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Sample records for normal t-cell development

  1. Normal Development and Function of T Cells in Proline Rich 7 (Prr7) Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hrdinka, Matous; Sudan, Kritika; Just, Sissy; Drobek, Ales; Stepanek, Ondrej; Schlüter, Dirk; Reinhold, Dirk; Jordan, Bryen A.; Gintschel, Patricia; Schraven, Burkhart; Kreutz, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Transmembrane adaptor proteins (TRAPs) are important organisers for the transduction of immunoreceptor-mediated signals. Prr7 is a TRAP that regulates T cell receptor (TCR) signalling and potently induces cell death when overexpressed in human Jurkat T cells. Whether endogenous Prr7 has a similar functional role is currently unknown. To address this issue, we analysed the development and function of the immune system in Prr7 knockout mice. We found that loss of Prr7 partially impairs development of single positive CD4+ T cells in the thymus but has no effect on the development of other T cell subpopulations, B cells, NK cells, or NKT cells. Moreover, Prr7 does not affect the TCR signalling pathway as T cells derived from Prr7 knockout and wild-type animals and stimulated in vitro express the same levels of the activation marker CD69, and retain their ability to proliferate and activate induced cell death programs. Importantly, Prr7 knockout mice retained the capacity to mount a protective immune response when challenged with Listeria monocytogenes infection in vivo. In addition, T cell effector functions (activation, migration, and reactivation) were normal following induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in Prr7 knockout mice. Collectively, our work shows that loss of Prr7 does not result in a major immune system phenotype and suggests that Prr7 has a dispensable function for TCR signalling. PMID:27657535

  2. T Cells Development Is Different between Thymus from Normal and Intrauterine Growth Restricted Pig Fetus at Different Gestational Stage.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan; Wang, Junjun; Wang, Xiaoqiu; Wu, Weizong; Lai, Changhua

    2013-03-01

    This experiment was conducted to evaluate the development of T cells in intrauterine growth retarded (IUGR) piglets at different gestational stages, and tentatively explore the relationship between T cells development and the Notch signaling pathway. A total of 18 crossbred (Landrace×Large white) primiparous sows were mated at similar weights and estruses and euthanized at d 60, 90 and 110 of gestation with six replicates for each time point. One IUGR and one normal fetus were picked from each litter. The T-cell subsets, mRNA expression of Delta-like1, Delta-like4, Jagged1, and Notch2 genes in the thymus were investigated. Compared to normal piglets, CD3(+)CD4(-)CD8(+) cells in IUGR fetuses at d 90 was 0.13% lower (p<0.05). At d 110 of gestation CD8(+) T cells in IUGR fetuses was 0.19% lower (p<0.05). The percentage of CD8(+) T cells was 3.14% lower (p<0.05) of the total T cells in IUGR pigs at d 60. The abundance of Notch2 and Delta-like4 mRNA at d 110 was 20.93% higher and 0.77% (p<0.05) lower, and Delta-like1 mRNA at d 90 was 0.19% (p<0.05) higher compared to normal pigs. These results suggested that normal fetuses had a greater proportion of T-cell subsets at earlier gestation periods, and the Notch signaling pathway was likely partially responsible for these differences to some degree.

  3. Elevated mitochondrial superoxide disrupts normal T-cell development to impair adaptive immune responses to an influenza challenge

    PubMed Central

    Case, Adam J.; McGill, Jodi L.; Tygrett, Lorraine T.; Shirasawa, Takuji; Spitz, Douglas R.; Waldschmidt, Thomas J.; Legge, Kevin L.; Domann, Frederick E.

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are critical in a broad spectrum of cellular processes including signaling, tumor progression, and innate immunity. The essential nature of ROS signaling in the immune systems of Drosophila and zebrafish has been demonstrated; however, the role of ROS, if any, in mammalian adaptive immune system development and function remains unknown. The current work provides the first clear demonstration that thymus specific elevation of mitochondrial superoxide (O2·−) disrupts normal T-cell development to impair function of the mammalian adaptive immune system. To assess the effect of elevated mitochondrial superoxide in the developing thymus, we used a T-cell specific knockout of manganese superoxide dismutase (i.e. SOD2) and have thus established a murine model to examine the role of mitochondrial superoxide in T-cell development. Conditional loss of SOD2 led to increased superoxide, apoptosis, and developmental defects in the T-cell population resulting in immunodeficiency and susceptibility to influenza A virus (IAV), H1N1. This phenotype was rescued with mitochondrially targeted superoxide scavenging drugs. These new findings demonstrate that loss of regulated levels of mitochondrial superoxide lead to aberrant T-cell development and function, and further suggest that manipulations of mitochondrial superoxide levels may significantly alter clinical outcomes resulting from viral infection. PMID:21130157

  4. Rapid copper acquisition by developing murine mesothelioma: decreasing bioavailable copper slows tumor growth, normalizes vessels and promotes T cell infiltration.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Andrew; Jackaman, Connie; Beddoes, Katie M; Ricciardo, Belinda; Nelson, Delia J

    2013-01-01

    Copper, an essential trace element acquired through nutrition, is an important co-factor for pro-angiogenic factors including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Decreasing bioavailable copper has been used as an anti-angiogenic and anti-cancer strategy with promising results. However, the role of copper and its potential as a therapy in mesothelioma is not yet well understood. Therefore, we monitored copper levels in progressing murine mesothelioma tumors and analyzed the effects of lowering bioavailable copper. Copper levels in tumors and organs were assayed using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Mesothelioma tumors rapidly sequestered copper at early stages of development, the copper was then dispersed throughout growing tumor tissues. These data imply that copper uptake may play an important role in early tumor development. Lowering bioavailable copper using the copper chelators, penicillamine, trientine or tetrathiomolybdate, slowed in vivo mesothelioma growth but did not provide any cures similar to using cisplatin chemotherapy or anti-VEGF receptor antibody therapy. The impact of copper lowering on tumor blood vessels and tumor infiltrating T cells was measured using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Copper lowering was associated with reduced tumor vessel diameter, reduced endothelial cell proliferation (reduced Ki67 expression) and lower surface ICAM/CD54 expression implying reduced endothelial cell activation, in a process similar to endothelial normalization. Copper lowering was also associated with a CD4(+) T cell infiltrate. In conclusion, these data suggest copper lowering is a potentially useful anti-mesothelioma treatment strategy that slows tumor growth to provide a window of opportunity for inclusion of other treatment modalities to improve patient outcomes.

  5. Linked T Cell Receptor and Cytokine Signaling Govern the Development of the Regulatory T cell Repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Burchill, Matthew A.; Yang, Jianying; Vang, Kieng B.; Moon, James J.; Chu, H. Hamlet; Lio, Chan-Wang J.; Vegoe, Amanda L.; Hsieh, Chyi-Song; Jenkins, Marc K.; Farrar, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Appropriate development of regulatory T cells (Tregs) is necessary to prevent autoimmunity. Neonatal mice, unlike adults, lack factors required for Treg development. It is unclear what these missing factors are. However, signals emanating from the TCR, CD28 and γc-dependent cytokine receptors are required for Treg development. Herein we demonstrate that expression of a constitutively-active STAT5b transgene (STAT5b-CA) allows for Treg development in neonatal mice and restores Treg numbers in CD28−/− mice. Sequence analysis of TCR genes in STAT5b-CA Tregs indicates that ectopic STAT5 activation results in a TCR repertoire that more closely resembles that of naïve T cells. Using MHCII tetramers to identify antigen-specific T cells, we demonstrate that STAT5 signals divert thymocytes normally destined to become naïve T cells into the Treg lineage. Our data support a two-step model of Treg differentiation in which TCR/CD28 signals induce cytokine responsiveness; STAT5-inducing cytokines then complete the program of Treg differentiation. PMID:18199418

  6. MmuPV1 infection and tumor development of T cell-deficient mice is prevented by passively transferred hyperimmune sera from normal congenic mice immunized with MmuPV1 virus-like particles (VLPs).

    PubMed

    Joh, Joongho; Ghim, Shin-je; Chilton, Paula M; Sundberg, John P; Park, Jino; Wilcher, Sarah A; Proctor, Mary L; Bennett Jenson, A

    2016-02-01

    Infection by mouse papillomavirus (PV), MmuPV1, of T cell-deficient, B6.Cg-Foxn1(nu)/J nude mice revealed that four, distinct squamous papilloma phenotypes developed simultaneously after infection of experimental mice. Papillomas appeared on the muzzle, vagina, and tail at or about day 42days post-inoculation. The dorsal skin developed papillomas and hair follicle tumors (trichoblastomas) as early as 26days after infection. Passive transfer of hyperimmune sera from normal congenic mice immunized with MmuPV1 virus-like particles (VLPs) to T cell-deficient strains of mice prevented infection by virions of experimental mice. This study provides further evidence that T cell deficiency is critical for tumor formation by MmuPV1 infection. PMID:26778691

  7. Encephalitogenic potential of myelin basic protein-specific T cells isolated from normal rhesus macaques.

    PubMed Central

    MeinL, E.; Hoch, R. M.; Dornmair, K.; de Waal Malefyt, R.; Bontrop, R. E.; Jonker, M.; Lassmann, H.; Hohlfeld, R.; Wekerle, H.; 't Hart, B. A.

    1997-01-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP)-specific T cells are implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis and are targets of selective immunotherapies. However, autoantigen-specific T cells can also be isolated from healthy individuals. Their functional potential is unknown and obviously cannot be tested in humans. We approached this question in a closely related primate species, the rhesus monkey. CD4+ T cell lines specific for MBP were isolated from normal rhesus monkeys using the same primary limiting dilution technique that is now widely used to generate human autoreactive T cell clones in vitro. Three different epitopes were recognized by three rhesus T cell lines isolated from three different monkeys. Upon activation, all lines produced interferon-gamma, interleukin-2, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor but neither interleukin-4 nor transforming growth factor-beta. The MBP-specific T cells were injected intravenously without adjuvant into the nonirradiated autologous monkey. One of the three rhesus monkeys developed an encephalomyelitis with a pleocytosis in the spinal fluid and perivascular infiltrates in the leptomeninges, spinal nerve roots and cerebral cortex. The data demonstrate that the normal immune repertoire of a primate species contains MBP-specific CD4+ T cells that are able to induce an autoimmune encephalomyelitis upon transfer into the nonirradiated autologous recipient. Images Figure 3 PMID:9033260

  8. A role for Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Beta in T cell development

    PubMed Central

    Mothe-Satney, Isabelle; Murdaca, Joseph; Sibille, Brigitte; Rousseau, Anne-Sophie; Squillace, Raphaëlle; Le Menn, Gwenaëlle; Rekima, Akila; Larbret, Frederic; Pelé, Juline; Verhasselt, Valérie; Grimaldi, Paul A.; Neels, Jaap G.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolism plays an important role in T cell biology and changes in metabolism drive T cell differentiation and fate. Most research on the role of metabolism in T lymphocytes focuses on mature T cells while only few studies have investigated the role of metabolism in T cell development. In this study, we report that activation or overexpression of the transcription factor Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor β (PPARβ) increases fatty acid oxidation in T cells. Furthermore, using both in vivo and in vitro models, we demonstrate that PPARβ activation/overexpression inhibits thymic T cell development by decreasing proliferation of CD4−CD8− double-negative stage 4 (DN4) thymocytes. These results support a model where PPARβ activation/overexpression favours fatty acid- instead of glucose-oxidation in developing T cells, thereby hampering the proliferative burst normally occurring at the DN4 stage of T cell development. As a consequence, the αβ T cells that are derived from DN4 thymocytes are dramatically decreased in peripheral lymphoid tissues, while the γδ T cell population remains untouched. This is the first report of a direct role for a member of the PPAR family of nuclear receptors in the development of T cells. PMID:27680392

  9. T cell development in B cell-deficient mice. V. Stopping anti-mu treatment results in Igh-restricted expansion of the T suppressor cell repertoire concomitant with the development of normal immunoglobulin levels

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    B cell-deficient (anti-mu-treated) mice have proven to be a valuable tool with which to examine the influence of Ig idiotypic determinants upon the development of the Ts repertoire. We have previously reported that ABA-specific Ts repertoires matured in normal and Ig-deficient environments differ from one another in their composition, and consequently, their functionally expressed Igh restrictions. The present report characterizes the impact of natural development of mature B cell activity upon the composition of the Ts repertoire. After stopping anti-mu treatment of C.AL-20 mice, ABA-specific Ts repertoires undergo a defined expansion shown by their acquisition of an additional Ts network that displays Igh restrictions characteristic of normal C.AL- 20 mice. This Igh-1d-restricted repertoire can be readily shown within 2 wk of major increases in surface Ig spleen cells and total serum Ig levels in these mice. At the same time, the original Ts restriction specificity (Igh-1a-restricted) generated in the Ig-deficient environment of anti-mu. C.AL-20 mice, is not lost for at least 20 wk. The resulting dual Ts repertoire, characterized by expression of parallel, idiotypically restricted Ts networks, is demonstrable for at least 13 wk. These findings favor an important role for Ig determinants in determining the makeup of the T cell repertoire, and ultimately, the composition of immunologic networks as a whole. PMID:2941514

  10. Human skin cells support thymus-independent T cell development.

    PubMed

    Clark, Rachael A; Yamanaka, Kei-ichi; Bai, Mei; Dowgiert, Rebecca; Kupper, Thomas S

    2005-11-01

    Thymic tissue has previously been considered a requirement for the generation of a functional and diverse population of human T cells. We report that fibroblasts and keratinocytes from human skin arrayed on a synthetic 3-dimensional matrix support the development of functional human T cells from hematopoietic precursor cells in the absence of thymic tissue. Newly generated T cells contained T cell receptor excision circles, possessed a diverse T cell repertoire, and were functionally mature and tolerant to self MHC, indicating successful completion of positive and negative selection. Skin cell cultures expressed the AIRE, Foxn1, and Hoxa3 transcription factors and a panel of autoantigens. Skin and bone marrow biopsies can thus be used to generate de novo functional and diverse T cell populations for potential therapeutic use in immunosuppressed patients. PMID:16224538

  11. Human skin cells support thymus-independent T cell development

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Rachael A.; Yamanaka, Kei-ichi; Bai, Mei; Dowgiert, Rebecca; Kupper, Thomas S.

    2005-01-01

    Thymic tissue has previously been considered a requirement for the generation of a functional and diverse population of human T cells. We report that fibroblasts and keratinocytes from human skin arrayed on a synthetic 3-dimensional matrix support the development of functional human T cells from hematopoietic precursor cells in the absence of thymic tissue. Newly generated T cells contained T cell receptor excision circles, possessed a diverse T cell repertoire, and were functionally mature and tolerant to self MHC, indicating successful completion of positive and negative selection. Skin cell cultures expressed the AIRE, Foxn1, and Hoxa3 transcription factors and a panel of autoantigens. Skin and bone marrow biopsies can thus be used to generate de novo functional and diverse T cell populations for potential therapeutic use in immunosuppressed patients. PMID:16224538

  12. Thymic stromal cell subsets for T cell development.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Takeshi; Suzuki, Harumi

    2016-03-01

    The thymus provides a specialized microenvironment in which a variety of stromal cells of both hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic origin regulate development and repertoire selection of T cells. Recent studies have been unraveling the inter- and intracellular signals and transcriptional networks for spatiotemporal regulation of development of thymic stromal cells, mainly thymic epithelial cells (TECs), and the molecular mechanisms of how different TEC subsets control T cell development and selection. TECs are classified into two functionally different subsets: cortical TECs (cTECs) and medullary TECs (mTECs). cTECs induce positive selection of diverse and functionally distinct T cells by virtue of unique antigen-processing systems, while mTECs are essential for establishing T cell tolerance via ectopic expression of peripheral tissue-restricted antigens and cooperation with dendritic cells. In addition to reviewing the role of the thymic stroma in conventional T cell development, we will discuss recently discovered novel functions of TECs in the development of unconventional T cells, such as natural killer T cells and γδT cells. PMID:26825337

  13. Asymmetric cell division during T cell development controls downstream fate

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Kim; Shimoni, Raz; Charnley, Mirren; Ludford-Menting, Mandy J.; Hawkins, Edwin D.; Ramsbottom, Kelly; Oliaro, Jane; Izon, David; Ting, Stephen B.; Reynolds, Joseph; Lythe, Grant; Molina-Paris, Carmen; Melichar, Heather; Robey, Ellen; Humbert, Patrick O.; Gu, Min

    2015-01-01

    During mammalian T cell development, the requirement for expansion of many individual T cell clones, rather than merely expansion of the entire T cell population, suggests a possible role for asymmetric cell division (ACD). We show that ACD of developing T cells controls cell fate through differential inheritance of cell fate determinants Numb and α-Adaptin. ACD occurs specifically during the β-selection stage of T cell development, and subsequent divisions are predominantly symmetric. ACD is controlled by interaction with stromal cells and chemokine receptor signaling and uses a conserved network of polarity regulators. The disruption of polarity by deletion of the polarity regulator, Scribble, or the altered inheritance of fate determinants impacts subsequent fate decisions to influence the numbers of DN4 cells arising after the β-selection checkpoint. These findings indicate that ACD enables the thymic microenvironment to orchestrate fate decisions related to differentiation and self-renewal. PMID:26370500

  14. Fine-tuning T cell receptor signaling to control T cell development.

    PubMed

    Fu, Guo; Rybakin, Vasily; Brzostek, Joanna; Paster, Wolfgang; Acuto, Oreste; Gascoigne, Nicholas R J

    2014-07-01

    T cell development from immature CD4(+)CD8(+) double-positive (DP) thymocytes to the mature CD4 or CD8 single-positive (SP) stage requires proper T cell receptor (TCR) signaling. The current working model of thymocyte development is that the strength of the TCR-mediated signal - from little-or-none, through intermediate, to strong - received by the immature cells determines whether they will undergo death by neglect, positive selection, or negative selection, respectively. In recent years, several developmentally regulated, stage-specifically expressed proteins and miRNAs have been found that act like fine-tuners for signal transduction and propagation downstream of the TCR. This allows them to govern thymocyte positive selection. Here, we summarize recent findings on these molecules and suggest new concepts of TCR positive-selection signaling.

  15. Fine-tuning T cell receptor signaling to control T cell development.

    PubMed

    Fu, Guo; Rybakin, Vasily; Brzostek, Joanna; Paster, Wolfgang; Acuto, Oreste; Gascoigne, Nicholas R J

    2014-07-01

    T cell development from immature CD4(+)CD8(+) double-positive (DP) thymocytes to the mature CD4 or CD8 single-positive (SP) stage requires proper T cell receptor (TCR) signaling. The current working model of thymocyte development is that the strength of the TCR-mediated signal - from little-or-none, through intermediate, to strong - received by the immature cells determines whether they will undergo death by neglect, positive selection, or negative selection, respectively. In recent years, several developmentally regulated, stage-specifically expressed proteins and miRNAs have been found that act like fine-tuners for signal transduction and propagation downstream of the TCR. This allows them to govern thymocyte positive selection. Here, we summarize recent findings on these molecules and suggest new concepts of TCR positive-selection signaling. PMID:24951034

  16. Functional Development of the T Cell Receptor for Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, Peter J.R.; Li, Qi-Jing; Huppa, Johannes B.; Davis, Mark M.

    2016-01-01

    For over three decades now, the T cell receptor (TCR) for antigen has not ceased to challenge the imaginations of cellular and molecular immunologists alike. T cell antigen recognition transcends every aspect of adaptive immunity: it shapes the T cell repertoire in the thymus and directs T cell-mediated effector functions in the periphery, where it is also central to the induction of peripheral tolerance. Yet, despite its central position, there remain many questions unresolved: how can one TCR be specific for one particular peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) ligand while also binding other pMHC ligands with an immunologically relevant affinity? And how can a T cell’s extreme specificity (alterations of single methyl groups in their ligand can abrogate a response) and sensitivity (single agonist ligands on a cell surface are sufficient to trigger a measurable response) emerge from TCR–ligand interactions that are so low in affinity? Solving these questions is intimately tied to a fundamental understanding of molecular recognition dynamics within the many different contexts of various T cell–antigen presenting cell (APC) contacts: from the thymic APCs that shape the TCR repertoire and guide functional differentiation of developing T cells to the peripheral APCs that support homeostasis and provoke antigen responses in naïve, effector, memory, and regulatory T cells. Here, we discuss our recent findings relating to T cell antigen recognition and how this leads to the thymic development of foreign-antigen-responsive αβT cells. PMID:20800817

  17. Normal T-Cell Turnover in Sooty Mangabeys Harboring Active Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Lisa A.; Lewin, Sharon R.; Zhang, Linqi; Gettie, Agegnehu; Luckay, Amara; Martin, Louis N.; Skulsky, Eva; Ho, David D.; Cheng-Mayer, Cecilia; Marx, Preston A.

    2000-01-01

    Sooty mangabeys naturally infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) remain healthy though they harbor viral loads comparable to those in rhesus macaques that progress to AIDS. To assess the immunologic basis of disease resistance in mangabeys, we compared the effect of SIV infection on T-cell regeneration in both monkey species. Measurement of the proliferation marker Ki-67 by flow cytometry showed that mangabeys harbored proliferating T cells at a level of 3 to 4% in peripheral blood irrespective of their infection status. In contrast, rhesus macaques demonstrated a naturally high fraction of proliferating T cells (7%) that increased two- to threefold following SIV infection. Ki-67+ T cells were predominantly CD45RA−, indicating increased proliferation of memory cells in macaques. Quantitation of an episomal DNA product of T-cell receptor α rearrangement (termed α1 circle) showed that the concentration of recent thymic emigrants in blood decreased with age over a 2-log unit range in both monkey species, consistent with age-related thymic involution. SIV infection caused a limited decrease of α1 circle numbers in mangabeys as well as in macaques. Dilution of α1 circles by T-cell proliferation likely contributed to this decrease, since α1 circle numbers and Ki-67+ fractions correlated negatively. These findings are compatible with immune exhaustion mediated by abnormal T-cell proliferation, rather than with early thymic failure, in SIV-infected macaques. Normal T-cell turnover in SIV-infected mangabeys provides an explanation for the long-term maintenance of a functional immune system in these hosts. PMID:10627531

  18. Cutting Edge: Localization of linker for activation of T cells to lipid rafts is not essential in T cell activation and development.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Minghua; Shen, Shudan; Liu, Yan; Granillo, Olivia; Zhang, Weiguo

    2005-01-01

    It has been proposed that upon T cell activation, linker for activation of T cells (LAT), a transmembrane adaptor protein localized to lipid rafts, orchestrates formation of multiprotein complexes and activates signaling cascades in lipid rafts. However, whether lipid rafts really exist or function remains controversial. To address the importance of lipid rafts in LAT function, we generated a fusion protein to target LAT to nonraft fractions using the transmembrane domain from a nonraft protein, linker for activation of X cells (LAX). Surprisingly, this fusion protein functioned well in TCR signaling. It restored MAPK activation, calcium flux, and NFAT activation in LAT-deficient cells. To further study the function of this fusion protein in vivo, we generated transgenic mice that express this protein. Analysis of these mice indicated that it was fully capable of replacing LAT in thymocyte development and T cell function. Our results demonstrate that LAT localization to lipid rafts is not essential during normal T cell activation and development.

  19. Comparative proteomics of exosomes secreted by tumoral Jurkat T cells and normal human T cell blasts unravels a potential tumorigenic role for valosin-containing protein

    PubMed Central

    Sanclemente, Manuel; Iturralde, María; Naval, Javier; Alava, María Angeles; Martínez-Lostao, Luis; Thierse, Hermann-Josef; Anel, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    We have previously characterized that FasL and Apo2L/TRAIL are stored in their bioactive form inside human T cell blasts in intraluminal vesicles present in multivesicular bodies. These vesicles are rapidly released to the supernatant in the form of exosomes upon re-activation of T cells. In this study we have compared for the first time proteomics of exosomes produced by normal human T cell blasts with those produced by tumoral Jurkat cells, with the objective of identify proteins associated with tumoral exosomes that could have a previously unrecognized role in malignancy. We have identified 359 and 418 proteins in exosomes from T cell blasts and Jurkat cells, respectively. Interestingly, only 145 (around a 40%) are common. The major proteins in both cases are actin and tubulin isoforms and the common interaction nodes correspond to these cytoskeleton and related proteins, as well as to ribosomal and mRNA granule proteins. We detected 14 membrane proteins that were especially enriched in exosomes from Jurkat cells as compared with T cell blasts. The most abundant of these proteins was valosin-containing protein (VCP), a membrane ATPase involved in ER homeostasis and ubiquitination. In this work, we also show that leukemic cells are more sensitive to cell death induced by the VCP inhibitor DBeQ than normal T cells. Furthermore, VCP inhibition prevents functional exosome secretion only in Jurkat cells, but not in T cell blasts. These results suggest VCP targeting as a new selective pathway to exploit in cancer treatment to prevent tumoral exosome secretion. PMID:27086912

  20. A Histone Methyltransferase ESET Is Critical for T Cell Development.

    PubMed

    Takikita, Shoichi; Muro, Ryunosuke; Takai, Toshiyuki; Otsubo, Takeshi; Kawamura, Yuki I; Dohi, Taeko; Oda, Hiroyo; Kitajima, Masayuki; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Endo, Takaho A; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Weis, John; Shinkai, Yoichi; Suzuki, Harumi

    2016-09-15

    ESET/SETDB1, one of the major histone methyltransferases, catalyzes histone 3 lysine 9 (H3K9) trimethylation. ESET is critical for suppressing expression of retroviral elements in embryonic stem cells; however, its role in the immune system is not known. We found that thymocyte-specific deletion of ESET caused impaired T cell development, with CD8 lineage cells being most severely affected. Increased apoptosis of CD8 single-positive cells was observed, and TCR-induced ERK activation was severely inhibited in ESET(-/-) thymocytes. Genome-wide comprehensive analysis of mRNA expression and H3K9 trimethylation revealed that ESET regulates expression of numerous genes in thymocytes. Among them, FcγRIIB, whose signaling can inhibit ERK activation, was strongly and ectopically expressed in ESET(-/-) thymocytes. Indeed, genetic depletion of FcγRIIB in ESET(-/-) thymocytes rescued impaired ERK activation and partially restored defective positive selection in ESET(-/-) mice. Therefore, impaired T cell development in ESET(-/-) mice is partly due to the aberrant expression of FcγRIIB. Collectively, to our knowledge, we identify ESET as the first trimethylated H3K9 histone methyltransferase playing a crucial role in T cell development. PMID:27511731

  1. Common mechanism of chromosome inversion in B- and T-cell tumors: relevance to lymphoid development.

    PubMed

    Denny, C T; Hollis, G F; Hecht, F; Morgan, R; Link, M P; Smith, S D; Kirsch, I R

    1986-10-10

    An inversion of chromosome 14 present in the tumor cells of a patient with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia of B-cell lineage was shown to be the result of a site-specific recombination event between an immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable gene and the joining segment of a T-cell receptor alpha chain. This rearrangement resulted in the formation of a hybrid gene, part immunoglobulin and part T-cell receptor. Furthermore, this hybrid gene was transcribed into messenger RNA with a completely open reading frame. Thus, two loci felt to be normally activated at distinct and disparate points in lymphocyte development were unified and expressed in this tumor.

  2. New insights on human T cell development by quantitative T cell receptor gene rearrangement studies and gene expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    Dik, Willem A.; Pike-Overzet, Karin; Weerkamp, Floor; de Ridder, Dick; de Haas, Edwin F.E.; Baert, Miranda R.M.; van der Spek, Peter; Koster, Esther E.L.; Reinders, Marcel J.T.; van Dongen, Jacques J.M.; Langerak, Anton W.; Staal, Frank J.T.

    2005-01-01

    To gain more insight into initiation and regulation of T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement during human T cell development, we analyzed TCR gene rearrangements by quantitative PCR analysis in nine consecutive T cell developmental stages, including CD34+ lin− cord blood cells as a reference. The same stages were used for gene expression profiling using DNA microarrays. We show that TCR loci rearrange in a highly ordered way (TCRD-TCRG-TCRB-TCRA) and that the initiating Dδ2-Dδ3 rearrangement occurs at the most immature CD34+CD38−CD1a− stage. TCRB rearrangement starts at the CD34+CD38+CD1a− stage and complete in-frame TCRB rearrangements were first detected in the immature single positive stage. TCRB rearrangement data together with the PTCRA (pTα) expression pattern show that human TCRβ-selection occurs at the CD34+CD38+CD1a+ stage. By combining the TCR rearrangement data with gene expression data, we identified candidate factors for the initiation/regulation of TCR recombination. Our data demonstrate that a number of key events occur earlier than assumed previously; therefore, human T cell development is much more similar to murine T cell development than reported before. PMID:15928199

  3. SHARPIN controls the development of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Redecke, Vanessa; Chaturvedi, Vandana; Kuriakose, Jeeba; Häcker, Hans

    2016-06-01

    SHARPIN is an essential component of the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC) complex that controls signalling pathways of various receptors, including the tumour necrosis factor receptor (TNFR), Toll-like receptor (TLR) and antigen receptor, in part by synthesis of linear, non-degrading ubiquitin chains. Consistent with SHARPIN's function in different receptor pathways, the phenotype of SHARPIN-deficient mice is complex, including the development of inflammatory systemic and skin diseases, the latter of which depend on TNFR signal transduction. Given the established function of SHARPIN in primary and malignant B cells, we hypothesized that SHARPIN might also regulate T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling and thereby control T-cell biology. Here, we focus primarily on the role of SHARPIN in T cells, specifically regulatory T (Treg) cells. We found that SHARPIN-deficient (Sharpin(cpdm/cpdm) ) mice have significantly reduced numbers of FOXP3(+) Treg cells in lymphoid organs and the peripheral blood. Competitive reconstitution of irradiated mice with mixed bone marrow from wild-type and SHARPIN-deficient mice revealed an overall reduced thymus population with SHARPIN-deficient cells with almost complete loss of thymic Treg development. Consistent with this cell-intrinsic function of SHARPIN in Treg development, TCR stimulation of SHARPIN-deficient thymocytes revealed reduced activation of nuclear factor-κB and c-Jun N-terminal kinase, establishing a function of SHARPIN in TCR signalling, which may explain the defective Treg development. In turn, in vitro generation and suppressive activity of mature SHARPIN-deficient Treg cells were comparable to wild-type cells, suggesting that maturation, but not function, of SHARPIN-deficient Treg cells is impaired. Taken together, these findings show that SHARPIN controls TCR signalling and is required for efficient generation of Treg cells in vivo, whereas the inhibitory function of mature Treg cells appears to be

  4. Normal development.

    PubMed

    Girard, Nadine; Koob, Meriam; Brunel, Herv

    2016-01-01

    Numerous events are involved in brain development, some of which are detected by neuroimaging. Major changes in brain morphology are depicted by brain imaging during the fetal period while changes in brain composition can be demonstrated in both pre- and postnatal periods. Although ultrasonography and computed tomography can show changes in brain morphology, these techniques are insensitive to myelination that is one of the most important events occurring during brain maturation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is therefore the method of choice to evaluate brain maturation. MRI also gives insight into the microstructure of brain tissue through diffusion-weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Metabolic changes are also part of brain maturation and are assessed by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Understanding and knowledge of the different steps in brain development are required to be able to detect morphologic and structural changes on neuroimaging. Consequently alterations in normal development can be depicted. PMID:27430460

  5. Foxo transcription factors control regulatory T cell development and function

    PubMed Central

    Kerdiles, Yann M.; Stone, Erica L.; Beisner, Daniel L.; McGargill, Maureen A.; Ch'en, Irene L.; Stockmann, Christian; Katayama, Carol D.; Hedrick, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Foxo transcription factors integrate extrinsic signals to regulate cell division, differentiation and survival, and specific functions of lymphoid and myeloid cells. Here we showed the absence of Foxo1 severely curtailed the development of Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells, and those that developed were nonfunctional in vivo. The loss of function included diminished CTLA-4 receptor expression as the Ctla4 gene was a direct target of Foxo1. T cell specific loss of Foxo1 resulted in exocrine pancreatitis, hind limb paralysis, multi-organ lymphocyte infiltration, anti-nuclear antibodies and expanded germinal centers. Foxo-mediated control over Treg cell specification was further revealed by the inability of TGF-β cytokine to suppress T-bet transcription factor in the absence of Foxo1, resulting in IFN-γ-secretion. In addition the absence of Foxo3 exacerbated the effects of the loss of Foxo1. Thus, Foxo transcription factors guide the contingencies of T cell differentiation and specific functions of effector cell populations. PMID:21167754

  6. Statistical Physics of T-Cell Development and Pathogen Specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Košmrlj, Andrej; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2013-04-01

    In addition to an innate immune system that battles pathogens in a nonspecific fashion, higher organisms, such as humans, possess an adaptive immune system to combat diverse (and evolving) microbial pathogens. Remarkably, the adaptive immune system mounts pathogen-specific responses, which can be recalled upon reinfection with the same pathogen. It is difficult to see how the adaptive immune system can be preprogrammed to respond specifically to a vast and unknown set of pathogens. Although major advances have been made in understanding pertinent molecular and cellular phenomena, the precise principles that govern many aspects of an immune response are largely unknown. We discuss complementary approaches from statistical mechanics and cell biology that can shed light on how key components of the adaptive immune system, T cells, develop to enable pathogen-specific responses against many diverse pathogens. The mechanistic understanding that emerges has implications for how host genetics may influence the development of T cells with differing responses to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection.

  7. Molecular mechanisms of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma development.

    PubMed

    Sakata-Yanagimoto, Mamiko; Chiba, Shigeru

    2016-08-01

    The molecular pathogenesis of peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) has gradually been clarified in terms of genomic abnormalities. Insights into these genomic abnormalities have provided clues to understanding the pathogenesis of PTCL. Furthermore, the origins of lymphoma cells have been clarified by investigating the distribution of genomic abnormalities in tumor cells and non-tumor blood cells. Multistep tumorigenesis has been suggested to be a fundamental mechanism underlying the development of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL), a distinct subtype of PTCL: premalignant cells evolve from hematopoietic progenitors via mutations in epigenetic regulators. These cells then further differentiate into tumor cells via the addition of tumor-specific G17V RHOA mutations. Meanwhile, AITL are composed of various infiltrating cells as well as tumor cells. Most notably, AITL tissues are characterized by massive infiltration of B cells partially infected by Epstein-Barr virus, follicular dendritic cells, and high endothelial venules. Infiltration of these cell types has been thought to be a reactive process, promoted by cytokines and chemokines released from tumor cells. Considering the multistep mechanisms of AITL allows us to analyze whether these infiltrating cells are also derived from premalignant cells. Indeed, the mechanisms underlying massive infiltration of bystander cells might be more complicated than previously imagined. PMID:27599421

  8. Histone acetyltransferases and histone deacetylases in B- and T-cell development, physiology and malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Haery, Leila; Thompson, Ryan C.; Gilmore, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    The development of B and T cells from hematopoietic precursors and the regulation of the functions of these immune cells are complex processes that involve highly regulated signaling pathways and transcriptional control. The signaling pathways and gene expression patterns that give rise to these developmental processes are coordinated, in part, by two opposing classes of broad-based enzymatic regulators: histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs). HATs and HDACs can modulate gene transcription by altering histone acetylation to modify chromatin structure, and by regulating the activity of non-histone substrates, including an array of immune-cell transcription factors. In addition to their role in normal B and T cells, dysregulation of HAT and HDAC activity is associated with a variety of B- and T-cell malignancies. In this review, we describe the roles of HATs and HDACs in normal B- and T-cell physiology, describe mutations and dysregulation of HATs and HDACs that are implicated lymphoma and leukemia, and discuss HAT and HDAC inhibitors that have been explored as treatment options for leukemias and lymphomas. PMID:26124919

  9. Defect in recruiting effector memory CD8+ T-cells in malignant pleural effusions compared to normal pleural fluid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Malignant pleural effusions (MPE) are a common and fatal complication in cancers including lung or breast cancers, or malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). MPE animal models and immunotherapy trials in MPM patients previously suggested defects of the cellular immunity in MPE. However only few observational studies of the immune response were done in MPM patients, using questionable control groups (transudate…). Methods We compared T cell populations evaluated by flow cytometry from blood and pleural effusion of untreated patients with MPM (n = 58), pleural metastasis of adenocarcinoma (n = 30) or with benign pleural lesions associated with asbestos exposure (n = 23). Blood and pleural fluid were also obtained from healthy subjects, providing normal values for T cell populations. Results Blood CD4+ or CD8+ T cells percentages were similar in all groups of patients or healthy subjects. Whereas pleural fluid from healthy controls contained mainly CD8+ T cells, benign or malignant pleural effusions included mainly CD4+ T cells. Effector memory T cells were the main T cell subpopulation in pleural fluid from healthy subjects. In contrast, there was a striking and selective recruitment of central memory CD4+ T cells in MPE, but not of effector cells CD8+ T cells or NK cells in the pleural fluid as one would expect in order to obtain an efficient immune response. Conclusions Comparing for the first time MPE to pleural fluid from healthy subjects, we found a local defect in recruiting effector CD8+ T cells, which may be involved in the escape of tumor cells from immune response. Further studies are needed to characterize which subtypes of effector CD8+ T cells are involved, opening prospects for cell therapy in MPE and MPM. PMID:23816056

  10. Transcriptional regulation of early T-cell development in the thymus.

    PubMed

    Seo, Wooseok; Taniuchi, Ichiro

    2016-03-01

    T-cell development occurs in multipotent progenitors arriving in the thymus, which provides a highly specialized microenvironment. Specification and sequential commitment processes to T cells begin in early thymic progenitors upon receiving thymus-specific environmental cues, resulting in the activation of the genetically programmed transcriptional cascade that includes turning on and off numerous transcription factors in a precise manner. Thus, early thymocyte differentiation has been an excellent model system to study cell differentiation processes. This review summarizes recent advances in our knowledge on thymic T-cell development from newly arrived multipotent T-cell progenitors to fully committed T-cell precursors, from the transcriptional regulation perspective. PMID:26763078

  11. Transcriptional regulation of early T-cell development in the thymus.

    PubMed

    Seo, Wooseok; Taniuchi, Ichiro

    2016-03-01

    T-cell development occurs in multipotent progenitors arriving in the thymus, which provides a highly specialized microenvironment. Specification and sequential commitment processes to T cells begin in early thymic progenitors upon receiving thymus-specific environmental cues, resulting in the activation of the genetically programmed transcriptional cascade that includes turning on and off numerous transcription factors in a precise manner. Thus, early thymocyte differentiation has been an excellent model system to study cell differentiation processes. This review summarizes recent advances in our knowledge on thymic T-cell development from newly arrived multipotent T-cell progenitors to fully committed T-cell precursors, from the transcriptional regulation perspective.

  12. Grb2 Is Important for T Cell Development, Th Cell Differentiation, and Induction of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Radtke, Daniel; Lacher, Sonja M; Szumilas, Nadine; Sandrock, Lena; Ackermann, Jochen; Nitschke, Lars; Zinser, Elisabeth

    2016-04-01

    The small adaptor protein growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2) modulates and integrates signals from receptors on cellular surfaces in inner signaling pathways. In murine T cells, Grb2 is crucial for amplification of TCR signaling. T cell-specific Grb2(fl/fl) Lckcre(tg) Grb2-deficient mice show reduced T cell numbers due to impaired negative and positive selection. In this study, we found that T cell numbers in Grb2(fl/fl) CD4cre(tg) mice were normal in the thymus and were only slightly affected in the periphery. Ex vivo analysis of CD4(+) Th cell populations revealed an increased amount of Th1 cells within the CD4(+) population of Grb2(fl/fl) CD4cre(tg) mice. Additionally, Grb2-deficient T cells showed a greater potential to differentiate into Th17 cells in vitro. To test whether these changes in Th cell differentiation potential rendered Grb2(fl/fl) CD4cre(tg) mice more prone to inflammatory diseases, we used the murine Th1 cell- and Th17 cell-driven model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In contrast to our expectations, Grb2(fl/fl) CD4cre(tg) mice developed a milder form of EAE. The impaired EAE disease can be explained by the reduced proliferation rate of Grb2-deficient CD4(+) T cells upon stimulation with IL-2 or upon activation by allogeneic dendritic cells, because the activation of T cells by dendritic cells and the subsequent T cell proliferation are known to be crucial factors for the induction of EAE. In summary, Grb2-deficient T cells show defects in T cell development, increased Th1 and Th17 cell differentiation capacities, and impaired proliferation after activation by dendritic cells, which likely reduce the clinical symptoms of EAE.

  13. Interleukin-1 receptors are differentially expressed in normal and psoriatic T cells.

    PubMed

    Bebes, Attila; Kovács-Sólyom, Ferenc; Prihoda, Judit; Kui, Róbert; Kemény, Lajos; Gyulai, Rolland

    2014-01-01

    This study was carried out to examine the possible role of interleukin-1 (IL-1) in the functional insufficiency of regulatory T cells in psoriasis, by comparing the expression of IL-1 receptors on healthy control and psoriatic T cells. Patients with moderate-to-severe chronic plaque psoriasis and healthy volunteers, matched in age and sex, were selected for all experiments. CD4(+)CD25(-) effector and CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(low) regulatory T cells were separated and used for the experiments. Expression of the mRNA of IL-1 receptors (IL-1R1, IL-1R2, and sIL-1R2) was determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Cell surface IL-1 receptor expression was assessed by flow cytometry. Relative expression of the signal transmitting IL-1 receptor type 1 (IL-1R1) mRNA is higher in resting psoriatic effector and regulatory T cells, and activation induces higher IL-1R1 protein expression in psoriatic T cells than in healthy cells. Psoriatic regulatory and effector T cells express increased mRNA levels of the decoy IL-1 receptors (IL-1R2 and sIL-1R2) upon activation compared to healthy counterparts. Psoriatic T cells release slightly more sIL-1R2 into their surrounding than healthy T cells. In conclusion, changes in the expression of IL-1 receptors in psoriatic regulatory and effector T cells could contribute to the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

  14. Differential function of Themis CABIT domains during T cell development.

    PubMed

    Okada, Toshiyuki; Nitta, Takeshi; Kaji, Kentaro; Takashima, Akiko; Oda, Hiroyo; Tamehiro, Norimasa; Goto, Motohito; Okamura, Tadashi; Patrick, Michael S; Suzuki, Harumi

    2014-01-01

    Themis (also named Gasp) is a newly identified Grb2-binding protein that is essential for thymocyte positive selection. Despite the possible involvement of Themis in TCR-mediated signal transduction, its function remains unresolved and controversial. Themis contains two functionally uncharacterized regions called CABIT (cysteine-containing, all-β in Themis) domains, a nuclear localization signal (NLS), and a proline-rich sequence (PRS). To elucidate the role of these motifs in Themis's function in vivo, we established a series of mutant Themis transgenic mice on a Themis(-/-) background. Deletion of the highly conserved Core motif of CABIT1 or CABIT2 (Core1 or Core2, respectively), the NLS, or the PRS abolished Grb2-association, as well as TCR-dependent tyrosine-phosphorylation and the ability to induce positive selection in the thymus. The NLS and Core1 motifs were required for the nuclear localization of Themis, whereas Core2 and PRS were not. Furthermore, expression of ΔCore1- but not ΔCore2-Themis conferred dominant negative-type inhibition on T cell development. Collectively, our current results indicate that PRS, NLS, CABIT1, and CABIT2 are all required for positive selection, and that each of the CABIT domains exerts distinct functions during positive selection. PMID:24586531

  15. Flow cytometric analysis of the stimulatory response of T cell subsets from normal and HIV-1+ individuals to various mitogenic stimuli in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Medina, E; Borthwick, N; Johnson, M A; Miller, S; Bofill, M

    1994-01-01

    A novel technique is described which allows the study of the responses of T cell subpopulations stimulated in bulk cultures without interfering with cell-cell interactions. The number and phenotype of lymphoblasts developing following stimulation with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), anti-CD3, staphylococcal protein A (SPA) and pokeweed mitogen (PWM) was determined in HIV-1- and HIV-1+ patients using a new five-parameter flow cytometric method. We found that normal T cells responded faster to PHA than to any of the other mitogens tested. The peak of the PHA response occurred on day 3, followed by anti-CD3 and SPA on day 4 and PWM mitogen on day 5. Although PHA and anti-CD3 stimulated up to 95% and 80% of lymphocytes, respectively, SPA and PWM stimulated only 40% and 30% of cells, respectively. A defective T cell response was observed in lymphocytes cultured from asymptomatic HIV-1+ patients compared with negative controls. This loss of response was related to a selective mortality of T cells following mitogenic stimulation, referred to as activation-associated lymphocyte death (AALD). The results showed that stronger mitogens (PHA and anti-CD3) induced AALD in a larger proportion (50-60%) of T cells than weaker mitogens such as SPA and PWM (30-40%), and that AALD affected different lymphocyte subsets to different extents. AALD occurred more frequently in total CD8+ and CD45RO+ T cells compared with CD4+ and CD45RA+ T cells, but memory CD4+ T cells were the population most severely affected in samples from HIV-1+ donors. PMID:7914156

  16. Regulation of early T cell development by the PHD finger of histone lysine methyltransferase ASH1

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Yujiro Nakayama, Yasuhiro; Taniguchi, Masaru; Kioussis, Dimitris

    2008-01-18

    We have previously isolated a mammalian homologue of Drosophila discsabsent, small, orhomeotic-1 (ash1) from the murine thymus, and recently shown that its SET domain methylates histone H3 lysine 36 (K36). Expression of ASH1 has been reported to be increased in NOD thymocytes in a BDC2.5 clonotype background, but its function in T cell development has remained elusive. Here we report that the ash1 gene is expressed at high levels in thymocytes of mice deficient for rag1 or tcra genes. ASH1 proteins are present at peri-nuclei and as nuclear speckles in thymocytes. Some of the nuclear ASH1 co-localize with RAG2. Expression of the evolutionarily conserved PHD finger of ASH1 impairs T cell development at the DP stage, and causes increased transcription from the HoxA9 promoter in vitro. Moreover, the C-terminal part of ASH1 interacts with HDAC1 repression complexes, suggesting that the PHD finger of ASH1 may be involved in down-regulation of genes for normal development of {alpha}{beta} T cells.

  17. Differential requirement of RasGRP1 for γδ T cell development and activation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Ci, Xinxin; Gorentla, Balachandra; Sullivan, Sarah A.; Stone, James C.; Zhang, Weiguo; Pereira, Pablo; Lu, Jianxin; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2012-01-01

    γδ T cells (γδT) belong to a distinct T cell lineage that performs immune functions different from αβ T cells (αβT). Previous studies have established that Erk1/2 MAPKs are critical for positive selection of αβT cells. Additional evidence also suggests that elevated Erk1/2 activity promotes γδT cell generation. RasGRP1, a guanine nucleotide releasing factor for Ras, plays an important role in positive selection of αβT cells by activating the Ras-Erk1/2 pathway. In this report, we demonstrate that RasGRP1 is critical for TCR-induced Erk1/2 activation in γδT cells but exerts different roles for γδT cell generation and activation. Deficiency of RasGRP1 does not obviously affect γδT cell numbers in the thymus but leads to increased γδT cells, particularly CD4−CD8+ γδT cells, in the peripheral lymphoid organs. The virtually unhindered γδT cell development in the RasGRP1−/− thymus proved to be cell intrinsic, while the increase in CD8+ γδT cells is caused by non-cell-intrinsic mechanisms. Our data provides genetic evidence that decreased Erk1/2 activation in the absence of RasGRP1 is compatible for γδT cell generation. Although RasGRP1 is dispensable for γδT cell generation, RasGRP1-deficient γδT cells are defective in proliferation following TCR stimulation. Additionally, RasGRP1-deficient γδT cells are impaired to produce IL-17 but not IFNγ. Together, these observations have revealed that RasGRP1 plays differential roles for γδ and αβ T cell development but is critical for γδT cell proliferation and production of IL-17. PMID:22623331

  18. Interleukin-1 Receptors Are Differentially Expressed in Normal and Psoriatic T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kovács-Sólyom, Ferenc; Prihoda, Judit; Kui, Róbert; Kemény, Lajos; Gyulai, Rolland

    2014-01-01

    This study was carried out to examine the possible role of interleukin-1 (IL-1) in the functional insufficiency of regulatory T cells in psoriasis, by comparing the expression of IL-1 receptors on healthy control and psoriatic T cells. Patients with moderate-to-severe chronic plaque psoriasis and healthy volunteers, matched in age and sex, were selected for all experiments. CD4+CD25− effector and CD4+CD25+CD127low regulatory T cells were separated and used for the experiments. Expression of the mRNA of IL-1 receptors (IL-1R1, IL-1R2, and sIL-1R2) was determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Cell surface IL-1 receptor expression was assessed by flow cytometry. Relative expression of the signal transmitting IL-1 receptor type 1 (IL-1R1) mRNA is higher in resting psoriatic effector and regulatory T cells, and activation induces higher IL-1R1 protein expression in psoriatic T cells than in healthy cells. Psoriatic regulatory and effector T cells express increased mRNA levels of the decoy IL-1 receptors (IL-1R2 and sIL-1R2) upon activation compared to healthy counterparts. Psoriatic T cells release slightly more sIL-1R2 into their surrounding than healthy T cells. In conclusion, changes in the expression of IL-1 receptors in psoriatic regulatory and effector T cells could contribute to the pathogenesis of psoriasis. PMID:24665164

  19. Comparison of stress-induced PRINS gene expression in normal human keratinocytes and HaCaT cells.

    PubMed

    Bari, Lilla; Bacsa, Sarolta; Sonkoly, Eniko; Bata-Csörgo, Zsuzsanna; Kemény, Lajos; Dobozy, Attila; Széll, Márta

    2011-12-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that affects approximately 2-4% of the population. We recently described a novel non-coding RNA, psoriasis susceptibility related RNA gene induced by stress (PRINS), that was overexpressed in non-lesional psoriatic epidermis, and its expression was induced by various stress factors such as serum starvation, contact inhibition, ultraviolet (UV)-B irradiation, viral infection and translational inhibition in HaCaT cells. In the present work we set out to compare the stress and microbial agent-induced PRINS expression in normal human keratinocytes (NHKs) and HaCaT cells. Since nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is involved in the cellular stress response, we sought to explore whether there is a connection between the NF-κB and PRINS-mediated signal transduction pathways in NHKs and HaCaT cells. We found that the PRINS expression responded differentially to various stress signals and microbial agents in HaCaT cells and in NHKs: after translational inhibition and UV-B treatment, similar induction of PRINS expression occurred with different time courses while after microbial agent treatment, the PRINS expression was significantly induced in HaCaT cells, whereas we could not detect similar changes in NHKs. To explore whether the known NF-κB abnormalities in HaCaT cells could be related to this differential PRINS expression, we silenced the PRINS gene expression with small interfering RNA (siRNA) in both HaCaT cells and in NHKs and monitored NF-κB signal transduction after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment. Silencing of PRINS had no effect on LPS-induced NF-κB activity either in HaCaT cells or in NHKs. Our results indicate that PRINS probably affects keratinocytes functions independently of NF-κB signalling. PMID:21750967

  20. T-Cell Development in Early Partially Decapitated Chicken Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Javier; Vicente, Angeles; Varas, Alberto

    1995-01-01

    We have evaluated the immunohistological and cytofluorometric changes that occur in the thymus of chicken embryos partially decapitated at 33-38 hr of incubation (DCx embryos) in an attempt to analyze possible neuroendocrinological influences on T-cell differentiation and, indirectly, the ontogeny of the so-called neuroendocrine-immune network. The thymus of DCx embryos shows important variations that profoundly and selectively affect different T-cell subsets, but not the nonlymphoid cell components of thymic stroma. These modifications include the accumulation of cell precursors, mainly DN (CD4- CD8-) cells and immature CD8high CD4- cells, which expand but do not differentiate, resulting in an extreme decline of both DP (CD4+ CD8+) cells and TcR c-expressing cells. Accordingly, both subcapsulary and outer cortex increase in size, whereas the deep cortex and principally the thymic medulla almost disappear in DCx embryos. In contrast, other T-cell subsets of DCx embryos, largely CDgglowCD4- cells and TcR γδ-expressing cells do not undergo significant variations throughout thymic ontogeny. PMID:8770560

  1. High-affinity FRβ-specific CAR T cells eradicate AML and normal myeloid lineage without HSC toxicity.

    PubMed

    Lynn, R C; Feng, Y; Schutsky, K; Poussin, M; Kalota, A; Dimitrov, D S; Powell, D J

    2016-06-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy, and development of new treatments to prolong remissions is warranted. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies appear promising but on-target, off-tumor recognition of antigen in healthy tissues remains a concern. Here we isolated a high-affinity (HA) folate receptor beta (FRβ)-specific single-chain variable fragment (2.48 nm KD) for optimization of FRβ-redirected CAR T-cell therapy for AML. T cells stably expressing the HA-FRβ CAR exhibited greatly enhanced antitumor activity against FRβ(+) AML in vitro and in vivo compared with a low-affinity FRβ CAR (54.3 nm KD). Using the HA-FRβ immunoglobulin G, FRβ expression was detectable in myeloid-lineage hematopoietic cells; however, expression in CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) was nearly undetectable. Accordingly, HA-FRβ CAR T cells lysed mature CD14(+) monocytes, while HSC colony formation was unaffected. Because of the potential for elimination of mature myeloid lineage, mRNA CAR electroporation for transient CAR expression was evaluated. mRNA-electroporated HA-FRβ CAR T cells retained effective antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Together, our results highlight the importance of antibody affinity in target protein detection and CAR development and suggest that transient delivery of potent HA-FRβ CAR T cells is highly effective against AML and reduces the risk for long-term myeloid toxicity.

  2. Role of Prolactin in the Recovered T-Cell Development of Early Partially Decapitated Chicken Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, J.; Varas, A.; Vicente, A.

    1998-01-01

    Although different experimental approaches have suggested certain regulation of the mammalian immune system by the neuroendocrine system, the precise factors involved in the process are largely unknown. In previous reports, we demonstrated important changes in the thymic development of chickens deprived of the major neuroendocrine centers by the removal of embryonic prosencephalon at 33-38 hr of incubation (DCx embryos) (Herradón et al., 1991; Moreno et al., 1995). In these embryos, there was a stopping of T-cell maturation that resulted in an accumulation of the most immature T-cell subsets (CD4-CD8- cells and CD4-CD81o cells) and, accordingly, in decreased numbers of DP (CD4+CD8+) thymocytes and mature CD3+TcRαβ + cells, but not CD3+TcRγδ lymphocytes. In the present work, we restore the thymic histology as well as the percentage of distinct T-cell subsets of DCx embryos by supplying recombinant chicken prolactin, grafting of embryonic pituitary gland, or making cephalic chick-quail chimeras. The recovery was not, however, whole and the percentage of CD3+TcRαβ thymocytes did not reach the normal values observed in 17-day-old control Sham-DCx embryos. The results are discussed on the basis of a key role for prolactin in chicken T-cell maturation. This hormone could regulate the transition of DN (CD4-CD8-) thymocytes to the DP (CD4+CD8+) cell compartment through its capacity for inducing IL-2 receptor expression on the former. PMID:9851358

  3. Differential expression of T cell antigens in normal peripheral blood lymphocytes: a quantitative analysis by flow cytometry.

    PubMed Central

    Ginaldi, L; Farahat, N; Matutes, E; De Martinis, M; Morilla, R; Catovsky, D

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: To obtain reference values of the level of expression of T cell antigens on normal lymphocyte subsets in order to disclose differences which could reflect their function or maturation stages, or both. METHODS: Peripheral blood from 15 healthy donors was processed by flow cytometry with triple colour analysis. For each sample phycoerythrin (PE) conjugated CD2, CD4, CD5, CD8, and CD56 monoclonal antibodies were combined with Cy5-R-phycoerythrin (TC) conjugated CD3 and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) conjugated CD7; CD2- and CD7-PE were also combined with CD3-TC and CD4-FITC. Standard microbeads with different capacities to bind mouse immunoglobulins were used to convert the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) values of the lymphocyte subsets identified by multiparametric flow cytometry into the number of antigen molecules per cell, measured as antibody binding capacity (ABC). RESULTS: CD4+ (helper/inducer) T cells exhibit a higher CD3 antigen expression compared with CD8+ (suppressor/ cytotoxic) T lymphocytes. Within the CD4+ T cells, the CD4+CD7- subset expressed a lower level of CD3 compared with CD4+CD7+ and CD8+CD7+ cells, and higher CD2 and CD5 expression than the main CD3+CD7+ subset. Major differences in antigen expression were also detected between CD3+ T cells and CD3-CD56+ natural killer (NK) cells: NK cells exhibited higher levels of CD7 and CD56 and lower levels of CD2 and CD5 than T cells. Significantly lower CD5 expression was also detected in the small CD5+ B lymphocyte subset compared with T cells. CONCLUSIONS: Quantitative flow cytometry with triple colour analysis may be used to detect antigen modulations in disease states and to increase the accuracy of diagnosis by comparison with findings in normal counterparts. Images PMID:8813949

  4. T Cell Repertoire Development in XSCID Dogs Following Non-conditioned Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Vernau, William; Hartnett, Brian J.; Kennedy, Douglas R.; Moore, Peter F.; Henthorn, Paula S.; Weinberg, Kenneth I.; Felsburg, Peter J.

    2007-01-01

    Dogs with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) can be successfully treated by bone marrow transplants (BMT) resulting in full immunologic reconstitution and engraftment of both donor B and T cells without the need for pre-transplant conditioning. In this study, we evaluated the T cell diversity in XSCID dogs 4 months to 10 1/2 years following BMT. At 4 months post transplantation, when the number of CD45RA+ (naïve) T cells had peaked and plateaued, the T cells in the transplanted dogs showed the same complex, diverse repertoire as those of normal young adult dogs. A decline in T cell diversity became evident approximately 3 1/2 years post transplant, but the proportion of Vβ families showing a polyclonal Gaussian spectratype still predominated up to 7 1/2 years post transplant. In two dogs evaluated at 7 1/2 and 10 1/2 years post transplant, >75% of the Vβ families consisted of a skewed or oligoclonal spectratype that was associated with a CD4/CD8 ratio of <0.5. The decline in the complexity of T cell diversity in the transplanted XSCID dogs is similar to that reported for XSCID patients following BMT. However, in contrast to transplanted XSCID boys who show a significant decline in their T cell diversity by 10 to 12 years following BMT, transplanted XSCID dogs maintain a polyclonal, diverse T cell repertoire through mid-life. PMID:17697962

  5. Development of Valpha4+ NK T cells in the early stages of embryogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Y; Kanno, R; Koseki, H; Taniguchi, M

    1996-01-01

    The majority of T lymphocytes start to develop at around day 15 of gestation (d15)-d17 in the thymus and comprise the peripheral repertoire characterized by the expression of polymorphic T-cell antigen receptors (TCRs). Contrary to these conventional T cells, a subset of T cells, called natural killer (NK) T cells (most of them expressing an invariant TCR encoded by the Valpha14Jalpha281 gene with a 1-nt N-region), preferentially differentiates extrathymically and dominates the peripheral T-cell population at a high frequency (5% in splenic T cells and 40% in bone marrow T cells). Here, we investigated the development of NK T cells and found that the invariant Valpha14+ TCR transcripts and the circular DNA created by Valpha14 and Jalpha281 gene rearrangements can be detected in the embryo body at d9.5 of gestation and in the yolk sac and the fetal liver at d11.5-d13.5 of gestation, but not in the thymus, whereas T cells with Valpha1+ TCR expression, a major population in the thymus, were not observed at these early stages of gestation. Fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis also demonstrated that there exist CD3+ alpha beta+ T cells, almost all of which are Valpha14/Vbeta8+ NK+ T cells, during early embryogenesis. To our knowledge, this demonstrates for the first time that a T lymphocyte subset develops in extrathymic tissues during the early stages of embryogenesis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:8692847

  6. Specificity for the tumor-associated self-antigen WT1 drives the development of fully functional memory T cells in the absence of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Pospori, Constandina; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; Voisine, Cecile; Perro, Mario; King, Judith; Fallah-Arani, Farnaz; Flutter, Barry; Chakraverty, Ronjon; Stauss, Hans J; Morris, Emma C

    2011-06-23

    Recently, vaccines against the Wilms Tumor antigen 1 (WT1) have been tested in cancer patients. However, it is currently not known whether physiologic levels of WT1 expression in stem and progenitor cells of normal tissue result in the deletion or tolerance induction of WT1-specific T cells. Here, we used an human leukocyte antigen-transgenic murine model to study the fate of human leukocyte antigen class-I restricted, WT1-specific T cells in the thymus and in the periphery. Thymocytes expressing a WT1-specific T-cell receptor derived from high avidity human CD8 T cells were positively selected into the single-positive CD8 population. In the periphery, T cells specific for the WT1 antigen differentiated into CD44-high memory phenotype cells, whereas T cells specific for a non-self-viral antigen retained a CD44(low) naive phenotype. Only the WT1-specific T cells, but not the virus-specific T cells, displayed rapid antigen-specific effector function without prior vaccination. Despite long-term persistence of WT1-specific memory T cells, the animals did not develop autoimmunity, and the function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells was unimpaired. This is the first demonstration that specificity for a tumor-associated self-antigen may drive differentiation of functionally competent memory T cells.

  7. Specificity for the tumor-associated self-antigen WT1 drives the development of fully functional memory T cells in the absence of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Pospori, Constandina; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; Voisine, Cecile; Perro, Mario; King, Judith; Fallah-Arani, Farnaz; Flutter, Barry; Chakraverty, Ronjon; Stauss, Hans J; Morris, Emma C

    2011-06-23

    Recently, vaccines against the Wilms Tumor antigen 1 (WT1) have been tested in cancer patients. However, it is currently not known whether physiologic levels of WT1 expression in stem and progenitor cells of normal tissue result in the deletion or tolerance induction of WT1-specific T cells. Here, we used an human leukocyte antigen-transgenic murine model to study the fate of human leukocyte antigen class-I restricted, WT1-specific T cells in the thymus and in the periphery. Thymocytes expressing a WT1-specific T-cell receptor derived from high avidity human CD8 T cells were positively selected into the single-positive CD8 population. In the periphery, T cells specific for the WT1 antigen differentiated into CD44-high memory phenotype cells, whereas T cells specific for a non-self-viral antigen retained a CD44(low) naive phenotype. Only the WT1-specific T cells, but not the virus-specific T cells, displayed rapid antigen-specific effector function without prior vaccination. Despite long-term persistence of WT1-specific memory T cells, the animals did not develop autoimmunity, and the function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells was unimpaired. This is the first demonstration that specificity for a tumor-associated self-antigen may drive differentiation of functionally competent memory T cells. PMID:21447831

  8. Development of Auto Antigen-specific Regulatory T Cells for Diabetes Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are essential for normal immune surveillance, and their dysfunction can lead to the development of autoimmune diseases, such as type-1 diabetes (T1D). T1D is a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease characterized by islet β cell destruction, hypoinsulinemia, and severely altered glucose homeostasis. Tregs play a critical role in the development of T1D and participate in peripheral tolerance. Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) can be utilized to obtain a renewable source of healthy Tregs to treat T1D as they have the ability to produce almost all cell types in the body, including Tregs. However, the right conditions for the development of antigen (Ag)-specific Tregs from PSCs (i.e., PSC-Tregs) remain undefined, especially molecular mechanisms that direct differentiation of such Tregs. Auto Ag-specific PSC-Tregs can be programmed to be tissue-associated and infiltrate to local inflamed tissue (e.g., islets) to suppress autoimmune responses after adoptive transfer, thereby avoiding potential overall immunosuppression from non-specific Tregs. Developing auto Ag-specific PSC-Tregs can reduce overall immunosuppression after adoptive transfer by accumulating inflamed islets, which drives forward the use of therapeutic PSC-Tregs for cell-based therapies in T1D. PMID:27799873

  9. Regulated expression of human CD4 rescues helper T cell development in mice lacking expression of endogenous CD4.

    PubMed Central

    Killeen, N; Sawada, S; Littman, D R

    1993-01-01

    During T cell development, precursor thymocytes that co-express the CD4 and CD8 glycoproteins give rise to mature progeny expressing one of these molecules to the exclusion of the other. Continued expression of only CD4 is the hallmark of mature helper T cells, whereas cytotoxic T cells express CD8 and extinguish CD4. The differentiation program that generates the two T cell subsets is likely to be intimately tied to regulation of expression of these cell surface molecules. We now describe the use of a murine CD4 enhancer in the generation of transgenic mice expressing physiologic levels of human CD4. The transgene is appropriately regulated during T cell development and includes the necessary cis-acting sequences for extinguishing expression in the CD8 lineage. Furthermore, in mice whose endogenous CD4 gene is inactivated, the transgenic human CD4 mediates rescue of the CD4 lineage and restoration of normal helper cell functions. The generation of these mice exemplifies a general approach for developing reliable animal models for the human immune system. Images PMID:8467804

  10. Thymosin increases production of T-cell growth factor by normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Zatz, M M; Oliver, J; Samuels, C; Skotnicki, A B; Sztein, M B; Goldstein, A L

    1984-01-01

    The in vitro incubation of phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes with thymosin results in a marked and reproducible increase in production of T-cell growth factor, which is dose dependent and most pronounced in the first 24 hr of culture. Incubation of lymphocytes with thymosin alone failed to induce any production of T-cell growth factor. The biological activity of thymosin fraction 5 cannot be attributed to the activity of thymosin alpha 1, one of the well-characterized peptide components of fraction 5. These data provide the basis for (i) a potential mechanism for the in vivo immunorestorative effects of thymosin in primary and secondary immunodeficiencies and (ii) identification of an additional, but as yet undefined, immunoregulatory component of thymosin fraction 5. PMID:6609371

  11. Dysregulation of CD30+ T cells by leukemia impairs isotype switching in normal B cells

    PubMed Central

    Cerutti, Andrea; Kim, Edmund C.; Shah, Shefali; Schattner, Elaine J.; Zan, Hong; Schaffer, András; Casali, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is associated with impaired immunoglobulin (Ig) class-switching from IgM to IgG and IgA, a defect that leads to recurrent infections. When activated in the presence of leukemic CLL B cells, T cells rapidly up-regulate CD30 through an OX40 ligand and interleukin 4 (IL-4)–dependent mechanism. These leukemia-induced CD30+ T cells inhibit CD40 ligand (CD40L)-mediated Sµ→Sγ and Sµ→Sα class-switch DNA recombination (CSR) by engaging CD30 ligand (CD30L), a molecule that interferes with the assembly of the CD40–tumor necrosis factor receptor–associated factor (TRAF) complex in nonmalignant IgD+ B cells. In addition, engagement of T cell CD30 by CD30L on neoplastic CLL B cells down-regulates the CD3-induced expression of CD40L. These findings indicate that, in CLL, abnormal CD30-CD30L interaction impairs IgG and IgA production by interfering with the CD40-mediated differentiation of nonmalignant B cells. PMID:11175813

  12. High affinity FRβ-specific CAR T cells eradicate AML and normal yeloid lineage without HSC toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lynn, Rachel C; Feng, Yang; Schutsky, Keith; Poussin, Mathilde; Kalota, Anna; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Powell, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy, and development of new treatments to prolong remissions is warranted. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies appear promising but on-target, off-tumor recognition of antigen in healthy tissues remains a concern. Here, we isolated a high affinity (HA) folate receptor beta (FRβ)-specific scFv (2.48nM KD) for optimization of FRβ-redirected CAR T-cell therapy for AML. T-cells stably expressing the HA-FRβ CAR exhibited greatly enhanced antitumor activity against FRβ+ AML in vitro and in vivo compared to a low affinity (LA) FRβ CAR (54.3nM KD). Using the HA-FRβ IgG, FRβ expression was detectable in myeloid-lineage hematopoietic cells; however, expression in CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) was nearly undetectable. Accordingly, HA-FRβ CAR T-cells lysed mature CD14+ monocytes, while HSC colony formation was unaffected. Because of the potential for elimination of mature myeloid lineage, mRNA CAR electroporation for transient CAR expression was evaluated. mRNA-electroporated HA-FRβ CAR T-cells retained effective anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Together, our results highlight the importance of antibody affinity in target protein detection and CAR development and suggest that transient delivery of potent HA-FRβ CAR T-cells is highly effective against AML and reduces the risk for long-term myeloid toxicity. PMID:26898190

  13. Regulation of Lipid Signaling by Diacylglycerol Kinases during T Cell Development and Function

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Sruti; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Diacylglycerol (DAG) and phosphatidic acid (PA) are bioactive lipids synthesized when the T cell receptor binds to a cognate peptide-MHC complex. DAG triggers signaling by recruiting Ras guanyl-releasing protein 1, PKCθ, and other effectors, whereas PA binds to effector molecules that include mechanistic target of rapamycin, Src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatase 1, and Raf1. While DAG-mediated pathways have been shown to play vital roles in T cell development and function, the importance of PA-mediated signals remains less clear. The diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) family of enzymes phosphorylates DAG to produce PA, serving as a molecular switch that regulates the relative levels of these critical second messengers. Two DGK isoforms, α and ζ, are predominantly expressed in T lineage cells and play an important role in conventional αβ T cell development. In mature T cells, the activity of these DGK isoforms aids in the maintenance of self-tolerance by preventing T cell hyper-activation and promoting T cell anergy. In this review, we discuss the roles of DAG-mediated pathways, PA-effectors, and DGKs in T cell development and function. We also highlight recent work that has uncovered previously unappreciated roles for DGK activity, for instance in invariant NKT cell development, anti-tumor and anti-viral CD8 responses, and the directional secretion of soluble effectors. PMID:23847619

  14. A role for CD44 in T cell development and function during direct competition between CD44+ and CD44- cells.

    PubMed

    Graham, Victoria A; Marzo, Amanda L; Tough, David F

    2007-04-01

    The role of CD44 in T cell biology remains incompletely understood. Although studies using anti-CD44 antibodies have implicated this cell adhesion molecule in a variety of important T cell processes, few T cell defects have been reported in CD44-deficient mice. We have assessed the requirement for CD44 in T cell development and mature T cell function by analyzing mice in which CD44(-/-) and WT cells were produced simultaneously. In mixed (CD44(-/-) + CD44(+/+)) bone marrow chimeras, production of CD44(-/-) T cells was shown to be reduced compared to WT cells due to inefficient intrathymic development. In addition, mature CD44(-/-) CD8(+) T cells generated a substantially lower response than WT T cells after infection of mice with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, with the reduction in response apparent in both lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues. Overall, these results demonstrate a poor capacity of CD44(-/-) T lineage cells to compete with WT cells at multiple levels, implicating CD44 in normal T cell function. PMID:17330818

  15. The CD3 gamma epsilon/delta epsilon signaling module provides normal T cell functions in the absence of the TCR zeta immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs.

    PubMed

    Pitcher, Lisa A; Mathis, Meredith A; Young, Jennifer A; DeFord, Laura M; Purtic, Bozidar; Wulfing, Christoph; van Oers, Nicolai S C

    2005-12-01

    T cell receptor (TCR) signal transduction is mediated by the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAM). The ten ITAM in the TCR complex are distributed in two distinct signaling modules termed TCR zetazeta and CD3 gammaepsilon/deltaepsilon. To delineate the specific role of the zeta ITAM in T cell development and TCR signal transmission, we compared the properties of T cells from different TCR zeta-transgenic lines wherein tyrosine-to-phenylalanine substitutions had been introduced in the zeta subunit. These lines lack selected phosphorylated forms of TCR zeta including just p23, both p21 and p23, or all phospho-zeta derivatives. We report herein that the efficiency of positive selection in HY TCR-transgenic female mice was directly related to the number of zeta ITAM in the TCR. In contrast, TCR-mediated signal transmission and T cell proliferative responses following agonist peptide stimulation were similar and independent of the zeta ITAM. Only the duration of MAPK activation was affected by multiple zeta ITAM substitutions. These results strongly suggest that the ITAM in the CD3 gammaepsilon/deltaepsilon module can provide normal TCR signal transmission, with zeta ITAM providing a secondary function facilitating MAPK activation and positive selection.

  16. Type I interferons regulate eomesodermin expression and the development of unconventional memory CD8(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Martinet, Valérie; Tonon, Sandrine; Torres, David; Azouz, Abdulkader; Nguyen, Muriel; Kohler, Arnaud; Flamand, Véronique; Mao, Chai-An; Klein, William H; Leo, Oberdan; Goriely, Stanislas

    2015-05-08

    CD8(+) T-cell memory phenotype and function are acquired after antigen-driven activation. Memory-like cells may also arise in absence of antigenic exposure in the thymus or in the periphery. Eomesodermin (Eomes) is a key transcription factor for the development of these unconventional memory cells. Herein, we show that type I interferon signalling in CD8(+) T cells directly activates Eomes gene expression. Consistent with this observation, the phenotype, function and age-dependent expansion of 'virtual memory' CD8(+) T cells are strongly affected in absence of type I interferon signalling. In addition, type I interferons induce a sustained expansion of 'virtual memory' CD8(+) T cells in an Eomes-dependent fashion. We further show that the development of 'innate thymic' CD8(+) T cells is dependent on the same pathway. In conclusion, we demonstrate that type I interferon signalling in CD8(+) T cells drives Eomes expression and thereby regulates the function and homeostasis of memory-like CD8(+) T cells.

