three approaches to improve IL-7 signaling: administration of human IL-7, ectopic expression of human IL-7 by the transplanted human HSC, or enforced expression of a murine/human chimeric IL-7 receptor binding murine IL-7. We show that premature IL-7 signaling at the HSC stage, before entrance in the thymus, impeded T cell development, whereas increased intrathymic IL-7 signaling significantly enhanced the maintenance of immature thymocytes. Increased thymopoiesis was also observed when we transplanted BCL-2- or BCL-x(L)-transduced human HSC. Homeostasis of peripheral mature T cells in this humanized mouse model was not improved by any of these strategies. Overall, our results provide evidence for an important role of IL-7 in human T cell development in vivo and highlight the notion that IL-7 availability is but one of many signals that condition peripheral T cell homeostasis.

  14. IL-17 protects T cells from apoptosis and contributes to development of ALPS-like phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Boggio, Elena; Clemente, Nausicaa; Mondino, Anna; Cappellano, Giuseppe; Orilieri, Elisabetta; Gigliotti, Casimiro L; Toth, Erika; Ramenghi, Ugo; Dianzani, Umberto; Chiocchetti, Annalisa

    2014-02-20

    In autoimmune/lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), defective Fas death receptor function causes lymphadenomegaly/splenomegaly, the expansion of T-cell receptor αβ(+) CD4/CD8 double-negative T cells, and frequent development of hematologic autoimmunity. Dianzani autoimmune lymphoproliferative disease (DALD) has a similar phenotype but lacks the expansion of double-negative T cells. This work shows that patients with ALPS and DALD have high serum levels of interleukin 17A (IL-17A), IL-17F, and IL-17AF, which are involved in several autoimmune diseases, and that their T cells show increased secretion of these cytokines upon activation in vitro. The following data indicate that these cytokines may contribute to ALPS and DALD: (1) recombinant IL-17A and IL-17F significantly inhibit Fas-induced cell death in Fas-sensitive T cells from healthy donors; (2) this inhibitory effect is also induced by the patients' serum and is reversed by anti-IL-17A antibodies; (3) IL-17A neutralization substantially increases Fas-induced cell death in T cells from ALPS and DALD patients in vitro; and (4) treatment with anti-IL-17A antibodies ameliorates the autoimmune manifestations and, at a lesser extent, the lymphoproliferative phenotype and prolongs survival in MRLlpr/lpr mice, which are an animal model of ALPS. These data suggest that IL-17A and IL-17F could be targeted therapeutically to improve Fas function in ALPS and DALD.

  15. SAP-Dependent and -Independent Regulation of Innate T Cell Development Involving SLAMF Receptors.

    PubMed

    De Calisto, Jaime; Wang, Ninghai; Wang, Guoxing; Yigit, Burcu; Engel, Pablo; Terhorst, Cox

    2014-01-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP) plays an essential role in the immune system mediating the function of several members of the SLAM family (SLAMF) of receptors, whose expression is essential for T, NK, and B-cell responses. Additionally, the expression of SAP in double-positive thymocytes is mandatory for natural killer T (NKT) cells and, in mouse, for innate CD8(+) T cell development. To date, only two members of the SLAMF of receptors, Slamf1 and Slamf6, have been shown to positively cooperate during NKT cell differentiation in mouse. However, it is less clear whether other members of this family may also participate in the development of these innate T cells. Here, we show that Slamf[1 + 6](-/-) and Slamf[1 + 5 + 6](-/-) B6 mice have ~70% reduction of NKT cells compared to wild-type B6 mice. Unexpectedly, the proportion of innate CD8(+) T cells slightly increased in the Slamf[1 + 5 + 6](-/-) , but not in the Slamf[1 + 6](-/-) strain, suggesting that Slamf5 may function as a negative regulator of innate CD8(+) T cell development. Accordingly, Slamf5(-/-) B6 mice showed an exclusive expansion of innate CD8(+) T cells, but not NKT cells. Interestingly, the SAP-independent Slamf7(-/-) strain showed an expansion of both splenic innate CD8(+) T cells and thymic NKT cells. On the other hand, and similar to what was recently shown in Slamf3(-/-) BALB/c mice, the proportions of thymic promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF(hi)) NKT cells and innate CD8(+) T cells significantly increased in the SAP-independent Slamf8(-/-) BALB/c strain. In summary, these results show that NKT and innate CD8(+) T cell development can be regulated in a SAP-dependent and -independent fashion by SLAMF receptors, in which Slamf1, Slamf6, and Slamf8 affect development of NKT cells, and that Slamf5, Slamf7, and Slamf8 affect the development of innate CD8(+) T cells.

  16. PD-1 and Tim-3 pathways are associated with regulatory CD8+ T-cell function in decidua and maintenance of normal pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Wang, S-C; Li, Y-H; Piao, H-L; Hong, X-W; Zhang, D; Xu, Y-Y; Tao, Y; Wang, Y; Yuan, M-M; Li, D-J; Du, M-R

    2015-05-07

    CD8+ T cells are critical in the balance between fetal tolerance and antiviral immunity. T-cell immunoglobulin mucin-3 (Tim-3) and programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) are important negative immune regulatory molecules involved in viral persistence and tumor metastasis. Here, we demonstrate that Tim-3+PD-1+CD8+ T cells from decidua greatly outnumbered those from peripheral blood during human early pregnancy. Co-culture of trophoblasts with CD8+ T cells upregulated PD-1+ and/or Tim-3+ immune cells. Furthermore, the population of CD8+ T cells co-expressing PD-1 and Tim-3 was enriched within the intermediate memory subset in decidua. This population exhibited high proliferative activity and Th2-type cytokine producing capacity. Blockade of Tim-3 and PD-1 resulted in decreased in vitro proliferation and Th2-type cytokine production while increased trophoblast killing and IFN-γ producing capacities of CD8+ T cells. Pregnant CBA/J females challenged with Tim-3 and/or PD-1 blocking antibodies were more susceptible to fetal loss, which was associated with CD8+ T-cell dysfunction. Importantly, the number and function of Tim-3+PD-1+CD8+ T cells in decidua were significantly impaired in miscarriage. These findings underline the important roles of Tim-3 and PD-1 pathways in regulating decidual CD8+ T-cell function and maintaining normal pregnancy.

  17. Clinical Outcome of HIV Viraemic Controllers and Noncontrollers with Normal CD4 Counts Is Exclusively Determined by Antigen-Specific CD8+ T-Cell-Mediated HIV Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Tansiri, Yada; Rowland-Jones, Sarah L.; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Hansasuta, Pokrath

    2015-01-01

    In this cross-sectional study we evaluated T-cell responses using several assays to determine immune correlates of HIV control that distinguish untreated viraemic controllers (VC) from noncontrollers (NC) with similar CD4 counts. Samples were taken from 65 ART-naïve chronically HIV-infected VC and NC from Thailand with matching CD4 counts in the normal range (>450 cells/μl). We determined HIVp24-specific T-cell responses using standard Interferon-gamma (IFNγ) ELISpot assays, and compared the functional quality of HIVp24-specific CD8+ T-cell responses using polychromatic flow cytometry. Finally, in vitro HIV suppression assays were performed to evaluate directly the activity of CD8+ T cells in HIV control. Autologous CD4+ T cells were infected with primary patient-derived HIV isolates and the HIV suppressive activity of CD8+ T cells was determined after co-culture, measuring production of HIVp24 Ag by ELISA. The HIVp24-specific T-cell responses of VC and NC could not completely be differentiated through measurement of IFNγ-producing cells using ELISpot assays, nor by the absolute cell numbers of polyfunctional HIVp24-specific CD8+ T cells. However, in vitro HIV suppression assays showed clear differences between VC and NC. HIV suppressive activity, mediated by either ex vivo unstimulated CD8+ T cells or HIVp24-specific T-cell lines, was significantly greater using cells from VC than NC cells. Additionally, we were able to demonstrate a significant correlation between the level of HIV suppressive activity mediated by ex vivo unstimulated CD8+ T cells and plasma viral load (pVL) (Spearman r = -0.7345, p = 0.0003). This study provides evidence that in vitro HIV suppression assays are the most informative in the functional evaluation of CD8+ T-cell responses and can distinguish between VC and NC. PMID:25764310

  18. Induction of T Cell Development In Vitro by Delta-Like (Dll)-Expressing Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Mohtashami, Mahmood; Zarin, Payam; Zúñiga-Pflücker, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Recreating the thymic microenvironment in vitro poses a great challenge to immunologists. Until recently, the only approach was to utilize the thymic tissue in its three-dimensional form and to transfer the hematopoietic progenitors into this tissue to generate de novo T cells. With the advent of OP9-DL cells (bone marrow-derived cells that are transduced to express Notch ligand, Delta-like), hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) could be induced to differentiate into T cells in culture for the first time outside of the thymic tissue on a monolayer. We, as well as others, asked whether the ability to support T cell development in vitro in a monolayer is unique to BM-derived OP9 cells, and showed that provision of Delta-like expression to thymic epithelial cells and fibroblasts also allowed for T cell development. This provides the opportunity to design an autologous coculture system where the supportive stromal and the hematopoietic components are both derived from the same individual, which has obvious clinical implications. In this chapter, we describe methods for establishing a primary murine dermal fibroblast cell population that is transduced to express Delta-like 4, and describe the conditions for its coculture with HSCs to support T cell lineage initiation and expansion, while comparing it to the now classic OP9-DL coculture.

  19. Kinetics of T-cell receptor-dependent antigen recognition determined in vivo by multi-spectral normalized epifluorescence laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favicchio, Rosy; Zacharakis, Giannis; Oikonomaki, Katerina; Zacharopoulos, Athanasios; Mamalaki, Clio; Ripoll, Jorge

    2012-07-01

    Detection of multiple fluorophores in conditions of low signal represents a limiting factor for the application of in vivo optical imaging techniques in immunology where fluorescent labels report for different functional characteristics. A noninvasive in vivo Multi-Spectral Normalized Epifluorescence Laser scanning (M-SNELS) method was developed for the simultaneous and quantitative detection of multiple fluorophores in low signal to noise ratios and used to follow T-cell activation and clonal expansion. Colocalized DsRed- and GFP-labeled T cells were followed in tandem during the mounting of an immune response. Spectral unmixing was used to distinguish the overlapping fluorescent emissions representative of the two distinct cell populations and longitudinal data reported the discrete pattern of antigen-driven proliferation. Retrieved values were validated both in vitro and in vivo with flow cytometry and significant correlation between all methodologies was achieved. Noninvasive M-SNELS successfully quantified two colocalized fluorescent populations and provides a valid alternative imaging approach to traditional invasive methods for detecting T cell dynamics.

  20. A CD4+ T cell line-secreted factor, growth promoting for normal and leukemic B cells, identified as thioredoxin.

    PubMed

    Rosen, A; Lundman, P; Carlsson, M; Bhavani, K; Srinivasa, B R; Kjellström, G; Nilsson, K; Holmgren, A

    1995-04-01

    In this study, a B cell growth stimulatory factor, constitutively secreted by a human CD4+ T cell hybridoma clone, MP6, has been purified and characterized. Serum-free 24 h culture media from MP6 cells were collected, concentrated by ultrafiltration and separated by gel chromatography. Fractions were analyzed for stimulatory activity using [3H]thymidine incorporation in normal and leukemic (B-CLL) B cells as target cells. Activity was present in a 12 kDa protein peak. Upon storage this lost activity indicating that the factor was sensitive to air oxidation, a well-known property of mammalian thioredoxins (Trxs). Treatment of the inactive fraction with dithiothreitol restored full activity. When culture medium was analyzed with a radioimmunoassay for human placenta Trx, the MP6 clone was shown to release 30-50 ng/ml per million cells during 24 h. The B cell stimulatory activity of the MP6 medium was removed by Sepharose-bound anti-human placenta Trx IgG and activity was recovered by elution from the antibodies. Furthermore, MP6 medium showed Trx activity with NADPH and Trx reductase using an insulin disulfide reduction assay. Starting from 5 l of serum-free MP6 conditioned medium, the Trx was purified approximately 100,000-fold. After gel electrophoresis banding, the material was analyzed by peptide sequencing and a full length sequence of an 104 amino acid long protein was obtained. This Trx sequence was identical to the previously published sequence of human Trx from HTLV-1 transformed T cells, adult T cell leukemia-derived factor/Trx.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor deficiency in T cells suppresses the development of collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nakahama, Taisuke; Kimura, Akihiro; Nguyen, Nam Trung; Chinen, Ichino; Hanieh, Hamza; Nohara, Keiko; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki; Kishimoto, Tadamitsu

    2011-01-01

    The contributions of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr) to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis have not been elucidated. Here, we show that Ahr deficiency ameliorated collagen-induced arthritis, a mouse model of RA. Collagen-immunized Ahr KO mice showed decreased serum levels of such proinflammatory cytokines as IL-1β and IL-6. The Th17 and Th1 cell populations in lymph nodes from these mice decreased and increased, respectively, whereas the percentage of regulatory T cells was unchanged. Interestingly, a lack of Ahr specifically in T cells significantly suppressed collagen-induced arthritis development, whereas Ahr deficiency in macrophages had no effect. These finding indicate that the development of experimental autoimmune arthritis depends on the presence of Ahr in T cells, and that Th1/Th17 balance may be particularly important for this process. PMID:21825138

  2. Developing an in vitro model of T cell type of large granular lymphocyte leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ren, Tong; Yang, Jun; Broeg, Katie; Liu, Xin; Loughran, Thomas P; Cheng, Hua

    2013-12-01

    We developed a strategy that can prolong in vitro growth of T cell type of large granular lymphocyte (T-LGL) leukemia cells. Primary CD8+ lymphocytes from T-LGL leukemia patients were stably transduced with the retroviral tax gene derived from human T cell leukemia virus type 2. Expression of Tax overrode replicative senescence and promoted clonal expansion of the leukemic CD8+ T cells. These cells exhibit features characteristic of leukemic LGL, including resistance to FasL-mediated apoptosis, sensitivity to the inhibitors of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor and IκB kinases as well as expression of cytotoxic gene products such as granzyme B, perforin and IFNγ. Collectively, these results indicate that this leukemia cell model can duplicate the main phenotype and pathophysiological characteristics of the clinical isolates of T-LGL leukemia. This model should be useful for investigating molecular pathogenesis of the disease and for developing new therapeutics targeting T-LGL leukemia.

  3. IL-10 and TGF-beta cooperate in the regulatory T cell response to mucosal allergens in normal immunity and specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jutel, Marek; Akdis, Mübeccel; Budak, Ferah; Aebischer-Casaulta, Carmen; Wrzyszcz, Maria; Blaser, Kurt; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2003-05-01

    The regulation of normal and allergic immune responses to airborne allergens in the mucosa is still poorly understood, and the mechanism of specific immunotherapy (SIT) in normalizing the allergic response to such allergens is currently not clear. Accordingly, we have investigated the immunoregulatory mechanism of both normal and allergic responses to the major house-dust mite (HDM) and birch pollen allergens--Dermatophagoides pteroynyssinus (Der p)1 and Bet v 1, respectively--as well as the immunologic basis of SIT to HDM in rhinitis and asthma patients. In normal immunity to HDM and birch pollen, an allergen-specific peripheral T cell suppression to Der p 1 and Bet v 1 was observed. The deviated immune response was characterized by suppressed proliferative T cell and Th1 (IFN-gamma) and Th2 (IL-5, IL-13) cytokine responses, and increased IL-10 and TGF-beta secretion by allergen-specific T cells. Neutralization of cytokine activity showed that T cell suppression was induced by IL-10 and TGF-beta during SIT and in normal immunity to the mucosal allergens. In addition, SIT induced an antigen-specific suppressive activity in CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells of allergic individuals. Together, these results demonstrate a deviation towards a regulatory/suppressor T cell response during SIT and in normal immunity as a key event for the healthy immune response to mucosal antigens.

  4. Gene therapy with human and mouse T-cell receptors mediates cancer regression and targets normal tissues expressing cognate antigen

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Laura A.; Morgan, Richard A.; Dudley, Mark E.; Cassard, Lydie; Yang, James C.; Hughes, Marybeth S.; Kammula, Udai S.; Royal, Richard E.; Sherry, Richard M.; Wunderlich, John R.; Lee, Chyi-Chia R.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Schwarz, Susan L.; Cogdill, Alexandria P.; Bishop, Rachel J.; Kim, Hung; Brewer, Carmen C.; Rudy, Susan F.; VanWaes, Carter; Davis, Jeremy L.; Mathur, Aarti; Ripley, Robert T.; Nathan, Debbie A.; Laurencot, Carolyn M.

    2009-01-01

    Gene therapy of human cancer using genetically engineered lymphocytes is dependent on the identification of highly reactive T-cell receptors (TCRs) with antitumor activity. We immunized transgenic mice and also conducted high-throughput screening of human lymphocytes to generate TCRs highly reactive to melanoma/melanocyte antigens. Genes encoding these TCRs were engineered into retroviral vectors and used to transduce autologous peripheral lymphocytes administered to 36 patients with metastatic melanoma. Transduced patient lymphocytes were CD45RA− and CD45RO+ after ex vivo expansion. After infusion, the persisting cells displayed a CD45RA+ and CD45RO− phenotype. Gene-engineered cells persisted at high levels in the blood of all patients 1 month after treatment, responding patients with higher ex vivo antitumor reactivity than nonresponders. Objective cancer regressions were seen in 30% and 19% of patients who received the human or mouse TCR, respectively. However, patients exhibited destruction of normal melanocytes in the skin, eye, and ear, and sometimes required local steroid administration to treat uveitis and hearing loss. Thus, T cells expressing highly reactive TCRs mediate cancer regression in humans and target rare cognate–antigen-containing cells throughout the body, a finding with important implications for the gene therapy of cancer. This trial was registered at www.ClinicalTrials.gov as NCI-07-C-0174 and NCI-07-C-0175. PMID:19451549

  5. The effects of radio-frequency electromagnetic fields on T cell function during development.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Shin; Ushiyama, Akira; Maeda, Machiko; Ogasawara, Yuki; Wang, Jianqing; Kunugita, Naoki; Ishii, Kazuyuki

    2015-05-01

    With the widespread use of radio-frequency devices, it is increasingly important to understand the biological effects of the associated electromagnetic fields. Thus, we investigated the effects of radio-frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) on T cell responses during development due to the lack of science-based evidence for RF-EMF effects on developmental immune systems. Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were exposed to 2.14-GHz wideband code division multiple-access (W-CDMA) RF signals at a whole-body specific absorption rate (SAR) of 0.2 W/kg. Exposures were performed for a total of 9 weeks spanning in utero development, lactation and the juvenile period. Rats were continuously exposed to RF-EMF for 20 h/day, 7 days/week. Comparisons of control and exposed rats using flow cytometry revealed no changes in the numbers of CD4/CD8 T cells, activated T cells or regulatory T cells among peripheral blood cells, splenocytes and thymocytes. Expression levels of 16 genes that regulate the immunological Th1/Th2 paradigm were analyzed using real-time PCR in the spleen and thymus tissues of control and RF-EMF-exposed rats. Although only the Il5 gene was significantly regulated in spleen tissues, Il4, Il5 and Il23a genes were significantly upregulated in thymus tissues following exposure to RF-EMF. However, ELISAs showed no changes in serum IL-4 protein concentrations. These data indicate no adverse effects of long-term RF-EMF exposure on immune-like T cell populations, T cell activation, or Th1/Th2 balance in developing rats, although significant transcriptional effects were observed.

  6. The effects of radio-frequency electromagnetic fields on T cell function during development

    PubMed Central

    Ohtani, Shin; Ushiyama, Akira; Maeda, Machiko; Ogasawara, Yuki; Wang, Jianqing; Kunugita, Naoki; Ishii, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-01

    With the widespread use of radio-frequency devices, it is increasingly important to understand the biological effects of the associated electromagnetic fields. Thus, we investigated the effects of radio-frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) on T cell responses during development due to the lack of science-based evidence for RF-EMF effects on developmental immune systems. Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were exposed to 2.14-GHz wideband code division multiple-access (W-CDMA) RF signals at a whole-body specific absorption rate (SAR) of 0.2 W/kg. Exposures were performed for a total of 9 weeks spanning in utero development, lactation and the juvenile period. Rats were continuously exposed to RF-EMF for 20 h/day, 7 days/week. Comparisons of control and exposed rats using flow cytometry revealed no changes in the numbers of CD4/CD8 T cells, activated T cells or regulatory T cells among peripheral blood cells, splenocytes and thymocytes. Expression levels of 16 genes that regulate the immunological Th1/Th2 paradigm were analyzed using real-time PCR in the spleen and thymus tissues of control and RF-EMF–exposed rats. Although only the Il5 gene was significantly regulated in spleen tissues, Il4, Il5 and Il23a genes were significantly upregulated in thymus tissues following exposure to RF-EMF. However, ELISAs showed no changes in serum IL-4 protein concentrations. These data indicate no adverse effects of long-term RF-EMF exposure on immune-like T cell populations, T cell activation, or Th1/Th2 balance in developing rats, although significant transcriptional effects were observed. PMID:25835473

  7. Dietary restriction and fasting arrest B and T cell development and increase mature B and T cell numbers in bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Shushimita, Shushimita; de Bruijn, Marjolein J W; de Bruin, Ron W F; IJzermans, Jan N M; Hendriks, Rudi W; Dor, Frank J M F

    2014-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) delays ageing and extends life span. Both long- and short-term DR, as well as short-term fasting provide robust protection against many "neuronal and surgery related damaging phenomena" such as Parkinson's disease and ischemia-reperfusion injury. The exact mechanism behind this phenomenon has not yet been elucidated. Its anti-inflammatory actions prompted us to thoroughly investigate the consequences of DR and fasting on B and T cell compartments in primary and secondary lymphoid organs of male C57Bl/6 mice. In BM we found that DR and fasting cause a decrease in the total B cell population and arrest early B cell development, while increasing the number of recirculating mature B cells. In the fasting group, a significant reduction in peripheral B cell counts was observed in both spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes (mLN). Thymopoiesis was arrested significantly at double negative DN2 stage due to fasting, whereas DR resulted in a partial arrest of thymocyte development at the DN4 stage. Mature CD3(+) T cell populations were increased in BM and decreased in both spleen and mLN. Thus, DR arrests B cell development in the BM but increases the number of recirculating mature B cells. DR also arrests maturation of T cells in thymus, resulting in depletion of mature T cells from spleen and mLN while recruiting them to the BM. The functional relevance in relation to protection against organ damage needs to be determined.

  8. [Development of Tax-redirected T-cell immunotherapy using TCR gene transduction in patients with ATL].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yukie; Kanda, Yoshinobu

    2015-07-01

    ATL is an aggressive T-cell malignancy caused by HTLV-1 virus infection. Tax, which is the most important regulatory protein of HTLV-1, is associated with aggressive proliferation of host cells and is also a major target antigen for CD8⁺ cytotoxic T-cells (CTLs). Recently, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) has proven effective for ATL, and donor-derived Tax-specific CTL might contribute to graft-versus-ATL effects in some recipients who maintained complete remission after allo-HSCT. We, for the first time, analyzed the Tax-specific T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire, phenotypes and functions of Tax-specific CTLs at single-cell levels in HLA-A24⁺ ATL patients who underwent allo-HSCT. We found that 1) a particular amino acid sequence motif (PDR) in the CDR3 region of TCR-β was conserved in different patients and also within the same patient before and after allo-HSCT, and 2) the PDR⁺ Tax-specific CTL clone selectively expanded in ATL long-term survivors as less-differentiated effector memory CTLs. Actually, the PDR⁺ CTL showed not only strong binding activity for the Tax-tetramer but also strong killing activity against patients' HTLV-1-infected T-cells without any reaction against normal cells. We are presently evaluating the killing activities of PDR⁺ TCR-transduced T-cells against Tax in immunodeficient mice, with the aim of developing a new immunotherapy for ATL.

  9. New role for the (pro)renin receptor in T-cell development.

    PubMed

    Geisberger, Sabrina; Maschke, Ulrike; Gebhardt, Matthias; Kleinewietfeld, Markus; Manzel, Arndt; Linker, Ralf A; Chidgey, Ann; Dechend, Ralf; Nguyen, Genevieve; Daumke, Oliver; Muller, Dominik N; Wright, Mark D; Binger, Katrina J

    2015-07-23

    The (pro)renin receptor (PRR) was originally thought to be important for regulating blood pressure via the renin-angiotensin system. However, it is now emerging that PRR has instead a generic role in cellular development. Here, we have specifically deleted PRR from T cells. T-cell-specific PRR-knockout mice had a significant decrease in thymic cellularity, corresponding with a 100-fold decrease in the number of CD4(+) and CD8(+) thymocytes, and a large increase in double-negative (DN) precursors. Gene expression analysis on sorted DN3 thymocytes indicated that PRR-deficient thymocytes have perturbations in key cellular pathways essential at the DN3 stage, including transcription and translation. Further characterization of DN T-cell progenitors leads us to propose that PRR deletion affects thymocyte survival and development at multiple stages; from DN3 through to DN4, double-positive, and single-positive CD4 and CD8. Our study thus identifies a new role for PRR in T-cell development.

  10. Prevailing over T cell exhaustion: New developments in the immunotherapy of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Christian; Kühnemuth, Benjamin; Duewell, Peter; Ormanns, Steffen; Gress, Thomas; Schnurr, Max

    2016-10-10

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive malignancies and has been considered poorly immunogenic for decades. However, this characterization might be over-simplistic. A more sophisticated approach is needed in order to develop new treatment strategies. In this review, we will focus on T cell exhaustion as a phenomenon of immune failure that is a useful paradigm to characterize immunosuppressive effects. Cancer creates an environment of constant antigen exposure and inflammation. In this setting, T cells transform into a differentiation state that has been termed T cell exhaustion, which is characterized by upregulation of inhibitory receptors, resulting in loss of effector function. The discovery of receptor-mediated immune checkpoints, which prevent uncontrolled T cell reactions, led to the development of a new class of antibodies termed checkpoint inhibitors. Unprecedented results in patients with metastatic melanoma and lung cancer have renewed interest in the immunotherapy of other solid tumor entities, including pancreatic cancer. Data on the efficacy of checkpoint inhibitors in pancreatic cancer are still sparse and indicate limited efficacy as single agents. Combination of checkpoint inhibitors with other immune-activating strategies or cytotoxic drugs might be a way to overcome therapy resistance in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  11. PP6 controls T cell development and homeostasis by negatively regulating distal TCR signaling.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jian; Shi, Hao; Shen, Ye; Peng, Chao; Liu, Yan; Li, Chenyu; Deng, Kejing; Geng, Jianguo; Xu, Tian; Zhuang, Yuan; Zheng, Biao; Tao, Wufan

    2015-02-15

    T cell development and homeostasis are both regulated by TCR signals. Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, which are catalyzed by protein kinases and phosphatases, respectively, serve as important switches controlling multiple downstream pathways triggered by TCR recognition of Ags. It has been well documented that protein tyrosine phosphatases are involved in negative regulation of proximal TCR signaling. However, how TCR signals are terminated or attenuated in the distal TCR signaling pathways is largely unknown. We investigated the function of Ser/Thr protein phosphatase (PP) 6 in TCR signaling. T cell lineage-specific ablation of PP6 in mice resulted in enhanced thymic positive and negative selection, and preferential expansion of fetal-derived, IL-17-producing Vγ6Vδ1(+) T cells. Both PP6-deficient peripheral CD4(+) helper and CD8(+) cytolytic cells could not maintain a naive state and became fast-proliferating and short-lived effector cells. PP6 deficiency led to profound hyperactivation of multiple distal TCR signaling molecules, including MAPKs, AKT, and NF-κB. Our studies demonstrate that PP6 acts as a critical negative regulator, not only controlling both αβ and γδ lineage development, but also maintaining naive T cell homeostasis by preventing their premature activation before Ag stimulation.

  12. Chromatin configuration of the human CD2 gene locus during T-cell development.

    PubMed Central

    Wotton, D; Flanagan, B F; Owen, M J

    1989-01-01

    To investigate the molecular basis for the tissue-specific expression of the human CD2 gene, its chromatin configuration was assessed by determining DNase I hypersensitivity and the degree of methylation during T-cell lineage commitment and development. Tissue-specific DNase I-hypersensitive sites were found within the 5' promoter region and a region 3' of the gene essential for gene expression. DNase I hypersensitivity of the 5' region correlated strictly with transcriptional activity, whereas hypersensitivity of the 3' region correlated with T-cell progenitor activity or lineage commitment but not necessarily with transcription. Hha I and Hpa II sites around the 5' and 3' regions were undermethylated in CD2-expressing T cells but were more extensively methylated in other cell types. These results define likely regulatory elements both upstream and downstream of the CD2 gene that control its tissue-specific expression. Further, they show that the 3' regulatory region adopts an open chromatin configuration prior to lineage commitment and during early stages of T-cell development before the CD2 gene is transcribed. Images PMID:2567000

  13. Comparative assessment of therapeutic safety of norcantharidin, N-farnesyloxy-norcantharimide, and N-farnesyl-norcantharimide against Jurkat T cells relative to human normal lymphoblast

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ming-Che; Wu, Jin-Yi; Liao, Hui-Fen; Chen, Yu-Jen; Kuo, Cheng-Deng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The therapeutic safety of an anticancer drug is one of the most important concerns of the physician treating the cancer patient. Half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) and hillslope are usually used to represent the strength and sensitivity of an anticancer drug on cancer cells. The therapeutic safety of the anticancer drug can be assessed by comparing the IC50 and hillslope of anticancer drugs on cancer cells relative to normal cells. Since there are situations where “more anticancer activity” implies “more toxicity,” the safety of an anticancer drug in these situations is hard to evaluate by using IC50 and hillslope alone. In a previous study, the “net effect” index was devised to represent the net therapeutic effects of one anticancer drug relative to the other. However, the therapeutic safety of one specific anticancer drug alone was not defined in the “net effect” index. This study introduced the “safety index (SI)” to quantify the degree of safety of an anticancer drug by using 4-parameter logistic model on cancer cells relative to normal cells. The therapeutic safety of norcantharidin (NCTD), N-farnesyloxy-norcantharimide (NOC15), and N-farnesyl-norcantharimide (NC15) in the treatment of Jurkat T cells relative to human normal lymphoblast was compared using the newly defined SI. We found that the SI of NOC15 and NC15 was significantly higher than that of NCTD, suggesting that both NOC15 and NC15 can damage more cancer cells and less normal cells than NCTD. We conclude that both NOC15 and NC15 are safer anticancer drugs than NCTD in the treatment of Jurkat T cells relative to human normal lymphoblast. The SI can be further applied to the screening, developments, and applications of anticancer drugs in the future. PMID:27495082

  14. Function of Cd3ε-Mediated Signals in T Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Sommers, Connie L.; Dejarnette, Jan B.; Huang, Kun; Lee, Jan; El-Khoury, Dalal; Shores, Elizabeth W.; Love, Paul E.

    2000-01-01

    The T cell antigen receptor (TCR) and pre-TCR complexes are composed of multiple signal-transducing subunits (CD3γ, CD3δ, CD3ε, and ζ) that each contain one or more copies of a semiconserved functional motif, the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM). Although biochemical studies indicate that individual TCR-ITAMs may bind selectively or with different affinity to various effector molecules, data from other experiments suggest that at least some ITAMs are functionally equivalent. In this study, we examined the role of CD3ε ITAM-mediated signals in T cell development by genetically reconstituting CD3ε-deficient mice with transgenes encoding either wild-type or ITAM-mutant (signaling defective) forms of the protein. The results demonstrate that signals transduced by CD3ε are not specifically required for T cell maturation but instead contribute quantitatively to TCR signaling in a manner similar to that previously observed for ζ chain. Unexpectedly, analysis of TCR-transgenic/CD3ε-mutant mice reveals a potential role for CD3ε signals in T cell survival. PMID:10993922

  15. CD8(+) T cell-mediated immunity during Trypanosoma cruzi infection: a path for vaccine development?

    PubMed

    Dos Santos Virgilio, Fernando; Pontes, Camila; Dominguez, Mariana Ribeiro; Ersching, Jonatan; Rodrigues, Mauricio Martins; Vasconcelos, José Ronnie

    2014-01-01

    MHC-restricted CD8(+) T cells are important during infection with the intracellular protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. Experimental studies performed in the past 25 years have elucidated a number of features related to the immune response mediated by these T cells, which are important for establishing the parasite/host equilibrium leading to chronic infection. CD8(+) T cells are specific for highly immunodominant antigens expressed by members of the trans-sialidase family. After infection, their activation is delayed, and the cells display a high proliferative activity associated with high apoptotic rates. Although they participate in parasite control and elimination, they are unable to clear the infection due to their low fitness, allowing the parasite to establish the chronic phase when these cells then play an active role in the induction of heart immunopathology. Vaccination with a number of subunit recombinant vaccines aimed at eliciting specific CD8(+) T cells can reverse this path, thereby generating a productive immune response that will lead to the control of infection, reduction of symptoms, and reduction of disease transmission. Due to these attributes, activation of CD8(+) T lymphocytes may constitute a path for the development of a veterinarian or human vaccine.

  16. CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Immunity during Trypanosoma cruzi Infection: A Path for Vaccine Development?

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos Virgilio, Fernando; Pontes, Camila; Dominguez, Mariana Ribeiro; Ersching, Jonatan; Rodrigues, Mauricio Martins; Vasconcelos, José Ronnie

    2014-01-01

    MHC-restricted CD8+ T cells are important during infection with the intracellular protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. Experimental studies performed in the past 25 years have elucidated a number of features related to the immune response mediated by these T cells, which are important for establishing the parasite/host equilibrium leading to chronic infection. CD8+ T cells are specific for highly immunodominant antigens expressed by members of the trans-sialidase family. After infection, their activation is delayed, and the cells display a high proliferative activity associated with high apoptotic rates. Although they participate in parasite control and elimination, they are unable to clear the infection due to their low fitness, allowing the parasite to establish the chronic phase when these cells then play an active role in the induction of heart immunopathology. Vaccination with a number of subunit recombinant vaccines aimed at eliciting specific CD8+ T cells can reverse this path, thereby generating a productive immune response that will lead to the control of infection, reduction of symptoms, and reduction of disease transmission. Due to these attributes, activation of CD8+ T lymphocytes may constitute a path for the development of a veterinarian or human vaccine. PMID:25104879

  17. Dietary Restriction and Fasting Arrest B and T Cell Development and Increase Mature B and T Cell Numbers in Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    Shushimita, Shushimita; de Bruijn, Marjolein J. W.; de Bruin, Ron W. F.; IJzermans, Jan N. M.; Hendriks, Rudi W.; Dor, Frank J. M. F.

    2014-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) delays ageing and extends life span. Both long- and short-term DR, as well as short-term fasting provide robust protection against many “neuronal and surgery related damaging phenomena” such as Parkinson’s disease and ischemia-reperfusion injury. The exact mechanism behind this phenomenon has not yet been elucidated. Its anti-inflammatory actions prompted us to thoroughly investigate the consequences of DR and fasting on B and T cell compartments in primary and secondary lymphoid organs of male C57Bl/6 mice. In BM we found that DR and fasting cause a decrease in the total B cell population and arrest early B cell development, while increasing the number of recirculating mature B cells. In the fasting group, a significant reduction in peripheral B cell counts was observed in both spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes (mLN). Thymopoiesis was arrested significantly at double negative DN2 stage due to fasting, whereas DR resulted in a partial arrest of thymocyte development at the DN4 stage. Mature CD3+ T cell populations were increased in BM and decreased in both spleen and mLN. Thus, DR arrests B cell development in the BM but increases the number of recirculating mature B cells. DR also arrests maturation of T cells in thymus, resulting in depletion of mature T cells from spleen and mLN while recruiting them to the BM. The functional relevance in relation to protection against organ damage needs to be determined. PMID:24504160

  18. Normalization of Tumor Microenvironment by Neem Leaf Glycoprotein Potentiates Effector T Cell Functions and Therapeutically Intervenes in the Growth of Mouse Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Barik, Subhasis; Banerjee, Saptak; Mallick, Atanu; Goswami, Kuntal Kanti; Roy, Soumyabrata; Bose, Anamika; Baral, Rathindranath

    2013-01-01

    We have observed restriction of the murine sarcoma growth by therapeutic intervention of neem leaf glycoprotein (NLGP). In order to evaluate the mechanism of tumor growth restriction, here, we have analyzed tumor microenvironment (TME) from sarcoma bearing mice with NLGP therapy (NLGP-TME, in comparison to PBS-TME). Analysis of cytokine milieu within TME revealed IL-10, TGFβ, IL-6 rich type 2 characters was switched to type 1 microenvironment with dominance of IFNγ secretion within NLGP-TME. Proportion of CD8+ T cells was increased within NLGP-TME and these T cells were protected from TME-induced anergy by NLGP, as indicated by higher expression of pNFAT and inhibit related downstream signaling. Moreover, low expression of FasR+ cells within CD8+ T cell population denotes prevention from activation induced cell death. Using CFSE as a probe, better migration of T cells was noted within TME from NLGP treated mice than PBS cohort. CD8+ T cells isolated from NLGP-TME exhibited greater cytotoxicity to sarcoma cells in vitro and these cells show higher expression of cytotoxicity related molecules, perforin and granzyme B. Adoptive transfer of NLGP-TME exposed T cells, but not PBS-TME exposed cells in mice, is able to significantly inhibit the growth of sarcoma in vivo. Such tumor growth inhibition by NLGP-TME exposed T cells was not observed when mice were depleted for CD8+ T cells. Accumulated evidences strongly suggest NLGP mediated normalization of TME allows T cells to perform optimally to inhibit the tumor growth. PMID:23785504

  19. Models of Self-Peptide Sampling by Developing T Cells Identify Candidate Mechanisms of Thymic Selection

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Iren; van Santen, Hisse M.; Seddon, Benedict; Yates, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Conventional and regulatory T cells develop in the thymus where they are exposed to samples of self-peptide MHC (pMHC) ligands. This probabilistic process selects for cells within a range of responsiveness that allows the detection of foreign antigen without excessive responses to self. Regulatory T cells are thought to lie at the higher end of the spectrum of acceptable self-reactivity and play a crucial role in the control of autoimmunity and tolerance to innocuous antigens. While many studies have elucidated key elements influencing lineage commitment, we still lack a full understanding of how thymocytes integrate signals obtained by sampling self-peptides to make fate decisions. To address this problem, we apply stochastic models of signal integration by T cells to data from a study quantifying the development of the two lineages using controllable levels of agonist peptide in the thymus. We find two models are able to explain the observations; one in which T cells continually re-assess fate decisions on the basis of multiple summed proximal signals from TCR-pMHC interactions; and another in which TCR sensitivity is modulated over time, such that contact with the same pMHC ligand may lead to divergent outcomes at different stages of development. Neither model requires that T and T are differentially susceptible to deletion or that the two lineages need qualitatively different signals for development, as have been proposed. We find additional support for the variable-sensitivity model, which is able to explain apparently paradoxical observations regarding the effect of partial and strong agonists on T and T development. PMID:23935465

  20. Molecular determinants of regulatory T cell development: the essential roles of epigenetic changes.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Yohko; Ohkura, Naganari; Sakaguchi, Shimon

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells constitute a distinct T cell subset, which plays a key role in immune tolerance and homeostasis. The transcription factor Foxp3 controls a substantial part of Treg cell development and function. Yet its expression alone is insufficient for conferring developmental and functional characteristics of Treg cells. There is accumulating evidence that concurrent induction of Treg-specific epigenetic changes and Foxp3 expression is crucial for lineage specification and functional stability of Treg cells. This review discusses recent progress in our understanding of molecular features of Treg cells, in particular, the molecular basis of how a population of developing T cells is driven to the Treg cell lineage and how its function is stably maintained.

  1. A quantitative increase in regulatory T cells controls development of vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Shilpak; Eby, Jonathan M; Al-Khami, Amir A; Soloshchenko, Myroslawa; Kang, Hee-Kap; Kaur, Navtej; Naga, Osama S; Murali, Anuradha; Nishimura, Michael I; Le Poole, I Caroline; Mehrotra, Shikhar

    2014-05-01

    T-cell cytolytic activity targeting epidermal melanocytes is shown to cause progressive depigmentation and autoimmune vitiligo. By using the recently developed transgenic mice h3TA2 that carry T cells with a HLA-A2-restricted human tyrosinase peptide (h-Tyr)-reactive TCR and develop spontaneous vitiligo from an early age, we addressed the mechanism regulating autoimmune vitiligo. Depigmentation was significantly impaired only in IFN-γ-knockout h3TA2 mice but not in TNF-α- or perforin-knockout h3TA2 mouse strains, confirming a central role for IFN-γ in vitiligo development. In addition, regulatory T cells (Tregs) were relatively abundant in h3TA2-IFN-γ(-/-) mice, and depletion of the Treg-engaging anti-CD25 antibody fully restored the depigmentation phenotype in h3TA2-IFN-γ(-/-) mice, mediated in part through the upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-17 and IL-22. Further therapeutic potential of Treg abundance in preventing progressive depigmentation was evaluated by adoptively transferring purified Treg or using rapamycin. Both the adoptive transfer of Tregs and the use of rapamycin induced a lasting remission of vitiligo in mice treated at the onset of disease, or in mice with established disease. This leads us to conclude that reduced regulatory responses are pivotal to the development of vitiligo in disease-prone mice, and that a quantitative increase in the Treg population may be therapeutic for vitiligo patients with active disease.

  2. Hormonal control of T-cell development in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Savino, Wilson; Mendes-da-Cruz, Daniella Arêas; Lepletier, Ailin; Dardenne, Mireille

    2016-02-01

    The physiology of the thymus, the primary lymphoid organ in which T cells are generated, is controlled by hormones. Data from animal models indicate that several peptide and nonpeptide hormones act pleiotropically within the thymus to modulate the proliferation, differentiation, migration and death by apoptosis of developing thymocytes. For example, growth hormone and prolactin can enhance thymocyte proliferation and migration, whereas glucocorticoids lead to the apoptosis of these developing cells. The thymus undergoes progressive age-dependent atrophy with a loss of cells being generated and exported, therefore, hormone-based therapies are being developed as an alternative strategy to rejuvenate the organ, as well as to augment thymocyte proliferation and the export of mature T cells to peripheral lymphoid organs. Some hormones (such as growth hormone and progonadoliberin-1) are also being used as therapeutic agents to treat immunodeficiency disorders associated with thymic atrophy, such as HIV infection. In this Review, we discuss the accumulating data that shows the thymus gland is under complex and multifaceted hormonal control that affects the process of T-cell development in health and disease.

  3. Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling Regulates Development and Activation of CD4(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    Kuczma, Michal; Kraj, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are growth factors belonging to the TGF-β (transforming growth factor β) superfamily. BMPs were found to regulate multiple cell processes such as proliferation, survival, differentiation, and apoptosis. They were originally described to play a pivotal role in inducing bone, cartilage, ligament, and tendon formation at both heterotopic and orthotopic sites but were found to play a significant role in embryogenesis and development of multiple tissues and organs. Activities of BMPs are regulated by a number of secreted proteins, which modulate their availability to bind cellular receptors. The functions of individual BMPs are highly redundant due to binding the same receptors and inducing overlapping signal transduction pathways. Recently, BMPs were found to regulate cells of the innate and adaptive immune system. BMPs are involved in thymic development of T cells at the early, double negative, as well as later, double positive, stages of thymopoesis. They specifically modulate thymic development of regulatory T cells (T(reg)). In the periphery, BMPs affect T cell activation, promoting generation of T(reg) cells. We found that mice deficient for one of the receptors activated by BMPs demonstrated slower growth of transplantable melanoma tumors.

  4. CD25+CD127+Foxp3- Cells Represent a Major Subpopulation of CD8+ T Cells in the Eye Chambers of Normal Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ziółkowska, Natalia; Ziółkowski, Hubert; Małaczewska, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study has been to determine whether eye chambers constitute part of the normal migratory pathway of naive CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in mouse and if natural CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ and CD8+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells are present within these eye compartments. To this aim, the cells obtained from aqueous humor (AH) of normal mice were phenotyped in terms of the expression CD4, CD8, CD25, CD127 and transcription factor Foxp3. The mean percentage of CD8+ T cells in the total AH lymphocyte population was as high as 28.69%; the mean percentage of CD8high and CD8low cells in this population was 34.09% and 65.91%, respectively. The presence of cells with the regulatory phenotype, i.e. CD25+Foxp3+ cells, constituted only 0.32% of CD8+ T cell subset. Regarding the expression of CD25, AH CD8+ T cells were an exceptional population in that nearly 85% of these cells expressed this molecule without concomitant Foxp3 expression. Despite having this phenotype, they should not be viewed as activated cells because most of them co-expressed CD127, which indicates that they are naive lymphocytes. With regard to the markers applied in the present research, CD8+CD25+CD127+Foxp3- T cells represent the most numerous subset of AH CD8+ cells. The results suggest that eye chambers in mice are an element in the normal migratory pathway of naive CD8+ T cells. The study presented herein demonstrated only trace presence of CD4+ cells in the eye chambers, as the mean percentage of these cells was just 0.56. Such selective and specific homing of CD8+ and CD4+ cells to the eye chambers is most clearly engaged in the induction and maintenance of ocular immune privilege. PMID:28081241

  5. Thymic development of autoreactive T cells in NOD mice is regulated in an age-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    He, Qiuming; Morillon, Y Maurice; Spidale, Nicholas A; Kroger, Charles J; Liu, Bo; Sartor, R Balfour; Wang, Bo; Tisch, Roland

    2013-12-15

    Inefficient thymic negative selection of self-specific T cells is associated with several autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes. The factors that influence the efficacy of thymic negative selection, as well as the kinetics of thymic output of autoreactive T cells remain ill-defined. We investigated thymic production of β cell-specific T cells using a thymus-transplantation model. Thymi from different aged NOD mice, representing distinct stages of type 1 diabetes, were implanted into NOD.scid recipients, and the diabetogenicity of the resulting T cell pool was examined. Strikingly, the development of diabetes-inducing β cell-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells was regulated in an age-dependent manner. NOD.scid recipients of newborn NOD thymi developed diabetes. However, recipients of thymi from 7- and 10-d-old NOD donor mice remained diabetes-free and exhibited a progressive decline in islet infiltration and β cell-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. A similar temporal decrease in autoimmune infiltration was detected in some, but not all, tissues of recipient mice implanted with thymi from NOD mice lacking expression of the autoimmune regulator transcription factor, which develop multiorgan T cell-mediated autoimmunity. In contrast, recipients of 10 d or older thymi lacked diabetogenic T cells but developed severe colitis marked by increased effector T cells reactive to intestinal microbiota. These results demonstrate that thymic development of autoreactive T cells is limited to a narrow time window and occurs in a reciprocal manner compared with colonic microbiota-responsive T cells in NOD mice.

  6. Impairment of T cell development and acute inflammatory response in HIV-1 Tat transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Fiume, Giuseppe; Scialdone, Annarita; Albano, Francesco; Rossi, Annalisa; Maria Tuccillo, Franca; Rea, Domenica; Palmieri, Camillo; Caiazzo, Elisabetta; Cicala, Carla; Bellevicine, Claudio; Falcone, Cristina; Vecchio, Eleonora; Pisano, Antonio; Ceglia, Simona; Mimmi, Selena; Iaccino, Enrico; Laurentiis, Annamaria de; Pontoriero, Marilena; Agosti, Valter; Troncone, Giancarlo; Mignogna, Chiara; Palma, Giuseppe; Arra, Claudio; Mallardo, Massimo; Maria Buonaguro, Franco; Scala, Giuseppe; Quinto, Ileana

    2015-01-01

    Immune activation and chronic inflammation are hallmark features of HIV infection causing T-cell depletion and cellular immune dysfunction in AIDS. Here, we addressed the issue whether HIV-1 Tat could affect T cell development and acute inflammatory response by generating a transgenic mouse expressing Tat in lymphoid tissue. Tat-Tg mice showed thymus atrophy and the maturation block from DN4 to DP thymic subpopulations, resulting in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells depletion in peripheral blood. In Tat-positive thymus, we observed the increased p65/NF-κB activity and deregulated expression of cytokines/chemokines and microRNA-181a-1, which are involved in T-lymphopoiesis. Upon LPS intraperitoneal injection, Tat-Tg mice developed an abnormal acute inflammatory response, which was characterized by enhanced lethality and production of inflammatory cytokines. Based on these findings, Tat-Tg mouse could represent an animal model for testing adjunctive therapies of HIV-1-associated inflammation and immune deregulation. PMID:26343909

  7. Role of Ets Proteins in Development, Differentiation, and Function of T-Cell Subsets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mian; Gao, Weiwu; van Velkinburgh, Jennifer C; Wu, Yuzhang; Ni, Bing; Tian, Yi

    2016-03-01

    Through positive selection, double-positive cells in the thymus differentiate into CD4(+) or CD8(+) T single-positive cells that subsequently develop into different types of effective T cells, such as T-helper and cytotoxic T lymphocyte cells, that play distinctive roles in the immune system. Development, differentiation, and function of thymocytes and CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells are controlled by a multitude of secreted and intracellular factors, ranging from cytokine signaling modules to transcription factors and epigenetic modifiers. Members of the E26 transformation specific (Ets) family of transcription factors, in particular, are potent regulators of these CD4(+) or CD8(+) T-cell processes. In this review, we summarize and discuss the functions and underlying mechanisms of the Ets family members that have been characterized as involved in these processes. Ongoing research of these factors is expected to identify practical applications for the Ets family members as novel therapeutic targets for inflammation-related diseases.

  8. Dissecting the dynamic changes of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in T-cell development and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Tsagaratou, Ageliki; Äijö, Tarmo; Lio, Chan-Wang J.; Yue, Xiaojing; Huang, Yun; Jacobsen, Steven E.; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Rao, Anjana

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of Ten Eleven Translocation proteins, enzymes that oxidize 5-methylcytosine (5mC) in DNA, has revealed novel mechanisms for the regulation of DNA methylation. We have mapped 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) at different stages of T-cell development in the thymus and T-cell differentiation in the periphery. We show that 5hmC is enriched in the gene body of highly expressed genes at all developmental stages and that its presence correlates positively with gene expression. Further emphasizing the connection with gene expression, we find that 5hmC is enriched in active thymus-specific enhancers and that genes encoding key transcriptional regulators display high intragenic 5hmC levels in precursor cells at those developmental stages where they exert a positive effect. Our data constitute a valuable resource that will facilitate detailed analysis of the role of 5hmC in T-cell development and differentiation. PMID:25071199

  9. A rapid manual method for CD4+ T-cell quantitation for use in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Landay, A; Ho, J L; Hom, D; Russell, T; Zwerner, R; Minuty, J G; Kataaha, P; Mmiro, F; Jackson, B

    1993-12-01

    Clinicians took blood samples from 294 HIV-1 seropositive patients and 88 HIV-1 seronegative patients at Cornell University Medical College and The New York Hospital in New York City, Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center in Chicago, and Makerere University Medical school in Kampala, Uganda, to assess a manual method's (Cytosphere) ability to accurately determine the CD4+ T-cell count. The Cytosphere assay uses latex beads coated with CD4 antibody which are combined with anticoagulated whole blood followed by red cell lysis. A hemacytometer then counts the bead-coated cells. The average technologist only needs 1-3 days of training (20 CD4 practice assays/days) in the Cytosphere assay. The minimal equipment required for the assay are a pipette, a hemacytometer, and a light microscope. The lysing agent inactivates HIV-1. The overall correlation between the standard flow cytometry method and the Cytosphere assay stood at 0.912 and was significant (p .001). When the researchers stratified the samples based on CD4+ T-cell counts defined by flow cytometry, the predictive values of the Cytosphere assay for correctly identifying patients with CD4 T-cell counts greater or less than 200 x 1 million/1 were 96% and 92%, respectively. These findings suggested that the Cytosphere assay has the potential to quantify CD4 cells in the limited laboratories in developing countries. Larger longitudinal studies of HIV seropositive people in developing countries are needed to test the reliability and reproducibility of the assay.

  10. Development of T cell lymphoma in HTLV-1 bZIP factor and Tax double transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tiejun; Satou, Yorifumi; Matsuoka, Masao

    2014-07-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is an aggressive T-cell malignancy caused by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). ATL cells possess a CD4+ CD25+ phenotype, similar to that of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Tax has been reported to play a crucial role in the leukemogenesis of HTLV-1. The HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ), which is encoded by the minus strand of the viral genomic RNA, is expressed in all ATL cases and induces neoplastic and inflammatory disease in vivo. To test whether HBZ and Tax are both required for T cell malignancy, we generated HBZ/Tax double transgenic mice in which HBZ and Tax are expressed exclusively in CD4+ T cells. Survival was much reduced in HBZ/Tax double-transgenic mice compared with wild type littermates. Transgenic expression of HBZ and Tax induced skin lesions and T-cell lymphoma in mice, resembling diseases observed in HTLV-1 infected individuals. However, Tax single transgenic mice did not develop major health problems. In addition, memory CD4+ T cells and Foxp3+ Treg cells counts were increased in HBZ/Tax double transgenic mice, and their proliferation was enhanced. There was very little difference between HBZ single and HBZ/Tax double transgenic mice. Taken together, these results show that HBZ, in addition to Tax, plays a critical role in T-cell lymphoma arising from HTLV-1 infection.

  11. Activation of Notch1 promotes development of human CD8(+) single positive T cells in humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Haji, Yoichi; Suzuki, Makiko; Moriya, Kunihiko; So, Takanori; Hozumi, Katsuto; Mizuma, Masamichi; Unno, Michiaki; Ishii, Naoto

    2014-05-02

    Notch1 mutations are found in more than 50% of human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells. However, the functions of Notch1 for human T cell development and leukemogenesis are not well understood. To examine the role of Notch1, human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which had been transduced with a constitutively active form of Notch1 (ICN1), were transplanted into severely immunodeficient NOD/Shi-scid-IL2rγ(null) (NOG) mice. We found that the great majority of the ICN1-expressing hematopoietic cells in the bone marrow expressed surface markers for T cells, such as CD3, CD4, and CD8, and that this T cell development was independent of the thymus. Accordingly, phenotypically mature CD8(+) single positive (SP) T cells were observed in the spleen. Furthermore, T-ALL developed in one NOG recipient mouse out of 26 that had been secondary transferred with the T cells developed in the first NOG mice. These results indicate that Notch1 signaling in HSCs promotes CD8(+) SP T cell development, and that T cell leukemogenesis may require additional oncogenic factors other than Notch1 activation.

  12. Development and dynamics of robust T-cell responses to CML under imatinib treatment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Christiane I-U; Maecker, Holden T; Lee, Peter P

    2008-06-01

    Novel molecular targeted therapies, such as imatinib for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), represent the first agents that inhibit cancer cells more than other dividing cells, such as immune cells. We hypothesize that imatinib may create a window in which the immune response is partially restored while apoptotic leukemic cells are present, thus rendering leukemic cells immunogenic as patients enter remission. To detect and quantify antileukemia immune responses in an antigen-unbiased way, we used cryopreserved autologous pretreatment blood samples (representing predominantly leukemic cells) as stimulators to detect antileukemia T-cell responses in CML patients in remission on imatinib. We studied patients over time to address the dynamics of such responses. Our data show that antileukemia T-cell responses develop in the majority of CML patients (9 of 14) in remission and that CD4(+) T cells producing tumor necrosis factor-alpha (median 17.6%) represent the major response over interferon-gamma. This confirms the immune system's ability to respond to leukemia under certain conditions. Such responses may be further amplified as a potential therapy that synergizes with imatinib for improved control of CML.

  13. Development and function of interleukin 17-producing γδ T cells.

    PubMed

    Korn, Thomas; Petermann, Franziska

    2012-01-01

    Interleukin (IL) 17 is a phylogenetically ancient cytokine that has been adopted by the adaptive immune system, and the investigation of adaptive T helper (Th) 17 cells has substantially contributed to our understanding of the molecular requirements for the induction, regulation, and function of IL-17. However, IL-17 is in fact produced by a large variety of innate immune cells and exerts its most significant biological functions at the interface of the organism with its environment, such as, for example, at epithelial surfaces, where γδ T cells are a prominent source of IL-17. In this review, we will give an overview on the concepts of commitment of γδ T cells to effector phenotypes, focusing on IL-17-producing γδ T cells (γδT17 cells). The role of γδT17 cells in animal models of autoimmunity will be discussed as well as the prerequisites for the development of human γδT17 cells and their potential importance for human disease conditions.

  14. Design and Development of Therapies using Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Expressing T cells

    PubMed Central

    Dotti, Gianpietro; Gottschalk, Stephen; Savoldo, Barbara; Brenner, Malcolm K

    2013-01-01

    Summary Investigators developed chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) for expression on T cells more than 25 years ago. When the CAR is derived from an antibody, the resultant cell should combine the desirable targeting features of an antibody (e.g. lack of requirement for major histocompatibility complex recognition, ability to recognize non-protein antigens) with the persistence, trafficking and effector functions of a T-cell. This article describes how the past two decades have seen a crescendo of research which has now begun to translate these potential benefits into effective treatments for patients with cancer. We describe the basic design of CARs, describe how antigenic targets are selected, and the initial clinical experience with CART cells. Our review then describes our own and other investigators’ work aimed at improving the function of CARs and reviews the clinical studies in hematological and solid malignancies that are beginning to exploit these approaches. Finally, we show the value of adding additional engineering features to CAR-T cells, irrespective of their target, to render them better suited to function in the tumor environment, and discuss how the safety of these heavily modified cells may be maintained. PMID:24329793

  15. Targeting of CD25 and glucocorticoid-induced TNF receptor family-related gene-expressing T cells differentially modulates asthma risk in offspring of asthmatic and normal mother mice.