  17. Thymus-autonomous T cell development in the absence of progenitor import.

    PubMed

    Martins, Vera C; Ruggiero, Eliana; Schlenner, Susan M; Madan, Vikas; Schmidt, Manfred; Fink, Pamela J; von Kalle, Christof; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer

    2012-07-30

    Thymus function is thought to depend on a steady supply of T cell progenitors from the bone marrow. The notion that the thymus lacks progenitors with self-renewal capacity is based on thymus transplantation experiments in which host-derived thymocytes replaced thymus-resident cells within 4 wk. Thymus grafting into T cell-deficient mice resulted in a wave of T cell export from the thymus, followed by colonization of the thymus by host-derived progenitors, and cessation of T cell development. Compound Rag2(-/-)γ(c)(-/-)Kit(W/Wv) mutants lack competitive hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and are devoid of T cell progenitors. In this study, using this strain as recipients for wild-type thymus grafts, we noticed thymus-autonomous T cell development lasting several months. However, we found no evidence for export of donor HSCs from thymus to bone marrow. A diverse T cell antigen receptor repertoire in progenitor-deprived thymus grafts implied that many thymocytes were capable of self-renewal. Although the process was most efficient in Rag2(-/-)γ(c)(-/-)Kit(W/Wv) hosts, γ(c)-mediated signals alone played a key role in the competition between thymus-resident and bone marrow-derived progenitors. Hence, the turnover of each generation of thymocytes is not only based on short life span but is also driven via expulsion of resident thymocytes by fresh progenitors entering the thymus.

  18. Oligoclonal CD8+ T cells play a critical role in the development of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Trott, Daniel W; Thabet, Salim R; Kirabo, Annet; Saleh, Mohamed A; Itani, Hana; Norlander, Allison E; Wu, Jing; Goldstein, Anna; Arendshorst, William J; Madhur, Meena S; Chen, Wei; Li, Chung-I; Shyr, Yu; Harrison, David G

    2014-11-01

    Recent studies have emphasized a role of adaptive immunity, and particularly T cells, in the genesis of hypertension. We sought to determine the T-cell subtypes that contribute to hypertension and renal inflammation in angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Using T-cell receptor spectratyping to examine T-cell receptor usage, we demonstrated that CD8(+) cells, but not CD4(+) cells, in the kidney exhibited altered T-cell receptor transcript lengths in Vβ3, 8.1, and 17 families in response to angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Clonality was not observed in other organs. The hypertension caused by angiotensin II in CD4(-/-) and MHCII(-/-) mice was similar to that observed in wild-type mice, whereas CD8(-/-) mice and OT1xRAG-1(-/-) mice, which have only 1 T-cell receptor, exhibited a blunted hypertensive response to angiotensin II. Adoptive transfer of pan T cells and CD8(+) T cells but not CD4(+)/CD25(-) cells conferred hypertension to RAG-1(-/-) mice. In contrast, transfer of CD4(+)/CD25(+) cells to wild-type mice receiving angiotensin II decreased blood pressure. Mice treated with angiotensin II exhibited increased numbers of kidney CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. In response to a sodium/volume challenge, wild-type and CD4(-/-) mice infused with angiotensin II retained water and sodium, whereas CD8(-/-) mice did not. CD8(-/-) mice were also protected against angiotensin-induced endothelial dysfunction and vascular remodeling in the kidney. These data suggest that in the development of hypertension, an oligoclonal population of CD8(+) cells accumulates in the kidney and likely contributes to hypertension by contributing to sodium and volume retention and vascular rarefaction.

  19. Unexpected Regulatory Role of CCR9 in Regulatory T Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Evans-Marin, Heather L.; Cao, Anthony T.; Yao, Suxia; Chen, Feidi; He, Chong; Liu, Han; Wu, Wei; Gonzalez, Maria G.; Dann, Sara M.; Cong, Yingzi

    2015-01-01

    T cells reactive to microbiota regulate the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). As T cell trafficking to intestines is regulated through interactions between highly specific chemokine-chemokine receptors, efforts have been made to develop intestine-specific immunosuppression based on blocking these key processes. CCR9, a gut-trophic chemokine receptor expressed by lymphocytes and dendritic cells, has been implicated in the regulation of IBD through mediating recruitment of T cells to inflamed sites. However, the role of CCR9 in inducing and sustaining inflammation in the context of IBD is poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrate that CCR9 deficiency in effector T cells and Tregs does not affect the development of colitis in a microbiota antigen-specific, T cell-mediated model. However, Treg cells express higher levels of CCR9 compared to those in effector T cells. Interestingly, CCR9 inhibits Treg cell development, in that CCR9-/- mice demonstrate a high level of Foxp3+ Tregs, and ligation of CCR9 by its ligand CCL25 inhibits Treg cell differentiation in vitro. Collectively, our data indicate that in addition to acting as a gut-homing molecule, CCR9 signaling shapes immune responses by inhibiting Treg cell development. PMID:26230654

  20. Analyses of regulatory CD4+ CD25+ FOXP3+ T cells and observations from peripheral T cell subpopulation markers during the development of type 1 diabetes in children.

    PubMed

    Hamari, S; Kirveskoski, T; Glumoff, V; Kulmala, P; Simell, O; Knip, M; Veijola, R

    2016-04-01

    Our aim was to study whether the aberrant amount or function of regulatory T cells is related to the development of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in children. We also set out to investigate the balance of different T cell subtype markers during the T1D autoimmune process. Treg cells were quantified with flow cytometric assay, and the suppression capacity was analysed with a carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE)-based T cell suppression assay in children in various phases of T1D disease process and in healthy autoantibody-negative control children. The mRNA expression of different T cell subpopulation markers was analysed with real-time qPCR method. The proportion and suppression capacity of regulatory T cells were similar in seroconverted children at an early stage of beta cell autoimmunity and also in children with T1D when compared to healthy and autoantibody-negative children. Significant differences were observed in the mRNA expression of different T cell subpopulation markers in prediabetic children with multiple (≥ 2) autoantibodies and in children with newly diagnosed T1D when compared to the control children. In conclusion, there were no quantitative or functional differences in regulatory T cells between the case and control groups in any phase of the autoimmune process. Decreased mRNA expression levels of T cell subtype markers were observed in children with multiple islet autoantibodies and in those with newly diagnosed T1D, probably reflecting an exhaustion of the immune system after the strong immune activation during the autoimmune process or a generally aberrant immune response related to the progression of the disease.

  1. Themis sets the signal threshold for positive and negative selection in T-cell development.

    PubMed

    Fu, Guo; Casas, Javier; Rigaud, Stephanie; Rybakin, Vasily; Lambolez, Florence; Brzostek, Joanna; Hoerter, John A H; Paster, Wolfgang; Acuto, Oreste; Cheroutre, Hilde; Sauer, Karsten; Gascoigne, Nicholas R J

    2013-12-19

    Development of a self-tolerant T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire with the potential to recognize the universe of infectious agents depends on proper regulation of TCR signalling. The repertoire is whittled down during T-cell development in the thymus by the ability of quasi-randomly generated TCRs to interact with self-peptides presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins. Low-affinity TCR interactions with self-MHC proteins generate weak signals that initiate 'positive selection', causing maturation of CD4- or CD8αβ-expressing 'single-positive' thymocytes from CD4(+)CD8αβ(+) 'double-positive' precursors. These develop into mature naive T cells of the secondary lymphoid organs. TCR interaction with high-affinity agonist self-ligands results in 'negative selection' by activation-induced apoptosis or 'agonist selection' of functionally differentiated self-antigen-experienced T cells. Here we show that positive selection is enabled by the ability of the T-cell-specific protein Themis to specifically attenuate TCR signal strength via SHP1 recruitment and activation in response to low- but not high-affinity TCR engagement. Themis acts as an analog-to-digital converter translating graded TCR affinity into clear-cut selection outcome. By dampening mild TCR signals Themis increases the affinity threshold for activation, enabling positive selection of T cells with a naive phenotype in response to low-affinity self-antigens.

  2. PD-1 is not required for natural or peripherally induced regulatory T cells: Severe autoimmunity despite normal production of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Ellestad, Kristofor K; Thangavelu, Govindarajan; Ewen, Catherine L; Boon, Louis; Anderson, Colin C

    2014-12-01

    The expression of the coinhibitor PD-1 on T cells is important for the establishment of immune homeostasis. We previously found that PD-1 is particularly critical for the control of self-tolerance during lymphopenia-induced proliferation of recent thymic emigrants (RTEs). Previous studies suggested that PD-1 modulates the generation of Treg cells, particularly peripherally induced Treg (pTreg) cells, and controls Th17 cells. However, these conclusions were derived indirectly from studies on the ligand PD-L1, and not PD-1 itself. Herein we directly tested whether T-cell PD-1 expression was needed for Treg cell generation and examined if a paucity of Treg cells or enhanced Th17 cells could explain the severe lymphopenia-potentiated autoimmunity caused by PD-1 KO RTEs. Employing the murine FoxP3(EGFP) reporter system to simultaneously monitor conversion of WT and PD-1 KO T cells to pTreg cells in the same animal, we found that PD-1 deficiency did not inhibit pTreg cell generation or lead to Th17-cell-mediated autoimmunity. Surprisingly, pTreg cell numbers were increased in PD-1 KO versus WT cell populations. Furthermore, we noted an increased conversion to pTreg cells by RTEs. Our data suggest that the primary role for PD-1 is to restrain T-cell activation/proliferation to self-Ags rather than promote generation of Treg cells.

  3. Influence of Ganoderma lucidum (Curt.: Fr.) P. Karst. on T-cell-mediated immunity in normal and immunosuppressed mice line CBA/Ca.

    PubMed

    Nizhenkovska, Iryna V; Pidchenko, Vitalii T; Bychkova, Nina G; Bisko, Nina A; Rodnichenko, Angela Y; Kozyko, Natalya O

    2015-09-01

    The article presents the results of the investigation of the effect of biomass powder of the fungus Ganoderma lucidum on T-cell-mediated immunity in normal and immunosuppressed mice CBA/Ca. Delayed-type hypersensitivity assay was used. Experimental immunodeficiency was established with intraperitoneal injection of the immunosuppressant cyclophosphamide at a single dose of 150 mg/kg on the first day of the experiment. Results of the study show that the administration of biomass powder of Ganoderma lucidum in a dose of 0.5 mg/kg orally for 10 days increases the delayed-type hypersensitivity response in normal mice CBA/Ca. Administration of 0.5 mg/kg of biomass powder of the fungus Ganoderma lucidum for 10 days blocked the development of the T-cell-mediated immunosuppression, induced by administration of cyclophosphamide and restored the delayed-type hypersensitivity response in immunosuppressed mice. Key words: fungus Ganoderma lucidum cyclophosphamide immunodeficiency T-cell-mediated immunity delayed-type hypersensitivity. PMID:26459128

  4. Influence of Ganoderma lucidum (Curt.: Fr.) P. Karst. on T-cell-mediated immunity in normal and immunosuppressed mice line CBA/Ca.

    PubMed

    Nizhenkovska, Iryna V; Pidchenko, Vitalii T; Bychkova, Nina G; Bisko, Nina A; Rodnichenko, Angela Y; Kozyko, Natalya O

    2015-09-01

    The article presents the results of the investigation of the effect of biomass powder of the fungus Ganoderma lucidum on T-cell-mediated immunity in normal and immunosuppressed mice CBA/Ca. Delayed-type hypersensitivity assay was used. Experimental immunodeficiency was established with intraperitoneal injection of the immunosuppressant cyclophosphamide at a single dose of 150 mg/kg on the first day of the experiment. Results of the study show that the administration of biomass powder of Ganoderma lucidum in a dose of 0.5 mg/kg orally for 10 days increases the delayed-type hypersensitivity response in normal mice CBA/Ca. Administration of 0.5 mg/kg of biomass powder of the fungus Ganoderma lucidum for 10 days blocked the development of the T-cell-mediated immunosuppression, induced by administration of cyclophosphamide and restored the delayed-type hypersensitivity response in immunosuppressed mice. Key words: fungus Ganoderma lucidum cyclophosphamide immunodeficiency T-cell-mediated immunity delayed-type hypersensitivity.

  5. Characterization of In Vivo Dlg1 Deletion on T Cell Development and Function

    PubMed Central

    Tomassian, Tamar; McMahon, Kerrie-Ann; Humbert, Patrick O.; Silva, Oscar; Round, June L.; Takamiya, Kogo; Huganir, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Background The polarized reorganization of the T cell membrane and intracellular signaling molecules in response to T cell receptor (TCR) engagement has been implicated in the modulation of T cell development and effector responses. In siRNA-based studies Dlg1, a MAGUK scaffold protein and member of the Scribble polarity complex, has been shown to play a role in T cell polarity and TCR signal specificity, however the role of Dlg1 in T cell development and function in vivo remains unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we present the combined data from three independently-derived dlg1-knockout mouse models; two germline deficient knockouts and one conditional knockout. While defects were not observed in T cell development, TCR-induced early phospho-signaling, actin-mediated events, or proliferation in any of the models, the acute knockdown of Dlg1 in Jurkat T cells diminished accumulation of actin at the IS. Further, while Th1-type cytokine production appeared unaffected in T cells derived from mice with a dlg1germline-deficiency, altered production of TCR-dependent Th1 and Th2-type cytokines was observed in T cells derived from mice with a conditional loss of dlg1 expression and T cells with acute Dlg1 suppression, suggesting a differential requirement for Dlg1 activity in signaling events leading to Th1 versus Th2 cytokine induction. The observed inconsistencies between these and other knockout models and siRNA strategies suggest that 1) compensatory upregulation of alternate gene(s) may be masking a role for dlg1 in controlling TCR-mediated events in dlg1 deficient mice and 2) the developmental stage during which dlg1 ablation begins may control the degree to which compensatory events occur. Conclusions/Significance These findings provide a potential explanation for the discrepancies observed in various studies using different dlg1-deficient T cell models and underscore the importance of acute dlg1 ablation to avoid the upregulation of compensatory

  6. T Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... or turn off the immune response. Cytotoxic or “killer” T cells directly attack and destroy cells bearing ... involve selective activation of helper T cells and killer T cells, with a corresponding decrease in regulatory ...

  7. lck-Driven Cre Expression Alters T Cell Development in the Thymus and the Frequencies and Functions of Peripheral T Cell Subsets.

    PubMed

    Carow, Berit; Gao, Yu; Coquet, Jonathan; Reilly, Marie; Rottenberg, Martin E

    2016-09-15

    Conditional gene targeting using the bacteriophage-derived Cre recombinase is widely applied for functional gene studies in mice. Mice transgenic for Cre under the control of the lck gene promoter are used to study the role of loxP-targeted genes in T cell development and function. In this article, we show a striking 65% reduction in cellularity, preferential development of γδ versus αβ T cells, and increased expression of IL-7R in the thymus of mice expressing Cre under the proximal lck promoter (lck-cre(+) mice). The transition from CD4/CD8 double-negative to double-positive cells was blocked, and lck-cre(+) double-positive cells were more prone to apoptosis and showed higher levels of Cre expression. Importantly, numbers of naive T cells were reduced in spleens and lymph nodes of lck-cre(+) mice. In contrast, frequencies of γδ T cells, CD44(+)CD62L(-) effector T cells, and Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells were elevated, as was the frequency of IFN-γ-secreting CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. A literature survey of 332 articles that used lck-cre(+) mice for deletion of floxed genes indicated that results are statistically influenced by the control used (lck-cre(+) or lck-cre(-)), more frequently resembling the lck-cre(+) phenotype described in this article if lck-cre(-) controls were used. Altogether, care should be taken when interpreting published results and to properly control targeted gene deletions using the lck-cre(+) strain. PMID:27503210

  8. SAP-Dependent and -Independent Regulation of Innate T Cell Development Involving SLAMF Receptors.

    PubMed

    De Calisto, Jaime; Wang, Ninghai; Wang, Guoxing; Yigit, Burcu; Engel, Pablo; Terhorst, Cox

    2014-01-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP) plays an essential role in the immune system mediating the function of several members of the SLAM family (SLAMF) of receptors, whose expression is essential for T, NK, and B-cell responses. Additionally, the expression of SAP in double-positive thymocytes is mandatory for natural killer T (NKT) cells and, in mouse, for innate CD8(+) T cell development. To date, only two members of the SLAMF of receptors, Slamf1 and Slamf6, have been shown to positively cooperate during NKT cell differentiation in mouse. However, it is less clear whether other members of this family may also participate in the development of these innate T cells. Here, we show that Slamf[1 + 6](-/-) and Slamf[1 + 5 + 6](-/-) B6 mice have ~70% reduction of NKT cells compared to wild-type B6 mice. Unexpectedly, the proportion of innate CD8(+) T cells slightly increased in the Slamf[1 + 5 + 6](-/-) , but not in the Slamf[1 + 6](-/-) strain, suggesting that Slamf5 may function as a negative regulator of innate CD8(+) T cell development. Accordingly, Slamf5(-/-) B6 mice showed an exclusive expansion of innate CD8(+) T cells, but not NKT cells. Interestingly, the SAP-independent Slamf7(-/-) strain showed an expansion of both splenic innate CD8(+) T cells and thymic NKT cells. On the other hand, and similar to what was recently shown in Slamf3(-/-) BALB/c mice, the proportions of thymic promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF(hi)) NKT cells and innate CD8(+) T cells significantly increased in the SAP-independent Slamf8(-/-) BALB/c strain. In summary, these results show that NKT and innate CD8(+) T cell development can be regulated in a SAP-dependent and -independent fashion by SLAMF receptors, in which Slamf1, Slamf6, and Slamf8 affect development of NKT cells, and that Slamf5, Slamf7, and Slamf8 affect the development of innate CD8(+) T cells.

  9. PD-1 and Tim-3 pathways are associated with regulatory CD8+ T-cell function in decidua and maintenance of normal pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Wang, S-C; Li, Y-H; Piao, H-L; Hong, X-W; Zhang, D; Xu, Y-Y; Tao, Y; Wang, Y; Yuan, M-M; Li, D-J; Du, M-R

    2015-01-01

    CD8+ T cells are critical in the balance between fetal tolerance and antiviral immunity. T-cell immunoglobulin mucin-3 (Tim-3) and programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) are important negative immune regulatory molecules involved in viral persistence and tumor metastasis. Here, we demonstrate that Tim-3+PD-1+CD8+ T cells from decidua greatly outnumbered those from peripheral blood during human early pregnancy. Co-culture of trophoblasts with CD8+ T cells upregulated PD-1+ and/or Tim-3+ immune cells. Furthermore, the population of CD8+ T cells co-expressing PD-1 and Tim-3 was enriched within the intermediate memory subset in decidua. This population exhibited high proliferative activity and Th2-type cytokine producing capacity. Blockade of Tim-3 and PD-1 resulted in decreased in vitro proliferation and Th2-type cytokine production while increased trophoblast killing and IFN-γ producing capacities of CD8+ T cells. Pregnant CBA/J females challenged with Tim-3 and/or PD-1 blocking antibodies were more susceptible to fetal loss, which was associated with CD8+ T-cell dysfunction. Importantly, the number and function of Tim-3+PD-1+CD8+ T cells in decidua were significantly impaired in miscarriage. These findings underline the important roles of Tim-3 and PD-1 pathways in regulating decidual CD8+ T-cell function and maintaining normal pregnancy.

  10. Kinetics of T-cell receptor-dependent antigen recognition determined in vivo by multi-spectral normalized epifluorescence laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favicchio, Rosy; Zacharakis, Giannis; Oikonomaki, Katerina; Zacharopoulos, Athanasios; Mamalaki, Clio; Ripoll, Jorge

    2012-07-01

    Detection of multiple fluorophores in conditions of low signal represents a limiting factor for the application of in vivo optical imaging techniques in immunology where fluorescent labels report for different functional characteristics. A noninvasive in vivo Multi-Spectral Normalized Epifluorescence Laser scanning (M-SNELS) method was developed for the simultaneous and quantitative detection of multiple fluorophores in low signal to noise ratios and used to follow T-cell activation and clonal expansion. Colocalized DsRed- and GFP-labeled T cells were followed in tandem during the mounting of an immune response. Spectral unmixing was used to distinguish the overlapping fluorescent emissions representative of the two distinct cell populations and longitudinal data reported the discrete pattern of antigen-driven proliferation. Retrieved values were validated both in vitro and in vivo with flow cytometry and significant correlation between all methodologies was achieved. Noninvasive M-SNELS successfully quantified two colocalized fluorescent populations and provides a valid alternative imaging approach to traditional invasive methods for detecting T cell dynamics.

  11. [Development of Tax-redirected T-cell immunotherapy using TCR gene transduction in patients with ATL].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yukie; Kanda, Yoshinobu

    2015-07-01

    ATL is an aggressive T-cell malignancy caused by HTLV-1 virus infection. Tax, which is the most important regulatory protein of HTLV-1, is associated with aggressive proliferation of host cells and is also a major target antigen for CD8⁺ cytotoxic T-cells (CTLs). Recently, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) has proven effective for ATL, and donor-derived Tax-specific CTL might contribute to graft-versus-ATL effects in some recipients who maintained complete remission after allo-HSCT. We, for the first time, analyzed the Tax-specific T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire, phenotypes and functions of Tax-specific CTLs at single-cell levels in HLA-A24⁺ ATL patients who underwent allo-HSCT. We found that 1) a particular amino acid sequence motif (PDR) in the CDR3 region of TCR-β was conserved in different patients and also within the same patient before and after allo-HSCT, and 2) the PDR⁺ Tax-specific CTL clone selectively expanded in ATL long-term survivors as less-differentiated effector memory CTLs. Actually, the PDR⁺ CTL showed not only strong binding activity for the Tax-tetramer but also strong killing activity against patients' HTLV-1-infected T-cells without any reaction against normal cells. We are presently evaluating the killing activities of PDR⁺ TCR-transduced T-cells against Tax in immunodeficient mice, with the aim of developing a new immunotherapy for ATL.

  12. The effects of radio-frequency electromagnetic fields on T cell function during development.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Shin; Ushiyama, Akira; Maeda, Machiko; Ogasawara, Yuki; Wang, Jianqing; Kunugita, Naoki; Ishii, Kazuyuki

    2015-05-01

    With the widespread use of radio-frequency devices, it is increasingly important to understand the biological effects of the associated electromagnetic fields. Thus, we investigated the effects of radio-frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) on T cell responses during development due to the lack of science-based evidence for RF-EMF effects on developmental immune systems. Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were exposed to 2.14-GHz wideband code division multiple-access (W-CDMA) RF signals at a whole-body specific absorption rate (SAR) of 0.2 W/kg. Exposures were performed for a total of 9 weeks spanning in utero development, lactation and the juvenile period. Rats were continuously exposed to RF-EMF for 20 h/day, 7 days/week. Comparisons of control and exposed rats using flow cytometry revealed no changes in the numbers of CD4/CD8 T cells, activated T cells or regulatory T cells among peripheral blood cells, splenocytes and thymocytes. Expression levels of 16 genes that regulate the immunological Th1/Th2 paradigm were analyzed using real-time PCR in the spleen and thymus tissues of control and RF-EMF-exposed rats. Although only the Il5 gene was significantly regulated in spleen tissues, Il4, Il5 and Il23a genes were significantly upregulated in thymus tissues following exposure to RF-EMF. However, ELISAs showed no changes in serum IL-4 protein concentrations. These data indicate no adverse effects of long-term RF-EMF exposure on immune-like T cell populations, T cell activation, or Th1/Th2 balance in developing rats, although significant transcriptional effects were observed.

  13. The effects of radio-frequency electromagnetic fields on T cell function during development

    PubMed Central

    Ohtani, Shin; Ushiyama, Akira; Maeda, Machiko; Ogasawara, Yuki; Wang, Jianqing; Kunugita, Naoki; Ishii, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-01

    With the widespread use of radio-frequency devices, it is increasingly important to understand the biological effects of the associated electromagnetic fields. Thus, we investigated the effects of radio-frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) on T cell responses during development due to the lack of science-based evidence for RF-EMF effects on developmental immune systems. Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were exposed to 2.14-GHz wideband code division multiple-access (W-CDMA) RF signals at a whole-body specific absorption rate (SAR) of 0.2 W/kg. Exposures were performed for a total of 9 weeks spanning in utero development, lactation and the juvenile period. Rats were continuously exposed to RF-EMF for 20 h/day, 7 days/week. Comparisons of control and exposed rats using flow cytometry revealed no changes in the numbers of CD4/CD8 T cells, activated T cells or regulatory T cells among peripheral blood cells, splenocytes and thymocytes. Expression levels of 16 genes that regulate the immunological Th1/Th2 paradigm were analyzed using real-time PCR in the spleen and thymus tissues of control and RF-EMF–exposed rats. Although only the Il5 gene was significantly regulated in spleen tissues, Il4, Il5 and Il23a genes were significantly upregulated in thymus tissues following exposure to RF-EMF. However, ELISAs showed no changes in serum IL-4 protein concentrations. These data indicate no adverse effects of long-term RF-EMF exposure on immune-like T cell populations, T cell activation, or Th1/Th2 balance in developing rats, although significant transcriptional effects were observed. PMID:25835473

  14. An alternative Fc gamma-receptor ligand: potential role in T-cell development.

    PubMed Central

    Sandor, M; Galon, J; Takacs, L; Tatsumi, Y; Mueller, A L; Sautes, C; Lynch, R G

    1994-01-01

    Fetal pre-T cells express low-affinity receptors for IgG (Fc gamma R) at a developmental stage prior to the rearrangement and expression of immunoglobulin genes. The present studies investigated the possible functional significance of Fc gamma R on fetal pre-T cells. Between 13 and 17 days of fetal development a subpopulation of T-cell receptor-, Thy-1+ thymocytes express for gamma R. The same cells contain mRNA for several forms of Fc gamma R (Fc gamma RII beta 1, beta 2, and Fc gamma RIII). Concurrently, a Pgp-1-, Thy-1-, surface-immunoglobulin- fetal thymic cell binds recombinant soluble Fc gamma R. In principle this cell can interact with the pre-T cells through this counter-receptor. To test this possibility anti-Fc gamma RII/III antibody (2.4G2) was injected into pregnant mice and then into their offspring for 6 wk postpartum. The injected antibody induced a slight increase in the proportion of CD4 or CD8 single-positive, alpha/beta T cells in the thymus. However, in fetal thymic cultures in the presence of 2.4G2 or the recombinant soluble Fc gamma R there was an accelerated differentiation of thymocytes to single-positive, CD3-bright, heat-stable antigen-dull, alpha/beta T cells. These experiments show that Fc gamma Rs are present on pre-T cells during early fetal thymic development, and that a non-IgG ligand of the Fc gamma R is expressed concurrently on Thy- fetal thymocytes. Furthermore, the presumed interaction of Fc gamma R and the alternative ligand(s) influences T-cell development. IgG binding could be an adapted function of Fc gamma Rs, and, as shown for many members of the Ig super family, these receptors may have originally served as cell-cell recognition/interaction molecules required for hematopoietic development. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7809135

  15. Innate PLZF+ CD4+ αβ T cells develop and expand in the absence of Itk1

    PubMed Central

    Prince, Amanda L.; Watkin, Levi B.; Yin, Catherine C.; Selin, Liisa K.; Kang, Joonsoo; Schwartzberg, Pamela L.; Berg, Leslie J.

    2014-01-01

    T cell development in the thymus produces multiple lineages of cells, including innate T cells. Studies in mice harboring alterations in TCR signaling proteins or transcriptional regulators have revealed an expanded population of CD4+ innate T cells in the thymus that produce IL-4 and express the transcription factor PLZF. In these mice, IL-4 produced by the CD4+ PLZF+ T cell population leads to the conversion of conventional CD8+ thymocytes into innate CD8+ T cells resembling memory T cells expressing Eomesodermin. The expression of PLZF, the signature iNKT cell transcription factor, in these innate CD4+ T cells suggests that they might be a subset of αβ or γδ TCR+ NKT cells or MAIT cells. To address these possibilities, we characterized the CD4+ PLZF+ innate T cells in itk-/- mice. We show that itk-/- innate PLZF+ CD4+ T cells are not CD1d-dependent NKT cells, MR1-dependent MAIT cells, nor γδ T cells. Further, although the itk-/- innate PLZF+ CD4+ T cells express αβ TCRs, neither β2m-dependent MHC class I nor any MHC class II molecules are required for their development. In contrast to iNKT cells and MAIT cells, this population has a highly diverse TCRα chain repertoire. Analysis of peripheral tissues indicates that itk-/- innate PLZF+ CD4+ T cells preferentially home to spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes due to increased expression of gut-homing receptors, and that their expansion is regulated by commensal gut flora. These data support the conclusion that itk-/- innate PLZF+ CD4+ T cells are a novel subset of innate T cells. PMID:24928994

  16. Critical roles of RasGRP1 for invariant natural killer T cell development

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shudan; Chen, Yong; Gorentla, Balachandra; Lu, Jianxin; Stone, James C.; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2011-01-01

    The invariant NKT (iNKT) cell lineage contains CD4+ and CD4- subsets. The mechanisms that control such subset differentiation and iNKT cell maturation in general have not been fully understood. RasGRP1, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for T cell receptor-induced activation of the Ras-Erk1/2 pathway, is critical for conventional αβ T cell development but dispensable for generating regulatory T cells. Its role in iNKT cells has been unknown. Here we report severe decreases of iNKT cells in RasGRP1-/- mice through cell intrinsic mechanisms. In the remaining iNKT cells in RasGRP1-/- mice, there is a selective absence of the CD4+ subset. Furthermore, RasGRP1-/- iNKT cells are defective in T cell receptor induced proliferation in vitro. These observations establish that RasGRP1 is not only important for early iNKT cell development, but also for the generation/maintenance of the CD4+ iNKT cells. Our data provides genetic evidence that the CD4+ and CD4- iNKT cells are distinct sub-lineages with differential signaling requirements for their development. PMID:21957144

  17. Regulatory T-cell Trafficking: From Thymic Development to Tumor-Induced Immune Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Mailloux, Adam W.; Young, M. Rita I.

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have become a priority for many investigators in immunology due to their potent immunosuppressive and tolerogenic effects. While Treg activity is required for normal immune homeostasis, dysregulation of their numbers can induce autoimmunity or aid in the pathogenesis of disease. Therefore, great effort has been made to understand the mechanisms by which Tregs accumulate in different areas of the body. Like other lymphocytes, Tregs migrate in response to a network of chemotactic stimuli involving chemokines, chemokine receptors, integrins, and their corresponding ligands. However, many of these stimuli are exclusive to Tregs, inducing their migration while leaving conventional populations unaffected. It is these selective stimuli that result in increased ratios of Tregs among conventional effector populations, leading to changes in immune suppression and homeostasis. This review explores selective Treg trafficking during thymic Treg development, migration to secondary lymphoid tissues and emigration into the periphery during homeostatic conditions, inflammation, and the tumor microenvironment, placing emphasis on stimuli that selectively recruits Tregs to target locations. PMID:21083525

  18. Comparative assessment of therapeutic safety of norcantharidin, N-farnesyloxy-norcantharimide, and N-farnesyl-norcantharimide against Jurkat T cells relative to human normal lymphoblast

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ming-Che; Wu, Jin-Yi; Liao, Hui-Fen; Chen, Yu-Jen; Kuo, Cheng-Deng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The therapeutic safety of an anticancer drug is one of the most important concerns of the physician treating the cancer patient. Half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) and hillslope are usually used to represent the strength and sensitivity of an anticancer drug on cancer cells. The therapeutic safety of the anticancer drug can be assessed by comparing the IC50 and hillslope of anticancer drugs on cancer cells relative to normal cells. Since there are situations where “more anticancer activity” implies “more toxicity,” the safety of an anticancer drug in these situations is hard to evaluate by using IC50 and hillslope alone. In a previous study, the “net effect” index was devised to represent the net therapeutic effects of one anticancer drug relative to the other. However, the therapeutic safety of one specific anticancer drug alone was not defined in the “net effect” index. This study introduced the “safety index (SI)” to quantify the degree of safety of an anticancer drug by using 4-parameter logistic model on cancer cells relative to normal cells. The therapeutic safety of norcantharidin (NCTD), N-farnesyloxy-norcantharimide (NOC15), and N-farnesyl-norcantharimide (NC15) in the treatment of Jurkat T cells relative to human normal lymphoblast was compared using the newly defined SI. We found that the SI of NOC15 and NC15 was significantly higher than that of NCTD, suggesting that both NOC15 and NC15 can damage more cancer cells and less normal cells than NCTD. We conclude that both NOC15 and NC15 are safer anticancer drugs than NCTD in the treatment of Jurkat T cells relative to human normal lymphoblast. The SI can be further applied to the screening, developments, and applications of anticancer drugs in the future. PMID:27495082

  19. Dietary Zinc Deficiency in Rodents: Effects on T-Cell Development, Maturation and Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Blewett, Heather J.; Taylor, Carla G.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for developing disease and yet we do not have a clear understanding of the mechanisms behind the increased susceptibility to infection. This review will examine the interrelationships among the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal stress axis, p56lck, and T-cell maturation in both zinc deficiency and responses during zinc repletion. We will highlight differences between the adult mouse model (wasting malnutrition) and growing rat model (stunting malnutrition) of dietary zinc deficiency and discuss the use of various controls to separate out the effects of zinc deficiency from the associated malnutrition. Elevated serum corticosterone in both zinc deficient and pair-fed rats does not support the hypothesis that zinc deficiency per se leads to corticosterone-induced apoptosis and lymphopenia. In fact, the zinc deficient rat does not have lymphopenia. Thymocytes from zinc deficient mice and rats have elevated levels of p56lck, a signalling protein with a zinc clasp structure, but this does not appear to affect thymocyte maturation. However, post-thymic T-cell maturation appears to be altered based on the lower proportion of splenic late thymic emigrants in zinc deficient rats. Fewer new T-cells in the periphery could adversely affect the T-cell repertoire and contribute to immunodeficiency in zinc deficiency. PMID:22822446

  20. Maternal Milk T Cells Drive Development of Transgenerational Th1 Immunity in Offspring Thymus

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Mrinal K.; Nguyen, Virginia; Muller, H. Konrad

    2016-01-01

    Using multiple murine foster-nursing protocols, thereby eliminating placental transfer and allowing a distinction between dam- and pup-derived cells, we show that foster nursing by an immunized dam results in development of CD8+ T cells in nonimmunized foster pups that are specific for Ags against which the foster dam was immunized (Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Candida albicans). We have dubbed this process “maternal educational immunity” to distinguish it from passive cellular immunity. Of the variety of maternal immune cells present in milk, only T cells were detected in pup tissues. Maternal T cells, a substantial percentage of which were CD4+MHC class II+, accumulated in the pup thymus and spleen during the nursing period. Further analysis of maternal cells in the pup thymus showed that a proportion was positive for maternal immunogen-specific MHC class II tetramers. To determine the outcome of Ag presentation in the thymus, the maternal or foster pup origin of immunogen-responding CD8+ cells in foster pup spleens was assessed. Whereas ∼10% were maternally derived in the first few weeks after weaning, all immunogen-responding CD8+ T cells were pup derived by 12 wk of age. Pup-derived immunogen-responsive CD8+ cells persisted until at least 1 y of age. Passive cellular immunity is well accepted and has been demonstrated in the human population. In this study, we show an arguably more important role for transferred immune cells: the direction of offspring T cell development. Harnessing maternal educational immunity through prepregnancy immunization programs has potential for improvement of infant immunity. PMID:27496970

  1. Maternal Milk T Cells Drive Development of Transgenerational Th1 Immunity in Offspring Thymus.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Mrinal K; Nguyen, Virginia; Muller, H Konrad; Walker, Ameae M

    2016-09-15

    Using multiple murine foster-nursing protocols, thereby eliminating placental transfer and allowing a distinction between dam- and pup-derived cells, we show that foster nursing by an immunized dam results in development of CD8(+) T cells in nonimmunized foster pups that are specific for Ags against which the foster dam was immunized (Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Candida albicans). We have dubbed this process "maternal educational immunity" to distinguish it from passive cellular immunity. Of the variety of maternal immune cells present in milk, only T cells were detected in pup tissues. Maternal T cells, a substantial percentage of which were CD4(+)MHC class II(+), accumulated in the pup thymus and spleen during the nursing period. Further analysis of maternal cells in the pup thymus showed that a proportion was positive for maternal immunogen-specific MHC class II tetramers. To determine the outcome of Ag presentation in the thymus, the maternal or foster pup origin of immunogen-responding CD8(+) cells in foster pup spleens was assessed. Whereas ∼10% were maternally derived in the first few weeks after weaning, all immunogen-responding CD8(+) T cells were pup derived by 12 wk of age. Pup-derived immunogen-responsive CD8(+) cells persisted until at least 1 y of age. Passive cellular immunity is well accepted and has been demonstrated in the human population. In this study, we show an arguably more important role for transferred immune cells: the direction of offspring T cell development. Harnessing maternal educational immunity through prepregnancy immunization programs has potential for improvement of infant immunity. PMID:27496970

  2. Disregulated expression of the transcription factor ThPOK during T-cell development leads to high incidence of T-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyung-Ok; He, Xiao; Mookerjee-Basu, Jayati; Zhongping, Dai; Hua, Xiang; Nicolas, Emmanuelle; Sulis, Maria Luisa; Ferrando, Adolfo A.; Testa, Joseph R.; Kappes, Dietmar J.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor T-helper-inducing POZ/Krueppel-like factor (ThPOK, encoded by the Zbtb7b gene) plays widespread and critical roles in T-cell development, particularly as the master regulator of CD4 commitment. Here we show that mice expressing a constitutive T-cell–specific ThPOK transgene (ThPOKconst mice) develop thymic lymphomas. These tumors resemble human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), in that they predominantly exhibit activating Notch1 mutations. Lymphomagenesis is prevented if thymocyte development is arrested at the DN3 stage by recombination-activating gene (RAG) deficiency, but restored by introduction of a T-cell receptor (TCR) transgene or by a single injection of anti-αβTCR antibody into ThPOKconst RAG-deficient mice, which promotes development to the CD4+8+ (DP) stage. Hence, TCR signals and/or traversal of the DN (double negative) > DP (double positive) checkpoint are required for ThPOK-mediated lymphomagenesis. These results demonstrate a novel link between ThPOK, TCR signaling, and lymphomagenesis. Finally, we present evidence that ectopic ThPOK expression gives rise to a preleukemic and self-perpetuating DN4 lymphoma precursor population. Our results collectively define a novel role for ThPOK as an oncogene and precisely map the stage in thymopoiesis susceptible to ThPOK-dependent tumor initiation. PMID:26056302

  3. Models of Self-Peptide Sampling by Developing T Cells Identify Candidate Mechanisms of Thymic Selection

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Iren; van Santen, Hisse M.; Seddon, Benedict; Yates, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Conventional and regulatory T cells develop in the thymus where they are exposed to samples of self-peptide MHC (pMHC) ligands. This probabilistic process selects for cells within a range of responsiveness that allows the detection of foreign antigen without excessive responses to self. Regulatory T cells are thought to lie at the higher end of the spectrum of acceptable self-reactivity and play a crucial role in the control of autoimmunity and tolerance to innocuous antigens. While many studies have elucidated key elements influencing lineage commitment, we still lack a full understanding of how thymocytes integrate signals obtained by sampling self-peptides to make fate decisions. To address this problem, we apply stochastic models of signal integration by T cells to data from a study quantifying the development of the two lineages using controllable levels of agonist peptide in the thymus. We find two models are able to explain the observations; one in which T cells continually re-assess fate decisions on the basis of multiple summed proximal signals from TCR-pMHC interactions; and another in which TCR sensitivity is modulated over time, such that contact with the same pMHC ligand may lead to divergent outcomes at different stages of development. Neither model requires that T and T are differentially susceptible to deletion or that the two lineages need qualitatively different signals for development, as have been proposed. We find additional support for the variable-sensitivity model, which is able to explain apparently paradoxical observations regarding the effect of partial and strong agonists on T and T development. PMID:23935465

  4. Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling Regulates Development and Activation of CD4(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    Kuczma, Michal; Kraj, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are growth factors belonging to the TGF-β (transforming growth factor β) superfamily. BMPs were found to regulate multiple cell processes such as proliferation, survival, differentiation, and apoptosis. They were originally described to play a pivotal role in inducing bone, cartilage, ligament, and tendon formation at both heterotopic and orthotopic sites but were found to play a significant role in embryogenesis and development of multiple tissues and organs. Activities of BMPs are regulated by a number of secreted proteins, which modulate their availability to bind cellular receptors. The functions of individual BMPs are highly redundant due to binding the same receptors and inducing overlapping signal transduction pathways. Recently, BMPs were found to regulate cells of the innate and adaptive immune system. BMPs are involved in thymic development of T cells at the early, double negative, as well as later, double positive, stages of thymopoesis. They specifically modulate thymic development of regulatory T cells (T(reg)). In the periphery, BMPs affect T cell activation, promoting generation of T(reg) cells. We found that mice deficient for one of the receptors activated by BMPs demonstrated slower growth of transplantable melanoma tumors.

  5. Depletion of CD4 T cells enhances immunotherapy for neuroblastoma after syngeneic HSCT but compromises development of antitumor immune memory.

    PubMed

    Jing, Weiqing; Gershan, Jill A; Johnson, Bryon D

    2009-04-30

    High-risk neuroblastoma remains a clinically challenging disease. Here, we report that a multifaceted immunotherapeutic approach including syngeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), adoptive transfer of sensitized T cells (from syngeneic donors vaccinated to tumor antigens), and early posttransplantation tumor vaccination can effectively treat mice with established neuroblastoma. Vaccination was an important component of this immunotherapy, as it resulted in enhanced and prolonged tumor-specific CD8 T-cell activity and improved antitumor efficacy. Surprisingly, CD4 cell depletion of mice given sensitized T cells resulted in better tumor-free survival, which was associated with an early increased expansion of CD8 T cells with an effector phenotype, increased numbers of tumor-reactive CD8 T cells, and increased tumor infiltration by CD8 T cells. However, in the absence of CD4 T cells, development of long-term tumor immunity (memory) was severely compromised as reflected by diminished CD8 T-cell recall responses and an inability to resist tumor rechallenge in vivo. Based on these results, a major challenge with this immunotherapeutic approach is how to obtain the ideal initial antitumor response but still preserve antitumor immune memory. These data suggest that identification and selective depletion of immune inhibitory CD4 T cells may be a strategy to enhance early antitumor immunity and induce a long-lasting tumor response after HSCT.

  6. Development of T cell lymphoma in HTLV-1 bZIP factor and Tax double transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tiejun; Satou, Yorifumi; Matsuoka, Masao

    2014-07-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is an aggressive T-cell malignancy caused by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). ATL cells possess a CD4+ CD25+ phenotype, similar to that of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Tax has been reported to play a crucial role in the leukemogenesis of HTLV-1. The HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ), which is encoded by the minus strand of the viral genomic RNA, is expressed in all ATL cases and induces neoplastic and inflammatory disease in vivo. To test whether HBZ and Tax are both required for T cell malignancy, we generated HBZ/Tax double transgenic mice in which HBZ and Tax are expressed exclusively in CD4+ T cells. Survival was much reduced in HBZ/Tax double-transgenic mice compared with wild type littermates. Transgenic expression of HBZ and Tax induced skin lesions and T-cell lymphoma in mice, resembling diseases observed in HTLV-1 infected individuals. However, Tax single transgenic mice did not develop major health problems. In addition, memory CD4+ T cells and Foxp3+ Treg cells counts were increased in HBZ/Tax double transgenic mice, and their proliferation was enhanced. There was very little difference between HBZ single and HBZ/Tax double transgenic mice. Taken together, these results show that HBZ, in addition to Tax, plays a critical role in T-cell lymphoma arising from HTLV-1 infection.

  7. CXCR3 Blockade Inhibits T Cell Migration into the Skin and Prevents Development of Alopecia Areata.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhenpeng; Xing, Luzhou; Cerise, Jane; Wang, Eddy Hsi Chun; Jabbari, Ali; de Jong, Annemieke; Petukhova, Lynn; Christiano, Angela M; Clynes, Raphael

    2016-08-15

    Alopecia areata (AA) is an autoimmune disease of the hair follicle that results in hair loss of varying severity. Recently, we showed that IFN-γ-producing NKG2D(+)CD8(+) T cells actively infiltrate the hair follicle and are responsible for its destruction in C3H/HeJ AA mice. Our transcriptional profiling of human and mouse alopecic skin showed that the IFN pathway is the dominant signaling pathway involved in AA. We showed that IFN-inducible chemokines (CXCL9/10/11) are markedly upregulated in the skin of AA lesions, and further, that the IFN-inducible chemokine receptor, CXCR3, is upregulated on alopecic effector T cells. To demonstrate whether CXCL9/10/11 chemokines were required for development of AA, we treated mice with blocking Abs to CXCR3, which prevented the development of AA in the graft model, inhibiting the accumulation of NKG2D(+)CD8(+) T cells in the skin and cutaneous lymph nodes. These data demonstrate proof of concept that interfering with the Tc1 response in AA via blockade of IFN-inducible chemokines can prevent the onset of AA. CXCR3 blockade could be approached clinically in human AA with either biologic or small-molecule inhibition, the latter being particularly intriguing as a topical therapeutic. PMID:27412416

  8. Impairment of T cell development and acute inflammatory response in HIV-1 Tat transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Fiume, Giuseppe; Scialdone, Annarita; Albano, Francesco; Rossi, Annalisa; Maria Tuccillo, Franca; Rea, Domenica; Palmieri, Camillo; Caiazzo, Elisabetta; Cicala, Carla; Bellevicine, Claudio; Falcone, Cristina; Vecchio, Eleonora; Pisano, Antonio; Ceglia, Simona; Mimmi, Selena; Iaccino, Enrico; Laurentiis, Annamaria de; Pontoriero, Marilena; Agosti, Valter; Troncone, Giancarlo; Mignogna, Chiara; Palma, Giuseppe; Arra, Claudio; Mallardo, Massimo; Maria Buonaguro, Franco; Scala, Giuseppe; Quinto, Ileana

    2015-01-01

    Immune activation and chronic inflammation are hallmark features of HIV infection causing T-cell depletion and cellular immune dysfunction in AIDS. Here, we addressed the issue whether HIV-1 Tat could affect T cell development and acute inflammatory response by generating a transgenic mouse expressing Tat in lymphoid tissue. Tat-Tg mice showed thymus atrophy and the maturation block from DN4 to DP thymic subpopulations, resulting in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells depletion in peripheral blood. In Tat-positive thymus, we observed the increased p65/NF-κB activity and deregulated expression of cytokines/chemokines and microRNA-181a-1, which are involved in T-lymphopoiesis. Upon LPS intraperitoneal injection, Tat-Tg mice developed an abnormal acute inflammatory response, which was characterized by enhanced lethality and production of inflammatory cytokines. Based on these findings, Tat-Tg mouse could represent an animal model for testing adjunctive therapies of HIV-1-associated inflammation and immune deregulation. PMID:26343909

  9. Proinflammatory cytokines contribute to development and function of regulatory T cells in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Helen E; Graham, Kate L; Chee, Jonathan; Thomas, Ranjeny; Kay, Thomas W; Krishnamurthy, Balasubramanian

    2013-04-01

    Type 1 diabetes is caused by immune-mediated loss of pancreatic beta cells. It has been proposed that inflammatory cytokines play a role in killing beta cells. Expression of interleukin (IL)-1 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) has been detected in islets from patients with type 1 diabetes, and these cytokines can induce beta cell death in vitro. We produced nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice lacking receptors for these cytokines. Islets from mice lacking IL-1RI or TNFR1 were killed when transplanted into wild-type NOD mice, suggesting that cytokine action on beta cells is not required for killing. Mice lacking TNFR1 did not develop diabetes, and mice lacking IL-1R had delayed onset of diabetes, indicating a role for these cytokines in disease development. TNFR1-deficient mice had an increased number of CD4(+) CD25(+) FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells with enhanced suppressive capacity. IL-1 was produced at higher levels in NOD mice and resulted in dilution of suppressor function of CD4(+) CD25(+) FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells. Our data suggest that blocking inflammatory cytokines may increase the capacity of the immune system to suppress type 1 diabetes through regulatory T cells.

  10. Role of Ets Proteins in Development, Differentiation, and Function of T-Cell Subsets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mian; Gao, Weiwu; van Velkinburgh, Jennifer C; Wu, Yuzhang; Ni, Bing; Tian, Yi

    2016-03-01

    Through positive selection, double-positive cells in the thymus differentiate into CD4(+) or CD8(+) T single-positive cells that subsequently develop into different types of effective T cells, such as T-helper and cytotoxic T lymphocyte cells, that play distinctive roles in the immune system. Development, differentiation, and function of thymocytes and CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells are controlled by a multitude of secreted and intracellular factors, ranging from cytokine signaling modules to transcription factors and epigenetic modifiers. Members of the E26 transformation specific (Ets) family of transcription factors, in particular, are potent regulators of these CD4(+) or CD8(+) T-cell processes. In this review, we summarize and discuss the functions and underlying mechanisms of the Ets family members that have been characterized as involved in these processes. Ongoing research of these factors is expected to identify practical applications for the Ets family members as novel therapeutic targets for inflammation-related diseases.

  11. Activated T cells induce expression of B7/BB1 on normal or leukemic B cells through a CD40-dependent signal

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Cognate interactions between antigen-presenting B and T cells play crucial roles in immunologic responses. T cells that have been activated via the crosslinking of CD3 are able to induce B cell proliferation and immunoglobulin secretion in a major histocompatibility complex-unrestricted and contact-dependent manner. We find that such activated human CD4+ T cells, but not control Ig- treated T cells, may induce normal or leukemic B cells to express B7/BB1 and significantly higher levels of CD54 intercellular adhesion molecule 1 via a process that also requires direct cell-cell contact. To discern what cell surface molecule(s) may be responsible for signalling B cells to express B7/BB1, we added various monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for T or B cell accessory molecules or control mAbs to cocultures of alpha-CD3-activated T cells and resting B cells. We find that only alpha-CD40 mAbs can significantly inhibit the increased expression of B7/BB1, suggesting that the ligand for CD40 expressed on activated T cells may be an important inducer of B7/BB1 expression. Subsequent experiments in fact demonstrate that alpha-CD40 mAbs, but not control mAbs, induce changes in B cell phenotype similar to those induced by activated T cells when the mAbs are presented on Fc gamma RII (CDw32)-expressing L cells. These phenotypic changes have significant effects on B cell function. Whereas chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) B cells normally are very poor stimulators in allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLRs), CLL-B cells preactivated via CD40 crosslinking are significantly better presenters of alloantigen, affecting up to 30-fold-greater stimulation of T cell proliferation than that induced by control treated or nontreated CLL-B cells. Similarly, the MLR of T cells stimulated by allogeneic nonleukemic B cells can be enhanced significantly if the stimulator B cells are preactivated via CD40 crosslinking. The enhanced MLR generated by such preactivated B cells may be inhibited

  12. Novel approaches in polyepitope T-cell vaccine development against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Karpenko, Larisa I; Bazhan, Sergei I; Antonets, Denis V; Belyakov, Igor M

    2014-01-01

    RV144 clinical trial was modestly effective in preventing HIV infection. New alternative approaches are needed to design improved HIV-1 vaccines and their delivery strategies. One of these approaches is construction of synthetic polyepitope HIV-1 immunogen using protective T- and B-cell epitopes that can induce broadly neutralizing antibodies and responses of cytotoxic (CD8(+) CTL) and helpers (CD4(+) Th) T-lymphocytes. This approach seems to be promising for designing of new generation of vaccines against HIV-1, enables in theory to cope with HIV-1 antigenic variability, focuses immune responses on protective determinants and enables to exclude from the vaccine compound that can induce autoantibodies or antibodies enhancing HIV-1 infectivity. Herein, the authors will focus on construction and rational design of polyepitope T-cell HIV-1 immunogens and their delivery, including: advantages and disadvantages of existing T-cell epitope prediction methods; features of organization of polyepitope immunogens, which can generate high-level CD8(+) and CD4(+) T-lymphocyte responses; the strategies to optimize efficient processing, presentation and immunogenicity of polyepitope constructs; original software to design polyepitope immunogens; and delivery vectors as well as mucosal strategies of vaccination. This new knowledge may bring us a one step closer to developing an effective T-cell vaccine against HIV-1, other chronic viral infections and cancer.

  13. Blocking development of a CD8+ T cell response by targeting lymphatic recruitment of APC.

    PubMed

    Teoh, Denise; Johnson, Louise A; Hanke, Tomas; McMichael, Andrew J; Jackson, David G

    2009-02-15

    Generating a protective immune response to viral infection is known to depend upon the priming and clonal expansion of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells by Ag-loaded dendritic cells (DC) within secondary lymphoid tissue. However, the actual initiation of the response involves critical upstream events that control the recruitment of mature Ag-charged DC from the periphery via afferent lymphatics, events that are still only partly understood. Recent evidence has revealed that transmigration of lymphatic endothelium by DC is regulated by the adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 both in vitro and in vivo. These findings imply that lymphatic entry may be an important rate-limiting step in primary immunity and a possible target for immune intervention. In this study, we have explored such possibilities using an F(5) TCR-transgenic mouse model to assess the contribution of lymphatic cell adhesion molecules in the CD8(+) T cell response to influenza virus nucleoprotein (NP). We show for the first time that immunization with ICAM-1- and VCAM-1-blocking mAbs can impair the T cell response in lymph node-draining sites of dermally administered nucleoprotein vaccine (MVA.HIVA.NP) by targeting lymphatic uptake of Ag-loaded DC ahead of other cell adhesion molecule-dependent events. These results reveal lymphatic entry as an important step that may be rate limiting in the development of immunity and reconfirm its potential as a target for localized immunotherapy in inflammation and tissue rejection.

  14. Transient CD4+ T Cell Depletion Results in Delayed Development of Functional Vaccine-Elicited Antibody Responses

    PubMed Central

    Provine, Nicholas M.; Badamchi-Zadeh, Alexander; Bricault, Christine A.; Penaloza-MacMaster, Pablo; Larocca, Rafael A.; Borducchi, Erica N.; Seaman, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have recently demonstrated that CD4+ T cell help is required at the time of adenovirus (Ad) vector immunization for the development of functional CD8+ T cell responses, but the temporal requirement for CD4+ T cell help for the induction of antibody responses remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that induction of antibody responses in C57BL/6 mice can occur at a time displaced from the time of Ad vector immunization by depletion of CD4+ T cells. Transient depletion of CD4+ T cells at the time of immunization delays the development of antigen-specific antibody responses but does not permanently impair their development or induce tolerance against the transgene. Upon CD4+ T cell recovery, transgene-specific serum IgG antibody titers develop and reach a concentration equivalent to that in undepleted control animals. These delayed antibody responses exhibit no functional defects with regard to isotype, functional avidity, expansion after boosting immunization, or the capacity to neutralize a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Env-expressing pseudovirus. The development of this delayed transgene-specific antibody response is temporally linked to the expansion of de novo antigen-specific CD4+ T cell responses, which develop after transient depletion of CD4+ T cells. These data demonstrate that functional vaccine-elicited antibody responses can be induced even if CD4+ T cell help is provided at a time markedly separated from the time of vaccination. IMPORTANCE CD4+ T cells have a critical role in providing positive help signals to B cells, which promote robust antibody responses. The paradigm is that helper signals must be provided immediately upon antigen exposure, and their absence results in tolerance against the antigen. Here we demonstrate that, in contrast to the current model that the absence of CD4+ T cell help at priming results in long-term antibody nonresponsiveness, antibody responses can be induced by adenovirus vector immunization or alum

  15. Dissecting the effects of endogenous brain IL-2 and normal versus autoreactive T lymphocytes on microglial responsiveness and T cell trafficking in response to axonal injury.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhi; Meola, Danielle; Petitto, John M

    2012-09-27

    IL-2 is essential for T-helper regulatory (Treg) cell function and self-tolerance, and dysregulation of both endogenous brain and peripheral IL-2 gene expression may have important implications for neuronal injury and repair. We used an experimental approach combining mouse congenic breeding and immune reconstitution to test the hypothesis that the response of motoneurons to injury is modulated by the combined effects of IL2-mediated processes in the brain that modulate its endogenous neuroimmunological milieu, and IL2-mediated processes in the peripheral immune system that regulate T cell function (i.e., normal versus autoreactive Treg-deficient T cells). This experimental strategy enabled us to test our hypothesis by disentangling the effect of normal versus autoreactive T lymphocytes from the effect of endogenous brain IL-2 on microglial responsiveness (microglial phagocytic clusters normally associated with dead motoneurons and MHC2(+) activated microglia) and T cell trafficking, using the facial nerve axotomy model of injury. The results demonstrate that the loss of both brain and peripheral IL-2 had an additive effect on numbers of microglial phagocytic clusters at day 14 following injury, whereas the autoreactive status of peripheral T cells was the primary factor that determined the degree to which T cells entered the injured brain and contributed to increased microglial phagocytic clusters. Changes in activated MHC2(+) microglial in the injured FMN were associated with loss of endogenous brain IL-2 and/or peripheral IL-2. This model may provide greater understanding of the mechanisms involved in determining if T cells entering the injured central nervous system (CNS) have damaging or proregenerative effects.

  16. Development of lifitegrast: a novel T-cell inhibitor for the treatment of dry eye disease

    PubMed Central

    Semba, Charles P; Gadek, Thomas R

    2016-01-01

    Dry eye disease (DED) is a multifactorial disorder of the ocular surface characterized by symptoms of discomfort, decreased tear quality, and chronic inflammation that affects an estimated 20 million patients in the US alone. DED is associated with localized inflammation of the ocular surface and periocular tissues leading to homing and activation of T cells, cytokine release, and development of hyperosmolar tears. This inflammatory milieu results in symptoms of eye dryness and discomfort. Homing of T cells to the ocular surface is influenced by the binding of lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1; CD11a/CD18; αLβ2), a cell surface adhesion protein, to its cognate ligand, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1; CD54), which is expressed on inflamed ocular/periocular epithelium and vascular endothelium. LFA-1/ICAM-1 binding within the immunologic synapse enables both T-cell activation and cytokine release. Lifitegrast is a novel T-cell integrin antagonist that is designed to mimic the binding epitope of ICAM-1. It serves as a molecular decoy to block the binding of LFA-1/ICAM-1 and inhibits the downstream inflammatory process. In vitro studies have demonstrated that lifitegrast inhibits T-cell adhesion to ICAM-1-expressing cells and inhibits secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interferon gamma, tumor necrosis factor alpha, macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha, interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, and IL-6, all of which are known to be associated with DED. Lifitegrast has the potential to be the first pharmaceutical product approved in the US indicated for the treatment of both symptoms and signs of DED. Clinical trials involving over 2,500 adult DED patients have demonstrated that topically administered lifitegrast 5.0% ophthalmic solution can rapidly reduce the symptoms of eye dryness and decrease ocular surface staining with an acceptable long-term safety profile. The purpose of this review is to highlight the developmental

  17. The Influence of T Cell Development on Pathogen Specificity and Autoreactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Košmrlj, Andrej; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2012-10-01

    T cells orchestrate adaptive immune responses upon activation. T cell activation requires sufficiently strong binding of T cell receptors on their surface to short peptides derived from foreign proteins bound to protein products of the major histocompatibility (MHC) gene products, which are displayed on the surface of antigen presenting cells. T cells can also interact with peptide-MHC complexes, where the peptide is derived from host (self) proteins. A diverse repertoire of relatively self-tolerant T cell receptors is selected in the thymus. We study a model, computationally and analytically, to describe how thymic selection shapes the repertoire of T cell receptors, such that T cell receptor recognition of pathogenic peptides is both specific and degenerate. We also discuss the escape probability of autoimmune T cells from the thymus.

  18. Influenza Virus–induced Dendritic Cell Maturation Is Associated with the Induction of Strong T Cell Immunity to a Coadministered, Normally Nonimmunogenic Protein

    PubMed Central

    Brimnes, Marie K.; Bonifaz, Laura; Steinman, Ralph M.; Moran, Thomas M.

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated the proposal that during microbial infection, dendritic cells (DCs) undergo maturation and present a mixture of peptides derived from the microbe as well as harmless environmental antigens. Mice were exposed to an aerosol of endotoxin free ovalbumin (OVA) in the absence or presence of influenza virus. In its absence, OVA failed to induce B and T cell responses and even tolerized, but with influenza, OVA-specific antibodies and CD8+ cytolytic T lymphocytes developed. With or without infection, OVA was presented selectively in the draining mediastinal lymph nodes, as assessed by the comparable proliferation of infused, CD8+ and CD4+, TCR transgenic T cells. In the absence of influenza, these OVA-specific T cells produced little IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, and IFN-γ, but with infection, both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells made high levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ. The OVA plus influenza-treated mice also showed accelerated recovery to a challenge with recombinant vaccinia OVA virus. CD11c+ DCs from the mediastinal lymph nodes of infected mice selectively stimulated both OVA- and influenza-specific T cells and underwent maturation, with higher levels of MHC class II, CD80, and CD86 molecules. The relatively slow (2–3 d) kinetics of maturation correlated closely to the time at which OVA inhalation elicited specific antibodies. Therefore respiratory infection can induce DC maturation and simultaneously B and T cell immunity to an innocuous antigen inhaled concurrently. PMID:12847140

  19. Development of leukemia in mice transgenic for the tax gene of human T-cell leukemia virus type I.

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, W J; Kimata, J T; Wong, F H; Zutter, M; Ley, T J; Ratner, L

    1995-01-01

    The human T-cell leukemia virus type I Tax protein trans-activates several cellular genes implicated in T-cell replication and activation. To investigate its leukemogenic potential, Tax was targeted to the mature T-lymphocyte compartment in transgenic mice by using the human granzyme B promoter. These mice developed large granular lymphocytic leukemia, demonstrating that expression of Tax in the lymphocyte compartment is sufficient for the development of leukemia. Furthermore, these observations suggest that human T-cell leukemia virus infection may be involved in the development of large granular lymphocytic leukemia. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:7862633

  20. CD4+ T cell expression of MyD88 is essential for normal resolution of Chlamydia muridarum genital tract infection1

    PubMed Central

    Frazer, Lauren C.; Sullivan, Jeanne E.; Zurenski, Matthew A.; Mintus, Margaret; Tomasak, Tammy E.; Prantner, Daniel; Nagarajan, Uma M.; Darville, Toni

    2013-01-01

    Resolution of Chlamydia genital tract infection is delayed in the absence of MyD88. In these studies, we first used bone marrow chimeras to demonstrate a requirement for MyD88 expression by hematopoietic cells in the presence of a wild-type epithelium. Using mixed bone marrow chimeras we then determined that MyD88 expression was specifically required in the adaptive immune compartment. Furthermore, adoptive transfer experiments revealed that CD4+ T cell expression of MyD88 was necessary for normal resolution of genital tract infection. This requirement was associated with a reduced ability of MyD88−/− CD4+ T cells to accumulate in the draining lymph nodes and genital tract when exposed to the same inflammatory milieu as wild-type CD4+ T cells. We also demonstrated that the impaired infection control we observed in the absence of MyD88 could not be recapitulated by deficiencies in TLR or IL-1R signaling. In vitro, we detected an increased frequency of apoptotic MyD88−/− CD4+ T cells upon activation in the absence of exogenous ligands for receptors upstream of MyD88. These data reveal an intrinsic requirement for MyD88 in CD4+ T cells during Chlamydia infection and indicate that the importance of MyD88 extends beyond innate immune responses by directly influencing adaptive immunity. PMID:24038087

  1. Noninvasive In Toto Imaging of the Thymus Reveals Heterogeneous Migratory Behavior of Developing T Cells.

    PubMed

    Bajoghli, Baubak; Kuri, Paola; Inoue, Daigo; Aghaallaei, Narges; Hanelt, Marleen; Thumberger, Thomas; Rauzi, Matteo; Wittbrodt, Joachim; Leptin, Maria

    2015-09-01

    The migration of developing T cells (thymocytes) between distinct thymic microenvironments is crucial for their development. Ex vivo studies of thymus tissue explants suggest two distinct migratory behaviors of thymocytes in the thymus. In the cortex, thymocytes exhibit a stochastic migration, whereas medullary thymocytes show confined migratory behavior. Thus far, it has been difficult to follow all thymocytes in an entire thymus and relate their differentiation steps to their migratory dynamics. To understand the spatial organization of the migratory behavior and development of thymocytes in a fully functional thymus, we developed transgenic reporter lines for the chemokine receptors ccr9a and ccr9b, as well as for rag2, and used them for noninvasive live imaging of the entire thymus in medaka (Oryzias latipes). We found that the expression of these two chemokine receptors in the medaka juvenile thymus defined two spatially distinct subpopulations of thymocytes. Landmark events of T cell development including proliferation, somatic recombination, and thymic selection can be mapped to subregions of the thymus. The migratory behavior of thymocytes within each of the subpopulations is equally heterogeneous, and specific migratory behaviors are not associated with particular domains in the thymus. During the period when thymocytes express rag2 their migratory behavior was more homogeneous. Therefore, the migratory behavior of thymocytes is partly correlated with their developmental stage rather than being defined by their spatial localization.

  2. T cell receptor usage in rheumatic disease.

    PubMed

    Richardson, B C

    1992-01-01

    Protection against microbial attack or invasion is a fundamental function of the immune system. Crucial to this function is the ability to distinguish "self" from the invading organism, and tolerate "self" while removing "non-self". The ability to distinguish self from non-self is not inherent in the immune system, but rather is acquired and continuously maintained. Unfortunately, the mechanisms maintaining self-tolerance are not perfect, and at times break down. In these instances an autoimmune disease results. T cells initiate normal immune responses, and it is now clear that T cells can also initiate pathologic immune responses. In animal models, T cells produce diseases resembling rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (1-3), systemic lupus erythematosus (4-6) and progressive systemic sclerosis (7,8). It is likely that T cells participate in human autoimmune diseases as well. The molecular basis of T cell antigen recognition has been clarified over the past decade. These advances now allow direct examination of the T cell receptor (TCR) molecules participating in autoimmune responses, and raise the exciting possibility that the cells inducing autoimmune responses may finally be identified. Selective agents might then be developed which would interfere with or inhibit the cells. Understanding these developments requires detailed knowledge of how T cells recognize antigen, and of the receptors involved in autoimmune diseases. This article reviews the current literature on T cell receptor structure, and summarizes what is currently known about the usage of specific T cell receptors in autoimmune rheumatic disease. PMID:1582073

  3. Normal Psychosexual Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutter, Michael

    1971-01-01

    Normal sexual development is reviewed with respect to physical maturation, sexual interests, sex drive", psychosexual competence and maturity, gender role, object choice, children's concepts of sexual differences, sex role preference and standards, and psychosexual stages. Biologic, psychoanalytic and psychosocial theories are briefly considered.…

  4. Development of Tumor-Reactive T Cells After Nonmyeloablative Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Tetsuya; Hudecek, Michael; Kostic, Ana; Bleakley, Marie; Warren, Edus H.; Maloney, David; Storb, Rainer; Riddell, Stanley R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Allogeneic NM-HSCT can result in durable remission of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). It is thought that the efficacy of NM-HSCT is mediated by recognition of tumor cells by T cells in the donor stem cell graft. We evaluated the development of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) specific for CLL after NM-HSCT to determine if their presence correlated with antitumor efficacy. Experimental Design Peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from twelve transplant recipients at intervals after NM-HSCT were stimulated in vitro with CLL cells. Polyclonal T cell lines and CD8+ T cell clones were derived from these cultures and evaluated for lysis of donor and recipient target cells including CLL. The presence and specificity of responses was correlated with clinical outcomes. Results Eight of the 12 patients achieved remission or a major antitumor response and all eight developed CD8+ and CD4+ T cells specific for antigens expressed by CLL. A clonal analysis of the CD8+ T cell response identified T cells specific for multiple minor histocompatibility (H) antigens expressed on CLL in six of the responding patients. A significant fraction of the CD8+ T cell response in some patients was also directed against non-shared tumor-specific antigens. By contrast, CLL-reactive T cells were not detected in the four patients who had persistent CLL after NM-HSCT, despite the development of GVHD. Conclusions The development of a diverse T cell response specific for minor H and tumor-associated antigens expressed by CLL predicts an effective GVL response after NM-HSCT. PMID:19567591

  5. Stem cell-derived tissue-associated regulatory T cells ameliorate the development of autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Mohammad; Song, Jianyong; Fino, Kristin; Sandhu, Praneet; Song, Xinmeng; Lei, Fengyang; Zheng, Songguo; Ni, Bing; Fang, Deyu; Song, Jianxun

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) have the potential to produce almost all of the cells in the body, including regulatory T cells (Tregs). However, the exact conditions required for the development of antigen (Ag)-specific Tregs from PSCs (i.e., PSC-Tregs) are not well delineated. Ag-specific PSC-Tregs can be tissue/organ-associated and migrate to local inflamed tissues/organs to suppress the autoimmune response after adoptive transfer, thereby avoiding potential overall immunosuppression from non-specific Tregs. In this study, we developed a new approach to generate functional Ag-specific Tregs from induced PSCs (iPSCs), i.e., iPSC-Tregs, which had the ability to generate an Ag-specific immunosuppressive response in a murine model of arthritis. We retrovirally transduced murine iPSCs with a construct containing genes of Ag-specific T cell receptor (TCR) and the transcriptional factor FoxP3. We differentiated the iPSCs into Ag-specific iPSC-Tregs using in vitro or in vivo Notch signaling, and demonstrated that adoptive transfer of such Tregs dramatically suppressed autoimmunity in a well-established Ag-induced arthritis model, including the inflammation, joint destruction, cartilage prostaglandin depletion, osteoclast activity, and Th17 production. Our results indicate that PSCs can be used to develop Ag-specific Tregs, which have a therapeutic potential for Treg-based therapies of autoimmune disorders. PMID:26846186

  6. Transgenic mice for MTCP1 develop T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gritti, C; Dastot, H; Soulier, J; Janin, A; Daniel, M T; Madani, A; Grimber, G; Briand, P; Sigaux, F; Stern, M H

    1998-07-15

    T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL) is a rare form of mature T-cell leukemia associated with chromosomal rearrangements implicating MTCP1 or TCL1 genes. These genes encode two homologous proteins, p13(MTCP1) and p14(TCL1), which share no similarity with other known protein. To determine the oncogenic role of MTCP1, mice transgenic for MTCP1 under the control of CD2 regulatory regions (CD2-p13 mice) were generated. No abnormality was detected during the first year after birth. A late effect of the transgene was searched for in a cohort of 48 CD2-p13 mice aged 15 to 20 months, issued from 3 independent founders. Lymphoid hemopathies, occurring in the three transgenic lines, were characterized by lymphoid cells with an irregular nucleus, a unique and prominent nucleolus, condensed chromatin, a basophilic cytoplasm devoid of granules, and an immunophenotype of mature T cells. The molecular characterization of Tcrb rearrangements demonstrated the monoclonal origin of these populations. Histopathological analysis of the cohort demonstrated early splenic and hepatic infiltrations, whereas lymphocytosis and medullar infiltrations were found infrequently. The engraftment of these proliferations in H2-matched animals demonstrated their malignant nature. Cumulative incidence of the disease at 20 months was 100%, 50%, and 21% in F3, F4, and F7 lines, respectively, and null in the control group. The level of expression of the transgene, as estimated by Western blotting in the transgenic lines correlated with the tumoral incidence, with the highest expression of p13(MTCP1) being found in F3 mice. CD2-p13 transgenic mice developed an hemopathy similar to human T-PLL. These data demonstrate that p13(MTCP1) is an oncoprotein and that CD2-p13 transgenic mice represent the first animal model for mature T-PLL.

  7. Tissue-specific nuclear factors mediate expression of the CD3 delta gene during T cell development.

    PubMed Central

    Georgopoulos, K; Galson, D; Terhorst, C

    1990-01-01

    An obligatory step towards T cell maturation is expression of the CD3 gene products which occurs very early during thymic differentiation and may even precede migration to the thymus. Delineation of the transcriptional mechanisms that determine expression of the CD3 complex in immature and mature T cells will help us understand the molecular events that govern T cell development. We have previously reported that a 400 bp region 3' of the CD3 delta gene functions as a transcriptional enhancer with strong specificity for T cells. Here we identify two elements in the CD3 delta enhancer which mediate its T cell restricted function. Element delta A can function as an independent enhancer while element delta B has no independent function but augments the activity of element delta A. Together, delta A and delta B are sufficient to reconstitute the activity of the CD3 delta enhancer. Nucleoprotein complexes found in mature T cells have been identified whose presence correlates with activity of these two elements. Since these protein binding sites are conserved in other genes of the TCR-CD3 complex, elements delta A and delta B and their cognate nuclear factors may play an important role in T cell development. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:2136828

  8. Thymic epithelial cells: working class heroes for T cell development and repertoire selection.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Graham; Takahama, Yousuke

    2012-06-01

    The thymus represents an epithelial-mesenchymal tissue, anatomically structured into discrete cortical and medullary regions that contain phenotypically and functionally distinct stromal cells, as well as thymocytes at defined stages of maturation. The stepwise progression of thymocyte development seems to require serial migration through these distinct thymic regions, where interactions with cortical thymic epithelial cell (cTEC) and medullary thymic epithelial cell (mTEC) subsets take place. Recent work on TEC subsets provides insight into T cell development and selection, such as the importance of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily members in thymus medulla development, and the specialised antigen processing/presentation capacity of the thymic cortex for positive selection. Here, we summarise current knowledge on the development and function of the thymic microenvironment, paying particular attention to the cortical and medullary epithelial compartments.

  9. Nonclassical MHC class I-dependent invariant T cells are evolutionarily conserved and prominent from early development in amphibians.

    PubMed

    Edholm, Eva-Stina; Albertorio Saez, Liz-Marie; Gill, Ann L; Gill, Steven R; Grayfer, Leon; Haynes, Nikesha; Myers, Jason R; Robert, Jacques

    2013-08-27

    Human and murine MHC nonclassical class Ib-restricted invariant T (iT) cell subsets, such as invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT) and mucosal-associated invariant T cells, have specialized functions early in immune responses, especially in modulating subsequent adaptive immune responses. Here, we characterize a prominent iT population in the amphibian Xenopus laevis and show the requirement of the class Ib molecule, Xenopus nonclassical gene 10, in its differentiation and function. Using Xenopus nonclassical gene 10 tetramers and RNAi loss of function by transgenesis, we identified a large class Ib-dependent CD8(-)/CD4(-) iT subset in unmanipulated frogs and tadpoles. This population is critical for antiviral immunity during early larval stages when classical MHC class Ia function is suboptimal. Furthermore, in young tadpoles with low class Ia expression, deep sequencing revealed additional preponderant invariant T cell receptor (TCR)α rearrangements, implying other iT cell subsets and a predominant selection process mediated by other class Ib molecules. The restriction and requirement of class Ib molecules for development and antiviral immunity of a mammalian iNKT or mucosal-associated invariant T cell counterpart in the amphibian Xenopus show the importance of iT cells in the emergence and evolution of the adaptive immune system.

  10. HIV-1 transgenic rat CD4+ T cells develop decreased CD28 responsiveness and suboptimal Lck tyrosine dephosphorylation following activation

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Anjana; Pati, Shibani; Nyugen, Anhthu; Barabitskaja, Oxana; Mondal, Prosanta; Anderson, Michael; Gallo, Robert C.; Huso, David L.; Reid, William . E-mail: reid@umbi.umd.edu

    2006-09-30

    Impaired CD4+ T cell responses, resulting in dysregulated T-helper 1 (Th1) effector and memory responses, are a common result of HIV-1 infection. These defects are often preceded by decreased expression and function of the {alpha}/{beta} T cell receptor (TCR)-CD3 complex and of co-stimulatory molecules including CD28, resulting in altered T cell proliferation, cytokine secretion and cell survival. We have previously shown that HIV Tg rats have defective development of T cell effector function and generation of specific effector/memory T cell subsets. Here we identify abnormalities in activated HIV-1 Tg rat CD4+ T cells that include decreased pY505 dephosphorylation of Lck (required for Lck activation), decreased CD28 function, reduced expression of the anti-apoptotic molecule Bcl-xL, decreased secretion of the mitogenic lympokine interleukin-2 (IL-2) and increased activation induced apoptosis. These events likely lead to defects in antigen-specific signaling and may help explain the disruption of Th1 responses and the generation of specific effector/memory subsets in transgenic CD4+ T cells.

  11. The lysophosphatidylserine receptor GPR174 constrains regulatory T cell development and function

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Michael J.; Li, Chien-Ming; Xu, Ying; An, Jinping; Huang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T cell (T reg cell) numbers and activities are tightly calibrated to maintain immune homeostasis, but the mechanisms involved are incompletely defined. Here, we report that the lysophosphatidylserine (LysoPS) receptor GPR174 is abundantly expressed in developing and mature T reg cells. In mice that lacked this X-linked gene, T reg cell generation in the thymus was intrinsically favored, and a higher fraction of peripheral T reg cells expressed CD103. LysoPS could act in vitro via GPR174 to suppress T cell proliferation and T reg cell generation. In vivo, LysoPS was detected in lymphoid organ and spinal cord tissues and was abundant in the colon. Gpr174−/Y mice were less susceptible to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis than wild-type mice, and GPR174 deficiency in T reg cells contributed to this phenotype. This study provides evidence that a bioactive lipid, LysoPS, negatively influences T reg cell accumulation and activity through GPR174. As such, GPR174 antagonists might have therapeutic potential for promoting immune regulation in the context of autoimmune disease. PMID:26077720

  12. Macrophage and T cell dynamics during the development and disintegration of mycobacterial granulomas.

    PubMed

    Egen, Jackson G; Rothfuchs, Antonio Gigliotti; Feng, Carl G; Winter, Nathalie; Sher, Alan; Germain, Ronald N

    2008-02-01

    Granulomas play a key role in host protection against mycobacterial pathogens, with their breakdown contributing to exacerbated disease. To better understand the initiation and maintenance of these structures, we employed both high-resolution multiplex static imaging and intravital multiphoton microscopy of Mycobacterium bovis BCG-induced liver granulomas. We found that Kupffer cells directly capture blood-borne bacteria and subsequently nucleate formation of a nascent granuloma by recruiting both uninfected liver-resident macrophages and blood-derived monocytes. Within the mature granuloma, these myeloid cell populations formed a relatively immobile cellular matrix that interacted with a highly dynamic effector T cell population. The efficient recruitment of these T cells was highly dependent on TNF-alpha-derived signals, which also maintained the granuloma structure through preferential effects on uninfected macrophage populations. By characterizing the migration of both innate and adaptive immune cells throughout the process of granuloma development, these studies provide a new perspective on the cellular events involved in mycobacterial containment and escape.

  13. The lysophosphatidylserine receptor GPR174 constrains regulatory T cell development and function.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Michael J; Li, Chien-Ming; Xu, Ying; An, Jinping; Huang, Yong; Cyster, Jason G

    2015-06-29

    Regulatory T cell (T reg cell) numbers and activities are tightly calibrated to maintain immune homeostasis, but the mechanisms involved are incompletely defined. Here, we report that the lysophosphatidylserine (LysoPS) receptor GPR174 is abundantly expressed in developing and mature T reg cells. In mice that lacked this X-linked gene, T reg cell generation in the thymus was intrinsically favored, and a higher fraction of peripheral T reg cells expressed CD103. LysoPS could act in vitro via GPR174 to suppress T cell proliferation and T reg cell generation. In vivo, LysoPS was detected in lymphoid organ and spinal cord tissues and was abundant in the colon. Gpr174(-/Y) mice were less susceptible to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis than wild-type mice, and GPR174 deficiency in T reg cells contributed to this phenotype. This study provides evidence that a bioactive lipid, LysoPS, negatively influences T reg cell accumulation and activity through GPR174. As such, GPR174 antagonists might have therapeutic potential for promoting immune regulation in the context of autoimmune disease. PMID:26077720

  14. Tertiary lymphoid organ development coincides with determinant spreading of the myelin-specific T cell response.

    PubMed

    Kuerten, Stefanie; Schickel, Achim; Kerkloh, Christian; Recks, Mascha S; Addicks, Klaus; Ruddle, Nancy H; Lehmann, Paul V

    2012-12-01

    While the role of T cells has been studied extensively in multiple sclerosis (MS), the pathogenic contribution of B cells has only recently attracted major attention, when it was shown that B cell aggregates can develop in the meninges of a subset of MS patients and were suggested to be correlates of late-stage and more aggressive disease in this patient population. However, whether these aggregates actually exist has subsequently been questioned and their functional significance has remained unclear. Here, we studied myelin basic protein (MBP)-proteolipid protein (PLP)-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), which is one of the few animal models for MS that is dependent on B cells. We provide evidence that B cell aggregation is reflective of lymphoid neogenesis in the central nervous system (CNS) in MBP-PLP-elicited EAE. B cell aggregation was present already few days after disease onset. With disease progression CNS B cell aggregates increasingly displayed the phenotype of tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs). Our results further imply that these TLOs were not merely epiphenomena of the disease, but functionally active, supporting intrathecal determinant spreading of the myelin-specific T cell response. Our data suggest that the CNS is not a passive "immune-privileged" target organ, but rather a compartment, in which highly active immune responses can perpetuate and amplify the autoimmune pathology and thereby autonomously contribute to disease progression.

  15. Rac GTPases play critical roles in early T-cell development

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Celine; Corsoni-Tadrzak, Agnieszka; Ruf, Sandra; de Boer, Jasper; Williams, Adam; Turner, Martin; Kioussis, Dimitris

    2009-01-01

    The Rac1 and Rac2 GTPases play important roles in many processes including cytoskeletal reorganization, proliferation, and survival, and are required for B-cell development. Previous studies had shown that deficiency in Rac2 did not affect T-cell development, whereas the function of Rac1 in this process has not been investigated. We now show that simultaneous absence of both GTPases resulted in a very strong developmental block at the pre-TCR checkpoint and in defective positive selection. Unexpectedly, deficiency of Rac1 and Rac2 also resulted in the aberrant survival of thymocytes lacking expression of TCRβ, showing hallmarks of hyperactive Notch signaling. Furthermore, we found a similar novel phenotype in the absence of Vav1, Vav2, and Vav3, which function as guanine nucleotide exchange factors for Rac1 and Rac2. These results show that a pathway containing Vav and Rac proteins may negatively regulate Notch signaling during early thymic development. PMID:19088377

  16. Aire-dependent thymic development of tumor-associated regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Malchow, Sven; Leventhal, Daniel S; Nishi, Saki; Fischer, Benjamin I; Shen, Lynn; Paner, Gladell P; Amit, Ayelet S; Kang, Chulho; Geddes, Jenna E; Allison, James P; Socci, Nicholas D; Savage, Peter A

    2013-03-01

    Despite considerable interest in the modulation of tumor-associated Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (T(regs)) for therapeutic benefit, little is known about the developmental origins of these cells and the nature of the antigens that they recognize. We identified an endogenous population of antigen-specific T(regs) (termed MJ23 T(regs)) found recurrently enriched in the tumors of mice with oncogene-driven prostate cancer. MJ23 T(regs) were not reactive to a tumor-specific antigen but instead recognized a prostate-associated antigen that was present in tumor-free mice. MJ23 T(regs) underwent autoimmune regulator (Aire)-dependent thymic development in both male and female mice. Thus, Aire-mediated expression of peripheral tissue antigens drives the thymic development of a subset of organ-specific T(regs), which are likely coopted by tumors developing within the associated organ.

  17. Aire-dependent thymic development of tumor-associated regulatory T cells*

    PubMed Central

    Malchow, Sven; Leventhal, Daniel S.; Nishi, Saki; Fischer, Benjamin I.; Shen, Lynn; Paner, Gladell P.; Amit, Ayelet S.; Kang, Chulho; Geddes, Jenna E.; Allison, James P.; Socci, Nicholas D.; Savage, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite considerable interest in the modulation of tumor-associated Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) for therapeutic benefit, little is known about the developmental origins of these cells and the nature of the antigens that they recognize. Here, we identified an endogenous population of antigen-specific Tregs (termed “MJ23” Tregs) found recurrently enriched in the tumors of mice with oncogene-driven prostate cancer. MJ23 Tregs were not reactive to a tumor-specific antigen, but instead recognized a prostate-associated antigen that was present in tumor-free mice. MJ23 Tregs underwent Aire-dependent thymic development in both male and female mice. Thus Aire-mediated expression of peripheral tissue antigens drives the thymic development of a subset of organ-specific Tregs, which are likely co-opted by tumors developing within the associated organ. PMID:23471412

  18. Regulation of DNA methylation dictates Cd4 expression during the development of helper and cytotoxic T cell lineages.

    PubMed

    Sellars, MacLean; Huh, Jun R; Day, Kenneth; Issuree, Priya D; Galan, Carolina; Gobeil, Stephane; Absher, Devin; Green, Michael R; Littman, Dan R

    2015-07-01

    During development, progenitor cells with binary potential give rise to daughter cells that have distinct functions. Heritable epigenetic mechanisms then lock in gene-expression programs that define lineage identity. Regulation of the gene encoding the T cell-specific coreceptor CD4 in helper and cytotoxic T cells exemplifies this process, with enhancer- and silencer-regulated establishment of epigenetic memory for stable gene expression and repression, respectively. Using a genetic screen, we identified the DNA-methylation machinery as essential for maintaining silencing of Cd4 in the cytotoxic lineage. Furthermore, we found a requirement for the proximal enhancer in mediating the removal of DNA-methylation marks from Cd4, which allowed stable expression of Cd4 in helper T cells. Our findings suggest that stage-specific methylation and demethylation events in Cd4 regulate its heritable expression in response to the distinct signals that dictate lineage 'choice' during T cell development. PMID:26030024

  19. Development and characterization of Histoplasma capsulatum-reactive murine T-cell lines and clones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepe, George S., Jr.; Smith, James G.; Denman, David; Bullock, Ward E.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1986-01-01

    Several Histoplasma capsulatum-reactive murine cloned T-cell lines (TCLs) were isolated from spleens of C57BL/6 mice immunized with viable H. capsulatum yeast cells, using the methodology of Kimoto and Fathman (1980). These T-cells were characterized phenotypically as Thy-1.2(+) Lyt-1(+) L3T4(+) Lyt-2(-), that is, as the helper/inducer phenotype. The cloned T cells proliferate in response to histoplasmin and, in some cases, to heterologous fungal anigens. Upon injection of mice with the antigen, the T-cells mediate local delayed-type hypersensitivity responses and, after stimulation, release regulatory lymphokines.

  20. Characterization of intermediate T-cell receptor cells expanding in the liver, thymus and other organs in autoimmune lpr mice: parallel analysis with their normal counterparts.

    PubMed Central

    Iiai, T; Kimura, M; Kawachi, Y; Hirokawa, K; Watanabe, H; Hatakeyama, K; Abo, T

    1995-01-01

    Autoimmune MRL-lpr/lpr (lpr) mice were previously demonstrated to have an abnormal proliferation of intermediate T-cell receptor (TCR) cells of extrathymic origin in the liver. Despite this situation, thymectomy in lpr mice resulted in amelioration of autoimmune disease. To understand the underlying mechanism, we investigated associated T-cell differentiation in the thymus and other organs of these mice. When the disease was evoked, T cells with extrathymic properties, i.e. intermediate TCR-alpha beta cells expressing double-negative (DN) CD4-8- phenotype and interleukin-2 (IL-2) receptor beta-chain, became prominent not only in the liver, but also in the thymus. Such thymic T cells mainly resided in the medulla. A small-scale localization of such T cells was seen in the thymic medulla even in normal control mice. There was a heterogeneity among intermediate TCR cells in terms of the composition of DN cells and the expression of CD2 and B220 antigens, depending on the organs and the sites in the same organ. Intermediate TCR cells in the liver, thymus and autoimmune target organs (e.g. kidney) contained a high proportion of the active form (CD2+B220-), while intermediate TCR cells accumulating in peripheral organs, the spleen and lymph nodes, were mainly of the inactive form (CD2-B220+). The active form had an ability to proliferate in response to IL-2 and SEB, whereas the inactive form did not. The present results suggest that the proliferation of intermediate TCR cells occur at multiple sites; this may explain the effect of thymectomy, namely, the retarded onset of disease, in lpr mice. Images Figure 3 PMID:7790034

  1. T Cells in Fish

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Teruyuki; Shibasaki, Yasuhiro; Matsuura, Yuta

    2015-01-01

    Cartilaginous and bony fish are the most primitive vertebrates with a thymus, and possess T cells equivalent to those in mammals. There are a number of studies in fish demonstrating that the thymus is the essential organ for development of T lymphocytes from early thymocyte progenitors to functionally competent T cells. A high number of T cells in the intestine and gills has been reported in several fish species. Involvement of CD4+ and CD8α+ T cells in allograft rejection and graft-versus-host reaction (GVHR) has been demonstrated using monoclonal antibodies. Conservation of CD4+ helper T cell functions among teleost fishes has been suggested in a number studies employing mixed leukocyte culture (MLC) and hapten/carrier effect. Alloantigen- and virus-specific cytotoxicity has also been demonstrated in ginbuna and rainbow trout. Furthermore, the important role of cell-mediated immunity rather than humoral immunity has been reported in the protection against intracellular bacterial infection. Recently, the direct antibacterial activity of CD8α+, CD4+ T-cells and sIgM+ cells in fish has been reported. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in T cell research focusing on the tissue distribution and function of fish T cells. PMID:26426066

  2. Clonal expansion of CD8 T cells in the systemic circulation precedes development of ipilimumab-induced toxicities

    PubMed Central

    Subudhi, Sumit K.; Aparicio, Ana; Gao, Jianjun; Zurita, Amado J.; Araujo, John C.; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Tahir, Salahaldin A.; Korivi, Brinda R.; Slack, Rebecca S.; Vence, Luis; Emerson, Ryan O.; Yusko, Erik; Vignali, Marissa; Robins, Harlan S.; Sun, Jingjing; Allison, James P.; Sharma, Padmanee

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint therapies, such as ipilimumab, induce dramatic antitumor responses in a subset of patients with advanced malignancies, but they may also induce inflammatory responses and toxicities termed immune-related adverse events (irAEs). These irAEs are often low grade and manageable, but severe irAEs may lead to prolonged hospitalizations or fatalities. Early intervention is necessary to minimize morbidities that occur with severe irAEs. However, correlative biomarkers are currently lacking. In a phase II clinical trial that treated 27 patients with metastatic prostate cancer, we aimed to test the safety and efficacy of androgen deprivation therapy plus ipilimumab. In this study, we observed grade 3 toxicities in >40% of treated patients, which led to early closure of the study. Because ipilimumab enhances T-cell responses, we hypothesized that increased clonal T-cell responses in the systemic circulation may contribute to irAEs. Sequencing of the T-cell receptor β-chains in purified T cells revealed clonal expansion of CD8 T cells, which occurred in blood samples collected before the onset of grade 2–3 irAEs. These initial results suggested that expansion of ≥55 CD8 T-cell clones preceded the development of severe irAEs. We further evaluated available blood samples from a second trial and determined that patients who experienced grade 2–3 irAEs also had expansion of ≥55 CD8 T-cell clones in blood samples collected before the onset of irAEs. We propose that CD8 T-cell clonal expansion may be a correlative biomarker to enable close monitoring and early intervention for patients receiving ipilimumab. PMID:27698113

  3. Evidence against T-cell development in the adult human intestinal mucosa based upon lack of terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase expression.

    PubMed Central

    Taplin, M E; Frantz, M E; Canning, C; Ritz, J; Blumberg, R S; Balk, S P

    1996-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that a subset of murine intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (iIEL), particularly those which express the CD8 alpha alpha homodimer, mature extrathymically. This study confirms that a small fraction of adult human iIEL also express the CD8 alpha alpha homodimer and demonstrates that most of these cells in the small intestine are T cells using the alpha beta T-cell receptor (TCR). Whether these cells or other subsets of adult human iIEL mature extrathymically in the intestine was assessed by measuring the expression of terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase (TdT), an enzyme expressed exclusively by immature lymphocytes. Very low levels of TdT message could be detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification in some iIEL samples. The level of TdT expression was assayed by competitive PCR amplification and compared with thymocytes and peripheral blood lymphocytes. These measurements indicated that the number of immature T cells expressing TdT in the intestinal epithelium was less than one cell per 10(7) lymphocytes. This demonstrates that there are few if any TdT expressing immature T cells in the adult human intestinal mucosa and indicates, therefore, that T-cell development in the intestinal mucosa does not contribute significantly to the T-cell repertoire of the adult human intestine. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8778025

  4. Effector-memory T cells develop in islets and report islet pathology in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chee, Jonathan; Ko, Hyun-Ja; Skowera, Ania; Jhala, Gaurang; Catterall, Tara; Graham, Kate L; Sutherland, Robyn M; Thomas, Helen E; Lew, Andrew M; Peakman, Mark; Kay, Thomas W H; Krishnamurthy, Balasubramanian

    2014-01-15

    CD8(+) T cells are critical in human type 1 diabetes and in the NOD mouse. In this study, we elucidated the natural history of islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit-related protein (IGRP)-specific CD8(+) T cells in NOD diabetes using MHC-tetramer technology. IGRP206-214-specific T cells in the peripheral lymphoid tissue increased with age, and their numbers correlated with insulitis progression. IGRP206-214-specific T cells in the peripheral lymphoid tissue expressed markers of chronic Ag stimulation, and their numbers were stable after diagnosis of diabetes, consistent with their memory phenotype. IGRP206-214-specific T cells in NOD mice expand, acquire the phenotype of effector-memory T cells in the islets, and emigrate to the peripheral lymphoid tissue. Our observations suggest that enumeration of effector-memory T cells of multiple autoantigen specificities in the periphery of type 1 diabetic subjects could be a reliable reporter for progression of islet pathology.

  5. Development of a diverse human T-cell repertoire despite stringent restriction of hematopoietic clonality in the thymus.

    PubMed

    Brugman, Martijn H; Wiekmeijer, Anna-Sophia; van Eggermond, Marja; Wolvers-Tettero, Ingrid; Langerak, Anton W; de Haas, Edwin F E; Bystrykh, Leonid V; van Rood, Jon J; de Haan, Gerald; Fibbe, Willem E; Staal, Frank J T

    2015-11-01

    The fate and numbers of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and their progeny that seed the thymus constitute a fundamental question with important clinical implications. HSC transplantation is often complicated by limited T-cell reconstitution, especially when HSC from umbilical cord blood are used. Attempts to improve immune reconstitution have until now been unsuccessful, underscoring the need for better insight into thymic reconstitution. Here we made use of the NOD-SCID-IL-2Rγ(-/-) xenograft model and lentiviral cellular barcoding of human HSCs to study T-cell development in the thymus at a clonal level. Barcoded HSCs showed robust (>80% human chimerism) and reproducible myeloid and lymphoid engraftment, with T cells arising 12 wk after transplantation. A very limited number of HSC clones (<10) repopulated the xenografted thymus, with further restriction of the number of clones during subsequent development. Nevertheless, T-cell receptor rearrangements were polyclonal and showed a diverse repertoire, demonstrating that a multitude of T-lymphocyte clones can develop from a single HSC clone. Our data imply that intrathymic clonal fitness is important during T-cell development. As a consequence, immune incompetence after HSC transplantation is not related to the transplantation of limited numbers of HSC but to intrathymic events.

  6. Development of a diverse human T-cell repertoire despite stringent restriction of hematopoietic clonality in the thymus

    PubMed Central

    Brugman, Martijn H.; Wiekmeijer, Anna-Sophia; van Eggermond, Marja; Wolvers-Tettero, Ingrid; Langerak, Anton W.; de Haas, Edwin F. E.; Bystrykh, Leonid V.; van Rood, Jon J.; de Haan, Gerald; Fibbe, Willem E.; Staal, Frank J. T.

    2015-01-01

    The fate and numbers of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and their progeny that seed the thymus constitute a fundamental question with important clinical implications. HSC transplantation is often complicated by limited T-cell reconstitution, especially when HSC from umbilical cord blood are used. Attempts to improve immune reconstitution have until now been unsuccessful, underscoring the need for better insight into thymic reconstitution. Here we made use of the NOD-SCID-IL-2Rγ−/− xenograft model and lentiviral cellular barcoding of human HSCs to study T-cell development in the thymus at a clonal level. Barcoded HSCs showed robust (>80% human chimerism) and reproducible myeloid and lymphoid engraftment, with T cells arising 12 wk after transplantation. A very limited number of HSC clones (<10) repopulated the xenografted thymus, with further restriction of the number of clones during subsequent development. Nevertheless, T-cell receptor rearrangements were polyclonal and showed a diverse repertoire, demonstrating that a multitude of T-lymphocyte clones can develop from a single HSC clone. Our data imply that intrathymic clonal fitness is important during T-cell development. As a consequence, immune incompetence after HSC transplantation is not related to the transplantation of limited numbers of HSC but to intrathymic events. PMID:26483497

  7. Dendritic Cells Coordinate the Development and Homeostasis of Organ-Specific Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, Daniel S; Gilmore, Dana C; Berger, Julian M; Nishi, Saki; Lee, Victoria; Malchow, Sven; Kline, Douglas E; Kline, Justin; Vander Griend, Donald J; Huang, Haochu; Socci, Nicholas D; Savage, Peter A

    2016-04-19

    Although antigen recognition mediated by the T cell receptor (TCR) influences many facets of Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cell biology, including development and function, the cell types that present antigen to Treg cells in vivo remain largely undefined. By tracking a clonal population of Aire-dependent, prostate-specific Treg cells in mice, we demonstrated an essential role for dendritic cells (DCs) in regulating organ-specific Treg cell biology. We have shown that the thymic development of prostate-specific Treg cells required antigen presentation by DCs. Moreover, Batf3-dependent CD8α(+) DCs were dispensable for the development of this clonotype and had negligible impact on the polyclonal Treg cell repertoire. In the periphery, CCR7-dependent migratory DCs coordinated the activation of organ-specific Treg cells in the prostate-draining lymph nodes. Our results demonstrate that the development and peripheral regulation of organ-specific Treg cells are dependent on antigen presentation by DCs, implicating DCs as key mediators of organ-specific immune tolerance.

  8. Monocytes and T cells cooperate to favor normal and follicular lymphoma B-cell growth: role of IL-15 and CD40L signaling.

    PubMed

    Epron, G; Ame-Thomas, P; Le Priol, J; Pangault, C; Dulong, J; Lamy, T; Fest, T; Tarte, K

    2012-01-01

    Interleukin-15 (IL-15) has been extensively studied for its role in the survival and proliferation of NK and T cells through a unique mechanism of trans-presentation by producer cells. Conversely, whereas activated B cells have been described as IL-15-responding cells, the cellular and molecular context sustaining this effect remains unexplored. In this study, we found that, whereas human B cells could not respond to soluble IL-15, monocytes and lymphoid tissue-derived macrophages but not stromal cells efficiently trans-present IL-15 to normal B cells and cooperate with T-cell-derived CD40L to promote IL-15-dependent B-cell proliferation. Furthermore, CD40L signaling triggers a Src-independent upregulation of STAT5 expression and favors a Src-dependent phosphorylation of STAT5 in response to IL-15. In follicular lymphoma (FL), immunohistochemical studies reported a strong relationship between malignant B cells, infiltrating macrophages and T cells. We show here an overexpression of IL-15 in purified tumor-associated macrophages, and STAT5A in purified tumor B cells. Moreover, FL B cells respond to IL-15 trans-presented by monocytes/macrophages, in particular, in the presence of CD40L-mediated signaling. This cooperation between IL-15 and CD40L reinforces the importance of tumor microenvironment and unravels a mechanism of FL growth that should be considered if using IL-15 as a drug in this disease.

  9. In vitro induction of non-responsiveness in cloned normal inducer T cells by antigen and purified Ia incorporated into planar membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Quill, H.; Fox, B.; Carlson, L.; Pardoll, D.; Schwartz, R.H.

    1986-03-05

    Incubation of cytochrome c-specific E/sub ..beta..//sup k/E/sub ..cap alpha..//sup k/-containing planar membranes and an antigenic peptide analogue of moth cytochrome c resulted in a specific increase in cell volume of 40-50% as measured by Coulter Counter analysis. No change in cell volume was seen in the absence of antigen, or when A/sub ..beta..//sup k/A/sub ..cap alpha..//sup k/-planar membranes were used. T cell proliferation was never detected at any time from one to eight days after incubation with E/sub ..beta..//sup k/E/sub ..cap alpha..//sup k/-membranes at a wide range of antigen concentrations. Furthermore, only trace amounts of IL-2 were detected and no increase in IL-2 receptor expression was seen. IL-3 production, however, could be detected. T cells pre-incubated for one day with E/sub ..beta..//sup k/E/sub ..cap alpha..//sup k/-membranes plus antigen became non-responsive to subsequent normal stimulation with antigen and APC. Incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine was reduced by more than 90% and the production of both IL-2 and IL-3 was inhibited. Non-responsiveness persisted for at least eight days after exposure to E/sub ..beta..///sup k/E/sub ..cap alpha..//sup k/-membranes plus antigen. In contrast, T cells pre-incubated under control conditions remained fully responsive. These results demonstrate the specific induction of non-responsiveness in inducer T cells by antigen and purified E/sub ..beta..//sup k/E/sub ..cap alpha..//sup k/ in planar membranes.

  10. Development of chidamide for peripheral T-cell lymphoma, the first orphan drug approved in China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xianping; Ning, Zhiqiang; Li, Zhibin; Cao, Haixiang; Wang, Xinhao

    2016-08-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) is a set of rare and highly heterogeneous group of mature T- and NK-cell neoplasms associated with poor outcomes and lack of standard and effective therapies. The total number of newly diagnosed cases of PTCL yearly in China is estimated about 50,000. Chidamide (CS055) is a novel and orally active benzamide class of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor that selectively inhibits activity of HDAC1, 2, 3 and 10, the enzymes that are involved and play an important role in tumor initiation and development in both tumor cells and their surrounding micro-environment. Functioning as a genuine epigenetic modulator, chidamide induces growth arrest and apoptosis in tumor cells and enhances cellular antitumor immunity. Based on the overall results from preclinical and phase I clinical studies, exploratory and pivotal phase II trials of chidamide for relapsed or refractory PTCL were conducted from March 2009 to May 2012, and the results led to CFDA approval of chidamide for the indication in December 2014, being the first approved orphan drug according to the research & development approach of orphan drugs in China, as well as the first orally active drug for PTCL in China and worldwide. PMID:27672541

  11. Development of chidamide for peripheral T-cell lymphoma, the first orphan drug approved in China

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xianping; Ning, Zhiqiang; Li, Zhibin; Cao, Haixiang; Wang, Xinhao

    2016-01-01

    Summary Peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) is a set of rare and highly heterogeneous group of mature T- and NK-cell neoplasms associated with poor outcomes and lack of standard and effective therapies. The total number of newly diagnosed cases of PTCL yearly in China is estimated about 50,000. Chidamide (CS055) is a novel and orally active benzamide class of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor that selectively inhibits activity of HDAC1, 2, 3 and 10, the enzymes that are involved and play an important role in tumor initiation and development in both tumor cells and their surrounding micro-environment. Functioning as a genuine epigenetic modulator, chidamide induces growth arrest and apoptosis in tumor cells and enhances cellular antitumor immunity. Based on the overall results from preclinical and phase I clinical studies, exploratory and pivotal phase II trials of chidamide for relapsed or refractory PTCL were conducted from March 2009 to May 2012, and the results led to CFDA approval of chidamide for the indication in December 2014, being the first approved orphan drug according to the research & development approach of orphan drugs in China, as well as the first orally active drug for PTCL in China and worldwide. PMID:27672541

  12. Contribution of JAK2 mutations to T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma development.

    PubMed

    Roncero, A M; López-Nieva, P; Cobos-Fernández, M A; Villa-Morales, M; González-Sánchez, L; López-Lorenzo, J L; Llamas, P; Ayuso, C; Rodríguez-Pinilla, S M; Arriba, M C; Piris, M A; Fernández-Navarro, P; Fernández, A F; Fraga, M F; Santos, J; Fernández-Piqueras, J

    2016-01-01

    The JAK-STAT pathway has a substantial role in lymphoid precursor cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. Nonetheless, the contribution of JAK2 to T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma (T-LBL) development remains poorly understood. We have identified one activating TEL-JAK2 translocation and four missense mutations accumulated in 2 out of 16 T-LBL samples. Two of them are novel JAK2 mutations and the other two are reported for the first time in T-LBL. Notably, R683G and I682T might have arisen owing to RNA editing. Mutated samples showed different mutated transcripts suggesting sub-clonal heterogeneity. Functional approaches revealed that two JAK2 mutations (H574R and R683G) constitutively activate JAK-STAT signaling in γ2A cells and can drive the proliferation of BaF3-EpoR cytokine-dependent cell line. In addition, aberrant hypermethylation of SOCS3 might contribute to enhance the activation of JAK-STAT signaling. Of utmost interest is that primary T-LBL samples harboring JAK2 mutations exhibited increased expression of LMO2, suggesting a mechanistic link between JAK2 mutations and the expression of LMO2, which was confirmed for the four missense mutations in transfected γ2A cells. We therefore propose that active JAK2 contribute to T-LBL development by two different mechanisms, and that the use of pan-JAK inhibitors in combination with epigenetic drugs should be considered in future treatments.

  13. Development of chidamide for peripheral T-cell lymphoma, the first orphan drug approved in China

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xianping; Ning, Zhiqiang; Li, Zhibin; Cao, Haixiang; Wang, Xinhao

    2016-01-01

    Summary Peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) is a set of rare and highly heterogeneous group of mature T- and NK-cell neoplasms associated with poor outcomes and lack of standard and effective therapies. The total number of newly diagnosed cases of PTCL yearly in China is estimated about 50,000. Chidamide (CS055) is a novel and orally active benzamide class of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor that selectively inhibits activity of HDAC1, 2, 3 and 10, the enzymes that are involved and play an important role in tumor initiation and development in both tumor cells and their surrounding micro-environment. Functioning as a genuine epigenetic modulator, chidamide induces growth arrest and apoptosis in tumor cells and enhances cellular antitumor immunity. Based on the overall results from preclinical and phase I clinical studies, exploratory and pivotal phase II trials of chidamide for relapsed or refractory PTCL were conducted from March 2009 to May 2012, and the results led to CFDA approval of chidamide for the indication in December 2014, being the first approved orphan drug according to the research & development approach of orphan drugs in China, as well as the first orally active drug for PTCL in China and worldwide.

  14. From Murine to Human Nude/SCID: The Thymus, T-Cell Development and the Missing Link

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Rosa; Palamaro, Loredana; Fusco, Anna; Iannace, Leucio; Maio, Stefano; Vigliano, Ilaria; Giardino, Giuliana; Pignata, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) are disorders of the immune system, which lead to increased susceptibility to infections. T-cell defects, which may affect T-cell development/function, are approximately 11% of reported PIDs. The pathogenic mechanisms are related to molecular alterations not only of genes selectively expressed in hematopoietic cells but also of the stromal component of the thymus that represents the primary lymphoid organ for T-cell differentiation. With this regard, the prototype of athymic disorders due to abnormal stroma is the Nude/SCID syndrome, first described in mice in 1966. In man, the DiGeorge Syndrome (DGS) has long been considered the human prototype of a severe T-cell differentiation defect. More recently, the human equivalent of the murine Nude/SCID has been described, contributing to unravel important issues of the T-cell ontogeny in humans. Both mice and human diseases are due to alterations of the FOXN1, a developmentally regulated transcription factor selectively expressed in skin and thymic epithelia. PMID:22474479

  15. Adoptive T-cell therapy for cancer: The era of engineered T cells.

    PubMed

    Bonini, Chiara; Mondino, Anna

    2015-09-01

    Tumors originate from a number of genetic events that deregulate homeostatic mechanisms controlling normal cell behavior. The immune system, devoted to patrol the organism against pathogenic events, can identify transformed cells, and in several cases cause their elimination. It is however clear that several mechanisms encompassing both central and peripheral tolerance limit antitumor immunity, often resulting into progressive diseases. Adoptive T-cell therapy with either allogeneic or autologous T cells can transfer therapeutic immunity. To date, genetic engineering of T cells appears to be a powerful tool for shaping tumor immunity. In this review, we discuss the most recent achievements in the areas of suicide gene therapy, and TCR-modified T cells and chimeric antigen receptor gene-modified T cells. We provide an overview of current strategies aimed at improving the safety and efficacy of these approaches, with an outlook on prospective developments.

  16. Defective CD8 T Cell Memory Following Acute Infection Without CD4 T Cell Help

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Joseph C.; Bevan, Michael J.

    2003-04-01

    The CD8+ cytotoxic T cell response to pathogens is thought to be CD4+ helper T cell independent because infectious agents provide their own inflammatory signals. Mice that lack CD4+ T cells mount a primary CD8 response to Listeria monocytogenes equal to that of wild-type mice and rapidly clear the infection. However, protective memory to a challenge is gradually lost in the former animals. Memory CD8+ T cells from normal mice can respond rapidly, but memory CD8+ T cells that are generated without CD4 help are defective in their ability to respond to secondary encounters with antigen. The results highlight a previously undescribed role for CD4 help in promoting protective CD8 memory development.

  17. Effect of IL-4 on the Development and Function of Memory-like CD8 T Cells in the Peripheral Lymphoid Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hi-Jung; Lee, Ara; Lee, Jae-Il; Park, Seong Hoe

    2016-01-01

    Unlike conventional T cells, innate CD8 T cells develop a memory-like phenotype in the thymus and immediately respond upon antigen stimulation, similar to memory T cells. The development of innate CD8 T cells in the thymus is known to require IL-4, which upregulates Eomesodermin (Eomes). These features are similar to that of virtual memory CD8 T cells and IL-4-induced memory-like CD8 T cells generated in the peripheral tissues. However, the relationship between these cell types has not been clearly documented. In the present study, IL-4-induced memory-like CD8 T cells generated in the peripheral tissues were compared with innate CD8 T cells in terms of phenotype and function. When an IL-4/anti-IL-4 antibody complex (IL-4C) was injected into C57BL/6 mice daily for 7 days, the EomeshiCXCR3 + CD8 T cell population was markedly increased in the peripheral lymphoid organs and blood. These cells were generated from naïve CD8 T cells or accumulated via the expansion of pre-existing CD44hiCXCR3 + CD8 T cells. Initially, the majority of these CXCR3 + CD8 T cells expressed low levels of CD44, which was followed by the conversion to the CD44hi phenotype. This conversion was associated with the acquisition of enhanced effector function. After discontinuation of IL-4C treatment, Eomes expression levels gradually decreased in CXCR3 + CD8 T cells. Taken together, the results of this study demonstrate that IL-4-induced memory-like CD8 T cells generated in the peripheral lymphoid tissues are phenotypically and functionally similar to the innate CD8 T cells generated in the thymus. PMID:27162529

  18. The Special Relationship in the Development and Function of T Helper 17 and Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Lochner, Matthias; Wang, Zuobai; Sparwasser, Tim

    2015-01-01

    T helper 17 (Th17) cells play an essential role in the clearance of extracellular pathogenic bacteria and fungi. However, this subset is critically involved in the pathology of many autoimmune diseases, e.g., psoriasis, multiple sclerosis, allergy, rheumatoid arthritis, and inflammatory bowel diseases in humans. Therefore, Th17 responses need to be tightly regulated in vivo to mediate effective host defenses against pathogens without causing excessive host tissue damage. Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells play an important role in maintaining peripheral tolerance to self-antigens and in counteracting the inflammatory activity of effector T helper cell subsets. Although Th17 and Treg cells represent two CD4(+) T cell subsets with opposing principal functions, these cell types are functionally connected. In this review, we will first give an overview on the biology of Th17 cells and describe their development and in vivo function, followed by an account on the special developmental relationship between Th17 and Treg cells. We will describe the identification of Treg/Th17 intermediates and consider their lineage stability and function in vivo. Finally, we will discuss how Treg cells may regulate the Th17 cell response in the context of infection and inflammation, and elude on findings demonstrating that Treg cells can also have a prominent function in promoting the differentiation of Th17 cells. PMID:26615094

  19. MAZR and Runx Factors Synergistically Repress ThPOK during CD8+ T Cell Lineage Development.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Shinya; Hainberger, Daniela; Tizian, Caroline; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Okuda, Tsukasa; Taniuchi, Ichiro; Ellmeier, Wilfried

    2015-09-15

    Th-inducing Pox virus and zinc finger/Krüppel-like factor (ThPOK) is a key commitment factor for CD4(+) lineage T cells and is essential for the maintenance of CD4 lineage integrity; thus, the expression of ThPOK has to be tightly controlled. In this article, we demonstrate that Myc-associated zinc finger-related factor (MAZR) and Runt-related transcription factor 1 (Runx1) together repressed ThPOK in preselection double-positive thymocytes, whereas MAZR acted in synergy with Runx3 in the repression of ThPOK in CD8(+) T cells. Furthermore, MAZR-Runx1 and MAZR-Runx3 double-mutant mice showed enhanced derepression of Cd4 in double-negative thymocytes and in CD8(+) T cells in comparison with Runx1 or Runx3 single-deficient mice, respectively, indicating that MAZR modulates Cd4 silencing. Thus, our data demonstrate developmental stage-specific synergistic activities between MAZR and Runx/core-binding factor β (CBFβ) complexes. Finally, retroviral Cre-mediated conditional deletion of MAZR in peripheral CD8(+) T cells led to the derepression of ThPOK, thus showing that MAZR is also part of the molecular machinery that maintains a repressed state of ThPOK in CD8(+) T cells. PMID:26254341

  20. KAP1 Regulates Gene Networks Controlling T cell Development and Responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Santoni de Sio, F.R.; Barde, I.; Offner, S.; Kapopoulou, A.; Genolet, R.; Corsinotti, A.; Bojkowska, K.; Thomas, J.H.; Luescher, I.; Pinschewer, D.; Harris, N.; Trono, D.

    2016-01-01

    The modulation of chromatin status at specific genomic loci controls lymphoid differentiation. Here, we investigated the role played in this process by KAP1, the universal cofactor of KRAB-containing zinc finger proteins (KRAB-ZFP), a tetrapod-restricted family of transcriptional repressors. T lymphoid KAP1 knockout mice displayed expansions of specific T cell populations, with impaired responses to stimulation and deregulation of genes involved in cell survival, cytoskeletal rearrangement, and immune signalling. Furthermore, chromatin studies demonstrate that KAP1 directly regulates the expression of a number of these genes, among which Foxo1 seemed of particular interest. Likely at least partly responsible for these effects, a small number of KRAB/ZFPs are selectively expressed in T cells. These results reveal the as-of-yet unsuspected importance of the KRAB/KAP1 epigenetic regulation system for T cell differentiation and function. PMID:22872677

  1. Sequential development of peripheral T-cell lymphoma in the course of chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Blonk, M C; van der Valk, P; Beverstock, G C; Ossenkoppele, G J

    1990-09-15

    A patient is described with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and an unusual karyotype 46XY,t(Y;12) (q11;p12), whose clinical course was complicated by T-cell lymphoma 5 years later. At that time bone marrow cells showed an additional karyotypic abnormality 46XY,t(Y;12) (q11;p12) del(7) (pter-p21), which remained unchanged until blastic transformation of the CML 8 months later. The bone marrow biopsy specimen, which revealed the blastic transformation of the CML, also showed evidence for localization of T-cell lymphoma. This case, added to two previously reported cases of the concurrence of CML and T-cell lymphoma, suggests a relationship between the two diseases, which is discussed. PMID:2400970

  2. Suppression of HIV replication in the resting CD4+ T cell reservoir by autologous CD8+ T cells: Implications for the development of therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Tae-Wook; Justement, J. Shawn; Moir, Susan; Hallahan, Claire W.; Ehler, Linda A.; Liu, Shuying; McLaughlin, Mary; Dybul, Mark; Mican, JoAnn M.; Fauci, Anthony S.

    2001-01-01

    CD8+ T cell-mediated antiviral activity against HIV has been described consistently in infected individuals; however, the role of this activity in controlling replication of HIV in the latently infected, resting CD4+ T cell reservoir is unclear. By using an ex vivo system, we show that replication of HIV in this viral reservoir is effectively suppressed in coculture by autologous CD8+ T cells in long-term nonprogressors (LTNPs) and in patients whose viremia was controlled by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), but not in therapy-naive patients who had substantial levels of plasma viremia. This antiviral activity was largely independent of cytotoxic CD8+ T lymphocytes (CTL). When the role of soluble CD8+ T cell-derived factors was examined, we found that CC-chemokines played a major role in inhibition of viral replication in the latent viral reservoir in some LTNPs and patients receiving HAART, but not in chronically infected patients who were not receiving antiretroviral therapy. Potent antiviral activity, independent of CC-chemokines, was found mainly in patients in whom HAART was initiated shortly after the acute phase of HIV infection. These results indicate that CD8+ T cells provide potent suppressive activity against HIV replication in the latent viral reservoir via direct cellular contact in patients who are naturally LTNPs or in those who are treated with HAART. Furthermore, the profound antiviral activity exerted by non-CC-chemokine soluble factors in infected patients who began HAART early in HIV infection suggests that preservation of this HIV-suppressive mechanism by early initiation of therapy may play an important role in the containment of viral replication in infected patients following interruption of therapy. PMID:11136258

  3. Effect of Cytomegalovirus Co-Infection on Normalization of Selected T-Cell Subsets in Children with Perinatally Acquired HIV Infection Treated with Combination Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kapetanovic, Suad; Aaron, Lisa; Montepiedra, Grace; Anthony, Patricia; Thuvamontolrat, Kasalyn; Pahwa, Savita; Burchett, Sandra; Weinberg, Adriana; Kovacs, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Background We examined the effect of cytomegalovirus (CMV) co-infection and viremia on reconstitution of selected CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subsets in perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV+) children ≥ 1-year old who participated in a partially randomized, open-label, 96-week combination antiretroviral therapy (cART)-algorithm study. Methods Participants were categorized as CMV-naïve, CMV-positive (CMV+) viremic, and CMV+ aviremic, based on blood, urine, or throat culture, CMV IgG and DNA polymerase chain reaction measured at baseline. At weeks 0, 12, 20 and 40, T-cell subsets including naïve (CD62L+CD45RA+; CD95-CD28+), activated (CD38+HLA-DR+) and terminally differentiated (CD62L-CD45RA+; CD95+CD28-) CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells were measured by flow cytometry. Results Of the 107 participants included in the analysis, 14% were CMV+ viremic; 49% CMV+ aviremic; 37% CMV-naïve. In longitudinal adjusted models, compared with CMV+ status, baseline CMV-naïve status was significantly associated with faster recovery of CD8+CD62L+CD45RA+% and CD8+CD95-CD28+% and faster decrease of CD8+CD95+CD28-%, independent of HIV VL response to treatment, cART regimen and baseline CD4%. Surprisingly, CMV status did not have a significant impact on longitudinal trends in CD8+CD38+HLA-DR+%. CMV status did not have a significant impact on any CD4+ T-cell subsets. Conclusions In this cohort of PHIV+ children, the normalization of naïve and terminally differentiated CD8+ T-cell subsets in response to cART was detrimentally affected by the presence of CMV co-infection. These findings may have implications for adjunctive treatment strategies targeting CMV co-infection in PHIV+ children, especially those that are now adults or reaching young adulthood and may have accelerated immunologic aging, increased opportunistic infections and aging diseases of the immune system. PMID:25794163

  4. Lipopeptides of Borrelia burgdorferi outer surface proteins induce Th1 phenotype development in alphabeta T-cell receptor transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Infante-Duarte, C; Kamradt, T

    1997-01-01

    Induction of the appropriate T helper cell (Th) subset is crucial for the resolution of infectious diseases and the prevention of immunopathology. Some pathogens preferentially induce Th1 or Th2 responses. How microorganisms influence Th phenotype development is unknown. We asked if Borrelia burgdorferi, the spirochete which causes Lyme arthritis, can promote a cytokine milieu in which T cells which are not specific for B. burgdorferi are induced to produce proinflammatory cytokines. Using alphabeta T-cell receptor transgenic mice as a source of T cells with a defined specificity other than for B. burgdorferi, we found that B. burgdorferi induced Th1 phenotype development in ovalbumin-specific transgenic T cells. Small synthetic lipopeptides corresponding to the N-terminal sequences of B. burgdorferi outer surface lipoproteins had similar effects. B. burgdorferi and its lipopeptides induced host cells to produce interleukin-12. When the peptides were used in delipidated form, they did not induce Th1 development. These findings may be of pathogenic importance, since it is currently assumed that a Th2-mediated antibody response is protective against B. burgdorferi. Bacteria associated with reactive arthritis, namely, Yersinia enterocolitica, Shigella flexneri, and Salmonella enteritidis, had different effects. The molecular definition of pathogen-host interactions determining cytokine production should facilitate rational therapeutic interventions directing the host response towards the desired cytokine response. Here, we describe small synthetic molecules capable of inducing Th1 phenotype development. PMID:9317013

  5. Definition of regulatory network elements for T cell development by perturbation analysis with PU.1 and GATA-3.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Michele K; Hernandez-Hoyos, Gabriela; Dionne, Christopher J; Arias, Alexandra M; Chen, Dan; Rothenberg, Ellen V

    2002-06-01

    PU.1 and GATA-3 are transcription factors that are required for development of T cell progenitors from the earliest stages. Neither one is a simple positive regulator for T lineage specification, however. When expressed at elevated levels at early stages of T cell development, each of these transcription factors blocks T cell development within a different, characteristic time window, with GATA-3 overexpression initially inhibiting at an earlier stage than PU.1. These perturbations are each associated with a distinct spectrum of changes in the regulation of genes needed for T cell development. Both transcription factors can interfere with expression of the Rag-1 and Rag-2 recombinases, while GATA-3 notably blocks PU.1 and IL-7Ralpha expression, and PU.1 reduces expression of HES-1 and c-Myb. A first-draft assembly of the regulatory targets of these two factors is presented as a provisional gene network. The target genes identified here provide insight into the basis of the effects of GATA-3 or PU.1 overexpression and into the regulatory changes that distinguish the developmental time windows for these effects.

  6. A Trypanosoma cruzi alkaline antigen induces polyclonal B-cell activation of normal murine spleen cells by T-cell-independent, BCR-directed stimulation.

    PubMed

    Montes, C L; Zuñiga, E; Minoprio, P; Vottero-Cima, E; Gruppi, A

    1999-08-01

    We have previously reported that a cytosolic alkaline fraction (FI) obtained from epimastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi promotes the activation, proliferation and differentiation of normal murine B cells into antibody-secreting plasmocytes. Neither the mechanism nor the cells involved in the FI-induced polyclonal B-cell activation were established. In this work we report that accessory cells are required for FI-induced polyclonal B-cell activation as no proliferative responses were obtained following treatment of normal spleen mononuclear cells (NSMC) with L-leucine methyl ester. Furthermore, FI did not induce the expression of CD25 on T cells and it promoted the proliferation of a T-cell-depleted population, indicating that it acts in a T-independent manner. We observed that NSMC were stimulated in vitro by FI-released cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6 and IL-10, which are involved in B-cell proliferation and differentiation. Interestingly, while significant amounts of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) were found in culture supernatants we did not observe detectable levels of IL-2. Additionally, we found that B-cell receptor (BCR) and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigens were involved in the proliferative response induced by FI because antibodies directed against cell-surface immunoglobulin M (IgM), CD45 and MHC class II molecules inhibited the FI-induced B-cell proliferation. CD40 ligand (CD40L) did not participate in such a phenomenon.

  7. Contribution of JAK2 mutations to T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma development

    PubMed Central

    Roncero, A M; López-Nieva, P; Cobos-Fernández, M A; Villa-Morales, M; González-Sánchez, L; López-Lorenzo, J L; Llamas, P; Ayuso, C; Rodríguez-Pinilla, S M; Arriba, M C; Piris, M A; Fernández-Navarro, P; Fernández, A F; Fraga, M F; Santos, J; Fernández-Piqueras, J

    2016-01-01

    The JAK-STAT pathway has a substantial role in lymphoid precursor cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. Nonetheless, the contribution of JAK2 to T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma (T-LBL) development remains poorly understood. We have identified one activating TEL-JAK2 translocation and four missense mutations accumulated in 2 out of 16 T-LBL samples. Two of them are novel JAK2 mutations and the other two are reported for the first time in T-LBL. Notably, R683G and I682T might have arisen owing to RNA editing. Mutated samples showed different mutated transcripts suggesting sub-clonal heterogeneity. Functional approaches revealed that two JAK2 mutations (H574R and R683G) constitutively activate JAK-STAT signaling in γ2A cells and can drive the proliferation of BaF3-EpoR cytokine-dependent cell line. In addition, aberrant hypermethylation of SOCS3 might contribute to enhance the activation of JAK-STAT signaling. Of utmost interest is that primary T-LBL samples harboring JAK2 mutations exhibited increased expression of LMO2, suggesting a mechanistic link between JAK2 mutations and the expression of LMO2, which was confirmed for the four missense mutations in transfected γ2A cells. We therefore propose that active JAK2 contribute to T-LBL development by two different mechanisms, and that the use of pan-JAK inhibitors in combination with epigenetic drugs should be considered in future treatments. PMID:26216197

  8. Mannosylated self-peptide inhibits the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis via expansion of nonencephalitogenic T cells.

    PubMed

    Kel, Junda M; Slütter, Bram; Drijfhout, Jan Wouter; Koning, Frits; Nagelkerken, Lex

    2008-07-01

    Tolerance to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in SJL mice can be induced by immunization with a mannosylated form of the proteolipid protein (M-PLP139-151), despite the presence of CFA. The state of tolerance is characterized by poor delayed-type hypersensitivity responses and the absence of clinical EAE symptoms. In vivo monitoring of CFSE-labeled PLP139-151-specific TCR-transgenic (5B6) T cells revealed that immunization with M-PLP139-151 increases the clonal expansion of 5B6 T cells that do not develop full effector functions. Moreover, nonfunctional T cells obtained from M-PLP139-151-immunized mice showed poor blastogenesis and were unable to transfer EAE to naïve recipients. Nevertheless, the in vitro production of cytokines and chemokines associated with EAE was unaffected. Importantly, tolerance induced by M-PLP139-151 was abrogated by the administration of pertussis toxin, resulting in EAE development. Our results suggest that M-PLP139-151 inhibits EAE development by affecting the differentiation of T cells into encephalitogenic effector cells.

  9. Rearrangement and expression of T cell antigen receptor and gamma genes during thymic development

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Rearrangement and expression of the T cell antigen receptor and the gamma genes during T cell ontogeny is a regulated process; the gamma genes are rearranged and expressed first, followed by the beta and then the alpha genes. Expression of both functional alpha and beta gene RNA first occurs at day 17 of gestation, along with the expression of T3 delta chain RNA. T cell antigen receptor gene rearrangements occur primarily or exclusively in the thymus, although some gamma gene rearrangements occur outside the thymus in fetal liver cells that may be committed T cell progenitors. There is no gross difference in the extent of beta and gamma gene rearrangements in the adult thymocyte subpopulations that were analyzed, despite the fact that some of these populations cannot respond to antigen and never emigrate from the thymus. Quantitative analysis of rearrangements in total adult thymocyte DNA shows that beta gene rearrangements generally occur on both chromosomal homologs, and that rearrangements occur preferentially to the J beta 2 gene segment cluster. PMID:3487610

  10. Modeling altered T-cell development with induced pluripotent stem cells from patients with RAG1-dependent immune deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Brauer, Patrick M; Pessach, Itai M; Clarke, Erik; Rowe, Jared H; Ott de Bruin, Lisa; Lee, Yu Nee; Dominguez-Brauer, Carmen; Comeau, Anne M; Awong, Geneve; Felgentreff, Kerstin; Zhang, Yuhang H; Bredemeyer, Andrea; Al-Herz, Waleed; Du, Likun; Ververs, Francesca; Kennedy, Marion; Giliani, Silvia; Keller, Gordon; Sleckman, Barry P; Schatz, David G; Bushman, Frederic D; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Zúñiga-Pflücker, Juan Carlos

    2016-08-11

    Primary immunodeficiency diseases comprise a group of heterogeneous genetic defects that affect immune system development and/or function. Here we use in vitro differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) generated from patients with different recombination-activating gene 1 (RAG1) mutations to assess T-cell development and T-cell receptor (TCR) V(D)J recombination. RAG1-mutants from severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) patient cells showed a failure to sustain progression beyond the CD3(--)CD4(-)CD8(-)CD7(+)CD5(+)CD38(-)CD31(-/lo)CD45RA(+) stage of T-cell development to reach the CD3(-/+)CD4(+)CD8(+)CD7(+)CD5(+)CD38(+)CD31(+)CD45RA(-) stage. Despite residual mutant RAG1 recombination activity from an Omenn syndrome (OS) patient, similar impaired T-cell differentiation was observed, due to increased single-strand DNA breaks that likely occur due to heterodimers consisting of both an N-terminal truncated and a catalytically dead RAG1. Furthermore, deep-sequencing analysis of TCR-β (TRB) and TCR-α (TRA) rearrangements of CD3(-)CD4(+)CD8(-) immature single-positive and CD3(+)CD4(+)CD8(+) double-positive cells showed severe restriction of repertoire diversity with preferential usage of few Variable, Diversity, and Joining genes, and skewed length distribution of the TRB and TRA complementary determining region 3 sequences from SCID and OS iPSC-derived cells, whereas control iPSCs yielded T-cell progenitors with a broadly diversified repertoire. Finally, no TRA/δ excision circles (TRECs), a marker of TRA/δ locus rearrangements, were detected in SCID and OS-derived T-lineage cells, consistent with a pre-TCR block in T-cell development. This study compares human T-cell development of SCID vs OS patients, and elucidates important differences that help to explain the wide range of immunologic phenotypes that result from different mutations within the same gene of various patients. PMID:27301863

  11. Development of a Model System for Tick-Borne Flavivirus Persistence in HEK 293T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mlera, Luwanika; Offerdahl, Danielle K.; Martens, Craig; Porcella, Stephen F.; Melik, Wessam

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We devised a model system to study persistent infection by the tick-borne flavivirus Langat virus (LGTV) in 293T cells. Infection with a molecularly cloned LGTV strain produced an acute lytic crisis that left few surviving cells. The culture was repopulated by cells that were ~90% positive for LGTV E protein, thus initiating a persistent infection that was maintained for at least 35 weeks without additional lytic crises. Staining of cells for viral proteins and ultrastructural analysis revealed only minor differences from the acute phase of infection. Infectious LGTV decreased markedly over the study period, but the number of viral genomes remained relatively constant, suggesting the development of defective interfering particles (DIPs). Viral genome changes were investigated by RNA deep sequencing. At the initiation of persistent infection, levels of DIPs were below the limit of detection at a coverage depth of 11,288-fold, implying that DIPs are not required for initiation of persistence. However, after 15 passages, DIPs constituted approximately 34% of the total LGTV population (coverage of 1,293-fold). Furthermore, at this point, one specific DIP population predominated in which nucleotides 1058 to 2881 had been deleted. This defective genome specified an intact polyprotein that coded for a truncated fusion protein containing 28 N-terminal residues of E and 134 C-terminal residues of NS1. Such a fusion protein has not previously been described, and a possible function in persistent infection is uncertain. DIPs are not required for the initiation of persistent LGTV infection but may play a role in the maintenance of viral persistence. PMID:26045539

  12. Development of an Antigen-driven Colitis Model to Study Presentation of Antigens by Antigen Presenting Cells to T Cells.

    PubMed

    Rossini, Valerio; Radulovic, Katarina; Riedel, Christian U; Niess, Jan Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammation which affects the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). One of the best ways to study the immunological mechanisms involved during the disease is the T cell transfer model of colitis. In this model, immunodeficient mice (RAG(-/-) recipients) are reconstituted with naive CD4(+) T cells from healthy wild type hosts. This model allows examination of the earliest immunological events leading to disease and chronic inflammation, when the gut inflammation perpetuates but does not depend on a defined antigen. To study the potential role of antigen presenting cells (APCs) in the disease process, it is helpful to have an antigen-driven disease model, in which a defined commensal-derived antigen leads to colitis. An antigen driven-colitis model has hence been developed. In this model OT-II CD4(+) T cells, that can recognize only specific epitopes in the OVA protein, are transferred into RAG(-/-) hosts challenged with CFP-OVA-expressing E. coli. This model allows the examination of interactions between APCs and T cells in the lamina propria. PMID:27684040

  13. Regulation of the transcriptional program by DNA methylation during human αβ T-cell development

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Ramon M.; Suarez-Alvarez, Beatriz; Mosén-Ansorena, David; García-Peydró, Marina; Fuentes, Patricia; García-León, María J.; Gonzalez-Lahera, Aintzane; Macias-Camara, Nuria; Toribio, María L.; Aransay, Ana M.; Lopez-Larrea, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Thymocyte differentiation is a complex process involving well-defined sequential developmental stages that ultimately result in the generation of mature T-cells. In this study, we analyzed DNA methylation and gene expression profiles at successive human thymus developmental stages. Gain and loss of methylation occurred during thymocyte differentiation, but DNA demethylation was much more frequent than de novo methylation and more strongly correlated with gene expression. These changes took place in CpG-poor regions and were closely associated with T-cell differentiation and TCR function. Up to 88 genes that encode transcriptional regulators, some of whose functions in T-cell development are as yet unknown, were differentially methylated during differentiation. Interestingly, no reversion of accumulated DNA methylation changes was observed as differentiation progressed, except in a very small subset of key genes (RAG1, RAG2, CD8A, PTCRA, etc.), indicating that methylation changes are mostly unique and irreversible events. Our study explores the contribution of DNA methylation to T-cell lymphopoiesis and provides a fine-scale map of differentially methylated regions associated with gene expression changes. These can lay the molecular foundations for a better interpretation of the regulatory networks driving human thymopoiesis. PMID:25539926

  14. Normal psychomotor development.

    PubMed

    Cioni, Giovanni; Sgandurra, Giuseppina

    2013-01-01

    "Psychomotor" development refers to changes in a child's cognitive, emotional, motor, and social capacities from the beginning of life throughout fetal and neonatal periods, infancy, childhood, and adolescence. It occurs in a variety of domains and a wide range of theories makes understanding children's development a challenging undertaking. Different models have tried to interpret the origins of human behavior, the pattern of developmental changes over time, and the individual and contextual factors that could direct child development. No single theory has been able to account for all aspects of child development, but each of them may contribute an important piece to the child development puzzle. Although theories sometimes disagree, much of their information is complementary rather than contradictory. The knowledge of child typical development and related theories and models is greatly useful for clinical practice, leading to recognition of developmental disorders and the ways in which they can be approached and treated. In this chapter, traditional and more modern concepts around functional development of psychomotor abilities are reported, firstly more in general and then specifically in the motor domain. PMID:23622146

  15. Normal growth and development

    MedlinePlus

    ... and development can be divided into four periods: Infancy Preschool years Middle childhood years Adolescence Soon after ... child's age. Healthy eating habits should begin during infancy. This can help prevent diseases such as high ...

  16. Splenic Long-Lived Plasma Cells Promote the Development of Follicular Helper T Cells during Autoimmune Responses.

    PubMed

    Jang, Eunkyeong; Cho, Wang Sik; Oh, Yeon-Kyung; Cho, Mi-La; Kim, Jung Mogg; Paik, Doo-Jin; Youn, Jeehee

    2016-02-01

    Long-lived plasma cells (LLPCs) develop under the help of follicular helper T (Tfh) cells and reside mainly in the bone marrow. However, these cells are unusually abundant in the spleen of several autoimmune models including K/BxNsf mice, yet their pathogenic impact remains unknown. To investigate a previously unappreciated role of splenic LLPCs, we sorted splenic plasma cells (PCs) from K/BxNsf and K/BxN mice, corresponding to LLPCs and conventional short-lived PCs, respectively, and compared their phenotypes and ability to prime and induce the differentiation of naive CD4(+) T cells into effector cells in vitro and in vivo. We found that K/BxNsf PCs had lower levels of the Ag presentation machinery and costimulators than K/BxN PCs, and also a lower CD4(+) T cell priming capacity. Autoantigen-pulsed K/BxNsf PCs selectively polarized cognate CD4(+) T cells toward the expression of molecules necessary for Tfh development and function. As a result, the K/BxNsf PC-primed CD4(+) T cells were more effective in stimulating B cells to produce autoantigen-specific IgGs than K/BxN PCs or even dendritic cells. Adoptive transfer of K/BxNsf PCs, but not K/BxN PCs, to K/BxN mice increased numbers of Tfh cells in draining lymph nodes. These results propose that abnormal accumulation of LLPCs in the spleen of autoimmune models drives the differentiation of autoantigen-primed CD4(+) T cells to Tfh cells. This positive feedback loop between splenic LLPCs and Tfh cells may contribute to the persistence of humoral autoimmunity. PMID:26729802

  17. Identification of stem cell transcriptional programs normally expressed in embryonic and neural stem cells in alloreactive CD8+ T cells mediating graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Koji; Cui, Shuaiying; Kuick, Rork; Mineishi, Shin; Hexner, Elizabeth; Ferrara, James LM; Emerson, Stephen G.; Zhang, Yi

    2010-01-01

    A hallmark of graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD), a life-threatening complication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, is the cytopathic injury of host tissues mediated by persistent alloreactive effector T cells (TE). However, the mechanisms that regulate the persistence of alloreactive TE during GVHD remain largely unknown. Using mouse GVHD models, we demonstrate that alloreactive CD8+ TE rapidly diminished in vivo when adoptively transferred into irradiated secondary congenic recipient mice. In contrast, although alloreactive CD8+ TE underwent massive apoptosis upon chronic exposure to alloantigens, they proliferated in vivo in secondary allogeneic recipients, persisted and caused severe GVHD. Thus, the continuous proliferation of alloreactive CD8+ TE, which is mediated by alloantigenic stimuli rather than homeostatic factors, is critical to maintaining their persistence. Gene expression profile analysis revealed that while alloreactive CD8+ TE increased the expression of genes associated with cell death, they activated a group of stem cell genes normally expressed in embryonic and neural stem cells. Most of these stem cell genes are associated with cell cycle regulation, DNA replication, chromatin modification and transcription. One of these genes, Ezh2, which encodes a chromatin modifying enzyme, was abundantly expressed in CD8+ TE. Silencing Ezh2 significantly reduced the proliferation of alloantigen-activated CD8+ T cells. Thus, these findings identify that a group of stem cell genes could play important roles in sustaining terminally differentiated alloreactive CD8+ TE and may be therapeutic targets for controlling GVHD. PMID:20116439

  18. CXXC finger protein 1 is critical for T-cell intrathymic development through regulating H3K4 trimethylation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wenqiang; Guo, Jing; Wen, Xiaofeng; Miao, Li; Lin, Feng; Xu, Guanxin; Ma, Ruoyu; Yin, Shengxia; Hui, Zhaoyuan; Chen, Tingting; Guo, Shixin; Chen, Wei; Huang, Yingying; Liu, Yizhi; Wang, Jianli; Wei, Lai; Wang, Lie

    2016-01-01

    T-cell development in the thymus is largely controlled by an epigenetic program, involving in both DNA methylation and histone modifications. Previous studies have identified Cxxc1 as a regulator of both cytosine methylation and histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3). However, it is unknown whether Cxxc1 plays a role in thymocyte development. Here we show that T-cell development in the thymus is severely impaired in Cxxc1-deficient mice. Furthermore, we identify genome-wide Cxxc1-binding sites and H3K4me3 modification sites in wild-type and Cxxc1-deficient thymocytes. Our results demonstrate that Cxxc1 directly controls the expression of key genes important for thymocyte survival such as RORγt and for T-cell receptor signalling including Zap70 and CD8, through maintaining the appropriate H3K4me3 on their promoters. Importantly, we show that RORγt, a direct target of Cxxc1, can rescue the survival defects in Cxxc1-deficient thymocytes. Our data strongly support a critical role of Cxxc1 in thymocyte development. PMID:27210293

  19. Proinsulin Expression Shapes the TCR Repertoire but Fails to Control the Development of Low-Avidity Insulin-Reactive CD8+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Pearson, James A; Thayer, Terri C; McLaren, James E; Ladell, Kristin; De Leenheer, Evy; Phillips, Amy; Davies, Joanne; Kakabadse, Dimitri; Miners, Kelly; Morgan, Peter; Wen, Li; Price, David A; Wong, F Susan

    2016-06-01

    NOD mice, a model strain for human type 1 diabetes, express proinsulin (PI) in the thymus. However, insulin-reactive T cells escape negative selection, and subsequent activation of the CD8(+) T-cell clonotype G9C8, which recognizes insulin B15-23 via an αβ T-cell receptor (TCR) incorporating TRAV8-1/TRAJ9 and TRBV19/TRBJ2-3 gene rearrangements, contributes to the development of diabetes. In this study, we used fixed TRAV8-1/TRAJ9 TCRα-chain transgenic mice to assess the impact of PI isoform expression on the insulin-reactive CD8(+) T-cell repertoire. The key findings were: 1) PI2 deficiency increases the frequency of insulin B15-23-reactive TRBV19(+)CD8(+) T cells and causes diabetes; 2) insulin B15-23-reactive TRBV19(+)CD8(+) T cells are more abundant in the pancreatic lymph nodes of mice lacking PI1 and/or PI2; 3) overexpression of PI2 decreases TRBV19 usage in the global CD8(+) T-cell compartment; 4) a biased repertoire of insulin-reactive CD8(+) T cells emerges in the periphery regardless of antigen exposure; and 5) low-avidity insulin-reactive CD8(+) T cells are less affected by antigen exposure in the thymus than in the periphery. These findings inform our understanding of the diabetogenic process and reveal new avenues for therapeutic exploitation in type 1 diabetes.

  20. Distinct Signaling of Coreceptors Regulates Specific Metabolism Pathways and Impacts Memory Development in CAR T Cells.

    PubMed

    Kawalekar, Omkar U; O'Connor, Roddy S; Fraietta, Joseph A; Guo, Lili; McGettigan, Shannon E; Posey, Avery D; Patel, Prachi R; Guedan, Sonia; Scholler, John; Keith, Brian; Snyder, Nathaniel W; Snyder, Nathaniel; Blair, Ian A; Blair, Ian; Milone, Michael C; June, Carl H

    2016-02-16

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) redirect T cell cytotoxicity against cancer cells, providing a promising approach to cancer immunotherapy. Despite extensive clinical use, the attributes of CAR co-stimulatory domains that impact persistence and resistance to exhaustion of CAR-T cells remain largely undefined. Here, we report the influence of signaling domains of coreceptors CD28 and 4-1BB on the metabolic characteristics of human CAR T cells. Inclusion of 4-1BB in the CAR architecture promoted the outgrowth of CD8(+) central memory T cells that had significantly enhanced respiratory capacity, increased fatty acid oxidation and enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis. In contrast, CAR T cells with CD28 domains yielded effector memory cells with a genetic signature consistent with enhanced glycolysis. These results provide, at least in part, a mechanistic insight into the differential persistence of CAR-T cells expressing 4-1BB or CD28 signaling domains in clinical trials and inform the design of future CAR T cell therapies. PMID:26885860

  1. Distinct Signaling of Coreceptors Regulates Specific Metabolism Pathways and Impacts Memory Development in CAR T Cells.

    PubMed

    Kawalekar, Omkar U; O'Connor, Roddy S; Fraietta, Joseph A; Guo, Lili; McGettigan, Shannon E; Posey, Avery D; Patel, Prachi R; Guedan, Sonia; Scholler, John; Keith, Brian; Snyder, Nathaniel W; Snyder, Nathaniel; Blair, Ian A; Blair, Ian; Milone, Michael C; June, Carl H

    2016-02-16

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) redirect T cell cytotoxicity against cancer cells, providing a promising approach to cancer immunotherapy. Despite extensive clinical use, the attributes of CAR co-stimulatory domains that impact persistence and resistance to exhaustion of CAR-T cells remain largely undefined. Here, we report the influence of signaling domains of coreceptors CD28 and 4-1BB on the metabolic characteristics of human CAR T cells. Inclusion of 4-1BB in the CAR architecture promoted the outgrowth of CD8(+) central memory T cells that had significantly enhanced respiratory capacity, increased fatty acid oxidation and enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis. In contrast, CAR T cells with CD28 domains yielded effector memory cells with a genetic signature consistent with enhanced glycolysis. These results provide, at least in part, a mechanistic insight into the differential persistence of CAR-T cells expressing 4-1BB or CD28 signaling domains in clinical trials and inform the design of future CAR T cell therapies.

  2. Virtual memory T cells develop and mediate bystander protective immunity in an IL-15-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    White, Jason T.; Cross, Eric W.; Burchill, Matthew A.; Danhorn, Thomas; McCarter, Martin D.; Rosen, Hugo R.; O'Connor, Brian; Kedl, Ross M.