    PubMed

    Hubeau, Cedric; Apostolou, Irina; Kobzik, Lester

    2007-02-01

    Immunological mechanisms leading to increased asthma susceptibility in early life remain obscure. In this study, we examined the effects of neonatal Ab treatments targeting T cell populations on the development of an asthma syndrome. We used a model of increased asthma susceptibility where offspring of asthmatic BALB/c mother mice are more prone (than normal pups) to develop the disease. Neonatal pretreatment of naive pups with mAb directed against the IL-2Ralpha chain (CD25), the costimulatory molecule glucocorticoid-induced TNFR family related gene, and the inhibitory molecule CTLA-4 elicited contrasting effects in offspring depending on the mother's asthma status. Specifically, neonatal CD25(high) T cell depletion stimulated asthma susceptibility in normal offspring whereas it ameliorated the condition of pups born of asthmatic mothers. Conversely, glucocorticoid-induced TNFR family related gene ligation as a primary signal reduced the spleen cellularity and largely abrogated asthma susceptibility in asthma-prone offspring, without inducing disease in normal pups. Striking changes in Th1/Th2 cytokine levels, especially IL-4, followed mAb pretreatment and were consistent with the impact on asthma susceptibility. These results point to major differences in neonatal T cell population and responsiveness related to maternal asthma history. Interventions that temporarily remove and/or inactivate specific T cell subsets may therefore prove useful to attenuate early life asthma susceptibility and prevent the development of Th2-driven allergic airway disease.

  16. Ionizing radiation and autoimmunity: Induction of autoimmune disease in mice by high dose fractionated total lymphoid irradiation and its prevention by inoculating normal T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaguchi, N.; Sakaguchi, S. Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA PRESTO, JRDC, Institute of Phical and Chemical Research, Tsukuba, Ibaraki ); Miyai, K. )

    1992-11-01

    Ionizing radiation can functionally alter the immune system and break self-tolerance. High dose (42.5 Gy), fractionated (2.5 Gy 17 times) total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) on mice caused various organ-specific autoimmune diseases, such as gastritis, thyroiditis, and orchitis, depending on the radiation dosages, the extent of lymphoid irradiation, and the genetic background of the mouse strains. Radiation-induced tissue damage is not the primary cause of the autoimmune disease because irradiation of the target organs alone failed to elicit the autoimmunity and shielding of the organs from irradiation was unable to prevent it. In contrast, irradiation of both the thymus and the peripheral lymphoid organs/tissues was required for efficient induction of autoimmune disease by TLI. TLI eliminated the majority of mature thymocytes and the peripheral T cells for 1 mo, and inoculation of spleen cell, thymocyte, or bone marrow cell suspensions (prepared from syngeneic nonirradiated mice) within 2 wk after TLI effectively prevented the autoimmune development. Depletion of T cells from the inocula abrogated the preventive activity. CD4[sup +] T cells mediated the autoimmune prevention but CD8[sup +] T cells did not. CD4[sup +] T cells also appeared to mediate the TLI-induced autoimmune disease because CD4[sup +] T cells from disease-bearing TLI mice adoptively transferred the autoimmune disease to syngeneic naive mice. Taken together, these results indicate that high dose, fractionated ionizing radiation on the lymphoid organs/tissues can cause autoimmune disease by affecting the T cell immune system, rather than the target self-Ags, presumably by altering T cell-dependent control of self-reactive T cells. 62 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Phospholipase Cγ1 is required for pre-TCR signal transduction and pre-T cell development.

    PubMed

    Fu, Guoping; Yu, Mei; Chen, Yuhong; Zheng, Yongwei; Zhu, Wen; Newman, Debra K; Wang, Demin; Wen, Renren

    2017-01-01

    Pre-T cell receptor (TCR) signaling is required for pre-T cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation from the CD4 and CD8 double negative (DN) to the double positive (DP) stage. However, the pre-TCR signal transduction pathway is not fully understood and the signaling molecules involved have not been completely identified. Phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ) 1 is an important signaling molecule that generates two second messengers, diacylglycerol and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, that are important to mediate PKC activation and intracellular Ca(2+) flux in many signaling pathways. Previously, we have shown that PLCγ1 is important for TCR-mediated signaling, development and T-cell activation, but the role of PLCγ1 in pre-TCR signal transduction and pre-T cell development is not known. In this study, we demonstrated that PLCγ1 expression level in pre-T cells was comparable to that in mature T cells. Deletion of PLCγ1 prior to the pre-TCR signaling stage partially blocked the DN3 to DN4 transition and reduced thymic cellularity. We also demonstrated that deletion of PLCγ1 impaired pre-T cell proliferation without affecting cell survival. Further study showed that deficiency of PLCγ1 impaired pre-TCR mediated Ca(2+) flux and Erk activation. Thus our studies demonstrate that PLCγ1 is important for pre-TCR mediated signal transduction and pre-T cell development.

  18. Epidermal T cells and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Havran, Wendy L; Jameson, Julie M

    2010-05-15

    The murine epidermis contains resident T cells that express a canonical gammadelta TCR. These cells arise from fetal thymic precursors and use a TCR that is restricted to the skin in adult animals. These cells assume a dendritic morphology in normal skin and constitutively produce low levels of cytokines that contribute to epidermal homeostasis. When skin is wounded, an unknown Ag is expressed on damaged keratinocytes. Neighboring gammadelta T cells then round up and contribute to wound healing by local production of epithelial growth factors and inflammatory cytokines. In the absence of skin gammadelta T cells, wound healing is impaired. Similarly, epidermal T cells from patients with healing wounds are activated and secreting growth factors. Patients with nonhealing wounds have a defective epidermal T cell response. Information gained on the role of epidermal-resident T cells in the mouse may provide information for development of new therapeutic approaches to wound healing.

  19. Circulating T cells to infliximab are detectable mainly in treated patients developing anti‐drug antibodies and hypersensitivity reactions

    PubMed Central

    Vultaggio, A.; Petroni, G.; Pratesi, S.; Nencini, F.; Cammelli, D.; Milla, M.; Prignano, F.; Annese, V.; Romagnani, S.; Matucci, A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Antibodies recognizing infliximab (IFX) may develop in a proportion of treated patients, leading to loss of response or hypersensitivity reactions (HRs). T cell response to IFX has been poorly investigated. This paper was addressed to detect IFX‐specific T cells in treated patients with inflammatory diseases developing, or not, anti‐drug antibodies (ADA) and to correlate the presence of specific T cells with the clinical outcomes of the treatment. A co‐culture system of IFX‐loaded dendritic cells and purified autologous CD4+ T cells was used to detect memory T cells in 32 ADA+ and 39 ADA– IFX‐treated patients and control groups. The cytokine profile of IFX‐specific T cells was also studied in culture supernatants. IFX‐specific cell proliferation was detected mainly in cells from ADA+ patients, irrespective of their different diseases. HR patients displayed higher T cell proliferation than non‐responder and tolerant patients. A mixed [interferon (IFN)‐γ, interleukin (IL)‐13, IL‐10] cytokine profile was shown in cells from ADA+ patients, while IL‐10 was the most frequently detected cytokine in the supernatants of cultures from ADA‐ patients. Immunoglobulin (Ig)E+ADA+ patients with previous HRs exhibited a more pronounced type 2 profile than IgE–ADA+ patients. This work provides evidence that IFX‐specific circulating T cells are detectable mainly in ADA+ patients with HRs, regardless of their disease. The IFX‐induced cytokine pattern partially correlates with the ADA isotype. PMID:27569750

  20. Development of lifitegrast: a novel T-cell inhibitor for the treatment of dry eye disease

    PubMed Central

    Semba, Charles P; Gadek, Thomas R

    2016-01-01

    Dry eye disease (DED) is a multifactorial disorder of the ocular surface characterized by symptoms of discomfort, decreased tear quality, and chronic inflammation that affects an estimated 20 million patients in the US alone. DED is associated with localized inflammation of the ocular surface and periocular tissues leading to homing and activation of T cells, cytokine release, and development of hyperosmolar tears. This inflammatory milieu results in symptoms of eye dryness and discomfort. Homing of T cells to the ocular surface is influenced by the binding of lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1; CD11a/CD18; αLβ2), a cell surface adhesion protein, to its cognate ligand, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1; CD54), which is expressed on inflamed ocular/periocular epithelium and vascular endothelium. LFA-1/ICAM-1 binding within the immunologic synapse enables both T-cell activation and cytokine release. Lifitegrast is a novel T-cell integrin antagonist that is designed to mimic the binding epitope of ICAM-1. It serves as a molecular decoy to block the binding of LFA-1/ICAM-1 and inhibits the downstream inflammatory process. In vitro studies have demonstrated that lifitegrast inhibits T-cell adhesion to ICAM-1-expressing cells and inhibits secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interferon gamma, tumor necrosis factor alpha, macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha, interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, and IL-6, all of which are known to be associated with DED. Lifitegrast has the potential to be the first pharmaceutical product approved in the US indicated for the treatment of both symptoms and signs of DED. Clinical trials involving over 2,500 adult DED patients have demonstrated that topically administered lifitegrast 5.0% ophthalmic solution can rapidly reduce the symptoms of eye dryness and decrease ocular surface staining with an acceptable long-term safety profile. The purpose of this review is to highlight the developmental

  1. The Influence of T Cell Development on Pathogen Specificity and Autoreactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Košmrlj, Andrej; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2012-10-01

    T cells orchestrate adaptive immune responses upon activation. T cell activation requires sufficiently strong binding of T cell receptors on their surface to short peptides derived from foreign proteins bound to protein products of the major histocompatibility (MHC) gene products, which are displayed on the surface of antigen presenting cells. T cells can also interact with peptide-MHC complexes, where the peptide is derived from host (self) proteins. A diverse repertoire of relatively self-tolerant T cell receptors is selected in the thymus. We study a model, computationally and analytically, to describe how thymic selection shapes the repertoire of T cell receptors, such that T cell receptor recognition of pathogenic peptides is both specific and degenerate. We also discuss the escape probability of autoimmune T cells from the thymus.

  2. Comparative contribution of CD1 on the development of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell compartments.

    PubMed

    Wang, B; Chun, T; Wang, C R

    2000-01-15

    CD1 molecules are MHC class I-like glycoproteins whose expression is essential for the development of a unique subset of T cells, the NK T cells. To evaluate to what extent CD1 contributes to the development of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, we generated CD1oIIo and CD1oTAPo mice and compared the generation of T cells in these double-mutant mice and IIo or TAPo mice. FACS analysis showed that the number of CD4+ T cells in CD1oIIo mice was reduced significantly compared with the corresponding population in IIo mice. Both CD4+ NK1.1+ and the CD4+ NK1.1- population were reduced in CD1oIIo mice, suggesting that CD1 can select not only CD4+ NK1.1+ T cells but also some NK1.1- CD4+ T cells. Functional analysis showed that the residual CD4+ cells in CD1oIIo can secrete large amounts of IFN-gamma and a significant amount of IL-4 during primary stimulation with anti-CD3, suggesting that this population may be enriched for NK T cells restricted by other class I molecules. In contrast to the CD4+ population, no significant differences in the CD8+ T cell compartment can be detected between TAPo and CD1oTAPo mice in all lymphoid tissues tested, including intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes. Our data suggest that, unlike other MHC class I molecules, CD1 does not contribute in a major way to the development of CD8+ T cells.

  3. Noninvasive In Toto Imaging of the Thymus Reveals Heterogeneous Migratory Behavior of Developing T Cells.

    PubMed

    Bajoghli, Baubak; Kuri, Paola; Inoue, Daigo; Aghaallaei, Narges; Hanelt, Marleen; Thumberger, Thomas; Rauzi, Matteo; Wittbrodt, Joachim; Leptin, Maria

    2015-09-01

    The migration of developing T cells (thymocytes) between distinct thymic microenvironments is crucial for their development. Ex vivo studies of thymus tissue explants suggest two distinct migratory behaviors of thymocytes in the thymus. In the cortex, thymocytes exhibit a stochastic migration, whereas medullary thymocytes show confined migratory behavior. Thus far, it has been difficult to follow all thymocytes in an entire thymus and relate their differentiation steps to their migratory dynamics. To understand the spatial organization of the migratory behavior and development of thymocytes in a fully functional thymus, we developed transgenic reporter lines for the chemokine receptors ccr9a and ccr9b, as well as for rag2, and used them for noninvasive live imaging of the entire thymus in medaka (Oryzias latipes). We found that the expression of these two chemokine receptors in the medaka juvenile thymus defined two spatially distinct subpopulations of thymocytes. Landmark events of T cell development including proliferation, somatic recombination, and thymic selection can be mapped to subregions of the thymus. The migratory behavior of thymocytes within each of the subpopulations is equally heterogeneous, and specific migratory behaviors are not associated with particular domains in the thymus. During the period when thymocytes express rag2 their migratory behavior was more homogeneous. Therefore, the migratory behavior of thymocytes is partly correlated with their developmental stage rather than being defined by their spatial localization.

  4. Speed of leukemia development and genetic diversity in xenograft models of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Poglio, Sandrine; Lewandowski, Daniel; Calvo, Julien; Caye, Aurélie; Gros, Audrey; Laharanne, Elodie; Leblanc, Thierry; Landman-Parker, Judith; Baruchel, André; Soulier, Jean; Ballerini, Paola; Clappier, Emmanuelle; Pflumio, Françoise

    2016-01-01

    T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) develops through accumulation of multiple genomic alterations within T-cell progenitors resulting in clonal heterogeneity among leukemic cells. Human T-ALL xeno-transplantation in immunodeficient mice is a gold standard approach to study leukemia biology and we recently uncovered that the leukemia development is more or less rapid depending on T-ALL sample. The resulting human leukemia may arise through genetic selection and we previously showed that human T-ALL development in immune-deficient mice is significantly enhanced upon CD7+/CD34+ leukemic cell transplantations. Here we investigated the genetic characteristics of CD7+/CD34+ and CD7+/CD34− cells from newly diagnosed human T-ALL and correlated it to the speed of leukemia development. We observed that CD7+/CD34+ or CD7+/CD34− T-ALL cells that promote leukemia within a short-time period are genetically similar, as well as xenograft-derived leukemia resulting from both cell fractions. In the case of delayed T-ALL growth CD7+/CD34+ or CD7+/CD34− cells were either genetically diverse, the resulting xenograft leukemia arising from different but branched subclones present in the original sample, or similar, indicating decreased fitness to mouse micro-environment. Altogether, our work provides new information relating the speed of leukemia development in xenografts to the genetic diversity of T-ALL cell compartments. PMID:27191650

  5. Influenza Virus–induced Dendritic Cell Maturation Is Associated with the Induction of Strong T Cell Immunity to a Coadministered, Normally Nonimmunogenic Protein

    PubMed Central

    Brimnes, Marie K.; Bonifaz, Laura; Steinman, Ralph M.; Moran, Thomas M.

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated the proposal that during microbial infection, dendritic cells (DCs) undergo maturation and present a mixture of peptides derived from the microbe as well as harmless environmental antigens. Mice were exposed to an aerosol of endotoxin free ovalbumin (OVA) in the absence or presence of influenza virus. In its absence, OVA failed to induce B and T cell responses and even tolerized, but with influenza, OVA-specific antibodies and CD8+ cytolytic T lymphocytes developed. With or without infection, OVA was presented selectively in the draining mediastinal lymph nodes, as assessed by the comparable proliferation of infused, CD8+ and CD4+, TCR transgenic T cells. In the absence of influenza, these OVA-specific T cells produced little IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, and IFN-γ, but with infection, both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells made high levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ. The OVA plus influenza-treated mice also showed accelerated recovery to a challenge with recombinant vaccinia OVA virus. CD11c+ DCs from the mediastinal lymph nodes of infected mice selectively stimulated both OVA- and influenza-specific T cells and underwent maturation, with higher levels of MHC class II, CD80, and CD86 molecules. The relatively slow (2–3 d) kinetics of maturation correlated closely to the time at which OVA inhalation elicited specific antibodies. Therefore respiratory infection can induce DC maturation and simultaneously B and T cell immunity to an innocuous antigen inhaled concurrently. PMID:12847140

  6. CD4+ T cell expression of MyD88 is essential for normal resolution of Chlamydia muridarum genital tract infection1

    PubMed Central

    Frazer, Lauren C.; Sullivan, Jeanne E.; Zurenski, Matthew A.; Mintus, Margaret; Tomasak, Tammy E.; Prantner, Daniel; Nagarajan, Uma M.; Darville, Toni

    2013-01-01

    Resolution of Chlamydia genital tract infection is delayed in the absence of MyD88. In these studies, we first used bone marrow chimeras to demonstrate a requirement for MyD88 expression by hematopoietic cells in the presence of a wild-type epithelium. Using mixed bone marrow chimeras we then determined that MyD88 expression was specifically required in the adaptive immune compartment. Furthermore, adoptive transfer experiments revealed that CD4+ T cell expression of MyD88 was necessary for normal resolution of genital tract infection. This requirement was associated with a reduced ability of MyD88−/− CD4+ T cells to accumulate in the draining lymph nodes and genital tract when exposed to the same inflammatory milieu as wild-type CD4+ T cells. We also demonstrated that the impaired infection control we observed in the absence of MyD88 could not be recapitulated by deficiencies in TLR or IL-1R signaling. In vitro, we detected an increased frequency of apoptotic MyD88−/− CD4+ T cells upon activation in the absence of exogenous ligands for receptors upstream of MyD88. These data reveal an intrinsic requirement for MyD88 in CD4+ T cells during Chlamydia infection and indicate that the importance of MyD88 extends beyond innate immune responses by directly influencing adaptive immunity. PMID:24038087

  7. CD4+ T cell expression of MyD88 is essential for normal resolution of Chlamydia muridarum genital tract infection.

    PubMed

    Frazer, Lauren C; Sullivan, Jeanne E; Zurenski, Matthew A; Mintus, Margaret; Tomasak, Tammy E; Prantner, Daniel; Nagarajan, Uma M; Darville, Toni

    2013-10-15

    Resolution of Chlamydia genital tract infection is delayed in the absence of MyD88. In these studies, we first used bone marrow chimeras to demonstrate a requirement for MyD88 expression by hematopoietic cells in the presence of a wild-type epithelium. Using mixed bone marrow chimeras we then determined that MyD88 expression was specifically required in the adaptive immune compartment. Furthermore, adoptive transfer experiments revealed that CD4(+) T cell expression of MyD88 was necessary for normal resolution of genital tract infection. This requirement was associated with a reduced ability of MyD88(-/-)CD4(+) T cells to accumulate in the draining lymph nodes and genital tract when exposed to the same inflammatory milieu as wild-type CD4(+) T cells. We also demonstrated that the impaired infection control we observed in the absence of MyD88 could not be recapitulated by deficiencies in TLR or IL-1R signaling. In vitro, we detected an increased frequency of apoptotic MyD88(-/-)CD4(+) T cells upon activation in the absence of exogenous ligands for receptors upstream of MyD88. These data reveal an intrinsic requirement for MyD88 in CD4(+) T cells during Chlamydia infection and indicate that the importance of MyD88 extends beyond innate immune responses by directly influencing adaptive immunity.

  8. Impact of T-cell-specific Smad4 deficiency on the development of autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Donghee; Lee, Song Mi; Jun, Hee-Sook

    2017-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes results from autoimmune-mediated pancreatic beta-cell destruction and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) is known to play a preventive role in type 1 diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. In this study, we investigated the role of Smad4, a key molecule for Smad-dependent TGF-β signaling, in T cells of NOD mice in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diabetes. We generated T-cell-specific Smad4 knockout (Smad4 tKO) NOD mice and assessed the pathological and immunological changes. Smad4 tKO showed earlier onset and increased incidence of diabetes than wild type (WT) NOD mice. Pathological features such as insulitis, anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase auto-antibody levels and serum IFN-γ levels were significantly increased in Smad4 tKO compared with WT NOD mice. Proportion and number of activated/memory CD4+ T cell were significantly increased in pancreatic lymph nodes of Smad4 tKO compared with WT NOD mice. However, the proportion and function of regulatory T cells was not different. Effector CD4+ T cells from Smad4 tKO were more resistant to suppression by regulatory T cells than effector cells from WT NOD mice. The proliferative potential of effector T cells from Smad4 tKO was significantly elevated compared with WT NOD mice, and activation of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) in T cells of Smad4 tKO NOD mice was correlated with this proliferative activity. We conclude that Smad4 deletion in T cells of NOD mice accelerated the development of autoimmune diabetes and increased the incidence of the disease by dysregulation of T cell activation at least in part via SREBP-1c activation. PMID:27686408

  9. Stem cell-derived tissue-associated regulatory T cells ameliorate the development of autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Mohammad; Song, Jianyong; Fino, Kristin; Sandhu, Praneet; Song, Xinmeng; Lei, Fengyang; Zheng, Songguo; Ni, Bing; Fang, Deyu; Song, Jianxun

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) have the potential to produce almost all of the cells in the body, including regulatory T cells (Tregs). However, the exact conditions required for the development of antigen (Ag)-specific Tregs from PSCs (i.e., PSC-Tregs) are not well delineated. Ag-specific PSC-Tregs can be tissue/organ-associated and migrate to local inflamed tissues/organs to suppress the autoimmune response after adoptive transfer, thereby avoiding potential overall immunosuppression from non-specific Tregs. In this study, we developed a new approach to generate functional Ag-specific Tregs from induced PSCs (iPSCs), i.e., iPSC-Tregs, which had the ability to generate an Ag-specific immunosuppressive response in a murine model of arthritis. We retrovirally transduced murine iPSCs with a construct containing genes of Ag-specific T cell receptor (TCR) and the transcriptional factor FoxP3. We differentiated the iPSCs into Ag-specific iPSC-Tregs using in vitro or in vivo Notch signaling, and demonstrated that adoptive transfer of such Tregs dramatically suppressed autoimmunity in a well-established Ag-induced arthritis model, including the inflammation, joint destruction, cartilage prostaglandin depletion, osteoclast activity, and Th17 production. Our results indicate that PSCs can be used to develop Ag-specific Tregs, which have a therapeutic potential for Treg-based therapies of autoimmune disorders. PMID:26846186

  10. Beyond the guidelines in the treatment of peripheral T-cell lymphoma: new drug development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Andy I; Advani, Ranjana H

    2008-04-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are a rare and diverse group of neoplasms with a poor prognosis. Management of these disorders has been largely extrapolated from the treatment of aggressive B-cell lymphomas; however, therapeutic responses to this approach are neither adequate nor durable for most patients with PTCL. Given the rarity of PTCL, much of the literature consists of studies with small sample size and anecdotal case reports. Therefore, no consensus exists on the best therapeutic strategy for either newly diagnosed or relapsed/refractory PTCL. This article reviews promising novel approaches in the treatment of PTCL and its subtypes. Investigation into the pathogenesis of PTCL has also identified new targets for treatment. These emerging therapies include new uses of existing agents and the development of novel agents specifically targeted against T-cell lymphoma. Results using antimetabolites, immunotherapies, and histone deacetylase inhibitors have been particularly encouraging. These novel therapies are being tested as single agents and in combination with conventional lymphoma regimens in the frontline and salvage settings. Because of the rarity and heterogeneity of PTCL, national and international cooperation is needed to conduct the clinical studies required for the development of more effective treatment paradigms. These efforts are ongoing and will hopefully guide new strategies to improve the historically poor outcome of PTCL.

  11. Agonistic Anti-TIGIT Treatment Inhibits T Cell Responses in LDLr Deficient Mice without Affecting Atherosclerotic Lesion Development

    PubMed Central

    Foks, Amanda C.; Ran, Ingrid A.; Frodermann, Vanessa; Bot, Ilze; van Santbrink, Peter J.; Kuiper, Johan; van Puijvelde, Gijs H. M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory molecules are mainly expressed on T cells and antigen presenting cells and strongly orchestrate adaptive immune responses. Whereas co-stimulatory molecules enhance immune responses, signaling via co-inhibitory molecules dampens the immune system, thereby showing great therapeutic potential to prevent cardiovascular diseases. Signaling via co-inhibitory T cell immunoglobulin and ITIM domain (TIGIT) directly inhibits T cell activation and proliferation, and therefore represents a novel therapeutic candidate to specifically dampen pro-atherogenic T cell reactivity. In the present study, we used an agonistic anti-TIGIT antibody to determine the effect of excessive TIGIT-signaling on atherosclerosis. Methods and Results TIGIT was upregulated on CD4+ T cells isolated from mice fed a Western-type diet in comparison with mice fed a chow diet. Agonistic anti-TIGIT suppressed T cell activation and proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. However, agonistic anti-TIGIT treatment of LDLr−/− mice fed a Western-type diet for 4 or 8 weeks did not affect atherosclerotic lesion development in comparison with PBS and Armenian Hamster IgG treatment. Furthermore, elevated percentages of dendritic cells were observed in the blood and spleen of agonistic anti-TIGIT-treated mice. Additionally, these cells showed an increased activation status but decreased IL-10 production. Conclusions Despite the inhibition of splenic T cell responses, agonistic anti-TIGIT treatment does not affect initial atherosclerosis development, possibly due to increased activity of dendritic cells. PMID:24376654

  12. A NOTCH1-driven MYC enhancer promotes T cell development, transformation and acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Herranz, Daniel; Ambesi-Impiombato, Alberto; Palomero, Teresa; Schnell, Stephanie A; Belver, Laura; Wendorff, Agnieszka A; Xu, Luyao; Castillo-Martin, Mireia; Llobet-Navás, David; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Clappier, Emmanuelle; Soulier, Jean; Ferrando, Adolfo A

    2014-10-01

    Efforts to identify and annotate cancer driver genetic lesions have been focused primarily on the analysis of protein-coding genes; however, most genetic abnormalities found in human cancer are located in intergenic regions. Here we identify a new long range-acting MYC enhancer controlled by NOTCH1 that is targeted by recurrent chromosomal duplications in human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). This highly conserved regulatory element, hereby named N-Me for NOTCH MYC enhancer, is located within a broad super-enhancer region +1.47 Mb from the MYC transcription initiating site, interacts with the MYC proximal promoter and induces orientation-independent MYC expression in reporter assays. Moreover, analysis of N-Me knockout mice demonstrates a selective and essential role of this regulatory element during thymocyte development and in NOTCH1-induced T-ALL. Together these results identify N-Me as a long-range oncogenic enhancer implicated directly in the pathogenesis of human leukemia and highlight the importance of the NOTCH1-MYC regulatory axis in T cell transformation and as a therapeutic target in T-ALL.

  13. Lassa fever: implications of T-cell immunity for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    ter Meulen, J

    1999-08-20

    Lassa fever is a re-emerging viral hemorrhagic fever, which causes significant human morbidity in endemic regions of West Africa. Attempts to vaccinate against this virus in animal models including non-human primates have revealed that eliciting a strong cellular immune response protects from clinical disease, but not infection, in the absence of measurable neutralizing antibodies. As there is renewed interest in developing a vaccine against Lassa fever for use in humans, several questions should be addressed in view of the scarce knowledge of the mechanisms of natural immunity against this disease. MHC-dependency of a vaccine relying mainly on the induction of T-cell immunity and its ability to cross-protect against different Lassa virus strains will be important issues. Furthermore, the question whether the vaccine can prevent human-to-human transmission of the virus should be discussed and the possibility that vaccination could predispose to immunopathology should be excluded. We are addressing some of the above mentioned problems concerning natural immunity through field studies in the Republic of Guinea, West Africa, and are presently studying the CD4 cell responses of Lassa antibody positive subjects on the basis of T-cell proliferation assays using recombinant Lassa virus proteins.

  14. Nonclassical MHC class I-dependent invariant T cells are evolutionarily conserved and prominent from early development in amphibians.

    PubMed

    Edholm, Eva-Stina; Albertorio Saez, Liz-Marie; Gill, Ann L; Gill, Steven R; Grayfer, Leon; Haynes, Nikesha; Myers, Jason R; Robert, Jacques

    2013-08-27

    Human and murine MHC nonclassical class Ib-restricted invariant T (iT) cell subsets, such as invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT) and mucosal-associated invariant T cells, have specialized functions early in immune responses, especially in modulating subsequent adaptive immune responses. Here, we characterize a prominent iT population in the amphibian Xenopus laevis and show the requirement of the class Ib molecule, Xenopus nonclassical gene 10, in its differentiation and function. Using Xenopus nonclassical gene 10 tetramers and RNAi loss of function by transgenesis, we identified a large class Ib-dependent CD8(-)/CD4(-) iT subset in unmanipulated frogs and tadpoles. This population is critical for antiviral immunity during early larval stages when classical MHC class Ia function is suboptimal. Furthermore, in young tadpoles with low class Ia expression, deep sequencing revealed additional preponderant invariant T cell receptor (TCR)α rearrangements, implying other iT cell subsets and a predominant selection process mediated by other class Ib molecules. The restriction and requirement of class Ib molecules for development and antiviral immunity of a mammalian iNKT or mucosal-associated invariant T cell counterpart in the amphibian Xenopus show the importance of iT cells in the emergence and evolution of the adaptive immune system.

  15. Alpha1beta1 integrin is crucial for accumulation of epidermal T cells and the development of psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Curdin; Boyman, Onur; Tonel, Giulia; Tun-Kyi, Adrian; Laggner, Ute; de Fougerolles, Antonin; Kotelianski, Victor; Gardner, Humphrey; Nestle, Frank O

    2007-07-01

    Psoriasis is a common T cell-mediated autoimmune inflammatory disease. We show that blocking the interaction of alpha1beta1 integrin (VLA-1) with collagen prevented accumulation of epidermal T cells and immunopathology of psoriasis. Alpha1beta1 integrin, a major collagen-binding surface receptor, was exclusively expressed by epidermal but not dermal T cells. Alpha1beta1-positive T cells showed characteristic surface markers of effector memory cells and contained high levels of interferon-gamma but not interleukin-4. Blockade of alpha1beta1 inhibited migration of T cells into the epidermis in a clinically relevant xenotransplantation model. This was paralleled by a complete inhibition of psoriasis development, comparable to that caused by tumor necrosis factor-alpha blockers. These results define a crucial role for alpha1beta1 in controlling the accumulation of epidermal type 1 polarized effector memory T cells in a common human immunopathology and provide the basis for new strategies in psoriasis treatment focusing on T cell-extracellular matrix interactions.

  16. The ubiquitin-specific protease USP8 is critical for the development and homeostasis of T cells.

    PubMed

    Dufner, Almut; Kisser, Agnes; Niendorf, Sandra; Basters, Anja; Reissig, Sonja; Schönle, Anne; Aichem, Annette; Kurz, Thorsten; Schlosser, Andreas; Yablonski, Deborah; Groettrup, Marcus; Buch, Thorsten; Waisman, Ari; Schamel, Wolfgang W; Prinz, Marco; Knobeloch, Klaus-Peter

    2015-09-01

    The modification of proteins by ubiquitin has a major role in cells of the immune system and is counteracted by various deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) with poorly defined functions. Here we identified the ubiquitin-specific protease USP8 as a regulatory component of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) signalosome that interacted with the adaptor Gads and the regulatory molecule 14-3-3β. Caspase-dependent processing of USP8 occurred after stimulation of the TCR. T cell-specific deletion of USP8 in mice revealed that USP8 was essential for thymocyte maturation and upregulation of the gene encoding the cytokine receptor IL-7Rα mediated by the transcription factor Foxo1. Mice with T cell-specific USP8 deficiency developed colitis that was promoted by disturbed T cell homeostasis, a predominance of CD8(+) γδ T cells in the intestine and impaired regulatory T cell function. Collectively, our data reveal an unexpected role for USP8 as an immunomodulatory DUB in T cells.

  17. The IDH2 R172K mutation associated with angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma produces 2HG in T cells and impacts lymphoid development

    PubMed Central

    Lemonnier, François; Cairns, Rob A.; Inoue, Satoshi; Li, Wanda Y.; Dupuy, Aurélie; Broutin, Sophie; Martin, Nadine; Fataccioli, Virginie; Pelletier, Romain; Wakeham, Andrew; Snow, Bryan E.; de Leval, Laurence; Pujals, Anais; Haioun, Corinne; Paci, Angelo; Tobin, Erica R.; Narayanaswamy, Rohini; Yen, Katherine; Jin, Shengfang; Gaulard, Philippe; Mak, Tak W.

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)1 and IDH2 mutations at three hotspot arginine residues cause an enzymatic gain of function that leads to the production and accumulation of the metabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG), which contributes to the development of a number of malignancies. In the hematopoietic system, mutations in IDH1 at arginine (R) 132 and in IDH2 at R140 and R172 are commonly observed in acute myeloid leukemia, and elevated 2HG is observed in cells and serum. However, in angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL), mutations are almost exclusively restricted to IDH2 R172, and levels of 2HG have not been comprehensively measured. In this study, we investigate the expression pattern of mutant IDH2 in the AITL tumor microenvironment and measure levels of 2HG in tissue and serum of AITL patients. We find that mutant IDH2 expression is restricted to the malignant T-cell component of AITL, and that 2HG is elevated in tumor tissue and serum of patients. We also investigate the differences between the three hotspot mutation sites in IDH1 and IDH2 using conditional knock-in mouse models. These studies show that in the lymphoid system, mutations in IDH2 at R172 produce high levels of 2HG compared with mutations at the other two sites and that lymphoid development is impaired in these animals. These data provide evidence that IDH2 R172 mutations may be the only variants present in AITL because of their capacity to produce significant amounts of the oncometabolite 2HG in the cell of origin of this disease. PMID:27956631

  18. Development and characterization of Histoplasma capsulatum-reactive murine T-cell lines and clones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepe, George S., Jr.; Smith, James G.; Denman, David; Bullock, Ward E.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1986-01-01

    Several Histoplasma capsulatum-reactive murine cloned T-cell lines (TCLs) were isolated from spleens of C57BL/6 mice immunized with viable H. capsulatum yeast cells, using the methodology of Kimoto and Fathman (1980). These T-cells were characterized phenotypically as Thy-1.2(+) Lyt-1(+) L3T4(+) Lyt-2(-), that is, as the helper/inducer phenotype. The cloned T cells proliferate in response to histoplasmin and, in some cases, to heterologous fungal anigens. Upon injection of mice with the antigen, the T-cells mediate local delayed-type hypersensitivity responses and, after stimulation, release regulatory lymphokines.

  19. T Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... Definition of MS Myelin Immune-Mediated Disease T Cells d What Causes MS? Disproved Theories Viruses Clusters d Who Gets MS? Pediatric MS ... the progression of MS, without harming any immune cells that are not involved in the process of myelin destruction. Share Smaller ... More Immune-Mediated Disease Learn More Myelin ...

  20. Activation of CD4⁺ Foxp3⁺ regulatory T cells proceeds normally in the absence of B cells during EAE.

    PubMed

    Hoehlig, Kai; Shen, Ping; Lampropoulou, Vicky; Roch, Toralf; Malissen, Bernard; O'Connor, Richard; Ries, Stefanie; Hilgenberg, Ellen; Anderton, Stephen M; Fillatreau, Simon

    2012-05-01

    B cells and regulatory T (Treg) cells can both facilitate remission from experimental auto immune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a disease of the central nervous system (CNS) used as a model for multiple sclerosis (MS). Considering that B-cell-depletion therapy (BCDT) is used to treat MS patients, we asked whether Treg-cell activation depended on B cells during EAE. Treg-cell proliferation, accumulation in CNS, and augmentation of suppressive activity in the CNS were normal in B-cell-deficient mice, indicating that B cells are not essential for activation of the protective Treg-cell response and thus provide an independent layer of regulation. This function of B cells involved early suppression of the encephalitogenic CD4(+) T-cell response, which was enhanced in B-cell-deficient mice. CD4(+) T-cell depletion was sufficient to intercept the transition from acute-to-chronic EAE when applied to B-cell-deficient animals that just reached the peak of disease severity. Intriguingly, this treatment did not improve disease when applied later, implying that chronic disability was ultimately maintained independently of pathogenic CD4(+) T cells. Collectively, our data indicate that BCDT is unlikely to impair Treg-cell function, yet it might produce undesirable effects on T-cell-mediated autoimmune pathogenesis.

  1. Anti-regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Mads Hald

    2017-04-01

    Our initial understanding of immune-regulatory cells was based on the discovery of suppressor cells that assure peripheral T-cell tolerance and promote immune homeostasis. Research has particularly focused on the importance of regulatory T cells (Tregs) for immune modulation, e.g. directing host responses to tumours or inhibiting autoimmunity development. However, recent studies report the discovery of self-reactive pro-inflammatory T cells-termed anti-regulatory T cells (anti-Tregs)-that target immune-suppressive cells. Thus, regulatory cells can now be defined as both cells that suppress immune reactions as well as effector cells that counteract the effects of suppressor cells and support immune reactions. Self-reactive anti-Tregs have been described that specifically recognize human leukocyte antigen-restricted epitopes derived from proteins that are normally expressed by regulatory immune cells, including indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), tryptophan 2,6-dioxygenase (TDO), programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1), and forkhead box P3 (Foxp3). These proteins are highly expressed in professional antigen-presenting cells under various physiological conditions, such as inflammation and stress. Therefore, self-reactive T cells that recognize such targets may be activated due to the strong activation signal given by their cognate targets. The current review describes the existing knowledge regarding these self-reactive anti-Tregs, providing examples of antigen-specific anti-Tregs and discussing their possible roles in immune homeostasis and their potential future clinical applications.

  2. Quantitative and Temporal Requirements Revealed for Zap-70 Catalytic Activity During T Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Au-Yeung, Byron B.; Melichar, Heather J.; Ross, Jenny O.; Cheng, Debra A.; Zikherman, Julie; Shokat, Kevan M.; Robey, Ellen A.; Weiss, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    The catalytic activity of Zap-70 is crucial for T cell receptor (TCR) signaling, but the quantitative and temporal requirements for its function in thymocyte development are not known. Using a chemical-genetic system to selectively and reversibly inhibit Zap-70 catalytic activity in a model of synchronized thymic selection, we showed that CD4+CD8+ thymocytes integrate multiple, transient, Zap-70-dependent signals over more than 36 h to reach a cumulative threshold for positive selection, whereas one hour of signaling was sufficient for negative selection. Titration of Zap-70 activity resulted in graded reductions in positive and negative selection but did not decrease the cumulative TCR signals integrated by positively selected OT-I cells, revealing heterogeneity, even among CD4+CD8+ thymocytes expressing identical TCRs undergoing positive selection. PMID:24908390

  3. The Recognition of Hypothalamo-Neurohypophysial Functions by Developing T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Martens, H.; Cormann, N.; Benhida, A.; Schoenen, J.; Geenen, V.

    1992-01-01

    Neuropeptide signals and specific neuropeptide receptors have been described in the thymus supporting the concept of a close dialogue between the neuroendocrine and the immune systems at the level of early T-cell differentiation. In this paper, we review recent data about neurohypophysial (NHP)-related peptides detected in the thymus from different species. We suggest that we are dealing in fact with other member(s) of the NHP hormone family, which seems to exert its activity locally through a novel model of cell-to-cell signaling, that of cryptocrine communication. This model involves exchange of signals between thymic epithelial cells and developing thymocytes. The NHP-related peptides have been shown to trigger thymocyte proliferation and could induce immune tolerance of this highly conserved neuroendocrine family. PMID:1322752

  4. Clonal expansion of CD8 T cells in the systemic circulation precedes development of ipilimumab-induced toxicities

    PubMed Central

    Subudhi, Sumit K.; Aparicio, Ana; Gao, Jianjun; Zurita, Amado J.; Araujo, John C.; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Tahir, Salahaldin A.; Korivi, Brinda R.; Slack, Rebecca S.; Vence, Luis; Emerson, Ryan O.; Yusko, Erik; Vignali, Marissa; Robins, Harlan S.; Sun, Jingjing; Allison, James P.; Sharma, Padmanee

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint therapies, such as ipilimumab, induce dramatic antitumor responses in a subset of patients with advanced malignancies, but they may also induce inflammatory responses and toxicities termed immune-related adverse events (irAEs). These irAEs are often low grade and manageable, but severe irAEs may lead to prolonged hospitalizations or fatalities. Early intervention is necessary to minimize morbidities that occur with severe irAEs. However, correlative biomarkers are currently lacking. In a phase II clinical trial that treated 27 patients with metastatic prostate cancer, we aimed to test the safety and efficacy of androgen deprivation therapy plus ipilimumab. In this study, we observed grade 3 toxicities in >40% of treated patients, which led to early closure of the study. Because ipilimumab enhances T-cell responses, we hypothesized that increased clonal T-cell responses in the systemic circulation may contribute to irAEs. Sequencing of the T-cell receptor β-chains in purified T cells revealed clonal expansion of CD8 T cells, which occurred in blood samples collected before the onset of grade 2–3 irAEs. These initial results suggested that expansion of ≥55 CD8 T-cell clones preceded the development of severe irAEs. We further evaluated available blood samples from a second trial and determined that patients who experienced grade 2–3 irAEs also had expansion of ≥55 CD8 T-cell clones in blood samples collected before the onset of irAEs. We propose that CD8 T-cell clonal expansion may be a correlative biomarker to enable close monitoring and early intervention for patients receiving ipilimumab. PMID:27698113

  5. Clonal expansion of CD8 T cells in the systemic circulation precedes development of ipilimumab-induced toxicities.

    PubMed

    Subudhi, Sumit K; Aparicio, Ana; Gao, Jianjun; Zurita, Amado J; Araujo, John C; Logothetis, Christopher J; Tahir, Salahaldin A; Korivi, Brinda R; Slack, Rebecca S; Vence, Luis; Emerson, Ryan O; Yusko, Erik; Vignali, Marissa; Robins, Harlan S; Sun, Jingjing; Allison, James P; Sharma, Padmanee

    2016-10-18

    Immune checkpoint therapies, such as ipilimumab, induce dramatic antitumor responses in a subset of patients with advanced malignancies, but they may also induce inflammatory responses and toxicities termed immune-related adverse events (irAEs). These irAEs are often low grade and manageable, but severe irAEs may lead to prolonged hospitalizations or fatalities. Early intervention is necessary to minimize morbidities that occur with severe irAEs. However, correlative biomarkers are currently lacking. In a phase II clinical trial that treated 27 patients with metastatic prostate cancer, we aimed to test the safety and efficacy of androgen deprivation therapy plus ipilimumab. In this study, we observed grade 3 toxicities in >40% of treated patients, which led to early closure of the study. Because ipilimumab enhances T-cell responses, we hypothesized that increased clonal T-cell responses in the systemic circulation may contribute to irAEs. Sequencing of the T-cell receptor β-chains in purified T cells revealed clonal expansion of CD8 T cells, which occurred in blood samples collected before the onset of grade 2-3 irAEs. These initial results suggested that expansion of ≥55 CD8 T-cell clones preceded the development of severe irAEs. We further evaluated available blood samples from a second trial and determined that patients who experienced grade 2-3 irAEs also had expansion of ≥55 CD8 T-cell clones in blood samples collected before the onset of irAEs. We propose that CD8 T-cell clonal expansion may be a correlative biomarker to enable close monitoring and early intervention for patients receiving ipilimumab.

  6. T Cells in Fish

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Teruyuki; Shibasaki, Yasuhiro; Matsuura, Yuta

    2015-01-01

    Cartilaginous and bony fish are the most primitive vertebrates with a thymus, and possess T cells equivalent to those in mammals. There are a number of studies in fish demonstrating that the thymus is the essential organ for development of T lymphocytes from early thymocyte progenitors to functionally competent T cells. A high number of T cells in the intestine and gills has been reported in several fish species. Involvement of CD4+ and CD8α+ T cells in allograft rejection and graft-versus-host reaction (GVHR) has been demonstrated using monoclonal antibodies. Conservation of CD4+ helper T cell functions among teleost fishes has been suggested in a number studies employing mixed leukocyte culture (MLC) and hapten/carrier effect. Alloantigen- and virus-specific cytotoxicity has also been demonstrated in ginbuna and rainbow trout. Furthermore, the important role of cell-mediated immunity rather than humoral immunity has been reported in the protection against intracellular bacterial infection. Recently, the direct antibacterial activity of CD8α+, CD4+ T-cells and sIgM+ cells in fish has been reported. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in T cell research focusing on the tissue distribution and function of fish T cells. PMID:26426066

  7. Rational development and characterization of humanized anti-EGFR variant III chimeric antigen receptor T cells for glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Laura A; Scholler, John; Ohkuri, Takayuki; Kosaka, Akemi; Patel, Prachi R; McGettigan, Shannon E; Nace, Arben K; Dentchev, Tzvete; Thekkat, Pramod; Loew, Andreas; Boesteanu, Alina C; Cogdill, Alexandria P; Chen, Taylor; Fraietta, Joseph A; Kloss, Christopher C; Posey, Avery D; Engels, Boris; Singh, Reshma; Ezell, Tucker; Idamakanti, Neeraja; Ramones, Melissa H; Li, Na; Zhou, Li; Plesa, Gabriela; Seykora, John T; Okada, Hideho; June, Carl H; Brogdon, Jennifer L; Maus, Marcela V

    2015-02-18

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are synthetic molecules designed to redirect T cells to specific antigens. CAR-modified T cells can mediate long-term durable remissions in B cell malignancies, but expanding this platform to solid tumors requires the discovery of surface targets with limited expression in normal tissues. The variant III mutation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII) results from an in-frame deletion of a portion of the extracellular domain, creating a neoepitope. We chose a vector backbone encoding a second-generation CAR based on efficacy of a murine scFv-based CAR in a xenograft model of glioblastoma. Next, we generated a panel of humanized scFvs and tested their specificity and function as soluble proteins and in the form of CAR-transduced T cells; a low-affinity scFv was selected on the basis of its specificity for EGFRvIII over wild-type EGFR. The lead candidate scFv was tested in vitro for its ability to direct CAR-transduced T cells to specifically lyse, proliferate, and secrete cytokines in response to antigen-bearing targets. We further evaluated the specificity of the lead CAR candidate in vitro against EGFR-expressing keratinocytes and in vivo in a model of mice grafted with normal human skin. EGFRvIII-directed CAR T cells were also able to control tumor growth in xenogeneic subcutaneous and orthotopic models of human EGFRvIII(+) glioblastoma. On the basis of these results, we have designed a phase 1 clinical study of CAR T cells transduced with humanized scFv directed to EGFRvIII in patients with either residual or recurrent glioblastoma (NCT02209376).

  8. B cell origin of non-T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. A model for discrete stages of neoplastic and normal pre-B cell differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Nadler, L M; Korsmeyer, S J; Anderson, K C; Boyd, A W; Slaughenhoupt, B; Park, E; Jensen, J; Coral, F; Mayer, R J; Sallan, S E

    1984-01-01

    The expression of B cell associated and restricted antigens on tumor cells isolated from 138 patients with non-T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (non-T cell ALL) was investigated by flow cytometric analysis by means of a panel of monoclonal antibodies. Tumor cells from these patients could be assigned to one of four subgroups: human leukocyte antigen-DR-related Ia-like antigens (Ia) alone (4%, stage I); IaB4 (14%, stage II); IaB4CALLA (33%, stage III); and IaB4CALLAB1 (49%, stage IV). The expression of B cell-restricted antigens (B4 and B1) and rearrangements of Ig heavy chain genes provided strong evidence for the B cell lineage of stages II, III, and IV tumors. The lineage of the Ia alone group is still unknown. The B4 antigen was expressed on approximately 95% of all non-T cell ALLs tested, and given its absence on T cell and myeloid tumors, it appears to be an exceptional marker to define cells of B lineage. The demonstration that Ia alone, IaB4, IaB4CALLA, and IaB4CALLAB1 positive cells can be readily identified by dual fluorescence analysis in normal fetal and adult bone marrow provided critical support for the view that these leukemic pre-B cell phenotypes were representative of the stages of normal pre-B cell differentiation. It was interesting that the IaB4+ cell was more frequently identified in fetal bone marrow than in adult marrow, whereas the predominant cell found in adult marrow expressed the IaB4CALLAB1 phenotype. These data suggest that the leukemogenic event may be random, since the predominant pre-B cell leukemic phenotype appears to correspond to the normal pre-B cell phenotype present in these hematopoietic organs. Our observations provide an additional distinction between adult and childhood ALL, since these studies show that most non-T cell ALLs seen in children less than 2 yr old are of stage II phenotype, whereas the majority of non-T ALLs in adults are of stage IV phenotype. Finally, it should be noted that the present study suggests

  9. Development of a diverse human T-cell repertoire despite stringent restriction of hematopoietic clonality in the thymus.

    PubMed

    Brugman, Martijn H; Wiekmeijer, Anna-Sophia; van Eggermond, Marja; Wolvers-Tettero, Ingrid; Langerak, Anton W; de Haas, Edwin F E; Bystrykh, Leonid V; van Rood, Jon J; de Haan, Gerald; Fibbe, Willem E; Staal, Frank J T

    2015-11-03

    The fate and numbers of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and their progeny that seed the thymus constitute a fundamental question with important clinical implications. HSC transplantation is often complicated by limited T-cell reconstitution, especially when HSC from umbilical cord blood are used. Attempts to improve immune reconstitution have until now been unsuccessful, underscoring the need for better insight into thymic reconstitution. Here we made use of the NOD-SCID-IL-2Rγ(-/-) xenograft model and lentiviral cellular barcoding of human HSCs to study T-cell development in the thymus at a clonal level. Barcoded HSCs showed robust (>80% human chimerism) and reproducible myeloid and lymphoid engraftment, with T cells arising 12 wk after transplantation. A very limited number of HSC clones (<10) repopulated the xenografted thymus, with further restriction of the number of clones during subsequent development. Nevertheless, T-cell receptor rearrangements were polyclonal and showed a diverse repertoire, demonstrating that a multitude of T-lymphocyte clones can develop from a single HSC clone. Our data imply that intrathymic clonal fitness is important during T-cell development. As a consequence, immune incompetence after HSC transplantation is not related to the transplantation of limited numbers of HSC but to intrathymic events.

  10. Development of a diverse human T-cell repertoire despite stringent restriction of hematopoietic clonality in the thymus

    PubMed Central

    Brugman, Martijn H.; Wiekmeijer, Anna-Sophia; van Eggermond, Marja; Wolvers-Tettero, Ingrid; Langerak, Anton W.; de Haas, Edwin F. E.; Bystrykh, Leonid V.; van Rood, Jon J.; de Haan, Gerald; Fibbe, Willem E.; Staal, Frank J. T.

    2015-01-01

    The fate and numbers of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and their progeny that seed the thymus constitute a fundamental question with important clinical implications. HSC transplantation is often complicated by limited T-cell reconstitution, especially when HSC from umbilical cord blood are used. Attempts to improve immune reconstitution have until now been unsuccessful, underscoring the need for better insight into thymic reconstitution. Here we made use of the NOD-SCID-IL-2Rγ−/− xenograft model and lentiviral cellular barcoding of human HSCs to study T-cell development in the thymus at a clonal level. Barcoded HSCs showed robust (>80% human chimerism) and reproducible myeloid and lymphoid engraftment, with T cells arising 12 wk after transplantation. A very limited number of HSC clones (<10) repopulated the xenografted thymus, with further restriction of the number of clones during subsequent development. Nevertheless, T-cell receptor rearrangements were polyclonal and showed a diverse repertoire, demonstrating that a multitude of T-lymphocyte clones can develop from a single HSC clone. Our data imply that intrathymic clonal fitness is important during T-cell development. As a consequence, immune incompetence after HSC transplantation is not related to the transplantation of limited numbers of HSC but to intrathymic events. PMID:26483497

  11. Catecholamines as immunomodulators: a role for adrenoceptor-mediated mechanisms in fine tuning of T-cell development.

    PubMed

    Leposavić, Gordana; Pilipović, Ivan; Radojević, Katarina; Pesić, Vesna; Perisić, Milica; Kosec, Dusko

    2008-12-15

    In its simplest form, effective T cell-mediated immunity emanates from the expansion of specific T cells activated in response to antigen. In establishing and maintaining the peripheral T-cell pool, the thymus plays a critical role. It does so by providing a microenvironment within which T-cell precursors proliferate, differentiate and undergo selection processes to create a fully functional population of major histocompatibility complex restricted, self-tolerant T cells. The control of the thymic function involves intrathymic, as well as sympathetic nervous and endocrine system signalling. In addition to postganglionic noradrenergic fibres, both thymic lymphoid and non-lymphoid cells, including epithelial cells and macrophages, have been demonstrated to express tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), and suggested to form a local non-neural catecholaminergic cell network. A higher level of noradrenaline has been found in male than in female rat thymi, and a role of gonadal hormones in providing this dimorphism has been demonstrated. In addition, thymic lymphoid and non-lymphoid cells, including those expressing TH, have been found to bear beta- and alpha1-adrenoceptors (ARs) and a role of gonadal hormones in regulation of, at least, beta-AR density and signalling has been suggested. These findings have also entailed conclusion that catecholamines (CAs) influence T-cell development, not only via neurocrine/endocrine, but also via autocrine/paracrine action. Generally, CAs have been shown to exert an inhibitory influence on thymopoiesis. Role of alpha1- and beta-AR-mediated mechanisms in maintaining thymic homeostasis and in fine tuning of both conventional and regulatory T-cell development is discussed in the manuscript.

  12. Changes in autoreactive T cell avidity during type 1 diabetes development

    PubMed Central

    Standifer, Nathan E.; Burwell, Emily A.; Gersuk, Vivian H.; Greenbaum, Carla J.; Nepom, Gerald T.

    2009-01-01

    The activation threshold for antigen-specific T cell responses is dependent on the avidity of the trimolecular interaction between TCR, antigen, and MHC. We compared CD4+ T cell avidities for the diabetes-associated autoantigen glutamic acid decarboxylase 555-567 (GAD 555) among serial samples from autoantibody-positive subjects at high risk of progression to type 1 diabetes (T1D). T cells from three at-risk subjects demonstrated significant avidity increases (p<0.05 by F test) over time. This avidity shift correlated with the outgrowth of T cells expressing TCR BV 9, 15, 17 or 20 that demonstrated higher GAD 555 tetramer-binding levels compared to cells expressing other TCR BV genes. Similar analysis of autoantibody-negative, first-degree relatives and T1D patients did not demonstrate similar changes in avidity. These data implicate the outgrowth of T cells expressing higher affinity TCR in a process of antigen-specific T cell avidity maturation during the pre-clinical stage of T1D. PMID:19482555

  13. Deficiency in regulatory T cells results in development of antimitochondrial antibodies and autoimmune cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weici; Sharma, Rahul; Ju, Shyr-Te; He, Xiao-Song; Tao, Yanyan; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Tian, Zhigang; Lian, Zhe-Xiong; Fu, Shu Man; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2008-01-01

    There have been several descriptions of mouse models that manifest select immunological and clinical features of autoimmune cholangitis with similarities to primary biliary cirrhosis in humans. Some of these models require immunization with complete Freund's adjuvant, whereas others suggest that a decreased frequency of T regulatory cells (Tregs) facilitate spontaneous disease. We hypothesized that anti-mitochondrial antibodies (AMA) and development of autoimmune cholangitis would be found in mice genetically deficient in components essential for the development and homeostasis of Foxp3+ Tregs. Therefore, we examined Scurfy (Sf) mice, animals that have a mutation in the gene encoding the Foxp3 transcription factor which results in a complete abolition of Foxp3+ Tregs. Indeed at 3-4 weeks of age, 100% of animals manifest high titer serum AMA of all isotypes. Further, mice have moderate to severe lymphocytic infiltrates surrounding portal areas with evidence of biliary duct damage, and dramatic elevation of cytokines in serum and mRNAs encoding cytokines in liver tissue, including TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-12 and IL-23. In conclusion, the lack of functional Foxp3 is a major predisposing feature for loss of tolerance that leads to autoimmune cholangitis. These findings reflect on the importance of regulatory T cells in other murine models as well as in patients with PBC. PMID:19065675

  14. Development of chidamide for peripheral T-cell lymphoma, the first orphan drug approved in China

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xianping; Ning, Zhiqiang; Li, Zhibin; Cao, Haixiang; Wang, Xinhao

    2016-01-01

    Summary Peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) is a set of rare and highly heterogeneous group of mature T- and NK-cell neoplasms associated with poor outcomes and lack of standard and effective therapies. The total number of newly diagnosed cases of PTCL yearly in China is estimated about 50,000. Chidamide (CS055) is a novel and orally active benzamide class of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor that selectively inhibits activity of HDAC1, 2, 3 and 10, the enzymes that are involved and play an important role in tumor initiation and development in both tumor cells and their surrounding micro-environment. Functioning as a genuine epigenetic modulator, chidamide induces growth arrest and apoptosis in tumor cells and enhances cellular antitumor immunity. Based on the overall results from preclinical and phase I clinical studies, exploratory and pivotal phase II trials of chidamide for relapsed or refractory PTCL were conducted from March 2009 to May 2012, and the results led to CFDA approval of chidamide for the indication in December 2014, being the first approved orphan drug according to the research & development approach of orphan drugs in China, as well as the first orally active drug for PTCL in China and worldwide. PMID:27672541

  15. Contribution of JAK2 mutations to T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma development.

    PubMed

    Roncero, A M; López-Nieva, P; Cobos-Fernández, M A; Villa-Morales, M; González-Sánchez, L; López-Lorenzo, J L; Llamas, P; Ayuso, C; Rodríguez-Pinilla, S M; Arriba, M C; Piris, M A; Fernández-Navarro, P; Fernández, A F; Fraga, M F; Santos, J; Fernández-Piqueras, J

    2016-01-01

    The JAK-STAT pathway has a substantial role in lymphoid precursor cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. Nonetheless, the contribution of JAK2 to T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma (T-LBL) development remains poorly understood. We have identified one activating TEL-JAK2 translocation and four missense mutations accumulated in 2 out of 16 T-LBL samples. Two of them are novel JAK2 mutations and the other two are reported for the first time in T-LBL. Notably, R683G and I682T might have arisen owing to RNA editing. Mutated samples showed different mutated transcripts suggesting sub-clonal heterogeneity. Functional approaches revealed that two JAK2 mutations (H574R and R683G) constitutively activate JAK-STAT signaling in γ2A cells and can drive the proliferation of BaF3-EpoR cytokine-dependent cell line. In addition, aberrant hypermethylation of SOCS3 might contribute to enhance the activation of JAK-STAT signaling. Of utmost interest is that primary T-LBL samples harboring JAK2 mutations exhibited increased expression of LMO2, suggesting a mechanistic link between JAK2 mutations and the expression of LMO2, which was confirmed for the four missense mutations in transfected γ2A cells. We therefore propose that active JAK2 contribute to T-LBL development by two different mechanisms, and that the use of pan-JAK inhibitors in combination with epigenetic drugs should be considered in future treatments.

  16. CD4 T cells with effector memory phenotype and function develop in the sterile environment of the fetus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Mozeleski, Brian; Lemoine, Sebastien; Dériaud, Edith; Lim, Annick; Zhivaki, Dania; Azria, Elie; Le Ray, Camille; Roguet, Gwenaelle; Launay, Odile; Vanet, Anne; Leclerc, Claude; Lo-Man, Richard

    2014-05-28

    The T cell compartment is considered to be naïve and dedicated to the development of tolerance during fetal development. We have identified and characterized a population of fetally developed CD4 T cells with an effector memory phenotype (TEM), which are present in cord blood. This population is polyclonal and has phenotypic features similar to those of conventional adult memory T cells, such as CD45RO expression. These cells express low levels of CD25 but are distinct from regulatory T cells because they lack Foxp3 expression. After T cell receptor activation, neonatal TEM cells readily produced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). We also detected interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-producing T helper 1 (TH1) cells and interleukin-4 (IL-4)/IL-13-producing TH2-like cells, but not IL-17-producing cells. We used chemokine receptor expression patterns to divide this TEM population into different subsets and identified distinct transcriptional programs using whole-genome microarray analysis. IFN-γ was found in CXCR3(+) TEM cells, whereas IL-4 was found in both CXCR3(+) TEM cells and CCR4(+) TEM cells. CCR6(+) TEM cells displayed a genetic signature that corresponded to TH17 cells but failed to produce IL-17A. However, the TH17 function of TEM cells was observed in the presence of IL-1β and IL-23. In summary, in the absence of reported pathology or any major infectious history, T cells with a memory-like phenotype develop in an environment thought to be sterile during fetal development and display a large variety of inflammatory effector functions associated with CD4 TH cells at birth.

  17. In vitro induction of non-responsiveness in cloned normal inducer T cells by antigen and purified Ia incorporated into planar membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Quill, H.; Fox, B.; Carlson, L.; Pardoll, D.; Schwartz, R.H.

    1986-03-05

    Incubation of cytochrome c-specific E/sub ..beta..//sup k/E/sub ..cap alpha..//sup k/-containing planar membranes and an antigenic peptide analogue of moth cytochrome c resulted in a specific increase in cell volume of 40-50% as measured by Coulter Counter analysis. No change in cell volume was seen in the absence of antigen, or when A/sub ..beta..//sup k/A/sub ..cap alpha..//sup k/-planar membranes were used. T cell proliferation was never detected at any time from one to eight days after incubation with E/sub ..beta..//sup k/E/sub ..cap alpha..//sup k/-membranes at a wide range of antigen concentrations. Furthermore, only trace amounts of IL-2 were detected and no increase in IL-2 receptor expression was seen. IL-3 production, however, could be detected. T cells pre-incubated for one day with E/sub ..beta..//sup k/E/sub ..cap alpha..//sup k/-membranes plus antigen became non-responsive to subsequent normal stimulation with antigen and APC. Incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine was reduced by more than 90% and the production of both IL-2 and IL-3 was inhibited. Non-responsiveness persisted for at least eight days after exposure to E/sub ..beta..///sup k/E/sub ..cap alpha..//sup k/-membranes plus antigen. In contrast, T cells pre-incubated under control conditions remained fully responsive. These results demonstrate the specific induction of non-responsiveness in inducer T cells by antigen and purified E/sub ..beta..//sup k/E/sub ..cap alpha..//sup k/ in planar membranes.

  18. Enumeration of T cells, B cells and monocytes in the peripheral blood of normal and lymphocytotic cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Paul, P S; Senogles, D R; Muscoplat, C C; Johnson, D W

    1979-01-01

    The rosette-forming capacity of bovine peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) was determined with dextran and 2-aminoethylisothiouronium bromide (AET)-treated sheep erythrocytes (SRBC). Both dextran and AET-enhanced rosette formation; however, AET-treated SRBC detected a larger percentage of rosette-forming cells and thus was used in this study. The specificity of rosette formation by bovine thymus-derived (T) lymphocytes was shown by (1) demonstration of rosettes and surface-membrane immunoglobulins sIg) on different cells in PBL and nylon-wool fractionated lymphocyte populations and (2) rosette formation by a large percentage (83--90%) of thymocytes from three bovine foetuses and two 14-month-old heifers. A procedure was also developed to identify bovine monocytes by latex phagocytosis and 10--30% latex-ingesting cells were detected in PBL preparations isolated by Ficoll-Hypaque flotation. The frequency of sIg-bearing latex-ingesting, and sIg-bearing latex non-ingesting cells in bovine peripheral blood was also determined. These procedures were utilized to determine the distribution of T and bone-marrow derived (B) lymphocytes in peripheral blood of normal and lymphocytotic cattle. PBL from twenty normal cattle contained approximately 63% T and 11% B (sIg+ latex non-ingesting) lymphocytes. In peripheral blood of three cattle with persistent lymphocytosis, a prodromal stage of bovine leukaemia, the percentage of B cells was elevated approximately to 59% whereas T lymphocytes decreased to 35%, thus providing additional evidence that persistent lymphocytosis is a B-cell disease. PMID:312176

  19. From Murine to Human Nude/SCID: The Thymus, T-Cell Development and the Missing Link

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Rosa; Palamaro, Loredana; Fusco, Anna; Iannace, Leucio; Maio, Stefano; Vigliano, Ilaria; Giardino, Giuliana; Pignata, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) are disorders of the immune system, which lead to increased susceptibility to infections. T-cell defects, which may affect T-cell development/function, are approximately 11% of reported PIDs. The pathogenic mechanisms are related to molecular alterations not only of genes selectively expressed in hematopoietic cells but also of the stromal component of the thymus that represents the primary lymphoid organ for T-cell differentiation. With this regard, the prototype of athymic disorders due to abnormal stroma is the Nude/SCID syndrome, first described in mice in 1966. In man, the DiGeorge Syndrome (DGS) has long been considered the human prototype of a severe T-cell differentiation defect. More recently, the human equivalent of the murine Nude/SCID has been described, contributing to unravel important issues of the T-cell ontogeny in humans. Both mice and human diseases are due to alterations of the FOXN1, a developmentally regulated transcription factor selectively expressed in skin and thymic epithelia. PMID:22474479

  20. THEMIS, a new T cell specific protein important for late thymocyte development

    PubMed Central

    Lesourne, Renaud; Uehara, Shoji; Lee, Jan; Song, Ki-Duk; Li, LiQi; Pinkhasov, Julia; Zhang, Yongqing; Weng, Nan-Ping; Wildt, Kathryn F.; Wang, Lie; Bosselut, Remy; Love, Paul E.

    2010-01-01

    During positive selection, thymocytes transition through a stage during which T cell receptor (TCR) signaling controls CD4 versus CD8 lineage choice and subsequent maturation. Here, we describe a new T cell specific protein, THEMIS, that performs a distinct function during this stage. In Themis-/- mice, thymocyte selection was impaired and the number of transitional CD4+CD8int thymocytes as well as CD4 and CD8 single positive thymocytes was decreased. Remarkably, although no overt TCR-proximal signaling deficiencies were detected, Themis-/-CD4+CD8int thymocytes exhibited developmental defects consistent with attenuated signaling that were reversible by increased TCR stimulation. These results identify THEMIS as a critical component of the T cell developmental program and suggest that THEMIS functions to sustain and/or integrate signals required for proper lineage commitment and maturation. PMID:19597498

  1. Adoptive T-cell therapy for cancer: The era of engineered T cells.

    PubMed

    Bonini, Chiara; Mondino, Anna

    2015-09-01

    Tumors originate from a number of genetic events that deregulate homeostatic mechanisms controlling normal cell behavior. The immune system, devoted to patrol the organism against pathogenic events, can identify transformed cells, and in several cases cause their elimination. It is however clear that several mechanisms encompassing both central and peripheral tolerance limit antitumor immunity, often resulting into progressive diseases. Adoptive T-cell therapy with either allogeneic or autologous T cells can transfer therapeutic immunity. To date, genetic engineering of T cells appears to be a powerful tool for shaping tumor immunity. In this review, we discuss the most recent achievements in the areas of suicide gene therapy, and TCR-modified T cells and chimeric antigen receptor gene-modified T cells. We provide an overview of current strategies aimed at improving the safety and efficacy of these approaches, with an outlook on prospective developments.

  2. Contribution of JAK2 mutations to T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma development

    PubMed Central

    Roncero, A M; López-Nieva, P; Cobos-Fernández, M A; Villa-Morales, M; González-Sánchez, L; López-Lorenzo, J L; Llamas, P; Ayuso, C; Rodríguez-Pinilla, S M; Arriba, M C; Piris, M A; Fernández-Navarro, P; Fernández, A F; Fraga, M F; Santos, J; Fernández-Piqueras, J

    2016-01-01

    The JAK-STAT pathway has a substantial role in lymphoid precursor cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. Nonetheless, the contribution of JAK2 to T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma (T-LBL) development remains poorly understood. We have identified one activating TEL-JAK2 translocation and four missense mutations accumulated in 2 out of 16 T-LBL samples. Two of them are novel JAK2 mutations and the other two are reported for the first time in T-LBL. Notably, R683G and I682T might have arisen owing to RNA editing. Mutated samples showed different mutated transcripts suggesting sub-clonal heterogeneity. Functional approaches revealed that two JAK2 mutations (H574R and R683G) constitutively activate JAK-STAT signaling in γ2A cells and can drive the proliferation of BaF3-EpoR cytokine-dependent cell line. In addition, aberrant hypermethylation of SOCS3 might contribute to enhance the activation of JAK-STAT signaling. Of utmost interest is that primary T-LBL samples harboring JAK2 mutations exhibited increased expression of LMO2, suggesting a mechanistic link between JAK2 mutations and the expression of LMO2, which was confirmed for the four missense mutations in transfected γ2A cells. We therefore propose that active JAK2 contribute to T-LBL development by two different mechanisms, and that the use of pan-JAK inhibitors in combination with epigenetic drugs should be considered in future treatments. PMID:26216197

  3. Effect of Cytomegalovirus Co-Infection on Normalization of Selected T-Cell Subsets in Children with Perinatally Acquired HIV Infection Treated with Combination Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kapetanovic, Suad; Aaron, Lisa; Montepiedra, Grace; Anthony, Patricia; Thuvamontolrat, Kasalyn; Pahwa, Savita; Burchett, Sandra; Weinberg, Adriana; Kovacs, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Background We examined the effect of cytomegalovirus (CMV) co-infection and viremia on reconstitution of selected CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subsets in perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV+) children ≥ 1-year old who participated in a partially randomized, open-label, 96-week combination antiretroviral therapy (cART)-algorithm study. Methods Participants were categorized as CMV-naïve, CMV-positive (CMV+) viremic, and CMV+ aviremic, based on blood, urine, or throat culture, CMV IgG and DNA polymerase chain reaction measured at baseline. At weeks 0, 12, 20 and 40, T-cell subsets including naïve (CD62L+CD45RA+; CD95-CD28+), activated (CD38+HLA-DR+) and terminally differentiated (CD62L-CD45RA+; CD95+CD28-) CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells were measured by flow cytometry. Results Of the 107 participants included in the analysis, 14% were CMV+ viremic; 49% CMV+ aviremic; 37% CMV-naïve. In longitudinal adjusted models, compared with CMV+ status, baseline CMV-naïve status was significantly associated with faster recovery of CD8+CD62L+CD45RA+% and CD8+CD95-CD28+% and faster decrease of CD8+CD95+CD28-%, independent of HIV VL response to treatment, cART regimen and baseline CD4%. Surprisingly, CMV status did not have a significant impact on longitudinal trends in CD8+CD38+HLA-DR+%. CMV status did not have a significant impact on any CD4+ T-cell subsets. Conclusions In this cohort of PHIV+ children, the normalization of naïve and terminally differentiated CD8+ T-cell subsets in response to cART was detrimentally affected by the presence of CMV co-infection. These findings may have implications for adjunctive treatment strategies targeting CMV co-infection in PHIV+ children, especially those that are now adults or reaching young adulthood and may have accelerated immunologic aging, increased opportunistic infections and aging diseases of the immune system. PMID:25794163

  4. Human T cell leukemia virus type I and neurologic disease: events in bone marrow, peripheral blood, and central nervous system during normal immune surveillance and neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Grant, Christian; Barmak, Kate; Alefantis, Timothy; Yao, Jing; Jacobson, Steven; Wigdahl, Brian

    2002-02-01

    Human T cell lymphotropic/leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) has been identified as the causative agent of both adult T cell leukemia (ATL) and HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). Although the exact sequence of events that occur during the early stages of infection are not known in detail, the initial route of infection may predetermine, along with host, environmental, and viral factors, the subset of target cells and/or the primary immune response encountered by HTLV-I, and whether an HTLV-I-infected individual will remain asymptomatic, develop ATL, or progress to the neuroinflammatory disease, HAM/TSP. Although a large number of studies have indicated that CD4(+) T cells represent an important target for HTLV-I infection in the peripheral blood (PB), additional evidence has accumulated over the past several years demonstrating that HTLV-I can infect several additional cellular compartments in vivo, including CD8(+) T lymphocytes, PB monocytes, dendritic cells, B lymphocytes, and resident central nervous system (CNS) astrocytes. More importantly, extensive latent viral infection of the bone marrow, including cells likely to be hematopoietic progenitor cells, has been observed in individuals with HAM/TSP as well as some asymptomatic carriers, but to a much lesser extent in individuals with ATL. Furthermore, HTLV-I(+) CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells can maintain the intact proviral genome and initiate viral gene expression during the differentiation process. Introduction of HTLV-I-infected bone marrow progenitor cells into the PB, followed by genomic activation and low level viral gene expression may lead to an increase in proviral DNA load in the PB, resulting in a progressive state of immune dysregulation including the generation of a detrimental cytotoxic Tax-specific CD8(+) T cell population, anti-HTLV-I antibodies, and neurotoxic cytokines involved in disruption of myelin-producing cells and neuronal degradation

  5. Development of a T cell receptor targeting an HLA-A*0201 restricted epitope from the cancer-testis antigen SSX2 for adoptive immunotherapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Abate-Daga, Daniel; Speiser, Daniel E; Chinnasamy, Nachimuthu; Zheng, Zhili; Xu, Hui; Feldman, Steven A; Rosenberg, Steven A; Morgan, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    The clinical success of adoptive immunotherapy of cancer relies on the selection of target antigens that are highly expressed in tumor cells but absent in essential normal tissues. A group of genes that encode the cancer/testis or cancer germline antigens have been proposed as ideal targets for immunotherapy due to their high expression in multiple cancer types and their restricted expression in immunoprivileged normal tissues. In the present work we report the isolation and characterization of human T cell receptors (TCRs) with specificity for synovial sarcoma X breakpoint 2 (SSX2), a cancer/testis antigen expressed in melanoma, prostate cancer, lymphoma, multiple myeloma and pancreatic cancer, among other tumors. We isolated seven HLA-A2 restricted T cell receptors from natural T cell clones derived from tumor-infiltrated lymph nodes of two SSX2-seropositive melanoma patients, and selected four TCRs for cloning into retroviral vectors. Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) transduced with three of four SSX2 TCRs showed SSX241-49 (KASEKIFYV) peptide specific reactivity, tumor cell recognition and tetramer binding. One of these, TCR-5, exhibited tetramer binding in both CD4 and CD8 cells and was selected for further studies. Antigen-specific and HLA-A*0201-restricted interferon-γ release, cell lysis and lymphocyte proliferation was observed following culture of TCR engineered human PBL with relevant tumor cell lines. Codon optimization was found to increase TCR-5 expression in transduced T cells, and this construct has been selected for development of clinical grade viral vector producing cells. The tumor-specific pattern of expression of SSX2, along with the potent and selective activity of TCR-5, makes this TCR an attractive candidate for potential TCR gene therapy to treat multiple cancer histologies.

  6. MAP kinase phosphatase 2 deficient mice develop attenuated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis through regulating dendritic cells and T cells

    PubMed Central

    Barbour, Mark; Plevin, Robin; Jiang, Hui-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatases (MKPs) play key roles in inflammation and immune mediated diseases. Here we investigated the mechanisms by which MKP-2 modulates central nervous system (CNS) inflammation in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Our results show that MKP-2 mRNA levels in the spinal cord and lymphoid organs of EAE mice were increased compared with naive controls, indicating an important role for MKP-2 in EAE development. Indeed, MKP-2−/− mice developed reduced EAE severity, associated with diminished CNS immune cell infiltration, decreased proinflammatory cytokine production and reduced frequency of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in spleens and lymph nodes. In addition, MKP-2−/− CD11c+ dendritic cells (DCs) had reduced expression of MHC-II and CD40 compared with MKP-2+/+ mice. Subsequent experiments revealed that CD4+ T cells from naïve MKP-2−/− mice had decreased cell proliferation and IL-2 and IL-17 production relative to wild type controls. Furthermore, co-culture experiments showed that bone marrow derived DCs of MKP-2−/− mice had impaired capability in antigen presentation and T cell activation. While MKP-2 also modulates macrophage activation, our study suggests that MKP-2 is essential to the pathogenic response of EAE, and it acts mainly via regulating the important antigen presenting DC function and T cell activation. PMID:27958388

  7. T cell receptor signal strength in Treg and iNKT cell development demonstrated by a novel fluorescent reporter mouse

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Amy E.; Holzapfel, Keli L.; Xing, Yan; Cunningham, Nicole R.; Maltzman, Jonathan S.; Punt, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    The ability of antigen receptors to engage self-ligands with varying affinity is crucial for lymphocyte development. To further explore this concept, we generated transgenic mice expressing GFP from the immediate early gene Nr4a1 (Nur77) locus. GFP was up-regulated in lymphocytes by antigen receptor stimulation but not by inflammatory stimuli. In T cells, GFP was induced during positive selection, required major histocompatibility complex for maintenance, and directly correlated with the strength of T cell receptor (TCR) stimulus. Thus, our results define a novel tool for studying antigen receptor activation in vivo. Using this model, we show that regulatory T cells (Treg cells) and invariant NKT cells (iNKT cells) perceived stronger TCR signals than conventional T cells during development. However, although Treg cells continued to perceive strong TCR signals in the periphery, iNKT cells did not. Finally, we show that Treg cell progenitors compete for recognition of rare stimulatory TCR self-ligands. PMID:21606508

  8. IL-27 controls the development of inducible regulatory T cells and Th17 cells via differential effects on STAT1.

    PubMed

    Neufert, Clemens; Becker, Christoph; Wirtz, Stefan; Fantini, Massimo C; Weigmann, Benno; Galle, Peter R; Neurath, Markus F

    2007-07-01

    IL-27 is an IL-12-related cytokine frequently present at sites of inflammation that can promote both anti- and pro-inflammatory immune responses. Here, we have analyzed the mechanisms how IL-27 may drive such divergent immune responses. While IL-27 suppressed the development of proinflammatory Th17 cells, a novel role for this cytokine in inhibiting the development of anti-inflammatory, inducible regulatory T cells (iTreg) was identified. In fact, IL-27 suppressed the development of adaptive, TGF-beta-induced Forkhead box transcription factor p3-positive (Foxp3(+)) Treg. Whereas the blockade of Th17 development was dependent on the transcription factor STAT1, the suppression of iTreg development was STAT1 independent, suggesting that IL-27 utilizes different signaling pathways to shape T cell-driven immune responses. Our data thus demonstrate that IL-27 controls the development of Th17 and iTreg cells via differential effects on STAT1.

  9. Identification of stem cell transcriptional programs normally expressed in embryonic and neural stem cells in alloreactive CD8+ T cells mediating graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Koji; Cui, Shuaiying; Kuick, Rork; Mineishi, Shin; Hexner, Elizabeth; Ferrara, James LM; Emerson, Stephen G.; Zhang, Yi

    2010-01-01

    A hallmark of graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD), a life-threatening complication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, is the cytopathic injury of host tissues mediated by persistent alloreactive effector T cells (TE). However, the mechanisms that regulate the persistence of alloreactive TE during GVHD remain largely unknown. Using mouse GVHD models, we demonstrate that alloreactive CD8+ TE rapidly diminished in vivo when adoptively transferred into irradiated secondary congenic recipient mice. In contrast, although alloreactive CD8+ TE underwent massive apoptosis upon chronic exposure to alloantigens, they proliferated in vivo in secondary allogeneic recipients, persisted and caused severe GVHD. Thus, the continuous proliferation of alloreactive CD8+ TE, which is mediated by alloantigenic stimuli rather than homeostatic factors, is critical to maintaining their persistence. Gene expression profile analysis revealed that while alloreactive CD8+ TE increased the expression of genes associated with cell death, they activated a group of stem cell genes normally expressed in embryonic and neural stem cells. Most of these stem cell genes are associated with cell cycle regulation, DNA replication, chromatin modification and transcription. One of these genes, Ezh2, which encodes a chromatin modifying enzyme, was abundantly expressed in CD8+ TE. Silencing Ezh2 significantly reduced the proliferation of alloantigen-activated CD8+ T cells. Thus, these findings identify that a group of stem cell genes could play important roles in sustaining terminally differentiated alloreactive CD8+ TE and may be therapeutic targets for controlling GVHD. PMID:20116439

  10. Bcl-2 expression during T-cell development: early loss and late return occur at specific stages of commitment to differentiation and survival.

    PubMed Central

    Gratiot-Deans, J; Merino, R; Nuñez, G; Turka, L A

    1994-01-01

    During T-cell development CD3-CD4-CD8- (double-negative) thymocytes proliferative and produce an enormous number of CD3loCD4+CD8+ (double-positive) thymocytes which are destined to die intrathymically unless rescued by positive selection. Those which survive become mature CD3hiCD4/8+ (single-positive) cells and are the precursor of peripheral blood lymphocytes. The product of the bcl-2 protooncogene has been implicated in preventing programmed cell death and is required for prolonged lymphocyte survival following maturation. Previously we and others have reported that Bcl-2 protein expression is biphasic, being high in proliferating double-negative stem cells, low in all double-positive thymocytes except for 1-5% of these cells, and restored in mature, single-positive thymocytes. However, it remained unclear which signaling and selection events regulate Bcl-2 during T-cell maturation. Now we have utilized four-color flow cytometry in normal and genetically altered mice for a detailed analysis of Bcl-2 expression as it relates to T-cell receptor (TCR) expression and positive selection. These studies show that (i) expression of a transgenic TCR in double-negative thymocytes does not lead to premature loss of Bcl-2; thus, Bcl-2 downregulation is not solely due to TCR expression; (ii) Bcl-2 expression is lost at the early transitional CD3-/loCD4-CD8+ stage, prior to expression of CD4; (iii) the Bcl-2+ double-positive thymocytes are those which have undergone positive selection; and (iv) upregulation of Bcl-2 during positive selection requires participation of the CD4 or CD8 co-receptor. These results demonstrate that Bcl-2 and TCR expression are regulated independently during T-cell development, and suggest a role for the CD4 or CD8 co-receptor in Bcl-2 induction during positive selection. Images PMID:7938012

  11. Mechanisms by Which B Cells and Regulatory T Cells Influence Development of Murine Organ-Specific Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Jason S.; Braley-Mullen, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Experiments with B cell-deficient (B−/−) mice indicate that a number of autoimmune diseases require B cells in addition to T cells for their development. Using B−/− Non-obese diabetic (NOD) and NOD.H-2h4 mice, we demonstrated that development of spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis (SAT), Sjogren’s syndrome and diabetes do not develop in B−/− mice, whereas all three diseases develop in B cell-positive wild-type (WT) mice. B cells are required early in life, since reconstitution of adult mice with B cells or autoantibodies did not restore their ability to develop disease. B cells function as important antigen presenting cells (APC) to initiate activation of autoreactive CD4+ effector T cells. If B cells are absent or greatly reduced in number, other APC will present the antigen, such that Treg are preferentially activated and effector T cells are not activated. In these situations, B−/− or B cell-depleted mice develop the autoimmune disease when T regulatory cells (Treg) are transiently depleted. This review focuses on how B cells influence Treg activation and function, and briefly considers factors that influence the effectiveness of B cell depletion for treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:28134752

  12. HLA-DR-restricted T cell lines from newly diagnosed type 1 diabetic patients specific for insulinoma and normal islet beta cell proteins: lack of reactivity to glutamic acid decarboxylase.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, G C; Tremble, J; Bailyes, E; Arden, S D; Kaye, T; McGregor, A M; Banga, J P

    1995-01-01

    T cells reacting with pancreatic islet beta cell proteins play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes in experimental animal models and man, although the islet cell autoantigens against which these T cells are directed remain to be characterized. We have previously shown the presence of disease-related antigens residing in the transplantable RIN insulinoma membranes which are recognized by T cells from diabetic NOD mice. We now report on the establishment of CD4+, T cell lines reacting with insulinoma membranes from six newly diagnosed type 1 diabetic patients. Detailed examination of T cell lines from two patients revealed that both the lines continued to react with normal islet cell proteins and, interestingly, were also stimulated by antigens present in brain microsomes. The two T cell lines showed reactivity with different molecular weight proteins of the insulinoma membranes and both the lines were histocompatibility-linked antigen (HLA)-DR restricted. Although the insulinoma membrane preparation is known to contain glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), none of the six T cell lines proliferates in response to purified GAD. These T cell lines will be valuable in characterizing novel islet beta cell antigens which are likely to be implicated in type 1 diabetes. PMID:7554382

  13. The MAR-binding protein SATB1 orchestrates temporal and spatial expression of multiple genes during T-cell development

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, John D.; Yasui, Dag H.; Niida, Hiroyuki; Joh, Tadashi; Loh, Dennis Y.; Kohwi-Shigematsu, Terumi

    2000-01-01

    SATB1 is expressed primarily in thymocytes and can act as a transcriptional repressor. SATB1 binds in vivo to the matrix attachment regions (MARs) of DNA, which are implicated in the loop domain organization of chromatin. The role of MAR-binding proteins in specific cell lineages is unknown. We generated SATB1-null mice to determine how SATB1 functions in the T-cell lineage. SATB1-null mice are small in size, have disproportionately small thymi and spleens, and die at 3 weeks of age. At the cellular level, multiple defects in T-cell development were observed. Immature CD3−CD4−CD8− triple negative (TN) thymocytes were greatly reduced in number, and thymocyte development was blocked mainly at the DP stage. The few peripheral CD4+ single positive (SP) cells underwent apoptosis and failed to proliferate in response to activating stimuli. At the molecular level, among 589 genes examined, at least 2% of genes including a proto-oncogene, cytokine receptor genes, and apoptosis-related genes were derepressed at inappropriate stages of T-cell development in SATB1-null mice. For example, IL-2Rα and IL-7Rα genes were ectopically transcribed in CD4+CD8+ double positive (DP) thymocytes. SATB1 appears to orchestrate the temporal and spatial expression of genes during T-cell development, thereby ensuring the proper development of this lineage. Our data provide the first evidence that MAR-binding proteins can act as global regulators of cell function in specific cell lineages. PMID:10716941

  14. CXXC finger protein 1 is critical for T-cell intrathymic development through regulating H3K4 trimethylation

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Wenqiang; Guo, Jing; Wen, Xiaofeng; Miao, Li; Lin, Feng; Xu, Guanxin; Ma, Ruoyu; Yin, Shengxia; Hui, Zhaoyuan; Chen, Tingting; Guo, Shixin; Chen, Wei; Huang, Yingying; Liu, Yizhi; Wang, Jianli; Wei, Lai; Wang, Lie

    2016-01-01

    T-cell development in the thymus is largely controlled by an epigenetic program, involving in both DNA methylation and histone modifications. Previous studies have identified Cxxc1 as a regulator of both cytosine methylation and histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3). However, it is unknown whether Cxxc1 plays a role in thymocyte development. Here we show that T-cell development in the thymus is severely impaired in Cxxc1-deficient mice. Furthermore, we identify genome-wide Cxxc1-binding sites and H3K4me3 modification sites in wild-type and Cxxc1-deficient thymocytes. Our results demonstrate that Cxxc1 directly controls the expression of key genes important for thymocyte survival such as RORγt and for T-cell receptor signalling including Zap70 and CD8, through maintaining the appropriate H3K4me3 on their promoters. Importantly, we show that RORγt, a direct target of Cxxc1, can rescue the survival defects in Cxxc1-deficient thymocytes. Our data strongly support a critical role of Cxxc1 in thymocyte development. PMID:27210293

  15. Rational development of high-affinity T-cell receptor-like antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Stewart-Jones, Guillaume; Wadle, Andreas; Hombach, Anja; Shenderov, Eugene; Held, Gerhard; Fischer, Eliane; Kleber, Sascha; Nuber, Natko; Stenner-Liewen, Frank; Bauer, Stefan; McMichael, Andrew; Knuth, Alexander; Abken, Hinrich; Hombach, Andreas A.; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Jones, E. Yvonne; Renner, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    T-cell interaction with a target cell is a key event in the adaptive immune response and primarily driven by T-cell receptor (TCR) recognition of peptide-MHC (pMHC) complexes. TCR avidity for a given pMHC is determined by number of MHC molecules, availability of coreceptors, and TCR affinity for MHC or peptide, respectively, with peptide recognition being the most important factor to confer target specificity. Here we present high-resolution crystal structures of 2 Fab antibodies in complex with the immunodominant NY-ESO-1157–165 peptide analogue (SLLMWITQV) presented by HLA-A*0201 and compare them with a TCR recognizing the same pMHC. Binding to the central methionine-tryptophan peptide motif and orientation of binding were almost identical for Fabs and TCR. As the MW “peg” dominates the contacts between Fab and peptide, we estimated the contributions of individual amino acids between the Fab and peptide to provide the rational basis for a peptide-focused second-generation, high-affinity antibody library. The final Fab candidate achieved better peptide binding by 2 light-chain mutations, giving a 20-fold affinity improvement to 2–4 nM, exceeding the affinity of the TCR by 1,000-fold. The high-affinity Fab when grafted as recombinant TCR on T cells conferred specific killing of HLA-A*0201/NY-ESO-1157–165 target cells. In summary, we prove that affinity maturation of antibodies mimicking a TCR is possible and provide a strategy for engineering high-affinity antibodies that can be used in targeting specific pMHC complexes for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:19307587

  16. Dissecting the Mechanism of T Cell Tolerance for More Effective Breast Cancer Vaccine Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    comprising amino acids 420-429 (PDSLRDLSVF) of neu. We also determined that RNEU420-429 is naturally processed and presented by tumor cells and is the...the natural RNEU4 20-4 2 9 epitope, both wild-type RNEU4 2 0 -42 9 and the heteroclitic variant RNEU 420-429A2 were used to vaccinate mice. Dendritic...Cancer Res. 2001, May 1;61(9):3689-97. 9. Sakaguchi S. Naturally arising CD4÷ regulatory t cells for immunologic self-tolerance and negative control

  17. Ikaros sets the potential for Th17 lineage gene expression through effects on chromatin state in early T cell development.

    PubMed

    Wong, Larry Y; Hatfield, Julianne K; Brown, Melissa A

    2013-12-06

    Th17 cells are important effectors of immunity to extracellular pathogens, particularly at mucosal surfaces, but they can also contribute to pathologic tissue inflammation and autoimmunity. Defining the multitude of factors that influence their development is therefore of paramount importance. Our previous studies using Ikaros(-/-) CD4+ T cells implicated Ikaros in Th1 versus Th2 lineage decisions. Here we demonstrate that Ikaros also regulates Th17 differentiation through its ability to promote expression of multiple Th17 lineage-determining genes, including Ahr, Runx1, Rorc, Il17a, and Il22. Ikaros exerts its influence on the chromatin remodeling of these loci at two distinct stages in CD4+ T helper cell development. In naive cells, Ikaros is required to limit repressive chromatin modifications at these gene loci, thus maintaining the potential for expression of the Th17 gene program. Subsequently, Ikaros is essential for the acquisition of permissive histone marks in response to Th17 polarizing signals. Additionally, Ikaros represses the expression of genes that limit Th17 development, including Foxp3 and Tbx21. These data define new targets of the action of Ikaros and indicate that Ikaros plays a critical role in CD4+ T cell differentiation by integrating specific cytokine cues and directing epigenetic modifications that facilitate activation or repression of relevant genes that drive T cell lineage choice.

  18. Gallium maltolate inhibits human cutaneous T-cell lymphoma tumor development in mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xuesong; Wang, Timothy W; Lessmann, George M; Saleh, Jamal; Liu, Xiping; Chitambar, Christopher R; Hwang, Sam T

    2015-03-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs) represent a heterogeneous group of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma characterized by an accumulation of malignant CD4 T cells in the skin. The group IIIa metal salt, gallium nitrate, is known to have antineoplastic activity against B-cell lymphoma in humans, but its activity in CTCLs has not been elaborated in detail. Herein, we examined the antineoplastic efficacy of a gallium compound, gallium maltolate (GaM), in vitro and in vivo with murine models of CTCLs. GaM inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis of cultured CTCL cells. In human CTCL xenograft models, peritumoral injection of GaM limited the growth of CTCL cells, shown by fewer tumor formations, smaller tumor sizes, and decreased neovascularization in tumor microenvironment. To identify key signaling pathways that have a role in GaM-mediated reduction of tumor growth, we analyzed inflammatory cytokines, as well as signal transduction pathways in CTCL cells treated by GaM. IFN-γ-induced chemokines and IL-13 were found to be notably increased in GaM-treated CTCL cells. However, immunosuppressive cytokines, such as IL-10, were decreased with GaM treatment. Interestingly, both oxidative stress and p53 pathways were involved in GaM-induced cytotoxicity. These results warrant further investigation of GaM as a therapeutic agent for CTCLs.

  19. Distinct Signaling of Coreceptors Regulates Specific Metabolism Pathways and Impacts Memory Development in CAR T Cells.

    PubMed

    Kawalekar, Omkar U; O'Connor, Roddy S; Fraietta, Joseph A; Guo, Lili; McGettigan, Shannon E; Posey, Avery D; Patel, Prachi R; Guedan, Sonia; Scholler, John; Keith, Brian; Snyder, Nathaniel W; Snyder, Nathaniel; Blair, Ian A; Blair, Ian; Milone, Michael C; June, Carl H

    2016-02-16

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) redirect T cell cytotoxicity against cancer cells, providing a promising approach to cancer immunotherapy. Despite extensive clinical use, the attributes of CAR co-stimulatory domains that impact persistence and resistance to exhaustion of CAR-T cells remain largely undefined. Here, we report the influence of signaling domains of coreceptors CD28 and 4-1BB on the metabolic characteristics of human CAR T cells. Inclusion of 4-1BB in the CAR architecture promoted the outgrowth of CD8(+) central memory T cells that had significantly enhanced respiratory capacity, increased fatty acid oxidation and enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis. In contrast, CAR T cells with CD28 domains yielded effector memory cells with a genetic signature consistent with enhanced glycolysis. These results provide, at least in part, a mechanistic insight into the differential persistence of CAR-T cells expressing 4-1BB or CD28 signaling domains in clinical trials and inform the design of future CAR T cell therapies.

  20. CD4+ T cells potently induce epithelial-mesenchymal-transition in premalignant and malignant pancreatic ductal epithelial cells–novel implications of CD4+ T cells in pancreatic cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Goebel, Lisa; Grage-Griebenow, Evelin; Gorys, Artur; Helm, Ole; Genrich, Geeske; Lenk, Lennart; Wesch, Daniela; Ungefroren, Hendrik; Freitag-Wolf, Sandra; Sipos, Bence; Röcken, Christoph; Schäfer, Heiner; Sebens, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a risk factor of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and characterized by a pronounced desmoplastic reaction with CD4+ T cells accounting for the majority of the stromal T cell infiltrate. Epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT) is a critical process for metastasis by which epithelial/carcinoma cells become enabled to disseminate probably prior to tumor formation. To investigate whether CD4+ T cells induce EMT in human pancreatic ductal epithelial cells, premalignant H6c7 cells were mono- or co-cultured with human CD4+CD25+CD127−CD49d− regulatory T cells (T-regs) or CD4+CD25− T-effector cells (T-effs) being isolated by negative magnetic bead separation from blood of healthy donors. Particularly in the presence of activated T-effs, H6c7 cells acquired a spindle-shaped morphology, reduced E-cadherin expression, and elevated expression of the mesenchymal proteins vimentin, L1CAM, and ZEB-1. This was accompanied by an increased invasive behavior. Moreover, activated T-effs exerted similar effects in the PDAC cell line T3M4. Blocking of TNF-α and IL-6 being released at greater amounts into supernatants during co-cultures with activated T-effs attenuated the EMT-associated alterations in H6c7 cells. Supporting these findings, EMT-associated alterations (exemplified by reduced E-cadherin expression and enhanced expression of vimentin and L1CAM) were predominantly detected in ductal epithelium of CP tissues surrounded by a dense stroma enriched with CD4+ T cells. Overall this study points to a novel role of CD4+ T cells beyond their immune function in pancreatic tumorigenesis and underscores the view that EMT induction in pancreatic ductal epithelial cells represents an early event in PDAC development being essentially promoted by inflammatory processes. PMID:26137395

  1. Profile of maternal CD4 T-cell effector function during normal pregnancy and in women with a history of recurrent miscarriage.

    PubMed

    Lissauer, David; Goodyear, Oliver; Khanum, Rahela; Moss, Paul A H; Kilby, Mark D

    2014-03-01

    The traditional paradigm suggests that during normal pregnancy maternal immunological tolerance of the allogenic fetus is association with a maternal T-lymphocyte shift from a Th1 to a Th2 phenotype, with the opposite effect reported in patients with recurrent miscarriage. However, studies on maternal peripheral blood are conflicting. In the present study, we characterized the maternal CD4 T-cell effector subsets, including the recently described Th17 subset, during normal pregnancy (cross-sectional cohort, n=71; longitudinal cohort, n=17) and contrasted this with women with recurrent miscarriage (n=24). Longitudinal analysis of peripheral blood from normal pregnancy demonstrated a fall in the percentage of Th17 cells between the first and second trimester (P≤0.05), but no significant changes were observed across gestation or the post-natal period in Th1 or Th2 subsets. In contrast, in women with a history of recurrent miscarriage, an elevated proportion of Th17 (0.314% compared with 0.097%; P=0.0009) and Th1 (12.4% compared with 5.3%; P=0.0002) cells was detected. The suggestion that Th17 cells may have a role in the normal events of implantation and early pregnancy requires further evaluation and mechanistic studies. The results of the present study, by conducting a careful longitudinal analysis, demonstrate that a peripheral Th1/Th2 shift is not a requirement for normal pregnancy. By contrast, the profound increase in Th1 and Th17 cells in women with recurrent miscarriage indicates that peripheral immunological dysfunction may be important in this group specifically, and these assays may be important in guiding therapeutic interventions in this group and warrant further investigation to determine whether they are predictive of outcome or responses to immunomodulatory therapy.

  2. Different gamma delta T-cell receptors are expressed on thymocytes at different stages of development.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, K; Bonneville, M; Takagaki, Y; Nakanishi, N; Kanagawa, O; Krecko, E G; Tonegawa, S

    1989-01-01

    We have analyzed the structural diversity of the murine gamma delta T-cell receptor (TCR) heterodimer expressed on CD4- CD8- thymocyte populations and on TCR gamma delta-expressing hybridomas derived from thymocytes of fetal, newborn, and adult mice. We found that CD4- CD8- thymocytes derived from mice of different pre- and postnatal age preferentially express a gamma delta TCR encoded by different subsets of gamma and delta gene segments. This age-dependent differential expression of gamma delta TCR on thymocytes seems to be accomplished in part by a specific control of rearranged gamma genes operating at the level of transcription and/or RNA stability. We discuss the implications of these findings with respect to the recognition roles of the gamma delta TCR. Images PMID:2463632

  3. Development of T cells carrying two complementary chimeric antigen receptors against glypican-3 and asialoglycoprotein receptor 1 for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng; Li, Kesang; Jiang, Hua; Song, Fei; Gao, Huiping; Pan, Xiaorong; Shi, Bizhi; Bi, Yanyu; Wang, Huamao; Wang, Hongyang; Li, Zonghai

    2017-04-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy leveraging chimeric antigen receptor-modified T (CAR-T) cells holds great promise for the treatment of cancer. However, tumor-associated antigens often have low expression levels in normal tissues, which can cause on-target, off-tumor toxicity. Recently, we reported that GPC3-targeted CAR-T cells could eradicate hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) xenografts in mice. However, it remains unknown whether on-target, off-tumor toxicity can occur. Therefore, we proposed that dual-targeted CAR-T cells co-expressing glypican-3 (GPC3) and asialoglycoprotein receptor 1 (ASGR1) (a liver tissue-specific protein)-targeted CARs featuring CD3ζ and 28BB (containing both CD28 and 4-1BB signaling domains), respectively, may have reduced on-target, off-tumor toxicity. Our results demonstrated that dual-targeted CAR-T cells caused no cytotoxicity to ASGR1(+)GPC3(-) tumor cells, but they exhibited a similar cytotoxicity against GPC3(+)ASGR1(-) and GPC3(+)ASGR1(+) HCC cells in vitro. We found that dual-targeted CAR-T cells showed significantly higher cytokine secretion, proliferation and antiapoptosis ability against tumor cells bearing both antigens than single-targeted CAR-T cells in vitro. Furthermore, the dual-targeted CAR-T cells displayed potent growth suppression activity on GPC3(+)ASGR1(+) HCC tumor xenografts, while no obvious growth suppression was seen with single or double antigen-negative tumor xenografts. Additionally, the dual-targeted T cells exerted superior anticancer activity and persistence against single-targeted T cells in two GPC3(+)ASGR1(+) HCC xenograft models. Together, T cells carrying two complementary CARs against GPC3 and ASGR1 may reduce the risk of on-target, off-tumor toxicity while maintaining relatively potent antitumor activities on GPC3(+)ASGR1(+) HCC.

  4. T cell development requires constraint of the myeloid regulator C/EBPa by the Notch target and transcriptional repressor Hes1

    PubMed Central

    De Obaldia, Maria Elena; Bell, J Jeremiah; Wang, Xinxin; Harly, Christelle; Yashiro-Ohtani, Yumi; DeLong, Jonathan H; Zlotoff, Daniel A; Sultana, Dil Afroz; Pear, Warren S; Bhandoola, Avinash

    2014-01-01

    Notch signaling induces gene expression of the T cell lineage and discourages alternative fate outcomes. Hematopoietic deficiency in the Notch target Hes1 results in severe T cell lineage defects; however, the underlying mechanism is unknown. We found here that Hes1 constrained myeloid gene-expression programs in T cell progenitor cells, as deletion of the myeloid regulator C/EBPa restored the development of T cells from Hes1-deficient progenitor cells. Repression of Cebpa by Hes1 required its DNA-binding and Groucho-recruitment domains. Hes1-deficient multipotent progenitor cells showed a developmental bias toward myeloid and dendritic cells after Notch signaling, whereas Hes1-deficient lymphoid progenitor cells required additional cytokine signaling for diversion into the myeloid lineage. Our findings establish the importance of constraining developmental programs of the myeloid lineage early in T cell development. PMID:24185616

  5. Ex Vivo γ-Retroviral Gene Therapy of Dogs with X-linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency and the Development of a Thymic T Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Douglas R.; Hartnett, Brian J.; Kennedy, Jeffrey S.; Vernau, William; Moore, Peter F.; O’Malley, Thomas; Burkly, Linda C.; Henthorn, Paula S.; Felsburg, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    We have previously shown that in vivo γ-retroviral gene therapy of dogs with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) results in sustained T cell reconstitution and sustained marking in myeloid and B cells for up to 4 years with no evidence of any serious adverse effects. The purpose of this study was to determine whether ex vivo γ-retroviral gene therapy of XSCID dogs results in a similar outcome. Eight of 12 XSCID dogs treated with an average of dose of 5.8 × 106 transduced CD34+ cells/kg successfully engrafted producing normal numbers of gene-corrected CD45RA+ (naïve) T cells. However, this was followed by a steady decrease in CD45RA+ T cells, T cell diversity, and thymic output as measured by T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) resulting in a T cell lymphopenia. None of the dogs survived past 11 months post treatment. At necropsy, few gene-corrected thymocytes were observed correlating with the TREC levels and one of the dogs was diagnosed with a thymic T cell lymphoma that was attributed to the gene therapy. This study highlights the outcome differences between the ex vivo and in vivo approach to γ-retroviral gene therapy and is the first to document a serious adverse event following gene therapy in a canine model of a human genetic disease. PMID:21536334

  6. Spontaneous development of psoriasis in a new animal model shows an essential role for resident T cells and tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Boyman, Onur; Hefti, Hans Peter; Conrad, Curdin; Nickoloff, Brian J; Suter, Mark; Nestle, Frank O

    2004-03-01

    Psoriasis is a common T cell-mediated autoimmune disorder where primary onset of skin lesions is followed by chronic relapses. Progress in defining the mechanism for initiation of pathological events has been hampered by the lack of a relevant experimental model in which psoriasis develops spontaneously. We present a new animal model in which skin lesions spontaneously developed when symptomless prepsoriatic human skin was engrafted onto AGR129 mice, deficient in type I and type II interferon receptors and for the recombination activating gene 2. Upon engraftment, resident human T cells in prepsoriatic skin underwent local proliferation. T cell proliferation was crucial for development of a psoriatic phenotype because blocking of T cells led to inhibition of psoriasis development. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha was a key regulator of local T cell proliferation and subsequent disease development. Our observations highlight the importance of resident T cells in the context of lesional tumor necrosis factor-alpha production during development of a psoriatic lesion. These findings underline the importance of resident immune cells in psoriasis and will have implications for new therapeutic strategies for psoriasis and other T cell-mediated diseases.

  7. Insights into immune system development and function from mouse T-cell repertoires

    PubMed Central

    Sethna, Zachary; Elhanati, Yuval; Dudgeon, Chrissy S.; Callan, Curtis G.; Levine, Arnold J.; Mora, Thierry; Walczak, Aleksandra M.

    2017-01-01

    The ability of the adaptive immune system to respond to arbitrary pathogens stems from the broad diversity of immune cell surface receptors. This diversity originates in a stochastic DNA editing process (VDJ recombination) that acts on the surface receptor gene each time a new immune cell is created from a stem cell. By analyzing T-cell receptor (TCR) sequence repertoires taken from the blood and thymus of mice of different ages, we quantify the changes in the VDJ recombination process that occur from embryo to young adult. We find a rapid increase with age in the number of random insertions and a dramatic increase in diversity. Because the blood accumulates thymic output over time, blood repertoires are mixtures of different statistical recombination processes, and we unravel the mixture statistics to obtain a picture of the time evolution of the early immune system. Sequence repertoire analysis also allows us to detect the statistical impact of selection on the output of the VDJ recombination process. The effects we find are nearly identical between thymus and blood, suggesting that our analysis mainly detects selection for proper folding of the TCR receptor protein. We further find that selection is weaker in laboratory mice than in humans and it does not affect the diversity of the repertoire. PMID:28196891

  8. Tumor antigen-specific CD4+ T cells in cancer immunity: from antigen identification to tumor prognosis and development of therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Protti, M P; De Monte, L; Monte, L D; Di Lullo, G; Lullo, G D

    2014-04-01

    CD4(+) T cells comprise a large fraction of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and it is now established that they may exert an important role in tumor immune-surveillance. Several CD4(+) T cell subsets [i.e. T helper (Th)1, Th2, T regulatory (Treg), Th17, Th22 and follicular T helper (Tfh)] have been described and differentiation of each subset depends on both the antigen presenting cells responsible for its activation and the cytokine environment present at the site of priming. Tumor antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells with different functional activity have been found in the blood of cancer patients and different CD4(+) T cell subsets have been identified at the tumor site by the expression of specific transcription factors and the profile of secreted cytokines. Importantly, depending on the subset, CD4(+) T cells may exert antitumor versus pro-tumor functions. Here we review the studies that first identified the presence of tumor-specific CD4(+) T cells in cancer patients, the techniques used to identify the tumor antigens recognized, the role of the different CD4(+) T cell subsets in tumor immunity and in cancer prognosis and the development of therapeutic strategies aimed at activating efficient antitumor CD4(+) T cell effectors.

  9. IL-15 receptor α signaling constrains the development of IL-17–producing γδ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Colpitts, Sara L.; Puddington, Lynn; Lefrançois, Leo

    2015-01-01

    The development and homeostasis of γδ T cells is highly dependent on distinct cytokine networks. Here we examine the role of IL-15 and its unique receptor, IL-15Rα, in the development of IL-17–producing γδ (γδ-17) T cells. Phenotypic analysis has shown that CD44high γδ-17 cells express IL-15Rα and the common gamma chain (CD132), yet lack the IL-2/15Rβ chain (CD122). Surprisingly, we found an enlarged population of γδ-17 cells in the peripheral and mesenteric lymph nodes of adult IL-15Rα KO mice, but not of IL-15 KO mice. The generation of mixed chimeras from neonatal thymocytes indicated that cell-intrinsic IL-15Rα expression was required to limit IL-17 production by γδ T cells. γδ-17 cells also were increased in the peripheral lymph nodes of transgenic knock-in mice, where the IL-15Rα intracellular signaling domain was replaced with the intracellular portion of the IL-2Rα chain (that lacks signaling capacity). Finally, an analysis of neonatal thymi revealed that the CD44lo/int precursors of γδ-17 cells, which also expressed IL-15Rα, were increased in newborn mice deficient in IL-15Rα signaling, but not in IL-15 itself. Thus, these findings demonstrate that signaling through IL-15Rα regulates the development of γδ-17 cells early in ontogeny, with long-term effects on their peripheral homeostasis in the adult. PMID:26195801

  10. Age-related development and tissue distribution of T cell markers (CD4 and CD8a) in Chinese goose.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shun; Zhou, Qin; Cheng, Beibei; Yan, Bing; Yan, Xiaoling; Zhao, Qiurong; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2015-06-01

    Aquatic birds play n critical role in the transmission and dissemination of many important pathogens such as avian influenza virus. The cell-mediated immunity is very important in eliminating the intracellular antigens. Expression of CD4 and CD8 on T cell surface is essential for cell-mediated immune defence and T-cell development. However, the ontogeny of T lymphocytes in waterfowl is scarce and fragmentary. To address these questions, here we report the development and tissues distribution of CD4 and CD8α in goose embryo, gosling and goose by immunocytochemistry assay using monoclonal antibodies. Moreover, the age-related mRNA level of goose CD4 and CD8α in different immune tissues were study by real time quantitative PCR. Our results suggested that the high expression of CD4 and CD8α were readily found in thymus, which peaked at the first week post-hatch. And the highest expression level of CD4 and CD8α were detected in bursa of Fabricius, caecal tonsils, spleen and intestine at the second week, after that the expression level were gradually decreased. Interestingly, the remarkably high expression of CD4 and CD8α in Harderian gland were detected at the first week, which is about hundreds times more than that in other tissues. Our findings demonstrated that the development and the distribution of CD4 and CD8α are partly changed in an age-related way. Moreover, the histological morphogenesis of immune tissues were also discussed. Our results may shed lights on the better understand of T-cell mediate immunity in goose.

  11. Normal human pregnancy is associated with an elevation in the immune suppressive CD25+ CD4+ regulatory T-cell subset.

    PubMed

    Somerset, David A; Zheng, Yong; Kilby, Mark D; Sansom, David M; Drayson, Mark T

    2004-05-01

    Summary CD4+ CD25+ T regulatory cells (TReg), suppress antigen-specific immune responses and are important for allograft tolerance. During pregnancy the mother tolerates an allograft expressing paternal antigens (the fetus) requiring substantial changes in immune regulation over a programmed period of time. We analysed whether immune-suppressive TReg cells were altered during pregnancy and therefore might play a part in this tolerant state. The presence of TReg cells was assessed in the blood of 25 non-pregnant, 63 pregnant and seven postnatal healthy women by flow cytometry. We observed an increase in circulating TReg cells during early pregnancy, peaking during the second trimester and then a decline postpartum. Isolated CD25+ CD4+ cells expressed FoxP3 messenger RNA, a marker of TReg cells, and suppressed proliferative responses of autologous CD4+ CD25- T cells to allogeneic dendritic cells. These data support the concept that normal pregnancy is associated with an elevation in the number of TReg cells which may be important in maintaining materno-fetal tolerance.

  12. Development of Spontaneous Anergy in Invariant Natural Killer T Cells in a Mouse Model of Dyslipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Nicole A.; Mendez-Fernandez, Yanice V.; Covarrubias, Roman; Porcelli, Steven A.; Savage, Paul B.; Yagita, Hideo; Van Kaer, Luc; Major, Amy S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective In this study, we investigated whether dyslipidemia-associated perturbed invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cell function is due to intrinsic changes in iNKT cells or defects in the ability of antigen-presenting cells to activate iNKT cells. Methods and Results We compared iNKT cell expansion and cytokine production in C57BL/6J (B6) and apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE−/−) mice. In response to in vivo stimulation with α-galactosylceramide, a prototypic iNKT cell glycolipid antigen, apoE−/− mice showed significantly decreased splenic iNKT cell expansion at 3 days after injection, a profile associated with iNKT cell anergy due to chronic stimulation. This decrease in expansion and cytokine production was accompanied by a 2-fold increase in percentage of iNKT cells expressing the inhibitory marker programmed death-1 in apoE−/− mice compared with controls. However, in vivo and in vitro blockade of programmed death-1 using monoclonal antibody was not able to restore functions of iNKT cells from apoE−/− mice to B6 levels. iNKT cells from apoE−/− mice also had increased intracellular T cell receptor and Ly49 expression, a phenotype associated with previous activation. Changes in iNKT cell functions were cell autonomous, because dendritic cells from apoE−/− mice were able to activate B6 iNKT cells, but iNKT cells from apoE−/− mice were not able to respond to B6 dendritic cells. Conclusion These data suggest that chronic dyslipidemia induces an iNKT cell phenotype that is unresponsive to further simulation by exogenous glycolipid and that sustained unresponsiveness is iNKT cell intrinsic. PMID:20539017

  13. Cytomegalovirus Infection Leads to Development of High Frequencies of Cytotoxic Virus-Specific CD4+ T Cells Targeted to Vascular Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Begum, Jusnara; Lal, Neeraj; Zuo, Jianmin; Beggs, Andrew; Moss, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection elicits a very strong and sustained intravascular T cell immune response which may contribute towards development of accelerated immune senescence and vascular disease in older people. Virus-specific CD8+ T cell responses have been investigated extensively through the use of HLA-peptide tetramers but much less is known regarding CMV-specific CD4+ T cells. We used a range of HLA class II-peptide tetramers to investigate the phenotypic and transcriptional profile of CMV-specific CD4+ T cells within healthy donors. We show that such cells comprise an average of 0.45% of the CD4+ T cell pool and can reach up to 24% in some individuals (range 0.01–24%). CMV-specific CD4+ T cells display a highly differentiated effector memory phenotype and express a range of cytokines, dominated by dual TNF-α and IFN-γ expression, although substantial populations which express IL-4 were seen in some donors. Microarray analysis and phenotypic expression revealed a profile of unique features. These include the expression of CX3CR1, which would direct cells towards fractalkine on activated endothelium, and the β2-adrenergic receptor, which could permit rapid response to stress. CMV-specific CD4+ T cells display an intense cytotoxic profile with high level expression of granzyme B and perforin, a pattern which increases further during aging. In addition CMV-specific CD4+ T cells demonstrate strong cytotoxic activity against antigen-loaded target cells when isolated directly ex vivo. PD-1 expression is present on 47% of cells but both the intensity and distribution of the inhibitory receptor is reduced in older people. These findings reveal the marked accumulation and unique phenotype of CMV-specific CD4+ T cells and indicate how such T cells may contribute to the vascular complications associated with CMV in older people. PMID:27606804

  14. Realism and pragmatism in developing an effective chimeric antigen receptor T-cell product for solid cancers.

    PubMed

    Gad, Ahmed Z; El-Naggar, Shahenda; Ahmed, Nabil

    2016-11-01

    Over the last two decades, harnessing the power of the immune system has shown substantial promise. Specifically, the successes that chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells achieved in the treatment of hematologic malignancies provided a concrete platform for further development in solid tumors. Considering that the latter contribute more than three quarters of cancer-related deaths in humans makes it clear that solid tumors represent the larger medical challenge, but also the larger developmental promise in the market. In solid tumors though, the more is achieved the more challenges are unveiled. The mere fact that engineered T cells are personalized therapies rather than a mass product has been a main constraint for clinical outspread. Further, the complexity of the hostile solid tumor microenvironment, antigenic diversity and dynamicity and the presence of a tenacious stem cell population rendered the effective development to the clinic questionable. In this article we shed light on the importance of a realistic understanding of challenges faced in solid tumors and some very innovative efforts to overcome these challenges in a manner that paves a pragmatic yet realistic road toward effective development at the discovery level and beyond.

  15. The adoptive transfer of cultured T cells for patients with metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, James C

    2013-01-01

    T cells have been shown to be capable of rejecting a patient's tumor. Weak responses to current vaccines and the toxicity of exogenously administered cytokines limit the intensity of the T-cell response that can be actively generated in vivo. Adoptive T-cell transfer enhances an intrinsically weak immune response to cancer by activating and expanding tumor reactive T cells in vitro and manipulating the environment of the host at the time of transfer. One can frequently find tumor-reactive T cells in metastatic lesions in patients with melanoma, and expand them in vitro for readministration. When successful, this adoptive cellular immunotherapy has resulted in sustainable curative outcomes. Subsequently, the applicability of adoptive T-cell transfer has been greatly expanded by the development of methods to genetically engineer open-repertoire human T-cells to confer tumor reactivity. This re-direction of T-cell specificity can be achieved by introducing a variety of receptors that ligate tumor-associated antigens and then trigger the normal activation mechanism of T cells. Future T-cell engineering will add a new dimension by reprogramming T-cell functions for optimal tumor rejection. The antigens recognized by T cells, the techniques to procure and grow tumor reactive T cells, the conditioning of the recipient to optimize efficacy, and the results of clinical protocols are reviewed herein.