    2016-01-01

    Virtual memory cells (VM) are an antigen-specific, memory phenotype CD8 T-cell subset found in lymphoreplete, unchallenged mice. Previous studies indicated that VM cells were the result of homeostatic proliferation (HP) resembling the proliferation observed in a lymphopenic environment. Here we demonstrate that HP is ongoing in lymphoreplete mice, the degree of which is dictated by the number of naive CD8 T cells with a sufficiently high affinity for self-antigen interacting with peripheral IL-15. VM cell transcriptional profiles suggest a capacity to mediate protective immunity via antigen non-specific bystander killing, a function we show is dependent on IL-15. Finally, we show a VM-like population of human cells that accumulate with age and traffic to the liver, displaying phenotypic and functional attributes consistent with the bystander protective functions of VM cells identified in the mouse. These data identify developmental and functional attributes of VM cells, including their likely role in protective immunity. PMID:27097762

  3. Virtual memory T cells develop and mediate bystander protective immunity in an IL-15-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    White, Jason T; Cross, Eric W; Burchill, Matthew A; Danhorn, Thomas; McCarter, Martin D; Rosen, Hugo R; O'Connor, Brian; Kedl, Ross M

    2016-01-01

    Virtual memory cells (VM) are an antigen-specific, memory phenotype CD8 T-cell subset found in lymphoreplete, unchallenged mice. Previous studies indicated that VM cells were the result of homeostatic proliferation (HP) resembling the proliferation observed in a lymphopenic environment. Here we demonstrate that HP is ongoing in lymphoreplete mice, the degree of which is dictated by the number of naive CD8 T cells with a sufficiently high affinity for self-antigen interacting with peripheral IL-15. VM cell transcriptional profiles suggest a capacity to mediate protective immunity via antigen non-specific bystander killing, a function we show is dependent on IL-15. Finally, we show a VM-like population of human cells that accumulate with age and traffic to the liver, displaying phenotypic and functional attributes consistent with the bystander protective functions of VM cells identified in the mouse. These data identify developmental and functional attributes of VM cells, including their likely role in protective immunity. PMID:27097762

  4. ITK tunes IL-4-induced development of innate memory CD8+ T cells in a γδ T and invariant NKT cell-independent manner

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weishan; Huang, Fei; Kannan, Arun Kumar; Hu, Jianfang; August, Avery

    2014-01-01

    True memory CD8+ T cells develop post antigenic exposure and can provide life-long immune protection. More recently, other types of memory CD8+ T cells have been described, such as the memory-like CD8+ T cells (IMP; CD44hiCD122+) that arise spontaneously in Itk−/− mice, which are suggested to develop as a result of IL-4 secreted by NKT-like γδ T or PLZF+ NKT cells found in Itk−/− mice. However, we report here that whereas IMP CD8+ T cell development in Itk−/− mice is dependent on IL-4/STAT6 signaling, it is not dependent on any γδ T or iNKT cells. Our experiments suggest that the IMP develops as a result of tuning of the CD8+ T cell response to exogenous IL-4 and TCR triggering by ITK and challenge the current model of IMP CD8+ T cell development as a result of NKT-like γδ T or iNKT cells. These findings suggest that some naive CD8+ T cells may be preprogrammed by weak homeostatic TCR signals in the presence of IL-4 to become memory phenotype cells with the ability to elaborate effector function rapidly. The role of ITK in this process suggests a mechanism by which IMP CD8+ T cells can be generated rapidly in response to infection. PMID:24620029

  5. Comparative assessment of therapeutic safety of norcantharidin, N-farnesyloxy-norcantharimide, and N-farnesyl-norcantharimide against Jurkat T cells relative to human normal lymphoblast: A quantitative pilot study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ming-Che; Wu, Jin-Yi; Liao, Hui-Fen; Chen, Yu-Jen; Kuo, Cheng-Deng

    2016-08-01

    The therapeutic safety of an anticancer drug is one of the most important concerns of the physician treating the cancer patient. Half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) and hillslope are usually used to represent the strength and sensitivity of an anticancer drug on cancer cells. The therapeutic safety of the anticancer drug can be assessed by comparing the IC50 and hillslope of anticancer drugs on cancer cells relative to normal cells. Since there are situations where "more anticancer activity" implies "more toxicity," the safety of an anticancer drug in these situations is hard to evaluate by using IC50 and hillslope alone. In a previous study, the "net effect" index was devised to represent the net therapeutic effects of one anticancer drug relative to the other. However, the therapeutic safety of one specific anticancer drug alone was not defined in the "net effect" index. This study introduced the "safety index (SI)" to quantify the degree of safety of an anticancer drug by using 4-parameter logistic model on cancer cells relative to normal cells. The therapeutic safety of norcantharidin (NCTD), N-farnesyloxy-norcantharimide (NOC15), and N-farnesyl-norcantharimide (NC15) in the treatment of Jurkat T cells relative to human normal lymphoblast was compared using the newly defined SI. We found that the SI of NOC15 and NC15 was significantly higher than that of NCTD, suggesting that both NOC15 and NC15 can damage more cancer cells and less normal cells than NCTD. We conclude that both NOC15 and NC15 are safer anticancer drugs than NCTD in the treatment of Jurkat T cells relative to human normal lymphoblast. The SI can be further applied to the screening, developments, and applications of anticancer drugs in the future. PMID:27495082

  6. The protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPN4/PTP-MEG1, an enzyme capable of dephosphorylating the TCR ITAMs and regulating NF-κB, is dispensable for T cell development and/or T cell effector functions

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jennifer A.; Becker, Amy M.; Medeiros, Jennifer J.; Shapiro, Virginia S.; Wang, Andrew; Farrar, J. David; Quill, Timothy A.; van Huijsduijnen, Rob Hooft; van Oers, Nicolai S.C.

    2008-01-01

    T cell receptor signaling processes are controlled by the integrated actions of families of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases). Several distinct cytosolic protein tyrosine phosphatases have been described that are able to negatively regulate TCR signaling pathways, including SHP-1, SHP-2, PTPH1, and PEP. Using PTPase substrate-trapping mutants and wild type enzymes, we determined that PTPN4/PTP-MEG1, a PTPH1-family member, could complex and dephosphorylate the ITAMs of the TCR ζ subunit. In addition, the substrate-trapping derivative augmented basal and TCR-induced activation of NF-κB in T cells. To characterize the contribution of this PTPase in T cells, we developed PTPN4-deficient mice. T cell development and TCR signaling events were comparable between wild type and PTPN4-deficient animals. The magnitude and duration of TCR-regulated ITAM phosphorylation, as well as overall protein phosphorylation, was unaltered in the absence of PTPN4. Finally, Th1- and Th2-derived cytokines and in vivo immune responses to Listeria monocytogeneswere equivalent between wild type and PTPN4-deficient mice. These findings suggest that additional PTPases are involved in controlling ITAM phosphorylations. PMID:18614237

  7. Spontaneous Intestinal Tumorigenesis in Apc/Min+ Mice Requires Altered T Cell Development with IL-17A

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Wook-Jin; Bothwell, Alfred L. M.

    2015-01-01

    The control of inflammatory diseases requires functional regulatory T cells (Tregs) with significant Gata-3 expression. Here we address the inhibitory role of Tregs on intestinal tumorigenesis in the Apc/Min+ mouse model that resembles human familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Apc/Min+ mice had a markedly increased frequency of Foxp3+ Tregs and yet decreased Gata-3 expression in the lamina propria. To address the role of heterozygous Apc gene mutation in Tregs, we generated Foxp3-Cre, Apcflox/+ mice. Tregs from these mice effectively inhibited tumorigenesis comparable to wild type Tregs after adoptive transfer into Apc/Min+ mice, demonstrating that the heterozygous Apc gene mutation in Tregs does not induce the loss of control over tumor microenvironment. Adoptive transfer of in vitro generated Apc/Min+ iTregs (inducible Tregs) failed to inhibit intestinal tumorigenesis, suggesting that naïve CD4 T cells generated from Apc/Min+ mice thymus were impaired. We also showed that adoptively transferred IL-17A-deficient Apc/Min+ Tregs inhibited tumor growth, suggesting that IL-17A was critical to impair the tumor regression function of Apc/Min+ Tregs. Taken together, our results suggest that both T cell development in a functional thymus and IL-17A control the ability of Treg to inhibit intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc/Min+ mice. PMID:26146642

  8. Relationship between T cell subpopulations and the mitogen responsiveness and suppressor cell function of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in normal individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Victorino, R M; Hodgson, H J

    1980-01-01

    A simultaneous analysis was made of numbers and proportions of T cell subsets (T mu and T gamma cells), lymphocyte responsiveness to non-specific mitogens in vitro and 'short-lived suppressor cell activity' in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of normal individuals. No correlation was found between either T gamma or T mu cells and the 'short-lived suppressor cell activity', suggesting that suppression in this system is not a reflection of quantitative alteration in these subsets. However, a highly significant positive correlation was found between numbers of T mu cells and PBMC responses to the mitogens phytohaemagglutinin, concanavalin A and pokeweek mitogen. This may reflect either a helper effect of T mu cells on lymphocyte proliferation in response to mitogens or the presence of the majority of mitogen-responsive cells within this subpopulation. As in normal individuals lymphocyte responsiveness correlates with the number of circulating T mu cells, it is possible that a reduction in these cells in disease states may contribute to defects in cell-mediated immunity. PMID:6452237

  9. T-cell count

    MedlinePlus

    Thymus derived lymphocyte count; T-lymphocyte count; T cell count ... T cells are a type of lymphocyte. Lymphocytes are white blood cells. They make up part of the immune system. T cells help the body fight diseases or harmful ...

  10. Rhizoctonia Bataticola Lectin (RBL) Induces Caspase-8-Mediated Apoptosis in Human T-Cell Leukemia Cell Lines but Not in Normal CD3 and CD34 Positive Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pujari, Radha; Eligar, Sachin M.; Kumar, Natesh; Barkeer, Srikanth; Reddy, Vishwanath; Swamy, Bale M.; Inamdar, Shashikala R.; Shastry, Padma

    2013-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated immunostimulatory activity of a fungal lectin, Rhizoctonia bataticola lectin (RBL), towards normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The present study aimed to explore the anticancer activities of RBL using human leukemic T-cell lines, Molt-4, Jurkat and HuT-78. RBL exhibited significant binding (>90%) to the cell membrane that was effectively inhibited by complex glycoproteins such as mucin (97% inhibition) and asialofetuin (94% inhibition) but not simple sugars such as N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, glucose and sucrose. RBL induced a dose and time dependent inhibition of proliferation and induced cytotoxicity in the cell lines. The percentage of apoptotic cells, as determined by hypodiploidy, was 33% and 42% in Molt-4 and Jurkat cells, respectively, compared to 3.11% and 2.92% in controls. This effect was associated with a concomitant decrease in the G0/G1 population. Though initiator caspase-8 and -9 were activated upon exposure to RBL, inhibition of caspase-8 but not caspase-9 rescued cells from RBL-induced apoptosis. Mechanistic studies revealed that RBL induced cleavage of Bid, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of caspase-3. The expression of the anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-X was down regulated without altering the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins- Bad and Bax. In contrast to leukemic cells, RBL did not induce apoptosis in normal PBMC, isolated CD3+ve cells and undifferentiated CD34+ve hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). The findings highlight the differential effects of RBL on transformed and normal hematopoietic cells and suggest that RBL may be explored for therapeutic applications in leukemia. PMID:24244478

  11. Cytomegalovirus-specific CD8+ T cells do not develop in all renal transplant patients at risk of virus infection.

    PubMed

    Christmas, Stephen E; Halliday, Deborah; Lawton, Nichola; Wang, Haiyi; Abdalla, Ibrahim; Masters, James; Hassan, Rebecca L; Hart, Ian J; Khan, Naeem; Smith, Jane; Hammad, Abdul; Bakran, Ali

    2009-12-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is an important pathogen in immunosuppressed renal transplant patients. At greatest risk are CMV IgG seronegative recipients (R-) of kidneys from CMV IgG seropositive donors (D+), although not all develop CMV disease. The aims of the study were to determine whether D+/R- patients who do or do not go on to develop CMV disease differ in their CD8+ T cell responses to CMV. Responses to the immunodominant NLVPMVATV peptide from the CMV structural protein pp65 in HLA-A2+ renal transplant patients were quantified using HLA tetramers/pentamers. Most D+/R+ patients had detectable tetramer+ cells while most D-/R- patients did not. Around 50% of D+/R- patients had some CD8+ tetramer+ cells and there was a strong correlation between % tetramer+ cells and the occurrence of a CMV infection post-transplantation (P<0.005). 18/41 (44%) of CMV negative patients receiving a kidney from a CMV+ donor failed to develop a detectable CMV infection, or significant numbers of tetramer+ cells. There was no relationship between CMV infection and acute cellular rejection. There was a tendency for patients who were given pre-emptive antiviral therapy to have lower levels of tetramer+ cells but this was not statistically significant. Hence the results show that CMV- patients receiving a kidney from a CMV+ donor do not inevitably acquire CMV infection. Those without CMV disease did not show any T cell response while most patients with detectable CMV developed specific CD8+ T cells.

  12. Age-related development and tissue distribution of T cell markers (CD4 and CD8a) in Chinese goose.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shun; Zhou, Qin; Cheng, Beibei; Yan, Bing; Yan, Xiaoling; Zhao, Qiurong; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2015-06-01

    Aquatic birds play n critical role in the transmission and dissemination of many important pathogens such as avian influenza virus. The cell-mediated immunity is very important in eliminating the intracellular antigens. Expression of CD4 and CD8 on T cell surface is essential for cell-mediated immune defence and T-cell development. However, the ontogeny of T lymphocytes in waterfowl is scarce and fragmentary. To address these questions, here we report the development and tissues distribution of CD4 and CD8α in goose embryo, gosling and goose by immunocytochemistry assay using monoclonal antibodies. Moreover, the age-related mRNA level of goose CD4 and CD8α in different immune tissues were study by real time quantitative PCR. Our results suggested that the high expression of CD4 and CD8α were readily found in thymus, which peaked at the first week post-hatch. And the highest expression level of CD4 and CD8α were detected in bursa of Fabricius, caecal tonsils, spleen and intestine at the second week, after that the expression level were gradually decreased. Interestingly, the remarkably high expression of CD4 and CD8α in Harderian gland were detected at the first week, which is about hundreds times more than that in other tissues. Our findings demonstrated that the development and the distribution of CD4 and CD8α are partly changed in an age-related way. Moreover, the histological morphogenesis of immune tissues were also discussed. Our results may shed lights on the better understand of T-cell mediate immunity in goose.

  13. Transgenic expression of cyclin D1 in thymic epithelial precursors promotes epithelial and T cell development.

    PubMed

    Klug, D B; Crouch, E; Carter, C; Coghlan, L; Conti, C J; Richie, E R

    2000-02-15

    We previously reported that precursors within the keratin (K) 8+5+ thymic epithelial cell (TEC) subset generate the major cortical K8+5- TEC population in a process dependent on T lineage commitment. This report demonstrates that expression of a cyclin D1 transgene in K8+5+ TECs expands this subset and promotes TEC and thymocyte development. Cyclin D1 transgene expression is not sufficient to induce TEC differentiation in the absence of T lineage-committed thymocytes because TECs from both hCD3epsilon transgenic and hCD3epsilon/cyclin D1 double transgenic mice remain blocked at the K8+5+ maturation stage. However, enforced cyclin D1 expression does expand the developmental window during which K8+5+ cells can differentiate in response to normal hemopoietic precursors. Thus, enhancement of thymic function may be achieved by manipulating the growth and/or survival of TEC precursors within the K8+5+ subset.

  14. Cytomegalovirus Infection Leads to Development of High Frequencies of Cytotoxic Virus-Specific CD4+ T Cells Targeted to Vascular Endothelium.

    PubMed

    Pachnio, Annette; Ciaurriz, Miriam; Begum, Jusnara; Lal, Neeraj; Zuo, Jianmin; Beggs, Andrew; Moss, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection elicits a very strong and sustained intravascular T cell immune response which may contribute towards development of accelerated immune senescence and vascular disease in older people. Virus-specific CD8+ T cell responses have been investigated extensively through the use of HLA-peptide tetramers but much less is known regarding CMV-specific CD4+ T cells. We used a range of HLA class II-peptide tetramers to investigate the phenotypic and transcriptional profile of CMV-specific CD4+ T cells within healthy donors. We show that such cells comprise an average of 0.45% of the CD4+ T cell pool and can reach up to 24% in some individuals (range 0.01-24%). CMV-specific CD4+ T cells display a highly differentiated effector memory phenotype and express a range of cytokines, dominated by dual TNF-α and IFN-γ expression, although substantial populations which express IL-4 were seen in some donors. Microarray analysis and phenotypic expression revealed a profile of unique features. These include the expression of CX3CR1, which would direct cells towards fractalkine on activated endothelium, and the β2-adrenergic receptor, which could permit rapid response to stress. CMV-specific CD4+ T cells display an intense cytotoxic profile with high level expression of granzyme B and perforin, a pattern which increases further during aging. In addition CMV-specific CD4+ T cells demonstrate strong cytotoxic activity against antigen-loaded target cells when isolated directly ex vivo. PD-1 expression is present on 47% of cells but both the intensity and distribution of the inhibitory receptor is reduced in older people. These findings reveal the marked accumulation and unique phenotype of CMV-specific CD4+ T cells and indicate how such T cells may contribute to the vascular complications associated with CMV in older people. PMID:27606804

  15. Cytomegalovirus Infection Leads to Development of High Frequencies of Cytotoxic Virus-Specific CD4+ T Cells Targeted to Vascular Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Begum, Jusnara; Lal, Neeraj; Zuo, Jianmin; Beggs, Andrew; Moss, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection elicits a very strong and sustained intravascular T cell immune response which may contribute towards development of accelerated immune senescence and vascular disease in older people. Virus-specific CD8+ T cell responses have been investigated extensively through the use of HLA-peptide tetramers but much less is known regarding CMV-specific CD4+ T cells. We used a range of HLA class II-peptide tetramers to investigate the phenotypic and transcriptional profile of CMV-specific CD4+ T cells within healthy donors. We show that such cells comprise an average of 0.45% of the CD4+ T cell pool and can reach up to 24% in some individuals (range 0.01–24%). CMV-specific CD4+ T cells display a highly differentiated effector memory phenotype and express a range of cytokines, dominated by dual TNF-α and IFN-γ expression, although substantial populations which express IL-4 were seen in some donors. Microarray analysis and phenotypic expression revealed a profile of unique features. These include the expression of CX3CR1, which would direct cells towards fractalkine on activated endothelium, and the β2-adrenergic receptor, which could permit rapid response to stress. CMV-specific CD4+ T cells display an intense cytotoxic profile with high level expression of granzyme B and perforin, a pattern which increases further during aging. In addition CMV-specific CD4+ T cells demonstrate strong cytotoxic activity against antigen-loaded target cells when isolated directly ex vivo. PD-1 expression is present on 47% of cells but both the intensity and distribution of the inhibitory receptor is reduced in older people. These findings reveal the marked accumulation and unique phenotype of CMV-specific CD4+ T cells and indicate how such T cells may contribute to the vascular complications associated with CMV in older people. PMID:27606804

  16. Kinase RIP3 is dispensable for normal NF-kappa Bs, signaling by the B-cell and T-cell receptors, tumor necrosis factor receptor 1, and Toll-like receptors 2 and 4.

    PubMed

    Newton, Kim; Sun, Xiaoqing; Dixit, Vishva M

    2004-02-01

    RIP3 is a member of the RIP kinase family. It is expressed in the embryo and in multiple adult tissues, including most hemopoietic cell lineages. Several studies have implicated RIP3 in the regulation of apoptosis and NF-kappa B signaling, but whether RIP3 promotes or attenuates activation of the NF-kappa B family of transcription factors has been controversial. We have generated RIP3-deficient mice by gene targeting and find RIP3 to be dispensable for normal mouse development. RIP3-deficient cells showed normal sensitivity to a variety of apoptotic stimuli and were indistinguishable from wild-type cells in their ability to activate NF-kappa B signaling in response to the following: human tumor necrosis factor (TNF), which selectively engages mouse TNF receptor 1; cross-linking of the B- or T-cell antigen receptors; peptidoglycan, which activates Toll-like receptor 2; and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which stimulates Toll-like receptor 4. Consistent with these observations, RIP3-deficient mice exhibited normal antibody production after immunization with a T-dependent antigen and normal interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), IL-6, and TNF production after LPS treatment. Thus, we can exclude RIP3 as an essential modulator of NF-kappa B signaling downstream of several receptor systems.

  17. Mnk1 and 2 are dispensable for T-cell development and activation but important for the pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Gorentla, Balachandra K; Krishna, Sruti; Shin, Jinwook; Inoue, Makoto; Shinohara, Mari L.; Grayson, Jason M.; Fukunaga, Rikiro; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2012-01-01

    T-cell development and activation are usually accompanied by expansion and production of numerous proteins that require active translation. The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) binds to the 5' cap structure of mRNA and is critical for cap-dependent translational initiation. It has been hypothesized that MAPK-interacting kinase 1 and 2 (Mnk1/2) promote cap-dependent translation by phosphorylating eIF4E at serine 209 (S209). Pharmacological studies utilizing inhibitors have suggested that Mnk1/2 play important roles in T-cells. However, genetic evidence supporting such conclusions is lacking. Moreover, the signaling pathways that regulate Mnk1/2 in T-cells remain unclear. We demonstrated here that T-cell receptor (TCR) engagement activates Mnk1/2 in primary T-cells. Such activation is dependent on Ras-Erk1/2 signaling and is inhibited by diacylglycerol kinases α and ζ. Mnk1/2 double deficiency in mice abolishes TCR-induced eIF4E S209 phosphorylation, indicating their absolute requirement for eIF4E S209 phosphorylation. However, Mnk1/2 double deficiency does not affect the development of conventional αβ T-cells, regulatory T-cells, or NKT-cells. Furthermore, T-cell activation, in vivo primary and memory CD8 T-cell responses to microbial infection, and NKT-cell cytokine production were not obviously altered by Mnk1/2 deficiency. Although Mnk1/2 deficiency causes decreased IL-17 and IFNγ production by CD4 T-cells following immunization of mice with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide in complete Freud's adjuvant, correlating with milder experimental autoimmune encephalitis scores, it does not affect T helper cell differentiation in vitro. Together, these data suggest that Mnk1/2 play a minimal role in T-cell development and activation but may regulate non-T-cell lineages to control Th1/Th17 differentiation in vivo. PMID:23269249

  18. Faster T-cell development following gene therapy compared with haploidentical HSCT in the treatment of SCID-X1.

    PubMed

    Touzot, Fabien; Moshous, Despina; Creidy, Rita; Neven, Bénédicte; Frange, Pierre; Cros, Guilhem; Caccavelli, Laure; Blondeau, Johanna; Magnani, Alessandra; Luby, Jean-Marc; Ternaux, Brigitte; Picard, Capucine; Blanche, Stéphane; Fischer, Alain; Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; Cavazzana, Marina

    2015-06-01

    During the last decade, gene therapy via ex vivo gene transfer into autologous hematopoietic stem cells has emerged as a convincing therapy for severe combined immunodeficiency caused by ILR2G mutation (SCID-X1) despite the occurrence of genotoxicity caused by the integration of first-generation retroviral vectors. However, the place of gene therapy among the therapeutic armamentarium remains to be defined. We retrospectively analyze and compare clinical outcomes and immune reconstitution in 13 consecutive SCID-X1 patients having undergone haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and 14 SCID-X1 patients treated with gene therapy over the same period at a single center level: the Necker Children's Hospital (Paris, France). Our results show a clear advantage in terms of T-cell development of gene therapy over HSCT with a mismatched donor. Patients treated with gene therapy display a faster T-cell reconstitution and a better long-term thymic output. Interestingly, this advantage of gene therapy vs haploidentical HSCT seems to be independent of the existence of clinical graft-versus-host disease in the latter condition. If data of safety are confirmed over the long term, gene therapy for SCID-X1 appears to be an equal, if not superior, alternative to haploidentical HSCT.

  19. The B cell repertoire revealed by major histocompatibility complex- specific helper T cells. I. Frequencies of a genetically defined V region marker among mitogen- and T helper cell-reactive B lymphocytes in normal and immunized mice

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to analyze the frequencies of a genetically defined variable (V) region marker in the B cell subset sensitive to T cell help. To this end we used an alloreactive T cell line that has the property of inducing B cells of the appropriate haplotype to exponential growth and polyclonal antibody synthesis. The frequency obtained with this helper line was also directly compared to that obtained with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We found that in normal BALB/c mice the frequency of M460-positive clonotypes was respectively, 1/100 and 1/1,000 among the T helper- and LPS-sensitive B cell subsets. In mice immunized with antiidiotype coupled to a thymus-dependent antigen, the differences in the numbers of idiotype-positive precursors were even more accentuated, i.e. 1/20 in the B cell subset triggered by T helper cells and 1/800 in those cells responsive to LPS. The frequencies of the M460 determinant in mice immunized with anti- idiotypes coupled to thymus-independent antigens were not significantly different, in either B cell subset, from those obtained with spleen cells of normal nonimmunized animals. Taken as a whole, our results imply that the V gene repertoire revealed by LPS includes precursor distribution, as this distribution occurs during the early stage of B cell development (potential repertoire), while the repertoire revealed by T helper cells includes the V region distribution of those clones that are selected in the periphery of the functional immune system. PMID:6200567

  20. Proinsulin Expression Shapes the TCR Repertoire but Fails to Control the Development of Low-Avidity Insulin-Reactive CD8+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Pearson, James A; Thayer, Terri C; McLaren, James E; Ladell, Kristin; De Leenheer, Evy; Phillips, Amy; Davies, Joanne; Kakabadse, Dimitri; Miners, Kelly; Morgan, Peter; Wen, Li; Price, David A; Wong, F Susan

    2016-06-01

    NOD mice, a model strain for human type 1 diabetes, express proinsulin (PI) in the thymus. However, insulin-reactive T cells escape negative selection, and subsequent activation of the CD8(+) T-cell clonotype G9C8, which recognizes insulin B15-23 via an αβ T-cell receptor (TCR) incorporating TRAV8-1/TRAJ9 and TRBV19/TRBJ2-3 gene rearrangements, contributes to the development of diabetes. In this study, we used fixed TRAV8-1/TRAJ9 TCRα-chain transgenic mice to assess the impact of PI isoform expression on the insulin-reactive CD8(+) T-cell repertoire. The key findings were: 1) PI2 deficiency increases the frequency of insulin B15-23-reactive TRBV19(+)CD8(+) T cells and causes diabetes; 2) insulin B15-23-reactive TRBV19(+)CD8(+) T cells are more abundant in the pancreatic lymph nodes of mice lacking PI1 and/or PI2; 3) overexpression of PI2 decreases TRBV19 usage in the global CD8(+) T-cell compartment; 4) a biased repertoire of insulin-reactive CD8(+) T cells emerges in the periphery regardless of antigen exposure; and 5) low-avidity insulin-reactive CD8(+) T cells are less affected by antigen exposure in the thymus than in the periphery. These findings inform our understanding of the diabetogenic process and reveal new avenues for therapeutic exploitation in type 1 diabetes. PMID:26953160

  1. Interferon-γ Promotes Inflammation and Development of T-Cell Lymphoma in HTLV-1 bZIP Factor Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mitagami, Yu; Yasunaga, Jun-ichirou; Kinosada, Haruka; Ohshima, Koichi; Matsuoka, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is an etiological agent of several inflammatory diseases and a T-cell malignancy, adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ) is the only viral gene that is constitutively expressed in HTLV-1-infected cells, and it has multiple functions on T-cell signaling pathways. HBZ has important roles in HTLV-1-mediated pathogenesis, since HBZ transgenic (HBZ-Tg) mice develop systemic inflammation and T-cell lymphomas, which are similar phenotypes to HTLV-1-associated diseases. We showed previously that in HBZ-Tg mice, HBZ causes unstable Foxp3 expression, leading to an increase in regulatory T cells (Tregs) and the consequent induction of IFN-γ-producing cells, which in turn leads to the development of inflammation in the mice. In this study, we show that the severity of inflammation is correlated with the development of lymphomas in HBZ-Tg mice, suggesting that HBZ-mediated inflammation is closely linked to oncogenesis in CD4+ T cells. In addition, we found that IFN-γ-producing cells enhance HBZ-mediated inflammation, since knocking out IFN-γ significantly reduced the incidence of dermatitis as well as lymphoma. Recent studies show the critical roles of the intestinal microbiota in the development of Tregs in vivo. We found that even germ-free HBZ-Tg mice still had an increased number of Tregs and IFN-γ-producing cells, and developed dermatitis, indicating that an intrinsic activity of HBZ evokes aberrant T-cell differentiation and consequently causes inflammation. These results show that immunomodulation by HBZ is implicated in both inflammation and oncogenesis, and suggest a causal connection between HTLV-1-associated inflammation and ATL. PMID:26296091

  2. The cell cycle inhibitor p21 controls T-cell proliferation and sex-linked lupus development.

    PubMed

    Balomenos, D; Martín-Caballero, J; García, M I; Prieto, I; Flores, J M; Serrano, M; Martínez-A, C

    2000-02-01

    Here we show that the cell-cycle regulator p21 is involved in immune system function. T lymphocytes from p21-/- mice exhibit significant proliferative advantage over wild-type cells following prolonged stimulation, but not after primary activation. Consistent with this, p21-deficient mice accumulate abnormal amounts of CD4+ memory cells, and develop loss of tolerance towards nuclear antigens. Similar to human lupus, female p21-deficient mice develop antibodies against dsDNA, lymphadenopathy, and glomerulonephritis, leading to decreased viability. These data demonstrate a specialized role for p21 in the control of T-cell proliferation, tolerance to nuclear antigens, and female-prone lupus. These findings could be the basis for new therapeutic approaches to lupus.

  3. WT1-specific T cell receptor gene therapy: improving TCR function in transduced T cells.

    PubMed

    Stauss, Hans J; Thomas, Sharyn; Cesco-Gaspere, Michela; Hart, Daniel P; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; King, Judy; Wright, Graham; Perro, Mario; Pospori, Constantina; Morris, Emma

    2008-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T lymphocytes is an attractive form of immunotherapy for haematological malignancies and cancer. The difficulty of isolating antigen-specific T lymphocytes for individual patients limits the more widespread use of adoptive T cell therapy. The demonstration that cloned T cell receptor (TCR) genes can be used to produce T lymphocyte populations of desired specificity offers new opportunities for antigen-specific T cell therapy. The first trial in humans demonstrated that TCR gene-modified T cells persisted for an extended time period and reduced tumor burden in some patients. The WT1 protein is an attractive target for immunotherapy of leukemia and solid cancer since elevated expression has been demonstrated in AML, CML, MDS and in breast, colon and ovarian cancer. In the past, we have isolated high avidity CTL specific for a WT1-derived peptide presented by HLA-A2 and cloned the TCR alpha and beta genes of a WT1-specific CTL line. The genes were inserted into retroviral vectors for transduction of human peripheral blood T lymphocytes of leukemia patients and normal donors. The treatment of leukemia-bearing NOD/SCID mice with T cells transduced with the WT1-specific TCR eliminated leukemia cells in the bone marrow of most mice, while treatment with T cells transduced with a TCR of irrelevant specificity did not diminish the leukemia burden. In order to improve the safety and efficacy of TCR gene therapy, we have developed lentiviral TCR gene transfer. In addition, we employed strategies to enhance TCR expression while avoiding TCR mis-pairing. It may be possible to generate dominant TCR constructs that can suppress the expression of the endogenous TCR on the surface of transduced T cells. The development of new TCR gene constructs holds great promise for the safe and effective delivery of TCR gene therapy for the treatment of malignancies.

  4. WT1-specific T cell receptor gene therapy: improving TCR function in transduced T cells.

    PubMed

    Stauss, Hans J; Thomas, Sharyn; Cesco-Gaspere, Michela; Hart, Daniel P; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; King, Judy; Wright, Graham; Perro, Mario; Pospori, Constantina; Morris, Emma

    2008-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T lymphocytes is an attractive form of immunotherapy for haematological malignancies and cancer. The difficulty of isolating antigen-specific T lymphocytes for individual patients limits the more widespread use of adoptive T cell therapy. The demonstration that cloned T cell receptor (TCR) genes can be used to produce T lymphocyte populations of desired specificity offers new opportunities for antigen-specific T cell therapy. The first trial in humans demonstrated that TCR gene-modified T cells persisted for an extended time period and reduced tumor burden in some patients. The WT1 protein is an attractive target for immunotherapy of leukemia and solid cancer since elevated expression has been demonstrated in AML, CML, MDS and in breast, colon and ovarian cancer. In the past, we have isolated high avidity CTL specific for a WT1-derived peptide presented by HLA-A2 and cloned the TCR alpha and beta genes of a WT1-specific CTL line. The genes were inserted into retroviral vectors for transduction of human peripheral blood T lymphocytes of leukemia patients and normal donors. The treatment of leukemia-bearing NOD/SCID mice with T cells transduced with the WT1-specific TCR eliminated leukemia cells in the bone marrow of most mice, while treatment with T cells transduced with a TCR of irrelevant specificity did not diminish the leukemia burden. In order to improve the safety and efficacy of TCR gene therapy, we have developed lentiviral TCR gene transfer. In addition, we employed strategies to enhance TCR expression while avoiding TCR mis-pairing. It may be possible to generate dominant TCR constructs that can suppress the expression of the endogenous TCR on the surface of transduced T cells. The development of new TCR gene constructs holds great promise for the safe and effective delivery of TCR gene therapy for the treatment of malignancies. PMID:17855129

  5. 78 FR 69429 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: The Development of Modified T-cells for the Treatment of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ... Modified T-cells for the Treatment of Multiple Myeloma AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, HHS. ACTION.../ 622,6008 entitled, ``Chimeric Antigen Receptors Targeting B-cell Maturation Antigen'' . The patent... human T-cells directed against B-cell Maturation Antigen (BCMA) for the treatment of multiple...

  6. Dendritic cells drive memory CD8 T-cell homeostasis via IL-15 transpresentation

    PubMed Central

    Stonier, Spencer W.; Ma, Lisa J.; Castillo, Eliseo F.

    2008-01-01

    Interleukin-15 (IL-15) is crucial for the development of naive and memory CD8 T cells and is delivered through a mechanism called transpresentation. Previous studies showed that memory CD8 T cells require IL-15 transpresentation by an as yet unknown cell of hematopoietic origin. We hypothesized that dendritic cells (DCs) transpresent IL-15 to CD8 T cells, and we examined this by developing a transgenic model that limits IL-15 transpresentation to DCs. In this study, IL-15 transpresentation by DCs had little effect on restoring naive CD8 T cells but contributed to the development of memory-phenotype CD8 T cells. The generation of virus-specific, memory CD8 T cells was partially supported by IL-15Rα+ DCs through the preferential enhancement of a subset of KLRG-1+CD27− CD8 T cells. In contrast, these DCs were largely sufficient in driving normal homeostatic proliferation of established memory CD8 T cells, suggesting that memory CD8 T cells grow more dependent on IL-15 transpresentation by DCs. Overall, our study clearly supports a role for DCs in memory CD8 T-cell homeostasis but also provides evidence that other hematopoietic cells are involved in this function. The identification of DCs fulfilling this role will enable future studies to better focus on mechanisms regulating T-cell homeostasis. PMID:18812469

  7. Relationship between gut microbiota and development of T cell associated disease.

    PubMed

    Kosiewicz, Michele M; Dryden, Gerald W; Chhabra, Anita; Alard, Pascale

    2014-11-17

    The interplay between the immune response and the gut microbiota is complex. Although it is well-established that the gut microbiota is essential for the proper development of the immune system, recent evidence indicates that the cells of the immune system also influence the composition of the gut microbiota. This interaction can have important consequences for the development of inflammatory diseases, including autoimmune diseases and allergy, and the specific mechanisms by which the gut commensals drive the development of different types of immune responses are beginning to be understood. Furthermore, sex hormones are now thought to play a novel role in this complex relationship, and collaborate with both the gut microbiota and immune system to influence the development of autoimmune disease. In this review, we will focus on recent studies that have transformed our understanding of the importance of the gut microbiota in inflammatory responses.

  8. T-Cell Receptor-Transduced T Cells: Clinical Experience.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Paul F

    2015-01-01

    The large number of T-cell epitopes that have been found to be processed and presented on human tumors, now numbering in the hundreds, provides a rich source of targets for therapeutic interventions aimed at inducing durable tumor regression. Vaccination strategies aimed at inducing responses to these antigens have been largely ineffective, and it has been challenging to generate large numbers of T cells with the functional capacity to mediate durable tumor regressions in adoptive immunotherapy strategies in patients who have common epithelial malignancies. The ability to generate T-cell receptors that recognize shared as well as unique antigens expressed in a wide variety of common tumor types that include lung, breast, ovarian, gastrointestinal, urothelial, and genitourinary cancers provides an opportunity to develop widely applicable therapies based on the adoptive transfer of autologous T cells transduced with those receptors.

  9. Regulatory T cells prevent CD8 T cell maturation by inhibiting CD4 Th cells at tumor sites.

    PubMed

    Chaput, Nathalie; Darrasse-Jèze, Guillaume; Bergot, Anne-Sophie; Cordier, Corinne; Ngo-Abdalla, Stacie; Klatzmann, David; Azogui, Orly

    2007-10-15

    Natural regulatory T cells (Tregs) are present in high frequencies among tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and in draining lymph nodes, supposedly facilitating tumor development. To investigate their role in controlling local immune responses, we analyzed intratumoral T cell accumulation and function in the presence or absence of Tregs. Tumors that grew in normal BALB/c mice injected with the 4T1 tumor cell line were highly infiltrated by Tregs, CD4 and CD8 cells, all having unique characteristics. Most infiltrating Tregs expressed low levels of CD25Rs and Foxp3. They did not proliferate even in the presence of IL-2 but maintained a strong suppressor activity. CD4 T cells were profoundly anergic and CD8 T cell proliferation and cytotoxicity were severely impaired. Depletion of Tregs modified the characteristics of tumor infiltrates. Tumors were initially invaded by activated CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells, which produced IL-2 and IFN-gamma. This was followed by the recruitment of highly cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells at tumor sites leading to tumor rejection. The beneficial effect of Treg depletion in tumor regression was abrogated when CD4 helper cells were also depleted. These findings indicate that the massive infiltration of tumors by Tregs prevents the development of a successful helper response. The Tregs in our model prevent Th cell activation and subsequent development of efficient CD8 T cell activity required for the control of tumor growth. PMID:17911581

  10. Differential dependence on nuclear factor-κB-inducing kinase among natural killer T-cell subsets in their development

    PubMed Central

    Noma, Haruka; Eshima, Koji; Satoh, Masashi; Iwabuchi, Kazuya

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer T cells (NKT cells) are comprised of several subsets. However, the possible differences in their developmental mechanisms have not been fully investigated. To evaluate the dependence of some NKT subpopulations on nuclear factor-κB-inducing kinase (NIK) for their generation, we analysed the differentiation of NKT cells, dividing them into subsets in various tissues of alymphoplasia (aly/aly), a mutant mouse strain that lacks functional NIK. The results indicated that the efficient differentiation of both invariant NKT (iNKT) and non-iNKT cells relied on NIK expression in non-haematopoietic cells; however, the dependence of non-iNKT cells was lower than that of iNKT cells. Especially, the differentiation of CD8+ non-iNKT cells was markedly resistant to the aly mutation. The proportion of two other NKT cell subsets, NK1.1+ γδ T cells and NK1.1− iNKT cells, was also significantly reduced in aly/aly mice, and this defect in their development was reversed in wild-type host mice given aly/aly bone marrow cells. In exerting effector functions, NIK in NKT-αβ cells appeared dispensable, as NIK-deficient NKT-αβ cells could secrete interleukin-4 or interferon-γ and exhibit cytolytic activity at a level comparable to that of aly/+ NKT-αβ cells. Collectively, these results imply that the NIK in thymic stroma may be critically involved in the differentiation of most NKT cell subsets (although the level of NIK dependence may vary among the subsets), and also that NIK in NKT-αβ cells may be dispensable for their effector function. PMID:25988531

  11. Antihelper T cell autoantibody in acquired agammaglobulinemia.

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, A; Sicklick, M; Mehra, V; Rosen, F S; Levey, R H

    1981-01-01

    A patient with acquired agammaglobulinemia had an antihelper T cell factor that was identified as an immunoglobulin of the IgG class. The factor specifically bound to the TH2- T cell subset and, in the presence of complement, abolished the helper effect of normal T cells. The antihelper T cell antibody preceded by several years the appearance of suppressor TH2+Ia+ T cells, at which time the clinical course rapidly deteriorated. Plasmapheresis resulted in lymphocytosis and reappearance of a functionally intact helper T cell population. It did not affect the suppressor cells. Conversely, total thymectomy resulted in a temporary disappearance of the TH2+Ia+ suppressor cells, but did not decrease the levels of the autoantibody to helper T cells. Neither of these treatments reversed the state of agammaglobulinemia. PMID:6450224

  12. Syncytium induction in primary CD4+ T-cell lines from normal donors by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates with non-syncytium-inducing genotype and phenotype in MT-2 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Todd, B J; Kedar, P; Pope, J H

    1995-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates classified as syncytium-inducing (SI) or non-SI (NSI) in the MT-2 T-cell line exhibit characteristic sequence differences in the V1-V2 and V3 regions of the env gene. Seven HIV-1 isolates were phenotyped as NSI or SI in the MT-2 cell line. Unexpectedly, all four NSI viruses induced large syncytia 4 to 8 days postinoculation in a panel of five primary CD4+ T-cell lines (including two clones) generated from the peripheral blood of normal donors by exposure to infectious HIV-1, inactivated HIV-1, or Epstein-Barr virus. The primary T-cell lines yielded neither HIV-1 provirus nor infectious HIV by PCR analysis or exhaustive coculture with phytohemagglutinin-treated blast cells. Three isolates (TC354, PK1, and PK2) were biologically cloned and retained their SI or NSI phenotypes in MT-2 and primary T-cell lines. The biologically cloned provirus DNA was also used to clone and sequence the relevant V2 and V3 regions of the env genes. The amino acid sequences of the V2 and V3 regions were characteristic of patterns already reported for the NSI, switch NSI, and SI phenotypes, respectively. This evidence precludes the possibility that these results were due to contamination of the NSI isolates with SI virus. The results unequivocally indicate that HIV-1 isolates with the NSI genotype and phenotype in MT-2 cells may actively induce syncytia in cloned CD4+ T cells in vitro and support the view that direct cytopathic effects may contribute to the steady decline in CD4+ T cells in asymptomatic HIV-1-seropositive patients without detectable SI virus. PMID:7474129

  13. IFNα/βR Signaling Promotes Regulatory T Cell Development and Function Under Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Metidji, Amina; Rieder, Sadiye Amcaoglu; Glass, Deborah Dacek; Cremer, Isabelle; Punkosdy, George A.; Shevach, Ethan M.

    2015-01-01

    Type I IFNs are a family of cytokines with antiviral and immunomodulatory properties. While the antiviral effects of IFNs are well characterized, their immunomodulatory properties are less clear. To specifically address the effects of type I IFNs on Treg, we studied mixed bone morrow (BM) chimeras between wild-type (WT) and IFNα/βR (IFNAR) knockout (KO) mice, and heterozygous female mice expressing a Treg-specific deletion of the IFNAR. In these two models, IFNAR signaling promotes the development of the Treg lineage in the thymus and their survival in the periphery. IFNAR KO Treg had a higher expression of the pro-apoptotic gene Bim and higher frequency of active caspase positive cells. IFNAR KO Treg from chimeric mice displayed a more naïve phenotype, accompanied by lower levels of CD25 and phosphorylated STAT5. Therefore, in Treg IFNAR signaling may directly or indirectly affect phosphorylation of STAT5. In mixed chimeras with Scurfy fetal liver, Treg derived from IFNAR KO BM were unable to control T effector cell activation and tissue inflammation. Under stress conditions or in a competitive environment, IFNAR signaling may be required to maintain Treg homeostasis and function. PMID:25795758

  14. Molecular profiling of CD8 T cells in autochthonous melanoma identifies Maf as driver of exhaustion

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Marilyn; Henin, Coralie; Maurizio, Julien; Imbratta, Claire; Bourdely, Pierre; Buferne, Michel; Baitsch, Lukas; Vanhille, Laurent; Sieweke, Michael H; Speiser, Daniel E; Auphan-Anezin, Nathalie; Schmitt-Verhulst, Anne-Marie; Verdeil, Grégory

    2015-01-01

    T cells infiltrating neoplasms express surface molecules typical of chronically virus-stimulated T cells, often termed “exhausted” T cells. We compared the transcriptome of “exhausted” CD8 T cells infiltrating autochthonous melanomas to those of naïve and acutely stimulated CD8 T cells. Despite strong similarities between transcriptional signatures of tumor- and virus-induced exhausted CD8 T cells, notable differences appeared. Among transcriptional regulators, Nr4a2 and Maf were highly overexpressed in tumor-exhausted T cells and significantly upregulated in CD8 T cells from human melanoma metastases. Transduction of murine tumor-specific CD8 T cells to express Maf partially reproduced the transcriptional program associated with tumor-induced exhaustion. Upon adoptive transfer, the transduced cells showed normal homeostasis but failed to accumulate in tumor-bearing hosts and developed defective anti-tumor effector responses. We further identified TGFβ and IL-6 as main inducers of Maf expression in CD8 T cells and showed that Maf-deleted tumor-specific CD8 T cells were much more potent to restrain tumor growth in vivo. Therefore, the melanoma microenvironment contributes to skewing of CD8 T cell differentiation programs, in part by TGFβ/IL-6-mediated induction of Maf. PMID:26139534

  15. The challenges and opportunities for the development of a T-cell epitope-based herpes simplex vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Tiffany; Wang, Christine; Badakhshan, Tina; Chilukuri, Sravya; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2014-11-28

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 & HSV-2) infections have been prevalent since the ancient Greek times. To this day, they still affect a staggering number of over a billion individuals worldwide. HSV-1 infections are predominant than HSV-2 infections and cause potentially blinding ocular herpes, oro-facial herpes and encephalitis. HSV-2 infections cause painful genital herpes, encephalitis, and death in newborns. While prophylactic and therapeutic HSV vaccines remain urgently needed for centuries, their development has been difficult. During the most recent National Institute of Health (NIH) workshop titled "Next Generation Herpes Simplex Virus Vaccines: The Challenges and Opportunities", basic researchers, funding agencies, and pharmaceutical representatives gathered: (i) to assess the status of herpes vaccine research; and (ii) to identify the gaps and propose alternative approaches in developing a safe and efficient herpes vaccine. One "common denominator" among previously failed clinical herpes vaccine trials is that they either used a whole virus or a whole viral protein, which contain both "pathogenic symptomatic" and "protective asymptomatic" antigens and epitopes. In this report, we continue to advocate developing "asymptomatic" epitope-based sub-unit vaccine strategies that selectively incorporate "protective asymptomatic" epitopes which: (i) are exclusively recognized by effector memory CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells (TEM cells) from "naturally" protected seropositive asymptomatic individuals; and (ii) protect human leukocyte antigen (HLA) transgenic animal models of ocular and genital herpes. We review the role of animal models in herpes vaccine development and discuss their current status, challenges, and prospects.

  16. The cellular immune system in myelomagenesis: NK cells and T cells in the development of MM and their uses in immunotherapies

    PubMed Central

    Dosani, T; Carlsten, M; Maric, I; Landgren, O

    2015-01-01

    As vast strides are being made in the management and treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), recent interests are increasingly focusing on understanding the development of the disease. The knowledge that MM develops exclusively from a protracted phase of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance provides an opportunity to study tumor evolution in this process. Although the immune system has been implicated in the development of MM, the scientific literature on the role and status of various immune components in this process is broad and sometimes contradictory. Accordingly, we present a review of cellular immune subsets in myelomagenesis. We summarize the current literature on the quantitative and functional profiles of natural killer cells and T-cells, including conventional T-cells, natural killer T-cells, γδ T-cells and regulatory T-cells, in myelomagenesis. Our goal is to provide an overview of the status and function of these immune cells in both the peripheral blood and the bone marrow during myelomagenesis. This provides a better understanding of the nature of the immune system in tumor evolution, the knowledge of which is especially significant considering that immunotherapies are increasingly being explored in the treatment of both MM and its precursor conditions. PMID:25885426

  17. The cellular immune system in myelomagenesis: NK cells and T cells in the development of myeloma [corrected] and their uses in immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Dosani, T; Carlsten, M; Maric, I; Landgren, O

    2015-01-01

    As vast strides are being made in the management and treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), recent interests are increasingly focusing on understanding the development of the disease. The knowledge that MM develops exclusively from a protracted phase of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance provides an opportunity to study tumor evolution in this process. Although the immune system has been implicated in the development of MM, the scientific literature on the role and status of various immune components in this process is broad and sometimes contradictory. Accordingly, we present a review of cellular immune subsets in myelomagenesis. We summarize the current literature on the quantitative and functional profiles of natural killer cells and T-cells, including conventional T-cells, natural killer T-cells, γδ T-cells and regulatory T-cells, in myelomagenesis. Our goal is to provide an overview of the status and function of these immune cells in both the peripheral blood and the bone marrow during myelomagenesis. This provides a better understanding of the nature of the immune system in tumor evolution, the knowledge of which is especially significant considering that immunotherapies are increasingly being explored in the treatment of both MM and its precursor conditions.

  18. Alpha beta T-cell development is not affected by inversion of TCR beta gene enhancer sequences: polar enhancement of gene expression regardless of enhancer orientation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fang; Cabaud, Olivier; Verthuy, Christophe; Hueber, Anne-Odile; Ferrier, Pierre

    2003-08-01

    V(D)J recombination and expression of the T-cell receptor beta (TCRbeta) gene are required for the development of the alphabeta T lymphocyte lineage. These processes depend on a transcriptional enhancer (Ebeta) which acts preferentially on adjacent upstream sequences, and has little impact on the 5' distal and 3' proximal regions of the TCRbeta locus. Using knock-in mice, we show that alphabeta T-cell differentiation and TCRbeta gene recombination and expression are not sensitive to the orientation of Ebeta sequences. We discuss the implication of these results regarding the mode of enhancer function at this locus during T lymphocyte development.

  19. Unexpected Role for the B cell-specific Src Family Kinase Blk in the Development of IL-17-Producing γδ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Laird, Renee M.; Laky, Karen; Hayes, Sandra M.

    2010-01-01

    The Ag receptors on αβ and γδ T cells differ not only in the nature of the ligands that they recognize but also in their signaling potential. We hypothesized that the differences in αβ- and γδTCR signal transduction were due to differences in the intracellular signaling pathways coupled to these two TCRs. To investigate this, we employed transcriptional profiling to identify genes encoding signaling molecules that are differentially expressed in mature αβ and γδ T cell populations. Unexpectedly, we found that B lymphoid kinase (Blk), a Src family kinase expressed primarily in B cells, is expressed in γδ T cells but not in αβ T cells. Analysis of Blk-deficient mice revealed that Blk is required for the development of IL-17-producing γδ T cells. Furthermore, Blk is expressed in lymphoid precursors and, in this capacity, plays a role in regulating thymus cellularity during ontogeny. PMID:20974990

  20. NFAT5 induction by the pre–T-cell receptor serves as a selective survival signal in T-lymphocyte development

    PubMed Central

    Berga-Bolaños, Rosa; Alberdi, Maria; Buxadé, Maria; Aramburu, José; López-Rodríguez, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    The Rel-like transcription factors nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and the calcineurin-dependent nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFATc) control specific points of thymocyte maturation. Thymocytes also express a distinct member of the Rel family, the calcineurin-independent, osmostress response regulator NFAT5. Here we show that IKKβ regulates the expression of NFAT5 in thymocytes, which in turn contributes to the survival of T-cell receptor αβ thymocytes and the transition from the β-selection checkpoint to the double-positive stage in an osmostress-independent manner. NFAT5-deficient thymocytes had normal expression and proximal signaling of the pre–T-cell receptor but exhibited a partial defect in β-chain allelic exclusion and increased apoptosis. Further analysis showed that NFAT5 regulated the expression of the prosurvival factors A1 and Bcl2 and attenuated the proapoptotic p53/Noxa axis. These findings position NFAT5 as a target of the IKKβ/NF-κB pathway in thymocytes and as a downstream effector of the prosurvival role of the pre–T-cell receptor. PMID:24043824

  1. NFAT5 induction by the pre-T-cell receptor serves as a selective survival signal in T-lymphocyte development.

    PubMed

    Berga-Bolaños, Rosa; Alberdi, Maria; Buxadé, Maria; Aramburu, José; López-Rodríguez, Cristina

    2013-10-01

    The Rel-like transcription factors nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and the calcineurin-dependent nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFATc) control specific points of thymocyte maturation. Thymocytes also express a distinct member of the Rel family, the calcineurin-independent, osmostress response regulator NFAT5. Here we show that IKKβ regulates the expression of NFAT5 in thymocytes, which in turn contributes to the survival of T-cell receptor αβ thymocytes and the transition from the β-selection checkpoint to the double-positive stage in an osmostress-independent manner. NFAT5-deficient thymocytes had normal expression and proximal signaling of the pre-T-cell receptor but exhibited a partial defect in β-chain allelic exclusion and increased apoptosis. Further analysis showed that NFAT5 regulated the expression of the prosurvival factors A1 and Bcl2 and attenuated the proapoptotic p53/Noxa axis. These findings position NFAT5 as a target of the IKKβ/NF-κB pathway in thymocytes and as a downstream effector of the prosurvival role of the pre-T-cell receptor.

  2. Poor Predictive Value of Cytomegalovirus (CMV)–Specific T Cell Assays for the Development of CMV Retinitis in Patients with AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Mark A.; Tan, Qi Xuan; Girling, Valerie; Poon, C.; Van Natta, Mark; Jabs, Douglas A.; Inokuma, Margaret; Maecker, Holden T.; Bredt, Barry; Sinclair, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Background We examined the potential clinical utility of using a cytomegalovirus (CMV)–specific T cell immunoassay to determine the risk of developing new-onset CMV retinitis (CMVR) in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Methods CMV-specific T cell assays were performed by multiparameter flow cytometry using stored peripheral blood mononuclear cells that had been obtained in an observational study 2–6 months before new-onset CMVR was diagnosed in case patients (at a study visit during which a dilated ophthalmologic examination revealed no evidence of CMVR) and at the same study visit in control subjects (matched by absolute CD4+ T cell count at entry) who did not subsequently develop retinitis during 1–6 years of study follow-up. Results There were no significant differences in CMV-specific CD4+ or CD8+ T cell interferon-γ or interleukin-2 expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from case patients and control subjects. Although there were trends toward lower percentages and absolute numbers of CMV-specific, cytokine-expressing CD8+ T cells with a “late memory” phenotype (CD27−CD28−) as well as with an “early memory” phenotype (CD27+CD28+CD45RA+) in case patients than in control subjects, these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions Many studies have reported that CMV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses distinguish patients with active CMVR (i.e., who lack CMV-protective immunity) from those with inactive CMVR after immune restoration by antiretroviral treatment (i.e., who have CMV-protective immunity). However, the multiple CMV-specific immune responses we measured do not appear to have clinical utility for predicting the risk for patients with AIDS of developing new-onset CMVR with sufficient accuracy to be used in guiding therapeutic management. PMID:18173357

  3. Development and characterization of a three-dimensional co-culture model of tumor T cell infiltration.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Nocelo, M; Abuín, C; López-López, R; de la Fuente, M

    2016-04-14

    Tumor growth and metastasis entangle the alteration and recruitment of non-malignant cells to the primary tumor, among them immune cells, constituting the tumor microenvironment (TME). Communication between tumor cells and their stroma has been shown as a fundamental driving force of the tumoral process. A great deal of effort has been focused on depicting their specific interactions and crosstalk. However, most research has been carried out in 2D conventional cultures that alter cell morphology and intracellular signaling processes. Considering these premises, we have developed a 3D cell co-culture model to mimic T cell infiltration into the tumor mass and explore tumor-immune cells interactions in the TME. Expression of specific cell markers and assessment of cell proliferation were carried out to characterize the proposed 3D co-culture model. Additionally, the study and profiling of the secretome revealed a subset of particular cancer-related inflammation proteins prompted upon 3D cultivation of tumor cells in presence of lymphocytes, pointing out an intercellular communication. Altogether, these results suggest that our 3D cell co-culture model can be a useful tool to identify and study critical factors mediating the crosstalk between tumor and immune cells in the TME. Finally, the potential of this model as a drug-screening platform has been explored using docetaxel as a model antitumoral compound.

  4. Combination of nifedipine and subtherapeutic dose of cyclosporin additively suppresses mononuclear cells activation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and normal individuals via Ca2+–calcineurin–nuclear factor of activated T cells pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lai, N-S; Yu, C-L; Yin, W-Y; Yu, H-C; Huang, H-B; Tung, C-H; Lu, M-C

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal Ca2+-mediated signalling contributes to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the potential implication of calcium channel blocker in RA remained unknown. We hypothesized that nifedipine, an L-type calcium channel blocker, combined with a calcineurin inhibitor, could suppress T cell activation via targeting different level of the Ca2+ signalling pathway. The percentage of activated T cells and the apoptotic rate of mononuclear cells (MNCs) was measured by flow cytometry. The MNC viability, cytokine production, cytosolic Ca2+ level and activity of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The NFAT-regulated gene expression, including interleukin (IL)-2, interferon (IFN)-γ and granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We found that the percentage of activated T cells in anti-CD3 + anti-CD28-activated MNC was higher in RA patients. High doses of nifedipine (50 µM) increased MNCs apoptosis, inhibited T cell activation and decreased T helper type 2 (Th1) (IFN-γ)/Th2 (IL-10) cytokine production in both groups. The Ca2+ influx was lower in anti-CD3 + anti-CD28-activated MNC from RA patients than healthy volunteers and suppressed by nifedipine. When combined with a subtherapeutic dose (50 ng/ml) of cyclosporin, 1 µM nifedipine suppressed the percentage of activated T cells in both groups. Moreover, this combination suppressed more IFN-γ secretion and NFAT-regulated gene (GM-CSF and IFN-γ) expression in RA-MNCs than normal MNCs via decreasing the activity of NFATc1. In conclusion, we found that L-type Ca2+ channel blockers and subtherapeutic doses of cyclosporin act additively to suppress the Ca2+-calcineurin-NFAT signalling pathway, leading to inhibition of T cell activity. We propose that this combination may become a potential treatment of RA. PMID:22385242

  5. Germinal Centers without T Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Vinuesa, Carola García; Cook, Matthew C.; Ball, Jennifer; Drew, Marion; Sunners, Yvonne; Cascalho, Marilia; Wabl, Matthias; Klaus, Gerry G.B.; MacLennan, Ian C.M.

    2000-01-01

    Germinal centers are critical for affinity maturation of antibody (Ab) responses. This process allows the production of high-efficiency neutralizing Ab that protects against virus infection and bacterial exotoxins. In germinal centers, responding B cells selectively mutate the genes that encode their receptors for antigen. This process can change Ab affinity and specificity. The mutated cells that produce high-affinity Ab are selected to become Ab-forming or memory B cells, whereas cells that have lost affinity or acquired autoreactivity are eliminated. Normally, T cells are critical for germinal center formation and subsequent B cell selection. Both processes involve engagement of CD40 on B cells by T cells. This report describes how high-affinity B cells can be induced to form large germinal centers in response to (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl) acetyl (NP)-Ficoll in the absence of T cells or signaling through CD40 or CD28. This requires extensive cross-linking of the B cell receptors, and a frequency of antigen-specific B cells of at least 1 in 1,000. These germinal centers abort dramatically at the time when mutated high-affinity B cells are normally selected by T cells. Thus, there is a fail-safe mechanism against autoreactivity, even in the event of thymus-independent germinal center formation. PMID:10662794

  6. Pathogen-Specific T Cell Polyfunctionality Is a Correlate of T Cell Efficacy and Immune Protection

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Anders; Almeida, Jorge R.; Darrah, Patricia A.; Sauce, Delphine; Seder, Robert A.; Appay, Victor; Gorochov, Guy; Larsen, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Understanding the factors that delineate the efficacy of T cell responses towards pathogens is crucial for our ability to develop potent therapies against infectious diseases. Multidimensional evaluation of T cell functionality at the single-cell level enables exhaustive analysis of combinatorial functional properties, hence polyfunctionality. We have recently invented an algorithm that quantifies polyfunctionality, the Polyfunctionality Index (Larsen et al. PLoS One 2012). Here we demonstrate that quantitative assessment of T cell polyfunctionality correlates with T cell efficacy measured as the capacity to kill target cells in vitro and control infection in vivo. Methods We employed the polyfunctionality index on two datasets selected for their unique ability to evaluate the polyfunctional imprint on T cell efficacy. 1) HIV-specific CD8+ T cells and 2) Leishmania major-specific CD4+ T cells were analysed for their capacity to secrete multiple effector molecules, kill target cells and control infection. Briefly, employing the Polyfunctionality Index algorithm we determined the parameter estimates resulting in optimal correlation between T cell polyfunctionality and T cell efficacy. Results T cell polyfunctionality is correlated with T cell efficacy measured as 1) target killing (r=0.807, P<0.0001) and 2) lesion size upon challenge with Leishmania major (r=-0.50, P=0.004). Contrary to an approach relying on the Polyfunctionality Index algorithm, quantitative evaluation of T cell polyfunctionality traditionally ignores the gradual contribution of more or less polyfunctional T cells. Indeed, comparing both approaches we show that optimal description of T cell efficacy is obtained when gradually integrating all levels of polyfunctionality in accordance with the Polyfunctionality Index. Conclusions Our study presents a generalizable methodology to objectively evaluate the impact of polyfunctionality on T cell efficacy. We show that T cell polyfunctionality

  7. Enterococcus durans TN-3 Induces Regulatory T Cells and Suppresses the Development of Dextran Sulfate Sodium (DSS)-Induced Experimental Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Kanda, Toshihiro; Ohno, Masashi; Imaeda, Hirotsugu; Shimada, Takashi; Inatomi, Osamu; Bamba, Shigeki; Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Andoh, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Probiotic properties of Enterococcus strains have been reported previously. In this study, we investigated the effects of Enterococcus (E.) durans TN-3 on the development of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) colitis. Methods BALB/c mice were fed with 4.0% DSS in normal chow. Administration of TN-3 (10mg/day) was initiated 7days before the start of DSS feeding. Mucosal cytokine expression was analyzed by real time-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The lymphocyte subpopulation were analyzed by flow cytometry. The gut microbiota profile was analyzed by a terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism method (T-RFLP). Results The disease activity index and histological colitis score were significantly lower in the DSS plus TN-3 group than in the DSS group. The mucosal mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17A and IFN-γ) decreased significantly in the DSS plus TN-3 group as compared to the DSS group. The proportion of regulatory T cells (Treg cells) in the mucosa increased significantly in the DSS plus TN-3 group as compared to the DSS group. Both fecal butyrate levels and the diversity of fecal microbial community were significantly higher in the TN-3 plus DSS group than in the DSS group. Conclusions E. durans TN-3 exerted an inhibitory effect on the development of DSS colitis. This action might be mediated by the induction of Treg cells and the restoration of the diversity of the gut microbiota. PMID:27438072

  8. Involvement of Ca/sup 2 +//phospholipid-dependent C-kinase in phorbol ester-mediated activation of normal human T cell

    SciTech Connect

    Dirienzo, W.; Nel, A.E.; Lattanze, G.R.; Galbraith, R.M.

    1986-03-01

    C-kinase appears to be involved in biological responses of T cells, and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) is a direct activator of this enzyme. In this study, reaction of T cells with PMA (0.1-50 ng/ml) showed a dose-dependent increase in /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation; higher concentrations were toxic. C-kinase assays performed in parallel demonstrated sustained translocation of >99% of C-kinase activity from the cytosol to the detergent-soluble membrane fraction. Experiments were done in the presence of cyclosporine (CSA), and of polymyxin B (PMB) which also inhibits C-kinase. Both PMA and CSA caused profound and dose-dependent reduction in proliferation, with maximal inhibition of >70% and >90% respectively. Moreover, addition of PMB showed coordinate inhibition of C-kinase activity (>80% at 10 ..mu..M), whereas at similar concentrations inhibiting cell proliferation CSA had no detectable effect. These results indicate that PMA initiates activation and proliferation by stimulation of at least two distinct pathways, one of which involves C-kinase activation and is inhibited by PMB.

  9. Improving therapy of chronic lymphocytic leukemia with chimeric antigen receptor T cells.

    PubMed

    Fraietta, Joseph A; Schwab, Robert D; Maus, Marcela V

    2016-04-01

    Adoptive cell immunotherapy for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has heralded a new era of synthetic biology. The infusion of genetically engineered, autologous chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells directed against CD19 expressed by normal and malignant B cells represents a novel approach to cancer therapy. The results of recent clinical trials of CAR T cells in relapsed and refractory CLL have demonstrated long-term disease-free remissions, underscoring the power of harnessing and redirecting the immune system against cancer. This review will briefly summarize T-cell therapies in development for CLL disease. We discuss the role of T-cell function and phenotype, T-cell culture optimization, CAR design, and approaches to potentiate the survival and anti-tumor effects of infused lymphocytes. Future efforts will focus on improving the efficacy of CAR T cells for the treatment of CLL and incorporating adoptive cell immunotherapy into standard medical management of CLL.

  10. Kinetics of Alloantigen-Specific Regulatory CD4 T Cell Development and Tissue Distribution After Donor-Specific Transfusion and Costimulatory Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Yusuke; Satomi, Miwa; Baran, William Bracamonte; Gan, Ewa Jankowska; Workman, Andrea Szymczak; Workman, Creg J.; Vignali, Dario Angelo Alberto; Burlingham, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Background The influence of donor-side regulation toward recipient antigens on graft outcome is poorly understood. Methods Because this influence might be due in part to the accumulation of tissue-resident memory T cells in the donor organ, we used a standard murine tolerization model (donor-specific transfusion plus CD40L blockade) to determine the kinetics of development and peripheralization of allospecific regulatory T cell in lymphoid tissues and liver, a secondary lymphoid organ used in transplantation. Results We found that donor-specific transfusion and CD40L blockade leads to a progressive and sustained T regulatory allospecific response. The cytokines IL10, TGFβ, and IL35 all contributed to the regulatory phenomenon as determined by trans vivo delayed hypersensitivity assay. Unexpectedly, an early and transient self-specific regulatory response was found as well. Using double reporter mice (forkhead box p 3 [Foxp3]-yellow fluorescent protein, Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 3 [Ebi3]-TdTomRed), we found an increase in Foxp3+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells paralleling the regulatory response. The Ebi3+ CD4 T cells (IL35-producing) were mainly classic Treg cells (Foxp3+CD25+), whereas TGFβ+ CD4 T cells are mostly Foxp3-negative, suggesting 2 different CD4 Treg cell subsets. Liver-resident TGFβ+ CD4 T cells appeared more rapidly than Ebi3-producing T cells, whereas at later timepoints, the Ebi3 response predominated both in lymphoid tissues and liver. Conclusions The timing of appearance of donor organ resident Treg cell subsets should be considered in experiments testing the role of bidirectional regulation in transplant tolerance. PMID:27500263

  11. Development of genetically engineered CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressing TCRs specific for a M. tuberculosis 38-kDa antigen.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Huang, Yong-Ta; Hao, Pei-Pei; Jiang, Zhen-Min; Wen, Qian; Zhou, Ming-Qian; Jin, Qi; Ma, Li

    2011-09-01

    Cell-mediated immunity is critical to the clearance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis due to the primarily intracellular niche of this pathogen. Adoptive transfer of M. tuberculosis-specific effector T cells has been shown to confer immunity to M. tuberculosis-infected recipients resulting in M. tuberculosis clearance. However, it is difficult to generate sufficient numbers of M. tuberculosis antigen-specific T cells in a short time. Recent studies have developed T cell receptor (TCR) gene-modified T cells that allow for the rapid generation of large numbers of antigen-specific T cells. Many TCRs that target various tumor and viral antigens have now been isolated and shown to have functional activity. Nevertheless, TCRs specific for intracellular bacterial antigens (including M. tuberculosis antigens) have yet to be isolated and their functionality confirmed. We isolated M. tuberculosis 38-kDa antigen-specific HLA class I and class II-restricted TCRs and modified the TCR gene C regions by substituting nine amino acids with their murine TCR homologs (minimal murinization). Results showed that both wild-type and minimal murinized TCR genes were successfully cloned into retroviral vectors and transduced into primary CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and displayed anti-M. tuberculosis activity. As expected, minimal murinized TCRs displayed higher cell surface expression levels and stronger anti-M. tuberculosis activity than wild-type TCRs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing TCRs targeting M. tuberculosis antigens and this investigation provides the basis for future TCR gene-based immunotherapies that can be designed for the treatment of immunocompromised M. tuberculosis-infected patients.

  12. Orientation-specific RAG activity in chromosomal loop domains contributes to Tcrd V(D)J recombination during T cell development.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lijuan; Frock, Richard L; Du, Zhou; Hu, Jiazhi; Chen, Liang; Krangel, Michael S; Alt, Frederick W

    2016-08-22

    T cell antigen receptor δ (Tcrd) variable region exons are assembled by RAG-initiated V(D)J recombination events in developing γδ thymocytes. Here, we use linear amplification-mediated high-throughput genome-wide translocation sequencing (LAM-HTGTS) to map hundreds of thousands of RAG-initiated Tcrd D segment (Trdd1 and Trdd2) rearrangements in CD4(-)CD8(-) double-negative thymocyte progenitors differentiated in vitro from bone marrow-derived hematopoietic stem cells. We find that Trdd2 joins directly to Trdv, Trdd1, and Trdj segments, whereas Trdd1 joining is ordered with joining to Trdd2, a prerequisite for further rearrangement. We also find frequent, previously unappreciated, Trdd1 and Trdd2 rearrangements that inactivate Tcrd, including sequential rearrangements from V(D)J recombination signal sequence fusions. Moreover, we find dozens of RAG off-target sequences that are generated via RAG tracking both upstream and downstream from the Trdd2 recombination center across the Tcrd loop domain that is bounded by the upstream INT1-2 and downstream TEA elements. Disruption of the upstream INT1-2 boundary of this loop domain allows spreading of RAG on- and off-target activity to the proximal Trdv domain and, correspondingly, shifts the Tcrd V(D)J recombination landscape by leading to predominant V(D)J joining to a proximal Trdv3 pseudogene that lies just upstream of the normal boundary. PMID:27526713

  13. Harnessing endogenous miR-181a to segregate transgenic antigen receptor expression in developing versus post-thymic T cells in murine hematopoietic chimeras.

    PubMed

    Papapetrou, Eirini P; Kovalovsky, Damian; Beloeil, Laurent; Sant'angelo, Derek; Sadelain, Michel

    2009-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression by targeting complementary sequences, referred to as miRNA recognition elements (MREs), typically located in the 3' untranslated region of mRNAs. miR-181a is highly expressed in developing thymocytes and markedly downregulated in post-thymic T cells. We investigated whether endogenous miR-181a can be harnessed to segregate expression of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) and TCRs between developing and mature T cells. Lentiviral-encoded antigen receptors were tagged with a miR-181a-specific MRE and transduced into mouse BM cells that were used to generate hematopoietic chimeras. Expression of a CAR specific for human CD19 (hCD19) was selectively suppressed in late double-negative and double-positive thymocytes, coinciding with the peak in endogenous miR-181a expression. Receptor expression was fully restored in post-thymic resting and activated T cells, affording protection against a subsequent challenge with hCD19+ tumors. Hematopoietic mouse chimeras engrafted with a conalbumin-specific TCR prone to thymic clonal deletion acquired peptide-specific T cell responsiveness only when the vector-encoded TCR transcript was similarly engineered to be subject to regulation by miR-181a. These results demonstrate the potential of miRNA-regulated transgene expression in stem cell-based therapies, including cancer immunotherapy.

  14. T Cell Immune Reconstitution Following Lymphodepletion

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kirsten; Hakim, Frances T.; Gress, Ronald E.

    2007-01-01

    T cell reconstitution following lymphopenia from chemotherapy or stem cell transplant is often slow and incompetent, contributing to the development of infectious diseases, relapse, and graft-versus-host disease. This is due to the fact that de novo T cell production is impaired following cytoreductive regimens. T cells can be generated from two pathways: 1) thymus derived through active thymopoiesis and 2) peripherally expanded clones through homeostatic proliferation. In the development of lymphopenia, the thymic pathway is commonly compromised in adults and T cells rely upon peripheral expansion to recover T cell numbers. This homeostatic proliferation exploits the high cytokine levels following lymphopenia to rapidly generate T cells in the periphery. Moreover, this early peripheral expansion of T cells can also be driven by exogenous antigen. This results in loss of T cell repertoire diversity and may predispose to auto- or alloimmunity. Alternatively, the high homeostatic proliferation following lymphopenia may facilitate expansion of anti-tumor immunity. Murine and human studies have provided insight into the cytokine and cellular regulators of these two pathways of T cell generation and the disparate portraits of T cell immunity created through robust thymopoiesis or peripheral expansion following lymphopenia. This insight has permitted the manipulation of the immune system to maximize anti-tumor immunity through lymphopenia and led to an appreciation of mechanisms that underlie graft vs. host disease. PMID:18023361

  15. T cell exhaustion during persistent viral infections.

    PubMed

    Kahan, Shannon M; Wherry, E John; Zajac, Allan J

    2015-05-01

    Although robust and highly effective anti-viral T cells contribute to the clearance of many acute infections, viral persistence is associated with the development of functionally inferior, exhausted, T cell responses. Exhaustion develops in a step-wise and progressive manner, ranges in severity, and can culminate in the deletion of the anti-viral T cells. This disarming of the response is consequential as it compromises viral control and potentially serves to dampen immune-mediated damage. Exhausted T cells are unable to elaborate typical anti-viral effector functions. They are characterized by the sustained upregulation of inhibitory receptors and display a gene expression profile that distinguishes them from prototypic effector and memory T cell populations. In this review we discuss the properties of exhausted T cells; the virological and immunological conditions that favor their development; the cellular and molecular signals that sustain the exhausted state; and strategies for preventing and reversing exhaustion to favor viral control.