  16. Molecular evidence for a thymus-independent partial T cell development in a FOXN1-/- athymic human fetus.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Anna; Panico, Luigi; Gorrese, Marisa; Bianchino, Gabriella; Barone, Maria V; Grieco, Vitina; Vitiello, Laura; D'Assante, Roberta; Romano, Rosa; Palamaro, Loredana; Scalia, Giulia; Vecchio, Luigi Del; Pignata, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    The thymus is the primary organ able to support T cell ontogeny, abrogated in FOXN1(-/-) human athymia. Although evidence indicates that in animal models T lymphocytes may differentiate at extrathymic sites, whether this process is really thymus-independent has still to be clarified. In an athymic FOXN1(-/-) fetus, in which we previously described a total blockage of CD4(+) and partial blockage of CD8(+) cell development, we investigated whether intestine could play a role as extrathymic site of T-lymphopoiesis in humans. We document the presence of few extrathymically developed T lymphocytes and the presence in the intestine of CD3(+) and CD8(+), but not of CD4(+) cells, a few of them exhibiting a CD45RA(+) naïve phenotype. The expression of CD3εεpTα, RAG1 and RAG2 transcripts in the intestine and TCR gene rearrangement was also documented, thus indicating that in humans the partial T cell ontogeny occurring at extrathymic sites is a thymus- and FOXN1-independent process.

  17. Reprogramming the tumor microenvironment: tumor-induced immunosuppressive factors paralyze T cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Annie A; Drake, Virginia; Huang, Huai-Shiuan; Chiu, ShihChi; Zheng, Lei

    2015-01-01

    It has become evident that tumor-induced immuno-suppressive factors in the tumor microenvironment play a major role in suppressing normal functions of effector T cells. These factors serve as hurdles that limit the therapeutic potential of cancer immunotherapies. This review focuses on illustrating the molecular mechanisms of immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment, including evasion of T-cell recognition, interference with T-cell trafficking, metabolism, and functions, induction of resistance to T-cell killing, and apoptosis of T cells. A better understanding of these mechanisms may help in the development of strategies to enhance the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapies. PMID:26140242

  18. Reprogramming the tumor microenvironment: tumor-induced immunosuppressive factors paralyze T cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Annie A; Drake, Virginia; Huang, Huai-Shiuan; Chiu, ShihChi; Zheng, Lei

    2015-07-01

    It has become evident that tumor-induced immuno-suppressive factors in the tumor microenvironment play a major role in suppressing normal functions of effector T cells. These factors serve as hurdles that limit the therapeutic potential of cancer immunotherapies. This review focuses on illustrating the molecular mechanisms of immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment, including evasion of T-cell recognition, interference with T-cell trafficking, metabolism, and functions, induction of resistance to T-cell killing, and apoptosis of T cells. A better understanding of these mechanisms may help in the development of strategies to enhance the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapies.

  19. Decreased T cell ERK pathway signaling may contribute to the development of lupus through effects on DNA methylation and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Oelke, Kurt; Richardson, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    T cells from patients with active lupus have multiple biochemical abnormalities. One of these is DNA hypomethylation, which in model systems alters gene expression and induces lupus-like autoimmunity. Recent reports indicate that DNA methylation is regulated in part by the ERK pathway, and that ERK pathway signaling is diminished in lupus T cells. This suggests a model in which defective T cell ERK pathway signaling contributes to the development of autoimmunity by decreasing DNA methyltransferase expression, modifying DNA methylation patterns and altering gene expression. This mechanism could contribute to idiopathic and drug-induced lupus.

  20. Faster T-cell development following gene therapy compared with haploidentical HSCT in the treatment of SCID-X1.

    PubMed

    Touzot, Fabien; Moshous, Despina; Creidy, Rita; Neven, Bénédicte; Frange, Pierre; Cros, Guilhem; Caccavelli, Laure; Blondeau, Johanna; Magnani, Alessandra; Luby, Jean-Marc; Ternaux, Brigitte; Picard, Capucine; Blanche, Stéphane; Fischer, Alain; Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; Cavazzana, Marina

    2015-06-04

    During the last decade, gene therapy via ex vivo gene transfer into autologous hematopoietic stem cells has emerged as a convincing therapy for severe combined immunodeficiency caused by ILR2G mutation (SCID-X1) despite the occurrence of genotoxicity caused by the integration of first-generation retroviral vectors. However, the place of gene therapy among the therapeutic armamentarium remains to be defined. We retrospectively analyze and compare clinical outcomes and immune reconstitution in 13 consecutive SCID-X1 patients having undergone haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and 14 SCID-X1 patients treated with gene therapy over the same period at a single center level: the Necker Children's Hospital (Paris, France). Our results show a clear advantage in terms of T-cell development of gene therapy over HSCT with a mismatched donor. Patients treated with gene therapy display a faster T-cell reconstitution and a better long-term thymic output. Interestingly, this advantage of gene therapy vs haploidentical HSCT seems to be independent of the existence of clinical graft-versus-host disease in the latter condition. If data of safety are confirmed over the long term, gene therapy for SCID-X1 appears to be an equal, if not superior, alternative to haploidentical HSCT.

  1. T-cell immunity of SARS-CoV: Implications for vaccine development against MERS-CoV.

    PubMed

    Liu, William J; Zhao, Min; Liu, Kefang; Xu, Kun; Wong, Gary; Tan, Wenjie; Gao, George F

    2017-01-01

    Over 12 years have elapsed since severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) triggered the first global alert for coronavirus infections. Virus transmission in humans was quickly halted by public health measures and human infections of SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) have not been observed since. However, other coronaviruses still pose a continuous threat to human health, as exemplified by the recent emergence of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) in humans. The work on SARS-CoV widens our knowledge on the epidemiology, pathophysiology and immunology of coronaviruses and may shed light on MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV). It has been confirmed that T-cell immunity plays an important role in recovery from SARS-CoV infection. Herein, we summarize T-cell immunological studies of SARS-CoV and discuss the potential cross-reactivity of the SARS-CoV-specific immunity against MERS-CoV, which may provide useful recommendations for the development of broad-spectrum vaccines against coronavirus infections.

  2. IL-15 promotes regulatory T cell function and protects against diabetes development in NK-depleted NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jinxing; Liu, Wentao; Hu, Biliang; Tian, Zhigang; Yang, Yongguang

    2010-02-01

    IL-15, an anti-apoptotic cytokine, has been reported to promote the survival and function of NK cells and T cells, including regulatory T cells (Tregs). Here we examined the effect of repeated injections of IL-15 on the development of diabetes in NOD mice. Injection of recombinant murine IL-15, once a day for 2 weeks, neither inhibited nor accelerated diabetes development in untreated NOD mice. However, treatment with IL-15 significantly reduced the incidence and delayed the onset of diabetes in NOD mice that were depleted of NK cells, while NK cell depletion alone had no protection against the disease development. The protective effect in IL-15-treated, NK cell-depleted NOD mice was associated with an increase in immunosuppressive activity of CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs. IL-15 also enhanced Foxp3 expression in CD4(+)CD25(+) cells in an in vitro culture system, and such an effect of IL-15 was abrogated by IL-15-activated NK cells. Inhibition of IL-15-induced Foxp3 expression by IL-15-activated NK cells likely resulted from their IFN-gamma production, as recombinant IFN-gamma, or the culture supernatant of IL-15-activated wild-type mouse NK cells but not of IL-15-activated IFN-gamma-deficient NK cells, mediated a similar inhibition. IFN-gamma also diminished the stimulatory effect of IL-15 on Treg function in vitro. These results indicate that IL-15 has the potential to promote Treg function and protect against diabetes development in NOD mice, but such an activity can be eliminated by simultaneous activation of NK cells in IL-15-treated mice.

  3. Tpl2 and ERK transduce antiproliferative T cell receptor signals and inhibit transformation of chronically stimulated T cells.

    PubMed

    Tsatsanis, Christos; Vaporidi, Katerina; Zacharioudaki, Vassiliki; Androulidaki, Ariadne; Sykulev, Yuri; Margioris, Andrew N; Tsichlis, Philip N

    2008-02-26

    The protein kinase encoded by the Tpl2 protooncogene plays an obligatory role in the transduction of Toll-like receptor and death receptor signals in macrophages, B cells, mouse embryo fibroblasts, and epithelial cells in culture and promotes inflammatory responses in animals. To address its role in T cell activation, we crossed the T cell receptor (TCR) transgene 2C, which recognizes class I MHC presented peptides, into the Tpl2(-/-) genetic background. Surprisingly, the TCR2C(tg/tg)/Tpl2(-/-) mice developed T cell lymphomas with a latency of 4-6 months. The tumor cells were consistently TCR2C(+)CD8(+)CD4(-), suggesting that they were derived either from chronically stimulated mature T cells or from immature single positive (ISP) cells. Further studies showed that the population of CD8(+) ISP cells was not expanded in the thymus of TCR2C(tg/tg)/Tpl2(-/-) mice, making the latter hypothesis unlikely. Mature peripheral T cells of Tpl2(-/-) mice were defective in ERK activation and exhibited enhanced proliferation after TCR stimulation. The same cells were defective in the induction of CTLA4, a negative regulator of the T cell response, which is induced by TCR signals via ERK. These findings suggest that Tpl2 functions normally in a feedback loop that switches off the T cell response to TCR stimulation. As a result, Tpl2, a potent oncogene, functions as a tumor suppressor gene in chronically stimulated T cells.

  4. The spleen CD4+ T cell response to blood-stage Plasmodium chabaudi malaria develops in two phases characterized by different properties.

    PubMed

    Muxel, Sandra Marcia; Freitas do Rosário, Ana Paula; Zago, Cláudia Augusta; Castillo-Méndez, Sheyla Inés; Sardinha, Luiz Roberto; Rodriguez-Málaga, Sérgio Marcelo; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva; Álvarez, José Maria; Lima, Maria Regina D'Império

    2011-01-01

    The pivotal role of spleen CD4(+) T cells in the development of both malaria pathogenesis and protective immunity makes necessary a profound comprehension of the mechanisms involved in their activation and regulation during Plasmodium infection. Herein, we examined in detail the behaviour of non-conventional and conventional splenic CD4(+) T cells during P. chabaudi malaria. We took advantage of the fact that a great proportion of CD4(+) T cells generated in CD1d(-/-) mice are I-A(b)-restricted (conventional cells), while their counterparts in I-A(b-/-) mice are restricted by CD1d and other class IB major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules (non-conventional cells). We found that conventional CD4(+) T cells are the main protagonists of the immune response to infection, which develops in two consecutive phases concomitant with acute and chronic parasitaemias. The early phase of the conventional CD4(+) T cell response is intense and short lasting, rapidly providing large amounts of proinflammatory cytokines and helping follicular and marginal zone B cells to secrete polyclonal immunoglobulin. Both TNF-α and IFN-γ production depend mostly on conventional CD4(+) T cells. IFN-γ is produced simultaneously by non-conventional and conventional CD4(+) T cells. The early phase of the response finishes after a week of infection, with the elimination of a large proportion of CD4(+) T cells, which then gives opportunity to the development of acquired immunity. Unexpectedly, the major contribution of CD1d-restricted CD4(+) T cells occurs at the beginning of the second phase of the response, but not earlier, helping both IFN-γ and parasite-specific antibody production. We concluded that conventional CD4(+) T cells have a central role from the onset of P. chabaudi malaria, acting in parallel with non-conventional CD4(+) T cells as a link between innate and acquired immunity. This study contributes to the understanding of malaria immunology and opens a perspective for

  5. 78 FR 69429 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: The Development of Modified T-cells for the Treatment of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ... Modified T-cells for the Treatment of Multiple Myeloma AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, HHS. ACTION.../ 622,6008 entitled, ``Chimeric Antigen Receptors Targeting B-cell Maturation Antigen'' . The patent... human T-cells directed against B-cell Maturation Antigen (BCMA) for the treatment of multiple...

  6. WT1-specific T cell receptor gene therapy: improving TCR function in transduced T cells.

    PubMed

    Stauss, Hans J; Thomas, Sharyn; Cesco-Gaspere, Michela; Hart, Daniel P; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; King, Judy; Wright, Graham; Perro, Mario; Pospori, Constantina; Morris, Emma

    2008-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T lymphocytes is an attractive form of immunotherapy for haematological malignancies and cancer. The difficulty of isolating antigen-specific T lymphocytes for individual patients limits the more widespread use of adoptive T cell therapy. The demonstration that cloned T cell receptor (TCR) genes can be used to produce T lymphocyte populations of desired specificity offers new opportunities for antigen-specific T cell therapy. The first trial in humans demonstrated that TCR gene-modified T cells persisted for an extended time period and reduced tumor burden in some patients. The WT1 protein is an attractive target for immunotherapy of leukemia and solid cancer since elevated expression has been demonstrated in AML, CML, MDS and in breast, colon and ovarian cancer. In the past, we have isolated high avidity CTL specific for a WT1-derived peptide presented by HLA-A2 and cloned the TCR alpha and beta genes of a WT1-specific CTL line. The genes were inserted into retroviral vectors for transduction of human peripheral blood T lymphocytes of leukemia patients and normal donors. The treatment of leukemia-bearing NOD/SCID mice with T cells transduced with the WT1-specific TCR eliminated leukemia cells in the bone marrow of most mice, while treatment with T cells transduced with a TCR of irrelevant specificity did not diminish the leukemia burden. In order to improve the safety and efficacy of TCR gene therapy, we have developed lentiviral TCR gene transfer. In addition, we employed strategies to enhance TCR expression while avoiding TCR mis-pairing. It may be possible to generate dominant TCR constructs that can suppress the expression of the endogenous TCR on the surface of transduced T cells. The development of new TCR gene constructs holds great promise for the safe and effective delivery of TCR gene therapy for the treatment of malignancies.

  7. Tumor-infiltrating regulatory T cells inhibit endogenous cytotoxic T cell responses to lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Anusha-Preethi; Johansson, Magnus; Ruffell, Brian; Beltran, Adam; Lau, Jonathan; Jablons, David M.; Coussens, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Immune cells comprise a substantial proportion of the tumor mass in human non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC), but the precise composition and significance of this infiltration is unclear. Herein we examined immune complexity of human NSCLC as well as NSCLC developing in CC10-TAg transgenic mice, and revealed that CD4+ T lymphocytes represent the dominant population of CD45+ immune cells, and relative to normal lung tissue, CD4+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) were significantly increased as a proportion of total CD4+ cells. To assess the functional significance of increased Treg cells, we evaluated CD8+ T cell-deficient/CC10-TAg mice and revealed that CD8+ T cells significantly controlled tumor growth with anti-tumor activity that was partially repressed by Treg cells. However, while treatment with anti-CD25 depleting mAb as monotherapy preferentially depleted Tregs and improved CD8+ T cell-mediated control of tumor progression during early tumor development, similar monotherapy was ineffective at later stages. Since mice bearing early NSCLC treated with anti-CD25 mAb exhibited increased tumor cell death associated with infiltration by CD8+ T cells expressing elevated levels of granzyme A, granzyme B, perforin and interferon-γ, we therefore evaluated carboplatin combination therapy resulting in a significantly extended survival beyond that observed with chemotherapy alone, indicating that Treg depletion in combination with cytotoxic therapy may be beneficial as a treatment strategy for advanced NSCLC. PMID:23851682

  8. Treatment with soluble interleukin-15Ralpha exacerbates intracellular parasitic infection by blocking the development of memory CD8+ T cell response.

    PubMed

    Khan, Imtiaz A; Moretto, Magali; Wei, Xiao-Qing; Williams, Martha; Schwartzman, Joseph D; Liew, Foo Y

    2002-06-03

    Interferon (IFN)-gamma-producing CD8+ T cells are important for the successful resolution of the obligate intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii by preventing the reactivation or controlling a repeat infection. Previous reports from our laboratory have shown that exogenous interleukin (IL)-15 treatment augments the CD8+ T cell response against the parasite. However, the role of endogenous IL-15 in the proliferation of activated/memory CD8+ T cells during toxoplasma or any other infection is unknown. In this study, we treated T. gondii immune mice with soluble IL-15 receptor alpha (sIL-15Ralpha) to block the host endogenous IL-15. The treatment markedly reduced the ability of the immune animals to control a lethal infection. CD8+ T cell activities in the sIL-15Ralpha-administered mice were severely reduced as determined by IFN-gamma release and target cell lysis assays. The loss of CD8+ T cell immunity due to sIL-15Ralpha treatment was further demonstrated by adoptive transfer experiments. Naive recipients transferred with CD44(hi) activated/memory CD8+ T cells and treated with sIL-15Ralpha failed to resist a lethal T. gondii infection. Moreover, sIL-15Ralpha treatment of the recipients blocked the ability of donor CD44(hi) activated/memory CD8+ T cells to replicate in response to T. gondii challenge. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the important role of host IL-15 in the development of antigen-specific memory CD8+ T cells against an intracellular infection.

  9. Differentiation of ICOS+ and ICOS- recent thymic emigrant regulatory T cells (RTE T regs) during normal pregnancy, pre-eclampsia and HELLP syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wagner, M I; Jöst, M; Spratte, J; Schaier, M; Mahnke, K; Meuer, S; Zeier, M; Steinborn, A

    2016-01-01

    Two different subsets of naturally occurring regulatory T cells (nTregs), defined by their expression of the inducible co-stimulatory (ICOS) molecule, are produced by the human thymus. To examine the differentiation of ICOS(+) and ICOS(-) CD45RA(+) CD31(+) recent thymic emigrant (RTE) T regs during normal pregnancy and in the presence of pre-eclampsia or haemolysis elevated liver enzymes low platelet (HELLP)-syndrome, we used six-colour flow cytometric analysis to determine the changes in the composition of the ICOS(+) and ICOS(-) T reg pools with CD45RA(+) CD31(+) RTE T regs, CD45RA(+) CD31(-) mature naive (MN) T regs, CD45RA(-) CD31(+) and CD45RA(-) CD31(-) memory Tregs. With the beginning of pregnancy until term, we observed a strong differentiation of both ICOS(+) and ICOS(-) CD45RA(+) CD31(+) RTE, but not CD45RA(+) CD31(-) MN T regs, into CD45RA(-) CD31(-) memory T regs. At the end of pregnancy, the onset of spontaneous term labour was associated with a significant breakdown of ICOS(+) CD45RA(-) CD31(-) memory T regs. However, in the presence of pre-eclampsia, there was a significantly increased differentiation of ICOS(+) and ICOS(-) CD45RA(+) CD31(+) RTE T regs into CD45RA(-) CD31(+) memory T regs, wherein the lacking differentiation into CD45RA(-) CD31(-) memory T regs was partially replaced by the increased differentiation of ICOS(+) and ICOS(-) CD45RA(+) CD31(-) MN Tregs into CD45RA(-) CD31(-) memory T regs. In patients with HELLP syndrome, this alternatively increased differentiation of CD45RA(-) CD31(-) MN T regs seemed to be exaggerated, and presumably restored the suppressive activity of magnetically isolated ICOS(+) and ICOS(-) T regs, which were shown to be significantly less suppressive in pre-eclampsia patients, but not in HELLP syndrome patients. Hence, our findings propose that the regular differentiation of both ICOS(+) and ICOS(-) CD45RA(+) CD31(+) RTE T regs ensures a healthy pregnancy course, while their disturbed differentiation is

  10. Thymic B cells promote thymus-derived regulatory T cell development and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fang-Ting; Yang, Wei; Wang, Yin-Hu; Ma, Hong-Di; Tang, Wei; Yang, Jing-Bo; Li, Liang; Ansari, Aftab A; Lian, Zhe-Xiong

    2015-07-01

    Thymic CD4(+) FoxP3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells are critical for the development of immunological tolerance and immune homeostasis and requires contributions of both thymic dendritic and epithelial cells. Although B cells have been reported to be present within the thymus, there has not hitherto been a definition of their role in immune cell development and, in particular, whether or how they contribute to the Treg cellular thymic compartment. Herein, using both phenotypic and functional approaches, we demonstrate that thymic B cells contribute to the maintenance of thymic Treg cells and, using an in vitro culture system, demonstrate that thymic B cells contribute to the size of the thymic Treg compartment via cell-cell MHC II contact and the involvement of two independent co-stimulatory pathways that include interactions between the CD40/CD80/CD86 co-stimulatory molecules. Our data also suggest that thymic B cells promote the generation of thymic Treg cell precursors (pre-Treg cells), but not the conversion of FoxP3(+) Treg cells from pre-Treg cells. In addition, thymic B cells directly promote the proliferation of thymic Treg cells that is MHC II contact dependent with a minimal if any role for co-stimulatory molecules including CD40/CD80/CD86. Both pathways are independent of TGFβ. In conclusion, we rigorously define the critical role of thymic B cells in the development of thymic Treg cells from non-Treg to precursor stage and in the proliferation of mature thymic Treg cells.

  11. Mechanisms for Development and Function of Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-04

    recognize self-antigens that are presented on MHC class II molecules by stromal cells in a process that is known as “altered negative selection”, after...BALB/c and B10D2, but sharing the same H-2d MHC class II haplotype. Differential development of CD4+25hiFoxp3+ T-regs in these mouse strains led to...emphasis on a multifarious genetic control on the thymic differentiation and function of T-reg cells independently of the MHC class II -peptide

  12. T-Cell Receptor-Transduced T Cells: Clinical Experience.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Paul F

    2015-01-01

    The large number of T-cell epitopes that have been found to be processed and presented on human tumors, now numbering in the hundreds, provides a rich source of targets for therapeutic interventions aimed at inducing durable tumor regression. Vaccination strategies aimed at inducing responses to these antigens have been largely ineffective, and it has been challenging to generate large numbers of T cells with the functional capacity to mediate durable tumor regressions in adoptive immunotherapy strategies in patients who have common epithelial malignancies. The ability to generate T-cell receptors that recognize shared as well as unique antigens expressed in a wide variety of common tumor types that include lung, breast, ovarian, gastrointestinal, urothelial, and genitourinary cancers provides an opportunity to develop widely applicable therapies based on the adoptive transfer of autologous T cells transduced with those receptors.

  13. Dendritic cells drive memory CD8 T-cell homeostasis via IL-15 transpresentation

    PubMed Central

    Stonier, Spencer W.; Ma, Lisa J.; Castillo, Eliseo F.

    2008-01-01

    Interleukin-15 (IL-15) is crucial for the development of naive and memory CD8 T cells and is delivered through a mechanism called transpresentation. Previous studies showed that memory CD8 T cells require IL-15 transpresentation by an as yet unknown cell of hematopoietic origin. We hypothesized that dendritic cells (DCs) transpresent IL-15 to CD8 T cells, and we examined this by developing a transgenic model that limits IL-15 transpresentation to DCs. In this study, IL-15 transpresentation by DCs had little effect on restoring naive CD8 T cells but contributed to the development of memory-phenotype CD8 T cells. The generation of virus-specific, memory CD8 T cells was partially supported by IL-15Rα+ DCs through the preferential enhancement of a subset of KLRG-1+CD27− CD8 T cells. In contrast, these DCs were largely sufficient in driving normal homeostatic proliferation of established memory CD8 T cells, suggesting that memory CD8 T cells grow more dependent on IL-15 transpresentation by DCs. Overall, our study clearly supports a role for DCs in memory CD8 T-cell homeostasis but also provides evidence that other hematopoietic cells are involved in this function. The identification of DCs fulfilling this role will enable future studies to better focus on mechanisms regulating T-cell homeostasis. PMID:18812469

  14. Dendritic cells drive memory CD8 T-cell homeostasis via IL-15 transpresentation.

    PubMed

    Stonier, Spencer W; Ma, Lisa J; Castillo, Eliseo F; Schluns, Kimberly S

    2008-12-01

    Interleukin-15 (IL-15) is crucial for the development of naive and memory CD8 T cells and is delivered through a mechanism called transpresentation. Previous studies showed that memory CD8 T cells require IL-15 transpresentation by an as yet unknown cell of hematopoietic origin. We hypothesized that dendritic cells (DCs) transpresent IL-15 to CD8 T cells, and we examined this by developing a transgenic model that limits IL-15 transpresentation to DCs. In this study, IL-15 transpresentation by DCs had little effect on restoring naive CD8 T cells but contributed to the development of memory-phenotype CD8 T cells. The generation of virus-specific, memory CD8 T cells was partially supported by IL-15Ralpha(+) DCs through the preferential enhancement of a subset of KLRG-1(+)CD27(-) CD8 T cells. In contrast, these DCs were largely sufficient in driving normal homeostatic proliferation of established memory CD8 T cells, suggesting that memory CD8 T cells grow more dependent on IL-15 transpresentation by DCs. Overall, our study clearly supports a role for DCs in memory CD8 T-cell homeostasis but also provides evidence that other hematopoietic cells are involved in this function. The identification of DCs fulfilling this role will enable future studies to better focus on mechanisms regulating T-cell homeostasis.

  15. TET Methylcytosine Oxidases in T Cell and B Cell Development and Function

    PubMed Central

    Tsagaratou, Ageliki; Lio, Chan-Wang J.; Yue, Xiaojing; Rao, Anjana

    2017-01-01

    DNA methylation is established by DNA methyltransferases and is a key epigenetic mark. Ten-eleven translocation (TET) proteins are enzymes that oxidize 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) and further oxidization products (oxi-mCs), which indirectly promote DNA demethylation. Here, we provide an overview of the effect of TET proteins and altered DNA modification status in T and B cell development and function. We summarize current advances in our understanding of the role of TET proteins and 5hmC in T and B cells in both physiological and pathological contexts. We describe how TET proteins and 5hmC regulate DNA modification, chromatin accessibility, gene expression, and transcriptional networks and discuss potential underlying mechanisms and open questions in the field.

  16. Induced and Natural Regulatory T Cells in the Development of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mayne, Christopher G.; Williams, Calvin B.

    2013-01-01

    The mucosal immune system mediates contact between the host, and the trillions of microbes that symbiotically colonize the gastrointestinal tract. Failure to tolerate the antigens within this “extended self” can result in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Within the adaptive immune system, the most significant cells modulating this interaction are Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells. Treg cells can be divided into two primary subsets: “natural” Treg (nTreg) cells, and “adaptive” or “induced” Treg (iTreg). Recent research suggests that these subsets serve to play both independent and synergistic roles in mucosal tolerance. Studies from both mouse models and human patients suggest defects in Treg cells can play distinct causative roles in IBD. Numerous genetic, microbial, nutritional, and environmental factors that associate with IBD may also affect Treg cells. In this review we summarize the development and function of Treg cells, and how their regulatory mechanisms may fail, leading to a loss of mucosal tolerance. We discuss both animal models and studies of IBD patients suggesting Treg cell involvement in IBD, and consider how Treg cells may be used in future therapies. PMID:23656897

  17. The challenges and opportunities for the development of a T-cell epitope-based herpes simplex vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Tiffany; Wang, Christine; Badakhshan, Tina; Chilukuri, Sravya; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2014-11-28

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 & HSV-2) infections have been prevalent since the ancient Greek times. To this day, they still affect a staggering number of over a billion individuals worldwide. HSV-1 infections are predominant than HSV-2 infections and cause potentially blinding ocular herpes, oro-facial herpes and encephalitis. HSV-2 infections cause painful genital herpes, encephalitis, and death in newborns. While prophylactic and therapeutic HSV vaccines remain urgently needed for centuries, their development has been difficult. During the most recent National Institute of Health (NIH) workshop titled "Next Generation Herpes Simplex Virus Vaccines: The Challenges and Opportunities", basic researchers, funding agencies, and pharmaceutical representatives gathered: (i) to assess the status of herpes vaccine research; and (ii) to identify the gaps and propose alternative approaches in developing a safe and efficient herpes vaccine. One "common denominator" among previously failed clinical herpes vaccine trials is that they either used a whole virus or a whole viral protein, which contain both "pathogenic symptomatic" and "protective asymptomatic" antigens and epitopes. In this report, we continue to advocate developing "asymptomatic" epitope-based sub-unit vaccine strategies that selectively incorporate "protective asymptomatic" epitopes which: (i) are exclusively recognized by effector memory CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells (TEM cells) from "naturally" protected seropositive asymptomatic individuals; and (ii) protect human leukocyte antigen (HLA) transgenic animal models of ocular and genital herpes. We review the role of animal models in herpes vaccine development and discuss their current status, challenges, and prospects.

  18. Changing T cell specificity by retroviral T cell receptor display

    PubMed Central

    Kessels, Helmut W. H. G.; van den Boom, Marly D.; Spits, Hergen; Hooijberg, Erik; Schumacher, Ton N. M.

    2000-01-01

    The diversity of the T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire is limited, because of the processes of positive and negative T cell selection. To obtain T cells with specificities beyond the immune system's capacity, we have developed a strategy for retroviral TCR display. In this approach, a library of T cell variants is generated in vitro and introduced into a TCR-negative murine T cell line by retroviral transfer. We document the value of TCR display by the creation of a library of an influenza A-specific TCR and the subsequent in vitro selection of TCRs that either recognize the parental influenza epitope or that have acquired a specificity for a different influenza A strain. The resulting in vitro selected TCRs induce efficient T cell activation after ligand recognition and are of equal or higher potency than the in vivo generated parent receptor. TCR display should prove a useful strategy for the generation of high-affinity tumor-specific TCRs for gene transfer purposes. PMID:11121060

  19. Smad4 in T cells plays a protective role in the development of autoimmune Sjögren's syndrome in the nonobese diabetic mouse

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Donghee; Kim, Jae Young; Jun, Hee-Sook

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the role of Smad4, a signaling molecule of the TGF-beta pathway, in T cells on the pathology of Sjögren's syndrome (SS) in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, an animal model of SS. T cell-specific Smad4-deleted (Smad4fl/fl,CD4-Cre; Smad4 tKO) NOD mice had accelerated development of SS compared with wild-type (Smad4+/+,CD4-Cre; WT) NOD mice, including increased lymphocyte infiltration into exocrine glands, decreased tear and saliva production, and increased levels of autoantibodies at 12 weeks of age. Activated/memory T cells and cytokine (IFN-γ, IL-17)-producing T cells were increased in Smad4 tKO NOD mice, however the proportion and function of regulatory T (Treg) cells were not different between Smad4 tKO and WT NOD mice. Effector T (Teff) cells from Smad4 tKO NOD mice were less sensitive than WT Teff cells to suppression by Treg cells. Th17 differentiation capability of Teff cells was similar between Smad4 tKO and WT NOD mice, but IL-17 expression was increased under inducible Treg skewing conditions in T cells from Smad4 tKO NOD mice. Our results demonstrate that disruption of the Smad4 pathway in T cells of NOD mice increases Teff cell activation resulting in upregulation of Th17 cells, indicating that Smad4 in T cells has a protective role in the development of SS in NOD mice. PMID:27880731

  20. Development of CD8+ T cells expressing two distinct receptors specific for MTB and HIV-1 peptides

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Pei-Pei; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Luo, Wei; Zhou, Chao-Ying; Wen, Qian; Yang, Zhi; Liu, Su-Dong; Jiang, Zhen-Min; Zhou, Ming-Qian; Jin, Qi; Ma, Li

    2013-01-01

    The immune response in individuals co-infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) and the human immunodeficiency virus (MTB/HIV) gradually deteriorates, particularly in the cellular compartment. Adoptive transfer of functional effector T cells can confer protective immunity to immunodeficient MTB/HIV co-infected recipients. However, few such effector T cells exist in vivo, and their isolation and amplification to sufficient numbers is difficult. Therefore, enhancing immune responses against both pathogens is critical for treating MTB/HIV co-infected patients. One approach is adoptive transfer of T cell receptor (TCR) gene-modified T cells for the treatment of MTB/HIV co-infections because lymphocyte numbers and their functional avidity is significantly increased by TCR gene transfer. To generate bispecific CD8+ T cells, MTB Ag85B199–207 peptide-specific TCRs (MTB/TCR) and HIV-1 Env120–128 peptide-specific TCRs (HIV/TCR) were isolated and introduced into CD8+ T cells simultaneously using a retroviral vector. To avoid mispairing among exogenous and endogenous TCRs, and to improve the function and stability of the introduced TCRs, several strategies were employed, including introducing mutations in the MTB/TCR constant (C) regions, substituting part of the HIV/TCR C regions with CD3ζ, and linking gene segments with three different 2A peptides. Results presented in this report suggest that the engineered T cells possessed peptide-specific specificity resulting in cytokine production and cytotoxic activity. This is the first report describing the generation of engineered T cells specific for two different pathogens and provides new insights into TCR gene therapy for the treatment of immunocompromised MTB/HIV co-infected patients.

  1. Maternal Filarial Infection Influences the Development of Regulatory T Cells in Children from Infancy to Early Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Bal, Madhusmita; Ranjit, Manoranjan; Achary, K. Gopinath; Satapathy, Ashok K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Children born from filarial infected mothers are comparatively more susceptible to filarial infection than the children born to uninfected mothers. But the mechanism of such increased susceptibility to infection in early childhood is not exactly known. Several studies have shown the association of active filarial infection with T cell hypo-responsiveness which is mediated by regulatory T cells (Tregs). Since the Tregs develop in the thymus from CD4+ CD25hi thymocytes at an early stage of the human fetus, it can be hypothesized that the maternal infection during pregnancy affects the development of Tregs in children at birth as well as early childhood. Hence the present study was designed to test the hypothesis by selecting a cohort of pregnant mothers and children born to them subsequently in a filarial endemic area of Odisha, India. Methodology and Principal finding A total number of 49 pregnant mothers and children born to them subsequently have been followed up (mean duration 4.4 years) in an area where the microfilariae (Mf) rate has come down to <1% after institution of 10 rounds of annual mass drug administration (MDA). The infection status of mother, cord and children were assessed through detection of microfilariae (Mf) and circulating filarial antigen (CFA). Expression of Tregs cells were measured by flow cytometry. The levels of IL-10 were evaluated by using commercially available ELISA kit. A significantly high level of IL-10 and Tregs have been observed in children born to infected mother compared to children of uninfected mother at the time of birth as well as during early childhood. Moreover a positive correlation between Tregs and IL-10 has been observed among the children born to infected mother. Significance From these observations we predict that early priming of the fetal immune system by filarial antigens modulate the development of Tregs, which ultimately scale up the production of IL-10 in neonates and creates a milieu for high rate

  2. The cellular immune system in myelomagenesis: NK cells and T cells in the development of myeloma [corrected] and their uses in immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Dosani, T; Carlsten, M; Maric, I; Landgren, O

    2015-04-17

    As vast strides are being made in the management and treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), recent interests are increasingly focusing on understanding the development of the disease. The knowledge that MM develops exclusively from a protracted phase of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance provides an opportunity to study tumor evolution in this process. Although the immune system has been implicated in the development of MM, the scientific literature on the role and status of various immune components in this process is broad and sometimes contradictory. Accordingly, we present a review of cellular immune subsets in myelomagenesis. We summarize the current literature on the quantitative and functional profiles of natural killer cells and T-cells, including conventional T-cells, natural killer T-cells, γδ T-cells and regulatory T-cells, in myelomagenesis. Our goal is to provide an overview of the status and function of these immune cells in both the peripheral blood and the bone marrow during myelomagenesis. This provides a better understanding of the nature of the immune system in tumor evolution, the knowledge of which is especially significant considering that immunotherapies are increasingly being explored in the treatment of both MM and its precursor conditions.

  3. The cellular immune system in myelomagenesis: NK cells and T cells in the development of MM and their uses in immunotherapies

    PubMed Central

    Dosani, T; Carlsten, M; Maric, I; Landgren, O

    2015-01-01

    As vast strides are being made in the management and treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), recent interests are increasingly focusing on understanding the development of the disease. The knowledge that MM develops exclusively from a protracted phase of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance provides an opportunity to study tumor evolution in this process. Although the immune system has been implicated in the development of MM, the scientific literature on the role and status of various immune components in this process is broad and sometimes contradictory. Accordingly, we present a review of cellular immune subsets in myelomagenesis. We summarize the current literature on the quantitative and functional profiles of natural killer cells and T-cells, including conventional T-cells, natural killer T-cells, γδ T-cells and regulatory T-cells, in myelomagenesis. Our goal is to provide an overview of the status and function of these immune cells in both the peripheral blood and the bone marrow during myelomagenesis. This provides a better understanding of the nature of the immune system in tumor evolution, the knowledge of which is especially significant considering that immunotherapies are increasingly being explored in the treatment of both MM and its precursor conditions. PMID:25885426

  4. Cutting edge: in the absence of TGF-β signaling in T cells, fewer CD103+ regulatory T cells develop, but exuberant IFN-γ production renders mice more susceptible to helminth infection.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Lisa A; Maizels, Rick M

    2012-08-01

    Multiple factors control susceptibility of C57BL/6 mice to infection with the helminth Heligmosomoides polygyrus, including TGF-β signaling, which inhibits immunity in vivo. However, mice expressing a T cell-specific dominant-negative TGF-β receptor II (TGF-βRII DN) show dampened Th2 immunity and diminished resistance to infection. Interestingly, H. polygyrus-infected TGF-βRII DN mice show greater frequencies of CD4(+)Foxp3(+)Helios(+) Tregs than infected wild-type mice, but levels of CD103 are greatly reduced on both these cells and on the CD4(+)Foxp3(+)Helios(-) population. Although Th9 and Th17 levels are comparable between infected TGF-βRII DN and wild-type mice, the former develop exaggerated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell IFN-γ responses. Increased susceptibility conferred by TGF-βRII DN expression was lost in IFN-γ-deficient mice, although they remained unable to completely clear infection. Hence, overexpression of IFN-γ negatively modulates immunity, and the presence of Helios(+) Tregs may maintain susceptibility on the C57BL/6 background.

  5. Expression of a single ICAM-1 isoform on T cells is sufficient for development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Bullard, Daniel C; Hu, Xianzhen; Crawford, David; McDonald, Kristin; Ramos, Theresa N; Barnum, Scott R

    2014-04-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) plays an important role in leukocyte trafficking, induction of cellular immune responses, and immunological synapse formation. As a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily of adhesion proteins, ICAM-1 is composed of repeating Ig-like domains, a transmembrane domain, and short cytoplasmic tail that participates in intracellular signaling events. At least seven ICAM-1 protein isoforms are generated by alternative splicing, however little is known regarding their immunobiology. We have previously shown using different lines of ICAM-1 mutant mice (Icam1(tm1Jcgr) and Icam1(tm1Bay) ) that expression of alternatively spliced ICAM-1 isoforms can significantly influence the disease course during the development of EAE. In this study, we show using a newly developed transgenic mouse (CD2-Icam1(D4del) /Icam1(null) ) that T-cell-specific expression of a single ICAM-1 isoform composed of Ig domains 1, 2, 3, and 5 can mediate the initiation and progression of EAE. Our results indicate that the ICAM-1 isoform lacking Ig domain 4 can drive pathogenesis in demyelinating disease and may be a novel therapeutic target for treating multiple sclerosis.

  6. Expression of a single ICAM-1 isoform on T cells is sufficient for development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Bullard, Daniel C.; Hu, Xianzhen; Crawford, David; McDonald, Kristen; Ramos, Theresa N.; Barnum, Scott R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) plays an important role in leukocyte trafficking, induction of cellular immune responses, and immunological synapse formation. As a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily of adhesion proteins, ICAM-1 is composed of repeating Ig-like domains, a transmembrane domain, and short cytoplasmic tail that participates in intracellular signaling events. At least seven ICAM-1 protein isoforms are generated by alternative splicing, however little is known regarding their immunobiology. We have previously shown using different lines of ICAM-1 mutant mice (Icam1tm1Jcgr and Icam1tm1Bay) that expression of alternatively spliced ICAM-1 isoforms can significantly influence the disease course during the development of EAE. In this study, we show using a newly developed transgenic mouse (CD2-Icam1D4del/Icam1null) that T cell-specific expression of a single ICAM-1 isoform composed of Ig domains 1, 2, 3 and 5, can mediate the initiation and progression of EAE. Our results indicate that the ICAM-1 isoform lacking Ig domain 4 can drive pathogenesis in demyelinating disease and may be a novel therapeutic target for treating multiple sclerosis. PMID:24435747

  7. Molecular profiling of CD8 T cells in autochthonous melanoma identifies Maf as driver of exhaustion

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Marilyn; Henin, Coralie; Maurizio, Julien; Imbratta, Claire; Bourdely, Pierre; Buferne, Michel; Baitsch, Lukas; Vanhille, Laurent; Sieweke, Michael H; Speiser, Daniel E; Auphan-Anezin, Nathalie; Schmitt-Verhulst, Anne-Marie; Verdeil, Grégory

    2015-01-01

    T cells infiltrating neoplasms express surface molecules typical of chronically virus-stimulated T cells, often termed “exhausted” T cells. We compared the transcriptome of “exhausted” CD8 T cells infiltrating autochthonous melanomas to those of naïve and acutely stimulated CD8 T cells. Despite strong similarities between transcriptional signatures of tumor- and virus-induced exhausted CD8 T cells, notable differences appeared. Among transcriptional regulators, Nr4a2 and Maf were highly overexpressed in tumor-exhausted T cells and significantly upregulated in CD8 T cells from human melanoma metastases. Transduction of murine tumor-specific CD8 T cells to express Maf partially reproduced the transcriptional program associated with tumor-induced exhaustion. Upon adoptive transfer, the transduced cells showed normal homeostasis but failed to accumulate in tumor-bearing hosts and developed defective anti-tumor effector responses. We further identified TGFβ and IL-6 as main inducers of Maf expression in CD8 T cells and showed that Maf-deleted tumor-specific CD8 T cells were much more potent to restrain tumor growth in vivo. Therefore, the melanoma microenvironment contributes to skewing of CD8 T cell differentiation programs, in part by TGFβ/IL-6-mediated induction of Maf. PMID:26139534

  8. Development of a Cell Marker ELISA for the Detection of Goose T Cell Surface CD8α Molecules.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Beibei; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Shun; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Sun, Kunfeng; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2016-06-01

    CD8 molecule is a key marker on T cell surface and is connected with the antigen recognition and activation of T lymphocytes. In order to provide a detection method for quantifying goose CD8α expression, this study raised the protein and antibody for goose CD8α and developed a feasible cell marker enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA) method. Recombinant protein of the extracellular region gene of goCD8α was expressed in prokaryotic expression system, and specific polyclonal antibodies for goCD8α were raised and purified, which was further confirmed by Western-blot, immunofluorescence assay (IFA), and immunohistochemistry (IHC). A cell marker ELISA was established and optimized to detect the change of goCD8α expression between goose parvovirus (GPV)-infected and mock-infected goose peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), which is consistent with our previously results of real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). Cell marker ELISA can provide a new method to detect goCD8α in protein level and in a sensitive, specific, and simple way. This may provide a convenient and novel method for the detection of goCD8α expression.

  9. Poor Predictive Value of Cytomegalovirus (CMV)–Specific T Cell Assays for the Development of CMV Retinitis in Patients with AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Mark A.; Tan, Qi Xuan; Girling, Valerie; Poon, C.; Van Natta, Mark; Jabs, Douglas A.; Inokuma, Margaret; Maecker, Holden T.; Bredt, Barry; Sinclair, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Background We examined the potential clinical utility of using a cytomegalovirus (CMV)–specific T cell immunoassay to determine the risk of developing new-onset CMV retinitis (CMVR) in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Methods CMV-specific T cell assays were performed by multiparameter flow cytometry using stored peripheral blood mononuclear cells that had been obtained in an observational study 2–6 months before new-onset CMVR was diagnosed in case patients (at a study visit during which a dilated ophthalmologic examination revealed no evidence of CMVR) and at the same study visit in control subjects (matched by absolute CD4+ T cell count at entry) who did not subsequently develop retinitis during 1–6 years of study follow-up. Results There were no significant differences in CMV-specific CD4+ or CD8+ T cell interferon-γ or interleukin-2 expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from case patients and control subjects. Although there were trends toward lower percentages and absolute numbers of CMV-specific, cytokine-expressing CD8+ T cells with a “late memory” phenotype (CD27−CD28−) as well as with an “early memory” phenotype (CD27+CD28+CD45RA+) in case patients than in control subjects, these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions Many studies have reported that CMV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses distinguish patients with active CMVR (i.e., who lack CMV-protective immunity) from those with inactive CMVR after immune restoration by antiretroviral treatment (i.e., who have CMV-protective immunity). However, the multiple CMV-specific immune responses we measured do not appear to have clinical utility for predicting the risk for patients with AIDS of developing new-onset CMVR with sufficient accuracy to be used in guiding therapeutic management. PMID:18173357

  10. NFAT5 induction by the pre-T-cell receptor serves as a selective survival signal in T-lymphocyte development.

    PubMed

    Berga-Bolaños, Rosa; Alberdi, Maria; Buxadé, Maria; Aramburu, José; López-Rodríguez, Cristina

    2013-10-01

    The Rel-like transcription factors nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and the calcineurin-dependent nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFATc) control specific points of thymocyte maturation. Thymocytes also express a distinct member of the Rel family, the calcineurin-independent, osmostress response regulator NFAT5. Here we show that IKKβ regulates the expression of NFAT5 in thymocytes, which in turn contributes to the survival of T-cell receptor αβ thymocytes and the transition from the β-selection checkpoint to the double-positive stage in an osmostress-independent manner. NFAT5-deficient thymocytes had normal expression and proximal signaling of the pre-T-cell receptor but exhibited a partial defect in β-chain allelic exclusion and increased apoptosis. Further analysis showed that NFAT5 regulated the expression of the prosurvival factors A1 and Bcl2 and attenuated the proapoptotic p53/Noxa axis. These findings position NFAT5 as a target of the IKKβ/NF-κB pathway in thymocytes and as a downstream effector of the prosurvival role of the pre-T-cell receptor.

  11. NFAT5 induction by the pre–T-cell receptor serves as a selective survival signal in T-lymphocyte development

    PubMed Central

    Berga-Bolaños, Rosa; Alberdi, Maria; Buxadé, Maria; Aramburu, José; López-Rodríguez, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    The Rel-like transcription factors nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and the calcineurin-dependent nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFATc) control specific points of thymocyte maturation. Thymocytes also express a distinct member of the Rel family, the calcineurin-independent, osmostress response regulator NFAT5. Here we show that IKKβ regulates the expression of NFAT5 in thymocytes, which in turn contributes to the survival of T-cell receptor αβ thymocytes and the transition from the β-selection checkpoint to the double-positive stage in an osmostress-independent manner. NFAT5-deficient thymocytes had normal expression and proximal signaling of the pre–T-cell receptor but exhibited a partial defect in β-chain allelic exclusion and increased apoptosis. Further analysis showed that NFAT5 regulated the expression of the prosurvival factors A1 and Bcl2 and attenuated the proapoptotic p53/Noxa axis. These findings position NFAT5 as a target of the IKKβ/NF-κB pathway in thymocytes and as a downstream effector of the prosurvival role of the pre–T-cell receptor. PMID:24043824

  12. B cell function in mice transgenic for mCTLA4-H gamma 1: lack of germinal centers correlated with poor affinity maturation and class switching despite normal priming of CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    This report outlines the B cell phenotype of transgenic mice that overexpresses the mouse CTLA-4-human gamma 1 (mCTLA4-H gamma 1) protein. Despite the fact that these mice prime CD4+ T cells (Ronchese, F., B. Housemann, S. Hubele, and P. Lane. 1994. J. Exp. Med. 179:809), antibody responses to T-dependent antigens are severely impaired. In contrast, T-independent responses are normal which suggests mCTLA4-H gamma 1 does not act directly on B cells, but acts indirectly by impairing T cell help. The impaired antibody defect is associated with impaired class switching, with low total immunoglobulin (Ig)G and antigen-specific IgG responses, and an absence of germinal center formation in spleen and lymph nodes but not gut-associated tissues. The defective germinal center formation is associated with a reduction in the degree of somatic mutation in hybridomas made from transgenic mice in comparison with those made from normal mice. It seems likely that mCTLA4-H gamma 1 exerts its effect by blocking an interaction between T and B cells that induce T cell help for B cells. PMID:7509361

  13. Decreasing sensitivity to RANTES (regulated on activation, normally T cell-expressed and -secreted) neutralization of CC chemokine receptor 5-using, non-syncytium-inducing virus variants in the course of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Koning, Fransje A; Kwa, David; Boeser-Nunnink, Brigitte; Dekker, Jos; Vingerhoed, Jose; Hiemstra, Harry; Schuitemaker, Hanneke

    2003-09-15

    In approximately half of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1-infected individuals, the development of CXC chemokine receptor 4-using, syncytium-inducing (SI) virus variants precedes a rapid progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). In other individuals, only CC chemokine receptor 5-using (R5), non-SI (NSI) virus variants are present throughout infection. These individuals may be either long-term survivors (LTSs) or rapid progressors. The basis for this variable disease progression in individuals with only R5 virus variants is not yet fully understood. In this study, the beta-chemokine sensitivity of biological HIV-1 clones isolated from 13 individuals who harbored only R5, NSI virus variants (7 LTSs and 6 progressors) was investigated. We found a statistically significant decrease in sensitivity of virus variants to RANTES (regulated on activation, normally T cell-expressed and -secreted) neutralization during the course of progressive infection, but not during follow-up of LTSs. Our data suggest that a role exists for RANTES neutralization sensitivity of HIV-1 in AIDS pathogenesis.

  14. T cell metabolic fitness in antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Siska, Peter J; Rathmell, Jeffrey C

    2015-04-01

    T cell metabolism has a central role in supporting and shaping immune responses and may have a key role in antitumor immunity. T cell metabolism is normally held under tight regulation in an immune response of glycolysis to promote effector T cell expansion and function. However, tumors may deplete nutrients, generate toxic products, or stimulate conserved negative feedback mechanisms, such as through Programmed Cell Death 1 (PD-1), to impair effector T cell nutrient uptake and metabolic fitness. In addition, regulatory T cells are favored in low glucose conditions and may inhibit antitumor immune responses. Here, we review how the tumor microenvironment modifies metabolic and functional pathways in T cells and how these changes may uncover new targets and challenges for cancer immunotherapy and treatment.

  15. Regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Claire; Powrie, Fiona

    2004-08-01

    Regulatory T (TR) cells are a subset of T cells that function to control immune responses. Different populations of TR cells have been described, including thymically derived CD4(+)CD25+ TR cells and Tr1 cells induced in the periphery through exposure to antigen. A transcription factor, Foxp3, has been identified that is essential for CD4(+)CD25+ TR cell development and function. There is now evidence that transforming growth factor-beta might play a role in this pathway. CD4(+)CD25+ TR cells proliferate extensively in vivo in an antigen-specific manner, and can respond to both self and foreign peptides. By suppressing excessive immune responses, TR cells play a key role in the maintenance of self-tolerance, thus preventing autoimmune disease, as well as inhibiting harmful inflammatory diseases such as asthma and inflammatory bowel disease.

  16. Lack of optimal T-cell reactivity against the hepatitis C virus is associated with the development of fibrosis/cirrhosis during chronic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Sreenarasimhaiah, Jayaprakash; Jaramillo, Andrés; Crippin, Jeffrey; Lisker-Melman, Mauricio; Chapman, William C; Mohanakumar, T

    2003-02-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection develops in 85% of exposed individuals and 20% develop cirrhosis. However, the pathogenesis of this process is not well-understood. The objective of this study was to determine whether HCV-reactive T cells play a role in the process of development of cirrhosis during chronic HCV infection. We analyzed 21 human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A2 patients with chronic HCV infection (9 with histology of inflammation and 12 with histology of fibrosis/cirrhosis). The frequency of CD8(+) T cells reactive to 12 HCV-derived epitopes was determined by an interferon-gamma enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay. The frequency of CD4(+) Th1 and Th2 cells reactive to the HCV core antigen was determined by interferon-gamma and interleukin-5 ELISPOT assays, respectively. Patients with histology of inflammation showed a significantly higher CD8(+) T-cell response to five HCV-derived epitopes (YLLPRRGPRL [core], CINGVCWTV [NS3], LLCPAGHAV [NS3], ILAGYGAGV [NS4B], and GLQDCTMLV [NS5B]) as compared with patients with histology of fibrosis/cirrhosis. Also, patients with histology of inflammation showed a significantly higher CD4(+) Th1 response to the HCV core antigen as compared to patients with histology of fibrosis/cirrhosis. These results indicate that a lack of an optimal T-cell response to HCV is associated with the development of cirrhosis during chronic HCV infection.

  17. Involvement of autophagy in T cell biology.

    PubMed

    Oral, Ozlem; Yedier, Ozlem; Kilic, Seval; Gozuacik, Devrim

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is an essential cellular pathway that sequesters various cytoplasmic components, including accumulated proteins, damaged organelles or invading microorganisms and delivers them to lysosomes for degradation. The function of autophagy has been reported in various tissues and systems, including its role in the regulation of cellular immunity. Autophagy plays a fundamental role at various stages of T cell maturation. It regulates the thymocyte selection and the generation of T cell repertoire by presenting intracellular antigens to MHC class molecules. Autophagy is crucial for metabolic regulation of T cells, and therefore supports cell survival and homeostasis, particularly in activated mature T cells. Furthermore, deletion of specific autophagy-related genes induces several immunological alterations including differentiation of activated T cells into regulatory, memory or natural killer T cells. In this review, we emphasize the impact of autophagy on T cell development, activation and differentiation, which is pivotal for the adaptive immune system.

  18. Regulatory T cell memory

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum, Michael D.; Way, Sing Sing; Abbas, Abul K.

    2016-01-01

    Memory for antigen is a defining feature of adaptive immunity. Antigen-specific lymphocyte populations show an increase in number and function after antigen encounter and more rapidly re-expand upon subsequent antigen exposure. Studies of immune memory have primarily focused on effector B cells and T cells with microbial specificity, using prime challenge models of infection. However, recent work has also identified persistently expanded populations of antigen-specific regulatory T cells that protect against aberrant immune responses. In this Review, we consider the parallels between memory effector T cells and memory regulatory T cells, along with the functional implications of regulatory memory in autoimmunity, antimicrobial host defence and maternal fetal tolerance. In addition, we discuss emerging evidence for regulatory T cell memory in humans and key unanswered questions in this rapidly evolving field. PMID:26688349

  19. Induction of Fc epsilon receptors on normal murine T cells and IgE binding factor(s) by cross-linked IgE or IgE-pulsed adherent cells.

    PubMed Central

    Firer, M A; Eshhar, Z

    1986-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the efficiency and extent of induction by monomeric versus cross-linked IgE of specific receptors for IgE on normal murine splenic T cells (Fc epsilon R-T), and to study the ability of IgE-pulsed splenic adherent cells to induce receptors for IgE on T cells. Chemically cross-linked IgE was found to be both more effective and more efficient than monomeric IgE in inducing Fc epsilon R-T as measured by the ability of IgE-pulsed T cells to form specific rosettes with IgE-sensitized trinitrophenylated sheep red blood cells (TNP-SRBC). This phenomenon was dependent on both DNA and protein synthesis, suggesting that induction caused the production of new IgE receptors. It was also found that cross-linked but not monomeric IgE-pulsed normal murine adherent cells as well as their cell-free products could actively induce significant levels of specific Fc epsilon R-T. Both cross-linked IgE-pulsed T cells and adherent cells released IgE binding factor(s). These materials were capable of specifically inhibiting the binding of IgE to rat basophilic leukaemic cells (RBL) in vitro and to rat tissue mast cells in vivo. Collectively, these data provide further evidence to suggest that polymerized forms of IgE and adherent cells play important roles in the regulation of IgE responses. Images Figure 3 PMID:2937716

  20. T cell-dependence of Lassa fever pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Flatz, Lukas; Rieger, Toni; Merkler, Doron; Bergthaler, Andreas; Regen, Tommy; Schedensack, Mariann; Bestmann, Lukas; Verschoor, Admar; Kreutzfeldt, Mario; Brück, Wolfgang; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten; Günther, Stephan; Pinschewer, Daniel D

    2010-03-26

    Lassa virus (LASV), the causative agent of Lassa fever (LF), is endemic in West Africa, accounting for substantial morbidity and mortality. In spite of ongoing research efforts, LF pathogenesis and mechanisms of LASV immune control remain poorly understood. While normal laboratory mice are resistant to LASV, we report that mice expressing humanized instead of murine MHC class I (MHC-I) failed to control LASV infection and develop severe LF. Infection of MHC-I knockout mice confirmed a key role for MHC-I-restricted T cell responses in controlling LASV. Intriguingly we found that T cell depletion in LASV-infected HHD mice prevented disease, irrespective of high-level viremia. Widespread activation of monocyte/macrophage lineage cells, manifest through inducible NO synthase expression, and elevated IL-12p40 serum levels indicated a systemic inflammatory condition. The absence of extensive monocyte/macrophage activation in T cell-depleted mice suggested that T cell responses contribute to deleterious innate inflammatory reactions and LF pathogenesis. Our observations in mice indicate a dual role for T cells, not only protecting from LASV, but also enhancing LF pathogenesis. The possibility of T cell-driven enhancement and immunopathogenesis should be given consideration in future LF vaccine development.

  1. Development of Augmented Leukemia/Lymphoma-Specific T-Cell Immunotherapy for Deployment with Haploidentical Hematopoietic Progenitor-Cell Transplant

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    1063-1069. 30. Serrano LM, Pfeiffer T, Olivares S, Numbenjapon T, Bennitt J, Kim D, et al., Differentiation of naive cord- blood T cells into CD19...expressed in Cockayne syndrome . PLoS Genet. 2008 Mar;4(3):e1000031. 43. Sarkar A, Sim C, Hong YS, Hogan JR, Fraser MJ, Robertson HM, et al.,. Molecular

  2. The Relationship of Development and Normalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pieper, Elizabeth J.

    1979-01-01

    The author concludes that, without changing practice to reflect both the philosophical concepts of normalization and the psychological concepts of development, such handicapped people will continue to suffer the traditional trade-offs of normalization at the sacrifice of development, or development at the cost of normalization. (DLS)

  3. Discontinuation of calcineurin inhibitors treatment allows the development of FOXP3+ regulatory T-cells in patients after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    van de Wetering, Jacqueline; Koumoutsakos, Periklis; Peeters, Annemiek; van der Mast, Barbara J; de Kuiper, Petronella; IJzermans, Jan N M; Weimar, Willem; Baan, Carla C

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated specific gene expression profiles in patients with donor-specific cytotoxic-hyporesponsiveness, reflected by cytotoxic T-lymphocyte precursor frequency (CTLpf). The effect of calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) withdrawal was studied on markers for cytotoxicity (perforin, granzyme B), apoptosis (Fas,FasL), Th1 and Th2 cytokines (IL-2, IL-10), Th1 and Th2 transcription factors (T-bet, GATA 3), Th17 transcription factor and cytokine (RORγt, IL-17), and for immune regulation/activation (CD25, FOXP3). Peripheral blood samples from renal allograft recipients (n = 18) more than two yr after transplantation with stable renal function were analyzed before and four months after CNI withdrawal. Additionally, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, cholesterol, serum creatinine and proteinuria were evaluated, and no significant differences were measured before and after CNI withdrawal. However, CNIs' discontinuation influenced peripheral gene expression profiles. After CNI withdrawal, the mRNA expression of Granzyme B, Perforin, Fas, FasL, T-bet, GATA3 and CD25 were significantly lower than during CNI treatment. After CNI discontinuation, donor-specific CTLpf decreased, while FOXP3 expression discriminated between detectable and non-detectable donor-specific cytolysis reactivity; FOXP3 transcript values were highest in absence of donor-specific cytotoxicity (p < 0.01). Our study shows CNI withdrawal in stable kidney transplant recipients two yr after transplantation is safe. Moreover, discontinuation of CNIs' treatment allows FOXP3+ regulatory T-cells development, resulting in a significant decrease of anti-donor immune reactivity.

  4. Orientation-specific RAG activity in chromosomal loop domains contributes to Tcrd V(D)J recombination during T cell development

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zhou; Hu, Jiazhi; Chen, Liang

    2016-01-01

    T cell antigen receptor δ (Tcrd) variable region exons are assembled by RAG-initiated V(D)J recombination events in developing γδ thymocytes. Here, we use linear amplification–mediated high-throughput genome-wide translocation sequencing (LAM-HTGTS) to map hundreds of thousands of RAG-initiated Tcrd D segment (Trdd1 and Trdd2) rearrangements in CD4−CD8− double-negative thymocyte progenitors differentiated in vitro from bone marrow–derived hematopoietic stem cells. We find that Trdd2 joins directly to Trdv, Trdd1, and Trdj segments, whereas Trdd1 joining is ordered with joining to Trdd2, a prerequisite for further rearrangement. We also find frequent, previously unappreciated, Trdd1 and Trdd2 rearrangements that inactivate Tcrd, including sequential rearrangements from V(D)J recombination signal sequence fusions. Moreover, we find dozens of RAG off-target sequences that are generated via RAG tracking both upstream and downstream from the Trdd2 recombination center across the Tcrd loop domain that is bounded by the upstream INT1-2 and downstream TEA elements. Disruption of the upstream INT1-2 boundary of this loop domain allows spreading of RAG on- and off-target activity to the proximal Trdv domain and, correspondingly, shifts the Tcrd V(D)J recombination landscape by leading to predominant V(D)J joining to a proximal Trdv3 pseudogene that lies just upstream of the normal boundary. PMID:27526713

  5. Improving Therapy of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) with Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fraietta, Joseph A.; Schwab, Robert D.; Maus, Marcela V.

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive cell immunotherapy for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has heralded a new era of synthetic biology. The infusion of genetically-engineered, autologous chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells directed against CD19 expressed by normal and malignant B cells represents a novel approach to cancer therapy. The results of recent clinical trials of CAR T cells in relapsed and refractory CLL have demonstrated long-term disease-free remissions, underscoring the power of harnessing and re-directing the immune system against cancer. This review will briefly summarize T cell therapies in development for CLL disease. We discuss the role of T cell function and phenotype, T cell culture optimization, CAR design, and approaches to potentiate the survival and anti-tumor effects of infused lymphocytes. Future efforts will focus on improving the efficacy of CAR T cells for the treatment of CLL and incorporating adoptive cell immunotherapy into standard medical management of CLL. PMID:27040708

  6. Alloreactive T cell clones.

    PubMed

    Fitch, F W

    1984-01-01

    T cell clones are useful models for studying lymphocyte function both at the level of the individual cell and in interacting systems. Murine cytolytic and non- cytolyic T cell clones have been obtained with relative ease, and the particular procedure used to derive and maintain T cell clones may influence profoundly the characteristics of the resulting cells. The method of choice depends on the specific question to be asked. Although some clones have characteristics that would have been expected on the basis of results observed with bulk cell populations, other clones have rather unexpected properties. Although most T cell clones appear to be either cytolytic or non-cytolytic, this distinction is not always absolute. A high proportion of both cytolytic and non-cytolytic T cell clones have dual reactivity. This is true for cells which by other criteria appear to be true clones. The frequency of such cells is high enough to suggest that most if not all T cells may have reactivity for more than one antigenic determinant or that antigenic determinants recognized by T cells are shared widely and unexpectedly. It is not clear whether one or two different antigen receptors account for such dual reactivity. The nature of the T cell receptor for antigen remains obscure. T cell clones, because of their homogeneous nature, should make it easier to answer these important immunological questions. Although it remains to be determined how many distinct molecules account for the numerous biological activities found in the culture supernatants from antigen-stimulated T cell clones, it is clear that these factors influence several different types of cells that are involved directly and indirectly in immune responses. IL-2 stimulates both cytolytic and non-cytolytic T cells to proliferate. BCSF causes polyclonal activation of B cells, and there may be other factors which influence B cell responses to antigenic stimulation. IL-3 apparently stimulates maturation of immature T cells

  7. Bcl-XL displays restricted distribution during T cell development and inhibits multiple forms of apoptosis but not clonal deletion in transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The survival of T lymphocytes is tightly controlled during development. Here, we show that Bcl-xL, a protein homologue of Bcl-2, is highly regulated in the thymus in a pattern different than that of Bcl-2. The maximum expression was in CD4+CD8+ thymocytes, a developmental stage where Bcl-2 is downregulated. To assess the role of Bcl-xL in thymocyte apoptosis, we generated mice overexpressing an E mu-bcl-x transgene within the T cell compartment. Constitutive expression of Bcl-xL resulted in accumulation of thymocytes and mature T cells in lymphoid organs. Thymocytes overexpressing Bcl-xL exhibited increased viability in vitro and were resistant to apoptosis induced by different signals, including glucocorticoid, gamma irradiation, calcium ionophore, and CD3 cross-linking. However, Bcl-xL was unable to block clonal deletion of thymocytes reactive with self-superantigens or H-Y antigen. These studies demonstrate that Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, two functionally related proteins, are regulated independently during T cell development. In contrast to Bcl-2, which has been implicated in the maintenance of mature T cells, Bcl-xL appears to provide a survival signal for the maintenance of more immature CD4+CD8+ thymocytes before positive selection. PMID:7500043

  8. Harnessing endogenous miR-181a to segregate transgenic antigen receptor expression in developing versus post-thymic T cells in murine hematopoietic chimeras.

    PubMed

    Papapetrou, Eirini P; Kovalovsky, Damian; Beloeil, Laurent; Sant'angelo, Derek; Sadelain, Michel

    2009-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression by targeting complementary sequences, referred to as miRNA recognition elements (MREs), typically located in the 3' untranslated region of mRNAs. miR-181a is highly expressed in developing thymocytes and markedly downregulated in post-thymic T cells. We investigated whether endogenous miR-181a can be harnessed to segregate expression of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) and TCRs between developing and mature T cells. Lentiviral-encoded antigen receptors were tagged with a miR-181a-specific MRE and transduced into mouse BM cells that were used to generate hematopoietic chimeras. Expression of a CAR specific for human CD19 (hCD19) was selectively suppressed in late double-negative and double-positive thymocytes, coinciding with the peak in endogenous miR-181a expression. Receptor expression was fully restored in post-thymic resting and activated T cells, affording protection against a subsequent challenge with hCD19+ tumors. Hematopoietic mouse chimeras engrafted with a conalbumin-specific TCR prone to thymic clonal deletion acquired peptide-specific T cell responsiveness only when the vector-encoded TCR transcript was similarly engineered to be subject to regulation by miR-181a. These results demonstrate the potential of miRNA-regulated transgene expression in stem cell-based therapies, including cancer immunotherapy.

  9. T-Cell Proliferation Assay: Determination of Immunodominant T-Cell Epitopes of Food Allergens.

    PubMed

    Masilamani, Madhan; Pascal, Mariona; Sampson, Hugh A

    2017-01-01

    Characterization of allergen-specific T cells is critical to understand their contribution to disease pathogenesis. The identification of immunodominant T-cell epitopes is crucial for development of T-cell-based vaccines. Peptide-specific T-cell proliferation studies are usually performed in a library of short synthetic peptides (15mer or 20mer) with 3 or 5 offset spanning the entire length of the allergen. T-cell peptide epitopes lack the primary and tertiary structure of the native protein to cross-link IgE, but retain the ability to stimulate T cells. The peptides sequences can also be obtained either by in silico approaches and in vitro binding assays. The efficacy of T-cell epitope-based peptide immunotherapy has been proven in certain allergies. The present methodology describes T-cell proliferation assays using whole blood sample from allergic subjects.

  10. Phenotypic characterization of CD3-7+ cells in developing human intestine and an analysis of their ability to differentiate into T cells.

    PubMed

    Gunther, Ute; Holloway, Judith A; Gordon, John N; Gordon, John G; Knight, Andrea; Chance, Victoria; Hanley, Neil A; Wilson, David I; French, Ruth; Spencer, Jo; Steer, Howard; Anderson, Graham; MacDonald, Thomas T

    2005-05-01

    We have identified a large population of CD3(-)7(+) cells in human fetal gut. Three- and four-color flow cytometry revealed a distinct surface Ag profile on this population; the majority were negative for CD4 and CD8, whereas most of the remainder expressed the CD8alphaalpha homodimer. In contrast about half of CD3(+) cells expressed CD4 and half expressed CD8alpha. A large proportion of CD3(-)7(+) cells expressed CD56, CD94, and CD161, and whereas CD3(+) T cells also expressed CD161, they only rarely expressed CD56 or CD94. Further studies were conducted to determine whether the CD3(-)7(+) cells have the potential to differentiate into CD3(+) cells. About half of CD3(-)7(+) cells contain intracellular CD3epsilon. Rearranged TCR gamma-chains were detected in highly purified CD3(-)7(+) cells as an early molecular sign of T cell commitment, and the pattern of rearrangement with V regions spliced to the most 5' Jgamma segment is reminiscent of early thymocyte differentiation. In reaggregate thymic organ cultures, CD3(-)7(+) cells also gave rise to CD3(+) T cells. Thus, we demonstrate that the CD3(-)7(+) cells present in the human fetal gut display a distinct phenotype and are able to develop into CD3(+) T cells.

  11. Testosterone replacement effectively inhibits the development of experimental autoimmune orchitis in rats: evidence for a direct role of testosterone on regulatory T cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Fijak, Monika; Schneider, Eva; Klug, Jörg; Bhushan, Sudhanshu; Hackstein, Holger; Schuler, Gerhard; Wygrecka, Malgorzata; Gromoll, Jörg; Meinhardt, Andreas

    2011-05-01

    Despite the immune-privileged status of the male genital tract, infection and inflammation of the male genital tract are important etiological factors in male infertility. A common observation in clinical and experimental orchitis as well as in systemic infection and inflammation are decreased levels of testosterone. Emerging data point to an immunosuppressive role of testosterone. In our study, we substituted testosterone levels in experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) in rat by s.c. testosterone implants. EAO development was reduced to 17% when animals were treated with low-dose testosterone implants (3 cm long, EAO+T3) and to 33% when rats were supplied with high-dose testosterone implants (24 cm, EAO+T24) compared with 80% of animals developing disease in the EAO control group. In the testis, testosterone replacement in EAO animals prevented the accumulation of macrophages and significantly reduced the number of CD4(+) T cells with a strong concomitant increase in the number of regulatory T cells (CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+)) compared with EAO control. In vitro testosterone treatment of naive T cells led to an expansion of the regulatory T cell subset with suppressive activity and ameliorated MCP-1-stimulated chemotaxis of T lymphocytes in a Transwell assay. Moreover, expression of proinflammatory mediators such as MCP-1, TNF-α, and IL-6 in the testis and secretion of Th1 cytokines such as IFN-γ and IL-2 by mononuclear cells isolated from testicular draining lymph nodes were decreased in the EAO+T3 and EAO+T24 groups. Thus, our study shows an immunomodulatory and protective effect of testosterone substitution in the pathogenesis of EAO and suggests androgens as a new factor in the differentiation of regulatory T cells.

  12. T-Cell Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... are extremely rare. T-cell lymphomas can be aggressive (fast-growing) or indolent (slow-growing). Lymphomas are ... also be involved. This group of PTCLs is aggressive and requires combination chemotherapy upon diagnosis. For more ...

  13. Heterogeneity assessment of functional T cell avidity

    PubMed Central

    Ioannidou, Kalliopi; Baumgaertner, Petra; Gannon, Philippe O.; Speiser, Michel F.; Allard, Mathilde; Hebeisen, Michael; Rufer, Nathalie; Speiser, Daniel E.

    2017-01-01

    The potency of cellular immune responses strongly depends on T cell avidity to antigen. Yet, functional avidity measurements are rarely performed in patients, mainly due to the technical challenges of characterizing heterogeneous T cells. The mean functional T cell avidity can be determined by the IFN-γ Elispot assay, with titrated amounts of peptide. Using this assay, we developed a method revealing the heterogeneity of functional avidity, represented by the steepness/hillslope of the peptide titration curve, documented by proof of principle experiments and mathematical modeling. Our data show that not only natural polyclonal CD8 T cell populations from cancer patients, but also monoclonal T cells differ strongly in their heterogeneity of functional avidity. Interestingly, clones and polyclonal cells displayed comparable ranges of heterogeneity. We conclude that besides the mean functional avidity, it is feasible and useful to determine its heterogeneity (hillslope) for characterizing T cell responses in basic research and patient investigation. PMID:28287160

  14. T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Smith-Garvin, Jennifer E; Koretzky, Gary A; Jordan, Martha S

    2009-01-01

    This year marks the 25th anniversary of the first Annual Review of Immunology article to describe features of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR). In celebration of this anniversary, we begin with a brief introduction outlining the chronology of the earliest studies that established the basic paradigm for how the engaged TCR transduces its signals. This review continues with a description of the current state of our understanding of TCR signaling, as well as a summary of recent findings examining other key aspects of T cell activation, including cross talk between the TCR and integrins, the role of costimulatory molecules, and how signals may negatively regulate T cell function.Acronyms and DefinitionsAdapter protein: cellular protein that functions to bridge molecular interactions via characteristic domains able to mediate protein/protein or protein/lipid interactions Costimulation: signals delivered to T cells by cell surface receptors other than the TCR itself that potentiate T cell activation cSMAC: central supramolecular activation cluster Immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM): a short peptide sequence in the cytoplasmic tails of key surface receptors on hematopoietic cells that is characterized by tyrosine residues that are phosphorylated by Src family PTKs, enabling the ITAM to recruit activated Syk family kinases Inside-out signaling: signals initiated by engagement of immunoreceptors that lead to conformational changes and clustering of integrins, thereby increasing the affinity and avidity of the integrins for their ligands NFAT: nuclear factor of activated T cells PI3K: phosphoinositide 3-kinase PKC: protein kinase C PLC: phospholipase C pMHC: peptide major histocompatibility complex (MHC) complex pSMAC: peripheral supramolecular activation cluster PTK: protein tyrosine kinase Signal transduction: biochemical events linking surface receptor engagement to cellular responses TCR: T cell antigen receptor

  15. Use of a microgravity organ culture dish system to demonstrate the signal dampening effects of modeled microgravity during T cell development.

    PubMed

    Woods, Chris C; Banks, Krista E; Lebsack, Ty W; White, Todd C; Anderson, Grant A; Maccallum, Taber; Gruener, Raphael; DeLuca, Dominick

    2005-01-01

    Recently, we have shown that exposure of fetal thymus organ cultures (FTOC) to modeled microgravity (MMG) using a clinostat with a microgravity organ culture dish system (MOCDS) blocks T cell development in a manner independent of steroid stress hormones present in vivo. In this study, we describe the development of the MOCDS system, as well as its use in attempting to understand the mechanism by which T cell development is inhibited in MMG. We show that after MMG exposure FTOC exhibited a significant reduction in CD4+CD8+ double positive (DP) cell production, but those DP cells which remained expressed higher levels of the T cell receptor (TCR) associated molecule, CD3. Interestingly, CD4-CD8- double negative (DN) cells expressed lower levels of CD3 on their surface. DN, as well as immature single positive (ISP) cells, also expressed reduced levels of the IL-7 receptor alpha chain (CD127). These changes in CD3 and CD127 expression were concomitantly associated with an increased production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. We were also able to show that addition of an exogenous signal (anti-CD3epsilon monoclonal antibody) to these cultures effectively mitigated the MMG-induced effects, suggesting that MMG-exposure causes a signal dampening effect on developing thymocytes.

  16. Normal development of brain circuits.

    PubMed

    Tau, Gregory Z; Peterson, Bradley S

    2010-01-01

    Spanning functions from the simplest reflex arc to complex cognitive processes, neural circuits have diverse functional roles. In the cerebral cortex, functional domains such as visual processing, attention, memory, and cognitive control rely on the development of distinct yet interconnected sets of anatomically distributed cortical and subcortical regions. The developmental organization of these circuits is a remarkably complex process that is influenced by genetic predispositions, environmental events, and neuroplastic responses to experiential demand that modulates connectivity and communication among neurons, within individual brain regions and circuits, and across neural pathways. Recent advances in neuroimaging and computational neurobiology, together with traditional investigational approaches such as histological studies and cellular and molecular biology, have been invaluable in improving our understanding of these developmental processes in humans in both health and illness. To contextualize the developmental origins of a wide array of neuropsychiatric illnesses, this review describes the development and maturation of neural circuits from the first synapse through critical periods of vulnerability and opportunity to the emergent capacity for cognitive and behavioral regulation, and finally the dynamic interplay across levels of circuit organization and developmental epochs.

  17. Development of Augmented Leukemia/Lymphoma-Specific T-Cell Immunotherapy for Deployment with Haploidentical, Hematompoietic Progenitor-Cell Transplant

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    adoptive transfer of donor-derived T cells that are HLA-mismatched is that these infused cells can cause graft-verses-host disease (GVHD). Thus, the...cancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/67/6/2872.full.html# related -urls This article has been cited by 4 HighWire-hosted articles. Access the articles at: E-mail...alerts related to this article or journal.Sign up to receive free email-alerts Subscriptions Reprints and .pubs@aacr.orgPublications Department at To

  18. Development of Augmented Leukemia/Lymphoma-Specific T-Cell Immunotherapy for Deployment with Haploidentical, Hematompoietic Progenitor-Cell Transplant

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    manufacturing time to generate and release clinical-grade CD19-specific T cells, during which the pace of the underlying leukemic disease often prevents...Topic Score (0 to 3) Hypothesis/Task #1 3 Hypothesis/Task #2 3 Hypothesis/Task #3 3 Childhood cancer research 3 Blood- related cancer research 3...Hypothesis/Task #2 3 Hypothesis/Task #3 3 Childhood cancer research 3 Blood- related cancer research 3 Military’s needs 3 Veterans’ needs 3 Total

  19. Epigenetics in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Peirs, Sofie; Van der Meulen, Joni; Van de Walle, Inge; Taghon, Tom; Speleman, Frank; Poppe, Bruce; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    Normal T-cell development is a strictly regulated process in which hematopoietic progenitor cells migrate from the bone marrow to the thymus and differentiate from early T-cell progenitors toward mature and functional T cells. During this maturation process, cooperation between a variety of oncogenes and tumor suppressors can drive immature thymocytes into uncontrolled clonal expansion and cause T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Despite improved insights in T-ALL disease biology and comprehensive characterization of its genetic landscape, clinical care remained largely similar over the past decades and still consists of high-dose multi-agent chemotherapy potentially followed by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Even with such aggressive treatment regimens, which are often associated with considerable side effects, clinical outcome is still extremely poor in a significant subset of T-ALL patients as a result of therapy resistance or hematological relapses. Recent genetic studies have identified recurrent somatic alterations in genes involved in DNA methylation and post-translational histone modifications in T-ALL, suggesting that epigenetic homeostasis is critically required in restraining tumor development in the T-cell lineage. In this review, we provide an overview of the epigenetic regulators that could be implicated in T-ALL disease biology and speculate how the epigenetic landscape of T-ALL could trigger the development of epigenetic-based therapies to further improve the treatment of human T-ALL.

  20. Persistent Infection Drives the Development of CD8+ T Cells Specific for Late Lytic Infection Antigens in Lymphocryptovirus-Infected Macaques and Epstein-Barr Virus-Infected Humans▿

    PubMed Central

    Orlova, Nina; Wang, Fred; Fogg, Mark H.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the CD8+ T cell repertoire against lytic infection antigens in rhesus macaques persistently infected with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-related lymphocryptovirus (rhLCV). CD8+ T cells specific for late (L) antigens were detected at rates comparable to those for early antigens and were associated with increasing duration of infection. L antigen-specific CD8+ T cells were also readily detected in adult, EBV-positive humans. Thus, viral major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) immune evasion genes expressed during lytic LCV infection do not prevent L-specific CD8+ T cell development over time during persistent infection. PMID:21917961

  1. The BMP Pathway Participates in Human Naive CD4+ T Cell Activation and Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Víctor G.; Sacedón, Rosa; Hidalgo, Laura; Valencia, Jaris; Fernández-Sevilla, Lidia M.; Hernández-López, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs) form a group of secreted factors that belongs to the TGF-β superfamily. Among different roles in a number of immune cell types, BMPs are known to regulate T cell development within the thymus, although the role of BMP signaling in human mature T cells remains elusive. In this study, we demonstrate that canonical BMP signaling is necessary during two critical events that regulate the size and function of human naive CD4+ T cell population: activation and homeostasis. Upon stimulation via TCR, naive CD4+ T cells upregulate the expression of BMP ligands triggering canonical BMP signaling in CD25+ cells. Blockade of BMP signaling severely impairs CD4+ T cell proliferation after activation mainly through regulation of IL-2, since the addition of this cytokine recuperates normal T cell expansion after inhibition of BMP signaling. Similarly, activation of canonical BMP pathway is required for both the maintenance of cell survival and the homeostatic proliferation induced by IL-7, a key factor for T cell homeostasis. Moreover, upregulation of two critical receptors for T cell homeostasis, CXCR4 and CCR9, triggered by IL-7 is also abrogated in the absence of BMP signaling. Collectively, we describe important roles of the canonical BMP signaling in human naive CD4+ T cell activation and homeostasis that could be valuable for clinical application. PMID:26110906

  2. Development of replication-defective lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus vectors for the induction of potent CD8+ T cell immunity

    PubMed Central

    Flatz, Lukas; Hegazy, Ahmed N; Bergthaler, Andreas; Verschoor, Admar; Claus, Christina; Fernandez, Marylise; Gattinoni, Luca; Johnson, Susan; Kreppel, Florian; Kochanek, Stefan; van den Broek, Maries; Radbruch, Andreas; Lévy, Frédéric; Lambert, Paul-Henri; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Restifo, Nicholas P; Löhning, Max; Ochsenbein, Adrian F; Nabel, Gary J; Pinschewer, Daniel D

    2011-01-01

    Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) exhibits natural tropism for dendritic cells and represents the prototypic infection that elicits protective CD8+ T cell (cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)) immunity. Here we have harnessed the immunobiology of this arenavirus for vaccine delivery. By using producer cells constitutively synthesizing the viral glycoprotein (GP), it was possible to replace the gene encoding LCMV GP with vaccine antigens to create replication-defective vaccine vectors. These rLCMV vaccines elicited CTL responses that were equivalent to or greater than those elicited by recombinant adenovirus 5 or recombinant vaccinia virus in their magnitude and cytokine profiles, and they exhibited more effective protection in several models. In contrast to recombinant adenovirus 5, rLCMV failed to elicit vector-specific antibody immunity, which facilitated re-administration of the same vector for booster vaccination. In addition, rLCMV elicited T helper type 1 CD4+ T cell responses and protective neutralizing antibodies to vaccine antigens. These features, together with low seroprevalence in humans, suggest that rLCMV may show utility as a vaccine platform against infectious diseases and cancer. PMID:20139992

  3. Angiotensin II Promotes the Development of Carotid Atherosclerosis in Type 2 Diabetes Patients via Regulating the T Cells Activities: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Jin, Feng; Zhang, Zhanpu; Sun, Xiaochuan

    2016-01-01

    Background Specific T cell phenotype has been reported to potentially contribute to the development of angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced several vascular disorders. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is intimately associated with cardiovascular disease. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between T cell phenotypes and Ang II in T2DM patients combined with carotid atherosclerosis (CA). Material/Methods This study was performed on 50 patients with T2DM in our hospital. Based on the presence of CA, they were divided into CA group (presence of CA, n=30) or T2DM group (absence of CA, n=20). Additionally, 10 healthy participants were selected as controls. Basic characteristics of all participants were collected and recorded. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from patients and controls with or without Ang II and Ang II receptor blocker (ARB) treatment were used to detect Th1, Th2, and Th17 cell proportions, mRNA levels of T-bet, GATA3, and RORγt as well as the expression of IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-17 by flow cytometry, ELISA, and Real-Time PCR. Results Ang II levels were notably higher in patients in the CA group than those in the T2DM and control group (p<0.05). Th1 and Th17 positive cells, mRNA levels of T-bet and RORγt as well as the expression of IFN-γ and IL-17 were significantly increased in the CA group compared with the T2DM group and control group (p<0.05). Moreover, the activities of T cells and related cytokines were significantly increased of healthy controls after Ang II treatment (p<0.05), while these changes were notably weakened by ARB treatment (p<0.05). Conclusions Ang II promotes the development of CA in T2DM patients by regulating T cells activities. PMID:27782101

  4. Ena/VASP proteins regulate activated T-cell trafficking by promoting diapedesis during transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Estin, Miriam L; Thompson, Scott B; Traxinger, Brianna; Fisher, Marlie H; Friedman, Rachel S; Jacobelli, Jordan

    2017-04-04

    Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) and Ena-VASP-like (EVL) are cytoskeletal effector proteins implicated in regulating cell morphology, adhesion, and migration in various cell types. However, the role of these proteins in T-cell motility, adhesion, and in vivo trafficking remains poorly understood. This study identifies a specific role for EVL and VASP in T-cell diapedesis and trafficking. We demonstrate that EVL and VASP are selectively required for activated T-cell trafficking but are not required for normal T-cell development or for naïve T-cell trafficking to lymph nodes and spleen. Using a model of multiple sclerosis, we show an impairment in trafficking of EVL/VASP-deficient activated T cells to the inflamed central nervous system of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Additionally, we found a defect in trafficking of EVL/VASP double-knockout (dKO) T cells to the inflamed skin and secondary lymphoid organs. Deletion of EVL and VASP resulted in the impairment in α4 integrin (CD49d) expression and function. Unexpectedly, EVL/VASP dKO T cells did not exhibit alterations in shear-resistant adhesion to, or in crawling on, primary endothelial cells under physiologic shear forces. Instead, deletion of EVL and VASP impaired T-cell diapedesis. Furthermore, T-cell diapedesis became equivalent between control and EVL/VASP dKO T cells upon α4 integrin blockade. Overall, EVL and VASP selectively mediate activated T-cell trafficking by promoting the diapedesis step of transendothelial migration in a α4 integrin-dependent manner.

  5. T cell expansion is the limiting factor of virus control in mice with attenuated TCR signaling: implications for human immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Hillen, Kristina M; Gather, Ruth; Enders, Anselm; Pircher, Hanspeter; Aichele, Peter; Fisch, Paul; Blumenthal, Britta; Schamel, Wolfgang W; Straub, Tobias; Goodnow, Christopher C; Ehl, Stephan

    2015-03-15

    Defining the minimal thresholds for effective antiviral T cell immunity is important for clinical decisions in immunodeficient patients. TCR signaling is critical for T cell development, activation, and effector functions. In this article, we analyzed which of these TCR-mediated processes is limiting for antiviral immunity in a mouse strain with reduced expression of SLP-76 (twp mice). Despite severe T cell activation defects in vitro, twp mice generated a normal proportion of antiviral effector T cells postinfection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). Twp CD8(+) T cells showed impaired polyfunctional cytokine production, whereas cytotoxicity as the crucial antiviral effector function for LCMV control was normal. The main limiting factor in the antiviral response of twp mice was impaired T cell proliferation and survival, leading to a 5- to 10-fold reduction of antiviral T cells at the peak of the immune response. This was still sufficient to control infection with the LCMV Armstrong strain, but the more rapidly replicating LCMV-WE induced T cell exhaustion and viral persistence. Thus, under conditions of impaired TCR signaling, reduced T cell expansion was the limiting factor in antiviral immunity. These findings have implications for understanding antiviral immunity in patients with T cell deficiencies.

  6. Developmental exposure to 2,3,7,8 tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin attenuates later-life Notch1-mediated T cell development and leukemogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrenhoerster, Lori S.; Leuthner, Tess C.; Tate, Everett R.; Lakatos, Peter A.; Laiosa, Michael D.

    2015-03-01

    Over half of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) patients have activating mutations in the Notch gene. Moreover, the contaminant 2,3,7,8 tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a known carcinogen that mediates its toxicity through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), and crosstalk between activated AHR and Notch signaling pathways has previously been observed. Given the importance of Notch signaling in thymocyte development and T-ALL disease progression, we hypothesized that the activated AHR potentiates disease initiation and progression in an in vivo model of Notch1-induced thymoma. This hypothesis was tested utilizing adult and developmental exposure paradigms to TCDD in mice expressing a constitutively active Notch1 transgene (Notch{sup ICN-TG}). Following exposure of adult Notch{sup ICN-TG} mice to a single high dose of TCDD, we observed a significant increase in the efficiency of CD8 thymocyte generation. We next exposed pregnant mice to 3 μg/kg of TCDD throughout gestation and lactation to elucidate effects of developmental AHR activation on later-life T cell development and T-ALL-like thymoma susceptibility induced by Notch1. We found that the vehicle-exposed Notch{sup ICN-TG} offspring have a peripheral T cell pool heavily biased toward the CD4 lineage, while TCDD-exposed Notch{sup ICN-TG} offspring were biased toward the CD8 lineage. Furthermore, while the vehicle-exposed NotchICN-TG mice showed increased splenomegaly and B to T cell ratios indicative of disease, mice developmentally exposed to TCDD were largely protected from disease. These studies support a model where developmental AHR activation attenuates later-life Notch1-dependent impacts on thymocyte development and disease progression. - Highlights: • Adult mice exposed to 30 μg/kg TCDD have higher efficiency of CD8 thymocyte generation. • Mice carrying a constitutively active Notch transgene were exposed to 3 μg/kg TCDD throughout development. • Progression of Notch

  7. Regulation of natural killer activity of lymphocytes from normal subjects and patients with chronic lymphatic leukemia by interaction between T and non-T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Khonina, N.A.; Shubinskii, G.Z.; Lozovoi, V.P.

    1987-08-01

    The authors study the effect of culture of human cells on functional activity of natural killer cells and investigate the possible mechanisms of regulation of natural killer activity by acting on cytodifferentiation of lymphocytes in normal subjects and in patients with the B-cell variant of chromic lymphatic leukemia. To estimate natural killer cell function, a membranotoxic test was carried out, using cells of the transplantable line K-562, labeled with /sup 3/H-uridine as the targets.

  8. Prenatal exposure to radiofrequencies: effects of WiFi signals on thymocyte development and peripheral T cell compartment in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Laudisi, Federica; Sambucci, Manolo; Nasta, Francesca; Pinto, Rosanna; Lodato, Rossella; Altavista, Pierluigi; Lovisolo, Giorgio Alfonso; Marino, Carmela; Pioli, Claudio

    2012-12-01

    Wireless local area networks are an increasing alternative to wired data networks in workplaces, homes, and public areas. Concerns about possible health effects of this type of signal, especially when exposure occurs early in life, have been raised. We examined the effects of prenatal (in utero) exposure to wireless fidelity (WiFi) signal-associated electromagnetic fields (2450 MHz center-frequency band) on T cell development and function. Pregnant mice were exposed whole body to a specific absorption rate of 4 W/kg, 2 h per day, starting 5 days after mating and ending 1 day before the expected delivery. Sham-exposed and cage control groups were used as controls. No effects on cell count, phenotype, and proliferation of thymocytes were observed. Also, spleen cell count, CD4/CD8 cell frequencies, T cell proliferation, and cytokine production were not affected by the exposure. These findings were consistently observed in the male and female offspring at early (5 weeks of age) and late (26 weeks of age) time points. Nevertheless, the expected differences associated with aging and/or gender were confirmed. In conclusion, our results do not support the hypothesis that the exposure to WiFi signals during prenatal life results in detrimental effects on the immune T cell compartment.

  9. Impaired autophagy, defective T cell homeostasis and a wasting syndrome in mice with a T cell-specific deletion of Vps34

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, Vrajesh V.; Wu, Lan; Boyd, Kelli L.; Williams, Janice A.; Gaddy, Jennifer A.; Olivares-Villagómez, Danyvid; Cover, Timothy L.; Zong, Wei-Xing; Zhang, Jianhua; Van Kaer, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy plays a critical role in multiple aspects of the immune system, including the development and function of T lymphocytes. In mammalian cells, the class III phosphoinositide 3-kinase Vps34 is thought to play a critical role in autophagy. However, recent studies have cast doubt on the role of Vps34 in autophagy, at least in certain cell types. In order to study the effects of Vps34 on autophagy in T lymphocytes, we generated mice that selectively lack Vps34 in the T cell lineage. Vps34 ablation in T cells caused profound defects in autophagic flux, resulting in accumulation of cellular organelles and apoptosis. These animals exhibited normal intrathymic development of conventional T cells, but were profoundly impaired in the intrathymic development of invariant natural killer T cells. In peripheral organs, T cell-specific ablation of Vps34 had a profound impact on T cell homeostasis and function. Furthermore, aged animals developed an inflammatory wasting syndrome characterized by weight loss, intestinal inflammation and anemia. Consistent with this phenotype, Vps34 was required for the peripheral maintenance and function of CD4+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells. Collectively, our study reveals a critical role for Vps34 in autophagy and for the peripheral homeostasis and function of T lymphocytes. PMID:23596309

  10. Graft-versus-host reaction and immune function. III. Functional pre-T cells in the bone marrow of graft-versus-host-reactive mice displaying T cell immunodeficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Seddik, M.; Seemayer, T.A.; Lapp, W.S.

    1986-02-01

    Studies were performed to determine whether pre-T cells develop normally in the bone marrow of mice displaying thymic dysplasia and T cell immunodeficiency as a consequence of a graft-versus-host (GVH) reaction. GVH reactions were induced in CBAxAF1 mice by the injection of A strain lymphoid cells. To test for the presence of pre-T cells in GVH-reactive mice, bone marrow from GVH-reactive mice (GVHBM) was injected into irradiated syngeneic F1 mice and 30-40 days later thymic morphology and function were studied. Morphology studies showed nearly normal thymic architectural restoration; moreover, such glands contained normal numbers of Thy-1-positive cells. Functional pre-T cells were evaluated by transferring thymocytes from the irradiated GVHBM-reconstituted mice into T-cell-deprived mice. These thymocytes reconstituted allograft reactivity, T helper cell function and Con A and PHA mitogen responses of T-cell-deprived mice. These results suggest that the pre-T cell population in the bone marrow is not affected by the GVH reaction. Therefore, the T cell immunodeficiency associated with the GVH reaction is not due to a deficiency of pre-T cells in the bone marrow but is more likely associated with GVH-induced thymic dysplasia.

  11. Bacillus subtilis-specific poly-gamma-glutamic acid regulates development pathways of naive CD4(+) T cells through antigen-presenting cell-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunghoon; Yang, Jun Young; Lee, Kyuheon; Oh, Kyu Heon; Gi, Mia; Kim, Jung Mogg; Paik, Doo Jin; Hong, Seokmann; Youn, Jeehee

    2009-08-01

    Peripheral naive CD4(+) T cells selectively differentiate to type 1 T(h), type 2 T(h) and IL-17-producing T(h) (T(h)17) cells, depending on the priming conditions. Since these subsets develop antagonistically to each other to elicit subset-specific adaptive immune responses, balance between these subsets can regulate the susceptibility to diverse immune diseases. The present study was undertaken to determine whether poly-gamma-glutamic acid (gamma-PGA), an edible and safe exopolymer that is generated by microorganisms such as Bacillus subtilis, could modulate the development pathways of T(h) subsets. The presence of gamma-PGA during priming promoted the development of T(h)1 and T(h)17 cells but inhibited development of T(h)2 cells. gamma-PGA up-regulated the expression of T-bet and ROR-gammat, the master genes of T(h)1 and T(h)17 cells, respectively, whereas down-regulating the level of GATA-3, the master gene of T(h)2 cells. gamma-PGA induced the expression of IL-12p40, CD80 and CD86 in dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages in a Toll-like receptor-4-dependent manner, and the effect of gamma-PGA on T(h)1/T(h)2 development was dependent on the presence of antigen-presenting cells (APC). Furthermore, gamma-PGA-stimulated DC favored the polarization of naive CD4(+) T cells toward T(h)1 cells rather than T(h)2 cells. In contrast, gamma-PGA affected T(h)17 cell development, regardless of the presence or absence of APC. Thus, these data demonstrate that gamma-PGA has the potential to regulate the development pathways of naive CD4(+) T cells through APC-dependent and -independent mechanisms and to be applicable to treating T(h)2-dominated diseases.

  12. Toward the development of multi-epitope p53 cancer vaccines: an in vitro assessment of CD8(+) T cell responses to HLA class I-restricted wild-type sequence p53 peptides.

    PubMed

    Sakakura, Koichi; Chikamatsu, Kazuaki; Furuya, Nobuhiko; Appella, Ettore; Whiteside, Theresa L; Deleo, Albert B

    2007-10-01

    Wild-type sequence (wt) p53 peptides are attractive candidates for broadly applicable cancer vaccines. Six HLA-A2 or HLA-A24-restricted wt p53 peptides were evaluated for their ex vivo immunogenicity and their potential for use in cancer vaccines. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) obtained from HLA-A*0201(+) and/or HLA-A*2402(+) normal donors and subjects with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) were analyzed for p53 peptide-specific reactivity in ELISPOT IFN-gamma assays. CD8(+) T cells in 7/10 normal donors (HD) and 11/23 subjects with SCCHN responded to at least one of the wt p53 peptides. CD8(+) T cell precursors responsive to wt p53 epitopes were detected in the circulation of most subjects with early disease, and an elevated blood Tc(1)/Tc(2) ratio distinguished wt p53 peptide responders from non-responders. The identification of multiple wt p53 peptides able to induce cytolytic T lymphocytes in most subjects with cancer promotes the development of multi-epitope p53 vaccines.

  13. Induction of Neonatal Tolerance to Mls^a Antigens by CD8^+ T Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Susan R.; Sprent, Jonathan

    1990-06-01

    Antigen-specific tolerance of T cells to minor lymphocyte stimulatory (Mis) antigens can be induced in mice by neonatal injection of foreign lymphohematopoietic cells. Although immune responses to Mls^a antigens are controlled by B cells, CD8^+ T cells were the most effective cell type for induction of Mls^a tolerance. Tolerance was evident in both thymus and lymph nodes and could be induced by as few as 2 x 10^4 CD8^+ T cells; these cells were 50 to 100 times as potent as CD4^+ cells or B cells in causing functional tolerance and deletion of Vβ6^+ T cells. Thus, intrathymic contact with antigens expressed on CD8^+ T cells may play an important role in controlling the normal development of tolerance.

  14. gammadelta T cells link innate and adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Holtmeier, Wolfgang; Kabelitz, Dieter

    2005-01-01

    While most T cells use a CD3-associated alpha/beta T cell receptor as antigen recognition structure, a second population of T cells expresses the alternative gamma/delta T cell receptor. gamma/delta T cells are a minor population in the peripheral blood but constitute a major population among intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes. Most gamma/delta T cells recognize ligands which are fundamentally different from the short peptides that are seen by alpha/beta T cells in the context of MHC class I or class II molecules. Thus, human Vdelta2 T cells recognize small bacterial phosphoantigens, alkylamines and synthetic aminobisphosphonates, whereas Vdelta1 T cells recognize stress-inducible MHC-related molecules MICA/B as well as several other ligands. At the functional level, gamma/delta T cells rapidly produce a variety of cytokines and usually exert potent cytotoxic activity, also towards many tumor cells. In this article, we discuss the role of gamma/delta T cells as a bridge between the innate and the adaptive immune system, based on the interpretation that gamma/delta T cells use their T cell receptor as a pattern recognition receptor. Our increasing understanding of the ligand recognition and activation mechanisms of gamma/delta T cells also opens new perspectives for the development of gamma/delta T cell-based immunotherapies.

  15. Development of a novel nitro-derivative of noscapine for the potential treatment of drug-resistant ovarian cancer and T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Aneja, Ritu; Vangapandu, Surya N; Lopus, Manu; Chandra, Ramesh; Panda, Dulal; Joshi, Harish C

    2006-06-01

    We have shown previously that an antitussive plant alkaloid, noscapine, binds tubulin, displays anticancer activity, and has a safe pharmacological profile in humans. Structure-function analyses pointed to a proton at position-9 of the isoquinoline ring that can be modified without compromising tubulin binding activity. Thus, many noscapine analogs with different functional moieties at position-9 were synthesized. Those analogs that kill human cancer cells resistant to other antimicrotubule agents, vincas and taxanes, were screened. Here, we present one such analog, 9-nitro-noscapine (9-nitro-nos), which binds tubulin and induces apoptosis selectively in tumor cells (ovarian and T-cell lymphoma) resistant to paclitaxel, vinblastine, and teniposide. 9-Nitro-nos treatment at doses as high as 100 microM did not affect the cell cycle profile of normal human fibroblasts. This selectivity of 9-nitro-nos for cancer cells represents a unique edge over the other available antimitotics. 9-Nitro-nos perturbs the progression of cell cycle by mitotic arrest, followed by apoptotic cell death associated with increased caspase-3 activation and appearance of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling-positive cells. Thus, we conclude that 9-nitro-nos has great potential to be a novel therapeutic agent for ovarian and T-cell lymphoma cancers, even those that have become drug-resistant to currently available chemotherapeutic drugs.

  16. Preselection Thymocytes Are More Sensitive to T Cell Receptor Stimulation Than Mature T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Gayle M.; Schober, Sonya L.; Endrizzi, Bart T.; Dutcher, Angela K.; Jameson, Stephen C.; Hogquist, Kristin A.

    1998-01-01

    During T cell development, thymocytes which are tolerant to self-peptides but reactive to foreign peptides are selected. The current model for thymocyte selection proposes that self-peptide–major histocompatibility complex (MHC) complexes that bind the T cell receptor with low affinity will promote positive selection while those with high affinity will result in negative selection. Upon thymocyte maturation, such low affinity self-peptide–MHC ligands no longer provoke a response, but foreign peptides can incidentally be high affinity ligands and can therefore stimulate T cells. For this model to work, thymocytes must be more sensitive to ligand than mature T cells. Contrary to this expectation, several groups have shown that thymocytes are less responsive than mature T cells to anti-T cell receptor for antigen (TCR)/CD3 mAb stimulation. Additionally, the lower TCR levels on thymocytes, compared with T cells, would potentially correlate with decreased thymocyte sensitivity. Here we compared preselection thymocytes and mature T cells for early activation events in response to peptide–MHC ligands. Remarkably, the preselection thymocytes were more responsive than mature T cells when stimulated with low affinity peptide variants, while both populations responded equally well to the antigenic peptide. This directly demonstrates the increased sensitivity of thymocytes compared with T cells for TCR engagement by peptide–MHC complexes. PMID:9815264

  17. γδT Cells: the Overlooked T cell Subset in Demyelinating Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wohler, Jillian E.; Smith, Sherry S.; Barnum, Scott R.

    2015-01-01

    γδ T cells represent a small subpopulation of T cells that express a restricted repertoire of T cell receptors and, unlike αβ T cells, function more as cells of the innate immune system. These cells are found in skin and mucosal sites as well as secondary lymphoid tissues and, frequently act as first line of defense sentinels. γδ T cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of demyelinating disease although little was known regarding their trafficking and effector functions. In this brief review we highlight recent studies demonstrating that γδ T cells migrate rapidly to the CNS during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model for multiple sclerosis. γδ T cell trafficking to the CNS is independent of β2-integrins and occurs well before onset of clinical signs of disease, peaking early during the acute phase of disease. γδ T cell-mediated production of inflammatory cytokines including IFN-γ and TNF-α appears critical for EAE development, suggesting these cells may set the stage for activation of other subsets of infiltrating effector cells. These data suggest that γδ T cells or subsets of γδ T cells may represent a new therapeutic target in demeylinating disease. PMID:19610090

  18. gammadelta T cells: the overlooked T-cell subset in demyelinating disease.

    PubMed

    Wohler, Jillian E; Smith, Sherry S; Barnum, Scott R

    2010-01-01

    gammadelta T cells represent a small subpopulation of T cells expressing a restricted repertoire of T-cell receptors and, unlike alphabeta T cells, function more as cells of the innate immune system. These cells are found in skin and mucosal sites as well as secondary lymphoid tissues and frequently act as first line of defense sentinels. gammadelta T cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of demyelinating disease, although little was known regarding their trafficking and effector functions. In this Mini-Review, we highlight recent studies demonstrating that gammadelta T cells migrate rapidly to the CNS during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model for multiple sclerosis. gammadelta T-cell trafficking to the CNS is independent of beta(2)-integrins and occurs well before onset of clinical signs of disease, peaking early during the acute phase of disease. gammadelta T-cell-mediated production of inflammatory cytokines, including interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, appears critical for EAE development, suggesting that these cells may set the stage for activation of other subsets of infiltrating effector cells. These data suggest that gammadelta T cells or subsets of gammadelta T cells may represent a new therapeutic target in demeylinating disease.

  19. Role of CD8 Regulatory T Cells versus Tc1 and Tc17 Cells in the Development of Human Graft-versus-Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Hoya, Adriana; López-Santiago, Rubén; Vela-Ojeda, Jorge; Montiel-Cervantes, Laura; Rodríguez-Cortés, Octavio; Rosales-García, Víctor; Flores-Mejía, Raúl; Sandoval-Borrego, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    CD8+ T cells that secrete proinflammatory cytokines play a central role in exacerbation of inflammation; however, a new subpopulation of CD8 regulatory T cells has recently been characterized. This study analyzes the prominent role of these different subpopulations in the development of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Samples from 8 healthy donors mobilized with Filgrastim® (G-CSF) and 18 patients who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) were evaluated by flow cytometry. Mobilization induced an increase in Tc1 (p < 0.01), Th1 (p < 0.001), Tc17 (p < 0.05), and CD8+IL-10+ cells (p < 0.05), showing that G-CSF induces both pro- and anti-inflammatory profiles. Donor-patient correlation revealed a trend (p = 0.06) toward the development of GVHD in patients who receive a high percentage of Tc1 cells. Patients with acute GVHD (aGVHD), either active or controlled, and patients without GVHD were evaluated; patients with active aGVHD had a higher percentage of Tc1 (p < 0.01) and Tc17 (p < 0.05) cells, as opposed to patients without GVHD in whom a higher percentage of CD8 Treg cells (p < 0.01) was found. These findings indicate that the increase in Tc1 and Tc17 cells is associated with GVHD development, while regulatory CD8 T cells might have a protective role in this disease. These tests can be used to monitor and control GVHD. PMID:28164135

  20. Role of CD8 Regulatory T Cells versus Tc1 and Tc17 Cells in the Development of Human Graft-versus-Host Disease.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Hoya, Adriana; López-Santiago, Rubén; Vela-Ojeda, Jorge; Montiel-Cervantes, Laura; Rodríguez-Cortés, Octavio; Rosales-García, Víctor; Paredes-Cervantes, Vladimir; Flores-Mejía, Raúl; Sandoval-Borrego, Daniela; Moreno-Lafont, Martha

    2017-01-01

    CD8(+) T cells that secrete proinflammatory cytokines play a central role in exacerbation of inflammation; however, a new subpopulation of CD8 regulatory T cells has recently been characterized. This study analyzes the prominent role of these different subpopulations in the development of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Samples from 8 healthy donors mobilized with Filgrastim® (G-CSF) and 18 patients who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) were evaluated by flow cytometry. Mobilization induced an increase in Tc1 (p < 0.01), Th1 (p < 0.001), Tc17 (p < 0.05), and CD8(+)IL-10(+) cells (p < 0.05), showing that G-CSF induces both pro- and anti-inflammatory profiles. Donor-patient correlation revealed a trend (p = 0.06) toward the development of GVHD in patients who receive a high percentage of Tc1 cells. Patients with acute GVHD (aGVHD), either active or controlled, and patients without GVHD were evaluated; patients with active aGVHD had a higher percentage of Tc1 (p < 0.01) and Tc17 (p < 0.05) cells, as opposed to patients without GVHD in whom a higher percentage of CD8 Treg cells (p < 0.01) was found. These findings indicate that the increase in Tc1 and Tc17 cells is associated with GVHD development, while regulatory CD8 T cells might have a protective role in this disease. These tests can be used to monitor and control GVHD.

  1. Tolerance checkpoint bypass permits emergence of pathogenic T cells to neuromyelitis optica autoantigen aquaporin-4

    PubMed Central

    Sagan, Sharon A.; Winger, Ryan C.; Cruz-Herranz, Andrés; Nelson, Patricia A.; Hagberg, Sarah; Miller, Corey N.; Spencer, Collin M.; Ho, Peggy P.; Bennett, Jeffrey L.; Levy, Michael; Levin, Marc H.; Verkman, Alan S.; Steinman, Lawrence; Green, Ari J.; Anderson, Mark S.; Sobel, Raymond A.; Zamvil, Scott S.

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4)-specific T cells are expanded in neuromyelitis optica (NMO) patients and exhibit Th17 polarization. However, their pathogenic role in CNS autoimmune inflammatory disease is unclear. Although multiple AQP4 T-cell epitopes have been identified in WT C57BL/6 mice, we observed that neither immunization with those determinants nor transfer of donor T cells targeting them caused CNS autoimmune disease in recipient mice. In contrast, robust proliferation was observed following immunization of AQP4-deficient (AQP4−/−) mice with AQP4 peptide (p) 135–153 or p201–220, peptides predicted to contain I-Ab–restricted T-cell epitopes but not identified in WT mice. In comparison with WT mice, AQP4−/− mice used unique T-cell receptor repertoires for recognition of these two AQP4 epitopes. Donor T cells specific for either determinant from AQP4−/−, but not WT, mice induced paralysis in recipient WT and B-cell–deficient mice. AQP4-specific Th17-polarized cells induced more severe disease than Th1-polarized cells. Clinical signs were associated with opticospinal infiltrates of T cells and monocytes. Fluorescent-labeled donor T cells were detected in CNS lesions. Visual system involvement was evident by changes in optical coherence tomography. Fine mapping of AQP4 p201–220 and p135–153 epitopes identified peptides within p201–220 but not p135–153, which induced clinical disease in 40% of WT mice by direct immunization. Our results provide a foundation to evaluate how AQP4-specific T cells contribute to AQP4-targeted CNS autoimmunity (ATCA) and suggest that pathogenic AQP4-specific T-cell responses are normally restrained by central tolerance, which may be relevant to understanding development of AQP4-reactive T cells in NMO. PMID:27940915

  2. T cell lipid peroxidation induces ferroptosis and prevents immunity to infection.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Mai; Freigang, Stefan; Schneider, Christoph; Conrad, Marcus; Bornkamm, Georg W; Kopf, Manfred

    2015-04-06

    The selenoenzyme glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4) is a major scavenger of phospholipid hydroperoxides. Although Gpx4 represents a key component of the reactive oxygen species-scavenging network, its relevance in the immune system is yet to be defined. Here, we investigated the importance of Gpx4 for physiological T cell responses by using T cell-specific Gpx4-deficient mice. Our results revealed that, despite normal thymic T cell development, CD8(+) T cells from T(ΔGpx4/ΔGpx4) mice had an intrinsic defect in maintaining homeostatic balance in the periphery. Moreover, both antigen-specific CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells lacking Gpx4 failed to expand and to protect from acute lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus and Leishmania major parasite infections, which were rescued with diet supplementation of high dosage of vitamin E. Notably, depletion of the Gpx4 gene in the memory phase of viral infection did not affect T cell recall responses upon secondary infection. Ex vivo, Gpx4-deficient T cells rapidly accumulated membrane lipid peroxides and concomitantly underwent cell death driven by ferroptosis but not necroptosis. These studies unveil an essential role of Gpx4 for T cell immunity.

  3. T cell-independent development and induction of somatic hypermutation in human IgM+ IgD+ CD27+ B cells.

    PubMed

    Scheeren, Ferenc A; Nagasawa, Maho; Weijer, Kees; Cupedo, Tom; Kirberg, Jörg; Legrand, Nicolas; Spits, Hergen

    2008-09-01

    IgM(+)IgD(+)CD27(+) B cells from peripheral blood have been described as circulating marginal zone B cells. It is still unknown when and where these cells develop. These IgM(+)IgD(+)CD27(+) B cells exhibit somatic hypermutations (SHMs) in their B cell receptors, but the exact nature of the signals leading to induction of these SHMs remains elusive. Here, we show that IgM(+)IgD(+)CD27(+) B cells carrying SHMs are observed during human fetal development. To examine the role of T cells in human IgM(+)IgD(+)CD27(+) B cell development we used an in vivo model in which Rag2(-/-)gamma(C)(-/-) mice were repopulated with human hematopoietic stem cells. Using Rag2(-/-)gamma(C)(-/-) mice on a Nude background, we demonstrated that development and induction of SHMs of human IgM(+)IgD(+)CD27(+) B cells can occur in a T cell-independent manner.

  4. Differential development of CD4 and CD8 cytotoxic T cells (CTL) in PBMC across the leprosy spectrum; IL-6 with IFN-gamma or IL-2 generate CTL in multibacillary patients.

    PubMed

    de la Barrera, S; Finiasz, D M; Fink, S; Valdez, R; Bottasso, O; Balina, L M; Sasiain, M C

    1997-03-01

    In the present study we evaluated the contribution of CD4 and CD8 T cells on the antigen-specific cytotoxic activity induced by whole Mycobacterium leprae in leprosy patients and normal controls (N) as well as the modulation of this activity by some cytokines. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from N or from leprosy patients were stimulated with antigen in the presence or absence of cytokines for 7 days. M. leprae-stimulated PBMC were depleted of CD4 or CD8 antigen-bearing cells and employed as effector cells in a 4-hr [31Cr]-release assay against autologous M. leprae-pulsed macrophages. Our results demonstrate that both CD4 and CD8 T cells contribute to M. leprae-induced cytotoxic activity, with differences observed in paucibacillary (PB) and multibacillary (MB) patients. CD8-mediated cytotoxic activity is higher than that of CD4 cells in PB patients, while in MB patients CD4 cytotoxicity is predominant. Our data also demonstrate that the generation of CD4 and CD8 cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) can be modulated differentially by interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-6, gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), or IL-2. Although MB patients developed the lowest CTL response, cytokines such as IL-6 plus IL-2 or IFN-gamma were able to generate both CD4 and CD8 cytotoxic T cells from MB patients. In PB patients, IL-6 plus IFN-gamma displayed the highest stimulation on CD8 effector cells. Thus, an important role may be assigned to IL-6, together with IL-2 or IFN-gamma, in the differentiation of M. leprae-specific CTL effector cells.

  5. Survival of mature T cells depends on signaling through HOIP

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Kazumi; Kitamura, Akiko; Sasaki, Yoshiteru; Chung, Doo Hyun; Kagami, Shoji; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Yasutomo, Koji

    2016-01-01

    T cell development in the thymus is controlled by a multistep process. The NF-κB pathway regulates T cell development as well as T cell activation at multiple differentiation stages. The linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC) is composed of Sharpin, HOIL-1L and HOIP, and it is crucial for regulating the NF-κB and cell death pathways. However, little is known about the roles of LUBAC in T-cell development and activation. Here, we show that in T-HOIPΔlinear mice lacking the ubiquitin ligase activity of LUBAC, thymic CD4+ or CD8+ T cell numbers were markedly reduced with severe defects in NKT cell development. HOIPΔlinear CD4+ T cells failed to phosphorylate IκBα and JNK through T cell receptor-mediated stimulation. Mature CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in T-HOIPΔlinear mice underwent apoptosis more rapidly than control T cells, and it was accompanied by lower CD127 expression on CD4+CD24low and CD8+CD24low T cells in the thymus. The enforced expression of CD127 in T-HOIPΔlinear thymocytes rescued the development of mature CD8+ T cells. Collectively, our results showed that LUBAC ligase activity is key for the survival of mature T cells, and suggest multiple roles of the NF-κB and cell death pathways in activating or maintaining T cell-mediated adaptive immune responses. PMID:27786304

  6. Ephrin-B-dependent thymic epithelial cell-thymocyte interactions are necessary for correct T cell differentiation and thymus histology organization: relevance for thymic cortex development.