  16. Characterization of suppressor T cells for antibody production by chicken spleen cells. II. Comparison of CT8+ cells from concanavalin A-injected normal and bursa cell-injected agammaglobulinaemic chickens.

    PubMed Central

    Quere, P; Bhogal, B S; Thorbecke, G J

    1990-01-01

    The phenotypes of two different types of suppressor T cells in the chicken, both capable of inhibiting secondary antibody responses in vitro, were determined. The first of these, induced by injection of concanavalin A (Con A) into normal chickens, was CT8+, TcR2+ (alpha beta), CT4-, TcR1- (gamma delta). These cells appeared to exhibit histamine type 2 (H2) receptors, as they adhered to cimetidine-BSA-coated dishes. Moreover, cimetidine added to the medium at 2 x 10(-4) M completely prevented the suppression induced by these suppressor cells. The second type of 'suppressor' T-cell studied, induced in agammaglobulinaemic (A gamma) chickens by injection of bursa cells, exhibited the same phenotype, but was insensitive to cimetidine and did not adhere to cimetidine-BSA-coated dishes, indicating heterogeneity with respect to H2 receptor expression on CT8+ chicken T cells with suppressor activity. The results also showed that a relatively larger proportion of CT8+ than of CT4+ cells adhered to cimetidine-BSA-coated dishes and thus appeared to be H2 receptor positive. TcR1 (gamma delta) cells did not contribute significantly to the antigen non-specific suppressor effects examined in this study. PMID:2149123

  17. Delta-like 4-mediated Notch signaling is required for early T-cell development in a three-dimensional thymic structure.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Ken-ichi; Negishi, Naoko; Yazawa, Masaki; Yagita, Hideo; Habu, Sonoko; Hozumi, Katsuto

    2015-08-01

    Delta-like 4 (Dll4)-mediated Notch signaling is critical for specifying T-cell fate, but how Dll4-mediated Notch signaling actually contributes to T-cell development in the thymus remains unclear. To explore this mechanism in the thymic three-dimensional structure, we performed fetal thymus organ culture using Dll4-deficient mice. DN1a/b+DN2mt cells, which had not yet committed to either the αβ T or γδ T/NK cell lineage, did not differentiate into the αβ T-cell lineage in Dll4-deficient thymus despite the lack of cell fate conversion into other lineages. However, DN3 cells efficiently differentiated into a later developmental stage of αβ T cells, the double-positive (DP) stage, although the proliferation was significantly impaired during the differentiation process. These findings suggest that the requirement for Notch signaling differs between the earliest and pre-TCR-bearing precursors and that continued Notch signaling is required for proper differentiation with active proliferation of αβ T lineage cells. Furthermore, we showed that Notch signaling increased the c-Myc expression in DN3 cells in the thymus and that its overexpression rescued the proliferation and differentiation of DN3 cells in the Dll4-null thymus. Therefore, c-Myc plays a central role in the transition from stage DN3 to DP as a downstream target of Notch signaling.

  18. T-Cell Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... are extremely rare. T-cell lymphomas can be aggressive (fast-growing) or indolent (slow-growing). Lymphomas are ... also be involved. This group of PTCLs is aggressive and requires combination chemotherapy upon diagnosis. For more ...

  19. Essential flexibility in the T-cell recognition of antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kersh, Gilbert J.; Allen, Paul M.

    1996-04-01

    αβ T cells specifically recognize a ligand composed of a peptide bound to a self-major-histocompatibility-complex molecule, but the recognition of slightly altered ligands by T cells can lead to a partial activation. This flexibility is crucial for T-cell development and can have both beneficial and harmful effects on peripheral T cells.

  20. Developments in allergen-specific immunotherapy: from allergen extracts to allergy vaccines bypassing allergen-specific immunoglobulin E and T cell reactivity.

    PubMed

    Focke, M; Swoboda, I; Marth, K; Valenta, R

    2010-03-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) is the only specific and disease-modifying approach for the treatment of allergy but several disadvantages have limited its broad applicability. We argue that the majority of the possible disadvantages of SIT such as unwanted effects, poor efficacy and specificity as well as inconvenient application are related to the poor quality of natural allergen extracts, which are the active ingredients of all currently available allergy vaccines. Because of the progress made in the field of molecular allergen characterization, new allergy vaccines based on recombinant allergens, recombinant hypoallergenic allergen derivatives and allergen-derived T cell peptides have entered clinical testing and hold promise to reduce the side-effects and to increase the specificity as well as the efficacy of SIT. Here, we present a refined immunotherapy concept, which is based on the use of peptides derived from allergen surfaces that exhibit reduced, allergen-specific IgE as well as T cell reactivity. These peptides when fused to non-allergenic carriers give rise to allergen-specific protective IgG responses with T cell help from a non-allergenic carrier molecule. We summarize the experimental data demonstrating that such peptide vaccines can bypass allergen-specific IgE as well as T cell activation and may be administered at high doses without IgE- and T cell-mediated side-effects. Should these peptide vaccines prove efficacious and safe in clinical trials, it may become possible to develop convenient, safe and broadly applicable forms of SIT as true alternatives to symptomatic, drug-based allergy treatment.

  1. In silico CD4+ T-cell epitope prediction and HLA distribution analysis for the potential proteins of Neisseria meningitidis Serogroup B--a clue for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shishir K; Smita, Suchi; Sarangi, Aditya Narayan; Srivastava, Mugdha; Akhoon, Bashir A; Rahman, Qamar; Gupta, Shailendra K

    2010-10-01

    Neisseria meningitidis, an exclusive human pathogen, is a major cause of mortality due to meningococcal meningitis and sepsis in many developing countries. Three meningococcal serogroup B proteins, i.e. T-cell stimulating protein A (TspA), autotransporter A (AutA), and IgA-specific serine endopeptidase (IGA1) elicits CD4+ T-cell response and may enhance the effectiveness of meningococcal vaccines by acting as protective immunogens. A very limited data on T-helper cell epitopes in MenB proteins is available. Hence, in silico prediction of peptide sequences which may act as helper T lymphocyte epitopes in MenB proteins was carried out by NetMHCIIpan web server. HLA distribution analysis was done by using the population coverage tool of Immune Epitope Database to determine the fraction of individuals in various populations expected to respond to a given set of predicted T-cell epitopes based on HLA genotype frequencies. Six epitopic core sequences, two from each MenB proteins, i.e. AutA, TspA and IgA1 protease were predicted to associate with a large number of HLA-DR alleles. These six peptides may act as T-cell epitope in more than 95% of populations in 8 out of 12 populations considered. The T-cell stimulation potential of these predicted peptides containing the core epitopic sequences is to be validated by using laboratory experiments for their efficient use as peptide vaccine candidates against N. meningitidis serogroup B.

  2. Asymptomatic memory CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Arif Azam; Srivastava, Ruchi; Lopes, Patricia Prado; Wang, Christine; Pham, Thanh T; Cochrane, Justin; Thai, Nhi Thi Uyen; Gutierrez, Lucas; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2014-01-01

    Generation and maintenance of high quantity and quality memory CD8+ T cells determine the level of protection from viral, bacterial, and parasitic re-infections, and hence constitutes a primary goal for T cell epitope-based human vaccines and immunotherapeutics. Phenotypically and functionally characterizing memory CD8+ T cells that provide protection against herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) infections, which cause blinding ocular herpes, genital herpes, and oro-facial herpes, is critical for better vaccine design. We have recently categorized 2 new major sub-populations of memory symptomatic and asymptomatic CD8+ T cells based on their phenotype, protective vs. pathogenic function, and anatomical locations. In this report we are discussing a new direction in developing T cell-based human herpes vaccines and immunotherapeutics based on the emerging new concept of “symptomatic and asymptomatic memory CD8+ T cells.” PMID:24499824

  3. Normal adult ramified microglia separated from other central nervous system macrophages by flow cytometric sorting: Phenotypic differences defined and direct ex vivo antigen presentation to myelin basic protein-reactive CD4{sup +} T cells compared

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, A.L.; Goodsall, A.L.; Sedgwick, J.D.

    1995-05-01

    Ramified microglia in the adult central nervous system (CNS) are the principal glial element up-regulating MHC class I and II expression in response to inflammatory events or neuronal damage. A proportion of these cells also express MHC class II constitutively in the normal CNS. The role of microglia as APCs for CD4{sup +} cells extravasating into the CNS remains undefined. In this study, using irradiation bone marrow chimeras in CD45-congenic rats, the phenotype CD45{sup low}CD11b/c{sup +} is shown to identify microglial cells specifically within the CNS. Highly purified populations of microglia and nonmicroglial but CNS-associated macrophages (CD45{sup high}CD11b/c{sup +}) have been obtained directly from the adult CNS, by using flow cytometric sorting. Morphologically, freshly isolated microglia vs other CNS macrophages are quite distinct. Of the two populations recovered from the normal CNS, it is the minority CD45{sup high}CD11 b/c{sup +} transitional macrophage population, and not microglia, that is the effective APC for experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis-inducing CD4{sup +} myelin basic protein (MBP)-reactive T cells. CD45{sup high}CD11b/c{sup +} CNS macrophages also stimulate MBP-reactive T cells without addition of MBP to culture suggesting presentation of endogenous Ag. This is the first study in which microglia vs other CNS macrophages have been analyzed for APC ability directly from the CNS, with substantial cross-contamination between the two populations eliminated. The heterogeneity of these populations in terms of APC function is clearly demonstrated. Evidence is still lacking that adult CNS microglia have the capacity to interact with and stimulate CD4{sup +} T cells to proliferate or secrete IL-2. 60 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Pushing the frontiers of T-cell vaccines: accurate measurement of human T-cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Saade, Fadi; Gorski, Stacey Ann; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2013-01-01

    There is a need for novel approaches to tackle major vaccine challenges such as malaria, tuberculosis and HIV, among others. Success will require vaccines able to induce a cytotoxic T-cell response – a deficiency of most current vaccine approaches. The successful development of T-cell vaccines faces many hurdles, not least being the lack of consensus on a standardized T-cell assay format able to be used as a correlate of vaccine efficacy. Hence, there remains a need for reproducible measures of T-cell immunity proven in human clinical trials to correlate with vaccine protection. The T-cell equivalent of a neutralizing antibody assay would greatly accelerate the development and commercialization of T-cell vaccines. Recent advances have seen a plethora of new T-cell assays become available, including some like cytometry by time-of-flight with extreme multiparameter T-cell phenotyping capability. However, whether it is historic thymidine-based proliferation assays or sophisticated new cytometry assays, each assay has its relative advantages and disadvantages, and relatively few of these assays have yet to be validated in large-scale human vaccine trials. This review examines the current range of T-cell assays and assesses their suitability for use in human vaccine trials. Should one or more of these assays be accepted as an agreed surrogate of T-cell protection by a regulatory agency, this would significantly accelerate the development of T-cell vaccines. PMID:23252389

  5. Epigenetics in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Peirs, Sofie; Van der Meulen, Joni; Van de Walle, Inge; Taghon, Tom; Speleman, Frank; Poppe, Bruce; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    Normal T-cell development is a strictly regulated process in which hematopoietic progenitor cells migrate from the bone marrow to the thymus and differentiate from early T-cell progenitors toward mature and functional T cells. During this maturation process, cooperation between a variety of oncogenes and tumor suppressors can drive immature thymocytes into uncontrolled clonal expansion and cause T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Despite improved insights in T-ALL disease biology and comprehensive characterization of its genetic landscape, clinical care remained largely similar over the past decades and still consists of high-dose multi-agent chemotherapy potentially followed by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Even with such aggressive treatment regimens, which are often associated with considerable side effects, clinical outcome is still extremely poor in a significant subset of T-ALL patients as a result of therapy resistance or hematological relapses. Recent genetic studies have identified recurrent somatic alterations in genes involved in DNA methylation and post-translational histone modifications in T-ALL, suggesting that epigenetic homeostasis is critically required in restraining tumor development in the T-cell lineage. In this review, we provide an overview of the epigenetic regulators that could be implicated in T-ALL disease biology and speculate how the epigenetic landscape of T-ALL could trigger the development of epigenetic-based therapies to further improve the treatment of human T-ALL. PMID:25510271

  6. The BMP Pathway Participates in Human Naive CD4+ T Cell Activation and Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Víctor G.; Sacedón, Rosa; Hidalgo, Laura; Valencia, Jaris; Fernández-Sevilla, Lidia M.; Hernández-López, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs) form a group of secreted factors that belongs to the TGF-β superfamily. Among different roles in a number of immune cell types, BMPs are known to regulate T cell development within the thymus, although the role of BMP signaling in human mature T cells remains elusive. In this study, we demonstrate that canonical BMP signaling is necessary during two critical events that regulate the size and function of human naive CD4+ T cell population: activation and homeostasis. Upon stimulation via TCR, naive CD4+ T cells upregulate the expression of BMP ligands triggering canonical BMP signaling in CD25+ cells. Blockade of BMP signaling severely impairs CD4+ T cell proliferation after activation mainly through regulation of IL-2, since the addition of this cytokine recuperates normal T cell expansion after inhibition of BMP signaling. Similarly, activation of canonical BMP pathway is required for both the maintenance of cell survival and the homeostatic proliferation induced by IL-7, a key factor for T cell homeostasis. Moreover, upregulation of two critical receptors for T cell homeostasis, CXCR4 and CCR9, triggered by IL-7 is also abrogated in the absence of BMP signaling. Collectively, we describe important roles of the canonical BMP signaling in human naive CD4+ T cell activation and homeostasis that could be valuable for clinical application. PMID:26110906

  7. Persistent Infection Drives the Development of CD8+ T Cells Specific for Late Lytic Infection Antigens in Lymphocryptovirus-Infected Macaques and Epstein-Barr Virus-Infected Humans▿

    PubMed Central

    Orlova, Nina; Wang, Fred; Fogg, Mark H.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the CD8+ T cell repertoire against lytic infection antigens in rhesus macaques persistently infected with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-related lymphocryptovirus (rhLCV). CD8+ T cells specific for late (L) antigens were detected at rates comparable to those for early antigens and were associated with increasing duration of infection. L antigen-specific CD8+ T cells were also readily detected in adult, EBV-positive humans. Thus, viral major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) immune evasion genes expressed during lytic LCV infection do not prevent L-specific CD8+ T cell development over time during persistent infection. PMID:21917961

  8. Metformin ameliorates the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by regulating T helper 17 and regulatory T cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yafei; Tian, Tian; Gao, Juan; Liu, Xiaoqian; Hou, Huiqing; Cao, Runjing; Li, Bin; Quan, Moyuan; Guo, Li

    2016-03-15

    Immoderate immunoreaction of antigen-specific Th17 and Treg cell dysfunction play critical roles in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. We examined Th17/Treg immune responses and the underlying mechanisms in response to metformin in C57BL/6 mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Metformin reduced Th17 and increased Treg cell percentages along with the levels of associated cytokines. Molecules involved in cellular metabolism were altered in mice with EAE. Suppressed activation of mTOR and its downstream target, HIF-1α, likely mediated the protective effects of metformin. Our findings demonstrate that regulation of T cell metabolism represents a new therapeutic target for CNS autoimmune disorders.

  9. Developmental Exposure To 2,3,7,8 Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-Dioxin Attenuates Later-Life Notch1-Mediated T Cell Development and Leukemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ahrenhoerster, Lori S.; Leuthner, Tess C.; Tate, Everett R.; Lakatos, Peter A.; Laiosa, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Over half of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) patients have activating mutations in the Notch gene. Moreover, the contaminant 2,3,7,8 Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a known carcinogen that mediates its toxicity through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), and crosstalk between activated AHR and Notch signaling pathways has previously been observed. Given the importance of Notch signaling in thymocyte development and T-ALL disease progression, we hypothesized that the activated AHR potentiates disease initiation and progression in an in vivo model of Notch1-induced thymoma. This hypothesis was tested utilizing adult and developmental exposure paradigms to TCDD in mice expressing a constitutively active Notch1 transgene (NotchICN-TG). Following exposure of adult NotchICN-TG mice to a single high dose of TCDD, we observed a significant increase in the efficiency of CD8 thymocyte generation. We next exposed pregnant mice to 3μg/kg of TCDD throughout gestation and lactation to elucidate effects of developmental AHR activation on later-life T cell development and T-ALL-like thymoma susceptibility induced by Notch1. We found that the vehicle-exposed NotchICN-TG offspring have a peripheral T-cell pool heavily biased toward the CD4 lineage, while TCDD-exposed NotchICN-TG offspring were biased toward the CD8 lineage. Furthermore, while the vehicle-exposed NotchICN-TG mice showed increased splenomegaly and B to T cell ratios indicative of disease, mice developmentally exposed to TCDD were largely protected from disease. These studies support a model where developmental AHR activation attenuates later-life Notch1-dependent impacts on thymocyte development and disease progression. PMID:25585350

  10. Unbalanced recovery of regulatory and effector T cells after allogeneic stem cell transplantation contributes to chronic GVHD

    PubMed Central

    Alho, Ana C.; Kim, Haesook T.; Chammas, Marie J.; Reynolds, Carol G.; Matos, Tiago R.; Forcade, Edouard; Whangbo, Jennifer; Nikiforow, Sarah; Cutler, Corey S.; Koreth, John; Ho, Vincent T.; Armand, Philippe; Antin, Joseph H.; Alyea, Edwin P.; Lacerda, Joao F.; Soiffer, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    The development and maintenance of immune tolerance after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) requires the balanced reconstitution of donor-derived CD4 regulatory T cells (CD4Tregs) as well as effector CD4 (conventional CD4 T cells [CD4Tcons]) and CD8 T cells. To characterize the complex mechanisms that lead to unbalanced recovery of these distinct T-cell populations, we studied 107 adult patients who received T-replete stem cell grafts after reduced-intensity conditioning. Immune reconstitution of CD4Treg, CD4Tcon, and CD8 T cells was monitored for a 2-year period. CD3 T-cell counts gradually recovered to normal levels during this period but CD8 T cells recovered more rapidly than either CD4Tregs or CD4Tcons. Reconstituting CD4Tregs and CD4Tcons were predominantly central memory (CM) and effector memory (EM) cells and CD8 T cells were predominantly terminal EM cells. Thymic generation of naive CD4Tcon and CD8 T cells was maintained but thymic production of CD4Tregs was markedly decreased with little recovery during the 2-year study. T-cell proliferation was skewed in favor of CM and EM CD4Tcon and CD8 T cells, especially 6 to 12 months after HSCT. Intracellular expression of BCL2 was increased in CD4Tcon and CD8 T cells in the first 3 to 6 months after HSCT. Early recovery of naive and CM fractions within each T-cell population 3 months after transplant was also strongly correlated with the subsequent development of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). These dynamic imbalances favor the production, expansion, and persistence of effector T cells over CD4Tregs and were associated with the development of chronic GVHD. PMID:26670634

  11. Engineered T cell therapies.

    PubMed

    Field, Anne-Christine; Qasim, Waseem

    2015-11-04

    Alongside advancements in gene therapy for inherited immune disorders, the need for effective alternative therapeutic options for other conditions has resulted in an expansion in the field of research for T cell gene therapy. T cells are easily obtained and can be induced to divide robustly ex vivo, a characteristic that allows them to be highly permissible to viral vector-mediated introduction of transgenes. Pioneering clinical trials targeting cancers and infectious diseases have provided safety and feasibility data and important information about persistence of engineered cells in vivo. Here, we review clinical experiences with γ-retroviral and lentiviral vectors and consider the potential of integrating transposon-based vectors as well as specific genome editing with designer nucleases in engineered T cell therapies.

  12. Development of replication-defective lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus vectors for the induction of potent CD8+ T cell immunity

    PubMed Central

    Flatz, Lukas; Hegazy, Ahmed N; Bergthaler, Andreas; Verschoor, Admar; Claus, Christina; Fernandez, Marylise; Gattinoni, Luca; Johnson, Susan; Kreppel, Florian; Kochanek, Stefan; van den Broek, Maries; Radbruch, Andreas; Lévy, Frédéric; Lambert, Paul-Henri; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Restifo, Nicholas P; Löhning, Max; Ochsenbein, Adrian F; Nabel, Gary J; Pinschewer, Daniel D

    2011-01-01

    Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) exhibits natural tropism for dendritic cells and represents the prototypic infection that elicits protective CD8+ T cell (cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)) immunity. Here we have harnessed the immunobiology of this arenavirus for vaccine delivery. By using producer cells constitutively synthesizing the viral glycoprotein (GP), it was possible to replace the gene encoding LCMV GP with vaccine antigens to create replication-defective vaccine vectors. These rLCMV vaccines elicited CTL responses that were equivalent to or greater than those elicited by recombinant adenovirus 5 or recombinant vaccinia virus in their magnitude and cytokine profiles, and they exhibited more effective protection in several models. In contrast to recombinant adenovirus 5, rLCMV failed to elicit vector-specific antibody immunity, which facilitated re-administration of the same vector for booster vaccination. In addition, rLCMV elicited T helper type 1 CD4+ T cell responses and protective neutralizing antibodies to vaccine antigens. These features, together with low seroprevalence in humans, suggest that rLCMV may show utility as a vaccine platform against infectious diseases and cancer. PMID:20139992

  13. The ζ isoform of diacylglycerol kinase plays a predominant role in regulatory T cell development and TCR-mediated ras signaling.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Rohan P; Schmidt, Amanda M; Das, Jayajit; Pytel, Dariusz; Riese, Matthew J; Lester, Melissa; Diehl, J Alan; Behrens, Edward M; Kambayashi, Taku; Koretzky, Gary A

    2013-11-26

    Diacylglycerol (DAG) is a critical second messenger that mediates T cell receptor (TCR)-stimulated signaling. The abundance of DAG is reduced by the diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs), which catalyze the conversion of DAG to phosphatidic acid (PA) and thus inhibit DAG-mediated signaling. In T cells, the predominant DGK isoforms are DGKα and DGKζ, and deletion of the genes encoding either isoform enhances DAG-mediated signaling. We found that DGKζ, but not DGKα, suppressed the development of natural regulatory T (T(reg)) cells and predominantly mediated Ras and Akt signaling downstream of the TCR. The differential functions of DGKα and DGKζ were not attributable to differences in protein abundance in T cells or in their localization to the contact sites between T cells and antigen-presenting cells. RasGRP1, a key DAG-mediated activator of Ras signaling, associated to a greater extent with DGKζ than with DGKα; however, in silico modeling of TCR-stimulated Ras activation suggested that a difference in RasGRP1 binding affinity was not sufficient to cause differences in the functions of each DGK isoform. Rather, the model suggested that a greater catalytic rate for DGKζ than for DGKα might lead to DGKζ exhibiting increased suppression of Ras-mediated signals compared to DGKα. Consistent with this notion, experimental studies demonstrated that DGKζ was more effective than DGKα at catalyzing the metabolism of DAG to PA after TCR stimulation. The enhanced effective enzymatic production of PA by DGKζ is therefore one possible mechanism underlying the dominant functions of DGKζ in modulating T(reg) cell development.

  14. The ζ Isoform of Diacylglycerol Kinase Plays a Predominant Role in Regulatory T Cell Development and TCR-Mediated Ras Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Rohan P.; Schmidt, Amanda M.; Das, Jayajit; Pytel, Dariusz; Riese, Matthew J.; Lester, Melissa; Diehl, J. Alan; Behrens, Edward M.; Kambayashi, Taku; Koretzky, Gary A.

    2014-01-01

    Diacylglycerol (DAG) is a critical second messenger that mediates T cell receptor (TCR)–stimulated signaling. The abundance of DAG is reduced by the diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs), which catalyze the conversion of DAG to phosphatidic acid (PA) and thus inhibit DAG-mediated signaling. In T cells, the predominant DGK isoforms are DGKα and DGKζ, and deletion of the genes encoding either isoform enhances DAG-mediated signaling. We found that DGKζ, but not DGKα, suppressed the development of natural regulatory T (Treg) cells and predominantly mediated Ras and Akt signaling downstream of the TCR. The differential functions of DGKα and DGKζ were not attributable to differences in protein abundance in T cells or in their localization to the contact sites between T cells and antigen-presenting cells. RasGRP1, a key DAG-mediated activator of Ras signaling, associated to a greater extent with DGKζ than with DGKα; however, in silico modeling of TCR-stimulated Ras activation suggested that a difference in RasGRP1 binding affinity was not sufficient to cause differences in the functions of each DGK isoform. Rather, the model suggested that a greater catalytic rate for DGKζ than for DGKα might lead to DGKζ exhibiting increased suppression of Ras-mediated signals compared to DGKα. Consistent with this notion, experimental studies demonstrated that DGKζ was more effective than DGKα at catalyzing the metabolism of DAG to PA after TCR stimulation. The enhanced effective enzymatic production of PA by DGKζ is therefore one possible mechanism underlying the dominant functions of DGKζ in modulating Treg cell development. PMID:24280043

  15. Developmental exposure to 2,3,7,8 tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin attenuates later-life Notch1-mediated T cell development and leukemogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrenhoerster, Lori S.; Leuthner, Tess C.; Tate, Everett R.; Lakatos, Peter A.; Laiosa, Michael D.

    2015-03-01

    Over half of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) patients have activating mutations in the Notch gene. Moreover, the contaminant 2,3,7,8 tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a known carcinogen that mediates its toxicity through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), and crosstalk between activated AHR and Notch signaling pathways has previously been observed. Given the importance of Notch signaling in thymocyte development and T-ALL disease progression, we hypothesized that the activated AHR potentiates disease initiation and progression in an in vivo model of Notch1-induced thymoma. This hypothesis was tested utilizing adult and developmental exposure paradigms to TCDD in mice expressing a constitutively active Notch1 transgene (Notch{sup ICN-TG}). Following exposure of adult Notch{sup ICN-TG} mice to a single high dose of TCDD, we observed a significant increase in the efficiency of CD8 thymocyte generation. We next exposed pregnant mice to 3 μg/kg of TCDD throughout gestation and lactation to elucidate effects of developmental AHR activation on later-life T cell development and T-ALL-like thymoma susceptibility induced by Notch1. We found that the vehicle-exposed Notch{sup ICN-TG} offspring have a peripheral T cell pool heavily biased toward the CD4 lineage, while TCDD-exposed Notch{sup ICN-TG} offspring were biased toward the CD8 lineage. Furthermore, while the vehicle-exposed NotchICN-TG mice showed increased splenomegaly and B to T cell ratios indicative of disease, mice developmentally exposed to TCDD were largely protected from disease. These studies support a model where developmental AHR activation attenuates later-life Notch1-dependent impacts on thymocyte development and disease progression. - Highlights: • Adult mice exposed to 30 μg/kg TCDD have higher efficiency of CD8 thymocyte generation. • Mice carrying a constitutively active Notch transgene were exposed to 3 μg/kg TCDD throughout development. • Progression of Notch

  16. Selectively Reduced Intracellular Proliferation of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium within APCs Limits Antigen Presentation and Development of a Rapid CD8 T Cell Response1

    PubMed Central

    Albaghdadi, Homam; Robinson, Nirmal; Finlay, Brett; Krishnan, Lakshmi; Sad, Subash

    2014-01-01

    Ag presentation to CD8+ T cells commences immediately after infection, which facilitates their rapid expansion and control of pathogen. This paradigm is not followed during infection with virulent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (ST), an intracellular bacterium that causes mortality in susceptible C57BL/6J mice within 7 days and a chronic infection in resistant mice (129 × 1SvJ). Infection of mice with OVA-expressing ST results in the development of a CD8+ T cell response that is detectable only after the second week of infection despite the early detectable bacterial burden. The mechanism behind the delayed CD8+ T cell activation was evaluated, and it was found that dendritic cells/macrophages or mice infected with ST-OVA failed to present Ag to OVA-specific CD8+ T cells. Lack of early Ag presentation was not rescued when mice or dendritic cells/macrophages were infected with an attenuated aroA mutant of ST or with mutants having defective Salmonella pathogenicity island I/II genes. Although extracellular ST proliferated extensively, the replication of ST was highly muted once inside macrophages. This muted intracellular proliferation of ST resulted in the generation of poor levels of intracellular Ag and peptide-MHC complex on the surface of dendritic cells. Additional experiments revealed that ST did not actively inhibit Ag presentation, rather it inhibited the uptake of another intracellular pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes, thereby causing inhibition of Ag presentation against L. monocytogenes. Taken together, this study reveals a dichotomy in the proliferation of ST and indicates that selectively reduced intra-cellular proliferation of virulent pathogens may be an important mechanism of immune evasion. PMID:19692639

  17. Restricted TCR-alpha CDR3 diversity disadvantages natural regulatory T cell development in the B6.2.16 beta-chain transgenic mouse.

    PubMed

    Singh, Yogesh; Ferreira, Cristina; Chan, Andrew C Y; Dyson, Julian; Garden, Oliver A

    2010-09-15

    To date, analysis of mice expressing TCR-beta transgenes derived from CD4(+) T cell clones has demonstrated equivalent or higher TCR diversity in naturally occurring regulatory CD4(+) T cells (Tregs) versus conventional CD4(+) T cells (Tcons). However, TCR-alpha-chain diversity in these mice may be influenced by the inherent bias toward the CD4(+) lineage in the selected repertoires. We wished to determine whether the choice of TCR-beta-chain influences the relative diversity of the Treg and Tcon repertoires, examining as a model the B6.2.16beta-transgenic mouse, in which the fixed beta-chain is derived from a CD8(+) T cell clone. B6.2.16beta Treg thymocytes showed significantly lower TRAV17 (AV9) CDR3 sequence diversity than both syngeneic Tcon thymocytes, and Treg and Tcon thymocytes from wild-type C57BL/6 (B6) mice. The ratio of single-positive CD4(+)/single-positive CD8(+) thymocytes in B6.2.16beta mice was similar to that in B6, yet both the proportional frequency and absolute number of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) cells was significantly lower in the thymi and peripheral lymph nodes of B6.2.16beta mice. Furthermore, B6 + B6.2.16beta-->B6 mixed bone marrow chimeras revealed that the transgenic beta-chain disadvantaged Treg development in a competitive environment. These data underline the importance of the beta-chain in assessments of Treg alpha-chain diversity and provide further support for the notion that interclonal competition for entry into the Treg lineage is a significant factor in determining the composition of this lineage.

  18. Influence of the route of infection on development of T-cell receptor beta-chain repertoires of reovirus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Jonathan R; Smith, Jeremy; Cunningham, Cynthia; Cuff, Christopher F

    2004-02-01

    It is well established that the route of infection affects the nature of the adaptive immune response. However, little is known about the effects of the route of exposure on development of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses. Alternative antigen-presenting cell populations, tissue-restricted expression of class I major histocompatibility complex-encoded molecules, and unique T-cell receptor (TCR)-bearing cells in mucosal tissues could influence the selection and expansion of responder T cells. This study addresses the question of whether the route of virus infection affects the selection and expansion of subpopulations of virus-specific CTLs. Mice were infected orally or in the hind footpads with reovirus, and the repertoires of TCR beta-chains expressed on virus-specific CD8(+) T cells in Peyer's patches or lymph nodes and spleens were examined. CD8(+) cells expressing the variable gene segment of the TCR beta-chain 6 (Vbeta6) expanded in the spleens of mice infected by either route and in CTL lines established from the spleens and draining lymphoid tissues. Adoptively transferred Vbeta6(+) CD8(+) T cells from orally or parenterally infected donors expanded in reovirus-infected severe combined immunodeficient recipient mice and mediated cytotoxicity ex vivo. Furthermore, recovered Vbeta6(+) cells were enriched for clones utilizing uniform complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) lengths. However, sequencing of CDR3beta regions from Vbeta6(+) CD8(+) cells indicated that Jbeta gene segment usage is significantly more restricted in CTLs from orally infected mice, suggesting that the route of infection affects selection and/or subsequent expansion of virus-specific CTLs. PMID:14722312

  19. Regulation of natural killer activity of lymphocytes from normal subjects and patients with chronic lymphatic leukemia by interaction between T and non-T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Khonina, N.A.; Shubinskii, G.Z.; Lozovoi, V.P.

    1987-08-01

    The authors study the effect of culture of human cells on functional activity of natural killer cells and investigate the possible mechanisms of regulation of natural killer activity by acting on cytodifferentiation of lymphocytes in normal subjects and in patients with the B-cell variant of chromic lymphatic leukemia. To estimate natural killer cell function, a membranotoxic test was carried out, using cells of the transplantable line K-562, labeled with /sup 3/H-uridine as the targets.

  20. Prenatal exposure to radiofrequencies: effects of WiFi signals on thymocyte development and peripheral T cell compartment in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Laudisi, Federica; Sambucci, Manolo; Nasta, Francesca; Pinto, Rosanna; Lodato, Rossella; Altavista, Pierluigi; Lovisolo, Giorgio Alfonso; Marino, Carmela; Pioli, Claudio

    2012-12-01

    Wireless local area networks are an increasing alternative to wired data networks in workplaces, homes, and public areas. Concerns about possible health effects of this type of signal, especially when exposure occurs early in life, have been raised. We examined the effects of prenatal (in utero) exposure to wireless fidelity (WiFi) signal-associated electromagnetic fields (2450 MHz center-frequency band) on T cell development and function. Pregnant mice were exposed whole body to a specific absorption rate of 4 W/kg, 2 h per day, starting 5 days after mating and ending 1 day before the expected delivery. Sham-exposed and cage control groups were used as controls. No effects on cell count, phenotype, and proliferation of thymocytes were observed. Also, spleen cell count, CD4/CD8 cell frequencies, T cell proliferation, and cytokine production were not affected by the exposure. These findings were consistently observed in the male and female offspring at early (5 weeks of age) and late (26 weeks of age) time points. Nevertheless, the expected differences associated with aging and/or gender were confirmed. In conclusion, our results do not support the hypothesis that the exposure to WiFi signals during prenatal life results in detrimental effects on the immune T cell compartment. PMID:22556007

  1. SJL mice infected with Acanthamoeba castellanii develop central nervous system autoimmunity through the generation of cross-reactive T cells for myelin antigens.

    PubMed

    Massilamany, Chandirasegaran; Marciano-Cabral, Francine; Rocha-Azevedo, Bruno da; Jamerson, Melissa; Gangaplara, Arunakumar; Steffen, David; Zabad, Rana; Illes, Zsolt; Sobel, Raymond A; Reddy, Jay

    2014-01-01

    We recently reported that Acanthamoeba castellanii (ACA), an opportunistic pathogen of the central nervous system (CNS) possesses mimicry epitopes for proteolipid protein (PLP) 139-151 and myelin basic protein 89-101, and that the epitopes induce experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in SJL mice reminiscent of the diseases induced with their corresponding cognate peptides. We now demonstrate that mice infected with ACA also show the generation of cross-reactive T cells, predominantly for PLP 139-151, as evaluated by T cell proliferation and IAs/dextramer staining. We verified that PLP 139-151-sensitized lymphocytes generated in infected mice contained a high proportion of T helper 1 cytokine-producing cells, and they can transfer disease to naïve animals. Likewise, the animals first primed with suboptimal dose of PLP 139-151 and later infected with ACA, developed EAE, suggesting that ACA infection can trigger CNS autoimmunity in the presence of preexisting repertoire of autoreactive T cells. Taken together, the data provide novel insights into the pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba infections, and the potential role of infectious agents with mimicry epitopes to self-antigens in the pathogenesis of CNS diseases such as multiple sclerosis.

  2. Prenatal exposure to radiofrequencies: effects of WiFi signals on thymocyte development and peripheral T cell compartment in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Laudisi, Federica; Sambucci, Manolo; Nasta, Francesca; Pinto, Rosanna; Lodato, Rossella; Altavista, Pierluigi; Lovisolo, Giorgio Alfonso; Marino, Carmela; Pioli, Claudio

    2012-12-01

    Wireless local area networks are an increasing alternative to wired data networks in workplaces, homes, and public areas. Concerns about possible health effects of this type of signal, especially when exposure occurs early in life, have been raised. We examined the effects of prenatal (in utero) exposure to wireless fidelity (WiFi) signal-associated electromagnetic fields (2450 MHz center-frequency band) on T cell development and function. Pregnant mice were exposed whole body to a specific absorption rate of 4 W/kg, 2 h per day, starting 5 days after mating and ending 1 day before the expected delivery. Sham-exposed and cage control groups were used as controls. No effects on cell count, phenotype, and proliferation of thymocytes were observed. Also, spleen cell count, CD4/CD8 cell frequencies, T cell proliferation, and cytokine production were not affected by the exposure. These findings were consistently observed in the male and female offspring at early (5 weeks of age) and late (26 weeks of age) time points. Nevertheless, the expected differences associated with aging and/or gender were confirmed. In conclusion, our results do not support the hypothesis that the exposure to WiFi signals during prenatal life results in detrimental effects on the immune T cell compartment.

  3. Early signaling defects in human T cells anergized by T cell presentation of autoantigen

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class II-positive human T cell clones are nontraditional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that are able to simultaneously present and respond to peptide or degraded antigen, but are unable to process intact protein. Although T cell presentation of peptide antigen resulted in a primary proliferative response, T cells that had been previously stimulated by T cells presenting antigen were completely unresponsive to antigen but not to interleukin 2 (IL-2). In contrast, peptide antigen presented by B cells or DR2+ L cell transfectants resulted in T cell activation and responsiveness to restimulation. The anergy induced by T cell presentation of peptide could not be prevented by the addition of either autologous or allogeneic B cells or B7+ DR2+ L cell transfectants, suggesting that the induction of anergy could occur in the presence of costimulation. T cell anergy was induced within 24 h of T cell presentation of antigen and was long lasting. Anergized T cells expressed normal levels of T cell receptor/CD3 but were defective in their ability to release [Ca2+]i to both alpha CD3 and APCs. Moreover, anergized T cells did not proliferate to alpha CD2 monoclonal antibodies or alpha CD3 plus phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), nor did they synthesize IL-2, IL-4, or interferon gamma mRNA in response to either peptide or peptide plus PMA. In contrast, ionomycin plus PMA induced both normal proliferative responses and synthesis of cytokine mRNA, suggesting that the signaling defect in anergized cells occurs before protein kinase C activation and [Ca2+]i release. PMID:1535366

  4. Visualizing T Cell Migration in situ

    PubMed Central

    Benechet, Alexandre P.; Menon, Manisha; Khanna, Kamal M.

    2014-01-01

    Mounting a protective immune response is critically dependent on the orchestrated movement of cells within lymphoid tissues. The structure of secondary lymphoid organs regulates immune responses by promoting optimal cell–cell and cell–extracellular matrix interactions. Naïve T cells are initially activated by antigen presenting cells in secondary lymphoid organs. Following priming, effector T cells migrate to the site of infection to exert their functions. Majority of the effector cells die while a small population of antigen-specific T cells persists as memory cells in distinct anatomical locations. The persistence and location of memory cells in lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues is critical to protect the host from re-infection. The localization of memory T cells is carefully regulated by several factors including the highly organized secondary lymphoid structure, the cellular expression of chemokine receptors and compartmentalized secretion of their cognate ligands. This balance between the anatomy and the ordered expression of cell surface and soluble proteins regulates the subtle choreography of T cell migration. In recent years, our understanding of cellular dynamics of T cells has been advanced by the development of new imaging techniques allowing in situ visualization of T cell responses. Here, we review the past and more recent studies that have utilized sophisticated imaging technologies to investigate the migration dynamics of naïve, effector, and memory T cells. PMID:25120547

  5. Targeting T cell metabolism for therapy

    PubMed Central

    O’Sullivan, David

    2015-01-01

    In the past several years, a wealth of evidence has emerged illustrating how metabolism supports many aspects of T cell biology, as well as how metabolic changes drive T cell differentiation and fate. Here we outline developing principles in the regulation of T cell metabolism, and discuss how these processes are impacted in settings of inflammation and cancer. In this context we discuss how metabolic pathways might be manipulated for the treatment of human disease, including how metabolism may be targeted to prevent T cell dysfunction in inhospitable microenvironments, to generate more effective adoptive cellular immunotherapies in cancer, and to direct T cell differentiation and function towards non-pathogenic phenotypes in settings of autoimmunity. PMID:25601541

  6. Molecular Characteristics of CTA056, a Novel Interleukin-2-Inducible T-Cell Kinase Inhibitor that Selectively Targets Malignant T Cells and Modulates Oncomirs

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wenchang; Liu, Ruiwu; Ono, Yoko; Ma, Ai-Hong; Martinez, Anthony; Sanchez, Eduardo; Wang, Yan; Huang, Wenzhe; Mazloom, Anisha; Li, Jixian; Ning, Jinying; Maverakis, Emanual; Lam, Kit S.

    2012-01-01

    Interleukin-2-inducible T-cell kinase (Itk) is a member of the Btk (Bruton's tyrosine kinase) family of tyrosine kinases. Itk plays an important role in normal T-cell functions and in the pathophysiology of both autoimmune diseases and T-cell malignancies. Here, we describe the initial characterization of a selective inhibitor, 7-benzyl-1-(3-(piperidin-1-yl)propyl)-2-(4-(pyridin-4-yl)phenyl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-g]quinoxalin-6(5H)-one (CTA056), that was developed through screening a 9600-compound combinatorial solution phase library, followed by molecular modeling, and extensive structure-activity relationship studies. CTA056 exhibits the highest inhibitory effects toward Itk, followed by Btk and endothelial and epithelial tyrosine kinase. Among the 41 cancer cell lines analyzed, CTA056 selectively targets acute lymphoblastic T-cell leukemia and cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Normal T cells are minimally affected. Incubation of Jurkat and MOLT-4 cells with CTA056 resulted in the inhibition of the phosphorylation of Itk and its effectors including PLC-γ, Akt, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase, as well as the decreased secretion of targeted genes such as interleukin-2 and interferon-γ. Jurkat cells also underwent apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner when incubated with CTA056. The potent apoptosis-inducing potential of CTA056 is reflected by the significant modulation of microRNAs involved in survival pathways and oncogenesis. The in vitro cytotoxic effect on malignant T cells is further validated in a xenograft model. The selective expression and activation of Itk in malignant T cells, as well as the specificity of CTA056 for Itk, make this molecule a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of T-cell leukemia and lymphoma. PMID:22899868

  7. Transcriptional regulator Id2 mediates CD8+ T cell immunity.

    PubMed

    Cannarile, Michael A; Lind, Nicholas A; Rivera, Richard; Sheridan, Alison D; Camfield, Kristin A; Wu, Bei Bei; Cheung, Kitty P; Ding, Zhaoqing; Goldrath, Ananda W

    2006-12-01

    Transcriptional programs that initiate and sustain the proliferation, differentiation and survival of CD8(+) T cells during immune responses are not completely understood. Here we show that inhibitor of DNA binding 2 (Id2), an antagonist of E protein transcription factors, was upregulated in CD8(+) T cells during infection and that expression of Id2 was maintained in memory CD8(+) T cells. Although Id2-deficient naive CD8(+) T cells recognized antigen and proliferated normally early after infection, effector CD8(+) T cells did not accumulate because the cells were highly susceptible to apoptosis. Id2-deficient CD8(+) T cells responding to infection had changes in the expression of genes that influence survival and had altered memory formation. Our data emphasize the importance of Id2 in regulating gene expression by CD8(+) T cells and the magnitude of effector responses, suggesting a mechanism involving Id protein- and E protein-mediated survival and differentiation of mature T cells.

  8. Effect of antigen-induced suppressor B cells on development of memory B cells, carrier-specific helper T cells, and antibody-forming cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinkovich, A.G.; Luganskaya, E.L.; Pinegin, B.V.

    1986-12-01

    This paper studies the presence of an Fc receptor on the surface of antigen-induced suppressor B cells (AISB), their sensitivity to antiproliferative agents, their interaction with other immunoregulator cells and with the precursors of antibody-forming cells (AFC). Mice were used in the experiments and were irradiated in a dose of 8.5 Gy (/sup 137/Cs). The effect of AISB on memory B cells is shown as is the effect of AISB on development of carrier-specific helper T cells. Also presented is the effect of AISB on development of AFC.

  9. Immunoregulatory T Cell Function in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Ozer, H.; Han, T.; Henderson, E. S.; Nussbaum, A.; Sheedy, D.

    1981-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a malignancy characterized by uncontrolled monoclonal B cell differentiation and immunoglobulin production. In most instances, there is concomitant reduction in polyclonal differentiation and immunoglobulin synthesis both in vivo and in vitro. In in vitro pokeweed mitogen-induced B cell differentiation assays, proliferation and polyclonal immunoglobulin secretion optimally requires T cell help and can be inhibited both by monocytes and suppressor T cells. Helper function and monocyte-mediated suppression are relatively radio-resistant whereas T suppressor function is sensitive to 2,000 rad x-irradiation. We have examined myeloma T cell subset function in this assay using recombinations of isolated patient and normal B cells, T cells, and T cell subsets. Monocytes were removed by a carbonyl iron ingestion technique, normal and myeloma T cells were fractionated on the basis of Fc receptors for immunoglobulin (Ig) G (Tγ) or IgM (Tμ or T non-γ), and proliferation and IgG secretion after co-culture determined by [3H]thymidine incorporation and radio-immunoassay, respectively. Myeloma B cells demonstrate quantitatively and qualitatively normal blastogenic responses and are appropriately regulated by either autologous or allogeneic T helper and suppressor subsets. Despite normal proliferation, however, myeloma B cells remain deficient in subsequent differentiation and immunoglobulin secretion even when co-cultured in the absence of monocytes or suppressor T cells and the presence of normal helper cells. Myeloma T cell populations, in contrast, are entirely normal in helper capacity over a range of T:B ratios but are markedly deficient in radiosensitive and concanavalin A-induced suppressor activity. T suppressor cell dysfunction in multiple myeloma is apparently due to a deficit in the T non-γ suppressor subset, whereas Tγ cells, although proportionately reduced, are functionally normal. This unique T suppressor deficit reflects the heterogeneity

  10. Apoptosis-Inducing-Factor-Dependent Mitochondrial Function Is Required for T Cell but Not B Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Milasta, Sandra; Dillon, Christopher P; Sturm, Oliver E; Verbist, Katherine C; Brewer, Taylor L; Quarato, Giovanni; Brown, Scott A; Frase, Sharon; Janke, Laura J; Perry, S Scott; Thomas, Paul G; Green, Douglas R

    2016-01-19

    The role of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) in promoting cell death versus survival remains controversial. We report that the loss of AIF in fibroblasts led to mitochondrial electron transport chain defects and loss of proliferation that could be restored by ectopic expression of the yeast NADH dehydrogenase Ndi1. Aif-deficiency in T cells led to decreased peripheral T cell numbers and defective homeostatic proliferation, but thymic T cell development was unaffected. In contrast, Aif-deficient B cells developed and functioned normally. The difference in the dependency of T cells versus B cells on AIF for function and survival correlated with their metabolic requirements. Ectopic Ndi1 expression rescued homeostatic proliferation of Aif-deficient T cells. Despite its reported roles in cell death, fibroblasts, thymocytes and B cells lacking AIF underwent normal death. These studies suggest that the primary role of AIF relates to complex I function, with differential effects on T and B cells.

  11. Galectin-1 inhibits the viability, proliferation, and Th1 cytokine production of nonmalignant T cells in patients with leukemic cutaneous T-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Cedeno-Laurent, Filiberto; Watanabe, Rei; Teague, Jessica E.; Kupper, Thomas S.; Clark, Rachael A.

    2012-01-01

    Tumor-derived galectin-1 (Gal-1), a β-galactoside–binding S-type lectin, has been shown to encourage T-cell death and promote T cell–mediated tumor immune escape. In this report, we show that patients with leukemic cutaneous T-cell lymphomas, known to have limited complexity of their T-cell repertoires, have a predominant T helper type-2 (Th2) cytokine profile and significantly elevated plasma levels of Gal-1 compared with healthy controls. Circulating clonal malignant T cells were a major source of Gal-1. The conditioned supernatant of cultured malignant T cells induced a β-galactoside–dependent inhibition of normal T-cell proliferation and a Th2 skewing of cytokine production. These data implicate Gal-1 in development of the Th2 phenotype in patients with advanced-stage cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and highlight the Gal-1–Gal-1 ligand axis as a potential therapeutic target for enhancing antitumor immune responses. PMID:22383798

  12. Survival of mature T cells depends on signaling through HOIP

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Kazumi; Kitamura, Akiko; Sasaki, Yoshiteru; Chung, Doo Hyun; Kagami, Shoji; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Yasutomo, Koji

    2016-01-01

    T cell development in the thymus is controlled by a multistep process. The NF-κB pathway regulates T cell development as well as T cell activation at multiple differentiation stages. The linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC) is composed of Sharpin, HOIL-1L and HOIP, and it is crucial for regulating the NF-κB and cell death pathways. However, little is known about the roles of LUBAC in T-cell development and activation. Here, we show that in T-HOIPΔlinear mice lacking the ubiquitin ligase activity of LUBAC, thymic CD4+ or CD8+ T cell numbers were markedly reduced with severe defects in NKT cell development. HOIPΔlinear CD4+ T cells failed to phosphorylate IκBα and JNK through T cell receptor-mediated stimulation. Mature CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in T-HOIPΔlinear mice underwent apoptosis more rapidly than control T cells, and it was accompanied by lower CD127 expression on CD4+CD24low and CD8+CD24low T cells in the thymus. The enforced expression of CD127 in T-HOIPΔlinear thymocytes rescued the development of mature CD8+ T cells. Collectively, our results showed that LUBAC ligase activity is key for the survival of mature T cells, and suggest multiple roles of the NF-κB and cell death pathways in activating or maintaining T cell-mediated adaptive immune responses. PMID:27786304

  13. Hepatosplenic alphabeta T cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Yuya; Ikegame, Kazuhiro; Mori, Minako; Inoue, Daichi; Kimura, Takaharu; Shimoji, Sonoko; Togami, Katsuhiro; Tabata, Sumie; Kurata, Masayuki; Imai, Yukihiro; Matsushita, Akiko; Nagai, Kenichi; Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Takayuki

    2010-04-01

    A 32-year-old male with chronic hepatitis B was admitted to a hospital with cellulitis in the right leg in September 2006. Pancytopenia, hepatosplenomegaly, and systemic superficial lymph node swelling were noted, and he was referred to our hospital. He developed fever and liver dysfunction in June 2007 and underwent a splenectomy. His pancytopenia subsequently improved. A pathologic diagnosis of hepatosplenic alphabeta T cell lymphoma was made by examining spleen tissue and biopsy specimens of the liver and mesenteric lymph node. He had stage IVB disease because neoplastic T cells were noted in the bone marrow. The response of the lymphoma to conventional chemotherapy including the CHOP (cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, vincristine, prednisolone) and DeVIC (dexamethasone, etoposide, ifoshamide, carboplatin) regimens was poor and transient. A partial remission was obtained with an ESHAP (etoposide, cisplatin, cytarabine, methylprednisolone) regimen. Therefore, we planned a bone marrow transplantation (BMT) from an HLA-haploidentical sibling donor. He was moved to the Department of Hematology, Hyogo Medical College, to receive this BMT as part of a clinical trial. During the conditioning procedure for the transplantation, however, he died of septicemia. Since hepatosplenic alphabeta T cell lymphoma is very rare with only 23 reported cases to date, herein we report this case and discuss the therapeutic strategy. PMID:20217452

  14. Designer T cells by T cell receptor replacement.

    PubMed

    Sommermeyer, Daniel; Neudorfer, Julia; Weinhold, Monika; Leisegang, Matthias; Engels, Boris; Noessner, Elfriede; Heemskerk, Mirjam H M; Charo, Jehad; Schendel, Dolores J; Blankenstein, Thomas; Bernhard, Helga; Uckert, Wolfgang

    2006-11-01

    T cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer is a convenient method to produce antigen-specific T cells for adoptive therapy. However, the expression of two TCR in T cells could impair their function or cause unwanted effects by mixed TCR heterodimers. With five different TCR and four different T cells, either mouse or human, we show that some TCR are strong--in terms of cell surface expression--and replace weak TCR on the cell surface, resulting in exchange of antigen specificity. Two strong TCR are co-expressed. A mouse TCR replaces human TCR on human T cells. Even though it is still poorly understood why some TCRalpha/beta combinations are preferentially expressed on T cells, our data suggest that, in the future, designer T cells with exclusive tumor reactivity can be generated by T cell engineering. PMID:17051621

  15. Breaking the co-operation between bystander T-cells and natural killer cells prevents the development of immunosuppression after traumatic skeletal muscle injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wirsdörfer, Florian; Bangen, Jörg M.; Pastille, Eva; Hansen, Wiebke

    2015-01-01

    Nosocomial infections represent serious complications after traumatic or surgical injuries in intensive care units. The pathogenesis of the underlying immunosuppression is only incompletely understood. In the present study, we investigated whether injury interferes with the function of the adaptive immune system in particular with the differentiation of antigen-specific T helper (Th)-cell responses in vivo. We used a mouse model for traumatic gastrocnemius muscle injury. Ovalbumin (OVA), which served as a foreign model antigen, was injected into the hind footpads for determination of the differentiation of OVA-specific Th-cells in the draining popliteal lymph node (pLN). The release of interferon (IFN)-γ from OVA-specific Th-cells was impaired within 24 h after injury and this impairment persisted for at least 7 days. In contrast, the proliferation of OVA-specific Th-cells remained unaffected. Injury did not modulate the function of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in the pLN. Adoptive transfer of total T-cells from pLNs of injured mice inhibited IFN-γ production by OVA-specific Th-cells in naive mice. Suppressed Th1 priming did not occur in lymphocyte-deficient mice after injury but was restored by administration of T-cells before injury. Moreover, the suppression of Th1 differentiation required the presence of natural killer (NK) cells that were recruited to the pLN after injury; this recruitment was dependent on lymphocytes, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88). In summary, upon traumatic skeletal muscle injury T-cells and NK cells together prevent the development of protective Th1 immunity. Breaking this co-operation might be a novel approach to reduce the risk of infectious complications after injury. PMID:25609031

  16. I spy alloreactive T cells.

    PubMed

    Alegre, Maria-Luisa

    2015-01-28

    High-throughput sequencing of the T cell receptor Vβ CDR3 region allowed longitudinal tracking of alloreactive T cells in kidney transplant patients, revealing clonal deletion as a mechanism of transplantation tolerance (Morris et al., this issue). PMID:25632032

  17. Neoantigen landscape dynamics during human melanoma-T cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Verdegaal, Els M E; de Miranda, Noel F C C; Visser, Marten; Harryvan, Tom; van Buuren, Marit M; Andersen, Rikke S; Hadrup, Sine R; van der Minne, Caroline E; Schotte, Remko; Spits, Hergen; Haanen, John B A G; Kapiteijn, Ellen H W; Schumacher, Ton N; van der Burg, Sjoerd H

    2016-08-01

    Recognition of neoantigens that are formed as a consequence of DNA damage is likely to form a major driving force behind the clinical activity of cancer immunotherapies such as T-cell checkpoint blockade and adoptive T-cell therapy. Therefore, strategies to selectively enhance T-cell reactivity against genetically defined neoantigens are currently under development. In mouse models, T-cell pressure can sculpt the antigenicity of tumours, resulting in the emergence of tumours that lack defined mutant antigens. However, whether the T-cell-recognized neoantigen repertoire in human cancers is constant over time is unclear. Here we analyse the stability of neoantigen-specific T-cell responses and the antigens they recognize in two patients with stage IV melanoma treated by adoptive T-cell transfer. The T-cell-recognized neoantigens can be selectively lost from the tumour cell population, either by overall reduced expression of the genes or loss of the mutant alleles. Notably, loss of expression of T-cell-recognized neoantigens was accompanied by development of neoantigen-specific T-cell reactivity in tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes. These data demonstrate the dynamic interactions between cancer cells and T cells, which suggest that T cells mediate neoantigen immunoediting, and indicate that the therapeutic induction of broad neoantigen-specific T-cell responses should be used to avoid tumour resistance. PMID:27350335

  18. Modulation of CD4+ T Cell-Dependent Specific Cytotoxic CD8+ T Cells Differentiation and Proliferation by the Timing of Increase in the Pathogen Load

    PubMed Central

    Tzelepis, Fanny; Persechini, Pedro M.; Rodrigues, Mauricio M.

    2007-01-01

    Background Following infection with viruses, bacteria or protozoan parasites, naïve antigen-specific CD8+ T cells undergo a process of differentiation and proliferation to generate effector cells. Recent evidences suggest that the timing of generation of specific effector CD8+ T cells varies widely according to different pathogens. We hypothesized that the timing of increase in the pathogen load could be a critical parameter governing this process. Methodology/Principal Findings Using increasing doses of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi to infect C57BL/6 mice, we observed a significant acceleration in the timing of parasitemia without an increase in mouse susceptibility. In contrast, in CD8 deficient mice, we observed an inverse relationship between the parasite inoculum and the timing of death. These results suggest that in normal mice CD8+ T cells became protective earlier, following the accelerated development of parasitemia. The evaluation of specific cytotoxic responses in vivo to three distinct epitopes revealed that increasing the parasite inoculum hastened the expansion of specific CD8+ cytotoxic T cells following infection. The differentiation and expansion of T. cruzi-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T cells is in fact dependent on parasite multiplication, as radiation-attenuated parasites were unable to activate these cells. We also observed that, in contrast to most pathogens, the activation process of T. cruzi-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T cells was dependent on MHC class II restricted CD4+ T cells. Conclusions/Significance Our results are compatible with our initial hypothesis that the timing of increase in the pathogen load can be a critical parameter governing the kinetics of CD4+ T cell-dependent expansion of pathogen-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T cells. PMID:17460760

  19. Downregulated Expression of Ly-6-ThB on Developing T Cells Marks CD4+CD8+ Subset Undergoing Selection in the Thymus

    PubMed Central

    Reese, Justin T.; Mehta, Hitesh; Chappell, Clay H.

    2001-01-01

    Interaction of TCRs on CD4+CD8+ immature T cell with MHC-peptide complexes on stromal cells is required for positive and negative selection in the thymus. Identification and characterization of a subpopulation of CD4+CD8+ thymocytes undergoing selection in the thymus will aid in understanding the mechanisms underlying lineage commitment and thymic selection. Herein, we describe the expression of Ly-6 ThB on developing thymocytes. The majority of CD4+CD8+ thymocytes express Ly-6 ThB at high levels. Its expression is downregulated in a subset of CD4+CD8+ thymocytes as well as in mature CD4+CD8- and CD4-CD8+ T cells. More importantly, interaction of TCR/coreceptor with the self-MHC-peptide contributes to the downregulation of ThB expression on developing thymocytes. These findings indicate that downregulation of ThB on CD4+CD8+ thymocytes identifies a unique subset (CD4+CD8+ThBneg–low) of thymocytes that has received the initial signals for thymic selection but have not yet downregulated the CD4 and CD8 cell surface expression. In addition, these results also indicate that a high frequency (Ÿ20–40%) of CD4+CD8+ immature thymocytes receive these initial signals during thymic selection. PMID:11589307

  20. Genetic Analysis of T Cell Lymphomas in Carbon Ion-Irradiated Mice Reveals Frequent Interstitial Chromosome Deletions: Implications for Second Cancer Induction in Normal Tissues during Carbon Ion Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Blyth, Benjamin J; Kakinuma, Shizuko; Sunaoshi, Masaaki; Amasaki, Yoshiko; Hirano-Sakairi, Shinobu; Ogawa, Kanae; Shirakami, Ayana; Shang, Yi; Tsuruoka, Chizuru; Nishimura, Mayumi; Shimada, Yoshiya

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring mice exposed to carbon ion radiotherapy provides an indirect method to evaluate the potential for second cancer induction in normal tissues outside the radiotherapy target volume, since such estimates are not yet possible from historical patient data. Here, male and female B6C3F1 mice were given single or fractionated whole-body exposure(s) to a monoenergetic carbon ion radiotherapy beam at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, Japan, matching the radiation quality delivered to the normal tissue ahead of the tumour volume (average linear energy transfer = 13 keV x μm(-1)) during patient radiotherapy protocols. The mice were monitored for the remainder of their lifespan, and a large number of T cell lymphomas that arose in these mice were analysed alongside those arising following an equivalent dose of 137Cs gamma ray-irradiation. Using genome-wide DNA copy number analysis to identify genomic loci involved in radiation-induced lymphomagenesis and subsequent detailed analysis of Notch1, Ikzf1, Pten, Trp53 and Bcl11b genes, we compared the genetic profile of the carbon ion- and gamma ray-induced tumours. The canonical set of genes previously associated with radiation-induced T cell lymphoma was identified in both radiation groups. While the pattern of disruption of the various pathways was somewhat different between the radiation types, most notably Pten mutation frequency and loss of heterozygosity flanking Bcl11b, the most striking finding was the observation of large interstitial deletions at various sites across the genome in carbon ion-induced tumours, which were only seen infrequently in the gamma ray-induced tumours analysed. If such large interstitial chromosomal deletions are a characteristic lesion of carbon ion irradiation, even when using the low linear energy transfer radiation to which normal tissues are exposed in radiotherapy patients, understanding the dose-response and tissue specificity of such DNA damage could prove key to

  1. Genetic Analysis of T Cell Lymphomas in Carbon Ion-Irradiated Mice Reveals Frequent Interstitial Chromosome Deletions: Implications for Second Cancer Induction in Normal Tissues during Carbon Ion Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Blyth, Benjamin J.; Kakinuma, Shizuko; Sunaoshi, Masaaki; Amasaki, Yoshiko; Hirano-Sakairi, Shinobu; Ogawa, Kanae; Shirakami, Ayana; Shang, Yi; Tsuruoka, Chizuru; Nishimura, Mayumi; Shimada, Yoshiya

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring mice exposed to carbon ion radiotherapy provides an indirect method to evaluate the potential for second cancer induction in normal tissues outside the radiotherapy target volume, since such estimates are not yet possible from historical patient data. Here, male and female B6C3F1 mice were given single or fractionated whole-body exposure(s) to a monoenergetic carbon ion radiotherapy beam at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, Japan, matching the radiation quality delivered to the normal tissue ahead of the tumour volume (average linear energy transfer = 13 keV.μm-1) during patient radiotherapy protocols. The mice were monitored for the remainder of their lifespan, and a large number of T cell lymphomas that arose in these mice were analysed alongside those arising following an equivalent dose of 137Cs gamma ray-irradiation. Using genome-wide DNA copy number analysis to identify genomic loci involved in radiation-induced lymphomagenesis and subsequent detailed analysis of Notch1, Ikzf1, Pten, Trp53 and Bcl11b genes, we compared the genetic profile of the carbon ion- and gamma ray-induced tumours. The canonical set of genes previously associated with radiation-induced T cell lymphoma was identified in both radiation groups. While the pattern of disruption of the various pathways was somewhat different between the radiation types, most notably Pten mutation frequency and loss of heterozygosity flanking Bcl11b, the most striking finding was the observation of large interstitial deletions at various sites across the genome in carbon ion-induced tumours, which were only seen infrequently in the gamma ray-induced tumours analysed. If such large interstitial chromosomal deletions are a characteristic lesion of carbon ion irradiation, even when using the low linear energy transfer radiation to which normal tissues are exposed in radiotherapy patients, understanding the dose-response and tissue specificity of such DNA damage could prove key to assessing

  2. The Notch driven long non-coding RNA repertoire in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Durinck, Kaat; Wallaert, Annelynn; Van de Walle, Inge; Van Loocke, Wouter; Volders, Pieter-Jan; Vanhauwaert, Suzanne; Geerdens, Ellen; Benoit, Yves; Van Roy, Nadine; Poppe, Bruce; Soulier, Jean; Cools, Jan; Mestdagh, Pieter; Vandesompele, Jo; Rondou, Pieter; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Taghon, Tom; Speleman, Frank

    2014-12-01

    Genetic studies in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia have uncovered a remarkable complexity of oncogenic and loss-of-function mutations. Amongst this plethora of genetic changes, NOTCH1 activating mutations stand out as the most frequently occurring genetic defect, identified in more than 50% of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias, supporting a role as an essential driver for this gene in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia oncogenesis. In this study, we aimed to establish a comprehensive compendium of the long non-coding RNA transcriptome under control of Notch signaling. For this purpose, we measured the transcriptional response of all protein coding genes and long non-coding RNAs upon pharmacological Notch inhibition in the human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line CUTLL1 using RNA-sequencing. Similar Notch dependent profiles were established for normal human CD34(+) thymic T-cell progenitors exposed to Notch signaling activity in vivo. In addition, we generated long non-coding RNA expression profiles (array data) from ex vivo isolated Notch active CD34(+) and Notch inactive CD4(+)CD8(+) thymocytes and from a primary cohort of 15 T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients with known NOTCH1 mutation status. Integration of these expression datasets with publicly available Notch1 ChIP-sequencing data resulted in the identification of long non-coding RNAs directly regulated by Notch activity in normal and malignant T cells. Given the central role of Notch in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia oncogenesis, these data pave the way for the development of novel therapeutic strategies that target hyperactive Notch signaling in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  3. The signaling symphony: T cell receptor tunes cytokine-mediated T cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weishan; August, Avery

    2015-03-01

    T cell development, differentiation, and maintenance are orchestrated by 2 key signaling axes: the antigen-specific TCR and cytokine-mediated signals. The TCR signals the recognition of self- and foreign antigens to control T cell homeostasis for immune tolerance and immunity, which is regulated by a variety of cytokines to determine T cell subset homeostasis and differentiation. TCR signaling can synergize with or antagonize cytokine-mediated signaling to fine tune T cell fate; however, the latter is less investigated. Murine models with attenuated TCR signaling strength have revealed that TCR signaling can function as regulatory feedback machinery for T cell homeostasis and differentiation in differential cytokine milieus, such as IL-2-mediated Treg development; IL-7-mediated, naïve CD8(+) T cell homeostasis; and IL-4-induced innate memory CD8(+) T cell development. In this review, we discuss the symphonic cross-talk between TCR and cytokine-mediated responses that differentially control T cell behavior, with a focus on the negative tuning by TCR activation on the cytokine effects.

  4. Development of an artificial-antigen-presenting-cell-based assay for the detection of low-frequency virus-specific CD8(+) T cells in whole blood, with application for measles virus.

    PubMed

    Ndhlovu, Zaza M; Angenendt, Monika; Heckel, Diana; Schneck, Jonathan P; Griffin, Diane E; Oelke, Mathias

    2009-07-01

    Evaluation of the immune responses induced by childhood vaccines requires measurement of T-cell, as well as antibody, responses. However, cellular immune responses are often not analyzed because of technical hurdles and the volume of blood required. Therefore, a sensitive and specific assay for antigen-specific T cells that utilizes a small volume of blood would facilitate new vaccine evaluation. We developed a novel assay for quantifying virus-specific CD8(+) T cells that combines the use of HLA-A2 immunoglobulin-based artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) for stimulation of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells in whole blood with quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) to detect gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) mRNA. This assay was optimized using a well-established cytomegalovirus (CMV) CD8(+) T-cell system. The aAPC-qRT-PCR assay had comparable sensitivity to intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) in detecting CMV-specific CD8(+) T cells with a detection limit of less than 0.004%. The assay was applied to the detection of low-frequency measles virus (MV)-specific CD8(+) T cells by stimulating blood from five MV-immune HLA-A*0201 donors with four different MV-specific peptides (MV peptide aAPCs). Stimulation with three of the MV peptide aAPCs resulted in significant increases in IFN-gamma mRNA ranging from 3.3- to 13.5-fold. Our results show that the aAPC-qRT-PCR assay is highly sensitive and specific and can be standardized for screening MV-specific CD8(+) T cells in vaccine trials. The technology should be transferable to analysis of CD8(+) T-cell responses to other antigens. PMID:19494085

  5. Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (HTLV-1)

    MedlinePlus

    ... gentic material made of DNA, but instead carry RNA. These viruses selectively infect only T-cells. Only ... potential to inject its genetic material (DNA or RNA) into normal cells. Once inside the normal cells, ...

  6. A Natural Variant of the T Cell Receptor-Signaling Molecule Vav1 Reduces Both Effector T Cell Functions and Susceptibility to Neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kassem, Sahar; Bernard, Isabelle; Dejean, Anne S.; Liblau, Roland; Fournié, Gilbert J.; Colacios, Céline

    2016-01-01

    The guanine nucleotide exchange factor Vav1 is essential for transducing T cell antigen receptor signals and therefore plays an important role in T cell development and activation. Our previous genetic studies identified a locus on rat chromosome 9 that controls the susceptibility to neuroinflammation and contains a non-synonymous polymorphism in the major candidate gene Vav1. To formally demonstrate the causal implication of this polymorphism, we generated a knock-in mouse bearing this polymorphism (Vav1R63W). Using this model, we show that Vav1R63W mice display reduced susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) induced by MOG35-55 peptide immunization. This is associated with a lower production of effector cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-17 and GM-CSF) by autoreactive CD4 T cells. Despite increased proportion of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in Vav1R63W mice, we show that this lowered cytokine production is intrinsic to effector CD4 T cells and that Treg depletion has no impact on EAE development. Finally, we provide a mechanism for the above phenotype by showing that the Vav1R63W variant has normal enzymatic activity but reduced adaptor functions. Together, these data highlight the importance of Vav1 adaptor functions in the production of inflammatory cytokines by effector T cells and in the susceptibility to neuroinflammation. PMID:27438086

  7. A Variable CD3+ T-Cell Frequency in Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes Associated with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Development in the LEW.1AR1-iddm Rat

    PubMed Central

    Arndt, Tanja; Jörns, Anne; Weiss, Heike; Tiedge, Markus; Hedrich, Hans-Jürgen; Lenzen, Sigurd; Wedekind, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The LEW.1AR1-iddm rat is an animal model of human type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), which arose through a spontaneous mutation within the MHC-congenic inbred strain LEW.1AR1 (RT1r2). In contrast to the diabetes-resistant LEW.1AR1 background strain in LEW.1AR1-iddm rats a highly variable T-cell frequency could be observed in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). Methods In this study we therefore characterised the T-cell repertoire within the PBLs of the two strains by flow cytometry analysis and identified the CD3+ T-cell phenotype and its possible linkage to diabetes susceptibility. To map loci conferring susceptibility to variable CD3+ T-cell frequency, backcross strains (N2) were generated with the genetically divergent BN and PAR rats for microsatellite analysis. Results The LEW.1AR1-iddm rat strain was characterised by a higher variability of CD3+ T-cells in PBLs along with a slightly decreased mean value compared to the LEW.1AR1 background strain. The reason for this reduction was a decrease in the CD4+ T-cell count while the CD8+ T-cell proportion remained unchanged. However, both T-cell subpopulations showed a high variability. This resulted in a lower CD4+/CD8+ T-cell ratio than in LEW.1AR1 rats. Like LEW.1AR1-iddm rats all animals of the backcross populations, N2 BN and N2 PAR rats, also showed large variations of the CD3+ T-cell frequency. The phenotype of variable CD3+ T-cell frequency mapped to the telomeric region of chromosome 1 (RNO1), which is identical with the already known Iddm8 diabetes susceptibility region. The data indicate that a variable CD3+ T-cell frequency in PBLs is genetically linked to diabetes susceptibility in the LEW.1AR1-iddm rat. Conclusion The T-cell variability in PBLs could be related to the previously reported imbalance between regulatory and effector T-cell populations which results in beta-cell autoimmunity. Since similar T-cell phenotypes have also been described in human T1DM the identification of the functional

  8. T cells, precocious aging, and familial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Fudenberg, H H; Schuman, S H; Goust, J M; Jorgenson, R

    1978-01-01

    A 15-year-old girl presented with precocious aging and was found to have low levels of active and total T cells. Family history revealed a high familial incidence of cancer on both the maternal and paternal sides, and activ T cell levels were found to be low in several living family members. The patient developed osteogenic sarcoma 13 months after initial study. Since our previous studies have reported low active and total T cells in patients with cancer, the present results suggest that subjects with low active T cells should be monitored frequently to detect possible neoplasia in it early stages. They also suggest that impaired cellular immunity in humans is associated with, if not the cause of, accelerated aging. PMID:304823

  9. A Comparative Study of N-glycolylneuraminic Acid (Neu5Gc) and Cytotoxic T Cell (CT) Carbohydrate Expression in Normal and Dystrophin-Deficient Dog and Human Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Paul T.; Golden, Bethannie; Okerblom, Jonathan; Camboni, Marybeth; Chandrasekharan, Kumaran; Xu, Rui; Varki, Ajit; Flanigan, Kevin M.; Kornegay, Joe N.