    PubMed

    Cejalvo, Teresa; Munoz, Juan J; Tobajas, Esther; Fanlo, Lucía; Alfaro, David; García-Ceca, Javier; Zapata, Agustín

    2013-03-15

    Previous analysis on the thymus of erythropoietin-producing hepatocyte kinases (Eph) B knockout mice and chimeras revealed that Eph-Eph receptor-interacting proteins (ephrins) are expressed both on T cells and thymic epithelial cells (TECs) and play a role in defining the thymus microenvironments. In the current study, we have used the Cre-LoxP system to selectively delete ephrin-B1 and/or ephrin-B2 in either thymocytes (EfnB1(thy/thy), EfnB2(thy/thy), and EfnB1(thy/thy)EfnB2(thy/thy) mice) or TECs (EfnB1(tec/tec), EfnB2(tec/tec), and EfnB1(tec/tec)EfnB2(tec/tec) mice) and determine the relevance of these Eph ligands in T cell differentiation and thymus histology. Our results indicate that ephrin-B1 and ephrin-B2 expressed on thymocytes play an autonomous role in T cell development and, expressed on TECs, their nonautonomous roles are partially overlapping. The effects of the lack of ephrin-B1 and/or ephrin-B2 on either thymocytes or TECs are more severe and specific on thymic epithelium, contribute to the cell intermingling necessary for thymus organization, and affect cortical TEC subpopulation phenotype and location. Moreover, ephrin-B1 and ephrin-B2 seem to be involved in the temporal appearance of distinct cortical TECs subsets defined by different Ly51 levels of expression on the ontogeny.

  7. Murine thymic selection quantified using a unique method to capture deleted T cells.

    PubMed

    Stritesky, Gretta L; Xing, Yan; Erickson, Jami R; Kalekar, Lokesh A; Wang, Xiaodan; Mueller, Daniel L; Jameson, Stephen C; Hogquist, Kristin A

    2013-03-19

    Thymic positive and negative selection events generate a T-cell repertoire that is MHC restricted and self-tolerant. The number of T cells undergoing positive and negative selection in normal mice has never been firmly established. We generated mice that lack the proapoptotic molecule Bim (bcl2l11) together with a Nur77(GFP) transgene, which allowed the identification and enumeration of T cells that would normally undergo clonal deletion. Using this method, we report the striking observation that six times more cells undergo negative selection than complete positive selection. Seventy-five percent of the negatively selected cells are deleted at the double positive stage in the thymic cortex, compared with 25% at the single positive stage in the medulla. The fact that more thymocytes are highly reactive to MHC than are weakly reactive is inconsistent with a random model of recognition and suggests that T-cell recognition is MHC biased. Furthermore, Bim(-/-) mice had an increased number of GFP(hi) cells in the peripheral lymphoid tissue and a corresponding increase in antigen experienced or anergic cell phenotype. Our data also show that the CD4+ T cells that are clonally deleted experienced only slightly stronger T-cell receptor signaling than those that developed into regulatory T cells.

  8. Negative immunomagnetic selection of T cells from peripheral blood of presentation AML specimens.

    PubMed

    Le Dieu, Rifca; Taussig, David; Lister, T Andrew; Gribben, John G

    2009-08-31

    To date, studies on T cells in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have been limited to flow cytometric analysis of whole peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) specimens or functional work looking at the impact of AML myeloblasts on normal or remission T cells. This lack of information on T cells at the time of presentation with disease is due in part to the difficulty in isolating sufficiently pure T cells from these specimens for further study. Negative immunomagnetic selection has been the method of choice for isolating immune cells for functional studies due to concerns that binding antibodies to the cell surface may induce cellular activation, block ligand-receptor interactions or result in immune clearance. In order specifically to study T cells in presentation AML specimens, we set out to develop a method of isolating highly pure CD4 and CD8 T cells by negative selection from the peripheral blood (PB) of newly diagnosed AML patients. This technique, unlike T cell selection from PB from normal individuals or from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, was extremely problematic due to properties of the leukaemic myeloblasts. A successful method was eventually optimized requiring the use of a custom antibody cocktail consisting of CD33, CD34, CD123, CD11c and CD36, to deplete myeloblasts.

  9. Identification of protein phosphatase interacting proteins from normal and UVA-irradiated HaCaT cell lysates by surface plasmon resonance based binding technique using biotin-microcystin-LR as phosphatase capturing molecule.

    PubMed

    Bécsi, Bálint; Dedinszki, Dóra; Gyémánt, Gyöngyi; Máthé, Csaba; Vasas, Gábor; Lontay, Beáta; Erdődi, Ferenc

    2014-09-05

    Identification of the interacting proteins of protein phosphatases is crucial to understand the cellular roles of these enzymes. Microcystin-LR (MC-LR), a potent inhibitor of protein phosphatase-1 (PP1), -2A (PP2A), PP4, PP5 and PP6, was biotinylated, immobilized to streptavidin-coupled sensorchip surface and used in surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based binding experiments to isolate phosphatase binding proteins. Biotin-MC-LR captured PP1 catalytic subunit (PP1c) stably and the biotin-MC-LR-PP1c complex was able to further interact with the regulatory subunit (MYPT1) of myosin phosphatase. Increased biotin-MC-LR coated sensorchip surface in the Surface Prep unit of Biacore 3000 captured PP1c, PP2Ac and their regulatory proteins including MYPT1, MYPT family TIMAP, inhibitor-2 as well as PP2A-A and -Bα-subunits from normal and UVA-irradiated HaCaT cell lysates as revealed by dot blot analysis of the recovered proteins. Biotin-MC-LR was used for the subcellular localization of protein phosphatases in HaCaT cells by identification of phosphatase-bound biotin-MC-LR with fluorescent streptavidin conjugates. Partial colocalization of the biotin-MC-LR signals with those obtained using anti-PP1c and anti-PP2Ac antibodies was apparent as judged by confocal microscopy. Our results imply that biotin-MC-LR is a suitable capture molecule in SPR for isolation of protein phosphatase interacting proteins from cell lysates in sufficient amounts for immunological detection.

  10. A case of T cell prolymphocytic leukemia involving blast transformation.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Kunimoto; Noguchi, Masaaki; Imai, Hidenori; Sekiguchi, Yasunobu; Wakabayashi, Mutsumi; Sawada, Tomohiro; Komatsu, Norio

    2011-05-01

    We report a case of T cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL) involving blast transformation. At the initial diagnosis, most peripheral blood cells demonstrated proliferation of indolent T cell small cell variants, i.e., small to medium prolymphocytes with inconspicuous nucleoli and a normal karyotype. These cells were positive for surface CD4, CD5, and CD7, and cytoplasmic CD3, but negative for surface CD3 and CD8 and cytoplasmic terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT). The T cell receptor (TCR) Cβ1 gene was rearranged in the cells. Large prolymphocytes with prominent nucleoli, irregular nuclei, and cytoplasmic vacuoles that exhibited chromosome 8 trisomy were observed about 1.5 years later. The CD4+CD8- single positive effector memory T cells transformed into surface CD4+CD8+ double positive precursor T cells. The clonal TCR gene rearrangement patterns of these cells were identical throughout the clinical course, suggesting clonal blast transformation. The CD4+CD8+ cells demonstrated increased chromosome 8 trisomy combined with complex chromosome abnormalities with t(14;14)(q11.2;q32) containing a 14q32 chromosome after transformation. T cell leukemia 1a (TCL1a) (14q32.1) may be implicated in this case. The TCL1a oncoprotein is expressed in approximately 70% of T-PLL cases. The disease gradually developed resistance to chemotherapy, and the patient died of the disease. It is known that indolent T-PLL can become aggressive. Therefore, similar transformations may occur in other aggressive T-PLL cases, particularly those involving trisomy 8 and TCL1a.

  11. Genetic Analysis of T Cell Lymphomas in Carbon Ion-Irradiated Mice Reveals Frequent Interstitial Chromosome Deletions: Implications for Second Cancer Induction in Normal Tissues during Carbon Ion Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Blyth, Benjamin J; Kakinuma, Shizuko; Sunaoshi, Masaaki; Amasaki, Yoshiko; Hirano-Sakairi, Shinobu; Ogawa, Kanae; Shirakami, Ayana; Shang, Yi; Tsuruoka, Chizuru; Nishimura, Mayumi; Shimada, Yoshiya

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring mice exposed to carbon ion radiotherapy provides an indirect method to evaluate the potential for second cancer induction in normal tissues outside the radiotherapy target volume, since such estimates are not yet possible from historical patient data. Here, male and female B6C3F1 mice were given single or fractionated whole-body exposure(s) to a monoenergetic carbon ion radiotherapy beam at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, Japan, matching the radiation quality delivered to the normal tissue ahead of the tumour volume (average linear energy transfer = 13 keV x μm(-1)) during patient radiotherapy protocols. The mice were monitored for the remainder of their lifespan, and a large number of T cell lymphomas that arose in these mice were analysed alongside those arising following an equivalent dose of 137Cs gamma ray-irradiation. Using genome-wide DNA copy number analysis to identify genomic loci involved in radiation-induced lymphomagenesis and subsequent detailed analysis of Notch1, Ikzf1, Pten, Trp53 and Bcl11b genes, we compared the genetic profile of the carbon ion- and gamma ray-induced tumours. The canonical set of genes previously associated with radiation-induced T cell lymphoma was identified in both radiation groups. While the pattern of disruption of the various pathways was somewhat different between the radiation types, most notably Pten mutation frequency and loss of heterozygosity flanking Bcl11b, the most striking finding was the observation of large interstitial deletions at various sites across the genome in carbon ion-induced tumours, which were only seen infrequently in the gamma ray-induced tumours analysed. If such large interstitial chromosomal deletions are a characteristic lesion of carbon ion irradiation, even when using the low linear energy transfer radiation to which normal tissues are exposed in radiotherapy patients, understanding the dose-response and tissue specificity of such DNA damage could prove key to

  12. Impaired T-Cell Function in B-Cell Lymphoma: A Direct Consequence of Events at the Immunological Synapse?

    PubMed Central

    Nassef Kadry Naguib Roufaiel, Marian; Wells, James W.; Steptoe, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    Tumors can escape immune destruction through the development of antigen loss variants and loss of antigen processing/presentation pathways, thereby rendering them invisible to T cells. Alternatively, mechanisms of peripheral T-cell tolerance that would normally be important for protection from the development of autoimmunity may also be co-opted to (i) generate an immuno-inhibitory tumor environment, (ii) promote development of regulatory cell populations, or (iii) cell-intrinsically inactivate tumor-specific T cells. Emerging evidence suggests that T-cell function is impaired in hematological malignancies, which may manifest from cognate interactions between T cells and the tumor. The immunological synapse forms the cognate T-cell and antigen-presenting cell interaction and is the site where key signalling events, including those delivered by co-inhibitory receptors, that determine the fate of T cells occur. Here, we review evidence that events at the immune synapse between T cells and malignant B cells and alterations in immune synapse function may contribute to loss of T-cell function in B-cell malignancies. PMID:26082776

  13. Caveolin-1 regulates TCR signal strength and regulatory T-cell differentiation into alloreactive T cells.

    PubMed

    Schönle, Anne; Hartl, Frederike A; Mentzel, Jan; Nöltner, Theresa; Rauch, Katharina S; Prestipino, Alessandro; Wohlfeil, Sebastian A; Apostolova, Petya; Hechinger, Anne-Kathrin; Melchinger, Wolfgang; Fehrenbach, Kerstin; Guadamillas, Marta C; Follo, Marie; Prinz, Gabriele; Ruess, Ann-Katrin; Pfeifer, Dietmar; del Pozo, Miguel Angel; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Duyster, Justus; Hippen, Keli I; Blazar, Bruce R; Schachtrup, Kristina; Minguet, Susana; Zeiser, Robert

    2016-04-14

    Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is a key organizer of membrane specializations and a scaffold protein that regulates signaling in multiple cell types. We found increased Cav-1 expression in human and murine T cells after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Indeed, Cav-1(-/-)donor T cells caused less severe acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and yielded higher numbers of regulatory T cells (Tregs) compared with controls. Depletion of Tregs from the graft abrogated this protective effect. Correspondingly, Treg frequencies increased when Cav-1(-/-)T cells were exposed to transforming growth factor-β/T-cell receptor (TCR)/CD28 activation or alloantigen stimulation in vitro compared with wild-type T cells. Mechanistically, we found that the phosphorylation of Cav-1 is dispensable for the control of T-cell fate by using a nonphosphorylatable Cav-1 (Y14F/Y14F) point-mutation variant. Moreover, the close proximity of lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (Lck) to the TCR induced by TCR-activation was reduced in Cav-1(-/-)T cells. Therefore, less TCR/Lck clustering results in suboptimal activation of the downstream signaling events, which correlates with the preferential development into a Treg phenotype. Overall, we report a novel role for Cav-1 in TCR/Lck spatial distribution upon TCR triggering, which controls T-cell fate toward a regulatory phenotype. This alteration translated into a significant increase in the frequency of Tregs and reduced GVHD in vivo.

  14. Distinctive selection mechanisms govern the T cell receptor repertoire of peripheral CD4-CD8- alpha/beta T cells

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire of CD4+ and CD8+ alpha/beta T cells is heavily influenced by positive and negative selection events that occur during T cell development in the thymus. The coreceptors CD4 and CD8 appear to be essential for this selection to occur. To gain insight into whether T cells that express TCR alpha/beta but lack either coreceptor (CD4- CD8- TCR alpha/beta or alpha/beta double- negative [DN] cells) are also subject to positive and negative selection, and whether selection can occur in the absence of coreceptors, we have performed an extensive immunogenetic analysis of the TCR V beta repertoire of alpha/beta DN cells in lymph nodes of normal mice. Our results show that alpha/beta DN cells appear to be unaffected by clonal deletion of V beta 5 and V beta 11 in I-E- expressing mice, and do not undergo deletion of V beta 6- and V beta 8.1-expressing T cells in Mls-1a-positive mice. They are also unaffected by positive selection of V beta 17a+ T cells in the context of I-Aq. The results suggest that most selection events require the participation of CD4 and CD8, while alpha/beta DN cells are unselected. This argues that most alpha/beta DN cells probably have never expressed CD4 or CD8. However, a unique form of repertoire selection occurs: enrichment of V beta 17a+ alpha/beta DN cells in I-E+ mice. This could be an instance of coreceptor-independent selection. PMID:1512537

  15. Modulation of CD4+ T Cell-Dependent Specific Cytotoxic CD8+ T Cells Differentiation and Proliferation by the Timing of Increase in the Pathogen Load

    PubMed Central

    Tzelepis, Fanny; Persechini, Pedro M.; Rodrigues, Mauricio M.

    2007-01-01

    Background Following infection with viruses, bacteria or protozoan parasites, naïve antigen-specific CD8+ T cells undergo a process of differentiation and proliferation to generate effector cells. Recent evidences suggest that the timing of generation of specific effector CD8+ T cells varies widely according to different pathogens. We hypothesized that the timing of increase in the pathogen load could be a critical parameter governing this process. Methodology/Principal Findings Using increasing doses of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi to infect C57BL/6 mice, we observed a significant acceleration in the timing of parasitemia without an increase in mouse susceptibility. In contrast, in CD8 deficient mice, we observed an inverse relationship between the parasite inoculum and the timing of death. These results suggest that in normal mice CD8+ T cells became protective earlier, following the accelerated development of parasitemia. The evaluation of specific cytotoxic responses in vivo to three distinct epitopes revealed that increasing the parasite inoculum hastened the expansion of specific CD8+ cytotoxic T cells following infection. The differentiation and expansion of T. cruzi-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T cells is in fact dependent on parasite multiplication, as radiation-attenuated parasites were unable to activate these cells. We also observed that, in contrast to most pathogens, the activation process of T. cruzi-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T cells was dependent on MHC class II restricted CD4+ T cells. Conclusions/Significance Our results are compatible with our initial hypothesis that the timing of increase in the pathogen load can be a critical parameter governing the kinetics of CD4+ T cell-dependent expansion of pathogen-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T cells. PMID:17460760

  16. Dynamic mapping of normal human hippocampal development.

    PubMed

    Gogtay, Nitin; Nugent, Tom F; Herman, David H; Ordonez, Anna; Greenstein, Deanna; Hayashi, Kiralee M; Clasen, Liv; Toga, Arthur W; Giedd, Jay N; Rapoport, Judith L; Thompson, Paul M

    2006-01-01

    The hippocampus, which plays an important role in memory functions and emotional responses, has distinct subregions subserving different functions. Because the volume and shape of the hippocampus are altered in many neuropsychiatric disorders, it is important to understand the trajectory of normal hippocampal development. We present the first dynamic maps to reveal the anatomical sequence of normal human hippocampal development. A novel hippocampal mapping technique was applied to a database of prospectively obtained brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans (100 scans in 31 children and adolescents), scanned every 2 yr for 6-10 yr between ages 4 and 25. Our results establish that the structural development of the human hippocampus is remarkably heterogeneous, with significant differences between posterior (increase over time) and anterior (loss over time) subregions. These distinct developmental trajectories of hippocampal subregions may parallel differences in their functional development.

  17. Dopamine, T cells and multiple sclerosis (MS).

    PubMed

    Levite, Mia; Marino, Franca; Cosentino, Marco

    2017-03-10

    Dopamine is a key neurotransmitter that induces critical effects in the nervous system and in many peripheral organs, via 5 dopamine receptors (DRs): D1R-D5R. Dopamine also induces many direct and very potent effects on many DR-expressing immune cells, primarily T cells and dendritic cells. In this review, we focus only on dopamine receptors, effects and production in T cells. Dopamine by itself (at an optimal concentration of~0.1 nM) induces multiple function of resting normal human T cells, among them: T cell adhesion, chemotactic migration, homing, cytokine secretion and others. Interestingly, dopamine activates resting effector T cells (Teffs), but suppresses regulatory T cells (Tregs), and both effects lead eventually to Teff activation. Dopamine-induced effects on T cells are dynamic, context-sensitive and determined by the: T cell activation state, T cell type, DR type, and dopamine concentration. Dopamine itself, and also few dopaminergic molecules/ drugs that are in clinical use for cardiac, neurological and other non-immune indications, have direct effects on human T cells (summarized in this review). These dopaminergic drugs include: dopamine = intropin, L-DOPA, bromocriptine, pramipexole, pergolide, haloperidol, pimozide, and amantadine. Other dopaminergic drugs were not yet tested for their direct effects on T cells. Extensive evidence in multiple sclerosis (MS) and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) show dopaminergic dysregulations in T cells in these diseases: D1-like DRs are decreased in Teffs of MS patients, and dopamine does not affect these cells. In contrast, D1-like DRs are increased in Tregs of MS patients, possibly causing functional Treg impairment in MS. Treatment of MS patients with interferon β (IFN-β) increases D1-like DRs and decreases D2-like DRs in Teffs, decreases D1-like DRs in Tregs, and most important: restores responsiveness of patient's Teffs to dopamine. DR agonists and antagonists confer some benefits in

  18. Immunopathology of experimental Chagas' disease: binding of T cells to Trypanosoma cruzi-infected heart tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Mortatti, R C; Maia, L C; de Oliveira, A V; Munk, M E

    1990-01-01

    The immunopathology of Chagas' disease was studied in the experimental model of chronic infection in C57BL/10JT or mice. Sublethal infection with Trypanosoma cruzi, Y strain, induced specific antibodies and a delayed hypersensitivity response to parasite antigens. Mice developed chronic chagasic myocarditis but not skeletal muscle myositis. Binding of T cells to infected heart tissue was investigated during short-term cocultivation of lymphocytes with heart cryostat sections. T cells from infected mice and from normal controls bound equally to myocardium and liver sections from both infected and normal mice. A search in depth was attempted with cells heavily tagged with 99mTc. Labeled T cells from chagasic mice bound to both normal and infected myocardium slices. 99mTc-labeled T cells from controls gave the same binding values. Glass-adherent spleen cells behaved identically to T cells. Prior treatment of the tissue with serum from chronically infected mice did not increase the number of binding cells. Peritoneal macrophages tagged with 99mTc-sulfur colloid also bound to infected myocardium slices. The binding of macrophages was not changed by pretreatment of infected tissue with anti-T, cruzi antibodies. In short, this work did not detect any population of T cells or macrophages which could bind specifically to infected heart tissue to initiate an autoreactive process. Images PMID:2228230

  19. Control of experimental inflammatory bowel disease by regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Asseman, C; Fowler, S; Powrie, F

    2000-10-01

    A helper T cell type 1-mediated colitis driven by enteric bacteria develops in severe combined immunodeficient mice after transfer of CD45RB(high)CD4(+) T cells. Development of disease can be prevented by cotransfer of the reciprocal CD45RB(low) subset. Analysis of the mechanism of immune suppression transferred by CD45RB(low)CD4(+) cells revealed essential roles for both IL-10 and TGF-beta. These data indicate that a functionally specialized population of regulatory T (Treg) cells exists in normal mice and that these can prevent the development of pathogenic responses toward commensal bacteria. The role of Treg cells in the control of the immune response is discussed.

  20. The Notch driven long non-coding RNA repertoire in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Durinck, Kaat; Wallaert, Annelynn; Van de Walle, Inge; Van Loocke, Wouter; Volders, Pieter-Jan; Vanhauwaert, Suzanne; Geerdens, Ellen; Benoit, Yves; Van Roy, Nadine; Poppe, Bruce; Soulier, Jean; Cools, Jan; Mestdagh, Pieter; Vandesompele, Jo; Rondou, Pieter; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Taghon, Tom; Speleman, Frank

    2014-12-01

    Genetic studies in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia have uncovered a remarkable complexity of oncogenic and loss-of-function mutations. Amongst this plethora of genetic changes, NOTCH1 activating mutations stand out as the most frequently occurring genetic defect, identified in more than 50% of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias, supporting a role as an essential driver for this gene in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia oncogenesis. In this study, we aimed to establish a comprehensive compendium of the long non-coding RNA transcriptome under control of Notch signaling. For this purpose, we measured the transcriptional response of all protein coding genes and long non-coding RNAs upon pharmacological Notch inhibition in the human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line CUTLL1 using RNA-sequencing. Similar Notch dependent profiles were established for normal human CD34(+) thymic T-cell progenitors exposed to Notch signaling activity in vivo. In addition, we generated long non-coding RNA expression profiles (array data) from ex vivo isolated Notch active CD34(+) and Notch inactive CD4(+)CD8(+) thymocytes and from a primary cohort of 15 T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients with known NOTCH1 mutation status. Integration of these expression datasets with publicly available Notch1 ChIP-sequencing data resulted in the identification of long non-coding RNAs directly regulated by Notch activity in normal and malignant T cells. Given the central role of Notch in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia oncogenesis, these data pave the way for the development of novel therapeutic strategies that target hyperactive Notch signaling in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  1. Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (HTLV-1)

    MedlinePlus

    ... gentic material made of DNA, but instead carry RNA. These viruses selectively infect only T-cells. Only ... potential to inject its genetic material (DNA or RNA) into normal cells. Once inside the normal cells, ...

  2. T Cell Receptor-Engineered T Cells to Treat Solid Tumors: T Cell Processing Toward Optimal T Cell Fitness

    PubMed Central

    van Steenbergen-Langeveld, Sabine; van Brakel, Mandy; Groot-van Ruijven, Corrien M.; van Elzakker, Pascal M.M.L.; van Krimpen, Brigitte; Sleijfer, Stefan; Debets, Reno

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Therapy with autologous T cells that have been gene-engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) or T cell receptors (TCR) provides a feasible and broadly applicable treatment for cancer patients. In a clinical study in advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients with CAR T cells specific for carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX), we observed toxicities that (most likely) indicated in vivo function of CAR T cells as well as low T cell persistence and clinical response rates. The latter observations were confirmed by later clinical trials in other solid tumor types and other gene-modified T cells. To improve the efficacy of T cell therapy, we have redefined in vitro conditions to generate T cells with young phenotype, a key correlate with clinical outcome. For their impact on gene-modified T cell phenotype and function, we have tested various anti-CD3/CD28 mAb-based T cell activation and expansion conditions as well as several cytokines prior to and/or after gene transfer using two different receptors: CAIX CAR and MAGE-C2(ALK)/HLA-A2 TCR. In a total set of 16 healthy donors, we observed that T cell activation with soluble anti-CD3/CD28 mAbs in the presence of both IL15 and IL21 prior to TCR gene transfer resulted in enhanced proportions of gene-modified T cells with a preferred in vitro phenotype and better function. T cells generated according to these processing methods demonstrated enhanced binding of pMHC, and an enhanced proportion of CD8+, CD27+, CD62L+, CD45RA+T cells. These new conditions will be translated into a GMP protocol in preparation of a clinical adoptive therapy trial to treat patients with MAGE-C2-positive tumors. PMID:25423330

  3. A Natural Variant of the T Cell Receptor-Signaling Molecule Vav1 Reduces Both Effector T Cell Functions and Susceptibility to Neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kassem, Sahar; Bernard, Isabelle; Dejean, Anne S.; Liblau, Roland; Fournié, Gilbert J.; Colacios, Céline

    2016-01-01

    The guanine nucleotide exchange factor Vav1 is essential for transducing T cell antigen receptor signals and therefore plays an important role in T cell development and activation. Our previous genetic studies identified a locus on rat chromosome 9 that controls the susceptibility to neuroinflammation and contains a non-synonymous polymorphism in the major candidate gene Vav1. To formally demonstrate the causal implication of this polymorphism, we generated a knock-in mouse bearing this polymorphism (Vav1R63W). Using this model, we show that Vav1R63W mice display reduced susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) induced by MOG35-55 peptide immunization. This is associated with a lower production of effector cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-17 and GM-CSF) by autoreactive CD4 T cells. Despite increased proportion of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in Vav1R63W mice, we show that this lowered cytokine production is intrinsic to effector CD4 T cells and that Treg depletion has no impact on EAE development. Finally, we provide a mechanism for the above phenotype by showing that the Vav1R63W variant has normal enzymatic activity but reduced adaptor functions. Together, these data highlight the importance of Vav1 adaptor functions in the production of inflammatory cytokines by effector T cells and in the susceptibility to neuroinflammation. PMID:27438086

  4. The two-faced T cell epitope

    PubMed Central

    Moise, Leonard; Gutierrez, Andres H.; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris; Terry, Frances; Leng, Qibin; Abdel Hady, Karim M.; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C.; Sztein, Marcelo B.; Losikoff, Phyllis T.; Martin, William D.; Rothman, Alan L; De Groot, Anne S.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in the field of T cell immunology have contributed to the understanding that cross-reactivity is an intrinsic characteristic of the T cell receptor (TCR), and that each TCR can potentially interact with many different T cell epitopes. To better define the potential for TCR cross-reactivity between epitopes derived from the human genome, the human microbiome, and human pathogens, we developed a new immunoinformatics tool, JanusMatrix, that represents an extension of the validated T cell epitope mapping tool, EpiMatrix. Initial explorations, summarized in this synopsis, have uncovered what appear to be important differences in the TCR cross-reactivity of selected regulatory and effector T cell epitopes with other epitopes in the human genome, human microbiome, and selected human pathogens. In addition to exploring the T cell epitope relationships between human self, commensal and pathogen, JanusMatrix may also be useful to explore some aspects of heterologous immunity and to examine T cell epitope relatedness between pathogens to which humans are exposed (Dengue serotypes, or HCV and Influenza, for example). In Hand-Foot-Mouth disease (HFMD) for example, extensive enterovirus and human microbiome cross-reactivity (and limited cross-reactivity with the human genome) seemingly predicts immunodominance. In contrast, more extensive cross-reactivity with proteins contained in the human genome as compared to the human microbiome was observed for selected Treg epitopes. While it may be impossible to predict all immune response influences, the availability of sequence data from the human genome, the human microbiome, and an array of human pathogens and vaccines has made computationally–driven exploration of the effects of T cell epitope cross-reactivity now possible. This is the first description of JanusMatrix, an algorithm that assesses TCR cross-reactivity that may contribute to a means of predicting the phenotype of T cells responding to selected T cell

  5. Deletion of Pten in CD45-expressing cells leads to development of T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma but not myeloid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Mirantes, Cristina; Dosil, Maria Alba; Hills, David; Yang, Jian; Eritja, Núria; Santacana, Maria; Gatius, Sònia; Vilardell, Felip; Medvinsky, Alexander; Matias-Guiu, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Since its discovery in the late 1990s, Pten has turned out to be one of the most important tumor suppressor genes. Pten loss results in increased activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway, which is associated with increased proliferation, survival, and neoplastic growth. Here, we have addressed the effects of conditional deletion of Pten in hematopoietic cells by crossing Pten conditional knockout mice with a knock-in mouse expressing the Cre recombinase in the CD45 locus. CD45 is also known as leukocyte common antigen, and it is expressed in virtually all white cells and in hematopoietic stem cells. Using a reporter mouse, we demonstrate that CD45:Cre mouse displays recombinase activity in both myeloid and lymphoid cells. However, deletion of Pten in CD45-expressing cells induces development of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and lymphoma, but not other hematologic malignancies. PMID:26773036

  6. Contrasting Roles For All-Trans Retinoic Acid in TGF-ß-mediated Induction of Foxp3 and Il10 Genes in Developing Regulatory T Cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extrathymic induction of regulatory T cells (Treg) is essential to the regulation of effector T cell responses in the periphery. TGF-ß has been shown to induce Foxp3-expressing Tregs both in vitro and in vivo. More recently, the vitamin A metabolite, all-trans retinoic acid (at-RA), has been found t...

  7. SAG/Rbx2-Dependent Neddylation Regulates T-Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Mathewson, Nathan D; Fujiwara, Hideaki; Wu, Shin-Rong; Toubai, Tomomi; Oravecz-Wilson, Katherine; Sun, Yaping; Rossi, Corinne; Zajac, Cynthia; Sun, Yi; Reddy, Pavan

    2016-10-01

    Neddylation is a crucial post-translational modification that depends on the E3 cullin ring ligase (CRL). The E2-adapter component of the CRL, sensitive to apoptosis gene (SAG), is critical for the function of CRL-mediated ubiquitination; thus, the deletion of SAG regulates neddylation. We examined the role of SAG-dependent neddylation in T-cell-mediated immunity using multiple approaches: a novel T-cell-specific, SAG genetic knockout (KO) and chemical inhibition with small-molecule MLN4924. The KO animals were viable and showed phenotypically normal mature T-cell development. However, in vitro stimulation of KO T cells revealed significantly decreased activation, proliferation, and T-effector cytokine release, compared with WT. Using in vivo clinically relevant models of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation also demonstrated reduced proliferation and effector cytokine secretion associated with markedly reduced graft-versus-host disease. Similar in vitro and in vivo results were observed with the small-molecule inhibitor of neddylation, MLN4924. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that SAG-mediated effects in T cells were concomitant with an increase in suppressor of cytokine signaling, but not NF-κB translocation. Our studies suggest that SAG is a novel molecular target that regulates T-cell responses and that inhibiting neddylation with the clinically available small-molecule MLN4924 may represent a novel strategy to mitigate T-cell-mediated immunopathologies, such as graft-versus-host disease.

  8. T cell tolerance and activation to a transgene-encoded tumor antigen.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, A; McCormick, D; Scott, D; Yeoman, H; Chandler, P; Mellor, A; Dyson, J

    1996-05-01

    Much has been learned in recent years concerning the nature of tumor antigens recognized by T cells. To apply this knowledge clinically, the nature of the host response to individual and multiple tumor antigens has to be characterized. This will help to define the efficacy of immune surveillance and the immune status of the host following exposure to tumor antigens expressed on pre-neoplastic tissue. To approach these questions, we have developed a transgenic mouse which expresses the tumor-specific antigen P91A. The single amino acid substitution in P91A results in the expression of a new MHC class I (H-2Ld)-binding peptide. In transgenic tissue, the H-2Ld/P91A complex is expressed in isolation from other tumor-associated antigens, allowing definition of the immune response to a single defined tumor antigen, a situation closely analogous to events during tumorigenesis. We show that CD8+ T cell immune surveillance of P91A is ineffective without the introduction of a helper determinant operating through stimulation of CD4+ T cells. Recognition of the isolated P91A tumor antigen on normal tissue by CD8+ T cells is a tolerogenic process. Induction of T cell tolerance suggests tumor antigen-T cell interactions occurring during tumorigenesis may elicit T cell tolerance and hence confound some immunotherapeutic approaches.

  9. Development of a cytotoxic T-cell assay in rabbits to evaluate early immune response to human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Rashade A H; Phipps, Andrew J; Yamamoto, Brenda; Green, Patrick; Lairmore, Michael D

    2009-12-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection causes adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia (ATL) following a prolonged clinical incubation period, despite a robust adaptive immune response against the virus. Early immune responses that allow establishment of the infection are difficult to study without effective animal models. We have developed a cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) assay to monitor the early events of HTLV-1 infection in rabbits. Rabbit skin fibroblast cell lines were established by transformation with a plasmid expressing simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen and used as autochthonous targets (derived from same individual animal) to measure CTL activity against HTLV-1 infection in rabbits. Recombinant vaccinia virus (rVV) constructs expressing either HTLV-1 envelope surface unit (SU) glycoprotein 46 or Tax proteins were used to infect fibroblast targets in a (51)Cr-release CTL assay. Rabbits inoculated with Jurkat T cells or ACH.2 cells (expressing ACH HTLV-1 molecule clone) were monitored at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 13, 21, and 34 wk post-infection. ACH.2-inoculated rabbits were monitored serologically and for viral infected cells following ex vivo culture. Proviral load analysis indicated that rabbits with higher proviral loads had significant CTL activity against HTLV-1 SU as early as 2 wk post-infection, while both low- and high-proviral-load groups had minimal Tax-specific CTL activity throughout the study. This first development of a stringent assay to measure HTLV-1 SU and Tax-specific CTL assay in the rabbit model will enhance immunopathogenesis studies of HTLV-1 infection. Our data suggest that during the early weeks following infection, HTLV-1-specific CTL responses are primarily targeted against Env-SU.

  10. A sharp T-cell antigen receptor signaling threshold for T-cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Au-Yeung, Byron B.; Zikherman, Julie; Mueller, James L.; Ashouri, Judith F.; Matloubian, Mehrdad; Cheng, Debra A.; Chen, Yiling; Shokat, Kevan M.; Weiss, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) signaling is essential for activation, proliferation, and effector function of T cells. Modulation of both intensity and duration of TCR signaling can regulate these events. However, it remains unclear how individual T cells integrate such signals over time to make critical cell-fate decisions. We have previously developed an engineered mutant allele of the critical T-cell kinase zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 kDa (Zap70) that is catalytically inhibited by a small molecule inhibitor, thereby blocking TCR signaling specifically and efficiently. We have also characterized a fluorescent reporter Nur77–eGFP transgenic mouse line in which T cells up-regulate GFP uniquely in response to TCR stimulation. The combination of these technologies unmasked a sharp TCR signaling threshold for commitment to cell division both in vitro and in vivo. Further, we demonstrate that this threshold is independent of both the magnitude of the TCR stimulus and Interleukin 2. Similarly, we identify a temporal threshold of TCR signaling that is required for commitment to proliferation, after which T cells are able to proliferate in a Zap70 kinase-independent manner. Taken together, our studies reveal a sharp threshold for the magnitude and duration of TCR signaling required for commitment of T cells to proliferation. These results have important implications for understanding T-cell responses to infection and optimizing strategies for immunomodulatory drug delivery. PMID:25136127

  11. Anticancer agent xanthohumol inhibits IL-2 induced signaling pathways involved in T cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yongbo; Gao, Xiaohua; Deeb, Dorrah; Arbab, Ali S.; Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Gautam, Subhash C.

    2013-01-01

    Xanthohumol (XN), a prenylated chalcone present in hops exhibits anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anticancer activity. In the present study we show that XN inhibits the proliferation of mouse lymphoma cells and IL-2 induced proliferation and cell cycle progression in mouse splenic T cells. The suppression of T cell proliferation by XN was due to the inhibition of IL-2 induced Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (Jak/STAT) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (Erk1/2) signaling pathways. XN also inhibited proliferation-related cellular proteins such as c-Myc, c-Fos and NF-κB and cyclin D1. Thus, understanding of IL-2 induced cell signaling pathways in normal T cells, which are constitutively turned on in T cell lymphomas may facilitate development of XN for the treatment of hematologic cancers. PMID:22946339

  12. Identification of Notch target genes in uncommitted T-cell progenitors: No direct induction of a T-cell specific gene program.

    PubMed

    Weerkamp, F; Luis, T C; Naber, B A E; Koster, E E L; Jeannotte, L; van Dongen, J J M; Staal, F J T

    2006-11-01

    Deregulated Notch signaling occurs in the majority of human T-ALL. During normal lymphoid development, activation of the Notch signaling pathway poses a T-cell fate on hematopoietic progenitors. However, the transcriptional targets of the Notch pathway are largely unknown. We sought to identify Notch target genes by inducing Notch signaling in human hematopoietic progenitors using two different methods: an intracellular signal through transfection of activated Notch and a Notch-receptor dependent signal by interaction with its ligand Delta1. Gene expression profiles were generated and evaluated with respect to expression profiles of immature thymic subpopulations. We confirmed HES1, NOTCH1 and NRARP as Notch target genes, but other reported Notch targets, including the genes for Deltex1, pre-T-cell receptor alpha and E2A, were not found to be differentially expressed. Remarkably, no induction of T-cell receptor gene rearrangements or transcription of known T-cell specific genes was found after activation of the Notch pathway. A number of novel Notch target genes, including the transcription factor TCFL5 and the HOXA cluster, were identified and functionally tested. Apparently, Notch signaling is essential to open the T-cell pathway, but does not initiate the T-cell program itself.

  13. A T-cell-directed chimeric antigen receptor for the selective treatment of T-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Mamonkin, Maksim; Rouce, Rayne H; Tashiro, Haruko; Brenner, Malcolm K

    2015-08-20

    Options for targeted therapy of T-cell malignancies remain scarce. Recent clinical trials demonstrated that chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) can effectively redirect T lymphocytes to eradicate lymphoid malignancies of B-cell origin. However, T-lineage neoplasms remain a more challenging task for CAR T cells due to shared expression of most targetable surface antigens between normal and malignant T cells, potentially leading to fratricide of CAR T cells or profound immunodeficiency. Here, we report that T cells transduced with a CAR targeting CD5, a common surface marker of normal and neoplastic T cells, undergo only limited fratricide and can be expanded long-term ex vivo. These CD5 CAR T cells effectively eliminate malignant T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and T-cell lymphoma lines in vitro and significantly inhibit disease progression in xenograft mouse models of T-ALL. These data support the therapeutic potential of CD5 CAR in patients with T-cell neoplasms.

  14. Identification and characterization of the transcription factors involved in T-cell development, t-bet, stat6 and foxp3, within the zebrafish, Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Suman; Alnabulsi, Ayham; Secombes, Chris J; Bird, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of cytokines expressed by T-helper 1 (Th1), Th2, Th17 and T-regulatory (T(reg)) cells has prompted speculation that these types of responses may exist in fish, arising early in vertebrate evolution. In this investigation, we cloned three zebrafish transcription factors, T-box expressed in T cells (t-bet), signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (stat6) and fork-head box p3 (foxp3), in which two transcripts are present, that are important in the development of a number of these cell types. They were found within the zebrafish genome, using a synteny approach in the case of t-bet and foxp3. Multiple alignments of zebrafish t-bet, stat6 and foxp3 amino acids with known vertebrate homologues revealed regions of high conservation, subsequently identified to be protein domains important in the functioning of these transcription factors. The gene organizations of zebrafish t-bet and foxp3 were identical to those of the human genes, with the second foxp3 transcript lacking exons 5, 6, 7 and 8. Zebrafish stat6 (21 exons and 20 introns) was slightly different from the human gene, which contained 22 exons and 21 introns. Immunostimulation of zebrafish head kidney and spleen cells with phytohaemagglutinin, lipopolysaccharide or Poly I:C, showed a correlation between the expression of t-bet, stat6 and foxp3 with other genes involved in Th and T(reg) responses using quantitative PCR. These transcription factors, together with many of the cytokines that are expressed by different T-cell subtypes, will aid future investigations into the Th and T(reg) cell types that exist in teleosts.

  15. The Challenges and Opportunities for Development of a T-Cell Epitope-Based Herpes Simplex Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Tiffany; Wang, Christine; Badakhshan, Tina; Chilukuri, Sravya; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2014-01-01

    The infections with herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 & HSV-2) have been prevalent since the ancient Greek times. To this day, they still affect a staggering number of over a half billion individuals worldwide. HSV-2 infections cause painful genital herpes, encephalitis, and death in newborns. HSV-1 infections are more prevalent than HSV-2 infections and cause potentially blinding ocular herpes, oro-facial herpes and encephalitis. While genital herpes in mainly caused by HSV-2 infections, in recent years, there is an increase in the proportion of genital herpes caused by HSV-1 infections in young adults, which reach 50% in some western societies. While prophylactic and therapeutic HSV vaccines remain urgently needed for centuries their development has been notoriously difficult. During the most recent National Institute of Health (NIH) workshop titled "Next Generation Herpes Simplex Virus Vaccines: The Challenges and Opportunities", basic researchers, funding agencies, and pharmaceutical representatives gathered: (i) to assess the status of herpes vaccine research; and (ii) to identify the gaps and propose alternative approaches in developing a safe and efficient herpes vaccine. One “common denominator” among previously failed clinical herpes vaccine trials is that they either used a whole virus or whole viral proteins, which contain both pathogenic “symptomatic” and protective “asymptomatic” antigens/epitopes. In this report, we continue to advocate that using an “asymptomatic” epitope-based vaccine strategy that selectively incorporates protective epitopes which: (i) are exclusively recognized, in vitro, by effector memory CD4+ and CD8+ TEM cells from “naturally” protected seropositive asymptomatic individuals; and (ii) protect, in vivo, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) transgenic animal models from ocular and genital herpes infections and diseases, could be the answer to many of the scientific challenges facing HSV vaccine

  16. Studies on T cell subsets and functions in leprosy.

    PubMed Central

    Bach, M A; Chatenoud, L; Wallach, D; Phan Dinh Tuy, F; Cottenot, F

    1981-01-01

    T cell subsets and T cell functions were explored in 31 leprosy patients with the following methods: determination of the percentages of the different T cell subpopulations defined by monoclonal antibodies directed at total T cells, helper T cells and suppressor/cytotoxic T cells; measurement of the in vitro proliferative responses to mitogens; study of the concanavalin A-induced suppressive activity, assessed on MLC; measurement of delayed-type hypersensitivity by skin testing. The confrontation between immunological lepromatous patients without type-2 reaction (erythema nodosum leprosum), (2) lepromatous patients without ENL (erythema nodosum leprosum), (2) lepromatous patients was recent ENL and (3) tuberculoid patients. Unexpectedly, groups 1 and 3, although differing strongly in their clinical status and their sensitivity to lepromin (absent in group 1 and strong in group 3), showed a similar immunological profile with a normal percentage of T cells and a normal distribution of T cells among the major T cell subset contrasting with a moderate decrease of proliferative responses to mitogens and impaired delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions. Concanavalin A-induced suppressive activity was type-2 reaction) strongly differed from both other groups, showing striking abnormalities other groups, showing striking abnormalities of the repartition of the T cell subsets, with increased percentages of helper T cells and decreased percentages of suppressor T cells, and elevated proliferative responses to mitogens. Concanavalin A-induced suppressive activity was reduced in most patients of this group. It is suggested that this imbalance between T cell subsets contributes to the occurrence of ENL reactions in lepromatous patients. PMID:6459897

  17. Decline of miR-124 in myeloid cells promotes regulatory T-cell development in hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jun P; Wang, Lin; Zhao, Juan; Wang, Ling; Ning, Shun B; El Gazzar, Mohamed; Moorman, Jonathan P; Yao, Zhi Q

    2017-02-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) contribute to attenuating immune responses during chronic viral infection; however, the precise mechanisms underlying their suppressive activities remain incompletely understood. We have recently shown marked expansion of MDSCs that promote regulatory T (Treg) cell development in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Here we further investigated whether the HCV-induced expansion of MDSCs and Treg cells is regulated by an miRNA-mediated mechanism. The RNA array analysis revealed that six miRNAs were up-regulated and six miRNAs were down-regulated significantly in myeloid cells during HCV infection. Real-time RT-PCR confirmed the down-regulation of miR-124 in MDSCs from HCV patients. Bioinformatic analysis suggested that miR-124 may be involved in the regulation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT-3), which was overexpressed in MDSCs from HCV patients. Notably, silencing of STAT-3 significantly increased the miR-124 expression, whereas reconstituting miR-124 decreased the levels of STAT-3, as well as interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor-β, which were overexpressed in MDCSs, and reduced the frequencies of Foxp3(+) Treg cells that were developed during chronic HCV infection. These results suggest that reciprocal regulation of miR-124 and STAT-3 in MDSCs promotes Treg cell development, thus uncovering a novel mechanism for the expansion of MDSC and Treg cells during HCV infection.

  18. The fragile environments of inexpensive CD4+ T-cell enumeration in the least developed countries: strategies for accessible support.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Christoph H

    2008-01-01

    With the advent of affordable antiretroviral treatment (ART), flow cytometry has ventured out of the exclusive realms of First World research to the resource-strapped clinical environment of developing countries (DCs). Flow cytometric instrumentation for ART has become more cost-efficient, thanks to simplified, yet accurate protocols and smart technologies. These positive developments have, however, not taken shape without problems, as health care in DCs remains weak due to chronic underfunding of their primary health systems. In addition, the multiplicity of donors has created parallel infrastructures that are difficult to manage and may undermine the responsibilities of public services. Hence, there is a prevailing lack of attention to maintenance, support, and human resource development. Not uncommonly, the procurement of high-value equipment is guided by nontechnical interests with mixed results. As conventional service contracts are unpopular, the sustainability of equipment is under serious threat after warranty periods, with environmental factors such as dust and unreliable power supplies being well-known culprits. Reagent supplies and servicing constitute further challenges, where a combination of short reagent shelf life, cold-box shipping, huge distances across poor infrastructures, rigid accounting procedures, and erratic customs requirements cause significant delays and extra costs. Although excellent, highly trained or trainable local staff is available, it is frequently diverted by brain drain from the government sector to privately funded hospitals, research facilities, and overseas postings. Despite these challenges, corporate service management has commonly remained loyal to its roots in the developed world.A number of propositions address the current situation: "Reagent-rental" agreements represent an attractive alternative to service contracts, while smart instrument design has started to make inroads into more robust device concepts. To avoid

  19. Bacterial clearance reverses a skewed T-cell repertoire induced by Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Leyva-Rangel, Jessica P; de Los Angeles Hernández-Cueto, Maria; Galan-Enriquez, Carlos-Samuel; López-Medina, Marcela; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney

    2015-09-01

    Salmonella typhimurium invades the spleen, liver, and peripheral lymph nodes and has recently been detected in the bone marrow and thymus, resulting in a reduced thymic size and a decline in the total number of thymic cells. A specific deletion of the double-positive cell subset has been characterized, yet the export of mature T cells to the periphery remains normal. We analyzed Salmonella pathogenesis regarding thymic structure and the T-cell maturation process. We demonstrate that, despite alterations in the thymic structure, T-cell development is maintained during Salmonella infection, allowing the selection of single-positive T-cell clones expressing particular T-cell receptor beta chains (TCR-Vβ). Moreover, the treatment of infected mice with an antibiotic restored the normal thymic architecture and thymocyte subset distribution. Additionally, the frequency of TCR-Vβ usage after treatment was comparable to that in non-infected mice. However, bacteria were still recovered from the thymus after 1 month of treatment. Our data reveal that a skewed T-cell developmental process is present in the Salmonella-infected thymus that alters the TCR-Vβ usage frequency. Likewise, the post-treatment persistence of Salmonella reveals a novel function of the thymus as a potential reservoir for this infectious agent.

  20. T cells conditioned with MDSC show an increased anti-tumor activity after adoptive T cell based immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Raber, Patrick L; Sierra, Rosa A; Thevenot, Paul T; Shuzhong, Zhang; Wyczechowska, Dorota D; Kumai, Takumi; Celis, Esteban; Rodriguez, Paulo C

    2016-04-05

    The success of adoptive T cell-based immunotherapy (ACT) in cancer is limited in part by the accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), which block several T cell functions, including T cell proliferation and the expression of various cytotoxic mediators. Paradoxically, the inhibition of CD8+ T cell differentiation into cytotoxic populations increased their efficacy after ACT into tumor-bearing hosts. Therefore, we aimed to test the impact of conditioning CD8+ T cells with MDSC on their differentiation potential and ACT efficacy. Our results indicate that MDSC impaired the progression of CD8+ T cells into effector populations, without altering their activation status, production of IL-2, or signaling through the T cell receptor. In addition, culture of CD8+ T cells with MDSC resulted in an increased ACT anti-tumor efficacy, which correlated with a higher frequency of the transferred T cells and elevated IFNγ production. Interestingly, activated CD62L+ CD8+ T cells were responsible for the enhanced anti-tumor activity showed by MDSC-exposed T cells. Additional results showed a decreased protein synthesis rate and lower activity of the mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) in T cells conditioned with MDSC. Silencing of the negative mTOR regulator tuberous sclerosis complex-2 in T cells co-cultured with MDSC restored mTOR activity, but resulted in T cell apoptosis. These results indicate that conditioning of T cells with MDSC induces stress survival pathways mediated by a blunted mTOR signaling, which regulated T cell differentiation and ACT efficacy. Continuation of this research will enable the development of better strategies to increase ACT responses in cancer.

  1. Development of tolerogenic dendritic cells and regulatory T cells favors exponential bacterial growth and survival during early respiratory tularemia.

    PubMed

    Periasamy, Sivakumar; Singh, Anju; Sahay, Bikash; Rahman, Tabassum; Feustel, Paul J; Pham, Giang H; Gosselin, Edmund J; Sellati, Timothy J

    2011-09-01

    Tularemia is a vector-borne zoonosis caused by Ft, a Gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacterium. Ft exists in two clinically relevant forms, the European biovar B (holarctica), which produces acute, although mild, self-limiting infections, and the more virulent United States biovar A (tularensis), which is often associated with pneumonic tularemia and more severe disease. In a mouse model of tularemia, respiratory infection with the virulence-attenuated Type B (LVS) or highly virulent Type A (SchuS4) strain engenders peribronchiolar and perivascular inflammation. Paradoxically, despite an intense neutrophilic infiltrate and high bacterial burden, T(h)1-type proinflammatory cytokines (e.g., TNF, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-12) are absent within the first ∼72 h of pulmonary infection. It has been suggested that the bacterium has the capacity to actively suppress or block NF-κB signaling, thus causing an initial delay in up-regulation of inflammatory mediators. However, our previously published findings and those presented herein contradict this paradigm and instead, strongly support an alternative hypothesis. Rather than blocking NF-κB, Ft actually triggers TLR2-dependent NF-κB signaling, resulting in the development and activation of tDCs and the release of anti-inflammatory cytokines (e.g., IL-10 and TGF-β). In turn, these cytokines stimulate development and proliferation of T(regs) that may restrain T(h)1-type proinflammatory cytokine release early during tularemic infection. The highly regulated and overall anti-inflammatory milieu established in the lung is permissive for unfettered growth and survival of Ft. The capacity of Ft to evoke such a response represents an important immune-evasive strategy.

  2. Development of tolerogenic dendritic cells and regulatory T cells favors exponential bacterial growth and survival during early respiratory tularemia

    PubMed Central

    Periasamy, Sivakumar; Singh, Anju; Sahay, Bikash; Rahman, Tabassum; Feustel, Paul J.; Pham, Giang H.; Gosselin, Edmund J.; Sellati, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    Tularemia is a vector-borne zoonosis caused by Ft, a Gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacterium. Ft exists in two clinically relevant forms, the European biovar B (holarctica), which produces acute, although mild, self-limiting infections, and the more virulent United States biovar A (tularensis), which is often associated with pneumonic tularemia and more severe disease. In a mouse model of tularemia, respiratory infection with the virulence-attenuated Type B (LVS) or highly virulent Type A (SchuS4) strain engenders peribronchiolar and perivascular inflammation. Paradoxically, despite an intense neutrophilic infiltrate and high bacterial burden, Th1-type proinflammatory cytokines (e.g., TNF, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-12) are absent within the first ∼72 h of pulmonary infection. It has been suggested that the bacterium has the capacity to actively suppress or block NF-κB signaling, thus causing an initial delay in up-regulation of inflammatory mediators. However, our previously published findings and those presented herein contradict this paradigm and instead, strongly support an alternative hypothesis. Rather than blocking NF-κB, Ft actually triggers TLR2-dependent NF-κB signaling, resulting in the development and activation of tDCs and the release of anti-inflammatory cytokines (e.g., IL-10 and TGF-β). In turn, these cytokines stimulate development and proliferation of Tregs that may restrain Th1-type proinflammatory cytokine release early during tularemic infection. The highly regulated and overall anti-inflammatory milieu established in the lung is permissive for unfettered growth and survival of Ft. The capacity of Ft to evoke such a response represents an important immune-evasive strategy. PMID:21724804

  3. Exploiting cytokines in adoptive T-cell therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Petrozziello, Elisabetta; Sturmheit, Tabea; Mondino, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with tumor-reactive autologous T cells, either expanded from tumor specimens or genetically engineered to express tumor-reactive T-cell receptors and chimeric antigen receptors, is holding promising results in clinical trials. Several critical issues have been identified and results underline the possibility to exploit cytokines to further ameliorate the efficacy of current treatment protocols, also encompassing adoptive T-cell therapy. Here we review latest developments on the use of cytokines to better direct the nature of the T-cell infusion product, T-cell function and persistence in vivo, as well as to modulate the tumor microenvironment.

  4. The Role of Lymphatic Niches in T Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Capece, Tara; Kim, Minsoo

    2016-01-01

    Long-term immunity to many viral and bacterial pathogens requires CD8+ memory T cell development, and the induction of long-lasting CD8+ memory T cells from a naïve, undifferentiated state is a major goal of vaccine design. Formation of the memory CD8+ T cell compartment is highly dependent on the early activation cues received by naïve CD8+ T cells during primary infection. This review aims to highlight the cellularity of various niches within the lymph node and emphasize recent evidence suggesting that distinct types of T cell activation and differentiation occur within different immune contexts in lymphoid organs. PMID:27306645

  5. Epigenomic Profiling of Human CD4(+) T Cells Supports a Linear Differentiation Model and Highlights Molecular Regulators of Memory Development.

    PubMed

    Durek, Pawel; Nordström, Karl; Gasparoni, Gilles; Salhab, Abdulrahman; Kressler, Christopher; de Almeida, Melanie; Bassler, Kevin; Ulas, Thomas; Schmidt, Florian; Xiong, Jieyi; Glažar, Petar; Klironomos, Filippos; Sinha, Anupam; Kinkley, Sarah; Yang, Xinyi; Arrigoni, Laura; Amirabad, Azim Dehghani; Ardakani, Fatemeh Behjati; Feuerbach, Lars; Gorka, Oliver; Ebert, Peter; Müller, Fabian; Li, Na; Frischbutter, Stefan; Schlickeiser, Stephan; Cendon, Carla; Fröhler, Sebastian; Felder, Bärbel; Gasparoni, Nina; Imbusch, Charles D; Hutter, Barbara; Zipprich, Gideon; Tauchmann, Yvonne; Reinke, Simon; Wassilew, Georgi; Hoffmann, Ute; Richter, Andreas S; Sieverling, Lina; Chang, Hyun-Dong; Syrbe, Uta; Kalus, Ulrich; Eils, Jürgen; Brors, Benedikt; Manke, Thomas; Ruland, Jürgen; Lengauer, Thomas; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Chen, Wei; Dong, Jun; Sawitzki, Birgit; Chung, Ho-Ryun; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schulz, Marcel H; Schultze, Joachim L; Radbruch, Andreas; Walter, Jörn; Hamann, Alf; Polansky, Julia K

    2016-11-15

    The impact of epigenetics on the differentiation of memory T (Tmem) cells is poorly defined. We generated deep epigenomes comprising genome-wide profiles of DNA methylation, histone modifications, DNA accessibility, and coding and non-coding RNA expression in naive, central-, effector-, and terminally differentiated CD45RA(+) CD4(+) Tmem cells from blood and CD69(+) Tmem cells from bone marrow (BM-Tmem). We observed a progressive and proliferation-associated global loss of DNA methylation in heterochromatic parts of the genome during Tmem cell differentiation. Furthermore, distinct gradually changing signatures in the epigenome and the transcriptome supported a linear model of memory development in circulating T cells, while tissue-resident BM-Tmem branched off with a unique epigenetic profile. Integrative analyses identified candidate master regulators of Tmem cell differentiation, including the transcription factor FOXP1. This study highlights the importance of epigenomic changes for Tmem cell biology and demonstrates the value of epigenetic data for the identification of lineage regulators.

  6. Biased signaling pathways via CXCR3 control the development and function of CD4+ T cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Karin, Nathan; Wildbaum, Gizi; Thelen, Marcus

    2016-06-01

    Structurally related chemotactic cytokines (chemokines) regulate cell trafficking through interactions with 7-transmembrane domain, G protein-coupled receptors. Biased signaling or functional selectivity is a concept that describes a situation where a 7-transmembrane domain receptor preferentially activates one of several available cellular signaling pathways. It can be divided into 3 distinct cases: ligand bias, receptor bias, and tissue or cell bias. Many studies, including those coming from our lab, have shown that only a limited number of chemokines are key drivers of inflammation. We have referred to them as "driver chemokines." They include the CXCR3 ligands CXCL9 and CXCL10, the CCR2 ligand CCL2, all 3 CCR5 ligands, and the CCR9 ligand CCL25. As for CXCR3, despite the proinflammatory nature of CXCL10 and CXCL9, transgenic mice lacking CXCR3 display an aggravated manifestation of different autoimmune disease, including Type I diabetes and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Recently, we showed that whereas CXCL9 and CXCL10 induce effector Th1/Th17 cells to promote inflammation, CXCL11, with a relatively higher binding affinity to CXCR3, drives the development of the forkhead box P3-negative IL-10(high) T regulatory 1 cell subset and hence, dampens inflammation. We also showed that CXCL9/CXCL10 activates a different signaling cascade than CXCL11, despite binding to the same receptor, CXCR3, which results in these diverse biologic activities. This provides new evidence for the role of biased signaling in regulating biologic activities, in which CXCL11 induces ligand bias at CXCR3 and receptor-biased signaling via atypical chemokine receptor 3.