    2014-01-01

    The expression of N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) and the cytotoxic T cell (CT) carbohydrate can impact the severity of muscular dystrophy arising from the loss of dystrophin in mdx mice. Here, we describe the expression of these two glycans in skeletal muscles of dogs and humans with or without dystrophin-deficiency. Neu5Gc expression was highly reduced (>95%) in muscle from normal golden retriever crosses (GR, n = 3) and from golden retriever with muscular dystrophy (GRMD, n = 5) dogs at multiple ages (3, 6 and 13 months) when compared to mouse muscle, however, overall sialic acid expression in GR and GRMD muscles remained high at all ages. Neu5Gc was expressed on only a minority of GRMD satellite cells, CD8+ T lymphocytes and macrophages. Human muscle from normal (no evident disease, n = 3), Becker (BMD, n = 3) and Duchenne (DMD, n = 3) muscular dystrophy individuals had absent to very low Neu5Gc staining, but some punctate intracellular muscle staining was present in BMD and DMD muscles. The CT carbohydrate was localized to the neuromuscular junction in GR muscle, while GRMD muscles had increased expression on a subset of myofibers and macrophages. In humans, the CT carbohydrate was ectopically expressed on the sarcolemmal membrane of some BMD muscles, but not normal human or DMD muscles. These data are consistent with the notion that altered Neu5Gc and CT carbohydrate expression may modify disease severity resulting from dystrophin deficiency in dogs and humans. PMID:24505439

  10. T Cells and Gene Regulation: The Switching On and Turning Up of Genes after T Cell Receptor Stimulation in CD8 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Conley, James M.; Gallagher, Michael P.; Berg, Leslie J.

    2016-01-01

    Signaling downstream of the T cell receptor (TCR) is directly regulated by the dose and affinity of peptide antigen. The strength of TCR signaling drives a multitude of T cell functions from development to differentiation. CD8 T cells differentiate into a diverse pool of effector and memory cells after activation, a process that is critical for pathogen clearance and is highly regulated by TCR signal strength. T cells rapidly alter their gene expression upon activation. Multiple signaling pathways downstream of the TCR activate transcription factors, which are critical for this process. The dynamics between proximal TCR signaling, transcription factor activation and CD8 T cell function are discussed here. We propose that inducible T cell kinase (ITK) acts as a rheostat for gene expression. This unique regulation of TCR signaling by ITK provides a possible signaling mechanism for the promotion of a diverse T cell repertoire in response to pathogen. PMID:26973653

  11. SAG/Rbx2-Dependent Neddylation Regulates T-Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Mathewson, Nathan D; Fujiwara, Hideaki; Wu, Shin-Rong; Toubai, Tomomi; Oravecz-Wilson, Katherine; Sun, Yaping; Rossi, Corinne; Zajac, Cynthia; Sun, Yi; Reddy, Pavan

    2016-10-01

    Neddylation is a crucial post-translational modification that depends on the E3 cullin ring ligase (CRL). The E2-adapter component of the CRL, sensitive to apoptosis gene (SAG), is critical for the function of CRL-mediated ubiquitination; thus, the deletion of SAG regulates neddylation. We examined the role of SAG-dependent neddylation in T-cell-mediated immunity using multiple approaches: a novel T-cell-specific, SAG genetic knockout (KO) and chemical inhibition with small-molecule MLN4924. The KO animals were viable and showed phenotypically normal mature T-cell development. However, in vitro stimulation of KO T cells revealed significantly decreased activation, proliferation, and T-effector cytokine release, compared with WT. Using in vivo clinically relevant models of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation also demonstrated reduced proliferation and effector cytokine secretion associated with markedly reduced graft-versus-host disease. Similar in vitro and in vivo results were observed with the small-molecule inhibitor of neddylation, MLN4924. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that SAG-mediated effects in T cells were concomitant with an increase in suppressor of cytokine signaling, but not NF-κB translocation. Our studies suggest that SAG is a novel molecular target that regulates T-cell responses and that inhibiting neddylation with the clinically available small-molecule MLN4924 may represent a novel strategy to mitigate T-cell-mediated immunopathologies, such as graft-versus-host disease. PMID:27543965

  12. Genomic landscape of cutaneous T cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jaehyuk; Goh, Gerald; Walradt, Trent; Hong, Bok S.; Bunick, Christopher G.; Chen, Kan; Bjornson, Robert D.; Maman, Yaakov; Wang, Tiffany; Tordoff, Jesse; Carlson, Kacie; Overton, John D.; Liu, Kristina J.; Lewis, Julia M.; Devine, Lesley; Barbarotta, Lisa; Foss, Francine M.; Subtil, Antonio; Vonderheid, Eric C.; Edelson, Richard L.; Schatz, David G.; Boggon, Titus J.; Girardi, Michael; Lifton, Richard P.

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) is a non-Hodgkin lymphoma of skin-homing T lymphocytes. We performed exome and whole genome DNA sequence and RNA sequencing on purified CTCL and matched normal cells. The results implicate mutations in 17 genes in CTCL pathogenesis, including genes involved in T cell activation and apoptosis, NFκB signaling, chromatin remodeling, and DNA damage response. CTCL is distinctive in that somatic copy number variants (SCNVs) comprise 92% of all driver mutations (mean of 11.8 pathogenic SCNVs vs. 1.0 somatic single nucleotide variants per CTCL). These findings have implications for novel therapeutics. PMID:26192916

  13. The T-Cell Response to HIV

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Bruce; McMichael, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    HIV is a disease in which the original clinical observations of severe opportunistic infections gave the first clues regarding the underlying pathology, namely that HIV is essentially an infection of the immune system. HIV infects and deletes CD4+ T cells that normally coordinate the adaptive T- and B-cell response to defend against intracellular pathogens. The immune defect is immediate and profound: At the time of acute infection with an AIDS virus, typically more than half of the gut-associated CD4+ T cells are depleted, leaving a damaged immune system to contend with a life-long infection. PMID:23002014

  14. Anticancer agent xanthohumol inhibits IL-2 induced signaling pathways involved in T cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongbo; Gao, Xiaohua; Deeb, Dorrah; Arbab, Ali S; Dulchavsky, Scott A; Gautam, Subhash C

    2012-01-01

    Xanthohumol (XN), a prenylated chalcone present in hops exhibits anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anticancer activity. In the present study we show that XN inhibits the proliferation of mouse lymphoma cells and IL-2 induced proliferation and cell cycle progression in mouse splenic T cells. The suppression of T cell proliferation by XN was due to the inhibition of IL-2 induced Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (Jak/STAT) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (Erk1/2) signaling pathways. XN also inhibited proliferation-related cellular proteins such as c-Myc, c-Fos and NF-kappaB and cyclin D1. Thus, understanding of IL-2 induced cell signaling pathways in normal T cells, which are constitutively turned on in T cell lymphomas may facilitate development of XN for the treatment of hematologic cancers. PMID:22946339

  15. Anticancer agent xanthohumol inhibits IL-2 induced signaling pathways involved in T cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yongbo; Gao, Xiaohua; Deeb, Dorrah; Arbab, Ali S.; Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Gautam, Subhash C.

    2013-01-01

    Xanthohumol (XN), a prenylated chalcone present in hops exhibits anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anticancer activity. In the present study we show that XN inhibits the proliferation of mouse lymphoma cells and IL-2 induced proliferation and cell cycle progression in mouse splenic T cells. The suppression of T cell proliferation by XN was due to the inhibition of IL-2 induced Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (Jak/STAT) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (Erk1/2) signaling pathways. XN also inhibited proliferation-related cellular proteins such as c-Myc, c-Fos and NF-κB and cyclin D1. Thus, understanding of IL-2 induced cell signaling pathways in normal T cells, which are constitutively turned on in T cell lymphomas may facilitate development of XN for the treatment of hematologic cancers. PMID:22946339

  16. Cell-autonomous requirement for TCF1 and LEF1 in the development of Natural Killer T cells.

    PubMed

    Berga-Bolaños, Rosa; Zhu, Wandi S; Steinke, Farrah C; Xue, Hai-Hui; Sen, Jyoti Misra

    2015-12-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells develop from common CD4(+) CD8(+) thymocyte precursors. Transcriptional programs that regulate the development of NKT cells in the thymus development remain to be fully delineated. Here, we demonstrate a cell-intrinsic requirement for transcription factors TCF1 and LEF1 for the development of all subsets of NKT cells. Conditional deletion of TCF1 alone results in a substantial reduction in NKT cells. The remaining NKT cells are eliminated when TCF1 and LEF1 are both deleted. These data reveal an essential role for TCF1 and LEF1 in development of NKT cells.

  17. Contrasting Roles For All-Trans Retinoic Acid in TGF-ß-mediated Induction of Foxp3 and Il10 Genes in Developing Regulatory T Cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extrathymic induction of regulatory T cells (Treg) is essential to the regulation of effector T cell responses in the periphery. TGF-ß has been shown to induce Foxp3-expressing Tregs both in vitro and in vivo. More recently, the vitamin A metabolite, all-trans retinoic acid (at-RA), has been found t...

  18. Deletion of Pten in CD45-expressing cells leads to development of T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma but not myeloid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Mirantes, Cristina; Dosil, Maria Alba; Hills, David; Yang, Jian; Eritja, Núria; Santacana, Maria; Gatius, Sònia; Vilardell, Felip; Medvinsky, Alexander; Matias-Guiu, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Since its discovery in the late 1990s, Pten has turned out to be one of the most important tumor suppressor genes. Pten loss results in increased activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway, which is associated with increased proliferation, survival, and neoplastic growth. Here, we have addressed the effects of conditional deletion of Pten in hematopoietic cells by crossing Pten conditional knockout mice with a knock-in mouse expressing the Cre recombinase in the CD45 locus. CD45 is also known as leukocyte common antigen, and it is expressed in virtually all white cells and in hematopoietic stem cells. Using a reporter mouse, we demonstrate that CD45:Cre mouse displays recombinase activity in both myeloid and lymphoid cells. However, deletion of Pten in CD45-expressing cells induces development of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and lymphoma, but not other hematologic malignancies. PMID:26773036

  19. [Molecular pathogenesis of peripheral T cell lymphoma (2): extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type, adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma and enteropathy associated T cell lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Couronné, Lucile; Bastard, Christian; Gaulard, Philippe; Hermine, Olivier; Bernard, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCL) belong to the group of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and particularly that of mature T /NK cells lymphoproliferative neoplasms. The 2008 WHO classification describes different PTCL entities with varying prevalence. With the exception of histologic subtype "ALK positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma", PTCL are characterized by a poor prognosis. The mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of these lymphomas are not yet fully understood, but development of genomic high-throughput analysis techniques now allows to extensively identify the molecular abnormalities present in tumor cells. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge and recent advances about the molecular events occurring at the origin or during the natural history of main entities of PTCL. The first part published in the October issue was focused on the three more frequent entities, i.e. angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma, peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified, and anaplastic large cell lymphoma. The second part presented herein will describe other subtypes less frequent and of poor prognosis : extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma. PMID:26576610

  20. A T-cell-directed chimeric antigen receptor for the selective treatment of T-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Mamonkin, Maksim; Rouce, Rayne H; Tashiro, Haruko; Brenner, Malcolm K

    2015-08-20

    Options for targeted therapy of T-cell malignancies remain scarce. Recent clinical trials demonstrated that chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) can effectively redirect T lymphocytes to eradicate lymphoid malignancies of B-cell origin. However, T-lineage neoplasms remain a more challenging task for CAR T cells due to shared expression of most targetable surface antigens between normal and malignant T cells, potentially leading to fratricide of CAR T cells or profound immunodeficiency. Here, we report that T cells transduced with a CAR targeting CD5, a common surface marker of normal and neoplastic T cells, undergo only limited fratricide and can be expanded long-term ex vivo. These CD5 CAR T cells effectively eliminate malignant T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and T-cell lymphoma lines in vitro and significantly inhibit disease progression in xenograft mouse models of T-ALL. These data support the therapeutic potential of CD5 CAR in patients with T-cell neoplasms.

  1. Nature of "memory" in T-cell-mediated antibacterial immunity: anamnestic production of mediator T cells.

    PubMed Central

    North, R J

    1975-01-01

    Mice that survived an immunizing infection with Listeria monocytogenes remained specifically resistant to lethal secondary infection for several months. This acquired, long-lived state of resistance was not dependent on activated macrophages that remained after the primary response. It depended, instead, on an acquired long-lived capacity on the part of immunized mice for generating mediator T cells faster and in larger numbers than normal mice. The number of mediator T cells generated in response to secondary infection was proportional to the level of infection. The results suggest that the accelerated production of mediator T cells that occurs in response to secondary infection represents the expression of a state of immunological T-cell memory. PMID:811558

  2. Engineering higher affinity T cell receptors using a T cell display system

    PubMed Central

    Chervin, Adam S.; Aggen, David H.; Raseman, John M.; Kranz, David M.

    2008-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) determines the cellular response to antigens, which are presented on the surface of target cells in the form of a peptide bound to a product of the major histocompatibility complex (pepMHC). The response of the T cell depends on the affinity of the TCR for the pepMHC, yet many TCRs have been shown to be of low affinity, and some naturally occurring T cell responses are poor due to low affinities. Accordingly, engineering the TCR for increased affinity for pepMHC, particularly tumor-associated antigens, has become an increasingly desirable goal, especially with the advent of adoptive T cell therapies. For largely technical reasons, to date there have been only a handful of TCRs engineered in vitro for higher affinity using well established methods of protein engineering. Here we report the use of a T cell display system, using a retroviral vector, for generating a high affinity TCR from the mouse T cell clone 2C. The method relies on the display of the TCR, in its normal, signaling competent state, as a CD3 complex on the T cell surface. A library in the CDR3α of the 2C TCR was generated in the MSCV retroviral vector and transduced into a TCR-negative hybridoma. Selection of a high affinity, CD8-independent TCR was accomplished after only two rounds of flow cytometric sorting using the pepMHC SIYRYYGL/Kb (SIY/Kb). The selected TCR contained a sequence motif in the CDR3α with characteristics of several other TCRs previously selected by yeast display. In addition, it was possible to directly use the selected T cell hybridoma in functional assays without the need for sub-cloning, revealing that the selected TCR was capable of mediating CD8-independent activity. The method may be useful in the direct isolation and characterization of TCRs that could be used in therapies with adoptive transferred T cells. PMID:18854190

  3. Development of a cytotoxic T-cell assay in rabbits to evaluate early immune response to human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Rashade A H; Phipps, Andrew J; Yamamoto, Brenda; Green, Patrick; Lairmore, Michael D

    2009-12-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection causes adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia (ATL) following a prolonged clinical incubation period, despite a robust adaptive immune response against the virus. Early immune responses that allow establishment of the infection are difficult to study without effective animal models. We have developed a cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) assay to monitor the early events of HTLV-1 infection in rabbits. Rabbit skin fibroblast cell lines were established by transformation with a plasmid expressing simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen and used as autochthonous targets (derived from same individual animal) to measure CTL activity against HTLV-1 infection in rabbits. Recombinant vaccinia virus (rVV) constructs expressing either HTLV-1 envelope surface unit (SU) glycoprotein 46 or Tax proteins were used to infect fibroblast targets in a (51)Cr-release CTL assay. Rabbits inoculated with Jurkat T cells or ACH.2 cells (expressing ACH HTLV-1 molecule clone) were monitored at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 13, 21, and 34 wk post-infection. ACH.2-inoculated rabbits were monitored serologically and for viral infected cells following ex vivo culture. Proviral load analysis indicated that rabbits with higher proviral loads had significant CTL activity against HTLV-1 SU as early as 2 wk post-infection, while both low- and high-proviral-load groups had minimal Tax-specific CTL activity throughout the study. This first development of a stringent assay to measure HTLV-1 SU and Tax-specific CTL assay in the rabbit model will enhance immunopathogenesis studies of HTLV-1 infection. Our data suggest that during the early weeks following infection, HTLV-1-specific CTL responses are primarily targeted against Env-SU. PMID:19951176

  4. Studies on T cell subsets and functions in leprosy.

    PubMed Central

    Bach, M A; Chatenoud, L; Wallach, D; Phan Dinh Tuy, F; Cottenot, F

    1981-01-01

    T cell subsets and T cell functions were explored in 31 leprosy patients with the following methods: determination of the percentages of the different T cell subpopulations defined by monoclonal antibodies directed at total T cells, helper T cells and suppressor/cytotoxic T cells; measurement of the in vitro proliferative responses to mitogens; study of the concanavalin A-induced suppressive activity, assessed on MLC; measurement of delayed-type hypersensitivity by skin testing. The confrontation between immunological lepromatous patients without type-2 reaction (erythema nodosum leprosum), (2) lepromatous patients without ENL (erythema nodosum leprosum), (2) lepromatous patients was recent ENL and (3) tuberculoid patients. Unexpectedly, groups 1 and 3, although differing strongly in their clinical status and their sensitivity to lepromin (absent in group 1 and strong in group 3), showed a similar immunological profile with a normal percentage of T cells and a normal distribution of T cells among the major T cell subset contrasting with a moderate decrease of proliferative responses to mitogens and impaired delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions. Concanavalin A-induced suppressive activity was type-2 reaction) strongly differed from both other groups, showing striking abnormalities other groups, showing striking abnormalities of the repartition of the T cell subsets, with increased percentages of helper T cells and decreased percentages of suppressor T cells, and elevated proliferative responses to mitogens. Concanavalin A-induced suppressive activity was reduced in most patients of this group. It is suggested that this imbalance between T cell subsets contributes to the occurrence of ENL reactions in lepromatous patients. PMID:6459897

  5. Apoptosis and T-cell depletion during feline infectious peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Haagmans, B L; Egberink, H F; Horzinek, M C

    1996-12-01

    Cats that have succumbed to feline infectious peritonitis, an immune-mediated disease caused by variants of feline coronaviruses, show apoptosis and T-cell depletion in their lymphoid organs. The ascitic fluid that develops in the course of the condition causes apoptosis in vitro but only in activated T cells. Since feline infectious peritonitis virus does not infect T cells, and viral proteins did not inhibit T-cell proliferation, we postulate that soluble mediators released during the infection cause apoptosis and T-cell depletion.

  6. The Role of Lymphatic Niches in T Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Capece, Tara; Kim, Minsoo

    2016-01-01

    Long-term immunity to many viral and bacterial pathogens requires CD8+ memory T cell development, and the induction of long-lasting CD8+ memory T cells from a naïve, undifferentiated state is a major goal of vaccine design. Formation of the memory CD8+ T cell compartment is highly dependent on the early activation cues received by naïve CD8+ T cells during primary infection. This review aims to highlight the cellularity of various niches within the lymph node and emphasize recent evidence suggesting that distinct types of T cell activation and differentiation occur within different immune contexts in lymphoid organs. PMID:27306645

  7. Deubiquitinating enzyme CYLD negatively regulates the ubiquitin-dependent kinase Tak1 and prevents abnormal T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Reiley, William W.; Jin, Wei; Lee, Andrew Joon; Wright, Ato; Wu, Xuefeng; Tewalt, Eric F.; Leonard, Timothy O.; Norbury, Christopher C.; Fitzpatrick, Leo; Zhang, Minying; Sun, Shao-Cong

    2007-01-01

    The deubiquitinating enzyme CYLD has recently been implicated in the regulation of signal transduction, but its physiological function and mechanism of action are still elusive. In this study, we show that CYLD plays a pivotal role in regulating T cell activation and homeostasis. T cells derived from Cyld knockout mice display a hyperresponsive phenotype and mediate the spontaneous development of intestinal inflammation. Interestingly, CYLD targets a ubiquitin-dependent kinase, transforming growth factor–β-activated kinase 1 (Tak1), and inhibits its ubiquitination and autoactivation. Cyld-deficient T cells exhibit constitutively active Tak1 and its downstream kinases c-Jun N-terminal kinase and IκB kinase β. These results emphasize a critical role for CYLD in preventing spontaneous activation of the Tak1 axis of T cell signaling and, thereby, maintaining normal T cell function. PMID:17548520

  8. MAPKAP kinase 3 suppresses Ifng gene expression and attenuates NK cell cytotoxicity and Th1 CD4 T-cell development upon influenza A virus infection.

    PubMed

    Köther, Katharina; Nordhoff, Carolin; Masemann, Dörthe; Varga, Georg; Bream, Jay H; Gaestel, Matthias; Wixler, Viktor; Ludwig, Stephan

    2014-10-01

    MK2 and MK3 are downstream targets of p38 and ERK1/2. They control the mRNA stability of several inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α and IL-10. Whereas MK2 is expressed ubiquitously, the expression of MK3 is restricted to muscle, liver, and heart tissues and T and NK cells. Using Mk-deficient and wild-type (WT) mice, we demonstrated an inhibitory effect of MK3, but not of MK2, on interferon (IFN)-γ expression in T and NK lymphocytes. The results provided evidence that the inhibitory effect of MK3 is based on negative feedback phosphorylation of p38 and ERK1/2, which causes decreased binding of Stat4 to the IFN-γ promoter and reduced expression of IFN-γ mRNA and protein. Consequently, all Mk3(-/-) mice challenged with the Th1-inducing influenza A virus (IAV) survived the WT LD50 virus dose. The reduced disease severity in the Mk3(-/-) mice was accompanied by a >10-fold reduction in viral lung titer and an increase in the number of activated NK cells and enhanced Th1 activation of CD4 T cells. Thus, our data describe the protein kinase MK3 as a novel regulator of the innate and adaptive immune responses.-Köther, K., Nordhoff, C., Masemann, D., Varga, G., Bream, J. H., Gaestel, M., Wixler, V., Ludwig, S. MAPKAP kinase 3 suppresses Ifng gene expression and attenuates NK cell cytotoxicity and Th1 CD4 T-cell development upon influenza A virus infection.

  9. Differential effects of IL-2 and IL-6 on the development of three distinct precursor T-cell populations in the thymus.

    PubMed

    Nakano, N; Kikutani, H; Kishimoto, T

    1990-01-01

    Three distinct T-cell precursors: bone marrow cells that express low levels of the Thy-1 antigen but no lineage markers (Thy-1-lo/BM); CD4-, CD8-, and CD3- thymocytes that express low levels of the Thy-1 antigen (Thy-1-lo/Thym); and CD4-, CD8-, and CD3- thymocytes that express high levels of the Thy-1 antigen and the IL-2 R alpha chain (Thy-1+/IL2R+) were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS). These three populations expanded with different kinetics in the thymus of irradiated recipient mice after intrathymic transfer. When a high dose of human recombinant IL-2 (r-IL-2) or human recombinant IL-6 (r-IL-6) was administered, r-IL-6 accelerated donor Thy-1+/IL2R+ to differentiate, whereas r-IL-2 blocked normal differentiation and expansion of donor Thy-1-lo/Thym, but did not show any significant effect on donor Thy-1+/IL2R+. Neither r-IL-2 nor r-IL-6 worked directly on donor Thy-1-lo/BM in this transfer system. PMID:1983777

  10. The Challenges and Opportunities for Development of a T-Cell Epitope-Based Herpes Simplex Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Tiffany; Wang, Christine; Badakhshan, Tina; Chilukuri, Sravya; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2014-01-01

    The infections with herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 & HSV-2) have been prevalent since the ancient Greek times. To this day, they still affect a staggering number of over a half billion individuals worldwide. HSV-2 infections cause painful genital herpes, encephalitis, and death in newborns. HSV-1 infections are more prevalent than HSV-2 infections and cause potentially blinding ocular herpes, oro-facial herpes and encephalitis. While genital herpes in mainly caused by HSV-2 infections, in recent years, there is an increase in the proportion of genital herpes caused by HSV-1 infections in young adults, which reach 50% in some western societies. While prophylactic and therapeutic HSV vaccines remain urgently needed for centuries their development has been notoriously difficult. During the most recent National Institute of Health (NIH) workshop titled "Next Generation Herpes Simplex Virus Vaccines: The Challenges and Opportunities", basic researchers, funding agencies, and pharmaceutical representatives gathered: (i) to assess the status of herpes vaccine research; and (ii) to identify the gaps and propose alternative approaches in developing a safe and efficient herpes vaccine. One “common denominator” among previously failed clinical herpes vaccine trials is that they either used a whole virus or whole viral proteins, which contain both pathogenic “symptomatic” and protective “asymptomatic” antigens/epitopes. In this report, we continue to advocate that using an “asymptomatic” epitope-based vaccine strategy that selectively incorporates protective epitopes which: (i) are exclusively recognized, in vitro, by effector memory CD4+ and CD8+ TEM cells from “naturally” protected seropositive asymptomatic individuals; and (ii) protect, in vivo, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) transgenic animal models from ocular and genital herpes infections and diseases, could be the answer to many of the scientific challenges facing HSV vaccine

  11. Auto-reactive T cells revised. Overestimation based on methodology?

    PubMed

    Thorlacius-Ussing, Gorm; Sørensen, Jesper F; Wandall, Hans H; Pedersen, Anders Elm

    2015-05-01

    Autoreactive T cells have been identified in most autoimmune diseases and recently even in healthy individuals. Similar, T cells that recognize either wild-type or tumorspecific tumor antigens have been increasingly reported to develop spontaneously in cancer patients. This insight has become possible mainly due to novel immunoassays which have revolutionized the discovery of rare antigen specific T cells. At present, the major dogma that explains this increasing number of reports of autoreactive T cells is that autoreactive T cells are counteracted by CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells in vivo, in particular in healthy individuals, whereas dysfunction in Tregs or Treg responsiveness may unmask the autoreactive T cell responses in patients with autoimmune diseases. However, studies that identify autoreactive T cells are usually performed by culturing T cells with antigen presenting cells loaded with E. coli produced recombinant protein or unmodified synthetic HLA binding peptides. Our concern is that this approach may ignore the presence of natural genetic variation and post-translational modifications such as e.g. the complex nature of N- and O-linked glycosylation of mammalian proteins. Thus, T cell antigen reactivities identified with unmodified antigens in vitro may in part represent in vitro T cell activation against neo-epitopes and not true in vivo autoreactivity as postulated. This methodological problem may have implications for the interpretation of the frequent reporting of autoreactive T cells in autoimmunity, T cell responses to wild-type tumor antigens in cancer patients and most important for the increasing reports on naïve T cells with specificity against self-antigens in healthy individuals. Here, we discuss and provide examples for the possibility that the experimental methodology applied to document T cell reactivity against unmodified protein or peptide may lead to overinterpretation of the reported frequencies of autoreactive CD4+ and CD8+ T

  12. Characterization of feline T cell receptor gamma (TCRG) variable region genes for the molecular diagnosis of feline intestinal T cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Moore, Peter F; Woo, Jennifer C; Vernau, William; Kosten, Sandra; Graham, Petra S

    2005-07-15

    A diagnosis of intestinal lymphoma is currently made on the basis of clinical and morphologic criteria. This can prove problematic for many reasons that include inadequate sample size, the coexistence of lymphoma and inflammation, and the inability to assess architectural integrity of all tissue compartments in biopsy specimens obtained endoscopically. The detection of a clonal population of cells in a lymphoproliferative lesion represents an important criterion for the diagnosis of neoplasia, but this has not been assessed in feline intestinal lymphoma. T cell receptor gamma (TCRG) gene rearrangement analysis using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a methodology that can be used to detect clonality in T cell populations. The basis of this assay depends on the assessment of the junctional diversity that results from rearrangement of TCRG V (variable) and J (joining) gene segments. Feline TCRG transcripts from normal small intestine and spleen were obtained using a rapid amplification of cDNA ends (5'RACE) method. Limited diversity of TCRG V and J gene segments was observed. The high degree of sequence homology in the TCRG V and J gene segments was exploited to develop a PCR test for the assessment of TCRG V--J junctional diversity and hence clonality determination of T cell populations in cats. Molecular clonality determination was applied to feline intestinal lymphoplasmacytic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) (9 cats), and transmural and mucosal T cell lymphoma (28 cats). Clonal rearrangement of the TCRG V--J junction was detected in 22 of 28 intestinal T cell lymphomas, and oligoclonality was detected in 3 intestinal T cell lymphomas. This contrasted with the detection of polyclonal rearrangement in normal intestinal tissues (3 cats) and in lymphoplasmacytic IBD (9 cats). It is proposed that assessment of TCRG V--J junctional diversity for the detection of clonality represents an important adjunctive tool for the diagnosis of T cell lymphoma in the cat.

  13. Chronic Inflammation and γδ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Fay, Nathan S; Larson, Emily C; Jameson, Julie M

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial tissues of the skin, lungs, reproductive tract, and intestines are the largest physical barriers the body has to protect against infection. Epithelial tissues are woven with a matrix of immune cells programed to mobilize the host innate and adaptive immune responses. Included among these immune cells are gamma delta T lymphocytes (γδ T cells) that are unique in their T cell receptor usage, location, and functions in the body. Stress reception by γδ T cells as a result of traumatic epithelial injury, malignancy, and/or infection induces γδ T cell activation. Once activated, γδ T cells function to repair tissue, induce inflammation, recruit leukocytes, and lyse cells. Many of these functions are mediated via the production of cytokines and growth factors upon γδ T cell activation. Pathogenesis of many chronic inflammatory diseases involves γδ T cells; some of which are exacerbated by their presence, while others are improved. γδ T cells require a delicate balance between their need for acute inflammatory mediators to function normally and the detrimental impact imparted by chronic inflammation. This review will focus on the recent progress made in understanding how epithelial γδ T cells influence the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases and how a balance between acute and chronic inflammation impacts γδ T cell function. Future studies will be important to understand how this balance is achieved. PMID:27303404

  14. Impaired T cell function in argininosuccinate synthetase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tarasenko, Tatyana N.; Gomez-Rodriguez, Julio; McGuire, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    ASS1 is a cytosolic enzyme that plays a role in the conversion of citrulline to arginine. In human and mouse tissues, ASS1 protein is found in several components of the immune system, including the thymus and T cells. However, the role of ASS1 in these tissues remains to be defined. Considerable attention has been focused recently on the role of metabolism in T cell differentiation and function. Based on the expression of ASS1 in the immune system, we hypothesized that ASS1 deficiency would result in T cell defects. To evaluate this question, we characterized immune function in hypomorphic fold/fold mice. Analysis of splenic T cells by flow cytometry showed a marked reduction in T cell numbers with normal expression of activation surface markers. Gene therapy correction of liver ASS1 to enhance survival resulted in a partial recovery of splenic T cells for characterization. In vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated the persistence of the ASS1 enzyme defect in T cells and abnormal T cell differentiation and function. Overall, our work suggests that ASS1 plays a role in T cell function, and deficiency produces primary immune dysfunction. In addition, these data suggest that patients with ASS1 deficiency (citrullinemia type I) may have T cell dysfunction. PMID:25492936

  15. Chronic Inflammation and γδ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fay, Nathan S.; Larson, Emily C.; Jameson, Julie M.

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial tissues of the skin, lungs, reproductive tract, and intestines are the largest physical barriers the body has to protect against infection. Epithelial tissues are woven with a matrix of immune cells programed to mobilize the host innate and adaptive immune responses. Included among these immune cells are gamma delta T lymphocytes (γδ T cells) that are unique in their T cell receptor usage, location, and functions in the body. Stress reception by γδ T cells as a result of traumatic epithelial injury, malignancy, and/or infection induces γδ T cell activation. Once activated, γδ T cells function to repair tissue, induce inflammation, recruit leukocytes, and lyse cells. Many of these functions are mediated via the production of cytokines and growth factors upon γδ T cell activation. Pathogenesis of many chronic inflammatory diseases involves γδ T cells; some of which are exacerbated by their presence, while others are improved. γδ T cells require a delicate balance between their need for acute inflammatory mediators to function normally and the detrimental impact imparted by chronic inflammation. This review will focus on the recent progress made in understanding how epithelial γδ T cells influence the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases and how a balance between acute and chronic inflammation impacts γδ T cell function. Future studies will be important to understand how this balance is achieved. PMID:27303404

  16. PTPN2 attenuates T-cell lymphopenia-induced proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiede, Florian; La Gruta, Nicole L.; Tiganis, Tony

    2014-01-01

    When the peripheral T-cell pool is depleted, T cells undergo homoeostatic expansion. This expansion is reliant on the recognition of self-antigens and/or cytokines, in particular interleukin-7. The T cell-intrinsic mechanisms that prevent excessive homoeostatic T-cell responses and consequent overt autoreactivity remain poorly defined. Here we show that protein tyrosine phosphatase N2 (PTPN2) is elevated in naive T cells leaving the thymus to restrict homoeostatic T-cell proliferation and prevent excess responses to self-antigens in the periphery. PTPN2-deficient CD8+ T cells undergo rapid lymphopenia-induced proliferation (LIP) when transferred into lymphopenic hosts and acquire the characteristics of antigen-experienced effector T cells. The enhanced LIP is attributed to elevated T-cell receptor-dependent, but not interleukin-7-dependent responses, results in a skewed T-cell receptor repertoire and the development of autoimmunity. Our results identify a major mechanism by which homoeostatic T-cell responses are tuned to prevent the development of autoimmune and inflammatory disorders.

  17. The fragile environments of inexpensive CD4+ T-cell enumeration in the least developed countries: strategies for accessible support.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Christoph H

    2008-01-01

    With the advent of affordable antiretroviral treatment (ART), flow cytometry has ventured out of the exclusive realms of First World research to the resource-strapped clinical environment of developing countries (DCs). Flow cytometric instrumentation for ART has become more cost-efficient, thanks to simplified, yet accurate protocols and smart technologies. These positive developments have, however, not taken shape without problems, as health care in DCs remains weak due to chronic underfunding of their primary health systems. In addition, the multiplicity of donors has created parallel infrastructures that are difficult to manage and may undermine the responsibilities of public services. Hence, there is a prevailing lack of attention to maintenance, support, and human resource development. Not uncommonly, the procurement of high-value equipment is guided by nontechnical interests with mixed results. As conventional service contracts are unpopular, the sustainability of equipment is under serious threat after warranty periods, with environmental factors such as dust and unreliable power supplies being well-known culprits. Reagent supplies and servicing constitute further challenges, where a combination of short reagent shelf life, cold-box shipping, huge distances across poor infrastructures, rigid accounting procedures, and erratic customs requirements cause significant delays and extra costs. Although excellent, highly trained or trainable local staff is available, it is frequently diverted by brain drain from the government sector to privately funded hospitals, research facilities, and overseas postings. Despite these challenges, corporate service management has commonly remained loyal to its roots in the developed world.A number of propositions address the current situation: "Reagent-rental" agreements represent an attractive alternative to service contracts, while smart instrument design has started to make inroads into more robust device concepts. To avoid

  18. The fragile environments of inexpensive CD4+ T-cell enumeration in the least developed countries: strategies for accessible support.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Christoph H

    2008-01-01

    With the advent of affordable antiretroviral treatment (ART), flow cytometry has ventured out of the exclusive realms of First World research to the resource-strapped clinical environment of developing countries (DCs). Flow cytometric instrumentation for ART has become more cost-efficient, thanks to simplified, yet accurate protocols and smart technologies. These positive developments have, however, not taken shape without problems, as health care in DCs remains weak due to chronic underfunding of their primary health systems. In addition, the multiplicity of donors has created parallel infrastructures that are difficult to manage and may undermine the responsibilities of public services. Hence, there is a prevailing lack of attention to maintenance, support, and human resource development. Not uncommonly, the procurement of high-value equipment is guided by nontechnical interests with mixed results. As conventional service contracts are unpopular, the sustainability of equipment is under serious threat after warranty periods, with environmental factors such as dust and unreliable power supplies being well-known culprits. Reagent supplies and servicing constitute further challenges, where a combination of short reagent shelf life, cold-box shipping, huge distances across poor infrastructures, rigid accounting procedures, and erratic customs requirements cause significant delays and extra costs. Although excellent, highly trained or trainable local staff is available, it is frequently diverted by brain drain from the government sector to privately funded hospitals, research facilities, and overseas postings. Despite these challenges, corporate service management has commonly remained loyal to its roots in the developed world.A number of propositions address the current situation: "Reagent-rental" agreements represent an attractive alternative to service contracts, while smart instrument design has started to make inroads into more robust device concepts. To avoid

  19. T Cell Metabolic Fitness in Anti-Tumor Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Siska, Peter J.; Rathmell, Jeffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY T cell metabolism plays a central role to support and shape immune responses and may play a key role in anti-tumor immunity. T cell metabolism is normally held under tight regulation in an immune response of glycolysis to promote effector T cell expansion and function. However, tumors may deplete nutrients, generate toxic products, or stimulate conserved negative feedback mechanisms, such as through PD-1, to impair effector T cell nutrient uptake and metabolic fitness. In addition, regulatory T cells are favored in low glucose conditions and may inhibit anti-tumor immune responses. Here we review how the tumor microenvironment modifies metabolic and functional pathways in T cells and how these changes may uncover new targets and challenges for cancer immunotherapy and treatment. PMID:25773310

  20. Elevation and persistence of CD8 T-cells in HIV infection: the Achilles heel in the ART era

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Wei; Mehraj, Vikram; Kaufmann, Daniel E; Li, Taisheng; Routy, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HIV infection leads to a disturbed T-cell homeostasis, featured by a depletion of CD4 T-cells and a persistent elevation of CD8 T-cells over disease progression. Most effort of managing HIV infection has been focused on CD4 T-cell recovery, while changes in the CD8 compartment were relatively underappreciated in the past. Methods A comprehensive literature review of publications in English language was conducted using major electronic databases. Our search was focused on factors contributing to CD8 T-cell dynamics in HIV infection and following antiretroviral therapy (ART). Discussion Normalization of CD8 counts is seldom observed even with optimal CD4 recovery following long-term treatment. Initiation of ART in primary HIV infection leads to enhanced normalization of CD8 count compared with long-term ART initiated in chronic infection. Importantly, such CD8 elevation in treated HIV infection is associated with an increased risk of inflammatory non-AIDS-related clinical events independent of CD4 T-cell recovery. The mechanisms underlying CD8 persistence remain largely unknown, which may include bystander activation, exhaustion and immunosenescence of CD8 T-cells. The information provided herein will lead to a better understanding of factors associated with CD8 persistence and contribute to the development of strategies aiming at CD8 normalization. Conclusions Persistence of CD8 T-cell elevation in treated HIV-infected patients is associated with an increased risk of non-AIDS-related events. Now that advances in ART have led to decreased AIDS-related opportunistic diseases, more attention has been focused on reducing non-AIDS events and normalizing persistent CD8 T-cell elevation. PMID:26945343

  1. Metabolic regulation of T cell differentiation and function

    PubMed Central

    Park, Benjamin V.; Pan, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Upon encountering pathogens, T cells mount immune responses by proliferating, increasing cellular mass and differentiating. These cellular changes impose significant energetic challenges on T cells. It was believed that TCR and cytokine-mediated signaling are dominant dictators of T cell-mediated immune responses. Recently, it was recognized that T cells utilize metabolic transporters and metabolic sensors that allow them to rapidly respond to nutrient-limiting inflammatory environments. Metabolic sensors allow T cells to find a balance between energy consumption (anabolic metabolism) and production (catabolic metabolism) in order to mount effective immune responses. Also, metabolic regulators interact with cytokine-dependent transcriptional regulators, suggesting a more integrative and advanced model of T cell activation and differentiation. In this review, we will discuss recent discoveries regarding the roles of metabolic regulators in effector and memory T cell development and their interaction with canonical transcription factors. PMID:26277275

  2. Key role of regulated upon activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted, nonstructural protein1 and myeloperoxidase in cytokine storm induced by influenza virus PR-8 (A/H1N1) infection in A549 bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Phung, Thuy Thi Bich; Sugamata, Ryuichi; Uno, Kazuko; Aratani, Yasuaki; Ozato, Keiko; Kawachi, Shoji; Thanh Nguyen, Liem; Nakayama, Toshinori; Suzuki, Kazuo

    2011-12-01

    Influenza virus infection causes severe respiratory disease such as that due to avian influenza (H5N1). Influenza A viruses proliferate in human epithelial cells, which produce inflammatory cytokines/chemokines as a "cytokine storm" attenuated with the viral nonstructural protein 1 (NS1). Cytokine/chemokine production in A549 epithelial cells infected with influenza A/H1N1 virus (PR-8) or nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) plasmid was examined in vitro. Because tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and regulated upon activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) are predominantly produced from cells infected with PR-8 virus, the effects of mRNA knockdown of these cytokines were investigated. Small interfering (si)TNF-α down-regulated RANTES expression and secretion of RANTES, interleukin (IL)-8, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1). In addition, siRANTES suppressed interferon (IFN)-γ expression and secretion of RANTES, IL-8, and MCP-1, suggesting that TNF-α stimulates production of RANTES, IL-8, MCP-1, and IFN-γ, and RANTES also increased IL-8, MCP-1, and IFN-γ. Furthermore, administration of TNF-α promoted increased secretion of RANTES, IL-8, and MCP-1. Administration of RANTES enhanced IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1 production without PR-8 infection. These results strongly suggest that, as an initial step, TNF-α regulates RANTES production, followed by increase of IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1 and IFNs concentrations. At a later stage, cells transfected with viral NS1 plasmid showed production of a large amount of IL-8 and MCP-1 in the presence of the H(2)O(2)-myeloperoxidse (MPO) system, suggesting that NS1 of PR-8 may induce a "cytokine storm" from epithelial cells in the presence of an H(2)O(2)-MPO system.

  3. Biased signaling pathways via CXCR3 control the development and function of CD4+ T cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Karin, Nathan; Wildbaum, Gizi; Thelen, Marcus

    2016-06-01

    Structurally related chemotactic cytokines (chemokines) regulate cell trafficking through interactions with 7-transmembrane domain, G protein-coupled receptors. Biased signaling or functional selectivity is a concept that describes a situation where a 7-transmembrane domain receptor preferentially activates one of several available cellular signaling pathways. It can be divided into 3 distinct cases: ligand bias, receptor bias, and tissue or cell bias. Many studies, including those coming from our lab, have shown that only a limited number of chemokines are key drivers of inflammation. We have referred to them as "driver chemokines." They include the CXCR3 ligands CXCL9 and CXCL10, the CCR2 ligand CCL2, all 3 CCR5 ligands, and the CCR9 ligand CCL25. As for CXCR3, despite the proinflammatory nature of CXCL10 and CXCL9, transgenic mice lacking CXCR3 display an aggravated manifestation of different autoimmune disease, including Type I diabetes and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Recently, we showed that whereas CXCL9 and CXCL10 induce effector Th1/Th17 cells to promote inflammation, CXCL11, with a relatively higher binding affinity to CXCR3, drives the development of the forkhead box P3-negative IL-10(high) T regulatory 1 cell subset and hence, dampens inflammation. We also showed that CXCL9/CXCL10 activates a different signaling cascade than CXCL11, despite binding to the same receptor, CXCR3, which results in these diverse biologic activities. This provides new evidence for the role of biased signaling in regulating biologic activities, in which CXCL11 induces ligand bias at CXCR3 and receptor-biased signaling via atypical chemokine receptor 3. PMID:26657511

  4. Developmentally determined reduction in CD31 during gestation is associated with CD8+ T cell effector differentiation in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Scheible, Kristin M; Emo, Jason; Yang, Hongmei; Holden-Wiltse, Jeanne; Straw, Andrew; Huyck, Heidie; Misra, Sara; Topham, David J; Ryan, Rita M; Reynolds, Anne Marie; Mariani, Thomas J; Pryhuber, Gloria S

    2015-12-01

    Homeostatic T cell proliferation is more robust during human fetal development. In order to understand the relative effect of normal fetal homeostasis and perinatal exposures on CD8+ T cell behavior in PT infants, we characterized umbilical cord blood CD8+ T cells from infants born between 23-42weeks gestation. Subjects were recruited as part of the NHLBI-sponsored Prematurity and Respiratory Outcomes Program. Cord blood from PT infants had fewer naïve CD8+ T cells and lower regulatory CD31 expression on both naïve and effector, independent of prenatal exposures. CD8+ T cell in vitro effector function was greater at younger gestational ages, an effect that was exaggerated in infants with prior inflammatory exposures. These results suggest that CD8+ T cells earlier in gestation have loss of regulatory co-receptor CD31 and greater effector differentiation, which may place PT neonates at unique risk for CD8+ T cell-mediated inflammation and impaired T cell memory formation.

  5. Regulation of the development of asthmatic inflammation by in situ CD4(+)Foxp3 (+) T cells in a mouse model of late allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Tomomi; Hayashi, Toshiharu; Mizuno, Takuya

    2014-10-01

    CD4(+)Foxp3(+)T cells (Tregs) mediate homeostatic peripheral tolerance by suppressing helper T2 cells in allergy. However, the regulation of asthmatic inflammation by local (in situ) Tregs in asthma remains unclear. BALB/c mice sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) (asthma group) developed asthmatic inflammation with eosinophils and lymphocytes, but not mast cells. The number of Tregs in the circulation, pulmonary lymph nodes (pLNs), and thymi significantly decreased in the asthma group compared to the control group without OVA sensitization and challenge in the effector phase. The development of asthmatic inflammation is inversely related to decreased Tregs with reduced mRNA expression such as interleukin (IL)-4, transforming growth factor-β1, and IL-10, but not interferon-γ, in pLNs. Moreover, M2 macrophages increased in the local site. The present study suggests that Tregs, at least in part, may regulate the development of asthmatic inflammation by cell-cell contact and regional cytokine productions.

  6. Synthetic Biology Approaches to Engineer T cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chia-Yung; Rupp, Levi J.; Roybal, Kole T.; Lim, Wendell A.

    2015-01-01

    There is rapidly growing interest in learning how to engineer immune cells, such as T lymphocytes, because of the potential of these engineered cells to be used for therapeutic applications such as the recognition and killing of cancer cells. At the same time, our knowhow and capability to logically engineer cellular behavior is growing rapidly with the development of synthetic biology. Here we describe how synthetic biology approaches are being used to rationally alter the behavior of T cells to optimize them for therapeutic functions. We also describe future developments that will be important in order to construct safe and precise T cell therapeutics. PMID:26218616

  7. Self-recognition specificity expressed by T cells from nude mice. Absence of detectable Ia-restricted T cells in nude mice that do exhibit self-K/D-restricted T cell responses

    SciTech Connect

    Kruisbeek, A.M.; Davis, M.L.; Matis, L.A.; Longo, D.L.

    1984-09-01

    The presence in athymic nude mice of precursor T cells with self-recognition specificity for either H-2 K/D or H-2 I region determinants was investigated. Chimeras were constructed of lethally irradiated parental mice receiving a mixture of F1 nude mouse (6-8 wk old) spleen and bone marrow cells. The donor inoculum was deliberately not subjected to any T cell depletion procedure, so that any potential major histocompatibility complex-committed precursor T cells were allowed to differentiate and expand in the normal parental recipients. 3 mo after reconstitution, the chimeras were immunized with several protein antigens in complete Freund's adjuvant in the footpads and their purified draining lymph node T cells tested 10 d later for ability to recognize antigen on antigen-presenting cells of either parental haplotype. Also, their spleen and lymph node cells were tested for ability to generate a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response to trinitrophenyl (TNP)-modified stimulator cells of either parental haplotype. It was demonstrated that T cell proliferative responses of these F1(nude)----parent chimeras were restricted solely to recognizing parental host I region determinants as self and expressed the Ir gene phenotype of the host. In contrast, CTL responses could be generated (in the presence of interleukin 2) to TNP-modified stimulator cells of either parental haplotype. Thus these results indicate that nude mice which do have CTL with self-specificity for K/D region determinants lack proliferating T cells with self-specificity for I region determinants. These results provide evidence for the concepts that development of the I region-restricted T cell repertoire is strictly an intrathymically determined event and that young nude mice lack the unique thymic elements responsible for edu

  8. T-cell adoptive immunotherapy using tumor-infiltrating T cells and genetically engineered TCR-T cells.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Hiroaki

    2016-07-01

    Immunotherapy has received the expectation that it should contribute to the therapy of cancer patients for >100 years. At long last, recent clinical trials of immunotherapy with immune checkpoint inhibitors and adoptive cell therapy with genetically engineered T cells have reported their remarkable efficacies. Nowadays, it is expected that T-cell adoptive immunotherapy can not only control tumor progression but even cure cancer in some patients. Conversely, severe adverse events associated with efficacy have frequently been reported in clinical trials, suggesting that the assessment and control of safety will be indispensable in the future development of the therapy. New approaches in T-cell adoptive immunotherapy such as reduction of adverse events, targeting of new antigens or utilization of allogeneic cells will open a new gate for less harmful and more effective immunological treatment of cancer patients. PMID:27127191

  9. Adoptive Immunotherapy using Regulatory T cells and Virus-specific T cells Derived from Cord Blood

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Patrick J.; Bollard, Catherine M.; Brunstein, Claudio G

    2014-01-01

    Cord blood transplantation, an alternative to traditional stem cell transplants (bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation), is an attractive option for patients lacking suitable stem cell transplant donors. Cord blood units have also proven to be a valuable donor source for the development of cellular therapeutics. Virus-specific T cells and regulatory T cells are two cord blood derived products that have shown promise in early phase clinical trials to prevent and/or treat viral infections and graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), respectively. Here we describe how current strategies utilizing cord blood-derived regulatory T cells and virus-specific T cells have been developed to improve outcomes for cord blood transplant recipients. PMID:25632003

  10. Decreased SAP Expression in T Cells from Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Contributes to Early Signaling Abnormalities and Reduced IL-2 Production.

    PubMed

    Karampetsou, Maria P; Comte, Denis; Kis-Toth, Katalin; Terhorst, Cox; Kyttaris, Vasileios C; Tsokos, George C

    2016-06-15

    T cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) display a number of abnormalities, including increased early signaling events following engagement of the TCR. Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule family cell surface receptors and the X-chromosome-defined signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP) adaptor are important in the development of several immunocyte lineages and modulating the immune response. We present evidence that SAP protein levels are decreased in T cells and in their main subsets isolated from 32 women and three men with SLE, independent of disease activity. In SLE T cells, SAP protein is also subject to increased degradation by caspase-3. Forced expression of SAP in SLE T cells normalized IL-2 production, calcium (Ca(2+)) responses, and tyrosine phosphorylation of a number of proteins. Exposure of normal T cells to SLE serum IgG, known to contain anti-CD3/TCR Abs, resulted in SAP downregulation. We conclude that SLE T cells display reduced levels of the adaptor protein SAP, probably as a result of continuous T cell activation and degradation by caspase-3. Restoration of SAP levels in SLE T cells corrects the overexcitable lupus T cell phenotype.

  11. Decreased SAP Expression in T Cells from Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Contributes to Early Signaling Abnormalities and Reduced IL-2 Production.

    PubMed

    Karampetsou, Maria P; Comte, Denis; Kis-Toth, Katalin; Terhorst, Cox; Kyttaris, Vasileios C; Tsokos, George C

    2016-06-15

    T cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) display a number of abnormalities, including increased early signaling events following engagement of the TCR. Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule family cell surface receptors and the X-chromosome-defined signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP) adaptor are important in the development of several immunocyte lineages and modulating the immune response. We present evidence that SAP protein levels are decreased in T cells and in their main subsets isolated from 32 women and three men with SLE, independent of disease activity. In SLE T cells, SAP protein is also subject to increased degradation by caspase-3. Forced expression of SAP in SLE T cells normalized IL-2 production, calcium (Ca(2+)) responses, and tyrosine phosphorylation of a number of proteins. Exposure of normal T cells to SLE serum IgG, known to contain anti-CD3/TCR Abs, resulted in SAP downregulation. We conclude that SLE T cells display reduced levels of the adaptor protein SAP, probably as a result of continuous T cell activation and degradation by caspase-3. Restoration of SAP levels in SLE T cells corrects the overexcitable lupus T cell phenotype. PMID:27183584

  12. miR-150, a microRNA expressed in mature B and T cells, blocks early B cell development when expressed prematurely.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Beiyan; Wang, Stephanie; Mayr, Christine; Bartel, David P; Lodish, Harvey F

    2007-04-24

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of approximately 22-nt noncoding RNAs that can posttranscriptionally regulate gene expression. Several miRNAs are specifically expressed in hematopoietic cells. Here we show that one such miRNA, miR-150, is mainly expressed in the lymph nodes and spleen and is highly up-regulated during the development of mature T and B cells; expression of miR-150 is sharply up-regulated at the immature B cell stage. Overexpression of miR-150 in hematopoietic stem cells, followed by bone marrow transplantation, had little effect on the formation of either mature CD8- and CD4-positive T cells or granulocytes or macrophages, but the formation of mature B cells was greatly impaired. Furthermore, premature expression of miR-150 blocked the transition from the pro-B to the pre-B stage. Our results indicate that miR-150 most likely down-regulates mRNAs that are important for pre- and pro-B cell formation or function, and its ectopic expression in these cells blocks further development of B cells.

  13. Efficacy and toxicity management of CAR-T-cell immunotherapy: a matter of responsiveness control or tumour-specificity?

    PubMed

    Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Harwood, Seandean Lykke; Álvarez-Méndez, Ana; Alvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2016-04-15

    Chimaeric antigen receptor (CAR)-expressing T-cells have demonstrated potent clinical efficacy in patients with haematological malignancies. However, the use of CAR-T-cells targeting solid tumour-associated antigens (TAAs) has been limited by organ toxicities related to activation of T-cell effector functions through the CAR. Most existing CARs recognize TAAs, which are also found in normal tissues. CAR-T-cell-mediated destruction of normal tissues constitutes a major roadblock to CAR-T-cell therapy, and must be avoided or mitigated. There is a broad range of strategies for modulating antigen responsiveness of CAR-T-cells, with varying degrees of complexity. Some of them might ameliorate the acute and chronic toxicities associated with current CAR constructs. However, further embellishments to CAR therapy may complicate clinical implementation and possibly create new immunogenicity issues. In contrast, the development of CARs targeting truly tumour-specific antigens might circumvent on-target/off-tumour toxicities without adding additional complexity to CAR-T-cell therapies, but these antigens have been elusive and may require novel selection strategies for their discovery.

  14. T cell and non-T cell compartments can independently determine resistance to Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    In experimental murine cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania major (Lm), the cellular determinants governing development of protective or exacerbative T cells are not well understood. We, therefore, attempted to determine the influence of T cell and non-T cell compartments on disease outcome. To this end, T cell chimeric mice were constructed using adult thymectomized lethally irradiated, bone marrow-reconstituted (ATXBM) animals of genetically resistant, C57BL/6, or susceptible, BALB/c, backgrounds. These hosts were engrafted with naive T cell populations from H-2-congenic susceptible, BALB.B6-H-2b, or resistant, C57BL/6.C-H-2d, animals, respectively. Chimeric mice were then infected with Lm, and disease outcome was monitored. BALB/c T cell chimeric mice, BALB/c ATXBM hosts given naive C57BL/6.C-H-2d T cells, resolved their infections as indicated by reductions in both lesion size and parasite numbers. Furthermore, the mice developed typical Th1 (interferon[IFN]-gamma hiinterleukin[IL]-4lo) cytokine patterns. In contrast, both sham chimeric, BALB/c ATXBM hosts given naive BALB/c T cells, and control irradiated euthymic mice succumbed to infection, producing Th2 profiles (IFN-gamma loIL-4hiIL-10hi). C57BL/6 T cell chimeras, C57BL/6 ATXBM hosts given naive BALB.B6-H-2b T cells, resolved their infections as did C57BL/6 sham chimeras and euthymic controls. Interestingly, whereas C57BL/6 control animals produced Th1 cytokines, chimeric animals progressed from Th0 (IFN-gamma hiIL-4hiIL- 10hi) to Th2 (IFN-gamma loIL-4hiIL-10hi) cytokine profiles as cure ensued. Both reconstitution and chimeric status of all mice were confirmed by flow cytometry. In addition, T cell receptor V beta usage of Lm-specific blasts was determined. In all cases, V beta use was multiclonal, involving primarily V beta 2, 4, 6, 8.1, 8.2, 8.3, 10, and 14, with relative V beta frequencies differing between H-2b and H-2d animals. Most importantly, however, these differences did not segregate

  15. Genetic engineering with T cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Morgan, Richard A

    2012-06-01

    In the past two decades, human gene transfer research has been translated from a laboratory technology to clinical evaluation. The success of adoptive transfer of tumor-reactive lymphocytes to treat the patients with metastatic melanoma has led to new strategies to redirect normal T cells to recognize tumor antigens by genetic engineering with tumor antigen-specific T cell receptor (TCR) genes. This new strategy can generate large numbers of defined antigen-specific cells for therapeutic application. Much progress has been made to TCR gene transfer systems by optimizing gene expression and gene transfer protocols. Vector and protein modifications have enabled excellent expression of introduced TCR chains in human lymphocytes with reduced mis-pairing between the introduced and endogenous TCR chains. Initial clinical studies have demonstrated that TCR gene-engineered T cells could mediate tumor regression in vivo. In this review, we discuss the progress and prospects of TCR gene-engineered T cells as a therapeutic strategy for treating patients with melanoma and other cancers.

  16. T cell dysfunction in the diabetes-prone BB rat. A role for thymic migrants that are not T cell precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Georgiou, H.M.; Lagarde, A.C.; Bellgrau, D.

    1988-01-01

    Diabetes-prone BB (BB-DP) rats express several T cell dysfunctions which include poor proliferative and cytotoxic responses to alloantigen. The goal of this study was to determine the origin of these T cell dysfunctions. When BB-DP rats were thymectomized, T cell depleted, and transplanted with neonatal thymus tissue from diabetes-resistant and otherwise normal DA/BB F1 rats, the early restoration of T cell function proceeded normally on a cell-for-cell basis; i.e., peripheral T cells functioned like those from the thymus donor. Because the thymus in these experiments was subjected to gamma irradiation before transplantation and there was no evidence of F1 chimerism in the transplanted BB-DP rats, it appeared that the BB-DP T cell precursors could mature into normally functioning T cells if the maturation process occurred in a normal thymus. If the F1 thymus tissue was treated with dGua before transplantation, the T cells of these animals functioned poorly like those from untreated BB-DP rats. dGua poisons bone marrow-derived cells, including gamma radiation-resistant cells of the macrophage/dendritic cell lineages, while sparing the thymic epithelium. Therefore, the reversal of the T cell dysfunction depends on the presence in the F1 thymus of gamma radiation-resistant, dGua-sensitive F1 cells. Conversely, thymectomized and T cell-depleted F1 rats expressed T cell dysfunction when transplanted with gamma-irradiated BB thymus grafts. T cell responses were normal in animals transplanted with dGua-treated BB thymus grafts. With increasing time after thymus transplantation, T cells from all animals gradually expressed the functional phenotype of the bone marrow donor. Taken together these results suggest that BB-DP bone marrow-derived cells that are not T cell precursors influence the maturation environment in the thymus of otherwise normal BB-DP T cell precursors.

  17. Development of Ultra-Super Sensitive Immunohistochemistry and Its Application to the Etiological Study of Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Hasui, Kazuhisa; Wang, Jia; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Izumo, Shuji; Eizuru, Yoshito; Matsuyama, Takami

    2012-01-01

    Antigen retrieval (AR) and ultra-super sensitive immunohistochemistry (ultra-IHC) have been established for application to archival human pathology specimens. The original ultra-IHC was the ImmunoMax method or the catalyzed signal amplification system (ImmunoMax/CSA method), comprising the streptavidin-biotin complex (sABC) method and catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD) reaction with visualization of its deposition. By introducing procedures to diminish non-specific staining in the original ultra-IHC method, we developed the modified ImmunoMax/CSA method with AR heating sections in an AR solution (heating-AR). The heating-AR and modified ImmunoMax/CSA method visualized expression of the predominantly simple present form of HTLV-1 proviral DNA pX region p40Tax protein (Tax) in adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) cells in archival pathology specimens in approximately 75% of cases. The simple present form of Tax detected exhibited a close relation with ATLL cell proliferation. We also established a new simplified CSA (nsCSA) system by replacing the sABC method with the secondary antibody- and horse radish peroxidase-labeled polymer reagent method, introducing the pretreatments blocking non-specific binding of secondary antibody reagent, and diminishing the diffusion of deposition in the CARD reaction. Combined with AR treating sections with proteinase K solution (enzymatic-AR), the nsCSA system visualized granular immunostaining of the complex present form of Tax in a small number of ATLL cells in most cases, presenting the possibility of etiological pathological diagnosis of ATLL and suggesting that the complex present form of Tax-positive ATLL cells were young cells derived from ATLL stem cells. The heating-AR and ultra-IHC detected physiological expression of the p53 protein and its probable phosphorylation by Tax in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of peripheral blood tissue specimens from HTLV-1 carriers, as well as physiological and pathological expression

  18. Development of ultra-super sensitive immunohistochemistry and its application to the etiological study of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Hasui, Kazuhisa; Wang, Jia; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Izumo, Shuji; Eizuru, Yoshito; Matsuyama, Takami

    2012-04-26

    Antigen retrieval (AR) and ultra-super sensitive immunohistochemistry (ultra-IHC) have been established for application to archival human pathology specimens. The original ultra-IHC was the ImmunoMax method or the catalyzed signal amplification system (ImmunoMax/CSA method), comprising the streptavidin-biotin complex (sABC) method and catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD) reaction with visualization of its deposition. By introducing procedures to diminish non-specific staining in the original ultra-IHC method, we developed the modified ImmunoMax/CSA method with AR heating sections in an AR solution (heating-AR). The heating-AR and modified ImmunoMax/CSA method visualized expression of the predominantly simple present form of HTLV-1 proviral DNA pX region p40Tax protein (Tax) in adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) cells in archival pathology specimens in approximately 75% of cases. The simple present form of Tax detected exhibited a close relation with ATLL cell proliferation. We also established a new simplified CSA (nsCSA) system by replacing the sABC method with the secondary antibody- and horse radish peroxidase-labeled polymer reagent method, introducing the pretreatments blocking non-specific binding of secondary antibody reagent, and diminishing the diffusion of deposition in the CARD reaction. Combined with AR treating sections with proteinase K solution (enzymatic-AR), the nsCSA system visualized granular immunostaining of the complex present form of Tax in a small number of ATLL cells in most cases, presenting the possibility of etiological pathological diagnosis of ATLL and suggesting that the complex present form of Tax-positive ATLL cells were young cells derived from ATLL stem cells. The heating-AR and ultra-IHC detected physiological expression of the p53 protein and its probable phosphorylation by Tax in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of peripheral blood tissue specimens from HTLV-1 carriers, as well as physiological and pathological expression

  19. PLZF+ Innate T Cells Support the TGF-β-Dependent Generation of Activated/Memory-Like Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Byung Hyun; Park, Hyo Jin; Park, Hi Jung; Lee, Jae-II; Park, Seong Hoe; Jung, Kyeong Cheon

    2016-01-01

    PLZF-expressing invariant natural killer T cells and CD4 T cells are unique subsets of innate T cells. Both are selected via thymocyte-thymocyte interaction, and they contribute to the generation of activated/memory-like CD4 and CD8 T cells in the thymus via the production of IL-4. Here, we investigated whether PLZF+ innate T cells also affect the development and function of Foxp3+ regulatory CD4 T cells. Flow cytometry analysis of the thymus and spleen from both CIITA transgenic C57BL/6 and wild-type BALB/c mice, which have abundant PLZF+ CD4 T cells and invariant natural killer T cells, respectively, revealed that Foxp3+ T cells in these mice exhibited a CD103+ activated/memory-like phenotype. The frequency of CD103+ regulatory T cells was considerably decreased in PLZF+ cell-deficient CIITATgPlzflu/lu and BALB/c.CD1d−/− mice as well as in an IL-4-deficient background, such as in CIITATgIL-4−/− and BALB/c.lL-4−/− mice, indicating that the acquisition of an activated/memory-like phenotype was dependent on PLZF+ innate T cells and IL-4. Using fetal thymic organ culture, we further demonstrated that IL-4 in concert with TGF-β enhanced the acquisition of the activated/memory-like phenotype of regulatory T cells. In functional aspects, the activated/memory-like phenotype of Treg cells was directly related to their suppressive function; regulatory T cells of CIITATgPIV−/− mice more efficiently suppressed ovalbumin-induced allergic airway inflammation compared with their counterparts from wild-type mice. All of these findings suggest that PLZF+ innate T cells also augmented the generation of activated/memory-like regulation via IL-4 production. PMID:27101876

  20. CIP2A Promotes T-Cell Activation and Immune Response to Listeria monocytogenes Infection.

    PubMed

    Côme, Christophe; Cvrljevic, Anna; Khan, Mohd Moin; Treise, Irina; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Au-Yeung, Byron; Sittig, Eleonora; Laajala, Teemu Daniel; Chen, Yiling; Oeder, Sebastian; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Horsch, Marion; Aittokallio, Tero; Busch, Dirk H; Ollert, Markus W; Neff, Frauke; Beckers, Johannes; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Fuchs, Helmut; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Chen, Zhi; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Westermarck, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    The oncoprotein Cancerous Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) is overexpressed in most malignancies and is an obvious candidate target protein for future cancer therapies. However, the physiological importance of CIP2A-mediated PP2A inhibition is largely unknown. As PP2A regulates immune responses, we investigated the role of CIP2A in normal immune system development and during immune response in vivo. We show that CIP2A-deficient mice (CIP2AHOZ) present a normal immune system development and function in unchallenged conditions. However when challenged with Listeria monocytogenes, CIP2AHOZ mice display an impaired adaptive immune response that is combined with decreased frequency of both CD4+ T-cells and CD8+ effector T-cells. Importantly, the cell autonomous effect of CIP2A deficiency for T-cell activation was confirmed. Induction of CIP2A expression during T-cell activation was dependent on Zap70 activity. Thus, we reveal CIP2A as a hitherto unrecognized mediator of T-cell activation during adaptive immune response. These results also reveal CIP2AHOZ as a possible novel mouse model for studying the role of PP2A activity in immune regulation. On the other hand, the results also indicate that CIP2A targeting cancer therapies would not cause serious immunological side-effects.

  1. CIP2A Promotes T-Cell Activation and Immune Response to Listeria monocytogenes Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cvrljevic, Anna; Khan, Mohd Moin; Treise, Irina; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Au-Yeung, Byron; Sittig, Eleonora; Laajala, Teemu Daniel; Chen, Yiling; Oeder, Sebastian; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Horsch, Marion; Aittokallio, Tero; Busch, Dirk H.; Ollert, Markus W.; Neff, Frauke; Beckers, Johannes; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Fuchs, Helmut; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Chen, Zhi; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Westermarck, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    The oncoprotein Cancerous Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) is overexpressed in most malignancies and is an obvious candidate target protein for future cancer therapies. However, the physiological importance of CIP2A-mediated PP2A inhibition is largely unknown. As PP2A regulates immune responses, we investigated the role of CIP2A in normal immune system development and during immune response in vivo. We show that CIP2A-deficient mice (CIP2AHOZ) present a normal immune system development and function in unchallenged conditions. However when challenged with Listeria monocytogenes, CIP2AHOZ mice display an impaired adaptive immune response that is combined with decreased frequency of both CD4+ T-cells and CD8+ effector T-cells. Importantly, the cell autonomous effect of CIP2A deficiency for T-cell activation was confirmed. Induction of CIP2A expression during T-cell activation was dependent on Zap70 activity. Thus, we reveal CIP2A as a hitherto unrecognized mediator of T-cell activation during adaptive immune response. These results also reveal CIP2AHOZ as a possible novel mouse model for studying the role of PP2A activity in immune regulation. On the other hand, the results also indicate that CIP2A targeting cancer therapies would not cause serious immunological side-effects. PMID:27100879

  2. [Molecular pathogenesis of peripheral T-cell lymphoma (1): angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma, peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified and anaplastic large cell lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Couronné, Lucile; Bastard, Christian; Gaulard, Philippe; Hermine, Olivier; Bernard, Olivier

    2015-10-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCL) belong to the group of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and particularly that of mature T/NK cells lymphoproliferative neoplasms. The 2008 WHO classification describes different PTCL entities with varying prevalence. With the exception of the histological subtype "ALK positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma", PTCL are characterized by a poor prognosis. The mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of these lymphomas are not yet fully understood, but development of genomic high-throughput analysis techniques now allows to extensively identify the molecular abnormalities present in tumor cells. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge and recent advances about the molecular events occurring at the origin or during the natural history of main entities of PTCL. It will be published in two parts : the first is focused on the three more frequent entities, angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma, peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified, and anaplastic large cell lymphoma. The second (which will appear in the november issue) will describe other subtypes less frequent and of poor prognosis : extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma. T or NK cell lymphoproliferative disorders with leukemic presentation, primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and very rare subtypes of PTCL whose prevalence is less than 5% (hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma and subcutaneous panniculitis-like T cell lymphoma) will not be discussed herein. PMID:26481023

  3. Production of tag-free recombinant fusion protein encompassing promiscuous T cell epitope of tetanus toxoid and dog zona pellucida glycoprotein-3 for contraceptive vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Neha; Shrestha, Abhinav; Panda, Amulya Kumar; Gupta, Satish Kumar

    2013-07-01

    Affinity tags can interfere in various physicochemical properties and immunogenicity of the recombinant proteins. In the present study, tag-free recombinant fusion protein encompassing promiscuous T cell epitope of tetanus toxoid [TT; amino acid (aa) residues 830-844] followed by dilysine linker and dog zona pellucida glycoprotein-3 (ZP3; aa residues 23-348) (TT-KK-ZP3) was expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein, expressed as inclusion bodies (IBs), was purified by isolation of IBs, processed to remove host cell proteins, followed by solubilization and refolding. A specific 39 kDa protein including ZP3 was identified by SDS-PAGE. CD spectra showed the presence of α-helices and β-sheets, and fluorescent spectroscopy revealed emission maxima of 265 A.U. at 339 nm for refolded protein and showed red shift in the presence of 6 M guanidine hydrochloride. Immunization of inbred FvB/J female mice with purified recombinant TT-KK-ZP3 (25 μg/animal) led to generation of high antibody titers against the recombinant protein. The antibodies reacted specifically with ZP matrix surrounding mouse oocytes. Immunized mice showed significant reduction in fertility as compared to the control group. The studies described herein provide a simple method to produce and purify tag-free recombinant protein for the development of a contraceptive vaccine. PMID:23242635

  4. Infusion of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Alleviates Autoimmune Nephritis in a Lupus Model by Suppressing Follicular Helper T-Cell Development.

    PubMed

    Jang, Eunkyeong; Jeong, Mini; Kim, Sukhyung; Jang, Kiseok; Kang, Bo-Kyeong; Lee, Dong Yun; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Kim, Kyung Suk; Youn, Jeehee

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies to components of the cell nucleus. These autoantibodies are predominantly produced with the help of follicular helper T (Tfh) cells and form immune complexes that trigger widespread inflammatory damage, including nephritis. In recent studies, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) elicited diverse, even opposing, effects in experimental and clinical SLE. Here we investigated the effect of human bone marrow-derived MSCs (hBM-MSCs) in a murine model of SLE, the F1 hybrid between New Zealand Black and New Zealand White strains (NZB/W). We found that infusion of female NZB/W mice with hBM-MSCs attenuated glomerulonephritis; it also decreased levels of autoantibodies and the incidence of proteinuria and improved survival. These effects coincided with a decrease in Tfh cells and downstream components. Infiltration of long-lived plasma cells into the inflamed kidney was also reduced in the hBM-MSC-treated mice. Importantly, hBM-MSCs directly suppressed the in vitro differentiation of naive CD4(+) T cells toward Tfh cells in a contact-dependent manner. These results suggest that MSCs attenuate lupus nephritis by suppressing the development of Tfh cells and the subsequent activation of humoral immune components. They thus reveal a novel mechanism by which MSCs regulate humoral autoimmune diseases such as SLE.

  5. Global T cell dysregulation in non-autoimmune-prone mice promotes rapid development of BAFF-independent, SLE-like autoimmunity1

    PubMed Central

    Stohl, William; Jacob, Noam; Quinn, William J.; Cancro, Michael P.; Gao, Huaxin; Putterman, Chaim; Gao, Xiaoni; Pricop, Luminita; Koss, Michael N.

    2008-01-01

    In otherwise non-autoimmune-prone C57BL/6 (B6) mice rendered genetically deficient in CD152 (CTLA-4), polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia with increased levels of SLE-associated IgG autoantibodies, glomerular IgG and C3 deposition, and interstitial nephritis all developed by 3-5 weeks of age. Remarkably, superimposing genetic deficiency of BAFF onto CD152 deficiency did not substantially attenuate humoral autoimmunity and immunopathology in these mice, despite the resulting marked reduction in B-lineage cells. Although superimposing a BAFF transgene (resulting in constitutive BAFF overexpression) onto CD152-deficient mice did lead to increases in B-lineage cells and serum levels of certain SLE-associated IgG autoantibodies, renal immunopathology remained largely unaffected. Taken together, these results demonstrate that global T cell dysregulation, even in an otherwise non-autoimmune-prone host, can promote systemic humoral autoimmunity and immunopathology in a BAFF-independent manner. Moreover, supra-physiologic expression of BAFF in the setting of ongoing autoimmunity does not necessarily lead to greater immunopathology. These findings may help explain the limited clinical efficacy appreciated to date of BAFF antagonists in human SLE. PMID:18566449

  6. Production of tag-free recombinant fusion protein encompassing promiscuous T cell epitope of tetanus toxoid and dog zona pellucida glycoprotein-3 for contraceptive vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Neha; Shrestha, Abhinav; Panda, Amulya Kumar; Gupta, Satish Kumar

    2013-07-01

    Affinity tags can interfere in various physicochemical properties and immunogenicity of the recombinant proteins. In the present study, tag-free recombinant fusion protein encompassing promiscuous T cell epitope of tetanus toxoid [TT; amino acid (aa) residues 830-844] followed by dilysine linker and dog zona pellucida glycoprotein-3 (ZP3; aa residues 23-348) (TT-KK-ZP3) was expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein, expressed as inclusion bodies (IBs), was purified by isolation of IBs, processed to remove host cell proteins, followed by solubilization and refolding. A specific 39 kDa protein including ZP3 was identified by SDS-PAGE. CD spectra showed the presence of α-helices and β-sheets, and fluorescent spectroscopy revealed emission maxima of 265 A.U. at 339 nm for refolded protein and showed red shift in the presence of 6 M guanidine hydrochloride. Immunization of inbred FvB/J female mice with purified recombinant TT-KK-ZP3 (25 μg/animal) led to generation of high antibody titers against the recombinant protein. The antibodies reacted specifically with ZP matrix surrounding mouse oocytes. Immunized mice showed significant reduction in fertility as compared to the control group. The studies described herein provide a simple method to produce and purify tag-free recombinant protein for the development of a contraceptive vaccine.