  7. CD31 is required on CD4+ T cells to promote T cell survival during Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Ross, Ewan A; Coughlan, Ruth E; Flores-Langarica, Adriana; Bobat, Saeeda; Marshall, Jennifer L; Hussain, Khiyam; Charlesworth, James; Abhyankar, Nikita; Hitchcock, Jessica; Gil, Cristina; López-Macías, Constantino; Henderson, Ian R; Khan, Mahmood; Watson, Steve P; MacLennan, Ian C M; Buckley, Christopher D; Cunningham, Adam F

    2011-08-15

    Hematopoietic cells constitutively express CD31/PECAM1, a signaling adhesion receptor associated with controlling responses to inflammatory stimuli. Although expressed on CD4(+) T cells, its function on these cells is unclear. To address this, we have used a model of systemic Salmonella infection that induces high levels of T cell activation and depends on CD4(+) T cells for resolution. Infection of CD31-deficient (CD31KO) mice demonstrates that these mice fail to control infection effectively. During infection, CD31KO mice have diminished numbers of total CD4(+) T cells and IFN-γ-secreting Th1 cells. This is despite a higher proportion of CD31KO CD4(+) T cells exhibiting an activated phenotype and an undiminished capacity to prime normally and polarize to Th1. Reduced numbers of T cells reflected the increased propensity of naive and activated CD31KO T cells to undergo apoptosis postinfection compared with wild-type T cells. Using adoptive transfer experiments, we show that loss of CD31 on CD4(+) T cells alone is sufficient to account for the defective CD31KO T cell accumulation. These data are consistent with CD31 helping to control T cell activation, because in its absence, T cells have a greater propensity to become activated, resulting in increased susceptibility to become apoptotic. The impact of CD31 loss on T cell homeostasis becomes most pronounced during severe, inflammatory, and immunological stresses such as those caused by systemic Salmonella infection. This identifies a novel role for CD31 in regulating CD4 T cell homeostasis.

  8. PTPN2 attenuates T-cell lymphopenia-induced proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiede, Florian; La Gruta, Nicole L.; Tiganis, Tony

    2014-01-01

    When the peripheral T-cell pool is depleted, T cells undergo homoeostatic expansion. This expansion is reliant on the recognition of self-antigens and/or cytokines, in particular interleukin-7. The T cell-intrinsic mechanisms that prevent excessive homoeostatic T-cell responses and consequent overt autoreactivity remain poorly defined. Here we show that protein tyrosine phosphatase N2 (PTPN2) is elevated in naive T cells leaving the thymus to restrict homoeostatic T-cell proliferation and prevent excess responses to self-antigens in the periphery. PTPN2-deficient CD8+ T cells undergo rapid lymphopenia-induced proliferation (LIP) when transferred into lymphopenic hosts and acquire the characteristics of antigen-experienced effector T cells. The enhanced LIP is attributed to elevated T-cell receptor-dependent, but not interleukin-7-dependent responses, results in a skewed T-cell receptor repertoire and the development of autoimmunity. Our results identify a major mechanism by which homoeostatic T-cell responses are tuned to prevent the development of autoimmune and inflammatory disorders.

  9. Chronic Inflammation and γδ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fay, Nathan S.; Larson, Emily C.; Jameson, Julie M.

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial tissues of the skin, lungs, reproductive tract, and intestines are the largest physical barriers the body has to protect against infection. Epithelial tissues are woven with a matrix of immune cells programed to mobilize the host innate and adaptive immune responses. Included among these immune cells are gamma delta T lymphocytes (γδ T cells) that are unique in their T cell receptor usage, location, and functions in the body. Stress reception by γδ T cells as a result of traumatic epithelial injury, malignancy, and/or infection induces γδ T cell activation. Once activated, γδ T cells function to repair tissue, induce inflammation, recruit leukocytes, and lyse cells. Many of these functions are mediated via the production of cytokines and growth factors upon γδ T cell activation. Pathogenesis of many chronic inflammatory diseases involves γδ T cells; some of which are exacerbated by their presence, while others are improved. γδ T cells require a delicate balance between their need for acute inflammatory mediators to function normally and the detrimental impact imparted by chronic inflammation. This review will focus on the recent progress made in understanding how epithelial γδ T cells influence the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases and how a balance between acute and chronic inflammation impacts γδ T cell function. Future studies will be important to understand how this balance is achieved. PMID:27303404

  10. Visualizing how T cells collect activation signals in vivo.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Hélène D; Bousso, Philippe

    2014-02-01

    A decade ago the first movies depicting T cell behavior in vivo with the help of two-photon microscopy were generated. These initial experiments revealed that T cells migrate rapidly and randomly in secondary lymphoid organs at steady state and profoundly alter their behavior during antigen recognition, establishing both transient and stable contacts with antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Since then, in vivo imaging has continuously improved our understanding of T cell activation. In particular, recent studies uncovered how T cells may be guided in their search for the best APCs. Additionally, the development of more sophisticated fluorescent tools has permitted not only to visualize T cell-APC contacts but also to probe their functional impact on T cell activation. These recent progresses are providing new insights into how T cells sense antigen, collect activation signals during distinct types of interaction and integrate information over successive encounters.

  11. Regulation of the development of asthmatic inflammation by in situ CD4(+)Foxp3 (+) T cells in a mouse model of late allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Tomomi; Hayashi, Toshiharu; Mizuno, Takuya

    2014-10-01

    CD4(+)Foxp3(+)T cells (Tregs) mediate homeostatic peripheral tolerance by suppressing helper T2 cells in allergy. However, the regulation of asthmatic inflammation by local (in situ) Tregs in asthma remains unclear. BALB/c mice sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) (asthma group) developed asthmatic inflammation with eosinophils and lymphocytes, but not mast cells. The number of Tregs in the circulation, pulmonary lymph nodes (pLNs), and thymi significantly decreased in the asthma group compared to the control group without OVA sensitization and challenge in the effector phase. The development of asthmatic inflammation is inversely related to decreased Tregs with reduced mRNA expression such as interleukin (IL)-4, transforming growth factor-β1, and IL-10, but not interferon-γ, in pLNs. Moreover, M2 macrophages increased in the local site. The present study suggests that Tregs, at least in part, may regulate the development of asthmatic inflammation by cell-cell contact and regional cytokine productions.

  12. SNX17 Affects T Cell Activation by Regulating T Cell Receptor and Integrin Recycling

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Douglas G.; Piotrowski, Joshua T.; Dick, Christopher J.; Zhang, Jin-San; Billadeau, Daniel D.

    2015-01-01

    A key component in T cell activation is the endosomal recycling of receptors to the cell surface, thereby allowing continual integration of signaling and antigen recognition. One protein potentially involved in T cell receptor transport is sorting nexin 17 (SNX17). SNX proteins have been found to bind proteins involved in T cell activation, but specifically the role of SNX17 in receptor recycling and T cell activation is unknown. Using immunofluorescence, we find that SNX17 co-localizes with TCR and localizes to the immune synapse in T-APC conjugates. Significantly, knockdown of the SNX17 resulted in fewer T-APC conjugates, lower CD69, TCR, and LFA-1 surface expression, as well as lower overall TCR recycling compared to control T cells. Lastly, we identified the FERM-domain of SNX17 as being responsible in the binding and trafficking of TCR and LFA-1 to the cell surface. These data suggest that SNX17 plays a role in the maintenance of normal surface levels of activating receptors and integrins to permit optimum T cell activation at the immune synapse. PMID:25825439

  13. Elevation and persistence of CD8 T-cells in HIV infection: the Achilles heel in the ART era

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Wei; Mehraj, Vikram; Kaufmann, Daniel E; Li, Taisheng; Routy, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HIV infection leads to a disturbed T-cell homeostasis, featured by a depletion of CD4 T-cells and a persistent elevation of CD8 T-cells over disease progression. Most effort of managing HIV infection has been focused on CD4 T-cell recovery, while changes in the CD8 compartment were relatively underappreciated in the past. Methods A comprehensive literature review of publications in English language was conducted using major electronic databases. Our search was focused on factors contributing to CD8 T-cell dynamics in HIV infection and following antiretroviral therapy (ART). Discussion Normalization of CD8 counts is seldom observed even with optimal CD4 recovery following long-term treatment. Initiation of ART in primary HIV infection leads to enhanced normalization of CD8 count compared with long-term ART initiated in chronic infection. Importantly, such CD8 elevation in treated HIV infection is associated with an increased risk of inflammatory non-AIDS-related clinical events independent of CD4 T-cell recovery. The mechanisms underlying CD8 persistence remain largely unknown, which may include bystander activation, exhaustion and immunosenescence of CD8 T-cells. The information provided herein will lead to a better understanding of factors associated with CD8 persistence and contribute to the development of strategies aiming at CD8 normalization. Conclusions Persistence of CD8 T-cell elevation in treated HIV-infected patients is associated with an increased risk of non-AIDS-related events. Now that advances in ART have led to decreased AIDS-related opportunistic diseases, more attention has been focused on reducing non-AIDS events and normalizing persistent CD8 T-cell elevation. PMID:26945343

  14. Bispecific T cell engagers for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Huehls, Amelia M.; Coupet, Tiffany A.; Sentman, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    Bispecific T cell engagers are a new class of immunotherapeutic molecules intended for the treatment of cancer. These molecules, termed BiTEs, enhance the patient’s immune response to tumors by retargeting T cells to tumor cells. BiTEs are constructed of two single chain variable fragments (scFv) connected in tandem by a flexible linker. One scFv binds to a T cell-specific molecule, usually CD3, while the second scFv binds to a tumor-associated antigen. This structure and specificity allows a BiTE to physically link a T cell to a tumor cell, ultimately stimulating T cell activation, tumor killing and cytokine production. BiTEs have been developed that target several tumor-associated antigens for a variety of both hematological and solid tumors. Several BiTEs are currently in clinical trials for their therapeutic efficacy and safety. This review examines the salient structural and functional features of BiTEs as well as the current state of their clinical and preclinical development. PMID:25367186

  15. PPARγ negatively regulates T cell activation to prevent follicular helper T cells and germinal center formation.

    PubMed

    Park, Hong-Jai; Kim, Do-Hyun; Choi, Jin-Young; Kim, Won-Ju; Kim, Ji Yun; Senejani, Alireza G; Hwang, Soo Seok; Kim, Lark Kyun; Tobiasova, Zuzana; Lee, Gap Ryol; Craft, Joseph; Bothwell, Alfred L M; Choi, Je-Min

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a transcription factor that regulates lipid and glucose metabolism. Although studies of PPARγ ligands have demonstrated its regulatory functions in inflammation and adaptive immunity, its intrinsic role in T cells and autoimmunity has yet to be fully elucidated. Here we used CD4-PPARγKO mice to investigate PPARγ-deficient T cells, which were hyper-reactive to produce higher levels of cytokines and exhibited greater proliferation than wild type T cells with increased ERK and AKT phosphorylation. Diminished expression of IκBα, Sirt1, and Foxo1, which are inhibitors of NF-κB, was observed in PPARγ-deficient T cells that were prone to produce all the signature cytokines under Th1, Th2, Th17, and Th9 skewing condition. Interestingly, 1-year-old CD4-PPARγKO mice spontaneously developed moderate autoimmune phenotype by increased activated T cells, follicular helper T cells (TFH cells) and germinal center B cells with glomerular inflammation and enhanced autoantibody production. Sheep red blood cell immunization more induced TFH cells and germinal centers in CD4-PPARγKO mice and the T cells showed increased of Bcl-6 and IL-21 expression suggesting its regulatory role in germinal center reaction. Collectively, these results suggest that PPARγ has a regulatory role for TFH cells and germinal center reaction to prevent autoimmunity.

  16. Synthetic biology approaches to engineer T cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chia-Yung; Rupp, Levi J; Roybal, Kole T; Lim, Wendell A

    2015-08-01

    There is rapidly growing interest in learning how to engineer immune cells, such as T lymphocytes, because of the potential of these engineered cells to be used for therapeutic applications such as the recognition and killing of cancer cells. At the same time, our knowhow and capability to logically engineer cellular behavior is growing rapidly with the development of synthetic biology. Here we describe how synthetic biology approaches are being used to rationally alter the behavior of T cells to optimize them for therapeutic functions. We also describe future developments that will be important in order to construct safe and precise T cell therapeutics.

  17. Development of a modified prognostic index of patients with aggressive adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma aged 70 years or younger: a possible risk-adapted management strategies including allogeneic transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fuji, Shigeo; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Inoue, Yoshitaka; Utsunomiya, Atae; Moriuchi, Yukiyoshi; Uchimaru, Kaoru; Owatari, Satsuki; Miyagi, Takashi; Taguchi, Jun; Choi, Ilseung; Otsuka, Eiichi; Nakachi, Sawako; Yamamoto, Hisashi; Kurosawa, Saiko; Tobinai, Kensei; Fukuda, Takahiro

    2017-03-24

    Adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma is a distinct type of peripheral T-cell lymphoma caused by human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I. Although allogeneic stem cell transplantation after chemotherapy is a recommended treatment option for patients with aggressive adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma, there is no consensus about indications for allogeneic stem cell transplantation because there is no established risk stratification system for transplant eligible patients. We conducted a nationwide survey of patients with aggressive adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma to construct a new large database that includes 1,792 patients aged 70 years or younger with aggressive adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma who were diagnosed between 2000 and 2013 and received intensive first-line chemotherapy. We randomly divided patients into two groups (training and validation sets). Acute type, poor performance status, high soluble interleukin-2 receptor level (> 5,000 U/mL), high adjusted calcium level (≥ 12 mg/dL), and high C-reactive protein level (≥ 2.5 mg/dL) were independent adverse prognostic factors using the training set. We used these five variables to divide patients into three risk groups. In the validation set, medial overall survival was 626 days, 322 days, and 197 days for the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups, respectively. In the intermediate- and high-risk groups, transplanted recipients had significantly better overall survival than non-transplanted patients. We developed a new promising risk stratification system to identify patients aged 70 years or younger with aggressive adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma who may benefit from upfront allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Prospective studies are warranted to confirm the benefit of this treatment strategy.

  18. Established thymic epithelial progenitor/stem cell-like cell lines differentiate into mature thymic epithelial cells and support T cell development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pengfei; Zhang, Jun; Zhan, Yu; Su, Juanjuan; Du, Yarui; Xu, Guoliang; Shi, Yufang; Siebenlist, Ulrich; Zhang, Xiaoren

    2013-01-01

    Common thymic epithelial progenitor/stem cells (TEPCs) differentiate into cortical and medullary thymic epithelial cells (TECs), which are required for the development and selection of thymocytes. Mature TEC lines have been widely established. However, the establishment of TEPC lines is rarely reported. Here we describe the establishment of thymic epithelial stomal cell lines, named TSCs, from fetal thymus. TSCs express some of the markers present on tissue progenitor/stem cells such as Sca-1. Gene expression profiling verifies the thymic identity of TSCs. RANK stimulation of these cells induces expression of autoimmune regulator (Aire) and Aire-dependent tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs) in TSCs in vitro. TSCs could be differentiated into medullary thymic epithelial cell-like cells with exogenously expressed NF-κB subunits RelB and p52. Importantly, upon transplantation under the kidney capsules of nude mice, TSCs are able to differentiate into mature TEC-like cells that can support some limited development of T cells in vivo. These findings suggest that the TSC lines we established bear some characteristics of TEPC cells and are able to differentiate into functional TEC-like cells in vitro and in vivo. The cloned TEPC-like cell lines may provide useful tools to study the differentiation of mature TEC cells from precursors.

  19. miR-150, a microRNA expressed in mature B and T cells, blocks early B cell development when expressed prematurely.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Beiyan; Wang, Stephanie; Mayr, Christine; Bartel, David P; Lodish, Harvey F

    2007-04-24

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of approximately 22-nt noncoding RNAs that can posttranscriptionally regulate gene expression. Several miRNAs are specifically expressed in hematopoietic cells. Here we show that one such miRNA, miR-150, is mainly expressed in the lymph nodes and spleen and is highly up-regulated during the development of mature T and B cells; expression of miR-150 is sharply up-regulated at the immature B cell stage. Overexpression of miR-150 in hematopoietic stem cells, followed by bone marrow transplantation, had little effect on the formation of either mature CD8- and CD4-positive T cells or granulocytes or macrophages, but the formation of mature B cells was greatly impaired. Furthermore, premature expression of miR-150 blocked the transition from the pro-B to the pre-B stage. Our results indicate that miR-150 most likely down-regulates mRNAs that are important for pre- and pro-B cell formation or function, and its ectopic expression in these cells blocks further development of B cells.

  20. Self-specific CD8+ T cells maintain a semi-naive state following lymphopenia-induced proliferation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lisa D S; Jameson, Stephen C

    2010-05-15

    Upon transfer into T cell-deficient hosts, naive CD8(+) T cells typically undergo lymphopenia-induced proliferation (LIP, also called homeostatic proliferation) and develop the phenotypic and functional characteristics of memory CD8(+) T cells. However, the capacity of T cells with self-peptide/MHC specificity to respond in this way has not been intensively studied. We examined pmel-1 TCR transgenic CD8(+) T cells that are specific for an epitope from gp100, a protein expressed by melanoma cells and normal melanocytes. Despite their self-specificity, naive pmel-1 cells were inefficient at LIP in typical lymphopenic hosts. In CD132 (common gamma-chain)-deficient hosts, pmel-1 CD8(+) T cells underwent extensive proliferation, but, surprisingly, the majority of these cells retained certain naive phenotypic traits (CD44(low), CD122(low)) rather than acquiring the expected central-memory phenotype. Following LIP, pmel-1 T cells acquired the capacity to control B16F10 tumor growth, but only in common gamma-chain-deficient host mice. Together, these data suggest that LIP does not always favor expansion of self-specific CD8 T cells and that sustained extensive lymphopenia is required for such cells to exhibit tumor control.

  1. Self-recognition specificity expressed by T cells from nude mice. Absence of detectable Ia-restricted T cells in nude mice that do exhibit self-K/D-restricted T cell responses

    SciTech Connect

    Kruisbeek, A.M.; Davis, M.L.; Matis, L.A.; Longo, D.L.

    1984-09-01

    The presence in athymic nude mice of precursor T cells with self-recognition specificity for either H-2 K/D or H-2 I region determinants was investigated. Chimeras were constructed of lethally irradiated parental mice receiving a mixture of F1 nude mouse (6-8 wk old) spleen and bone marrow cells. The donor inoculum was deliberately not subjected to any T cell depletion procedure, so that any potential major histocompatibility complex-committed precursor T cells were allowed to differentiate and expand in the normal parental recipients. 3 mo after reconstitution, the chimeras were immunized with several protein antigens in complete Freund's adjuvant in the footpads and their purified draining lymph node T cells tested 10 d later for ability to recognize antigen on antigen-presenting cells of either parental haplotype. Also, their spleen and lymph node cells were tested for ability to generate a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response to trinitrophenyl (TNP)-modified stimulator cells of either parental haplotype. It was demonstrated that T cell proliferative responses of these F1(nude)----parent chimeras were restricted solely to recognizing parental host I region determinants as self and expressed the Ir gene phenotype of the host. In contrast, CTL responses could be generated (in the presence of interleukin 2) to TNP-modified stimulator cells of either parental haplotype. Thus these results indicate that nude mice which do have CTL with self-specificity for K/D region determinants lack proliferating T cells with self-specificity for I region determinants. These results provide evidence for the concepts that development of the I region-restricted T cell repertoire is strictly an intrathymically determined event and that young nude mice lack the unique thymic elements responsible for edu

  2. 1810011o10 Rik Inhibits the Antitumor Effect of Intratumoral CD8+ T Cells through Suppression of Notch2 Pathway in a Murine Hepatocellular Carcinoma Model

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Kai; Huang, Ling; Huang, Ya-bing; Chen, Zu-bing; Yang, Li-hua; Jiang, Ying-an

    2017-01-01

    The mechanisms by which tumor-responsive CD8+ T cells are regulated are important for understanding the tumor immunity and for developing new therapeutic strategies. In current study, we identified the expression of 1810011o10 Rik, which is the homolog of human thyroid cancer 1, in intratumoral activated CD8+ T cells in a murine hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) implantation model. To investigate the role of 1810011o10 Rik in the regulation of antitumor activity of CD8+ T cells, normal CD8+ T cells were transduced with 1810011o10 Rik-expressing lentiviruses. Although 1810011o10 Rik overexpression did not influence agonistic antibody-induced CD8+ T cell activation in vitro, it inhibited the cytotoxic efficacy of CD8+ T cells on HCC cells in vivo. 1810011o10 Rik overexpression impeded CD8+ T cell-mediated HCC cell apoptosis and favored tumor cell growth in vivo. Further investigation revealed that 1810011o10 Rik blocked the nuclear translocation of Notch2 intracellular domain, which is crucial for CD8+ T cell activity. Furthermore, a brief in vitro experiment suggested that both antigen-presenting cells and TGF-β might be necessary for the upregulation of Rik expression in activated CD8+ T cells. In general, our study disclosed a novel mechanism underlying the negative regulation of antitumor CD8+ T cells during HCC progression. PMID:28382040

  3. Genetic engineering with T cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Morgan, Richard A

    2012-06-01

    In the past two decades, human gene transfer research has been translated from a laboratory technology to clinical evaluation. The success of adoptive transfer of tumor-reactive lymphocytes to treat the patients with metastatic melanoma has led to new strategies to redirect normal T cells to recognize tumor antigens by genetic engineering with tumor antigen-specific T cell receptor (TCR) genes. This new strategy can generate large numbers of defined antigen-specific cells for therapeutic application. Much progress has been made to TCR gene transfer systems by optimizing gene expression and gene transfer protocols. Vector and protein modifications have enabled excellent expression of introduced TCR chains in human lymphocytes with reduced mis-pairing between the introduced and endogenous TCR chains. Initial clinical studies have demonstrated that TCR gene-engineered T cells could mediate tumor regression in vivo. In this review, we discuss the progress and prospects of TCR gene-engineered T cells as a therapeutic strategy for treating patients with melanoma and other cancers.

  4. [Epstein-Barr virus-related B-cell lymphoma of the skin which developed early after cord blood transplantation for angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Tajika, Kenji; Tamai, Hayato; Mizuki, Taro; Nakayama, Kazutaka; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Dan, Kazuo

    2010-02-01

    We report here a rare case of EBV-related post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) localized to the skin. The patient was a 64-year-old man diagnosed with angioimmunoblastic T cell lymphoma (AITL). He underwent cord blood transplantation with a reduced intensity conditioning regimen during partial remission after chemotherapy. On day 70 after transplantation, subcutaneous tumors developed near the left scapula and in the left upper arm. Pathological examination of the skin tumor revealed that this tumor was composed of diffuse large centroblast-like cells, the majority of which were CD20 positive, CD 79a positive, CD30 positive and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latency-associated RNA (EBER) positive, and EBV-DNA was also detected in tumor cells. At that time, real-time polymerase chain reaction documented no evidence of the EBV genome in his blood. Chimerism analysis revealed that the tumor cells were derived from donor cells, which led to the diagnosis of EBV-related PTLD. For treatment, in addition to decreasing the dose of tacrolimus, we administered rituximab and local irradiation to skin lesions, which led to disappearance of the tumors followed by continued complete remission.

  5. Production of tag-free recombinant fusion protein encompassing promiscuous T cell epitope of tetanus toxoid and dog zona pellucida glycoprotein-3 for contraceptive vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Neha; Shrestha, Abhinav; Panda, Amulya Kumar; Gupta, Satish Kumar

    2013-07-01

    Affinity tags can interfere in various physicochemical properties and immunogenicity of the recombinant proteins. In the present study, tag-free recombinant fusion protein encompassing promiscuous T cell epitope of tetanus toxoid [TT; amino acid (aa) residues 830-844] followed by dilysine linker and dog zona pellucida glycoprotein-3 (ZP3; aa residues 23-348) (TT-KK-ZP3) was expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein, expressed as inclusion bodies (IBs), was purified by isolation of IBs, processed to remove host cell proteins, followed by solubilization and refolding. A specific 39 kDa protein including ZP3 was identified by SDS-PAGE. CD spectra showed the presence of α-helices and β-sheets, and fluorescent spectroscopy revealed emission maxima of 265 A.U. at 339 nm for refolded protein and showed red shift in the presence of 6 M guanidine hydrochloride. Immunization of inbred FvB/J female mice with purified recombinant TT-KK-ZP3 (25 μg/animal) led to generation of high antibody titers against the recombinant protein. The antibodies reacted specifically with ZP matrix surrounding mouse oocytes. Immunized mice showed significant reduction in fertility as compared to the control group. The studies described herein provide a simple method to produce and purify tag-free recombinant protein for the development of a contraceptive vaccine.

  6. CAR-T Cell Therapy for Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Carlos A; Heslop, Helen E; Brenner, Malcolm K

    2016-01-01

    Lymphomas arise from clonal expansions of B, T, or NK cells at different stages of differentiation. Because they occur in the immunocyte-rich lymphoid tissues, they are easily accessible to antibodies and cell-based immunotherapy. Expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) on T cells is a means of combining the antigen-binding site of a monoclonal antibody with the activating machinery of a T cell, enabling antigen recognition independent of major histocompatibility complex restriction, while retaining the desirable antitumor properties of a T cell. Here, we discuss the basic design of CARs and their potential advantages and disadvantages over other immune therapies for lymphomas. We review current clinical trials in the field and consider strategies to improve the in vivo function and safety of immune cells expressing CARs. The ultimate driver of CAR development and implementation for lymphoma will be the demonstration of their ability to safely and cost-effectively cure these malignancies.

  7. CAR-T Cell Therapy for Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Carlos A.; Heslop, Helen E.; Brenner, Malcolm K.

    2016-01-01

    Lymphomas arise from clonal expansions of B, T, or NK cells at different stages of differentiation. Because they occur in the immunocyte-rich lymphoid tissues, they are easily accessible to antibodies and cell-based immunotherapy. Expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) on T cells is a means of combining the antigen-binding site of a monoclonal antibody with the activating machinery of a T cell, enabling antigen recognition independent of major histocompatibility complex restriction, while retaining the desirable antitumor properties of a T cell. Here, we discuss the basic design of CARs and their potential advantages and disadvantages over other immune therapies for lymphomas. We review current clinical trials in the field and consider strategies to improve the in vivo function and safety of immune cells expressing CARs. The ultimate driver of CAR development and implementation for lymphoma will be the demonstration of their ability to safely and cost-effectively cure these malignancies. PMID:26332003

  8. Regulatory T cells and COPD.

    PubMed

    Dancer, Rachel; Sansom, David M

    2013-12-01

    While the innate immune system has long been implicated in the pathogenesis of COPD, a role for the acquired immune system is less well studied. The increasing recognition that COPD shares features with autoimmune disease has led to interest in a potential role for regulatory T cells, which are intimately involved in the control of autoimmunity. The suggestion that regulatory T cell numbers are increased in patients with COPD may indicate their dysfunction or resistance to suppression by target cells. Investigation of regulatory T cells may therefore be of importance in understanding the inflammation and tissue damage that occurs in patients with COPD who cease smoking.

  9. Decreased SAP Expression in T Cells from Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Contributes to Early Signaling Abnormalities and Reduced IL-2 Production.

    PubMed

    Karampetsou, Maria P; Comte, Denis; Kis-Toth, Katalin; Terhorst, Cox; Kyttaris, Vasileios C; Tsokos, George C

    2016-06-15

    T cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) display a number of abnormalities, including increased early signaling events following engagement of the TCR. Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule family cell surface receptors and the X-chromosome-defined signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP) adaptor are important in the development of several immunocyte lineages and modulating the immune response. We present evidence that SAP protein levels are decreased in T cells and in their main subsets isolated from 32 women and three men with SLE, independent of disease activity. In SLE T cells, SAP protein is also subject to increased degradation by caspase-3. Forced expression of SAP in SLE T cells normalized IL-2 production, calcium (Ca(2+)) responses, and tyrosine phosphorylation of a number of proteins. Exposure of normal T cells to SLE serum IgG, known to contain anti-CD3/TCR Abs, resulted in SAP downregulation. We conclude that SLE T cells display reduced levels of the adaptor protein SAP, probably as a result of continuous T cell activation and degradation by caspase-3. Restoration of SAP levels in SLE T cells corrects the overexcitable lupus T cell phenotype.

  10. Efficacy and toxicity management of CAR-T-cell immunotherapy: a matter of responsiveness control or tumour-specificity?

    PubMed

    Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Harwood, Seandean Lykke; Álvarez-Méndez, Ana; Alvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2016-04-15

    Chimaeric antigen receptor (CAR)-expressing T-cells have demonstrated potent clinical efficacy in patients with haematological malignancies. However, the use of CAR-T-cells targeting solid tumour-associated antigens (TAAs) has been limited by organ toxicities related to activation of T-cell effector functions through the CAR. Most existing CARs recognize TAAs, which are also found in normal tissues. CAR-T-cell-mediated destruction of normal tissues constitutes a major roadblock to CAR-T-cell therapy, and must be avoided or mitigated. There is a broad range of strategies for modulating antigen responsiveness of CAR-T-cells, with varying degrees of complexity. Some of them might ameliorate the acute and chronic toxicities associated with current CAR constructs. However, further embellishments to CAR therapy may complicate clinical implementation and possibly create new immunogenicity issues. In contrast, the development of CARs targeting truly tumour-specific antigens might circumvent on-target/off-tumour toxicities without adding additional complexity to CAR-T-cell therapies, but these antigens have been elusive and may require novel selection strategies for their discovery.

  11. T cell dysfunction in the diabetes-prone BB rat. A role for thymic migrants that are not T cell precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Georgiou, H.M.; Lagarde, A.C.; Bellgrau, D.

    1988-01-01

    Diabetes-prone BB (BB-DP) rats express several T cell dysfunctions which include poor proliferative and cytotoxic responses to alloantigen. The goal of this study was to determine the origin of these T cell dysfunctions. When BB-DP rats were thymectomized, T cell depleted, and transplanted with neonatal thymus tissue from diabetes-resistant and otherwise normal DA/BB F1 rats, the early restoration of T cell function proceeded normally on a cell-for-cell basis; i.e., peripheral T cells functioned like those from the thymus donor. Because the thymus in these experiments was subjected to gamma irradiation before transplantation and there was no evidence of F1 chimerism in the transplanted BB-DP rats, it appeared that the BB-DP T cell precursors could mature into normally functioning T cells if the maturation process occurred in a normal thymus. If the F1 thymus tissue was treated with dGua before transplantation, the T cells of these animals functioned poorly like those from untreated BB-DP rats. dGua poisons bone marrow-derived cells, including gamma radiation-resistant cells of the macrophage/dendritic cell lineages, while sparing the thymic epithelium. Therefore, the reversal of the T cell dysfunction depends on the presence in the F1 thymus of gamma radiation-resistant, dGua-sensitive F1 cells. Conversely, thymectomized and T cell-depleted F1 rats expressed T cell dysfunction when transplanted with gamma-irradiated BB thymus grafts. T cell responses were normal in animals transplanted with dGua-treated BB thymus grafts. With increasing time after thymus transplantation, T cells from all animals gradually expressed the functional phenotype of the bone marrow donor. Taken together these results suggest that BB-DP bone marrow-derived cells that are not T cell precursors influence the maturation environment in the thymus of otherwise normal BB-DP T cell precursors.

  12. CIP2A Promotes T-Cell Activation and Immune Response to Listeria monocytogenes Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cvrljevic, Anna; Khan, Mohd Moin; Treise, Irina; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Au-Yeung, Byron; Sittig, Eleonora; Laajala, Teemu Daniel; Chen, Yiling; Oeder, Sebastian; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Horsch, Marion; Aittokallio, Tero; Busch, Dirk H.; Ollert, Markus W.; Neff, Frauke; Beckers, Johannes; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Fuchs, Helmut; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Chen, Zhi; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Westermarck, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    The oncoprotein Cancerous Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) is overexpressed in most malignancies and is an obvious candidate target protein for future cancer therapies. However, the physiological importance of CIP2A-mediated PP2A inhibition is largely unknown. As PP2A regulates immune responses, we investigated the role of CIP2A in normal immune system development and during immune response in vivo. We show that CIP2A-deficient mice (CIP2AHOZ) present a normal immune system development and function in unchallenged conditions. However when challenged with Listeria monocytogenes, CIP2AHOZ mice display an impaired adaptive immune response that is combined with decreased frequency of both CD4+ T-cells and CD8+ effector T-cells. Importantly, the cell autonomous effect of CIP2A deficiency for T-cell activation was confirmed. Induction of CIP2A expression during T-cell activation was dependent on Zap70 activity. Thus, we reveal CIP2A as a hitherto unrecognized mediator of T-cell activation during adaptive immune response. These results also reveal CIP2AHOZ as a possible novel mouse model for studying the role of PP2A activity in immune regulation. On the other hand, the results also indicate that CIP2A targeting cancer therapies would not cause serious immunological side-effects. PMID:27100879

  13. [Psychomotor development and its disorders: between normal and pathological development].

    PubMed

    Vericat, Agustina; Bibiana Orden, Alicia

    2013-10-01

    This article discusses some aspects of psychomotor development and its disorders, with special emphasis on psychomotor retardation. Diagnostic classifications of psychomotor problems, such as DSM-IV and CIE-10, are referred to and their advantages and disadvantages are analyzed. The concept of normality as a synonym for the statistical mean in the context of psychomotor disorders is also analyzed in order to consider its dynamic and variability, thereby avoiding the normality/pathology opposition, while some issues, such as the social and cultural aspects, are highlighted, making it possible to rethink the universality and relativity of psychomotor development.

  14. Inducible T-cell receptor expression in precursor T-cells for leukemia control

    PubMed Central

    Hoseini, Shahabuddin S; Hapke, Martin; Herbst, Jessica; Wedekind, Dirk; Baumann, Rolf; Heinz, Niels; Schiedlmeier, Bernhard; Vignali, Dario AA; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.; Schambach, Axel; Blazar, Bruce R.; Sauer, Martin G.

    2015-01-01

    Co-transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells with those engineered to express leukemia-reactive T cell receptors (TCRs) and differentiated ex vivo into precursor T cells (preTs) may reduce the risk of leukemia relapse. Since expression of potentially self-(leukemia-) reactive TCRs will lead to negative selection or provoke autoimmunity upon thymic maturation, we investigated a novel concept whereby TCR expression set under the control of an inducible promoter would allow timely controlled TCR expression. After in vivo maturation and gene induction, preTs developed potent anti-leukemia effects. Engineered preTs provided protection even after repeated leukemia challenges by giving rise to effector and central memory cells. Importantly, adoptive transfer of TCR-transduced allogeneic preTs mediated anti-leukemia effect without evoking graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Earlier transgene induction forced CD8+ T cell development, was required to obtain a mature T cell subset of targeted specificity, allowed engineered T cells to efficiently pass positive selection and abrogated the endogenous T cell repertoire. Later induction favored CD4 differentiation and failed to produce a leukemia-reactive population emphasizing the dominant role of positive selection. Taken together, we provide new functional insights for the employment of TCR-engineered precursor cells as a controllable immunotherapeutic modality with significant anti-leukemia activity. PMID:25652739

  15. Normal development, oncogenesis and programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Liebermann, D A

    1998-09-10

    Meeting's Report -- June 2, 1998, Sugarload Estate Conference Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. A symposium on Normal Development, Oncogenesis and Programmed Cell Death, was held at the Sugarload Estate Conference Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA sponsored by the Fels Cancer Institute, Temple University School of Medicine, with the support of the Alliance Pharmaceutical Corporation. The symposium was organized by Drs Dan A Liebermann and Barbara Hoffman at the Fels. Invited speakers included: Dr Andrei V Gudkov (University of Illinois) who started the symposium talking about 'New cellular factors modulating the tumor suppressor function of p53'; Dr Yuri Lazebnik (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories) spoke about 'Caspases considered as enemies within'; Dr E Premkumar Reddy (Fels Institute, Temple University) talked about recent exciting findings in his laboratory regarding 'JAK-STATs dedicated signaling pathways'; Dr Michael Greenberg (Harvard University) spoke about 'Signal transduction pathways that regulate differentiation and survival in the developing nervous system'; Dr Richard Kolesnick's (Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center) talk has been focused at 'Stress signals for apoptosis, including Ceramide and c-Jun Kinase/Stress-activated Protein Kinase'; Dr Barbara Hoffman (Fels Institute, Temple University) described research, conducted in collaboration with Dr Dan A Liebermann, aimed at deciphering the roles of 'myc, myb, and E2F as negative regulators of terminal differentiation', using hematopoietic cells as model system. Dr Daniel G Tenen (Harvard Medical School), described studies aimed at understanding the 'Regulation of hematopoietic cell development by lineage specific transcription regulators'. Dr George C Prendergast (The Wistar Institute) talked about the 'Myc-Bin1 signaling pathway in cell death and differentiation. Dr Ruth J Muschel (University of Pennsylvania) spoke about work, conducted in collaboration with Dr WG McKenna, aimed at

  16. B and T cell screen

    MedlinePlus

    Direct immunofluorescence; E-rosetting; T and B lymphocyte assays; B and T lymphocyte assays ... identifiers are added to distinguish between T and B cells. The E-rosetting test identifies T cells ...

  17. Therapeutic Potential of Hyporesponsive CD4+ T Cells in Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Maggi, Jaxaira; Schafer, Carolina; Ubilla-Olguín, Gabriela; Catalán, Diego; Schinnerling, Katina; Aguillón, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between dendritic cells (DCs) and T cells is crucial on immunity or tolerance induction. In an immature or semi-mature state, DCs induce tolerance through T-cell deletion, generation of regulatory T cells, and/or induction of T-cell anergy. Anergy is defined as an unresponsive state that retains T cells in an “off” mode under conditions in which immune activation is undesirable. This mechanism is crucial for the control of T-cell responses against self-antigens, thereby preventing autoimmunity. Tolerogenic DCs (tDCs), generated in vitro from peripheral blood monocytes of healthy donors or patients with autoimmune pathologies, were shown to modulate immune responses by inducing T-cell hyporesponsiveness. Animal models of autoimmune diseases confirmed the impact of T-cell anergy on disease development and progression in vivo. Thus, the induction of T-cell hyporesponsiveness by tDCs has become a promising immunotherapeutic strategy for the treatment of T-cell-mediated autoimmune disorders. Here, we review recent findings in the area and discuss the potential of anergy induction for clinical purposes. PMID:26441992

  18. γδ T cells in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zou, Chang; Zhao, Pan; Xiao, Zhangang; Han, Xianghua; Fu, Fan; Fu, Li

    2017-01-31

    γδ T cells are one of the three immune cell types that express antigen receptors. They contribute to lymphoid antitumor surveillance and bridge the gap between innate and adaptive immunity. γδ T cells have the capacity of secreting abundant cytokines and exerting potent cytotoxicity against a wide range of cancer cells. γδ T cells exhibit important roles in immune-surveillance and immune defense against tumors and have become attractive effector cells for cancer immunotherapy. γδ T cells mediate anti-tumor therapy mainly by secreting pro-apoptotic molecules and inflammatory cytokines, or through a TCR-dependent pathway. Recently, γδ T cells are making their way into clinical trials. Some clinical trials demonstrated that γδ T cell-based immunotherapy is well tolerated and efficient. Despite the advantages that could be exploited, there are obstacles have to be addressed for the development of γδ T cell immunotherapies. Future direction for immunotherapy using γδ T cells should focus on overcoming the side effects of γδ T cells and exploring better antigens that help stimulating γδ T cell expansion in vitro.

  19. Pre-miRNA Loop Nucleotides Control the Distinct Activities of mir-181a-1 and mir-181c in Early T Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Sibiao; Chen, Chang-Zheng

    2008-01-01

    Background Mature miRNAs can often be classified into large families, consisting of members with identical seeds (nucleotides 2 through 7 of the mature miRNAs) and highly homologous ∼21-nucleotide (nt) mature miRNA sequences. However, it is unclear whether members of a miRNA gene family, which encode identical or nearly identical mature miRNAs, are functionally interchangeable in vivo. Methods and Findings We show that mir-181a-1, but not mir-181c, can promote CD4 and CD8 double-positive (DP) T cell development when ectopically expressed in thymic progenitor cells. The distinct activities of mir-181a-1 and mir-181c are largely determined by their unique pre-miRNA loop nucleotides—not by the one-nucleotide difference in their mature miRNA sequences. Moreover, the activity of mir-181a-1 on DP cell development can be quantitatively influenced by nucleotide changes in its pre-miRNA loop region. We find that both the strength and the functional specificity of miRNA genes can be controlled by the pre-miRNA loop nucleotides. Intriguingly, we note that mutations in the pre-miRNA loop regions affect pre-miRNA and mature miRNA processing, but find no consistent correlation between the effects of pre-miRNA loop mutations on the levels of mature miRNAs and the activities of the mir-181a-1/c genes. Conclusions These results demonstrate that pre-miRNA loop nucleotides play a critical role in controlling the activity of miRNA genes and that members of the same miRNA gene families could have evolved to achieve different activities via alterations in their pre-miRNA loop sequences, while maintaining identical or nearly identical mature miRNA sequences. PMID:18974849

  20. Adoptive Immunotherapy For Leukemia With Ex vivo Expanded T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Conrad Russell Y.; Bollard, Catherine M.

    2016-01-01

    The development of novel T cell therapies to target leukemia has facilitated the translation of this approach for hematologic malignancies. Different methods of manufacturing leukemia-specific T cells have evolved, along with additional measures to increase the safety of this therapy. This is an overview of expanded T cell therapeutics with a focus on how the manufacturing strategies have been refined, and where the research is heading. PMID:26648070

  1. Immunophenotypic and antigen receptor gene rearrangement analysis in T cell neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    exceptional circumstances do normal, non-neoplastic T cell populations express the CD4- CD8- or the CD4+ CD8+ phenotype and/or lack one or more pan-T cell antigens. T cell receptor beta chain gene rearrangement analysis represents an accurate, objective, and sensitive molecular genetic marker of T cell lineage and clonality that allows discrimination among non-T cell, polyclonal T cell and monoclonal T cell populations. Non-T cells exhibit the TCR-beta gene germline configuration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) Images Figure 3 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:2495724

  2. Identification of a Late Stage of Small Noncycling pTα−  Pre-T Cells as Immediate Precursors of T Cell Receptor α/β+  Thymocytes

    PubMed Central

    Trigueros, César; Ramiro, Almudena R.; Carrasco, Yolanda R.; de Yebenes, Virginia G.; Albar, Juan P.; Toribio, María L.

    1998-01-01

    During thymocyte development, progression from T cell receptor (TCR)β to TCRα rearrangement is mediated by a CD3-associated pre-TCR composed of the TCRβ chain paired with pre-TCRα (pTα). A major issue is how surface expression of the pre-TCR is regulated during normal thymocyte development to control transition through this checkpoint. Here, we show that developmental expression of pTα is time- and stage-specific, and is confined in vivo to a limited subset of large cycling human pre-T cells that coexpress low density CD3. This restricted expression pattern allowed the identification of a novel subset of small CD3− thymocytes lacking surface pTα, but expressing cytoplasmic TCRβ, that represent late noncycling pre-T cells in which recombination activating gene reexpression and downregulation of T early α transcription are coincident events associated with cell cycle arrest, and immediately preceding TCRα gene expression. Importantly, thymocytes at this late pre-T cell stage are shown to be functional intermediates between large pTα+ pre-T cells and TCRα/β+ thymocytes. The results support a developmental model in which pre-TCR–expressing pre-T cells are brought into cycle, rapidly downregulate surface pre-TCR, and finally become small resting pre-T cells, before the onset of TCRα gene expression. PMID:9782117

  3. Discrete dynamic modeling of T cell survival signaling networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ranran

    2009-03-01

    Biochemistry-based frameworks are often not applicable for the modeling of heterogeneous regulatory systems that are sparsely documented in terms of quantitative information. As an alternative, qualitative models assuming a small set of discrete states are gaining acceptance. This talk will present a discrete dynamic model of the signaling network responsible for the survival and long-term competence of cytotoxic T cells in the blood cancer T-LGL leukemia. We integrated the signaling pathways involved in normal T cell activation and the known deregulations of survival signaling in leukemic T-LGL, and formulated the regulation of each network element as a Boolean (logic) rule. Our model suggests that the persistence of two signals is sufficient to reproduce all known deregulations in leukemic T-LGL. It also indicates the nodes whose inactivity is necessary and sufficient for the reversal of the T-LGL state. We have experimentally validated several model predictions, including: (i) Inhibiting PDGF signaling induces apoptosis in leukemic T-LGL. (ii) Sphingosine kinase 1 and NFκB are essential for the long-term survival of T cells in T-LGL leukemia. (iii) T box expressed in T cells (T-bet) is constitutively activated in the T-LGL state. The model has identified potential therapeutic targets for T-LGL leukemia and can be used for generating long-term competent CTL necessary for tumor and cancer vaccine development. The success of this model, and of other discrete dynamic models, suggests that the organization of signaling networks has an determining role in their dynamics. Reference: R. Zhang, M. V. Shah, J. Yang, S. B. Nyland, X. Liu, J. K. Yun, R. Albert, T. P. Loughran, Jr., Network Model of Survival Signaling in LGL Leukemia, PNAS 105, 16308-16313 (2008).

  4. Harnessing Regulatory T cells to Suppress Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Thorburn, Alison N.; Hansbro, Philip M.

    2010-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an essential role in maintaining the homeostatic balance of immune responses. Asthma is an inflammatory condition of the airways that is driven by dysregulated immune responses toward normally innocuous antigens. Individuals with asthma have fewer and less functional Tregs, which may lead to uncontrolled effector cell responses and promote proasthmatic responses of T helper type 2, T helper 17, natural killer T, antigen-presenting, and B cells. Tregs have the capacity to either directly or indirectly suppress these responses. Hence, the induced expansion of functional Tregs in predisposed or individuals with asthma is a potential approach for the prevention and treatment of asthma. Infection by a number of micro-organisms has been associated with reduced prevalence of asthma, and many infectious agents have been shown to induce Tregs and reduce allergic airways disease in mouse models. The translation of the regulatory and therapeutic properties of infectious agents for use in asthma requires the identification of key modulatory components and the development and trial of effective immunoregulatory therapies. Further translational and clinical research is required for the induction of Tregs to be harnessed as a therapeutic strategy for asthma. PMID:20097830

  5. Transgelin-2 in B-Cells Controls T-Cell Activation by Stabilizing T Cell - B Cell Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Myoung-Won; Kim, Hye-Ran; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Jun, Chang-Duk; Park, Zee-Yong

    2016-01-01

    The immunological synapse (IS), a dynamic and organized junction between T-cells and antigen presenting cells (APCs), is critical for initiating adaptive immunity. The actin cytoskeleton plays a major role in T-cell reorganization during IS formation, and we previously reported that transgelin-2, an actin-binding protein expressed in T-cells, stabilizes cortical F-actin, promoting T-cell activation in response to antigen stimulation. Transgelin-2 is also highly expressed in B-cells, although no specific function has been reported. In this study, we found that deficiency in transgelin-2 (TAGLN2-/-) in B-cells had little effect on B-cell development and activation, as measured by the expression of CD69, MHC class II molecules, and CD80/86. Nevertheless, in B-cells, transgelin-2 accumulated in the IS during the interaction with T-cells. These results led us to hypothesize that transgelin-2 may also be involved in IS stability in B-cells, thereby influencing T-cell function. Notably, we found that transgelin-2 deficiency in B-cells reduced T-cell activation, as determined by the release of IL-2 and interferon-γ and the expression of CD69. Furthermore, the reduced T-cell activation was correlated with reduced B-cell–T-cell conjugate formation. Collectively, these results suggest that actin stability in B-cells during IS formation is critical for the initiation of adaptive T-cell immunity. PMID:27232882

  6. Physical Development: What's Normal? What's Not?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Normal? What’s Not? Page Content Article Body ​Two boys or girls exactly the same age can start ... early as eight or as late as fourteen. Boys: Usually trail behind by about two years—this ...

  7. Characterization of bovine gamma delta T cells phenotype during post-natal development and following Mycobacterium bovis vaccination or virulent infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium bovis is a globally significant veterinary health problem. Gamma delta T cells are known to participate in the immune control of mycobacterial infections. Data in human and non-human primates suggest that mycobacterial infection regulates memory/effector p...

  8. Rictor/mammalian target of rapamycin 2 regulates the development of Notch1 induced murine T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia via forkhead box O3.

    PubMed

    Hua, Chunlan; Guo, Huidong; Bu, Jiachen; Zhou, Mi; Cheng, Hui; He, Fuhong; Wang, Jinhong; Wang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Yinchi; Wang, Qianfei; Zhou, Jianfeng; Cheng, Tao; Xu, Mingjiang; Yuan, Weiping

    2014-12-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is composed of two distinct biochemical complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2. In response to nutrients and growth factors, mTORC1 is known to control cellular growth by regulating the translational regulators S6 kinase 1 and 4E binding protein 1, whereas mTORC2 mediates cell proliferation and survival by activating Akt through phosphorylation at Ser473. Studies have shown that the deregulation of mTORC2 leads to the development of myeloproliferative disorder and leukemia in the phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN)-deleted mouse model. However, the mechanism by which mTORC2 specifically affects leukemogenesis is still not fully understood. Here, we investigated the role of mTORC2 in NOTCH1-driven T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) in a Rictor-deficient mouse model. We found that, by deleting Rictor, an essential component of mTORC2, leukemia progression was significantly suppressed by arresting a greater proportion of Rictor(△/△) leukemic cells at the G0 phase of the cell cycle. Furthermore, the absence of Rictor led to the overexpression of chemotaxis-related genes, such as CCR2, CCR4 and CXCR4, which contributed to the homing and migration of Rictor-deficient T-ALL cells to the spleen but not the bone marrow. In addition, we demonstrated that inactivation of mTORC2 caused the overexpression of forkhead box O3 and its downstream effectors and eased the progression of leukemia in T-ALL mice. Our study thus indicates that forkhead box O3 could be a potential drug target for the treatment of T-ALL leukemia.

  9. Dysregulated development of IL-17- and IL-21-expressing follicular helper T cells and increased germinal center formation in the absence of RORγt.

    PubMed

    Wichner, Katharina; Stauss, Dennis; Kampfrath, Branka; Krüger, Kerstin; Müller, Gerd; Rehm, Armin; Lipp, Martin; Höpken, Uta E

    2016-02-01

    Interleukin 17-producing helper T (Th17) cells have been widely defined by the lineage transcription factor retinoid-related orphan receptor (ROR)γt. Pathophysiologically, these cells play a crucial role in autoimmune diseases and have been linked to dysregulated germinal center (GC) reactions and autoantibody production. In this study, we used gene expression and flow cytometric analyses for the characterization of Rorγt(-/-) and Rorγt(-/-)Il21(RFP/+) mice to demonstrate a previously unknown transcriptional flexibility in the development of IL-17-producing Th-cell subsets. We found an accumulation of follicular Th (Tfh) cells by 5.2-fold, spontaneous 13-fold higher GC formation, decreased frequency of follicular Foxp3(+) T-regulatory (Treg) cells (50%), and a 3.4-fold increase in the number of proliferating follicular B cells in RORγt-deficient vs. wild-type mice. Dysregulated B-cell responses were associated with enhanced production of IL-17 (6.4-fold), IL-21 (2.2-fold), and B-cell-activating factor (BAFF) (2-fold) and were partially rescued by adoptive transfer of Treg cells. In an unexpected finding, we detected RORγt-independent IL-17 expression in ICOS(+)CXCR5(+)Tfh and in ICOS(+)CXCR5(-)Th cells. Based on the observed high Irf4 and Batf gene expression, we suggest that CD4(+) T-cell transcription factors other than RORγt can cooperatively induce differentiation of IL-17-producing Th cells, including Th17-like Tfh-cell subsets. We conclude that the occurrence of aberrant Tfh and follicular Treg cells support spontaneous GC formation and dysregulated B-cell responses in RORγt-deficient mice.

  10. Lymphotoxin-β receptor in microenvironmental cells promotes the development of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia with cortical/mature immunophenotype.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Mónica T; Ghezzo, Marinella N; Silveira, André B; Kalathur, Ravi K; Póvoa, Vanda; Ribeiro, Ana R; Brandalise, Sílvia R; Dejardin, Emmanuel; Alves, Nuno L; Ghysdael, Jacques; Barata, João T; Yunes, José Andres; dos Santos, Nuno R

    2015-12-01

    Lymphotoxin-mediated activation of the lymphotoxin-β receptor (LTβR; LTBR) has been implicated in cancer, but its role in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL) has remained elusive. Here we show that the genes encoding lymphotoxin (LT)-α and LTβ (LTA, LTB) are expressed in T-ALL patient samples, mostly of the TAL/LMO molecular subtype, and in the TEL-JAK2 transgenic mouse model of cortical/mature T-ALL (Lta, Ltb). In these mice, expression of Lta and Ltb is elevated in early stage T-ALL. Surface LTα1 β2 protein is expressed in primary mouse T-ALL cells, but only in the absence of microenvironmental LTβR interaction. Indeed, surface LT expression is suppressed in leukaemic cells contacting Ltbr-expressing but not Ltbr-deficient stromal cells, both in vitro and in vivo, thus indicating that dynamic surface LT expression in leukaemic cells depends on interaction with its receptor. Supporting the notion that LT signalling plays a role in T-ALL, inactivation of Ltbr results in a significant delay in TEL-JAK2-induced leukaemia onset. Moreover, young asymptomatic TEL-JAK2;Ltbr(-/-) mice present markedly less leukaemic thymocytes than age-matched TEL-JAK2;Ltbr(+/+) mice and interference with LTβR function at this early stage delayed T-ALL development. We conclude that LT expression by T-ALL cells activates LTβR signalling in thymic stromal cells, thus promoting leukaemogenesis.

  11. Mechanisms Underlying T Cell Immunosenescence: Aging and Cytomegalovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Wenjuan; Rao, Sudha

    2016-01-01

    The ability of the human immune system to protect against infectious disease declines with age and efficacy of vaccination reduces significantly in the elderly. Aging of the immune system, also termed as immunosenescence, involves many changes in human T cell immunity that is characterized by a loss in naïve T cell population and an increase in highly differentiated CD28- memory T cell subset. There is extensive data showing that latent persistent human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is also associated with age-related immune dysfunction in the T cells, which might enhance immunosenescence. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying age-related and HCMV-related immunosenescence is critical for the development of effective age-targeted vaccines and immunotherapies. In this review, we will address the role of both aging and HCMV infection that contribute to the T cell senescence and discuss the potential molecular mechanisms in aged T cells. PMID:28082969

  12. Production of CD4+ and CD8+ T Cell Hybridomas

    PubMed Central

    Canaday, David H.

    2015-01-01

    T cell hybridomas are very useful tools to investigate antigen presenting cell (APC) function. They were developed based on the fusion technology that led to monoclonal antibody section. Antigen-specific primary T cells are generated and fused to an immortal thymoma line. Unfused thymoma cells are eliminated by engineered metabolic selection. Antigen-specific hybridomas are identified and may be characterized in detail. Primary T cells are preferable for studies of the regulatory mechanisms intrinsic to T cells, but for study of antigen presentation T cell hybridomas have advantages over primary T cell clones, including their relative uniformity, stability over time, and ready availability in large numbers for extensive antigen presentation experiments. PMID:23329495

  13. Chimeric Antigen Receptors Modified T-Cells for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hanren; Wang, Yao; Lu, Xuechun; Han, Weidong

    2016-07-01

    The genetic modification and characterization of T-cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) allow functionally distinct T-cell subsets to recognize specific tumor cells. The incorporation of costimulatory molecules or cytokines can enable engineered T-cells to eliminate tumor cells. CARs are generated by fusing the antigen-binding region of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) or other ligand to membrane-spanning and intracellular-signaling domains. They have recently shown clinical benefit in patients treated with CD19-directed autologous T-cells. Recent successes suggest that the modification of T-cells with CARs could be a powerful approach for developing safe and effective cancer therapeutics. Here, we briefly review early studies, consider strategies to improve the therapeutic potential and safety, and discuss the challenges and future prospects for CAR T-cells in cancer therapy.

  14. Chimeric Antigen Receptors Modified T-Cells for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Hanren; Wang, Yao; Lu, Xuechun

    2016-01-01

    The genetic modification and characterization of T-cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) allow functionally distinct T-cell subsets to recognize specific tumor cells. The incorporation of costimulatory molecules or cytokines can enable engineered T-cells to eliminate tumor cells. CARs are generated by fusing the antigen-binding region of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) or other ligand to membrane-spanning and intracellular-signaling domains. They have recently shown clinical benefit in patients treated with CD19-directed autologous T-cells. Recent successes suggest that the modification of T-cells with CARs could be a powerful approach for developing safe and effective cancer therapeutics. Here, we briefly review early studies, consider strategies to improve the therapeutic potential and safety, and discuss the challenges and future prospects for CAR T-cells in cancer therapy. PMID:26819347

  15. Regulatory CD4+ T-Cell Subsets and Anti-Citrullinated Protein Antibody Repertoire: Potential Biomarkers for Arthritis Development in Seropositive Arthralgia Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Koen M. J.; Westra, Johanna; Chalan, Paulina; Boots, Annemieke M. H.; de Smit, Menke J.; van Winkelhoff, Arie Jan; Vissink, Arjan; Brouwer, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Objective Seropositive arthralgia patients (SAP) are at high risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This prospective study aimed to determine whether altered peripheral regulatory T-cells (Tregs) and defined subsets, besides a broadened anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) response, may qualify as biomarkers for RA development in SAP. Methods Thirty-four consecutive SAP were prospectively assessed every 6 months for minimally 2 years. At inclusion, peripheral Treg (CD4+CD25+FoxP3+) numbers and subsets, defined as CD45RA+FoxP3low naive Tregs (Fr I), CD45RA-FoxP3high activated Tregs (Fr II) and CD45RA-FoxP3low non-Tregs (Fr III), were compared to age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HC, n = 16) and treatment-naive RA patients (n = 12). SAP that developed RA were compared to non-switchers and analyzed for Treg numbers and Treg subsets at inclusion. Also, Treg numbers and subsets were compared in switched SAP before and at diagnosis. To assess the ACPA repertoire, IgG and IgA reactivity was measured against citrullinated peptides from fibrinogen, α-enolase and vimentin. Results Treg numbers were similar between HC, SAP and RA patients. Although the bonafide Treg subsets Fr I and Fr II were comparable between groups, Fr III was increased in SAP compared to HC (p = 0.01). Fourteen (41%) SAP developed RA during follow-up. Their Treg numbers and subsets were comparable to non-switched SAP. At RA diagnosis, Treg numbers in switched SAP were similar to 6 months before. Switched SAP displayed a more diverse IgG ACPA repertoire compared to non-switched SAP (p = 0.046) and showed more IgA reactivity than non-switched SAP reaching significance for Fib1 only (p = 0.047). Conclusion Numbers of Total Treg and bonafide Treg subsets are not indicative for RA development in SAP, opposed to the ACPA repertoire. PMID:27585422

  16. Studies on thyroglobulin-specific suppressor T cell function in autoimmune thyroid disease

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, H.; Hamada, N.; DeGroot, L.J.