  7. Inducible T-cell receptor expression in precursor T cells for leukemia control.

    PubMed

    Hoseini, S S; Hapke, M; Herbst, J; Wedekind, D; Baumann, R; Heinz, N; Schiedlmeier, B; Vignali, D A A; van den Brink, M R M; Schambach, A; Blazar, B R; Sauer, M G

    2015-07-01

    Co-transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells with those engineered to express leukemia-reactive T-cell receptors (TCRs) and differentiated ex vivo into precursor T cells (preTs) may reduce the risk of leukemia relapse. As expression of potentially self-(leukemia-) reactive TCRs will lead to negative selection or provoke autoimmunity upon thymic maturation, we investigated a novel concept whereby TCR expression set under the control of an inducible promoter would allow timely controlled TCR expression. After in vivo maturation and gene induction, preTs developed potent anti-leukemia effects. Engineered preTs provided protection even after repeated leukemia challenges by giving rise to effector and central memory cells. Importantly, adoptive transfer of TCR-transduced allogeneic preTs mediated anti-leukemia effect without evoking graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Earlier transgene induction forced CD8(+) T-cell development was required to obtain a mature T-cell subset of targeted specificity, allowed engineered T cells to efficiently pass positive selection and abrogated the endogenous T-cell repertoire. Later induction favored CD4 differentiation and failed to produce a leukemia-reactive population emphasizing the dominant role of positive selection. Taken together, we provide new functional insights for the employment of TCR-engineered precursor cells as a controllable immunotherapeutic modality with significant anti-leukemia activity.

  8. Inducible T-cell receptor expression in precursor T cells for leukemia control.

    PubMed

    Hoseini, S S; Hapke, M; Herbst, J; Wedekind, D; Baumann, R; Heinz, N; Schiedlmeier, B; Vignali, D A A; van den Brink, M R M; Schambach, A; Blazar, B R; Sauer, M G

    2015-07-01

    Co-transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells with those engineered to express leukemia-reactive T-cell receptors (TCRs) and differentiated ex vivo into precursor T cells (preTs) may reduce the risk of leukemia relapse. As expression of potentially self-(leukemia-) reactive TCRs will lead to negative selection or provoke autoimmunity upon thymic maturation, we investigated a novel concept whereby TCR expression set under the control of an inducible promoter would allow timely controlled TCR expression. After in vivo maturation and gene induction, preTs developed potent anti-leukemia effects. Engineered preTs provided protection even after repeated leukemia challenges by giving rise to effector and central memory cells. Importantly, adoptive transfer of TCR-transduced allogeneic preTs mediated anti-leukemia effect without evoking graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Earlier transgene induction forced CD8(+) T-cell development was required to obtain a mature T-cell subset of targeted specificity, allowed engineered T cells to efficiently pass positive selection and abrogated the endogenous T-cell repertoire. Later induction favored CD4 differentiation and failed to produce a leukemia-reactive population emphasizing the dominant role of positive selection. Taken together, we provide new functional insights for the employment of TCR-engineered precursor cells as a controllable immunotherapeutic modality with significant anti-leukemia activity. PMID:25652739

  9. Therapeutic Potential of Hyporesponsive CD4+ T Cells in Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Maggi, Jaxaira; Schafer, Carolina; Ubilla-Olguín, Gabriela; Catalán, Diego; Schinnerling, Katina; Aguillón, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between dendritic cells (DCs) and T cells is crucial on immunity or tolerance induction. In an immature or semi-mature state, DCs induce tolerance through T-cell deletion, generation of regulatory T cells, and/or induction of T-cell anergy. Anergy is defined as an unresponsive state that retains T cells in an “off” mode under conditions in which immune activation is undesirable. This mechanism is crucial for the control of T-cell responses against self-antigens, thereby preventing autoimmunity. Tolerogenic DCs (tDCs), generated in vitro from peripheral blood monocytes of healthy donors or patients with autoimmune pathologies, were shown to modulate immune responses by inducing T-cell hyporesponsiveness. Animal models of autoimmune diseases confirmed the impact of T-cell anergy on disease development and progression in vivo. Thus, the induction of T-cell hyporesponsiveness by tDCs has become a promising immunotherapeutic strategy for the treatment of T-cell-mediated autoimmune disorders. Here, we review recent findings in the area and discuss the potential of anergy induction for clinical purposes. PMID:26441992

  10. B and T cell screen

    MedlinePlus

    Direct immunofluorescence; E-rosetting; T and B lymphocyte assays; B and T lymphocyte assays ... to distinguish between T and B cells. The E-rosetting test identifies T cells and direct immunofluorescence ...

  11. Identification of a Late Stage of Small Noncycling pTα−  Pre-T Cells as Immediate Precursors of T Cell Receptor α/β+  Thymocytes

    PubMed Central

    Trigueros, César; Ramiro, Almudena R.; Carrasco, Yolanda R.; de Yebenes, Virginia G.; Albar, Juan P.; Toribio, María L.

    1998-01-01

    During thymocyte development, progression from T cell receptor (TCR)β to TCRα rearrangement is mediated by a CD3-associated pre-TCR composed of the TCRβ chain paired with pre-TCRα (pTα). A major issue is how surface expression of the pre-TCR is regulated during normal thymocyte development to control transition through this checkpoint. Here, we show that developmental expression of pTα is time- and stage-specific, and is confined in vivo to a limited subset of large cycling human pre-T cells that coexpress low density CD3. This restricted expression pattern allowed the identification of a novel subset of small CD3− thymocytes lacking surface pTα, but expressing cytoplasmic TCRβ, that represent late noncycling pre-T cells in which recombination activating gene reexpression and downregulation of T early α transcription are coincident events associated with cell cycle arrest, and immediately preceding TCRα gene expression. Importantly, thymocytes at this late pre-T cell stage are shown to be functional intermediates between large pTα+ pre-T cells and TCRα/β+ thymocytes. The results support a developmental model in which pre-TCR–expressing pre-T cells are brought into cycle, rapidly downregulate surface pre-TCR, and finally become small resting pre-T cells, before the onset of TCRα gene expression. PMID:9782117

  12. [Psychomotor development and its disorders: between normal and pathological development].

    PubMed

    Vericat, Agustina; Bibiana Orden, Alicia

    2013-10-01

    This article discusses some aspects of psychomotor development and its disorders, with special emphasis on psychomotor retardation. Diagnostic classifications of psychomotor problems, such as DSM-IV and CIE-10, are referred to and their advantages and disadvantages are analyzed. The concept of normality as a synonym for the statistical mean in the context of psychomotor disorders is also analyzed in order to consider its dynamic and variability, thereby avoiding the normality/pathology opposition, while some issues, such as the social and cultural aspects, are highlighted, making it possible to rethink the universality and relativity of psychomotor development. PMID:24061024

  13. [Psychomotor development and its disorders: between normal and pathological development].

    PubMed

    Vericat, Agustina; Bibiana Orden, Alicia

    2013-10-01

    This article discusses some aspects of psychomotor development and its disorders, with special emphasis on psychomotor retardation. Diagnostic classifications of psychomotor problems, such as DSM-IV and CIE-10, are referred to and their advantages and disadvantages are analyzed. The concept of normality as a synonym for the statistical mean in the context of psychomotor disorders is also analyzed in order to consider its dynamic and variability, thereby avoiding the normality/pathology opposition, while some issues, such as the social and cultural aspects, are highlighted, making it possible to rethink the universality and relativity of psychomotor development.

  14. T Cell Fates Zipped Up: How the Bach2 Basic Leucine Zipper Transcriptional Repressor Directs T Cell Differentiation and Function.

    PubMed

    Richer, Martin J; Lang, Mark L; Butler, Noah S

    2016-08-15

    Recent data illustrate a key role for the transcriptional regulator bric-a-brac, tramtrack, and broad complex and cap'n'collar homology (Bach)2 in orchestrating T cell differentiation and function. Although Bach2 has a well-described role in B cell differentiation, emerging data show that Bach2 is a prototypical member of a novel class of transcription factors that regulates transcriptional activity in T cells at super-enhancers, or regions of high transcriptional activity. Accumulating data demonstrate specific roles for Bach2 in favoring regulatory T cell generation, restraining effector T cell differentiation, and potentiating memory T cell development. Evidence suggests that Bach2 regulates various facets of T cell function by repressing other key transcriptional regulators such as B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1. In this review, we examine our present understanding of the role of Bach2 in T cell function and highlight the growing evidence that this transcriptional repressor functions as a key regulator involved in maintenance of T cell quiescence, T cell subset differentiation, and memory T cell generation.

  15. T Cell Fates Zipped Up: How the Bach2 Basic Leucine Zipper Transcriptional Repressor Directs T Cell Differentiation and Function.

    PubMed

    Richer, Martin J; Lang, Mark L; Butler, Noah S

    2016-08-15

    Recent data illustrate a key role for the transcriptional regulator bric-a-brac, tramtrack, and broad complex and cap'n'collar homology (Bach)2 in orchestrating T cell differentiation and function. Although Bach2 has a well-described role in B cell differentiation, emerging data show that Bach2 is a prototypical member of a novel class of transcription factors that regulates transcriptional activity in T cells at super-enhancers, or regions of high transcriptional activity. Accumulating data demonstrate specific roles for Bach2 in favoring regulatory T cell generation, restraining effector T cell differentiation, and potentiating memory T cell development. Evidence suggests that Bach2 regulates various facets of T cell function by repressing other key transcriptional regulators such as B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1. In this review, we examine our present understanding of the role of Bach2 in T cell function and highlight the growing evidence that this transcriptional repressor functions as a key regulator involved in maintenance of T cell quiescence, T cell subset differentiation, and memory T cell generation. PMID:27496973

  16. Transgelin-2 in B-Cells Controls T-Cell Activation by Stabilizing T Cell - B Cell Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Myoung-Won; Kim, Hye-Ran; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Jun, Chang-Duk; Park, Zee-Yong

    2016-01-01

    The immunological synapse (IS), a dynamic and organized junction between T-cells and antigen presenting cells (APCs), is critical for initiating adaptive immunity. The actin cytoskeleton plays a major role in T-cell reorganization during IS formation, and we previously reported that transgelin-2, an actin-binding protein expressed in T-cells, stabilizes cortical F-actin, promoting T-cell activation in response to antigen stimulation. Transgelin-2 is also highly expressed in B-cells, although no specific function has been reported. In this study, we found that deficiency in transgelin-2 (TAGLN2-/-) in B-cells had little effect on B-cell development and activation, as measured by the expression of CD69, MHC class II molecules, and CD80/86. Nevertheless, in B-cells, transgelin-2 accumulated in the IS during the interaction with T-cells. These results led us to hypothesize that transgelin-2 may also be involved in IS stability in B-cells, thereby influencing T-cell function. Notably, we found that transgelin-2 deficiency in B-cells reduced T-cell activation, as determined by the release of IL-2 and interferon-γ and the expression of CD69. Furthermore, the reduced T-cell activation was correlated with reduced B-cell–T-cell conjugate formation. Collectively, these results suggest that actin stability in B-cells during IS formation is critical for the initiation of adaptive T-cell immunity. PMID:27232882

  17. mTORC1 in Thymic Epithelial Cells Is Critical for Thymopoiesis, T-Cell Generation, and Temporal Control of γδT17 Development and TCRγ/δ Recombination.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Xia; Shin, Jinwook; Wang, Shang; Gorentla, Balachandra; Lin, Xingguang; Gao, Jimin; Qiu, Yu-Rong; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2016-02-01

    Thymus is crucial for generation of a diverse repertoire of T cells essential for adaptive immunity. Although thymic epithelial cells (TECs) are crucial for thymopoiesis and T cell generation, how TEC development and function are controlled is poorly understood. We report here that mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in TECs plays critical roles in thymopoiesis and thymus function. Acute deletion of mTORC1 in adult mice caused severe thymic involution. TEC-specific deficiency of mTORC1 (mTORC1KO) impaired TEC maturation and function such as decreased expression of thymotropic chemokines, decreased medullary TEC to cortical TEC ratios, and altered thymic architecture, leading to severe thymic atrophy, reduced recruitment of early thymic progenitors, and impaired development of virtually all T-cell lineages. Strikingly, temporal control of IL-17-producing γδT (γδT17) cell differentiation and TCRVγ/δ recombination in fetal thymus is lost in mTORC1KO thymus, leading to elevated γδT17 differentiation and rearranging of fetal specific TCRVγ/δ in adulthood. Thus, mTORC1 is central for TEC development/function and establishment of thymic environment for proper T cell development, and modulating mTORC1 activity can be a strategy for preventing thymic involution/atrophy. PMID:26889835

  18. mTORC1 in Thymic Epithelial Cells Is Critical for Thymopoiesis, T-Cell Generation, and Temporal Control of γδT17 Development and TCRγ/δ Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong-Xia; Shin, Jinwook; Wang, Shang; Gorentla, Balachandra; Lin, Xingguang; Gao, Jimin; Qiu, Yu-Rong; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Thymus is crucial for generation of a diverse repertoire of T cells essential for adaptive immunity. Although thymic epithelial cells (TECs) are crucial for thymopoiesis and T cell generation, how TEC development and function are controlled is poorly understood. We report here that mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in TECs plays critical roles in thymopoiesis and thymus function. Acute deletion of mTORC1 in adult mice caused severe thymic involution. TEC-specific deficiency of mTORC1 (mTORC1KO) impaired TEC maturation and function such as decreased expression of thymotropic chemokines, decreased medullary TEC to cortical TEC ratios, and altered thymic architecture, leading to severe thymic atrophy, reduced recruitment of early thymic progenitors, and impaired development of virtually all T-cell lineages. Strikingly, temporal control of IL-17-producing γδT (γδT17) cell differentiation and TCRVγ/δ recombination in fetal thymus is lost in mTORC1KO thymus, leading to elevated γδT17 differentiation and rearranging of fetal specific TCRVγ/δ in adulthood. Thus, mTORC1 is central for TEC development/function and establishment of thymic environment for proper T cell development, and modulating mTORC1 activity can be a strategy for preventing thymic involution/atrophy. PMID:26889835

  19. T cells in murine lupus: propagation and regulation of disease.

    PubMed

    Peng, S L; Craft, J

    1996-01-01

    MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr mice develop a spontaneous lupus syndrome, including hypergammaglobulinemia, autoantibodies, glomerulonephritis, and lymphadenopathy. To investigate the role of lymphocytes subsets in the pathogenesis of disease, lupus-prone MRL mice deficient in alpha beta T cells, gamma delta T cells, or both were generated. Mice deficient in alpha beta T cells developed a partially penetrant lupus syndrome, characterized by lymphadenopathy, elevated levels of class-switched immunoglobulins, an increased incidence of antinuclear antibodies, and immune deposits in kidneys which progressed to renal insufficiency over time. In comparison to wild type animals, gamma delta T cell-deficient animals developed an accelerated and exacerbated disease phenotype, characterized by accelerated hypergammaglobulinemia and enhanced autoantibody production and mortality. Repertoire analysis of these latter animals identified polyclonal expansion (V beta) of alpha beta CD4+ B220-cells. Mice lacking both alpha beta and gamma delta T cells failed to generate class-switched autoantibodies and immune complex renal disease. First, these findings demonstrate that murine lupus in the setting of Fas-deficiency does not absolutely require the presence of alpha beta T cells, and they also suggest that a significant basis for MRL/lpr disease, including renal disease, involves alpha beta T cell-independent, gamma delta T cell dependent, polyreactive B cell autoimmunity, upon which alpha beta T cell-dependent mechanisms aggravate specific autoimmune responses. Second, these data indicate that gamma delta T cells partake in the regulation of systemic autoimmunity, presumably via their effects on alpha beta CD4+ B220-T cells that provide B cell help. Finally, these results demonstrate that MRL/lpr B cells, despite their intrinsic abnormalities, cannot per se cause tissue injury without T cell help.

  20. Chimeric Antigen Receptors Modified T-Cells for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Hanren; Wang, Yao; Lu, Xuechun

    2016-01-01

    The genetic modification and characterization of T-cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) allow functionally distinct T-cell subsets to recognize specific tumor cells. The incorporation of costimulatory molecules or cytokines can enable engineered T-cells to eliminate tumor cells. CARs are generated by fusing the antigen-binding region of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) or other ligand to membrane-spanning and intracellular-signaling domains. They have recently shown clinical benefit in patients treated with CD19-directed autologous T-cells. Recent successes suggest that the modification of T-cells with CARs could be a powerful approach for developing safe and effective cancer therapeutics. Here, we briefly review early studies, consider strategies to improve the therapeutic potential and safety, and discuss the challenges and future prospects for CAR T-cells in cancer therapy. PMID:26819347

  1. Engineered T cells: the promise and challenges of cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fesnak, Andrew D; June, Carl H; Levine, Bruce L

    2016-08-23

    The immune system evolved to distinguish non-self from self to protect the organism. As cancer is derived from our own cells, immune responses to dysregulated cell growth present a unique challenge. This is compounded by mechanisms of immune evasion and immunosuppression that develop in the tumour microenvironment. The modern genetic toolbox enables the adoptive transfer of engineered T cells to create enhanced anticancer immune functions where natural cancer-specific immune responses have failed. Genetically engineered T cells, so-called 'living drugs', represent a new paradigm in anticancer therapy. Recent clinical trials using T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) or engineered T cell receptors (TCRs) have produced stunning results in patients with relapsed or refractory haematological malignancies. In this Review we describe some of the most recent and promising advances in engineered T cell therapy with a particular emphasis on what the next generation of T cell therapy is likely to entail. PMID:27550819

  2. Chimeric Antigen Receptors Modified T-Cells for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hanren; Wang, Yao; Lu, Xuechun; Han, Weidong

    2016-07-01

    The genetic modification and characterization of T-cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) allow functionally distinct T-cell subsets to recognize specific tumor cells. The incorporation of costimulatory molecules or cytokines can enable engineered T-cells to eliminate tumor cells. CARs are generated by fusing the antigen-binding region of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) or other ligand to membrane-spanning and intracellular-signaling domains. They have recently shown clinical benefit in patients treated with CD19-directed autologous T-cells. Recent successes suggest that the modification of T-cells with CARs could be a powerful approach for developing safe and effective cancer therapeutics. Here, we briefly review early studies, consider strategies to improve the therapeutic potential and safety, and discuss the challenges and future prospects for CAR T-cells in cancer therapy.

  3. Engineered T cells: the promise and challenges of cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fesnak, Andrew D; June, Carl H; Levine, Bruce L

    2016-08-23

    The immune system evolved to distinguish non-self from self to protect the organism. As cancer is derived from our own cells, immune responses to dysregulated cell growth present a unique challenge. This is compounded by mechanisms of immune evasion and immunosuppression that develop in the tumour microenvironment. The modern genetic toolbox enables the adoptive transfer of engineered T cells to create enhanced anticancer immune functions where natural cancer-specific immune responses have failed. Genetically engineered T cells, so-called 'living drugs', represent a new paradigm in anticancer therapy. Recent clinical trials using T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) or engineered T cell receptors (TCRs) have produced stunning results in patients with relapsed or refractory haematological malignancies. In this Review we describe some of the most recent and promising advances in engineered T cell therapy with a particular emphasis on what the next generation of T cell therapy is likely to entail.

  4. Pre-miRNA Loop Nucleotides Control the Distinct Activities of mir-181a-1 and mir-181c in Early T Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Sibiao; Chen, Chang-Zheng

    2008-01-01

    Background Mature miRNAs can often be classified into large families, consisting of members with identical seeds (nucleotides 2 through 7 of the mature miRNAs) and highly homologous ∼21-nucleotide (nt) mature miRNA sequences. However, it is unclear whether members of a miRNA gene family, which encode identical or nearly identical mature miRNAs, are functionally interchangeable in vivo. Methods and Findings We show that mir-181a-1, but not mir-181c, can promote CD4 and CD8 double-positive (DP) T cell development when ectopically expressed in thymic progenitor cells. The distinct activities of mir-181a-1 and mir-181c are largely determined by their unique pre-miRNA loop nucleotides—not by the one-nucleotide difference in their mature miRNA sequences. Moreover, the activity of mir-181a-1 on DP cell development can be quantitatively influenced by nucleotide changes in its pre-miRNA loop region. We find that both the strength and the functional specificity of miRNA genes can be controlled by the pre-miRNA loop nucleotides. Intriguingly, we note that mutations in the pre-miRNA loop regions affect pre-miRNA and mature miRNA processing, but find no consistent correlation between the effects of pre-miRNA loop mutations on the levels of mature miRNAs and the activities of the mir-181a-1/c genes. Conclusions These results demonstrate that pre-miRNA loop nucleotides play a critical role in controlling the activity of miRNA genes and that members of the same miRNA gene families could have evolved to achieve different activities via alterations in their pre-miRNA loop sequences, while maintaining identical or nearly identical mature miRNA sequences. PMID:18974849

  5. Human Papillomavirus Genome-Wide Identification of T-Cell Epitopes for Peptide Vaccine Development Against Cervical Cancer: An Integration of Computational Analysis and Experimental Assay.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Zheng, Xianfang; Hu, Chuancui; Cao, Yunxia

    2015-10-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has long been documented as the primary factor causing cervical cancer and other complications, and development of immunotherapeutic vaccines against HPV is thought to be an important approach in preventing women from HPV infections. It is known that the first step in vaccine development is to find potent T-cell epitopes in HPV proteins that can be effectively recognized and presented by the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system. In the current study, we proposed a synthetic pipeline that integrates computational analysis and experimental assay to discover new peptide epitopes from HPV genome with high affinity to the HLA-A*0201, one of the most frequent HLA allele in Caucasian and Asian populations. In the procedure, a structure-based three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) methodology was described and several 3D-QSAR predictors were established using a set of activity-known HLA binders. The best predictor was then employed to perform extrapolation over the HPV genome to screen potential protein fragments with high HLA binding potency. Consequently, 10 peptides were suggested as promising candidates and their affinities toward HLA-A*0201 were assayed using a standard T2 cell surface stabilization test. Four peptides--LLITSNINA from protein E1 (BL50 = 7244 nM), VLLCVCLLI from protein E5 (BL50 = 9118 nM), VLLLWITAA from protein E5 (BL50 = 3388 nM), and LLMGTLGIV from protein E7 (BL50 = 5500 nM)--were identified as high-affinity binders. Further, the structural basis and binding mode of HLA-A*0201-LLITSNINA complex was examined in detail, revealing a complicated network of nonbonded interactions across the complex interface that should render high stability and specificity for the interaction system.

  6. Peripheral T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Foss, Francine M; Zinzani, Pier Luigi; Vose, Julie M; Gascoyne, Randy D; Rosen, Steven T; Tobinai, Kensei

    2011-06-23

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are a heterogeneous group of clinically aggressive diseases associated with poor outcome. Studies that focus specifically on PTCL are emerging, with the ultimate goal of improved understanding of disease biology and the development of more effective therapies. However, one of the difficulties in classifying and studying treatment options in clinical trials is the rarity of these subtypes. Various groups have developed lymphoma classifications over the years, including the World Health Organization, which updated its classification in 2008. This article briefly reviews the major lymphoma classification schema, highlights contributions made by the collaborative International PTCL Project, discusses prognostic issues and gene expression profiling, and outlines therapeutic approaches to PTCL. These include the standard chemotherapeutic regimens and other modalities incorporating antifolates, conjugates, histone deacetylase inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies, nucleoside analogs, proteasome inhibitors, and signaling inhibitors. As this review emphasizes, the problem has now evolved into an abundance of drugs and too few patients available to test them. Collaborative groups will aid in future efforts to find the best treatment strategies to improve the outcome for patients with PTCL.

  7. T cells as a therapeutic target in SLE

    PubMed Central

    Comte, Denis; Karampetsou, Maria P.; Tsokos, George C.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease characterized by a loss of tolerance to multiple endogenous antigens. SLE etiology remains largely unknown, despite recent insight into the immunopathogenesis of the disease. T cells are important in the development of the disease by amplifying the immune response and contributing to organ damage. Aberrant signaling, cytokine secretion and tissue homing displayed by SLE T cells have been extensively studied and the underlying pathogenic molecular mechanisms are starting to be elucidated. T-cell targeted treatments are being explored in SLE patients. This review is an update on the T-cell abnormalities and related therapeutic options in SLE. PMID:25801878

  8. Monoclonal regulatory T cells provide insights into T cell suppression

    PubMed Central

    Gubser, Céline; Schmaler, Mathias; Rossi, Simona W.; Palmer, Ed

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have a crucial role in maintaining lymphocyte homeostasis. However an understanding of how Tregs function at a cellular and molecular level has not yet been fully elucidated. Here, we make use of a T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic, Rag−/− mouse expressing a Forkhead-Box-Protein P3 (Foxp3) transgene. This mouse provides a source of monoclonal CD4+ Foxp3+ T cells with a defined specificity. Here we show that monoclonal B3K506 Tregs are functional in vitro and in vivo and clearly require cognate antigen to be suppressive. We further show that the strength of Treg stimulation determines the strength of Treg mediated suppression. Finally we analysed various suppressive mechanisms used by monoclonal Tregs and found that Treg-Tconv proximity is a parameter, which correlates with enhanced suppression. PMID:27210828

  9. Deficiency of antigen-specific B cells results in decreased Trypanosoma cruzi systemic but not mucosal immunity due to CD8 T cell exhaustion

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Nicole L.; Eickhoff, Christopher S.; Sagartz, John; Hoft, Daniel F.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines against mucosally invasive, intracellular pathogens must induce a myriad of immune responses in order to provide optimal mucosal and systemic protection, including CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells and antibody-producing B cells. In general, CD4+ T cells are known to provide important helper functions for both CD8+ T cell and B cell responses. However, the relative importance of CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells and B cells for mucosal protection is less clearly defined. We have studied these questions in detail using the murine model of Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Despite our initial hypothesis that mucosal antibodies would be important, we show that B cells are critical for systemic, but not mucosal, T. cruzi protective immunity. B cell deficient mice developed normal levels of CD8+ effector T cell responses early after mucosal T. cruzi infection and T. cruzi trans-sialidase vaccination. However, after highly virulent systemic challenge, T. cruzi immune mice lacking T. cruzi-specific B cells failed to control parasitemia or prevent death. Mechanistically, T. cruzi-specific CD8+ T cells generated in the absence of B cells expressed increased PD-1 and Lag-3 and became functionally exhausted after high-level T. cruzi systemic challenge. T. cruzi immune serum prevented CD8+ T cell functional exhaustion and reduced mortality in mice lacking B cells. Overall, these results demonstrate that T. cruzi-specific B cells are necessary during systemic, but not mucosal, parasite challenge. PMID:25595788

  10. New Strategies in Engineering T-cell Receptor Gene-Modified T cells to More Effectively Target Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Thomas M; Stromnes, Ingunn M; Chapuis, Aude G; Greenberg, Philip D

    2015-12-01

    The immune system, T cells in particular, have the ability to target and destroy malignant cells. However, antitumor immune responses induced from the endogenous T-cell repertoire are often insufficient for the eradication of established tumors, as illustrated by the failure of cancer vaccination strategies or checkpoint blockade for most tumors. Genetic modification of T cells to express a defined T-cell receptor (TCR) can provide the means to rapidly generate large numbers of tumor-reactive T cells capable of targeting tumor cells in vivo. However, cell-intrinsic factors as well as immunosuppressive factors in the tumor microenvironment can limit the function of such gene-modified T cells. New strategies currently being developed are refining and enhancing this approach, resulting in cellular therapies that more effectively target tumors and that are less susceptible to tumor immune evasion.

  11. Depressed immune surveillance against cancer: role of deficient T cell: extracellular matrix interactions.

    PubMed

    Górski, A; Castronovo, V; Stepień-Sopniewska, B; Grieb, P; Ryba, M; Mrowiec, T; Korczak-Kowalska, G; Wierzbicki, P; Matysiak, W; Dybowska, B

    1994-07-01

    Although T cells infiltrate malignant tumors, the local immune response is usually inefficient and tumors escape destruction. While extracellular matrix proteins strongly costimulate T cell responses in normal individuals, our studies indicate that peripheral blood T cells from cancer patients and tumor infiltrating cells respond poorly or are resistant to stimulative signals mediated by collagen I and IV and fibronectin. Moreover, the adhesive properties of cancer T cells are markedly depressed. Those functional deficiencies are paralleled by variable deficits in integrin and non-integrin T cell receptors for extracellular matrix. Immunotherapy with BCG causes a dramatic but transient increase in T cell: ECM interactions.

  12. Regulatory CD4+ T-Cell Subsets and Anti-Citrullinated Protein Antibody Repertoire: Potential Biomarkers for Arthritis Development in Seropositive Arthralgia Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Koen M. J.; Westra, Johanna; Chalan, Paulina; Boots, Annemieke M. H.; de Smit, Menke J.; van Winkelhoff, Arie Jan; Vissink, Arjan; Brouwer, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Objective Seropositive arthralgia patients (SAP) are at high risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This prospective study aimed to determine whether altered peripheral regulatory T-cells (Tregs) and defined subsets, besides a broadened anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) response, may qualify as biomarkers for RA development in SAP. Methods Thirty-four consecutive SAP were prospectively assessed every 6 months for minimally 2 years. At inclusion, peripheral Treg (CD4+CD25+FoxP3+) numbers and subsets, defined as CD45RA+FoxP3low naive Tregs (Fr I), CD45RA-FoxP3high activated Tregs (Fr II) and CD45RA-FoxP3low non-Tregs (Fr III), were compared to age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HC, n = 16) and treatment-naive RA patients (n = 12). SAP that developed RA were compared to non-switchers and analyzed for Treg numbers and Treg subsets at inclusion. Also, Treg numbers and subsets were compared in switched SAP before and at diagnosis. To assess the ACPA repertoire, IgG and IgA reactivity was measured against citrullinated peptides from fibrinogen, α-enolase and vimentin. Results Treg numbers were similar between HC, SAP and RA patients. Although the bonafide Treg subsets Fr I and Fr II were comparable between groups, Fr III was increased in SAP compared to HC (p = 0.01). Fourteen (41%) SAP developed RA during follow-up. Their Treg numbers and subsets were comparable to non-switched SAP. At RA diagnosis, Treg numbers in switched SAP were similar to 6 months before. Switched SAP displayed a more diverse IgG ACPA repertoire compared to non-switched SAP (p = 0.046) and showed more IgA reactivity than non-switched SAP reaching significance for Fib1 only (p = 0.047). Conclusion Numbers of Total Treg and bonafide Treg subsets are not indicative for RA development in SAP, opposed to the ACPA repertoire. PMID:27585422

  13. Expansion of cytokine-producing CD4-CD8- T cells associated with abnormal Fas expression and hypereosinophilia

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The mechanisms of sustained overproduction of eosinophils in the idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome and in some human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1-infected individuals are largely unknown. We hypothesized that T cells may release soluble products that regulate eosinophilia in these patients, as has been previously shown in bronchial asthma. We identified one patient with idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome and one HIV-1-infected individual with associated hypereosinophilia who demonstrated high numbers of CD4-CD8- T cells in peripheral blood. CD4-CD8- T cells from both patients, although highly activated, did not express functional Fas receptors. In one case, the lack of functional Fas receptors was associated with failure of Fas mRNA and protein expression, and in another, expression of a soluble form of the Fas molecule that may have antagonized normal signaling of Fas ligand. In contrast to the recently described lymphoproliferative/autoimmune syndrome, which is characterized by accumulation of CD4-CD8- T cells and mutations within the Fas gene, this study suggests somatic variations in Fas expression and function quite late in life. Both genetic and somatic abnormalities in regulation of the Fas gene are therefore associated with failures to undergo T cell apoptosis. Furthermore, the expanded population of CD4- CD8- T cells from both patients elaborated cytokines with antiapoptotic properties for eosinophils, indicating a major role of these T cells in the development of eosinophilia. Thus, this study demonstrates a sequential dysregulation of apoptosis in different cell types. PMID:8642249

  14. Redundant and specialized roles for diacylglycerol kinases α and ζ in the control of T cell functions.

    PubMed

    Mérida, Isabel; Andrada, Elena; Gharbi, Severine I; Ávila-Flores, Antonia

    2015-04-28

    The diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) attenuate diacylglycerol (DAG)-mediated signals by catalyzing the conversion of DAG to phosphatidic acid. In T lymphocytes, the antigen-stimulated generation of DAG links signal strength to the intensity and duration of signaling by the Ras-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent pathways. The generation of DAG at the plasma membrane of T cells lies at the core of the mechanisms that delimit T cell functions. DGKα and DGKζ are the two main isoforms that are found in T cells, and several approaches define their precise contribution to T cell responses. Each of these isoforms has specialized and redundant functions that limit the intensity of DAG-regulated signals downstream of antigenic stimulation. This ability, which in normal T cells contributes to maintaining homeostasis and function, is exploited by tumors to evade immune surveillance. Modification of DGK activity offers new perspectives for the therapeutic manipulation of T cell functions for treatment of autoimmune pathologies, or for overcoming tumor-induced T cell tolerance. Precise knowledge of the mechanisms that sustain DGK isoform-specific regulation in T lymphocytes is indispensable for the development of new tools for pharmacological intervention.

  15. The appearance of T cells bearing self-reactive T cell receptor in the livers of mice injected with bacteria.

    PubMed

    Abo, T; Ohteki, T; Seki, S; Koyamada, N; Yoshikai, Y; Masuda, T; Rikiishi, H; Kumagai, K

    1991-08-01

    We demonstrated in the present study that with bacterial stimulation, an increased number of alpha/beta T cells proliferated in the liver of mice and that even T cells bearing self-reactive T cell receptor (TCR) (or forbidden T cell clones), as estimated by anti-V beta monoclonal antibodies in conjunction with immunofluorescence tests, appeared in the liver and, to some extent, in the periphery. The majority (greater than 80%) of forbidden clones induced had double-negative CD4-8-phenotype. In a syngeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction, these T cells appear to be self-reactive. Such forbidden clones and normal T cells in the liver showed a two-peak pattern of TCR expression, which consisted of alpha/beta TCR dull and bright positive cells, as seen in the thymus. A systematic analysis of TCR staining patterns in the various organs was then carried out. T cells from not only the thymus but also the liver had the two-peak pattern of alpha/beta TCR, whereas all of the other peripheral lymphoid organs had a single-peak pattern of TCR. However, T cells in the liver were not comprised of double-positive CD4+8+ cells, which predominantly reside in the thymus. The present results therefore suggest that T cell proliferation in the liver might reflect a major extrathymic pathway for T cell differentiation and that this hepatic pathway has the ability to produce T cells bearing self-reactive TCR under bacterial stimulation, probably due to the lack of a double-positive stage for negative selection.

  16. Isolation and Characterization of Salmonid CD4+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Maisey, Kevin; Montero, Ruth; Corripio-Miyar, Yolanda; Toro-Ascuy, Daniela; Valenzuela, Beatriz; Reyes-Cerpa, Sebastián; Sandino, Ana María; Zou, Jun; Wang, Tiehui; Secombes, Christopher J; Imarai, Mónica

    2016-05-15

    This study reports the isolation and functional characterization of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) CD4-1(+) T cells and the establishment of an IL-15-dependent CD4-1(+) T cell line. By using Abs specific for CD4-1 and CD3ε it was possible to isolate the double-positive T cells in spleen and head kidney. The morphology and the presence of transcripts for T cell markers in the sorted CD4-1(+)CD3ε(+) cells were studied next. Cells were found to express TCRα, TCRβ, CD152 (CTLA-4), CD154 (CD40L), T-bet, GATA-3, and STAT-1. The sorted CD4-1(+) T cells also had a distinctive functional attribute of mammalian T lymphocytes, namely they could undergo Ag-specific proliferation, using OVA as a model Ag. The OVA-stimulated cells showed increased expression of several cytokines, including IFN-γ1, IL-4/13A, IL-15, IL-17D, IL-10, and TGF-β1, perhaps indicating that T cell proliferation led to differentiation into distinct effector phenotypes. Using IL-15 as a growth factor, we have selected a lymphoid cell line derived from rainbow trout head kidney cells. The morphology, cell surface expression of CD4-1, and the presence of transcripts of T cell cytokines and transcription factors indicated that this is a CD4-1(+) T cell line. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the presence of CD4-1(+)CD3ε(+) T cells in salmonids. As in mammals, CD4-1(+) T cells may be the master regulators of immune responses in fish, and therefore these findings and the new model T cell line developed will contribute to a greater understanding of T cell function and immune responses in teleost fish. PMID:27053758

  17. Retargeting T cells to GD2 pentasaccharide on human tumors using bispecific humanized antibody

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong; Cheng, Ming; Guo, Hongfen; Chen, Yuedan; Huse, Morgan; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2015-01-01

    Anti-disialoganglioside GD2 IgG antibodies have shown clinical efficacy in solid tumors that lack human leukocyte antigens (e.g. neuroblastoma) by relying on Fc-dependent cytotoxicity. However, there are pain side effects secondary to complement activation. T-cell retargeting bispecific antibodies (BsAb) also have clinical potential, but it is thus far only effective against liquid tumors. In this study, a fully humanized hu3F8-BsAb was developed, in which the anti-CD3 huOKT3 single chain Fv fragment (ScFv) was linked to the carboxyl end of the anti-GD2 hu3F8 IgG1 light chain, and was aglycosylated at N297 of Fc to prevent complement activation and cytokine storm. In vitro, hu3F8-BsAb activated T cells through classic immunological synapses, inducing GD2-specific tumor cytotoxicity at femtomolar EC50 with >105-fold selectivity over normal tissues, releasing Th1 cytokines (TNFα, IFNγ and IL2) when GD2(+) tumors were present. In separate murine neuroblastoma and melanoma xenograft models, intravenous hu3F8-BsAb activated T cells in situ and recruited intravenous T cells for tumor ablation, significantly prolonging survival from local recurrence or from metastatic disease. Hu3F8-BsAb, but not control BsAb, drove T cells and monocytes to infiltrate tumor stroma. These monocytes were necessary for sustained T-cell proliferation and/or survival and contributed significantly to the antitumor effect. The in vitro and in vivo antitumor properties of hu3F8-BsAb and its safety profile support its further clinical development as a cancer therapeutic, and provide the rationale for exploring aglycosylated IgG-scFv as a structural platform for retargeting human T cells. PMID:25542634

  18. Viral inoculum dose impacts memory T-cell inflation.

    PubMed

    Redeker, Anke; Welten, Suzanne P M; Arens, Ramon

    2014-04-01

    Memory T-cell inflation develops during certain persistent viral infections and is characterized by the accumulation and maintenance of large numbers of effector-memory T cells, albeit with varying degrees in size and phenotype among infected hosts. The underlying mechanisms that control memory T-cell inflation are not yet fully understood. Here, we dissected CMV-specific memory T-cell formation and its connection to the initial infectious dose by varying the inoculum size. After low dose inoculum with mouse CMV, the accumulation of inflationary memory T cells was severely hampered and correlated with reduced reservoirs of latent virus in nonhematopoietic cells and diminished antigen-driven T-cell proliferation. Moreover, lowering of the initial viral dose turned the characteristic effector memory-like inflationary T cells into more central memory-like cells as evidenced by the cell-surface phenotype of CD27(high) , CD62L(+) , CD127(+) , and KLRG1(-) , and by improved secondary expansion potential. These data show the impact of the viral inoculum on the degree of memory T-cell inflation and provide a rationale for the observed variation of human CMV-specific T-cell responses in terms of magnitude and phenotype.

  19. TIM3 Mediates T Cell Exhaustion during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, Pushpa; Jacques, Miye K; Zhu, Chen; Steblenko, Katherine M; Stowell, Britni L; Madi, Asaf; Anderson, Ana C; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Behar, Samuel M

    2016-03-01

    While T cell immunity initially limits Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, why T cell immunity fails to sterilize the infection and allows recrudescence is not clear. One hypothesis is that T cell exhaustion impairs immunity and is detrimental to the outcome of M. tuberculosis infection. Here we provide functional evidence for the development T cell exhaustion during chronic TB. Second, we evaluate the role of the inhibitory receptor T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-containing-3 (TIM3) during chronic M. tuberculosis infection. We find that TIM3 expressing T cells accumulate during chronic infection, co-express other inhibitory receptors including PD1, produce less IL-2 and TNF but more IL-10, and are functionally exhausted. Finally, we show that TIM3 blockade restores T cell function and improves bacterial control, particularly in chronically infected susceptible mice. These data show that T cell immunity is suboptimal during chronic M. tuberculosis infection due to T cell exhaustion. Moreover, in chronically infected mice, treatment with anti-TIM3 mAb is an effective therapeutic strategy against tuberculosis.

  20. CD1 and mycobacterial lipids activate human T cells

    PubMed Central

    Van Rhijn, Ildiko; Moody, D. Branch

    2014-01-01

    Summary For decades, proteins were thought to be the sole or at least the dominant source of antigens for T cells. Studies in the 1990s demonstrated that CD1 proteins and mycobacterial lipids form specific targets of human αβ T cells. The molecular basis by which T-cell receptors (TCRs) recognize CD1-lipid complexes is now well understood. Many types of mycobacterial lipids function as antigens in the CD1 system, and new studies done with CD1 tetramers identify T-cell populations in the blood of tuberculosis patients. In human populations, a fundamental difference between the CD1 and major histocompatibility complex systems is that all humans express nearly identical CD1 proteins. Correspondingly, human CD1 responsive T cells show evidence of conserved TCRs. In addition to natural killer T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT cells), conserved TCRs define other subsets of human T cells, including germline-encoded mycolyl-reactive (GEM) T cells. The simple immunogenetics of the CD1 system and new investigative tools to measure T-cell responses in humans now creates a situation in which known lipid antigens can be developed as immunodiagnostic and immunotherapeutic reagents for tuberculosis disease. PMID:25703557

  1. T cell-specific inhibition of multiple apoptotic pathways blocks negative selection and causes autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Megan L; Leung, Kenneth K; Bennett, Margaux J; Winoto, Astar

    2014-01-01

    T cell self-tolerance is thought to involve peripheral tolerance and negative selection, involving apoptosis of autoreactive thymocytes. However, evidence supporting an essential role for negative selection is limited. Loss of Bim, a Bcl-2 BH3-only protein essential for thymocyte apoptosis, rarely results in autoimmunity on the C57BL/6 background. Mice with T cell-specific over-expression of Bcl-2, that blocks multiple BH3-only proteins, are also largely normal. The nuclear receptor Nur77, also implicated in negative selection, might function redundantly to promote apoptosis by associating with Bcl-2 and exposing its potentially pro-apoptotic BH3 domain. Here, we report that T cell-specific expression of a Bcl2 BH3 mutant transgene results in enhanced rescue of thymocytes from negative selection. Concomitantly, Treg development is increased. However, aged BH3 mutant mice progressively accumulate activated, autoreactive T cells, culminating in development of multi-organ autoimmunity and lethality. These data provide strong evidence that negative selection is crucial for establishing T cell tolerance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03468.001 PMID:25182415

  2. T-cell help dependence of memory CD8+ T-cell expansion upon vaccinia virus challenge relies on CD40 signaling.

    PubMed

    Bedenikovic, Gregor; Crouse, Josh; Oxenius, Annette

    2014-01-01

    Due to their capacity to differentiate into long-lived memory cells, CD8(+) T cells are able to resolve subsequent infections faster than during the primary response. Among other factors, CD4(+) T cells play a crucial role during primary and secondary CD8(+) T-cell responses. However, the timing and mechanisms by which they influence CD8(+) T cells may differ in primary and secondary responses. Here, we demonstrate that during both primary and secondary vaccinia virus infection, CD4(+) T cells are necessary to promote CD8(+) T-cell responses. While CD4(+) T cells contributed to memory CD8(+) T-cell development, they were even more important during memory recall responses during challenge, as absence of CD4(+) T cells during challenge resulted in markedly decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis. T-cell help during primary and secondary responses was mediated via CD40 signaling, with DCs being an integral part of that pathway. As opposed to primary CD8(+) T-cell responses where only a combination of agonistic CD40 signaling and provision of IL-2 could substitute for T-cell help, agonistic CD40 triggering alone was sufficient to rescue memory CD8(+) T-cell responses in absence of T-cell help in the context of vaccinia virus infection.

  3. ZFAT plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its T cell receptor-mediated response

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, Keiko; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Okamura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Masahiro; Tanaka, Yoko; Mototani, Yasumasa; Goto, Motohito; Ota, Takeharu; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Kuroki, Masahide; Tsunoda, Toshiyuki; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Shirasawa, Senji

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We generated Cd4-Cre-mediated T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zfat-deficiency leads to reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Impaired T cell receptor-mediated response in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decreased expression of IL-7R{alpha}, IL-2R{alpha} and IL-2 in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zfat plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis. -- Abstract: ZFAT, originally identified as a candidate susceptibility gene for autoimmune thyroid disease, has been reported to be involved in apoptosis, development and primitive hematopoiesis. Zfat is highly expressed in T- and B-cells in the lymphoid tissues, however, its physiological function in the immune system remains totally unknown. Here, we generated the T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice and demonstrated that Zfat-deficiency leads to a remarkable reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. Intriguingly, a reduced expression of IL-7R{alpha} and the impaired responsiveness to IL-7 for the survival were observed in the Zfat-deficient T cells. Furthermore, a severe defect in proliferation and increased apoptosis in the Zfat-deficient T cells following T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation was observed with a reduced IL-2R{alpha} expression as well as a reduced IL-2 production. Thus, our findings reveal that Zfat is a critical regulator in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its TCR-mediated response.

  4. Physical Development: What's Normal? What's Not?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Normal? What’s Not? Page Content Article Body ​Two boys or girls exactly the same age can start or end ... in Girls: What to Expect . Growth in both boys and girls slows considerably soon after puberty is complete. Having ...

  5. Gamma-delta t-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Foppoli, Marco; Ferreri, Andrés J M

    2015-03-01

    Gamma-delta T-cell lymphomas are aggressive and rare diseases originating from gamma-delta lymphocytes. These cells, which naturally play a role in the innate, non-specific immune response, develop from thymic precursor in the bone marrow, lack the major histocompatibility complex restrictions and can be divided into two subpopulations: Vdelta1, mostly represented in the intestine, and Vdelta2, prevalently located in the skin, tonsils and lymph nodes. Chronic immunosuppression such as in solid organ transplanted subjects and prolonged antigenic exposure are probably the strongest risk factors for the triggering of lymphomagenesis. Two entities are recognised by the 2008 WHO Classification: hepatosplenic gamma-delta T-cell lymphoma (HSGDTL) and primary cutaneous gamma-delta T-cell lymphoma (PCGDTL). The former is more common among young males, presenting with B symptoms, splenomegaly and thrombocytopenia, usually with the absence of nodal involvement. Natural behaviour of HSGDTL is characterised by low response rates, poor treatment tolerability, common early progression of disease and disappointing survival figures. PCGDTL accounts for <1% of all primary cutaneous lymphomas, occurring in adults with relevant comorbidities. Cutaneous lesions may vary, but its clinical behaviour is usually aggressive and long-term survival is anecdotal. Available literature on gamma-delta T-cell lymphomas is fractioned, mostly consisting of case reports or small cumulative series. Therefore, clinical suspicion and diagnosis are usually delayed, and therapeutic management remains to be established. This review critically analyses available evidence on diagnosis, staging and behaviour of gamma-delta T-cell lymphomas, provides recommendations for therapeutic management in routine practice and discusses relevant unmet clinical needs for future studies.

  6. T-cell libraries allow simple parallel generation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones.

    PubMed

    Theaker, Sarah M; Rius, Cristina; Greenshields-Watson, Alexander; Lloyd, Angharad; Trimby, Andrew; Fuller, Anna; Miles, John J; Cole, David K; Peakman, Mark; Sewell, Andrew K; Dolton, Garry

    2016-03-01

    Isolation of peptide-specific T-cell clones is highly desirable for determining the role of T-cells in human disease, as well as for the development of therapies and diagnostics. However, generation of monoclonal T-cells with the required specificity is challenging and time-consuming. Here we describe a library-based strategy for the simple parallel detection and isolation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones from CD8(+) or CD4(+) polyclonal T-cell populations. T-cells were first amplified by CD3/CD28 microbeads in a 96U-well library format, prior to screening for desired peptide recognition. T-cells from peptide-reactive wells were then subjected to cytokine-mediated enrichment followed by single-cell cloning, with the entire process from sample to validated clone taking as little as 6 weeks. Overall, T-cell libraries represent an efficient and relatively rapid tool for the generation of peptide-specific T-cell clones, with applications shown here in infectious disease (Epstein-Barr virus, influenza A, and Ebola virus), autoimmunity (type 1 diabetes) and cancer.

  7. T-cell libraries allow simple parallel generation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones.

    PubMed

    Theaker, Sarah M; Rius, Cristina; Greenshields-Watson, Alexander; Lloyd, Angharad; Trimby, Andrew; Fuller, Anna; Miles, John J; Cole, David K; Peakman, Mark; Sewell, Andrew K; Dolton, Garry

    2016-03-01

    Isolation of peptide-specific T-cell clones is highly desirable for determining the role of T-cells in human disease, as well as for the development of therapies and diagnostics. However, generation of monoclonal T-cells with the required specificity is challenging and time-consuming. Here we describe a library-based strategy for the simple parallel detection and isolation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones from CD8(+) or CD4(+) polyclonal T-cell populations. T-cells were first amplified by CD3/CD28 microbeads in a 96U-well library format, prior to screening for desired peptide recognition. T-cells from peptide-reactive wells were then subjected to cytokine-mediated enrichment followed by single-cell cloning, with the entire process from sample to validated clone taking as little as 6 weeks. Overall, T-cell libraries represent an efficient and relatively rapid tool for the generation of peptide-specific T-cell clones, with applications shown here in infectious disease (Epstein-Barr virus, influenza A, and Ebola virus), autoimmunity (type 1 diabetes) and cancer. PMID:26826277

  8. Switching CAR T cells on and off: a novel modular platform for retargeting of T cells to AML blasts

    PubMed Central

    Cartellieri, M; Feldmann, A; Koristka, S; Arndt, C; Loff, S; Ehninger, A; von Bonin, M; Bejestani, E P; Ehninger, G; Bachmann, M P

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor engineered T cells (CAR T cells) resulted in encouraging clinical trials in indolent B-cell malignancies. However, they also show the limitations of this fascinating technology: CAR T cells can lead to even life-threatening off-tumor, on-target side effects if CAR T cells crossreact with healthy tissues. Here, we describe a novel modular universal CAR platform technology termed UniCAR that reduces the risk of on-target side effects by a rapid and reversible control of CAR T-cell reactivity. The UniCAR system consists of two components: (1) a CAR for an inert manipulation of T cells and (2) specific targeting modules (TMs) for redirecting UniCAR T cells in an individualized time- and target-dependent manner. UniCAR T cells can be armed against different tumor targets simply by replacement of the respective TM for (1) targeting more than one antigen simultaneously or subsequently to enhance efficacy and (2) reducing the risk for development of antigen-loss tumor variants under treatment. Here we provide ‘proof of concept' for retargeting of UniCAR T cells to CD33- and/or CD123-positive acute myeloid leukemia blasts in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27518241

  9. Multiplex Genome-Edited T-cell Manufacturing Platform for "Off-the-Shelf" Adoptive T-cell Immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Poirot, Laurent; Philip, Brian; Schiffer-Mannioui, Cécile; Le Clerre, Diane; Chion-Sotinel, Isabelle; Derniame, Sophie; Potrel, Pierrick; Bas, Cécile; Lemaire, Laetitia; Galetto, Roman; Lebuhotel, Céline; Eyquem, Justin; Cheung, Gordon Weng-Kit; Duclert, Aymeric; Gouble, Agnès; Arnould, Sylvain; Peggs, Karl; Pule, Martin; Scharenberg, Andrew M; Smith, Julianne

    2015-09-15

    Adoptive immunotherapy using autologous T cells endowed with chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) has emerged as a powerful means of treating cancer. However, a limitation of this approach is that autologous CAR T cells must be generated on a custom-made basis. Here we show that electroporation of transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) mRNA allows highly efficient multiplex gene editing in primary human T cells. We use this TALEN-mediated editing approach to develop a process for the large-scale manufacturing of T cells deficient in expression of both their αβ T-cell receptor (TCR) and CD52, a protein targeted by alemtuzumab, a chemotherapeutic agent. Functionally, T cells manufactured with this process do not mediate graft-versus-host reactions and are rendered resistant to destruction by alemtuzumab. These characteristics enable the administration of alemtuzumab concurrently or prior to engineered T cells, supporting their engraftment. Furthermore, endowing the TALEN-engineered cells with a CD19 CAR led to efficient destruction of CD19(+) tumor targets even in the presence of the chemotherapeutic agent. These results demonstrate the applicability of TALEN-mediated genome editing to a scalable process, which enables the manufacturing of third-party CAR T-cell immunotherapies against arbitrary targets. As such, CAR T-cell immunotherapies can therefore be used in an "off-the-shelf" manner akin to other biologic immunopharmaceuticals

  10. Rapid and efficient transfer of the T cell aging marker CD57 from glioblastoma stem cells to CAR T cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xuekai; Niedermann, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) holds great promise for cancer treatment. We recently developed CAR T cells targeting the prototypic cancer stem cell marker AC133 and showed that these CAR T cells killed AC133+ glioblastoma stem cells (GBM-SCs) in vitro and inhibited the growth of brain tumors initiated from GBM-SCs in xenograft mouse models in vivo. Upon coincubation with GBM-SCs, we observed strong upregulation of the T cell aging marker CD57, but other phenotypical or functional changes usually associated with terminal T cell differentiation could not immediately be detected. Here, we provide evidence suggesting that CD57 is rapidly and efficiently transferred from CD57+ GBM-SCs to preactivated T cells and that the transfer is greatly enhanced by specific CAR/ligand interaction. After separation from CD57+ tumor cells, CD57 epitope expression on T cells decreased only slowly over several days. We conclude that CD57 transfer from tumor cells to T cells may occur in patients with CD57+ tumors and that it may have to be considered in the interpretation of phenotyping results for tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and perhaps also in the characterization of tumor-specific T cells from tumor or lymph node homogenates or peripheral blood mononuclear cells. PMID:26097880

  11. Switching CAR T cells on and off: a novel modular platform for retargeting of T cells to AML blasts.

    PubMed

    Cartellieri, M; Feldmann, A; Koristka, S; Arndt, C; Loff, S; Ehninger, A; von Bonin, M; Bejestani, E P; Ehninger, G; Bachmann, M P

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor engineered T cells (CAR T cells) resulted in encouraging clinical trials in indolent B-cell malignancies. However, they also show the limitations of this fascinating technology: CAR T cells can lead to even life-threatening off-tumor, on-target side effects if CAR T cells crossreact with healthy tissues. Here, we describe a novel modular universal CAR platform technology termed UniCAR that reduces the risk of on-target side effects by a rapid and reversible control of CAR T-cell reactivity. The UniCAR system consists of two components: (1) a CAR for an inert manipulation of T cells and (2) specific targeting modules (TMs) for redirecting UniCAR T cells in an individualized time- and target-dependent manner. UniCAR T cells can be armed against different tumor targets simply by replacement of the respective TM for (1) targeting more than one antigen simultaneously or subsequently to enhance efficacy and (2) reducing the risk for development of antigen-loss tumor variants under treatment. Here we provide 'proof of concept' for retargeting of UniCAR T cells to CD33- and/or CD123-positive acute myeloid leukemia blasts in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27518241

  12. T-cell libraries allow simple parallel generation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones

    PubMed Central

    Theaker, Sarah M.; Rius, Cristina; Greenshields-Watson, Alexander; Lloyd, Angharad; Trimby, Andrew; Fuller, Anna; Miles, John J.; Cole, David K.; Peakman, Mark; Sewell, Andrew K.; Dolton, Garry

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of peptide-specific T-cell clones is highly desirable for determining the role of T-cells in human disease, as well as for the development of therapies and diagnostics. However, generation of monoclonal T-cells with the required specificity is challenging and time-consuming. Here we describe a library-based strategy for the simple parallel detection and isolation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones from CD8+ or CD4+ polyclonal T-cell populations. T-cells were first amplified by CD3/CD28 microbeads in a 96U-well library format, prior to screening for desired peptide recognition. T-cells from peptide-reactive wells were then subjected to cytokine-mediated enrichment followed by single-cell cloning, with the entire process from sample to validated clone taking as little as 6 weeks. Overall, T-cell libraries represent an efficient and relatively rapid tool for the generation of peptide-specific T-cell clones, with applications shown here in infectious disease (Epstein–Barr virus, influenza A, and Ebola virus), autoimmunity (type 1 diabetes) and cancer. PMID:26826277

  13. Susceptibility to T cell-mediated liver injury is enhanced in asialoglycoprotein receptor-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    McVicker, Benita L; Thiele, Geoffrey M; Casey, Carol A; Osna, Natalia A; Tuma, Dean J

    2013-05-01

    T cell activation and associated pro-inflammatory cytokine production is a pathological feature of inflammatory liver disease. It is also known that liver injury is associated with marked impairments in the function of many hepatic proteins including a hepatocyte-specific binding protein, the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR). Recently, it has been suggested that hepatic ASGPRs may play an important role in the physiological regulation of T lymphocytes, leading to our hypothesis that ASGPR defects correlate with inflammatory-mediated events in liver diseases. Therefore, in this study we investigated whether changes in hepatocellular ASGPR expression were related to the dysregulation of intrahepatic T lymphocytes and correlate with the development of T-cell mediated hepatitis. Mice lacking functional ASGPRs (receptor-deficient, RD), and wild-type (WT) controls were intravenously injected with T-cell mitogens, Concanavalin A (Con A) or anti-CD3 antibody. As a result of T cell mitogen treatment, RD mice lacking hepatic ASGPRs displayed enhancements in liver pathology, transaminase activities, proinflammatory cytokine expression, and caspase activation compared to that observed in normal WT mice. Furthermore, FACS analysis demonstrated that T-cell mitogen administration resulted in a significant rise in the percentage of CD8+ lymphocytes present in the livers of RD animals versus WT mice. Since these two mouse strains differ only in whether they express the hepatic ASGPR, it can be concluded that proper ASGPR function exerts a protective effect against T cell mediated hepatitis and that impairments to this hepatic receptor could be related to the accumulation of cytotoxic T cells that are observed in inflammatory liver diseases.

  14. NY-ESO-1 antigen-reactive T cell receptors exhibit diverse therapeutic capability.

    PubMed

    Sommermeyer, Daniel; Conrad, Heinke; Krönig, Holger; Gelfort, Haike; Bernhard, Helga; Uckert, Wolfgang

    2013-03-15

    The cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1 has been used as a target for different immunotherapies like vaccinations and adoptive transfer of antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells, as it is expressed in various tumor types and has limited expression in normal cells. The in vitro generation of T cells with defined antigen specificity by T cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer is an established method to create cells for immunotherapy. However, an extensive characterization of TCR which are candidates for treatment of patients is crucial for successful therapies. The TCR has to be efficiently expressed, their affinity to the desired antigen should be high enough to recognize low amounts of endogenously processed peptides on tumor cells, and the TCR should not be cross-reactive to other antigens. We characterized three NY-ESO-1 antigen-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocyte clones which were generated by different approaches of T cell priming (autologous, allogeneic), and transferred their TCR into donor T cells for more extensive evaluations. Although one TCR most efficiently bound MHC-multimers loaded with NY-ESO-1 peptide, T cells expressing this transgenic TCR were not able to recognize endogenously processed antigen. A second TCR recognized HLA-A2 independent of the bound peptide beside its much stronger recognition of NY-ESO-1 bound to HLA-A2. A third TCR displayed an intermediate but peptide-specific performance in all functional assays and, therefore, is the most promising candidate TCR for further clinical development. Our data indicate that multiple parameters of TCR gene-modified T cells have to be evaluated to identify an optimal TCR candidate for adoptive therapy.

  15. CD4+CD25+ FOXP3+ regulatory T cells from human thymus and cord blood suppress antigen-specific T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Wing, Kajsa; Larsson, Pia; Sandström, Kerstin; Lundin, Samuel B; Suri-Payer, Elisabeth; Rudin, Anna

    2005-01-01

    Activation of self-reactive T cells in healthy adults is prevented by the presence of autoantigen-specific CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (CD25+ Treg). To explore the functional development of autoantigen-reactive CD25+ Treg in humans we investigated if thymic CD25+ Treg from children aged 2 months to 11 years and cord blood CD25+ Treg are able to suppress proliferation and cytokine production induced by specific antigens. While CD4+CD25− thymocytes proliferated in response to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), tetanus toxoid and beta-lactoglobulin, suppression of proliferation was not detected after the addition of thymic CD25+ Treg. However, CD25+ Treg inhibited interferon (IFN)-γ production induced by MOG, which indicates that MOG-reactive CD25+ Treg are present in the thymus. In contrast, cord blood CD25+ Treg suppressed both proliferation and cytokine production induced by MOG. Both cord blood and thymic CD25+ Treg expressed FOXP3 mRNA. However, FOXP3 expression was lower in cord blood than in thymic CD25+ T cells. Further characterization of cord blood CD25+ T cells revealed that FOXP3 was highly expressed by CD25+CD45RA+ cells while CD25+CD45RA− cells contained twofold less FOXP3, which may explain the lower expression level of FOXP3 in cord blood CD25+ T cells compared to thymic CD25+ T cells. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that low numbers of MOG-reactive functional CD25+ Treg are present in normal thymus, but that the suppressive ability of the cells is broader in cord blood. This suggests that the CD25+ Treg may be further matured in the periphery after being exported from the thymus. PMID:16011520

  16. Differential Responses of Human Regulatory T Cells (Treg) and Effector T Cells to Rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Laura; Czystowska, Malgorzata; Szajnik, Marta; Mandapathil, Magis; Whiteside, Theresa L.

    2009-01-01

    Background The immunosuppressive drug rapamycin (RAPA) promotes the expansion of CD4+ CD25highFoxp3+ regulatory T cells via mechanisms that remain unknown. Here, we studied expansion, IL-2R-γ chain signaling, survival pathways and resistance to apoptosis in human Treg responding to RAPA. Methodology/Principal Findings CD4+CD25+ and CD4+CD25neg T cells were isolated from PBMC of normal controls (n = 21) using AutoMACS. These T cell subsets were cultured in the presence of anti-CD3/CD28 antibodies and 1000 IU/mL IL-2 for 3 to 6 weeks. RAPA (1–100 nM) was added to half of the cultures. After harvest, the cell phenotype, signaling via the PI3K/mTOR and STAT pathways, expression of survival proteins and Annexin V binding were determined and compared to values obtained with freshly-separated CD4+CD25high and CD4+CD25neg T cells. Suppressor function was tested in co-cultures with autologous CFSE-labeled CD4+CD25neg or CD8+CD25neg T-cell responders. The frequency and suppressor activity of Treg were increased after culture of CD4+CD25+ T cells in the presence of 1–100 nM RAPA (p<0.001). RAPA-expanded Treg were largely CD4+CD25highFoxp3+ cells and were resistant to apoptosis, while CD4+CD25neg T cells were sensitive. Only Treg upregulated anti-apoptotic and down-regulated pro-apoptotic proteins. Treg expressed higher levels of the PTEN protein than CD4+CD25neg cells. Activated Treg±RAPA preferentially phosphorylated STAT5 and STAT3 and did not utilize the PI3K/mTOR pathway. Conclusions/Significance RAPA favors Treg expansion and survival by differentially regulating signaling, proliferation and sensitivity to apoptosis of human effector T cells and Treg after TCR/IL-2 activation. PMID:19543393

  17. PSGL-1 regulates the migration and proliferation of CD8(+) T cells under homeostatic conditions.

    PubMed

    Veerman, Krystle M; Carlow, Douglas A; Shanina, Iryna; Priatel, John J; Horwitz, Marc S; Ziltener, Hermann J

    2012-02-15

    P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), a heavily glycosylated sialomucin expressed on most leukocytes, has dual function as a selectin ligand for leukocyte rolling on vascular selectins expressed in inflammation and as a facilitator of resting T cell homing into lymphoid organs. In this article, we document disturbances in T cell homeostasis present in PSGL-1(null) mice. Naive CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell frequencies were profoundly reduced in blood, whereas T cell numbers in lymph nodes and spleen were at or near normal levels. Although PSGL-1(null) T cells were less efficient at entering lymph nodes, they also remained in lymph nodes longer than PSGL-1(+/+) T cells, suggesting that PSGL-1 supports T cell egress. In addition, PSGL-1(null) CD8(+) T cell proliferation was observed under steady-state conditions and PSGL-1(null) CD8(+) T cells were found to be hyperresponsive to homeostatic cytokines IL-2, IL-4, and IL-15. Despite these disturbances in T cell homeostasis, PSGL-1(null) mice exhibited a normal acute response (day 8) to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection but generated an increased frequency of memory T cells (day 40). Our observations demonstrate a novel pleiotropic influence of PSGL-1 deficiency on several aspects of T cell homeostasis that would not have been anticipated based on the mild phenotype of PSGL-1(null) mice. These potentially offsetting effects presumably account for the near-normal cellularity seen in lymph nodes of PSGL-1(null) mice.

  18. Peripheral canine CD4(+)CD8(+) double-positive T cells - unique amongst others.

    PubMed

    von Buttlar, Heiner; Bismarck, Doris; Alber, Gottfried

    2015-12-15

    T lymphocytes co-expressing CD4 and CD8 ("double-positive T cells") are commonly associated with a thymic developmental stage of T cells. Their first description in humans and pigs as extrathymic T cells with a memory phenotype almost 30 years ago came as a surprise. Meanwhile peripheral double-positive T cells have been described in a growing number of different species. In this review we highlight novel data from our very recent studies on canine peripheral double-positive T cells which point to unique features of double-positive T cells in the dog. In contrast to porcine CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells forming a homogenous cellular population based on their expression of CD4 and CD8α, canine CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells can be divided into three different cellular subsets with distinct expression levels of CD4 and CD8α. Double-positive T cells expressing CD8β are present in humans and dogs but absent in swine. Moreover, canine CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells can not only develop from CD4(+) single-positive T cells but also from CD8(+) single-positive T cells. Together, this places canine CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells closer to their human than porcine counterparts since human double-positive T cells also appear to be heterogeneous in their CD4 and CD8α expression and have both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells as progenitor cells. However, CD4(+) single-positive T cells are the more potent progenitors for canine double-positive T cells, whereas CD8(+) single-positive T cells are more potent progenitors for human double-positive T cells. Canine double-positive T cells have an activated phenotype and may have as yet unrecognized roles in vivo in immunity to infection or in inflammatory diseases such as chronic infection, autoimmunity, allergy, or cancer.

  19. Human regulatory T cells control TCR signaling and susceptibility to suppression in CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Chellappa, Stalin; Lieske, Nora V; Hagness, Morten; Line, Pål D; Taskén, Kjetil; Aandahl, Einar M

    2016-07-01

    Human CD4(+)CD25(hi)FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells maintain immunologic tolerance and prevent autoimmune and inflammatory immune responses. Regulatory T cells undergo a similar activation cycle as conventional CD4(+) T cells upon antigen stimulation. Here, we demonstrate that T cell receptors and costimulation are required to activate the regulatory T cell suppressive function. Regulatory T cells suppressed the T cell receptor signaling in effector T cells in a time-dependent manner that corresponded with inhibition of cytokine production and proliferation. Modulation of the activation level and thereby the suppressive capacity of regulatory T cells imposed distinct T cell receptor signaling signatures and hyporesponsiveness in suppressed and proliferating effector T cells and established a threshold for effector T cell proliferation. The immune suppression of effector T cells was completely reversible upon removal of regulatory T cells. However, the strength of prior immune suppression by regulatory T cells and corresponding T cell receptor signaling in effector T cells determined the susceptibility to suppression upon later reexposure to regulatory T cells. These findings demonstrate how the strength of the regulatory T cell suppressive function determines intracellular signaling, immune responsiveness, and the later susceptibility of effector T cells to immune suppression and contribute to unveiling the complex interactions between regulatory T cells and effector T cells. PMID:26715685

  20. Increased Immune Response Variability during Simultaneous Viral Coinfection Leads to Unpredictability in CD8 T Cell Immunity and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, Laurie L.; Cornberg, Markus; Chen, Alex T.; Emonet, Sebastien; de la Torre, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT T cell memory is usually studied in the context of infection with a single pathogen in naive mice, but how memory develops during a coinfection with two pathogens, as frequently occurs in nature or after vaccination, is far less studied. Here, we questioned how the competition between immune responses to two viruses in the same naive host would influence the development of CD8 T cell memory and subsequent disease outcome upon challenge. Using two different models of coinfection, including the well-studied lymphocytic choriomeningitis (LCMV) and Pichinde (PICV) viruses, several differences were observed within the CD8 T cell responses to either virus. Compared to single-virus infection, coinfection resulted in substantial variation among mice in the size of epitope-specific T cell responses to each virus. Some mice had an overall reduced number of virus-specific cells to either one of the viruses, and other mice developed an immunodominant response to a normally subdominant, cross-reactive epitope (nucleoprotein residues 205 to 212, or NP205). These changes led to decreased protective immunity and enhanced pathology in some mice upon challenge with either of the original coinfecting viruses. In mice with PICV-dominant responses, during a high-dose challenge with LCMV clone 13, increased immunopathology was associated with a reduced number of LCMV-specific effector memory CD8 T cells. In mice with dominant cross-reactive memory responses, during challenge with PICV increased immunopathology was directly associated with these cross-reactive NP205-specific CD8 memory cells. In conclusion, the inherent competition between two simultaneous immune responses results in significant alterations in T cell immunity and subsequent disease outcome upon reexposure. IMPORTANCE Combination vaccines and simultaneous administration of vaccines are necessary to accommodate required immunizations and maintain vaccination rates. Antibody responses generally correlate with

  1. Fish T cells: recent advances through genomics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laing, Kerry J.; Hansen, John D.

    2011-01-01

    This brief review is intended to provide a concise overview of the current literature concerning T cells, advances in identifying distinct T cell functional subsets, and in distinguishing effector cells from memory cells. We compare and contrast a wealth of recent progress made in T cell immunology of teleost, elasmobranch, and agnathan fish, to knowledge derived from mammalian T cell studies. From genome studies, fish clearly have most components associated with T cell function and we can speculate on the presence of putative T cell subsets, and the ability to detect their differentiation to form memory cells. Some recombinant proteins for T cell associated cytokines and antibodies for T cell surface receptors have been generated that will facilitate studying the functional roles of teleost T cells during immune responses. Although there is still a long way to go, major advances have occurred in recent years for investigating T cell responses, thus phenotypic and functional characterization is on the near horizon.