    1985-08-01

    T cell regulation of the generation of thyroglobulin plaque-forming cells (Tg PFC) and protein A plaque-forming cells (Prot A PFC) was investigated using lymphocytes from patients with autoimmune thyroid disease. T and B cell mixed cultures (T-B MC) were carried out without mitogenic or antigenic stimulation to identify physiological T cell effects in the system. Tg PFC were found in 8 (44%) of 18 patients who had high titers of thyroglobulin antibody in their sera. Tg-specific and nonspecific immunoregulation by T cells from patients and normal subjects was studied using B cells from these eight patients in the T-B MC system. Remarkably lower values of Tg PFC induction compared to Prot A PFC induction were found after T cell addition. Normal T cells inhibited Tg PFC induction, but patient T cells did not, while the same extent of helper effects were found on Prot A PFC induction by the addition of patient and normal T cells. Irradiation (1500 rads) of T cells from patients and normal subjects significantly enhanced both Tg PFC and Prot A PFC induction. Thus, Tg-specific suppressor T cells are present in all normal subjects as part of the radiosensitive suppressor T cell subset. The increase in Tg-PFC caused by irradiation-induced inhibition of Tg-specific suppressor T cell function was significantly greater in normal subjects than in patients. Histamine type 2 receptor-bearing T cells inhibited Prot A PFC induction, but not Tg PFC induction, in the autologous T-B MC system. No Tg PFC were induced from normal B cells in any combination with untreated T cells, irradiated T cells, or histamine type 2 receptor-negative T cells from patients or normal subjects.

  17. Oncogenic PTEN functions and models in T-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Tesio, M; Trinquand, A; Macintyre, E; Asnafi, V

    2016-07-28

    PTEN is a protein phosphatase that is crucial to prevent the malignant transformation of T-cells. Although a numerous mechanisms regulate its expression and function, they are often altered in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemias and T-cell lymphomas. As such, PTEN inactivation frequently occurs in these malignancies, where it can be associated with chemotherapy resistance and poor prognosis. Different Pten knockout models recapitulated the development of T-cell leukaemia/lymphoma, demonstrating that PTEN loss is at the center of a complex oncogenic network that sustains and drives tumorigenesis via the activation of multiple signalling pathways. These aspects and their therapeutic implications are discussed in this review.

  18. New Strategies in Engineering T-Cell Receptor Gene-Modified T Cells to More Effectively Target Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Thomas M.; Stromnes, Ingunn M.; Chapuis, Aude G.; Greenberg, Philip D.

    2016-01-01

    The immune system, and T cells in particular, have the ability to target and destroy malignant cells. However, anti-tumor immune responses induced from the endogenous T cell repertoire are often insufficient for the eradication of established tumors, as illustrated by the failure of cancer vaccination strategies or checkpoint blockade for most tumors. Genetic modification of T cells to express a defined T cell receptor (TCR) can provide the means to rapidly generate large numbers of tumor-reactive T cells capable of targeting tumor cells in vivo. However, cell-intrinsic factors as well as immunosuppressive factors in the tumor microenvironment can limit the function of such gene-modified T cells. New strategies currently being developed are refining and enhancing this approach, resulting in cellular therapies that more effectively target tumors and that are less susceptible to tumor immune-evasion. PMID:26463711

  19. New Strategies in Engineering T-cell Receptor Gene-Modified T cells to More Effectively Target Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Thomas M; Stromnes, Ingunn M; Chapuis, Aude G; Greenberg, Philip D

    2015-12-01

    The immune system, T cells in particular, have the ability to target and destroy malignant cells. However, antitumor immune responses induced from the endogenous T-cell repertoire are often insufficient for the eradication of established tumors, as illustrated by the failure of cancer vaccination strategies or checkpoint blockade for most tumors. Genetic modification of T cells to express a defined T-cell receptor (TCR) can provide the means to rapidly generate large numbers of tumor-reactive T cells capable of targeting tumor cells in vivo. However, cell-intrinsic factors as well as immunosuppressive factors in the tumor microenvironment can limit the function of such gene-modified T cells. New strategies currently being developed are refining and enhancing this approach, resulting in cellular therapies that more effectively target tumors and that are less susceptible to tumor immune evasion.

  20. T cells and autoimmune kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Fueyo, Abel; Bradley, Sean J; Klatzmann, David; Tsokos, George C

    2017-03-13

    Glomerulonephritis is traditionally considered to result from the invasion of the kidney by autoantibodies and immune complexes from the circulation or following their formation in situ, and by cells of the innate and the adaptive immune system. The inflammatory response leads to the proliferation and dysfunction of cells of the glomerulus, and invasion of the interstitial space with immune cells, resulting in tubular cell malfunction and fibrosis. T cells are critical drivers of autoimmunity and related organ damage, by supporting B-cell differentiation and antibody production or by directly promoting inflammation and cytotoxicity against kidney resident cells. T cells might become activated by autoantigens in the periphery and become polarized to secrete inflammatory cytokines before entering the kidney where they have the opportunity to expand owing to the presence of costimulatory molecules and activating cytokines. Alternatively, naive T cells could enter the kidney where they become activated after encountering autoantigen and expand locally. As not all individuals with a peripheral autoimmune response to kidney antigens develop glomerulonephritis, the contribution of local kidney factors expressed or produced by kidney cells is probably of crucial importance. Improved understanding of the biochemistry and molecular biology of T cells in patients with glomerulonephritis offers unique opportunities for the recognition of treatment targets for autoimmune kidney disease.

  1. Producer T cells: Using genetically engineered T cells as vehicles to generate and deliver therapeutics to tumors

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Alexander K.; Davila, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adoptive cell transfer (ACT) is an emerging anticancer therapy that has shown promise in various malignancies. Redirecting antigen specificity by genetically engineering T cells to stably express receptors has become an effective variant of ACT. A novel extension of this approach is to utilize engineered T cells to produce and deliver anticancer therapeutics that enhance cytotoxic T cell function and simultaneously inhibit immunosuppressive processes. Here, we review the potential of using T cells as therapeutic-secreting vehicles for immunotherapies and present theoretical and established arguments in support of further development of this unique cell-based immunotherapy. PMID:27467930

  2. Liposomes as immune adjuvants: T cell dependence.

    PubMed

    Beatty, J D; Beatty, B G; Paraskevas, F; Froese, E

    1984-08-01

    The T cell dependence of the immune adjuvant action of liposomes containing the soluble antigens bovine serum albumin (BSA) and chicken immunoglobulin (CIgG) was studied with use of a quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure serum antibody levels. Normal BALB/c mice, adult thymectomized mice, and congenitally athymic (nu+/nu+) mice were intravenously inoculated with liposomes containing BSA (Lip-BSA). The high levels of serum anti-BSA antibody that were seen in the normal group were decreased in the adult thymectomized group and were almost completely abrogated in the nu+/nu+ group. Reconstitution of nu+/nu+ mice with normal thymocytes and cortisone-resistant thymocytes led to a partial restoration of the anti-BSA antibody production after Lip-BSA immunization. Examination of the class of immunoglobulin produced in normal mice, immunized with Lip-BSA, showed an early low IgM response and a sustained higher IgG response that was primarily due to the IgG1 subclass. Trypsin removal of BSA exposed on the liposome surface decreased the resulting serum anti-BSA antibody level by 30% to 50%. Animals could be primed equally with a very low dose (0.2 micrograms) of Lip-BSA or with peritoneal macrophages that had phagocytosed the same dose of Lip-BSA. The adjuvant effect of liposomes containing CIgG on the number and type of specific anti-CIgG antibody-producing cells in the spleen was an early increase in IgM-producing cells followed by a substantially higher increase in IgG-producing cells. These observations suggest that liposome encapsulation of a soluble T-dependent antigen stimulates the helper T cell, not the suppressor T cell population, and that this stimulation involves uptake by macrophages.

  3. [Panniculitic T-cell lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, María; García-Arpa, Mónica; Martín, Francisco; Calle, Carmen; Marchán, Enrique; Romero, Guillermo; Cortina, Pilar

    2005-03-01

    Panniculitic T-cell lymphoma is a rare, aggressive variant of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, with fewer than 100 cases described. The main problem is its diagnosis, as both the clinical and the histological features may simulate benign panniculitis. We present the case of a 34-year-old male patient, who had presented with an indurated plaque, sclerodermiform in appearance, on the front of the right thigh for 4 months, later accompanied by fever and constitutional symptoms. The initial diagnosis was cellulitis, but no clinical improvement was seen despite systemic antibiotic therapy. After two skin biopsies, the patient was diagnosed with panniculitic cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. The patient was treated with 8 cycles of CHOP chemotherapy, with resolution of the symptoms.

  4. Local expression of transgene encoded TNF alpha in islets prevents autoimmune diabetes in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice by preventing the development of auto-reactive islet-specific T cells.

    PubMed

    Grewal, I S; Grewal, K D; Wong, F S; Picarella, D E; Janeway, C A; Flavell, R A

    1996-11-01

    Lately, TNF alpha has been the focus of studies of autoimmunity; its role in the progression of autoimmune diabetes is, however, still unclear. To analyze the effects of TNF alpha in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), we have generated nonobese diabetic (NOD) transgenic mice expressing TNF alpha under the control of the rat insulin II promoter (RIP). In transgenic mice, TNF alpha expression on the islets resulted in massive insulitis, composed of CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, and B cells. Despite infiltration of considerable number of lymphoid cells in islets, expression of TNF alpha protected NOD mice from IDDM. To determine the mechanism of TNF alpha action, splenic cells from control NOD and RIP-TNF alpha mice were adoptively transferred to NOD-SCID recipients. In contrast to the induction of diabetes by splenic cells from control NOD mice, splenic cells from RIP-TNF alpha transgenic mice did not induce diabetes in NOD-SCID recipients. Diabetes was induced however, in the RIP-TNF alpha transgenic mice when CD8+ diabetogenic cloned T cells or splenic cells from diabetic NOD mice were adoptively transferred to these mice. Furthermore, expression of TNF alpha in islets also downregulated splenic cell responses to autoantigens. These data establish a mechanism of TNF alpha action and provide evidence that local expression of TNF alpha protects NOD mice from autoimmune diabetes by preventing the development of autoreactive islet-specific T cells.

  5. Retargeting T cells to GD2 pentasaccharide on human tumors using bispecific humanized antibody

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong; Cheng, Ming; Guo, Hongfen; Chen, Yuedan; Huse, Morgan; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2015-01-01

    Anti-disialoganglioside GD2 IgG antibodies have shown clinical efficacy in solid tumors that lack human leukocyte antigens (e.g. neuroblastoma) by relying on Fc-dependent cytotoxicity. However, there are pain side effects secondary to complement activation. T-cell retargeting bispecific antibodies (BsAb) also have clinical potential, but it is thus far only effective against liquid tumors. In this study, a fully humanized hu3F8-BsAb was developed, in which the anti-CD3 huOKT3 single chain Fv fragment (ScFv) was linked to the carboxyl end of the anti-GD2 hu3F8 IgG1 light chain, and was aglycosylated at N297 of Fc to prevent complement activation and cytokine storm. In vitro, hu3F8-BsAb activated T cells through classic immunological synapses, inducing GD2-specific tumor cytotoxicity at femtomolar EC50 with >105-fold selectivity over normal tissues, releasing Th1 cytokines (TNFα, IFNγ and IL2) when GD2(+) tumors were present. In separate murine neuroblastoma and melanoma xenograft models, intravenous hu3F8-BsAb activated T cells in situ and recruited intravenous T cells for tumor ablation, significantly prolonging survival from local recurrence or from metastatic disease. Hu3F8-BsAb, but not control BsAb, drove T cells and monocytes to infiltrate tumor stroma. These monocytes were necessary for sustained T-cell proliferation and/or survival and contributed significantly to the antitumor effect. The in vitro and in vivo antitumor properties of hu3F8-BsAb and its safety profile support its further clinical development as a cancer therapeutic, and provide the rationale for exploring aglycosylated IgG-scFv as a structural platform for retargeting human T cells. PMID:25542634

  6. A role for CD9 molecules in T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Costimulation mediated by the CD28 molecule plays an important role in optimal activation of T cells. However, CD28-deficient mice can mount effective T cell-dependent immune responses, suggesting the existence of other costimulatory systems. In a search for other costimulatory molecules on T cells, we have developed a monoclonal antibody (mAb) that can costimulate T cells in the absence of antigen-presenting cells (APC). The molecule recognized by this mAb, 9D3, was found to be expressed on almost all mature T cells and to be a protein of approximately 24 kD molecular mass. By expression cloning, this molecule was identified as CD9, 9D3 (anti-CD9) synergized with suboptimal doses of anti-CD3 mAb in inducing proliferation by virgin T cells. Costimulation was induced by independent ligation of CD3 and CD9, suggesting that colocalization of these two molecules is not required for T cell activation. The costimulation by anti-CD9 was as potent as that by anti-CD28. Moreover, anti-CD9 costimulated in a CD28- independent way because anti-CD9 equally costimulated T cells from the CD28-deficient as well as wild-type mice. Thus, these results indicate that CD9 serves as a molecule on T cells that can deliver a potent CD28- independent costimulatory signal. PMID:8760830

  7. Viral inoculum dose impacts memory T-cell inflation.

    PubMed

    Redeker, Anke; Welten, Suzanne P M; Arens, Ramon

    2014-04-01

    Memory T-cell inflation develops during certain persistent viral infections and is characterized by the accumulation and maintenance of large numbers of effector-memory T cells, albeit with varying degrees in size and phenotype among infected hosts. The underlying mechanisms that control memory T-cell inflation are not yet fully understood. Here, we dissected CMV-specific memory T-cell formation and its connection to the initial infectious dose by varying the inoculum size. After low dose inoculum with mouse CMV, the accumulation of inflationary memory T cells was severely hampered and correlated with reduced reservoirs of latent virus in nonhematopoietic cells and diminished antigen-driven T-cell proliferation. Moreover, lowering of the initial viral dose turned the characteristic effector memory-like inflationary T cells into more central memory-like cells as evidenced by the cell-surface phenotype of CD27(high) , CD62L(+) , CD127(+) , and KLRG1(-) , and by improved secondary expansion potential. These data show the impact of the viral inoculum on the degree of memory T-cell inflation and provide a rationale for the observed variation of human CMV-specific T-cell responses in terms of magnitude and phenotype.

  8. TIM3 Mediates T Cell Exhaustion during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, Pushpa; Jacques, Miye K; Zhu, Chen; Steblenko, Katherine M; Stowell, Britni L; Madi, Asaf; Anderson, Ana C; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Behar, Samuel M

    2016-03-01

    While T cell immunity initially limits Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, why T cell immunity fails to sterilize the infection and allows recrudescence is not clear. One hypothesis is that T cell exhaustion impairs immunity and is detrimental to the outcome of M. tuberculosis infection. Here we provide functional evidence for the development T cell exhaustion during chronic TB. Second, we evaluate the role of the inhibitory receptor T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-containing-3 (TIM3) during chronic M. tuberculosis infection. We find that TIM3 expressing T cells accumulate during chronic infection, co-express other inhibitory receptors including PD1, produce less IL-2 and TNF but more IL-10, and are functionally exhausted. Finally, we show that TIM3 blockade restores T cell function and improves bacterial control, particularly in chronically infected susceptible mice. These data show that T cell immunity is suboptimal during chronic M. tuberculosis infection due to T cell exhaustion. Moreover, in chronically infected mice, treatment with anti-TIM3 mAb is an effective therapeutic strategy against tuberculosis.

  9. Human T-cell leukemia-lymphoma virus (HTLV) is in T but not B lymphocytes from a patient with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Gallo, R C; Mann, D; Broder, S; Ruscetti, F W; Maeda, M; Kalyanaraman, V S; Robert-Guroff, M; Reitz, M S

    1982-09-01

    A human type C retrovirus, designated HTLV, previously was isolated from or identified in some patients with leukemias and lymphomas of mature T lymphocytes. HTLV is genetically and serologically distinct from any known animal retroviruses. The absence of HTLV proviral sequences in DNA from normal humans showed that HTLV is not a ubiquitous endogenous (germ-line transmitted) virus of humans. Antibodies to HTLV core proteins have been identified in some people with T-cell neoplasias and are particularly prevalent in Japanese with adult T-cell leukemia, suggesting that HTLV is acquired horizontally. However, it was possible that HTLV is transmitted through the germ line of some (possibly rare) families and is then expressed in the HTLV- positive malignancies. An opportunity to study this question was provided by the development of several T-cell lines and a B-cell provided by the development of several T-cell lines and a B-cell line from one HTLV-positive patient with a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Here we report that HTLV proteins or nucleic acids (or both) are found in three independently derived T-cell lines, all shown by HLA typing to have originated from the patient. In contrast, the B-cell line, the identity of which was also ascertained by HLA typing, contained no detectable HTLV protein, RNA, or proviral DNA. Because the sensitivity of the latter assay is more than sufficient to detect one proviral equivalent per haploid genome, the results indicate that HTLV was not transmitted to this patient through the germ line but rather was acquired by infection.

  10. Intestinal barrier dysfunction develops at the onset of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, and can be induced by adoptive transfer of auto-reactive T cells.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Mehrnaz; Bredberg, Anders; Weström, Björn; Lavasani, Shahram

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system with a pathogenesis involving a dysfunctional blood-brain barrier and myelin-specific, autoreactive T cells. Although the commensal microbiota seems to affect its pathogenesis, regulation of the interactions between luminal antigens and mucosal immune elements remains unclear. Herein, we investigated whether the intestinal mucosal barrier is also targeted in this disease. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the prototypic animal model of MS, was induced either by active immunization or by adoptive transfer of autoreactive T cells isolated from these mice. We show increased intestinal permeability, overexpression of the tight junction protein zonulin and alterations in intestinal morphology (increased crypt depth and thickness of the submucosa and muscularis layers). These intestinal manifestations were seen at 7 days (i.e., preceding the onset of neurological symptoms) and at 14 days (i.e., at the stage of paralysis) after immunization. We also demonstrate an increased infiltration of proinflammatory Th1/Th17 cells and a reduced regulatory T cell number in the gut lamina propria, Peyer's patches and mesenteric lymph nodes. Adoptive transfer to healthy mice of encephalitogenic T cells, isolated from EAE-diseased animals, led to intestinal changes similar to those resulting from the immunization procedure. Our findings show that disruption of intestinal homeostasis is an early and immune-mediated event in EAE. We propose that this intestinal dysfunction may act to support disease progression, and thus represent a potential therapeutic target in MS. In particular, an increased understanding of the regulation of tight junctions at the blood-brain barrier and in the intestinal wall may be crucial for design of future innovative therapies.

  11. Immunopathogenesis In Autism: Regulatory T Cells and Autoimmunity In Neurodevelopment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    exogenous agents, such as environmental pollutants, play a role in causing or triggering dysfunctional development that may culminate in an autism diagnosis...1-0484 TITLE: Immunopathogenesis in Autism : Regulatory T Cells and Autoimmunity in Neurodevelopment PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jamie C...1 July 2010 – 30 June 2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Immunopathogenesis in Autism : 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Regulatory T Cells and Autoimmunity in

  12. ZFAT plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its T cell receptor-mediated response

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, Keiko; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Okamura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Masahiro; Tanaka, Yoko; Mototani, Yasumasa; Goto, Motohito; Ota, Takeharu; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Kuroki, Masahide; Tsunoda, Toshiyuki; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Shirasawa, Senji

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We generated Cd4-Cre-mediated T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zfat-deficiency leads to reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Impaired T cell receptor-mediated response in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decreased expression of IL-7R{alpha}, IL-2R{alpha} and IL-2 in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zfat plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis. -- Abstract: ZFAT, originally identified as a candidate susceptibility gene for autoimmune thyroid disease, has been reported to be involved in apoptosis, development and primitive hematopoiesis. Zfat is highly expressed in T- and B-cells in the lymphoid tissues, however, its physiological function in the immune system remains totally unknown. Here, we generated the T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice and demonstrated that Zfat-deficiency leads to a remarkable reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. Intriguingly, a reduced expression of IL-7R{alpha} and the impaired responsiveness to IL-7 for the survival were observed in the Zfat-deficient T cells. Furthermore, a severe defect in proliferation and increased apoptosis in the Zfat-deficient T cells following T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation was observed with a reduced IL-2R{alpha} expression as well as a reduced IL-2 production. Thus, our findings reveal that Zfat is a critical regulator in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its TCR-mediated response.

  13. T-cell libraries allow simple parallel generation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones.

    PubMed

    Theaker, Sarah M; Rius, Cristina; Greenshields-Watson, Alexander; Lloyd, Angharad; Trimby, Andrew; Fuller, Anna; Miles, John J; Cole, David K; Peakman, Mark; Sewell, Andrew K; Dolton, Garry

    2016-03-01

    Isolation of peptide-specific T-cell clones is highly desirable for determining the role of T-cells in human disease, as well as for the development of therapies and diagnostics. However, generation of monoclonal T-cells with the required specificity is challenging and time-consuming. Here we describe a library-based strategy for the simple parallel detection and isolation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones from CD8(+) or CD4(+) polyclonal T-cell populations. T-cells were first amplified by CD3/CD28 microbeads in a 96U-well library format, prior to screening for desired peptide recognition. T-cells from peptide-reactive wells were then subjected to cytokine-mediated enrichment followed by single-cell cloning, with the entire process from sample to validated clone taking as little as 6 weeks. Overall, T-cell libraries represent an efficient and relatively rapid tool for the generation of peptide-specific T-cell clones, with applications shown here in infectious disease (Epstein-Barr virus, influenza A, and Ebola virus), autoimmunity (type 1 diabetes) and cancer.

  14. Switching CAR T cells on and off: a novel modular platform for retargeting of T cells to AML blasts.

    PubMed

    Cartellieri, M; Feldmann, A; Koristka, S; Arndt, C; Loff, S; Ehninger, A; von Bonin, M; Bejestani, E P; Ehninger, G; Bachmann, M P

    2016-08-12

    The adoptive transfer of CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor engineered T cells (CAR T cells) resulted in encouraging clinical trials in indolent B-cell malignancies. However, they also show the limitations of this fascinating technology: CAR T cells can lead to even life-threatening off-tumor, on-target side effects if CAR T cells crossreact with healthy tissues. Here, we describe a novel modular universal CAR platform technology termed UniCAR that reduces the risk of on-target side effects by a rapid and reversible control of CAR T-cell reactivity. The UniCAR system consists of two components: (1) a CAR for an inert manipulation of T cells and (2) specific targeting modules (TMs) for redirecting UniCAR T cells in an individualized time- and target-dependent manner. UniCAR T cells can be armed against different tumor targets simply by replacement of the respective TM for (1) targeting more than one antigen simultaneously or subsequently to enhance efficacy and (2) reducing the risk for development of antigen-loss tumor variants under treatment. Here we provide 'proof of concept' for retargeting of UniCAR T cells to CD33- and/or CD123-positive acute myeloid leukemia blasts in vitro and in vivo.

  15. T-cell libraries allow simple parallel generation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones

    PubMed Central

    Theaker, Sarah M.; Rius, Cristina; Greenshields-Watson, Alexander; Lloyd, Angharad; Trimby, Andrew; Fuller, Anna; Miles, John J.; Cole, David K.; Peakman, Mark; Sewell, Andrew K.; Dolton, Garry

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of peptide-specific T-cell clones is highly desirable for determining the role of T-cells in human disease, as well as for the development of therapies and diagnostics. However, generation of monoclonal T-cells with the required specificity is challenging and time-consuming. Here we describe a library-based strategy for the simple parallel detection and isolation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones from CD8+ or CD4+ polyclonal T-cell populations. T-cells were first amplified by CD3/CD28 microbeads in a 96U-well library format, prior to screening for desired peptide recognition. T-cells from peptide-reactive wells were then subjected to cytokine-mediated enrichment followed by single-cell cloning, with the entire process from sample to validated clone taking as little as 6 weeks. Overall, T-cell libraries represent an efficient and relatively rapid tool for the generation of peptide-specific T-cell clones, with applications shown here in infectious disease (Epstein–Barr virus, influenza A, and Ebola virus), autoimmunity (type 1 diabetes) and cancer. PMID:26826277

  16. Analysis of T cell responses to the autoantigen in Goodpasture's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Derry, C J; Ross, C N; Lombardi, G; Mason, P D; Rees, A J; Lechler, R I; Pusey, C D

    1995-01-01

    Goodpasture's disease is a rare form of glomerulonephritis characterized by the production of autoantibodies to the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). In order to understand the development of autoimmunity to the GBM, it is important to examine mechanisms underlying T cell responses to the autoantigen. A MoAb P1, with the same specificity as patients' autoantibodies, was used to affinity-purify the antigen from collagenase-digested human GBM. This material was enriched in the NC1 domain of the alpha 3 chain of type IV collagen (alpha 3(IV)NC1), known to be the principal target of anti-GBM antibodies, but also contained lower quantities of alpha 4(IV)NC1. In proliferation assays, T cells from 11/14 patients with Goodpasture's disease showed significant responses (SI > or = 2.0) to affinity-purified human GBM. Peak responses were demonstrated at 7 or 10 days at antigen concentrations of 10-30 micrograms/ml. As in other autoimmune disorders, the presence of autoantigen-reactive T cells was also demonstrated in 5/10 healthy volunteers. Tissue typing revealed that all patients possessed HLA-DR2 and/or -DR4 alleles, while normal individuals whose T cells responded possessed DR2 and/or DR7 alleles. The specificity of the T cell response in Goodpasture's disease was further investigated using monomeric components of human GBM purified by gel filtration and reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Two antigenic monomer pools were obtained, which were shown by amino-terminal sequence analysis to contain alpha 3(IV)NC1 and alpha 4(IV)NC1, respectively. In all patients tested, significant T cell proliferation was observed in response to one or both of these alpha (IV)NC1 domains. These results demonstrate that patients with Goodpasture's disease possess T cells reactive with autoantigens known to be recognized by anti-GBM antibodies. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7743665

  17. Antibody-Independent Function of Human B Cells Contributes to Antifungal T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Rezk, Ayman; Li, Hulun; Gommerman, Jennifer L; Prat, Alexandre; Bar-Or, Amit

    2017-04-15

    Fungal infections (e.g., Candida albicans) can manifest as serious medical illnesses, especially in the elderly and immune-compromised hosts. T cells are important for Candida control. Whether and how B cells are involved in antifungal immunity has been less clear. Although patients with agammaglobulinemia exhibit normal antifungal immunity, increased fungal infections are reported following B cell-depleting therapy, together pointing to Ab-independent roles of B cells in controlling such infections. To test how human B cells may contribute to fungal-associated human T cell responses, we developed a novel Ag-specific human T cell/B cell in vitro coculture system and found that human B cells could induce C. albicans-associated, MHC class II-restricted responses of naive T cells. Activated B cells significantly enhanced C. albicans-mediated Th1 and Th17 T cell responses, which were both strongly induced by CD80/CD86 costimulation. IL-6(+)GM-CSF(+) B cells were the major responding B cell subpopulation to C. albicans and provided efficient costimulatory signals to the T cells. In vivo B cell depletion in humans resulted in reduced C. albicans-associated T responses. Of note, the decreased Th17, but not Th1, responses could be reversed by soluble factors from B cells prior to depletion, in an IL-6-dependent manner. Taken together, our results implicate an Ab-independent cytokine-defined B cell role in human antifungal T cell responses. These findings may be particularly relevant given the prospects of chronic B cell depletion therapy use in lymphoma and autoimmune disease, as patients age and are exposed to serial combination therapies.

  18. Activity of host-derived T cells which differentiate in nude mice grafted with co-isogenic or allogeneic thymuses.

    PubMed

    Kindred, B; Loor, F

    1974-05-01

    If nude mice are grafted with a neonatal thymus, host type precursor cells develop within the graft thymus and after about 6 wk the T-cell population of the thymus, spleen, and lymph nodes is of host type. However, immunological responsiveness produced in nude mice in this manner is incomplete: (a) the ability to react to T-cell mitogens in vitro is greater than in untreated nudes but lower than in normal mice; (b) the response to T-cell dependent antigens is less than normal; and (c) the rejection of skin grafts is slower than in normal animals. Whether host precursor cells which differentiate in an allogeneic thymus are able to reject skin grafts from thymus donor strain appears to depend on the strain combination used.

  19. Concomitant T-cell receptor alpha and delta gene rearrangements in individual T-cell precursors.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, S D; Pelkonen, J; Hurwitz, J L

    1990-01-01

    A debate has recently surfaced concerning the degree of precommitment attained by alpha beta and gamma delta T-cell precursors prior to T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement. It has been suggested that precursors may be precommitted to rearrange either alpha or delta genes, but not both, thus giving rise to alpha beta- and gamma delta-producing T cells, respectively. Alternatively, the precursors may be flexible with regard to potential TCR gene rearrangements. To address this controversy, the gene rearrangements among a group of T-cell hybridomas from fetal, newborn, and early postnatal mouse thymi were examined. Six probes spanning the delta and alpha loci were used in Southern blot analyses to characterize the rearrangements which occurred on homologous chromosomes in each cell. Although homologous chromosomes often rearranged in synchrony within the alpha locus, a number of hybridomas were found which had retained a delta rearrangement on one chromosome and an alpha rearrangement on the second. Results show that a precommitment by T cells to rearrange delta or alpha genes in a mutually exclusive manner is not an absolute feature of mouse thymocyte development. Images PMID:2164690

  20. Substrate rigidity regulates human T cell activation and proliferation.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Roddy S; Hao, Xueli; Shen, Keyue; Bashour, Keenan; Akimova, Tatiana; Hancock, Wayne W; Kam, Lance C; Milone, Michael C

    2012-08-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy using cultured T cells holds promise for the treatment of cancer and infectious disease. Ligands immobilized on surfaces fabricated from hard materials such as polystyrene plastic are commonly employed for T cell culture. The mechanical properties of a culture surface can influence the adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation of stem cells and fibroblasts. We therefore explored the impact of culture substrate stiffness on the ex vivo activation and expansion of human T cells. We describe a simple system for the stimulation of the TCR/CD3 complex and the CD28 receptor using substrates with variable rigidity manufactured from poly(dimethylsiloxane), a biocompatible silicone elastomer. We show that softer (Young's Modulus [E] < 100 kPa) substrates stimulate an average 4-fold greater IL-2 production and ex vivo proliferation of human CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells compared with stiffer substrates (E > 2 MPa). Mixed peripheral blood T cells cultured on the stiffer substrates also demonstrate a trend (nonsignificant) toward a greater proportion of CD62L(neg), effector-differentiated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Naive CD4(+) T cells expanded on softer substrates yield an average 3-fold greater proportion of IFN-γ-producing Th1-like cells. These results reveal that the rigidity of the substrate used to immobilize T cell stimulatory ligands is an important and previously unrecognized parameter influencing T cell activation, proliferation, and Th differentiation. Substrate rigidity should therefore be a consideration in the development of T cell culture systems as well as when interpreting results of T cell activation based upon solid-phase immobilization of TCR/CD3 and CD28 ligands.

  1. Substrate rigidity regulates human T cell activation and proliferation1

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Roddy S.; Hao, Xueli; Shen, Keyue; Bashour, Keenan; Akimova, Tatiana; Hancock, Wayne W.; Kam, Lance; Milone, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy using cultured T cells holds promise for the treatment of cancer and infectious disease. Ligands immobilized on surfaces fabricated from hard materials such as polystyrene plastic are commonly employed for T cell culture. The mechanical properties of a culture surface can influence the adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation of stem cells and fibroblasts. We therefore explored the impact of culture substrate stiffness on the ex vivo activation and expansion of human T cells. We describe a simple system for the stimulation of the TCR/CD3 complex and the CD28 receptor using substrates with variable rigidity manufactured from poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), a biocompatible silicone elastomer. We show that softer (Young’s Modulus [E] < 100 kPa) substrates stimulate an average 4-fold greater IL-2 production and ex vivo proliferation of human CD4+ and CD8+ T cells compared with stiffer substrates (E >2 MPa). Mixed peripheral blood T cells cultured on the stiffer substrates also demonstrate a trend (non-significant) towards a greater proportion of CD62Lneg, effector-differentiated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Naïve CD4+ T cells expanded on softer substrates yield an average 3-fold greater proportion of IFN-γ producing TH1-like cells. These results reveal that the rigidity of the substrate used to immobilize T cell stimulatory ligands is an important and previously unrecognized parameter influencing T cell activation, proliferation and TH differentiation. Substrate rigidity should therefore be a consideration in the development of T cell culture systems as well as when interpreting results of T cell activation based upon solid-phase immobilization of TCR/CD3 and CD28 ligands. PMID:22732590

  2. Fish T cells: recent advances through genomics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laing, Kerry J.; Hansen, John D.

    2011-01-01

    This brief review is intended to provide a concise overview of the current literature concerning T cells, advances in identifying distinct T cell functional subsets, and in distinguishing effector cells from memory cells. We compare and contrast a wealth of recent progress made in T cell immunology of teleost, elasmobranch, and agnathan fish, to knowledge derived from mammalian T cell studies. From genome studies, fish clearly have most components associated with T cell function and we can speculate on the presence of putative T cell subsets, and the ability to detect their differentiation to form memory cells. Some recombinant proteins for T cell associated cytokines and antibodies for T cell surface receptors have been generated that will facilitate studying the functional roles of teleost T cells during immune responses. Although there is still a long way to go, major advances have occurred in recent years for investigating T cell responses, thus phenotypic and functional characterization is on the near horizon.

  3. Efficient adenovirus-mediated gene transfer into primary T cells and thymocytes in a new coxsackie/adenovirus receptor transgenic model

    PubMed Central

    Hurez, Vincent; Dzialo-Hatton, Robin; Oliver, James; Matthews, R James; Weaver, Casey T

    2002-01-01

    Background Gene transfer studies in primary T cells have suffered from the limitations of conventional viral transduction or transfection techniques. Replication-defective adenoviral vectors are an attractive alternative for gene delivery. However, naive lymphocytes are not readily susceptible to infection with adenoviruses due to insufficient expression of the coxsackie/adenovirus receptor. Results To render T cells susceptible to adenoviral gene transfer, we have developed three new murine transgenic lines in which expression of the human coxsackie/adenovirus receptor (hCAR) with a truncated cytoplasmic domain (hCARΔcyt) is limited to thymocytes and lymphocytes under direction of a human CD2 mini-gene. hCARΔcyt.CD2 transgenic mice were crossed with DO11.10 T cell receptor transgenic mice (DO11.hCARΔcyt) to allow developmental studies in a defined, clonal T cell population. Expression of hCARΔcyt enabled adenoviral transduction of resting primary CD4+ T cells, differentiated effector T cells and thymocytes from DO11.hCARΔcyt with high efficiency. Expression of hCARΔcyt transgene did not perturb T cell development in these mice and adenoviral transduction of DO11.hCARΔcyt T cells did not alter their activation status, functional responses or differentiative potential. Adoptive transfer of the transduced T cells into normal recipients did not modify their physiologic localization. Conclusion The DO11.hCARΔcyt transgenic model thus allows efficient gene transfer in primary T cell populations and will be valuable for novel studies of T cell activation and differentiation. PMID:12019030

  4. TCR repertoires of intratumoral T-cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Carsten; Mezzadra, Riccardo; Schumacher, Ton N M

    2014-01-01

    The infiltration of human tumors by T cells is a common phenomenon, and over the past decades, it has become increasingly clear that the nature of such intratumoral T-cell populations can predict disease course. Furthermore, intratumoral T cells have been utilized therapeutically in clinical studies of adoptive T-cell therapy. In this review, we describe how novel methods that are either based on T-cell receptor (TCR) sequencing or on cancer exome analysis allow the analysis of the tumor reactivity and antigen-specificity of the intratumoral TCR repertoire with unprecedented detail. Furthermore, we discuss studies that have started to utilize these techniques to probe the link between cancer exomes and the intratumoral TCR pool. Based on the observation that both the cancer epitope repertoire and intratumoral TCR repertoire appear highly individual, we outline strategies, such as 'autologous TCR gene therapy', that exploit the tumor-resident TCR repertoire for the development of personalized immunotherapy.

  5. Thymic emigration: when and how T cells leave home.

    PubMed

    Weinreich, Michael A; Hogquist, Kristin A

    2008-08-15

    The thymus supports the differentiation of multiple distinct T cell subsets that play unique roles in the immune system. CD4 and CD8 alpha/beta T cells, gamma/delta T cells, NKT cells, regulatory T cells, and intraepithelial lymphocytes all develop in the thymus and must leave it to provide their functions elsewhere in the body. This article will review recent research indicating differences in the time and migration patterns of T cell subsets found in the thymus. Additionally, we review current understanding of the molecules involved in thymocyte emigration, including the sphingolipid receptor S1P(1) and its regulation by the Krüppel-like transcription factor KLF2.

  6. Strategies to genetically engineer T cells for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Spear, Timothy T; Nagato, Kaoru; Nishimura, Michael I

    2016-06-01

    Immunotherapy is one of the most promising and innovative approaches to treat cancer, viral infections, and other immune-modulated diseases. Adoptive immunotherapy using gene-modified T cells is an exciting and rapidly evolving field. Exploiting knowledge of basic T cell biology and immune cell receptor function has fostered innovative approaches to modify immune cell function. Highly translatable clinical technologies have been developed to redirect T cell specificity by introducing designed receptors. The ability to engineer T cells to manifest desired phenotypes and functions is now a thrilling reality. In this review, we focus on outlining different varieties of genetically engineered T cells, their respective advantages and disadvantages as tools for immunotherapy, and their promise and drawbacks in the clinic.

  7. Role of Memory T Cells in Allograft Rejection and Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Benichou, Gilles; Gonzalez, Bruno; Marino, Jose; Ayasoufi, Katayoun; Valujskikh, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Memory T cells are characterized by their low activation threshold, robust effector functions, and resistance to conventional immunosuppression and costimulation blockade. Unlike their naïve counterparts, memory T cells reside in and recirculate through peripheral non-lymphoid tissues. Alloreactive memory T cells are subdivided into different categories based on their origins, phenotypes, and functions. Recipients whose immune systems have been directly exposed to allogeneic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules display high affinity alloreactive memory T cells. In the absence of any prior exposure to allogeneic MHC molecules, endogenous alloreactive memory T cells are regularly generated through microbial infections (heterologous immunity). Regardless of their origin, alloreactive memory T cells represent an essential element of the allograft rejection process and a major barrier to tolerance induction in clinical transplantation. This article describes the different subsets of alloreactive memory T cells involved in transplant rejection and examine their generation, functional properties, and mechanisms of action. In addition, we discuss strategies developed to target deleterious allospecific memory T cells in experimental animal models and clinical settings. PMID:28293238

  8. T cell responses in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Diani, Marco; Altomare, Gianfranco; Reali, Eva

    2015-04-01

    According to the current view the histological features of psoriasis arise as a consequence of the interplay between T cells, dendritic cells and keratinocytes giving rise to a self-perpetuating loop that amplifies and sustains inflammation in lesional skin. In particular, myeloid dendritic cell secretion of IL-23 and IL-12 activates IL-17-producing T cells, Th22 and Th1 cells, leading to the production of inflammatory cytokines such as IL-17, IFN-γ, TNF and IL-22. These cytokines mediate effects on keratinocytes thus establishing the inflammatory loop. Unlike psoriasis the immunopathogenic features of psoriatic arthritis are poorly characterized and there is a gap in the knowledge of the pathogenic link between inflammatory T cell responses arising in the skin and the development of joint inflammation. Here we review the knowledge accumulated over the years from the early evidence of autoreactive CD8 T cells that was studied mainly in the years 1990s and 2000s to the recent findings of the role of Th17, Tc17 cells and γδ T cells in psoriatic disease pathogenesis. The review will also focus on common and distinguishing features of T cell responses in psoriatic plaques and in synovial fluid of patients with psoriatic arthritis. The integration of this information could help to distinguish the role played by T cells in the initiation phase of the disease from the role of T cells as downstream effectors sustaining inflammation in psoriatic plaques and potentially leading to disease manifestation in distant joints.

  9. Lymph node topology dictates T cell migration behavior

    PubMed Central

    Beltman, Joost B.; Marée, Athanasius F.M.; Lynch, Jennifer N.; Miller, Mark J.; de Boer, Rob J.

    2007-01-01

    Adaptive immunity is initiated by T cell recognition of foreign peptides presented on dendritic cells (DCs) by major histocompatibility molecules. These interactions take place in secondary lymphoid tissues, such as lymph nodes (LNs) and spleen, and hence the anatomical structure of these tissues plays a crucial role in the development of immune responses. Two-photon microscopy (2PM) imaging in LNs suggests that T cells walk in a consistent direction for several minutes, pause briefly with a regular period, and then take off in a new, random direction. Here, we construct a spatially explicit model of T cell and DC migration in LNs and show that all dynamical properties of T cells could be a consequence of the densely packed LN environment. By means of 2PM experiments, we confirm that the large velocity fluctuations of T cells are indeed environmentally determined rather than resulting from an intrinsic motility program. Our simulations further predict that T cells self-organize into microscopically small, highly dynamic streams. We present experimental evidence for the presence of such turbulent streams in LNs. Finally, the model allows us to estimate the scanning rates of DCs (2,000 different T cells per hour) and T cells (100 different DCs per hour). PMID:17389236

  10. Lymph node topology dictates T cell migration behavior.

    PubMed

    Beltman, Joost B; Marée, Athanasius F M; Lynch, Jennifer N; Miller, Mark J; de Boer, Rob J

    2007-04-16

    Adaptive immunity is initiated by T cell recognition of foreign peptides presented on dendritic cells (DCs) by major histocompatibility molecules. These interactions take place in secondary lymphoid tissues, such as lymph nodes (LNs) and spleen, and hence the anatomical structure of these tissues plays a crucial role in the development of immune responses. Two-photon microscopy (2PM) imaging in LNs suggests that T cells walk in a consistent direction for several minutes, pause briefly with a regular period, and then take off in a new, random direction. Here, we construct a spatially explicit model of T cell and DC migration in LNs and show that all dynamical properties of T cells could be a consequence of the densely packed LN environment. By means of 2PM experiments, we confirm that the large velocity fluctuations of T cells are indeed environmentally determined rather than resulting from an intrinsic motility program. Our simulations further predict that T cells self-organize into microscopically small, highly dynamic streams. We present experimental evidence for the presence of such turbulent streams in LNs. Finally, the model allows us to estimate the scanning rates of DCs (2,000 different T cells per hour) and T cells (100 different DCs per hour).

  11. In Vitro Generation of Antigen-Specific T Cells from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells of Antigen-Specific T Cell Origin.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Shin

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells derived from T lymphocyte (T-iPS cells) preserve the T cell receptor (TCR) α and β gene rearrangements identical to the original T cell clone. Re-differentiated CD8 single positive αβ T cells from the T-iPS cells exhibited antigen-specific cytotoxicity, improved proliferative response, and elongation of telomere indicating rejuvenation of antigen specific T cell immunity in vitro. To regenerate antigen specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), first, we have optimized a method for reprogramming-resistant CD8 T cell clones into T-iPS cells by using sendaiviral vectors. Second, we have optimized stepwise differentiation methods for inducing hematopoietic progenitor cells, T cell progenitors, and functionally matured CD8 single positive CTL. These protocols provide useful in vitro tools and models both for research of antigen-specific T cell immunotherapy and for research of normal and pathological thymopoiesis.

  12. T cell recognition of beryllium.

    PubMed

    Dai, Shaodong; Falta, Michael T; Bowerman, Natalie A; McKee, Amy S; Fontenot, Andrew P

    2013-12-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a granulomatous lung disorder caused by a hypersensitivity to beryllium and characterized by the accumulation of beryllium-specific CD4(+) T cells in the lung. Genetic susceptibility to beryllium-induced disease is strongly associated with HLA-DP alleles possessing a glutamic acid at the 69th position of the β-chain (βGlu69). The structure of HLA-DP2, the most prevalent βGlu69-containing molecule, revealed a unique solvent-exposed acidic pocket that includes βGlu69 and represents the putative beryllium-binding site. The delineation of mimotopes and endogenous self-peptides that complete the αβTCR ligand for beryllium-specific CD4(+) T cells suggests a unique role of these peptides in metal ion coordination and the generation of altered self-peptides, blurring the distinction between hypersensitivity and autoimmunity.

  13. Definition of Human Epitopes Recognized in Tetanus Toxoid and Development of an Assay Strategy to Detect Ex Vivo Tetanus CD4+ T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Antunes, Ricardo; Paul, Sinu; Sidney, John; Weiskopf, Daniela; Dan, Jennifer M.; Phillips, Elizabeth; Mallal, Simon; Crotty, Shane; Sette, Alessandro; Lindestam Arlehamn, Cecilia S.

    2017-01-01

    Despite widespread uses of tetanus toxoid (TT) as a vaccine, model antigen and protein carrier, TT epitopes have been poorly characterized. Herein we defined the human CD4+ T cell epitope repertoire by reevaluation of previously described epitopes and evaluation of those derived from prediction of HLA Class II binding. Forty-seven epitopes were identified following in vitro TT stimulation, with 28 epitopes accounting for 90% of the total response. Despite this diverse range of epitopes, individual responses were associated with only a few immunodominant epitopes, with each donor responding on average to 3 epitopes. For the top 14 epitopes, HLA restriction could be inferred based on HLA typing of the responding donors. HLA binding predictions re-identified the vast majority of known epitopes, and identified 24 additional novel epitopes. With these epitopes, we created a TT epitope pool, which allowed us to characterize TT responses directly ex vivo using a cytokine-independent Activation Induced Marker (AIM) assay. These TT responses were highly Th1 or Th2 polarized, which was dependent upon the original priming vaccine, either the cellular DTwP or acellular DTaP formulation. This polarization remained despite the original priming having occurred decades past and a recent booster immunization with a reduced acellular vaccine formulation. While TT responses following booster vaccination were not durably increased in magnitude, they were associated with a relative expansion of CD4+ effector memory T cells. PMID:28081174

  14. ZEB2 drives immature T-cell lymphoblastic leukaemia development via enhanced tumour-initiating potential and IL-7 receptor signalling.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Steven; Radaelli, Enrico; Blanchet, Odile; Durinck, Kaat; Van der Meulen, Joni; Peirs, Sofie; Taghon, Tom; Tremblay, Cedric S; Costa, Magdaline; Farhang Ghahremani, Morvarid; De Medts, Jelle; Bartunkova, Sonia; Haigh, Katharina; Schwab, Claire; Farla, Natalie; Pieters, Tim; Matthijssens, Filip; Van Roy, Nadine; Best, J Adam; Deswarte, Kim; Bogaert, Pieter; Carmichael, Catherine; Rickard, Adam; Suryani, Santi; Bracken, Lauryn S; Alserihi, Raed; Canté-Barrett, Kirsten; Haenebalcke, Lieven; Clappier, Emmanuelle; Rondou, Pieter; Slowicka, Karolina; Huylebroeck, Danny; Goldrath, Ananda W; Janzen, Viktor; McCormack, Matthew P; Lock, Richard B; Curtis, David J; Harrison, Christine; Berx, Geert; Speleman, Frank; Meijerink, Jules P P; Soulier, Jean; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Haigh, Jody J

    2015-01-07

    Early T-cell precursor leukaemia (ETP-ALL) is a high-risk subtype of human leukaemia that is poorly understood at the molecular level. Here we report translocations targeting the zinc finger E-box-binding transcription factor ZEB2 as a recurrent genetic lesion in immature/ETP-ALL. Using a conditional gain-of-function mouse model, we demonstrate that sustained Zeb2 expression initiates T-cell leukaemia. Moreover, Zeb2-driven mouse leukaemia exhibit some features of the human immature/ETP-ALL gene expression signature, as well as an enhanced leukaemia-initiation potential and activated Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) signalling through transcriptional activation of IL7R. This study reveals ZEB2 as an oncogene in the biology of immature/ETP-ALL and paves the way towards pre-clinical studies of novel compounds for the treatment of this aggressive subtype of human T-ALL using our Zeb2-driven mouse model.

  15. The general transcription factor TAF7 is essential for embryonic development but not essential for the survival or differentiation of mature T cells.

    PubMed

    Gegonne, Anne; Tai, Xuguang; Zhang, Jinghui; Wu, Gang; Zhu, Jianjian; Yoshimoto, Aki; Hanson, Jeffrey; Cultraro, Constance; Chen, Qing-Rong; Guinter, Terry; Yang, Zhihui; Hathcock, Karen; Singer, Alfred; Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime; Tessarollo, Lino; Mackem, Susan; Meerzaman, Daoud; Buetow, Ken; Singer, Dinah S

    2012-05-01

    TAF7, a component of the TFIID complex that nucleates the assembly of transcription preinitiation complexes, also independently interacts with and regulates the enzymatic activities of other transcription factors, including P-TEFb, TFIIH, and CIITA, ensuring an orderly progression in transcription initiation. Since not all TAFs are required in terminally differentiated cells, we examined the essentiality of TAF7 in cells at different developmental stages in vivo. Germ line disruption of the TAF7 gene is embryonic lethal between 3.5 and 5.5 days postcoitus. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts with TAF7 deleted cease transcription globally and stop proliferating. In contrast, whereas TAF7 is essential for the differentiation and proliferation of immature thymocytes, it is not required for subsequent, proliferation-independent differentiation of lineage committed thymocytes or for their egress into the periphery. TAF7 deletion in peripheral CD4 T cells affects only a small number of transcripts. However, T cells with TAF7 deleted are not able to undergo activation and expansion in response to antigenic stimuli. These findings suggest that TAF7 is essential for proliferation but not for proliferation-independent differentiation.

  16. Signal peptides and trans-membrane regions are broadly immunogenic and have high CD8+ T cell epitope densities: Implications for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Kovjazin, Riva; Volovitz, Ilan; Daon, Yair; Vider-Shalit, Tal; Azran, Roy; Tsaban, Lea; Carmon, Lior; Louzoun, Yoram

    2011-04-01

    Cell mediated immune response has a major role in controlling the elimination of infectious agents. The rational design of sub-unit peptide vaccines against intracellular pathogens or cancer requires the use of antigenic sequence/s that can induce highly potent, long lasting and antigen-specific responses in the majority of the population. A promising peptide selection strategy is the detection of multi-epitope peptide sequences with an ability to bind multiple MHC alleles. While past research sought the best epitopes based on their specific antigenicity, we ask whether specific defined domains have high epitope densities. Signal peptides and trans-membrane domains were found to have exceptionally high epitope densities. The improved MHC binding of these domains relies on their hydrophobic nature and, in signal peptides, also on their specific sequence. The high epitope density of SP was computed using in-silico methods and corroborated by the high percentage of identified SP epitope in the IEDB (immune epitope database). The enhanced immunogenicity of SP was then experimentally confirmed using a panel of nine peptides derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb) proteins used in human PBMC proliferation assays and T cell lines functional assays. Our results show the exceptionally high antigen specific response rates and population coverage to SP sequences compared with non-SP peptide antigens derived from the same proteins. The results suggest a novel scheme for the rational design of T cell vaccines using a domain based rather than an epitope based approach.

  17. Normal development of the female reproductive system

    EPA Science Inventory

    The embryonic development of the female reproductive system involves a progression of events that is conserved across vertebrate species. The early gonad progresses from a form that is undifferentiated in both genotypic males and females. Rudimentary male (Wolffian) and female (M...

  18. Adoptive T-cell Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gottschalk, Stephen; Rooney, Cliona

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with a range of malignancies involving B-cells, T-cells, natural killer (NK)-cells, epithelial cells and smooth muscle. All of these are associated with the latent life cycles of EBV, but the pattern of latency-associated viral antigens expressed in tumor cells depends on the type of tumor. EBV-specific T cells (EBVSTs) have been explored as prophylaxis and therapy for EBV-associated malignancies for more than two decades. EBVSTs have been most successful as prophylaxis and therapy for post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD), which expresses the full array of latent EBV antigens (type 3 latency), in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. While less effective, clinical studies have also demonstrated their therapeutic potential for PTLD post solid organ transplant, and for EBV-associated malignancies such as Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, and nasopharyngeal carcinoma that express a limited array of latent EBV antigens (type 2 latency),. Several approaches are actively being pursued to improve the antitumor activity of EBVSTs including activation and expansion of T cells specific for the EBV antigens expressed in type 2 latency, genetic approaches to render EBVSTs resistant to the immunosuppressive tumor environment and combination approaches with other immune-modulating modalities. Given the recent advances and renewed interest in cell therapy, we hope that EBVSTs will become an integral part of our treatment armamentarium against EBV-positive malignancies in the near future. PMID:26428384

  19. Expression pattern of notch1, 2 and 3 and Jagged1 and 2 in lymphoid and stromal thymus components: distinct ligand-receptor interactions in intrathymic T cell development.

    PubMed

    Felli, M P; Maroder, M; Mitsiadis, T A; Campese, A F; Bellavia, D; Vacca, A; Mann, R S; Frati, L; Lendahl, U; Gulino, A; Screpanti, I

    1999-07-01

    The suggested role of Notch1 or its mutants in thymocyte differentiation and T cell tumorigenesis raises the question of how the different members of the Notch family influence distinct steps in T cell development and the role played by Notch ligands in the thymus. We report here that different Notch receptor-ligand partnerships may occur inside the thymus, as we observed differential expression of Notch1, 2 and 3 receptors, their ligands Jagged1 and 2, and downstream intracellular effectors hairy and Enhancer of Split homolog 1 (HES-1) and hairy and Enhancer of Split homolog 5 (HES-5), depending on ontogenetic stage and thymic cell populations. Indeed, while Jagged2 is expressed in both stromal cells and thymocytes, Jagged1 expression is restricted to stromal cells. Moreover, a differential distribution of Notch3, with respect to Notch1, was observed in distinct age-related thymocyte subsets. Finally, Notch3 was preferentially up-regulated in thymocytes, following the induction of their differentiation by interaction with thymic epithelial cells expressing the cognate Jagged1 and 2 ligands, suggesting that, besides Notch1, Notch3 may also be involved in distinct steps of thymocyte development. Our results suggest that the Notch signaling pathway is involved in a complex interplay of T cell developmental stages, as a consequence of the heterogeneity and specific expression of members of the Notch receptor family and their cognate ligands, in distinct thymic cell compartments.

  20. Retinoic Acid as a Modulator of T Cell Immunity.

    PubMed

    Bono, Maria Rosa; Tejon, Gabriela; Flores-Santibañez, Felipe; Fernandez, Dominique; Rosemblatt, Mario; Sauma, Daniela

    2016-06-13

    Vitamin A, a generic designation for an array of organic molecules that includes retinal, retinol and retinoic acid, is an essential nutrient needed in a wide array of aspects including the proper functioning of the visual system, maintenance of cell function and differentiation, epithelial surface integrity, erythrocyte production, reproduction, and normal immune function. Vitamin A deficiency is one of the most common micronutrient deficiencies worldwide and is associated with defects in adaptive immunity. Reports from epidemiological studies, clinical trials and experimental studies have clearly demonstrated that vitamin A plays a central role in immunity and that its deficiency is the cause of broad immune alterations including decreased humoral and cellular responses, inadequate immune regulation, weak response to vaccines and poor lymphoid organ development. In this review, we will examine the role of vitamin A in immunity and focus on several aspects of T cell biology such as T helper cell differentiation, function and homing, as well as lymphoid organ development. Further, we will provide an overview of the effects of vitamin A deficiency in the adaptive immune responses and how retinoic acid, through its effect on T cells can fine-tune the balance between tolerance and immunity.

  1. Retinoic Acid as a Modulator of T Cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Bono, Maria Rosa; Tejon, Gabriela; Flores-Santibañez, Felipe; Fernandez, Dominique; Rosemblatt, Mario; Sauma, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin A, a generic designation for an array of organic molecules that includes retinal, retinol and retinoic acid, is an essential nutrient needed in a wide array of aspects including the proper functioning of the visual system, maintenance of cell function and differentiation, epithelial surface integrity, erythrocyte production, reproduction, and normal immune function. Vitamin A deficiency is one of the most common micronutrient deficiencies worldwide and is associated with defects in adaptive immunity. Reports from epidemiological studies, clinical trials and experimental studies have clearly demonstrated that vitamin A plays a central role in immunity and that its deficiency is the cause of broad immune alterations including decreased humoral and cellular responses, inadequate immune regulation, weak response to vaccines and poor lymphoid organ development. In this review, we will examine the role of vitamin A in immunity and focus on several aspects of T cell biology such as T helper cell differentiation, function and homing, as well as lymphoid organ development. Further, we will provide an overview of the effects of vitamin A deficiency in the adaptive immune responses and how retinoic acid, through its effect on T cells can fine-tune the balance between tolerance and immunity. PMID:27304965

  2. Reduced surface expression of transforming growth factor beta receptor type II in mitogen-activated T cells from Sézary patients.

    PubMed Central

    Capocasale, R J; Lamb, R J; Vonderheid, E C; Fox, F E; Rook, A H; Nowell, P C; Moore, J S

    1995-01-01

    Sézary syndrome (SzS), the leukemic form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, is characterized by clonal proliferation of CD4+ T cells and immune dysfunctions, raising the possibility of cytokine-related abnormalities. We previously described a decreased response to the growth-inhibitory effects of transforming growth factor type beta (TGF-beta) in SzS T cells accompanied by apparent loss of surface type II TGF-beta receptor (TGF beta RII). To specifically determine if defects exist in TGF beta RII protein expression and/or transport in SzS patients, we developed a sensitive flow cytome