  2. In healthy primates, circulating autoreactive T cells mediate autoimmune disease.

    PubMed Central

    Genain, C P; Lee-Parritz, D; Nguyen, M H; Massacesi, L; Joshi, N; Ferrante, R; Hoffman, K; Moseley, M; Letvin, N L; Hauser, S L

    1994-01-01

    A T cell response against myelin basic protein (MBP) is thought to contribute to the central nervous system (CNS) inflammation that occurs in the human demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis. To test whether MBP-reactive T cells that are normally retrieved from the circulation are capable of inducing CNS disease, MBP-reactive T cell clones were isolated from the peripheral blood of healthy, unimmunized Callithrix jacchus (C. jacchus) marmosets. This primate species is characterized by a natural chimerism of bone marrow elements between siblings that should make possible adoptive transfer of MBP-reactive T cells. We report that MBP-reactive T cell clones efficiently and reproducibly transfer CNS inflammatory disease between members of C. jacchus chimeric sets. The demyelination that is characteristic of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis induced in C. jacchus by immunization against human white matter did not occur after adoptive transfer of the MBP-reactive clones. It was noteworthy that encephalitogenic T cell clones were diverse in terms of their recognition of different epitopes of MBP, distinguishing the response in C. jacchus from that in some inbred rodents in which restricted recognition of MBP occurs. These findings are the first direct evidence that natural populations of circulating T cells directed against a CNS antigen can mediate an inflammatory autoimmune disease. Images PMID:7521889

  3. CD6 modulates thymocyte selection and peripheral T cell homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Orta-Mascaró, Marc; Consuegra-Fernández, Marta; Carreras, Esther; Roncagalli, Romain; Carreras-Sureda, Amado; Alvarez, Pilar; Girard, Laura; Simões, Inês; Martínez-Florensa, Mario; Aranda, Fernando; Merino, Ramón; Martínez, Vanesa-Gabriela; Vicente, Rubén; Merino, Jesús; Sarukhan, Adelaida; Malissen, Marie; Malissen, Bernard; Lozano, Francisco

    2016-07-25

    The CD6 glycoprotein is a lymphocyte surface receptor putatively involved in T cell development and activation. CD6 facilitates adhesion between T cells and antigen-presenting cells through its interaction with CD166/ALCAM (activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule), and physically associates with the T cell receptor (TCR) at the center of the immunological synapse. However, its precise role during thymocyte development and peripheral T cell immune responses remains to be defined. Here, we analyze the in vivo consequences of CD6 deficiency. CD6(-/-) thymi showed a reduction in both CD4(+) and CD8(+) single-positive subsets, and double-positive thymocytes exhibited increased Ca(2+) mobilization to TCR cross-linking in vitro. Bone marrow chimera experiments revealed a T cell-autonomous selective disadvantage of CD6(-/-) T cells during development. The analysis of TCR-transgenic mice (OT-I and Marilyn) confirmed that abnormal T cell selection events occur in the absence of CD6. CD6(-/-) mice displayed increased frequencies of antigen-experienced peripheral T cells generated under certain levels of TCR signal strength or co-stimulation, such as effector/memory (CD4(+)TEM and CD8(+)TCM) and regulatory (T reg) T cells. The suppressive activity of CD6(-/-) T reg cells was diminished, and CD6(-/-) mice presented an exacerbated autoimmune response to collagen. Collectively, these data indicate that CD6 modulates the threshold for thymocyte selection and the generation and/or function of several peripheral T cell subpopulations, including T reg cells. PMID:27377588

  4. Human autoreactive T cells recognize CD1b and phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Van Rhijn, Ildiko; van Berlo, Twan; Hilmenyuk, Tamara; Cheng, Tan-Yun; Wolf, Benjamin J.; Tatituri, Raju V. V.; Uldrich, Adam P.; Napolitani, Giorgio; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Altman, John D.; Willemsen, Peter; Huang, Shouxiong; Rossjohn, Jamie; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Brenner, Michael B.; Godfrey, Dale I.; Moody, D. Branch

    2016-01-01

    In contrast with the common detection of T cells that recognize MHC, CD1a, CD1c, or CD1d proteins, CD1b autoreactive T cells have been difficult to isolate in humans. Here we report the development of polyvalent complexes of CD1b proteins and carbohydrate backbones (dextramers) and their use in identifying CD1b autoreactive T cells from human donors. Activation is mediated by αβ T-cell receptors (TCRs) binding to CD1b-phospholipid complexes, which is sufficient to activate autoreactive responses to CD1b-expressing cells. Using mass spectrometry and T-cell responses to scan through the major classes of phospholipids, we identified phosphatidylglycerol (PG) as the immunodominant lipid antigen. T cells did not discriminate the chemical differences that distinguish mammalian PG from bacterial PG. Whereas most models of T-cell recognition emphasize TCR discrimination of differing self and foreign structures, CD1b autoreactive T cells recognize lipids with dual self and foreign origin. PG is rare in the cellular membranes that carry CD1b proteins. However, bacteria and mitochondria are rich in PG, so these data point to a more general mechanism of immune detection of infection- or stress-associated lipids. PMID:26621732

  5. T cell responses in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Diani, Marco; Altomare, Gianfranco; Reali, Eva

    2015-04-01

    According to the current view the histological features of psoriasis arise as a consequence of the interplay between T cells, dendritic cells and keratinocytes giving rise to a self-perpetuating loop that amplifies and sustains inflammation in lesional skin. In particular, myeloid dendritic cell secretion of IL-23 and IL-12 activates IL-17-producing T cells, Th22 and Th1 cells, leading to the production of inflammatory cytokines such as IL-17, IFN-γ, TNF and IL-22. These cytokines mediate effects on keratinocytes thus establishing the inflammatory loop. Unlike psoriasis the immunopathogenic features of psoriatic arthritis are poorly characterized and there is a gap in the knowledge of the pathogenic link between inflammatory T cell responses arising in the skin and the development of joint inflammation. Here we review the knowledge accumulated over the years from the early evidence of autoreactive CD8 T cells that was studied mainly in the years 1990s and 2000s to the recent findings of the role of Th17, Tc17 cells and γδ T cells in psoriatic disease pathogenesis. The review will also focus on common and distinguishing features of T cell responses in psoriatic plaques and in synovial fluid of patients with psoriatic arthritis. The integration of this information could help to distinguish the role played by T cells in the initiation phase of the disease from the role of T cells as downstream effectors sustaining inflammation in psoriatic plaques and potentially leading to disease manifestation in distant joints.

  6. Molecular Insights for Optimizing T Cell Receptor Specificity Against Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hebeisen, Michael; Oberle, Susanne G.; Presotto, Danilo; Speiser, Daniel E.; Zehn, Dietmar; Rufer, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    Cytotoxic CD8 T cells mediate immunity to pathogens and they are able to eliminate malignant cells. Immunity to viruses and bacteria primarily involves CD8 T cells bearing high affinity T cell receptors (TCRs), which are specific to pathogen-derived (non-self) antigens. Given the thorough elimination of high affinity self/tumor-antigen reactive T cells by central and peripheral tolerance mechanisms, anti-cancer immunity mostly depends on TCRs with intermediate-to-low affinity for self-antigens. Because of this, a promising novel therapeutic approach to increase the efficacy of tumor-reactive T cells is to engineer their TCRs, with the aim to enhance their binding kinetics to pMHC complexes, or to directly manipulate the TCR-signaling cascades. Such manipulations require a detailed knowledge on how pMHC-TCR and co-receptors binding kinetics impact the T cell response. In this review, we present the current knowledge in this field. We discuss future challenges in identifying and targeting the molecular mechanisms to enhance the function of natural or TCR-affinity optimized T cells, and we provide perspectives for the development of protective anti-tumor T cell responses. PMID:23801991

  7. CRTAM is negatively regulated by ZEB1 in T cells.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Marquez, C; Valle-Rios, R; Lopez-Bayghen, E; Ortiz-Navarrete, V

    2015-08-01

    T cell activation leads to the induction of genes that are required for appropriate immune responses. This includes CRTAM (Class-I MHC-restricted T cell associated molecule), a protein that plays a key role in T cell development, proliferation, and generating cell polarity during activation. We previously characterized the CRTAM promoter and described how AP-1 family members are important for inducing CRTAM expression upon antigenic activation. Here, we show that CRTAM is a molecular target for ZEB1 (zinc finger E-box-binding protein), a homeodomain/Zn finger transcription factor. Overexpression of ZEB1 repressed CRTAM promoter activity, as well as endogenous CRTAM levels in human T cells. ZEB1-mediated transcriptional repression was abolished when E-box-like elements in the CRTAM promoter are mutated. In summary, ZEB1 functions as a transcriptional repressor for the CRTAM gene in both non-stimulated and stimulated T cells, thereby modulating adaptive immune responses.

  8. Strategies to genetically engineer T cells for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Spear, Timothy T; Nagato, Kaoru; Nishimura, Michael I

    2016-06-01

    Immunotherapy is one of the most promising and innovative approaches to treat cancer, viral infections, and other immune-modulated diseases. Adoptive immunotherapy using gene-modified T cells is an exciting and rapidly evolving field. Exploiting knowledge of basic T cell biology and immune cell receptor function has fostered innovative approaches to modify immune cell function. Highly translatable clinical technologies have been developed to redirect T cell specificity by introducing designed receptors. The ability to engineer T cells to manifest desired phenotypes and functions is now a thrilling reality. In this review, we focus on outlining different varieties of genetically engineered T cells, their respective advantages and disadvantages as tools for immunotherapy, and their promise and drawbacks in the clinic. PMID:27138532

  9. Homeostatic regulation of intestinal epithelia by intraepithelial gamma delta T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Komano, H; Fujiura, Y; Kawaguchi, M; Matsumoto, S; Hashimoto, Y; Obana, S; Mombaerts, P; Tonegawa, S; Yamamoto, H; Itohara, S

    1995-01-01

    Although T cells bearing gamma delta T-cell receptors have long been known to be present in the epithelial lining of many organs, their specificity and function remain elusive. In the present study, we examined the intestinal epithelia of T-cell-receptor mutant mice, which were deficient in either gamma delta T cells or alpha beta T cells, and of normal littermates. The absence of gamma delta T cells was associated with a reduction in epithelial cell turnover and a downregulation of the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. No such effects were observed in alpha beta T-cell-deficient mice. These findings indicate that intraepithelial gamma delta T cells regulate the generation and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7597094

  10. Engineering CAR-T cells: Design concepts.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Shivani; Riddell, Stanley R

    2015-08-01

    Despite being empirically designed based on a simple understanding of TCR signaling, T cells engineered with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) have been remarkably successful in treating patients with advanced refractory B cell malignancies. However, many challenges remain in improving the safety and efficacy of this therapy and extending it toward the treatment of epithelial cancers. Other aspects of TCR signaling beyond those directly provided by CD3ζ and CD28 phosphorylation strongly influence a T cell's ability to differentiate and acquire full effector functions. Here, we discuss how the principles of TCR recognition, including spatial constraints, Kon/Koff rates, and synapse formation, along with in-depth analysis of CAR signaling might be applied to develop safer and more effective synthetic tumor targeting receptors.

  11. MicroRNA-128-3p is a novel oncomiR targeting PHF6 in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mets, Evelien; Van Peer, Gert; Van der Meulen, Joni; Boice, Michael; Taghon, Tom; Goossens, Steven; Mestdagh, Pieter; Benoit, Yves; De Moerloose, Barbara; Van Roy, Nadine; Poppe, Bruce; Vandesompele, Jo; Wendel, Hans-Guido; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Speleman, Frank; Rondou, Pieter

    2014-08-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia arises from the leukemic transformation of developing thymocytes and results from cooperative genetic lesions. Inactivation of the PHF6 gene is frequently observed in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, suggesting an important tumor suppressive role for PHF6 in the pathobiology of this leukemia. Although the precise function of PHF6 is still unknown, this gene is most likely involved in chromatin regulation, a strongly emerging theme in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In this context, our previous description of a cooperative microRNA regulatory network controlling several well-known T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia tumor suppressor genes, including PHF6, is of great importance. Given the high frequency of PHF6 lesions in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and the integration of PHF6 in this microRNA regulatory network, we aimed to identify novel oncogenic microRNAs in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia which suppress PHF6. To this end, we performed an unbiased PHF6 3'UTR-microRNA library screen and combined the results with microRNA profiling data of samples from patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and normal thymocyte subsets. We selected miR-128-3p as a candidate PHF6-targeting, oncogenic microRNA and demonstrated regulation of PHF6 expression upon modulation of this microRNA in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines. In vivo evidence of an oncogenic role of this microRNA in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia was obtained through accelerated leukemia onset in a NOTCH1-induced T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia mouse model upon miR-128-3p over-expression. We conclude that miR-128-3p is a strong novel candidate oncogenic microRNA in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia which targets the PHF6 tumor suppressor gene.

  12. A cryptic vascular endothelial growth factor T-cell epitope: identification and characterization by mass spectrometry and T-cell assays.

    PubMed

    Weinzierl, Andreas O; Maurer, Dominik; Altenberend, Florian; Schneiderhan-Marra, Nicole; Klingel, Karin; Schoor, Oliver; Wernet, Dorothee; Joos, Thomas; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Stevanović, Stefan

    2008-04-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is involved in various physiologic processes, such as angiogenesis or wound healing, but is also crucial in pathologic events, such as tumor growth. Thus, clinical anti-VEGF treatments have been developed that could already show beneficial effects for cancer patients. In this article, we describe the first VEGF-derived CD8(+) T-cell epitope. The natural HLA ligand SRFGGAVVR was identified by differential mass spectrometry in two primary renal cell carcinomas (RCC) and was significantly overpresented on both tumor tissues. SRFGGAVVR is derived from a cryptic translated region of VEGF presumably by initiation of translation at the nonclassic start codon CUG(499). SRFGGAVVR-specific T cells were generated in vitro using peptide-loaded dendritic cells or artificial antigen-presenting cells. SRFGGAVVR-specific CD8(+) T cells, identified by HLA tetramer analysis after in vitro stimulation, were fully functional T effector cells, which were able to secrete IFN-gamma on stimulation and killed tumor cells in vitro. Additionally, we have quantitatively analyzed VEGF mRNA and protein levels in RCC tumor and normal tissue samples by gene chip analysis, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, in situ hybridization, and bead-based immunoassay. In the future, T cells directed against VEGF as a tumor-associated antigen may represent a possible way of combining peptide-based anti-VEGF immunotherapy with already existent anti-VEGF cancer therapies. PMID:18381453

  13. Increased frequency of CD4-8-T cells bearing T-cell receptor alpha beta chains in peripheral blood of atomic bomb survivors exposed to high doses.

    PubMed

    Kusunoki, Y; Kyoizumi, S; Hirai, Y; Fujita, S; Akiyama, M

    1994-07-01

    A rare T-cell subpopulation, CD4-8- alpha beta T cells, may be differentiated through a pathway (or pathways) different from the pathway(s) of conventional CD4+ or CD8+ T cells. In the present study, the frequencies of CD4-8-T cells in peripheral-blood alpha beta T cells in 409 atomic bomb survivors (160 estimated to have been exposed to 1.5 Gy or more and 249 controls) were determined to investigate late effects of radiation on the composition of human T-cell subpopulations. The frequency of CD4-8- alpha beta T-cell decreased significantly with the subject's age and was higher in females than males. A significant increase in the frequency was found in the survivors exposed to more than 1.5 Gy, suggesting that the previous radiation exposure altered differentiation and development of T cells.

  14. Impact of sepsis on CD4 T cell immunity

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera-Perez, Javier; Condotta, Stephanie A.; Badovinac, Vladimir P.; Griffith, Thomas S.

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis remains the primary cause of death from infection in hospital patients, despite improvements in antibiotics and intensive-care practices. Patients who survive severe sepsis can display suppressed immune function, often manifested as an increased susceptibility to (and mortality from) nosocomial infections. Not only is there a significant reduction in the number of various immune cell populations during sepsis, but there is also decreased function in the remaining lymphocytes. Within the immune system, CD4 T cells are important players in the proper development of numerous cellular and humoral immune responses. Despite sufficient clinical evidence of CD4 T cell loss in septic patients of all ages, the impact of sepsis on CD4 T cell responses is not well understood. Recent findings suggest that CD4 T cell impairment is a multipronged problem that results from initial sepsis-induced cell loss. However, the subsequent lymphopenia-induced numerical recovery of the CD4 T cell compartment leads to intrinsic alterations in phenotype and effector function, reduced repertoire diversity, changes in the composition of naive antigen-specific CD4 T cell pools, and changes in the representation of different CD4 T cell subpopulations (e.g., increases in Treg frequency). This review focuses on sepsis-induced alterations within the CD4 T cell compartment that influence the ability of the immune system to control secondary heterologous infections. The understanding of how sepsis affects CD4 T cells through their numerical loss and recovery, as well as function, is important in the development of future treatments designed to restore CD4 T cells to their presepsis state. PMID:24791959

  15. MAGE-C2-Specific TCRs Combined with Epigenetic Drug-Enhanced Antigenicity Yield Robust and Tumor-Selective T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Kunert, Andre; van Brakel, Mandy; van Steenbergen-Langeveld, Sabine; da Silva, Marvin; Coulie, Pierre G; Lamers, Cor; Sleijfer, Stefan; Debets, Reno

    2016-09-15

    Adoptive T cell therapy has shown significant clinical success for patients with advanced melanoma and other tumors. Further development of T cell therapy requires improved strategies to select effective, yet nonself-reactive, TCRs. In this study, we isolated 10 TCR sequences against four MAGE-C2 (MC2) epitopes from melanoma patients who showed clinical responses following vaccination that were accompanied by significant frequencies of anti-MC2 CD8 T cells in blood and tumor without apparent side effects. We introduced these TCRs into T cells, pretreated tumor cells of different histological origins with the epigenetic drugs azacytidine and valproate, and tested tumor and self-reactivities of these TCRs. Pretreatment of tumor cells upregulated MC2 gene expression and enhanced recognition by T cells. In contrast, a panel of normal cell types did not express MC2 mRNA, and similar pretreatment did not result in recognition by MC2-directed T cells. Interestingly, the expression levels of MC2, but not those of CD80, CD86, or programmed death-ligand 1 or 2, correlated with T cell responsiveness. One of the tested TCRs consistently recognized pretreated MC2(+) cell lines from melanoma, head and neck, bladder, and triple-negative breast cancers but showed no response to MHC-eluted peptides or peptides highly similar to MC2. We conclude that targeting MC2 Ag, combined with epigenetic drug-enhanced antigenicity, allows for significant and tumor-selective T cell responses. PMID:27489285

  16. T cell recognition of beryllium.

    PubMed

    Dai, Shaodong; Falta, Michael T; Bowerman, Natalie A; McKee, Amy S; Fontenot, Andrew P

    2013-12-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a granulomatous lung disorder caused by a hypersensitivity to beryllium and characterized by the accumulation of beryllium-specific CD4(+) T cells in the lung. Genetic susceptibility to beryllium-induced disease is strongly associated with HLA-DP alleles possessing a glutamic acid at the 69th position of the β-chain (βGlu69). The structure of HLA-DP2, the most prevalent βGlu69-containing molecule, revealed a unique solvent-exposed acidic pocket that includes βGlu69 and represents the putative beryllium-binding site. The delineation of mimotopes and endogenous self-peptides that complete the αβTCR ligand for beryllium-specific CD4(+) T cells suggests a unique role of these peptides in metal ion coordination and the generation of altered self-peptides, blurring the distinction between hypersensitivity and autoimmunity.

  17. Antibodies targeting human OX40 expand effector T cells and block inducible and natural regulatory T cell function

    PubMed Central

    Voo, Kui S.; Bover, Laura; Harline, Megan L.; Vien, Long T.; Facchinetti, Valeria; Arima, Kazuhiko; Kwak, Larry W.; Liu, Yong J.

    2013-01-01

    Current cancer vaccines induce tumor-specific T cell responses without sustained tumor regression because immunosuppressive elements within the tumor induce exhaustion of effector T cells and infiltration of immune-suppressive regulatory T cells (Tregs). Therefore, much effort has been made to generate agonistic Abs targeting members of the TNFR superfamily, such as OX40, 4- 1BB, and GITR, expressed on effector T cells and Tregs, to reinvigorate T cell effector function and block Treg-suppressive function. In this article, we describe the development of a panel of anti-human OX40 agonistic mouse mAbs that could promote effector CD4+ and CD8+ T cell proliferation, inhibit the induction of CD4+ IL-10 -producing type 1 regulatory T cells, inhibit the expansion of ICOS+IL-10+ Tregs, inhibit TGF-b–induced FOXP3 expression on naive CD4+ T cells, and block natural Treg–suppressive function. We humanized two anti–human OX40 mAb clones, and they retained the potency of their parental clones. These Abs should provide broad opportunities for potential combination therapy to treat a wide realm of cancers and preventative vaccines against infectious diseases. PMID:24014877

  18. Antibodies targeting human OX40 expand effector T cells and block inducible and natural regulatory T cell function.

    PubMed

    Voo, Kui S; Bover, Laura; Harline, Megan L; Vien, Long T; Facchinetti, Valeria; Arima, Kazuhiko; Kwak, Larry W; Liu, Yong J

    2013-10-01

    Current cancer vaccines induce tumor-specific T cell responses without sustained tumor regression because immunosuppressive elements within the tumor induce exhaustion of effector T cells and infiltration of immune-suppressive regulatory T cells (Tregs). Therefore, much effort has been made to generate agonistic Abs targeting members of the TNFR superfamily, such as OX40, 4-1BB, and GITR, expressed on effector T cells and Tregs, to reinvigorate T cell effector function and block Treg-suppressive function. In this article, we describe the development of a panel of anti-human OX40 agonistic mouse mAbs that could promote effector CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell proliferation, inhibit the induction of CD4(+) IL-10 -producing type 1 regulatory T cells, inhibit the expansion of ICOS(+)IL-10(+) Tregs, inhibit TGF-β-induced FOXP3 expression on naive CD4(+) T cells, and block natural Treg-suppressive function. We humanized two anti-human OX40 mAb clones, and they retained the potency of their parental clones. These Abs should provide broad opportunities for potential combination therapy to treat a wide realm of cancers and preventative vaccines against infectious diseases. PMID:24014877

  19. Normalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuevas, Eduardo J.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses cornerstone of Montessori theory, normalization, which asserts that if a child is placed in an optimum prepared environment where inner impulses match external opportunities, the undeviated self emerges, a being totally in harmony with its surroundings. Makes distinctions regarding normalization, normalized, and normality, indicating how…

  20. Retinoic Acid as a Modulator of T Cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Bono, Maria Rosa; Tejon, Gabriela; Flores-Santibañez, Felipe; Fernandez, Dominique; Rosemblatt, Mario; Sauma, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin A, a generic designation for an array of organic molecules that includes retinal, retinol and retinoic acid, is an essential nutrient needed in a wide array of aspects including the proper functioning of the visual system, maintenance of cell function and differentiation, epithelial surface integrity, erythrocyte production, reproduction, and normal immune function. Vitamin A deficiency is one of the most common micronutrient deficiencies worldwide and is associated with defects in adaptive immunity. Reports from epidemiological studies, clinical trials and experimental studies have clearly demonstrated that vitamin A plays a central role in immunity and that its deficiency is the cause of broad immune alterations including decreased humoral and cellular responses, inadequate immune regulation, weak response to vaccines and poor lymphoid organ development. In this review, we will examine the role of vitamin A in immunity and focus on several aspects of T cell biology such as T helper cell differentiation, function and homing, as well as lymphoid organ development. Further, we will provide an overview of the effects of vitamin A deficiency in the adaptive immune responses and how retinoic acid, through its effect on T cells can fine-tune the balance between tolerance and immunity. PMID:27304965

  1. T cell receptor repertoire and function in patients with DiGeorge syndrome and velocardiofacial syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pierdominici, M; Marziali, M; Giovannetti, A; Oliva, A; Rosso, R; Marino, B; Digilio, M C; Giannotti, A; Novelli, G; Dallapiccola, B; Aiuti, F; Pandolfi, F

    2000-01-01

    DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) and velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS) are associated with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion. Limited information is available on the T cell receptor (TCR) Vβ repertoire. We therefore investigated TCR Vβ families in lymphocytes isolated from blood and thymic samples of seven patients with DGS and seven patients with VCFS, all with 22q11.2 deletion. We also studied activities related to TCR signalling including in vitro proliferation, anti-CD3-induced protein tyrosine phosphorylation, and susceptibility to apoptosis. Reduced CD3+ T cells were observed in most patients. Spontaneous improvement of T cell numbers was detected in patients, 3 years after the first study. Analysis of CD4+ and CD8+ TCR Vβ repertoire in peripheral and thymic cells showed a normal distribution of populations even if occasional deletions were observed. Lymphoproliferative responses to mitogens were comparable to controls as well as anti-CD3-induced protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Increased anti-CD3-mediated apoptosis was observed in thymic cells. Our data support the idea that in patients surviving the correction of cardiac anomalies, the immune defect appears milder than originally thought, suggesting development of a normal repertoire of mature T cells. PMID:10886249

  2. Adoptive T-cell Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gottschalk, Stephen; Rooney, Cliona

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with a range of malignancies involving B-cells, T-cells, natural killer (NK)-cells, epithelial cells and smooth muscle. All of these are associated with the latent life cycles of EBV, but the pattern of latency-associated viral antigens expressed in tumor cells depends on the type of tumor. EBV-specific T cells (EBVSTs) have been explored as prophylaxis and therapy for EBV-associated malignancies for more than two decades. EBVSTs have been most successful as prophylaxis and therapy for post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD), which expresses the full array of latent EBV antigens (type 3 latency), in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. While less effective, clinical studies have also demonstrated their therapeutic potential for PTLD post solid organ transplant, and for EBV-associated malignancies such as Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, and nasopharyngeal carcinoma that express a limited array of latent EBV antigens (type 2 latency),. Several approaches are actively being pursued to improve the antitumor activity of EBVSTs including activation and expansion of T cells specific for the EBV antigens expressed in type 2 latency, genetic approaches to render EBVSTs resistant to the immunosuppressive tumor environment and combination approaches with other immune-modulating modalities. Given the recent advances and renewed interest in cell therapy, we hope that EBVSTs will become an integral part of our treatment armamentarium against EBV-positive malignancies in the near future. PMID:26428384

  3. Inhibition of Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase p110delta Does Not Affect T Cell Driven Development of Type 1 Diabetes Despite Significant Effects on Cytokine Production

    PubMed Central

    Barbera Betancourt, Ariana; Emery, Juliet L.; Recino, Asha; Wong, F. Susan; Cooke, Anne; Okkenhaug, Klaus; Wallberg, Maja

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is caused by the destruction of insulin producing beta cells by the immune system. The p110δ isoform of PI3K is expressed primarily in cells of haematopoietic origin and the catalytic activity of p110δ is important for the activation of these cells. Targeting of this pathway offers an opportunity to reduce immune cell activity without unwanted side effects. We have explored the effects of a specific p110δ isoform inhibitor, IC87114, on diabetogenic T cells both in vitro and in vivo, and find that although pharmacological inhibition of p110δ has a considerable impact on the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, it does not delay the onset of diabetes after adoptive transfer of diabetogenic cells. Further, we demonstrate that combination treatment with CTLA4-Ig does not improve the efficacy of treatment, but instead attenuates the protective effects seen with CTLA4-Ig treatment alone. Our results suggest that decreased IL-10 production by Foxp3+ CD4+ T cells in the presence of IC87114 negates individual anti-inflammatory effects of IC8114 and CTLA4-Ig. PMID:26783747

  4. ZEB2 drives immature T-cell lymphoblastic leukaemia development via enhanced tumour-initiating potential and IL-7 receptor signalling

    PubMed Central

    Goossens, Steven; Radaelli, Enrico; Blanchet, Odile; Durinck, Kaat; Van der Meulen, Joni; Peirs, Sofie; Taghon, Tom; Tremblay, Cedric S.; Costa, Magdaline; Ghahremani, Morvarid Farhang; De Medts, Jelle; Bartunkova, Sonia; Haigh, Katharina; Schwab, Claire; Farla, Natalie; Pieters, Tim; Matthijssens, Filip; Van Roy, Nadine; Best, J. Adam; Deswarte, Kim; Bogaert, Pieter; Carmichael, Catherine; Rickard, Adam; Suryani, Santi; Bracken, Lauryn S.; Alserihi, Raed; Canté-Barrett, Kirsten; Haenebalcke, Lieven; Clappier, Emmanuelle; Rondou, Pieter; Slowicka, Karolina; Huylebroeck, Danny; Goldrath, Ananda W.; Janzen, Viktor; McCormack, Matthew P.; Lock, Richard B.; Curtis, David J.; Harrison, Christine; Berx, Geert; Speleman, Frank; Meijerink, Jules P. P.; Soulier, Jean; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Haigh, Jody J.

    2015-01-01

    Early T-cell precursor leukaemia (ETP-ALL) is a high-risk subtype of human leukaemia that is poorly understood at the molecular level. Here we report translocations targeting the zinc finger E-box-binding transcription factor ZEB2 as a recurrent genetic lesion in immature/ETP-ALL. Using a conditional gain-of-function mouse model, we demonstrate that sustained Zeb2 expression initiates T-cell leukaemia. Moreover, Zeb2-driven mouse leukaemia exhibit some features of the human immature/ETP-ALL gene expression signature, as well as an enhanced leukaemia-initiation potential and activated Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) signalling through transcriptional activation of IL7R. This study reveals ZEB2 as an oncogene in the biology of immature/ETP-ALL and paves the way towards pre-clinical studies of novel compounds for the treatment of this aggressive subtype of human T-ALL using our Zeb2-driven mouse model. PMID:25565005

  5. HCV-induced miR146a controls SOCS1/STAT3 and cytokine expression in monocytes to promote regulatory T-cell development.

    PubMed

    Ren, J P; Ying, R S; Cheng, Y Q; Wang, L; El Gazzar, M; Li, G Y; Ning, S B; Moorman, J P; Yao, Z Q

    2016-10-01

    Host innate and adaptive immune responses must be tightly regulated by an intricate balance between positive and negative signals to ensure their appropriate onset and termination while fighting pathogens and avoiding autoimmunity; persistent pathogens may usurp these regulatory machineries to dampen host immune responses for their persistence in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that miR146a is up-regulated in monocytes from hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected individuals compared to control subjects. Interestingly, miR146a expression in monocytes without HCV infection increased, whereas its level in monocytes with HCV infection decreased, following Toll-like receptor (TLR) stimulation. This miR146a induction by HCV infection and differential response to TLR stimulation were recapitulated in vitro in monocytes co-cultured with hepatocytes with or without HCV infection. Importantly, inhibition of miR146a in monocytes from HCV-infected patients led to a decrease in IL-23, IL-10 and TGF-β expressions through the induction of suppressor of cytokine signalling 1 (SOCS1) and the inhibition of signal transducer and activator transcription 3 (STAT3), and this subsequently resulted in a decrease in regulatory T cells (Tregs) accumulated during HCV infection. These results suggest that miR146a may regulate SOCS1/STAT3 and cytokine signalling in monocytes, directing T-cell differentiation and balancing immune clearance and immune injury during chronic viral infection.

  6. ZEB2 drives immature T-cell lymphoblastic leukaemia development via enhanced tumour-initiating potential and IL-7 receptor signalling.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Steven; Radaelli, Enrico; Blanchet, Odile; Durinck, Kaat; Van der Meulen, Joni; Peirs, Sofie; Taghon, Tom; Tremblay, Cedric S; Costa, Magdaline; Farhang Ghahremani, Morvarid; De Medts, Jelle; Bartunkova, Sonia; Haigh, Katharina; Schwab, Claire; Farla, Natalie; Pieters, Tim; Matthijssens, Filip; Van Roy, Nadine; Best, J Adam; Deswarte, Kim; Bogaert, Pieter; Carmichael, Catherine; Rickard, Adam; Suryani, Santi; Bracken, Lauryn S; Alserihi, Raed; Canté-Barrett, Kirsten; Haenebalcke, Lieven; Clappier, Emmanuelle; Rondou, Pieter; Slowicka, Karolina; Huylebroeck, Danny; Goldrath, Ananda W; Janzen, Viktor; McCormack, Matthew P; Lock, Richard B; Curtis, David J; Harrison, Christine; Berx, Geert; Speleman, Frank; Meijerink, Jules P P; Soulier, Jean; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Haigh, Jody J

    2015-01-01

    Early T-cell precursor leukaemia (ETP-ALL) is a high-risk subtype of human leukaemia that is poorly understood at the molecular level. Here we report translocations targeting the zinc finger E-box-binding transcription factor ZEB2 as a recurrent genetic lesion in immature/ETP-ALL. Using a conditional gain-of-function mouse model, we demonstrate that sustained Zeb2 expression initiates T-cell leukaemia. Moreover, Zeb2-driven mouse leukaemia exhibit some features of the human immature/ETP-ALL gene expression signature, as well as an enhanced leukaemia-initiation potential and activated Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) signalling through transcriptional activation of IL7R. This study reveals ZEB2 as an oncogene in the biology of immature/ETP-ALL and paves the way towards pre-clinical studies of novel compounds for the treatment of this aggressive subtype of human T-ALL using our Zeb2-driven mouse model. PMID:25565005

  7. Development of T cell-mediated immunity after autologous stem cell transplantation: prolonged impairment of antigen-stimulated production of gamma-interferon.

    PubMed

    van der Velden, A M T; Claessen, A M E; van Velzen-Blad, H; Biesma, D H; Rijkers, G T

    2007-08-01

    The conditioning regimens for autologous SCT (auto-SCT) lead to impairment of the immune system and concomitant increase in susceptibility to infections. We studied the recovery of cellular immunity by in vitro analysis of T-cell proliferation and cytokine production profiles during the first 15 months after auto-SCT in patients with multiple myeloma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. PBMC were collected at 6, 9 and 15 months after transplantation and stimulated with a combination of CD2 and CD28 monoclonal antibodies, with PHA or with tetanus toxoid as recall antigen. A multiplex enzyme linked immunoassay was used to determine levels of Th1 cytokines IL-2, IFN-gamma and tumour-necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), Th2 cytokines IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13, the regulatory cytokine IL-10 and the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6 and the chemokine IL-8. T-cell proliferation progressively increased from 6 to 15 months after auto-SCT. Overall, cytokine production increased after auto-SCT. Production of Th2 cytokines IL-5 and IL-13 was superior to production of Th1 cytokines IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha. We hypothesize that prolonged impairment of IFN-gamma production might contribute to the relatively high incidence of viral infections after auto-SCT.

  8. Normal development of the female reproductive system

    EPA Science Inventory

    The embryonic development of the female reproductive system involves a progression of events that is conserved across vertebrate species. The early gonad progresses from a form that is undifferentiated in both genotypic males and females. Rudimentary male (Wolffian) and female (M...

  9. T cell epitope-based allergy vaccines.

    PubMed

    Larché, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Specific immunotherapy (SIT) with extracts containing intact allergen molecules is clinically efficacious, but associated with frequent adverse events related to the allergic sensitization of the patient. As a result, treatment is initiated in an incremental dose fashion which ultimately achieves a plateau (maintenance dose) that may be continued for several years. Reduction of allergic adverse events may allow safer and more rapid treatment Thus, many groups have developed and evaluated strategies to reduce allergenicity whilst maintaining immunogenicity, the latter being required to achieve specific modulation of the immune response. Peptide immunotherapy can be used to target T and/or B cells in an antigen-specific manner. To date, only approaches that target T cells have been clinically evaluated. Short, synthetic peptides representing immunodominant T cell epitopes of major allergens are able to modulate allergen-specific T cell responses in the absence of IgE cross linking and activation of effector cells. Here we review clinical and mechanistic studies associated with peptide immunotherapy targeting allergy to cats or to bee venom. 

  10. Durable Complete Response from Metastatic Melanoma after Transfer of Autologous T Cells Recognizing 10 Mutated Tumor Antigens.

    PubMed

    Prickett, Todd D; Crystal, Jessica S; Cohen, Cyrille J; Pasetto, Anna; Parkhurst, Maria R; Gartner, Jared J; Yao, Xin; Wang, Rong; Gros, Alena; Li, Yong F; El-Gamil, Mona; Trebska-McGowan, Kasia; Rosenberg, Steven A; Robbins, Paul F

    2016-08-01

    Immunotherapy treatment of patients with metastatic cancer has assumed a prominent role in the clinic. Durable complete response rates of 20% to 25% are achieved in patients with metastatic melanoma following adoptive cell transfer of T cells derived from metastatic lesions, responses that appear in some patients to be mediated by T cells that predominantly recognize mutated antigens. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of the reactivity of T cells administered to a patient with metastatic melanoma who exhibited a complete response for over 3 years after treatment. Over 4,000 nonsynonymous somatic mutations were identified by whole-exome sequence analysis of the patient's autologous normal and tumor cell DNA. Autologous B cells transfected with 720 mutated minigenes corresponding to the most highly expressed tumor cell transcripts were then analyzed for their ability to stimulate the administered T cells. Autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes recognized 10 distinct mutated gene products, but not the corresponding wild-type products, each of which was recognized in the context of one of three different MHC class I restriction elements expressed by the patient. Detailed clonal analysis revealed that 9 of the top 20 most prevalent clones present in the infused T cells, comprising approximately 24% of the total cells, recognized mutated antigens. Thus, we have identified and enriched mutation-reactive T cells and suggest that such analyses may lead to the development of more effective therapies for the treatment of patients with metastatic cancer. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(8); 669-78. ©2016 AACR.

  11. MicroRNAs targeting TGFβ signalling underlie the regulatory T cell defect in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Severin, Mary E; Lee, Priscilla W; Liu, Yue; Selhorst, Amanda J; Gormley, Matthew G; Pei, Wei; Yang, Yuhong; Guerau-de-Arellano, Mireia; Racke, Michael K; Lovett-Racke, Amy E

    2016-06-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) signalling is critical for regulatory T cell development and function, and regulatory T cell dysregulation is a common observation in autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis. In a comprehensive miRNA profiling study of patients with multiple sclerosis naïve CD4 T cells, 19 differentially expressed miRNAs predicted to target the TGFβ signalling pathway were identified, leading to the hypothesis that miRNAs may be responsible for the regulatory T cell defect observed in patients with multiple sclerosis. Patients with multiple sclerosis had reduced levels of TGFβ signalling components in their naïve CD4 T cells. The differentially expressed miRNAs negatively regulated the TGFβ pathway, resulting in a reduced capacity of naïve CD4 T cells to differentiate into regulatory T cells. Interestingly, the limited number of regulatory T cells, that did develop when these TGFβ-targeting miRNAs were overexpressed, were capable of suppressing effector T cells. As it has previously been demonstrated that compromising TGFβ signalling results in a reduced regulatory T cell repertoire insufficient to control autoimmunity, and patients with multiple sclerosis have a reduced regulatory T cell repertoire, these data indicate that the elevated expression of multiple TGFβ-targeting miRNAs in naïve CD4 T cells of patients with multiple sclerosis impairs TGFβ signalling, and dampens regulatory T cell development, thereby enhancing susceptibility to developing multiple sclerosis.

  12. Sleeping Beauty Transposition of Chimeric Antigen Receptors Targeting Receptor Tyrosine Kinase-Like Orphan Receptor-1 (ROR1) into Diverse Memory T-Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Deniger, Drew C.; Yu, Jianqiang; Huls, M. Helen; Figliola, Matthew J.; Mi, Tiejuan; Maiti, Sourindra N.; Widhopf, George F.; Hurton, Lenka V.; Thokala, Radhika; Singh, Harjeet; Olivares, Simon; Champlin, Richard E.; Wierda, William G.; Kipps, Thomas J.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2015-01-01

    T cells modified with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeting CD19 demonstrated clinical activity against some B-cell malignancies. However, this is often accompanied by a loss of normal CD19+ B cells and humoral immunity. Receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor-1 (ROR1) is expressed on sub-populations of B-cell malignancies and solid tumors, but not by healthy B cells or normal post-partum tissues. Thus, adoptive transfer of T cells specific for ROR1 has potential to eliminate tumor cells and spare healthy tissues. To test this hypothesis, we developed CARs targeting ROR1 in order to generate T cells specific for malignant cells. Two Sleeping Beauty transposons were constructed with 2nd generation ROR1-specific CARs signaling through CD3ζ and either CD28 (designated ROR1RCD28) or CD137 (designated ROR1RCD137) and were introduced into T cells. We selected for T cells expressing CAR through co-culture with γ-irradiated activating and propagating cells (AaPC), which co-expressed ROR1 and co-stimulatory molecules. Numeric expansion over one month of co-culture on AaPC in presence of soluble interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-21 occurred and resulted in a diverse memory phenotype of CAR+ T cells as measured by non-enzymatic digital array (NanoString) and multi-panel flow cytometry. Such T cells produced interferon-γ and had specific cytotoxic activity against ROR1+ tumors. Moreover, such cells could eliminate ROR1+ tumor xenografts, especially T cells expressing ROR1RCD137. Clinical trials will investigate the ability of ROR1-specific CAR+ T cells to specifically eliminate tumor cells while maintaining normal B-cell repertoire. PMID:26030772

  13. Sleeping Beauty Transposition of Chimeric Antigen Receptors Targeting Receptor Tyrosine Kinase-Like Orphan Receptor-1 (ROR1) into Diverse Memory T-Cell Populations.

    PubMed

    Deniger, Drew C; Yu, Jianqiang; Huls, M Helen; Figliola, Matthew J; Mi, Tiejuan; Maiti, Sourindra N; Widhopf, George F; Hurton, Lenka V; Thokala, Radhika; Singh, Harjeet; Olivares, Simon; Champlin, Richard E; Wierda, William G; Kipps, Thomas J; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2015-01-01

    T cells modified with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeting CD19 demonstrated clinical activity against some B-cell malignancies. However, this is often accompanied by a loss of normal CD19+ B cells and humoral immunity. Receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor-1 (ROR1) is expressed on sub-populations of B-cell malignancies and solid tumors, but not by healthy B cells or normal post-partum tissues. Thus, adoptive transfer of T cells specific for ROR1 has potential to eliminate tumor cells and spare healthy tissues. To test this hypothesis, we developed CARs targeting ROR1 in order to generate T cells specific for malignant cells. Two Sleeping Beauty transposons were constructed with 2nd generation ROR1-specific CARs signaling through CD3ζ and either CD28 (designated ROR1RCD28) or CD137 (designated ROR1RCD137) and were introduced into T cells. We selected for T cells expressing CAR through co-culture with γ-irradiated activating and propagating cells (AaPC), which co-expressed ROR1 and co-stimulatory molecules. Numeric expansion over one month of co-culture on AaPC in presence of soluble interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-21 occurred and resulted in a diverse memory phenotype of CAR+ T cells as measured by non-enzymatic digital array (NanoString) and multi-panel flow cytometry. Such T cells produced interferon-γ and had specific cytotoxic activity against ROR1+ tumors. Moreover, such cells could eliminate ROR1+ tumor xenografts, especially T cells expressing ROR1RCD137. Clinical trials will investigate the ability of ROR1-specific CAR+ T cells to specifically eliminate tumor cells while maintaining normal B-cell repertoire. PMID:26030772

  14. T cell metabolism drives immunity

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Michael D.; O’Sullivan, David

    2015-01-01

    Lymphocytes must adapt to a wide array of environmental stressors as part of their normal development, during which they undergo a dramatic metabolic remodeling process. Research in this area has yielded surprising findings on the roles of diverse metabolic pathways and metabolites, which have been found to regulate lymphocyte signaling and influence differentiation, function and fate. In this review, we integrate the latest findings in the field to provide an up-to-date resource on lymphocyte metabolism. PMID:26261266

  15. T-cell receptor gene therapy in human melanoma-bearing immune-deficient mice: human but not mouse T cells recapitulate outcome of clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Straetemans, Trudy; Coccoris, Miriam; Berrevoets, Cor; Treffers-Westerlaken, Elike; Scholten, Csilla E V; Schipper, Debby; Ten Hagen, Timo L M; Debets, Reno

    2012-02-01

    Adoptive cell therapy using T-cell receptor (TCR)-engineered T cells is a clinically feasible and promising approach to target tumors, but is currently faced with compromised antitumor efficacies in patients. Here, we extensively validated immune-deficient mice to facilitate further development of the therapeutic potential of TCR-engineered T cells. Treatment of human melanoma-bearing SCID or NSG mice with high doses of human T cells transduced with an hgp100/HLA-A2-specific TCR did not result in antitumor responses irrespective of chemotherapeutic preconditioning. Imaging of human green fluorescent protein-labeled T cells demonstrated significant T-cell accumulation in intratumoral vasculature directly upon T-cell transfer, which was followed by loss of T cells within 72 hr. Peripheral persistence of human T cells was highly compromised and appeared related to T-cell differentiation. On the contrary, adoptive transfer (AT) of relatively low numbers of hgp100/HLA-A2 TCR-transduced mouse T cells resulted in rapid clearance of large established human melanomas. Unexpectedly and in contrast to reported studies with chimeric antibody receptor-engineered T cells, antitumor activity and homeostatic expansion of T cells were independent of TCR transgene as evidenced in two SCID strains and using two different human melanoma cell lines. Interestingly, the xeno-reactive melanoma response of mouse T cells appeared to be dictated by CD4(+) tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and did not require in vitro T-cell activation, retroviral gene transfer, or subcutaneous interleukin-2 support. Taken together, AT of human but not mouse T cells in human melanoma-bearing immune-deficient mice is in close accordance with clinical studies. PMID:21958294

  16. Loss of T cell precursors after spaceflight and exposure to vector-averaged gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Chris C.; Banks, Krista E.; Gruener, Raphael; DeLuca, Dominick

    2003-01-01

    Using fetal thymus organ culture (FTOC), we examined the effects of spaceflight and vector-averaged gravity on T cell development. Under both conditions, the development of T cells was significantly attenuated. Exposure to spaceflight for 16 days resulted in a loss of precursors for CD4+, CD8+, and CD4+CD8+ T cells in a rat/mouse xenogeneic co-culture. A significant decrease in the same precursor cells, as well as a decrease in CD4-CD8- T cell precursors, was also observed in a murine C57BL/6 FTOC after rotation in a clinostat to produce a vector-averaged microgravity-like environment. The block in T cell development appeared to occur between the pre-T cell and CD4+CD8+ T cell stage. These data indicate that gravity plays a decisive role in the development of T cells.

  17. Adolescent brain development in normality and psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    LUCIANA, MONICA

    2014-01-01

    Since this journal’s inception, the field of adolescent brain development has flourished, as researchers have investigated the underpinnings of adolescent risk-taking behaviors. Explanations based on translational models initially attributed such behaviors to executive control deficiencies and poor frontal lobe function. This conclusion was bolstered by evidence that the prefrontal cortex and its interconnections are among the last brain regions to structurally and functionally mature. As substantial heterogeneity of prefrontal function was revealed, applications of neuroeconomic theory to adolescent development led to dual systems models of behavior. Current epidemiological trends, behavioral observations, and functional magnetic resonance imaging based brain activity patterns suggest a quadratic increase in limbically mediated incentive motivation from childhood to adolescence and a decline thereafter. This elevation occurs in the context of immature prefrontal function, so motivational strivings may be difficult to regulate. Theoretical models explain this patterning through brain-based accounts of subcortical–cortical integration, puberty-based models of adolescent sensation seeking, and neurochemical dynamics. Empirically sound tests of these mechanisms, as well as investigations of biology–context interactions, represent the field’s most challenging future goals, so that applications to psychopathology can be refined and so that developmental cascades that incorporate neurobiological variables can be modeled. PMID:24342843

  18. CMV-Specific T-cells Generated From Naïve T-cells Recognize Atypical Epitopes And May Be Protective in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Patrick J.; Melenhorst, Jan J.; Nikiforow, Sarah; Scheinberg, Phillip; Blaney, James W.; Demmler-Harrison, Gail; Cruz, C. Russell; Lam, Sharon; Krance, Robert A.; Leung, Kathryn S.; Martinez, Caridad A.; Liu, Hao; Heslop, Helen E.; Rooney, Cliona M.; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Barrett, A. John; Rodgers, John R.; Bollard, Catherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of adult-seropositive, cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific T-cells can effectively restore antiviral immunity after transplantation. Lack of CMV-specific memory T-cells in blood from CMV-seronegative adult and cord blood (CB) donors restricts the availability of donor-derived virus-specific T-cells for immunoprophylaxis. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of naïve-donor-derived CMV-specific T-cell therapy for transplant recipients. Primed naïve T-cells recognized only atypical epitopes and with a similar avidity to CMV-seropositive-derived T-cells recognizing typical epitopes, but T-cells from CMV-seropositive donors recognizing atypical epitopes had a lower avidity suggesting the loss of high-avidity T-cells over time. Clonotypic analysis revealed T-cells recognizing atypical CMVpp65 epitopes in the peripheral blood of recipients of CB grafts who did not develop CMV. T-cell receptors from atypical epitopes were most common in unmanipulated CB units explaining why these T-cells expanded. When infused to recipients, naïve donor-derived virus specific T-cells that recognized atypical epitopes were associated with prolonged periods of CMV-free survival and complete remission. PMID:25925682

  19. STAT3 is a critical cell-intrinsic regulator of human unconventional T cell numbers and function

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Robert P.; Ives, Megan L.; Rao, Geetha; Lau, Anthony; Payne, Kathryn; Kobayashi, Masao; Arkwright, Peter D.; Peake, Jane; Wong, Melanie; Adelstein, Stephen; Smart, Joanne M.; French, Martyn A.; Fulcher, David A.; Picard, Capucine; Bustamante, Jacinta; Boisson-Dupuis, Stephanie; Gray, Paul; Stepensky, Polina; Warnatz, Klaus; Freeman, Alexandra F.; Rossjohn, Jamie; McCluskey, James; Holland, Steven M.; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Uzel, Gulbu; Ma, Cindy S.

    2015-01-01

    Unconventional T cells such as γδ T cells, natural killer T cells (NKT cells) and mucosal-associated invariant T cells (MAIT cells) are a major component of the immune system; however, the cytokine signaling pathways that control their development and function in humans are unknown. Primary immunodeficiencies caused by single gene mutations provide a unique opportunity to investigate the role of specific molecules in regulating human lymphocyte development and function. We found that individuals with loss-of-function mutations in STAT3 had reduced numbers of peripheral blood MAIT and NKT but not γδ T cells. Analysis of STAT3 mosaic individuals revealed that this effect was cell intrinsic. Surprisingly, the residual STAT3-deficient MAIT cells expressed normal levels of the transcription factor RORγt. Despite this, they displayed a deficiency in secretion of IL-17A and IL-17F, but were able to secrete normal levels of cytokines such as IFNγ and TNF. The deficiency in MAIT and NKT cells in STAT3-deficient patients was mirrored by loss-of-function mutations in IL12RB1 and IL21R, respectively. Thus, these results reveal for the first time the essential role of STAT3 signaling downstream of IL-23R and IL-21R in controlling human MAIT and NKT cell numbers. PMID:25941256

  20. STAT3 is a critical cell-intrinsic regulator of human unconventional T cell numbers and function.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Robert P; Ives, Megan L; Rao, Geetha; Lau, Anthony; Payne, Kathryn; Kobayashi, Masao; Arkwright, Peter D; Peake, Jane; Wong, Melanie; Adelstein, Stephen; Smart, Joanne M; French, Martyn A; Fulcher, David A; Picard, Capucine; Bustamante, Jacinta; Boisson-Dupuis, Stephanie; Gray, Paul; Stepensky, Polina; Warnatz, Klaus; Freeman, Alexandra F; Rossjohn, Jamie; McCluskey, James; Holland, Steven M; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Uzel, Gulbu; Ma, Cindy S; Tangye, Stuart G; Deenick, Elissa K

    2015-06-01

    Unconventional T cells such as γδ T cells, natural killer T cells (NKT cells) and mucosal-associated invariant T cells (MAIT cells) are a major component of the immune system; however, the cytokine signaling pathways that control their development and function in humans are unknown. Primary immunodeficiencies caused by single gene mutations provide a unique opportunity to investigate the role of specific molecules in regulating human lymphocyte development and function. We found that individuals with loss-of-function mutations in STAT3 had reduced numbers of peripheral blood MAIT and NKT but not γδ T cells. Analysis of STAT3 mosaic individuals revealed that this effect was cell intrinsic. Surprisingly, the residual STAT3-deficient MAIT cells expressed normal levels of the transcription factor RORγt. Despite this, they displayed a deficiency in secretion of IL-17A and IL-17F, but were able to secrete normal levels of cytokines such as IFNγ and TNF. The deficiency in MAIT and NKT cells in STAT3-deficient patients was mirrored by loss-of-function mutations in IL12RB1 and IL21R, respectively. Thus, these results reveal for the first time the essential role of STAT3 signaling downstream of IL-23R and IL-21R in controlling human MAIT and NKT cell numbers.

  1. A low-molecular-weight dialysable leukocyte extract selectively enhances development of CD4⁺RORγt⁺ T cells and IL-17 production.

    PubMed

    Zajícová, A; Javorková, E; Trošan, P; Chudíčková, M; Krulová, M; Holáň, V

    2014-01-01

    A low-molecular-weight (under 10 kDa) dialysable leukocyte extract (called transfer factor, TF) has been shown to be a prospective substance to improve or modulate immune response in autoimmunity, inflammation, infectious diseases or cancers. However, the use of TF has been limited by the absence of any data on the mechanism of its action. Here we show that TF prepared from peripheral blood leukocytes of healthy human donors displays multiple regulatory effects on individual parameters of the immune system. TF decreases proliferation of T and B lymphocytes and partially alters the production of cytokines and nitric oxide by activated macrophages. TF also inhibits production of T helper 1 (Th1) cytokines interleukin 2 (IL-2) and interferon γ, slightly stimulates production of Th2 cytokine IL-10 and considerably enhances the secretion of IL-17 by activated mouse spleen T cells. At the molecular level, TF enhances expression of genes for transcription factor RORγt and for IL-17. The enhanced expression of the RORgt gene corresponds with an increase in the number of RORγt⁺CD4⁺ Th17 cells and with enhanced IL-17 production. In contrast, the expression of the Foxp3 gene and the proportion of CD4⁺CD25⁺Foxp3⁺ regulatory T cells are not significantly changed in the presence of TF. These results suggest that the activation of pro-inflammatory Th17 cells, which have multiple immunoregulatory properties, could be the main mechanism of the immunomodulatory action of a low-molecular-weight leukocyte extract.

  2. Bacteria-reactive immune response may induce RANKL-expressing T-cells in the mouse periapical bone loss lesion

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Marcelo J.B.; Kajiya, Mikihito; AlShwaimi, Emad; Sasaki, Hajime; Hong, Jennifer; Ok, Peter; Rezende, Taia M.B.; Pagonis, Tom C.; White, Robert R.; Paster, Bruce J; Stashenko, Philip; Kawai, Toshihisa

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The present study investigated if T-cells infiltrating the periapical lesion produce RANKL and whether bacteria infecting the root canal can activate T-cells to produce RANKL. Methods Using a mouse model of periapical lesion induced by artificial dental pulp exposure, the presence of RANKL-positive T-cells and osteoclasts in the periapical lesion was examined by an immuno-histochemical approach. The bacteria colonizing the exposed root canal were identified by 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequence analysis. The isolated endodontic bacteria were further immunized to normal mice, and sRANKL production by the T-cells isolated from the immunized mice was evaluated by ex vivo culture system. Results RANKL-positive T-cells, along with TARP+ osteoclasts, were identified in periapical bone resorption lesions. The Gram-negative bacterium Pasterurella pnumotropica (P. pnumotropica), which was most frequently detected from root canal of exposed pulp, showed remarkably elevated serum IgG antibody response in pulp-exposed mice compared to control non-treated mice. Immunization of mice with P. pneumotropica induced not only serum IgG antibody but also primed bacteria reactive T-cells that produced sRANKL in response to ex vivo exposure to P. pneumotropica. Conclusion T-cells infiltrating the periapical region express RANKL, and the endodontic bacteria colonizing the root canal appear to induce RANKL expression from bacteria-reactive T-cells, suggesting the possible pathogenic engagement of immune response to endodontic bacteria in the context of developing boneresorptive periapical lesions. PMID:22341072

  3. The impact of regulatory T cells on T-cell immunity following hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Vu H.; Shashidhar, Sumana; Chang, Daisy S.; Ho, Lena; Kambham, Neeraja; Bachmann, Michael; Brown, Janice M.

    2008-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) prevent graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) by inhibiting the proliferation and function of conventional T cells (Tcons). However, the impact of Tregs on T-cell development and immunity following hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is unknown. Using a murine GvHD model induced by Tcons, we demonstrate that adoptive transfer of Tregs leads to (1) abrogration of GvHD, (2) preservation of thymic and peripheral lymph node architecture, and (3) an accelerated donor lymphoid reconstitution of a diverse TCR-Vβ repertoire. The resultant enhanced lymphoid reconstitution in Treg recipients protects them from lethal cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. By contrast, mice that receive Tcons alone have disrupted lymphoid organs from GvHD and remain lymphopenic with a restricted TCR-Vβ repertoire and rapid death on MCMV challenge. Lymphocytes from previously infected Treg recipients generate secondary response specific to MCMV, indicating long-term protective immunity with transferred Tregs. Thymectomy significantly reduces survival after MCMV challenge in Treg recipients compared with euthymic controls. Our results indicate that Tregs enhance immune reconstitution by preventing GvHD-induced damage of the thymic and secondary lymphoid microenvironment. These findings provide new insights into the role of Tregs in affording protection to lymphoid stromal elements important for T-cell immunity. PMID:17916743

  4. Involvement of T cells in early evolving segmental vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Shin, J; Kang, H Y; Kim, K H; Park, C J; Oh, S H; Lee, S C; Lee, S; Choi, G S; Hann, S K

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies have suggested an overlapping autoimmune mechanism between segmental vitiligo (SV) and nonsegmental vitiligo (NSV). Although T-cell infiltration is observed in the margins of active lesions in NSV, the histopathological characteristics of the active margin of SV are not well known. To determine if T-cell inflammatory responses are present in the active margin of SV lesions, biopsies were taken from the active margin of a lesion in 12 patients with early or actively spreading SV and compared with a normal control sample (on the symmetrical, opposite site of the same dermatome). The samples were stained for CD4, CD8, CD25 and interferon-γ. Lymphocytic infiltration was seen in 70% of patients. CD4+ T cells infiltrated the dermis, while CD8+ T cells were present in the epidermis or attached to the basal layer. The increase in the number of CD8+ T cells was significant (P < 0.04), while CD4+ or CD25+ T cells also appeared to be increased in number, but this was not significant. These results suggest that SV also has an autoimmune mechanism in the early evolving stage. PMID:27334675

  5. Leukemia -- Chronic T-Cell Lymphocytic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chronic T-Cell Lymphocytic: Overview Print to PDF Leukemia - Chronic T-Cell Lymphocytic: Overview Approved by the ... Platelets that help the blood to clot About leukemia Types of leukemia are named after the specific ...

  6. Genetic modification of T cells.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Richard A; Kakarla, Sunitha

    2014-01-01

    Gene transfer technology has advanced rapidly from simple physical-chemical laboratory methods in the 1970s and 1980s to the sophisticated viral and nonviral methods currently in clinical practice. Herein, we review 4 gene transfer methodologies applied in human gene therapy clinical trials transferring chimeric antigen receptors into T cells for the treatment of B-cell malignancies. The 4 methods include 2 viral vector gene transfer technologies, gamma retroviral vectors and lentiviral vectors, and 2 nonviral methods, transposons and mRNA electroporation.

  7. From T cell "exhaustion" to anti-cancer immunity.

    PubMed

    Verdeil, Grégory; Fuertes Marraco, Silvia A; Murray, Timothy; Speiser, Daniel E

    2016-01-01

    The immune system has the potential to protect from malignant diseases for extended periods of time. Unfortunately, spontaneous immune responses are often inefficient. Significant effort is required to develop reliable, broadly applicable immunotherapies for cancer patients. A major innovation was transplantation with hematopoietic stem cells from genetically distinct donors for patients with hematologic malignancies. In this setting, donor T cells induce long-term remission by keeping cancer cells in check through powerful allogeneic graft-versus-leukemia effects. More recently, a long awaited breakthrough for patients with solid tissue cancers was achieved, by means of therapeutic blockade of T cell inhibitory receptors. In untreated cancer patients, T cells are dysfunctional and remain in a state of T cell "exhaustion". Nonetheless, they often retain a high potential for successful defense against cancer, indicating that many T cells are not entirely and irreversibly exhausted but can be mobilized to become highly functional. Novel antibody therapies that block inhibitory receptors can lead to strong activation of anti-tumor T cells, mediating clinically significant anti-cancer immunity for many years. Here we review these new treatments and the current knowledge on tumor antigen-specific T cells.

  8. Integrated molecular analysis of adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Keisuke; Nagata, Yasunobu; Kitanaka, Akira; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Shimamura, Teppei; Yasunaga, Jun-Ichirou; Totoki, Yasushi; Chiba, Kenichi; Sato-Otsubo, Aiko; Nagae, Genta; Ishii, Ryohei; Muto, Satsuki; Kotani, Shinichi; Watatani, Yosaku; Takeda, June; Sanada, Masashi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Sato, Yusuke; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Yoshizato, Tetsuichi; Yoshida, Kenichi; Makishima, Hideki; Iwanaga, Masako; Ma, Guangyong; Nosaka, Kisato; Hishizawa, Masakatsu; Itonaga, Hidehiro; Imaizumi, Yoshitaka; Munakata, Wataru; Ogasawara, Hideaki; Sato, Toshitaka; Sasai, Ken; Muramoto, Kenzo; Penova, Marina; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Nakamura, Hiromi; Hama, Natsuko; Shide, Kotaro; Kubuki, Yoko; Hidaka, Tomonori; Kameda, Takuro; Nakamaki, Tsuyoshi; Ishiyama, Ken; Miyawaki, Shuichi; Yoon, Sung-Soo; Tobinai, Kensei; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Takeuchi, Kengo; Nureki, Osamu; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Toshiki; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Matsuoka, Masao; Miyano, Satoru; Shimoda, Kazuya; Ogawa, Seishi

    2015-11-01

    Adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) is a peripheral T cell neoplasm of largely unknown genetic basis, associated with human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) infection. Here we describe an integrated molecular study in which we performed whole-genome, exome, transcriptome and targeted resequencing, as well as array-based copy number and methylation analyses, in a total of 426 ATL cases. The identified alterations overlap significantly with the HTLV-1 Tax interactome and are highly enriched for T cell receptor-NF-κB signaling, T cell trafficking and other T cell-related pathways as well as immunosurveillance. Other notable features include a predominance of activating mutations (in PLCG1, PRKCB, CARD11, VAV1, IRF4, FYN, CCR4 and CCR7) and gene fusions (CTLA4-CD28 and ICOS-CD28). We also discovered frequent intragenic deletions involving IKZF2, CARD11 and TP73 and mutations in GATA3, HNRNPA2B1, GPR183, CSNK2A1, CSNK2B and CSNK1A1. Our findings not only provide unique insights into key molecules in T cell signaling but will also guide the development of new diagnostics and therapeutics in this intractable tumor. PMID:26437031

  9. Double Negative (DN) αβ T Cells: misperception and overdue recognition

    PubMed Central

    Martina, Maria N; Noel, Sanjeev; Saxena, Ankit; Rabb, Hamid; Hamad, Abdel Rahim A

    2015-01-01

    CD4−CD8− double negative (DN) αβ T cells are legitimate components of the normal immune system. However, they are poorly understood and largely ignored by immunologists because of their historical association with the lymphoproliferation that occurs in mice (lpr and gld) and humans (ALPS patients) with impaired Fas-mediated apoptosis where they are considered abnormal T cells. We believe that the traditional view that DN T cells that cause lymphoproliferation (hereafter referred to as lpr DN T cells) are CD4 and CD8 T cells that lost their coreceptor, conceived more than two decades ago, is flawed and that conflating lpr DN T cells with DN T cells found in normal immune system (hereafter referred to as nDN T cells) is unnecessarily dampening interest of this potentially important cell type. To begin rectifying these misperceptions, we will revisit the traditional view of lpr DN T cells and show that it does not hold true in light of recent immunological advances. In lieu of it, we offer a new model proposing that Fas-mediated apoptosis actively removes normally existing DN T cells from the periphery and that impaired Fas-mediated apoptosis leads to accumulation of these cells rather than de novo generation of DN T cells from activated CD4 or CD8 T cells. By doing so, we hope to provoke a new discussion that may lead to a consensus about the origin of lpr DN T cells and regulation of their homeostasis by the Fas pathway and reignite wider interest in nDN T cells. PMID:25420721

  10. The Influence of Costimulation and Regulatory Cd4+ T Cells on Intestinal Iga Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Kagrdic, Dubrav; Kjerrulf, Martin; Bromander, Annakari; Vajdy, Michael; Hörnquist, Elisabeth; Lycke, Nils

    1998-01-01

    It is thought that IgA B-cell differentiation is highly dependent on activated CD4+ T cells. In particular, cell-cell interactions in the Peyer's patches involving CD40 and/or CD80/CD86 have been implicated in germinal-center formation and IgA B-cell development. Also soluble factors, such as IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, and TGFβ may be critical for IgA B-cell differentiation in vivo. Here we report on some paradoxical findings with regard to IgA B-cell differentiation and specific mucosal immune responses that we have recently made using gene knockout mice. More specifically, we have investigated to what extent absence of CD4+ T cells, relevant cytokines, or T-cell-B-cell interactions would influence IgA B-cell differentiation in vivo. Using CD4– or IL- 4-gene knockout mice or mice made transgenic for CTLA4Ig, we found that, although specific responses were impaired, total IgA production and IgA B-cell differentiation appeared to proceed normally. However, a poor correlation was found between, on the one hand, GC formation and IgA differentiation and, on the other hand, the ability to respond to T-celldependent soluble protein antigens in these mice. Thus, despite the various deficiencies in CD4+ T-cell functions seemingly intact IgA B-cell development was observed. PMID:9716905

  11. A role for intrathymic B cells in the generation of natural regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Walters, Stacey N; Webster, Kylie E; Daley, Stephen; Grey, Shane T

    2014-07-01

    B cells inhabit the normal human thymus, suggesting a role in T cell selection. In this study, we report that B cells can modulate thymic production of CD4+ Foxp3+ T cells (regulatory T cells [Tregs]). Mice with transgenic expression of BAFF (BAFF-Tg) harbor increased numbers of Helios+ Foxp3+ thymic Tregs and, similar to some human autoimmune conditions, also exhibit increased numbers of B cells colonizing the thymus. Distinct intrathymic B cell subpopulations were identified, namely B220+, IgM+, CD23(hi), CD21(int) cells; B220+, IgM+, CD23(lo), CD21(lo) cells; and a population of B220+, IgM+, CD23(lo), CD21(hi) cells. Anatomically, CD19+ B cells accumulated in the thymic medulla region juxtaposed to Foxp3+ T cells. These intrathymic B cells engender Tregs. Indeed, thymic Treg development was diminished in both B cell-deficient BAFF-Tg chimeras, but also B cell-deficient wild-type chimeras. B cell Ag capture and presentation are critical in vivo events for Treg development. In the absence of B cell surface MHC class II expression, thymic expansion of BAFF-Tg Tregs was lost. Further to this, expansion of Tregs did not occur in BAFF-Tg/Ig hen egg lysozyme BCR chimeras, demonstrating a requirement for Ag specificity. Thus, we present a mechanism whereby intrathymic B cells, through the provision of cognate help, contribute to the shaping of the Treg repertoire.

  12. Therapeutic implications of autoimmune vitiligo T cells

    PubMed Central

    Oyarbide-Valencia, Kepa; van den Boorn, Jasper G.; Denman, Cecele J.; Li, Mingli; Carlson, Jeremy M.; Hernandez, Claudia; Nishimura, Michael I.; Das, Pranab K.; Luiten, Rosalie M.; Le Poole, I. Caroline

    2007-01-01

    Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease presenting with progressive loss of skin pigmentation. The disease strikes 1% of the world population, generally during teenage years. The progressive loss of melanocytes from depigmenting vitiligo skin is accompanied by cellular infiltrates containing both CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes. Infiltrating cytotoxic T cells with high affinity T cell receptors have likely escaped clonal deletion in the thymus, allowing such T cells to enter the circulation. Through the expression of CLA, these T cells home to the skin where they express type 1-cytokine profiles and mediate melanocyte apoptosis via the granzyme/perforin pathway. T cells found juxtapositionally apposed to remaining melanocytes can be isolated from the skin. Vitiligo T cells have demonstrated reactivity to antigens previously recognized as target antigens for T cells infiltrating melanoma tumors. In a comparison to existing melanoma-derived T cells, vitiligo T cells displayed superior reactivity towards melanoma cells. It is thought that genes encoding the TCRs expressed by vitiligo skin infiltrating T cells can be cloned and expressed in melanoma T cells, thereby generating a pool of circulating T cells with high affinity for their targets that can re-direct the immune response towards the tumor. PMID:16920575

  13. New insights into T cell biology and T cell-directed therapy for autoimmunity, inflammation, and immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Steward-Tharp, Scott M.; Song, Yun-jeong; Siegel, Richard M.; O'Shea, John J.

    2010-01-01

    T cell-directed therapies have become mainstays in the management of various autoimmune diseases and organ transplantation. The understanding of T cell biology has expanded greatly since the development of most agents currently in use. Here we discuss important recent discoveries pertaining to T helper cell differentiation, lineage commitment, and function. Within this context, we examine existing T cell-directed therapies, including new agents being evaluated in clinical and preclinical studies. We also use recent findings to speculate on novel targets. PMID:20146712

  14. Targeting γδ T cells for immunotherapy of HIV disease

    PubMed Central

    Pauza, C David; Riedel, David J; Gilliam, Bruce L; Redfield, Robert R

    2011-01-01

    Disruption of circulating γδ T-cell populations is an early and common outcome of HIV infection. T-cell receptor (TCR)-γ2δ2 cells (expressing the Vγ2 and Vδ2 chains of the γδ TCR) are depleted, even though they are minimally susceptible to direct HIV infection, and exemplify indirect cell depletion mechanisms that are important in the progression to AIDS. Among individuals with common or normally progressing HIV disease, the loss of TCR-γ2δ2 cells has a broad impact on viral immunity, control of opportunistic pathogens and resistance to malignant disease. Advanced HIV disease can result in complete loss of TCR-γ2δ2 cells that are not recovered even during antiretroviral therapy with complete virus suppression. However, normal levels of TCR-γ2δ2 were observed among natural virus suppressors (low or undetectable virus without antiretroviral therapy) irrespective of their MHC haplotype, consistent with their disease-free status. The pattern of loss and recovery of TCR-γ2δ2 cells revealed their unique features and functional capacities, and encourage the development of immune-based therapies to activate and expand this T-cell subset. New research has identified drugs that might reconstitute the TCR-γ2δ2 population, recover their functional contributions, and improve control of HIV replication and disease. Here, we review research on HIV and TCR-γδ T cells to highlight the consequences of depleting this subset and the unique features of TCR-γδ biology that argue in favor of clinical strategies to reconstitute this T-cell subset in individuals with HIV/AIDS. PMID:21339853

  15. T cell responses in calcineurin A alpha-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    We have created embryonic stem (ES) cells and mice lacking the predominant isoform (alpha) of the calcineurin A subunit (CNA alpha) to study the role of this serine/threonine phosphatase in the immune system. T and B cell maturation appeared to be normal in CNA alpha -/- mice. CNA alpha -/- T cells responded normally to mitogenic stimulation (i.e., PMA plus ionomycin, concanavalin A, and anti-CD3 epsilon antibody). However, CNA alpha -/- mice generated defective antigen- specific T cell responses in vivo. Mice produced from CNA alpha -/- ES cells injected into RAG-2-deficient blastocysts had a similar defective T cell response, indicating that CNA alpha is required for T cell function per se, rather than for an activity of other cell types involved in the immune response. CNA alpha -/- T cells remained sensitive to both cyclosporin A and FK506, suggesting that CNA beta or another CNA-like molecule can mediate the action of these immunosuppressive drugs. CNA alpha -/- mice provide an animal model for dissecting the physiologic functions of calcineurin as well as the effects of FK506 and CsA. PMID:8627154

  16. T cell fate and clonality inference from single-cell transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Stubbington, Michael J T; Lönnberg, Tapio; Proserpio, Valentina; Clare, Simon; Speak, Anneliese O; Dougan, Gordon; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2016-04-01

    We developed TraCeR, a computational method to reconstruct full-length, paired T cell receptor (TCR) sequences from T lymphocyte single-cell RNA sequence data. TraCeR links T cell specificity with functional response by revealing clonal relationships between cells alongside their transcriptional profiles. We found that T cell clonotypes in a mouse Salmonella infection model span early activated CD4(+) T cells as well as mature effector and memory cells. PMID:26950746

  17. Dorsal and ventral stream sensitivity in normal development and hemiplegia.

    PubMed

    Gunn, Alison; Cory, Elizabeth; Atkinson, Janette; Braddick, Oliver; Wattam-Bell, John; Guzzetta, Andrea; Cioni, Giovanni

    2002-05-01

    Form and motion coherence thresholds can provide comparable measures of global visual processing in the ventral and dorsal streams respectively. Normal development of thresholds was tested in 360 normally developing children aged 4-11 and in normal adults. The two tasks showed similar developmental trends, with some greater variability and a slight delay in motion coherence compared to form coherence performance, in reaching adult levels. To examine the proposal of dorsal stream vulnerability related to specific developmental disorders, we compared 24 children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy with the normally developing group. Hemiplegic children performed significantly worse than controls on the motion coherence task for their age, but not on the form coherence task; however, within this group no specific brain area was significantly associated with poor motion compared to form coherence performance. These results suggest that extrastriate mechanisms mediating these thresholds normally develop in parallel, but that the dorsal stream has a greater, general vulnerability to early neurological impairment. PMID:11997698

  18. Tracking and treating activated T cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, N.H.; Nadithe, V.; Elsayed, M.; Merkel, O.M.

    2014-01-01

    Upon activation, T cells of various subsets are the most important mediators in cell-mediated immune responses. Activated T cells play an important role in immune system related diseases such as chronic inflammatory diseases, viral infections, autoimmune disease, transplant rejection, Crohn disease, diabetes, and many more. Therefore, efforts have been made to both visualize and treat activated T cells specifically. This review summarizes imaging approaches and selective therapeutics for activated T cells and gives an outlook on how tracking and treating can be combined into theragnositc agents for activated T